Science.gov

Sample records for skills training programme

  1. Social skills programmes for schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Almerie, Muhammad Qutayba; Al Marhi, Muhammad Okba; Alsabbagh, Mohamad; Jawoosh, Muhammad; Matar, Hosam E; Maayan, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: The primary objective is to investigate the effects of social skills training programmes, compared to standard care, for people with schizophrenia. PMID:25414592

  2. The Effect of Using a Multiple Intelligences-Based Training Programme on Developing English Majors' Oral Communication Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdallah, Mahmoud Mohammad Sayed

    2005-01-01

    The main purpose of the present study is to investigate the effect of using a Multiple Intelligences-Based Training Programme on developing first-year English majors' oral communication skills. Based on literature review and related studies, a list of 20 oral communication skills was prepared and displayed over a panel of jury members to select…

  3. Parents' Training: Effects of the Self-Help Skills Programme with Down's Syndrome Babies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanz, Maria Teresa; Menendez, Javier

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews studies evaluating the effectiveness of two types of early intervention programmes for babies with Down's syndrome (DS). Evaluation of self-help early intervention programmes was done with two types of training with the parents: in the first the parents learned the training programme from observing the clinician, and in the…

  4. Training the powerful: issues that emerged during the evaluation of a communication skills training programme for senior cancer care professionals.

    PubMed

    Bibila, S; Rabiee, F

    2014-07-01

    'Connected' is the name of the national advanced communication skills training programme developed in 2008 for cancer care professionals in the NHS. A 3-day training course combining didactic and experiential learning elements is run by two facilitators with course participants expected to engage fully in simulated consultations with trained actors. In 2011, and as a result of participant feedback on the length of the course and increasing pressures on budgets and clinical time, the Connected team developed and piloted an alternative 2-day training course. Before its roll-out in 2012, Birmingham City University was commissioned to evaluate the effectiveness and quality of the 2-day course vis-à-vis the 'traditional' 3-day one. This article is written by the two evaluators and it discusses some of the issues that emerged during the evaluation. We broadly grouped these issues into two overlapping categories: the mandatory nature of the course and the different professional background and seniority of participants. In our discussion we consider the implications these issues have for communication skills training policy and practice and put forward suggestions for further research.

  5. A Programme-Wide Training Framework to Facilitate Scientific Communication Skills Development amongst Biological Sciences Masters Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Divan, Aysha; Mason, Sam

    2016-01-01

    In this article we describe the effectiveness of a programme-wide communication skills training framework incorporated within a one-year biological sciences taught Masters course designed to enhance the competency of students in communicating scientific research principally to a scientific audience. In one class we analysed the numerical marks…

  6. Rehabilitation of face-processing skills in an adolescent with prosopagnosia: Evaluation of an online perceptual training programme.

    PubMed

    Bate, Sarah; Bennetts, Rachel; Mole, Joseph A; Ainge, James A; Gregory, Nicola J; Bobak, Anna K; Bussunt, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we describe the case of EM, a female adolescent who acquired prosopagnosia following encephalitis at the age of eight. Initial neuropsychological and eye-movement investigations indicated that EM had profound difficulties in face perception as well as face recognition. EM underwent 14 weeks of perceptual training in an online programme that attempted to improve her ability to make fine-grained discriminations between faces. Following training, EM's face perception skills had improved, and the effect generalised to untrained faces. Eye-movement analyses also indicated that EM spent more time viewing the inner facial features post-training. Examination of EM's face recognition skills revealed an improvement in her recognition of personally-known faces when presented in a laboratory-based test, although the same gains were not noted in her everyday experiences with these faces. In addition, EM did not improve on a test assessing the recognition of newly encoded faces. One month after training, EM had maintained the improvement on the eye-tracking test, and to a lesser extent, her performance on the familiar faces test. This pattern of findings is interpreted as promising evidence that the programme can improve face perception skills, and with some adjustments, may at least partially improve face recognition skills.

  7. Rehabilitation of face-processing skills in an adolescent with prosopagnosia: Evaluation of an online perceptual training programme.

    PubMed

    Bate, Sarah; Bennetts, Rachel; Mole, Joseph A; Ainge, James A; Gregory, Nicola J; Bobak, Anna K; Bussunt, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we describe the case of EM, a female adolescent who acquired prosopagnosia following encephalitis at the age of eight. Initial neuropsychological and eye-movement investigations indicated that EM had profound difficulties in face perception as well as face recognition. EM underwent 14 weeks of perceptual training in an online programme that attempted to improve her ability to make fine-grained discriminations between faces. Following training, EM's face perception skills had improved, and the effect generalised to untrained faces. Eye-movement analyses also indicated that EM spent more time viewing the inner facial features post-training. Examination of EM's face recognition skills revealed an improvement in her recognition of personally-known faces when presented in a laboratory-based test, although the same gains were not noted in her everyday experiences with these faces. In addition, EM did not improve on a test assessing the recognition of newly encoded faces. One month after training, EM had maintained the improvement on the eye-tracking test, and to a lesser extent, her performance on the familiar faces test. This pattern of findings is interpreted as promising evidence that the programme can improve face perception skills, and with some adjustments, may at least partially improve face recognition skills. PMID:25369318

  8. Life skills programmes for chronic mental illnesses

    PubMed Central

    Tungpunkom, Patraporn; Maayan, Nicola; Soares-Weiser, Karla

    2014-01-01

    Background Most people with schizophrenia have a cyclical pattern of illness characterised by remission and relapses. The illness can reduce the ability of self-care and functioning and can lead to the illness becoming disabling. Life skills programmes, emphasising the needs associated with independent functioning, are often a part of the rehabilitation process. These programmes have been developed to enhance independent living and quality of life for people with schizophrenia. Objectives To review the effects of life skills programmes compared with standard care or other comparable therapies for people with chronic mental health problems. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group Trials Register (June 2010). We supplemented this process with handsearching and scrutiny of references. We inspected references of all included studies for further trials. Selection criteria We included all relevant randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials for life skills programmes versus other comparable therapies or standard care involving people with serious mental illnesses. Data collection and analysis We extracted data independently. For dichotomous data we calculated relative risks (RR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) on an intention-to-treat basis, based on a random-effects model. For continuous data, we calculated mean differences (MD), again based on a random-effects model. Main results We included seven randomised controlled trials with a total of 483 participants. These evaluated life skills programmes versus standard care, or support group. We found no significant difference in life skills performance between people given life skills training and standard care (1 RCT, n = 32, MD −1.10; 95% CI −7.82 to 5.62). Life skills training did not improve or worsen study retention (5 RCTs, n = 345, RR 1.16; 95% CI 0.40 to 3.36). We found no significant difference in PANSS positive, negative or total scores between life skills intervention and

  9. Teaching Emotion Recognition Skills to Young Children with Autism: A Randomised Controlled Trial of an Emotion Training Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Beth T.; Gray, Kylie M.; Tonge, Bruce J.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Children with autism have difficulties in emotion recognition and a number of interventions have been designed to target these problems. However, few emotion training interventions have been trialled with young children with autism and co-morbid ID. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of an emotion training programme for a group…

  10. Effectiveness of a workplace training programme in improving social, communication and emotional skills for adults with autism and intellectual disability in Hong Kong--a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Karen P Y; Wong, Denys; Chung, Anthony C Y; Kwok, Natalie; Lam, Madeleine K Y; Yuen, Cheri M C; Arblaster, Karen; Kwan, Aldous C S

    2013-12-01

    This pilot study explored the effectiveness of workplace training programme that aimed to enhance the work-related behaviours in individuals with autism and intellectual disabilities. Fourteen participants with autism and mild to moderate intellectual disability (mean age = 24.6 years) were recruited. The workplace training programme included practices in work context and group educational sessions. A pre-test-post-test design was used with the Work Personality Profile, the Scale of Independent Behaviour Revised and the Observational Emotional Inventory Revised to evaluate the targeted behaviours. Improvement in social and communication skills specific to the workplace was achieved. For emotional control, participants became less confused and had a better self-concept. However, improvement in other general emotional behaviours, such as impulse control, was limited. The results indicated that a structured workplace training programme aimed at improving social, communication and emotional behaviours can be helpful for people with autism and intellectual disability. Further study with a larger sample size and a control group is recommended. The development of specific programme to cater for the emotional control needs at workplace for people with autism is also suggested.

  11. Participative Training Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodwell, John

    Based on extensive field experience, this two-part book is intended to be a practical guide for maximizing participative training methods. The first part of the book looks at the principles and the core skills involved in participative training. It shows how trainee participation corresponds to the processes of adult learning and describes each…

  12. Rapid Response Skills Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelley-Winders, Anna Faye

    2008-01-01

    Mississippi Gulf Coast Community College's (MGCCC) long-term commitment to providing workforce training in a post-Katrina environment became a catalyst for designing short-term flexible educational opportunities. Providing nationally recognized skills training for the recovery/rebuilding of communities challenged the college to develop innovative,…

  13. An Analysis of the Efficacy of a Motor Skills Training Programme for Young People with Moderate Learning Difficulties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyle, Christopher M.

    2007-01-01

    A secondary school for children with Moderate Learning Difficulties had requested assistance from psychological services for pupils that the school felt were experiencing poor motor-coordination and in some cases low self-esteem. An intervention programme for children with dyspraxic type difficulties (Portwood, 1999) was proposed as a suitable…

  14. Evaluation of a PICC care training programme.

    PubMed

    Purran, Ashutosh; Weller, Gordon; Kerr, Catherine

    2016-01-13

    An integrated care organisation requires a flexible workforce with a variable skill mix in all care settings. Organisations should ensure that education and training are maintained to support safe, high quality care that provides value for money, promotes flexibility, and increases workforce participation in achieving organisation objectives and the expansion of services. Peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) care was identified as a challenging area for the nursing workforce in acute care and community services, following the integration and service enlargement of the Whittington Health NHS Trust. This article describes the evaluation of a new PICC care training programme that was developed and implemented to increase knowledge and awareness. The evaluation provides the clinical education team with information to help identify additional training needs to facilitate the integration of care.

  15. Life Skills in Educational Contexts: Testing the Effects of an Intervention Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gomes, A. Rui; Marques, Brazelina

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the effects of a training programme on students' acquisition of life skills, life satisfaction, life orientation and expectations about academic achievement. Participants were allocated to either an intervention group ("n"?=?41) that took part in a life skills programme, or a control group ("n"?=?43). Participants completed the…

  16. Effects of a Self-Instruction Communication Skills Training on Skills, Self-Efficacy, Motivation, and Transfer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hommes, Mark A.; Van der Molen, Henk T.

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a study on the effects of a self-instruction training programme in communication skills for psychology students at the Open University of the Netherlands in comparison to a fully supervised training. We expected both training programmes to increase students' knowledge and skills, as well as their self-efficacy and motivation…

  17. The Problem with Numbers: An Examination of the Aboriginal Skills and Employment Partnership Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodgkins, Andrew P.

    2015-01-01

    This article examines a federally funded pre-apprenticeship training programme designed to transition aboriginal northerners living in the Canadian Arctic into trades-related employment. Drawing from interviews involving programme partners and stakeholders, the Aboriginal Skills and Employment Partnership programme that operated in the Beaufort…

  18. EVA Skills Training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parazynski, Scott

    2012-01-01

    Dr. Parazynski and a colleague from Extravehicular Activity (EVA), Robotics, & Crew Systems Operations (DX) worked closely to build the EVA Skills Training Program, and for the first time, defined the gold standards of EVA performance, allowing crewmembers to increase their performance significantly. As part of the program, individuals had the opportunity to learn at their own rate, taking additional water time as required, to achieve that level of performance. This focus on training to one's strengths and weaknesses to bolster them enabled the Crew Office and DX to field a much larger group of spacewalkers for the daunting "wall of EVA" required for the building and maintenance of the ISS. Parazynski also stressed the need for designers to understand the capabilities and the limitations of a human in a spacesuit, as well as opportunities to improve future generations of space. He shared lessons learned (how the Crew Office engaged in these endeavors) and illustrated the need to work as a team to develop these complex systems.

  19. Digital skills training in care homes: achievement.

    PubMed

    Wild, Deidre; Kydd, Angela

    2016-05-27

    This article describes digital skills training (DST) for staff and later, residents, as part of a programme of culture change in a large care home with nursing in Glasgow. It presents the successes and challenges arising from DST from the perspectives of the two volunteer information technology (IT) champions (Thomas Sloan and John Thomson), who were also staff members. Using their written reports, questionnaires and subsequent conversations, the IT champions recall the challenges and gains for staff and residents as a result of their initial training. This is supplemented by a follow-up on IT activities in the 18 months after the introduction period. PMID:27231084

  20. Digital skills training in care homes: achievement.

    PubMed

    Wild, Deidre; Kydd, Angela

    2016-05-27

    This article describes digital skills training (DST) for staff and later, residents, as part of a programme of culture change in a large care home with nursing in Glasgow. It presents the successes and challenges arising from DST from the perspectives of the two volunteer information technology (IT) champions (Thomas Sloan and John Thomson), who were also staff members. Using their written reports, questionnaires and subsequent conversations, the IT champions recall the challenges and gains for staff and residents as a result of their initial training. This is supplemented by a follow-up on IT activities in the 18 months after the introduction period.

  1. Phacoemulsification skills training and assessment.

    PubMed

    Spiteri, Anthony; Aggarwal, Rajesh; Kersey, Tom; Benjamin, Larry; Darzi, Ara; Bloom, Philip

    2010-05-01

    BACKGROUND The quality of ophthalmic surgical training is increasingly challenged by an untimely convergence of several factors. This article reviews the tools currently available for training and assessment in phacoemulsification surgery. METHODS Medline searches were performed to identify articles with combinations of the following words: phacoemulsification, training, curriculum, virtual reality and assessment. Further articles were obtained by manually searching the reference lists of identified papers. RESULTS Thus far phacoemulsification training outside the operating room include wet labs and micro-surgical skills courses. These methods have been criticised for being unrealistic, inaccurate and inconsistent. Virtual reality simulators have the ability to teach phacoemulsification psychomotor skills, as well as to carry out objective assessment. Other ophthalmic surgical skill assessment tools such as Objective Assessment of Skills in Intraocular Surgery (OASIS) and Global Rating Assessment of Skills in Intraocular Surgery (GRASIS) are emerging. Assessor bias is minimised by using video-based assessments, which have been shown to reduce subjectivity. Dexterity analysis technology such as the Imperial College Surgical Assessment Device (ICSAD) and virtual reality simulators can be used as objective assessment devices. CONCLUSION Improvements in technology can be utilised in ophthalmology and will help to address the increasingly limited opportunities for training and assessment during training and throughout a subsequent career (re-training and re-validation). This will inevitably translate into enhanced patient care. PMID:19628497

  2. Work Skills for Prevocational Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skaggs, Donald Ray

    A prevocational work skills training program for moderately retarded students emphasizes the need for developmentally appropriate tasks, concern for increasing students' attention span, orderly arrangement within tasks, and increased proficiency after training. Major units in the program focus on concepts of similarity and difference, large and…

  3. Senior Survival Skills Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington-Greene County Community Action Corp., Waynesburg, PA.

    A demonstration project established the need for, interest in, and the feasibility of an ongoing, volunteer-based, educational program designed to meet the specific needs of the elderly population in a rural county. The program established training sessions, attracting participation in the sessions and developing a network of interested community…

  4. Entrepreneurship Training Programme in Universities and Graduates' Productivity in South-South Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oleforo, Ngozika A.; Oko, Dominic Edema; Akpan, Eno G.

    2013-01-01

    Entrepreneurial training programme has to do with acquiring relevant skills in which an individual has to be sensitized, motivated and guided to achieve self-reliance and self employment. The paper examined the relevance of entrepreneurial training programme in the universities to graduates' productivity. Three null hypotheses were formulated. A…

  5. Communications skills for CRM training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shearer, M.

    1984-01-01

    A pilot training program in communication skills, listening, conflict solving, and task orientation, for a small but growing commuter airline is discussed. The interactions between pilots and management, and communication among crew members are examined. Methods for improvement of cockpit behavior management personnel relations are investigated.

  6. Process Evaluation of the Teacher Training for an AIDS Prevention Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmed, Nazeema; Flisher, Alan J.; Mathews, Catherine; Jansen, Shahieda; Mukoma, Wanjiru; Schaalma, Herman

    2006-01-01

    This paper provides a process evaluation of a 6-day teacher training programme which forms part of a sexuality education project. The training aimed at providing teachers with the necessary knowledge and skills to effectively teach a 16-lesson Grade 8 (14 year olds) life skills curriculum consisting of participatory exercises on sexual…

  7. Excellence needs training "Certified programme in endoscopic surgery".

    PubMed

    Campo, R; Puga, M; Meier Furst, R; Wattiez, A; De Wilde, R L

    2014-01-01

    The complexity of modern surgery has increased the demands and challenges to surgical education and quality control. Today the endoscopic approach is preferred because it increases the surgical possibilities and decreases patient discomfort. Implementing endoscopic surgery without specific training leads to decrease in surgical performance and increase in patient morbidity and mortality. Research of the European Academy for Gynaecological Surgery (+he Academy) has resulted in the establishment of a structured certification and diploma programme with three levels of expertise. One level should be passed to obtain access to the next level. Furthermore one should first pass +he Academy skill exam before entering the clinical surgical competence programme. The European Society for Gynaecological Endoscopy (ESGE) has defined the different diplomas, whereas the Bachelor diploma is seen as a prerequisite to start the in OR one to one clinical training aiming to provide endoscopic skilled individuals to the clinical one to one training. Further diplomas are the Minimal invasive Gynaecological Surgeon (MIGS), master in hysteroscopy and the laparoscopic pelvic surgeon. This programme is based on the best available scientific evidence. It counteracts the problem of the traditional surgical apprentice tutor model and increases patient safety and surgical performance. It is seen as a major step toward standardization of endoscopic surgical training in general. PMID:25593700

  8. Excellence needs training "Certified programme in endoscopic surgery".

    PubMed

    Campo, R; Puga, M; Meier Furst, R; Wattiez, A; De Wilde, R L

    2014-01-01

    The complexity of modern surgery has increased the demands and challenges to surgical education and quality control. Today the endoscopic approach is preferred because it increases the surgical possibilities and decreases patient discomfort. Implementing endoscopic surgery without specific training leads to decrease in surgical performance and increase in patient morbidity and mortality. Research of the European Academy for Gynaecological Surgery (+he Academy) has resulted in the establishment of a structured certification and diploma programme with three levels of expertise. One level should be passed to obtain access to the next level. Furthermore one should first pass +he Academy skill exam before entering the clinical surgical competence programme. The European Society for Gynaecological Endoscopy (ESGE) has defined the different diplomas, whereas the Bachelor diploma is seen as a prerequisite to start the in OR one to one clinical training aiming to provide endoscopic skilled individuals to the clinical one to one training. Further diplomas are the Minimal invasive Gynaecological Surgeon (MIGS), master in hysteroscopy and the laparoscopic pelvic surgeon. This programme is based on the best available scientific evidence. It counteracts the problem of the traditional surgical apprentice tutor model and increases patient safety and surgical performance. It is seen as a major step toward standardization of endoscopic surgical training in general.

  9. Effects of a Music Programme on Kindergartners' Phonological Awareness Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolduc, Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    This research examines the effect of a music training programme on the development of phonological awareness among 104 Franco-Canadian kindergarten children. The experimental group (N = 51) participated in an adapted version of the Standley and Hughes music training programme, while the control group (N = 53) took part in the Ministere de…

  10. Programme Budgets for Graduate Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Appelquist, Claes G.; And Others

    The development of a methodological framework for planning, programming, and budgeting which is specific to graduate training and research activities at the Chalmers University of Technology in Sweden is described. This pilot project is regarded as a step towards developing and implementing a generalized approach to an output-oriented finance…

  11. Training Phoneme Blending Skills in Children with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgoyne, Kelly; Duff, Fiona; Snowling, Maggie; Buckley, Sue; Hulme, Charles

    2013-01-01

    This article reports the evaluation of a 6-week programme of teaching designed to support the development of phoneme blending skills in children with Down syndrome (DS). Teaching assistants (TAs) were trained to deliver the intervention to individual children in daily 10-15-minute sessions, within a broader context of reading and language…

  12. The Galileo Teacher Training Programme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doran, Rosa

    The Galileo Teacher Training Program is a global effort to empower teachers all over the world to embark on a new trend in science teaching, using new technologies and real research meth-ods to teach curriculum content. The GTTP goal is to create a worldwide network of "Galileo Ambassadors", promoters of GTTP training session, and a legion of "Galileo Teachers", edu-cators engaged on the use of innovative resources and sharing experiences and supporting its pears worldwide. Through workshops, online training tools and resources, the products and techniques promoted by this program can be adapted to reach locations with few resources of their own, as well as network-connected areas that can take advantage of access to robotic, optical and radio telescopes, webcams, astronomy exercises, cross-disciplinary resources, image processing and digital universes (web and desktop planetariums). Promoters of GTTP are expert astronomy educators connected to Universities or EPO institutions that facilitate the consolidation of an active support to newcomers and act as a 24 hour helpdesk to teachers all over the world. GTTP will also engage in the creation of a repository of astronomy education resources and science research projects, ViRoS (Virtual Repository of resources and Science Projects), in order to simplify the task of educators willing to enrich classroom activities.

  13. Embedding Publication Skills in Science Research Training: A Writing Group Programme Based on Applied Linguistics Frameworks and Facilitated by a Scientist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cargill, Margaret; Smernik, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    Few systematic efforts have been reported to develop higher degree by research student skills for writing publishable articles in science and technology fields. There is a need to address this lack in the light of the current importance of publication to science research students and the high supervisor workload entailed in repeated draft…

  14. Visual training programme applied to precision shooting.

    PubMed

    Quevedo i Junyent, L; Solé i Fortó, J

    1995-09-01

    A three month visual training programme was conducted at the CAR of Sant Cugat (Olympic Training Center). Eleven members of 'The Catalan Government Special Intervention Squad' were used in a clinical trial. Pre-test and post-test results were obtained for pistol shooting, visual function, and psychological and physical states. Statistical analysis indicated significant gains in visual function and pistol shooting scores after the programme, while psychological (anxiety) and physical condition remained the same. Some conclusive statements can be made with regard to the relation of visual function improvement and shooting performance increment, after analysing the data. This improvement is evident in statistically significant post-test gains in the following variables: 'phoria at distance, recovery points in fusional reserves at distance, analytical amplitude, negative relative accommodation, saccadic fixations, and accommodative facility at distance and at near. The rest of the controlled visual variables also showed clinical improvement.

  15. Training of Leadership Skills in Medical Education

    PubMed Central

    Kiesewetter, Jan; Schmidt-Huber, Marion; Netzel, Janine; Krohn, Alexandra C.; Angstwurm, Matthias; Fischer, Martin R.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Effective team performance is essential in the delivery of high-quality health-care. Leadership skills therefore are an important part of physicians’ everyday clinical life. To date, the development of leadership skills are underrepresented in medical curricula. Appropriate training methods for equipping doctors with these leadership skills are highly desirable. Objective: The review aims to summarize the findings in the current literature regarding training in leadership skills in medicine and tries to integrate the findings to guide future research and training development. Method: The PubMED, ERIC, and PsycArticles, PsycINFO, PSYNDEX and Academic search complete of EBSCOhost were searched for training of leadership skills in medicine in German and English. Relevant articles were identified and findings were integrated and consolidated regarding the leadership principles, target group of training and number of participants, temporal resources of the training, training content and methods, the evaluation design and trainings effects. Results: Eight studies met all inclusion criteria and no exclusion criteria. The range of training programs is very broad and leadership skill components are diverse. Training designs implied theoretical reflections of leadership phenomena as well as discussions of case studies from practice. The duration of training ranged from several hours to years. Reactions of participants to trainings were positive, yet no behavioral changes through training were examined. Conclusions: More research is needed to understand the factors critical to success in the development of leadership skills in medical education and to adapt goal-oriented training methods. Requirements analysis might help to gain knowledge about the nature of leadership skills in medicine. The authors propose a stronger focus on behavioral training methods like simulation-based training for leadership skills in medical education. PMID:24282452

  16. Education and Training for Development in East Asia: The Political Economy of Skill Formation in East Asian Newly Industrialised Economies. ESRC Pacific Asia Programme [Series].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashton, David; Green, Francis; James, Donna; Sung, Johnny

    This book provides a detailed analysis of the development of education and training systems in Asia and the relationship with the process of economic growth. Focus is on four impoverished agrarian economies--Hong Kong, Singapore, South Korea, and Taiwan--that were transformed in little more than a generation into East Asian "tigers":…

  17. Establishing Fire Safety Skills Using Behavioral Skills Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houvouras, Andrew J., IV; Harvey, Mark T.

    2014-01-01

    The use of behavioral skills training (BST) to educate 3 adolescent boys on the risks of lighters and fire setting was evaluated using in situ assessment in a school setting. Two participants had a history of fire setting. After training, all participants adhered to established rules: (a) avoid a deactivated lighter, (b) leave the training area,…

  18. Assessing knowledge skills in the NHS: a training needs analysis approach.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Seona

    2013-06-01

    This feature discusses the use of a training needs analysis exercise carried out by library staff at the NHS Greater Glasgow & Clyde (NHSGGC) Library Network to support the development of a fit for purpose programme of information skills training. A survey was designed based on a well-known information skills competency framework and used to gain an understanding of the knowledge skills needed by staff and how library training could best support these. The survey received a good response rate and led to the successful writing of a training plan for the Library Network for the delivery of information skills training. H.S.

  19. Skills Governance and the Workforce Development Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hordern, Jim

    2013-01-01

    In the United Kingdom higher education environment, government may make efforts to encourage institutions to engage in governance structures to secure policy objectives through a steering approach. In this article connections between skills governance structures and the recent Higher Education Funding Council for England workforce development…

  20. Daughters of the Earth: Skills-Based Literacy Programme for Women, China. Education for All: Making It Work. Innovation Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aksornkool, Namtip

    Begun in the early 1990s, The Skills-Based Literacy Programme for Women aims to improve the lives of rural Chinese women by linking literacy education with skills training in agriculture and other forms of income generation. Xuan Wei County, Yunnan Province, was chosen as the seat of the project because of high female illiteracy rates and the need…

  1. Skill Training in Counselling and Psychotherapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Albert

    1977-01-01

    Although Rational Emotive Therapy (RET) pioneered in some aspects of skill training, it recognizes some distinct disadvantages in making that approach the modus operandi of counselling. Both the advantages and the disadvantages of a skill-training approach are discussed in order to clarify RET's position on the topic. (Author)

  2. Improving Problem Solving in Primary School Students: The Effect of a Training Programme Focusing on Metacognition and Working Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornoldi, Cesare; Carretti, Barbara; Drusi, Silvia; Tencati, Chiara

    2015-01-01

    Background: Despite doubts voiced on their efficacy, a series of studies has been carried out on the capacity of training programmes to improve academic and reasoning skills by focusing on underlying cognitive abilities and working memory in particular. No systematic efforts have been made, however, to test training programmes that involve both…

  3. Training in Soft and Essential Skills for Young Atmospheric Scientists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuepbach, E.

    2006-05-01

    ACCENT is the European Network of Excellence in Atmospheric Composition Change (www.accent- network.org). The Task Training and Education (TE) in ACCENT brings attention to the wide scientific issues tackled in the Network via education and training. It provides individuals and/or teams from institutions of higher education and research with a diversity of skills and competencies. These include soft and essential skills, focusing on communication, leadership and interdisciplinary co-operation. The educational and training programme, and associated training tools offered by the Task TE in ACCENT aim at specific target groups such as young scientists (from Master level up to 3 years after completion of a Ph.D.). Three major training events for young scientists are scheduled in ACCENT: an event on air quality in the Mediterranean in Thessaloniki (Greece) in October 2006, an event on regional climate change in Eastern Europe in Riga (Latvia) in June 2007, and the ACCENT YOUTH SUMMIT in summer 2008. Here, the concepts underlying the training of the next generation of atmospheric scientists in soft and essential skills are presented, and applications of some of the training tools are demonstrated. network.org/training-and-education

  4. Learning Basic Surgical Skills through Simulator Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silvennoinen, Minna; Helfenstein, Sacha; Ruoranen, Minna; Saariluoma, Pertti

    2012-01-01

    Computer-based surgical training simulators are instrumental in skill-based training and performance measurement. However, to date, the educational employment of these tools lacks empirically founded insights and effective practical guidelines. This study examined surgical residents during computer-based simulator training of basic laparoscopic…

  5. Earthquake drills and simulations in community-based training and preparedness programmes.

    PubMed

    Simpson, David M

    2002-03-01

    The San Francisco, California, bay area is subject to continuous seismic risk. One particular response has been the development of community-based training programmes designed to teach residents basic emergency response skills. Citizens are taught emergency medical techniques, search and rescue, fire suppression and other fundamental response skills. Current estimates in the Bay Area place the number of programmes at more than 100. Many programmes now include an annual community drill to reinforce the training and to evaluate the programme. The study described here is based on an evaluation of an effort initiated by BayNET (Bay Area Neighborhood Emergency Training), a voluntary association of communities with community-based disaster preparedness programmes. In April 1996, BayNET asked all of its members to hold a community earthquake drill. After the drill, a mail survey was conducted of all programme managers. The survey examined the structure and administration of the programmes, training efforts and other related components. This paper describes the typology of drill formats that communities used, the role of the simulation in the city's preparedness efforts, the qualitative costs and benefits, as well as an assessment of the drill based on survey respondents.

  6. Social skills training for chronic mental patients.

    PubMed

    Liberman, R P; Massel, H K; Mosk, M D; Wong, S E

    1985-04-01

    Social skills training has proved to be effective in increasing the social competence of chronic mental patients. The authors describe three models of social skills training, all of which involve role playing by the patient and modeling, prompting, feedback, and reinforcement by the therapist. Many patients can benefit from the basic training model. For patients functioning at a higher level, the problem-solving model provides general strategies for dealing with a variety of social situations. The attention-focusing model, designed for highly distractible and withdrawn patients, teaches skills through constant repetition of tasks and minimizes demands on cognitive abilities. The authors emphasize the importance of taking steps to ensure that the skills learned during training are generalized to other situations and settings.

  7. Teaching and assessing clinical skills: a competency-based programme in China.

    PubMed

    Stillman, P L; Wang, Y; Ouyang, Q; Zhang, S; Yang, Y; Sawyer, W D

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a competency-based clinical skills teaching and assessment programme in China utilizing modern teaching techniques. Medical teachers from three schools agreed on items for inclusion in the complete physical examination of an asymptomatic adult, an outline for an adult and paediatric history, and important interviewing skills. Lesson plans, performance checklists, and written and videotape training materials were developed. Standardized patients were trained at one school to assist with the teaching at that school and with the assessment at all three schools. A national, a provincial, and a local medical school in China were used. Before beginning the new curriculum for students in their first year of clinical training, baseline data were collected on skills of students at various levels of training in the previous curriculum at all three schools. Although in the previous curriculum there was some improvement in clinical skills among advanced compared to more junior students, performance was lower than expected by staff. One year after implementation of the new curriculum, students were evaluated. These students significantly outperformed their counterparts as well as the more senior level students tested the previous year. This project has established a competency-based teaching and assessment programme in China that allows for rapid improvement in the clinical skills of students. Within a short time, a sophisticated group of medical educators has been formed, who now function as consultants to other educators in their own country. Many aspects of this programme are being adapted throughout China and are applicable to medical schools throughout the world. PMID:9231122

  8. Focussing on Generic Skills in Training Packages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawe, Susan

    A study assessed whether training packages gave sufficient focus to attainment of generic skills and examined approaches that can be used to enhance the delivery of these skills so students are better prepared for the new demands of the workplace. A literature review and consultations with stakeholders provided information on development of the…

  9. Assertiveness Training for Job-Seeking Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, Patricia G.; McLoughlin, Mary Ellen

    1977-01-01

    Assertiveness Training for Job-Seeking Skills includes skill development in initiating the job search; arranging actual interviews; preparing a resume; articulating strengths, weaknesses, and career objectives; responding assertively in interviews; asking appropriate questions; accepting or rejecting job offers; confronting discrimination;…

  10. Adult Skills Training Center: Feasibility Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skalski, John M.; Baratta, Anthony N.

    A 4-phase project, this study was conducted to determine the feasibility of a bilingual vocational skill training program for out-of-school youth and adults of the Perth Amboy Hispanic community. Sampled were 494 out-of-school youth and adults in the area. Findings include: (1) There is a significant need for an adult vocational skills training…

  11. Training of microsurgical skills on nonliving models.

    PubMed

    Ilie, Victor G; Ilie, Vlad I; Dobreanu, Codrin; Ghetu, Nicolae; Luchian, Stefan; Pieptu, Dragos

    2008-01-01

    Although direct exposure to procedures in the operating theater environment, together with practice on laboratory animals, is still seen as the gold standard of teaching in microsurgery, practice on nonliving simulators is currently being validated as an important educational tool. We reviewed the widely used nonliving training models, together with currently accepted innovations, which are parts of curricula of training courses in microsurgery. Using the experience accumulated in training programs at the Centre for Simulation and Training in Surgery, we identified which particular skills can be reliably targeted by each nonliving tissue exercise. We were able to find five groups of nonliving training models: basic manipulation, knot-tying principles, completing the anastomosis, the real tissue experience, and training in virtual reality. The more abstract models might seem quite far from the real life experience, but they each closely address specific skills. It thus becomes convenient for the instructor to train these skills separately. This generates series of consistently favorable results once the skills are integrated into a more complex procedure. Focused exercises, once assembled in continuity, reconstruct the real life scenario. The training program can comprise a series of increasingly difficult exercises, which mirror the real life situations. Performance on nonliving models in each progressively more challenging exercise can be assessed via direct observation, assisted by clear and objective criteria. Finally, focused training will help both the transition to human surgery and replication of the favorable results to large series of subjects. PMID:18683874

  12. Participatory Training in Monitoring and Evaluation for Maternal and Newborn Health Programmes

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Jacqueline S.; Marais, Debbi

    2015-01-01

    In the context of slow progress towards Millennium Development Goals for child and maternal health, an innovative participatory training programme in the monitoring and evaluation (M&E) of Maternal and Newborn Health programmes was developed and delivered in six developing countries. The training, for health professionals and programme managers, aimed: (i) to strengthen participants’ skills in M&E to enable more effective targeting of resources, and (ii) to build the capacity of partner institutions hosting the training to run similar courses. This review aims to assess the extent to which these goals were met and elicit views on ways to improve the training. An online survey of training participants and structured interviews with stakeholders were undertaken. Data from course reports were also incorporated. There was clearly a benefit to participants in terms of improved knowledge and skills. There is also some evidence that this translated into action through M&E implementation and tool development. Evidence of capacity-building at an institutional level was limited. Lessons for professional development training can be drawn from several aspects of the training programme that were found to facilitate learning, engagement and application. These include structuring courses around participant material, focussing on the development of practical action plans and involving multi-disciplinary teams. The need for strengthening follow-up and embedding it throughout the training was highlighted to overcome the challenges to applying learning in the ‘real world’. PMID:25716377

  13. Promoting interprofessional collaboration in oncology through a teamwork skills simulation programme.

    PubMed

    James, Ted A; Page, Jenna S; Sprague, Julian

    2016-07-01

    Outcomes in clinical oncology can be improved when care is delivered by high-performance teams. The purpose of the initiative described in this article was to develop interprofessional team training opportunities using simulated cancer care scenarios to enhance collaborative practice skills within clinical oncology. Scenarios were developed based on internal needs assessment and review of patient safety data. Paired teams of haematology-oncology nurses and fellows completed the patient management scenarios, followed by debriefing and performance feedback. Research design consisted of an observational case study and questionnaire of participants in a cross-sectional analysis. Twenty-three learners participated in two separate sessions. All participants responded with scores of 4-5 on a 5-point Likert scale regarding the perceived value of the training programme and its effectiveness in developing skills in teamwork and communication. Simulation-based team training scenarios were successfully implemented into an interprofessional curriculum for haematology-oncology nurses and fellows. Participants valued the experience and indicated that they acquired new knowledge, skills, and attitudes to enhance interprofessional collaboration in cancer care. These types of training programmes have the potential to transform cancer care by creating high-performing teams resulting in improved patient outcomes, enhanced clinical effectiveness, and higher levels of satisfaction among patients, families, and healthcare providers.

  14. Evaluation of a Soft Skills Training Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charoensap-Kelly, Piyawan; Broussard, Lauren; Lindsly, Mallory; Troy, Megan

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effectiveness of a soft skills employee training program. We examined willingness to learn and delivery methods (face-to-face vs. online) and their associations with the training outcomes in terms of learning and behavioral change. Results showed that neither participants' willingness to learn nor delivery…

  15. Evaluating a Special Education Training Programme in Nicaragua

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delkamiller, Julie; Swain, Kristine D.; Ritzman, Mitzi J.; Leader-Janssen, Elizabeth M.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined a two-year special education and inclusive practices in-service training programme with a university in Nicaragua. Participants included 14 teachers from nine schools in Nicaragua. Participants' knowledge of special education concepts were evaluated as part of assessing the training modules. In addition, programme evaluation…

  16. General medicine advanced training: lessons from the John Hunter training programme.

    PubMed

    Jackel, D; Attia, J; Pickles, R

    2014-03-01

    Recent years have seen a rapid growth in the number of advanced trainees pursuing general medicine as a specialty. This reflects an awareness of the need for broader training experiences to equip future consultant physicians with the skills to manage the healthcare challenges arising from the demographic trends of ageing and increasing comorbidity. The John Hunter Hospital training programme in general medicine has several characteristics that have led to the success in producing general physicians prepared for these challenges. These include support from a core group of committed general physicians, an appropriate and sustainable funding model, flexibility with a focus on genuine training and developing awareness of a systems approach, and strong links with rural practice.

  17. Coop Programs Extend Skill Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Peter

    1977-01-01

    The cooperative program used at Sycamore High School, Sycamore, Illinois, for 24 years has been integrated with career education to provide student experience in many occupations in a cluster and to permit progression toward a specific occupation and attain salable skills. Grades 9-12 curriculum is based on a series of career orientation and…

  18. Basic Extension Skills Training (BEST): A Responsive Approach to Integrated Extension for Rural Development in Botswana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gboku, Matthew L. S.; Modise, Oitshepile M.

    2008-01-01

    In a rapidly changing society like Botswana, the competition for employment, training and progression on the job has become very high. The development of skills is therefore a crucial and integral part of nation building, which needs a direct link to a training programme to continuously help staff to cope with the different needs they meet in the…

  19. Group Music Training and Children's Prosocial Skills

    PubMed Central

    Schellenberg, E. Glenn; Corrigall, Kathleen A.; Dys, Sebastian P.; Malti, Tina

    2015-01-01

    We investigated if group music training in childhood is associated with prosocial skills. Children in 3rd or 4th grade who attended 10 months of music lessons taught in groups were compared to a control group of children matched for socio-economic status. All children were administered tests of prosocial skills near the beginning and end of the 10-month period. Compared to the control group, children in the music group had larger increases in sympathy and prosocial behavior, but this effect was limited to children who had poor prosocial skills before the lessons began. The effect was evident even when the lessons were compulsory, which minimized the role of self-selection. The results suggest that group music training facilitates the development of prosocial skills. PMID:26506414

  20. Group Music Training and Children's Prosocial Skills.

    PubMed

    Schellenberg, E Glenn; Corrigall, Kathleen A; Dys, Sebastian P; Malti, Tina

    2015-01-01

    We investigated if group music training in childhood is associated with prosocial skills. Children in 3rd or 4th grade who attended 10 months of music lessons taught in groups were compared to a control group of children matched for socio-economic status. All children were administered tests of prosocial skills near the beginning and end of the 10-month period. Compared to the control group, children in the music group had larger increases in sympathy and prosocial behavior, but this effect was limited to children who had poor prosocial skills before the lessons began. The effect was evident even when the lessons were compulsory, which minimized the role of self-selection. The results suggest that group music training facilitates the development of prosocial skills.

  1. Group Music Training and Children's Prosocial Skills.

    PubMed

    Schellenberg, E Glenn; Corrigall, Kathleen A; Dys, Sebastian P; Malti, Tina

    2015-01-01

    We investigated if group music training in childhood is associated with prosocial skills. Children in 3rd or 4th grade who attended 10 months of music lessons taught in groups were compared to a control group of children matched for socio-economic status. All children were administered tests of prosocial skills near the beginning and end of the 10-month period. Compared to the control group, children in the music group had larger increases in sympathy and prosocial behavior, but this effect was limited to children who had poor prosocial skills before the lessons began. The effect was evident even when the lessons were compulsory, which minimized the role of self-selection. The results suggest that group music training facilitates the development of prosocial skills. PMID:26506414

  2. Developing the Model for Optimal Learning and Transfer (MOLT) Following an Evaluation of Outdoor Groupwork Skills Programmes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooley, Sam Joseph; Cumming, Jennifer; Holland, Mark J. G.; Burns, Victoria E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to evaluate the perceived efficacy of outdoor groupwork skills programmes for the undergraduate and postgraduate students, and the factors that influence its success. It also illustrates the use of Kirkpatrick's (1994) 4-level model of training evaluation as a framework for qualitative investigation of learning and…

  3. Surgical simulation in orthopaedic skills training.

    PubMed

    Atesok, Kivanc; Mabrey, Jay D; Jazrawi, Laith M; Egol, Kenneth A

    2012-07-01

    Mastering rapidly evolving orthopaedic surgical techniques requires a lengthy period of training. Current work-hour restrictions and cost pressures force trainees to face the challenge of acquiring more complex surgical skills in a shorter amount of time. As a result, alternative methods to improve the surgical skills of orthopaedic trainees outside the operating room have been developed. These methods include hands-on training in a laboratory setting using synthetic bones or cadaver models as well as software tools and computerized simulators that enable trainees to plan and simulate orthopaedic operations in a three-dimensional virtual environment. Laboratory-based training offers potential benefits in the development of basic surgical skills, such as using surgical tools and implants appropriately, achieving competency in procedures that have a steep learning curve, and assessing already acquired skills while minimizing concerns for patient safety, operating room time, and financial constraints. Current evidence supporting the educational advantages of surgical simulation in orthopaedic skills training is limited. Despite this, positive effects on the overall education of orthopaedic residents, and on maintaining the proficiency of practicing orthopaedic surgeons, are anticipated. PMID:22751160

  4. Evaluation of Formal Training Programmes in Greek Organisations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diamantidis, Anastasios D.; Chatzoglou, Prodromos D.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the paper is to highlight the training factors that mostly affect trainees' perception of learning and training usefulness. Design/methodology/approach: A new research model is proposed exploring the relationships between a trainer's performance, training programme components, outcomes of the learning process and training…

  5. Entrepreneurial training for girls empowerment in Lesotho: A process evaluation of a model programme

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Mary O'Neill; Kuriansky, Judy; Lytle, Megan; Vistman, Bozhena; Mosisili, ‘Mathato S.; Hlothoane, Lieketso; Matlanyane, Mapeo; Mokobori, Thabang; Mosuhli, Silas; Pebane, Jane

    2014-01-01

    A Girls Empowerment Programme held in 2010 in Lesotho, Sub-Saharan Africa, focused on HIV/AIDS risk reduction and prevention, life skills and entrepreneurial training (income-generating activities). Entrepreneurial training was a crucial part of equipping the camp attendees with basic skills to help them develop sustainable livelihoods. Such skills and financial independence are essential to enable rural girls to complete their secondary schooling (in a fee-based educational system) and to pursue a career, as well as to further help them be less susceptible to transactional sex and its significant risks. The results of a brief process evaluation with some nested supporting data showed considerable improvement in the girls' knowledge about income-generating activities. In addition, almost half of the camp attendees participated in further entrepreneurial training and about half of these girls went on to develop small businesses. Replication of this model of camp training is recommended and being explored in other African countries. PMID:25505804

  6. A fit for purpose training programme for the decontamination of personnel.

    PubMed

    O'Mara, E; Cole, P; Wynn, A; Collison, R

    2015-06-01

    Contingency plans are a crucial part of operating any nuclear facility. The success of a contingency plan depends on the efficacy of the plan and the confidence and understanding of those who must enact it. This project focused on both of these aspects, clarifying technique and then designing and delivering a training programme for decontamination. The design of the training was based on the IAEA Systematic Approach to Training (SAT). The delivery focused on ways of increasing retention including use of practical examples and assessment, peer assessment and visual contingency plans. A quantitative survey of the trainees was conducted using a questionnaire before and after the training programme delivery. The results clearly demonstrate an improvement across all elements of skills and knowledge required to undertake decontamination. Effective training is fundamental to the development of a good safety culture and the methodology used in this work has led to a clear improvement in radiation protection culture at the Devonport site. PMID:25769116

  7. Interpersonal Skills Training II: The Trainer's Role.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Catherine; Butcher, David

    1983-01-01

    Examines the two critical functions of the interpersonal skills (IPS) trainer: (1) to analyze trainee performance and (2) to provide effective performance feedback. Discusses training styles and recommends the Causal-Analytic style. Derives guidelines for effective trainer behavior. (MEAD Subscriptions, CSML, University of Lancaster, Lancaster LA1…

  8. The Skills Enhancement Training Program. Performance Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Food and Beverage Workers Union, Local 32, Washington, DC.

    This report describes a joint labor-management workplace literacy program called SET (Skills Enhancement Training) that targeted the more than 2,000 unionized employees of food service contractors at U.S. government institutions in Washington, D.C. Nineteen classes were offered and a total of 191 people self-selected themselves into the program.…

  9. Sibling Conflict Resolution Skills: Assessment and Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Brett W.; Roberts, Mark W.

    2009-01-01

    Sibling conflict can rise to the level of a clinical problem. In Phase 1 a lengthy behavioral role-play analog sampling child reactions to normal sibling conflicts was successfully shortened. In Phase 2 normal children who lacked sibling conflict resolution skills were randomly assigned to a Training or Measurement Only condition. Training…

  10. Informatics Approach to Improving Surgical Skills Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Islam, Gazi

    2013-01-01

    Surgery as a profession requires significant training to improve both clinical decision making and psychomotor proficiency. In the medical knowledge domain, tools have been developed, validated, and accepted for evaluation of surgeons' competencies. However, assessment of the psychomotor skills still relies on the Halstedian model of…

  11. Sequencing Visual Perception Skills. Training Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langstaff, Anne L., Ed.

    The training manual of sequenced visual perception skills offers an assessment guide, explains approximately 20 major types of instructional activities, and describes appropriate instructional materials, illustrated in an associated filmstrip. All activities are organized into four learning steps (recognition, discrimination, recall, and…

  12. Training high performance skills using above real-time training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guckenberger, Dutch; Uliano, Kevin C.; Lane, Norman E.

    1993-01-01

    The Above Real-Time Training (ARTT) concept is a unique approach to training high performance skills. ARTT refers to a training paradigm that places the operator in a simulated environment that functions at faster than normal time. Such a training paradigm represents a departure from the intuitive, but not often supported, feeling that the best practice is determined by the training environment with the highest fidelity. This approach is hypothesized to provide greater 'transfer value' per simulation trial, by incorporating training techniques and instructional features into the simulator. These techniques allow individuals to acquire these critical skills faster and with greater retention. ARTT also allows an individual trained in 'fast time' to operate at what appears to be a more confident state, when the same task is performed in a real-time environment. Two related experiments are discussed. The findings appear to be consistent with previous findings that show positive effects of task variation during training. Moreover, ARTT has merit in improving or maintaining transfer with sharp reductions in training time. There are indications that the effectiveness of ARTT varies as a function of task content and possibly task difficulty. Other implications for ARTT are discussed along with future research directions.

  13. Implementing digital skills training in care homes: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Wild, Deidre; Kydd, Angela; Szczepura, Ala

    2016-05-01

    This article is the first of a two-part series that informs and describes digital skills training using a dedicated console computer provided for staff and residents in a care home setting. This was part of a programme of culture change in a large care home with nursing in Glasgow, Scotland. The literature review shows that over the past decade there has been a gradual increase in the use of digital technology by staff and older people in community settings including care homes. Policy from the European Commission presents a persuasive argument for the advancement of technology-enabled care to counter the future impact of an increased number of people of advanced age on finite health and social care resources. The psychosocial and environmental issues that inhibit or enhance the acquisition of digital skills in care homes are considered and include the identification of exemplar schemes and the support involved. PMID:27125940

  14. Implementing digital skills training in care homes: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Wild, Deidre; Kydd, Angela; Szczepura, Ala

    2016-05-01

    This article is the first of a two-part series that informs and describes digital skills training using a dedicated console computer provided for staff and residents in a care home setting. This was part of a programme of culture change in a large care home with nursing in Glasgow, Scotland. The literature review shows that over the past decade there has been a gradual increase in the use of digital technology by staff and older people in community settings including care homes. Policy from the European Commission presents a persuasive argument for the advancement of technology-enabled care to counter the future impact of an increased number of people of advanced age on finite health and social care resources. The psychosocial and environmental issues that inhibit or enhance the acquisition of digital skills in care homes are considered and include the identification of exemplar schemes and the support involved.

  15. Communication skills and psychological training in oncology.

    PubMed

    Razavi, D; Delvaux, N

    1997-07-01

    Preserving the best possible quality of life for cancer patients and their families has become a major goal in cancer care. However, the cumulative effect of stressors related to cancer care, many of which involve communicating with patients and relatives, may lead to the development of burnout in staff. Many health care professionals lack the psychosocial knowledge and communications skills needed to identify patients' problems because general professional training focuses on technical care. Teaching strategies known as psychological training programs (PTP) are therefore being developed to help improve health care professionals' sensitivity to communication problems with patients and relatives. Cognitive (e.g. theoretical information), experiential (e.g. case-history discussions), behavioural (e.g. role-playing exercise) and supportive (e.g. stressor identification) training techniques are used to teach the essential skills of good communication, i.e. listening, empathy, response to cues and appropriate use of reassurance. PTP range from one-day courses and residential workshops to full-time 1- or 2-year curricula. However, one of the main obstacles to implementing PTP is scepticism among health care professionals about its usefulness. Research on training effectiveness should therefore be developed to assess the impact of communication skills on quality of care and patients' quality of life.

  16. Potential role for psychological skills training in emergency medicine: Part 1 - Introduction and background.

    PubMed

    Lauria, Michael J; Rush, Stephen; Weingart, Scott D; Brooks, Jason; Gallo, Isabelle A

    2016-10-01

    Psychological skills training (PST) is the systematic acquisition and practice of different psychological techniques to improve cognitive and technical performance. This training consists of three phases: education, skills acquisition and practice. Some of the psychological skills developed in this training include relaxation techniques, focusing and concentration skills, positive 'self-suggestion' and visualisation exercises. Since the middle of the 20th century, PST has been successfully applied by athletes, performing artists, business executives, military personnel and other professionals in high-risk occupations. Research in these areas has demonstrated the breadth and depth of the training's effectiveness. Despite the benefits realised in other professions, medicine has only recently begun to explore certain elements of PST. The present paper reviews the history and evidence behind the concept of PST. In addition, it presents some aspects of PST that have already been incorporated into medical training as well as implications for developing more comprehensive programmes to improve delivery of emergency medical care.

  17. Designing Training Programmes for EIU and ESD: A Trainer's Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    UNESCO Bangkok, 2006

    2006-01-01

    The training guide is based on a TOT (Training of Trainer) workshop conducted in September 2005 in Chiangmai, Thailand jointly by Asia Pacific Centre of Education for International Understanding (APCEIU) and UNESCO's Asia Pacific Programme of Educational Innovation for Development (APEID). The publication provides a comprehensive guide to trainers…

  18. Do Computerised Training Programmes Designed to Improve Working Memory Work?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Apter, Brian J. B.

    2012-01-01

    A critical review of working memory training research during the last 10 years is provided. Particular attention is given to research that has attempted to investigate the efficacy of commercially marketed computerised training programmes such as "Cogmed" and "Jungle Memory". Claimed benefits are questioned on the basis that research methodologies…

  19. Outreach Programmes for Education and Training: Contributions from the International Cartographic Association

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartwright, W. E.; Fairbairn, D.

    2012-07-01

    Organisations like the International Cartographic Association champion programmes that develop and deliver education and training to cartographers and geospatial scientists, globally. This can be in the form of traditional university and training college programmes, short courses for professional and technical members of mapping agencies and as outreach initiatives to transfer knowledge about the discipline and its contemporary practices. Through its international community, the ICA undertakes the transfer of knowledge about cartography and GI Science by publishing books and special editions of journals and running workshops. Colleagues from the ICA community conduct these workshops on a volunteer basis, generally with the support of the national member organisation of ICA or the national mapping body. For example, the ICA promotes the generation of extensive publications, generally through its Commissions and Working Groups. The publications include books, journals and the ICA Newsletter. Outreach activities are especially pertinent to up skill colleagues from developing countries. Specialist programmes can be offered for professional and 'everyday' map users (from adults to children). The ICA can assist with its current programmes, designed to embrace professional and non-professional cartographers alike. This paper will address how education and outreach programmes can be supported by international associations, by offering programmes independently, or in partnership with sister associations and national and regional organisations and societies. As well, the paper will address the need to deliver education and outreach programmes not to just the professional international community, but also to map users and citizen map publishers.

  20. 10 CFR 835.103 - Education, training and skills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Education, training and skills. 835.103 Section 835.103... § 835.103 Education, training and skills. Individuals responsible for developing and implementing... education, training, and skills to discharge these responsibilities....

  1. 10 CFR 835.103 - Education, training and skills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Education, training and skills. 835.103 Section 835.103... § 835.103 Education, training and skills. Individuals responsible for developing and implementing... education, training, and skills to discharge these responsibilities....

  2. 10 CFR 835.103 - Education, training and skills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Education, training and skills. 835.103 Section 835.103... § 835.103 Education, training and skills. Individuals responsible for developing and implementing... education, training, and skills to discharge these responsibilities....

  3. 10 CFR 835.103 - Education, training and skills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Education, training and skills. 835.103 Section 835.103... § 835.103 Education, training and skills. Individuals responsible for developing and implementing... education, training, and skills to discharge these responsibilities....

  4. Hospitality Occupational Skills Training Cooperative. Project HOST Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northwest Educational Cooperative, Des Plaines, IL.

    This curriculum guide provides instructional materials for an 8-week training program, entitled Hospitality Occupational Skills Training (HOST) Cooperative. It offers an alternative skills training program to meet the needs of disadvantaged, minority populations and of employers who must recruit more highly skilled workers from those populations.…

  5. 10 CFR 835.103 - Education, training and skills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Education, training and skills. 835.103 Section 835.103... § 835.103 Education, training and skills. Individuals responsible for developing and implementing... education, training, and skills to discharge these responsibilities....

  6. An evaluation of the HM prison service "thinking skills programme" using psychometric assessments.

    PubMed

    Gobbett, Matthew J; Sellen, Joselyn L

    2014-04-01

    The most widely implemented offending behaviour programme in the United Kingdom was Enhanced Thinking Skills (ETS), a cognitive-behavioural group intervention that aimed to develop participant's general cognitive skills. A new offending behaviour programme has been developed to replace ETS: the Thinking Skills Programme (TSP). This study reports an evaluation of the effectiveness of TSP using psychometric assessments. Phasing of the two programmes created an opportunity to compare the two programmes consecutively. Forty participants, 20 from each programme, completed a range of psychometric measures to examine cognition, attitudes, and thinking styles. Analysis of pre- and post-programme psychometric results indicated that participants of TSP demonstrated improvements on 14 of the 15 scales, 9 of which were statistically significant. Effect sizes between pre-post results were generally greater for TSP than ETS, demonstrating that TSP had a more positive impact on the thinking styles and attitudes of participants than the ETS programme.

  7. Radio Programme Production; A Manual For Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aspinall, Richard

    This manual for training broadcast personnel covers the following topics: a brief discussion of the history and nature of radio broadcasting, technical facilities of the broadcasting studio, production of various types of radio programs, and staff development and training. The section on production deals with producing and writing for the…

  8. Training Simulator for Developing Laparoscopic Skills

    PubMed Central

    Aruna Kumari, Nakka V.; Eekhout, Juancho

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To measure, using objective pre- and post-training assessments, the degree of improvement in laparoscopic skills following training with a new laparoscopy training simulator (LTS 2000). Methods: This study utilized the LTS 2000 training simulator. The simulator was used in conjunction with a laparoscope joined to a camera, light source, and monitor or with a camcorder. Eleven exercises were planned with tasks designed to develop visual-motor-processing capabilities for referencing the 2-dimensional image of an object on a video screen, and to teach and allow practice of delicate manipulations, circular motions, oviductal cannulation, formation of Roeder loops, and simple suturing and knot-tying. The skill level of individual trainees was assessed before and after training with objective means. Each exercise was assigned a point value of 100 with a maximum score of 1100. Some exercises were scored in number of tasks per 1 minute, others in number of minutes per 1 task. A score of 100 was given for completing a target number of tasks in 1 minute and 0 for not completing any. A score of 100 was given for completing the assigned task in a target amount of time and 0 for not completing it in 3 times that amount. Scores between 100 and 0 were set linearly as a function of those values. Results: Of the 11 participating physicians, none scored above the 65th percentile of the maximum achievable score before training; 8 scored above the 73rd percentile after training. The average pretest score was 304.9 points (SD 190.8) range 43.2 to 705.7; posttest score was 834.2 points (SD 141.2) range 547.3 to 1021.7. The average number of hours spent in practice was 5.9 (range 2 to 23). A positive correlation existed between hours of practice and posttest score improvement. Conclusion: Sustained training with the new simulator resulted in significant improvement in laparoscopic skills in all tested physicians, regardless of prior level of experience. PMID:11548833

  9. Analysis of Skills Requirement for Entry-Level Programmer/Analysts in Fortune 500 Corporations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Choong Kwon; Han, Hyo-Joo

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents the most up-to-date skill requirements for programmer/analyst, one of the most demanded entry-level job titles in the Information Systems (IS) field. In the past, several researchers studied job skills for IS professionals, but few have focused especially on "programmer/analyst." The authors conducted an extensive empirical…

  10. Sustained change in didactic skills--does teacher training last?

    PubMed

    Kuhnigk, Olaf; Schreiner, Julia; Harendza, Sigrid

    2013-01-01

    Teacher training programmes are necessary assets in faculty development. Few data exist on their long-term effects on participants' teaching skills. Our aim was to study participants' didactic competencies up to four years after attending a newly established faculty development workshop at Hamburg Medical School. Of the 322 participants who attended our teacher training between 2006 and 2009, 313 received a self-assessment and evaluation questionnaire in 2010. This follow-up self-assessment (t2) was compared with their self-assessment of the same didactic competencies before (t0) and directly after (t1) the training. Correlations between participants' personal reasons to attend the workshop and their assessment of didactic competencies were investigated. Self-assessment was significantly higher at the time of follow-up (t2) for all cohorts compared to the assessment before the workshop (t0). Personal reasons for participation differed greatly between voluntary and mandatory. However, self-assessment of the didactic competencies (t2) was not different between these groups. Participants involved in objective structured clinical examinations (OSCE) rated their competency in this field higher than participants without OSCE involvement. In conclusion, teacher training can be effective in the long run even when participation is mandatory. Competencies seem to be retained best when the content of the training fits participants' teaching activities.

  11. Components of Effective Diversity Training Programmes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wentling, Rose Mary; Palma-Rivas, Nilda

    1999-01-01

    Interviews with 12 diversity experts uncovered components of effective diversity training programs: management commitment and support, inclusion in strategic planning, attention to specific organizational needs, qualified trainers, mandatory attendance, inclusiveness, trust and confidentiality, accountability, and clearly focused evaluation. (SK)

  12. Evaluation of a developmental care training programme for neonatal nurses.

    PubMed

    Milette, Isabelle H; Richard, Lucie; Martel, Marie-Josée

    2005-06-01

    Although the impact of developmental care on premature infants has been investigated at length, often the issue of professional development and training related to this type of care has not been examined. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the impact of a developmental care training programme on nurses' behaviours and cognitive attributes with regard to the prevention of overstimulation of premature infants. The Theory of Reasoned Action (TRA) was the framework underlying the study. This programme evaluation used a quasi-experimental one group pre-test/post-test design. Participants were nurses working in a neonatal intensive care unit. Data were collected by self-administered questionnaires. Significantly higher post-test scores were observed for knowledge and for a variety of theoretical constructs. The results of this study showed the potential of such training programmes to help nurses implement developmental care.

  13. REBOUND: A Media-Based Life Skills and Risk Education Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kröninger-Jungaberle, Henrik; Nagy, Ede; von Heyden, Maximilian; DuBois, Fletcher

    2015-01-01

    Background: REBOUND is a novel media-based life skills and risk education programme developed for 14- to 25-year olds in school, university or youth group settings. This paper outlines the programme's rationale, curriculum and implementation. It provides information of relevance to researchers, programme developers and policymakers. Methods/design…

  14. Collaborative Doctoral Programmes: Employer Engagement, Knowledge Mediation and Skills for Innovation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kitagawa, Fumi

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates forms of collaborative doctoral programmes that enable employer engagement in innovation and skills development. Collaborative doctoral programmes exist in different national contexts for the development of the science and technology human capital. Such programmes are also seen as policy tools that enhance relationships…

  15. Workforce Skills Development and Engagement in Training through Skill Sets: Literature Review. Occasional Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, John; Bowman, Kaye; Crean, David; Ranshaw, Danielle

    2012-01-01

    This literature review examines the available research on skill sets. It provides background for a larger research project "Workforce skills development and engagement in training through skill sets," the report of which will be released early next year. This paper outlines the origin of skill sets and explains the difference between skill sets…

  16. An economic analysis of midwifery training programmes in South Kalimantan, Indonesia.

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Damian; McDermott, Jeanne M.; Fox-Rushby, Julia; Tanjung, Marwan; Nadjib, Mardiati; Widiatmoko, Dono; Achadi, Endang

    2002-01-01

    In order to improve the knowledge and skills of midwives at health facilities and those based in villages in South Kalimantan, Indonesia, three in-service training programmes were carried out during 1995-98. A scheme used for both facility and village midwives included training at training centres, peer review and continuing education. One restricted to village midwives involved an internship programme in district hospitals. The incremental cost-effectiveness of these programmes was assessed from the standpoint of the health care provider. It was estimated that the first scheme could be expanded to increase the number of competent midwives based in facilities and villages in South Kalimantan by 1% at incremental costs of US$ 764.6 and US$ 1175.7 respectively, and that replication beyond South Kalimantan could increase the number of competent midwives based in facilities and villages by 1% at incremental costs of US$ 1225.5 and US$ 1786.4 per midwife respectively. It was also estimated that the number of competent village midwives could be increased by 1% at an incremental cost of US$ 898.1 per intern if replicated elsewhere, and at a cost of US$ 146.2 per intern for expanding the scheme in South Kalimantan. It was not clear whether the training programmes were more or less cost-effective than other safe motherhood interventions because the nature of the outcome measures hindered comparison. PMID:11884973

  17. Training Blind and Visually Handicapped Computer Programmers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charlston, Stewart E.; And Others

    The state of California and System Development Corporation have developed, implemented, and evaluated a training program in computer programing for the blind and visually impaired. Students are selected according to general aptitude, interests, general intelligence, previous educational achievement, health, and personal qualities. The eight-month…

  18. Social Skills Training. What Works Clearinghouse Intervention Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2013

    2013-01-01

    "Social skills training" is not a specific curriculum, but rather a collection of practices that use a behavioral approach for teaching preschool children age-appropriate social skills and competencies, including communication, problem solving, decision making, self-management, and peer relations. "Social skills training" can occur in both regular…

  19. Overcoming Barriers to Skills Training in Borderline Personality Disorder: A Qualitative Interview Study

    PubMed Central

    Barnicot, Kirsten; Couldrey, Laura; Sandhu, Sima; Priebe, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Despite evidence suggesting that skills training is an important mechanism of change in dialectical behaviour therapy, little research exploring facilitators and barriers to this process has been conducted. The study aimed to explore clients’ experiences of barriers to dialectical behaviour therapy skills training and how they felt they overcame these barriers, and to compare experiences between treatment completers and dropouts. In-depth qualitative interviews were conducted with 40 clients with borderline personality disorder who had attended a dialectical behaviour therapy programme. A thematic analysis of participants’ reported experiences found that key barriers to learning the skills were anxiety during the skills groups and difficulty understanding the material. Key barriers to using the skills were overwhelming emotions which left participants feeling unable or unwilling to use them. Key ways in which participants reported overcoming barriers to skills training were by sustaining their commitment to attending therapy and practising the skills, personalising the way they used them, and practising them so often that they became an integral part of their behavioural repertoire. Participants also highlighted a number of key ways in which they were supported with their skills training by other skills group members, the group therapists, their individual therapist, friends and family. Treatment dropouts were more likely than completers to describe anxiety during the skills groups as a barrier to learning, and were less likely to report overcoming barriers to skills training via the key processes outlined above. The findings of this qualitative study require replication, but could be used to generate hypotheses for testing in further research on barriers to skills training, how these relate to dropout, and how they can be overcome. The paper outlines several such suggestions for further research. PMID:26465757

  20. Overcoming Barriers to Skills Training in Borderline Personality Disorder: A Qualitative Interview Study.

    PubMed

    Barnicot, Kirsten; Couldrey, Laura; Sandhu, Sima; Priebe, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Despite evidence suggesting that skills training is an important mechanism of change in dialectical behaviour therapy, little research exploring facilitators and barriers to this process has been conducted. The study aimed to explore clients' experiences of barriers to dialectical behaviour therapy skills training and how they felt they overcame these barriers, and to compare experiences between treatment completers and dropouts. In-depth qualitative interviews were conducted with 40 clients with borderline personality disorder who had attended a dialectical behaviour therapy programme. A thematic analysis of participants' reported experiences found that key barriers to learning the skills were anxiety during the skills groups and difficulty understanding the material. Key barriers to using the skills were overwhelming emotions which left participants feeling unable or unwilling to use them. Key ways in which participants reported overcoming barriers to skills training were by sustaining their commitment to attending therapy and practising the skills, personalising the way they used them, and practising them so often that they became an integral part of their behavioural repertoire. Participants also highlighted a number of key ways in which they were supported with their skills training by other skills group members, the group therapists, their individual therapist, friends and family. Treatment dropouts were more likely than completers to describe anxiety during the skills groups as a barrier to learning, and were less likely to report overcoming barriers to skills training via the key processes outlined above. The findings of this qualitative study require replication, but could be used to generate hypotheses for testing in further research on barriers to skills training, how these relate to dropout, and how they can be overcome. The paper outlines several such suggestions for further research.

  1. Overcoming Barriers to Skills Training in Borderline Personality Disorder: A Qualitative Interview Study.

    PubMed

    Barnicot, Kirsten; Couldrey, Laura; Sandhu, Sima; Priebe, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Despite evidence suggesting that skills training is an important mechanism of change in dialectical behaviour therapy, little research exploring facilitators and barriers to this process has been conducted. The study aimed to explore clients' experiences of barriers to dialectical behaviour therapy skills training and how they felt they overcame these barriers, and to compare experiences between treatment completers and dropouts. In-depth qualitative interviews were conducted with 40 clients with borderline personality disorder who had attended a dialectical behaviour therapy programme. A thematic analysis of participants' reported experiences found that key barriers to learning the skills were anxiety during the skills groups and difficulty understanding the material. Key barriers to using the skills were overwhelming emotions which left participants feeling unable or unwilling to use them. Key ways in which participants reported overcoming barriers to skills training were by sustaining their commitment to attending therapy and practising the skills, personalising the way they used them, and practising them so often that they became an integral part of their behavioural repertoire. Participants also highlighted a number of key ways in which they were supported with their skills training by other skills group members, the group therapists, their individual therapist, friends and family. Treatment dropouts were more likely than completers to describe anxiety during the skills groups as a barrier to learning, and were less likely to report overcoming barriers to skills training via the key processes outlined above. The findings of this qualitative study require replication, but could be used to generate hypotheses for testing in further research on barriers to skills training, how these relate to dropout, and how they can be overcome. The paper outlines several such suggestions for further research. PMID:26465757

  2. Integrating Research Skills Training into Non--Research Methods Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woolf, Jules

    2014-01-01

    Research skills are a valued commodity by industry and university administrators. Despite the importance placed on these skills students typically dislike taking research method courses where these skills are learned. However, training in research skills does not necessarily have to be confined to these courses. In this study participants at a…

  3. Consequences of Skill: The Case of Abacus Training in Taiwan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stigler, James W.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Studies abacus calculation to explore the development of skills and the resulting consequences. Consideration of the effects of abacus training, transfer of the skill to other tasks, and the contexts in which abacus skill develops demonstrates the multiple ways in which specific skills can contribute to cognitive development. (ETS)

  4. Programming Programmable Logic Controller. High-Technology Training Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipsky, Kevin

    This training module on programming programmable logic controllers (PLC) is part of the memory structure and programming unit used in a packaging systems equipment control course. In the course, students assemble, install, maintain, and repair industrial machinery used in industry. The module contains description, objectives, content outline,…

  5. Agricultural Development Workers Training Manual. Volume II. Extension Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menard, Peter; And Others

    This training manual, the second volume in a four-volume series of curriculum guides for use in training Peace Corps agricultural development workers, deals with extension skills. The first chapter provides suggested guidelines for setting up and carrying out the extension skills component of the agricultural development worker training series.…

  6. Evaluation of Peer Training for Teaching Abduction Prevention Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarasenko, Melissa A.; Miltenberger, Raymond G.; Brower-Breitwieser, Carrie; Bosch, Amanda

    2010-01-01

    Child abduction is a serious problem, with approximately 100 children killed each year by nonfamily abductors. Training programs to teach children the correct skills to use if they ever come into contact with a stranger can be effective when they incorporate behavioral skills training (BST) and in-situ training (IST) into their protocol. However,…

  7. Social Skills Training with Schizophrenics: A Meta-Analytic Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benton, Mary K.; Schroeder, Harold E.

    1990-01-01

    Conducted meta-analytic review of 27 studies on social skills training with schizophrenics, addressing magnitude of treatment effects relative to outcome measures, extent of generalization and maintenance of treatment effects, and impact of diagnostic clarity and training variations. Found that social skills training had strong, positive impact on…

  8. Training programme for the dissemination of climatological and meteorological applications using GIS technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Filippis, T.; di Vecchia, A.; Maracchi, G.; Sorani, F.

    2006-06-01

    IBIMET-CNR is involved in making different research projects and in managing operational programmes on national and international level and has acquired a relevant training competence to sustain partner countries and improve their methodological and operational skills by using innovative tools, such as Geographical Information Systems focused on the development of meteorological and climatological applications. Training activities are mainly addressed to National Meteorological and Hydrological Services of Partner-Countries and/or to other Specialized Centers in the frame of Cooperation Programmes promoted by the Italian Ministry of Foreign Affairs mainly in favour of the Less Developing Countries (LDC) of World Meteorological Organisation (WMO) Regional Association I (Africa). The Institute, as a branch of the WMO-Regional Meteorological Training Centre for Region VI (Europe), organizes also international training courses of high-level in Meteorology, Climatology and Remote Sensing applied to environment and agriculture fields. Moreover, considering the increasing evolution of the GIS functions for meteorological information users, IBIMET has promoted in 2005 the EU COST Action 719 Summer School on "GIS applications in meteorology and climatology''. The paper offers an overview of the main institute training programmes organised to share the results of research activities and operational projects, through the exploitation of innovative technologies and tools like GIS.

  9. Basic visual observation skills training course: Appendix A. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Toquam, J.L.; Morris, F.A.; Griggs, J.R.

    1995-06-01

    The purpose of the basic visual observation skills course is to help safeguards inspectors evaluate and improve their skills in making observations during inspections and in evaluating and interpreting this information. The first 12 hours of the course provide training in five skill areas: perception and recognition; attention to detail; memory; mental imaging, mapping, and modeling skills; and judgment and decision making. Following this training is an integrating exercise involving a simulated safeguards inspection. This report contains the course manual and materials.

  10. Evaluating Behavioral Skills Training with and without Simulated in Situ Training for Teaching Safety Skills to Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miltenberger, Raymond; Gross, Amy; Knudson, Peter; Bosch, Amanda; Jostad, Candice; Breitwieser, Carrie Brower

    2009-01-01

    This study compared the effectiveness of behavioral skills training (BST) to BST plus simulated in situ training (SIT) for teaching safety skills to children to prevent gun play. The results were evaluated in a posttest only control group design. Following the first assessment, participants in both training groups and the control group who did not…

  11. Basic visual observation skills training course: Appendix B. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Toquam, J.L.; Morris, F.A.; Griggs, J.R.

    1995-06-01

    The purpose of the basic visual observation skills course is to help safeguards inspectors evaluate and improve their skills in making observations during inspections and in evaluating and interpreting this information. The first 12 hours of the course provide training in five skill areas: perception and recognition; attention to detail; memory; mental imaging, mapping, and modeling skills; and judgment and decision making. Following this training is an integrating exercise involving a simulated safeguards inspection. This report contains the in-class exercises in the five skill areas; pre- and post-course exercises in closure, hidden figures, map memory, and mental rotations; the final examination; a training evaluation form; and the integrating exercise.

  12. The Effects of Basketball Basic Skills Training on Gross Motor Skills Development of Female Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bayazit, Betul

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of basketball basic skills training on gross motor skills development of female children in Turkey. For that purpose, 40 female children took part in the study voluntarily. Basketball basic skills test was used to improve the gross motor skills of the female children in the study. Also,…

  13. Interpersonal Skills Training I: The Nature of Skill Acquisition and Its Implications for Training Design and Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Catherine T.; Butcher, David J.

    1983-01-01

    The authors discuss the different methods of interpersonal skills training, focusing on the most commonly applied method, that of role playing used in a skills workshop context. (MEAD Subscriptions, CSML, University of Lancaster, Lancaster LA1 4YX, England) (SSH)

  14. Cost Effective Skill Training Module Development Dramatically Leveraging Knowledge and Skills Learned on the Job.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utterstrom, Jan

    1997-01-01

    Multimedia authoring packages and low cost delivery systems make it possible to produce and deliver inexpensive skill training modules. This article examines computer-based training (CBT) in the workplace; features of skill training modules; steps in their development; and delivery alternatives (CD-ROM, batch download, CD-ROM jukebox or tower,…

  15. Training a Parent in Wheelchair Skills to Improve Her Child's Wheelchair Skills: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirby, R. Lee; Smith, Cher; Billard, Jessica L.; Irving, Jenny D. H.; Pitts, Janice E.; White, Rebecca S.

    2010-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that training a parent in wheelchair-user and caregiver wheelchair skills would improve the child's wheelchair skills. We studied an 11-year-old girl with spina bifida and her mother. The mother received 4 training sessions averaging 42.5 minutes per session, over a period of 3 weeks. The total pre-training and, 4 weeks…

  16. Evaluation of Behavioral Skills Training for Teaching Abduction-Prevention Skills to Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Brigitte M.; Miltenberger, Raymond G.; Egemo-Helm, Kristin; Jostad, Candice M.; Flessner, Christopher; Gatheridge, Brian

    2005-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of individual behavioral skills training in conjunction with in situ training in teaching 13 preschool children abduction prevention skills. Children's performance was measured during baseline, training, and at 2-week, 1-month, and 3-month follow-ups using in situ assessments in which abduction prevention…

  17. Teaching and Assessing Communication Skills in Medical Undergraduate Training.

    PubMed

    Modi, Jyoti Nath; Anshu, -; Chhatwal, Jugesh; Gupta, Piyush; Singh, Tejinder

    2016-06-01

    Good communication skills are essential for an optimal doctor-patient relationship, and also contribute to improved health outcomes. Although the need for training in communication skills is stated as a requirement in the 1997 Graduate Medical Education Regulations of the Medical Council of India, formal training in these skills has been fragmentary and non-uniform in most Indian curricula. The Vision 2015 document of the Medical Council of India reaffirms the need to include training in communication skills in the MBBS curriculum. Training in communication skills needs approaches which are different from that of teaching other clinical subjects. It is also a challenge to ensure that students not only imbibe the nuances of communication and interpersonal skills, but adhere to them throughout their careers. This article addresses the possible ways of standardizing teaching and assessment of communication skills and integrating them into the existing curriculum. PMID:27376604

  18. Teaching and Assessing Communication Skills in Medical Undergraduate Training.

    PubMed

    Modi, Jyoti Nath; Anshu, -; Chhatwal, Jugesh; Gupta, Piyush; Singh, Tejinder

    2016-06-01

    Good communication skills are essential for an optimal doctor-patient relationship, and also contribute to improved health outcomes. Although the need for training in communication skills is stated as a requirement in the 1997 Graduate Medical Education Regulations of the Medical Council of India, formal training in these skills has been fragmentary and non-uniform in most Indian curricula. The Vision 2015 document of the Medical Council of India reaffirms the need to include training in communication skills in the MBBS curriculum. Training in communication skills needs approaches which are different from that of teaching other clinical subjects. It is also a challenge to ensure that students not only imbibe the nuances of communication and interpersonal skills, but adhere to them throughout their careers. This article addresses the possible ways of standardizing teaching and assessment of communication skills and integrating them into the existing curriculum.

  19. Evaluation of behavioral skills training for teaching abduction-prevention skills to young children.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Brigitte M; Miltenberger, Raymond G; Egemo-Helm, Kristin; Jostad, Candice M; Flessner, Christopher; Gatheridge, Brian

    2005-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of individual behavioral skills training in conjunction with in situ training in teaching 13 preschool children abduction prevention skills. Children's performance was measured during baseline, training, and at 2-week, 1-month, and 3-month follow-ups using in situ assessments in which abduction prevention skills were measured in naturalistic settings. Results revealed that all the children learned the skills and all the children available at the 2-week and 1-month follow-ups maintained the skills at criterion level. All but 3 children's criterion-level performances were maintained at the 3-month follow-up as well.

  20. Social Skills Training in Correctional Treatment: An Educational Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodrick, David D.; Reed, Thomas

    The authors describe the utilization of psychological methods in training or retraining of prison guards/staff who engaged in an action project with prisoners. Social skills training, behavioral training and effective living approaches are described as they may be integrated into training of persons who work with inmates of correctional…

  1. Enhancing Teachers' Counselling Skills: Student Teachers' Views on a Teachers' Education Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doikou, Maro; Diamandidou, Konstantina

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this small-scale study is to investigate the outcomes of a brief teacher education programme by exploring student teachers' views. The teacher education programme aimed to provide teachers with the opportunity to develop qualities and skills that facilitate communication and to enhance teachers' competence to apply social and…

  2. Understanding Learning Transfer in Employment Preparation Programmes for Adults with Low Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Maurice C.; Ayala, Gabriel E.; Pinsent-Johnson, Christine

    2009-01-01

    This Canadian study investigated how the transfer of learning occurred in an employment preparation programme for adults with low literacy skills using a multi-site case study research design. Four different programmes involving trainees, instructors and workplace supervisors participated in the investigation. Results indicated that the transfer…

  3. What's the Buzz? A Social Skills Enrichment Programme for Primary Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Le Messurier, Mark; Parker, Madhavi Nawana

    2011-01-01

    Some children, for all manner of reasons, struggle to make friends and fit in socially. "What's the Buzz?" is a unique sixteen-lesson social skills enrichment programme designed to explicitly teach children how to think and relate to others in social situations. This lively, highly practical role-play and play-based programme targets everyday…

  4. Training High Performance Skills: Fallacies and Guidelines. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Walter

    High performance skills are defined as ones: (1) which require over 100 hours of training, (2) in which a substantial number of individuals fail to develop proficiency, and (3) in which the performance of the expert is qualitatively different from that of the novice. Training programs for developing high performance skills are often based on…

  5. Opinions of Counselor Candidates Regarding Counseling Skills Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aladag, Mine; Yaka, Baris; Koç, Ismet

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to contribute to the enhancement of the quality of counseling skills training and counselor education through the medium of understanding the opinions of counselor candidates regarding counseling skills training. The research group consisted of 67 counselor candidates who voluntarily participated in the study. The research…

  6. Short Term Skill Training. Alternative Approaches. Information Series No. 222.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paulsen, Russell

    Short term skill training programs are those programs, usually one year or less, designed to train, retrain, or upgrade the skills of workers. Such programs provide an opportunity for postsecondary vocational institutions to respond to the human resource needs of their communities. A number of important policy issues are involved in the provision…

  7. Effectiveness of Mobile Learning on Athletic Training Psychomotor Skill Acquisition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davie, Emily; Martin, Malissa; Cuppett, Micki; Lebsack, Denise

    2015-01-01

    Context: Instruction of psychomotor skills is an important component of athletic training education. Accommodating the varied learning abilities and preferences of athletic training students can be challenging for an instructor initiating skill acquisition in a traditional face-to-face (F2F) environment. Video instruction available on mobile…

  8. Determining Factors of Students' Satisfaction with Malaysian Skills Training Institutes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ibrahim, Mohd Zuhdi; Ab Rahman, Mohd Nizam; Yasin, Ruhizan M.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine students' perception of quality of service offered in Malaysian skills training institutes and how it influences overall satisfaction. This study employed a questionnaire survey involving seven skills training institutes in Klang Valley, Malaysia. From 600 questionnaires distributed, 419 were returned (69.8…

  9. Improving Communicative Competence: Validation of a Social Skills Training Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawson, Pamela J.; Spitzberg, Brian H.

    The effectiveness of a social skills training workshop was assessed by comparing the rated competence of participants in an Interpersonal Skills Training Program to the rated competence of nonparticipants. Subjects' self-ratings were included. This comparison was operationalized through a pretest-posttest design with 12 experimental and 22 control…

  10. Neuroplasticity-Based Cognitive and Linguistic Skills Training Improves Reading and Writing Skills in College Students

    PubMed Central

    Rogowsky, Beth A.; Papamichalis, Pericles; Villa, Laura; Heim, Sabine; Tallal, Paula

    2013-01-01

    This study reports an evaluation of the effect of computer-based cognitive and linguistic training on college students’ reading and writing skills. The computer-based training included a series of increasingly challenging software programs that were designed to strengthen students’ foundational cognitive skills (memory, attention span, processing speed, and sequencing) in the context of listening and higher level reading tasks. Twenty-five college students (12 native English language; 13 English Second Language), who demonstrated poor writing skills, participated in the training group. The training group received daily training during the spring semester (11 weeks) with the Fast ForWord Literacy (FFW-L) and upper levels of the Fast ForWord Reading series (Levels 3–5). The comparison group (n = 28) selected from the general college population did not receive training. Both the training and comparison groups attended the same university. All students took the Gates MacGinitie Reading Test (GMRT) and the Oral and Written Language Scales (OWLS) Written Expression Scale at the beginning (Time 1) and end (Time 2) of the spring college semester. Results from this study showed that the training group made a statistically greater improvement from Time 1 to Time 2 in both their reading skills and their writing skills than the comparison group. The group who received training began with statistically lower writing skills before training, but exceeded the writing skills of the comparison group after training. PMID:23533100

  11. Neuroplasticity-based cognitive and linguistic skills training improves reading and writing skills in college students.

    PubMed

    Rogowsky, Beth A; Papamichalis, Pericles; Villa, Laura; Heim, Sabine; Tallal, Paula

    2013-01-01

    This study reports an evaluation of the effect of computer-based cognitive and linguistic training on college students' reading and writing skills. The computer-based training included a series of increasingly challenging software programs that were designed to strengthen students' foundational cognitive skills (memory, attention span, processing speed, and sequencing) in the context of listening and higher level reading tasks. Twenty-five college students (12 native English language; 13 English Second Language), who demonstrated poor writing skills, participated in the training group. The training group received daily training during the spring semester (11 weeks) with the Fast ForWord Literacy (FFW-L) and upper levels of the Fast ForWord Reading series (Levels 3-5). The comparison group (n = 28) selected from the general college population did not receive training. Both the training and comparison groups attended the same university. All students took the Gates MacGinitie Reading Test (GMRT) and the Oral and Written Language Scales (OWLS) Written Expression Scale at the beginning (Time 1) and end (Time 2) of the spring college semester. Results from this study showed that the training group made a statistically greater improvement from Time 1 to Time 2 in both their reading skills and their writing skills than the comparison group. The group who received training began with statistically lower writing skills before training, but exceeded the writing skills of the comparison group after training.

  12. Generic Skills in Vocational Education and Training: Research Readings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibb, Jennifer, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    Possessing generic or employability skills is vital in the current labour market. The vocational education and training (VET) sector, like other education sectors, must ensure its clients gain and develop generic skills. This volume of readings summarises NCVER managed research into generic skills undertaken in 2001 and 2002. The work covers four…

  13. Social skills training with mildly retarded young adults.

    PubMed

    Meredith, R L; Saxon, S; Doleys, D M; Kyzer, B

    1980-10-01

    Described a social skills assessment and training model for use with mildly retarded young adults (N = 20). The assessment procedure examined social behavior in three types of social situations (e.g., conversational situation, cooperative task and assertive situation) with both male and female respondents. Group behavioral social skills training was compared with a no treatment control condition using various dependent measures collected in the in-vivo social situations. Group behavioral social skills training was more effective than the control condition in increasing positive social behavior, attention to the transaction, and degree of empathy. It was also more effective than a control condition in decreasing negative social skill behavior. A situation effect also was observed, which suggests a need for more focus on particular social skills and a need to address issues of generalization. A comprehensive social skills assessment and training model is discussed. PMID:7440726

  14. Assessment and Teaching of Science Skills: Whole of Programme Perceptions of Graduating Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodgson, Yvonne; Varsavsky, Cristina; Matthews, Kelly E.

    2014-01-01

    This study reports on science student perceptions of their skills (scientific knowledge, oral communication, scientific writing, quantitative skills, teamwork and ethical thinking) as they approach graduation. The focus is on which teaching activities and assessment tasks over the whole programme of study students thought utilised each of the six…

  15. Implicit, Stand-Alone or Integrated Skills Education for Undergraduates: A Longitudinal Analysis of Programme Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacVaugh, Jason; Jones, Anna; Auty, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports the findings of a longitudinal investigation into the effectiveness of skills education programmes within business and management undergraduate degree courses. During the period between 2005 and 2011, a large business school in the south-west of England was developed and implemented two distinct approaches to skills education.…

  16. Creating capacity through partnership: a palliative care skills development programme.

    PubMed

    Kelsall, Kay; Brennan, Ebony; Cole, Teresa

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents the development and implementation of a recurrently funded, rolling, 6-month palliative care secondment programme for NHS community staff nurses based in a rural health economy in Southwest England. The programme is a key tool in a wider development plan for improving access to, and the quality of, palliative and end-of-life care for a dispersed rural population. This is part of a much bigger programme of integration to meet the shared challenges of service capacity, equity, and sustainability that are presented by the geographical and demographical profile of the locality. The 'bigger picture' is defined and set in the context of the national drive and evidence base for integration in order to explain the reasons behind the secondment programme. This is followed by outlining the iterative process of design and implementation--the 'what?' and 'how?'--and key learning points to date are shared.

  17. An Evaluation of Computerized Behavioral Skills Training to Teach Safety Skills to Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanselow, Nicholas R.; Hanley, Gregory P.

    2014-01-01

    Previous research has demonstrated the efficacy of behavioral skills training (BST) and in situ training (IST) for teaching children to protect themselves. However, BST may be resource intensive and difficult to implement on a large scale. We evaluated a computerized version of BST (CBST) to teach safety skills and determined the extent to which…

  18. Generalization of Social Skills: Strategies and Results of a Training Program in Problem Solving Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paraschiv, Irina; Olley, J. Gregory

    This paper describes the "Problem Solving for Life" training program which trains adolescents and adults with mental retardation in skills for solving social problems. The program requires group participants to solve social problems by practicing two prerequisite skills (relaxation and positive self-statements) and four problem solving steps: (1)…

  19. Social Skills and Peer Acceptance: Effects of a Social Learning Method for Training Verbal Social Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ladd, Gary W.

    The purpose of this study was to see if a social learning method for training verbal social skills might influence the social effectiveness of third grade children with low peer acceptance. Children were trained in three verbal skills: asking questions of peers; leading peers (e.g., offering useful suggestions or directions); and, offering…

  20. The Skilled Counselor Training Model: Skills Acquisition, Self-Assessment, and Cognitive Complexity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little, Cassandra; Packman, Jill; Smaby, Marlowe H.; Maddux, Cleborne D.

    2005-01-01

    The authors evaluated the effectiveness of the Skilled Counselor Training Model (SCTM; M. H. Smaby, C. D. Maddux, E. Torres-Rivera, & R. Zimmick, 1999) in teaching counseling skills and in fostering counselor cognitive complexity. Counselor trainees who completed the SCTM had better counseling skills and higher levels of cognitive complexity than…

  1. Practical Clinical Training in Skills Labs: Theory and Practice.

    PubMed

    Bugaj, T J; Nikendei, C

    2016-01-01

    Today, skills laboratories or "skills labs", i.e. specific practical skill training facilities, are a firmly established part of medical education offering the possibility of training clinical procedures in a safe and fault-forging environment prior to real life application at bedside or in the operating room. Skills lab training follows a structured teaching concept, takes place under supervision and in consideration of methodological-didactic concepts, ideally creating an atmosphere that allows the repeated, anxiety- and risk-free practice of targeted skills. In this selective literature review, the first section is devoted to (I) the development and dissemination of the skills lab concept. There follows (II) an outline of the underlying idea and (III) an analysis of key efficacy factors. Thereafter, (IV) the training method's effectiveness and transference are illuminated, before (V) the use of student tutors, in the sense of peer-assisted-learning, in skills labs is discussed separately. Finally, (VI) the efficiency of the skills lab concept is analyzed, followed by an outlook on future developments and trends in the field of skills lab training. PMID:27579363

  2. Practical Clinical Training in Skills Labs: Theory and Practice

    PubMed Central

    Bugaj, T. J.; Nikendei, C.

    2016-01-01

    Today, skills laboratories or “skills labs”, i.e. specific practical skill training facilities, are a firmly established part of medical education offering the possibility of training clinical procedures in a safe and fault-forging environment prior to real life application at bedside or in the operating room. Skills lab training follows a structured teaching concept, takes place under supervision and in consideration of methodological-didactic concepts, ideally creating an atmosphere that allows the repeated, anxiety- and risk-free practice of targeted skills. In this selective literature review, the first section is devoted to (I) the development and dissemination of the skills lab concept. There follows (II) an outline of the underlying idea and (III) an analysis of key efficacy factors. Thereafter, (IV) the training method’s effectiveness and transference are illuminated, before (V) the use of student tutors, in the sense of peer-assisted-learning, in skills labs is discussed separately. Finally, (VI) the efficiency of the skills lab concept is analyzed, followed by an outlook on future developments and trends in the field of skills lab training. PMID:27579363

  3. Basic visual observation skills training course. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Toquam, J.L.; Morris, F.A.; Griggs, J.R.

    1995-06-01

    This is the third report in a series prepared to assist the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA or Agency) in enhancing the effectiveness of its international safeguards inspections through inspector training in Observation Skills. The first report (Phase 1) was essentially exploratory. It defined Observation Skills` broadly to include all appropriate cognitive, communications, and interpersonal techniques that have the potential to help IAEA safeguards inspectors function more effectively. The second report (Phase 2) provided a more specific basis for the actual design and delivery of Observation Skills training to IAEA inspectors. The present report (Phase 3) documents the design of a Basic Visual Observation Skills course and delivery of the course to safeguards inspectors at IAEA Headquarters Vienna in February and May of 1995. The purpose of the course is to help safeguards inspectors evaluate and improve their skills in making observations during inspections and in evaluating and interpreting this information. The course is basic in the sense that it provides training in skills which are generally applicable to inspections of all types of facilities and activities subject to safeguards. The course is designed for 16 hours of classroom delivery, ideally in four 4-hour sessions over a period of four days. The first 12 hours provide training in five skill areas: perception and recognition; attention and attention to detail; memory; mental imaging, mapping, and modeling skills; and judgment and decision making. Following the training in each of the five skill areas is an Integrating Exercise involving a simulated safeguards inspection.

  4. Helping While Learning: A Skilled Group Helper Training Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smaby, Marlowe H.; Tamminen, Armas W.

    1983-01-01

    Describes a developmental group training workshop for training experienced counselors to do group counseling. Discusses stages of training including exploration, understanding, and action, which can help counselors learn helping skills for counseling that can often transfer to their own interpersonal lives and interactions with others. (JAC)

  5. An Evaluation of Supervisory Skills to Determine Training Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Claycombe, W. W.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Tennessee's Department of Public Health supervisors found their training insufficient; a study, employing a package approach including subordinates' ratings, located strengths and weaknesses in supervisory skills, providing a base for developing specialized training courses. Conclusions supported supervisors' perception: they require training in…

  6. Effects of Skill Training on Working Memory Capacity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Yuh-shiow; Lu, Min-ju; Ko, Hsiu-ping

    2007-01-01

    In this study we examined the effects of skill training, in particular mental abacus and music training, on working memory. Two groups of participants--children who had received mental abacus training and their controls--participated in Experiment 1. All participants performed the following span tasks: forward digit span, backward digit span,…

  7. Role-playing for more realistic technical skills training.

    PubMed

    Nikendei, C; Zeuch, A; Dieckmann, P; Roth, C; Schäfer, S; Völkl, M; Schellberg, D; Herzog, W; Jünger, J

    2005-03-01

    Clinical skills are an important and necessary part of clinical competence. Simulation plays an important role in many fields of medical education. Although role-playing is common in communication training, there are no reports about the use of student role-plays in the training of technical clinical skills. This article describes an educational intervention with analysis of pre- and post-intervention self-selected student survey evaluations. After one term of skills training, a thorough evaluation showed that the skills-lab training did not seem very realistic nor was it very demanding for trainees. To create a more realistic training situation and to enhance students' involvement, case studies and role-plays with defined roles for students (i.e. intern, senior consultant) were introduced into half of the sessions. Results of the evaluation in the second term showed that sessions with role-playing were rated significantly higher than sessions without role-playing.

  8. Utilising Multimedia ESP Programme in Enhancing Flight Attendants' Safety Knowledge and Problem Solving Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bani-Salameh, Zakaria A.; Kabilan, Muhammad K.; Bani-Salalmeh, Lina

    2011-01-01

    A multimedia English for Specific Purposes (ESP) programme was developed to train flight attendants. The programme comprised of two units. Unit one is listening comprehension, which provides the flight attendants' with specific information of Airbus A340. Unit two is reading comprehension, which provides the flight attendants with the emergency…

  9. Trainees' experiences of a four-year programme for specialty training in general practice.

    PubMed

    Capewell, Sarah; Stewart, Kirsty; Bowie, Paul; Kelly, Moya

    2014-01-01

    In 2012 the first Scottish cohort of trainees completed a four-year training programme in general practice. In the same year, the Royal College of General Practitioners (RCGP) successfully made the educational case for lengthening training from three to four years in the rest of the UK. This project sought to evaluate the experiences of the initial four-year cohorts (2012 and 2013) to gain the Certificate of Completion of Training (CCT). We aimed to capture trainees' experiences of the training programme and how well it prepared them for independent general practice. We also investigated whether perceived levels of clinical confidence in key areas of the curriculum improved over time. To achieve this we undertook a cross-sectional online questionnaire survey. Open-ended questions were included to elicit more in-depth responses by participants on all issues. A total of 20/49 trainees in 2012 (40%) and 46/50 trainees in 2013 (92%) completed the survey. Perceived mean levels of clinical confidence in the key curriculum domains surveyed in 2012/13 were generally high, particularly in clinical domains or topics such as cancer management (94%) and paediatrics (94%). It was lowest in non-clinical domains such as GP partnership (57%), practice management (68%) and leadership (65%), but also in some skills specific to general practice that are of importance where healthcare delivery is increasingly community-based such as public health (63%) and caring for the long-term unemployed (33%). This small study will inform the implementation of an integrated, community-based model of training to enable GP trainees to achieve the clinical and generalist skills required in the immediate future.

  10. TRAINING COMMUNITY VOLUTEERS IN PREVENTING ALCOHOLISM AND DRUG ADDICTION : A BASIC PROGRAMME AND ITS IMPACT ON CERTAIN VARIABLES

    PubMed Central

    Manickam, L.S.S.

    1997-01-01

    A study was conducted on 19 community volunteers and the training module they underwent is presented. The subjects were given 7 days in-training with the objectives of imparting knowledge ana skill to identify and motivate alcohol and drug dependent person, to motivate them and their family to seek treatment to provide social support to them and to organise prevention programmes in the community. Their knowledge, skills and attitudes have shown significant improvement and change as a result to training. Extraversion was found to be significantly related to change in all the above variables, psychoticism was related to attitude and self-esteem was related to improvement in skills. Need for under taking further research in this area is also emphasized. PMID:21584078

  11. Training for Skill in Fault Diagnosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, J. D.

    1974-01-01

    The Knitting, Lace and Net Industry Training Board has developed a training innovation called fault diagnosis training. The entire training process concentrates on teaching based on the experiences of troubleshooters or any other employees whose main tasks involve fault diagnosis and rectification. (Author/DS)

  12. Clerkship maturity: Does the idea of training clinical skills work?

    PubMed Central

    Stosch, Christoph; Joachim, Alexander; Ascher, Johannes

    2011-01-01

    Background: With the reformed curriculum “4C”, the Medical Faculty of the University of Cologne has started to systematically plan practical skills training, for which Clerkship Maturity is the first step. The key guidelines along which the curriculum was development were developed by experts. This approach has now been validated. Materials and methods: Both students and teachers were asked to fill in a questionnaire regarding preclinical practical skills training to confirm the concept of Clerkship Maturity. Results and discussion: The Cologne training program Clerkship Maturity can be validated empirically overall through the activities of the students awaiting the clerkship framework and through the evaluation by the medical staff providing the training. The subjective ratings of the advantages of the training by the students leave room for improvement. Apart from minor improvements to the program, the most likely solution providing sustainable results will involve an over-regional strategy for establishing skills training planned as part of the curriculum. PMID:21866243

  13. Teaching Safety Skills to Children to Prevent Gun Play: An Evaluation of in Situ Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miltenberger, Raymond G.; Gatheridge, Brian J.; Satterlund, Melisa; Egemo-Helm, Kristin R.; Johnson, Brigitte M.; Jostad, Candice; Kelso, Pamela; Flessner, Christopher A.

    2005-01-01

    This study evaluated behavioral skills training with added in situ training for teaching safety skills to prevent gun play. Following baseline, each child received two sessions of behavioral skills training and one in situ training session. Additional in situ training sessions were conducted until the child exhibited the safety skills (don't touch…

  14. Adolescent pregnancy: an interpersonal skill training approach to prevention.

    PubMed

    Schinke, S P; Gilchrist, L D

    1977-01-01

    The research literature reports numerous negative consequences of adolescent pregnancy. Unfortunately, contemporary approaches to preventing teenage pregnancies have been largely unsuccessful. Recent evidence, however, suggests that interpersonal communication skill training may represent an important step in helping adolescents deal with their sexual and contraceptive behavior. This describes a pilot study of an interpersonal skill training model for sexually active inner-city teenagers. Results show that this training model is a feasible and attractive approach to modifying the youths' communication patterns. Findings indicate that such training is a fruitful direction for future pregnancy prevention research with the adolescent target population.

  15. Planning Skills. High-Technology Training Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vobejda, Allen

    This module on planning skills contains the product development unit in a manufacturing course for grades 10, 11, and 12. The module helps students develop thinking, communication, and problem-solving skills and acquire knowledge relating to creation, retrieval, and use of information found on common project plans. The content outline includes the…

  16. Incorporating a Movement Skill Programme into a Preschool Daily Schedule

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vidoni, Carla; Lorenz, Douglas J.; de Paleville, Daniela Terson

    2014-01-01

    Children's participation in physical activity is a leading health indicator to combat obesity and sedentary lifestyles. The challenge to battle this problem is placed in the hands of early childhood educators. However, there is little evidence that early childhood educators have the skills and knowledge to design and implement appropriate…

  17. Computer Skills Training and Readiness to Work with Computers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mor, Dalit; Laks, Hagar; Hershkovitz, Arnon

    2016-01-01

    In today's job market, computer skills are part of the prerequisites for many jobs. In this paper, we report on a study of readiness to work with computers (the dependent variable) among unemployed women (N = 54) after participating in a unique, web-supported training focused on computer skills and empowerment. Overall, the level of participants'…

  18. Mental Skills Training Experience of NCAA Division II Softball Catchers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norman, Shannon

    2012-01-01

    Athletes competing at all levels of sport are constantly working on ways to enhance their physical performance. Sport psychology research insists there are higher performance results among athletes who incorporate mental skills training into their practice and competition settings. In order to use the mental skills strategies effectively, athletes…

  19. Links between Early Rhythm Skills, Musical Training, and Phonological Awareness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moritz, Catherine; Yampolsky, Sasha; Papadelis, Georgios; Thomson, Jennifer; Wolf, Maryanne

    2013-01-01

    A small number of studies show that music training is associated with improvements in reading or in its component skills. A central question underlying this present research is whether musical activity can enhance the acquisition of reading skill, potentially before formal reading instruction begins. We explored two dimensions of this question: an…

  20. Survival Skills. Pre-Apprenticeship Phase 2 Training. Instructors Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane Community Coll., Eugene, OR.

    This instructor's guide contains the 43 Survival Skills modules developed for Pre-Apprenticeship Phase 2 Training. Introductory materials include a description of components of the pre-apprenticeship project, recommendations for module implementation, and synopses of the modules that were developed to prompt social skills development. Each module…

  1. Perceptions of Safety Knowledge and Skills in Vocational Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bani-Salameh, Zakaria

    2016-01-01

    This research aims at investigating the perceptions towards safety knowledge and skills and perceived efficacies among flight attendants onboard. Many studies have reported deficiencies in vocational training among flight attendants to handle specific onboard emergencies, but these findings are not surprising as knowledge and skills that are not…

  2. Training and assessment of laparoscopic skills using a haptic simulator.

    PubMed

    Rolfsson, Göran; Nordgren, Anna; Bindzau, Stefan; Hagström, J-P; McLaughlin, John; Thurfjell, Lennart

    2002-01-01

    Surgical simulation is a promising technique for training of laparoscopic surgery. Computer based simulation provides not only a cost effective alternative to traditional training but also a way to assess the surgeons performance. In this paper, we present a haptic simulator that allows for training and assessment of basic laparoscopic skills. The skills trained are modeled around a cholecystectomy procedure and include bi-manual dissection, clips setting, catheter insertion and cutting. The system uses accurate anatomic models of the organs involved in the procedure. This combined with effective methods for soft tissue deformation and haptic feedback, giving the surgeon a precise feeling of the interaction between organs and surgical instruments, provides a realistic training environment. The system has been designed with procedural training in mind and by putting together the individual tasks it will be possible to train on performing a complete cholecystectomy procedure. PMID:15458123

  3. Music training for the development of reading skills.

    PubMed

    Tierney, Adam; Kraus, Nina

    2013-01-01

    The beneficial effects of musical training are not limited to enhancement of musical skills, but extend to language skills. Here, we review evidence that musical training can enhance reading ability. First, we discuss five subskills underlying reading acquisition-phonological awareness, speech-in-noise perception, rhythm perception, auditory working memory, and the ability to learn sound patterns-and show that each is linked to music experience. We link these five subskills through a unifying biological framework, positing that they share a reliance on auditory neural synchrony. After laying this theoretical groundwork for why musical training might be expected to enhance reading skills, we review the results of longitudinal studies providing evidence for a role for musical training in enhancing language abilities. Taken as a whole, these findings suggest that musical training can provide an effective developmental educational strategy for all children, including those with language learning impairments.

  4. Communication skills training for paraprofessional helpers.

    PubMed

    Avery, A W

    1978-12-01

    The purpose of the present study was to develop and evaluate a training program for paraprofessional helpers. Twenty dormitory counselor candidates were given 20 hours of communication training while 15 other candidates were given no training. The results indicated that the trained subjects demonstrated significantly higher levels of empathy than the untrained subjects and that they maintained their level of empathy after 6 months. Results are discussed in terms of the lasting effects of the training program and the advantages of being able to use trainers with only limited experience. PMID:736009

  5. Training healthcare professionals as moral case deliberation facilitators: evaluation of a Dutch training programme.

    PubMed

    Plantinga, Mirjam; Molewijk, Bert; de Bree, Menno; Moraal, Marloes; Verkerk, Marian; Widdershoven, Guy A M

    2012-10-01

    Until recently, moral case deliberation (MCD) sessions have mostly been facilitated by external experts, mainly professional ethicists. We have developed a train the facilitator programme for healthcare professionals aimed at providing them with the competences needed for being an MCD facilitator. In this paper, we present the first results of a study in which we evaluated the programme. We used a mixed methods design. One hundred and twenty trained healthcare professionals and five trainers from 16 training groups working in different healthcare organisations throughout the Netherlands were included. After completion of the programme, participants feel sufficiently confident and equipped to facilitate an MCD session. Feeling competent does not mean that participants have no doubts or questions left. Rather, they are aware of their limitations and see the need for continuous learning. According to the respondents, the actual exercise of facilitating MCD during and in between the training sessions contributed most to the development of competences necessary for being an MCD facilitator. Respondents without prior experience of participating in MCD sessions felt less competent after the training than those who had participated in MCD sessions before. Self-attributed competence varied between participants with different professional backgrounds.

  6. Communication Skills Training in Pediatric Oncology: Moving Beyond Role Modeling.

    PubMed

    Feraco, Angela M; Brand, Sarah R; Mack, Jennifer W; Kesselheim, Jennifer C; Block, Susan D; Wolfe, Joanne

    2016-06-01

    Communication is central to pediatric oncology care. Pediatric oncologists disclose life-threatening diagnoses, explain complicated treatment options, and endeavor to give honest prognoses, to maintain hope, to describe treatment complications, and to support families in difficult circumstances ranging from loss of function and fertility to treatment-related or disease-related death. However, parents, patients, and providers report substantial communication deficits. Poor communication outcomes may stem, in part, from insufficient communication skills training, overreliance on role modeling, and failure to utilize best practices. This review summarizes evidence for existing methods to enhance communication skills and calls for revitalizing communication skills training within pediatric oncology.

  7. Efficacy of a sports specific balance training programme on the incidence of ankle sprains in basketball.

    PubMed

    Cumps, Elke; Verhagen, Evert; Meeusen, Romain

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the efficacy of a 22- week prescribed sports specific balance training programme on the incidence of lateral ankle sprains in basketball players. A controlled clinical trial was set up. In total 54 subjects of six teams participated and were assigned to either an intervention (IG) or a control group (CG). The IG performed a prescribed balance training programme on top of their normal training routine, using balance semi-globes. The programme consisted of 4 basketball skills each session and its difficulty was progressively thought-out. The intervention lasted 22 weeks and was performed 3 times a week for 5 to 10 minutes. Efficacy of the intervention on the incidence of lateral ankle sprains was determined by calculating Relative Risks (RR, including their 95% Confidence Intervals or CI) and incidence rates expressed per 1000h. RR (95% CI) showed a significantly lower incidence of lateral ankle sprains in the IG compared to the CG for the total sample (RR= 0.30 [95% CI: 0.11-0.84]) and in men (RR= 0.29 [95% CI: 0.09-0.93]). The difference in RR was not confirmed when examining the incidence rates and their 95%CI's, which overlapped. The risk for new or recurrent ankle sprains was slightly lower in the IG (new: RR= 0.76 [95% CI: 0.17-3.40]; re-injury: RR= 0.21 [95% CI: 0.03-1.44]). Based on these pilot results, the use of balance training is recommended as a routine during basketball activities for the prevention of ankle sprains. Key pointsWe could not establish a true preventive effect of the training, most likely due to the low sample size.Although not significant, large differences in incidence rates were found between the intervention and control group and relative risks showed a significant difference.Our results were in line with previous results and therefore proprioceptive balance training should become a part of the training routine.Concerning this study and the literature, proprioceptive balance training should

  8. Training Literacy Skills through Sign Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudner, Mary; Andin, Josefine; Rönnberg, Jerker; Heimann, Mikael; Hermansson, Anders; Nelson, Keith; Tjus, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    The literacy skills of deaf children generally lag behind those of their hearing peers. The mechanisms of reading in deaf individuals are only just beginning to be unraveled but it seems that native language skills play an important role. In this study 12 deaf pupils (six in grades 1-2 and six in grades 4-6) at a Swedish state primary school for…

  9. Hospitality Occupational Skills Training Cooperative. Project HOST Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northwest Educational Cooperative, Des Plaines, IL.

    Project HOST (Hospitality Occupational Skills Training) provided vocational training and employment opportunities in the hotel industry to disadvantaged adult minority populations in Chicago. It demonstrated a model for successful cooperation between the business sector and a public vocational education agency and developed and piloted a…

  10. Training with NLP: Skills for Managers, Trainers and Communicators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connor, Joseph; Seymour, John

    Based on the premise that changes in technology and organizational development suggest that 75% of people working today are likely to need training within the next 10 years, this book addresses training as one of the most effective ways to learn the new skills and knowledge needed for the future. The book sees opportunities for outstanding…

  11. Accident Avoidance Skill Training and Performance Testing. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatterick, G. Richard; Barthurst, James R.

    A two-phased study was conducted to determine the feasibility of training drivers to acquire skills needed to avoid critical conflict motor vehicle accidents, and to develop the procedures and materials necessary for such training. Basic data were derived from indepth accident investigations and task analyses of driver behavior. Principal…

  12. Integrating Mental-Skills Training into Everyday Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voight, Mike

    2005-01-01

    This article takes a different approach to presenting the importance and applications of mental training. Applying mental-skills training to enhance learning and performance requires athletes and students to improve their awareness of what they do to help themselves (mentally, emotionally, physically, and behaviorally), as well as what they do to…

  13. Skills and Training in Great Britain: Further Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutherland, John

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the amount of training received by employees; the extent to which individuals are dissatisfied with the training they receive; and employee perceptions of the extent to which the skill levels they possess are higher than/lower than those required to do their jobs. Design/methodology/approach: A…

  14. Principles of teaching in a structured training programme, the rotations, and the surgical training plan.

    PubMed

    Steiger, H J

    2004-01-01

    The present paper is divided into two parts. In the first part it summarises the essentials of transfer of knowledge and personality from trainer to trainee. The training capacity of a programme should be identified first since the number of residents in training has implications on the structure of the programme. The capacity is limited by the number of surgical "resident cases", which should at least amount to 70 per year and resident. For the future, more emphasis should be laid on the acquirement of methods of self-teaching and continuous self-education, in order to provide the trainees with the ability to cope with changes during their later career more easily. In part two the organisation of rotations as well as the structured surgical training plan are discussed. Teaching can be organised either as a gradual exposure to more and more complex procedures or as a sequence of speciality rotations. Structured teaching of theoretical contents should accompany practical teaching and in academic programmes a scientific rotation should be integrated. The ongoing subspecialisation is currently exceeding the limits of complete coverage during a six-year-programme.

  15. Workforce Skills Development and Engagement in Training through Skill Sets. NCVER Monograph Series 11/2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, John; Crean, David; Ranshaw, Danielle; Bowman, Kaye

    2012-01-01

    There has been some debate over whether skill sets have the capacity to be part of a more flexible skilling solution, one in which vocational education and training (VET) in Australia is enhanced. This proposition is explored using a case study of agrifood students who were enrolled in TAFE NSW Statement of Attainment in Rural Production Studies…

  16. Using Behavioral Skills Training and Video Rehearsal to Teach Blackjack Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Speelman, Ryan C.; Whiting, Seth W.; Dixon, Mark R.

    2015-01-01

    A behavioral skills training procedure that consisted of video instructions, video rehearsal, and video testing was used to teach 4 recreational gamblers a specific skill in playing blackjack (sometimes called "card counting"). A multiple baseline design was used to evaluate intervention effects on card-counting accuracy and chips won or…

  17. Mentoring during surgical training: consensus recommendations for mentoring programmes from the Association of Surgeons in Training.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, P; Fitzgerald, J E F; McDermott, F D; Derbyshire, L; Shalhoub, J

    2014-11-01

    Mentoring has been present within surgical training for many years, albeit in different forms. There is evidence that formal mentoring can improve patient outcomes and facilitate learning and personal growth in the mentee. The Association of Surgeons in Training (ASiT) is an independent educational charity working to promote excellence in surgical training. This document recommends the introduction of a structured mentoring programme, which is readily accessible to all surgical trainees. A review of the available evidence--including an ASiT-led survey of its membership--highlights the desire of surgical trainees to have a mentor, whilst the majority do not have access to one. There is also limited training for those in mentoring roles. In response, ASiT have implemented a pilot mentoring scheme, with surgical trainees acting both as mentors and mentees. Based on the existing literature, survey data and pilot experience, ASiT formalises in this document consensus recommendations for mentoring in surgical training.

  18. Recommended observational skills training for IAEA safeguards inspections. Final report: Recommended observational skills training for IAEA safeguards inspections

    SciTech Connect

    Toquam, J.L.; Morris, F.A.

    1994-09-01

    This is the second of two reports prepared to assist the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA or Agency) in enhancing the effectiveness of its international safeguards inspections through inspector training in {open_quotes}Observational Skills{close_quotes}. The first (Phase 1) report was essentially exploratory. It defined Observational Skills broadly to include all appropriate cognitive, communications, and interpersonal techniques that have the potential to help IAEA safeguards inspectors function more effectively. It identified 10 specific Observational Skills components, analyzed their relevance to IAEA safeguards inspections, and reviewed a variety of inspection programs in the public and private sectors that provide training in one or more of these components. The report concluded that while it should be possible to draw upon these other programs in developing Observational Skills training for IAEA inspectors, the approaches utilized in these programs will likely require significant adaption to support the specific job requirements, policies, and practices that define the IAEA inspector`s job. The overall objective of this second (Phase 2) report is to provide a basis for the actual design and delivery of Observational Skills training to IAEA inspectors. The more specific purposes of this report are to convey a fuller understanding of the potential application of Observational Skills to the inspector`s job, describe inspector perspectives on the relevance and importance of particular Observational Skills, identify the specific Observational Skill components that are most important and relevant to enhancing safeguards inspections, and make recommendations as to Observational Skills training for the IAEA`s consideration in further developing its Safeguards training program.

  19. Does Music Training Enhance Literacy Skills? A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Reyna L.; Fehd, Hilda M.; McCandliss, Bruce D.

    2015-01-01

    Children's engagement in music practice is associated with enhancements in literacy-related language skills, as demonstrated by multiple reports of correlation across these two domains. Training studies have tested whether engaging in music training directly transfers benefit to children's literacy skill development. Results of such studies, however, are mixed. Interpretation of these mixed results is made more complex by the fact that a wide range of literacy-related outcome measures are used across these studies. Here, we address these challenges via a meta-analytic approach. A comprehensive literature review of peer-reviewed music training studies was built around key criteria needed to test the direct transfer hypothesis, including: (a) inclusion of music training vs. control groups; (b) inclusion of pre- vs. post-comparison measures, and (c) indication that reading instruction was held constant across groups. Thirteen studies were identified (n = 901). Two classes of outcome measures emerged with sufficient overlap to support meta-analysis: phonological awareness and reading fluency. Hours of training, age, and type of control intervention were examined as potential moderators. Results supported the hypothesis that music training leads to gains in phonological awareness skills. The effect isolated by contrasting gains in music training vs. gains in control was small relative to the large variance in these skills (d = 0.2). Interestingly, analyses revealed that transfer effects for rhyming skills tended to grow stronger with increased hours of training. In contrast, no significant aggregate transfer effect emerged for reading fluency measures, despite some studies reporting large training effects. The potential influence of other study design factors were considered, including intervention design, IQ, and SES. Results are discussed in the context of emerging findings that music training may enhance literacy development via changes in brain mechanisms that

  20. Does Music Training Enhance Literacy Skills? A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Reyna L; Fehd, Hilda M; McCandliss, Bruce D

    2015-01-01

    Children's engagement in music practice is associated with enhancements in literacy-related language skills, as demonstrated by multiple reports of correlation across these two domains. Training studies have tested whether engaging in music training directly transfers benefit to children's literacy skill development. Results of such studies, however, are mixed. Interpretation of these mixed results is made more complex by the fact that a wide range of literacy-related outcome measures are used across these studies. Here, we address these challenges via a meta-analytic approach. A comprehensive literature review of peer-reviewed music training studies was built around key criteria needed to test the direct transfer hypothesis, including: (a) inclusion of music training vs. control groups; (b) inclusion of pre- vs. post-comparison measures, and (c) indication that reading instruction was held constant across groups. Thirteen studies were identified (n = 901). Two classes of outcome measures emerged with sufficient overlap to support meta-analysis: phonological awareness and reading fluency. Hours of training, age, and type of control intervention were examined as potential moderators. Results supported the hypothesis that music training leads to gains in phonological awareness skills. The effect isolated by contrasting gains in music training vs. gains in control was small relative to the large variance in these skills (d = 0.2). Interestingly, analyses revealed that transfer effects for rhyming skills tended to grow stronger with increased hours of training. In contrast, no significant aggregate transfer effect emerged for reading fluency measures, despite some studies reporting large training effects. The potential influence of other study design factors were considered, including intervention design, IQ, and SES. Results are discussed in the context of emerging findings that music training may enhance literacy development via changes in brain mechanisms that

  1. Does Music Training Enhance Literacy Skills? A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Reyna L; Fehd, Hilda M; McCandliss, Bruce D

    2015-01-01

    Children's engagement in music practice is associated with enhancements in literacy-related language skills, as demonstrated by multiple reports of correlation across these two domains. Training studies have tested whether engaging in music training directly transfers benefit to children's literacy skill development. Results of such studies, however, are mixed. Interpretation of these mixed results is made more complex by the fact that a wide range of literacy-related outcome measures are used across these studies. Here, we address these challenges via a meta-analytic approach. A comprehensive literature review of peer-reviewed music training studies was built around key criteria needed to test the direct transfer hypothesis, including: (a) inclusion of music training vs. control groups; (b) inclusion of pre- vs. post-comparison measures, and (c) indication that reading instruction was held constant across groups. Thirteen studies were identified (n = 901). Two classes of outcome measures emerged with sufficient overlap to support meta-analysis: phonological awareness and reading fluency. Hours of training, age, and type of control intervention were examined as potential moderators. Results supported the hypothesis that music training leads to gains in phonological awareness skills. The effect isolated by contrasting gains in music training vs. gains in control was small relative to the large variance in these skills (d = 0.2). Interestingly, analyses revealed that transfer effects for rhyming skills tended to grow stronger with increased hours of training. In contrast, no significant aggregate transfer effect emerged for reading fluency measures, despite some studies reporting large training effects. The potential influence of other study design factors were considered, including intervention design, IQ, and SES. Results are discussed in the context of emerging findings that music training may enhance literacy development via changes in brain mechanisms that

  2. Information Use Skills in the Engineering Programme Accreditation Criteria of Four Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, Cara

    2014-01-01

    The need for twenty-first century information skills in engineering practice, combined with the importance for engineering programmes to meet accreditation requirements, suggests that it may be worthwhile to explore the potential for closer alignment between librarians and their work with information literacy competencies to assist in meeting…

  3. Monitoring and Stimulating Development of Integrated Professional Skills in University Study Programmes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wahlgren, Marie; Ahlberg, Anders

    2013-01-01

    In Swedish higher education, quality assurance mainly focuses on course module outcomes. With this in mind we developed a qualitative method to monitor and stimulate progression of learning in two modularized engineering study programmes. A set of core professional values and skills were triangulated through interviews with students, teachers,…

  4. The Effects of Two Different Instructional Programmes on Literacy Skills of Kindergarten Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gahwaji, Nahla M.

    2016-01-01

    Lately, research exploring the effects of tutorial instructional programmes and educational games on literacy skills of kindergarten children has attracted large number of educational technology researchers and practitioners. Even though overwhelming research literature on the subject is available, the majority of this existing work is designed…

  5. Could MOOCs Answer the Problems of Teaching AQF-Required Skills in Australian Tertiary Programmes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraser, Kym; Ryan, Yoni

    2013-01-01

    From 2015, Australian universities will be required to demonstrate that their programmes explicitly teach and assess achievement of, knowledge and skills, and the application of both as specified by the Australian Qualifications Framework (AQF). Over the last twenty years, the sector has applied significant effort and resources to embedding the…

  6. ASTD Technical and Skills Training Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Leslie, Ed.

    This handbook is intended to serve as a hands-on reference for technical trainers, many of whom are resident experts in corporations who have been recruited from within the organization rather than individuals with training background. It contains 23 chapters by experts in the field: (1) The History of Technical Training (Richard A. Swanson and…

  7. Authentic Listening Materials: ESL Life Skills Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Beverly J.

    This guide is designed for use in providing English-as-a-second-language training to adults. The first part of the package describes the development of these materials during a project to provide training in conversational English to refugees and migrants. Outlined next are procedures and activities for assessing student needs, taping student…

  8. Energetics of competitive swimming. Implications for training programmes.

    PubMed

    Toussaint, H M; Hollander, A P

    1994-12-01

    An analysis of the mechanics and energetics of swimming reveals that different factors play key roles in success in competitive swimming events. Knowledge of these performance factors will help the development of optimal training programmes, especially when their relative importance can be identified. One approach to doing this is to evaluate the energy cost of swimming and the energy generating systems that cover these costs. It appears that the rate of energy expenditure is related to the velocity, the gross efficiency, the propelling efficiency and a drag factor. Energy is generated by aerobic and anaerobic processes. A balance should exist between the energy necessary to swim a distance in a certain time and the total energy available in this time from the energy producing system. This balance was used to predict the performance times over difference distances and to predict the effect of a 10% increase in the aerobic capacity, the anaerobic capacity or the propelling efficiency on the performance times, while keeping all other factors constant. The 10% increase in propelling efficiency resulted in both a reduction in time over the short distance as well as an improvement in performance over the long distance which was superior to the gains found when increasing the maximal aerobic or anaerobic power by 10%. It is concluded that for an optimal use of training time and for an optimal use of the capacities of the swimmer, it seems important to determine both the mechanical parameters (technique, drag) and the parameters describing the energy production. By determining the weak and strong points of competitive swimmers, the optimal training distances and what performance factors are the weakest and most likely to improve with training can be determined. PMID:7886354

  9. Staff's perceptions of voluntary assertiveness skills training.

    PubMed

    McVanel, Sarah; Morris, Beth

    2010-01-01

    Clinicians' ability to be assertive when unsure or concerned about procedures, treatment modalities, or patients' symptoms is key in reducing risk and preventing sentinel events. In this article, the authors provide a framework for generic, voluntary assertiveness communication skills workshops that any educator can implement. PMID:21119378

  10. Examining the relationship between skilled music training and attention.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao; Ossher, Lynn; Reuter-Lorenz, Patricia A

    2015-11-01

    While many aspects of cognition have been investigated in relation to skilled music training, surprisingly little work has examined the connection between music training and attentional abilities. The present study investigated the performance of skilled musicians on cognitively demanding sustained attention tasks, measuring both temporal and visual discrimination over a prolonged duration. Participants with extensive formal music training were found to have superior performance on a temporal discrimination task, but not a visual discrimination task, compared to participants with no music training. In addition, no differences were found between groups in vigilance decrement in either type of task. Although no differences were evident in vigilance per se, the results indicate that performance in an attention-demanding temporal discrimination task was superior in individuals with extensive music training. We speculate that this basic cognitive ability may contribute to advantages that musicians show in other cognitive measures.

  11. Gaze-contingent training enhances perceptual skill acquisition.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Donghyun; Mann, David L; Abernethy, Bruce; Poolton, Jamie M

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether decision-making skill in perceptual-cognitive tasks could be enhanced using a training technique that impaired selective areas of the visual field. Recreational basketball players performed perceptual training over 3 days while viewing with a gaze-contingent manipulation that displayed either (a) a moving window (clear central and blurred peripheral vision), (b) a moving mask (blurred central and clear peripheral vision), or (c) full (unrestricted) vision. During the training, participants watched video clips of basketball play and at the conclusion of each clip made a decision about to which teammate the player in possession of the ball should pass. A further control group watched unrelated videos with full vision. The effects of training were assessed using separate tests of decision-making skill conducted in a pretest, posttest, and 2-week retention test. The accuracy of decision making was greater in the posttest than in the pretest for all three intervention groups when compared with the control group. Remarkably, training with blurred peripheral vision resulted in a further improvement in performance from posttest to retention test that was not apparent for the other groups. The type of training had no measurable impact on the visual search strategies of the participants, and so the training improvements appear to be grounded in changes in information pickup. The findings show that learning with impaired peripheral vision offers a promising form of training to support improvements in perceptual skill. PMID:26824639

  12. Gaze-contingent training enhances perceptual skill acquisition.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Donghyun; Mann, David L; Abernethy, Bruce; Poolton, Jamie M

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether decision-making skill in perceptual-cognitive tasks could be enhanced using a training technique that impaired selective areas of the visual field. Recreational basketball players performed perceptual training over 3 days while viewing with a gaze-contingent manipulation that displayed either (a) a moving window (clear central and blurred peripheral vision), (b) a moving mask (blurred central and clear peripheral vision), or (c) full (unrestricted) vision. During the training, participants watched video clips of basketball play and at the conclusion of each clip made a decision about to which teammate the player in possession of the ball should pass. A further control group watched unrelated videos with full vision. The effects of training were assessed using separate tests of decision-making skill conducted in a pretest, posttest, and 2-week retention test. The accuracy of decision making was greater in the posttest than in the pretest for all three intervention groups when compared with the control group. Remarkably, training with blurred peripheral vision resulted in a further improvement in performance from posttest to retention test that was not apparent for the other groups. The type of training had no measurable impact on the visual search strategies of the participants, and so the training improvements appear to be grounded in changes in information pickup. The findings show that learning with impaired peripheral vision offers a promising form of training to support improvements in perceptual skill.

  13. Geritalk: communication skills training for geriatric and palliative medicine fellows.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Amy S; Back, Anthony L; Arnold, Robert M; Goldberg, Gabrielle R; Lim, Betty B; Litrivis, Evgenia; Smith, Cardinale B; O'Neill, Lynn B

    2012-02-01

    Expert communication is essential to high-quality care for older patients with serious illness. Although the importance of communication skills is widely recognized, formal curricula for teaching communication skills to geriatric and palliative medicine fellows is often inadequate or unavailable. The current study drew upon the educational principles and format of an evidence-based, interactive teaching method to develop an intensive communication skills training course designed specifically to address the common communication challenges that geriatric and palliative medicine fellows face. The 2-day retreat, held away from the hospital environment, included large-group overview presentations, small-group communication skills practice, and development of future skills practice commitment. Faculty received in-depth training in small-group facilitation techniques before the course. Geriatric and palliative medicine fellows were recruited to participate in the course and 100% (n = 18) enrolled. Overall satisfaction with the course was very high (mean 4.8 on a 5-point scale). After the course, fellows reported an increase in self-assessed preparedness for specific communication challenges (mean increase 1.4 on 5-point scale, P < .001). Two months after the course, fellows reported a high level of sustained skills practice (mean 4.3 on 5-point scale). In sum, the intensive communication skills program, customized for the specific needs of geriatric and palliative medicine fellows, improved fellows' self-assessed preparedness for challenging communication tasks and provided a model for ongoing deliberate practice of communication skills.

  14. Using Participatory Action Research to Improve Vocational Skills Training for Marginalised Youth in Uganda: Experiences from an Early School-Leavers' Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tukundane, Cuthbert; Zeelen, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Although vocational education and training is considered to be a good option for improving livelihood opportunities for marginalised youth in developing countries, it often suffers from an image problem. This situation affects the quality of entrants, instruction and skills acquisition in training programmes. In this article, the researchers…

  15. Trained, generalized, and collateral behavior changes of preschool children receiving gross-motor skills training.

    PubMed

    Kirby, K C; Holborn, S W

    1986-01-01

    Three preschool children participated in a behavioral training program to improve their gross-motor skills. Ten target behaviors were measured in the training setting to assess direct effects of the program. Generalization probes for two gross-motor behaviors, one fine-motor skill, and two social behaviors were conducted in other settings. Results indicated that the training program improved the gross-motor skills trained and that improvements sometimes generalized to other settings. Contrary to suggestions in educational literature, the gross-motor training program did not produce changes in fine-motor skills or social behaviors. Implications for educators and for the development of the technology of generalization are outlined. PMID:3771421

  16. Effects of balance training on selected skills.

    PubMed

    Yaggie, James A; Campbell, Brian M

    2006-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of a 4-week balance training program on specified functional tasks. Thirty-six subjects (age = 22.7 +/- 2.10 years; height = 168.30 +/- 9.55 cm; weight = 71.15 +/- 16.40 kg) were randomly placed into control (C; n = 19) and experimental groups (Tx; n = 17). The Tx group trained using a commercially available balance training device (BOSU). Postural limits (displacement and sway) and functional task (time on ball, shuttle run, and vertical jump) were assessed during a pretest (T1), a posttest (T2), and 2 weeks posttraining (T3). Multivariate repeated measures analysis (alpha = 0.05) revealed significant differences in time on ball, shuttle run, total sway, and fore/aft displacement after the exercise intervention (T2). T3 assessment revealed that total sway and time on ball remained controlled; however, no other measures were retained. Balance training improved performance of selected sport-related activities and postural control measures, although it is unclear whether the effect of training would transfer to general functional enhancement.

  17. Cognitive skill training for nuclear power plant operational decision making

    SciTech Connect

    Mumaw, R.J.; Swatzler, D.; Roth, E.M.; Thomas, W.A.

    1994-06-01

    Training for operator and other technical positions in the commercial nuclear power industry traditionally has focused on mastery of the formal procedures used to control plant systems and processes. However, decisionmaking tasks required of nuclear power plant operators involve cognitive skills (e.g., situation assessment, planning). Cognitive skills are needed in situations where formal procedures may not exist or may not be as prescriptive, as is the case in severe accident management (SAM). The Westinghouse research team investigated the potential cognitive demands of SAM on the control room operators and Technical Support Center staff who would be most involved in the selection and execution of severe accident control actions. A model of decision making, organized around six general cognitive processes, was developed to identify the types of cognitive skills that may be needed for effective performance. Also, twelve SAM scenarios were developed to reveal specific decision-making difficulties. Following the identification of relevant cognitive skills, 19 approaches for training individual and team cognitive skills were identified. A review of these approaches resulted in the identification of general characteristics that are important in effective training of cognitive skills.

  18. Operational Context Training in Individual Technical Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoehn, Arthur J.; And Others

    Four papers were presented at a conference dealing with the objectives and problems of operational context training (OCT) sponsored by HumRRO in June 1958. The first paper (by William McCleland) outlines the objectives of the conference and its general goals. The second paper (by Arthur J. Hoehn) describes the use of operational context training…

  19. Training in Brainstorming and Developing Writing Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rao, Zhenhui

    2007-01-01

    This article describes an exploratory study that investigated the effects of training in brainstorming strategy on learners' performance and perceptions about writing. The learners who received instruction in brainstorming were two complete classes of sophomores in a Chinese university. Writing performance, at the beginning and end of the study,…

  20. Training of leadership skills in medical education.

    PubMed

    Kiesewetter, Jan; Schmidt-Huber, Marion; Netzel, Janine; Krohn, Alexandra C; Angstwurm, Matthias; Fischer, Martin R

    2013-01-01

    Hintergrund: Eine effektive Zusammenarbeit in Teams ist eine wichtige Voraussetzung für qualitativ hochwertige Versorgung im Gesundheitswesen. In diesem Zusammenhang spielen auch Führungskompetenzen von Ärztinnen und Ärzten im klinischen Alltag eine wichtige Rolle. Bisher wurde die Entwicklung von Führungskompetenzen in medizinischen Curricula in der Aus- und Weiterbildung von Ärztinnen und Ärzten jedoch kaum systematisch abgebildet. Die Entwicklung adäquater und effektiver Trainingsmethoden für die Vermittlung von Führungskompetenzen ist daher wünschenswert. Ziel: Das Review soll vorliegende Ergebnisse der Literatur zu Trainings von Führungskompetenzen in der Medizin zusammenfassen und integrieren, um zukünftige Forschung und Trainingsentwicklung anzuregen. Methode: Die Datenbanken PubMED, ERIC, PsycArticles, PsycINFO, PSYNDEX und dem Academic search complete durch EBSCOhost wurden auf Deutsch und Englisch nach Trainings von Führungskompetenzen in der Medizin durchsucht. Relevante Artikel wurden identifiziert und die Studienergebnisse hinsichtlich des zugrundeliegenden Führungsverständnisses, der Zielgruppe und Teilnehmeranzahl, der zeitlichen Ressourcen, sowie der Inhalte und Methoden des Trainings, des Evaluationsdesigns und der berichteten Trainingseffekte zusammengefasst. Ergebnisse: Auf acht Studien trafen alle Einschluss- und kein Ausschlusskriterium zu. Die Trainings selbst sowie die thematisierten Führungskompetenzen differenzieren jedoch stark voneinander. Die Trainingsdesigns beinhalten im Schwerpunkt die theoretische Auseinandersetzung mit dem Thema Führung sowie die Diskussion von Fallstudien aus der Praxis. Die Dauer der Trainings reicht von mehrstündigen bis hin zu mehrjährigen Veranstaltungen. Die selbst eingeschätzte Reaktion der Teilnehmer auf alle Trainings war positiv; es fand jedoch bisher keine systematische Überprüfung des Trainingserfolgs in Bezug auf konkrete Verhaltensänderungen der Teilnehmer statt

  1. Promoting Darfuri women's psychosocial health: developing a war trauma counsellor training programme tailored to the person.

    PubMed

    Badri, Alia; Crutzen, Rik; Eltayeb, Shahla; Van den Borne, Hw

    2013-01-01

    Women are considered special groups who are uniquely vulnerable in the context of war exposures. To effectively target the resources aimed at mitigating mental health consequences and optimising and maximising the use of mental health provisions, culturally relevant war trauma counsellor training is required. The objectives of this study are to promote a new philosophy in the Sudanese mental health care by introducing an integrative approach for targeted prevention and tailored treatments to the Darfuri person in a cost-effective way. Furthermore, the study provides evidence- and theory-based guidelines for developing a war trauma counsellor training programme in Sudan, mainly based on qualitative and quantitative studies among war-affected Darfuri female students. Cultural conceptualisations such as gender roles and religious expectations as well as theories that emphasise resilience and other psychosocial adaptation skills have been operationalised to reflect the totality of the Darfuri women's experiences. Furthermore, the results of four interrelated studies among war-traumatised undergraduate Darfuri women who are internally displaced provide the basis that guides an outline for qualification development, capacity building and skills consolidation among Sudanese mental health care providers. Explicit war-related psychosocial needs assessment tools, specific war-related trauma counsellor training and particular counsellor characteristics, qualities and awareness that pertain to strengthening the efficacy of war trauma Sudanese counsellors are recommended. The aim is to produce expertly trained war trauma counsellors working with war-affected Darfuri women in particular and with regards to their helpfulness in responding to the psychosocial needs of war-exposed Sudanese in general. PMID:23531430

  2. Investigating the Effectiveness of a Study Skills Training Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sikhwari, T. D.; Pillay, J.

    2012-01-01

    Various studies have shown that the school system in South Africa is continually producing learners who are inadequately prepared for higher education studies, particularly schools in disadvantaged environments. The University of Venda (UNIVEN) is situated in an educationally disadvantaged environment. Most of the students who enroll at this…

  3. An Innovative Supply Chain Management Programme Structure: Broadening the SCM Skill Set

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okongwu, Uche

    2007-01-01

    This paper proposes a matrix structure for training Supply Chain Management (SCM) professionals. It is an innovative programme structure that combines two approaches: cross-border and inter-organisational. It enables the students to comprehend complex and specific business environments and to understand the diverse nature of SCM systems in both…

  4. Upgrade and interpersonal skills training at American Airlines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estridge, W. W.; Mansfield, J. L.

    1980-01-01

    Segments of the interpersonal skills training audio visual program are presented. The program was developed to train customer contact personnel with specific emphasis on transactional analysis in customer treatment. Concepts of transactional analysis are summarized in terms of the make up of the personality, identified as the three ego states. These ego states are identified as the parent, the adult, and the child. Synopses of four of the tape programs are given.

  5. An evaluation of computerized behavioral skills training to teach safety skills to young children.

    PubMed

    Vanselow, Nicholas R; Hanley, Gregory P

    2014-01-01

    Previous research has demonstrated the efficacy of behavioral skills training (BST) and in situ training (IST) for teaching children to protect themselves. However, BST may be resource intensive and difficult to implement on a large scale. We evaluated a computerized version of BST (CBST) to teach safety skills and determined the extent to which safety skills generalized across different dangers. In Study 1, 11 children learned, via CBST and IST, to respond safely when asked to leave with a stranger. In Studies 2 and 3, IST was implemented with 16 children for 1 or 2 dangers after exposure to CBST for 3 dangers. Participants correctly self-protected from dangers after CBST and IST, and performance generalized to similar dangers for which participants did not receive IST. CBST may be an acceptable substitute for BST when combined with IST to improve efficiency and maintain efficacy in a comprehensive safety skills program.

  6. Staying or Leaving? Designing for Persistence in an Online Educator Training Programme in Indonesia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Mary

    2013-01-01

    This case study discusses factors impacting the attrition and persistence rates of 60 Indonesian educators in an online programme in 2010. Course designers developed three variations of a web-based programme--a fully online, hybrid and web-facilitated model--and placed 20 learners, all with similar technology skills, in the three different models.…

  7. [A video based training in communication skills for physicians].

    PubMed

    Kopecky-Wenzel, Marie; Reiner, Frank

    2010-01-01

    The aim of an "intensive training course in communication skills for physicians" is to train the perception of behaviour and of emotions in the doctor-patient communication. Core elements of the training are role plays on topics perceived as difficult and brought in by participants. From the group discussions arises a rich array of observations. The identical reproduction of a situation in time and space by means of video permits a variety of ways to check the perception of a situation and the communication skills. The approach is illustrated by an example taken from one exercise. 26 physicians participated in three courses. The repetition of the scene played at the first day is repeated with the same actors at the end of a training. Progress can be measured by comparing the two scenes. An evaluation by means of a structured questionnaire was carried out at the end of the training, after three and twelve months. The higher degree of self confidence on the part of the physicians could be seen from the analysis of the videos, from the comparison of the two videos and also from the questionnaires. Training by means of video takes time and energy. From the view of the authors and also from the participants this didactic approach to training is very effective. The training can be a building block towards a better care for patients. PMID:20408275

  8. Cultural Adaptation of the Skills Training Model: Assertion Training with American Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaFromboise, Teresa D.; Rowe, Wayne

    A skills training approach provides a conceptual framework from which human services can be provided for the personal and emotional needs of Indian people without the subtle, culturally erosive effect of traditional psychotherapy. Some 30 tribal groups and agencies participated in a cultural adaptation of an assertive coping-skills training…

  9. The Mental Skills Training of University Soccer Players

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sadeghi, Hassan; Omar-Fauzee, Mohd-Sofian; Jamalis, Marjohan; Ab-Latif, Rozita; Cheric, Majid Chahrdah

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify the kind of mental skills training needed most by the university soccer players. Eight male university football players (aged 25 to 36) from one large university in Kuala Lumpur agreed to participate in this study. On average, they have 10 years of playing experience. All of them have signed the informed…

  10. Measuring Effects of a Skills Training Intervention for Drug Abusers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkins, J. David; And Others

    1986-01-01

    A test was conducted of a supplemental skills training and social-network-development aftercare program with 130 drug abusers from four residential therapeutic communities. The intervention produced positive effects on subjects' performance at the conclusion of treatment. Performance improved in situations involving avoidance of drug use, coping…

  11. Learner Training: Towards Improving Secondary Students' Writing Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charalambous, Angeliki Constantinou

    2011-01-01

    In recent years more emphasis has been placed on training learners to take charge of their own learning. Guided teaching is gradually decreased and more responsibility is transferred to learners themselves by giving them opportunities to develop skills and strategies and to realize their potential. This new attitude is based on the notion that it…

  12. Guidelines for Training in Advanced Gestalt Therapy Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holiman, Marjorie; Engle, David

    1989-01-01

    Describes guidelines for gestalt training emphasizing observation of novice and expert therapists, opportunities to practice skills, and procedures to provide trainees with immediate feedback. Claims three methods of evaluation are useful to trainees: publicly monitoring progress; increasing specificity of feedback; and helping trainees to…

  13. Remediating the Deficit: Social Skills Training with Juvenile Offenders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jolly, Sharon L.; Sherer, Mark

    Assessment and rehabilitation of juvenile offenders has been enhanced by the identification of several cognitive and behavioral dimensions on which offenders differ from non-offenders. To investigate the influence of social skills training on locus of control, self-esteem, and observed behavior, 27 adolescent male offenders, aged 12-17,…

  14. Occupational Skills Training and Counseling Handbook. Transitional Black Women's Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atlanta Univ., GA. Women's Inst. for the Southeast.

    This handbook provides seven days of workshops in occupational skills training and counseling for developing career awareness and motivating career decision-making among transitional black women in the population of women who are underemployed, unemployed, undereducated, or poor, and who are unaware of educational or occupational opportunities…

  15. Preventing Relapse to Cigarette Smoking by Behavioral Skill Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Sharon M.; And Others

    Although smoking cessation techniques have been effective, few programs have long term results. To investigate the effectiveness of a tobacco dependence relapse prevention program, 123 adult smokers (51 male, 72 female) voluntarily participated in one of four small group treatment conditions (6 or 30 second aversive smoking plus skill training, or…

  16. Cooperative Learning and Soft Skills Training in an IT Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Aimao

    2012-01-01

    Pedagogy of higher education is shifting from passive to active and deep learning. At the same time, the information technology (IT) industry and the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET) are demanding soft skills training. Thus, in designing an IT course, we devised group teaching projects where students learn to work with…

  17. Techniques for Determining Manpower Skill Needs and Training Requirements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Employment Security (DOL), Washington, DC.

    This is a handbook of simplified techniques for determining manpower skill needs and training requirements and is for use by manpower advisors in developing countries. The handbook is in three sections which may be used separately or in conjunction with each other, depending upon the extent of statistical intelligence available in a given country.…

  18. Common Misconceptions about Behavior Modeling and Supervisory Skill Training (SST).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenbaum, Bernard L.

    1979-01-01

    Describes a process known as behavior modeling, used by more than 300 companies to train managers and supervisors by showing videotapes of company managers effectively motivating others in a variety of situations. Participants rehearse the modeling behavior and apply the skills to the job. Includes an actual model script. (MF)

  19. IT & Basic Skills. A Training Pack for Tutors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adult Literacy and Basic Skills Unit, London (England).

    This training package, which is designed for use by tutors teaching basic skills in a variety of adult education settings throughout the United Kingdom, consists of four booklets. The first two booklets explain how to use Microsoft Works word processing and spreadsheet software. Each contains instructions for using the Microsoft products in MS DOS…

  20. Independent Living: Relation among Training, Skills, and Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lozano, Beverly

    1993-01-01

    The effects of independent living training programs for 1,498 people with developmental disabilities were examined. After seven years, individuals who had received greater amounts of independent living services and improved/maintained their independent living skills were more likely to still live independently. There was no relationship between…

  1. Using a Behavioral Skills Training Package to Teach Conversation Skills to Young Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nuernberger, Jodi E.; Ringdahl, Joel E.; Vargo, Kristina K.; Crumpecker, Anna C.; Gunnarsson, Karl F.

    2013-01-01

    A behavioral skills training package was used to teach vocal and non-vocal conversation skills to young adults with autism spectrum disorders. A task analysis was created and verified that included both vocal conversation skills such as making comments related to the conversation topic, and non-vocal conversation skills such as maintaining…

  2. [Skills Training for Patients with Borderline Personality Disorder].

    PubMed

    Armbrust, Michael; Ehrig, Christian

    2016-07-01

    The emotionally instable personality disorder, mostly called borderline disorder, shows central abnormalities in impulse control as well as instability of mood and identity. It is composed of behaviour problems in creating relationships and in self-management, first of all by high psychophysiological tension. The prevalence of this disorder is 10 % in outpatients and 20 % in inpatients and has therefore high relevance for the medical-psychotherapeutic care system. The treatment is deemed to be complex and interminable. Regarding all evaluated techniques of treatment the best examined is the Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT). This specific therapy, developed in the eighties by Marsha M. Linehan, can be used for inpatient and outpatient treatment and combines single and group sessions. It is essential in mental health care of this disorder, but not available everywhere. Essential part of DBT is the skill training, a specific technique for the acquirement and for exercising skills for mindfulness, modulation of tension, regulation of emotions, structuring of social competence and developing self value. The central goal of DBT is to ensure the survival of the patients, to reduce self- and external aggressive behaviour and to provide inpatient crisis interventions. For sustained crisis management skills for reality acceptance are best fitting. But before, fast available sensory and active body-related skills should be used. Radical acceptance is the most important, since most effective, skill. The skills training, although in use for only twenty years, is permanently expanding in practice and is meanwhile also used for other disorders such as, for example, PTSD or ADHD. Since 2010, there also exists an elaborated DBT-version for adolescents. For medical care politics and health-economic reasons a supply with skills training for in- and outpatients all over the country is desirable. PMID:27388871

  3. [Skills Training for Patients with Borderline Personality Disorder].

    PubMed

    Armbrust, Michael; Ehrig, Christian

    2016-07-01

    The emotionally instable personality disorder, mostly called borderline disorder, shows central abnormalities in impulse control as well as instability of mood and identity. It is composed of behaviour problems in creating relationships and in self-management, first of all by high psychophysiological tension. The prevalence of this disorder is 10 % in outpatients and 20 % in inpatients and has therefore high relevance for the medical-psychotherapeutic care system. The treatment is deemed to be complex and interminable. Regarding all evaluated techniques of treatment the best examined is the Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT). This specific therapy, developed in the eighties by Marsha M. Linehan, can be used for inpatient and outpatient treatment and combines single and group sessions. It is essential in mental health care of this disorder, but not available everywhere. Essential part of DBT is the skill training, a specific technique for the acquirement and for exercising skills for mindfulness, modulation of tension, regulation of emotions, structuring of social competence and developing self value. The central goal of DBT is to ensure the survival of the patients, to reduce self- and external aggressive behaviour and to provide inpatient crisis interventions. For sustained crisis management skills for reality acceptance are best fitting. But before, fast available sensory and active body-related skills should be used. Radical acceptance is the most important, since most effective, skill. The skills training, although in use for only twenty years, is permanently expanding in practice and is meanwhile also used for other disorders such as, for example, PTSD or ADHD. Since 2010, there also exists an elaborated DBT-version for adolescents. For medical care politics and health-economic reasons a supply with skills training for in- and outpatients all over the country is desirable.

  4. Feasibility Pilot Study: Training Soft Skills in Virtual Worlds.

    PubMed

    Abshier, Patricia

    2012-04-01

    In a world where funding is limited, training for healthcare professionals is turning more and more to distance learning in an effort to maintain a knowledgeable and skilled work force. In 2010, Cicatelli Associates, Inc. began exploring the feasibility of using games and virtual worlds as an alternative means to teach skills-training in a distance-learning environment. The pilot study was conducted with six individuals familiar with general counseling and communication skills used by the healthcare industry to promote behavior change. Participants reported that the venue, although challenging at first, showed great potential for use with healthcare providers, as it allowed for more interaction and activities than traditional Webinars. However, there are significant limitations that must be overcome in order for this healthcare training modality to be utilized on a large scale. These limitations included a lack of microgestures and issues regarding the technology being used. In spite of the limitations, however, the potential use of virtual worlds for the training of healthcare providers exists and should be researched further. This article discusses the need and intended benefits of virtual world training as well as the results and conclusions of the pilot study. PMID:26193192

  5. Feasibility Pilot Study: Training Soft Skills in Virtual Worlds.

    PubMed

    Abshier, Patricia

    2012-04-01

    In a world where funding is limited, training for healthcare professionals is turning more and more to distance learning in an effort to maintain a knowledgeable and skilled work force. In 2010, Cicatelli Associates, Inc. began exploring the feasibility of using games and virtual worlds as an alternative means to teach skills-training in a distance-learning environment. The pilot study was conducted with six individuals familiar with general counseling and communication skills used by the healthcare industry to promote behavior change. Participants reported that the venue, although challenging at first, showed great potential for use with healthcare providers, as it allowed for more interaction and activities than traditional Webinars. However, there are significant limitations that must be overcome in order for this healthcare training modality to be utilized on a large scale. These limitations included a lack of microgestures and issues regarding the technology being used. In spite of the limitations, however, the potential use of virtual worlds for the training of healthcare providers exists and should be researched further. This article discusses the need and intended benefits of virtual world training as well as the results and conclusions of the pilot study.

  6. Do generalized visual training programmes for sport really work? An experimental investigation.

    PubMed

    Abernethy, B; Wood, J M

    2001-03-01

    We assessed the effectiveness of two generalized visual training programmes in enhancing visual and motor performance for racquet sports. Forty young participants were assigned equally to groups undertaking visual training using Revien and Gabor's Sports Vision programme (Group 1), visual training using Revien's Eyerobics (Group 2), a placebo condition involving reading (Group 3) and a control condition involving physical practice only (Group 4). Measures of basic visual function and of sport-specific motor performance were obtained from all participants before and immediately after a 4-week training period. Significant pre- to post-training differences were evident on some of the measures; however, these were not group-dependent. Contrary to the claims made by proponents of generalized visual training, we found no evidence that the visual training programmes led to improvements in either vision or motor performance above and beyond those resulting simply from test familiarity.

  7. Medical Training Issues and Skill Mix for Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janney, R. P.; Armstrong, C. W.; Stepaniak, P. C.; Billica, Roger (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The approach for treating in-flight medical events during exploration-class missions must reflect the need for an autonomous crew, and cannot be compared to current space flight therapeutic protocols. An exploration mission exposes the crew to periods of galactic cosmic radiation, isolation, confinement, and microgravity deconditioning far exceeding the low-Earth orbital missions performed to date. In addition, exploration crews will not be able to return to Earth at the onset of a medical event and will need to control the situation in-flight. Medical consultations with Earth-based physicians will be delayed as much as 40 minutes, dictating the need for a highly-trained medical team on board. This presentation will address the mix of crew medical skills and the training required for crew health care providers for missions beyond low-Earth orbit. Both low- and high-risk options for medical skill mix and preflight training will be compared.

  8. Formation of spatial thinking skills through different training methods.

    PubMed

    Kornkasem, Sorachai; Black, John B

    2015-09-01

    Spatial training can be durable and transferable if the training involves cognitive process-based tasks. The current study explored different spatial training methods and investigated the sequences of process-based mental simulation that was facilitated by various structures of external spatial representation, 3D technology, spatial cues, and/or technical languages. A total of 115 Columbia University's students were conducted through three experiments using a between-subjects design to examine the effects of spatial training methods on spatial ability performance. The conditions for training environments included 3D-virtual and 3D-physical interactions with abstract (nonsense-geometric) and concrete (everyday-object) contents. Overall, learners in the treatment conditions improved in their spatial skills significantly more than those in the control conditions. Particularly, 3D-direct-manipulation conditions in the third experiment added promising results about the specific sequences during spatial thinking formation processes.

  9. Evaluation of Life Skills Training and Infused-Life Skills Training in a Rural Setting: Outcomes at Two Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Edward A.; Swisher, John D.; Vicary, Judith R.; Bechtel, Lori J.; Minner, Daphne; Henry, Kimberly L.; Palmer, Raymond

    2004-01-01

    This study reports on findings from the first two years of a study to compare a standard Life Skill Training (LST) program with an infused (I-LST) approach. Nine small, rural school districts were randomly assigned to LST, I-LST, or control conditions in grade seven. The LST program significantly reduced alcohol use, binge drinking, marijuana use,…

  10. Vocational Training and Skills Recertification: Program Components and Models of Vocational Training and Skills Recertification for Refugees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Tipawan Troung-Quang

    This guide describes program components and models for the provision of vocational training and skills recertification for refugees. Necessary service components are identified, and possible delivery strategies are outlined with reference to successful programs throughout the United States. The document is intended to help service providers in…

  11. The Structured Operational Research and Training Initiative for public health programmes.

    PubMed

    Ramsay, A; Harries, A D; Zachariah, R; Bissell, K; Hinderaker, S G; Edginton, M; Enarson, D A; Satyanarayana, S; Kumar, A M V; Hoa, N B; Tweya, H; Reid, A J; Van den Bergh, R; Tayler-Smith, K; Manzi, M; Khogali, M; Kizito, W; Ali, E; Delaunois, P; Reeder, J C

    2014-06-21

    In 2009, the International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease (The Union) and Médecins sans Frontières Brussels-Luxembourg (MSF) began developing an outcome-oriented model for operational research training. In January 2013, The Union and MSF joined with the Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases (TDR) at the World Health Organization (WHO) to form an initiative called the Structured Operational Research and Training Initiative (SORT IT). This integrates the training of public health programme staff with the conduct of operational research prioritised by their programme. SORT IT programmes consist of three one-week workshops over 9 months, with clearly-defined milestones and expected output. This paper describes the vision, objectives and structure of SORT IT programmes, including selection criteria for applicants, the research projects that can be undertaken within the time frame, the programme structure and milestones, mentorship, the monitoring and evaluation of the programmes and what happens beyond the programme in terms of further research, publications and the setting up of additional training programmes. There is a growing national and international need for operational research and related capacity building in public health. SORT IT aims to meet this need by advocating for the output-based model of operational research training for public health programme staff described here. It also aims to secure sustainable funding to expand training at a global and national level. Finally, it could act as an observatory to monitor and evaluate operational research in public health. Criteria for prospective partners wishing to join SORT IT have been drawn up.

  12. Developing Patient-Centered Communication Skills Training for Oncologists: Describing the Content and Efficacy of Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Richard F.; Bylund, Carma L.; Gueguen, Jennifer A.; Diamond, Catherine; Eddington, Julia; Kissane, David

    2010-01-01

    Communication Skills Training (CST) is a proven aid to help oncologists achieve high quality patient-centered communication. No research studies have provided clear guidelines for developing the content of CST. The aim of this work is to describe a method of developing such content and evaluation of effectiveness of CST training workshops (based…

  13. Summary of Outcome Evaluation Report for Preparing Educational Training Consultants: Skills Training (PETC-1).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George, Catherine; Green, David

    This report summarizes the technical report Outcome Evaluation Report for Preparing Educational Training Consultants: Skills Training (PETC-I) which presents the data collected about the three outcome studies of the PETC-I system. This information is primarily summative in nature and is designed to help those who may be considering the system as a…

  14. The U.S. Diversity Visa Programme and the Transfer of Skills from Africa.

    PubMed

    Logan, B Ikubolajeh; Thomas, Kevin J A

    2012-04-01

    The Diversity Visa (DV) programme is designed to improve the multicultural composition of the U.S. "melting pot" beyond the traditional source countries in Europe. In pursuit of this objective, the basic eligibility requirement for participation in the programme is a high school diploma. Despite its salutary objective and design, the programme's implications for the African brain drain may not all be benign. The "tired, poor, huddled masses" from Africa are defined in more restrictive terms, and the obstacles they face are more economically and administratively onerous than those encountered by their early European counterparts. The costs of transforming a lottery win to an actual diversity visa and Green Card are so high that only Africans in well-paying jobs, who are likely to be professionals rather than mere high school graduates, are likely to be able to afford the full costs of programme participation. In this sense, the programme has an in-built, skills-selective mechanism. The main objective of this study is to examine the extent to which the DV has facilitated the movement of professional, technical and kindred workers (PTKs) from Africa to the United States, and some of the economic and policy implications of the process.

  15. A Skills beyond School Review of Switzerland. OECD Reviews of Vocational Education and Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fazekas, Mihaly; Field, Simon

    2013-01-01

    Higher level vocational education and training (VET) programmes are facing rapid change and intensifying challenges. What type of training is needed to meet the needs of a changing economies? How should the programmes be funded? How should they be linked to academic and university programmes? How can employers and unions be engaged? This report…

  16. The impact of a multiple intelligences teaching approach drug education programme on drug refusal skills of Nigerian pupils.

    PubMed

    Nwagu, Evelyn N; Ezedum, Chuks E; Nwagu, Eric K N

    2015-09-01

    The rising incidence of drug abuse among youths in Nigeria is a source of concern for health educators. This study was carried out on primary six pupils to determine the effect of a Multiple Intelligences Teaching Approach Drug Education Programme (MITA-DEP) on pupils' acquisition of drug refusal skills. A programme of drug education based on the Multiple Intelligences Teaching Approach (MITA) was developed. An experimental group was taught using this programme while a control group was taught using the same programme but developed based on the Traditional Teaching Approach. Pupils taught with the MITA acquired more drug refusal skills than those taught with the Traditional Teaching Approach. Urban pupils taught with the MITA acquired more skills than rural pupils. There was no statistically significant difference in the mean refusal skills of male and female pupils taught with the MITA.

  17. The impact of a multiple intelligences teaching approach drug education programme on drug refusal skills of Nigerian pupils.

    PubMed

    Nwagu, Evelyn N; Ezedum, Chuks E; Nwagu, Eric K N

    2015-09-01

    The rising incidence of drug abuse among youths in Nigeria is a source of concern for health educators. This study was carried out on primary six pupils to determine the effect of a Multiple Intelligences Teaching Approach Drug Education Programme (MITA-DEP) on pupils' acquisition of drug refusal skills. A programme of drug education based on the Multiple Intelligences Teaching Approach (MITA) was developed. An experimental group was taught using this programme while a control group was taught using the same programme but developed based on the Traditional Teaching Approach. Pupils taught with the MITA acquired more drug refusal skills than those taught with the Traditional Teaching Approach. Urban pupils taught with the MITA acquired more skills than rural pupils. There was no statistically significant difference in the mean refusal skills of male and female pupils taught with the MITA. PMID:25288586

  18. Training of basic laparoscopy skills on SimSurgery SEP.

    PubMed

    Buzink, Sonja N; Goossens, Richard H M; De Ridder, Huib; Jakimowicz, Jack J

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the performance curve for novices training in bimanual tissue manipulation and angled laparoscope navigation, and compare those performances with the performances of experienced laparoscopic surgeons. The Camera Navigation task with a 30 degrees angled laparoscope and the Place Arrow task of the new SimSurgery SEP virtual reality simulator were used. Fourteen medical trainees (no laparoscopy experience) performed four training sessions within one week, including 15 repetitions of each task in total. The experienced participants (>50 procedures & familiar with angled laparoscope) performed each task twice. The performance on both tasks by the novices improved significantly over the training sessions. The experienced participants performed both tasks significantly better than the novices in repetition 3. After repetition 15, the performances of the novices on both tasks were of the same level as the performances of the experienced participants. By training on SimSurgery SEP, medical trainees can extensively improve their skills in navigation with 30 degrees angled laparoscope and bimanual tissue manipulation. Further research should focus on the transfer of skills acquired on the simulator to the clinical setting. Knowledge on proficiency thresholds and training end-points for pre-clinical criterion-based training of different laparoscopic tasks also needs to be extended.

  19. Teaching Safety Skills to Children to Prevent Gun Play: an Evaluation of in Situ Training

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    This study evaluated behavioral skills training with added in situ training for teaching safety skills to prevent gun play. Following baseline, each child received two sessions of behavioral skills training and one in situ training session. Additional in situ training sessions were conducted until the child exhibited the safety skills (don't touch the gun, get away, and tell an adult). All children acquired and maintained the safety skills at a 3-month follow-up. In addition, of the 7 children assessed in a dyad situation, all exhibited the correct skills in the presence of another child. PMID:16270848

  20. A reusable suture anchor for arthroscopy psychomotor skills training.

    PubMed

    Tillett, Edward D; Rogers, Rainie; Nyland, John

    2003-03-01

    For residents to adequately develop the early arthroscopy psychomotor skills required to better learn how to manage the improvisational situations they will encounter during actual patient cases, they need to experience sufficient practice repetitions within a contextually relevant environment. Unfortunately, the cost of suture anchors can be a practice repetition-limiting factor in learning arthroscopic knot-tying techniques. We describe a technique for creating inexpensive reusable suture anchors and provide an example of their application to repair the anterior glenoid labrum during an arthroscopy psychomotor skills laboratory training session.

  1. New family medicine residency training programme: Residents’ perspectives from the University of Botswana

    PubMed Central

    Tshitenge, Stephane; Setlhare, Vincent; Tsima, Billy; Adewale, Ganiyu; Parsons, Luise

    2016-01-01

    Background Family Medicine (FM) training is new in Botswana. No previous evaluation of the experiences and opinions of residents of the University of Botswana (UB) Family Medicine training programme has been reported. Aims This study explored and assessed residents’ experiences and satisfaction with the FM training programme at the UB and solicited potential strategies for improvement from the residents. Methods A descriptive survey using a self-administered questionnaire based on a Likert-type scale and open-ended questions was used to collect data from FM residents at the UB. Results Eight out the 14 eligible residents participated to this study. Generally, residents were not satisfied with the FM training programme. Staff shortage, inadequate supervision and poor programme organisation by the faculty were the main reasons for this. However, the residents were satisfied with weekly training schedules and the diversity of patients in the current training sites. Residents’ potential solutions included an increase in staff, the acquisition of equipment at teaching sites and emphasis on FM core topics teachings. They had different views regarding how certain future career paths will be. Conclusions Despite the general dissatisfaction among residents because of challenges faced by the training programme, we have learnt that residents are capable of valuable inputs for improvement of their programme when engaged. There is need for the Department of Family Medicine to work with the Ministry of Health to set a clear career pathway for future graduates and to reflect on residents’ input for possible implementation. PMID:27796117

  2. New family medicine residency training programme: Residents’ perspectives from the University of Botswana

    PubMed Central

    Tshitenge, Stephane; Setlhare, Vincent; Tsima, Billy; Adewale, Ganiyu; Parsons, Luise

    2016-01-01

    Background Family Medicine (FM) training is new in Botswana. No previous evaluation of the experiences and opinions of residents of the University of Botswana (UB) Family Medicine training programme has been reported. Aims This study explored and assessed residents’ experiences and satisfaction with the FM training programme at the UB and solicited potential strategies for improvement from the residents. Methods A descriptive survey using a self-administered questionnaire based on a Likert-type scale and open-ended questions was used to collect data from FM residents at the UB. Results Eight out the 14 eligible residents participated to this study. Generally, residents were not satisfied with the FM training programme. Staff shortage, inadequate supervision and poor programme organisation by the faculty were the main reasons for this. However, the residents were satisfied with weekly training schedules and the diversity of patients in the current training sites. Residents’ potential solutions included an increase in staff, the acquisition of equipment at teaching sites and emphasis on FM core topics teachings. They had different views regarding how certain future career paths will be. Conclusions Despite the general dissatisfaction among residents because of challenges faced by the training programme, we have learnt that residents are capable of valuable inputs for improvement of their programme when engaged. There is need for the Department of Family Medicine to work with the Ministry of Health to set a clear career pathway for future graduates and to reflect on residents’ input for possible implementation.

  3. Behavioral Skills Training to Improve the Abduction-Prevention Skills of Children with Autism.

    PubMed

    Ledbetter-Cho, Katherine; Lang, Russell; Davenport, Katy; Moore, Melissa; Lee, Allyson; O'Reilly, Mark; Watkins, Laci; Falcomata, Terry

    2016-09-01

    A concurrent multiple baseline across participants design evaluated the effects of behavioral skills training (BST) on abduction-prevention skills of four children with autism. Across phases, confederates presented four types of abduction lures: (a) simple requests, (b) appeals to authority, (c) assistance requests, and (d) incentives. During baseline, lures resulted in children leaving with confederate strangers. During intervention, BST targeted a three-step response (i.e., refuse, move away, and report) and the abduction-prevention skills of all participants improved. Improvements generalized to novel settings and confederates and were maintained at 4 weeks. There is currently limited research on abduction-prevention pertaining to individuals with ASD. BST can be used to teach abduction-prevention skills to individuals with ASD. BST can be effective at teaching appropriate responses to multiple types of abduction lures. The effects of BST on multiple responses to multiple types of lures can generalize across settings and people and maintain over time.

  4. Evaluation of the Chemistry for Non-Specialists Training Programme. Final Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Megan; Harland, Jennie; Mitchell, Holly; Springate, Iain; Straw, Suzanne

    2008-01-01

    This report focuses on the findings from the evaluation of the Chemistry for Non-Specialists training programme. The programme takes place over four days and covers key chemistry concepts providing hands-on experience of pupil practical work and teacher demonstrations. The research was conducted by the National Foundation for Educational Research…

  5. Training Programme for Secondary School Principals: Evaluating its Effectiveness and Impact

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutton, Disraeli M.

    2013-01-01

    The article presents the evaluation of the training programme for secondary school principals conducted in the period between 2006 and 2009. A mixed method approach was used to conduct the summative evaluation with 28 graduate participants. For the impact evaluation, 15 of the graduates were interviewed three years after the programme was…

  6. Using Epidemiological Survey Data to Examine Factors Influencing Participation in Parent-Training Programmes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morawska, Alina; Dyah Ramadewi, Mikha; Sanders, Matthew R.

    2014-01-01

    Evidence-based parent-training programmes aim to reduce child behaviour problems; however, the effects of these programmes are often limited by poor participation rates. This study proposes a model of parent, child and family factors related to parental participation in parenting interventions. A computer-assisted telephone interview was used to…

  7. Challenging Ideological Environments: International Teachers' Experiences in an Outside-of-Country Teacher Training Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gutierrez, Amanda

    2016-01-01

    Teacher training for developing nation contexts is often conducted in short, intensive inside and outside-of-country programmes. Concerns have been raised in relation to the uncritical take-up of the western-centric material provided by these programmes, which are usually funded by national and international government organizations. This paper…

  8. Programme Content Orientation in Vocational Education and Training and Life Chances--A Comparative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kap, Hrvoje

    2014-01-01

    Comparative studies of vocational education and training systems rarely conduct systematic comparisons of the content of educational programmes, partly because of methodological difficulties. Yet, comparing the organisation of curricula can increase our understanding of how programme design reflects orientation towards various life chances in…

  9. Evaluation of the Latest English Language Teacher Training Programme in Turkey: Teacher Trainees' Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uzun, Levent

    2016-01-01

    The present study evaluated the latest English Language Teacher Training Programme in Turkey from the viewpoint of students who were enrolled on the programme for a period of four years. Participants were 90 last year students who were enrolled in the English Language Teaching department at Uludag University, Turkey. Data were collected by means…

  10. Affordable, web-based surgical skill training and evaluation tool.

    PubMed

    Islam, Gazi; Kahol, Kanav; Li, Baoxin; Smith, Marshall; Patel, Vimla L

    2016-02-01

    Advances in the medical field have increased the need to incorporate modern techniques into surgical resident training and surgical skills learning. To facilitate this integration, one approach that has gained credibility is the incorporation of simulator based training to supplement traditional training programs. However, existing implementations of these training methods still require the constant presence of a competent surgeon to assess the surgical dexterity of the trainee, which limits the evaluation methods and relies on subjective evaluation. This research proposes an efficient, effective, and economic video-based skill assessment technique for minimally invasive surgery (MIS). It analyzes a surgeon's hand and surgical tool movements and detects features like smoothness, efficiency, and preciseness. The system is capable of providing both real time on-screen feedback and a performance score at the end of the surgery. Finally, we present a web-based tool where surgeons can securely upload MIS training videos and receive evaluation scores and an analysis of trainees' performance trends over time. PMID:26556643

  11. Isolated teenagers, cooperative learning, and the training of social skills.

    PubMed

    Mesch, D; Lew, M; Johnson, D W; Johnson, R

    1986-07-01

    The effects of individual and group contingencies on the achievement and social integration of isolated, learning-disabled students were studied. Five socially isolated and withdrawn eighth-grade students in foreign-language and math classes were subjects. The choice of working alone or in a group with no academic contingency (i.e., bonus points) was compared with working in cooperative learning groups with a group-academic contingency (i.e., bonus points), a group-academic contingency with social-skills training, and a group-academic contingency in combination with a social-skills contingency (i.e., bonus points). The results indicated that the combination of group-academic and social-skills contingencies produced in the socially isolated and withdrawn students the highest rates of appropriate social interaction with peers, acceptance and liking by peers, positive attitudes toward the subject area, and achievement. PMID:3761218

  12. The U.S. Diversity Visa Programme and the Transfer of Skills from Africa

    PubMed Central

    Logan, B. Ikubolajeh; Thomas, Kevin J. A.

    2014-01-01

    The Diversity Visa (DV) programme is designed to improve the multicultural composition of the U.S. “melting pot” beyond the traditional source countries in Europe. In pursuit of this objective, the basic eligibility requirement for participation in the programme is a high school diploma. Despite its salutary objective and design, the programme’s implications for the African brain drain may not all be benign. The “tired, poor, huddled masses” from Africa are defined in more restrictive terms, and the obstacles they face are more economically and administratively onerous than those encountered by their early European counterparts. The costs of transforming a lottery win to an actual diversity visa and Green Card are so high that only Africans in well-paying jobs, who are likely to be professionals rather than mere high school graduates, are likely to be able to afford the full costs of programme participation. In this sense, the programme has an in-built, skills-selective mechanism. The main objective of this study is to examine the extent to which the DV has facilitated the movement of professional, technical and kindred workers (PTKs) from Africa to the United States, and some of the economic and policy implications of the process. PMID:24899733

  13. Dumbing down or Beefing up the Curriculum? Integrating an "Academic Skills Framework" into a First Year Sociology Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keating, Mike; O'Siochru, Cathal; Watt, Sal

    2009-01-01

    This article describes a C-SAP-funded project evaluating the introduction of a new tutorial programme for first year Sociology students, which sought to integrate a "skills framework" to enable students to develop a range of academic skills alongside their study of the subject. The pegagogical and institutional background to the decision to adopt…

  14. Oxytocin-Augmented Social Cognitive Skills Training in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Michael C; Green, Michael F; Lee, Junghee; Horan, William P; Senturk, Damla; Clarke, Angelika D; Marder, Stephen R

    2014-01-01

    Impairments in social cognition are common in schizophrenia and predict poor functional outcome. The purpose of this proof-of-concept randomized, parallel group clinical trial was to assess whether intranasal oxytocin (OT), given before social cognitive training, enhances learning of social cognitive skills. Twenty seven male outpatients with schizophrenia participated in a 6-week (12 session) training on social cognitive skills. Training focused on three domains: facial affect recognition, social perception, and empathy. Subjects were randomly assigned (double blind) to receive either intranasal OTor placebo 30 min before each session. Participants did not receive OT between sessions or on the day of assessments. We evaluated scores on social-cognition measures, as well as clinical symptoms and neurocognition, at baseline, 1 week following the final training session, and 1 month later. Our prespecified primary outcome measure was a social-cognition composite score comprised of five individual measures. There were main effects of time (indicating improvement across the combined-treatment groups) on the social-cognition composite score at both 1 week and 1 month following completion of training. Subjects receiving OT demonstrated significantly greater improvements in empathic accuracy than those receiving placebo at both posttreatment and 1 month follow up. There were no OT-related effects for the other social cognitive tests, clinical symptoms, or neurocognition. This study provides initial support for the idea that OT enhances the effectiveness of training when administered shortly before social cognitive training sessions. The effects were most pronounced on empathic accuracy, a high-level social cognitive process that is not easily improved in current social cognitive remediation programs. PMID:24637803

  15. Oxytocin-augmented social cognitive skills training in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Davis, Michael C; Green, Michael F; Lee, Junghee; Horan, William P; Senturk, Damla; Clarke, Angelika D; Marder, Stephen R

    2014-08-01

    Impairments in social cognition are common in schizophrenia and predict poor functional outcome. The purpose of this proof-of-concept randomized, parallel group clinical trial was to assess whether intranasal oxytocin (OT), given before social cognitive training, enhances learning of social cognitive skills. Twenty seven male outpatients with schizophrenia participated in a 6-week (12 session) training on social cognitive skills. Training focused on three domains: facial affect recognition, social perception, and empathy. Subjects were randomly assigned (double blind) to receive either intranasal OTor placebo 30 min before each session. Participants did not receive OT between sessions or on the day of assessments. We evaluated scores on social-cognition measures, as well as clinical symptoms and neurocognition, at baseline, 1 week following the final training session, and 1 month later. Our prespecified primary outcome measure was a social-cognition composite score comprised of five individual measures. There were main effects of time (indicating improvement across the combined-treatment groups) on the social-cognition composite score at both 1 week and 1 month following completion of training. Subjects receiving OT demonstrated significantly greater improvements in empathic accuracy than those receiving placebo at both posttreatment and 1 month follow up. There were no OT-related effects for the other social cognitive tests, clinical symptoms, or neurocognition. This study provides initial support for the idea that OT enhances the effectiveness of training when administered shortly before social cognitive training sessions. The effects were most pronounced on empathic accuracy, a high-level social cognitive process that is not easily improved in current social cognitive remediation programs.

  16. Private Sector Providers of Basic Skills Training in the Workplace. A Study of the General Training and Basic Skills Responses of Randomly Selected Companies Which Provide Basic Skills Training to Their Employees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mark, Jorie Lester

    A questionnaire was distributed to 1,305 companies to study the basic skills training provided. Of 62 responses, 41 companies had basic skills training programs. Respondents represented these types of companies: communications and utilities, finance and insurance, manufacturing, wholesalers, retailers, health and hospitals, and mining, and had…

  17. Improving a Bimanual Motor Skill Through Unimanual Training

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Takuji; Nozaki, Daichi

    2016-01-01

    When we learn a bimanual motor skill (e.g., rowing a boat), we often break it down into unimanual practices (e.g., a rowing drill with the left or right arm). Such unimanual practice is thought to be useful for learning bimanual motor skills efficiently because the learner can concentrate on learning to perform a simpler component. However, it is not so straightforward to assume that unimanual training (UT) improves bimanual performance. We have previously demonstrated that motor memories for reaching movements consist of three different parts: unimanual-specific, bimanual-specific, and overlapping parts. According to this scheme, UT appears to be less effective, as its training effect is only partially transferred to the same limb for bimanual movement. In the present study, counter-intuitively, we demonstrate that, even after the bimanual skill is almost fully learned by means of bimanual training (BT), additional UT could further improve bimanual skill. We hypothesized that this effect occurs because UT increases the memory content in the overlapping part, which might contribute to an increase in the memory for bimanual movement. To test this hypothesis, we examined whether the UT performed after sufficient BT could improve the bimanual performance. Participants practiced performing bimanual reaching movements (BM) in the presence of a novel force-field imposed only on their left arm. As an index for the motor performance, we used the error-clamp method (i.e., after-effect of the left arm) to evaluate the force output to compensate for the force-field during the reaching movement. After sufficient BT, the training effect reached a plateau. However, UT performed subsequently improved the bimanual performance significantly. In contrast, when the same amount of BT was continued, the bimanual performance remained unchanged, highlighting the beneficial effect of UT on bimanual performance. Considering memory structure, we also expected that BT could improve unimanual

  18. Improving a Bimanual Motor Skill Through Unimanual Training.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Takuji; Nozaki, Daichi

    2016-01-01

    When we learn a bimanual motor skill (e.g., rowing a boat), we often break it down into unimanual practices (e.g., a rowing drill with the left or right arm). Such unimanual practice is thought to be useful for learning bimanual motor skills efficiently because the learner can concentrate on learning to perform a simpler component. However, it is not so straightforward to assume that unimanual training (UT) improves bimanual performance. We have previously demonstrated that motor memories for reaching movements consist of three different parts: unimanual-specific, bimanual-specific, and overlapping parts. According to this scheme, UT appears to be less effective, as its training effect is only partially transferred to the same limb for bimanual movement. In the present study, counter-intuitively, we demonstrate that, even after the bimanual skill is almost fully learned by means of bimanual training (BT), additional UT could further improve bimanual skill. We hypothesized that this effect occurs because UT increases the memory content in the overlapping part, which might contribute to an increase in the memory for bimanual movement. To test this hypothesis, we examined whether the UT performed after sufficient BT could improve the bimanual performance. Participants practiced performing bimanual reaching movements (BM) in the presence of a novel force-field imposed only on their left arm. As an index for the motor performance, we used the error-clamp method (i.e., after-effect of the left arm) to evaluate the force output to compensate for the force-field during the reaching movement. After sufficient BT, the training effect reached a plateau. However, UT performed subsequently improved the bimanual performance significantly. In contrast, when the same amount of BT was continued, the bimanual performance remained unchanged, highlighting the beneficial effect of UT on bimanual performance. Considering memory structure, we also expected that BT could improve unimanual

  19. Surgical skills simulation in trauma and orthopaedic training.

    PubMed

    Stirling, Euan R B; Lewis, Thomas L; Ferran, Nicholas A

    2014-12-19

    Changing patterns of health care delivery and the rapid evolution of orthopaedic surgical techniques have made it increasingly difficult for trainees to develop expertise in their craft. Working hour restrictions and a drive towards senior led care demands that proficiency be gained in a shorter period of time whilst requiring a greater skill set than that in the past. The resulting conflict between service provision and training has necessitated the development of alternative methods in order to compensate for the reduction in 'hands-on' experience. Simulation training provides the opportunity to develop surgical skills in a controlled environment whilst minimising risks to patient safety, operating theatre usage and financial expenditure. Many options for simulation exist within orthopaedics from cadaveric or prosthetic models, to arthroscopic simulators, to advanced virtual reality and three-dimensional software tools. There are limitations to this form of training, but it has significant potential for trainees to achieve competence in procedures prior to real-life practice. The evidence for its direct transferability to operating theatre performance is limited but there are clear benefits such as increasing trainee confidence and familiarity with equipment. With progressively improving methods of simulation available, it is likely to become more important in the ongoing and future training and assessment of orthopaedic surgeons.

  20. Surgical skills simulation in trauma and orthopaedic training.

    PubMed

    Stirling, Euan R B; Lewis, Thomas L; Ferran, Nicholas A

    2014-01-01

    Changing patterns of health care delivery and the rapid evolution of orthopaedic surgical techniques have made it increasingly difficult for trainees to develop expertise in their craft. Working hour restrictions and a drive towards senior led care demands that proficiency be gained in a shorter period of time whilst requiring a greater skill set than that in the past. The resulting conflict between service provision and training has necessitated the development of alternative methods in order to compensate for the reduction in 'hands-on' experience. Simulation training provides the opportunity to develop surgical skills in a controlled environment whilst minimising risks to patient safety, operating theatre usage and financial expenditure. Many options for simulation exist within orthopaedics from cadaveric or prosthetic models, to arthroscopic simulators, to advanced virtual reality and three-dimensional software tools. There are limitations to this form of training, but it has significant potential for trainees to achieve competence in procedures prior to real-life practice. The evidence for its direct transferability to operating theatre performance is limited but there are clear benefits such as increasing trainee confidence and familiarity with equipment. With progressively improving methods of simulation available, it is likely to become more important in the ongoing and future training and assessment of orthopaedic surgeons. PMID:25523023

  1. How useful are skills acquired at adult non-formal education and training centres for finding employment in South Africa?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayombe, Celestin; Lombard, Antoinette

    2015-10-01

    Non-formal adult education and training (NFET) in South Africa is instrumental in breaking the high level of poverty and decreasing the social inequality the country continues to face as a post-apartheid democracy. Public and private NFET centres in South Africa aim to meet the training needs of adults who have been deprived of formal education with courses which foster access to opportunities for skills acquisition and employment and bring about social and economic inclusion. However, many adults who were facing long-term unemployment due to a lack of marketable skills remain unemployed after completing NFET programmes. This paper reports on a study which investigated what constitutes favourable conditions ("internal enabling environments") for skills acquisition inside NFET centres leading to employment and how they can be improved to contribute to coordinated efforts of increasing NFET graduates' paid and/or self-employment capacities. The authors found that centres focusing on activities suitable for self-employment during training were more likely to create internal enabling environments for skills acquisition and income generation than centres offering courses designed for entering paid employment. The authors conclude that there appears to be a significant correlation between NFET centres' training programme objectives, financial resources, trainee selection criteria, the process of training needs assessment, and skills acquisition for successful employment outcomes of NFET graduates. Without these internal enabling factors, adult trainees are likely to continue finding it difficult to integrate into the labour market or participate in economic activities and hence break the cycle of poverty and social exclusion.

  2. EM Talk: communication skills training for emergency medicine patients with serious illness.

    PubMed

    Grudzen, Corita R; Emlet, Lillian L; Kuntz, Joanne; Shreves, Ashley; Zimny, Erin; Gang, Maureen; Schaulis, Monique; Schmidt, Scott; Isaacs, Eric; Arnold, Robert

    2016-06-01

    The emergency department visit for a patient with serious illness represents a sentinel event, signalling a change in the illness trajectory. By better understanding patient and family wishes, emergency physicians can reinforce advance care plans and ensure the hospital care provided matches the patient's values. Despite their importance in care at the end of life, emergency physicians have received little training on how to talk to seriously ill patients and their families about goals of care. To expand communication skills training to emergency medicine, we developed a programme to give emergency medicine physicians the ability to empathically deliver serious news and to talk about goals of care. We have built on lessons from prior studies to design an intervention employing the most effective pedagogical techniques, including the use of simulated patients/families, role-playing and small group learning with constructive feedback from master clinicians. Here, we describe our evidence-based communication skills training course EM Talk using simulation, reflective feedback and deliberate practice. PMID:26762163

  3. A supervised training program in flexible sigmoidoscopy: evaluating skills from residency training to clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Lewan, R B; Baskin, W N; Sharon, M W; Greenlaw, R L; Frakes, J T; Vidican, D E

    1989-01-01

    To assess the effectiveness of a training program in flexible sigmoidoscopy for family practice residents, we prospectively studied the performance of four residents during their training and after graduation. One hundred and four training exams performed with the assistance of an experienced gastroenterologist were compared with 118 unassisted post-training, post-residency exams. The mean depth of insertion for the post-training period was 51.1 +/- 1.2 cm, which was significantly greater (P less than .05, Student's t test) than the mean training period depth of 47.6 +/- 1.2 cm. There was no significant difference in the identification of polyps or cancer between the training and post-training periods. The mean duration of an exam was 17.3 +/- 0.6 minutes in the post-training period. No significant complications were encountered in either period. The residency trained family physicians obtained results similar to those reported by trained endoscopists in depth of examination and pathology detected, although their examinations required more time. We conclude that this model of training was effective in the development of flexible sigmoidoscopy procedural skill for family practice residents.

  4. Perception of Entrepreneurial Training beyond the Domain of Undergraduate Programme in Estate Management and Valuation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bioku, Joseph Olufemi; Ataguba, Joseph Obaje; Ogungbenro, Matthew Taiwo

    2016-01-01

    Undergraduates at the Federal Polytechnic Idah in Nigeria are trained in vocations outside their domain programmes in connection with the entrepreneurship development course as pre-requisite for their graduation. This study assessed students' perception of entrepreneurship training in vocations beyond those taught within the core estate management…

  5. Effectiveness of a Competence Training Programme for Parents of Socially Disruptive Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lauth, Gerhard W.; Otte, T. Alian; Heubeck, Bernd G.

    2009-01-01

    Modern evaluations of parent training programmes seek evidence not only of efficacy in optimal, often university clinic settings, but also of effectiveness under normal field conditions. The Kompetenztraining fur Eltern sozial auffalliger Kinder (KES) is a cognitive-behavioural competence training for parents of socially disruptive children. This…

  6. Single incision laparoscopic surgery – is it time for laboratory skills training?

    PubMed Central

    Łaski, Dariusz; Makarewicz, Wojciech; Bobowicz, Maciej; Kobiela, Jarosław; Nateghi, Behzad; Proczko, Monika; Madejewska, Ilona; Gruca, Zbigniew; Śledzinski, Zbigniew

    2013-01-01

    Introduction With the introduction of new surgical equipment, there is always the need for new, more advanced training. The authors try to answer whether the use of the newest generation tools has an impact on achieving better results in single incision laparoscopic surgery (SILS) technique during the exercises in the surgical skills laboratory. Material and methods There were 51 participants in the study: 44 ‘novices’ and 7 ‘experts’. All subjects performed the ‘advanced grasping’ exercise according to the FLS programme manual using four types of laparoscopic approach including two SILS ports and SILS-dedicated instruments. The outcome measures involved task completion time and the number of errors. Results Tasks using straight laparoscopic instruments set together with classic three-port access as well as SILS access ports were finished significantly faster when compared with SILS-dedicated instruments (p < 0.05). There were no significant differences in performance times between the two setups with straight instruments (p < 0.05) and both setups with SILS-dedicated instruments, irrespective of the use of curved or dynamic articulated tools. Students with no previous laparoscopic experience had significantly worse task completion times in all tasks in comparison to students with laparoscopic laboratory training and the ‘experts’ group. Conclusions The use of the straight instruments in the SILS technique remain similar to its performance in full triangulation. SILS-dedicated instruments paradoxically increase the task completion time irrespective of possessed skills. The study showed the necessity of a SILS-dedicated tools training programme. PMID:24130635

  7. The PIP training programme: building of ACP experts capacities in crop protection and food safety to support local companies to comply with EU regulations on pesticides residues.

    PubMed

    Schiffers, B C; Schubert, A; Schiffers, C; Fontaine, S; Gumusboga, N; Werner, B; Webb, M; Lugros, H; Stinglhamber, G

    2006-01-01

    Regulatory requirements, and in particular phytosanitary quality standards change rapidly. As ACP producers/exporters race to become more competitive, to keep their market share and to satisfay their customers' commercial demands (e.g. EUREP-GAP certification), the need for competent staff who are aware of the company's quality objectives and trained to follow instructions is crucial. Mastering sanitary quality is only possible if matched with a programme to build the skills of companies' human resources. The Pesticide Initiative Programme (PIP), mindful of the importance of making operators autonomous and of training them to monitor EU food safety regulations and technology on their own, has successfully developed a training programme while building a quality network of local/ACP service providers. By building the capacities of ACP experts and then securing their services as trainers, PIP also guarantees companies' access to expertise and the sustainability of their efforts to comply with new EU regulations. The training strategy developed by PIP rests on two pilars: instructor training and collective training. Instructor training consists in reinforcing the technical knowledge of local experts (agronomists, hygienists, etc.) by providing them with active teaching methods. Once the ACP experts have gained enough technical knowledge of the key areas of crop protection--mainly pesticides management--and food safety, and have demonstrated their capacity to train the technical staff of local companies, the PIP has carried out a collective training programme in 2004, 2005 and 2006. To date, more than 130 consultants covering about 15 ACP countries have received instructor training, and more than 700 people have participated in collective and in-company training sessions.

  8. Robot Guided 'Pen Skill' Training in Children with Motor Difficulties.

    PubMed

    Shire, Katy A; Hill, Liam J B; Snapp-Childs, Winona; Bingham, Geoffrey P; Kountouriotis, Georgios K; Barber, Sally; Mon-Williams, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Motor deficits are linked to a range of negative physical, social and academic consequences. Haptic robotic interventions, based on the principles of sensorimotor learning, have been shown previously to help children with motor problems learn new movements. We therefore examined whether the training benefits of a robotic system would generalise to a standardised test of 'pen-skills', assessed using objective kinematic measures [via the Clinical Kinematic Assessment Tool, CKAT]. A counterbalanced, cross-over design was used in a group of 51 children (37 male, aged 5-11 years) with manual control difficulties. Improved performance on a novel task using the robotic device could be attributed to the intervention but there was no evidence of generalisation to any of the CKAT tasks. The robotic system appears to have the potential to support motor learning, with the technology affording numerous advantages. However, the training regime may need to target particular manual skills (e.g. letter formation) in order to obtain clinically significant improvements in specific skills such as handwriting.

  9. Robot Guided 'Pen Skill' Training in Children with Motor Difficulties.

    PubMed

    Shire, Katy A; Hill, Liam J B; Snapp-Childs, Winona; Bingham, Geoffrey P; Kountouriotis, Georgios K; Barber, Sally; Mon-Williams, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Motor deficits are linked to a range of negative physical, social and academic consequences. Haptic robotic interventions, based on the principles of sensorimotor learning, have been shown previously to help children with motor problems learn new movements. We therefore examined whether the training benefits of a robotic system would generalise to a standardised test of 'pen-skills', assessed using objective kinematic measures [via the Clinical Kinematic Assessment Tool, CKAT]. A counterbalanced, cross-over design was used in a group of 51 children (37 male, aged 5-11 years) with manual control difficulties. Improved performance on a novel task using the robotic device could be attributed to the intervention but there was no evidence of generalisation to any of the CKAT tasks. The robotic system appears to have the potential to support motor learning, with the technology affording numerous advantages. However, the training regime may need to target particular manual skills (e.g. letter formation) in order to obtain clinically significant improvements in specific skills such as handwriting. PMID:26967993

  10. Training in Socio-Emotional Skills through On-Site Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talavera, Elvira Repetto; Perez-Gonzalez, Juan Carlos

    2007-01-01

    Socio-emotional skills are highly prized on the labour market these days; many writers say that competencies of this type help to increase individuals' employability, but educational institutions consistently forget their responsibility for providing training in them. Most jobs call not only for knowledge and specific technical competencies, but…

  11. Developmental Plan Handbook for Community Skills Training (TACL, Training Adults for Community Living).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roth, Martin R.; Hermus, Gary P.

    Based on behavioral principles, the handbook is designed as both an assessment tool and curriculum guide for training community living skills to mentally retarded and developmentally disabled individuals. Behavioral Programing Scales are provided to record baseline data, where the client receives no assistance. These scales cover all program…

  12. B-WEST Regional Workforce Training Center. Building Workers Entering Skilled Trades. Employer Training Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Portland Community Coll., OR.

    This guide, which was developed during the B-WEST (Building Workers Entering Skilled Trades) project, includes materials for use in training and providing on-site consultations to contractors, managers, supervisors, office/technical staff, and others in two areas: diversity in the workplace and sexual harassment in the workplace. Part 1, which…

  13. Group Parent Training with Immigrant Chinese Families: Enhancing Engagement and Augmenting Skills Training

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Anna S.; Fung, Joey J.; Yung, Vanda

    2013-01-01

    Parent training (PT) is a well supported treatment for reducing and preventing child conduct problems and abusive parenting. However, questions have been raised about the dissemination of PT to culturally diverse families who hold different views on childrearing and family structure. This article describes the application of group PT in two Chinese immigrant families to illustrate dual strategies for addressing potential cultural barriers. The Incredible Years program builds in many therapeutic process elements to address cultural concerns about PT skills to enhance parental engagement. In addition, augmenting basic PT with additional skills training can help parents manage stressors common in immigrant families in order to facilitate uptake of new parenting skills. Our implementation experience suggests that high risk immigrant Chinese parents can be effectively engaged in group PT even when they are not in treatment voluntarily. PMID:20564684

  14. Scaling up family medicine training in Gezira, Sudan – a 2-year in-service master programme using modern information and communication technology: a survey study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In 2010 the Gezira Family Medicine Project (GFMP) was initiated in Gezira state, Sudan, designed as an in-service training model. The project is a collaboration project between the University of Gezira, which aims to provide a 2-year master’s programme in family medicine for practicing doctors, and the Ministry of Health, which facilitates service provision and funds the training programme. This paper presents the programme, the teaching environment, and the first batch of candidates enrolled. Methods In this study a self-administered questionnaire was used to collect baseline data at the start of the project from doctors who joined the programme. A checklist was also used to assess the health centres where they work. A total of 188 out of 207 doctors responded (91%), while data were gathered from all 158 health centres (100%) staffed by the programme candidates. Results The Gezira model of in-service family medicine training has succeeded in recruiting 207 candidates in its first batch, providing health services in 158 centres, of which 84 had never been served by a doctor before. The curriculum is community oriented. The mean age of doctors was 32.5 years, 57% were males, and 32% were graduates from the University of Gezira. Respondents stated high confidence in practicing some skills such as asthma management and post-abortion uterine evacuation. They were least confident in other skills such as managing depression or inserting an intrauterine device. The majority of health centres was poorly equipped for management of noncommunicable diseases, as only 10% had an electrocardiography machine (ECG), 5% had spirometer, and 1% had a defibrillator. Conclusions The Gezira model has responded to local health system needs. Use of modern information and communication technology is used to facilitate both health service provision and training. The GFMP represents an example of a large-volume scaling-up programme of family medicine in Africa. PMID:24443978

  15. Thiel embalming method for cadaver preservation: a review of new training model for urologic skills training.

    PubMed

    Healy, Samuel E; Rai, Bhavan Prasad; Biyani, Chandra Shekhar; Eisma, Roos; Soames, Roger W; Nabi, Ghulam

    2015-03-01

    The use of endourology training models is on the rise. Surgical practice is moving toward a more minimally invasive approach and deficits in surgical exposure by enforcement of the European Working Time Directive call for simulation models to be anatomically sound. Thiel-embalmed cadavers have been found to demonstrate efficacy in tissue quality, elasticity, and handling in addition to playing a role in teaching and training. This review summarizes the current status of the Thiel method and its role in urologic skills training.

  16. Endoscopic non-technical skills team training: The next step in quality assurance of endoscopy training

    PubMed Central

    Matharoo, Manmeet; Haycock, Adam; Sevdalis, Nick; Thomas-Gibson, Siwan

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether novel, non-technical skills training for Bowel Cancer Screening (BCS) endoscopy teams enhanced patient safety knowledge and attitudes. METHODS: A novel endoscopy team training intervention for BCS teams was developed and evaluated as a pre-post intervention study. Four multi-disciplinary BCS teams constituting BCS endoscopist(s), specialist screening practitioners, endoscopy nurses and administrative staff (A) from English BCS training centres participated. No patients were involved in this study. Expert multidisciplinary faculty delivered a single day’s training utilising real clinical examples. Pre and post-course evaluation comprised participants’ patient safety awareness, attitudes, and knowledge. Global course evaluations were also collected. RESULTS: Twenty-three participants attended and their patient safety knowledge improved significantly from 43%-55% (P ≤ 0.001) following the training intervention. 12/41 (29%) of the safety attitudes items significantly improved in the areas of perceived patient safety knowledge and awareness. The remaining safety attitude items: perceived influence on patient safety, attitudes towards error management, error management actions and personal views following an error were unchanged following training. Both qualitative and quantitative global course evaluations were positive: 21/23 (91%) participants strongly agreed/agreed that they were satisfied with the course. Qualitative evaluation included mandating such training for endoscopy teams outside BCS and incorporating team training within wider endoscopy training. Limitations of the study include no measure of increased patient safety in clinical practice following training. CONCLUSION: A novel comprehensive training package addressing patient safety, non-technical skills and adverse event analysis was successful in improving multi-disciplinary teams’ knowledge and safety attitudes. PMID:25516665

  17. A qualitative evaluation of foundation dentists' and training programme directors' perceptions of clinical audit in general dental practice.

    PubMed

    Thornley, P; Quinn, A; Elley, K

    2015-08-28

    This study reports on an investigation into clinical audit (CA) educational and service delivery outcomes in a dental foundation training (DFT) programme. The aim was to investigate CA teaching, learning and practice from the perspective of foundation dentists (FDs) and to record suggestions for improvement. A qualitative research methodology was used. Audio recordings of focus group interviews with FDs were triangulated by an interview with a group of training programme directors (TPDs). The interviews were transcribed and thematically analysed using a 'Framework' approach within Nvivo Data Analysis Software. FDs report considerable learning and behaviour change. However, TPDs have doubts about the long-term effects on service delivery. There can be substantial learning in the clinical, managerial, communication and professionalism domains, and in the development of time management, organisational and team-working skills. Information is provided about use of resources and interaction with teachers and colleagues. CA provides learning opportunities not produced by other educational activities including 'awkward conversations' with team-members in the context of change management and providing feedback. This is relevant when applying the recommendations of the Francis report. This paper should be useful to any dentist conducting audit or team training. Suggestions are made for improvements to resources and support including right touch intervention. Trainers should teach in the 'Goldilocks Zone'. PMID:26315182

  18. Financial Management and Job Social Skills Training Components in a Summer Business Institute

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donohue, Brad; Conway, Debbie; Beisecker, Monica; Murphy, Heather; Farley, Alisha; Waite, Melissa; Gugino, Kristin; Knatz, Danielle; Lopez-Frank, Carolina; Burns, Jack; Madison, Suzanne; Shorty, Carrie

    2005-01-01

    Ninety-two adolescents, predominantly ethnic minority high school students, participated in a structured Summer Business Institute (SBI). Participating youth were randomly assigned to receive either job social skills or financial management skills training components. Students who additionally received the job social skills training component were…

  19. An Evaluation of Prepracticum Helping Skills Training for Graduate Social Work Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gockel, Annemarie; Burton, David L.

    2014-01-01

    Although foundational practice classes play a key role in helping prepracticum students develop counseling skills, we know little about the effectiveness of this form of helping skills training. This study assessed the effect of helping skills training delivered in foundational practice classes on proximal indicators of counseling skills…

  20. Duplication, Gaps and Coordination of Publicly Funded Skill Training Programs in 20 Cities. Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Planning Association, Washington, DC. Center for Priority Analysis.

    A study of duplications in public skill training programs in twenty American cities resulted in a two-volume report. Volume One (ED 068 706) summarized and drew conclusions from the individual city reports contained in Volume Two. "Skill training" is used to mean all programs whose major purpose is the imparting of marketable skills to enrollees…

  1. Digital Environment for Movement Control in Surgical Skill Training.

    PubMed

    Juanes, Juan A; Gómez, Juan J; Peguero, Pedro D; Ruisoto, Pablo

    2016-06-01

    Intelligent environments are increasingly becoming useful scenarios for handling computers. Technological devices are practical tools for learning and acquiring clinical skills as part of the medical training process. Within the framework of the advanced user interface, we present a technological application using Leap Motion, to enhance interaction with the user in the process of a laparoscopic surgical intervention and integrate the navigation through augmented reality images using manual gestures. Thus, we intend to achieve a more natural interaction with the objects that participate in a surgical intervention, which are augmented and related to the user's hand movements. PMID:27091754

  2. Digital Environment for Movement Control in Surgical Skill Training.

    PubMed

    Juanes, Juan A; Gómez, Juan J; Peguero, Pedro D; Ruisoto, Pablo

    2016-06-01

    Intelligent environments are increasingly becoming useful scenarios for handling computers. Technological devices are practical tools for learning and acquiring clinical skills as part of the medical training process. Within the framework of the advanced user interface, we present a technological application using Leap Motion, to enhance interaction with the user in the process of a laparoscopic surgical intervention and integrate the navigation through augmented reality images using manual gestures. Thus, we intend to achieve a more natural interaction with the objects that participate in a surgical intervention, which are augmented and related to the user's hand movements.

  3. A Study of the Effects of a Skills-Based Versus a Conventional Group Counseling Training Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smaby, Marlowe H.; Maddux, Cleborne D.; Torres-Rivera, Edil; Zimmick, Renee

    1999-01-01

    Reports on a study of counselors-in-training who completed systematic groups skills training based on the Skilled Group Counseling Training Model (SGCTM). Findings indicate that higher level group-counseling skills can be efficiently taught prior to practica and internships. Concludes that if counselors-in-training gain higher level skills prior…

  4. Training self-advocacy skills to adults with mild handicaps.

    PubMed Central

    Sievert, A L; Cuvo, A J; Davis, P K

    1988-01-01

    We developed and empirically evaluated an instructional program to teach self-advocacy skills to eight young adults with mild handicaps. Participants were taught to discriminate whether or not possible violations of legal rights occurred in socially validated scenarios and, if so, to role-play how to redress rights violations. Experimental control was demonstrated with a multiple probe design across four general legal rights categories for the discrimination component of training, and a multiple probe across groups of subjects for the redressing legal rights component of training. Participants' behavior was probed in simulations and deceptions of legal rights violations in natural settings. There were marked increases in dependent measures after instruction. Difficulties in assessing generalization and maintenance of low-rate behaviors and suggestions for future research are presented. PMID:3198550

  5. Group training in interpersonal problem-solving skills for workplace adaptation of adolescents and adults with Asperger syndrome: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Bonete, Saray; Calero, María Dolores; Fernández-Parra, Antonio

    2015-05-01

    Adults with Asperger syndrome show persistent difficulties in social situations which psychosocial treatments may address. Despite the multiple studies focusing on social skills interventions, only some have focused specifically on problem-solving skills and have not targeted workplace adaptation training in the adult population. This study describes preliminary data from a group format manual-based intervention, the Interpersonal Problem-Solving for Workplace Adaptation Programme, aimed at improving the cognitive and metacognitive process of social problem-solving skills focusing on typical social situations in the workplace based on mediation as the main strategy. A total of 50 adults with Asperger syndrome received the programme and were compared with a control group of typical development. The feasibility and effectiveness of the treatment were explored. Participants were assessed at pre-treatment and post-treatment on a task of social problem-solving skills and two secondary measures of socialisation and work profile using self- and caregiver-report. Using a variety of methods, the results showed that scores were significantly higher at post-treatment in the social problem-solving task and socialisation skills based on reports by parents. Differences in comparison to the control group had decreased after treatment. The treatment was acceptable to families and subject adherence was high. The Interpersonal Problem-Solving for Workplace Adaptation Programme appears to be a feasible training programme.

  6. Behavioral Skills Training to Improve the Abduction-Prevention Skills of Children with Autism.

    PubMed

    Ledbetter-Cho, Katherine; Lang, Russell; Davenport, Katy; Moore, Melissa; Lee, Allyson; O'Reilly, Mark; Watkins, Laci; Falcomata, Terry

    2016-09-01

    A concurrent multiple baseline across participants design evaluated the effects of behavioral skills training (BST) on abduction-prevention skills of four children with autism. Across phases, confederates presented four types of abduction lures: (a) simple requests, (b) appeals to authority, (c) assistance requests, and (d) incentives. During baseline, lures resulted in children leaving with confederate strangers. During intervention, BST targeted a three-step response (i.e., refuse, move away, and report) and the abduction-prevention skills of all participants improved. Improvements generalized to novel settings and confederates and were maintained at 4 weeks. There is currently limited research on abduction-prevention pertaining to individuals with ASD. BST can be used to teach abduction-prevention skills to individuals with ASD. BST can be effective at teaching appropriate responses to multiple types of abduction lures. The effects of BST on multiple responses to multiple types of lures can generalize across settings and people and maintain over time. PMID:27622133

  7. Evaluation of Behavioral Skills Training to Prevent Gun Play in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miltenberger, Raymond G.; Flessner, Christopher; Gatheridge, Brian; Johnson, Brigitte; Satterlund, Melisa; Egemo, Kristin

    2004-01-01

    This study evaluated behavioral skills training (BST), in a multiple baseline across subjects design, for teaching firearm safety skills to 6 6- and 7-year-old children. Similar to previous research with 4- and 5-year-olds, half of the children acquired the safety skills following BST and half acquired the skills following BST plus in situ…

  8. 20 CFR 638.600 - Applied vocational skills training (VST) through work projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) The Job Corps Director shall establish procedures for administering applied vocational skills training... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Applied vocational skills training (VST) through work projects. 638.600 Section 638.600 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING...

  9. A Disciplinary Perspective of Competency-Based Training on the Acquisition of Employability Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boahin, Peter; Hofman, Adriaan

    2013-01-01

    In the changing global economy, employability skills increasingly are the focus of vocational education and training institutions. This paper explores the effect of academic disciplines, students' background characteristics and industry training on the acquisition of employability skills through competency-based training. A significant…

  10. The effects of behavioral skills training on caregiver implementation of guided compliance.

    PubMed

    Miles, Nicholas I; Wilder, David A

    2009-01-01

    The effectiveness of a behavioral skills training package that consisted of modeling, rehearsal, and feedback was evaluated to increase correct implementation of guided compliance by caregivers of 3 children who exhibited noncompliance. Results showed that the training package improved performance of guided compliance. Generalization probes indicated that the skills learned were exhibited in different settings 3 to 6 weeks after training ended. PMID:19949532

  11. Identifying and Exploring Factors Affecting Embodied Conversational Agent Social Presence for Interpersonal Skills Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chuah, Joon Hao

    2013-01-01

    Embodied conversational agents (ECAs) have been used as virtual conversational partners in interpersonal skills training applications such as medical interviews, military decision making, and cultural training. Ideally, in interpersonal skills training users will perceive and treat the ECAs the same as they would real people. The perception and…

  12. Survey of Entry-Level Skills Training by Selected Missouri Manufacturers. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubbs, Marguerite; Erickson, Richard C.

    Missouri manufacturers of electrical and electronic equipment and related products were surveyed to identify entry-level skills training decision factors and the extent of entry-level skills training by the manufacturers. Two instruments were constructed for use in the study. The Training Decision Inventory was used to assess the influence of…

  13. Formal Art Observation Training Improves Medical Students’ Visual Diagnostic Skills

    PubMed Central

    Naghshineh, Sheila; Hafler, Janet P.; Miller, Alexa R.; Blanco, Maria A.; Lipsitz, Stuart R.; Dubroff, Rachel P.; Khoshbin, Shahram

    2008-01-01

    Background Despite evidence of inadequate physical examination skills among medical students, teaching these skills has declined. One method of enhancing inspection skills is teaching “visual literacy,” the ability to reason physiology and pathophysiology from careful and unbiased observation. Objective To improve students’ visual acumen through structured observation of artworks, understanding of fine arts concepts and applying these skills to patient care. Design Prospective, partially randomized pre- vs. post-course evaluation using mixed-methods data analysis. Participants Twenty-four pre-clinical student participants were compared to 34 classmates at a similar stage of training. Intervention Training the Eye: Improving the Art of Physical Diagnosis consists of eight paired sessions of art observation exercises with didactics that integrate fine arts concepts with physical diagnosis topics and an elective life drawing session. Measurements The frequency of accurate observations on a 1-h visual skills examination was used to evaluate pre- vs. post-course descriptions of patient photographs and art imagery. Content analysis was used to identify thematic categories. All assessments were blinded to study group and pre- vs. post-course evaluation. Results Following the course, class participants increased their total mean number of observations compared to controls (5.41 ± 0.63 vs. 0.36 ± 0.53, p < 0.0001) and had increased sophistication in their descriptions of artistic and clinical imagery. A ‘dose-response’ was found for those who attended eight or more sessions, compared to participants who attended seven or fewer sessions (6.31 + 0.81 and 2.76 + 1.2, respectively, p = 0.03). Conclusions This interdisciplinary course improved participants’ capacity to make accurate observations of art and physical findings. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s11606-008-0667-0) contains

  14. Training in the Retail Trade in the United Kingdom. Report for the FORCE Programme. First Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toye, Janet; And Others

    An international team of researchers studied the following aspects of training in the United Kingdom's retail sector: structure and characteristics, institutional and social context, employment and labor, changing conditions and their implications for skill requirements, and training and recruitment. Data were collected from an analysis of social…

  15. Training in the Retail Sector in Germany. Report for the FORCE Programme. First Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuhnlein, Gertrud

    An international team of researchers studied the following aspects of training in Germany's retail sector: structure and characteristics, institutional and social context, employment and labor, changing conditions and their implications for skill requirements, and training and recruitment. Data were collected from an analysis of social and…

  16. Training in the Retail Trade in France. Report for the FORCE Programme. First Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baret, Christophe; Bertrand, Olivier

    An international team of researchers studied the following aspects of training in France's retail sector: structure and characteristics, institutional and social context, employment and labor, changing conditions and their implications for skill requirements, and training and recruitment. Data were collected from an analysis of social and…

  17. Training in the Retail Trade in the Netherlands. Report for the FORCE Programme. First Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van den Tillaart, Harry

    An international team of researchers studied the following aspects of training in the Netherlands' retail sector: structure and characteristics, institutional and social context, employment and labor, changing conditions and their implications for skill requirements, and training and recruitment. Data were collected from an analysis of social and…

  18. Training in the Retail Trade in Ireland. Report for the FORCE Programme. First Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    European Centre for the Development of Vocational Training, Berlin (Germany).

    An international team of researchers studied the following aspects of training in Ireland's retail sector: structure and characteristics, institutional and social context, employment and labor, changing conditions and their implications for skill requirements, and training and recruitment. Data were collected from an analysis of social and…

  19. Training in the Retail Trade in Italy. Report for the FORCE Programme. First Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattei, Patrizia; And Others

    An international team of researchers studied the following aspects of training in Italy's retail sector: structure and characteristics, institutional and social context, employment and labor, changing conditions and their implications for skill requirements, and training and recruitment. Data were collected from an analysis of social and…

  20. Going out-of-programme as a specialty trainee: procrastination or optimisation of training?

    PubMed

    Kurien, Matthew; Azmy, Iman A F; Sanders, David S

    2011-12-01

    Out-of-programme (OOP) activities enable postgraduate trainees to undertake an experience outside of their individual subspecialty training programmes. Activities vary but may include a period of research, additional clinical experiences or time for a planned career break. Determining whether to go OOP is a common dilemma faced by many trainees as they progress through postgraduate training. This review assesses the options trainees have with regards to going OOP, evaluates the potential advantages and disadvantages and also provides advice for those considering an OOP activity. PMID:22268310

  1. Going out-of-programme as a specialty trainee: procrastination or optimisation of training?

    PubMed

    Kurien, Matthew; Azmy, Iman A F; Sanders, David S

    2011-12-01

    Out-of-programme (OOP) activities enable postgraduate trainees to undertake an experience outside of their individual subspecialty training programmes. Activities vary but may include a period of research, additional clinical experiences or time for a planned career break. Determining whether to go OOP is a common dilemma faced by many trainees as they progress through postgraduate training. This review assesses the options trainees have with regards to going OOP, evaluates the potential advantages and disadvantages and also provides advice for those considering an OOP activity.

  2. Perspectives and concerns of clients at primary health care facilities involved in evaluation of a national mental health training programme for primary care in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A cluster randomised controlled trial (RCT) of a national Kenyan mental health primary care training programme demonstrated a significant impact on the health, disability and quality of life of clients, despite a severe shortage of medicines in the clinics (Jenkins et al. Submitted 2012). As focus group methodology has been found to be a useful method of obtaining a detailed understanding of client and health worker perspectives within health systems (Sharfritz and Roberts. Health Transit Rev 4:81–85, 1994), the experiences of the participating clients were explored through qualitative focus group discussions in order to better understand the potential reasons for the improved outcomes in the intervention group. Methods Two ninety minute focus groups were conducted in Nyanza province, a poor agricultural region of Kenya, with 10 clients from the intervention group clinics where staff had received the training programme, and 10 clients from the control group where staff had not received the training during the earlier randomised controlled trial. Results These focus group discussions suggest that the clients in the intervention group noticed and appreciated enhanced communication, diagnostic and counselling skills in their respective health workers, whereas clients in the control group were aware of the lack of these skills. Confidentiality emerged from the discussions as a significant client concern in relation to the volunteer cadre of community health workers, whose only training comes from their respective primary care health workers. Conclusion Enhanced health worker skills conferred by the mental health training programme may be responsible for the significant improvement in outcomes for clients in the intervention clinics found in the randomised controlled trial, despite the general shortage of medicines and other health system weaknesses. These findings suggest that strengthening mental health training for primary care staff is worthwhile even

  3. THE TRAINING OF SKILLED WORKERS, REPORT ON A SAMPLE INQUIRY INTO THE BACKGROUND, TRAINING AND PRESENT OCCUPATIONS OF SKILLED WORKERS IN THE MECHANICAL ENGINEERING INDUSTRY OF FOUR COUNTRIES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development, Paris (France). Manpower Div.

    AN INTENSIVE STUDY OF TWO SAMPLES DRAWN FROM ONE GEOGRAPHIC AREA IN EACH OF FOUR COUNTRIES AIMED TO DETERMINE THE TRAINING AND JOB HISTORIES OF SKILLED WORKERS IN THE METAL TRADES AND THE RESULTS OBTAINED BY DIFFERENT TRAINING SYSTEMS. THE COUNTRIES WERE SELECTED TO REPRESENT (1) PREDOMINANTLY SCHOOL-BASED TRAINING (BELGIUM), (2) HIGHLY REGULATED…

  4. Optimal training design for procedural motor skills: a review and application to laparoscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Spruit, Edward N; Band, Guido P H; Hamming, Jaap F; Ridderinkhof, K Richard

    2014-11-01

    This literature review covers the choices to consider in training complex procedural, perceptual and motor skills. In particular, we focus on laparoscopic surgery. An overview is provided of important training factors modulating the acquisition, durability, transfer, and efficiency of trained skills. We summarize empirical studies and their theoretical background on the topic of training complex cognitive and motor skills that are pertinent to proficiency in laparoscopic surgery. The overview pertains to surgical simulation training for laparoscopy, but also to training in other demanding procedural and dexterous tasks, such as aviation, managing complex systems and sports. Evidence-based recommendations are provided for facilitating efficiency in laparoscopic motor skill training such as session spacing, adaptive training, task variability, part-task training, mental imagery and deliberate practice.

  5. A preliminary evaluation of two behavioral skills training procedures for teaching abduction-prevention skills to schoolchildren.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Brigitte M; Miltenberger, Raymond G; Knudson, Peter; Egemo-Helm, Kristin; Kelso, Pamela; Jostad, Candice; Langley, Linda

    2006-01-01

    Although child abduction is a low-rate event, it presents a serious threat to the safety of children. The victims of child abduction face the threat of physical and emotional injury, sexual abuse, and death. Previous research has shown that behavioral skills training (BST) is effective in teaching children abduction-prevention skills, although not all children learn the skills. This study compared BST only to BST with an added in situ training component to teach abduction-prevention skills in a small-group format to schoolchildren. Results showed that both programs were effective in teaching abduction-prevention skills. In addition, the scores for the group that received in situ training were significantly higher than scores for the group that received BST alone at the 3-month follow-up assessment.

  6. Quality of Project Management Education and Training Programmes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodea, Constanta-Nicoleta; Dascalu, Maria; Coman, Melania

    The paper refers to the factors which influence the quality of training and education on project management. A survey was made and the main results are presented. 81 % of the responses came from China. The rest were professionals of different EU nationalities. The percentage of Project Managers who answered the questions is rather low - 8%. In the "Others" category, we have software developers, financial managers and professors, who are involved in both training on project management, but also as team members or team managers in projects, thus ensuring a balanced overview of both theory and practical issues.

  7. Universities and Institutes Offering Literacy Training Programmes: Directory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Inst. for Adult Literacy Methods, Teheran (Iran).

    This directory for literacy workers and adult educators lists universities and institutes that offer training programs to literacy personnel in four geographic regions of the world. The directory contains four sections which are organized alphabetically by geographic region, by countries within each region, and by universities and institutes…

  8. Training Programmes for Stress Management in Small Businesses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Treven, Sonja; Potocan, Vojko

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to present: the problem of stress employees might encounter; the individual inclination to stress; the individual methods for reducing stress; and the authors' model of training for stress prevention. Design/Methodology/Approach: The paper uses both descriptive and analytical approaches to research and…

  9. Social Skills Training for Adolescents With Intellectual Disabilities: A School-Based Evaluation.

    PubMed

    O'Handley, Roderick D; Ford, W Blake; Radley, Keith C; Helbig, Kate A; Wimberly, Joy K

    2016-07-01

    Individuals with intellectual disabilities (ID) often demonstrate impairments in social functioning, with deficits becoming more apparent during adolescence. This study evaluated the effects of the Superheroes Social Skills program, a program that combines behavioral skills training and video modeling to teach target social skills, on accurate demonstration of three target social skills in adolescents with ID. Skills taught in the present study include Expressing Wants and Needs, Conversation, and Turn Taking. Four adolescents with ID participated in a 3-week social skills intervention, with the intervention occurring twice per week. A multiple baseline across skills design was used to determine the effect of the intervention on social skill accuracy in both a training and generalization setting. All participants demonstrated substantial improvements in skill accuracy in both settings, with teacher ratings of social functioning further suggesting generalization of social skills to nontraining settings.

  10. A Preliminary Evaluation of Two Behavioral Skills Training Procedures for Teaching Abduction-Prevention Skills to Schoolchildren

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Brigitte M.; Miltenberger, Raymond G.; Knudson, Peter; Egemo-Helm, Kristin; Kelso, Pamela; Jostad, Candice; Langley, Linda

    2006-01-01

    Although child abduction is a low-rate event, it presents a serious threat to the safety of children. The victims of child abduction face the threat of physical and emotional injury, sexual abuse, and death. Previous research has shown that behavioral skills training (BST) is effective in teaching children abduction-prevention skills, although not…

  11. Implementing clinical ethics in German hospitals: content, didactics and evaluation of a nationwide postgraduate training programme.

    PubMed

    Dörries, Andrea; Simon, Alfred; Neitzke, Gerald; Vollmann, Jochen

    2010-12-01

    The Hannover qualifying programme 'ethics consultation in hospitals', conducted by a four-institution cooperation partnership, is an interdisciplinary, scientifically based programme for healthcare professionals interested in ethics consultation services and is widely acknowledged by hospital managements and healthcare professionals. It is unique concerning its content, scope and teaching format. With its basic and advanced modules it has provided training and education for 367 healthcare professionals with 570 participations since 2003 (until February 2010). One characteristic feature is its attractiveness for health professionals from different backgrounds. Internationally, the Hannover programme is one of the few schedules with both academics and non-academics as target groups and a high participation rate of physicians. The concept of the Hannover programme is in great demand, and its schedule is continuously optimised through evaluation. The goals of enabling healthcare professionals from different professional backgrounds to define and reflect ethical problems, to facilitate and support the process of decision-making and to work out structures for their own institutions seem to have been achieved. However, in order to obtain effective and sustainable results, participation in the programme should be supplemented regularly by in-house training sessions or individual expert consultations. Future challenges include new thematic courses and providing a network for former participants, especially when they come from non-academic hospitals. The network is a reasonable platform to discuss participants' experiences, successes and pitfalls. A further task will be research on how the programme's concept can support the sustainability of ethics structures in the various institutions.

  12. Training Programmes Can Change Behaviour and Encourage the Cultivation of Over-Harvested Plant Species

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Sophie J.; Jones, Julia P. G.; Clubbe, Colin; Gibbons, James M.

    2012-01-01

    Cultivation of wild-harvested plant species has been proposed as a way of reducing over-exploitation of wild populations but lack of technical knowledge is thought to be a barrier preventing people from cultivating a new species. Training programmes are therefore used to increase technical knowledge to encourage people to adopt cultivation. We assessed the impact of a training programme aiming to encourage cultivation of xaté (Chamaedorea ernesti-augusti), an over-harvested palm from Central America. Five years after the training programme ended, we surveyed untrained and trained individuals focusing on four potential predictors of behaviour: technical knowledge, attitudes (what individuals think about a behaviour), subjective norms (what individuals perceive others to think of a behaviour) and perceived behavioural control (self assessment of whether individuals can enact the behaviour successfully). Whilst accounting for socioeconomic variables, we investigate the influence of training upon these behavioural predictors and examine the factors that determine whether people adopt cultivation of a novel species. Those who had been trained had higher levels of technical knowledge about xaté cultivation and higher belief in their ability to cultivate it while training was not associated with differences in attitudes or subjective norms. Technical knowledge and perceived behavioural control (along with socio-economic variables such as forest ownership and age) were predictors of whether individuals cultivate xaté. We suggest that training programmes can have a long lasting effect on individuals and can change behaviour. However, in many situations other barriers to cultivation, such as access to seeds or appropriate markets, will need to be addressed. PMID:22431993

  13. Say 'trouble's gone': chronic illness and employability in job training programmes.

    PubMed

    Tsui, Emma K

    2013-01-01

    The concept of biographical disruption has unique relevance for socioeconomically disadvantaged groups who participate in entry-level job training programmes. In these programmes trainees often suffer from various forms of chronic illness and must arrange these illnesses into a picture of employability. In this article I use ethnographic data and narrative analysis to examine closely two trainees' illness-related experiences, expressions and talk, and find that their ability to present their illnesses in ways that are consistent with programmatic goals is strongly influenced by family support, responsibilities and roles, as well as particular aspects of illness, like the interpretability of symptoms. I also find that the concept of biographical disruption has a curious traction in the world of job training, particularly among job training programme staff who would like to see trainees mobilise a variety of resources to help manage their illness. However, for trainees, many of whom have lived with chronic illness for years, the concept of biographical disruption may be more limited as a tool for understanding the experiences of illness. A more meaningful disruptive force in the lives of trainees appears to be the programme itself and the strategies for dealing with illness that programme staff may extend. PMID:22533603

  14. Simulation For Task Practice in Technical Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mallory, W. J.

    1981-01-01

    Describes two programs used by the Ford Motor Company to train manufacturing skilled trades personnel. Programmable Controller Maintenance Training Program for Industrial Technicians and Troubleshooting Strategy Program use simulation and provide improved task performance after training. (JOW)

  15. Effect of a 6-week dynamic neuromuscular training programme on ankle joint function: A Case report

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Ankle joint sprain and the subsequent development of chronic ankle instability (CAI) are commonly encountered by clinicians involved in the treatment and rehabilitation of musculoskeletal injuries. It has recently been advocated that ankle joint post-sprain rehabilitation protocols should incorporate dynamic neuromuscular training to enhance ankle joint sensorimotor capabilities. To date no studies have reported on the effects of dynamic neuromuscular training on ankle joint positioning during landing from a jump, which has been reported as one of the primary injury mechanisms for ankle joint sprain. This case report details the effects of a 6-week dynamic neuromuscular training programme on ankle joint function in an athlete with CAI. Methods The athlete took part in a progressive 6-week dynamic neuromuscular training programme which incorporated postural stability, strengthening, plyometric, and speed/agility drills. The outcome measures chosen to assess for interventional efficacy were: [1] Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool (CAIT) scores, [2] Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT) reach distances, [3] ankle joint plantar flexion during drop landing and drop vertical jumping, and [4] ground reaction forces (GRFs) during walking. Results CAIT and SEBT scores improved following participation in the programme. The angle of ankle joint plantar flexion decreased at the point of initial contact during the drop landing and drop vertical jumping tasks, indicating that the ankle joint was in a less vulnerable position upon landing following participation in the programme. Furthermore, GRFs were reduced whilst walking post-intervention. Conclusions The 6-week dynamic neuromuscular training programme improved parameters of ankle joint sensorimotor control in an athlete with CAI. Further research is now required in a larger cohort of subjects to determine the effects of neuromuscular training on ankle joint injury risk factors. PMID:21658224

  16. A Focus into the Charity "Young Enterprise Northern Ireland" and How Effective Their "Company Programme" Is at Increasing "Life Skills" in Young People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McVeigh, Francis

    2014-01-01

    Purpose - This research project has investigated the "Company Programme" of the charity YE and how effective it is at increasing Life Skills in young people. Data has been obtained using student questionnaires and teacher interviews. Previous studies have been completed on "Life Skills" and "Enterprise Programmes",…

  17. Traces of Discourses and Governmentality within the Content and Implementation of the Western Australian Fundamental Movement Skills Programme (STEPS Professional Development)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jefferson-Buchanan, Rachael

    2016-01-01

    Over the last 20 years or more, a plethora of movement programmes have been adopted within primary physical education in the UK and across Australia. One particular programme, Fundamental Movement Skills (STEPS Professional Development), became of interest to the researcher during her dual role as the UK Fundamental Movement Skills (FMS)…

  18. The combined medical/PhD degree: a global survey of physician-scientist training programmes.

    PubMed

    Alamri, Yassar

    2016-06-01

    Typically lasting 7-9 years, medical-scientist training programmes (MSTPs) allow students a unique opportunity to simultaneously intercalate medical (MBBS, MBChB or MD) and research (PhD) degrees. The nature of both degrees means that the combined programme is arduous, and selection is often restricted to a few highly motivated students. Despite the many successes of MSTPs, enthusiasm about MSTPs and the number of intercalating students, at least in some countries, appear to be diminishing. In this review, I shed light on MSTPs around the world, highlight the plethora of successes such programmes have had and provide insights on the setbacks experienced and solutions offered, with the aim of reigniting interest in these programmes. PMID:27251908

  19. The combined medical/PhD degree: a global survey of physician-scientist training programmes.

    PubMed

    Alamri, Yassar

    2016-06-01

    Typically lasting 7-9 years, medical-scientist training programmes (MSTPs) allow students a unique opportunity to simultaneously intercalate medical (MBBS, MBChB or MD) and research (PhD) degrees. The nature of both degrees means that the combined programme is arduous, and selection is often restricted to a few highly motivated students. Despite the many successes of MSTPs, enthusiasm about MSTPs and the number of intercalating students, at least in some countries, appear to be diminishing. In this review, I shed light on MSTPs around the world, highlight the plethora of successes such programmes have had and provide insights on the setbacks experienced and solutions offered, with the aim of reigniting interest in these programmes.

  20. Religion and Spirituality within Counselling/Clinical Psychology Training Programmes: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jafari, Simon

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, there have been increasing efforts to attend to religious and spiritual issues within clinical/counselling psychology. However, there is limited research demonstrating how successfully such content is integrated into existing training programmes. This investigation sought to review primary research literature related to training…

  1. Participation in Formal Technical and Vocational Education and Training Programmes Worldwide: An Initial Statistical Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    UNESCO-UNEVOC International Centre for Technical and Vocational Education and Training, 2006

    2006-01-01

    There is a common perception that technical and vocational education and training (TVET) is diversifying and expanding in terms of its supply and demand. Practitioners and policymakers often believe that educational systems are offering a wider array of programmes at different levels and in various fields of study. They also assume that these…

  2. An Evaluation of Participation in a Schools-Based Youth Mental Health Peer Education Training Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Reilly, Aileen; Barry, James; Neary, Marie-Louise; Lane, Sabrina; O'Keeffe, Lynsey

    2016-01-01

    The use of peer education has been well documented within the discipline of health promotion, but not within the youth mental health domain. This paper describes an evaluation of an innovative schools-based peer education training programme that involved preparing young people to deliver a mental health workshop to their peers. Participants…

  3. Shovelling Smoke? The Experience of Being a Philosopher on an Educational Research Training Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suissa; Judith

    2006-01-01

    This paper is a reflective account of the experience of designing and teaching a philosophy module as part of a research training programme for students studying for research degrees in education. In the course of the discussion, I address various problems and questions to do with the relationship between philosophy and educational research, the…

  4. A Critical Evaluation of Training within the South African National Public Works Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mccord, Anna

    2005-01-01

    This article explores the ability of the training and work experience offered under public works programmes to promote employment in South Africa. Public works are a key component of South African labour market policy and are ascribed considerable potential in terms of addressing the core challenge of unemployment. However, despite this policy…

  5. Effects of a Teacher Training Programme on Symptoms of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Froelich, Jan; Breuer, Dieter; Doepfner, Manfred; Amonn, Frauke

    2012-01-01

    A substantial lack of effective school based interventions especially in the natural setting exists in the treatment of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. We performed a 18-week teacher training programme in a public elementary school with 378 pupils in 16 classes. After completing a screening assessment for symptoms related to ADHD and to…

  6. Sweden's International Training Programme in Education for Sustainable Development Enables Students to Change Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Jim; Neeser, Marie

    2012-01-01

    The Swedish International Training Programme in Education for Sustainable Development, which has been run annually for the past 10 years, is a five-phase program that supports participants to develop and implement a change project in their work places. It requires a team of students from an institution and provides extensive follow up. The course…

  7. The Training and Support Programme for Parents of Children with Ataxia: Parents' Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, L. A.; Barlow, J. H.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the Training and Support Programme (TSP) among parents of children with ataxia. Twenty-seven parents and their children completed the TSP. Data were collected by home record sheets and observation sheets completed by parents and therapists, respectively, and telephone interviews with 10 parents. Benefits reported…

  8. Mentoring in the Context of a Training Programme for Young Unemployed Adults with Physical Disability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cullen, L. A.; Barlow, J. H.

    1998-01-01

    This study examined the mentoring component of a program in the United Kingdom for young unemployed adults with the physical disability of arthritis. The 18-month Into-Work Personal Development Programme includes residential components, mentoring, and a work experience or vocational-training placement. Issues are raised concerning matching of…

  9. Towards Quality Technical Vocational Education and Training (Tvet) Programmes in Nigeria: Challenges and Improvement Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayonmike, Chinyere Shirley; Okwelle, P. Chijioke; Okeke, Benjamin Chukwumaijem

    2015-01-01

    Technical Vocational Education and Training (TVET) is widely recognized as a vital driving force for the socio-economic growth and technological development of nations. In achieving the goals and objectives of TVET in Nigeria, the quality of the programme needs to be improved and sustained. The purpose of this study is to ascertain the challenges…

  10. Parent Training: Effectiveness of the Parents Plus Early Years Programme in Community Preschool Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerber, Sarah-Jane; Sharry, John; Streek, Adrienne

    2016-01-01

    Evidenced based parent training (PT) programmes offer an important intervention strategy to improve early behavioural and emotional difficulties for young children. Initial research highlights the benefits of incorporating PT within local community services such as preschools. The present study aims to evaluate the effectiveness of the Parents…

  11. Intervention Programmes in Mathematics and Literacy: Teaching Assistants' Perceptions of Their Training and Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houssart, Jenny; Croucher, Richard

    2013-01-01

    We approach the recent argument put in this journal that teaching assistants (TAs) should be more strongly trained, monitored and supervised when teaching on intervention programmes. We suggest that the argument sits uneasily with wider management and educational literature. We examine TAs' experience of delivering important intervention…

  12. Social Skills Training for Adolescents with Asperger's Syndrome Using a Consultation Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minihan, Aileen; Kinsella, William; Honan, Rita

    2011-01-01

    A case study design was used to evaluate the effectiveness of behavioural consultation as a method for improving the social skills of adolescents with Asperger's syndrome. Two case studies were conducted. In each study, two teachers implemented a social skills programme with two to three adolescents with Asperger's syndrome in a group setting with…

  13. Neurocognitive individualized training versus social skills individualized training: a randomized trial in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Bucci, Paola; Piegari, Giuseppe; Mucci, Armida; Merlotti, Eleonora; Chieffi, Marcello; De Riso, Francesco; De Angelis, Maria; Di Munzio, Walter; Galderisi, Silvana

    2013-10-01

    Rehabilitation programs integrating cognitive remediation (CR) and psychosocial rehabilitation are often implemented as they seem to yield greater improvements in functional outcome than stand alone treatment approaches. Mechanisms underlying synergistic effects of combining CR with psychosocial interventions are not fully understood. Disentangling the relative contribution of each component of integrated programs might improve understanding of underlying mechanisms. In the present study we compared the efficacy of two components of our rehabilitation program [the Neurocognitive Individualized Training (NIT) and the Social Skills Individualized Training (SSIT)]. Seventy-two patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder were randomly assigned to one of two treatment groups. Changes in cognitive, psychopathological and real-world functioning indices after 6 and 12 months were compared between the two groups. After both 6 and 12 months, NIT produced an improvement of attention, verbal memory and perseverative aspects of executive functioning, while SSIT produced a worsening of visuo-spatial memory and attention and no significant effect on the other cognitive domains. As to the real-world functioning, NIT produced a significant improvement of interpersonal relationships, while SSIT yielded a significant improvement of QLS instrumental role subscale. According to our findings, cognitive training is more effective than social skills training on several cognitive domains and indices of real-world functioning relevant to subject's relationships with other people. Integrated approaches might target different areas of functional impairment but should be planned carefully and individually to fully exploit the synergistic potential.

  14. Interpersonal Skills Training: Evaluation of a Program with Adult Male Offenders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bornstein, Philip H.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    To assess the efficacy of an interpersonal skill training program, adult offenders were randomly assigned to either interpersonal effectiveness training or waiting-list control. Results indicated interpersonal effectiveness training group superiority on Interpersonal Behavior Role-Play Test training and generalization assessment items. Findings…

  15. Training of Self-Regulated Learning Skills on a Social Network System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cho, Kwangsu; Cho, Moon-Heum

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether self-regulated learning (SRL) skills trained using a social network system (SNS) may be generalized outside the training session. A total of 29 undergraduate students participated in the study. During the training session, students in the experimental group were trained to practice…

  16. Team Training and Retention of Skills Acquired Above Real Time Training on a Flight Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ali, Syed Friasat; Guckenberger, Dutch; Crane, Peter; Rossi, Marcia; Williams, Mayard; Williams, Jason; Archer, Matt

    2000-01-01

    Above Real-Time Training (ARTT) is the training acquired on a real time simulator when it is modified to present events at a faster pace than normal. The experiments related to training of pilots performed by NASA engineers (Kolf in 1973, Hoey in 1976) and others (Guckenberger, Crane and their associates in the nineties) have shown that in comparison with the real time training (RTT), ARTT provides the following benefits: increased rate of skill acquisition, reduced simulator and aircraft training time, and more effective training for emergency procedures. Two sets of experiments have been performed; they are reported in professional conferences and the respective papers are included in this report. The retention of effects of ARTT has been studied in the first set of experiments and the use of ARTT as top-off training has been examined in the second set of experiments. In ARTT, the pace of events was 1.5 times the pace in RTT. In both sets of experiments, university students were trained to perform an aerial gunnery task. The training unit was equipped with a joystick and a throttle. The student acted as a nose gunner in a hypothetical two place attack aircraft. The flight simulation software was installed on a Universal Distributed Interactive Simulator platform supplied by ECC International of Orlando, Florida. In the first set of experiments, two training programs RTT or ART7 were used. Students were then tested in real time on more demanding scenarios: either immediately after training or two days later. The effects of ARTT did not decrease over a two day retention interval and ARTT was more time efficient than real time training. Therefore, equal test performance could be achieved with less clock-time spent in the simulator. In the second set of experiments three training programs RTT or ARTT or RARTT, were used. In RTT, students received 36 minutes of real time training. In ARTT, students received 36 minutes of above real time training. In RARTT, students

  17. Promoting Darfuri women’s psychosocial health: developing a war trauma counsellor training programme tailored to the person

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Women are considered special groups who are uniquely vulnerable in the context of war exposures. To effectively target the resources aimed at mitigating mental health consequences and optimising and maximising the use of mental health provisions, culturally relevant war trauma counsellor training is required. The objectives of this study are to promote a new philosophy in the Sudanese mental health care by introducing an integrative approach for targeted prevention and tailored treatments to the Darfuri person in a cost-effective way. Furthermore, the study provides evidence- and theory-based guidelines for developing a war trauma counsellor training programme in Sudan, mainly based on qualitative and quantitative studies among war-affected Darfuri female students. Cultural conceptualisations such as gender roles and religious expectations as well as theories that emphasise resilience and other psychosocial adaptation skills have been operationalised to reflect the totality of the Darfuri women’s experiences. Furthermore, the results of four interrelated studies among war-traumatised undergraduate Darfuri women who are internally displaced provide the basis that guides an outline for qualification development, capacity building and skills consolidation among Sudanese mental health care providers. Explicit war-related psychosocial needs assessment tools, specific war-related trauma counsellor training and particular counsellor characteristics, qualities and awareness that pertain to strengthening the efficacy of war trauma Sudanese counsellors are recommended. The aim is to produce expertly trained war trauma counsellors working with war-affected Darfuri women in particular and with regards to their helpfulness in responding to the psychosocial needs of war-exposed Sudanese in general. PMID:23531430

  18. Temporary above-knee prostheses and training programme during chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, J; Hayashi, Y; Yoneda, T; Minamihara, K; Tanaka, H; Arimitsu, K; Tominaga, A

    1985-08-01

    A temporary prosthesis has been developed for above-knee amputees who receive long-term post-amputation chemotherapy. The temporary prosthesis has an adjustable laminated quadrilateral socket, the size of which is adjusted by metal screws. Fifteen patients were fitted with the temporary prosthesis. Initial fittings were carried out after a period averaging 46 days from amputation. All of the patients were able to walk with one crutch after about one month from initial fitting. Although patients often had to discontinue their prosthetic training owing to chemotherapy, they could resume wearing their prostheses simply by adjusting the socket. One patient, who was fitted with a cosmetic ultra-light prosthesis initially due to her poor general condition, was later fitted with the temporary prosthesis. She regained the ability to walk 60 days later and still wears it. Early fitting of temporary prostheses for these patients is not only of practical convenience but also improves their mental state. PMID:4047925

  19. Hand-washing behaviour and nurses' knowledge after a training programme.

    PubMed

    Erkan, Tulay; Findik, Ummu Yildiz; Tokuc, Burcu

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the nurses' hand-washing behaviour and knowledge before and after a training programme. This prospective study involved 200 nurses who participated in hand-washing training at a university hospital in Turkey. The data were collected using a personal information form and pre- and post-test surveys that had been developed by the researchers. During the study, the nurses received 40 min of training on hand washing and a handbook prepared by the researchers. The hand-washing behaviour and knowledge of the nurses were assessed before training and 1 month after the training. To analyse the data, descriptive statistics, a t-test and a Mc Nemar chi-squared test were used. Following the training, there was a significant increase in the frequency of hand washing by the nurses (t = -2.202, P = 0.029), together with an increase in the time allowed for hand washing (P = 0.024, P < 0.05), knowledge of hand-washing practices (t = -16.081, P < 0.05) and quality (t = -10.874, P < 0.05). Planned training programmes for hand washing should be implemented to improve the behaviour and knowledge of nurses. PMID:21939477

  20. The Effects of Assertiveness Training on Enhancing the Social Skills of Adolescents with Visual Impairments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Young-il

    2003-01-01

    A study of the effects of assertiveness training to enhance the social/assertiveness skills of 36 adolescents with visual impairments found that parents, the students, teachers, and observers judged the adolescents' social skills differently. However, the training did have some specific effect on increasing assertiveness. (Contains references.)…

  1. Action First--Understanding Follows: An Expansion of Skills-Based Training Using Action Method.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Colin

    1988-01-01

    This paper discusses the concept of training trainers in the skills they need to perform competently as trainers and how they follow their skills mastery with discussion on their new theoretical insight. Moreno's action method (psychodrama, sociodrama, sociometry, and role training) is the model used. (JOW)

  2. A Meta-Analysis of Controlled Research on Social Skills Training for Schizophrenia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurtz, Matthew M.; Mueser, Kim T.

    2008-01-01

    A meta-analysis of randomized, controlled trials of social skills training for schizophrenia was conducted. Outcome measures from 22 studies including 1,521 clients were categorized according to a proximal-distal continuum in relation to the presumed site of action of skills training interventions, with content mastery tests and performance-based…

  3. Evaluation of the Life Skills Training Program, Los Angeles County, California: Final Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Courtney, Mark E.; Zinn, Andrew; Zielewski, Erica H.; Bess, Roseana J.; Malm, Karin E.; Stagner, Matthew; Pergamit, Michael

    2008-01-01

    This report presents findings from a rigorous evaluation of the Life Skills Training Program (LST) in Los Angeles County. LST provides 30 hours of life skills training over five weeks to foster youths ages 16 and older. The classes are held on community college campuses throughout Los Angeles County. The program is staffed by workers tasked with…

  4. 10 CFR 1046.15 - Training and qualification for security skills and knowledge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Training and qualification for security skills and knowledge. 1046.15 Section 1046.15 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) PHYSICAL PROTECTION OF SECURITY INTERESTS Protective Force Personnel § 1046.15 Training and qualification for security skills and knowledge. (a) DOE contractors shall...

  5. Key Principles of Open Motor-Skill Training for Peak Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Motor-skill training is an imperative element contributing to overall sport performance. In order to help coaches, athletes and practitioners to capture the characteristics of motor skills, sport scientists have divided motor skills into different categories, such as open versus closed, serial or discrete, outcome- or process-oriented, and…

  6. Review of Social Skills Training Groups for Youth with Asperger Syndrome and High Functioning Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cappadocia, M. Catherine; Weiss, Jonathan A.

    2011-01-01

    Although social skills deficits represent core symptoms of Asperger Syndrome and High Functioning Autism, there is limited research investigating the empirical validity of social skills interventions currently being used with these populations. This literature review compares three types of social skills training groups: traditional, cognitive…

  7. The Effects of Musical Training on the Decoding Skills of German-Speaking Primary School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rautenberg, Iris

    2015-01-01

    This paper outlines the results of a long-term study of 159 German-speaking primary school children. The correlations between musical skills (perception and differentiation of rhythmical and tonal/melodic patterns) and decoding skills, and the effects of musical training on word-level reading abilities were investigated. Cognitive skills and…

  8. The Relationship between Athletic Training Student Critical Thinking Skills and Clinical Instructor Supervision: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kabay, Michele R.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to 1) assess the critical thinking skill level of the athletic training student at onset and end of the clinical education experience 2) to examine the influence of the students' critical thinking skills and the CIs' supervision responses to the changes in the students' critical thinking skills and 3) to compare the…

  9. Social Skills Training for Taiwanese Students at Risk for Emotional and Behavioral Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Chiu-yen; Lo, Ya-yu; Feng, Hua; Lo, Yafen

    2010-01-01

    Two third-grade Taiwanese students at risk for emotional and behavioral disorders participated in a pull-out, small-group social skills training program developed to promote their skill acquisition and maintenance. Using a multiple baseline across skills design, the authors demonstrated that both participants made marked performance improvement in…

  10. Academic Remedial Training: A Language Skills Development Program for U.S. Navy Recruits.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Harry L.; And Others

    Noting that the program is primarily a reading and verbal skills program for adult learners, this paper describes the Academic Remedial Training (ART) Program of the U.S. Navy. The first section of the paper discusses the historical background of the program. The second section describes the reading skills component and the verbal skills component…

  11. Developing Managerial Skills in Palestine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Madhoun, Mohammed; Analoui, Farhad

    2002-01-01

    This paper assesses the contribution of management training and development programmes (MTPs) to the development of managerial skills in small and medium enterprises (SMEs). Different sets of variables were used to explore the managers' skills development by dividing the managerial skills into three main categories: self, people, and task-related…

  12. Voluntary undergraduate technical skills training course to prepare students for clerkship assignment: tutees’ and tutors’ perspectives

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Skills lab training has become a widespread tool in medical education, and nowadays, skills labs are ubiquitous among medical faculties across the world. An increasingly prevalent didactic approach in skills lab teaching is peer-assisted learning (PAL), which has been shown to be not only effective, but can be considered to be on a par with faculty staff-led training. The aim of the study is to determine whether voluntary preclinical skills teaching by peer tutors is a feasible method for preparing medical students for effective workplace learning in clerkships and to investigate both tutees’ and tutors’ attitudes towards such an intervention. Methods A voluntary clerkship preparation skills course was designed and delivered. N = 135 pre-clinical medical students visited the training sessions. N = 10 tutors were trained as skills-lab peer tutors. Voluntary clerkship preparation skills courses as well as tutor training were evaluated by acceptance ratings and pre-post self-assessment ratings. Furthermore, qualitative analyses of skills lab tutors’ attitudes towards the course were conducted following principles of grounded theory. Results Results show that a voluntary clerkship preparation skills course is in high demand, is highly accepted and leads to significant changes in self-assessment ratings. Regarding qualitative analysis of tutor statements, clerkship preparation skills courses were considered to be a helpful and necessary asset to preclinical medical education, which benefits from the tutors’ own clerkship experiences and a high standardization of training. Tutor training is also highly accepted and regarded as an indispensable tool for peer tutors. Conclusions Our study shows that the demand for voluntary competence-oriented clerkship preparation is high, and a peer tutor-led skills course as well as tutor training is well accepted. The focused didactic approach for tutor training is perceived to be effective in preparing

  13. Evaluation of the effectiveness of a multi-skill program for training younger drivers on higher cognitive skills.

    PubMed

    Yamani, Yusuke; Samuel, Siby; Knodler, Michael A; Fisher, Donald L

    2016-01-01

    Training programs exist that prove effective at teaching novice drivers to anticipate latent hazards (RAPT), mitigate hazards (ACT) and maintain attention (FOCAL). The current study (a) measures the effectiveness of a novel integrated training program (SAFE-T) that takes only a third as long to complete compared to the three individual training programs and (b) determines if integrating the training of all the three higher cognitive skills would yield results comparable to the existing programs. Three groups were evaluated: SAFE-T, RAPT and Placebo. The results show that the drivers in the SAFE-T-trained group were more likely to anticipate hazards, quicker and more effective at responding to hazards, and more likely to maintain glance durations under a critical threshold of 2 s as compared to drivers in the Placebo-trained group who received a control program that does not actively train on any of the three cognitive skills. Moreover, the results show that the drivers in the SAFE-T trained group were just as likely to anticipate hazards as the drivers in the RAPT trained group. Finally, when compared with prior studies, the drivers in the SAFE-T trained group showed similar effects of attention maintenance training.

  14. Life skills training as HIV/AIDS preventive strategy in secondary schools: evaluation of a large-scale implementation process.

    PubMed

    Visser, Maretha J

    2005-04-01

    A life skills and HIV/AIDS education programme was implemented in secondary schools as a strategy to combat the spread of HIV/AIDS among school-going young people in South Africa. As part of a joint effort of the Departments of Health and Education, two teachers per school were trained to implement life skills training and HIV/AIDS education in schools as part of the school curriculum. The implementation of the intervention was evaluated in 24 schools in two educational districts in Gauteng province using an action research approach. Data about the implementation were gathered through interviews and focus group discussions with school principals, teachers and learners. A repeated measurement research design was used to assess the impact of the intervention in terms of knowledge, attitudes and reported risk behaviour in a sample of 667 learners representing learners from grades 8 to 12 from different population groups. Results showed that the programme was not implemented as planned in schools due to organisational problems in the schools, lack of commitment of the teachers and the principal, non-trusting relationships between teachers and learners, lack of resources and conflicting goals in the educational system. In an outcome evaluation over the period of a year it was found that learners' knowledge of HIV/AIDS increased and their attitudes were more positive although the changes may not be attributed to the programme alone. In the post-test more learners were sexually active, although preventive behaviour did not increase. The programme as implemented in the area did not succeed in changing high-risk behaviour patterns among school-going young people. From the evaluation of the intervention a few valuable lessons were learned about the content and implementation of HIV/AIDS preventive interventions, which could be useful in the implementation of various other HIV/AIDS preventive interventions in the community.

  15. Evaluating the Effectiveness of a Teaching Package Utilizing Behavioral Skills Training and In Situ Training to Teach Gun Safety Skills in a Preschool Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanratty, Laura A.; Miltenberger, Raymond G.; Florentino, Samantha R.

    2016-01-01

    There are a number of different safety threats that children face in their lives. One infrequent, but highly dangerous situation a child can face is finding a firearm. Hundreds of children are injured or killed by firearms each year. Fortunately, behavioral skills training (BST) and in situ training (IST) are effective approaches for teaching a…

  16. The green shoots of a novel training programme: progress and identified key actions to providing services to MSM at Kenyan health facilities

    PubMed Central

    van der Elst, Elise M; Kombo, Bernadette; Gichuru, Evans; Omar, Anisa; Musyoki, Helgar; Graham, Susan M; Smith, Adrian D; Sanders, Eduard J; Operario, Don

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Although men who have sex with men (MSM) in sub-Saharan Africa are at high risk for HIV acquisition, access to and quality of health and HIV services within this population are negatively affected by stigma and capacity within the health sector. A recently developed online MSM training programme (www.marps-africa.org) was shown to contribute to reductions in MSM prejudice among healthcare providers (HCPs) in coastal Kenya. In this study, we used qualitative methods to explore the provision of MSM healthcare services two years post-training in coastal Kenya. Methods From February to July 2014, we held 10 focus group discussions (FGD) with 63 participants, including HCP from 25 facilities, county AIDS coordinators and MSM from local support groups. Participants discussed availability, acceptability and accessibility of HIV healthcare for MSM. HCP also discussed changes in their health service practices after completing the training. FGD were recorded, transcribed verbatim and analyzed using Ritchie and Spencer's “framework approach” for qualitative data. Results HCPs described continued improvements in their ability to provide service in a non-stigmatizing way to MSM patients since completing the training programme and expressed comfort engaging MSM patients in care. Four additional recommendations for improving MSM healthcare services were identified: 1) expanding the reach of MSM sensitivity training across the medical education continuum; 2) establishing guidelines to manage sexually transmitted anal infections; 3) promoting legal and policy reforms to support integration of MSM-appropriate services into healthcare; and 4) including MSM information in national reporting tools for HIV services. Conclusions Positive impacts of this sensitivity and skills training programme were reflected in HCP attitudes two years post-intervention. Scaling-up of efforts will rely on continued policies to include MSM in healthcare programmes to reduce stigma in

  17. [SUPPORT, CO-OPERATIVE EDUCATION PROGRAMMES, PRAGMATIC CODE OF ETHICS: A CLINICAL APPROACH OF EXECUTIVE TRAINING].

    PubMed

    Cabaret, Véronique

    2016-01-01

    This article aims at introducing an educational sequence completed at l'Institut de Formation des Cadres de Santé (IFCS) at the CHRU in Lille in France, entitled "training project and educational project" present in the "training duties" module whose goal is to generate students'knowledge through co-operative education programmes. By creating this innovative sequence, the educational aim is to use the Institut ground as a ground of learning, associated with the various internship grounds, in order to get the most of co-operative education programmes. Besides, in a pragmatic code of ethics in training, the teaching staff draw their inspiration from a clinical approach of executive training: they regard students as true protagonists in a co-operative plan created for them, wishing to design it with them using their words. Thus, students are brought to criticize the IFCS educational project and debate it with the trainers who have built it. Each partner tries to understand the Other, being aware of their being different. By contributing every year to rewriting the educational project which directly concerns them, students build their professional positions as health executives. They play an active role in co-operative education programmes just like IFCS outside partners. PMID:27305794

  18. [SUPPORT, CO-OPERATIVE EDUCATION PROGRAMMES, PRAGMATIC CODE OF ETHICS: A CLINICAL APPROACH OF EXECUTIVE TRAINING].

    PubMed

    Cabaret, Véronique

    2016-01-01

    This article aims at introducing an educational sequence completed at l'Institut de Formation des Cadres de Santé (IFCS) at the CHRU in Lille in France, entitled "training project and educational project" present in the "training duties" module whose goal is to generate students'knowledge through co-operative education programmes. By creating this innovative sequence, the educational aim is to use the Institut ground as a ground of learning, associated with the various internship grounds, in order to get the most of co-operative education programmes. Besides, in a pragmatic code of ethics in training, the teaching staff draw their inspiration from a clinical approach of executive training: they regard students as true protagonists in a co-operative plan created for them, wishing to design it with them using their words. Thus, students are brought to criticize the IFCS educational project and debate it with the trainers who have built it. Each partner tries to understand the Other, being aware of their being different. By contributing every year to rewriting the educational project which directly concerns them, students build their professional positions as health executives. They play an active role in co-operative education programmes just like IFCS outside partners.

  19. Adaptive Virtual Reality Training to Optimize Military Medical Skills Acquisition and Retention.

    PubMed

    Siu, Ka-Chun; Best, Bradley J; Kim, Jong Wook; Oleynikov, Dmitry; Ritter, Frank E

    2016-05-01

    The Department of Defense has pursued the integration of virtual reality simulation into medical training and applications to fulfill the need to train 100,000 military health care personnel annually. Medical personnel transitions, both when entering an operational area and returning to the civilian theater, are characterized by the need to rapidly reacquire skills that are essential but have decayed through disuse or infrequent use. Improved efficiency in reacquiring such skills is critical to avoid the likelihood of mistakes that may result in mortality and morbidity. We focus here on a study testing a theory of how the skills required for minimally invasive surgery for military surgeons are learned and retained. Our adaptive virtual reality surgical training system will incorporate an intelligent mechanism for tracking performance that will recognize skill deficiencies and generate an optimal adaptive training schedule. Our design is modeling skill acquisition based on a skill retention theory. The complexity of appropriate training tasks is adjusted according to the level of retention and/or surgical experience. Based on preliminary work, our system will improve the capability to interactively assess the level of skills learning and decay, optimizes skill relearning across levels of surgical experience, and positively impact skill maintenance. Our system could eventually reduce mortality and morbidity by providing trainees with the reexperience they need to help make a transition between operating theaters. This article reports some data that will support adaptive tutoring of minimally invasive surgery and similar surgical skills. PMID:27168575

  20. Effects of Snoezelen room, Activities of Daily Living skills training, and Vocational skills training on aggression and self-injury by adults with mental retardation and mental illness.

    PubMed

    Singh, Nirbhay N; Lancioni, Giulio E; Winton, Alan S W; Molina, Enrique J; Sage, Monica; Brown, Stephen; Groeneweg, Jop

    2004-01-01

    Multi-sensory stimulation provided in a Snoezelen room is being used increasingly for individuals with mental retardation and mental illness to facilitate relaxation, provide enjoyment, and inhibit behavioral challenges. We observed aggressive and self-injurious behavior in three groups of 15 individuals with severe or profound mental retardation and mental illness before, during, and after being in a Snoezelen room. All participants were receiving psychotropic medication for their mental illness and function-derived behavioral interventions for aggression, self-injury, or both. Using a repeated measures counterbalanced design, each group of participants was rotated through three experimental conditions: Activities of Daily Living (ADL) skills training, Snoezelen, and Vocational skills training. All other treatment and training activities specified in each individual's person-centered plan were continued during the 10-week observational period. Both aggression and self-injury were lowest when the individuals were in a Snoezelen room, followed by Vocational skills training and ADL skills training. The levels in the Snoezelen room were significantly lower than in both the other conditions for aggression but only in ADL skills training for self-injury. The difference in levels before and after Snoezelen were statistically significant with self-injury but not with aggression. The order of conditions showed no significant effect on either behavior. Snoezelen may provide an effective context for reducing the occurrence of self-injury and aggression.

  1. A Training Programme for a Teacher Working with a Student with ASD: An Action Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Güleç-Aslan, Yesim

    2013-01-01

    The qualifications of the educators who teach children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) may affect the outputs of the education. Qualified educators play an important role in skill development. Therefore, educators need to have special qualifications. Within this scope, it is important to organize well-designed training programs for the…

  2. Engaging Employers in Workplace Training - Lessons from the English Train to Gain Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazenod, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Despite the ambition of an employer-led vocational education and training system, a lack of employer engagement in workplace training continues to be reported in England. There seems to be a mismatch between national policy level expectations of how employers should be engaging in workplace training and the practicalities of employer engagement at…

  3. Implementing clinical ethics in German hospitals: content, didactics and evaluation of a nationwide postgraduate training programme.

    PubMed

    Dörries, Andrea; Simon, Alfred; Neitzke, Gerald; Vollmann, Jochen

    2010-12-01

    The Hannover qualifying programme 'ethics consultation in hospitals', conducted by a four-institution cooperation partnership, is an interdisciplinary, scientifically based programme for healthcare professionals interested in ethics consultation services and is widely acknowledged by hospital managements and healthcare professionals. It is unique concerning its content, scope and teaching format. With its basic and advanced modules it has provided training and education for 367 healthcare professionals with 570 participations since 2003 (until February 2010). One characteristic feature is its attractiveness for health professionals from different backgrounds. Internationally, the Hannover programme is one of the few schedules with both academics and non-academics as target groups and a high participation rate of physicians. The concept of the Hannover programme is in great demand, and its schedule is continuously optimised through evaluation. The goals of enabling healthcare professionals from different professional backgrounds to define and reflect ethical problems, to facilitate and support the process of decision-making and to work out structures for their own institutions seem to have been achieved. However, in order to obtain effective and sustainable results, participation in the programme should be supplemented regularly by in-house training sessions or individual expert consultations. Future challenges include new thematic courses and providing a network for former participants, especially when they come from non-academic hospitals. The network is a reasonable platform to discuss participants' experiences, successes and pitfalls. A further task will be research on how the programme's concept can support the sustainability of ethics structures in the various institutions. PMID:21112935

  4. The Incredible Years Therapeutic Social and Emotional Skills Programme: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchings, Judy; Bywater, Tracey; Gridley, Nicole; Whitaker, Christopher J.; Martin-Forbes, Pam; Gruffydd, Stella

    2012-01-01

    The Incredible Years (IY) universal child Classroom Dinosaur and Teacher Classroom Management programmes are delivered in all 102 primary schools in Gwynedd County, Wales. This article describes a pilot study of the IY Therapeutic (small group) Dinosaur School social and emotional coaching programme, developed as a treatment programme, in one such…

  5. [It's not only the gamblers who need help - a pilot study on a family training programme].

    PubMed

    Gisela Buchner, Ursula; Arnold, Melanie; Koytek, Annalena; Gollrad, Tanja; Wodarz, Norbert

    2012-01-01

    Relatives of problematic and pathological gamblers are seriously affected by the illness comparable to relatives of substance abusers. Therefore they might need support. Hence the psycho-educational training programme ETAPPE was developed and tested in an explorative pilot study in cooperation with counselling services. The participants got several questionnaires concerning amongst others: self-assessment of stress, psychological distress and taxing subjects. Results show that families of problematic and pathological gamblers are highly stressed. ETAPPE addresses the topics that are a burden for families. Taking into consideration the limitations, there are positive trends: Through this training, self-assessment of stress, psychological distress and actual situative perceived stress are reduced significantly. Chronic stress remains unchanged. A conclusive evaluation of the effectiveness of this manualized programme is still pending.

  6. A Problem in Online Interpersonal Skills Training: Do Learners Practice Skills?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doo, Min Young

    2006-01-01

    One problem found when teaching interpersonal skills online is learners' lack of opportunity for skill practice. The online learning environment is deficient in face-to-face interaction, and opportunities for self-regulation make it difficult to ensure learners practice skills despite the positive effects of such practice on skill improvement. The…

  7. Effectiveness of an adventure-based training programme in promoting the psychological well-being of primary schoolchildren.

    PubMed

    Li, William H C; Chung, Joyce O K; Ho, Eva K Y

    2013-11-01

    This study tested the effectiveness of an adventure-based training programme in promoting the psychological well-being of primary schoolchildren. A randomised controlled trial was conducted, with 56 primary school pupils randomly assigned to the experimental group participating in the adventure-based training programme and 64 to the attention placebo control group. Children in the experimental group reported significantly fewer depressive symptoms, lower anxiety levels and higher self-esteem than those in the attention placebo control group. This study provides some evidence that the adventure-based training programme is effective in promoting the psychological well-being of Hong Kong Chinese schoolchildren. PMID:23221616

  8. Leveraging M and S in Soft Skills Training for the DoD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cimino, James D.

    2011-01-01

    Soft skills, also called "people skills," are typically hard to observe, quantify and measure. These skills have to do with how we relate to each other; communicating, listening, engaging in dialogue, giving feedback, cooperating as a team member, solving problems and resolving conflicts. Most of the soft skills training is scenario based, utilizing written or video-based scenarios. with limited or no branching, as well as quantitative feedback. This paper will outline a game-based approach to configurable, scenario-based, soft skills training. The paper will discuss the application of realistic visual behavior cues (e.g. body language, vocal inflection, facial expressions) and how these can benefit the learner. Using the concept of a "virtual vignette" this paper will discuss a prototype system intended to leach suicide prevention and provide qualitative feedback to the learner. The paper will also explore other soft skills training applications for this technology

  9. Technology-assisted training of arm-hand skills in stroke: concepts on reacquisition of motor control and therapist guidelines for rehabilitation technology design

    PubMed Central

    Timmermans, Annick AA; Seelen, Henk AM; Willmann, Richard D; Kingma, Herman

    2009-01-01

    Background It is the purpose of this article to identify and review criteria that rehabilitation technology should meet in order to offer arm-hand training to stroke patients, based on recent principles of motor learning. Methods A literature search was conducted in PubMed, MEDLINE, CINAHL, and EMBASE (1997–2007). Results One hundred and eighty seven scientific papers/book references were identified as being relevant. Rehabilitation approaches for upper limb training after stroke show to have shifted in the last decade from being analytical towards being focussed on environmentally contextual skill training (task-oriented training). Training programmes for enhancing motor skills use patient and goal-tailored exercise schedules and individual feedback on exercise performance. Therapist criteria for upper limb rehabilitation technology are suggested which are used to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of a number of current technological systems. Conclusion This review shows that technology for supporting upper limb training after stroke needs to align with the evolution in rehabilitation training approaches of the last decade. A major challenge for related technological developments is to provide engaging patient-tailored task oriented arm-hand training in natural environments with patient-tailored feedback to support (re) learning of motor skills. PMID:19154570

  10. Soft Skills Training: An Annotated Guide to Selected Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leigh, Wilhelmina A.; Lee, Deitra H.; Lindquist, Malinda A.

    This guidebook presents data from a two-part study that reviewed existing literature on soft work skills, defined soft skills, and determined their importance to employers. The study also identified programs that were teaching those skills. Researchers contacted 90 organizations, asking for detailed written materials about themselves. The 53 that…

  11. Transferable Skills Training for Researchers: Supporting Career Development and Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    OECD Publishing (NJ3), 2012

    2012-01-01

    Researchers are embarking on increasingly diverse careers where collaboration, networking and interdisciplinarity are becoming more important. Transferable skills (e.g. communication skills and problem-solving abilities) can help researchers operate more effectively in different work environments. While researchers acquire some of these skills in…

  12. Videodisc Interpersonal Skills Training and Assessment (VISTA): Overview and Findings, Volume 1. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schroeder, James E.; And Others

    The Videodisc Interpersonal Skills Training and Assessment (VISTA) project was conceived as a means to use computer-assisted leadership training to reduce high personnel costs associated with assessment center training and simulation. Originated by the Army Research Institute's Ft. Benning Field Unit, the research effort included topic analysis,…

  13. Social Skills Training with Young Adolescents: Group and Individual Approaches in a School Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bulkeley, R.; Cramer, D.

    1994-01-01

    The program involved each adolescent receiving 10 weeks' consecutive training. The results suggested that individualized training was superior to standardized training. Skills important for making friendships were included in the program, and provision was made for meeting the needs of both impulsive and unassertive adolescents within group…

  14. The Relative Effectiveness of Academic and Practicum Training on Developing Behavior Modification Skills in Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Luke S., Jr.

    This paper is concerned with evaluating the Parent Training Program component of the Parent Training Technology System. The specific problem assessed was the relative influence of academic and practicum training on developing behavior modification skills in parents who work with their own psychotic and mentally retarded children. Three parents…

  15. Industrial Provision of Practice Skills of Students Training Gastronomy Education (Case of Turkey)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarioglan, Mehmet

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of this study is to determine to what extent practice skills of students, training in gastronomy education, meet the expectations of food and beverage industry. In the study, 197 students training internship in 27 different firms of total 1540 students training in gastronomy education at higher education level in Turkey were reached by…

  16. Genetic variants influencing effectiveness of exercise training programmes in obesity - an overview of human studies.

    PubMed

    Leońska-Duniec, A; Ahmetov, I I; Zmijewski, P

    2016-09-01

    Frequent and regular physical activity has significant benefits for health, including improvement of body composition and help in weight control. Consequently, promoting training programmes, particularly in those who are genetically predisposed, is a significant step towards controlling the presently increasing epidemic of obesity. Although the physiological responses of the human body to exercise are quite well described, the genetic background of these reactions still remains mostly unknown. This review not only summarizes the current evidence, through a literature review and the results of our studies on the influence of gene variants on the characteristics and range of the body's adaptive response to training, but also explores research organization problems, future trends, and possibilities. We describe the most reliable candidate genetic markers that are involved in energy balance pathways and body composition changes in response to training programmes, such as FTO, MC4R, ACE, PPARG, LEP, LEPR, ADRB2, and ADRB3. This knowledge can have an enormous impact not only on individualization of exercise programmes to make them more efficient and safer, but also on improved recovery, traumatology, medical care, diet, supplementation and many other areas. Nevertheless, the current studies still represent only the first steps towards a better understanding of the genetic factors that influence obesity-related traits, as well as gene variant x physical activity interactions, so further research is necessary. PMID:27601774

  17. Genetic variants influencing effectiveness of exercise training programmes in obesity – an overview of human studies

    PubMed Central

    Ahmetov, II; Zmijewski, P

    2016-01-01

    Frequent and regular physical activity has significant benefits for health, including improvement of body composition and help in weight control. Consequently, promoting training programmes, particularly in those who are genetically predisposed, is a significant step towards controlling the presently increasing epidemic of obesity. Although the physiological responses of the human body to exercise are quite well described, the genetic background of these reactions still remains mostly unknown. This review not only summarizes the current evidence, through a literature review and the results of our studies on the influence of gene variants on the characteristics and range of the body's adaptive response to training, but also explores research organization problems, future trends, and possibilities. We describe the most reliable candidate genetic markers that are involved in energy balance pathways and body composition changes in response to training programmes, such as FTO, MC4R, ACE, PPARG, LEP, LEPR, ADRB2, and ADRB3. This knowledge can have an enormous impact not only on individualization of exercise programmes to make them more efficient and safer, but also on improved recovery, traumatology, medical care, diet, supplementation and many other areas. Nevertheless, the current studies still represent only the first steps towards a better understanding of the genetic factors that influence obesity-related traits, as well as gene variant x physical activity interactions, so further research is necessary.

  18. Genetic variants influencing effectiveness of exercise training programmes in obesity – an overview of human studies

    PubMed Central

    Ahmetov, II; Zmijewski, P

    2016-01-01

    Frequent and regular physical activity has significant benefits for health, including improvement of body composition and help in weight control. Consequently, promoting training programmes, particularly in those who are genetically predisposed, is a significant step towards controlling the presently increasing epidemic of obesity. Although the physiological responses of the human body to exercise are quite well described, the genetic background of these reactions still remains mostly unknown. This review not only summarizes the current evidence, through a literature review and the results of our studies on the influence of gene variants on the characteristics and range of the body's adaptive response to training, but also explores research organization problems, future trends, and possibilities. We describe the most reliable candidate genetic markers that are involved in energy balance pathways and body composition changes in response to training programmes, such as FTO, MC4R, ACE, PPARG, LEP, LEPR, ADRB2, and ADRB3. This knowledge can have an enormous impact not only on individualization of exercise programmes to make them more efficient and safer, but also on improved recovery, traumatology, medical care, diet, supplementation and many other areas. Nevertheless, the current studies still represent only the first steps towards a better understanding of the genetic factors that influence obesity-related traits, as well as gene variant x physical activity interactions, so further research is necessary. PMID:27601774

  19. Training hospital providers in basic CPR skills in Botswana: Acquisition, retention and impact of novel training techniques☆

    PubMed Central

    Meaney, Peter A.; Sutton, Robert M.; Tsima, Billy; Steenhoff, Andrew P.; Shilkofski, Nicole; Boulet, John R.; Davis, Amanda; Kestler, Andrew M.; Church, Kasey K.; Niles, Dana E.; Irving, Sharon Y.; Mazhani, Loeto; Nadkarni, Vinay M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Globally, one third of deaths each year are from cardiovascular diseases, yet no strong evidence supports any specific method of CPR instruction in a resource-limited setting. We hypothesized that both existing and novel CPR training programs significantly impact skills of hospital-based healthcare providers (HCP) in Botswana. Methods HCP were prospectively randomized to 3 training groups: instructor led, limited instructor with manikin feedback, or self-directed learning. Data was collected prior to training, immediately after and at 3 and 6 months. Excellent CPR was prospectively defined as having at least 4 of 5 characteristics: depth, rate, release, no flow fraction, and no excessive ventilation. GEE was performed to account for within subject correlation. Results Of 214 HCP trained, 40% resuscitate ≥1/month, 28% had previous formal CPR training, and 65% required additional skills remediation to pass using AHA criteria. Excellent CPR skill acquisition was significant (infant: 32% vs. 71%, p < 0.01; adult 28% vs. 48%, p < 0.01). Infant CPR skill retention was significant at 3 (39% vs. 70%, p < 0.01) and 6 months (38% vs. 67%, p < 0.01), and adult CPR skills were retained to 3 months (34% vs. 51%, p = 0.02). On multivariable analysis, low cognitive score and need for skill remediation, but not instruction method, impacted CPR skill performance. Conclusions HCP in resource-limited settings resuscitate frequently, with little CPR training. Using existing training, HCP acquire and retain skills, yet often require remediation. Novel techniques with increased student: instructor ratio and feedback manikins were not different compared to traditional instruction. PMID:22561463

  20. Skills-O-Mat: Computer Supported Interactive Motion- and Game-Based Training in Mixing Alginate in Dental Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hannig, Andreas; Lemos, Martin; Spreckelsen, Cord; Ohnesorge-Radtke, Ulla; Rafai, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    The training of motor skills is a crucial aspect of medical education today. Serious games and haptic virtual simulations have been used in the training of surgical procedures. Otherwise, however, a combination of serious games and motor skills training is rarely used in medical education. This article presents Skills-O-Mat, an interactive serious…

  1. Development of a training programme for primary care providers to counsel patients with risky lifestyle behaviours in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Mash, Bob; Everett-Murphy, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    Background We are facing a global epidemic of non-communicable disease (NCDs), which has been linked with four risky lifestyle behaviours. It is recommended that primary care providers (PCPs) provide individual brief behaviour change counselling (BBCC) as part of everyday primary care, however currently training is required to build capacity. Local training programmes are not sufficient to achieve competence. Aim This study aimed to redesign the current training for PCPs in South Africa, around a new model for BBCC that would offer a standardised approach to addressing patients’ risky lifestyle behaviours. Setting The study population included clinical nurse practitioners and primary care doctors in the Western Cape Province. Methods The analyse, design, develop, implement and evaluate (ADDIE) model provided a systematic approach to the analysis of learning needs, the design and development of the training programme, its implementation and initial evaluation. Results This study designed a new training programme for PCPs in BBCC, which was based on a conceptual model that combined the 5As (ask, alert, assess, assist and arrange) with a guiding style derived from motivational interviewing. The programme was developed as an eight-hour training programme that combined theory, modelling and simulated practice with feedback, for either clinical nurse practitioners or primary care doctors. Conclusion This was the first attempt at developing and implementing a best practice BBCC training programme in our context, targeting a variety of PCPs, and addressing different risk factors. PMID:26245608

  2. Effects of Electrical Stimulation, Exercise Training and Motor Skills Training on Strength of Children with Meningomyelocele: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dagenais, Liese M.; Lahay, Erin R.; Stueck, Kailey A.; White, Erin; Williams, Lindsay; Harris, Susan R.

    2009-01-01

    This systematic review provides a critical synthesis of research regarding the effects of electrical stimulation, exercise training, and motor skills training on muscle strength in children with meningomyelocele. Nine databases were searched using terms related to meningomyelocele and physical therapy interventions. Of 298 potentially relevant…

  3. “Old Dogs” and New Skills: How Clinician Characteristics Relate to Motivational Interviewing Skills Before, During, and After Training

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Kenneth M.; Cheng, Wendy Y.; Smith, Jennifer L.; Brooks, Adam C.; Amrhein, Paul C.; Wain, R. Morgan; Nunes, Edward V.

    2012-01-01

    Objective The relationships between the occupational, educational, and verbal-cognitive characteristics of health care professionals and their Motivational Interviewing (MI) skills before, during, and after training were investigated. Method Fifty-eight community-based addiction clinicians (M = 42.1 yrs., SD =10.0; 66% Female) were assessed prior to enrolling in a two-day MI training workshop and being randomized to one of three post-workshop supervision programs: live supervision via tele-conferencing (TCS), standard tape-based supervision (Tape), or workshop training alone. Audiotaped sessions with clients were rated for MI skillfulness with the Motivational Interviewing Treatment Integrity (MITI) coding system v 2.0 at pre-workshop and 1, 8, and 20 weeks post-workshop. Correlation coefficients and generalized linear models were used to test the relationships between clinician characteristics and MI skill at each assessment point. Results Baseline MI skill levels were the most robust predictors of pre- and post-supervision performances. Clinician characteristics were associated with MI Spirit and reflective listening skill throughout training and moderated the effect of post-workshop supervision method on MI skill. TCS, which provided immediate feedback during practice sessions, was most effective for increasing MI Spirit and reflective listening among clinicians with no graduate degree and stronger vocabulary performances. Tape supervision was more effective for increasing these skills among clinicians with a graduate degree. Further, TCS and Tape were most likely to enhance MI Spirit among clinicians with low average to average verbal and abstract reasoning performances. Conclusions Clinician attributes influence the effectiveness of methods used to promote the acquisition of evidence-based practices among community-based practitioners. PMID:22563640

  4. Improving Reasoning Skills in Secondary History Education by Working Memory Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ariës, Roel Jacobus; Groot, Wim; van den Brink, Henriette Maassen

    2015-01-01

    Secondary school pupils underachieve in tests in which reasoning abilities are required. Brain-based training of working memory (WM) may improve reasoning abilities. In this study, we use a brain-based training programme based on historical content to enhance reasoning abilities in history courses. In the first experiment, a combined intervention…

  5. Community Residency Programme (CRP)--a tool for research and rural health training for medical students.

    PubMed

    Yadav, H

    2002-12-01

    Rural health training is an important element in the training of medical students in the University of Malaya. There is a need for the undergraduates to be familiar with the rural health infrastructure and to understand the social and economic aspects of the rural poor. The objective of the training is to make the students understand the problems faced by the poor in the rural areas so that when they practice in rural health areas, after graduation, they will understand the problems of the rural poor. They will have the knowledge of the diseases in the rural areas and also understand the community and the environmental factors that contribute to the disease. The training lasts' for 4 weeks, one week for lectures on health survey, two weeks for the field trip and one week of data analysis and presentation of their findings to an expert panel. During the field trip the students are divided into groups and they go to different parts of the country. Each group will do a field survey to find out the socio-demography, environmental, economic, nutritional and health problems in the village. In addition to the survey they also do a research project on any topic. The students also do social work, visit places of public health interest like the water treatment plant, sewage disposal, factory visits and others. Apart from technical skills in statistics and epidemiology, various other managerial skills like leadership, teamwork, communications and public relations are also learnt during the training. In conclusion this rural health training is an important aspect of the medical students training as it imparts several skills to them that are needed as a doctor.

  6. Improvement of nursing students' learning outcomes through scenario-based skills training

    PubMed Central

    Uysal, Nurcan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: this study analyzed the influence of scenario-based skills training on students' learning skills. Method: the author evaluated the nursing skills laboratory exam papers of 605 sophomores in nursing programs for seven years. The study determined the common mistakes of students and the laboratory work was designed in a scenario-based format. The effectiveness of this method was evaluated by assessing the number of errors the students committed and their achievement scores in laboratory examinations. This study presents the students' common mistakes in intramuscular and subcutaneous injection and their development of intravenous access skills, included in the nursing skills laboratory examination. Results: an analysis of the students' most common mistakes revealed that the most common was not following the principles of asepsis for all three skills (intramuscular, subcutaneous injection, intravenous access) in the first year of the scenario-based training. The students' exam achievement scores increased gradually, except in the fall semester of the academic year 2009-2010. The study found that the scenario-based skills training reduced students' common mistakes in examinations and enhanced their performance on exams. Conclusion: this method received a positive response from both students and instructors. The scenario-based training is available for use in addition to other skills training methods. PMID:27508922

  7. Exploring the Links Between Visual Arts and Environmental Education: Experiences of Teachers Participating in an In-Service Training Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savva, Andri; Trimis, Eli; Zachariou, Aravella

    2004-01-01

    An in-service teachers' training programme was designed aiming to encourage art teachers to learn through theoretical and artistic experiential activities in a specific environmental setting (Lemithou environmental education centre, Cyprus). The programme was based on the use of the environment as an educational resource, and sought to develop…

  8. Exercise training characteristics in cardiac rehabilitation programmes: a cross-sectional survey of Australian practice

    PubMed Central

    Abell, Bridget; Glasziou, Paul; Briffa, Tom; Hoffmann, Tammy

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Exercise training is a core component of cardiac rehabilitation (CR), however, little information exists regarding the specific exercise interventions currently provided for coronary heart disease in Australian practice. We aimed to analyse the current status of exercise-based CR services across Australia. Design Cross-sectional survey. Methods Australian sites offering exercise-based CR were identified from publically available directories. All sites were invited by email to participate in an online Survey Monkey questionnaire between October 2014 and March 2015, with reminders via email and phone follow-up. Questions investigated the demographics and format of individual programmes, as well as specific exercise training characteristics. Results 297 eligible programmes were identified, with an 82% response rate. Most sites (82%) were based at hospital or outpatient centres, with home (15%), community (18%) or gym-based options (5%) less common. While CR was most often offered in a comprehensive format (72% of sites), the level of exercise intervention varied greatly among programmes. Most frequently, exercise was prescribed 1–2 times per week for 60 min over 7 weeks. Almost one-quarter (24%) had a sole practitioner supervising exercise, although the majority used a nurse/physiotherapist combination. Low to moderate exercise intensities were used in 60% of programmes, however, higher intensity prescriptions were not uncommon. Few sites (<6%) made use of technology, such as mobile phones or the internet, to deliver or support exercise training. Conclusions While advances have been made towards providing flexible and accessible exercise-based CR, much of Australia's service remains within traditional models of care. A continuing focus on service improvement and evidence-based care should, therefore, be considered a core aim of those providing exercise for CR in order to improve health service delivery and optimise outcomes for patients. PMID

  9. Physiological changes arising from a training programme in under-21 international netball players.

    PubMed

    Bell, W; Cooper, S M; Cobner, D; Longville, J

    1994-01-01

    Physiological and anthropometric measurements were taken on 21 members of an under-21 international squad of mean age 18.9 years. The aims of the investigation were (i) to examine the physiological status of players according to playing unit; and (ii) to quantify the changes arising from a four-month training programme. Maximal/peak oxygen uptake was assessed using an incremental test to exhaustion during treadmill running. Anaerobic performance was measured using the 30s Wingate test. Significant differences occurred between playing units in height (p < 0.001), body mass and FVC (p < 0.05), but not in skinfolds or any of the expressions of aerobic or anaerobic performance (p > 0.05). As a consequence of the training programme significant differences were evident in height (169.7 v 170.1 cm, p < 0.01), body mass (62 v 64 kg, p < 0.05), FVC (4.3 v 4.51, p < 0.01), and anaerobic performance (p < 0.01). Increases in VO2 max (3.3 v 3.51.min-1) were not significant (p > 0.05). Standard deviation scores illustrated that aerobic and anaerobic performances were of roughly the same magnitude before training (-0.35 v -0.29, p > 0.05), but that after training the dominant performance was anaerobic (+0.11 v +1.48, p < 0.01).

  10. Quiet eye training: the acquisition, refinement and resilient performance of targeting skills.

    PubMed

    Vine, Samuel J; Moore, Lee J; Wilson, Mark R

    2014-01-01

    How we learn and refine motor skills in the most effective manner and how we prevent performance breakdown in pressurised or demanding circumstances are among the most important questions within the sport psychology and skill acquisition literature. The quiet eye (QE) has emerged as a characteristic of highly skilled perceptual and motor performance in visually guided motor tasks. Defined as the final fixation that occurs prior to a critical movement, over 70 articles have been published in the last 15 years probing the role that the QE plays in underpinning skilled performance. The aim of this review is to integrate research findings from studies examining the QE as a measure of visuomotor control in the specific domain of targeting skills; motor skills requiring an object to be propelled to a distant target. Previous reviews have focused primarily on the differences in QE between highly skilled performers and their less skilled counterparts. The current review aims to discuss contemporary findings relating to 1. The benefits of QE training for the acquisition and refinement of targeting skills; 2. The effects of anxiety upon the QE and subsequent targeting skill performance and 3. The benefits of QE training in supporting resilient performance under elevated anxiety. Finally, potential processes through which QE training proffers this advantage, including improved attentional control, response programming and external focus, will be discussed and directions for future research proposed.

  11. Effects of two physical education programmes on health- and skill-related physical fitness of Albanian children.

    PubMed

    Jarani, J; Grøntved, A; Muca, F; Spahi, A; Qefalia, D; Ushtelenca, K; Kasa, A; Caporossi, D; Gallotta, M C

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the effectiveness of two school-based physical education (PE) programmes (exercise-based and games-based) compared with traditional PE, on health- and skill-related physical fitness components in children in Tirana, Albania. Participants were 378 first-grade (6.8 years) and 389 fourth-grade (9.8 years) children attending four randomly selected schools in Tirana. Twenty-four school classes within these schools were randomly selected (stratified by school and school grade) to participate as exercise group (EG), games group (GG) and control group (CG). Both EG and GG intervention programmes were taught by professional PE teachers using station/circuit teaching framework while CG referred to traditional PE school lessons by a general teacher. All programmes ran in parallel and lasted 5 months, having the same frequency (twice weekly) and duration (45 min). Heart rate (HR) monitoring showed that intensity during PE lessons was significantly higher in the intervention groups compared with control (P < 0.001). Both PE exercise- and games programmes significantly improved several health- and skill-related fitness indicators compared with traditional PE lessons (e.g. gross motor skill summary score: 9.4 (95% CI 7.9; 10.9) for exercise vs. control and 6.5 (95% CI 5.1; 8.1) for games vs. control, cardiorespiratory fitness: 2.0 ml O2 · min(-1) · kg(-1) (95% CI 1.5; 2.4) for exercise vs. control and 1.4 ml O2 · min(-1) · kg(-1) (95% CI 1.0; 1.8) for games vs. control). Furthermore, compared to games-based PE, exercise-based PE showed more positive changes in some gross motor coordination skills outcomes, coordination skills outcomes and cardiorespiratory fitness. The results from this study show that exercise- and games-based PE represents a useful strategy for improving health- and skill-related physical fitness in Albanian elementary school children. In addition, the study shows that exercise-based PE was more effective than games-based PE in

  12. Effects of two physical education programmes on health- and skill-related physical fitness of Albanian children.

    PubMed

    Jarani, J; Grøntved, A; Muca, F; Spahi, A; Qefalia, D; Ushtelenca, K; Kasa, A; Caporossi, D; Gallotta, M C

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the effectiveness of two school-based physical education (PE) programmes (exercise-based and games-based) compared with traditional PE, on health- and skill-related physical fitness components in children in Tirana, Albania. Participants were 378 first-grade (6.8 years) and 389 fourth-grade (9.8 years) children attending four randomly selected schools in Tirana. Twenty-four school classes within these schools were randomly selected (stratified by school and school grade) to participate as exercise group (EG), games group (GG) and control group (CG). Both EG and GG intervention programmes were taught by professional PE teachers using station/circuit teaching framework while CG referred to traditional PE school lessons by a general teacher. All programmes ran in parallel and lasted 5 months, having the same frequency (twice weekly) and duration (45 min). Heart rate (HR) monitoring showed that intensity during PE lessons was significantly higher in the intervention groups compared with control (P < 0.001). Both PE exercise- and games programmes significantly improved several health- and skill-related fitness indicators compared with traditional PE lessons (e.g. gross motor skill summary score: 9.4 (95% CI 7.9; 10.9) for exercise vs. control and 6.5 (95% CI 5.1; 8.1) for games vs. control, cardiorespiratory fitness: 2.0 ml O2 · min(-1) · kg(-1) (95% CI 1.5; 2.4) for exercise vs. control and 1.4 ml O2 · min(-1) · kg(-1) (95% CI 1.0; 1.8) for games vs. control). Furthermore, compared to games-based PE, exercise-based PE showed more positive changes in some gross motor coordination skills outcomes, coordination skills outcomes and cardiorespiratory fitness. The results from this study show that exercise- and games-based PE represents a useful strategy for improving health- and skill-related physical fitness in Albanian elementary school children. In addition, the study shows that exercise-based PE was more effective than games-based PE in

  13. "Old Dogs" and New Skills: How Clinician Characteristics Relate to Motivational Interviewing Skills before, during, and after Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpenter, Kenneth M.; Cheng, Wendy Y.; Smith, Jennifer L.; Brooks, Adam C.; Amrhein, Paul C.; Wain, R. Morgan; Nunes, Edward V.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The relationships between the occupational, educational, and verbal-cognitive characteristics of health care professionals and their motivational interviewing (MI) skills before, during, and after training were investigated. Method: Fifty-eight community-based addiction clinicians (M = 42.1 years, SD = 10.0; 66% Female) were assessed…

  14. The Importance of Spatial Reasoning Skills in Undergraduate Geology Students and the Effect of Weekly Spatial Skill Trainings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gold, Anne; Pendergast, Philip; Stempien, Jennifer; Ormand, Carol

    2016-04-01

    Spatial reasoning is a key skill for student success in STEM disciplines in general and for students in geosciences in particular. However, spatial reasoning is neither explicitly trained, nor evenly distributed, among students and by gender. This uneven playing field allows some students to perform geoscience tasks easily while others struggle. A lack of spatial reasoning skills has been shown to be a barrier to success in the geosciences, and for STEM disciplines in general. Addressing spatial abilities early in the college experience might therefore be effective in retaining students, especially females, in STEM disciplines. We have developed and implemented a toolkit for testing and training undergraduate student spatial reasoning skills in the classroom. In the academic year 2014/15, we studied the distribution of spatial abilities in more than 700 undergraduate Geology students from 4 introductory and 2 upper level courses. Following random assignment, four treatment groups received weekly online training and intermittent hands-on trainings in spatial thinking while four control groups only participated in a pre- and a posttest of spatial thinking skills. In this presentation we summarize our results and describe the distribution of spatial skills in undergraduate students enrolled in geology courses. We first discuss the factors that best account for differences in baseline spatial ability levels, including general intelligence (using standardized test scores as a proxy), major, video gaming, and other childhood play experiences, which help to explain the gender gap observed in most research. We found a statistically significant improvement of spatial thinking still with large effect sizes for the students who received the weekly trainings. Self-report data further shows that students improve their spatial thinking skills and report that their improved spatial thinking skills increase their performance in geoscience courses. We conclude by discussing the

  15. Impact of a Community-Based Programme for Motor Development on Gross Motor Skills and Cognitive Function in Preschool Children from Disadvantaged Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Draper, Catherine E.; Achmat, Masturah; Forbes, Jared; Lambert, Estelle V.

    2012-01-01

    The aims of the studies were to assess the impact of the Little Champs programme for motor development on (1) the gross motor skills, and (2) cognitive function of children in the programme. In study 1, 118 children from one Early Childhood Development Centre (ECDC) were tested using the Test of Gross Motor Development-2, and in study 2, 83…

  16. Learning about Teachers' Accomplishment in "Learning Skills for Science" Practice: The Use of Portfolios in an Evidence-Based Continuous Professional Development Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scherz, Zahava; Bialer, Liora; Eylon, Bat-Sheva

    2008-01-01

    The study in this paper was carried out in the framework of an evidence-based continuous professional development (CPD) programme in which teachers documented evidence about their practice in a portfolio. The context of the CPD was related to the "Learning Skills for Science" (LSS) programme, which advocates the incorporation of high-order…

  17. Guide to good practices for teamwork training and diagnostic skills development

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-01

    This guide provides assistance in the development, implementation, and improvement of training on teamwork and diagnostics. DOE and contractor representatives identified the need for teamwork and diagnostics training guidance. This need was based on the increasing emphasis of properly applying knowledge and skills to complete assigned tasks. Teamwork and diagnostic skills have become a focal point because of the impact they have on effective facility operation and safety.

  18. A Review of Managerial Skills Training in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paglis, Laura L.

    2013-01-01

    Courses designed specifically to develop students' managerial skills began to emerge in the 1980s, in response to criticism of the theoretical and quantitative orientation of business school coursework. Since then, a number of management textbooks focusing on skills-based learning have been published, and many instructors have become…

  19. Bike Skills Training in PE Is Fun, Keeps Kids Safe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Judi Lawson; Sutton, Nancy P.

    2015-01-01

    Incorporating bike skills into the elementary- and middle-school physical education curriculum encourages students to be physically active in a fun way while also learning bike safety skills. Winston-Salem's (NC) Safe Routes to School program demonstrates how collaboration with the public schools' health and physical education program…

  20. Social Skills Training in Natural Play Settings: Educating through the Physical Theory to Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aljadeff-Abergel, Elian; Ayvazo, Shiri; Eldar, Eitan

    2012-01-01

    Social skills are prerequisite to academic performance and success in school. Training of these skills is particularly important for students with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) who have social deficits and struggle maintaining appropriate and accepted behavior in and outside of the classroom. Educating through the "physical" model is a…

  1. An Afrocentric Approach to Group Social Skills Training with Inner-City African-American Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banks, Reginald; And Others

    Social Skills Training (SST) has become a popular and effective means of prevention and intervention with adolescent populations exhibiting behavioral difficulties. Early in their development many African-American youth are exposed to homicide, crime, and interpersonal violence. The acquisition of social skills is critical to the development of…

  2. The Effects of Social Skills Training on the Peer Interactions of a Nonnative Toddler

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Cheng-Hsien; Hursh, Daniel E.; Walls, Richard T.; Stack, Samuel F., Jr.; Lin, I-An

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to increase peer interactions of a toddler who is nonnative. A 30-month old boy evidenced social withdrawal when playing at playgrounds. Social skills training served as the intervention to increase social initiations by this participant. Targeted social skills included greeting peers, gesturing to peers,…

  3. Encouraging Connections: Integrating Expressive Art and Drama into Therapeutic Social Skills Training with Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lenz, A. Stephen; Holman, Rachel L.; Dominguez, Denise L.

    2010-01-01

    The effective use of social skills has been positively associated with career success, romantic involvement, academic achievement, and mood. In response, counselors often integrate social skills training into counseling interventions with adolescents to encourage authentic and effective interactions with others. We illustrate some therapeutic…

  4. The Intercultural Communication Negotiation Simulation: An Instructional Model for Teaching/Training Intercultural Communication Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samp, Jennifer A.

    The intercultural reality of the global marketplace necessitates effective intercultural communication and diplomatic skills training. An effective educational strategy must emphasize a balanced enhancement of learners' conceptual understanding of intercultural communication, their attitudes toward cultural differences, and the skills required for…

  5. Issues Affecting Skill Demand and Supply in Australia's Education and Training Sector. At a Glance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Centre for Vocational Education Research, Leabrook (Australia).

    The responses to a 1999 study of Australian employers and an examination of skill shortages by Australia's Department for Employment, Work Relations, and Small Business were analyzed to identify issues affecting skill demand and supply in Australia's education and training sector. The following were among the key findings: (1) in recent years, the…

  6. Integrated Basic Education and Skills Training (I-BEST). Washington's Community and Technical Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Washington's Integrated Basic Education and Skills Training Program (I-BEST) quickly teaches students literacy, work, and college-readiness skills so they can move through school and into living wage jobs faster. Pioneered by Washington's community and technical colleges, I-BEST uses a team-teaching approach to combine college-readiness classes…

  7. The Malleability of Spatial Skills: A Meta-Analysis of Training Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uttal, David H.; Meadow, Nathaniel G.; Tipton, Elizabeth; Hand, Linda L.; Alden, Alison R.; Warren, Christopher; Newcombe, Nora S.

    2013-01-01

    Having good spatial skills strongly predicts achievement and attainment in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics fields (e.g., Shea, Lubinski, & Benbow, 2001; Wai, Lubinski, & Benbow, 2009). Improving spatial skills is therefore of both theoretical and practical importance. To determine whether and to what extent training and…

  8. Learning Physical Examination Skills outside Timetabled Training Sessions: What Happens and Why?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duvivier, Robbert J.; van Geel, Koos; van Dalen, Jan; Scherpbier, Albert J. J. A.; van der Vleuten, Cees P. M.

    2012-01-01

    Lack of published studies on students' practice behaviour of physical examination skills outside timetabled training sessions inspired this study into what activities medical students undertake to improve their skills and factors influencing this. Six focus groups of a total of 52 students from Years 1-3 using a pre-established interview guide.…

  9. The Learning and Development of Low-Skilled Workers Training to Become Surgical Technologists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyer, Judith Sandra

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this case study was to explore how low-skilled workers who participated in a health care training program learned to acquire the technical, cognitive, and developmental competencies they needed to gain skilled employment in higher-level positions in the field and thus advance their careers. The data methods used were: (1) in-depth…

  10. Increase in Counselling Communication Skills after Basic and Advanced Microskills Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuntze, Jeroen; van der Molen, Henk T.; Born, Marise P.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Mastering counselling communication skills is one of the requirements that lead to the diploma of a registered European psychologist. The microcounseling method proves to be effective in training these skills. Aim: Research into the effectiveness of the microcounseling method often reports overall effect sizes only. The aim of this…

  11. Learning Racial Hierarchies: Communication Skills Training in Transnational Customer Service Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mirchandani, Kiran

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to focus on the communications skills training given to transnational call center workers in India whose jobs involve providing customer service to Western customers. Emotion work is a key component of customer service jobs, and this work is constructed as an important soft skill. Design/methodology/approach: Between 2002…

  12. Rural Education and Training in the New Economy: The Myth of the Rural Skills Gap.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbs, Robert M., Ed.; Swaim, Paul L., Ed.; Teixeira, Ruy, Ed.

    This book examines the education, training, and skill supply of the rural workforce; the role of rural workforce quality in rural development; and the barriers that prevent many rural people from obtaining the skills needed for good jobs. Data are drawn from large national surveys of schools, students, and households. The first three chapters…

  13. Predictive Validity of Five Cognitive Skills Tests among Women Receiving Engineering Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wittig, Michele Andrisin; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Investigated women's (N=35) aptitude for and changes in skills during an engineering training program and the relationship between academic/demographic information and cognitive skills to success in the program. Compares results with those of studies of male undergraduates. Includes results of mathematics anxiety and conservation of horizontality…

  14. Practical Skills Training in Agricultural Education--A Comparison between Traditional and Blended Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deegan, Donna; Wims, Padraig; Pettit, Tony

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: In this article the use of blended learning multimedia materials as an education tool was compared with the traditional approach for skills training. Design/Methodology/Approach: This study was conducted in Ireland using a pre-test, post-test experimental design. All students were instructed on how to complete two skills using either a…

  15. A DBT Skills Training Group for Family Caregivers of Persons with Dementia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drossel, Claudia; Fisher, Jane E.; Mercer, Victoria

    2011-01-01

    A Dialectical Behavior Therapy Skills training manual (DBT Skills) was adapted for use with caregivers of individuals with dementia. Implementation occurred in a community clinic with a heterogeneous caregiver group at risk for elder abuse. Sixteen caregivers completed the 9-week group. The results point to improved psychosocial adjustment,…

  16. Assessing Teacher Skill Maintenance After Behavior Training: Multi-Year Followup.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Filipczak, James; And Others

    For seven years, the PREP (Preparation through Responsive Educational Programs) Project maintained behavioral learning programs for highly disruptive and skill-deficient juveniles in a suburban, a rural, and an urban school. Forty-one volunteer teachers were taught to use specific procedures for academic and social skill training. Followup was…

  17. Social Skills Training Interventions: A Promising Approach for Children Treated for Brain Tumors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinberger, Beverley Slome; Barakat, Lamia P.

    2007-01-01

    As a result of their disease, its treatment, and late effects, children treated for brain tumors are at risk for developing problems in social functioning in terms of social competence and peer acceptance, poor social skills, and social isolation. Despite research suggesting the effectiveness of social skills training interventions in improving…

  18. Firearm Injury Prevention Skills: Increasing the Efficiency of Training with Peer Tutoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jostad, Candice M.; Miltenberger, Raymond G.

    2004-01-01

    Gun play results in hundreds of childhood injuries and deaths each year in the United States. Behavioral Skills Training (BST) is used to teach children the skills needed to resist gun play when finding a firearm. Although effective, existing BST programs are time and resource intensive and therefore lack the efficiency required to be widely…

  19. Listen to Me Listen to You: A Step-By-Step Guide to Communication Skills Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kotzman, Mandy; Kotzman, Anne

    2008-01-01

    This step-by-step guide is a companion to the popular "Listen to Me, Listen to You: A Practical Guide to Self-Awareness, Communication Skills and Conflict Management" (New Expanded Edition, Penguin Books, 2007). It is designed for use by anyone working in communication skills and personal development training. Resource material is grouped under…

  20. Project KIND (Keeping Interfering Noncompliance Down): A Social Skills Training Program for Noncompliant Primary Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masters, Janice

    This study examined the effect of a social skills training intervention on the behavior of 18 noncompliant second graders who exhibited poor study skills and experienced academic failure. Teachers selected students for intervention and rated them on the Achenbach Child Behavior Checklist before and after the intervention. Pre- and post-test…

  1. A Method for Extracting Sensory Motor Skills and Designing a Training System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doyo, Daisuke; Ohara, Atushi; Shida, Keisuke; Matsumoto, Toshiyuki; Otomo, Kazuo

    2009-01-01

    Two years ago, the rapid retirement of the "baby boomer artisans" in vast numbers threatened to erode the competitiveness of Japanese manufacturers (i.e., the 2007 problem). This study proposes a practical process for extracting skills and designing a training system, to accelerate the learning of skills in production fields by younger…

  2. Upgrading Interpersonal Skills in the Community: Training of Trainers and Helpers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turock, Art; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Describes a two-stage project for upgrading practitioners' interpersonal skills in a statewide service delivery system. Involved selection and training of trainers and teaching service providers a model for helping that described the skills, goals, and process for facilitating client action. Provides a brief summary of workshop evaluation data.…

  3. ROSS Skills, Knowledge, and Abilities Training Evaluation. Gaps and Recommendations

    SciTech Connect

    Ala, Maureen; Gruidl, Jeremiah; Buddemeier, Brooke

    2015-09-30

    This document describes the development of the ROSS SKAs, the cross-mapping of the SKAs to the available training, identifies gaps in the SKA and training, and provides recommendations to address those gaps.

  4. Training Reading and Phoneme Awareness Skills in Children with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goetz, Kristina; Hulme, Charles; Brigstocke, Sophie; Carroll, Julia M.; Nasir, Louise; Snowling, M.

    2008-01-01

    The authors report a short-term reading intervention study involving 15 children with Down syndrome (DS) who attended mainstream schools. The intervention programme taught children phoneme segmentation and blending skills in the context of learning letter-sounds and working with words in books. The children were taught by their learning support…

  5. Proposed Training Module on Goal Setting and Decision-Making Skills for Distant Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ibrahim, Aminu Kazeem; Tanglang, Nebath

    2015-01-01

    Inappropriate goal setting and decision-making skills are threat to distant learners' completion of academic programme, development and social well-being. This was realised following two related studies carried out by the authors of this write-up in addition to facts from reviewed literatures as one of the factors responsible for low retention and…

  6. Integrating Space Flight Resource Management Skills into Technical Lessons for International Space Station Flight Controller Training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldwin, Evelyn

    2008-01-01

    The Johnson Space Center s (JSC) International Space Station (ISS) Space Flight Resource Management (SFRM) training program is designed to teach the team skills required to be an effective flight controller. It was adapted from the SFRM training given to Shuttle flight controllers to fit the needs of a "24 hours a day/365 days a year" flight controller. More recently, the length reduction of technical training flows for ISS flight controllers impacted the number of opportunities for fully integrated team scenario based training, where most SFRM training occurred. Thus, the ISS SFRM training program is evolving yet again, using a new approach of teaching and evaluating SFRM alongside of technical materials. Because there are very few models in other industries that have successfully tied team and technical skills together, challenges are arising. Despite this, the Mission Operations Directorate of NASA s JSC is committed to implementing this integrated training approach because of the anticipated benefits.

  7. Communication Skills Training in Trainee Primary School Teachers in Spain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ortega, José Luis Gallego; Fuentes, Antonio Rodríguez

    2015-01-01

    Research on teacher training often focuses on learners' perceptions of that training. The focus of this paper, which uses a research-to-practice approach, is instead on the views of the trainers. It evaluates the perceptions of university lecturers teaching classes as part of primary teachers' training degrees and assesses their views of the…

  8. Circles of Women: Professional Skills Training with American Indian Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaFromboise, Teresa D.

    This manual is a resource guide for organizing leadership training workshops for American Indian women at various levels of professional training. The resources and ideas for training were supplied by American Indian women who participated in such workshops. Section 1 of the manual presents an overview of critical issues in the professionalization…

  9. A social skills training program for preschool children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia-Chen; Tsou, Kuo-Su; Shen, Winston W; Wong, Ching-Ching; Chao, Chia-Chen

    2004-12-01

    Many children with Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have difficulties in regulating their emotions and maintaining good peer relations. It is important for children with ADHD to receive interventions as early as possible so that their social and emotional development can be achieved. Some social skills training programs for school-ages children with ADHD in Taiwan have shown positive results. However, such programs have not been applied to preschool children with ADHD yet and its applicability needs to be explored. In this report, we describe the clinical experience of conducting social skills training with 8 boys with ADHD (aged 4 to 6 years) and their parents. Eight weekly training sessions were conducted. Each session included a joint parent-child social skills training group (1 hour) and a parent group (40 minutes). After the training, most parents (75%) reported improvements in their children's behaviors. Clinical implications and limitations of this study are discussed. PMID:15754782

  10. Communication skills in pediatric training program: National-based survey of residents’ perspectives in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Alofisan, Tariq; Al-Alaiyan, Saleh; Al-Abdulsalam, Moath; Siddiqui, Khawar; Hussain, Ibrahim Bin; Al-Qahtani, Mohammad H.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Good communication skills and rapport building are considered the cardinal tools for developing a patient-doctor relationship. A positive, healthy competition among different health care organizations in Saudi Arabia underlines an ever increasing emphasis on effective patient-doctor relationship. Despite the numerous guidelines provided and programs available, there is a significant variation in the acceptance and approach to the use of this important tool among pediatric residents in this part of the world. Objective: To determine pediatric residents' attitude toward communication skills, their perception of important communication skills, and their confidence in the use of their communication skills in the performance of their primary duties. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among all pediatrics trainee residents working in 13 different hospitals in Saudi Arabia. A standardized self-administered questionnaire developed by the Harvard Medical School was used. Results: A total of 297 residents out of all trainees in these centers participated in the data collection. The 283 (95%) residents considered learning communication skills a priority in establishing a good patient-doctor relationship. Thirty four percent reported being very confident with regard to their communication skills. Few residents had the skills, and the confidence to communicate with children with serious diseases, discuss end-of-life issues, and deal with difficult patients and parents. Conclusion: Pediatric residents perceive the importance of communication skills and competencies as crucial components in their training. A proper comprehensive communication skills training should be incorporated into the pediatric resident training curriculum. PMID:26929729

  11. Auto Body Repairer (Branch 2). Performance Demonstration Guidelines. Apprenticeship Training Program = Carrossiers automobiles (categorie 2). Programme de formation des apprentis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ontario Ministry of Skills Development, Toronto.

    This manual presents training standards for auto body repairers (branch 2) and is intended to be used by apprentice/trainees, instructors, and companies in Ontario, Canada as a blueprint for training or as a prerequisite for accreditation/certification. The training standards identify skills required for this occupation and its related training…

  12. The need for a clinical trials research methodology training programme in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Lui, W F; Karlberg, J

    1998-03-01

    Training courses in the concepts of clinical trials research methodology that include rules in good clinical practice have not yet been extensively implemented in Hong Kong. This study aims to define the current knowledge of rules in good clinical practice and identify any need for such training programmes. Between May and August 1996, 161 clinical research staff were asked non-randomly to fill in a questionnaire about their knowledge of research methodology and their interest in specific courses. The median number of correctly answered questions (maximum score, 20) was 5 and the mode was 4, which was the expected score if questions had been answered randomly. Only minor differences in score were detected between doctors, research staff, and industry employees. Many researchers were keen, however, to further their knowledge by attending future courses; on average, each person showed an interest in three of the eight proposed courses. The study shows that the knowledge of rules in good clinical practice among clinical research staff in Hong Kong is poor, but there is nevertheless a demand for training programmes.

  13. Developing skills for youth in the 21st century: The role of elite International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme schools in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Ewan; Lee, Moosung

    2014-04-01

    There is a growing body of research suggesting that schools need to respond to changing social and economic dynamics by prioritising "21st-century skills". Proponents of this view, who have been termed "the 21st century skills movement", have called for greater emphasis on cognitive and non-cognitive skills development, alongside the learning of subject content and technical skills. This paper explores the potential of International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme (IBDP) schools to respond to this mandate in China, one of the fastest-growing markets for International Baccalaureate® (IB) schools globally. The authors' research team undertook a multi-site case study of five elite IBDP schools in China. Their findings revealed confidence among interviewees that the IB educational philosophy was conducive to 21st-century skills development, especially through the provision of the three IBDP "Core Requirements", which are Creativity, Action, Service (CAS), Extended Essay (EE) and Theory of Knowledge (TOK). Despite this confidence, concerns remain about the implementation of the IB educational philosophy in the context of IBDP schools in China.

  14. Pandemic response: developing a mission-critical inventory and cross-training programme.

    PubMed

    Rosenbluth, James M

    2010-03-01

    This paper examines how companies' pandemic response planning has evolved from the 2002 SARS epidemic through to the H1N1 pandemic that emerged in 2009. While many companies had undertaken general pandemic planning prior to the emergence of H1N1, most were compelled to take their planning to a much more detailed level as the likelihood of widespread absenteeism became apparent. The paper outlines the steps necessary for completing a mission-critical inventory, identifying interdependencies between business functions and developing an effective cross-training programme that minimises the likelihood of business disruption due to the absence of key personnel.

  15. Design, Implementation, and Evaluation of a Tutor Training for Problem Based Learning in Undergraduate Psychology Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mühlfelder, Manfred; Konermann, Tobias; Borchard, Linda-Marie

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we describe a "Train the Tutor" programme (TtT) for developing the metacognitive skills, facilitator skills, and tutor skills of students in a problem based learning (PBL) context. The purpose of the programme was to train 2nd and 3rd year undergraduate students in psychology to become effective PBL tutors for…

  16. The Constraints of Ghanaian Polytechnics in Adopting Competency Based Training (CBT): The Case of a Pilot-Tested Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alhassan, Munkaila; Habib, Abdallah Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Polytechnics in Ghana view Competency Based Training (CBT) as a major intervention to the perennial constraints confronting its education and training. On the basis of this, and by government policy, a pilot programme of CBT was instituted in all the 10 polytechnics of Ghana, and was pilot tested in, at least, one department. Agricultural…

  17. Improvement of physical fitness and muscle strength in polymyositis/dermatomyositis patients by a training programme.

    PubMed

    Wiesinger, G F; Quittan, M; Aringer, M; Seeber, A; Volc-Platzer, B; Smolen, J; Graninger, W

    1998-02-01

    In the present investigation, the benefit of physical training in patients with inflammatory myopathy was studied. In this prospective, randomized, controlled study, 14 patients with polymyositis (PM) or dermatomyositis (DM) were investigated. The training, consisting of bicycle exercise and step aerobics, took place over a 6 week period. Baseline and endpoint measurements included an 'activities of daily living' (ADL) score, peak isometric torque (PIT) generated by muscle groups in the lower extremities, peak oxygen consumption (VO2max), and creatine phosphokinase (CPK) levels. There was no significant rise in disease activity in the training group in comparison to the controls. The ADL score for the treatment group, in comparison to the control group, improved (P < 0.02), PIT rose (P < 0.05) and there was a statistically significant increase in oxygen uptake relative to body weight (P < 0.05). No rise in inflammatory activity, but significant improvement in muscle strength, oxygen uptake and well-being, were found in patients with inflammatory myopathy as a result of physical training. Besides medication, a physical training programme consisting mainly of concentric muscle contractions should therefore be an integral part of therapy, particularly in view of the cardiopulmonary risk of these patients.

  18. Incorporating Foundational Evidence-Based Practice Concepts and Skills across an Athletic Training Education Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jutte, Lisa S.; Walker, Stacy E.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this article is to provide an example of how to develop and implement an evidence-based practice (EBP) concepts and skills plan in an athletic training education program (ATEP). Background: Evidence-based practice is an integral part of medical practice today. As stated in the "Athletic Training Educational Competencies…

  19. Responding to Health Skills Shortages: Innovative Directions from Vocational Education and Training. Support Document

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilpatrick, Sue; Le, Quynh; Johns, Susan; Millar, Pat; Routley, Georgie

    2007-01-01

    This research examines innovative solutions developed by the vocational education and training (VET) sector in response to skill shortages in the health sector. The study focuses on VET-trained workers in the health industry, and includes enrolled nurses, nursing assistants, personal care assistants, allied health assistants and Aboriginal and…

  20. Uneven South African Private Enterprise Training: The National Skills Survey of 2003

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paterson, Andrew; Du Toit, Jacques L.

    2005-01-01

    The South African workforce is characterised by racial, gender, occupational and sectoral unevenness in the distribution of skills, employment and training opportunities. This article considers how enterprise training in South Africa contributes to ameliorating, sustaining or exacerbating such inequalities. Using data from the National Skills…

  1. Evaluating Training to Promote Critical Thinking Skills for Determining Children's Safety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatton-Bowers, Holly; Pecora, Peter J.; Johnson, Kristen; Brooks, Susan; Schindell, Melanie

    2015-01-01

    This study examined changes in training participants' satisfaction with the instruction, knowledge gain, transfer of new skills, and beliefs about family involvement and engagement in working with families to help ensure children have safety. One hundred and forty-five practitioners participated in the training. Findings revealed shifts in…

  2. Training in Relationship Skills and Rehabilitation Clients' Behavior in Career Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farley, Roy C.; Akridge, Robert L.

    1987-01-01

    Examined effects of training in relationship skills for rehabilitation clients. Training was found to be effective in teaching basic concepts about interpersonal styles and in teaching participants how to communicate understanding and behave assertively in simulated career situations, and partially successful in an actual career preparation…

  3. Draft Cognitive Skills Training Program for En-Route Air Traffic Controllers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redding, Richard E.

    This document begins with a discussion of the cognitive task analysis (CTA) that was commissioned by the Federal Aviation Administration to identify the cognitive skills-related training needs of en-route air traffic controllers. Concluding the introductory section are a brief list of recommendations regarding the design of a training program…

  4. Group Conversational-Skills Training and Social Validation with Mentally Retarded Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wildman, Beth G.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    The effectiveness of a training program in conversational skills was evaluated with seven community-dwelling mildly and moderately mentally retarded adults. Training sessions consisted of instructions, modeling, and behavioral rehearsal. Substantial improvements in targeted behaviors in generalization settings was found after treatment and…

  5. The Contribution of Vocational Education and Training to Australia's Skills Base. Conference Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karmel, Tom

    2009-01-01

    This paper considers three aspects of vocational education and training's (VET) contribution to the labour market: the relationship between their training and the occupations VET graduates work in; the extent to which the qualified proportion of the workforce has increased; and the link between VET and skills acquisition. Finally, some thoughts…

  6. The Laborers-AGC Construction Skills Training Program. Final Performance Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tippie, John L.; Rice, Eric

    Patterned after a previously successful Laborers-Associated General Contractors model named the Construction Skills Training Program, a demonstration project was implemented at five regional training centers. At least eight courses were created, combined, or revised. Four full-length audiovisual support pieces were completed. Three courses were…

  7. Cognitive Skills Training Improves Listening and Visual Memory for Academic and Career Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erland, Jan

    The Mem-ExSpan Accelerative Cognitive Training System (MESACTS) is described as a cognitive skills training program for schools, businesses, and industry. The program achieves extraordinary academic results in reading and mathematics with 1 semester of input 4 days a week for 30 minutes a day. Intensive versions of the program accelerate…

  8. The Inclusion of Siblings in Social Skills Training Groups for Boys with Asperger Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castorina, Lia L.; Negri, Lisa M.

    2011-01-01

    This pilot investigation evaluated the effectiveness of siblings as generalisation agents in an 8-week social skills training (SST) program designed for boys with Asperger syndrome (AS). Twenty-one boys aged 8-12 participated in a SST group alone, with a sibling, or remained in a wait-list control group. After training, participants'…

  9. Development and Evaluation of a Remedial Numerical Skills Workbook for Navy Training. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Harry L.; And Others

    A remedial Navy-relevant numerical skills workbook was developed and field tested for use in Navy recruit training commands and as part of the Navy Junior Reserve Officers Training curriculum. Research and curriculum specialists from the Department of the Navy and Memphis State University identified Navy-relevant topics requiring numerical skill…

  10. Youth Knowledge, Interpersonal Skills, and Media Attitudes After Anti-Tobacco Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carver, Vivien; Reinert, Bonita; Range, Lillian M.

    2004-01-01

    To see if youth tobacco use prevention training improves knowledge, interaction skills, and awareness of media influences, junior high and high school students (161 at pre-test, 176 at post-test) from southeastern U.S. public schools completed questionnaires before and after anti-tobacco lessons. After training, high school (but not junior high)…

  11. Listen to Me, Listen to You: Interpersonal Skills Training Manual and Masters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kotzman, Anne

    This training manual contains material from the book "Listen to Me, Listen to You--A Practical Guide to Improving Self-Esteem, Listening Skills and Assertiveness" set out in the form of exercises and handouts. The manual provides a series of 14 group exercises and 19 related handouts suitable for use in workshops or group training sessions on…

  12. Apprenticeship Training in Germany--Still a Future-Oriented Model for Recruiting Skilled Workers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walden, Gunter; Troltsch, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    The apprenticeship training system in Germany, where training takes place in both private companies and vocational schools, has traditionally played an outstanding role in the development of young skilled workers. However, particularly since the start of the new millennium, the chances of smooth transition from secondary school to an…

  13. Communications Skills Training in the Public Sector: Applying the Carkhuff Model for Patient Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smoot, Sharene L.; Gonzales, James L.

    The long-term results of a 32-hour interpersonal communication skills training program for unit staff in a large state psychiatric hospital were evaluated. The main goal was to improve staff effectiveness through systematic training in communication behaviors expressing empathy in staff-patient interactions. Staff outcome measures were turnover,…

  14. The Orthopaedic Training Study, Phase II 1968-1972. Final Report Supplement, Psychomotor Skills, Part B.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Carl J.; And Others

    This document, as a supplement to the final report of the Orthopaedic Training Study, presents a discussion of the rationale behind the implementation of a laboratory course in psychomotor skills development for medical students. Medical educators examined resident training in terms of 3 components of cognitive elements of learning: cognitive,…

  15. Bringing in the Excluded? Aesthetic Labour, Skills and Training in the "New" Economy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nickson, Dennis; Warhurst, Chris; Cullen, Anne Marie; Watt, Allan

    2003-01-01

    Documents the growth in aesthetic service occupations and issues regarding employability: interpersonal skills, training, and social exclusion of those deemed unsuitable for "style" labor. Examines a Scottish training program that raises concerns about social control but may improve the employability of long-term unemployed persons. (Contains 40…

  16. 75 FR 44265 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Online Skills Training for PCPs on Substance Abuse

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-28

    ... Training for PCPs on Substance Abuse SUMMARY: Under the provisions of Section 3506(c)(2)A of the Paperwork... Online Skills Training for PCPs on Substance Abuse, via the Web site SBIRTTraining.com , to positively..., information will be collected from primary care physicians before exposure to the Web based materials...

  17. Training Community College faculty in the techniques and skills required for Solar Energy System installation

    SciTech Connect

    Leo, R.J.

    1980-05-01

    A project to train a specified number of community college, vocational/technical faculty in the techniques and skills required to install solar energy systems is described. The planning that led to the contract, the development and conduct of the training workshops, and the outcomes are detailed. An overall evaluation of the project and recommendations for the future are included. (MHR)

  18. Effects of Behavioral Skills Training on Parental Treatment of Children's Food Selectivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seiverling, Laura; Williams, Keith; Sturmey, Peter; Hart, Sadie

    2012-01-01

    We used behavioral skills training to teach parents of 3 children with autism spectrum disorder and food selectivity to conduct a home-based treatment package that consisted of taste exposure, escape extinction, and fading. Parent performance following training improved during both taste sessions and probe meals and was reflected in increases in…

  19. The influence of training and mental skills preparation on injury incidence and performance in marathon runners.

    PubMed

    Hamstra-Wright, Karrie L; Coumbe-Lilley, John E; Kim, Hajwa; McFarland, Jose A; Huxel Bliven, Kellie C

    2013-10-01

    There has been a considerable increase in the number of participants running marathons over the past several years. The 26.2-mile race requires physical and mental stamina to successfully complete it. However, studies have not investigated how running and mental skills preparation influence injury and performance. The purpose of our study was to describe the training and mental skills preparation of a typical group of runners as they began a marathon training program, assess the influence of training and mental skills preparation on injury incidence, and examine how training and mental skills preparation influence marathon performance. Healthy adults (N = 1,957) participating in an 18-week training program for a fall 2011 marathon were recruited for the study. One hundred twenty-five runners enrolled and received 4 surveys: pretraining, 6 weeks, 12 weeks, posttraining. The pretraining survey asked training and mental skills preparation questions. The 6- and 12-week surveys asked about injury incidence. The posttraining survey asked about injury incidence and marathon performance. Tempo runs during training preparation had a significant positive relationship to injury incidence in the 6-week survey (ρ[93] = 0.26, p = 0.01). The runners who reported incorporating tempo and interval runs, running more miles per week, and running more days per week in their training preparation ran significantly faster than did those reporting less tempo and interval runs, miles per week, and days per week (p ≤ 0.05). Mental skills preparation did not influence injury incidence or marathon performance. To prevent injury, and maximize performance, while marathon training, it is important that coaches and runners ensure that a solid foundation of running fitness and experience exists, followed by gradually building volume, and then strategically incorporating runs of various speeds and distances.

  20. The inclusion of siblings in social skills training groups for boys with Asperger syndrome.

    PubMed

    Castorina, Lia L; Negri, Lisa M

    2011-01-01

    This pilot investigation evaluated the effectiveness of siblings as generalisation agents in an 8-week social skills training (SST) program designed for boys with Asperger syndrome (AS). Twenty-one boys aged 8-12 participated in a SST group alone, with a sibling, or remained in a wait-list control group. After training, participants' identification of non-verbal social cues significantly improved and was maintained at 3-month follow-up, irrespective of sibling involvement. Similar trends existed for participants' ability to accurately interpret emotions relative to controls. Improvements did not extend to parent and teacher ratings on standardised social skills measures, suggesting poor generalisation, or questionable sensitivity of measures to taught skills. Results suggest some promise in improving social skills training for children with AS.

  1. Social skills training with institutionalized severely and profoundly mentally retarded persons.

    PubMed

    Singh, N N; Winton, A S

    1983-01-01

    This paper examines the literature on training severely and profoundly retarded individuals in social skills. Experimental studies have focused mainly on three areas: (1) cooperative responding during play, (2) non-verbal physical or close-proximity interactions, and (3) conversational skills. Training procedures varied but usually involved combinations of physical and verbal prompting, modeling, shaping, and social and edible reinforcement. These studies provide strong evidence that severely and profoundly retarded individuals can be taught useful interpersonal skills and can sometimes even assist the development of these skills in their peers. In general, the studies were methodologically sound in terms of basic design and interobserver reliabilities but weak with respect to maintenance and follow-up procedures. Only some studies tested for generalization of treatment effects and only a few specifically trained for such generalization. PMID:6670874

  2. Determining training needs from supervisors` assessment of staff proficiency in tasks and skills

    SciTech Connect

    Young, C.; Hensley, J.; Lehr, J.

    1995-06-01

    To provide the basis for establishing training opportunities, this project investigated supervisors` views of three components of staff activities. The project established the tasks that staff perform, identified staffs level of effectiveness in performing these tasks, and investigated staffs level of proficiency in performing the skills underlying these tasks. Training opportunities were then determined in those areas where knowledge and skins could be improved for staff to perform their tasks more effectively. Staff currently perform their tasks sufficiently well. Furthermore, supervisors indicated that for the most part staff do perform the tasks they should perform. In carrying out these tasks, staff use primarily critical thinking, problem solving, and communication skills rather than discipline-specific skills. Although staff generally have working knowledge of most of these skills, additional training in critical thinking and problem solving, program and project management techniques, and communications is appropriate to further improve the organizations effectiveness.

  3. The Relationship between Musical Skills, Music Training, and Intonation Analysis Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dankovicova, Jana; House, Jill; Crooks, Anna; Jones, Katie

    2007-01-01

    Few attempts have been made to look systematically at the relationship between musical and intonation analysis skills, a relationship that has been to date suggested only by informal observations. Following Mackenzie Beck (2003), who showed that musical ability was a useful predictor of general phonetic skills, we report on two studies…

  4. The Effect of the Values Education Programme on 5.5-6 Year Old Children's Social Development: Social Skills, Psycho-Social Development and Social Problem Solving Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dereli-Iman, Esra

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of the Values Education Programme (developed for pre-school children) on the children's social skills, psycho-social development, and social problem solving skills. The sample group consisted of 66 children (33 experimental group, 33 control group) attending pre-school. The Values Education…

  5. Telephone conversational skills training with socially isolated, impaired nursing home residents.

    PubMed Central

    Praderas, K; MacDonald, M L

    1986-01-01

    We evaluated the effectiveness of a comprehensive training program for enhancing the conversational skills of socially isolated, impaired elderly nursing home residents. A multiple baseline design across behaviors was used to train four subjects (aged 87, 85, 68, and 66), on four content-related conversational components: expressing common courtesies, making positive self-disclosures, asking questions, and making interjections and acknowledgements. Training procedures included instructions, modeling, behavior rehearsal, feedback, and reinforcement. Results showed positive effects with all four subjects; in two cases, changes were significant enough to affect untrained observers' perceptions of the elders' conversational skills. PMID:3804867

  6. The Effect of Communication Skills Training by Video Feedback Method on Clinical Skills of Interns of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences Compared to Didactic Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Managheb, S. E.; Zamani, A.; Shams, B.; Farajzadegan, Z.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Effective communication is essential to the practice of high-quality medicine. There are methodological challenges in communication skills training. This study was performed in order to assess the educational benefits of communication skills training by video feedback method versus traditional formats such as lectures on clinical…

  7. Improving Early Reading Skills for Beginning Readers Using an Online Programme as Supplementary Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyler, Emily Jehanne; Hughes, John Carl; Beverley, Michael; Hastings, Richard Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Many children fail to acquire basic reading skills. The current evidence base for supplementary reading instruction indicates that explicit, systematic and intensive instruction in the early years for children considered to be "at-risk" of reading difficulties can have significant and preventative effects on reading skills. However,…

  8. The Rise and Fall of Workplace Basic Skills Programmes: Lessons for Policy and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Alison; Aspin, Liam; Waite, Edmund; Ananiadou, Katerina

    2010-01-01

    Since the publication of the Moser Report in 1999, improving the basic skills of adults has been a major priority for all of the UK's governments. There has been a particular interest in building up workplace provision, because of the assumed relationship between the basic skills of the employed population and productivity. A longitudinal study…

  9. High-Skill Training: Grants from H-1B Visa Fees Meet Specific Workforce Needs, But at Varying Skill Levels. Report to Congressional Requesters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC. Education, Workforce, and Income Security Issues.

    A study examined the skill grant and scholarship grant programs. Findings indicated skill grantees offered training through various service delivery options to people needing skill upgrading; scholarship grantees provided scholarships to low income students for college degree programs in computer science, mathematics, and engineering. The skill…

  10. Fluency Training a Writing Skill: Editing for Concision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dermer, Marshall L.; Lopez, Shannon L.; Messling, Paul A., III

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this study was to design and evaluate fluency-based training units to help students eliminate inconcision. Participants first completed a 1.5-hr lesson on writing concisely and then a 5-min test during which they edited sentences containing inconcise text from the training units. Subsequently, participants were randomly assigned to an…

  11. Evaluation of an inter-professional workshop to develop a psychosocial assessment and child-centred communication training programme for paediatricians in training

    PubMed Central

    Nestel, Debra; Taylor, Sharon; Spender, Quentin

    2004-01-01

    Background The quality of psychosocial assessment of children in consultations varies widely. One reason for this difference is the variability in effective mental health and communication training at undergraduate and post-qualification levels. In recognition of this problem, the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health in the United Kingdom have developed the Child in Mind Project that aims to meet this deficit in medical training. This paper describes the evaluation of a workshop that explored the experiences and expectations of health care professionals in the development of a training programme for doctors. Methods The one-day inter-professional workshop was attended by 63 participants who were invited to complete evaluation forms before and immediately after the workshop. Results The results showed that the workshop was partially successful in providing an opportunity for an inter-professional group to exchange ideas and influence the development of a significant project. Exploring the content and process of the proposed training programme and the opportunity for participants to share experiences of effective practice were valued. Participants identified that the current culture within many health care settings would be an obstacle to successful implementation of a training programme. Working within existing training structures will be essential. Areas for improvement in the workshop included clearer statement of goals at the outset and a more suitable environment for the numbers of participants. Conclusions The participants made a valuable contribution to the development of the training programme identifying specific challenges. Inter-professional collaborations are likely to result in more deliverable and relevant training programmes. Continued consultation with potential users of the programme – both trainers and trainees will be essential. PMID:15555066

  12. Specificity of Occupational Training and Occupational Mobility: An Empirical Study Based on Lazear's Skill-Weights Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geel, Regula; Mure, Johannes; Backes-Gellner, Uschi

    2011-01-01

    According to standard human capital theory, firm-financed training cannot be explained if the skills obtained are general in nature. Nevertheless, in German-speaking countries, firms invest heavily in apprenticeship training although the skills are assumed to be general. In our paper, we study the extent to which apprenticeship training is general…

  13. How can surgical training benefit from theories of skilled motor development, musical skill acquisition and performance psychology?

    PubMed

    McCaskie, Andrew W; Kenny, Dianna T; Deshmukh, Sandeep

    2011-05-01

    Trainee surgeons must acquire expert status in the context of reduced hours, reduced operating room time and the need to learn complex skills involving screen-mediated techniques, computers and robotics. Ever more sophisticated surgical simulation strategies have been helpful in providing surgeons with the opportunity to practise, but not all of these strategies are widely available. Similarities in the motor skills required in skilled musical performance and surgery suggest that models of music learning, and particularly skilled motor development, may be applicable in training surgeons. More attention should be paid to factors associated with optimal arousal and optimal performance in surgical training - lessons learned from helping anxious musicians optimise performance and manage anxiety may also be transferable to trainee surgeons. The ways in which the trainee surgeon moves from novice to expert need to be better understood so that this process can be expedited using current knowledge in other disciplines requiring the performance of complex fine motor tasks with high cognitive load under pressure.

  14. Self-Efficacy After Life Skills Training: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Rezayat, Fatemeh; Dehghan Nayeri, Nahid

    2013-01-01

    Background: Nursing students’ self-efficacy is a predictor for their educational progress. Students, who believe that they can be successful in their studies, are more confident. Therefore, many universities have focused on life skills training programs to improve the mental health of their students. Objectives: This study was conducted to evaluate and compare self-efficacy in two groups of nursing students of Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS). One group of students was trained on life skill programs, and the second group was not trained on the issue. Materials and Methods: A case-control study was conducted on two groups of nursing students in TUMS in the late 2012. The case group (n = 112) had passed life skills training course, and the control group (n = 139) was not trained on the issue. Data was collected using a questionnaire containing 12 questions about demographic features, and the Sherer’s general self-efficacy questionnaire. Data analysis was performed using independent sample t-test, Chi-square, odds ratio, and Fisher’s exact test. Results: In the untrained and trained groups, 23% and 8% of the students had very high self-efficacy, respectively. The overall mean scores of self-efficacy were 41.99 ± 9.31 and 38.99 ± 10.48 in the trained and untrained groups, respectively (P = 0.015), and the higher mean score indicates lower level of self-efficacy. A significant difference was also found between the self-efficacy and family income (P = 0.029). Conclusions: The present study showed that life skills training program did not affect self-efficacy of nursing students. Perhaps, the methods used in education were influencing and then, more effective techniques such as role-play and group discussion should be substituted in life skills training. PMID:25414884

  15. Effectiveness of the Power Dry-Land Training Programmes in Youth Swimmers

    PubMed Central

    Sadowski, Jerzy; Mastalerz, Andrzej; Gromisz, Wilhelm; NiŸnikowski, Tomasz

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of the dry-land power training on swimming force, swimming performance and strength in youth swimmers. Twenty six male swimmers, free from injuries and training regularly at least 6 times a week, were enrolled in the study and randomly assigned to one of two groups: experimental (n=14, mean age 14.0 ± 0.5 yrs, mean height 1.67±0.08 m and mean body mass 55.71 ±9.55 kg) and control (n=12, mean age 14.1 ± 0.5 yrs, mean height 1.61±0.11 m and mean body mass 49.07 ±8.25 kg). The experimental group took part in a combined swimming and dry-land power training. The control group took part in swimming training only. The training programmes in water included a dominant aerobic work in front crawl. In this research the experimental group tended to present slightly greater improvements in sprint performance. However, the stroke frequency insignificantly decreased (−4.30%, p>0.05) in the experimental group and increased (6.28%, p>0.05) in the control group. The distance per stroke insignificantly increased in the experimental group (5.98%, p>0.05) and insignificantly decreased in the control group (−5.36%, p>0.05). A significant improvement of tethered swimming force for the experimental group (9.64%, p<0.02) was found, whereas the increase was not statistically significant in the control group (2.86%, p>0.05). The main data cannot clearly state that power training allowed an enhancement in swimming performance, although a tendency to improve swimming performance in tethered swimming was noticed. PMID:23486353

  16. Simulated Job Interview Skill Training for People with Psychiatric Disability: Feasibility and Tolerability of Virtual Reality Training

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Morris D.; Weinstein, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    The job interview is an important step toward successful employment and often a significant challenge for people with psychiatric disability. Vocational rehabilitation specialists can benefit from a systematic approach to training job interview skills. The investigators teamed up with a company that specializes in creating simulated job interview training to create software that provides a virtual reality experience with which learners can systematically improve their job interview skills, reduce their fears, and increase their confidence about going on job interviews. The development of this software is described and results are presented from a feasibility and tolerability trial with 10 participants with psychiatric disability referred from their vocational service programs. Results indicate that this representative sample had a strongly positive response to the prototype job interview simulation. They found it easy to use, enjoyed the experience, and thought it realistic and helpful. Almost all described the interview as anxiety provoking but that the anxiety lessened as they became more skilled. They saw the benefit of its special features such as ongoing feedback from a “coach in the corner” and from being able to review a transcript of the interview. They believed that they could learn the skills being taught through these methods. Participants were enthusiastic about wanting to use the final product when it becomes available. The advantages of virtual reality technology for training important skills for rehabilitation are discussed. PMID:21860052

  17. Training Social Skills to Severely Mentally Retarded Multiply Handicapped Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matson, Johnny L.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Three severely mentally retarded, multiply handicapped adolescents were treated in a classroom setting for social skill deficits. Treatment focused on increasing eye contact and strengthening on-task and in-seat behaviors. Results suggested that a combination of visual stimuli, operant, and social learning methods can be used to successfully…

  18. Training Advanced Writing Skills: The Case for Deliberate Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kellogg, Ronald T.; Whiteford, Alison P.

    2009-01-01

    The development of advanced writing skills has been neglected in schools of the United States, with even some college graduates lacking the level of ability required in the workplace (National Commission on Writing, 2003, 2004). The core problem, we argue, is an insufficient degree of appropriate task practice distributed throughout the secondary…

  19. Undergraduate Training and Skills for Careers outside Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carducci, Bernardo J.

    Many potential psychology majors are electing to pursue degrees in other disciplines that appear to have greater market value in the current employment environment. Providing psychology majors with the skills and knowledge necessary to compete successfully with business majors for entry-level employment opportunities in a variety of business…

  20. Basic Counseling Skills Training Program for Juvenile Court Workers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Richard W.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Conducted week-long course of study in counseling skills for individuals (n=73) working with juvenile offenders. Participants evidenced significant changes in certain behavior categories as measured by the Fundamental Interpersonal Relations Orientation-Behavior Scales (FIRO-B). Compared to controls, participants made certain movements in positive…

  1. Improving Social Skills: A Training Presentation to Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utay, Joe; Utay, Carol

    2005-01-01

    All school professionals working with children and adolescents deal with social skills issues. Even if not the primary issue or goal, teachers, counselors, school psychologists, other specialists such as nurses, speech and language therapists, etc., and some administrators make informal assessments of their students' ability to successfully…

  2. Psychological Readiness and Motor Skills Needed for Toilet Training

    MedlinePlus

    ... fully toilet-trained. Awareness of the Need to Go At around her first birthday, your child will ... child’s awareness of the feeling of needing to go so that she can build on this understanding ...

  3. Training of perceptual-cognitive skills in offside decision making.

    PubMed

    Catteeuw, Peter; Gilis, Bart; Jaspers, Arne; Wagemans, Johan; Helsen, Werner

    2010-12-01

    This study investigates the effect of two off-field training formats to improve offside decision making. One group trained with video simulations and another with computer animations. Feedback after every offside situation allowed assistant referees to compensate for the consequences of the flash-lag effect and to improve their decision-making accuracy. First, response accuracy improved and flag errors decreased for both training groups implying that training interventions with feedback taught assistant referees to better deal with the flash-lag effect. Second, the results demonstrated no effect of format, although assistant referees rated video simulations higher for fidelity than computer animations. This implies that a cognitive correction to a perceptual effect can be learned also when the format does not correspond closely with the original perceptual situation. Off-field offside decision-making training should be considered as part of training because it is a considerable help to gain more experience and to improve overall decision-making performance. PMID:21282841

  4. Improving Patient Outcomes: Effectively Training Healthcare Staff in Psychological Practice Skills: A Mixed Systematic Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Garzonis, Katherine; Mann, Eryn; Wyrzykowska, Aleksandra; Kanellakis, Pavlo

    2015-01-01

    Training is an important part of modern European healthcare services and is often cited as a way to improve care quality. To date, various training methods have been used to impart skills relevant to psychological practice in a variety of mental health professionals. However, patient outcomes are rarely used in evaluating the effectiveness of the different training methods used, making it difficult to assess true utility. In the present review, we consider methods of training that can effectively impact trainee and patient outcomes. To do so, PubMed, PsycNET, Scopus, CENTRAL and ERIC were searched for studies on training of healthcare staff in psychological practice approaches. In total, 24 studies were identified (16 quantitative and 8 qualitative). For the most part, group, individual, and web-based training was used. A variety of health professionals were trained in skills including ‘communication’, ‘diagnosis’, and ‘referral’ to name but a few. In the majority of studies staff skill level improved. These findings hold implications for the design, implementation, and evaluation of training for mental healthcare staff. PMID:27247676

  5. Learning physical examination skills outside timetabled training sessions: what happens and why?

    PubMed

    Duvivier, Robbert J; van Geel, Koos; van Dalen, Jan; Scherpbier, Albert J J A; van der Vleuten, Cees P M

    2012-08-01

    Lack of published studies on students' practice behaviour of physical examination skills outside timetabled training sessions inspired this study into what activities medical students undertake to improve their skills and factors influencing this. Six focus groups of a total of 52 students from Years 1-3 using a pre-established interview guide. Interviews were recorded, transcribed and analyzed using qualitative methods. The interview guide was based on questionnaire results; overall response rate for Years 1-3 was 90% (n = 875). Students report a variety of activities to improve their physical examination skills. On average, students devote 20% of self-study time to skill training with Year 1 students practising significantly more than Year 3 students. Practice patterns shift from just-in-time learning to a longitudinal selfdirected approach. Factors influencing this change are assessment methods and simulated/real patients. Learning resources used include textbooks, examination guidelines, scientific articles, the Internet, videos/DVDs and scoring forms from previous OSCEs. Practising skills on fellow students happens at university rooms or at home. Also family and friends were mentioned to help. Simulated/real patients stimulated students to practise of physical examination skills, initially causing confusion and anxiety about skill performance but leading to increased feelings of competence. Difficult or enjoyable skills stimulate students to practise. The strategies students adopt to master physical examination skills outside timetabled training sessions are self-directed. OSCE assessment does have influence, but learning takes place also when there is no upcoming assessment. Simulated and real patients provide strong incentives to work on skills. Early patient contacts make students feel more prepared for clinical practice.

  6. Rheumatology clinicians’ experiences of brief training and implementation of skills to support patient self-management

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Self-management of arthritis requires informed, activated patients to manage its physical and psychosocial consequences. Patient activation and self-management can be enhanced through the use of cognitive-behavioural approaches, which have a strong evidence base and provide insight into the variation in outcome of patients with ostensibly the same degree of disease activity. However, training for rheumatology health professionals in theory and skills underpinning the facilitation of self-management is not widely available. To develop such training, this study explored rheumatology clinicians’ experiences of a variety of brief skills training courses to understand which aspects were helpful or unhelpful, and to identify the barriers and facilitators of applying the skills in clinical practice. Methods 16 clinicians who had previously attended communication and self-management skills training participated in semi-structured interviews: 3 physicians, 3 physiotherapists, 4 nurses, 6 occupational therapists. Transcripts were analysed (ED) using a hybrid inductive and deductive thematic approach, with a subset independently analysed (SH, RG-H, RJ). Results 3 overarching themes captured views about training undertaken and subsequent use of approaches to facilitate self-management. In ‘putting theory into practice’, clinicians felt that generic training was not as relevant as rheumatology-specific training. They wanted a balance between theory and skills practice, and identified the importance of access to ongoing support. In ‘challenging professional identity’, models of care and working cultures influenced learning and implementation. Training often challenged a tendency to problem-solve on behalf of patients and broadened clinicians’ remit from a primary focus on physical symptoms to the mind and body interaction. In ‘enhanced practice’, clinicians viewed consultations as enhanced after training. Focus had shifted from clinicians’ agendas to

  7. Effectiveness of a Wheelchair Skills Training Program for Powered Wheelchair Users: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kirby, R. Lee; Miller, William C.; Routhier, Francois; Demers, Louise; Mihailidis, Alex; Polgar, Jan Miller; Rushton, Paula W.; Titus, Laura; Smith, Cher; McAllister, Mike; Theriault, Chris; Thompson, Kara; Sawatzky, Bonita

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To test the hypothesis that powered wheelchair users who receive the Wheelchair Skills Training Program (WSTP) improve their wheelchair skills in comparison with a Control group that receives standard care. Our secondary objectives were to assess goal achievement, satisfaction with training, retention, injury rate, confidence with wheelchair use and participation. Design Randomized controlled trial (RCT). Setting Rehabilitation centers and communities. Participants 116 powered wheelchair users. Intervention Five 30-minute WSTP training sessions. Main Outcome Measures Assessments were done at baseline (T1), post-training (T2) and 3 months post-training (T3) using the Wheelchair Skills Test Questionnaire (WST-Q 4.1), Goal Attainment Score (GAS), Satisfaction Questionnaire, Injury Rate, Wheelchair Use Confidence Scale for Power Wheelchair Users (WheelCon) and Life Space Assessment (LSA). Results There was no significant T2-T1 difference between the groups for WST-Q capacity scores (p = 0.600) but the difference for WST-Q performance scores was significant (p = 0.016) with a relative (T2/T1 x 100%) improvement of the median score for the Intervention group of 10.8%. The mean (SD) GAS for the Intervention group after training was 92.8% (11.4) and satisfaction with training was high. The WST-Q gain was not retained at T3. There was no clinically significant difference between the groups in injury rate and no statistically significant differences in WheelCon or LSA scores at T3. Conclusions Powered wheelchair users who receive formal wheelchair skills training demonstrate modest transient post-training improvements in their WST-Q performance scores, they have substantial improvements on individualized goals and they are positive about training. PMID:26232684

  8. Family Numeracy Adds on: The Follow-Up Study of the Basic Skills Agency's Pilot Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Greg; Hutchison, Dougal

    2002-01-01

    In 1998 the authors published research with NFER (National Foundation for Educational Research) "Family Numeracy Adds Up" showing how parents and children had gained from fourteen pilot family numeracy programmes. It showed strong evidence of the double benefits of work with families. Children have an early boost in their learning and parents, who…

  9. Practical Skills in Laptop Computer Repairs for Curriculum Innovation in Technical Education Programmes in Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chukwuedo, Samson O.; Omofonmwan, Godwin O.

    2015-01-01

    The increase in the use of laptop computer in Nigeria with their corresponding incessant breakdown calls for the preparation of competent technicians/technologists to carry out such repairs at the downtime of the appliance. This is one of the responsibilities of technology education programmes. This study therefore determined the practical skills…

  10. An Individualised Curriculum to Teach Numeracy Skills to Children with Autism: Programme Description and Pilot Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tzanakaki, Pagona; Grindle, Corinna Fay; Saville, Maria; Hastings, Richard Patrick; Hughes, John Carl; Huxley, Kathleen

    2014-01-01

    Teaching mathematics to children with autism is an area with limited research evidence. In this study we developed a teaching manual based on Maths Recovery, a numeracy programme designed for typically developing children. Six children with autism participated in the study and received daily numeracy teaching over a 20-week period. Our aims were…

  11. A Structured Writing Programme for Staff: Facilitating Knowledge, Skills, Confidence and Publishing Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devlin, Marcia; Radloff, Alex

    2014-01-01

    The growing interest in the higher education sector in publishing pedagogical research has led to a focus on professional development for staff who wish to engage in this endeavour. This paper describes and evaluates a specific programme designed to help university staff to prepare and submit a high-quality paper to a peer-reviewed journal.…

  12. Social skills training for adolescents with Asperger syndrome and high-functioning autism.

    PubMed

    Tse, Jeanie; Strulovitch, Jack; Tagalakis, Vicki; Meng, Linyan; Fombonne, Eric

    2007-11-01

    The effectiveness of a social skills training group for adolescents with Asperger syndrome and high-functioning autism (AS/HFA) was evaluated. Parents of six groups of adolescents (n = 46, 61% male, mean age 14.6) completed questionnaires immediately before and after the 12-week group. Parents and adolescents were surveyed regarding their experience with the group. Significant pre- to post-treatment gains were found on measures of both social competence and problem behaviors associated with AS/HFA. Effect sizes ranged from .34 to .72. Adolescents reported more perceived skill improvements than did parents. Parent-reported improvement suggests that social skills learned in group sessions generalize to settings outside the treatment group. Larger, controlled studies of social skills training groups would be valuable.

  13. Skill Training versus 12-Step Facilitation for Parents of Substance-Abusing Teens

    PubMed Central

    McGillicuddy, Neil B.; Rychtarik, Robert G.; Papandonatos, George D.

    2014-01-01

    Distressed parents (N = 85) with a substance-abusing adolescent not receiving treatment were randomized to 12 weeks of coping skill training (CST), 12-step facilitation (TSF), or delayed treatment control (DTC). At the end of treatment/delay, CST showed greater coping skillfulness than TSF, and both CST and TSF were more skillful than DTC. The percentage of parent problem days (PPD)—days when the adolescent’s substance use caused a problem—also was reduced in CST and TSF, relative to DTC. Both CST and TSF reported significantly reduced monthly PPD by the end of a 12-month follow-up. Skill training and TSF interventions appear equally effective for this underserved parent population. PMID:25306932

  14. Skill training versus 12-step facilitation for parents of substance-abusing teens.

    PubMed

    McGillicuddy, Neil B; Rychtarik, Robert G; Papandonatos, George D

    2015-03-01

    Distressed parents (N=85) with a substance-abusing adolescent not receiving treatment were randomized to 12 weeks of coping skill training (CST), 12-step facilitation (TSF), or delayed treatment control (DTC). At the end of treatment/delay, CST showed greater coping skillfulness than TSF, and both CST and TSF were more skillful than DTC. The percentage of parent problem days (PPD)-days when the adolescent's substance use caused a problem-also was reduced in CST and TSF, relative to DTC. Both CST and TSF reported significantly reduced monthly PPD by the end of a 12-month follow-up. Skill training and TSF interventions appear equally effective for this underserved parent population.

  15. Learn, see, practice, prove, do, maintain: an evidence-based pedagogical framework for procedural skill training in medicine.

    PubMed

    Sawyer, Taylor; White, Marjorie; Zaveri, Pavan; Chang, Todd; Ades, Anne; French, Heather; Anderson, JoDee; Auerbach, Marc; Johnston, Lindsay; Kessler, David

    2015-08-01

    Acquisition of competency in procedural skills is a fundamental goal of medical training. In this Perspective, the authors propose an evidence-based pedagogical framework for procedural skill training. The framework was developed based on a review of the literature using a critical synthesis approach and builds on earlier models of procedural skill training in medicine. The authors begin by describing the fundamentals of procedural skill development. Then, a six-step pedagogical framework for procedural skills training is presented: Learn, See, Practice, Prove, Do, and Maintain. In this framework, procedural skill training begins with the learner acquiring requisite cognitive knowledge through didactic education (Learn) and observation of the procedure (See). The learner then progresses to the stage of psychomotor skill acquisition and is allowed to deliberately practice the procedure on a simulator (Practice). Simulation-based mastery learning is employed to allow the trainee to prove competency prior to performing the procedure on a patient (Prove). Once competency is demonstrated on a simulator, the trainee is allowed to perform the procedure on patients with direct supervision, until he or she can be entrusted to perform the procedure independently (Do). Maintenance of the skill is ensured through continued clinical practice, supplemented by simulation-based training as needed (Maintain). Evidence in support of each component of the framework is presented. Implementation of the proposed framework presents a paradigm shift in procedural skill training. However, the authors believe that adoption of the framework will improve procedural skill training and patient safety.

  16. Improving risk communication through interactive training in communication skills

    SciTech Connect

    White, D.A.; White, R.K.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes a workshop in communication and public speaking skills recently conducted for a group of public officials whose responsibilities include presenting risk information at public meetings associated with hazardous waste sites. We detail the development and execution of the 2 1/2 day workshop, including the development and integration of a 45-minute video of a simulated public meeting used to illustrate examples of good and bad communication behaviors. The workshop uses a mock public meeting video, participatory video exercises, role-playing, and instructor, and a resource text. This interactive approach to teaching communication skills can help sensitize scientists to the public's understanding of risk and improve scientists' confidence and effectiveness in communicating scientific information. 10 refs., 1 fig.

  17. Improving risk communication through interactive training in communication skills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, D. A.; White, R. K.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes a workshop in communication and public speaking skills recently conducted for a group of public officials whose responsibilities include presenting risk information at public meetings associated with hazardous waste sites. We detail the development and execution of the 2(1/2)-day workshop, including the development and integration of a 45-min video of a simulated public meeting used to illustrate examples of good and bad communication behaviors. The workshop uses a mock public meeting video, participatory video exercises, role-playing, an instructor, and a resource text. This interactive approach to teaching communication skills can help sensitize scientists to the public's understanding of risk and improve scientists' confidence and effectiveness in communicating scientific information.

  18. A randomized controlled study of a social skills training for preadolescent children with autism spectrum disorders: generalization of skills by training parents and teachers?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Social skills training (SST) is a common intervention for children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) to improve their social and communication skills. Despite the fact that SSTs are often applied in clinical practice, the evidence for the effectiveness of these trainings for children with ASD is inconclusive. Moreover, long term outcome and generalization of learned skills are little evaluated. Additionally, there is no research on the influence of involvement of parents and teachers on effectiveness of SST and on the generalization of learned social skills to daily life. We expect parent and teacher involvement in SST to enhance treatment efficacy and to facilitate generalization of learned skills to daily life. Method/Design In a randomized controlled trial (RCT) with three conditions, 120 participants with ASD at the end of primary school (10–12 years of calendar age) have been randomized to SST, SST-PTI (SST with Parent & Teacher Involvement), or care-as-usual. The SST consists of 18 group sessions of 1.5 hours for the children. In the SST-PTI condition, parents additionally participate in 8 parent sessions and parents and teachers are actively involved in homework assignments. Assessment takes place at three moments: before and immediately after the intervention period and at 6 months follow-up. Primary outcome is socialization, as an aspect of adaptive functioning. Secondary outcomes focus on specific social skills children learn during SST and on more general social skills pertaining to home and community settings from a multi-informant perspective. Additionally, possible predictors of treatment outcome will be assessed. Discussion The current study is an RCT study evaluating SST in a large sample of Dutch children with ASD in a specific age range (10–12 years). Strengths of the study are the use of one manualized protocol, application of standardized and internationally used rating instruments, use of multiple raters, investigation of

  19. Immediate video feedback on ramp, wheelie, and curb wheelchair skill training for persons with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong Tai; Limroongreungrat, Weerawat; Chang, Li-Shan; Ke, Xiang; Tsai, Liang-Ching; Chen, Yu-Ping; Lewis, James

    2015-01-01

    We hypothesized that the effects of immediate video feedback (IVF) on training ramp, wheelie, and curb wheelchair skills for persons with spinal cord injury (SCI) would be equivalent to or better than the traditional wheelchair skill training. Participants were manual wheelchair users with recent SCI (thoracic 1-lumbar 1) who were matched (9 pairs) on motor function level, age, and sex and randomly assigned to a control group (conventional training) or an experimental group (IVF training). Participants learned three wheelchair skills and then went through the wheelchair skill competency test, retention test, and transfer test. Paired t-tests were used to examine the differences in training time (minutes), spotter intervention needed (counts), and successful rate in performance between the two groups. A 2 (groups) x 3 (skills) x 3 (tests) repeated-measures analysis of variance and Bonferroni adjustment test were used to examine differences between groups on wheelchair skills and tests. No differences were found between two groups in training times (minutes) on three wheelchair skills (experimental vs control: ramp 14.92 +/- 5.80 vs 11.69 +/- 7.85; wheelie 17.79 +/- 6.03 vs 19.92 +/- 13.42; and curb 38.35 +/-23.01 vs 48.59 +/- 15.21). This study demonstrated that IVF for training manual wheelchair skills may produce similar results as the conventional training and may be an alternative training method for wheelchair skills. PMID:26360645

  20. Immediate video feedback on ramp, wheelie, and curb wheelchair skill training for persons with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong Tai; Limroongreungrat, Weerawat; Chang, Li-Shan; Ke, Xiang; Tsai, Liang-Ching; Chen, Yu-Ping; Lewis, James

    2015-01-01

    We hypothesized that the effects of immediate video feedback (IVF) on training ramp, wheelie, and curb wheelchair skills for persons with spinal cord injury (SCI) would be equivalent to or better than the traditional wheelchair skill training. Participants were manual wheelchair users with recent SCI (thoracic 1-lumbar 1) who were matched (9 pairs) on motor function level, age, and sex and randomly assigned to a control group (conventional training) or an experimental group (IVF training). Participants learned three wheelchair skills and then went through the wheelchair skill competency test, retention test, and transfer test. Paired t-tests were used to examine the differences in training time (minutes), spotter intervention needed (counts), and successful rate in performance between the two groups. A 2 (groups) x 3 (skills) x 3 (tests) repeated-measures analysis of variance and Bonferroni adjustment test were used to examine differences between groups on wheelchair skills and tests. No differences were found between two groups in training times (minutes) on three wheelchair skills (experimental vs control: ramp 14.92 +/- 5.80 vs 11.69 +/- 7.85; wheelie 17.79 +/- 6.03 vs 19.92 +/- 13.42; and curb 38.35 +/-23.01 vs 48.59 +/- 15.21). This study demonstrated that IVF for training manual wheelchair skills may produce similar results as the conventional training and may be an alternative training method for wheelchair skills.