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Sample records for skin blood flowmotions

  1. Altered skin flowmotion in hypertensive humans

    PubMed Central

    Bruning, R.S.; Kenney, W.L.; Alexander, L.M.

    2017-01-01

    Essential hypertensive humans exhibit attenuated cutaneous nitric oxide (NO)-dependent vasodilation. Using spectral analysis (fast Fourier transformation) we aimed to characterize the skin flowmotion contained in the laser-Doppler flowmetry recordings during local heating-induced vasodilation before and after concurrent pharmacological inhibition of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) in hypertensive and age-matched normotensive men and women. We hypothesized that hypertensive subjects would have lower total power spectral densities (PSD), specifically in the frequency intervals associated with intrinsic endothelial and neurogenic control of the microvasculature. Furthermore, we hypothesized that NOS inhibition would attenuate the endothelial frequency interval. Laser-Doppler flowmetry recordings during local heating experiments from 18 hypertensive (MAP: 108±2mmHg) and 18 normotensive (MAP: 88±2mmHg) men and women were analyzed. Within site NO-dependent vasodilation was assessed by perfusion of a non-specific NOS inhibitor (NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester; L-NAME) through intradermal microdialysis during the heating-induced plateau in skin blood flow. Local heating-induced vasodilation increased total PSD for all frequency intervals (all p<0.001). Hypertensives had a lower total PSD (p=0.03) and absolute neurogenic frequency intervals (p<0.01) compared to the normotensives. When normalized as a percentage of total PSD, hypertensives had reduced neurogenic (p<0.001) and augmented myogenic contributions (p=0.04) to the total spectrum. NOS inhibition decreased total PSD (p<0.001) for both groups, but hypertensives exhibited lower absolute endothelial (p<0.01), neurogenic (p<0.05), and total PSD (p<0.001) frequency intervals compared to normotensives. These data suggest that essential hypertension results in altered neurogenic and NOS-dependent control of skin flowmotion and support the use of spectral analysis as a non-invasive technique to study vasoreactivity. PMID

  2. Spectral analysis of skin blood flowmotion before and after exercise in healthy trained and in sedentary subjects.

    PubMed

    Rossi, M; Santoro, G; Maurizio, S; Carpi, A

    2006-07-01

    Cutaneous blood flowmotion (CBF) can contribute to a reduction in the resistance in skin microvascular networks. The increase of CBF during exercise can improve the capacity of skin microvascular networks to transport and eliminate heat. In order to verify if the physical training could increase the skin blood flowmotion during exercise, we performed spectral analysis of cutaneous forearm laser Doppler signal, before and after acute maximal exercise in 15 healthy trained subjects (TS) and in 15 control sedentary subjects (SS). Within the total spectrum of 0.009 - 2.3 Hz, five frequency intervals of CBF were analysed: 0.009 - 0.02 Hz (endothelial activity), 0.02 - 0.06 Hz (sympathetic activity), 0.06 - 0.2 Hz (vascular myogenic activity), 0.2 - 0.6 Hz (respiratory activity), and 0.6 - 2.3 Hz (heart activity). In basal conditions, no difference between TS and SS was observed in the cutaneous blood perfusion (CBP), expressed in conventional perfusion units (PU), and in the mean value of CBF total spectrum power density (PD), measured in PU/Hz, while the absolute PD of the endothelial and myogenic CBF components was significantly higher (p < 0.05) in TS (0.69 +/- 0.62 PU/Hz and 0.47 +/- 0.43 PU/Hz, respectively) than in SS (0.29 +/- 0.16 PU/Hz and 0.23 +/- 0.16 PU/Hz, respectively). In both TS and SS, acute exercise induced a significant increase of CBP mean value (30.91 +/- 20.28 PU, p < 0.0005 and 16.45 +/- 7.02 PU, p < 0.0005; respectively) and of CBF total spectrum PD (6.65 +/- 4.13 Hz/PU, p < 0.001 and 4.17 +/- 1.86 Hz/PU, p < 0.05; respectively), with a significant difference of these two parameters between the two groups (p < 0.05). After exercise, CBF components regarding endothelial and myogenic activities maintained a higher PD mean value in TS in respect to SS (1.69 +/- 1.34 PU/Hz and 1.59 +/- 0.93 versus 0.91 +/- 0.44 and 0.98 +/- 0.48 PU/Hz respectively, p < 0.05). These findings suggest that physical training is associated with the increase of CBF and

  3. Effects of prolonged surface pressure on the skin blood flowmotions in anaesthetized rats—an assessment by spectral analysis of laser Doppler flowmetry signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zengyong; Tam, Eric W. C.; Kwan, Maggie P. C.; Mak, Arthur F. T.; Lo, Samuel C. L.; Leung, Mason C. P.

    2006-05-01

    The objective of this study is to assess the effect of prolonged surface compression on the skin blood flowmotion in rats using spectral analysis based on wavelets transform of the periodic oscillations of the cutaneous laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) signal. An external pressure of 13.3 kPa (100 mmHg) was applied to the trochanter area and the distal lateral tibia of Sprague-Dawley rats via two specifically designed pneumatic indentors. The loading duration was 6 hours/day for 4 consecutive days. Five frequency intervals were identified (0.01-0.04 Hz, 0.04-0.15 Hz, 0.15-0.4 Hz, 0.4-2 Hz and 2-5 Hz) corresponding to endothelial related metabolic, neurogenic, myogenic, respiratory and cardiac origins. The absolute amplitude of oscillations of each particular frequency interval and the normalized amplitude were calculated for quantitative assessments. The results showed that (1) tissue compression following the above schedule induced significant decrease in the normalized amplitude in the frequency interval of 0.01-0.04 Hz both in the trochanter area (p < 0.001) and tibialis area (p = 0.023), (2) prolonged compression induced significant increase in the absolute amplitude (p = 0.004 for the trochanter area and p = 0.017 for the tibialis area) but significant decrease in the normalized amplitude (p = 0.023 for the trochanter area and p = 0.026 for the tibialis area) in the frequency interval of 0.15-0.4 Hz, and (3) at the tibialis area, the flowmotion amplitude (frequency interval 0.15-0.4 Hz) measured prior to the daily tissue compression schedule was found to be significantly higher on day 4 than the measurements obtained on day 1. However, this finding was not observed at the trochanter area. Our results suggested that prolonged compression might induce endothelial damage and affect the endothelial related metabolic activities.

  4. Generalised wavelet analysis of cutaneous flowmotion during post-occlusive reactive hyperaemia in patients with peripheral arterial obstructive disease.

    PubMed

    Rossi, M; Bertuglia, S; Varanini, M; Giusti, A; Santoro, G; Carpi, A

    2005-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to assess whether the generalised wavelet analysis (GWA) of the leg cutaneous laser Doppler (LD) flowmotion waves recorded during baseline (Bsl) and after skin post-occlusive hyperaemia (POH) can provide information on the leg cutaneous microcirculatory adaptation to stage II peripheral arterial obstructive disease (PAOD). With this aim the flowmotion was characterised in 20 healthy subjects (HS) and 20 stage II PAOD patients by GWA of LDF tracings during Bsl and POH test. The vascular endothelial and smooth muscle function was also evaluated exploring the arm skin vasodilatory response to iontophoretically delivered acetylcholine (Ach) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) using LD. During Bsl there was no significant difference in leg skin perfusion between HS and PAOD patients (7.3+/-5.6 vs. 5.8+/-2.9 AU, respectively). PAOD patients revealed higher peak powers in the frequency interval of 0.007-0.02 Hz (120+/-82 vs. 85+/-62 AU(2)/Hz; P < 0.05), 0.02-0.06 Hz (116+/-128 vs. 63+/-48 AU(2)/Hz, respectively; P < 0.05) and 0.06-0.2 Hz (39+/-49 vs. 14+/-10 AU(2)/Hz; P < 0.05). These flowmotion frequencies are related to vascular endothelium activity, sympathetic activity and vessel wall myogenic activity, respectively. During POH the mean peak power of the flowmotion waves increased significantly (P < 0.05) in HS respect to Bsl with the only exception of the 0.02-0.06 Hz band. In the PAOD patients, compared to Bsl the amplitude of the flowmotion waves did not significantly change during POH. In addition, the PAOD patients presented an increased time from release to peak-flux (18.25+/-15.5 vs. 2.16+/-1.28 s, respectively; P < 0.05), an increased time from release to recovery of the basal perfusion (90.26+/-39.14 vs. 26.55+/-14.05 s, respectively; P < 0.05) and a lower slope of the POH curve (10+/-15 vs. 54+/-17 degrees , respectively; P < 0.05), compared with HS. The cutaneous arm vasodilatory response to Ach and to SNP was reduced in PAOD

  5. Methodological issues in the assessment of skin microvascular endothelial function in humans.

    PubMed

    Cracowski, Jean-Luc; Minson, Christopher T; Salvat-Melis, Muriel; Halliwill, John R

    2006-09-01

    The study of microvascular function can be performed in humans using laser Doppler flowmetry of the skin. This technology lends itself to a wide range of applications for studying the endothelial function of skin blood vessels. We review the advantages and limitations of postocclusive hyperemia, local thermal hyperemia, acetylcholine iontophoresis, flowmotion and association with microdialysis as tools with which to investigate skin microvascular endothelial function in humans. Postocclusive hyperemia, thermal hyperemia and acetylcholine iontophoresis provide integrated indexes of microvascular function rather than specific endothelial markers. However, they are valuable tools and can be used as surrogate endpoints in clinical trials in which the assessment of microvascular function in humans is required.

  6. Spectral analysis of laser Doppler skin blood flow oscillations in human essential arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Marco; Carpi, Angelo; Di Maria, Cinzia; Galetta, Fabio; Santoro, Gino

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether human essential arterial hypertension (EHT) is associated with modification of the skin blood flowmotion (SBF), which could be a sign of skin microcirculatory impairment. Forearm skin perfusion was measured by laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) in conventional perfusion units (PU) before and after ischemia in 20 middle-age newly diagnosed EHT untreated patients, in 20 middle-age long standing EHT treated patients and in 30 age and sex matched healthy normotensive subjects (NS). Power spectral density (PSD) of SBF total spectrum (0.009-1.6 Hz), as well of five different frequency intervals (FI), each of them related to endothelial (0.009-0.02 Hz), sympathetic (0.02-0.06 Hz), myogenic (0.06-0.2 Hz), respiratory (0.2-0.6) or cardiac (0.6-1.6) activity, was also measured in PU(2)/Hz before and after ishemia, using Fourier analysis of LDF signal. The three studied groups did not differ in basal and post-ischemic skin perfusion or in basal SBF parameters considered. However, while a significant post-ischemic increase in PSD of total spectrum SBF (P < 0.001) and of its different FI, with the only exception of respiratory FI, was observed in NS, a significsnt post-ischemic increase in PSD was observed only for total spectrum (P < 0.01) and for endothelial FI (P < 0.001) in newly diagnosed EHT patients and only for myogenic FI (P < 0.05) in long standing EHT patients. These findings suggest that the mechanisms which mediate the post-ischemic increment of SBF are perturbed earlier in human EHT than the mechanisms which mediate the skin post-ischemic hyperaemia. The same findings also suggest that the impairment of the endothelial mechanism involved in SBF control occurs by the time in the course of EHT.

  7. Optical multichannel sensing of skin blood pulsations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spigulis, Janis; Erts, Renars; Kukulis, Indulis; Ozols, Maris; Prieditis, Karlis

    2004-09-01

    Time resolved detection and analysis of the skin back-scattered optical signals (reflection photoplethysmography or PPG) provide information on skin blood volume pulsations and can serve for cardiovascular assessment. The multi-channel PPG concept has been developed and clinically verified in this study. Portable two- and four-channel PPG monitoring devices have been designed for real-time data acquisition and processing. The multi-channel devices were successfully applied for cardiovascular fitness tests and for early detection of arterial occlusions in extremities. The optically measured heartbeat pulse wave propagation made possible to estimate relative arterial resistances for numerous patients and healthy volunteers.

  8. Blood hyperviscosity with reduced skin blood flow in scleroderma

    PubMed Central

    McGrath, M. A.; Peek, R.; Penny, R.

    1977-01-01

    The vascular complications of scleroderma have previously been attributed to the progressive obliteration of small vessels. Our study was carried out to determine whether abnormalities of blood viscosity occur in this disease, thereby contributing to the ischaemic process. Blood viscosity was measured in 20 patients using a rotational viscometer. At a high rate of shear, blood hyperviscosity was found in 35% of the patients and at a low rate of shear, in 70%. In addition there was a significant increase in the plasma viscosity which implicates changes in plasma proteins (fibrinogen, immunoglobulins) as causing the hyperviscosity. Measurement of the hand blood flow by venous occlusion plethysmography showed reduced flow at 32°, 27°, and 20°C. A unique finding was a delayed recovery of the blood flow after cooling. These observations suggest that the increased resistance to blood flow in skin affected by scleroderma may be caused by an interaction between the occlusive vascular lesion and blood hyperviscosity. In addition, blood flow patterns and hyperviscosity could help distinguish scleroderma from primary Raynaud's disease. PMID:596950

  9. Optical noninvasive monitoring of skin blood pulsations.

    PubMed

    Spigulis, Janis

    2005-04-01

    Time-resolved detection and analysis of skin backscattered optical signals (remission photoplethysmography or PPG) provide rich information on skin blood volume pulsations and can serve for reliable cardiovascular assessment. Single- and multiple-channel PPG concepts are discussed. Simultaneous data flow from several locations on the human body allows us to study heartbeat pulse-wave propagation in real time and to evaluate vascular resistance. Portable single-, dual-, and four-channel PPG monitoring devices with special software have been designed for real-time data acquisition and processing. The prototype devices have been clinically studied, and their potential for monitoring heart arrhythmias, drug-efficiency tests, steady-state cardiovascular assessment, body fitness control, and express diagnostics of the arterial occlusions has been confirmed.

  10. Effect of tap-water iontophoresis on sweat gland recruitment, skin temperature and skin blood flow.

    PubMed

    Kolkhorst, Fred W; DiPasquale, Dana M; Buono, Michael J

    2002-02-01

    Our interest was to quantify the role of sweat gland activation on the maintenance of skin temperature during mild exercise in the heat. Seven days of tap-water iontophoresis decreased the number of active sweat glands by 72% which significantly increased forearm skin temperature and blood flow during mild exercise (70 W) in the heat (32 degrees C). Skin temperature of the treated forearm was 0.5 degrees C warmer (P=0.049); skin blood flow in the treated forearm was 13% higher than the control arm (P=0.021). These results illustrate the importance of sweat evaporation on skin temperature and blood flow during exercise.

  11. Bioavailability of natural carotenoids in human skin compared to blood.

    PubMed

    Meinke, Martina C; Darvin, Maxim E; Vollert, Henning; Lademann, Jürgen

    2010-10-01

    Skin functions and structure are significantly influenced by nutrients. Antioxidants protect the supportive layer of the skin against any damaging irradiation effects and the action of free radicals. A lack of suitable methods means that the pharmacokinetic properties of systemically applied carotenoids transferred into the skin remain poorly understood. In this study, a natural kale extract or placebo oil were given orally to 22 healthy volunteers for 4 weeks. Carotenoid bioaccessibility was evaluated using non-invasive resonance Raman spectroscopy on the palm and forehead skin. For the analysis of the blood serum, the standard HPLC method was used. The blood and skin levels of the carotenoids increased significantly during the study but compared to the blood serum values, increases in skin were delayed and depended on the dermal area as well as on the carotenoid. Lycopene, measured as being low in the extract, increases more in the skin compared to the blood indicating that the natural mixture of the extract stabilizes the antioxidative network in the skin. After supplementation had ended, the carotenoids decreased much faster in the blood than in the skin. The delayed decrease in the skin may indicate a peripheral buffer function of the skin for carotenoids.

  12. Skin Blood Perfusion and Oxygenation Colour Affect Perceived Human Health

    PubMed Central

    Stephen, Ian D.; Coetzee, Vinet; Law Smith, Miriam; Perrett, David I.

    2009-01-01

    Skin blood perfusion and oxygenation depends upon cardiovascular, hormonal and circulatory health in humans and provides socio-sexual signals of underlying physiology, dominance and reproductive status in some primates. We allowed participants to manipulate colour calibrated facial photographs along empirically-measured oxygenated and deoxygenated blood colour axes both separately and simultaneously, to optimise healthy appearance. Participants increased skin blood colour, particularly oxygenated, above basal levels to optimise healthy appearance. We show, therefore, that skin blood perfusion and oxygenation influence perceived health in a way that may be important to mate choice. PMID:19337378

  13. Characterizing human skin blood flow regulation in response to different local skin temperature perturbations.

    PubMed

    Wu, Y; Nieuwenhoff, M D; Huygen, F J P M; van der Helm, F C T; Niehof, S; Schouten, A C

    2017-05-01

    Small nerve fibers regulate local skin blood flow in response to local thermal perturbations. Small nerve fiber function is difficult to assess with classical neurophysiological tests. In this study, a vasomotor response model in combination with a heating protocol was developed to quantitatively characterize the control mechanism of small nerve fibers in regulating skin blood flow in response to local thermal perturbation. The skin of healthy subjects' hand dorsum (n=8) was heated to 42°C with an infrared lamp, and then naturally cooled down. The distance between the lamp and the hand was set to three different levels in order to change the irradiation intensity on the skin and implement three different skin temperature rise rates (0.03°C/s, 0.02°C/s and 0.01°C/s). A laser Doppler imager (LDI) and a thermographic video camera recorded the temporal profile of the skin blood flow and the skin temperature, respectively. The relationship between the skin blood flow and the skin temperature was characterized by a vasomotor response model. The model fitted the skin blood flow response well with a variance accounted for (VAF) between 78% and 99%. The model parameters suggested a similar mechanism for the skin blood flow regulation with the thermal perturbations at 0.03°C/s and 0.02°C/s. But there was an accelerated skin vasoconstriction after a slow heating (0.01°C/s) (p-value<0.05). An attenuation of the skin vasodilation was also observed in four out of the seven subjects during the slow heating (0.01°C/s). Our method provides a promising way to quantitatively assess the function of small nerve fibers non-invasively and non-contact. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Predicting Disease Progression in Scleroderma with Skin and Blood Biomarkers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    keratin signature in addition to the fibro-inflammatory signature indicating that the dysregulation in SSc skin is not confined to the dermis (as...the first microRNA whole blood profiling in SSc as described in Abstract #1 above. b. The discovery of the keratin signature in SSc skin described

  15. Bare skin, blood and the evolution of primate colour vision.

    PubMed

    Changizi, Mark A; Zhang, Qiong; Shimojo, Shinsuke

    2006-06-22

    We investigate the hypothesis that colour vision in primates was selected for discriminating the spectral modulations on the skin of conspecifics, presumably for the purpose of discriminating emotional states, socio-sexual signals and threat displays. Here we show that, consistent with this hypothesis, there are two dimensions of skin spectral modulations, and trichromats but not dichromats are sensitive to each. Furthermore, the M and L cone maximum sensitivities for routine trichromats are optimized for discriminating variations in blood oxygen saturation, one of the two blood-related dimensions determining skin reflectance. We also show that, consistent with the hypothesis, trichromat primates tend to be bare faced.

  16. Control of skin blood flow, sweating, and heart rate - Role of skin vs. core temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyss, C. R.; Brengelmann, G. L.; Johnson, J. M.; Rowell, L. B.; Niederberger, M.

    1974-01-01

    A study was conducted to generate quantitative expressions for the influence of core temperature, skin temperature, and the rate of change of skin temperature on sweat rate, skin blood flow, and heart rate. A second goal of the study was to determine whether the use of esophageal temperature rather than the right atrial temperature as a measure of core temperature would lead to different conclusions about the control of measured effector variables.

  17. Control of skin blood flow, sweating, and heart rate - Role of skin vs. core temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyss, C. R.; Brengelmann, G. L.; Johnson, J. M.; Rowell, L. B.; Niederberger, M.

    1974-01-01

    A study was conducted to generate quantitative expressions for the influence of core temperature, skin temperature, and the rate of change of skin temperature on sweat rate, skin blood flow, and heart rate. A second goal of the study was to determine whether the use of esophageal temperature rather than the right atrial temperature as a measure of core temperature would lead to different conclusions about the control of measured effector variables.

  18. Dry skin conditions are related to the recovery rate of skin temperature after cold stress rather than to blood flow.

    PubMed

    Yoshida-Amano, Yasuko; Nomura, Tomoko; Sugiyama, Yoshinori; Iwata, Kayoko; Higaki, Yuko; Tanahashi, Masanori

    2017-02-01

    Cutaneous blood flow plays an important role in the thermoregulation, oxygen supply, and nutritional support necessary to maintain the skin. However, there is little evidence for a link between blood flow and skin physiology. Therefore, we conducted surveys of healthy volunteers to determine the relationship(s) between dry skin properties and cutaneous vascular function. Water content of the stratum corneum, transepidermal water loss, and visual dryness score were investigated as dry skin parameters. Cutaneous blood flow in the resting state, the recovery rate (RR) of skin temperature on the hand after a cold-stress test, and the responsiveness of facial skin blood flow to local cooling were examined as indices of cutaneous vascular functions. The relationships between dry skin parameters and cutaneous vascular functions were assessed. The RR correlated negatively with the visual dryness score of skin on the leg but correlated positively with water content of the stratum corneum on the arm. No significant correlation between the resting state of blood flow and dry skin parameters was observed. In both the face and the body, deterioration in skin dryness from summer to winter was significant in subjects with low RR. The RR correlated well with the responsiveness of facial skin blood flow to local cooling, indicating that the RR affects systemic dry skin conditions. These results suggest that the RR but not blood flow at the resting state is associated with dry skin conditions and is involved in skin homeostasis during seasonal environmental changes. © 2016 The Authors. International Journal of Dermatology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of International Society of Dermatology.

  19. Skin blood flow dynamics and its role in pressure ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Fuyuan; Burns, Stephanie; Jan, Yih-Kuen

    2013-01-01

    Pressure ulcers are a significant healthcare problem affecting the quality of life in wheelchair bounded or bed-ridden people and are a major cost to the healthcare system. Various assessment tools such as the Braden scale have been developed to quantify the risk level of pressure ulcers. These tools have provided an initial guideline on preventing pressure ulcers while additional assessments are needed to improve the outcomes of pressure ulcer prevention. Skin blood flow function that determines the ability of the skin in response to ischemic stress has been proposed to be a good indicator for identifying people at risk of pressure ulcers. Wavelet spectral and nonlinear complexity analyses have been performed to investigate the influences of the metabolic, neurogenic and myogenic activities on microvascular regulation in people with various pathological conditions. These findings have contributed to the understanding of the role of ischemia and viability on the development of pressure ulcers. The purpose of the present review is to provide an introduction of the basic concepts and approaches for the analysis of skin blood flow oscillations, and present an overview of the research results obtained so far. We hope this information may contribute to the development of better clinical guidelines for the prevention of pressure ulcers. PMID:23602509

  20. Skin blood flow with elastic compressive extravehicular activity space suit.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Kunihiko; Gotoh, Taro M; Morita, Hironobu; Hargens, Alan R

    2003-10-01

    During extravehicular activity (EVA), current space suits are pressurized with 100% oxygen at approximately 222 mmHg. A tight elastic garment, or mechanical counter pressure (MCP) suit that generates pressure by compression, may have several advantages over current space suit technology. In this study, we investigated local microcirculatory effects produced with negative ambient pressure with an MCP sleeve. The MCP glove and sleeve generated pressures similar to the current space suit. MCP remained constant during negative pressure due to unchanged elasticity of the material. Decreased skin capillary blood flow and temperature during MCP compression was counteracted by greater negative pressure or a smaller pressure differential.

  1. [Ratio of haematology indexes in exudation of "skin window" and venous blood].

    PubMed

    Kashutin, S L; Degtiar, Iu S

    2008-08-01

    The data obtained revealed the maintenance of basophiles; monocytes and large granular lymphocytes were higher in the skin then in the venous blood. The level of eosinophiles and lymphocytes were lower in the skin. Concentrations of the polymorphic leucocytes were equal in the skin and in the blood.

  2. The colour of blood in skin: a comparison of Allen's test and photonics simulations.

    PubMed

    Välisuo, Petri; Kaartinen, Ilkka; Kuokkanen, Hannu; Alander, Jarmo

    2010-11-01

    The colour of the skin reflects many physiological and pathological states of an individual. Usually, the skin colour is examined by the bare eye alone. Several scaling systems have been developed to quantify the sensory evaluation of skin colour. In this work, the reflectance of the skin is measured directly using an objective instrument. Haemoglobin inside the dermal circulation is one of the key factors of skin colour and it also has a major role in the appearance of many skin lesions and scars. To quantitatively measure and analyse such conditions, the relation between the skin colour and the haemoglobin concentration in the skin needs to be resolved. To examine the effect of blood concentration on the skin colour, five Allen's tests were performed on 20 persons. The skin colour change was measured using a spectrophotometer by changing the blood concentration by the Allen's test. Light interaction with the skin was simulated with a Monte Carlo model, tuning the blood concentration parameter until the simulated and the measured spectra matched, yielding the relationship between the skin colour and the blood concentration. The simulation produced spectra similar to those measured. The change in the blood concentration in the simulation model and in the skin produced changes similar to the spectra. The reflectance of the skin was found to be a nonlinear function of the blood concentration. The relationship found between skin colour and blood concentration makes it possible to quantify those skin conditions expressed by blood volume better than plain colour. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  3. [Changes in palmar skin blood flow, perfusion index and temperature during endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy].

    PubMed

    Asano, Maiko; Tanaka, Motoshige; Kusaka, Hitomi; Sakai, Masato; Minami, Toshiaki

    2010-12-01

    In endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy (ETS), it is required to perform accurate cautery of the sympathetic trunk. Monitoring of palmar skin blood flow and temperature has been used to assess the efficacy of ETS. This study investigated whether Perfusion Index (PI) is useful in assessing palmar skin blood flow and temperature in ETS. We studied 5 patients (1 man, 4 women) with palmar hyperhidrosis who had undergone a total of 10 ETS procedures. We measured skin blood flow, temperature and PI during ETS and evaluated the results. Significant correlations were found between increases in skin blood flow and PI after ETS in cases with the palmar skin temperature just before ETS of below 35 degrees C. In these cases, we can substitute increases in PI with increases in skin blood flow during ETS.

  4. Incisions for cochlear implant flaps and superficial skin temperature. Skin temperature/blood circulation in CI flaps.

    PubMed

    Pau, Hans Wilhelm; Sievert, Uwe; Graumüller, Sylke; Wild, Ernst

    2004-01-01

    Healing and integration of a cochlear implant is largely influenced by good blood circulation in the covering skin, which, on the other hand, is closely correlated to skin temperature. Measuring superficial flap temperatures by thermography is an easy way to get some clues about the corresponding blood supply. These data should allow some implications for the design of skin flaps in cochlear implant surgery. In 15 patients thermography was carried out prior to and after cochlear implantation, using the Agema 550 Thermovision system. It was evident, that the anatomic courses of the major superficial arteries were represented by areas of increased temperature. The pattern of temperature distribution may allow some conclusions concerning site and shape of surgical incisions. From our data we concluded, that most types of incisions do not interfere too much with the arterial blood supply. However, some types like the extended retroauricular C-incision may eventually cause problems. Our data suggest, that the straight or slightly curved vertical retroauricular incision causes the least impairment of blood circulation. After surgery, directly along the incisions (and later along the scars) temperature was diminished, indicating reduced blood circulation. In our series, the thickness of the implant did not impede blood circulation significantly. So far, we could not examine patients with local circulation disorders. Probably local scars, skin atrophies, angiopathies etc. may present typical patterns of temperature distribution, which require individual design of skin flaps. Thermography is an easy method which can give impressions of local blood circulation in skin flaps. If the courses of the major arteries and their branches are respected, blood circulation within the flap should not be problematic. Thermography is likely to help designing optimal flaps in cases with impeded blood circulation e.g. by pre-existing scar formations.

  5. Melanin and blood concentration in human skin studied by multiple regression analysis: experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, M.; Yamada, Y.; Itoh, M.; Yatagai, T.

    2001-09-01

    Knowledge of the mechanism of human skin colour and measurement of melanin and blood concentration in human skin are needed in the medical and cosmetic fields. The absorbance spectrum from reflectance at the visible wavelength of human skin increases under several conditions such as a sunburn or scalding. The change of the absorbance spectrum from reflectance including the scattering effect does not correspond to the molar absorption spectrum of melanin and blood. The modified Beer-Lambert law is applied to the change in the absorbance spectrum from reflectance of human skin as the change in melanin and blood is assumed to be small. The concentration of melanin and blood was estimated from the absorbance spectrum reflectance of human skin using multiple regression analysis. Estimated concentrations were compared with the measured one in a phantom experiment and this method was applied to in vivo skin.

  6. Melanin and blood concentration in human skin studied by multiple regression analysis: experiments.

    PubMed

    Shimada, M; Yamada, Y; Itoh, M; Yatagai, T

    2001-09-01

    Knowledge of the mechanism of human skin colour and measurement of melanin and blood concentration in human skin are needed in the medical and cosmetic fields. The absorbance spectrum from reflectance at the visible wavelength of human skin increases under several conditions such as a sunburn or scalding. The change of the absorbance spectrum from reflectance including the scattering effect does not correspond to the molar absorption spectrum of melanin and blood. The modified Beer-Lambert law is applied to the change in the absorbance spectrum from reflectance of human skin as the change in melanin and blood is assumed to be small. The concentration of melanin and blood was estimated from the absorbance spectrum reflectance of human skin using multiple regression analysis. Estimated concentrations were compared with the measured one in a phantom experiment and this method was applied to in vivo skin.

  7. Skin Tone, Racism, Locus of Control, Hostility, and Blood Pressure in Hispanic College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trevino, Brandy; Ernst, Frederick A.

    2012-01-01

    There is some evidence that blood pressure is higher in persons with darker skin tone but the reasons for this remain unclear. When seen in minorities, the positive relationship between darkness of skin and blood pressure invites hypotheses about potential mediators of the relationship. We investigated the relationship in Hispanics of primarily…

  8. Skin Tone, Racism, Locus of Control, Hostility, and Blood Pressure in Hispanic College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trevino, Brandy; Ernst, Frederick A.

    2012-01-01

    There is some evidence that blood pressure is higher in persons with darker skin tone but the reasons for this remain unclear. When seen in minorities, the positive relationship between darkness of skin and blood pressure invites hypotheses about potential mediators of the relationship. We investigated the relationship in Hispanics of primarily…

  9. Basic Taste Stimuli Elicit Unique Responses in Facial Skin Blood Flow

    PubMed Central

    Kashima, Hideaki; Hayashi, Naoyuki

    2011-01-01

    Facial expression changes characteristically with the emotions induced by basic tastes in humans. We tested the hypothesis that the five basic tastes also elicit unique responses in facial skin blood flow. Facial skin blood flow was measured using laser speckle flowgraphy in 16 healthy subjects before and during the application of basic taste stimuli in the oral cavity for 20 s. The skin blood flow in the eyelid increased in response to sweet and umami taste stimuli, while that in the nose decreased in response to a bitter stimulus. There was a significant correlation between the subjective hedonic scores accompanying these taste stimuli and the above changes in skin blood flow. These results demonstrate that sweet, umami, and bitter tastes induce unique changes in facial skin blood flow that reflect subjective hedonic scores. PMID:22145032

  10. BOLD Response Selective to Flow-Motion in Very Young Infants

    PubMed Central

    Tosetti, Michela; Morrone, Maria Concetta

    2015-01-01

    In adults, motion perception is mediated by an extensive network of occipital, parietal, temporal, and insular cortical areas. Little is known about the neural substrate of visual motion in infants, although behavioural studies suggest that motion perception is rudimentary at birth and matures steadily over the first few years. Here, by measuring Blood Oxygenated Level Dependent (BOLD) responses to flow versus random-motion stimuli, we demonstrate that the major cortical areas serving motion processing in adults are operative by 7 wk of age. Resting-state correlations demonstrate adult-like functional connectivity between the motion-selective associative areas, but not between primary cortex and temporo-occipital and posterior-insular cortices. Taken together, the results suggest that the development of motion perception may be limited by slow maturation of the subcortical input and of the cortico-cortical connections. In addition they support the existence of independent input to primary (V1) and temporo-occipital (V5/MT+) cortices very early in life. PMID:26418729

  11. Attenuated skin blood flow response to nociceptive stimulation of latent myofascial trigger points.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yang; Ge, Hong-You; Yue, Shou-Wei; Kimura, Yoshiyuki; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2009-02-01

    To investigate the effect of painful stimulation of latent myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) on skin blood flow and to evaluate the relative sensitivity of laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) and thermography in the measurement of skin blood flow. Painful stimulation was obtained by a bolus injection of glutamate (0.1mL, 0.5M) into a latent MTrP located in the right or left brachioradialis muscles. A bolus of glutamate injection into a non-MTrP served as control. Pain intensity (visual analog scale [VAS]) was assessed after glutamate injection. Pressure pain threshold (PPT) was recorded bilaterally in the brachioradialis muscle before and after glutamate-induced pain. Skin blood flow and surface skin temperature were measured bilaterally in the forearms before, during, and after glutamate-induced pain with LDF and thermography. A biomedical research facility. Fifteen healthy volunteer subjects. Not applicable. VAS, PPT, skin blood flow, and surface skin temperature. Glutamate injection into latent MTrPs induced higher pain intensity (F=7.16; P<.05) and lower PPT (F=11.41, P<.005) than into non-MTrPs. Glutamate injection into non-MTrPs increased skin blood flow bilaterally in the forearms, but skin blood flow after glutamate injection into latent MTrPs was significantly less increased at the local injection area or decreased at distant areas compared with non-MTrPs (all P<.05). Skin temperature was not affected after glutamate injection into either latent MTrPs or non-MTrPs (all P>.05). The present study demonstrated an attenuated skin blood flow response after painful stimulation of latent MTrPs compared with non-MTrPs, suggesting increased sympathetic vasoconstriction activity at latent MTrPs. Additionally, LDF was more sensitive than thermography in the detection of the changes in skin blood flow after intramuscular nociceptive stimulation.

  12. Abnormal Morphology of Blood Vessels in Erythematous Skin From Atopic Dermatitis Patients.

    PubMed

    Tsutsumi, Moe; Fukuda, Maki; Kumamoto, Junichi; Goto, Makiko; Denda, Sumiko; Yamasaki, Kenshi; Aiba, Setsuya; Nagayama, Masaharu; Denda, Mitsuhiro

    2016-05-01

    Previous studies suggest that altered peripheral blood circulation might be associated with erythema or inflammation in atopic dermatitis (AD) patients. However, the overall structure of blood vessels and capillaries in AD skin is poorly understood because most studies have involved light-microscopic observation of thin skin sections. In the present study, we compared the 3-dimensional structures of peripheral blood vessels of healthy subjects and AD patients in detail by means of 2-photon microscopy. In skin from healthy subjects, superficial vascular plexus and capillaries originating from flexous blood vessels were observed. However, skin from AD patients contained thickened, flexuous blood vessels, which might be associated with increased blood flow, in both erythematous and nonlesional areas. However, patients with lichenification did not display these morphological changes. Bifurcation of vessels was not observed in either erythematous or lichenification lesions. These results might be helpful for developing new clinical strategies to treat erythema in AD patients.

  13. Sildenafil increases digital skin blood flow during all phases of local cooling in primary Raynaud's phenomenon

    PubMed Central

    Roustit, Matthieu; Hellmann, Marcin; Cracowski, Claire; Blaise, Sophie; Cracowski, Jean-Luc

    2012-01-01

    Digital skin vasoconstriction on local cooling is exaggerated in primary Raynaud’s phenomenon (RP) compared to controls. A significant part of such vasoconstriction relies on the nitric oxide (NO) pathway inhibition. We tested the effect of PDE5 inhibitor sildenafil, which potentiates the effect of NO, on skin blood flow. We recruited 15 patients with primary RP, performing local cooling without sildenafil (day 1), after a single 50 mg oral dose (day 2), and 100 mg (day 3). Skin blood flow, skin temperature and arterial pressure were recorded, and data were expressed as cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC). Sildenafil at 100 mg, but not 50 mg, significantly lessened the cooling-induced decrease in CVC. It also increased resting CVC and skin temperature. These data suggest that 100 mg sildenafil improves digital skin blood flow to local cooling in primary RP. The benefit of sildenafil “as required” should be confirmed in a randomized controlled trial. PMID:22453196

  14. Relationships between skin color, income, and blood pressure among African Americans in the CARDIA Study.

    PubMed

    Sweet, Elizabeth; McDade, Thomas W; Kiefe, Catarina I; Liu, Kiang

    2007-12-01

    We explored how income and skin color interact to influence the blood pressure of African American adults enrolled in the longitudinal Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) Study. Data were derived from 1893 African American CARDIA year-15 participants who had undergone skin reflectance assessments at year 7. We adjusted for age, gender, body mass index, smoking status, and use of antihypertensive medication to examine whether year-15 self-reported family incomes, in interaction with skin reflectance, predicted blood pressure levels. Mean systolic and diastolic blood pressure levels were 117.1 (+/-16.07) and 76.9 (+/-12.5) mm Hg, respectively. After adjustment, the interaction between skin reflectance and income was significantly associated with systolic blood pressure (P< .01). Among lighter-skinned African Americans, systolic pressure decreased as income increased (b= -1.15, P<.001); among those with darker skin, systolic blood pressure increased with increasing income (b=0.10, P=.75). The protective gradient of income on systolic blood pressure seen among African Americans with lighter skin is not observed to the same degree among those with darker skin. Psychosocial stressors, including racial discrimination, may play a role in this relationship.

  15. Biopartitioning micellar chromatography to predict blood to lung, blood to liver, blood to fat and blood to skin partition coefficients of drugs.

    PubMed

    Martín-Biosca, Y; Torres-Cartas, S; Villanueva-Camañas, R M; Sagrado, S; Medina-Hernández, M J

    2009-01-26

    Biopartitioning micellar chromatography (BMC), a mode of micellar liquid chromatography that uses micellar mobile phases of Brij35 in adequate experimental conditions, has demonstrated to be useful in mimicking the drug partitioning process into biological systems. In this paper, the usefulness of BMC for predicting the partition coefficients from blood to lung, blood to liver, blood to fat and blood to skin is demonstrated. PLS2 and multiple linear regression (MLR) models based on BMC retention data are proposed and compared with other ones reported in bibliography. The proposed models present better or similar descriptive and predictive capability.

  16. Facial skin blood flow responses during exposures to emotionally charged movies.

    PubMed

    Matsukawa, Kanji; Endo, Kana; Ishii, Kei; Ito, Momoka; Liang, Nan

    2017-01-21

    The changes in regional facial skin blood flow and vascular conductance have been assessed for the first time with noninvasive two-dimensional laser speckle flowmetry during audiovisually elicited emotional challenges for 2 min (comedy, landscape, and horror movie) in 12 subjects. Limb skin blood flow and vascular conductance and systemic cardiovascular variables were simultaneously measured. The extents of pleasantness and consciousness for each emotional stimulus were estimated by the subjective rating from -5 (the most unpleasant; the most unconscious) to +5 (the most pleasant; the most conscious). Facial skin blood flow and vascular conductance, especially in the lips, decreased during viewing of comedy and horror movies, whereas they did not change during viewing of a landscape movie. The decreases in facial skin blood flow and vascular conductance were the greatest with the comedy movie. The changes in lip, cheek, and chin skin blood flow negatively correlated (P < 0.05) with the subjective ratings of pleasantness and consciousness. The changes in lip skin vascular conductance negatively correlated (P < 0.05) with the subjective rating of pleasantness, while the changes in infraorbital, subnasal, and chin skin vascular conductance negatively correlated (P < 0.05) with the subjective rating of consciousness. However, none of the changes in limb skin blood flow and vascular conductance and systemic hemodynamics correlated with the subjective ratings. The mental arithmetic task did not alter facial and limb skin blood flows, although the task influenced systemic cardiovascular variables. These findings suggest that the more emotional status becomes pleasant or conscious, the more neurally mediated vasoconstriction may occur in facial skin blood vessels.

  17. Hydrogen clearance: Assessment of technique for measurement of skin-flap blood flow in pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, J.G.; Kerrigan, C.L. )

    1991-10-01

    The hydrogen clearance technique has been used for many years by investigators to determine brain blood flow and has been partially validated in this setting using other methods of blood flow measurement. The method has been modified to allow blood flow measurements in skin, but the accuracy of H2 clearance for measuring skin blood flow has not been determined. Multiple blood flow measurements were performed using H2 clearance and radioactive microspheres on skin flaps and control skin in pigs. On 12 pigs, a total of 117 flap and 42 control skin measurements were available for analysis. There was no significant difference between the two techniques in measuring mean control skin blood flow. In skin flaps, H2 clearance was significantly correlated to microsphere-measured blood flow, but it consistently gave an overestimate. Sources of error may include injury to the tissues by insertion of electrodes, consumption of H2 by the electrodes, or diffusion of H2 from the relatively ischemic flap to its well-vascularized bed. Further studies are necessary to determine the cause of this error and to measure the technique's accuracy in skeletal muscle and other flaps.

  18. Spectroscopic imaging of blood vessels only near the skin surface for non-invasive blood glucose measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Masaru; Sato, Shun; Abeygunawardhana, Pradeep K. W.; Suzuki, Satoru; Nishiyama, Akira; Wada, Kenji; Ishimaru, Ichiro

    2015-07-01

    To realize the non-invasive blood glucose measurement, it will be effective to acquire the spectroscopic imaging of blood vessels only near the skin surface for eliminating other biological-component's disturbances. Our proposed imaging-type 2-dimensional Fourier spectroscopic imaging can limit the measuring depth into focal plane with high light detection sensitivity. Thus, the proposed method will be suitable for measuring only near the skin surface with detecting weak reflected light from inner biomembrane. But reflectance of skin surface is more than 1000 times larger than inner skin's reflectance. Paying attention on Fresnel reflection, fingers what were illuminated by p-polarized beam from Brewster's angle were observed with crossed-Nicol dark field optics. We successfully acquired spectroscopic characteristics of hemoglobin at vein area near the skin surface.

  19. [The influence of isosorbide mononitrate on skin blood flow in patients with Raynaud's syndrome].

    PubMed

    Gross, Robert; Galus, Krzysztof; Zajac, Stanisław; Jedrasik, Maciej

    2002-01-01

    The influence of isosorbide mononitrate on skin blood flow in the pulp of finger by means of laser-Doppler flowmetry was evaluated in 19 women with Raynaud's syndrome. Skin blood flow changes were measured after cooling the hand. Isosorbide mononitrate decreased the influence of cooling on skin blood flow in the pulp of finger. This finding supports the theory that endothelial dysfunction is one of the reasons of Raynaud's syndrome. We suppose that application of isosorbide mononitrate should be useful in prevention and the treatment of Raynaud's phenomenon attacks.

  20. Skin Color, Social Classification, and Blood Pressure in Southeastern Puerto Rico

    PubMed Central

    Gravlee, Clarence C.; Dressler, William W.; Bernard, H. Russell

    2005-01-01

    Objectives. We tested competing hypotheses for the skin color–blood pressure relationship by analyzing the association between blood pressure and 2 skin color variables: skin pigmentation and social classification. Methods. We measured skin pigmentation by reflectance spectrophotometry and social classification by linking respondents to ethnographic data on the cultural model of “color” in southeastern Puerto Rico. We used multiple regression analysis to test the associations between these variables and blood pressure in a community-based sample of Puerto Rican adults aged 25–55 years (n=100). Regression models included age, gender, body mass index (BMI), self-reported use of antihypertensive medication, and socioeconomic status (SES). Results. Social classification, but not skin pigmentation, is associated with systolic and diastolic blood pressure through a statistical interaction with SES, independent of age, gender, BMI, self-reported use of antihypertensive medication, and skin reflectance. Conclusion. Our findings suggest that sociocultural processes mediate the relationship between skin color and blood pressure. They also help to clarify the meaning and measurement of skin color and “race” as social variables in health research. PMID:16257938

  1. The contribution of skin blood flow in warming the skin after the application of local heat; the duality of the Pennes heat equation.

    PubMed

    Petrofsky, Jerrold; Paluso, Dominic; Anderson, Devyn; Swan, Kristin; Yim, Jong Eun; Murugesan, Vengatesh; Chindam, Tirupathi; Goraksh, Neha; Alshammari, Faris; Lee, Haneul; Trivedi, Moxi; Hudlikar, Akshay N; Katrak, Vahishta

    2011-04-01

    As predicted by the Pennes equation, skin blood flow is a major contributor to the removal of heat from an external heat source. This protects the skin from erythema and burns. But, for a person in a thermally neutral room, the skin is normally much cooler than arterial blood. Therefore, if skin blood flow (BF) increases, it should initially warm the skin paradoxically. To examine this phenomenon, 10 young male and female subjects participated in a series of experiments to examine the contribution of skin blood flow in the initial warming the skin after the application of local heat. Heat flow was measured by the use of a thermode above the brachioradialis muscle. The thermode was warmed by constant temperature water at 44°C entering the thermode at a water flow rate of 100 cm(3)/min. Skin temperature was measured by a thermistor and blood flow in the underlying skin was measured by a laser Doppler imager in single point mode. The results of the experiments showed that, when skin temperature is cool (31-32°C), the number of calories being transferred to the skin from the thermode cannot account for the rise in skin temperature alone. A significant portion of the rise in skin temperature is due to the warm arterialized blood traversing the skin from the core areas of the body. However, as skin temperature approaches central core temperature, it becomes less of a heat source and more of a heat sync such that when skin temperature is at or above core temperature, the blood flow to the skin, as predicted by Pennes, becomes a heat sync pulling heat from the thermode. Copyright © 2010 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Effect of Acupuncture Manipulations at LI4 or LI11 on Blood Flow and Skin Temperature.

    PubMed

    Li, Weihui; Ahn, Andrew

    2016-06-01

    Acupuncture induces physiological changes, and patients have reported warm or cool sensations with "Burning Fire" (BF) or "Penetrating Cool" (PC) manipulations. This study aimed to evaluate whether these techniques had distinct effects on skin temperature and blood flow and to examine whether skin temperature correlated with blood flow. The participants were 25 healthy volunteers, each receiving acupuncture manipulations on points LI4 and LI11 bilaterally. Skin temperatures and blood flow were recorded continuously on both arms. The study found that acupuncture significantly increased skin temperature on the needling arm by 0.3514°C on average, but decreased it on the contralateral arm by 0.2201°C on average. Blood flow decreased significantly in both arms during needling (-3.4% and -5.97% for the ipsilateral and the contralateral sides, respectively), but the changes in skin temperature did not correlate with the changes in blood flow. Furthermore, these changes were not significantly different between acupuncture techniques and acupuncture points. In conclusion, acupuncture changes local skin temperature and blood flow independent of the manipulation technique. Moreover, blood flow may not be affected by the increased temperature on the needling arm. These results help to verify traditional Chinese medicine concepts and may help in establishing standards for acupuncture treatments.

  3. Skin blood flow and local temperature independently modify sweat rate during passive heat stress in humans.

    PubMed

    Wingo, Jonathan E; Low, David A; Keller, David M; Brothers, R Matthew; Shibasaki, Manabu; Crandall, Craig G

    2010-11-01

    Sweat rate (SR) is reduced in locally cooled skin, which may result from decreased temperature and/or parallel reductions in skin blood flow. The purpose of this study was to test the hypotheses that decreased skin blood flow and decreased local temperature each independently attenuate sweating. In protocols I and II, eight subjects rested supine while wearing a water-perfused suit for the control of whole body skin and internal temperatures. While 34°C water perfused the suit, four microdialysis membranes were placed in posterior forearm skin not covered by the suit to manipulate skin blood flow using vasoactive agents. Each site was instrumented for control of local temperature and measurement of local SR (capacitance hygrometry) and skin blood flow (laser-Doppler flowmetry). In protocol I, two sites received norepinephrine to reduce skin blood flow, while two sites received Ringer solution (control). All sites were maintained at 34°C. In protocol II, all sites received 28 mM sodium nitroprusside to equalize skin blood flow between sites before local cooling to 20°C (2 sites) or maintenance at 34°C (2 sites). In both protocols, individuals were then passively heated to increase core temperature ~1°C. Both decreased skin blood flow and decreased local temperature attenuated the slope of the SR to mean body temperature relationship (2.0 ± 1.2 vs. 1.0 ± 0.7 mg·cm(-2)·min(-1)·°C(-1) for the effect of decreased skin blood flow, P = 0.01; 1.2 ± 0.9 vs. 0.07 ± 0.05 mg·cm(-2)·min(-1)·°C(-1) for the effect of decreased local temperature, P = 0.02). Furthermore, local cooling delayed the onset of sweating (mean body temperature of 37.5 ± 0.4 vs. 37.6 ± 0.4°C, P = 0.03). These data demonstrate that local cooling attenuates sweating by independent effects of decreased skin blood flow and decreased local skin temperature.

  4. Triangulation method for determining capillary blood flow and physical characteristics of the skin.

    PubMed

    Gorti, S; Tone, H; Imokawa, G

    1999-08-01

    A method capable of measuring blood flow at precise depths within the skin is described. The method determines the static and the dynamic properties of light that is backscattered to small areas on the surface of the skin at several contiguous locations along the expected trajectory of laser-light propagation. From observations the method has been shown to be capable of determining physical characteristics that are unique to the different layers of the skin.

  5. Facts and artefacts regarding correlation between skin electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and blood glucose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ollmar, Stig; Nicander, Ingrid; Åberg, Peter; Bolinder, Jan

    2013-04-01

    Earlier observations on possible co-variation between skin EIS and blood glucose prompted us to map and include other factors at play in the predictive model. Skin pH would be one such factor. A cohort of 20 diabetics was investigated, taking around 30 measurements spread over each of two different days 2-21 days apart. Each measurement comprises skin EIT in the frequency range 1kHz to 2.5MHz, skin pH, and immediately evaluated blood samples. There is a co-variation for some, but not all, test persons. The relationship gets stronger on the group level by adding pH-information, but is still poor or non-existent for some test persons. Non-invasive EIS measurements on skin is influenced by skin hydration, blood glucose, skin pH, body location, season, environmental factors, and variables not yet understood. Since impedance related parameters are used to estimate skin hydration, users of such devices should be aware that skin pH may influence as much as the water content of the stratum corneum.

  6. Exercise training and the control of skin blood flow in older adults.

    PubMed

    Tew, G A; Saxton, J M; Hodges, G J

    2012-03-01

    The ability to control skin blood flow decreases with primary aging, making older adults less able to adequately thermoregulate and repair cutaneous wounds. Lifestyle factors such as physical activity, diet, and smoking might interact with the aging process to modulate "normal" age-associated changes in the cutaneous microcirculation. The main focus of this brief review is the effects of exercise training on the control of skin blood flow in older adults.

  7. The interrealtionship between locally applied heat, ageing and skin blood flow on heat transfer into and from the skin.

    PubMed

    Petrofsky, Jerrold; Alshahmmari, Faris; Yim, Jong Eun; Hamdan, Adel; Lee, Haneul; Neupane, Sushma; Shetye, Gauri; Moniz, Harold; Chen, Wei-Ti; Cho, Sungkwan; Pathak, Kunal; Malthane, Swapnil; Shenoy, Samruddha; Somanaboina, Karunakar; Alshaharani, Mastour; Nevgi, Bhakti; Dave, Bhargav; Desai, Rajavi

    2011-07-01

    In response to a thermal stress, skin blood flow (BF) increases to protect the skin from damage. When a very warm, noxious, heat source (44 °C) is applied to the skin, the BF increases disproportionately faster than the heat stress that was applied, creating a safety mechanism for protecting the skin. In the present investigation, the rate of rise of BF in response to applied heat at temperatures between 32 °C and 40 °C was examined as well as the thermal transfer to and from the skin with and without BF in younger and older subjects to see how the skin responds to a non-noxious heat source. Twenty male and female subjects (10 - 20-35 years, 10 - 40-70 years) were examined. The arms of the subjects were passively heated for 6 min with and without vascular occlusion by a thermode at temperatures of 32, 36, 38 or 40 °C. When occlusion was not used during the 6 min exposure to heat, there was an exponential rise in skin temperature and BF in both groups of subjects over the 6-min period. However, the older subjects achieved similar skin temperatures but with the expenditure of fewer calories from the thermode than was seen for the younger subjects (p<0.05). BF was significantly less in the older group than the younger group at rest and after exposure to each of the three warmest thermode temperatures (p<0.05). As was seen for noxious temperatures, after a delay, the rate of rise of BF at the three warmest thermode temperatures was faster than the rise in skin temperature in the younger group but less in the older group of subjects. Thus, a consequence of ageing is reduced excess BF in response to thermal stress increasing susceptibility to thermal damage. This must be considered in modelling of BF.

  8. Elevated Skin Blood Flow Influences Near Infrared Spectroscopy Measurements During Supine Rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Stuart M. C.; Clarke, Mark S. F.

    2004-01-01

    Near infrared spectroscopy is a non-invasive technique that allows determination of tissue oxygenation/blood flow based on spectrophotometric quantitation of oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin present within a tissue. This technique has gained acceptance as a means of detecting and quantifying changes in tissue blood flow due to physiological perturbation, such as that which is elicited in skeletal muscle during exercise. Since the NIRS technique requires light to penetrate the skin and subcutaneous fat in order to reach the muscle of interest, changes in skin blood flow may alter the NIRS signal in a fashion unrelated to blood flow in the muscle of interest. The aim of this study was to determine the contribution of skin blood flow to the NIRS signal obtained from resting vastus lateralis muscle of the thigh.

  9. Blood flow and epithelial thickness in different regions of feline oral mucosa and skin.

    PubMed

    Johnson, G K; Squier, C A; Johnson, W T; Todd, G L

    1987-07-01

    The relationship between epithelial thickness and blood flow was examined in 6 mucosal and 3 skin regions of the cat. Blood flow to these tissues was determined using the radiolabelled microsphere method. From histologic sections the proportion of the tissue biopsy occupied by epithelium and the average epithelial thickness were calculated. The oral tissues had a significantly higher blood flow than the skin regions (p less than 0.05). In terms of epithelial thickness, the tissues could be divided into 4 groups (p less than 0.05). These were: a) palate; b) gingival regions and dorsum of the tongue; c) lip and buccal mucosa; d) all skin regions. When epithelial thickness was related to blood flow there was a significant positive correlation (p less than 0.005) indicating that a thicker epithelium is associated with a higher blood flow. This finding may reflect the greater metabolic demands of the thicker epithelia.

  10. Almond Skin Inhibits HSV-2 Replication in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells by Modulating the Cytokine Network.

    PubMed

    Arena, Adriana; Bisignano, Carlo; Stassi, Giovanna; Filocamo, Angela; Mandalari, Giuseppina

    2015-05-15

    We have investigated the effect of almond skin extracts on the production of pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). PBMCs were either infected or not by herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2), with and without prior treatment with almond skin extracts. Production of IL-17 induced by HSV-2 was inhibited by natural skins (NS) treatment. NS triggered PBMC in releasing IFN-α, IFN-γ and IL-4 in cellular supernatants. These results may explain the antiviral potential of almond skins.

  11. Synchronization of sacral skin blood flow oscillations in response to local heating.

    PubMed

    Jan, Yih-Kuen; Liao, Fuyuan

    2011-01-01

    Local heating causes an increase in skin blood flow by activating sensory axon reflex and metabolic nitric oxide controls. It has been observed that the remote skin area without temperature changes also shows a slightly increase in blood flow. The responsible mechanism of this indirect vasodilation remains unclear. We hypothesized that the remote skin area will have enhanced synchronization of blood flow oscillations (BFO), thus inducing a vasodilatory response. We studied BFO in two sites separated 10 cm of the sacral skin in 12 healthy people. Ensemble empirical mode decomposition method was used to decompose blood flow signals into a set of intrinsic mode functions (IMFs), and an IMF was selected to quantify each of myogenic, neurogenic, and metabolic modes of BFO. Then the instantaneous phase of the mode was calculated using the Hilbert transform. From the time series of phase difference between a pair of characteristic modes, we detected the epochs of phase synchronization and estimated the level of statistical significance using surrogate time series. The results showed that phase synchronization between neurogenic BFO was significantly higher in the period of the maximal vasodilation. We also observed a weak synchronization between myogenic BFO of the two skin sites. Our results suggested that synchronization of BFO may be associated with the changes in skin blood flow at the non-heated site.

  12. A comparison of blood alcohol concentration using non-alcohol- and alcohol-containing skin antiseptics.

    PubMed

    Goldfinger, T M; Schaber, D

    1982-12-01

    We simultaneously obtained blood samples in emergency patients for ethanol content from both antecubital fossae using an alcohol prep pad on one arm and a non-alcohol-containing germicidal solution on the other. Fifty patients with ethanol concentrations greater than zero were statistically analyzed. Twenty patients surveyed had no measurable alcohol level by either technique. There was no significant difference in the blood alcohol concentration obtained by either method of skin preparation in both groups (P less than .01). Blood alcohol concentration incidentally obtained in the emergency department by routine isopropyl alcohol skin preparation is an accurate laboratory parameter.

  13. Effect of skin to skin care to neonates on pulse rate, respiratory rate SPO2 and blood pressure in mothers.

    PubMed

    Nimbalkar, Archana; Patel, Dipen; Sethi, Ankur; Nimbalkar, Somashekhar

    2014-01-01

    Physiological benefits of skin to skin care (STS) to newborns are known but there is scarcity of data on changes in physiological parameters like pulse rate, respiratory rate, SPO2 and blood pressure in mothers during STS. We hypothesize that STS is beneficial to mothers with respect to these parameters. Objective of this study was to assess the changes of these parameters in mothers while providing STS for one hour. STS was provided by 52 mothers for a total of 127 times and parameters were recorded at starting of STS, at 15 min, at 30 min, at 60 min of STS and at 5 min rest after stopping STS. There were no significant changes in pulse rate and SPO2 but blood pressure and respiratory rate reduced significantly during STS as compared to rest after stopping STS. Thus STS is physiologically beneficial to mothers.

  14. Enhanced Phase Synchronization of Blood Flow Oscillations between Heated and Adjacent Non-heated Sacral Skin

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Fuyuan; Jan, Yih-Kuen

    2012-01-01

    The study of skin microcirculation may be used to assess risk for pressure ulcers. It is observed that local heating not only causes an increase in blood flow of the heated skin but also in the adjacent non-heated skin. The underlying physiological mechanism of this indirect vasodilation of the non-heated skin remains unclear. We hypothesized that blood flow oscillations (BFO) in the adjacent non-heated skin area synchronize with BFO in the heated skin, thus inducing a vasodilatory response. We investigated BFO in the heated and adjacent non-heated skin (12.1±1.2 cm distance) on the sacrum in 12 healthy participants. The ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) was used to decompose blood flow signals into a set of intrinsic mode functions (IMFs), and the IMFs with power spectra over the frequency range of 0.0095–0.02 Hz, 0.02–0.05 Hz, and 0.05–0.15 Hz were chosen as the characteristic components corresponding to metabolic, neurogenic, and myogenic regulations, respectively. Then, the instantaneous phase of the characteristic components was calculated using the Hilbert transform. From the time series of phase difference between a pair of characteristic components, the epochs of phase synchronization were detected. The results showed that myogenic and neurogenic BFO exhibit self-phase synchronization during the slower vasodilation of the heated skin. In the non-heated skin, the degree of synchronization of BFO is associated with the changes in blood flow. PMID:22936012

  15. Skin and muscle components of forearm blood flow in directly heated resting man.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Detry, J.-M. R.; Brengelmann, G. L.; Rowell, L. B.; Wyss, C.

    1972-01-01

    Changes in forearm muscle blood flow (FMBF) during direct whole-body heating were measured in 17 normal subjects using three different methods. We conclude that FMBF is not increased by direct whole-body heating. Since renal and splanchnic blood flow fall 30% under these conditions, maximal total skin blood flow in 12 previously studied subjects can be estimated from the rise in cardiac output to be 7.6 L/min (3.0-11.1 L/min).

  16. Skin and muscle components of forearm blood flow in directly heated resting man.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Detry, J.-M. R.; Brengelmann, G. L.; Rowell, L. B.; Wyss, C.

    1972-01-01

    Changes in forearm muscle blood flow (FMBF) during direct whole-body heating were measured in 17 normal subjects using three different methods. We conclude that FMBF is not increased by direct whole-body heating. Since renal and splanchnic blood flow fall 30% under these conditions, maximal total skin blood flow in 12 previously studied subjects can be estimated from the rise in cardiac output to be 7.6 L/min (3.0-11.1 L/min).

  17. Cryotherapy-Induced Persistent Vasoconstriction After Cutaneous Cooling: Hysteresis Between Skin Temperature and Blood Perfusion.

    PubMed

    Khoshnevis, Sepideh; Craik, Natalie K; Matthew Brothers, R; Diller, Kenneth R

    2016-03-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the persistence of cold-induced vasoconstriction following cessation of active skin-surface cooling. This study demonstrates a hysteresis effect that develops between skin temperature and blood perfusion during the cooling and subsequent rewarming period. An Arctic Ice cryotherapy unit (CTU) was applied to the knee region of six healthy subjects for 60 min of active cooling followed by 120 min of passive rewarming. Multiple laser Doppler flowmetry perfusion probes were used to measure skin blood flow (expressed as cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC)). Skin surface cooling produced a significant reduction in CVC (P < 0.001) that persisted throughout the duration of the rewarming period. In addition, there was a hysteresis effect between CVC and skin temperature during the cooling and subsequent rewarming cycle (P < 0.01). Mixed model regression (MMR) showed a significant difference in the slopes of the CVC-skin temperature curves during cooling and rewarming (P < 0.001). Piecewise regression was used to investigate the temperature thresholds for acceleration of CVC during the cooling and rewarming periods. The two thresholds were shown to be significantly different (P = 0.003). The results show that localized cooling causes significant vasoconstriction that continues beyond the active cooling period despite skin temperatures returning toward baseline values. The significant and persistent reduction in skin perfusion may contribute to nonfreezing cold injury (NFCI) associated with cryotherapy.

  18. Cryotherapy-Induced Persistent Vasoconstriction After Cutaneous Cooling: Hysteresis Between Skin Temperature and Blood Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Khoshnevis, Sepideh; Craik, Natalie K.; Matthew Brothers, R.; Diller, Kenneth R.

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the persistence of cold-induced vasoconstriction following cessation of active skin-surface cooling. This study demonstrates a hysteresis effect that develops between skin temperature and blood perfusion during the cooling and subsequent rewarming period. An Arctic Ice cryotherapy unit (CTU) was applied to the knee region of six healthy subjects for 60 min of active cooling followed by 120 min of passive rewarming. Multiple laser Doppler flowmetry perfusion probes were used to measure skin blood flow (expressed as cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC)). Skin surface cooling produced a significant reduction in CVC (P < 0.001) that persisted throughout the duration of the rewarming period. In addition, there was a hysteresis effect between CVC and skin temperature during the cooling and subsequent rewarming cycle (P < 0.01). Mixed model regression (MMR) showed a significant difference in the slopes of the CVC–skin temperature curves during cooling and rewarming (P < 0.001). Piecewise regression was used to investigate the temperature thresholds for acceleration of CVC during the cooling and rewarming periods. The two thresholds were shown to be significantly different (P = 0.003). The results show that localized cooling causes significant vasoconstriction that continues beyond the active cooling period despite skin temperatures returning toward baseline values. The significant and persistent reduction in skin perfusion may contribute to nonfreezing cold injury (NFCI) associated with cryotherapy. PMID:26632263

  19. Blood culture contamination with Enterococci and skin organisms: implications for surveillance definitions of primary bloodstream infections.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Joshua T; Chen, Luke Francis; Sexton, Daniel J; Anderson, Deverick J

    2011-06-01

    Enterococci are a common cause of bacteremia but are also common contaminants. In our institution, approximately 17% of positive blood cultures with enterococci are mixed with skin organisms. Such isolates are probable contaminants. The specificity of the current definition of primary bloodstream infection could be increased by excluding enterococci mixed with skin organisms. Copyright © 2011 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Skin blood flow in sheep: comparison of xenon-133 washout and radioactive microsphere techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Midtgard, U.H.; Hales, J.R.; Fawcett, A.A.; Sejrsen, P.

    1987-09-01

    Blood flow was measured in leg and torso skin of conscious or anesthetized sheep by using 15-micron radioactive microspheres (Qm) and the /sup 133/Xe washout method (QXe). There was a good relationship between Qm in the cutaneous compartment and QXe calculated from the fast component of the biexponential washout curves (QXe = 0.40.Qm + 6.2, r = 0.90, P less than 0.001) with QXe values substantially below those determined with microspheres. Only at low blood flow levels was there a tendency for QXe to overestimate capillary blood flow as assessed with microspheres, but at higher blood flow levels the /sup 133/Xe washout method resulted in values substantially below those determined with microspheres. The slope of the slow component of the washout curves was inversely related to the tissue-blood partition coefficient in the subcutaneous tissue (r = 0.52, P less than 0.001), indicating an influence of the amount of subcutaneous fat on the washout rate. QXe calculated from the slow component of the washout curves was not significantly correlated with Qm in the subcutaneous compartment (r = 0.19, P greater than 0.10). In leg skin with dilated arteriovenous anastomoses, QXe was generally higher than in torso skin and leg skin with constricted arteriovenous anastomoses, indicating that shunt blood flow increases the washout of /sup 133/Xe.

  1. Influence of blood flow and millimeter wave exposure on skin temperature in different thermal models.

    PubMed

    Alekseev, S I; Ziskin, M C

    2009-01-01

    Recently we showed that the Pennes bioheat transfer equation was not adequate to quantify mm wave heating of the skin at high blood flow rates. To do so, it is necessary to incorporate an "effective" thermal conductivity to obtain a hybrid bioheat equation (HBHE). The main aim of this study was to determine the relationship between non-specific tissue blood flow in a homogeneous unilayer model and dermal blood flow in multilayer models providing that the skin surface temperatures before and following mm wave exposure were the same. This knowledge could be used to develop multilayer models based on the fitting parameters obtained with the homogeneous tissue models. We tested four tissue models consisting of 1-4 layers and applied the one-dimensional steady-state HBHE. To understand the role of the epidermis in skin models we added to the one- and three-layer models an external thin epidermal layer with no blood flow. Only the combination of models containing the epidermal layer was appropriate for determination of the relationship between non-specific tissue and dermal blood flows giving the same skin surface temperatures. In this case we obtained a linear relationship between non-specific tissue and dermal blood flows. The presence of the fat layer resulted in the appearance of a significant temperature gradient between the dermis and muscle layer which increased with the fat layer thickness.

  2. The ageing of the blood supply and the lymphatic drainage of the skin.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Terence

    2004-01-01

    The anatomy and functions of the blood and lymph vessels of human skin are described. Variation in these due to site, ageing and events during life consequent to exposure to a threatening environment are emphasised. Gradual atrophy and greater heterogeneity are features of ageing. Responses to injury and repair are complex and the interaction of mechanical signals distorting skin cells with numerous chemical signals are referred to. The lymphatics are part of an immunosurveillance system to monitor skin barrier penetration. The review attempts to draw attention to key recent advances in our understanding of the cytokine and growth factor production of the skin in the context of previous mainly physiological reviews especially influenced by 50 years of clinical practice as a dermatologist with an eye on both the skin and the fields of microcirculation and lymphology.

  3. Peripheral mechanisms of thermoregulatory control of skin blood flow in aged humans

    PubMed Central

    Kenney, W. Larry

    2010-01-01

    Human skin blood flow is controlled via dual innervation from the sympathetic nervous system. Reflex cutaneous vasoconstriction and vasodilation are both impaired with primary aging, rendering the aged more vulnerable to hypothermia and cardiovascular complications from heat-related illness. Age-related alterations in the thermoregulatory control of skin blood flow occur at multiple points along the efferent arm of the reflex, including 1) diminished sympathetic outflow, 2) altered presynaptic neurotransmitter synthesis, 3) reduced vascular responsiveness, and 4) impairments in downstream (endothelial and vascular smooth muscle) second-messenger signaling. This mechanistic review highlights some of the recent findings in the area of aging and the thermoregulatory control of skin blood flow. PMID:20413421

  4. Diffusing wave spectroscopy and its application for monitoring of skin blood microcirculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meglinski, Igor V.

    2003-10-01

    Diffusing Wave Spectroscopy (DWS) is a novel modern technique uniquely suited for the non-invasive measurements of the particles size and their motion within the randomly inhomogeneous highly scattering and absorbing media, including biological tissues as a human skin. The technique is based on the illuminating the media (tissues) with a coherent laser light, and analyzing the loss of coherence of the scattered field arises from motion of the scattering particles with respect to each other. Both theoretical and experimental results has shown the potentialities and viability of DWS application for the express non-invasive quantitative monitoring and functional diagnostics of skin blood microcirculation, with down to 1 μm/sec resolution. This is likely lead to quantitative monitoring in general diagnostics, diabetes studies, pharmacological intervention for the failing surgical skin flaps or replants, blood microcirculation monitoring during sepsis, assess burn depth, diagnose atherosclerotic disease, and investigate mechanisms of photodynamic therapy for cancer treatment. In frame of current report we describe the recent developments of DWS further to the point that skin blood micro-flow can be routinely and accurately obtained in a separate skin vascular bed on normal skin tissues.

  5. Development of Blood and Lymphatic Endothelial Cells in Embryonic and Fetal Human Skin.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Christopher; Mildner, Michael; Botta, Albert; Nemec, Lucas; Rogojanu, Radu; Beer, Lucian; Fiala, Christian; Eppel, Wolfgang; Bauer, Wolfgang; Petzelbauer, Peter; Elbe-Bürger, Adelheid

    2015-09-01

    Blood and lymphatic vessels provide nutrients for the skin and fulfill important homeostatic functions, such as the regulation of immunologic processes. In this study, we investigated the development of blood and lymphatic endothelial cells in prenatal human skin in situ using multicolor immunofluorescence and analyzed angiogenic molecules by protein arrays of lysates and cell culture supernatants. We found that at 8 to 10 weeks of estimated gestational age, CD144(+) vessels predominantly express the venous endothelial cell marker PAL-E, whereas CD144(+)PAL-E(-) vessels compatible with arteries only appear at the end of the first trimester. Lymphatic progenitor cells at 8 weeks of estimated gestational age express CD31, CD144, Prox1, and temporary PAL-E. At that developmental stage not all lymphatic progenitor cells express podoplanin or Lyve-1, which are acquired with advancing gestational age in a stepwise fashion. Already in second-trimester human skin, the phenotype of blood and lymphatic vessels roughly resembles the one in adult skin. The expression pattern of angiogenic molecules in lysates and cell culture supernatants of prenatal skin did not reveal the expected bent to proangiogenic molecules, indicating a complex regulation of angiogenesis during ontogeny. In summary, this study provides enticing new insights into the development and phenotypic characteristics of the vascular system in human prenatal skin. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Blood-derived dermal langerin+ dendritic cells survey the skin in the steady state

    PubMed Central

    Ginhoux, Florent; Collin, Matthew P.; Bogunovic, Milena; Abel, Michal; Leboeuf, Marylene; Helft, Julie; Ochando, Jordi; Kissenpfennig, Adrien; Malissen, Bernard; Grisotto, Marcos; Snoeck, Hans; Randolph, Gwendalyn; Merad, Miriam

    2007-01-01

    Langerin is a C-type lectin receptor that recognizes glycosylated patterns on pathogens. Langerin is used to identify human and mouse epidermal Langerhans cells (LCs), as well as migratory LCs in the dermis and the skin draining lymph nodes (DLNs). Using a mouse model that allows conditional ablation of langerin+ cells in vivo, together with congenic bone marrow chimeras and parabiotic mice as tools to differentiate LC- and blood-derived dendritic cells (DCs), we have revisited the origin of langerin+ DCs in the skin DLNs. Our results show that in contrast to the current view, langerin+CD8− DCs in the skin DLNs do not derive exclusively from migratory LCs, but also include blood-borne langerin+ DCs that transit through the dermis before reaching the DLN. The recruitment of circulating langerin+ DCs to the skin is dependent on endothelial selectins and CCR2, whereas their recruitment to the skin DLNs requires CCR7 and is independent of CD62L. We also show that circulating langerin+ DCs patrol the dermis in the steady state and migrate to the skin DLNs charged with skin antigens. We propose that this is an important and previously unappreciated element of immunosurveillance that needs to be taken into account in the design of novel vaccine strategies. PMID:18086862

  7. Do Haematophagous Bugs Assess Skin Surface Temperature to Detect Blood Vessels?

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Raquel A.; Lazzari, Claudio R.; Lorenzo, Marcelo G.; Pereira, Marcos H.

    2007-01-01

    Background It is known that some blood-sucking insects have the ability to reach vessels under the host skin with their mouthparts to feed blood from inside them. However, the process by which they locate these vessels remains largely unknown. Less than 5% of the skin is occupied by blood vessels and thus, it is not likely that insects rely on a “random search strategy”, since it would increase the probability of being killed by their hosts. Indeed, heterogeneities along the skin surface might offer exploitable information for guiding insect's bites. Methodology/Principal Findings We tested whether the bug Rhodnius prolixus can evaluate temperature discontinuities along the body surface in order to locate vessels before piercing the host skin. When placed over a rabbit ear, the bug's first bites were mostly directed towards the main vessels. When insects were confronted to artificial linear heat sources presenting a temperature gradient against the background, most bites were directly addressed to the warmer linear source, notwithstanding the temperature of both, the source and the background. Finally, tests performed using uni- and bilaterally antennectomized insects revealed that the bilateral integration of thermal inputs from both antennae is necessary for precisely directing bites. Conclusions/Significance R. prolixus may be able to exploit the temperature differences observed over the skin surface to locate blood vessles. Bugs bite the warmest targets regardless of the target/background temperatures, suggesting that they do not bite choosing a preferred temperature, but select temperature discontinuities along the skin. This strategy seems to be an efficient one for finding blood vessels within a wide temperature range, allowing finding them on different hosts, as well as on different areas of the host body. Our study also adds new insight about the use of antennal thermal inputs by blood sucking bugs. PMID:17895973

  8. Simultaneous recording of skin blood pulsations at different vascular depths by multiwavelength photoplethysmography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spigulis, Janis; Gailite, Lasma; Lihachev, Alexey; Erts, Renars

    2007-04-01

    A new technique for parallel recording of reflection photoplethysmography (PPG) signals in a broad spectral band (violet to near-infrared) has been developed, and its potential for assessment of blood microcirculation at various depths from the skin surface is discussed. PPG signals have been simultaneously detected at cw laser wavelength sets comprising 405, 532, 645, 807, and 1064 nm. Various signal baseline responses to breath holding and different shapes of the PPG pulses originated from the same heartbeat but recorded at different wavelengths have been observed, indicating a depth variety of the skin blood pulsation dynamics.

  9. Accuracy of cyclosporin measurements made in capillary blood samples obtained by skin puncture.

    PubMed

    Merton, G; Jones, K; Lee, M; Johnston, A; Holt, D W

    2000-10-01

    International consensus guidelines suggest that cyclosporin should be measured in whole blood. In some instances it may be advantageous to collect capillary blood, by a finger or ear prick method. However, drug concentrations in skin-puncture blood may not necessarily correlate with those measured in venous blood. This study compared cyclosporin concentrations in blood collected from the fingertip or earlobe with blood collected by standard venipuncture. Patient preference for each of the blood collection methods was also assessed. Specimens were obtained from organ transplant patients receiving cyclosporin, using each of the three methods: venipuncture, finger prick, and earlobe prick. The samples were assayed using a specific radioimmunoassay and the results were compared. In the 102 sets of samples collected, the mean difference (+/- standard deviation) in cyclosporin concentration between finger prick and venipuncture and ear prick and venipuncture was 2.6% (+/- 9.5%) and 2.7% (+/- 12.1%), respectively, while the comparable median (IQR) differences were 1.9% (-3.4% to +6.6%) and -1.1% (-2.8% to +7.2%), respectively. A high degree of correlation was observed between finger prick and venipuncture or ear prick and venipuncture or ear prick and finger prick (r2 > 0.86). Of the three methods of blood collection, finger prick was the patients' preferred method (P < 0.01). These data suggest that capillary blood collected by skin puncture is suitable for use in cyclosporin blood monitoring and acceptable to patients.

  10. The effect of moist air on skin blood flow and temperature in subjects with and without diabetes.

    PubMed

    Petrofsky, Jerrold; Berk, Lee; Alshammari, Faris; Lee, Haneul; Hamdan, Adel; Yim, Jong Eun; Patel, Denis; Kodawala, Yusufi; Shetye, Gauri; Chen, Wei-Ti; Moniz, Harold; Pathak, Kunal; Somanaboina, Karunakar; Desai, Rajavi; Dave, Bhargav; Malthane, Swapnil; Alshaharani, Mastour; Neupane, Sushma; Shenoy, Samruddha; Nevgi, Bhakti; Cho, Sungkwan; Al-Nakhli, Hani

    2012-02-01

    Endothelial function is known to be impaired in response to heat in people with diabetes, but little has been done to see how air humidity alters the skin blood flow response to heat. Seventeen male and female subjects were divided in two groups, one with type 2 diabetes and the other the control subjects without diabetes, age-matched to the diabetes group. All subjects participated in a series of experiments to determine the effect of the warming of the skin by air on skin temperature and skin blood flow. On different days, skin temperature was warmed with air that was 38°C, 40°C, or 42°C for 20 min. Also, on different days, at each temperature, the air humidity was adjusted to 0%, 25%, 50%, 75%, or 100% humidity. Skin blood flow and temperature were measured throughout the exposure period. This allowed the interactions between air humidity and temperature to be assessed. For the control subjects, the moisture in the air had no different effect on skin blood flow at air temperatures of 38°C and 40°C (analysis of variance, P>0.05), although skin blood flow progressively increased at each air temperature that was applied. But for the warmest air temperature, 42°C, although the four lower humidities had the same effect on skin blood flow, air at 100% humidity caused the largest increase in skin blood flow. In contrast, in the subjects with diabetes, blood flow was always significantly less at any air temperature applied to the skin than was observed in the control subjects (P<0.05), and skin blood flow was significantly higher for the two higher humidities for the two higher air temperatures. Skin temperature paralleled these findings. These data show that individuals with diabetes do not tolerate moist, warm air above 50% humidity as well as controls without diabetes.

  11. Forearm skin tissue dielectric constant measured at 300 MHz: effect of changes in skin vascular volume and blood flow.

    PubMed

    Mayrovitz, Harvey N; Guo, Xiaoran; Salmon, Mark; Uhde, Matt

    2013-01-01

    Skin tissue dielectric constant (TDC) values measured via the open-ended coaxial probe method are useful non-invasive indices of local skin tissue water. However, the effect of skin blood flow (SBF) or skin blood volume (SBV) on TDC values is unknown. To determine the magnitude of such effects, we decreased forearm SBV via vertical arm raising for 5 min (test 1) and increased SBV by bicep cuff compression to 50 mmHg for 5 min (test 2) in 20 healthy supine subjects (10 men). TDC values were measured to a depth of 1·5 mm on anterior forearm, and SBF was measured with laser-Doppler system simultaneously on forearm and finger. Results indicate that decreasing vascular volume (test 1) was associated with a small but statistically significant reduction in TDC (3·0 ± 4·3%, P = 0·003) and increasing vascular volume (test 2) was associated with a slight but statistically significant increase in TDC (3·5 ± 3·0%, P<0·001). SBF changes depended on test and measurement site. For forearm, test 1 significantly increased SBF (102·6 ± 156·2%, P<0·001) and test 2 significantly decreased it (39·5 ± 13·1%, P<0·001). In finger, SBF was significantly reduced by both tests: in test 1 by 55·3 ± 32·1%, P<0·001 and in test 2 by 53·3 ± 27·6%, P<0·001. We conclude that the small percentage changes in TDC values (3·0-3·5%) over the wide range of induced SBV and SBF changes suggest a minor effect on clinically determined TDC values because of SBV or SBF changes or differences when comparing TDC longitudinally over time or among individuals of different groups in a research setting.

  12. Increase of blood flow in skin and spinal cord following activation of small diameter primary afferents.

    PubMed

    Koltzenburg, M; Lewin, G; McMahon, S

    1990-02-12

    Activation of unmyelinated primary afferents produces vasodilatation and plasma extravasation in the skin. Here, using the laser Doppler technique to measure changes in blood flow and the Evans blue technique for quantification of plasma extravasation, we have asked whether the stimulation of C-fibre precipitates the same phenomena in the spinal cord. Our results show that there is an increase of blood flow, but no extravasation in the ipsilateral lumbar enlargement of the spinal cord following supramaximal electrical stimulation of the sciatic nerve. The blood flow increases were small and short-lived compared with those seen in skin, and could be completely explained by concomitant blood pressure changes. Hence, whilst the same substances are apparently released from the peripheral and central terminals of primary afferent fibres, their ability to produce vasodilatation and extravasation is absent or severely restricted in the spinal cord.

  13. Local heating of human skin by millimeter waves: effect of blood flow.

    PubMed

    Alekseev, S I; Radzievsky, A A; Szabo, I; Ziskin, M C

    2005-09-01

    We investigated the influence of blood perfusion on local heating of the forearm and middle finger skin following 42.25 GHz exposure with an open ended waveguide (WG) and with a YAV mm wave therapeutic device. Both sources had bell-shaped distributions of the incident power density (IPD) with peak intensities of 208 and 55 mW/cm(2), respectively. Blood perfusion was changed in two ways: by blood flow occlusion and by externally applied vasodilator (nonivamide/nicoboxil) cream to the skin. For thermal modeling, we used the bioheat transfer equation (BHTE) and the hybrid bioheat equation (HBHE) which combines the BHTE and the scalar effective thermal conductivity equation (ETCE). Under normal conditions with the 208 mW/cm(2) exposure, the cutaneous temperature elevation (DeltaT) in the finger (2.5 +/- 0.3 degrees C) having higher blood flow was notably smaller than the cutaneous DeltaT in the forearm (4.7 +/- 0.4 degrees C). However, heating of the forearm and finger skin with blood flow occluded was the same, indicating that the thermal conductivity of tissue in the absence of blood flow at both locations was also the same. The BHTE accurately predicted local hyperthermia in the forearm only at low blood flow. The HBHE made accurate predictions at both low and high perfusion rates. The relationship between blood flow and the effective thermal conductivity (k(eff)) was found to be linear. The heat dissipating effect of higher perfusion was mostly due to an apparent increase in k(eff). It was shown that mm wave exposure could result in steady state heating of tissue layers located much deeper than the penetration depth (0.56 mm). The surface DeltaT and heat penetration into tissue increased with enlarging the irradiating beam area and with increasing exposure duration. Thus, mm waves at sufficient intensities could thermally affect thermo-sensitive structures located in the skin and underlying tissue.

  14. Multiple spatially resolved reflection spectroscopy for in vivo determination of carotenoids in human skin and blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darvin, Maxim E.; Magnussen, Björn; Lademann, Juergen; Köcher, Wolfgang

    2016-09-01

    Non-invasive measurement of carotenoid antioxidants in human skin is one of the important tasks to investigate the skin physiology in vivo. Resonance Raman spectroscopy and reflection spectroscopy are the most frequently used non-invasive techniques in dermatology and skin physiology. In the present study, an improved method based on multiple spatially resolved reflection spectroscopy (MSRRS) was introduced. The results obtained were compared with those obtained using the ‘gold standard’ resonance Raman spectroscopy method and showed strong correlations for the total carotenoid concentration (R  =  0.83) as well as for lycopene (R  =  0.80). The measurement stability was confirmed to be better than 10% within the total temperature range from 5 °C to  +  30 °C and pressure contact between the skin and the MSRRS sensor from 800 Pa to 18 000 Pa. In addition, blood samples taken from the subjects were analyzed for carotenoid concentrations. The MSRRS sensor was calibrated on the blood carotenoid concentrations resulting in being able to predict with a correlation of R  =  0.79. On the basis of blood carotenoids it could be demonstrated that the MSRRS cutaneous measurements are not influenced by Fitzpatrick skin types I-VI. The MSRRS sensor is commercially available under the brand name biozoom.

  15. Skin blood perfusion and cellular response to insertion of insulin pen needles with different diameters.

    PubMed

    Præstmark, Kezia Ann; Jensen, Casper Bo; Stallknecht, Bente; Madsen, Nils Berg; Kildegaard, Jonas

    2014-07-01

    Today most research on pen needle design revolves around pain perception statements through clinical trials, but these are both costly, timely, and require high sample sizes. The purpose of this study was to test if tissue damage, caused by different types of needles, can be assessed by evaluating skin blood perfusion response around needle insertion sites. Three common sized pen needles of 28G, 30G, and 32G as well as hooked 32G needles, were inserted into the neck skin of pigs and then removed. Laser Speckle Contrast Analysis was used to measure skin blood perfusion for 20 minutes after the insertions. Seven pigs were included in the study and a total of 118 randomized needle insertions were conducted. Histology was made of tissue samples inserted with 18G, 28G, and 32G needles, and stained to quantify red and white blood cell response. Based on area under curve, calculated for each individual blood perfusion recording and grouped according to needle type, skin blood perfusion response relates to needle diameter. The response was significantly higher after insertions with 28G and hooked 32G needles than with 30G (P < .05) and 32G (P < .01) needles. Histology results were not significant, but there was a trend of an increased response with increasing needle diameter. Skin blood perfusion response to pen needle insertions rank according to needle diameter, and the tissue response caused by hooked 32G needles corresponds to that of 28G needles. The relation between needle diameter and trauma when analyzing histology was also suggested. © 2014 Diabetes Technology Society.

  16. Quick analysis of optical spectra to quantify epidermal melanin and papillary dermal blood content of skin.

    PubMed

    Jacques, Steven L

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents a practical approach for assessing the melanin and blood content of the skin from total diffuse reflectance spectra, R(λ), where λ is wavelength. A quick spectral analysis using just three wavelengths (585 nm, 700 nm and 800 nm) is presented, based on the 1985 work of Kollias and Baquer who documented epidermal melanin of skin using the slope of optical density (OD) between 620 nm and 720 nm. The paper describes the non-rectilinear character of such a quick analysis, and shows that almost any choice of two wavelengths in the 600-900 range can achieve the characterization of melanin. The extrapolation of the melanin slope to 585 nm serves as a baseline for subtraction from the OD (585 nm) to yield a blood perfusion score. Monte Carlo simulations created spectral data for a skin model with epidermis, papillary dermis and reticular dermis to illustrate the analysis.

  17. Bioengineering dermo-epidermal skin grafts with blood and lymphatic capillaries.

    PubMed

    Marino, Daniela; Luginbühl, Joachim; Scola, Simonetta; Meuli, Martin; Reichmann, Ernst

    2014-01-29

    The first bioengineered, autologous, dermo-epidermal skin grafts are presently undergoing clinical trials; hence, it is reasonable to envisage the next clinical step at the forefront of plastic and burn surgery, which is the generation of autologous skin grafts that contain vascular plexuses, preformed in vitro. As the importance of the blood, and particularly the lymphatic vascular system, is increasingly recognized, it is attractive to engineer both human blood and lymphatic vessels in one tissue or organ graft. We show here that functional lymphatic capillaries can be generated using three-dimensional hydrogels. Like normal lymphatics, these capillaries branch, form lumen, and take up fluid in vitro and in vivo after transplantation onto immunocompromised rodents. Formation of lymphatic capillaries could be modulated by both lymphangiogenic and anti-lymphangiogenic stimuli, demonstrating the potential usefulness of this system for in vitro testing. Blood and lymphatic endothelial cells never intermixed during vessel development, nor did blood and lymphatic capillaries anastomose under the described circumstances. After transplantation of the engineered grafts, the human lymphatic capillaries anastomosed to the nude rat's lymphatic plexus and supported fluid drainage. Successful preclinical results suggest that these skin grafts could be applied on patients suffering from severe skin defects.

  18. The interrelationship between air temperature and humidity as applied locally to the skin: The resultant response on skin temperature and blood flow with age differences

    PubMed Central

    Petrofsky, Jerrold S.; Berk, Lee; Alshammari, Faris; Lee, Haneul; Hamdan, Adel; Yim, Jong Eun; Kodawala, Yusufi; Patel, Dennis; Nevgi, Bhakti; Shetye, Gauri; Moniz, Harold; Chen, Wei Ti; Alshaharani, Mastour; Pathak, Kunal; Neupane, Sushma; Somanaboina, Karunakar; Shenoy, Samruddha; Cho, Sungwan; Dave, Bargav; Desai, Rajavi; Malthane, Swapnil; Al-Nakhli, Hani

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Most studies of the skin and how it responds to local heat have been conducted with either water, thermodes, or dry heat packs. Very little has been accomplished to look at the interaction between air humidity and temperature on skin temperature and blood flow. With variable air temperatures and humidity’s around the world, this, in many ways, is a more realistic assessment of environmental impact than previous water bath studies. Material/Methods Eight young and 8 older subjects were examined in an extensive series of experiments where on different days, air temperature was 38, 40, or 42°C. and at each temperature, humidity was either 0%, 25%, 50%, 75%, or 100% humidity. Over a 20 minute period of exposure, the response of the skin in terms of its temperature and blood flow was assessed. Results For both younger and older subjects, for air temperatures of 38 and 40°C., the humidity of the air had no effect on the blood flow response of the skin, while skin temperature at the highest humidity was elevated slightly. However, for air temperatures of 42°C., at 100% humidity, there was a significant elevation in skin blood flow and skin temperature above the other four air humidity’s (p<0.05). In older subjects, the blood flow response was less and the skin temperature was much higher than younger individuals for air at 42°C. and 100% humidity (p<0.05). Conclusions Thus, in older subjects, warm humid air caused a greater rise in skin temperature with less protective effect of blood flow to protect the skin from overheating than is found in younger subjects. PMID:22460091

  19. Spatial and temporal skin blood volume and saturation estimation using a multispectral snapshot imaging camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewerlöf, Maria; Larsson, Marcus; Salerud, E. Göran

    2017-02-01

    Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) can estimate the spatial distribution of skin blood oxygenation, using visible to near-infrared light. HSI oximeters often use a liquid-crystal tunable filter, an acousto-optic tunable filter or mechanically adjustable filter wheels, which has too long response/switching times to monitor tissue hemodynamics. This work aims to evaluate a multispectral snapshot imaging system to estimate skin blood volume and oxygen saturation with high temporal and spatial resolution. We use a snapshot imager, the xiSpec camera (MQ022HG-IM-SM4X4-VIS, XIMEA), having 16 wavelength-specific Fabry-Perot filters overlaid on the custom CMOS-chip. The spectral distribution of the bands is however substantially overlapping, which needs to be taken into account for an accurate analysis. An inverse Monte Carlo analysis is performed using a two-layered skin tissue model, defined by epidermal thickness, haemoglobin concentration and oxygen saturation, melanin concentration and spectrally dependent reduced-scattering coefficient, all parameters relevant for human skin. The analysis takes into account the spectral detector response of the xiSpec camera. At each spatial location in the field-of-view, we compare the simulated output to the detected diffusively backscattered spectra to find the best fit. The imager is evaluated for spatial and temporal variations during arterial and venous occlusion protocols applied to the forearm. Estimated blood volume changes and oxygenation maps at 512x272 pixels show values that are comparable to reference measurements performed in contact with the skin tissue. We conclude that the snapshot xiSpec camera, paired with an inverse Monte Carlo algorithm, permits us to use this sensor for spatial and temporal measurement of varying physiological parameters, such as skin tissue blood volume and oxygenation.

  20. Melanin and blood concentration in a human skin model studied by multiple regression analysis: assessment by Monte Carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    Shimada, M; Yamada, Y; Itoh, M; Yatagai, T

    2001-09-01

    Measurement of melanin and blood concentration in human skin is needed in the medical and the cosmetic fields because human skin colour is mainly determined by the colours of melanin and blood. It is difficult to measure these concentrations in human skin because skin has a multi-layered structure and scatters light strongly throughout the visible spectrum. The Monte Carlo simulation currently used for the analysis of skin colour requires long calculation times and knowledge of the specific optical properties of each skin layer. A regression analysis based on the modified Beer-Lambert law is presented as a method of measuring melanin and blood concentration in human skin in a shorter period of time and with fewer calculations. The accuracy of this method is assessed using Monte Carlo simulations.

  1. Melanin and blood concentration in a human skin model studied by multiple regression analysis: assessment by Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, M.; Yamada, Y.; Itoh, M.; Yatagai, T.

    2001-09-01

    Measurement of melanin and blood concentration in human skin is needed in the medical and the cosmetic fields because human skin colour is mainly determined by the colours of melanin and blood. It is difficult to measure these concentrations in human skin because skin has a multi-layered structure and scatters light strongly throughout the visible spectrum. The Monte Carlo simulation currently used for the analysis of skin colour requires long calculation times and knowledge of the specific optical properties of each skin layer. A regression analysis based on the modified Beer-Lambert law is presented as a method of measuring melanin and blood concentration in human skin in a shorter period of time and with fewer calculations. The accuracy of this method is assessed using Monte Carlo simulations.

  2. Resting Blood Flow in the Skin: Does It Exist, and What Is the Influence of Temperature, Aging, and Diabetes?

    PubMed Central

    Petrofsky, Jerrold Scott

    2012-01-01

    Measurement of resting blood flow to the skin and other organs is an important indicator of health and disease and a way to assess the reaction to various stimuli and pharmaceutical interventions. However, unlike plasma ions such as sodium or potassium, it is difficult to determine what the proper value for resting blood flow really is. Part of the problem is in the measurement of blood flow; various techniques yield very different measures of skin blood flow even in the same area. Even if there were common techniques, resting blood flow to tissue, such as the skin, is determined by the interaction of a plurality of factors, including the sympathetic nervous system, temperature, pressure, shear forces on blood vessels, tissue osmolality, and a variety of other stimuli. Compounding this variability, the blood flow response to any stressor is reduced by free radicals in the blood and diminished by aging and diabetes. Race also has an effect on resting blood flow to the skin. All these factors interact to make the exact resting blood flow difficult to determine in any one individual and at any one time. This review examines the main techniques to assess blood flow, the factors that alter blood flow in the skin, and how aging and diabetes affect blood flow. Recommendations for the measurement of resting blood flow are presented. PMID:22768900

  3. Resting blood flow in the skin: does it exist, and what is the influence of temperature, aging, and diabetes?

    PubMed

    Petrofsky, Jerrold Scott

    2012-05-01

    Measurement of resting blood flow to the skin and other organs is an important indicator of health and disease and a way to assess the reaction to various stimuli and pharmaceutical interventions. However, unlike plasma ions such as sodium or potassium, it is difficult to determine what the proper value for resting blood flow really is. Part of the problem is in the measurement of blood flow; various techniques yield very different measures of skin blood flow even in the same area. Even if there were common techniques, resting blood flow to tissue, such as the skin, is determined by the interaction of a plurality of factors, including the sympathetic nervous system, temperature, pressure, shear forces on blood vessels, tissue osmolality, and a variety of other stimuli. Compounding this variability, the blood flow response to any stressor is reduced by free radicals in the blood and diminished by aging and diabetes. Race also has an effect on resting blood flow to the skin. All these factors interact to make the exact resting blood flow difficult to determine in any one individual and at any one time. This review examines the main techniques to assess blood flow, the factors that alter blood flow in the skin, and how aging and diabetes affect blood flow. Recommendations for the measurement of resting blood flow are presented.

  4. Switchable skin window induced by optical clearing method for dermal blood flow imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing; Shi, Rui; Zhu, Dan

    2013-06-01

    Optical imaging techniques have shown tremendous potential for assessing cutaneous microcirculation, but the imaging depth and contrast is limited by the strong scattering of skin. Current skin windows have to be fulfilled by surgical operation and suffer from some side effects. In this study, a switchable skin window was developed by topical application of an optical clearing agent (OCA) and saline on rat skin in vivo. The validity of the skin window was evaluated by the laser speckle contrast imaging technique, and the safety of OCA to the body was tested through histologic examinations. The results indicated that administration of OCA or saline on rat skin in vivo can open or close the window of skin repeatedly for three days. With the repair effect of hyaluronic acid and Vaseline, it is able to repeatedly visualize the dermal blood vessels and flow distribution. Long-term observation shows that there is no abnormal reflection in micro-structure, body weight, organ coefficients, histopathologic lesions, or toxic reactions compared with a control group. This switchable window will provide an effective tool not only for cutaneous microcirculation with laser speckle contrast imaging, but also for diagnosis and treatment of peripheral vascular diseases, including tumor research with various optical imaging techniques.

  5. Non-thermal influences on the control of skin blood flow have minimal effects on heat transfer during exercise.

    PubMed Central

    Nadel, E. R.

    1986-01-01

    During exercise, circulatory reflexes ensure that the cardiac output is sufficiently elevated to meet the oxygen delivery requirements of the contracting skeletal muscles and the heat delivery requirements of the body to the skin. The latter requirements are met by increasing skin blood flow. These increases are largely driven by elevations in the body temperatures, although non-thermal effects on the control of skin blood flow occur in certain conditions. These effects are largely the consequence of high and/or low baroreflex stimulation. Even in the face of such non-thermal effects, which occur during exercise in the heat, the body's requirements for heat transfer from core to skin are largely met by the increased skin blood flow. Thus, non-thermal effects on the control of skin blood flow are relatively unimportant in the body's overall regulatory response to exercise. PMID:3751137

  6. Reflex sympathetic dystrophy: skin blood flow, sympathetic vasoconstrictor reflexes and pain before and after surgical sympathectomy.

    PubMed

    Baron, R; Maier, C

    1996-10-01

    To examine the pathophysiological mechanisms of vascular disturbances and to assess the role of the sympathetic nervous system, 12 patients with reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD) of the hand were studied using laser Doppler flowmetry. Cutaneous blood flow, skin resistance and skin temperature were measured at the affected and contralateral hands. Sympathetic vasoconstrictor reflexes were induced bilaterally by deep inspiration. Four patients were treated with unilateral surgical sympathectomy and pain and vascular changes were documented in follow-up investigations. (1) After acclimatization in cold environment (< or = 18 degrees C) blood flow and skin temperature were considerably lower on the affected side in 10 patients. No additional vasoconstrictor reflexes could be elicited. (2) After acclimatization in warm environment (22-24 degrees C) blood flow and skin temperature demonstrated no side differences in all cases. Vasoconstrictor responses were the same on both sides. (3) After sympathectomy vasoconstrictor reflexes were absent. Skin resistance was considerably higher on the affected side. In the first 4 weeks the affected hand was warmer and blood flow was higher compared with the healthy side. Thereafter, skin temperature and perfusion slowly decreased and the affected hand turned from warm to cold. Very regular high amplitude vasomotion waves occurred unilaterally. There were no signs of reinnervation. Two patients had long-term pain relief. We conclude as follows. (1) Side differences in skin temperature and blood flow are no static descriptors in RSD. They are dynamic values depending critically on environmental temperature. Therefore, they have to be interpreted with care when defining reliable diagnostic criteria. (2) Vascular disturbances in RSD are not due to constant overactivity of sympathetic vasoconstrictor neurons. Changes in vascular sensitivity to cold temperature and circulating catecholamines may be responsible for vascular abnormalities

  7. Impact of hydrotherapy on skin blood flow: How much is due to moisture and how much is due to heat?

    PubMed

    Petrofsky, Jerrold; Gunda, Shashi; Raju, Chinna; Bains, Gurinder S; Bogseth, Michael C; Focil, Nicholas; Sirichotiratana, Melissa; Hashemi, Vahideh; Vallabhaneni, Pratima; Kim, Yumi; Madani, Piyush; Coords, Heather; McClurg, Maureen; Lohman, Everett

    2010-02-01

    Hydrotherapy and whirlpool are used to increase skin blood flow and warm tissue. However, recent evidence seems to show that part of the increase in skin blood flow is not due to the warmth itself but due to the moisture content of the heat. Therefore, two series of experiments were accomplished on 10 subjects with an average age of 24.2 +/- 9.7 years and free of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Subjects sat in a 37 degrees C hydrotherapy pool under two conditions: one in which a thin membrane protecting their skin from moisture while their arm was submerged in water and the second where their arm was allowed to be exposed to the water for 15 minutes. During this period of time, skin and body temperature were measured as well as skin blood flow by a Laser Doppler Imager. The results of the experiments showed that the vapor barrier blocked any change in skin moisture content during submersion in water, and while skin temperature was the same as during exposure to the water, the blood flow with the arm exposed to water increased from 101.1 +/- 10.4 flux to 224.9 +/- 18.2 flux, whereas blood flow increased to only 118.7 +/- 11.4 flux if the moisture of the water was blocked. Thus, a substantial portion of the increase in skin blood flow associated with warm water therapy is probably associated with moisturizing of the skin rather than the heat itself.

  8. Effects of acupuncture on skin and muscle blood flow in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Sandberg, Margareta; Lundeberg, Thomas; Lindberg, Lars-Göran; Gerdle, Björn

    2003-09-01

    In 14 healthy female subjects, the effects of needle stimulation (acupuncture) on skin and muscle blood flow were investigated using a non-invasive custom-designed probe and photoplethysmography (PPG). In randomised order, 2-7 days apart, three modes of needle stimulation were performed on the anterior aspect of the tibia: superficial insertion (SF), insertion into the anterior tibial muscle (Mu), and insertion into the muscle including manipulation of the needle in order to elicit a distinct sensation of distension, heaviness or numbness (DeQi). Before intervention, the subjects rested for 30 min. After the intervention, the needle was left in situ for 20 min. Blood flow recordings were performed intermittently from 10 min prior to the intervention to the end of the trial. In a fourth session, serving as control, corresponding measurements were performed without any needle stimulation. Area under curve was calculated for 5-min periods prior to and after stimulation, respectively, and for the remaining 15-min period after stimulation. Compared to the control situation, muscle blood flow increased following both Mu and DeQi for 20 min, with the latter being more pronounced for the initial 5 min. Skin blood flow increased for 5 min following DeQi. However, no increase was found following SF. The DeQi stimulation was preceded by higher visual analogue scale ratings of anxiety prior to stimulation, which might have influenced skin blood flow to some extent. The results indicate that the intensity of the needling is of importance, the DeQi stimulation resulting in the most pronounced increase in both skin and muscle blood flow.

  9. Skin cooling maintains cerebral blood flow velocity and orthostatic tolerance during tilting in heated humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Thad E.; Cui, Jian; Zhang, Rong; Witkowski, Sarah; Crandall, Craig G.

    2002-01-01

    Orthostatic tolerance is reduced in the heat-stressed human. The purpose of this project was to identify whether skin-surface cooling improves orthostatic tolerance. Nine subjects were exposed to 10 min of 60 degrees head-up tilting in each of four conditions: normothermia (NT-tilt), heat stress (HT-tilt), normothermia plus skin-surface cooling 1 min before and throughout tilting (NT-tilt(cool)), and heat stress plus skin-surface cooling 1 min before and throughout tilting (HT-tilt(cool)). Heating and cooling were accomplished by perfusing 46 and 15 degrees C water, respectively, though a tube-lined suit worn by each subject. During HT-tilt, four of nine subjects developed presyncopal symptoms resulting in the termination of the tilt test. In contrast, no subject experienced presyncopal symptoms during NT-tilt, NT-tilt(cool), or HT-tilt(cool). During the HT-tilt procedure, mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) and cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV) decreased. However, during HT-tilt(cool), MAP, total peripheral resistance, and CBFV were significantly greater relative to HT-tilt (all P < 0.01). No differences were observed in calculated cerebral vascular resistance between the four conditions. These data suggest that skin-surface cooling prevents the fall in CBFV during upright tilting and improves orthostatic tolerance, presumably via maintenance of MAP. Hence, skin-surface cooling may be a potent countermeasure to protect against orthostatic intolerance observed in heat-stressed humans.

  10. Muscle and skin sympathetic nerve traffic during physician and nurse blood pressure measurement.

    PubMed

    Grassi, Guido; Seravalle, Gino; Buzzi, Silvia; Magni, Laura; Brambilla, Gianmaria; Quarti-Trevano, Fosca; Dell'Oro, Raffaella; Mancia, Giuseppe

    2013-06-01

    Previous studies have shown that blood pressure assessment by a nurse markedly attenuates the pressor and tachicardic responses triggered by the physician blood pressure measurement. Whether and to what extent this attenuation reflects a different pattern of the neuroadrenergic responses to doctor or nurse blood pressure evaluation is unknown. In 19 lean untreated mild essential hypertensive patients (age 39.1 ± 2.4 years, mean ± SEM), we measured beat-to-beat mean arterial pressure (Finapres), heart rate (ECG), and efferent postganglionic muscle and skin sympathetic nerve traffic [muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) and skin sympathetic nerve activity (SSNA), respectively, by microneurography], before, during, and following a 10-min sphygmomanometric BP measurement by a doctor or by a nurse unfamiliar to the patients. Measurements were repeated at a 30-min interval to obtain, in separate periods, muscle and skin sympathetic nerve traffic recordings. Both the sequences (doctor vs. nurse and muscle vs. skin sympathetic nerve traffic) were randomized. A doctor visit induced sudden, marked, and prolonged blood pressure and heart rate increases, accompanied by a muscle sympathetic nerve traffic inhibition (average response: -18.1 ± 4.3%, P < 0.01) coupled with a skin sympathetic nerve traffic excitation (average response: +46.1 ± 5.5%, P < 0.01). In contrast, a nurse visit elicited blood pressure and heart rate responses markedly and significantly reduced (-72.1 ± 11 and -81.7 ± 13% respectively, P < 0.01) as compared with those seen during the doctor's visit. This was the case also for muscle and skin sympathetic neural responses (-44.3 ± 9 and -65.6 ± 13%, P < 0.01). These data provide the first evidence that the blunted pressor and tachicardic responses to nurse's blood pressure measurements are accompanied by an attenuation of the adrenergic neural responses seen during the alerting reaction accompanying

  11. Skin tone, hostility, and blood pressure in young normotensive African Americans.

    PubMed

    Ernst, F A; Jackson, I; Robertson, R M; Nevels, H; Watts, E

    1997-01-01

    Several studies have found a positive relationship between darkness of skin tone and blood pressure in African Americans. This has raised speculation about the relative contributions of genetic and/or psychosocial factors in the mediation of this relationship. Using a laboratory stress protocol, we performed cardiovascular reactivity testing with 42 male and 40 female African-American college students after pre-testing them on measures of hostility using four psychometric scales derived from the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI). Skin tone measures were obtained with a reflectance spectrophotometer. In the combined sample of males and females, we found a weak but statistically significant positive relationship between darker skin tone and systolic blood pressure (p = 0.03). However, males were significantly darker than females (p = .005) suggesting that the skin tone and blood pressure relationship is an artifact of gender. No differences in patterns of cardiovascular habituation or levels of hostility were found between dark and light subjects. Discussion of these results focuses on the weak statistical relationship found in this and other studies and the specificity of previous findings based on educational and socioeconomic factors.

  12. The Characterization of Varicella Zoster Virus-Specific T Cells in Skin and Blood during Aging.

    PubMed

    Vukmanovic-Stejic, Milica; Sandhu, Daisy; Seidel, Judith A; Patel, Neil; Sobande, Toni O; Agius, Elaine; Jackson, Sarah E; Fuentes-Duculan, Judilyn; Suárez-Fariñas, Mayte; Mabbott, Neil A; Lacy, Katie E; Ogg, Graham; Nestle, Frank O; Krueger, James G; Rustin, Malcolm H A; Akbar, Arne N

    2015-07-01

    Reactivation of the varicella zoster virus (VZV) increases during aging. Although the effects of VZV reactivation are observed in the skin (shingles), the number and functional capacity of cutaneous VZV-specific T cells have not been investigated. The numbers of circulating IFN-γ-secreting VZV-specific CD4(+) T cells are significantly decreased in old subjects. However, other measures of VZV-specific CD4(+) T cells, including proliferative capacity to VZV antigen stimulation and identification of VZV-specific CD4(+) T cells with an major histocompatibility complex class II tetramer (epitope of IE-63 protein), were similar in both age groups. The majority of T cells in the skin of both age groups expressed CD69, a characteristic of skin-resident T cells. VZV-specific CD4(+) T cells were significantly increased in the skin compared with the blood in young and old subjects, and their function was similar in both age groups. In contrast, the number of Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells and expression of the inhibitory receptor programmed cell death -1 PD-1 on CD4(+) T cells were significantly increased in the skin of older humans. Therefore, VZV-specific CD4(+) T cells in the skin of older individuals are functionally competent. However, their activity may be restricted by multiple inhibitory influences in situ.

  13. The Characterization of Varicella Zoster Virus Specific T Cells In Skin and Blood During Ageing

    PubMed Central

    Vukmanovic-Stejic, Milica; Sandhu, Daisy; Seidel, Judith A.; Patel, Neil; Sobande, Toni O.; Agius, Elaine; Jackson, Sarah E.; Fuentes-Duculan, Judilyn; Suarez-Farinas, Mayte; Mabbott, Neil A.; Lacy, Katie E.; Ogg, Graham; Nestle, Frank O; Krueger, James G.; Rustin, Malcolm H.A.; Akbar, Arne N.

    2015-01-01

    The varicella-zoster virus (VZV) re-activation increases during ageing. Although the effects of VZV re-activation are observed in the skin (shingles) the number or functional capacity of cutaneous VZV specific T cells have not been investigated. The numbers of circulating IFN-γ secreting VZV specific CD4+ T cells are significantly decreased in old subjects however other measures of VZV-specific CD4+ T cells, including proliferative capacity to VZV antigen stimulation and identification of VZV-specific CD4+ T cells with a MHC class II tetramer (epitope of IE-63 protein), were similar in both age groups. The majority of T cells in the skin of both age groups expressed CD69, a characteristic of skin resident T cells. VZV-specific CD4+ T cells were significantly increased in the skin compared to the blood in young and old subjects and their function was similar in both age groups. In contrast the number of Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) and expression of the inhibitory receptor PD-1 on CD4+ T cells were significantly increased in the skin of older humans. Therefore VZV-specific CD4+ T cells in the skin of older individuals are functionally competent. However their activity may be restricted by multiple inhibitory influences in situ. PMID:25734814

  14. Pharmacokinetics of niacinamide in blood and skin of hairless guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Bongiovannieier, R.; Koplovitz, I.; Shulz, S.; Lieb, J.; Railer, R.

    1993-05-13

    Niacinamide (NA) has been reported to be effective in reducing the development of microblisters caused by sulfur mustard (HD) vapor exposure in the Hairless guinea pig when given as a single bolus pretreatment 30 min prior to HD vapor exposure (Yourick et al.). The purpose of these experiments was to establish the pharmacokinetics of NA in the hairless guinea pig to optimize the evaluation of NA against HD cutaneous injury. A high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method was developed for the quantitation of NA in blood and skin. The method was linear (corr coeff r = 0.998) and sensitive with a working range from 50 microns/ml to 2000 microns/ml. The NA Tl/2 was measured after a bolus injection of 750 and 375 mg/kg via IP and IV routes, respectively. The Tl/2 was 2.8 + or - 0.3 hr for both routes. Drug concentrations in blood, during multiple dosing (5 IP) of a fixed dose (375 mg/kg, i.p.) given every 2.8 hr, were within 15% of the theoretical values calculated using a computer model (Principle of Superposition). NA serum levels ranged from 325 microns/mL to 1404 microns/mL (n = 12). The corresponding skin levels were within 93% of the blood levels. The elimination of NA from the skin paralleled its elimination from the blood. The results of these studies will aid in the future evaluation of NA as a pretreatment/treatment for HD injury.

  15. Hair follicle-derived blood vessels vascularize tumors in skin and are inhibited by Doxorubicin.

    PubMed

    Amoh, Yasuyuki; Li, Lingna; Yang, Meng; Jiang, Ping; Moossa, Abdool R; Katsuoka, Kensei; Hoffman, Robert M

    2005-03-15

    We have recently shown that the neural-stem cell marker nestin is expressed in hair follicle stem cells and the blood vessel network interconnecting hair follicles in the skin of transgenic mice with nestin regulatory element-driven green fluorescent protein (ND-GFP). The hair follicles were shown to give rise to the nestin-expressing blood vessels in the skin. In the present study, we visualized tumor angiogenesis by dual-color fluorescence imaging in ND-GFP transgenic mice after transplantation of the murine melanoma cell line B16F10 expressing red fluorescent protein. ND-GFP was highly expressed in proliferating endothelial cells and nascent blood vessels in the growing tumor. Results of immunohistochemical staining showed that the blood vessel-specific antigen CD31 was expressed in ND-GFP-expressing nascent blood vessels. ND-GFP expression was diminished in the vessels with increased blood flow. Progressive angiogenesis during tumor growth was readily visualized during tumor growth by GFP expression. Doxorubicin inhibited the nascent tumor angiogenesis as well as tumor growth in the ND-GFP mice transplanted with B16F10-RFP. This model is useful for direct visualization of tumor angiogenesis and evaluation of angiogenic inhibitors.

  16. Mobile phone based laser speckle contrast imager for assessment of skin blood flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakovels, Dainis; Saknite, Inga; Krievina, Gita; Zaharans, Janis; Spigulis, Janis

    2014-10-01

    Assessment of skin blood flow is of interest for evaluation of skin viability as well as for reflection of the overall condition of the circulatory system. Laser Doppler perfusion imaging (LDPI) and laser speckle contrast imaging (LASCI) are optical techniques used for assessment of skin perfusion. However, these systems are still too expensive and bulky to be widely available. Implementation of such techniques as connection kits for mobile phones have a potential for primary diagnostics. In this work we demonstrate simple and low cost LASCI connection kit for mobile phone and its comparison to laser Doppler perfusion imager. Post-occlusive hyperemia and local thermal hyperemia tests are used to compare both techniques and to demonstrate the potential of LASCI device.

  17. Study on the effect of blood content on diffuse reflectance spectra of basal cell carcinoma skin tissue.

    PubMed

    Nan, Miaoqing; He, Qingli

    2013-01-01

    Diffuse reflectance spectrum as a noninvasive method has been widely used to study the optical properties of cutaneous skin tissue. In this work, we optimized an eight-layered optical model of basal cell carcinoma skin tissue to study its optical properties. Based on the model, the diffuse reflectance spectra were reconstructed in visible wavelength range by Monte Carlo methods. After different blood contents were added to the optical model, the contribution of blood to diffuese reflectance spectra was investigated theoretically. The ratios of basal cell carcinoma skin and normal skin tissue were also calculated for both experimental result and rebuilt results to testify the theoretical reasonability of the model and methods.

  18. Nicotine increases initial blood flow responses to local heating of human non-glabrous skin.

    PubMed

    Warner, David O; Joyner, Michael J; Charkoudian, Nisha

    2004-09-15

    Nicotine affects the regulation of skin blood flow (SkBF), but the mechanisms involved are not well understood. We tested the hypothesis that acute exposure to nicotine inhibits both the initial neurally mediated component and the later sustained component of SkBF responses to local heating of non-glabrous skin in humans. SkBF (measured by laser-Doppler) responses to local heating of forearm skin from 32 to 42 degrees C were measured in 11 chronic smokers. Heating occurred at one site over 15 min (RAMP) and over 90 s (STEP) at another site, and was maintained for an additional 30 min. STEP heating was also applied to a site pretreated with bretylium via iontophoresis to inhibit noradrenergic neurotransmission. Responses were measured before and after acute administration of nicotine via cigarettes or nasal spray in two experimental sessions. Nicotine decreased resting skin blood flow (P < 0.05); this response was inhibited by bretylium. During RAMP, nicotine increased the initial SkBF at 42 degrees C (by approximately 12%, P < 0.05). For STEP, nicotine increased the initial peak response (by approximately 25%, P < 0.05), and decreased the sustained plateau value (by approximately 10%, P < 0.05). In skin pretreated with bretylium, the increase caused by nicotine in the initial peak value persisted, but the plateau value was not different from pre-nicotine. These data suggest that in abstinent cigarette smokers, nicotine augments initial responses to both gradual and rapid non-painful heating of non-glabrous skin by sensitizing the sensory nerves that mediate the axon reflex associated with rapid vasodilatation. In contrast, nicotine decreases SkBF responses to prolonged heating by activating noradrenergic nerves.

  19. Sample-free quantification of blood biomarkers via laser-treated skin

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bo; Wang, Ji; Yang, Seung Yun; Zhou, Chang; Wu, Mei X.

    2015-01-01

    Surface modified microneedle (MN) arrays are being developed to capture circulating biomarkers from the skin, but inefficiency and unreliability of the current method limit its clinical applications. We describe here that illumination of a tiny area of the skin with hemoglobin-preferably absorbent laser increased the amount of circulating biomarkers in the upper dermis by more than 1,000-fold. The hemoglobin-specific light altered the permeability of capillaries leading to extravasation of molecules but not blood cells beneath the skin involved. When specific probe-coated MN arrays were applied into the laser-treated skin, the biomarkers accumulated in the upper dermis were reliably, accurately, and sufficiently captured as early as 15 min of the assay. The maximal binding occurred in one hr in a manner independent of penetration depth or a molecular mass of the biomarker. With anti-fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-MNs, we were able to measure blood concentrations of FITC in mice receiving FITC intravenously. The sensitivity and accuracy were comparable to those attained by fluorescence spectrophotometer. Likewise, MNs containing influenza hemagglutinin (HA) could detect anti-HA antibody in mice or swine receiving influenza vaccines as effectively as standard immunoassays. The novel, minimally invasive approach holds great promise for measurement of multiple biomarkers by a single array for point-of-care diagnosis. PMID:25950985

  20. Sample-free quantification of blood biomarkers via laser-treated skin.

    PubMed

    Li, Bo; Wang, Ji; Yang, Seung Yun; Zhou, Chang; Wu, Mei X

    2015-08-01

    Surface modified microneedle (MN) arrays are being developed to capture circulating biomarkers from the skin, but inefficiency and unreliability of the current method limit its clinical applications. We describe here that illumination of a tiny area of the skin with hemoglobin-preferably absorbent laser increased the amount of circulating biomarkers in the upper dermis by more than 1000-fold. The hemoglobin-specific light altered the permeability of capillaries leading to extravasation of molecules but not blood cells beneath the skin involved. When specific probe-coated MN arrays were applied into the laser-treated skin, the biomarkers accumulated in the upper dermis were reliably, accurately, and sufficiently captured as early as 15 min of the assay. The maximal binding occurred in 1 h in a manner independent of penetration depth or a molecular mass of the biomarker. With anti-fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-MNs, we were able to measure blood concentrations of FITC in mice receiving FITC intravenously. The sensitivity and accuracy were comparable to those attained by fluorescence spectrophotometer. Likewise, MNs containing influenza hemagglutinin (HA) could detect anti-HA antibody in mice or swine receiving influenza vaccines as effectively as standard immunoassays. The novel, minimally invasive approach holds great promise for measurement of multiple biomarkers by a single array for point-of-care diagnosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The effect of ketoconazole on whole blood and skin ciclosporin concentrations in dogs.

    PubMed

    Gray, Laura L; Hillier, Andrew; Cole, Lynette K; Rajala-Schultz, Päivi J

    2013-02-01

    Ciclosporin (CSA) is approved for the treatment of canine atopic dermatitis. Ciclosporin is metabolized by liver cytochrome P450 enzymes, a process inhibited by ketoconazole (KTZ). The aims of this study were to determine skin and blood CSA concentrations when CSA was administered alone at 5.0 (Treatment 1) or 2.5 mg/kg (Treatment 2) and when CSA was administered at 2.5 mg/kg concurrently with KTZ at 5 (Treatment 3) or 2.5 mg/kg (Treatment 4). We hypothesized that skin and blood CSA concentrations in Treatment 1 would not differ from those obtained with T3 or T4. In a randomized cross-over study, six healthy research dogs received each of the treatments (Treatment 1, 2, 3 and 4) once daily for 7 days. After the first, fourth and seventh dose for each treatment, a peak and trough skin punch biopsy sample and whole blood sample were collected and analysed with high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Data were analysed using a repeated measures approach with PROC MIXED in SAS. Pairwise comparisons were performed with least squares means and Tukey-Kramer adjustment for multiple comparisons. Mean blood CSA concentrations in Treatment 1 were not different from those in Treatment 2 or 4, but were less than in Treatment 3. Mean skin CSA concentrations in Treatment 1 were greater than in Treatment 2, not different from those in Treatment 4, and less than those in Treatment 3. Administration of CSA and KTZ concurrently at 2.5 mg/kg each may be as effective as CSA alone at 5.0 mg/kg for treatment of canine atopic dermatitis. © 2013 The Authors. Veterinary Dermatology © 2013 ESVD and ACVD.

  2. Laser speckle contrast imaging of skin blood perfusion responses induced by laser coagulation

    SciTech Connect

    Ogami, M; Kulkarni, R; Wang, H; Reif, R; Wang, R K

    2014-08-31

    We report application of laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI), i.e., a fast imaging technique utilising backscattered light to distinguish such moving objects as red blood cells from such stationary objects as surrounding tissue, to localise skin injury. This imaging technique provides detailed information about the acute perfusion response after a blood vessel is occluded. In this study, a mouse ear model is used and pulsed laser coagulation serves as the method of occlusion. We have found that the downstream blood vessels lacked blood flow due to occlusion at the target site immediately after injury. Relative flow changes in nearby collaterals and anastomotic vessels have been approximated based on differences in intensity in the nearby collaterals and anastomoses. We have also estimated the density of the affected downstream vessels. Laser speckle contrast imaging is shown to be used for highresolution and fast-speed imaging for the skin microvasculature. It also allows direct visualisation of the blood perfusion response to injury, which may provide novel insights to the field of cutaneous wound healing. (laser biophotonics)

  3. Laser speckle contrast imaging of skin blood perfusion responses induced by laser coagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogami, M.; Kulkarni, R.; Wang, H.; Reif, R.; Wang, R. K.

    2014-08-01

    We report application of laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI), i.e., a fast imaging technique utilising backscattered light to distinguish such moving objects as red blood cells from such stationary objects as surrounding tissue, to localise skin injury. This imaging technique provides detailed information about the acute perfusion response after a blood vessel is occluded. In this study, a mouse ear model is used and pulsed laser coagulation serves as the method of occlusion. We have found that the downstream blood vessels lacked blood flow due to occlusion at the target site immediately after injury. Relative flow changes in nearby collaterals and anastomotic vessels have been approximated based on differences in intensity in the nearby collaterals and anastomoses. We have also estimated the density of the affected downstream vessels. Laser speckle contrast imaging is shown to be used for highresolution and fast-speed imaging for the skin microvasculature. It also allows direct visualisation of the blood perfusion response to injury, which may provide novel insights to the field of cutaneous wound healing.

  4. Effect of a deproteinized blood extract on the recovery of blood circulation in an ischaemic skin lesion.

    PubMed Central

    Smahel, J.

    1982-01-01

    An experimental model was used to study the revascularization of an ischaemic skin lesion and the effect on this process of the blood extract Solcoseryl. Under the conditions given in the experiment, restoration of the circulation was by 2 modes--re-flow in the original vessels, and neovascularization. Solcoseryl given daily i.p. encouraged the re-flow phenomenon and therefore, by improving the microcirculation and nutrition, the healing of the ischaemic lesions. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 PMID:6176254

  5. Analysis of blood and lymph vascularization patterns in tissue-engineered human dermo-epidermal skin analogs of different pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Klar, Agnieszka S; Böttcher-Haberzeth, Sophie; Biedermann, Thomas; Schiestl, Clemens; Reichmann, Ernst; Meuli, Martin

    2014-02-01

    Bioengineered dermo-epidermal skin analogs containing melanocytes represent a promising approach to cover large skin defects including restoration of the patient's own skin color. So far, little is known about the development of blood and lymphatic vessels in pigmented skin analogs after transplantation. In this experimental study, we analyzed the advancement and differences of host blood and lymphatic vessel ingrowth into light- and dark-pigmented human tissue-engineered skin analogs in a rat model. Keratinocytes, melanocytes, and fibroblasts from light- and dark-pigmented skin biopsies were isolated, cultured, and expanded. For each donor, melanocytes and keratinocytes were seeded in ratios of 1:1, 1:5, and 1:10 onto fibroblast-containing collagen gels. The skin analogs were subsequently transplanted onto full-thickness wounds of immuno-incompetent rats and quantitatively analyzed for vascular and lymphatic vessel density after 8 and 15 weeks. The skin analogs revealed a significant difference in vascularization patterns between light- and dark-pigmented constructs after 8 weeks, with a higher amount of blood vessels in light compared to dark skin. In contrast, no obvious difference could be detected within the light- and dark-pigmented group when varying melanocyte/keratinocyte ratios were used. However, after 15 weeks, the aforementioned difference in blood vessel density between light and dark constructs could no longer be detected. Regarding lymphatic vessels, light and dark analogs showed similar vessel density after 8 and 15 weeks, while there were generally less lymphatic than blood vessels. These data suggest that, at least during early skin maturation, keratinocytes, melanocytes, and fibroblasts from different skin color types used to construct pigmented dermo-epidermal skin analogs have distinct influences on the host tissue after transplantation. We speculate that different VEGF expression patterns might be involved in this disparate revascularization

  6. Changes in the control of skin blood flow with exercise training: where do cutaneous vascular adaptations fit in?

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Grant H.; Wong, Brett J.; Holowatz, Lacy A.; Kenney, W. Larry

    2013-01-01

    Heat is the most abundant byproduct of cellular metabolism. As such, dynamic exercise in which a significant percentage of muscle mass is engaged generates thermoregulatory demands that are met in part by increases in skin blood flow. Increased skin blood flow during exercise adds to the demands on cardiac output and confers additional circulatory strain beyond that associated with perfusion of active muscle alone. Endurance exercise training results in a number of physiological adaptations which ultimately reduce circulatory strain and shift thermoregulatory control of skin blood flow to higher levels of blood flow for a given core temperature. In addition, exercise training induces peripheral vascular adaptations within the cutaneous microvasculature indicative of enhanced endothelium-dependent vasomotor function. However, it is not currently clear how (or if) these local vascular adaptations contribute to the beneficial changes in thermoregulatory control of skin blood flow following exercise training. The purpose of this Hot Topic review is to synthesize the literature pertaining to exercise training-mediated changes in cutaneous microvascular reactivity and thermoregulatory control of skin blood flow. In addition, we address mechanisms driving changes in cutaneous microvascular reactivity and thermoregulatory control of skin blood flow, and pose the question: what (if any) is the functional role of increased cutaneous microvascular reactivity following exercise training? PMID:21602295

  7. Changes in the control of skin blood flow with exercise training: where do cutaneous vascular adaptations fit in?

    PubMed

    Simmons, Grant H; Wong, Brett J; Holowatz, Lacy A; Kenney, W Larry

    2011-09-01

    Heat is the most abundant byproduct of cellular metabolism. As such, dynamic exercise in which a significant percentage of muscle mass is engaged generates thermoregulatory demands that are met in part by increases in skin blood flow. Increased skin blood flow during exercise adds to the demands on cardiac output and confers additional circulatory strain beyond that associated with perfusion of active muscle alone. Endurance exercise training results in a number of physiological adaptations which ultimately reduce circulatory strain and shift thermoregulatory control of skin blood flow to higher levels of blood flow for a given core temperature. In addition, exercise training induces peripheral vascular adaptations within the cutaneous microvasculature indicative of enhanced endothelium-dependent vasomotor function. However, it is not currently clear how (or if) these local vascular adaptations contribute to the beneficial changes in thermoregulatory control of skin blood flow following exercise training. The purpose of this Hot Topic Review is to synthesize the literature pertaining to exercise training-mediated changes in cutaneous microvascular reactivity and thermoregulatory control of skin blood flow. In addition, we address mechanisms driving changes in cutaneous microvascular reactivity and thermoregulatory control of skin blood flow, and pose the question: what (if any) is the functional role of increased cutaneous microvascular reactivity following exercise training?

  8. The contribution of blood flow to the skin temperature responses during a cold sensitivity test.

    PubMed

    Davey, Martha; Eglin, Clare; House, James; Tipton, Michael

    2013-09-01

    The presumption in a cold sensitivity test (CST) used for cold injuries is that the skin temperature (T sk) observed reflects the return of blood flow to the extremity following a local cold challenge. We questioned this assumption. Six non-cold injured participants undertook two CSTs in 30 °C air. The control (CON) CST involved 12 min gentle exercise prior to immersing the foot into 15 °C water for 2 min followed by 15 min of spontaneous rewarming. The occlusion (OCC) CST was the same except that blood flow to the foot was occluded during the rewarming period. These results were compared to CSTs from six individuals with non-freezing cold injury and moderate-severe cold sensitivity (CS) and a non-perfused human digit model (NPDM). Before immersion, great toe skin blood flow (SkBF) was similar in CON and OCC conditions [255 (107) laser Doppler units (LDU)] and was higher than CS [59 (52) LDU]. During rewarming, SkBF in CON returned to 104 % of the pre-immersion value and was higher than both OCC and CS. Great toe T sk before immersion was lower in CS [28.5 (2.1) °C] compared to CON [34.7 (0.4) °C], OCC [34.6 (0.9) °C] and NPDM [35.0 (0.4) °C]. During rewarming skin/surface temperature in OCC, CS and NPDM were similar and all lower than CON. SkBF does contribute to the skin rewarming profile during a CST as a faster rate of rewarming was observed in CON compared to either OCC or NPDM. The lower T sk in CS may be due to a reduced basal SkBF.

  9. Thermography-based blood flow imaging in human skin of the hands and feet: a spectral filtering approach.

    PubMed

    Sagaidachnyi, A A; Fomin, A V; Usanov, D A; Skripal, A V

    2017-02-01

    The determination of the relationship between skin blood flow and skin temperature dynamics is the main problem in thermography-based blood flow imaging. Oscillations in skin blood flow are the source of thermal waves propagating from micro-vessels toward the skin's surface, as assumed in this study. This hypothesis allows us to use equations for the attenuation and dispersion of thermal waves for converting the temperature signal into the blood flow signal, and vice versa. We developed a spectral filtering approach (SFA), which is a new technique for thermography-based blood flow imaging. In contrast to other processing techniques, the SFA implies calculations in the spectral domain rather than in the time domain. Therefore, it eliminates the need to solve differential equations. The developed technique was verified within 0.005-0.1 Hz, including the endothelial, neurogenic and myogenic frequency bands of blood flow oscillations. The algorithm for an inverse conversion of the blood flow signal into the skin temperature signal is addressed. The examples of blood flow imaging of hands during cuff occlusion and feet during heating of the back are illustrated. The processing of infrared (IR) thermograms using the SFA allowed us to restore the blood flow signals and achieve correlations of about 0.8 with a waveform of a photoplethysmographic signal. The prospective applications of the thermography-based blood flow imaging technique include non-contact monitoring of the blood supply during engraftment of skin flaps and burns healing, as well the use of contact temperature sensors to monitor low-frequency oscillations of peripheral blood flow.

  10. Post-prandial effects in reactivity of forehead and mid-femoral skin blood flow and heart rate in neonates.

    PubMed

    Jahnukainen, T; Lindqvist, A; Vuorinen, M; Jalonen, J; Välimäki, I

    1994-11-18

    The effect of post-prandial period on the cutaneous vascular reactivity was studied in twelve full-term infants on their 3rd postnatal day. The differences in vasomotor reactions between the forehead and femoral skin were also investigated. Two 10-min control registrations about 30 and 90 min after feeding were followed by a registration of equal duration during thermal stimulation of the skin. The lower extremity of each infant was stimulated by warm and cool air currents (5 cycles/min) to induce periodic vasomotor changes. The fast Fourier transform was used to compute variability spectra for the recorded skin blood flow, heart rate and respiratory wave form signals. The skin blood flow became synchronised to the thermal stimulation in both skin regions. Neither the spontaneous nor synchronised oscillations of the skin blood flow differed significantly between femoral skin and forehead. The post-prandial time did not have any influence on this synchronisation. Heart rate variability was synchronised to the periodicity of thermal stimulation more 1.5 h after feeding than 0.5 h after feeding. Respiration was not affected. The results show that increasing post-prandial time has no influence on the synchronised oscillations of skin blood flow. However, it potentiates reactivity of heart rate to perturbations in the peripheral vasculature.

  11. Characterization of innate lymphoid cells (ILC) in human skin and blood demonstrates increase of NKp44+ ILC3 in psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Tosi, Isabella; Grys, Katarzyna; Sreeneebus, Hemawtee; Perera, Gayathri K; Chapman, Anna; Smith, Catherine H; Di Meglio, Paola; Nestle, Frank O

    2013-01-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILC) are increasingly appreciated as key regulators of tissue immunity. However, their role in human tissue homeostasis and disease remains to be fully elucidated. Here we characterise the ILC in human skin from healthy individuals and from the inflammatory skin disease psoriasis. We show that a substantial proportion of IL-17A and IL-22 producing cells in skin and blood of normal individuals and psoriasis patients are CD3 negative innate lymphocytes. Deep immunophenotyping of human ILC subsets showed a statistically significant increase in the frequency of circulating NKp44+ ILC3 in blood of psoriasis patients compared to healthy individuals or atopic dermatitis patients. More than 50% of circulating NKp44+ ILC3 expressed cutaneous lymphocyte-associated antigen indicating their potential for skin homing. Analysis of skin tissue revealed a significantly increased frequency of total ILC in skin compared to blood. Moreover the frequency of NKp44+ ILC3 was significantly increased in non-lesional psoriatic skin compared to normal skin. A detailed time course of a psoriasis patient treated with anti-TNF showed a close association between therapeutic response, decrease in inflammatory skin lesions, and decrease of circulating NKp44+ ILC3. Overall, data from this initial observational study suggest a potential role for NKp44+ ILC3 in psoriasis pathogenesis. PMID:24352038

  12. Doppler standard deviation imaging for clinical monitoring of in vivo human skin blood flow

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Yonghua; Chen, Zhongping; Saxer, Christopher; Shen, Qimin; Xiang, Shaohua; Boer, Johannes F. de; Nelson, J. Stuart

    2000-09-15

    We used a novel phase-resolved optical Doppler tomographic (ODT) technique with very high flow-velocity sensitivity (10 {mu}m/s) and high spatial resolution (10 {mu}m) to image blood flow in port-wine stain (PWS) birthmarks in human skin. In addition to the regular ODT velocity and structural images, we use the variance of blood flow velocity to map the PWS vessels. Our device combines ODT and therapeutic systems such that PWS blood flow can be monitored in situ before and after laser treatment. To the authors' knowledge this is the first clinical application of ODT to provide a fast semiquantitative evaluation of the efficacy of PWS laser therapy in situ and in real time. (c) 2000 Optical Society of America.

  13. The effect of oral uptake of nicotine in snus on peripheral skin blood circulation evaluated by thermography.

    PubMed

    Høiland, Ina Isabella; de Weerd, Louis; Mercer, James B

    2014-01-01

    While health risks from smoking cigarettes are well known, little is known about the health risks of using smokeless tobacco (ST). The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect that ST in the form of oral use of snus with nicotine and snus without nicotine has on peripheral skin blood circulation. 21 young habitual users of snus with nicotine participated in this study. Under controlled conditions the subjects were exposed to a 30 minute period of oral use of snus with nicotine (SN+) and snus without nicotine (SN-). The peripheral skin blood circulation was indirectly monitored on the hands by measuring skin temperature using infrared thermography. The skin blood circulation in the hands showed a statistical significant decrease in the SN+ experiments, while skin blood circulation was hardly effected in the SN- experiments. It is concluded that the use of smokeless tobacco in the form of oral use of snus containing nicotine causes a decrease in peripheral skin blood circulation while such an effect is not seen in snus without nicotine. This knowledge may be of use when treating patients that require adequate peripheral skin circulation or in the military when soldiers are exposed cold conditions.

  14. The effect of oral uptake of nicotine in snus on peripheral skin blood circulation evaluated by thermography

    PubMed Central

    Høiland, Ina Isabella; de Weerd, Louis; Mercer, James B

    2014-01-01

    While health risks from smoking cigarettes are well known, little is known about the health risks of using smokeless tobacco (ST). The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect that ST in the form of oral use of snus with nicotine and snus without nicotine has on peripheral skin blood circulation. 21 young habitual users of snus with nicotine participated in this study. Under controlled conditions the subjects were exposed to a 30 minute period of oral use of snus with nicotine (SN+) and snus without nicotine (SN-). The peripheral skin blood circulation was indirectly monitored on the hands by measuring skin temperature using infrared thermography. The skin blood circulation in the hands showed a statistical significant decrease in the SN+ experiments, while skin blood circulation was hardly effected in the SN- experiments. It is concluded that the use of smokeless tobacco in the form of oral use of snus containing nicotine causes a decrease in peripheral skin blood circulation while such an effect is not seen in snus without nicotine. This knowledge may be of use when treating patients that require adequate peripheral skin circulation or in the military when soldiers are exposed cold conditions. PMID:27626049

  15. Methodological assessment of skin and limb blood flows in the human forearm during thermal and baroreceptor provocations.

    PubMed

    Brothers, R Matthew; Wingo, Jonathan E; Hubing, Kimberly A; Crandall, Craig G

    2010-09-01

    Skin blood flow responses in the human forearm, assessed by three commonly used technologies-single-point laser-Doppler flowmetry, integrated laser-Doppler flowmetry, and laser-Doppler imaging-were compared in eight subjects during normothermic baseline, acute skin-surface cooling, and whole body heat stress (Δ internal temperature=1.0±0.2 degrees C; P<0.001). In addition, while normothermic and heat stressed, subjects were exposed to 30-mmHg lower-body negative pressure (LBNP). Skin blood flow was normalized to the maximum value obtained at each site during local heating to 42 degrees C for at least 30 min. Furthermore, comparisons of forearm blood flow (FBF) measures obtained using venous occlusion plethysmography and Doppler ultrasound were made during the aforementioned perturbations. Relative to normothermic baseline, skin blood flow decreased during normothermia+LBNP (P<0.05) and skin-surface cooling (P<0.01) and increased during whole body heating (P<0.001). Subsequent LBNP during whole body heating significantly decreased skin blood flow relative to control heat stress (P<0.05). Importantly, for each of the aforementioned conditions, skin blood flow was similar between the three measurement devices (main effect of device: P>0.05 for all conditions). Similarly, no differences were identified across all perturbations between FBF measures using plethysmography and Doppler ultrasound (P>0.05 for all perturbations). These data indicate that when normalized to maximum, assessment of skin blood flow in response to vasoconstrictor and dilator perturbations are similar regardless of methodology. Likewise, FBF responses to these perturbations are similar between two commonly used methodologies of limb blood flow assessment.

  16. Assessment of skin flaps using optically based methods for measuring blood flow and oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Payette, Jeri R; Kohlenberg, Elicia; Leonardi, Lorenzo; Pabbies, Arone; Kerr, Paul; Liu, Kan-Zhi; Sowa, Michael G

    2005-02-01

    The objective of this study was to compare two noninvasive techniques, laser Doppler and optical spectroscopy, for monitoring hemodynamic changes in skin flaps. Animal models for assessing these changes in microvascular free flaps and pedicle flaps were investigated. A 2 x 3-cm free flap model based on the epigastric vein-artery pair and a reversed MacFarlane 3 x 10-cm pedicle flap model were used in this study. Animals were divided into four groups, with groups 1 (n = 6) and 2 (n = 4) undergoing epigastric free flap surgery and groups 3 (n = 3) and 4 (n = 10) undergoing pedicle flap surgery. Groups 1 and 4 served as controls for each of the flap models. Groups 2 and 3 served as ischemia-reperfusion models. Optical spectroscopy provides a measure of hemoglobin oxygen saturation and blood volume, and the laser Doppler method measures blood flow. Optical spectroscopy proved to be consistently more reliable in detecting problems with arterial in flow compared with laser Doppler assessments. When spectroscopy was used in an imaging configuration, oxygen saturation images of the entire flap were generated, thus creating a visual picture of global flap health. In both single-point and imaging modes the technique was sensitive to vessel manipulation, with the immediate post operative images providing an accurate prediction of eventual outcome. This series of skin flap studies suggests a potential role for optical spectroscopy and spectroscopic imaging in the clinical assessment of skin flaps.

  17. Wavelet-based correlations of skin temperature and blood flow oscillations.

    PubMed

    Podtaev, Sergey; Morozov, Matvey; Frick, Peter

    2008-09-01

    The wavelet transform-based correlation analysis has been used to study skin temperature fluctuations caused by periodic changes in blood flow resulting from oscillations in vasomotor smooth muscle tone. We considered two cases, one in which temperature measurements and blood flow recordings by laser Doppler flowmetry are made simultaneously and another in which two temperature signals are measured concurrently. Twelve healthy subjects participated in our study. The gapped wavelet technique was used to suppress artifacts caused by boundary effects. Simultaneous recordings of skin temperature fluctuations and the signal of the laser Doppler flowmeter provided correlation coefficients essentially exceeding the values obtained for noise signals within three spectral ranges corresponding to myogenic (0.05-0.14 Hz), neurogenic (0.02-0.05 Hz), and endothelial (0.0095-0.02 Hz) regulation mechanisms. Within the frequency range from 0.14 to 2 Hz the values of the correlation function are compatible with the values of noise correlations. The same results were obtained for two concurrently measured temperature signals. Reduction in the amplitude of temperature fluctuations and in the level of correlations with the frequency arises because the skin has the properties of a low-frequency filter. As temperature fluctuations propagate their amplitude decays as an exponential function of frequency. Hence small oscillations in the spectral range reflecting the influence of heartbeat and respiration cannot be distinguished from external thermal noise.

  18. Laser Doppler perfusion imaging of skin blood flow using red and near-infrared sources.

    PubMed

    Abbot, N C; Ferrell, W R; Lockhart, J C; Lowe, J G

    1996-12-01

    At present, scanning laser Doppler imaging uses a 633-nm helium-neon laser (RED) as the only light source, but this restricts its ability to measure blood flow (i) at darkly pigmented skin and (ii) from deeper or subdermal structures. Because near-infrared (NIR) light is known to penetrate deeper into tissue and to be less absorbed than RED, two imagers were adapted to include a NIR laser diode source (one of 830 nm for UK studies; one of 780 nm for leprosy field trials) in parallel with the existing RED source. In human hands representing a range of skin pigmentations, RED scans were unobtainable at the darkest areas of skin, but intact NIR scans could be collected in all cases. In experiments at the rat knee and the dorsal human hand, NIR and RED values were similar on normal skin. Over underlying vessels, however, NIR values greatly exceeded RED values, an effect abolished by occlusion. Similarly, in patients with leprosy and in healthy controls in Spain, fingerpulp NIR values exceeded RED values to the greatest degree when thermoregulatory flow was highest, i.e., when the deeper-lying arteriovenous anastomoses were open. Over areas of experimental inflammation, NIR gave higher values and also exhibited a greater degree of spatial heterogeneity than RED. We conclude that some current limitations of laser Doppler imaging technology can be overcome by the use of NIR laser diode sources.

  19. Effect of floor surface temperature on blood flow and skin temperature in the foot.

    PubMed

    Song, G-S

    2008-12-01

    A total of 16 healthy college students participated as subjects to elucidate the hypothesis that blood flow and skin temperature in foot are affected by the floor surface temperature. The floor surface temperature was controlled by varying the temperature of water (tw) flowing underneath the floor, and it ranged from tw 15 to 40 degrees C at 5 degrees C intervals. The blood flow rate was measured in the dorsal right toe, and skin temperatures were measured for 60 min at 8 points: the neck, right scapular, left hand, right shin, left bottom of the toe, right instep, left finger, and rectum. The blood flow rate in the foot tissue was increased until the foot skin temperature warmed up to 34 degrees C (P = 0.000). The final skin temperatures on the bottom of the toe were 19.4 +/- 2.44 degrees C for tw 15 degrees C, 22.4 +/- 2.45 degrees C for tw 20 degrees C, 24.8 +/- 2.80 degrees C for tw 25 degrees C, 27.7 +/- 2.13 degrees C for tw 30 degrees C, 30.6 +/- 2.06 degrees C for tw 35 degrees C, 33.2 +/- 1.45 degrees C for tw 40 degrees C, 34.2 +/- 1.55 degrees C for tw 45 degrees C, and 35.2 +/- 1.65 degrees C for tw 50 degrees C. Considering blood flow and comfort, the partial floor heating system is suggested and the recommended floor surface temperature range is 27-33 degrees C. A warm floor surface can serve to satisfy occupants when the ambient temperature maintained at 20 degrees C which represents an energy conscious temperature. A warm floor can induce high blood perfusion in the feet and consequently improve an occupant's health by treating many vascular-related disorders. Even in a well-insulated residential building, a partially heated floor system could prevent overheating while providing surface warmth.

  20. Assessment of skin blood content and oxygenation in spinal cord injured subjects during reactive hyperemia.

    PubMed

    Hagisawa, S; Ferguson-Pell, M; Cardi, M; Miller, S D

    1994-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine whether the reactive hyperemia response following ischemia in spinal cord injured (SCI) individuals is different from that which occurs in able-bodied (AB) individuals. The reactive hyperemia response was produced by applying a pressure of 150 mmHg for 300 s, 600 s, and 900 s to the skin over the greater trochanter in 10 SCI and 10 AB subjects using a computer-controlled pneumatic indentation system. The changes in blood content and oxygenation in the superficial vessels of the skin, associated with indentation, were monitored using reflectance spectrophotometry. A brief pressure of 80 mmHg, to simulate finger pressing (blanching), was applied to the same site to detect changes in reflow behavior during the hyperemic period. The results indicate that the reactive hyperemia response in SCI group was not substantially different from AB group although the reflow rate after load release was slower in the SCI group compared with the AB group.

  1. Dimethyl Sulfoxide Enhances Effectiveness of Skin Antiseptics and Reduces Contamination Rates of Blood Cultures

    PubMed Central

    LaSala, Paul R.; Han, Xiang-Yang; Rolston, Kenneth V.; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P.

    2012-01-01

    Effective skin antisepsis is of central importance in the prevention of wound infections, colonization of medical devices, and nosocomial transmission of microorganisms. Current antiseptics have a suboptimal efficacy resulting in substantial infectious morbidity, mortality, and increased health care costs. Here, we introduce an in vitro method for antiseptic testing and a novel alcohol-based antiseptic containing 4 to 5% of the polar aprotic solvent dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). The DMSO-containing antiseptic resulted in a 1- to 2-log enhanced killing of Staphylococcus epidermidis and other microbes in vitro compared to the same antiseptic without DMSO. In a prospective clinical validation, blood culture contamination rates were reduced from 3.04% for 70% isopropanol–1% iodine (control antiseptic) to 1.04% for 70% isopropanol–1% iodine–5% DMSO (P < 0.01). Our results predict that improved skin antisepsis is possible using new formulations of antiseptics containing strongly polarized but nonionizing (polar aprotic) solvents. PMID:22378911

  2. The influence of local pressure on evaluation parameters of skin blood perfusion and fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zherebtsov, E. A.; Kandurova, K. Y.; Seryogina, E. S.; Kozlov, I. O.; Dremin, V. V.; Zherebtsova, A. I.; Dunaev, A. V.; Meglinski, I.

    2017-03-01

    This article presents the results of the study of the pressure applied on optical diagnostic probes as a significant factor affecting the results of measurements. During stepwise increasing and decreasing of local pressure on skin we conducted measurements using the methods of laser Doppler flowmetry and fluorescence spectroscopy. It was found out that pressure on optical probe has sufficient impact on skin microcirculation to affect registered fluorescence intensity. Data obtained in this study are of interest for design and development of diagnostic technologies for wearable devices. This data will also inform further investigation into issues of compensation of blood absorption influence on fluorescence spectrum, allowing increased accuracy and reproducibility of measurements by fluorescence spectroscopy methods in optical diagnosis.

  3. Estimating skin blood saturation by selecting a subset of hyperspectral imaging data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewerlöf, Maria; Salerud, E. Göran; Strömberg, Tomas; Larsson, Marcus

    2015-03-01

    Skin blood haemoglobin saturation (?b) can be estimated with hyperspectral imaging using the wavelength (λ) range of 450-700 nm where haemoglobin absorption displays distinct spectral characteristics. Depending on the image size and photon transport algorithm, computations may be demanding. Therefore, this work aims to evaluate subsets with a reduced number of wavelengths for ?b estimation. White Monte Carlo simulations are performed using a two-layered tissue model with discrete values for epidermal thickness (?epi) and the reduced scattering coefficient (μ's ), mimicking an imaging setup. A detected intensity look-up table is calculated for a range of model parameter values relevant to human skin, adding absorption effects in the post-processing. Skin model parameters, including absorbers, are; μ's (λ), ?epi, haemoglobin saturation (?b), tissue fraction blood (?b) and tissue fraction melanin (?mel). The skin model paired with the look-up table allow spectra to be calculated swiftly. Three inverse models with varying number of free parameters are evaluated: A(?b, ?b), B(?b, ?b, ?mel) and C(all parameters free). Fourteen wavelength candidates are selected by analysing the maximal spectral sensitivity to ?b and minimizing the sensitivity to ?b. All possible combinations of these candidates with three, four and 14 wavelengths, as well as the full spectral range, are evaluated for estimating ?b for 1000 randomly generated evaluation spectra. The results show that the simplified models A and B estimated ?b accurately using four wavelengths (mean error 2.2% for model B). If the number of wavelengths increased, the model complexity needed to be increased to avoid poor estimations.

  4. [Quantitative bacteriological evaluation of a method for skin disinfection in blood donors].

    PubMed

    Folléa, G; Saint-Laurent, P; Bigey, F; Gayet, S; Bientz, M; Cazenave, J P

    1997-12-01

    Skin disinfection at the site of venipuncture is a critical point in every blood transfusion collection procedure, as it contributes to ensure the bacterial safety of transfusion. Quantitative and qualitative analysis of bacteria present in the antecubital fossae before and after skin disinfection may be one method of assessing the anti-bacterial efficiency of disinfection. Swab culture systems and contact plates are the two techniques usually employed for this purpose. A washing and swabbing technique was used to quantify bacteria before and skin disinfection of the antecubital fossae in blood donors. This contra-placebo study was carried out on 32 donors, each of whom served as his own control, with a random choice of test arm and opposing control arm. Bacterial counts were determined in the antecubital fossae without skin disinfection (control, n = 32) and after a 3 step skin preparation procedure (cleaning, wiping, disinfection) using placebo (distilled water, n = 16) or an antiseptic product (mixture of chlorexidine, benzalkonium chloride and benzylic alcohol, n = 16). The absence of a statistical difference in bacterial counts between the right and left antecubital fossae without disinfection was controlled in a preliminary study of 20 subjects. Mean bacterial counts were 25,000/cm2 and 27,400/cm2 respectively for aerobic and anaerobic bacteria before disinfection, with a wide variation in results between individuals. When using placebo, preparation of the venipuncture site by the 3 step method (cleaning, wiping, disinfection) resulted in a non significant mean reduction of 0.56 log in aerobic and anaerobic bacteria. Using the antiseptic product, the same method resulted in a significant mean reduction of 1.8 and 1.7 log respectively in aerobic (p = 0.015) and anaerobic flora (p = 0.005). On an average, 2,750 aerobic bacteria/cm2 and 2,910 anaerobic bacteria/cm2 remained after disinfection, while qualitative analysis showed that disinfection suppressed the

  5. Low yield of blood and wound cultures in patients with skin and soft-tissue infections.

    PubMed

    Torres, Jesus; Avalos, Nathaniel; Echols, Lamarr; Mongelluzzo, Jillian; Rodriguez, Robert M

    2017-08-01

    Current guidelines recommend blood cultures in skin and soft-tissue infection (SSTI) patients only with signs of systemic toxicity and wound cultures for severe purulent infections. Our objectives were to determine: 1) blood and wound culture yields in patients admitted with SSTIs; 2) whether injection drug users (IDUs) and febrile patients had higher blood culture yields; and 3) whether blood and wound cultures grew organisms sensitive to typical SSTI empiric antibiotics. We prospectively enrolled adult patients admitted from the ED with SSTIs at an urban hospital. We recorded patient characteristics, including IDU, comorbidities and temperatures, and followed admitted patients throughout their hospital course. Of 734 SSTI patients enrolled, 246 (33.5%) were admitted. Of 86 (35.0%) patients who had blood cultures, six had positive cultures (yield=7.0%; 95% confidence intervals [CIs] 3.2-14.4); 4 were methicillin sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) and 2 were methicillin resistant (MRSA). Of 29 febrile patients, 1 had a positive culture (yield=3.5%; 95% CI 0.6-17.2). Of 101 admitted IDU patients, 46 (46%) received blood cultures, and 4 had positive cultures (yield=8.7%; 95% CI 3.4-20.3). Of 89 patients with purulent wounds, 44 (49.4%) patients had ED wound cultures. Thirteen had positive cultures (yield=29.6%; 95% CI 18.2-44.2%). Most were MRSA, MSSA, and group A Streptococcus species - all sensitive to Vancomycin. Febrile and IDU patients had low yields of blood cultures similar to yields in non-IDU and afebrile patients. All blood and wound culture species were adequately covered by currently recommended empiric antibiotic regimens. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Facial skin blood flow responses to irritant stimuli in the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Kashima, Hideaki; Hayashi, Naoyuki

    2013-03-01

    To investigate whether capsaicin and menthol stimuli elicit characteristic responses in facial skin blood flow (SkBF), we observed the facial SkBF response to low and high concentrations of capsaicin and menthol stimuli of 1-ml solution applied to the oral cavity for 20s in 17 healthy subjects. High concentration of capsaicin significantly increased the SkBF in all of the facial areas monitored. High concentration of menthol stimulus significantly decreased SkBF in the nose and increased that in the eyelid, and upper and lower lips. These results demonstrated that capsaicin and menthol stimuli in the oral cavity elicit characteristic responses in facial SkBF.

  7. Static magnetic fields affect capillary flow of red blood cells in striated skin muscle.

    PubMed

    Brix, Gunnar; Strieth, Sebastian; Strelczyk, Donata; Dellian, Marc; Griebel, Jürgen; Eichhorn, Martin E; Andrā, Wilfried; Bellemann, Matthias E

    2008-01-01

    Blood flowing in microvessels is one possible site of action of static magnetic fields (SMFs). We evaluated SMF effects on capillary flow of red blood cells (RBCs) in unanesthetized hamsters, using a skinfold chamber technique for intravital fluorescence microscopy. By this approach, capillary RBC velocities (v(RBC)), capillary diameters (D), arteriolar diameters (D(art)), and functional vessel densities (FVD) were measured in striated skin muscle at different magnetic flux densities. Exposure above a threshold level of about 500 mT resulted in a significant (P < 0.001) reduction of v(RBC) in capillaries as compared to the baseline value. At the maximum field strength of 587 mT, v(RBC) was reduced by more than 40%. Flow reduction was reversible when the field strength was decreased below the threshold level. In contrast, mean values determined at different exposure levels for the parameters D, D(art), and FVD did not vary by more than 5%. Blood flow through capillary networks is affected by strong SMFs directed perpendicular to the vessels. Since the influence of SMFs on blood flow in microvessels directed parallel to the field as well as on collateral blood supply could not be studied, our findings should be carefully interpreted with respect to the setting of safety guidelines.

  8. Photoacoustic blood glucose and skin measurement based on optical scattering effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zuomin; Myllyla, Risto A.

    2002-07-01

    Non-invasive blood glucose determination has been investigated by more than 100 research groups in the world during the past fifteen years. The commonly optical methods are based on the capacity of near-IR light to penetrate a few hundreds micrometers or a few millimeters into human tissue where it interacts with glucose. A change of glucose concentration may modify the optical parameters in tissue, with the result that its glucose concentration can be extracted by analyzing the received optical signals. This paper demonstrates that glucose affects on the scattering coefficient of human blood, by applying the streak camera and pulsed photoacoustic techniques; and drinking water seems also affecting on PA signal from skin surface.

  9. [Peripheral blood circulation in the skin and the regulatory mechanisms in the course of primary transmural myocardial infarction].

    PubMed

    Khalepo, O V; Molotkov, O V; Eshkina, S L

    2009-01-01

    Laser Doppler flowmetry was used to study the indicators characterizing the peripheral blood circulation in the skin, regulatory mechanisms, and the compensatory capacities of the microcirculatory bed in 32 patients aged 45-60 years in the course of primary transmural myocardial infarction during exercise tests. Significant disturbances of the mechanism responsible for regulating the peripheral blood circulation system and chiefly its active components were detected in the presence of adequate blood filling of microvessels. There was a drastic decrease in the reserves of skin microvascular endothelial activity during ionophoresis of sodium nitroprusside and acetylcholine, the maximum degree of disturbances being observed on day 10 of myocardial infarction development.

  10. The impact of contralateral cooling on skin capillary blood cell velocity in patients with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Haak, E; Haak, T; Grözinger, Y; Krebs, G; Usadel, K H; Kusterer, K

    1998-01-01

    In healthy volunteers, cooling of the contralateral hand leads to a rapid decrease in the ipsilateral capillary perfusion via a nerval reflex arc. The aim of this study was to investigate whether this reflex arc after contralateral cooling might be altered in patients with diabetes mellitus with and without peripheral neuropathy. Therefore, 12 patients with diabetic neuropathy (4 IDDM, diabetes duration 17.2 +/- 2.9 (SD) years, age 60.8 +/- 4.0 years, HbA1c 6.5 +/- 0.3%) and 12 patients with diabetes mellitus but without neuropathy (6 IDDM, diabetes duration 15.1 +/- 2.7 years, age 55.9 +/- 4.5 years, HbA1c 5.4 +/- 0.1%) were investigated by nailfold capillaroscopy. Twelve healthy volunteers (age 56.8 +/- 3.1 years, HbA1c 4.8 +/- 0.2%) served as controls. Contralateral skin capillary blood cell velocity was determined at rest and during the following 20 min after cooling of the hand (3 min at 15 degreesC). Blood pressure, heart rate and local skin temperature were examined regularly during the investigation. Resting capillary blood cell velocity did not differ between patients and controls. While contralateral cooling resulted in a decrease in capillary blood cell velocity (CBV) in controls (0.29 +/- 0.05 vs. 0.42 +/- 0.05 mm/s, p < 0.03), CBV remained unchanged or was delayed in patients. These results demonstrate that in diabetic patients nerval reflex arcs are impaired. A long-term follow-up in a larger number of patients is required to evaluate whether these findings might serve as a very early diagnostic tool for the diagnosis of developing diabetic neuropathy.

  11. Analysis of heart rate variability and skin blood flow oscillations under deep controlled breathing.

    PubMed

    Krasnikov, Gennady V; Tyurina, Miglena Y; Tankanag, Arina V; Piskunova, Galina M; Chemeris, Nikolai K

    2013-02-01

    The effect of deep breathing controlled in both rate (0.25, 0.16, 0.1, 0.07, 0.05 and 0.03 Hz) and amplitude on the heart rate variability (HRV) and respiration-dependent oscillations of forearm/finger skin blood flow (SBF) has been studied in 29 young healthy volunteers. The influence of sympathovagal balance on the respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) amplitude and respiratory SBF oscillations has been studied. The subjects with predominant parasympathetic tonus had statistically significant higher RSA amplitudes in the breathing rate region of 0.03-0.07 Hz than the subjects with predominant sympathetic tonus. In the finger-cushion zone, having a well-developed sympathetic vascular innervations, the amplitudes of respiratory SBF oscillations at breathing rates 0.05 and 0.07 Hz were higher in the group of subjects with predominant parasympathetic tonus. In the forearm skin, where the density of sympathetic innervations is low comparatively to that in the finger skin, no statistically significant differences in the amplitude of respiratory SBF oscillations were found concerning the two groups of subjects.

  12. Advanced Glycation End Products are Increased in the Skin and Blood of Patients with Severe Psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Papagrigoraki, Anastasia; Del Giglio, Micol; Cosma, Chiara; Maurelli, Martina; Girolomoni, Giampiero; Lapolla, Annunziata

    2017-03-30

    Psoriasis is frequently associated with metabolic comorbidities. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are highly oxidant, biologically active compounds that accumulate in tissues in association with hyperglycaemia, hyperlipidaemia and oxidative stress. This is a cross-sectional case-control study involving 80 patients with mild/severe psoriasis and 80 controls matched for age, sex and body mass index (40 with severe eczema, 40 healthy individuals). Patients and healthy individuals with a smoking habit, diabetes, dyslipidaemia, hypercholesterolaemia, hypertension or who were under systemic treatment were excluded from the study. Skin AGEs were measured in normal-appearing skin by a standard fluorescence technique, and blood AGEs (total AGEs, pentosidine and AGEs receptor) by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Levels of cutaneous AGEs (p < 0.04), serum AGEs (p < 0.03) and pentosidine (p < 0.05) were higher in patients with severe psoriasis. Cutaneous AGEs correlated well with serum AGEs (r = 0.93, p < 0.0001) and with Psoriasis Area and Severity Index score (r = 0.91, p < 0.0001). Receptor levels were lower (p < 0.001) in severe psoriasis, and inversely correlated with disease severity (r = -0.71, p < 0.0002). Patients with severe psoriasis have accumulation of skin and serum AGEs, independent of associated metabolic disorders.

  13. Skin blood flow in patients with stage 5 chronic kidney disease on hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Binh; Rongey, Christine; Hiscox, Bryan; Rendell, Marc; Woodley, David; Smogorzewski, Miroslaw

    2010-09-01

    We have shown previously that skin perfusion is reduced in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). Patients with diabetes and with chronic kidney disease (CKD) stage 5 were having advanced microangiopathy. In this cross-sectional study, we measured skin blood flow in DM and non-DM patients on dialysis to assess whether any differences exist in skin perfusion in those 2 groups of patients. A total of 25 patients with DM (aged 59.9 +/- 2.2 years) and 24 patients with non-DM CKD stage 5 (44.6 +/- 2.9 years) on hemodialysis (HD) were studied. Ten healthy subjects (37 +/- 4.3 years) were used as a control group. Skin blood flow (SBF) was measured using Vasamedic Model 403B laser Doppler device (Vasamedics Inc., St. Paul, MN) in a standardized way at the plantar and dorsal surface of the finger and toe and at the pretibial surface of the leg at 2 different local skin temperatures of 35 degrees C and 44 degrees C. Laboratory biochemical data were collected at the time of SBF study. The SBF measured at 35 degrees C was lower in the patients with DM on dialysis as compared with healthy subjects and non-DM dialysis patients. The SBF response to the increase in temperature of the probe to 44 degrees C was 70% to 80% lower in DM patients as compared with healthy subjects and non-DM patients. However, non-DM subjects who displayed SBF similar to control subjects at 35 degrees C, had impaired response in SBF at 44 degrees C as well. Patients with lower serum albumin exhibited lower SBF even after adjustment for age. SBF is impaired in patients with stage 5 CKD on HD, particularly in those with DM as a cause of CKD. SBF negatively correlated with age and albumin (nutritional status) in DM and non-DM patients with stage 5 CKD on HD. Measurement of SBF can be useful in the evaluation of vasculopathy in CKD population and can potentially be used for assessment of vascular response during specific clinical intervention. Copyright 2010 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by

  14. Effects of environmental O2 on blood flow and diffusing capacity in amphibian skin.

    PubMed

    Malvin, G M; Hlastala, M P

    1989-05-01

    The effects of local environmental PO2 on cutaneous blood flow (Q) and the membrane diffusing capacity of the skin (D) were investigated in the leopard frog, Rana pipiens, and the lungless salamander, Desmognathus quadramaculatus. Halothane anesthetized animals were equilibrated with Freon-22 (Fr) and acetylene (Ac) in a box. A gas mixture containing either 0, 20 or 40% O2, respectively, in N2 and initially free of Fr and Ac was drawn through a small sample chamber on the abdomen. The excretion of Fr and Ac into the chamber was analyzed with a mass spectrometer. These conditions allowed the determination of the cutaneous conductance to Fr (GFr) and Ac (GAc) at the 3 levels of local environmental O2. GFr and GAc of the isolated skin and the blood solubilities of the 2 gases were also determined. To estimate Q, DAc and DFr, the data were analyzed with a homogeneous single capillary model. In the frog, Q varied directly with sample chamber [O2], but chamber [O2] had no effect on D. In the salamander, O2 had no effect on either Q or D. The results indicate that regulation of cutaneous gas exchange in the frog by local environmental O2 only involves alterations in Q. Similar control of cutaneous gas exchange is absent in the lungless salamander.

  15. Skin blood flow response to locally applied mechanical and thermal stresses in the diabetic foot.

    PubMed

    Jan, Yih-Kuen; Shen, Sa; Foreman, Robert D; Ennis, William J

    2013-09-01

    Diabetic foot ulcers are one of the most common complications in diabetics, causing significant disabilities and decreasing the quality of life. Impaired microvascular reactivity contributes to the development of diabetic foot ulcers. However, underlying physiological mechanisms responsible for the impaired microvascular reactivity in response to extrinsic causative factors of foot ulcers such as mechanical and thermal stresses have not been well investigated. A total of 26 participants were recruited into this study, including 18 type 2 diabetics with peripheral neuropathy and 8 healthy controls. Laser Doppler flowmetry was used to measure skin blood flow at the first metatarsal head in response to a mechanical stress at 300mmHg and a fast thermal stress at 42°C. Wavelet analysis of skin blood flow oscillations was used to assess metabolic, neurogenic and myogenic controls. Our results indicated that diabetics have significantly decreased metabolic, neurogenic and myogenic responses to thermal stress, especially in the neurogenic and myogenic controls during the first vasodilatory response and in the metabolic control during the second vasodilatory response. Diabetics have a significantly decreased myogenic response to mechanical stress during reactive hyperemia. Our findings demonstrate that locally applied mechanical and thermal stresses can be used to assess microvascular reactivity and risk of diabetic foot ulcers.

  16. Effect of local cooling on skin temperature and blood flow of men in Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naidu, M.; Sachdeva, U.

    1993-12-01

    Alterations to the finger skin temperature (Tsk) and blood flow (FBF) before and after cold immersion on exposure to an Antarctic environment for 8 weeks were studied in 64 subjects. There was a significant fall in Tsk and increase in finger blood flow after 1 week of Antarctic exposure. The Tsk did not further change even after 8 weeks of stay in Antarctica but a significant increase in FBF was obtained after 8 weeks. The cold immersion test was performed at non-Antarctic and Antarctic conditions by immersing the hand for 2 min in 0 4° C cold water. In the non-Antarctic environment the Tsk and FBF dropped significantly ( P < 0.001) indicating a vasoconstriction response. Interestingly after 8 weeks of stay in Antarctic conditions, the skin temperature dropped ( P < 0.001) but the cold induced fall in FBF was inhibited. Based on these observations it may be hypothesized that continuous cold exposure in Antarctica results in vasodilatation, which overrides the stronger vasoactive response of acute cold exposure and thus prevents cold injuries.

  17. A Prospective Study of Blood Selenium Levels and the Risk of Arsenic-related Premalignant Skin Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu; Hall, Marni; Graziano, Joseph H.; Slavkovich, Vesna; van Geen, Alexander; Parvez, Faruque; Ahsan, Habibul

    2007-01-01

    Arsenic exposure from drinking water is considered to be a risk factor for skin and internal cancers. Animal studies suggest a potential antagonism between As and Se in the body. We performed a case-cohort analysis to prospectively evaluate the association between As-related premalignant skin lesions and prediagnostic blood Se levels in 303 cases of skin lesions newly-diagnosed from November 2002 to April 2004 and 849 subcohort members randomly-selected from the 8,092 participants in the Health Effects of As Longitudinal Study with available baseline blood and urine samples collected in 2000. Incidence rate ratios for skin lesions in increasing blood Se quintiles were 1.00 (ref), 0.68 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.39, 1.18), 0.51 (95% CI: 0.29, 0.87), 0.52 (95% CI: 0.30, 0.91), and 0.53 (95% CI: 0.31, 0.90). Effect estimates remained similar with adjustments for age, sex, BMI, smoking status, excessive sunlight exposure (in men), well water As concentration at baseline, and nutritional intakes of folate, iron, protein, Vitamin E, and B Vitamins. At any given As exposure level, the risk of premalignant skin lesions was consistently greater among participants with blood Se lower than the average level. The findings support the hypothesis that dietary Se intake may reduce the incidence of As-related premalignant skin lesions among populations exposed to As exposure from drinking water. PMID:17301251

  18. Free fatty acids exert a greater effect on ocular and skin blood flow than triglycerides in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Bayerle-Eder, M; Polska, E; Kopf, A; Roden, M; Waldhäusl, W; Pleiner, H; Wipler, B; Wolzt, M; Schmetterer, L

    2004-08-01

    Free fatty acids (FFAs) and triglycerides (TGs) can cause vascular dysfunction and arteriosclerosis. Acute elevation of plasma FFA and TG concentration strongly increase ocular and skin blood flow. This study was designed to discriminate whether FFA or TG independently induce hyperperfusion by measuring regional and systemic haemodynamics. In a balanced, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, three-way, crossover study nine healthy subjects received either Intralipid (Pharmacia and Upjohn, Vienna, Austria) with heparin, Intralipid alone or placebo control. Pulsatile choroidal blood flow was measured with laser interferometry, retinal blood flow and retinal red blood cell velocity with laser Doppler velocimetry, and skin blood flow with laser Doppler flowmetry during an euglycaemic insulin clamp. A sevenfold increase of FFA during Intralipid/heparin infusion was paralleled by enhanced choriodal, retinal, and skin blood flow by 17 +/- 4%, 26 +/- 5% (P < 0.001), and 47 +/- 19% (P = 0.03) from baseline, respectively. In contrast, a mere threefold increase of FFA by infusion of Intralipid alone did not affect outcome parameters, despite the presence of plasma TG levels of 250-700 mg dL(-1); similar to those obtained during combined Intralipid/heparin infusion. Systemic haemodynamics were not affected by drug infusion. Present findings demonstrate a concentration-dependent increase in ocular and skin blood flow by FFA independently of elevated TG plasma concentrations. As vasodilation of resistance vessels occur rapidly, FFA may play a role in the development of continued regional hyperperfusion and deteriorate microvascular function. Copyright 2004 Blackwell Publishing Ltd

  19. Face cooling with mist water increases cerebral blood flow during exercise: effect of changes in facial skin blood flow.

    PubMed

    Miyazawa, Taiki; Horiuchi, Masahiro; Ichikawa, Daisuke; Subudhi, Andrew W; Sugawara, Jun; Ogoh, Shigehiko

    2012-01-01

    Facial cooling (FC) increases cerebral blood flow (CBF) at rest and during exercise; however, the mechanism of this response remains unclear. The purpose of the present study was to test our hypothesis that FC causes facial vasoconstriction that diverts skin blood flow (SkBF(face)) toward the middle cerebral artery (MCA V(mean)) at rest and to a greater extent during exercise. Nine healthy young subjects (20 ± 2 years) underwent 3 min of FC by fanning and spraying the face with a mist of cold water (~4°C) at rest and during steady-state exercise [heart rate (HR) of 120 bpm]. We focused on the difference between the averaged data acquired from 1 min immediately before FC and last 1 min of FC. SkBF(face), MCA V(mean), and mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) were higher during exercise than at rest. As hypothesized, FC decreased SkBF(face) at rest (-32 ± 4%) and to a greater extent during exercise (-64 ± 10%, P = 0.012). Although MCA V(mean) was increased by FC (Rest, +1.4 ± 0.5 cm/s; Exercise, +1.4 ± 0.6 cm/s), the amount of the FC-evoked changes in MCA V(mean) at rest and during exercise differed among subjects. In addition, changes in MCA V(mean) with FC did not correlate with concomitant changes in SkBF(face) (r = 0.095, P = 0.709). MAP was also increased by FC (Rest, +6.2 ± 1.4 mmHg; Exercise, +4.2 ± 1.2 mmHg). These findings suggest that the FC-induced increase in CBF during exercise could not be explained only by change in SkBF(face).

  20. Contactless diagnostics of biophysical parameters of skin and blood on the basis of approximating functions for radiation fluxes scattered by skin

    SciTech Connect

    Lisenko, S A; Kugeiko, M M

    2014-03-28

    Approximating expressions are derived to calculate spectral and spatial characteristics of diffuse reflection of light from a two-layer medium mimicking human skin. The effectiveness of the use of these expressions in the optical diagnosis of skin biophysical parameters (tissue scattering parameters, concentration of melanin in the epidermis, concentration of total haemoglobin and bilirubin in the tissues of the dermis) and content of haemoglobin derivatives in blood (oxy-, deoxy-, met-, carboxy- and sulfhaemoglobin) is analysed numerically. The methods are proposed to determine in realtime these parameters without contact of the measuring instrument with the patient's body. (biophotonics)

  1. Contactless diagnostics of biophysical parameters of skin and blood on the basis of approximating functions for radiation fluxes scattered by skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisenko, S. A.; Kugeiko, M. M.

    2014-03-01

    Approximating expressions are derived to calculate spectral and spatial characteristics of diffuse reflection of light from a two-layer medium mimicking human skin. The effectiveness of the use of these expressions in the optical diagnosis of skin biophysical parameters (tissue scattering parameters, concentration of melanin in the epidermis, concentration of total haemoglobin and bilirubin in the tissues of the dermis) and content of haemoglobin derivatives in blood (oxy-, deoxy-, met-, carboxy- and sulfhaemoglobin) is analysed numerically. The methods are proposed to determine in realtime these parameters without contact of the measuring instrument with the patient's body.

  2. Study on the Effect of Blood Content on Diffuse Reflectance Spectra of Basal Cell Carcinoma Skin Tissue

    PubMed Central

    He, Qingli

    2013-01-01

    Diffuse reflectance spectrum as a noninvasive method has been widely used to study the optical properties of cutaneous skin tissue. In this work, we optimized an eight-layered optical model of basal cell carcinoma skin tissue to study its optical properties. Based on the model, the diffuse reflectance spectra were reconstructed in visible wavelength range by Monte Carlo methods. After different blood contents were added to the optical model, the contribution of blood to diffuese reflectance spectra was investigated theoretically. The ratios of basal cell carcinoma skin and normal skin tissue were also calculated for both experimental result and rebuilt results to testify the theoretical reasonability of the model and methods. PMID:24023527

  3. Chemosensory function of amphibian skin: integrating epithelial transport, capillary blood flow and behaviour.

    PubMed

    Hillyard, S D; Willumsen, N J

    2011-07-01

    Terrestrial anuran amphibians absorb water across specialized regions of skin on the posterioventral region of their bodies. Rapid water absorption is mediated by the insertion of aquaporins into the apical membrane of the outermost cell layer. Water moves out of the epithelium via aquaglyceroporins in the basolateral membrane and into the circulation in conjunction with increased capillary blood flow to the skin and aquaporins in the capillary endothelial cells. These physiological responses are activated by intrinsic stimuli relating to the animals' hydration status and extrinsic stimuli relating to the detection of osmotically available water. The integration of these processes has been studied using behavioural observations in conjunction with neurophysiological recordings and studies of epithelial transport. These studies have identified plasma volume and urinary bladder stores as intrinsic stimuli that activate the formation of angiotensin II (AII) to stimulate water absorption behaviour. The coordinated increase in water permeability and capillary blood flow appears to be mediated primarily by sympathetic stimulation of beta adrenergic receptors, although the neurohypopyseal hormone arginine vasotocin (AVT) may also play a role. Extrinsic stimuli relate primarily to the ionic and osmotic properties of hydration sources. Toads avoid NaCl solutions that have been shown to be harmful in acute exposure, approx. 200-250 mm. The avoidance is partially attenuated by amiloride raising the hypothesis that the mechanism for salt detection by toads resembles that for salt taste in mammals that take in water by mouth. In this model, depolarization of the basolateral membrane of taste cells is coupled to afferent neural stimulation. In toad skin we have identified innervation of skin epithelial cells by branches of spinal nerves and measured neural responses to NaCl solutions that elicit behavioural avoidance. These same concentrations produce depolarization of the

  4. Differences among moisturizers in affecting skin susceptibility to hexyl nicotinate, measured as time to increase skin blood flow.

    PubMed

    Duval, Céline; Lindberg, Magnus; Boman, Anders; Johnsson, Stina; Edlund, Fredrik; Lodén, Marie

    2003-02-01

    A wide range of branded and generic moisturizers is frequently used for the prevention and treatment of dry skin. The influence of moisturizers on the skin permeability is pertinent to the understanding of their therapeutic efficacy. The aim of the present study was to compare the effect of two moisturizers on the skin permeability barrier, assessed as skin reactivity to a vasodilating substance. The study was parallel, randomized and double blind on 53 healthy volunteers. One of the creams contained 5% urea, whereas the other contained no humectant but had a high lipid content. The participants were instructed to apply the cream twice daily for three weeks on the volar aspect of one of their forearms. The skin was then exposed to hexyl nicotinate, which induces vasodilation. The time-course and magnitude of the microvascular changes in the two skin areas were monitored with a non-invasive optical technique (laser Doppler flowmetry) with two measuring probes. The lag-time between application and initial response was significantly longer for the urea-treated site compared with the other cream. Furthermore, the time for maximum response was shorter for the lipid-rich cream than for its placebo. The study shows differences in action between moisturizers, which may influence the skin susceptibility to other irritants and allergens in the environment. Copyright Blackwell Munksgaard 2003

  5. [Assessment of the changes in regulatory systems of human's skin blood flow during local heating].

    PubMed

    Krasnikov, G V; Tankanag, A V; Koniaeva, T N; Piskunova, T N; Chemeris, N K

    2007-04-01

    The mechanisms of thermal regulation of skin blood flow during local heating to 35, 40 and 45 'C have been studied by the method of laser Doppler flowmetry in healthy volunteers. To estimate the state of microvascular bed the continuous wavelet-transform spectral analysis has been used. The amplitudes of fluxmotions in the range of blood flow active modulation significantly increase during local heating to 35 degrees C. The amplitudes of blood flow oscillations in the ranges of cardiorhythm and respiratory rhythm increase during local heating to 40 degrees C. The high amplitude oscillations in the range of myogenic activity are maintained. The amplitude of oscillations in the range of endothelial activity distinctly decreases and the oscillations in the range of neurogenic activity are inhibited. Local heating to 45 degrees C results in a significant decreasing of the oscillation amplitudes in the range of myogenic activity, and the amplitudes of cardio- and respiratory spectral components amount to their peak values among the temperatures of local heating under study.

  6. Impact of blood volume changes within the human skin on the diffuse reflectance measurements in visible and NIR spectral ranges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zherebtsov, Evgeny; Bykov, Alexander; Popov, Alexey; Doronin, Alexander; Meglinski, Igor

    2017-03-01

    We consider changes in the volume of blood and oxygen saturation caused by a pulse wave and their influence on the diffuse reflectance spectra in the visible/NIR spectral range. CUDA-based Monte-Carlo model was used for routine simulation of detector depth sensitivity (sampling volume) and skin spectra, and their variations associated with physiological changes in the human skin. The results presented in the form of animated graphs of sampling volume changes for scaling of the parameters of the main human skin layers related to the results of experimental measurements are of particular interest for pulse oximetry, photoplethysmography, Doppler flowmetry, reflectance spectroscopy.

  7. Use of skin and blood as nonlethal indicators of heavy metal contamination in northern water snakes (Nerodia sipedon).

    PubMed

    Burger, J; Campbell, K R; Campbell, T S; Shukla, T; Jeitner, C; Gochfeld, M

    2005-08-01

    Relatively little is known about contaminants in reptiles, particularly snakes. The concentrations of arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead, manganese, mercury, and selenium were examined in blood and skin of 46 northern water snakes (Nerodia sipedon) in Tennessee and correlated with concentrations in internal tissues (liver, kidney, muscle) to determine if blood or skin could serve as a nonlethal indicator of internal metal exposure or body burden. Snakes were collected from the East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC) within the United States Department of Energy's Y-12 National Security Complex (part of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory) and from a reference stretch of the Little River in East Tennessee. For blood, the only consistent positive correlations with internal organs were for mercury, and correlations were low except for muscle. Skin showed significant positive correlations with all three organs for mercury, chromium, selenium, and lead. For manganese and cadmium, skin level was positively correlated with liver level. Blood generally reflects recent exposure, not necessarily body burden, but in water snakes it correlates with body burden for mercury. Skin proved useful for more metals, although patterns were not necessarily consistent across sex and locality subgroups. The most consistent pattern was for mercury, the metal of greatest concern in many aquatic ecosystems, including EFPC.

  8. Simultaneous assessment of pulsating and total blood in inflammatory skin lesions using functional diffuse reflectance spectroscopy in the visible range.

    PubMed

    Seo, InSeok; Bargo, Paulo R; Kollias, Nikiforos

    2010-01-01

    We present a simple and cost-effective optical technique for the simultaneous assessment of pulsating and total blood noninvasively in an inflammatory skin lesion. Acquisitions of diffuse reflectance spectra in the visible range at 6 Hz are used to trace the oscillating components of reflectance. Measurements on erythematous lesions from a UV insult show slow changing signal at about 0.1 Hz and heart-driven regular oscillations at about 1 Hz simultaneously. The results demonstrate the potential of the technique in monitoring both pulsating and steady components of the blood in inflammatory lesions of the skin.

  9. Study on the Effect of Thermal and Magnetic Stimulation by Measuring of the Peripheral Blood Flow and Skin Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubota, Kouhei; Nuruki, Atsuo; Tamari, Youzou; Yunokuchi, Kazutomo

    Recently, the stiff shoulder accompanying the muscle fatigue becomes an issue of public concern. Therefore, we paid attention to the effect of the thermal and magnetic stimulation for the muscle fatigue. The maximum voluntary contraction has recovered significantly, and also peripheral blood flow has increased by stimulation. In order to evaluate if the thermal and magnetic stimulation has any effects, three parameters was measured, which are the maximum voluntary contraction, peripheral blood flow and skin temperature. The skin temperature, however, did not changed significantly.

  10. An upgraded camera-based imaging system for mapping venous blood oxygenation in human skin tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jun; Zhang, Xiao; Qiu, Lina; Leotta, Daniel F.

    2016-07-01

    A camera-based imaging system was previously developed for mapping venous blood oxygenation in human skin. However, several limitations were realized in later applications, which could lead to either significant bias in the estimated oxygen saturation value or poor spatial resolution in the map of the oxygen saturation. To overcome these issues, an upgraded system was developed using improved modeling and image processing algorithms. In the modeling, Monte Carlo (MC) simulation was used to verify the effectiveness of the ratio-to-ratio method for semi-infinite and two-layer skin models, and then the relationship between the venous oxygen saturation and the ratio-to-ratio was determined. The improved image processing algorithms included surface curvature correction and motion compensation. The curvature correction is necessary when the imaged skin surface is uneven. The motion compensation is critical for the imaging system because surface motion is inevitable when the venous volume alteration is induced by cuff inflation. In addition to the modeling and image processing algorithms in the upgraded system, a ring light guide was used to achieve perpendicular and uniform incidence of light. Cross-polarization detection was also adopted to suppress surface specular reflection. The upgraded system was applied to mapping of venous oxygen saturation in the palm, opisthenar and forearm of human subjects. The spatial resolution of the oxygenation map achieved is much better than that of the original system. In addition, the mean values of the venous oxygen saturation for the three locations were verified with a commercial near-infrared spectroscopy system and were consistent with previously published data.

  11. Modeling of skin cooling, blood flow, and optical properties in wounds created by electrical shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Thu T. A.; Shupp, Jeffrey W.; Moffatt, Lauren T.; Jordan, Marion H.; Jeng, James C.; Ramella-Roman, Jessica C.

    2012-02-01

    High voltage electrical injuries may lead to irreversible tissue damage or even death. Research on tissue injury following high voltage shock is needed and may yield stage-appropriate therapy to reduce amputation rate. One of the mechanisms by which electricity damages tissue is through Joule heating, with subsequent protein denaturation. Previous studies have shown that blood flow had a significant effect on the cooling rate of heated subcutaneous tissue. To assess the thermal damage in tissue, this study focused on monitoring changes of temperature and optical properties of skin next to high voltage wounds. The burns were created between left fore limb and right hind limb extremities of adult male Sprague-Dawley rats by a 1000VDC delivery shock system. A thermal camera was utilized to record temperature variation during the exposure. The experimental results were then validated using a thermal-electric finite element model (FEM).

  12. Equivalent sphere approximations for skin, eye, and blood-forming organs

    SciTech Connect

    Maxson, W.L.; Townsend, L.W.; Bier, S.G.

    1996-12-31

    Throughout the manned spaceflight program, protecting astronauts from space radiation has been the subject of intense study. For interplanetary crews, two main sources of radiation hazards are solar particle events (SPEs) and galactic cosmic rays. For nearly three decades, crew doses and related shielding requirements have been assessed using the assumption that body organ exposures are well approximated by exposures at the center of tissue-equivalent spheres. For the skin and for blood-forming organs (BFOs), these spheres have radii of 0 and 5 cm, respectively. Recent studies indicate that significant overestimation of organ doses occurs if these models are used instead of realistic human geometry models. The use of the latter, however, requires much longer computational times. In this work, the authors propose preliminary revisions to these equivalent sphere approximations that yield more realistic dose estimates.

  13. Dynamic markers based on blood perfusion fluctuations for selecting skin melanocytic lesions for biopsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lancaster, Gemma; Stefanovska, Aneta; Pesce, Margherita; Marco Vezzoni, Gian; Loggini, Barbara; Pingitore, Raffaele; Ghiara, Fabrizio; Barachini, Paolo; Cervadoro, Gregorio; Romanelli, Marco; Rossi, Marco

    2015-08-01

    Skin malignant melanoma is a highly angiogenic cancer, necessitating early diagnosis for positive prognosis. The current diagnostic standard of biopsy and histological examination inevitably leads to many unnecessary invasive excisions. Here, we propose a non-invasive method of identification of melanoma based on blood flow dynamics. We consider a wide frequency range from 0.005-2 Hz associated with both local vascular regulation and effects of cardiac pulsation. Combining uniquely the power of oscillations associated with individual physiological processes we obtain a marker which distinguishes between melanoma and atypical nevi with sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 90.9%. The method reveals valuable functional information about the melanoma microenvironment. It also provides the means for simple, accurate, in vivo distinction between malignant melanoma and atypical nevi, and may lead to a substantial reduction in the number of biopsies currently undertaken.

  14. Assessment of skin blood flow following spinal manual therapy: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Zegarra-Parodi, Rafael; Park, Peter Yong Soo; Heath, Deborah M; Makin, Inder Raj S; Degenhardt, Brian F; Roustit, Matthieu

    2015-04-01

    Skin blood flow (SBF) indexes have been used to describe physiological mechanisms associated with spinal manual therapy (SMT). The aims of the current review were to assess methods for data collection, assess how investigators interpreted SBF changes, and formulate recommendations to advance manual medicine research. A database search was performed in PubMed, Cochrane Library, the Physiotherapy Evidence Database, and the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature through April 2014. Articles were included if at least 1 outcome measure was changes in 1 SBF index following SMT. The database search yielded 344 records. Two independent authors applied the inclusion criteria. Twenty studies met the inclusion criteria. Selected studies used heterogeneous methods to assess short-term post-SMT changes in SBF, usually vasoconstriction, which was interpreted as a general sympathoexcitatory effect through central mechanisms. However, this conclusion might be challenged by the current understanding of skin sympathetic nervous activity over local endothelial mechanisms that are specifically controlling SBF. Evaluation of SBF measurements in peripheral tissues following SMT may document physiological responses that are beyond peripheral sympathetic function. Based on the current use of SBF indexes in clinical and physiological research, 14 recommendations for advancing manual medicine research using laser Doppler flowmetry are presented.

  15. Decreased Symptoms without Augmented Skin Blood Flow in Subjects with RLS/WED after Vibration Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Ulrike H.; Hilton, Sterling C.; Hunsaker, Erik; Ulfberg, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Vascular disturbances leading to tissue hypoxia have been named as a possible cause for RLS/WED. Vibration to the whole body (WBV) in subjects with RLS/WED results in increased skin blood flow (SBF). The aims of this investigation were to (1) determine if a two-week treatment with WBV will decrease symptoms associated with RLS/WED and, (2) if so, determine if the mechanism for improvement in symptoms is related to an increase in SBF, as measured in flux. Methods: Eleven subjects with RLS/WED underwent 2 weeks of 14-minute intermittent WBV and a 2-week sham treatment in randomized order. Pre and post intervention RLS symptom severity were compared. Baseline SBF was compared between subjects with RLS/WED and an age- and sex-matched control group. A crossover design (aim 1) and a matched case-control design and repeated measures design (aim 2) were used. The data analyses consisted of 2-sample and paired t-tests; where applicable we used a standard crossover design adjustment. Results: WBV did significantly decrease symptoms associated with RLS/WED compared to baseline data and compared to sham treatment. The baseline flux was significantly lower in RLS/WED subjects than matched controls, but this deficit was negated with WBV. There was no increase in resting SBF over the 2 weeks of treatment. Conclusions: Subjects with RLS/WED have decreased SBF but are able to increase flux to the same level as normal subjects with WBV. A 2-week intervention with WBV decreases symptoms associated with RLS/WED, but this does not seem to be related to an increase in resting SBF. Citation: Mitchell UH, Hilton SC, Hunsaker E, Ulfberg J. Decreased symptoms without augmented skin blood flow in subjects with RLS/WED after vibration treatment. J Clin Sleep Med 2016;12(7):947–952. PMID:27070250

  16. Age‐related differences in postsynaptic increases in sweating and skin blood flow postexercise

    PubMed Central

    Stapleton, Jill M.; Fujii, Naoto; McGinn, Ryan; McDonald, Katherine; Kenny, Glen P.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The influence of peripheral factors on the control of heat loss responses (i.e., sweating and skin blood flow) in the postexercise period remains unknown in young and older adults. Therefore, in eight young (22 ± 3 years) and eight older (65 ± 3 years) males, we examined dose‐dependent responses to the administration of acetylcholine (ACh) and methacholine (MCh) for sweating (ventilated capsule), as well as to ACh and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) for cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC, laser‐Doppler flowmetry, % of max). In order to assess if peripheral factors are involved in the modulation of thermoeffector activity postexercise, pharmacological agonists were perfused via intradermal microdialysis on two separate days: (1) at rest (DOSE) and (2) following a 30‐min bout of exercise (Ex+DOSE). No differences in sweat rate between the DOSE and Ex+DOSE conditions at either ACh or MCh were observed for the young (ACh: P =0.992 and MCh: P =0.710) or older (ACh: P =0.775 and MCh: P =0.738) adults. Similarly, CVC was not different between the DOSE and Ex+DOSE conditions for the young (ACh: P =0.123 and SNP: P =0.893) or older (ACh: P =0.113 and SNP: P =0.068) adults. Older adults had a lower sweating response for both the DOSE (ACh: P =0.049 and MCh: P =0.006) and Ex+DOSE (ACh: P =0.050 and MCh: P =0.029) conditions compared to their younger counterparts. These findings suggest that peripheral factors do not modulate postexercise sweating and skin blood flow in both young and older adults. Additionally, sweat gland function is impaired in older adults, albeit the impairments were not exacerbated during postexercise recovery. PMID:25347861

  17. A comparison of whole body vibration and moist heat on lower extremity skin temperature and skin blood flow in healthy older individuals.

    PubMed

    Lohman, Everett B; Sackiriyas, Kanikkai Steni Balan; Bains, Gurinder S; Calandra, Giovanni; Lobo, Crystal; Nakhro, Daniel; Malthankar, Gauri; Paul, Sherwine

    2012-07-01

    Tissue healing is an intricate process that is regulated by circulation. Heat modalities have been shown to improve skin circulation. Recent research supports that passive vibration increases circulation without risk of burns. Study purpose is to compare and determine effects of short duration vibration, moist heat, and a combination of the two on skin blood flow (SBF) and skin temperature (ST) in elderly, non-diabetic individuals following short-term exposure. Ten subjects, 3 female and 7 male (55-73 years of age), received two interventions over three days: 1--Active vibration, 2--passive vibration, 3--moist heat, 4--moist heat combined with passive vibration (MHPV), 5--a commercial massaging heating pad, and 6--no intervention. SBF and ST were measured using a MOOR Laser Doppler before and after the intervention and the third measurement were taken 10 minutes following. Mean SBF following a ten-minute intervention were significantly different in the combination of moist heat and passive vibration from the control, active vibration, and the commercial massaging heating pad. Compared to baseline measurements, this resulted in mean SBF elevation to 450% (at conclusion of 10 minutes of intervention) and 379% (10 minutes post). MHPV (p=0.02) showed significant changes in ST from the commercial massaging heating pad, passive vibration, and active vibration interventions. SBF in the lower legs showed greatest increase with MHPV. Interventions should be selected that are low risk while increasing lower extremity skin blood flow.

  18. Fibre optic confocal imaging (FOCI) of keratinocytes, blood vessels and nerves in hairless mouse skin in vivo

    PubMed Central

    BUSSAU, L. J.; VO, L. T.; DELANEY, P. M.; PAPWORTH, G. D.; BARKLA, D. H.; KING, R. G.

    1998-01-01

    Fibre optic confocal imaging (FOCI) enabled subsurface fluorescence microscopy of the skin of hairless mice in vivo. Application of acridine orange enabled imaging of the layers of the epidermis. The corneocytes of the stratum corneum, the keratinocytes in the basal layers and redundant hair follicles were visualised at depths greater than 100 μm. Cellular and nuclear membranes of keratinocytes of the skin were visualised by the use of acridine orange and DIOC5(3). Imaging of the skin after injection of FITC-dextran revealed an extensive network of blood vessels with a size range up to 20 μm. Blood cells could be seen moving through dermal vessels and the blood circulation through the dermal vascular bed was video-taped. The fluorescent dye 4-di-2-ASP showed the presence of nerves fibres around the hair follicles and subsurface blood vessels. Comparison was made between images obtained in vivo using FOCI and in vitro scanning electron microscopy and conventional histology. FOCI offers the potential to study dynamic events in vivo, such as blood flow, skin growth, nerve regeneration and many pathological processes, in ways which have not previously been possible. PMID:9643419

  19. Ketorolac alters blood flow during normothermia but not during hyperthermia in middle-aged human skin

    PubMed Central

    Jennings, John D.; Lang, James A.; Kenney, W. Larry

    2009-01-01

    In young healthy humans full expression of reflex cutaneous vasodilation is dependent on cyclooxygenase (COX)- and nitric oxide synthase (NOS)-dependent mechanisms. Chronic low-dose aspirin therapy attenuates reflex cutaneous vasodilation potentially through both platelet and vascular COX-dependent mechanisms. We hypothesized the contribution of COX-dependent vasodilators to reflex cutaneous vasodilation during localized acute COX inhibition would be attenuated in healthy middle-aged humans due to a shift toward COX-dependent vasoconstrictors. Four microdialysis fibers were placed in forearm skin of 13 middle-aged (53 ± 2 yr) normotensive healthy humans, serving as control (Ringer), COX-inhibited (10 mM ketorolac), NOS-inhibited (10 mM NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester), and combined NOS- and COX-inhibited sites. Red blood cell flux was measured over each site by laser-Doppler flowmetry as reflex vasodilation was induced by increasing oral temperature (Tor) 1.0°C using a water-perfused suit. Cutaneous vascular conductance was calculated (CVC = flux/mean arterial pressure) and normalized to maximal CVC (CVCmax; 28 mM sodium nitroprusside). CVCmax was not affected by localized microdialysis drug treatment (P > 0.05). Localized COX inhibition increased baseline (18 ± 3%CVCmax; P < 0.001) compared with control (9 ± 1%CVCmax), NOS-inhibited (7 ± 1%CVCmax), and combined sites (10 ± 1%CVCmax). %CVCmax in the COX-inhibited site remained greater than the control site with ΔTor ≤ 0.3°C; however, there was no difference between these sites with ΔTor ≥ 0.4°C. NOS inhibition and combined COX and NOS inhibition attenuated reflex vasodilation compared with control (P < 0.001), but there was no difference between these sites. Localized COX inhibition with ketorolac significantly augments baseline CVC but does not alter the subsequent skin blood flow response to hyperthermia, suggesting a limited role for COX-derived vasodilator prostanoids in reflex cutaneous

  20. Interaction of sympathetic vasoconstriction and antidromic vasodilatation in the control of skin blood flow.

    PubMed

    Häbler, H J; Wasner, G; Jänig, W

    1997-03-01

    We studied the interaction between the vasoconstriction evoked by postganglionic sympathetic neurones (sympathetic vasoconstriction) and the vasodilatation mediated by small-diameter afferent neurones (antidromic vasodilatation) in hairless skin of anaesthetized rats kept under controlled conditions. In all animals both the lumbar sympathetic trunk (LST) and the ipsilateral dorsal root (DR) L5 were surgically exposed, sectioned and electrically stimulated using different protocols. This experimental approach results in the exclusive and selective activation of sympathetic efferents and primary afferents respectively. Blood flow responses were measured using laser Doppler flowmetry. Sectioning the LST resulted in a pronounced increase in cutaneous blood flow by 112+/-15% (mean+/-SEM, n=25) indicating that ongoing sympathetic vasoconstrictor activity had been abolished. When a brief antidromic vasodilatation was produced by DR stimulation with 10-15 pulses at 1 Hz with C-fibre intensity during a sustained sympathetic vasoconstriction, peak blood flow reached preconstriction levels at LST stimulation frequencies of < or = 3 Hz. By contrast, antidromic vasodilatation was reduced at sympathetic stimulation frequencies of > or = 5 Hz and absent when stimulating the LST with 20 Hz. A similar response characteristic was obtained when LST and DR stimulation were started simultaneously. Continuous DR stimulation with 0.1 Hz evoked a substantial increase in cutaneous blood flow by 38+/-10% (mean+/-SEM, n=8) to a new baseline level. When sympathetic vasoconstriction was elicited on this background DR stimulation, the responses were smaller at all sympathetic frequencies. However, the maximum decrease in blood flow was significantly smaller than the controls at LST stimulation with < or = 3 Hz but not at higher frequencies. We conclude that sympathetic vasoconstriction and antidromic vasodilatation are competitive influences in the control of cutaneous blood flow. At low levels

  1. Increased Activity and Apoptosis of Eosinophils in Blister Fluids, Skin and Peripheral Blood of Patients with Bullous Pemphigoid.

    PubMed

    Engmann, Judith; Rüdrich, Urda; Behrens, Georg; Papakonstantinou, Eleni; Gehring, Manuela; Kapp, Alexander; Raap, Ulrike

    2017-04-06

    Bullous pemphigoid (BP) is an autoimmune blistering skin disease that is more common in elderly individuals. The aim of this study was to determine the functional activity of eosinophils in patients with BP compared with healthy donors. Blood, skin and blister-derived eosinophils were strongly activated in patients with BP, seen by increased surface expression of CD69 compared with controls. CD11b was also increased in BP blood eosinophils, which may explain the striking accumulation of eosinophils in BP (1×106 per ml blister fluid). Furthermore, CCL26 was expressed by activated eosinophils in BP skin and in blister fluid. BP eosinophils also released IL-6, IL-8 and IL-1α in BP blister fluids. Apoptosis in cultivated BP eosinophils was increased and accompanied by enhanced surface externalization of CD95. Caspase 3 positive eosinophils in lesional BP skin and blister fluid also showed the initiation of apoptosis. These results reveal novel pathophysiological aspects of BP, with a strong activation pattern and increased apoptosis of eosinophils in the peripheral blood, skin and blister fluids.

  2. Forearm Skin Blood Flow After Kinesiology Taping in Healthy Soccer Players: An Exploratory Investigation.

    PubMed

    Woodward, Kirsty A; Unnithan, Vish; Hopkins, Nicola D

    2015-10-01

    Kinesiology tape (KT) has become popular among athletes for both injury prevention and rehabilitation due to its reported therapeutic effects, including facilitation of lymphatic flow and enhanced peripheral blood flow. However, evidence to support such claims is insufficient. To determine whether KT improves skin blood flow (SkBF) responses in young, elite soccer players. Randomized crossover study. Research laboratory. Thirteen healthy, elite, adolescent male soccer players (age = 14.7 ± 0.6 years). Participants completed 2 experimental trials; during trial 1, the volar aspect of the dominant forearm was taped. Forearm SkBF was measured within the taped area and 3 cm lateral to the taped area. During trial 2, no tape was applied to either site. Both trials were performed within 7 days. Baseline and maximal thermally (42°C) stimulated SkBF responses were assessed using laser Doppler flowmetry. Continuously measured SkBF and derived mean arterial pressure obtained at 5-minute intervals were used to calculate cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC), the primary outcome measure. No differences were observed for baseline SkBF or CVC between trials or measurement sites. After local heating, no differences were evident for SkBF or CVC between trials or measurement sites. Our findings suggest that, in healthy, trained adolescent males, KT was not associated with increased forearm SkBF.

  3. Forearm Skin Blood Flow After Kinesiology Taping in Healthy Soccer Players: An Exploratory Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Woodward, Kirsty A.; Unnithan, Vish; Hopkins, Nicola D.

    2015-01-01

    Context Kinesiology tape (KT) has become popular among athletes for both injury prevention and rehabilitation due to its reported therapeutic effects, including facilitation of lymphatic flow and enhanced peripheral blood flow. However, evidence to support such claims is insufficient. Objective To determine whether KT improves skin blood flow (SkBF) responses in young, elite soccer players. Design Randomized crossover study. Setting Research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants Thirteen healthy, elite, adolescent male soccer players (age = 14.7 ± 0.6 years). Intervention(s) Participants completed 2 experimental trials; during trial 1, the volar aspect of the dominant forearm was taped. Forearm SkBF was measured within the taped area and 3 cm lateral to the taped area. During trial 2, no tape was applied to either site. Both trials were performed within 7 days. Main Outcome Measure(s) Baseline and maximal thermally (42°C) stimulated SkBF responses were assessed using laser Doppler flowmetry. Continuously measured SkBF and derived mean arterial pressure obtained at 5-minute intervals were used to calculate cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC), the primary outcome measure. Results No differences were observed for baseline SkBF or CVC between trials or measurement sites. After local heating, no differences were evident for SkBF or CVC between trials or measurement sites. Conclusions Our findings suggest that, in healthy, trained adolescent males, KT was not associated with increased forearm SkBF. PMID:26445024

  4. Comparison of oscillations of skin blood flow and deoxygenation in vastus lateralis in light exercise.

    PubMed

    Yano, T; Lian, C-S; Afroundeh, R; Shirakawa, K; Yunoki, T

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of the present study was to compare oscillation of skin blood flow with that of deoxygenation in muscle during light exercise in order to determine the physiological significance of oscillations in deoxygenation. Prolonged exercise with 50% of peak oxygen uptake was performed for 60 min. Skin blood flow (SBF) was measured using a laser blood flow meter on the right vastus lateralis muscle. Deoxygenated haemoglobin/myoglobin (DHb/Mb) concentration in the left vastus lateralis were measured using a near-infrared spectroscopy system. SBF and DHb/Mb during exercise were analysed by fast Fourier transform. We classified frequency bands according to previous studies (Kvernmo et al. 1999, Kvandal et al. 2006) into phase I (0.005-0.0095 and 0.0095-0.02 Hz), phase II (0.02-0.06 Hz: phase II) and phase III (0.06-0.16 Hz). The first peak of power spectra density (PSD) in SBF appeared at 0.0078 Hz in phase I. The second peak of PSD in SBF appeared at 0.035 Hz. The third peak of PSD in SBF appeared at 0.078 Hz. The first peak of PSD in DHb/Mb appeared at 0.0039 Hz, which was out of phase I. The second peak of PSD in DHb/Mb appeared at 0.016 Hz. The third peak of PSD in DHb/Mb appeared at 0.035 Hz. The coefficient of cross correlation was very low. Cross power spectra density showed peaks of 0.0039, 0.016 and 0.035 Hz. It is concluded that a peak of 0.016 Hz in oscillations of DHb/Mb observed in muscle during exercise is associated with endothelium-dependent vasodilation (phase I) and that a peak of 0.035 Hz in DHb/Mb is associated with sympathetic nerve activity (phase II). It is also confirmed that each peak of SBF oscillations is observed in each phase.

  5. Direct observation of liposome uptake by leukocytes in vivo in skin blood vessels using intravital fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devoisselle, Jean-Marie; Mordon, Serge R.; Begu, Sylvie; Desmettre, Thomas

    2000-04-01

    This study aimed to observe liposome uptake by leukocytes in vivo. The study was performed on skin by using a dorsal skin-fold chamber implanted in golden hamsters using intravital microscopy. 5,6-CF-encapsulated PEGylated liposomes were injected intravenously. The skin microcirculation was observed with an intravital Eclipse E800 Nikon microscope fitted with a Xenon light source and an epi-fluorescence assembly. An ultra-high sensitivity video-camera mounted on the microscope projected the image onto a monitor, and the images were recorded for playback analysis with a digital video cassette recorder. An acute inflammatory response was obtained by removing one complete layer of skin and the underlying fascia and avascular tissue on the opposing side of the flap corresponding to an area equivalent to the window aperture. Using these model and set-up, leukocyte rolling and adhesion were easily observed and the entry of PEGylated liposomes into hamster blood leukocytes was studied for a period of 6 hours. PEGylated liposomes were clearly identified alone inside the blood flow and inside the leukocytes as soon as the inflammatory reaction appeared. This study shows for the first time that blood leukocytes in their natural milieu of whole blood are capable of interacting with, and taking up liposomes. This observation is in accordance with previous in vitro studies.

  6. 3-D volume reconstruction of skin lesions for melanin and blood volume estimation and lesion severity analysis.

    PubMed

    D'Alessandro, Brian; Dhawan, Atam P

    2012-11-01

    Subsurface information about skin lesions, such as the blood volume beneath the lesion, is important for the analysis of lesion severity towards early detection of skin cancer such as malignant melanoma. Depth information can be obtained from diffuse reflectance based multispectral transillumination images of the skin. An inverse volume reconstruction method is presented which uses a genetic algorithm optimization procedure with a novel population initialization routine and nudge operator based on the multispectral images to reconstruct the melanin and blood layer volume components. Forward model evaluation for fitness calculation is performed using a parallel processing voxel-based Monte Carlo simulation of light in skin. Reconstruction results for simulated lesions show excellent volume accuracy. Preliminary validation is also done using a set of 14 clinical lesions, categorized into lesion severity by an expert dermatologist. Using two features, the average blood layer thickness and the ratio of blood volume to total lesion volume, the lesions can be classified into mild and moderate/severe classes with 100% accuracy. The method therefore has excellent potential for detection and analysis of pre-malignant lesions.

  7. The effects of different lying positions on interface pressure, skin temperature, and tissue blood flow in nursing home residents.

    PubMed

    Källman, Ulrika; Engström, Maria; Bergstrand, Sara; Ek, Anna-Christina; Fredrikson, Mats; Lindberg, Lars-Göran; Lindgren, Margareta

    2015-03-01

    Although repositioning is considered an important intervention to prevent pressure ulcers, tissue response during loading in different lying positions has not been adequately explored. To compare the effects of different lying positions on interface pressure, skin temperature, and tissue blood flow in nursing home residents. From May 2011 to August 2012, interface pressure, skin temperature, and blood flow at three tissue depths were measured for 1 hr over the sacrum in 30° supine tilt and 0° supine positions and over the trochanter major in 30° lateral and 90° lateral positions in 25 residents aged 65 years or older. Measurement of interface pressure was accomplished using a pneumatic pressure transmitter connected to a digital manometer, skin temperature using a temperature sensor, and blood flow using photoplethysmography and laser Doppler flowmetry. Interface pressure was significantly higher in the 0° supine and 90° lateral positions than in 30° supine tilt and 30° lateral positions. The mean skin temperature increased from baseline in all positions. Blood flow was significantly higher in the 30° supine tilt position compared to the other positions. A hyperemic response in the post pressure period was seen at almost all tissue depths and positions. The 30° supine tilt position generated less interface pressure and allowed greater tissue perfusion, suggesting that this position is the most beneficial. © The Author(s) 2014.

  8. Effects of Gloves, Temperature and Their Interaction on Finger, Hand, and Arm Blood Flow and Skin Temperature: A Pilot Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallbech, M. Susan

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the effects of cold only, commercially available gloves only, and the combination of gloves and cold on the blood flow and surface (skin) temperature of the medial and proximal phalanxes of digit 3, the metacarpal region of the hand, and the forearm.

  9. Determination of the amplitude and phase relationships between oscillations in skin temperature and photoplethysmography-measured blood flow in fingertips.

    PubMed

    Sagaidachnyi, A A; Skripal, A V; Fomin, A V; Usanov, D A

    2014-02-01

    It is well established that skin temperature oscillations in fingertips coexist with blood flow oscillations and there is a certain correlation between them. At the same time, the reasons for differences in waveform and the delay between the blood flow and temperature oscillations are far from being fully understood. In this study we determine the relationships between spectral components of the blood flow and temperature oscillations in fingertips, and we ascertain the frequency dependences of amplitude attenuation and delay time for the temperature oscillations. The blood flow oscillations were considered as a source of thermal waves propagating from micro-vessels towards the skin surface and manifesting as temperature oscillations. The finger temperature was measured by infrared thermography and blood flow was assessed by photoplethysmography for ten healthy subjects. The time-frequency analysis of oscillations was based on the Morlet wavelet transform. The frequency dependences of delay time and amplitude attenuation in temperature compared with blood flow oscillations have been determined in endothelial (0.005-0.02 Hz) and neurogenic (0.02-0.05 Hz) frequency bands using the wavelet spectra. We approximated the experimental frequency dependences by equations describing thermal wave propagation through the medium and taking into account the thermal properties and thickness of a tissue. Results of analysis show that with the increase of frequency f the delay time of temperature oscillations decreases inversely proportional to f(1/2), and the attenuation of the amplitude increases directly proportional to exp f(1/2). Using these relationships allows us to increase correlation between the processed temperature oscillations and blood flow oscillations from 0.2 to 0.7 within the frequency interval 0.005-0.05 Hz. The established experimental and theoretical relationships clarify an understanding of interrelation between the dynamics of blood flow and skin

  10. Nonuniform, age-related decrements in regional sweating and skin blood flow

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Lacy M.; Kenney, W. Larry

    2013-01-01

    Aging is associated with attenuated thermoregulatory function that varies regionally over the body. Decrements in vasodilation and sweating are well documented with age, yet limited data are available concerning the regional relation between these responses. We aimed to examine age-related alterations in the relation between regional sweating (RSR) and skin blood flow (SkBF) to thermal and pharmacological stimuli. Four microdialysis fibers were inserted in the ventral forearm, abdomen, thigh, and lower back of eight healthy aged subjects (64 ± 7 yr) and nine young (23 ± 3 yr) during 1) ACh dose response (1 × 10−7 to 0.1 M, mean skin temperature 34°C) and 2) passive whole body heating to Δ1°C rise in oral temperature (Tor). RSR and SkBF were measured over each microdialysis membrane using ventilated capsules and laser-Doppler flowmetry. Maximal SkBF was measured at the end of both protocols (50 mM SNP). Regional sweating thresholds and RSR were attenuated in aged vs. young at all sites (P < 0.0001) during whole body heating. Vasodilation thresholds were similar between groups (P > 0.05). Attenuated SkBF were observed at the arm and back in the aged, representing 56 and 82% of those in the young at these sites, respectively (0.5 ΔTor). During ACh perfusion, SkBF (P = 0.137) and RSR were similar between groups (P = 0.326). Together these findings suggest regional age-related decrements in heat-activated sweat gland function but not cholinergic sensitivity. Functional consequences of such thermoregulatory impairment include the compromised ability of older individuals to defend core temperature during heat exposure and a subsequently greater susceptibility to heat-related illness and injury. PMID:23926135

  11. Combined education and skin antisepsis intervention for persistently high blood-culture contamination rates in neonatal intensive care.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, C; Philip, R K; Powell, J; Slevin, B; Quinn, C; Power, L; O'Connell, N H; Dunne, C P

    2016-05-01

    Contaminated blood cultures represent challenges regarding diagnosis, duration of hospitalization, antimicrobial use, pharmacy and laboratory costs. Facing problematic neonatal blood culture contamination (3.8%), we instigated a successful intervention combining skin antisepsis using sterile applicators with 2% chlorhexidine gluconate in 70% isopropanol prior to phlebotomy (replacing 70% isopropanol) and staff education. In the six months prior to intervention, 364 neonatal peripheral blood samples were collected. Fourteen (3.8%) were contaminated. In the post-intervention six months, 314 samples were collected. Three (0.96%) were contaminated, representing significant improvement (Fisher's exact test: P = 0.0259). No dermatological sequelae were observed. The improvement has been sustained.

  12. Divergent roles of plasma osmolality and the baroreflex on sweating and skin blood flow.

    PubMed

    Lynn, Aaron G; Gagnon, Daniel; Binder, Konrad; Boushel, Robert C; Kenny, Glen P

    2012-03-01

    Plasma hyperosmolality and baroreceptor unloading have been shown to independently influence the heat loss responses of sweating and cutaneous vasodilation. However, their combined effects remain unresolved. On four separate occasions, eight males were passively heated with a liquid-conditioned suit to 1.0°C above baseline core temperature during a resting isosmotic state (infusion of 0.9% NaCl saline) with (LBNP) and without (CON) application of lower-body negative pressure (-40 cmH2O) and during a hyperosmotic state (infusion of 3.0% NaCl saline) with (LBNP + HYP) and without (HYP) application of lower-body negative pressure. Forearm sweat rate (ventilated capsule) and skin blood flow (laser-Doppler), as well as core (esophageal) and mean skin temperatures, were measured continuously. Plasma osmolality increased by ∼10 mosmol/kgH2O during HYP and HYP + LBNP conditions, whereas it remained unchanged during CON and LBNP (P ≤ 0.05). The change in mean body temperature (0.8 × core temperature + 0.2 × mean skin temperature) at the onset threshold for increases in cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) was significantly greater during LBNP (0.56 ± 0.24°C) and HYP (0.69 ± 0.36°C) conditions compared with CON (0.28 ± 0.23°C, P ≤ 0.05). Additionally, the onset threshold for CVC during LBNP + HYP (0.88 ± 0.33°C) was significantly greater than CON and LBNP conditions (P ≤ 0.05). In contrast, onset thresholds for sweating were not different during LBNP (0.50 ± 0.18°C) compared with CON (0.46 ± 0.26°C, P = 0.950) but were elevated (P ≤ 0.05) similarly during HYP (0.91 ± 0.37°C) and LBNP + HYP (0.94 ± 0.40°C). Our findings show an additive effect of hyperosmolality and baroreceptor unloading on the onset threshold for increases in CVC during whole body heat stress. In contrast, the onset threshold for sweating during heat stress was only elevated by hyperosmolality with no effect of the baroreflex.

  13. Age-related changes in skin blood flow at four anatomic sites of the body in males studied by xenon-133

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuchida, Y.

    1990-04-01

    The normal skin blood flow in healthy subjects consisting of 28 males whose ages ranged from 20 to 72 years was measured by the xenon-133 clearance method at four different sites of the body to determine the presence of any age-related changes. The following results were obtained: Significant age-related changes were observed in the skin blood flow of the deltoid region, anterior chest, dorsum of the hand, and dorsum of the foot. Normal skin blood flow was demonstrated to be highly dependent on age and to significantly decrease with age. Average skin blood flow at these four regions of those 70 years of age decreased by 30 to 40 percent when compared to that of those 20 years of age. The skin blood flow at the deltoid region of healthy subjects was higher by 6.3 ml/100 gm per minute than that of patients in poor condition with cancer of the head and neck.

  14. Comparison of blood volume pulse and skin conductance responses to mental and affective stimuli at different anatomical sites.

    PubMed

    Kushki, Azadeh; Fairley, Jillian; Merja, Satyam; King, Gillian; Chau, Tom

    2011-10-01

    Measurements of blood volume pulse (BVP) and skin conductance are commonly used as indications of psychological arousal in affective computing and human-machine interfaces. To date, palmar surfaces remain the primary site for these measurements. Placement of sensors on palmar surfaces, however, is undesirable when recordings are fraught with motion and pressure artifacts. These artifacts are frequent when the human participant has involuntary movements as in hyperkinetic cerebral palsy. This motivates the use of alternative measurement sites. The present study examined the correlation between measurements of blood volume pulse and skin conductance obtained from three different sites on the body (fingers, toes and ear for BVP; fingers, toes and arch of the foot for skin conductance) in response to cognitive and affective stimuli. The results of this pilot study indicated significant inter-site correlation among signal features derived from different sites, with the exception of BVP amplitude, the number of electrodermal reactions and the slope of the electrodermal activity response. We attribute these differences in part to inter-site discrepancies in local skin conditions, such as skin temperature. Despite these differences, significant changes from baseline were present in the responses to the cognitive and affective stimuli at non-palmar sites, suggesting that these sites may provide viable signal measurements for use in affective computing and human-machine interface applications.

  15. [Secondary Raynaud's syndrome: skin blood flow decrease between the ischemic episodes and prolongation of the vasoconstriction during the respiratory maneuvers].

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Nieva, Gabriela; Estañol, Bruno; Téllez-Zenteno, José Francisco; García-Villa, Marcela; Corona-Marco, Vinicio; Padilla-Rubio, Joel; Cardiel-Ríos, Mario Humberto; García-Ramos, Guillermo

    2004-01-01

    The Raynaud's syndrome is an episodic skin ischemia manifested by pallor, cyanosis and erythema of the fingers in response to cold or emotional stress. The exact pathophysiology is unknown but it has been hypothetised that may be due to an autonomic alteration in the sympathetic innervation of skin blood vessels. To study the changes of heart rate and skin blood flow (SBF) in healthy subjects and in patients with secondary Raynaud's syndrome during different respiratory maneuvers: 1. spontaneous respiration; 2. rhythmic respirations (RR), 3. sudden inspirations (SI), and 4. Valsalva maneuver (VM). We studied 22 healthy subjects and 22 patients with secondary Raynaud's syndrome. The variables measured were: 1) RR intervals; 2) amplitudes of SBF; 3) percentage of decrease of SBF; 4) latency of the maximum decrease of SBF. In all patients with secondary Raynaud's syndrome the SBF was decreased basally during spontaneous rations and during all respiratory maneuvers (p < 0.001). The mean latency of recovery of the SBF was prolonged during sudden deep inspiration. The patients with Raynaud also had significant basal tachycardia at rest (p < 0.003). The basal skin blood flow during spontaneous respirations and in asymptomatic periods is decreased in patients with Raynaud's syndrome; this may be related to endothelial arterioral damage. The SBF was also significantly decreased dynamically during sudden inspirations (SI), rhythmic breathing (RR) and Valsalva maneuver (VM). This dynamic change suggests sympathetic hyperactivity.

  16. A comparison of whole body vibration and moist heat on lower extremity skin temperature and skin blood flow in healthy older individuals

    PubMed Central

    Lohman, Everett B.; Sackiriyas, Kanikkai Steni Balan; Bains, Gurinder S.; Calandra, Giovanni; Lobo, Crystal; Nakhro, Daniel; Malthankar, Gauri; Paul, Sherwine

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Tissue healing is an intricate process that is regulated by circulation. Heat modalities have been shown to improve skin circulation. Recent research supports that passive vibration increases circulation without risk of burns. Study purpose is to compare and determine effects of short duration vibration, moist heat, and a combination of the two on skin blood flow (SBF) and skin temperature (ST) in elderly, non-diabetic individuals following short-term exposure. Material/Methods Ten subjects, 3 female and 7 male (55–73 years of age), received two interventions over three days: 1 – Active vibration, 2 – passive vibration, 3 – moist heat, 4 – moist heat combined with passive vibration (MHPV), 5 – a commercial massaging heating pad, and 6 – no intervention. SBF and ST were measured using a MOOR Laser Doppler before and after the intervention and the third measurement were taken 10 minutes following. Results Mean SBF following a ten-minute intervention were significantly different in the combination of moist heat and passive vibration from the control, active vibration, and the commercial massaging heating pad. Compared to baseline measurements, this resulted in mean SBF elevation to 450% (at conclusion of 10 minutes of intervention) and 379% (10 minutes post). MHPV (p=0.02) showed significant changes in ST from the commercial massaging heating pad, passive vibration, and active vibration interventions. Conclusions SBF in the lower legs showed greatest increase with MHPV. Interventions should be selected that are low risk while increasing lower extremity skin blood flow. PMID:22739731

  17. Continuous imaging of the blood vessels in tumor mouse dorsal skin window chamber model by using SD-OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Xiao; Yang, Shaozhuang; Yu, Bin; Wang, Qi; Lin, Danying; Gao, Jian; Zhang, Peiqi; Ma, Yiqun; Qu, Junle; Niu, Hanben

    2016-03-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) has been widely applied into microstructure imaging of tissues or blood vessels with a series of advantages, including non-destructiveness, real-time imaging, high resolution and high sensitivity. In this study, a Spectral Domain OCT (SD-OCT) system with higher sensitivity and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was built up, which was used to observe the blood vessel distribution and blood flow in the dorsal skin window chamber of the nude mouse tumor model. In order to obtain comparable data, the distribution images of blood vessels were collected from the same mouse before and after tumor injection. In conclusion, in vivo blood vessel distribution images of the tumor mouse model have been continuously obtained during around two weeks.

  18. FSOCA-induced switchable footpad skin optical clearing window for blood flow and cell imaging in vivo.

    PubMed

    Shi, Rui; Feng, Wei; Zhang, Chao; Zhang, Zhihong; Zhu, Dan

    2017-05-18

    The mouse footpad for its feature of hairlessness provides an available window for imaging vascular and cellular structure and function in vivo. Unfortunately, the strong scattering of its skin limits the penetration of light and reduces the imaging contrast and depth. Herein, an innovative footpad skin optical clearing agent (FSOCA) was developed to make the footpad skin transparent quickly by topical application. The results demonstrate that FSOCA treatment not only allowed the cutaneous blood vessels and blood flow distribution to be monitored by laser speckle contrast imaging technique with higher contrast, but also permitted the fluorescent cells to be imaged by laser scanning confocal microscopy with higher fluorescence signal intensity and larger imaging depth. In addition, the physiological saline-treatment could make the footpad skin recover to the initial turbid status, and reclearing would not induce any adverse effects on the distributions and morphologies of blood vessels and cells, which demonstrated a safe and switchable window for biomedical imaging. This switchable footpad skin optical clearing window will be significant for studying blood flow dynamics and cellular immune function in vivo in some vascular and immunological diseases. Picture: Repeated cell imaging in vivo before (a) and after (b) FSOCA treatment. (c) Merged images of 4 h (cyan border) or 72 h (magenta border) over 0 h. (d) Zoom of ROI in 4 h (yellow rectangle) or 72 h (red rectangle). © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Paracrine Factors from Irradiated Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Improve Skin Regeneration and Angiogenesis in a Porcine Burn Model

    PubMed Central

    Hacker, Stefan; Mittermayr, Rainer; Nickl, Stefanie; Haider, Thomas; Lebherz-Eichinger, Diana; Beer, Lucian; Mitterbauer, Andreas; Leiss, Harald; Zimmermann, Matthias; Schweiger, Thomas; Keibl, Claudia; Hofbauer, Helmut; Gabriel, Christian; Pavone-Gyöngyösi, Mariann; Redl, Heinz; Tschachler, Erwin; Mildner, Michael; Ankersmit, Hendrik Jan

    2016-01-01

    Burn wounds pose a serious threat to patients and often require surgical treatment. Skin grafting aims to achieve wound closure but requires a well-vascularized wound bed. The secretome of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) has been shown to improve wound healing and angiogenesis. We hypothesized that topical application of the PBMC secretome would improve the quality of regenerating skin, increase angiogenesis, and reduce scar formation after burn injury and skin grafting in a porcine model. Full-thickness burn injuries were created on the back of female pigs. Necrotic areas were excised and the wounds were covered with split-thickness mesh skin grafts. Wounds were treated repeatedly with either the secretome of cultured PBMCs (SecPBMC), apoptotic PBMCs (Apo-SecPBMC), or controls. The wounds treated with Apo-SecPBMC had an increased epidermal thickness, higher number of rete ridges, and more advanced epidermal differentiation than controls. The samples treated with Apo-SecPBMC had a two-fold increase in CD31+ cells, indicating more angiogenesis. These data suggest that the repeated application of Apo-SecPBMC significantly improves epidermal thickness, angiogenesis, and skin quality in a porcine model of burn injury and skin grafting. PMID:27125302

  20. Paracrine Factors from Irradiated Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Improve Skin Regeneration and Angiogenesis in a Porcine Burn Model.

    PubMed

    Hacker, Stefan; Mittermayr, Rainer; Nickl, Stefanie; Haider, Thomas; Lebherz-Eichinger, Diana; Beer, Lucian; Mitterbauer, Andreas; Leiss, Harald; Zimmermann, Matthias; Schweiger, Thomas; Keibl, Claudia; Hofbauer, Helmut; Gabriel, Christian; Pavone-Gyöngyösi, Mariann; Redl, Heinz; Tschachler, Erwin; Mildner, Michael; Ankersmit, Hendrik Jan

    2016-04-29

    Burn wounds pose a serious threat to patients and often require surgical treatment. Skin grafting aims to achieve wound closure but requires a well-vascularized wound bed. The secretome of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) has been shown to improve wound healing and angiogenesis. We hypothesized that topical application of the PBMC secretome would improve the quality of regenerating skin, increase angiogenesis, and reduce scar formation after burn injury and skin grafting in a porcine model. Full-thickness burn injuries were created on the back of female pigs. Necrotic areas were excised and the wounds were covered with split-thickness mesh skin grafts. Wounds were treated repeatedly with either the secretome of cultured PBMCs (Sec(PBMC)), apoptotic PBMCs (Apo-Sec(PBMC)), or controls. The wounds treated with Apo-Sec(PBMC) had an increased epidermal thickness, higher number of rete ridges, and more advanced epidermal differentiation than controls. The samples treated with Apo-Sec(PBMC) had a two-fold increase in CD31+ cells, indicating more angiogenesis. These data suggest that the repeated application of Apo-Sec(PBMC) significantly improves epidermal thickness, angiogenesis, and skin quality in a porcine model of burn injury and skin grafting.

  1. An On-Site Thermoelectric Cooling Device for Cryotherapy and Control of Skin Blood Flow

    PubMed Central

    Mejia, Natalia; Dedow, Karl; Nguy, Lindsey; Sullivan, Patrick; Khoshnevis, Sepideh; Diller, Kenneth R.

    2015-01-01

    Cryotherapy involves the surface application of low temperatures to enhance the healing of soft tissue injuries. Typical devices embody a remote source of chilled water that is pumped through a circulation bladder placed on the treatment site. In contrast, the present device uses thermoelectric refrigeration modules to bring the cooling source directly to the tissue to be treated, thereby achieving significant improvements in control of therapeutic temperature while having a reduced size and weight. A prototype system was applied to test an oscillating cooling and heating protocol for efficacy in regulating skin blood perfusion in the treatment area. Data on 12 human subjects indicate that thermoelectric coolers (TECs) delivered significant and sustainable changes in perfusion for both heating (increase by (±SE) 173.0 ± 66.0%, P < 0.005) and cooling (decrease by (±SE) 57.7 ± 4.2%, P < 0.0005), thus supporting the feasibility of a TEC-based device for cryotherapy with local temperature regulation. PMID:26421089

  2. The human thermoneutral and thermal comfort zones: Thermal comfort in your own skin blood flow.

    PubMed

    Schlader, Zachary J

    2015-01-01

    Human thermoregulation is achieved via autonomic and behavioral responses. Autonomic responses involve 2 synchronous 'components'. One counteracts large thermal perturbations, eliciting robust heat loss or gain (i.e., sweating or shivering). The other fends off smaller insults, relying solely on changes in sensible heat exchange (i.e., skin blood flow). This sensible component occurs within the thermoneutral zone [i.e., the ambient temperature range in which temperature regulation is achieved only by sensible heat transfer, without regulatory increases in metabolic heat production (e.g., shivering) or evaporative heat loss (e.g., sweating)].(1) The combination of behavior and sensible heat exchange permits a range of conditions that are deemed thermally comfortable, which is defined as the thermal comfort zone.(1) Notably, we spend the majority of our lives within the thermoneutral and thermal comfort zones. It is only when we are unable to stay within these zones that deleterious health and safety outcomes can occur (i.e., hypo- or hyperthermia). Oddly, although the thermoneutral zone and thermal preference (a concept similar to the thermal comfort zone) has been extensively studied in non-human animals, our understanding of human thermoregulation within the thermoneutral and thermal comfort zones remains rather crude.

  3. The human thermoneutral and thermal comfort zones: Thermal comfort in your own skin blood flow

    PubMed Central

    Schlader, Zachary J

    2015-01-01

    Human thermoregulation is achieved via autonomic and behavioral responses. Autonomic responses involve 2 synchronous ‘components’. One counteracts large thermal perturbations, eliciting robust heat loss or gain (i.e., sweating or shivering). The other fends off smaller insults, relying solely on changes in sensible heat exchange (i.e., skin blood flow). This sensible component occurs within the thermoneutral zone [i.e., the ambient temperature range in which temperature regulation is achieved only by sensible heat transfer, without regulatory increases in metabolic heat production (e.g., shivering) or evaporative heat loss (e.g., sweating)].1 The combination of behavior and sensible heat exchange permits a range of conditions that are deemed thermally comfortable, which is defined as the thermal comfort zone.1 Notably, we spend the majority of our lives within the thermoneutral and thermal comfort zones. It is only when we are unable to stay within these zones that deleterious health and safety outcomes can occur (i.e., hypo- or hyperthermia). Oddly, although the thermoneutral zone and thermal preference (a concept similar to the thermal comfort zone) has been extensively studied in non-human animals, our understanding of human thermoregulation within the thermoneutral and thermal comfort zones remains rather crude. PMID:27226992

  4. Identification and characterization of Daldinia eschscholtzii isolated from skin scrapings, nails, and blood

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Kee Peng; Chan, Chai Ling; Yew, Su Mei; Yeo, Siok Koon; Toh, Yue Fen; Looi, Hong Keat; Na, Shiang Ling; Lee, Kok Wei; Yee, Wai-Yan

    2016-01-01

    Background Daldinia eschscholtzii is a filamentous wood-inhabiting endophyte commonly found in woody plants. Here, we report the identification and characterization of nine D. eschscholtzii isolates from skin scrapings, nail clippings, and blood. Methods The nine isolates were identified based on colony morphology, light microscopy, and internal transcribed spacer (ITS)-based phylogeny. In vitro antifungal susceptibility of the fungal isolates was evaluated by the Etest to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). Results The nine isolates examined were confirmed as D. eschscholtzii. They exhibited typical features of Daldinia sp. on Sabouraud Dextrose Agar, with white felty colonies and black-gray coloration on the reverse side. Septate hyphae, branching conidiophore with conidiogenous cells budding from its terminus, and nodulisporium-like conidiophores were observed under the microscope. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the nine isolates were clustered within the D. eschscholtzii species complex. All the isolates exhibited low MICs against azole agents (voriconazole, posaconazole, itraconazole, and ketoconazole), as well as amphotericin B, with MIC of less than 1 µg/ml. Discussion Early and definitive identification of D. eschscholtzii is vital to reducing misuse of antimicrobial agents. Detailed morphological and molecular characterization as well as antifungal profiling of D. eschscholtzii provide the basis for future studies on its biology, pathogenicity, and medicinal potential. PMID:28028453

  5. Local inhibition of nitric oxide generation in man reduces blood flow in finger pulp but not in hand dorsum skin.

    PubMed Central

    Noon, J P; Haynes, W G; Webb, D J; Shore, A C

    1996-01-01

    1. Nitric oxide generation is important in the regulation of resistance vessel tone. Until now, however, there has been no evidence of such a role for basal generation of nitric oxide in the skin microcirculation of humans. 2. To investigate this, L-NG-monomethylarginine (L-NMMA), a competitive inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase, was administered at 1, 2 and 4 mumol min-1 (each for 10 min), via the brachial artery, in six healthy male subjects. 3. At each dose, using laser Doppler fluximetry, red blood cell flux was measured as an index of blood flow in the pulp of the thumb, an area rich in arteriovenous anastomoses, and on the dorsal surface of the hand, where arteriovenous anastomoses are rare. Finger nailfold capillary blood velocity was monitored at each dose using videomicroscopy. Forearm blood flow was measured by venous occlusion plethysmography, before, and 8 min after, completing infusion of L-NMMA. All data were obtained from both the infused and control arms. 4. L-NMMA reduced blood flow in the infused forearm by 37% (P = 0.005). In contrast, dorsum red cell flux, capillary blood velocity, and skin temperature were unchanged. There was, however, a significant reduction in thumb red cell flux (ANOVA, P = 0.0001), reaching a maximum reduction of 33% with 4 mumol min-1 L-NMMA. There were no effects apparent in the opposite arm. 5. These results suggest that endogenous nitric oxide production may be more important in regulating microvascular skin blood flow in regions rich in arteriovenous anastomoses than in areas containing mainly nutritive vessels. PMID:8821146

  6. Investigating the roles of core and local temperature on forearm skin blood flow.

    PubMed

    Mallette, Matthew M; Hodges, Gary J; McGarr, Gregory W; Gabriel, David A; Cheung, Stephen S

    2016-07-01

    We sought to isolate the contributions of core and local temperature on forearm skin blood flow (SkBF), and to examine the interaction between local- and reflexive-mechanisms of SkBF control. Forearm SkBF was assessed using laser-Doppler flowmetry in eight males and eight females during normothermia and hyperthermia (+1.2°C rectal temperature). Mean experimental forearm temperature was manipulated in four, 5min blocks between neutral (A: 33.0°C) and warm (B: 38.5°C) in an A-B-A-B fashion during normothermia, and B-A-B-A during hyperthermia. Mean control forearm skin temperature was maintained at ~33°C. Finally, local heating to 44°C was performed on both forearms to elicit maximal SkBF. Data are presented as a percentage of maximal cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC), calculated as laser-Doppler flux divided by mean arterial pressure. No sex differences were observed in any CVC measures (P>0.05). During normothermia, increasing experimental forearm temperature to 38.5°C elevated CVC by 42±8%max (d=3.1, P<0.001). Subsequently decreasing experimental forearm temperature back down to 33.0°C reduced CVC by 36±7%max (d=2.5, P<0.001). Finally, the second increase in experimental forearm temperature to 38.5°C increased CVC by 25±6%max (d=1.9, P<0.0001). During hyperthermia, decreasing experimental forearm temperature to 33.0°C reduced CVC by 6±1%max (d=0.5, P<0.001). Increasing experimental forearm temperature to 38.5°C increased CVC by 4±2%max (d=0.4, P<0.001). Finally, decreasing experimental forearm temperature to 33.0°C reduced CVC by 8±2%max (d=0.7, P<0.001). Compared to normothermia, CVC responses to local temperature changes during hyperthermia were almost abolished (normothermia: d=1.9-3.1; hyperthermia: d=0.4-0.7). These data indicate that local temperature drives SkBF during normothermia, while reflexive mechanisms regulate SkBF during hyperthermia.

  7. Skin blood flow differentially affects near-infrared spectroscopy-derived measures of muscle oxygen saturation and blood volume at rest and during dynamic leg exercise.

    PubMed

    Tew, Garry A; Ruddock, Alan D; Saxton, John M

    2010-11-01

    The impact of skin blood flow changes on near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS)-derived measures of muscle oxygen saturation (SmO(2)) and blood volume has not been fully established. We measured SmO(2) and total hemoglobin concentration ([tHb]) responses of the right vastus lateralis during rest and dynamic knee extension exercise in ten young, healthy males. The protocol was repeated four times: twice without thigh heating for reliability, and twice with different grades of thigh heating for assessing the impact of cutaneous vasodilation on SmO(2) and Δ[tHb]. The reliability of our SmO(2) and [tHb] measurements was good. Thigh heating at 37 and 42°C caused marked increases in cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) during rest and exercise (P < 0.001 between each condition), and small increases in SmO(2) during rest (from 69 ± 8% to 71 ± 7% and 73 ± 6%, respectively; P < 0.05 between each condition), but not during exercise (e.g. 1 min exercise: 51 ± 11% vs. 51 ± 11% and 52 ± 11%, respectively; P > 0.05 at all time points). In contrast, heating-induced increases in %CVC(peak) were accompanied by increases in [tHb] at rest and during exercise and a decrease in Δ[tHb] during exercise (all P < 0.05). Our findings suggest that NIRS-derived measures of SmO(2) and blood volume are differentially affected by skin blood flow at rest and during exercise. The findings from this study should be considered in NIRS experiments where skin blood flow can change markedly (e.g. high-intensity and/or prolonged exercise).

  8. Adenosine receptor inhibition with theophylline attenuates the skin blood flow response to local heating in humans.

    PubMed

    Fieger, Sarah M; Wong, Brett J

    2010-09-01

    Mechanisms underlying the robust cutaneous vasodilatation in response to local heating of human skin remain unresolved. Adenosine receptor activation has been shown to induce vasodilatation via nitric oxide, and a substantial portion of the plateau phase to local heating of human skin has been shown to be dependent on nitric oxide. The purpose of this study was to investigate a potential role for adenosine receptor activation in cutaneous thermal hyperaemia in humans. Six subjects were equipped with four microdialysis fibres on the ventral forearm. Sites were randomly assigned to receive one of the following four treatments: (1) lactated Ringer solution to serve as a control; (2) 4 mM theophylline, a competitive, non-selective A(1)/A(2) adenosine receptor antagonist; (3) 10 mM Nomega(-)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) to inhibit NO synthase; or (4) combined 4 mm theophylline + 10 mM L-NAME. Following baseline measurements, each site was locally heated from a baseline temperature of 33 degrees C to 42 degrees C at a rate of 1 degrees C (10 s)(-1), and skin blood flow was monitored via laser-Doppler flowmetry (LDF). Cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) was calculated as LDF divided by mean arterial pressure and normalized to maximal values (CVC(max)) via local heating to 43 degrees C and infusion of 28 mM sodium nitroprusside. The initial peak was significantly reduced in theophylline (68 +/- 2% CVC(max)) and L-NAME sites (54 +/- 5% CVC(max)) compared with control sites (81 +/- 2% CVC(max); P < 0.01 and P < 0.001, respectively). Combined theophylline + L-NAME (52 +/- 5% CVC(max)) reduced the initial peak compared with control and theophylline sites, but was not significantly different compared with L-NAME sites. The secondary plateau was attenuated in theophylline (77 +/- 2% CVC(max)), L-NAME (60 +/- 2% CVC(max)) and theophylline + L-NAME (53 +/- 1% CVC(max)) compared with control sites (94 +/- 2% CVC(max); P < 0.001 for all conditions). The secondary plateau

  9. Diagnostic Efficacy of Molecular Techniques for Detection and Identification of Leishmania Species in Human Whole Blood and Skin Samples from Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Erika B; Santander, Stephanie; Rojas-Silva, Patricio; Cardenas, Paul A; Fornasini, Marco; Cifuentes, Sara C; Salvador, Daniela; Baldeón, Manuel E

    2016-10-05

    Microscopic examination is the standard method for diagnosis of cutaneous and mucocutaneous leishmaniasis despite its low sensitivity. This study compared the diagnosis efficacy of microscopic examination versus polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods and DNA sequencing using whole blood and skin lesion samples from patients with suspected leishmaniasis. The presence of Leishmania was determined by microscopy and amplification of 18S ribosomal RNA gene from blood and skin samples of 22 patients. Twenty individuals were positive for leishmaniasis. Microscopic analysis identified 85%, whereas PCR identified 100% of positive cases from skin and 90% from blood. Cytochrome b gene (cyt-b) amplification and sequencing identified Leishmania guyanensis, Leishmania shawi, and Leishmania naiffi from skin and blood samples. This study demonstrated the usefulness of whole blood and molecular techniques for the diagnosis and species identification of leishmaniasis. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  10. Diagnostic Efficacy of Molecular Techniques for Detection and Identification of Leishmania Species in Human Whole Blood and Skin Samples from Ecuador

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, Erika B.; Santander, Stephanie; Rojas-Silva, Patricio; Cardenas, Paul A.; Fornasini, Marco; Cifuentes, Sara C.; Salvador, Daniela; Baldeón, Manuel E.

    2016-01-01

    Microscopic examination is the standard method for diagnosis of cutaneous and mucocutaneous leishmaniasis despite its low sensitivity. This study compared the diagnosis efficacy of microscopic examination versus polymerase chain reaction (PCR)–based methods and DNA sequencing using whole blood and skin lesion samples from patients with suspected leishmaniasis. The presence of Leishmania was determined by microscopy and amplification of 18S ribosomal RNA gene from blood and skin samples of 22 patients. Twenty individuals were positive for leishmaniasis. Microscopic analysis identified 85%, whereas PCR identified 100% of positive cases from skin and 90% from blood. Cytochrome b gene (cyt-b) amplification and sequencing identified Leishmania guyanensis, Leishmania shawi, and Leishmania naiffi from skin and blood samples. This study demonstrated the usefulness of whole blood and molecular techniques for the diagnosis and species identification of leishmaniasis. PMID:27481055

  11. Three-dimensional interactions of mean body and local skin temperatures in the control of hand and foot blood flows.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, Joanne N; Matsuda-Nakamura, Mayumi; Taylor, Nigel A S

    2014-08-01

    Much is known about the control of blood flow, yet gaps remain concerning the interactions of deep-body and peripheral thermal feedback. In this experiment, changes in the vascular tone of the hands and feet were mapped to demonstrate the separate and combined influences of mean body and local skin temperature changes. Eight males participated in three trials. Three pre-experimental conditions were established via water immersion (oesophageal temperatures: 36.1, 37.0, 38.5 °C), with core and mean skin temperatures then clamped (water-perfusion garment) whilst five thermal treatments were applied to the right hand and left foot (5, 15, 25, 33, 40 °C). This yielded 15 thermal combinations under which hand and foot blood flows were measured (displacement plethysmography). Lower volume-specific blood flows were observed at the foot for almost all temperature combinations. When thermoneutral and moderately hyperthermic, the cutaneous thermosensitivity of the hand was significantly greater: thermoneutral: 0.2 vs. 0.1 (foot) mL 100 mL(-1) min(-1) °C(-1) (P < 0.05); moderate hyperthermia: 0.4 vs. 0.2 (foot) mL 100 mL(-1) min(-1) °C(-1) (P < 0.05). The hand was 13 times more responsive to core temperature elevations than an equivalent local skin temperature change. For the foot, this thermosensitivity differed by a factor of 26. These observations identified the hands as heat radiators, with the feet resisting heat loss, and reinforce the dominance of central thermal feedback, particularly in controlling foot blood flow. However, thermosensitivity to local skin temperature changes was highly plastic, site-specific and dictated by thermal and regional variations in vaso- and venoconstrictor tone.

  12. Effects of permanent magnets on resting skin blood perfusion in healthy persons assessed by laser Doppler flowmetry and imaging.

    PubMed

    Mayrovitz, H N; Groseclose, E E; Markov, M; Pilla, A A

    2001-10-01

    Effects on skin blood perfusion of permanent ceramic magnets [0.1 T (1000 G) surface field], individually (disk shaped, 4 cm diameter x 1 cm thick) or in the form of a 11 x 7 in pad ( approximately 28 x 17.8 cm) with an array of 16 rectangular magnets (4.5 x 2.2 cm), were investigated in 16 female volunteers (27.4 +/- 1.7 years, range 21-48 years) using three separate protocols. In protocol A, a disk magnet was placed on the palmar surface of the hand in contact with the thenar eminence (n = 5). In protocol B, the magnet was placed on the hand dorsum overlying the thenar eminence (n = 5). In protocol C, the entire palm and fingers rested on the magnetic pad (n = 6). Magnets were in place for 36 min on one hand, and a sham was in place on the other hand. Blood perfusion was measured on the middle finger dorsum by laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) and on the index finger by laser Doppler imaging (LDI). Perfusion measurements were simultaneously taken in sham and magnet exposed hands, before and during the entire magnet exposure interval. Magnetic field effects were tested by comparing skin blood perfusion sequences in magnet and sham exposed regions. Results showed no significant changes in either LDF or LDI perfusion at magnet or sham sites during exposure, nor were there any significant differences between sham and magnet sites for any protocol. Measurements of skin temperature at the LDF measurement sites also showed no significant change. It is concluded that in the healthy subjects studied with normal, unstressed circulation, magnets of the type and for the duration used, showed no detectible effect on skin blood perfusion in the anatomical area studied.

  13. Role of skin blood flow and sweating rate in exercise thermoregulation after bed rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Stuart M C.; Williams, W. Jon; Schneider, Suzanne M.

    2002-01-01

    Two potential mechanisms, reduced skin blood flow (SBF) and sweating rate (SR), may be responsible for elevated intestinal temperature (T(in)) during exercise after bed rest and spaceflight. Seven men underwent 13 days of 6 degrees head-down bed rest. Pre- and post-bed rest, subjects completed supine submaximal cycle ergometry (20 min at 40% and 20 min at 65% of pre-bed rest supine peak exercise capacity) in a thermoneutral room. After bed rest, T(in) was elevated at rest (+0.31 +/- 0.12 degrees C) and at the end of exercise (+0.33 +/- 0.07 degrees C). Percent increase in SBF during exercise was less after bed rest (211 +/- 53 vs. 96 +/- 31%; P < or = 0.05), SBF/T(in) threshold was greater (37.09 +/- 0.16 vs. 37.33 +/- 0.13 degrees C; P < or = 0.05), and slope of SBF/T(in) tended to be reduced (536 +/- 184 vs. 201 +/- 46%/ degrees C; P = 0.08). SR/T(in) threshold was delayed (37.06 +/- 0.11 vs. 37.34 +/- 0.06 degrees C; P < or = 0.05), but the slope of SR/T(in) (3.45 +/- 1.22 vs. 2.58 +/- 0.71 mg x min-1 x cm-2 x degrees C-1) and total sweat loss (0.42 +/- 0.06 vs. 0.44 +/- 0.08 kg) were not changed. The higher resting and exercise T(in) and delayed onset of SBF and SR suggest a centrally mediated elevation in the thermoregulatory set point during bed rest exposure.

  14. Correlations between skin blood perfusion values and nailfold capillaroscopy scores in systemic sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Ruaro, B; Sulli, A; Pizzorni, C; Paolino, S; Smith, V; Cutolo, M

    2016-05-01

    To correlate blood perfusion (BP) values assessed by laser speckle contrast analysis (LASCA) in selected skin areas of hands and face with nailfold capillary damage scores in systemic sclerosis (SSc) patients. Seventy SSc patients (mean SSc duration 6 ± 5 years) and 70 volunteer healthy subjects were enrolled after informed consent. LASCA was performed at different areas of the face (forehead, tip of nose, zygomas and perioral region) and at dorsal and volar regions of hands. Microvascular damage was assessed and scored by nailfold videocapillaroscopy (NVC) and the microangiopathy evolution score (MES) was calculated. SSc patients showed a significantly lower BP than healthy subjects at fingertips, periungual areas and palm of hands (p<0.0001), but not at the level of face and dorsum of hands. A gradual decrease of BP at fingertips, periungual and palm areas, was found in SSc patients with progressive severity of NVC patterns of microangiopathy ("early", "active", or "late") (p<0.01). A negative correlation was observed between MES and BP values, as well as between loss of capillaries and BP, at the same areas (p<0.001 and p<0.01, respectively). Patients with diffuse cutaneous SSc (dcSSc) showed lower BP than those with limited cutaneous SSc (p<0.04). LASCA detects a significant reduction of BP only in those areas usually affected by Raynaud's phenomenon (fingertips, periungual and palm areas), especially in dcSSc patients, and BP values significantly correlate with the nailfold capillaroscopy scores of microangiopathy. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Role of skin blood flow and sweating rate in exercise thermoregulation after bed rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Stuart M C.; Williams, W. Jon; Schneider, Suzanne M.

    2002-01-01

    Two potential mechanisms, reduced skin blood flow (SBF) and sweating rate (SR), may be responsible for elevated intestinal temperature (T(in)) during exercise after bed rest and spaceflight. Seven men underwent 13 days of 6 degrees head-down bed rest. Pre- and post-bed rest, subjects completed supine submaximal cycle ergometry (20 min at 40% and 20 min at 65% of pre-bed rest supine peak exercise capacity) in a thermoneutral room. After bed rest, T(in) was elevated at rest (+0.31 +/- 0.12 degrees C) and at the end of exercise (+0.33 +/- 0.07 degrees C). Percent increase in SBF during exercise was less after bed rest (211 +/- 53 vs. 96 +/- 31%; P < or = 0.05), SBF/T(in) threshold was greater (37.09 +/- 0.16 vs. 37.33 +/- 0.13 degrees C; P < or = 0.05), and slope of SBF/T(in) tended to be reduced (536 +/- 184 vs. 201 +/- 46%/ degrees C; P = 0.08). SR/T(in) threshold was delayed (37.06 +/- 0.11 vs. 37.34 +/- 0.06 degrees C; P < or = 0.05), but the slope of SR/T(in) (3.45 +/- 1.22 vs. 2.58 +/- 0.71 mg x min-1 x cm-2 x degrees C-1) and total sweat loss (0.42 +/- 0.06 vs. 0.44 +/- 0.08 kg) were not changed. The higher resting and exercise T(in) and delayed onset of SBF and SR suggest a centrally mediated elevation in the thermoregulatory set point during bed rest exposure.

  16. Local cooling reduces skin ischemia under surface pressure in rats: an assessment by wavelet analysis of laser Doppler blood flow oscillations.

    PubMed

    Jan, Yih-Kuen; Lee, Bernard; Liao, Fuyuan; Foreman, Robert D

    2012-10-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate the effects of local cooling on skin blood flow response to prolonged surface pressure and to identify associated physiological controls mediating these responses using the wavelet analysis of blood flow oscillations in rats. Twelve Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to three protocols, including pressure with local cooling (Δt = -10 °C), pressure with local heating (Δt = 10 °C) and pressure without temperature changes. Pressure of 700 mmHg was applied to the right trochanter area of rats for 3 h. Skin blood flow was measured using laser Doppler flowmetry. The 3 h loading period was divided into non-overlapping 30 min epochs for the analysis of the changes of skin blood flow oscillations using wavelet spectral analysis. The wavelet amplitudes and powers of three frequencies (metabolic, neurogenic and myogenic) of skin blood flow oscillations were calculated. The results showed that after an initial loading period of 30 min, skin blood flow continually decreased under the conditions of pressure with heating and of pressure without temperature changes, but maintained stable under the condition of pressure with cooling. Wavelet analysis revealed that stable skin blood flow under pressure with cooling was attributed to changes in the metabolic and myogenic frequencies. This study demonstrates that local cooling may be useful for reducing ischemia of weight-bearing soft tissues that prevents pressure ulcers.

  17. Local cooling reduces skin ischemia under surface pressure in rats: an assessment by wavelet analysis of laser Doppler blood flow oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Jan, Yih-Kuen; Lee, Bernard; Liao, Fuyuan; Foreman, Robert D.

    2012-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate the effects of local cooling on skin blood flow response to prolonged surface pressure and to identify associated physiological controls mediating these responses using wavelet analysis of blood flow oscillations in rats. Twelve Sprague Dawley rats were randomly assigned into three protocols, including pressure with local cooling (Δt= −10°C), pressure with local heating (Δt= 10°C), and pressure without temperature changes. Pressure of 700 mmHg was applied to the right trochanter area of rats for 3 hours. Skin blood flow was measured using laser Doppler flowmetry. The 3-hour loading period was divided into non-overlapping 30 min epochs for analysis of the changes of skin blood flow oscillations using wavelet spectral analysis. The wavelet amplitudes and powers of three frequencies (metabolic, neurogenic and myogenic) of skin blood flow oscillations were calculated. The results showed that after an initial loading period of 30 min, skin blood flow continually decreased in the conditions of pressure with heating and of pressure without temperature changes, but maintained stable in the condition of pressure with cooling. Wavelet analysis revealed that stable skin blood flow under pressure with cooling was attributed to changes in the metabolic and myogenic frequencies. This study demonstrates that local cooling may be useful for reducing ischemia of weight-bearing soft tissues that prevents pressure ulcers. PMID:23010955

  18. Influence of skin blood flow on near-infrared spectroscopy signals measured on the forehead during a verbal fluency task.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Toshimitsu; Takikawa, Yoriko; Kawagoe, Reiko; Shibuya, Satoshi; Iwano, Takayuki; Kitazawa, Shigeru

    2011-08-01

    Brain activity during a verbal fluency task (VFT) has been the target of many functional imaging studies. Most studies using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) have reported major activation in the frontal pole, but those using PET or fMRI have not. This led us to hypothesize that changes in the NIRS signals measured in the forehead during VFT were due to changes in skin blood flow. To test this hypothesis, we measured NIRS signals and the Doppler tissue blood flow signals in the foreheads of 50 participants. The measurements were performed while each participant produced words during two 60-s periods with an interval of 100 s. In addition to a conventional optode separation distance of 30 mm (FAR channels), we used a short distance--5mm (NEAR channels)--to measure NIRS signals that originated exclusively from surface tissues. The oxygenated hemoglobin (oxyHb) concentration in the FAR and NEAR channels, as well as the Doppler blood flow signal, increased in a similar manner during the two periods of word production; the signal increase in the first period was twice as high as that in the second period. Accordingly, the mean changes in oxyHb concentration in the FAR channels were correlated closely with the changes in the NEAR channels (R(2) = 0.91) and with the integrated Doppler skin blood flow signal (R(2) = 0.94). Furthermore, task-related NIRS responses disappeared when we blocked skin blood flows by pressing a small area that covered a pair of optodes. Additionally, changes in the FAR channel signals were correlated closely with the magnitude of pulsatile waves in the Doppler signal (R(2) = 0.92), but these signals were not highly correlated with the pulse rate (R(2) = 0.43). These results suggest that a major part of the task-related changes in the oxyHb concentration in the forehead is due to task-related changes in the skin blood flow, which is under different autonomic control than heart rate.

  19. Relationship between nonlinear properties of sacral skin blood flow oscillations and vasodilatory function in people at risk for pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Liao, Fuyuan; Garrison, David W; Jan, Yih-Kuen

    2010-07-01

    The purposes of this study were to quantify the nonlinear properties of sacral skin blood flow oscillations (BFO) and to explore their relationships with impaired vasodilatory function in people at risk for pressure ulcers. A total of 25 people with various levels of vasodilatory functions were studied, 10 people with normal vasodilatory function (Biphasic thermal index, BTI (5.5, 4.5, 10.1)), 10 people with slight impaired vasodilatory function (BTI (3.7, 3.2, 6.7)), and 5 people with severe impaired vasodilation (BTI (2.4, 1.7, 4.5)). A non-painful fast heating protocol was applied to the sacral region to induce biphasic vasodilation, axon reflex mediated and nitric oxide mediated. Biphasic thermal index is defined as ratios of first peak, nadir, and second peak to baseline blood flow. Laser Doppler flowmetry was used to record the BFO signals. Nonlinear properties of BFO were quantified based on self-similarity using Hurst exponent (HE) and detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA), regularity using sample entropy (SampEn), complexity using correlation dimension (CD), and chaotic behavior using largest Lyapunov exponent (LLE). The Wilcoxon signed rank tests were used to examine the differences between groups. Our results showed that local heating reduces the self-similarity and increases complexity of skin blood flow oscillations. Vasodilatory function has an inverse relationship with nonlinear properties in sacral skin baseline BFO. Nonlinear indexes, including HE, DFA, CD, and LLE, are appropriate tools to quantify nonlinear properties of BFO to study the microvascular dysfunction (p<0.05), and that SampEn may not be appropriate for this purpose (p>0.05). Our study supports the use of nonlinear indexes to predict the vasodilatory function, which can complement current analysis of blood flow control mechanisms using spectral (wavelet) analysis.

  20. Effect of change in blood volume in skin plus active muscle on heart rate drift during submaximal exercise.

    PubMed

    Yano, T; Yunoki, T; Matsuura, R; Arimitsu, T; Kimura, T

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the effect of change in blood volume in skin plus active muscle on heart rate drift during moderate exercise and heavy exercise for 30 min. Total hemoglobin concentration (Total Hb) in the vastus lateralis muscle plus its skin was determined by near-infrared spectroscopy. Total Hb significantly increased and remained stable from 20 min in moderate exercise and from 10 min in heavy exercise. Heart rate (HR) rapidly increased until 3 min and showed a steady state in moderate exercise. HR at 30 min was significantly higher than that at 3 min in moderate exercise. HR rapidly increased until 3 min and then gradually but significantly increased in heavy exercise. Increase in total Hb was not significantly related with HR after 3 min of exercise when HR was around 120 beats per min in moderate exercise. Increase in total Hb was significantly related with HR from 3 min to 10 min in the heavy exercise (correlation coefficients ranged from 0.959 to 0.702). It is concluded that an increase in the blood volume in skin plus active muscle is not simply associated with HR drift.

  1. An aspartic protease of the scabies mite Sarcoptes scabiei is involved in the digestion of host skin and blood macromolecules.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, Wajahat; Viberg, Linda T; Fischer, Katja; Walton, Shelley F; Holt, Deborah C

    2013-11-01

    Scabies is a disease of worldwide significance, causing considerable morbidity in both humans and other animals. The scabies mite Sarcoptes scabiei burrows into the skin of its host, obtaining nutrition from host skin and blood. Aspartic proteases mediate a range of diverse and essential physiological functions such as tissue invasion and migration, digestion, moulting and reproduction in a number of parasitic organisms. We investigated whether aspartic proteases may play role in scabies mite digestive processes. We demonstrated the presence of aspartic protease activity in whole scabies mite extract. We then identified a scabies mite aspartic protease gene sequence and produced recombinant active enzyme. The recombinant scabies mite aspartic protease was capable of digesting human haemoglobin, serum albumin, fibrinogen and fibronectin, but not collagen III or laminin. This is consistent with the location of the scabies mites in the upper epidermis of human skin. The development of novel therapeutics for scabies is of increasing importance given the evidence of emerging resistance to current treatments. We have shown that a scabies mite aspartic protease plays a role in the digestion of host skin and serum molecules, raising the possibility that interference with the function of the enzyme may impact on mite survival.

  2. An Aspartic Protease of the Scabies Mite Sarcoptes scabiei Is Involved in the Digestion of Host Skin and Blood Macromolecules

    PubMed Central

    Mahmood, Wajahat; Viberg, Linda T.; Fischer, Katja; Walton, Shelley F.; Holt, Deborah C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Scabies is a disease of worldwide significance, causing considerable morbidity in both humans and other animals. The scabies mite Sarcoptes scabiei burrows into the skin of its host, obtaining nutrition from host skin and blood. Aspartic proteases mediate a range of diverse and essential physiological functions such as tissue invasion and migration, digestion, moulting and reproduction in a number of parasitic organisms. We investigated whether aspartic proteases may play role in scabies mite digestive processes. Methodology/Principle Findings We demonstrated the presence of aspartic protease activity in whole scabies mite extract. We then identified a scabies mite aspartic protease gene sequence and produced recombinant active enzyme. The recombinant scabies mite aspartic protease was capable of digesting human haemoglobin, serum albumin, fibrinogen and fibronectin, but not collagen III or laminin. This is consistent with the location of the scabies mites in the upper epidermis of human skin. Conclusions/Significance The development of novel therapeutics for scabies is of increasing importance given the evidence of emerging resistance to current treatments. We have shown that a scabies mite aspartic protease plays a role in the digestion of host skin and serum molecules, raising the possibility that interference with the function of the enzyme may impact on mite survival. PMID:24244770

  3. Does attenuated skin blood flow lower sweat rate and the critical environmental limit for heat balance during severe heat exposure?

    PubMed

    Cramer, Matthew N; Gagnon, Daniel; Crandall, Craig G; Jay, Ollie

    2017-02-01

    What is the central question of this study? Does attenuated skin blood flow diminish sweating and reduce the critical environmental limit for heat balance, which indicates maximal heat loss potential, during severe heat stress? What is the main finding and its importance? Isosmotic hypovolaemia attenuated skin blood flow by ∼20% but did not result in different sweating rates, mean skin temperatures or critical environmental limits for heat balance compared with control and volume-infusion treatments, suggesting that the lower levels of skin blood flow commonly observed in aged and diseased populations may not diminish maximal whole-body heat dissipation. Attenuated skin blood flow (SkBF) is often assumed to impair core temperature (Tc ) regulation. Profound pharmacologically induced reductions in SkBF (∼85%) lead to impaired sweating, but whether the smaller attenuations in SkBF (∼20%) more often associated with ageing and certain diseases lead to decrements in sweating and maximal heat loss potential is unknown. Seven healthy men (28 ± 4 years old) completed a 30 min equilibration period at 41°C and a vapour pressure (Pa ) of 2.57 kPa followed by incremental steps in Pa of 0.17 kPa every 6 min to 5.95 kPa. Differences in heat loss potential were assessed by identifying the critical vapour pressure (Pcrit ) at which an upward inflection in Tc occurred. The following three separate treatments elicited changes in plasma volume to achieve three distinct levels of SkBF: control (CON); diuretic-induced isosmotic dehydration to lower SkBF (DEH); and continuous saline infusion to maintain SkBF (SAL). The Tc , mean skin temperature (Tsk ), heart rate, mean laser-Doppler flux (forearm and thigh; LDFmean ), mean local sweat rate (forearm and thigh; LSRmean ) and metabolic rate were measured. In DEH, a 14.2 ± 5.7% lower plasma volume resulted in a ∼20% lower LDFmean in perfusion units (PU) (DEH, 139 ± 23 PU; CON, 176 ± 22 PU; and SAL, 186 ± 22

  4. Melatonin reduces oxidative damage to skin and normalizes blood coagulation in a rat model of thermal injury.

    PubMed

    Tunali, Tugba; Sener, Goksel; Yarat, Aysen; Emekli, Nesrin

    2005-01-28

    This study was designed to determine the effect of melatonin treatment on the glutathione (GSH) and lipid peroxidation (LPO) levels in the skin as well as prothrombin time (PT) and fibrin degradation products (FDPs) in the blood of rats with thermal injury. Under ether anaesthesia, the shaved dorsum of the rats was exposed to 90 degrees C bath for 10 s to induce burn injury. Rats were decapitated either 3 or 24 hours after burn injury. Melatonin (10 mg/kg) was administered i.p. immediately after burn injury to same animals. In the 24 hour burn group, melatonin injections were repeated for two more occasions 8 and 16 h after burn injury. In the control group the same protocol was applied except that the dorsum was exposed to a 25 degrees C water bath for 10 s. Severe skin scald injury (30% of total body surface area) caused a significant decrease in PT at post burn 3 and 24 hours. FDPs was not increased at post burn 3 hour but was significantly increased at post burn 24 hour. GSH levels were significantly depressed at post burn 3 hour but were not changed at post burn 24 hour. LPO levels were significantly increased both at post burn 3 and 24 hours. Skin protein levels were significantly reduced at post burn 24 hour as evidenced by electrophoresis. Treatment of rats with melatonin normalized PT levels both at post burn 3 and 24 hours. FDP decreased at post burn 24 hour due to melatonin treatment. GSH levels significantly increased as a result of melatonin treatment both at post burn 3 and 24 hours melatonin treatment. LPO levels were not changed by melatonin at post burn 3 hour; however, the melatonin significantly decreased LPO values at post burn 24 hours. In conclusion, exogenously administered melatonin reduced skin oxidant damage and normalized the activated blood coagulation induced by thermal trauma.

  5. Reduction of regulatory T cells in skin lesions but not in peripheral blood of patients with systemic scleroderma.

    PubMed

    Klein, S; Kretz, C C; Ruland, V; Stumpf, C; Haust, M; Hartschuh, W; Hartmann, M; Enk, A; Suri-Payer, E; Oberle, N; Krammer, P H; Kuhn, A

    2011-08-01

    To determine the frequency and suppressive capacity of regulatory T cells (T(reg)) and their association with clinical parameters in patients with systemic scleroderma (SSc). Peripheral blood from 25 patients with SSc, 15 patients with localised scleroderma (LS) and 29 healthy controls (HC) was studied. Analysis of CD4(+) forkhead box P3 (Foxp3)(+) and CD4(+)CD25(++)Foxp3(+) T(reg) subpopulations was carried out by flow cytometry and cell proliferation was quantified by (3)H-thymidine incorporation. Quantitative analysis of T(reg) was further performed in skin biopsies from 17 patients with SSc and 21 patients with LS using anti-CD4 and anti-Foxp3 monoclonal antibodies for immunohistochemistry. The frequency of CD4(+)Foxp3(+) and CD4(+)CD25(++)Foxp3(+) T(reg) in peripheral blood from patients with SSc was not significantly different from that of patients with LS or HC. The suppressive capacity of CD4(+)CD25(++) T(reg) in SSc was also found to be similar to that of HC. Phenotypic and functional data revealed no significant difference between the limited or diffuse form of SSc. Moreover, therapy with bosentan showed no significant effect on the frequency of T(reg) during the course of the disease. However, the frequency of T(reg) in skin lesions from patients with SSc or LS, determined as the percentage of CD4(+) cells expressing Foxp3 in the inflammatory infiltrate, was significantly reduced compared with other inflammatory skin diseases. These results indicate that although the authors found no defect in the frequency or function of peripheral T(reg) subpopulations, the reduction of CD4(+)Foxp3(+) T(reg) in the skin of patients with SSc may be important in the pathogenesis of the disease.

  6. Increases in muscle sympathetic nerve activity, heart rate, respiration, and skin blood flow during passive viewing of exercise

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Rachael; Kemp, Ursula; Macefield, Vaughan

    2013-01-01

    The cardiovascular and respiratory effects of exercise have been widely studied, as have the autonomic effects of imagined and observed exercise. However, the effects of observed exercise in the first person have not been documented, nor have direct recordings of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) been obtained during observed or imagined exercise. The aim of the current study was to measure blood pressure, heart rate, respiration, skin blood flow, sweat release, and MSNA (via microelectrodes inserted into the common peroneal nerve), during observation of exercise from the first person point of view. It was hypothesized that the moving stimuli would produce robust compensatory increases in the above-mentioned parameters as effectively as those generated by mental imagery and—to a lesser extent—actual exercise. Nine subjects watched a first-person running video, allowing them to view the action from the perspective of the runner rather than viewing someone else perform the exercise. On average, statistically significant increases from baseline during the running phase were seen in heart rate, respiratory rate, skin blood flow, and burst amplitude of MSNA. These results suggest that observation of exercise in the first person is a strong enough stimulus to evoke “physiologically appropriate” autonomic responses that have a purely psychogenic origin. PMID:23781170

  7. Neural and non-neural control of skin blood flow during isometric handgrip exercise in the heat stressed human

    PubMed Central

    Shibasaki, Manabu; Rasmussen, Peter; Secher, Niels H; Crandall, Craig G

    2009-01-01

    During heat stress, isometric handgrip (IHG) exercise causes cutaneous vasoconstriction, but it remains controversial whether neural mechanisms are responsible for this observation. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that cutaneous vasoconstriction during IHG exercise in heat stressed individuals occurs via a neural mechanism. An axillary nerve blockade was performed to block efferent nerve traffic to the left forearm in seven healthy subjects. Two intradermal microdialysis probes were placed within forearm skin of the blocked area. Forearm skin blood flow was measured by laser-Doppler flowmetry over the microdialysis probes as well as from skin of the contralateral (unblocked) forearm. Cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) was calculated from the ratio of skin blood flow to mean arterial pressure. Effectiveness of nerve blockade was verified by the absence of tactile sensation, as well as an absence of sweating and cutaneous vasodilatation during a whole-body heat stress. Upon this confirmation, adenosine was perfused through one of the microdialysis probes to increase skin blood flow similar to that of the unblocked site. After internal temperature increased ∼0.7°C, subjects performed 2 min of IHG exercise at 35% of maximal voluntary contraction using the non-blocked arm. IHG exercise significantly decreased CVC at the unblocked site (82.3 ± 5.7 to 70.9 ± 5.4%max, P= 0.005, means ±s.e.m.) and the adenosine treated site of the blocked arm (75.2 ± 7.2 to 68.3 ± 6.6%max, P= 0.005), whereas CVC was unchanged at the blocked site that did not receive adenosine (15.7 ± 2.8 to 13.7 ± 2.0%max, P= 0.10). Importantly, the reduction in CVC was greater at the unblocked site than at the adenosine treated site (11.4 ± 2.6 vs. 6.9 ± 1.6%max, respectively, P= 0.01). These findings suggest that neural and non-neural mechanisms contribute to the reduction in forearm CVC during IHG exercise in heat stressed humans. PMID:19307299

  8. Neural and non-neural control of skin blood flow during isometric handgrip exercise in the heat stressed human.

    PubMed

    Shibasaki, Manabu; Rasmussen, Peter; Secher, Niels H; Crandall, Craig G

    2009-05-01

    During heat stress, isometric handgrip (IHG) exercise causes cutaneous vasoconstriction, but it remains controversial whether neural mechanisms are responsible for this observation. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that cutaneous vasoconstriction during IHG exercise in heat stressed individuals occurs via a neural mechanism. An axillary nerve blockade was performed to block efferent nerve traffic to the left forearm in seven healthy subjects. Two intradermal microdialysis probes were placed within forearm skin of the blocked area. Forearm skin blood flow was measured by laser-Doppler flowmetry over the microdialysis probes as well as from skin of the contralateral (unblocked) forearm. Cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) was calculated from the ratio of skin blood flow to mean arterial pressure. Effectiveness of nerve blockade was verified by the absence of tactile sensation, as well as an absence of sweating and cutaneous vasodilatation during a whole-body heat stress. Upon this confirmation, adenosine was perfused through one of the microdialysis probes to increase skin blood flow similar to that of the unblocked site. After internal temperature increased approximately 0.7 degrees C, subjects performed 2 min of IHG exercise at 35% of maximal voluntary contraction using the non-blocked arm. IHG exercise significantly decreased CVC at the unblocked site (82.3 +/- 5.7 to 70.9 +/- 5.4%max, P = 0.005, means +/- S.E.M.) and the adenosine treated site of the blocked arm (75.2 +/- 7.2 to 68.3 +/- 6.6%max, P = 0.005), whereas CVC was unchanged at the blocked site that did not receive adenosine (15.7 +/- 2.8 to 13.7 +/- 2.0%max, P = 0.10). Importantly, the reduction in CVC was greater at the unblocked site than at the adenosine treated site (11.4 +/- 2.6 vs. 6.9 +/- 1.6%max, respectively, P = 0.01). These findings suggest that neural and non-neural mechanisms contribute to the reduction in forearm CVC during IHG exercise in heat stressed humans.

  9. Immune Evasion and Recognition of the Syphilis Spirochete in Blood and Skin of Secondary Syphilis Patients: Two Immunologically Distinct Compartments

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Adriana R.; Ramirez, Lady G.; Zuluaga, Ana V.; Pillay, Allan; Abreu, Christine; Valencia, Carlos A.; La Vake, Carson; Cervantes, Jorge L.; Dunham-Ems, Star; Cartun, Richard; Mavilio, Domenico; Radolf, Justin D.; Salazar, Juan C.

    2012-01-01

    Background The clinical syndrome associated with secondary syphilis (SS) reflects the propensity of Treponema pallidum (Tp) to escape immune recognition while simultaneously inducing inflammation. Methods To better understand the duality of immune evasion and immune recognition in human syphilis, herein we used a combination of flow cytometry, immunohistochemistry (IHC), and transcriptional profiling to study the immune response in the blood and skin of 27 HIV(-) SS patients in relation to spirochetal burdens. Ex vivo opsonophagocytosis assays using human syphilitic sera (HSS) were performed to model spirochete-monocyte/macrophage interactions in vivo. Results Despite the presence of low-level spirochetemia, as well as immunophenotypic changes suggestive of monocyte activation, we did not detect systemic cytokine production. SS subjects had substantial decreases in circulating DCs and in IFNγ-producing and cytotoxic NK-cells, along with an emergent CD56−/CD16+ NK-cell subset in blood. Skin lesions, which had visible Tp by IHC and substantial amounts of Tp-DNA, had large numbers of macrophages (CD68+), a relative increase in CD8+ T-cells over CD4+ T-cells and were enriched for CD56+ NK-cells. Skin lesions contained transcripts for cytokines (IFN-γ, TNF-α), chemokines (CCL2, CXCL10), macrophage and DC activation markers (CD40, CD86), Fc-mediated phagocytosis receptors (FcγRI, FcγR3), IFN-β and effector molecules associated with CD8 and NK-cell cytotoxic responses. While HSS promoted uptake of Tp in conjunction with monocyte activation, most spirochetes were not internalized. Conclusions Our findings support the importance of macrophage driven opsonophagocytosis and cell mediated immunity in treponemal clearance, while suggesting that the balance between phagocytic uptake and evasion is influenced by the relative burdens of bacteria in blood and skin and the presence of Tp subpopulations with differential capacities for binding opsonic antibodies. They also

  10. Role of alpha2C-adrenoceptors in the reduction of skin blood flow induced by local cooling in mice.

    PubMed

    Honda, M; Suzuki, M; Nakayama, K; Ishikawa, T

    2007-09-01

    The reduction of skin blood flow induced by local cooling results from a reflex increase in sympathetic output and an enhanced vasoconstrictor activity of cutaneous vessels. The present study investigated the latter local response in vivo in tetrodotoxin-treated mice, in which the sympathetic nerve tone was abolished. Male ddY mice, anaesthetized with pentobarbitone, were treated with tetrodotoxin and artificially ventilated. The plantar skin blood flow (PSBF) was measured by laser Doppler flowmetry. Cooling the air temperature around the left foot from 25 to 10 degrees C decreased the PSBF of the left foot. Bunazosin, an alpha (1)-adrenoceptor antagonist, RS79948, an alpha (2)-adrenoceptor antagonist, and MK-912, an alpha (2C)-adrenoceptor antagonist, all significantly inhibited the cooling-induced reduction of PSBF; the inhibition by bunazosin was relatively small compared with that by RS79948 and MK-912. The response was not affected by guanethidine or bretylium, but was diminished in adrenalectomized mice. An intra-arterial injection of clonidine, an alpha (2)-adrenoceptor agonist, to the left iliac artery of adrenalectomized mice caused a transient decrease in PSBF, which was significantly augmented at 10 degrees C. MK-912 suppressed only the augmented portion at 10 degrees C. Y-27632, H-1152 and fasudil, Rho kinase inhibitors, also inhibited the cooling-induced reduction of PSBF. RS79948 caused no further reduction of the cooling-induced response after the inhibition by Y-27632. Local cooling-induced reduction of skin blood flow in mice primarily results from increased reactivity of alpha (2C)-adrenoceptors to circulating catecholamines, in which the Rho/Rho kinase pathway is involved.

  11. Wrist skin temperature, motor activity, and body position as determinants of the circadian pattern of blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Blazquez, A; Martinez-Nicolas, A; Salazar, F J; Rol, M A; Madrid, J A

    2012-07-01

    Although the circadian blood pressure (BP) pattern has been extensively studied, the determinants of this rhythm are not fully understood. Peripheral vasodilatation is a regulatory mechanism for BP maintenance. However, it remains to be established whether the increase of nocturnal distal skin temperature associated with heat loss could also reflect the dipping status. For the first time, this paper investigates the relationship between BP and skin wrist temperature (WT), to evaluate whether the WT circadian rhythm can serve as screening procedure to detect dipping/non-dipping BP patterns. In addition, the authors compare the relationship between WT and other variables previously described as determinants of the BP pattern, such as physical activity and body position. Measurements of WT, motor activity, and body position for 5 d, plus ambulatory BP for 24-h during that span, were obtained from 28 diurnally active normotensive volunteers. WT was negatively correlated, whereas activity and body position were positively correlated, with systolic and diastolic BPs. However, these relationships were stronger during the rest than activity phase. In addition, a 78.6% concordance was detected between the observed dips in BP and the predicted BP pattern calculated based on the WT rhythm. Thus, these results suggest that the increase in WT produced by heat loss during the rest phase through peripheral skin blood vessels is the result of blood vessel vasodilatation reflexes in response to a shift from a standing to a supine position, together with shift in the circadian sympathetic/parasympathetic balance (nocturnal parasympathetic activation). In conclusion, WT could be considered as a potential new screening procedure to implement the diagnosis of non-dipping BP pattern.

  12. Cutaneous disease resembling mycosis fungoides in HIV-infected patients whose skin and blood cells also harbor proviral HTLV type I.

    PubMed

    Zucker-Franklin, D; Pancake, B A; Friedman-Kien, A E

    1994-09-01

    Two homosexual HIV-infected patients with lymphocyte counts of < 50 presented with intense pruritus, hyperpigmentation, and skin lesions clinically suggestive of the cutaneous T cell lymphoma, mycosis fungoides. On light microscopy, the skin biopsies were difficult to interpret because of the sparseness of the lymphocytic infiltrates. However, electron microscopy revealed typical Sézary cells in the peripheral blood and skin. Cultures of blood mononuclear cells of one of the patients generated HTLV-I-like particles. Although both patients lacked antibodies to HTLV, their blood and skin specimens proved to harbor tax and pol HTLV-I proviral sequences as shown by the polymerase chain reaction and Southern blot analysis. Dual infection with HIV and HTLV should be considered in the diagnostic work-up of patients at risk, even in the absence of demonstrable antibodies. Dual infections could result in clinical manifestations and evolution of disease not anticipated in patients who harbor only one of these retroviruses.

  13. Co-stimulatory molecules on peripheral blood mononuclear cells and tissue infiltrating cells of skin wart and in vitro poke weed mitogen stimulation.

    PubMed

    Phumeesat, Potjaman; Charuwichitratana, Somyot; Vongsakul, Molvibha

    2007-09-01

    Skin wart is a lesion caused by human papilloma viruses (HPVs) that can infect both male and female. Quantify the number of CD28+, CD86+, CD152+ and gammadelta+ in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of subjects with skin wart. Identify CD86+ and gammagamma+ cells in skin wart cryosections. Sixteen subjects with skin warts on face, hand, finger, knee, foot or plantar, both male and female, aged between 19-59 years-old, were recruited from Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok. CD86 and CD152, on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of subjects with skin wart are significantly lower compared to controls. Tissue cryosection staining for CD86+ and gammadelta+ cells showed no difference among subjects with skin wart and control. Proliferative response to poke weed mitogen of subjects with skin wart is significantly lower than control subjects. There was no difference in the number of subjects positive for CD28 and CD86 cell between normal and skin wart subject, but an increase in skin wart subjects with gammadelta+ cells.

  14. The Role of Human Adult Peripheral and Umbilical Cord Blood Platelet-Rich Plasma on Proliferation and Migration of Human Skin Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Hashemi, Seyedeh-Sara; Mahmoodi, Mahdokht; Rafati, Ali Reza; Manafi, Farzad; Mehrabani, Davood

    2017-05-01

    Wound healing is a complex and dynamic process following damage in tissue structures. Due to extensive skin damage caused by burn injuries, this study determined the role of human adult peripheral and umbilical cord blood platelet-rich plasma on proliferation and migration in human skin fibroblasts. Platelet-rich plasma (5, 10, 15, 20 and 50% PRP) from human umbilical cord blood and adult peripheral blood were provided and added to fibroblasts cultured from a human skin sample. Migration and proliferation of fibroblasts were assessed in comparison to 10% FBS and by the fibroblast responses to a concentration gradient. All components of the umbilical cord blood PRP significantly stimulated the growth of fibroblasts when compared to the negative control. Fibroblast growth was enhanced in a dose dependent manner. All fibroblast cultures retained normal morphology. No significant difference was noted between umbilical cord blood and adult peripheral blood PRP preparations regarding cell proliferation and migration, but the difference to 10% FBS was significant. 1% and 50% PRP reduced cellular proliferation. The 20% umbilical cord blood PRP and 10% adult peripheral blood PRP had a significant stimulatory effect on the migration of the skin fibroblast cells in comparison with 10% FBS. As PRP could promote the migration and proliferation of dermal fibroblasts, it can be safely added in cultures when treatment of chronic wounds without triggering the immune response is needed.

  15. Reduction of Skin Impedance by the Improvement of the Blood Circulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    to the positive output of a constant voltage power supply via an analog switch, which could be switched in 10-6 sec , and the other box was...Ch5, 1998 [4] J. Rosell, J. Colominas, P. Riu , R. Pallas-Areny, and J. G. Webster, “Skin impedance from 1Hz to 1MHz”, IEEE Trans. Biomed. Eng., 1988

  16. Analysis of skin blood microflow oscillations in patients with rheumatic diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizeva, Irina; Makovik, Irina; Dunaev, Andrey; Krupatkin, Alexander; Meglinski, Igor

    2017-07-01

    Laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) has been applied for the assessment of variation in blood microflows in patients with rheumatic diseases and healthy volunteers. Oscillations of peripheral blood microcirculation observed by LDF have been analyzed utilizing a wavelet transform. A higher amplitude of blood microflow oscillations has been observed in a high frequency band (over 0.1 Hz) in patients with rheumatic diseases. Oscillations in the high frequency band decreased in healthy volunteers in response to the cold pressor test, whereas lower frequency pulsations prevailed in patients with rheumatic diseases. A higher perfusion rate at normal conditions was observed in patients, and a weaker response to cold stimulation was observed in healthy volunteers. Analysis of blood microflow oscillations has a high potential for evaluation of mechanisms of blood flow regulation and diagnosis of vascular abnormalities associated with rheumatic diseases.

  17. Radionuclide angiography and blood pool imaging to assess skin ulcer healing prognosis in patients with peripheral vascular disease

    SciTech Connect

    Alazraki, N.; Lawrence, P.F.; Syverud, J.B.

    1984-01-01

    Several non-invasive diagnostic techniques including segmental limb blood pressures, skin fluoresence, and photo plethysmography, have been evaluated as predictors of skin ulcer healing in patients with peripheral vascular disease, but none are widely used. Using 20mCi of Tc-99m phosphate compounds, four phase bone scans were obtained, including (1) radionuclide angiogram (2) blood pool image (3) 2 hour and 4-6 hour static images and (4) 24 hour static delayed images. The first two phases were used to assess vacularity to the region of distal extremity ulceration; the last two phases evaluated presence or absence of osteomyelitis. Studies were performed in 30 patients with non-healing ulcers of the lower extremities. Perfusion to the regions of ulceration on images was graded as normal, increased, or reduced with respect to the opposite (presumed normal) limb or some other normal reference area. Hypervascular response was interpreted as good prognosis for healing unless osteomyelitis was present. Clinicians followed patients for 14 days to assess limb healing with optimum care. If there was no improvement, angiography and/or surgery (reconstructive surgery, sympathectomy, or amputation) was done. Results showed: sensitivity for predicting ulcer healing was 94%, specificity 89%. Patients who failed to heal their ulcers showed reduced perfusion, no hypervascular response, or osteomyelitis. Microcirculatory adequacy for ulcer healing appear predictable by this technique.

  18. Blood and lymphatic microvessel damage in irradiated human skin: The role of TGF-β, endoglin and macrophages.

    PubMed

    Russell, Nicola S; Floot, Ben; van Werkhoven, Erik; Schriemer, Mitchel; de Jong-Korlaar, Regina; Woerdeman, Leonie A E; Stewart, Fiona A; Scharpfenecker, Marion

    2015-09-01

    Microvascular damage is an important component of late radiation-induced morbidity. In our pre-clinical models, we demonstrated that repair of vessel injury is dependent on proper endoglin-mediated transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) signalling and that it can be affected by infiltrating macrophages. We now wanted to extend these findings in irradiated patients, using skin as a model system, and assess whether bisphosphonates could modulate the response. Paired skin biopsies from irradiated and non-irradiated sites were obtained from 48 breast cancer patients. In 8 patients, biopsies were repeated after 4months of bisphosphonate treatment. Immunohistochemistry was used to assess vascular alterations and leucocyte infiltration. Western Blot and qPCR were used to assess expression of growth factors and their receptors. Decreased blood vessel numbers at early time points were followed by increased endoglin expression and restoration of vessel number. Loss of small lymphatic vessels was associated with increased TGF-β levels, whereas dilation of lymphatic vessels correlated with increased macrophage infiltration. Bisphosphonate treatment reduced leucocyte infiltration, but also prevented restoration of blood vessel numbers after irradiation. Radiation injury of the microvasculature is mediated through TGF-β, whereas repair is modulated by the co-receptor endoglin and promoted by macrophages. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Investigating tissue respiration and skin microhaemocirculation under adaptive changes and the synchronization of blood flow and oxygen saturation rhythms.

    PubMed

    Dunaev, A V; Sidorov, V V; Krupatkin, A I; Rafailov, I E; Palmer, S G; Stewart, N A; Sokolovski, S G; Rafailov, E U

    2014-04-01

    Multi-functional laser non-invasive diagnostic systems allow the study of a number of microcirculatory parameters, including index of blood microcirculation (Im) (by laser Doppler flowmetry, LDF) and oxygen saturation (StO2) of skin tissue (by tissue reflectance oximetry, TRO). This research aimed to use such a system to investigate the synchronization of microvascular blood flow and oxygen saturation rhythms under normal and adaptive change conditions. Studies were conducted on eight healthy volunteers of 21-49 years. These volunteers were observed between one and six months, totalling 422 basic tests (3 min each). Measurements were performed on the palmar surface of the right middle finger and the lower forearm's medial surface. Rhythmic oscillations of LDF and TRO were studied using wavelet analysis. Combined tissue oxygen consumption data for all volunteers during 'adaptive changes' increased relative to normal conditions with and without arteriovenous anastomoses. Data analysis revealed resonance and synchronized rhythms in microvascular blood flow and oxygen saturation as an adaptive change in myogenic oscillation (vasomotion) resulting from exercise and possibly psychoemotional stress. Synchronization of myogenic rhythms during adaptive changes may lead to increased oxygen consumption as a result of increased microvascular blood flow velocity.

  20. Light absorption in blood during low-intensity laser irradiation of skin

    SciTech Connect

    Barun, V V; Ivanov, A P

    2010-06-23

    An analytical procedure is proposed for describing optical fields in biological tissues inhomogeneous in the depth direction, such as human skin, with allowance for multiple scattering. The procedure is used to investigate the depth distribution of the optical power density in homogeneous and multilayer dermis when the skin is exposed to a laser beam. We calculate the absorbed laser power spectra for oxy- and deoxyhaemoglobin at different depths in relation to the absorption selectivity of these haemoglobin derivatives and the spectral dependence of the optical power density and demonstrate that the spectra vary considerably with depth. A simple exponential approximation is proposed for the depth distribution of the power density in the epidermis and dermis. (laser methods in medicine)

  1. LASER METHODS IN MEDICINE: Light absorption in blood during low-intensity laser irradiation of skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barun, V. V.; Ivanov, A. P.

    2010-06-01

    An analytical procedure is proposed for describing optical fields in biological tissues inhomogeneous in the depth direction, such as human skin, with allowance for multiple scattering. The procedure is used to investigate the depth distribution of the optical power density in homogeneous and multilayer dermis when the skin is exposed to a laser beam. We calculate the absorbed laser power spectra for oxy- and deoxyhaemoglobin at different depths in relation to the absorption selectivity of these haemoglobin derivatives and the spectral dependence of the optical power density and demonstrate that the spectra vary considerably with depth. A simple exponential approximation is proposed for the depth distribution of the power density in the epidermis and dermis.

  2. Gene expression changes with age in skin, adipose tissue, blood and brain.

    PubMed

    Glass, Daniel; Viñuela, Ana; Davies, Matthew N; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Parts, Leopold; Knowles, David; Brown, Andrew A; Hedman, Asa K; Small, Kerrin S; Buil, Alfonso; Grundberg, Elin; Nica, Alexandra C; Di Meglio, Paola; Nestle, Frank O; Ryten, Mina; Durbin, Richard; McCarthy, Mark I; Deloukas, Panagiotis; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T; Weale, Michael E; Bataille, Veronique; Spector, Tim D

    2013-07-26

    Previous studies have demonstrated that gene expression levels change with age. These changes are hypothesized to influence the aging rate of an individual. We analyzed gene expression changes with age in abdominal skin, subcutaneous adipose tissue and lymphoblastoid cell lines in 856 female twins in the age range of 39-85 years. Additionally, we investigated genotypic variants involved in genotype-by-age interactions to understand how the genomic regulation of gene expression alters with age. Using a linear mixed model, differential expression with age was identified in 1,672 genes in skin and 188 genes in adipose tissue. Only two genes expressed in lymphoblastoid cell lines showed significant changes with age. Genes significantly regulated by age were compared with expression profiles in 10 brain regions from 100 postmortem brains aged 16 to 83 years. We identified only one age-related gene common to the three tissues. There were 12 genes that showed differential expression with age in both skin and brain tissue and three common to adipose and brain tissues. Skin showed the most age-related gene expression changes of all the tissues investigated, with many of the genes being previously implicated in fatty acid metabolism, mitochondrial activity, cancer and splicing. A significant proportion of age-related changes in gene expression appear to be tissue-specific with only a few genes sharing an age effect in expression across tissues. More research is needed to improve our understanding of the genetic influences on aging and the relationship with age-related diseases.

  3. Activation of Blood Coagulation in Two Prototypic Autoimmune Skin Diseases: A Possible Link with Thrombotic Risk.

    PubMed

    Cugno, Massimo; Tedeschi, Alberto; Borghi, Alessandro; Bucciarelli, Paolo; Asero, Riccardo; Venegoni, Luigia; Griffini, Samantha; Grovetti, Elena; Berti, Emilio; Marzano, Angelo Valerio

    2015-01-01

    Coagulation activation has been demonstrated in two prototypic autoimmune skin diseases, chronic autoimmune urticaria and bullous pemphigoid, but only the latter is associated with increased thrombotic risk. Two markers of coagulation activation (prothrombin fragment F1+2 and fibrin fragment D-dimer) were measured by immunoenzymatic methods in plasma samples from 30 patients with active chronic autoimmune urticaria, positive for autologous serum skin test, 30 patients with active bullous pemphigoid and 30 healthy subjects. In skin biopsies, tissue factor expression was evaluated by both immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. F1+2 and D-dimer levels were higher in active chronic autoimmune urticaria (276.5±89.8 pmol/L and 5.56±4.40 nmol/L, respectively) than in controls (145.2±38.0 pmol/L and 1.06±0.25 nmol/L; P=0.029 and P=0.011) and were much higher in active bullous pemphigoid (691.7±318.7 pmol/L and 15.24±9.09 nmol/L, respectively) (P<0.0001). Tissue factor positivity was evident in skin biopsies of both disorders with higher intensity in bullous pemphigoid. F1+2 and D-dimer, during remission, were markedly reduced in both disorders. These findings support the involvement of coagulation activation in the pathophysiology of both diseases. The strong systemic activation of coagulation in bullous pemphigoid may contribute to increase the thrombotic risk and provides the rationale for clinical trials on anticoagulant treatments in this disease.

  4. Increased Skin Blood Flow and Enhanced Heat Loss in Humans after Niacin Ingestion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-06-01

    vasodilatory substances, neurotransmitters or neuromodulators other than acetylcholine may contribute to skin vasodilaiion during exercise. Potent...endogenous vasoactive agents which act through NO, as well as nonadrenergic, noncholinergic neurotransmitters and neuromodulators of smooth muscle function...Dietz et al. (1994) has shown the importance of NO as a neuromodulator of SkBF. The increased sensible heat flux (through increased SkBF) and reduced

  5. Synthetic smooth muscle in the outer blood plexus of the rhinarium skin of Lemur catta L.

    PubMed

    Elofsson, Rolf; Kröger, Ronald H H

    2017-01-01

    The skin of the lemur nose tip (rhinarium) has arterioles in the outer vascular plexus that are endowed with an unusual coat of smooth muscle cells. Comparison with the arterioles of the same area in a number of unrelated mammalians shows that the lemur pattern is unique. The vascular smooth muscle cells belong to the synthetic type. The function of synthetic smooth muscles around the terminal vessels in the lemur rhinarium is unclear but may have additional functions beyond regulation of vessel diameter.

  6. Gene expression changes with age in skin, adipose tissue, blood and brain

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous studies have demonstrated that gene expression levels change with age. These changes are hypothesized to influence the aging rate of an individual. We analyzed gene expression changes with age in abdominal skin, subcutaneous adipose tissue and lymphoblastoid cell lines in 856 female twins in the age range of 39-85 years. Additionally, we investigated genotypic variants involved in genotype-by-age interactions to understand how the genomic regulation of gene expression alters with age. Results Using a linear mixed model, differential expression with age was identified in 1,672 genes in skin and 188 genes in adipose tissue. Only two genes expressed in lymphoblastoid cell lines showed significant changes with age. Genes significantly regulated by age were compared with expression profiles in 10 brain regions from 100 postmortem brains aged 16 to 83 years. We identified only one age-related gene common to the three tissues. There were 12 genes that showed differential expression with age in both skin and brain tissue and three common to adipose and brain tissues. Conclusions Skin showed the most age-related gene expression changes of all the tissues investigated, with many of the genes being previously implicated in fatty acid metabolism, mitochondrial activity, cancer and splicing. A significant proportion of age-related changes in gene expression appear to be tissue-specific with only a few genes sharing an age effect in expression across tissues. More research is needed to improve our understanding of the genetic influences on aging and the relationship with age-related diseases. PMID:23889843

  7. Membrane feeding of dengue patient's blood as a substitute for direct skin feeding in studying Aedes-dengue virus interaction.

    PubMed

    Tan, Cheong-Huat; Wong, Pei-Sze Jeslyn; Li, Mei-Zhi Irene; Yang, Hui-Ting; Chong, Chee-Seng; Lee, Linda K; Yuan, Shi; Leo, Yee-Sin; Ng, Lee-Ching; Lye, David C

    2016-04-15

    Understanding the interaction between Aedes vectors and dengue viruses (DENV) has significant implications in determining the transmission dynamics of dengue. The absence of an animal model and ethical concerns regarding direct feeding of mosquitoes on patients has resulted in most infection studies using blood meals spiked with laboratory-cultured DENV. Data obtained from such studies may not reflect the natural human-mosquito transmission scenario. This study explored the potential of using membrane feeding of dengue patient's blood as a substitute for direct skin feeding. Four to six-day old female Ae. aegypti were provided the opportunity to feed via direct exposure to a patient's forearm for 15 min or via exposure to EDTA-treated blood from the same patient through an artificial membrane for 30 min. Mosquitoes from both feeding methods were incubated inside environmental chambers. Mosquitoes were sampled at day 13 post-feeding. Midgut and salivary glands of each mosquito were dissected to determine DENV infection by RT-qPCR and viral titration, respectively. Feeding rates: Direct skin feeding assay (DSFA) consistently showed higher mosquito feeding rates (93.3-100%) when compared with the membrane feeding assay (MFA) (48-98.2%). Midgut infection: Pair-wise comparison between methods showed no significant difference in midgut infection rates between mosquitoes exposed via each method and a strong correlation was observed in midgut infection rates for both feeding methods (r = 0.89, P < 0.0001). Overall midgut viral titers (n = 20) obtained by both methods were comparable (P ≥ 0.06). Salivary gland infection: Pair-wise comparison between both methods revealed no significant difference in salivary gland infection rate. Strong correlation in salivary gland infection was observed between DSFA and MFA (r = 0.81, P < 0.0001). In general, mosquitoes fed directly on dengue patients and those on patients' blood (n = 11) had comparable virus

  8. Establishing baseline levels of trace elements in blood and skin of bottlenose dolphins in Sarasota Bay, Florida: implications for non-invasive monitoring.

    PubMed

    Bryan, Colleen E; Christopher, Steven J; Balmer, Brian C; Wells, Randall S

    2007-12-15

    Several major unusual mortality events occurring in recent years have increased the level of concern for the health of bottlenose dolphin populations along the United States Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico coasts. Trace element concentrations were examined in a population of free-ranging dolphins in Sarasota Bay, Florida, in order to develop a benchmark for future comparisons within and between populations. Whole blood (n=51) and skin (n=40) samples were collected through capture and release health assessment events during 2002-2004. Samples were analyzed for Al, V, Cr, Mn, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Rb, Sr, Mo, Cd, and Pb by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) and Hg via atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS). Trace element concentrations (wet mass) in skin were 2 to 45 times greater than blood, except Cu was approximately 1.5 times higher in blood. Statistically strong correlations (p<0.05) were found for V, As, Se, Rb, Sr, and Hg between blood and skin demonstrating that these tissues can be used as effective non-lethal monitoring tools. The strongest correlation was established for Hg (r=0.9689) and concentrations in both blood and skin were above the threshold at which detrimental effects are observed in other vertebrate species. Female dolphins had significantly greater Hg concentrations in blood and skin and Pb concentrations in skin, relative to males. Calves exhibited significantly lower V, As, and Hg concentrations in blood and V and Hg concentrations in skin, relative to other age classes. Rubidium and Cu concentrations in skin were greatest in subadults and calves, respectively. In blood, V, Zn, and As concentrations were significantly greater in winter, relative to summer, and the opposite trend was observed for Rb and Sr concentrations. In skin, Cu and Zn concentrations were significantly greater in winter, relative to summer, and the opposite trend was observed for Mn, Rb, Cd, and Pb concentrations. The baseline concentrations and trends

  9. Sustained increases in skin blood flow are not a prerequisite to initiate sweating during passive heat exposure.

    PubMed

    Ravanelli, Nicholas; Jay, Ollie; Gagnon, Daniel

    2017-08-01

    Some studies have observed a functional relationship between sweating and skin blood flow. However, the implications of this relationship during physiologically relevant conditions remain unclear. We manipulated sudomotor activity through changes in sweating efficiency to determine if parallel changes in vasomotor activity are observed. Eight young men completed two trials at 36°C and two trials at 42°C. During these trials, air temperature remained constant while ambient vapor pressure increased from 1.6 to 5.6 kPa over 2 h. Forced airflow across the skin was used to create conditions of high (HiSeff) or low (LoSeff) sweating efficiency. Local sweat rate (LSR), local skin blood flow (SkBF), as well as mean skin and esophageal temperatures were measured continuously. It took longer for LSR to increase during HiSeff at 36°C (HiSeff: 99 ± 11 vs. LoSeff: 77 ± 11 min, P < 0.01) and 42°C (HiSeff: 72 ± 16 vs. LoSeff: 51 ± 15 min, P < 0.01). In general, an increase in LSR preceded the increase in SkBF when expressed as ambient vapor pressure and time for all conditions (P < 0.05). However, both responses were activated at a similar change in mean body temperature (average across all trials, LSR: 0.26 ± 0.15 vs. SkBF: 0.30 ± 0.18°C, P = 0.26). These results demonstrate that altering the point at which LSR is initiated during heat exposure is paralleled by similar shifts for the increase in SkBF. However, local sweat production occurs before an increase in SkBF, suggesting that SkBF is not necessarily a prerequisite for sweating. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  10. Ebselen protects brain, skin, lung and blood cells from mechlorethamine toxicity.

    PubMed

    Hardej, Diane; Billack, Blase

    2007-05-01

    Nitrogen mustards are vesicants capable of burning the skin, eyes and respiratory tract of exposed individuals. While generally less toxic than sulfur mustards, these compounds have the potential for use as chemical warfare agents. Presently, no antidote exists for treatment against nitrogen mustard toxicity. The purpose of this study was to investigate the in vitro toxicity of the nitrogen mustard mechlorethamine (HN2) in four cell models: CEM-SS human T cells, A431 human skin epithelial cells, rat hippocampal astrocytes and rat pleural mesothelial cells. Furthermore, the efficacy of the synthetic seleno-organic compound ebselen (Eb) (2-phenyl-1,2- benzisoselenazol-3(2H)-one) as a cytoprotective agent against such toxicity was evaluated. Significant increases in cell viability, as assessed using an MTT assay for viability, was demonstrated when 30 microM Eb was used as a cotreatment with HN2 in all cell models tested at the following doses of HN2: A431 skin cells,10-40 microM; rat astrocytes, 20 and 40 microM; rat mesothelia, 10-40 microM; and human T cells 4-16 microM. Decreases in cell viability and toxicity to HN2 were confirmed using light and scanning electron microscopy. Membrane damage, observed with HN2 exposure, such as blebbing and loss of cell projections, was ameliorated with Eb cotreatment. Our results demonstrate a generalized protective effect observed with Eb cotreatment that suggests that this agent may have potential as an antidote for HN2 exposure and toxicity.

  11. Skin extracts from 2 Italian table grapes (Italia and Palieri) inhibit tissue factor expression by human blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Milella, Rosa Anna; Antonacci, Donato; Crupi, Pasquale; Incampo, Francesca; Carrieri, Cosimo; Semeraro, Nicola; Colucci, Mario

    2012-08-01

    Grape and its products such as red wine and grape juice have well-known antithrombotic properties, which have been attributed to their high content in polyphenolic compounds. Most studies on the mechanisms underlying these beneficial effects, among which the suppression of tissue factor (TF) synthesis in blood mononuclear cells (MNC) and vascular endothelium is a prominent one, have been performed with purified polyphenols, while little is known about the effect of fresh grapes which contain a multitude of phytochemicals whose interaction may lead to different cell responses. In this study, we investigated the effect of grape skin extracts (GSEs) on TF expression in isolated blood MNC and in whole blood. Alcoholic extracts from skins of 2 grape varieties (Palieri and Italia) inhibited TF expression in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated MNC in a concentration-dependent manner with ≥90% inhibition of TF activity and antigen at 6 μg/mL of gallic acid equivalents. Noteworthy, GSEs were also able to inhibit the appearance of TF in whole blood challenged with LPS. The 2 grape varieties displayed a fairly similar TF-inhibiting capacity despite marked differences in phenolic profile. When selected purified polyphenols were tested, their ability to inhibit TF expression was markedly lower as compared to grape extracts, whereas a mixture of some representative polyphenols was much more efficient, supporting the occurrence of a synergistic effect. Given the key role of cell TF in thrombotic diseases, the inhibition of MNC-mediated clotting activation, if confirmed by in vivo studies, might represent an important antithrombotic mechanism. Our data indicate that the combination of different polyphenols, as in grape extracts, is much more efficient than the single constituents, a finding that might be useful as starting point for the development of new antithrombotic nutraceutics. In addition, our study validated a simple, inexpensive, and physiologically relevant in vitro

  12. Synthetic smooth muscle in the outer blood plexus of the rhinarium skin of Lemur catta L.

    PubMed Central

    Elofsson, Rolf; Kröger, Ronald H H

    2017-01-01

    The skin of the lemur nose tip (rhinarium) has arterioles in the outer vascular plexus that are endowed with an unusual coat of smooth muscle cells. Comparison with the arterioles of the same area in a number of unrelated mammalians shows that the lemur pattern is unique. The vascular smooth muscle cells belong to the synthetic type. The function of synthetic smooth muscles around the terminal vessels in the lemur rhinarium is unclear but may have additional functions beyond regulation of vessel diameter. PMID:28260706

  13. Activation of blood coagulation in plasma from chronic urticaria patients with negative autologous plasma skin test.

    PubMed

    Asero, R; Cugno, M; Tedeschi, A

    2011-02-01

    Skin reactivity to the intradermal injection of autologous serum (autologous serum skin test - ASST) and/or plasma (autologous plasma skin test - APST) is thought to identify chronic urticaria (CU) patients with an autoimmune/autoreactive disease. Immune-mediated inflammation and coagulation are strictly linked, and coagulation activation has been described in CU patients as shown by the elevation of plasma prothrombin fragment F1+2 and, in severe cases, of d-dimer as well. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the coagulation cascade is activated in APST-negative CU patients as it has been described in CU patients with an autoreactive disease. A total of 43 adults with CU (M/F 15/28; mean age 43.5 years; 16 APST-negative patients and 27 APST-positive) and 30 healthy subjects were studied. Prothrombin fragment F1+2, d-dimer and C-reactive protein (CRP) plasma levels were measured by ELISA. Prothrombin fragment F1+2 and d-dimer were elevated in seven of 16 APST-negative CU patients. The activation of the coagulation cascade was associated with disease severity. Men were more prevalent in idiopathic than in autoreactive CU patients (M/F: 10/6 vs. 5/22; P<0.001). In patients with APST-negative CU, mean F1 + 2 level [242.8 ± 33.7 pmol/L (ESM)] was higher than in normal controls (151.8 ± 9.09 pmol/L; P=0.002) but lower than in autoreactive patients (526.2 ± 97.8 pmol/L; P=0.05). Similarly, mean d-dimer level was higher than in normal controls (484.2 ± 148.3 ng/mL vs. 229.5 ± 16.7 ng/mL; P=0.03) but lower than in autoreactive patients (1142.2 ± 317.4 ng/mL; P=0.05). In contrast, mean CRP was lower than in autoreactive patients (1.06 ± 0.32 μg/mL vs. 3.09 ± 0.74 μg/mL; P=0.02) but not different from normal subjects (0.78 ± 0.09 μg/mL; NS). Autologous plasma skin test-negative CU prevails in men; in these patients the coagulation cascade is activated although with a lower intensity than in patients with autoreactive disease. © 2010 The Authors. Journal

  14. Differences in HTLV-I integration patterns between skin lesions and peripheral blood lymphocytes of HTLV-I seropositive patients with cutaneous lymphoproliferative disorders.

    PubMed

    Hamada, T; Setoyama, M; Katahira, Y; Furuno, T; Fujiyoshi, T; Sonoda, S; Tashiro, M

    1992-09-01

    We examined HTLV-I integration patterns in nine cases of HTLV-I-seropositive patients with cutaneous lymphoproliferative disorders. The Southern blot on EcoRI digests of DNA revealed a discrete band of HTLV-I provirus (monoclonal integration) in either skin lesions or peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL). Four cases showed the monoclonal integration of HTLV-I provirus only in skin lesions: one case showed only in PBL and two cases showed in both skin and PBL. The Southern blot on PstI digests of DNA revealed a 2.4 Kb band of the internal construct of HTLV-I provirus (polyclonal integration) in the PBL of EcoRI-negative samples. The difference in HTLV-I integration patterns between skin lesions and PBL in these cases suggests that the monoclonal outgrowth of HTLV-I-infected cells in the skin is causatively associated with the pathogenesis of cutaneous ATL.

  15. Characterization of monocyte/macrophage subsets in the skin and peripheral blood derived from patients with systemic sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Recent accumulating evidence indicates a crucial involvement of macrophage lineage in the pathogenesis of systemic sclerosis (SSc). To analyze the assembly of the monocyte/macrophage population, we evaluated the expression of CD163 and CD204 and various activated macrophage markers, in the inflammatory cells of the skin and in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) derived from patients with SSc. Methods Skin biopsy specimens from 6 healthy controls and 10 SSc patients (7 limited cutaneous SSc and 3 diffuse cutaneous SSc) were analyzed by immunohistochemistry using monoclonal antibody against CD68 (pan-macrophage marker), CD163 and CD204. Surface and/or intracellular protein expression of CD14 (marker for monocyte lineage), CD163 and CD204 was analysed by flow cytometry in PBMCs from 16 healthy controls and 41 SSc patients (26 limited cutaneous SSc and 15 diffuse cutaneous SSc). Statistical analysis was carried out using Mann-Whitney U test for comparison of means. Results In the skin from SSc patients, the number of CD163+ cells or CD204+ cells between the collagen fibers was significantly larger than that in healthy controls. Flow cytometry showed that the population of CD14+ cells was significantly greater in PBMCs from SSc patients than that in healthy controls. Further analysis of CD14+ cells in SSc patients revealed higher expression of CD163 and the presence of two unique peaks in the CD204 histogram. Additionally, we found that the CD163+ cells belong to CD14brightCD204+ population. Conclusions This is the first report indicating CD163+ or CD204+ activated macrophages may be one of the potential fibrogenic regulators in the SSc skin. Furthermore, this study suggests a portion of PBMCs in SSc patients abnormally differentiates into CD14brightCD163+CD204+ subset. The subset specific to SSc may play an important role in the pathogenesis of this disease, as the source of CD163+ or CD204+ macrophages in the skin. PMID:20602758

  16. [Calculation of thermally caused blood flow changes in a finger using thermographic skin temperature measurements (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Hundhausen, E; Theves, B

    1979-03-01

    The skin temperature changes of the third finger were registered with the help of an infrared camera during a cooling process of the hand and forearm of a male, 38-years-old subject. Using the system of formulae, explained in previous publications [4-7], it was possible to describe the blood flow changes in the finger. The results are: 1. A formula for the "pseudo thermal conductivity" (material constant of the thermal conductivity plus the convective contribution), which is similar to the formula used for theat release of the whole body [4], describes well the experimental results. The "pseudo thermal conductivity" is a measure for the specific blood flow and can be converted into it. 2. The "pseudo thermal conductivity" has a local maximum. 3. The position of the maximum is independent of the tissue temperature. The anatomical properties of the finger seem to determine the position of the maximum. 4. The maximum of the "pseudo thermal conductivity"--and therefore the maximal blood flow--increases stronger than linearly with the tissue temperature.

  17. Microcirculatory effect of different skin contacting pressures around the blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Hsiu, Hsin; Hsu, Wei-Chen; Chang, Shu-Ling; Hsu, Chia-Liang; Huang, Shih-Ming; Lin, Yuh-Ying Wang

    2008-12-01

    We used laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) and spectrum analysis to investigate the microcirculatory responses to pressure stimulation (PS) of the skin surface. A control group without PS applied, and four groups with different PS (20, 60, 100 and 160 mmHg in groups PS(20), PS(60), PS(100) and PS(160), respectively) were formed from seven volunteers. Each experiment involved recording a 20 min baseline and two effect data recorded at 0-20 and 50-70 min after stopping PS. The relative energy contribution (REC) in five frequency bands revealed by Morlet-wavelet transformation was calculated. At the pressed site, the dc component of the flux signal in the second effect increased significantly only in group PS(60) compared with the control values. The REC was significantly increased in a myogenic-related band in groups PS(60), PS(100) and PS(160), and was significantly decreased in a nerve-related band only in group PS(160). Different PS magnitudes compress vessels to different extents. The proposed vessel-pressing model-which is supported by the results of spectral analysis of flux signals-might help to elucidate the underlying mechanism. The study results indicate that an improved perfusion was sustained for the longest time when applying 60 mmHg PS. This might aid the development of techniques for improving skin microcirculatory perfusion.

  18. Blood culture

    MedlinePlus

    Culture - blood ... A blood sample is needed . The site where blood will be drawn is first cleaned with an antiseptic such ... organism from the skin getting into (contaminating) the blood sample and causing a false-positive result (see ...

  19. Your Skin

    MedlinePlus

    ... wear sunscreen and protective clothing, such as a hat, to prevent painful sunburns. Protecting your skin now ... happens in a split second, without you ever thinking about it. previous continue Dermis = Lots of Blood ...

  20. Responses to hyperthermia. Optimizing heat dissipation by convection and evaporation: Neural control of skin blood flow and sweating in humans.

    PubMed

    Smith, Caroline J; Johnson, John M

    2016-04-01

    Under normothermic, resting conditions, humans dissipate heat from the body at a rate approximately equal to heat production. Small discrepancies between heat production and heat elimination would, over time, lead to significant changes in heat storage and body temperature. When heat production or environmental temperature is high the challenge of maintaining heat balance is much greater. This matching of heat elimination with heat production is a function of the skin circulation facilitating heat transport to the body surface and sweating, enabling evaporative heat loss. These processes are manifestations of the autonomic control of cutaneous vasomotor and sudomotor functions and form the basis of this review. We focus on these systems in the responses to hyperthermia. In particular, the cutaneous vascular responses to heat stress and the current understanding of the neurovascular mechanisms involved. The available research regarding cutaneous active vasodilation and vasoconstriction is highlighted, with emphasis on active vasodilation as a major responder to heat stress. Involvement of the vasoconstrictor and active vasodilator controls of the skin circulation in the context of heat stress and nonthermoregulatory reflexes (blood pressure, exercise) are also considered. Autonomic involvement in the cutaneous vascular responses to direct heating and cooling of the skin are also discussed. We examine the autonomic control of sweating, including cholinergic and noncholinergic mechanisms, the local control of sweating, thermoregulatory and nonthermoregulatory reflex control and the possible relationship between sudomotor and cutaneous vasodilator function. Finally, we comment on the clinical relevance of these control schemes in conditions of autonomic dysfunction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Effects of pressure applied during standardized spinal mobilizations on peripheral skin blood flow: A randomised cross-over study.

    PubMed

    Zegarra-Parodi, Rafael; Pazdernik, Vanessa K; Roustit, Matthieu; Park, Peter Yong Soo; Degenhardt, Brian F

    2016-02-01

    Peripheral skin blood flow (SBF) changes during and after spinal mobilization (SM), evaluated with laser Doppler flowmetry, may document physiological responses associated with SM. To document variations in SBF during and after application of an SM and evaluate influence of pressure on SBF by applying the same standardized SM with 3 different nonnoxious pressures. Cross-over design with 4 interventions on 4 different days: control (no touch) and 3 SMs applied rhythmically at 5%, 40%, or 80% of pain pressure threshold (sham SM, low-pressure SM, or high-pressure SM, respectively). Thirty-two individuals participated. The inspiratory gasp (IG) test was our positive control of vasoconstriction through excitation of the skin sympathetic nervous activity (SSNA). Each session comprised 5 phases: (1) baseline at the end of a 20-min acclimatization, (2) IG test, (3) post-IG phase, (4) SM phase or no manual contact for control, and (5) post-SM phase. A Biopac MP36 system collected SBF data, and a Novel Pliance-X system recorded pressure data. Equal and significant bilateral vasodilation occurred during application of unilateral sham SM, low-pressure SM, and high-pressure SM. Post-SM significant vasodilation persisted after high-pressure SM. The current study is the first to describe bilateral peripheral SBF changes occurring during and 5 min after application of standardized SMs. Our post-SM vasodilation suggests involvement of mechanisms other than the putative SSNA-excitatory mechanism proposed with skin conductance measurements. Persistence of post-SM vasodilation following only high-pressure SM suggests possible pressure-dependent mechanisms. However, further research is warranted to clarify our findings. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Longitudinal 3-week tracking of blood glucose concentration from thermo-optical response measurements on human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Shu-jen; Kantor, Stan; Hanna, Charles; Shain, Eric; Hohs, Ronald; Khalil, Omar S.

    2006-08-01

    We designed a dual-sensor instrument for measuring optical signals from the arms of human volunteers. The instrument had two temperature-controlled localized reflectance optical probes. Each probe had one illumination fiber and four detection fibers at different source-detector distances. The two probes were maintained at 30 °C. Thirty seconds after contact with the skin one was heated and the other was cooled at the same rate. The effect of heating and cooling on the signal was measured and correlated with blood glucose concentration. The measurements were performed 3 to 5 times a day for each volunteer over the span of three weeks. The data points from the first two weeks were used to establish a calibration model for each volunteer, which was used to predict glucose values from the third week optical data. Successftil calibration was possible for two of the three volunteers.

  3. [Age-dependent characteristics of the skin peripheral blood flow oscillations by nonlinear dynamics methods in humans].

    PubMed

    Tankanag, A V; Tikhonova, I V; Chemeris, N K

    2008-03-01

    Study of peripheral microhaemodynamics was carried out with laser Doppler flowmetry in healthy volunteers of different age groups. The ageing changes in the state of the skin peripheral blood flow, in the functioning of separate links and regulatory systems ofmicrovascular bed have been estimated in terms of relative entropy and fractal dimension values. The revealed significant age-dependent decrease of relative entropy values in the respiratory rhythm ranges, the neurogenic and myogenic activities yielded some evidence concerning the reduction of the microcirculation system chaotic changes within these frequency ranges during the ageing. The significant increase of fractal dimension values in the ranges of cardio-rhythm and the endothelial activity in the oldest group with the mean age of 77 years indicated that the structural complexity of the oscillations in these frequency ranges increased during ageing.

  4. Single skin exposure to visible polarized light induces rapid modification of entire circulating blood: II. Appearance of soluble factors restoring proliferation and chromosome structure in X-damag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samoilova, Kira A.; Zubanova, O. I.; Snopov, S. A.; Mukhuradze, N. A.; Mikhelson, V. M.

    1998-12-01

    Exposure of a small skin area (400 cm2) of volunteers to visible incoherent polarized (VIP) light (400 - 2000 nm) in therapeutic doses is accompanied by rapid appearance in the circulating blood of soluble factors able to restore proliferation of X-ray-damaged autologous lymphocytes and to decrease frequency of chromosome breaks. The appearance of a such activity in blood can also be induced without skin irradiation, by in vitro modeling of mixing in the circulation of a small amount of transcutaneously VIP- irradiated blood with the intact blood (one volume of the directly VIP-irradiated blood was added to 10 volumes of the intact blood). Hence, the blood (not the skin) is a major source of the active factors. The data obtained indicate a possibility of release of them from photomodified platelets; moreover, the activity restoring chromosome structure in X- damaged cells has been found in the platelet-derived growth factor and epidermal growth factor (which are known to be associated with platelets) when they were added to physiological concentrations to the culture medium. We assume that activation of cell proliferation based on the effective repair of DNA damaged in situ by endogenous and exogenous factors could be one of the mechanisms of photostimulation of wound healing.

  5. Three-way assessment of long-chain n-3 PUFA nutrition: by questionnaire and matched blood and skin samples.

    PubMed

    Wallingford, Sarah C; Pilkington, Suzanne M; Massey, Karen A; Al-Aasswad, Naser M I; Ibiebele, Torukiri I; Celia Hughes, Maria; Bennett, Susan; Nicolaou, Anna; Rhodes, Lesley E; Green, Adèle C

    2013-02-28

    The long-chain n-3 PUFA, EPA, is believed to be important for skin health, including roles in the modulation of inflammation and protection from photodamage. FFQ and blood levels are used as non-invasive proxies for assessing skin PUFA levels, but studies examining how well these proxies reflect target organ content are lacking. In seventy-eight healthy women (mean age 42·8, range 21-60 years) residing in Greater Manchester, we performed a quantitative analysis of long-chain n-3 PUFA nutrition estimated from a self-reported FFQ (n 75) and correlated this with n-3 PUFA concentrations in erythrocytes (n 72) and dermis (n 39). Linear associations between the three n-3 PUFA measurements were assessed by Spearman correlation coefficients and agreement between these measurements was estimated. Average total dietary content of the principal long-chain n-3 PUFA EPA and DHA was 171 (SD 168) and 236 (SD 248) mg/d, respectively. EPA showed significant correlations between FFQ assessments and both erythrocyte (r 0·57, P< 0·0001) and dermal (r 0·33, P= 0·05) levels, as well as between erythrocytes and dermis (r 0·45, P= 0·008). FFQ intake of DHA and the sum of n-3 PUFA also correlated well with erythrocyte concentrations (r 0·50, P< 0·0001; r 0·27, P= 0·03). Agreement between ranked thirds of dietary intake, blood and dermis approached 50% for EPA and DHA, though gross misclassification was lower for EPA. Thus, FFQ estimates and circulating levels of the dietary long-chain n-3 PUFA, EPA, may be utilised as well-correlated measures of its dermal bioavailability.

  6. Influence of Mitochondrial Genetics on the Mitochondrial Toxicity of Linezolid in Blood Cells and Skin Nerve Fibers.

    PubMed

    Garrabou, G; Soriano, À; Pinós, T; Casanova-Mollà, J; Pacheu-Grau, D; Morén, C; García-Arumí, E; Morales, M; Ruiz-Pesini, E; Catalán-Garcia, M; Milisenda, J C; Lozano, E; Andreu, A L; Montoya, J; Mensa, J; Cardellach, F

    2017-09-01

    The antibiotic linezolid is a ribosomal inhibitor with excellent efficacy. Although the administration period has been reduced to 28 days, side effects, usually of hematologic or neuropathic origin, are still reported due to secondary inhibition of mitochondrial protein synthesis. Susceptibility to linezolid toxicity remains unknown. Therefore, the objective of this study was to gain an understanding of clinical heterogeneity in response to identical linezolid exposures through exhaustive examination of the molecular basis of tissue-dependent mitotoxicity, consequent cell dysfunction, and the association of mitochondrial genetics with adverse effects of linezolid administered for the recommended period. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and skin nerve fibers from 19 and 6 patients, respectively, were evaluated before and after a 28-day linezolid treatment in order to assess toxic effects on mitochondria and cells. Mitochondrial DNA haplotypes and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in ribosomal sequences where linezolid binds to mitochondrial ribosomes were also analyzed to investigate their genetic contributions. We found that linezolid reduced mitochondrial protein levels, complex IV activity, and mitochondrial mass in PBMC and was associated with a trend toward an increase in the rate of apoptosis. In skin tissue, mitochondrial mass increased within nerve fibers, accompanied by subclinical axonal swelling. Mitochondrial haplogroup U, mutations in 12S rRNA, and the m.2706A→G, m.3197T→C, and m.3010G→A polymorphisms in 16S rRNA showed a trend toward an association with increased mitochondrial and clinical adverse effects. We conclude that even when linezolid is administered for a shorter time than formerly, adverse effects are reported by 63% of patients. Linezolid exerts tissue-dependent mitotoxicity that is responsible for downstream cellular consequences (blood cell death and nerve fiber swelling), leading to adverse hematologic and peripheral

  7. A comparison of the effect of a variety of thermal and vibratory modalities on skin temperature and blood flow in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Lohman, Everett B; Bains, Gurinder S; Lohman, Trevor; DeLeon, Michael; Petrofsky, Jerrold Scott

    2011-09-01

    Circulation plays an essential role in tissue healing. Moist heat and warm water immersion have been shown to increase skin circulation; however, these heating modalities can cause burns. Recent research has shown that passive vibration can also increase circulation but without the risk of burns. The aim of this study is to compare the effects of short-duration vibration, moist heat, and a combination of the two on skin blood flow (SBF) and skin temperature (ST). Ten (10) subjects, 5 female and 5 male, aged 20-30 years of age, received two interventions a day for 3 consecutive days: Intervention 1--Active vibration only (vibration exercise), Intervention 2--passive vibration only, Intervention 3--moist heat only, Intervention 4--passive vibration combined with moist heat, Intervention 5--a commercial massaging heating pad, and Intervention 6--no intervention, resting in supine only (control). SBF and ST were measured using a laser Doppler imager during the 10 minute intervention and then throughout the nine minute recovery period. The mean skin blood flow following a ten-minute intervention of the combination of passive vibration and moist heat was significantly different from the control, active vibration, and the commercial massaging heating pad. Skin temperature following the ten-minute interventions of moist heat alone and passive vibration alone were both significantly different from the commercial massaging heating pad and active vibration interventions. The combination of passive vibration and moist heat produced the greatest increase in skin blood flow and the second highest increase in skin blood flow nine minutes post application.

  8. Investigation of the Molecular Response in Blood and Skin of Belugas in Response to Stressors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    Rosenberger, T, Siebert, Prange, A., 2008. ’Cytokine and acute phase protein expression in blood samples of harbour seal pups’ Marine Biology , 155 (3):337-345. ...The published DNA sequences for belugas (Noel et al, 2014; Sitt et al, 2008; St-Laurent and Archambault, 2000), or for other marine mammal species...gene to obtain Delta Ct values. IMPACT/APPLICATIONS This study will contribute to our understanding of stress physiology in marine mammals as a

  9. Tuberculosis infection in foreign-born children: a screening survey based on skin and blood testing.

    PubMed

    Losi, M; Bergamini, B M; Venturelli, C; Del Giovane, C; Sighinolfi, G; Rumpaneisi, F; Richeldi, L

    2011-09-01

    This study, carried out in a low tuberculosis (TB) prevalence country with high immigration rates from high TB prevalence countries, deals with the interferon-gamma release assay, QuantiFERON®-TB Gold In-Tube, for the diagnosis of latent TB infection (LTBI) in foreign-born children. The results of our study highlight the potential advantages and concerns of using a blood test for diagnosing LTBI in a 'two-step' strategy in foreign-born children.

  10. Mapping of cerebro-vascular blood perfusion in mice with skin and skull intact by Optical Micro-AngioGraphy at 1.3 mum wavelength.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruikang K; Hurst, Sawan

    2007-09-03

    Optical micro-angiography (OMAG) was developed to achieve volumetric imaging of the microstructures and dynamic cerebrovascular blood perfusion in mice with capillary level resolution and high signal-to-background ratio. In this paper, we present a high-speed and high-sensitivity OMAG imaging system by using an InGaAs line scan camera and broadband light source at 1.3 mum wavelength for enhanced imaging depth in tissue. We show that high quality imaging of cerebrovascular blood perfusion down to capillary level resolution with the intact skin and cranium are obtained in vivo with OMAG, without the interference from the blood perfusion in the overlaying skin. The results demonstrate the potential of 1.3 mum OMAG for high-speed and high-sensitivity imaging of blood perfusion in human and small animal studies.

  11. Immunological study of pustulosis palmaris et plantaris. Blastoid transformation of tonsil and peripheral blood lymphocytes by stimulation with human skin extract.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, N; Ichino, Y; Ikawa, T; Ishikawa, T

    1983-01-01

    The experiment was performed in order to approach the question whether denatured epithelial debris in the tonsillar crypts could be an antigenic substance which might be responsible for inducing autoallergic reactions in the skin. Identical antigenicity of the tonsillar epithelium and of the skin was determined by immunofluorescence study. Then heat-denatured skin extract was used as a model system for studying the antigenicity of denatured epithelial debris. A blastoid transformation study of tonsil and peripheral blood lymphocytes obtained from patients with pustulosis palmaris et plantaris and control individuals was carried out by stimulating with heat-denatured skin extract. Tonsil lymphocytes responded well to skin extract, but peripheral blood lymphocytes scarcely responded at all. Skin extract induced transformation of tonsil lymphocytes occurred in the T-cell fraction, but not in the B-cell fraction. The results indicate that denatured tonsillar epithelium can induce an immune response of tonsil lymphocytes as autoantigen, and that the blastogenesis observed was dependent upon T cells.

  12. Rejuvenation of aged pig facial skin by transplanting allogeneic granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-induced peripheral blood stem cells from a young pig.

    PubMed

    Harn, Horng-Jyh; Huang, Mao-Hsuan; Huang, Chi-Ting; Lin, Po-Cheng; Yen, Ssu-Yin; Chou, Yi-Wen; Ho, Tsung-Jung; Chu, Hen-Yi; Chiou, Tzyy-Wen; Lin, Shinn-Zong

    2013-01-01

    Following a stroke, the administration of stem cells that have been treated with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (GCSF) can ameliorate functional deficits in both rats and humans. It is not known, however, whether the application of GCSF-mobilized peripheral blood stem cells (PBSCs) to human skin can function as an antiaging treatment. We used a Lanyu pig (Sus scrofa) model, since compared with rodents, the structure of a pig's skin is very similar to human skin, to provide preliminary data on whether these cells can exert antiaging effects over a short time frame. GCSF-mobilized PBSCs from a young male Lanyu pig (5 months) were injected intradermally into the cheek skin of aged female Lanyu pigs, and tissues before and after the cell injections were compared to determine whether this treatment caused skin rejuvenation. Increased levels of collagen, elastin, hyaluronic acid, and the hyaluronic acid receptor CD44 were observed in both dermal and subcutaneous layers following the injection of PBSCs. In addition, the treated skin tissue was tighter and more elastic than adjacent control regions of aged skin tissue. In the epidermal layer, PBSC injection altered the levels of both involucrin and integrin, indicating an increased rate of epidermal cell renewal as evidenced by reductions in both cornified cells and cells of the spinous layers and increases in the number of dividing cells within the basal layer. We found that the exogenous PBSCs, visualized using fluorescence in situ hybridization, were located primarily in hair follicles and adjacent tissues. In summary, PBSC injection restored young skin properties in the skin of aged (90 months) pigs. On the basis of our preliminary data, we conclude that intradermal injection of GCSF-mobilized PBSCs from a young pig can rejuvenate the skin in aged pigs.

  13. Isopropyl alcohol compared with isopropyl alcohol plus povidone-iodine as skin preparation for prevention of blood culture contamination.

    PubMed

    Kiyoyama, Tomonori; Tokuda, Yasuharu; Shiiki, Soichi; Hachiman, Teruyuki; Shimasaki, Teppei; Endo, Kazuo

    2009-01-01

    Despite a number of studies on the efficacies of antiseptics for the prevention of blood culture contamination, it still remains unclear which antiseptic should be used. Although the combination of povidone-iodine and isopropyl alcohol has been traditionally used in many institutions, the application of povidone-iodine needs extra time, and there is little evidence that this combination could have an additive effect in reducing contamination rates. To elucidate the additive efficacy of povidone-iodine, we compared two antiseptics, 70% isopropyl alcohol only and 70% isopropyl alcohol plus povidone-iodine, in a prospective, nonrandomized, and partially blinded study in a community hospital in Japan between 1 October 2007 and 21 March 2008. All blood samples for culture were drawn by first-year residents who received formal training on collection techniques. Skin antisepsis was performed with 70% isopropyl alcohol plus povidone-iodine on all inpatient wards and with only 70% isopropyl alcohol in the emergency department. For the group of specimens from inpatient wards cultured, 13 (0.46%) of 2,797 cultures were considered contaminated. For the group of specimens from the emergency department cultured, 12 (0.42%) of 2,856 cultures were considered contaminated. There was no significant difference in the contamination rates between the two groups (relative risk, 0.90; 95% confidence interval, 0.41 to 1.98; P = 0.80). In conclusion, the use of a single application of 70% isopropyl alcohol is a sufficient and a more cost- and time-effective method of obtaining blood samples for culture than the use of a combination of isopropyl alcohol and povidone-iodine. The extremely low contamination rates in both groups suggest that the type of antiseptic used may not be as important as the use of proper technique.

  14. Induction of skin papillomas in the rabbit, Oryctologus cuniculus, by bites of a blood-sucking insect, Cimex lectularius, irradiated by gamma rays

    SciTech Connect

    el-Mofty, M.M.; Sakr, S.A.; Younis, M.W. )

    1989-11-01

    Bed bugs, Cimex lectularius, irradiated with gamma rays were allowed to suck blood from shaved areas of the skin of rabbits, Oryctolagus cuniculus, 2 times/week for 5 months and then once weekly for another 5 months. This significantly induced the formation of skin papillomas and sweat gland hyperplasia in five out of nine experimental animals. It is speculated that the saliva of the irradiated bugs was activated by gamma rays and was responsible for the induction of skin papillomas. Because bed bugs play a significant role in the transmission of virus, it is also speculated that there is a virus in the saliva of bugs; this virus may be activated by gamma radiation and causes the development of papillomas in the skin.

  15. Influence of Nigella sativa fixed oil on some blood parameters and histopathology of skin in staphylococcal-infected BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Abu-Al-Basal, Mariam A

    2011-12-01

    Nigella sativa has been used for a long time in Jordanian folk medicine to treat skin diseases like microbial infections and inflammation. Therefore, the present study was conducted to assess the healing efficacy of petroleum ether extract of Nigella sativa seeds (fixed oil) on staphylococcal-infected skin. Male BALB/c mice were infected with 100 microL of Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 6538) suspension at a dose of 10(8) colony forming unit/mouse into shaved mild dorsal skin. Application of treatments for each group (100 microL sterile saline, 100 microL chloramphenicol (10 microg/mouse) and Nigella sativa fixed oil at a dose of 50, 100 or 150 microL/mouse) was performed at the site of infection twice a day for two consecutive days after 3 h of infection. At day 3 and 5 after infection, total White Blood Cells (WBCs) count; differential and absolute differential WBC counts and the number of viable bacteria present in the skin area were measured. At day 5 after infection, the animals were sacrificed and the histology of skin was examined. Results indicated that fixed oil of Nigella sativa seeds enhance healing of staphylococcal-infected skin by reducing total and absolute differential WBC counts, local infection and inflammation, bacterial expansion and tissue impairment. These effects provide scientific basis for the use of Nigella sativa in traditional medicine to treat skin infections and inflammations.

  16. Microbiology and potential virulence of Sporothrix cyanescens, a fungus rarely isolated from blood and skin.

    PubMed Central

    Sigler, L; Harris, J L; Dixon, D M; Flis, A L; Salkin, I F; Kemna, M; Duncan, R A

    1990-01-01

    Sporothrix cyanescens has been recovered from blood and a finger lesion at several medical centers in the United States. The morphology and physiology of these and three additional isolates were studied. S. cyanescens was distinguished from S. schenckii and S. fungorum by white to lavender colonial pigmentation and from S. schenckii also by the formation of secondary conidia. All isolates of S. cyanescens grew well at 37 degrees C, were cycloheximide susceptible, strongly urease positive, and benomyl resistant, failed to hydrolyze starch, and were inhibited by sodium chloride in vitro at a concentration of greater than or equal to 12%. Study of S. cyanescens in a murine model by using intravenous inoculation failed to demonstrate an invasive pathogenic potential. The validity of the transfer of S. cyanescens to the new genus Cerinosterus Moore is discussed. Images PMID:2351719

  17. Parasite load in the blood and skin of dogs naturally infected by Leishmania infantum is correlated with their capacity to infect sand fly vectors.

    PubMed

    Borja, Lairton Souza; Sousa, Orlando Marcos Farias de; Solcà, Manuela da Silva; Bastos, Leila Andrade; Bordoni, Marcelo; Magalhães, Jairo Torres; Larangeira, Daniela Farias; Barrouin-Melo, Stella Maria; Fraga, Deborah Bittencourt Mothé; Veras, Patrícia Sampaio Tavares

    2016-10-15

    The sand fly Lutzomyia longipalpis is primarily responsible for the transmission of visceral leishmaniasis (VL) in the New World, and dogs are considered to be the main urban reservoir of this disease. In order to improve the efficacy of control measures, it is essential to assess the transmission capacity of Leishmania infantum to the sand fly vector by naturally infected dogs. The present study investigated the existence of correlations between canine clinical presentation and the intensity of parasite load in the blood, skin and spleen of naturally infected dogs. In addition, we also attempted to establish correlations between the intensity of parasite load in canine tissue and the parasite load detected in sandflies five days after feeding on naturally infected dogs. A total of 23 dogs were examined and classified according to clinical manifestation of canine VL. Blood samples, splenic aspirate and skin biopsies were collected and parasite DNA was quantified by qPCR. Canine capacity to infect Lu. longipalpis with parasites was evaluated by xenodiagnosis and parasite loads were measured five days after feeding. No significant differences were observed with respect to canine clinical manifestation and the parasite loads detected in the blood, skin and spleen samples obtained from naturally infected dogs. Regardless of clinical canine visceral leishmaniasis (CVL) presentation and the degree of parasite burden, almost half of the dogs successfully infected sandflies with parasites, albeit to a low number of sandflies with correspondingly low parasite loads. Parasite loads in both canine blood and skin were shown to be positively correlated with the canine infectiousness to the sand fly vector, and positive correlations were also observed with respect to these tissues and the sand fly infection rate, as well as the parasite load detected in sandflies following xenodiagnosis. In conclusion, this indicates that parasite loads in both blood and skin can function as

  18. Regional relation between skin blood flow and sweating to passive heating and local administration of acetylcholine in young, healthy humans

    PubMed Central

    Kenney, W. Larry; Alexander, Lacy M.

    2013-01-01

    Regional variation in sweating over the human body is widely recognized yet variation in vasomotor responses and mechanisms causing this variation remain unclear. This study aimed to explore the relation between regional sweating rates (RSR) and skin blood flow (SkBF) responses to thermal and pharmacological stimuli in young, healthy subjects. In nine subjects (23 ± 3 yr), intradermal microdialysis (MD) probes were inserted into the ventral forearm, abdomen, thigh, and lower back and perfused with lactated Ringer solution. RSR over each MD membrane were measured using ventilated capsules with a laser Doppler probe housed in each capsule for measurement of red cell flux (laser Doppler flux, LDF) as an index of SkBF. Subjects completed a whole body heating protocol to 1°C rise in oral temperature and an acetylcholine dose response (ACh 1 × 10−7-0.1 M; mean skin temperature 34°C). Maximal LDF were obtained at the end of both protocols (50 mM sodium nitroprusside).During heating RSR varied among sites (P < 0.0001) and was greater on the back versus other sites (P < 0.05), but LDF was similar between sites (P = 0.343). RSR and SkBF showed a strong relation during initial (arm: r = 0.77 ± 0.09, thigh: r = 0.81 ± 0.08, abdomen: r = 0.89 ± 0.04, back: r = 0.86 ± 0.04) but not latter stages of heating. No differences in RSR (P = 0.160) or SkBF (LDF, P = 0.841) were observed between sites during ACh perfusion. Taken together, these data suggest that increases in SkBF are necessary to initiate and increase sweating, but further rises in RSR are not fully dependent on SkBF in a dose-response manner. Furthermore, RSR cannot be explained by cholinergic sensitivity or variation in SkBF. PMID:23389110

  19. The effect of diurnal variation on the regional differences in sweating and skin blood flow during exercise.

    PubMed

    Aoki, K; Shiojiri, T; Shibasaki, M; Takano, S; Kondo, N; Iwata, A

    1995-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine changes in the control of heat-dissipation responses to exercise associated with the diurnal variation in core temperature from the viewpoint of the regional response patterns. We studied seven men during exercise on a cycle ergometer at 100 W for 40 min at 25 degrees C at 0630 (morning) 1630 (evening) hours on 2 separate days. Oesophageal temperature (T(oes)), local skin temperature, local sweating rate (msw) on the forehead, back, forearm and thigh, and skin blood flow by laser Doppler flowmeter (LDF) on the back and forearm were measured continuously. The T(oes) at rest was significantly higher in the evening than in the morning, the difference averaging approximately 0.4 degrees C (P < 0.05). The T(oes) thresholds for each site in msw and that for back in LDF were significantly different between the two times of day (P < 0.05). The change in T(oes) thresholds for sweating and vasodilatation for morning and evening were similar to T(oes) at rest. Although msw on the forehead was significantly higher in the morning than in the evening, msw on the back was significantly higher in the evening than in the morning (P < 0.05). Total local sweating rate (msw,tot) for each site during exercise was significantly higher on the forehead than on the forearm in the morning, and on the back than on the forearm in the evening, respectively (P < 0.05). The results would suggest that the diurnal variation of heat-dissipation responses to exercise is influenced not only by a central controlling mechanism but also by changes in the regional differences.

  20. Effect of ThermaCare HeatWraps and Icy Hot Cream/Patches on Skin and Quadriceps Muscle Temperature and Blood Flow

    PubMed Central

    Petrofsky, Jerrold Scott; Laymon, Michael; Berk, Lee; Bains, Gurinder

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of over-the-counter treatments—ThermaCare HeatWraps (chemical reaction to produce heat above the skin), Icy Hot Patch, and Icy Hot Cream (topically applied menthol)—on skin and deep tissue temperature. Methods This was a longitudinal crossover study. On each of 3 days, a ThermaCare HeatWrap, Icy Hot Cream, or Icy Hot Patch was applied randomly over the quadriceps muscle in 15 healthy volunteers with normal body mass. Skin and muscle temperature and blood flow were measured by laser flowmetry every 15 minutes for 2 hours. Results After 2 hours, mean temperature decreased by 2.1°C (7.0%; P = .02) in skin and 1.0°C (2.9%; P = .01) in muscle with Icy Hot Cream. Icy Hot Patch decreased skin and muscle temperature by 1.7°C (5.4%; P = .03) and 1.3°C (3.8%; P = .01), respectively. In contrast, ThermaCare raised skin and muscle temperature by 7.8°C (25.8%; P = .001) and 2.7°C (7.7%; P = .002), respectively; both were significantly warmer with ThermaCare vs either Icy Hot product (all P < .007). Icy Hot products produced a net decrease in skin blood flow (Cream: 56.7 flux [39.3%; P = .003]; Patch: 19.1 flux [16.7%; P = .045]). Muscle blood flow decreased with the Patch (6.7 flux [7.0%; P = .02]). After a period of fluctuations, Icy Hot Cream produced a net increase vs baseline of 7.0 flux (16.9%; P = .02). ThermaCare more than doubled blood flow in skin (83.3 flux [109.7%; P = .0003]) and muscle (25.1 flux [148.5%; P = .004]). Conclusions In this group of 15 healthy volunteers, ThermaCare HeatWraps provided the greatest degree of tissue warming and increase in tissue blood flow. PMID:27069427

  1. Effect of ThermaCare HeatWraps and Icy Hot Cream/Patches on Skin and Quadriceps Muscle Temperature and Blood Flow.

    PubMed

    Petrofsky, Jerrold Scott; Laymon, Michael; Berk, Lee; Bains, Gurinder

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of over-the-counter treatments-ThermaCare HeatWraps (chemical reaction to produce heat above the skin), Icy Hot Patch, and Icy Hot Cream (topically applied menthol)-on skin and deep tissue temperature. This was a longitudinal crossover study. On each of 3 days, a ThermaCare HeatWrap, Icy Hot Cream, or Icy Hot Patch was applied randomly over the quadriceps muscle in 15 healthy volunteers with normal body mass. Skin and muscle temperature and blood flow were measured by laser flowmetry every 15 minutes for 2 hours. After 2 hours, mean temperature decreased by 2.1°C (7.0%; P = .02) in skin and 1.0°C (2.9%; P = .01) in muscle with Icy Hot Cream. Icy Hot Patch decreased skin and muscle temperature by 1.7°C (5.4%; P = .03) and 1.3°C (3.8%; P = .01), respectively. In contrast, ThermaCare raised skin and muscle temperature by 7.8°C (25.8%; P = .001) and 2.7°C (7.7%; P = .002), respectively; both were significantly warmer with ThermaCare vs either Icy Hot product (all P < .007). Icy Hot products produced a net decrease in skin blood flow (Cream: 56.7 flux [39.3%; P = .003]; Patch: 19.1 flux [16.7%; P = .045]). Muscle blood flow decreased with the Patch (6.7 flux [7.0%; P = .02]). After a period of fluctuations, Icy Hot Cream produced a net increase vs baseline of 7.0 flux (16.9%; P = .02). ThermaCare more than doubled blood flow in skin (83.3 flux [109.7%; P = .0003]) and muscle (25.1 flux [148.5%; P = .004]). In this group of 15 healthy volunteers, ThermaCare HeatWraps provided the greatest degree of tissue warming and increase in tissue blood flow.

  2. Blood

    MedlinePlus

    ... The liquid part, called plasma, is made of water, salts, and protein. Over half of your blood is plasma. The solid part of your blood contains red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Red ...

  3. Absolute measurement of androgen receptor mRNA in peripheral blood mononuclear, preputial skin and urethral mucosa cells of control individuals with phimosis using qRT-PCR.

    PubMed

    Silva, Tatiane Sousa e; Richetti, Flavio; Cunha, Daniela Patricia Palmeira Santos; Amarante, Antonio Carlos Moreira; Leão, Jovelino Quintino de Souza; Longui, Carlos Alberto

    2011-11-01

    Androgen actions are exerted upon the androgen receptor (AR), and complete genital virilization of normal 46,XY individuals depends on adequate function and expression of the AR gene in a tissue-specific manner. Standardization of normal ARmRNA in androgen-sensitive tissues. In this study, we determined the quantitative amounts of ARmRNA in peripheral blood mononuclear, urethral mucosa and preputial skin cells of control subjects with phimosis by using RT-PCR. The mean (SD) values of AR expression in blood, urethra and prepuce were: 0.01 (0.01); 0.43 (0.32); 0.31 (0.36), respectively. The AR expression is low in blood and equivalent in urethral mucosa and preputial skin, which may be useful in the diagnosis of individuals with abnormal external genitalia.

  4. Minimizing endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy for primary palmar hyperhidrosis: guided by palmar skin temperature and laser Doppler blood flow.

    PubMed

    Li, Xu; Tu, Yuan-Rong; Lin, Min; Lai, Fan-Cai; Chen, Jian-Feng; Miao, Hui-Weng

    2009-02-01

    Limiting the extent of sympathectomy in palmar hyperhidrosis was recently recognized as an effective method to minimize the incidence and severity of troublesome compensatory sweating. However, the levels at which transection should be performed remain controversial. In this study, we proposed that the level of ablation varies and should be adjusted for each individual patient. Guided by palmar skin temperature and laser Doppler blood flow, we try to find the correct target level in each case. Fifty patients with severe primary palmar hyperhidrosis received bilateral endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy. Different levels of transection from T4 to T2 were performed step by step until the successful extirpation was implied by the intraoperative monitoring. The results of the operations were studied. All patients were followed up and evaluated for symptom resolution, postoperative complication, levels of satisfaction, and severity of compensatory sweating. Of a total of 100 lateral procedures, 76 laterals (76%) ended the procedure at the T4 level, 23 laterals (23%) ended the procedure at the T3 level, and 1 lateral (1%) ended the procedure at the T2 level. The postoperative complication was minor, and no Horner's syndrome was detected. The rate of symptom resolution was 100% and no recurrence was found. The satisfaction rate was 92%, and the incidence of mild, moderate, and severe compensatory sweating were 12%, 8%, and 6%, respectively. Concerning the sympathectomy for palmar hyperhidrosis, there is a possibility that the level of the transection varies and should be adjusted for each individual patient. Intraoperative monitoring of temperature and blood flow may be a useful tool in establishing a kind of standardized reference for finding the correct target level.

  5. Comparison of blood glucose measurements using samples obtained from the forearm, finger skin puncture, and venous serum.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyung Soon; Park, Mi Sook; Cha, Young Joo; Kim, Wun Jae; Choi, Seong Su; Kim, Kyoung Ok; Cha, Eun Jong; Kim, Kyung Ah

    2010-06-01

    Blood glucose testing (BGT) at the forearm minimizes the pain experienced during sampling of capillary blood. We compared the BGT results for forearm sampling with those for standard finger skin puncture and venous serum to evaluate the clinical validity of forearm BGT. BGT was performed on the finger (G(F)) and forearm (G(A)) with a portable glucometer in 555 subjects, including 61 diabetic patients, under fasting conditions. BGT with venous serum (G(V)) was followed within an hour in 514 subjects. Simple linear regression, intraclass correlation, and Passing-Bablok regression analyses were performed using the G(A)-G(F) and G(A)-G(V) data. G(A) showed an excellent linear relationship with both G(F) and G(V) with a Pearson correlation coefficient (r) of 0.97 (P<0.0001) in the patient group, which was similar to the findings in the normal group except for the lower r values. The mean bias between G(A) and G(F) and between G(A) and G(V) were within +/- 10 mg/dL in both groups. The intraclass correlation coefficients were slightly smaller than the corresponding r values, but they showed the same tendency in both groups. In the Passing-Bablok analyses, the 95% confidence intervals of the slope and intercept parameters were <+/-20% of unity and <+/-20 mg/dL, respectively, which were within the acceptable ranges. All 3 statistical analyses supported the satisfactory agreement of G(A) with G(F) or G(V). BGT at the forearm was highly consistent with the standard BGT, thereby confirming its applicability in clinical practice for self-testing under steady fasting conditions.

  6. Local variation in cutaneous and subcutaneous blood flow measured by CdTe(C1) minidetectors in normal and psoriatic skin

    SciTech Connect

    Klemp, P.; Bojsen, J.

    1986-02-01

    The accuracy of the /sup 133/Xe washout method and the validity of newly developed cadmium telluride CdTe(Cl) minisemiconductor detectors were estimated by performing comparative, simultaneous measurements of both cutaneous (CBF) and subcutaneous (SBF) blood flow using 2 conventional scintillation sodium iodide NaI(Tl) and CdTe(Cl) detectors over the same radioactive depot in each of 10 individuals. The accuracy of the /sup 133/Xe washout method was found to be 13-15% (C.V.) for the CBF measurements and 9-12% (C.V.) for the SBF measurements. The CdTe(Cl) detectors, which have a weight of 20 g and were attached directly over the radioactive depot, may replace stationary NaI(Tl) detectors placed 20 cm from the depot for measurements of both CBF and SBF. Two CdTe(Cl) detectors were used for estimations of the local variation in CBF and SBF within a distance of 5 cm in normal skin of 10 individuals. The C.V. was 7% for the CBF measurements and 18% for the SBF measurements. Measurements of CBF and SBF were performed in 6 psoriatic patients who developed typical Woronoff rings. The local CBF differed significantly from the center of psoriatic plaques to the margin, in the Woronoff ring, and in nonlesional skin. In contrast, SBF was remarkably equal within the plaque and in the Woronoff ring. Cutaneous blood flow in chronic stable, lesional psoriatic skin was significantly lower than previously published values for active lesional psoriatic skin, but significantly higher than CBF in normal individuals. Measurements of CBF in tetrahydrofurfuryl nicotinic acid (Trafuril)-treated skin showed higher values than measurements of CBF in the postischemic hyperemia period both in normal and in lesional psoriatic skin. Trafuril induced a significant increase of CBF in both lesional and nonlesional skin.

  7. Changes in skin blood flow during the menstrual cycle: the influence of the menstrual cycle on the peripheral circulation in healthy female volunteers.

    PubMed

    Bartelink, M L; Wollersheim, H; Theeuwes, A; van Duren, D; Thien, T

    1990-05-01

    1. It is known that females have a lower skin perfusion than males. In women there are also differences in blood flow at different reproductive stages of their lives. As an initial investigation of the possible contribution of sex hormones to these differences, we studied skin and forearm blood flow during the natural changes in hormone levels which occur during the menstrual cycle. 2. Thirty-one healthy female volunteers were studied. The effect of a standardized finger cooling test (immersion of a gloved hand in a 16 degrees C water bath) on finger skin temperature and on laser Doppler flux in the finger, and forearm blood flow (strain gauge venous occlusion plethysmography) was assessed at four different times during one cycle: during menstruation, 1 day before ovulation, 2 days after ovulation and at the mid-luteal phase. Test days were determined by daily measurements of basal body temperature and were confirmed afterwards by determinations of serum luteinizing hormone, follicle-stimulating hormone, 17 beta-oestradiol and progesterone. 3. Peripheral skin circulation varied significantly within one menstrual cycle. The extremes were a mean finger skin temperature of 25.9 +/- 3.0 degrees C in the luteal phase compared with 28.4 +/- 3.7 degrees C in the pre-ovulatory phase (P = 0.002). The respective values for the mean laser Doppler flux were 18.4 +/- 10.9 compared with 29.2 +/- 16.4 arbitrary units (P = 0.003). 4. Baseline forearm muscle blood flow also varied significantly (P = 0.04) within one menstrual cycle, with low values in the menstrual phase compared with the other phases.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Simultaneous recording of fingertip skin blood flow changes by multiprobe laser Doppler flowmetry and frequency-corrected thermal clearance.

    PubMed

    Raamat, Rein; Jagomägi, Kersti; Kingisepp, Peet

    2002-09-01

    We compared the results of skin blood flow (SBF) measurements, obtained simultaneously in adjacent fingertips by laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) and thermal clearance (TC) probes, having approximately the same spatial and temporal characteristics. Experiments were performed in nine healthy volunteers during rest at room temperature (26-28 degrees C). A time resolution equal to about a second was achieved by speeding up the response of the thermal measurement circuit by applying the computer simulation software of the MATLAB package. The comparison revealed that the frequency-corrected TC signal correlated well with the multiprobe LDF signal (median correlation coefficient = 0.90, range = 0.84 to 0.96). At the same time the individual slope values of the regression equation ranged from 0.58 to 1.61, revealing the difficulties encountered in obtaining the invariant scaling factor between the TC and LDF measurements. The relationship between the frequency-corrected TC signal and the multiprobe LDF signal was found to be linear in the range of SBF changes of about three- to fourfold. In the case of larger fluctuations in SBF, excessive acceleration at high SBF rates was noted.

  9. Biological monitoring techniques for human exposure to industrial chemicals. Analysis of human fat, skin, nails, hair, blood, urine, and breath

    SciTech Connect

    Sheldon, L.; Umana, M.; Bursey, J.; Gutknecht, W.; Handy, R.; Hyldburg, P.; Michael, L.; Moseley, A.; Raymer, J.; Smith, D.

    1986-01-01

    Biological monitoring techniques for human exposure to industrial chemicals are detailed in this book which surveys and evaluates methods and procedures to identify and quantitative chemical constituents in human tissues and body fluids, including fat, skin, nails, hair, blood, urine, and breath. The book details attempts to determine 1) the feasibility of correlating preferred methods with specific tissues or fluids and/or with readily identifiable chemical characteristics, and 2) which biological matrices serve as the best indicators of past or present exposure to chemical constituents of concern. The methods studied have been evaluated of their ease and rapidly, as well as cost, accuracy and precision. Target compounds studied were those inorganic and organic chemicals basically of current or previous concern to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Information provided for the methods evaluated includes sections regarding various types of instrumentation and sample preparation. Sections on method/analyte correlation suggest physical or chemical properties which might be used to predict the applicability of a given analytical method to the analysis of that chemical in a specific biological matrix.

  10. Radiation-induced stress response in peripheral blood of breast cancer patients differs between patients with severe acute skin reactions and patients with no side effects to radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Skiöld, Sara; Naslund, Ingemar; Brehwens, Karl; Andersson, Arja; Wersall, Peter; Lidbrink, Elisabet; Harms-Ringdahl, Mats; Wojcik, Andrzej; Haghdoost, Siamak

    2013-08-30

    The aim of the study was to compare the radiation-induced oxidative stress response in blood samples from breast cancer patients that developed severe acute skin reactions during the radiotherapy, with the response in blood samples from patients with no side effects. Peripheral blood was collected from 12 breast cancer patients showing no early skin reactions after radiotherapy (RTOG grade 0) and from 14 breast cancer patients who developed acute severe skin reactions (RTOG grade 3-4). Whole blood was irradiated with 0, 5 and 2000mGy γ-radiation and serum was isolated. The biomarker for oxidative stress, 8-oxo-dG, was analyzed in the serum by a modified ELISA. While a significant radiation-induced increase of serum 8-oxo-dG levels was observed in serum of the RTOG 0 patients, no increase was seen in serum of the RTOG 3-4 patients. The radiation induced increase in serum 8-oxo-dG levels after 5mGy did not differ significantly from the increase observed for 2000mGy in the RTOG 3-4 cohort, thus no dose response relation was observed. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) value of 0.97 was obtained from the radiation-induced increase in 8-oxo-dG indicating that the assay could be used to identify patients with severe acute adverse reactions to radiotherapy. The results show that samples of whole blood from patients, classified as highly radiosensitive (RTOG 3-4) based on their skin reactions to radiotherapy, differ significantly in their oxidative stress response to ionizing radiation compared to samples of whole blood from patients with no skin reactions (RTOG 0). Extracellular 8-oxo-dG is primarily a biomarker of nucleotide damage and the results indicate that the patients with severe acute skin reactions differ in their cellular response to ionizing radiation at the level of induction of oxidative stress or at the level of repair or both. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Skin, Hair, and Nails

    MedlinePlus

    ... thousands of cells and hundreds of sweat glands, oil glands, nerve endings, and blood vessels. Skin is ... empty into hair follicles and pores, produce the oil sebum that lubricates the skin and hair. Sebaceous ...

  12. Blood

    MedlinePlus

    ... that die or are lost from the body. White Blood Cells White blood cells (WBCs, and also ... of severe pain. previous continue Diseases of the White Blood Cells Neutropenia (pronounced: new-truh-PEE-nee- ...

  13. Orexin microinjection in the medullary raphe increases heart rate and arterial pressure but does not reduce tail skin blood flow in the awake rat.

    PubMed

    Luong, L N L; Carrive, P

    2012-01-27

    The rostral medullary raphe region is an important target of hypothalamic orexin neurons; however, little is known of the effect of orexin in this key autonomic and somatic premotor region. Here we tested the effect of orexin-A (3 and 30 pmol) microinjected in the medullary raphe, on heart rate (HR), mean arterial pressure (MAP), tail skin blood flow, body temperature, and behavior in freely moving, awake rats. HR, MAP, and body activity were recorded by radio-telemetry. Changes in tail skin blood flow and body temperature, as well as potential interscapular brown adipose tissue thermogenesis were recorded indirectly by infrared thermography of the skin of the tail, lumbosacral back, and interscapular back areas, respectively. Compared with saline, orexin-A (30 pmol) evoked significant and long lasting increases in HR (+99 bpm), MAP (+11 mmHg), and body activity (grooming, not locomotor activity). However, it did not reduce tail skin blood flow more than saline, and there was no significant increase in body temperature. A small, though significant, thermogenic effect was observed in the interscapular region, but this effect is more likely to have originated from activity in neck and shoulder muscles than brown adipose tissue. Thus, orexin projections to the rostral medullary raphe can mediate significant cardiovascular changes, but does not seem to affect tail skin vasomotor tone or brown adipose tissue in the awake rat. This important brainstem relay may contribute to the cardiovascular changes evoked by arousal and various forms of stress that are associated with activation of orexin neurons.

  14. Oxidative DNA damage of peripheral blood polymorphonuclear leukocytes, selectively induced by chronic arsenic exposure, is associated with extent of arsenic-related skin lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Pei, Qiuling; Ma, Ning; Zhang, Jing; Xu, Wenchao; Li, Yong; Ma, Zhifeng; Li, Yunyun; Tian, Fengjie; Zhang, Wenping; Mu, Jinjun; Li, Yuanfei; Wang, Dongxing; Liu, Haifang; Yang, Mimi; Ma, Caifeng; Yun, Fen

    2013-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that oxidative stress is an important risk factor for arsenic-related diseases. Peripheral blood leukocytes constitute an important defense against microorganisms or pathogens, while the research on the impact of chronic arsenic exposure on peripheral blood leukocytes is much more limited, especially at low level arsenic exposure. The purpose of the present study was to explore whether chronic arsenic exposure affects oxidative stress of peripheral blood leukocytes and possible linkages between oxidative stress and arsenic-induced skin lesions. 75 male inhabitants recruited from an As-endemic region of China were investigated in the present study. The classification of arsenicosis was based on the degree of skin lesions. Arsenic levels were measured in drinking water and urine by Atomic Fluorescence Spectroscopy. Urinary 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) was tested by Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay. 8-OHdG of peripheral blood leukocytes was evaluated using immunocytochemical staining. 8-OHdG-positive reactions were only present in polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs), but not in monocytes (MNs). The 8-OHdG staining of PMN cytoplasm was observed in all investigated populations, while the 8-OHdG staining of PMN nuclei was frequently found along with the elevated amounts of cell debris in individuals with skin lesion. Urinary arsenic levels were increased in the severe skin lesion group compared with the normal group. No relationship was observed between drinking water arsenic or urine 8-OHdG and the degree of skin lesions. These findings indicated that the target and persistent oxidative stress in peripheral blood PMNs may be employed as a sensitive biomarker directly to assess adverse health effects caused by chronic exposure to lower levels of arsenic. -- Highlights: ► Male inhabitants were investigated from an As-endemic region of China. ► 8-OHdG-positive reactions were only present in polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs).

  15. Phase-resolved optical coherence tomography and optical Doppler tomography for imaging blood flow in human skin with fast scanning speed and high velocity sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Yonghua; Chen, Zhongping; Saxer, Christopher; Xiang, Shaohua; Boer, Johannes F. de; Nelson, J. Stuart

    2000-01-15

    We have developed a novel phase-resolved optical coherence tomography (OCT) and optical Doppler tomography (ODT) system that uses phase information derived from a Hilbert transformation to image blood flow in human skin with fast scanning speed and high velocity sensitivity. Using the phase change between sequential scans to construct flow-velocity imaging, this technique decouples spatial resolution and velocity sensitivity in flow images and increases imaging speed by more than 2 orders of magnitude without compromising spatial resolution or velocity sensitivity. The minimum flow velocity that can be detected with an axial-line scanning speed of 400 Hz and an average phase change over eight sequential scans is as low as 10 {mu}m/s , while a spatial resolution of 10 {mu}m is maintained. Using this technique, we present what are to our knowledge the first phase-resolved OCT/ODT images of blood flow in human skin. (c) 2000 Optical Society of America.

  16. Phase-resolved functional optical coherence tomography: simultaneous imaging of in situ tissue structure, blood flow velocity, standard deviation, birefringence, and Stokes vectors in human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Hongwu; Ding, Zhihua; Zhao, Yonghua; Miao, Jianjun; Nelson, J. Stuart; Chen, Zhongping

    2002-10-01

    We describe a phase-resolved functional optical coherence tomography system that can simultaneously yield in situ images of tissue structure, blood flow velocity, standard deviation, birefringence, and the Stokes vectors in human skin. Multifunctional images were obtained by processing of analytical interference fringe signals derived from two perpendicular polarization-detection channels. The blood flow velocity and standard deviation images were obtained by comparison of the phases from pairs of analytical signals in neighboring A-lines in the same polarization state. The analytical signals from two polarization-diversity detection channels were used to determine the four Stokes vectors for four reference polarization states. From the four Stokes vectors, the birefringence image, which is not sensitive to the orientation of the optical axis in the sample, was obtained. Multifunctional in situ images of a port wine stain birthmark in human skin are presented.

  17. Analytical prediction of the heat transfer from a blood vessel near the skin surface when cooled by a symmetrical cooling strip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chato, J. C.; Shitzer, A.

    1971-01-01

    An analytical method was developed to estimate the amount of heat extracted from an artery running close to the skin surface which is cooled in a symmetrical fashion by a cooling strip. The results indicate that the optimum width of a cooling strip is approximately three times the depth to the centerline of the artery. The heat extracted from an artery with such a strip is about 0.9 w/m-C which is too small to affect significantly the temperature of the blood flow through a main blood vessel, such as the carotid artery. The method is applicable to veins as well.

  18. Effect of linear polarized light irradiation near the stellate ganglion in skin blood flow of fingers in patients with progressive systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chih-Hung; Chen, Gwo-Shing; Yu, Hsin-Su

    2006-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effect of linear polarized light irradiation near the stellate ganglion area on cutaneous blood flow in fingers of patients with progressive systemic sclerosis. Sympathetic overactivity is known to be present in patients with progressive systemic sclerosis. Recently introduced linear polarized light irradiation is designed to simulate noninvasive stellate ganglion block to decrease sympathetic output. Five patients with progressive systemic sclerosis and three normal healthy controls were studied. Linear polarized light (Super Lizer) was irradiated near the stellate ganglion on the right side of the neck at 358 J/cm(2) for 10 min. Then, laser Doppler flowmetry, laser Doppler imager, and capillary microscopy were used to measure the cutaneous blood flow of the right fourth finger for 30 min. No significant alternations of the skin blood flow between normal controls and patients with progressive systemic sclerosis after linear polarized light irradiation were detected. The effect of linear polarized light on the microcirculation of patients with progressive systemic sclerosis was minimal and transient. The effect of linear polarized light in treating patients with progressive systemic sclerosis may not result from the improvement of skin blood flow. Therefore, the use of linear polarized light in those patients to increase cutaneous blood flow should not be overemphasized.

  19. A skin disease, a blood disease or something in between? An exploratory focus group study of patients' experiences with porphyria cutanea tarda*

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, J; Gjengedal, E; Sandberg, S; Råheim, M

    2015-01-01

    Background Porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT) is characterized by fragile skin with blistering on sun-exposed areas. Symptoms typically develop in late adulthood and can be triggered by iron overload, alcohol intake, oestrogens and various liver diseases. Treatment consists of phlebotomy to reduce iron, or increasing urinary porphyrin excretion by administering chlorochin. To optimize patient care, health personnel need to understand the subjective experiences of PCT. Objectives To explore the experiences of persons with PCT with regard to symptoms, treatment, follow-up and prevention of the disease. Methods Interpretive description was used as a qualitative approach. Twenty-one participants attended three focus groups. All participants had experienced PCT symptoms during the last 5 years. Results Participants' experiences varied from trivializing symptoms and fragile skin to what was described as a desperate situation, with huge blisters, skin falling off and feeling as if one was in a ‘horror movie’. For some, itching was very troublesome, preventing sleep and delaying skin healing. In managing PCT a shift in focus from skin to blood was described. PCT was perceived as a chronic and systemic disease causing a range of health problems. Strategies for preventing symptoms ranged from doing nothing to frequent controls and check-ups. Conclusions Participants had a systemic perception of PCT, and a tendency to attribute a range of health problems to the condition. This study adds insight into the experiences patients have with PCT. PMID:24958197

  20. Acute exposure to solar simulated ultraviolet radiation affects oxidative stress-related biomarkers in skin, liver and blood of hairless mice.

    PubMed

    Svobodová, Alena Rajnochová; Galandáková, Adéla; Sianská, Jarmila; Doležal, Dalibor; Ulrichová, Jitka; Vostálová, Jitka

    2011-01-01

    The ultraviolet (UV) region of solar radiation is a critical factor in the initiation and development of a number of skin diseases. However, it is not only skin which is directly exposed to solar light that is affected by UV radiation, through low molecular weight mediators, generated upon irradiation, "non-skin" tissues can also be affected. The aim of this study was to examine in detail, the acute effects of UVA and UVB wavebands on hairless mice. Female SKH-1 hairless mice were exposed to a single dose of UVB (200, 800 mJ/cm(2)) or UVA (10, 20 J/cm(2)) using a solar simulator. The effects on haematological parameters, activity and/or expression of antioxidant enzymes, level of glutathione (GSH), markers of oxidative damage (lipid peroxidation and carbonylated proteins) were analysed in erythrocytes, plasma, liver and whole skin homogenates. No macroscopic changes were observed either 4 or 24 h after UVA/UVB exposure. The blood count showed a significant increase in leukocyte number and reduction of platelets 4 h following UVA and UVB irradiation, which disappeared 24 h after irradiation except for the higher UVA dose. Changes in oxidative stress-related parameters, particularly activity of catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) and level of GSH and lipid peroxidation products, were found in skin, erythrocytes and liver. The expression of several enzymes (CAT, SOD, glutathione transferase (GST), nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate) quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1) and hem oxygenase-1 (HO-1)) in skin was affected following UVA and UVB radiation. Increase in carbonylated proteins was found in plasma and skin samples.

  1. [Effects of Frankincense and Myrrh essential oil on transdermal absorption in vitro of Chuanxiong and penetration mechanism of skin blood flow].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiao-Fang; Luo, Jing; Guan, Yong-Mei; Yu, Ya-Ting; Jin, Chen; Zhu, Wei-Feng; Liu, Hong-Ning

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this paper was to explore the effects of Frankincense and Myrrh essential oil on transdermal absorption in vitro of Chuanxiong, and to investigate the possible penetration mechanism of their essential oil from the perspective of skin blood perfusion changes. Transdermal tests were performed in vitro with excised mice skin by improved Franz diffusion cells. The cumulative penetration amounts of ferulic acid in Chuanxiong were determined by HPLC to investigate the effects of Frankincense and Myrrh essential oil on transdermal permeation properties of Chuanxiong. Simultaneously, the skin blood flows were determined by laser flow doppler. The results showed that the cumulative penetration amount of ferulic acid in Chuanxiong was (8.13±0.76) μg•cm⁻² in 24 h, and was (48.91±4.87), (57.80±2.86), (63.34±4.56), (54.17±4.40), (62.52±7.79) μg•cm⁻² respectively in Azone group, Frankincense essential oil group, Myrrh essential oil, frankincense and myrrh singly extracted essential oil mixture group, and frankincense and myrrh mixed extraction essential oil group. The enhancement ratios of each essential oil groups were 7.68, 8.26, 7.26, 8.28, which were slightly greater than 6.55 in Azone group. In addition, as compared with the conditions before treatment, there were significant differences and obvious increasing trend in blood flow of rats in Frankincense essential oil group, Myrrh essential oil group, frankincense and myrrh singly extracted essential oil mixture group, and frankincense and myrrh mixed extraction essential oil group when were dosed at 10, 20, 30, 10 min respectively, indicating that the skin blood flows were increased under the effects of Frankincense and Myrrh essential oil to a certain extent. Thus, Frankincense and Myrrh essential oil had certain effect on promoting permeability of Chuanxiong both before and after drug combination, and may promote the elimination of drugs from epidermis to dermal capillaries through increase of

  2. Influence of temporal noise on the skin blood flow measurements performed by cooled thermal imaging camera: limit possibilities within each physiological frequency range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagaidachnyi, A. A.; Volkov, I. U.; Fomin, A. V.

    2016-04-01

    This paper describes limit possibilities of modern cooled thermal imaging cameras as a tool for estimation of blood flow oscillations at the surface of living body. Skin temperature oscillations, as we assumed, are a consequence of the blood flow oscillations. We considered the temperature sensitivity 0.01-0.02 °C as a typical for the most of modern cooled long wave thermal imaging cameras. Fourier filter used to investigate the temperature signal separately within endothelial, neurogenic, myogenic, respiratory and cardiac frequency ranges. The level of temporal noise has been estimated during measurements of no living body with stabilized temperature ~ 24°C. The level of temperature oscillations has been calculated for the group of healthy subjects within each frequency range. Thus, we were able to determine signal-to-noise ratio within frequency band [0.001, 1] Hz. As a result, we determine that skin temperature oscillations measured by thermal imaging camera with sensitivity 0.02°C have the upper frequency limit ~ 0.2 Hz. In other words, within the respiratory and cardiac frequency ranges of blood flow oscillations the noise level exceeds signal one, and temperature measurements at the skin surface are practically useless. The endothelial, neurogenic and myogenic components of the temperature oscillations contain ~98% of the total spectral power of the signal. We have plot the empirical extrapolated curve of sensitivity of thermal imaging camera vs. frequency of the temperature oscillations. The data analysis shows that measurements of skin temperature oscillations within respiratory and cardiac ranges require the temperature sensitivity at least ~ 0.01°C and 0.001°C, respectively.

  3. Presence of Bartonella species and Rickettsia species DNA in the blood, oral cavity, skin and claw beds of cats in the United States.

    PubMed

    Lappin, Michael R; Hawley, Jennifer

    2009-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of Bartonella species and Rickettsia species DNA in the blood, oral cavity, skin and claw beds of feral cats without evidence of skin disease that were housed in Alabama (n = 24), Florida (n = 27) and Colorado (n = 32). Samples were assessed by use of polymerase chain reaction assays. The Bartonella species IgG prevalence was also determined. While Bartonella species DNA was not amplified from any sample from Colorado cats, it was commonly amplified from blood (56.9%), skin (31.4%), claws (17.6%) and gingiva (17.6%) of the 51 cats housed in Alabama and Florida. All 10 flea groups assessed in this study were infected with a Bartonella species or R. felis. Bartonella species IgG titres did not accurately predict bacteraemia (positive predictive value = 57.1%; negative predictive value = 82.1%). Bartonella species DNA was amplified from blood of cats with and without C. felis. Rickettsia felis DNA was only detected in or on the skin of one cat and the gingiva of an additional cat. It was concluded that cats can be an occupational health risk for veterinarians, particularly in areas with high prevalence of Ctenocephalides felis. Further study is required to determine whether Bartonella species or Rickettsia species infections of cats are associated with dermatological disease. The combination of Bartonella species serological test results with Bartonella species PCR or culture is likely to give the most accurate information concerning the current infection status of individual cats.

  4. MMP8 Is Increased in Lesions and Blood of Acne Inversa Patients: A Potential Link to Skin Destruction and Metabolic Alterations

    PubMed Central

    Tsaousi, Athanasia; Witte, Ellen; Witte, Katrin; Röwert-Huber, Hans-Joachim; Volk, Hans-Dieter; Sterry, Wolfram; Wolk, Kerstin; Schneider-Burrus, Sylke

    2016-01-01

    Acne inversa (AI; also designated as hidradenitis suppurativa) is a chronic inflammatory disease with still unknown pathogenesis that affects the intertriginous skin of perianal, inguinal, and axillary sites. It leads to painful nodules, abscesses, and fistulas with malodorous secretion and is frequently associated with metabolic alterations. Here, we demonstrate that one of the most highly upregulated molecules in AI lesions is matrix metalloproteinase 8 (MMP8), an enzyme specialized in the degradation of extracellular matrix components and the HDL component apolipoprotein A-I. Granulocytes, which were present in AI lesions, secreted high amounts of MMP8 especially after TNF-α stimulation. Furthermore, activated fibroblasts but not keratinocytes were found to express MMP8. The high lesional MMP8 levels were accompanied by elevated blood levels that positively correlated with TNF-α blood levels and disease severity assessed by Sartorius score, especially with the number of regions with inflammatory nodules/abscesses and fistulas. Additionally, we found a negative correlation between blood MMP8 and HDL-cholesterol levels, suggesting a contributory role of MMP8 in metabolic alterations in AI. In summary, we demonstrate elevated MMP8 levels in AI lesions, suggest their role in skin destruction and metabolic alterations, and recommend the use of MMP8 as blood biomarker for AI disease activity assessment. PMID:27843200

  5. Array CGH on unstimulated blood does not detect all cases of Pallister-Killian syndrome: a skin biopsy should remain the diagnostic gold standard.

    PubMed

    Hodge, Jennelle C; Hulshizer, Rachael L; Seger, Pam; St Antoine, Angelique; Bair, Jennifer; Kirmani, Salman

    2012-03-01

    A child whose features are consistent with Pallister-Killian syndrome (PKS) did not have detectable tetrasomy 12p due to an additional isochromosome 12p in an unstimulated blood specimen by interphase FISH or array CGH analysis. The diagnosis of PKS was made through these methods solely in a skin biopsy specimen. To determine the sensitivity of our array CGH platform to tetrasomy 12p mosaicism, dilutions of DNA from both the child's skin fibroblasts and a PKS cell line were analyzed. Tetrasomy 12p at 10% mosaicism was identifiable but 5% was below the limit of detection. This result suggests through extrapolation that the tetrasomy 12p is present in <10% of cells in our patient's blood, confirming the tissue-limited mosaicism of PKS. Multiple recent studies show that array CGH provides greater sensitivity than chromosome analysis to detect mosaic abnormalities including that of tetrasomy 12p in blood specimens. However, our case demonstrates that the biology of PKS precludes the exclusive use of array CGH on blood for diagnosis. A tissue sample should continue to be the diagnostic gold standard for PKS.

  6. Lymphocyctes Tgammadelta in clinically normal skin and peripheral blood of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and their correlation with disease activity.

    PubMed Central

    Robak, E; Niewiadomska, H; Robak, T; Bartkowiak, J; Błoński, J Z; Woźniacka, A; Pomorski, L; Sysa-Jedrezejowska, A

    2001-01-01

    Human Tgammadelta lymphocytes constitute from 1 to 15% of all peripheral blood lymphocytes. Recent work has demonstrated that this population plays a major role in the pathogenesis of infectious and immune diseases. Increased numbers of gammadelta T cells have been found in affected skin from systemic sclerosis and chronic cutaneous lupus erythematosus patients. In our study, we have determined the numbers of Tgammadelta lymphocytes and their subpopulations in peripheral blood from 29 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and in 19 healthy volunteers using flow cytometry and specific monoclonal antibodies. The same cells in uninvolved skin from SLE patients and human controls using immunohistochemical analysis were estimated. T-Cell receptor (TCR) delta chain gene rearrangement was identified with primers for Vdelta1, Vdelta2 and Vdelta3 by the polymerase chain reaction. Statistical analysis showed a significantly decreased number of gammadelta T cells in SLE patients (26.4+/-16.9/microl) compared with the control group (55.3+/-20.6/microl (p < 0.001). The number of Vdelta2 TCR+ and Vgamma9 TCR+ subpopulations was also lower in SLE patients than in healthy persons. No statistical correlation between disease activity and the number of gammadelta T cells was demonstrated. The percentage of Tgammadelta lymphocytes in clinically normal skin from SLE patients was twice (22.0+/-9.4%) that found in the skin from healthy persons (11.1+/-5.5%) (p < 0.002). Higher percentages of the Vdelta2 TCR+ and Vgamma9 TCR+ subpopulation of lymphocytes were found in the skin from SLE patients. We have also found positive correlation between the percentage of Tgammadelta lymphocytes in skin and the activity of SLE (r=0.594, p < 0.001), and between subpopulation Vdelta3 TCR+ and disease activity (r=0.659, p< 0.001). In conclusion, the results of our studies demonstrate that, in patients with SLE, accumulation of Tgammadelta lymphocytes can be seen in clinically normal skin, and

  7. aCGH detects partial tetrasomy of 12p in blood from Pallister-Killian syndrome cases without invasive skin biopsy.

    PubMed

    Theisen, Aaron; Rosenfeld, Jill A; Farrell, Sandra A; Harris, Catharine J; Wetzel, Heather H; Torchia, Beth A; Bejjani, Bassem A; Ballif, Blake C; Shaffer, Lisa G

    2009-05-01

    Pallister-Killian syndrome (PKS) is a genetic disorder characterized by mental retardation, seizures, streaks of hypo- or hyperpigmentation and dysmorphic features. PKS is associated with tissue-limited mosaic partial tetrasomy of 12p, usually caused by an isochromosome 12p. The mosaicism is usually detected in cultured skin fibroblasts or amniotic cells and rarely in phytohemagluttinin-stimulated lymphocytes, which suggests stimulation of T-lymphocytes may distort the percentage of abnormal cells. We recently reported on the identification by microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) of a previously unsuspected case of partial tetrasomy of 12p caused by an isochromosome 12p. Here we report on seven additional individuals with partial tetrasomy of 12p characterized by our laboratory. All individuals were referred for mental retardation/developmental delay and/or dysmorphic features. In each case, aCGH using genomic DNA extracted from whole peripheral blood detected copy-number gain for all clones for the short arm of chromosome 12. In all but one case, FISH on metaphases from cultured lymphocytes did not detect the copy-number gain; in the remaining case, metaphase FISH on cultured lymphocytes showed an isochromosome in 10% of cells. However, interphase FISH using probes to 12p on peripheral blood smears showed additional hybridization signals in 18-70% of cells. Microarray and FISH analysis on cultured skin biopsies from four individuals confirmed the presence of an isochromosome 12p. Our results demonstrate the usefulness of aCGH with genomic DNA from whole peripheral blood to detect chromosome abnormalities that are not present in stimulated blood cultures and would otherwise require invasive skin biopsies for identification.

  8. Increased messenger RNA levels of the mesenchymal cadherin-11 in the peripheral blood of systemic sclerosis patients correlate with diffuse skin involvement.

    PubMed

    Christopoulos, Panagiotis F; Bournia, Vasiliki-Kalliopi; Panopoulos, Stylianos; Vaiopoulos, Aristeides; Koutsilieris, Michael; Sfikakis, Petros P

    2015-01-01

    Cadherin-11 is a cell-cell adhesion molecule also involved in cellular migration and invasion. Experimental studies implicated this molecule in inflammatory arthritis and fibrosing conditions. Moreover, cadherin-11 protein is hyper-expressed on fibroblasts and macrophages in the skin of systemic sclerosis (SSc) patients, whereas the respective mRNA levels correlate with skin thickness. Herein, we searched for possible cadherin-11 expression also in cells that circulate in SSc peripheral blood. Cadherin-11 mRNA was quantified by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction in 3 ml blood samples obtained from 71 SSc patients (aged 53±2 years, 65 women) and 35 control non-SSc patients with Raynaud's phenomenon. Cadherin-11 mRNA transcripts were detected in blood samples from 39% of patients with diffuse SSc, versus 16% of those with limited SSc, versus 6% and 16% of patients with idiopathic or associated with other connective tissue diseases Raynaud's phenomenon, respectively (p=0.049). Cadherin-11 mRNA levels in SSc patients were increased by 3.74-fold comparing to controls (p=0.036). By multivariate logistic regression analysis we found that diffuse skin involvement correlated, independently of age, gender, disease duration, lung involvement, digital ulcers, inflammatory indices or anti-Scl-70 autoantibody presence, with cadherin-11 mRNA positivity (p=0.028), but also with increased cadherin-11 mRNA levels (≥3-fold of non-SSc levels, p=0.011). Cadherin-11 may be hyper-expressed in the peripheral blood of diffuse SSc patients. Studies on the origin and possible pathogenic function of these circulating cells may shed light into the complex disease pathogenesis and further support the notion that cadherin-11 is a potential therapeutic target in SSc.

  9. [Epstein-Barr virus-related B-cell lymphoma of the skin which developed early after cord blood transplantation for angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Tajika, Kenji; Tamai, Hayato; Mizuki, Taro; Nakayama, Kazutaka; Yamaguchi, Hiroki; Dan, Kazuo

    2010-02-01

    We report here a rare case of EBV-related post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) localized to the skin. The patient was a 64-year-old man diagnosed with angioimmunoblastic T cell lymphoma (AITL). He underwent cord blood transplantation with a reduced intensity conditioning regimen during partial remission after chemotherapy. On day 70 after transplantation, subcutaneous tumors developed near the left scapula and in the left upper arm. Pathological examination of the skin tumor revealed that this tumor was composed of diffuse large centroblast-like cells, the majority of which were CD20 positive, CD 79a positive, CD30 positive and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) latency-associated RNA (EBER) positive, and EBV-DNA was also detected in tumor cells. At that time, real-time polymerase chain reaction documented no evidence of the EBV genome in his blood. Chimerism analysis revealed that the tumor cells were derived from donor cells, which led to the diagnosis of EBV-related PTLD. For treatment, in addition to decreasing the dose of tacrolimus, we administered rituximab and local irradiation to skin lesions, which led to disappearance of the tumors followed by continued complete remission.

  10. Single skin exposure to visible polarized light induces rapid modification of entire circulating blood: I. Improvement of rheologic and immune parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samoilova, Kira A.; Obolenskaya, K. D.; Vologdina, A. V.; Snopov, S. A.; Shevchenko, E. V.

    1998-12-01

    We have found that exposure of a small skin area (400 cm2) of healthy volunteers to visible (400 - 2000 nm) incoherent polarized (VIP) light (degree of polarization > 95%) in therapeutic doses (4.8 - 9.6 J/cm2) induces a rapid structural-functional modification of erythrocytes, leukocytes, and some plasma components in the whole circulating volume of blood. We have recorded changes in: lipid peroxidation (LPO) produce content in erythrocyte membranes, deformability and viscosity of erythrocytes, phagocytotic activity of monocytes, cytotoxic activity of natural killer cells against target malignant cells, release of bactericidal proteins by granulocytes, plasma content of LPO-produces and pro-inflammatory cytokines, interleukine-1 beta and tumor necrosis factor-alpha, total anti-oxidant activity of plasma. Most of these effects were of regulative character, as their direction and extent depended on the initial level of the studied parameters: the initially low indices increased, while the initially high ones decreased or remained unaffected. In 24 h the changes were still detectable in 33 - 62% of volunteers. We have shown a great similarity of the blood changes induced by the skin exposure and by the direct irradiation of blood in vitro. Moreover, we obtained an evidence that the light-induced rapid modification of the entire circulating blood resulted from the direct effect upon it of transcutaneously irradiated blood, rather than of other systems of organism. Since many pathological conditions are characterized by an increase in LPO processes, by disturbances in blood rheology, by decrease in natural resistance and immunity, correction of their parameters with the VIP light might be a key mechanism of its therapeutic efficacy.

  11. A C-type lectin isolated from the skin of Japanese bullhead shark (Heterodontus japonicus) binds a remarkably broad range of sugars and induces blood coagulation.

    PubMed

    Tsutsui, Shigeyuki; Dotsuta, Yuma; Ono, Ayaka; Suzuki, Masanari; Tateno, Hiroaki; Hirabayashi, Jun; Nakamura, Osamu

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the physiological role of skin lectins of the Japanese bullhead shark (Heterodontus japonicus). A skin extract was subjected to affinity chromatography using seven different sugars as ligands. Molecular mass and N-terminal amino acid sequence analyses indicated elution of the same protein by each of the seven respective cognate ligands from sugar affinity columns. The predicted amino acid sequence encoded by the cDNA of this protein [designated as H. japonicus C-type-lectin (HjCL)] identified it as a novel fish subgroup VII C-type lectin evolutionarily related to snake venom lectins. HjCL was predicted to bind to mannose because of the presence of a Glu-Pro-Asn (EPN) motif; however, haemagglutination inhibition assays and glycoconjugate microarray analysis demonstrated its binding to numerous structurally diverse sugars. Competitive sugar-binding assays using affinity chromatography indicated that HjCL bound multiple sugars via a common carbohydrate-recognition domain. The mRNA encoding HjCL was specifically detected in the skin, and immunohistochemical analysis detected its expression in uncharacterized large cells in the epidermis. HjCL agglutinated the bacterial pathogen Edwardsiella tarda and promoted immediate clotting of shark blood, indicating that HjCL is involved in host defence on the skin surface especially when the shark is injured and bleeds. © The Authors 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Japanese Biochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  12. Epidemiology of Staphylococcus aureus blood and skin and soft tissue infections in the US military health system, 2005-2010.

    PubMed

    Landrum, Michael L; Neumann, Charlotte; Cook, Courtney; Chukwuma, Uzo; Ellis, Michael W; Hospenthal, Duane R; Murray, Clinton K

    2012-07-04

    Rates of hospital-onset methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections are reported as decreasing, but recent rates of community-onset S. aureus infections are less known. To characterize the overall and annual incidence rates of community-onset and hospital-onset S. aureus bacteremia and skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) in a national health care system and to evaluate trends in the incidence rates of S. aureus bacteremia and SSTIs and the proportion due to MRSA. Observational study of all Department of Defense TRICARE beneficiaries from January 2005 through December 2010. Medical record databases were used to identify and classify all annual first-positive S. aureus blood and wound or abscess cultures as methicillin-susceptible S. aureus or MRSA, and as community-onset or hospital-onset infections (isolates collected >3 days after hospital admission). Unadjusted incidence rates per 100,000 person-years of observation, the proportion of infections that was due to MRSA, and annual trends for 2005 through 2010 (examined using the Spearman rank correlation test or the Mantel-Haenszel χ2 test for linear trend). During 56 million person-years (nonactive duty: 47 million person-years; active duty: 9 million person-years), there were 2643 blood and 80,281 wound or abscess annual first-positive S. aureus cultures. Annual incidence rates varied from 3.6 to 6.0 per 100,000 person-years for S. aureus bacteremia and 122.7 to 168.9 per 100,000 person-years for S. aureus SSTIs. The annual incidence rates for community-onset MRSA bacteremia decreased from 1.7 per 100,000 person-years (95% CI, 1.5-2.0 per 100,000 person-years) in 2005 to 1.2 per 100,000 person-years (95% CI, 0.9-1.4 per 100,000 person-years) in 2010 (P = .005 for trend). The annual incidence rates for hospital-onset MRSA bacteremia also decreased from 0.7 per 100,000 person-years (95% CI, 0.6-0.9 per 100,000 person-years) in 2005 to 0.4 per 100,000 person-years (95% CI, 0.3-0.5 per 100

  13. Improvement of blood flow, expression of nitric oxide, and vascular endothelial growth factor by low-energy shockwave therapy in random-pattern skin flap model.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xiaoyu; Zeng, Bingfang; Chai, Yimin; Luo, Congfeng; Li, Xiaolin

    2008-12-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) can improve flap survival, but its mechanism remains unclear. In this study, we aim to investigate whether ESWT can improve blood flow in ischemic skin flaps and the possible mechanism. Cranially based random-pattern flap (3 x 10 cm) model was established, and its ischemic portion was treated with or without ESWT at 0.09 mJ/mm2 with 750 impulses (1.5 Hz), immediately after operation. Survival area, blood flow, vessel distribution, microvessel density, and expression of nitric oxide and vascular endothelial growth factor were evaluated at 1, 3, and 10 days postoperatively. The results showed that blood perfusion, expression of nitric oxide and vascular endothelial growth factor, vasodilatation of pre-existing vessels at early postoperative stage, neovascularization at late stage, and flap survival were all significantly promoted in treatment group. In conclusion, ESWT can improve skin flap surviving rate through enhanced vasodilatation at early postoperative stage and neovascularization at late stage via modulation of angio-active factors expression.

  14. γ-H2AX as a biomarker of DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation in human peripheral blood lymphocytes and artificial skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redon, Christophe E.; Dickey, Jennifer S.; Bonner, William M.; Sedelnikova, Olga A.

    2009-04-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) exposure is inevitable in our modern society and can lead to a variety of deleterious effects including cancer and birth defects. A reliable, reproducible and sensitive assessment of exposure to IR and the individual response to that exposure would provide much needed information for the optimal treatment of each donor examined. We have developed a diagnostic test for IR exposure based on detection of the phosphorylated form of variant histone H2AX (γ-H2AX), which occurs specifically at sites of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). The cell responds to a nascent DSB through the phosphorylation of thousands of H2AX molecules flanking the damaged site. This highly amplified response can be visualized as a γ-H2AX focus in the chromatin that can be detected in situ with the appropriate antibody. Here we assess the usability of γ-H2AX focus formation as a possible biodosimeter for human exposure to IR using peripheral blood lymphocytes irradiated ex vivo and three-dimensional artificial models of human skin biopsies. In both systems, the tissues were exposed to 0.2-5 Gy, doses of IR that might be realistically encountered in various scenarios such as cancer radiotherapies or accidental exposure to radiation. Since the γ-H2AX response is maximal 30 min after exposure and declines over a period of hours as the cells repair the damage, we examined the time limitations of the useful detectability of γ-H2AX foci. We report that a linear response proportional to the initial radiation dose was obtained 48 and 24 h after exposure in blood samples and skin cells respectively. Thus, detection of γ-H2AX formation to monitor DNA damage in minimally invasive blood and skin tests could be useful tools to determine radiation dose exposure and analyze its effects on humans.

  15. γ-H2AX as a biomarker of DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation in human peripheral blood lymphocytes and artificial skin

    PubMed Central

    Redon, Christophe E.; Dickey, Jennifer S.; Bonner, William M.; Sedelnikova, Olga A.

    2009-01-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) exposure is inevitable in our modern society and can lead to a variety of deleterious effects including cancer and birth defects. A reliable, reproducible and sensitive assessment of exposure to IR and the individual response to that exposure would provide much needed information for the optimal treatment of each donor examined. We have developed a diagnostic test for IR exposure based on detection of the phosphorylated form of variant histone H2AX (γ-H2AX), which occurs specifically at sites of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). The cell responds to a nascent DSB through the phosphorylation of thousands of H2AX molecules flanking the damaged site. This highly amplified response can be visualized as a γ-H2AX focus in the chromatin that can be detected in situ with the appropriate antibody. Here we assess the usability of γ-H2AX focus formation as a possible biodosimeter for human exposure to IR using peripheral blood lymphocytes irradiated ex vivo and three-dimensional artificial models of human skin biopsies. In both systems, the tissues were exposed to 0.2–5 Gy, doses of IR that might be realistically encountered in various scenarios such as cancer radiotherapies or accidental exposure to radiation. Since the γ-H2AX response is maximal 30 minutes after exposure and declines over a period of hours as the cells repair the damage, we examined the time limitations of the useful detectibility of γ-H2AX foci. We report that a linear response proportional to the initial radiation dose was obtained 48 hours and 24 hours after exposure in blood samples and skin cells respectively. Thus, detection of γ-H2AX formation to monitor DNA damage in minimally invasive blood and skin tests could be useful tools to determine radiation dose exposure and analyze its effects on humans. PMID:20046946

  16. The fatty acid profile of subcutaneous fat and blood plasma in pruritic dogs and dogs without skin problems.

    PubMed Central

    Taugbøl, O; Baddaky-Taugbøl, B; Saarem, K

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the concentration of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) in subcutaneous fat and the relative amounts of PUFAs in plasma in two groups of dogs. Group 1 included dogs with a good skin and coat condition. Group 2 was comprised of dogs with pruritus and compatible clinical signs of atopy. The fatty acid composition of the total lipid fraction was analyzed by gas chromatography. In subcutaneous fat, the concentration of adrenic acid (22:4n-6) was lower in the group of pruritic dogs compared to dogs with healthy skin. The amount of dihomogammalinolenic acid (20:3n-6; DGLA) in plasma lipids from pruritic dogs was higher than in dogs without skin problems. PMID:9798093

  17. Skin blood flow during histamine flare using the clearance of epicutaneous applied Xenon-133 in diabetic and non-diabetic subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchison, K.J.; Overton, T.R.; Biltek, K.B.; Nixon, R.; Williams, H.T.

    1983-04-01

    The increase in skin blood flow produced by both reactive hyperemia and histamine was examined in 8 normal, 8 diabetic and 3 cancer patients using the epicutaneous Xenon-133 clearance method. The histamine flare response in both diabetic and cancer groups was reduced compared to that in the normal group. There was no significant difference in the reactive hyperemia responses. It is concluded that the reduction in the histamine flare response is due to a defect in the sensory nerves mediating the axon reflex and not due to a change in the vascular response.

  18. The supply of blood in the skin territory above the lower part of the serratus anterior muscle.

    PubMed

    Mijatović, Davor; Bulić, Kresimir; Dzepina, Ivo; Unusić, Josip

    2006-09-01

    At present, the putative clinical use of the musculocutaneous and ostomusculocutaneous serratus anterior flaps has been compromised by the risk of partial or total necrosis of the skin overlying the lower part of the serratus anterior muscle. Therefore, the aim of this study was to delineate a skin area vascularized by perforant musculocutaneous branches of arteries stemming from the lower segment of the anterior serrated muscle. Black ink was injected in thoracodorsal artery branches for the serratus anterior muscle in 50 human cadavers before the autopsies (the study was approved by the Institutional Review Board). The surface area of the labeled skin was determined and its borders delineated by means of transparent millimeter grid. Planimetry data were subsequently analyzed with the aid of PC computer program. The results show that the calculated mean surface area (143.79 +/- 2.68 x 2.077; range 138.22-149.36 cm2) of the skin vascularized by perforant musculocuaneous branches stemming from the lower segment of the anterior serrated muscle, can serve as a reliable guide for taking serratus anterior flap in any patient. Therefore, appropriately sized musculocutaneous or osteomusculocutaneous serratus anterior flap can be safely and efficiently used in plastic and reconstructive surgery.

  19. Skin antiseptics in venous puncture site disinfection for preventing blood culture contamination: A Bayesian network meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenjie; Duan, Yuchen; Cui, Wenyao; Li, Li; Wang, Xia; Dai, Heling; You, Chao; Chen, Maojun

    2016-07-01

    To compare the efficacy of several antiseptics in decreasing the blood culture contamination rate. Network meta-analysis. Electronic searches of PubMed and Embase were conducted up to November 2015. Only randomized controlled trials or quasi-randomized controlled trials were eligible. We applied no language restriction. A comprehensive review of articles in the reference lists was also accomplished for possible relevant studies. Relevant studies evaluating efficacy of different antiseptics in venous puncture site for decreasing the blood culture contamination rate were included. The data were extracted from the included randomized controlled trials by two authors independently. The risk of bias was evaluated using Detsky scale by two authors independently. We used WinBUGS1.43 software and statistic model described by Chaimani to perform this network meta-analysis. Then graphs of statistical results of WinBUGS1.43 software were generated using 'networkplot', 'ifplot', 'netfunnel' and 'sucra' procedure by STATA13.0. Odds ratio and 95% confidence intervals were assessed for dichotomous data. A probability of p less than 0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. Compared with ordinary meta-analyses, this network meta-analysis offered hierarchies for the efficacy of different antiseptics in decreasing the blood culture contamination rate. Seven randomized controlled trials involving 34,408 blood samples were eligible for the meta-analysis. No significant difference was found in blood culture contamination rate among different antiseptics. No significant difference was found between non-alcoholic antiseptics and alcoholic antiseptics, alcoholic chlorhexidine and povidone iodine, chlorhexidine and iodine compounds, povidone iodine and iodine tincture in this aspect, respectively. Different antiseptics may not affect the blood culture contamination rate. Different intervals between the skin disinfection and the venous puncture, the different settings (emergency

  20. Precautions for breast cancer-related lymphoedema: risk from air travel, ipsilateral arm blood pressure measurements, skin puncture, extreme temperatures, and cellulitis.

    PubMed

    Asdourian, Maria S; Skolny, Melissa N; Brunelle, Cheryl; Seward, Cara E; Salama, Laura; Taghian, Alphonse G

    2016-09-01

    Precautionary recommendations conveyed to survivors of cancer by health-care practitioners to reduce the risk of breast cancer-related lymphoedema are indispensable aspects of clinical care, yet remain unsubstantiated by high-level scientific evidence. By reviewing the literature, we identified 31 original research articles that examined whether lifestyle-associated risk factors (air travel, ipsilateral arm blood pressure measurements, skin puncture, extreme temperatures, and skin infections-eg, cellulitis) increase the risk of breast cancer-related lymphoedema. Among the few studies that lend support to precautionary guidelines, most provide low-level (levels 3-5) or inconclusive evidence of an association between lymphoedema and these risk factors, and only four level 2 studies show a significant association. Skin infections and previous infection or inflammation on the ipsilateral arm were among the most clearly defined and well established risk factors for lymphoedema. The paucity of high-level evidence and the conflicting nature of the existing literature make it difficult to establish definitive predictive factors for breast cancer-related lymphoedema, which could be a considerable source of patient distress and anxiety. Along with further research into these risk factors, continued discussion regarding modification of the guidelines and adoption of a risk-adjusted approach is needed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Effect of local cooling on pro-inflammatory cytokines and blood flow of the skin under surface pressure in rats: feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bernard; Benyajati, Siribhinya; Woods, Jeffrey A; Jan, Yih-Kuen

    2014-05-01

    The primary purpose of this feasibility study was to establish a correlation between pro-inflammatory cytokine accumulation and severity of tissue damage during local pressure with various temperatures. The secondary purpose was to compare skin blood flow patterns for assessing the efficacy of local cooling on reducing skin ischemia under surface pressure. Eight Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to two protocols, including pressure with local cooling (Δt = -10 °C) and pressure with local heating (Δt = 10 °C). Pressure of 700 mmHg was applied to the right trochanter area of rats for 3 h. Skin perfusion quantified by laser Doppler flowmetry and TNF-∗ and IL-1β levels were measured. Our results showed that TNF-α concentrations were increased more significantly with local heating than with local cooling under pressure whereas IL-1β did not change. Our results support the notion that weight bearing soft tissue damage may be reduced through temperature modulation and that non-invasive perfusion measurements using laser Doppler flowmetry may be capable of assessing viability. Furthermore, these results show that perfusion response to loading pressure may be correlated with changes in local pro-inflammatory cytokines. These relationships may be relevant for the development of cooling technologies for reducing risk of pressure ulcers. Copyright © 2014 Tissue Viability Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Failure to Influence the Rejection Time of Homologous Skin Grafts in the Rabbit by Prior Injection of Donor Blood*

    PubMed Central

    Piomelli, S.; Brooke, M. S.

    1961-01-01

    Intravenous injection of rabbits with homologous whole blood or erythrocytes did not influence the rejection time of subsequent grafts from the blood donors. In some animals warm agglutinins developed, and donor erythrocytes labelled with chromium had an immune disappearance slope. PMID:14486825

  3. Determination of blood oxygenation in the brain by time-resolved reflectance spectroscopy: influence of the skin, skull, and meninges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hielscher, Andreas H.; Liu, Hanli; Wang, Lihong; Tittel, Frank K.; Chance, Britton; Jacques, Steven L.

    1994-07-01

    Near infrared light has been used for the determination of blood oxygenation in the brain but little attention has been paid to the fact that the states of blood oxygenation in arteries, veins, and capillaries differ substantially. In this study, Monte Carlo simulations for a heterogeneous system were conducted, and near infrared time-resolved reflectance measurements were performed on a heterogeneous tissue phantom model. The model was made of a solid polyester resin, which simulates the tissue background. A network of tubes was distributed uniformly through the resin to simulate the blood vessels. The time-resolved reflectance spectra were taken with different absorbing solutions filled in the network. Based on the simulation and experimental results, we investigated the dependence of the absorption coefficient obtained from the heterogeneous system on the absorption of the actual absorbing solution filled in the tubes. We show that light absorption by the brain should result from the combination of blood and blood-free tissue background.

  4. Blood

    MedlinePlus

    ... spans vary from a few days to months. New cells are constantly being formed in the bone marrow. ... the bloodstream and are constantly being replaced by new cells. Blood also contains important proteins called clotting factors , ...

  5. Nonlinear dynamics of skin blood flow response to mechanical and thermal stresses in the plantar foot of diabetics with peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Liao, Fuyuan; Jan, Yih-Kuen

    2017-01-01

    Diabetic foot ulcers (DFU) are a major complication in diabetics. Impaired microvascular reactivity is a major contributor to the development of DFU and has been traditionally quantified by time-domain or frequency-domain measures of skin blood flow (SBF). These measures, however, are unable to characterize the changes of nonlinear dynamics of SBF associated with diabetes and peripheral neuropathy. The objective of this study was to investigate altered nonlinear dynamics of skin blood flow in the plantar foot of diabetics with peripheral neuropathy. 18 type 2 diabetics with peripheral neuropathy and 8 healthy controls were recruited. SBF at the first metatarsal head in response to a loading pressure of 300 mmHg and a local heating was measured using laser Doppler flowmetry. A sample entropy approach was used to quantify the degree of regularity of SBF. Our results showed that the regularity degree of SBF in the diabetic foot underwent only small changes during post-occlusive reactive hyperemia and thermally induced biphasic response compared to non-diabetics. SBF of the diabetic foot has higher degree of irregularity during reactive hyperemia because of attenuated myogenic activity, and demonstrated higher regularity during the biphasic response largely due to significantly enhanced cardiac activities. This study suggests that the regularity degree of SBF at the first metatarsal head could be used to assess impaired microvascular reactivity and thus may be used to assess the risk for DFU in diabetics with peripheralneuropathy.

  6. Assessing complexity of skin blood flow oscillations in response to locally applied heating and pressure in rats: Implications for pressure ulcer risk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Fuyuan; O'Brien, William D.; Jan, Yih-Kuen

    2013-10-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of local heating on the complexity of skin blood flow oscillations (BFO) under prolonged surface pressure in rats. Eleven Sprague-Dawley rats were studied: 7 rats underwent surface pressure with local heating (△t=10 °C) and 4 rats underwent pressure without heating. A pressure of 700 mmHg was applied to the right trochanter area of rats for 3 h. Skin blood flow was measured using laser Doppler flowmetry. The loading period was divided into nonoverlapping 30 min epochs. For each epoch, multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MDFA) was utilized to compute DFA coefficients and complexity of endothelial related metabolic, neurogenic, and myogenic frequencies of BFO. The results showed that under surface pressure, local heating led to a significant decrease in DFA coefficients of myogenic frequency during the initial epoch of loading period, a sustained decrease in complexity of myogenic frequency, and a significantly higher degree of complexity of metabolic frequency during the later phase of loading period. Surrogate tests showed that the reduction in complexity of myogenic frequency was associated with a loss of nonlinearity whereas increased complexity of metabolic frequency was associated with enhanced nonlinearity. Our results indicate that increased metabolic activity and decreased myogenic response due to local heating manifest themselves not only in magnitudes of metabolic and myogenic frequencies but also in their structural complexity. This study demonstrates the feasibility of using complexity analysis of BFO to monitor the ischemic status of weight-bearing skin and risk of pressure ulcers.

  7. Influence of skin blood flow and source-detector distance on near-infrared spectroscopy-determined cerebral oxygenation in humans.

    PubMed

    Hirasawa, Ai; Yanagisawa, Shintaro; Tanaka, Naoki; Funane, Tsukasa; Kiguchi, Masashi; Sørensen, Henrik; Secher, Niels H; Ogoh, Shigehiko

    2015-05-01

    Most near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) apparatus fails to isolate cerebral oxygenation from an extracranial contribution although they use different source-detector distances. Nevertheless, the effect of different source-detector distances and change in extracranial blood flow on the NIRS signal has not been identified in humans. This study evaluated the extracranial contribution, as indicated by forehead skin blood flow (SkBF) to changes in the NIRS-determined cerebral oxyhaemoglobin concentration (O2 Hb) by use of a custom-made multidistance probe. Seven males (age 21 ± 1 year) were in a semi-recumbent position, while extracranial blood flow was restricted by application of four different pressures (+20 to +80 mmHg) to the left temporal artery. The O2 Hb was measured at the forehead via a multidistance probe (source-detector distance; 15, 22·5 and 30 mm), and SkBF was determined by laser Doppler. Heart rate and blood pressure were unaffected by application of pressure to the temporal artery, while SkBF gradually decreased (P<0·001), indicating that extracranial blood flow was manipulated without haemodynamic changes. Also, O2 Hb gradually decreased with increasing applied pressure (P<0·05), and the decrease was related to that in SkBF (r = 0·737, P<0·01) independent of the NIRS source to detector distance. These findings suggest that the NIRS-determined cerebral oxyhaemoglobin is affected by change in extracranial blood flow independent of the source-detector distance from 15 to 30 mm. Therefore, new algorithms need to be developed for unbiased NIRS detection of cerebral oxygenation. © 2014 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Treponema pallidum Elicits Innate and Adaptive Cellular Immune Responses in Skin and Blood during Secondary Syphilis: A Flow-Cytometric Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Salazar, Juan C.; Cruz, Adriana R.; Pope, Constance D.; Valderrama, Liliana; Trujillo, Rodolfo; Saravia, Nancy G.; Radolf, Justin D.

    2007-01-01

    Background Syphilis is caused by the spirochetal pathogen Treponema pallidum. The local and systemic cellular immune responses elicited by the bacterium have not been well studied in humans. Methods We used multiparameter flow cytometry to characterize leukocyte immunophenotypes in skin and peripheral blood from 23 patients with secondary syphilis and 5 healthy control subjects recruited in Cali, Colombia. Dermal leukocytes were obtained from fluid aspirated from epidermal suction blisters raised over secondary syphilis skin lesions. Results Compared with peripheral blood (PB), blister fluids (BFs) were enriched for CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, activated monocytes/macrophages, and CD11c+ monocytoid and CD11c− plasmacytoid dendritic cells (mDCs and pDCs, respectively). Nearly all mDCs in BFs expressed the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coreceptors CCR5 and DC-specific intercellular adhesion molecule 3–grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN) and high levels of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)–DR. Dermal pDCs expressed both HIV coreceptors without increases in HLA-DR intensity. Compared with normal blood, circulating mDCs in patients with syphilis expressed higher levels of both CCR5 and DC-SIGN, whereas circulating pDCs in patients expressed only higher levels of DC-SIGN. Most dermal T cells were CCR5+ and displayed a memory (CD27+/CD45RO+) or memory/effector (CD27−/CD45RO+) immunophenotype. A corresponding shift toward memory and memory/effector immunophenotype was clearly discernible among circulating CD4+ T cells. Compared with PB from control subjects, a larger percentage of CD4+ T cells in PB from patients with syphilis expressed the activation markers CD69 and CD38. Conclusions During secondary syphilis, T. pallidum simultaneously elicits local and systemic innate and adaptive immune responses that may set the stage for the bidirectional transmission of HIV. PMID:17299719

  9. [Bacterial contamination of salvaged blood in open heart surgery: is that an airborne contamination or a normal skin flora contamination?].

    PubMed

    Ishida, T; Nakano, S; Nakatani, H; Gomi, A; Sato, T; Saegusa, N; Ito, A; Okada, A; Tazawa, Y

    2001-08-01

    We investigated sources of bacterial contamination of intraoperative salvaged blood producted by autologous transfusions device (CS; CELL SAVER 5, Heamonetics Corp., Braintree, MA). Eleven patients undergone open heart surgeries including 2 emergency operations with a median sternotomy enrolled in this study. Blood samples were drawn from salvaged blood bags. Airborne contaminants (AB) were collected by a blood agar plate put besides the operation bed for 30 minutes. The median wounds samples were collected by a swab. Bacterial growth was detected in 81.8% of salvaged blood samples. Twenty-nine bacterium were isolated from CS, 72.4% of those were Staphylococci. 9.1% of sample was positive in wound swabs. Forty bacterium were isolated from plate cultures. 65% of them were Staphylococci. Staphylococcus epidermidis and coagulase negative Staphylococcus isolated both CS and AB in the 2 cases had the same identify codes, and incubated from several AB cultures. Corynebacterium sp. is also isolated from both CS and AB cultures in other 2 same cases. In 7 out of 8 cases (87.5%), from which Staphylococci isolated in CS, the Staphylococci were cultured from AB in not the same but the other cases. In conclusion, highly incidence of the identification in identical code of Staphylococci indicated that the main source of CS contamination was highly suspected to AB.

  10. Use of laser speckle contrast imaging to reveal changes in temperature and blood perfusion in the skin of healthy subjects after administration of heated moxa sticks and daiwenjiu ointment.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qingyan; Yang, Jinsheng; Wang, Liang; Deng, Zi; Wang, Yingying; Yang, Li; Wu, Peng; Li, Liang

    2014-08-01

    To investigate the influence of heated moxa sticks ("moxibustion") and Daiwenjiu ointment (DO) on changes in temperature and blood perfusion volume on the skin of the backs of healthy subjects. DO was spread on the left side of the body, and the right side of the body was treated with a heated moxa stick. Images denoting blood perfusion and body temperature were collected 7-8 cm lateral to the spinous process of the sixth thoracic vertebra using laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI). Data obtained from eight-frame images were analyzed and used to calculate the mean blood perfusion volume. Simultaneously, blood-perfusion images were collected from the body surface and used to compare the change in blood flow on the body surface and the actual position of imaging. After moxibustion, a rapid increase in blood perfusion volume and body temperature was noted in the local skin surface. The maximum blood perfusion volume and body temperature was noted at 20 min (P < 0.05). At 80-110 min after the spreading of DO, a gradual increase was noted in blood perfusion volume (P < 0.05) and body temperature (P < 0.05) compared with the baseline level. The maximum blood perfusion volume was at 110 min. Using LSCI, these data revealed a rapid and sharp increase in blood perfusion volume and body temperature after treatment with moxibustion, but the respective changes seen in the DO group were gradual and moderate.

  11. Cell-Based Regenerative Strategies for Treatment of Diabetic Skin Wounds, a Comparative Study between Human Umbilical Cord Blood-Mononuclear Cells and Calves' Blood Haemodialysate

    PubMed Central

    El-Mesallamy, Hala O.; Diab, Mohamed R.; Hamdy, Nadia M.; Dardir, Sarah M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Diabetes-related foot problems are bound to increase. However, medical therapies for wound care are limited; therefore, the need for development of new treatment modalities to improve wound healing in diabetic patients is essential and constitutes an emerging field of investigation. Methods Animals were randomly divided into 8 groups (I–VIII) (32 rats/group), all were streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetics except groups III and VIII were non-diabetic controls. The study comprised two experiments; the first included 3 groups. Group I injected with mononuclear cells (MNCs) derived from human umbilical cord blood (HUCB), group II a diabetic control group (PBS i.v). The second experiment included 5 groups, groups IV, V, and VI received topical HUCB-haemodialysate (HD), calves' blood HD, and solcoseryl, respectively. Group VII was the diabetic control group (topical saline). Standard circular wounds were created on the back of rats. A sample of each type of HD was analyzed using the high performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS) system. Wound area measurement and photography were carried out every 4 days. Plasma glucose, catalase (CAT), malondialdehyde (MDA), nitric oxide (NO) and platelets count were assessed. Wound samples were excised for hydroxyproline (HP) and histopathological study. Results Treatment with HUCB MNCs or HUCB-HD resulted in wound contraction, increased CAT, NO, platelets count, body weights, and HP content, and decreased MDA and glucose. Conclusion Systemic administration of HUCB MNCs and topical application of the newly prepared HUCB-HD or calves' blood HD significantly accelerated the rate of diabetic wound healing and would open the possibility of their future use in regenerative medicine. PMID:24643010

  12. Gamma-H2AX as a biomarker of DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation in targeted and bystander human artificial skin models and peripheral blood lymphocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redon, Christophe; Dickey, Jennifer; Bonner, William; Sedelnikova, Olga

    Ionizing radiation (IR) exposure is inevitable. In addition to exposure from cosmic rays, the sun and radioactive substances, modern society has created new sources of radiation exposure such as space and high altitude journeys, X-ray diagnostics, radiological treatments and the increasing threat of radiobiological terrorism. For these reasons, a reliable, reproducible and sensitive assessment of dose and time exposure to IR is essential. We developed a minimally invasive diagnostic test for IR exposure based on detection of a phosphorylated variant of histone H2AX (gamma-H2AX), which occurs specifically at sites of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). The phosphorylation of thousands of H2AX molecules forms a gamma-H2AX focus in the chromatin flanking the DSB site that can be detected in situ. We analyzed gamma- H2AX focus formation in both directly irradiated cells as well as in un-irradiated "bystanders" in close contact with irradiated cells. In order to insure minimal invasiveness, we examined commercially available artificial skin models as a surrogate for human skin biopsies as well as peripheral blood lymphocytes. In human skin models, cells in a thin plane were microbeamirradiated and gamma-H2AX formation was measured both in irradiated and in distal bystander cells over time. In irradiated cells DSB formation reached a maximum at 15-30 minutes post- IR and then declined within several hours; all cells were affected. In marked contrast, the incidence of DSBs in bystander cells reached a maximum by 12-48 hours post-irradiation, gradually decreasing over the 7 day time course. At the maxima, 40-60% of bystander cells were affected. Similarly, we analyzed blood samples exposed to IR ex vivo at doses ranging from 0.02 to 3 Gy. The amount of DNA damage was linear in respect to radiation dose and independent of the age or sex of the blood donor. The method is highly reproducible and highly sensitive. In directly irradiated cells, the number of gamma-H2AX foci peaked

  13. An investigation into variability in microvascular skin blood flow and the responses to transdermal delivery of acetylcholine at different sites in the forearm and hand

    PubMed Central

    Gardner-Medwin, Janet M; Taylor, J Y; Macdonald, I A; Powell, R J

    1997-01-01

    Aims Transdermal iontophoresis in combination with laser Doppler fluxmetry (LDF) are useful techniques for examining dermal microcirculatory responses to different vasodilators. Differences in skin and microcirculation structure could influence the recorded baseline flux, and the observed vasodilatation. To examine this we compared baseline flux and the response of microvascular blood flow to a single vasodilator, acetylcholine, at sites in the forearm and hand. Methods Baseline microcirculation flow was recorded by LDF in a temperature controlled laboratory. The change in flux with iontophoresis of identical doses of acetylcholine, 150 μA for 40 s, was recorded at 12 different sites in the forearm and hand in 10 female and 3 male subjects. Results Baseline flux patterns and the vasodilatation to identical periods of iontophoresis of acetylcholine were site dependent. Palmar sites showed a higher baseline flux, but no vasodilatation to iontophoresis of acetylcholine. In contrast the volar forearm, dorsal hand and finger sites showed lower site-dependent baseline flux, but did vasodilate. Conclusions Patterns of baseline flux are specific to sites on the hand and forearm reflecting differences in underlying microvascular structure. The vasodilatation to transdermal delivery of acetylcholine is also site dependent, but differences in skin structure may be more important than the underlying microvasculature in determining the response. PMID:9146851

  14. Optical coherence tomography angiography offers comprehensive evaluation of skin optical clearing in vivo by quantifying optical properties and blood flow imaging simultaneously.

    PubMed

    Guo, Li; Shi, Rui; Zhang, Chao; Zhu, Dan; Ding, Zhihua; Li, Peng

    2016-08-01

    Tissue optical clearing (TOC) is helpful for reducing scattering and enhancing the penetration depth of light, and shows promising potential in optimizing optical imaging performances. A mixture of fructose with PEG-400 and thiazone (FPT) is used as an optical clearing agent in mouse dorsal skin and evaluated with OCT angiography (Angio-OCT) by quantifying optical properties and blood flow imaging simultaneously. It is observed that FPT leads to an improved imaging performance for the deeper tissues. The imaging performance improvement is most likely caused by the FPT-induced dehydration of skin, and the reduction of scattering coefficient (more than ∼ 40.5%) and refractive-index mismatching (more than ∼ 25.3%) in the superficial (epidermal, dermal, and hypodermal) layers. A high correlation (up to ∼ 90%) between the relative changes in refractive-index mismatching and Angio-OCT signal strength is measured. The optical clearing rate is ∼ 5.83 × 10(-5) cm/s. In addition, Angio-OCT demonstrates enhanced performance in imaging cutaneous hemodynamics with satisfactory spatiotemporal resolution and contrast when combined with TOC, which exhibits a powerful practical application in studying microcirculation.

  15. Optical coherence tomography angiography offers comprehensive evaluation of skin optical clearing in vivo by quantifying optical properties and blood flow imaging simultaneously

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Li; Shi, Rui; Zhang, Chao; Zhu, Dan; Ding, Zhihua; Li, Peng

    2016-08-01

    Tissue optical clearing (TOC) is helpful for reducing scattering and enhancing the penetration depth of light, and shows promising potential in optimizing optical imaging performances. A mixture of fructose with PEG-400 and thiazone (FPT) is used as an optical clearing agent in mouse dorsal skin and evaluated with OCT angiography (Angio-OCT) by quantifying optical properties and blood flow imaging simultaneously. It is observed that FPT leads to an improved imaging performance for the deeper tissues. The imaging performance improvement is most likely caused by the FPT-induced dehydration of skin, and the reduction of scattering coefficient (more than ˜40.5%) and refractive-index mismatching (more than ˜25.3%) in the superficial (epidermal, dermal, and hypodermal) layers. A high correlation (up to ˜90%) between the relative changes in refractive-index mismatching and Angio-OCT signal strength is measured. The optical clearing rate is ˜5.83×10-5 cm/s. In addition, Angio-OCT demonstrates enhanced performance in imaging cutaneous hemodynamics with satisfactory spatiotemporal resolution and contrast when combined with TOC, which exhibits a powerful practical application in studying microcirculation.

  16. PCR-based diagnosis for detection of Leishmania in skin and blood of rodents from an endemic area of cutaneous and visceral leishmaniasis in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Fernanda S; Pirmez, Claude; Pires, Marize Q; Brazil, Reginaldo P; Pacheco, Raquel S

    2005-05-15

    The technique of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) associated to hybridization was used to screen 123 samples collected from wild and synanthropic rodents captured in a cutaneous and visceral leishmaniasis endemic area in the State of Minas Gerais, Brazil. The detection of Leishmania spp in naturally infected rodents is of fundamental importance for incriminating them as possible reservoir hosts of the diseases in Minas Gerais. A total of 62 specimens belonging to wild (Thrichomys apereoides, Oryzomys subflavus, Galea spixii, Bolomys lasiurus and Wiedomys pyrrhorhinos) and synanthropic (R. rattus) rodent species were captured in different ecotopes. Blood and skin samples were submitted for PCR analyses followed by molecular hybridization with specific probes for the three Leishmania-species complexes. Fifteen samples were found positive after PCR-hybridization and identified as follows: nine belonging to the L. mexicana complex, three to the L. braziliensis complex and three to the L. donovani complex. Positive PCR results were found in 11 out of the 61 (18%) blood samples and in four out of the 62 (6.4%) skin fragments screened. R. rattus and T. apereoides were the most abundant species in the area also presenting high prevalence of natural infection. The presence of parasite DNA belonging to L. braziliensis, L. mexicana and L. donovani complexes was confirmed in several individuals of a rodent species, R. rattus. This work is the first report of the detection of L. (L.) chagasi in a naturally infected T. apereoides. The utility of filter paper as a substrate for PCR analyses and the efficacy of the procedure associated to the hybridization is emphasized.

  17. Fatty acid composition of red blood cell membranes and risk of squamous cell carcinoma of the skin.

    PubMed

    Harris, Robin B; Foote, Janet A; Hakim, Iman A; Bronson, Dan L; Alberts, David S

    2005-04-01

    Differential effects of fatty acids on carcinogenesis suggest that fatty acid composition is important in tumor development. Arachidonic acid and its metabolites elicit inflammation and promote tumor formation in mouse skin. Inhibitors of the arachidonic cascade inhibit tumor incidence. A population-based case control study in Southeastern Arizona tested the hypothesis that lower levels of arachidonic acid in RBC membranes were associated with decreased risk of skin squamous cell carcinoma (SCC; n = 335 SCC cases and 321 controls). Extracted and esterified RBC fatty acids were analyzed using capillary gas chromatography. Individual peaks for 14 fatty acids were measured as a percentage of total fatty acids. Logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (OR), adjusting for SCC risk factors (age, gender, actinic keratosis history, freckling, and tanning ability). Increased levels of arachidonic acid in RBC membranes were associated with increased risk of SCC [odds ratio (OR), 1.08 per mg/100 mL change; 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 1.02-1.15] and this association remained when controls with actinic keratosis precursor lesions were excluded. SCC risk was highest among the upper quartile of arachidonic acid (OR, 2.38; 95% CI, 1.37-4.12). In contrast, increasing proportions of palmitic acid (OR, 0.94; 95% CI, 0.89-1.00) and palmitoleicacid (OR, 0.49; 95% CI, 0.30-0.81) were associated with reduced SCC risk. More studies are needed to elucidate the function of RBC fatty acids so that recommendations can be made to alter the human diet for cancer prevention.

  18. Skin lesion removal

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hair Small blood vessels in the skin Tattoos CRYOTHERAPY Cryotherapy is a method of super-freezing tissue in ... warts, actinic keratoses, solar keratoses, and molluscum contagiosum. Cryotherapy is done using a cotton swab that has ...

  19. Effect of low-level laser therapy on blood flow and oxygen- hemoglobin saturation of the foot skin in healthy subjects: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Heu, Franziska; Forster, Clemens; Namer, Barbara; Dragu, Adrian; Lang, Werner

    2013-01-01

    This study on healthy test subjects intends to show whether one-off Low-Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) has an instant effect on the perfusion or the oxygenation of the skin tissue. These possible instant effects may have an influence on the accelerated wound healing which is often observed after application of LLLT, in addition to the usual postulated effects of LLLT which occur with a time delay normally. The study was carried out double-blind and placebo-controlled in two batches of testing. The test subjects received one-off LLLT on a defined area of the arch of the foot. Simultaneously a placebo treatment was carried out on the corresponding contralateral area. In the first batch of tests, the blood flow was measured immediately before and after treatment using thermography and LDI. In the second batch of tests, the blood flow and the oxygen saturation were determined immediately before and after the treatment using an O2C device. No evidence that the LLLT has a significant instant effect on the circulation or the oxygen saturation could be found. No immediate effect of an LLLT on the perfusion or oxygenation situation is to be expected with physiologically normal starting conditions. An additional investigation should be carried out in which either the radiation dose is varied or the starting conditions are pathological (e.g. chronic wounds) in order to rule out immediate effects on circulation or oxygen saturation as the cause of the improved wound healing which is often observed.

  20. Blood circulation in the fingers is aggravated after creating a vascular access for dialysis: assessment using skin perfusion pressure.

    PubMed

    Sato, Makoto; Tahara, Shinya; Sugiyama, Daisuke; Terashi, Hiroto

    2014-10-01

    Internal vascular shunts for haemodialysis can cause different complications. One of the most serious complications is steal syndrome, which can result in disturbed peripheral circulation causing finger necrosis and lead to amputation. Thus, prevention of these complications is important. Measurement of skin perfusion pressure (SPP) has been used in various clinical settings, including wound-healing management, and its usefulness has been increasingly unveiled. The present study was undertaken to evaluate changes in haemodynamics after internal shunt creation by measuring SPP of the thumb and the little finger before and after surgery in five patients undergoing shunt surgery using the radial artery and the cephalic vein. The study revealed average changes of -22.8 mmHg in thumb SPP. The change in the thumb was statistically significant (p < 0.05). If the effect of surgery and the threshold for wound healing are taken into account, the present results indicate the necessity to pay extra attention to fingers with extremely low preoperative SPP values. For the prevention of serious disturbances of peripheral circulation (e.g. steal syndrome), routine preoperative SPP measurement seems effective for screening of high-risk patients.

  1. Seasonal differences in finger skin temperature and microvascular blood flow in healthy men and women are exaggerated in women with primary Raynaud's phenomenon

    PubMed Central

    Gardner–medwin, J M; Macdonald, I A; Taylor, J Y; Riley, P H; Powell, R J

    2001-01-01

    Aims Patients with primary Raynaud's phenomenon (PRP) have more severe symptoms in the winter. The aetiology of this is more complex than simply increased vasoconstriction in response to the immediate ambient temperature. The aim of this study was to investigate differences in skin temperature (Tsk), microvascular blood flow and responses to endothelium-dependent and independent vasodilators in healthy controls, and women with PRP under identical environmental temperatures but in different seasons. Methods Ten women with PRP were compared with age matched women (10) and men (10). Finger skin responses were recorded immediately on arrival, after stabilizing in a temperature regulated laboratory at 22–24 °C, and at matched warm (35 °C) and cold (15 °C) Tsk in the winter and summer. Baseline red blood cell flux (r.b.c. flux), and the change in flux in response to iontophoresis of acetylcholine (ACh) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) were recorded by laser Doppler fluxmetry at the warm and cold Tsk. Results Arrival Tsk were significantly cooler for all subjects during the winter (mean seasonal difference −2.6 °C, P < 0.0001), and markedly colder in subjects with PRP (mean seasonal difference −3.5 °C, P < 0.0005). Statistically significant seasonal differences persisted in all subjects at stable Tsk despite an identical laboratory temperature (mean difference 1.3 °C, P < 0.0001). To achieve comparable controlled finger Tsk a significantly colder local environment was required for male controls (mean of −2.1 °C, P < 0.0001), and a significantly warmer environment for subjects with PRP (mean of +2.4 °C, P < 0.0001) compared with female controls. This needed to be warmer in the winter, by a mean of 2.4 °C, than the summer for all subjects. Vasodilatation in response to ACh, but not SNP, was significantly smaller (P < 0.0001) in the PRP group compared with the female controls for all visits, with most of this difference arising in the winter visits (P < 0

  2. Effect of nitric-oxide-generating system on microcirculatory blood flow in skin of patients with severe Raynaud's syndrome: a randomised trial.

    PubMed

    Tucker, A T; Pearson, R M; Cooke, E D; Benjamin, N

    1999-11-13

    Patients with Raynaud's syndrome have abnormal digital vasoconstriction, which may be secondary to impaired synthesis of, or impaired sensitivity to, nitric oxide. We studied the effect on microcirculation of a nitric-oxide-generating system applied topically to the finger and forearm of healthy volunteers and patients with primary Raynaud's syndrome. We did a single-blind, randomised, placebo controlled, cross-over study of the microcirculatory response to topical application of a nitric-oxidegenerating gel in 20 patients with severe Raynaud's syndrome, and ten healthy volunteers. We prepared the nitric-oxide-generating system by mixing a solution of KY jelly and sodium nitrite (5% weight/volume), with a solution of KY jelly and ascorbic acid (5% weight/volume). About 0.5 mL of each solution was separately applied to the skin of the forearm (3 cm2), and then mixed with a sterile cotton bud. A similar procedure was done simultaneously on the other arm with KY jelly only (placebo). The procedure was then repeated on the finger pulps. Changes in skin microcirculatory volume and flux were measured bilaterally by infrared photoplethysmography and laser doppler fluxmetry, respectively. In the forearm, blood flow increased significantly after application of the active gel both in patients with Raynaud's syndrome (microcirculatory volume from mean area under the curve 98 [SE 14] to 1024 [130]; microcirculatory flux from 5060 [462] to 74,800 [3940]) and in healthy controls (volume from 85 [19] to 1020 [60]; flux from 4420 [435] to 84,500 [7000]). In the fingers, although baseline blood flow was lower in patients than in controls, both groups showed increases with application of active gel (volume from 1100 [194] to 3280 [672] and 2380 [441] to 6160 [1160], respectively; flux from 33,400 [4200] to 108,000 [13,600] and 52,000 [8950] to 185,000 [19,500]). Increases in blood flow with placebo gel were not significant. No adverse effects were reported. In primary Raynaud

  3. [Age features of the dynamics of the oscillation amplitudes of the peripheral skin blood flow during the postocclusive reactive hyperemia].

    PubMed

    Tikhonova, I V; Tankanag, A V; Chemeris, N K

    2010-01-01

    The study of age-related changes of peripheral microhemodynamics was performed by laser Doppler flowmetry in 60 healthy volunteers. To determine the reaction of the microvascular system in response to short-term ischemia an occlusion test was used. To study the dynamics of the oscillation amplitudes of the peripheral blood flow the time-amplitude analysis on the basis of continuous adaptive wavelet filtration was used. It was found that the amplitudes of the oscillation in the range of heart rate in each age group reached its maxima with a delay after the occlusion stopping, whereas in the range of respiratory rhythm such delay was not observed. It is assumed that the formation ofhyperemic response to short-term ischemia occurs due to the preferential effect of arterio-arteriolar level, and the dynamics of the amplitudes in the range of respiratory rhythm reflects the devastation ofvenular level after occlusion stop. The observed age-related decreases of the maximum amplitudes in the range of myogenic, neurogenic and endothelial rhythms in response to shortterm ischemia demonstrate an age reduction limits of the peripheral blood flow regulation by related systems.

  4. Skin graft

    MedlinePlus

    ... that need skin grafts to heal Venous ulcers, pressure ulcers , or diabetic ulcers that do not heal Very ... graft; Full thickness skin graft Patient Instructions Preventing pressure ulcers Surgical wound care - open Images Skin graft Skin ...

  5. Skin Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Skin Cancer What is Skin Cancer? Skin cancer is the most common type ... of approximately 9,480 Americans in 2013. Can Skin Cancer Be Treated? Most basal cell and squamous ...

  6. Skin Diseases: Skin Health and Skin Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... and dryness. Sunlight is a major cause of skin aging. ( See "Skin and Sun—Not a Good Mix") . ... person has smoked. Many products claim to revitalize aging skin or reduce wrinkles, but the Food and Drug ...

  7. H1 but not H2 histamine receptor activation contributes to the rise in skin blood flow during whole body heating in humans.

    PubMed

    Wong, Brett J; Wilkins, Brad W; Minson, Christopher T

    2004-11-01

    Recent evidence suggests a role for vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) in active vasodilatation and it has been shown that VIP-mediated vasodilatation includes a nitric oxide (NO) and histamine component. Thus, the purpose of this study was to determine the role of H1 and H2 histamine receptors and to examine a potential interaction between NO and histamine receptors in cutaneous active vasodilatation. Eleven subjects were instrumented with four microdialysis fibres. Site 1 served as a control and site 2 was perfused with l-NAME to inhibit nitric oxide synthase. Site 3 was perfused with either the H1 antagonist pyrilamine maleate or the H2 antagonist cimetidine. Site 4 was perfused with l-NAME plus pyrilamine maleate or l-NAME plus cimetidine. Laser-Doppler flowmetry (LDF) was used as an index of skin blood flow and cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) was calculated as LDF/mean arterial pressure and normalized to maximal vasodilatation achieved via 28 mm sodium nitroprusside infusion. During whole body heating, subjects' sublingual temperature increased a minimum of 0.8 degrees C. In the H1 antagonist studies, CVC in l-NAME, pyrilamine, and combined l-NAME plus pyrilamine sites was significantly reduced compared with control (P < 0.001). The l-NAME and combined l-NAME plus pyrilamine sites were significantly reduced compared with pyrilamine only sites (P < 0.05) but no significant differences were observed between sites. In the H2 receptor antagonist studies, CVC in control sites was not significantly different from cimetidine sites. There was no difference between the l-NAME and combined l-NAME plus cimetidine sites but these sites were significantly attenuated compared with control and cimetidine only sites (P < 0.05). These data suggest the rise in skin blood flow during whole body heating contains an H1 histamine receptor component but do not support an H2 histamine receptor component. Furthermore, part of the NO-dependent component of active

  8. Neurally mediated vasoconstriction is capable of decreasing skin blood flow during orthostasis in the heat-stressed human

    PubMed Central

    Shibasaki, Manabu; Davis, Scott L; Cui, Jian; Low, David A; Keller, David M; Durand, Sylvain; Crandall, Craig G

    2006-01-01

    Given the large increase in cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) during whole-body heat stress, this vascular bed is important in the regulation of blood pressure during orthostatic stress. In this thermal state, changes in CVC are reported to be due to withdrawal of active vasodilator activity. The purpose of this study was to identify, contrary to the current line of thinking, whether cutaneous vasoconstrictor neural activity is enhanced and capable of contributing to reductions in CVC during an orthostatic challenge of heat-stressed individuals. Healthy normotensive subjects were pretreated, subcutaneously, with botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) to inhibit the release of neurotransmitters from cutaneous active vasodilator nerves. On the experimental day, microdialysis probes were placed in the BTX-A-treated site and in an adjacent untreated site. In protocol 1, internal temperature was elevated ∼0.7°C, followed by the application of lower body negative pressure (LBNP; −30 mmHg). LBNP reduced CVC at the BTX-A-treated sites (Δ4.2 ± 2.9%max), as well as at the control site (Δ9.8 ± 4.1%max). In protocol 2, after confirming the absence of cutaneous vasodilatation at the BTX-A-treated site during whole-body heating, CVC at this site was elevated to a similar level relative to the control site (55.4 ± 13.4 versus 60.7 ± 10.4%max, respectively) via intradermal administration of isoproterenol prior to LBNP. Similarly, when flow was matched between sites, LBNP reduced CVC at both the BTX-A-treated (Δ15.3 ± 4.6%max) and the control sites (Δ8.8 ± 5.6%max). These data suggest that the cutaneous vasoconstrictor system is engaged and is capable of decreasing CVC during an orthostatic challenge in heat-stressed individuals. PMID:16793901

  9. Characterization of CD8+ T-cell responses in the peripheral blood and skin injection sites of melanoma patients treated with mRNA electroporated autologous dendritic cells (TriMixDC-MEL).

    PubMed

    Benteyn, Daphné; Van Nuffel, An M T; Wilgenhof, Sofie; Corthals, Jurgen; Heirman, Carlo; Neyns, Bart; Thielemans, Kris; Bonehill, Aude

    2013-01-01

    Treatment of melanoma patients with mRNA electroporated dendritic cells (TriMixDC-MEL) stimulates T-cell responses against the presented tumor-associated antigens (TAAs). In the current clinical trials, melanoma patients with systemic metastases are treated, requiring priming and/or expansion of preexisting TAA-specific T cells that are able to migrate to both the skin and internal organs. We monitored the presence of TAA-specific CD8(+) T cells infiltrating the skin at sites of intradermal TriMixDC-MEL injection (SKILs) and within the circulation of melanoma patients treated in two clinical trials. In 10 out of fourteen (71%) patients screened, CD8(+) T cells recognizing any of the four TAA presented by TriMixDC-MEL cellular vaccine were found in both compartments. In total, 30 TAA-specific T-cell responses were detected among the SKILs and 29 among peripheral blood T cells, of which 24 in common. A detailed characterization of the antigen specificity of CD8(+) T-cell populations in four patients indicates that the majority of the epitopes detected were only recognized by CD8(+) T cells derived from either skin biopsies or peripheral blood, indicating that some compartmentalization occurs after TriMix-DC therapy. To conclude, functional TAA-specific CD8(+) T cells distribute both to the skin and peripheral blood of patients after TriMixDC-MEL therapy.

  10. The responses of skin blood flow, mean arterial pressure and R-R interval induced by cold stimulation with cold wind and ice water.

    PubMed

    Shibahara, N; Matsuda, H; Umeno, K; Shimada, Y; Itoh, T; Terasawa, K

    1996-11-06

    This study was designed to evaluate the peripheral circulation response to cold wind stimulation. Skin blood flow (SBF), ECG R-R intervals (RRs) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) were measured in ten healthy men under strictly controlled conditions. Cold wind flow and ice water bath were prepared as cold stimulations. The subjects were exposed to each cold stimulation and the values of the responses were simultaneously recorded. The cold wind stimulation reduced SBF (maximally 40.4 +/- 3.2%) and increased MAP (maximally 106.9 +/- 1.3%), but did not affect RRs. On the other hand, all parameters were affected by the ice water stimulation, which reduced SBF to 16.4 +/- 1.2% and RRs to 85.1 +/- 3.0%, and increased MAP to 130.6 +/- 2.4% compared with the control state. All subjects suffered from intense pain during the ice water but not the cold wind stimulation, and two of them were eliminated from this study because of vagotonia. After phentolamine iontophoresis was used to block the receptor of peripheral alpha-adrenergic nerve terminals, the cold wind stimulation did not affect SBF. These results suggest that cold wind stimulation is a useful test for evaluating peripheral alpha-adrenergic nerve function in relation to cold sensation, without increase of RRs and noxious pain.

  11. Alterations of mononuclear inflammatory cells, CD4/CD8+ T cells, interleukin 1beta, and tumour necrosis factor alpha in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, peripheral blood, and skin of patients with systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Hussein, M R; Hassan, H I; Hofny, E R M; Elkholy, M; Fatehy, N A; Abd Elmoniem, A E A; Ezz El-Din, A M; Afifi, O A; Rashed, H G

    2005-02-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a multisystem disease with underlying immune mechanisms. To investigate the clinicopathological characteristics of the lesions; immunological alterations in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), peripheral blood, and skin; and correlations between the clinicopathological characteristics and immunological alterations in SSc. Skin biopsies, BALF, and peripheral blood samples were obtained from 19 patients (18 women, one man) with SSc and six age and sex matched healthy controls (HCs). Mononuclear inflammatory cells (MICs), CD4/CD8 cells, tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha), and interleukin 1beta (IL1-1beta) concentrations were examined in all samples using histological methods, enzyme linked immunosorbent assay, and immunoperoxidase staining. The mean (SD) age of the patients with SSc was 34.8 (2.6) years. Proteinuria, positive rheumatoid factor, and C reactive protein were seen in 15.8%, 26.3%, and 26.3% of patients, respectively. Compared with HCs, there were significantly higher: total MICs (macrophages, lymphocytes), neutrophils, and eosinophils in BALF, blood, and skin (all p<0.05); cytokine concentrations in BALF (TNFalpha, p<0.001; IL-1, p<0.01) and peripheral blood (p<0.01 and p<0.05); and CD8/CD4+ T cells in peripheral blood (p<0.05). Compared with HCs, lesional skin had significantly higher histiocyte cell counts (p<0.05), lower lymphocyte counts (p<0.05), and higher CD4/CD8 ratios (p<0.001). There were significant correlations between cytokine concentrations and CD8+ T cells and forced vital capacity (p<0.001 and p<0.01, respectively). MICs, CD4/CD8+ cells, and cytokines are altered in SSc. These alterations correlated with the underlying disease process and therefore may have pathogenic, modulatory, and potential prognostic roles in SSc.

  12. Aging Skin

    MedlinePlus

    ... email address Submit Home > Healthy Aging > Wellness Healthy Aging Aging skin More information on aging skin When it ... treated early. Return to top More information on Aging skin Read more from womenshealth.gov Varicose Veins ...

  13. Skin Conditions

    MedlinePlus

    Your skin is your body's largest organ. It covers and protects your body. Your skin Holds body fluids in, preventing dehydration Keeps harmful ... it Anything that irritates, clogs, or inflames your skin can cause symptoms such as redness, swelling, burning, ...

  14. Changes in pulse rate, respiratory rate, blood oxygenation, perfusion index, skin conductance, and their variability induced during and after grounding human subjects for 40 minutes.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, Gaetan

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that grounding produces quantifiable physiologic changes. This study was set up to reproduce and expand earlier electrophysiologic and physiologic parameters measured immediately after grounding with improved methodology and state-of-the-art equipment. A multiparameter double-blind experiment was conducted with 14 men and 14 women (age range: 18-80) in relatively good health. Subjects were screened for health problems using a commonly used health questionnaire. They were seated in a comfortable recliner and measured during 2-hour grounding sessions, leaving time for signals to stabilize before, during, and after grounding (40 minutes for each period). Sham 2-hour grounding sessions were also recorded with the same subjects as controls. This report presents results for 5 of the 18 parameters measured. The parameters reported here are: skin conductance (SC), blood oxygenation (BO), respiratory rate (RR), pulse rate (PR), and perfusion index (PI). This study was performed in a rented facility in Encinitas, California. The facility was chosen in a quiet area for its very low electromagnetic noise. For each session, statistical analyses were performed on four 10-minute segments: before and after grounding (sham grounding for control session) and before and after ungrounding (sham ungrounding). There was an immediate decrease in SC at grounding and an immediate increase at ungrounding on all subjects. RR increased during grounding, and the effect lasted after ungrounding. RR variance increased immediately after grounding then decreased. BO variance decreased during grounding, followed by a dramatic increase after ungrounding. PR and PI variances increased toward the end of the grounding period, and this change persisted after ungrounding. These results warrant further research to determine how grounding affects the body. Grounding could become important for relaxation, health maintenance and disease prevention.

  15. Thermal damage assessment of blood vessels in a hamster skin flap model by fluorescence measurement of a liposome-dye system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mordon, Serge R.; Desmettre, Thomas; Devoisselle, Jean-Marie; Soulie-Begu, Sylvie

    1997-06-01

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate the feasibility of thermal damage assessment of blood vessels by using laser-induced release of liposome-encapsulated dye. Experiments were performed in a hamster skin flap model. Laser irradiation was achieved with a 300micrometers fiber connected to a 805nm diode laser after potentiation using a specific indocyanine green (ICG) formulation. Liposomes- encapsulated carboxyfluorescein were prepared by the sonication procedure. Carboxyfluorescein was loaded at high concentration in order to quench its fluorescence. The measurements were performed after i.v. injection of DSPC liposomes and lasted 40 minutes. Fluorescence emission was measured with an ultra high sensitivity intensified camera. Three different shapes of fluorescent spots were identified depending on target and energy deposition in tissue: (i) intravascular fluorescence, (ii) transient low fluorescence circular spot and (iii) persistent high intense fluorescence spot. These images are correlated with histological data. The advantages of this liposome-dye system are (1) direct measurements can be obtained, (2) several repeated readings can be made from one injection, (3) continuous monitoring of the fluorescence can be made, (4) temperature-sensitive range can be adapted using different liposomes compositions, (5) circulation times of several hours can be achieved using DSPC liposomes (6) the tissue microcirculation and the vessel macrocirculation can be investigated simultaneously, therefore changes in response to a treatment regimen and/or ICG formulations can be detected. One main constraint exists: the fluorescent dye encapsulated into the liposomes has to be carefully chosen in order to avoid any direct absorption by the dye itself. In conclusion, one of the most significant applications of this experimental technique is the evaluation of various degrees of tissue thermal damage. It could be possible to consider the application of this technique in

  16. Skin Biomes.

    PubMed

    Fyhrquist, N; Salava, A; Auvinen, P; Lauerma, A

    2016-05-01

    The cutaneous microbiome has been investigated broadly in recent years and some traditional perspectives are beginning to change. A diverse microbiome exists on human skin and has a potential to influence pathogenic microbes and modulate the course of skin disorders, e.g. atopic dermatitis. In addition to the known dysfunctions in barrier function of the skin and immunologic disturbances, evidence is rising that frequent skin disorders, e.g. atopic dermatitis, might be connected to a dysbiosis of the microbial community and changes in the skin microbiome. As a future perspective, examining the skin microbiome could be seen as a potential new diagnostic and therapeutic target in inflammatory skin disorders.

  17. The relationship between skin maturation and electrical skin impedance.

    PubMed

    Emery, M M; Hebert, A A; Aguirre Vila-Coro, A; Prager, T C

    1991-09-01

    When performing electrophysiological testing, high electrical impedance values are sometimes found in neonates. Since excessive impedance can invalidate test results, a study was conducted to delineate the relationship between skin maturation and electrical skin impedance. This study investigated the skin impedance in 72 infants ranging from 196 to 640 days of age from conception. Regression analyses demonstrated a significant relationship between impedance and age, with the highest impedance centered around full-term gestation with values falling precipitously at time points on either side. Clinically, impedance values fall to normal levels at approximately four months following full-term gestation. Skin impedance values are low in premature infants, but rapidly increase as the age approaches that of full-term neonates. Low impedance values in premature infants are attributed to greater skin hydration which results from immature skin conditions such as 1) thinner epidermal layers particularly at the transitional and cornified layers; 2) more blood flow to the skin; and 3) higher percentage of water composition. These factors facilitate the diffusion of water vapor through the skin. As the physical barrier to skin water loss matures with gestational age, the skin impedance reaches a maximum value at full term neonatal age. After this peak, a statistically significant inverse relationship exists between electrical skin impedance and age in the first year of life. This drop in skin impedance is attributed to an increase in skin hydration as a result of the greater functional maturity of eccrine sweat glands.

  18. Biothermomechanics of skin tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, F.; Lu, T. J.; Seffen, K. A.

    Biothermomechanics of skin is highly interdisciplinary involving bioheat transfer, burn damage, biomechanics and neurophysiology. During heating, thermally induced mechanical stress arises due to the thermal denaturation of collagen, resulting in macroscale shrinkage. Thus, the strain, stress, temperature and thermal pain/damage are highly correlated; in other words, the problem is fully coupled. The aim of this study is to develop a computational approach to examine the heat transfer process and the heat-induced mechanical response, so that the differences among the clinically applied heating modalities can be quantified. Exact solutions for temperature, thermal damage and thermal stress for a single-layer skin model were first derived for different boundary conditions. For multilayer models, numerical simulations using the finite difference method (FDM) and finite element method (FEM) were used to analyze the temperature, burn damage and thermal stress distributions in the skin tissue. The results showed that the thermomechanical behavior of skin tissue is very complex: blood perfusion has little effect on thermal damage but large influence on skin temperature distribution, which, in turn, influences significantly the resulting thermal stress field; the stratum corneum layer, although very thin, has a large effect on the thermomechanical behavior of skin, suggesting that it should be properly accounted for in the modeling of skin thermal stresses; the stress caused by non-uniform temperature distribution in the skin may also contribute to the thermal pain sensation.

  19. Effects of replacing wheat bran by pistachio skins on feed intake, nutrient digestibility, milk yield, milk composition and blood metabolites of dairy Saanen goats.

    PubMed

    Naserian, A A; Staples, C R; Ghaffari, M H

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of pistachio skins (PiS) as a replacement of wheat bran on feed intake, nutrient digestibility, milk yield, milk composition and blood metabolites of dairy Saanen goats. Eight multiparous lactating Saanen goats (55 ± 7.2 days post-partum, 45 ± 2 kg body weight) were randomly assigned to one of the four dietary treatments arranged in a replicated 4 × 4 Latin square design. The dietary treatments were 1) 0 g/kg PiS and 210 g/kg wheat bran in the TMR (0PiS), 2) 70 g/kg PiS and 140 g/kg wheat bran in the TMR (7PiS), 3) 140 g/kg PiS and 70 g/kg wheat bran in the TMR (14PiS) and 4) 210 g/kg PiS and 0 g/kg wheat bran in the TMR (21PiS). The trial consisted of four 21-day periods, each composed of 14 days adaptation and 7 days data collection. Dry matter intake (p < 0.05) and crude protein digestibility (p < 0.01) increased linearly with increasing PiS proportions in the diet. Increasing the proportion of PiS in the diet caused a quadratic increase in apparent digestibility of dry matter (p < 0.05), and tended (p = 0.05) to increase quadratically organic matter, and ether extract digestibility. Replacing wheat bran with PiS in the diet had no effects on milk yield, whereas milk fat concentration increased linearly (p < 0.01) with increasing inclusion of PiS in the diet. As the dietary proportion of PiS increased, ruminal pH tended (p = 0.07) to increase linearly, whereas ammonia-N concentration declined in the rumen. Plasma concentrations of glucose and BUN remained unaffected, whereas triglycerides (p < 0.05) and cholesterol (p < 0.01) concentrations increased linearly with increasing inclusion of PiS in the diet. It was concluded that PiS based on local ingredients can successfully replace wheat bran in diets of dairy goats without detrimental effects on feed intake, nutrient digestibility and milk production. Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition © 2015 Blackwell

  20. [Effect of proteflazid on TLRs expression by mononuclear leukocytes of peripheral blood and epithelial cells of mucous membranes and skin in patients with herpes-associated erythema multiforme and erythema annulare centrifugum].

    PubMed

    Sorokina, E V; Akhmatova, N K; Skhodova, S A

    2014-01-01

    The article reports survey data on 23 patients with erythemas, including 19 patients with herpes-associated erythema multiforme (HAEM) and 4 patients with Darier's erythema annulare centrifugum (DEAC). Patients in the initial state (baseline) and after two weeks of therapy with proteflazid were characterized by measuring the levels of Toll-like receptor (TLR) expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and in epithelial cells of the throat and the skin. The TLR expression in PBMC and skin was assessed by flow cytometry with monoclonal antibodies (ICA) (Caltag Laboratories, USA; Hycult Biotech, Netherlands) against relevant antigens. In addition, patients were also characterized by the content of subpopulations of lymphocytes expressing surface markers CD3, CD4, CD8, CD16, CD21, CD23, CD72, CD25, and HLA-DR in the peripheral blood, which was measured by flow cytometry. The therapy with proteflazid in patients with both HAEM and DEAC led to normalization of the level of both T-cell and B-cell immunity, which was manifested by an increase in the total number of lymphocytes, CD3+, CD4+, CD21+, and CD72+. Measurements of the dynamics of TLR expression in the course of immunotherapy showed an increase in the number of TLR 2, 3, 4, 7, 8, and 9 in PBMC (which was especially pronounced for TLR2) and in epithelium of the pharyngeal mucosa and skin (increased expression of TLR3, 7, and 9).

  1. Skin Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... to the touch may have yellow drainage Of cellulitis: a red, inflamed area on the skin that is tender to the touch may occur in an area of a scratch or cut redness often spreads rapidly over the skin's surface ...

  2. Skin Aging

    MedlinePlus

    ... heal, too. Sunlight is a major cause of skin aging. You can protect yourself by staying out of ... person has smoked. Many products claim to revitalize aging skin or reduce wrinkles, but the Food and Drug ...

  3. Skin Complications

    MedlinePlus

    ... drugs that can help clear up this condition. Day-to-Day Skin Care See our tips for daily skin ... Better Breakfast Ensure a healthy start to your day with this guide. » « Connect With Us Register for ...

  4. Sensitive skin.

    PubMed

    Misery, L; Loser, K; Ständer, S

    2016-02-01

    Sensitive skin is a clinical condition defined by the self-reported facial presence of different sensory perceptions, including tightness, stinging, burning, tingling, pain and pruritus. Sensitive skin may occur in individuals with normal skin, with skin barrier disturbance, or as a part of the symptoms associated with facial dermatoses such as rosacea, atopic dermatitis and psoriasis. Although experimental studies are still pending, the symptoms of sensitive skin suggest the involvement of cutaneous nerve fibres and neuronal, as well as epidermal, thermochannels. Many individuals with sensitive skin report worsening symptoms due to environmental factors. It is thought that this might be attributed to the thermochannel TRPV1, as it typically responds to exogenous, endogenous, physical and chemical stimuli. Barrier disruptions and immune mechanisms may also be involved. This review summarizes current knowledge on the epidemiology, potential mechanisms, clinics and therapy of sensitive skin.

  5. Skin flaps in reconstructive surgery.

    PubMed

    Pavletic, M M

    1990-01-01

    A skin flap (pedicle graft) is a partially detached segment of skin and subcutaneous tissue that includes a blood supply essential to its survival. As a result, skin flaps are capable of closing a variety of defects, including poorly vascularized wound beds that are incapable of maintaining free grafts. In many cases, skin flaps can bypass economically many of the potential problems associated with healing by second intention. This article presents an overview of pedicle grafts, with emphasis on the clinical use of local flap techniques.

  6. Travel-associated skin disease.

    PubMed

    Morris-Jones, Rachael; Morris-Jones, Stephen

    2012-09-01

    Travel associated skin disease is extremely common and a frequent cause of the returning traveller seeking medical attention. Widespread cutaneous eruptions usually represent reactive rashes, indicating an underlying systemic infection or allergic reaction. Patients with disseminated or spreading rashes following travel often present with fever and malaise. In contrast, those presenting with localised skin disease such as a blister, nodule, plaque, ulcer etc are usually well in themselves but have sustained a bite/sting/penetrating injury or introduction of infection directly into the skin at the affected site. As a general rule widespread rashes are investigated with blood tests/serology and localised lesions with a skin biopsy for culture and histology.

  7. Skin aging and dry skin.

    PubMed

    Hashizume, Hideo

    2004-08-01

    Skin aging appears to be the result of both scheduled and continuous "wear and tear" processes that damage cellular DNA and proteins. Two types of aging, chronological skin aging and photoaging, have distinct clinical and histological features. Chronological skin aging is a universal and inevitable process characterized primarily by physiologic alterations in skin function. In this case, keratinocytes are unable to properly terminally differentiate to form a functional stratum corneum, and the rate of formation of neutral lipids that contribute to the barrier function slows, causing dry, pale skin with fine wrinkles. In contrast, photoaging results from the UVR of sunlight and the damage thus becomes apparent in sun-exposed skin. Characteristics of this aging type are dry and sallow skin displaying fine wrinkles as well as deep furrows, resulting from the disorganization of epidermal and dermal components associated with elastosis and heliodermatitis. Understanding of the functions of the skin and the basic principles of moisturizer use and application is important for the prevention of skin aging. Successful treatment of dry skin with appropriate skin care products gives the impression of eternal youth.

  8. Chemokines and skin diseases.

    PubMed

    Sugaya, Makoto

    2015-04-01

    Chemokines are small molecules that induce chemotaxis and activation of certain subsets of leukocytes. The expression patterns of chemokines and chemokine receptors are specific to certain organs and cells. Therefore, chemokines are important to elucidate the mechanism of organ-specific human diseases. CCL17 expressed by Langerhans cells, blood endothelial cells, and fibroblasts plays a key role in attracting Th2 cells and tumor cells of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma and mycosis fungoides/Sézary syndrome into the skin, developing various Th2-type inflammatory skin diseases as well as cutaneous lymphoma. CCL11 and CCL26 expressed by skin-resident cells, such as fibroblasts, blood endothelial cells, and keratinocytes, induce infiltration of CCR3-expressing cells such as Th2 cells and eosinophils. CCL11 may also serve as an autocrine as well as a paracrine in anaplastic large cell lymphoma. CX3CL1 expressed on blood endothelial cells leads to infiltration of CX3CR1(+) immune cells, such as mast cells, neutrophils, and macrophages, playing important roles in wound healing, tumor immunity, and vasculitis. Biologics targeting chemokines and their receptors are promising strategies for various skin diseases that are resistant to the current therapy.

  9. Ultraflexible organic photonic skin

    PubMed Central

    Yokota, Tomoyuki; Zalar, Peter; Kaltenbrunner, Martin; Jinno, Hiroaki; Matsuhisa, Naoji; Kitanosako, Hiroki; Tachibana, Yutaro; Yukita, Wakako; Koizumi, Mari; Someya, Takao

    2016-01-01

    Thin-film electronics intimately laminated onto the skin imperceptibly equip the human body with electronic components for health-monitoring and information technologies. When electronic devices are worn, the mechanical flexibility and/or stretchability of thin-film devices helps to minimize the stress and discomfort associated with wear because of their conformability and softness. For industrial applications, it is important to fabricate wearable devices using processing methods that maximize throughput and minimize cost. We demonstrate ultraflexible and conformable three-color, highly efficient polymer light-emitting diodes (PLEDs) and organic photodetectors (OPDs) to realize optoelectronic skins (oe-skins) that introduce multiple electronic functionalities such as sensing and displays on the surface of human skin. The total thickness of the devices, including the substrate and encapsulation layer, is only 3 μm, which is one order of magnitude thinner than the epidermal layer of human skin. By integrating green and red PLEDs with OPDs, we fabricate an ultraflexible reflective pulse oximeter. The device unobtrusively measures the oxygen concentration of blood when laminated on a finger. On-skin seven-segment digital displays and color indicators can visualize data directly on the body. PMID:27152354

  10. Skin optics

    SciTech Connect

    van Gemert, M.J.; Jacques, S.L.; Sterenborg, H.J.; Star, W.M.

    1989-12-01

    Quantitative dosimetry in the treatment of skin disorders with (laser) light requires information on propagation of light in the skin related to the optical properties of the individual skin layers. This involves the solution of the integro-differential equation of radiative transfer in a model representing skin geometry, as well as experimental methods to determine the optical properties of each skin layer. These activities are unified under the name skin optics. This paper first reviews the current status of tissue optics, distinguishing between the cases of: dominant absorption, dominant scattering, and scattering about equal to absorption. Then, previously published data as well as some current unpublished data on (human) stratum corneum, epidermis and dermis, have been collected and/or (re)analyzed in terms of absorption coefficient, scattering coefficient, and anisotropy factor of scattering. The results are that the individual skin layers show strongly forward scattering (anisotropy factors between 0.7 and 0.9). The absorption and scattering data show that for all wavelengths considered scattering is much more important than absorption. Under such circumstances, solutions to the transport equation for a multilayer skin model and finite beam laser irradiation are currently not yet available. Hence, any quantitative dosimetry for skin treated with (laser) light is currently lacking.

  11. Skin findings in newborns

    MedlinePlus

    Newborn skin characteristics; Infant skin characteristics; Neonatal care - skin ... the first few weeks of the baby's life. Newborn skin will vary, depending on the length of the pregnancy. Premature infants have thin, transparent skin. The skin of a ...

  12. Effects of a quercetin-rich onion skin extract on 24 h ambulatory blood pressure and endothelial function in overweight-to-obese patients with (pre-)hypertension: a randomised double-blinded placebo-controlled cross-over trial.

    PubMed

    Brüll, Verena; Burak, Constanze; Stoffel-Wagner, Birgit; Wolffram, Siegfried; Nickenig, Georg; Müller, Cornelius; Langguth, Peter; Alteheld, Birgit; Fimmers, Rolf; Naaf, Stefanie; Zimmermann, Benno F; Stehle, Peter; Egert, Sarah

    2015-10-28

    The polyphenol quercetin may prevent CVD due to its antihypertensive and vasorelaxant properties. We investigated the effects of quercetin after regular intake on blood pressure (BP) in overweight-to-obese patients with pre-hypertension and stage I hypertension. In addition, the potential mechanisms responsible for the hypothesised effect of quercetin on BP were explored. Subjects (n 70) were randomised to receive 162 mg/d quercetin from onion skin extract powder or placebo in a double-blinded, placebo-controlled cross-over trial with 6-week treatment periods separated by a 6-week washout period. Before and after the intervention, ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) and office BP were measured; urine and blood samples were collected; and endothelial function was measured by EndoPAT technology. In the total group, quercetin did not significantly affect 24 h ABP parameters and office BP. In the subgroup of hypertensives, quercetin decreased 24 h systolic BP by -3·6 mmHg (P=0·022) when compared with placebo (mean treatment difference, -3·9 mmHg; P=0·049). In addition, quercetin significantly decreased day-time and night-time systolic BP in hypertensives, but without a significant effect in inter-group comparison. In the total group and also in the subgroup of hypertensives, vasoactive biomarkers including endothelin-1, soluble endothelial-derived adhesion molecules, asymmetric dimethylarginine, angiotensin-converting enzyme activity, endothelial function, parameters of oxidation, inflammation, lipid and glucose metabolism were not affected by quercetin. In conclusion, supplementation with 162 mg/d quercetin from onion skin extract lowers ABP in patients with hypertension, suggesting a cardioprotective effect of quercetin. The mechanisms responsible for the BP-lowering effect remain unclear.

  13. Skin Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... it can get infected by them. Some common types of skin infections are Bacterial: Cellulitis and impetigo. Staphylococcal infections can also affect the skin. Viral: Shingles, warts, and herpes simplex Fungal: Athlete's foot and yeast infections Parasitic: Body lice, head lice, and scabies ...

  14. Skin Substitutes

    PubMed Central

    Howe, Nicole; Cohen, George

    2014-01-01

    In a relatively short timespan, a wealth of new skin substitutes made of synthetic and biologically derived materials have arisen for the purpose of wound healing of various etiologies. This review article focuses on providing an overview of skin substitutes including their indications, contraindications, benefits, and limitations. The result of this overview was an appreciation of the vast array of options available for clinicians, many of which did not exist a short time ago. Yet, despite the rapid expansion this field has undergone, no ideal skin substitute is currently available. More research in the field of skin substitutes and wound healing is required not only for the development of new products made of increasingly complex biomolecular material, but also to compare the existing skin substitutes. PMID:25371771

  15. Studies of DNA and chromosome damage in skin fibroblasts and blood lymphocytes from psoriasis patients treated with 8-methoxypsoralen and UVA irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Bredberg, A.; Lambert, B.; Lindblad, A.; Swanbeck, G.; Wennersten, G.

    1983-08-01

    Exposure of human lymphocytes and skin fibroblasts in vitro to a single, clinically used dose of PUVA, i.e., 0.1 micrograms/ml of 8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP) plus 0.9-4 J/cm2 of longwave ultraviolet radiation (UVA), lead to the formation of DNA damage as determined by alkaline elution, and to chromosome aberrations and sister chromatid exchanges (SCE). When lymphocyte-enriched plasma was obtained from psoriasis patients 2 h after oral intake of 8-MOP and then UVA irradiated (1.8-3.6 J/cm2) in vitro, an increased frequency of chromosome aberrations and SCE was observed. Normal levels of chromosome aberrations and SCE were found in lymphocytes of psoriasis patients after 3-30 weeks of PUVA treatment in vivo. A small but statistically significant increase in the SCE frequency was observed in the lymphocytes of psoriasis patients treated for 1-6 years with PUVA (mean 18.0 SCE/cell) as compared with before PUVA (mean 15.8, p less than 0.05). Skin fibroblasts of psoriasis patients analyzed 5 years after the start of PUVA treatment showed a normal number of SCE but a high fraction of filter-retained DNA in the alkaline elution assay, suggesting the presence of cross-linked DNA.

  16. Consumption of oxygen and blood flow during exercise and recovery phase evaluated by near-infrared spectroscopy and its relationship to skin forehead, quadriceps, tympanic, and rectal temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdaguer-Codina, Joan; Pujol, P.; Drobnic, F.; Galilea, P.; Riera, J.; Pons, V.; Banquells, M.; Ruiz, O.

    1995-12-01

    The availability of oxygen in the human vastus medialis muscle and the tympanic, skin forehead, quadriceps, and rectal temperatures has been investigated during exercise test and post-exercise with non-invasive near-infrared spectroscopy, infrared thermometer, and an array of four thermistors, respectively. During exercise time rectal temperature was not recorded, before exercise basal values were obtained, and after exercise all the data for two hours were recorded. The signals from near-infrared spectroscopy have been studied by analogy to forced vibration and viscously damped free vibration. Other models have been used to evaluate the temperatures. The time necessary for the reoxygenation signal to cross the baseline during the post exercise period was from 30 min to over 100 min. The peak of pH values was 5 min post-exercise and to arrive at basal levels needed 25 min to more than 40 min. The peak of rectal temperature starts around 20 - 30 min post-exercise remaining 25 - 40 min at the same value, starting to slip down slowly at variable intervals of several minutes requiring over two hours to arrive at basal levels. The data obtained by near-infrared spectroscopy and skin quadriceps, rectal temperatures confirm that the oxygen consumption remains after exercise in the muscle studied.

  17. [Physiological features of skin ageing in human].

    PubMed

    Tikhonova, I V; Tankanag, A V; Chemeris, N K

    2013-01-01

    The issue deals with the actual problem of gerontology, notably physiological features of human skin ageing. In the present review the authors have considered the kinds of ageing, central factors, affected on the ageing process (ultraviolet radiation and oxidation stress), as well as the research guidelines of the ageing changes in the skin structure and fuctions: study of mechanical properties, microcirculation, pH and skin thickness. The special attention has been payed to the methods of assessment of skin blood flow, and to results of investigations of age features of peripheral microhemodynamics. The laser Doppler flowmetry technique - one of the modern, noninvasive and extensively used methods for the assessmant of skin blood flow microcirculation system has been expanded in the review. The main results of the study of the ageing changes of skin blood perfusion using this method has been also presented.

  18. Skin Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... States. The two most common types are basal cell cancer and squamous cell cancer. They usually form on the head, face, ... If not treated, some types of skin cancer cells can spread to other tissues and organs. Treatments ...

  19. Skin abscess

    MedlinePlus

    Abscess - skin; Cutaneous abscess; Subcutaneous abscess; MRSA - abscess; Staph infection - abscess ... have methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) or another staph infection, follow instructions for self-care at home.

  20. Your Skin

    MedlinePlus

    ... from getting burned by the sun's ultraviolet, or UV, rays. That's why your skin gets tan if ... Nemours Foundation, iStock, Getty Images, Corbis, Veer, Science Photo Library, Science Source Images, Shutterstock, and Clipart.com

  1. Skin Pigment

    MedlinePlus

    ... the Professional Version Also of Interest Test your knowledge Impetigo is a bacterial skin infection. The infection ... Learn more about our commitment to Global Medical Knowledge . Merck Manuals About Disclaimer Permissions Privacy Contributors Terms ...

  2. Skin Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... exposure to ultraviolet light, which is found in sunlight and in lights used in tanning salons.What ... the safe-sun guidelines.1. Avoid the sun.Sunlight damages your skin. The sun is strongest during ...

  3. Skin Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... to the touch may have yellow drainage Of cellulitis: a red, inflamed area on the skin that ... For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC Erythema Multiforme Cellulitis Pityriasis Rosea Paronychia Molluscum Contagiosum Abscess Cellulitis Taking ...

  4. Seminoma in a postmenopausal woman with a Y;15 translocation in peripheral blood lymphocytes and a t(Y;15)/45,X Turner mosaic pattern in skin fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Hoshi, N; Fujita, M; Mikuni, M; Fujino, T; Okuyama, K; Handa, Y; Yamada, H; Sagawa, T; Hareyama, H; Nakahori, Y; Fujieda, K; Kant, J A; Nagashima, K; Fujimoto, S

    1998-10-01

    We report an unusual case of a 55 year old Japanese woman with a seminoma but relatively normal menses. The patient was a phenotypic female with late onset menarche (18 years of age), who was amenorrhoeic for the first year, followed by menses of one to three days' slight flow with dysmenorrhoea, but an otherwise normal menstrual history. A typical seminoma was removed from the left adnexal region and an immature testis was identified separately as an associated right adnexal mass. Repeated karyotypic studies on peripheral blood lymphocyte cultures showed only 46,X,-Y,t(Y;15)(q12;p13). Cytogenetic examination of the patient's younger brother, who had fathered three healthy children, showed an identical karyotype. Mosaicism of 46,X,-Y,t(Y;15)(q12;p13)/45,X cell lines was found in skin samples from the patient's elbow and genital regions, although there were no clinical stigmata of Turner syndrome. An androgen receptor binding assay of cultured genital skin fibroblasts was negative. Molecular analysis using Southern blot hybridisation, PCR, and direct DNA sequencing showed that neither the patient nor her brother had a detectable deletion or other abnormalities of Y chromosome sequences, including the SRY (sex determining region of the Y chromosome) gene sequence. These findings suggest that Turner mosaicism of the 45,X cell line may have contributed to this atypical presentation in an XY female, although we cannot exclude abnormalities of other genes related to sex differentiation.

  5. Seminoma in a postmenopausal woman with a Y;15 translocation in peripheral blood lymphocytes and a t(Y;15)/45,X Turner mosaic pattern in skin fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Hoshi, N; Fujita, M; Mikuni, M; Fujino, T; Okuyama, K; Handa, Y; Yamada, H; Sagawa, T; Hareyama, H; Nakahori, Y; Fujieda, K; Kant, J A; Nagashima, K; Fujimoto, S

    1998-01-01

    We report an unusual case of a 55 year old Japanese woman with a seminoma but relatively normal menses. The patient was a phenotypic female with late onset menarche (18 years of age), who was amenorrhoeic for the first year, followed by menses of one to three days' slight flow with dysmenorrhoea, but an otherwise normal menstrual history. A typical seminoma was removed from the left adnexal region and an immature testis was identified separately as an associated right adnexal mass. Repeated karyotypic studies on peripheral blood lymphocyte cultures showed only 46,X,-Y,t(Y;15)(q12;p13). Cytogenetic examination of the patient's younger brother, who had fathered three healthy children, showed an identical karyotype. Mosaicism of 46,X,-Y,t(Y;15)(q12;p13)/45,X cell lines was found in skin samples from the patient's elbow and genital regions, although there were no clinical stigmata of Turner syndrome. An androgen receptor binding assay of cultured genital skin fibroblasts was negative. Molecular analysis using Southern blot hybridisation, PCR, and direct DNA sequencing showed that neither the patient nor her brother had a detectable deletion or other abnormalities of Y chromosome sequences, including the SRY (sex determining region of the Y chromosome) gene sequence. These findings suggest that Turner mosaicism of the 45,X cell line may have contributed to this atypical presentation in an XY female, although we cannot exclude abnormalities of other genes related to sex differentiation. Images PMID:9783712

  6. Senescent Skin

    PubMed Central

    Kushniruk, William

    1974-01-01

    The cutaneous surface is continually influenced by aging and environmental factors. A longer life span is accompanied by an increase in the frequency of problems associated with aging skin. Although most of these changes and lesions are not life threatening, the premalignant lesions must be recognized and treated. The common aging and actinic skin changes are discussed and appropriate management is described. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4 PMID:20469067

  7. Development of Four Dimensional Human Model that Enables Deformation of Skin, Organs and Blood Vessel System During Body Movement - Visualizing Movements of the Musculoskeletal System.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Naoki; Hattori, Asaki; Hashizume, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    We constructed a four dimensional human model that is able to visualize the structure of a whole human body, including the inner structures, in real-time to allow us to analyze human dynamic changes in the temporal, spatial and quantitative domains. To verify whether our model was generating changes according to real human body dynamics, we measured a participant's skin expansion and compared it to that of the model conducted under the same body movement. We also made a contribution to the field of orthopedics, as we were able to devise a display method that enables the observer to more easily observe the changes made in the complex skeletal muscle system during body movements, which in the past were difficult to visualize.

  8. Ammonia blood test

    MedlinePlus

    ... any time the skin is broken) Alternative Names Serum ammonia Images Blood test References Nevah MI, Fallon MB. Hepatic encephalopathy, hepatorenal syndrome, hepatopulmonary syndrome, and other systemic complications of liver disease. In: Feldman M, Friedman LS, Brandt LJ, eds. ...

  9. High blood sugar - self-care

    MedlinePlus

    ... High blood glucose - self care; Diabetes - high blood sugar ... Symptoms of high blood sugar can include: Being very thirsty or having a dry mouth Having blurry vision Having dry skin Feeling weak or tired ...

  10. Potentials of the circulating pruritogenic mediator lysophosphatidic acid in development of allergic skin inflammation in mice: role of blood cell-associated lysophospholipase D activity of autotaxin.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Yoshibumi; Morikawa, Yoshiyuki; Okudaira, Shinichi; Kimoto, Shigenobu; Tanaka, Tamotsu; Aoki, Junken; Tokumura, Akira

    2014-05-01

    Itching and infiltration of immune cells are important hallmarks of atopic dermatitis (AD). Although various studies have focused on peripheral mediator-mediated mechanisms, systemic mediator-mediated mechanisms are also important in the pathogenesis and development of AD. Herein, we found that intradermal injection of lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a bioactive phospholipid, induces scratching responses by Institute of Cancer Research mice through LPA1 receptor- and opioid μ receptor-mediating mechanisms, indicating its potential as a pruritogen. The circulating level of LPA in Naruto Research Institute Otsuka Atrichia mice, a systemic AD model, with severe scratching was found to be higher than that of control BALB/c mice, probably because of the increased lysophospholipase D activity of autotaxin (ATX) in the blood (mainly membrane associated) rather than in plasma (soluble). Heparan sulfate proteoglycan was shown to be involved in the association of ATX with blood cells. The sequestration of ATX protein on the blood cells by heparan sulfate proteoglycan may accelerate the transport of LPA to the local apical surface of vascular endothelium with LPA receptors, promoting the hyperpermeability of venules and the pathological uptake of immune cells, aggravating lesion progression and itching in Naruto Research Institute Otsuka Atrichia mice.

  11. Learning about Skin Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Skin Cancers Spread 2000 News Release Learning About Skin Cancer What are the most common forms of skin ... years. What are the most common forms of skin cancer? Three types of skin cancer are the most ...

  12. The sensory channel of presentation alters subjective ratings and autonomic responses toward disgusting stimuli—Blood pressure, heart rate and skin conductance in response to visual, auditory, haptic and olfactory presented disgusting stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Croy, Ilona; Laqua, Kerstin; Süß, Frank; Joraschky, Peter; Ziemssen, Tjalf; Hummel, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Disgust causes specific reaction patterns, observable in mimic responses and body reactions. Most research on disgust deals with visual stimuli. However, pictures may cause another disgust experience than sounds, odors, or tactile stimuli. Therefore, disgust experience evoked by four different sensory channels was compared. A total of 119 participants received 3 different disgusting and one control stimulus, each presented through the visual, auditory, tactile, and olfactory channel. Ratings of evoked disgust as well as responses of the autonomic nervous system (heart rate, skin conductance level, systolic blood pressure) were recorded and the effect of stimulus labeling and of repeated presentation was analyzed. Ratings suggested that disgust could be evoked through all senses; they were highest for visual stimuli. However, autonomic reaction toward disgusting stimuli differed according to the channel of presentation. In contrast to the other, olfactory disgust stimuli provoked a strong decrease of systolic blood pressure. Additionally, labeling enhanced disgust ratings and autonomic reaction for olfactory and tactile, but not for visual and auditory stimuli. Repeated presentation indicated that participant's disgust rating diminishes to all but olfactory disgust stimuli. Taken together we argue that the sensory channel through which a disgust reaction is evoked matters. PMID:24027509

  13. The sensory channel of presentation alters subjective ratings and autonomic responses toward disgusting stimuli-Blood pressure, heart rate and skin conductance in response to visual, auditory, haptic and olfactory presented disgusting stimuli.

    PubMed

    Croy, Ilona; Laqua, Kerstin; Süß, Frank; Joraschky, Peter; Ziemssen, Tjalf; Hummel, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Disgust causes specific reaction patterns, observable in mimic responses and body reactions. Most research on disgust deals with visual stimuli. However, pictures may cause another disgust experience than sounds, odors, or tactile stimuli. Therefore, disgust experience evoked by four different sensory channels was compared. A total of 119 participants received 3 different disgusting and one control stimulus, each presented through the visual, auditory, tactile, and olfactory channel. Ratings of evoked disgust as well as responses of the autonomic nervous system (heart rate, skin conductance level, systolic blood pressure) were recorded and the effect of stimulus labeling and of repeated presentation was analyzed. Ratings suggested that disgust could be evoked through all senses; they were highest for visual stimuli. However, autonomic reaction toward disgusting stimuli differed according to the channel of presentation. In contrast to the other, olfactory disgust stimuli provoked a strong decrease of systolic blood pressure. Additionally, labeling enhanced disgust ratings and autonomic reaction for olfactory and tactile, but not for visual and auditory stimuli. Repeated presentation indicated that participant's disgust rating diminishes to all but olfactory disgust stimuli. Taken together we argue that the sensory channel through which a disgust reaction is evoked matters.

  14. Skin lumps

    MedlinePlus

    ... DM. Dermal and subcutaneous tumors. In: James WD, Berger TG, Elston DM, eds. Andrews' Diseases of the Skin: Clinical ... Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla Ogilvie, PhD, and the ...

  15. Oily skin

    MedlinePlus

    ... Clean your face with astringent pads if frequent face washing causes irritation. Use only water-based or oil-free cosmetics if you have oily skin. Your health care provider may also recommend or prescribe creams to absorb or limit the production of oil ...

  16. Mechanisms of Skin Penetration by Schistosoma Mansoni Cercariae.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Schistosoma mansoni , Penetration, Skin(Anatomy), Cercariae, Enzymes, Chymotrypsin, Blood serum, Calcium, Zinc, Parasitic diseases, Control...Inhibitors, Gamma globulin, Infections, Surfaces, Schistosomiasis , Humans, In vitro analysis

  17. How Is Melanoma Skin Cancer Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... near the skin. Sometimes a thin layer of alcohol or oil is used with this instrument. The ... blood for levels of a substance called lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) before treatment. If the melanoma has spread ...

  18. Nanomechanical characterization of skin and skin cream.

    PubMed

    Bhushan, B; Tang, W; Ge, S

    2010-11-01

    The mechanical properties of skin are an important characteristic of its resistance to damage and important indicators of pathological situations. Skin care products are the most common method to improve skin health and create a smooth, soft, and elastic perception by altering the mechanical properties of skin. It is of interest to study how skin cream affects the mechanical properties of skin. It also can help to quantify the effectiveness of cosmetic products. In this study, we present a systematic study of the mechanical properties of virgin skin and cream-treated skin. In nanoscratch measurements, the scratch wear tracks were generated at various loads using an atomic force microscope. Hardness and elastic moduli were measured using a nanoindenter. The in situ tensile properties of virgin skin and cream-treated skin were measured using a custom-built tensile stage that attaches to the atomic force microscope. Compared with virgin skin, cream-treated skin exhibits better scratch resistance up to a normal load of 15 μN. The indentation hardness and elastic modulus of cream-treated skin are lower than that of virgin skin, indicating that the skin cream moistens and softens the skin surface. In the stretching experiments, the elastic modulus is lower and ultimate strain is higher than that of virgin skin, indicating skin cream can improve the tensile response of skin. Mechanisms for the observed trends are discussed. © 2010 The Authors Journal compilation © 2010 The Royal Microscopical Society.

  19. Estimating physiological skin parameters from hyperspectral signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyas, Saurabh; Banerjee, Amit; Burlina, Philippe

    2013-05-01

    We describe an approach for estimating human skin parameters, such as melanosome concentration, collagen concentration, oxygen saturation, and blood volume, using hyperspectral radiometric measurements (signatures) obtained from in vivo skin. We use a computational model based on Kubelka-Munk theory and the Fresnel equations. This model forward maps the skin parameters to a corresponding multiband reflectance spectra. Machine-learning-based regression is used to generate the inverse map, and hence estimate skin parameters from hyperspectral signatures. We test our methods using synthetic and in vivo skin signatures obtained in the visible through the short wave infrared domains from 24 patients of both genders and Caucasian, Asian, and African American ethnicities. Performance validation shows promising results: good agreement with the ground truth and well-established physiological precepts. These methods have potential use in the characterization of skin abnormalities and in minimally-invasive prescreening of malignant skin cancers.

  20. Estimating physiological skin parameters from hyperspectral signatures.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Saurabh; Banerjee, Amit; Burlina, Philippe

    2013-05-01

    We describe an approach for estimating human skin parameters, such as melanosome concentration, collagen concentration, oxygen saturation, and blood volume, using hyperspectral radiometric measurements (signatures) obtained from in vivo skin. We use a computational model based on Kubelka-Munk theory and the Fresnel equations. This model forward maps the skin parameters to a corresponding multiband reflectance spectra. Machine-learning-based regression is used to generate the inverse map, and hence estimate skin parameters from hyperspectral signatures. We test our methods using synthetic and in vivo skin signatures obtained in the visible through the short wave infrared domains from 24 patients of both genders and Caucasian, Asian, and African American ethnicities. Performance validation shows promising results: good agreement with the ground truth and well-established physiological precepts. These methods have potential use in the characterization of skin abnormalities and in minimally-invasive prescreening of malignant skin cancers.

  1. Unexpected skin barrier influence from nonionic emulsifiers.

    PubMed

    Bárány, E; Lindberg, M; Lodén, M

    2000-02-15

    Skin disorders are often treated with creams containing various active substances. The creams also contain emulsifiers, which are surface-active ingredients used to stabilize the emulsion. Emulsifiers are potential irritants and in the present study the influence of stearic acid, glyceryl stearate, PEG-2, -9, -40, and -100 stearate, steareth-2, -10 and -21 on normal as well as on irritated skin have been evaluated with non-invasive measurements. Test emulsions were created by incorporating 5% emulsifiers in a water/mineral oil mixture (50:50). The emulsions and their vehicle were then applied to normal skin for 48 h and to sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) damaged skin for 17 h in aluminum chambers. Twenty-four hours after removal of the chambers the test sites were evaluated for degree of irritation. In normal skin, the emulsifiers induced significant differences in TEWL but not in skin blood flow. Five of the emulsifiers increased TEWL. In SLS-damaged skin an aggravation of the irritation was expected. However, no differences regarding skin blood flow was noted from the emulsifiers. Furthermore, three emulsifiers unexpectedly decreased TEWL. These results highlight the possibility of absorption of these emulsifiers into the lipid bilayer, which increase TEWL in normal skin and decrease TEWL in damaged skin.

  2. Skin self-exam

    MedlinePlus

    Skin cancer - self-exam; Melanoma - self-exam; Basal cell cancer - self-exam; Squamous cell - self-exam; Skin mole - ... You Need To Know About Melanoma and Other Skin Cancers: How To Check Your Skin. (NIH Publication No. ...

  3. Skin Pigmentation Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Pigmentation means coloring. Skin pigmentation disorders affect the color of your skin. Your skin gets its color from a pigment called melanin. Special cells in the skin make melanin. When these cells become damaged or ...

  4. Depigmented Skin and Phantom Color Measurements for Realistic Prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Tanner, Paul; Leachman, Sancy; Boucher, Kenneth; Ozçelik, Tunçer Burak

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that regardless of human skin phototype, areas of depigmented skin, as seen in vitiligo, are optically indistinguishable among skin phototypes. The average of the depigmented skin measurements can be used to develop the base color of realistic prostheses. Methods and Materials Data from 20 of 32 recruited vitiligo study participants. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy measurements were made from depigmented skin and adjacent pigmented skin, then compared to 66 pigmented polydimethylsiloxane phantoms to determine pigment concentrations in turbid media for making realistic facial prostheses. Results The Area Under spectral intensity Curve (AUC) was calculated for average spectroscopy measurements of pigmented sites in relation to skin phototype (p=0.0505) and depigmented skin in relation to skin phototype (p=0.59). No significant relationship exists between skin phototypes and depigmented skin spectroscopy measurements. The average of the depigmented skin measurements (AUC 19,129) was the closest match to phantom 6.4 (AUC 19,162) Conclusions Areas of depigmented skin are visibly indistinguishable per skin phototype, yet spectrometry shows that depigmented skin measurements varied and were unrelated to skin phototype. Possible sources of optical variation of depigmented skin include age, body site, blood flow, quantity/quality of collagen, and other chromophores. The average of all depigmented skin measurements can be used to derive the pigment composition and concentration for realistic facial prostheses. PMID:23750920

  5. Depigmented skin and phantom color measurements for realistic prostheses.

    PubMed

    Tanner, Paul; Leachman, Sancy; Boucher, Kenneth; Ozçelik, Tunçer Burak

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that regardless of human skin phototype, areas of depigmented skin, as seen in vitiligo, are optically indistinguishable among skin phototypes. The average of the depigmented skin measurements can be used to develop the base color of realistic prostheses. Data was analyzed from 20 of 32 recruited vitiligo study participants. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy measurements were made from depigmented skin and adjacent pigmented skin, then compared with 66 pigmented polydimethylsiloxane phantoms to determine pigment concentrations in turbid media for making realistic facial prostheses. The Area Under spectral intensity Curve (AUC) was calculated for average spectroscopy measurements of pigmented sites in relation to skin phototype (P = 0.0505) and depigmented skin in relation to skin phototype (P = 0.59). No significant relationship exists between skin phototypes and depigmented skin spectroscopy measurements. The average of the depigmented skin measurements (AUC 19,129) was the closest match to phantom 6.4 (AUC 19,162). Areas of depigmented skin are visibly indistinguishable per skin phototype, yet spectrometry shows that depigmented skin measurements varied and were unrelated to skin phototype. Possible sources of optical variation of depigmented skin include age, body site, blood flow, quantity/quality of collagen, and other chromophores. The average of all depigmented skin measurements can be used to derive the pigment composition and concentration for realistic facial prostheses. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Cutaneous skin tag

    MedlinePlus

    Skin tag; Acrochordon; Fibroepithelial polyp ... have diabetes. They are thought to occur from skin rubbing against skin. ... The tag sticks out of the skin and may have a short, narrow stalk connecting it to the surface of the skin. Some skin tags are as long as ...

  7. Filaggrin and Skin Barrier Function.

    PubMed

    Kezic, Sanja; Jakasa, Ivone

    2016-01-01

    The skin barrier function is greatly dependent on the structure and composition of the uppermost layer of the epidermis, the stratum corneum (SC), which is made up of flattened anucleated cells surrounded by highly organized and continuous lipid matrix. The interior of the corneocytes consists mainly of keratin filaments aggregated by filaggrin (FLG) protein. Next, together with several other proteins, FLG is cross-linked into a mechanically robust cornified cell envelope providing a scaffold for the extracellular lipid matrix. In addition to its role for the SC structural and mechanical integrity, FLG degradation products account in part for the water-holding capacity and maintenance of acidic pH of the SC, both crucial for the epidermal barrier homoeostasis by regulating activity of multiple enzymes that control desquamation, lipid synthesis and inflammation. The major determinant of FLG expression in the skin are loss-of-function mutations in FLG, the strongest genetic risk factor for atopic dermatitis (AD), an inflammatory skin disease characterized by a reduced skin barrier function. The prevalence of FLG mutations varies greatly among different populations and ranges from about 10% in Northern Europeans to less than 1% in the African populations. An impaired skin barrier facilitates absorption of potentially hazardous chemicals, which might cause adverse effects in the skin, such as contact dermatitis, or systemic toxicity after their passage into blood. In another direction, a leaky epidermal barrier will lead to enhanced loss of water from the skin. A recent study has shown that even subtle increase in epidermal water loss in newborns increases the risk for AD. Although there are multiple modes of action by which FLG might affect skin barrier it is still unclear whether and how FLG deficiency leads to the reduced skin barrier function. This chapter summarizes the current knowledge in this field obtained from clinical studies, and animal and in vitro models

  8. Portable hyperspectral imager for assessment of skin disorders: preliminary measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beach, James M.; Lanoue, Mark A.; Brabham, Kori; Khoobehi, Bahram

    2005-04-01

    Oxygenation of the facial skin was evaluated in rosacea using a hyperspectral camera. A portable imaging system utilizing crossed-polarization optics for illumination and recording is described. Relative oxygen saturation was determined from rosacea features and compared with normal skin. Saturation maps and light absorption spectra showed a significant increase in the oxygen saturation of the blood in rosacea-affected skin.

  9. Artificial skin in perspective: concepts and applications.

    PubMed

    Brohem, Carla A; Cardeal, Laura B da Silva; Tiago, Manoela; Soengas, María S; Barros, Silvia B de Moraes; Maria-Engler, Silvya S

    2011-02-01

    Skin, the largest organ of the human body, is organized into an elaborate layered structure consisting mainly of the outermost epidermis and the underlying dermis. A subcutaneous adipose-storing hypodermis layer and various appendages such as hair follicles, sweat glands, sebaceous glands, nerves, lymphatics, and blood vessels are also present in the skin. These multiple components of the skin ensure survival by carrying out critical functions such as protection, thermoregulation, excretion, absorption, metabolic functions, sensation, evaporation management, and aesthetics. The study of how these biological functions are performed is critical to our understanding of basic skin biology such as regulation of pigmentation and wound repair. Impairment of any of these functions may lead to pathogenic alterations, including skin cancers. Therefore, the development of genetically controlled and well characterized skin models can have important implications, not only for scientists and physicians, but also for manufacturers, consumers, governing regulatory boards and animal welfare organizations. As cells making up human skin tissue grow within an organized three-dimensional (3D) matrix surrounded by neighboring cells, standard monolayer (2D) cell cultures do not recapitulate the physiological architecture of the skin. Several types of human skin recombinants, also called artificial skin, that provide this critical 3D structure have now been reconstructed in vitro. This review contemplates the use of these organotypic skin models in different applications, including substitutes to animal testing. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  10. Artificial Skin in Perspective: Concepts and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Brohem, Carla Abdo; da Silva Cardeal, Laura Beatriz; Tiago, Manoela; Soengas, María S.; de Moraes Barros, Silvia Berlanga; Maria-Engler, Silvya Stuchi

    2010-01-01

    Summary Skin, the largest organ of the human body, is organized into an elaborate layered structure consisting mainly of the outermost epidermis and the underlying dermis. A subcutaneous adipose-storing hypodermis layer and various appendages such as hair follicles, sweat glands, sebaceous glands, nerves, lymphatics and blood vessels are also present in the skin. These multiple components of the skin ensure survival by providing critical functions in protection, thermoregulation, excretion, absorption, metabolic functions, sensation, evaporation management and aesthetics. The study of how these biological functions are performed is critical in our understanding of basic skin biology, such as regulation of pigmentation and wound repair. Impairment of any of these functions may lead to pathogenic alterations, including skin cancers. Therefore, the development of genetically controlled and well-characterized skin models can have important implications, not only for scientists and physicians, but also for manufacturers, consumers, governing regulatory boards and animal welfare organizations. Since cells making up human skin tissue grow within an organized three dimensional (3D) matrix continually surrounded by neighboring cells, standard monolayer (2D) cell cultures do not recapitulate the physiological architecture of the skin. Several types of human skin recombinants, also called artificial skin, that provide this critical 3-D structure, have now been reconstructed in vitro. This review contemplates the use of these organotypic skin models in different applications, including substitutes to animal testing. PMID:21029393

  11. Skin Keratins

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fengrong; Zieman, Abigail; Coulombe, Pierre A.

    2016-01-01

    Keratins comprise the type I and type II intermediate filament-forming proteins and occur primarily in epithelial cells. They are encoded by 54 evolutionarily conserved genes (28 type I, 26 type II) and regulated in a pairwise and tissue type-, differentiation-, and context-dependent manner. Keratins serve multiple homeostatic and stress-enhanced mechanical and nonmechanical functions in epithelia, including the maintenance of cellular integrity, regulation of cell growth and migration, and protection from apoptosis. These functions are tightly regulated by posttranslational modifications as well as keratin-associated proteins. Genetically determined alterations in keratin-coding sequences underlie highly penetrant and rare disorders whose pathophysiology reflects cell fragility and/or altered tissue homeostasis. Moreover, keratin mutation or misregulation represents risk factors or genetic modifiers for several acute and chronic diseases. This chapter focuses on keratins that are expressed in skin epithelia, and details a number of basic protocols and assays that have proven useful for analyses being carried out in skin. PMID:26795476

  12. Skin Keratins.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fengrong; Zieman, Abigail; Coulombe, Pierre A

    2016-01-01

    Keratins comprise the type I and type II intermediate filament-forming proteins and occur primarily in epithelial cells. They are encoded by 54 evolutionarily conserved genes (28 type I, 26 type II) and regulated in a pairwise and tissue type-, differentiation-, and context-dependent manner. Keratins serve multiple homeostatic and stress-enhanced mechanical and nonmechanical functions in epithelia, including the maintenance of cellular integrity, regulation of cell growth and migration, and protection from apoptosis. These functions are tightly regulated by posttranslational modifications as well as keratin-associated proteins. Genetically determined alterations in keratin-coding sequences underlie highly penetrant and rare disorders whose pathophysiology reflects cell fragility and/or altered tissue homeostasis. Moreover, keratin mutation or misregulation represents risk factors or genetic modifiers for several acute and chronic diseases. This chapter focuses on keratins that are expressed in skin epithelia, and details a number of basic protocols and assays that have proven useful for analyses being carried out in skin. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. A novel way to treat skin tears.

    PubMed

    Moradian, Scott; Klapper, Andrew M

    2016-04-01

    Skin tears are one of the most commonly treated wounds in the elderly population. In their most basic form, they are essentially traumatic random pattern flaps. We postulate that the injured blood flow to these skin flaps should be ignored and the tissue should be treated as a skin graft. A case report is presented of an 86-year-old female with an 8 × 3·5 cm skin tear to her right upper extremity after a hip fracture. In addition to conventional wound closure strips re-approximating the tissues, a disposable negative pressure wound therapy device was placed to act as bolster. Upon its removal on day 5, the opposed skin tear tissue was found to be 100% viable. We therefore propose that this update may be an improvement over classical skin tear treatments and should be followed up with a case series.

  14. Randomized clinical trial in vitamin D-deficient adults comparing replenishment with oral vitamin D3 with narrow-band UV type B light: effects on cholesterol and the transcriptional profiles of skin and blood.

    PubMed

    Ponda, Manish P; Liang, Yupu; Kim, Jaehwan; Hutt, Richard; Dowd, Kathleen; Gilleaudeau, Patricia; Sullivan-Whalen, Mary M; Rodrick, Tori; Kim, Dong Joo; Barash, Irina; Lowes, Michelle A; Breslow, Jan L

    2017-02-22

    Background: Vitamin D deficiency, defined as a serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] concentration <20 ng/mL, is correlated with a more atherogenic lipid profile. However, oral vitamin D supplementation does not lower LDL-cholesterol concentrations or raise HDL-cholesterol concentrations. This uncoupling between association and causation may result from a failure of oral vitamin D to mimic the effect of dermally synthesized vitamin D in response to ultraviolet type B (UVB) light.Objective: We tested the hypothesis that, in vitamin D-deficient adults, the replenishment of vitamin D with UVB exposure would lower LDL-cholesterol concentrations compared with the effect of oral vitamin D3 supplementation.Design: We performed a randomized clinical trial in vitamin D-deficient adults and compared vitamin D replenishment between subjects who received oral vitamin D3 (n = 60) and those who received narrow-band UVB exposure (n = 58) ≤6 mo.Results: There was no difference in the change from baseline LDL-cholesterol concentrations between oral vitamin D3 and UVB groups (difference in median of oral vitamin D3 minus that of UVB: 1.5 mg/dL; 95% CI: -5.0, 7.0 mg/dL). There were also no differences within groups or between groups for changes in total or HDL cholesterol or triglycerides. Transcriptional profiling of skin and blood, however, revealed significant upregulation of immune pathway signaling with oral vitamin D3 but significant downregulation with UVB.Conclusions: Correcting vitamin D deficiency with either oral vitamin D3 or UVB does not improve the lipid profile. Beyond cholesterol, these 2 modalities of raising 25(OH)D have disparate effects on gene transcription. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01688102.

  15. Skin Condition Finder

    MedlinePlus

    SKIN CONDITIONS HEALTH TOPICS FOR PROFESSIONALS SKIN CONDITIONS HOME SKIN CONDITIONS HEALTH TOPICS FOR PROFESSIONALS Rash and Skin Condition Finder ... Toe Toe Webspace Toe Nail CLOSE About the Skin Condition Finder Have a health question or concern? Looking for self-care patient ...

  16. Complete blood count - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... The skin should be cleaned with alcohol or iodine before the test. The patient should be seated ... which has many causes including: Blood loss Iron deficiency Deficiences of vitamin B12 or folic acid Bone ...

  17. Cutaneous control of blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Randall S; Titze, Jens; Weller, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Textbook theory holds that blood pressure (BP) is regulated by the brain, by blood vessels, or by the kidney. Recent evidence suggests that BP could be regulated in the skin. The skin holds a complex capillary counter current system, which controls body temperature, skin perfusion, and apparently systemic BP. Epidemiological data suggest that sunlight exposure plays a role in controlling BP. Ultraviolet A radiation produces vasodilation and a fall in BP. Keratinocytes and immune cells control blood flow in the extensive countercurrent loop system of the skin by producing nitric oxide, a key regulator of vascular tone. The balance between hypoxia-inducible factor-1α and hypoxia-inducible factor-2α activity in keratinocytes controls skin perfusion, systemic thermoregulation, and systemic BP by nitric oxide-dependent mechanisms. Furthermore, the skin accumulates Na which generates a barrier to promote immunological host defense. Immune cells control skin Na metabolism and the clearance of Na via the lymphatic system. Reduced lymphatic clearance increases BP. Apart from the well-known role of the brain, blood vessels, and the kidney, the skin is important for systemic BP control in humans and in experimental animals.

  18. Donating Blood

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood transfusion. Blood donors — especially donors with certain blood types — are always in demand. Who Can Donate Blood? ... Natural Disasters: How to Help Blood Blood Transfusions Blood Types Contact Us Print Resources Send to a Friend ...

  19. Skin Allergy Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... time. Some common medications that can cause skin allergy include penicillin, sulfa drugs, barbiturates and anticonvulsants just to mention a few. Some of the symptoms from drug allergies might be hives, skin rash, itchy skin or ...

  20. Skin care and incontinence

    MedlinePlus

    ... skin problems such as redness, peeling, irritation, and yeast infections likely. Bedsores ( pressure sores ) may also develop ... drying the skin. Incontinence problems can cause a yeast infection on the skin. This is an itchy, ...

  1. Healthy Skin Matters

    MedlinePlus

    ... increases the risk of skin cancer and premature skin aging just like too much sun. In fact, most ... is known to lead to signs of premature aging of the skin such as wrinkling and age spots. UVB rays ...

  2. Neuromodulators for Aging Skin

    MedlinePlus

    ... Choose the Best Skin Care Products Neuromodulators for Aging Skin Treatment Options Learn more about treatment options for ... MD - Los Angeles, California Why choose neuromodulators for aging skin Non-invasive — does not require surgery. Can be ...

  3. Basal cell skin cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... occur on skin that is regularly exposed to sunlight or other ultraviolet radiation. This type of skin ... skin cancer is to reduce your exposure to sunlight . Always use sunscreen: Apply sunscreen with sun protection ...

  4. Stages of Skin Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Skin Cancer Skin color and being exposed to sunlight can increase the risk of nonmelanoma skin cancer ... carcinoma include the following: Being exposed to natural sunlight or artificial sunlight (such as from tanning beds) ...

  5. Skin Cancer Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Skin Cancer Skin color and being exposed to sunlight can increase the risk of nonmelanoma skin cancer ... carcinoma include the following: Being exposed to natural sunlight or artificial sunlight (such as from tanning beds) ...

  6. Skin Condition Finder

    MedlinePlus

    ... SKIN CONDITIONS HEALTH TOPICS FOR PROFESSIONALS Rash and Skin Condition Finder 1 Select Age Group Infant Child ... Toe Toe Webspace Toe Nail CLOSE About the Skin Condition Finder Have a health question or concern? ...

  7. Scalded skin syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Ritter disease; Staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome (SSS) ... Scalded skin syndrome (SSS) is caused by infection with certain strains of Staphylococcus bacteria. The bacteria produce a toxin that causes the skin ...

  8. Skin lesion biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... confirms the diagnosis, your provider will start a treatment plan. A few of the skin problems that may be diagnosed are: Psoriasis Infection from bacteria or fungus Melanoma Basal cell skin cancer Squamous cell skin cancer Risks Risks of a ...

  9. Skin discoloration - bluish

    MedlinePlus

    Lips - bluish; Fingernails - bluish; Cyanosis; Bluish lips and fingernails; Bluish skin ... color to their skin. This condition is called cyanosis. Depending on the cause, cyanosis may develop suddenly, ...

  10. Biological Rhythms in the Skin

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, Mary S.; Pelle, Edward; Dong, Kelly; Pernodet, Nadine

    2016-01-01

    Circadian rhythms, ≈24 h oscillations in behavior and physiology, are reflected in all cells of the body and function to optimize cellular functions and meet environmental challenges associated with the solar day. This multi-oscillatory network is entrained by the master pacemaker located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus, which directs an organism’s rhythmic expression of physiological functions and behavior via a hierarchical system. This system has been highly conserved throughout evolution and uses transcriptional–translational autoregulatory loops. This master clock, following environmental cues, regulates an organism’s sleep pattern, body temperature, cardiac activity and blood pressure, hormone secretion, oxygen consumption and metabolic rate. Mammalian peripheral clocks and clock gene expression have recently been discovered and are present in all nucleated cells in our body. Like other essential organ of the body, the skin also has cycles that are informed by this master regulator. In addition, skin cells have peripheral clocks that can function autonomously. First described in 2000 for skin, this review summarizes some important aspects of a rapidly growing body of research in circadian and ultradian (an oscillation that repeats multiple times during a 24 h period) cutaneous rhythms, including clock mechanisms, functional manifestations, and stimuli that entrain or disrupt normal cycling. Some specific relationships between disrupted clock signaling and consequences to skin health are discussed in more depth in the other invited articles in this IJMS issue on Sleep, Circadian Rhythm and Skin. PMID:27231897

  11. Biological Rhythms in the Skin.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Mary S; Pelle, Edward; Dong, Kelly; Pernodet, Nadine

    2016-05-24

    Circadian rhythms, ≈24 h oscillations in behavior and physiology, are reflected in all cells of the body and function to optimize cellular functions and meet environmental challenges associated with the solar day. This multi-oscillatory network is entrained by the master pacemaker located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus, which directs an organism's rhythmic expression of physiological functions and behavior via a hierarchical system. This system has been highly conserved throughout evolution and uses transcriptional-translational autoregulatory loops. This master clock, following environmental cues, regulates an organism's sleep pattern, body temperature, cardiac activity and blood pressure, hormone secretion, oxygen consumption and metabolic rate. Mammalian peripheral clocks and clock gene expression have recently been discovered and are present in all nucleated cells in our body. Like other essential organ of the body, the skin also has cycles that are informed by this master regulator. In addition, skin cells have peripheral clocks that can function autonomously. First described in 2000 for skin, this review summarizes some important aspects of a rapidly growing body of research in circadian and ultradian (an oscillation that repeats multiple times during a 24 h period) cutaneous rhythms, including clock mechanisms, functional manifestations, and stimuli that entrain or disrupt normal cycling. Some specific relationships between disrupted clock signaling and consequences to skin health are discussed in more depth in the other invited articles in this IJMS issue on Sleep, Circadian Rhythm and Skin.

  12. Skin Color and Pigmentation in Ethnic Skin.

    PubMed

    Visscher, Marty O

    2017-02-01

    Skin coloration is highly diverse, partly due to the presence of pigmentation. Color variation is related to the extent of ultraviolet radiation exposure, as well as other factors. Inherent skin coloration arises from differences in basal epidermal melanin amount and type. Skin color is influenced by both the quantity and distribution of melanocytes. The effectiveness of inherent pigmentation for protecting living cells also varies. This article discusses skin color, pigmentation, and ethnicity in relation to clinical practice. Color perception, skin typing/classification, and quantitation of pigmentation are reviewed in relation to ethnicity, environmental stresses/irritants, and potential treatment effects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The metabolic response to skin temperature.

    PubMed

    Kuhnen, G; Jessen, C

    1988-09-01

    Experiments were done to assess that fraction of the metabolic response to external cold exposure, which is attributable to skin temperature. In 5 conscious and closely clipped goats the metabolic rate was determined at various stable levels of skin temperature in the range from 13 to 41 degrees C, while core temperature was kept constant at 38.8 degrees C. Skin temperature was manipulated by a rapidly circulating shower bath, while core temperature was controlled by means of heat exchangers acting on arterial blood temperature in a chronic arteriovenous shunt. The metabolic response to skin temperature fell into two clearly discernible sections: a first zone with skin temperatures above 25-30 degrees C, within which the metabolic rate rose at a rate of -0.34 +/- 0.07 W/kg.degrees C with decreasing skin temperature, and a second zone with skin temperatures below 25-30 degrees C, within which the metabolic rate either plateaued or even grew smaller with further decreasing skin temperature. It is concluded that the relationship between skin temperature and metabolic rate does not directly reproduce the temperature-response curve of cutaneous cold receptors but also reflects a complex interaction of several factors, including an unspecific temperature effect on muscle metabolism.

  14. Skin to skin care:heat balance.

    PubMed Central

    Karlsson, H

    1996-01-01

    Skin to skin care has been practised in primitive and high technology cultures for body temperature preservation in neonates. Regional skin temperature and heat flow was measured in moderately hypothermic term neonates to quantitate the heat transfer occurring during one hour of skin to skin care. Nine healthy newborns with a mean rectal temperature of 36.3 degrees C were placed skin to skin on their mothers' chests. The mean (SD) rectal temperature increased by 0.7 (0.4) degrees C to 37.0 degrees C. The heat loss was high (70 Wm-2) from the unprotected skin of the head to the surrounding air. Minute heat losses occurred from covered areas; and heat was initially gained from areas in contact with the mother's skin. The total dry heat loss during skin to skin care corresponded to heat loss during incubator care at 32-32.5 degrees C. The reduced heat loss, and to a minor extent, the initial heat flux from the mothers allowed heat to be conserved, leading to rewarming. PMID:8949698

  15. An assessment of sex chromosome copy number in a phenotypic female patient with hypergonadtropic hypogonadism, primary amenorrhea and growth retardation by GTG-banding and FISH in peripheral blood and skin tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, I.M.D.; DeMoranville, B.; Grollino, M.G.

    1994-09-01

    The present report describes studies performed on an 18-year-old phenotypic female referred because of primary amenorrhea, hypergonadotropic hypoganadism and growth retardation. The clinical features raised the possibility of a gonadal dysgenesis. The ovaries were not identified on either side. Her testosterone was significantly elevated, with serum level at 48 ng/dl, and her free testosterone at 7 pg/ml. A GTG-banding analysis of 33 peripheral blood leukocytes revealed the modal number of chromosomes to be 46 per cell with a male sex constitution and normal appearing banding patterns (46,XY). In view of the clinical findings, additional cells were scored to rule out low percentage mosaicism. Out of 35 additional GTG-banded cells scored for the sex chromosomes, 4 cells (11.5%) were found to contain only one copy of the X chromosome. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) using dual color biotinylated X and Y probes (Imagenetics) was subsequently performed. Out of approximately 500 cells scored, 87% were found to be XY and 9% were found to be positive for the X signal only, versus 7% and 3% X signal only for 2 XY controls, aged 61 and 46, respectively. As loss of the Y chromosome has been reported in elderly males as well as certain males with leukemia, the age of the controls was important to note. To unequivocally establish the presence of mosaicism, a skin biopsy was obtained for fibroblast culture. Out of 388 total cells scored, 286 (74%) were found to be XY and 46 (12%) were found to be X, versus 99% XY and <1% X in controls. GTG-banding analysis of the same fibroblast culture is currently in progress. Preliminary data on this specimen thus far corroborate results of the FISH study. The presence of XY cells, along with an increased testosterone level, raises the distinct possibility of a gonadoblastoma. In view of this increased risk, arrangements are being made for the patient to have a laparoscopy and surgical removal of her presumptive streak gonads.

  16. Skin irritation and sensitization: mechanisms and new approaches for risk assessment. 1. Skin irritation.

    PubMed

    Fluhr, J W; Darlenski, R; Angelova-Fischer, I; Tsankov, N; Basketter, D

    2008-01-01

    Cutaneous irritation presents a major health problem with serious social and occupational impact. The interaction between an irritant and the human skin depends on multiple factors: the intrinsic properties and the nature of the irritant itself, and specific individual- and environment-related variables. The main pathological mechanisms of irritancy include skin barrier disruption, induction of a cytokine cascade and involvement of the oxidative stress network; all of them resulting in a visible or subclinical inflammatory reaction. In vivo, different non-invasive parameters for the evaluation of skin irritation and irritant potential of compounds and their specific formulations have been introduced, such as epidermal barrier function, skin hydration, surface pH, lipid composition, skin colour and skin blood flow. The diverse physiological changes caused by irritating agents require implementation of a multiparametric approach in the evaluation of cutaneous irritancy.

  17. Skin microvascular reactivity in patients with hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Mihor, Ana; Gergar, Maša; Gaberšček, Simona; Lenasi, Helena

    2016-11-04

    Hypothyroidism is associated with impaired vascular function; however, little is known about its impact on microcirculation. We aimed to determine skin microvascular reactivity in hypothyroidism focusing on endothelial function and the sympathetic response. We measured skin laser Doppler (LD) flux (LDF) on the volar forearm and the finger pulp using LD flowmetry in hypothyroid patients (N = 13) and healthy controls (N = 15). Skin microvascular reactivity was assessed by a three-minute occlusion of the brachial artery, inducing postocclusive reactive hyperaemia (PRH), and by a four-minute local cooling of the hand. An electrocardiogram (ECG), digital artery blood pressure and skin temperature at the measuring sites were recorded. Baseline LDF, the digital artery blood pressure and the heart rate were comparable between patients and controls. On the other hand, patients exhibited significantly longer PRH duration, significantly higher blood pressure during cooling (unpaired t-test, p <0.05) and lower, albeit not significant, LDF in the ipsilateral finger pulp during cooling compared to controls. Unexpectedly, the results of the present study point to an increased vasodilator capacity of skin microcirculation and an apparent increase in sympathetic reactivity after local cooling in hypothyroid patients. Hypothyroidism induces subtle changes of some haemodynamic parameters in skin microcirculation implying altered endothelial function and altered sympathetic reactivity.

  18. Skin Care and Aging

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Skin Care and Aging How Aging Affects Skin Your skin changes with age. It becomes thinner, ... if they bother you. See additional resources on aging skin, including information on treatment options, specific conditions, and ...

  19. Skin (Pressure) Sores

    MedlinePlus

    ... Dry Skin Itching Skin Color Changes Pressure Sores Scars and Wounds Treatments and Side Effects Managing Cancer-related Side Effects ... Dry Skin Itching Skin Color Changes Pressure Sores Scars and Wounds More In Treatment & Support Understanding Your Diagnosis Finding and Paying for ...

  20. Acne in ethnic skin.

    PubMed

    Halder, Rebat M; Brooks, Howard L; Callender, Valerie D

    2003-10-01

    Acne is the most common disorder observed in ethnic skin. Clinical presentation is different than in white skin. Postinflammatory hyperpigmentation is a common sequelae of acne in darker skin. The management of acne in ethnic skin is based largely on the prevention and treatment of hyperpigmentation.

  1. High skin temperature and hypohydration impair aerobic performance.

    PubMed

    Sawka, Michael N; Cheuvront, Samuel N; Kenefick, Robert W

    2012-03-01

    This paper reviews the roles of hot skin (>35°C) and body water deficits (>2% body mass; hypohydration) in impairing submaximal aerobic performance. Hot skin is associated with high skin blood flow requirements and hypohydration is associated with reduced cardiac filling, both of which act to reduce aerobic reserve. In euhydrated subjects, hot skin alone (with a modest core temperature elevation) impairs submaximal aerobic performance. Conversely, aerobic performance is sustained with core temperatures >40°C if skin temperatures are cool-warm when euhydrated. No study has demonstrated that high core temperature (∼40°C) alone, without coexisting hot skin, will impair aerobic performance. In hypohydrated subjects, aerobic performance begins to be impaired when skin temperatures exceed 27°C, and even warmer skin exacerbates the aerobic performance impairment (-1.5% for each 1°C skin temperature). We conclude that hot skin (high skin blood flow requirements from narrow skin temperature to core temperature gradients), not high core temperature, is the 'primary' factor impairing aerobic exercise performance when euhydrated and that hypohydration exacerbates this effect.

  2. Photoacoustic detection of neovascularities in skin graft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Mutsuo; Sato, Shunichi; Saitoh, Daizo; Ishihara, Miya; Okada, Yoshiaki; Ashida, Hiroshi; Obara, Minoru

    2005-04-01

    We previously proposed a new method for monitoring adhesion of skin graft by measuring photoacoustic (PA) signal originated from the neovascularities. In this study, immunohistochemical staining (IHC) with CD31 antibody was performed for grafted skin tissue to observe neovascularity, and the results were compared with PA signals. We also used a laser Doppler imaging (LDI) to observe blood flow in the grafted skin, and sensitivity of PA measurement and that of LDI were compared. In rat autograft models, PA signals were measured for the grafted skin at postgrafting times of 0-48 h. At 6 h postgrafting, PA signal was observed in the skin depth region of 500-600 mm, while the results of IHC showed that angiogenesis occurred at the depth of about 600 mm. Depths at which PA signal and angiogenesis were observed decreased with postgrafting time. These indicate that the PA signal observed at 6 h postgrafting originated from the neovascularities in the skin graft. Results of LDI showed no blood-originated signal before 48 h postgrafting. These findings suggest that PA measurement is effective in monitoring the adhesion of skin graft in early stage after transplantation.

  3. Blood-borne infections.

    PubMed

    Pirozzolo, Jason J; LeMay, Donald C

    2007-07-01

    Blood-borne infections are transmitted by way of direct blood contact from one individual to another from injured skin or a mucous membrane. Blood-borne infections can also be transmitted through blood doping and drug abuse and through sexual contact. Risk factors for hepatitis B virus (HBV) HBV infection include travel to regions with endemic hepatitis. Prevention of blood-borne pathogens in the student-athlete should focus on traditional transmission routes and off-the-field behavior because experts believe that field transmission of blood-borne pathogens is minimal. Worldwide, HBV, hepatitis C virus (HCV), and HIV are the most common pathogens encountered. This article focuses on HBV and HCV as being the most prevalent in athletics.

  4. [Skin-sparing mastectomies: how to avoid skin necrosis?].

    PubMed

    Delbaere, M; Delaporte, T; Toussoun, G; Delay, E

    2008-04-01

    Skin-sparing mastectomy (SSM) has emerged as the surgical technique best adapted to the treatment of early breast cancers or breast cancer recurrences after conservative treatment; the technique is particularly appreciated by the patients who had been expecting the development of immediate, high-quality breast reconstruction for over 15 years. SSM preserves anatomical landmarks on the skin surface (notably the under-breast fold and the conical shape of the breast). The procedure must be performed by a skilled surgical team in order to maximize the quality of breast resection and reconstruction, particularly to avoid postoperative complications, notably damage to blood vessels within the skin flap and prosthesis infection. These complications generally affect the cosmetic outcome of the reconstruction, with serious short-term and long-term consequences for the acceptability of the surgical procedure, and may sometimes compromise the delivery of adjuvant treatments (either chemo- or radiotherapy). Based on our previous experience (1000 new cases since 1992), we will compare the advantages and drawbacks of the procedure, discuss its indications, describe the clinical situations encountered and the various specific interventions available, as well as the methods to reduce the risks of tissue damage and skin necrosis.

  5. [The clinical use of cryopreserved human skin allografts for transplantation].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Flores, Francisco; Chacón-Gómez, María; Madinaveitia-Villanueva, Juan Antonio; Barrera-Lopez, Araceli; Aguirre-Cruz, Lucinda; Querevalu-Murillo, Walter

    2015-01-01

    The biological recovery of human skin allografts is the gold standard for preservation in Skin Banks. However, there is no worldwide consensus about specific allocation criteria for preserved human skin allografts with living cells. A report is presented on the results of 5 years of experience of using human skin allografts in burned patient in the Skin and Tissue Bank at the "Instituto Nacional de Rehabilitacion" The human skin allografts were obtained from multi-organ donors. processed and preserved at -80 °C for 12 months. Allocation criteria were performed according to blood type match, clinical history, and burned body surface. Up to now, the Skin and Tissue Bank at 'Instituto Nacional de Rehabilitacion" has processed and recovered 125,000 cm(2) of human skin allografts. It has performed 34 surgical implants on 21 burned patients. The average of burn body surface was 59.2%. More than two-thirds (67.7%) of recipients of skin allografts were matched of the same to type blood of the donor, and 66.6% survived after 126 days hospital stay. It is proposed to consider recipient's blood group as allocation criteria to assign tissue; and use human skin allografts on patiens affected with burns over 30% of body surface (according the "rule of the 9"). Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  6. Hyperspectral signature analysis of skin parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyas, Saurabh; Banerjee, Amit; Garza, Luis; Kang, Sewon; Burlina, Philippe

    2013-02-01

    The temporal analysis of changes in biological skin parameters, including melanosome concentration, collagen concentration and blood oxygenation, may serve as a valuable tool in diagnosing the progression of malignant skin cancers and in understanding the pathophysiology of cancerous tumors. Quantitative knowledge of these parameters can also be useful in applications such as wound assessment, and point-of-care diagnostics, amongst others. We propose an approach to estimate in vivo skin parameters using a forward computational model based on Kubelka-Munk theory and the Fresnel Equations. We use this model to map the skin parameters to their corresponding hyperspectral signature. We then use machine learning based regression to develop an inverse map from hyperspectral signatures to skin parameters. In particular, we employ support vector machine based regression to estimate the in vivo skin parameters given their corresponding hyperspectral signature. We build on our work from SPIE 2012, and validate our methodology on an in vivo dataset. This dataset consists of 241 signatures collected from in vivo hyperspectral imaging of patients of both genders and Caucasian, Asian and African American ethnicities. In addition, we also extend our methodology past the visible region and through the short-wave infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum. We find promising results when comparing the estimated skin parameters to the ground truth, demonstrating good agreement with well-established physiological precepts. This methodology can have potential use in non-invasive skin anomaly detection and for developing minimally invasive pre-screening tools.

  7. Estrogens and aging skin

    PubMed Central

    Thornton, M. Julie

    2013-01-01

    Estrogen deficiency following menopause results in atrophic skin changes and acceleration of skin aging. Estrogens significantly modulate skin physiology, targeting keratinocytes, fibroblasts, melanocytes, hair follicles and sebaceous glands, and improve angiogenesis, wound healing and immune responses. Estrogen insufficiency decreases defense against oxidative stress; skin becomes thinner with less collagen, decreased elasticity, increased wrinkling, increased dryness and reduced vascularity. Its protective function becomes compromised and aging is associated with impaired wound healing, hair loss, pigmentary changes and skin cancer.   Skin aging can be significantly delayed by the administration of estrogen. This paper reviews estrogen effects on human skin and the mechanisms by which estrogens can alleviate the changes due to aging. The relevance of estrogen replacement, selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) and phytoestrogens as therapies for diminishing skin aging is highlighted. Understanding estrogen signaling in skin will provide a basis for interventions in aging pathologies. PMID:24194966

  8. Viral Skin Diseases.

    PubMed

    Ramdass, Priya; Mullick, Sahil; Farber, Harold F

    2015-12-01

    In the vast world of skin diseases, viral skin disorders account for a significant percentage. Most viral skin diseases present with an exanthem (skin rash) and, oftentimes, an accompanying enanthem (lesions involving the mucosal membrane). In this article, the various viral skin diseases are explored, including viral childhood exanthems (measles, rubella, erythema infectiosum, and roseola), herpes viruses (herpes simplex virus, varicella zoster virus, Kaposi sarcoma herpes virus, viral zoonotic infections [orf, monkeypox, ebola, smallpox]), and several other viral skin diseases, such as human papilloma virus, hand, foot, and mouth disease, molluscum contagiosum, and Gianotti-Crosti syndrome. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Blood Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood cells, white blood cells and platelets. Blood disorders affect one or more parts of the blood ... They can be acute or chronic. Many blood disorders are inherited. Other causes include other diseases, side ...

  10. Blood pressure

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    Normal blood pressure is important for proper blood flow to the body's organs and tissues. The force of the blood on the walls of the arteries is called blood pressure. Blood pressure is measured both as the heart ...

  11. Blood Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... Blood Clots) Blood clot in a deep vein. Hemophilia Blood does not clot properly. Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia ( ... infants. Blood Disorders Homepage Venous Thromboembolism (Blood Clots) Hemophilia Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia (HHT) Sickle Cell Disease Thalassemia ...

  12. Microbiome and skin diseases.

    PubMed

    Zeeuwen, Patrick L J M; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Timmerman, Harro M; Schalkwijk, Joost

    2013-10-01

    This article reviews recent findings on the skin microbiome. It provides an update on the current understanding of the role of microbiota in healthy skin and in inflammatory and allergic skin diseases. Advances in computing and high-throughput sequencing technology have enabled in-depth analysis of microbiota composition and functionality of human skin. Most data generated to date are related to the skin microbiome of healthy volunteers, but recent studies have also addressed the dynamics of the microbiome in diseased and injured skin. Currently, reports are emerging that evaluate the strategies to manipulate the skin microbiome, intending to modulate diseases and/or their symptoms. The microbiome of normal human skin was found to have a high diversity and high interpersonal variation. Microbiota compositions of diseased lesional skin (in atopic dermatitis and psoriasis) showed distinct differences compared with healthy skin. The function of microbial colonization in establishing immune system homeostasis has been reported, whereas host-microbe interactions and genetically determined variation of stratum corneum properties might be linked to skin dysbiosis. Both are relevant for cutaneous disorders with aberrant immune responses and/or disturbed skin barrier function. Modulation of skin microbiota composition to restore host-microbiota homeostasis could be future strategies to treat or prevent disease.

  13. High Skin Temperature and Hypohydration Impair Aerobic Performance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    high skin blood flow for heat dissipation (Sawka et al. 2011). Skin temperature is elevated in proportion to ambient temperature and humidity ( Gagge ...is elevated with WBGT ( Gagge & Gonzalez, 1996), but Tc may or may not be elevated, as it depends upon the sustainment of exercise intensity and...exertion, while warm-hot skin is associated with elevated thermal discomfort ( Gagge et al. 1969; Gonzalez & Gagge , 1973). Other physiological cues

  14. Cultured skin microbiota attracts malaria mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Host-seeking of the African malaria mosquito, Anopheles gambiae sensu stricto, is guided by human odours. The precise nature of the odours, and the composition of attractive blends of volatiles, remains largely unknown. Skin microbiota plays an important role in the production of human body odours. It is hypothesized that host attractiveness and selection of An. gambiae is affected by the species composition, density, and metabolic activity of the skin microbiota. A study is presented in which the production and constituency of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) by human skin microbiota is examined and the behavioural responses of An. gambiae to VOCs from skin microbiota are investigated. Methods Blood agar plates incubated with skin microbiota from human feet or with a reference strain of Staphylococcus epidermidis were tested for their attractiveness to An. gambiae in olfactometer bioassays and indoor trapping experiments. Entrained air collected from blood agar plates incubated with natural skin microbiota or with S. epidermidis were analysed using GC-MS. A synthetic blend of the compounds identified was tested for its attractiveness to An. gambiae. Behavioural data were analysed by a χ2-test and GLM. GC-MS results were analysed by fitting an exponential regression line to test the effect of the concentration of bacteria. Results More An. gambiae were caught with blood agar plates incubated with skin bacteria than with sterile blood agar plates, with a significant effect of incubation time and dilution of the skin microbiota. When bacteria from the feet of four other volunteers were tested, similar effects were found. Fourteen putative attractants were found in the headspace of the skin bacteria. A synthetic blend of 10 of these was attractive to An. gambiae. Conclusions The discovery that volatiles produced by human skin microorganisms in vitro mediate An. gambiae host-seeking behaviour creates new opportunities for the development of odour

  15. Bacterial Skin Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diseases Take Big Slice Out of America's Health, Economy (News) Health Tip: Use Caution When Applying Hair Dye Additional ... Skin Diseases Take Big Slice Out of America's Health, Economy THURSDAY, March 2, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Skin diseases ...

  16. Aging changes in skin

    MedlinePlus

    ... changes than people with darker, more heavily pigmented skin. AGING CHANGES With aging, the outer skin layer (epidermis) ... melanocytes) decreases. The remaining melanocytes increase in ... looks thinner, paler, and clear (translucent). Large pigmented ...

  17. Bleeding into the skin

    MedlinePlus

    Protect aging skin. Avoid trauma such as bumping or pulling on skin areas. For a cut or scrape, use direct pressure to stop the bleeding. If you have a drug reaction, ask your provider about stopping the drug. Otherwise, follow ...

  18. Squamous cell skin cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... occur on skin that is regularly exposed to sunlight or other ultraviolet radiation. The earliest form of ... skin cancer is to reduce your exposure to sunlight . Always use sunscreen: Apply sunscreen with sun protection ...

  19. Skin lesion of blastomycosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/ency/article/000865.htm Skin lesion of blastomycosis To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A skin lesion of blastomycosis is a symptom of an infection with the ...

  20. Skin Cancer Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment Glossary Information on medications and procedures The 2017 Skin Cancer Foundation Journal The latest in skin cancer prevention, detection and treatment 2017 Champions for Change Gala Purchase tickets Research Grants ...

  1. Examine Your Skin

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... Store In Memory Melanoma Info Melanoma Facts Melanoma Prevention Sunscreen Suggestions Examine Your Skin Newly Diagnosed? Understanding ... video. UPDATED: November 23, 2016 Melanoma Facts Melanoma Prevention Sunscreen Suggestions Examine Your Skin Newly Diagnosed? Understanding ...

  2. Components of skin

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... skin layers from the outside environment and contains cells that make keratin, a substance that waterproofs and strengthens the skin. The epidermis also has cells that contain melanin, the dark pigment that gives ...

  3. Dry Skin Relief

    MedlinePlus

    ... Previous meetings archive Advocacy News Advocacy priorities Drug pricing and availability CVS dermatologic formulary restrictions Skin cancer ... baths and showers short. Use warm, not hot water, and a mild cleanser. Gently pat the skin ...

  4. Necrotizing Skin Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... to the touch, and sometimes swollen, and gas bubbles may form under the skin. The person usually ... produce gas (see Gas Gangrene ). The gas creates bubbles under the skin and sometimes in the blisters ...

  5. PPD skin test

    MedlinePlus

    ... is a method used to diagnose silent (latent) tuberculosis (TB) infection. PPD stands for purified protein derivative. ... skin test; Tuberculin skin test; Mantoux test Images Tuberculosis in the kidney Tuberculosis in the lung Positive ...

  6. Fraxel skin resurfacing.

    PubMed

    Collawn, Sherry S

    2007-03-01

    Fractional photothermolysis is a new skin resurfacing laser technology for treating wrinkles, melanocytic pigmentation, scars, and photodamaged skin. Treatment with the Fraxel laser (Reliant Technologies, Inc.) creates microzones of injury in the skin that are surrounded by normal intervening skin that rapidly heals the injured tissue. From June to November of 2005, 70 patients underwent 2 to 6 treatments with the Fraxel laser (Reliant Technologies, Inc.) on the face and/or extremities for abnormal pigmentation, wrinkles, and scars. Treatments were 1 to 3 weeks apart. Clinically, the patient experienced little downtime other than erythema and edema for a few days followed by light skin exfoliation for a few days. After treatment, skin color and texture were more homogeneous with a decrease in the unwanted melanocytic pigmentation. The skin showed a decrease in rhytids. In summary, fractional photothermolysis improved skin color and texture and decreased fine wrinkles and melanocytic pigmentation with minimal downtime for the patient.

  7. Diffusing Wave Spectroscopy: Application for Blood Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meglinski, Igor; Tuchin, Valery V.

    This chapter describes the application of diffusing wave spectroscopy (DWS) for noninvasive characterization of skin blood flow and skin blood microcirculation in vivo. The DWS is a simple but ingenious approach, utilizing the loss of correlation of scattered laser light to observe the structural changes and displacement of scattering particles, such as red blood cells (RBC) within the biological tissues. This approach has the potential to be so specific that it can revolutionize the currently developed techniques for blood flow monitoring. Developments in DWS are likely to lead it to be used for characterization of skin blood microcirculation, to assess burn depth, to diagnose atherosclerotic disease, and investigate mechanisms of photodynamic therapy for cancer treatment, as well as to monitor pharmacological intervention for failing surgical skin flaps or replants.

  8. 2. VIEW OF WASH TANKS Skins are brought in through ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW OF WASH TANKS Skins are brought in through hatches, seen on rear wall, and washed of blood and flesh in redwood tanks, with wooden grates to hold skins down in water. Superstructure and screening on tanks are a later alteration, unrelated to this process. - Sealing Plant, St. George Island, Pribilof Islands, Saint George, Aleutians West Census Area, AK

  9. Effect of Skin-To-Skin Contact on Preterm Infant Skin Barrier Function and Hospital-Acquired Infection

    PubMed Central

    Abouelfettoh, Amel; Ludington-Hoe, Susan M.; Burant, Chris J.; Visscher, Marty O.

    2011-01-01

    Background The preterm infants' skin is structurally and functionally immature at birth because of immature stratum corneum barrier function, leading to problems with fluid loses, thermoregulation, and infection. Two parameters of barrier function can be non-invasively assessed: Stratum Corneum Hydration (SCH) and Transepidermal Water Loss (TEWL). Skin-to-Skin Care (SSC) is the proposed independent variable that might affect barrier function by decreasing TEWL and increasing SCH, thereby improving stratum corneum barrier function and consequently decreasing the rate of infection. No study of SSC's effects on TEWL and SCH of preterm infants could be found. The purpose of the study was to determine the effect of 5 daily Skin-to-Skin Contact sessions on infant skin hydration (SCH), transepidermal evaporated water loss (TEWL), and on SCH when TEWL was controlled, and on the presence of hospital acquired infection. Methods A one-group pretest-test-posttest design with 10 preterm infants (28 - 30 wks GA < 32 wks postmenstrual age, and no infection at entry). Test = 90 minutes of SSC; pre-test and post-test = 30 minutes each of prone positioning in an incubator. SCH and TEWL were taken on Days 1 and 5 at the beginning, middle and end of each period using Multi-Probe Adaptor. A 3 X 3 X 2 Repeated Measures Mixed Models Design, including a covariate, was used to analyze level of Skin Hydration. Specifically, the model tested comparisons in SCH made across repetitions, time, and days, as well as all possible interactions while controlling for TEWL. Descriptive statistics described the number of positive blood cultures during hospitalization and the presence of infections four weeks post-discharge. Results Significant differences in skin hydration were found across TIME (Pre-SSC, SSC, Post-SSC) (F = 21.86; p < 0.001). One infant had a positive blood culture during hospitalization; no infants had signs of infection by 4 weeks post-discharge. Conclusions The study has begun

  10. Biology of Skin Color.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corcos, Alain

    1983-01-01

    Information from scientific journals on the biology of skin color is discussed. Major areas addressed include: (1) biology of melanin, melanocytes, and melanosomes; (2) melanosome and human diversity; (3) genetics of skin color; and (4) skin color, geography, and natural selection. (JN)

  11. Psychoneuroimmunology and the Skin.

    PubMed

    Honeyman, Juan F

    2016-08-23

    The nervous, immune, endocrine and integumentary systems are closely related and interact in a number of normal and pathological conditions. Nervous system mediators may bring about direct changes to the skin or may induce the release of immunological or hormonal mediators that cause pathological changes to the skin. This article reviews the psychological mechanisms involved in the development of skin diseases.

  12. Biology of Skin Color.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corcos, Alain

    1983-01-01

    Information from scientific journals on the biology of skin color is discussed. Major areas addressed include: (1) biology of melanin, melanocytes, and melanosomes; (2) melanosome and human diversity; (3) genetics of skin color; and (4) skin color, geography, and natural selection. (JN)

  13. Superficial angiomyxoma of the skin

    PubMed Central

    Abarzúa-Araya, Alvaro; Lallas, Aimillios; Piana, Simonetta; Longo, Caterina; Moscarella, Elvira; Argenziano, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Superficial angiomyxomas (SA) of the skin are rare benign cutaneous tumors of soft tissue composed of prominent myxoid matrix and numerous blood vessels. SA are more common in males [1] and they are usually located on the trunk but can also appear on the lower limbs, head, neck and genitalia [2,3]. Treatment is surgical, the total excision is curative, but local recurrence is possible [4]. Herein we present a 72-year-old patient with a history of melanoma in situ, with a new lesion on the lower back. PMID:27648383

  14. Impact of mast cells on the skin.

    PubMed

    Kritas, S K; Saggini, A; Varvara, G; Murmura, G; Caraffa, A; Antinolfi, P; Toniato, E; Pantalone, A; Neri, G; Frydas, S; Rosati, M; Tei, M; Speziali, A; Saggini, R; Pandolfi, F; Cerulli, G; Theoharides, T C; Conti, P

    2013-01-01

    When through the skin a foreign antigen enters it provokes an immune response and inflammatory reaction. Mast cells are located around small vessels that are involved in vasaldilation. They mature under the influence of local tissue to various cytokines. Human skin mast cells play an essential role in diverse physiological and pathological processes and mediate immediate hypersensitive reaction and allergic diseases. Injection of anti-IgE in the skin or other agents that directly activate mast cells may cause the decrease in vascular tone, leakage of plasma and may lead to a fall in blood pressure with fatal anaphylactic shock. Skin mast cells are also implicated as effector cells in response to multiple parasites such as Leishmania which is primarily characterized by its tissue cutaneous tropism. Activated macrophages by IFNgamma, cytotoxic T cells, activated mast cells and several cytokines are involved in the elimination of the parasites and immunoprotection. IL-33 is one of the latest cytokines involved in IgE-induced anaphylaxis and in the pathogenesis of allergic skin disorders. IL-33 has been shown in epidermis of patients with psoriasis and its skin expression causes atopic dermatitis and it is crucial for the development of this disease. Here we review the impact of mast cells on the skin.

  15. Modeling of Light Reflection from Human Skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado, J. A.; Cornejo, A.; Rivas-Silva, J. F.; Rodríguez, E. E.

    2006-09-01

    In this work a two-layer model is used to simulate the spectral reflectance of adult human skin. We report and discuss diffuse reflectance spectra of this model for three values of the volume fraction of melanosomes fme, namely a) lightly pigmented skin fme = 4%, b) moderately pigmented skin fme = 14% and c) heavily pigmented skin fme = 30% at a volume fraction of blood fbl = 0.2%. We also considered the modeling of reflectance spectra for two values of fbl (0.2% and 1%) with fme = 4%. Both simulations were done in the 400-700 nm spectral range using the Monte Carlo simulation code MCML in standard C. Results showed that the principal signatures of human skin reflectance spectrum are obtained with this model and that it could be of valuable use to made predictions of diffuse reflectance of human skin for different values of the parameters related to skin characterization. These parameters can be associated to distinct medical conditions, such as erythema, jaundice, etc.

  16. Skin pigmentation evaluation in broilers fed natural and synthetic pigments.

    PubMed

    Castañeda, M P; Hirschler, E M; Sams, A R

    2005-01-01

    Broiler carcass skin color is important in the United States and Mexico. This study evaluated the use of natural and synthetic pigments in broiler diets at commercial levels. Birds were fed natural or synthetic pigments at low or high levels, simulating US and Mexican commercial practices. Skin color was measured during live production (3 to 7 wk of age) and after slaughter and chilling. The natural pigments had consistently greater skin b* values (yellowness) than the synthetic pigments. The high levels produced greater skin b* values than the low levels, regardless of source. The synthetic pigments had a slower increase in skin b* but reached the same level as the natural low by 7 wk. There was no difference in skin a* values (redness) due to pigment source or level or the age of the bird. By 7 wk, all pigment sources approached plateau levels in the blood, but the synthetic pigment diet produced higher blood levels of yellow and red pigments than the natural pigment diets. Processing intensified skin yellowness and reduced skin redness. These data suggest that although synthetic pigments might have been absorbed better than natural ones, natural pigments were more efficient at increasing skin yellowness and there were only small differences between high and low levels for each pigment source. This finding may allow reduction in pigment use and feed cost to achieve the same skin acceptance by the consumer.

  17. Elastin hydrolysate derived from fish enhances proliferation of human skin fibroblasts and elastin synthesis in human skin fibroblasts and improves the skin conditions.

    PubMed

    Shiratsuchi, Eri; Nakaba, Misako; Yamada, Michio

    2016-03-30

    Recent studies have shown that certain peptides significantly improve skin conditions, such as skin elasticity and the moisture content of the skin of healthy woman. This study aimed to investigate the effects of elastin hydrolysate on human skin. Proliferation and elastin synthesis were evaluated in human skin fibroblasts exposed to elastin hydrolysate and proryl-glycine (Pro-Gly), which is present in human blood after elastin hydrolysate ingestion. We also performed an ingestion test with elastin hydrolysate in humans and evaluated skin condition. Elastin hydrolysate and Pro-Gly enhanced the proliferation of fibroblasts and elastin synthesis. Maximal proliferation response was observed at 25 ng mL(-1) Pro-Gly. Ingestion of elastin hydrolysate improved skin condition, such as elasticity, number of wrinkles, and blood flow. Elasticity improved by 4% in the elastin hydrolysate group compared with 2% in the placebo group. Therefore, elastin hydrolysate activates human skin fibroblasts and has beneficial effects on skin conditions. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  18. Anyone Can Get Skin Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    No matter if your skin is light, dark, or somewhere in between, everyone is at risk for skin cancer. Learn what skin cancer looks like, how to find it early, and how to lower the chance of skin cancer.

  19. Using skin impedance to improve prediction accuracy of continuous glucose monitoring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Haixia; Liu, Jin; Shi, Ting; Li, Dachao; Du, Zhenhui; Xu, Kexin

    2008-02-01

    The continuous blood glucose monitoring system using interstitial fluid (ISF) extracted by ultrasound and vacuum is proposed in this paper. The skin impedance measurement is introduced into the system to monitor the skin permeability variation. Low-frequency ultrasound is applied on skin surface to enhance the skin permeability by disrupting the lipid bilayers of the stratum corneum (SC), and then ISF is extracted out of skin continuously by vacuum. The extracted ISF is diluted and the concentration of glucose in it is detected by a biosensor and used to predict the blood glucose concentration. The skin permeability is variable during the extraction, and its variation affects the prediction accuracy. The skin impedance is an excellent indicator of skin permeability in that the lipid bilayers of the SC, which offer electrical resistance to the skin, retard transdermal transport of molecules. So the skin impedance measured during the extraction is transformed to skin conductivity to estimate correlation coefficient between skin conductivity and permeability. Skin conductivity correlates well with skin permeability. The method and experiment system mentioned above may be significative for improving the prediction accuracy of continuous blood glucose monitoring system.

  20. In vivo skin penetration of macromolecules in irritant contact dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Mottaleb, Mona M A; Lamprecht, Alf

    2016-12-30

    Recently, a selective preferential accumulation of polymeric nanoparticles (in the size range around 100nm) has been observed in the follicular system of dermatitis skin. The present investigation aimed at clearly investigating the effect of irritant contact dermatitis on the barrier permeability for colloidal systems below this size range, namely quantum dots and hydrophilic macromolecules. Irritant dermatitis was induced in mice and the penetrability of quantum dots (5nm) and hydrophilic dextran molecules has been tracked in both healthy and inflamed skin using confocal laser scanning microscopy. The selective accumulation of the quantum dots was clearly observed in inflamed skin while hydrophilic dextran behaved similarly in both healthy and inflamed skin. The therapeutic potential for the transdermal delivery of peptide drugs through inflamed skin has been also tested in rats. Results revealed that the transdermal permeation of insulin and calcitonin was not significantly enhanced in dermatitis compared to healthy skin. On the other side, permeation through stripped skin was significantly higher. However, the effect was limited and shorter compared to the SC injection where tmin was 0.5h and 2h with a 70% and 46% reduction in blood glucose levels for the stripped skin and the SC injection respectively. Similarly, tmin was 4h and 8h with area under the curve of 161±65% and 350±97% for the stripped skin and the SC injection respectively. In conclusion, the changes in skin permeability accompanied with skin inflammation did not affect its permeability to peptide drugs. Our findings also underline that experiments with the tape stripped skin model as a surrogate for inflamed skin can risk misleading conclusions due to significant difference of skin permeability between the tape stripped skin and inflamed skin. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Noncontacting diffuse VIS-NIR spectroscopy of human skin for evaluation of skin type and time-dependent microcirculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Wolf-Dieter; Fassler, Dieter; Zimmermann, Gabi; Liebold, Kristin; Wollina, Uwe

    2000-11-01

    Spectroscopic investigations of the VIS-NIR range allow the objective determination of pigmentation, blood microcirculation and water content of human skin. Non- contacting in vivo measurements of the human skin of 50 volunteers reflect the clinical skin type well. Our correlation analysis yields that the red/infrared spectral range can be used for a determination of skin type. The observed strong spectral variations within the same group of skin type are likely based on the high biological variability of human skin and subjective clinically observed skin type. Therefore it can be useful to measure the full spectral range and to calculate a non-observed skin score with multivariate spectral methods. By multivariate analysis a correct classification of remittance spectra can be obtained. Time- depending spectral variations of dermal microcirculation can be measured at defined locations of the body, for instance the dynamics of oxygenation or blood volume in the skin of the fingertip. The cardial, pulmonal and vasomotoric waves of the micro- and macrocirculation are clearly visible at different wavelengths. The spectroscopic informations are important as an objective measure for the skin type evaluation, the penetration behavior of pharmaca, laser surgery, and therapy.

  2. [Skin diseases and obesity].

    PubMed

    Guerra-Segovia, Carolina; Ocampo-Candiani, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a public health problem worldwide. It predominates in industrialized countries; however, it is prevalent in all nations. It is defined as a condition of excess adipose tissue and is the result of changes in lifestyle, excessive consumption of energy-dense foods with poor nutritional value, physical inactivity and the reduction of open space where one can practice a sport. Although obesity is associated with multiple diseases, it is important to stress that the metabolic changes caused by it affect skin physiology and play a predisposing factor for the development of skin diseases. Very little has been studied on the impact of obesity on the skin. The purpose of this article is to review the most frequently skin diseases in obesity. Some skin pathologies in obesity are caused by changes in skin physiology, others are related to insulin resistance or constitute an exacerbating factor for dermatitis. This article covers the clinical features of obesity related skin disease and its management.

  3. Sensitive skin: an overview.

    PubMed

    Inamadar, Arun C; Palit, Aparna

    2013-01-01

    Sensitive skin is less tolerant to frequent and prolonged use of cosmetics and toiletries. It is self-diagnosed and typically unaccompanied by any obvious physical signs of irritation. With the change in lifestyle and also with increased opportunity to use many new brands of cosmetics and toiletries, there has been an increase in females complaining of unique sensation in their facial skin. Sensitive skin presents as smarting, burning, stinging, itching, and/or tight sensation in their facial skin. The condition is found in more than 50% of women and 40% of men, creating a sizable demand for products designed to minimize skin sensitivity. Good numbers of invasive and non-invasive tests are designed to evaluate and predict the sensitive skin. Management includes guidelines for selecting suitable cosmetics and toiletries in sensitive skin individuals.

  4. Pursuing prosthetic electronic skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chortos, Alex; Liu, Jia; Bao, Zhenan

    2016-09-01

    Skin plays an important role in mediating our interactions with the world. Recreating the properties of skin using electronic devices could have profound implications for prosthetics and medicine. The pursuit of artificial skin has inspired innovations in materials to imitate skin's unique characteristics, including mechanical durability and stretchability, biodegradability, and the ability to measure a diversity of complex sensations over large areas. New materials and fabrication strategies are being developed to make mechanically compliant and multifunctional skin-like electronics, and improve brain/machine interfaces that enable transmission of the skin's signals into the body. This Review will cover materials and devices designed for mimicking the skin's ability to sense and generate biomimetic signals.

  5. Laser skin perforator with focal point detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponce, L.; Arronte, M.; Cabrera, J. L.; Flores, T.

    2006-02-01

    The development of laser skin perforator device for obtaining blood samples is presented. The use of photoelectric proximity photoelectric sensor permits to determine the focal point eliminating any contact and them avoiding the risk of contamination. Perforation of about 0.2 mm - 0.5 mm in diameter can be obtained in order to take the sample of blood. The method permits to make the blood analysis not only avoiding the contamination risk but also diminishing the pain sensation in comparison with metal lancet.

  6. 12-OH-nevirapine sulfate, formed in the skin, is responsible for nevirapine-induced skin rash.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Amy M; Novalen, Maria; Tanino, Tadatoshi; Uetrecht, Jack P

    2013-05-20

    Nevirapine (NVP) treatment is associated with a significant incidence of skin rash in humans, and it also causes a similar immune-mediated skin rash in Brown Norway (BN) rats. We have shown that the sulfate of a major oxidative metabolite, 12-OH-NVP, covalently binds in the skin. The fact that the sulfate metabolite is responsible for covalent binding in the skin does not prove that it is responsible for the rash. We used various inhibitors of sulfation to test whether this reactive sulfate is responsible for the skin rash. Salicylamide (SA), which depletes 3'-phosphoadenosine-5'-phosphosulfate (PAPS) in the liver, significantly decreased 12-OH-NVP sulfate in the blood, but it did not prevent covalent binding in the skin or the rash. Topical application of 1-phenyl-1-hexanol, a sulfotransferase inhibitor, prevented covalent binding in the skin as well as the rash, but only where it was applied. In vitro incubations of 12-OH-NVP with PAPS and cytosolic fractions from the skin of rats or from human skin also led to covalent binding that was inhibited by 1-phenyl-1-hexanol. Incubation of 12-OH-NVP with PAPS and sulfotransferase 1A1*1, a human isoform that is present in the skin, also led to covalent binding, and this binding was also inhibited by 1-phenyl-1-hexanol. We conclude that salicylamide did not deplete PAPS in the skin and was unable to prevent covalent binding or the rash, while topical 1-phenyl-1-hexanol inhibited sulfation of 12-OH-NVP in the skin and did prevent covalent binding and the rash. These results provide definitive evidence that 12-OH-NVP sulfate formed in skin is responsible for NVP-induced skin rashes. Sulfotransferase is one of the few metabolic enzymes with significant activity in the skin, and it may be responsible for the bioactivation of other drugs that cause skin rashes.

  7. Blood clotting

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... the external bleeding stops. Clotting factors in the blood cause strands of blood-borne material, called fibrin, to stick together and ... the inside of the wound. Eventually, the cut blood vessel heals, and the blood clot dissolves after ...

  8. Blood typing

    MedlinePlus

    A blood sample is needed. The test to determine your blood group is called ABO typing. Your blood sample is mixed with antibodies against type A and B blood. Then, the sample is checked to see whether ...

  9. Blood transfusions

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000431.htm Blood transfusions To use the sharing features on this ... several sources of blood which are described below. Blood From the Public (Volunteer Blood Donation) The most ...

  10. Blood Types

    MedlinePlus

    ... FIND A BLOOD DRIVE Blood Types and the Population O positive is the most common blood type. ... of the different blood types in the U.S. population is: Caucasian African- American Latino-American Asian O + ...

  11. Cutaneous blood flow in psoriasis

    SciTech Connect

    Klemp, P.; Staberg, B.

    1983-12-01

    The disappearance rate of /sup 133/Xe was studied in 20 patients with psoriasis vulgaris, using an epicutaneous labeling technique in involved skin lesions or normal-appearing skin of the proximal extensor site of the forearm. Control experiments were performed in 10 normal subjects. Calculations of the cutaneous blood flow (CBF) in psoriatic skin lesions were performed using a tissue-to-blood partition coefficient for /sup 133/Xe, lambda c,pso, of 1.2 ml/100 g/min. lambda c,pso was estimated after the relative content of water, lipids, and proteins had been analyzed in psoriatic skin biopsies of 6 patients with untreated psoriasis. The mean relative content of water was markedly reduced to 23.5 +/- 1.5% (SEM), and lipids and proteins were markedly increased to 2.5 +/- 0.7% and 74.0 +/- 2.2, respectively, compared to previously published data for normal skin (water 72.5%, lipids 1%, proteins 26.5%). Mean CBF in untreated psoriatic skin was 63.5 +/- 9.0 ml/100 g/min. This was significantly higher than the mean CBF in 10 normal subjects, 6.3 +/- 0.5 ml/100 g/min (p much less than 0.0001). Mean CBF in normal-appearing skin in patients with psoriasis was 11.0 +/- 1.3 ml/100 g/min. This was significantly higher than CBF in normal subjects (p less than 0.0002).

  12. Construction of three-dimensional dermo-epidermal skin equivalents using cell coating technology and their utilization as alternative skin for permeation studies and skin irritation tests.

    PubMed

    Akagi, Takami; Nagura, Mayuka; Hiura, Ayami; Kojima, Hajime; Akashi, Mitsuru

    2017-03-23

    In vitro generated human skin equivalents are generating interest as promising tools in basic research, as alternatives to animal testing and for clinical applications in regenerative medicine. For prediction of skin irritation and corrosion, three-dimensional (3D) human skin equivalents consisting of differentiated human keratinocytes have been developed and some models have been internationally accepted. However, more delicate assessments using full-thickness skin models, such as skin sensitization tests cannot be performed because of the lack of a dermis containing fibroblasts or appendages. In a previous study, we developed dermo-epidermal human skin equivalents (DESEs) using a cell coating technique, which employs cell surface coating by layer-by-layer (LbL) assembled extracellular matrix (ECM) films. The DESEs with dermis consisting of normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDF) and epidermis consisting of human keratinocytes (KC) were easily fabricated by using this technology. In this study, the constructed DESEs were evaluated as an alternative skin for skin permeation and irritation tests. A good relationship of permeability coefficient of chemicals was observed between the DESEs and human skin data. We investigated whether the DESEs, a new in vitro skin model, are able to identify skin irritant and non-irritant substances among 20 reference chemicals. It was confirmed that the DESEs are applicable to skin irritation testing as defined in the European Centre for the Validation of Alternative Methods (ECVAM) Performance Standard (OECD Test Guideline 439). We further studied the construction of the DESEs with density-controlled blood capillary networks using human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). The results suggest that DESEs allowing incorporation of skin appendages are more promising alternatives to animal testing, and can be applied to the design of physiologically relevant in vitro skin models.

  13. [Evaluation of efficacy and safety of drugs absorbed through skin using their physicochemical parameters].

    PubMed

    Oshizaka, Takeshi; Todo, Hiroaki; Sugibayashi, Kenji

    2012-01-01

    Skin has been paid attention as a site of application of prescription drugs, over-the-counter drugs (non-prescription drugs) and cosmetics. Skin permeation and skin concentration of the compounds should be considered after topical administration, as well as their blood concentration to evaluate efficacy and safety. Since the evaluation of the amount of drugs permeated through skin is important for topically applied drugs, studies on the skin permeation has been greatly advanced. In addition, many reports proved that skin permeabilities of drugs could be predicted from physicochemical parameters of drugs. On the other hand, few reports have been found on the prediction of skin concentration of drugs. Furthermore, many experimented problems are left to determine the skin concentration of drugs: severe consume of human or animal skins, difficult removal of applied drugs from the skin surface, low drug extraction ratio from skin and low sensitivity to determine skin concentration of drugs, and requirement of long time measurement. Thus, fast and accurate measurement of skin concentration of applied drugs are urgently required. This report describes the relationship between skin permeation and skin concentration, and the prediction of skin concentration of drugs using skin permeation parameters of drugs.

  14. Blood culture contaminants.

    PubMed

    Dawson, S

    2014-05-01

    Blood cultures are an essential diagnostic tool. However, contamination may impact on patients' care and lead to increased patient stay, additional tests, and inappropriate antibiotic use. The aim of this study was to review the literature for factors that influence the rate of blood culture contamination. A comprehensive literature search was performed using Medline and CINAHL on blood culture contamination. Hospitals/units should have in place a protocol for staff on how to take blood cultures, incorporating use of an aseptic technique. Studies have shown that several key factors in the process may lower contamination rates such as adherence to a protocol, sampling by peripheral venepuncture route rather than via an intravascular catheter, use of sterile gloves, cleaning tops of blood culture bottles with antiseptics and inoculating blood culture bottles before other blood tubes, samples being taken by a phlebotomy team, monitoring contamination rates, and providing individual feedback and retraining for those with contaminants. Although skin antisepsis is advocated there is still debate on which antiseptic is most effective, as there is no conclusive evidence, only that there is benefit from alcohol-containing preparations. In conclusion, hospitals should aim to minimize their blood culture contamination rates. They should monitor their rate regularly and aim for a rate of ≤3%.

  15. Hyperelastic Material Properties of Mouse Skin under Compression

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuxiang; Marshall, Kara L.; Baba, Yoshichika; Gerling, Gregory J.; Lumpkin, Ellen A.

    2013-01-01

    The skin is a dynamic organ whose complex material properties are capable of withstanding continuous mechanical stress while accommodating insults and organism growth. Moreover, synchronized hair cycles, comprising waves of hair growth, regression and rest, are accompanied by dramatic fluctuations in skin thickness in mice. Whether such structural changes alter skin mechanics is unknown. Mouse models are extensively used to study skin biology and pathophysiology, including aging, UV-induced skin damage and somatosensory signaling. As the skin serves a pivotal role in the transfer function from sensory stimuli to neuronal signaling, we sought to define the mechanical properties of mouse skin over a range of normal physiological states. Skin thickness, stiffness and modulus were quantitatively surveyed in adult, female mice (Mus musculus). These measures were analyzed under uniaxial compression, which is relevant for touch reception and compression injuries, rather than tension, which is typically used to analyze skin mechanics. Compression tests were performed with 105 full-thickness, freshly isolated specimens from the hairy skin of the hind limb. Physiological variables included body weight, hair-cycle stage, maturity level, skin site and individual animal differences. Skin thickness and stiffness were dominated by hair-cycle stage at young (6–10 weeks) and intermediate (13–19 weeks) adult ages but by body weight in mature mice (26–34 weeks). Interestingly, stiffness varied inversely with thickness so that hyperelastic modulus was consistent across hair-cycle stages and body weights. By contrast, the mechanics of hairy skin differs markedly with anatomical location. In particular, skin containing fascial structures such as nerves and blood vessels showed significantly greater modulus than adjacent sites. Collectively, this systematic survey indicates that, although its structure changes dramatically throughout adult life, mouse skin at a given location

  16. Coherent diagnostics of burned skin: experiments with phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bednov, Andrey A.; Cheng, Cecil; Ulyanov, Sergey S.; Yodh, Arjun G.

    2000-04-01

    Modeling of skin burns has been realized in this study. Autocorrelation functions of intensity fluctuations of scattered light were measured for two-layered turbid media. The first layer served as a model of motionless scatterers whereas the second one simulated dynamic light scattering. This medium was used as a model of skin burns. A theory related quasi-elastic light scattering measurements to cutaneous blood flow was used. The dependencies of statistical properties of Doppler signal on the properties of skin burns as well as on the velocity of cutaneous blood flow has ben investigated. Predictions were verified by measurements both of dynamic and stationary light scattering in model media. Experimental results might be used as a basis for blood micro circulation diagnostics as well as for precise measurements of a depth of burned skin.

  17. Aquaporins in the Skin.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ravi; Kevin Heard, L; Chen, Xunsheng; Bollag, Wendy B

    2017-01-01

    The skin is the largest organ of the body, serving as an important barrier between the internal milieu and the external environment. The skin is also one of the first lines of defense against microbial infection and other hazards, and thus, the skin has important immune functions . This organ is composed of many cell types, including immune-active dendritic cells (epidermal Langerhans cells and dermal dendritic cells), connective tissue-generating dermal fibroblasts and pigment-producing melanocytes. Comprising the outer skin layer are the epidermal keratinocytes, the predominant cell of this layer, the epidermis , which provides both a mechanical barrier and a water -permeability barrier. Recent data suggest that aquaporins, a family of barrel-shaped proteins surrounding internal pores that allow the passage of water and, in some family members, small solutes such as glycerol , play critical roles in regulating various skin parameters. The involvement of different aquaporin family members in skin function is discussed.

  18. Skin disorders of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Errickson, C V; Matus, N R

    1994-02-15

    Skin disorders of pregnancy fall into three major groups: disorders due to physiologic changes, specific skin disorders of pregnancy, and skin tumors. Elevated levels of estrogen and progesterone stimulate melanogenesis, which causes hyperpigmentation, including melasma; high levels of circulating hormones also cause vascular changes and alter hair growth cycles. Specific skin disorders of pregnancy range from pruritic urticarial papules and plaques of pregnancy and pruritus gravidarum, which are fairly common, to pemphigus gestationis and impetigo herpetiformis, which are rare. Common skin tumors in pregnant women include pyogenic granuloma, which occurs primarily in the gingiva, and molluscum fibrosum gravidarum, or skin tags. While the effect of pregnancy on malignant melanoma continues to be disputed, recent studies indicate that long-term survival is close to that in the general population, although the disease-free interval is reduced.

  19. [Skin diseases of swine].

    PubMed

    von Altrock, A; Höltig, D

    2013-01-01

    Skin alterations can be caused by both environmental conditions and diseases of the organism. Some diseases may only manifest in the skin while others represent signs of a generalized infection. Regarding their origin, skin diseases can be divided into congenital, infectious, and nutritional disorders, and those resulting from housing scarcities. Additionally, there are skin diseases with unknown causes. Skin diseases in a swine herd can result in economic losses through decreased feed efficiency and growth rate and increased mortality. The knowledge of causes and symptoms as well as the selection of appropriate further laboratory investigations provide a valid diagnosis and enable a quick and effective therapy. This description of several skin diseases should provide a background.

  20. Skin protection for hairdressers.

    PubMed

    Skudlik, Christoph; John, Swen Malte

    2007-01-01

    The application of protective creams in the hairdressing trade forms part of a complex concept for the prevention of occupational skin disorders. To date, no comparative controlled intervention studies have been carried out using different skin-protective creams. Previously published skin protection plans concerning barrier creams for the hairdressing trade are fairly general or rudimentary, reflecting our still limited knowledge on the subject. Bioengineering studies have even demonstrated a paradoxical effect of a certain skin-protective foam designed for hairdressers. Regarding other barrier creams, a certain protective effect could however be shown in studies concerning exposure to wetness and detergents. Pre-exposition skin protection seems to be of particular relevance. Thus, in principle, the regular application of adequate skin protection creams can be recommended in the hairdressing trade, although the protective effect should not be overvalued.

  1. The skin microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Grice, Elizabeth A.; Segre, Julia A.

    2012-01-01

    The skin is the human body’s largest organ, colonized by a diverse milieu of microorganisms, most of which are harmless or even beneficial to their host. Colonization is driven by the ecology of the skin surface, which is highly variable depending on topographical location, endogenous host factors and exogenous environmental factors. The cutaneous innate and adaptive immune responses can modulate the skin microbiota, but the microbiota also functions in educating the immune system. The development of molecular methods to identify microorganisms has led to an emerging view of the resident skin bacteria as highly diverse and variable. An enhanced understanding of the skin microbiome is necessary to gain insight into microbial involvement in human skin disorders and to enable novel promicrobial and antimicrobial therapeutic approaches for their treatment. PMID:21407241

  2. Ultrasound skin imaging.

    PubMed

    Alfageme Roldán, F

    2014-12-01

    The interaction of high-frequency ultrasound waves with the skin provides the basis for noninvasive, fast, and accessible diagnostic imaging. This tool is increasingly used in skin cancer and inflammatory conditions as well as in cosmetic dermatology. This article reviews the basic principles of skin ultrasound and its applications in the different areas of dermatology. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y AEDV. All rights reserved.

  3. Neuroendocrinology of the skin

    PubMed Central

    Zmijewski, Michal A

    2011-01-01

    The concept on the skin neuro-endocrine has been formulated ten years ago, and recent advances in the field further strengthened this role. Thus, skin forms a bidirectional platform for a signal exchange with other peripheral organs, endocrine and immune systems or brain to enable rapid and selective responses to the environment in order to maintain local and systemic homeostasis. In this context, it is not surprising that the function of the skin is tightly regulated by systemic neuro-endocrine system. Skin cells and skin appendages not only respond to neuropeptides, steroids and other regulatory signals, but also actively synthesis variety of hormones. The stress responses within the skin are tightly regulated by locally synthesized factors and their receptor expression. There is growing evidence for alternative splicing playing an important role in stress signaling. Deregulation of the skin neuro-endocrine signaling can lead or/and be a marker of variety of skin diseases. The major problem in this area relates to their detailed mechanisms of crosstalk between skin and brain and between the local and global endocrine as well as immune systems. PMID:21519402

  4. Surfactants, skin cleansing protagonists.

    PubMed

    Corazza, M; Lauriola, M M; Zappaterra, M; Bianchi, A; Virgili, A

    2010-01-01

    The correct choice of cosmetic products and cleansers is very important to improve skin hydration, to provide moisturizing benefits and to minimize cutaneous damage caused by surfactants. In fact, surfactants may damage protein structures and solubilize lipids. Soaps, defined as the alkali salts of fatty acids, are the oldest surfactants and are quite aggressive. Syndets (synthetic detergents) vary in composition and surfactant types (anionic, cationic, amphotheric, non-ionic). These new skin cleansing products also contain preservatives, fragrances, and sometimes emollients, humectants and skin nutrients. We present a revision of the literature and discuss recent findings regarding skin cleansers.

  5. Physiology of skin.

    PubMed

    Greaves, M W

    1976-07-01

    One of Montagna's greatest contributions to study of the biology of the skin has been his demolition of the artificial walls that traditionally separated the histologist from the physiologist. He has shown that only by relating function with structure can we shed light on the workings of the skin. He has stressed the fallacy of studying a single structural or functional unit in isolation from others. The skin represents an organization of many different functional units, and physiology of skin is the study of this organization. My purpose is to make a personal commentary on the achievements, failures, and prospects of understanding some aspects of the organization of the functional units. Twenty-five years ago, the importance of relating skin to internal organs and systems received much attention. We have long been aware that skin sometimes reacts to internal disease, but only recently has the impact of skin disorders on the circulatory, renal, and gastrointestinal systems been recognized. As a result, our patients are now less likely to suffer from neglect of the whole which follows narrow over-specialized attention to the part. Increased interest in endocrine effects on the skin has revealed that several important physiologic activities of the skin are either partly or wholly regulated by hormones secreted by endocrine glands. Nevertheless, some physiologic activities in skin seems to be independent, their regulation being carried out by local mediating hormones. Other activities involve both central and local regulation. The nature and roles of these two control mechanisms and their interrelation constitute by far the most promising physiologic research in skin.

  6. Monte Carlo Method in optical diagnostics of skin and skin tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meglinski, Igor V.

    2003-12-01

    A novel Monte Carlo (MC) technique for photon migration through 3D media with the spatially varying optical properties is presented. The employed MC technique combines the statistical weighting variance reduction and real photon paths tracing schemes. The overview of the results of applications of the developed MC technique in optical/near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy, confocal microscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, OCT, Doppler flowmetry and Diffusing Wave Spectroscopy (DWS) are presented. In frame of the model skin represents as a complex inhomogeneous multi-layered medium, where the spatial distribution of blood and chromophores are variable within the depth. Taking into account variability of cells structure we represent the interfaces of skin layers as a quasi-random periodic wavy surfaces. The rough boundaries between the layers of different refractive indices play a significant role in the distribution of photons within the medium. The absorption properties of skin tissues in visible and NIR spectral region are estimated by taking into account the anatomical structure of skin as determined from histology, including the spatial distribution of blood vessels, water and melanin content. Model takes into account spatial distribution of fluorophores following the collagen fibers packing, whereas in epidermis and stratum corneum the distribution of fluorophores assumed to be homogeneous. Reasonable estimations for skin blood oxygen saturation and haematocrit are also included. The model is validated against analytic solution of the photon diffusion equation for semi-infinite homogeneous highly scattering medium. The results demonstrate that matching of the refractive index of the medium significantly improves the contrast and spatial resolution of the spatial photon sensitivity profile. It is also demonstrated that when model supplied with reasonable physical and structural parameters of biological tissues the results of skin reflectance spectra simulation

  7. HIV-1 detection by nested PCR and viral culture in fresh or cryopreserved postmortem skin: potential implications for skin handling and allografting.

    PubMed Central

    Gala, J L; Vandenbroucke, A T; Vandercam, B; Pirnay, J P; Delferrière, N; Burtonboy, G

    1997-01-01

    AIMS: To date, the risk relating to the handling or allografting of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infected postmortem skin remains hypothetical. While blood screening for HIV antibodies is still the key safety procedure to detect HIV infected cadavers, false negative results are a concern. Conversely, false positive results may hamper the collection of skin allografts. Accordingly, viral culture was used to clarify skin infectivity and the nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to assess the reliability of skin PCR testing. METHODS: Viral culture and nested PCR performed with gag and pol specific primers were investigated in cadaveric skin and blood from 12 HIV-1 infected patients. Samples were collected repeatedly between one and five days in seven patients. In most cases, analyses were performed on triplicate skin samples: fresh (n = 26); cryopreserved in 5% dimethylsulphoxide (n = 21), or cryopreserved in 30% glycerol (n = 26). RESULTS: HIV was isolated in two of 26 cultures of fresh skin specimens (8%), seven of 47 cryopreserved skin specimens (15%), and eight of 26 blood specimens (31%). The nested PCR detected HIV-1 in all skin samples (n = 73), regardless of the postmortem interval or cryopreservation. In blood, a positive signal was found in eight of 12 patients but two of them had discordant results on successive samples. CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest that nested PCR on postmortem skin samples can detect HIV more reliably than on blood. They also demonstrate the potential viral infectivity of fresh or stored skin postmortem samples in HIV infected patients. They underscore the need for caution during the handling of skin tissue from HIV infected cadavers and confirm the potential risk related to accidental allografting of HIV contaminated skin. Images PMID:9378813

  8. 21 CFR 884.1560 - Fetal blood sampler.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Fetal blood sampler. 884.1560 Section 884.1560... § 884.1560 Fetal blood sampler. (a) Identification. A fetal blood sampler is a device used to obtain fetal blood transcervically through an endoscope by puncturing the fetal skin with a short blade...

  9. 21 CFR 884.1560 - Fetal blood sampler.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Fetal blood sampler. 884.1560 Section 884.1560... § 884.1560 Fetal blood sampler. (a) Identification. A fetal blood sampler is a device used to obtain fetal blood transcervically through an endoscope by puncturing the fetal skin with a short blade...

  10. 21 CFR 884.1560 - Fetal blood sampler.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Fetal blood sampler. 884.1560 Section 884.1560... § 884.1560 Fetal blood sampler. (a) Identification. A fetal blood sampler is a device used to obtain fetal blood transcervically through an endoscope by puncturing the fetal skin with a short blade...

  11. 21 CFR 884.1560 - Fetal blood sampler.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Fetal blood sampler. 884.1560 Section 884.1560... § 884.1560 Fetal blood sampler. (a) Identification. A fetal blood sampler is a device used to obtain fetal blood transcervically through an endoscope by puncturing the fetal skin with a short blade...

  12. 21 CFR 884.1560 - Fetal blood sampler.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Fetal blood sampler. 884.1560 Section 884.1560... § 884.1560 Fetal blood sampler. (a) Identification. A fetal blood sampler is a device used to obtain fetal blood transcervically through an endoscope by puncturing the fetal skin with a short blade...

  13. Indirect Blood Pressure Measuring Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hum, L.; Cole, C. E.

    1973-01-01

    Design and performance of a blood pressure recording device for pediatric use are reported. A strain gage transducer with a copper-beryllium strip as force sensing element is used to monitor skin movements and to convert them into electrical signals proportional to those displacements. Experimental tests with this device in recording of force developed above the left femoral artery of a dog accurately produced a blood pressure curve.

  14. Indirect Blood Pressure Measuring Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hum, L.; Cole, C. E.

    1973-01-01

    Design and performance of a blood pressure recording device for pediatric use are reported. A strain gage transducer with a copper-beryllium strip as force sensing element is used to monitor skin movements and to convert them into electrical signals proportional to those displacements. Experimental tests with this device in recording of force developed above the left femoral artery of a dog accurately produced a blood pressure curve.

  15. Skin-PAMPA: a new method for fast prediction of skin penetration.

    PubMed

    Sinkó, Bálint; Garrigues, Teresa M; Balogh, György T; Nagy, Zsombor K; Tsinman, Oksana; Avdeef, Alex; Takács-Novák, Krisztina

    2012-04-11

    The goal of this study was to develop a quick, reliable, and cost-effective permeability model for predicting transdermal penetration of compounds. The Parallel Artificial Membrane Permeability Assay (PAMPA) was chosen for this purpose, as it already has been successfully used for estimating passive gastrointestinal absorption and blood-brain barrier permeability. To match the permeability of the rate-limiting barrier in human skin, synthetic certramides, which are analogs of the ceramides present in the stratum corneum, were selected for the skin-PAMPA model. The final skin-PAMPA membrane lipid mixture (certramide, free fatty acid, and cholesterol) was selected and optimized based on data from three different human skin databases and the final model was found to correlate well to all of the databases. The reproducibility of the skin-PAMPA model was investigated and compared to that of other PAMPA models. The homogeneity of the filter-impregnated lipid mixture membrane was confirmed with Raman microscopy. It was shown that skin-PAMPA is a quick and cost-effective research tool that can serve as a useful model of skin penetration in pharmaceutical and cosmetic research. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Appearance benefits of skin moisturization.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Z-X; DeLaCruz, J

    2011-02-01

    Skin hydration is essential for skin health. Moisturized skin is generally regarded as healthy and healthy looking. It is thus speculated that there may be appearance benefits of skin moisturization. This means that there are corresponding changes in the optical properties when skin is moisturized. The appearance of the skin is the result of light reflection, scattering and absorption at various skin layers of the stratum corneum, epidermis, dermis and beyond. The appearance benefits of skin moisturization are likely primarily due to the changes in the optical properties of the stratum corneum. We hypothesize that the major optical effect of skin moisturization is the decrease of light scattering at the skin surface, i.e., the stratum corneum. This decrease of surface scattering corresponds to an increase of light penetration into the deeper layers of the skin. An experiment was conducted to measure the corresponding change in skin spectral reflectance, the skin scattering coefficient and skin translucency with a change in skin hydration. In the experiment, skin hydration was decreased with the topical application of acetone and alcohol and increased with the topical application of known moisturizers and occlusives such as PJ. It was found that both the skin spectral reflectance and the skin scattering coefficient increased when the skin was dehydrated and decreased when the skin was hydrated. Skin translucency increased as the skin became moisturized. The results agree with the hypothesis that there is less light scattering at the skin surface and more light penetration into the deeper skin layers when the skin is moisturized. As a result, the skin appears darker, more pinkish and more translucent. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  17. Material Properties of Hagfish Skin, with Insights into Knotting Behaviors.

    PubMed

    Clark, Andrew J; Crawford, Callie H; King, Brooke D; Demas, Andrew M; Uyeno, Theodore A

    2016-06-01

    Hagfishes (Myxinidae) often integrate whole-body knotting movements with jawless biting motions when reducing large marine carcasses to ingestible items. Adaptations for these behaviors include complex arrangements of axial muscles and flexible, elongate bodies without vertebrae. Between the axial muscles and the hagfish skin is a large, blood-filled subcutaneous sinus devoid of the intricate, myoseptal tendon networks characteristic of the taut skins of other fishes. We propose that the loose-fitting skin of the hagfish facilitates the formation and manipulation of body knots, even if it is of little functional significance to steady swimming. Hagfish skin is a relatively thick, anisotropic, multilayered composite material comprising a superficial, thin, and slimy epidermis, a middle dermal layer densely packed with fibrous tissues, and a deep subdermal layer comprised of adipose tissue. Hagfish skin is stiffer when pulled longitudinally than circumferentially. Stress-strain data from uniaxial tensile tests show that hagfish skins are comparable in tensile strength and stiffness to the taut skins of elongate fishes that do not engage in knotting behaviors (e.g., sea lamprey and penpoint gunnel). Sheath-core-constructed ropes, which serve as more accurate models for hagfish bodies, demonstrate that loose skin (extra sheathing) enhances flexibility of the body (rope). Along with a loose-fitting skin, the morphologies of hagfish skin parallel those of moray eels, which are also known for generating and manipulating figure-eight-style body knots when struggling with prey. © 2016 Marine Biological Laboratory.

  18. Urea-containing moisturizers influence barrier properties of normal skin.

    PubMed

    Loden, M

    1996-02-01

    Moisturizers are used in the treatment of dry skin, both clinically and in cosmetic products. In the present study the influence of different moisturizers on the normal skin barrier properties was evaluated by measuring transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and skin capacitance. In addition, the skin reactivity to a topically applied surfactant, sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS), following the use of the moisturizers was examined. The skin reaction was assessed visually and by measuring TEWL and superficial blood flow. Treatment with two urea-containing moisturizers for 10 and 20 days decreased TEWL. The irritant reactions after exposure to SLS were also significantly decreased after prior treatment for 20 days with the urea-containing moisturizers. In a double-blind vehicle-controlled part of the study, urea was found to decrease the skin susceptibility to SLS after only three applications. However, this decrease in skin reactivity was not preceded by a reduction in TEWL. Skin capacitance increased after three applications of urea-containing moisturizers and was still increased after 10 days, but not after 20 days of this treatment. Treatment for 20 days with two moisturizers without urea did not influence either TEWL or the susceptibility to irritation from SLS, but it increased the skin capacitance significantly. The mechanism underlying these changes is not known. The lower degree of SLS-induced irritation in the skin treated previously with urea-containing moisturizers may be of clinical relevance in reducing contact dermatitis from irritant stimuli.

  19. Dark Skin No Shield from Deadly Skin Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... 166194.html Dark Skin No Shield From Deadly Skin Cancer Death rates from melanoma are higher for people ... deadly melanomas, an expert warns. This type of skin cancer can be affected by genetics and is far ...