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Sample records for skin cell cultures

  1. Skin or nail culture

    MedlinePlus

    Mucosal culture; Culture - skin; Culture - mucosal; Nail culture; Culture - fingernail; Fingernail culture ... There, it is placed in a special dish (culture). It is then watched to see if bacteria, ...

  2. Hyperbaric oxygen attenuates cell growth in skin fibroblasts cultured in a high-glucose medium.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hen-I; Chu, Shi-Jye; Perng, Wann-Cherng; Wu, Chin-Pyng; Lin, Zuei-Yin; Huang, Kun-Lun

    2008-01-01

    Hyperglycemia and hypoxia synergistically retard diabetic wound healing. We investigated the direct effect of hyperbaric and normobaric hyperoxia on skin fibroblasts cultured in a high-glucose medium. Detroit 551 human dermal fibroblasts cultured in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium containing d-glucose had reduced cell survival compared with cells grown in normal glucose medium; survival was 27.5+/-3.8% lower in 25 mM glucose and 30.6+/-3.7% lower in 50 mM glucose. Cell survival decreased because of inhibition of cell proliferation and enhanced cell death. Daily hyperbaric oxygen therapy at 2.5 atmosphere absolute for 90 minutes on 3 consecutive days reduced cell proliferation and increased cell death in normal cultured fibroblasts. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy and high-glucose medium had a synergistic effect and reduced survival by 37.6+/-4.4% (25 mM glucose) and 39.6+/-5.1% (50 mM glucose). The effects of hyperbaric oxygen and high-glucose medium were associated with overproduction of reactive oxygen species. Our results suggest that direct exposure of skin fibroblasts to hyperbaric oxygen affects cell growth and superimposes the toxic effect of high glucose. This cytotoxicity may be related to the production of reactive oxygen species in the fibroblasts. PMID:18638270

  3. Artificial SkinCulturing of Different Skin Cell Lines for Generating an Artificial Skin Substitute on Cross-Weaved Spider Silk Fibres

    PubMed Central

    Reimers, Kerstin; Kuhbier, Joern W.; Schäfer-Nolte, Franziska; Allmeling, Christina; Kasper, Cornelia; Vogt, Peter M.

    2011-01-01

    Background In the field of Plastic Reconstructive Surgery the development of new innovative matrices for skin repair is in urgent need. The ideal biomaterial should promote attachment, proliferation and growth of cells. Additionally, it should degrade in an appropriate time period without releasing harmful substances, but not exert a pathological immune response. Spider dragline silk from Nephila spp meets these demands to a large extent. Methodology/Principal Findings Native spider dragline silk, harvested directly out of Nephila spp spiders, was woven on steel frames. Constructs were sterilized and seeded with fibroblasts. After two weeks of cultivating single fibroblasts, keratinocytes were added to generate a bilayered skin model, consisting of dermis and epidermis equivalents. For the next three weeks, constructs in co-culture were lifted on an originally designed setup for air/liquid interface cultivation. After the culturing period, constructs were embedded in paraffin with an especially developed program for spidersilk to avoid supercontraction. Paraffin cross- sections were stained in Haematoxylin & Eosin (H&E) for microscopic analyses. Conclusion/Significance Native spider dragline silk woven on steel frames provides a suitable matrix for 3 dimensional skin cell culturing. Both fibroblasts and keratinocytes cell lines adhere to the spider silk fibres and proliferate. Guided by the spider silk fibres, they sprout into the meshes and reach confluence in at most one week. A well-balanced, bilayered cocultivation in two continuously separated strata can be achieved by serum reduction, changing the medium conditions and the cultivation period at the air/liquid interphase. Therefore spider silk appears to be a promising biomaterial for the enhancement of skin regeneration. PMID:21814557

  4. Differential susceptibility of primary cultured human skin cells to hypericin PDT in an in vitro model.

    PubMed

    Popovic, A; Wiggins, T; Davids, L M

    2015-08-01

    Skin cancer is the most common cancer worldwide, and its incidence rate in South Africa is increasing. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been shown to be an effective treatment modality, through topical administration, for treatment of non-melanoma skin cancers. Our group investigates hypericin-induced PDT (HYP-PDT) for the treatment of both non-melanoma and melanoma skin cancers. However, a prerequisite for effective cancer treatments is efficient and selective targeting of the tumoral cells with minimal collateral damage to the surrounding normal cells, as it is well established that cancer therapies have bystander effects on normal cells in the body, often causing undesirable side effects. The aim of this study was to investigate the cellular and molecular effects of HYP-PDT on normal primary human keratinocytes (Kc), melanocytes (Mc) and fibroblasts (Fb) in an in vitro tissue culture model which represented both the epidermal and dermal cellular compartments of human skin. Cell viability analysis revealed a differential cytotoxic response to a range of HYP-PDT doses in all the human skin cell types, showing that Fb (LD50=1.75μM) were the most susceptible to HYP-PDT, followed by Mc (LD50=3.5μM) and Kc (LD50>4μM HYP-PDT) These results correlated with the morphological analysis which displayed distinct morphological changes in Fb and Mc, 24h post treatment with non-lethal (1μM) and lethal (3μM) doses of HYP-PDT, but the highest HYP-PDT doses had no effect on Kc morphology. Fluorescent microscopy displayed cytoplasmic localization of HYP in all the 3 skin cell types and additionally, HYP was excluded from the nuclei in all the cell types. Intracellular ROS levels measured in Fb at 3μM HYP-PDT, displayed a significant 3.8 fold (p<0.05) increase in ROS, but no significant difference in ROS levels occurred in Mc or Kc. Furthermore, 64% (p<0.005) early apoptotic Fb and 20% (p<0.05) early apoptotic Mc were evident; using fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS), 24

  5. Conditioned Media From Adipose-Derived Stromal Cells Accelerates Healing in 3-Dimensional Skin Cultures.

    PubMed

    Collawn, Sherry S; Mobley, James A; Banerjee, N Sanjib; Chow, Louise T

    2016-04-01

    Wound healing involves a number of factors that results in the production of a "closed" wound. Studies have shown, in animal models, acceleration of wound healing with the addition of adipose-derived stromal cells (ADSC). The cause for the positive effect which these cells have on wound healing has not been elucidated. We have previously shown that addition of ADSC to the dermal equivalent in 3-dimensional skin cultures accelerates reepithelialization. We now demonstrate that conditioned media (CM) from cultured ADSC produced a similar rate of healing. This result suggests that a feedback from the 3-dimensional epithelial cultures to ADSC was not necessary to effect the accelerated reepithelialization. Mass spectrometry of CM from ADSC and primary human fibroblasts revealed differences in secretomes, some of which might have roles in the accelerating wound healing. Thus, the use of CM has provided some preliminary information on a possible mode of action. PMID:26954733

  6. Establishment, characterization, and toxicological application of loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta) primary skin fibroblast cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Webb, Sarah J; Zychowski, Gregory V; Bauman, Sandy W; Higgins, Benjamin M; Raudsepp, Terje; Gollahon, Lauren S; Wooten, Kimberly J; Cole, Jennifer M; Godard-Codding, Céline

    2014-12-16

    Pollution is a well-known threat to sea turtles but its impact is poorly understood. In vitro toxicity testing presents a promising avenue to assess and monitor the effects of environmental pollutants in these animals within the legal constraints of their endangered status. Reptilian cell cultures are rare and, in sea turtles, largely derived from animals affected by tumors. Here we describe the full characterization of primary skin fibroblast cell cultures derived from biopsies of multiple healthy loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta), and the subsequent optimization of traditional in vitro toxicity assays to reptilian cells. Characterization included validating fibroblast cells by morphology and immunocytochemistry, and optimizing culture conditions by use of growth curve assays with a fractional factorial experimental design. Two cell viability assays, MTT and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and an assay measuring cytochrome P4501A (CYP1A) expression by quantitative PCR were optimized in the characterized cells. MTT and LDH assays confirmed cytotoxicity of perfluorooctanoic acid at 500 μM following 72 and 96 h exposures while CYP1A5 induction was detected after 72 h exposure to 0.1-10 μM benzo[a]pyrene. This research demonstrates the validity of in vitro toxicity testing in sea turtles and highlights the need to optimize mammalian assays to reptilian cells. PMID:25384208

  7. Enhancing growth of cultured human skin cells using low-energy CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossman, Nili; Reuveni, Haim; Halevy, Sima; Lubart, Rachel

    1997-12-01

    In view of the versatility and usage of the CO2 laser as a too. in surgery and dermatology, we have studied its effect on enhancing proliferation of cultured skin cells using an attenuated CO2 laser. Exposure of cultured keratinocytes or fibroblasts to continuous wave or pulse mode irradiation enhanced thymidine incorporation by 1.4 to 1.7 folds, and cell number by 1.25 to 1.4 folds, measured 24 and 48 hours later, depending on the fluency applied. As expected, these effects were not suppressed by added antioxidants, indicating that the mechanism involved in this newly observed effect, differ from photosensitization by low energy visible and near IR lasers.

  8. Cell Death Induced on Cell Cultures and Nude Mouse Skin by Non-Thermal, Nanosecond-Pulsed Generated Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Bousquet, Guilhem; Gapihan, Guillaume; Starikovskaia, Svetlana M.; Rousseau, Antoine; Janin, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Non-thermal plasmas are gaseous mixtures of molecules, radicals, and excited species with a small proportion of ions and energetic electrons. Non-thermal plasmas can be generated with any high electro-magnetic field. We studied here the pathological effects, and in particular cell death, induced by nanosecond-pulsed high voltage generated plasmas homogeneously applied on cell cultures and nude mouse skin. In vitro, Jurkat cells and HMEC exhibited apoptosis and necrosis, in dose-dependent manner. In vivo, on nude mouse skin, cell death occurred for doses above 113 J/cm2 for the epidermis, 281 J/cm2 for the dermis, and 394 J/cm2 for the hypodermis. Using electron microscopy, we characterized apoptosis for low doses and necrosis for high doses. We demonstrated that these effects were not related to thermal, photonic or pH variations, and were due to the production of free radicals. The ability of cold plasmas to generate apoptosis on cells in suspension and, without any sensitizer, on precise skin areas, opens new fields of application in dermatology for extracorporeal blood cell treatment and the eradication of superficial skin lesions. PMID:24358244

  9. Transcriptomic analysis of cultured whale skin cells exposed to hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)].

    PubMed

    Pabuwal, Vagmita; Boswell, Mikki; Pasquali, Amanda; Wise, Sandra S; Kumar, Suresh; Shen, Yingjia; Garcia, Tzintzuni; Lacerte, Carolyne; Wise, John Pierce; Wise, John Pierce; Warren, Wesley; Walter, Ronald B

    2013-06-15

    Hexavalent chromium Cr(VI) is known to produce cytotoxic effects in humans and is a highly toxic environmental contaminant. Interestingly, it has been shown that free ranging sperm whales (Phyester macrocephalus) may have exceedingly high levels of Cr in their skin. Also, it has been demonstrated that skin cells from whales appear more resistant to both cytotoxicity and clastogenicity upon Cr exposure compared to human cells. However, the molecular genetic mechanisms employed in whale skin cells that might lead to Cr tolerance are unknown. In an effort to understand the underlying mechanisms of Cr(VI) tolerance and to illuminate global gene expression patterns modulated by Cr, we exposed whale skin cells in culture to varying levels of Cr(VI) (i.e., 0.0, 0.5, 1.0 and 5.0 μg/cm²) followed by short read (100 bp) next generation RNA sequencing (RNA-seq). RNA-seq reads from all exposures (≈280 million reads) were pooled to generate a de novo reference transcriptome assembly. The resulting whale reference assembly had 11K contigs and an N50 of 2954 bp. Using the reads from each dose (0.0, 0.5, 1.0 and 5.0 μg/cm²) we performed RNA-seq based gene expression analysis that identified 35 up-regulated genes and 19 down-regulated genes. The experimental results suggest that low dose exposure to Cr (1.0 μg/cm²) serves to induce up-regulation of oxidative stress response genes, DNA repair genes and cell cycle regulator genes. However, at higher doses (5.0 μg/cm²) the DNA repair genes appeared down-regulated while other genes that were induced suggest the initiation of cytotoxicity. The set of genes identified that show regulatory modulation at different Cr doses provide specific candidates for further studies aimed at determination of how whales exhibit resistance to Cr toxicity and what role(s) reactive oxygen species (ROS) may play in this process. PMID:23584427

  10. Tissue engineering of cultured skin substitutes.

    PubMed

    Horch, Raymund E; Kopp, Jürgen; Kneser, Ulrich; Beier, Justus; Bach, Alexander D

    2005-01-01

    Skin replacement has been a challenging task for surgeons ever since the introduction of skin grafts by Reverdin in 1871. Recently, skin grafting has evolved from the initial autograft and allograft preparations to biosynthetic and tissue-engineered living skin replacements. This has been fostered by the dramatically improved survival rates of major burns where the availability of autologous normal skin for grafting has become one of the limiting factors. The ideal properties of a temporary and a permanent skin substitute have been well defined. Tissue-engineered skin replacements: cultured autologous keratinocyte grafts, cultured allogeneic keratinocyte grafts, autologous/allogeneic composites, acellular biological matrices, and cellular matrices including such biological substances as fibrin sealant and various types of collagen, hyaluronic acid etc. have opened new horizons to deal with such massive skin loss. In extensive burns it has been shown that skin substitution with cultured grafts can be a life-saving measure where few alternatives exist. Future research will aim to create skin substitutes with cultured epidermis that under appropriate circumstances may provide a wound cover that could be just as durable and esthetically acceptable as conventional split-thickness skin grafts. Genetic manipulation may in addition enhance the performance of such cultured skin substitutes. If cell science, molecular biology, genetic engineering, material science and clinical expertise join their efforts to develop optimized cell culture techniques and synthetic or biological matrices then further technical advances might well lead to the production of almost skin like new tissue-engineered human skin products resembling natural human skin. PMID:16202208

  11. Squamous cell skin cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... cell; NMSC - squamous cell; Squamous cell skin cancer; Squamous cell carcinoma of the skin ... squamous cell cancer is called Bowen disease (or squamous cell carcinoma in situ). This type does not spread to ...

  12. Role of PKC isozymes in low-power light-stimulated proliferation of cultured skin cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossman, Nili; Kleitman, Vered; Meller, Julia; Kaufmann, Roland; Akgun, Nermin; Ruck, Angelika; Livneh, Etta; Lubart, Rachel

    2000-11-01

    Exposure of cultured skin cells to low power visible light leads to a transiently stimulated proliferation. Facilitation of this response requires the presence of active PKC, elevation of intracellular calcium, and involves reactive oxygen species. In the present study, the role of PKC(alpha) and PCK(eta) was examined using paired murine fibroblasts, differing in the level of these isozymes expression. The ability of the cells to respond to low power UVA light or HeNe laser by stimulated proliferation was correlated with an active state or overexpression of PKC(alpha) , but not PKC(eta) . A parallel response was obtained in cells that were loaded with A1PcS4 before photosensitization. Whenever this latter treatment caused a light-stimulated inhibition, it was accompanied by the intracellular calcium and photosensitizer dynamics typical of the effect of PDT on rate epithelial cells. Accordingly, added antioxidants that suppressed light-stimulated proliferation also suppressed this light-stimulated inhibition. The model systems employed in this study are the first to demonstrate the specific effect of PKC isozymes on light-stimulated proliferation, in relation to oxidative stress, and indicate their dual role in light-tissue interaction.

  13. Quantitative proteomic analysis of cultured skin fibroblast cells derived from patients with triglyceride deposit cardiomyovasculopathy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Triglyceride deposit cardiomyovasculopathy (TGCV) is a rare disease, characterized by the massive accumulation of triglyceride (TG) in multiple tissues, especially skeletal muscle, heart muscle and the coronary artery. TGCV is caused by mutation of adipose triglyceride lipase, which is an essential molecule for the hydrolysis of TG. TGCV is at high risk for skeletal myopathy and heart dysfunction, and therefore premature death. Development of therapeutic methods for TGCV is highly desirable. This study aims to discover specific molecules responsible for TGCV pathogenesis. Methods To identify differentially expressed proteins in TGCV patient cells, the stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) method coupled with LC-MS/MS was performed using skin fibroblast cells derived from two TGCV patients and three healthy volunteers. Altered protein expression in TGCV cells was confirmed using the selected reaction monitoring (SRM) method. Microarray-based transcriptome analysis was simultaneously performed to identify changes in gene expression in TGCV cells. Results Using SILAC proteomics, 4033 proteins were quantified, 53 of which showed significantly altered expression in both TGCV patient cells. Twenty altered proteins were chosen and confirmed using SRM. SRM analysis successfully quantified 14 proteins, 13 of which showed the same trend as SILAC proteomics. The altered protein expression data set was used in Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA), and significant networks were identified. Several of these proteins have been previously implicated in lipid metabolism, while others represent new therapeutic targets or markers for TGCV. Microarray analysis quantified 20743 transcripts, and 252 genes showed significantly altered expression in both TGCV patient cells. Ten altered genes were chosen, 9 of which were successfully confirmed using quantitative RT-PCR. Biological networks of altered genes were analyzed using an IPA search. Conclusions We

  14. DNA damage in wounded, hypoxic and acidotic human skin fibroblast cell cultures after low laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins Evans, D.; Mbene, A.; Zungu, I.; Houreld, N.; Abrahamse, H.

    2009-02-01

    Phototherapy has become more popular and widely used in the treatment of a variety of medical conditions. To ensure sound results as evidence of its effectiveness, well designed experiments must be conducted when determining the effect of phototherapy. Cell culture models such as hypoxic, acidotic and wounded cell cultures simulating different disease conditions including ischemic heart disease, diabetes and wound healing were used to determine the effect of laser irradiation on the genetic integrity of the cell. Even though phototherapy has been found to be beneficial in a wide spectrum of conditions, it has been shown to induce DNA damage. However, this damage appears to be repairable. The risk lies in the fact that phototherapy may help the medical condition initially but damage DNA at the same time leaving undetected damage that may result in late onset, more severe, induced medical conditions including cancer. Human skin fibroblasts were cultured and used to induce a wound (by the central scratch model), hypoxic (by incubation in an anaerobic jar, 95% N2 and 5% O2) and acidotic (reducing the pH of the media to 6.7) conditions. Different models were irradiated using a Helium-Neon (632.8 nm) laser with a power density of 2.07 mW/cm2 and a fluence of 5 J/cm2 or 16 J/cm2. The effect of the irradiation was determined using the Comet assay 1 and 24 h after irradiation. In addition, the Comet assay was performed with the addition of formamidopyrimidine glycosylase (FPG) obviating strand brakes in oxidized bases at a high fluence of 16 J/cm2. A significant increase in DNA damage was seen in all three injured models at both 1 and 24 h post-irradiation when compared to the normal un-injured cells. However, when compared to non-irradiated controls the acidotic model showed a significant decrease in DNA damage 24 h after irradiation indicating the possible induction of cellular DNA repair mechanisms. When wounded cells were irradiated with higher fluences of 16 J/cm2

  15. Isolation and culture of adult epithelial stem cells from human skin.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhiru; Draheim, Kyle; Lyle, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    The homeostasis of all self-renewing tissues is dependent on adult stem cells. As undifferentiated stem cells undergo asymmetric divisions, they generate daughter cells that retain the stem cell phenotype and transit-amplifying cells (TA cells) that migrate from the stem cell niche, undergo rapid proliferation and terminally differentiate to repopulate the tissue. Epithelial stem cells have been identified in the epidermis, hair follicle, and intestine as cells with a high in vitro proliferative potential and as slow-cycling label-retaining cells in vivo (1-3). Adult, tissue-specific stem cells are responsible for the regeneration of the tissues in which they reside during normal physiologic turnover as well as during times of stress (4-5). Moreover, stem cells are generally considered to be multi-potent, possessing the capacity to give rise to multiple cell types within the tissue (6). For example, rodent hair follicle stem cells can generate epidermis, sebaceous glands, and hair follicles (7-9). We have shown that stem cells from the human hair follicle bulge region exhibit multi-potentiality (10). Stem cells have become a valuable tool in biomedical research, due to their utility as an in vitro system for studying developmental biology, differentiation, tumorigenesis and for their possible therapeutic utility. It is likely that adult epithelial stem cells will be useful in the treatment of diseases such as ectodermal dysplasias, monilethrix, Netherton syndrome, Menkes disease, hereditary epidermolysis bullosa and alopecias (11-13). Additionally, other skin problems such as burn wounds, chronic wounds and ulcers will benefit from stem cell related therapies (14,15). Given the potential for reprogramming of adult cells into a pluripotent state (iPS cells)(16,17), the readily accessible and expandable adult stem cells in human skin may provide a valuable source of cells for induction and downstream therapy for a wide range of disease including diabetes and

  16. Derivation and characterization of cell cultures from the skin of the Indo-Pacific humpback dolphin Sousa chinensis.

    PubMed

    Jin, Wei; Jia, Kuntong; Yang, Lili; Chen, Jialin; Wu, Yuping; Yi, Meisheng

    2013-06-01

    The marine mammalian Indo-Pacific humpback dolphin, once widely lived in waters of the Indian to western Pacific oceans, has become an endangered species. The individual number of this dolphin has significantly declined in recent decades, which raises the concern of extinction. Direct concentration on laboratorial conservation of the genetic and cell resources should be paid to this marine species. Here, we report the successful derivation of cell lines form the skin of Indo-Pacific humpback dolphin. The cell cultures displayed the characteristics of fibroblast in morphology and grew rapidly at early passages, but showed obvious growth arrest at higher passages. The karyotype of the cells consisted of 42 autosomes and sex chromosomes X and Y. The immortalized cell lines obtained by forced expression of the SV40 large T-antigen were capable of proliferation at high rate in long-term culture. Immortalization and long-term culture did not cause cytogenetically observable abnormality in the karyotype. The cell type of the primary cultures and immortalized cell lines were further characterized as fibroblasts by the specific expression of vimentin. Gene transfer experiments showed that exogenetic genes could be efficiently delivered into the cells by both plasmid transfection and lentivirus infection. The cells derived from the skin of the Indo-Pacific humpback dolphin may serve as a useful in vitro system for studies on the effects of environmental pollutants and pathogens in habitats on the dolphin animals. More importantly, because of their high proliferation rate and susceptibility to lentivirus, these cells are potential ideal materials for generation of induced pluripotent stem cells. PMID:23661087

  17. In vitro growth, cytopathic effects and clearance of monolayers by clinical isolates of Balamuthia mandrillaris in human skin cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Yera, Hélène; Dupouy-Camet, Jean; Jackson, Jonathan W; Sriram, Rama; Sweat, Stacey; Goldstein, Jason M; Visvesvara, Govinda S

    2015-09-01

    Balamuthia mandrillaris is a free-living ameba (FLA) that has been isolated or its DNA identified in soil, dust and water. It causes a fatal central nervous system infection in humans and animals. Although it is environmental as Acanthamoeba and Naegleria fowleri, the two other free-living amebae that also cause CNS infections in humans and other animals, Balamuthia does not feed on bacteria as the other FLA. In the laboratory, it can be grown on a variety of mammalian cell cultures. In this study we examined the ability of three different Balamuthia isolates to grow on several different human skin cell cultures including the WT/A keratinocyte cell cultures. A corneal isolate of Acanthamoeba castellanii was used for comparison. PMID:25980370

  18. Use of primary cell cultures to measure the late effects in the skins of rhesus monkeys irradiated with protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, A. B.; Wood, D. H.; Lett, J. T.

    Previous pilot investigations of the uses of primary cell cultures to study late damage in stem cells of the skin of the New Zealand white (NZW) rabbit and the rhesus monkey /1-3/, have been extended to individual monkeys exposed to 55 MeV protons. Protons of this energy have a larger range in tissue of (~2.6 cm) than the 32 MeV protons (~0.9 cm) to which the animals in our earlier studies had been exposed. Although the primary emphases in the current studies were improvement and simplification in the techniques and logistics of transportation of biopsies to a central analytical facility, comparison of the quantitative measurements obtained thus far for survival of stem cells in the skins from animals irradiated 21 years ago reveals that the effects of both proton energies are similar.

  19. Epidermal Stem Cells Cultured on Collagen-Modified Chitin Membrane Induce In Situ Tissue Regeneration of Full-Thickness Skin Defects in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yan; Dai, Libing; Li, Xiaojian; Liang, Rong; Guan, Guangxiong; Zhang, Zhi; Cao, Wenjuan; Liu, Zhihe; Mei, Shirley; Liang, Weiguo; Qin, Shennan; Xu, Jiake; Chen, Honghui

    2014-01-01

    A Large scale of full-thickness skin defects is lack of auto-grafts and which requires the engineered skin substitutes for repair and regeneration. One major obstacle in skin tissue engineering is to expand epidermal stem cells (ESCs) and develop functional substitutes. The other one is the scaffold of the ESCs. Here, we applied type I collagen-modified chitin membrane to form collagen-chitin biomimetic membrane (C-CBM), which has been proved to have a great biocompatibility and degraded totally when it was subcutaneously transplanted into rat skin. ESCs were cultured, and the resulting biofilm was used to cover full-thickness skin defects in nude mice. The transplantation of ESCs- collagen- chitn biomimetic membrane (ESCs-C-CBM) has achieved in situ skin regeneration. In nude mice, compared to controls with collagen-chitin biomimetic membrane (C-CBM) only, the ESCs-C-CBM group had significantly more dermatoglyphs on the skin wound 10 w after surgery, and the new skin was relatively thick, red and elastic. In vivo experiments showed obvious hair follicle cell proliferation in the full-thickness skin defect. Stem cell markers examination showed active ESCs in repair and regeneration of skin. The results indicate that the collagen-modified chitin membrane carry with ESCs has successfully regenerated the whole skin with all the skin appendages and function. PMID:24516553

  20. A yeast glycolipid biosurfactant, mannosylerythritol lipid, shows potential moisturizing activity toward cultured human skin cells: the recovery effect of MEL-A on the SDS-damaged human skin cells.

    PubMed

    Morita, Tomotake; Kitagawa, Masaru; Suzuki, Michiko; Yamamoto, Shuhei; Sogabe, Atsushi; Yanagidani, Shusaku; Imura, Tomohiro; Fukuoka, Tokuma; Kitamoto, Dai

    2009-01-01

    Mannosylerythritol lipids (MELs) are produced in large amounts from renewable vegetable oils by Pseudozyma antarctica, and are the most promising biosurfactants known due to its versatile interfacial and biochemical actions. In order to broaden the application in cosmetics and pharmaceuticals, the skin care property of MEL-A, the major component of MELs, was investigated using a three-dimensional cultured human skin model. The skin cells were cultured and treated with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) solution of 1 wt%, and the effects of different lipids on the SDS-damaged cells were then evaluated on the basis of the cell viability. The viability of the damaged cells was markedly recovered by the addition of MEL-A in a dose-dependent manner. Compared to the control, MEL-A solutions of 5 wt% and 10 wt% gave the recovery rate of 73% and 91%, respectively, while ceramide solution of 1 wt% gave the rate of over 100%. This revealed that MEL-A shows a ceramide-like moisturizing activity toward the skin cells. Considering the drawbacks of natural ceramides, namely limited amount and high production cost, the yeast biosurfactants should have a great potential as a novel moisturizer for treating the damaged skin. PMID:19915321

  1. Phenolic compounds of Chromolaena odorata protect cultured skin cells from oxidative damage: implication for cutaneous wound healing.

    PubMed

    Phan, T T; Wang, L; See, P; Grayer, R J; Chan, S Y; Lee, S T

    2001-12-01

    Extracts from the leaves of Chromolaena odorata have been shown to be beneficial for treatment of wounds. The crude ethanol extract of the plant had been demonstrated to be a powerful antioxidant to protect fibroblasts and keratinocytes in vitro. In this study, the most active compounds were fractionated and identified from the crude extract using liquid chromatography coupled with UV spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The antioxidant effects of purified fractions on cultured fibroblasts and keratinocytes were investigated using colorimetric and lactate hydrogenase release assay. The results showed that the phenolic acids present (protocatechuic, p-hydroxybenzoic, p-coumaric, ferulic and vanillic acids) and complex mixtures of lipophilic flavonoid aglycones (flavanones, flavonols, flavones and chalcones) were major and powerful antioxidants to protect cultured skin cells against oxidative damage. In conclusion, the extract from C odorata contains a mixture of powerful antioxidant compounds that may be one of potential mechanism contributing to enhanced wound healing. PMID:11767105

  2. Ultraviolet irradiation increases the sensitivity of cultured human skin cells to cadmium probably through the inhibition of metallothionein gene expression.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Hirotomo; Murata, Mie; Suzuki, Kaoru; Koizumi, Shinji

    2004-11-01

    We previously developed an apparatus that can irradiate cultured cells with monochromatic ultraviolet (UV) rays to exactly assess the biological effects of UV components on mammalian cells. Using this device, we studied the effects of UV in and near the UVB region on the general as well as specific protein synthesis of the human skin-derived NB1RGB cells. We found that Cd-induced synthesis of metallothioneins (MTs), which are the proteins involved in the protection against heavy metals and oxidative stress, is inhibited by UV at 280 nm more extensively than total protein synthesis. Such an inhibition was observed when MTs were induced by different inducers such as Cd, Zn, and dexamethasone in three human cell lines, indicating that it is not an event specific to a certain inducer or a certain cell type. By contrast, UV at 300 or 320 nm showed only a marginal effect. UV at 280 nm was likely to block MT gene transcription because Cd-induced increase of MT mRNA was strongly inhibited by irradiation. Cd induction of 70-kDa heat shock protein mRNA was also inhibited by UV irradiation, suggesting that the expression of inducible genes are commonly sensitive to UV. Furthermore, we observed that the irradiation of UV at 280 nm renders NB1RGB cells extremely susceptible to Cd, probably due to the reduced MT synthesis. These observations strongly suggest that UV at 280 nm severely damages cellular inducible protective functions, warning us of a new risk of UV exposure. PMID:15504461

  3. Own Experience From The Use Of A Substitute Of An Allogeneic Acellular Dermal Matrix Revitalized With In Vitro Cultured Skin Cells In Clinical Practice.

    PubMed

    Łabuś, Wojciech; Kawecki, Marek; Glik, Justyna; Maj, Mariusz; Kitala, Diana; Misiuga, Marcelina; Klama-Baryła, Agnieszka; Kraut, Małgorzata; Nowak, Mariusz

    2015-10-01

    As a result of the removal of cells from human allogeneic dermis, a collagen scaffold is obtained, which can be populated de novo with autologous/allogeneic skin cells and transplanted onto the area of skin loss. The optimal method for production of acellular dermal matrices (ADM) has been selected. Three female patients (a mean age of 54 years) were subjected to the transplantation of either autologous or allogeneic keratinocytes and fibroblasts into the holes of acellular dermal matrix (ADM) mesh graft. The method for burn wound treatment based on the use of a viable dermal-epidermal skin substitute (based on ADM and in vitro cultured fibroblasts and keratinocytes) may be the optimal method of burn treatment. PMID:26812752

  4. Characterization of A Three-Dimensional Organotypic Co-Culture Skin Model for Epidermal Differentiation of Rat Adipose-Derived Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ghanavati, Zeinab; Orazizadeh, Mahmoud; Bayati, Vahid; Abbaspour, Mohammad Reza; Khorsandi, Layasadat; Mansouri, Esrafil; Neisi, Niloofar

    2016-01-01

    Objective The organotypic co-culture is a well-known technique to examine cellular interactions and their roles in stem cell proliferation and differentiation. This study aims to evaluate the effects of dermal fibroblasts (DFs) on epidermal differentiation of adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) using a three-dimensional (3D) organotypic co- culture technique. Materials and Methods In this experimental research study, rat DFs and ASCs were isolated and cultured separately on electrospun polycaprolactone (PCL) matrices. The PCL matrices seeded by ASCs were superimposed on to the matrices seeded by DFs in order to create a 3D organotypic co-culture. In the control groups, PCL matrices seeded by ASCs were placed on matrices devoid of DFs. After 10 days, we assessed the expressions of keratinocyte-related genes by real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and expression of pan-cytokeratin protein by immunofluorescence in the differentiated keratinocyte-like cells from co- culture and control groups. Keratinocyte-like cell morphologies were also observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results The early, intermediate, and terminal differentiation keratinocyte markers-Cytokeratin14, Filaggrin, and Involucrin significantly expressed in the co-culture groups com- pared to the control ones (P<0.05). We observed pan-cytokeratin in keratinocyte-like cells of both groups by immunofluorescence. SEM observation of the co-culture groups showed that the differentiated keratinocyte-like cells developed a polygonal cobblestone shape, considered characteristic of keratinocytes. Conclusion The 3D organotypic co-culture bilayered construct that consisted of DFs and ASCs was an effective technique for epidermal differentiation of ASCs. This co-culture might be useful for epidermal differentiation of stem cells for future applications in skin regeneration. PMID:27602310

  5. Basal cell skin cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... occur on skin that is regularly exposed to sunlight or other ultraviolet radiation. This type of skin ... skin cancer is to reduce your exposure to sunlight . Always use sunscreen: Apply sunscreen with sun protection ...

  6. Effects of ambient oxygen concentration on the growth and antioxidant defenses of of human cell cultures established from fetal and postnatal skin.

    PubMed

    Balin, Arthur K; Pratt, Loretta; Allen, R G

    2002-02-01

    Oxygen toxicity is believed to arise from changes in the rates at which cells generate reactive oxygen species (ROS). Sensitivity to hyperoxia has been postulated to depend on levels of antioxidant defense. Human cells obtained from fetal tissues have lower antioxidant defenses than those obtained from adult tissue. The present study was performed to determine whether the differences in fetal and adult antioxidant defense levels modulated their responses to changes in the ambient oxygen concentration. Our results demonstrate that oxygen modulates the proliferation of human fetal and adult skin fibroblasts in a similar fashion. In general, skin fibroblasts grew better at approximately 31 mm Hg, regardless of donor age. Manganese superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase activities were lower in fetal cells than in adult fibroblasts. Copper/zinc superoxide dismutase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase were similar in fetal and postnatal tissues and were unaltered appreciably by hyperoxic exposure. Glutathione concentration increased at higher oxygen tensions; however, the increase was much greater in fetal cells than in cultures derived from adult skin. These observations demonstrate that the capacity of fetal and adult cells to cope with oxidative stress, while similar, result from distinct mechanisms. PMID:11827751

  7. Squamous cell skin cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... occur on skin that is regularly exposed to sunlight or other ultraviolet radiation. The earliest form of ... skin cancer is to reduce your exposure to sunlight . Always use sunscreen: Apply sunscreen with sun protection ...

  8. Langerhans Cells in Porcine Skin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Langerhans cells (LCs) are resident dendritic cells (DCs) of the skin possessing intracellular Birbeck granules (BGs). Langerin, a surface protein unique to LCs, can be internalized resulting in BG formation. The standard for characterizing DCs as Langerhans cells is expression of the protein, lange...

  9. Advances in cell culture

    SciTech Connect

    Maramorosch, K. )

    1987-01-01

    This book presents papers on advances in cell culture. Topics covered include: Genetic changes in the influenza viruses during growth in cultured cells; The biochemistry and genetics of mosquito cells in culture; and Tree tissue culture applications.

  10. Specific high-affinity binding of high density lipoproteins to cultured human skin fibroblasts and arterial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Biesbroeck, R; Oram, J F; Albers, J J; Bierman, E L

    1983-03-01

    Binding of human high density lipoproteins (HDL, d = 1.063-1.21) to cultured human fibroblasts and human arterial smooth muscle cells was studied using HDL subjected to heparin-agarose affinity chromatography to remove apoprotein (apo) E and B. Saturation curves for binding of apo E-free 125I-HDL showed at least two components: low-affinity nonsaturable binding and high-affinity binding that saturated at approximately 20 micrograms HDL protein/ml. Scatchard analysis of high-affinity binding of apo E-free 125I-HDL to normal fibroblasts yielded plots that were significantly linear, indicative of a single class of binding sites. Saturation curves for binding of both 125I-HDL3 (d = 1.125-1.21) and apo E-free 125I-HDL to low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor-negative fibroblasts also showed high-affinity binding that yielded linear Scatchard plots. On a total protein basis, HDL2 (d = 1.063-1.10), HDL3 and very high density lipoproteins (VHDL, d = 1.21-1.25) competed as effectively as apo E-free HDL for binding of apo E-free 125I-HDL to normal fibroblasts. Also, HDL2, HDL3, and VHDL competed similarly for binding of 125I-HDL3 to LDL receptor-negative fibroblasts. In contrast, LDL was a weak competitor for HDL binding. These results indicate that both human fibroblasts and arterial smooth muscle cells possess specific high affinity HDL binding sites. As indicated by enhanced LDL binding and degradation and increased sterol synthesis, apo E-free HDL3 promoted cholesterol efflux from fibroblasts. These effects also saturated at HDL3 concentrations of 20 micrograms/ml, suggesting that promotion of cholesterol efflux by HDL is mediated by binding to the high-affinity cell surface sites. PMID:6826722

  11. Xenobiotic metabolism capacities of human skin in comparison with a 3D-epidermis model and keratinocyte-based cell culture as in vitro alternatives for chemical testing: phase II enzymes.

    PubMed

    Götz, Christine; Pfeiffer, Roland; Tigges, Julia; Ruwiedel, Karsten; Hübenthal, Ulrike; Merk, Hans F; Krutmann, Jean; Edwards, Robert J; Abel, Josef; Pease, Camilla; Goebel, Carsten; Hewitt, Nicola; Fritsche, Ellen

    2012-05-01

    The 7th Amendment to the EU Cosmetics Directive prohibits the use of animals in cosmetic testing for certain endpoints, such as genotoxicity. Therefore, skin in vitro models have to replace chemical testing in vivo. However, the metabolic competence neither of human skin nor of alternative in vitro models has so far been fully characterized, although skin is the first-pass organ for accidentally or purposely (cosmetics and pharmaceuticals) applied chemicals. Thus, there is an urgent need to understand the xenobiotic-metabolizing capacities of human skin and to compare these activities to models developed to replace animal testing. We have measured the activity of the phase II enzymes glutathione S-transferase, UDP-glucuronosyltransferase and N-acetyltransferase in ex vivo human skin, the 3D epidermal model EpiDerm 200 (EPI-200), immortalized keratinocyte-based cell lines (HaCaT and NCTC 2544) and primary normal human epidermal keratinocytes. We show that all three phase II enzymes are present and highly active in skin as compared to phase I. Human skin, therefore, represents a more detoxifying than activating organ. This work systematically compares the activities of three important phase II enzymes in four different in vitro models directly to human skin. We conclude from our studies that 3D epidermal models, like the EPI-200 employed here, are superior over monolayer cultures in mimicking human skin xenobiotic metabolism and thus better suited for dermatotoxicity testing. PMID:22509834

  12. Functional testing of topical skin formulations using an optimised ex vivo skin organ culture model.

    PubMed

    Sidgwick, G P; McGeorge, D; Bayat, A

    2016-07-01

    A number of equivalent-skin models are available for investigation of the ex vivo effect of topical application of drugs and cosmaceuticals onto skin, however many have their drawbacks. With the March 2013 ban on animal models for cosmetic testing of products or ingredients for sale in the EU, their utility for testing toxicity and effect on skin becomes more relevant. The aim of this study was to demonstrate proof of principle that altered expression of key gene and protein markers could be quantified in an optimised whole tissue biopsy culture model. Topical formulations containing green tea catechins (GTC) were investigated in a skin biopsy culture model (n = 11). Punch biopsies were harvested at 3, 7 and 10 days, and analysed using qRT-PCR, histology and HPLC to determine gene and protein expression, and transdermal delivery of compounds of interest. Reduced gene expression of α-SMA, fibronectin, mast cell tryptase, mast cell chymase, TGF-β1, CTGF and PAI-1 was observed after 7 and 10 days compared with treated controls (p < 0.05). Histological analysis indicated a reduction in mast cell tryptase and chymase positive cell numbers in treated biopsies compared with untreated controls at day 7 and day 10 (p < 0.05). Determination of transdermal uptake indicated that GTCs were detected in the biopsies. This model could be adapted to study a range of different topical formulations in both normal and diseased skin, negating the requirement for animal models in this context, prior to study in a clinical trial environment. PMID:27086034

  13. Basal cell skin cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... occur in younger people who have had extensive sun exposure. You are more likely to get basal cell ... severe sunburns early in life Long-term daily sun exposure (such as the sun exposure received by people ...

  14. Enhanced isolation of lymphoid cells from human skin.

    PubMed

    Salimi, M; Subramaniam, S; Selvakumar, T; Wang, X; Zemenides, S; Johnson, D; Ogg, G

    2016-07-01

    Studying skin immune cells under various pathophysiological conditions is vital for understanding the nature of cutaneous inflammatory responses. Available methods of isolating cells from the skin have relatively low yield or require in vitro culture. To increase the effective isolation of skin immune cells, we used collagenase P treatment. The number of T cells obtained ex vivo using this technique was dramatically greater than that obtained with conventional methods, without the need for long-term culture. The phenotype and function of isolated cells were comparable with those of cells isolated by EDTA treatment. Collagenase P-based methods will enhance the ability to investigate lymphoid cell function in both healthy and diseased skin. PMID:26805629

  15. Organ culture of mammalian skin and the effects of ultraviolet light and testosterone on melanocyte morphology and function.

    PubMed

    Glimcher, M E; Garcia, R I; Szabó, G

    1978-05-01

    Scrotal skin of black Long-Evans rats and human thigh skin were maintained in vitro as organ cultures for as long as 14 days, and examined histologically using the combined skin splitting and Dopa techniques. Selected rat skin cultures received testosterone in the culture medium and/or were irradiated with ultraviolet light (290-320 nm UVL). With increased time in culture, scrotal melanocytes round up and there is an increase in epidermal pigmentation. Human skin behaves similarly; after eight days in vitro human melanocytes also become rounded, but remain strongly Dopa-positive. Addition of exogenous testosterone to cultured rat skin maintains dendritic morphology of melanocytes, but cell body size is still reduced. UVL irradiation stimulates melanocytes in rat skin cultures, maintaining their dendritic morphology and increasing epidermal and dermal pigmentation. Cultured skin receiving both UVL and testosterone illustrates a synergistic effect. Electron microscopic examination of cultured rat skin shows the presence of large melanosome complexes in keratinocytes, much larger than those found in vivo. Melanocytes appear to be active as they contain an extensive Golgi zone, rough endoplasmic reticulum, and melanosomes in various stages of formation. Dermis contained many dermal melanocytes and macrophages laden with melanosomes, correlating with the increased visible dermal pigmentation in vitro. This UVL stimulation of melanocytes in our skin organ cultures contrasts with the lack of melanogenic stimulation found in melanoma cell cultures. Our findings suggest that the intact epidermal melanin unit may be necessary for UVL stimulation of melanocytes. PMID:641488

  16. Studies in human skin epithelial cell carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Lehman, T.A.

    1987-01-01

    Metabolism and DNA adduct formation of benzo(a)pyrene (BP) by human epidermal keratinocytes pretreated with inhibitors or inducer of cytochrame P450 was studied. To study DNA adduct analysis, cultures were pretreated as described above, and then treated with non-radiolabeled BP. DNA was prepared from these cultures, digested to the nucleotide level, and /sup 32/P-postlabeled for adduct analysis. Cultures pretreated with BHA, 7,8-BF or disulfiralm formed significantly fewer BPDE I-dB adducts than non-pretreated cultures, while cultures pretreated with MeBHA formed more BPDE-I-dG adducts. MeBHA increased BP activation and adduct formation inhuman keratinocyte in cultures by inducing a specific isoenzyme of cytochrome P450 which preferentially increases the oxidative metabolism of BP to 7,8 diol BP and 7,8 diol BP to BPDE I. To approximate an in vivo human system, metabolism of BPDE I by human skin xenografts treated with cell cycles modulators was studied. When treated with BPDE I, specific carcinogen-DNA adducts were formed. Separation and identification of these adducts by the /sup 32/P-postlabeling technique indicated that the 7R- and 7S-BPDE I-dG adducts were the major adducts.

  17. Modulation of androgen receptor protein by culture conditions of human skin fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Palma, Marcela M; Fernandez, Mireya; Vivanco, Ximena; Pino, Ana M

    2002-10-01

    Cultures of skin fibroblasts show variation of androgen binding with culture conditions; binding variations are usually avoided by using confluent cultures. In this work, we analysed the effect of cell density and mitogenic agents on the level of androgen receptor (AR) of cultured human skin fibroblasts. Results demonstrated that in cultures of human skin fibroblasts, cellular binding of dihydrotestosterone was higher in cells grown at low than at high cell density. The reduction in binding resulted from a decrease in the number of high affinity receptors and not from a change in receptor affinity. Immunocytochemistry for AR showed greater staining intensity in cells grown at low than at high cell density. Additionally, immunoblot analysis demonstrated more AR protein in low cell density cultures. On the other hand, it was observed that cells grown at low cell density showed diminished androgen binding capacity after 24 h of treatment with insulin-like growth factor (IGF-l), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), epidermal growth factor (EGF), or granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF); this effect of growth factors was not observed in cells grown at high cell density. In conclusion, we found that cell density of cultures and mitogenic agents can regulate AR binding activity in human fibroblasts. While we do not yet know how changes in cell density affect the amount of AR, we conclude that the mechanism could be mediated by activation of the tyrosine kinase pathway, as the effect was reproduced by mitogens. PMID:12270026

  18. Interaction of dermatologically relevant nanoparticles with skin cells and skin

    PubMed Central

    Rancan, Fiorenza; Ahlberg, Sebastian; Nazemi, Berouz; Choe, Chun Sik; Darvin, Maxim E; Hadam, Sabrina; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike; Loza, Kateryna; Diendorf, Jörg; Epple, Matthias; Graf, Christina; Rühl, Eckart; Meinke, Martina C; Lademann, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Summary The investigation of nanoparticle interactions with tissues is complex. High levels of standardization, ideally testing of different material types in the same biological model, and combinations of sensitive imaging and detection methods are required. Here, we present our studies on nanoparticle interactions with skin, skin cells, and biological media. Silica, titanium dioxide and silver particles were chosen as representative examples for different types of skin exposure to nanomaterials, e.g., unintended environmental exposure (silica) versus intended exposure through application of sunscreen (titanium dioxide) or antiseptics (silver). Because each particle type exhibits specific physicochemical properties, we were able to apply different combinations of methods to examine skin penetration and cellular uptake, including optical microscopy, electron microscopy, X-ray microscopy on cells and tissue sections, flow cytometry of isolated skin cells as well as Raman microscopy on whole tissue blocks. In order to assess the biological relevance of such findings, cell viability and free radical production were monitored on cells and in whole tissue samples. The combination of technologies and the joint discussion of results enabled us to look at nanoparticle–skin interactions and the biological relevance of our findings from different angles. PMID:25551064

  19. Preclinical safety studies on autologous cultured human skin fibroblast transplantation.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Wei; Zhang, Shuying; Liu, Dai; Chai, Mi; Wang, Jiaqi; Zhao, Yuming

    2014-01-01

    Recently, FDA approved the clinical use of autologous fibroblasts (LAVIV™) for the improvement of nasolabial fold wrinkles in adults. The use of autologous fibroblasts for the augmentation of dermal and subcutaneous defects represents a potentially exciting natural alternative to the use of other filler materials for its long-term corrective ability and absence of allergic adverse effects proved by clinical application. However, compared to the clinical evidence, preclinical studies are far from enough. In this study, human skin-derived fibroblasts were cultured and expanded for both in vitro and in vivo observations. In vitro, the subcultured fibroblasts were divided into two groups. One set of cells underwent cell cycle and karyotype analysis at passages 5 and 10. The second group of cells was cocultured in medium with different concentrations of human skin extract D for the measurement of collagen concentration and cell count. In vivo, the subcultured fibroblasts were injected into nude mice subcutaneously. Biopsies were taken for morphology observation and specific collagen staining at 1, 2, and 3 months after injection. The results in vitro showed no significant differences in cell cycle distribution between passages 5 and 10. Cell proliferation and secretion were inhibited as the concentration of extract D increased. In vivo, the fibroblasts were remarkably denser on the experimental side with no dysplastic cells. Mitotic cells were easily observed at the end of the first month but were rare at the end of the third month. Type III collagen was detected at the end of the first month, while collagen type I was positive at the end of the second month. The content of both collagens increased as time passed. The above results indicated that the use of the autologous fibroblasts was safe, providing a basic support for clinical use of fibroblasts. PMID:23211390

  20. Studying cell biology in the skin

    PubMed Central

    Morrow, Angel; Lechler, Terry

    2015-01-01

    Advances in cell biology have often been driven by studies in diverse organisms and cell types. Although there are technical reasons for why different cell types are used, there are also important physiological reasons. For example, ultrastructural studies of vesicle transport were aided by the use of professional secretory cell types. The use of tissues/primary cells has the advantage not only of using cells that are adapted to the use of certain cell biological machinery, but also of highlighting the physiological roles of this machinery. Here we discuss advantages of the skin as a model system. We discuss both advances in cell biology that used the skin as a driving force and future prospects for use of the skin to understand basic cell biology. A unique combination of characteristics and tools makes the skin a useful in vivo model system for many cell biologists. PMID:26564861

  1. Altered chloride metabolism in cultured cystic fibrosis skin fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Mattes, P.M.; Maloney, P.C.; Littlefield, J.W.

    1987-05-01

    An abnormal regulation of chloride permeability has been described for epithelial cells from patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). To learn more about the biochemical basis of this inherited disease, the authors have studied chloride metabolism in cultured CF fibroblasts by comparing the efflux of /sup 36/Cl/sup -/ from matched pairs of CF and normal fibroblasts. The rate constants describing /sup 36/Cl/sup -/ efflux did not differ between the two cell types, but in each of the four pairs tested the amount of /sup 36/Cl/sup -/ contained within CF cells was consistently reduced, by 25-30%, relative to normal cells. Comparisons of cell water content and /sup 22/Na/sup +/ efflux showed no differences between the two cell types, suggesting that overall intracellular chloride concentration is lower than normal in CF fibroblasts. Such data suggest that the CF gene defect is expressed in skin fibroblasts and that this defect may alter the regulation of intracellular Cl/sup -/ concentration, perhaps through changes in Cl/sup -/ permeability.

  2. Optimizing stem cell culture.

    PubMed

    van der Sanden, Boudewijn; Dhobb, Mehdi; Berger, François; Wion, Didier

    2010-11-01

    Stem cells always balance between self-renewal and differentiation. Hence, stem cell culture parameters are critical and need to be continuously refined according to progress in our stem cell biology understanding and the latest technological developments. In the past few years, major efforts have been made to define more precisely the medium composition in which stem cells grow or differentiate. This led to the progressive replacement of ill-defined additives such as serum or feeder cell layers by recombinant cytokines or growth factors. Another example is the control of the oxygen pressure. For many years cell cultures have been done under atmospheric oxygen pressure which is much higher than the one experienced by stem cells in vivo. A consequence of cell metabolism is that cell culture conditions are constantly changing. Therefore, the development of high sensitive monitoring processes and control algorithms is required for ensuring cell culture medium homeostasis. Stem cells also sense the physical constraints of their microenvironment. Rigidity, stiffness, and geometry of the culture substrate influence stem cell fate. Hence, nanotopography is probably as important as medium formulation in the optimization of stem cell culture conditions. Recent advances include the development of synthetic bioinformative substrates designed at the micro- and nanoscale level. On going research in many different fields including stem cell biology, nanotechnology, and bioengineering suggest that our current way to culture cells in Petri dish or flasks will soon be outdated as flying across the Atlantic Ocean in the Lindbergh's plane. PMID:20803548

  3. Cell Culture Made Easy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dye, Frank J.

    1985-01-01

    Outlines steps to generate cell samples for observation and experimentation. The procedures (which use ordinary laboratory equipment) will establish a short-term primary culture of normal mammalian cells. Information on culture vessels and cell division and a list of questions to generate student interest and involvement in the topics are…

  4. Quantitative differences in host cell reactivation of ultraviolet-damaged virus in human skin fibroblasts and epidermal keratinocytes cultured from the same foreskin biopsy

    SciTech Connect

    Tyrrell, R.M.; Pidoux, M.

    1986-06-01

    Repair efficiency of cultured cells may be estimated by measuring the ability of a particular cell type to support virus damaged by an appropriate agent. In this study we have compared the inactivation of ultraviolet (254 nm)-damaged herpes simplex virus in human fibroblast and epidermal keratinocyte cell lines derived from the same foreskin biopsy and found the epithelial cells to be a factor of 3 times less efficient in supporting the damaged virus. The two different cell types show comparable ultraviolet inactivation of clone-forming ability, indicating that the difference is specific to viral host cell reactivation. This study required the development of a quantitative infectious centers assay for the measurement of viral titer in human epithelial cells, a system which may be of more general application in studies of potential human carcinogens.

  5. Multi-layered culture of human skin fibroblasts and keratinocytes through three-dimensional freeform fabrication.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wonhye; Debasitis, Jason Cushing; Lee, Vivian Kim; Lee, Jong-Hwan; Fischer, Krisztina; Edminster, Karl; Park, Je-Kyun; Yoo, Seung-Schik

    2009-03-01

    We present a method to create multi-layered engineered tissue composites consisting of human skin fibroblasts and keratinocytes which mimic skin layers. Three-dimensional (3D) freeform fabrication (FF) technique, based on direct cell dispensing, was implemented using a robotic platform that prints collagen hydrogel precursor, fibroblasts and keratinocytes. A printed layer of cell-containing collagen was crosslinked by coating the layer with nebulized aqueous sodium bicarbonate. The process was repeated in layer-by-layer fashion on a planar tissue culture dish, resulting in two distinct cell layers of inner fibroblasts and outer keratinocytes. In order to demonstrate the ability to print and culture multi-layered cell-hydrogel composites on a non-planar surface for potential applications including skin wound repair, the technique was tested on a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) mold with 3D surface contours as a target substrate. Highly viable proliferation of each cell layer was observed on both planar and non-planar surfaces. Our results suggest that organotypic skin tissue culture is feasible using on-demand cell printing technique with future potential application in creating skin grafts tailored for wound shape or artificial tissue assay for disease modeling and drug testing. PMID:19108884

  6. Evaluation of the skin sensitization potential of chemicals in THP-1/keratinocyte co-cultures.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yu-Ping; Ma, Peng-Cheng; Liu, Wei-Da; Zhou, Wu-Qing; Tao, Yue; Zhang, Meng-Li; Li, Ling-Jun; Chen, Zi-Yi

    2012-04-01

    Many attempts have been made to develop in vitro sensitization tests that employ dendritic cells (DCs), DC-like cell lines or keratinocytes. The aim of the present investigation was to establish a co-culture of THP-1 cells and keratinocytes for evaluation of skin sensitization potential of chemicals. Co-cultures were constructed by THP-1 cells cultured in lower compartments and keratinocytes cultured in upper compartments of cell culture inserts. After 24 h exposure to sensitizers (2, 4-dinitrochlorobenzene, p-phenylenediamine, formaldehyde, nickel sulfate, isoeugenol and eugenol) and non-sensitizers (sodium lauryl sulfate, benzalkonium chloride and lactic acid), the expression of CD86 and CD54 on THP-1 cells were evaluated by flow cytometry, and cell viabilities were determined. The sensitizers induced the augmentation of CD86 and CD54 expression, but the non-sensitizers had no significant effect. Compared with mono-cultures of THP-1 cells, the augmentation of CD86 and CD54 could be detected even at a non-toxic concentration of sensitizers in THP-1 cell/keratinocyte co-cultures. Moreover, isoeugenol was distinguished as a sensitizer in co-cultures, but failed to be identified in mono-cultures. These results revealed that the co-cultures of THP-1 cells and keratinocytes were successfully established and suitable for identifying sensitizers using CD86 and CD54 expression as identification markers. PMID:21721923

  7. Promotion of hair follicle development and trichogenesis by Wnt-10b in cultured embryonic skin and in reconstituted skin

    SciTech Connect

    Ouji, Yukiteru . E-mail: oujix@naramed-u.ac.jp; Yoshikawa, Masahide; Shiroi, Akira; Ishizaka, Shigeaki

    2006-06-30

    We previously showed that Wnt-10b promoted the differentiation of primary skin epithelial cells (MPSEC) toward hair shaft and inner root sheath of the hair follicle (IRS) cells in vitro. In the present study, we found that Wnt-10b promotes the development of hair follicles using a culture of mouse embryonic skin tissue and trichogenesis using a reconstitution experiment with nude mice. Hair follicle development was observed in skin taken from mouse embryos on embryonic day 10.5 following a 2-day culture with recombinant Wnt-10b (rWnt-10b), however, not without rWnt-10b. Brown hair growth was observed at the site of reconstituted skin in Balb/c nude mice where dermal fibroblasts and keratinocytes, derived from C3H/HeN new born mice, were transplanted with Wnt-10b-producing COS cells (Wnt-COS). Without the co-transplantation of Wnt-COS, no hair growth was observed. Our results suggest an important role of Wnt-10b in the initiation of hair follicle development and following trichogenesis.

  8. The expression of β-galactosidase during long-term cultured goat skin fibroblasts and the effect of donor cell passage on in vitro development of nuclear transfer embryos.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haijun; Peng, Hui; Liu, Fang; Ma, Qun; Zhang, Wenchang

    2016-05-01

    The present study aimed to detect the expression of β-galactosidase during long-term cultured goat skin fibroblasts and investigate the effects of donor goat age, sex, and cell passage on senescence and the effects of donor cell passage on in vitro development of nuclear transfer embryos. The results showed that, in the same cell passage, more β-galactosidase-positive cells were detected in cells from older donors than younger donors. Irrespective of the donor age, the number of positive cells was higher in later passages from passages 20 to 50. In the same passage from 20 to 50, the β-galactosidase-positive rate was higher in cells from 5-yr female goat than 5-yr male goat. Using fibroblasts from male goats at various passages as donor cells, reconstructed embryos had similar fusion and cleavage rates, but the blastocyst rate was higher for cells at passages 10 and 20 than passage 30. In conclusion, donor goat age and cell passage had significant effects on the β-galactosidase-positive rate; also, cells from 5-yr female goat had a higher β-galactosidase-positive rate than those from 5-yr male goat, and the donor cell passage affected the developmental potential of nuclear transfer embryos. PMID:26944897

  9. Human Skin Cells That Express Stage-Specific Embryonic Antigen 3 Associate with Dermal Tissue Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Vega Crespo, Agustin; Awe, Jason P.; Reijo Pera, Renee

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Stage-specific embryonic antigen 3 (SSEA3) is a glycosphingolipid that has previously been used to identify cells with stem cell-like, multipotent, and pluripotent characteristics. A rare subpopulation of SSEA3-expressing cells exists in the dermis of adult human skin. These SSEA3-expressing cells undergo a significant increase in cell number in response to injury, suggesting a possible role in regeneration. These SSEA3-expressing regeneration-associated (SERA) cells were derived through primary cell culture, purified by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS), and characterized. Longer in vitro culture of the primary skin cells led to lower SSEA3 expression stability after FACS-based purification, suggesting that the current culture conditions may need to be optimized to permit the large-scale expansion of SERA cells. The SERA cells demonstrated a global transcriptional state that was most similar to bone marrow- and fat-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), and the highest expressing SSEA3-expressing cells co-expressed CD105 (clone 35). However, while a rare population of MSCs was observed in primary human skin cell cultures that could differentiate into adipocytes, osteoblasts, or chondrocytes, SERA cells did not possess this differentiation capacity, suggesting that there are at least two different rare subpopulations in adult human skin primary cultures. The identification, efficient purification, and large-scale expansion of these rare subpopulations (SERA cells and MSCs) from heterogeneous adult human skin primary cell cultures may have applications for future patient-specific cellular therapies. PMID:23514702

  10. Prolonged viability of human organotypic skin explant in culture method (hOSEC)*

    PubMed Central

    Frade, Marco Andrey Cipriani; de Andrade, Thiago Antônio Moretti; Aguiar, Andréia Fernanda Carvalho Leone; Guedes, Flávia Araújo; Leite, Marcel Nani; Passos, Williane Rodrigues; Coelho, Eduardo Barbosa; Das, Pranab Kummar

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Currently, the cosmetic industry is overwhelmed in keeping up with the safety assessment of the increasing number of new products entering the market. To meet such demand, research centers have explored alternative methods to animal testing and also the large number of volunteers necessary for preclinical and clinical tests. OBJECTIVES: This work describes the human skin ex-vivo model (hOSEC: Human Organotypic Skin Explant Culture) as an alternative to test the effectiveness of cosmetics and demonstrate its viability through cutaneous keratinocytes' proliferative capacity up to 75 days in culture. METHODS: The skin explants obtained from surgeries were cultured in CO2-humid incubator. After 1, 7, 30 and 75 days in culture, skin fragments were harvested for analysis with histomorphological exam (HE staining) on all days of follow-up and immunohistochemistry for Ck5/6, Ck10 and Ki-67 only on the 75th day. RESULTS: On the 7th day, the epidermis was perfect in the dermoepidermal junction, showing the viability of the model. On the 30th day, the epidermis was thicker, with fewer layers on the stratum corneum, although the cutaneous structure was unaltered. On the 75th day, the skin became thinner but the dermoepidermal junctions were preserved and epidermal proliferation was maintained. After the 75th day on culture, the skin was similar to normal skin, expressing keratinocytes with Ck5/6 on supra-basal layers; Ck10 on differentiated layers; and viability could be assessed by the positivity of basal cells by Ki-67. CONCLUSION: The hOSEC model seems a good alternative to animal testing; it can be used as a preclinical test analogous to clinical human skin test with similar effectiveness and viability proven by immunohistological analyses. PMID:26131864

  11. Endothelin-1 increases melanin synthesis in an established sheep skin melanocyte culture.

    PubMed

    Pang, Yamiao; Geng, Jianjun; Qin, Yilong; Wang, Haidong; Fan, Ruiwen; Zhang, Ying; Li, Hongquan; Jiang, Shan; Dong, Changsheng

    2016-08-01

    The aims of the study were to establish a culture system for sheep skin melanocytes and uncover the effects of endothelin-1 on melanin synthesis in cultured melanocytes in order to provide an optimal cell system and a theoretical basis for studying the regulatory mechanism of coat color in sheep. In this study, skin punch biopsies were harvested from the dorsal region of 1-3-yr-old sheep, and skin melanocytes were then obtained by the two-step digestion using dispase II and trypsin/ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA). The primary cultures of the melanocytes were established and characterized by dopa-staining, immunocytochemical localization of melanocyte markers, and RT-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis of coat color genes. To determine the effect of endothelin-1 on proliferation and melanin synthesis of melanocytes, the cultured cells were treated with different doses of endothelin-1 (10(-7), 10(-8), 10(-9), 10(-10), and 0 mol/L), and the growth rate of melanocytes, production of melanin, expression of related genes, and location of related protein in cultured cells were examined by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT), ultraviolet spectrophotometry, qRT-PCR, and immunocytochemical localization, respectively. The results showed that the established melanocyte culture functions properly. Endothelin-1 treatment increased markedly the number of melanocytes and melanin content. In responding to this treatment, expressions of microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF), melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R), tyrosinase (TYR), and endothelin receptor B (EDNRB) in the melanocytes were significantly up regulated (P < 0.05). Immunocytochemical localization revealed that TYR was mainly localized in the cytoplasm. Positive staining of TYR in the melanocytes was significant. The findings demonstrated that the culture system of sheep skin melanocytes was established successfully in vitro, and endothelin-1 promotes the

  12. Mammalian Cell Culture Simplified.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moss, Robert; Solomon, Sondra

    1991-01-01

    A tissue culture experiment that does not require elaborate equipment and that can be used to teach sterile technique, the principles of animal cell line maintenance, and the concept of cell growth curves is described. The differences between cancerous and normal cells can be highlighted. The procedure is included. (KR)

  13. Rapid creation of skin substitutes from human skin cells and biomimetic nanofibers for acute full-thickness wound repair.

    PubMed

    Mahjour, Seyed Babak; Fu, Xiaoling; Yang, Xiaochuan; Fong, Jason; Sefat, Farshid; Wang, Hongjun

    2015-12-01

    Creation of functional skin substitutes within a clinically acceptable time window is essential for timely repair and management of large wounds such as extensive burns. The aim of this study was to investigate the possibility of fabricating skin substitutes via a bottom-up nanofiber-enabled cell assembly approach and using such substitutes for full-thickness wound repair in nude mice. Following a layer-by-layer (L-b-L) manner, human primary skin cells (fibroblasts and keratinocytes) were rapidly assembled together with electrospun polycaprolactone (PCL)/collagen (3:1, w/w; 8%, w/v) nanofibers into 3D constructs, in which fibroblasts and keratinocytes were located in the bottom and upper portion respectively. Following culture, the constructs developed into a skin-like structure with expression of basal keratinocyte markers and deposition of new matrix while exhibiting good mechanical strength (as high as 4.0 MPa by 14 days). Treatment of the full-thickness wounds created on the back of nude mice with various grafts (acellular nanofiber meshes, dermal substitutes, skin substitutes and autografts) revealed that 14-day-cultured skin substitutes facilitated a rapid wound closure with complete epithelialization comparable to autografts. Taken together, skin-like substitutes can be formed by L-b-L assembling human skin cells and biomimetic nanofibers and they are effective to heal acute full-thickness wounds in nude mice. PMID:26187057

  14. Digital Microfluidic Cell Culture.

    PubMed

    Ng, Alphonsus H C; Li, Bingyu Betty; Chamberlain, M Dean; Wheeler, Aaron R

    2015-01-01

    Digital microfluidics (DMF) is a droplet-based liquid-handling technology that has recently become popular for cell culture and analysis. In DMF, picoliter- to microliter-sized droplets are manipulated on a planar surface using electric fields, thus enabling software-reconfigurable operations on individual droplets, such as move, merge, split, and dispense from reservoirs. Using this technique, multistep cell-based processes can be carried out using simple and compact instrumentation, making DMF an attractive platform for eventual integration into routine biology workflows. In this review, we summarize the state-of-the-art in DMF cell culture, and describe design considerations, types of DMF cell culture, and cell-based applications of DMF. PMID:26643019

  15. Influence of free residual chlorine on cultured human epidermal keratinocytes from normal skin and hypertrophic scars.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Y; Mori, H; Hayakawa, A; Ohashi, M

    1995-07-01

    In Japan, public health regulations state that the water in rinsing pools used before swimming should contain 50-100 mg/l of chlorine. We examined the influence of chlorination at high concentrations in rinsing pools on the skin using cultured human epidermal keratinocytes from normal skin and hypertrophic scars. Chlorination of cell culture for 15 min with 200 mg/l of free residual chlorine proved cytotoxic to both types of keratinocytes as did 100 mg/l of free residual chlorine for 1 or 3 consecutive days. Keratinocytes from hypertrophic scars, when cultivated in 100 mg/l of free residual chlorine, were more vulnerable to chlorine than those from normal skin. Cell characteristics of cultured keratinocytes from hypertrophic scars may be somewhat different from those of normal skin. The phenomena observed in this experimental model of the skin suggest that people exposed to chlorine in rinsing pools at concentrations in excess of 200 mg/l for about 15 min before swimming are at risk of developing cutaneous disorders, especially at sites of injury, e.g. scars. PMID:7577833

  16. Effects of all-trans retinoic acid and Ca++ on human skin in organ culture.

    PubMed Central

    Varani, J.; Fligiel, S. E.; Schuger, L.; Perone, P.; Inman, D.; Griffiths, C. E.; Voorhees, J. J.

    1993-01-01

    In this study, we have established an organ culture model of human skin and examined the effects of both all-trans retinoic acid (RA) and extracellular Ca++ on the epidermal and dermal components of the organ-cultured skin. Our data show that while organ cultures maintained in serum-free, growth factor-free culture medium containing 0.15 mM Ca++ degenerated rapidly, those treated with concentrations of RA that have been shown previously to stimulate fibroblast and keratinocyte proliferation in monolayer culture (J Invest Dermatol 1989, 93:449; 1990, 94:717; Am J Pathol 1990, 136:1275) demonstrated a healthy appearance for up to 12 days. Degeneration of the control cultures was characterized by separation of the epidermis from the underlying dermis, progressive cell necrosis leading to a complete absence of viable cells from both the dermal and epidermal compartments, disintegration and fibrillation of the dermal connective tissue, and a cessation of protein synthesis. RA-treated organ cultures contained large numbers of healthy-appearing cells in both the epidermal and dermal compartments. One or several layers of viable basal cells in the epidermis could be seen at least through day 12. However, the upper layers of the epidermis frequently separated from the cells in the basal layer. The dermal connective tissue was histologically well-preserved. Furthermore, the level of protein synthesis was higher in the RA-treated cultures than in the control cultures. In addition to treating organ cultures with RA, other cultures were exposed to serum-free, growth factor-free culture medium containing 1.4 mM Ca++. The presence of the elevated Ca++ concentration also preserved cellular and connective tissue structures in the dermal and epidermal compartments. In comparison to RA there was better preservation of the overall epidermal structure. The upper layers of epidermal cells did not separate from the basal cells, and the various stages of epithelial differentiation could

  17. Derivation of Human Skin Fibroblast Lines for Feeder Cells of Human Embryonic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Unger, Christian; Felldin, Ulrika; Rodin, Sergey; Nordenskjöld, Agneta; Dilber, Sirac; Hovatta, Outi

    2016-01-01

    After the first derivations of human embryonic stem cell (hESC) lines on fetal mouse feeder cell layers, the idea of using human cells instead of mouse cells as feeder cells soon arose. Mouse cells bear a risk of microbial contamination, and nonhuman immunogenic proteins are absorbed from the feeders to hESCs. Human skin fibroblasts can be effectively used as feeder cells for hESCs. The same primary cell line, which can be safely used for up to 15 passages after stock preparations, can be expanded and used for large numbers of hESC derivations and cultures. These cells are relatively easy to handle and maintain. No animal facilities or animal work is needed. Here, we describe the derivation, culture, and cryopreservation procedures for research-grade human skin fibroblast lines. We also describe how to make feeder layers for hESCs using these fibroblasts. PMID:26840224

  18. Skin cell proliferation stimulated by microneedles.

    PubMed

    Liebl, Horst; Kloth, Luther C

    2012-03-01

    A classical wound may be defined as a disruption of tissue integrity. Wounds, caused by trauma from accidents or surgery, that close via secondary intention rely on the biological phases of healing, i.e., hemostasis, inflammation, proliferation, and remodeling (HIPR). Depending on the wound type and severity, the inflammation phase begins immediately after injury and may last for an average of 7-14 days. Concurrent with the inflammation phase or slightly delayed, cell proliferation is stimulated followed by the activation of the remodeling (maturation) phase. The latter phase can last as long as 1 year or more, and the final healed state is represented by a scar tissue, a cross-linked collagen formation that usually aligns collagen fibers in a single direction. One may assume that skin microneedling that involves the use of dozens or as many as 200 needles that limit penetration to 1.5 mm over 1 cm(2) of skin would cause trauma and bleeding followed by the classical HIPR. However, this is not the case or at least the HIPR phases are significantly curtailed and healing never ends in a scar formation. Conversely dermabrasion used in aesthetic medicine for improving skin quality is based on "ablation" (destruction or wounding of superficial skin layers), which requires several weeks for healing that involves formation of new skin layers. Such procedures provoke an acute inflammatory response. We believe that a less intense inflammatory response occurs following microneedle perforation of the skin. However, the mechanism of action of microneedling appears to be different. Here we review the potential mechanisms by which microneedling of the skin facilitates skin repair without scarring after the treatment of superficial burns, acne, hyperpigmentation, and the non-advancing periwound skin surrounding the chronic ulcerations of the integument. PMID:24527373

  19. Skin Cell Proliferation Stimulated by Microneedles

    PubMed Central

    Liebl, Horst; Kloth, Luther C.

    2012-01-01

    A classical wound may be defined as a disruption of tissue integrity. Wounds, caused by trauma from accidents or surgery, that close via secondary intention rely on the biological phases of healing, i.e., hemostasis, inflammation, proliferation, and remodeling (HIPR). Depending on the wound type and severity, the inflammation phase begins immediately after injury and may last for an average of 7–14 days. Concurrent with the inflammation phase or slightly delayed, cell proliferation is stimulated followed by the activation of the remodeling (maturation) phase. The latter phase can last as long as 1 year or more, and the final healed state is represented by a scar tissue, a cross-linked collagen formation that usually aligns collagen fibers in a single direction. One may assume that skin microneedling that involves the use of dozens or as many as 200 needles that limit penetration to 1.5 mm over 1 cm2 of skin would cause trauma and bleeding followed by the classical HIPR. However, this is not the case or at least the HIPR phases are significantly curtailed and healing never ends in a scar formation. Conversely dermabrasion used in aesthetic medicine for improving skin quality is based on “ablation” (destruction or wounding of superficial skin layers), which requires several weeks for healing that involves formation of new skin layers. Such procedures provoke an acute inflammatory response. We believe that a less intense inflammatory response occurs following microneedle perforation of the skin. However, the mechanism of action of microneedling appears to be different. Here we review the potential mechanisms by which microneedling of the skin facilitates skin repair without scarring after the treatment of superficial burns, acne, hyperpigmentation, and the non-advancing periwound skin surrounding the chronic ulcerations of the integument. PMID:24527373

  20. Liver Cell Culture Devices

    PubMed Central

    Andria, B.; Bracco, A.; Cirino, G.; Chamuleau, R. A. F. M.

    2010-01-01

    In the last 15 years many different liver cell culture devices, consisting of functional liver cells and artificial materials, have been developed. They have been devised for numerous different applications, such as temporary organ replacement (a bridge to liver transplantation or native liver regeneration) and as in vitro screening systems in the early stages of the drug development process, like assessing hepatotoxicity, hepatic drug metabolism, and induction/inhibition studies. Relevant literature is summarized about artificial human liver cell culture systems by scrutinizing PubMed from 2003 to 2009. Existing devices are divided in 2D configurations (e.g., static monolayer, sandwich, perfused cells, and flat plate) and 3D configurations (e.g., liver slices, spheroids, and different types of bioreactors). The essential features of an ideal liver cell culture system are discussed: different types of scaffolds, oxygenation systems, extracellular matrixes (natural and artificial), cocultures with nonparenchymal cells, and the role of shear stress problems. Finally, miniaturization and high-throughput systems are discussed. All these factors contribute in their own way to the viability and functionality of liver cells in culture. Depending on the aim for which they are designed, several good systems are available for predicting hepatotoxicity and hepatic metabolism within the general population. To predict hepatotoxicity in individual cases genomic analysis might be essential as well. PMID:26998397

  1. Molluscan cells in culture: primary cell cultures and cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Yoshino, T. P.; Bickham, U.; Bayne, C. J.

    2013-01-01

    In vitro cell culture systems from molluscs have significantly contributed to our basic understanding of complex physiological processes occurring within or between tissue-specific cells, yielding information unattainable using intact animal models. In vitro cultures of neuronal cells from gastropods show how simplified cell models can inform our understanding of complex networks in intact organisms. Primary cell cultures from marine and freshwater bivalve and gastropod species are used as biomonitors for environmental contaminants, as models for gene transfer technologies, and for studies of innate immunity and neoplastic disease. Despite efforts to isolate proliferative cell lines from molluscs, the snail Biomphalaria glabrata Say, 1818 embryonic (Bge) cell line is the only existing cell line originating from any molluscan species. Taking an organ systems approach, this review summarizes efforts to establish molluscan cell cultures and describes the varied applications of primary cell cultures in research. Because of the unique status of the Bge cell line, an account is presented of the establishment of this cell line, and of how these cells have contributed to our understanding of snail host-parasite interactions. Finally, we detail the difficulties commonly encountered in efforts to establish cell lines from molluscs and discuss how these difficulties might be overcome. PMID:24198436

  2. Culturing Uveal Melanoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Angi, Martina; Versluis, Mieke; Kalirai, Helen

    2015-04-01

    A major challenge in cancer research is the use of appropriate models with which to study a specific biological question. Cell lines have long been used to study cellular processes and the effects of individual molecules because they are easy to use, grow rapidly, produce reproducible results and have a strong track record in research. In uveal melanoma in particular, the absence of animal models that faithfully replicate the behavior of the human disease has propagated the generation and use of numerous cell lines by individual research groups. This in itself, however, can be viewed as a problem due to the lack of standardization when characterizing these entities to determine how closely they reflect the genetic and phenotypic characteristics of this disease. The alternative is to use in vitro primary cultures of cells obtained directly from uveal melanoma patient samples, but this too has its difficulties. Primary cell cultures are difficult to use, hard to obtain and can show considerable heterogeneity. In this article, we review the following: (1) the uveal melanoma cell lines that are currently available, discussing the importance of establishing a bank of those that represent the molecular heterogeneity of uveal melanoma; (2) the methods used to isolate and perform short-term cultures of primary uveal melanoma cells, and (3) the establishment of 3D tissue culture models that bridge the gap between 2D in vitro systems and in vivo models with which to dissect cancer biology and perform therapeutic screens. PMID:27171555

  3. Cell Culturing of Cytoskeleton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Biomedical research offers hope for a variety of medical problems, from diabetes to the replacement of damaged bone and tissues. Bioreactors, which are used to grow cells and tissue cultures, play a major role in such research and production efforts. Cell culturing, such as this bone cell culture, is an important part of biomedical research. The BioDyn payload includes a tissue engineering investigation. The commercial affiliate, Millenium Biologix, Inc. has been conducting bone implant experiments to better understand how synthetic bone can be used to treat bone-related illnesses and bone damaged in accidents. On STS-95, the BioDyn payload will include a bone cell culture aimed to help develop this commercial synthetic bone product. Millenium Biologix, Inc. is exploring the potential for making human bone implantable materials by seeding its proprietary artificial scaffold material with human bone cells. The product of this tissue engineering experiment using the Bioprocessing Modules (BPMs) on STS-95 is space-grown bone implants, which could have potential for dental implants, long bone grafts, and coating for orthopedic implants such as hip replacements.

  4. Cell Culturing of Cytoskeleton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Biomedical research offers hope for a variety of medical problems, from diabetes to the replacement of damaged bone and tissues. Bioreactors, which are used to grow cells and tissue cultures, play a major role in such research and production efforts. Cell culturing, such as this bone cell culture, is an important part of biomedical research. The BioDyn payload includes a tissue engineering investigation. The commercial affiliate, Millenium Biologix, Inc., has been conducting bone implant experiments to better understand how synthetic bone can be used to treat bone-related illnesses and bone damaged in accidents. On STS-95, the BioDyn payload will include a bone cell culture aimed to help develop this commercial synthetic bone product. Millenium Biologix, Inc., is exploring the potential for making human bone implantable materials by seeding its proprietary artificial scaffold material with human bone cells. The product of this tissue engineering experiment using the Bioprocessing Modules (BPMs) on STS-95 is space-grown bone implants, which could have potential for dental implants, long bone grafts, and coating for orthopedic implants such as hip replacements.

  5. Oscillating Cell Culture Bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freed, Lisa E.; Cheng, Mingyu; Moretti, Matteo G.

    2010-01-01

    To better exploit the principles of gas transport and mass transport during the processes of cell seeding of 3D scaffolds and in vitro culture of 3D tissue engineered constructs, the oscillatory cell culture bioreactor provides a flow of cell suspensions and culture media directly through a porous 3D scaffold (during cell seeding) and a 3D construct (during subsequent cultivation) within a highly gas-permeable closed-loop tube. This design is simple, modular, and flexible, and its component parts are easy to assemble and operate, and are inexpensive. Chamber volume can be very low, but can be easily scaled up. This innovation is well suited to work with different biological specimens, particularly with cells having high oxygen requirements and/or shear sensitivity, and different scaffold structures and dimensions. The closed-loop changer is highly gas permeable to allow efficient gas exchange during the cell seeding/culturing process. A porous scaffold, which may be seeded with cells, is fixed by means of a scaffold holder to the chamber wall with scaffold/construct orientation with respect to the chamber determined by the geometry of the scaffold holder. A fluid, with/without biological specimens, is added to the chamber such that all, or most, of the air is displaced (i.e., with or without an enclosed air bubble). Motion is applied to the chamber within a controlled environment (e.g., oscillatory motion within a humidified 37 C incubator). Movement of the chamber induces relative motion of the scaffold/construct with respect to the fluid. In case the fluid is a cell suspension, cells will come into contact with the scaffold and eventually adhere to it. Alternatively, cells can be seeded on scaffolds by gel entrapment prior to bioreactor cultivation. Subsequently, the oscillatory cell culture bioreactor will provide efficient gas exchange (i.e., of oxygen and carbon dioxide, as required for viability of metabolically active cells) and controlled levels of fluid

  6. Hypoxanthine-Guanine Phosphoribosyltransferase Deficiency: Activity in Normal, Mutant, and Heterozygote-Cultured Human Skin Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Fujimoto, Wilfred Y.; Seegmiller, J. Edwin

    1970-01-01

    Cultured skin fibroblasts from patients deficient for the enzyme hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (PRT) activity show very low but nevertheless significant levels of apparent PRT enzyme despite absence of detectable activity (<0.004% of normal) in erythrocytes of the same patients. In fibroblasts this mutant enzyme is more heat labile than the normal enzyme. These findings indicate that PRT deficiency in this disorder is not due to a deletion mutation of the PRT locus. Individual cultured skin fibroblasts from heterozygote females for PRT deficiency show normal, intermediate, or very low levels of PRT activity. The mosaicism demonstrated in the heterozygotes for this X-linked disorder accounts for the cells with normal and very low activities of PRT. Intermediate activity can best be explained by the phenomenon of metabolic cooperation presumably from the transfer of either PRT enzyme or messenger RNA, from normal to mutant cells. Images PMID:5267139

  7. Extracellular depolymerization of hyaluronic acid in cultured human skin fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, T.; Takagaki, K.; Kubo, K.; Morikawa, A.; Tamura, S.; Endo, M. )

    1990-10-15

    The chain length of ({sup 3}H)hyaluronic acid synthesized by cultivating human skin fibroblasts in the presence of ({sup 3}H)glucosamine was investigated. ({sup 3}H)Hyaluronic acid obtained from the matrix fraction was excluded from a Sepharose CL-2B column irrespective of the incubation period, whereas that from the medium was depolymerized into a constant chain length (Mr = 40,000). The reducing and non-reducing terminals of the depolymerized hyaluronic acid were N-acetylglucosamine and glucuronic acid, respectively. Prolonged incubation produced no oligosaccharides as shown by examination of hyaluronidase digests, suggesting the presence of a novel endo-beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase in cultured human skin fibroblasts.

  8. Sperm functional changes and fertilization in vitro in co-culture with human skin fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Wetzels, A M; Van der Auwera, I; Bastiaans, B A; Goverde, H J; Hollanders, H M; Hamilton, C J

    1995-01-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the effects of human skin fibroblast monolayers on human sperm function and fertilization in vitro. Sperm function was evaluated using the hamster oocyte penetration assay (HOPA) and zona binding assay (ZBA) in medium alone and in co-culture with human skin fibroblast monolayers and suspensions. The ZBA was also studied in fibroblast conditioned medium and in bovine oviduct cell monolayers and suspensions. Fertilization was measured both in in-vitro fertilization (IVF) couples with a normal semen analysis (first study; randomized) and in IVF couples with subnormal semen analysis (second study; each patient served as its own control). The HOPA results were not significantly different with or without fibroblasts. In all co-culture situations and in conditioned medium the ZBA scored significantly lower than medium alone. No significant differences with respect to IVF were observed between the co-culture and the control group in either study. The mean fertilization rate per patient was approximately 60% in the group with normal semen analysis and approximately 25% in the group with abnormal semen analysis. From this study we conclude that although co-culture with human skin fibroblasts and epithelial cells influences the results of some sperm function tests, it does not influence fertilization in vitro. PMID:7745043

  9. Xenobiotic metabolism capacities of human skin in comparison with a 3D epidermis model and keratinocyte-based cell culture as in vitro alternatives for chemical testing: activating enzymes (Phase I).

    PubMed

    Götz, Christine; Pfeiffer, Roland; Tigges, Julia; Blatz, Veronika; Jäckh, Christine; Freytag, Eva-Maria; Fabian, Eric; Landsiedel, Robert; Merk, Hans F; Krutmann, Jean; Edwards, Robert J; Pease, Camilla; Goebel, Carsten; Hewitt, Nicola; Fritsche, Ellen

    2012-05-01

    Skin is important for the absorption and metabolism of exposed chemicals such as cosmetics or pharmaceuticals. The Seventh Amendment to the EU Cosmetics Directive prohibits the use of animals for cosmetic testing for certain endpoints, such as genotoxicity; therefore, there is an urgent need to understand the xenobiotic metabolizing capacities of human skin and to compare these activities with reconstructed 3D skin models developed to replace animal testing. We have measured Phase I enzyme activities of cytochrome P450 (CYP) and cyclooxygenase (COX) in ex vivo human skin, the 3D skin model EpiDerm™ (EPI-200), immortalized keratinocyte-based cell lines and primary normal human epidermal keratinocytes. Our data demonstrate that basal CYP enzyme activities are very low in whole human skin and EPI-200 as well as keratinocytes. In addition, activities in monolayer cells differed from organotypic tissues after induction. COX activity was similar in skin, EPI-200 and NHEK cells, but was significantly lower in immortalized keratinocytes. Hence, the 3D model EPI-200 might represent a more suitable model for dermatotoxicological studies. Altogether, these data help to better understand skin metabolism and expand the knowledge of in vitro alternatives used for dermatotoxicity testing. PMID:22509833

  10. How Are Squamous and Basal Cell Skin Cancers Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... often enough to cure basal and squamous cell skin cancers without further treatment. There are different types of skin biopsies. The ... and Prevention Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging Treating Skin Cancer - ... Your Doctor After Treatment What`s New in Skin Cancer - Basal and Squamous ...

  11. Emerging interactions between skin stem cells and their niches

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Ya-Chieh; Li, Lishi; Fuchs, Elaine

    2015-01-01

    The skin protects mammals from insults, infection and dehydration and enables thermoregulation and sensory perception. Various skin-resident cells carry out these diverse functions. Constant turnover of cells and healing upon injury necessitate multiple reservoirs of stem cells. Thus, the skin provides a model for studying interactions between stem cells and their microenvironments, or niches. Advances in genetic and imaging tools have brought new findings about the lineage relationships between skin stem cells and their progeny and about the mutual influences between skin stem cells and their niches. Such knowledge may offer novel avenues for therapeutics and regenerative medicine. PMID:25100530

  12. Microfluidic Cell Culture Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takayama, Shuichi (Inventor); Cabrera, Lourdes Marcella (Inventor); Heo, Yun Seok (Inventor); Smith, Gary Daniel (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Microfluidic devices for cell culturing and methods for using the same are disclosed. One device includes a substrate and membrane. The substrate includes a reservoir in fluid communication with a passage. A bio-compatible fluid may be added to the reservoir and passage. The reservoir is configured to receive and retain at least a portion of a cell mass. The membrane acts as a barrier to evaporation of the bio-compatible fluid from the passage. A cover fluid may be added to cover the bio-compatible fluid to prevent evaporation of the bio-compatible fluid.

  13. Collagen gene expression by cultured human skin fibroblasts. Abundant steady-state levels of type VI procollagen messenger RNAs.

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, D R; Peltonen, J; Jaakkola, S; Chu, M L; Uitto, J

    1989-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that procollagen types I and III are the major collagenous gene products of cultured human skin fibroblasts. In this study the expression of 10 different genes, encoding the subunit polypeptides for collagen types I-VI, by human skin fibroblasts in culture was analyzed by molecular hybridizations. Northern transfer analysis demonstrated the presence of specific mRNA transcripts for collagen types I, III, IV, V, and VI, but not for type II collagen. Quantitation of the abundance of these mRNAs by slot blot hybridizations revealed that type I, III, and VI procollagens were the major collagenous gene products of skin fibroblasts in culture. The mRNAs for type IV and V collagens represented only a small percentage of the total collagenous mRNA transcripts. Further analysis by in situ hybridization demonstrated that the majority of the cultured cells coexpressed the genes for type I, III, and VI procollagen pro-alpha chains. Further in situ hybridization analyses revealed the expression of type VI collagen genes in normal human skin. These data demonstrate that human skin fibroblast cultures can be used to study the transcriptional regulation of at least nine genetically distinct procollagen genes. The data further suggest that type VI collagen, in addition to types I and III, may be a major collagenous component of human skin. Images PMID:2921321

  14. Melanocyte Stem Cells as Potential Therapeutics in Skin Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ju Hee; Fisher, David E.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Melanocytes produce pigment granules that color both skin and hair. In the hair follicles melanocytes are derived from stem cells (MelSC) that are present in hair bulges or sub-bulge regions and function as melanocyte reservoirs. Quiescence, maintenance, activation, and proliferation of MelSC are controlled by specific activities in the microenvironment that can influence the differentiation and regeneration of melanocytes. Therefore, understanding MelSC and their niche may lead to use of MelSC in new treatments for various pigmentation disorders. Areas covered We describe here pathophysiological mechanisms by which melanocyte defects lead to skin pigmentation disorders such as vitiligo and hair graying. The development, migration, and proliferation of melanocytes and factors involved in the survival, maintenance, and regeneration of MelSC are reviewed with regard to the biological roles and potential therapeutic applications in skin pigmentation diseases. Expert Opinion MelSC biology and niche factors have been studied mainly in murine experimental models. Human MelSC markers or methods to isolate them are much less well understood. Identification, isolation and culturing of human MelSC would represent a major step toward new biological therapeutic options for patients with recalcitrant pigmentary disorders or hair graying. By modulating the niche factors for MelSC it may one day be possible to control skin pigmentary disorders and prevent or reverse hair graying. PMID:25104310

  15. Evaluation of selected biomarkers for the detection of chemical sensitization in human skin: a comparative study applying THP-1, MUTZ-3 and primary dendritic cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Hitzler, Manuel; Bergert, Antje; Luch, Andreas; Peiser, Matthias

    2013-09-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) exhibit the unique capacity to induce T cell differentiation and proliferation, two processes that are crucially involved in allergic reactions. By combining the exclusive potential of DCs as the only professional antigen-presenting cells of the human body with the well known handling advantages of cell lines, cell-based alternative methods aimed at detecting chemical sensitization in vitro commonly apply DC-like cells derived from myeloid cell lines. Here, we present the new biomarkers programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1), DC immunoreceptor (DCIR), IL-16, and neutrophil-activating protein-2 (NAP-2), all of which have been detectable in primary human DCs upon exposure to chemical contact allergens. To evaluate the applicability of DC-like cells in the prediction of a chemical's sensitization potential, the expression of cell surface PD-L1 and DCIR was analyzed. In contrast to primary DCs, only minor subpopulations of MUTZ-3 and THP-1 cells presented PD-L1 or DCIR at their surface. After exposure to increasing concentrations of nickel and cinnamic aldehyde, the expression level of PD-L1 and DCIR revealed much stronger affected on monocyte-derived DCs (MoDCs) or Langerhans cells (MoLCs) when compared to THP-1 and MUTZ-3 cells. Applying protein profiler arrays we further identified the soluble factors NAP-2, IL-16, IL-8 and MIP-1α as sensitive biomarkers showing the capacity to discriminate sensitizing from non-sensitizing chemicals or irritants. An allergen-specific release of IL-8 and MIP-1α could be detected in the supernatants of MoDCs and MoLCs and also in MUTZ-3 and THP-1 cells, though at much lower levels. On the protein and transcriptional level, NAP-2 and IL-16 indicated sensitizers most sensitively and specifically in MoDCs. Altogether, we have proven the reciprocal regulated surface molecules PD-L1 and DCIR and the soluble factors MIP-1α, NAP-2 and IL-16 as reliable biomarkers for chemical sensitization. We further show that primary

  16. Short-term cadmium exposure induces stress responses in frog (Pelophylax bergeri) skin organ culture.

    PubMed

    Simoncelli, Francesca; Belia, Silvia; Di Rosa, Ines; Paracucchi, Romina; Rossi, Roberta; La Porta, Gianandrea; Lucentini, Livia; Fagotti, Anna

    2015-12-01

    There have been a few studies on the negative effects of pollutants on amphibian skin, the first structural barrier that interacts with the environment and its potential contaminants. In this study an ex vivo skin organ culture from the amphibian Pelophylax bergeri was used to evaluate cell stress responses induced by short-term exposure to cadmium (Cd), a toxic heavy metal known to be an environmental hazard to both humans and wildlife. Histopathological studies were carried out on skin explants using light microscopy and changes in the expression of stress proteins, such as Metallothionein (MT) and Heat shock proteins (HSPs), were investigated by Real-time RT-PCR. Results revealed that amphibian skin reacts to Cd-induced stress by activating biological responses such as morphological alterations and dose- and time-dependent induction of Mt and Hsp70 mRNA expression, suggesting their potential role as biomarkers of exposure to Cd. This work provides a basis for a better understanding of the tissue-specific responses of amphibian skin as a target organ to Cd exposure and its in vitro use for testing potentially harmful substances present in the environment. PMID:26277541

  17. Resistance to 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D. Association with heterogeneous defects in cultured skin fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Liberman, U.A.; Eil, C.; Marx, S.J.

    1983-02-01

    The authors evaluated the interaction of (/sub 3/H)1,25(OH)/sup 2/D3 with skin fibroblasts cultured from normal subjects or from affected members of six kindreds with rickets and resistance to 1-alpha, 25(OH)/sub 2/D (1,25(OH)/sub 2/D). They analyzed two aspects of the radioligand interaction; nuclear uptake with dispersed, intact cells at 37 degrees C and binding at 0 degrees C with soluble extract (cytosol) prepared from cells disrupted in buffer. With normal fibroblasts the affinity and capacity of nuclear uptake of (/sub 3/H)1,25(OH)/sup 2/D3 were 0.5 nM and 10,300 sites per cell, respectively; for binding with cytosol these were 0.13 nM and 8,900 sites per cell, respectively. The following four patterns of interaction with (/sub 3/H)1,25(OH)/sup 2/D3 were observed with cells cultured from affected patients. In all cases where the radioligand bound with high affinity in nucleus or cytosol, the nucleus- or cytosol-associated radioligand exhibited normal sedimentation velocity on sucrose density gradients. When two kindreds exhibited similar patterns (i.e. pattern a or c) with the analyses of cultured fibroblasts, clinical features in affected members suggested that the underlying genetic defects were not identical. In conclusion: (a) Fibroblasts cultured from human skin manifest nuclear uptake and cytosol binding of (/sub 3/H)1,25(OH)/sup 2/D3 that is an expression of the genes determining these processes in target tissues. (b) Based upon data from clinical evaluations and from analyses of cultured fibroblasts, severe resistance to 1,25(OH)/sup 2/D resulted from five or six distinct genetic mutations in six kindreds.

  18. Poly(L-lactide-co-glycolide) thin films can act as autologous cell carriers for skin tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Zuber, Aleksandra; Borowczyk, Julia; Zimolag, Eliza; Krok, Malgorzata; Madeja, Zbigniew; Pamula, Elzbieta; Drukala, Justyna

    2014-06-01

    Degradable aliphatic polyesters such as polylactides, polyglycolides and their copolymers are used in several biomedical and pharmaceutical applications. We analyzed the influence of poly(L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) thin films on the adhesion, proliferation, motility and differentiation of primary human skin keratinocytes and fibroblasts in the context of their potential use as cell carriers for skin tissue engineering. We did not observe visible differences in the morphology, focal contact appearance, or actin cytoskeleton organization of skin cells cultured on PLGA films compared to those cultured under control conditions. Moreover, we did not detect biologically significant differences in proliferative activity, migration parameters, level of differentiation, or expression of vinculin when the cells were cultured on PLGA films and tissue culture polystyrene. Our results indicate that PLGA films do not affect the basic functions of primary human skin keratinocytes and fibroblasts and thus show acceptable biocompatibility in vitro, paving the way for their use as biomaterials for skin tissue engineering. PMID:24825569

  19. Granular cell leiomyosarcoma of the skin

    SciTech Connect

    Suster, S.; Rosen, L.B.; Sanchez, J.L.

    1988-06-01

    A case is presented of a multifocal malignant neoplasm involving the skin of the upper back in a 10-year-old boy following radiation therapy to the head and neck for a cerebellar medulloblastoma. Histologically, the neoplastic cells were remarkable for the presence of abundant periodic acid-Schiff (PAS)-positive diastase-resistant intracytoplasmic eosinophilic granules. Immunoperoxidase procedures revealed strong positive staining of the tumor cells with desmin, vimentin, and smooth muscle myosin antibodies, and negative staining for myoglobin, S-100 protein and keratin, thus supporting a smooth muscle line of differentiation for this neoplasm. Electronmicroscopy demonstrated numerous intracytoplasmic autophagic vacuoles that corresponded to the granules observed under the light microscope. Leiomyosarcoma should be entertained in the differential diagnosis of poorly differentiated cutaneous neoplasms histologically characterized by a proliferation of cells containing abundant granular eosinophilic cytoplasm.

  20. Building a microphysiological skin model from induced pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) in 2006 was a major breakthrough for regenerative medicine. The establishment of patient-specific iPSCs has created the opportunity to model diseases in culture systems, with the potential to rapidly advance the drug discovery field. Current methods of drug discovery are inefficient, with a high proportion of drug candidates failing during clinical trials due to low efficacy and/or high toxicity. Many drugs fail toxicity testing during clinical trials, since the cells on which they have been tested do not adequately model three-dimensional tissues or their interaction with other organs in the body. There is a need to develop microphysiological systems that reliably represent both an intact tissue and also the interaction of a particular tissue with other systems throughout the body. As the port of entry for many drugs is via topical delivery, the skin is the first line of exposure, and also one of the first organs to demonstrate a reaction after systemic drug delivery. In this review, we discuss our strategy to develop a microphysiological system using iPSCs that recapitulates human skin for analyzing the interactions of drugs with the skin. PMID:24564920

  1. Dermal Substitutes Support the Growth of Human Skin-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells: Potential Tool for Skin Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Jeremias, Talita da Silva; Machado, Rafaela Grecco; Visoni, Silvia Beatriz Coutinho; Pereima, Maurício José; Leonardi, Dilmar Francisco; Trentin, Andrea Gonçalves

    2014-01-01

    New strategies for skin regeneration are needed in order to provide effective treatment for cutaneous wounds and disease. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are an attractive source of cells for tissue engineering because of their prolonged self-renewal capacity, multipotentiality, and ability to release active molecules important for tissue repair. In this paper, we show that human skin-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (SD-MSCs) display similar characteristics to the multipotent MSCs. We also evaluate their growth in a three-dimensional (3D) culture system with dermal substitutes (Integra and Pelnac). When cultured in monolayers, SD-MSCs expressed mesenchymal markers, such as CD105, Fibronectin, and α-SMA; and neural markers, such as Nestin and βIII-Tubulin; at transcriptional and/or protein level. Integra and Pelnac equally supported the adhesion, spread and growth of human SD-MSCs in 3D culture, maintaining the MSC characteristics and the expression of multilineage markers. Therefore, dermal substitutes support the growth of mesenchymal stromal cells from human skin, promising an effective tool for tissue engineering and regenerative technology. PMID:24586857

  2. Oral fibroblasts produce more HGF and KGF than skin fibroblasts in response to co-culture with keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Grøn, Birgitte; Stoltze, Kaj; Andersson, Anders; Dabelsteen, Erik

    2002-12-01

    The production of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) in subepithelial fibroblasts from buccal mucosa, periodontal ligament, and skin was determined after co-culture with keratinocytes. The purpose was to detect differences between the fibroblast subpopulations that could explain regional variation in epithelial growth and wound healing. Normal human fibroblasts were cultured on polystyrene or maintained in collagen matrix and stimulated with keratinocytes cultured on membranes. The amount of HGF and KGF protein in the culture medium was determined every 24 h for 5 days by ELISA. When cultured on polystyrene, the constitutive level of KGF and HGF in periodontal fibroblasts was higher than the level in buccal and skin fibroblasts. In the presence of keratinocytes, all three types of fibroblasts in general increased their HGF and KGF production 2-3 times. When cells were maintained in collagen, the level of HGF and KGF was decreased mainly in skin cultures. However, in oral fibroblasts, induction after stimulation was at a similar level in collagen compared to on polystyrene. Skin fibroblasts maintained in collagen produced almost no HGF whether with or without stimulation. The results demonstrate that the secretion of KGF and HGF in both unstimulated fibroblasts and in fibroblasts co-cultured with keratinocytes is dependent on the type of fibroblasts. In general, the periodontal fibroblasts had the highest level of cytokine production. This high level of growth factor production may influence the proliferation and the migration of junctional epithelium and thereby influence the development of periodontal disease. PMID:12645668

  3. Biocompatible films with tailored spectral response for prevention of DNA damage in skin cells.

    PubMed

    Núñez-Lozano, Rebeca; Pimentel, Belén; Castro-Smirnov, José R; Calvo, Mauricio E; Míguez, Hernán; de la Cueva-Méndez, Guillermo

    2015-09-16

    A hybrid nanostructured organic-in-organic biocompatible film capable of efficiently blocking a preselected range of ultraviolet light is designed to match the genotoxic action spectrum of human epithelial cells. This stack protects cultured human skin cells from UV-induced DNA lesions. As the shielding mechanism relies exclusively on reflection, the secondary effects due to absorption harmful radiation are prevented. PMID:26149339

  4. Phenotypic variability in human skin mast cells.

    PubMed

    Babina, Magda; Guhl, Sven; Artuc, Metin; Trivedi, Neil N; Zuberbier, Torsten

    2016-06-01

    Mast cells (MCs) are unique constituents of the human body. While inter-individual differences may influence the ways by which MCs operate in their skin habitat, they have not been surveyed in a comprehensive manner so far. We therefore set out to quantify skin MC variability in a large cohort of subjects. Pathophysiologically relevant key features were quantified and correlated: transcripts of c-kit, FcεRIα, FcεRIβ, FcεRIγ, histidine decarboxylase, tryptase, and chymase; surface expression of c-Kit, FcεRIα; activity of tryptase, and chymase; histamine content and release triggered by FcεRI and Ca(2+) ionophore. While there was substantial variability among subjects, it strongly depended on the feature under study (coefficient of variation 33-386%). Surface expression of FcεRI was positively associated with FcεRIα mRNA content, histamine content with HDC mRNA, and chymase activity with chymase mRNA. Also, MC signature genes were co-regulated in distinct patterns. Intriguingly, histamine levels were positively linked to tryptase and chymase activity, whereas tryptase and chymase activity appeared to be uncorrelated. FcεRI triggered histamine release was highly variable and was unrelated to FcεRI expression but unexpectedly tightly correlated with histamine release elicited by Ca(2+) ionophore. This most comprehensive and systematic work of its kind provides not only detailed insights into inter-individual variability in MCs, but also uncovers unexpected patterns of co-regulation among signature attributes of the lineage. Differences in MCs among humans may well underlie clinical responses in settings of allergic reactions and complex skin disorders alike. PMID:26706922

  5. Does manganese protect cultured human skin fibroblasts against oxidative injury by UVA, dithranol and hydrogen peroxide?

    PubMed

    Parat, M O; Richard, M J; Leccia, M T; Amblard, P; Favier, A; Beani, J C

    1995-10-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are involved in the mechanism of photoaging and carcinogenesis. Skin is endowed with antioxidant enzymes including superoxide dismutases (SOD): cytosolic copper zinc SOD and mitochondrial manganese SOD. The aim of our study was to estimate the protective effect of manganese against oxidative injury on cultured human skin fibroblasts. Dithranol, hydrogen peroxide and UV-A radiation (375 nm) were employed as oxidative stressors. The supply of manganese chloride produced an increase in cellular content of this element up to 24 fold without concomitant elevation of MnSOD activity. Nevertheless, manganese protects cells against two of the three ROS generating systems assessed, namely hydrogen peroxyde and UV-A. This protective effect depends on the concentration of manganese in the medium, 0.1 mM and 0.2 mM protect against UVA cytotoxicity, only 0.2 mM protects against H2O2 cytotoxicity. PMID:7493040

  6. Development of Blood and Lymphatic Endothelial Cells in Embryonic and Fetal Human Skin.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Christopher; Mildner, Michael; Botta, Albert; Nemec, Lucas; Rogojanu, Radu; Beer, Lucian; Fiala, Christian; Eppel, Wolfgang; Bauer, Wolfgang; Petzelbauer, Peter; Elbe-Bürger, Adelheid

    2015-09-01

    Blood and lymphatic vessels provide nutrients for the skin and fulfill important homeostatic functions, such as the regulation of immunologic processes. In this study, we investigated the development of blood and lymphatic endothelial cells in prenatal human skin in situ using multicolor immunofluorescence and analyzed angiogenic molecules by protein arrays of lysates and cell culture supernatants. We found that at 8 to 10 weeks of estimated gestational age, CD144(+) vessels predominantly express the venous endothelial cell marker PAL-E, whereas CD144(+)PAL-E(-) vessels compatible with arteries only appear at the end of the first trimester. Lymphatic progenitor cells at 8 weeks of estimated gestational age express CD31, CD144, Prox1, and temporary PAL-E. At that developmental stage not all lymphatic progenitor cells express podoplanin or Lyve-1, which are acquired with advancing gestational age in a stepwise fashion. Already in second-trimester human skin, the phenotype of blood and lymphatic vessels roughly resembles the one in adult skin. The expression pattern of angiogenic molecules in lysates and cell culture supernatants of prenatal skin did not reveal the expected bent to proangiogenic molecules, indicating a complex regulation of angiogenesis during ontogeny. In summary, this study provides enticing new insights into the development and phenotypic characteristics of the vascular system in human prenatal skin. PMID:26188132

  7. Identification of Drugs that Regulate Dermal Stem Cells and Enhance Skin Repair.

    PubMed

    Naska, Sibel; Yuzwa, Scott A; Johnston, Adam P W; Paul, Smitha; Smith, Kristen M; Paris, Maryline; Sefton, Michael V; Datti, Alessandro; Miller, Freda D; Kaplan, David R

    2016-01-12

    Here, we asked whether we could identify pharmacological agents that enhance endogenous stem cell function to promote skin repair, focusing on skin-derived precursors (SKPs), a dermal precursor cell population. Libraries of compounds already used in humans were screened for their ability to enhance the self-renewal of human and rodent SKPs. We identified and validated five such compounds, and showed that two of them, alprostadil and trimebutine maleate, enhanced the repair of full thickness skin wounds in middle-aged mice. Moreover, SKPs isolated from drug-treated skin displayed long-term increases in self-renewal when cultured in basal growth medium without drugs. Both alprostadil and trimebutine maleate likely mediated increases in SKP self-renewal by moderate hyperactivation of the MEK-ERK pathway. These findings identify candidates for potential clinical use in human skin repair, and provide support for the idea that pharmacological activation of endogenous tissue precursors represents a viable therapeutic strategy. PMID:26724904

  8. Resistance to 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D. Association with heterogeneous defects in cultured skin fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Liberman, U.A.; Eil, C.; Marx, S.J.

    1983-02-01

    We evaluated the interaction of (/sup 3/H)1,25(OH)/sub 2/D/sub 3/ with skin fibroblasts cultured from normal subjects or from affected members of six kindreds with rickets and resistance to 1-alpha, 25(OH)/sub 2/D (1,25(OH)/sub 2/D). We analyzed two aspects of the radioligand interaction; nuclear uptake with dispersed, intact cells at 37 degrees C and binding at 0 degrees C with soluble extract (cytosol) prepared from cells disrupted in buffer containing 300 mM KCl and 10 mM sodium molybdate. With normal fibroblasts the affinity and capacity of nuclear uptake of (/sup 3/H)1,25(OH)/sub 2/D/sub 3/ were 0.5 nM and 10,300 sites per cell, respectively; for binding with cytosol these were 0.13 nM and 8,900 sites per cell, respectively. In all cases where the radioligand bound with high affinity in nucleus or cytosol, the nucleus- or cytosol-associated radioligand exhibited normal sedimentation velocity on sucrose density gradients. When two kindreds exhibited similar patterns (i.e. pattern a or c) with the analyses of cultured fibroblasts, clinical features in affected members suggested that the underlying genetic defects were not identical. In conclusion: (a) Fibroblasts cultured from human skin manifest nuclear uptake and cytosol binding of (/sup 3/H)1,25(OH)/sub 2/D/sub 3/ that is an expression of the genes determining these processes in target tissues. (b) Based upon data from clinical evaluations and from analyses of cultured fibroblasts, severe resistance to 1,25(OH)/sub 2/D resulted from five or six distinct genetic mutations in six kindreds.

  9. Scarring, stem cells, scaffolds and skin repair.

    PubMed

    Markeson, Daniel; Pleat, Jonathon M; Sharpe, Justin R; Harris, Adrian L; Seifalian, Alexander M; Watt, Suzanne M

    2015-06-01

    The treatment of full thickness skin loss, which can be extensive in the case of large burns, continues to represent a challenging clinical entity. This is due to an on-going inability to produce a suitable tissue engineered substrate that can satisfactorily replicate the epidermal and dermal in vivo niches to fulfil both aesthetic and functional demands. The current gold standard treatment of autologous skin grafting is inadequate because of poor textural durability, scarring and associated contracture, and because of a paucity of donor sites in larger burns. Tissue engineering has seen exponential growth in recent years with a number of 'off-the-shelf' dermal and epidermal substitutes now available. Each has its own limitations. In this review, we examine normal wound repair in relation to stem/progenitor cells that are intimately involved in this process within the dermal niche. Endothelial precursors, in particular, are examined closely and their phenotype, morphology and enrichment from multiple sources are described in an attempt to provide some clarity regarding the controversy surrounding their classification and role in vasculogenesis. We also review the role of the next generation of cellularized scaffolds and smart biomaterials that attempt to improve the revascularisation of artificial grafts, the rate of wound healing and the final cosmetic and functional outcome. PMID:24668923

  10. Hair & skin derived progenitor cells: In search of a candidate cell for regenerative medicine

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Anil; Mohanty, Sujata; Nandy, Sushmita Bose; Gupta, Somesh; Khaitan, Binod K.; Sharma, Shilpa; Bhargava, Balram; Airan, Balram

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: Skin is an established tissue source for cell based therapy. The hair follicle has been introduced later as a tissue source for cell based therapy. The ease of tissue harvest and multipotent nature of the resident stem cells in skin and hair follicle has promoted basic and clinical research in this area. This study was conducted to evaluate skin stem cells (SSCs) and hair follicle stem cells (HFSCs) as candidate cells appropriate for neuronal and melanocyte lineage differentiation. Methods: In this study, SSCs and hair follicle stem cells (HFSCs) were expanded in vitro by explant culture method and were compared in terms of proliferative potential and stemness; differentiation potential into melanocytes and neuronal lineage. Results: SSCs were found to be more proliferative in comparison to HFSCs, however, telomerase activity was more in HFSCs in comparison to SSCs. Capacity to differentiate into two lineages of ectoderm origin (neuronal and melanocyte) was found to be different. HFSCs cells showed more propensities towards melanocyte lineage, whereas SSCs were more inclined towards neuronal lineage. Interpretation & conclusions: The study showed that SSCs had differential advantage over the HFSCs for neuronal cell differentiation, whereas, the HFSCs were better source for melanocytic differentiation. PMID:27121515

  11. In Vitro and In Vivo Germ Line Potential of Stem Cells Derived from Newborn Mouse Skin

    PubMed Central

    Dyce, Paul W.; Liu, Jinghe; Tayade, Chandrakant; Kidder, Gerald M.; Betts, Dean H.; Li, Julang

    2011-01-01

    We previously reported that fetal porcine skin-derived stem cells were capable of differentiation into oocyte-like cells (OLCs). Here we report that newborn mice skin-derived stem cells are also capable of differentiating into early OLCs. Using stem cells from mice that are transgenic for Oct4 germline distal enhancer-GFP, germ cells resulting from their differentiation are expected to be GFP+. After differentiation, some GFP+ OLCs reached 40–45 µM and expressed oocyte markers. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that ∼0.3% of the freshly isolated skin cells were GFP+. The GFP-positive cells increased to ∼7% after differentiation, suggesting that the GFP+ cells could be of in vivo origin, but are more likely induced upon being cultured in vitro. To study the in vivo germ cell potential of skin-derived cells, they were aggregated with newborn ovarian cells, and transplanted under the kidney capsule of ovariectomized mice. GFP+ oocytes were identified within a subpopulation of follicles in the resulting growth. Our finding that early oocytes can be differentiated from mice skin-derived cells in defined medium may offer a new in vitro model to study germ cell formation and oogenesis. PMID:21629667

  12. Huanglongbing and psyllid cell cultures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We successfully established cell cultures of the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri (Psyllidae: Hemiptera), DcHH-1. The cell culture also supported growth of Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus. This bacterial pathogen is associated with Huanglongbing, known as citrus greening disease. Research on...

  13. Tailored immunity by skin antigen-presenting cells

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Clement; Perrin, Helene; Combadiere, Behazine

    2014-01-01

    Skin vaccination aims at targeting epidermal and dermal antigen-presenting cells (APCs), indeed many subsets of different origin endowed with various functions populate the skin. The idea that the skin could represent a particularly potent site to induce adaptive and protective immune response emerged after the success of vaccinia virus vaccination by skin scarification. Recent advances have shown that multiple subsets of APCs coexist in the skin and participate in immunity to infectious diseases. Induction of an adaptive immune response depends on the initial recognition and capture of antigens by skin APCs and their transport to lymphoid organs. Innovative strategies of vaccination have thus been developed to target skin APCs for tailored immunity, hence this review will discuss recent insights into skin APC subsets characterization and how they can shape adaptive immune responses. PMID:25483512

  14. Establishment of epidermal cell lines derived from the skin of the Atlantic bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus).

    PubMed

    Yu, Jin; Kindy, Mark S; Ellis, Blake C; Baatz, John E; Peden-Adams, Margie; Ellingham, Tara J; Wolff, Daynna J; Fair, Patricia A; Gattoni-Celli, Sebastiano

    2005-12-01

    The Atlantic bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus), a marine mammal found off the Atlantic coast, has become the focus of considerable attention because of an increasing number of mortality events witnessed in this species over the last several years along the southeastern United States. Assessment of the impact of environmental stressors on bottlenose dolphins (BND) has been difficult because of the protected status of these marine mammals. The studies presented herein focused on establishing epidermal cell cultures and cell lines as tools for the in vitro evaluation of environmental stressors on BND skin. Epidermal cell cultures were established from skin samples obtained from Atlantic BND and subjected to karyotype analysis. These cultures were further characterized using immunohistochemical methods demonstrating expression of cytokeratins. By two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE), we observed that the proteomic profile of BND skin tissue samples shared distinct similarities with that of skin-derived cultures. Epidermal cell cultures were transfected with a plasmid encoding the SV40 small t- and large T-antigens, as well as the neomycin-resistance gene. Five neomycin-resistant clones were isolated and expanded, and all of them proliferated at a faster rate than nontransfected BND epidermal cultures, which exhibited signs of senescence. Cell lysates prepared from two transfected clones were shown to express, by Western blot analysis, both SV40 tumor antigens. These experimental results are consistent with the concept that transfected clones expressing SV40 tumor antigens represent immortalized BND cell lines. Epidermal cell lines derived from Tursiops truncatus will provide a unique tool for studying key features of the interaction occurring between dolphins and the environment in which they live at their most crucial interface: the skin. PMID:16281302

  15. Tetraploid/Diploid Mosaicism in Cultured Genital Skin Fibroblasts: Is It Causally Related to Penoscrotal Hypospadias?

    PubMed

    Giltay, Jacques C; Klijn, Aart J; de Jong, Tom P V M; Kats, Peter; van Breugel, Marjolijn; Lens, Susan; Vromans, Martijn; van der Veken, Lars T; Hochstenbach, Ron

    2016-07-01

    Tetraploid/diploid mosaicism is a rare chromosomal abnormality that is infrequently reported in patients with severe developmental delay, growth retardation, and short life span. Here, we present a 6-year-old patient with severe penoscrotal hypospadias and a coloboma of the left eye but with normal growth, normal psychomotor development, and without dysmorphisms. We considered a local, mosaic sex chromosomal aneuploidy as a possible cause of his genital anomaly and performed karyotyping in cultured fibroblasts from the genital skin, obtained during surgical correction. Tetraploid/diploid (92,XXYY/46,XY) mosaicism was found in 43/57 and 6/26 metaphases in 2 separate cultures, respectively. Buccal smear cells, blood lymphocytes, and cells from urine sediment all showed diploidy. We investigated whether this chromosomal abnormality could be found in other patients with severe hypospadias and karyotyped genital fibroblasts of 6 additional patients but found only low frequencies (<11%) of tetraploid cells, not statistically different from those found in control males with no hypospadias. This is the first time tetraploid mosaicism is found in such a high percentage in a patient without psychomotor retardation, dysmorphisms or growth delay. Although the relationship between this observed mosaicism in cultured cells and the underlying pathogenetic mechanism in penoscrotal hypospadias remains to be determined, our data clearly illustrate the power of cytogenetic techniques in detecting mosaicism compared to next-generation sequencing techniques, in which DNA pooled from multiple cells is used. PMID:27587991

  16. Simultaneous Isolation of Three Different Stem Cell Populations from Murine Skin.

    PubMed

    Forni, Maria Fernanda; Ramos Maia Lobba, Aline; Pereira Ferreira, Alexandre Hamilton; Sogayar, Mari Cleide

    2015-01-01

    The skin is a rich source of readily accessible stem cells. The level of plasticity afforded by these cells is becoming increasingly important as the potential of stem cells in Cell Therapy and Regenerative Medicine continues to be explored. Several protocols described single type stem cell isolation from skin; however, none of them afforded simultaneous isolation of more than one population. Herein, we describe the simultaneous isolation and characterization of three stem cell populations from the dermis and epidermis of murine skin, namely Epidermal Stem Cells (EpiSCs), Skin-derived Precursors (SKPs) and Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs). The simultaneous isolation was possible through a simple protocol based on culture selection techniques. These cell populations are shown to be capable of generating chondrocytes, adipocytes, osteocytes, terminally differentiated keratinocytes, neurons and glia, rendering this protocol suitable for the isolation of cells for tissue replenishment and cell based therapies. The advantages of this procedure are far-reaching since the skin is not only the largest organ in the body, but also provides an easily accessible source of stem cells for autologous graft. PMID:26462205

  17. Skin telocytes versus fibroblasts: two distinct dermal cell populations.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yuli; Zhu, Zaihua; Zheng, Yonghua; Wan, Weiguo; Manole, Catalin G; Zhang, Qiangqiang

    2015-11-01

    It is already accepted that telocytes (TCs) represent a new type of interstitial cells in human dermis. In normal skin, TCs have particular spatial relations with different dermal structures such as blood vessels, hair follicles, arrector pili muscles or segments of sebaceous and/or eccrine sweat glands. The distribution and the density of TCs is affected in various skin pathological conditions. Previous studies mentioned the particular (ultra)structure of TCs and also their immunophenotype, miR imprint or proteome, genome or secretome features. As fibroblast is the most common intersitital cell (also in human dermis), a dedicated comparison between human skin TCs and fibroblasts (Fbs) was required to be performed. In this study, using different techniques, we document several points of difference between human dermis TCs and Fbs. By transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), we demonstrated TCs with their hallmark cellular prolongations - telopodes. Thus, we showed their ultrastructural distinctiveness from Fbs. By RayBio Human Cytokine Antibody Array V analyses performed on the supernatant from separately cultured TCs and Fbs, we detected the cytokine profile of both cell types, individually. Two of 79 detected cytokines - epithelial-derived neutrophil-activating peptide 78 and granulocyte chemotactic protein-2 - were 1.5 times higher in the supernatant of TCs (comparing with Fbs). On the other hand, 37 cytokines were at least 1.5 higher in Fbs supernatant (comparing with TCs), and among them six cytokines - interleukin 5, monocyte chemotactic protein-3 (MCP-3), MCP-4, macrophage inflammatory protein-3, angiogenin, thrombopoietin - being 9.5 times higher (results also confirmed by ELISA testing). In summary, using different techniques, we showed that human dermal TCs and Fbs are different in terms of ultrastructure and cytokine profile. PMID:26414534

  18. Skin telocytes versus fibroblasts: two distinct dermal cell populations

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Yuli; Zhu, Zaihua; Zheng, Yonghua; Wan, Weiguo; Manole, Catalin G; Zhang, Qiangqiang

    2015-01-01

    It is already accepted that telocytes (TCs) represent a new type of interstitial cells in human dermis. In normal skin, TCs have particular spatial relations with different dermal structures such as blood vessels, hair follicles, arrector pili muscles or segments of sebaceous and/or eccrine sweat glands. The distribution and the density of TCs is affected in various skin pathological conditions. Previous studies mentioned the particular (ultra)structure of TCs and also their immunophenotype, miR imprint or proteome, genome or secretome features. As fibroblast is the most common intersitital cell (also in human dermis), a dedicated comparison between human skin TCs and fibroblasts (Fbs) was required to be performed. In this study, using different techniques, we document several points of difference between human dermis TCs and Fbs. By transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), we demonstrated TCs with their hallmark cellular prolongations – telopodes. Thus, we showed their ultrastructural distinctiveness from Fbs. By RayBio Human Cytokine Antibody Array V analyses performed on the supernatant from separately cultured TCs and Fbs, we detected the cytokine profile of both cell types, individually. Two of 79 detected cytokines – epithelial-derived neutrophil-activating peptide 78 and granulocyte chemotactic protein-2 – were 1.5 times higher in the supernatant of TCs (comparing with Fbs). On the other hand, 37 cytokines were at least 1.5 higher in Fbs supernatant (comparing with TCs), and among them six cytokines – interleukin 5, monocyte chemotactic protein-3 (MCP-3), MCP-4, macrophage inflammatory protein-3, angiogenin, thrombopoietin – being 9.5 times higher (results also confirmed by ELISA testing). In summary, using different techniques, we showed that human dermal TCs and Fbs are different in terms of ultrastructure and cytokine profile. PMID:26414534

  19. DNA repair responses in human skin cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hanawalt, P.C.; Liu, S.C.; Parsons, C.S.

    1981-07-01

    Sunlight and some environmental chemical agents produce lesions in the DNA of human skin cells that if unrepaired may interfere with normal functioning of these cells. The most serious outcome of such interactions may be malignancy. It is therefore important to develop an understanding of mechanisms by which the lesions may be repaired or tolerated without deleterious consequences. Our models for the molecular processing of damaged DNA have been derived largely from the study of bacterial systems. Some similarities but significant differences are revealed when human cell responses are tested against these models. It is also of importance to learn DNA repair responses of epidermal keratinocytes for comparison with the more extensive studies that have been carried out with dermal fibroblasts. Our experimental results thus far indicate similarities for the excision-repair of ultraviolet-induced pyrimidine dimers in human keratinocytes and fibroblasts. Both the monoadducts and the interstrand crosslinks produced in DNA by photoactivated 8-methoxypsoralen (PUVA) can be repaired in normal human fibroblasts but not in those from xeroderma pigmentosum patients. The monoadducts, like pyrimidine dimers, are probably the more mutagenic/carcinogenic lesions while the crosslinks are less easily repaired and probably result in more effective blocking of DNA function. It is suggested that a split-dose protocol that maximizes the production of crosslinks while minimizing the yield of monoadducts may be more effective and potentially less carcinogenic than the single ultraviolet exposure regimen in PUVA therapy for psoriasis.

  20. Targeting Skin Dendritic Cells to Improve Intradermal Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Romani, N.; Flacher, V.; Tripp, C. H.; Sparber, F.; Ebner, S.; Stoitzner, P.

    2014-01-01

    Vaccinations in medicine are typically administered into the muscle beneath the skin or into the subcutaneous fat. As a consequence, the vaccine is immunologically processed by antigen-presenting cells of the skin or the muscle. Recent evidence suggests that the clinically seldom used intradermal route is effective and possibly even superior to the conventional subcutaneous or intramuscular route. Several types of professional antigen-presenting cells inhabit the healthy skin. Epidermal Langerhans cells (CD207/langerin+), dermal langerinneg, and dermal langerin+ dendritic cells (DC) have been described, the latter subset so far only in mouse skin. In human skin langerinneg dermal DC can be further classified based on their reciprocal expression of CD1a and CD14. The relative contributions of these subsets to the generation of immunity or tolerance are still unclear. Yet, specializations of these different populations have become apparent. Langerhans cells in human skin appear to be specialized for induction of cytotoxic T lymphocytes; human CD14+ dermal DC can promote antibody production by B cells. It is currently attempted to rationally devise and improve vaccines by harnessing such specific properties of skin DC. This could be achieved by specifically targeting functionally diverse skin DC subsets. We discuss here advances in our knowledge on the immunological properties of skin DC and strategies to significantly improve the outcome of vaccinations by applying this knowledge. PMID:21253784

  1. In vitro bioartificial skin culture model of tissue rejection and inflammatory/immune mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Strande, L F; Foley, S T; Doolin, E J; Hewitt, C W

    1997-06-01

    We hypothesized that an in vitro bioartificial skin rejection model using living LSEs grown in tissue culture could be developed for the study of autologous, allogenic, and/or xenogeneic inflammatory/immune mechanisms and topical immunosuppressive drugs. Human fibroblasts were mixed with type 1 rat-tail collagen to form a matrix (4 to 5 days), on which human keratinocytes were seeded. After a keratinocyte monolayer formed, CT cultures were raised to the air-liquid interface for continued growth. In the REJ LSE model, immunocytes isolated from human blood were seeded on top of the NHEK monolayer at the time of air-lifting. Thickness measurements of the acellular keratin and keratinocyte layers, and nuclear/cytoplasmic ratios, in both CT and REJ were made using digital image analysis. Immunostaining with anticytokeratin demonstrated a viable, keratin-producing epidermal layer; staining with anti-TGF-beta suggested a role for this cytokine in the rejection or wound-healing process. The LSE appeared histologically similar to normal human epidermis. Immunocytes added to the REJ cultures caused an obvious rejection response and were clearly identifiable in the gels as CD45+ staining cells. The LSE model appears promising for the study of immune/inflammatory mechanisms, thermal injury, screening antirejection agents that might be applied topically and as an in vitro replacement for skin graft studies in animals. PMID:9193551

  2. Effect of zinc supplementation on resistance of cultured human skin fibroblasts toward oxidant stress.

    PubMed

    Richard, M J; Guiraud, P; Leccia, M T; Beani, J C; Favier, A

    1993-01-01

    In purified system zinc has been shown to have an antioxidant role. Its effects on the resistance of cultured cells towards oxidative stress in vitro were examined. Diploid human skin fibroblasts were grown for 21 d in culture media (RPMI 1640 containing 15% fetal calf serum) added with different zinc (Zn) concentrations (100, 125, and 150 microM as Zinc chlorur ZnCl2). In comparison, cell controls were grown in standard culture media (6.5 microM Zn). The intracellular zinc levels of treated fibroblasts increased from 3- to 7-fold (2330 +/- 120 ng/mg protein in 150-microM Zn-treated cells versus 331 +/- 21 ng/mg protein in control cells). The intracellular copper increased 3- fold whereas the iron content slightly but not significantly decreased. The index of basal lipid peroxidation measured as thiobarbituric acid reactants (TBARs) of zinc-supplemented cells was lower than that of non zinc supplemented controls (0.89 mumol/g protein in 150 microM Zn-treated cells versus 1.59 mumol/g protein in controls). At these high doses of zinc, fibroblasts expressed lower antioxidant metalloenzymes activities. Diminished TBARs in Zn treated cells tends to support that Zn acts protectively against free radical mediated damage. However when the cells were challenged with extracellular oxidant stresses mediated by hypoxanthine/xanthine oxidase or hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), an increased toxicity in Zn-supplemented cells was observed. When we applied an intracellular oxidative stress as UV-B or UV-A radiation, Zn-treated fibroblasts were more resistant than cells grown in normal medium. If Zn has shown antioxidant effect in some in vitro or in vivo systems our observations clearly demonstrate that this role is not mediated by antioxidant metalloenzymes. PMID:7688532

  3. Melanin Transfer in Human 3D Skin Equivalents Generated Exclusively from Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gledhill, Karl; Guo, Zongyou; Umegaki-Arao, Noriko; Higgins, Claire A.; Itoh, Munenari; Christiano, Angela M.

    2015-01-01

    The current utility of 3D skin equivalents is limited by the fact that existing models fail to recapitulate the cellular complexity of human skin. They often contain few cell types and no appendages, in part because many cells found in the skin are difficult to isolate from intact tissue and cannot be expanded in culture. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) present an avenue by which we can overcome this issue due to their ability to be differentiated into multiple cell types in the body and their unlimited growth potential. We previously reported generation of the first human 3D skin equivalents from iPSC-derived fibroblasts and iPSC-derived keratinocytes, demonstrating that iPSCs can provide a foundation for modeling a complex human organ such as skin. Here, we have increased the complexity of this model by including additional iPSC-derived melanocytes. Epidermal melanocytes, which are largely responsible for skin pigmentation, represent the second most numerous cell type found in normal human epidermis and as such represent a logical next addition. We report efficient melanin production from iPSC-derived melanocytes and transfer within an entirely iPSC-derived epidermal-melanin unit and generation of the first functional human 3D skin equivalents made from iPSC-derived fibroblasts, keratinocytes and melanocytes. PMID:26308443

  4. High density cell culture system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaulding, Glenn F. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An annular culture vessel for growing mammalian cells is constructed in a one piece integral and annular configuration with an open end which is closed by an endcap. The culture vessel is rotatable about a horizontal axis by use of conventional roller systems commonly used in culture laboratories. The end wall of the endcap has tapered access ports to frictionally and sealingly receive the ends of hypodermic syringes. The syringes permit the introduction of fresh nutrient and withdrawal of spent nutrients. The walls are made of conventional polymeric cell culture material and are subjected to neutron bombardment to form minute gas permeable perforations in the walls.

  5. Spectral analysis of delayed luminescence as a tool to discriminate between normal and cancer skin cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musumeci, F.; Scordino, A.; Tudisco, S.; Privitera, S.; Applegate, L. A.; Niggli, H. J.

    2005-08-01

    Photobiological research in the last decades has shown the existence of Delayed Luminescence in biological tissue, which presents an excitation spectrum with a peak within the UVA region and can be detected with sophisticated photomultiplier systems. Based on these findings, a new and powerful tool able to measure the UV-A-laser-induced Delayed Luminescence emission of cultured cells was developed, with the intention to detect biophysical changes between carcinogenic and normal cells. Indeed noticeable differences have been found in the time resolved emission spectrum of delayed luminescence of cell cultures of human fibroblast and human melanoma. This new, powerful and non-invasive technique, in principle, could be applied in all fields of skin research, such as the investigation of skin abnormalities and to test the effect of products involved in regeneration, anti-aging and UV-light protection in order to prevent skin cancer.

  6. Isolation and characterization of SSEA3(+) stem cells derived from goat skin fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhongcai; Liu, Jun; Liu, Hongliang; Qiu, Mingning; Liu, Qingqing; Zheng, Liming; Pang, Meijun; Quan, Fusheng; Zhang, Yong

    2013-06-01

    Novel stem cells expressing stage-specific embryonic antigen 3 (SSEA-3) reside among human dermal fibroblasts and are known as multilineage-differentiating stress-enduring (Muse) cells. They enhance the generation efficiency of induced pluripotent stem cells. However, Muse cells have only been found in humans. We aimed to isolate SSEA3-positive cells from terminally differentiated skin fibroblasts of adult goat and determine their pluripotency. Cell clusters from SSEA3(+) populations possessed stem cell-like morphological features and normal karyotypes, were consistently positive for alkaline phosphatase, and expressed stem cell pluripotency markers. These SSEA3(+) cells remained undifferentiated over eight passages in suspension culture and were able to differentiate into cells of all three germ layers in vitro and in vivo. Our combined findings suggest that a subset of adult stem cells expressing SSEA3 also exist among adult goat skin fibroblasts. We are the first to report that multipotent adult goat cells exist among terminally differentiated goat skin in suspension culture. Our results also provide a promising platform for generation of a transgenic goat, because the undifferentiated state of stem cells was thought to be more efficient as donor cells for somatic cell nuclear transfer. PMID:23668861

  7. Effects of selenium on UVA-induced lipid peroxidation in cultured human skin fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Moysan, A; Morlière, P; Marquis, I; Richard, A; Dubertret, L

    1995-01-01

    The effect of selenium on the lethal action of ultraviolet radiations and on the lipid peroxidation induced by exposures to ultraviolet A (320-400 nm; 360 kJ.m-2) and ultraviolet B (290-320 nm; 2 kJ.m-2) have been measured in cultured human skin fibroblasts. The experiments have been performed with either pure selenium or a spring water containing selenium and other trace elements (zinc and strontium). For cells cultured in a standard medium containing 10% fetal calf serum, no effect of selenium or spring water addition to the culture medium was observed on the lethality or on the peroxidative process induced by ultraviolet A and B radiations. Concurrently, there was no detectable increase of the seleno-dependent glutathione peroxidase activity. For cells previously depleted in selenium by a culture in a medium containing only 2% serum, a protective effect of selenium can be detected. Depending on the fibroblast donor, we observed (1) a protective effect on lethality of dividing fibroblasts induced by ultraviolet A radiations, (2) a protective effect on lipid peroxidation induced by ultraviolet A radiations on dividing or quiescent fibroblasts and (3) an increase in glutathione peroxidase activity in fibroblasts. PMID:7632435

  8. Assessment of dermal toxicity of nanosilica using cultured keratinocytes, a human skin equivalent model and an in vivo model.

    PubMed

    Park, Yoon-Hee; Kim, Ji Na; Jeong, Sang Hoon; Choi, Jae Eun; Lee, Seung-Ho; Choi, Byeong Hyeok; Lee, Jung Pyo; Sohn, Kyung Hee; Park, Kui Lea; Kim, Meyoung-Kon; Son, Sang Wook

    2010-01-12

    Assessments of skin irritation potentials are important aspects of the development of nanotechnology. Nanosilica is currently being widely used for commercial purposes, but little literature is available on its skin toxicity and irritation potential. This study was designed to determine whether nanosilica has the potential to cause acute cutaneous toxicity, using cultured HaCaT keratinocytes (CHK), a human skin equivalent model (HSEM), and invivo model. Nanosilica was characterized by scanning electron microscopy. We evaluated the cytotoxic effects of nanosilica on CHKs and the HSEM. In addition, we also investigated whether two commercially available nanosilicas with different sizes (7 and 10-20 nm) have different effects. To confirm invitro results, we evaluated the irritation potentials of nanosilicas on rabbit skin. Nanosilicas reduced the cell viabilities of CHKs in a dose-dependent manner. However, the HSEM revealed no irritation at 500 microg/ml of nanosilica. Furthermore, this result concurred with Draize skin irritation test findings. The present study data indicate that nanosilica does not cause acute cutaneous irritation. Furthermore, this study shows that the HSEM used provides more useful screening data than the conventional cell culture model on the relative toxicities of NPs. PMID:19850098

  9. What's New in Research and Treatment of Basal and Squamous Cell Skin Cancers?

    MedlinePlus

    ... for basal and squamous cell skin cancers What’s new in basal and squamous cell skin cancer research? ... cancer cells. Researchers are working to apply this new information to strategies for preventing and treating skin ...

  10. Cell culture purity issues and DFAT cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Shengjuan; Bergen, Werner G.; Zan, Linsen; Dodson, Michael V.

    2013-04-12

    Highlights: •DFAT cells are progeny cells derived from dedifferentiated mature adipocytes. •Common problems in this research is potential cell contamination of initial cultures. •The initial cell culture purity is crucial in DFAT cell research field. -- Abstract: Dedifferentiation of mature adipocytes, in vitro, has been pursued/documented for over forty years. The subsequent progeny cells are named dedifferentiated adipocyte-derived progeny cells (DFAT cells). DFAT cells are proliferative and likely to possess mutilineage potential. As a consequence, DFAT cells and their progeny/daughter cells may be useful as a potential tool for various aspects of tissue engineering and as potential vectors for the alleviation of several disease states. Publications in this area have been increasing annually, but the purity of the initial culture of mature adipocytes has seldom been documented. Consequently, it is not always clear whether DFAT cells are derived from dedifferentiated mature (lipid filled) adipocytes or from contaminating cells that reside in an impure culture.

  11. Melanocytes in the Skin – Comparative Whole Transcriptome Analysis of Main Skin Cell Types

    PubMed Central

    Reemann, Paula; Reimann, Ene; Ilmjärv, Sten; Porosaar, Orm; Silm, Helgi; Jaks, Viljar; Vasar, Eero; Kingo, Külli; Kõks, Sulev

    2014-01-01

    Melanocytes possess several functions besides a role in pigment synthesis, but detailed characteristics of the cells are still unclear. We used whole transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq) to assess differential gene expression of cultivated normal human melanocytes with respect to keratinocytes, fibroblasts and whole skin. The present results reveal cultivated melanocytes as highly proliferative cells with possible stem cell-like properties. The enhanced readiness to regenerate makes melanocytes the most vulnerable cells in the skin and explains their high risk of developing into malignant melanoma. PMID:25545474

  12. Chromium Is Elevated in Fin Whale (Balaenoptera physalus) Skin Tissue and Is Genotoxic to Fin Whale Skin Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wise, Catherine F.; Wise, Sandra S.; Thompson, W. Douglas; Perkins, Christopher; Wise, John Pierce

    2015-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) is present in the marine environment and is a known carcinogen and reproductive toxicant. Cr(VI) is the form of chromium that is well absorbed through the cell membrane. It is also the most prevalent form in seawater. We measured the total Cr levels in skin biopsies obtained from healthy free-ranging fin whales from the Gulf of Maine and found elevated levels relative to marine mammals in other parts of the world. The levels in fin whale biopsies ranged from 1.71 ug/g to 19.6 ug/g with an average level of 10.07 ug/g. We also measured the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of Cr(VI) in fin whale skin cells. We found that particulate and soluble Cr(VI) are both cytotoxic and genotoxic to fin whale skin cells in a concentration-dependent manner. The concentration range used in our cell culture studies used environmentally relevant concentrations based on the biopsy measurements. These data suggest that Cr(VI) may be a concern for whales in the Gulf of Maine. PMID:25805270

  13. Motogenic substrata and chemokinetic growth factors for human skin cells

    PubMed Central

    Sutherland, Jennifer; Denyer, Morgan; Britland, Stephen

    2005-01-01

    Extracellular matrix remodelling and accurate spatio-temporal coordination of growth factor expression are two factors that are believed to regulate mitoses and cell migration in developing and regenerating tissues. The present quantitative videomicroscopical study examined the influence of some of the principal components of extracellular matrix and several growth factors that are known to be expressed in dermal wounds on three important facets of human skin cell behaviour in culture. Keratinocytes, melanocytes and dermal fibroblasts (and myofibroblast controls) exhibited varying degrees of substrate adhesion, division and migration depending on the composition of the culture substrate. Substrates that are recognized components of transitional matrices generally accentuated cell adhesion and proliferation, and were motogenic, when compared with serum-treated control surfaces, whereas components of more stable structures such as basement membrane had less influence. Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), epidermal growth factor (EGF) and α fibroblastic growth factor (αFGF) all promoted cell proliferation and were chemokinetic to dermal fibroblasts, but not keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) or transforming growth factor β (TGFβ). PDGF, EGF and KGF, but not TGFβ or αFGF, all enhanced proliferation of dermal keratinocytes. The same growth factors, and in addition KGF, all stimulated motility in keratinocytes, but TGFβ and αFGF again had no effect. Developing a better understanding of the interdependency of factors that control crucial cell behaviour may assist those who are interested in the regulation of histogenesis and also inform the development of rational therapeutic strategies for the management of chronic and poorly healed wounds. PMID:16011545

  14. Differentiation of early germ cells from human skin-derived stem cells without exogenous gene integration.

    PubMed

    Ge, Wei; Ma, Hua-Gang; Cheng, Shun-Feng; Sun, Yuan-Chao; Sun, Li-Lan; Sun, Xiao-Feng; Li, Lan; Dyce, Paul; Li, Julang; Shi, Qing-Hua; Shen, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Infertility has long been a difficult issue for many couples. The successful differentiation of germ cells and live progeny from pluripotent stem cells brings new hope to the couples suffering with infertility. Here we successfully isolated human fetus skin-derived stem cells (hfSDSCs) from fetus skin tissue and demonstrated that hfSDSCs can be differentiated into early human germ cell-like cells (hGCLCs). These cells express human germ cell markers DAZL and VASA. Moreover, these pluripotent stem cell-derived hGCLCs are free of exogenous gene integration. When hfSDSCs were differentiated in porcine follicle fluid (PFF) conditioned media, which has been shown to promote the differentiation of mouse and porcine SDSCs into oocyte-like cells (OLCs), we observed some vesicular structures formed from hfSDSCs. Moreover, when hfSDSCs were cultured with specific conditioned media, we observed punctate and elongated SCP3 staining foci, indicating the initiation of meiosis. Ploidy analysis and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis indicated that a small percentage of putative 1N populations formed from hfSDSCs when compared with positive controls. In conclusion, our data here, for the first time, demonstrated that hfSDSCs possess the differentiation potential into germ lines, and they may differentiate both male and female hGCLCs in vitro under appropriate conditions. PMID:26347377

  15. Differentiating skin-limited and multisystem Langerhans cell histiocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Simko, Stephen J.; Garmezy, Benjamin; Abhyankar, Harshal; Lupo, Philip J.; Chakraborty, Rikhia; Lim, Karen Phaik Har; Shih, Albert; Hicks, M. John; Wright, Teresa S.; Levy, Moise L.; McClain, Kenneth L.; Allen, Carl E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To identify features associated with multisystem involvement and therapeutic failure in patients with skin Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH). Study design We reviewed medical records of 71 consecutive LCH patients with skin involvement evaluated at Texas Children’s Hospital and analyzed clinical features, laboratory results, and presence of circulating cells with the BRAF-V600E mutation, with respect to initial staging and clinical outcomes. Results Skin disease in patients older than 18 months at diagnosis was associated with presence of multisystem disease (OR 9.65, 95% CI 1.17–79.4). Forty percent of patients referred for presumed skin-limited LCH had underlying multisystem involvement, half of these with risk-organ involvement. Patients with skin-limited LCH had 3-year progression-free survival (PFS) of 89% after initial therapy, and none developed multisystem disease. Patients with skin/multisystem involvement had 3 year PFS of 44% with vinblastine/prednisone therapy, and risk-organ involvement did not correlate with failure to achieve non-active disease. Circulating cells with BRAF-V600E were detected at higher frequency in multisystem patients (8/11 skin/multisystem, 1/13 skin-limited, P=0.002). Conclusions Skin-limited LCH requires infrequent therapeutic intervention and has lower risk of progression relative to skin plus multisystem LCH. The less aggressive clinical course and lack of circulating cells with BRAF-V600E mutation in skin-limited LCH suggest a different mechanism of disease origin compared with multisystem or risk-organ disease. PMID:25441388

  16. Vital roles of stem cells and biomaterials in skin tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Mohd Hilmi, Abu Bakar; Halim, Ahmad Sukari

    2015-03-26

    Tissue engineering essentially refers to technology for growing new human tissue and is distinct from regenerative medicine. Currently, pieces of skin are already being fabricated for clinical use and many other tissue types may be fabricated in the future. Tissue engineering was first defined in 1987 by the United States National Science Foundation which critically discussed the future targets of bioengineering research and its consequences. The principles of tissue engineering are to initiate cell cultures in vitro, grow them on scaffolds in situ and transplant the composite into a recipient in vivo. From the beginning, scaffolds have been necessary in tissue engineering applications. Regardless, the latest technology has redirected established approaches by omitting scaffolds. Currently, scientists from diverse research institutes are engineering skin without scaffolds. Due to their advantageous properties, stem cells have robustly transformed the tissue engineering field as part of an engineered bilayered skin substitute that will later be discussed in detail. Additionally, utilizing biomaterials or skin replacement products in skin tissue engineering as strategy to successfully direct cell proliferation and differentiation as well as to optimize the safety of handling during grafting is beneficial. This approach has also led to the cells' application in developing the novel skin substitute that will be briefly explained in this review. PMID:25815126

  17. Complementation studies of isovaleric acidemia and glutaric aciduria type II using cultured skin fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Dubiel, B; Dabrowski, C; Wetts, R; Tanaka, K

    1983-01-01

    Using cultured skin fibroblasts, we studied the heterogeneity of inborn errors of leucine metabolism such as isovaleric acidemia (IVA), glutaric aciduria type II (GA II), and multiple carboxylase deficiency (MC). We first developed a simple macromolecular-labeling test to measure the ability of cells to oxidize [1-14C]isovaleric acid in situ in culture. Cells from two different lines were fused using polyethylene glycol, and the ability of the heterokaryons to oxidize [1-14C]isovaleric acid was tested by the macromolecular-labeling test. The MC line complemented with all 10 IVA lines tested; heterokaryons showed 99 +/- 68% more activity than the unfused mixture of component cells. GA II/IVA heterokaryons exhibited poor growth, but when the culture remained confluent, the GA II cells complemented with all six IVA lines tested, showing a 71 +/- 41% increase in activity. The relatively large standard deviations are due to a few experiments in which significant enhancement of macromolecular-labeling test activity was not observed upon fusion, but significant complementation was clearly observed in repeats of the same combinations. These results are consistent with our previous findings, which indicated that the decreased ability of GA II cells to oxidize isovaleryl-CoA involves a defective electron-transporting system rather than a defective isovaleryl-CoA dehydrogenase. IVA/IVA heterokaryons showed no complementation in any combination tested, indicating no detectable heterogeneity in isovaleric acidemia. This finding indicates that the same gene is mutated in all IVA lines. Previous results indicated that this gene codes for isovaleryl-CoA dehydrogenase. PMID:6630517

  18. Using stem cells in skin regeneration: possibilities and reality.

    PubMed

    Cerqueira, Mariana Teixeira; Marques, Alexandra Pinto; Reis, Rui Luís

    2012-05-20

    Tissue-engineered skin has a long history of clinical applications, yet current treatments are not capable of completely regenerating normal, uninjured skin. Nonetheless, the field has experienced a tremendous development in the past 10 years, encountering the summit of tissue engineering (TE) and the arising of stem cell research. Since then, unique features of these cells such as self-renewal capacity, multi-lineage differentiation potential, and wound healing properties have been highlighted. However, a realistic perspective of their outcome in skin regenerative medicine applications is still absent. This review intends to discuss the directions that adult and embryonic stem cells (ESCs) can take, strengthening the skin regeneration field. Distinctively, a critical overview of stem cells' differentiation potential onto skin main lineages, along with a highlight of their participation in wound healing mechanisms, is herein provided. We aim to compile and review significant work to allow a better understanding of the best skin TE approaches, enabling the embodiment of the materialization of a new era in skin regeneration to come, with a conscious overview of the current limitations. PMID:22188597

  19. Skin Biopsy and Patient-Specific Stem Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yao; Nguyen, Huy V.; Tsang, Stephen H.

    2016-01-01

    The generation of patient-specific induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells permits the development of next-generation patient-specific systems biology models reflecting personalized genomics profiles to better understand pathophysiology. In this chapter, we describe how to create a patient-specific iPS cell line. There are three major steps: (1) performing a skin biopsy procedure on the patient; (2) extracting human fibroblast cells from the skin biopsy tissue; and (3) reprogramming patient-specific fibroblast cells into the pluripotent stem cell stage. PMID:26141312

  20. Therapeutic Potential of Adipose-Derived SSEA-3-Positive Muse Cells for Treating Diabetic Skin Ulcers.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Kahori; Kuno, Shinichiro; Ishimine, Hisako; Aoi, Noriyuki; Mineda, Kazuhide; Kato, Harunosuke; Doi, Kentaro; Kanayama, Koji; Feng, Jingwei; Mashiko, Takanobu; Kurisaki, Akira; Yoshimura, Kotaro

    2015-02-01

    Stage-specific embryonic antigen-3 (SSEA-3)-positive multipotent mesenchymal cells (multilineage differentiating stress-enduring [Muse] cells) were isolated from cultured human adipose tissue-derived stem/stromal cells (hASCs) and characterized, and their therapeutic potential for treating diabetic skin ulcers was evaluated. Cultured hASCs were separated using magnetic-activated cell sorting into positive and negative fractions, a SSEA-3+ cell-enriched fraction (Muse-rich) and the remaining fraction (Muse-poor). Muse-rich hASCs showed upregulated and downregulated pluripotency and cell proliferation genes, respectively, compared with Muse-poor hASCs. These cells also released higher amounts of certain growth factors, particularly under hypoxic conditions, compared with Muse-poor cells. Skin ulcers were generated in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice with type 1 diabetes, which showed delayed wound healing compared with nondiabetic SCID mice. Treatment with Muse-rich cells significantly accelerated wound healing compared with treatment with Muse-poor cells. Transplanted cells were integrated into the regenerated dermis as vascular endothelial cells and other cells. However, they were not detected in the surrounding intact regions. Thus, the selected population of ASCs has greater therapeutic effects to accelerate impaired wound healing associated with type 1 diabetes. These cells can be achieved in large amounts with minimal morbidity and could be a practical tool for a variety of stem cell-depleted or ischemic conditions of various organs and tissues. PMID:25561682

  1. Therapeutic Potential of Adipose-Derived SSEA-3-Positive Muse Cells for Treating Diabetic Skin Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Kinoshita, Kahori; Kuno, Shinichiro; Ishimine, Hisako; Aoi, Noriyuki; Mineda, Kazuhide; Kato, Harunosuke; Doi, Kentaro; Kanayama, Koji; Feng, Jingwei; Mashiko, Takanobu; Kurisaki, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Stage-specific embryonic antigen-3 (SSEA-3)-positive multipotent mesenchymal cells (multilineage differentiating stress-enduring [Muse] cells) were isolated from cultured human adipose tissue-derived stem/stromal cells (hASCs) and characterized, and their therapeutic potential for treating diabetic skin ulcers was evaluated. Cultured hASCs were separated using magnetic-activated cell sorting into positive and negative fractions, a SSEA-3+ cell-enriched fraction (Muse-rich) and the remaining fraction (Muse-poor). Muse-rich hASCs showed upregulated and downregulated pluripotency and cell proliferation genes, respectively, compared with Muse-poor hASCs. These cells also released higher amounts of certain growth factors, particularly under hypoxic conditions, compared with Muse-poor cells. Skin ulcers were generated in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice with type 1 diabetes, which showed delayed wound healing compared with nondiabetic SCID mice. Treatment with Muse-rich cells significantly accelerated wound healing compared with treatment with Muse-poor cells. Transplanted cells were integrated into the regenerated dermis as vascular endothelial cells and other cells. However, they were not detected in the surrounding intact regions. Thus, the selected population of ASCs has greater therapeutic effects to accelerate impaired wound healing associated with type 1 diabetes. These cells can be achieved in large amounts with minimal morbidity and could be a practical tool for a variety of stem cell-depleted or ischemic conditions of various organs and tissues. PMID:25561682

  2. Double trisomy mosaic (47,XXX/48,XXX,+13) confirmed by FISH and skin fibroblast culture

    SciTech Connect

    Lieber, E.; Grady, V.; Dosik, H.

    1994-09-01

    A 4 lb 8 oz female was born to a 49-year-old woman (P1200G12) at 40 weeks. The baby had tetralogy of Fallot, polydactyly, microcephaly, low set simple ears, posterior cleft of the soft palate and overlapping flexion deformities of both hands. The eyes were deep set. The clinical impression was trisomy 13. The baby is not doing well and needs a gastrotomy tube for feeding. Sucking is allright but swallowing is impeded. An MRI showed an anomaly of the corpus callosum. The ophthalmological examination showed no abnormalities. A chromosome study on a 2-day peripheral blood sample resulted in poor growth and poor morphology; however, 20 Giemsa-banded cells revealed a 47,XXX karyotype. A second specimen was obtained to search for mosaicism and a blood smear revealed nuclear projections on the neutrophils. FISH analysis using whole chromosome painting probe (Life Technologies) first identified the extra chromosome number 13, the final results showing five of sixty metaphase cells (8.3%) with trisomy 13. Cytogenetic analysis using Giemsa-banding technique revealed four cells in fifty examined (8.0%) with a 48,XXX,+13 karyotype. In order to further evaluate the mosaicism, cytogenetic analysis of a skin fibroblast culture was performed. Twenty one of twenty three cells examined (91.3%) showed the 48,XXX,+13 karyotype. FISH analysis of the skin biopsy revealed eighteen of twenty cells (90.9%) with the trisomy 13. The FISH technique is an important enhancement to routine cytogenetic studies when they do not immediately correlate with clinical impressions.

  3. Rat epidermal keratinocyte organotypic culture (ROC) as a model for chemically induced skin irritation testing

    SciTech Connect

    Pappinen, Sari . E-mail: sari.pappinen@uku.fi; Pasonen-Seppaenen, Sanna; Suhonen, Marjukka; Tammi, Raija; Urtti, Arto

    2005-11-01

    The potential of rat epidermal keratinocyte (REK) organotypic culture (ROC) with proper stratum corneum barrier as a model for screening skin irritants was evaluated. The test chemicals were selected from ECETOC database (1995) and the observed in vitro irritation potential was compared to ECETOC in vivo primary irritation index (PII), to EU risk phrases, and to the harmonized OECD criteria. Chemicals were applied onto the stratum corneum surface of ROC for 30 min and samples were taken from the underlying medium at 4 and 8 h after exposure. Cell membrane integrity (determined by LDH assay) and pro-inflammatory effect (determined by IL-1{alpha} release) were verified at both time points and correlated to PII values. The best correlation (R {sup 2} = 0.831) was seen with LDH leakage test. Based on obtained data, chemicals were classified according to criteria defined by EU and OECD. From 12 chemicals, only two were incorrectly classified according to OECD criteria when using LDH leakage and IL-1{alpha} release as irritation markers. At the end of experiment, chemical-treated ROC cultures were fixed and histological changes were assessed. Typical signs for irritation were lightly stained cytoplasm, condensed nuclei, cellular vacuolization, eosinophilic cytoplasms, and blebbing. These irritation effects of chemicals were graded visually into four classes (A-D). The extent of morphological perturbations of the cultures mostly correlated with PII. The present results indicate the validity of the ROC model in predicting skin irritation potential of chemicals and show that the use of set of irritation markers with different mechanistic responses gives more information on irritation than if only one marker was used.

  4. Stories on the Skin: Tattoo Culture at a South Florida University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leader, Karen J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a multidisciplinary creative and research project at a South Florida public university. "Stories on the Skin: Tattoo Culture at FAU" has explored and presented tattoos as a shared cultural experience, rather than as a symptom, or a fad. Considering relevant scholarship in various disciplines, tattoo emerges as a…

  5. Shikonin Suppresses Skin Carcinogenesis via Inhibiting Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenjuan; Zhang, Chunjing; Ren, Amy; Li, Teena; Jin, Rong; Li, Guohong; Gu, Xin; Shi, Runhua; Zhao, Yunfeng

    2015-01-01

    The M2 isoform of pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) has been shown to be up-regulated in human skin cancers. To test whether PKM2 may be a target for chemoprevention, shikonin, a natural product from the root of Lithospermum erythrorhizon and a specific inhibitor of PKM2, was used in a chemically-induced mouse skin carcinogenesis study. The results revealed that shikonin treatment suppressed skin tumor formation. Morphological examinations and immunohistochemical staining of the skin epidermal tissues suggested that shikonin inhibited cell proliferation without inducing apoptosis. Although shikonin alone suppressed PKM2 activity, it did not suppress tumor promoter-induced PKM2 activation in the skin epidermal tissues at the end of the skin carcinogenesis study. To reveal the potential chemopreventive mechanism of shikonin, an antibody microarray analysis was performed, and the results showed that the transcription factor ATF2 and its downstream target Cdk4 were up-regulated by chemical carcinogen treatment; whereas these up-regulations were suppressed by shikonin. In a promotable skin cell model, the nuclear levels of ATF2 were increased during tumor promotion, whereas this increase was inhibited by shikonin. Furthermore, knockdown of ATF2 decreased the expression levels of Cdk4 and Fra-1 (a key subunit of the activator protein 1. In summary, these results suggest that shikonin, rather than inhibiting PKM2 in vivo, suppresses the ATF2 pathway in skin carcinogenesis. PMID:25961580

  6. Aseptic technique for cell culture.

    PubMed

    Coté, R J

    2001-05-01

    This unit describes some of the ways that a laboratory can deal with the constant threat of microbial contamination in cell cultures. A protocol on aseptic technique is described first. This catch-all term universally appears in any set of instructions pertaining to procedures in which noncontaminating conditions must be maintained. In reality, aseptic technique encompasses all aspects of environmental control, personal hygiene, equipment and media sterilization, and associated quality control procedures needed to ensure that a procedure is, indeed, performed with aseptic, noncontaminating technique. Although cell culture can theoretically be carried out on an open bench in a low-traffic area, most cell culture work is carried out using a horizontal laminar-flow clean bench or a vertical laminar-flow biosafety cabinet. Both are described here. PMID:18228291

  7. Cultured Human Renal Cortical Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    During the STS-90 shuttle flight in April 1998, cultured renal cortical cells revealed new information about genes. Timothy Hammond, an investigator in NASA's microgravity biotechnology program was interested in culturing kidney tissue to study the expression of proteins useful in the treatment of kidney diseases. Protein expression is linked to the level of differentiation of the kidney cells, and Hammond had difficulty maintaining differentiated cells in vitro. Intrigued by the improvement in cell differentiation that he observed in rat renal cells cultured in NASA's rotating wall vessel (a bioreactor that simulates some aspects of microgravity) and during an experiment performed on the Russian Space Station Mir, Hammond decided to sleuth out which genes were responsible for controlling differentiation of kidney cells. To do this, he compared the gene activity of human renal cells in a variety of gravitational environments, including the microgravity of the space shuttle and the high-gravity environment of a centrifuge. Hammond found that 1,632 genes out of 10,000 analyzed changed their activity level in microgravity, more than in any of the other environments. These results have important implications for kidney research as well as for understanding the basic mechanism for controlling cell differentiation.

  8. Skin Deep: Women Writing on Color, Culture and Identity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Featherston, Elena, Ed.

    This anthology contains 48 selections about being a woman of color in the United States. The first section, "The Paradox of Color: Living in an 'Unsane' World," considers the emotional amputations as well as the spiritual powers that are derived from the woman's struggle to "be" in her skin. The second section, "On Becoming 'AdNormal': Finding,…

  9. Esterase Activity and Intracellular Localization in Reconstructed Human Epidermal Cultured Skin Models

    PubMed Central

    Katayanagi, Mishina; Hashimoto, Fumie

    2015-01-01

    Background Reconstructed human epidermal culture skin models have been developed for cosmetic and pharmaceutical research. Objective This study evaluated the total and carboxyl esterase activities (i.e., Km and Vmax, respectively) and localization in two reconstructed human epidermal culture skin models (LabCyte EPI-MODEL [Japan Tissue Engineering] and EpiDerm [MatTek/Kurabo]). The usefulness of the reconstruction cultured epidermis was also verified by comparison with human and rat epidermis. Methods Homogenized epidermal samples were fractioned by centrifugation. p-nitrophenyl acetate and 4-methylumbelliferyl acetate were used as substrates of total esterase and carboxyl esterase, respectively. Results Total and carboxyl esterase activities were present in the reconstructed human epidermal culture skin models and were localized in the cytosol. Moreover, the activities and localization were the same as those in human and rat epidermis. Conclusion LabCyte EPI-MODEL and EpiDerm are potentially useful for esterase activity prediction in human epidermis. PMID:26082583

  10. Ex Vivo Prefabricated Rat Skin Flap Using Cell Sheets and an Arteriovenous Vascular Bundle

    PubMed Central

    Fujisawa, Daisuke; Sekine, Hidekazu; Okano, Teruo; Sakurai, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recently, research on tissue-engineered skin substitutes have been active in plastic surgery, and significant development has been made in this area over the past several decades. However, a regenerative skin flap has not been developed that could provide immediate blood flow after transplantation. Here, we make a regenerative skin flap ex vivo that is potentially suitable for microsurgical transplantation in future clinical applications. Methods: In rats, for preparing a stable vascular carrier, a femoral vascular pedicle was sandwiched between collagen sponges and inserted into a porous chamber in the abdomen. The vascular bed was harvested 3 weeks later, and extracorporeal perfusion was performed. A green fluorescent protein positive epidermal cell sheet was placed on the vascular bed. After perfusion culture, the whole construct was harvested and fixed for morphological analyses. Results: After approximately 10 days perfusion, the epidermal cell sheet cornified sufficiently. The desquamated corneum was positive for filaggrin. The basement membrane protein laminin 332 and type 4 collagen were deposited on the interface area between the vascular bed and the epidermal cell sheet. Moreover, an electron microscopic image showed anchoring junctions and keratohyalin granules. These results show that we were able to produce native-like skin. Conclusions: We have succeeded in creating regenerative skin flap ex vivo that is similar to native skin, and this technique could be applied to create various tissues in the future. PMID:26180725

  11. Vital roles of stem cells and biomaterials in skin tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Mohd Hilmi, Abu Bakar; Halim, Ahmad Sukari

    2015-01-01

    Tissue engineering essentially refers to technology for growing new human tissue and is distinct from regenerative medicine. Currently, pieces of skin are already being fabricated for clinical use and many other tissue types may be fabricated in the future. Tissue engineering was first defined in 1987 by the United States National Science Foundation which critically discussed the future targets of bioengineering research and its consequences. The principles of tissue engineering are to initiate cell cultures in vitro, grow them on scaffolds in situ and transplant the composite into a recipient in vivo. From the beginning, scaffolds have been necessary in tissue engineering applications. Regardless, the latest technology has redirected established approaches by omitting scaffolds. Currently, scientists from diverse research institutes are engineering skin without scaffolds. Due to their advantageous properties, stem cells have robustly transformed the tissue engineering field as part of an engineered bilayered skin substitute that will later be discussed in detail. Additionally, utilizing biomaterials or skin replacement products in skin tissue engineering as strategy to successfully direct cell proliferation and differentiation as well as to optimize the safety of handling during grafting is beneficial. This approach has also led to the cells’ application in developing the novel skin substitute that will be briefly explained in this review. PMID:25815126

  12. Immune cells control skin lymphatic electrolyte homeostasis and blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Wiig, Helge; Schröder, Agnes; Neuhofer, Wolfgang; Jantsch, Jonathan; Kopp, Christoph; Karlsen, Tine V; Boschmann, Michael; Goss, Jennifer; Bry, Maija; Rakova, Natalia; Dahlmann, Anke; Brenner, Sven; Tenstad, Olav; Nurmi, Harri; Mervaala, Eero; Wagner, Hubertus; Beck, Franz-Xaver; Müller, Dominik N; Kerjaschki, Dontscho; Luft, Friedrich C; Harrison, David G; Alitalo, Kari; Titze, Jens

    2013-07-01

    The skin interstitium sequesters excess Na+ and Cl- in salt-sensitive hypertension. Mononuclear phagocyte system (MPS) cells are recruited to the skin, sense the hypertonic electrolyte accumulation in skin, and activate the tonicity-responsive enhancer-binding protein (TONEBP, also known as NFAT5) to initiate expression and secretion of VEGFC, which enhances electrolyte clearance via cutaneous lymph vessels and increases eNOS expression in blood vessels. It is unclear whether this local MPS response to osmotic stress is important to systemic blood pressure control. Herein, we show that deletion of TonEBP in mouse MPS cells prevents the VEGFC response to a high-salt diet (HSD) and increases blood pressure. Additionally, an antibody that blocks the lymph-endothelial VEGFC receptor, VEGFR3, selectively inhibited MPS-driven increases in cutaneous lymphatic capillary density, led to skin Cl- accumulation, and induced salt-sensitive hypertension. Mice overexpressing soluble VEGFR3 in epidermal keratinocytes exhibited hypoplastic cutaneous lymph capillaries and increased Na+, Cl-, and water retention in skin and salt-sensitive hypertension. Further, we found that HSD elevated skin osmolality above plasma levels. These results suggest that the skin contains a hypertonic interstitial fluid compartment in which MPS cells exert homeostatic and blood pressure-regulatory control by local organization of interstitial electrolyte clearance via TONEBP and VEGFC/VEGFR3-mediated modification of cutaneous lymphatic capillary function. PMID:23722907

  13. Assessment of skin absorption and irritation potential of arachidonic acid and glyceryl arachidonate using in vitro diffusion cell techniques.

    PubMed

    Eppler, A R; Kraeling, M E K; Wickett, R R; Bronaugh, R L

    2007-11-01

    Arachidonic acid (AA), a precursor of pro-inflammatory mediators, and its glycerin ester, glyceryl arachidonate (GA), are reportedly used in cosmetic products. In vitro skin penetration of AA and GA and GA's ester hydrolysis was determined in flow-through diffusion cells. AA penetration with human and rat skin was 19.5% and 52.3% of the applied dose respectively, a substantial amount of which remained in the skin at 24h. Similar penetration results were obtained with GA in human skin. However, GA penetration through cultured skin (EpiDerm) was 51% of the applied dose, almost all of which appeared in the receptor fluid. At least 27.8% of GA penetrating skin was hydrolyzed to AA. In vitro methods were used to assess skin irritation in diffusion cells. Skin irritation of AA, sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS), and Tween 80 was determined by changes in transepidermal water loss (TEWL), skin viability (3-(4,5-dimethylthiaxol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide, MTT, formation), and cytokine release (IL-1alpha). SLS irritation was much less pronounced in an emulsion versus an aqueous vehicle. No significant irritation was observed in vitro from AA in an emulsion. This work predicts that AA would penetrate human skin in vivo and that it could be formed in skin from topically applied GA. PMID:17602815

  14. Cell culture compositions

    DOEpatents

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Goedegebuur, Frits; Ward, Michael; Yiao, Jian

    2014-03-18

    The present invention provides a novel endoglucanase nucleic acid sequence, designated egl6 (SEQ ID NO:1 encodes the full length endoglucanase; SEQ ID NO:4 encodes the mature form), and the corresponding endoglucanase VI amino acid sequence ("EGVI"; SEQ ID NO:3 is the signal sequence; SEQ ID NO:2 is the mature sequence). The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding EGVI, recombinant EGVI proteins and methods for producing the same.

  15. Principles of cancer cell culture.

    PubMed

    Cree, Ian A

    2011-01-01

    The basics of cell culture are now relatively common, though it was not always so. The pioneers of cell culture would envy our simple access to manufactured plastics, media and equipment for such studies. The prerequisites for cell culture are a well lit and suitably ventilated laboratory with a laminar flow hood (Class II), CO(2) incubator, benchtop centrifuge, microscope, plasticware (flasks and plates) and a supply of media with or without serum supplements. Not only can all of this be ordered easily over the internet, but large numbers of well-characterised cell lines are available from libraries maintained to a very high standard allowing the researcher to commence experiments rapidly and economically. Attention to safety and disposal is important, and maintenance of equipment remains essential. This chapter should enable researchers with little prior knowledge to set up a suitable laboratory to do basic cell culture, but there is still no substitute for experience within an existing well-run laboratory. PMID:21516394

  16. In vitro photodynamic effect of aluminum tetrasulfophthalocyanines on melanoma skin cancer and healthy normal skin cells.

    PubMed

    Maduray, K; Odhav, B; Nyokong, T

    2012-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy is a medical treatment that uses an inactive dye/drug and lasers as a light source to activate the dye/drug to produce a toxic form of oxygen that destroys the cancer cells. This study aimed at investigating the cytotoxic effects of different concentrations of aluminum tetrasulfophthalocyanines in its inactive and active state (laser induced) on melanoma skin cancer cells, healthy normal skin fibroblast and keratinocyte cells. Experimentally, 3 × 10⁴ cells/ml were seeded in 24-well plates before treatment with different concentrations of aluminum tetrasulfophthalocyanines. After 2h, cells were irradiated with a light dose of 4.5 J/cm². Post-irradiated cells were incubated for 24h before cell viability was measured using the CellTiter-Blue Viability Assay. Results showed that aluminum tetrasulfophthalocyanines at high concentrations were cytotoxic to melanoma cells in the absence of laser activation. In the presence of laser activation of aluminum tetrasulfophthalocyanines at a concentration of 40 μg/ml decreased cell viability of melanoma cells to 45%, fibroblasts to 78% and keratinocytes to 73%. At this photosensitizing concentration of aluminum tetrasulfophthalocyanines the efficacy of the treatment light dose 4.5 J/cm² and the cell death mechanism induced by photoactivated aluminum tetrasulfophthalocyanines was evaluated. A light dose of 4.5 J/cm² was more efficient in killing a higher number of melanoma cells and a lower number of fibroblast and keratinocyte cells than the other light doses of 2.5 J/cm², 7.5 J/cm² and 10.5 J/cm². Apoptosis features such as blebbing, nucleus condensation, nucleus fragmentation and the formation of apoptotic bodies were seen in the photodynamic therapy treated melanoma skin cancer cells. This in vitro photodynamic therapy study concludes that using aluminum tetrasulfophthalocyanines at a photosensitizing concentration of 40 μg/ml in combination with a laser dose of 4.5 J/cm² was potentially lethal

  17. The Skin That We Sing: Culturally Responsive Choral Music Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Julia

    2012-01-01

    This article describes ways that music education can be made more culturally responsive, or congruent with the orientations of culturally diverse students. Music education in the United States has historically been based on Eurocentric frameworks that may no longer be applicable in an increasingly multicultural society. For the many teachers…

  18. Cell Autonomous and Non-autonomous Effects of Senescent Cells in the Skin

    PubMed Central

    Demaria, Marco; Desprez, Pierre Yves; Campisi, Judith; Velarde, Michael C.

    2015-01-01

    Human and mouse skin accumulate senescent cells in both the epidermis and dermis during aging. When chronically present, senescent cells are thought to enhance the age-dependent deterioration of the skin during extrinsic and intrinsic aging. However, when transiently present, senescent cells promote optimal wound healing. Here, we review recent studies on how senescent cells and the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) contribute to different physiological and pathophysiological conditions in the skin with a focus on some of the cell autonomous and non-autonomous functions of senescent cells in the context of skin aging and wound healing. PMID:25855157

  19. Kanglaite attenuates UVB-induced down-regulation of aquaporin-3 in cultured human skin keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    SHAN, SHI-JUN; XIAO, TING; CHEN, JOHN; GENG, SHI-LING; LI, CHANG-PING; XU, XUEGANG; HONG, YUXIAO; JI, CHAO; GUO, YING; WEI, HUACHEN; LIU, WEI; LI, DAPENG; CHEN, HONG-DUO

    2012-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation plays an important role in the pathogenesis of skin photoaging. Depending on the wavelength of UV, the epidermis is affected primarily by UVB. One major characteristic of photoaging is the dehydration of the skin. Membrane-inserted water channels (aquaporins) are involved in this process. In this study we demonstrated that UVB radiation induced aquaporin-3 (AQP3) down-regulation in cultured human skin keratinocytes. Kanglaite is a mixture consisting of extractions of Coix Seed, which is an effective anti-neoplastic agent and can inhibit the activities of protein kinase C and NF-κB. We demonstrated that Kanglaite inhibited UVB-induced AQP3 down-regulation of cultured human skin keratinocytes. Our findings provide a potential new agent for anti-photoaging. The related molecular mechanisms remain to be further elucidated. PMID:22211241

  20. All-trans retinoic acid (RA) stimulates events in organ-cultured human skin that underlie repair. Adult skin from sun-protected and sun-exposed sites responds in an identical manner to RA while neonatal foreskin responds differently.

    PubMed Central

    Varani, J; Perone, P; Griffiths, C E; Inman, D R; Fligiel, S E; Voorhees, J J

    1994-01-01

    Adult human skin from a sun-protected site (hip) and from a sun-exposed site (forearm) was maintained in organ culture for 12 d in the presence of a serum-free, growth factor-free basal medium. Cultures were incubated under conditions optimized for keratinocyte growth (i.e., in 0.15 mM extracellular Ca2+) or for fibroblast growth (i.e., in 1.4 mM extracellular Ca2+). Treatment with all-trans retinoic acid (RA) induced histological changes in the organ-cultured skin under both conditions which were similar to the changes seen in intact skin after topical application. These included expansion of the viable portion of the epidermis and activation of cells in the dermis. In sun-damaged skin samples, which were characterized by destruction of normal connective tissue elements and presence of thick, dark-staining elastotic fibers, a zone of healthy connective tissue could be seen immediately below the dermo-epidermal junction. This zone was more prominent in RA-treated organ cultures than in matched controls. Associated with these histological changes was an increase in overall protein and extracellular matrix synthesis. In concomitant studies, it was found that RA treatment enhanced survival and proliferation of adult keratinocytes and adult dermal fibroblasts under both low- and high-Ca2+ conditions. In all of these assays, responses of sun-protected and sun-exposed skin were identical. In contrast, responses of neonatal foreskin to RA were similar to those of adult skin in the presence of low-Ca2+ culture medium, but under conditions of high extracellular Ca2+ RA provided little or no additional stimulus. Together these studies suggest that the ability of RA to enhance repair of sun-damaged skin (documented in previous studies) may reflect its ability to influence the behavior of skin in a manner that is age dependent but independent of sun-exposure status. Images PMID:7962521

  1. Distribution of apoptosis-mediating Fas antigen in human skin and effects of anti-Fas monoclonal antibody on human epidermal keratinocyte and squamous cell carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Oishi, M; Maeda, K; Sugiyama, S

    1994-01-01

    Fast antigen is a cell surface protein that mediates apoptosis. Using immunohistological, flow cytometry and electron microscopic analyses, we investigated the expression of Fas antigen on various skin tissues, and on cultured SV40-transformed human epidermal keratinocyte cell line KJD and human skin squamous cell carcinoma cell line HSC. The Fas antigen was widely distributed in skin components such as the keratinocytes in the lower portion of the epidermis, epidermal dendritic cells, endothelial cells, fibroblasts, apocrine glands, eccrine sweat glands, sebaceous glands, some normal melanocytes and infiltrating lymphoid cells. It was also strongly expressed on the keratinocytes of lichenoid eruptions seen in lupus erythematosus and lichen planus, and on the spongiotic or acanthotic epidermis seen in chronic eczema, adult T-cell leukaemia/lymphoma (ATLL) and atopic dermatitis. Its expression was closely correlated with lymphoid infiltrating cells and it was strongly expressed in lymphoid neoplastic cells, particularly ATLL cells, and fibroblasts seen in dermatofibroma. However, the antigen was not detected on basal cell epithelioma cells, some malignant melanomas or any junctional naevi. The cell lines KJD and HSC strongly expressed the Fas antigen, and crosslinking of the Fas antigen by an anti-Fas monoclonal antibody induced apoptosis of these cell lines. These results indicate that the apoptosis-mediating Fas antigen may play an important role in normal skin turnover and cell differentiation, in immune regulation of skin tumours, and in the pathogenesis of various skin diseases. PMID:7529480

  2. PKK Suppresses Tumor Growth and is Decreased in Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Skin

    PubMed Central

    Poligone, Brian; Gilmore, Elaine S.; Alexander, Carolina; Oleksyn, David; Gillespie, Kathleen; Zhao, Jiyong; Ibrahim, Sherrif; Pentland, Alice P.; Brown, Marc; Chen, Luojing

    2014-01-01

    Non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) represents the most common cancer in the United States. Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the skin is a sub-type of NMSC that shows a greater potential for invasion and metastasis. The current study identifies the Protein Kinase C-associated Kinase (PKK), which is also known as the Receptor-Interacting Protein Kinase 4 (RIPK4), as a suppressor of tumor growth in SCC of the skin. We show that expression of PKK is decreased in human SCC of the skin compared to normal skin. Further, suppression of PKK in human keratinocytes leads to increased cell proliferation. Use of RNA interference to reduce PKK expression in keratinocytes leads to an increase in S phase and in proteins that promote cell cycle progression. Consistent with the results obtained from cell culture, there is a dramatic increased tumorigenesis after PKK knockdown in a xenotransplant model and in soft agar assays. The loss of tumor suppression involves the NF-κB and p63 pathways. NF-κB is inhibited through inhibition of IKK function and there is increased nuclear TP63 activity after PKK knockdown. This study opens new avenues both in the discovery of disease pathogenesis and for potential treatments. PMID:25285922

  3. Preliminary survival studies on autologous cultured skin fibroblasts transplantation by injection.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuming; Wang, Jiaqi; Yan, Xiaoqing; Li, Dan; Xu, Jun

    2008-01-01

    In the correction of aesthetic impairments on the face, dermal, and superficial subcutaneous defects, adequately safe implant material is required. Cultured autologous skin fibroblasts, as a protein repair system, create a living injectable system that has been utilized effectively to treat rhytids, depressed scars, subcutaneous atrophy, acne irregularities, and laser wounds. To evaluate the new method, we have investigated the survival and collagen secretion of autologous transplanted fibroblasts. In this study, rabbit fibroblasts were cultured and expanded. Cells (8 x 10(7)/ml) were injected into the superficial and deep dermal junction of the dorsal ears. Two rabbits were injected independently with labeled [3H]TdR fibroblasts; similarly, eight rabbits were given unlabeled transplanted cells in the right ear and vehicle in the left. Each site was injected three times with the same amount of cells every 2 weeks. The grafts were evaluated for 5 months. After explantation, the samples were collected from the injected sites and stained with autoradiography, H&E, and sirius red, respectively. According to the histological observations, the [3H]TdR-labeled cells survived and large amounts of embryo fibroblasts were found in the experimental subgroup of the labeled cell group. The depth of dermis was significantly different between the experimental subgroup (701.3 +/- 31.5 microm) and the control subgroup (638.3 +/- 23.9 microm) of the unlabeled group (p < 0.01). There was also a significant difference of collagen III between the experimental subgroup (2.63 +/- 1.41 cm2) and the control subgroup (1.05 +/- 0.90 cm2) (p < 0.05). There was no significant difference of collagen I between the experimental subgroup (56.25 +/- 14.41 cm2) and the control subgroup (55.41 +/- 16.59 cm2) (p > 0.05). The results obtained demonstrate that the distinction of the depth of dermis should be interpreted by the increase of collagen III, instead of collagen I, which is produced by the

  4. Skin Metabolites Define a New Paradigm in the Localization of Skin Tropic Memory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    McCully, Michelle L.; Collins, Paul J.; Hughes, Timothy R.; Thomas, Christopher P.; Billen, Jaak; O’Donnell, Valerie B.

    2015-01-01

    The localization of memory T cells to human skin is essential for long-term immune surveillance and the maintenance of barrier integrity. The expression of CCR8 during naive T cell activation is controlled by skin-specific factors derived from epidermal keratinocytes and not by resident dendritic cells. In this study, we show that the CCR8-inducing factors are heat stable and protease resistant and include the vitamin D3 metabolite 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 and PGE2. The effect of either metabolite alone on CCR8 expression was weak, whereas their combination resulted in robust CCR8 expression. Elevation of intracellular cAMP was essential because PGE2 could be substituted with the adenylyl cyclase agonist forskolin, and CCR8 expression was sensitive to protein kinase A inhibition. For effective induction, exposure of naive T cells to these epidermal factors needed to occur either prior to or during T cell activation even though CCR8 was only detected 4–5 d later in proliferating T cells. The importance of tissue environments in maintaining cellular immune surveillance networks within distinct healthy tissues provides a paradigm shift in adaptive immunity. Epidermal-derived vitamin D3 metabolites and PGs provide an essential cue for the localization of CCR8+ immune surveillance T cells within healthy human skin. PMID:26002980

  5. Growth of melanocytes in human epidermal cell cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Staiano-Coico, L.; Hefton, J.M.; Amadeo, C.; Pagan-Charry, I.; Madden, M.R.; Cardon-Cardo, C. )

    1990-08-01

    Epidermal cell cultures were grown in keratinocyte-conditioned medium for use as burn wound grafts; the melanocyte composition of the grafts was studied under a variety of conditions. Melanocytes were identified by immunohistochemistry based on a monoclonal antibody (MEL-5) that has previously been shown to react specifically with melanocytes. During the first 7 days of growth in primary culture, the total number of melanocytes in the epidermal cultures decreased to 10% of the number present in normal skin. Beginning on day 2 of culture, bipolar melanocytes were present at a mean cell density of 116 +/- 2/mm2; the keratinocyte to melanocyte ratio was preserved during further primary culture and through three subpassages. Moreover, exposure of cultures to mild UVB irradiation stimulated the melanocytes to proliferate, suggesting that the melanocytes growing in culture maintained their responsiveness to external stimuli. When the sheets of cultured cells were enzymatically detached from the plastic culture flasks before grafting, melanocytes remained in the basal layer of cells as part of the graft applied to the patient.

  6. Antibody-Functionalized Peptidic Membranes for Neutralization of Allogeneic Skin Antigen-Presenting Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Yi; Liu, Wen; Bagia, Christina; Zhang, Shaojuan; Bai, Mingfeng; Janjic, Jelena M.; Giannoukakis, Nick; Gawalt, Ellen S.; Meng, Wilson S.

    2014-01-01

    We report herein application of an in situ material strategy to attenuate allograft T cell responses in a skin transplant mouse model. Functionalized peptidic membranes were used to impede trafficking of donor antigen-presenting cells (dAPCs) from skin allografts in recipient mice. Membranes formed by self-assembling peptides (SAPs) presenting antibodies were found to remain underneath grafted skins for up to 6 days. At the host-graft interface, dAPCs were targeted by using a monoclonal antibody that binds to a class II MHC molecule (IAd) expressed exclusively by donor cells. Using a novel cell labeling near-infrared nanoemulsion, we found more dAPCs remained in allografts treated with membranes loaded with aI-Ad than without. In vitro, dAPCs released from skin explants were found adsorbed preferentially on aI-Ad membranes. Recipient T cells from these mice produced lower concentrations of interferon-gamma cultured ex vivo with donor cells. Taken together, the data indicate that the strategy has the potential to alter the natural course of rejection immune mechanisms in stringent allogeneic models. PMID:25117952

  7. Preclinical Corrective Gene Transfer in Xeroderma Pigmentosum Human Skin Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Warrick, Emilie; Garcia, Marta; Chagnoleau, Corinne; Chevallier, Odile; Bergoglio, Valérie; Sartori, Daniela; Mavilio, Fulvio; Angulo, Jaime F; Avril, Marie-Françoise; Sarasin, Alain; Larcher, Fernando; Del Rio, Marcela; Bernerd, Françoise; Magnaldo, Thierry

    2012-01-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a devastating disease associated with dramatic skin cancer proneness. XP cells are deficient in nucleotide excision repair (NER) of bulky DNA adducts including ultraviolet (UV)-induced mutagenic lesions. Approaches of corrective gene transfer in NER-deficient keratinocyte stem cells hold great hope for the long-term treatment of XP patients. To face this challenge, we developed a retrovirus-based strategy to safely transduce the wild-type XPC gene into clonogenic human primary XP-C keratinocytes. De novo expression of XPC was maintained in both mass population and derived independent candidate stem cells (holoclones) after more than 130 population doublings (PD) in culture upon serial propagation (>1040 cells). Analyses of retrovirus integration sequences in isolated keratinocyte stem cells suggested the absence of adverse effects such as oncogenic activation or clonal expansion. Furthermore, corrected XP-C keratinocytes exhibited full NER capacity as well as normal features of epidermal differentiation in both organotypic skin cultures and in a preclinical murine model of human skin regeneration in vivo. The achievement of a long-term genetic correction of XP-C epidermal stem cells constitutes the first preclinical model of ex vivo gene therapy for XP-C patients. PMID:22068429

  8. Abnormal formation of collagen cross-links in skin fibroblasts cultured from patients with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type VI.

    PubMed

    Pasquali, M; Still, M J; Vales, T; Rosen, R I; Evinger, J D; Dembure, P P; Longo, N; Elsas, L J

    1997-01-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type VI (EDS VI) is an autosomal recessive disorder of connective tissue characterized by hyperextensible, friable skin and joint hypermobility. Severe scoliosis and ocular fragility are present in some patients. This disease is caused by defective collagen lsyl hydroxylase, a vitamin C-dependent enzyme that converts lysyl residues to hydroxylysine on procollagen peptides. Hydroxylysine is essential for the formation of the covalent pyridinium cross-links pyridinoline (Pyr) and deoxypyridinoline (Dpyr), among mature collagen molecules. Pyr derives from three hydroxylysyl residues, whereas Dpyr derives from one lysyl and two hydroxylysyl residues. Patients with EDS VI have high urinary excretion of Dpyr, resulting in a high ratio of Dpyr-Pyr. In this study, we evaluate content and production of pyridinium cross-links in the skin and cultured fibroblasts from patients with EDS VI. The skin of normal controls contained both Pyr and Dpyr, with a marked predominance of Pyr as observed in normal urine. The skin of patients with EDS VI had reduced total content of pyridinium cross-links, with the presence of Dpyr but not Pyr. Long-term cultures of control fibroblasts produced both Pyr and Dpyr, with a pattern resembling that of normal skin. By contrast, cross-links were not detected in dermal fibroblasts cultured from patients with EDS VI. Vitamin C, which improves the clinical manifestations of some patients with EDS VI, decreased Dpyr accumulation though only minimally affecting Pyr content in control cells. By contrast, addition of vitamin C to fibroblasts from patients with EDS VI stimulated the formation of Dpyr more than that of Pyr and greatly increased total pyridinium cross-link formation. These results indicate that qualitative and quantitative alterations of pyridinium cross-links occur in skin and in cultured dermal fibroblasts of patients with EDS VI and may be responsible for their abnormal skin findings. The vitamin C

  9. Pigment cell localizations in anuran ventral skin at climactic metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Denèfle, J P; Lechaire, J P

    1991-09-01

    In anuran amphibians, the specific color pattern of the skin is expressed after metamorphosis, and its formation involves pigment cell migrations. Pigment cells are differently distributed in the tadpole, larval, and froglet skin. To learn more about their fate during metamorphic climax and in the young froglet, we focused our attention on the different localizations of larval melanophores and iridophores in the ventral skin of Rana esculenta before and during skin homing. Localizations of melanophores and iridophores can be elucidated at the developmental stages suggested by Taylor and Kollros (TK stages). At TK stage II (during early premetamorphosis), large melanophores beneath the larval skin are detected. At TK stage X, dispersed melanophores lie under bundles of muscular striated fibrils near the larval skin; they are also observed at the vascular level. At TK stage XVII (prometamorphosis), melanophores are extended on the inner side of the basement lamellar collagen. At the end of prometamorphosis, iridophores are located with melanophores in the separating space between attached basement collagen and derived basement collagen. At TK stage XX (earlier climax), melanophores and iridophores are detected inside the upper extremities of fractures opened in the derived basement collagen. At TK stage XXIV (later climax), both types of larval pigment cells are observed in the inner extremities of breaks derived from the fractures. During climax, these pigment cells occupy the well-formed breaks. At TK stage XXV in young froglet, the pigment cells remain alone in the breaks formed in the derived basement collagen. Briefly, breaks in the basement lamellar collagen are opened by invading cell processes of mesenchymal cells.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1750384

  10. Recovery of fibroblast-like cells from refrigerated goat skin up to 41 d of animal death.

    PubMed

    Okonkwo, Charles; Singh, Mahipal

    2015-05-01

    Successful cloning of animals using somatic cell nuclear transfer requires undamaged nuclear DNA from desired donor cell types. In vitro culture of cells is one way of ensuring nuclear integrity. The goal of this study was to evaluate the limits of postmortem cell survival/culture in refrigerated goat ear skin tissues which could be used for long-term storage and cloning of animals in future. To achieve this, 60 explants from 6 different goats were cultured after 0, 3, 6, 9, 13, 16, 20, 23, 27, 30, 33, 37, and 41 d postmortem and observed under inverted microscope for outgrowth of fibroblast-like cells, after 10-12 d of culture. Explants from all time points including 19% from 41-dpm tissues exhibited outgrowth. However, the percentage of outgrowth positive explants, as well as culture confluence, reduced with increasing postmortem time interval. Cell cultures established from primary outgrowth of 41-dpm tissues when compared for their growth profile with similarly obtained 0-dpm cultures revealed similar growth curve and cell morphology. Cytogenetic analysis of 41-dpm tissue-derived cell populations revealed a normal female karyotype with 60 XX homologous chromosomes indicating genetic stability of the cell population. In conclusion, these results show that refrigerated skin tissue remains alive for more than a month and that the cells derived from such tissues are normal and can be cryopreserved for long-term storage and future cloning of animals with desired genetics. PMID:25539865

  11. Establishment, Culture, and Characterization of Guinea Pig Fetal Fibroblast Cell

    PubMed Central

    Mahboobi, Reza; Dianatpour, Mehdi; Zare, Shahrokh; Hosseini, Seyed Ebrahim

    2014-01-01

    Establishment of Guinea pig fetal fibroblast cells and their biological evaluation before and after cryopreservation were the main purposes of this study. After determination of the proper age of pregnancy by ultrasonography, 30 days old fetuses of Guinea pigs were recovered. Their skins were cut into small pieces (1 mm2) and were cultured. When reaching 80–90% confluence, the cells were passaged. Cells of the second and eighth passages were cultured in 24-well plates (4 × 104 cells/well) for 6 days and three wells per day were counted. The average cell counts at each time point were then plotted against time and the population doubling time (PDT) was determined. Then, vials of cells (2 × 106 cells/mL) were cryopreserved for 1 month and after thawing, the cell viability was evaluated. The PDT of the second passage was about 23 h and for the eighth passage was about 30 h. The viability of the cultures was 95% in the second passage and 74.5% in the eighth passage. It was shown that the Guinea pig fetal fibroblast cell culture can be established using the adherent culture method while, after freezing, the viability indices of these cells were favorable. PMID:24790770

  12. A Vibrio anguillarum strain associated with skin ulcer on cultured flounder, Paralichthys olivaceus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Zhao-Lan; Tan, Xun-Gang; Xu, Yong-Li; Zhang, Pei-Jun

    2001-12-01

    The characteristics of a bacterium strain M3, isolated from cultured flounder Paralichthys olivaceus with remarkable external sign of skin ulcer during an epizootic outbreak, indicated that the bacterium belonged to the species Vibrio anguillarum. Challenge by I.M. (intramuscular injection), bath, and oral administration with M3 showed that it was highly pathogenic for Paralichthys olivacues. The LD50 dose was 5.144×103 CFU/ per fish infection by I.M. injection. Recovered inoculated bacteria from the surviving fish revealed that the asymptomatic carriers could be a latent contagious source. Study of the effect of bacterial culture CFS (cell-free-supernatant) showed that the exotoxins produced by M3 play an important role in its pathogenicity for flounder. The resistance of M3 to 36 out of 41 antibiotics indicated that the bacterial disease outbreak was mainly attributable to the frequent and excessive use of antimicrobial agents; and that vaccination would be an effective precaution against bacterial disease.

  13. Red light interferes in UVA-induced photoaging of human skin fibroblast cells.

    PubMed

    Niu, Tianhui; Tian, Yan; Ren, Qu; Wei, Lizhao; Li, Xiaoxin; Cai, Qing

    2014-01-01

    The possible regulation mechanism of red light was determined to discover how to retard UVA-induced skin photoaging. Human skin fibroblasts were cultured and irradiated with different doses of UVA, thus creating a photoaging model. Fibroblasts were also exposed to a subtoxic dose of UVA combined with a red light-emitting diode (LED) for five continuous days. Three groups were examined: control, UVA and UVA plus red light. Cumulative exposure doses of UVA were 25 J cm(-2), and the total doses of red light were 0.18 J cm(-2). Various indicators were measured before and after irradiation, including cell morphology, viability, β-galactosidase staining, apoptosis, cycle phase, the length of telomeres and the protein levels of photoaging-related genes. Red light irradiation retarded the cumulative low-dose UVA irradiation-induced skin photoaging, decreased the expression of senescence-associated β-galactosidase, upregulated SIRT1 expression, decreased matrix metalloproteinase MMP-1 and the acetylation of p53 expression, reduced the horizon of cell apoptosis and enhanced cell viability. Furthermore, the telomeres in UVA-treated cells were shortened compared to those of cells in the red light groups. These results suggest that red light plays a key role in the antiphotoaging of human skin fibroblasts by acting on different signaling transduction pathways. PMID:25039464

  14. Will stem cells bring hope to pathological skin scar treatment?

    PubMed

    Li, Qiankun; Zhang, Cuiping; Fu, Xiaobing

    2016-08-01

    Pathological skin scars, such as keloids, aesthetically and psychosocially affect patients. The quest for scar reduction and the increasing recognition of patient satisfaction has led to the continued exploration of scar treatment. Stem cells are a promising source for tissue repair and regeneration. The multi-potency and secretory functions of these cells could offer possible treatments for pathological scars and have been examined in recent studies. Here, we analyze the factors that influence the formation of pathological skin scars, summarize recent research on pathological scar treatment with stem cells and elaborate on the possible mechanisms of this treatment. Additionally, other effects of stem cell treatments are also presented while evaluating potential side effects of stem cell-based pathological scar treatments. Thus, this review may provide meaningful guidance in the clinic for scar treatments with stem cells. PMID:27293205

  15. Cell Culture, Technology: Enhancing the Culture of Diagnosing Human Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Alshrari, Ahmed Subeh; Syahida, Ahmad; Sekawi, Zamberi

    2016-01-01

    Cell culture involves a complex of processes of cell isolation from their natural environment (in vivo) and subsequent growth in a controlled environmental artificial condition (in vitro). Cells from specific tissues or organs are cultured as short term or established cell lines which are widely used for research and diagnosis, most specially in the aspect of viral infection, because pathogenic viral isolation depends on the availability of permissible cell cultures. Cell culture provides the required setting for the detection and identification of numerous pathogens of humans, which is achieved via virus isolation in the cell culture as the “gold standard” for virus discovery. In this review, we summarized the views of researchers on the current role of cell culture technology in the diagnosis of human diseases. The technological advancement of recent years, starting with monoclonal antibody development to molecular techniques, provides an important approach for detecting presence of viral infection. They are also used as a baseline for establishing rapid tests for newly discovered pathogens. A combination of virus isolation in cell culture and molecular methods is still critical in identifying viruses that were previously unrecognized. Therefore, cell culture should be considered as a fundamental procedure in identifying suspected infectious viral agent. PMID:27134874

  16. Cell Culture, Technology: Enhancing the Culture of Diagnosing Human Diseases.

    PubMed

    Hudu, Shuaibu Abdullahi; Alshrari, Ahmed Subeh; Syahida, Ahmad; Sekawi, Zamberi

    2016-03-01

    Cell culture involves a complex of processes of cell isolation from their natural environment (in vivo) and subsequent growth in a controlled environmental artificial condition (in vitro). Cells from specific tissues or organs are cultured as short term or established cell lines which are widely used for research and diagnosis, most specially in the aspect of viral infection, because pathogenic viral isolation depends on the availability of permissible cell cultures. Cell culture provides the required setting for the detection and identification of numerous pathogens of humans, which is achieved via virus isolation in the cell culture as the "gold standard" for virus discovery. In this review, we summarized the views of researchers on the current role of cell culture technology in the diagnosis of human diseases. The technological advancement of recent years, starting with monoclonal antibody development to molecular techniques, provides an important approach for detecting presence of viral infection. They are also used as a baseline for establishing rapid tests for newly discovered pathogens. A combination of virus isolation in cell culture and molecular methods is still critical in identifying viruses that were previously unrecognized. Therefore, cell culture should be considered as a fundamental procedure in identifying suspected infectious viral agent. PMID:27134874

  17. Techniques for mammalian cell tissue culture.

    PubMed

    Phelan, Mary C

    2006-11-01

    This appendix opens with detailed discussions on the latest principles of sterile technique and preparation of culture media. Step-by-step protocols describe trypsinizing and subculturing monolayer cultures, passaging suspension cultures, freezing and thawing cells, counting cells using a hemacytometer, and preparing cells for transport. PMID:18428384

  18. Techniques for mammalian cell tissue culture.

    PubMed

    Phelan, Mary C

    2006-05-01

    This appendix opens with detailed discussions on the latest principles of sterile technique and preparation of culture media. Step-by-step protocols describe trypsinizing and subculturing monolayer cultures, passaging suspension cultures, freezing and thawing cells, counting cells using a hemacytometer, and preparing cells for transport. PMID:18265370

  19. Techniques for mammalian cell tissue culture.

    PubMed

    Phelan, Mary C

    2006-05-01

    This unit opens with detailed discussions on the latest principles of sterile technique and preparation of culture media. Step-by-step protocols describe trypsinizing and subculturing monolayer cultures, passaging suspension cultures, freezing and thawing cells, counting cells using a hemacytometer, and preparing cells for transport. PMID:18770828

  20. Techniques for mammalian cell tissue culture.

    PubMed

    Phelan, Mary C

    2006-12-01

    This appendix opens with detailed discussions on the latest principles of sterile technique and preparation of culture media. Step-by-step protocols describe trypsinizing and subculturing monolayer cultures, passaging suspension cultures, freezing and thawing cells, counting cells using a hemacytometer, and preparing cells for transport. PMID:18429293

  1. Clinical evaluation of allogeneic cultured dermal substitutes for intractable skin ulcers after tumor resection.

    PubMed

    Moroi, Yoichi; Fujita, Shohei; Fukagawa, Shuji; Mashino, Toshihiko; Goto, Takako; Masuda, Teiichi; Urabe, Kazunori; Kubo, Kentaro; Matsui, Hiromichi; Kagawa, Shizuko; Kuroyanagi, Yoshimitsu; Furue, Masutaka

    2004-01-01

    Clinical research on allogeneic cultured dermal substitute (CDS), which was newly developed at the R&D Center for Artificial Skin of Kitasato University, has been carried out in medical centers across Japan with the support of the Millennium Project of the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare of Japan. Allogeneic CDS was prepared by cultivation of fibroblasts on a two-layered spongy matrix of hyaluronic acid and atelo-collagen. This paper reports the clinical results of application of allogeneic CDS in 12 patients with full-thickness skin defects after surgical resection of skin tumors. In 9 of 10 patients, healthy granulation tissue developed immediately, allowing us to perform split-thickness skin grafts at an early stage. In two cases, allogeneic CDS was used to cover an expanded mesh skin graft that had been applied to treat a large ulcer, and rapid epithelization was observed. No patient developed local infection nor local tumor recurrence after treatment with CDS. The spongy matrix itself as well as the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) released by the allogeneic CDS seemed to be beneficial for the treatment of intractable skin ulcers. Allogeneic CDS functions as an excellent biological dressing, and could dramatically change the treatment of intractable skin ulcers. PMID:15246944

  2. Application of a Novel Population of Multipotent Stem Cells Derived from Skin Fibroblasts as Donor Cells in Bovine SCNT

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Shaohui; Chen, Wuju; Liu, Xu; Xiao, Jiajia; Wang, Yanqin; Liu, Jun; Du, Yue; Wang, Yongsheng; Zhang, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Undifferentiated stem cells are better donor cells for somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), resulting in more offspring than more differentiated cells. While various stem cell populations have been confirmed to exist in the skin, progress has been restricted due to the lack of a suitable marker for their prospective isolation. To address this fundamental issue, a marker is required that could unambiguously prove the differentiation state of the donor cells. We therefore utilized magnetic activated cell sorting (MACS) to separate a homogeneous population of small SSEA-4+ cells from a heterogeneous population of bovine embryonic skin fibroblasts (BEF). SSEA-4+ cells were 8-10 μm in diameter and positive for alkaline phosphatase (AP). The percentage of SSEA-4+ cells within the cultured BEF population was low (2-3%). Immunocytochemistry and PCR analyses revealed that SSEA-4+ cells expressed pluripotency-related markers, and could differentiate into cells comprising all three germ layers in vitro. They remained undifferentiated over 20 passages in suspension culture. In addition, cloned embryos derived from SSEA-4 cells showed significant differences in cleavage rate and blastocyst development when compared with those from BEF and SSEA-4− cells. Moreover, blastocysts derived from SSEA-4+ cells showed a higher total cell number and lower apoptotic index as compared to BEF and SSEA-4– derived cells. It is well known that nuclei from pluripotent stem cells yield a higher cloning efficiency than those from adult somatic cells, however, pluripotent stem cells are relatively difficult to obtain from bovine. The SSEA-4+ cells described in the current study provide an attractive candidate for SCNT and a promising platform for the generation of transgenic cattle. PMID:25602959

  3. IL-31-Driven Skin Remodeling Involves Epidermal Cell Proliferation and Thickening That Lead to Impaired Skin-Barrier Function

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Brijendra; Jegga, Anil G.; Shanmukhappa, Kumar S.; Edukulla, Ramakrishna; Khurana, Gurjit H.; Medvedovic, Mario; Dillon, Stacey R.; Madala, Satish K.

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin-31 (IL-31) is a type 2 helper T-cell-derived cytokine that has recently been shown to cause severe inflammation and tissue remodeling in multiple chronic diseases of the skin and lungs. IL-31 is upregulated in allergic and inflammatory diseases, including atopic dermatitis, asthma, cutaneous T-cell lymphomas, and allergic rhinitis, as well as autoimmune diseases such as systemic erythematosus. Overexpression of IL-31 in T cells causes severe inflammation, with histological features similar to skin lesions of patients with atopic dermatitis. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in IL31-driven pathological remodeling in skin diseases remain largely unknown. Here, we studied the role of IL-31 in skin damage as a result of intradermal administration of recombinant IL-31 into mice. Notably, IL-31 was sufficient to increase epidermal basal-cell proliferation and thickening of the epidermal skin layer. Our findings demonstrate a progressive increase in transepidermal water loss with chronic administration of IL-31 into the skin. Further, analysis of the skin transcriptome indicates a significant increase in the transcripts involved in epidermal-cell proliferation, epidermal thickening, and mechanical integrity. In summary, our findings demonstrate an important role for IL-31 signaling in epidermal cell proliferation and thickening that together may lead to impaired skin-barrier function in pathological remodeling of the skin. PMID:27556734

  4. Traumatic Acid Reduces Oxidative Stress and Enhances Collagen Biosynthesis in Cultured Human Skin Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Jabłońska-Trypuć, Agata; Pankiewicz, Walentyn; Czerpak, Romuald

    2016-09-01

    Traumatic acid (TA) is a plant hormone (cytokinin) that in terms of chemical structure belongs to the group of fatty acids derivatives. It was isolated from Phaseolus vulgaris. TA activity and its influence on human cells and organism has not previously been the subject of research. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of TA on collagen content and basic oxidative stress parameters, such as antioxidative enzyme activity, reduced glutathione, thiol group content, and lipid peroxidation in physiological conditions. The results show a stimulatory effect of TA on tested parameters. TA caused a decrease in membrane phospholipid peroxidation and exhibited protective properties against ROS production. It also increases protein and collagen biosynthesis and its secretion into the culture medium. The present findings reveal that TA exhibits multiple and complex activity in fibroblast cells in vitro. TA, with its activity similar to unsaturated fatty acids, shows antioxidant and stimulatory effects on collagen biosynthesis. It is a potentially powerful agent with applications in the treatment of many skin diseases connected with oxidative stress and collagen biosynthesis disorders. PMID:27423205

  5. Identification of Drugs that Regulate Dermal Stem Cells and Enhance Skin Repair

    PubMed Central

    Naska, Sibel; Yuzwa, Scott A.; Johnston, Adam P.W.; Paul, Smitha; Smith, Kristen M.; Paris, Maryline; Sefton, Michael V.; Datti, Alessandro; Miller, Freda D.; Kaplan, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Here, we asked whether we could identify pharmacological agents that enhance endogenous stem cell function to promote skin repair, focusing on skin-derived precursors (SKPs), a dermal precursor cell population. Libraries of compounds already used in humans were screened for their ability to enhance the self-renewal of human and rodent SKPs. We identified and validated five such compounds, and showed that two of them, alprostadil and trimebutine maleate, enhanced the repair of full thickness skin wounds in middle-aged mice. Moreover, SKPs isolated from drug-treated skin displayed long-term increases in self-renewal when cultured in basal growth medium without drugs. Both alprostadil and trimebutine maleate likely mediated increases in SKP self-renewal by moderate hyperactivation of the MEK-ERK pathway. These findings identify candidates for potential clinical use in human skin repair, and provide support for the idea that pharmacological activation of endogenous tissue precursors represents a viable therapeutic strategy. PMID:26724904

  6. Increased mRNA expression of manganese superoxide dismutase in psoriasis skin lesions and in cultured human keratinocytes exposed to IL-1 beta and TNF-alpha.

    PubMed

    Löntz, W; Sirsjö, A; Liu, W; Lindberg, M; Rollman, O; Törmä, H

    1995-02-01

    Because reactive oxygen species have been implicated in the pathogenesis of various hyperproliferative and inflammatory diseases, the mRNA expression of the antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase was studied in psoriatic skin tissue. By using reverse transcription-PCR we found similar expression of copper, zinc superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD) in the involved vs. uninvolved psoriatic skin. In contrast, the level of the manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) mRNA message was consistently higher in lesional psoriatic skin as compared to adjacent uninvolved skin and healthy control skin. Parallel investigation of those cytokines that are thought to be direct or indirect inducers of the MnSOD activity revealed an increased mRNA expression of IL-1 beta, TNF-alpha, and GM-CSF in lesional psoriatic skin. To study if these cytokines exert a direct effect on dismutase expression in epidermal cells, human keratinocytes in culture were challenged with IL-1 beta, TNF-alpha, and GM-CSF. It was found that IL-1 beta and TNF-alpha, but not GM-CSF, induced the mRNA expression of MnSOD, and an additive effect was demonstrated for the two former cytokines. Further, the expression of both CuZnSOD and MnSOD transcripts was similar in cultured keratinocytes maintained at low differentiation (low Ca2+ medium) and cells forced to terminal differentiation (by high Ca2+ medium). Our results indicate that the abnormal expression of MnSOD mRNA in lesional psoriatic skin is not directly linked to the pathologic state of keratinocyte differentiation in the skin. It seems more likely that the cutaneous overexpression of MnSOD in psoriatic epidermis represents a protective cellular response evoked by cytokines released from inflammatory cells invading the diseased skin. PMID:7744320

  7. Stem Cells in Skin Wound Healing: Are We There Yet?

    PubMed Central

    Cerqueira, Mariana Teixeira; Pirraco, Rogério Pedro; Marques, Alexandra Pinto

    2016-01-01

    Significance: Cutaneous wound healing is a serious problem worldwide that affects patients with various wound types, resulting from burns, traumatic injuries, and diabetes. Despite the wide range of clinically available skin substitutes and the different therapeutic alternatives, delayed healing and scarring are often observed. Recent Advances: Stem cells have arisen as powerful tools to improve skin wound healing, due to features such as effective secretome, self-renewal, low immunogenicity, and differentiation capacity. They represent potentially readily available biological material that can particularly target distinct wound-healing phases. In this context, mesenchymal stem cells have been shown to promote cell migration, angiogenesis, and a possible regenerative rather than fibrotic microenvironment at the wound site, mainly through paracrine signaling with the surrounding cells/tissues. Critical Issues: Despite the current insights, there are still major hurdles to be overcome to achieve effective therapeutic effects. Limited engraftment and survival at the wound site are still major concerns, and alternative approaches to maximize stem cell potential are a major demand. Future Directions: This review emphasizes two main strategies that have been explored in this context. These comprise the exploration of hypoxic conditions to modulate stem cell secretome, and the use of adipose tissue stromal vascular fraction as a source of multiple cells, including stem cells and factors requiring minimal manipulation. Nonetheless, the attainment of these approaches to target successfully skin regeneration will be only evident after a significant number of in vivo works in relevant pre-clinical models. PMID:27076994

  8. Generation of bioengineered feather buds on a reconstructed chick skin from dissociated epithelial and mesenchymal cells.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Kentaro; Mitsui, Toshiyuki

    2016-04-01

    Various kinds of in vitro culture systems of tissues and organs have been developed, and applied to understand multicellular systems during embryonic organogenesis. In the research field of feather bud development, tissue recombination assays using an intact epithelial tissue and mesenchymal tissue/cells have contributed to our understanding the mechanisms of feather bud formation and development. However, there are few methods to generate a skin and its appendages from single cells of both epithelium and mesenchyme. In this study, we have developed a bioengineering method to reconstruct an embryonic dorsal skin after completely dissociating single epithelial and mesenchymal cells from chick skin. Multiple feather buds can form on the reconstructed skin in a single row in vitro. The bioengineered feather buds develop into long feather buds by transplantation onto a chorioallantoic membrane. The bioengineered bud sizes were similar to those of native embryo. The number of bioengineered buds was increased linearly with the initial contact length of epithelial and mesenchymal cell layers where the epithelial-mesenchymal interactions occur. In addition, the bioengineered bud formation was also disturbed by the inhibition of major signaling pathways including FGF (fibroblast growth factor), Wnt/β-catenin, Notch and BMP (bone morphogenetic protein). We expect that our bioengineering technique will motivate further extensive research on multicellular developmental systems, such as the formation and sizing of cutaneous appendages, and their regulatory mechanisms. PMID:27019985

  9. Translocation of Cell Penetrating Peptide Engrafted Nanoparticles Across Skin Layers

    PubMed Central

    Patlolla, Ram R; Desai, Pinaki; Belay, Kalayu; Singh, Mandip

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the current study was to evaluate the ability of cell penetrating peptides (CPP) to translocate the lipid payload into the skin layers. Fluorescent dye (DID-oil) encapsulated nano lipid crystal nanoparticles (FNLCN) were prepared using Compritol, Miglyol and DOGS-NTA-Ni lipids by hot melt homogenization technique. The FNLCN surface was coated with TAT peptide (FNLCNT) or control YKA peptide (FNLCNY) and in vitro rat skin permeation studies were performed using Franz diffusion cells. Observation of lateral skin sections obtained using cryotome with a confocal microscope demonstrated that skin permeation of FNLCNT was time dependent and after 24 h, fluorescence was observed upto a depth of 120 µm which was localized in the hair follicles and epidermis. In case of FNLCN and FNLCNY formulations fluorescence was mainly observed in the hair follicles. This observation was further supported by confocal Raman spectroscopy where higher fluorescence signal intensity was observed at 80 and 120 µm depth with FNLCNT treated skin and intensity of fluorescence peaks was in the ratio of 2:1:1 and 5:3:1 for FNLCNT, FNLCN, and FNLCNY treated skin sections, respectively. Furthermore, replacement of DID-oil with celecoxib (Cxb), a model lipophilic drug showed similar results and after 24 h, the CXBNT formulation increased the Cxb concentration in SC by 3 and 6 fold and in epidermis by 2 and 3 fold as compared to CXBN and CXBNY formulations respectively. Our results strongly suggest that CPP can translocate nanoparticles with their payloads into deeper skin layers. PMID:20413152

  10. In vitro differentiation of human skin-derived multipotent stromal cells into putative endothelial-like cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Multipotent stem cells have been successfully isolated from various tissues and are currently utilized for tissue-engineering and cell-based therapies. Among the many sources, skin has recently emerged as an attractive source for multipotent cells because of its abundance. Recent literature showed that skin stromal cells (SSCs) possess mesoderm lineage differentiation potential; however, the endothelial differentiation and angiogenic potential of SSC remains elusive. In our study, SSCs were isolated from human neonatal foreskin (hNFSSCs) and adult dermal skin (hADSSCs) using explants cultures and were compared with bone marrow (hMSC-TERT) and adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hADMSCs) for their potential differentiation into osteoblasts, adipocytes, and endothelial cells. Results Concordant with previous studies, both MSCs and SSCs showed similar morphology, surface protein expression, and were able to differentiate into osteoblasts and adipocytes. Using an endothelial induction culture system combined with an in vitro matrigel angiogenesis assay, hNFSSCs and hADSSCs exhibited the highest tube-forming capability, which was similar to those formed by human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), with hNFSSCs forming the most tightly packed, longest, and largest diameter tubules among the three cell types. CD146 was highly expressed on hNFSSCs and HUVEC followed by hADSSCs, and hMSC-TERT, while its expression was almost absent on hADMSCs. Similarly, higher vascular density (based on the expression of CD31, CD34, vWF, CD146 and SMA) was observed in neonatal skin, followed by adult dermal skin and adipose tissue. Thus, our preliminary data indicated a plausible relationship between vascular densities, and the expression of CD146 on multipotent cells derived from those tissues. Conclusions Our data is the first to demonstrate that human dermal skin stromal cells can be differentiated into endothelial lineage. Hence, SSCs represents a novel

  11. Stem cell recovering effect of copper-free GHK in skin.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hye-Ryung; Kang, Youn-A; Ryoo, Sun-Jong; Shin, Jung-Won; Na, Jung-Im; Huh, Chang-Hun; Park, Kyoung-Chan

    2012-11-01

    The peptide Gly-His-Lys (GHK) is a naturally occurring copper(II)-chelating motifs in human serum and cerebrospinal fluid. In industry, GHK (with or without copper) is used to make hair and skin care products. Copper-GHK plays a physiological role in the process of wound healing and tissue repair by stimulating collagen synthesis in fibroblasts. We also reported that copper-GHK promotes the survival of basal stem cells in the skin. However, the effects of copper-free GHK (GHK) have not been investigated well. In this study, the effects of GHK were studied using cultured normal human keratinocytes and skin equivalent (SE) models. In monolayer cultured keratinocytes, GHK increased the proliferation of keratinocytes. When GHK was added during the culture of SE models, the basal cells became more cuboidal than control model. In addition, there was linear and intense staining of α6 and β1 integrin along the basement membrane. The number of p63 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen positive cells was also significantly increased in GHK-treated SEs than in control SEs. Western blot and slide culture experiment showed that GHK increased the expression of integrin by keratinocytes. All these results showed that GHK increased the stemness and proliferative potential of epidermal basal cells, which is associated with increased expression of integrin. In conclusion, copper-free GHK showed similar effects with copper-GHK. Thus, it can be said that copper-free GHK can be used in industry to obtain the effects of copper-GHK in vivo. Further study is necessary to explore the relationship between copper-free GHK and copper-GHK. PMID:23019153

  12. Expression of The Embryonic Stem Cell Transcription Factor SOX2 in Human Skin

    PubMed Central

    Laga, Alvaro C.; Lai, Chiou-Yan; Zhan, Qian; Huang, Susan J.; Velazquez, Elsa F.; Yang, Qinghong; Hsu, Mei-Yu; Murphy, George F.

    2010-01-01

    SOX2 is a gene located on chromosome 3q26.33 that encodes a transcription factor important to maintenance of embryonic neural crest stem cell pluripotency. We have identified rare SOX2-immunoreactive cells in normal human skin at or near the established stem cell niches. Three subsets of SOX2-positive cells were defined in these regions: those expressing only SOX2 and those that co-expressed SOX2 and either CK20 or microphthalmia-associated transcription factor, which are consistent with dichotomous differentiation of SOX2-expressing precursors along neuroendocrine (Merkel cell) or melanocytic lines, respectively. Examination of Merkel cell carcinomas confirmed nuclear SOX2 expression in this tumor type. In human patient melanoma, strong nuclear expression of SOX2 was noted in a subset of tumors, and the ability to detect SOX2 in lesional cells significantly correlated with primary tumor thickness in a survey cohort. To assess the potential role of SOX2 in melanoma growth, an in vivo tumorigenesis assay was used. Whereas SOX2 knockdown failed to influence proliferation of cultured melanoma cells in vitro, tumor xenografts generated with the SOX2-knockdown cell line showed significant decrease in mean tumor volume as compared with controls. In aggregate, these findings suggest that SOX2 is a novel biomarker for subpopulations of normal skin cells that reside in established stem cell niches and that might relate to Merkel cell and melanocyte ontogeny and tumorigenesis. PMID:20042675

  13. Comparison of the Biological Characteristics of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Derived from Bone Marrow and Skin

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ruifeng; Chang, Wenjuan; Wei, Hong; Zhang, Kaiming

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) exhibit high proliferation and self-renewal capabilities and are critical for tissue repair and regeneration during ontogenesis. They also play a role in immunomodulation. MSCs can be isolated from a variety of tissues and have many potential applications in the clinical setting. However, MSCs of different origins may possess different biological characteristics. In this study, we performed a comprehensive comparison of MSCs isolated from bone marrow and skin (BMMSCs and SMSCs, resp.), including analysis of the skin sampling area, separation method, culture conditions, primary and passage culture times, cell surface markers, multipotency, cytokine secretion, gene expression, and fibroblast-like features. The results showed that the MSCs from both sources had similar cell morphologies, surface markers, and differentiation capacities. However, the two cell types exhibited major differences in growth characteristics; the primary culture time of BMMSCs was significantly shorter than that of SMSCs, whereas the growth rate of BMMSCs was lower than that of SMSCs after passaging. Moreover, differences in gene expression and cytokine secretion profiles were observed. For example, secretion of proliferative cytokines was significantly higher for SMSCs than for BMMSCs. Our findings provide insights into the different biological functions of both cell types. PMID:27239202

  14. Comparison of the Biological Characteristics of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Derived from Bone Marrow and Skin.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ruifeng; Chang, Wenjuan; Wei, Hong; Zhang, Kaiming

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) exhibit high proliferation and self-renewal capabilities and are critical for tissue repair and regeneration during ontogenesis. They also play a role in immunomodulation. MSCs can be isolated from a variety of tissues and have many potential applications in the clinical setting. However, MSCs of different origins may possess different biological characteristics. In this study, we performed a comprehensive comparison of MSCs isolated from bone marrow and skin (BMMSCs and SMSCs, resp.), including analysis of the skin sampling area, separation method, culture conditions, primary and passage culture times, cell surface markers, multipotency, cytokine secretion, gene expression, and fibroblast-like features. The results showed that the MSCs from both sources had similar cell morphologies, surface markers, and differentiation capacities. However, the two cell types exhibited major differences in growth characteristics; the primary culture time of BMMSCs was significantly shorter than that of SMSCs, whereas the growth rate of BMMSCs was lower than that of SMSCs after passaging. Moreover, differences in gene expression and cytokine secretion profiles were observed. For example, secretion of proliferative cytokines was significantly higher for SMSCs than for BMMSCs. Our findings provide insights into the different biological functions of both cell types. PMID:27239202

  15. Naïve adult stem cells isolation from primary human fibroblast cultures.

    PubMed

    Wenzel, Vera; Roedl, Daniela; Ring, Johannes; Djabali, Karima

    2013-01-01

    Over the last decade, several adult stem cell populations have been identified in human skin (1-4). The isolation of multipotent adult dermal precursors was first reported by Miller F. D laboratory (5, 6). These early studies described a multipotent precursor cell population from adult mammalian dermis (5). These cells--termed SKPs, for skin-derived precursors-- were isolated and expanded from rodent and human skin and differentiated into both neural and mesodermal progeny, including cell types never found in skin, such as neurons (5). Immunocytochemical studies on cultured SKPs revealed that cells expressed vimentin and nestin, an intermediate filament protein expressed in neural and skeletal muscle precursors, in addition to fibronectin and multipotent stem cell markers (6). Until now, the adult stem cells population SKPs have been isolated from freshly collected mammalian skin biopsies. Recently, we have established and reported that a population of skin derived precursor cells could remain present in primary fibroblast cultures established from skin biopsies (7). The assumption that a few somatic stem cells might reside in primary fibroblast cultures at early population doublings was based upon the following observations: (1) SKPs and primary fibroblast cultures are derived from the dermis, and therefore a small number of SKP cells could remain present in primary dermal fibroblast cultures and (2) primary fibroblast cultures grown from frozen aliquots that have been subjected to unfavorable temperature during storage or transfer contained a small number of cells that remained viable (7). These rare cells were able to expand and could be passaged several times. This observation suggested that a small number of cells with high proliferation potency and resistance to stress were present in human fibroblast cultures (7). We took advantage of these findings to establish a protocol for rapid isolation of adult stem cells from primary fibroblast cultures that are

  16. Evaluation of topically applied copper(II) oxide nanoparticle cytotoxicity in human skin organ culture.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Dror; Soroka, Yoram; Ma'or, Zeev; Oron, Miriam; Portugal-Cohen, Meital; Brégégère, François Menahem; Berhanu, Deborah; Valsami-Jones, Eugenia; Hai, Noam; Milner, Yoram

    2013-02-01

    The increasing use of nano-sized materials in our environment, and in many consumer products, dictates new safety concerns. In particular, adequate experimental models are needed to evaluate skin toxicity of metal oxide ions, commonly found in cosmetic and dermatologic preparations. We have addressed the biological effects of topically applied copper oxide (CuO) nanoparticles in human skin organ cultures, using light and electron microscopy, and biochemical tests. Nanoparticles were more toxic than micro-sized particles, and their effects were stronger when supplied in growth medium than in topical application. Still topically applied CuO nanoparticles induced inflammatory cytokine secretion and necrosis, especially in epidermis deprived of its protective cornea. Since nanoparticle penetration was not seen, we propose that they may adhere to skin surface, react with the local acidic environment, and generate soluble ions that make their way to inner sites. This work illustrates the abilities of skin organ culture to evaluate the biological effects of topically-applied materials on skin in vitro. PMID:22954531

  17. [Merkel cell carcinoma (trabecular carcinoma) of the skin].

    PubMed

    Zala, L; Armagni, C; Krebs, A

    1983-04-01

    The Merkel cell carcinoma was first designated some years ago by the descriptive term trabecular carcinoma. Both names refer to a skin tumor occurring in elderly patients. This is another example where ultrastructural differentiating criteria are necessary for a definite diagnosis i.e., identification of so-called neurosecretory-like granules by electron microscopy. We report clinical, histological, ultrastructural, and histogenetic aspects of such a disease in a woman suffering from a metastasizing Merkel cell carcinoma. PMID:6853165

  18. Bioprinted Amniotic Fluid-Derived Stem Cells Accelerate Healing of Large Skin Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Skardal, Aleksander; Mack, David; Kapetanovic, Edi; Atala, Anthony; Jackson, John D.; Yoo, James

    2012-01-01

    Stem cells obtained from amniotic fluid show high proliferative capacity in culture and multilineage differentiation potential. Because of the lack of significant immunogenicity and the ability of the amniotic fluid-derived stem (AFS) cells to modulate the inflammatory response, we investigated whether they could augment wound healing in a mouse model of skin regeneration. We used bioprinting technology to treat full-thickness skin wounds in nu/nu mice. AFS cells and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were resuspended in fibrin-collagen gel and “printed” over the wound site. At days 0, 7, and 14, AFS cell- and MSC-driven wound closure and re-epithelialization were significantly greater than closure and re-epithelialization in wounds treated by fibrin-collagen gel only. Histological examination showed increased microvessel density and capillary diameters in the AFS cell-treated wounds compared with the MSC-treated wounds, whereas the skin treated only with gel showed the lowest amount of microvessels. However, tracking of fluorescently labeled AFS cells and MSCs revealed that the cells remained transiently and did not permanently integrate in the tissue. These observations suggest that the increased wound closure rates and angiogenesis may be due to delivery of secreted trophic factors, rather than direct cell-cell interactions. Accordingly, we performed proteomic analysis, which showed that AFS cells secreted a number of growth factors at concentrations higher than those of MSCs. In parallel, we showed that AFS cell-conditioned media induced endothelial cell migration in vitro. Taken together, our results indicate that bioprinting AFS cells could be an effective treatment for large-scale wounds and burns. PMID:23197691

  19. Testosterone metabolism in human skin cells in vitro and its interaction with estradiol and dutasteride.

    PubMed

    Münster, U; Hammer, S; Blume-Peytavi, U; Schäfer-Korting, M

    2003-01-01

    Since the limited knowledge of cutaneous drug metabolism can impair the development of specifically acting topical dermatics and transdermal application systems, the cell-type-specific androgen metabolism in human skin and its inhibition by drugs were investigated. Cultured human foreskin and scalp skin keratinocytes and fibroblasts as well as occipital scalp dermal papilla cells (DPC) were incubated with testosterone 10(-6) and 10(-8)M alone and in the presence of 17alpha-estradiol, 17beta-estradiol or dutasteride for 24 h. Androgens extracted from culture supernatants were subjected to thin-layer chromatography and quantified by beta-counting. In keratinocytes and DPC, dihydrotestosterone (DHT) was only formed to a low extent while androstenedione was the main metabolite. In fibroblasts, DHT formation was pronounced following 10(-8)M testosterone. Dutasteride 10(-8)M completely suppressed 5alpha-dihydro metabolite formation. 17alpha-Estradiol and 17beta-estradiol at nontoxic concentrations decreased 17-ketometabolites. Human skin regulates testosterone action by cell-type-specific activation or deactivation. Effects of 17alpha-estradiol in androgenetic alopecia are not due to 5alpha-reductase inhibition. Dutasteride may be useful in acne and androgenetic alopecia. PMID:14528059

  20. Cyclooxygenases in human and mouse skin and cultured human keratinocytes: association of COX-2 expression with human keratinocyte differentiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leong, J.; Hughes-Fulford, M.; Rakhlin, N.; Habib, A.; Maclouf, J.; Goldyne, M. E.

    1996-01-01

    Epidermal expression of the two isoforms of the prostaglandin H-generating cyclooxygenase (COX-1 and COX-2) was evaluated both by immunohistochemistry performed on human and mouse skin biopsy sections and by Western blotting of protein extracts from cultured human neonatal foreskin keratinocytes. In normal human skin, COX-1 immunostaining is observed throughout the epidermis whereas COX-2 immunostaining increases in the more differentiated, suprabasilar keratinocytes. Basal cell carcinomas express little if any COX-1 or COX-2 immunostaining whereas both isozymes are strongly expressed in squamous cell carcinomas deriving from a more differentiated layer of the epidermis. In human keratinocyte cultures, raising the extracellular calcium concentration, a recognized stimulus for keratinocyte differentiation, leads to an increased expression of both COX-2 protein and mRNA; expression of COX-1 protein, however, shows no significant alteration in response to calcium. Because of a recent report that failed to show COX-2 in normal mouse epidermis, we also looked for COX-1 and COX-2 immunostaining in sections of normal and acetone-treated mouse skin. In agreement with a previous report, some COX-1, but no COX-2, immunostaining is seen in normal murine epidermis. However, following acetone treatment, there is a marked increase in COX-1 expression as well as the appearance of significant COX-2 immunostaining in the basal layer. These data suggest that in human epidermis as well as in human keratinocyte cultures, the expression of COX-2 occurs as a part of normal keratinocyte differentiation whereas in murine epidermis, its constitutive expression is absent, but inducible as previously published.

  1. Asymmetric stem-cell division ensures sustained keratinocyte hyperproliferation in psoriatic skin lesions

    PubMed Central

    JIA, HAI-YAN; SHI, YING; LUO, LONG-FEI; JIANG, GUAN; ZHOU, QIONG; XU, SHI-ZHENG; LEI, TIE-CHI

    2016-01-01

    Excessive expansion of the transit-amplifying (TA) cell compartment is a distinct morphological characteristic of psoriatic epidermal hyperplasia. In order to examine the activation of basal stem cells and how they replenish such an enlarged compartment of TA cells in psoriatic epidermis, we utilized a BrdU labeling method to monitor mitotic stem cells in a mouse model of psoriasiform dermatitis, which was induced by imiquimod. Our results showed that perpendicular and parallel cell division characteristics of dividing stem cells existed in the inflamed epidermis. When we analyzed template-DNA strand segregation in trypsin-dissociated human psoriatic keratinocytes using BrdU pulse-chase labeling, we found that the percentage of asymmetric segregation of BrdU was significantly increased in the cell pairs of psoriatic epidermal cells compared with normal epidermal cells. Furthermore, we also examined the effects of both interleukin (IL)-17A and IL-22 cytokines on the differentiation status of cultured human keratinocytes. The results indicated that both cytokines had synergistic effects on passage-one epidermal cell sheets derived from skin explants and also on cultured keratinocytes, were involved in the maintenance of the undifferentiated stem cell phenotype, and these results suggest an efficient mechanism for preventing the premature loss of basal stem-cell pools in the pro-inflammatory cytokine-enriched milieu of the psoriatic epidermis. Our findings suggest that inhibition of hyperactive stem cells represents a potential therapeutic target to combat recalcitrant epidermal hyperplasia in psoriasis. PMID:26707630

  2. Antibacterial plasma at safe levels for skin cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boekema, B. K. H. L.; Hofmann, S.; van Ham, B. J. T.; Bruggeman, P. J.; Middelkoop, E.

    2013-10-01

    Plasmas produce various reactive species, which are known to be very effective in killing bacteria. Plasma conditions, at which efficient bacterial inactivation is observed, are often not compatible with leaving human cells unharmed. The purpose of this study was to determine plasma settings for inactivation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, without damaging skin cells in vitro under the same treatment conditions. An RF argon plasma jet excited with either continuous or time modulated (20 kHz, 20% duty cycle) voltages was used. To compare these two operation modes, only the input voltage was adjusted in order to obtain the same average power (1.7 W) for both modes. All other settings, i.e. gas flow, distance plasma tip to liquid surface, were kept constant. Bacteria or skin cells in physiological salt solution were exposed to direct non-contact plasma treatments. Short plasma treatments of up to 2 min resulted in a high reduction of bacterial numbers and did not affect dermal fibroblasts or keratinocytes. Bacterial inactivation has been previously ascribed to peroxynitrite, nitrite and H2O2 while eukaryotic cell viability is proposed to be reduced in the long term by the presence of H2O2 and is less affected by reactive nitrogen species. The remote RF plasma jet treatment was highly effective for bacterial inactivation while skin cell viability was preserved.

  3. Photosensitization of cultured cells and viruses by pyrene lipids.

    PubMed

    Gatt, S; Dinur, T; Abou-Rabia, S; Kotler, M; Fibach, E

    1990-12-01

    Administration of pyrene-linked fatty acids and lipids to cultured cells or an enveloped (vesicular stomatitis) virus induced photosensitization which, following irradiation with a long ultra-violet light (LUV), resulted in killing of the cells and loss of the infectivity of the virus with the following specific effects. (i) LUV illumination of the pyrene-sphingomyelin administered cultured skin fibroblasts derived from normal individuals and patients with Niemann-Pick disease permitted selective killing of the latter. (ii) Similarly LUV illumination of pyrenedodecanoic acid (P12) incubates of leukemic cell lines mixed with human bone marrow cells permitted selective killing of the former. (iii) LUV illumination of P12 incubates of vesicular stomatitis virus decreased the infectivity of the virus by up to 12 logs. PMID:1966337

  4. Topical steroid therapy induces pro-tolerogenic changes in Langerhans cells in human skin.

    PubMed

    Ali, Mohammad Alhadj; Thrower, Sally L; Hanna, Stephanie J; Coulman, Sion A; Birchall, James C; Wong, F Susan; Dayan, Colin Mark; Tatovic, Danijela

    2015-11-01

    We have investigated the efficacy of conditioning skin Langerhans cells (LCs) with agents to promote tolerance and reduce inflammation, with the goal of improving the outcomes of antigen-specific immunotherapy. Topical treatments were assessed ex vivo, using excised human breast skin maintained in organ bath cultures, and in vivo in healthy volunteers by analysing skin biopsies and epidermal blister roof samples. Following topical treatment with a corticosteroid, tumour necrosis factor-α levels were reduced in skin biopsy studies and blister fluid samples. Blister fluid concentrations of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, macrophage inflammatory proteins -1α and 1β and interferon-γ inducible protein-10 were also reduced, while preserving levels of interleukin-1α (IL-1α), IL-6, IL-8 and IL-10. Steroid pre-treatment of the skin reduced the ability of LCs to induce proliferation, while supernatants showed an increase in the IL-10/interferon-γ ratio. Phenotypic changes following topical steroid treatment were also observed, including reduced expression of CD83 and CD86 in blister-derived LCs, but preservation of the tolerogenic signalling molecules immunoglobulin-like transcript 3 and programmed death-1. Reduced expression of HLA-DR, CD80 and CD86 were also apparent in LCs derived from excised human skin. Topical therapy with a vitamin D analogue (calcipotriol) and steroid, calcipotriol alone or vitamin A elicited no significant changes in the parameters studied. These experiments suggest that pre-conditioning the skin with topical corticosteroid can modulate LCs by blunting their pro-inflammatory signals and potentially enhancing tolerance. We suggest that such modulation before antigen-specific immunotherapy might provide an inexpensive and safe adjunct to current approaches to treat autoimmune diseases. PMID:26293297

  5. Epithelial mechanobiology, skin wound healing, and the stem cell niche.

    PubMed

    Evans, Nicholas D; Oreffo, Richard O C; Healy, Eugene; Thurner, Philipp J; Man, Yu Hin

    2013-12-01

    Skin wound healing is a vital process that is important for re-establishing the epithelial barrier following disease or injury. Aberrant or delayed skin wound healing increases the risk of infection, causes patient morbidity, and may lead to the formation of scar tissue. One of the most important events in wound healing is coverage of the wound with a new epithelial layer. This occurs when keratinocytes at the wound periphery divide and migrate to re-populate the wound bed. Many approaches are under investigation to promote and expedite this process, including the topical application of growth factors and the addition of autologous and allogeneic tissue or cell grafts. The mechanical environment of the wound site is also of fundamental importance for the rate and quality of wound healing. It is known that mechanical stress can influence wound healing by affecting the behaviour of cells within the dermis, but it remains unclear how mechanical forces affect the healing epidermis. Tensile forces are known to affect the behaviour of cells within epithelia, however, and the material properties of extracellular matrices, such as substrate stiffness, have been shown to affect the morphology, proliferation, differentiation and migration of many different cell types. In this review we will introduce the structure of the skin and the process of wound healing. We will then discuss the evidence for the effect of tissue mechanics in re-epithelialisation and, in particular, on stem cell behaviour in the wound microenvironment and in intact skin. We will discuss how the elasticity, mechanical heterogeneity and topography of the wound extracellular matrix impact the rate and quality of wound healing, and how we may exploit this knowledge to expedite wound healing and mitigate scarring. PMID:23746929

  6. E-Cadherin Suppression Directs Cytoskeletal Rearrangement and Intraepithelial Tumor Cell Migration in 3D Human Skin Equivalents

    PubMed Central

    Alt-Holland, Addy; Shamis, Yulia; Riley, Kathleen N.; DesRochers, Teresa M.; Fusenig, Norbert E.; Herman, Ira M.; Garlick, Jonathan A.

    2010-01-01

    The link between loss of cell–cell adhesion, the activation of cell migration, and the behavior of intraepithelial (IE) tumor cells during the early stages of skin cancer progression is not well understood. The current study characterized the migratory behavior of a squamous cell carcinoma cell line (HaCaT-II-4) upon E-cadherin suppression in both 2D, monolayer cultures and within human skin equivalents that mimic premalignant disease. The migratory behavior of tumor cells was first analyzed in 3D tissue context by developing a model that mimics transepithelial tumor cell migration. We show that loss of cell adhesion enabled migration of single, IE tumor cells between normal keratinocytes as a prerequisite for stromal invasion. To further understand this migratory behavior, E-cadherin-deficient cells were analyzed in 2D, monolayer cultures and displayed altered cytoarchitecture and enhanced membrane protrusive activity that was associated with circumferential actin organization and induction of the nonmuscle, β actin isoform. These features were associated with increased motility and random, individual cell migration in response to scrape-wounding. Thus, loss of E-cadherin-mediated adhesion led to the acquisition of phenotypic properties that augmented cell motility and directed the transition from the precancer to cancer in skin-like tissues. PMID:18528437

  7. Cell culture techniques in honey bee research

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cell culture techniques are indispensable in most if not all life science disciplines to date. Wherever cell culture models are lacking scientific development is hampered. Unfortunately this has been and still is the case in honey bee research because permanent honey bee cell lines have not yet been...

  8. Cell Culture as an Alternative in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nardone, Roland M.

    1990-01-01

    Programs that are intended to inform and provide "hands-on" experience for students and to facilitate the introduction of cell culture-based laboratory exercises into the high school and college laboratory are examined. The components of the CellServ Program and the Cell Culture Toxicology Training Programs are described. (KR)

  9. Impact of AQP3 inducer treatment on cultured human keratinocytes, ex vivo human skin and volunteers.

    PubMed

    Garcia, N; Gondran, C; Menon, G; Mur, L; Oberto, G; Guerif, Y; Dal Farra, C; Domloge, N

    2011-10-01

    One of the main functions of the skin is to protect the organism against environmental threats, such as thermal stress. Aquaporin-3 (AQP3) facilitates water and glycerol transport across cell membranes and therefore regulates osmotic balance in different situations of stress. This mechanism seems to be particularly important for the resistance of different organisms to cold stress. Consequently, we were interested in investigating the effect of cold and osmotic stress on AQP3 expression in normal human keratinocytes. We developed a new active ingredient to stimulate aquaporins in skin and demonstrated the partial restoration of AQP3 expression in keratinocytes transfected with AQP3 siRNA. Moreover, we examined the effect of cold stress on cell morphology and the impact of a pre-treatment with the active ingredient. Our results indicated that induction of AQP3 helped maintain a correct organization of the actin cytoskeleton, preserving cell morphology and preventing cells from rounding. Immunofluorescent staining revealed cytoplasmic localization of AQP3 and its translocation to the cell membrane following osmotic stress. Histological ex vivo studies of skin under different conditions, such as cold environment and tape-stripping, indicated that increase in AQP3 expression appears to be involved in skin protection and showed that the pattern of AQP3 expression was more enhanced in the active ingredient-treated samples. In vivo confocal microscopy by Vivascope showed a generally healthier appearance of the skin in the treated areas. These results attest to the potential value of the active ingredient in optimizing environmental stress resistance and protecting the skin from stratum corneum damage. PMID:21401652

  10. Mesenchymal stem cell-conditioned medium accelerates skin wound healing: An in vitro study of fibroblast and keratinocyte scratch assays

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, M.N.M.; Wright, K.T.; Fuller, H.R.; MacNeil, S.; Johnson, W.E.B.

    2010-04-15

    We have used in vitro scratch assays to examine the relative contribution of dermal fibroblasts and keratinocytes in the wound repair process and to test the influence of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) secreted factors on both skin cell types. Scratch assays were established using single cell and co-cultures of L929 fibroblasts and HaCaT keratinocytes, with wound closure monitored via time-lapse microscopy. Both in serum supplemented and serum free conditions, wound closure was faster in L929 fibroblast than HaCaT keratinocyte scratch assays, and in co-culture the L929 fibroblasts lead the way in closing the scratches. MSC-CM generated under serum free conditions significantly enhanced the wound closure rate of both skin cell types separately and in co-culture, whereas conditioned medium from L929 or HaCaT cultures had no significant effect. This enhancement of wound closure in the presence of MSC-CM was due to accelerated cell migration rather than increased cell proliferation. A number of wound healing mediators were identified in MSC-CM, including TGF-{beta}1, the chemokines IL-6, IL-8, MCP-1 and RANTES, and collagen type I, fibronectin, SPARC and IGFBP-7. This study suggests that the trophic activity of MSC may play a role in skin wound closure by affecting both dermal fibroblast and keratinocyte migration, along with a contribution to the formation of extracellular matrix.

  11. Cell selectivity to laser-induced photoacoustic injury of skin.

    PubMed

    Yashima, Y; McAuliffe, D J; Flotte, T J

    1990-01-01

    Cell selectivity to photoacoustic injury induced by argon-fluoride excimer laser (193 nm) was studied. Rats were irradiated through air or water and a 2.5 mm aperture. The laser was adjusted to deliver 150 mJ/cm2 at the skin surface with 12 and 24 pulses. Immediate damage was assessed by transmission electron microscopy. Cell selectivity was observed in dermis and epidermis. Fibroblasts showed alteration of nuclear chromatin and cytoplasmic organelles, while some of the migratory cells adjacent to fibroblasts did not. Similar difference of damage was observed between keratinocytes and Langerhans cells in epidermis. Considering the relationship between cells and their microenvironment in tissue, this selectivity may be due to the difference of acoustical coupling of propagation of acoustic waves rather than to differential sensitivity of the cells to damage. PMID:2345477

  12. Human Skin-Derived Stem Cells as a Novel Cell Source for In Vitro Hepatotoxicity Screening of Pharmaceuticals

    PubMed Central

    De Kock, Joery; Branson, Steven; Vinken, Mathieu; Meganathan, Kesavan; Chaudhari, Umesh; Sachinidis, Agapios; Govaere, Olivier; Roskams, Tania; De Boe, Veerle; Vanhaecke, Tamara; Rogiers, Vera

    2014-01-01

    Human skin-derived precursors (hSKP) are postnatal stem cells with neural crest properties that reside in the dermis of human skin. These cells can be easily isolated from small (fore) skin segments and have the capacity to differentiate into multiple cell types. In this study, we show that upon exposure to hepatogenic growth factors and cytokines, hSKP acquire sufficient hepatic features that could make these cells suitable in vitro tools for hepatotoxicity screening of new chemical entities and already existing pharmaceutical compounds. Indeed, hepatic differentiated hSKP [hSKP-derived hepatic progenitor cells (hSKP-HPC)] express hepatic progenitor cell markers (EPCAM, NCAM2, PROM1) and adult hepatocyte markers (ALB), as well as key biotransformation enzymes (CYP1B1, FMO1, GSTA4, GSTM3) and influx and efflux drug transporters (ABCC4, ABCA1, SLC2A5). Using a toxicogenomics approach, we could demonstrate that hSKP-HPC respond to acetaminophen exposure in a comparable way to primary human hepatocytes in culture. The toxicological responses “liver damage”, “liver proliferation”, “liver necrosis” and “liver steatosis” were found to be significantly enriched in both in vitro models. Also genes associated with either cytotoxic responses or induction of apoptosis (BCL2L11, FOS, HMOX1, TIMP3, and AHR) were commonly upregulated and might represent future molecular biomarkers for hepatotoxicity. In conclusion, our data gives a first indication that hSKP-HPC might represent a suitable preclinical model for in vitro screening of hepatotoxicity. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report in which human postnatal stem cells derived from skin are described as a potentially relevant cell source for in vitro hepatotoxicity testing of pharmaceutical compounds. PMID:23952781

  13. An application of embryonic skin cells to repair diabetic skin wound: a wound reparation trail.

    PubMed

    Qian, De Jian; Guo, Xiang Kai; Duan, Hui Chuan; Han, Zhi Hua; Meng, Fei; Liu, Ju; Wang, Yan

    2014-12-01

    Cell therapy has shown its power to promote diabetic chronic wound healing. However, problems of scar formation and loss of appendages have not yet been solved. Our study aims to explore the potential of using embryonic skin cells (ESkCs) to repair diabetic wounds. Circular wound was created on the back of the diabetic mice, and ESkCs stained with CM-DIL were transplanted into the wound. Wound area was recorded at the day 4, 7, 11, and 14 after transplantation. The tissue samples were obtained at week 1, 2, and 3, and the tissue sections were stained by transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1), TGF-β3, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and CD31. The new skin formed on the wound of the diabetic mice with ESkC treatment at week 1 but not on the wounds of the non-treatment group. The histological scores of diabetic group with ESkC treatment were significantly better than the non-treatment group (P < 0.05). The fluorescence examination of CM-DIL and CD31 staining indicated that the ESkCs participated in the tissue regeneration, hair follicles formation, and angiogenesis. The expression of TGF-β1 and VEGF in ESkC-treated groups was noticeable in week 1 but disappeared in week 2. TGF-β3 was not expressed at week 1 but expressed markedly around hair follicles in week 2 in ESkC-treated groups. Our study demonstrated that ESkCs are capable of developing new skin with appendage restoration to repair the diabetic wounds. PMID:25030484

  14. Biology of Zika Virus Infection in Human Skin Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hamel, Rodolphe; Dejarnac, Ophélie; Wichit, Sineewanlaya; Ekchariyawat, Peeraya; Neyret, Aymeric; Luplertlop, Natthanej; Perera-Lecoin, Manuel; Surasombatpattana, Pornapat; Talignani, Loïc; Thomas, Frédéric; Cao-Lormeau, Van-Mai; Choumet, Valérie; Briant, Laurence; Desprès, Philippe; Amara, Ali; Yssel, Hans

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emerging arbovirus of the Flaviviridae family, which includes dengue, West Nile, yellow fever, and Japanese encephalitis viruses, that causes a mosquito-borne disease transmitted by the Aedes genus, with recent outbreaks in the South Pacific. Here we examine the importance of human skin in the entry of ZIKV and its contribution to the induction of antiviral immune responses. We show that human dermal fibroblasts, epidermal keratinocytes, and immature dendritic cells are permissive to the most recent ZIKV isolate, responsible for the epidemic in French Polynesia. Several entry and/or adhesion factors, including DC-SIGN, AXL, Tyro3, and, to a lesser extent, TIM-1, permitted ZIKV entry, with a major role for the TAM receptor AXL. The ZIKV permissiveness of human skin fibroblasts was confirmed by the use of a neutralizing antibody and specific RNA silencing. ZIKV induced the transcription of Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3), RIG-I, and MDA5, as well as several interferon-stimulated genes, including OAS2, ISG15, and MX1, characterized by strongly enhanced beta interferon gene expression. ZIKV was found to be sensitive to the antiviral effects of both type I and type II interferons. Finally, infection of skin fibroblasts resulted in the formation of autophagosomes, whose presence was associated with enhanced viral replication, as shown by the use of Torin 1, a chemical inducer of autophagy, and the specific autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine. The results presented herein permit us to gain further insight into the biology of ZIKV and to devise strategies aiming to interfere with the pathology caused by this emerging flavivirus. IMPORTANCE Zika virus (ZIKV) is an arbovirus belonging to the Flaviviridae family. Vector-mediated transmission of ZIKV is initiated when a blood-feeding female Aedes mosquito injects the virus into the skin of its mammalian host, followed by infection of permissive cells via specific receptors. Indeed, skin immune

  15. Effects of subepithelial fibroblasts on epithelial differentiation in human skin and oral mucosa: heterotypically recombined organotypic culture model.

    PubMed

    Okazaki, Mutsumi; Yoshimura, Kotaro; Suzuki, Yasutoshi; Harii, Kiyonori

    2003-09-01

    The stratified squamous epithelia differ regionally in their patterns of morphogenesis and differentiation. Although some reports suggested that the adult epithelial phenotype is an intrinsic property of the epithelium, there is increasing evidence that subepithelial connective tissue can modify the phenotypic expression of the epithelium. The aim of this study was to elucidate whether the differentiation of cutaneous and oral epithelia is influenced by underlying mesenchymal tissues. Three normal skin samples and three normal buccal mucosa samples were used for the experiments. Skin equivalents were constructed in four ways, depending on the combinations of keratinocytes (cutaneous or mucosal keratinocytes) and fibroblasts (dermal or mucosal fibroblasts), and the effects of subepithelial fibroblasts on the differentiation of oral and cutaneous keratinocytes were studied with histological examinations and immunohistochemical analyses with anti-cytokeratin (keratins 10 and 13) antibodies. For each experiment, three paired skin equivalents were constructed by using single parent keratinocyte and fibroblast sources for each group; consequently, nine (3 x 3) organotypic cultures per group were constructed and studied. The oral and cutaneous epithelial cells maintained their intrinsic keratin expression. The keratin expression patterns in oral and cutaneous epithelia of skin equivalents were generally similar to their original patterns but were partly modified exogenously by the topologically different fibroblasts. The mucosal keratinocytes were more differentiated and expressed keratin 10 when cocultured with dermal fibroblasts, and the expression patterns of keratin 13 in cutaneous keratinocytes cocultured with mucosal fibroblasts were different from those in keratinocytes cocultured with cutaneous fibroblasts. The results suggested that the epithelial phenotype and keratin expression could be extrinsically modified by mesenchymal fibroblasts. In epithelial

  16. Culture of Cells from Amphibian Embryos.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanisstreet, Martin

    1983-01-01

    Describes a method for in vitro culturing of cells from amphibian early embryos. Such cells can be used to demonstrate such properties of eukaryote cells as cell motility, adhesion, differentiation, and cell sorting into tissues. The technique may be extended to investigate other factors. (Author/JN)

  17. Squamous cell carcinoma of the skin (non-metastatic)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma is a malignant tumour of keratinocytes arising in the epidermis, with histological evidence of dermal invasion. Incidence varies by country, skin colour, and outdoor behaviour, and is as high as 400/100,000 in Australia. People with fair skin colour who have high sun exposure and sunburn easily with little or no tanning, people with xeroderma pigmentosum, and people who are immunosuppressed are most susceptible to squamous cell carcinoma. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: Does the use of sunscreen help prevent cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma and actinic (solar) keratosis? What is the optimal margin for primary excision of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (non-metastatic)? Does radiotherapy after surgery affect local recurrence of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma in people with squamous cell carcinoma of the skin (non-metastatic)? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to August 2013 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found five studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review, we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: sunscreens, primary excision, and radiotherapy after surgery. PMID:25137222

  18. Wnt-10b secreted from lymphocytes promotes differentiation of skin epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ouji, Yukiteru . E-mail: oujix@naramed-u.ac.jp; Yoshikawa, Masahide; Shiroi, Akira; Ishizaka, Shigeaki

    2006-04-21

    Wnt-10b was originally isolated from lymphoid tissue and is known to be involved in a wide range of biological actions, while recently it was found to be expressed early in the development of hair follicles. However, few studies have been conducted concerning the role of Wnt-10b with the differentiation of skin epithelial cells. To evaluate its role in epithelial differentiation, we purified Wnt-10b from the supernatant of a concanavalin A-stimulated lymphocyte culture using an affinity column and investigated its effects on the differentiation of adult mouse-derived primary skin epithelial cells (MPSEC). MPSEC cultured with Wnt-10b showed morphological changes from cuboidal to spindle-shaped with inhibited proliferation, and also obtained characteristics of the hair shaft and inner root sheath of the hair follicle, represented by red-colored Ayoub Shklar staining, and reactions to AE-13 and AE-15 as seen with immunocytology. Further, RT-PCR analysis demonstrated the expression of mRNA for keratin 1, keratin 2, loricrin, mHa5, and mHb5, in association with a decreased expression of the basal cell marker keratin 5, in Wnt-10b-treated MPSEC. In addition, involvement of the canonical Wnt signal pathway was demonstrated by a TCF reporter (pTOPFLASH) assay. These results suggest that Wnt-10b promotes the differentiation of MPSEC and may play an important role in hair follicle development by promoting differentiation of epithelial cells.

  19. Niacin protects against UVB radiation-induced apoptosis in cultured human skin keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    LIN, FUQUAN; XU, WEN; GUAN, CUIPING; ZHOU, MIAONI; HONG, WEISONG; FU, LIFANG; LIU, DONGYIN; XU, AIE

    2012-01-01

    Niacin and its related derivatives have been shown to have effects on cellular activities. However, the molecular mechanism of its reduced immunosuppressive effects and photoprotective effects remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanism of the photoprotective effect of niacin in ultraviolet (UV)-irradiated human skin keratinocytes (HaCaT cells). We found that niacin effectively suppressed the UV-induced cell death and cell apoptosis of HaCaT cells. Existing data have shown that AKT activation is involved in the cell survival process. Yet, the potential mechanism of niacin in protection against UV-induced skin damage has thus far not fully been eluvidated. We observed that niacin pretreatment enhances UV induced activation of AKT (Ser473 phosphorylation) as well as that of the downstream signal mTOR (S6 and 4E-BP1 phosphorylation). The PI3K/AKT inhibitor, LY294002, and the mTOR inhibitor, rapamycin, largely neutralized the protective effects of niacin, suggesting that AKT and downstream signaling mTOR/S6 activation are necessary for the niacin-induced protective effects against UV-induced cell death and cell apoptosis. Collectively, our data suggest that niacin may be utilized to prevent UV-induced skin damage and provide a novel mechanism of its photoprotective effects against the UV radiation of sunlight by modulating both AKT and downstream mTOR signaling pathways. PMID:22246168

  20. Ultraviolet Radiation-Induced Skin Aging: The Role of DNA Damage and Oxidative Stress in Epidermal Stem Cell Damage Mediated Skin Aging

    PubMed Central

    Panich, Uraiwan; Sittithumcharee, Gunya; Rathviboon, Natwarath

    2016-01-01

    Skin is the largest human organ. Skin continually reconstructs itself to ensure its viability, integrity, and ability to provide protection for the body. Some areas of skin are continuously exposed to a variety of environmental stressors that can inflict direct and indirect damage to skin cell DNA. Skin homeostasis is maintained by mesenchymal stem cells in inner layer dermis and epidermal stem cells (ESCs) in the outer layer epidermis. Reduction of skin stem cell number and function has been linked to impaired skin homeostasis (e.g., skin premature aging and skin cancers). Skin stem cells, with self-renewal capability and multipotency, are frequently affected by environment. Ultraviolet radiation (UVR), a major cause of stem cell DNA damage, can contribute to depletion of stem cells (ESCs and mesenchymal stem cells) and damage of stem cell niche, eventually leading to photoinduced skin aging. In this review, we discuss the role of UV-induced DNA damage and oxidative stress in the skin stem cell aging in order to gain insights into the pathogenesis and develop a way to reduce photoaging of skin cells. PMID:27148370

  1. Acute leukemia after radiotherapy in a patient with Turcot's syndrome. Impaired colony formation in skin fibroblast cultures after irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, F.P.; Little, J.B.; Bech-Hansen, N.T.; Paterson, M.C.; Arlett, C.; Garnick, M.B.; Mayer, R.J.

    1983-02-01

    Colonic polyposis and carcinoma developed in a woman with Turcot's syndrome at the age of 31 years; astrocytoma developed when she was 37. Her brother and sister had died of astrocytoma at the ages of 18 and 33 years, respectively. Progressive neutropenia developed in the patient three months after radiotherapy for her brain tumor and acute myelomonocytic leukemia 19 months after treatment. Three laboratories independently evaluated cultures of her skin fibroblasts for in vitro sensitivity to cell killing (loss of colony-forming ability) by x-rays. Survival assays consistently revealed slight but significant radiosensitivity in an early-passage (six to 10 doublings) fibroblast subculture. A later subculture (21 to 29 doublings) showed no abnormality, a possible effect of selective in vitro loss of radiosensitive cells.

  2. Single-cell growth analysis in a mixed cell culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Jun; Bato, Mary Grace P.; Daria, Vincent Ricardo

    2008-06-01

    We perform single cell analysis of cell growth in a mixed cell culture. Two species of yeast cells: Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans, are optically trapped using focused continuous-wave near infrared laser. Cell growth for both cells is inhibited only when the two species of cells are in contact with each other. This indicates cell-cell interaction mediated cell growth inhibition mechanism. Single cell level analysis of cell growth studied here contributes to the further understanding of yeast growth arrest in a mixed yeast culture.

  3. Skin TLR7 triggering promotes accumulation of respiratory dendritic cells and natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Hackstein, Holger; Hagel, Nicole; Knoche, Angela; Kranz, Sabine; Lohmeyer, Jürgen; von Wulffen, Werner; Kershaw, Olivia; Gruber, Achim D; Bein, Gregor; Baal, Nelli

    2012-01-01

    The TLR7 agonist imiquimod has been used successfully as adjuvant for skin treatment of virus-associated warts and basal cell carcinoma. The effects of skin TLR7 triggering on respiratory leukocyte populations are unknown. In a placebo-controlled experimental animal study we have used multicolour flow cytometry to systematically analyze the modulation of respiratory leukocyte subsets after skin administration of imiquimod. Compared to placebo, skin administration of imiquimod significantly increased respiratory dendritic cells (DC) and natural killer cells, whereas total respiratory leukocyte, alveolar macrophages, classical CD4+ T helper and CD8+ T killer cell numbers were not or only moderately affected. DC subpopulation analyses revealed that elevation of respiratory DC was caused by an increase of respiratory monocytic DC and CD11b(hi) DC subsets. Lymphocyte subpopulation analyses indicated a marked elevation of respiratory natural killer cells and a significant reduction of B lymphocytes. Analysis of cytokine responses of respiratory leukocytes after stimulation with Klebsiella pneumonia indicated reduced IFN-γ and TNF-α expression and increased IL-10 and IL-12p70 production after 7 day low dose skin TLR7 triggering. Additionally, respiratory NK cytotoxic activity was increased after 7d skin TLR7 triggering. In contrast, lung histology and bronchoalveolar cell counts were not affected suggesting that skin TLR7 stimulation modulated respiratory leukocyte composition without inducing overt pulmonary inflammation. These data suggest the possibility to modulate respiratory leukocyte composition and respiratory cytokine responses against pathogens like Klebsiella pneumonia through skin administration of a clinically approved TLR7 ligand. Skin administration of synthetic TLR7 ligands may represent a novel, noninvasive means to modulate respiratory immunity. PMID:22927956

  4. Skin TLR7 Triggering Promotes Accumulation of Respiratory Dendritic Cells and Natural Killer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hackstein, Holger; Hagel, Nicole; Knoche, Angela; Kranz, Sabine; Lohmeyer, Jürgen; von Wulffen, Werner; Kershaw, Olivia; Gruber, Achim D.; Bein, Gregor; Baal, Nelli

    2012-01-01

    The TLR7 agonist imiquimod has been used successfully as adjuvant for skin treatment of virus-associated warts and basal cell carcinoma. The effects of skin TLR7 triggering on respiratory leukocyte populations are unknown. In a placebo-controlled experimental animal study we have used multicolour flow cytometry to systematically analyze the modulation of respiratory leukocyte subsets after skin administration of imiquimod. Compared to placebo, skin administration of imiquimod significantly increased respiratory dendritic cells (DC) and natural killer cells, whereas total respiratory leukocyte, alveolar macrophages, classical CD4+ T helper and CD8+ T killer cell numbers were not or only moderately affected. DC subpopulation analyses revealed that elevation of respiratory DC was caused by an increase of respiratory monocytic DC and CD11bhi DC subsets. Lymphocyte subpopulation analyses indicated a marked elevation of respiratory natural killer cells and a significant reduction of B lymphocytes. Analysis of cytokine responses of respiratory leukocytes after stimulation with Klebsiella pneumonia indicated reduced IFN-γ and TNF-α expression and increased IL-10 and IL-12p70 production after 7 day low dose skin TLR7 triggering. Additionally, respiratory NK cytotoxic activity was increased after 7d skin TLR7 triggering. In contrast, lung histology and bronchoalveolar cell counts were not affected suggesting that skin TLR7 stimulation modulated respiratory leukocyte composition without inducing overt pulmonary inflammation. These data suggest the possibility to modulate respiratory leukocyte composition and respiratory cytokine responses against pathogens like Klebsiella pneumonia through skin administration of a clinically approved TLR7 ligand. Skin administration of synthetic TLR7 ligands may represent a novel, noninvasive means to modulate respiratory immunity. PMID:22927956

  5. How to Check Your Skin for Skin Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Cancer Types Skin Cancer Skin Cancer Patient Skin Cancer Treatment Melanoma Treatment Merkel Cell Carcinoma Treatment Skin Cancer Prevention Skin Cancer Screening Health Professional Skin Cancer Treatment Melanoma Treatment Merkel Cell Carcinoma Treatment Skin Cancer ...

  6. Perlecan expression influences the keratin 15-positive cell population fate in the epidermis of aging skin.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Morgan; Michopoulou, Anna; André-Frei, Valérie; Boulesteix, Sophie; Guicher, Christine; Dayan, Guila; Whitelock, John; Damour, Odile; Rousselle, Patricia

    2016-04-01

    The epidermis is continuously renewed by stem cell proliferation and differentiation. Basal keratinocytes append the dermal-epidermal junction, a cell surface-associated, extracellular matrix that provides structural support and influences their behaviour. It consists of laminins, type IV collagen, nidogens, and perlecan, which are necessary for tissue organization and structural integrity. Perlecan is a heparan sulfate proteoglycan known to be involved in keratinocyte survival and differentiation. Aging affects the dermal epidermal junction resulting in decreased contact with keratinocytes, thus impacting epidermal renewal and homeostasis. We found that perlecan expression decreased during chronological skin aging. Our in vitro studies revealed reduced perlecan transcript levels in aged keratinocytes. The production of in vitro skin models revealed that aged keratinocytes formed a thin and poorly organized epidermis. Supplementing these models with purified perlecan reversed the phenomenon allowing restoration of a well-differentiated multi-layered epithelium. Perlecan down-regulation in cultured keratinocytes caused depletion of the cell population that expressed keratin 15. This phenomenon depended on the perlecan heparan sulphate moieties, which suggested the involvement of a growth factor. Finally, we found defects in keratin 15 expression in the epidermis of aging skin. This study highlighted a new role for perlecan in maintaining the self-renewal capacity of basal keratinocytes. PMID:26996820

  7. Effect of tripeptide-copper complexes on the process of skin wound healing and on cultured fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Buffoni, F; Pino, R; Dal Pozzo, A

    1995-01-01

    The effects of Gly-His-Lys-Cu and of three synthetic analogues (I, II and III) on wound healing of the guinea-pig dorsal skin, as well as on cultured fibroblasts, were examined. Gly-His-Lys-Cu and peptide I-Cu were tested in vivo. Hydroxyproline, proteins, DNA and semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase, with a high affinity for benzylamine, were measured, and the histology of the wounds was observed after staining with hematoxylin/eosin. Another set of wounds was treated in parallel with equivalent amounts of copper acetate. Gly-His-Lys-Cu and the analogues caused a decrease of the activity of semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase, with a high affinity for benzylamine, 4-8 days after surgery, followed by an increase on day 11 that was higher than in the control group. No significant difference was found between the two peptides. A slower reorganization of the skin and a delayed activation of fibroblasts are the main effects observed with these peptides-Cu complexes. Preliminary studies on cultured fibroblasts were monitored to see whether these peptides had a direct effect on fibroblasts. The products studied at a concentration of 10(-7) M, decreased cell reproduction and increased collagen expression. PMID:8836453

  8. 9 CFR 101.6 - Cell cultures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Cell cultures. 101.6 Section 101.6 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS DEFINITIONS § 101.6 Cell cultures....

  9. 9 CFR 101.6 - Cell cultures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Cell cultures. 101.6 Section 101.6 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS DEFINITIONS § 101.6 Cell cultures....

  10. 9 CFR 101.6 - Cell cultures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Cell cultures. 101.6 Section 101.6 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS DEFINITIONS § 101.6 Cell cultures....

  11. AMMONIA REMOVAL FROM MAMMALIAN CELL CULTURE MEDIUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Metabolites such as ammonia and lactic formed during mammalian cell culture can frequently be toxic to the cells themselves beyond a threshold concentration of the metabolites. ell culture conducted in the presence of such accumulated metabolites is therefore limited in productiv...

  12. [Wound treatment with autogenous epidermal cell expansion culture].

    PubMed

    Bonnekoh, B; Müller, R P; Mahrle, G; Steigleder, G K

    1988-11-11

    Sheets of autologous epidermal cells grown by expansion culture were used to cover small skin defects in seven patients with postoperative necroses, necroses due to temporal arteritis, varicose ulcers or after tangential excision of tattoos. Several transplantation techniques were used: backing of the cultured epithelia with vaseline gauze, Surfasoft, Adaptic, Silastic foil, culturing directly from Petriperm-foil. Meshed Silastic-foil proved to give the best support. Optimal take of the in-vitro epithelia (more than 80% of their surface area) was achieved only for fresh dermal wound-beds. The take was only moderate on chronic granulation tissue, but the transplants reduced the formation of fibrinous-necrotic material and favoured the formation of fresh granulation tissue. PMID:3181024

  13. Establishment of a 2-week canine skin organ culture model and its pharmacological modulation by epidermal growth factor and dexamethasone.

    PubMed

    Abramo, Francesca; Pirone, Andrea; Lenzi, Carla; Vannozzi, Iacopo; Della Valle, Maria Federica; Miragliotta, Vincenzo

    2016-09-01

    Although canine skin models are already available as either monocellular or organotypic cultures, they only partly recapitulate normal skin morphological features and function. The objective of this study was to establish a canine serum-free skin organ culture model and verify whether dexamethasone could rescue epidermal growth factor-induced changes. The study of morphological changes as a response to pharmacological substances may indeed help to investigate skin physiology and pathology. Normal skin was obtained from five client-owned dogs subjected to surgical procedures unrelated to dermatological conditions. Two experimental designs were performed: (i) two-week viability of the skin culture; (ii) dexamethasone (DMS) inhibition of epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced effects. Serum-free submerged organ cultures were established in Williams' E medium supplemented with penicillin-streptomycin, insulin, hydrocortisone and l-glutamine. General morphological features of skin anatomical structures were well maintained up to day 14, scattered pyknotic nuclei were visible in the epidermis from day 7. Normal keratinocyte differentiation was confirmed by cytokeratin (K) 10, K14 and loricrin immunostaining. Epidermal thickness did not decrease throughout the study. A decrease in keratinocyte proliferation was observed at day 7 and 14. Treatment with EGF induced both keratinocyte proliferation and thickening of the epidermis; both responses were counteracted by DMS. Treatment with EGF increased the length of epithelial tongues at the edge of the skin explants; this effect was further enhanced by DMS supplementation. Our findings demonstrate the potential use of a full-thickness canine skin organ culture model for the study of skin physiology and pharmacological response to exogenous compounds, especially in the field of re-epithelialisation and keratinization disorders. PMID:27058637

  14. Interleukin 6 is Expressed in High Levels in Psoriatic Skin and Stimulates Proliferation of Cultured Human Keratinocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossman, Rachel M.; Krueger, James; Yourish, Debra; Granelli-Piperno, Angela; Murphy, Daniel P.; May, Lester T.; Kupper, Thomas S.; Sehgal, Pravinkumar B.; Gottlieb, Alice B.

    1989-08-01

    Psoriasis is a common papulosquamous skin disease. The histopathology is characterized by epidermal hyperplasia and inflammation. Recent studies suggest that keratinocyte proliferation and inflammation in psoriasis are manifestations of the same underlying pathological process. Interleukin 6 (IL-6), a cytokine that is a major mediator of the host response to tissue injury and infection, is produced by both keratinocytes and leukocytes in culture. IL-6 expression was studied in psoriatic plaques by immunoperoxidase staining with two different polyclonal anti-recombinant IL-6 antisera and by in situ nucleic acid hybridization with IL-6 cRNA probes. Epidermal and dermal cells in active psoriatic plaques from 35 psoriasis patients stained heavily for IL-6 as compared with nonlesional skin and with plaques after treatment with antimetabolic and antiinflammatory agents. Absorption of the anti-recombinant IL-6 antisera with purified fibroblast-derived IL-6 or with recombinant IL-6, but not bovine serum albumin, removed the immunostaining. Increased levels of IL-6 were detected in the plasma of patients with active psoriasis (mean 3 ng/ml) by using two different bioassays. IL-6 production by proliferating keratinocytes was suggested by IL-6-specific immunostaining in cultured normal and psoriatic keratinocytes and by the detection of mRNA specific for IL-6 in psoriatic epidermis by in situ hybridization. IL-6 stimulated the proliferation of cultured, normal human keratinocytes as assessed by two different assays. Thus, IL-6 could directly contribute to the epidermal hyperplasia seen in psoriatic epithelium as well as affect the function of dermal inflammatory cells.

  15. Wnt-10b promotes differentiation of skin epithelial cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Ouji, Yukiteru . E-mail: oujix@naramed-u.ac.jp; Yoshikawa, Masahide; Shiroi, Akira; Ishizaka, Shigeaki

    2006-03-31

    To evaluate the role of Wnt-10b in epithelial differentiation, we investigated the effects of Wnt-10b on adult mouse-derived primary skin epithelial cells (MPSEC). Recombinant Wnt-10b protein (rWnt-10b) was prepared using a gene engineering technique and MPSEC were cultured in its presence, which resulted in morphological changes from cuboidal to spindle-shaped and inhibited their proliferation. Further, involvement of the canonical Wnt signal pathway was also observed. MPSEC treated with rWnt-10b showed characteristics of the hair shaft and inner root sheath of the hair follicle, in results of Ayoub Shklar staining and immunocytochemistry. Further, the cells expressed mRNA for differentiated epithelial cells, including keratin 1, keratin 2, loricrin, mHa5, and mHb5, in association with a decreased expression of the basal cell marker keratin 5. These results suggest that Wnt-10b promotes the differentiation of MPSEC.

  16. Dynamic culture improves cell reprogramming efficiency.

    PubMed

    Sia, Junren; Sun, Raymond; Chu, Julia; Li, Song

    2016-06-01

    Cell reprogramming to pluripotency is an inefficient process and various approaches have been devised to improve the yield of induced pluripotent stem cells. However, the effect of biophysical factors on cell reprogramming is not well understood. Here we showed that, for the first time, dynamic culture with orbital shaking significantly improved the reprogramming efficiency in adherent cells. Manipulating the viscosity of the culture medium suggested that the improved efficiency is mainly attributed to convective mixing rather than hydrodynamic shear stress. Temporal studies demonstrated that the enhancement of reprogramming efficiency required the dynamic culture in the middle but not early phase. In the early phase, fibroblasts had a high proliferation rate, but as the culture became over-confluent in the middle phase, expression of p57 was upregulated to inhibit cell proliferation and consequently, cell reprogramming. Subjecting the over confluent culture to orbital shaking prevented the upregulation of p57, thus improving reprogramming efficiency. Seeding cells at low densities to avoid over-confluency resulted in a lower efficiency, and optimal reprogramming efficiency was attained at a high seeding density with dynamic culture. Our findings provide insight into the underlying mechanisms of how dynamic culture condition regulate cell reprogramming, and will have broad impact on cell engineering for regenerative medicine and disease modeling. PMID:27031931

  17. Human Pulmonary Endothelial Cells in Culture

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Alice R.

    1980-01-01

    Endothelial cells were cultured from various different human vessels, including aortas, pulmonary, ovarian, and umbilical arteries, and pulmonary, ovarian, and umbilical veins. The cultured cells were identified as endothelial cells by the presence of Factor VIII antigen and antiotensin I converting enzyme (kininase II). They retained these markers for at least five passages in culture, and some cells had them for seven passages or more. Endothelial cells from the various vessels were compared with respect to their ability to metabolize angiotensins I and II and bradykinin. Cells from arteries had three to five times the angiotensin I converting enzyme activity as cells from veins. The activity of angiotensinase A (aspartyl aminopeptidase) had a similar distribution, and cells from arteries were consistently more active than cells from veins. Cultures of endothelial cells from pulmonary and umbilical vessels formed prostacyclin in response to mechanical stimulation. Media from cell monolayers that were subjected to a change of medium and gentle agitation inhibited aggregation of human platelets. This inhibitory activity was generated within 2-5 min, and it was not formed by cells that were treated with indomethacin or tranylcypromine. Addition of prostaglandin (PG)H2 to indomethacin-treated cells restored the ability to form the inhibitor, but cells treated with tranylcypromine were not responsive to PGH2. In experiments where [14C]arachidonic acid was added to the cells before stimulation, the major metabolite identified by thin-layer chromatography was 6-keto PGF1α. Thus, it appears that pulmonary endothelial cells, as well as umbilical cord cells, can form prostacyclin. In experiments comparing the ability of arterial and venous cells to form prostacyclin, arterial cells were more active than venous cells. These studies of cells from various human vessels suggest that the vascular origin of cultured endothelial cells determines how they metabolize vasoactive

  18. Dimethyl Sulfoxide Enhances Effectiveness of Skin Antiseptics and Reduces Contamination Rates of Blood Cultures

    PubMed Central

    LaSala, Paul R.; Han, Xiang-Yang; Rolston, Kenneth V.; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P.

    2012-01-01

    Effective skin antisepsis is of central importance in the prevention of wound infections, colonization of medical devices, and nosocomial transmission of microorganisms. Current antiseptics have a suboptimal efficacy resulting in substantial infectious morbidity, mortality, and increased health care costs. Here, we introduce an in vitro method for antiseptic testing and a novel alcohol-based antiseptic containing 4 to 5% of the polar aprotic solvent dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). The DMSO-containing antiseptic resulted in a 1- to 2-log enhanced killing of Staphylococcus epidermidis and other microbes in vitro compared to the same antiseptic without DMSO. In a prospective clinical validation, blood culture contamination rates were reduced from 3.04% for 70% isopropanol–1% iodine (control antiseptic) to 1.04% for 70% isopropanol–1% iodine–5% DMSO (P < 0.01). Our results predict that improved skin antisepsis is possible using new formulations of antiseptics containing strongly polarized but nonionizing (polar aprotic) solvents. PMID:22378911

  19. Evaluation of skin viability effect on ethosome and liposome-mediated psoralen delivery via cell uptake.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong-Tai; Shen, Li-Na; Wu, Zhong-Hua; Zhao, Ji-Hui; Feng, Nian-Ping

    2014-10-01

    This study investigated the effect of skin viability on its permeability to psoralen delivered by ethosomes, as compared with liposomes. With decreasing skin viability, the amount of liposome-delivered psoralen that penetrated through the skin increased, whereas skin deposition of psoralen from both ethosomes and liposomes reduced. Psoralen delivery to human-immortalized epidermal cells was more effective using liposomes, whereas delivery to human embryonic skin fibroblast cells was more effective when ethosomes were used. These findings agreed with those of in vivo studies showing that skin psoralen deposition from ethosomes and liposomes first increased and then plateaued overtime, which may indicate gradual saturation of intracellular drug delivery. It also suggested that the reduced deposition of ethosome- or liposome-delivered psoralen in skin with reduced viability may relate to reduced cellular uptake. This work indicated that the effects of skin viability should be taken into account when evaluating nanocarrier-mediated drug skin permeation. PMID:25070929

  20. Pumpless steady-flow microfluidic chip for cell culture.

    PubMed

    Marimuthu, Mohana; Kim, Sanghyo

    2013-06-15

    The current research engineered a pumpless energy-efficient microfluidic perfusion cell culture chip that works by modifying the basic gravity-driven siphon flow using an intravenous (IV) infusion set as a conventional, inexpensive, and sterile tool. The IV set was modified to control the constant hydrostatic head difference, thereby maintaining the steady flow rate medium perfusion. The micro-bioreactor chip demonstrated flexibility in controlling a wide range of flow rates from 0.1 to 10ml/min, among which 1- and 5-ml/min flow rates were examined as suitable shear flows for long-term dermal fibroblast cell culture, paving the way for artificial skin development. PMID:23453976

  1. Impact of Varicella-Zoster Virus on Dendritic Cell Subsets in Human Skin during Natural Infection▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Huch, Jennifer H.; Cunningham, Anthony L.; Arvin, Ann M.; Nasr, Najla; Santegoets, Saskia J. A. M.; Slobedman, Eric; Slobedman, Barry; Abendroth, Allison

    2010-01-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) causes varicella and herpes zoster, diseases characterized by distinct cutaneous rashes. Dendritic cells (DC) are essential for inducing antiviral immune responses; however, the contribution of DC subsets to immune control during natural cutaneous VZV infection has not been investigated. Immunostaining showed that compared to normal skin, the proportion of cells expressing DC-SIGN (a dermal DC marker) or DC-LAMP and CD83 (mature DC markers) were not significantly altered in infected skin. In contrast, the frequency of Langerhans cells was significantly decreased in VZV-infected skin, whereas there was an influx of plasmacytoid DC, a potent secretor of type I interferon (IFN). Langerhans cells and plasmacytoid DC in infected skin were closely associated with VZV antigen-positive cells, and some Langerhans cells and plasmacytoid DC were VZV antigen positive. To extend these in vivo observations, both plasmacytoid DC (PDC) isolated from human blood and Langerhans cells derived from MUTZ-3 cells were shown to be permissive to VZV infection. In VZV-infected PDC cultures, significant induction of alpha IFN (IFN-α) did not occur, indicating the VZV inhibits the capacity of PDC to induce expression of this host defense cytokine. This study defines changes in the response of DC which occur during cutaneous VZV infection and implicates infection of DC subtypes in VZV pathogenesis. PMID:20130046

  2. Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation reverses skin fibrosis but does not change skin vessel density in patients with systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Daikeler, T; Kump, E; Stern, M; Hügle, T; Hij, A; Haeuserman, P; Farge, D

    2015-09-01

    Hematopoetic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) improves survival in patients with severe systemic sclerosis (SSc) by resetting the immune system. We studied how HSCT acts on the key SSc skin pathology findings (fibrosis and vascularization). In mean, 3 skin punch biopsies per patient (range 2-6) were analyzed from 13 patients (5 females) with severe diffuse SSc before and up to 96 months after HSCT. Fibrosis of the four skin layers was graded semi-quantitatively and an overall fibrosis score was then calculated. Vessel numbers and calibers were assessed in the superficial and deeper dermis after immune-staining for endothelial antigens (CD31, VE-cadherin and vWF). The median age of patients at HSCT was 47 (24-64) years. The overall median modified Rodnan skin score decreased from 24 to 10 (P=0.003) at first follow-up within a median of 9 (6-36) months after HSCT as did the histological skin score (P=0.03). The modified Rodnan skin score and the fibrosis score correlated positively (r=0.589, P<0.001). The vessels density did not significantly change after HSCT nor did the expression of the tested endothelial markers. Although improving skin fibrosis in patients with SSc, HSCT does not alter vessel density within skin biopsies. PMID:26300240

  3. Cell Culture for Production of Insecticidal Viruses.

    PubMed

    Reid, Steven; Chan, Leslie C L; Matindoost, Leila; Pushparajan, Charlotte; Visnovsky, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    While large-scale culture of insect cells will need to be conducted using bioreactors up to 10,000 l scale, many of the main challenges for cell culture-based production of insecticidal viruses can be studied using small-scale (20-500 ml) shaker/spinner flasks, either in free suspension or using microcarrier-based systems. These challenges still relate to the development of appropriate cell lines, stability of virus strains in culture, enhancing virus yields per cell, and the development of serum-free media and feeds for the desired production systems. Hence this chapter presents mainly the methods required to work with and analyze effectively insect cell systems using small-scale cultures. Outlined are procedures for quantifying cells and virus and for establishing frozen cells and virus stocks. The approach for maintaining cell cultures and the multiplicity of infection (MOI) and time of infection (TOI) parameters that should be considered for conducting infections are discussed.The methods described relate, in particular, to the suspension culture of Helicoverpa zea and Spodoptera frugiperda cell lines to produce the baculoviruses Helicoverpa armigera nucleopolyhedrovirus, HearNPV, and Anticarsia gemmatalis multicapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus, AgMNPV, respectively, and the production of the nonoccluded Oryctes nudivirus, OrNV, using an adherent coleopteran cell line. PMID:27565495

  4. Effect of microwaves at X-band on guinea-pig skin in tissue culture: 3. Effect of pulsed microwaves on skin respiration and biochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Carney, S. A.; Lawrence, J. C.; Ricketts, C. R.

    1970-01-01

    Carney, S. A., Lawrence, J. C., and Ricketts, C. R. (1970).Brit. J. industr. Med.,27, 72-76. Effect of microwaves at X-band on guinea-pig skin in tissue culture. 3. Effect of pulsed microwaves on skin respiration and biochemistry. Small pieces of guinea-pig skin were exposed to known power densities of pulsed microwaves at X-band (9·6 GHz). The pulse duration was 0·25 microsecond and the pulse repetition frequency 4 KHz. The peak power was thus 1,000 times the mean power. Otherwise conditions were closely comparable with those of previous experiments using continuous microwaves. After exposure the skin was maintained on a nutrient medium in vitro. The respiration of the skin and the uptake of 35S-sulphate, 32P-phosphate, and 14C-L-proline into skin constituents were reduced by exposure. The reduction was very similar to that observed after exposure to the same mean power density of continuous microwaves. The effects are believed to be attributable to heating of the skin. PMID:5418922

  5. Emulsions Containing Perfluorocarbon Support Cell Cultures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ju, Lu-Kwang; Lee, Jaw Fang; Armiger, William B.

    1990-01-01

    Addition of emulsion containing perfluorocarbon liquid to aqueous cell-culture medium increases capacity of medium to support mammalian cells. FC-40 Fluorinert (or equivalent) - increases average density of medium so approximately equal to that of cells. Cells stay suspended in medium without mechanical stirring, which damages them. Increases density enough to prevent cells from setting, and increases viscosity of medium so oxygen bubbled through it and nutrients stirred in with less damage to delicate cells.

  6. Tocopherol production in plant cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Caretto, Sofia; Nisi, Rossella; Paradiso, Annalisa; De Gara, Laura

    2010-05-01

    Tocopherols, collectively known as vitamin E, are lipophilic antioxidants, essential dietary components for mammals and exclusively synthesized by photosynthetic organisms. Of the four forms (alpha, beta, gamma and delta), alpha-tocopherol is the major vitamin E form present in green plant tissues, and has the highest vitamin E activity. Synthetic alpha-tocopherol, being a racemic mixture of eight different stereoisomers, always results less effective than the natural form (R,R,R) alpha-tocopherol. This raises interest in obtaining this molecule from natural sources, such as plant cell cultures. Plant cell and tissue cultures are able to produce and accumulate valuable metabolites that can be used as food additives, nutraceuticals and pharmaceuticals. Sunflower cell cultures, growing under heterotrophic conditions, were exploited to establish a suitable in vitro production system of natural alpha-tocopherol. Optimization of culture conditions, precursor feeding and elicitor application were used to improve the tocopherol yields of these cultures. Furthermore, these cell cultures were useful to investigate the relationship between alpha-tocopherol biosynthesis and photomixotrophic culture conditions, revealing the possibility to enhance tocopherol production by favouring sunflower cell photosynthetic properties. The modulation of alpha-tocopherol levels in plant cell cultures can provide useful hints for a regulatory impact on tocopherol metabolism. PMID:20166145

  7. Replication of human endothelial cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Lewis, L J; Hoak, J C; Maca, R D; Fry, G L

    1973-08-01

    Investigative studies dealing with the properties and functions of endothelial cells have been hampered because there has been little or no success in the isolation, growth, and passage of individual cells in large numbers. We have developed a system whereby pure cultures of endothelial cells derived from umbilical veins can be subcultured for at least five serial passages. Many facets of endothelial function and interaction can be evaluated with the use of this new adaptive system of isolation and culture. PMID:4718112

  8. Lysine hydroxylation of collagen in a fibroblast cell culture system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uzawa, Katsuhiro; Yeowell, Heather N.; Yamamoto, Kazushi; Mochida, Yoshiyuki; Tanzawa, Hideki; Yamauchi, Mitsuo

    2003-01-01

    The lysine (Lys) hydroxylation pattern of type I collagen produced by human fibroblasts in culture was analyzed and compared. Fibroblasts were cultured from normal human skin (NSF), keloid (KDF), fetal skin (FDF), and skin tissues of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type VIA and VIB patients (EDS-VIA and -VIB). The type I collagen alpha chains with or without non-helical telopeptides were purified from the insoluble matrix and analyzed. In comparison with NSFs, KDF and FDF showed significantly higher Lys hydroxylation, particularly in the telopeptide domains of both alpha chains. Both EDS-VIA and -VIB showed markedly lower Lys hydroxylation in the helical domains of both alpha chains whereas that in the telopeptides was comparable with those of NSFs. A similar profile was observed in the tissue sample of the EDS-VIB patient. These results demonstrate that the Lys hydroxylation pattern is domain-specific within the collagen molecule and that this method is useful to characterize the cell phenotypes in normal/pathological connective tissues.

  9. Constructing a High Density Cell Culture System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaulding, Glenn F. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    An annular culture vessel for growing mammalian cells is constructed in a one piece integral and annular configuration with an open end which is closed by an endcap. The culture vessel is rotatable about a horizontal axis by use of conventional roller systems commonly used in culture laboratories. The end wall of the endcap has tapered access ports to frictionally and sealingly receive the ends of hypodermic syringes. The syringes permit the introduction of fresh nutrient and withdrawal of spent nutrients. The walls are made of conventional polymeric cell culture material and are subjected to neutron bombardment to form minute gas permeable perforations in the walls.

  10. Resident and “inflammatory” dendritic cells in human skin

    PubMed Central

    Zaba, Lisa C.; Krueger, James G; Lowes, Michelle A.

    2009-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are a heterogeneous group of antigen-presenting leukocytes that play an important role in activation of both the innate and acquired arms of the immune system. While there are several different DC populations in the body, DCs are globally defined by their capacity for potent antigen presentation and naive T cell activation. In non-inflamed human skin during steady-state, there are three main cutaneous DC populations: epidermal Langerhans cells (LCs), dermal myeloid DCs, and dermal plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs). In psoriasis, a model for cutaneous inflammation, there is an additional population of myeloid dermal DCs – “inflammatory DCs” – which appear to be critical for disease pathogenesis. PMID:18685620

  11. Regulatory T Cells Modulate Th17 Responses in Tuberculin skin test positive (TST+) individuals

    PubMed Central

    Babu, Subash; Bhat, Sajid Q.; Kumar, N. Pavan; Kumaraswami, V.; Nutman, Thomas B.

    2009-01-01

    Background The factors governing latency in tuberculosis (TB) are not well understood but appear to include pathogen and host factors. We have used Tuberculin skin test positivity as a tool to study cytokine responses in latent TB. Methods To identify host factors important in maintenance of TST positivity, we examined mycobacteria-specific immune responses of tuberculin skin test positive (TST+; latent TB) or negative (TST−; healthy) individuals in South India where skin test positivity can define TB latency. Results While PPD- and Mycobacterium tuberculosis culture filtrate Ag-specific Th1 and Th2 cytokines were not significantly different between the two groups, the Th17 cytokines—IL-17 and IL-23—were significantly decreased in TST+ individuals compared with the TST− individuals. This Th17 cytokine modulation was associated with significantly increased expression of CTLA-4 and Foxp3. Although CTLA-4 blockade failed to restore full production of IL-17 and IL-23 in TST+ individuals, depletion of regulatory T cells significantly increased production of these cytokines. Conclusion TST positivity is characterized by increased activity of regulatory T cells and a coincident downregulation of the Th17 response. PMID:19929695

  12. 3D Cell Culture in Alginate Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Therese; Auk-Emblem, Pia; Dornish, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This review compiles information regarding the use of alginate, and in particular alginate hydrogels, in culturing cells in 3D. Knowledge of alginate chemical structure and functionality are shown to be important parameters in design of alginate-based matrices for cell culture. Gel elasticity as well as hydrogel stability can be impacted by the type of alginate used, its concentration, the choice of gelation technique (ionic or covalent), and divalent cation chosen as the gel inducing ion. The use of peptide-coupled alginate can control cell–matrix interactions. Gelation of alginate with concomitant immobilization of cells can take various forms. Droplets or beads have been utilized since the 1980s for immobilizing cells. Newer matrices such as macroporous scaffolds are now entering the 3D cell culture product market. Finally, delayed gelling, injectable, alginate systems show utility in the translation of in vitro cell culture to in vivo tissue engineering applications. Alginate has a history and a future in 3D cell culture. Historically, cells were encapsulated in alginate droplets cross-linked with calcium for the development of artificial organs. Now, several commercial products based on alginate are being used as 3D cell culture systems that also demonstrate the possibility of replacing or regenerating tissue. PMID:27600217

  13. Culture and characterization of rat hair follicle stem cells.

    PubMed

    Quan, Renfu; Zheng, Xuan; Ni, Yueming; Xie, Shangju; Li, Changming

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish methods for isolation, culture, expansion, and characterization of rat hair follicle stem cells (rHFSCs). Hair follicles were harvested from 1-week-old Sprague-Dawley rats and digested with dispase and collagenase IV. The bulge of the hair follicle was dissected under a microscope and cultured in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium/F12 supplemented with KnockOut™ Serum Replacement serum substitute, penicillin-streptomycin, L-glutamine, non-essential amino acids, epidermal growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor, polyhydric alcohol, and hydrocortisone. The rHFSCs were purified using adhesion to collagen IV. Cells were characterized by detecting marker genes with immunofluorescent staining and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The proliferation and vitality of rHFSCs at different passages were evaluated. The cultured rHFSCs showed typical cobblestone morphology with good adhesion and colony-forming ability. Expression of keratin 15, integrin α6, and integrin β1 were shown by immunocytochemistry staining. On day 1-2, the cells were in the latent phase. On day 5-6, the cells were in the logarithmic phase. Cell vitality gradually decreased from the 7th passage. Real-time PCR showed that the purified rHFSCs had good vitality and proliferative capacity and contained no keratinocytes. Highly purified rHFSCs can be obtained using tissue culture and adhesion to collagen IV. The cultured cells had good proliferative capacity and could therefore be a useful cell source for tissue-engineered hair follicles, vessels, and skin. PMID:25407732

  14. Adipose derived mesenchymal stem cells express keratinocyte lineage markers in a co-culture model.

    PubMed

    Irfan-Maqsood, M; Matin, M M; Heirani-Tabasi, A; Bahrami, M; Naderi-Meshkin, H; Mirahmadi, M; Hassanzadeh, H; Sanjar Moussavi, N; Raza-Shah, H; Raeesolmohaddeseen, M; Bidkhori, H; Bahrami, A R

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous wound healing is a complex type of biological event involving proliferation, differentiation, reprograming, trans/de-differentiation, recruitment, migration, and apoptosis of a number of cells (keratinocytes, fibroblasts, endothelial cells, nerve cells and stem cells) to regenerate a multi-layered tissue that is damaged by either internal or external factors. The exact regeneration mechanism of damaged skin is still unknown but the epithelial and other kinds of stem cells located in skin play crucial roles in the healing process. In this work, a co-culture model composed of adipose derived mesenchymal stem cells and keratinocytes was developed to understand the cellular differentiation behaviour in wound healing. Human mesenchymal stem cells were isolated from waste lipoaspirates. Keratinocytes were isolated from neonatal rats skin as well from human adult skin. Both types of cells were cultured and their culturing behaviour was observed microscopically under regular intervals of time. The identity of both cells was confirmed by flow cytometry and qRT-PCR. Cells were co-cultured under the proposed co-culturing model and the model was observed for 7, 14 and 21 days. The cellular behaviour was studied based on change in morphology, colonization, stratification, migration and expression of molecular markers. Expression of molecular markers was studied at transcriptional level and change in cellular morphology and migration capabilities was observed under the invert microscope regularly. Successfully isolated and characterized mesenchymal stem cells were found to express keratinocyte lineage markers i.e. K5, K10, K14, K18, K19 and Involucrin when co-cultured with keratinocytes after 14 and 21 days. Their expression was found to increase by increasing the time span of cell culturing. The keratinocyte colonies started to disappear after 10 days of culturing which might be due to stratification process initiated by possibly transdifferentiated stem cells. It can

  15. All-trans retinoic acid and extracellular Ca2+ differentially influence extracellular matrix production by human skin in organ culture.

    PubMed Central

    Varani, J.; Larson, B. K.; Perone, P.; Inman, D. R.; Fligiel, S. E.; Voorhees, J. J.

    1993-01-01

    Two-mm full-thickness punch biopsies of human skin were placed in organ culture in a serum-free, growth factor-free basal medium. Under conditions of low extracellular Ca2+ (0.15 mmol/L), the tissue quickly degenerated. However, degeneration was prevented when the extracellular Ca2+ concentration was increased to 1.4 mmol/L. The tissue remained histologically normal in appearance and biochemically active for up to 12 days. The addition of 3 mumol/L all-trans retinoic acid (RA) to the low-Ca2+ culture medium also prevented tissue degeneration. However, in contrast to what was seen in the presence of 1.4 mmol/L Ca2+, epidermal differentiation did not occur normally in the presence of RA. Rather, the upper layers of the epidermis routinely separated from the underlying basal cells. Fibronectin production by the organ cultured skin was examined. Biosynthetic labeling/immunoprecipitation studies demonstrated that incubation of the tissue in basal medium containing 1.4 mmol/L Ca2+ resulted in a high level of fibronectin production relative to the amount produced in basal medium containing 0.15 mmol/L Ca2+. In contrast, the addition of 3 mumol/L RA to the low Ca2+ basal medium did not stimulate fibronectin production. Similar results were observed in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays where the addition of Ca2+ to a final concentration of 1.4 mmol/L stimulated fibronectin and thrombospondin production whereas RA (3 mumol/L) did not. Although RA by itself failed to stimulate extracellular matrix production, the addition of 3 mumol/L RA to basal medium containing 1.4 mmol/L Ca2+ led to a further increase in fibronectin production over that seen in the presence of 1.4 mmol/L Ca2+ alone. Taken together, these data indicate that although either 1.4 mmol/L Ca2+ or 3 mumol/L RA facilitates survival of organ-cultured skin in basal medium, they have very different effects on extracellular matrix production. This supports the view, based on histological appearance, that the two

  16. Paracrine Factors from Irradiated Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Improve Skin Regeneration and Angiogenesis in a Porcine Burn Model

    PubMed Central

    Hacker, Stefan; Mittermayr, Rainer; Nickl, Stefanie; Haider, Thomas; Lebherz-Eichinger, Diana; Beer, Lucian; Mitterbauer, Andreas; Leiss, Harald; Zimmermann, Matthias; Schweiger, Thomas; Keibl, Claudia; Hofbauer, Helmut; Gabriel, Christian; Pavone-Gyöngyösi, Mariann; Redl, Heinz; Tschachler, Erwin; Mildner, Michael; Ankersmit, Hendrik Jan

    2016-01-01

    Burn wounds pose a serious threat to patients and often require surgical treatment. Skin grafting aims to achieve wound closure but requires a well-vascularized wound bed. The secretome of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) has been shown to improve wound healing and angiogenesis. We hypothesized that topical application of the PBMC secretome would improve the quality of regenerating skin, increase angiogenesis, and reduce scar formation after burn injury and skin grafting in a porcine model. Full-thickness burn injuries were created on the back of female pigs. Necrotic areas were excised and the wounds were covered with split-thickness mesh skin grafts. Wounds were treated repeatedly with either the secretome of cultured PBMCs (SecPBMC), apoptotic PBMCs (Apo-SecPBMC), or controls. The wounds treated with Apo-SecPBMC had an increased epidermal thickness, higher number of rete ridges, and more advanced epidermal differentiation than controls. The samples treated with Apo-SecPBMC had a two-fold increase in CD31+ cells, indicating more angiogenesis. These data suggest that the repeated application of Apo-SecPBMC significantly improves epidermal thickness, angiogenesis, and skin quality in a porcine model of burn injury and skin grafting. PMID:27125302

  17. Paracrine Factors from Irradiated Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Improve Skin Regeneration and Angiogenesis in a Porcine Burn Model.

    PubMed

    Hacker, Stefan; Mittermayr, Rainer; Nickl, Stefanie; Haider, Thomas; Lebherz-Eichinger, Diana; Beer, Lucian; Mitterbauer, Andreas; Leiss, Harald; Zimmermann, Matthias; Schweiger, Thomas; Keibl, Claudia; Hofbauer, Helmut; Gabriel, Christian; Pavone-Gyöngyösi, Mariann; Redl, Heinz; Tschachler, Erwin; Mildner, Michael; Ankersmit, Hendrik Jan

    2016-01-01

    Burn wounds pose a serious threat to patients and often require surgical treatment. Skin grafting aims to achieve wound closure but requires a well-vascularized wound bed. The secretome of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) has been shown to improve wound healing and angiogenesis. We hypothesized that topical application of the PBMC secretome would improve the quality of regenerating skin, increase angiogenesis, and reduce scar formation after burn injury and skin grafting in a porcine model. Full-thickness burn injuries were created on the back of female pigs. Necrotic areas were excised and the wounds were covered with split-thickness mesh skin grafts. Wounds were treated repeatedly with either the secretome of cultured PBMCs (Sec(PBMC)), apoptotic PBMCs (Apo-Sec(PBMC)), or controls. The wounds treated with Apo-Sec(PBMC) had an increased epidermal thickness, higher number of rete ridges, and more advanced epidermal differentiation than controls. The samples treated with Apo-Sec(PBMC) had a two-fold increase in CD31+ cells, indicating more angiogenesis. These data suggest that the repeated application of Apo-Sec(PBMC) significantly improves epidermal thickness, angiogenesis, and skin quality in a porcine model of burn injury and skin grafting. PMID:27125302

  18. Ultra-violet B (UVB)-induced skin cell death occurs through a cyclophilin D intrinsic signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Chao; Yang, Bo; Yang, Zhi; Tu, Ying; Yang, Yan-li; He, Li; Bi, Zhi-Gang

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer UVB radiated skin keratinocytes show cyclophilin D (Cyp-D) upregulation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NAC inhibits UVB induced Cyp-D expression, while H{sub 2}O{sub 2} facilitates it. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cyp-D-deficient cells are significantly less susceptible to UVB induced cell death. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Over-expression of Cyp-D causes spontaneous keratinocytes cell death. -- Abstract: UVB-induced skin cell damage involves the opening of mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP), which leads to both apoptotic and necrotic cell death. Cyclophilin D (Cyp-D) translocation to the inner membrane of mitochondrion acts as a key component to open the mPTP. Our Western-Blot results in primary cultured human skin keratinocytes and in HaCaT cell line demonstrated that UVB radiation and hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) induced Cyp-D expression, which was inhibited by anti-oxidant N-acetyl cysteine (NAC). We created a stable Cyp-D deficiency skin keratinocytes by expressing Cyp-D-shRNA through lentiviral infection. Cyp-D-deficient cells were significantly less susceptible than their counterparts to UVB- or H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced cell death. Further, cyclosporine A (Cs-A), a Cyp-D inhibitor, inhibited UVB- or H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced keratinocytes cell death. Reversely, over-expression of Cyp-D in primary keratinocytes caused spontaneous keratinocytes cell death. These results suggest Cyp-D's critical role in UVB/oxidative stress-induced skin cell death.

  19. Orf virus IL-10 reduces monocyte, dendritic cell and mast cell recruitment to inflamed skin.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Jared R; Lateef, Zabeen; Fleming, Stephen B; Mercer, Andrew A; Wise, Lyn M

    2016-02-01

    Orf virus (ORFV) is a zoonotic parapoxvirus that causes pustular dermatitis of sheep, and occasionally humans. Despite causing sustained infections, ORFV induces only a transient increase in pro-inflammatory signalling and the trafficking of innate immune cells within the skin seems to be impaired. An explanation for this tempered response to ORFV infection may lie in its expression of a homolog of the anti-inflammatory cytokine, interleukin (IL)-10. Using a murine model in which inflammation was induced by bacterial lipopolysaccharide, we examined the effects of the ORFV-IL-10 protein on immune cell trafficking to and from the skin. ORFV-IL-10 limited the recruitment of blood-derived Gr-1(int)/CD11b(int) monocytes, CD11c(+ve)/MHC-II(+ve) dendritic cells and c-kit(+ve)/FcεR1(+ve) mature mast cells into inflamed skin. ORFV-IL-10 also suppressed the activation of CD11c(+ve)/MHC-II(+ve) dendritic cells within the skin, reducing their trafficking to the draining lymph node. These findings suggest that expression of IL-10 by ORFV may contribute to the impaired trafficking of innate immune cells within infected skin. PMID:26732486

  20. Rotating cell culture systems for human cell culture: human trophoblast cells as a model.

    PubMed

    Zwezdaryk, Kevin J; Warner, Jessica A; Machado, Heather L; Morris, Cindy A; Höner zu Bentrup, Kerstin

    2012-01-01

    The field of human trophoblast research aids in understanding the complex environment established during placentation. Due to the nature of these studies, human in vivo experimentation is impossible. A combination of primary cultures, explant cultures and trophoblast cell lines support our understanding of invasion of the uterine wall and remodeling of uterine spiral arteries by extravillous trophoblast cells (EVTs), which is required for successful establishment of pregnancy. Despite the wealth of knowledge gleaned from such models, it is accepted that in vitro cell culture models using EVT-like cell lines display altered cellular properties when compared to their in vivo counterparts. Cells cultured in the rotating cell culture system (RCCS) display morphological, phenotypic, and functional properties of EVT-like cell lines that more closely mimic differentiating in utero EVTs, with increased expression of genes mediating invasion (e.g. matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs)) and trophoblast differentiation. The Saint Georges Hospital Placental cell Line-4 (SGHPL-4) (kindly donated by Dr. Guy Whitley and Dr. Judith Cartwright) is an EVT-like cell line that was used for testing in the RCCS. The design of the RCCS culture vessel is based on the principle that organs and tissues function in a three-dimensional (3-D) environment. Due to the dynamic culture conditions in the vessel, including conditions of physiologically relevant shear, cells grown in three dimensions form aggregates based on natural cellular affinities and differentiate into organotypic tissue-like assemblies. The maintenance of a fluid orbit provides a low-shear, low-turbulence environment similar to conditions found in vivo. Sedimentation of the cultured cells is countered by adjusting the rotation speed of the RCCS to ensure a constant free-fall of cells. Gas exchange occurs through a permeable hydrophobic membrane located on the back of the bioreactor. Like their parental tissue in vivo, RCCS

  1. Cell culture processes for monoclonal antibody production

    PubMed Central

    Li, Feng; Vijayasankaran, Natarajan; Shen, Amy (Yijuan); Kiss, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Animal cell culture technology has advanced significantly over the last few decades and is now generally considered a reliable, robust and relatively mature technology. A range of biotherapeutics are currently synthesized using cell culture methods in large scale manufacturing facilities that produce products for both commercial use and clinical studies. The robust implementation of this technology requires optimization of a number of variables, including (1) cell lines capable of synthesizing the required molecules at high productivities that ensure low operating cost; (2) culture media and bioreactor culture conditions that achieve both the requisite productivity and meet product quality specifications; (3) appropriate on-line and off-line sensors capable of providing information that enhances process control; and (4) good understanding of culture performance at different scales to ensure smooth scale-up. Successful implementation also requires appropriate strategies for process development, scale-up and process characterization and validation that enable robust operation and ensure compliance with current regulations. This review provides an overview of the state-of-the art technology in key aspects of cell culture, e.g., generation of highly productive cell lines and optimization of cell culture process conditions. We also summarize the current thinking on appropriate process development strategies and process advances that might affect process development. PMID:20622510

  2. Making more matrix: enhancing the deposition of dermal-epidermal junction components in vitro and accelerating organotypic skin culture development, using macromolecular crowding.

    PubMed

    Benny, Paula; Badowski, Cedric; Lane, E Birgitte; Raghunath, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Skin is one of the most accessible tissues for experimental biomedical sciences, and cultured skin cells represent one of the longest-running clinical applications of stem cell therapy. However, culture-generated skin mimetic multicellular structures are still limited in their application by the time taken to develop these constructs in vitro and by their incomplete differentiation. The development of a functional dermal-epidermal junction (DEJ) is one of the most sought after aspects of cultured skin, and one of the hardest to recreate in vitro. At the DEJ, dermal fibroblasts and epidermal keratinocytes interact to form an interlinked basement membrane of extracellular matrix (ECM), which forms as a concerted action of both keratinocytes and fibroblasts. Successful formation of this basement membrane is essential for take and stability of cultured skin autografts. We studied interactive matrix production by monocultures and cocultures of primary human keratinocytes and fibroblasts in an attempt to improve the efficiency of basement membrane production in culture using mixed macromolecular crowding (mMMC); resulting ECM were enriched with the deposition of collagens I, IV, fibronectin, and laminin 332 (laminin 5) and also in collagen VII, the anchoring fibril component. Our in vitro data point to fibroblasts, rather than keratinocytes, as the major cellular contributors of the DEJ. Not only did we find more collagen VII production and deposition by fibroblasts in comparison to keratinocytes, but also observed that decellularized fibroblast ECM stimulated the production and deposition of collagen VII by keratinocytes, over and above that of keratinocyte monocultures. In confrontation cultures, keratinocytes and fibroblasts showed spontaneous segregation and demarcation of cell boundaries by DEJ protein deposition. Finally, mMMC was used in a classical organotypic coculture protocol with keratinocytes seeded over fibroblast-containing collagen gels. Applied during

  3. Mechanisms of DNA damage response to targeted irradiation in organotypic 3D skin cultures.

    PubMed

    Acheva, Anna; Ghita, Mihaela; Patel, Gaurang; Prise, Kevin M; Schettino, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    DNA damage (caused by direct cellular exposure and bystander signaling) and the complex pathways involved in its repair are critical events underpinning cellular and tissue response following radiation exposures. There are limited data addressing the dynamics of DNA damage induction and repair in the skin particularly in areas not directly exposed. Here we investigate the mechanisms regulating DNA damage, repair, intracellular signalling and their impact on premature differentiation and development of inflammatory-like response in the irradiated and surrounding areas of a 3D organotypic skin model. Following localized low-LET irradiation (225 kVp X-rays), low levels of 53BP1 foci were observed in the 3D model (3.8±0.28 foci/Gy/cell) with foci persisting and increasing in size up to 48 h post irradiation. In contrast, in cell monolayers 14.2±0.6 foci/Gy/cell and biphasic repair kinetics with repair completed before 24 h was observed. These differences are linked to differences in cellular status with variable level of p21 driving apoptotic signalling in 2D and accelerated differentiation in both the directly irradiated and bystander areas of the 3D model. The signalling pathways utilized by irradiated keratinocytes to induce DNA damage in non-exposed areas of the skin involved the NF-κB transcription factor and its downstream target COX-2. PMID:24505255

  4. Advances in cell culture: anchorage dependence

    PubMed Central

    Merten, Otto-Wilhelm

    2015-01-01

    Anchorage-dependent cells are of great interest for various biotechnological applications. (i) They represent a formidable production means of viruses for vaccination purposes at very large scales (in 1000–6000 l reactors) using microcarriers, and in the last decade many more novel viral vaccines have been developed using this production technology. (ii) With the advent of stem cells and their use/potential use in clinics for cell therapy and regenerative medicine purposes, the development of novel culture devices and technologies for adherent cells has accelerated greatly with a view to the large-scale expansion of these cells. Presently, the really scalable systems—microcarrier/microcarrier-clump cultures using stirred-tank reactors—for the expansion of stem cells are still in their infancy. Only laboratory scale reactors of maximally 2.5 l working volume have been evaluated because thorough knowledge and basic understanding of critical issues with respect to cell expansion while retaining pluripotency and differentiation potential, and the impact of the culture environment on stem cell fate, etc., are still lacking and require further studies. This article gives an overview on critical issues common to all cell culture systems for adherent cells as well as specifics for different types of stem cells in view of small- and large-scale cell expansion and production processes. PMID:25533097

  5. Skin Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... are specialized skin cells that produce pigment called melanin. The melanin pigment produced by melanocytes gives skin its color. ... absorbing and scattering the energy. People with more melanin have darker skin and better protection from UV ...

  6. Culture and Manipulation of Embryonic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Edgar, Lois G.; Goldstein, Bob

    2012-01-01

    The direct manipulation of embryonic cells is an important tool for addressing key questions in cell and developmental biology. C. elegans is relatively unique among genetic model systems in being amenable to manipulation of embryonic cells. Embryonic cell manipulation has allowed the identification of cell interactions by direct means, and it has been an important technique for dissecting mechanisms by which cell fates are specified, cell divisions are oriented, and morphogenesis is accomplished. Here, we present detailed methods for isolating, manipulating and culturing embryonic cells of C. elegans. PMID:22226523

  7. Spheroid Culture of Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cesarz, Zoe; Tamama, Kenichi

    2016-01-01

    Compared with traditional 2D adherent cell culture, 3D spheroidal cell aggregates, or spheroids, are regarded as more physiological, and this technique has been exploited in the field of oncology, stem cell biology, and tissue engineering. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) cultured in spheroids have enhanced anti-inflammatory, angiogenic, and tissue reparative/regenerative effects with improved cell survival after transplantation. Cytoskeletal reorganization and drastic changes in cell morphology in MSC spheroids indicate a major difference in mechanophysical properties compared with 2D culture. Enhanced multidifferentiation potential, upregulated expression of pluripotency marker genes, and delayed replicative senescence indicate enhanced stemness in MSC spheroids. Furthermore, spheroid formation causes drastic changes in the gene expression profile of MSC in microarray analyses. In spite of these significant changes, underlying molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways triggering and sustaining these changes are largely unknown. PMID:26649054

  8. Migration of Langerhans cells and gammadelta dendritic cells from UV-B-irradiated sheep skin.

    PubMed

    Dandie, G W; Clydesdale, G J; Radcliff, F J; Muller, H K

    2001-02-01

    Depletion of dendritic cells from UV-B-irradiated sheep skin was investigated by monitoring migration of these cells towards regional lymph nodes. By creating and cannulating pseudoafferent lymphatic vessels draining a defined region of skin, migrating cells were collected and enumerated throughout the response to UV-B irradiation. In the present study, the effects of exposing sheep flank skin to UV-B radiation clearly demonstrated a dose-dependent increase in the migration of Langerhans cells (LC) from the UV-B-exposed area to the draining lymph node. The range of UV-B doses assessed in this study included 2.7 kJ/m2, a suberythemal dose; 8 kJ/m2, 1 minimal erythemal dose (MED); 20.1 kJ/m2; 40.2 kJ/m2; and 80.4 kJ/m2, 10 MED. The LC were the cells most sensitive to UV-B treatment, with exposure to 8 kJ/m2 or greater reproducibly causing a significant increase in migration. Migration of gammadelta+ dendritic cells (gammadelta+ DC) from irradiated skin was also triggered by exposure to UV-B radiation, but dose dependency was not evident within the range of UV-B doses examined. This, in conjunction with the lack of any consistent correlation between either the timing or magnitude of migration peaks of these two cell types, suggests that different mechanisms govern the egress of LC and gammadelta+ DC from the skin. It is concluded that the depression of normal immune function in the skin after exposure to erythemal doses of UV-B radiation is associated with changes in the migration patterns of epidermal dendritic cells to local lymph nodes. PMID:11168622

  9. Murine trabecular meshwork cells in tissue culture.

    PubMed

    Begley, C G; Yue, B Y; Hendricks, R L

    1991-11-01

    Trabecular meshwork cells from an inbred strain of mice (A/J) were established in tissue culture. Within 1 hour of enucleation, tissue containing the cornea and the chamber angle was excised and placed in tissue culture. Two to five days later, three cell types grew from the explants. Two of these cell types, corneal endothelium and fibroblasts, grew together, with the fibroblasts preferentially spreading on top of the endothelial cells. The trabecular meshwork cells extended from the explant as a distinct morphological type. The corneal endothelium and its associated fibroblasts were then removed from the culture flask with a sterile cotton swab, leaving a monolayer of pure trabecular meshwork cells. These cells required 3-4 weeks to reach confluency and could be passaged five times. They were actively phagocytic in culture and exhibited immunoreactivity to antibodies against two extracellular matrix components, laminin and collagen type IV. Mouse trabecular meshwork cells also expressed receptors for acetylated low-density lipoprotein, a property shared by trabecular meshwork cells derived from other species. The availability of trabecular meshwork cells from an inbred strain of mice will facilitate future in vivo functional studies of these cells in a syngeneic system, as well as investigations of potential immunoregulatory properties of the trabecular meshwork. PMID:1782800

  10. Generation of insulin-producing cells from gnotobiotic porcine skin-derived stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Ji Hoon; Lee, Sung Ho; Heo, Young Tae; Uhm, Sang Jun; Lee, Hoon Taek

    2010-07-09

    A major problem in the treatment of type 1 diabetes mellitus is the limited availability of alternative sources of insulin-producing cells for islet transplantation. In this study, we investigated the effect of bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP-4) treatments of gnotobiotic porcine skin-derived stem cells (gSDSCs) on their reprogramming and subsequent differentiation into insulin-producing cells (IPCs). We isolated SDSCs from the ear skin of a gnotobiotic pig. During the proliferation period, the cells expressed stem-cell markers Oct-4, Sox-2, and CD90; nestin expression also increased significantly. The cells could differentiate into IPCs after treatments with activin-A, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), and nicotinamide. After 15 days in the differentiation medium, controlled gSDSCs began expressing endocrine progenitor genes and proteins (Ngn3, Neuro-D, PDX-1, NKX2.2, NKX6.1, and insulin). The IPCs showed increased insulin synthesis after glucose stimulation. The results indicate that stem cells derived from the skin of gnotobiotic pigs can differentiate into IPCs under the appropriate conditions in vitro. Our three-stage induction protocol could be applied without genetic modification to source IPCs from stem cells in the skin of patients with diabetes for autologous transplantation.

  11. Adipose-Derived Stem Cells Improve Efficacy of Melanocyte Transplantation in Animal Skin

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Won-Suk; Kim, Chang-Hyun; Kim, Ji-Young; Do, Byung-Rok; Kim, Eo Jin; Lee, Ai-Young

    2014-01-01

    Vitiligo is a pigmentary disorder induced by a loss of melanocytes. In addition to replacement of pure melanocytes, cocultures of melanocytes with keratinocytes have been used to improve the repigmentation outcome in vitiligo treatment. We previously identified by in vitro studies, that adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) could be a potential substitute for keratinocytes in cocultures with melanocytes. In this study, the efficacy of pigmentation including durability of grafted melanocytes and short-term safety was examined in the nude mouse and Sprague-Dawley rat after grafting of primary cultured human melanocytes, with or without different ratios of primary cultured human ADSCs. Simultaneous grafting of melanocytes and ADSCs, which were separately cultured and mixed on grafting at the ratios of 1:1, 1:2, or 1:3, showed better efficacy than that of pure melanocytes. Grafting of melanocytes cocultured with ADSCs resulted in a similar outcome as the grafting of cell mixtures. Skin pigmentation by melanocytes : ADSCs at the ratios of 1:1 and 1:2 was better than at 1:3. No significant difference was observed between the 1-week and 2-week durations in coculturing. Time-course microscopic examination showed that the grafted melanocytes remained a little longer than 6-week post-grafting. No inflammatory cell infiltration was observed in the grafted skin and no melanocytes were detectable in other organs. Collectively, grafting of melanocytes and ADSCs was equally safe and more effective than grafting of melanocytes alone. Despite the absence of significant differences in efficacy between the group of 1:1 and that of 1:2 ratio, 1:2 ratio for 1-week coculturing may be better for clinical use from the cost-benefit viewpoint. PMID:25143812

  12. Effect of Photofrin on skin reflection of basal cell nevus syndrome patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossweiner, Leonard I.; Jones, Linda R.; Koehler, Irmgard K.; Bilgin, Mehmet D.

    1996-04-01

    Skin reflection spectra were measured before and 24 hours after administration of Photofrin (Reg. TM) to basal cell nevus syndrome (BCNS) patients. The drug reduced the reflectivity of uninvolved BCNS skin and increased the reflectivity of basal cell cancers. Photofrin (Reg. TM) absorption in normal rat skin and uninvolved BCNS skin was resolved by the diffusion approximation. Optical constants calculated with a two-layer skin model indicate that the drug increased light scattering in tumor tissues. The possible use of reflection spectra for PDT light dosimetry is discussed.

  13. Distribution of T Cells in Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) Skin and Responsiveness to Viral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Leal, Esther; Granja, Aitor G.; Zarza, Carlos; Tafalla, Carolina

    2016-01-01

    Although the skin constitutes the first line of defense against waterborne pathogens, there is a great lack of information regarding the skin associated lymphoid tissue (SALT) and whether immune components of the skin are homogeneously distributed through the surface of the fish is still unknown. In the current work, we have analyzed the transcription of several immune genes throughout different rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) skin areas. We found that immunoglobulin and chemokine gene transcription levels were higher in a skin area close to the gills. Furthermore, this skin area as well as other anterior sections also transcribed significantly higher levels of many different immune genes related to T cell immunity such as T cell receptor α (TCRα), TCRγ, CD3, CD4, CD8, perforin, GATA3, Tbet, FoxP3, interferon γ (IFNγ), CD40L and Eomes in comparison to posterior skin sections. In agreement with these results, immunohistochemical analysis revealed that anterior skin areas had a higher concentration of CD3+ T cells and flow cytometry analysis confirmed that the percentage of CD8+ T lymphocytes was also higher in anterior skin sections. These results demonstrate for the first time that T cells are not homogeneously distributed throughout the teleost skin. Additionally, we studied the transcriptional regulation of these and additional T cell markers in response to a bath infection with viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV). We found that VHSV regulated the transcription of several of these T cell markers in both the skin and the spleen; with some differences between anterior and posterior skin sections. Altogether, our results point to skin T cells as major players of teleost skin immunity in response to waterborne viral infections. PMID:26808410

  14. Distribution of T Cells in Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) Skin and Responsiveness to Viral Infection.

    PubMed

    Leal, Esther; Granja, Aitor G; Zarza, Carlos; Tafalla, Carolina

    2016-01-01

    Although the skin constitutes the first line of defense against waterborne pathogens, there is a great lack of information regarding the skin associated lymphoid tissue (SALT) and whether immune components of the skin are homogeneously distributed through the surface of the fish is still unknown. In the current work, we have analyzed the transcription of several immune genes throughout different rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) skin areas. We found that immunoglobulin and chemokine gene transcription levels were higher in a skin area close to the gills. Furthermore, this skin area as well as other anterior sections also transcribed significantly higher levels of many different immune genes related to T cell immunity such as T cell receptor α (TCRα), TCRγ, CD3, CD4, CD8, perforin, GATA3, Tbet, FoxP3, interferon γ (IFNγ), CD40L and Eomes in comparison to posterior skin sections. In agreement with these results, immunohistochemical analysis revealed that anterior skin areas had a higher concentration of CD3(+) T cells and flow cytometry analysis confirmed that the percentage of CD8(+) T lymphocytes was also higher in anterior skin sections. These results demonstrate for the first time that T cells are not homogeneously distributed throughout the teleost skin. Additionally, we studied the transcriptional regulation of these and additional T cell markers in response to a bath infection with viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV). We found that VHSV regulated the transcription of several of these T cell markers in both the skin and the spleen; with some differences between anterior and posterior skin sections. Altogether, our results point to skin T cells as major players of teleost skin immunity in response to waterborne viral infections. PMID:26808410

  15. Cultured dermal papilla cells induce follicle formation and hair growth by transdifferentiation of an adult epidermis.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, A J; Jahoda, C A

    1992-06-01

    Adult rat pelage follicle dermal papilla cells induced follicle neogenesis and external hair growth when associated with adult footpad skin epidermis. They thus demonstrated a capacity to completely change the structural arrangement and gene expression of adult epidermis--an ability previously undocumented for cultured adult cells. Isolation chambers ensured that de novo follicle formation must have occurred by eliminating the possibility of cellular contributions, and/or inductive influences, from local skin follicles. These findings argue against previous suggestions of vibrissa follicle specificity, and imply that the potential for hair follicle induction may be common to all adult papilla cells. PMID:1425341

  16. Adipose-derived stem cells for skin regeneration.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Hiroshi; Nambu, Masaki

    2011-01-01

    Intractable skin ulcers resulting from diabetes, ischemia and collagen diseases represent significant problems with few solutions. Cell-based therapy may hold promise in overcoming such disorders. In order to establish a suitable experimental model for the treatment of such ulcers using stem cells, this chapter describes detailed methods for: (1) isolation of stem cells from adipose tissue, termed adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs), (2) preparing a hybrid-type artificial dermis that consists of a type I collagen sponge and ASCs, (3) preparing intractable ulcers using Mitomycin C, and (4) evaluating the effect of wound healing histologically. ASCs seeded onto a type I collagen sponge are applied to intractable ulcers induced by topical application of Mitomycin C. Histological evaluation after 1 and 2 weeks revealed an increase in capillary density and granulation thickness of the hybrid-type artificial dermis. These findings suggest that ASCs may have a positive effect on wound healing and may be a useful tool for future cell-based therapy. PMID:21082422

  17. Protective effects of antioxidants against UVA-induced DNA damage in human skin fibroblasts in culture.

    PubMed

    Emonet-Piccardi, N; Richard, M J; Ravanat, J L; Signorini, N; Cadet, J; Béani, J C

    1998-10-01

    Ultraviolet A radiation (UVA, 320-400 nm) is mutagenic and induces genomic damage to skin cells. N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC), selenium and zinc have been shown to have antioxidant properties and to exhibit protective effects against UVA cytotoxicity. The present work attempts to delineate the effect of these compounds on genomic integrity of human skin fibroblasts exposed to UVA radiation using the single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) or Comet assay. The cells were incubated with NAC (5 mM), sodium selenite (0.6 microM) or zinc chloride (100 microM). Then cells were embedded in low melting point agarose, and immediately submitted to UVA fluences ranging from 1 to 6J/cm2. In the Comet assay, the tail moment increased by 45% (1 J/cm2) to 89% (6J/cm2) in non-supplemented cells (p)<0.01). DNA damage was significantly prevented by NAC, Se and Zn, with a similar efficiency from 1 to 4J/cm2 (p < 0.05). For the highest UVA dose (6J/cm2), Se and Zn were more effective than NAC (p < 0.01). PMID:9860045

  18. In Vitro Differentiation Potential of Human Placenta Derived Cells into Skin Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mahmood, Ruhma; Choudhery, Mahmood S.; Mehmood, Azra; Khan, Shaheen N.; Riazuddin, Sheikh

    2015-01-01

    Skin autografting is the most viable and aesthetic technique for treatment of extensive burns; however, this practice has potential limitations. Harvesting cells from neonatal sources (such as placental tissue) is a simple, inexpensive, and noninvasive procedure. In the current study authors sought to evaluate in vitro potential of human placenta derived stem cells to develop into skin-like cells. After extensive washing, amniotic membrane and umbilical cord tissue were separated to harvest amniotic epithelial cells (AECs) and umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (UC-MSCs), respectively. Both types of cells were characterized for the expression of embryonic lineage markers and their growth characteristics were determined. AECs and UC-MSCs were induced to differentiate into keratinocytes-like and dermal fibroblasts-like cells, respectively. After induction, morphological changes were detected by microscopy. The differentiation potential was further assessed using immunostaining and RT-PCR analyses. AECs were positive for cytokeratins and E-Cadherin while UC-MSCs were positive for fibroblast specific makers. AECs differentiated into keratinocytes-like cells showed positive expression of keratinocyte specific cytokeratins, involucrin, and loricrin. UC-MSCs differentiated into dermal fibroblast-like cells indicated expression of collagen type 3, desmin, FGF-7, fibroblast activation protein alpha, procollagen-1, and vimentin. In conclusion, placenta is a potential source of cells to develop into skin-like cells. PMID:26229539

  19. Hyaluronan and Fibrin Biomaterial as Scaffolds for Neuronal Differentiation of Adult Stem Cells Derived from Adipose Tissue and Skin

    PubMed Central

    Gardin, Chiara; Vindigni, Vincenzo; Bressan, Eriberto; Ferroni, Letizia; Nalesso, Elisa; Puppa, Alessandro Della; D’Avella, Domenico; Lops, Diego; Pinton, Paolo; Zavan, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    Recently, we have described a simple protocol to obtain an enriched culture of adult stem cells organized in neurospheres from two post-natal tissues: skin and adipose tissue. Due to their possible application in neuronal tissue regeneration, here we tested two kinds of scaffold well known in tissue engineering application: hyaluronan based membranes and fibrin-glue meshes. Neurospheres from skin and adipose tissue were seeded onto two scaffold types: hyaluronan based membrane and fibrin-glue meshes. Neurospheres were then induced to acquire a glial and neuronal-like phenotype. Gene expression, morphological feature and chromosomal imbalance (kariotype) were analyzed and compared. Adipose and skin derived neurospheres are able to grow well and to differentiate into glial/neuron cells without any chromosomal imbalance in both scaffolds. Adult cells are able to express typical cell surface markers such as S100; GFAP; nestin; βIII tubulin; CNPase. In summary, we have demonstrated that neurospheres isolated from skin and adipose tissues are able to differentiate in glial/neuron-like cells, without any chromosomal imbalance in two scaffold types, useful for tissue engineering application: hyaluronan based membrane and fibrin-glue meshes. PMID:22072917

  20. Epidermal stem cells and skin tissue engineering in hair follicle regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Balañá, María Eugenia; Charreau, Hernán Eduardo; Leirós, Gustavo José

    2015-01-01

    The reconstitution of a fully organized and functional hair follicle from dissociated cells propagated under defined tissue culture conditions is a challenge still pending in tissue engineering. The loss of hair follicles caused by injuries or pathologies such as alopecia not only affects the patients’ psychological well-being, but also endangers certain inherent functions of the skin. It is then of great interest to find different strategies aiming to regenerate or neogenerate the hair follicle under conditions proper of an adult individual. Based upon current knowledge on the epithelial and dermal cells and their interactions during the embryonic hair generation and adult hair cycling, many researchers have tried to obtain mature hair follicles using different strategies and approaches depending on the causes of hair loss. This review summarizes current advances in the different experimental strategies to regenerate or neogenerate hair follicles, with emphasis on those involving neogenesis of hair follicles in adult individuals using isolated cells and tissue engineering. Most of these experiments were performed using rodent cells, particularly from embryonic or newborn origin. However, no successful strategy to generate human hair follicles from adult cells has yet been reported. This review identifies several issues that should be considered to achieve this objective. Perhaps the most important challenge is to provide three-dimensional culture conditions mimicking the structure of living tissue. Improving culture conditions that allow the expansion of specific cells while protecting their inductive properties, as well as methods for selecting populations of epithelial stem cells, should give us the necessary tools to overcome the difficulties that constrain human hair follicle neogenesis. An analysis of patent trends shows that the number of patent applications aimed at hair follicle regeneration and neogenesis has been increasing during the last decade. This

  1. Epidermal stem cells and skin tissue engineering in hair follicle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Balañá, María Eugenia; Charreau, Hernán Eduardo; Leirós, Gustavo José

    2015-05-26

    The reconstitution of a fully organized and functional hair follicle from dissociated cells propagated under defined tissue culture conditions is a challenge still pending in tissue engineering. The loss of hair follicles caused by injuries or pathologies such as alopecia not only affects the patients' psychological well-being, but also endangers certain inherent functions of the skin. It is then of great interest to find different strategies aiming to regenerate or neogenerate the hair follicle under conditions proper of an adult individual. Based upon current knowledge on the epithelial and dermal cells and their interactions during the embryonic hair generation and adult hair cycling, many researchers have tried to obtain mature hair follicles using different strategies and approaches depending on the causes of hair loss. This review summarizes current advances in the different experimental strategies to regenerate or neogenerate hair follicles, with emphasis on those involving neogenesis of hair follicles in adult individuals using isolated cells and tissue engineering. Most of these experiments were performed using rodent cells, particularly from embryonic or newborn origin. However, no successful strategy to generate human hair follicles from adult cells has yet been reported. This review identifies several issues that should be considered to achieve this objective. Perhaps the most important challenge is to provide three-dimensional culture conditions mimicking the structure of living tissue. Improving culture conditions that allow the expansion of specific cells while protecting their inductive properties, as well as methods for selecting populations of epithelial stem cells, should give us the necessary tools to overcome the difficulties that constrain human hair follicle neogenesis. An analysis of patent trends shows that the number of patent applications aimed at hair follicle regeneration and neogenesis has been increasing during the last decade. This

  2. The panoply of αβT cells in the skin.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Takashi; Kabashima, Kenji; Miyachi, Yoshiki

    2014-10-01

    Skin protects body from continual attack by microbial pathogens and environmental factors. Such barrier function of skin is achieved by multiple components including immune system, which is mainly regulated by lymphocytes. T lymphocytes (T cells) that express T cell receptor (TCR) α and β chains (αβT cells) control the strength and the type of immune response. CD4T cell population consists of helper T (Th) cell-subsets and immunosuppressive regulatory T (Treg) cells. Th1 cells produce IFN-γ and protect against intracellular pathogens. Th2 cells produce IL-4 family cytokines and participate in allergic skin diseases, including atopic dermatitis (AD). Th17 cells secrete IL-17, recruit granulocytes to fight against extracellular microorganisms, and play a role in psoriasis and AD. Th22 cells produce IL-22 that activates epithelial cells and mediates acanthosis in psoriasis and AD. On the other hand, Foxp3+ Treg cells attenuate immune responses partly via TGF-β or IL-10. Tissue resident memory T (Trm) cells in the skin-most of which are epidermal CD8T cells-constitute the first line of the defense against repeated infections. CD8 T cells are also engaged in psoriasis, lichen planus, and drug eruptions. Skin harbors innate-like αβT cells such as natural killer T (NKT) cells as well, whose function is not fully revealed. Understanding these αβT cells helps to comprehend skin diseases. PMID:25190363

  3. Isolation and culture of pulmonary endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ryan, U S

    1984-06-01

    Methods for isolation, identification and culture of pulmonary endothelial cells are now routine. In the past, methods of isolation have used proteolytic enzymes to detach cells; thereafter, traditional methods for cell passaging have used trypsin/EDTA mixtures. Cells isolated and passaged using proteolytic enzymes have been useful in establishing the field and in verifying certain endothelial properties. However, there is a growing awareness of the role of endothelial cells in processing vasoactive substances, in responding to hormones and other agonists and in cell-cell interactions with other cell types of the vascular wall, with blood cells and with cellular products. Consequently, a new requirement has arisen for cells in vitro that maintain the differentiated properties of their counterparts in vivo. The deleterious effects of trypsin and other proteolytic enzymes commonly used in cell culture on surface structures of endothelial cells such as enzymes, receptors and junctional proteins, as well as on extracellular layers such as the glycocalyx or "endothelial fuzz," have led to the development of methods that avoid use of proteolytic enzymes at both the isolation step and during subsequent subculture. This chapter describes traditional methods for isolating pulmonary endothelial cells but emphasizes newer approaches using mechanical harvest and scale-up using microcarriers. The new methods allow maintenance of long-term, large-scale cultures of cells that retain the full complement of surface properties and that maintain the cobblestone monolayer morphology and differentiated functional properties. Methods for identification of isolated cells are therefore also considered as methods for validation of cultures during their in vitro lifespan. PMID:6090112

  4. The fate of cells in skin: from clonal analysis to cell kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Allon M.; Doupe, David P.; Winton, Douglas J.; Jones, Phil H.; Simons, Benjamin D.

    2007-03-01

    Biologists are keen to understand the mechanisms of development and maintenance of tissues in mammals. As well as its intrinsic scientific interest, an understanding of the kinetics of cell division has important implications for mechanisms of aging and cancer development. Analysis of cell populations (clones) resulting from progenitor cells provides indirect access to the laws governing cell division and fate. Yet, until recently, the quality of clonal fate data acquired in vivo has inhibited reliable quantitative analysis. By addressing a recent, detailed, and extensive experimental study of mammalian skin, we develop a general theoretical framework which shows that the wide range of clonal fate data are consistent with a remarkably simple cell kinetic model. As well as overturning the accepted paradigm for skin maintenance, the analysis introduces a general framework for analysing clone fate data in future experiments. We now have a robust platform to study the effect of drug treatments and the influence of cell mutations on the epidermis.

  5. Cd2+-Induced Alteration of the Global Proteome of Human Skin Fibroblast Cells

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd2+) is a toxic heavy metal and a well-known human carcinogen. The toxic effects of Cd2+ on biological systems are diverse and thought to be exerted through a complex array of mechanisms. Despite the large number of studies aimed to elucidate the toxic mechanisms of action of Cd2+, few have been targeted toward investigating the ability of Cd2+ to disrupt multiple cellular pathways simultaneously and the overall cellular responses toward Cd2+ exposure. In this study, we employed a quantitative proteomic method, relying on stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) and LC–MS/MS, to assess the Cd2+-induced simultaneous alterations of multiple cellular pathways in cultured human skin fibroblast cells. By using this approach, we were able to quantify 2931 proteins, and 400 of them displayed significantly changed expression following Cd2+ exposure. Our results unveiled that Cd2+ treatment led to the marked upregulation of several antioxidant enzymes (e.g., metallothionein-1G, superoxide dismutase, pyridoxal kinase, etc.), enzymes associated with glutathione biosynthesis and homeostasis (e.g., glutathione S-transferases, glutathione synthetase, glutathione peroxidase, etc.), and proteins involved in cellular energy metabolism (e.g., glycolysis, pentose phosphate pathway, and the citric acid cycle). Additionally, we found that Cd2+ treatment resulted in the elevated expression of two isoforms of dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase (DDAH I and II), enzymes known to play a key role in regulating nitric oxide biosynthesis. Consistent with these findings, we observed elevated formation of nitric oxide in human skin (GM00637) and lung (IMR-90) fibroblast cells following Cd2+ exposure. The upregulation of DDAH I and II suggests a role of nitric oxide synthesis in Cd2+-induced toxicity in human cells. PMID:24527689

  6. A water soluble extract from Uncaria tomentosa (Cat's Claw) is a potent enhancer of DNA repair in primary organ cultures of human skin.

    PubMed

    Mammone, Thomas; Akesson, Christina; Gan, David; Giampapa, Vincent; Pero, Ronald W

    2006-03-01

    Cat's Claw (Uncaria tomentosa) water extracts, essentially free of oxindole alkaloids, have been shown to possess a broad spectrum of biological activity including DNA repair enhancement and antiinflammatory properties. These two biological mechanisms are key molecular targets to develop treatments that protect skin exposed to ultraviolet light from the sun. Because C-Med-100, a Cat's Claw water extract, is the only documented natural source of components that can up-regulate simultaneously both DNA repair and antiinflammation, its ability to modulate DNA repair in human skin organ cultures was undertaken. For this purpose skin cultures were treated with or without 5 mg/mL C-Med-100, irradiated with 0-100 mJ/cm2 UVB, and microscopically analysed for necrosis as well as the level of pyrimidine dimers using immunofluorescent TT-dimer antibody staining. The data clearly demonstrated that co-incubation with C-Med-100 reduced skin cell death from UV exposure, and this protection was accounted for by a concomitant increase in DNA repair. Based on these results, it was concluded that C-Med-100 was a natural plant extract worthy of further consideration as a sunscreen product. PMID:16521105

  7. Age-related decrease in CD271(+) cells in human skin.

    PubMed

    Akamatsu, Hirohiko; Hasegawa, Seiji; Yamada, Takaaki; Mizutani, Hiroshi; Nakata, Satoru; Yagami, Akiko; Matsunaga, Kayoko

    2016-03-01

    According to recent studies, stem cells are found in various tissues in our bodies. It has been reported that stem cells can reside in the skin tissues, including the epidermis, dermis, hair follicles and subcutaneous tissues. Homeostasis of the skin is maintained because these stem cells collaborate with each other to form new cells. We previously identified the CD271(p75NTR)(+) cell as a stem cell that was present in the epidermis, dermis and subcutaneous tissue, and further investigated the role of stem cells in wound healing and their association with skin disease. In this study, we investigated the localization of CD271(+) cells in human skin (epidermis and dermis) and its age-related changes in stem cells using CD271(+) cells. The study revealed that the number of CD271(+) cells in the epidermis and dermis decreased with aging. It is possible that such an age-related decrease in stem cells causes impaired regenerative ability and is associated with various skin diseases. If the relationship between stem cells and skin aging and diseases can be elucidated by investigations such as this study, it may lead to the development of novel anti-aging technologies and medical treatments for skin diseases in the future. PMID:26300383

  8. Transferring isolated mitochondria into tissue culture cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yi-Wei; Koob, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a new method for introducing large numbers of isolated mitochondria into tissue culture cells. Direct microinjection of mitochondria into typical mammalian cells has been found to be impractical due to the large size of mitochondria relative to microinjection needles. To circumvent this problem, we inject isolated mitochondria through appropriately sized microinjection needles into rodent oocytes or single-cell embryos, which are much larger than tissue culture cells, and then withdraw a ‘mitocytoplast’ cell fragment containing the injected mitochondria using a modified holding needle. These mitocytoplasts are then fused to recipient cells through viral-mediated membrane fusion and the injected mitochondria are transferred into the cytoplasm of the tissue culture cell. Since mouse oocytes contain large numbers of mouse mitochondria that repopulate recipient mouse cells along with the injected mitochondria, we used either gerbil single-cell embryos or rat oocytes to package injected mouse mitochondria. We found that the gerbil mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is not maintained in recipient rho0 mouse cells and that rat mtDNA initially replicated but was soon completely replaced by the injected mouse mtDNA, and so with both procedures mouse cells homoplasmic for the mouse mtDNA in the injected mitochondria were obtained. PMID:22753025

  9. Dermatocosmetologic aspects of treatment of basal-cell skin cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geinitz, A. V.; Stranadko, Ye. F.; Yusupova, Zh. M.; Tkachenko, S. B.

    2005-08-01

    The obtained clinical findings demonstrate excellent results after surgical MSC treatment with the application of modem laser surgical technologies. All the operated patients were under oncologist"s control during 1.5-2.5 years. In 6 cases we observed topical recurrences which needed a repeated intervention. Thus, our experience of applying LPh for surgical treatment of basal-cell carcinomas of the head and neck dem- onstrate that in the analysed cases it is more reasonable to use two models of laser devices different in their physical parameters. These devices are used at different surgical stages so as to provide a precise effect in laser tumour va- porization within the borders of the healthy tissue, to make better vascular coagulation and laser smoothing of wound surface. Immediate, direct and long-term results of modern surgical lasers" application for treating skin BSC almost in all cases give good and excellent cosmetic effect after such intenventions.

  10. Autologous Cell Delivery to the Skin-Implant Interface via the Lumen of Percutaneous Devices in vitro.

    PubMed

    Peramo, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Induced tissue regeneration around percutaneous medical implants could be a useful method to prevent the failure of the medical device, especially when the epidermal seal around the implant is disrupted and the implant must be maintained over a long period of time. In this manuscript, a novel concept and technique is introduced in which autologous keratinocytes were delivered to the interfacial area of a skin-implant using the hollow interior of a fixator pin as a conduit. Full thickness human skin explants discarded from surgeries were cultured at the air-liquid interface and were punctured to fit at the bottom of hollow cylindrical stainless steel fixator pins. Autologous keratinocytes, previously extracted from the same piece of skin and cultured separately, were delivered to the specimens thorough the interior of the hollow pins. The delivered cells survived the process and resembled undifferentiated epithelium, with variations in size and shape. Viability was demonstrated by the lack of morphologic evidence of necrosis or apoptosis. Although the cells did not form organized epithelial structures, differentiation toward a keratinocyte phenotype was evident immunohistochemically. These results suggest that an adaptation of this technique could be useful for the treatment of complications arising from the contact between skin and percutaneous devices in vivo. PMID:24955931

  11. Human cell culture in a space bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Dennis R.

    1988-01-01

    Microgravity offers new ways of handling fluids, gases, and growing mammalian cells in efficient suspension cultures. In 1976 bioreactor engineers designed a system using a cylindrical reactor vessel in which the cells and medium are slowly mixed. The reaction chamber is interchangeable and can be used for several types of cell cultures. NASA has methodically developed unique suspension type cell and recovery apparatus culture systems for bioprocess technology experiments and production of biological products in microgravity. The first Space Bioreactor was designed for microprocessor control, no gaseous headspace, circulation and resupply of culture medium, and slow mixing in very low shear regimes. Various ground based bioreactors are being used to test reactor vessel design, on-line sensors, effects of shear, nutrient supply, and waste removal from continuous culture of human cells attached to microcarriers. The small Bioreactor is being constructed for flight experiments in the Shuttle Middeck to verify systems operation under microgravity conditions and to measure the efficiencies of mass transport, gas transfer, oxygen consumption and control of low shear stress on cells.

  12. Increasing cell culture population doublings for long-term growth of finite life span human cell cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Stampfer, Martha R; Garbe, James C

    2015-02-24

    Cell culture media formulations for culturing human epithelial cells are herein described. Also described are methods of increasing population doublings in a cell culture of finite life span human epithelial cells and prolonging the life span of human cell cultures. Using the cell culture media disclosed alone and in combination with addition to the cell culture of a compound associated with anti-stress activity achieves extended growth of pre-stasis cells and increased population doublings and life span in human epithelial cell cultures.

  13. Increasing cell culture population doublings for long-term growth of finite life span human cell cultures

    DOEpatents

    Stampfer, Martha R.; Garbe, James C.

    2016-06-28

    Cell culture media formulations for culturing human epithelial cells are herein described. Also described are methods of increasing population doublings in a cell culture of finite life span human epithelial cells and prolonging the life span of human cell cultures. Using the cell culture media disclosed alone and in combination with addition to the cell culture of a compound associated with anti-stress activity achieves extended growth of pre-stasis cells and increased population doublings and life span in human epithelial cell cultures.

  14. Identification of Key Proteins in Human Epithelial Cells Responding to Bystander Signals From Irradiated Trout Skin

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Richard; Wang, Jiaxi; Seymour, Colin; Mothersill, Carmel; Howe, Orla

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-induced bystander signaling has been found to occur in live rainbow trout fish (Oncorhynchus mykiss). This article reports identification of key proteomic changes in a bystander reporter cell line (HaCaT) grown in low-dose irradiated tissue-conditioned media (ITCM) from rainbow trout fish. In vitro explant cultures were generated from the skin of fish previously exposed to low doses (0.1 and 0.5 Gy) of X-ray radiation in vivo. The ITCM was harvested from all donor explant cultures and placed on recipient HaCaT cells to observe any change in protein expression caused by the bystander signals. Proteomic methods using 2-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis and mass spectroscopy were employed to screen for novel proteins expressed. The proteomic changes measured in HaCaT cells receiving the ITCM revealed that exposure to 0.5 Gy induced an upregulation of annexin A2 and cingulin and a downregulation of Rho-GDI2, F-actin-capping protein subunit beta, microtubule-associated protein RP/EB family member, and 14-3-3 proteins. The 0.1 Gy dose also induced a downregulation of Rho-GDI2, hMMS19, F-actin-capping protein subunit beta, and microtubule-associated protein RP/EB family member proteins. The proteins reported may influence apoptotic signaling, as the results were suggestive of an induction of cell communication, repair mechanisms, and dysregulation of growth signals. PMID:26673684

  15. Transformation of human mesenchymal cells and skin fibroblasts into hematopoietic cells.

    PubMed

    Harris, David M; Hazan-Haley, Inbal; Coombes, Kevin; Bueso-Ramos, Carlos; Liu, Jie; Liu, Zhiming; Li, Ping; Ravoori, Murali; Abruzzo, Lynne; Han, Lin; Singh, Sheela; Sun, Michael; Kundra, Vikas; Kurzrock, Razelle; Estrov, Zeev

    2011-01-01

    Patients with prolonged myelosuppression require frequent platelet and occasional granulocyte transfusions. Multi-donor transfusions induce alloimmunization, thereby increasing morbidity and mortality. Therefore, an autologous or HLA-matched allogeneic source of platelets and granulocytes is needed. To determine whether nonhematopoietic cells can be reprogrammed into hematopoietic cells, human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) and skin fibroblasts were incubated with the demethylating agent 5-azacytidine (Aza) and the growth factors (GF) granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and stem cell factor. This treatment transformed MSCs to round, non-adherent cells expressing T-, B-, myeloid-, or stem/progenitor-cell markers. The transformed cells engrafted as hematopoietic cells in bone marrow of immunodeficient mice. DNA methylation and mRNA array analysis suggested that Aza and GF treatment demethylated and activated HOXB genes. Indeed, transfection of MSCs or skin fibroblasts with HOXB4, HOXB5, and HOXB2 genes transformed them into hematopoietic cells. Further studies are needed to determine whether transformed MSCs or skin fibroblasts are suitable for therapy. PMID:21731684

  16. Transcriptomic study of high‑glucose effects on human skin fibroblast cells.

    PubMed

    Pang, Lingxia; Wang, Youpei; Zheng, Meiqin; Wang, Qing; Lin, Hong; Zhang, Liqing; Wu, Lingjian

    2016-03-01

    Skin ulcers are a common complication of diabetes mellitus (DM). Fibroblasts are located within the dermis of skin tissue and can be damaged by diabetes. However, the underlying mechanism of how DM affects fibroblasts remains elusive. To understand the effects of DM on fibroblasts, the current study mimicked DM by high‑glucose (HG) supplementation in the culture medium of human foreskin primary fibroblast cells, and the analysis of transcriptomic changes was conducted. RNA sequencing‑based transcriptome analysis identified that, upon HG stress, 463 genes were upregulated and 351 genes downregulated (>1.5‑fold changes; P<0.05). These altered genes were distributed into 20 different pathways. In addition, gene ontology (GO) analysis indicated that 31 GO terms were enriched. Among the pathways identified, nuclear factor κB (NF‑κB) pathway genes were highly expressed, and the addition of Bay11‑7082, a typical NF‑κB signaling inhibitor, blocked the previously observed alterations in plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI1), an inflammation marker and frizzled class receptor 8 (FZD8), a Wnt signaling gene, expression that resulted from HG stress. Furthermore, an inhibitor of Wnt signaling diminished the role of Bay11‑7082 in the regulation of PAI1 expression under HG conditions, suggesting that Wnt signaling may function downstream of the NF‑κB pathway to protect fibroblast cells from HG stress. To the best of our knowledge, the current study is the first analysis of transcriptomic responses under HG stress in human fibroblasts. The data provided here may aid the understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which fibroblast cells are damaged in the skin of patients with DM. PMID:26820167

  17. [CO-CULTURE OF BOAR SPERMATOGONIAL CELLS WITH SERTOLI CELLS].

    PubMed

    Savchenkova, I P; Vasil'eva, S A

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we developed in vitro culture conditions using co-culture of boar spermatogonial cells with Sertoli cells. Testes from 60-day-old crossbred boar were used. A spermatogonia-enriched culture was achieved by enzymatic digestion method and purification by density gradient centrifugation using a discontinuous Percoll gradient and differentiated adherence technique. Lipid drops were detected in isolated Sertoli cells by Oil Red O staining. We have found that the cultivation of boar spermatogonia in the presence of Sertoli cells (up to 35 days) leads to their differentiation as well as in vivo in testis. Association of cells in groups, formation of chains and suspension clusters of the spermatogenic cells were observed on the 10th day. Spermatogonial cellular colonies were noted at the same time. These cellular colonies were analyzed for the expression of genes: Nanog and Plzf in RT PCR. The expression of the Nanog gene in the experimental cellular clones obtained by short-term culture of spermatogonial cells in the presence of Sertoli cells was 200 times higher than the expression of this gene in the freshly isolated spermatogonial cells expression was found in freshly isolated germ cells and in cellular clones derived in vitro. We have found that, in the case of longer cultivation of these cells on Sertoli cells, in vitro process of differentiation of germ cells and formation of single mobile boar spermatozoa occurs at 30-33 days. Cellular population is heterogeneous at this stage. Spermatogenic differentiation in vitro without Sertoli cells stays on the 7th day of cultivation. The results show that co-culture of boar spermatogonia-enriched cells with Sertoli cells can induce their differentiation into spermatozoa in vitro and facilitate obtaining of porcine germ cell culture. PMID:27228660

  18. Functional Specialization of Skin Dendritic Cell Subsets in Regulating T Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Clausen, Björn E.; Stoitzner, Patrizia

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are a heterogeneous family of professional antigen-presenting cells classically recognized as most potent inducers of adaptive immune responses. In this respect, Langerhans cells have long been considered to be prototypic immunogenic DC in the skin. More recently this view has considerably changed. The generation of in vivo cell ablation and lineage tracing models revealed the complexity of the skin DC network and, in particular, established the existence of a number of phenotypically distinct Langerin+ and negative DC populations in the dermis. Moreover, by now we appreciate that DC also exert important regulatory functions and are required for the maintenance of tolerance toward harmless foreign and self-antigens. This review summarizes our current understanding of the skin-resident DC system in the mouse and discusses emerging concepts on the functional specialization of the different skin DC subsets in regulating T cell responses. Special consideration is given to antigen cross-presentation as well as immune reactions toward contact sensitizers, cutaneous pathogens, and tumors. These studies form the basis for the manipulation of the human counterparts of the murine DC subsets to promote immunity or tolerance for the treatment of human disease. PMID:26557117

  19. The myofibroblast markers α-SM actin and β-actin are differentially expressed in 2 and 3-D culture models of fibrotic and normal skin.

    PubMed

    Vozenin, M C; Lefaix, J L; Ridi, R; Biard, D S; Daburon, F; Martin, M

    1998-01-01

    To characterize the differences between fibrotic myofibroblasts and normal fibroblasts, we studied two differentiation markers: α-smooth muscle (SM) actin, a specific marker of myofibroblast differentiation, and β-actin, which is overexpressed in the fibrotic tissue. Experiments were performed on fibroblasts isolated from normal pig skin and on subcutaneous myofibroblasts isolated from pig radiation-induced fibrosis. Three culture models were used: cells in monolayers, equivalent dermis, consisting of fibroblasts embedded into a matrix composed of type I collagen, and in vitro reconstituted skin, in which the matrix and containing life fibroblasts were overlaid with keratinocytes. Samples were studied using immunofluorescence and western-blotting. In monolayers cultures, both fibrosis and normal cells expressed α-SM actin. Furthermore, similar amounts of β-actin protein were found. In these conditions, the resulting alterations in the phenotypes of cells made comparison of cultured fibrotic and normal cells irrelevant. Under the two 3-D culture models, normal fibroblasts no longer expressed α-SM actin. They expressed β-actin at the basal level. Moreover, the fibrotic myofibroblasts in both 3-D models retained their differentiation features, expressing α-SM actin and overexpressing β-actin. We found that this normalization was mainly related to the genomic programmation acquired by the cells in the tissue. Cellular motility and microenvironment were also involved, whereas cellular proliferation was not a major factor. Consequently, both three-dimensional models allowed the study of radiation-induced fibrosis in vitro, provided good extrapolations to in vivo conditions and avoided certain of culture artefacts. PMID:22359004

  20. Proinflammatory Effects of Diesel Exhaust Nanoparticles on Scleroderma Skin Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mastrofrancesco, A.; Alfè, M.; Rosato, E.; Gargiulo, V.; Beatrice, C.; Di Blasio, G.; Zhang, B.; Su, D. S.; Picardo, M.; Fiorito, S.

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases are complex disorders of unknown etiology thought to result from interactions between genetic and environmental factors. We aimed to verify whether environmental pollution from diesel engine exhaust nanoparticulate (DEP) of actually operating vehicles could play a role in the development of a rare immune-mediated disease, systemic sclerosis (SSc), in which the pathogenetic role of environment has been highlighted. The effects of carbon-based nanoparticulate collected at the exhaust of newer (Euro 5) and older (Euro 4) diesel engines on SSc skin keratinocytes and fibroblasts were evaluated in vitro by assessing the mRNA expression of inflammatory cytokines (IL-1α, IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α) and fibroblast chemical mediators (metalloproteases 2, 3, 7, 9, and 12; collagen types I and III; VEGF). DEP was shown to stimulate cytokine gene expression at a higher extent in SSc keratinocytes versus normal cells. Moreover, the mRNA gene expression of all MMPs, collagen types, and VEGF genes was significantly higher in untreated SSc fibroblasts versus controls. Euro 5 particle exposure increased the mRNA expression of MMP-2, -7, and -9 in SSc fibroblasts in a dose dependent manner and only at the highest concentration in normal cells. We suggest that environmental DEP could trigger the development of SSc acting on genetically hyperreactive cell systems. PMID:24982919

  1. Metal ion bombardment of onion skin cell wall

    SciTech Connect

    Sangyuenyongpipat, S.; Vilaithong, T.; Yu, L.D.; Verdaguer, A.; Ratera, I.; Ogletree, D.F.; Monteiro, O.R.; Brown, I.G.

    2004-05-10

    Ion bombardment of living cellular material is a novel subfield of ion beam surface modification that is receiving growing attention from the ion beam and biological communities. Although it has been demonstrated that the technique is sound, in that an adequate fraction of the living cells can survive both the vacuum environment and energetic ion bombardment, there remains much uncertainty about the process details. Here we report on our observations of onion skin cells that were subjected to ion implantation, and propose some possible physical models that tend to support the experimental results. The ion beams used were metallic (Mg, Ti, Fe, Ni, Cu), mean ion energy was typically 30keV, and the implantation fluence was in the range 1014 1016 ions/cm2. The cells were viewed using Atomic Force Microscopy, revealing the formation of microcrater-like structures due to ion bombardment. The implantation depth profile was measured with Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and compared to the results of the TRIM, T-DYN and PROFILE computer codes.

  2. Comparison of Bio-Revitalizing Injective Products: A Study on Skin Fibroblast Cultures.

    PubMed

    Avantaggiato, Anna; Girardi, Ambra; Palmieri, Annalisa; Pascali, Michele; Carinci, Francesco

    2015-06-01

    Bio-revitalization is a commonly used technique in aesthetic medicine for improving skin quality and appearance by intra-dermal injection of hyaluronic acid (HA)-containing compounds. The present study compares different HA-containing injectables regarding their effects on cultured skin fibroblasts over time (24, 48, and 72 hr) by using RT-PCR and a panel of genes involved in dermal integrity. Human dermal fibroblasts were seeded on a layer of five different commercial medical devices containing 6.2 mg/mL 10 mg/mL 10%, 13 mg/mL and 20 mg/mL, respectively, of HA. The products differ not only in HA concentration but also in the content and quality of other ingredients; moreover, one of these products contained cross-linked HA. Differences among medical devices were found. In particular, HA concentration seems to be inversely correlated to elastin gene activation. Regarding the neutrophil elastase gene, the two medical devices with the higher concentration of HA displayed the greater effect. Genes encoding for hyaluronan synthase 1, hyaluronidase 1, and desmoplakin were enhanced, but the HA content of the different products did not seem to be directly related to gene activation. Therefore, the explanation for the differences must be studied further with respect to elements that are distinctive for each device. For the physician, it is important to choose which drugs or medical devices can be used and in what protocols. The present study performed a comparison that can be useful in better addressing the skin improvement therapies for aging and in its prevention. PMID:25640228

  3. Micronuclei in mouse skin cells following in vivo exposure to benzo(a)pyrene, 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene, chrysene, pyrene and urethane

    SciTech Connect

    Shuilin He ); Baker, R. )

    1991-01-01

    Detection of micronuclei (MN) in skin cells from HRA/Skh hairless mice treated with chemical or physical agents may prove informative in qualitative and quantitative studies of skin carcinogenesis. MN induction and cell survival were estimated in cytokinesis-blocked keratinocytes, cultured for 4 days in vitro, after a single topical dose of various organic compounds. Treatment with 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) resulted in maximal MN induction in cells removed from skin 12-24 hr after topical administration. Even in cells removed only 1 hr after DMBA treatment, a significant increase in MN was evident. However, to allow sufficient time for metabolic activation, a sampling time of 24 hr was adopted for all test substances. Dose-dependent increases in MN were observed with DMBA, benzo(a)pyrene, chrysene, and urethane. Increased numbers of micronucleated cells were detected at the lowest doses administered in the present study. Although reduced cell recovery occurred following exposure of mice to acetone, pyrene, and other chemicals, there was no evidence that cytotoxicity contributed to MN scored in keratinocytes. Moreover, the probable noncarcinogen, pyrene, failed to induce MN at doses from 2.5 {mu}g to 2.5 mg/mouse. These results show that it is possible to assess chemical exposure in skin by measuring cell survival and skin genotoxicity by measuring MN induction in cultured keratinocytes.

  4. Absence of induction of enhanced reactivation of herpes simplex virus in cells from xeroderma pigmentosum patients without skin cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Abrahams, P.J.; van der Kleij, A.A.; Schouten, R.; van der Eb, A.J.

    1988-11-01

    The time course of appearance of enhanced reactivation (ER) and enhanced mutagenesis (EM) of herpes simplex virus type 1 were studied in UV-irradiated stationary cultures of xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) fibroblasts. In some of the XP cells EM followed similar kinetics of appearance as ER. Maximal activities occurred when infection was delayed 1 or 2 days after cell treatment. However, in certain XP cells only induction of the EM response was observed, whereas ER was absent. Interestingly, the latter XP cells had been obtained from patients who had not yet developed skin cancer at the time they were described in the literature, whereas the former XP patients had already developed skin tumors. This suggests that the ER response may somehow be involved in the process of oncogenic transformation. Dose-response studies of ER in XP cells from tumor-bearing patients showed that ER is maximally induced with a UV dose of 40 Jm-2 given to the virus. Normal levels of ER were observed in 14 different normal human skin fibroblasts, indicating that the ER- phenotype does not occur in normal cells or at least more rarely than in XP cells.

  5. Cell culture experiments planned for the space bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Dennis R.; Cross, John H.

    1987-01-01

    Culturing of cells in a pilot-scale bioreactor remains to be done in microgravity. An approach is presented based on several studies of cell culture systems. Previous and current cell culture research in microgravity which is specifically directed towards development of a space bioprocess is described. Cell culture experiments planned for a microgravity sciences mission are described in abstract form.

  6. Different radiosensitivities of mast-cell precursors in the bone marrow and skin of mice

    SciTech Connect

    Kitamura, Y.; Yokoyama, M.; Sonoda, T.; Mori, K.J.

    1983-01-01

    Although tissue mast cells are derived from the bone marrow, some descendants of bone marrow-derived precursors retain the ability to proliferate and differentiate into mast cells even after localization in the skin. The purpose of the present study was to determine the D/sub 0/ values for mast-cell precursors in the bone marrow and those localized in the skin. Bone marrow cells were removed from (WB X C57BL/6)F/sub 1/+/+ mice after various doses of irradiation and injected into the skin of the congenic W/W/sup v/ mice which were genetically without mast cells. Radiosensitivity of mast-cell precursors in the bone marrow was evaluated by determining the proportion of the injection sites at which mast cells did not appear. For the assay of the radiosensitivity of mast-cell precursors localized in the skin, pieces of skin were removed from beige C57BL/6 (bg/sup J//bg/sup J/, Chediak-Higashi syndrome) mice after various doses of irradiation and grafted onto the backs of the normal C57BL/6 mice. Radiosensitivity of mast-cell precursors in the skin was evaluated by determining the decrease of beige-type mast cells which possessed giant granules. Mast-cell precursors in the bone marrow were much more radiosenitive than those localized in the skin. D/sup 0/ value was about 100 rad for the former and about 800 rad for the latter.

  7. Different radiosensitivities of mast-cell precursors in the bone marrow and skin of mice

    SciTech Connect

    Kitamura, Y.; Yokoyama, M.; Sonoda, T.; Mori, K.J.

    1983-01-01

    Although tissue mast cells are derived from the bone marrow, some descendants of bone marrow-derived precursors retain the ability to proliferate and differentiate into mast cells even after localization in the skin. The purpose of the present study was to determine the D0 values for mast-cell precursors in the bone marrow and those localized in the skin. Bone marrow cells were removed from (WB X C57BL/6)F1-+/+ mice after various doses of irradiation and injected into the skin of the congenic W/Wv mice which were genetically without mast cells. Radiosensitivity of mast-cell precursors in the bone marrow was evaluated by determining the proportion of the injection sites at which mast cells did not appear. For the assay of the radiosensitivity of mast-cell precursors localized in the skin, pieces of skin were removed from beige C57BL/6 (bgJ/bgJ. Chediak-Higashi syndrome) mice after various doses of irradiation and grafted onto the back of the normal C57BL/6 mice. Radiosensitivity of mast-cell precursors in the skin was evaluated by determining the decrease of beige-type mast cells which possessed giant granules. Mast-cell precursors in the bone marrow were much more radiosensitive than those localized in the skin. D0 value was about 100 rad for the former and about 800 rad for the latter.

  8. Chip-based human liver-intestine and liver-skin co-cultures--A first step toward systemic repeated dose substance testing in vitro.

    PubMed

    Maschmeyer, Ilka; Hasenberg, Tobias; Jaenicke, Annika; Lindner, Marcus; Lorenz, Alexandra Katharina; Zech, Julie; Garbe, Leif-Alexander; Sonntag, Frank; Hayden, Patrick; Ayehunie, Seyoum; Lauster, Roland; Marx, Uwe; Materne, Eva-Maria

    2015-09-01

    Systemic repeated dose safety assessment and systemic efficacy evaluation of substances are currently carried out on laboratory animals and in humans due to the lack of predictive alternatives. Relevant international regulations, such as OECD and ICH guidelines, demand long-term testing and oral, dermal, inhalation, and systemic exposure routes for such evaluations. So-called "human-on-a-chip" concepts are aiming to replace respective animals and humans in substance evaluation with miniaturized functional human organisms. The major technical hurdle toward success in this field is the life-like combination of human barrier organ models, such as intestine, lung or skin, with parenchymal organ equivalents, such as liver, at the smallest biologically acceptable scale. Here, we report on a reproducible homeostatic long-term co-culture of human liver equivalents with either a reconstructed human intestinal barrier model or a human skin biopsy applying a microphysiological system. We used a multi-organ chip (MOC) platform, which provides pulsatile fluid flow within physiological ranges at low media-to-tissue ratios. The MOC supports submerse cultivation of an intact intestinal barrier model and an air-liquid interface for the skin model during their co-culture with the liver equivalents respectively at (1)/100.000 the scale of their human counterparts in vivo. To increase the degree of organismal emulation, microfluidic channels of the liver-skin co-culture could be successfully covered with human endothelial cells, thus mimicking human vasculature, for the first time. Finally, exposure routes emulating oral and systemic administration in humans have been qualified by applying a repeated dose administration of a model substance - troglitazone - to the chip-based co-cultures. PMID:25857839

  9. Staphylococcus δ-toxin promotes mouse allergic skin disease by inducing mast cell degranulation

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Yuumi; Oscherwitz, Jon; Cease, Kemp B.; Chan, Susana M.; Muñoz-Planillo, Raul; Hasegawa, Mizuho; Villaruz, Amer E.; Cheung, Gordon Y. C.; McGavin, Martin J.; Travers, Jeffrey B.; Otto, Michael; Inohara, Naohiro; Núñez, Gabriel

    2013-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic inflammatory skin disease that affects 15 to 30% of children and ~5% of adults in industrialized countries1. Although the pathogenesis of AD is not fully understood, the disease is mediated by an abnormal immunoglobulin E (IgE) immune response in the setting of skin barrier dysfunction2. Mast cells (MCs) contribute to IgE-mediated allergic disorders including AD3. Upon activation, MCs release their membrane-bound cytosolic granules leading to the release of multiple molecules that are important in the pathogenesis of AD and host defense4. More than 90% of AD patients are colonized with Staphylococcus aureus in the lesional skin whereas most healthy individuals do not harbor the pathogen5. Several Staphylococcal exotoxins (SEs) can act as superantigens and/or antigens in models of AD6. However, the role of these SEs in disease pathogenesis remains unclear. Here, we report that culture supernatants of S. aureus contain potent MC degranulation activity. Biochemical analysis identified δ-toxin as the MC degranulation-inducing factor produced by S. aureus. MC degranulation induced by δ-toxin depended on phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and calcium (Ca2+) influx, but unlike that mediated by IgE crosslinking, it did not require the spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk). In addition, IgE enhanced δ-toxin-induced MC degranulation in the absence of antigen. Furthermore, S. aureus isolates recovered from AD patients produced high levels of δ-toxin. Importantly, skin colonization with S. aureus, but not a mutant deficient in δ-toxin, promoted IgE and IL-4 production, as well as inflammatory skin disease. Furthermore, enhancement of IgE production and dermatitis by δ-toxin was abrogated in KitW-sh/W-sh MC-deficient mice and restored by MC reconstitution. These studies identify δ-toxin as a potent inducer of MC degranulation and suggest a mechanistic link between S. aureus colonization and allergic skin disease. PMID:24172897

  10. Recordings from cultured newt olfactory receptor cells.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Kyohei; Matsumoto, Masahiro; Kurahashi, Takashi; Takeuchi, Hiroko

    2012-05-01

    Freshly dissociated olfactory receptor cells (ORCs) are commonly used in electrophysiological research investigations of the physicochemical mechanisms of olfactory signal transduction. Because the morphology of cultured cells clearly becomes worse over time, the ORCs are examined traditionally within several days after dissociation. However, there has been a major concern that cells are affected soon after dissociation. To gain a better understanding of the reliability of data obtained from solitary cells, we obtained electrical data during the lifetime of single ORCs dissociated from the newt. The time course for the deterioration could be revealed by monitoring the membrane properties during culture. Although the number of living cells that were identified by trypan blue extrusion declined day by day, the remaining cells retained morphology and their fundamental electrical features until day 19. In some cells, the cilia and dendrite were observed until day 21, and the bipolar morphology until day 31. The fundamental features of cell excitation were maintained during culture without showing remarkable changes when they retained morphological features. The results suggest that electrical properties of cells are almost unchanged within several days. Furthermore, the dissociated newt ORCs can be used for several weeks that are almost comparable to the intrinsic lifetime of the ORCs in vivo. PMID:22559969

  11. Oxidative stress in skin fibroblasts cultures from patients with Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In the substantia nigra of Parkinson's disease (PD) patients, increased lipid peroxidation, decreased activities of the mitochondrial complex I of the respiratory chain, catalase and glutathione-peroxidase, and decreased levels of reduced glutathione have been reported. These observations suggest that oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction play a role in the neurodegeneration in PD. We assessed enzymatic activities of respiratory chain and other enzymes involved in oxidative processes in skin fibroblasts cultures of patients with PD. Methods We studied respiratory chain enzyme activities, activities of total, Cu/Zn- and Mn-superoxide-dismutase, gluthatione-peroxidase and catalase, and coenzyme Q10 levels in skin fibroblasts cultures from 20 Parkinson's disease (PD) patients and 19 age- and sex- matched healthy controls. Results When compared with controls, PD patients showed significantly lower specific activities for complex V (both corrected by citrate synthase activity and protein concentrations). Oxidized, reduced and total coenzyme Q10 levels (both corrected by citrate synthase and protein concentrations), and activities of total, Cu/Zn- and Mn-superoxide-dismutase, gluthatione-peroxidase and catalase, did not differ significantly between PD-patients and control groups. Values for enzyme activities in the PD group did not correlate with age at onset, duration, scores of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating scales and Hoehn-Yahr staging. Conclusions The main result of this study was the decreased activity of complex V in PD patients. This complex synthesizes ATP from ADP using an electrochemical gradient generated by complexes I-IV. These results suggest decreased energetic metabolism in fibroblasts of patients with PD. PMID:20958999

  12. Effects of teicoplanin on cell number of cultured cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Kashkolinejad-Koohi, Tahere; Saadat, Iraj

    2015-01-01

    Teicoplanin is a glycopeptide antibiotic with a wide variation in human serum half-life. It is also a valuable alternative of vancomycin. There is however no study on its effect on cultured cells. The aim of the present study was to test the effect of teicoplanin on cultured cell lines CHO, Jurkat E6.1 and MCF-7. The cultured cells were exposed to teicoplanin at final concentrations of 0–11000 μg/ml for 24 hours. To determine cell viability, the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) test was performed. At low concentrations of teicoplanin the numbers of cultured cells (due to cell proliferation) were increased in the three cell lines examined. The maximum cell proliferation rates were observed at concentrations of 1000, 400, and 200 μg/ml of teicoplanin for CHO, MCF-7 and Jurkat cell lines, respectively. Cell toxicity was observed at final concentrations over 2000, 6000, and 400 μg/ml of teicoplanin for CHO, MCF-7 and Jurkat cell lines, respectively. A dose-dependent manner of cell toxicity was observed. Our present findings indicated that teicoplanin at clinically used concentrations induced cell proliferation. It should therefore be used cautiously, particularly in children, pregnant women and patients with cancer.

  13. Zinc l-pyrrolidone carboxylate inhibits the UVA-induced production of matrix metalloproteinase-1 by in vitro cultured skin fibroblasts, whereas it enhances their collagen synthesis.

    PubMed

    Takino, Y; Okura, F; Kitazawa, M; Iwasaki, K; Tagami, H

    2012-02-01

    Reduced collagen matrix in the dermis constitutes one of the characteristic features of chronologically aged skin, which is further enhanced on the sun-exposed portions of the body by chronic ultraviolet light (UV) irradiation, inducing the unique changes associated with skin photoageing. The zinc salt of l-pyrrolidone carboxylate (Zinc PCA) has long been used as a cosmetic ingredient, because of its astringent and anti-microbial properties. In the present study, by employing cultured normal human dermal fibroblasts, we found that Zinc PCA suppressed UVA-induced activation of activator protein-1 (AP-1) and reduced matrix metalloproteinase-1 production in these cells, which is thought to be involved in collagen degradation in photoaged skin. Moreover, Zinc PCA treatment of the cells increased the expression of an ascorbic acid transporter mRNA, SVCT2, but not SVCT1, resulting in the enhanced production of type I collagen. Based on these in vitro findings, we consider Zinc PCA to be a promising candidate for an anti-skin ageing agent. PMID:21834944

  14. Preparation of Single-cell Suspensions for Cytofluorimetric Analysis from Different Mouse Skin Regions.

    PubMed

    Broggi, Achille; Cigni, Clara; Zanoni, Ivan; Granucci, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    The skin is a barrier organ that interacts with the external environment. Being continuously exposed to potential microbial invasion, the dermis and epidermis home a variety of immune cells in both homeostatic and inflammatory conditions. Tools to obtain skin cell release for cytofluorimetric analyses are, therefore, very useful in order to study the complex network of immune cells residing in the skin and their response to microbial stimuli. Here, we describe an efficient methodology for the digestion of mouse skin to rapidly and efficiently obtain single-cell suspensions. This protocol allows maintenance of maximum cell viability without compromising surface antigen expression. We also describe how to take and digest skin samples from different anatomical locations, such as the ear, trunk, tail, and footpad. The obtained suspensions are then stained and analyzed by flow cytometry to discriminate between different leukocyte populations. PMID:27166881

  15. Active wound dressing with artificial capillaries for temporary wound irrigation and skin cell supply.

    PubMed

    Plettig, Jörn; Johnen, Christa M; Bräutigam, Kirsten; Zeilinger, Katrin; Borneman, Reinhard; Gerlach, Jörg C

    2012-04-01

    Medical treatment of burns and chronic wounds remains a challenge. We discussed a therapy concept that combines skin cell spray transplantation with a novel wound dressing based on artificial hollow fiber membrane capillaries. In skin cell-based therapy development, autologous skin progenitor cells are isolated from a healthy skin area and sprayed onto the wound. A medical device was introduced that uses perfused capillaries, known from clinical plasma separation, as a temporarily applied extracorporeal wound capillary bed. The functions of the dressing are comparable with those of dialysis; the capillaries, however, are applied externally onto the wound. Perfusion with a clinical peripheral nutrition and buffer solution can provide wound irrigation, wound debris removal, cell nutrition, pH regulation, and electrolyte balance while potentially serving to address delivery of regenerative factors and antibiosis. An innovative active skin wound dressing that provides cell support and stimulates regeneration by wound irrigation is discussed. PMID:22074237

  16. Microfabricated Platforms for Mechanically Dynamic Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    Moraes, Christopher; Sun, Yu; Simmons, Craig A.

    2010-01-01

    The ability to systematically probe in vitro cellular response to combinations of mechanobiological stimuli for tissue engineering, drug discovery or fundamental cell biology studies is limited by current bioreactor technologies, which cannot simultaneously apply a variety of mechanical stimuli to cultured cells. In order to address this issue, we have developed a series of microfabricated platforms designed to screen for the effects of mechanical stimuli in a high-throughput format. In this protocol, we demonstrate the fabrication of a microactuator array of vertically displaced posts on which the technology is based, and further demonstrate how this base technology can be modified to conduct high-throughput mechanically dynamic cell culture in both two-dimensional and three-dimensional culture paradigms. PMID:21206477

  17. Cell Culture on MEMS Platforms: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Ming; Tong, Wen Hao; Choudhury, Deepak; Rahim, Nur Aida Abdul; Iliescu, Ciprian; Yu, Hanry

    2009-01-01

    Microfabricated systems provide an excellent platform for the culture of cells, and are an extremely useful tool for the investigation of cellular responses to various stimuli. Advantages offered over traditional methods include cost-effectiveness, controllability, low volume, high resolution, and sensitivity. Both biocompatible and bio-incompatible materials have been developed for use in these applications. Biocompatible materials such as PMMA or PLGA can be used directly for cell culture. However, for bio-incompatible materials such as silicon or PDMS, additional steps need to be taken to render these materials more suitable for cell adhesion and maintenance. This review describes multiple surface modification strategies to improve the biocompatibility of MEMS materials. Basic concepts of cell-biomaterial interactions, such as protein adsorption and cell adhesion are covered. Finally, the applications of these MEMS materials in Tissue Engineering are presented. PMID:20054478

  18. Biochemical Assays of Cultured Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barlow, G. H.

    1985-01-01

    Subpopulations of human embryonic kidney cells isolated from continuous flow electrophoresis experiments performed at McDonnell Douglas and on STS-8 have been analyzed. These analyses have included plasminogen activator assays involving indirect methodology on fibrin plated and direct methodology using chromogenic substrates. Immunological studies were performed and the conditioned media for erythropoietin activity and human granulocyte colony stimulating (HGCSF) activity was analyzed.

  19. Integrated bioprocessing for plant cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Choi, J W; Cho, G H; Byun, S Y; Kim, D I

    2001-01-01

    Plant cell suspension culture has become the focus of much attention as a tool for the production of secondary metabolites including paclitaxel, a well-known anticancer agent. Recently, it has also been regarded as one of the host systems for the production of recombinant proteins. In order to produce phytochemicals using plant cell cultures, efficient processes must be developed with adequate bioreactor design. Most of the plant secondary metabolites are toxic to cells at the high concentrations required during culture. Therefore, if the product could be removed in situ during culture, productivity might be enhanced due to the alleviation of this toxicity. In situ removal or extractive bioconversion of such products can be performed by in situ extraction with various kinds of organic solvents. In situ adsorption using polymeric resins is another possibility. Using the fact that secondary metabolites are generally hydrophobic, various integrated bioprocessing techniques can be designed not only to lower toxicity, but also to enhance productivity. In this article, in situ extraction, in situ adsorption, utilization of cyclodextrins, and the application of aqueous two-phase systems in plant cell cultures are reviewed. PMID:11729756

  20. The circadian clock in skin: implications for adult stem cells, tissue regeneration, cancer, aging, and immunity.

    PubMed

    Plikus, Maksim V; Van Spyk, Elyse N; Pham, Kim; Geyfman, Mikhail; Kumar, Vivek; Takahashi, Joseph S; Andersen, Bogi

    2015-06-01

    Historically, work on peripheral circadian clocks has been focused on organs and tissues that have prominent metabolic functions, such as the liver, fat, and muscle. In recent years, skin has emerged as a model for studying circadian clock regulation of cell proliferation, stem cell functions, tissue regeneration, aging, and carcinogenesis. Morphologically, skin is complex, containing multiple cell types and structures, and there is evidence for a functional circadian clock in most, if not all, of its cell types. Despite the complexity, skin stem cell populations are well defined, experimentally tractable, and exhibit prominent daily cell proliferation cycles. Hair follicle stem cells also participate in recurrent, long-lasting cycles of regeneration: the hair growth cycles. Among other advantages of skin is a broad repertoire of available genetic tools enabling the creation of cell type-specific circadian mutants. Also, due to the accessibility of skin, in vivo imaging techniques can be readily applied to study the circadian clock and its outputs in real time, even at the single-cell level. Skin provides the first line of defense against many environmental and stress factors that exhibit dramatic diurnal variations such as solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation and temperature. Studies have already linked the circadian clock to the control of UVB-induced DNA damage and skin cancers. Due to the important role that skin plays in the defense against microorganisms, it also represents a promising model system to further explore the role of the clock in the regulation of the body's immune functions. To that end, recent studies have already linked the circadian clock to psoriasis, one of the most common immune-mediated skin disorders. Skin also provides opportunities to interrogate the clock regulation of tissue metabolism in the context of stem cells and regeneration. Furthermore, many animal species feature prominent seasonal hair molt cycles, offering an attractive model

  1. The circadian clock in skin: implications for adult stem cells, tissue regeneration, cancer, aging, and immunity

    PubMed Central

    Plikus, Maksim V.; Van Spyk, Elyse Noelani; Pham, Kim; Geyfman, Mikhail; Kumar, Vivek; Takahashi, Joseph S.; Andersen, Bogi

    2015-01-01

    Historically work on peripheral circadian clocks has been focused on organs and tissues that have prominent metabolic functions, such as liver, fat and muscle. In recent years, skin is emerging as a model for studying circadian clock regulation of cell proliferation, stem cell functions, tissue regeneration, aging and carcinogenesis. Morphologically skin is complex, containing multiple cell types and structures, and there is evidence for a functional circadian clock in most, if not all, of its cell types. Despite the complexity, skin stem cell populations are well defined, experimentally tractable and exhibit prominent daily cell proliferation cycles. Hair follicle stem cells also participate in recurrent, long-lasting cycles of regeneration -- the hair growth cycles. Among other advantages of skin is a broad repertoire of available genetic tools enabling the creation of cell-type specific circadian mutants. Also, due to the accessibility of the skin, in vivo imaging techniques can be readily applied to study the circadian clock and its outputs in real time, even at the single-cell level. Skin provides the first line of defense against many environmental and stress factors that exhibit dramatic diurnal variations such as solar UV radiation and temperature. Studies have already linked the circadian clock to the control of UVB-induced DNA damage and skin cancers. Due to the important role that skin plays in the defense against microorganisms, it represents a promising model system to further explore the role of the clock in the regulation of the body's immune functions. To that end, recent studies have already linked the circadian clock to psoriasis, one of the most common immune-mediated skin disorders. The skin also provides opportunities to interrogate clock regulation of tissue metabolism in the context of stem cells and regeneration. Furthermore, many animal species feature prominent seasonal hair molt cycles, offering an attractive model for investigating the

  2. BAY11 enhances OCT4 synthetic mRNA expression in adult human skin cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The OCT4 transcription factor is involved in many cellular processes, including development, reprogramming, maintaining pluripotency and differentiation. Synthetic OCT4 mRNA was recently used (in conjunction with other reprogramming factors) to generate human induced pluripotent stem cells. Here, we discovered that BAY 11-7082 (BAY11), at least partially through an NF-κB-inhibition based mechanism, could significantly increase the expression of OCT4 following transfection of synthetic mRNA (synRNA) into adult human skin cells. Methods We tested various chemical and molecular small molecules on their ability to suppress the innate immune response seen upon synthetic mRNA transfection. Three molecules - B18R, BX795, and BAY11 - were used in immunocytochemical and proliferation-based assays. We also utilized global transcriptional meta-analysis coupled with quantitative PCR to identify relative gene expression downstream of OCT4. Results We found that human skin cells cultured in the presence of BAY11 resulted in reproducible increased expression of OCT4 that did not inhibit normal cell proliferation. The increased levels of OCT4 resulted in significantly increased expression of genes downstream of OCT4, including the previously identified SPP1, DUSP4 and GADD45G, suggesting the expressed OCT4 was functional. We also discovered a novel OCT4 putative downstream target gene SLC16A9 which demonstrated significantly increased expression following elevation of OCT4 levels. Conclusions For the first time we have shown that small molecule-based stabilization of synthetic mRNA expression can be achieved with use of BAY11. This small molecule-based inhibition of innate immune responses and subsequent robust expression of transfected synthetic mRNAs may have multiple applications for future cell-based research and therapeutics. PMID:23388106

  3. [Regenerative medicine: stem cells, cellular and matricial interactions in the reconstruction of skin and cornea by tissue engineering].

    PubMed

    Larouche, D; Lavoie, A; Proulx, S; Paquet, C; Carrier, P; Beauparlant, A; Auger, F A; Germain, L

    2009-06-01

    Considering that there is a shortage of organ donor, the aim of tissue engineering is to develop substitutes for the replacement of wounded or diseased tissues. Autologous tissue is evidently a preferable transplant material for long-term graft persistence because of the unavoidable rejection reaction occuring against allogeneic transplant. For the production of such substitutes, it is essential to control the culture conditions for post-natal human stem cells. Furthermore, histological organization and functionality of reconstructed tissues must approach those of native organs. For self-renewing tissues such as skin and cornea, tissue engineering strategies must include the preservation of stem cells during the in vitro process as well as after grafting to ensure the long-term regeneration of the transplants. We described a tissue engineering method named the self-assembly approach allowing the production of autologous living organs from human cells without any exogenous biomaterial. This approach is based on the capacity of mesenchymal cells to create in vitro their own extracellular matrix and then reform a tissue. Thereafter, various techniques allow the reorganization of such tissues in more complex organ such as valve leaflets, blood vessels, skin or cornea. These tissues offer the hope of new alternatives for organ transplantation in the future. In this review, the importance of preserving stem cells during in vitro expansion and controlling cell differentiation as well as tissue organization to ensure quality and functionality of tissue-engineered organs will be discussed, while focusing on skin and cornea. PMID:18513892

  4. A tomato stem cell extract, containing antioxidant compounds and metal chelating factors, protects skin cells from heavy metal-induced damages.

    PubMed

    Tito, Annalisa; Carola, Antonietta; Bimonte, Marida; Barbulova, Ani; Arciello, Stefania; de Laurentiis, Francesco; Monoli, Irene; Hill, Jacqueline; Gibertoni, Simone; Colucci, Gabriella; Apone, Fabio

    2011-12-01

    Heavy metals can cause several genotoxic effects on cells, including oxidative stress, DNA sequence breakage and protein modification. Among the body organs, skin is certainly the most exposed to heavy metal stress and thus the most damaged by the toxic effects that these chemicals cause. Moreover, heavy metals, in particular nickel, can induce the over-expression of collagenases (enzymes responsible for collagen degradation), leading to weakening of the skin extracellular matrix. Plants have evolved sophisticated mechanisms to protect their cells from heavy metal toxicity, including the synthesis of metal chelating proteins and peptides, such as metallothioneins and phytochelatins (PC), which capture the metals and prevent the damages on the cellular structures. To protect human skin cells from heavy metal toxicity, we developed a new cosmetic active ingredient from Lycopersicon esculentum (tomato) cultured stem cells. This product, besides its high content of antioxidant compounds, contained PC, effective in the protection of skin cells towards heavy metal toxicity. We have demonstrated that this new product preserves nuclear DNA integrity from heavy metal damages, by inducing genes responsible for DNA repair and protection, and neutralizes the effect of heavy metals on collagen degradation, by inhibiting collagenase expression and inducing the synthesis of new collagen. PMID:21609336

  5. Shell Extracts from the Marine Bivalve Pecten maximus Regulate the Synthesis of Extracellular Matrix in Primary Cultured Human Skin Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Latire, Thomas; Legendre, Florence; Bigot, Nicolas; Carduner, Ludovic; Kellouche, Sabrina; Bouyoucef, Mouloud; Carreiras, Franck; Marin, Frédéric; Lebel, Jean-Marc; Galéra, Philippe; Serpentini, Antoine

    2014-01-01

    Mollusc shells are composed of more than 95% calcium carbonate and less than 5% of an organic matrix consisting mostly of proteins, glycoproteins and polysaccharides. Previous studies have elucidated the biological activities of the shell matrices from bivalve molluscs on skin, especially on the expression of the extracellular matrix components of fibroblasts. In this work, we have investigated the potential biological activities of shell matrix components extracted from the shell of the scallop Pecten maximus on human fibroblasts in primary culture. Firstly, we demonstrated that shell matrix components had different effects on general cellular activities. Secondly, we have shown that the shell matrix components stimulate the synthesis of type I and III collagens, as well as that of sulphated GAGs. The increased expression of type I collagen is likely mediated by the recruitment of transactivating factors (Sp1, Sp3 and human c-Krox) in the −112/−61 bp COL1A1 promoter region. Finally, contrarily to what was obtained in previous works, we demonstrated that the scallop shell extracts have only a small effect on cell migration during in vitro wound tests and have no effect on cell proliferation. Thus, our research emphasizes the potential use of shell matrix of Pecten maximus for dermo-cosmetic applications. PMID:24949635

  6. Shell extracts from the marine bivalve Pecten maximus regulate the synthesis of extracellular matrix in primary cultured human skin fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Latire, Thomas; Legendre, Florence; Bigot, Nicolas; Carduner, Ludovic; Kellouche, Sabrina; Bouyoucef, Mouloud; Carreiras, Franck; Marin, Frédéric; Lebel, Jean-Marc; Galéra, Philippe; Serpentini, Antoine

    2014-01-01

    Mollusc shells are composed of more than 95% calcium carbonate and less than 5% of an organic matrix consisting mostly of proteins, glycoproteins and polysaccharides. Previous studies have elucidated the biological activities of the shell matrices from bivalve molluscs on skin, especially on the expression of the extracellular matrix components of fibroblasts. In this work, we have investigated the potential biological activities of shell matrix components extracted from the shell of the scallop Pecten maximus on human fibroblasts in primary culture. Firstly, we demonstrated that shell matrix components had different effects on general cellular activities. Secondly, we have shown that the shell matrix components stimulate the synthesis of type I and III collagens, as well as that of sulphated GAGs. The increased expression of type I collagen is likely mediated by the recruitment of transactivating factors (Sp1, Sp3 and human c-Krox) in the -112/-61 bp COL1A1 promoter region. Finally, contrarily to what was obtained in previous works, we demonstrated that the scallop shell extracts have only a small effect on cell migration during in vitro wound tests and have no effect on cell proliferation. Thus, our research emphasizes the potential use of shell matrix of Pecten maximus for dermo-cosmetic applications. PMID:24949635

  7. Low doses of nanodiamonds and silica nanoparticles have beneficial hormetic effects in normal human skin fibroblasts in culture.

    PubMed

    Mytych, Jennifer; Wnuk, Maciej; Rattan, Suresh I S

    2016-04-01

    Nanodiamonds (ND) and silica nanoparticles (SiO2-NP) have been much investigated for their toxicity at high doses, little is known about their biological activity at low concentrations. Here we report the biphasic dose response of ND and SiO2-NP in modulating normal human facial skin fibroblasts (FSF1) in culture. ND and SiO2-NP at low concentration (up to 0.5 μg/ml) had beneficial effects on FSF1 in terms of increasing their proliferation and metabolic activity. Exposure of FSF1 cells to low levels of NP enhanced their wound healing ability in vitro and slowed down aging during serial passaging as measured by maintenance of youthful morphology, reduction in the rate of loss of telomeres, and the over all proliferative characteristics. Furthermore, NP treatment induced the activation of Nrf2- and FOXO3A-mediated cellular stress responses, including an increased expression of heme oxygenease (HO-1), sirtuin (SIRT1), and DNA methyltransferase II (DNMT2). These results imply that ND and SiO2-NP at low doses are potential hormetins, which exert mild stress-induced beneficial hormetic effects through improved survival, longevity, maintenance, repair and function of human cells. PMID:26814705

  8. Wnt-Dependent Control of Cell Polarity in Cultured Cells.

    PubMed

    Runkle, Kristin B; Witze, Eric S

    2016-01-01

    The secreted ligand Wnt5a regulates cell polarity and polarized cell movement during development by signaling through the poorly defined noncanonical Wnt pathway. Cell polarity regulates most aspects of cell behavior including the organization of apical/basolateral membrane domains of epithelial cells, polarized cell divisions along a directional plane, and front rear polarity during cell migration. These characteristics of cell polarity allow coordinated cell movements required for tissue formation and organogenesis during embryonic development. Genetic model organisms have been used to identify multiple signaling pathways including Wnt5a that are required to establish cell polarity and regulate polarized cell behavior. However, the downstream signaling events that regulate these complex cellular processes are still poorly understood. The methods below describe assays to study Wnt5a-induced cell polarity in cultured cells, which may facilitate our understanding of these complex signaling pathways. PMID:27590152

  9. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells in skin lesions of classic Kaposi's sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Karouni, Mirna; Kurban, Mazen; Abbas, Ossama

    2016-09-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) are the most potent producers of type I interferons (IFNs), which allows them to provide anti-viral resistance and to link the innate and adaptive immunity by controlling the function of myeloid DCs, lymphocytes, and natural killer cells. pDCs are involved in the pathogenesis of several infectious [especially viral, such as Molluscum contagiosum (MC)], inflammatory/autoimmune, and neoplastic entities. Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) is a multifocal, systemic lympho-angioproliferative tumor associated with Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) infection. Microscopy typically exhibits a chronic inflammatory lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate in addition to the vascular changes and spindle cell proliferation. Despite the extensive research done on the immune evasion strategies employed by KSHV, pDCs role in relation to KS has only rarely been investigated. Given this, we intend to investigate pDC occurrence and activity in the skin lesions of KS. Immunohistochemical staining for BDCA-2 (specific pDC marker) and MxA (surrogate marker for local type I IFN production) was performed on classic KS (n = 20) with the control group comprising inflamed MC (n = 20). As expected, BDCA-2+ pDCs were present in abundance with diffuse and intense MxA expression (indicative of local type I IFN production) in all inflamed MC cases (20 of 20, 100 %). Though present in all the KS cases, pDCs were significantly less abundant in KS than in inflamed MC cases, and MxA expression was patchy/weak in most KS cases. In summary, pDCs are part of the inflammatory host response in KS; however, they were generally low in number with decreased type I IFN production which is probably related to KSHV's ability to evade the immune system through the production of different viral proteins capable of suppressing IFN production as well as pDC function. PMID:27372661

  10. Hair Follicle Morphogenesis in the Treatment of Mouse Full-Thickness Skin Defects Using Composite Human Acellular Amniotic Membrane and Adipose Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Minjuan, Wu; Jun, Xiong; Shiyun, Shao; Sha, Xu; Haitao, Ni

    2016-01-01

    Early repair of skin injury and maximal restoration of the function and appearance have become important targets of clinical treatment. In the present study, we observed the healing process of skin defects in nude mice and structural characteristics of the new skin after transplantation of isolated and cultured adipose derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADMSCs) onto the human acellular amniotic membrane (AAM). The result showed that ADMSCs were closely attached to the surface of AAM and grew well 24 h after seeding. Comparison of the wound healing rate at days 7, 14, and 28 after transplantation showed that ADMSCs seeded on AAM facilitated the healing of full-thickness skin wounds more effectively as compared with either hAM or AAM alone, indicating that ADMSCs participated in skin regeneration. More importantly, we noticed a phenomenon of hair follicle development during the process of skin repair. Composite ADMSCs and AAM not only promoted the healing of the mouse full-thickness defects but also facilitated generation of the appendages of the affected skin, thus promoting restoration of the skin function. Our results provide a new possible therapy idea for the treatment of skin wounds with respect to both anatomical regeneration and functional restoration. PMID:27597871

  11. Hair Follicle Morphogenesis in the Treatment of Mouse Full-Thickness Skin Defects Using Composite Human Acellular Amniotic Membrane and Adipose Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Minjuan, Wu; Jun, Xiong; Shiyun, Shao; Sha, Xu; Haitao, Ni; Yue, Wang; Kaihong, Ji

    2016-01-01

    Early repair of skin injury and maximal restoration of the function and appearance have become important targets of clinical treatment. In the present study, we observed the healing process of skin defects in nude mice and structural characteristics of the new skin after transplantation of isolated and cultured adipose derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADMSCs) onto the human acellular amniotic membrane (AAM). The result showed that ADMSCs were closely attached to the surface of AAM and grew well 24 h after seeding. Comparison of the wound healing rate at days 7, 14, and 28 after transplantation showed that ADMSCs seeded on AAM facilitated the healing of full-thickness skin wounds more effectively as compared with either hAM or AAM alone, indicating that ADMSCs participated in skin regeneration. More importantly, we noticed a phenomenon of hair follicle development during the process of skin repair. Composite ADMSCs and AAM not only promoted the healing of the mouse full-thickness defects but also facilitated generation of the appendages of the affected skin, thus promoting restoration of the skin function. Our results provide a new possible therapy idea for the treatment of skin wounds with respect to both anatomical regeneration and functional restoration. PMID:27597871

  12. Co-localization of cell death with antigen deposition in skin enhances vaccine immunogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Depelsenaire, Alexandra C.I.; Meliga, Stefano C.; McNeilly, Celia L.; Pearson, Frances E.; Coffey, Jacob W.; Haigh, Oscar L.; Flaim, Christopher J.; Frazer, Ian H.; Kendall, Mark A.F.

    2014-01-01

    Vaccines delivered to the skin by microneedles – with and without adjuvants – have increased immunogenicity with lower doses than standard vaccine delivery techniques such as intramuscular (i.m.) or intradermal (i.d.) injection. However, the mechanisms behind this skin-mediated ‘adjuvant’ effect are not clear. Here, we show that the dynamic application of a microprojection array (the Nanopatch) to skin generates localized transient stresses invoking cell death around each projection. Nanopatch application caused significantly higher levels (~65-fold) of cell death in murine ear skin than i.d. injection using a hypodermic needle. Measured skin cell death is associated with modeled stresses ~1–10 MPa. Nanopatch-immunized groups also yielded consistently higher anti-IgG endpoint titers (up to 50-fold higher) than i.d. groups after delivery of a split virion influenza vaccine. Importantly, co-localization of cell death with nearby live skin cells and delivered antigen was necessary for immunogenicity enhancement. These results suggest a correlation between cell death caused by the Nanopatch with increased immunogenicity. We propose that the localized cell death serves as a ‘physical immune enhancer’ for the adjacent viable skin cells, which also receive antigen from the projections. This natural immune enhancer effect has the potential to mitigate or replace chemical-based adjuvants in vaccines. PMID:24714201

  13. Common clonal origin of central and resident memory T cells following skin immunization

    PubMed Central

    Gaide, Olivier; Emerson, Ryan O.; Jiang, Xiaodong; Gulati, Nicholas; Nizza, Suzanne; Desmarais, Cindy; Robins, Harlan; Krueger, James G.; Clark, Rachael A.; Kupper, Thomas S.

    2015-01-01

    Central memory T (TCM) cells in lymph nodes (LN) and resident memory T (TRM) cells in peripheral tissues play distinct roles in protective immunity1-5. Both are generated after primary infections, but the clonal origin of TRM and TCM cells is unclear. To address this question, mice were immunized through the skin with either a protein antigen, a chemical hapten, or a non-replicating poxvirus. We then analyzed antigen activated T cells from different tissues using high-throughput sequencing (HTS) of the gene (Tcrbv) encoding T cell receptor gene β chain CDR3 region to simultaneously track thousands of unique T cells6. For every abundant TRM clone generated in the skin, an abundant TCM clone bearing the identical TCR was present in lymph nodes (LN). Thus antigen reactive skin TRM and LN TCM clones were derived from a common naive T cell precursor after skin immunization, generating overlapping TCR repertoires. Although they bore the same TCR, TRM mediated rapid contact hypersensitivity (CHS)7 responses in mice, whereas TCM mediated delayed and attenuated responses. Studies in human subjects confirmed the generation of skin TRM in allergic contact dermatitis. Thus, immunization through skin simultaneously generates skin TRM and LN TCM in similar numbers from the same naïve T cells. PMID:25962122

  14. Persistence of skin-resident memory T cells within an epidermal niche.

    PubMed

    Zaid, Ali; Mackay, Laura K; Rahimpour, Azad; Braun, Asolina; Veldhoen, Marc; Carbone, Francis R; Manton, Jonathan H; Heath, William R; Mueller, Scott N

    2014-04-01

    Barrier tissues such as the skin contain various populations of immune cells that contribute to protection from infections. These include recently identified tissue-resident memory T cells (TRM). In the skin, these memory CD8(+) T cells reside in the epidermis after being recruited to this site by infection or inflammation. In this study, we demonstrate prolonged persistence of epidermal TRM preferentially at the site of prior infection despite sustained migration. Computational simulation of TRM migration within the skin over long periods revealed that the slow rate of random migration effectively constrains these memory cells within the region of skin in which they form. Notably, formation of TRM involved a concomitant local reduction in dendritic epidermal γδ T-cell numbers in the epidermis, indicating that these populations persist in mutual exclusion and may compete for local survival signals. Accordingly, we show that expression of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor, a transcription factor important for dendritic epidermal γδ T-cell maintenance in skin, also contributes to the persistence of skin TRM. Together, these data suggest that skin tissue-resident memory T cells persist within a tightly regulated epidermal T-cell niche. PMID:24706879

  15. Stem Cells in Skin Regeneration, Wound Healing, and Their Clinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Ojeh, Nkemcho; Pastar, Irena; Tomic-Canic, Marjana; Stojadinovic, Olivera

    2015-01-01

    The skin is the largest organ of the body and has an array of functions. Skin compartments, epidermis, and hair follicles house stem cells that are indispensable for skin homeostasis and regeneration. These stem cells also contribute to wound repair, resulting in restoration of tissue integrity and function of damaged tissue. Unsuccessful wound healing processes often lead to non-healing wounds. Chronic wounds are caused by depletion of stem cells and a variety of other cellular and molecular mechanisms, many of which are still poorly understood. Current chronic wound therapies are limited, so the search to develop better therapeutic strategies is ongoing. Adult stem cells are gaining recognition as potential candidates for numerous skin pathologies. In this review, we will discuss epidermal and other stem cells present in the skin, and highlight some of the therapeutic applications of epidermal stem cells and other adult stem cells as tools for cell/scaffold-based therapies for non-healing wounds and other skin disorders. We will also discuss emerging concepts and offer some perspectives on how skin tissue-engineered products can be optimized to provide efficacious therapy in cutaneous repair and regeneration. PMID:26512657

  16. Persistence of skin-resident memory T cells within an epidermal niche

    PubMed Central

    Zaid, Ali; Mackay, Laura K.; Rahimpour, Azad; Braun, Asolina; Veldhoen, Marc; Carbone, Francis R.; Manton, Jonathan H.; Heath, William R.; Mueller, Scott N.

    2014-01-01

    Barrier tissues such as the skin contain various populations of immune cells that contribute to protection from infections. These include recently identified tissue-resident memory T cells (TRM). In the skin, these memory CD8+ T cells reside in the epidermis after being recruited to this site by infection or inflammation. In this study, we demonstrate prolonged persistence of epidermal TRM preferentially at the site of prior infection despite sustained migration. Computational simulation of TRM migration within the skin over long periods revealed that the slow rate of random migration effectively constrains these memory cells within the region of skin in which they form. Notably, formation of TRM involved a concomitant local reduction in dendritic epidermal γδ T-cell numbers in the epidermis, indicating that these populations persist in mutual exclusion and may compete for local survival signals. Accordingly, we show that expression of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor, a transcription factor important for dendritic epidermal γδ T-cell maintenance in skin, also contributes to the persistence of skin TRM. Together, these data suggest that skin tissue-resident memory T cells persist within a tightly regulated epidermal T-cell niche. PMID:24706879

  17. Stem Cells in Skin Regeneration, Wound Healing, and Their Clinical Applications.

    PubMed

    Ojeh, Nkemcho; Pastar, Irena; Tomic-Canic, Marjana; Stojadinovic, Olivera

    2015-01-01

    The skin is the largest organ of the body and has an array of functions. Skin compartments, epidermis, and hair follicles house stem cells that are indispensable for skin homeostasis and regeneration. These stem cells also contribute to wound repair, resulting in restoration of tissue integrity and function of damaged tissue. Unsuccessful wound healing processes often lead to non-healing wounds. Chronic wounds are caused by depletion of stem cells and a variety of other cellular and molecular mechanisms, many of which are still poorly understood. Current chronic wound therapies are limited, so the search to develop better therapeutic strategies is ongoing. Adult stem cells are gaining recognition as potential candidates for numerous skin pathologies. In this review, we will discuss epidermal and other stem cells present in the skin, and highlight some of the therapeutic applications of epidermal stem cells and other adult stem cells as tools for cell/scaffold-based therapies for non-healing wounds and other skin disorders. We will also discuss emerging concepts and offer some perspectives on how skin tissue-engineered products can be optimized to provide efficacious therapy in cutaneous repair and regeneration. PMID:26512657

  18. Cell Cycle Progression of Human Cells Cultured in Rotating Bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parks, Kelsey

    2009-01-01

    Space flight has been shown to alter the astronauts immune systems. Because immune performance is complex and reflects the influence of multiple organ systems within the host, scientists sought to understand the potential impact of microgravity alone on the cellular mechanisms critical to immunity. Lymphocytes and their differentiated immature form, lymphoblasts, play an important and integral role in the body's defense system. T cells, one of the three major types of lymphocytes, play a central role in cell-mediated immunity. They can be distinguished from other lymphocyte types, such as B cells and natural killer cells by the presence of a special receptor on their cell surface called T cell receptors. Reported studies have shown that spaceflight can affect the expression of cell surface markers. Cell surface markers play an important role in the ability of cells to interact and to pass signals between different cells of the same phenotype and cells of different phenotypes. Recent evidence suggests that cell-cycle regulators are essential for T-cell function. To trigger an effective immune response, lymphocytes must proliferate. The objective of this project is to investigate the changes in growth of human cells cultured in rotating bioreactors and to measure the growth rate and the cell cycle distribution for different human cell types. Human lymphocytes and lymphoblasts will be cultured in a bioreactor to simulate aspects of microgravity. The bioreactor is a cylindrical culture vessel that incorporates the aspects of clinostatic rotation of a solid fluid body around a horizontal axis at a constant speed, and compensates gravity by rotation and places cells within the fluid body into a sustained free-fall. Cell cycle progression and cell proliferation of the lymphocytes will be measured for a number of days. In addition, RNA from the cells will be isolated for expression of genes related in cell cycle regulations.

  19. Stem cell properties in cell cultures from different stage of melanoma progression.

    PubMed

    Magnoni, Cristina; Giudice, Stefania; Pellacani, Giovanni; Bertazzoni, Giorgia; Longo, Caterina; Veratti, Eugenia; Morini, Daria; Benassi, Luisa; Vaschieri, Cristina; Azzoni, Paola; De Pol, Anto; Seidenari, Stefania; Tomasi, Aldo; Pollio, Annamaria; Ponti, Giovanni

    2014-03-01

    Cutaneous melanoma is an extremely heterogenous human cancer. The most aggressive melanoma may contain deregulated cells with undifferentiated/stem cell-like phenotype. A critical mechanism by which melanoma cells enhance their invasive capacity is the dissolution of the intercellular adhesion and the acquisition of mesenchymal features as a part of an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. The aim of this study was to clarify the role of a stem cell-like population in human melanomas by means of melanocytic cell culture analysis obtained from distinct histotypes of primary and metastatic malignant melanoma. Patients with advanced melanoma >2 cm in diameter and/or >300 mm surface were enrolled. The melanoma cells were isolated from skin biopsies of lentigo maligna melanoma, superficial spreading melanoma, nodular melanoma, and metastatic melanoma. The colony forming unit assay and alkaline phosphatase stain were evaluated. Cells were subsequently cultured and maintained in different media to evaluate their ability to differentiate into osteogenic and adipogenic lineages. Immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry analysis were performed to evaluate antigenic markers CD90, CD73, CD105, CD146, CD20, CD166, and Nestin. This study confirms that melanoma can include heterogenous cell populations with the ability both to self-renew and to a give rise to differentiated progeny. Melanoma cells displayed intratumoral heterogeneity and dynamic antigen phenotypes. Histologically, transitions from normal skin to melanoma were associated with a gradual increase in the expression of CD146, CD20, CD133, Nestin, and CD73. These molecular profiles could be further analyzed and, in the future, used for the development of novel biomolecular targeted-therapy approaches. PMID:23702651

  20. Human Wharton's Jelly Mesenchymal Stem Cells plasticity augments scar-free skin wound healing with hair growth.

    PubMed

    Sabapathy, Vikram; Sundaram, Balasubramanian; V M, Sreelakshmi; Mankuzhy, Pratheesh; Kumar, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are a promising candidate for cell-based transplantation and regenerative medicine therapies. Thus in the present study Wharton's Jelly Mesenchymal Stem Cells (WJ-MSCs) have been derived from extra embryonic umbilical cord matrix following removal of both arteries and vein. Also, to overcome the clinical limitations posed by fetal bovine serum (FBS) supplementation because of xenogeneic origin of FBS, usual FBS cell culture supplement has been replaced with human platelet lysate (HPL). Apart from general characteristic features of bone marrow-derived MSCs, wharton jelly-derived MSCs have the ability to maintain phenotypic attributes, cell growth kinetics, cell cycle pattern, in vitro multilineage differentiation plasticity, apoptotic pattern, normal karyotype-like intrinsic mesenchymal stem cell properties in long-term in vitro cultures. Moreover, the WJ-MSCs exhibited the in vitro multilineage differentiation capacity by giving rise to differentiated cells of not only mesodermal lineage but also to the cells of ectodermal and endodermal lineage. Also, WJ-MSC did not present any aberrant cell state upon in vivo transplantation in SCID mice and in vitro soft agar assays. The immunomodulatory potential assessed by gene expression levels of immunomodulatory factors upon exposure to inflammatory cytokines in the fetal WJ-MSCs was relatively higher compared to adult bone marrow-derived MSCs. WJ-MSCs seeded on decellularized amniotic membrane scaffold transplantation on the skin injury of SCID mice model demonstrates that combination of WJ-MSCs and decellularized amniotic membrane scaffold exhibited significantly better wound-healing capabilities, having reduced scar formation with hair growth and improved biomechanical properties of regenerated skin compared to WJ-MSCs alone. Further, our experimental data indicate that indocyanin green (ICG) at optimal concentration can be resourcefully used for labeling of stem cells and in vivo

  1. Redox Imbalance in T Cell-Mediated Skin Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Pastore, Saveria; Korkina, Liudmila

    2010-01-01

    The skin is permanently exposed to physical, chemical, and biological aggression by the environment. In addition, acute and chronic inflammatory events taking place in the skin are accompanied by abnormal release of pro-oxidative mediators. In this paper, we will briefly overview the homeostatic systems active in the skin to maintain the redox balance and also to counteract abnormal oxidative stress. We will concentrate on the evidence that a local and/or systemic redox dysregulation accompanies the chronic inflammatory disorder events associated to psoriasis, contact dermatitis, and atopic dermatitis. We will also discuss the fact that several well-established treatments for the therapy of chronic inflammatory skin disorders are based on the application of strong physical or chemical oxidants onto the skin, indicating that, in selected conditions, a further increase of the oxidative imbalance may lead to a beneficial outcome. PMID:20847812

  2. 9 CFR 101.6 - Cell cultures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Cell cultures. 101.6 Section 101.6 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES... more subcultures from the tissue of origin. (c) Subculture. Each flask to flask transfer or...

  3. 9 CFR 101.6 - Cell cultures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cell cultures. 101.6 Section 101.6 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES... more subcultures from the tissue of origin. (c) Subculture. Each flask to flask transfer or...

  4. USE OF CELL CULTURE FOR EVALUATING NEUROTOXICITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter familiarizes the reader with the need to develop, validate and utilize in vitro models to test chemicals for neurotoxic potential. he major advantages and disadvantages of using cell and tissue culture, factors which have stimulated and hampered the promulgation of i...

  5. ANTHOCYANIN (ACN) STABILITY IN CELL CULTURE MEDIA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Anthocyanins (ACNs) are potential oxygen radical scavengers that have coronary vasoactive and vasoprotective properties. Cell or tissue culture systems have been used to examine the bioactivity and mechanisms of action of ACNs on the vascular system. However, due to their unique chemical structure, ...

  6. Skin Pigmentation Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Pigmentation means coloring. Skin pigmentation disorders affect the color of your skin. Your skin gets its color from a pigment called melanin. Special cells in the skin make melanin. When these cells become damaged or ...

  7. Cell culture models using rat primary alveolar type I cells

    PubMed Central

    Downs, Charles A.; Montgomery, David W.; Merkle, Carrie J.

    2011-01-01

    There is a lack of cell culture models using primary alveolar type I (AT I) cells. The purpose of this study was to develop cell culture models using rat AT I cells and microvascular endothelial cells from the lung (MVECL). Two types of model systems were developed: single and co-culture systems; additionally a 3-dimensional model system was developed. Pure AT I cell (96.3 ±2.7%) and MVECL (97.9 ±1.1 %) preparations were used. AT I cell morphology, mitochondrial number and distribution, actin filament arrangement and number of apoptotic cells at confluence, and telomere attrition were characterized. AT I cells maintained their morphometric characteristics through at least population doubling (PD) 35, while demonstrating telomere attrition through at least PD 100. Furthermore, AT I cells maintained the expression of their specific markers, T1α and AQ-5, through PD 42. For the co-cultures, AT I cells were grown on the top and MVECL were grown on the bottom of fibronectin coated 24 well Transwell Fluroblok™ filter inserts. Neither cell type transmigrated the 1 micron pores. Additionally AT I cells were grown in a thick layer of Matrigel® to create a 3-dimensional model in which primary AT I cells form ring-like structures that resemble an alveolus. The development of these model systems offers the opportunities to investigate AT I cell cells and their interactions with MVECL in response to pharmacological interventions and in the processes of disease, repair and regeneration. PMID:21624488

  8. Diagnosis and Management of Hereditary Basal Cell Skin Cancer.

    PubMed

    Shanley, Susan; McCormack, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common cancer in Caucasians worldwide and its incidence is rising. It is generally considered a sporadic tumour, most likely to affect fair-skinned individuals exposed to ultraviolet (UV) radiation. This chapter focusses on the approach to recognising the relatively few individuals in whom a high-risk hereditary susceptibility may be present. Gorlin syndrome is the main consideration and the gene most commonly mutated is PTCH1, a key regulator of the Hedgehog developmental pathway. Recently, loss of function of another gene in the same pathway, SUFU, has been found to explain a subset of families. Understanding the pathogenesis of familial BCCs has advanced the understanding of the biology of sporadic tumours and led to targeted therapy trials. The management of familial BCCs remains a challenge due to significant unmet needs for non-surgical treatments and a high burden of disease for the individual. Together with the prospect of advances in gene discovery and translation, these challenges highlight the need for ongoing review of at-risk and affected individuals by a multidisciplinary team. PMID:27075355

  9. Effects of topical corticosteroid therapy on Langerhans cell antigen presenting function in human skin.

    PubMed

    Ashworth, J; Booker, J; Breathnach, S M

    1988-04-01

    We have investigated the mechanisms by which topical corticosteroids modulate cutaneous immune reactions in man. Volunteers applied clobetasone butyrate 0.05% (Eumovate; EV), betamethasone valerate 0.1% (Betnovate; BV), clobetasol propionate 0.05% (Dermovate; DV), and control vehicles twice daily to forearm skin for 7 days. Steroid therapy significantly decreased the number of HLA-DR/T6 (CD1a) positive Langerhans cells (LCs) per mm2 in suction blister-derived epidermal sheets, expressed as a mean percentage of controls, as follows: EV 69.2%; BV 67.3%; DV 37.8%. LC antigen presenting capacity was determined in the allogeneic and autologous epidermal cell-lymphocyte reactions. The LC-dependent allostimulatory capacity of epidermal cells, expressed as a mean percentage of controls, was also significantly reduced by steroid therapy: EV 45.1%; BV 41.9%; DV 23.4%. Following therapy with clobetasol propionate 0.05%, the capacity of epidermal cells to present tetanus toxoid to, and to augment concanavalin A mediated lymphocyte stimulation of, autologous lymphocytes was reduced to 33.6% and 19.7% respectively of controls. Depression of epidermal cell allostimulatory capacity was not the result of a steroid-induced decrease in the production of epidermal cell-derived thymocyte activating factor (ETAF)/interleukin 1 by keratinocytes, since it could not be reversed by addition of exogenous interleukin 1. Indomethacin, added to block any potential prostaglandin synthesis during the culture period, did not restore the allostimulatory capacity of epidermal cells from steroid-treated sites. Addition of epidermal cells from DV-treated sites depressed the capacity of control epidermal cells to stimulate lymphocytes in the allogeneic epidermal-lymphocyte reaction. Our results demonstrate that the anti-inflammatory action of topical corticosteroids in man is associated not only with a reduction in the number of HLA-DR/T6 positive LCs, but also with a marked decrease in Langerhans cell

  10. p53 modulates the AMPK inhibitor compound C induced apoptosis in human skin cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Shi-Wei; Wu, Chun-Ying; Wang, Yen-Ting; Kao, Jun-Kai; Lin, Chi-Chen; Chang, Chia-Che; Mu, Szu-Wei; Chen, Yu-Yu; Chiu, Husan-Wen; Chang, Chuan-Hsun; Liang, Shu-Mei; Chen, Yi-Ju; Huang, Jau-Ling; Shieh, Jeng-Jer

    2013-02-15

    Compound C, a well-known inhibitor of the intracellular energy sensor AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), has been reported to cause apoptotic cell death in myeloma, breast cancer cells and glioma cells. In this study, we have demonstrated that compound C not only induced autophagy in all tested skin cancer cell lines but also caused more apoptosis in p53 wildtype skin cancer cells than in p53-mutant skin cancer cells. Compound C can induce upregulation, phosphorylation and nuclear translocalization of the p53 protein and upregulate expression of p53 target genes in wildtype p53-expressing skin basal cell carcinoma (BCC) cells. The changes of p53 status were dependent on DNA damage which was caused by compound C induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and associated with activated ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein. Using the wildtype p53-expressing BCC cells versus stable p53-knockdown BCC sublines, we present evidence that p53-knockdown cancer cells were much less sensitive to compound C treatment with significant G2/M cell cycle arrest and attenuated the compound C-induced apoptosis but not autophagy. The compound C induced G2/M arrest in p53-knockdown BCC cells was associated with the sustained inactive Tyr15 phosphor-Cdc2 expression. Overall, our results established that compound C-induced apoptosis in skin cancer cells was dependent on the cell's p53 status. - Highlights: ► Compound C caused more apoptosis in p53 wildtype than p53-mutant skin cancer cells. ► Compound C can upregulate p53 expression and induce p53 activation. ► Compound C induced p53 effects were dependent on ROS induced DNA damage pathway. ► p53-knockdown attenuated compound C-induced apoptosis but not autophagy. ► Compound C-induced apoptosis in skin cancer cells was dependent on p53 status.

  11. Ovine Hair Follicle Stem Cells Derived from Single Vibrissae Reconstitute Haired Skin

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Huishan; Zhang, Shoubing; Zhao, Huashan; Qiao, Jingqiao; Liu, Shuang; Deng, Zhili; Lei, Xiaohua; Ning, Lina; Cao, Yujing; Zhao, Yong; Duan, Enkui

    2015-01-01

    Hair follicle stem cells (HFSCs) possess fascinating self-renewal capacity and multipotency, which play important roles in mammalian hair growth and skin wound repair. Although HFSCs from other mammalian species have been obtained, the characteristics of ovine HFSCs, as well as the methods to isolate them have not been well addressed. Here, we report an efficient strategy to obtain multipotent ovine HFSCs. Through microdissection and organ culture, we obtained keratinocytes that grew from the bulge area of vibrissa hair follicles, and even abundant keratinocytes were harvested from a single hair follicle. These bulge-derived keratinocytes are highly positive for Krt15, Krt14, Tp63, Krt19 and Itga6; in addition to their strong proliferation abilities in vitro, these keratinocytes formed new epidermis, hair follicles and sebaceous glands in skin reconstitution experiments, showing that these are HFSCs from the bulge outer root sheath. Taken together, we developed an efficient in vitro system to enrich ovine HFSCs, providing enough HFSCs for the investigations about the ovine hair cycle, aiming to promote wool production in the future. PMID:26247934

  12. Alleviation of skin inflammation after Lin− cell transplantation correlates with their differentiation into myeloid-derived suppressor cells

    PubMed Central

    Jeong Ryu, Su; Ju, Ji-Min; Kim, Woojin; Bum Kim, Min; Hee Oh, Kuen; Sup Lee, Dong; Lee, Hakmo; Eun Oh, Ju; Soo Park, Kyong; Young Choi, Eun

    2015-01-01

    To understand the cellular mechanism underlying the therapeutic effects exerted by hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in the repair of tissue damage, we investigated the in vivo dynamics of bone marrow (BM) lineage-negative (Lin−) cells transplanted into mice with hyper sensitivity dermatitis. Longitudinal in vivo imaging and flow cytometry analyses revealed that Lin− cells home directly to inflamed skin within 6 h, where they undergo extensive expansion with the peak on day 14 post-transplantation, and preferential differentiation into CD11b+Ly6GintLy6C+ cells by day 7. Cells with phenotypic profiles of neutrophils, macrophages, and DCs appeared in inflamed skin on day 14. Progenies of transplanted Lin− cells showed similar kinetics of expansion and myeloid differentiation in BM. However, differentiation into CD11b+Ly6GintLy6C+ cells in the inflamed skin on day 7 was more skewed toward CD115+ cells (≥60%) with immune suppressive function and higher expression levels of iNOS, arginase, and IL-10, compared with those in the BM. Transplantation of Lin− cells reduced the levels of Cd3 transcript and CD4+/CD8+ cells in inflamed skin. These results demonstrate differentiation of transplanted Lin− cells into myeloid-derived suppressor cells in inflamed skin to be the basis of the alleviation of skin inflammation after Lin− cell transplantation. PMID:26441031

  13. Cell Culture Assay for Human Noroviruses [response

    SciTech Connect

    Straub, Tim M.; Honer Zu Bentrup, Kerstin; Orosz Coghlan, Patricia; Dohnalkova, Alice; Mayer, Brooke K.; Bartholomew, Rachel A.; Valdez, Catherine O.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.; Gerba, Charles P.; Abbaszadegan, Morteza A.; Nickerson, Cheryl A.

    2007-07-01

    We appreciate the comments provided by Leung et al., in response to our recently published article “In Vitro Cell Culture Infectivity Assay for Human Noroviruses” by Straub et al. (1). The specific aim of our project was to develop an in vitro cell culture infectivity assay for human noroviruses (hNoV) to enhance risk assessments when they are detected in water supplies. Reverse transcription (RT) qualitative or quantitative PCR are the primary assays for waterborne NoV monitoring. However, these assays cannot distinguish between infectious vs. non-infectious virions. When hNoV is detected in water supplies, information provided by our infectivity assay will significantly improve risk assessment models and protect human health, regardless of whether we are propagating NoV. Indeed, in vitro cell culture infectivity assays for the waterborne pathogen Cryptosporidium parvum that supplement approved fluorescent microscopy assays, do not result in amplification of the environmentally resistant hard-walled oocysts (2). However, identification of life cycle stages in cell culture provides evidence of infectious oocysts in a water supply. Nonetheless, Leung et al.’s assertion regarding the suitability of our method for the in vitro propagation of high titers of NoV is valid for the medical research community. In this case, well-characterized challenge pools of virus would be useful for developing and testing diagnostics, therapeutics, and vaccines. As further validation of our published findings, we have now optimized RT quantitative PCR to assess the level of viral production in cell culture, where we are indeed finding significant increases in viral titer. The magnitude and time course of these increases is dependent on both virus strain and multiplicity of infection. We are currently preparing a manuscript that will discuss these findings in greater detail, and the implications this may have for creating viral challenge pools

  14. Cell culture models using rat primary alveolar type I cells.

    PubMed

    Downs, Charles A; Montgomery, David W; Merkle, Carrie J

    2011-10-01

    There is a lack of cell culture models using primary alveolar type I (AT I) cells. The purpose of this study was to develop cell culture models using rat AT I cells and microvascular endothelial cells from the lung (MVECL). Two types of model systems were developed: single and co-culture systems; additionally a 3-dimensional model system was developed. Pure AT I cell (96.3 ± 2.7%) and MVECL (97.9 ± 1.1%) preparations were used. AT I cell morphology, mitochondrial number and distribution, actin filament arrangement and number of apoptotic cells at confluence, and telomere attrition were characterized. AT I cells maintained their morphometric characteristics through at least population doubling (PD) 35, while demonstrating telomere attrition through at least PD 100. Furthermore, AT I cells maintained the expression of their specific markers, T1α and AQ-5, through PD 42. For the co-cultures, AT I cells were grown on the top and MVECL were grown on the bottom of fibronectin-coated 24-well Transwell Fluroblok™ filter inserts. Neither cell type transmigrated the 1 μm pores. Additionally, AT I cells were grown in a thick layer of Matrigel(®) to create a 3-dimensional model in which primary AT I cells form ring-like structures that resemble an alveolus. The development of these model systems offers the opportunities to investigate AT I cells and their interactions with MVECL in response to pharmacological interventions and in the processes of disease, repair and regeneration. PMID:21624488

  15. The skin-resident and migratory immune system in steady state and memory: innate lymphocytes, dendritic cells and T cells.

    PubMed

    Heath, William R; Carbone, Francis R

    2013-10-01

    The skin is a highly complex organ interspersed with a variety of smaller organ-like structures and a plethora of cell types that together perform essential functions such as physical sensing, temperature control, barrier maintenance and immunity. In this Review, we outline many of the innate and adaptive immune cell types associated with the skin, focusing on the steady state in mice and men, and include a broad update of dendritic cell function and T cell surveillance. PMID:24048119

  16. Hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid metabolism in cultured human skin fibroblasts. Evidence for peroxisomal beta-oxidation.

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, J A; Figard, P H; Spector, A A

    1990-01-01

    To determine whether the peroxisome is responsible for hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (HETE) oxidation, 12- and 15-HETE oxidation was measured in normal and peroxisomal deficient skin fibroblasts from patients with Zellweger's (cerebrohepatorenal) syndrome. When incubated for 1 h with normal fibroblasts, reverse phase HPLC indicated that 24% of the 12-HETE radioactivity was converted to one major polar metabolite. Chemical derivatization followed by reverse phase HPLC and TLC indicated that this metabolite is 8-hydroxyhexadecatrienoic acid [16:3(8-OH)]. Similarly, 33% of the added 15-HETE was also converted to a more polar metabolite. Neither 12- nor 15-HETE were converted to any metabolites by the peroxisomal deficient (Zellweger) cells. No defect in HETE oxidation was found in other human fibroblast cell lines with diverse metabolic abnormalities. Zellweger fibroblasts accumulated increased amounts of 12-HETE, compared with normal fibroblasts. As in the normal cells, most of the 12-HETE incorporated into Zellweger fibroblasts was present in the choline and ethanolamine phosphoglycerides. Protein synthesis, lysosomal acid lipase activity, and mitochondrial butyrate oxidation were not impaired in the Zellweger fibroblasts. Since the Zellweger cells do not convert 12- and 15-HETE to oxidative metabolites, peroxisomes appear to be the cellular organelle responsible for HETE oxidation. Images PMID:2318972

  17. Immunogenicity of guinea pig cells transformed in culture by chemical carcinogens

    SciTech Connect

    Ohanian, S.H.; McCabe, R.P.; Evans, C.H.

    1981-12-01

    The immunogenicity of inbred strain 2/N guinea pig fibroblasts transformed to the malignant state in vitro by chemical carcinogens was evaluated with the use of a variety of in vivo and in vitro methods including delayed-type hypersensitivity skin and tumor transplantation tests and analysis of antibody production by immunofluorescence, complement fixation, and staphylococcal protein A binding tests. Neoplastic transformation was induced by direct treatment of cells in culture with benzo(a)pyrene, 3-methylcholanthrene, or N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) or by the host-mediated method by which fetuses were exposed to diethylnitrosamine or MNNG in vivo prior to cell culture. Rabbits and syngeneic guinea pigs were inoculated with unirradiated and X-irradiated clonally derived cells. Delayed hypersensitivity skin reactions to immunizing or other cells were equivalent in immunized or control guinea pigs, and no protection to tumor outgrowth from a challenge inoculum of immunizing cells was observed. Antibody activity induced in the sera of immunized guinea pigs was cross-reactive and removed by absorption with nontumorigenic cells. Rabbit antisera after absorption with fetal guinea pig cells were nonreactive with the specific immunizing or other culture cells. Chemical carcinogen-induced neoplastic transformation of guinea pig cells can, therefore, occur without formation of detectable, individually distinct cell surface tumor-specific neoantigens.

  18. Immunogenicity of guinea pig cells transformed in culture by chemical carcinogens

    SciTech Connect

    Ohanian, S.H.; McCabe, R.P.; Evans, C.H.

    1981-12-01

    The immunogenicity of inbred strain 2/N guinea pig fibroblasts transformed to the malignant state in vitro by chemical carcinogens was evaluated with the use of a variety of in vivo and in vitro methods including delayed-type hypersensitivity skin and tumor transplantation tests and analysis of antibody production by immunofluorescence, complement fixation, and staphylococcal protein A binding tests. Neoplastic transformation was induced by direct treatment of cells in culture with benzo(a)pyrene, 3-methylcholanthrene, or N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) or by the host-mediated method by which fetuses were exposed to diethylnitrosamine or MNNG in vivo prior to cell culture. Rabbits and syngeneic guinea pigs were inoculated with unirradiated and X-irradiated clonally derived cells. Delayed hypersensitivity skin reactions to immunizing or other cells were equivalent in immunized or control guinea pigs, and no protection to tumor outgrowth from a challenge inoculum of immunizing cells was observed. Antibody activity induced in the sera of immunized guinea pigs was cross-reactive and removed by absorption with nontumorigenic cells. Rabbit anitsera after absorption with fetal guinea pig cells were nonreactive with the specific immunizing or other cultured cells. Chemical carcinogen-induced neoplastic transformation of guinea pig cells can, therefore, occur without formation of detectable, individually distinct cell surface tumor-specific neoantigens.

  19. A Wave of Regulatory T Cells into Neonatal Skin Mediates Tolerance to Commensal Microbes.

    PubMed

    Scharschmidt, Tiffany C; Vasquez, Kimberly S; Truong, Hong-An; Gearty, Sofia V; Pauli, Mariela L; Nosbaum, Audrey; Gratz, Iris K; Otto, Michael; Moon, James J; Liese, Jan; Abbas, Abul K; Fischbach, Michael A; Rosenblum, Michael D

    2015-11-17

    The skin is a site of constant dialog between the immune system and commensal bacteria. However, the molecular mechanisms that allow us to tolerate the presence of skin commensals without eliciting destructive inflammation are unknown. Using a model system to study the antigen-specific response to S. epidermidis, we demonstrated that skin colonization during a defined period of neonatal life was required for establishing immune tolerance to commensal microbes. This crucial window was characterized by an abrupt influx of highly activated regulatory T (Treg) cells into neonatal skin. Selective inhibition of this Treg cell wave completely abrogated tolerance. Thus, the host-commensal relationship in the skin relied on a unique Treg cell population that mediated tolerance to bacterial antigens during a defined developmental window. This suggests that the cutaneous microbiome composition in neonatal life is crucial in shaping adaptive immune responses to commensals, and disrupting these interactions might have enduring health implications. PMID:26588783

  20. Wound Dressing Model of Human Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stem Cells-Alginates Complex Promotes Skin Wound Healing by Paracrine Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Huachao; Tang, Zhenrui; Long, Gang; Huang, Wen

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To probe growth characteristics of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (hUCMSCs) cultured with alginate gel scaffolds, and to explore feasibility of wound dressing model of hUCMSCs-alginates compound. Methods. hUCMSCs were isolated, cultured, and identified in vitro. Then cells were cultivated in 100 mM calcium alginate gel, and the capacity of proliferation and migration and the expression of vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGF) were investigated regularly. Wound dressing model of hUCMSCs-alginate gel mix was transplanted into Balb/c mice skin defects. Wound healing rate and immunohistochemistry were examined. Results. hUCMSCs grew well but with little migration ability in the alginate gel. Compared with control group, a significantly larger cell number and more VEGF expression were shown in the gel group after culturing for 3–6 days (P < 0.05). In addition, a faster skin wound healing rate with more neovascularization was observed in the hUCMSCs-alginate gel group than in control groups at 15th day after surgery (P < 0.05). Conclusion. hUCMSCs can proliferate well and express massive VEGF in calcium alginate gel porous scaffolds. Wound dressing model of hUCMSCs-alginate gel mix can promote wound healing through paracrine signaling. PMID:26880953

  1. Use of an adaptable cell culture kit for performing lymphocyte and monocyte cell cultures in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatton, J. P.; Lewis, M. L.; Roquefeuil, S. B.; Chaput, D.; Cazenave, J. P.; Schmitt, D. A.

    1998-01-01

    The results of experiments performed in recent years on board facilities such as the Space Shuttle/Spacelab have demonstrated that many cell systems, ranging from simple bacteria to mammalian cells, are sensitive to the microgravity environment, suggesting gravity affects fundamental cellular processes. However, performing well-controlled experiments aboard spacecraft offers unique challenges to the cell biologist. Although systems such as the European 'Biorack' provide generic experiment facilities including an incubator, on-board 1-g reference centrifuge, and contained area for manipulations, the experimenter must still establish a system for performing cell culture experiments that is compatible with the constraints of spaceflight. Two different cell culture kits developed by the French Space Agency, CNES, were recently used to perform a series of experiments during four flights of the 'Biorack' facility aboard the Space Shuttle. The first unit, Generic Cell Activation Kit 1 (GCAK-1), contains six separate culture units per cassette, each consisting of a culture chamber, activator chamber, filtration system (permitting separation of cells from supernatant in-flight), injection port, and supernatant collection chamber. The second unit (GCAK-2) also contains six separate culture units, including a culture, activator, and fixation chambers. Both hardware units permit relatively complex cell culture manipulations without extensive use of spacecraft resources (crew time, volume, mass, power), or the need for excessive safety measures. Possible operations include stimulation of cultures with activators, separation of cells from supernatant, fixation/lysis, manipulation of radiolabelled reagents, and medium exchange. Investigations performed aboard the Space Shuttle in six different experiments used Jurkat, purified T-cells or U937 cells, the results of which are reported separately. We report here the behaviour of Jurkat and U937 cells in the GCAK hardware in ground

  2. Cells, cancer, and rare events: Homeostatic metastability in stochastic nonlinear dynamical models of skin cell proliferation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Patrick B.

    2009-09-01

    A recently proposed model for skin cell proliferation [E. Clayton , Nature (London) 446, 185 (2007)] is extended to incorporate mitotic autoregulation, and hence homeostasis as a fixed point of the dynamics. Unlimited cell proliferation in such a model can be viewed as a model for carcinogenesis. One way in which this can arise is homeostatic metastability, in which the cell populations escape from the homeostatic basin of attraction by a large but rare stochastic fluctuation. Such an event can be viewed as the final step in a multistage model of carcinogenesis. Homeostatic metastability offers a possible explanation for the peculiar epidemiology of lung cancer in ex-smokers.

  3. Skin allografts in lethally irradiated animals repopulated with syngeneic hemopoietic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Schwadron, R.B.

    1983-01-01

    Total body irradiation and repopulation with syngeneic hemopoietic cells can be used to induce tolerance to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) mismatched heart and kidney grafts in rats and mice. However, this protocol does not work for MHC mismatched skin grafts in rats or mice. Furthermore, LEW rats that accept WF cardiac allografts after irradiation and repopulation reject subsequent WF skin grafts. Treatment of skin allograft donors with methotrexate prior to grafting onto irradiated and reconstituted mice resulted in doubling of the mean survival time. Analysis of which antigens provoked skin graft rejection by irradiation and reconstituted animals revealed the importance of I region antigens. Cardiac allograft acceptance by irradiated and reconstituted animals is mediated by suppressor cells found in the spleen. Adoptively tolerant LEW rats accepted WF skin grafts in 50% of grafted animals. Analysis of this phenomenon revealed that the adoptive transfer procedure itself was important in achieving skin allograft acceptance by these animals. In general, it seems that the lack of ability of irradiated and reconstituted animals to accept fully MHC disparate skin grafts results from the inability of these animals to suppress lymph node effector cells against I region antigen seen on highly immunogenic allogeneic Langerhans cells in the skin.

  4. Skin-Directed Therapies in Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Cuong V; Bohjanen, Kimberly A

    2015-10-01

    Early stage mycosis fungoides represents the most common clinical presentation of cutaneous lymphoma, with skin-directed therapies long established in its treatment. These therapies continue to change as new treatment regimens emerge. Other skin-directed treatments include light and radiation therapy. Therapies with higher levels of evidence and less systemic toxicity are usually preferred as first-line treatment. However, even these established therapies, like topical corticosteroids and carmustine, lack randomized clinical trials to establish their efficacy. Research is also needed to further define the role of combination topical therapies and how skin-directed therapies can be used as adjuvants to systemic medications. PMID:26433841

  5. Dynamic cell culture system (7-IML-1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cogoli, Augusto

    1992-01-01

    This experiment is one of the Biorack experiments being flown on the International Microgravity Laboratory 1 (MIL-1) mission as part of an investigation studying cell proliferation and performance in space. One of the objectives of this investigation is to assess the potential benefits of bioprocessing in space with the ultimate goal of developing a bioreactor for continuous cell cultures in space. This experiment will test the operation of an automated culture chamber that was designed for use in a Bioreactor in space. The device to be tested is called the Dynamic Cell Culture System (DCCS). It is a simple device in which media are renewed or chemicals are injected automatically, by means of osmotic pumps. This experiment uses four Type I/O experiment containers. One DCCS unit, which contains a culture chamber with renewal of medium and a second chamber without a medium supply fits in each container. Two DCCS units are maintained under zero gravity conditions during the on-orbit period. The other two units are maintained under 1 gh conditions in a 1 g centrifuge. The schedule for incubator transfer is given.

  6. Cytotoxic Effects of the Ethanol Bane Skin Extract in Human Prostate Cancer Pc3 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Amiri, Maryam; Kazerouni, Faranak; Namaki, Saeed; Darbandi Tamijani, Hassan; Rahimipour, Hooman; Boroumand, Nasrin; Barghi, Siyamak; Ebrahimi, Nazanin; Gheibi Hayat, Seyed Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background: It is extensively supposed that vegetarian diet could affect cancer progress and increase the influence of formal chemotherapy. Objectives: The present study was designed to determine the effect of the ethanol Bane skin extract against chemo resistant prostate cancer PC3 cells. Materials and Methods: PC3 and L929 cells were cultivated and then incubated in the ethanol Bane skin extract with various concentrations of 0.78, 1.5, 3.13, 6.25, 12.5 mg/mL in 3 times 24, 48, 72 hours. Cytotoxic effect of the ethanol Bane skin extract on PC3 and L929 cells was examined by MTT assay after 24, 48, and 72 hours. Morphology of PC3 cells was evaluated by Gimsa staining. Results: The ethanol Bane skin extract inhibited proliferation and caused cell death with IC50 values of 2.8 mg/mL on PC3 cells and the IC50 was 6.1 mg/mL on l929 cells. Morphological changes and apoptotic bodies were observed in PC3 cells faced with the ethanol Bane skin extract by staining with Gimsa. Conclusions: The ethanol Bane skin extract could repress the growth of PC3 cell line. This inhibitory effect of the Bane extract depended on the dose and the time on PC3. The result of this study shows that the ethanol Bane skin extract includes photochemical and inhibitory function against proliferation and inducer of apoptosis in human prostate cancer PC3 cells and also has less cytotoxic effect on l929 than PC3 cells. The ethanol Bane skin extract might be a good candidate for the new herbal anticancer drug. PMID:27482333

  7. 21 CFR 864.2280 - Cultured animal and human cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cultured animal and human cells. 864.2280 Section... Cultured animal and human cells. (a) Identification. Cultured animal and human cells are in vitro cultivated cell lines from the tissue of humans or other animals which are used in various...

  8. 21 CFR 864.2280 - Cultured animal and human cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cultured animal and human cells. 864.2280 Section... Cultured animal and human cells. (a) Identification. Cultured animal and human cells are in vitro cultivated cell lines from the tissue of humans or other animals which are used in various...

  9. 21 CFR 864.2280 - Cultured animal and human cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cultured animal and human cells. 864.2280 Section... Cultured animal and human cells. (a) Identification. Cultured animal and human cells are in vitro cultivated cell lines from the tissue of humans or other animals which are used in various...

  10. 21 CFR 864.2280 - Cultured animal and human cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cultured animal and human cells. 864.2280 Section... Cultured animal and human cells. (a) Identification. Cultured animal and human cells are in vitro cultivated cell lines from the tissue of humans or other animals which are used in various...

  11. 21 CFR 864.2280 - Cultured animal and human cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cultured animal and human cells. 864.2280 Section... Cultured animal and human cells. (a) Identification. Cultured animal and human cells are in vitro cultivated cell lines from the tissue of humans or other animals which are used in various...

  12. UVB dependence of quantum dot reactive oxygen species generation in common skin cell models

    PubMed Central

    MORTENSEN, LUKE J.; FAULKNOR, RENEA; RAVICHANDRAN, SUPRIYA; ZHENG, HONG; DELOUISE, LISA A.

    2015-01-01

    Studies have shown that UVB can slightly increase the penetration of nanoparticles through skin and significantly alter skin cell biology, thus it is important to understand if and how UVB may impact subsequent nanoparticle skin cell interactions. The research presented herein evaluates the effect of UVB on quantum dot (QD) uptake and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in primary keratinocytes, primary melanocytes, and related cell lines. QD exposure induced cell type dependent ROS responses increased by pre-exposing cells to UVB and correlated with the level of QD uptake. Our results suggest that keratinocytes may be at greater risk for QD induced ROS generation than melanocytes, and raise awareness about the differential cellular effects that topically applied nanomaterials may have on UVB exposed skin. PMID:26485933

  13. UVB Dependence of Quantum Dot Reactive Oxygen Species Generation in Common Skin Cell Models.

    PubMed

    Mortensen, Luke J; Faulknor, Renea; Ravichandran, Supriya; Zheng, Hong; DeLouise, Lisa A

    2015-09-01

    Studies have shown that UVB can slightly increase the penetration of nanoparticles through skin and significantly alter skin cell biology, thus it is important to understand if and how UVB may impact subsequent nanoparticle skin cell interactions. The research presented herein evaluates the effect of UVB on quantum dot (QD) uptake and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in primary keratinocytes, primary melanocytes, and related cell lines. QD exposure induced cell type dependent ROS responses increased by pre-exposing cells to UVB and correlated with the level of QD uptake. Our results suggest that keratinocytes may be at greater risk for QD induced ROS generation than melanocytes, and raise awareness about the differential cellular effects that topically applied nanomaterials may have on UVB exposed skin. PMID:26485933

  14. Genomics in mammalian cell culture bioprocessing

    PubMed Central

    Wuest, Diane M.; Harcum, Sarah W.; Lee, Kelvin H.

    2013-01-01

    Explicitly identifying the genome of a host organism including sequencing, mapping, and annotating its genetic code has become a priority in the field of biotechnology with aims at improving the efficiency and understanding of cell culture bioprocessing. Recombinant protein therapeutics, primarily produced in mammalian cells, constitute a $108 billion global market. The most common mammalian cell line used in biologic production processes is the Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell line, and although great improvements have been made in titer production over the past 25 years, the underlying molecular and physiological factors are not well understood. Confident understanding of CHO bioprocessing elements (e.g. cell line selection, protein production, and reproducibility of process performance and product specifications) would significantly improve with a well understood genome. This review describes mammalian cell culture use in bioprocessing, the importance of obtaining CHO cell line genetic sequences, and the current status of sequencing efforts. Furthermore, transcriptomic techniques and gene expression tools are presented, and case studies exploring genomic techniques and applications aimed to improve mammalian bioprocess performance are reviewed. Finally, future implications of genomic advances are surmised. PMID:22079893

  15. Expression of Heat Shock Protein 70 in Human Skin Cells as a Photoprotective Function after UV Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Roh, Byoung Hwa; Kim, Dae Hyun; Cho, Moon Kyun; Park, Young Lip

    2008-01-01

    Background Human skin is exposed to various environmental stresses, such as heat, cold, and ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Heat shock proteins (HSPs) induced by temperature elevations, as a physiologic response to mediate repair mechanisms and reduce cellular damage. Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate the induction of HSPs in human skin cells after UV exposure. Methods We performed immunoblotting using a specific monoclonal antibody to the HSP70 family, one of the best-conserved stress proteins in humans, with cultured normal human keratinocytes, A431 cells, human melanocytes, SK30 cells, and human dermal fibroblasts (HDF). Results Our results indicated that high expression of HSP70 in the unstressed state was noted in epidermal cells, including normal human keratinocytes, A431 cells, human melanocytes, and SK30 cells, but epidermal cells showed no additional up-regulation of HSP70 after UV irradiation. On the other hand, HDF expressed very small amounts of HSP70 at baseline, but significantly higher amounts of HSP70 after UV exposure. Conclusion These findings suggest that constitutive expression of HSP70 in epidermal cells may be an important mechanism for protection of the human epidermis from environmental stresses, such as sunlight exposure. PMID:27303188

  16. Interaction of nanoparticles and cell-penetrating peptides with skin for transdermal drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Pinaki; Patlolla, Ram R.; Singh, Mandip

    2011-01-01

    Topical or transdermal drug delivery is challenging because the skin acts as a natural and protective barrier. Therefore, several methods have been examined to increase the permeation of therapeutic molecules into and through the skin. One approach is to use the nanoparticulate delivery system. Starting with liposomes and other vesicular systems, several other types of nanosized drug carriers have been developed such as solid lipid nanoparticles, nanostructured lipid carriers, polymer-based nanoparticles and magnetic nanoparticles for dermatological applications. This review article discusses how different particulate systems can interact and penetrate into the skin barrier. In this review, the effectiveness of nanoparticles, as well as possible mode of actions of nanoparticles, is presented. In addition to nanoparticles, cell-penetrating peptide (CPP)-mediated drug delivery into the skin and the possible mechanism of CPP-derived delivery into the skin is discussed. Lastly, the effectiveness and possible mechanism of CPP-modified nanocarriers into the skin are addressed. PMID:21028936

  17. Universal lab-on-a-chip platform for complex, perfused 3D cell cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonntag, F.; Schmieder, F.; Ströbel, J.; Grünzner, S.; Busek, M.; Günther, K.; Steege, T.; Polk, C.; Klotzbach, U.

    2016-03-01

    The miniaturization, rapid prototyping and automation of lab-on-a-chip technology play nowadays a very important role. Lab-on-a-chip technology is successfully implemented not only for environmental analysis and medical diagnostics, but also as replacement of animals used for the testing of substances in the pharmaceutical and cosmetics industries. For that purpose the Fraunhofer IWS and partners developed a lab-on-a-chip platform for perfused cell-based assays in the last years, which includes different micropumps, valves, channels, reservoirs and customized cell culture modules. This technology is already implemented for the characterization of different human cell cultures and organoids, like skin, liver, endothelium, hair follicle and nephron. The advanced universal lab-on-a-chip platform for complex, perfused 3D cell cultures is divided into a multilayer basic chip with integrated micropump and application-specific 3D printed cell culture modules. Moreover a technology for surface modification of the printed cell culture modules by laser micro structuring and a complex and flexibly programmable controlling device based on an embedded Linux system was developed. A universal lab-on-a-chip platform with an optional oxygenator and a cell culture module for cubic scaffolds as well as first cell culture experiments within the cell culture device will be presented. The module is designed for direct interaction with robotic dispenser systems. This offers the opportunity to combine direct organ printing of cells and scaffolds with the microfluidic cell culture module. The characterization of the developed system was done by means of Micro-Particle Image Velocimetry (μPIV) and an optical oxygen measuring system.

  18. A role for T cell-derived interleukin 22 in psoriatic skin inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Boniface, K; Guignouard, E; Pedretti, N; Garcia, M; Delwail, A; Bernard, F-X; Nau, F; Guillet, G; Dagregorio, G; Yssel, H; Lecron, J-C; Morel, F

    2007-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-22 is a T cell-derived cytokine that has been reported recently to induce cutaneous inflammation in an experimental murine model of psoriasis, and to induce in vitro an inflammatory-like phenotype. In the present study, we assessed the presence of IL-22 and the IL-22 receptor 1 (IL-22R1) in skin lesions, skin-derived T cells, as well as IL-22 levels in sera from patients with psoriasis. IL-22R1 and IL-10R2 transcripts are expressed at a similar level in psoriatic and healthy skin. In contrast, IL-22 mRNA expression was up-regulated in psoriatic skin lesions compared to normal skin, whereas IL-22 mRNA levels in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from psoriatic patients and normal subjects were similar. Circulating IL-22 levels were significantly higher in psoriatic patients than in normal subjects. T cells isolated from psoriatic skin produced higher levels of IL-22 in comparison to peripheral T cells isolated from the same patients. IL-10 was expressed at similar levels in skin biopsies and peripheral blood mononuclear cells of psoriatic patients and normal subjects. Finally, we show here that supernatants of lesional psoriatic skin-infiltrating T cells induce an inflammatory response by normal human epidermal keratinocytes, resembling that observed in psoriatic lesions. Taken together, the results reported in this study indicate that IL-22 is a cytokine produced by skin-infiltrating lymphocytes that is potentially involved in initiation and/or maintenance of the pathogenesis of psoriasis. PMID:17900301

  19. Mast Cells Regulate Epidermal Barrier Function and the Development of Allergic Skin Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Sehra, Sarita; Serezani, Ana P M; Ocaña, Jesus A; Travers, Jeffrey B; Kaplan, Mark H

    2016-07-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease characterized by infiltration of eosinophils, T helper cells, and mast cells. The role of mast cells in atopic dermatitis is not completely understood. To define the effects of mast cells on skin biology, we observed that mast cells regulate the homeostatic expression of epidermal differentiation complex and other skin genes. Decreased epidermal differentiation complex gene expression in mice that genetically lack mast cells (Kit(W-sh/W-sh) mice) is associated with increased uptake of protein antigens painted on the skin by dendritic cells (DCs) compared with similarly treated wild-type mice, suggesting a protective role for mast cells in exposure to nominal environmental allergens. To test this further, we crossed Kit(W-sh/W-sh) mice with signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (i.e., Stat6) VT transgenic mice that develop spontaneous atopic dermatitis-like disease that is dependent on T helper cell 2 cytokines and is associated with high serum concentrations of IgE. We observed that Stat6VT × Kit(W-sh/W-sh) mice developed more frequent and more severe allergic skin inflammation than Stat6VT transgenic mice that had mast cells. Together, these studies suggest that mast cells regulate epidermal barrier function and have a potential protective role in the development of atopic dermatitis-like disease. PMID:27021404

  20. A Skin-selective Homing Mechanism for Human Immune Surveillance T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schaerli, Patrick; Ebert, Lisa; Willimann, Katharina; Blaser, Andrea; Roos, Regula Stuber; Loetscher, Pius; Moser, Bernhard

    2004-01-01

    Effective immune surveillance is essential for maintaining protection and homeostasis of peripheral tissues. However, mechanisms controlling memory T cell migration to peripheral tissues such as the skin are poorly understood. Here, we show that the majority of human T cells in healthy skin express the chemokine receptor CCR8 and respond to its selective ligand I-309/CCL1. These CCR8+ T cells are absent in small intestine and colon tissue, and are extremely rare in peripheral blood, suggesting healthy skin as their physiological target site. Cutaneous CCR8+ T cells are preactivated and secrete proinflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor–α and interferon-γ, but lack markers of cytolytic T cells. Secretion of interleukin (IL)-4, IL-10, and transforming growth factor–β was low to undetectable, arguing against a strict association of CCR8 expression with either T helper cell 2 or regulatory T cell subsets. Potential precursors of skin surveillance T cells in peripheral blood may correspond to the minor subset of CCR8+CD25− T cells. Importantly, CCL1 is constitutively expressed at strategic cutaneous locations, including dermal microvessels and epidermal antigen-presenting cells. For the first time, these findings define a chemokine system for homeostatic T cell traffic in normal human skin. PMID:15123746

  1. Discrimination of skin sensitizers from non-sensitizers by interleukin-1α and interleukin-6 production on cultured human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Jung, Daun; Che, Jeong-Hwan; Lim, Kyung-Min; Chun, Young-Jin; Heo, Yong; Seok, Seung Hyeok

    2016-09-01

    In vitro testing methods for classifying sensitizers could be valuable alternatives to in vivo sensitization testing using animal models, such as the murine local lymph node assay (LLNA) and the guinea pig maximization test (GMT), but there remains a need for in vitro methods that are more accurate and simpler to distinguish skin sensitizers from non-sensitizers. Thus, the aim of our study was to establish an in vitro assay as a screening tool for detecting skin sensitizers using the human keratinocyte cell line, HaCaT. HaCaT cells were exposed to 16 relevant skin sensitizers and 6 skin non-sensitizers. The highest dose used was the dose causing 75% cell viability (CV75) that we determined by an MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] assay. The levels of extracellular production of interleukin-1α (IL-1α) and IL-6 were measured. The sensitivity of IL-1α was 63%, specificity was 83% and accuracy was 68%. In the case of IL-6, sensitivity: 69%, specificity: 83% and accuracy: 73%. Thus, this study suggests that measuring extracellular production of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1α and IL-6 by human HaCaT cells may potentially classify skin sensitizers from non-sensitizers. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26691653

  2. Acetaldehyde and hexanaldehyde from cultured white cells

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Hye-Won; Umber, Brandon J; Meinardi, Simone; Leu, Szu-Yun; Zaldivar, Frank; Blake, Donald R; Cooper, Dan M

    2009-01-01

    Background Noninvasive detection of innate immune function such as the accumulation of neutrophils remains a challenge in many areas of clinical medicine. We hypothesized that granulocytes could generate volatile organic compounds. Methods To begin to test this, we developed a bioreactor and analytical GC-MS system to accurately identify and quantify gases in trace concentrations (parts per billion) emitted solely from cell/media culture. A human promyelocytic leukemia cell line, HL60, frequently used to assess neutrophil function, was grown in serum-free medium. Results HL60 cells released acetaldehyde and hexanaldehyde in a time-dependent manner. The mean ± SD concentration of acetaldehyde in the headspace above the cultured cells following 4-, 24- and 48-h incubation was 157 ± 13 ppbv, 490 ± 99 ppbv, 698 ± 87 ppbv. For hexanaldehyde these values were 1 ± 0.3 ppbv, 8 ± 2 ppbv, and 11 ± 2 ppbv. In addition, our experimental system permitted us to identify confounding trace gas contaminants such as styrene. Conclusion This study demonstrates that human immune cells known to mimic the function of innate immune cells, like neutrophils, produce volatile gases that can be measured in vitro in trace amounts. PMID:19402909

  3. Neglected skin cancer in the elderly: a case of basosquamous cell carcinoma of the right shoulder.

    PubMed

    Bisgaard, Erika; Tarakji, Michael; Lau, Frank; Riker, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Skin cancer remains the most common cancer worldwide, and basal cell carcinoma represents the largest portion of non-melanomatous skin cancers with over 3 million cases diagnosed annually. Locally advanced disease is frequently seen in the elderly posing clinical challenges regarding proper treatment.We report on an 86-year-old female presenting with fatigue, anemia and a large ulcerated skin lesion along the right upper back. A biopsy of the lesion revealed a basosquamous cell carcinoma. She underwent a wide local excision with complex wound reconstruction.Neglected skin cancers in the elderly can present difficult clinical scenarios. There are associated adjuvant therapies that should be considered following resection, such as local radiation therapy and other novel therapies. Newer therapies, such as with vismodegib, may also be considered. A comprehensive, multimodal approach to treatment should be considered in most cases of locally advanced, non-melanoma skin cancers. PMID:27534889

  4. Cell-type-specific roles for COX-2 in UVB-induced skin cancer

    PubMed Central

    Herschman, Harvey

    2014-01-01

    In human tumors, and in mouse models, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) levels are frequently correlated with tumor development/burden. In addition to intrinsic tumor cell expression, COX-2 is often present in fibroblasts, myofibroblasts and endothelial cells of the tumor microenvironment, and in infiltrating immune cells. Intrinsic cancer cell COX-2 expression is postulated as only one of many sources for prostanoids required for tumor promotion/progression. Although both COX-2 inhibition and global Cox-2 gene deletion ameliorate ultraviolet B (UVB)-induced SKH-1 mouse skin tumorigenesis, neither manipulation can elucidate the cell type(s) in which COX-2 expression is required for tumorigenesis; both eliminate COX-2 activity in all cells. To address this question, we created Cox-2 flox/flox mice, in which the Cox-2 gene can be eliminated in a cell-type-specific fashion by targeted Cre recombinase expression. Cox-2 deletion in skin epithelial cells of SKH-1 Cox-2 flox/flox;K14Cre + mice resulted, following UVB irradiation, in reduced skin hyperplasia and increased apoptosis. Targeted epithelial cell Cox-2 deletion also resulted in reduced tumor incidence, frequency, size and proliferation rate, altered tumor cell differentiation and reduced tumor vascularization. Moreover, Cox-2 flox/flox;K14Cre + papillomas did not progress to squamous cell carcinomas. In contrast, Cox-2 deletion in SKH-1 Cox-2 flox/flox; LysMCre + myeloid cells had no effect on UVB tumor induction. We conclude that (i) intrinsic epithelial COX-2 activity plays a major role in UVB-induced skin cancer, (ii) macrophage/myeloid COX-2 plays no role in UVB-induced skin cancer and (iii) either there may be another COX-2-dependent prostanoid source(s) that drives UVB skin tumor induction or there may exist a COX-2-independent pathway(s) to UVB-induced skin cancer. PMID:24469308

  5. Transdifferentiation of Umbilical Cord-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Into Epidermal-Like Cells by the Mimicking Skin Microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Chen, Deyun; Hao, Haojie; Tong, Chuan; Liu, Jiejie; Dong, Liang; Ti, Dongdong; Hou, Qian; Liu, Huiling; Han, Weidong; Fu, Xiaobing

    2015-06-01

    Human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells (UC-MSCs) are multipotent, primitive, and have been widely used for skin tissue engineering. Their transdifferentiation is determined by the local microenvironment. In this study, we investigated the potential epidermal differentiation of UC-MSCs and the formation of epidermis substitutes in a 3-dimensional (3D) microenvironment, which was fabricated by UC-MSCs embedded into collagen-chitosan scaffolds (CCSs) combined with an air-liquid interface (ALI) culture system. Using fluorescence microscope, we observed that UC-MSCs were spindle-shaped and evenly distributed in the scaffold. Methyl thiazolyl blue tetrazolium bromide assay and Live/Dead assay indicated that the CCSs have good biocompatibility with UC-MSCs. Immunohistochemistry and western blotting assay showed that UC-MSCs on the surface of the CCSs were positive for the epidermal markers cytokeratin 19 and involucrin at 14 days. In addition, hematoxylin-eosin staining indicated that multilayered epidermis substitutes were established. The constructed epidermis substitutes were applied to treat full-thickness wounds in rats and proved to promote wound healing. In conclusion, manipulating the 3D microenvironment is a novel method for inducing the epidermal differentiation of MSCs to engineer epidermal substitutes, which provides an alternative strategy for skin tissue engineering. PMID:25700709

  6. Cell culture: Progenitor cells from human brain after death

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Theo D.; Schwartz, Philip H.; Taupin, Philippe; Kaspar, Brian; Stein, Stuart A.; Gage, Fred H.

    2001-05-01

    Culturing neural progenitor cells from the adult rodent brain has become routine and is also possible from human fetal tissue, but expansion of these cells from postnatal and adult human tissue, although preferred for ethical reasons, has encountered problems. Here we describe the isolation and successful propagation of neural progenitor cells from human postmortem tissues and surgical specimens. Although the relative therapeutic merits of adult and fetal progenitor cells still need to be assessed, our results may extend the application of these progenitor cells in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.

  7. Dendritic cells and skin sensitization: Biological roles and uses in hazard identification

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, Cindy A.; Kimber, Ian; Basketter, David A.; Pallardy, Marc; Gildea, Lucy A.; Gerberick, G. Frank . E-mail: gerberick.gf@pg.com

    2007-06-15

    Recent advances have been made in our understanding of the roles played by cutaneous dendritic cells (DCs) in the induction of contact allergy. A number of associated changes in epidermal Langerhans cell phenotype and function required for effective skin sensitization are providing the foundations for the development of cellular assays (using DC and DC-like cells) for skin sensitization hazard identification. These alternative approaches to the identification and characterization of skin sensitizing chemicals were the focus of a Workshop entitled 'Dendritic Cells and Skin Sensitization: Biological Roles and Uses in Hazard Identification' that was given at the annual Society of Toxicology meeting held March 6-9, 2006 in San Diego, California. This paper reports information that was presented during the Workshop.

  8. Differentiation of mammalian skeletal muscle cells cultured on microcarrier beads in a rotating cell culture system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torgan, C. E.; Burge, S. S.; Collinsworth, A. M.; Truskey, G. A.; Kraus, W. E.

    2000-01-01

    The growth and repair of adult skeletal muscle are due in part to activation of muscle precursor cells, commonly known as satellite cells or myoblasts. These cells are responsive to a variety of environmental cues, including mechanical stimuli. The overall goal of the research is to examine the role of mechanical signalling mechanisms in muscle growth and plasticity through utilisation of cell culture systems where other potential signalling pathways (i.e. chemical and electrical stimuli) are controlled. To explore the effects of decreased mechanical loading on muscle differentiation, mammalian myoblasts are cultured in a bioreactor (rotating cell culture system), a model that has been utilised to simulate microgravity. C2C12 murine myoblasts are cultured on microcarrier beads in a bioreactor and followed throughout differentiation as they form a network of multinucleated myotubes. In comparison with three-dimensional control cultures that consist of myoblasts cultured on microcarrier beads in teflon bags, myoblasts cultured in the bioreactor exhibit an attenuation in differentiation. This is demonstrated by reduced immunohistochemical staining for myogenin and alpha-actinin. Western analysis shows a decrease, in bioreactor cultures compared with control cultures, in levels of the contractile proteins myosin (47% decrease, p < 0.01) and tropomyosin (63% decrease, p < 0.01). Hydrodynamic measurements indicate that the decrease in differentiation may be due, at least in part, to fluid stresses acting on the myotubes. In addition, constraints on aggregate size imposed by the action of fluid forces in the bioreactor affect differentiation. These results may have implications for muscle growth and repair during spaceflight.

  9. Specificity of T cells invading the skin during acute graft-vs.-host disease after semiallogeneic bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed Central

    Gaschet, J; Mahé, B; Milpied, N; Devilder, M C; Dréno, B; Bignon, J D; Davodeau, F; Hallet, M M; Bonneville, M; Vié, H

    1993-01-01

    The mechanisms responsible for skin lesions during acute graft-vs.-host disease (aGVHD) after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) are poorly understood. The exact role of various effector cell populations and "major" (particularly HLA-DP) or "minor" antigens as target molecules is not known. To investigate the nature of cells responsible for tissue injury, we cultured T cells from skin biopsy first with interleukin 2 (IL-2) alone and then in polyclonal activation conditions to avoid in vitro antigenic sensitization before specificity testing. We applied this method to two biopsies performed during aGVHD after semiallogeneic BMT and obtained cytotoxic T cells against four graft mismatches: CD8+ T cells against HLA-A2.2 and HLA-B27 and CD4+ T cells against HLA-DP101 and HLA-DP401. This demonstrates that T cells with documented specificity can be obtained from an aGVHD lesion without antigenic selection. Moreover, these data directly implicate DP as a potential target antigen for aGVHD. Images PMID:8423212

  10. Gonococcal and meningococcal pathogenesis as defined by human cell, cell culture, and organ culture assays.

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, D S

    1989-01-01

    Human cells, cell cultures, and organ cultures have been extremely useful for studying the events that occur when gonococci and meningococci encounter human mucosal surfaces. The specificity and selectivity of these events for human cells are striking and correlate with the adaptation of these pathogens for survival on human mucous membranes. To colonize these sites, meningococci and gonococci have developed mechanisms to damage local host defenses such as the mucociliary blanket, to attach to epithelial cells, and to invade these cells. Attachment to epithelial cells mediated by pili, and to some types of cells mediated by PIIs, serves to anchor the organism close to sources of nutrition and allows multiplication. Intracellular invasion, possibly initiated by the major porin protein, may provide additional nutritional support and protection from host defenses. Mucosal invasion may also result in access of gonococci and meningococci to the bloodstream, leading to dissemination. Images PMID:2497953

  11. Commensal-dendritic-cell interaction specifies a unique protective skin immune signature.

    PubMed

    Naik, Shruti; Bouladoux, Nicolas; Linehan, Jonathan L; Han, Seong-Ji; Harrison, Oliver J; Wilhelm, Christoph; Conlan, Sean; Himmelfarb, Sarah; Byrd, Allyson L; Deming, Clayton; Quinones, Mariam; Brenchley, Jason M; Kong, Heidi H; Tussiwand, Roxanne; Murphy, Kenneth M; Merad, Miriam; Segre, Julia A; Belkaid, Yasmine

    2015-04-01

    The skin represents the primary interface between the host and the environment. This organ is also home to trillions of microorganisms that play an important role in tissue homeostasis and local immunity. Skin microbial communities are highly diverse and can be remodelled over time or in response to environmental challenges. How, in the context of this complexity, individual commensal microorganisms may differentially modulate skin immunity and the consequences of these responses for tissue physiology remains unclear. Here we show that defined commensals dominantly affect skin immunity and identify the cellular mediators involved in this specification. In particular, colonization with Staphylococcus epidermidis induces IL-17A(+) CD8(+) T cells that home to the epidermis, enhance innate barrier immunity and limit pathogen invasion. Commensal-specific T-cell responses result from the coordinated action of skin-resident dendritic cell subsets and are not associated with inflammation, revealing that tissue-resident cells are poised to sense and respond to alterations in microbial communities. This interaction may represent an evolutionary means by which the skin immune system uses fluctuating commensal signals to calibrate barrier immunity and provide heterologous protection against invasive pathogens. These findings reveal that the skin immune landscape is a highly dynamic environment that can be rapidly and specifically remodelled by encounters with defined commensals, findings that have profound implications for our understanding of tissue-specific immunity and pathologies. PMID:25539086

  12. Commensal–dendritic-cell interaction specifies a unique protective skin immune signature

    PubMed Central

    Naik, Shruti; Bouladoux, Nicolas; Linehan, Jonathan L.; Han, Seong-Ji; Harrison, Oliver J.; Wilhelm, Christoph; Conlan, Sean; Himmelfarb, Sarah; Byrd, Allyson L.; Deming, Clayton; Quinones, Mariam; Brenchley, Jason M.; Kong, Heidi H.; Tussiwand, Roxanne; Murphy, Kenneth M.; Merad, Miriam; Segre, Julia A; Belkaid, Yasmine

    2015-01-01

    The skin represents the primary interface between the host and the environment. This organ is also home to trillions of microorganisms that play an important role in tissue homeostasis and local immunity1–4. Skin microbial communities are highly diverse and can be remodelled over time or in response to environmental challenges5–7. How, in the context of this complexity, individual commensal microorganisms may differentially modulate skin immunity and the consequences of these responses for tissue physiology remains unclear. Here we show that defined commensals dominantly affect skin immunity and identify the cellular mediators involved in this specification. In particular, colonization with Staphylococcus epidermidis induces IL-17A+ CD8+ T cells that home to the epidermis, enhance innate barrier immunity and limit pathogen invasion. Commensal-specific T-cell responses result from the coordinated action of skin-resident dendritic cell subsets and are not associated with inflammation, revealing that tissue-resident cells are poised to sense and respond to alterations in microbial communities. This interaction may represent an evolutionary means by which the skin immune system uses fluctuating commensal signals to calibrate barrier immunity and provide heterologous protection against invasive pathogens. These findings reveal that the skin immune landscape is a highly dynamic environment that can be rapidly and specifically remodelled by encounters with defined commensals, findings that have profound implications for our understanding of tissue-specific immunity and pathologies. PMID:25539086

  13. Role of adipose-derived stromal cells in pedicle skin flap survival in experimental animal models.

    PubMed

    Foroglou, Pericles; Karathanasis, Vasileios; Demiri, Efterpi; Koliakos, George; Papadakis, Marios

    2016-03-26

    The use of skin flaps in reconstructive surgery is the first-line surgical treatment for the reconstruction of skin defects and is essentially considered the starting point of plastic surgery. Despite their excellent usability, their application includes general surgical risks or possible complications, the primary and most common is necrosis of the flap. To improve flap survival, researchers have used different methods, including the use of adipose-derived stem cells, with significant positive results. In our research we will report the use of adipose-derived stem cells in pedicle skin flap survival based on current literature on various experimental models in animals. PMID:27022440

  14. Role of adipose-derived stromal cells in pedicle skin flap survival in experimental animal models

    PubMed Central

    Foroglou, Pericles; Karathanasis, Vasileios; Demiri, Efterpi; Koliakos, George; Papadakis, Marios

    2016-01-01

    The use of skin flaps in reconstructive surgery is the first-line surgical treatment for the reconstruction of skin defects and is essentially considered the starting point of plastic surgery. Despite their excellent usability, their application includes general surgical risks or possible complications, the primary and most common is necrosis of the flap. To improve flap survival, researchers have used different methods, including the use of adipose-derived stem cells, with significant positive results. In our research we will report the use of adipose-derived stem cells in pedicle skin flap survival based on current literature on various experimental models in animals. PMID:27022440

  15. Recombinant protein production and insect cell culture and process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaulding, Glenn (Inventor); Prewett, Tacey (Inventor); Goodwin, Thomas (Inventor); Francis, Karen (Inventor); Andrews, Angela (Inventor); Oconnor, Kim (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A process has been developed for recombinant production of selected polypeptides using transformed insect cells cultured in a horizontally rotating culture vessel modulated to create low shear conditions. A metabolically transformed insect cell line is produced using the culture procedure regardless of genetic transformation. The recombinant polypeptide can be produced by an alternative process using the cultured insect cells as host for a virus encoding the described polypeptide such as baculovirus. The insect cells can also be a host for viral production.

  16. Phospholipid composition of cultured human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Murphy, E J; Joseph, L; Stephens, R; Horrocks, L A

    1992-02-01

    Detailed analyses of the phospholipid compositions of cultured human endothelial cells are reported here. No significant differences were found between the phospholipid compositions of cells from human artery, saphenous and umbilical vein. However, due to the small sample sizes, relatively large standard deviations for some of the phospholipid classes were observed. A representative composition of endothelial cells is: phosphatidylcholine 36.6%, choline plasmalogen 3.7%, phosphatidylethanolamine 10.2%, ethanolamine plasmalogen 7.6%, sphingomyelin 10.8%, phosphatidylserine 7.1%, lysophosphatidylcholine 7.5%, phosphatidylinositol 3.1%, lysophosphatidylethanolamine 3.6%, phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate 1.8%, phosphatidic acid 1.9%, phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate 1.5%, and cardiolipin 1.9%. The cells possess high choline plasmalogen and lysophosphatidylethanolamine contents. The other phospholipids are within the normal biological ranges expected. Phospholipids were separated by high-performance liquid chromatography and quantified by lipid phosphorus assay. PMID:1315902

  17. Skin antiseptics in venous puncture-site disinfection for prevention of blood culture contamination: systematic review with meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Caldeira, D; David, C; Sampaio, C

    2011-03-01

    Blood cultures drawn by venous puncture are common clinical procedures for the detection of bacteraemia. Blood culture contamination (BCC) can lead to clinical misinterpretation and unnecessary expenses. We aimed to systematically review randomised controlled trials (RCTs) with skin antiseptics for prevention of contamination in venous-puncture drawn blood cultures. We conducted database search using CENTRAL (Cochrane Library issue April 2010), MEDLINE, EMBASE and mRCT, in June 2010. All RCTs testing skin antiseptics in venous-puncture drawn blood cultures were retrieved. Relative risk (RR) of the BCC outcome was analysed by random effects method using confidence interval (CI) of 95%. Studies were assessed by one review author and checked by another. Six studies were identified. Single-trial comparisons showed that alcoholic iodine tincture was better than non-alcoholic povidone-iodine, and isopropyl/acetone/povidone-iodine showed superiority against isopropyl/povidone-iodine. Meta-analysis demonstrated that alcoholic chlorhexidine was better than non-alcoholic povidone-iodine (RR: 0.33; 95% CI: 0.24-0.46) in 4757 blood cultures from two trials. Alcoholic solutions were better than non-alcoholic products (0.53; 0.31-0.90) in 21,300 blood cultures from four studies. Two trials with 13,418 blood cultures showed that iodine tincture was not superior to povidone-iodine in BCC prevention (0.79; 0.54-1.18). Alcoholic iodine was not different from non-alcoholic iodine (0.79; 0.53-1.17). Comparison of chlorhexidine vs iodine compounds was not conclusive. Alcohol alone was not inferior to iodinated products for prevention of contamination in venous-puncture drawn blood cultures. The association of alcohol and povidone-iodine did not seem to be useful. Alcoholic chlorhexidine solutions reduced blood culture false positives compared with aqueous povidone-iodine. PMID:21194791

  18. Perlecan expression influences the keratin 15‐positive cell population fate in the epidermis of aging skin

    PubMed Central

    Dos Santos, Morgan; Michopoulou, Anna; André‐Frei, Valérie; Boulesteix, Sophie; Guicher, Christine; Dayan, Guila; Whitelock, John; Damour, Odile; Rousselle, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    The epidermis is continuously renewed by stem cell proliferation and differentiation. Basal keratinocytes append the dermal‐epidermal junction, a cell surface‐associated, extracellular matrix that provides structural support and influences their behaviour. It consists of laminins, type IV collagen, nidogens, and perlecan, which are necessary for tissue organization and structural integrity. Perlecan is a heparan sulfate proteoglycan known to be involved in keratinocyte survival and differentiation. Aging affects the dermal epidermal junction resulting in decreased contact with keratinocytes, thus impacting epidermal renewal and homeostasis. We found that perlecan expression decreased during chronological skin aging. Our in vitro studies revealed reduced perlecan transcript levels in aged keratinocytes. The production of in vitro skin models revealed that aged keratinocytes formed a thin and poorly organized epidermis. Supplementing these models with purified perlecan reversed the phenomenon allowing restoration of a well‐differentiated multi‐layered epithelium. Perlecan down‐regulation in cultured keratinocytes caused depletion of the cell population that expressed keratin 15. This phenomenon depended on the perlecan heparan sulphate moieties, which suggested the involvement of a growth factor. Finally, we found defects in keratin 15 expression in the epidermis of aging skin. This study highlighted a new role for perlecan in maintaining the self‐renewal capacity of basal keratinocytes. PMID:26996820

  19. A Versatile Bioreactor for Dynamic Suspension Cell Culture. Application to the Culture of Cancer Cell Spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Madeddu, Denise; Cerino, Giulia; Falco, Angela; Frati, Caterina; Gallo, Diego; Deriu, Marco A.; Falvo D’Urso Labate, Giuseppe; Quaini, Federico; Audenino, Alberto; Morbiducci, Umberto

    2016-01-01

    A versatile bioreactor suitable for dynamic suspension cell culture under tunable shear stress conditions has been developed and preliminarily tested culturing cancer cell spheroids. By adopting simple technological solutions and avoiding rotating components, the bioreactor exploits the laminar hydrodynamics establishing within the culture chamber enabling dynamic cell suspension in an environment favourable to mass transport, under a wide range of tunable shear stress conditions. The design phase of the device has been supported by multiphysics modelling and has provided a comprehensive analysis of the operating principles of the bioreactor. Moreover, an explanatory example is herein presented with multiphysics simulations used to set the proper bioreactor operating conditions for preliminary in vitro biological tests on a human lung carcinoma cell line. The biological results demonstrate that the ultralow shear dynamic suspension provided by the device is beneficial for culturing cancer cell spheroids. In comparison to the static suspension control, dynamic cell suspension preserves morphological features, promotes intercellular connection, increases spheroid size (2.4-fold increase) and number of cycling cells (1.58-fold increase), and reduces double strand DNA damage (1.5-fold reduction). It is envisioned that the versatility of this bioreactor could allow investigation and expansion of different cell types in the future. PMID:27144306

  20. A Versatile Bioreactor for Dynamic Suspension Cell Culture. Application to the Culture of Cancer Cell Spheroids.

    PubMed

    Massai, Diana; Isu, Giuseppe; Madeddu, Denise; Cerino, Giulia; Falco, Angela; Frati, Caterina; Gallo, Diego; Deriu, Marco A; Falvo D'Urso Labate, Giuseppe; Quaini, Federico; Audenino, Alberto; Morbiducci, Umberto

    2016-01-01

    A versatile bioreactor suitable for dynamic suspension cell culture under tunable shear stress conditions has been developed and preliminarily tested culturing cancer cell spheroids. By adopting simple technological solutions and avoiding rotating components, the bioreactor exploits the laminar hydrodynamics establishing within the culture chamber enabling dynamic cell suspension in an environment favourable to mass transport, under a wide range of tunable shear stress conditions. The design phase of the device has been supported by multiphysics modelling and has provided a comprehensive analysis of the operating principles of the bioreactor. Moreover, an explanatory example is herein presented with multiphysics simulations used to set the proper bioreactor operating conditions for preliminary in vitro biological tests on a human lung carcinoma cell line. The biological results demonstrate that the ultralow shear dynamic suspension provided by the device is beneficial for culturing cancer cell spheroids. In comparison to the static suspension control, dynamic cell suspension preserves morphological features, promotes intercellular connection, increases spheroid size (2.4-fold increase) and number of cycling cells (1.58-fold increase), and reduces double strand DNA damage (1.5-fold reduction). It is envisioned that the versatility of this bioreactor could allow investigation and expansion of different cell types in the future. PMID:27144306

  1. Paracoccidioides brasiliensis interacts with dermal dendritic cells and keratinocytes in human skin and oral mucosa lesions.

    PubMed

    Ferreira da Silva, Wellington Luiz; Pagliari, Carla; Duarte, Maria Irma Seixas; Sotto, Mirian N

    2016-05-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM) is a systemic disease caused by the fungusParacoccidioides brasiliensisandParacoccidioides lutzii In PCM the skin and oral mucosa are often affected. Dendritic cells and keratinocytes of the integument play a role in innate and adaptive immune response against pathogens, due to their function as antigen presenting cells. Aiming to verify the interaction ofP. brasiliensiswith these cell populations, we studied 52 skin and 47 oral mucosa samples taken from patients with proven diagnosis of PCM. The biopsies were subjected to immunohistochemical and/or immunofluorescence staining with anti-factor XIIIa (marker of dermal dendrocytes), anti-CD207 (marker of mature Langerhans cells), anti-pan cytokeratins (AE1-AE3) and anti-P. brasiliensisantibodies. Analyses with confocal laser microscopy were also performed for better visualization of the interaction between keratinocytes and the fungi. In sum, 42% of oral mucosa samples displayed yeast forms in Factor XIIIa dermal dendrocytes cytoplasm. Langerhans cells in skin and oral mucosa samples did not show yeast cells in their cytoplasm. In sum, 54% of skin and 60% of mucosal samples displayed yeast cells in the cytoplasm of keratinocytes. The parasitism of keratinocytes may represent a possible mechanism of evasion of the fungus to local immune mechanisms. Factor XIIIa dendrocytes and keratinocytes may be acting as antigen-presenting cells to fulfill the probably impaired function of Langerhans cells in skin and oral mucosa of human PCM. PMID:26768374

  2. Reversible gelling culture media for in-vitro cell culture in three-dimensional matrices

    DOEpatents

    An, Yuehuei H.; Mironov, Vladimir A.; Gutowska, Anna

    2000-01-01

    A gelling cell culture medium useful for forming a three dimensional matrix for cell culture in vitro is prepared by copolymerizing an acrylamide derivative with a hydrophilic comonomer to form a reversible (preferably thermally reversible) gelling linear random copolymer in the form of a plurality of linear chains having a plurality of molecular weights greater than or equal to a minimum gelling molecular weight cutoff, mixing the copolymer with an aqueous solvent to form a reversible gelling solution and adding a cell culture medium to the gelling solution to form the gelling cell culture medium. Cells such as chondrocytes or hepatocytes are added to the culture medium to form a seeded culture medium, and temperature of the medium is raised to gel the seeded culture medium and form a three dimensional matrix containing the cells. After propagating the cells in the matrix, the cells may be recovered by lowering the temperature to dissolve the matrix and centrifuging.

  3. An Introductory Undergraduate Course Covering Animal Cell Culture Techniques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mozdziak, Paul E.; Petitte, James N.; Carson, Susan D.

    2004-01-01

    Animal cell culture is a core laboratory technique in many molecular biology, developmental biology, and biotechnology laboratories. Cell culture is a relatively old technique that has been sparingly taught at the undergraduate level. The traditional methodology for acquiring cell culture training has been through trial and error, instruction when…

  4. The effect of platelet-derived growth factor on cell division and glycosaminoglycan synthesis by human skin and scar fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Savage, K; Siebert, E; Swann, D

    1987-07-01

    The effect of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) on cell division and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) synthesis by fibroblasts isolated from skin and scar was measured. We found that PDGF stimulates cell division more efficiently in normal skin fibroblasts than in scar fibroblasts and decreases GAG synthesis in skin and scar fibroblasts. Using a 4-h pulse label with [3H]thymidine ([3H]Thd) following a 20-h incubation of confluent monolayer cultures with 0-5 units PDGF/ml Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium, we found a concentration-dependent increase in [3H]Thd incorporation. After incubation of fibroblasts with [3H]glucosamine and 35SO4 in the presence or absence of PDGF, labeled constituents were isolated from the extracellular, pericellular, and cellular fractions by pronase digestion and column chromatography on Sepharose CL4B or DEAE-cellulose and analyzed by cellulose acetate electrophoresis. The presence of PDGF decreased the total amount of 35S incorporated into macromolecules by skin and scar fibroblasts and resulted in an altered distribution of labeled GAGs. Dermal fibroblasts exposed to PDGF for 24 h incorporated a greater percentage of radiolabeled 35S into dermatan sulfate prime (DS') and less into dermatan sulfate (DS) in the extracellular fractions and a greater percentage of 35S into heparan sulfate (HS) in the pericellular fractions than did parallel cultures grown in the absence of PDGF. It is thought than PDGF may have an effect on scar formation by increasing the fibroblast population in the wound tissue and by affecting the total amount and types of matrix components synthesized. PMID:3598205

  5. A highly enriched niche of precursor cells with neuronal and glial potential within the hair follicle dermal papilla of adult skin.

    PubMed

    Hunt, David P J; Morris, Paul N; Sterling, Jane; Anderson, Jane A; Joannides, Alexis; Jahoda, Colin; Compston, Alastair; Chandran, Siddharthan

    2008-01-01

    Skin-derived precursor cells (SKPs) are multipotent neural crest-related stem cells that grow as self-renewing spheres and are capable of generating neurons and myelinating glial cells. SKPs are of clinical interest because they are accessible and potentially autologous. However, although spheres can be readily isolated from embryonic and neonatal skin, SKP frequency falls away sharply in adulthood, and primary sphere generation from adult human skin is more problematic. In addition, the culture-initiating cell population is undefined and heterogeneous, limiting experimental studies addressing important aspects of these cells such as the behavior of endogenous precursors in vivo and the molecular mechanisms of neural generation. Using a combined fate-mapping and microdissection approach, we identified and characterized a highly enriched niche of neural crest-derived sphere-forming cells within the dermal papilla of the hair follicle of adult skin. We demonstrated that the dermal papilla of the rodent vibrissal follicle is 1,000-fold enriched for sphere-forming neural crest-derived cells compared with whole facial skin. These "papillaspheres" share a phenotypic and developmental profile similar to that of SKPs, can be readily expanded in vitro, and are able to generate both neuronal and glial cells in response to appropriate cues. We demonstrate that papillaspheres can be efficiently generated and expanded from adult human facial skin by microdissection of a single hair follicle. This strategy of targeting a highly enriched niche of sphere-forming cells provides a novel and efficient method for generating neuronal and glial cells from an accessible adult somatic source that is both defined and minimally invasive. PMID:17901404

  6. Combined education and skin antisepsis intervention for persistently high blood-culture contamination rates in neonatal intensive care.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, C; Philip, R K; Powell, J; Slevin, B; Quinn, C; Power, L; O'Connell, N H; Dunne, C P

    2016-05-01

    Contaminated blood cultures represent challenges regarding diagnosis, duration of hospitalization, antimicrobial use, pharmacy and laboratory costs. Facing problematic neonatal blood culture contamination (3.8%), we instigated a successful intervention combining skin antisepsis using sterile applicators with 2% chlorhexidine gluconate in 70% isopropanol prior to phlebotomy (replacing 70% isopropanol) and staff education. In the six months prior to intervention, 364 neonatal peripheral blood samples were collected. Fourteen (3.8%) were contaminated. In the post-intervention six months, 314 samples were collected. Three (0.96%) were contaminated, representing significant improvement (Fisher's exact test: P = 0.0259). No dermatological sequelae were observed. The improvement has been sustained. PMID:26944902

  7. A Chemically Defined Carrier for the Delivery of Human Mesenchymal Stem/Stromal Cells to Skin Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Nathan G.; Mistry, Anita R.; Smith, Louise E.; Eves, Paula C.; Tsaknakis, Grigorios; Forster, Simon; Watt, Suzanne M.

    2012-01-01

    Skin has a remarkable capacity for regeneration, but age- and diabetes-related vascular problems lead to chronic non-healing wounds for many thousands of U.K. patients. There is a need for new therapeutic approaches to treat these resistant wounds. Donor mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) have been shown to assist cutaneous wound healing by accelerating re-epithelialization. The aim of this work was to devise a low risk and convenient delivery method for transferring these cells to wound beds. Plasma polymerization was used to functionalize the surface of medical-grade silicone with acrylic acid. Cells attached well to these carriers, and culture for up to 3 days on the carriers did not significantly affect their phenotype or ability to support vascular tubule formation. These carriers were then used to transfer MSCs onto human dermis. Cell transfer was confirmed using an MTT assay to assess viable cell numbers and enhanced green fluorescent protein–labeled MSCs to demonstrate that the cells post-transfer attached to the dermis. We conclude that this synthetic carrier membrane is a promising approach for delivery of therapeutic MSCs and opens the way for future studies to evaluate its impact on repairing difficult skin wounds. PMID:21943098

  8. Progress and opportunities for tissue-engineered skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacNeil, Sheila

    2007-02-01

    Tissue-engineered skin is now a reality. For patients with extensive full-thickness burns, laboratory expansion of skin cells to achieve barrier function can make the difference between life and death, and it was this acute need that drove the initiation of tissue engineering in the 1980s. A much larger group of patients have ulcers resistant to conventional healing, and treatments using cultured skin cells have been devised to restart the wound-healing process. In the laboratory, the use of tissue-engineered skin provides insight into the behaviour of skin cells in healthy skin and in diseases such as vitiligo, melanoma, psoriasis and blistering disorders.

  9. Establishment of an Immortalized Skin Keratinocyte Cell Line Derived from the Animal Model Mastomys coucha

    PubMed Central

    Hasche, Daniel; Stephan, Sonja; Savelyeva, Larissa; Westermann, Frank; Rösl, Frank

    2016-01-01

    In the present report we describe the establishment of a spontaneous immortalized skin keratinocyte cell line derived from the skin of the multimammate rodent Mastomys coucha. These animals are used in preclinical studies for a variety of human diseases such as infections with nematodes, bacteria and papillomaviruses, especially regarding cutaneous manifestations such as non-melanoma skin cancer. Here we characterize the cells in terms of their origin and cytogenetic features. Searching for genomic signatures, a spontaneous mutation in the splicing donor sequence of Trp53 (G to A transition at the first position of intron 7) could be detected. This point mutation leads to alternative splicing and to a premature stop codon, resulting in a truncated and, in turn, undetectable form of p53, probably contributing to the process of immortalization. Mastomys coucha-derived skin keratinocytes can be used as an in vitro system to investigate molecular and immunological aspects of infectious agent interactions with their host cells. PMID:27533138

  10. Establishment of an Immortalized Skin Keratinocyte Cell Line Derived from the Animal Model Mastomys coucha.

    PubMed

    Hasche, Daniel; Stephan, Sonja; Savelyeva, Larissa; Westermann, Frank; Rösl, Frank; Vinzón, Sabrina E

    2016-01-01

    In the present report we describe the establishment of a spontaneous immortalized skin keratinocyte cell line derived from the skin of the multimammate rodent Mastomys coucha. These animals are used in preclinical studies for a variety of human diseases such as infections with nematodes, bacteria and papillomaviruses, especially regarding cutaneous manifestations such as non-melanoma skin cancer. Here we characterize the cells in terms of their origin and cytogenetic features. Searching for genomic signatures, a spontaneous mutation in the splicing donor sequence of Trp53 (G to A transition at the first position of intron 7) could be detected. This point mutation leads to alternative splicing and to a premature stop codon, resulting in a truncated and, in turn, undetectable form of p53, probably contributing to the process of immortalization. Mastomys coucha-derived skin keratinocytes can be used as an in vitro system to investigate molecular and immunological aspects of infectious agent interactions with their host cells. PMID:27533138

  11. Skin equivalents: skin from reconstructions as models to study skin development and diseases.

    PubMed

    Ali, N; Hosseini, M; Vainio, S; Taïeb, A; Cario-André, M; Rezvani, H R

    2015-08-01

    While skin is readily available for sampling and direct studies of its constituents, an important intermediate step is to design in vitro and/or in vivo models to address scientific or medical questions in dermatology and skin biology. Pioneered more than 30 years ago, human skin equivalents (HSEs) have been refined with better cell culture techniques and media, together with sophisticated cell biology tools including genetic engineering and cell reprogramming. HSEs mimic key elements of human skin biology and have been instrumental in demonstrating the importance of cell-cell interactions in skin homeostasis and the role of a complex cellular microenvironment to coordinate epidermal proliferation, differentiation and pigmentation. HSEs have a wide field of applications from cell biology to dermocosmetics, modelling diseases, drug development, skin ageing, pathophysiology and regenerative medicine. In this article we critically review the major current approaches used to reconstruct organotypic skin models and their application with a particular emphasis on skin biology and pathophysiology of skin disorders. PMID:25939812

  12. Transplantation of Tail Skin to Study Allogeneic CD4 T Cell Responses in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Simona W.

    2014-01-01

    The study of T cell responses and their consequences during allo-antigen recognition requires a model that enables one to distinguish between donor and host T cells, to easily monitor the graft, and to adapt the system in order to answer different immunological questions. Medawar and colleagues established allogeneic tail-skin transplantation in mice in 1955. Since then, the skin transplantation model has been continuously modified and adapted to answer specific questions. The use of tail-skin renders this model easy to score for graft rejection, requires neither extensive preparation nor deep anesthesia, is applicable to animals of all genetic background, discourages ischemic necrosis, and permits chemical and biological intervention. In general, both CD4+ and CD8+ allogeneic T cells are responsible for the rejection of allografts since they recognize mismatched major histocompatibility antigens from different mouse strains. Several models have been described for activating allogeneic T cells in skin-transplanted mice. The identification of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and II molecules in different mouse strains including C57BL/6 mice was an important step toward understanding and studying T cell-mediated alloresponses. In the tail-skin transplantation model described here, a three-point mutation (I-Abm12) in the antigen-presenting groove of the MHC-class II (I-Ab) molecule is sufficient to induce strong allogeneic CD4+ T cell activation in C57BL/6 mice. Skin grafts from I-Abm12 mice on C57BL/6 mice are rejected within 12-15 days, while syngeneic grafts are accepted for up to 100 days. The absence of T cells (CD3-/- and Rag2-/- mice) allows skin graft acceptance up to 100 days, which can be overcome by transferring 2 x 104 wild type or transgenic T cells. Adoptively transferred T cells proliferate and produce IFN-γ in I-Abm12-transplanted Rag2-/- mice. PMID:25147005

  13. Traditional and Modern Cell Culture in Virus Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Hematian, Ali; Sadeghifard, Nourkhoda; Mohebi, Reza; Taherikalani, Morovat; Nasrolahi, Abbas; Amraei, Mansour; Ghafourian, Sobhan

    2016-04-01

    Cell cultures are developed from tissue samples and then disaggregated by mechanical, chemical, and enzymatic methods to extract cells suitable for isolation of viruses. With the recent advances in technology, cell culture is considered a gold standard for virus isolation. This paper reviews the evolution of cell culture methods and demonstrates why cell culture is a preferred method for identification of viruses. In addition, the advantages and disadvantages of both traditional and modern cell culture methods for diagnosis of each type of virus are discussed. Detection of viruses by the novel cell culture methods is considered more accurate and sensitive. However, there is a need to include some more accurate methods such as molecular methods in cell culture for precise identification of viruses. PMID:27169004

  14. Cytotoxicity effects of amiodarone on cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Golli-Bennour, Emna El; Bouslimi, Amel; Zouaoui, Olfa; Nouira, Safa; Achour, Abdellatif; Bacha, Hassen

    2012-07-01

    Amiodarone is a potent anti-arrhythmic drug used for the treatment of cardiac arrhythmias. Although, the effects of amiodarone are well characterized on post-ischemic heart and cardiomyocytes, its toxicity on extra-cardiac tissues is still poorly understood. To this aim, we have monitored the cytotoxicity effects of this drug on three cultured cell lines including hepatocytes (HepG2), epithelial cells (EAhy 926) and renal cells (Vero). We have investigated the effects of amiodarone on (i) cell viabilities, (ii) heat shock protein expressions (Hsp 70) as a parameter of protective and adaptive response and (iii) oxidative damage.Our results clearly showed that amiodarone inhibits cell proliferation, induces an over-expression of Hsp 70 and generates significant amount of reactive oxygen species as measured by lipid peroxidation occurrence. However, toxicity of amiodarone was significantly higher in renal and epithelial cells than in hepatocytes. Vitamin E supplement restores the major part of cell mortalities induced by amiodarone showing that oxidative damage is the predominant toxic effect of the drug.Except its toxicity for the cardiac system, our findings demonstrated that amiodarone can target other tissues. Therefore, kidneys present a high sensibility to this drug which may limit its use with subjects suffering from renal disorders. PMID:21093234

  15. Accelerating skin wound healing by M-CSF through generating SSEA-1 and -3 stem cells in the injured sites

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yunyuan; Jalili, Reza Baradar; Ghahary, Aziz

    2016-01-01

    Wound healing is a complicated process requiring the collaborative efforts of different cell lineages. Our recent studies have found that one subset of hematopoietic cells can be induced to dedifferentiate into multipotent stem cells by means of a proliferating fibroblast releasable factor, M-CSF. Understanding the importance of stem cells on skin wound healing, here we evaluate the biological significance of M-CSF on skin wound healing. In an in vivo mouse skin excisional wound model, we found that SSEA-positive stem cells were present in wounded but not normal skin. After isolating skin cells from either normal or wounded skin by collagenase digestion, and analyzing the SSEA-1 positive cells by flow cytometry, we found a significant increase in the number of SSEA-1 positive cells in wounded skin. Topical application of M-CSF in skin wounds accelerated healing remarkably, while application of M-CSF-neutralizing antibody slowed wound healing. Furthermore, injection of EGFP-labeled hematopoietic cell-derived stem cells generated from M-CSF treated splenocytes resulted in EGFP-labeled cells being enriched in the skin wound site and further differentiated into functional organ-specific cells. Together, these data demonstrated that M-CSF makes a significant contribution to the healing process by inducing hematopoietic cell dedifferentiation into stem cells. PMID:27363517

  16. The developmental pathway for CD103(+)CD8+ tissue-resident memory T cells of skin.

    PubMed

    Mackay, Laura K; Rahimpour, Azad; Ma, Joel Z; Collins, Nicholas; Stock, Angus T; Hafon, Ming-Li; Vega-Ramos, Javier; Lauzurica, Pilar; Mueller, Scott N; Stefanovic, Tijana; Tscharke, David C; Heath, William R; Inouye, Michael; Carbone, Francis R; Gebhardt, Thomas

    2013-12-01

    Tissue-resident memory T cells (T(RM) cells) provide superior protection against infection in extralymphoid tissues. Here we found that CD103(+)CD8(+) T(RM) cells developed in the skin from epithelium-infiltrating precursor cells that lacked expression of the effector-cell marker KLRG1. A combination of entry into the epithelium plus local signaling by interleukin 15 (IL-15) and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) was required for the formation of these long-lived memory cells. Notably, differentiation into T(RM) cells resulted in the progressive acquisition of a unique transcriptional profile that differed from that of circulating memory cells and other types of T cells that permanently reside in skin epithelium. We provide a comprehensive molecular framework for the local differentiation of a distinct peripheral population of memory cells that forms a first-line immunological defense system in barrier tissues. PMID:24162776

  17. Saggy skin as a presenting sign of angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Maher, N G; Chiang, Y Z; Badoux, X; Vonthethoff, L W; Murrell, D F

    2016-06-01

    Angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma (AITL) is a rare, aggressive form of peripheral T-cell lymphoma that has a variety of cutaneous manifestations. To our knowledge, saggy skin has not been documented as one of these manifestations. We report a case of a patient with angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma presenting initially with pruritus and saggy skin, which later progressed into erythroderma despite chemotherapy; the disease eventually resolved with autologous stem cell transplant. Appreciating the cutaneous manifestations of AITL may allow for earlier diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26620295

  18. Transplanted Skin-Derived Precursor Stem Cells Generate Enteric Ganglion-Like Structures in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Justin P.; Sullins, Veronica F.; Dunn, James C. Y.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Hirschsprung’s disease is characterized by a developmental arrest of neural crest cell migration, causing distal aganglionosis. Transplanted cells derived from the neural crest may regenerate enteric ganglia in this condition. We investigated the potential of skin-derived precursor cells (SKPs) to engraft and to differentiate into enteric ganglia in aganglionic rat intestine in vivo. Methods Adult Lewis rat jejunal segments were separated from intestinal continuity and treated with benzalkonium chloride to induce aganglionosis. Ganglia were identified via immunohistochemical stains for S100 and β-III tubulin (TUJ1). SKPs were procured from neonatal Lewis rats expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP) and cultured in neuroglial-selective media. SKP cell line expansion was quantified, and immunophenotypes were assessed by immunocytochemistry. Aganglionic segments underwent SKP transplantation 21–79 days after benzalkonium chloride treatment. The presence of GFP+ cells, mature neurons, and mature glia was evaluated at post-transplant days 1, 6, and 9. Results Benzalkonium chloride-induced aganglionosis persisted for at least 85 days. Prior to differentiation, SKPs expressed S100, denoting neural crest lineage, and nestin, a marker of neuronal precursors. Differentiated SKPs in vitro expressed GFAP, a marker of glial differentiation, as well as TUJ1 and several enteric neurotransmitters. After transplantation, GFP+ structures resembling ganglia were identified between longitudinal and circular smooth muscle layers. Conclusion SKPs are capable of engraftment, migration, and differentiation within aganglionic rodent intestine in vivo. Differentiated SKPs generate structures that resemble enteric ganglia. Our observations suggest that SKPs represent a potential gangliogenic therapeutic agent for Hirschsprung’s disease. PMID:25092099

  19. Rotating bio-reactor cell culture apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarz, Ray P. (Inventor); Wolf, David A. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A bioreactor system is described in which a tubular housing contains an internal circularly disposed set of blade members and a central tubular filter all mounted for rotation about a common horizontal axis and each having independent rotational support and rotational drive mechanisms. The housing, blade members and filter preferably are driven at a constant slow speed for placing a fluid culture medium with discrete microbeads and cell cultures in a discrete spatial suspension in the housing. Replacement fluid medium is symmetrically input and fluid medium is symmetrically output from the housing where the input and the output are part of a loop providing a constant or intermittent flow of fluid medium in a closed loop.

  20. How do culture media influence in vitro perivascular cell behavior?

    PubMed

    Huber, Birgit; Volz, Ann-Cathrin; Kluger, Petra Juliane

    2015-12-01

    Perivascular cells are multilineage cells located around the vessel wall and important for wall stabilization. In this study, we evaluated a stem cell media and a perivascular cell-specific media for the culture of primary perivascular cells regarding their cell morphology, doubling time, stem cell properties, and expression of cell type-specific markers. When the two cell culture media were compared to each other, perivascular cells cultured in the stem cell medium had a more elongated morphology and a faster doubling rate and cells cultured in the pericyte medium had a more typical morphology, with several filopodia, and a slower doubling rate. To evaluate stem cell properties, perivascular cells, CD146(-) cells, and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were differentiated into the adipogenic, osteogenic, and chondrogenic lineages. It was seen that perivascular cells, as well as CD146(-) cells and MSCs, cultured in stem cell medium showed greater differentiation than cells cultured in pericyte-specific medium. The expression of pericyte-specific markers CD146, neural/glial antigen 2 (NG2), platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β (PDGFR-β), myosin, and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) could be found in both pericyte cultures, as well as to varying amounts in CD146(-) cells, MSCs, and endothelial cells. The here presented work shows that perivascular cells can adapt to their in vitro environment and cell culture conditions influence cell functionality, such as doubling rate or differentiation behavior. Pericyte-specific markers were shown to be expressed also from cells other than perivascular cells. We can further conclude that CD146(+) perivascular cells are inhomogeneous cell population probably containing stem cell subpopulations, which are located perivascular around capillaries. PMID:26179857

  1. Inhibitory effect of berberine on human skin squamous cell carcinoma A431 cells.

    PubMed

    Li, D X; Zhang, J; Zhang, Y; Zhao, P W; Yang, L M

    2015-01-01

    Berberine (BBR) is a natural alkaloid with significant anti-tumor activity against many types of cancer cells. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms employed by BBR to repress the proliferation and growth of skin squamous cell carcinoma A431 cells. Berberine was reported to inhibit the proliferation of A431 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner and was observed to induce a series of biochemical events, including the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, release of cytochrome-c to cytosol, induction of proteins of the Bcl-2 family and caspases, and the cleavage of poly(ADP)-ribose polymerase. This suggested its ability to induce apoptosis. The results of a wound healing test revealed that berberine inhibited the migration of A431 cells. Ezrin was transfected into A431 cells by RNA interference. The level of expression of Ezrin in the transfected A431 cells was observed to decrease with berberine treatment, which suggested that berberine might inhibit the invasion of A431 cells through Ezrin. The results of this study demonstrated that berberine could potentially inhibit proliferation, induce apoptosis, and inhibit the invasion of A431 cells. PMID:26400287

  2. Real-time cell analysis: sensitivity of different vertebrate cell cultures to copper sulfate measured by xCELLigence(®).

    PubMed

    Rakers, S; Imse, F; Gebert, M

    2014-10-01

    In this study, we report the use of a real-time cell analysis (RTCA) test system, the xCELLigence(®) RTCA, as efficient tool for a fast cytotoxicity analysis and comparison of four different vertebrate cell cultures. This new dynamic real-time monitoring and impedance-based assay allows for a combined measurement of cell adhesion, spreading and proliferation. Cell cultures were obtained from mouse, rat, human and fish, all displaying a fibroblast-like phenotype. The measured impedance values could be correlated to characteristic cell culture behaviours. In parallel, relative cytotoxicity of a commonly used but due to its very good water solubility highly hazardous pesticide, copper sulfate, was evaluated under in vitro conditions through measurements of cell viability by classical end-point based assays MTT and PrestoBlue(®). Cell line responses in terms of viability as measured by these three methods were variable between the fish skin cells and cells from higher vertebrates and also between the three methods. The advantage of impedance-based measurements is mainly based on the continuous monitoring of cell responses for a broad range of different cells, including fish cells. PMID:25001081

  3. Skin-resident memory CD4+ T cells enhance protection against Leishmania major infection

    PubMed Central

    Glennie, Nelson D.; Yeramilli, Venkata A.; Beiting, Daniel P.; Volk, Susan W.; Weaver, Casey T.

    2015-01-01

    Leishmaniasis causes a significant disease burden worldwide. Although Leishmania-infected patients become refractory to reinfection after disease resolution, effective immune protection has not yet been achieved by human vaccines. Although circulating Leishmania-specific T cells are known to play a critical role in immunity, the role of memory T cells present in peripheral tissues has not been explored. Here, we identify a population of skin-resident Leishmania-specific memory CD4+ T cells. These cells produce IFN-γ and remain resident in the skin when transplanted by skin graft onto naive mice. They function to recruit circulating T cells to the skin in a CXCR3-dependent manner, resulting in better control of the parasites. Our findings are the first to demonstrate that CD4+ TRM cells form in response to a parasitic infection, and indicate that optimal protective immunity to Leishmania, and thus the success of a vaccine, may depend on generating both circulating and skin-resident memory T cells. PMID:26216123

  4. Silibinin Inhibits Ultraviolet B Radiation-Induced DNA-Damage and Apoptosis by Enhancing Interleukin-12 Expression in JB6 Cells and SKH-1 Hairless Mouse Skin

    PubMed Central

    Narayanapillai, Sreekanth; Agarwal, Chapla; Deep, Gagan; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated silibinin efficacy against ultraviolet B (UVB)-induced skin carcinogenesis via different mechanisms in cell lines and animal models; however, its role in regulating interleukin-12 (IL-12), an immunomodulatory cytokine that reduces UVB-induced DNA damage and apoptosis, is not known. Here, we report that UVB irradiation causes caspase 3 and PARP cleavage and apoptosis, and addition of recombinant IL-12 or silibinin immediately after UVB significantly protects UVB-induced apoptosis in JB6 cells. IL-12 antibody-mediated blocking of IL-12 activity compromised the protective effects of both IL-12 and silibinin. Both silibinin and IL-12 also accelerated the repair of UVB-caused cyclobutane-pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) in JB6 cells. Additional studies confirmed that indeed silibinin causes a significant increase in IL-12 levels in UVB-irradiated JB6 cells as well as in mouse skin epidermis, and that similar to cell-culture findings, silibinin topical application immediately after UVB exposure causes a strong protection against UVB-induced TUNEL positive cells in epidermis possibly through a significantly accelerated repair of UVB-caused CPDs. Together, these findings for the first time provide an important insight regarding the pharmacological mechanism wherein silibinin induces endogenous IL-12 in its efficacy against UVB-caused skin damages. In view of the fact that an enhanced endogenous IL-12 level could effectively remove UVB-caused DNA damage and associated skin cancer, our findings suggest that the use of silibinin in UVB-damaged human skin would also be a practical and translational strategy to manage solar radiation-caused skin damages as well as skin cancer. PMID:23359305

  5. Molecular and culture-based assessment of the microbial diversity of diabetic chronic foot wounds and contralateral skin sites.

    PubMed

    Oates, Angela; Bowling, Frank L; Boulton, Andrew J M; McBain, Andrew J

    2012-07-01

    Wound debridement samples and contralateral (healthy) skin swabs acquired from 26 patients attending a specialist foot clinic were analyzed by differential isolation and eubacterium-specific PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) in conjunction with DNA sequencing. Thirteen of 26 wounds harbored pathogens according to culture analyses, with Staphylococcus aureus being the most common (13/13). Candida (1/13), pseudomonas (1/13), and streptococcus (7/13) were less prevalent. Contralateral skin was associated with comparatively low densities of bacteria, and overt pathogens were not detected. According to DGGE analyses, all wounds contained significantly greater eubacterial diversity than contralateral skin (P < 0.05), although no significant difference in total eubacterial diversity was detected between wounds from which known pathogens had been isolated and those that were putatively uninfected. DGGE amplicons with homology to Staphylococcus sp. (8/13) and S. aureus (2/13) were detected in putatively infected wound samples, while Staphylococcus sp. amplicons were detected in 11/13 noninfected wounds; S. aureus was not detected in these samples. While a majority of skin-derived DGGE consortial fingerprints could be differentiated from wound profiles through principal component analysis (PCA), a large minority could not. Furthermore, wounds from which pathogens had been isolated could not be distinguished from putatively uninfected wounds on this basis. In conclusion, while chronic wounds generally harbored greater eubacterial diversity than healthy skin, the isolation of known pathogens was not associated with qualitatively distinct consortial profiles or otherwise altered diversity. The data generated support the utility of both culture and DGGE for the microbial characterization of chronic wounds. PMID:22553231

  6. Extracts from Calendula officinalis offer in vitro protection against H2 O2 induced oxidative stress cell killing of human skin cells.

    PubMed

    Alnuqaydan, Abdullah M; Lenehan, Claire E; Hughes, Rachel R; Sanderson, Barbara J

    2015-01-01

    The in vitro safety and antioxidant potential of Calendula officinalis flower head extracts was investigated. The effect of different concentrations (0.125, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0 and 5.0% (v/v)) of Calendula extracts on human skin cells HaCaT in vitro was explored. Doses of 1.0% (v/v) (0.88 mg dry weight/mL) or less showed no toxicity. Cells were also exposed to the Calendula extracts for either 4, 24 or 48 h before being exposed to an oxidative insult (hydrogen peroxide H2 O2 ) for 1 h. Using the MTT cytotoxicity assay, it was observed that two independent extracts of C. officinalis gave time-dependent and concentration-dependent H2 O2 protection against induced oxidative stress in vitro using human skin cells. Pre-incubation with the Calendula extracts for 24 and 48 h increased survival relative to the population without extract by 20% and 40% respectively following oxidative challenge. The antioxidant potential of the Calendula extracts was confirmed using a complimentary chemical technique, the DPPH(●) assay. Calendula extracts exhibited free radical scavenging abilities. This study demonstrates that Calendula flower extracts contain bioactive and free radical scavenging compounds that significantly protect against oxidative stress in a human skin cell culture model. PMID:25266574

  7. Primary culture of axolotl spinal cord ependymal cells.

    PubMed

    Chernoff, E A; Munck, C M; Mendelsohn, L G; Egar, M W

    1990-01-01

    In order to examine the role of ependymal cells in the spinal cord regeneration of urodele amphibians, procedures were established to identify and culture these cells. Cell isolation and culture conditions were determined for ependymal cells from larval and adult axolotls (Ambystoma mexicanum). Dissociated cells prepared from intact spinal cords were cultured on fibronectin- or laminin-coated dishes. Dissociated cells attached more rapidly to fibronectin, but attached and spread on both fibronectin and laminin. Essentially pure populations of ependymal cells were obtained by removing 2 week old ependymal outgrowth from lesion sites of adult spinal cords. These ependymal outgrowths attached and grew only on fibronectin-coated dishes. Growth and trophic factors were tested to formulate a medium that would support ependymal cell proliferation. The necessary peptide hormones were PDGF, EGF, and insulin. TGF-beta(1) affected the organization of cell outgrowth. Initially, longterm culture required the presence of high levels of axolotl serum. Addition of purified bovine hemaglobin in the culture medium reduced the serum requirement. Outgrowth from expiants was subcultured by transferring groups of cells. Intrinsic markers were used to identify ependymal cells in culture. The ependymal cells have characteristic ring-shaped nucleoli in both intact axolotl spinal cords and in culture. Indirect immunofluorescence examination of intermediate filaments showed that ependymal cells were glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) negative and vimentin positive in culture. Identification of dividing cells was made using (3)H-thymidine incorporation and autoradiography, and by the presence of mitotic figures in the cultured cells. PMID:18620322

  8. Visualization of the melanosome transfer-inhibition in a mouse epidermal cell co-culture model.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hae Jong; Kazi, Julhash U; Lee, You-Ree; Nguyen, Dung H; Lee, Hyang-Bok; Shin, Jeong-Hyun; Soh, Jae-Won; Kim, Eun-Ki

    2010-02-01

    Transfer of melanin-containing melanosomes from melanocytes to neighboring keratinocytes results in skin pigmentation. To provide a more practical method of visualizing melanosomes in melanocytes as well as in keratinocytes, we attempted to use murine cell lines instead of human primary cells. We generated various fluorescent fusion proteins of tyrosinase, a melanin synthesis enzyme located in the melanosome, by using green fluorescent protein and red fluorescent protein. The intracellular localization of tyrosinase was then examined by fluorescence and confocal microscopy. Co-culture of murine melanocytes and keratinocytes was optimized and melanosome transfer was either stimulated with alphaMSH or partially inhibited by niacinamide. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study showing that a murine co-culture model, in addition to human primary cell co-culture, can be a good tool for depigmenting agent screening by monitoring melanosome transfer. PMID:20043134

  9. Cell Density Effects of Frog Skin Bacteria on Their Capacity to Inhibit Growth of the Chytrid Fungus, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis.

    PubMed

    Yasumiba, Kiyomi; Bell, Sara; Alford, Ross

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial symbionts on frog skin can reduce the growth of the chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) through production of inhibitory metabolites. Bacteria can be effective at increasing the resistance of amphibians to chytridiomycosis when added to amphibian skin, and isolates can be screened for production of metabolites that inhibit Bd growth in vitro. However, some bacteria use density-dependent mechanism such as quorum sensing to regulate metabolite production. It is therefore important to consider cell density effects when evaluating bacteria as possible candidates for bioaugmentation. The aim of our study was to evaluate how the density of cutaneous bacteria affects their inhibition of Bd growth in vitro. We sampled cutaneous bacteria isolated from three frog species in the tropical rainforests of northern Queensland, Australia, and selected ten isolates that were inhibitory to Bd in standardised pilot trials. We grew each isolate in liquid culture at a range of initial dilutions, sub-sampled each dilution at a series of times during the first 48 h of growth and measured spectrophotometric absorbance values, cell counts and Bd-inhibitory activity of cell-free supernatants at each time point. The challenge assay results clearly demonstrated that the inhibitory effects of most isolates were density dependent, with relatively low variation among isolates in the minimum cell density needed to inhibit Bd growth. We suggest the use of minimum cell densities and fast-growing candidate isolates to maximise bioaugmentation efforts. PMID:26563320

  10. Application of Microneedles to Skin Induces Activation of Epidermal Langerhans Cells and Dermal Dendritic Cells in Mice.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Asuka; Nomoto, Yusuke; Watanabe, Mai; Kimura, Soichiro; Morimoto, Yasunori; Ueda, Hideo

    2016-08-01

    An adequate immune response to percutaneous vaccine application is generated by delivery of sufficient amounts of antigen to skin and by administration of toxin adjuvants or invasive skin abrasion that leads to an adjuvant effect. Microneedles penetrate the stratum corneum, the outermost layer of the skin, and enable direct delivery of vaccines from the surface into the skin, where immunocompetent dendritic cells are densely distributed. However, whether the application of microneedles to the skin activates antigen-presenting cells (APCs) has not been demonstrated. Here we aimed to demonstrate that microneedles may act as a potent physical adjuvant for successful transcutaneous immunization (TCI). We prepared samples of isolated epidermal and dermal cells and analyzed the expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II and costimulatory molecules on Langerhans or dermal dendritic cells in the prepared samples using flow cytometry. The expression of MHC class II and costimulatory molecules demonstrated an upward trend in APCs in the skin after the application of 500- and 300-µm microneedles. In addition, in the epidermal cells, application of microneedles induced more effective activation of Langerhans cells than did an invasive tape-stripping (positive control). In conclusion, the use of microneedles is likely to have a positive effect not only as an antigen delivery system but also as a physical technique inducing an adjuvant-like effect for TCI. PMID:27251665

  11. Six cloned calves produced from adult fibroblast cells after long-term culture

    PubMed Central

    Kubota, Chikara; Yamakuchi, Hiroshi; Todoroki, Junichi; Mizoshita, Kazunori; Tabara, Norio; Barber, Michele; Yang, Xiangzhong

    2000-01-01

    Cloning whole animals with somatic cells as parents offers the possibility of targeted genetic manipulations in vitro such as “gene knock-out” by homologous recombination. However, such manipulation requires prolonged culture of nuclear donor cells. Previous successes in cloning have been limited to the use of cells collected either fresh or after short-term culture. Therefore, demonstration of genetic totipotency of cells after prolonged culture is pivotal to combining site-specific genetic manipulations and cloning. Here we report birth of six clones of an aged (17-year-old) Japanese Black Beef bull using ear skin fibroblast cells as nuclear donor cells after up to 3 months of in vitro culture (10–15 passages). We observed higher developmental rates for embryos derived from later passages (10 and 15) as compared with those embryos from an early passage (passage 5). The four surviving clones are now 10–12 months of age and appear normal, similar to their naturally reproduced peers. These data show that fibroblasts of aged animals remain competent for cloning, and prolonged culture does not affect the cloning competence of adult somatic donor cells. PMID:10655472

  12. Glycolipid biosurfactants, mannosylerythritol lipids, show antioxidant and protective effects against H(2)O(2)-induced oxidative stress in cultured human skin fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Makoto; Morita, Tomotake; Fukuoka, Tokuma; Imura, Tomohiro; Kitamoto, Dai

    2012-01-01

    Mannosylerythritol lipids (MELs) are biosurfactants known for their versatile interfacial and biochemical properties. To broaden their application in cosmetics, we investigated the antioxidant properties of different MEL derivatives (MEL-A, -B, and -C) by using a 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl hydrazine (DPPH) free-radical- and superoxide anion-scavenging assay. All MEL derivatives tested showed antioxidant activity in vitro, but at lower levels than those of arbutin. Of the MELs, MEL-C, which is produced from soybean oil by Pseudozyma hubeiensis, showed the highest rates of DPPH radical scavenging (50.3% at 10 mg/mL) and superoxide anion scavenging (>50% at 1 mg/mL). The antioxidant property of MEL-C was further examined using cultured human skin fibroblasts (NB1RGB cells) under H(2)O(2) induced oxidative stress. Surprisingly, MEL-C had a higher protective activity against oxidative stress than arbutin did: 10 µg/mL of MEL-C and arbutin had protective activities of 30.3% and 13%, respectively. Expression of an oxidative stress marker, cyclooxygenase-2, in these cells was repressed by treatment with MEL-C as well as by arbutin. MEL-C was thus confirmed to have antioxidant and protective effects in cells, and we suggest that MELs have potential as anti-aging skin care ingredients. PMID:22864517

  13. Cardiac Cells Beating in Culture: A Laboratory Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver, Debora

    2007-01-01

    This article describes how to establish a primary tissue culture, where cells are taken directly from an organ of a living animal. Cardiac cells are taken from chick embryos and transferred to culture dishes. These cells are not transformed and therefore have a limited life span. However, the unique characteristics of cardiac cells are maintained…

  14. Equipment for large-scale mammalian cell culture.

    PubMed

    Ozturk, Sadettin S

    2014-01-01

    This chapter provides information on commonly used equipment in industrial mammalian cell culture, with an emphasis on bioreactors. The actual equipment used in the cell culture process can vary from one company to another, but the main steps remain the same. The process involves expansion of cells in seed train and inoculation train processes followed by cultivation of cells in a production bioreactor. Process and equipment options for each stage of the cell culture process are introduced and examples are provided. Finally, the use of disposables during seed train and cell culture production is discussed. PMID:24429549

  15. Rearrangement of S-100 immunoreactive Langerhans' cells in human psoriatic skin treated with peptide T.

    PubMed

    Wang, L; Hilliges, M; Talme, T; Marcusson, J A; Wetterberg, L; Johansson, O

    1995-01-01

    Dendritic cells marked by protein S-100 (S-100) antiserum in the suprabasal layers of the epidermis have previously been identified to be Langerhans' cells. In this study, S-100 immunoreactive cells have been investigated in psoriatic lesioned skin during and after peptide T treatment. Peptide T is an octapeptide with affinity for the CD4 receptor. Nine patients were intravenously infused with peptide T, 2 mg in 500 ml saline per day for 28 days. Sections from involved skin before, every week during, and after the treatment were processed by indirect immunofluorescence using S-100 antiserum. Before the treatment the epidermal Langerhans' cells were numerically decreased or even completely gone in the involved skin of psoriasis as compared to skin from normal healthy controls, while the dermal dendritic cells instead were increased and gathered in cell clusters around vascular structures. Four of the nine patients had histopathological improvements after the peptide T treatment, and, in those cases, the dendritic cells in the dermis were reduced in number, and the Langerhans' cells in the epidermis were numerically increased as well as even reversed to normal position and morphology. These changes in the distribution and density of Langerhans' cells represent their rearrangement during the course of psoriasis and/or the remission after peptide T treatment.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7727353

  16. Human norovirus culture in B cells.

    PubMed

    Jones, Melissa K; Grau, Katrina R; Costantini, Veronica; Kolawole, Abimbola O; de Graaf, Miranda; Freiden, Pamela; Graves, Christina L; Koopmans, Marion; Wallet, Shannon M; Tibbetts, Scott A; Schultz-Cherry, Stacey; Wobus, Christiane E; Vinjé, Jan; Karst, Stephanie M

    2015-12-01

    Human noroviruses (HuNoVs) are a leading cause of foodborne disease and severe childhood diarrhea, and they cause a majority of the gastroenteritis outbreaks worldwide. However, the development of effective and long-lasting HuNoV vaccines and therapeutics has been greatly hindered by their uncultivability. We recently demonstrated that a HuNoV replicates in human B cells, and that commensal bacteria serve as a cofactor for this infection. In this protocol, we provide detailed methods for culturing the GII.4-Sydney HuNoV strain directly in human B cells, and in a coculture system in which the virus must cross a confluent epithelial barrier to access underlying B cells. We also describe methods for bacterial stimulation of HuNoV B cell infection and for measuring viral attachment to the surface of B cells. Finally, we highlight variables that contribute to the efficiency of viral replication in this system. Infection assays require 3 d and attachment assays require 3 h. Analysis of infection or attachment samples, including RNA extraction and RT-qPCR, requires ∼6 h. PMID:26513671

  17. Human norovirus culture in B cells

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Melissa K; Grau, Katrina R; Costantini, Veronica; Kolawole, Abimbola O; de Graaf, Miranda; Freiden, Pamela; Graves, Christina L; Koopmans, Marion; Wallet, Shannon M; Tibbetts, Scott A; Schultz-Cherry, Stacey; Wobus, Christiane E; Vinjé, Jan; Karst, Stephanie M

    2015-01-01

    Human noroviruses (HunoVs) are a leading cause of foodborne disease and severe childhood diarrhea, and they cause a majority of the gastroenteritis outbreaks worldwide. However, the development of effective and long-lasting HunoV vaccines and therapeutics has been greatly hindered by their uncultivability. We recently demonstrated that a HunoV replicates in human B cells, and that commensal bacteria serve as a cofactor for this infection. In this protocol, we provide detailed methods for culturing the GII.4-sydney HunoV strain directly in human B cells, and in a coculture system in which the virus must cross a confluent epithelial barrier to access underlying B cells. We also describe methods for bacterial stimulation of HunoV B cell infection and for measuring viral attachment to the surface of B cells. Finally, we highlight variables that contribute to the efficiency of viral replication in this system. Infection assays require 3 d and attachment assays require 3 h. analysis of infection or attachment samples, including rna extraction and rt-qpcr, requires ~6 h. PMID:26513671

  18. Oxygenation of intensive cell-culture system.

    PubMed

    Emery, A N; Jan, D C; al-Rubeai, M

    1995-11-01

    The abilities of various methods of oxygenation to meet the demands of high-cell-density culture were investigated using a spin filter perfusion system in a bench-top bioreactor. Oxygen demand at high cell density could not be met by sparging with air inside a spin filter (oxygen transfer values in this condition were comparable with those for surface aeration). Sparging with air outside a spin filter gave adequate oxygen transfer for the support of cell concentrations above 10(7) ml-1 in fully aerobic conditions but the addition of antifoam to control foaming caused blockage of the spinfilter mesh. Bubble-free aeration through immersed silicone tubing with pure oxygen gave similar oxygen transfer rates to that of sparging with air but without the problems of bubble damage and fouling of the spin filter. A supra-optimal level of dissolved oxygen (478% air saturation) inhibited cell growth. However, cells could recover from this stress and reach high density after reduction of the dissolved oxygen level to 50% air saturation. PMID:8590652

  19. Neonatal rat heart cells cultured in simulated microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akins, Robert E.; Schroedl, Nancy A.; Gonda, Steve R.; Hartzell, Charles R.

    1994-01-01

    In vitro characteristics of cardiac cells cultured in simulated microgravity are reported. Tissue culture methods performed at unit gravity constrain cells to propagate, differentiate, and interact in a two dimensional (2D) plane. Neonatal rat cardiac cells in 2D culture organize predominantly as bundles of cardiomyocytes with the intervening areas filled by non-myocyte cell types. Such cardiac cell cultures respond predictably to the addition of exogenous compounds, and in many ways they represent an excellent in vitro model system. The gravity-induced 2D organization of the cells, however, does not accurately reflect the distribution of cells in the intact tissue. We have begun characterizations of a three-dimensional (3D) culturing system designed to mimic microgravity. The NASA designed High-Aspect-Ratio-Vessel (HARV) bioreactors provide a low shear environment which allows cells to be cultured in static suspension. HARV-3D cultures were prepared on microcarrier beads and compared to control-2D cultures using a combination of microscopic and biochemical techniques. Both systems were uniformly inoculated and medium exchanged at standard intervals. Cells in control cultures adhered to the polystyrene surface of the tissue culture dishes and exhibited typical 2D organization. Cells in cultured in HARV's adhered to microcarrier beads, the beads aggregated into defined clusters containing 8 to 15 beads per cluster, and the clusters exhibited distinct 3D layers: myocytes and fibroblasts appeared attached to the surfaces of beads and were overlaid by an outer cell type. In addition, cultures prepared in HARV's using alternative support matrices also displayed morphological formations not seen in control cultures. Generally, the cells prepared in HARV and control cultures were similar, however, the dramatic alterations in 3D organization recommend the HARV as an ideal vessel for the generation of tissue-like organizations of cardiac cells in simulated microgravity.

  20. Neonatal rat heart cells cultured in simulated microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akins, R. E.; Schroedl, N. A.; Gonda, S. R.; Hartzell, C. R.

    1997-01-01

    In vitro characteristics of cardiac cells cultured in simulated microgravity are reported. Tissue culture methods performed at unit gravity constrain cells to propagate, differentiate, and interact in a two-dimensional (2D) plane. Neonatal rat cardiac cells in 2D culture organize predominantly as bundles of cardiomyocytes with the intervening areas filled by nonmyocyte cell types. Such cardiac cell cultures respond predictably to the addition of exogenous compounds, and in many ways they represent an excellent in vitro model system. The gravity-induced 2D organization of the cells, however, does not accurately reflect the distribution of cells in the intact tissue. We have begun characterizations of a three-dimensional (3D) culturing system designed to mimic microgravity. The NASA-designed High-Aspect Ratio Vessel (HARV) bioreactors provide a low shear environment that allows cells to be cultured in static suspension. HARV-3D cultures were prepared on microcarrier beads and compared to control-2D cultures using a combination of microscopic and biochemical techniques. Both systems were uniformly inoculated and medium exchanged at standard intervals. Cells in control cultures adhered to the polystyrene surface of the tissue culture dishes and exhibited typical 2D organization. Cells cultured in HARVs adhered to microcarrier beads, the beads aggregated into defined clusters containing 8 to 15 beads per cluster, and the clusters exhibited distinct 3D layers: myocytes and fibroblasts appeared attached to the surfaces of beads and were overlaid by an outer cell type. In addition, cultures prepared in HARVs using alternative support matrices also displayed morphological formations not seen in control cultures. Generally, the cells prepared in HARV and control cultures were similar; however, the dramatic alterations in 3D organization recommend the HARV as an ideal vessel for the generation of tissuelike organization of cardiac cells in vitro.

  1. Inhibition of proliferation of psoriatic and healthy fibroblasts in cell culture by selected Dead-sea salts.

    PubMed

    Levi-Schaffer, F; Shani, J; Politi, Y; Rubinchik, E; Brenner, S

    1996-05-01

    The effect of five selected minerals abundant in the Dead-sea brine was studied on proliferation of fibroblasts grown from psoriatic and healthy skin biopsy specimens in cell culture. The reason for carrying out this study was looking for the mechanism of the antiproliferative effect of selective Dead-sea minerals in improving the psoriatic condition. Psoriatic skin shave biopsy specimens (both from involved and uninvolved areas of the body) as well as healthy skin (obtained from amputated limbs) were incubated in tissue culture, and their outgrowing fibroblasts were used for this study. The number of cells and their cyclic AMP content were used as parameters for cell division and for proving the selective involvement of magnesium salts in the antiproliferative effect. It is shown that the inhibitory effects of magnesium bromide and magnesium chloride on cell growth were significantly stronger than those of their corresponding potassium salts or of sodium chloride. These results were obtained with both psoriatic and healthy skin fibroblasts, indicating that the inhibitory effect of the selected Dead-sea minerals is present in healthy and psoriatic skin cells. PMID:8807676

  2. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell implantation for the treatment of radioactivity‑induced acute skin damage in rats.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Kai; Wu, Weizhen; Yang, Shunliang; Huang, Lianghu; Chen, Jin; Gong, Chungui; Fu, Zhichao; Zhang, Linlin; Tan, Jianming

    2015-11-01

    The present study aimed to observe the role of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in the repair of acute skin damage caused by radiation. Rat bone marrow MSCs (BMSCs) were isolated and cultured in vitro. A rat model of radiation‑induced acute skin damage was established by irradiation of the hind legs of Sprague-Dawley rats using a linear accelerator (45 Gy). After irradiation, rats were randomly divided into two groups: BMSC group and control group. Rats in the BMSC group were treated with a tail vein injection of 2x106 BMSCs (1 ml) immediately after irradiation and a local multipoint injection of 2x106 BMSCs at the injured area two weeks later. Then the wound healing of each rat was observed. The expression of transforming growth factor (TGF)‑β1, stromal cell‑derived factor-1 (SDF‑1) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in the wounded tissues was determined by immunohistochemistry. The results demonstrated that skin damage was milder in the BMSC group than in the control group. Moreover, the speed of healing in the BMSC group was better than that in the control group. In addition, the wound score, it was significantly lower in the BMSC group than in the control group (P<0.05). The expression of PGE2 and TGF‑β1 in the BMSC group was also significantly lower than that in the control group (P<0.05), whereas the SDF‑1 expression was significantly higher in the BMSC group than that in the control group (P<0.05). BMSCs can effectively reduce inflammation and fibrosis in the wounded skin and promote the repair of acute radioactive skin injury. Thus, may be developed as a novel treatment for wound healing. PMID:26323987

  3. Metabolic flux rewiring in mammalian cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Young, Jamey D

    2013-12-01

    Continuous cell lines (CCLs) engage in 'wasteful' glucose and glutamine metabolism that leads to accumulation of inhibitory byproducts, primarily lactate and ammonium. Advances in techniques for mapping intracellular carbon fluxes and profiling global changes in enzyme expression have led to a deeper understanding of the molecular drivers underlying these metabolic alterations. However, recent studies have revealed that CCLs are not necessarily entrenched in a glycolytic or glutaminolytic phenotype, but instead can shift their metabolism toward increased oxidative metabolism as nutrients become depleted and/or growth rate slows. Progress to understand dynamic flux regulation in CCLs has enabled the development of novel strategies to force cultures into desirable metabolic phenotypes, by combining fed-batch feeding strategies with direct metabolic engineering of host cells. PMID:23726154

  4. Activin enhances skin tumourigenesis and malignant progression by inducing a pro-tumourigenic immune cell response

    PubMed Central

    Antsiferova, Maria; Huber, Marcel; Meyer, Michael; Piwko-Czuchra, Aleksandra; Ramadan, Tamara; MacLeod, Amanda S.; Havran, Wendy L.; Dummer, Reinhard; Hohl, Daniel; Werner, Sabine

    2011-01-01

    Activin is an important orchestrator of wound repair, but its potential role in skin carcinogenesis has not been addressed. Here we show using different types of genetically modified mice that enhanced levels of activin in the skin promote skin tumour formation and their malignant progression through induction of a pro-tumourigenic microenvironment. This includes accumulation of tumour-promoting Langerhans cells and regulatory T cells in the epidermis. Furthermore, activin inhibits proliferation of tumour-suppressive epidermal γδ T cells, resulting in their progressive loss during tumour promotion. An increase in activin expression was also found in human cutaneous basal and squamous cell carcinomas when compared with control tissue. These findings highlight the parallels between wound healing and cancer, and suggest inhibition of activin action as a promising strategy for the treatment of cancers overexpressing this factor. PMID:22146395

  5. Quantifying activity: a new assay reveals T-cell signalling in tiny skin biopsy samples.

    PubMed

    Dornmair, Klaus

    2014-06-01

    Tissue-invasive T cells are observed in many inflammatory dermatological diseases, but in most cases, it is not known how they were attracted, what they might recognize, and to which extent they are activated. Answering these questions is surely essential for understanding pathogeneses of the diseases. In a recent issue of Experimental Dermatology, Smith et al. showed that early signalling events in skin-resident T cells may be investigated by multiplex immunoprecipitation flow cytometry, even if only few T cells are available from skin biopsy samples. This new technology will most likely contribute to elucidating the role of skin-invasive T cells and to understanding the pathology of dermatological diseases. PMID:24665970

  6. Cell wall compounds of red grapes skins and their grape marcs from three different winemaking techniques.

    PubMed

    Apolinar-Valiente, Rafael; Romero-Cascales, Inmaculada; Gómez-Plaza, Encarna; López-Roca, José María; Ros-García, José María

    2015-11-15

    Different winemaking practices are aimed at increasing cell wall degradation to facilitate extraction of valuables molecules into the wine. However, little attention has been paid to the composition of marcs from different cultivars according to the influence of the winemaking procedures. We provide information on skin cell walls from Cabernet Sauvignon, Syrah and Monastrell grapes and examine how different winemaking practices (addition of enzymatic preparation and β-galactosidase separately and dry ice addition) may affect the composition of marc skin cell wall material (CWM). The efficiency of CWM isolation from the grape skin and also its composition is influenced by the cultivar. A similar cultivar influence has been detected on CWM from the marc, being the differences also due to the enological technique. Our results help to increase our knowledge on the degradation of cell walls during vinification, while providing a valuable guideline to upgrade the value of these by-products. PMID:25977002

  7. Functional cloning of a gp100-reactive T-cell receptor from vitiligo patient skin.

    PubMed

    Klarquist, Jared; Eby, Jonathan M; Henning, Steven W; Li, Mingli; Wainwright, Derek A; Westerhof, Wiete; Luiten, Rosalie M; Nishimura, Michael I; Le Poole, I Caroline

    2016-05-01

    We isolated gp100-reactive T cells from perilesional skin of a patient with progressive vitiligo with superior reactivity toward melanoma cells compared with tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes 1520, a melanoma-derived T-cell line reactive with the same cognate peptide. After dimer enrichment and limited dilution cloning, amplified cells were subjected to reverse transcription and 5' RACE to identify the variable TCRα and TCRβ subunit sequences. The full-length sequence was cloned into a retroviral vector separating both subunits by a P2A slippage sequence and introduced into Jurkat cells and primary T cells. Cytokine secreted by transduced cells in response to cognate peptide and gp100-expressing targets signifies that we have successfully cloned a gp100-reactive T-cell receptor from actively depigmenting skin. PMID:26824221

  8. Identification of mast cells in buffy coat preparations from dogs with inflammatory skin diseases.

    PubMed

    Cayatte, S M; McManus, P M; Miller, W H; Scott, D W

    1995-02-01

    In 100 dogs with 4 inflammatory dermatologic diseases, buffy coat preparations from EDTA-treated blood samples were examined cytologically. Fifty-four dogs had atopy, 26 had flea-bite hypersensitivity, 17 had sarcoptic mange, and 3 had food allergy. Twenty-eight dogs had 2 or more concurrent skin diseases; most of these had secondary pyoderma. Dogs did not have mast cell tumors. Thirteen samples contained 1 or more mast cells/4 slides reviewed. This study revealed that dogs with inflammatory skin diseases can have a few to many mast cells evident on cytologic examination of buffy coat preparations. PMID:7751239

  9. Dynamic Visualization of Dendritic Cell-Antigen Interactions in the Skin Following Transcutaneous Immunization

    PubMed Central

    Rattanapak, Teerawan; Birchall, James C.; Young, Katherine; Kubo, Atsuko; Fujimori, Sayumi; Ishii, Masaru; Hook, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Delivery of vaccines into the skin provides many advantages over traditional parenteral vaccination and is a promising approach due to the abundance of antigen presenting cells (APC) residing in the skin including Langerhans cells (LC) and dermal dendritic cells (DDC). However, the main obstacle for transcutaneous immunization (TCI) is the effective delivery of the vaccine through the stratum corneum (SC) barrier to the APC in the deeper skin layers. This study therefore utilized microneedles (MN) and a lipid-based colloidal delivery system (cubosomes) as a synergistic approach for the delivery of vaccines to APC in the skin. The process of vaccine uptake and recruitment by specific types of skin APC was investigated in real-time over 4 hours in B6.Cg-Tg (Itgax-EYFP) 1 Mnz/J mice by two-photon microscopy. Incorporation of the vaccine into a particulate delivery system and the use of MN preferentially increased vaccine antigen uptake by a highly motile subpopulation of skin APC known as CD207+ DC. No uptake of antigen or any response to immunisation by LC could be detected. PMID:24586830

  10. Role of soluble and cell surface molecules in the pathogenesis of autoimmune skin diseases.

    PubMed

    Drosera, M; Facchetti, F; Landolfo, S; Mondini, M; Nyberg, F; Parodi, A; Santoro, A; Zampieri, S; Doria, A

    2006-01-01

    The skin is one of the most commonly involved tissue in rheumatic autoimmune diseases. Different mechanisms are thought to be implicated in the pathogenesis of skin lesions. In genetically predisposed individuals, ultraviolet (UV) light can contribute to the induction of skin lesions via an inflammatory process. UV light promotes the release of cytokines by keratinocytes and the induction of adhesion molecules on the surface of epidermal cells initiating a cascade of inflammatory events and recruiting immunoinflammatory cells into the skin. In this review data regarding the expression of TNF-alpha in lesional skin tissue from subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus patients and the role of interferons in the pathogenesis of skin manifestations of rheumatic autoimmune diseases are reported. In addition, an overview on the expression of cellular adhesion molecules in these diseases is provided.UV light can also induce apoptosis in keratinocytes. During this cell death several enzymes became activated. Among them, desoxyribonuclease (DNase) is an enzyme involved in degrading DNA during apoptosis. Data regarding the activity of DNAse in patients with cutaneous lupus erythematosus as a possible risk factor for the development of systemic disease are here reported. PMID:16466628

  11. Recombinant Protein Production and Insect Cell Culture and Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaulding, Glenn F. (Inventor); Goodwin, Thomas J. (Inventor); OConnor, Kim C. (Inventor); Francis, Karen M. (Inventor); Andrews, Angela D. (Inventor); Prewett, Tracey L. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A process has been developed for recombinant production of selected polypeptides using transformed insect cells cultured in a horizontally rotating culture vessel modulated to create low shear conditions. A metabolically transformed insect cell line is produced using the culture procedure regardless of genetic transformation. The recombinant polypeptide can be produced by an alternative process using virtually infected or stably transformed insect cells containing a gene encoding the described polypeptide. The insect cells can also be a host for viral production.

  12. Skin Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... States. The two most common types are basal cell cancer and squamous cell cancer. They usually form on the head, face, ... If not treated, some types of skin cancer cells can spread to other tissues and organs. Treatments ...

  13. Prevention of skin tumorigenesis and impairment of epidermal cell proliferation by targeted aquaporin-3 gene disruption.

    PubMed

    Hara-Chikuma, Mariko; Verkman, A S

    2008-01-01

    Aquaporin-3 (AQP3) is a water/glycerol-transporting protein expressed strongly at the plasma membranes of basal epidermal cells in skin. We found that human skin squamous cell carcinoma strongly overexpresses AQP3. A novel role for AQP3 in skin tumorigenesis was discovered using mice with targeted AQP3 gene disruption. We found that AQP3-null mice were remarkably resistant to the development of skin tumors following exposure to a tumor initiator and phorbol ester promoter. Though tumor initiator challenge produced comparable apoptotic responses in wild-type and AQP3-null mice, promoter-induced cell proliferation was greatly impaired in the AQP3-null epidermis. Reductions of epidermal cell glycerol, its metabolite glycerol-3-phosphate, and ATP were found in AQP3 deficiency without impairment of mitochondrial function. Glycerol supplementation corrected the reduced proliferation and ATP content in AQP3 deficiency, with cellular glycerol, ATP, and proliferative ability being closely correlated. Our data suggest involvement of AQP3-facilitated glycerol transport in epidermal cell proliferation and tumorigenesis by a novel mechanism implicating cellular glycerol as a key determinant of cellular ATP energy. AQP3 may thus be an important determinant in skin tumorigenesis and hence a novel target for tumor prevention and therapy. PMID:17967887

  14. The Effect of Adipose-Derived Stem Cells on Full-Thickness Skin Grafts

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Haojie; Huang, Hong; Chen, Deyun; Han, Yan; Han, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    Background. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of ASCs on full-thickness skin grafts. Specifically, we investigated the anti-inflammatory effects of ASCs that are mediated via regulation of the phenotypes of activated macrophages. Methods. ASCs were isolated, cultured, and injected under full-thickness skin grafts in 15 rats (ASC group). An additional 15 rats served as controls (PBS group). Skin graft survival assessment and vascularization detection were assessed with H&E staining and laser Doppler blood flowmetry (LDF). The effects of ASCs on angiogenesis, anti-inflammation, collagen accumulation-promoting, and antiscarring were assessed. Results. We found that the skin graft survival rate was significantly increased in the ASC group. The neovascularization, collagen deposition, collagen type I to type III ratio, and levels of VEGF and TGF-β3 in the ASC group were markedly higher than those in the PBS group at day 14. Additionally, in the ASC group, the levels of iNOS, IL-1β, and TNF-α were remarkably decreased, whereas the levels of IL-10 and Arg-1 were substantially increased. Conclusions. Our results confirm that ASCs transplantation can effectively improve full-thickness skin graft survival. Additionally, the anti-inflammatory role of ASCs may indirectly contribute to skin graft survival via its effect on macrophage polarization. PMID:27413735

  15. The Effect of Adipose-Derived Stem Cells on Full-Thickness Skin Grafts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Juan; Hao, Haojie; Huang, Hong; Chen, Deyun; Han, Yan; Han, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    Background. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of ASCs on full-thickness skin grafts. Specifically, we investigated the anti-inflammatory effects of ASCs that are mediated via regulation of the phenotypes of activated macrophages. Methods. ASCs were isolated, cultured, and injected under full-thickness skin grafts in 15 rats (ASC group). An additional 15 rats served as controls (PBS group). Skin graft survival assessment and vascularization detection were assessed with H&E staining and laser Doppler blood flowmetry (LDF). The effects of ASCs on angiogenesis, anti-inflammation, collagen accumulation-promoting, and antiscarring were assessed. Results. We found that the skin graft survival rate was significantly increased in the ASC group. The neovascularization, collagen deposition, collagen type I to type III ratio, and levels of VEGF and TGF-β3 in the ASC group were markedly higher than those in the PBS group at day 14. Additionally, in the ASC group, the levels of iNOS, IL-1β, and TNF-α were remarkably decreased, whereas the levels of IL-10 and Arg-1 were substantially increased. Conclusions. Our results confirm that ASCs transplantation can effectively improve full-thickness skin graft survival. Additionally, the anti-inflammatory role of ASCs may indirectly contribute to skin graft survival via its effect on macrophage polarization. PMID:27413735

  16. Proliferation of protease-enriched mast cells in sarcoptic skin lesions of raccoon dogs.

    PubMed

    Noviana, D; W Harjanti, D; Otsuka, Y; Horii, Y

    2004-07-01

    Skin sites, tongue, lung, liver, jejunum and rectum from two raccoon dogs with Sarcoptes scabiei infestation and five normal (control) raccoon dogs were examined in terms of the distribution, proteoglycan properties and protease activity of mast cells. Infestation with S. scabiei caused a significant increase in the number of dermal mast cells. While the number of mast cells (average +/- standard deviation) in specimens of skin from the dorsum, dorsal neck, dorsal hind foot and dorsal fore foot was 40.0 +/- 19.8/mm2 in control animals, it was 236.1 +/- 58.9/mm2 in the skin of mange-infested animals. Histochemical analysis revealed the glycosaminoglycan, heparin, within the mast cells of all organs examined in both control and affected animals. Enzyme-histochemical detection of serine proteases demonstrated an increase in mast-cell-specific protease activity (i.e., chymase and tryptase) in the skin of infested animals. The percentage of mast cells demonstrating chymase activity was 53.0 +/- 27.4% in control animals and 73.8 +/- 19.4% in mite-infested animals. The corresponding results for tryptase activity were 53.5 +/- 25.2% and 89.4 +/- 9.8%. Increases in mast cell chymase or tryptase activity, or both, were also observed within other organs of the infected animals, but the total number of mast cells found at such sites (with the exception of liver and ventrolateral pinna) did not differ from those of control animals. PMID:15144797

  17. Crusted scabies is associated with increased IL-17 secretion by skin T cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, X; Walton, S F; Murray, H C; King, M; Kelly, A; Holt, D C; Currie, B J; McCarthy, J S; Mounsey, K E

    2014-11-01

    Scabies is an ectoparasitic infestation by the mite Sarcoptes scabiei. Although commonly self-limiting, a fraction of patients develop severely debilitating crusted scabies. The immune mechanisms underlying the development of crusted scabies are unclear, and undertaking longitudinal infection studies in humans is difficult. We utilized a porcine model to compare cellular immune responses in peripheral blood and skin of pigs with different clinical manifestations of scabies (n = 12), and in uninfected controls (n = 6). Although clinical symptoms were not evident until at least 4 weeks post-infestation, the numbers of peripheral IFNγ-secreting CD4(+) T cells and γδ T cells increased in infected pigs from week 1 post-infestation. γδ T cells remained increased in the blood at week 15 post-infestation. At week 15, skin cell infiltrates from pigs with crusted scabies had significantly higher CD8(+) T cell, γδ T cell and IL-17(+) cell numbers than those with ordinary scabies. Peripheral IL-17 levels were not increased, suggesting that localized skin IL-17-secreting T cells may play a critical role in the pathogenesis of crusted scabies development. Given the potential of anti-IL-17 immunotherapy demonstrated for other inflammatory skin diseases, this study may provide a novel therapeutic avenue for patients with recurrent crusted scabies. PMID:25040151

  18. CHARACTERIZATION OF ALVEOLAR EPITHELIAL CELLS CULTURED IN SEMIPERMEABLE HOLLOW FIBERS

    PubMed Central

    Grek, Christina L.; Newton, Danforth A.; Qiu, Yonhzhi; Wen, Xuejun; Spyropoulos, Demetri D.; Baatz, John E.

    2012-01-01

    Cell culture methods commonly used to represent alveolar epithelial cells in vivo have lacked airflow, a 3-dimensional air-liquid interface, and dynamic stretching characteristics of native lung tissue—physiological parameters critical for normal phenotypic gene expression and cellular function. Here the authors report the development of a selectively semipermeable hollow fiber culture system that more accurately mimics the in vivo microenvironment experienced by mammalian distal airway cells than in conventional or standard air-liquid interface culture. Murine lung epithelial cells (MLE-15) were cultured within semipermeable polyurethane hollow fibers and introduced to controlled airflow through the microfiber interior. Under these conditions, MLE-15 cells formed confluent monolayers, demonstrated a cuboidal morphology, formed tight junctions, and produced and secreted surfactant proteins. Numerous lamellar bodies and microvilli were present in MLE-15 cells grown in hollow fiber culture. Conversely, these alveolar type II cell characteristics were reduced in MLE-15 cells cultured in conventional 2D static culture systems. These data support the hypothesis that MLE-15 cells grown within our microfiber culture system in the presence of airflow maintain the phenotypic characteristics of type II cells to a higher degree than those grown in standard in vitro cell culture models. Application of our novel model system may prove advantageous for future studies of specific gene and protein expression involving alveolar epithelial or bronchiolar epithelial cells. PMID:19263283

  19. CCR10 regulates balanced maintenance and function of resident regulatory and effector T cells to promote immune homeostasis in skin

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Mingcan; Hu, Shaomin; Fu, Yaoyao; Jin, Wensen; Yi, Qiyi; Matsui, Yurika; Yang, Jie; McDowell, Mary Ann; Sarkar, Surojit; Kalia, Vandana; Xiong, Na

    2014-01-01

    Background CCR10 and CCL27 are the most skin-specific chemokine receptor/ligand pair implicated in skin allergy and inflammatory diseases including atopic dermatitis and psoriasis. This pair is thought to regulate migration and/or maintenance of skin T cells and suggested as therapeutic targets for treatment of skin diseases. However, the functional importance of CCR10/CCL27 in vivo remains elusive. Objective We sought to determine expression and function of CCR10 in different subsets of skin T cells under both homeostatic and inflammatory conditions to gain a mechanistic insight into potential roles of CCR10 during skin inflammation. Methods Using heterozygous and homozygous CCR10-knockout/EGFP-knockin mice, we assessed expression of CCR10 on regulatory and effector T cells of healthy and inflamed skin induced by chemicals, pathogens and auto-reactive T cells. In addition, we assessed the effect of CCR10-knockout on the maintenance and functions of different T cells and inflammatory status in the skin during different phases of the immune response. Results CCR10 expression is preferentially induced on memory-like skin-resident T cells and their progenitors for their maintenance in homeostatic skin but not expressed on most skin-infiltrating effector T cells during inflammation. In CCR10-knockout mice, the imbalanced presence and dysregulated function of resident regulatory and effector T cells result in over-reactive and prolonged innate and memory responses in the skin, leading to increased clearance of Leishmamia infection in the skin. Conclusion CCR10 is a critical regulator of skin immune homeostasis. PMID:24767879

  20. Self-assembled adult adipose-derived stem cell spheroids combined with biomaterials promote wound healing in a rat skin repair model.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Shan-Hui; Hsieh, Pai-Shan

    2015-01-01

    Adult adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) are a type of multipotent mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) with easy availability and serve as a potential cell source for cell-based therapy. Three-dimensional MSC spheroids may be derived from the self-assembly of individual MSCs grown on certain polymer membranes. In this study, we demonstrated that the self-assembled ASC spheroids on chitosan-hyaluronan membranes expressed more cytokine genes (fibroblast growth factor 1, vascular endothelial growth factor, and chemokine [C-C motif] ligand 2) as well as migration-associated genes (chemokine [C-X-C motif] receptor type 4 and matrix metalloprotease 1) compared with ASC dispersed single cells grown on culture dish. To evaluate the in vivo effects of these spheroids, we applied ASC single cells and ASC spheroids in a designed rat skin repair model. Wounds of 15 × 15 mm were created on rat dorsal skin, where ASCs were administered and covered with hyaluronan gel/chitosan sponge to maintain a moist environment. Results showed that skin wounds treated with ASC spheroids had faster wound closure and a significantly higher ratio of angiogenesis. Tracking of fluorescently labeled ASCs showed close localization of ASC spheroids to microvessels, suggesting enhanced angiogenesis through paracrine effects. Based on the in vitro and in vivo results, the self-assembled ASC spheroids may be a promising cellular source for skin tissue engineering and wound regeneration. PMID:25421559

  1. Characteristics of cultured desmoid cells with different CTNNB1 mutation status.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Shunsuke; Urakawa, Hiroshi; Kozawa, Eiji; Arai, Eisuke; Ikuta, Kunihiro; Sakai, Tomohisa; Ishiguro, Naoki; Nishida, Yoshihiro

    2016-02-01

    Desmoid tumors are benign mesenchymal neoplasms with a locally aggressive nature. The mutational status of β-catenin gene (CTNNB1) is presumed to affect the tumorous activity of the cells. In this study, we isolated three kinds of desmoid cell with different CTNNB1 status, and compared their characteristics. Cells were isolated from three patients with abdominal wall desmoid during surgery, all of which were resistant to meloxicam treatment. The mutational status of the CTNNB1 exon 3 was determined for both parental tumor tissues and isolated cultured cells. β-catenin expression was determined with immunohistochemistry. Responsiveness to meloxicam was investigated with MTS assay together with COX-2 immunostaining. mRNA expressions of downstream molecules of Wnt/β-catenin pathway were determined with real-time RT-PCR. Three kinds of cell isolated from desmoid tumors harboring different CTNNB1 mutation status (wild type, T41A, and S45F), all exhibited a spindle shape. These isolated cells could be cultured until the 20th passage with unchanged proliferative activity. Nuclear accumulation of β-catenin was observed in all cultured cells, particularly in those with S45F. Proliferating activity was significantly suppressed by meloxicam (25 μmol/L, P < 0.007) in all three cell cultures, of which parental desmoid was resistant to meloxicam clinically. The mRNA expressions of Axin2, c-Myc, and Cyclin D1 differently increased in the three cultured cell types as compared with those in human skin fibroblast cells (HDF). Inhibitors of Wnt/β-catenin pathway downregulated Axin2, c-Myc, and Cyclin D1 significantly. Isolated and cultured desmoid tumor cells harboring any one of the CTNNB1 mutation status had unique characteristics, and could be useful to investigate desmoid tumors with different mutation status of CTNNB1. PMID:26686699

  2. Polyamine Uptake in Carrot Cell Cultures 1

    PubMed Central

    Pistocchi, Rossella; Bagni, Nello; Creus, José A.

    1987-01-01

    Putrescine and spermidine uptake into carrot (Daucus carota L.) cells in culture was studied. The time course of uptake showed that the two polyamines were very quickly transported into the cells, reaching a maximum absorption within 1 minute. Increasing external polyamine concentrations up to 100 millimolar showed the existence of a biphasic system with different affinities at low and high polyamine concentrations. The cellular localization of absorbed polyamines was such that a greater amount of putrescine was present in the cytoplasmic soluble fraction, while spermidine was mostly present in cell walls. The absorbed polyamines were released into the medium in the presence of increasing external concentrations of the corresponding polyamine or Ca2+. The effects of Ca2+ were different for putrescine and spermidine; putrescine uptake was slightly stimulated by 10 micromolar Ca2+ and inhibited by higher concentrations, while for spermidine uptake there was an increasing stimulation in the Ca2+ concentration range between 10 micromolar and 1 millimolar. La3+ nullified the stimulatory effect of 10 micromolar Ca2+ on putrescine uptake and that of 1 millimolar Ca2+ on spermidine uptake. La3+ at 0.5 to 1 millimolar markedly inhibited the uptake of both polyamines, suggesting that it interferes with the sites of polyamine uptake. Putrescine uptake was affected to a lesser extent by metabolic inhibitors than was spermidine uptake. It is proposed that the entry of polyamines into the cells is driven by the transmembrane electrical gradient, with a possible antiport mechanism between external and internal polyamine molecule. PMID:16665446

  3. Density gradient electrophoresis of cultured human embryonic kidney cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plank, L. D.; Kunze, M. E.; Giranda, V.; Todd, P. W.

    1985-01-01

    Ground based confirmation of the electrophoretic heterogeneity of human embryonic kidney cell cultures, the general characterization of their electrophoretic migration, and observations on the general properties of cultures derived from electrophoretic subpopulations were studied. Cell migration in a density gradient electrophoresis column and cell electrophoretic mobility was determined. The mobility and heterogeneity of cultured human embryonic kidney cells with those of fixed rat erythrocytes as model test particle was compared. Electrophoretically separated cell subpopulations with respect to size, viability, and culture characteristics were examined.

  4. Isolation of human dermis derived mesenchymal stem cells using explants culture method: expansion and phenotypical characterization.

    PubMed

    Park, Jeong-Ran; Kim, Eunjeong; Yang, Jungwon; Lee, Hanbyeol; Hong, Seok-Ho; Woo, Heung-Myong; Park, Sung-Min; Na, Sunghun; Yang, Se-Ran

    2015-06-01

    Recent studies have reported that stem cells can be isolated from a wide range of tissues including bone marrow, fatty tissue, adipose tissue and placenta. Moreover, several studies also suggest that skin dermis could serve as a source of stem cells, but are of unclear phenotype. Therefore, we isolated and investigated to determine the potential of stem cell within human skin dermis. We isolated cells from human dermis, termed here as human dermis-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hDMSCs) which is able to be isolated by using explants culture method. Our method has an advantage over the enzymatic method as it is easier, less expensive and less cell damage. hDMSCs were maintained in basal culture media and proliferation potential was measured. hDMSCs were highly proliferative and successfully expanded with no additional growth factor. In addition, hDMSCs revealed normal karyotype and expressed high levels of CD90, CD73 and CD105 while did not express the surface markers for CD34, CD45 and HLA-DR. Also, we confirmed that hDMSCs possess the capacity to differentiate into multiple lineage including adipocyte, osteocyte, chondrocyte and precursor of hepatocyte lineage. Considering these results, we suggest that hDMSCs might be a valuable source of stem cells and could potentially be a useful source of clinical application. PMID:25163610

  5. Hemorrhagic Skin Nodules and Plaques: A Diagnostic Clue to Underlying Primary Plasma Cell Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ranjan; Nath, Amiya Kumar; Subbian, Murugavel; Basu, Debdatta; Hamide, Abdoul; D'Souza, Mariette

    2016-01-01

    Plasma cell leukemia (PCL) is a rare lymphoproliferative disorder characterized by a malignant proliferation of plasma cells (PC) in blood and marrow. Cutaneous involvement is very rare in PCL. We present the case of a 45-year-old lady who presented with multiple hemorrhagic nodules and plaques in the skin. Her total leucocyte count was 2,00,200/cmm with 85% abnormal plasmacytoid cells in peripheral smear. Biopsy of the skin lesions revealed diffuse infiltration by plasma cells with ‘choked’ blood vessels. A diagnosis of plasma cell leukemia with cutaneous involvement was made. On the second day of admission, the patient expired probably because of intracranial bleed due to thrombocytopenia. Post-mortem bone marrow and liver biopsy also showed diffuse infiltration by plasma cells. Monoclonality of the cells was proven by demonstrating the production of only kappa light chains. PMID:27057024

  6. Hemorrhagic Skin Nodules and Plaques: A Diagnostic Clue to Underlying Primary Plasma Cell Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ranjan; Nath, Amiya Kumar; Subbian, Murugavel; Basu, Debdatta; Hamide, Abdoul; D'Souza, Mariette

    2016-01-01

    Plasma cell leukemia (PCL) is a rare lymphoproliferative disorder characterized by a malignant proliferation of plasma cells (PC) in blood and marrow. Cutaneous involvement is very rare in PCL. We present the case of a 45-year-old lady who presented with multiple hemorrhagic nodules and plaques in the skin. Her total leucocyte count was 2,00,200/cmm with 85% abnormal plasmacytoid cells in peripheral smear. Biopsy of the skin lesions revealed diffuse infiltration by plasma cells with 'choked' blood vessels. A diagnosis of plasma cell leukemia with cutaneous involvement was made. On the second day of admission, the patient expired probably because of intracranial bleed due to thrombocytopenia. Post-mortem bone marrow and liver biopsy also showed diffuse infiltration by plasma cells. Monoclonality of the cells was proven by demonstrating the production of only kappa light chains. PMID:27057024

  7. Profiling the Hydrolysis of Isolated Grape Berry Skin Cell Walls by Purified Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Zietsman, Anscha J J; Moore, John P; Fangel, Jonatan U; Willats, William G T; Vivier, Melané A

    2015-09-23

    The unraveling of crushed grapes by maceration enzymes during winemaking is difficult to study because of the complex and rather undefined nature of both the substrate and the enzyme preparations. In this study we simplified both the substrate, by using isolated grape skin cell walls, and the enzyme preparations, by using purified enzymes in buffered conditions, to carefully follow the impact of the individual and combined enzymes on the grape skin cell walls. By using cell wall profiling techniques we could monitor the compositional changes in the grape cell wall polymers due to enzyme activity. Extensive enzymatic hydrolysis, achieved with a preparation of pectinases or pectinases combined with cellulase or hemicellulase enzymes, completely removed or drastically reduced levels of pectin polymers, whereas less extensive hydrolysis only opened up the cell wall structure and allowed extraction of polymers from within the cell wall layers. Synergistic enzyme activity was detectable as well as indications of specific cell wall polymer associations. PMID:26309153

  8. Gravity, chromosomes, and organized development in aseptically cultured plant cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krikorian, Abraham D.

    1993-01-01

    The objectives of the PCR experiment are: to test the hypothesis that microgravity will in fact affect the pattern and developmental progression of embryogenically competent plant cells from one well-defined, critical stage to another; to determine the effects of microgravity in growth and differentiation of embryogenic carrot cells grown in cell culture; to determine whether microgravity or the space environment fosters an instability of the differentiated state; and to determine whether mitosis and chromosome behavior are adversely affected by microgravity. The methods employed will consist of the following: special embryogenically competent carrot cell cultures will be grown in cell culture chambers provided by NASDA; four cell culture chambers will be used to grow cells in liquid medium; two dishes (plant cell culture dishes) will be used to grow cells on a semi-solid agar support; progression to later embryonic stages will be induced in space via crew intervention and by media manipulation in the case of liquid grown cell cultures; progression to later stages in case of semi-solid cultures will not need crew intervention; embryo stages will be fixed at a specific interval (day 6) in flight only in the case of liquid-grown cultures; and some living cells and somatic embryos will be returned for continued post-flight development and 'grown-out.' These will derive from the semi-solid grown cultures.

  9. Uptake, accumulation, and egress of erythromycin by tissue culture cells of human origin.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, J R; Johnson, P; Miller, M F

    1985-01-01

    The ability of erythromycin A base to penetrate and accumulate in tissue culture cells of human origin was investigated. The antibiotic was highly concentrated by early passage cells of normal bronchus, kidney, liver, lung, and skin and by cancer cells derived from breast, liver, and lung. Intracellular levels 4 to 12 times that of the extracellular milieu were obtained in both early-passage and transformed cells. The total quantity of erythromycin accumulated depended on the extracellular concentration of antibiotic, but the cellular/extracellular ratios were, for the most part, independent of the initial extracellular drug concentration. In all cell types tested, the accumulated antibiotic rapidly egressed when cells were incubated in antibiotic-free medium. Bioactivity assays demonstrated that the expelled drug was unmetabolized, fully active antibiotic. The concentration of erythromycin by a variety of human cell types probably accounts, in part, for the effectiveness of the antibiotic against intracellular parasites such as Legionella and Chlamydia spp. PMID:3994346

  10. The expression of peripheral benzodiazepine receptors in human skin: the relationship with epidermal cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Stoebner, P E; Carayon, P; Penarier, G; Fréchin, N; Barnéon, G; Casellas, P; Cano, J P; Meynadier, J; Meunier, L

    1999-06-01

    The peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) is a protein of mitochondrial outer membranes utilizing porphyrins as endogenous ligands. PBR is part of a heteromeric receptor complex involved in the formation of mitochondrial permeability transition pores and in the early events of apoptosis. PBR may function as an oxygen-dependent signal generator; recent data indicate that these receptors may preserve the mitochondria of haematopoietic cell lines from damage caused by oxygen radicals. To identify PBRs in human skin, we used a specific monoclonal antibody directed against the C-terminus fragment of the human receptor. PBR immunoreactivity was found in keratinocytes, Langerhans cells, hair follicles and dermal vascular endothelial cells. Interestingly, confocal microscopic examination of skin sections revealed that PBR expression was strongly upregulated in the superficial differentiated layers of the epidermis. Ultrastructurally, PBRs were distributed throughout the cytoplasm but were selectively expressed on the mitochondrial membranes of epidermal cells. The elevated level of PBRs in the spinous layer was not associated with an increased number of mitochondria nor with an increased amount of mRNA as assessed by in situ hybridization on microautoradiographed skin sections. The present work provides, for the first time, evidence of PBR immunoreactivity in human skin. This mitochondrial receptor may modulate apoptosis in the epidermis; its increased expression in differentiated epidermal layers may represent a novel mechanism of natural skin protection against free radical damage generated by ultraviolet exposure. PMID:10354064

  11. Who is really in control of skin immunity under physiological circumstances - lymphocytes, dendritic cells or keratinocytes?

    PubMed

    Schröder, J M; Reich, K; Kabashima, K; Liu, F T; Romani, N; Metz, M; Kerstan, A; Lee, P H A; Loser, K; Schön, M P; Maurer, M; Stoitzner, P; Beissert, S; Tokura, Y; Gallo, R L

    2006-11-01

    Our views of the skin immunity theatre are undergoing constant change. These not only reflect paradigm shifts in general immunology and skin biology, but also have profound clinical implications, which call for strategic changes in dermatological therapy. Nowhere can this be witnessed at a greater level of instructiveness and fascination than when addressing the question posed by this new Controversies feature. Thus, after a very long period of dominance by T cells and Langerhans cells as 'lead actors' on the skin immunity stage, the lowly keratinocyte has recently made an astounding theatrical appearance as a key protagonist of the innate skin immunity system, which may control even acquired skin immune responses. Further enhancing dramatic complexity and tension, the mast cell has entered as an additional actor claiming centre stage, and the epidermal Langerhans cell has slipped in a surprise appearance as the chief agent of immunotolerance. May you, esteemed reader, enjoy the spectacle offered here by selected immunodermatology authorities who double as 'stage managers' pushing their respective favourite actors into the limelight. You get everything you may expect from a good performance - complete with the impresario's overture that lures you into the theatre and sets the stage, competing divas, recently discovered new talents and even the critic's digest while the performance is still ongoing. By the time the curtain drops, you will have reached your own, independent conclusions on how to answer the title question of this play - at least for the time being... PMID:17002689

  12. Update on the role of plasmacytoid dendritic cells in inflammatory/autoimmune skin diseases.

    PubMed

    Saadeh, Dana; Kurban, Mazen; Abbas, Ossama

    2016-06-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) represent a specialized dendritic cell population that exhibit plasma cell morphology, express CD4, CD123, blood-derived dendritic cell antigen-2 (BDCA-2) and Toll-like receptor (TLR)7 and TLR9 within endosomal compartments. When activated, pDCs are capable of producing large quantities of type I IFNs (mainly IFN-α/β), which provide antiviral resistance and link the innate and adaptive immunity. While generally lacking from normal skin, pDCs infiltrate the skin and appear to be involved in the pathogenesis of several inflammatory, infectious (especially viral) and neoplastic entities. In recent years, pDC role in inflammatory/autoimmune skin conditions has been extensively studied. Unlike type I IFN-mediated protective immunity that pDCs provide at the level of the skin by regulated sensing of microbial or self-nucleic acids upon skin damage, excessive sensing may elicit IFN-driven inflammatory/autoimmune diseases. In this review, focus will be on the role of pDCs in cutaneous inflammatory/autoimmune dermatoses. PMID:26837058

  13. CCR7 regulates B16 murine melanoma cell tumorigenesis in skin.

    PubMed

    Fang, Lei; Lee, Vivian C; Cha, Emily; Zhang, Hong; Hwang, Sam T

    2008-10-01

    Tumor cell-associated chemokine receptors play distinct roles in cancer biology, including enhancement of lymph node (LN) metastasis. To determine if CCR7 influences tumor formation in skin, we inoculated B16 cells transduced with CCR7 and luciferase (CCR7-luc-B16) or with retroviral vector and luciferase (pLNCX2-luc-B16) into ear skin and footpads of wild-type (WT) mice. In contrast to pLNCX2-luc-B16 cells, 97% of CCR7-luc-B16 cell-inoculated mice formed skin tumors as well as cervical LN metastases by Day 21 following ear inoculation. CCR7-expressing and control B16 cells, however, formed tumors of similar size and with high-efficiency in SCID-beige mice. Cells from both lines accumulated in the skin of WT mice in similar numbers until Day 7. By Day 11, however, control cells decreased tenfold, whereas CCR7-luc-B16 cells formed small tumor nodules. Tumor cells were infrequently detected in draining cervical LNs up to 11 days after injection of both cell lines, but stable nodal metastases were only observed after CCR7-luc-B16 ear tumors had been established (Day 21). ELISPOT assays revealed that IFN--producing cells in draining LNs from CCR7-luc-B16-injected ears were reduced through Day 7. After footpad injection, tumor formation by CCR7-expressing B16 cells was enhanced only with small, initial tumor cell inocula. With larger inocula, tumor formation was equivalent, but the numbers of tumor-infiltrating leukocytes were reduced by approximately sixfold in CCR7-B16 tumors compared with pLNCX2-B16 tumors of equal size. IFN- and CXCL10 were reduced 35- and sixfold, respectively, in CCR7-B16 cell tumors (vs. control tumors). Thus, CCR7 expression enhances tumorigenesis in addition to facilitating LN metastasis. PMID:18519742

  14. Imaging immune response of skin mast cells in vivo with two-photon microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunqiang; Pastila, Riikka K.; Lin, Charles P.

    2012-02-01

    Intravital multiphoton microscopy has provided insightful information of the dynamic process of immune cells in vivo. However, the use of exogenous labeling agents limits its applications. There is no method to perform functional imaging of mast cells, a population of innate tissue-resident immune cells. Mast cells are widely recognized as the effector cells in allergy. Recently their roles as immunoregulatory cells in certain innate and adaptive immune responses are being actively investigated. Here we report in vivo mouse skin mast cells imaging with two-photon microscopy using endogenous tryptophan as the fluorophore. We studied the following processes. 1) Mast cells degranulation, the first step in the mast cell activation process in which the granules are released into peripheral tissue to trigger downstream reactions. 2) Mast cell reconstitution, a procedure commonly used to study mast cells functioning by comparing the data from wild type mice, mast cell-deficient mice, and mast-cell deficient mice reconstituted with bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs). Imaging the BMMCs engraftment in tissue reveals the mast cells development and the efficiency of BMMCs reconstitution. We observed the reconstitution process for 6 weeks in the ear skin of mast cell-deficient Kit wsh/ w-sh mice by two-photon imaging. Our finding is the first instance of imaging mast cells in vivo with endogenous contrast.

  15. Three-dimensional culture of epidermal cells on ordered cellulose scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Seyama, Tomoko; Suh, Eun Young; Kondo, Tetsuo

    2013-06-01

    An ordered cellulose film scaffold, termed a nematic ordered cellulose (NOC) template, had unique surface properties and successfully induced the establishment of a three-dimensional (3D), hierarchical structure of epidermal cells by cell attachment and subsequent culture. Initially, the scaffold surface properties were characterized through contact angle measurements and atomic force microscopy to evaluate appropriate hydrophobicity and orientation of molecular chains for 3D culture. The template surfaces exhibited higher hydrophobicity, in the range of 70-75°, than usual cellulose films and appeared suitable for surface cell adhesion. In fact, epidermal cells successfully attached and proliferated favorably on the NOC templates, similar to development in normal culture flasks. Furthermore, the NOC film, as a semipermeable template, was also employed to allow 3D proliferation of epidermal cell layers in the perpendicular direction. The template proved to be suitable as a 3D cell culture device, resulting in the proposal that the construction processes of these 3D cell layers followed the basic concept of skin formation. PMID:23624420

  16. Biolistic transformation of cotton embryogenic cell suspension cultures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic transformation of cotton is highly dependent on the ability to regenerate fertile plants from transgenic cells through somatic embryogenesis. Induction of embryogenic cell cultures is genotype-dependant. However, once embryogenic cell cultures are available, they can be effectively used fo...

  17. Skin cancer and photoaging in ethnic skin.

    PubMed

    Halder, Rebat M; Ara, Collette J

    2003-10-01

    Skin cancer prevalence in ethnic skin is low. Squamous cell carcinoma, hypopigmented mycosis fungoides, and acral lentiginous melanoma are the most serious types of skin cancer noted in the darker-skinned population. Photoaging occurs less frequently and is less severe in ethnic skin. PMID:14717413

  18. The role of transcription factor Nrf2 in skin cells metabolism.

    PubMed

    Gęgotek, Agnieszka; Skrzydlewska, Elżbieta

    2015-07-01

    Skin, which is a protective layer of the body, is in constant contact with physical and chemical environmental factors. Exposure of the skin to highly adverse conditions often leads to oxidative stress. Moreover, it has been observed that skin cells are also exposed to reactive oxygen species generated during cell metabolism particularly in relation to the synthesis of melanin or the metabolism in immune system cells. However, skin cells have special features that protect them against oxidative modifications including transcription factor Nrf2, which is responsible for the transcription of the antioxidant protein genes such as antioxidant enzymes, small molecular antioxidant proteins or interleukins, and multidrug response protein. In the present study, the mechanisms of Nrf2 activation have been compared in the cells forming the various layers of the skin: keratinocytes, melanocytes, and fibroblasts. The primary mechanism of control of Nrf2 activity is its binding by cytoplasmic inhibitor Keap1, while cells have also other controlling mechanisms, such as phosphorylation of Nrf2 and modifications of its activators (e.g., Maf, IKKβ) or inhibitors (e.g., Bach1, caveolae, TGF-β). Moreover, there are a number of drugs (e.g., ketoconazole) used in the pharmacotherapy of skin diseases based on the activation of Nrf2, but they may also induce oxidative stress. Therefore, it is important to look for compounds that cause a selective activation of Nrf2 particularly natural substances such as curcumin, sulforaphane, or extracts from the broccoli leaves without side effects. These findings could be helpful in the searching for new drugs for people with vitiligo or even melanoma. PMID:25708189

  19. Three-Dimensional Cell Culture: A Breakthrough in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Antoni, Delphine; Burckel, Hélène; Josset, Elodie; Noel, Georges

    2015-01-01

    Cell culture is an important tool for biological research. Two-dimensional cell culture has been used for some time now, but growing cells in flat layers on plastic surfaces does not accurately model the in vivo state. As compared to the two-dimensional case, the three-dimensional (3D) cell culture allows biological cells to grow or interact with their surroundings in all three dimensions thanks to an artificial environment. Cells grown in a 3D model have proven to be more physiologically relevant and showed improvements in several studies of biological mechanisms like: cell number monitoring, viability, morphology, proliferation, differentiation, response to stimuli, migration and invasion of tumor cells into surrounding tissues, angiogenesis stimulation and immune system evasion, drug metabolism, gene expression and protein synthesis, general cell function and in vivo relevance. 3D culture models succeed thanks to technological advances, including materials science, cell biology and bioreactor design. PMID:25768338

  20. Cell and tissue culture of Miscanthus Sacchariflorus

    SciTech Connect

    Godovikova, V.A.; Moiseyeva, E.A.; Shumny, V.K.

    1995-11-01

    Since recent time search and introduction of new species of plants have paid attention. More perspective are perennial low maintenance landscape plants from genera Phragmites L. and Miscanthus Anderss. known as high speed growing and great amount of cellulose`s containing. Absence of seeds production and limited distribution area prevent from immediately introduction the plants of this species. The main goal of our investigation is the scientific development of the cell and tissue culture methods to get changing clones, salt and cold tolerant plants and their micropogation. At present there are collection of biovariety represented by subspecies, ecotypes and plant regenerants of two species - Miscanthus purpurascens (Anders.) and Miscanthus sacchariflorus (Maxim.). Successful results have been achieved in screening of culture media, prepared on MS base medium and contained a row of tropic components to protect the explant and callus tissue from oxidation and necrosis. Initially the callus was induced from stem segments, apical and nodular meristem of vegetative shoots of elulalia, growing in hydroponic greenhouse. Morphological and cytologic analysis of plant-regenerants have been done.

  1. Coxsackie- and adenovirus receptor (CAR) is expressed in lymphatic vessels in human skin and affects lymphatic endothelial cell function in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Vigl, Benjamin; Zgraggen, Claudia; Rehman, Nadia; Banziger-Tobler, Nadia E.; Detmar, Michael; Halin, Cornelia

    2009-01-15

    Lymphatic vessels play an important role in tissue fluid homeostasis, intestinal fat absorption and immunosurveillance. Furthermore, they are involved in pathologic conditions, such as tumor cell metastasis and chronic inflammation. In comparison to blood vessels, the molecular phenotype of lymphatic vessels is less well characterized. Performing comparative gene expression analysis we have recently found that coxsackie- and adenovirus receptor (CAR) is significantly more highly expressed in cultured human, skin-derived lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs), as compared to blood vascular endothelial cells. Here, we have confirmed these results at the protein level, using Western blot and FACS analysis. Immunofluorescence performed on human skin confirmed that CAR is expressed at detectable levels in lymphatic vessels, but not in blood vessels. To address the functional significance of CAR expression, we modulated CAR expression levels in cultured LECs in vitro by siRNA- and vector-based transfection approaches. Functional assays performed with the transfected cells revealed that CAR is involved in distinct cellular processes in LECs, such as cell adhesion, migration, tube formation and the control of vascular permeability. In contrast, no effect of CAR on LEC proliferation was observed. Overall, our data suggest that CAR stabilizes LEC-LEC interactions in the skin and may contribute to lymphatic vessel integrity.

  2. Studying mast cells in peripheral tolerance by using a skin transplantation model.

    PubMed

    de Vries, Victor C; Le Mercier, Isabelle; Nowak, Elizabeth C; Noelle, Randolph J

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells (MCs) play an important role in both inflammatory and immunosuppressive responses [1]. The importance of MCs in maintaining peripheral tolerance was discovered in a FoxP3(+) regulatory T-cell (Treg)-mediated skin transplant model [2]. MCs can directly mediate tolerance by releasing anti-inflammatory mediators (reviewed in ref. 3) or by interacting with other immune cells in the graft. Here we will present protocols used to study the role of MCs in peripheral tolerance with the emphasis on how MCs can regulate T-cell functionality. First we will introduce the skin transplant model followed by reconstitution of mast cell-deficient