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Sample records for slac summer institute

  1. Summer Youth Forestry Institute

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roesch, Gabrielle E.; Neuffer, Tamara; Zobrist, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    The Summer Youth Forestry Institute (SYFI) was developed to inspire youth through experiential learning opportunities and early work experience in the field of natural resources. Declining enrollments in forestry and other natural resource careers has made it necessary to actively engage youth and provide them with exposure to careers in these…

  2. GLEANINGS FROM A SUMMER INSTITUTE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Twin City Inst. for Talented Youth, St. Paul, Minn.

    IN THIS REPORT TO THE ENGLISH TEACHING PROFESSION, THE TWIN CITY INSTITUTE STAFF DESCRIBES ITS CURRICULUM EXPERIMENTATION WITH ACADEMICALLY TALENTED HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS DURING THE SUMMER OF 1967. THE FOLLOWING COURSES ARE BRIEFLY DISCUSSED IN THEIR REPORTS--(1) COMPOSITION AND RHETORIC, IN WHICH THEORY AND PRACTICE WERE BALANCED, AND EXPOSITION…

  3. Summer Technical Institute. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Packard, Beth

    The Summer Technical Institute project was funded by the Arizona Department of Education to encourage sex equity in vocational education in the state. The project was designed to (1) encourage young women to consider technical careers, (2) provide activities to promote success and self-confidence, (3) provide an opportunity for young women to…

  4. Quartz Mountain/Oklahoma Summer Arts Institute.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frates, Mary Y.; Madeja, Stanley S.

    1982-01-01

    Describes the Quartz Mountain Oklahoma Summer Arts Institute program. It is designed to nurture artistic talent and to provide intensive arts experiences in music, dance, theater, and the visual arts for talented students aged 14-18. (AM)

  5. The Oklahoma Summer Arts Institute.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suttle, Denise

    1982-01-01

    Programs were offered for fine arts students, 14-18 years old, in nine areas: orchestra, ballet, modern dance, acting, creative writing, mime, painting, printmaking, and photography. Guest artists also participated. The effect of the summer session upon the work of the students is easily recognizable. (RM)

  6. Summer institute for the teaching of psychology

    SciTech Connect

    Rycek, R.F.; Miller, R.L.

    1994-12-31

    This presentation will focus on the development of a summer institute to enhance high school and post-secondary teaching in psychology. The purpose of the institute is to provide an intensive teaching seminar in a specific content area of psychology presented by notable researchers and textbook authors in the field. The goal of the institute is to: (1) update participants in a particular content area, (2) introduce participants to new methods and technologies for teaching the content area at the high school and college level, and (3) provide attendees with a set of curriculum materials including classroom exercises and demonstrations which will allow students to conduct scientific experiments in psychology as well as to relate their findings to real world issues. The actual institute is staffed by at least three nationally known experts in a particular topic area of psychology. Over a five-day period, each expert gives at least three major presentations followed by appropriate breakout session which include demonstrations and discussions. The experts supply lecture outlines and supporting materials for their topics area which participants receive as a part of their learning packet. Participants also have the opportunity to share their teaching experiences and expertise.

  7. Summer institute of sustainability and energy

    SciTech Connect

    Crabtree, George W.

    2012-08-01

    The vision for the Summer Institute on Sustainability and Energy (SISE) is to integrate advancements in basic energy sciences with innovative energy technologies to train the next generation of interdisciplinary scientists and policy makers for both government and industry. Through BES related research, these future leaders will be equipped to make educated decisions about energy at the personal, civic, and global levels in energy related fields including science, technology, entrepreneurship, economics, policy, planning, and behavior. This vision explicitly supports the 2008 report by the Department of Energy’s Basic Energy Science Advisory Committee (2), which outlines scientific opportunities and challenges to achieve energy security, lower CO2 emissions, reduce reliance on foreign oil and create enduring economic growth through discovery, development and the marketing of new technologies for sustainable energy production, delivery, and use (3).

  8. Summer Institute for Physical Science Teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maheswaranathan, Ponn; Calloway, Cliff

    2007-04-01

    A summer institute for physical science teachers was conducted at Winthrop University, June 19-29, 2006. Ninth grade physical science teachers at schools within a 50-mile radius from Winthrop were targeted. We developed a graduate level physics professional development course covering selected topics from both the physics and chemistry content areas of the South Carolina Science Standards. Delivery of the material included traditional lectures and the following new approaches in science teaching: hands-on experiments, group activities, computer based data collection, computer modeling, with group discussions & presentations. Two experienced master teachers assisted us during the delivery of the course. The institute was funded by the South Carolina Department of Education. The requested funds were used for the following: faculty salaries, the University contract course fee, some of the participants' room and board, startup equipment for each teacher, and indirect costs to Winthrop University. Startup equipment included a Pasco stand-alone, portable Xplorer GLX interface with sensors (temperature, voltage, pH, pressure, motion, and sound), and modeling software (Wavefunction's Spartan Student and Odyssey). What we learned and ideas for future K-12 teacher preparation initiatives will be presented.

  9. Summer Institute for High School Teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maheswaranathan, Ponn; Calloway, Cliff

    2008-04-01

    We have conducted again a summer institute for high-school teachers in South Carolina at Winthrop University. The target audience were 9th grade physical science teachers in schools within a 50-mile radius from Winthrop. We developed a graduate level physics professional development course covering selected topics from the physics and chemistry content areas of the South Carolina Science Standards. Delivery of the material included the traditional lectures and the following innovative approaches in science teaching: hands-on experiments, group activities, computer based data collection, group discussions, and presentations. Two master teachers assisted us during the delivery of the course which took place in June 20-29, 2007 using Winthrop facilities. Requested funds were used for the following: salary for us and master teachers, contract course fee, some of the participants' room and board, startup equipment for all the teachers, and indirect costs to Winthrop University. Startup equipment included Pasco's stand-alone and portable Xplorer GLX interface and sensors (temperature, voltage, pH, pressure, motion, and sound). What we learned and ideas for continued K-12 teacher preparation initiatives will be presented.

  10. 45 CFR 2400.51 - Summer Institute accreditation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Summer Institute accreditation. 2400.51 Section 2400.51 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) JAMES MADISON MEMORIAL FELLOWSHIP FOUNDATION FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS Graduate Study § 2400.51 Summer Institute...

  11. 45 CFR 2400.51 - Summer Institute accreditation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Summer Institute accreditation. 2400.51 Section 2400.51 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) JAMES MADISON MEMORIAL FELLOWSHIP FOUNDATION FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS Graduate Study § 2400.51 Summer Institute...

  12. 45 CFR 2400.47 - Summer Institute's relationship to fellowship.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Summer Institute's relationship to fellowship... MEMORIAL FELLOWSHIP FOUNDATION FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS Graduate Study § 2400.47 Summer Institute's relationship to fellowship. Each year, the Foundation normally offers during July a four-week...

  13. 45 CFR 2400.47 - Summer Institute's relationship to fellowship.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Summer Institute's relationship to fellowship... MEMORIAL FELLOWSHIP FOUNDATION FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS Graduate Study § 2400.47 Summer Institute's relationship to fellowship. Each year, the Foundation normally offers during July a four-week...

  14. 45 CFR 2400.47 - Summer Institute's relationship to fellowship.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Summer Institute's relationship to fellowship... MEMORIAL FELLOWSHIP FOUNDATION FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS Graduate Study § 2400.47 Summer Institute's relationship to fellowship. Each year, the Foundation normally offers during July a four-week...

  15. 45 CFR 2400.47 - Summer Institute's relationship to fellowship.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Summer Institute's relationship to fellowship... MEMORIAL FELLOWSHIP FOUNDATION FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS Graduate Study § 2400.47 Summer Institute's relationship to fellowship. Each year, the Foundation normally offers during July a four-week...

  16. 45 CFR 2400.47 - Summer Institute's relationship to fellowship.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Summer Institute's relationship to fellowship... MEMORIAL FELLOWSHIP FOUNDATION FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS Graduate Study § 2400.47 Summer Institute's relationship to fellowship. Each year, the Foundation normally offers during July a four-week...

  17. An Innovative Summer Institute for Teachers: Examining the Underground Railroad

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dallmer, Denise

    2002-01-01

    In this article, the author describes the summer institute which she planned through her involvement with the Institute for Freedom Studies at Northern Kentucky University, whose purpose is to promote interdisciplinary research, teaching and community outreach grounded in the study of the Underground Railroad. The purpose of the institute was to…

  18. 45 CFR 2400.50 - Allowances and Summer Institute costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...' round-trip transportation to and from the Institute site. The costs of tuition, required fees, books... 45 Public Welfare 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Allowances and Summer Institute costs. 2400.50... Institute costs. At the Foundation's discretion, Fellows may be paid an allowance to help offset...

  19. 45 CFR 2400.50 - Allowances and Summer Institute costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...' round-trip transportation to and from the Institute site. The costs of tuition, required fees, books... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Allowances and Summer Institute costs. 2400.50... Institute costs. At the Foundation's discretion, Fellows may be paid an allowance to help offset...

  20. 45 CFR 2400.50 - Allowances and Summer Institute costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...' round-trip transportation to and from the Institute site. The costs of tuition, required fees, books... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowances and Summer Institute costs. 2400.50... Institute costs. At the Foundation's discretion, Fellows may be paid an allowance to help offset...

  1. 45 CFR 2400.50 - Allowances and Summer Institute costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...' round-trip transportation to and from the Institute site. The costs of tuition, required fees, books... 45 Public Welfare 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Allowances and Summer Institute costs. 2400.50... Institute costs. At the Foundation's discretion, Fellows may be paid an allowance to help offset...

  2. Summer Music Institute for Blind College-Bound Musicians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldstein, David

    1998-01-01

    Describes a three-week summer institute which provided seven blind students (grade 10 to college level) with musical training that included Braille music, keyboard and theory, computer skills, and independent college-living skills. (DB)

  3. An Earth Science Summer Institute for Elementary Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levitt, Karen E.; Manner, Barbara M.

    2001-01-01

    Introduces the Earth Science Summer Institute for elementary teachers, a program of professional development in content and inquiry. Focuses on concepts and learning demonstrating the interconnectedness of earth science topics. (Author/YDS)

  4. Summer Spectacular: Children's Literature Workshops, Institutes, and Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huff, Karen; Pavonetti, Linda; Roser, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    No matter how long teachers have been out of school, or how many children's literature classes they have taught, when summer comes, most of them long to "go back to class." It is because of the intriguing, exciting, reinvigorating institutes and conferences their colleagues offer in summer. In this interview, two veteran planners of summer…

  5. 77 FR 38840 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request; National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR) Summer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-29

    ... Nursing Research (NINR) Summer Genetics Institute Alumni Survey SUMMARY: In compliance with the... Nursing Research (NINR) Summer Genetics Institute Alumni Survey. Type of Information Collection Request: NEW. Need and Use of Information Collection: The NINR Summer Genetics Institute Alumni Survey...

  6. Institute for Support Personnel. Garland Junior College, EPDA 1969 Summer Institute.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garland Junior Coll., Boston, MA.

    For four and one-half weeks in June and July 1969, Garland Junior College operated the intensive summer phase of a one-year training institute for 68 teachers, teacher aides, and trainers of classroom personnel. Under the authority of the Education Professions Development Act, the institute was comprised of the full-time summer portion and…

  7. Aspen Global Change Institute Summer Science Sessions

    SciTech Connect

    Katzenberger, John; Kaye, Jack A

    2006-10-01

    The Aspen Global Change Institute (AGCI) successfully organized and convened six interdisciplinary meetings over the course of award NNG04GA21G. The topics of the meetings were consistent with a range of issues, goals and objectives as described within the NASA Earth Science Enterprise Strategic Plan and more broadly by the US Global Change Research Program/Our Changing Planet, the more recent Climate Change Program Strategic Plan and the NSF Pathways report. The meetings were chaired by two or more leaders from within the disciplinary focus of each session. 222 scholars for a total of 1097 participants-days were convened under the auspices of this award. The overall goal of each AGCI session is to further the understanding of Earth system science and global environmental change through interdisciplinary dialog. The format and structure of the meetings allows for presentation by each participant, in-depth discussion by the whole group, and smaller working group and synthesis activities. The size of the group is important in terms of the group dynamics and interaction, and the ability for each participant's work to be adequately presented and discussed within the duration of the meeting, while still allowing time for synthesis

  8. Summer Research Institute Interfacial and Condensed Phase Chemical Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Barlow, Stephan E.

    2004-10-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) hosted its first annual Summer Research Institute in Interfacial and Condensed Phase Chemical Physics from May through September 2004. During this period, fourteen PNNL scientists hosted sixteen young scientists from eleven different universities. Of the sixteen participants, fourteen were graduate students; one was transitioning to graduate school; and one was a university faculty member.

  9. Comprehensive Evaluation of the 1996 Interdisciplinary Teamed Instruction Summer Institute.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meehan, Merrill L.; Cowley, Kimberly S.

    The Interdisciplinary Teamed Instruction (ITI) Project was a 2-year project aimed at determining the effects of ITI on teaching and learning and at validating the effectiveness of a professional development model to facilitate development, implementation, and evaluation of ITI. Through summer institutes and onsite workshops, project staff provided…

  10. Opening Doors: The Summer Institute in Computer Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorensen, Barbara

    1999-01-01

    The Summer Institute in Computer Science (SICS) at the University of California in Irvine invites Native American community college students to spend 6 weeks studying computer science. The students live on campus and intern with a large corporation, sharpening computer skills and establishing mentoring relationships with business professionals.…

  11. The Advanced Technology Environmental Education Center Summer Fellows Institute.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Depken, Diane E.; Zeman, Catherine L.; Lensch, Ellen Kabat; Brown, Edward J.

    2002-01-01

    Describes the background, activities, and outcomes of the Advanced Technology Environmental Education Center (ATEEC) and its Summer Fellows Institutes as a model for disciplinary and cross-disciplinary infusion of environmental science and technology content, curriculum, and methods into the classroom. Presents experiences, themes, and activities…

  12. Bioengineering and Bioinformatics Summer Institutes: Meeting Modern Challenges in Undergraduate Summer Research

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Cheng; Snyder, Alan J.; Jones, A. Daniel; Sheets, Erin D.

    2008-01-01

    Summer undergraduate research programs in science and engineering facilitate research progress for faculty and provide a close-ended research experience for students, which can prepare them for careers in industry, medicine, and academia. However, ensuring these outcomes is a challenge when the students arrive ill-prepared for substantive research or if projects are ill-defined or impractical for a typical 10-wk summer. We describe how the new Bioengineering and Bioinformatics Summer Institutes (BBSI), developed in response to a call for proposals by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the National Science Foundation (NSF), provide an impetus for the enhancement of traditional undergraduate research experiences with intense didactic training in particular skills and technologies. Such didactic components provide highly focused and qualified students for summer research with the goal of ensuring increased student satisfaction with research and mentor satisfaction with student productivity. As an example, we focus on our experiences with the Penn State Biomaterials and Bionanotechnology Summer Institute (PSU-BBSI), which trains undergraduates in core technologies in surface characterization, computational modeling, cell biology, and fabrication to prepare them for student-centered research projects in the role of materials in guiding cell biology. PMID:18316807

  13. Summer Institute in Engineering and Computer Applications: Learning Through Experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langdon, Joan S.

    1995-01-01

    The document describing the Summer Institute project is made up of the following information: Administrative procedures; Seminars/Special Courses/Tours/College fair; Facilities/ Transportation; Staff and Administration; Collaboration; Participant/Project monitoring and evaluation; Fiscal and developmental activities; Job readiness/Job internship development and placement; and Student Follow-up/Tracking. Appendices include presentations, self-evaluations; abstracts and papers developed by the students during their participation in the program.

  14. Summer Institute for Mathematics and Science teachers (SIMS). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1994-07-01

    The Summer Institute for Mathematics and Science Teachers (SIMS) was to provide training for science and mathematics educators in strategies and techniques to use for educating and motivating historically under-represented populations. The Institute featured 40 hours of training over five days, July 13-17, 1993 plus half-day follow-up training November 13, 1993 and April 30, 1994. The objective of the training was to include sensitization to cultural and gender issues, and to instruct participants in the utilization of a variety of techniques and activities for encouraging historically under-represented groups to take more advanced science and mathematics courses.

  15. Understanding Emergent Readers and Writers. Custom Edition for the Ohio Summer Institute for Reading Intervention, Summer 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrow, Lesley Mandel; McGee, Lea M.; Richgels, Donald J.

    This book, a custom edition for the Ohio Summer Institute for Reading Intervention (Summer 2001), reprints selected chapters from two books, "Literacy Development in the Early Years: Helping Children Read and Write," Fourth Edition (Lesley Mandel Morrow) and "Literacy's Beginnings: Supporting Young Readers and Writers," Third Edition (Lea M. McGee…

  16. Howard University Energy Expert Systems Institute Summer Program (EESI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Momoh, James A.; Chuku, Arunsi; Abban, Joseph

    1996-01-01

    Howard University, under the auspices of the Center for Energy Systems and Controls runs the Energy Expert Systems Institute (EESI) summer outreach program for high school/pre-college minority students. The main objectives are to introduce precollege minority students to research in the power industry using modern state-of-the-art technology such as Expert Systems, Fuzzy Logic and Artificial Neural Networks; to involve minority students in space power management, systems and failure diagnosis; to generate interest in career options in electrical engineering; and to experience problem-solving in a teamwork environment consisting of faculty, senior research associates and graduate students. For five weeks the students are exposed not only to the exciting experience of college life, but also to the inspiring field of engineering, especially electrical engineering. The program consists of lectures in the fundamentals of engineering, mathematics, communication skills and computer skills. The projects are divided into mini and major. Topics for the 1995 mini projects were Expert Systems for the Electric Bus and Breast Cancer Detection. Topics on the major projects include Hybrid Electric Vehicle, Solar Dynamics and Distribution Automation. On the final day, designated as 'EESI Day' the students did oral presentations of their projects and prizes were awarded to the best group. The program began in the summer of 1993. The reaction from the students has been very positive. The program also arranges field trips to special places of interest such as the NASA Goddard Space Center.

  17. 76 FR 27305 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; the NIST Summer Institute for Middle School...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-11

    ... National Institute of Standards and Technology Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; the NIST Summer Institute for Middle School Science Teachers (NIST Summer Institute) and the NIST Research... to take this opportunity to comment on proposed and/or continuing information collections,...

  18. SLAC site design aesthetics

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, F.F.

    1985-10-01

    Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) is a single mission laboratory dedicated to basic research in high energy particle physics. SLAC site also houses Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) which is a multi-mission laboratory for research using beams of ultraviolet light and low energy photons as emitted tangentially from SLAC colliding beam facilities. This paper discusses various aspects of SLAC site design aesthetics under the following headings: (1) imposed footprint of SLAC, (2) description of selected site, (3) use of earth cover for radiation and sight screens, (4) use of landscaping for cosmetic purposes, (5) use of exterior paint colors to soften SLAC impact on neighbors, (6) relocation of SLAC main entrance, (7) relocation of SLAC collider arcs and experimental hall, (8) parking lots and storage yards, and (9) land use zoning at SLAC.

  19. Summer Internship Program at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, G. I.

    2009-12-01

    The Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute formally started the Internship Program in 1997. The program is open to undergraduate and graduate students and educators. The purpose of the Program is to provide an opportunity for talented students and teachers to come to MBARI for a certain period of time and to work on a research project under MBARI staff supervision. The interns are selected following a rigorous application procedure, merit review and, in some cases, an interview process. They are from around the world and represent a variety of different backgrounds, experience, and education. They all share a common desire to learn more about the marine environment and to work with MBARI staff. The mission of the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute is to serve as a world center for advanced research and education in ocean science and technology. MBARI strives to achieve this mission through the development of better instruments, systems, and methods for scientific research in the deep ocean. MBARI emphasizes peer relationships between engineers and scientists as a basic principle of its operation. Teams at MBARI use cutting-edge technology to develop equipment, software, and research methods to meet the specific needs of deep-sea research. The focus of the MBARI internship is on the intern’s professional development—learning research techniques and improving communication and collaboration skills. Each intern has an MBARI mentor who will supervise a specific project. Interns will also serve as peer-mentors to other interns. This presentation will provide a brief overview of the history of the program as well as lessons learned. 2009 MBARI SUMMER INTERNS WITH PRESIDENT AND CEO MARCIA MCNUTT

  20. Summer Institutes for Secondary Teachers of Science, Mathematics and Social Science. 1972 Directory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Science Foundation, Washington, DC.

    This directory lists the institutions awarded support by the National Science Foundation for 276 summer institutes in 1972 for secondary school teachers of science and/or mathematics. The introduction gives information on "unitary" and "sequential" institutes, eligibility and selection of participants, applications, and information concerning…

  1. English as a Second Language Summer Institute. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marks, Teresa; Seiler, Tammy

    A 3-day institute on English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) instruction, designed for adult literacy teachers, is reported. The institute, held at Northampton Community College (Bethlehem, Pennsylvania) in July 1993, offered seminars in acquired immune deficiency syndrome/human immunovirus (AIDS/HIV) and the ESL student, sheltered English instruction,…

  2. Bioengineering and Bioinformatics Summer Institutes: Meeting Modern Challenges in Undergraduate Summer Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Peter J.; Dong, Cheng; Snyder, Alan J.; Jones, A. Daniel; Sheets, Erin D.

    2008-01-01

    Summer undergraduate research programs in science and engineering facilitate research progress for faculty and provide a close-ended research experience for students, which can prepare them for careers in industry, medicine, and academia. However, ensuring these outcomes is a challenge when the students arrive ill-prepared for substantive research…

  3. Arrival: Notes from the 2005 "Views on Understanding" Summer Institute, Harvard University Project Zero Research Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fluellen, Jerry E., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    Of all the summer institutes for educators, the Harvard University Project Zero Research Center's "Views on Understanding" institute stands out as one of the few offering extensive exchanges amongst researchers and practitioners from all over the world. "Arrival" captures the experience of one participant while capturing the essences of plenary…

  4. Evaluation of the General Electric Foundation Summer Institutes on Career Education and Guidance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Kenney E.; Pierson, Terrence K.

    An evaluation was conducted to determine the effects of the General Electric Foundation Summer Institutes on Career Education and Guidance over a one to two year period in participating school districts and communities. The study evaluated the team-oriented institutes held in 1976 and 1977 at the University of South Carolina and Indiana…

  5. School Nurse Summer Institute: A Model for Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neighbors, Marianne; Barta, Kathleen

    2004-01-01

    The components of a professional development model designed to empower school nurses to become leaders in school health services is described. The model was implemented during a 3-day professional development institute that included clinical and leadership components, especially coalition building, with two follow-up sessions in the fall and…

  6. An Evaluation of a Summer Reading Institute, 1968.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenfeld, Michael

    This document describes part of the evaluation of a six-week reading institute for 69 K-3 teachers from the Raymond School, Model School Division (MSD), Washington, D.C. and thereby provides an evaluation model for schools to use in their own inservice training programs. Two evaluation instruments developed by an MSD innovation team in cooperation…

  7. THE MARK TWAIN SUMMER INSTITUTE. 1964 ANNUAL REPORT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LEMEN, ROBERT F.; AND OTHERS

    INTELLECTUALLY ABLE SECONDARY SCHOOL STUDENTS APPLIED FOR THE INSTITUTE. COURSES OFFERED WERE NOT FOR CREDIT BUT WERE SUPPLEMENTARY TO THE REGULAR CURRICULUM. A SMALL TUITION WAS PAID FOR THE ONE COURSE CHOSEN. THE COURSES OFFERED INCLUDED ENGLISH COMPOSITION AND LITERATURE, BEGINNING CHINESE, ADVANCED CHINESE, GERMAN, JAPANESE, BEGINNING RUSSIAN,…

  8. GPS Activities at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Behrend, Dirk

    2002-11-19

    The Alignment Engineering Group of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) started to use RTK (real-time kinematic) GPS equipment in order to perform structure mapping and GIS-related tasks on the SLAC campus. In a first step a continuously observing GPS station (SLAC M40) was set up. This station serves as master control station for all differential GPS activities on site and its coordinates have been determined in the well-defined global geodetic datum ITRF2000 at a given reference epoch. Some trials have been performed to test the RTK method. The tests have proven RTK to be very fast and efficient.

  9. SLAC All Access: FACET

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, Mark

    2012-07-05

    SLAC's Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests, or FACET, is a test-bed where researchers are developing the technologies required for particle accelerators of the future. Scientists from all over the world come to explore ways of improving the power and efficiency of the particle accelerators used in basic research, medicine, industry and other areas important to society. In this video, Mark Hogan, head of SLAC's Advanced Accelerator Research Department, offers a glimpse into FACET, which uses part of SLAC's historic two-mile-long linear accelerator.

  10. SLAC All Access: FACET

    ScienceCinema

    Hogan, Mark

    2016-07-12

    SLAC's Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests, or FACET, is a test-bed where researchers are developing the technologies required for particle accelerators of the future. Scientists from all over the world come to explore ways of improving the power and efficiency of the particle accelerators used in basic research, medicine, industry and other areas important to society. In this video, Mark Hogan, head of SLAC's Advanced Accelerator Research Department, offers a glimpse into FACET, which uses part of SLAC's historic two-mile-long linear accelerator.

  11. Impact of Hazardous Materials on Man and the Environment: A Summer Institute with Academic Year Follow-up.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kjeldsen, Chris K.

    This report focuses on three 11-day summer institutes on "The Impact of Toxic and Hazardous Materials on Humans and the Environment" conducted for 90 secondary school science teachers over the course of three summers at Sonoma State University, California. These summer institutes were all followed up with in-service days during the following…

  12. NCAR Johns Hopkins/CDC Climate and Health Summer Institute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mearns, Linda O.

    2005-01-01

    The interactions between climate and health are rife with complexity and present many conceptual and methodological challenges. Possible effects of climate change on health are considered some of the most sensitive impacts of climate change and are a high priority for policy-makers and the public. As a first step toward improving tlit: quality of research, we developed a Climate and Health Workshop (Institute), geared toward teaching students various aspects of how to conduct integrated climate and health research. At the workshop scientists presented selected case studies of climate and health (e.g., heat mortality, vector-borne diseases), thus demonstrating a subset of key analytical tools and databases most useful to researchers in this field. Key research gaps in this research area were discussed. In this six-day Institute (21-28 July 2004, Boulder, Colorado), health scientists and students benefited from lectures and hands-on tools taught by top NCAR scientists. The attendees learned about health databases and epidemiologic methods from leading health scientists from CDC, Johns Hopkins, and other institutions from around the globe.

  13. Summer Synthesis Institutes: A Novel Approach for Transformative Research and Student Career Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, J.; Hermans, C. M.

    2010-12-01

    It is believed that breakthroughs tend to occur when small groups of highly motivated scientists are driven by challenges encountered in real problem-solving situations and given the freedom to experiment with new ideas. Summer synthesis institutes provide a mechanism to facilitiate these breakthroughs and by which graduate students may engage in interdisciplinary research in a way that is not often available in their normal course of study. In this presentation we examine two complementary models of summer synthesis institutes in hydrology, how these intensive programs facilitate scientific outcomes and the impact of synthesis and the summer institute model on student perceptions of academic roles, collaboration opportunities and team science. Five summer synthesis institutes were held over three years, sharing similar duration and structure but different degrees of participant interdisciplinarity and focus questions. Through informal assessments, this presentation will demonstrate how these programs offered a unique opportunity for the development of student-student and student-mentor relationships and facilitated deeper understanding of a student’s own research as well as new techniques, perspective and disciplines. Additionally, though the summer synthesis institute model offers a unique ability to leverage limited funding (on the order of a single graduate student) to advance earth sciences, the model also presents specific challenges for research follow-through and may require specific content and interpersonal dynamics for optimum success.

  14. Fuzzy Cognitive Maps, Web-based Instruction, and Technology Integration. A Report on AECT 2000 Summer Leadership Institute.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Driscoll, Marcy

    2000-01-01

    Reports on the Association for Educational Technology (AECT) Summer Leadership Institute (Montreal, Canada, July 2000). The Institute opened with icebreaker activities. Then the results of last year's summer institute were reviewed. Participants re-acted to the fuzzy cognitive map that was generated last year. AECT and its future, Web-based…

  15. 2005 Annual Report Summer Research Institute Interfacial and Condensed Phase Chemical Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Barlow, Stephan E.

    2005-11-15

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) hosted its second annual Summer Research Institute in Interfacial and Condensed Phase Chemical Physics from May through September 2005. During this period, sixteen PNNL scientists hosted fourteen young scientists from eleven different universities. Of the fourteen participants, twelve were graduate students; one was a postdoctoral fellow; and one was a university faculty member.

  16. Summer Institute on Research and Evaluation (June 20-August 5, 1966).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ginther, John

    A 6-week summer institute was conducted to train and improve the research and evaluation competencies of 19 public school and college teachers and administrators. Instruction was individualized on the basis of pretest information since the major objective was to help the participants develop programs of research to be implemented during the…

  17. Bibliography of the Summer Institute of Linguistics, Philippines 1953-1988.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gieser, C. Richard, Ed.

    This document, the third edition of the bibliography of the Philippines Summer Institute of Linguistics, contains about 2,300 citations on 83 languages. The technical works cited include (1) textbooks for language study; (2) papers resulting from general linguistic research; (3) descriptions of the philologies, grammars, and lexicons of specific…

  18. Contemporary Art and the Role of Interpretation: Reflections from Tate Modern's Summer Institute for Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charman, Helen; Ross, Michaela

    2006-01-01

    Recent research indicates that the taught curriculum in art and design secondary school education pays scant attention to meaning-making in visual art. This article explores possibilities for teaching interpretation through a report on an action-research project based on Tate Modern's Summer Institute for Teachers. In doing so it argues for the…

  19. Financial Management and Job Social Skills Training Components in a Summer Business Institute

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donohue, Brad; Conway, Debbie; Beisecker, Monica; Murphy, Heather; Farley, Alisha; Waite, Melissa; Gugino, Kristin; Knatz, Danielle; Lopez-Frank, Carolina; Burns, Jack; Madison, Suzanne; Shorty, Carrie

    2005-01-01

    Ninety-two adolescents, predominantly ethnic minority high school students, participated in a structured Summer Business Institute (SBI). Participating youth were randomly assigned to receive either job social skills or financial management skills training components. Students who additionally received the job social skills training component were…

  20. Evaluation of the Nursing Program at Caldwell Community College and Technical Institute--Summer, 1983.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pipes, V. David

    In summer 1983, an evaluation of the nursing program at Caldwell Community College and Technical Institute was conducted to determine whether program objectives were being met, to measure program success, and to identify areas needing improvement. Surveys were sent to 19 early (pre-1978) and 47 recent Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN) graduates; 17…

  1. Work Papers of the Summer Institute of Linguistics, University of North Dakota Session, Volume 28.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Derbyshire, Desmond C., Ed.

    Six papers resulting from the fieldwork projects of members of the Summer Institute of Linguistics program at the University of North Dakota include: "A Relational Grammar Approach to Kera Syntax" (Janet K. Camburn), a syntactic study of an Afroasiatic language; "Clitic Doubling and M-Chains in Piraha" (Dan Everett), examining the applicability of…

  2. Summer Institute in Agricultural Mechanics Education, Southern Region, Proceedings (Blacksburg, Virginia, August 3-7, 1970).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg.

    This summer institute emphasizes the establishment of minimum measurable standards of attainment in agricultural engineering phases of teacher education in agriculture. Speeches presented are: (1) "Where We Are in Agricultural Mechanics Education," by Alfred H. Krebs, (2) "Research Offerings for More Effective Teaching in Agricultural Mechanics,"…

  3. Work Papers of the Summer Institute of Linguistics, University of North Dakota Session, Volume 24.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daly, John P.; Daly, Margaret H.

    The working papers in this volume, written by staff and advanced students of the Summer Institute of Linguistics at the University of North Dakota, include the following: "The Antigone Constraint" (David Tuggy); "Clause Types in Southeastern Tepehuan" (Thomas L. Willett); "Sentence Components in Southeastern Tepehuan" (Thomas L. Willett); "Ethical…

  4. Personal Writing and Basics: Reflections from a Writing Project Summer Institute.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sudol, Ron

    2003-01-01

    Considers how the Meadow Brook Writing Project's summer institute provides a fertile field for reflection because it involves experienced and successful teachers in a process of critical review of what works and what does not, and how to bring about change. Discusses the power of personal writing. Considers teachers of old and young, and teachers…

  5. Institute for Career Exploration (ICE) Program. Summer, 1987, End-Of-Year-Report. OEA Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mei, Dolores M.; And Others

    The summer 1987 high school Institute for Career Exploration (ICE) Program was a theme-based instructional program for incoming 9th and 10th grade students who were eligible for services provided by chapter 1 of the Education Consolidation and Improvement Act, students with limited English proficiency, and special education students who recently…

  6. Work Papers of the Summer Institute of Linguistics 1989, University of North Dakota Session, Volume 33.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dooley, Robert A., Ed.; Bickford, J. Albert, Ed.

    The volume represents in microcosm the sort of faculty-trainee-student interaction that is a priority at the Summer Institute of Linguistics (SIL) at the University of North Dakota. Seven studies by faculty and students of SIL include the following: "Lexical Variation in Mexican Sign Language" (J. Albert Bickford); "Reflexives in Veracruz Huastec"…

  7. Work Papers. Summer Institute of Linguistics, University of North Dakota Sessions, Vol. 22.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daly, John, Ed.

    This collection of papers from the Summer Institute of Linguistics contains the following articles: (1) "Texmelucan Suprasegmental Phonology," by C. H. Speck; (2) "Some Discourse Features in Siberian Yupik Eskimo," by D. C. and M. R. Shinen; (3) "The Particle t'ah in Slavey Discourse," by C. Harrison and V. Monus; (4) "The Point-Line Dimension in…

  8. MARK TWAIN SUMMER INSTITUTE, 1965 SESSION. GENERAL CATALOGUE OF INFORMATION AND COURSES OFFERED.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LEMEN, ROBERT F.

    THE MARK TWAIN SUMMER INSTITUTE OFFERED CHALLENGING EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES, PROVIDED EXCELLENT TEACHERS AN OPPORTUNITY TO DEVELOP NEW TECHNIQUES, AND OFFERED AN "INTERN-TEACHER" PROGRAM. THE STUDENTS QUALIFIED TO ATTEND WERE ABLE SECONDARY STUDENTS FROM GRADES 9 THROUGH 12. EACH STUDENT WOULD TAKE ONE NON-CREDIT HIGH SCHOOL COURSE. THE…

  9. Polarization at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, M.

    1995-01-01

    A highly polarized electron beam is a key feature. for the Current physics program at SLAC. An electron beam polarization of 80% can now be routinely achieved for typically 5000 hours of machine operation per year. Two main Physics programs utilize the polarized beam. Fixed target experiments in End Station A study the collision of polarized electrons with polarized nuclear targets to elucidate the spin structure of the nucleon and to provide an important test of QCD. Using the SLAC Linear Collider, collisions of polarized electrons with unpolarized positrons allow precise measurements of parity violation in the Z-fermion couplings and provide a very precise measurement of tile weak mixing angle. This paper discusses polarized beam operation at SLAC, and gives an overview of the polarized physics program.

  10. SLAC Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Richter, B.

    1985-12-01

    A report is given on the goals and progress of the SLAC Linear Collider. The status of the machine and the detectors are discussed and an overview is given of the physics which can be done at this new facility. Some ideas on how (and why) large linear colliders of the future should be built are given.

  11. FACET: SLAC___s New User Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, C.I.; Decker, F.-J.; England, R.J.; Erickson, R.A.; Hast, C.; Hogan, M.J.; Li, S.Z.; Litos, M.D.; Nosochkov, Y.; Seeman, J.T.; Sheppard, J.; Wienands, U.; Woodley, M.; Yocky, G.; /SLAC

    2012-05-16

    FACET (Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests) is a new User Facility at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The first User Run started in spring 2012 with 20 GeV, 3 nC electron beams. The facility is designed to provide short (20 {micro}m) bunches and small (20 {micro}m wide) spot sizes, producing uniquely high power beams. FACET supports studies from many fields but in particular those of Plasma Wakefield Acceleration and Dielectric Wakefield Acceleration. The creation of drive and witness bunches and shaped bunch profiles is possible with 'Notch' Collimation. FACET is also a source of THz radiation for material studies. Positrons will be available at FACET in future user runs. We present the User Facility and the available tools and opportunities for future experiments.

  12. 2006 Annual Report Summer Research Institute Interfacial and Condensed Phase Chemical Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Avery, Nikki B.; Barlow, Stephan E.

    2006-11-10

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) hosted its third annual Summer Research Institute in Interfacial and Condensed Phase Chemical Physics from May through September 2006. During this period, twenty PNNL scientists hosted twenty-seven scientists from twenty-five different universities. Of the twenty-seven participants, one was a graduating senior; twenty-one were graduate students; one was a postdoctoral fellow; and four were university faculty members.

  13. 2007 Annual Report Summer Research Institute Interfacial and Condensed Phase Chemical Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, Kenneth M.

    2007-10-31

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) hosted its fourth annual Summer Research Institute in Interfacial and Condensed Phase Chemical Physics from April through September 2007. During this time, 21 PNNL scientists hosted 23 participants from 20 different universities. Of the 23 participants, 20 were graduate students, 1 was a postdoctoral fellow, and 2 were university faculty members. This report covers the essense of the program and the research the participants performed.

  14. SLAC B Factory computing

    SciTech Connect

    Kunz, P.F.

    1992-02-01

    As part of the research and development program in preparation for a possible B Factory at SLAC, a group has been studying various aspects of HEP computing. In particular, the group is investigating the use of UNIX for all computing, from data acquisition, through analysis, and word processing. A summary of some of the results of this study will be given, along with some personal opinions on these topics.

  15. Sleepless at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Dement, William

    2006-01-23

    Feeling tired? More than 30 million Americans suffer from sleep disorders. Nevertheless, as a society we remain largely ignorant of the significance of sleep in determining the quality of our waking lives. Dr. William Dement, Stanford Professor and one of the world's foremost experts on sleep and sleep deprivation, joins SLAC's Colloquium Series to present exciting new findings in the field of sleep research. You'll never sleep the same again!

  16. The 2013 Summer Undergraduate Research Internship Program at the Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelaz, Michael W.; Cline, J. D.; Whitworth, C.; Clavier, D.; Barker, T.

    2014-01-01

    Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute (PARI) offers summer undergraduate research internships. PARI has received support for the internships from the EMC Corporation, private donations, private foundations, and through a collaboration with the Pisgah Astronomical Research and Education Center of the University of North Carolina - Asheville. The internship program began in 2001 with 4 students. This year 10 funded students participated. Mentors for the interns include PARI’s Directors of Science, Education, and Information Technology and visiting faculty who are members of the PARI Research Faculty Affiliate program. Students work with mentors on radio and optical astronomy research, electrical engineering for robotic control of instruments, software development for instrument control and and science education by developing curricula and multimedia and teaching high school students in summer programs at PARI. At the end of the summer interns write a paper about their research which is published in the PARI Summer Student Proceedings. Students are encouraged to present their research at AAS Meetings. We will present a summary of specific research conducted by the students with their mentors.

  17. The Summer Undergraduate Research Internship Program at the Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cline, J. Donald; Castelaz, M.; Whitworth, C.; Clavier, D.; Owen, L.; Barker, T.

    2012-01-01

    Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute (PARI) offers summer undergraduate research internships. PARI has received support for the internships from the NC Space Grant Consortium, NSF awards for public science education, private donations, private foundations, and through a collaboration with the Pisgah Astronomical Research and Education Center of the University of North Carolina - Asheville. The internship program began in 2001 with 4 students. This year 7 funded students participated in 2011. Mentors for the interns include PARI's Science, Education, and Information Technology Directors and visiting faculty who are members of the PARI Research Affiliate Faculty program. Students work with mentors on radio and optical astronomy research, electrical engineering for robotic control of instruments, software development for instrument control and software for citizen science projects, and science education by developing curricula and multimedia and teaching high school students in summer programs at PARI. At the end of the summer interns write a paper about their research which is published in the PARI Summer Student Proceedings. Several of the students have presented their results at AAS Meetings. We will present a summary of specific research conducted by the students with their mentors, the logistics for hosting the PARI undergraduate internship program, and plans for growth based on the impact of an NSF supported renovation to the Research Building on the PARI campus.

  18. The Summer Undergraduate Research Internship Program at the Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelaz, Michael W.; Cline, J.; Whitworth, C.; Clavier, D.

    2011-01-01

    Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute (PARI) offers summer undergraduate research internships. PARI has received support for the internships from the NC Space Grant Consortium, NSF awards for public science education, private donations, private foundations, and through a collaboration with the Pisgah Astronomical Research and Education Center of the University of North Carolina - Asheville. The internship program began in 2001 with 4 students. This year 9 funded students participated in 2010. Mentors for the interns include PARI's Directors of Science, Education, and Information Technology and visiting faculty who are members of the PARI Research Affiliate Faculty program. Students work with mentors on radio and optical astronomy research, electrical engineering for robotic control of instruments, software development for instrument control and applets for citizen science projects, and science education by developing curricula and multimedia and teaching high school students in summer programs at PARI. At the end of the summer interns write a paper about their research which is published in the PARI Summer Student Proceedings. Several of the students have presented their results at AAS Meetings. We will present a summary of specific research conducted by the students with their mentors, the logistics for hosting the PARI undergraduate internship program, and plans for growth based on the impact of an NSF supported renovation to the Research Building on the PARI campus.

  19. Evaluation of the Appalachian Regional Commission Oak Ridge National Laboratory Summer Institute for Math/Science/Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simkin, Linda S.; Futch, Valerie

    2006-01-01

    This report describes some of the key immediate and long-term outcomes achieved by the Appalachian Regional Commission (ARC)-Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Summer Institute for Math/Science/Technology for student and teacher participants. This two-week summer program provides high school students and teachers from the Appalachian region the…

  20. Luminosity enhancements at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Coward, D.H.

    1984-04-01

    Several ideas are discussed that have been proposed to improve the luminosity at the SPEAR and PEP electron-positron storage rings and to insure good luminosity at the SLAC Linear Collider. There have been two proposals studied recently for SPEAR: a Microbeta insertion using Samarium Cobalt permanent magnets, and a Minibeta insertion using conventional quadrupole magnets. The notations Microbeta and minibeta used here are somewhat arbitrary since the front faces of the first quadrupole magnets for both insertions are at nearly the same distance from the interaction point.

  1. 1992 Environmental Summer Science Camp Program evaluation. The International Environmental Institute of Westinghouse Hanford Company

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    This report describes the 1992 Westinghouse Hanford Company/US Department of Energy Environmental Summer Science Camp. The objective of the ``camp`` was to motivate sixth and seventh graders to pursue studies in math, science, and the environment. This objective was accomplished through hands-on fun activities while studying the present and future challenges facing our environment. The camp was funded through Technical Task Plan, 424203, from the US Department of Energy-Headquarters, Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, Technology Development,to Westinghouse Hanford Company`s International Environmental Institute, Education and Internship Performance Group.

  2. Recommendation for funding the 1992 Global Change Summer Institute: Industrial ecology and global change

    SciTech Connect

    Fein, J.S.

    1992-12-31

    A summer institute on Industrial Ecology and Global Change was held at Snow Mass, Colorado, July 20--31, 1992. Topics of discussion included the following: the patterns and prospects of global industrialization; the vulnerability of the global environment to human activity; how industrial activity might be reconfigured in response to a deeper understanding of the major biogeochemical cycles in which this activity is embedded; how industrial activity might be reconfigured in response to a deeper understanding of associated exotic disturbances of the environment; interactions of human activity with basic environmental cycles; human activity in the form of exotic disturbance of the environment; and the dynamics of industrial development and the environmental implications.

  3. 2012 Summer Research Experiences for Undergraduates at Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelaz, Michael W.; Cline, J. D.; Whitworth, C.; Clavier, D.; Owen, L.

    2013-01-01

    Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute (PARI) offers research experiences for undergraduates (REU). PARI receives support for the internships from the NC Space Grant Consortium, NSF awards, private donations, and industry partner funding. The PARI REU program began in 2001 with 4 students and has averaged 6 students per year over the past 11 years. This year PARI hosted 8 funded REU students. Mentors for the interns include PARI’s Science, Education, and Information Technology staff and visiting faculty who are members of the PARI Research Faculty Affiliate program. Students work with mentors on radio and optical astronomy research, electrical engineering for robotic control of instruments, software development for instrument control and software for citizen science projects, and science education by developing curricula and multimedia and teaching high school students in summer programs at PARI. At the end of the summer interns write a paper about their research which is published in the annually published PARI Summer Student Proceedings. Several of the students have presented their results at AAS Meetings. We will present a summary of specific research conducted by the students with their mentors and the logistics for hosting the PARI undergraduate internship program.

  4. The summer institute in clinical dental research methods: still going and growing after twenty years.

    PubMed

    Derouen, Timothy A; Wiesenbach, Carol

    2012-11-01

    The first Summer Institute in Clinical Dental Research Methods, a faculty development program at the University of Washington, was offered in the summer of 1992 for sixteen participants. The primary objective of the program was to give clinical faculty members in dentistry an introduction to and an understanding of the fundamental principles and methods used in good clinical research. In the twentieth offering of the institute in 2011, there were thirty-five participants, and over the twenty institutes, there has been a cumulative total of 463 participants who have come from thirty U.S. states as well as forty-three countries outside the United States. The curriculum has expanded from the initial offering of biostatistics, clinical epidemiology, behavioral research methods, and ethics in clinical research to now include clinical trials, grantsmanship, data analysis, an elective in molecular biology, and a team project that provides participants with hands-on experience in research proposal development as members of an interdisciplinary team. Enrollment has doubled since the first year, yet exit evaluations of the program content have remained consistently high (rated as very good to excellent). One of the indicators of program quality is that at least 50 percent of recent participants indicated that they attended because the program was recommended by colleagues who had attended. There seems to be an ever-increasing pool of dental faculty members who are eager to learn more about clinical research methodology through the institute despite the intensive demands of full-time participation in a six-week program.

  5. Energy, environment, and policy choices: Summer institutes for science and social studies educators

    SciTech Connect

    Marek, E.A.; Chiodo, J.J.; Gerber, B.L.

    1997-06-01

    The Center for Energy Education (CEE) is a partnership linking the University of Oklahoma, Close Up Foundation and Department of Energy. Based upon the theme of energy, environment and public policy, the CEE`s main purposes are to: (1) educate teachers on energy sources, environmental issues and decisionmaking choices regarding public policy; (2) develop interdisciplinary curricula that are interactive in nature (see attachments); (3) disseminate energy education curricula; (4) serve as a resource center for a wide variety of energy education materials; (5) provide a national support system for teachers in energy education; and (6) conduct research in energy education. The CEE conducted its first two-week experimentially-based program for educators during the summer of 1993. Beginning at the University of Oklahoma, 57 teachers from across the country examined concepts and issues related to energy and environment, and how the interdependence of energy and environment significantly influences daily life. During the second week of the institute, participants went to Washington, D.C. to examine the processes used by government officials to make critical decisions involving interrelationships among energy, environment and public policy. Similar institutes were conducted during the summers of 1994 and 1995 resulting in nearly 160 science and social studies educators who had participated in the CEE programs. Collectively the participants represented 36 states, the Pacific Territories, Puerto Rico, and Japan.

  6. Are Summer Institutes Funded by FHWA and State Departments of Transportation Effective? Case Studies of Evaluation and Learning Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aleong, Chandra; Aleong, John

    2008-01-01

    For the last three years Delaware State University (DSU) and the University of Vermont (UVM) have implemented a new approach to a summer program or "Institute" that emphasizes evaluation and accountability. Beginning in 2005, both institutes changed the focus of their programs to fulfill not only the primary objectives of instilling inquiry and…

  7. Investigating the Potential of Community College Developmental Summer Bridge Programs in Facilitating Student Adjustment to Four-Year Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Claire E.; Alozie, Nonye M.; Wathington, Heather D.

    2015-01-01

    This study examines whether community college developmental summer bridge programs (DSBPs) can help students acquire the academic and college knowledge needed to attend and succeed at a four-year higher education institution. In-depth interviews with 14 participants at nine four-year institutions in Texas were conducted two years after their…

  8. NATIONAL PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT INSTITUTES IN TECHNICAL EDUCATION, SUMMER 1967, A COMPILATION OF SELECTED PRESENTATIONS AND INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS. LEADERSHIP 16.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MILLER, A.J.; VALENTINE, I.E.

    SELECTED MATERIALS GENERATED BY THE FOUR 1967 SUMMER LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT INSTITUTES IN TECHNICAL EDUCATION ARE PRESENTED. THE MATERIALS WERE COMPILED TO FULFILL A NEED FOR ADDITIONAL INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALSTO BE USED IN CONDUCTING FUTURE STATE AND LOCALLY SPONSORED TRAINING ACTIVITIES AND INSTITUTES. COMMISSIONED PAPERS ARE--"A DESIGN FOR THE…

  9. 2008 Summer Research Institute Interfacial and Condensed Phase Chemical Physics Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett, Bruce C.; Tonkyn, Russell G.; Avery, Nachael B.

    2008-11-01

    For the fifth year, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in Richland, Washington, invited graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, university faculty, and students entering graduate students from around the world to participate in the Summer Research Institute in Interfacial and Condensed Phase Chemical Physics. The institute offers participants the opportunity to gain hands-on experience in top-notch research laboratories while working along internationally respected mentors. Of the 38 applicants, 20 were accepted for the 8- to 10-week program. The participants came from universities as close as Seattle and Portland and as far away as Germany and Singapore. At Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, the 20 participants were mentored by 13 scientists. These mentors help tailor the participant’s experience to the needs of that person. Further, the mentors provide guidance on experimental and theoretical techniques, research design and completion, and other aspects of scientific careers in interfacial and condensed phase chemical physics. The research conducted at the institute can result in tangible benefits for the participants. For example, many have co-authored papers that have been published in peer-reviewed journals, including top-rated journals such as Science. Also, they have presented their research at conferences, such as the Gordon Research Conference on Dynamics at Surfaces and the AVS national meeting. Beyond that, many of the participants have started building professional connections with researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, connections that will serve them well during their careers.

  10. Presentations from 35th SLAC Summer Institute On Particle Physics (SSI 2007): Dark Matter: From The Cosmos To The Laboratory 30 Jul - 10 Aug 2007, Menlo Park, California

    SciTech Connect

    Ly, T.; /SLAC

    2008-03-19

    Morning lectures covered all aspects of dark matter, from observational evidence for its existence, to its role in cosmic evolution and structure formation, to indirect and direct searches and attempts to produce it at colliders. In the afternoons, topical conference talks alternated with discussion sessions, tours, and social events.

  11. SLAC All Access: Laser Labs

    ScienceCinema

    Minitti, Mike; Woods Mike

    2016-07-12

    From supermarket checkouts to video game consoles, lasers are ubiquitous in our lives. Here at SLAC, high-power lasers are critical to the cutting-edge research conducted at the laboratory. But, despite what you might imagine, SLAC's research lasers bear little resemblance to the blasters and phasers of science fiction. In this edition of All Access we put on our safety goggles for a peek at what goes on inside some of SLAC's many laser labs. LCLS staff scientist Mike Minitti and SLAC laser safety officer Mike Woods detail how these lasers are used to study the behavior of subatomic particles, broaden our understanding of cosmic rays and even unlock the mysteries of photosynthesis.

  12. SLAC All Access: Laser Labs

    SciTech Connect

    Minitti, Mike; Woods Mike

    2013-03-01

    From supermarket checkouts to video game consoles, lasers are ubiquitous in our lives. Here at SLAC, high-power lasers are critical to the cutting-edge research conducted at the laboratory. But, despite what you might imagine, SLAC's research lasers bear little resemblance to the blasters and phasers of science fiction. In this edition of All Access we put on our safety goggles for a peek at what goes on inside some of SLAC's many laser labs. LCLS staff scientist Mike Minitti and SLAC laser safety officer Mike Woods detail how these lasers are used to study the behavior of subatomic particles, broaden our understanding of cosmic rays and even unlock the mysteries of photosynthesis.

  13. FCCSET/CEHR summer institutes for teacher development in science, mathematics, and technology. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-05-01

    This report summarizes the profiling procedure that grantees used to carry out a formative evaluation of their summer institutes. It discusses programmatic issues identified through profiling as well as how well the profiling process worked for the grantees. The report contains recommendations on both programmatic issues and profiling for NSTC/DOE, NCISE (the technical assistance provider), and the grantees themselves. In early September NCISE held its second workshop for NSTC grantees. Data from the evaluation of this two-day event generated six recommendations for DOE and the technical assistance provider. This NCISE report summarizes the two-year process NCISE used in attempting to help the grantees establish some indicators of success. A number of indicators were identified the first year with others added the second year. Additionally, a compilation of the various measures for the indicators of success developed collaboratively by NCISE and grantees is included. Although these indicators are not mandatory, they do provide guides for grantees in assessing the impact of the institutes. Embedded in the report are several recommendations for NSTC/DOE and the technical assistance provider.

  14. iSTEM Summer Institute: An Integrated Approach to Teacher Professional Development inSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Anne Seifert; Louis Nadelson

    2012-04-01

    The importance of STEM education to our national prosperity and global competitiveness was recently reinforced by the Obama administration support for Change the Equation. Change the Equation is a multi-entity initiative formed in response to the rapidly increasing demand for STEM related careers and the potential lack of preparation by many Americans to be employed in these positions. To address the issue many are calling for increased emphasis on K-12 STEM education, as early preparation in STEM provides the foundation essential for further learning and competencies (National Research Council, 2007). Achieving and sustaining depth and breadth of K-12 STEM education is inextricably linked to ongoing professional development of K-12 educators. The need for teacher continuing education in STEM education and the link between teacher effectiveness and student preparation in STEM was the impetus behind our i- STEM professional development summer institute. The i-STEM initiative is a collaborative effort between business, industry, government, K-12, and higher education. Although the organization is working on a number of projects, including policy, research, communication, and collaborations, the i-STEM group has directed significant resources toward K-12 educator professional development opportunities in STEM. Our report focuses on the structure and impact of the intensive four-day i-STEM residential professional development institute which we designed to increase the capacity of grade 4-9 teachers to teach STEM content. We structured the summer institute using the outcome of a survey we conducted of grade 4-9 teachers’ to assess their STEM professional development needs, the extant literature on teacher development, the increasing need for a STEM informed society, and our desire to use evidence based practices to enhance teacher capacity to teach STEM content. We developed this investigation to determine if our summer institute influenced the participating teachers

  15. Student-Athlete Perceptions of a Summer Pre-Enrollment Experience at an NCAA Division I-AAA Institution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalgety, Michael Franklin

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this exploratory qualitative study was to examine student-athlete perceptions of the role of summer pre-enrollment in their adjustment and transition to college. The study focused on student-athletes who received athletically-related financial aid at a National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I-AAA institution. The…

  16. Ensuring Student Success through Collaboration: Summer Institute Papers and Recommendations of the Council of Chief State School Officers, 1992.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of Chief State School Officers, Washington, DC.

    This volume contains papers that were commissioned for the 1992 Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO) Summer Institute. These papers form the basis for the CCSSO's study of school-community collaboration, which focuses on the role of the community in ensuring the success of all students. Following the acknowledgements and introduction,…

  17. More Is Not Always Better: Comprehensive Evaluation of a Summer Institute on Interdisciplinary Teamed Instruction for School-Level Teams.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meehan, Merrill L.; Cowley, Kimberly S.; Burns, Rebecca C.

    The Interdisciplinary Teamed Instruction (ITI) project investigated the effects of interdisciplinary, teamed instruction on secondary school teaching and learning. It examined the effectiveness of a professional development model that facilitated the development, implementation, and evaluation of ITI. Through summer institutes and onsite…

  18. Summer School Survey of Arkansas' Two-Year Higher Education Institutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moody, Allen B.

    As part of an effort to improve its summer school offerings, Arkansas' Garland County Community College conducted a survey of summer school practices at the state's 23 other two-year colleges. Survey results, based on responses from all 23 schools, included the following: (1) 13 schools offered 2 sessions during the summer months, 7 offered 3…

  19. SLAC Cosmic Ray Telescope Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Va'vra, J.

    2010-02-15

    SLAC does not have a test beam for the HEP detector development at present. We have therefore created a cosmic ray telescope (CRT) facility, which is presently being used to test the FDIRC prototype. We have used it in the past to debug this prototype with the original SLAC electronics before going to the ESA test beam. Presently, it is used to test a new waveform digitizing electronics developed by the University of Hawaii, and we are also planning to incorporate the new Orsay TDC/ADC electronics. As a next step, we plan to put in a full size DIRC bar box with a new focusing optics, and test it together with a final SuberB electronics. The CRT is located in building 121 at SLAC. We anticipate more users to join in the future. This purpose of this note is to provide an introductory manual for newcomers.

  20. Teaching and Training in Geoinformatics: Experiences from the Cyberinfrastructure Summer Institute for Geoscientists (CSIG)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smeekens, M.; Baru, C.; Keller, G. R.; Arrowsmith, R.; Crosby, C. J.

    2009-12-01

    The Cyberinfrastructure Summer Institute for Geoscientists (CSIG) has been conducted each year since 2004 under sponsorship of the GEON project that is funded by the NSF. The goal of the institute, which is broadly advertised to the Geoscience community, is to introduce geoscientists to Computer Science concepts and commonly-used as well as emergent information technology tools. The week-long program originally covered topics ranging from Data Modeling, Web Services, and Geographic Information Systems, to brief introductions to key concepts in Grid Computing, Parallel Programming, and Scientific Workflows. However, the program as well as the composition and expectations of the audience have evolved over time. Detailed course and instructor evaluations provide valuable feedback on course content and presentation approaches, and are used to plan future CSIG curriculum. From an initial emphasis on Geoscience graduate students and postdocs, the selection process has evolved to encourage participation by individuals with backgrounds in Geoscience as well as Computer Science from academia, government agencies, and industry. More recently, there has been an emphasis on selecting junior faculty and those interested in teaching Geoinformatics courses. While the initial objective of CSIG was to provide an overview of information technology topics via lectures and demonstrations, over time attendees have become more interested in specific instruction in how informatics and cyberinfrastructure (CI) capabilities could be utilized to address issues in Earth Science research and education. There have been requests over the years for more in-depth coverage on some topics and hands-on exercises. The program has now evolved to include a “Build Track”, focused on IT issues related to the development and implementation of Geoinformatics systems, and an “Education Track”, focused on use of Geoinformatics resources in education. With increasing awareness of CI projects, the

  1. Institute for Career Exploration (ICE), the Basic Skills Academy/Comprehensive Competency Program (B.S.A./C.C.P.), and the Career Employment Center Summer School Program. Summer 1989. OREA Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mei, Dolores M.; And Others

    In 1989, the New York City Division of High Schools developed three summer programs designed to meet the needs of disadvantaged students: the Institute for Career Exploration (ICE), the Basic Skills Academy/Comprehensive Competency Program (BSA/CCP), and the Career Employment Center (CEP) Summer School Program. The ICE program had three…

  2. FACET: The New User Facility at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, C.I.; Decker, F.J.; Erikson, R.; Hast, C.; Hogan, M.J.; Iverson, R.; Li, S.Z.; Nosochkov, Y.; Phinney, N.; Sheppard, J.; Wienands, U.; Woodley, M.; Yocky, G.; Seryi, A.; Wittmer, W.; /Michigan State U.

    2011-12-13

    FACET (Facility for Advanced Accelerator and Experimental Tests) is a new User Facility at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. Its high power electron and positron beams make it a unique facility, ideal for beam-driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration studies. The first 2 km of the SLAC linac produce 23 GeV, 3.2 nC electron and positron beams with short bunch lengths of 20 {mu}m. A final focusing system can produce beam spots 10 {mu}m wide. User-aided Commissioning took place in summer 2011 and FACET will formally come online in early 2012. We present the User Facility, the current features, planned upgrades and the opportunities for further experiments. Accelerators are our primary tool for discovering the fundamental laws to the universe. Each new frontier we probe requires a new, more powerful method. Accelerators are therefore increasing in size and cost. The future of this field requires new accelerating techniques that can reach the high energies required over shorter distances. New concepts for high gradient acceleration include utilizing the wakes in plasma and dielectric and metallic structures. FACET was built to provide a test bed for novel accelerating concepts with its high charge and highly compressed beams. As a test facility unlike any other, it has also attracted groups interested in beam diagnostic techniques and terahertz studies. The first phase of the construction was completed in May 2011. Beam commissioning began in June and was interleaved with the installation of five experiments. Users were invited to aid with the commissioning for the month of August during which time experimental hardware and software were checked out and some first measurements were taken. FACET is currently in the process of becoming a Department of Energy User Facility for High Energy Physics.

  3. SLAC Linac Preparations for FACET

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, R.; Bentson, L.; Kharakh, D.; Owens, A.; Schuh, P.; Seeman, J.; Sheppard, J.C.; Stanek, M.; Wittmer, W.; Yocky, G.; Wienands, U.; /SLAC

    2011-02-07

    The SLAC 3km linear electron accelerator has been cut at the two-thirds point to provide beams to two independent programs. The last third provides the electron beam for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), leaving the first two-thirds available for FACET, the new experimental facility for accelerator science and test beams. In this paper, we describe this separation and projects to prepare the linac for the FACET experimental program.

  4. Recent GPS Results at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Behrend, Dirk; Imfeld, Hans L.; /SLAC

    2005-08-17

    The Alignment Engineering Group (AEG) makes use of GPS technology for fulfilling part of its above ground surveying tasks at SLAC since early 2002. A base station (SLAC M40) has been set up at a central location of the SLAC campus serving both as master station for real-time kinematic (RTK) operations and as datum point for local GPS campaigns. The Leica RS500 system is running continuously and the GPS data are collected both externally (logging PC) and internally (receiver flashcard). The external logging is facilitated by a serial to Ethernet converter and an Ethernet connection at the station. Internal logging (ring buffer) is done for data security purposes. The weatherproof boxes for the instrumentation are excellent shelters against rain and wind, but do heat up considerably in sun light. Whereas the GPS receiver showed no problems, the Pacific Crest PDL 35 radio shut down several times due to overheating disrupting the RTK operations. In order to prevent heat-induced shutdowns, a protection against direct sun exposure (shading) and a constant air circulation system (ventilation) were installed. As no further shutdowns have occurred so far, it appears that the two measures successfully mended the heat problem.

  5. The American Indian Summer Institute in Earth System Science (AISESS) at UC Irvine: A Two-Week Residential Summer Program for High School Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, K. R.; Polequaptewa, N.; Leon, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Native Americans remain severely underrepresented in the geosciences, despite a clear need for qualified geoscience professionals within Tribal communities to address critical issues such as natural resource and land management, water and air pollution, and climate change. In addition to the need for geoscience professionals within Tribal communities, increased participation of Native Americans in the geosciences would enhance the overall diversity of perspectives represented within the Earth science community and lead to improved Earth science literacy within Native communities. To address this need, the Department of Earth System Science and the American Indian Resource Program at the University California have organized a two-week residential American Indian Summer Institute in Earth System Science (AISESS) for high-school students (grades 9-12) from throughout the nation. The format of the AISESS program is based on the highly-successful framework of a previous NSF Funded American Indian Summer Institute in Computer Science (AISICS) at UC Irvine and involves key senior personnel from the AISICS program. The AISESS program, however, incorporates a week of camping on the La Jolla Band of Luiseño Indians reservation in Northern San Diego County, California. Following the week of camping and field projects, the students spend a week on the campus of UC Irvine participating in Earth System Science lectures, laboratory activities, and tours. The science curriculum is closely woven together with cultural activities, native studies, and communication skills programs The program culminates with a closing ceremony during which students present poster projects on environmental issues relevant to their tribal communities. The inaugural AISESS program took place from July 15th-28th, 2012. We received over 100 applications from Native American high school students from across the nation. We accepted 40 students for the first year, of which 34 attended the program. The

  6. The Minneapolis Heart Institute Foundation Summer Research Internship Program: the benefits of preprofessional experience for prospective physicians.

    PubMed

    Willenbring, Benjamin D; McKee, Katherine C; Wilson, Betsy V; Henry, Timothy D

    2008-08-01

    There is a distinct shortage of preprofessional opportunities for undergraduate premedical students. During the last 7 summers, the Minneapolis Heart Institute Foundation Summer Research Internship Program has exposed interested students to cardiology and clinical research. The goals of the internship program are threefold: to bring students in contact with the medical profession, to offer experiences in the various disciplines of cardiology, and to introduce students to clinical research. The success of the program can be measured by its influence on participants' academic pursuits and scholarly contributions. Of the 65 internship alumni, 52 are studying to become physicians and most of the others are in health-related fields. Interns have also contributed abstracts and manuscripts to peer-reviewed journals and presented their research at major conferences. PMID:18773709

  7. Documenting the Physical Universe:Preserving the Record of SLAC from 1962 to 2005

    SciTech Connect

    Deken, Jean Marie; /SLAC

    2006-03-10

    Since 1905, Albert Einstein's ''miraculous year'', modern physics has advanced explosively. In 2005, the World Year of Physics, a session at the SAA Annual meeting discusses three institutional initiatives--Einstein's collected papers, an international geophysical program, and a research laboratory--to examine how physics and physicists are documented and how that documentation is being collected, preserved, and used. This paper provides a brief introduction to the research laboratory (SLAC), discusses the origins of the SLAC Archives and History Office, its present-day operations, and the present and future challenges it faces in attempting to preserve an accurate historical record of SLAC's activities.

  8. Proceedings of the Summer Institute on Biological Control of Plant Insects and Diseases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxwell, Fowden G., Ed.; Harris, F. A., Ed.

    This institute, conducted at Mississippi State University, was an outgrowth of the Council of Higher Education in the Agricultural Science's efforts to study the needs and opportunities for the advancement of scientific knowledge in land grant institutions and recommend programs for implementation. The proceedings serve as an information source to…

  9. Linear collider development at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Irwin, J.

    1993-08-01

    Linear collider R&D at SLAC comprises work on the present Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) and work toward the next linear collider (NLC). Recent SLC developments are summarized. NLC studies are divided into hardware-based and theoretical. We report on the status of the NLC Test Accelerator (NLCTA) and the final focus test beam (FFTB), describe plans for ASSET, an installation to measure accelerator structure wakefields, and mention IR design developments. Finally we review recent NLC theoretical studies, ending with the author`s view of next linear collider parameter sets.

  10. RF breakdown experiments at SLAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, L.; Scheitrum, G.; Vlieks, A.; Pearson, C.; Caryotakis, G.; Luhmann, N. C.

    1999-05-01

    RF breakdown is a critical issue in the conditioning of klystrons, accelerator sections, and rf components for the next linear collider (NLC), as well as other high gradient accelerators and high power microwave sources. SLAC is conducting a series of experiments using an X-band traveling wave ring to characterize the processes and trigger mechanisms associated with rf breakdown. The goal of the research is to identify materials, processes, and manufacturing methods that will increase the breakdown threshold and minimize the time required for conditioning.

  11. Organizational Support for the 3rd Summer Institute on Complex Plasmas, July 30 – August 8, 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, Jose L.

    2012-07-01

    This grant provided partial funds for American graduate students to attend the 3rd Graduate Summer Institute on Complex Plasmas, which was held from July 30 to August 8, 2012 at Seton Hall University in South Orange, New Jersey. The Graduate Summer Institute is a topical series of instructional workshops held bi-annually on the emerging field of complex plasmas that is jointly organized through a collaboration between American and German-European Union plasmas researchers. This specialized program brings together many of the world's leading researchers in the specialized area of complex plasmas, who freely provide instructional lectures and tutorials on the most recent research and discoveries done in this branch of plasma science. The partial funds provided by this grant helped support the travel and accommodation expenses of the participating American students and tutorial instructors. Partial funds further supported the travel and accommodation of three renown American plasma researchers that provided educational tutorials to the thirty-eight participating students from the United States, Europe, and Asia. The organized program afforded a unique opportunity for the participating American graduate students to learn about and engage more deeply in an area of plasma science that is not studied in any of the graduate educational curriculums provided by universities in the United States of America. The educational experience offered by this program provided the necessary knowledge needed by future American plasma researchers to keep the national plasma research effort on the cutting-edge and keep the national plasma community as a global leader.

  12. The SLAC P2 Marx

    SciTech Connect

    Kemp, Mark; Benwell, Andrew; Burkhart, Craig; MacNair, David; Nguyen1, Minh; /SLAC

    2012-07-05

    A proposed high energy physics accelerator, the International Linear Collider, will require greater than five hundred rf stations. Each station is composed of a klystron driven by a modulator. Recently, the SLAC P2 Marx was designated the baseline modulator for the ILC. This paper describes some key features of this modulator and presents recent experimental results. The P2 Marx is presently being transported to another facility for lifetime testing. Here, we will gain understanding of how the Marx performs into a klystron load and gain experience operating the Marx for longer periods. Long term plans include the possibility of using this rf station for L-band technology demonstration at SLAC. While the Marx was designed with the ILC in mind, the topology can be readily applied to several different applications. We are currently evaluating the use of the topology for ESS, CLIC, and upgrades for systems at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. Because of the modular nature of the cell and the robustness of the control system, many different combinations of series and parallel operation are possible along with different load currents and pulse shapes.

  13. Wakefields in SLAC linac collimators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novokhatski, A.; Decker, F.-J.; Smith, H.; Sullivan, M.

    2014-12-01

    When a beam travels near collimator jaws, it gets an energy loss and a transverse kick due to the backreaction of the beam field diffracted from the jaws. The effect becomes very important for an intense short bunch when a tight collimation of the background beam halo is required. In the Linac Coherent Light Source at SLAC a collimation system is used to protect the undulators from radiation due to particles in the beam halo. The halo is most likely formed from gun dark current or dark current in some of the accelerating sections. However, collimators are also responsible for the generation of wake fields. The wake field effect from the collimators not only brings an additional energy jitter and change in the trajectory of the beam, but it also rotates the beam on the phase plane, which consequently leads to a degradation of the performance of the Free Electron Laser at the Linac Coherent Light Source. In this paper, we describe a model of the wake field radiation in the SLAC linac collimators. We use the results of a numerical simulation to illustrate the model. Based on the model, we derive simple formulas for the bunch energy loss and the average kick. We also present results from experimental measurements that confirm our model.

  14. 76 FR 6172 - Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs (ECA) Request for Grant Proposals: Summer Institutes...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-03

    ... disciplines. In addition to thematic teaching, all institutes should explore American history, government... government. Such records are subject to audit. The basis for determining the value of cash and in-kind... Governments. OMB Circular No. A-133, Audits of States, Local Government, and Non- profit Organizations...

  15. EDPA Summer Institute for Home Economics-Gainful Teachers of the Disadvantaged. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina State Coll., Orangeburg.

    OBJECTIVES: The institute was organized around five of the major components believed to influence the quality of the relationship between the learner and the teacher: 1) characteristics of the disadvantaged learner, 2) perceptions and beliefs of the teacher, 3) facilitators of learning, 4) curriculum material, and 5) teaching skills. DURATION:…

  16. Summer Teacher Enhancement Institute for Science, Mathematics, and Technology Using the Problem-Based Learning Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersen, Richard H.

    1997-01-01

    The objectives of the Institute were: (a) increase participants' content knowledge about aeronautics, science, mathematics, and technology, (b) model and promote the use of scientific inquiry through problem-based learning, (c) investigate the use of instructional technologies and their applications to curricula, and (d) encourage the dissemination of TEI experiences to colleagues, students, and parents.

  17. Evaluation of the Radiography Program at Caldwell Community College and Technical Institute--Summer, 1982.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pipes, V. David

    As part of a periodic evaluation of the occupational programs at Caldwell Community College and Technical Institute (CCC&TI), a study of the radiography program was conducted to collect information to facilitate planning, aid in program improvement, and meet accountability demands. The specific objectives of the program evaluation were to…

  18. SLAC Linear Collider waveguide valve

    SciTech Connect

    Dean, N.R.; Fowkes, W.R.; Hoyt, M.W.; Schwarz, H.D.; Tillmann, E.F.

    1987-03-01

    A waveguide valve with a peak rf power handling capability of 70 MW and a reliable vacuum seal was needed for changing the new SLC klystrons. The original SLAC indium seal valve experienced rf breakdown above 35 MW and did not make a reliable vacuum seal. A new design was developed which incorporates the old valve housing but employs a new concept. The indium-knife edge seal has been replaced by an O-ring seal mechanism, which is transported to an rf-free environment during high power operation. The O-ring ''garage door'' seal rf currents are reduced to a manageable level through the use of an rf choke plunger which has a rejection capability in excess of 20 dB. The isolation between the high power rf and the O-ring chamber exceeds 100 dB.

  19. Descriptive survey of Summer Genetics Institute nurse graduates in the USA.

    PubMed

    Hickey, Kathleen T; Sciacca, Robert R; McCarthy, Mary S

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the clinical, research, educational, and professional activities that nurses are engaged in following participation in a 2 month intramural genetics training program. An online survey was administered in 2010 to graduates of the program sponsored by the US National Institute of Nursing Research from 2000 to 2009, in Bethesda, Maryland, USA. The electronic, voluntary survey was sent to 189 graduates via email. The survey included demographic characteristics, educational preparation, professional roles and responsibilities, and attitudes about genetic testing and privacy issues. Of the 95 graduates responding to the survey, 74% had doctorates and 70% were advanced practice nurses. All respondents reported incorporating genetics knowledge into daily clinical, academic, or research practices since completing the program, with 72% reporting being involved in genetically-focused research (52% with research funding), 32% incorporating genetics into patient care, and 79% providing genetics education. Respondents working in a hospital setting or academic institution were more likely to desire additional training in genetics. National Institute of Nursing Research graduates have successfully integrated genomics into a variety of nursing practices.

  20. SLAC All Access: Vacuum Microwave Device Department

    ScienceCinema

    Haase, Andy

    2016-07-12

    The Vacuum Microwave Device Department (VMDD) builds the devices that make SLAC's particle accelerators go. These devices, called klystrons, generate intense waves of microwave energy that rocket subatomic particles up to nearly the speed of light.

  1. SLAC All Access: Vacuum Microwave Device Department

    SciTech Connect

    Haase, Andy

    2012-10-09

    The Vacuum Microwave Device Department (VMDD) builds the devices that make SLAC's particle accelerators go. These devices, called klystrons, generate intense waves of microwave energy that rocket subatomic particles up to nearly the speed of light.

  2. SLAC accelerator operations report: 1995--1997

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, R.; Allen, C.W.; Anderson, S.; Linebarger, W.; Stanek, M.

    1997-05-01

    Operational statistics for the linear accelerator programs at SLAC are presented, including run-time records for SLC and the fixed-target programs. Also included are summaries of reliability and maintenance-related statistics.

  3. SLC Energy Upgrade Program at SLAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loew, G. A.; Allen, M. A.; Cassel, R. L.; Dean, N. R.; Konrad, G. T.; Koontz, R. F.; Lebacqz, J. V.

    1985-03-01

    The Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) Linear Collider (SLC) must reach a nominal center-of-mass energy of 100 GeV to fulfill its high energy physics goals. The energy upgrade program that is being implemented on the SLAC linear accelerator to meet these goals is described. A discussion of the design requirements and available technical options, the rationale for the adopted solution, and the technical problems involved in the engineering and production of klystrons and modulators is presented.

  4. X-BAND KLYSTRON DEVELOPMENT AT SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Vlieks, Arnold E.; /SLAC

    2009-08-03

    The development of X-band klystrons at SLAC originated with the idea of building an X-band Linear Collider in the late 1980's. Since then much effort has been expended in developing a reliable X-band Power source capable of delivering >50 MW RF power in pulse widths >1.5 {micro}s. I will report on some of the technical issues and design strategies which have led to the current SLAC klystron designs.

  5. Aztec Studies I. Phonological and Grammatical Studies in Modern Nahuatl Dialects. Summer Institute of Linguistics Publications in Linguistics and Related Fields.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Dow F., Ed.

    The articles presented in this study represent four of the seven Nahuatl dialects in which the Summer Institute of Linguistics workers are currently involved. Tentative conclusions from the dialect testing teams engaged in measuring degree of intelligibility between Nahuatl dialects suggest that almost a dozen mutually unintelligible Nahuatl areas…

  6. Bilingual Higher Education Summer Institute. Bilingual Higher Education: Foundations, Policy, and Practice. Report of Proceedings (Seton Hall University, August 24-29, 1979).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cotayo, Rosa Maria, Ed.

    Papers are presented from the New Jersey Department of Higher Education Summer Institute. Focus is on sociolinguistic, anthropological, social psychological, pedagogical, and socio-political-economic considerations. Each analyzes particular factors that influence the form and quality of bilingual policy and instruction programs, and offers…

  7. Summer Institute to Train Data Processing Teachers for the New Oklahoma State-Wide Computer Science System, Phase II. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuttle, Francis

    Twenty-three instructors participated in an 8-week summer institute to develop their technical competency to teach the second year of a 2-year Technical Education Computer Science Program. Instructional material covered the following areas: (1) compiler languages and systems design, (2) cost studies, (3) business organization, (4) advanced…

  8. Advancing the Agenda of Inclusive Education. Proceedings of the CASWE Summer Institute (1st, St. Catherines, Ontario, Canada, June 7-9, 1996).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Carol E., Ed.; Depledge, Norma E., Ed.

    The first Canadian Association for the Study of Women and Education (CASWE) Summer Institute convened to address issues resulting from exclusionary practices in education. The forum provided a venue for individuals and groups involved in a wide range of educational endeavors to share perspectives of inclusive education. Those facing exclusion in…

  9. Summer Bridge Programs: A Quantitative Study of the Relationship between Participation and Institutional Integration Using Tinto's Student Integration Model at a Mid-Sized, Public University in Massachusetts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arena, Meaghan L.

    2013-01-01

    With six-year degree completion rates for undergraduate students at a dismal 50% nationally (Weddle-West & Bingham, 2010), many institutions of higher education strive to develop programming to increase student retention rates. Summer bridge programs, an example of commonly used retention programs, seek to increase retention rates by…

  10. Summer Institute of Psychological-Sociological Problems of School Desegration; 80 School Administrators, Supervisors, Principals and Teachers in Ten Florida Counties. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Joseph H.

    A six-week biracial summer institute for school personnel and a follow-up one-day symposium were devoted to increasing understanding of problems accompanying desegregation, changes in race relations patterns, and ways of solving psychological-sociological problems posed by desegregation. Another concern was to develop acceptance and understanding…

  11. ACHIEVE LEARNING OBJECTIVES, PAPERS PREPARED ESPECIALLY FOR A SUMMER INSTITUTE ON EFFECTIVE TEACHING FOR YOUNG ENGINEERING TEACHERS (PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIVERSITY, AUGUST 28 THROUGH SEPTEMBER 3, 1960).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LANCASTER, OTIS E.

    PAPERS PREPARED FOR A SUMMER INSTITUTE ON EFFECTIVE TEACHING FOR TEACHERS OF ENGINEERING SUBJECTS ARE CONTAINED IN THIS CONFERENCE REPORT. GENERAL SUBJECT AREAS DISCUSSED ARE--(1) EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES IN ENGINEERING EDUCATION, (2) LEARNING THEORY AND ITS APPLICATION TO CLASSROOM TEACHING, (3) LECTURE, DISCUSSION, AND LECTURE-DISCUSSION METHODS…

  12. Making the Adjustment: A Qualitative Investigation of the Potential of Community College Developmental Summer Bridge Programs in Facilitating Student Adjustment to Four-Year Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Claire E.

    2013-01-01

    This study qualitatively examines whether participation in a summer bridge program situated at a community college can help students acquire the academic and college knowledge as well as "social know-how" needed to attend and succeed at a four-year higher education institution. The study's theoretical framework helps to elucidate the…

  13. S-Band Loads for SLAC Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Krasnykh, A.; Decker, F.-J.; LeClair, R.; /INTA Technologies, Santa Clara

    2012-08-28

    The S-Band loads on the current SLAC linac RF system were designed, in some cases, 40+ years ago to terminate 2-3 MW peak power into a thin layer of coated Kanthal material as the high power absorber [1]. The technology of the load design was based on a flame-sprayed Kanthal wire method onto a base material. During SLAC linac upgrades, the 24 MW peak klystrons were replaced by 5045 klystrons with 65+ MW peak output power. Additionally, SLED cavities were introduced and as a result, the peak power in the current RF setup has increased up to 240 MW peak. The problem of reliable RF peak power termination and RF load lifetime required a careful study and adequate solution. Results of our studies and three designs of S-Band RF load for the present SLAC RF linac system is discussed. These designs are based on the use of low conductivity materials.

  14. Computer control of rf at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, H.D.

    1985-03-01

    The Stanford Linear Accelerator is presently upgraded for the SLAC Linear Collider project. The energy is to be increased from approximately 31 GeV to 50 GeV. Two electron beams and one positron beam are to be accelerated with high demands on the quality of the beams. The beam specifications are shown. To meet these specifications, all parameters influencing the beams have to be under tight control and continuous surveillance. This task is accomplished by a new computer system implemented at SLAC which has, among many other functions, control over rf accelerating fields. 13 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. SLAC All Access: X-ray Microscope

    ScienceCinema

    Nelson, Johanna; Liu, Yijin

    2016-07-12

    SLAC physicists Johanna Nelson and Yijin Liu give a brief overview of the X-ray microscope at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) that is helping improve rechargeable-battery technology by letting researchers peek into the inner workings of batteries as they operate.

  16. Recent Ground Motion Studies at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Seryi, Andrei

    2000-06-28

    Studies of slow ground motion have recently been performed at SLAC using the linac laser alignment system over a period of one month. Two significant effects responsible for the observed motion have been identified, namely tidal forces and variation of external atmospheric pressure. The latter is of particular interest as it may result in misalignments with rather short wavelength.

  17. SLAC All Access: X-ray Microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Johanna; Liu, Yijin

    2012-08-14

    SLAC physicists Johanna Nelson and Yijin Liu give a brief overview of the X-ray microscope at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) that is helping improve rechargeable-battery technology by letting researchers peek into the inner workings of batteries as they operate.

  18. Future Proof for Physics: Preserving the Record of SLAC

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deken, Jean Marie

    2005-01-01

    This article provides a brief introduction to the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), discusses the origins of the SLAC Archives and History Office, its present-day operations, and the present and future challenges it faces in attempting to preserve an accurate historical record of SLAC's activities. (Contains 21 notes.)

  19. ESTB: A New Beam Test Facility at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Pivi, M.; Fieguth, T.; Hast, C.; Iverson, R.; Jaros, J.; Jobe, K.; Keller, L.; Walz, D.; Weathersby, S.; Woods, M.; /SLAC

    2011-04-05

    End Station A Test Beam (ESTB) is a beam line at SLAC using a small fraction of the bunches of the 13.6 GeV electron beam from the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), restoring test beam capabilities in the large End Station A (ESA) experimental hall. ESTB will provide one of a kind test beam essential for developing accelerator instrumentation and accelerator R&D, performing particle and particle astrophysics detector research, linear collider machine and detector interface (MDI) R&D studies, development of radiation-hard detectors, and material damage studies with several distinctive features. In the past, 18 institutions participated in the ESA program at SLAC. In stage I, 4 new kicker magnets will be added to divert 5 Hz of the LCLS beam to the A-line. A new beam dump will be installed and a new Personnel Protection System (PPS) is being built in ESA. In stage II, a secondary hadron target will be installed, able to produce pions up to about 12 GeV/c at 1 particle/pulse.

  20. An examination of science NCE scores of students of participating and nonparticipating teachers in East Tennessee State University Summer Science Institute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Kevin

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of East Tennessee State University's summer science institute training through the effect on mean Normal Curve Equivalent science test scores of students in a Northeast Tennessee school system whose teachers participated in the ETSU summer science institute training. Data analysis were compiled using students' science NCE scores to determine if there were significant differences in scores for those students whose teachers participated in the summer science institutes and those who did not participate. Students' NCE scores were compiled from the middle school setting over a 3-year academic period: 2004-2005, 2005-2006, and 2006-2007. Paired-samples t tests were used to analyze the effectiveness of teacher participation by comparing preparticipation and postparticipation students' science NCE scores for years 3 years. Independent-samples t tests were used to compare students' gender, socioeconomic status (free- and reduced-price meals), and NCE science scores (using 5th grade only) for 2 consecutive years of the study (2005-2006 through 2006-2007). Two analyses were used to determine teachers' participation and the effect on students' NCE science scores among two subgroups: gender and socioeconomic status. For research questions 4 and 5, a mean net gain and NCE raw scores average was performed. The findings from this study indicated significant differences in years 2004-2005 and 2006-2007 favoring students of teachers who participated in the summer science institutes. However, the results from year 2005-2006 showed no significant differences in students' science NCE scores of teachers who participated or did not participate in summer science institutes. In the consecutive year (2005-2006 through 2006-2007) using 5th grade only comparisons, data analyses showed significant differences in students' science NCE scores when performing NCE raw scores comparisons for gender and socioeconomic status. The

  1. Summer Programs for Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curriculum Review, 2009

    2009-01-01

    There are so many great ways to extend oneself professionally--or personally--over the summer. This paper presents several opportunities for summer 2009: (1) The Teacher-to-Teacher Initiative; (2) Courage to Teach; (3) University of South Carolina's Summer Institute in Computer Science; (4) Online Program in Online Teaching; and (5) College Board…

  2. A New Control Room for SLAC Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, Roger; Guerra, E.; Stanek, M.; Hoover, Z.Van; Warren, J.; /SLAC

    2012-06-04

    We are planning to construct a new control room at SLAC to unify and improve the operation of the LCLS, SPEAR3, and FACET accelerator facilities, and to provide the space and flexibility needed to support the LCLS-II and proposed new test beam facilities. The existing control rooms for the linac and SPEAR3 have been upgraded in various ways over the last decade, but their basic features have remained unchanged. We propose to build a larger modern Accelerator Control Room (ACR) in the new Research Support Building (RSB) which is currently under construction at SLAC. Shifting the center of control for the accelerator facilities entails both technical and administrative challenges. In this paper, we describe the history, concept, and status of this project.

  3. LLRF System Upgrade for the SLAC Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Bo; Akre, Ron; Pacak, Vojtech; /SLAC

    2012-07-06

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at SLAC is in full user operation and has met the stability goals for stable lasing. The 250pC bunch can be compressed to below 100fS before passing through an undulator. In a new mode of operation a 20pC bunch is compressed to about 10fS. Experimenters are regularly using this shorter X-ray pulse and getting pristine data. The 10fS bunch has timing jitter on the order of 100fS. Physicists are requesting that the RF system achieve better stability to reduce timing jitter. Drifts in the RF system require longitudinal feedbacks to work over large ranges and errors result in reduced performance of the LCLS. A new RF system is being designed to help diagnose and reduce jitter and drift in the SLAC linac.

  4. LCLS LLRF Upgrades to the SLAC Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Akre, R.; Dowell, D.; Emma, P.; Frisch, J.; Hong, B.; Kotturi, K.; Krejcik, P.; Wu, J.; Byrd, J.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2007-10-04

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at SLAC will be the brightest X-ray laser in the world when it comes on line. In order to achieve the brightness a 200fS length electron bunch is passed through an undulator. To create the 200fS, 3kA bunch, a 10pS electron bunch, created from a photo cathode in an RF gun, is run off crest on the RF to set up a position to energy correlation. The bunch is then compressed by chicanes. The stability of the RF system is critical in setting up the position to energy correlation. Specifications derived from simulations require the RF system to be stable to below 200fS in several critical injector stations and the last kilometer of linac. The SLAC linac RF system is being upgraded to meet these requirements.

  5. A Look Inside SLAC's Battery Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Wei Seh, Zhi

    2014-07-17

    In this video, Stanford materials science and engineering graduate student Zhi Wei Seh shows how he prepares battery materials in SLAC's energy storage laboratory, assembles dime-sized prototype "coin cells" and then tests them to see how many charge-discharge cycles they can endure without losing their ability to hold a charge. Results to date have already set records: After 1,000 cycles, they retain 70 percent of their original charge.

  6. Progress report on the SLAC Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Rees, J.

    1986-06-01

    The SLAC Linear Collider project (SLC) is reported as being near completion. The performance specifications are tabulated both for the initial form and for eventual goals. Various parts of the SLC are described and the status of their construction is reported, including the front end electron gun and booster, the linac, damping ring, positron source, SLC arcs, and conventional facilities. 5 refs., 12 figs. (LEW)

  7. A Look Inside SLAC's Battery Lab

    ScienceCinema

    Wei Seh, Zhi

    2016-07-12

    In this video, Stanford materials science and engineering graduate student Zhi Wei Seh shows how he prepares battery materials in SLAC's energy storage laboratory, assembles dime-sized prototype "coin cells" and then tests them to see how many charge-discharge cycles they can endure without losing their ability to hold a charge. Results to date have already set records: After 1,000 cycles, they retain 70 percent of their original charge.

  8. Tales from Tall Pines: An Anthology. Summer Institute for Public School Teachers (June 16 - July 17, 1986).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, David H., Ed.; Lebow, Jeanne, Ed.

    This anthology presents materials associated with the five-week summer session of the South Mississippi Writing Project, 1986. The anthology begins with a position statement on teaching writing, and curriculum vitae of staff and teacher consultants followed by lists of group and committee members and a calendar of events in the session. Summaries…

  9. A Program Evaluation of a Summer Research Training Institute for American Indian and Alaska Native Health Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaback, Tosha; Becker, Thomas M.; Dignan, Mark B.; Lambert, William E.

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe a unique summer program to train American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) health professionals in a variety of health research-related skills, including epidemiology, data management, statistical analysis, program evaluation, cost-benefit analysis, community-based participatory research, grant writing, and…

  10. Intensive Training Academy During Winter Breaks (Winternships) at a Two-Year Hispanic Serving Institution to Prepare STEM Students for Summer Internships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farmer, J. C.; Sim, A. M.; Usher, T. D.

    2014-12-01

    College of the Desert, in partnership with California State University San Bernardino, both Hispanic serving institutions, with the support of a 3-year grant through the NASA Curriculum Improvements Partnership Award for the Integration of Research (CIPAIR) has provided training for community college students, especially those from underrepresented groups, to better prepare them for summer internships opportunities at four-year schools and national laboratories. The Winternships provided an enhanced alternative learning environment for students pursuing degrees in the STEM fields through faculty and peer mentoring in guided undergraduate research activities. All activities associated with undergraduate research were covered including literature searches, hands-on laboratory and field research, collection and analysis of data, culminating in oral and written presentations at College of the Desert and regional student conferences. In addition, students received assistance in searching for summer internships in their area of interest, completing applications, and guidance on follow-up communication with the programs to which they applied. During the funding period, 44 students participated in the Winternship activity in which all submitted a minimum of 3 applications for summer internship opportunities. Results presented will include student success at receiving summer internships, examples of projects completed during the summer and winter activities, and impact on student success. Adaption of this program to other community colleges and into a sophomore level research experience course will be described. This activity has now been funded through the NSF Centers of Research Excellence in Science and Technology (CREST) Program for an additional five years in a partnership with California State University at San Bernardino.

  11. Scientific and Engineering Influences on Industrial Arts. A Summary of Institute Activities (NDEA Summer Inst., College Station, Texas).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas A and M Univ., College Station. Dept. of Industrial Education.

    These units developed for teacher use consist primarily of a collection of typical experiments or research activities developed by staff and participants of a National Defense Education Act Institute. The institute was designed to broaden the viewpoint of 25 industrial arts teachers with regard to some of the newer scientific and/or engineering…

  12. Report on 2nd Royan Institute International Summer School on developmental biology and stem cells Tehran, Iran, 17-22nd July 2011.

    PubMed

    Newgreen, Donald; Grounds, Miranda; Jesuthasan, Suresh; Rashidi, Hassan; Familari, Mary

    2012-03-01

    The 2nd Royan Institute International Summer School was built around the topic of stem cells and grounding in the discipline of developmental biology. The meeting provided not only direct transfer of technical and intellectual information, the normal process in scientific meetings, but was also a forum for the exchange of personal ideas of science as a creative pursuit. This summer school introduced aspiring young Iranian scientists to international researchers and exposed the latter to a rich culture that highly values learning and education, attested by the confident, intelligent young men and women who asked probing questions and who were eager to participate in the workshops. Hossein Baharvand's dedication and passion for science have led to an impressive record of national and international peer-reviewed publications and an increasing number of students who pursue science in Iran, and shows how the right people can create an environment where good science, good science education and motivation will flourish. This report summarizes some of the activities of the workshop in the Royan Institute and the impressions of the visiting scientists in the wider context of the scientific and cultural heritage of Iran.

  13. X-ray Astronomy at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Saz Parkinson, P

    2005-04-06

    The USA (Unconventional Stellar Aspect) experiment was launched in February of 1999 and operated for approximately 18 months. Group K at SLAC (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center) participated in this experiment along with the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL). The author discusses the USA experiment and the data accumulated, along with some of the results obtained from the observations of such objects as the extragalactic BL Lac object 1ES1959+65, the Black Hole Candidate (BHC) XTE J1118+480, and the eccentric X-ray binary system Circinus X-1.

  14. SLAC-Linac-Collider (SLC) Project

    SciTech Connect

    Wiedemann, H.

    1981-02-01

    The proposed SLAC Linear Collider Project (SLC) and its features are described in this paper. In times of ever increasing costs for energy the electron storage ring principle is about to reach its practical limit. A new class of colliding beam beam facilities, the Linear Colliders, are getting more and more attractive and affordable at very high center-of-mass energies. The SLC is designed to be a poineer of this new class of colliding beam facilities and at the same time will serve as a valuable tool to explore the high energy physics at the level of 100 GeV in the center-of-mass system.

  15. Survey and Alignment of SLAC's B Factory

    SciTech Connect

    Pietryka, Matthew J.; Gaydosh, Michael L.; /SLAC

    2011-09-08

    The survey and alignment of SLAC's B-factory injector and high energy ring will be complete in March 1997. Modern digital electronic surveying tools are contributing to new, efficient alignment procedures. A laser tracker was used to fiducialize almost 300 quadrupole magnets. Digital levels were used to pre-set base plate elevations. Theodolites with very accurate co-axial distance meters were used for everything from layout to 3D magnet positioning to network surveys, all in free stationing mode. A number of procedures and measurement results are outlined.

  16. SLAC Parallel Tracking Code Development and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    McCandless, Brian C.

    2001-01-19

    The increase in single processor speed based on Moore's law alone will not be able to deliver the dramatic speedup needed in many beam tracking simulations to uncover very slowly evolving effects in a reasonable time. SLAC has embarked on an effort to bring the power of parallel computing to bear on such computations with the goal to reduce the turnaround time by orders of magnitude so that the results may impact present facilities and future machine designs. This poster will describe the approaches adopted for parallelizing the LIAR code and the ION{_}MAD code. The scalability of these tracking codes and their further improvement will be discussed.

  17. Møller polarimetry at SLAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Band, H. R.

    1995-09-01

    Four Mo/ller polarimeters have been constructed and run at SLAC in the past three years and a fifth is planned for operation in 1995. Typical parameters and operational details are discussed. The analyzing power for all the polarimeters have been modeled, including effects due to the atomic motion of the target electrons. These corrections are sensitive to the geometry of the polarimeter design and vary in magnitude from ≤1% for the E-143 double arm detector to ≊15% for the Linac polarimeter.

  18. Environmental Studies in the Boreal Forest Zone: Summer IPY Institute at Central Boreal Forest Reserve, Fedorovskoe, Tver area, Russia (14-28 August, 2007)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparrow, E. B.; Kurbatova, Y.; Groisman, P.; Alexeev, V.

    2007-12-01

    The Summer Institute was organized by the International Arctic Research Center (IARC) at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, in collaboration with the A.N. Severtsov Institute for Ecology and Evolution of the Russian Academy of Sciences in Moscow, Russia, and the Central Forest State Nature Biosphere Reserve in Fedorovskoe, Russia. The Institute was arranged as a part of the education/outreach activities of the International Polar Year (IPY) at the University of Alaska and the Northern Eurasia Earth Science Partnership Initiative (NEESPI) and was held in Russia. The Institute provided a unique opportunity for participants to learn about the climate and environment of Northern Eurasia from leading scientists and educators, in a wide spectrum of polar and Earth system science disciplines from meteorology, biology, chemistry, and earth system modeling. Additionally, the Institute attendees observed and participated in the biospheric research activities under the guidance of experienced scientists. During a two-week-interval, the School attendees heard 40 lectures, attended several field trips and participated in three brainstorming Round Table Workshop Sessions devoted to perspectives of the boreal forest zone research and major unresolved problems that it faces. Thirty professors and experts in different areas of climate and biosphere research from Russia, the United States, Germany, Finland, and Japan, shared their expertise in lectures and in round table discussions with the Institute participants. Among the Institute participants there were 31 graduate students/early career scientists from six countries (China, Russia, Estonia, Finland, UK, and the United States) and eight K-12 teachers from Russia. The two groups joined together for several workshop sessions and for the field work components of the Institute. The field work was focused on land-atmosphere interactions and wetland studies in the boreal forest zone. Several field trips in and outside the Forest

  19. Knowledge Without Goodness Is Dangerous. Moral Education in Boarding Schools. Report of the Summer Institute on Moral Education held at Phillips Exeter Academy (Exeter, New Hampshire, June 18-30, 1978).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terry, Charles L., Ed.

    Moral education in boarding schools is the topic of this publication which includes summaries of the proceedings of the Bicentennial Summer Institute sponsored by Phillips Exeter Academy in June 1978. Interspersed throughout are passages from a journal kept by a participant in the Institute. The contextual and didactic approaches to moral…

  20. The Impact of a Summer Institute on Inservice Early Childhood Teachers' Knowledge of Earth and Space Science Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sackes, Mesut; Trundle, Kathy Cabe; Krissek, Lawrence A.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated inservice PreK to Grade two teachers' knowledge of some earth and space science concepts before and after a short-term teacher institute. A one-group pre-test-post-test design was used in the current study. Earth science concepts targeted during the professional development included properties of rocks and soils, and the…

  1. Foreign Language Registrations and Student Contact Hours in Institutions of Higher Education, Fall 1968 and Summer 1969.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kant, Julia Gibson; And Others

    This study of college language registration and student contact hours presents data for all foreign languages taught in colleges and universities. The body of the report consists of 24 tables, in which the data are summarized, and a directory of the 2,149 institutions that reported registrations in one or more foreign languages. It is the first in…

  2. Binary rf pulse compression experiment at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Lavine, T.L.; Spalek, G.; Farkas, Z.D.; Menegat, A.; Miller, R.H.; Nantista, C.; Wilson, P.B.

    1990-06-01

    Using rf pulse compression it will be possible to boost the 50- to 100-MW output expected from high-power microwave tubes operating in the 10- to 20-GHz frequency range, to the 300- to 1000-MW level required by the next generation of high-gradient linacs for linear for linear colliders. A high-power X-band three-stage binary rf pulse compressor has been implemented and operated at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). In each of three successive stages, the rf pulse-length is compressed by half, and the peak power is approximately doubled. The experimental results presented here have been obtained at low-power (1-kW) and high-power (15-MW) input levels in initial testing with a TWT and a klystron. Rf pulses initially 770 nsec long have been compressed to 60 nsec. Peak power gains of 1.8 per stage, and 5.5 for three stages, have been measured. This corresponds to a peak power compression efficiency of about 90% per stage, or about 70% for three stages, consistent with the individual component losses. The principle of operation of a binary pulse compressor (BPC) is described in detail elsewhere. We recently have implemented and operated at SLAC a high-power (high-vacuum) three-stage X-band BPC. First results from the high-power three-stage BPC experiment are reported here.

  3. Wake fields in SLAC Linac Collimators

    SciTech Connect

    Novokhatski, Alexander; Decker, F. -J.; Smith, H.; Sullivan, M.

    2014-12-02

    When a beam travels near collimator jaws, it gets an energy loss and a transverse kick due to the backreaction of the beam field diffracted from the jaws. The effect becomes very important for an intense short bunch when a tight collimation of the background beam halo is required. In the Linac Coherent Light Source at SLAC a collimation system is used to protect the undulators from radiation due to particles in the beam halo. The halo is most likely formed from gun dark current or dark current in some of the accelerating sections. However, collimators are also responsible for the generation of wake fields. The wake field effect from the collimators not only brings an additional energy jitter and change in the trajectory of the beam, but it also rotates the beam on the phase plane, which consequently leads to a degradation of the performance of the Free Electron Laser at the Linac Coherent Light Source. In this paper, we describe a model of the wake field radiation in the SLAC linac collimators. We use the results of a numerical simulation to illustrate the model. Based on the model, we derive simple formulas for the bunch energy loss and the average kick. In addition, we also present results from experimental measurements that confirm our model.

  4. SLAC three-body partial wave analysis system

    SciTech Connect

    Aston, D.; Lasinski, T.A.; Sinervo, P.K.

    1985-10-01

    We present a heuristic description of the SLAC-LBL three-meson partial wave model, and describe how we have implemented it at SLAC. The discussion details the assumptions of the model and the analysis, and emphasizes the methods we have used to prepare and fit the data. 28 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Stomatal closure: the old guard takes up the SLAC.

    PubMed

    Chater, Caspar; Gray, Julie E

    2015-03-30

    Flowering plant stomata close through passive dehydration or by active pumping of anions through SLAC, a phospho-activated membrane channel. A new study reports that moss likely utilise this same mechanism, and thus supports an early origin for SLAC-mediated active stomatal control.

  6. Financial management and job social skills training components in a summer business institute: a controlled evaluation in high achieving predominantly ethnic minority youth.

    PubMed

    Donohue, Brad; Conway, Debbie; Beisecker, Monica; Murphy, Heather; Farley, Alisha; Waite, Melissa; Gugino, Kristin; Knatz, Danielle; Lopez-Frank, Carolina; Burns, Jack; Madison, Suzanne; Shorty, Carrie

    2005-07-01

    Ninety-two adolescents, predominantly ethnic minority high school students, participated in a structured Summer Business Institute (SBI). Participating youth were randomly assigned to receive either job social skills or financial management skills training components. Students who additionally received the job social skills training component were more likely to recommend their employment agency to others than were youth who received the financial management component, rated their overall on-the-job work experience more favorably, and demonstrated higher scores in areas that were relevant to the skills that were taught in the job social skills workshops. The financial management component also appeared to be relatively effective, as youth who received this intervention improved their knowledge of financial management issues more than youth who received job social skills, and rated their workshops as more helpful in financial management, as well as insurance management. Future directions are discussed in light of these results.

  7. Resonant Kicker System Development at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Beukers, Tony; Krzaszczak, John; Larrus, Marc; Lira, Antonio de; /SLAC

    2009-04-27

    The design and installation of the Linear Coherent Light Source [1] at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory has included the development of a kicker system for selective beam bunch dumping. The kicker is based on an LC resonant topology formed by the 50 uF energy storage capacitor and the 64 uH air core magnet load which has a sinusoidal pulse period of 400us. The maximum magnet current is 500 A. The circuit is weakly damped, allowing most of the magnet energy to be recovered in the energy storage capacitor. The kicker runs at a repetition rate of 120Hz. A PLC-based control system provides remote control and monitoring of the kicker via EPICS protocol. Fast timing and interlock signals are converted by discrete peak-detect and sample-hold circuits into DC signals that can be processed by the PLC. The design and experimental characterization of the system are presented.

  8. Microprocessors in physics experiments at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Rochester, L.S.

    1981-04-01

    The increasing size and complexity of high energy physics experiments is changing the way data are collected. To implement a trigger or event filter requires complex logic which may have to be modified as the experiment proceeds. Simply to monitor a detector, large amounts of data must be processed on line. The use of microprocessors or other programmable devices can help to achieve these ends flexibly and economically. At SLAC, a number of microprocessor-based systems have been built and are in use in experimental setups, and others are now being developed. This talk is a review of existing systems and their use in experiments, and of developments in progress and future plans.

  9. Cerenkov ring imaging detector development at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, S.H.

    1984-06-01

    The imaging of Cerenkov light on to photosensitive detectors promises to be a powerful technique for identifying particles in colliding beam spectrometers. Toward this end two and three dimensional imaging photon detectors are being developed at SLAC. The present techniques involve photon conversion using easily ionized exotic chemicals like tetrakisdimethyl-amino-ethylene (TMAE) in a drift and amplifying gas mixture of methane and isobutane. Single photoelectrons from Cerenkov light are currently being drifted 20 cm and a new device under study will be used to study drifting up to 80 cm along a magnetic field. A short description of a large device currently being designed for the SLD spectrometer at the Stanford Linear Collider will be given.

  10. Pulsed rf superconductivity program at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Campisi, I.E.; Farkas, Z.D.

    1984-08-01

    Recent tests performed at SLAC on superconducting TM/sub 010/ caavities using short rf pulses (less than or equal to 2.5 ..mu..s) have established that at the cavity surface magnetic fields can be reached in the vicinity of the theoretical critical fields without an appreciable increase in average losses. Tests on niobium and lead cavities are reported. The pulse method seems to be best suited to study peak field properties of superconductors in the microwave band, without the limitations imposed by defects. The short pulses also seem to be more effective in decreasing the causes of field emission by rf processing. Applications of the pulsed rf superconductivity to high-gradient linear accelerators are also possible.

  11. Formative and summative evaluation efforts for the Teacher Enhancement Institute conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center, summer 1994

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, Randal D.

    1994-01-01

    The Teacher Enhancement Institute (TEI) at NASA Langley Research Center was developed in response to Executive Order 12821 which mandates national laboratories to 'assist in the mathematics and science education of our Nation's students, teachers, parents, and the public by establishing programs at their agency to provide for training elementary and secondary school teachers to improve their knowledge of mathematics and science. Such programs, to the maximum extent possible, shall involve partnerships with universities, state and local elementary and secondary school authorities, corporations and community based organizations'. The faculty worked closely with one another and the invited speakers to insure that the sessions supported the objectives. Speakers were informed of the objectives and given guidance concerning form and function for the session. Faculty members monitored sessions to assist speakers and to provide a quality control function. Faculty provided feedback to speakers concerning general objective accomplishment. Participant comments were also provided when applicable. Post TEI surveys asked for specific comments about each TEI session. During the second of the two, two week institutes, daily critiques were provided to the participants for their reflection. This seemed to provide much improved feedback to speakers and faculty because the sessions were fresh in each participant's mind. Between sessions one and two, some changes were made to the program as a result of the formative evaluation process. Those changes, though, were minor in nature and comprised what may be called 'fine tuning' a well conceived and implemented program. After the objectives were written, an assessment instrument was developed to test the accomplishment of the objectives. This instrument was actually two surveys, one given before the TEI and one given after the TEI. In using such a series, it was expected that changes in the participants induced by attendance at TEI may be

  12. Short wavelength FELs using the SLAC linac

    SciTech Connect

    Winick, H.; Bane, K.; Boyce, R.

    1993-08-01

    Recent technological developments have opened the possibility to construct a device which we call a Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS); a fourth generation light source, with brightness, coherence, and peak power far exceeding other sources. Operating on the principle of the free electron laser (FEL), the LCLS would extend the range of FEL operation to much aborter wavelength than the 240 mn that has so far been reached. We report the results of studies of the use of the SLAC linac to drive an LCLS at wavelengths from about 3-100 nm initially and possibly even shorter wavelengths in the future. Lasing would be achieved in a single pass of a low emittance, high peak current, high energy electron beam through a long undulator. Most present FELs use an optical cavity to build up the intensity of the light to achieve lasing action in a low gain oscillator configuration. By eliminating the optical cavity, which is difficult to make at short wavelengths, laser action can be extended to shorter wavelengths by Self-Amplified-Spontaneous-Emission (SASE), or by harmonic generation from a longer wavelength seed laser. Short wavelength, single pass lasers have been extensively studied at several laboratories and at recent workshops.

  13. The LCLS-II Project at SLAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, David

    2015-04-01

    The Linac Coherent Light Source-II (LCLS-II) Project will add capability and capacity to the LCLS facility. The design of the Project presents interesting challenges. The Project will construct a 4 GeV CW superconducting (SC) linac in the first kilometer of the existing SLAC linac tunnel and a substantial cryogenics plant to supply it. Two new variable gap undulators will be placed in the existing LCLS undulator hall, one optimized as a soft x-ray (200-1,300 eV) source will receive electrons from the new SC linac, the other replacing the existing LCLS undulator will receive electrons either simultaneously from the new SC linac (providing 1-5 keV photons) or the 120 Hz copper linac presently used by LCLS (providing 1-25 keV x-rays). The bright x-ray beams are conditioned before they are delivered to experimental stations. First light from the new facility is expected late in 2019. Work supported by US DOE Contract DE-AC02-766SF00515.

  14. RF Gun Photocathode Research at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Jongewaard, E.; Akre, R.; Brachmann, A.; Corbett, J.; Gilevich, S.; Grouev, K.; Hering, P.; P.Krejcik,; Lewandowski, J.; Loos, H.; Montagne, T.; Sheppard, J.C.; Stefan, P.; Vlieks, A.; Weathersby, S.; Zhou, F.; /SLAC

    2012-05-16

    LCLS is presently operating with a third copper photocathode in the original rf gun, with a quantum efficiency (QE) of {approx}1 x 10{sup -4} and projected emittance {gamma}{var_epsilon}{sub x,y} = 0.45 {micro}m at 250 pC bunch charge. The spare LCLS gun is installed in the SLAC Accelerator Structure Test Area (ASTA), fully processed to high rf power. As part of a wider photocathode R and D program, a UV laser system and additional gun diagnostics are being installed at ASTA to measure QE, QE lifetime, and electron beam emittance under a variety of operating conditions. The near-term goals are to test and verify the spare photocathode production/installation sequence, including transfer from the final holding chamber to the rf gun. Mid- and longer-term goals include development of a rigorous understanding of plasma and laser-assisted surface conditioning and investigation of new, high-QE photocathode materials. In parallel, an x-ray photoemission spectroscopy station is nearing completion, to analyze Cu photocathode surface chemistry. In this paper we review the status and anticipated operating parameters of ASTA and the spectroscopy test chamber.

  15. Parton distributions from SMC and SLAC data

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsey, G.P. |; Goshtasbpour, M. |

    1996-01-04

    We have extracted spin-weighted parton distributions in a proton from recent data at CERN and SLAC. The valence, sea quark and Antiquark spin-weighted distributions are determined separately. The data are all consistent with a small to moderate polarized gluon distribution, so that the anomaly term is not significant in the determination of the constituent contributions to the spin of the proton. We have analyzed the consistency of the results obtained from various sets of data and the Biorken sum rule. Although all data are consistent with the sum rule, the polarized distributions from different experiments vary, even with higher order QCD corrections taken into account. Results split into two models, one set implying a large polarized strange sea which violates the positivity bound, and the other set yielding a smaller polarized strange sea. Only further experiments which extract information about the polarized sea will reconcile these differences. We suggest specific experiments which can be performed to determine the size of the polarized sea and gluons.

  16. COSMIC - The SLAC Control System Migration Challenge

    SciTech Connect

    MacKenzie, Ronald R.

    2002-01-18

    The current SLC control system was designed and constructed over 20 years ago. Many of the technologies on which it was based are obsolete and difficult to maintain. The VMS system that forms the core of the Control System is still robust but third party applications are almost non-existent and its long-term future is in doubt. The need for a Control System at SLAC that can support experiments for the foreseeable future is not in doubt. The present B-Factory or PEPII experiment is projected to run at least 10 years. An FEL laser of unprecedented intensity plus an ongoing series of fixed target experiments is also in our future. The Next Linear Collider or NLC may also be in our future although somewhat farther distant in time. The NLC has performance requirements an order of magnitude greater than anything we have built to date. In addition to large numbers of IOCs and process variables, Physicists would like to archive everything all the time. This makes the NLC Control System a bit like a detector system as well. The NLC Control System will also need the rich suite of accelerator applications that are available with the current SLC Control System plus many more that are now only a glimmer in the eyes of Accelerator Physicists. How can we migrate gradually away from the current SLC Control System towards a design that will scale to the NLC while keeping everything operating smoothly for the ongoing experiments?

  17. 100 GeV SLAC Linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farkas, Z. D.

    2002-03-01

    The SLAC beam energy can be increased from the current 50 GeV to 100 GeV, if we change the operating frequency from the present 2856 MHz to 11424 MHz, using technology developed for the NLC. We replace the power distribution system with a proposed NLC distribution system as shown in Fig. 1. The four 3 meter s-band 820 nS .ll time accelerator sections are replaced by six 2 meter x-band 120 nS .ll time sections. Thus the accelerator length per klystron retains the same length, 12 meters. The 4050 65MW- 3.5microS klystrons are replaced by 75MW-1.5microS permanent magnet klystrons developed here and in Japan. The present input to the klystrons would be multiplied by a factor of 4 and possibly ampli.ed. The SLED cavities have to be replaced. The increase in beam voltage is due to the higher elastance to group velocity ratio, higher compression ratio and higher unloaded to external Q ratio of the new SLED cavities. The average power input is reduced because of the narrower klystron pulse width and because the klystron electro-magnets are replaced by permanent magnets.

  18. A 100 GeV SLAC Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Farkas, Zoltan D

    2002-03-07

    The SLAC beam energy can be increased from the current 50 GeV to 100 GeV, if we change the operating frequency from the present 2856 MHz to 11424 MHz, using technology developed for the NLC. We replace the power distribution system with a proposed NLC distribution system as shown in Fig. 1. The four 3 meter s-band 820 nS fill time accelerator sections are replaced by six 2 meter x-band 120 nS fill time sections. Thus the accelerator length per klystron retains the same length, 12 meters. The 4050 65MW-3.5 {micro}S klystrons are replaced by 75MW-1.5 {micro}S permanent magnet klystrons developed here and in Japan. The present input to the klystrons would be multiplied by a factor of 4 and possibly amplified. The SLED [1] cavities have to be replaced. The increase in beam voltage is due to the higher elastance to group velocity ratio, higher compression ratio and higher unloaded to external Q ratio of the new SLED cavities. The average power input is reduced because of the narrower klystron pulse width and because the klystron electro-magnets are replaced by permanent magnets.

  19. Search milli-charged particles at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Langeveld, W.G.J.

    1997-01-01

    Particles with electric charge q {triple_bond} Qe {le} 10{sup -3} e and masses in the range 1-1000 MeV/c{sup 2} are not excluded by present experiments or by astrophysical or cosmological arguments. A beam dump experiment uniquely suited to the detection of such {open_quotes}milli-charged{close_quotes} particles has been carried out at SLAC, utilizing the short-duration pulses of the SLC electron beam to establish a tight coincidence window for the signal. The detector, a large scintillation counter sensitive to very small energy depositions, provided much greater sensitivity than previous searches. Analysis of the data leads to the exclusion of a substantial portion of the charge-mass plane. In this report, a preliminary mass-dependent upper limit is presented for the charge of milli-charged particles, ranging from Q = 1.7 x 10{sup -5} at milli-charged particle mass 0.1 MeV/c{sup 2} to Q = 9.5 x 10{sup -4} at 100 MeV/c{sup 2}.

  20. COMPUTER-AIDED DRAFTING AND DESIGN, A THREE-WEEK SUMMER INSTITUTE TRAINING PROGRAM (MIAMI-DADE JUNIOR COLLEGE, MIAMI, FLORIDA, JULY 10, 1967 - JULY 28, 1967). FINAL REPORT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MORPHONIOS, ALEX G.

    THIRTY-SIX INSTRUCTORS, SUPERVISORS, AND DEPARTMENT CHAIRMEN IN AREAS OF DRAFTING, ENGINEERING, MANUFACTURING, AND COMPUTER TECHNOLOGY AT JUNIOR COLLEGES, TECHNICAL, AND AREA VOCATIONAL SCHOOLS IN 20 STATES ATTENDED A 3-WEEK SUMMER INSTITUTE TRAINING PROGRAM ON COMPUTER-AIDED DRAFTING AND DESIGN. EXPERIENCE IN PROGRAMING THE IBM SYSTEM 1620 WITH…

  1. Vistazos Intimos De Puebla; Una Compilacion De Informes Individuales Preparados Por Los Participantes Del Instituto De Verano (NDEA) (Close-ups on Puebla; A Compilation of Individual Reports Prepared by the Participants of the NDEA Summer Institute).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wichita State Univ., KS.

    The individual and committee reports on the sociology of Puebla, Mexico, which are collected here, were written by participants in an NDEA Summer Institute program of the University of Wichita, Kansas. The underlying motives of the program, described in the preface, were to provide participants with real language experience and a chance to…

  2. Progress report on the SLAC Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Kozanecki, W.

    1987-11-01

    In this paper we report on the status of the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC), the prototype of a new generation of colliding beam accelerators. This novel type of machine holds the potential of extending electron-positron colliding beam studies to center-of-mass (c.m.) energies far in excess of what is economically achievable with colliding beam storage rings. If the technical challenges posed by linear colliders are solvable at a reasonable cost, this new approach would provide an attractive alternative to electron-positron rings, where, because of rapidly rising synchrotron radiation losses, the cost and size of the ring increases with the square of the c.m. energy. In addition to its role as a test vehicle for the linear collider principle, the SLC aims at providing an abundant source of Z/sup 0/ decays to high energy physics experiments. Accordingly, two major detectors, the upgraded Mark II, now installed on the SLC beam line, and the state-of-the-art SLD, currently under construction, are preparing to probe the Standard Model at the Z/sup 0/ pole. The SLC project was originally funded in 1983. Since the completion of construction, we have been commissioning the machine to bring it up to a performance level adequate for starting the high energy physics program. In the remainder of this paper, we will discuss the status, problems and performance of the major subsystems of the SLC. We will conclude with a brief outline of the physics program, and of the planned enhancements to the capabilities of the machine. 26 refs., 7 figs.

  3. Radiation aspects of the B-Factory at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, J.C.; Nelson, W.R.; Mao, X.S.

    1996-11-01

    The B-Factor is a high-energy physics project at SLAC that studies the phenomenon of CP violation from collisions between two stored beams; high energy electrons (HER, maximum 12-GeV) and low energy positrons (LER, maximum 4-GeV). Both the HER and LER are located in an underground tunnel of 2,200-m-long circumference with a maximum stored current of 3 A. The injector consists of the existing SLAC 2-mile-long LINAC with two extraction and transport lines for both rings. Radiation aspects of the machine are addressed in the context of machine protection and personnel protection. Specific illustrations (e.g., the estimations of neutron, photon and synchrotron radiation environment in the ring tunnel and the radiation levels outside a typical Interaction Region, etc.) are given to show a few natures of the radiation issues for the B-Factory and to reflect the appropriate SLAC policies on radiation safety.

  4. RF pulse compression in the NLC test accelerator at SLAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavine, T. L.

    At the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), the authors are designing a Next Linear Collider (NLC) with linacs powered by x-band klystrons with RF pulse compression. The design of the linac RF system is based on x-band prototypes which have been tested at high power, and on a systems-integration test - the Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator (NLCTA) - which is currently under construction at SLAC. This paper discusses some of the systems implications of RF pulse compression, and the use of pulse compression in the NLCTA, both for peak power multiplication and for controlling, by RF phase modulation, intrapulse variations in the linac beam energy.

  5. A Prototype Two-tier Mentoring Program for Undergraduate Summer Interns from Minority-Serving Institutions at the University of Alaska Fairbanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gens, R.; Prakash, A.; Ozbay, G.; Sriharan, S.; Balazs, M. S.; Chittambakkam, A.; Starkenburg, D. P.; Waigl, C.; Cook, S.; Ferguson, A.; Foster, K.; Jones, E.; Kluge, A.; Stilson, K.

    2013-12-01

    The University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF) is partnering with Delaware State University, Virginia State University, Elizabeth City State University, Bethune-Cookman University, and Morgan State University on a U.S. Department of Agriculture - National Institute for Food and Agriculture funded grant for ';Enhancing Geographic Information System Education and Delivery through Collaboration: Curricula Design, Faculty, Staff, and Student Training and Development, and Extension Services'. As a part of this grant, in summer 2013, UAF hosted a week long workshop followed by an intense two week undergraduate internship program. Six undergraduate students from partnering Universities worked with UAF graduate students as their direct mentors. This cohort of undergraduate mentees and graduate student mentors were in-turn counseled by the two UAF principal investigators who served as ';super-mentors'. The role of each person in the two-tier mentoring system was well defined. The super-mentors ensured that there was consistency in the way the internship was setup and resources were allocated. They also ensured that there were no technical glitches in the research projects and that there was healthy communication and interaction among participants. Mentors worked with the mentees ahead of time in outlining a project that aligned with the mentees research interest, provided basic reading material to the interns to get oriented, prepared the datasets required to start the project, and guided the undergraduates throughout the internship. Undergraduates gained hands-on experience in geospatial data collection and application of tools in their projects related to mapping geomorphology, landcover, geothermal sites, fires, and meteorological conditions. Further, they shared their research results and experiences with a broad university-wide audience at the end of the internship period. All participants met at lunch-time for a daily science talk from external speakers. The program offered

  6. The Turn-on of LCLS: the X-Ray Free Electron Laser at SLAC ( Keynote - 2011 JGI User Meeting)

    ScienceCinema

    Drell, Persis [SLAC Director

    2016-07-12

    The U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI) invited scientists interested in the application of genomics to bioenergy and environmental issues, as well as all current and prospective users and collaborators, to attend the annual DOE JGI Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting held March 22-24, 2011 in Walnut Creek, Calif. The emphasis of this meeting was on the genomics of renewable energy strategies, carbon cycling, environmental gene discovery, and engineering of fuel-producing organisms. The meeting features presentations by leading scientists advancing these topics. SLAC National Laboratory Director Persis Drell gives a keynote talk on "The Turn-on of LCLS: the X-Ray Free-Electron Laser at SLAC" at the 6th Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 22, 2011

  7. The Turn-on of LCLS: the X-Ray Free Electron Laser at SLAC ( Keynote - 2011 JGI User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect

    Drell, Persis

    2011-03-22

    The U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI) invited scientists interested in the application of genomics to bioenergy and environmental issues, as well as all current and prospective users and collaborators, to attend the annual DOE JGI Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting held March 22-24, 2011 in Walnut Creek, Calif. The emphasis of this meeting was on the genomics of renewable energy strategies, carbon cycling, environmental gene discovery, and engineering of fuel-producing organisms. The meeting features presentations by leading scientists advancing these topics. SLAC National Laboratory Director Persis Drell gives a keynote talk on "The Turn-on of LCLS: the X-Ray Free-Electron Laser at SLAC" at the 6th Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 22, 2011

  8. Where do we stand on the SLC (SLAC Linear Collider)

    SciTech Connect

    Kozanecki, W.

    1989-02-01

    This paper reviews the current performance of the SLAC Linear Collider, as well as the issues, problems and prospects facing the project. A few of the original accelerator physics results achieved in the last year are described in detail. 36 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Review of trigger and on-line processors at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Lankford, A.J.

    1984-07-01

    The role of trigger and on-line processors in reducing data rates to manageable proportions in e/sup +/e/sup -/ physics experiments is defined not by high physics or background rates, but by the large event sizes of the general-purpose detectors employed. The rate of e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation is low, and backgrounds are not high; yet the number of physics processes which can be studied is vast and varied. This paper begins by briefly describing the role of trigger processors in the e/sup +/e/sup -/ context. The usual flow of the trigger decision process is illustrated with selected examples of SLAC trigger processing. The features are mentioned of triggering at the SLC and the trigger processing plans of the two SLC detectors: The Mark II and the SLD. The most common on-line processors at SLAC, the BADC, the SLAC Scanner Processor, the SLAC FASTBUS Controller, and the VAX CAMAC Channel, are discussed. Uses of the 168/E, 3081/E, and FASTBUS VAX processors are mentioned. The manner in which these processors are interfaced and the function they serve on line is described. Finally, the accelerator control system for the SLC is outlined. This paper is a survey in nature, and hence, relies heavily upon references to previous publications for detailed description of work mentioned here. 27 references, 9 figures, 1 table.

  10. SLAC: A Tool for Addressing Chaos in the Ecology Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, A. J.

    2005-01-01

    Until the early 1970s, ecologists generally assumed that erratic fluctuations observed in natural populations were a product of stochastic noise. It is now known that extremely complex dynamics can arise from basic deterministic processes. This field of study is generally called chaos theory. Here, a computer program, SLAC (Stability, Limits, And…

  11. SLAC Users Bulletin No. 102, November 1985-April 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, L. P.; Edminster, D.

    1986-01-01

    The status experimental activities at SLAC is reported, including the long-range schedule and a list of approved high-energy experiments. Work on PEP, SPEAR, and the SLC is included, as well as computing. Such operational data as operating hours and experimental hours are given. (LEW)

  12. SLAC linear collider: the machine, the physics, and the future

    SciTech Connect

    Richter, B.

    1981-11-01

    The SLAC linear collider, in which beams of electrons and positrons are accelerated simultaneously, is described. Specifications of the proposed system are given, with calculated preditions of performance. New areas of research made possible by energies in the TeV range are discussed. (GHT)

  13. Summer Study Abroad.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Gail A., Ed.

    This catalog describes summer study abroad programs around the world for students of college age and up. The included information was obtained from surveys conducted by the Institute of International Education in September 1978. The catalog contains programs of interest to the pre-college student who wants to improve his language skills before…

  14. Laser Safety for the Experimental Halls at SLAC_s Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS)

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, Michael; Anthony, Perry; Barat, Ken; Gilevich, Sasha; Hays, Greg; White, William E.; /SLAC

    2009-01-15

    The LCLS at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory will be the world's first source of an intense hard x-ray laser beam, generating x-rays with wavelengths of 1nm and pulse durations less than 100fs. The ultrafast x-ray pulses will be used in pump-probe experiments to take stop-motion pictures of atoms and molecules in motion, with pulses powerful enough to take diffraction images of single molecules, enabling scientists to elucidate fundamental processes of chemistry and biology. Ultrafast conventional lasers will be used as the pump. In 2009, LCLS will deliver beam to the Atomic Molecular and Optical (AMO) Experiment, located in one of 3 x-ray Hutches in the Near Experimental Hall (NEH). The NEH includes a centralized Laser Hall, containing up to three Class 4 laser systems, three x-ray Hutches for experiments and vacuum transport tubes for delivering laser beams to the Hutches. The main components of the NEH laser systems are a Ti:sapphire oscillator, a regen amplifier, green pump lasers for the oscillator and regen, a pulse compressor and a harmonics conversion unit. Laser safety considerations and controls for the ultrafast laser beams, multiple laser controlled areas, and user facility issues are discussed.

  15. Summer Astronomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riddle, Bob

    2004-01-01

    This brief article describes what can be expected of the skies in the summer of 2004 with quite a few celestial thrills to anticipate. In addition to the planet viewing opportunities, there is a very rare Venus transit of the Sun and the annual Perseid meteor shower. The 2004 summer also marks both an end and beginning for the Cassini/Huygens…

  16. Reverse Transfer Project, Summer 1986.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reis, Elizabeth

    In 1986, a Reverse Transfer Project was initiated at Moraine Valley Community College (MVCC) in order to promote the summer school attendance at MVCC of "reverse transfer" students (i.e., students who attended another institution during the regular academic year). A mailing, containing a cover letter, informational brochure, summer catalog, and…

  17. Center for Computing Research Summer Research Proceedings 2015.

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, Andrew Michael; Parks, Michael L.

    2015-12-18

    The Center for Computing Research (CCR) at Sandia National Laboratories organizes a summer student program each summer, in coordination with the Computer Science Research Institute (CSRI) and Cyber Engineering Research Institute (CERI).

  18. iUTAH Summer Research Institutes: Supporting the STEM Pipeline Through Engagement of High School, Undergraduate and Graduate Students, Secondary Teachers, and University Faculty in Authentic, Joint Research Experiences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, L. A.; Malone, M.

    2015-12-01

    Multiple types of programs are needed to support the STEM workforce pipeline from pre-college through graduate school and beyond. Short-term, intensive programs provide opportunities to participate in authentic scientific research for students who may not be sure of their interest in science and for teachers who may be unable to devote an entire summer to a research experience. The iUTAH (innovative Urban Transitions and Aridregion Hydro-Systainability) Summer Research Institute utilizes an innovative approach for a 5-day program that engages high school and undergraduate students as well as middle and high school teachers in conducting research projects led by graduate students and faculty members. Each Institute involves 3-4 half to full-day research projects. Participants collect (usually in the field) and analyze data for use in on-going research or that is related to a current research project. The participants work in groups with the graduate students to create a poster about each research project. They present their posters on the last day of the Institute at the state-wide meeting of all researchers and involved in this EPSCoR-funded program. In addition to introducing participants to research, one of the Institute's goals is to provide opportunities for meaningful near-peer interactions with students along the STEM pipeline from high school to undergraduate to graduate school. On the end-of-Institute evaluations, almost all students have reported that their discussions with other participants and with graduate students and faculty were a "Highly effective" or "Effective" part of the Institute. In response to a question about how the Institute will impact their course choices or their plans to pursue a career in science, many high school and undergraduate students have noted that they plan to take more science courses. Each year several undergraduates who were previously unsure about a career in science have indicated that they now intend to pursue a

  19. Linac design for the LCLS project at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Bharadwaj, V.K.; Bane, K.; Clendenin, J.

    1997-05-01

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at SLAC is being designed to produce intense, coherent 0.15-nm x-rays. These x-rays will be produced by a single pass of a 15 GeV bunched electron beam through a long undulator. Nominally, the bunches have a charge of 1 nC, normalized transverse emittances of less than 1.5{pi} mm-mr and an rms bunch length of 20 {mu}m. The electron beam will be produced using the last third of the SLAC 3-km linac in a manner compatible with simultaneous operation of the remainder of the linac for PEP-II. The linac design necessary to produce an electron beam with the required brightness for LCLS is discussed, and the specific linac modifications are described.

  20. An X-Band Gun Test Area at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Limborg-Deprey, C.; Adolphsen, C.; Chu, T.S.; Dunning, M.P.; Jobe, R.K.; Jongewaard, E.N.; Hast, C.; Vlieks, A.E.; Wang, F.; Walz, D.R.; Marsh, R.A.; Anderson, S.G.; Hartemann, F.V.; Houck, T.L.; /LLNL, Livermore

    2012-09-07

    The X-Band Test Area (XTA) is being assembled in the NLCTA tunnel at SLAC to serve as a test facility for new RF guns. The first gun to be tested will be an upgraded version of the 5.6 cell, 200 MV/m peak field X-band gun designed at SLAC in 2003 for the Compton Scattering experiment run in ASTA. This new version includes some features implemented in 2006 on the LCLS gun such as racetrack couplers, increased mode separation and elliptical irises. These upgrades were developed in collaboration with LLNL since the same gun will be used in an injector for a LLNL Gamma-ray Source. Our beamline includes an X-band acceleration section which takes the electron beam up to 100 MeV and an electron beam measurement station. Other X-Band guns such as the UCLA Hybrid gun will be characterized at our facility.

  1. Laser Tracker Test Facility at SLAC - Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Gassner, G.L.; Ruland, R.E.; /SLAC

    2008-02-22

    Physics experiments at SLAC require high accuracy positioning, e. g. 100 {micro}m over a distance of 150 m or 25 {micro}m in a 10 x 10 x 3 meter volume. Laser Tracker measurement systems have become one of the most important tools for achieving these accuracies when mapping components. In order to improve and get a better understanding of laser tracker measurement tolerances we extended our laboratory with a rotary calibration table (Kugler GmbH) providing an accuracy of better than 0.2 arcsec. This paper gives an overview of the calibration table and its evaluation. Results of tests on two of our Laser Trackers utilizing the new rotary table as well as the SLAC interferometer bench are presented.

  2. SLAC E144 Plots, Simulation Results, and Data

    DOE Data Explorer

    The 1997 E144 experiments at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) utilitized extremely high laser intensities and collided huge groups of photons together so violently that positron-electron pairs were briefly created, actual particles of matter and antimatter. Instead of matter exploding into heat and light, light actually become matter. That accomplishment opened a new path into the exploration of the interactions of electrons and photons or quantum electrodynamics (QED). The E144 information at this website includes Feynmann Diagrams, simulation results, and data files. See also aseries of frames showing the E144 laser colliding with a beam electron and producing an electron-positron pair at http://www.slac.stanford.edu/exp/e144/focpic/focpic.html and lists of collaborators' papers, theses, and a page of press articles.

  3. SLAC Next-Generation High Availability Power Supply

    SciTech Connect

    Bellomo, P.; MacNair, D.; /SLAC

    2010-06-11

    SLAC recently commissioned forty high availability (HA) magnet power supplies for Japan's ATF2 project. SLAC is now developing a next-generation N+1 modular power supply with even better availability and versatility. The goal is to have unipolar and bipolar output capability. It has novel topology and components to achieve very low output voltage to drive superconducting magnets. A redundant, embedded, digital controller in each module provides increased bandwidth for use in beam-based alignment, and orbit correction systems. The controllers have independent inputs for connection to two external control nodes. Under fault conditions, they sense failures and isolate the modules. Power supply speed mitigates the effects of fault transients and obviates subsequent magnet standardization. Hot swap capability promises higher availability and other exciting benefits for future, more complex, accelerators, and eventually the International Linear Collider project.

  4. RF pulse compression in the NLC test accelerator at SLAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavine, Theodore L.

    1995-07-01

    At the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), we are designing a Next Linear Collider (NLC) with linacs powered by X-band klystrons with rf pulse compression. The design of the linac rf system is based on X-band prototypes which have been tested at high power, and on a systems-integration test—the Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator (NLCTA)—which is currently under construction at SLAC. This paper discusses some of the systems implications of rf pulse compression, and the use of pulse compression in the NLCTA, both for peak power multiplication and for controlling, by rf phase modulation, intra-pulse variations in the linac beam energy.

  5. Preliminary results of the echo-seeding experiment at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, D.; Colby, E.; Ding, Y.; Dunning, M.; Frederico, J.; Gilevich, S.; Hast, C.; Jobe, K.; McCormick, D.; Nelson, J.; Raubenheimer, T.O.; Soong, K.; Stupakov, G.; Szalata, Z.; Walz, D.; Weathersby, S.; Woodley, M.; Corlett, J.; Qiang, J.; Penn, G.; Prestemon, S.; Schlueter, R.; Venturini, M.; Wan, W.; Pernet, P-L.

    2010-05-23

    ECHO-7 is a proof-of-principle echo-enabled harmonic generation FEL experiment in the Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator (NLCTA) at SLAC. The experiment aims to generate coherent radiation at 318 nm and 227 nm, which are the 5th and 7th harmonic of the infrared seed laser. In this paper we present the preliminary results from the commissioning run of the completed experimental setup which started in April 2010.

  6. Single bunch beam measurements for the proposed SLAC linear collider

    SciTech Connect

    Clendenin, J.E.; Loew, G.A.; Miller, R.H.; Pellegrin, J.L.; Truher, J.B.

    1981-02-01

    Single S-band bunches of approx. 10/sup 9/ electrons have been used to study the characteristics of the SLAC linac in anticipation of its operation as a linear collider. Emittance measurements have been made, the longitudinal charge distribution within single bunches has been determined and transverse emittance growth has been produced by deliberately missteering the beam. New equipment is being installed and checked out, and the sensitivity of new traveling-wave beam position monitors has been measured.

  7. D Phase Space Measurements at the SLAC Gun Test Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmerge, J. F.; Bolton, P. R.; Clendenin, J. E.; Dowell, D. H.; Gierman, S. M.; Limborg, C. G.; Murphy, B. F.

    2003-12-01

    Proposed fourth generation light sources using SASE FELs to generate short pulse, coherent, X-rays require demonstration of high brightness electron sources. The Gun Test Facility (GTF) at SLAC was built to test high brightness sources for the proposed Linac Coherent Light Source at SLAC. The GTF is composed of an S-band photocathode rf gun with a Cu cathode, emittance compensating solenoid, single 3 m SLAC linac section and e-beam diagnostic section with a UV drive laser system. The longitudinal emittance exiting the gun has been determined by measuring the energy spectrum downstream of the linac as a function of the linac phase. The e-beam pulse width, correlated and uncorrelated energy spread at the linac entrance have been fit to the measured energy spectra using a least square error fitting routine. The fit yields a pulse width of 2.9 ps FWHM for a 4.3 ps FWHM laser pulsewidth and 2% rms correlated energy spread with 0.07% rms uncorrelated energy spread. The correlated energy spread is enhanced in the linac to allow slice emittance measurements by conducting a quadrupole scan in a dispersive section. The normalized slice emittance has been measured to be as low as 2 mm-mrad for beams with peak currents up to 150 A (300 pC with a laser pulse length of 1.8 ps) while the full projected emittance is 3 mm-mrad.

  8. Beam parametr measurements for the SLAC linear collider

    SciTech Connect

    Clendenin, J.E.; Blocker, C.; Breidenbach, M.

    1981-01-01

    A stable, closely-controlled, high-intensity, single-bunch beam will be required for the SLAC Linear Collider. The characteristics of short-pulse, low-intensity beams in the SLAC linac have been studied. A new, high-intensity thermionic gun, subharmonic buncher and S-band buncher/accelerator section were installed recently at SLAC. With these components, up to 10/sup 11/ electrons in a single S-band bunch are available for injection into the linac. the first 100-m accelerator sector has been modified to allow control of short-pulse beams by a model-driven computer program. Additional instrumentation, including a computerized energy analyzer and emittance monitor have been added at the end of the 100-m sector. The beam intensity, energy spectrum, emittance, charge distribution and the effect of wake fields in the first accelerator sector have been measured. The new source and beam control system are described and the most recent results of the beam parameter measurements are discussed.

  9. The SLAC Vertical Comparator for the Calibration of Digital Levels

    SciTech Connect

    Woschitz, Helmut; Gassner, Georg; Ruland, Robert; /SLAC

    2006-12-06

    Digital levels replaced spirit levels in most fields of precise height measurements because of the automation of the height readings. Three manufacturers offer digital levels with a single reading resolution of 10 {micro}m, and for all of them systematic effects are known. In Europe several facilities for system calibration of digital levels using vertical comparators were established within the last decade. However, there still was no system calibration facility in North America. In order to guarantee the accuracy required for the alignment of experiments at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) a calibration facility for the system calibration of digital levels was built. In this paper the setup of the SLAC vertical comparator is described in detail and its standard uncertainty is derived. In order to perform traditional rod calibration of conventional line-scaled rods, a CCD camera was integrated into the SLAC comparator. The CCD camera setup is also briefly described. To demonstrate the capabilities of the comparator, results of system and rod calibration are shown.

  10. Recent Upgrade of the Klystron Modulator at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, M.N.; Burkhart, C.P.; Lam, B.K.; Morris, B.; /SLAC

    2011-11-04

    The SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory employs 244 klystron modulators on its two-mile-long linear accelerator that has been operational since the early days of the SLAC establishment in the sixties. Each of these original modulators was designed to provide 250 kV, 262 A and 3.5 {mu}S at up to 360 pps using an inductance-capacitance resonant charging system, a modified type-E pulse-forming network (PFN), and a pulse transformer. The modulator internal control comprised of large step-start resistor-contactors, vacuum-tube amplifiers, and 120 Vac relays for logical signals. A major, power-component-only upgrade, which began in 1983 to accommodate the required beam energy of the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) project, raised the modulator peak output capacity to 360 kV, 420 A and 5.0 {mu}S at a reduced pulse repetition rate of 120 pps. In an effort to improve safety, performance, reliability and maintainability of the modulator, this recent upgrade focuses on the remaining three-phase AC power input and modulator controls. The upgrade includes the utilization of primary SCR phase control rectifiers, integrated fault protection and voltage regulation circuitries, and programmable logic controllers (PLC) -- with an emphasis on component physical layouts for safety and maintainability concerns. In this paper, we will describe the design and implementation of each upgraded component in the modulator control system. We will also report the testing and present status of the modified modulators.

  11. Latest Results in SLAC 75 MW PPM Klystrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprehn, D.; Caryotakis, G.; Haase, A.; Jongewaard, E.; Laurent, L.; Pearson, C.; Phillips, R.

    2006-01-01

    75 MW X-band klystrons utilizing Periodic Permanent Magnet (PPM) focusing have been undergoing design, fabrication and testing at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) for almost nine years. The klystron development has been geared toward realizing the necessary components for the construction of the Next Linear Collider (NLC). The PPM devices built to date which fit this class of operation consist of a variety of 50 MW and 75 MW devices constructed by SLAC, KEK (Tsukuba, Japan ) and industry. All these tubes follow from the successful SLAC design of a 50 MW PPM klystron in 1996. In 2004 the latest two klystrons were constructed and tested with preliminary results reported at EPAC2004. The first of these two devices was tested to the full NLC specifications of 75 MW, 1.6 microseconds pulse length, and 120 Hz. This 14.4 kW average power operation came with a tube efficiency >50%. The most recent testing of these last two devices will be presented here. Design and manufacturing issues of the latest klystron, due to be tested by the Fall of 2005, are also discussed.

  12. Latest Results in SLAC 75-MW PPM Klystrons

    SciTech Connect

    Sprehn, D.; Caryotakis, G.; Haase, A.; Jongewaard, E.; Laurent, L.; Pearson, C.; Phillips, R.; /SLAC

    2006-03-06

    75 MW X-band klystrons utilizing Periodic Permanent Magnet (PPM) focusing have been undergoing design, fabrication and testing at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) for almost nine years. The klystron development has been geared toward realizing the necessary components for the construction of the Next Linear Collider (NLC). The PPM devices built to date which fit this class of operation consist of a variety of 50 MW and 75 MW devices constructed by SLAC, KEK (Tsukuba, Japan) and industry. All these tubes follow from the successful SLAC design of a 50 MW PPM klystron in 1996. In 2004 the latest two klystrons were constructed and tested with preliminary results reported at EPAC2004. The first of these two devices was tested to the full NLC specifications of 75 MW, 1.6 microseconds pulse length, and 120 Hz. This 14.4 kW average power operation came with a tube efficiency >50%. The most recent testing of these last two devices will be presented here. Design and manufacturing issues of the latest klystron, due to be tested by the Fall of 2005, are also discussed.

  13. Compliance of SLAC_s Laser Safety Program with OSHA Requirements for the Control of Hazardous Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, Michael; /SLAC

    2009-01-15

    SLAC's COHE program requires compliance with OSHA Regulation 29CFR1910.147, 'The control of hazardous energy (lockout/tagout)'. This regulation specifies lockout/tagout requirements during service and maintenance of equipment in which the unexpected energization or start up of the equipment, or release of stored energy, could cause injury to workers. Class 3B and Class 4 laser radiation must be considered as hazardous energy (as well as electrical energy in associated equipment, and other non-beam energy hazards) in laser facilities, and therefore requires careful COHE consideration. This paper describes how COHE is achieved at SLAC to protect workers against unexpected Class 3B or Class 4 laser radiation, independent of whether the mode of operation is normal, service, or maintenance.

  14. Arthroscopic Resection Arthroplasty of the Radial Column for SLAC Wrist

    PubMed Central

    Cobb, Tyson K.; Walden, Anna L.; Wilt, Jessica M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Symptomatic advanced scapholunate advanced collapse (SLAC) wrists are typically treated with extensive open procedures, including but not limited to scaphoidectomy plus four-corner fusion (4CF) and proximal row carpectomy (PRC). Although a minimally invasive arthroscopic option would be desirable, no convincing reports exist in the literature. The purpose of this paper is to describe a new surgical technique and outcomes on 14 patients who underwent arthroscopic resection arthroplasty of the radial column (ARARC) for arthroscopic stage II through stage IIIB SLAC wrists and to describe an arthroscopic staging classification of the radiocarpal joint for patients with SLAC wrist. Patients and Methods Data were collected prospectively on 17 patients presenting with radiographic stage I through III SLAC wrist who underwent ARARC in lieu of scaphoidectomy and 4CF or PRC. Fourteen patients (12 men and 2 women) subject to 1-year follow-up were included. The average age was 57 years (range 41 to 78). The mean follow-up was 24 months (range 12 to 61). Arthroscopic resection arthroplasty of the radial column is described for varying stages of arthritic changes of the radioscaphoid joint. Midcarpal resection was not performed. Results The mean Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) score was 66 preoperatively and 28 at final follow-up. The mean satisfaction (0 = not satisfied, 5 = completely satisfied) at final follow-up was 4.5 (range 3 to 5). The pain level (on 0–10 scale) improved from 6.6 to 1.3. The total arc of motion changed from 124° preoperatively to 142° postoperatively following an ARARC. Grip was 16 kg preoperatively and 18 kg postoperatively. Radiographic stages typically underestimated arthroscopic staging. Although four of our patients appeared to be radiographic stage I, all were found to have arthritis involving some or all of the radioscaphoid articulation at the time of arthroscopy. Clinical Relevance

  15. Summer Skies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Scope, 2005

    2005-01-01

    During the evening hours of the summer of 2005, there will be numerous opportunities to observe several of the brighter planets as they move along their respective orbits, overtaking and passing one another, performing a planetary dance with the choreography set to orbital speeds. With the exception of Mars, the visible planets will all be in the…

  16. Summer Opportunities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winds of Change, 2002

    2002-01-01

    This directory describes 24 summer internships and cooperative education programs for college students, especially in the science, engineering, and technology fields. A few programs are specifically for American Indians, minority groups, or college-bound high school students. Program entries include a brief description, skills and background…

  17. Summer Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toussaint, Isabella H.

    An intensive 6-week summer readiness program held in the Beaver Area School District, Beaver, Pennsylvania, developed linguistic facility among 15 preschool children. Daily activities included discussion, picture study, creative arts, field trips, developing experience charts, and other nonlanguage arts activities. A combined experiential,…

  18. Results from the SLAC High Energy Density Plasma Lens Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Johnny S. T.

    2000-04-01

    The plasma lens was proposed(P. Chen, Part. Acc. 20), 171 (1987). as a final focusing mechanism to achieve high luminosity for future high energy linear colliders. Previous experiments(See, for example, R. Govil et al.), Phys. Rev. Lett, 86, No. 16, 3202 (1999), and references therein. to test this concept were carried out at low energy densities. In this talk, results from the SLAC E-150 experiment(P. Chen et al.), Proposal for a Plasma Lens Experiment at the Final Focus Test Beam, SLAC Expt. Prop. E-150, April 1997. on plasma lens focusing of a high energy density beam with parameters relevant to linear colliders are presented and compared with theoretical expectations. The experiment was carried out at the SLAC Final Focus Test Beam, with nominal parameters of 30 GeV beam energy, 1.5× 10^10 electrons per bunch, bunch length σz = 0.7 mm and beam cross-section σ_x^* × σ_y^* = 7 μm × 3 μm. The plasma lens was produced by a fast pulsing gas-jet providing a neutral Nitrogen gas column with density up to 5× 10^18 / cm^3. The gas was then ionized by the leading portion of the incident high energy density electron beam, while the rest of the electrons in the same bunch were focused by the strong plasma pinching force and a reduction in the beam size of up to 40% was measured. The beam waist was also measured and compared with detailed numerical calculations with a particles-in-cell code. The reduction in focal length indicated a focusing strength approximately 100 times that of the FFTB final focus magnets. The synchrotron radiation with critical energy in the 1-10 MeV range due to the strong bending of beam particles inside the plasma lens was observed for the first time.

  19. Commissioning the Echo-Seeding Experiment Echo-7 at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Weathersby, S.a E.Colby; Dunning, M.; Gilevich, S.; Hast, C.; Jobe, K.; McCormick, D.; Nelson, J.; Raubenheimer, T.O.; Soong, K.; Stupakov, G.; Szalata, Z.; Walz, D.; Woodley, M.; Xiang, D.; Pernet, P-L.; /Ecole Polytechnique, Lausanne

    2011-06-02

    ECHO-7 is a proof-of-principle echo-enabled harmonic generation (EEHG) FEL experiment in the Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator (NLCTA) at SLAC. The experiment is intended to test the EEHG principle at low electron beam energy, 120 MeV, and determine the sensitivities and limitations to understand the expected performance at the higher energy scales and harmonic numbers required for x-ray FELs. In this paper we present the experimental results from the commissioning run of the completed experimental setup which started in April 2010.

  20. Using the SLAC VHF and UHF radio systems

    SciTech Connect

    Struven, W.

    1987-02-01

    The use of the SLAC VHF and UHF Radio Systems and the Tunnel Antenna Systems as they are presently configured is described. The original radio system was built in 1966 and has grown in scope over the years. The Tunnel Antenna Systems were developed for, and first installed in, the PEP ring, and later added to other tunnels and redesigned to cover the UHF range, as well as VHF. The UHF radio system was designed and built for SLC use, and was first used in the SLC Arcs. The three radio systems will be described and the capabilities of each system will be defined.

  1. Reliability of Operation at SLAC in the LCLS Era

    SciTech Connect

    Wienands, U.; Allen, W.B.; Colocho, W.; Erickson, R.; Stanek, M.; /SLAC

    2009-06-19

    LCLS hardware availability has been above 90% for the first two commissioning runs of the accelerator. In this paper we compare the reliability data for LCLS (availability, MTBF and MTTR) to those of PEP-II, the e{sup +}e{sup -} collider operating previously at SLAC. It may be seen that the linac availability is not significantly different now than it was before, while the availability of the whole LCLS facility is significantly higher than that of the PEP-II facility as a whole (which was about 87%). Most of the improvement is in the MTTR. Ways to improve availability towards the goal of 95% are discussed.

  2. New injector (NPI) for nuclear physics at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Koontz, R.F.

    1984-05-01

    A program of nuclear physics experiments has been approved at SLAC, and a new high average current injector is being added to the accelerator 650 meters upstream (Sector 25) of the accelerator output. The new injector (NPI) will produce beams in End Station A of up to 150 mA, 1.6 ..mu..sec, 180 pps at energies from 0.5 to 6 GeV. NPI will also have 1 nsec short pulse capability for electron injection into SSRL. Work on NPI started in October of 1983, and the first beam from the new injector is scheduled for the Fall of 1984.

  3. SLAC RF Source Research at X-Band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprehn, D.

    2003-12-01

    X-band klystrons capable of 75 MW and utilizing either solenoidal or Periodic Permanent Magnet (PPM) focusing are undergoing design, fabrication and testing at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). The klystron development is part of an effort to realize components necessary for the construction of the Next Linear Collider (NLC). SLAC has developed a solenoidal-focused X-band klystron which is currently the workhorse of high power component testing for the NLC. A state-of-the-art modulator will drive eight of these tubes which, in turn, will power an rf distribution system referred to as the "8-pack" in order to test these modulators and waveguide components. Eventually, in an interest to save millions of dollars per year in the operational cost of the NLC, these tubes will be replaced by PPM klystrons. The PPM devices built to date which fit this class of operation consist of a variety of 50 MW and 75 MW devices constructed by SLAC, KEK (Tsukuba, Japan ), and industry. These tubes follow from the successful 50 MW PPM design of 1996. Recent testing of this particular tube at wider pulsewidths has reached 50 MW at 55 % efficiency, 2.4 μs and 60 Hz. Two 50 MW PPM klystrons produced by industry have been delivered to SLAC. One of these devices arrived with a vacuum suitable for test. Testing during 2001 revealed a serious, but curious, vacuum response which limited the operation to an rf output of ˜40 MW. A 75 MW PPM klystron prototype was first constructed in 1997 and later modified in 1999 to eliminate oscillations. This tube has reached the NLC design target of 75 MW at 1.5 μs though at a significantly reduced rep rate. Two new 75 MW PPM klystrons were constructed and tested in 2002 after a diode was successfully tested in 2001. The new design was aimed at reducing the cost and increasing the reliability of such high-energy devices. The rf circuit and beam focusing for one of these devices was built by industry and incorporated into one of the tubes

  4. Polar Summer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    30 December 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows eroding mesas of frozen carbon dioxide in the martian south polar residual cap. During the summer season, the scarps that bound each pit and mesa in the south polar region become dark as carbon dioxide sublimes away. The darkening might result from the roughening of the surfaces from which ice is subliming, or from the concentration of trace amounts of dust on these slopes, or both.

    Location near: 84.7oS, 48.2oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Summer

  5. Searching for light dark matter with the SLAC millicharge experiment.

    PubMed

    Diamond, M; Schuster, P

    2013-11-27

    New sub-GeV gauge forces ("dark photons") that kinetically mix with the photon provide a promising scenario for MeV-GeV dark matter and are the subject of a program of searches at fixed-target and collider facilities around the world. In such models, dark photons produced in collisions may decay invisibly into dark-matter states, thereby evading current searches. We reexamine results of the SLAC mQ electron beam dump experiment designed to search for millicharged particles and find that it was strongly sensitive to any secondary beam of dark matter produced by electron-nucleus collisions in the target. The constraints are competitive for dark photon masses in the ~1-30 MeV range, covering part of the parameter space that can reconcile the apparent (g-2)(μ) anomaly. Simple adjustments to the original SLAC search for millicharges may extend sensitivity to cover a sizable portion of the remaining (g-2)(μ) anomaly-motivated region. The mQ sensitivity is therefore complementary to ongoing searches for visible decays of dark photons. Compared to existing direct-detection searches, mQ sensitivity to electron-dark-matter scattering cross sections is more than an order of magnitude better for a significant range of masses and couplings in simple models.

  6. Recording PEP2 Ring Beam Losses at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Zelazny, M.; Gromme, T.; Himel, T.; Hendrickson, L.; Krauter, K.; /SLAC

    2005-09-30

    The PEP2 (e+)(e-) storage rings contain many complex interrelated systems. When the beam aborts, examining a record of the orbit from the time just before the abort can help identify the root cause. At the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) a system has been developed to continuously record beam orbits from Beam Position Monitors (BPMS) into a circular buffer. When the beam is aborted the buffers are frozen and their contents are stored for later analysis. BPM orbits are saved on a turn by turn basis for 2800 turns in both the high energy ring (HER) and the low energy ring (LER). Each BPM Processor (BPMP) can either monitor the HER or the LER, but not both as the readout of the two rings is multiplexed into a single readout channel. Tools exist as part of the SLAC Control Program (SCP) to collect, display, and save the data. A physicist or operator can choose a few BPMS in which to view all 2800 turns to identify the turn in which the beam went awry; then ask for that specific orbit from all of the BPMS in the storage ring to determine the root cause of the abort.

  7. 77 FR 68134 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request (30-day): National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-15

    ...): National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR) Summer Genetics Institute Alumni Survey SUMMARY: Under the... publication. Proposed Collection: National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR) Summer Genetics Institute Alumni Survey, -0925-New Need and Use of Information Collection: The NINR Summer Genetics...

  8. The Summer School Alpbach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gitsch, Michaela; Manoharan, Periasamy K.

    2015-02-01

    Sixty young, highly qualified European science and engineering students converge annually for stimulating 10 days of work in the Austrian Alps. Four teams are formed, each of which designs a space mission, which are then judged by a jury of experts. Students learn how to approach the design of a satellite mission and explore new and startling ideas supported by experts. The Summer School Alpbach enjoys more than 30 years of tradition in providing in-depth teaching on different topics of space science and space technology, featuring lectures and concentrated working sessions on mission studies in self-organised working groups. The Summer School is organised by the Austrian Research Promotion Agency (FFG) and co-sponsored by the European Space Agency (ESA), the International Space Science Institute (ISSI), and the national space authorities of its member and cooperating states.

  9. Development of X-Band Klystron Technology at SLAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caryotakis, George

    1997-05-01

    The SLAC design for a 1-TeV collider (NLC) requires klystrons with a performance which is well beyond the state-of-the-art for microwave tubes in the United States or abroad. SLAC is in the seventh year of a program to develop these klystrons. A number of difficult technical issues had to be addressed, in order to satisfy the NLC requirement for very high peak power at X-band, together with good efficiency, excellent reliability and low acquisition cost. The electrical specifications for the NLC klystrons are not fully established, but they are approximately as follows: Frequency: 11.4 GHz Peak Power: 75 MW Pulse length: 1.5 microseconds Repetition rate: 180 pps Gain: 50 dB Efficiency: 50% (total, including beam focusing) The 100+ joules in the rf output pulses, together with the high frequency, call for the use of extended interaction output circuits, instead of simple resonant cavities. The efficiency requirement, deriving from the necessity to minimize operating costs for the collider, precludes use of solenoids for beam confinement. It was necessary to develop periodic permanent magnet focusing (PPM) for this klystron. Once again, the beam pulse energies, coupled to the small dimensions of drift tubes and cavities require near-perfect beam optics. In addition to designing for the above parameters, SLAC engineers are also planning for the changes which will be necessary in order for the prototype klystron to be transferred to industry and produced in quantity (and for substantially reduced cost). The NLC will require a factory producing klystrons at the rate of about 1000/year, for an initial complement of about 10,000 klystrons, and for replacements. A paper design of such a factory is part of the NLC klystron development program. The latest test results of a 50-MW PPM-focused klystron built in May 1996 will be presented, along with the design of the 75-MW prototype and plans for its low-cost factory-produced version. .

  10. Electron Bunch Length Measurement for LCLS at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Zelazny, M.; Allison, S.; Chevtsov, Sergei; Emma, P.; Kotturi, K.d.; Loos, H.; Peng, S.; Rogind, D.; Straumann, T.; /SLAC

    2007-10-04

    At Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) a Bunch Length Measurement system has been developed to measure the length of the electron bunch for its new Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). This destructive measurement uses a transverse-mounted RF deflector (TCAV) to vertically streak the electron beam and an image taken with an insertable screen and a camera. The device control software was implemented with the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS) toolkit. The analysis software was implemented in Matlab{trademark} using the EPICS/Channel Access Interface for Scilab{trademark} and Matlab{trademark} (labCA). This architecture allowed engineers and physicists to develop and integrate their control and analysis without duplication of effort.

  11. SLAC All Access: Atomic, Molecular and Optical Science Instrument

    ScienceCinema

    Bozek, John

    2016-07-12

    John Bozek, a staff scientist at SLAC's Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) X-ray laser who manages the LCLS Soft X-ray Department, takes us behind the scenes at the Atomic, Molecular and Optical Science (AMO) instrument, the first of six experimental stations now operating at LCLS. Samples used in AMO experiments include atoms, molecules, clusters, and nanoscale objects such as protein crystals or viruses. Science performed at AMO includes fundamental studies of light-matter interactions in the extreme X-ray intensity of the LCLS pules, time-resolved studies of increasingly charged states of atoms and molecules, X-ray diffraction imaging of nanocrystals, and single-shot imaging of a variety of objects.

  12. SLAC All Access: Atomic, Molecular and Optical Science Instrument

    SciTech Connect

    Bozek, John

    2013-11-05

    John Bozek, a staff scientist at SLAC's Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) X-ray laser who manages the LCLS Soft X-ray Department, takes us behind the scenes at the Atomic, Molecular and Optical Science (AMO) instrument, the first of six experimental stations now operating at LCLS. Samples used in AMO experiments include atoms, molecules, clusters, and nanoscale objects such as protein crystals or viruses. Science performed at AMO includes fundamental studies of light-matter interactions in the extreme X-ray intensity of the LCLS pules, time-resolved studies of increasingly charged states of atoms and molecules, X-ray diffraction imaging of nanocrystals, and single-shot imaging of a variety of objects.

  13. A damping ring design for the SLAC Next Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Raubenheimer, T.O.; Byrd, J.; Corlett, J.

    1995-05-01

    In this paper, we describe the design of the main damping rings and the positron pre-damping ring for the SLAC Next Linear Collider, a future linear collider with a center-of-mass energy of 0.5 to 1.5 TeV. The rings will operate at an energy of 2 GeV with a maximum repetition rate of 180 Hz. The normalized extracted beam emittances are {gamma}{epsilon}{sub x} = 3 mm-mrad and {gamma}{epsilon}{sub y} = 0.03 mm-mrad. To provide the necessary damping, the rings must damp multiple trains of bunches. Thus, the beam current is large, roughly 1 A. We will present the optical layout, magnet designs, and RF systems, along with the dynamic aperture and required alignment tolerances; collective effects will be discussed in another paper.

  14. Computing and data handling recent experiences at Fermilab and SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, P.S.

    1990-04-09

    Computing has become evermore central to the doing of high energy physics. There are now major second and third generation experiments for which the largest single cost is computing. At the same time the availability of cheap'' computing has made possible experiments which were previously considered infeasible. The result of this trend has been an explosion of computing and computing needs. I will review here the magnitude of the problem, as seen at Fermilab and SLAC, and the present methods for dealing with it. I will then undertake the dangerous assignment of projecting the needs and solutions forthcoming in the next few years at both laboratories. I will concentrate on the offline'' problem; the process of turning terabytes of data tapes into pages of physics journals. 5 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. The ILC Marx Modulator Development Program at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Leyh, G.E.; /SLAC

    2005-06-07

    The International Linear Collider [ILC] baseline design requires 576 L-band klystron stations, each supplying 10MW peak RF power to the accelerating structures. Each klystron requires a modulator capable of delivering 120kV, 140A 1.6ms pulses, at 5Hz. Solid-state Marx modulator topologies are rapidly becoming feasible with the advent of PC-board-level 4500V IGBTs, fast single junction HV diodes, high density capacitors, and sophisticated modeling software. Making full use of recent technology advances, the ILC Marx Modulator program at SLAC plans to pursue a 120kV solid-state Marx design, which appears to offer significantly higher efficiency, availability, and cost savings than existing modulator options.

  16. SLAC modulator operation and reliability in the SLC Era

    SciTech Connect

    Donaldson, A.R.; Ashton, J.R.

    1992-06-01

    A discussion of the operation and reliability of the 244 modulators in the SLAC linac with an emphasis on the past three years of operation. The linac modulators were designed and built in the 60's, upgraded for the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) in the mid 80s, and despite their age are still reliable accelerator components. The 60s modulator operated at 65 MW peak and 83 kW average power. The upgrade resulted in 150 MW peak output at an average power of 87 kW, a modest increase since the repetition rate was dropped from 360 to 120 Hz. In the present accelerator configuration, the Linac operates as a source of electrons and positrons to a single pass coillider. The classic collider is a storage ring filled with oppositely charged, counter-rotating particles which are allowed to collide until an accelerator fault occurs and the stored beams are aborted. A reasonable storage ring can store and collide particles for as long as eight hours with a 10 or 20 minute filling time. A single pass collider, + on the other hand, can only produce e{sup {minus}} and e{sup +} collisions at whatever rate the source operates. To be effective the SLC must operate at 120 Hz with a very high degree of reliability and on a continuous basis. Fortunately, the linac has a modest excess of modulator/klystron systems which allows some measure of redundancy and hence some freedom from the constraint that all 244 modulator/klystrons operate simultaneously. Nonetheless, high importance is placed on modulator MTBF and MTRR or, in the parlance of reliability experts and accelerator physicists, availability. This is especially true of the modulators associated with the fundamental requirements of a collider such as injection, compression and positron production.

  17. SLAC modulator operation and reliability in the SLC Era

    SciTech Connect

    Donaldson, A.R.; Ashton, J.R.

    1992-06-01

    A discussion of the operation and reliability of the 244 modulators in the SLAC linac with an emphasis on the past three years of operation. The linac modulators were designed and built in the 60`s, upgraded for the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) in the mid 80s, and despite their age are still reliable accelerator components. The 60s modulator operated at 65 MW peak and 83 kW average power. The upgrade resulted in 150 MW peak output at an average power of 87 kW, a modest increase since the repetition rate was dropped from 360 to 120 Hz. In the present accelerator configuration, the Linac operates as a source of electrons and positrons to a single pass coillider. The classic collider is a storage ring filled with oppositely charged, counter-rotating particles which are allowed to collide until an accelerator fault occurs and the stored beams are aborted. A reasonable storage ring can store and collide particles for as long as eight hours with a 10 or 20 minute filling time. A single pass collider, + on the other hand, can only produce e{sup {minus}} and e{sup +} collisions at whatever rate the source operates. To be effective the SLC must operate at 120 Hz with a very high degree of reliability and on a continuous basis. Fortunately, the linac has a modest excess of modulator/klystron systems which allows some measure of redundancy and hence some freedom from the constraint that all 244 modulator/klystrons operate simultaneously. Nonetheless, high importance is placed on modulator MTBF and MTRR or, in the parlance of reliability experts and accelerator physicists, availability. This is especially true of the modulators associated with the fundamental requirements of a collider such as injection, compression and positron production.

  18. Summer Series 2012 - Shashi Buluswar

    ScienceCinema

    Shashi Buluswar

    2016-07-12

    The last installment of the "Summer Series of Conversations" took place Wednesday, August 1, with guest Shashi Buluswar, the executive director of the LBNL Institute for Globally Transformative Technologies (LIGTT). The Institute seeks to foster the discovery, development and deployment of a generation of low-carbon, affordable technologies that will advance sustainable methods to fight global poverty. The event, was hosted by Public Affairs Head Jeff Miller.

  19. Summer Series 2012 - Shashi Buluswar

    SciTech Connect

    Shashi Buluswar

    2012-08-08

    The last installment of the "Summer Series of Conversations" took place Wednesday, August 1, with guest Shashi Buluswar, the executive director of the LBNL Institute for Globally Transformative Technologies (LIGTT). The Institute seeks to foster the discovery, development and deployment of a generation of low-carbon, affordable technologies that will advance sustainable methods to fight global poverty. The event, was hosted by Public Affairs Head Jeff Miller.

  20. Loss-of-function mutation of rice SLAC7 decreases chloroplast stability and induces a photoprotection mechanism in rice.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xiaolei; Wu, Jiemin; Chen, Taiyu; Tie, Weiwei; Chen, Hao; Zhou, Fei; Lin, Yongjun

    2015-12-01

    Plants absorb sunlight to power the photochemical reactions of photosynthesis, which can potentially damage the photosynthetic machinery. However, the mechanism that protects chloroplasts from the damage remains unclear. In this work, we demonstrated that rice (Oryza sativa L.) SLAC7 is a generally expressed membrane protein. Loss-of-function of SLAC7 caused continuous damage to the chloroplasts of mutant leaves under normal light conditions. Ion leakage indicators related to leaf damage such as H2 O2 and abscisic acid levels were significantly higher in slac7-1 than in the wild type. Consistently, the photosynthesis efficiency and Fv/Fm ratio of slac7-1 were significantly decreased (similar to photoinhibition). In response to chloroplast damage, slac7-1 altered its leaf morphology (curled or fused leaf) by the synergy between plant hormones and transcriptional factors to decrease the absorption of light, suggesting that a photoprotection mechanism for chloroplast damage was activated in slac7-1. When grown in dark conditions, slac7-1 displayed a normal phenotype. SLAC7 under the control of the AtSLAC1 promoter could partially complement the phenotypes of Arabidopsis slac1 mutants, indicating a partial conservation of SLAC protein functions. These results suggest that SLAC7 is essential for maintaining the chloroplast stability in rice. PMID:25739330

  1. Loss‐of‐function mutation of rice SLAC7 decreases chloroplast stability and induces a photoprotection mechanism in rice

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Xiaolei; Wu, Jiemin; Chen, Taiyu; Tie, Weiwei; Chen, Hao; Zhou, Fei

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Plants absorb sunlight to power the photochemical reactions of photosynthesis, which can potentially damage the photosynthetic machinery. However, the mechanism that protects chloroplasts from the damage remains unclear. In this work, we demonstrated that rice (Oryza sativa L.) SLAC7 is a generally expressed membrane protein. Loss‐of‐function of SLAC7 caused continuous damage to the chloroplasts of mutant leaves under normal light conditions. Ion leakage indicators related to leaf damage such as H2O2 and abscisic acid levels were significantly higher in slac7‐1 than in the wild type. Consistently, the photosynthesis efficiency and Fv/Fm ratio of slac7‐1 were significantly decreased (similar to photoinhibition). In response to chloroplast damage, slac7‐1 altered its leaf morphology (curled or fused leaf) by the synergy between plant hormones and transcriptional factors to decrease the absorption of light, suggesting that a photoprotection mechanism for chloroplast damage was activated in slac7‐1. When grown in dark conditions, slac7‐1 displayed a normal phenotype. SLAC7 under the control of the AtSLAC1 promoter could partially complement the phenotypes of Arabidopsis slac1 mutants, indicating a partial conservation of SLAC protein functions. These results suggest that SLAC7 is essential for maintaining the chloroplast stability in rice. PMID:25739330

  2. Summer 1993 Transient Student Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kent State Univ., Warren, OH. Office of Institutional Research.

    A study was conducted by the Trumbull Campus (TC) of Kent State University, in Ohio, to determine the motivations, objectives, and level of satisfaction of transient students, or students pursuing a degree at another institution but enrolled in courses at TC. Surveys were mailed to 50 transient students enrolled in summer 1993, with completed…

  3. Indian Summer

    SciTech Connect

    Galindo, E.

    1997-08-01

    This paper focuses on preserving and strengthening two resources culturally and socially important to the Shoshone-Bannock Indian Tribe on the Fort Hall Reservation in Idaho; their young people and the Pacific-Northwest Salmon. After learning that salmon were not returning in significant numbers to ancestral fishing waters at headwater spawning sites, tribal youth wanted to know why. As a result, the Indian Summer project was conceived to give Shoshone-Bannock High School students the opportunity to develop hands-on, workable solutions to improve future Indian fishing and help make the river healthy again. The project goals were to increase the number of fry introduced into the streams, teach the Shoshone-Bannock students how to use scientific methodologies, and get students, parents, community members, and Indian and non-Indian mentors excited about learning. The students chose an egg incubation experiment to help increase self-sustaining, natural production of steelhead trout, and formulated and carried out a three step plan to increase the hatch-rate of steelhead trout in Idaho waters. With the help of local companies, governmental agencies, scientists, and mentors students have been able to meet their project goals, and at the same time, have learned how to use scientific methods to solve real life problems, how to return what they have used to the water and land, and how to have fun and enjoy life while learning.

  4. Report on the 2008 ISAGA Summer School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van de Westelaken, Marleen

    2011-01-01

    This article reports on the 2008 ISAGA Summer School held in New Delhi (Gurgaon), India. This Summer School was hosted by the Institute for Integrated Learning in Management. Participants came from all over the world. This year's theme was "The Art and Science of Simulation and Gaming Design and Facilitation for Business and Management."

  5. Who Said Learning about the Constitution Isn't Fun? Active Lessons on the U.S. Constitution for Junior and Senior High School Students. Lessons created by participants at "Congress and the Constitution: A Summer Institute for Teachers" (Ontario, California, 1988).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cramer, Elizabeth, Ed.; Hill, Margaret, Ed.

    Twenty-eight lesson plans developed by California teachers who attended a summer institute on Congress and the Constitution are presented in this document. Sample lesson plan titles are: (1) "Geopolitics and the Constitution," (2) "Judicial Review," (3) "Electoral College and the Constitution," (4) "First Amendment Rights," (5) "Mr. Truman and the…

  6. Intensity Effects of the FACET Beam in the SLAC Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Decker, F.-J.; Lipkowitz, N.; Sheppard, J.; White, G.R.; Wienands, U.; Woodley, M.; Yocky, G.; /SLAC

    2012-07-03

    The beam for FACET (Facility for Advanced aCcelerator Experimental Tests) at SLAC requires an energy-time correlation ('chirp') along the linac, so it can be compressed in two chicanes, one at the midpoint in sector 10 and one W-shaped chicane just before the FACET experimental area. The induced correlation has the opposite sign to the typical used for BNS damping, and therefore any orbit variations away from the center kick the tail of the beam more than the head, causing a shear in the beam and emittance growth. Any dispersion created along the linac has similar effects due to the high (>1.2% rms) energy spread necessary for compression. The initial huge emittances could be reduced by a factor of 10, but were still bigger than expected by a factor of 2-3. Normalized emittance of 3 {micro}m-rad in Sector 2 blew up to 150 {micro}m-rad in Sector 11 but could be reduced to about 6-12 {micro}m-rad, for the vertical plane although the results were not very stable. Investigating possible root causes for this, we found locations where up to 10 mm dispersion was created along the linac, which were finally verified with strong steering and up to 7 mm settling of the linac accelerator at these locations.

  7. Reducing energy spread for long bunch train at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Decker, F.-J.; Farkas, D.; Rinolfi, L.; Truher, J.

    1996-06-01

    The normal energy gain of the SLC RF system, using SLED (SLAC Energy Development) cavities, can accelerate only about 150 ns beam pulse within an energy spread of 0.5% with 10(exp 11) particles per pulse. By applying two additional 180 deg. phase inversions for about 20% of all SLC klystrons, the classical SLED pulse is flattened to achieve an energy spread of 0.3% over 240 ns which corresponds to 680 bunches in S-band. This scheme was developed for the fixed target experiment E-154, to study the neutron spin. It was used to run at a beam energy of 48.8 GeV and a beam charge of up to 10(exp 11) e- per pulse. This paper describes the beam loading compensation using early beam injection scheme and new RF phase inversions which have been implemented for the SLED devices. The experimental results, obtained during fall 1995, are compared to simulations. The results surpassed the initial requested beam qualities. A similar approach might be useful for future linear colliders with long bunch trains.

  8. SLAC P2 Marx Control System and Regulation Scheme

    SciTech Connect

    MacNair, David; Kemp, Mark A.; Macken, Koen; Nguyen, Minh N.; Olsen, Jeff; /SLAC

    2011-05-20

    The SLAC P2 MARX Modulator consists of 32 cells charged in parallel by a -4 kV supply and discharged in series to provide a -120 kV 140 amp 1.7 millisecond pulse. Each cell has a 350 uF main storage capacitor. The voltage on the capacitor will droop approximately 640 volts during each pulse. Each cell will have a boost supply that can add up to 700 V to the cell output. This allows the output voltage of the cell to remain constant within 0.1% during the pulse. The modulator output voltage control is determined by the -4 kV charging voltage. A voltage divider will measure the modulator voltage on each pulse. The charging voltage will be adjusted by the data from previous pulses to provide the desired output. The boost supply in each cell consists of a 700 V buck regulator in series with the main capacitor. The supply uses a lookup table for PWM control. The lookup table is calculated from previous pulse data to provide a constant cell output. The paper will describe the modulator and cell regulation used by the MARX modulator. Measured data from a single cell and three cell string will be included.

  9. Recent Advances in RF Pulse Compressor Systems at SLAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tantawi, Sami G.; Nantista, Christopher D.

    2003-12-01

    We will review the design of the dual-mode X-band rf system proposed for the Next Linear Collider (NLC). Recent experimental data are presented. The system is to produce 400 ns pulses with power levels up to 600 MW. A proof-of-principle experiment is being constructed at SLAC. Four 50 MW klystrons will power a fully dual-moded resonance delay line pulse compression system. Both the transfer line and the delay lines are dual-moded. The modes carried by the transfer line are controlled by the rf phases of the different klystrons. The modes in the delay lines are controlled by a set of mode converters at the input and the end of each delay line. By manipulating the modes in the transfer line, one can achieve either no pulse compression or a pulse compression ratio of 4. The total output power will be 200 MW for 1.6 microseconds or 600 MW for 400 nanoseconds.

  10. Support and utilization of the LSI-11 processor family at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Kieffer, J.; Logg, C.A.; Farwell, D.E.

    1981-01-01

    Microcomputer systems based on the DEC LSI-11 processor family have been in use at SLAC for five years. They are used for a wide variety of applications. The support of these systems is divided into three general areas: engineering, maintenance, and software. Engineering specifies the system to match user requirements. SLAC has been able to design one general purpose system which can be tailored to fit many specific requirements. Maintenance provides system and component diagnostic services and repair. Software support includes software consulting services, assistance in systems design, and the development and support of special purpose operating systems and programs. These support functions are handled as subtasks by three teams in the SLAC Electronics Instrumentation Group. Each of these teams utilizes several LSI-11 systems in the performance of its primary tasks. They work closely together to jointly provide overall support for the larger SLAC community.

  11. Homolog Structure of the SLAC1 Anion Channel for Closing Stomata in Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yuhang; Hu, Lei; Punta, Marco; Bruni, Renato; Hillerich, Brandan; Kloss, Brian; Rost, Burkhard; Love, James; Siegelbaum, Steven A.; Hendrickson, Wayne A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The plant SLAC1 anion channel controls turgor pressure in the aperture-defining guard cells of plant stomata, thereby regulating exchange of water vapor and photosynthetic gases in response to environmental signals such as drought or high levels of carbon dioxide. We determined the crystal structure of a bacterial homolog of SLAC1 at 1.20Å resolution, and we have used structure-inspired mutagenesis to analyze the conductance properties of SLAC1 channels. SLAC1 is a symmetric trimer composed from quasi-symmetric subunits, each having ten transmembrane helices arranged from helical hairpin pairs to form a central five-helix transmembrane pore that is gated by an extremely conserved phenylalanine residue. Conformational features suggest a mechanism for control of gating by kinase activation, and electrostatic features of the pore coupled with electrophysiological characteristics suggest that selectivity among different anions is largely a function of the energetic cost of ion dehydration. PMID:20981093

  12. New drift chamber for the Mark II detector at the SLAC Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Burchat, P.R.; Hanson, G.G.; Sadrozinski, H.F.W.

    1984-10-01

    The design of the new cylindrical drift chamber for the Mark II detector at the SLAC Linear Collider is described. Prototype tests to determine the working parameters of the chamber and to study possible gas mixtures are discussed.

  13. Homologue Structure of the SLAC1 Anion Channel for Closing Stomata in Leaves

    SciTech Connect

    Y Chen; L Hu; M Punta; R Bruni; B Hillerich; B Kloss; B Rost; J Love; S Siegelbaum; W Hendrickson

    2011-12-31

    The plant SLAC1 anion channel controls turgor pressure in the aperture-defining guard cells of plant stomata, thereby regulating the exchange of water vapour and photosynthetic gases in response to environmental signals such as drought or high levels of carbon dioxide. Here we determine the crystal structure of a bacterial homologue (Haemophilus influenzae) of SLAC1 at 1.20 {angstrom} resolution, and use structure-inspired mutagenesis to analyse the conductance properties of SLAC1 channels. SLAC1 is a symmetrical trimer composed from quasi-symmetrical subunits, each having ten transmembrane helices arranged from helical hairpin pairs to form a central five-helix transmembrane pore that is gated by an extremely conserved phenylalanine residue. Conformational features indicate a mechanism for control of gating by kinase activation, and electrostatic features of the pore coupled with electrophysiological characteristics indicate that selectivity among different anions is largely a function of the energetic cost of ion dehydration.

  14. 1998 Complex Systems Summer School

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-15

    For the past eleven years a group of institutes, centers, and universities throughout the country have sponsored a summer school in Santa Fe, New Mexico as part of an interdisciplinary effort to promote the understanding of complex systems. The goal of these summer schools is to provide graduate students, postdoctoral fellows and active research scientists with an introduction to the study of complex behavior in mathematical, physical, and living systems. The Center for Nonlinear Studies supported the eleventh in this series of highly successful schools in Santa Fe in June, 1998.

  15. A Possible CO2 Conducting and Concentrating Mechanism in Plant Stomata SLAC1 Channel

    PubMed Central

    Du, Qi-Shi; Fan, Xina-Wei; Wang, Cheng-Hua; Huang, Ri-Bo

    2011-01-01

    Background The plant SLAC1 is a slow anion channel in the membrane of stomatal guard cells, which controls the turgor pressure in the aperture-defining guard cells, thereby regulating the exchange of water vapour and photosynthetic gases in response to environmental signals such as drought, high levels of carbon dioxide, and bacterial invasion. Recent study demonstrated that bicarbonate is a small-molecule activator of SLAC1. Higher CO2 and HCO3– concentration activates S-type anion channel currents in wild-type Arabidopsis guard cells. Based on the SLAC1 structure a theoretical model is derived to illustrate the activation of bicarbonate to SLAC1 channel. Meanwhile a possible CO2 conducting and concentrating mechanism of the SLAC1 is proposed. Methodology The homology structure of Arabidopsis thaliana SLAC1 (AtSLAC1) provides the structural basis for study of the conducting and concentrating mechanism of carbon dioxide in SLAC1 channels. The pKa values of ionizable amino acid side chains in AtSLAC1 are calculated using software PROPKA3.0, and the concentration of CO2 and anion HCO3– are computed based on the chemical equilibrium theory. Conclusions The AtSLAC1 is modeled as a five-region channel with different pH values. The top and bottom layers of channel are the alkaline residue-dominated regions, and in the middle of channel there is the acidic region surrounding acidic residues His332. The CO2 concentration is enhanced around 104 times by the pH difference between these regions, and CO2 is stored in the hydrophobic region, which is a CO2 pool. The pH driven CO2 conduction from outside to inside balances the back electromotive force and maintain the influx of anions (e.g. Cl– and NO3–) from inside to outside. SLAC1 may be a pathway providing CO2 for photosynthesis in the guard cells. PMID:21931667

  16. Summer Institute in Biomedical Engineering, 1973

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deloatch, E. M.; Coble, A. J.

    1974-01-01

    Bioengineering of medical equipment is detailed. Equipment described includes: an environmental control system for a surgical suite; surface potential mapping for an electrode system; the use of speech-modulated-white-noise to differentiate hearers and feelers among the profoundly deaf; the design of an automatic weight scale for an isolette; and an internal tibial torsion correction study. Graphs and charts are included with design specifications of this equipment.

  17. Antarctica--the Ultimate Summer Institute.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Wey, Nate J.

    1995-01-01

    Describes personal experiences of a participant in the National Science Foundation program, Teachers Experiencing Antarctica. Uses the study of the temperature history of Taylor Dome to provide teachers with the experience of research and help other teachers recognize that there are opportunities outside the classroom for personal and professional…

  18. Final Design of the SLAC P2 Marx Klystron Modulator

    SciTech Connect

    Kemp, M.A.; Benwell, A.; Burkhart, C.; Larsen, R.; MacNair, D.; Nguyen, M.; Olsen, J.; /SLAC

    2011-11-08

    The SLAC P2 Marx has been under development for two years, and follows on the P1 Marx as an alternative to the baseline klystron modulator for the International Linear Collider. The P2 Marx utilizes a redundant architecture, air-insulation, a control system with abundant diagnostic access, and a novel nested droop correction scheme. This paper is an overview of the design of this modulator. There are several points of emphasis for the P2 Marx design. First, the modulator must be compatible with the ILC two-tunnel design. In this scheme, the modulator and klystron are located within a service tunnel with limited access and available footprint for a modulator. Access to the modulator is only practical from one side. Second, the modulator must have high availability. Robust components are not sufficient alone to achieve availability much higher than 99%. Therefore, redundant architectures are necessary. Third, the modulator must be relatively low cost. Because of the large number of stations in the ILC, the investment needed for the modulator components is significant. High-volume construction techniques which take advantage of an economy of scale must be utilized. Fourth, the modulator must be simple and efficient to maintain. If a modulator does become inoperable, the MTTR must be small. Fifth, even though the present application for the modulator is for the ILC, future accelerators can also take advantage of this development effort. The hardware, software, and concepts developed in this project should be designed such that further development time necessary for other applications is minimal.

  19. The 1981 Summer Research Fellowship Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, J. H. (Compiler)

    1981-01-01

    The NASA-Hampton Institute Summer Research Fellowship Program, offering capable scientists and engineers at traditionally black institutions an opportunity to participate in research activities in an environment at the Langley Research Center where basic research is of primary importance is considered. The Summer Research Fellowship Program, specifically designed to assist these faculty members in identifying areas of research which correlate positively with their individual interest and capabilities is discussed. It is also designed to help them to initiate viable research which increases their technical knowledge about how research efforts at their institutions might be increased.

  20. Mass decomposition of SLACS lens galaxies in Weyl conformal gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potapov, Alexander A.; Izmailov, Ramil N.; Nandi, Kamal K.

    2016-06-01

    We study here, using the Mannheim-Kazanas solution of Weyl conformal theory, the mass decomposition in the representative subsample of 57 early-type elliptical lens galaxies of the Sloan Lens Advanced Camera for Surveys (SLACS) on board the Hubble Space Telescope. We begin by showing that the solution need not be an exclusive solution of conformal gravity but can also be viewed as a solution of a class of f (R ) gravity theories coupled to nonlinear electrodynamics thereby rendering the ensuing results more universal. Since lensing involves light bending, we shall first show that the solution adds to Schwarzschild light bending caused by the luminous mass (M*) a positive contribution +γ R contrary to the previous results in the literature, thereby resolving a long-standing problem. The cause of the error is critically examined. Next, applying the expressions for light bending together with an input equating Einstein and Weyl angles, we develop a novel algorithm for separating the luminous component from the total lens mass (luminous+dark ) within the Einstein radius. Our results indicate that the luminous mass estimates differ from the observed total lens masses by a linear proportionality factor across the subsample, which qualitatively agrees with the common conclusion from a number of different simulations in the literature. In quantitative detail, we observe that the ratios of luminous over total lens mass (f*) within the Einstein radius of individual galaxies take on values near unity, many of which remarkably fall inside or just marginally outside the specified error bars obtained from a simulation based on the Bruzual-Charlot stellar population synthesis model together with the Salpeter initial mass function favored on the ground of metallicity [Grillo et al., Astron. Astrophys. 501, 461 (2009)]. We shall also calculate the average dark matter density ⟨ρ⟩ av of individual galaxies within their respective Einstein spheres. To our knowledge, the present

  1. Essay: Bob Siemann-SLC Days at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Raubenheimer, Tor O.; /SLAC

    2011-11-14

    Bob Siemann was a great experimentalist and an excellent teacher.We will greatly miss him. Bob came to SLAC in early 1991 to work on the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC). The SLC was a challenging accelerator which began operating in the late 1980's but still had numerous obstacles to be overcome years into operation. One of the compounding difficulties was making reproducible measurements, since the stability of the collider was poor and the diagnostics were insufficient. Bob dove into this challenge and helped design experiments and diagnostics that provided further clarity. I first got to know Bob while I was still a graduate student, trying to finish my thesis and performing some experimental studies on the SLC, which, at the time, was proving to be very difficult. Most of my expertise had been in beam theory and simulation. Dealing with the real issues of the accelerator was challenging. Bob helped me understand the difference between systematic and statistical errors, and separate operational issues from the fundamental physics. His way of teaching was not to provide an explanation but to ask enough questions so that I could find the answer on my own - this was the best way to learn. I later asked Bob to be a reader on my thesis. As in all things, he took this role extremely seriously. He read through the draft and marked every page to the point where I was regretting my decision. However, his questions again helped me understand my own work better and greatly improved my thesis. Bob was also the de facto leader of an effort focused on the damping rings and the bunch compressors. He was great to work with. He made people think for themselves and refused to simply provide answers. He also worked hard himself, expressing real interest and curiosity. After the studies of the SLC damping rings identified a sawtooth instability due to the vacuum chamber impedance as a source of many downstream fluctuations, Bob took charge of upgrading the rings. As part of this

  2. The News, Summer 1999-Summer 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Trische, Ed.

    2000-01-01

    This document contains five quarterly issues of The News, published Summer 1999 through Summer 2000 by the Community College League of California. The following items are contained in this document: "Grant Writing Success Depends on Resources, Information and Staff,""College Theaters Perform Balancing Act with Community, Instruction,…

  3. Initial Testing of the Mark-0 X-Band RF Gun at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Vlieks, Arnold; Adolphsen, C.; Dolgashev, V.; Lewandowski, J.; Limborg, Cecile; Weathersby, S.; /SLAC

    2012-06-06

    A new X-band RF gun (Mark-0) has been assembled, tuned and was tested in the ASTA facility at SLAC. This gun has been improved from an earlier gun used in Compton-scattering experiments at SLAC by the introduction of a racetrack dual-input coupler to reduce quadrupole fields. Waveguide-to-coupler irises were also redesigned to reduce surface magnetic fields and therefore peak pulse surface heating. Tests of this photocathode gun will allow us to gain early operational experience for beam tests of a new gun with further improvements (Mark-1) being prepared for SLAC's X-Band Test Area (XTA) program and the LLNL MEGa-ray program. Results of current testing up to {approx} 200 MV/m peak surface Electric fields are presented.

  4. High voltage pulse cable and connector experience in the kicker systems at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, K.; Artusy, M.; Donaldson, A.; Mattison, T.

    1991-05-01

    The SLAC 2-mile linear accelerator uses a wide variety of pulse kicker systems that require high voltage cable and connectors to deliver pulses from the drivers to the magnet loads. Many of the drivers in the SLAC kicker systems use cable lengths up to 80 feet and are required to deliver pulses up to 40 kV, with rise and fall time on the order of 20 ns. Significant pulse degradation from the cable and connector assembly cannot be tolerated. Other drivers are required to deliver up to 80 kV, 20 {mu}s pulses over cables 20 feet long. Several combinations of an applicable high voltage cable and matching connector have been used at SLAC to determine the optimum assembly that meets the necessary specifications and is reliable. 14 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Using The SLAC Two-Mile Accelerator for Powering an FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Barletta, W.A.; Sessler, A.M.; Yu, L.H.; /Brookhaven

    2012-06-29

    A parameter survey is made, employing the recently developed 2D formalism for an FEL, of the characteristics of an FEL using the SLAC accelerator. Attention is focused upon a wavelength of 40 {angstrom} (the water window) and 1 {angstrom} case is also presented. They consider employing the SLAC linac with its present operating parameters and with improved parameters such as would be supplied by a new photo-cathode injector. They find that improved parameters are necessary, but that the parameters presently achieved with present-day photo-cathode guns are adequate to reach the water window.

  6. Archiving SLD Records in SRB: The Persistent Archives Test-Bed (PAT) Project at SLAC in 2004

    SciTech Connect

    Deken, J.

    2005-01-26

    Report on the first year of SLAC's participation in the collaboration to test the NARA prototype persistent archives' ability to perform the functions of accessioning, arrangement, description, preservation and access on the electronic records of the SLD (SLAC Large Detector) collaboration.

  7. Slowing the Summer Slide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Lorna

    2012-01-01

    Research shows that summer slide--the loss of learning over the summer break--is a huge contributor to the achievement gap between low-income students and their higher-income peers. In fact, some researchers have concluded that two-thirds of the 9th-grade reading achievement gap can be explained by unequal access to summer learning opportunities…

  8. Summer Library Reading Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fiore, Carole D.

    2007-01-01

    Virtually all public libraries in the United States provide some type of summer library reading program during the traditional summer vacation period. Summer library reading programs provide opportunities for students of many ages and abilities to practice their reading skills and maintain skills that are developed during the school year. Fiore…

  9. Summer Television Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evansville-Vanderburgh School Corp., IN.

    Three general goals guided the creation of this summer education project: to maintain academic basic skills over the summer months, to involve parents in the learning process, and to involve teachers in reading inservice training. The summer television programs available to all Indiana children are "Ride the Reading Rocket" for grade 2; "Catch a…

  10. Booktalking: Avoiding Summer Drift

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whittingham, Jeff; Rickman, Wendy A.

    2015-01-01

    Summer drift, otherwise known as loss of reading comprehension skills or reading achievement, has been a well-known and well-documented phenomenon of public education for decades. Studies from the late twentieth century to the present have demonstrated a slowdown in summer drift attributed to specific summer reading programs addressing motivation…

  11. Summer Correspondence Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sulphur Springs Union Elementary School District, Canyon Country, CA.

    THE FOLLOWING IS THE FULL TEXT OF THIS DOCUMENT: The goals of the Summer Correspondence Program have been to help students maintain their basic skills and avoid summer fall-out, as well as to promote parent involvement and positive community relations. After Proposition 13 left no funds for continuation of summer school programs, Sulphur Springs…

  12. Slithering into Summer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Catherine; Matthews, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    The summer provides a unique opportunity for children to further their interests in science, especially science in the out-of-doors. Once school is out for the summer, there is seemingly unlimited time, with no strict curriculum guidelines to follow. For students with a passion for the out-of-doors, summer science camps and school-based summer…

  13. Summer Program Aims to Improve Literacy Skills of Black Male Teens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Cassandra

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about a summer program at the African American Adolescent Male Summer Literacy Institute which aims to improve literacy skills of black male teens. The African American Adolescent Male Summer Literacy Institute is now in its fourth year at the University of Illinois-Chicago (UIC). Alfred Tatum, director of the…

  14. Enhancing University Summer Session Programs: The Role and Effect of Visiting Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heinz, Anne K.; Lewis, Alcinda C.

    2009-01-01

    Many college and university summer session deans and directors face significant challenges in providing quality summer courses. At research institutions, for example, the number of regular tenured and tenure-track faculty who want to focus on research, scholarship, and other activities during summer, affects the composition of the summer session…

  15. An evaluation of the 1997 JPL Summer Teacher Enhancement Program

    SciTech Connect

    Slovacek, Simeon P.; Doyle-Nichols, Adelaide R.

    1997-10-20

    There were two major components in the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) Summer Teacher Enhancement Project (STEP). First, the Summer Institute was structured as a four-week, 4-credit-unit University course for middle school science teachers, and consisted of workshops, lectures, labs, and tours as activities. The second component consists of follow-up activities related to the summer institute's contents, and again is structured as a University credit-bearing course for participants to reinforce their summer training. Considerable information from the comments and course ratings as given by the participants is included.

  16. Structure Loaded Vacuum Laser-Driven Particle Acceleration Experiments at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Plettner, T.; Byer, R.L.; Colby, E.R.; Cowan, B.M.; Ischebeck, R.; McGuinness, C.; Lincoln, M.R.; Sears, C.M.; Siemann, R.H.; Spencer, J.E.; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2007-04-09

    We present an overview of the future laser-driven particle acceleration experiments. These will be carried out at the E163 facility at SLAC. Our objectives include a reconfirmation of the proof-of-principle experiment, a staged buncher laser-accelerator experiment, and longer-term future experiments that employ dielectric laser-accelerator microstructures.

  17. High Frequency, High Gradient Dielectric Wakefield Acceleration Experiments at SLAC and BNL

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenzweig, James; Travish, Gil; Hogan, Mark; Muggli, Patric; /Southern California U.

    2012-07-05

    Given the recent success of >GV/m dielectric wakefield accelerator (DWA) breakdown experiments at SLAC, and follow-on coherent Cerenkov radiation production at the UCLA Neptune, a UCLA-USC-SLAC collaboration is now implementing a new set of experiments that explore various DWA scenarios. These experiments are motivated by the opportunities presented by the approval of FACET facility at SLAC, as well as unique pulse-train wakefield drivers at BNL. The SLAC experiments permit further exploration of the multi-GeV/m envelope in DWAs, and will entail investigations of novel materials (e.g. CVD diamond) and geometries (Bragg cylindrical structures, slab-symmetric DWAs), and have an over-riding goal of demonstrating >GeV acceleration in {approx}33 cm DWA tubes. In the nearer term before FACET's commissioning, we are planning measurements at the BNL ATF, in which we drive {approx}50-200 MV/m fields with single pulses or pulse trains. These experiments are of high relevance to enhancing linear collider DWA designs, as they will demonstrate potential for efficient operation with pulse trains.

  18. dE/dx electronics for MARK II experiment at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, D.; Boyarski, A.; Coupal, D.; Feldman, G.; Paffrath, L.

    1985-10-01

    This paper describes a 100 MHz pulse digitizer for dE/dx measurements on the MARK II drift chamber at SLAC. The electronics provides the read-out of the detector's 5832 sense based on a 16-channel FASTBUS module. The basic element of the module is the TRW 6-bit Flash-ADC.

  19. A user's guide to particle physics computer-searchable databases on the SLAC-SPIRES system

    SciTech Connect

    Rittenberg, A.; Armstrong, F.E.; Levine, B.S.; Trippe, T.G.; Wohl, C.G.; Yost, G.P.; Whalley, M.R.; Addis, L.

    1986-09-01

    This report discusses five computer-searchable databases located at SLAC which are of interest to particle physicists. These databases assist the user in literature-searching, provide numerical data extracted from papers, and contain information about experiments. We describe the databases briefly, tell how to use the SPIRES database management system to access them interactively, and give several examples of their use.

  20. Molecular Evolution of Slow and Quick Anion Channels (SLACs and QUACs/ALMTs)

    PubMed Central

    Dreyer, Ingo; Gomez-Porras, Judith Lucia; Riaño-Pachón, Diego Mauricio; Hedrich, Rainer; Geiger, Dietmar

    2012-01-01

    Electrophysiological analyses conducted about 25 years ago detected two types of anion channels in the plasma membrane of guard cells. One type of channel responds slowly to changes in membrane voltage while the other responds quickly. Consequently, they were named SLAC, for SLow Anion Channel, and QUAC, for QUick Anion Channel. Recently, genes SLAC1 and QUAC1/ALMT12, underlying the two different anion current components, could be identified in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Expression of the gene products in Xenopus oocytes confirmed the quick and slow current kinetics. In this study we provide an overview on our current knowledge on slow and quick anion channels in plants and analyze the molecular evolution of ALMT/QUAC-like and SLAC-like channels. We discovered fingerprints that allow screening databases for these channel types and were able to identify 192 (177 non-redundant) SLAC-like and 422 (402 non-redundant) ALMT/QUAC-like proteins in the fully sequenced genomes of 32 plant species. Phylogenetic analyses provided new insights into the molecular evolution of these channel types. We also combined sequence alignment and clustering with predictions of protein features, leading to the identification of known conserved phosphorylation sites in SLAC1-like channels along with potential sites that have not been yet experimentally confirmed. Using a similar strategy to analyze the hydropathicity of ALMT/QUAC-like channels, we propose a modified topology with additional transmembrane regions that integrates structure and function of these membrane proteins. Our results suggest that cross-referencing phylogenetic analyses with position-specific protein properties and functional data could be a very powerful tool for genome research approaches in general. PMID:23226151

  1. The University of Alabama at Birmingham Center for Community OutReach Development Summer Science Institute Program: A 3-Yr Laboratory Research Experience for Inner-City Secondary-Level Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niemann, Marilyn A.; Miller, Michael L.; Davis, Thelma

    2004-01-01

    This article describes and assesses the effectiveness of a 3-yr, laboratory-based summer science program to improve the academic performance of inner-city high school students. The program was designed to gradually introduce such students to increasingly more rigorous laboratory experiences in an attempt to interest them in and model what "real"…

  2. 76 FR 57068 - National Institute of Nursing Research Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Nursing Research Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Institute of Nursing Research Special Emphasis Panel, Summer Research... Officer, National Institute of Nursing Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892,...

  3. 76 FR 10912 - National Institute of Nursing Research; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Nursing Research; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Institute of Nursing Research Special Emphasis Panel, Summer Research... Officer, National Institute of Nursing Research, National Institutes of Health, 6701 Democracy Blvd,...

  4. Summer library reading programs.

    PubMed

    Fiore, Carole D

    2007-01-01

    Virtually all public libraries in the United States provide some type of summer library reading program during the traditional summer vacation period. Summer library reading programs provide opportunities for students of many ages and abilities to practice their reading skills and maintain skills that are developed during the school year. Fiore summarizes some of the research in the field and relates it to library programs and usage by students. Several traditional and innovative programs from U.S. and Canadian libraries are described. She concludes with a call for further research related to summer library reading programs.

  5. A Metacognitive Pedagogy: The River Summer Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Son, Lisa K.; Kenna, Timothy; Pfirman, Stephanie

    2007-01-01

    This article describes River Summer, an interdisciplinary, field project on the Hudson River. Using cognitive data, the team aimed to design an experience that fostered an environment implementing strategies that improve learning. The participants, 40 faculty members from 24 institutions who acted as teachers, students, or both, boarded the…

  6. Summer Programs Offer Great Ideas for Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pantin, Travis

    2007-01-01

    Every summer, with financial support from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH), more than 2,500 teachers from across the U.S. participate in advanced study programs in the humanities that range from one to six weeks in length. Most of the programs are conducted at institutions of higher learning, both within the U.S. and abroad, and…

  7. Project Cooperation: Designing and Implementing Models of Outcomes Assessments for Two-Year Institutions. Report on Project Cooperation Summer Conference for Demonstration Sites (Nashville, Tennessee, July 9-11, 1989).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowart, Susan Cooper

    In July 1989, the members of Project Cooperation, 10 community colleges that had been invited to serve as demonstration sites for research on institutional effectiveness, were brought together for the second national colloquium on institutional effectiveness through outcomes measures. This report contains the presentations made at the colloquium…

  8. Book Your Summer Vacation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texley, Juliana

    2012-01-01

    Summer's the time for teachers to travel, not only physically from the confines of the classroom to exotic places, but vicariously, through the magic of books. Summer adventures help teachers expand their experience and enrich their store of context so that they can offer their students more when school resumes in the fall. That's why each year…

  9. Celebrate Summer with Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texley, Juliana

    2007-01-01

    School is out and the summer is full of both official and unofficial holidays that prompt us to enjoy science and the profession of sharing it. As in past years, the reviewers and editors of "NSTA Recommends"--ready and willing to share their enthusiasm for reading with you--have been gathering suggestions for the summer. So along with your beach…

  10. Under Summer Skies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texley, Juliana

    2009-01-01

    There's no better way to celebrate 2009, the International Year of Astronomy, than by curling up with a good book under summer skies. To every civilization, in every age, the skies inspired imagination and scientific inquiry. There's no better place to start your summer reading than under their influence. Here are a few selections identified by…

  11. School Construction Summer Slam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, Richard F.

    2012-01-01

    Every school has a list of renovations, upgrades and repairs that need attention, but many are too distracting and disruptive to carry out during the school year. Often, the best time to address these nagging construction projects is during the summer when students are on break and the campus is quieter. Although these "summer slammers" often are…

  12. Your Best Summer Ever

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleaver, Samantha

    2012-01-01

    "It must be nice to have summers off." Only other teachers know just how short summer is, with much of August devoted to planning for the new school year. This article offers 17 fresh ideas for exploring, making money, and preparing for next year. Plus, a reading list that hits all the marks!

  13. Radiation Dose Measurement for High-Intensity Laser Interactions with Solid Targets at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Taiee

    2015-09-25

    A systematic study of photon and neutron radiation doses generated in high-intensity laser-solid interactions is underway at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. We found that these laser-solid experiments are being performed using a 25 TW (up to 1 J in 40 fs) femtosecond pulsed Ti:sapphire laser at the Linac Coherent Light Source’s (LCLS) Matter in Extreme Conditions (MEC) facility. Additionally, radiation measurements were performed with passive and active detectors deployed at various locations inside and outside the target chamber. Results from radiation dose measurements for laser-solid experiments at SLAC MEC in 2014 with peak intensity between 1018 to 7.1x1019 W/cm2 are presented.

  14. Final Report: BaBar Detector and Experimental at SLAC, September 30, 1998 - September 29, 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Judd, Dennis J.

    2000-01-20

    The Prairie View A&M University High Energy Physics Group with its contingent of three undergraduates physics majors, joined the BaBar Collaboration at SLAC in September 1994. BaBar is the experiment and detector running in the PEP-II ring at SLAC as part of the Asymmetric B Factory project there to study CP violation and heavy flavor physics. The focus of our effort before this year was with the Muon/Neutral Hadron Detector/Instrumented Flux Return (IFD) subgroup within the BaBar collaboration, and particularly with the GEANT simulation of the IFR. With the GEANT3 simulation essentially frozen, and the GEANT4 full simulation of the IFR done, we have decided to redirect our efforts toward other areas.

  15. Lattice design and optimization for the PEP-X ultra low emittance storage ring at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Min-Huey; Nosochkov, Yuri; Bane, Karl; Cai, Yunhai; Hettel, Robert; Huang, Xiaobiao; /SLAC

    2011-08-12

    SLAC is developing a long-range plan to transfer the evolving scientific programs at SSRL from the SPEAR3 light source to a much higher performing photon source. One of the possibilities is a new PEP-X 4.5 GeV storage ring that would be housed in the 2.2 km PEP-II tunnel. The PEP-X is designed to produce photon beams having brightness near 10{sup 22} (ph/s/mm{sup 2}/mrad{sup 2}/0.1% BW) at 10 keV with 3.5 m undulator at beam current of 1.5 A. This report presents an overview of the PEP-X baseline lattice design and describes the lattice optimization procedures in order to maximize the beam dynamic aperture. The complete report of PEP-X baseline design is published in SLAC report.

  16. A 2--4 nm Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) using the SLAC linac

    SciTech Connect

    Winick, H.; Bane, K.; Boyce, R.

    1993-05-01

    We describe the use of the SLAC linac to drive a unique, powerful. short wavelength Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). Operating as an FEL, lasing would be achieved in a single pass of a high peak current electron beam through a long undulator by self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE). The main components are a high-brightness rf photocathode electron gun; pulse compressors; about 1/5 of the SLAC linac; and a long undulator with a FODO quadrupole focussing system. Using electrons below 8 GeV, the system would operate at wavelengths down to about 3 nm, producing {ge}10 GW peak power in sub-ps pulses. At a 120 Hz rate the average power is {approx} 1 W.

  17. Mega-electron-volt ultrafast electron diffraction at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Weathersby, S. P.; Brown, G.; Centurion, M.; Chase, T. F.; Coffee, R.; Corbett, J.; Eichner, J. P.; Frisch, J. C.; Fry, A. R.; Gühr, M.; Hartmann, N.; Hast, C.; Hettel, R.; Jobe, R. K.; Jongewaard, E. N.; Lewandowski, J. R.; Li, R. K.; Lindenberg, A. M.; Makasyuk, I.; May, J. E.; McCormick, D.; Nguyen, M. N.; Reid, A. H.; Shen, X.; Sokolowski-Tinten, K.; Vecchione, T.; Vetter, S. L.; Wu, J.; Yang, J.; Dürr, H. A.; Wang, X. J.

    2015-07-01

    Ultrafast electron probes are powerful tools, complementary to x-ray free-electron lasers, used to study structural dynamics in material, chemical, and biological sciences. High brightness, relativistic electron beams with femtosecond pulse duration can resolve details of the dynamic processes on atomic time and length scales. SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory recently launched the Ultrafast Electron Diffraction (UED) and microscopy Initiative aiming at developing the next generation ultrafast electron scattering instruments. As the first stage of the Initiative, a mega-electron-volt (MeV) UED system has been constructed and commissioned to serve ultrafast science experiments and instrumentation development. The system operates at 120-Hz repetition rate with outstanding performance. In this paper, we report on the SLAC MeV UED system and its performance, including the reciprocal space resolution, temporal resolution, and machine stability.

  18. Mega-electron-volt ultrafast electron diffraction at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Weathersby, S. P.; Brown, G.; Chase, T. F.; Coffee, R.; Corbett, J.; Eichner, J. P.; Frisch, J. C.; Fry, A. R.; Gühr, M.; Hartmann, N.; Hast, C.; Hettel, R.; Jobe, R. K.; Jongewaard, E. N.; Lewandowski, J. R.; Li, R. K. Lindenberg, A. M.; Makasyuk, I.; May, J. E.; McCormick, D.; and others

    2015-07-15

    Ultrafast electron probes are powerful tools, complementary to x-ray free-electron lasers, used to study structural dynamics in material, chemical, and biological sciences. High brightness, relativistic electron beams with femtosecond pulse duration can resolve details of the dynamic processes on atomic time and length scales. SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory recently launched the Ultrafast Electron Diffraction (UED) and microscopy Initiative aiming at developing the next generation ultrafast electron scattering instruments. As the first stage of the Initiative, a mega-electron-volt (MeV) UED system has been constructed and commissioned to serve ultrafast science experiments and instrumentation development. The system operates at 120-Hz repetition rate with outstanding performance. In this paper, we report on the SLAC MeV UED system and its performance, including the reciprocal space resolution, temporal resolution, and machine stability.

  19. The analog processing system for the Liquid Argon Calorimeter for SLD at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Haller, G.M.; Nelson, D.; Freytag, D.R.

    1986-09-01

    The analog processing system for the Liquid Argon Calorimeter for the SLD project at SLAC is described. Amplification, storage of the analog information, and multiplexing is realized on specially developed hybrids, which will be mounted directly on the detector. This leads to a substantial reduction of the cable plant. Test results for the amplifier and for the sampling and multiplexing hybrid (CDU hybrid) are presented. The latter hybird contains a custom monolithic device, the Calorimeter Data Unit (CDU).

  20. Nucleon resonance electroproduction at high momentum transers: Results from SLAC and suggestions for CEBAF

    SciTech Connect

    Keppel, C.

    1994-04-01

    Nucleon resonance electroproduction results from SLAC Experiment E14OX are presented. A CEBAF facility with doubled energy would enable similar high momentum transfer measurements to be made with greater accuracy. Of particular interest are the Delta P{sub 33}(1232) resonance form factor and R = {sigma}{sub L}/{sigma}{sub T}, the ratio of the longitudinal and transverse components of the cross section. A suggestion is made to study these quantities in conjunction with Bloom-Gilman duality.

  1. Preliminary Results of the Echo-Seeding Experiment ECHO-7 at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, D.; Colby, E.; Ding, Y.; Dunning, M.; Frederico, J.; Gilevich, S.; Hast, C.; Jobe, K.; McCormick, D.; Nelson, J.; Raubenheimer, T.O.; Soong, K.; Stupakov, G.; Szalata, Z.; Walz, D.; Weathersby, S.; Woodley, M.; Corlett, J.; Qiang, J.; Penn, G.; Prestemon, S.; /LBL, Berkeley /LPHE, Lausanne

    2010-06-15

    ECHO-7 is a proof-of-principle echo-enabled harmonic generation FEL experiment in the Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator (NLCTA) at SLAC. The experiment aims to generate coherent radiation at 318 nm and 227 nm, which are the 5th and 7th harmonic of the infrared seed laser. In this paper we present the preliminary results from the commissioning run of the completed experimental setup which started in April 2010.

  2. Anomalous electron loading in SLAC 5045 klystron and relativistic klystron input cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Koontz, R.F.; Fowkes, R.W.; Lavine, T.L.; Miller, R.H.; Vlieks, A.E.

    1989-03-01

    Recent studies of RF breakup and instability in the SLAC 5045 klystrons have revealed that many production klystrons show loading of the input cavity by low energy electrons even under cold cathode no beam conditions. Sometime after the onset of the RF drive pulse, the input cavity absorbs a portion of the incident RF drive that would otherwise be reflected from the not-beam-loaded cavity. This power absorption is a function of drive level, and of axial magnetic field surrounding the cavity. No power absorption is present when the axial magnetic field is zero. This same phenomenon has been observed in the input cavity of relativistic klystron experiments being conducted as part of the SLAC-LBL-LLNL development program. The phenomenon may be associated with RF breakup and RF instability in SLAC 5045 klystrons, and with unstable pulse shortening in the relativistic klystron experiments. This paper outlines some old and new observations of microwave beam device malfunctions that probably are associated with low energy electron fluxes in the vacuum environments of microwave power devices. 2 refs., 5 figs.

  3. IISME Summer Fellowship Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    During the summer of 1997, NASA-Ames scientists served as mentors to six teachers who worked as IISME (Industry Initiatives for Science and Math Education) Teacher Fellows over the summer. These six teachers were among 91 IISME Teacher Fellows working at various corporate, government agency, and university sites throughout the San Francisco Bay Area. These NASA-Ames fellowship positions are described in brief. One requirement of the IISME Summer Fellowship program is that teachers develop a personal Action Plan for classroom transfer. These Action Plans are published in abstract form in an annual catalog. I have also attached the abstracts of NASA-Ames teachers.

  4. NEWS: AAPT Summer Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellema, Steve

    2000-11-01

    The 2000 Summer Meeting of the American Association of Physics Teachers (AAPT) was held from 28~July-2~August at the University of Guelph in Ontario, Canada. Despite somewhat rainy weather throughout the week, the annual gathering was an enjoyable one, filled with interesting talks on the state of physics education in North America. Using a new scheduling format for the summer meeting, all of the paid workshops and tutorials were held on Saturday and Sunday 29-30 July. The invited and contributed papers for the main AAPT meeting were then presented on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday. As had been done in 1999 in San Antonio, a two-day tandem meeting dedicated to Physics Education Research (PER) was held on Wednesday and Thursday 2-3 August, immediately after the main AAPT meeting. Over the three days of the main meeting, 60 sessions were held under the sponsorship of various AAPT committees. These included sessions (numbers in parentheses) organized by the committees on Apparatus (1), Astronomy Education (3), Awards (2), Computers (5), Graduate Education (2), High Schools (1), History and Philosophy (1), Instructional Media (3), International Education (1), Laboratories (2), Pre-High School Education (2), Programs (4), Professional Concerns (6), Research in Physics Education (8), Science Education for the Public (2), Two-Year Colleges (5), Undergraduate Education (7) and Women in Physics (4). Figure 1. Guelph Church of Our Lady. The main meeting opened on Sunday evening with an invited lecture by Dr John J Simpson from the host institution, the University of Guelph, describing the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory. At the ceremonial session that began the activities on Monday morning, recognition was given to Clifford Swartz for his almost 30 years of service as Editor of the AAPT journal, The Physics Teacher. This was followed by an invited talk by Jim Nelson from Seminole County Public School in Florida, who received the Excellence in Pre-College Teaching Award. The

  5. The Purdue Summer Internship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, William; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Describes a program in which college agricultural education majors between their junior and senior years are placed with vocational agriculture teachers to gain experience in conducting a summer vocational agriculture program. (HD)

  6. Chemical Physics Summer School

    SciTech Connect

    2002-06-28

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on Chemical Physics Summer School was held at Roger Williams University, Bristol, RI. Emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field.

  7. Summer Success Story.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matika, Francis W.

    1994-01-01

    Pennsylvania's Beaver Valley Intermediate Unit built a collaborative 2-week summer academy, opening it to students in the other 14 school districts in the county. Cooperation among all the districts provided students opportunities for expanded learning experiences. (MLF)

  8. Summer Water Safety Guide

    MedlinePlus

    ... this flyer at your pool, community center and beach bulletin boards. • Visit RedCross. org for more swimming ... GREAT SUMMER SAVINGS AT RED CROSS STORE! VINTAGE BEACH TOWEL ALL RED CROSS GEAR USE DISCOUNT CODE: ...

  9. Germline Mutation in EXPH5 Implicates the Rab27B Effector Protein Slac2-b in Inherited Skin Fragility.

    PubMed

    McGrath, John A; Stone, Kristina L; Begum, Rumena; Simpson, Michael A; Dopping-Hepenstal, Patricia J; Liu, Lu; McMillan, James R; South, Andrew P; Pourreyron, Celine; McLean, W H Irwin; Martinez, Anna E; Mellerio, Jemima E; Parsons, Maddy

    2012-12-01

    The Rab GTPase Rab27B and one of its effector proteins, Slac2-b (also known as EXPH5, exophilin-5), have putative roles in intracellular vesicle trafficking but their relevance to human disease is not known. By using whole-exome sequencing, we identified a homozygous frameshift mutation in EXPH5 in three siblings with inherited skin fragility born to consanguineous Iraqi parents. All three individuals harbor the mutation c.5786delC (p.Pro1929Leufs(∗)8) in EXPH5, which truncates the 1,989 amino acid Slac2-b protein by 52 residues. The clinical features comprised generalized scale-crusts and occasional blisters, mostly induced by trauma, as well as mild diffuse pigmentary mottling on the trunk and proximal limbs. There was no increased bleeding tendency, no neurologic abnormalities, and no increased incidence of infection. Analysis of an affected person's skin showed loss of Slac2-b immunostaining (C-terminal antibody), disruption of keratinocyte adhesion within the lower epidermis, and an increased number of perinuclear vesicles. A role for Slac2-b in keratinocyte biology was supported by findings of cytoskeletal disruption (mainly keratin intermediate filaments) and decreased keratinocyte adhesion in both keratinocytes from an affected subject and after shRNA knockdown of Slac2-b in normal keratinocytes. Slac2-b was also shown to colocalize with Rab27B and β4 integrin to early adhesion initiation sites in spreading normal keratinocytes. Collectively, our findings identify an unexpected role for Slac2-b in inherited skin fragility and expand the clinical spectrum of human disorders of GTPase effector proteins.

  10. Summer faculty fellowship program, 1984

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, J. H. (Compiler)

    1984-01-01

    Since 1964, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has supported a program of summer faculty fellowships for engineering and science educators. In a series of collaborations between NASA research and development centers and nearby universities, engineering faculty members spend 10 or 11 weeks working with professional peers on research. The Summer Faculty Program Committee of the American Society of Engineering Education supervises the programs. Objectives: (1) to further the professional knowledge of a qualified between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA center. Program Description: College or university faculty members will be appointed as research fellows to spend 10 weeks in cooperative research and study at the NASA-Langley Research Center. The fellow will devote approximately 90 percent of the time to a research problem and the remaining time to a study program. The study program will consist of lectures and seminars on topics of general interest or that are directly relevant to the fellow's research project. The lecturers and seminar leaders will be distinguished scientists and engineers from NASA, education, or industry.

  11. Gifted Students' Perceptions of an Accelerated Summer Program and Social Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Seon-Young; Olszewski-Kubilius, Paula; Makel, Matthew C.; Putallaz, Martha

    2015-01-01

    Using survey responses from students who participated in the summer programs at two university-based gifted education institutions, this study examined changes in gifted students' perceptions of their learning environments, accelerated summer programs and regular schools, and social support in lives after participation in the summer programs. Our…

  12. Promethean Summer: Professional Development Boldly Focuses on the Classics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dubin, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the Sue Rose Summer Institute for Teachers at the Dallas Institute of Humanities and Culture, which, for 30 years, has treated teachers as intellectuals. To that end, the nonprofit educational organization offers teachers from all grade levels and all disciplines an experience that either reacquaints them with or introduces…

  13. Progress in L-Band Power Distribution System R&D at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Nantista, Christopher; Adolphsen, Chris; Wang, Faya; /SLAC

    2008-10-20

    We report on the L-band RF power distribution system (PDS) developed at SLAC for Fermilab's NML superconducting test accelerator facility. The makeup of the system, which allows tailoring of the power distribution to cavities by pairs, is briefly described. Cold test measurements of the system and the results of high power processing are presented. We also investigate the feasibility of eliminating the expensive, lossy circulators from the PDS by pair-feeding cavities through custom 3-dB hybrids. A computational model is used to simulate the impact on cavity field stability due to the reduced cavity-to-cavity isolation.

  14. A 4 to 0.1 nm FEL Based on the SLAC Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Pellegrini, C.; /UCLA

    2012-06-05

    The author show that using existing electron gun technology and a high energy linac like the one at SLAC, it is possible to build a Free Electron Laser operating around the 4 nm water window. A modest improvement in the gun performance would further allow to extend the FEL to the 0.1 nm region. Such a system would produce radiation with a brightness many order of magnitude above that of any synchrotron radiation source, existing or under construction, with laser power in the multigawatt region and subpicosecond pulse length.

  15. ENHANCED LENSING RATE BY CLUSTERING OF MASSIVE GALAXIES: NEWLY DISCOVERED SYSTEMS IN THE SLACS FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Newton, Elisabeth R.; Marshall, Philip J.; Treu, Tommaso

    2009-05-10

    Galaxy-scale strong gravitational lens systems are useful for a variety of astrophysical applications. However, their use is limited by the relatively small samples of lenses known to date. It is thus important to develop efficient ways to discover new systems both in present and forthcoming data sets. For future large high-resolution imaging surveys we anticipate an ever-growing need for efficiency and for independence from spectroscopic data. In this paper, we exploit the clustering of massive galaxies to perform a high-efficiency imaging search for gravitational lenses. Our data set comprises 44 fields imaged by the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS), each of which is centered on a lens discovered by the Strong Lens ACS Survey (SLACS). We compare four different search methods: (1) automated detection with the HST Archive Galaxy-scale Gravitational Lens Survey (HAGGLeS) robot, (2) examining cutout images of bright galaxies (BGs) after subtraction of a smooth galaxy light distribution, (3) examining the unsubtracted BG cutouts, and (4) performing a full-frame visual inspection of the ACS images. We compute purity and completeness and consider investigator time for the four algorithms, using the main SLACS lenses as a testbed. The first and second algorithms perform the best. We present the four new lens systems discovered during this comprehensive search, as well as one other likely candidate. For each new lens we use the fundamental plane to estimate the lens velocity dispersion and predict, from the resulting lens geometry, the redshifts of the lensed sources. Two of these new systems are found in galaxy clusters, which include the SLACS lenses in the two respective fields. Overall we find that the enhanced lens abundance (30{sup +24} {sub -8} lenses deg{sup -2}) is higher than expected for random fields (12{sup +4} {sub -2} lenses deg{sup -2} for the COSMOS survey). Additionally, we find that the gravitational lenses we detect are

  16. Introduction to high-energy physics and the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC)

    SciTech Connect

    Clearwater, S.

    1983-03-01

    The type of research done at SLAC is called High Energy Physics, or Particle Physics. This is basic research in the study of fundamental particles and their interactions. Basic research is research for the sake of learning something. Any practical application cannot be predicted, the understanding is the end in itself. Interactions are how particles behave toward one another, for example some particles attract one another while others repel and still others ignore each other. Interactions of elementary particles are studied to reveal the underlying structure of the universe.

  17. The proposed alignment system for the Final Focus Test Beam at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Ruland, R.E.; Fischer, G.E.

    1990-09-01

    This report describes the current state of work in progress with respect to the geometry, alignment requirements, scenarios, and hardware for meeting the tolerances of the Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) at SLAC. The methods and systems proposed acknowledge that component motion at the micron level, from whatever cause (ground motion, thermal effects, etc.) must be measured on-line and compensated for on relatively short time scales. To provide an integrated alignment/positioning package, some unique designs for reference systems, calibration of effect electric and magnetic centers, and component movers are introduced. 24 refs., 28 figs.

  18. Requirements for use of nonmedical x-ray generators at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Busick, D.D.

    1984-09-01

    The risks associated with use of x-ray equipment have long been recognized. While the relative frequency of x-ray damage is small, machine produced x-rays and large radiography sources continue to account for a large percentage of preventable radiation injuries reported worldwide. The intent of this report is to formalize SLAC's radiation safety program as it applies to radiation producing equipment (diffraction, fluorescence analysis and nondestructive testing). It does not apply to the two-mile linac, experimental areas or other x-ray producing equipment directly related to the high energy physics program. 4 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Possible sources of pulse-to-pulse orbit variation in the SLAC linac

    SciTech Connect

    Assmann, R.; Zimmermann, F.

    1996-08-01

    Pulse-to-pulse variation of the transverse beam orbit, frequently referred to as jitter, has long been a major problem in SLC operation. It impairs the SLC luminosity both by reducing the average beam overlap at the IP and by hampering precision tuning of the final focus. The origin of the fast orbit variation is not fully understood. Measurements during the 1994/95 SLC run showed that it is random from pulse to pulse, increases strongly with current and grows steadily along the SLAC linac, with a typical final rms amplitude of about half the beam size. In this paper, they investigate possible sources of the vertical orbit jitter.

  20. Juwen and High Gradient Structure Development From SLAC's SLC to NLC/GLC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, R. H.

    2015-10-01

    A Global Effort -- The effort to develop high gradient room temperature accelerator structures for the Next Linear Collider or the Global Linear Collider was a global effort involving many people from a number of laboratories around the world including SLAC, FNAL and LLNL in the US, KEK in Japan and CERN in Europe. Critical ideas came from many sources, so my attributions may not always be accurate, but indicate where I first heard the concept. Juwen Wang's role was very important in accepting, modifying where appropriate, and implementing ideas to produce a long series of structures finally leading to a successful structure.

  1. Solid State Induction Modulator Replacement for the Conventional SLAC 5045 Klystron Modulator

    SciTech Connect

    Cassel, Richard

    2000-11-08

    The Next Linear Collider accelerator is developing a high efficiency, highly reliable, and low cost pulsed-power modulator to drive the NLC 500KV, 230A X band klystrons. To demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed induction modulator, a 10 section Solid State Induction Modulator has been assembled to drive a single 5045 klystrons in the SLAC linac. The Induction Modulator replaces the existing modulators PFN/thyratron and drives the klystron using its existing conventional pulse transformer. The status of the proposed thousand-megawatt NLC Solid State induction modulator will be discussed, and the results of the 5045 klystron modulator test.

  2. Upgrade of the SLAC SLED II Pulse Compression System Based on Recent High Power Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Vlieks, A.E.; Fowkes, W.R.; Loewen, R.J.; Tantawi, S.G.; /SLAC

    2011-09-06

    In the Next Linear Collider (NLC) it is expected that the high power rf components be able to handle peak power levels in excess of 400 MW. We present recent results of high power tests designed to investigate the RF breakdown limits of the X-band pulse compression system used at SLAC. (SLED-II). Results of these tests show that both the TE{sub 01}-TE{sub 10} mode converter and the 4-port hybrid have a maximum useful power limit of 220-250 MW. Based on these tests, modifications of these components have been undertaken to improve their peak field handling capability. Results of these modifications will be presented. As part of an international effort to develop a new 0.5-1.5 TeV electron-positron linear collider for the 21st century, SLAC has been working towards a design, referred to as 'The Next Linear Collider' (NLC), which will operate at 11.424 GHz and utilize 50-75 MW klystrons as rf power sources. One of the major challenges in this design, or any other design, is how to generate and efficiently transport extremely high rf power from a source to an accelerator structure. SLAC has been investigating various methods of 'pulse compressing' a relatively wide rf pulse ({ge} 1 {mu}s) from a klystron into a narrower, but more intense, pulse. Currently a SLED-II pulse compression scheme is being used at SLAC in the NLC Test Accelerator (NLCTA) and in the Accelerator Structures Test Area (ASTA) to provide high rf power for accelerator and component testing. In ASTA, a 1.05 {mu}s pulse from a 50 MW klystron was successfully pulse compressed to 205 MW with a pulse width of 150 ns. Since operation in NLC will require generating and transporting rf power in excess of 400 MW it was decided to test the breakdown limits of the SLED-II rf components in ASTA with rf power up to the maximum available of 400 MW. This required the combining of power from two 50 MW klystrons and feeding the summed power into the SLED-II pulse compressor. Results from this experiment demonstrated

  3. Biology of the Mi-2/NuRD Complex in SLAC (Stemness, Longevity/Ageing, and Cancer)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yue

    2011-01-01

    The dynamic chromatin activities of Mi-2/Nucleosome Remodeling and Histone deacetylation (Mi-2/NuRD) complexes in mammals are at the basis of current research on stemness, longevity/ageing, and cancer (4-2-1/SLAC), and have been widely studied over the past decade in mammals and the elegant model organism, Caenorhabditis elegans. Interestingly, a common emergent theme from these studies is that of distinct coregulator-recruited Mi-2/NuRD complexes largely orchestrating the 4-2-1/SLAC within a unique paradigm by maintaining genome stability via DNA repair and controlling three types of transcriptional programs in concert in a number of cellular, tissue, and organism contexts. Thus, the core Mi-2/NuRD complex plays a central role in 4-2-1/SLAC. The plasticity and robustness of 4-2-1/SLAC can be interpreted as modulation of specific coregulator(s) within cell-specific, tissue-specific, stage-specific, or organism-specific niches during stress induction, ie, a functional module and its networking, thereby conferring differential responses to different environmental cues. According to “Occam’s razor”, a simple theory is preferable to a complex one, so this simplified notion might be useful for exploring 4-2-1/SLAC with a holistic view. This thought could also be valuable in forming strategies for future research, and could open up avenues for cancer prevention and antiageing strategies. PMID:21523247

  4. Summer programming in rural communities: unique challenges.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Ruthellen; Harper, Stacey; Gamble, Susan

    2007-01-01

    During the past several decades, child poverty rates have been higher in rural than in urban areas, and now 2.5 million children live in deep poverty in rural America. Studies indicate that poor children are most affected by the typical "summer slide." Summer programming has the ability to address the issues of academic loss, nutritional loss, and the lack of safe and constructive enrichment activities. However, poor rural communities face three major challenges in implementing summer programming: community resources, human capital, and accessibility. The success of Energy Express, a statewide award-winning six-week summer reading and nutrition program in West Virginia, documents strategies for overcoming the challenges faced by poor, rural communities in providing summer programs. Energy Express (1) uses community collaboration to augment resources and develop community ownership, (2) builds human capital and reverses the acknowledged brain drain by engaging college students and community volunteers in meaningful service, and (3) increases accessibility through creative transportation strategies. West Virginia University Extension Service, the outreach arm of the land-grant institution, partners with AmeriCorps, a national service program, and various state and local agencies and organizations to implement a program that produces robust results. PMID:17623413

  5. Summer programming in rural communities: unique challenges.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Ruthellen; Harper, Stacey; Gamble, Susan

    2007-01-01

    During the past several decades, child poverty rates have been higher in rural than in urban areas, and now 2.5 million children live in deep poverty in rural America. Studies indicate that poor children are most affected by the typical "summer slide." Summer programming has the ability to address the issues of academic loss, nutritional loss, and the lack of safe and constructive enrichment activities. However, poor rural communities face three major challenges in implementing summer programming: community resources, human capital, and accessibility. The success of Energy Express, a statewide award-winning six-week summer reading and nutrition program in West Virginia, documents strategies for overcoming the challenges faced by poor, rural communities in providing summer programs. Energy Express (1) uses community collaboration to augment resources and develop community ownership, (2) builds human capital and reverses the acknowledged brain drain by engaging college students and community volunteers in meaningful service, and (3) increases accessibility through creative transportation strategies. West Virginia University Extension Service, the outreach arm of the land-grant institution, partners with AmeriCorps, a national service program, and various state and local agencies and organizations to implement a program that produces robust results.

  6. The University of Alabama at Birmingham Center for Community OutReach Development Summer Science Institute Program: A 3-Yr Laboratory Research Experience for Inner-City Secondary-Level Students

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    This article describes and assesses the effectiveness of a 3-yr, laboratory-based summer science program to improve the academic performance of inner-city high school students. The program was designed to gradually introduce such students to increasingly more rigorous laboratory experiences in an attempt to interest them in and model what “real” science is like. The students are also exposed to scientific seminars and university tours as well as English and mathematics workshops designed to help them analyze their laboratory data and prepare for their closing ceremony presentations. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of student performance in these programs indicates that participants not only learn the vocabulary, facts, and concepts of science, but also develop a better appreciation of what it is like to be a “real” scientist. In addition, the college-bound 3-yr graduates of this program appear to be better prepared to successfully academically compete with graduates of other high schools; they also report learning useful job-related life skills. Finally, the critical conceptual components of this program are discussed so that science educators interested in using this model can modify it to fit the individual resources and strengths of their particular setting. PMID:15526064

  7. NEWS: AAPT Summer Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellema, Steve

    2000-11-01

    The 2000 Summer Meeting of the American Association of Physics Teachers (AAPT) was held from 28~July-2~August at the University of Guelph in Ontario, Canada. Despite somewhat rainy weather throughout the week, the annual gathering was an enjoyable one, filled with interesting talks on the state of physics education in North America. Using a new scheduling format for the summer meeting, all of the paid workshops and tutorials were held on Saturday and Sunday 29-30 July. The invited and contributed papers for the main AAPT meeting were then presented on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday. As had been done in 1999 in San Antonio, a two-day tandem meeting dedicated to Physics Education Research (PER) was held on Wednesday and Thursday 2-3 August, immediately after the main AAPT meeting. Over the three days of the main meeting, 60 sessions were held under the sponsorship of various AAPT committees. These included sessions (numbers in parentheses) organized by the committees on Apparatus (1), Astronomy Education (3), Awards (2), Computers (5), Graduate Education (2), High Schools (1), History and Philosophy (1), Instructional Media (3), International Education (1), Laboratories (2), Pre-High School Education (2), Programs (4), Professional Concerns (6), Research in Physics Education (8), Science Education for the Public (2), Two-Year Colleges (5), Undergraduate Education (7) and Women in Physics (4). Figure 1. Guelph Church of Our Lady. The main meeting opened on Sunday evening with an invited lecture by Dr John J Simpson from the host institution, the University of Guelph, describing the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory. At the ceremonial session that began the activities on Monday morning, recognition was given to Clifford Swartz for his almost 30 years of service as Editor of the AAPT journal, The Physics Teacher. This was followed by an invited talk by Jim Nelson from Seminole County Public School in Florida, who received the Excellence in Pre-College Teaching Award. The

  8. International Summer Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, June

    1979-01-01

    The article describes five summer programs for gifted and talented students offered internationally. The programs outlined are workshops in the publication arts, a study of humanistic development; computer science, writing, and photography workshops; a language study; a historical/social study of English history; and a workshop on photography,…

  9. A Flying Summer Camp

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercurio, Frank X.

    1975-01-01

    Describes a five-day summer camp which provided 12 children, ages 9-14, with a complete flying experience. The training consisted of ground school and one hour actual flying time, including the basics of aircraft control and a flight prepared and executed by the students. (MLH)

  10. Summer Service, 1963.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Michael J.

    1993-01-01

    The author's experiences in community service at a Quaker summer work camp 30 years ago taught him more about himself than about the community in which he helped. National service needs to include an organizing orientation that allows the strengths of both participants and community members to flourish. (SLD)

  11. Use Your Summer Wisely

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vick, Julie Miller; Furlong, Jennifer S.

    2007-01-01

    Academics welcome summer with a collective sigh of relief. Finally they can get to those tasks that are nearly impossible to accomplish during a busy academic year: working on that manuscript, completing the revisions on an article, learning the new laboratory technique from the colleague across the hall. However, those going on the job market in…

  12. Summer Reading That Inspires

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texley, Juliana

    2012-01-01

    Why did you decide on science as a career? For many, it was the inspiration of a mentor or model--an explorer who could communicate excitement and a sense of adventure to others. During the school year, teachers take on that role of motivator for students. But as they recharge over summer break, it is great to treat themselves again to the stories…

  13. My Summer Vacation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galus, Pamela

    2010-01-01

    In this article, a science teacher from the Midwest reflects on her summer vacation to the Gulf of Mexico. She felt that this vacation would help improve her teaching about the environmental problems in the gulf and elsewhere. After all, anyone can show photos of oil-laden birds and dead sea turtles and read news clips of a distant place, but to…

  14. Summer by the Book

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texley, Judiana

    2005-01-01

    Teachers are usually avid readers, but the pressures of the school year often prevent the sort of thoughtful professional development that a good book can provide. That's why a summer reading list is such a great option, to refresh and renew the scientist within. At the National Science Teachers Association (NSTA), a group of teachers works all…

  15. Bright Beginnings: Summer Kindergarten.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Div. of Curriculum and Instruction.

    The summer kindergarten program described in this guide is designed to meet the needs of children according to their stages of development and experience. The curriculum grows out of children's interests, learning styles, strengths, and stages of development. Direct experiences though which children can explore and discover constitute the core of…

  16. Active Healthy Summer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliott, Eloise

    2005-01-01

    Summer break is almost here for most elementary teachers and students. Warmer weather and additional free time to make choices create more opportunities to be physically active, whether home alone or out with friends and family. This article describes ways by which physical education specialists can encourage students' physical activity by…

  17. Waunakee's Summer Science Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neil, J. Peter

    1981-01-01

    Describes Waunakee Community School's six-week Summer Science Program for students entering the seventh grade. Students are selected for this science enrichment program on the basis of interest, ability, and maturity. Program content includes wetlands, forests, prairies, and animals, concluding with a camping trip. (DS)

  18. Summer Opportunities for Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winds of Change, 2003

    2003-01-01

    Eleven summer internships, work experience programs, research opportunities, and courses are described. Some offer stipends. Some are specifically for American Indian, minority, disadvantaged, or disabled students in high school or college. Most are in science or engineering related fields. Each entry contains a brief program description,…

  19. Summer Options for Teenagers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ware, Cindy

    This guide to more than 1,000 summer programs for teenagers encompasses recreational and academic programs sponsored by colleges, universities, independent schools, foundations, museums, nonprofit organizations, and for-profit businesses. Every program listed accepts students age 13-18; some programs also accept participants older or younger.…

  20. Help for the Summer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greifner, Laura

    2006-01-01

    Throngs of people cover the concrete walkways of Dorney Park, an amusement park about an hour north of Philadelphia. Employees under the age of 18 make up about 40 percent of the park's summer workforce, and, park officials say, are even more crucial to its operations later in the season, when college-student employees go back to school and…

  1. Superheroes and Summer Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Ron; Buckner, Joyce

    1980-01-01

    To combat summer learning loss among remedial readers, teachers and consultants in the Omaha, Nebraska, Title I program designed a series of comic-book reading units and mailed them to students' homes. Parents were pleased with the project and it appeared that less reading skill had been lost by September. (SJL)

  2. Books for Summer Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phi Delta Kappan, 1991

    1991-01-01

    To help replenish educators' supply of ideas, "Kappan" editors suggest several books for summer reading, including many noncurrent titles not specifically on education such as Peter Novick's "That Noble Dream," Joy Kogawa's "Obasan," Zora Neale Hurston's "Their Eyes Were Watching God," Kate Chopin's "The Awakening," Willa Cather's "My Antonia,"…

  3. Summer Fish Camp.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Remick, Dennis; Pulu, Tupou L.

    The booklet presents a description and illustrates, with photographs, the Eskimo lifestyle and the kinds of activities that occur at a summer fish camp on the Yukon River. Eleven suggested activities are listed for the teacher to present when using the booklet. Activities include studying the map of Alaska; tracing the life cycle of the fish;…

  4. Books for Summer Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phi Delta Kappan, 1993

    1993-01-01

    Recommends fine fiction for summer reading, including Nadine Gordimer's "My Son's Story" (1991), Lillian Smith's "Strange Fruit" (1944), Josephine Hart's "Damage" (1991), Jane Smiley's "A Thousand Acres" (1991), and George Eliot's "Middlemarch" (1874). Nonfiction suggestions include Harlan Lane's "Mask of Benevolence" (1992), Diane Ackerman's "A…

  5. Books for Summer Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phi Delta Kappan, 1996

    1996-01-01

    Suggests several novels for educators' summer reading enjoyment, including classics by Robert Pirsig, Robertson Davies, John Steinbeck, Albert Camus, and Charles Dickens. Educators might also read Alex Kotlowitz's "There Are No Children Here" (Doubleday, 1991) and Sharon Quint's "Schooling Homeless Children" (Teachers College Press, 1994) to gain…

  6. Parameters for the PEP-II B-Factory at SLAC in 2008

    SciTech Connect

    Seeman, J.; Akre, R.; Bellomo, P.; Bertsche, Kirk J.; Chai, Y.; Chestnut, R.; Clendenin, J.; DeBarger, S.; Decker, F.J.; Dorfan, J.; Ecklund, S.; Erickson, R.; Fisher, A.; Fox, J.; Heifets, S.; Himel, T.; Iverson, R.; Humphrey, R.; Irwin, J.; Klaisner, L.; Kharakh, D.; /SLAC /LBL, Berkeley /Frascati

    2011-11-22

    The PEP-II B-Factory at SLAC (3.1 GeV e{sup +} x 9.0 GeV e{sup -}) operated from 1999 to 2008, delivering luminosity to the BaBar experiment. The design luminosity was reached after one and a half years of operation. In the end PEP-II surpassed, by four times, its design luminosity reaching 1.21 x 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. It also set world stored beam current records of 2.1 A e{sup -} and 3.2 A e{sup +}. Continuous injection was implemented with BaBar successfully taking data. The total delivered luminosity to the BaBar detector was 557.4 fb{sup -1} spanning five upsilon resonances. PEP-II was constructed by SLAC, LBNL, and LLNL with help from BINP, IHEP, the BaBar collaboration, and the US DOE OHEP.

  7. Advocacy for the Archives and History Office of the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory: Stages and Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Deken, Jean Marie; /SLAC

    2009-06-19

    Advocating for the good of the SLAC Archives and History Office (AHO) has not been a one-time affair, nor has it been a one-method procedure. It has required taking time to ascertain the current and perhaps predict the future climate of the Laboratory, and it has required developing and implementing a portfolio of approaches to the goal of building a stronger archive program by strengthening and appropriately expanding its resources. Among the successful tools in the AHO advocacy portfolio, the Archives Program Review Committee has been the most visible. The Committee and the role it serves as well as other formal and informal advocacy efforts are the focus of this case study My remarks today will begin with a brief introduction to advocacy and outreach as I understand them, and with a description of the Archives and History Office's efforts to understand and work within the corporate culture of the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. I will then share with you some of the tools we have employed to advocate for the Archives and History Office programs and activities; and finally, I will talk about how well - or badly - those tools have served us over the past decade.

  8. Results of the SLAC LCLS Gun High-Power RF Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Dowell, D.H.; Jongewaard, E.; Limborg-Deprey, C.; Schmerge, J.F.; Li, Z.; Xiao, L.; Wang, J.; Lewandowski, J.; Vlieks, A.; /SLAC

    2007-11-02

    The beam quality and operational requirements for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) currently being constructed at SLAC are exceptional, requiring the design of a new RF photocathode gun for the electron source. Based on operational experience at SLAC's GTF and SDL and ATF at BNL as well as other laboratories, the 1.6cell s-band (2856MHz) gun was chosen to be the best electron source for the LCLS, however a significant redesign was necessary to achieve the challenging parameters. Detailed 3-D analysis and design was used to produce near-perfect rotationally symmetric rf fields to achieve the emittance requirement. In addition, the thermo-mechanical design allows the gun to operate at 120Hz and a 140MV/m cathode field, or to an average power dissipation of 4kW. Both average and pulsed heating issues are addressed in the LCLS gun design. The first LCLS gun is now fabricated and has been operated with high-power RF. The results of these high-power tests are presented and discussed.

  9. Guard cell SLAC1-type anion channels mediate flagellin-induced stomatal closure.

    PubMed

    Guzel Deger, Aysin; Scherzer, Sönke; Nuhkat, Maris; Kedzierska, Justyna; Kollist, Hannes; Brosché, Mikael; Unyayar, Serpil; Boudsocq, Marie; Hedrich, Rainer; Roelfsema, M Rob G

    2015-10-01

    During infection plants recognize microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs), and this leads to stomatal closure. This study analyzes the molecular mechanisms underlying this MAMP response and its interrelation with ABA signaling. Stomata in intact Arabidopsis thaliana plants were stimulated with the bacterial MAMP flg22, or the stress hormone ABA, by using the noninvasive nanoinfusion technique. Intracellular double-barreled microelectrodes were applied to measure the activity of plasma membrane ion channels. Flg22 induced rapid stomatal closure and stimulated the SLAC1 and SLAH3 anion channels in guard cells. Loss of both channels resulted in cells that lacked flg22-induced anion channel activity and stomata that did not close in response to flg22 or ABA. Rapid flg22-dependent stomatal closure was impaired in plants that were flagellin receptor (FLS2)-deficient, as well as in the ost1-2 (Open Stomata 1) mutant, which lacks a key ABA-signaling protein kinase. By contrast, stomata of the ABA protein phosphatase mutant abi1-1 (ABscisic acid Insensitive 1) remained flg22-responsive. These data suggest that the initial steps in flg22 and ABA signaling are different, but that the pathways merge at the level of OST1 and lead to activation of SLAC1 and SLAH3 anion channels.

  10. The UCLA/SLAC Ultra-High Gradient Cerenkov Wakefield Accelerator Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, M.C.; Badakov, H.; Rosenzweig, J.B.; Travish, G.; Hogan, M.; Ischebec, R.; Siemann, R.; Walz, D.; Scott, A.; Yoder, R.; /Manhattan Coll., Riverdale

    2006-01-25

    An experiment is planned to study the performance of dielectric Cerenkov wakefield accelerating structures at extremely high gradients in the GV/m range. This new UCLA/SLAC/USC collaboration will take advantage of the unique SLAC FFTB electron beam and its demonstrated ultra-short pulse lengths and high currents (e.g., {delta}{sub z} = 20 {micro}m at Q = 3 nC). The electron beam will be focused down and sent through varying lengths of fused silica capillary tubing with two different sizes: ID = 200 {micro}m/OD = 325 {micro}m and ID = 100 {micro}m/OD = 325 {micro}m. The pulse length of the electron beam will be varied in order to alter the accelerating gradient and probe the breakdown threshold of the dielectric structures. In addition to breakdown studies, we plan to collect and measure coherent Cerenkov radiation emitted from the capillary tube to gain information about the strength of the accelerating fields.

  11. Production of high intensity electron bunches for the SLAC Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect

    James, M.B.

    1987-08-01

    This thesis describes the design and performance of a high intensity electron injecfor for the SLAC Linear Collider. Motivation for the collider and the specifications for the injector are discussed. An analytic theory of the bunching and capture of electrons by rf fields is discussed in the limit of low space charge and small signal. The design and performance of SLAC's main injector are described to illustrate a successful application of this theory. The bunching and capture of electrons by rf fields are then discussed in the limit of high space charge and large signal, and a description of the design of the collider injector follows. In the limit of high space charge forces and large rf signals, the beam dynamics are considerably more complex and numerical simulations are required to predict particle motion. A computer code which models the longitudinal dynamics of electrons in the presence of space charge and rf fields is described. The results of the simulations, the resulting collider injector design and the various components which make up the collider injector are described. These include the gun, subharmonic bunchers, traveling-wave buncher and velocity-of-light accelerator section. Finally, the performance of the injector is described including the beam intensity, bunch length, transverse emittance and energy spectrum. While the final operating conditions differ somewaht from the design, the performance of the collider injector is in good agreement with the numerical simulations and meets all of the collider specifications. 28 refs.

  12. From the {psi} to charmed mesons: Three years with the SLAC-LBL detector at SPEAR

    SciTech Connect

    Goldhaber, G.

    1992-06-01

    As I look back at the first three years or so at SPEAR, I consider this one of the most revolutionary or perhaps the most revolutionary, experiment in the 60 year history of particle physics. It certainly was the most exciting time, in a laboratory that is, that I have ever experienced. In my talk I will cover the period 1973--1976 which saw the discoveries of the {psi} and {psi}{prime} resonances the {chi} states and most of the Psion spectroscopy, the D{degree}, D{sup +}* charmed meson doublet as well as the D{degree}* and D{sup +}* doublet. I will also refer briefly to some more recent results. Most of the discoveries I will mention were made with the SLAC-LBL Magnetic Detector or ``MARK I`` which we operated at SPEAR from 1973 to 1976. In 1976 the MARK I was modified to include a ``Lead Glass Wall`` (LGW) for improved photon and electron detection. This involved a new physics group from LBL, who built the LGW, Lina Barbaro-Galtieri et al. as well as a continuing group from SLAC, Martin Perl and Gary Feldman et al. to provide continuity in the running of the MARK I and to continue the study of the anomalous e{mu}events which Martin found earlier and which eventually were identified as the signature of the {tau} lepton.

  13. Performance of the SLC polarized electron source and injector with the SLAC 3 km linac configured for fixed target experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Yeremian, A.D.; Alley, R.K.; Clendenin, J.E.

    1993-03-01

    The SLC polarized electron source (PES) can be modified to produce {mu}sec-long pulses for injection into the un-SLEDed SLAC 3 km linac, with a duty factor considerably higher than for SLC. Such beams are desirable for fixed target experiments at SLAC requiring polarized electron beams of up to 50 mA within an energy spread of 0.5%, at energies of up to 26 GeV. During the fall of 1992, the SLAC linac was operated continuously for two months unSLEDed with the PES dye laser (715 nm) modified to produce a 1{mu}ec pulse at 120Hz. An AlGaAs photocathode was installed in the electron gun to achieve 40% polarization, and a prebuncher was added to the SLC injector to improve capture for long pulse beams. We discuss the performance eo the polarized electron beam for long pulse operation.

  14. SLAC1 is required for plant guard cell S-type anion channel function in stomatal signalling.

    PubMed

    Vahisalu, Triin; Kollist, Hannes; Wang, Yong-Fei; Nishimura, Noriyuki; Chan, Wai-Yin; Valerio, Gabriel; Lamminmäki, Airi; Brosché, Mikael; Moldau, Heino; Desikan, Radhika; Schroeder, Julian I; Kangasjärvi, Jaakko

    2008-03-27

    Stomatal pores, formed by two surrounding guard cells in the epidermis of plant leaves, allow influx of atmospheric carbon dioxide in exchange for transpirational water loss. Stomata also restrict the entry of ozone--an important air pollutant that has an increasingly negative impact on crop yields, and thus global carbon fixation and climate change. The aperture of stomatal pores is regulated by the transport of osmotically active ions and metabolites across guard cell membranes. Despite the vital role of guard cells in controlling plant water loss, ozone sensitivity and CO2 supply, the genes encoding some of the main regulators of stomatal movements remain unknown. It has been proposed that guard cell anion channels function as important regulators of stomatal closure and are essential in mediating stomatal responses to physiological and stress stimuli. However, the genes encoding membrane proteins that mediate guard cell anion efflux have not yet been identified. Here we report the mapping and characterization of an ozone-sensitive Arabidopsis thaliana mutant, slac1. We show that SLAC1 (SLOW ANION CHANNEL-ASSOCIATED 1) is preferentially expressed in guard cells and encodes a distant homologue of fungal and bacterial dicarboxylate/malic acid transport proteins. The plasma membrane protein SLAC1 is essential for stomatal closure in response to CO2, abscisic acid, ozone, light/dark transitions, humidity change, calcium ions, hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide. Mutations in SLAC1 impair slow (S-type) anion channel currents that are activated by cytosolic Ca2+ and abscisic acid, but do not affect rapid (R-type) anion channel currents or Ca2+ channel function. A low homology of SLAC1 to bacterial and fungal organic acid transport proteins, and the permeability of S-type anion channels to malate suggest a vital role for SLAC1 in the function of S-type anion channels.

  15. Summer Harvest in Saratov, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    this region are brighter in MISR's red band than the vegetation. Because plants have vertical structure, the oblique cameras observe a greater proportion of vegetation relative to the nadir camera, which sees more soil. In spring, therefore, the scene is brightest in the vertical view and thus appears with an overall greenish hue. In summer, the soil characteristics play a greater role in governing the appearance of the scene, and the angular reflectance is now brighter at the oblique view angles (displayed as red and blue), thus imparting a pink color to much of the farmland and a purple color to areas along the banks of several narrow rivers. The unusual appearance of the clouds is due to geometric parallax which splits the imagery into spatially separated components as a consequence of their elevation above the surface.

    The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer observes the daylit Earth continuously from pole to pole, and views almost the entire globe every 9 days. These images are a portion of the data acquired during Terra orbits 13033 and 13732, and cover an area of about 173 kilometers x 171 kilometers. They utilize data from blocks 49 to 50 within World Reference System-2 path 170.

    MISR was built and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Earth Science, Washington, DC. The Terra satellite is managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology.

  16. Summer Reading Summer Not: How Project READS Can Advance Equity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, James S.

    2010-01-01

    This paper has three goals. First, it describes the broader research on summer reading loss. Second, it discusses how research and development efforts informed the key components of Project READS (Reading Enhances Achievement During Summer), a scaffolded voluntary summer reading intervention for children in grades 3 to 5. The second part of the…

  17. Making Summer Count: How Summer Programs Can Boost Children's Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCombs, Jennifer Sloan; Augustine, Catherine; Schwartz, Heather; Bodilly, Susan; McInnis, Brian; Lichter, Dahlia; Cross, Amanda Brown

    2012-01-01

    During summer vacation, many students lose knowledge and skills. By the end of summer, students perform, on average, one month behind where they left off in the spring. Participation in summer learning programs should mitigate learning loss and could even produce achievement gains. Indeed, educators and policymakers increasingly promote summer…

  18. Summer South Polar Cap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    13 April 2004 The martian south polar residual ice cap is composed mainly of frozen carbon dioxide. Each summer, a little bit of this carbon dioxide sublimes away. Pits grow larger, and mesas get smaller, as this process continues from year to year. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a view of a small portion of the south polar cap as it appeared in mid-summer in January 2004. The dark areas may be places where the frozen carbon dioxide contains impurities, such as dust, or places where sublimation of ice has roughened the surface so that it appears darker because of small shadows cast by irregularities in the roughened surface. The image is located near 86.9oS, 7.6oW. The image covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) across. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the upper left.

  19. Summer 2014 Pathways Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hand, Zachary

    2014-01-01

    Over the summer I had the exciting opportunity to work for NASA at the Kennedy Space Center as a Mission Assurance Engineering intern. When I was offered a position in mission assurance for the Safety and Mission Assurance directorate's Launch Services Division, I didn't really know what I would be doing, but I knew it would be an excellent opportunity to learn and grow professionally. In this report I will provide some background information on the Launch Services Division, as well as detail my duties and accomplishments during my time as an intern. Additionally, I will relate the significance of my work experience to my current academic work and future career goals. This report contains background information on Mission Assurance Engineering, a description of my duties and accomplishments over the summer of 2014, and relates the significance of my work experience to my school work and future career goals. It is a required document for the Pathways program.

  20. Goddard Summer Interns: Alejandro Arambula

    NASA Video Gallery

    Alejandro Arambula is an aerospace engineering student at M.I.T. and a 2011 summer intern in Goddard's Propulsion Lab. This summer he is working with his mentor Khary Parker in building a test asse...

  1. Summer Learning: Accelerating Student Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pitcock, Sarah; Seidel, Bob

    2015-01-01

    As numerous studies from 1906 on have confirmed, children lose ground in learning if they lack opportunities for building skills over the summer. Nonetheless, summer learning loss comes up but rarely in the national discussion of education reform. By the end of summer, students perform on average one month behind where they left off in the spring.…

  2. Lattice design for the high energy ring of the SLAC B-Factory (PEP-II)

    SciTech Connect

    Donald, M.H.R.; Cai, Y.; Irwin, J.

    1995-04-01

    The design of the lattice for the High Energy Ring (HER) of the SLAC B-Factory has several special features, notably provision for octupole compensation of amplitude dependent tune shift effects and a beta-beat scheme for semi-local chromaticity correction. In the arcs adjacent to the interaction point (IP) the beta functions are enhanced to allow the use of non-interlaced sextupoles to compensate the chromaticity of the interaction region. A closed bump of beta {open_quotes}mismatch{close_quotes} is generated by two vertically focusing quadrupoles spaced 2 betatron wavelengths apart. The beta-beat has two advantages: it enhances the ratio between the horizontal and vertical beta functions at the sextupoles and, because of the locally higher beta function, allows weaker sextupoles to be used. The standard design uses a 60 degree/cell lattice but a 90 degree/cell lattice may also be used if lower emittances and momentum compaction factor are desired.

  3. Emittance Studies of the BNL/SLAC/UCLA 1.6 Cell Photocathode RF Gun

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, D.T.; Wang, X.J.; Miller, R.H.; Babzien, M.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Pellegrini, C.; Sheehan, J.; Skaritka, J.; Winick, H.; Woodle, M.; Yakimenko, V.; /Brookhaven

    2011-09-09

    The symmetrized 1.6 cell S-band photocathode gun developed by the BNL/SLAC/UCLA collaboration is in operation at the Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility (ATF). A novel emittance compensation solenoid magnet has also been designed, built and is in operation at the ATF. These two subsystems form an emittance compensated photoinjector used for beam dynamics, advanced acceleration and free electron laser experiments at the ATF. The highest acceleration field achieved on the copper cathode is 150 MV/m, and the guns normal operating field is 130 MV/m. The maximum rf pulse length is 3 {mu}s. The transverse emittance of the photoelectron beam were measured for various injection parameters. The 1 nC emittance results are presented along with electron bunch length measurements that indicated that at above the 400 pC, space charge bunch lengthening is occurring. The thermal emittance, {epsilon}{sub o}, of the copper cathode has been measured.

  4. Intense terahertz pulses from SLAC electron beams using coherent transition radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Ziran; Fisher, Alan S.; Hogan, Mark; Loos, Henrik; Goodfellow, John; Fuchs, Matthias; Daranciang, Dan; Lindenberg, Aaron

    2013-02-15

    SLAC has two electron accelerators, the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) and the Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests (FACET), providing high-charge, high-peak-current, femtosecond electron bunches. These characteristics are ideal for generating intense broadband terahertz (THz) pulses via coherent transition radiation. For LCLS and FACET respectively, the THz pulse duration is typically 20 and 80 fs RMS and can be tuned via the electron bunch duration; emission spectra span 3-30 THz and 0.5 THz-5 THz; and the energy in a quasi-half-cycle THz pulse is 0.2 and 0.6 mJ. The peak electric field at a THz focus has reached 4.4 GV/m (0.44 V/A) at LCLS. This paper presents measurements of the terahertz pulses and preliminary observations of nonlinear materials response.

  5. Optics Design for a Soft X-ray FEL at the SLAC A-Line

    SciTech Connect

    Geng, H; Ding, Y.; Emma, P.; Huang, Z.; Nosochkov, Y.; Woodley, M.; /SLAC

    2009-05-15

    LCLS capabilities can be significantly extended with a second undulator aiming at the soft x-ray spectrum (1-5 nm). To allow for simultaneous hard and soft x-ray operations, 14 GeV beams at the end of the LCLS accelerator can be intermittently switched into the SLAC A-line (the beam transport line to End Station A) where the second undulator may be located. In this paper, we discuss the A-line optics design for transporting the high-brightness LCLS beams using the existing tunnel. To preserve the high brightness of the LCLS beams, special attention is paid to effects of incoherent and coherent synchrotron radiation. Start-to-end simulations using realistic LCLS beam distributions are carried out.

  6. Test of QED using a laser at the SLAC final focus test beam

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, J.E.

    1992-04-01

    Experiment {number sign}144 at SLAC has three parts: the search for low-mass states excited in {gamma}{gamma} collisions and observed in pair decay, the study of nonlinear, nonperturbative QED in {gamma}e and {gamma}{gamma} collisions, and its possible applications to general purpose linear colliders. Such colliders could produce the full range of J{sub q{center dot}{center dot}{bar q}}/{sup PC} states, leptoquarks J{sub l{center dot}{center dot}{bar q}}/{sup PC}, the particles of supersymmetry, the top quark or Higgs. However, to realize them a number of technical problems need resolution that are addressed in E144 together with interesting possibilities for highly polarized, high brightness {gamma}/{sup {yields}} e{sup {yields}{plus minus}} beams that are needed for electroweak studies.

  7. Test of QED using a laser at the SLAC final focus test beam

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, J.E.

    1992-04-01

    Experiment {number_sign}144 at SLAC has three parts: the search for low-mass states excited in {gamma}{gamma} collisions and observed in pair decay, the study of nonlinear, nonperturbative QED in {gamma}e and {gamma}{gamma} collisions, and its possible applications to general purpose linear colliders. Such colliders could produce the full range of J{sub q{center_dot}{center_dot}{bar q}}/{sup PC} states, leptoquarks J{sub l{center_dot}{center_dot}{bar q}}/{sup PC}, the particles of supersymmetry, the top quark or Higgs. However, to realize them a number of technical problems need resolution that are addressed in E144 together with interesting possibilities for highly polarized, high brightness {gamma}/{sup {yields}} e{sup {yields}{plus_minus}} beams that are needed for electroweak studies.

  8. 3D Modeling Activity for Novel High Power Electron Guns at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Krasnykh, Anatoly

    2003-07-29

    The next generation of powerful electronic devices requires new approaches to overcome the known limitations of existing tube technology. Multi-beam and sheet beam approaches are novel concepts for the high power microwave devices. Direct and indirect modeling methods are being developed at SLAC to meet the new requirements in the 3D modeling. The direct method of solving of Poisson's equations for the multi-beam and sheet beam guns is employed in the TOPAZ 3D tool. The combination of TOPAZ 2D and EGUN (in the beginning) with MAFIA 3D and MAGIC 3D (at the end) is used in an indirect method to model the high power electron guns. Both methods complement each other to get reliable representation of the beam trajectories. Several gun ideas are under consideration at the present time. The collected results of these simulations are discussed.

  9. Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests (FACET) at SLAC and its Radiological Considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, X.S.; Leitner, M.Santana; Vollaire, J.

    2011-08-22

    Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests (FACET) in SLAC will be used to study plasma wakefield acceleration. FLUKA Monte Carlo code was used to design a maze wall to separate FACET project and LCLS project to allow persons working in FACET side during LCLS operation. Also FLUKA Monte Carlo code was used to design the shielding for FACET dump to get optimum design for shielding both prompt and residual doses, as well as reducing environmental impact. FACET will be an experimental facility that provides short, intense pulses of electrons and positrons to excite plasma wakefields and study a variety of critical issues associated with plasma wakefield acceleration [1]. This paper describes the FACET beam parameters, the lay-out and its radiological issues.

  10. Transverse wakefield control and feedback in the SLC (SLAC Linear Collider) linear

    SciTech Connect

    Seeman, J.T.; Campisi, I.E.; Herrmannsfeldt, W.; Lee, M.; Petersen, A.; Phinney, N.; Ross, M.; Abrams, G.S.; Adolphsen, C.; Soderstrom, E.

    1987-01-01

    Transverse wakefields in the linac of the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) have been observed to enlarge the effective emittance of beams which are not properly centered in the accelerating structure. A fast feedback system has been constructed to minimize the enlargement under changing conditions by controlling the beam launching parameters. Theoretical aspects of this transverse feedback system are reviewed as well as the design of the beam sensors, launch controllers, communication equipment and data processing micro-computer. A variety of beam observations have been made. They show that dispersion as well as wakefield effects are important. In the near future the fast transverse feedback system will be beam tested, and algorithms tailored to the noise environment of the SLC will be tried.

  11. 600 kV modulator design for the SLAC Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, K.; de Lamare, J.; Nesterov, V.; Cassel, R.

    1992-07-01

    Preliminary design for the SLAC Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator (NLCTA) requires a pulse power source to produce a 600 kV, 600 A, 1.4 {mu}s, 0.1% flat top pulse with rise and fall times of approximately 100 ns to power an X-Band klystron with a microperveance of 1.25 at {approx} 100 MW peak RF power. The design goals for the modulator, including those previously listed, are peak modulator pulse power of 340 MW operating at 120 Hz. A three-stage darlington pulse-forming network, which produces a >100 kV, 1.4 {mu}s pulse, is coupled to the klystron load through a 6:1 pulse transformer. Careful consideration of the transformer leakage inductance, klystron capacitance, system layout, and component choice is necessary to produce the very fast rise and fall times at 600 kV operating continuously at 120 Hz.

  12. Microwave measurements of the BNL/SLAC/UCLA 1.6 cell photocathode rf gun

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, D.T.; Miller, R.H.; Winick, H.; Wang, X.J.; Batchelor, K.; Woodle, M.; Ben-Zvi, I.

    1995-06-01

    The longitudinal accelerating field E. has been measured as a function of azimuthal angle in the full cell of the cold test model for the 1.6 cell BNL/SLAC/UCLA {number_sign}3 S-band RF Gun using a needle rotation/frequency perturbation technique. These measurements were conducted before and after symmetrizing the full cell with a vacuum pump out port and an adjustable short. Two different waveguide to full cell coupling schemes were studied. The dipole mode of the full cell is an order of magnitude less severe before symmetrization for the 0{theta}-coupling scheme. The multi-pole contribution to the longitudinal field asymmetry are calculated using standard Fourier series techniques. The Panofsky-Wenzel theorem is used in estimating the transverse emittance due to the multipole components of E{sub x}.

  13. Analysis of the Wakefield Effects in the PEP-II SLAC B-FACTORY

    SciTech Connect

    Novokhatski, A; Seeman, J.; Sullivan, M.; Wienands, U.; /SLAC

    2009-07-06

    We present the history and analysis of different wake field effects throughout the operational life of the PEP-II SLAC B-factory. Although the impedance of the high and low energy rings is small, the intense high current beams generated a lot of power. The effects from these wake fields are: heating and damage of vacuum beam chamber elements like RF seals, vacuum valves , shielded bellows, BPM buttons and ceramic tiles; vacuum spikes, vacuum instabilities and high detector background; beam longitudinal and transverse instabilities. We also discuss the methods used to eliminate these effects. Results of this analysis and the PEP-II experience may be very useful in the design of new storage rings and light sources.

  14. A summary of ground motion effects at SLAC (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center) resulting from the Oct 17th 1989 earthquake

    SciTech Connect

    Ruland, R.E.

    1990-08-01

    Ground motions resulting from the October 17th 1989 (Loma Prieta) earthquake are described and can be correlated with some geologic features of the SLAC site. Recent deformations of the linac are also related to slow motions observed over the past 20 years. Measured characteristics of the earthquake are listed. Some effects on machine components and detectors are noted. 18 refs., 16 figs.

  15. Integrating Newer Technology Software Systems into the SLAC Legacy Control System - Two Case Histories and New CMLOG Developments

    SciTech Connect

    MacKenzie, Ronald R.

    2001-12-11

    It has been the goal of SLAC Controls Software to offload processing from the aging Alpha/VMS based control system onto machines that are more widely accepted and used. An additional goal has been to provide more modern software tools to our user community. This paper presents two software products which satisfy those goals.

  16. THE SLACS SURVEY. VIII. THE RELATION BETWEEN ENVIRONMENT AND INTERNAL STRUCTURE OF EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Treu, Tommaso; Gavazzi, Raphael; Gorecki, Alexia; Marshall, Philip J.; Koopmans, Leon V. E.; Bolton, Adam S.; Moustakas, Leonidas A.; Burles, Scott E-mail: pjm@physics.ucsb.edu E-mail: koopmans@astro.rug.nl E-mail: leonidas@jpl.nasa.gov

    2009-01-01

    We study the relation between the internal structure of early-type galaxies and their environment using 70 strong gravitational lenses from the SLACS Survey. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) database is used to determine two measures of overdensity of galaxies around each lens-the projected number density of galaxies inside the tenth nearest neighbor ({sigma}{sub 10}) and within a cone of radius one h{sup -1} Mpc (D {sub 1}). Our main results are as follows. (1) The average overdensity is somewhat larger than unity, consistent with lenses preferring overdense environments as expected for massive early-type galaxies (12/70 lenses are in known groups/clusters). (2) The distribution of overdensities is indistinguishable from that of 'twin' nonlens galaxies selected from SDSS to have the same redshift and stellar velocity dispersion {sigma}{sub *}. Thus, within our errors, lens galaxies are an unbiased population, and the SLACS results can be generalized to the overall population of early-type galaxies. (3) Typical contributions from external mass distribution are no more than a few percent in local mass density, reaching 10-20% ({approx}0.05-0.10 external convergence) only in the most extreme overdensities. (4) No significant correlation between overdensity and slope of the mass-density profile of the lens galaxies is found. (5) Satellite galaxies (those with a more luminous companion) have marginally steeper mass-density profiles (as quantified by f {sub SIE} = {sigma}{sub *}/{sigma}{sub SIE} = 1.12 {+-} 0.05 versus 1.01 {+-} 0.01) and smaller dynamically normalized mass enclosed within the Einstein radius ({delta}log M {sub Ein}/M {sub dim} differs by -0.09 {+-} 0.03 dex) than central galaxies (those without). This result suggests that tidal stripping may affect the mass structure of early-type galaxies down to kpc scales probed by strong lensing, when they fall into larger structures.

  17. A Proof-Of-Principle Echo-Enabled Harmonic Generation Experiment at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Dunning, Michael; Colby, Eric; Ding, Yuantao; Frederico, Joel; Gilevich, Sasha; Hast, Carsten; Jobe, R.; McCormick, Douglas; Nelson, Janice; Raubenheimer, Tor; Soong, Ken; Stupakov, Gennady; Szalata, Zenon; Walz, Dieter; Weathersby, Stephen; Woodley, Mark; Xiang, Dao; Corlett, John; Penn, Gregory; Prestemon, Soren; Qiang, Ji; /LBL, Berkeley /LBL, Berkeley /LBL, Berkeley /LBL, Berkeley /LPHE, Lausanne

    2011-05-20

    In this paper we describe the technical design of an ongoing proof-of-principle echo-enabled harmonic generation (EEHG) experiment at the Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator (NLCTA) at SLAC.We present the design considerations and the technical details of the experiment. Recently a new method, entitled echo-enabled harmonic generation, was proposed for generation of high harmonics using the beam echo effect. In an EEHG free electron laser (FEL), an electron beam is energy modulated in a modulator and then sent through a dispersive section with a high dispersion strength. After this first stage, the modulation obtained in the modulator is macroscopically washed out, while simultaneously introducing complicated fine structure (separated energy bands) into the phase space of the beam. A second laser is used to further modulate the beam energy in a second modulator. After passing through a second dispersive section, the separated energy bands will be converted into current modulation and the echo signal then occurs as a recoherence effect caused by the mixing of the correlations between the modulation in the second modulator and the fine structures in the beam. The EEHG scheme has a remarkable up-frequency conversion efficiency; it has been shown that the EEHG FEL scheme may allow generation of soft x-rays directly from a UV seed laser in a single stage. In order to confirm the physics behind the EEHG technique and benchmark the theory, a proof-of-principleEEHG experimentwas planned at SLAC. The experiment is now in a commissioning stage and the preliminary results are reported in a separate paper of these proceedings. In this paper we present the design considerations and the details of the experiment setup.

  18. Radiation Safety Aspects of the Linac Coherent Light Source Project At SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Rokni, S.H.; Fasso, A.; Mao, S.; Vincke, H.; /SLAC /LCLS

    2005-07-06

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is a Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission based Free Electron Laser (FEL) that is being designed and built at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) by a multilaboratory collaboration. This facility will provide ultra-short pulses of coherent x-ray radiation with the fundamental harmonic energy tunable over the energy range of 0.82 to 8.2 keV. One-third of the existing SLAC LINAC will compress and accelerate the electron beam to energies ranging from 4.5 GeV to 14.35 GeV. The beam will then be transported through a 130-meter long undulator, emit FEL and spontaneous radiation. After passing through the undulator, the electron beam is bent to the main electron dump. The LCLS will have two experiment halls as well as x-ray optics and infrastructure necessary to make use of the FEL for research and development in a variety of scientific fields. The facility design will incorporate features that would make it possible to expand in future such that up to 6 independent undulators can be used. While some of the radiation protection issues for the LCLS are similar to those encountered at both high-energy electron linacs and synchrotron radiation facilities, LCLS poses new challenges as well. Some of these new issues include: the length of the facility and of the undulator, the experimental floor in line with the electron beam and the occupancy near zero degrees, and the very high instantaneous intensity of the FEL. The shielding design criteria, methodology, and results from Monte Carlo and analytical calculations are presented.

  19. SLAC/SPIRES Announces the Top-Cited Papers of 2000

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connell, Heath B

    2002-02-22

    Physicists who search the literature on elementary particles know that the SLAC library's SPIRES-HEP database provides an essential tool. The database lists virtually every paper published or even preprinted in high energy physics over the past thirty years. The database connects preprint or eprint versions to articles published in journals or conference proceedings, providing access to all phases of the publication history. In addition, most papers have backward links to the papers they cite and forward links to the papers citing them. These citation linkages provide a very effective means of searching the literature on any topic of interest. In the past few years, SPIRES-HEP has been automatically harvesting reference citations from eprints, creating a web of links which indexes the literature in a quite thorough manner. As a byproduct of this citation linkage, SPIRES-HEP can easily search out the papers most highly cited by publications in high-energy physics. The list of papers with the most citations in a given year provides a snapshot of the hottest topics that have engaged the attention of theorists and experimenters. For the past several years, SPIRES-HEP has posted a scientific review of the year's top-cited papers. The whole collection of these reviews can be found on the Web at: http://www.slac.stanford.edu/library/topcites/. We have recently posted the topcite lists for the year 2000. These materials include a list of the papers with more than 100 citations in the past year, and a list of the paper with more than 1000 citations over the history of the SPIRES-HEP database.

  20. Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests at SLAC (FACET) Conceptual Design Report

    SciTech Connect

    Amann, J.; Bane, K.; /SLAC

    2009-10-30

    This Conceptual Design Report (CDR) describes the design of FACET. It will be updated to stay current with the developing design of the facility. This CDR begins as the baseline conceptual design and will evolve into an 'as-built' manual for the completed facility. The Executive Summary, Chapter 1, gives an introduction to the FACET project and describes the salient features of its design. Chapter 2 gives an overview of FACET. It describes the general parameters of the machine and the basic approaches to implementation. The FACET project does not include the implementation of specific scientific experiments either for plasma wake-field acceleration for other applications. Nonetheless, enough work has been done to define potential experiments to assure that the facility can meet the requirements of the experimental community. Chapter 3, Scientific Case, describes the planned plasma wakefield and other experiments. Chapter 4, Technical Description of FACET, describes the parameters and design of all technical systems of FACET. FACET uses the first two thirds of the existing SLAC linac to accelerate the beam to about 20GeV, and compress it with the aid of two chicanes, located in Sector 10 and Sector 20. The Sector 20 area will include a focusing system, the generic experimental area and the beam dump. Chapter 5, Management of Scientific Program, describes the management of the scientific program at FACET. Chapter 6, Environment, Safety and Health and Quality Assurance, describes the existing programs at SLAC and their application to the FACET project. It includes a preliminary analysis of safety hazards and the planned mitigation. Chapter 7, Work Breakdown Structure, describes the structure used for developing the cost estimates, which will also be used to manage the project. The chapter defines the scope of work of each element down to level 3.

  1. SLAC E155 and E155x Numeric Data Results and Data Plots: Nucleon Spin Structure Functions

    DOE Data Explorer

    The nucleon spin structure functions g1 and g2 are important tools for testing models of nucleon structure and QCD. Experiments at CERN, DESY, and SLAC have measured g1 and g2 using deep inelastic scattering of polarized leptons on polarized nucleon targets. The results of these experiments have established that the quark component of the nucleon helicity is much smaller than naive quark-parton model predictions. The Bjorken sum rule has been confirmed within the uncertainties of experiment and theory. The experiment E155 at SLAC collected data in March and April of 1997. Approximately 170 million scattered electron events were recorded to tape. (Along with several billion inclusive hadron events.) The data were collected using three independent fixed-angle magnetic spectrometers, at approximately 2.75, 5.5, and 10.5 degrees. The momentum acceptance of the 2.75 and 5.5 degree spectrometers ranged from 10 to 40 GeV, with momentum resolution of 2-4%. The 10.5 degree spectrometer, new for E155, accepted events of 7 GeV to 20 GeV. Each spectrometer used threshold gas Cerenkov counters (for particle ID), a segmented lead-glass calorimeter (for energy measurement and particle ID), and plastic scintillator hodoscopes (for tracking and momentum measurement). The polarized targets used for E155 were 15NH3 and 6LiD, as targets for measuring the proton and deuteron spin structure functions respectively. Experiment E155x recently concluded a successful two-month run at SLAC. The experiment was designed to measure the transverse spin structure functions of the proton and deuteron. The E155 target was also recently in use at TJNAF's Hall C (E93-026) and was returned to SLAC for E155x. E155x hopes to reduce the world data set errors on g2 by a factor of three. [Copied from http://www.slac.stanford.edu/exp/e155/e155_nickeltour.html, an information summary linked off the E155 home page at http://www.slac.stanford.edu/exp/e155/e155_home.html. The extension run, E155x, also makes

  2. Next Generation Summer School

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eugenia, Marcu

    2013-04-01

    On 21.06.2010 the "Next Generation" Summer School has opened the doors for its first students. They were introduced in the astronomy world by astronomical observations, astronomy and radio-astronomy lectures, laboratory projects meant to initiate them into modern radio astronomy and radio communications. The didactic programme was structure as fallowing: 1) Astronomical elements from the visible spectrum (lectures + practical projects) 2) Radio astronomy elements (lectures + practical projects) 3) Radio communication base (didactic- recreative games) The students and professors accommodation was at the Agroturistic Pension "Popasul Iancului" situated at 800m from the Marisel Observatory. First day (summer solstice day) began with a practical activity: determination of the meridian by measurements of the shadow (the direction of one vertical alignment, when it has the smallest length). The experiment is very instructive and interesting because combines notions of physics, spatial geometry and basic astronomy elements. Next day the activities took place in four stages: the students processed the experimental data obtained on first day (on sheets of millimetre paper they represented the length of the shadow alignments according the time), each team realised its own sun quadrant, point were given considering the design and functionality of these quadrant, the four teams had to mimic important constellations on carton boards with phosphorescent sticky stars and the students, accompanied by the professors took a hiking trip to the surroundings, marking the interest point coordinates, using a GPS to establish the geographical coronations and at the end of the day the students realised a small map of central Marisel area based on the GPS data. On the third day, the students were introduced to basic notions of radio astronomy, the principal categories of artificial Earth satellites: low orbit satellites (LEO), Medium orbit satellites (MEO) and geostationary satellites (GEO

  3. 2003 SOLAS Summer School

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGillis, Wade R.

    2003-01-01

    In 2003, the United States provided support for the participation of 18 students, three research assistants, and seven lecturers in the first international Surface Ocean Lower Atmosphere Study (SOLAS) Summer School. The purpose of this school was to introduce graduate students and young researchers to different components of SOLAS research including biogeochemical interactions and feedbacks, exchange processes, and air-sea fluxes. Support was provided through grants from: NASA (contact: Charles Trees); NSF (contact: Anne-Marie Schmoltner); NOAA (contact: Kathy Tedesco); and ONR (contact: Ronald Ferek).

  4. A River Summer on the Hudson

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenna, T. C.; Pfirman, S.; Selleck, B.; Son, L.; Land, M.; Cronin, J.

    2006-12-01

    River Summer is a month-long faculty development program extending from the continental shelf off New York City to the headwaters of the Hudson in the Adirondack Mountains. During the program, faculty from the Environmental Consortium of Hudson Valley Colleges and Universities teach each other about the Hudson environment, using innovative methods of teaching and learning, with a focus on incorporation of hands-on approaches from the perspective of multiple disciplines. Over four weeks, faculty from research universities, community colleges, liberal arts institutions, and middle and high schools work and live together, on board a research vessel or in a remote tent campsite, for several days at a time. Using the geology, hydrology, and landscape of the River as a foundation, River Summer focuses on understanding development of the Hudson within the context of its natural resources and cultural history. Participants conduct field sampling and analyses and consider issues through approaches that are common to many disciplines: scaling for problem solving; sampling and assessing bias and representation; observing and documenting; representing and depicting; interpretation and assessing relationships and causality; and evaluation. They also get a chance to experience, first-hand, the complexity and often open-ended nature of doing science. By allowing individuals, many of whom come from non-science disciplines, to experience these methods and processes in a safe learning environment, science is made more meaningful and accessible. The program's pedagogy is based on the principles of cognitive psychology and immersive field-, place- and inquiry-based learning. Field programs have been found to provide memorable, transformative experiences for undergraduate students, and our experience with River Summer 2005 and 2006 suggests they are equally effective with faculty. Evaluation shows that River Summer has a significant impact on its participants. Participants develop new

  5. Site- and kinase-specific phosphorylation-mediated activation of SLAC1, a guard cell anion channel stimulated by abscisic acid.

    PubMed

    Maierhofer, Tobias; Diekmann, Marion; Offenborn, Jan Niklas; Lind, Christof; Bauer, Hubert; Hashimoto, Kenji; S Al-Rasheid, Khaled A; Luan, Sheng; Kudla, Jörg; Geiger, Dietmar; Hedrich, Rainer

    2014-09-09

    Under drought stress, abscisic acid (ABA) triggers closure of leaf cell pores called stomata, which are formed by two specialized cells called guard cells in plant epidermis. Two pathways downstream of ABA stimulate phosphorylation of the S-type anion channels SLAC1 (slow anion channel associated 1) and SLAH3 (SLAC1 homolog 3), which causes these channels to open, reducing guard cell volume and triggering stomatal closure. One branch involves OST1 (open stomata 1), a calcium-independent SnRK2-type kinase, and the other branch involves calcium-dependent protein kinases of the CPK (calcium-dependent protein kinase) family. We used coexpression analyses in Xenopus oocytes to show that the calcineurin B-like (CBL) calcium sensors CBL1 and CBL9 and their interacting protein kinase CIPK23 also triggered SLAC1 and SLAH3 opening. We analyzed whether regulation of SLAC1 opening by these different families of kinases involved the same or different sites on SLAC1 by measuring channel conductance of SLAC1 with mutations in the putative phosphorylation sites in the amino or carboxyl termini coexpressed with specific kinases in Xenopus oocytes. SLAC1 mutants lacking the OST1-phosphorylated site were still activated by CPK or by CBL/CIPK complexes. Phosphorylation and activation of SLAC1 by any of the kinases were inhibited by the phosphatase ABI1 (ABA insensitive 1), which is inactivated in response to ABA signaling. These findings identified CBL/CIPK complexes as potential regulators of stomatal aperture through S-type anion channels and indicated that phosphorylation at distinct sites enables SLAC1 activation by both calcium-dependent and calcium-independent pathways downstream of ABA.

  6. Conducting Summer School in Agriculture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lloyd, Melvin

    1976-01-01

    Course objectives, student competencies, and class session schedules are outlined for two high school vocational agriculture summer courses: Livestock and Livestock Products Evaluation and Agribusiness Leadership Seminar. (MS)

  7. The 1982 NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barfield, B. F. (Editor); Kent, M. I. (Editor); Dozier, J. (Editor); Karr, G. (Editor)

    1982-01-01

    A NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Research Program was conducted to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members, to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA, to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions, and to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA Centers.

  8. Tsunami Summer! 2003 Young Adult Summer Library Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Public Library Service, Montgomery.

    This manual is designed to assist public libraries in Alabama with setting up "Tsunami Summer!," a summer program for young adults, i.e., students in grades 6 through 12. The manual contains the following sections: (1) Publicity and Promotion; (2) Working with Schools; (3) Involving the Students, including teen volunteers, teen advisory councils,…

  9. National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI) JSC Summer Projects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowdy, Forrest Ryan

    2014-01-01

    This project optimized the calorie content in a breakfast meal replacement bar for the Advanced Food Technology group. Use of multivariable optimization yielded the highest weight savings possible while simultaneously matching NASA Human Standards nutritional guidelines. The scope of this research included the study of shelf-life indicators such as water activity, moisture content, and texture analysis. Key metrics indicate higher protein content, higher caloric density, and greater mass savings as a result of the reformulation process. The optimization performed for this study demonstrated wide application to other food bars in the Advanced Food Technology portfolio. Recommendations for future work include shelf life studies on bar hardening and overall acceptability data over increased time frames and temperature fluctuation scenarios.

  10. X-ray optics design studies for the SLAC 1.5-15 Å Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatchyn, R.; Arthur, J.; Boyce, R.; Fasso, A.; Montgomery, J.; Vylet, V.; Walz, D.; Yotam, R.; Freund, A. K.; Howells, M.

    1999-06-01

    In recent years, a number of systematic studies have been carried out on the design and R&D aspects of X-ray free-electron laser (XRFEL) schemes based on driving highly compressed electron bunches from a multi-GeV linac through long (30 m - 100+ m) undulators. These sources, when operated in the self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) mode, feature singularly high peak output power densities and frequently unprecedented combinations of phase-space and output-parameter values. This has led to correspondingly pivotal design challenges and opportunities for the optical materials, systems, components, and experimental configurations for transporting and utilizing this radiation. In this paper we summarize the design and R&D status of the X-ray optics section of the SLAC Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), a 1.5 Angstrom SASE FEL driven by the last kilometer of the SLAC 3-kilometer S-band linac.

  11. Strong constraints on sub-GeV dark sectors from SLAC beam dump E137.

    PubMed

    Batell, Brian; Essig, Rouven; Surujon, Ze'ev

    2014-10-24

    We present new constraints on sub-GeV dark matter and dark photons from the electron beam-dump experiment E137 conducted at SLAC in 1980-1982. Dark matter interacting with electrons (e.g., via a dark photon) could have been produced in the electron-target collisions and scattered off electrons in the E137 detector, producing the striking, zero-background signature of a high-energy electromagnetic shower that points back to the beam dump. E137 probes new and significant ranges of parameter space and constrains the well-motivated possibility that dark photons that decay to light dark-sector particles can explain the ∼3.6σ discrepancy between the measured and standard model value of the muon anomalous magnetic moment. It also restricts the parameter space in which the relic density of dark matter in these models is obtained from thermal freeze-out. E137 also convincingly demonstrates that (cosmic) backgrounds can be controlled and thus serves as a powerful proof of principle for future beam-dump searches for sub-GeV dark-sector particles scattering off electrons in the detector.

  12. A Proof-of-Principle Echo-enabled Harmonic Generation Free Electron Laser Experiment at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Pernet, Pierre-Louis

    2010-06-24

    With the advent of X-ray Free Electron Lasers (FELs), new methods have been developed to extend capabilities at short wavelengths beyond Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE). In particular, seeding of a FEL allows for temporal control of the radiation pulse and increases the peak brightness by orders of magnitude. Most recently, Gennady Stupakov and colleagues at SLAC proposed a new technique: Echo-Enabled Harmonic Generation (EEHG). Here a laser microbunches the beam in an undulator and the beam is sheared in a chicane. This process is repeated with a second laser, undulator and chicane. The interplay between these allows a seeding of the X-ray laser up to the 100th harmonic of the first laser. After introducing the physics of FELs and the EEHG seeding technique, we describe contributions to the experimental effort. We will present detailed studies of the experiment including the choice of parameters and their optimization, the emittance effect, spontaneous emission in the undulators, the second laser phase effect, and measurements of the jitter between RF stations. Finally, the status and preliminary results of the Echo-7 experiment will be outlined.

  13. ILC @ SLAC R&D Program for a Polarized RF Gun

    SciTech Connect

    Clendenin, J.E.; Brachman, A.; Dowell, D.H.; Garwin, E.L.; Ioakemidi, K.; Kirby, R.E.; Maruyama, T.; Miller, R.A.; Prescott, C.Y.; Wang, J.W.; Lewellen, J.W.; Prepost, R.; /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2006-01-25

    Photocathode rf guns produce high-energy low-emittance electron beams. DC guns utilizing GaAs photocathodes have proven successful for generating polarized electron beams for accelerators, but they require rf bunching systems that significantly increase the transverse emittance of the beam. With higher extraction field and beam energy, rf guns can support higher current densities at the cathode. The source laser system can then be used to generate the high peak current, relatively low duty-factor micropulses required by the ILC without the need for post-extraction rf bunching. The net result is that the injection system for a polarized rf gun can be identical to that for an unpolarized rf gun. However, there is some uncertainty as to the survivability of an activated GaAs cathode in the environment of an operating rf gun. Consequently, before attempting to design a polarized rf gun for the ILC, SLAC plans to develop an rf test gun to demonstrate the rf operating conditions suitable for an activated GaAs cathode.

  14. Availability Performance and Considerations for LCLS X-Ray FEL at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, W.B.; Brachmann, A.; Colocho, W.; Stanek, M.; Warren, J.; /SLAC

    2011-08-16

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is an X-ray Free Electron Laser (FEL) facility located at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. LCLS has been in operation since spring 2009, and it has completed its 3rd user run. LCLS is the first in its class of X-ray FEL user facilities, and presents different availability challenges compared to storage ring light sources. This paper presents recent availability performance of the FEL as well as factors to consider when defining the operational availability figure of merit for user runs. During LCLS [1] user runs, an availability of 95% has been set as a goal. In run III, LCLS photon and electron beam systems achieved availabilities of 94.8% and 96.7%, respectively. The total availability goal can be distributed among subsystems to track performance and identify areas that need attention in order to maintain and improve hardware reliability and operational availability. Careful beam time accounting is needed to understand the distribution of down time. The LCLS complex includes multiple experimental hutches for X-ray science, and each user program has different requirements of a set of parameters that the FEL can be configured to deliver. Since each user may have different criteria for what is considered 'acceptable beam', the quality of the beam must be considered to determine the X-ray beam availability.

  15. IMPROVEMENTS IN EMITTANCE WAKE FIELD OPTIMIZATION FOR THE SLAC LINEAR COLLIDER

    SciTech Connect

    Decker, Franz-Josef

    2003-05-01

    The transverse emittances in the SLAC Linear Collider can be severely diluted by collective wakefield effects and dispersion. For the 1997/98 SLC/SLD run important changes were implemented in the way the emittance is optimized. Early in the linac, where the energy spread is large due to BNS damping, the emittance growth is dominated by dispersion. In this regime emittance tuning bumps may introduce additional wakefield tails and their use is now avoided. At the end of the linac the energy spread is minimal and the emittance measurement is most sensitive to wakefield emittance dilution. In previous years, the emittances were tuned on wire scanners located near but not at the end of the linac (after about 90% of its length). Simulations show that emittance growth of up to 100% can occur in the remaining 10%. In this run wire scanners at the entrance of the Final Focus, the last place where the emittances can be measured, were used for the optimization. Screens at the end of the linac allow additional real time monitoring of the beam sizes. We show that the different tuning strategy provided significantly improved emittances at the interaction point of the SLC.

  16. Two-body photodisintegration of the deutron at high energy: Experiment NE17 at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Geesaman, D.F.; Jackson, H.E.; Hansen, J.O.

    1995-08-01

    Experiment NE17 was granted three days of beam time during the last NPAS run at SLAC. During that time, the cross section data for the {gamma}d {yields} pn reaction were extended up to 2.8 GeV at {theta}{sub cm} = 90{degrees} and up to 4.2 GeV at {theta}{sub cm} = 37{degrees}. Data were also taken at {theta}{sub cm} = 37{degrees} 53{degrees}, and 90{degrees} at E{gamma} = 1.6 GeV so that a complete angular distribution would be available at this energy where an Enhancement at a large angle (143{degrees}) was found during experiment NE8. The results indicate the surprising feature that the cross sections at 90{degrees} and 53{degrees} follow the quark counting rule prediction, while those at 37{degrees} do not. Perhaps this indicates that p{sub T}{sup 2} is a controlling variable in the approach to asymptotic scaling. A manuscript was accepted for publication.

  17. The Physics Program of a High-Luminosity Asymmetric B Factory at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Eisner, A.; Mandelkern, M.; Morrison, R.; Witherell, M.; Burchat, P.; Kent, J.; Erbacher, R.; Vernon, W.; Eigen, G.; Hitlin, D.; Porter, F.; Weinstein, A.; Wisniewski, W.; Wagner, S.; Franzini, P.; Tuts, M.; Averill, D.; Snyder, A.; Goldhaber, G.; Oddone, P.; Roe, N.; Ronan, M.; Spahn, M.; MacFarlane, D.; Bartelt, J.; Bloom, E.; Bulos, F.; Cords, D.; Dib, C.; Dorfan, J.; Dunietz, I.; Gilman, F.; Godfrey, G.; Hyer, T.; Jensen, G.; Leith, D.; Marsiske, H.; Nir, Y.; Lee-Franzini, J.

    1989-10-01

    A high-luminosity asymmetric energy B Factory, proposed as an upgrade to the PEP storage ring at SLAC, provides the best opportunity to study CP violation as a means of testing the consistency of the Standard Model. If the phenomenon of CP violation is xplained by the Standard Model simply through the non-zero angles and phase of the Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix, then there are precise relations between the K-M parameters and the various measurable CP-violating asymmetries in B meson decay. Should these onsistency relations fail, the origin of CP violation must lie outside the Standard Model framework. Our measurements would then lead to the first experiment-driven extensions of the Standard Model. The B Factory will also carry out a varied, high-quality program of studies f other aspects of the physics of b quarks, as well as high-precision measurements in r and charm physics. We describe a detailed series of measurements to be carried out in the first few years at a peak luminosity of 3 x 10{sup 33} cm{sup -2}sec{sup -1}, the initial luminosity goal of the B Factory, as well as the program accessible to a larger data sample.

  18. Development of Modulator Pulse Stability Measurement Device and Test Results at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, C.; Burkhart, C.; Kemp, M.; Morris, B.; Beukers, T.; Ciprian, R.; Nguyen, M.; /SLAC

    2011-08-19

    In this paper, the development of a pulse stability measurement device is presented. The measurement accuracy is better than 250uV, about 4.2ppm of a typical 60V input pulse. Pulse signals up to +/- 80V peak can be measured. The device works together with an oscilloscope. The primary function of the measurement device is to provide a precision offset, such that variations in the flattop of the modulator voltage pulse can be accurately resolved. The oscilloscope records the difference between the pulse flattop and the reference for a series of waveforms. The scope math functions are utilized to calculate the rms variations over the series. The frequency response of the device is characterized by the measured cutoff frequency of about 6.5MHz. In addition to detailing the design and calibration of the precision pulse stability device, measurements of SLAC line-type linac modulators and recently developed induction modulators will be presented. Factors affecting pulse stability will be discussed.

  19. Preliminary Results from the UCLA/SLAC Ultra-High Gradient CerenkovWakefield Accelerator Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, M.C.; Badakov, H.; Rosenzweig, J.B.; Travish, G.; Hogan, M.; Ischebeck, R.; Kirby, N.; Siemann, R.; Walz, D.; Muggli, P.; Scott, A.; Yoder, R.; /Manhattan Coll., Riverdale

    2008-02-06

    The first phase of an experiment to study the performance of dielectric Cerenkov wakefield accelerating structures at extremely high gradients in the GV/m range has been completed. This experiment takes advantage of the unique SLAC FFTB electron beam and its demonstrated ultra-short pulse lengths and high currents (e.g., {sigma}{sub z} = 20 {micro}m at Q = 3 nC). The FFTB electron beam has been successfully focused down and sent through varying lengths of fused silica capillary tubing with two different sizes: ID = 200 {micro}m/OD = 325 {micro}m and ID = 100 {micro}m/OD = 325 {micro}m. The pulse length of the electron beam was varied in the range 20 {micro}m < {sigma}{sub z} < 100 {micro}m which produced a range of electric fields between 2 and 20 GV/m at the inner surface of the dielectric tubes. We observed a sharp increase in optical emissions from the capillaries in the middle part of this surface field range which we believe indicates the transition between sustainable field levels and breakdown. If this initial interpretation is correct, the surfaced fields that were sustained equate to on axis accelerating field of several GV/m. In future experiments we plan to collect and measure coherent Cerenkov radiation emitted from the capillary tube to gain more information about the strength of the accelerating fields.

  20. An Exploration of Analysis Software at SLAC through the Study of X(3872)

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, A.

    2004-09-03

    X(3872), a particle discovered by Belle Labs, has not yet been described in a sufficient enough way by any group to draw definitive conclusions about it. In order to verify the claims of Belle Labs and learn more about X(3872), Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (henceforth SLAC) has undertaken a project to analyze the particle, a subgroup of the BaBar project. The computing systems involved are complex; the tutorials for the software and new software releases both need constant testing and revision. Using a new software release, I tested tutorials for various software used by the BaBar group, including UNIX, Root, and CM2, in an effort to eventually analyze X(3872) data. The offline workbook for the BaBar software needs to be better maintained, and the CM2 tutorials need to be modified and updated. While none of my results contributed directly to the project (i.e. I have no results that add to information about X(3872)), improvement of the tutorials will streamline integration of new scientists into the BaBar group.

  1. Passive Performance Monitoring and Traffic Characteristics on the SLAC Internet Border

    SciTech Connect

    Logg, Connie A

    2002-05-01

    Understanding how the Internet is used by HEP is critical to optimizing the performance of the inter-lab computing environment. Typically use requirements have been defined by discussions between collaborators. However, later analysis of the actual traffic has shown this is often misunderstood and actual use is significantly different to that predicted. Passive monitoring of the real traffic provides insight into the true communications requirements and the performance of a large number of inter-communicating nodes. It may be useful in identifying performance problems that are due to factors other than Internet congestion, especially when compared to other methods such as active monitoring where traffic is generated specifically to measure its performance. Controlled active monitoring between dedicated servers often gives an indication of what can be achieved on a network. Passive monitoring of the real traffic gives a picture of the true performance. This paper will discuss the method and results of collecting and analyzing flows of data obtained from the SLAC Internet border. The unique nature of HEP traffic and the needs of the HEP community will be highlighted. The insights this has brought to understanding the network will be reviewed and the benefit it can bring to engineering networks will be discussed.

  2. PD Pathways: Attending a Science Institute

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashmann, Scott; Marcou, Darcy; Lange, Melissa; Konitzer, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    For two weeks during Summer 2009, three elementary school teachers--Darcy Marcou, Melissa Lange, and Andrea Konitzer--participated in a science institute directed by Scott Ashmann, a science education professor at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay. The purpose of this institute for elementary school teachers was to learn (a) more about Earth…

  3. A combined analysis of SLAC experiments on deep inelastic e-p and e-d scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Whitlow, L.W.; Bodek, A.; deBarbaro, P.; Dasu, S.; Harada, H.; Krasny, M.W.; Lang, K.; Riordan, E.M.; Rock, S.; Arnold, R.; Benton, D.; Bosted, P.; Button-Shafer, J.; deChambrier, G.; Clogher, L.; Lung, A.; Szalata, Z.M.; Alster, J.; Debebe, B.; Hicks, R.; Dietrich, F.; Van Bibber, K.; Filippone, B.; Jourdan, J.; Milner, R.; McKeown, R.; Potterveld, D.; Walker, R.C.; Gearhart, R.; Para, A.

    1989-08-01

    We report recent work on the extraction of R = {sigma}{sub L}/{sigma}{sub T} and the structure function F{sub 2} over a large kinematic range, which is based on a reanalysis of deep inelastic {var_epsilon} {minus} p and {var_epsilon} {minus} d scattering cross sections measured at SLAC between 1970 and 1985. All these data were corrected for radiative effects using improved versions of external and internal radiative correction procedures. The data from seven individual experiments were normalized to those from the recent high-precision SLAC experiment E140. We find that R{sub p} = R{sub d}, as expected in QCD. The value of R is higher than predicted by QCD even when target-mass effects are included. This difference indicates that additional dynamical higher-twist effects may be present. The structure functions F{sub 2}p and F{sub 2}d were also extracted from the full data sets of normalized cross sections using an empirical fit to R. These structure functions were then compared with data from the CERN muon scattering experiments BCDMS and EMC. We find that our data are consistent with the EMC data, if the latter are multiplied by a normalization factor of 1.07. No single, uniform normalization factor can be applied to the BCDMS data that will bring them into agreement with the SLAC data in the region of overlap.

  4. A combined analysis of SLAC experiments on deep inelastic e-p and e-d scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Whitlow, L.W. ); Bodek, A.; deBarbaro, P.; Dasu, S.; Harada, H.; Krasny, M.W.; Lang, K.; Riordan, E.M. ); Rock, S.; Arnold, R.; Benton, D.; Bosted, P.; Button-Shafer, J.; deChambrier, G.; Clogher, L.; Lung, A.; Szalata, Z.M. ); Alster, J. ); Debebe, B.; Hicks, R. (Massach

    1989-08-01

    We report recent work on the extraction of R = {sigma}{sub L}/{sigma}{sub T} and the structure function F{sub 2} over a large kinematic range, which is based on a reanalysis of deep inelastic {var epsilon} {minus} p and {var epsilon} {minus} d scattering cross sections measured at SLAC between 1970 and 1985. All these data were corrected for radiative effects using improved versions of external and internal radiative correction procedures. The data from seven individual experiments were normalized to those from the recent high-precision SLAC experiment E140. We find that R{sub p} = R{sub d}, as expected in QCD. The value of R is higher than predicted by QCD even when target-mass effects are included. This difference indicates that additional dynamical higher-twist effects may be present. The structure functions F{sub 2}p and F{sub 2}d were also extracted from the full data sets of normalized cross sections using an empirical fit to R. These structure functions were then compared with data from the CERN muon scattering experiments BCDMS and EMC. We find that our data are consistent with the EMC data, if the latter are multiplied by a normalization factor of 1.07. No single, uniform normalization factor can be applied to the BCDMS data that will bring them into agreement with the SLAC data in the region of overlap.

  5. Summer Drying Under Enhanced Greenhouse Gas Warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roesch, A.; Wild, M.; Tschuck, P.

    2005-12-01

    Present day climate and future climate projections from the latest version of the Max Planck Institute GCM, ECHAM5, at T106 resolution are used to investigate changes in the near-surface climate, focusing on summer in Europe. For the control climate, ECHAM5 has been integrated over the period 1961 to 1990, using sea surface temperature (SST) and sea ice cover (SIC) provided by the EU project PRUDENCE. Projections of future climate are based on the SRES scenario A2 from 2071-2100. SST and SIC were inferred from a coupled transient experiment carried out at the Hadley Centre with HadCM3. In summer, precipitation in the future climate integration decreases over most of continental Europe excluding Northern Scandinavia. This leads to a distinct decrease in soil moisture, with maximum absolute changes in Central Europe and Northern Spain. The highest negative signal in evaporation is found over Southern Europe where water is already limited under present-day climate conditions. This feature is closely related to the strong decrease of the water stress factor south of approximately 46N. The Bowen ratio will decline by more than 3 during the pronounced summer drying in Southern Spain, South Italy and Greece, implying a reduced evaporative cooling and thus a strong warming. In contrast, water hardly becomes a limiting factor in Central and Northern Europe in summer. The variability of summer temperatures generally increases slightly over Central Europe. Additionally, the widening of the statistical distribution exceeds 20% in major parts in Southern Europe since these areas are more often affected by summer droughts. For precipitation, the coefficient of variance (the standard deviation divided by its mean) increases by more than 100% over major parts of the Iberian Peninsula, indicating that the normalized precipitation variability significantly increases over the strongly water-limited region. In winter, ECHAM5 simulates a water-limited climate only in a minor part of

  6. Quality of Summer Teachers Examined

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawchuk, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    A hefty body of evidence documents the phenomenon of "summer learning loss," but consensus on the attributes of effective summer intervention, especially when it comes to access to high-quality teaching for students most at risk of falling behind, is only starting to emerge. Now, though, a handful of districts are beginning to wrestle with the…

  7. Special Handbook: The Summer Scholar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thaler, Pat Koch; Shapiro, Sonya

    1978-01-01

    No longer is summer ushered in with that old "no more lessons, no more books" refrain. There are plenty of vacation learning opportunities--in and around New York, at college campuses, and even abroad--for all age groups. Here is a roundup of this summer's offerings. (Editor)

  8. Evaluation of Summer Bridge Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia, Lisa D.; Paz, Chiara C.

    2009-01-01

    Many colleges and universities in the United States offer summer programs for their incoming students. While programs are structured and administered in a variety of ways and target various student populations, the most common type of summer bridge program aims to serve historically underrepresented students and students of low socioeconomic…

  9. A Good Start? The Impact of Texas' Developmental Summer Bridge Program on Student Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wathington, Heather; Pretlow, Joshua; Barnett, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    Summer bridge programs have long been utilized by postsecondary institutions to improve the college readiness of students; however, the research on their effectiveness is limited. This study presents evidence from an experimental study of one summer bridge program model specifically designed for recent high school graduates who placed into…

  10. Application Deadlines - CPFP Summer Curriculum in Cancer Prevention Courses 2016 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Cancer Prevention Fellowship Program (CPFP) is now accepting applications for the Summer Curriculum in Cancer Prevention until February 26, 2016 for international applicants and March 15, 2016 for domestic applicants. For more information and to apply, please visit: cpfp.cancer.gov/summer. |

  11. The Transmembrane Region of Guard Cell SLAC1 Channels Perceives CO2 Signals via an ABA-Independent Pathway in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yoshiko; Negi, Juntaro; Wang, Cun; Isogai, Yasuhiro; Schroeder, Julian I; Iba, Koh

    2016-02-01

    The guard cell S-type anion channel, SLOW ANION CHANNEL1 (SLAC1), a key component in the control of stomatal movements, is activated in response to CO2 and abscisic acid (ABA). Several amino acids existing in the N-terminal region of SLAC1 are involved in regulating its activity via phosphorylation in the ABA response. However, little is known about sites involved in CO2 signal perception. To dissect sites that are necessary for the stomatal CO2 response, we performed slac1 complementation experiments using transgenic plants expressing truncated SLAC1 proteins. Measurements of gas exchange and stomatal apertures in the truncated transgenic lines in response to CO2 and ABA revealed that sites involved in the stomatal CO2 response exist in the transmembrane region and do not require the SLAC1 N and C termini. CO2 and ABA regulation of S-type anion channel activity in guard cells of the transgenic lines confirmed these results. In vivo site-directed mutagenesis experiments targeted to amino acids within the transmembrane region of SLAC1 raise the possibility that two tyrosine residues exposed on the membrane are involved in the stomatal CO2 response.

  12. Institution Closures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayden, Mary F., Ed.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    This newsletter theme issue focuses on the need to accelerate the closing of institutions for people with mental retardation. Articles are by both current and former residents of institutions and by professionals, and include: "The Realities of Institutions" (Tia Nelis); "I Cry Out So That I Won't Go Insane" (Mary F. Hayden); "Trends in…

  13. Design of the SLAC RCE Platform: A General Purpose ATCA Based Data Acquisition System

    SciTech Connect

    Herbst, R.; Claus, R.; Freytag, M.; Haller, G.; Huffer, M.; Maldonado, S.; Nishimura, K.; O'Grady, C.; Panetta, J.; Perazzo, A.; Reese, B.; Ruckman, L.; Thayer, J. G.; Weaver, M.

    2015-01-23

    The SLAC RCE platform is a general purpose clustered data acquisition system implemented on a custom ATCA compliant blade, called the Cluster On Board (COB). The core of the system is the Reconfigurable Cluster Element (RCE), which is a system-on-chip design based upon the Xilinx Zynq family of FPGAs, mounted on custom COB daughter-boards. The Zynq architecture couples a dual core ARM Cortex A9 based processor with a high performance 28nm FPGA. The RCE has 12 external general purpose bi-directional high speed links, each supporting serial rates of up to 12Gbps. 8 RCE nodes are included on a COB, each with a 10Gbps connection to an on-board 24-port Ethernet switch integrated circuit. The COB is designed to be used with a standard full-mesh ATCA backplane allowing multiple RCE nodes to be tightly interconnected with minimal interconnect latency. Multiple shelves can be clustered using the front panel 10-gbps connections. The COB also supports local and inter-blade timing and trigger distribution. An experiment specific Rear Transition Module adapts the 96 high speed serial links to specific experiments and allows an experiment-specific timing and busy feedback connection. This coupling of processors with a high performance FPGA fabric in a low latency, multiple node cluster allows high speed data processing that can be easily adapted to any physics experiment. RTEMS and Linux are both ported to the module. The RCE has been used or is the baseline for several current and proposed experiments (LCLS, HPS, LSST, ATLAS-CSC, LBNE, DarkSide, ILC-SiD, etc).

  14. The Summer of Hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, Philip

    2008-01-01

    Ground crew veterans at Kennedy Space Center still talk about what they call "the summer of hydrogen"-the long, frustrating months in 1990 when the shuttle fleet was grounded by an elusive hydrogen leak that foiled our efforts to fill the orbiter's external fuel tank. Columbia (STS-35) was on Launch Pad A for a scheduled May 30 launch when we discovered the hydrogen leak during - tanking. The external fuel tank is loaded through the orbiter. Liquid hydrogen flows through a 17-inch umbilical between the orbiter and the tank. During fueling, we purge the aft fuselage with gaseous nitrogen to reduce the risk of fire, and we have a leak-detection system in the mobile launch platform, which samples (via tygon tubing) the atmosphere in and around the vehicle, drawing it down to a mass spectrometer that analyzes its composition. When we progressed to the stage of tanking where liquid hydrogen flows through the vehicle, the concentration of hydrogen approached four percent-the limit above which it would be dangerously flammable. We had a leak. We did everything we could think of to find it, and the contractor who supplied the flight hardware was there every day, working alongside us. We did tanking tests, which involved instrumenting the suspected leak sources, and cryo-loaded the external tank to try to isolate precisely where the leak originated. We switched out umbilicals; we replaced the seals between the umbilical and the orbiter. We inspected the seals microscopically and found no flaws. We replaced the recirculation pumps, and we found and replaced a damaged teflon seal in a main propulsion system detent cover, which holds the prevalve-the main valve supplying hydrogen to Space Shuttle Main Engine 3 -in the open position. The seal passed leak tests at ambient temperature but leaked when cryogenic temperatures were applied. We added new leak sensors-up to twenty at a time and tried to be methodical in our placements to narrow down the possible sources of the problem

  15. The year without a summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luterbacher, J.; Pfister, C.

    2015-04-01

    The 1815 eruption of Tambora caused an unusually cold summer in much of Europe in 1816. The extreme weather led to poor harvests and malnutrition, but also demonstrated the capability of humans to adapt and help others in worse conditions.

  16. Goddard Summer Interns: Danielle Wood

    NASA Video Gallery

    Profile of Goddard intern Danielle Wood. Danielle is interning at Goddard in the Innovative Partnerships Program and at NASA Headquarters in the Office of the Chief Technologist in the summer of 20...

  17. Potentials Unlimited: A Summer Happening.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Croskery, Beverly; Marten, Mary Elizabeth

    1980-01-01

    The article describes Potentials Unlimited, a summer camp program for gifted intermediate grade students in Cincinnati, Ohio. Aspects covered include priorities in selecting curricular activities and some of the camp activities themselves. (DLS)

  18. Goddard Summer Interns: Andy Ryan

    NASA Video Gallery

    Andy Ryan is an intern staff assistant with the Lunar and Planetary Science Academy. This summer the LPSA traveled to the Channeled Scablands of eastern Washington to study and map the geology of t...

  19. The Summer Robotic Autonomy Course

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nourbakhsh, Illah R.

    2002-01-01

    We offered a first Robotic Autonomy course this summer, located at NASA/Ames' new NASA Research Park, for approximately 30 high school students. In this 7-week course, students worked in ten teams to build then program advanced autonomous robots capable of visual processing and high-speed wireless communication. The course made use of challenge-based curricula, culminating each week with a Wednesday Challenge Day and a Friday Exhibition and Contest Day. Robotic Autonomy provided a comprehensive grounding in elementary robotics, including basic electronics, electronics evaluation, microprocessor programming, real-time control, and robot mechanics and kinematics. Our course then continued the educational process by introducing higher-level perception, action and autonomy topics, including teleoperation, visual servoing, intelligent scheduling and planning and cooperative problem-solving. We were able to deliver such a comprehensive, high-level education in robotic autonomy for two reasons. First, the content resulted from close collaboration between the CMU Robotics Institute and researchers in the Information Sciences and Technology Directorate and various education program/project managers at NASA/Ames. This collaboration produced not only educational content, but will also be focal to the conduct of formative and summative evaluations of the course for further refinement. Second, CMU rapid prototyping skills as well as the PI's low-overhead perception and locomotion research projects enabled design and delivery of affordable robot kits with unprecedented sensory- locomotory capability. Each Trikebot robot was capable of both indoor locomotion and high-speed outdoor motion and was equipped with a high-speed vision system coupled to a low-cost pan/tilt head. As planned, follow the completion of Robotic Autonomy, each student took home an autonomous, competent robot. This robot is the student's to keep, as she explores robotics with an extremely capable tool in the

  20. Reconstitution of CO2 Regulation of SLAC1 Anion Channel and Function of CO2-Permeable PIP2;1 Aquaporin as CARBONIC ANHYDRASE4 Interactor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cun; Hu, Honghong; Qin, Xue; Zeise, Brian; Xu, Danyun; Rappel, Wouter-Jan; Boron, Walter F; Schroeder, Julian I

    2016-02-01

    Dark respiration causes an increase in leaf CO2 concentration (Ci), and the continuing increases in atmospheric [CO2] further increases Ci. Elevated leaf CO2 concentration causes stomatal pores to close. Here, we demonstrate that high intracellular CO2/HCO3 (-) enhances currents mediated by the Arabidopsis thaliana guard cell S-type anion channel SLAC1 upon coexpression of any one of the Arabidopsis protein kinases OST1, CPK6, or CPK23 in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Split-ubiquitin screening identified the PIP2;1 aquaporin as an interactor of the βCA4 carbonic anhydrase, which was confirmed in split luciferase, bimolecular fluorescence complementation, and coimmunoprecipitation experiments. PIP2;1 exhibited CO2 permeability. Mutation of PIP2;1 in planta alone was insufficient to impair CO2- and abscisic acid-induced stomatal closing, likely due to redundancy. Interestingly, coexpression of βCA4 and PIP2;1 with OST1-SLAC1 or CPK6/23-SLAC1 in oocytes enabled extracellular CO2 enhancement of SLAC1 anion channel activity. An inactive PIP2;1 point mutation was identified that abrogated water and CO2 permeability and extracellular CO2 regulation of SLAC1 activity. These findings identify the CO2-permeable PIP2;1 as key interactor of βCA4 and demonstrate functional reconstitution of extracellular CO2 signaling to ion channel regulation upon coexpression of PIP2;1, βCA4, SLAC1, and protein kinases. These data further implicate SLAC1 as a bicarbonate-responsive protein contributing to CO2 regulation of S-type anion channels. PMID:26764375

  1. Summer Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Makidi, Nitou

    2012-01-01

    The summer of 2012 has been filled with many memorable events and activities. As an intern, I had responsibilities that had to be fulfilled. My tour of duty was completed as an administrative student trainee in the Information Technology and Communications Services Business Office (IT-A). In accordance with the Business Objectives and Agreement of the Business Office and my performance plan, I was to provide business office support, improve business, project management, and technical work processes. With this being stated, I supported a project called "The Big Move Project" (TBMP), which will take course over the next several years. The Big Move Project is the planning of the Information Technology (IT) Directorate's relocation to various buildings in the course of upcoming years, when designs and the building of Central Campus have been completed. Working directly with my supervisor and the project manager, I was responsible for gathering both administrative and operational area requirements for the Information Technology (IT) Directorate, along with its outsourced support and contractors, such as IMCS, NICS, and ACES. My first action was to create rubrics that will serve as a guideline for the information that should be given by each branch of IT. After receiving that information via a few KAITS actions, I was able to start the consolidation process, and begin working on a presentation. A SharePoint was created shortly after for others to view the progression of the project, which I managed. During the consolidation ofthis information, I would occasionally present to the IT Deputy Director and IT Chiefs. The draft of this presentation was shown to employees of Center Operations (T A) and stakeholders-IT Chief Officers and contractor managers-in the relocation of IT to make them aware of what requirements must be met that will enable IT to be accommodated appropriately in the design of Central Campus Phase 11-the time in which IT and its contractors are scheduled

  2. NASA-ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prahl, Joseph M.; Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Montegani, Francis J.

    1996-01-01

    During the summer of 1996, a ten-week Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted at the NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) in collaboration with Case Western Reserve University (CWRU), and the Ohio Aerospace Institute (OAI). This is the thirty-third summer of this program at Lewis. It was one of nine summer programs sponsored by NASA in 1996, at various field centers under the auspices of the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE). The objectives of the program are: (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science educators, (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA, (3) to enrich and refresh the research activities of participants' institutions. (4) to contribute to the research objectives of LeRC. This report is intended to recapitulate the activities comprising the 1996 Lewis Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, to summarize evaluations by the participants, and to make recommendations regarding future programs.

  3. [Bilateral SLAC (scapholunate advanced collapse) wrist: an unusual entity. Apropos of a 7000-year-old prehistoric case].

    PubMed

    Masmejean, E; Dutour, O; Touam, C; Oberlin, C

    1997-01-01

    SLAC (Scapho-Lunate Advanced Collapse) wrist is the most common form of osteoarthritis of the wrist. The main aetiology is ligamentous rotary subluxation of the scaphoid. The authors report on a case of bilateral SLAC wrist, identified on a prehistoric skeleton derived from the Hassi-el-Abiod site in the malian Sahara (Dutour, 1989). The paleopathological study consisted of macroscopic examination and radiological examination. Radiocarbon dating situated this human occupation to 7 thousand years ago. The diseases observed included bilateral radiocarpal lesions in an adult male individual. The degree of preservation of the carpal skeleton was 90%. Lesions were bilateral, but predominantly affected the right side. The radial styloid processes presented a lateral osteophytic cuff, giving a tapered "pen-nib" appearance. The scaphoid has a normal shape, but presented posterior and lateral osteophytes. The scaphoid surfaces of the two distal extremities of the radius and the corresponding parts of the scaphoid showed characteristic polishing. X-rays showed a band of condensation corresponding to the ivory region on the articular surfaces. In this case, the bilateral nature and the absence of any obvious macrotraumatic aetiology suggest that the only aetiology was progressive and bilateral ligamentous distension, due to repeated microtrauma analogous to that observed in sports disease (volley-ball) or in occupational diseases (jackhammer). The manufacture of stone tools (carved or polished) can be incriminated in the pathogenesis of these lesions. These lesions are therefore useful markers of repeated microtraumatic activities or "activity markers". The is the first paleopathological description and the oldest known case of bilateral SLAC wrist.

  4. Observation and Characterization of Coherent Optical Radiation and Microbunching Instability in the SLAC Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Weathersby, S.; Dunning, M.; Hast, C.; Jobe, K.; McCormick, D.; Nelson, J.; Xiang, D.; /SLAC

    2011-06-02

    The NLC Test Accelerator (NLCTA) at SLAC is currently configured for a proof-of-principle echo-enabled harmonic generation (EEHG) experiment using an 120 MeV beam. During commissioning, unexpected coherent optical undulator radiation (CUR) and coherent optical transition radiation (COTR) was observed when beam is accelerated off-crest and compressed after the chicanes. The CUR and COTR is likely due to a microbunching instability where the initial small ripples in cathode drive laser is compressed and amplified. In this paper we present the observation and characterization of the CUR, COTR and microbunching instability at NLCTA.

  5. Measurements of Transverse Emittance Growth due to Coherent Synchrotron Radiation in the SLAC SPPS Bunch Compressor Chicane

    SciTech Connect

    Emma, Paul J

    2003-06-20

    A four-dipole bunch compressor chicane has recently been installed in the SLAC linac at 9 GeV and is capable of compressing a 3.4-nC electron bunch to an rms length of 50 microns, resulting in a peak current of nearly 10 kA [1]. The electron bunch is extracted from a damping ring with normalized horizontal emittance of {approx} 30 {micro}m. We present preliminary measurements of the initial and final emittance in the chicane and compare these to 1D and 3D calculations of the effects of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR).

  6. NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hosler, E. Ramon (Editor); Valdes, Carol (Editor); Brown, Tom (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    This document is a collection of technical reports on research conducted by the participants in the 1993 NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program at KSC. The basic common objectives of the Program are: to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA centers. 1993 topics include wide band fiber optic communications, a prototype expert/information system for examining environmental risks of KSC activities, alternatives to premise wiring using ATM and microcellular technologies, rack insertion end effector (RIEE) automation, FTIR quantification of industrial hydraulic fluids in perchloroethylene, switch configuration for migration to optical fiber network, and more.

  7. NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    SciTech Connect

    Hosler, E.R.; Valdes, C.; Brown, T.

    1993-10-01

    This document is a collection of technical reports on research conducted by the participants in the 1993 NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program at KSC. The basic common objectives of the Program are: to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA centers. 1993 topics include wide band fiber optic communications, a prototype expert/information system for examining environmental risks of KSC activities, alternatives to premise wiring using ATM and microcellular technologies, rack insertion end effector (RIEE) automation, FTIR quantification of industrial hydraulic fluids in perchloroethylene, switch configuration for migration to optical fiber network, and more. Separate abstracts have been indexed into the data base for articles from this report.

  8. Los Alamos Space Weather Summer School

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koller, J.

    2011-12-01

    Los Alamos National Lab recently initiated a new summer school specializing on space science, space weather, and instrumentation. The school is geared towards graduate level students and has been established to bring graduate students together with internationally recognized scientists at the Los Alamos National Lab. Students are receiving a prestigious Vela Fellowship to cover relocation expenses and cost of living for the duration of their stay in Los Alamos. For two months students have the opportunity to attend science lectures given by distinguished researchers at LANL. Topics are related to space weather research including plasma physics, radiation belts, numerical modeling, solar wind physics, spacecraft charging, and instrumentation. Students are also working closely with a Los Alamos mentor on exciting space weather science topics with access to Los Alamos GPS and geosynchronous data. The summer school concludes with project presentations by the students in a technical forum. The program is designed for graduate students currently enrolled at US Universities and open to all nationalities. We are presenting an overview of this exciting new program funded by IGPP (Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics), the Global Security Directorate, and the Directorate for Science, Technology and Engineering at Los Alamos National Lab.

  9. [Institutional Renewal].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Peggy, Ed.

    1983-01-01

    The theme of this journal issue is "Institutional Renewal." Projects designed to address the issues of the 1980s at 18 colleges are described, and 15 definitions of institutional renewal are presented. Participating colleges were provided expert advice through the Association of American College's (AAC) Project Lodestar (renamed Consultation and…

  10. Institutional History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kohlstedt, Sally Gregory

    1985-01-01

    Discusses recent work on scientific institutions in the United States, indicating that although historians have explored the origins of institutions, few have pursued these organizations into their later and perhaps equally complex years. Learned/professional organizations, museums, publications, and philanthropy are among the major topic areas…

  11. Mathematics Intensive Summer Session (MISS). Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-11-01

    This final technical report appears in two parts: the report for the 1995 summer MISS program and the report for the 1996 summer MISS program. Copies of the US Department of Energy Pre-Freshman Enrichment Program 1995 Entry Form and 1996 Entry Form completed by all participants were sent to the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education in the fall of 1995 and 1996 respectively. Those forms are on file should they be needed. Attached also is a copy of the Summary of ideas for panel discussions, problem-solving sessions, or small group discussions presented at the Department of Energy Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education Pre-Freshman Enrichment Program Project Directors Meeting held in San Antonio, TX, November 12--14, 1995.

  12. Summer Fun in the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, D.; Noldon, D.

    2002-05-01

    We report here on the development of a program to incorporate a math/science component, emphasizing space science and solar physics, into an existing set of summer activities sponsored by the National Youth Sports Program (NYSP). NYSP provides summer sports and classroom training components to youth whose families fall within federal poverty guidelines. Recently, a partnership between Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Lab. and Chabot Community College received NASA IDEAS funding to develop a summer curriculum in math and science to augment the already successful program. This provides an opportunity to significantly enhance the experience of the participating students by giving them access to the latest in space data and direct interaction with space scientists. This paper discusses our goals, our approach and the current status of our curricular materials. We would like to acknowledge funding by the National Youth Sports Program and NASA IDEAS.

  13. Hottest summers the new normal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camargo, Suzana J.; Seth, Anji

    2016-08-01

    With the rise in temperature due to anthropogenic climate change, the occurrence of hot summers, temperature extremes and heat waves is increasing globally. Projections for the coming decades to century indicate increases in the occurrence, magnitude and duration of these events. In a recent paper, Mueller et al (2016 Environ. Res. Lett. 11 044011) showed that half of summers are expected to be ‘hot’ (warmer than the warmest on record) across much of the world in one or two decades. While these results are consistent with earlier work, what is new here includes (i) an earlier timing of emergence of the hot summer signal and (ii) additional confidence due to the rigorous statistical examination of the observations and the analyses of the latest improved suite of model experiments. The potential impacts of these projections on society are extremely serious.

  14. Summer Ice and Carbon Dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukla, G.; Gavin, J.

    1981-10-01

    The extent of Antarctic pack ice in the summer, as charted from satellite imagery, decreased by 2.5 million square kilometers between 1973 and 1980. The U.S. Navy and Russian atlases and whaling and research ship reports from the 1930's indicate that summer ice conditions earlier in this century were heavier than the current average. Surface air temperatures along the seasonally shifting belt of melting snow between 55 degrees and 80 degrees N during spring and summer were higher in 1974 to 1978 than in 1934 to 1938. The observed departures in the two hemispheres qualitatively agree with the predicted impact of an increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide. However, since it is not known to what extent the changes in snow and ice cover and in temperature can be explained by the natural variability of the climate system or by other processes unrelated to carbon dioxide, a cause-and-effect relation cannot yet be established.

  15. Summer ice and carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Kukla, G.; Gavin, J.

    1981-10-30

    The extent of Antarctic pack ice in the summer, as charted from satellite imagery, decreased by 2.5 million square kilometers between 1973 and 1980. The U.S. Navy and Russian atlases and whaling and reseach ship reports from the 1930's indicate that summer ice conditions earlier in this century were heavier than the current average. Surface air temperatures along the seasonally shifting belt of melting snow between 55/sup o/ and 80/sup o/N during spring and summer were higher in 1974 to 1978 than in 1934 to 1938. The observed departures in the two hemispheres qualitatively agree with the predicted impact of an increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide. However, since it is not known to what extent the changes in snow and ice cover and in temperature can be explained by the natural variability of the climate system or by other processes unrelated to carbon dioxide, a cause-and-effect relation cannot yet be established.

  16. International Summer School, ‘ From Genome to Life’

    PubMed Central

    2002-01-01

    This report from the International Summer School ‘From Genome to Life’, held at the Institute d'Etudes Scientifiques de Cargèse in Corsica in July 2002, covers the talks of the invited speakers. The topics of the talks can be broadly grouped into the areas of genome annotation, comparative and evolutionary genomics, functional genomics, proteomics, structural genomics, pharmacogenomics, and organelle genomes, epigenetics and RNA. PMID:18629253

  17. Development of Cellulosic Biofuels (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    ScienceCinema

    Somerville, Chris [Director, Energy Biosciences Institute

    2016-07-12

    Summer Lecture Series 2007: Chris Somerville, Director of the Energy Biosciences Institute and an award-winning plant biochemist with Berkeley Lab's Physical Biosciences Division, is a leading authority on the structure and function of plant cell walls. He discusses an overview of some of the technical challenges associated with the production of cellulosic biofuels, which will require an improved understanding of a diverse range of topics in fields such as agronomy, chemical engineering, microbiology, structural biology, genomics, environmental sciences, and socioeconomics.

  18. Interannual and Interdecadal Variability of Thailand Summer Monsoon Season.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singhrattna, Nkrintra; Rajagopalan, Balaji; Krishna Kumar, K.; Clark, Martyn

    2005-06-01

    Summer monsoon rains are a critical factor in Thailand's water resources and agricultural planning and management. In fact, they have a significant impact on the country's economic health. Consequently, understanding the variability of the summer monsoon rains over Thailand is important for instituting effective mitigating strategies against extreme rainfall fluctuations. To this end, the authors systematically investigated the relationships between summer monsoon precipitation from the central and northern regions of Thailand and large-scale climate features. It was found that Pacific sea surface temperatures (SSTs), in particular, El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), have a negative relationship with the summer monsoon rainfall over Thailand in recent decades. However, the relationship between summer rainfall and ENSO was weak prior to 1980. It is hypothesized that the ENSO teleconnection depends on the SST configuration in the tropical Pacific Ocean, that is, an eastern Pacific-based El Niño pattern, such as is the case in most of the post-1980 El Niño events, tends to place the descending limb of the Walker circulation over the Thailand-Indonesian region, thereby significantly reducing convection and consequently, rainfall over Thailand. It is believed that this recent shift in the Walker circulation is instrumental for the nonstationarity in ENSO-monsoon relationships in Thailand. El Niños of 1997 and 2002 corroborate this hypothesis. This has implications for monsoon rainfall forecasting and, consequently, for resources planning and management.

  19. Research and Development Toward a 4.5-1.5 {Angstrom} Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Tatchyn, R.; Arthur, J.; Baltay, M.

    1995-08-01

    In recent years significant studies have been initiated on the feasibility of utilizing a portion of the 3km S-band accelerator at SLAC to drive a short wavelength (4.5-1.5 A) Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), a Free Electron Laser (FEL) operating in the Self- Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE) regime. Electron beam requirements for single-pass saturation in a minimal time include: (1) a peak current in the 7 kA range, (2) a relative energy spread of {lt}0.05%, and (3) a transverse emittance, {epsilon}[r-m], approximating the diffraction limit condition {epsilon} = {lambda} / 4{pi}, where lambda(m) is the output wavelength. Requirements on the insertion device include field error levels of 0.02% for keeping the electron bunch centered on and in phase with the amplified photons, and a focusing beta of 8 m/rad for inhibiting the dilution of its transverse density. Although much progress has been made in developing individual components and beam processing techniques necessary for LCLS operation down to approx. 20 A, a substantial amount of research and development is still required in a number of theoretical and experimental areas leading to the construction and operation of a 4.5-1.5 A LCLS. In this paper we report on a research and development program underway and in planning at SLAC for addressing critical questions in these areas.

  20. Picosecond Bunch length and Energy-z correlation measurements at SLAC's A-Line and End Station A

    SciTech Connect

    Molloy, Stephen; Emma, P.; Frisch, J.C.; Iverson, R.H.; Ross, M.; McCormick, D.J.; Ross, Marc C.; Walston, S.; Blackmore, V.; /Oxford U.

    2007-06-27

    We report on measurements of picosecond bunch lengths and the energy-z correlation of the bunch with a high energy electron test beam to the A-line and End Station A (ESA) facilities at SLAC. The bunch length and the energy-z correlation of the bunch are measured at the end of the linac using a synchrotron light monitor diagnostic at a high dispersion point in the A-line and a transverse RF deflecting cavity at the end of the linac. Measurements of the bunch length in ESA were made using high frequency diodes (up to 100 GHz) and pyroelectric detectors at a ceramic gap in the beamline. Modeling of the beam's longitudinal phase space through the linac and A-line to ESA is done using the 2-dimensional tracking program LiTrack, and LiTrack simulation results are compared with data. High frequency diode and pyroelectric detectors are planned to be used as part of a bunch length feedback system for the LCLS FEL at SLAC. The LCLS also plans precise bunch length and energy-z correlation measurements using transverse RF deflecting cavities.

  1. Think Summer: Early Planning, Teacher Support Boost Summer Learning Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Browne, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    A fundamental problem that continues to plague educators is the achievement gap between low-income and higher-income students. In the ongoing search for solutions, one of the more promising approaches is expanding opportunities for learning, particularly in the summer. This article describes a project funded by The Wallace Foundation that offers…

  2. CSCAPES Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Alex Pothen

    2008-10-26

    We report on the progress made by researchers of the CSCAPES Institute at Old Dominion University for the years 2007 and 2008 in the areas of research, software creation, education and training, and outreach activities.

  3. Make Summer Your Growing Season.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simons, Harriet

    1982-01-01

    Describes the opportunities available in summer workshops and graduate programs for music teachers. The impact of the workshops and programs on improving teacher effectiveness is evaluated. Criteria are included for evaluating program offerings for their usefulness to teachers. The author offers suggestions to workshop planners to improve the…

  4. Boost Reading Skills by Summer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fink, Jennifer L. W.

    2012-01-01

    The end of the school year is in sight, but it's not too late to help lower-level readers catch up. Experts across the country were asked about the most common obstacles to reading success--and effective ways to over-come them. Their insights and tips can help a teacher make a real difference before summer begins.

  5. Why Have a Summer Program?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crownover, Jerry

    1976-01-01

    Farmers, agribusinessmen, students, and the community need the help and support of a 12-month program in vocational agriculture. Experience programs, leadership training, local and county fairs, agricultural mechanics programs, teachers' organizations, student recruitment, and adult programs would suffer if summer programs are eliminated. (MS)

  6. Welcome to LANL Summer 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, Alan

    2012-06-19

    Alan Bishop, Principal Associate Director for Science, Technology & Engineering, delivers a Laboratory overview and welcome to the summer student population. Topics include LANL mission, opportunities, organization, and workforce, and the briefing concludes with a more in-depth look of the student programs.

  7. Summer Reading Goes High Tech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fink, Jennifer L. W.

    2012-01-01

    Not long ago, "summer reading" meant settling under a shady tree with a hefty book. Shady trees are still around, but books with pages can seem as out-of-date as vinyl records to many kids, especially older ones. Today, they scroll through content online, swipe pages on tablets, and manage a near-constant stream of media. Teachers can take…

  8. The Encouragement of Summer Enrollment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery, David C.

    1982-01-01

    Florida's unsuccessful statewide, 20-year effort to encourage summer enrollment began with conversion from a semester to trimester calendar, then to a quarter system, and included such incentives as tuition reduction, dormitory rate reduction, adoption of full course schedules, and mandatory enrollment. (MSE)

  9. Arctic Sea Ice, Summer 2014

    NASA Video Gallery

    An animation of daily Arctic sea ice extent in summer 2014, from March 21, 2014 to Sept. 17, 2014 – when the ice appeared to reach it’s minimum extent for the year. It’s the sixth lowest minimum se...

  10. 1988 Award Winning Summer Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Exceptional Parent, 1989

    1989-01-01

    Briefly described are four award winning summer programs including a Massachusetts Girl Scout camp which mainstreams girls with disabilities; a New York camp serving siblings of children with disabilities; a Texas camp which utilizes volunteers to serve disabled children who may have serious medical conditions; and a California camp offering…

  11. Award Winning Summer Programs--1987.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Exceptional Parent, 1988

    1988-01-01

    Four award-winning summer programs provide opportunities for disabled children. Agassiz Village integrates physically disabled, inner-city, suburban, and rural campers. Camp Challenge serves hearing-impaired children and their families. Minspeak provides hands-on experience with assistive equipment and techniques for nonspeaking children, parents,…

  12. Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC) Summer Internship Programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benthien, M. L.; Perry, S.; Jordan, T. H.

    2004-12-01

    For the eleventh consecutive year, the Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC) coordinated undergraduate research experiences in summer 2004, allowing 35 students with a broad array of backgrounds and interests to work with the world's preeminent earthquake scientists and specialists. Students participate in interdisciplinary, system-level earthquake science and information technology research, and several group activities throughout the summer. Funding for student stipends and activities is made possible by the NSF Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) program. SCEC coordinates two intern programs: The SCEC Summer Undergraduate Research Experience (SCEC/SURE) and the SCEC Undergraduate Summer in Earthquake Information Technology (SCEC/USEIT). SCEC/SURE interns work one-on-one with SCEC scientists at their institutions on a variety of earthquake science research projects. The goals of the program are to expand student participation in the earth sciences and related disciplines, encourage students to consider careers in research and education, and to increase diversity of students and researchers in the earth sciences. 13 students participated in this program in 2004. SCEC/USEIT is an NSF REU site that brings undergraduate students from across the country to the University of Southern California each summer. SCEC/USEIT interns interact in a team-oriented research environment and are mentored by some of the nation's most distinguished geoscience and computer science researchers. The goals of the program are to allow undergraduates to use advanced tools of information technology to solve problems in earthquake research; close the gap between computer science and geoscience; and engage non-geoscience majors in the application of earth science to the practical problems of reducing earthquake risk. SCEC/USEIT summer research goals are structured around a grand challenge problem in earthquake information technology. For the past three years the students have

  13. The role of supersymmetry phenomenology in particle physics

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, James D.

    2000-12-14

    Supersymmetry phenomenology is an important component of particle physics today. I provide a definition of supersymmetry phenomenology, outline the scope of its activity, and argue its legitimacy. This essay derives from a presentation given at the 2000 SLAC Summer Institute.

  14. A New Green's Function for the Wake Potential Calculation of the SLAC S-band Constant Gradient Accelerating Section

    SciTech Connect

    Novokhatski, A,; /SLAC

    2012-02-17

    The behavior of the longitudinal wake fields excited by a very short bunch in the SLAC S-band constant gradient accelerating structures has been studied. Wake potential calculations were performed for a bunch length of 10 microns using the author's code to obtain a numerical solution of Maxwell's equations in the time domain. We have calculated six accelerating sections in the series (60-ft) to find the stationary solution. While analyzing the computational results we have found a new formula for the Green's function. Wake potentials, which are calculated using this Green's function are in amazingly good agreement with numerical results over a wide range of bunch lengths. The Green's function simplifies the wake potential calculations and can be easily incorporated into the tracking codes. This is very useful for beam dynamics studies of the linear accelerators of LCLS and FACET.

  15. First Measurements of the Longitudinal Bunch Profile at SLAC Using Coherent Smith-Purcell Radiation at 28GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Blackmore, V.; Doucas, G.; Ottewell, B.; Perry, C.; Kimmitt, M.F.; Arnold, R.; Molloy, S.; Woods, M.; /SLAC

    2011-11-02

    Coherent Smith-Purcell radiation has been demonstrated as a technique for measuring the longitudinal profile of charged particles bunches in the low to intermediate energy range. However, with the advent of the International Linear Collider, the need has arisen for a non-invasive method of measuring the bunch profile at extremely high energies. Smith-Purcell radiation has been used for the first time in the multi-GeV regime to measure the longitudinal profile of the 28GeV SLAC beam. The experiment has both successfully determined the bunch length, and has also demonstrated its sensitivity to bunch profile changes. The challenges associated with this technique, and its prospects as a diagnostic tool are reported here.

  16. Complete Genomes of Bacillus coagulans S-lac and Bacillus subtilis TO-A JPC, Two Phylogenetically Distinct Probiotics

    PubMed Central

    Ramya, T. N. C.; Subramanian, Srikrishna

    2016-01-01

    Several spore-forming strains of Bacillus are marketed as probiotics due to their ability to survive harsh gastrointestinal conditions and confer health benefits to the host. We report the complete genomes of two commercially available probiotics, Bacillus coagulans S-lac and Bacillus subtilis TO-A JPC, and compare them with the genomes of other Bacillus and Lactobacillus. The taxonomic position of both organisms was established with a maximum-likelihood tree based on twenty six housekeeping proteins. Analysis of all probiotic strains of Bacillus and Lactobacillus reveal that the essential sporulation proteins are conserved in all Bacillus probiotic strains while they are absent in Lactobacillus spp. We identified various antibiotic resistance, stress-related, and adhesion-related domains in these organisms, which likely provide support in exerting probiotic action by enabling adhesion to host epithelial cells and survival during antibiotic treatment and harsh conditions. PMID:27258038

  17. Scientific Teaching Targeting Faculty from Diverse Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gregg, Christopher S.; Ales, Jo Dale; Pomarico, Steven M.; Wischusen, E. William; Siebenaller, Joseph F.

    2013-01-01

    We offered four annual professional development workshops called STAR (for Scientific Teaching, Assessment, and Resources) modeled after the National Academies Summer Institute (SI) on Undergraduate Education in Biology. In contrast to the SI focus on training faculty from research universities, STAR's target was faculty from community…

  18. ASBO Eagle Institute: A Leadership Opportunity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scharff, James

    2012-01-01

    Each summer, ASBO International conducts an Eagle Institute leadership session in the Washington, D.C., area that provides a group of about 25 participants, including Eagle Award recipients, an opportunity to network with and learn from exemplary leaders inside and outside the field of school business management. Each year, the focus of the…

  19. 78 FR 40755 - National Institute on Drug Abuse; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-08

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute on Drug Abuse; Notice of Closed Meeting... Committee: National Institute on Drug Abuse Special Emphasis Panel; NIH Summer Research Experience Programs... Officer, Office of Extramural Affairs, National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH, DHHS, Room 4245, MSC...

  20. 78 FR 37835 - National Institute on Drug Abuse; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute on Drug Abuse; Notice of Closed Meeting... Committee: National Institute on Drug Abuse Special Emphasis Panel; NIH Summer Research Experience Programs... Officer, Office of Extramural Affairs, National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH, DHHS, 6001 Executive...

  1. Artists Paint ... Summer: Grade 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herberholz, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    A humid summer haze covers the River Seine and the grassy bank where young men and boys go swimming on Sunday. Everything seems so quiet, still, and very hot. They wear hats to protect them from the hot sun. The artist Georges Seurat used warm tones to give viewers the feeling of the hot sun. Seurat was trying to catch the dazzle of hot sunlight…

  2. Chemical and Biological Summer Poisons

    PubMed Central

    Lees, Ronald E. M.

    1972-01-01

    Summer has its own special poisoning hazards for the vacationer, gardener or outdoorsman. Because of the comparative variety of accidental human poisonings from contact with these seasonal toxic substances, either artificial or natural, many family physicians are unfamiliar with their effects. Some of us, unfortunately, will be called upon to deal with them over the next few months. This article highlights some of the hazards, outlines their toxicology and summarizes the treatment of the poisoned patient. PMID:20468771

  3. SNOWMASS (DPF Community Summer Study)

    SciTech Connect

    Cronin-Hennessy, et al, Daniel

    2013-08-06

    The 2013 Community Summer Study, known as Snowmass," brought together nearly 700 physicists to identify the critical research directions for the United States particle physics program. Commissioned by the American Physical Society, this meeting was the culmination of intense work over the past year by more than 1000 physicists that defined the most important questions for this field and identified the most promising opportunities to address them. This Snowmass study report is a key resource for setting priorities in particle physics.

  4. Research and development toward a 4.5-1.5{angstrom} linac coherent light source (LCLS) at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Tatchyn, R.; Arthur, J.; Baltay, M.

    1995-12-31

    In recent years significant studies have been initiated on the theoretical and technical feasibility of utilizing a portion of the 3km S-band accelerator at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) to drive a short wavelength (4.5-1.5 {Angstrom}) Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), a Free-Electron Laser (FEL) operating in the Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE) regime. Electron beam requirements for single-pass saturation include: (1) a peak current in the 3-7 kA range, (2) a relative energy spread of <0.05%, ad (3) a transverse emittance, {epsilon}{le}{lambda}/4{pi}, where {lambda}[m] is the output wavelength. Requirements on the insertion device include field error levels of 0.1-0.2% for keeping the electron bunch centered on and in phase with the amplified photons, and a focusing beta of 4-8 m for inhibiting the dilution of its transverse density. Although much progress techniques necessary for LCLS operation down to {approximately}20 {angstrom}, a substantial amount of research and development is still required in a number of theoretical and experimental areas leading to the construction and operation of a 4.5-1.5 {angstrom} LCLS. In this paper we report on a research and development program underway and in planning at SLAC for addressing critical questions in these areas. These include the construction and operation of a linac test stand for developing laser-driven photocathode rf guns with normalized emittances approaching 1 mm-mr; development of advanced beam compression, stability, an emittance control techniques at multi-GeV energies; the construction and operation of a FEL Amplifier Test Experiment (FATE) for theoretical and experimental studies of SASE at IR wavelengths; an undulator development program to investigate superconducting, hybrid/permanent magnet (hybrid/PM), and pulsed-Cu technologies; theoretical and computational studies of high-gain FEL physics and LCLS component designs.

  5. GeoFORCE Alaska, A Successful Summer Exploring Alaska's Geology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wartes, D.

    2012-12-01

    Thirty years old this summer, RAHI, the Rural Alaska Honors Institute is a statewide, six-week, summer college-preparatory bridge program at the University of Alaska Fairbanks for Alaska Native and rural high school juniors and seniors. This summer, in collaboration with the University of Texas Austin, the Rural Alaska Honors Institute launched a new program, GeoFORCE Alaska. This outreach initiative is designed to increase the number and diversity of students pursuing STEM degree programs and entering the future high-tech workforce. It uses Earth science to entice kids to get excited about dinosaurs, volcanoes and earthquakes, and includes physics, chemistry, math, biology and other sciences. Students were recruited from the Alaska's Arctic North Slope schools, in 8th grade to begin the annual program of approximately 8 days, the summer before their 9th grade year and then remain in the program for all four years of high school. They must maintain a B or better grade average and participate in all GeoFORCE events. The culmination is an exciting field event each summer. Over the four-year period, events will include trips to Fairbanks and Anchorage, Arizona, Oregon and the Appalachians. All trips focus on Earth science and include a 100+ page guidebook, with tests every night culminating with a final exam. GeoFORCE Alaska was begun by the University of Alaska Fairbanks in partnership with the University of Texas at Austin, which has had tremendous success with GeoFORCE Texas. GeoFORCE Alaska is managed by UAF's long-standing Rural Alaska Honors Institute, that has been successfully providing intense STEM educational opportunities for Alaskan high school students for over 30 years. The program will add a new cohort of 9th graders each year for the next four years. By the summer of 2015, GeoFORCE Alaska is targeting a capacity of 160 students in grades 9th through 12th. Join us to find out more about this exciting new initiative, which is enticing young Alaska Native

  6. Hydromania: Summer Science Camp Curriculum.

    SciTech Connect

    Moura, Joan

    1995-07-01

    In 1992, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the US Department of Energy (DOE) began a collaborative pilot project with the Portland Parks and Recreation Community Schools Program and others to provide summer science camps to children in Grades 4--6. Camps run two weeks in duration between late June and mid-August. Sessions are five days per week, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. In addition to hands-on science and math curriculum, at least three field trips are incorporated into the educational learning experience. The purpose of the BPA/DOE summer camps is to make available opportunities for fun, motivating experiences in science to students who otherwise would have difficulty accessing them. This includes inner city, minority, rural and low income students. Public law 101-510, which Congress passed in 1990, authorizes DOE facilities to establish collaborative inner-city and rural partnership programs in science and math. A primary goal of the BPA summer hands on science camps is to bring affordable science camp experiences to students where they live. It uses everyday materials to engage students` minds and to give them a sense that they have succeeded through a fun hands-on learning environment.

  7. Institution Morphisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goguen, Joseph; Rosu, Grigore; Norvig, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Institutions formalize the intuitive notion of logical system, including both syntax and semantics. A surprising number of different notions of morphisim have been suggested for forming categories with institutions as objects, and a surprising variety of names have been proposed for them. One goal of this paper is to suggest a terminology that is both uniform and informative to replace the current rather chaotic nomenclature. Another goal is to investigate the properties and interrelations of these notions. Following brief expositions of indexed categories, twisted relations, and Kan extensions, we demonstrate and then exploit the duality between institution morphisms in the original sense of Goguen and Burstall, and the 'plain maps' of Meseguer, obtaining simple uniform proofs of completeness and cocompleteness for both resulting categories; because of this duality, we prefer the name 'comorphism' over 'plain map.' We next consider 'theoroidal' morphisms and comorphisims, which generalize signatures to theories, finding that the 'maps' of Meseguer are theoroidal comorphisms, while theoroidal morphisms are a new concept. We then introduce 'forward' and 'semi-natural' morphisms, and appendices discuss institutions for hidden algebra, universal algebra, partial equational logic, and a variant of order sorted algebra supporting partiality.

  8. Institutional betrayal.

    PubMed

    Smith, Carly Parnitzke; Freyd, Jennifer J

    2014-09-01

    A college freshman reports a sexual assault and is met with harassment and insensitive investigative practices leading to her suicide. Former grade school students, now grown, come forward to report childhood abuse perpetrated by clergy, coaches, and teachers--first in trickles and then in waves, exposing multiple perpetrators with decades of unfettered access to victims. Members of the armed services elect to stay quiet about sexual harassment and assault during their military service or risk their careers by speaking up. A Jewish academic struggles to find a name for the systematic destruction of his people in Nazi Germany during the Holocaust. These seemingly disparate experiences have in common trusted and powerful institutions (schools, churches, military, government) acting in ways that visit harm upon those dependent on them for safety and well-being. This is institutional betrayal. The purpose of this article is to describe psychological research that examines the role of institutions in traumatic experiences and psychological distress following these experiences. We demonstrate the ways in which institutional betrayal has been left unseen by both the individuals being betrayed as well as the field of psychology and introduce means by which to identify and address this betrayal. PMID:25197837

  9. Undignifying institutions

    PubMed Central

    Seedhouse, D; Gallagher, A

    2002-01-01

    Declarations of the importance of dignity in health care are commonplace in codes of practice and other mission statements, yet these documents never clarify dignity's meaning. Their vague aspirations are compared to comments from staff and patients about opportunities for and barriers against the promotion of dignity in elderly care institutions. These suggest that while nurses and health care assistants have an intuitive understanding of dignity, they either do not or cannot always bring it about in practice. Thus, despite stated intentions to promote dignity, it appears that the circumstances of at least some elderly care institutions cause patients to experience avoidable indignities. Such institutions are "undignifying institutions" because they fail to acknowledge dignity's basic components, focus excessively on quantifiable priorities, and have insufficient resources available to assure consistently dignifying care. As a partial solution, we argue that health workers should be taught to understand and specify the components of dignity, which will better prepare them to challenge undignifying practices and to recognise opportunities for dignity promotion. PMID:12468656

  10. Ticket to a First Class Summer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Instructor, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Eight reproducible pages are offered for teachers to use as a summer send-off package which contains activities extending from a child's backyard to outer space. A list of books for summer reading is included. (MT)

  11. Summer Travel: Plan Ahead To Stay Healthy

    MedlinePlus

    ... This Issue Features Summer Travel Strange Migrations and Killer Cramps Health Capsules How Secondhand Smoke Affects the ... healthy.” search Features Summer Travel Strange Migrations and Killer Cramps Wise Choices Links Plan for Healthy Travel ...

  12. General circulation model simulations of winter and summer sea-level pressures over North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCabe, G.J.; Legates, D.R.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, observed sea-level pressures were used to evaluate winter and summer sea-level pressures over North America simulated by the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) and the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) general circulation models. The objective of the study is to determine how similar the spatial and temporal distributions of GCM-simulated daily sea-level pressures over North America are to observed distributions. Overall, both models are better at reproducing observed within-season variance of winter and summer sea-level pressures than they are at simulating the magnitude of mean winter and summer sea-level pressures. -from Authors

  13. Summer Session: A Time for Innovation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mola, Monty

    2013-01-01

    Summer is almost here (at least for those of us who teach semesters). Many of us are taking a well-deserved break to spend time with our families, conduct research, travel, and myriad other activities. Some of us, however, will be teaching summer school. For those of us lucky enough to be teaching this summer, we have one suggestion: Be bold!…

  14. Close the Achievement Gap with Summer Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huggins, Gary

    2012-01-01

    Summer vacation from school can bring afternoons at the swimming pool, family vacations, and maybe a spirit-filled summer camp that ignites a passion for art or rock climbing. But for many children, summer also means setbacks in learning that take a tremendous toll on teaching and student performance over time. PTA leaders can make a vital…

  15. Finding Funds to Move Summer Learning Forward

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seidel, Bob

    2015-01-01

    Summer learning loss creates a permanent drag on the US education system. With the generous support of the Charles Stewart Mott Foundation, the National Summer Learning Association (NSLA) developed "Moving Summer Learning Forward: A Strategic Roadmap for Funding in Tough Times" to provide out-of-school time programs, school districts,…

  16. Evaluation of the National School Health Coordinator Leadership Institute

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ottoson, Judith M.; Streib, Greg; Thomas, John Clayton; Rivera, Mark; Stevenson, Beth

    2004-01-01

    In 1999 the American Cancer Society (ACS) launched the National School Health Coordinator Leadership Institute, a groundbreaking initiative designed to enhance and invigorate school health in the nation's schools by training individual school health coordinators to act as change agents. The Institute consisted of three, week-long summer training…

  17. Research Reports: 1984 NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, L. M. (Editor); Osborn, T. L. (Editor); Dozier, J. B. (Editor); Karr, G. R. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    A NASA/ASEE Summer Faulty Fellowship Program was conducted at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The basic objectives of the programs are: (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of the participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA Centers. The Faculty Fellows spent ten weeks at MSFC engaged in a research project compatible with their interests and background and worked in collaboration with a NASA/MSFC colleague. This document is a compilation of Fellows' reports on their research during the summer of 1984. Topics covered include: (1) data base management; (2) computational fluid dynamics; (3) space debris; (4) X-ray gratings; (5) atomic oxygen exposure; (6) protective coatings for SSME; (7) cryogenics; (8) thermal analysis measurements; (9) solar wind modelling; and (10) binary systems.

  18. Research reports: 1994 NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, L. Michael (Editor); Chappell, Charles R. (Editor); Six, Frank (Editor); Karr, Gerald R. (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    For the 30th consecutive year, a NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The basic objectives of the programs, which are in the 31st year of operation nationally, are (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA centers. The Faculty Fellows spent 10 weeks at MSFC engaged in a research project compatible with their interests and background and worked in collaboration with a NASA/MSFC colleague. This document is a compilation of Fellows' reports on their research during the summer of 1994.

  19. Research reports: 1987 NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karr, Gerald R. (Editor); Cothran, Ernestine K. (Editor); Freeman, L. Michael (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    For the 23rd consecutive year, a NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The program was conducted by the University of Alabama in Huntsville and MSFC during the period 1 June to 7 August 1987. Operated under the auspices of the American Society for Engineering Education, the MSFC program, as well as those at other NASA Centers, was sponsored by the Office of University Affairs, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C. The basic objectives of the program are: (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of the participant's institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA Centers. This document is a compilation of Fellow's reports on their research during the Summer of 1987.

  20. Research Reports: 1986 NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, L. Michael (Editor); Speer, Fridtjof A. (Editor); Cothran, Ernestine K. (Editor); Karr, Gerald R. (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    For the 22th consecutive year, a NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted for the summer of 1986 by the University of Alabama and Marshall Space Flight Center. The basic objectives of the program are: (1)to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2)to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3)to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of the participants' institution; and (4)to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA center. The Faculty Fellows spent ten weeks at MSFC engaged in a research project compatible with their interest and background and worked in collaboration with a NASA/MSFC colleague. This is a compilation of Fellows' reports on their research.

  1. Second Multiflow Summer School on Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez, Javier

    2016-04-01

    Multiflow is a research program, funded by the European Research Council, whose goal is to improve our understanding of the multiscale dynamics of turbulence in fluids. Its second Summer School on Turbulence took place at the School of Aeronautics of the Technical University of Madrid from May 25 to June 26, 2015, with the goal of providing a meeting place for theoreticians, experimentalists and simulators, in which to develop and test new ideas on turbulence physics and structure. Around forty, mostly young, participants from twenty international groups met for five weeks of collaborative work, primarily using the computational data archived in the receiving institution but, in many cases, also contributing their own. Although the format included a few invited formal seminars and periodic plenary meetings, most of the work took place in small groups that, in many cases, changed their composition during the workshop. The papers in these proceedings reflect the results of the work of these groups which, in many cases, later continued in the form of new collaborations.

  2. My Summer Internship at Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philpott, Hobert Leon

    2011-01-01

    During my summer internship at Kennedy Space Center, I worked on several projects with my mentor Grace Johnson in the Education Programs Office. My primary project was the CubeSat project in which my job was to help mentor Merritt Island High School students in the building of a CubeSat. CubeSats are picosatellites that are used to carry out auxiliary missions; they "piggy back" into orbit on launch vehicles launching primary missions. CubeSats come in the sizes of 1U (10 by 10 by 10 cm) 2U (1Ux2) and 3U (1Ux3). The Cube Sats are housed in a protective deploying device called a Poly Picosatellite Orbital Deplored (P-POD). I also participated in a Balloon Workshop with the MIHS students. This was an intense 4-day project in which we constructed a balloon satellite equipped with a camera whose main goal was to obtain video images of the curvature of the earth at high altitudes and relay it back down to our ground station. I also began developing my own science research program for minority serving institutions to be implemented when funding becomes available. In addition to the projects that I completed during my internship, I got the opportunity to go on various tours of the technological facilities here at Kennedy Space Center.

  3. Research Reports: 1989 NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karr, Gerald R. (Editor); Six, Frank (Editor); Freeman, L. Michael (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    For the twenty-fifth consecutive year, a NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The basic objectives of the programs are: (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of the participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA Centers. The Faculty Fellows spent ten weeks at MSFC engaged in a research project compatible with their interests and background and worked in collaboration with a NASA/MSFC colleague.

  4. Research reports: 1991 NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karr, Gerald R. (Editor); Chappell, Charles R. (Editor); Six, Frank (Editor); Freeman, L. Michael (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    The basic objectives of the programs, which are in the 28th year of operation nationally, are: (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of the participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA Centers. The faculty fellows spent 10 weeks at MSFC engaged in a research project compatible with their interests and background and worked in collaboration with a NASA/MSFC colleague. This is a compilation of their research reports for summer 1991.

  5. AAU Research Institution Pilots Transfer Institute To Enhance Minority Educational Opportunities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elvin, Rebecca S.; Wood, Gerald L.

    In an effort to improve minority recruitment and retention, the University of Arizona collaborated with Pima Community College to launch the Exploratory Transfer Institute (ETI), a summer program to encourage minority students who were not considering transfer to do so. The ETI was conceived, planned, and implemented through a relatively complex…

  6. Institute news

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-11-01

    Joining the team A new member of staff has recently joined the Institute of Physics Education Department (Schools and Colleges) team. (Dr) Steven Chapman will have managerial responsibility for physics education issues in the 11 - 16 age range, particularly on the policy side. He will work closely with Mary Wood, who spends much of her time out and about doing the practical things to support physics education pre-16. Catherine Wilson will be spending more of her time working to support the Post-16 Physics Initiative but retains overall responsibility for the department. Steven graduated in Physics and Astronomy and then went on to do his doctorate at Sussex University. He stayed in the research field for a while, including a period at NPL. Then, having decided to train as a teacher, he taught for the last five years, most recently at a brand new school in Sutton where he was Head of Physics. Physics update Dates for `Physics Update' courses in 2000, intended for practising science teachers, are as follows: 1 - 3 April: Malvern College 9 - 10 June: Stirling University 8 - 10 July: York University 8 - 10 December: Oxford University The deadline for applications for the course to be held on 11 - 13 December 1999 at the School of Physics, Exeter University, is 12 November, so any late enquiries should be sent to Leila Solomon at The Institute of Physics, 76 Portland Place, London W1N 3DH (tel: 020 7470 4821) right away. Name that teacher! Late nominations are still welcome for the Teachers of Physics/Teachers of Primary Science awards for the year 2000. Closing date for nominations is `the last week in November'. Further details can be obtained from Catherine Wilson or Barbara Hill in the Institute's Education Department. Forward and back! The Education Group's one-day meeting on 13 November is accepting bookings until almost the last minute, so don't delay your application! The day is entitled `Post-16 physics: Looking forward, learning from the past' and it aims to

  7. STEM Summer Academy on the Navajo Reservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, C. J.

    2012-12-01

    The US Rosetta Project is the NASA contribution to the International Rosetta Mission, an ESA cornerstone mission to comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko. While the project's outreach efforts span multi-media, and a variety of age and ethnic groups, a special emphasis has been made to find a way to provide meaningful outreach to the reservation communities. Because language preservation is an issue of urgent concern to the reservation communities, and because Rosetta, uniquely among NASA missions, has been named after the notion that keys to missing understanding of elements of the ancient past were found in the language on the original Rosetta stone, the US Rosetta Project has embarked upon outreach with a focus on STEM vocabulary in ancient US languages of the Navajo, Hopi, Ojibwe, and other tribal communities as the project expands. NASA image and science are used and described in the native language, alongside lay English and scientific English curriculum elements. Additionally, science (geology/chemistry/botany/physics) elements drawn from the reservation environment, including geomorphology, geochemistry, soil physics, are included and discussed in the native language as much as possible — with their analogs in other planetary environments (such as Mars). In this paper we will report on the most recent Summer Science Academy [2012], a four week summer course for middle school children, created in collaboration with teachers and administrators in the Chinle Unified School District. The concept of the Academy was initiated in 2011, and the first Academy was conducted shortly thereafter, in June 2011 with 14 children, 3 instructors, and a NASA teacher workshop. The community requested three topics: geology, astronomy, and botany. The 2012 Academy built on the curriculum already developed with more robust field trips, addressed to specific science topics, additional quantitative measurements and activities, with more written material for the cultural components from

  8. Institute news

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-11-01

    Joining the team A new member of staff has recently joined the Institute of Physics Education Department (Schools and Colleges) team. (Dr) Steven Chapman will have managerial responsibility for physics education issues in the 11 - 16 age range, particularly on the policy side. He will work closely with Mary Wood, who spends much of her time out and about doing the practical things to support physics education pre-16. Catherine Wilson will be spending more of her time working to support the Post-16 Physics Initiative but retains overall responsibility for the department. Steven graduated in Physics and Astronomy and then went on to do his doctorate at Sussex University. He stayed in the research field for a while, including a period at NPL. Then, having decided to train as a teacher, he taught for the last five years, most recently at a brand new school in Sutton where he was Head of Physics. Physics update Dates for `Physics Update' courses in 2000, intended for practising science teachers, are as follows: 1 - 3 April: Malvern College 9 - 10 June: Stirling University 8 - 10 July: York University 8 - 10 December: Oxford University The deadline for applications for the course to be held on 11 - 13 December 1999 at the School of Physics, Exeter University, is 12 November, so any late enquiries should be sent to Leila Solomon at The Institute of Physics, 76 Portland Place, London W1N 3DH (tel: 020 7470 4821) right away. Name that teacher! Late nominations are still welcome for the Teachers of Physics/Teachers of Primary Science awards for the year 2000. Closing date for nominations is `the last week in November'. Further details can be obtained from Catherine Wilson or Barbara Hill in the Institute's Education Department. Forward and back! The Education Group's one-day meeting on 13 November is accepting bookings until almost the last minute, so don't delay your application! The day is entitled `Post-16 physics: Looking forward, learning from the past' and it aims to

  9. North Polar Layers in Summer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    15 October 2004 It is now early summer in the northern hemisphere on Mars, and this means that the ices of the north polar cap are in full retreat. Exposed from beneath seasonal frost are the eroded layers of what Mars scientists suspect are composed of a mixture of dust and ice (and in some layers, sand). This October 2004 Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows some of the north polar layers exposed on a moderately-dipping slope. The bright material at the top of the image is water ice frost; the triangular features are thought to be caused by wind erosion of the frost. This image is located near 87.1oN, 267.4oW, and covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) wide. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  10. Data Plots of Run I - III Results from SLAC E-158: A precision Measurement of the Weak Mixing Angle in Moller Scattering

    DOE Data Explorer

    Three physics runs were made in 2002 and 2003 by E-158. As a result, the E-158 Collaboration announced that it had made "the first observation of Parity Violation in electron-electron (Moller) scattering). This precise Parity Violation measurement gives the best determination of the electron's weak charge at low energy (low momentum transfer between interacting particles). E158's measurement tests the predicted running (or evolution) of this weak charge with energy, and searches for new phenomena at TeV energy scales (one thousand times the proton-mass energy scale).[Copied from the experiment's public home page at http://www-project slac.stanford.edu/3158/Default.htm] See also the E158 page for collaborators at http://www.slac.stanford.edu/exp/e158/. Both websites provide data and detailed information.

  11. Research Institute for Technical Careers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glenn, Ronald L.

    1996-01-01

    The NASA research grant to Wilberforce University enabled us to establish the Research Institute for Technical Careers (RITC) in order to improve the teaching of science and engineering at Wilberforce. The major components of the research grant are infrastructure development, establishment of the Wilberforce Intensive Summer Experience (WISE), and Joint Research Collaborations with NASA Scientists. (A) Infrastructure Development. The NASA grant has enabled us to improve the standard of our chemistry laboratory and establish the electronics, design, and robotics laboratories. These laboratories have significantly improved the level of instruction at Wilberforce University. (B) Wilberforce Intensive Summer Experience (WISE). The WISE program is a science and engineering bridge program for prefreshman students. It is an intensive academic experience designed to strengthen students' knowledge in mathematics, science, engineering, computing skills, and writing. (C) Joint Collaboration. Another feature of the grant is research collaborations between NASA Scientists and Wilberforce University Scientists. These collaborations have enabled our faculty and students to conduct research at NASA Lewis during the summer and publish research findings in various journals and scientific proceedings.

  12. Design optimization and transverse coherence analysis for an x-ray free electron laser driven by SLAC LINAC

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, M.

    1995-12-31

    I present a design study for an X-ray Free Electron Laser driven by the SLAC linac, the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). The study assumes the LCLS is based on Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE). Following a brief review of the fundamentals of SASE, I will provide without derivation a collection of formulas relating SASE performance to the system parameters. These formulas allow quick evaluation of FEL designs and provide powerful tools for optimization in multi-dimensional parameter space. Optimization is carried out for the LCLS over all independent system parameters modeled, subjected to a number of practical constraints. In addition to the optimizations concerning gain and power, another important consideration for a single pass FEL starting from noise is the transverse coherence property of the amplified radiation, especially at short wavelength. A widely used emittance criteria for FELs requires that the emittance is smaller than the radiation wavelength divided by 4{pi}. For the LCLS the criteria is violated by a factor of 5, at a normalized emittance of 1.5 mm-mrad, wavelength of 1.5 {angstrom}, and beam energy of 15 GeV. Thus it is important to check quantitatively the emittance effect on the transverse coherence. I will examine the emittance effect on transverse coherence by analyzing different transverse modes and show that full transverse coherence can be obtained even at the LCLS parameter regime.

  13. A precise measurement of the left-right asymmetry of Z Boson production at the SLAC linear collider

    SciTech Connect

    1994-09-01

    We present a precise measurement of the left-right cross section asymmetry of Z boson production (A{sub LR}) observed in 1993 data at the SLAC linear collider. The A{sub LR} experiment provides a direct measure of the effective weak mixing angle through the initial state couplings of the electron to the Z. During the 1993 run of the SLC, the SLD detector recorded 49,392 Z events produced by the collision of longitudinally polarized electrons on unpolarized positrons at a center-of-mass energy of 91.26 GeV. A Compton polarimeter measured the luminosity-weighted electron polarization to be (63.4{+-}1.3)%. ALR was measured to be 0.1617{+-}0.0071(stat.){+-}0.0033(syst.), which determines the effective weak mixing angle to be sin {sup 2}{theta}{sub W}{sup eff} = 0.2292{+-}0.0009(stat.){+-}0.0004(syst.). This measurement of A{sub LR} is incompatible at the level of two standard deviations with the value predicted by a fit of several other electroweak measurements to the Standard Model.

  14. Two member of the S-lac lectin gene family, LGALS1 and LGALS2, reside in close proximity on human chromosome 22q12-q13

    SciTech Connect

    Mehrabian, M.; Sparkes, R.S.; Lusis, A.J. ); Gitt, M.A.; Leffler, H.; Barondes, S.H. )

    1993-02-01

    S-lac lectins are a family of soluble lactose-binding proteins thought to function in the control of cell growth. We now report the chromosomal mapping of two members of the family, termed L-14-I and L-14-II, to the q12-q13 region of human chromosome 22, suggesting the possibility of a cluster of genes for lactose-binding proteins. 20 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  15. Studies in Enrollment Trends and Patterns. Part II--Summer Quarter: 1940-1964.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmid, Calvin F.; Watson, F. Jean

    This is the second part of a report on major facets of institutional change at the University of Washington. Part II is a detailed analysis of Summer Quarter students and covers: class differentials in enrollment trends; trends in undergraduate students by major field and college; trends in graduate and professional students by major field and…

  16. A Summer Program Designed to Educate College Students for Careers in Bioinformatics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krilowicz, Beverly; Johnston, Wendie; Sharp, Sandra B.; Warter-Perez, Nancy; Momand, Jamil

    2007-01-01

    A summer program was created for undergraduates and graduate students that teaches bioinformatics concepts, offers skills in professional development, and provides research opportunities in academic and industrial institutions. We estimate that 34 of 38 graduates (89%) are in a career trajectory that will use bioinformatics. Evidence from…

  17. Summer Discovery Program for Academically Gifted Students in Grades 5-8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hern, Dennis E.; Hern, Ann

    1979-01-01

    Ninety gifted students from Warren County schools participated in a multifaceted summer institute program, focusing on water pollution. Writing and research skills were emphasized. This article describes the rationale, objectives, process, and evaluation design of this program and comments on the future of gifted education. (SJL)

  18. A SURVEY OF INTENSIVE PROGRAMS IN THE UNCOMMON LANGUAGES, SUMMER 1962.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HOENIGSWALD, HENRY M.; AND OTHERS

    THIS REPORT ON INTENSIVE COURSES IN THE UNCOMMON LANGUAGES CONDUCTED AT 22 AMERICAN COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES DURING THE SUMMER OF 1962 IS THE RESULT OF A SURVEY UNDERTAKEN BY H.M. HOENIGSWALD OF THE UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA, R.B. NOSS OF THE FOREIGN SERVICE INSTITUTE, AND E.N. MCCARUS AND J.K. YAMAGIWA OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN. (BY…

  19. Work Papers of the Summer Intitute of Linguistics, 1993. University of North Dakota Session, Volume 37.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dooley, Robert A., Ed.; Meyer, Jim, Ed.

    This volume of work papers from the Summer Institute of Linguistics includes the following: "Goals and Indirect Objects in Seri" (Stephen A. Marlett); "Seri Kinship Terminology" (Mary B. Moser and Stephen A. Marlett); "Quiegolani Zapotec Phonology" (Sue Regnier); "Role and Reference Grammar" (Robert D. Van Valin, Jr.); "The Binding Properties of…

  20. Bridging the Divide: Developing a Scholarly Habitus for Aspiring Graduate Students through Summer Bridge Programs Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCoy, Dorian L.; Winkle-Wagner, Rachelle

    2015-01-01

    This multisite case study explored the role of summer institutes in preparing Students of Color for doctoral programs. Bourdieu's social reproduction theory, particularly the concept of habitus, was employed as a theoretical framework to investigate how the participants further developed habitus (their dispositions, identities, and perspectives)…