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Sample records for slow wave sleep

  1. Slow wave sleep dreaming.

    PubMed

    Cavallero, C; Cicogna, P; Natale, V; Occhionero, M; Zito, A

    1992-12-01

    Fifty volunteers slept two nonconsecutive nights in a sleep laboratory under electropolygraphic control. They were awakened for one report per night. Awakenings were made, in counterbalanced order, from slow wave sleep (SWS--stage 3-4 and stage 4) and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. Following dream reporting, subjects were asked to identify memory sources of their dream imagery. Two independent judges reliably rated mentation reports for temporal units and for several content and structural dimensions. The same judges also categorized memory sources as autobiographical episodes, abstract self-references, or semantic knowledge. We found that REM reports were significantly longer than SWS reports. Minor content SWS-REM differences were also detected. Moreover, semantic knowledge was more frequently mentioned as a dream source for REM than for SWS dream reports. These findings are interpreted as supporting the hypothesis that dreaming is a continuous process that is not unique to REM sleep. Different levels of engagement of the cognitive system are responsible for the few SWS-REM differences that have been detected.

  2. Slow wave sleep in crayfish.

    PubMed

    Ramón, Fidel; Hernández-Falcón, Jesús; Nguyen, Bao; Bullock, Theodore H

    2004-08-10

    Clear evidence of sleep in invertebrates is still meager. Defined as a distinct state of reduced activity, arousability, attention, and initiative, it is well established in mammals, birds, reptiles, and teleosts. It is commonly defined by additional electroencephalographic criteria that are only well established in mammals and to some extent in birds. Sleep states similar to those in mammals, except for electrical criteria, seem to occur in some invertebrates, based on behavior and some physiological observations. Currently the most compelling evidence for sleep in invertebrates (evidence that meets most standard criteria for sleep) has been obtained in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. However, in mammals, sleep is also characterized by a brain state different from that at rest but awake. The electrophysiological slow wave criterion for this state is not seen in Drosophila or in honey bees. Here, we show that, in crayfish, a behavioral state with elevated threshold for vibratory stimulation is accompanied by a distinctive form of slow wave electrical activity of the brain, quite different from that during waking rest. Therefore, crayfish can attain a sleep state comparable to that of mammals.

  3. Slow Wave Sleep and Long Duration Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmire, Alexandra; Orr, Martin; Arias, Diana; Rueger, Melanie; Johnston, Smith; Leveton, Lauren

    2012-01-01

    While ground research has clearly shown that preserving adequate quantities of sleep is essential for optimal health and performance, changes in the progression, order and /or duration of specific stages of sleep is also associated with deleterious outcomes. As seen in Figure 1, in healthy individuals, REM and Non-REM sleep alternate cyclically, with stages of Non-REM sleep structured chronologically. In the early parts of the night, for instance, Non-REM stages 3 and 4 (Slow Wave Sleep, or SWS) last longer while REM sleep spans shorter; as night progresses, the length of SWS is reduced as REM sleep lengthens. This process allows for SWS to establish precedence , with increases in SWS seen when recovering from sleep deprivation. SWS is indeed regarded as the most restorative portion of sleep. During SWS, physiological activities such as hormone secretion, muscle recovery, and immune responses are underway, while neurological processes required for long term learning and memory consolidation, also occur. The structure and duration of specific sleep stages may vary independent of total sleep duration, and changes in the structure and duration have been shown to be associated with deleterious outcomes. Individuals with narcolepsy enter sleep through REM as opposed to stage 1 of NREM. Disrupting slow wave sleep for several consecutive nights without reducing total sleep duration or sleep efficiency is associated with decreased pain threshold, increased discomfort, fatigue, and the inflammatory flare response in skin. Depression has been shown to be associated with a reduction of slow wave sleep and increased REM sleep. Given research that shows deleterious outcomes are associated with changes in sleep structure, it is essential to characterize and mitigate not only total sleep duration, but also changes in sleep stages.

  4. Linking Sleep Slow Oscillations with consciousness theories: new vistas on Slow Wave Sleep unconsciousness.

    PubMed

    Gemignani, Angelo; Menicucci, Danilo; Laurino, Marco; Piarulli, Andrea; Mastorci, Francesca; Sebastiani, Laura; Allegrini, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    We review current models of consciousness in the context of wakefulness and sleep. We show that recent results on Slow Wave Sleep, including our own works, naturally fit within consciousness models. In particular, Sleep Slow Oscillations, namely low-frequency (<1Hz) oscillations, contain electrophysiological properties (up and down states) able to elicit and quench neural integration during Slow Wave Sleep. The physiological unconsciousness related to the Sleep Slow Oscillation derives from the interplay between spontaneous or evoked wake-like activities (up states) and half-a-second's electrical silences (down states). Sleep Slow Oscillation induces unconsciousness via the formation of parallel and segregated neural activities.

  5. Involvement of cytokines in slow wave sleep.

    PubMed

    Krueger, James M; Clinton, James M; Winters, Bradley D; Zielinski, Mark R; Taishi, Ping; Jewett, Kathryn A; Davis, Christopher J

    2011-01-01

    Cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) and interleukin-1 beta (IL1β) play a role in sleep regulation in health and disease. TNFα or IL1β injection enhances non-rapid eye movement sleep. Inhibition of TNFα or IL1β reduces spontaneous sleep. Mice lacking TNFα or IL1β receptors sleep less. In normal humans and in multiple disease states, plasma levels of TNFα covary with EEG slow wave activity (SWA) and sleep propensity. Many of the symptoms induced by sleep loss, for example, sleepiness, fatigue, poor cognition, enhanced sensitivity to pain, are elicited by injection of exogenous TNFα or IL1β. IL1β or TNFα applied unilaterally to the surface of the cortex induces state-dependent enhancement of EEG SWA ipsilaterally, suggesting greater regional sleep intensity. Interventions such as unilateral somatosensory stimulation enhance localized sleep EEG SWA, blood flow, and somatosensory cortical expression of IL1β and TNFα. State oscillations occur within cortical columns. One such state shares properties with whole animal sleep in that it is dependent on prior cellular activity, shows homeostasis, and is induced by TNFα. Extracellular ATP released during neuro- and gliotransmission enhances cytokine release via purine type 2 receptors. An ATP agonist enhances sleep, while ATP antagonists inhibit sleep. Mice lacking the P2X7 receptor have attenuated sleep rebound responses after sleep loss. TNFα and IL1β alter neuron sensitivity by changing neuromodulator/neurotransmitter receptor expression, allowing the neuron to scale its activity to the presynaptic neurons. TNFα's role in synaptic scaling is well characterized. Because the sensitivity of the postsynaptic neuron is changed, the same input will result in a different network output signal and this is a state change. The top-down paradigm of sleep regulation requires intentional action from sleep/wake regulatory brain circuits to initiate whole-organism sleep. This raises unresolved

  6. Slow Wave Sleep and Long Duration Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orr, M.; Whitmire, A.; Arias, D.; Leveton, L.

    2011-01-01

    To review the literature on slow wave sleep (SWS) in long duration space flight, and place this within the context of the broader literature on SWS particularly with respect to analogous environments such as the Antarctic. Explore how SWS could be measured within the International Space Station (ISS) context with the aim to utilize the ISS as an analog for future extra-orbital long duration missions. Discuss the potential use of emergent minimally intrusive wireless technologies like ZEO for integrated prelaunch, flight, and return to Earth analysis and optimization of SWS (and general quality of sleep).

  7. Human Gamma Oscillations during Slow Wave Sleep

    PubMed Central

    Valderrama, Mario; Crépon, Benoît; Botella-Soler, Vicente; Martinerie, Jacques; Hasboun, Dominique; Alvarado-Rojas, Catalina; Baulac, Michel; Adam, Claude; Navarro, Vincent; Le Van Quyen, Michel

    2012-01-01

    Neocortical local field potentials have shown that gamma oscillations occur spontaneously during slow-wave sleep (SWS). At the macroscopic EEG level in the human brain, no evidences were reported so far. In this study, by using simultaneous scalp and intracranial EEG recordings in 20 epileptic subjects, we examined gamma oscillations in cerebral cortex during SWS. We report that gamma oscillations in low (30–50 Hz) and high (60–120 Hz) frequency bands recurrently emerged in all investigated regions and their amplitudes coincided with specific phases of the cortical slow wave. In most of the cases, multiple oscillatory bursts in different frequency bands from 30 to 120 Hz were correlated with positive peaks of scalp slow waves (“IN-phase” pattern), confirming previous animal findings. In addition, we report another gamma pattern that appears preferentially during the negative phase of the slow wave (“ANTI-phase” pattern). This new pattern presented dominant peaks in the high gamma range and was preferentially expressed in the temporal cortex. Finally, we found that the spatial coherence between cortical sites exhibiting gamma activities was local and fell off quickly when computed between distant sites. Overall, these results provide the first human evidences that gamma oscillations can be observed in macroscopic EEG recordings during sleep. They support the concept that these high-frequency activities might be associated with phasic increases of neural activity during slow oscillations. Such patterned activity in the sleeping brain could play a role in off-line processing of cortical networks. PMID:22496749

  8. Enhancement of sleep slow waves: underlying mechanisms and practical consequences

    PubMed Central

    Bellesi, Michele; Riedner, Brady A.; Garcia-Molina, Gary N.; Cirelli, Chiara; Tononi, Giulio

    2014-01-01

    Even modest sleep restriction, especially the loss of sleep slow wave activity (SWA), is invariably associated with slower electroencephalogram (EEG) activity during wake, the occurrence of local sleep in an otherwise awake brain, and impaired performance due to cognitive and memory deficits. Recent studies not only confirm the beneficial role of sleep in memory consolidation, but also point to a specific role for sleep slow waves. Thus, the implementation of methods to enhance sleep slow waves without unwanted arousals or lightening of sleep could have significant practical implications. Here we first review the evidence that it is possible to enhance sleep slow waves in humans using transcranial direct-current stimulation (tDCS) and transcranial magnetic stimulation. Since these methods are currently impractical and their safety is questionable, especially for chronic long-term exposure, we then discuss novel data suggesting that it is possible to enhance slow waves using sensory stimuli. We consider the physiology of the K-complex (KC), a peripheral evoked slow wave, and show that, among different sensory modalities, acoustic stimulation is the most effective in increasing the magnitude of slow waves, likely through the activation of non-lemniscal ascending pathways to the thalamo-cortical system. In addition, we discuss how intensity and frequency of the acoustic stimuli, as well as exact timing and pattern of stimulation, affect sleep enhancement. Finally, we discuss automated algorithms that read the EEG and, in real-time, adjust the stimulation parameters in a closed-loop manner to obtain an increase in sleep slow waves and avoid undesirable arousals. In conclusion, while discussing the mechanisms that underlie the generation of sleep slow waves, we review the converging evidence showing that acoustic stimulation is safe and represents an ideal tool for slow wave sleep (SWS) enhancement. PMID:25389394

  9. Enhancement of sleep slow waves: underlying mechanisms and practical consequences.

    PubMed

    Bellesi, Michele; Riedner, Brady A; Garcia-Molina, Gary N; Cirelli, Chiara; Tononi, Giulio

    2014-01-01

    Even modest sleep restriction, especially the loss of sleep slow wave activity (SWA), is invariably associated with slower electroencephalogram (EEG) activity during wake, the occurrence of local sleep in an otherwise awake brain, and impaired performance due to cognitive and memory deficits. Recent studies not only confirm the beneficial role of sleep in memory consolidation, but also point to a specific role for sleep slow waves. Thus, the implementation of methods to enhance sleep slow waves without unwanted arousals or lightening of sleep could have significant practical implications. Here we first review the evidence that it is possible to enhance sleep slow waves in humans using transcranial direct-current stimulation (tDCS) and transcranial magnetic stimulation. Since these methods are currently impractical and their safety is questionable, especially for chronic long-term exposure, we then discuss novel data suggesting that it is possible to enhance slow waves using sensory stimuli. We consider the physiology of the K-complex (KC), a peripheral evoked slow wave, and show that, among different sensory modalities, acoustic stimulation is the most effective in increasing the magnitude of slow waves, likely through the activation of non-lemniscal ascending pathways to the thalamo-cortical system. In addition, we discuss how intensity and frequency of the acoustic stimuli, as well as exact timing and pattern of stimulation, affect sleep enhancement. Finally, we discuss automated algorithms that read the EEG and, in real-time, adjust the stimulation parameters in a closed-loop manner to obtain an increase in sleep slow waves and avoid undesirable arousals. In conclusion, while discussing the mechanisms that underlie the generation of sleep slow waves, we review the converging evidence showing that acoustic stimulation is safe and represents an ideal tool for slow wave sleep (SWS) enhancement.

  10. Regional Slow Waves and Spindles in Human Sleep

    PubMed Central

    Nir, Yuval; Staba, Richard J.; Andrillon, Thomas; Vyazovskiy, Vladyslav V.; Cirelli, Chiara; Fried, Itzhak; Tononi, Giulio

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY The most prominent EEG events in sleep are slow waves, reflecting a slow (<1 Hz) oscillation between up and down states in cortical neurons. It is unknown whether slow oscillations are synchronous across the majority or the minority of brain regions—are they a global or local phenomenon? To examine this, we recorded simultaneously scalp EEG, intracerebral EEG, and unit firing in multiple brain regions of neurosurgical patients. We find that most sleep slow waves and the underlying active and inactive neuronal states occur locally. Thus, especially in late sleep, some regions can be active while others are silent. We also find that slow waves can propagate, usually from medial prefrontal cortex to the medial temporal lobe and hippocampus. Sleep spindles, the other hallmark of NREM sleep EEG, are likewise predominantly local. Thus, intracerebral communication during sleep is constrained because slow and spindle oscillations often occur out-of-phase in different brain regions. PMID:21482364

  11. Slow waves, sharp waves, ripples, and REM in sleeping dragons.

    PubMed

    Shein-Idelson, Mark; Ondracek, Janie M; Liaw, Hua-Peng; Reiter, Sam; Laurent, Gilles

    2016-04-29

    Sleep has been described in animals ranging from worms to humans. Yet the electrophysiological characteristics of brain sleep, such as slow-wave (SW) and rapid eye movement (REM) activities, are thought to be restricted to mammals and birds. Recording from the brain of a lizard, the Australian dragon Pogona vitticeps, we identified SW and REM sleep patterns, thus pushing back the probable evolution of these dynamics at least to the emergence of amniotes. The SW and REM sleep patterns that we observed in lizards oscillated continuously for 6 to 10 hours with a period of ~80 seconds. The networks controlling SW-REM antagonism in amniotes may thus originate from a common, ancient oscillator circuit. Lizard SW dynamics closely resemble those observed in rodent hippocampal CA1, yet they originate from a brain area, the dorsal ventricular ridge, that has no obvious hodological similarity with the mammalian hippocampus.

  12. Essential thalamic contribution to slow waves of natural sleep.

    PubMed

    David, François; Schmiedt, Joscha T; Taylor, Hannah L; Orban, Gergely; Di Giovanni, Giuseppe; Uebele, Victor N; Renger, John J; Lambert, Régis C; Leresche, Nathalie; Crunelli, Vincenzo

    2013-12-11

    Slow waves represent one of the prominent EEG signatures of non-rapid eye movement (non-REM) sleep and are thought to play an important role in the cellular and network plasticity that occurs during this behavioral state. These slow waves of natural sleep are currently considered to be exclusively generated by intrinsic and synaptic mechanisms within neocortical territories, although a role for the thalamus in this key physiological rhythm has been suggested but never demonstrated. Combining neuronal ensemble recordings, microdialysis, and optogenetics, here we show that the block of the thalamic output to the neocortex markedly (up to 50%) decreases the frequency of slow waves recorded during non-REM sleep in freely moving, naturally sleeping-waking rats. A smaller volume of thalamic inactivation than during sleep is required for observing similar effects on EEG slow waves recorded during anesthesia, a condition in which both bursts and single action potentials of thalamocortical neurons are almost exclusively dependent on T-type calcium channels. Thalamic inactivation more strongly reduces spindles than slow waves during both anesthesia and natural sleep. Moreover, selective excitation of thalamocortical neurons strongly entrains EEG slow waves in a narrow frequency band (0.75-1.5 Hz) only when thalamic T-type calcium channels are functionally active. These results demonstrate that the thalamus finely tunes the frequency of slow waves during non-REM sleep and anesthesia, and thus provide the first conclusive evidence that a dynamic interplay of the neocortical and thalamic oscillators of slow waves is required for the full expression of this key physiological EEG rhythm.

  13. Essential Thalamic Contribution to Slow Waves of Natural Sleep

    PubMed Central

    David, François; Schmiedt, Joscha T.; Taylor, Hannah L.; Orban, Gergely; Di Giovanni, Giuseppe; Uebele, Victor N.; Renger, John J.; Lambert, Régis C.; Leresche, Nathalie

    2013-01-01

    Slow waves represent one of the prominent EEG signatures of non-rapid eye movement (non-REM) sleep and are thought to play an important role in the cellular and network plasticity that occurs during this behavioral state. These slow waves of natural sleep are currently considered to be exclusively generated by intrinsic and synaptic mechanisms within neocortical territories, although a role for the thalamus in this key physiological rhythm has been suggested but never demonstrated. Combining neuronal ensemble recordings, microdialysis, and optogenetics, here we show that the block of the thalamic output to the neocortex markedly (up to 50%) decreases the frequency of slow waves recorded during non-REM sleep in freely moving, naturally sleeping-waking rats. A smaller volume of thalamic inactivation than during sleep is required for observing similar effects on EEG slow waves recorded during anesthesia, a condition in which both bursts and single action potentials of thalamocortical neurons are almost exclusively dependent on T-type calcium channels. Thalamic inactivation more strongly reduces spindles than slow waves during both anesthesia and natural sleep. Moreover, selective excitation of thalamocortical neurons strongly entrains EEG slow waves in a narrow frequency band (0.75–1.5 Hz) only when thalamic T-type calcium channels are functionally active. These results demonstrate that the thalamus finely tunes the frequency of slow waves during non-REM sleep and anesthesia, and thus provide the first conclusive evidence that a dynamic interplay of the neocortical and thalamic oscillators of slow waves is required for the full expression of this key physiological EEG rhythm. PMID:24336724

  14. Spontaneous neural activity during human slow wave sleep

    PubMed Central

    Dang-Vu, Thien Thanh; Schabus, Manuel; Desseilles, Martin; Albouy, Geneviève; Boly, Mélanie; Darsaud, Annabelle; Gais, Steffen; Rauchs, Géraldine; Sterpenich, Virginie; Vandewalle, Gilles; Carrier, Julie; Moonen, Gustave; Balteau, Evelyne; Degueldre, Christian; Luxen, André; Phillips, Christophe; Maquet, Pierre

    2008-01-01

    Slow wave sleep (SWS) is associated with spontaneous brain oscillations that are thought to participate in sleep homeostasis and to support the processing of information related to the experiences of the previous awake period. At the cellular level, during SWS, a slow oscillation (<1 Hz) synchronizes firing patterns in large neuronal populations and is reflected on electroencephalography (EEG) recordings as large-amplitude, low-frequency waves. By using simultaneous EEG and event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we characterized the transient changes in brain activity consistently associated with slow waves (>140 μV) and delta waves (75–140 μV) during SWS in 14 non-sleep-deprived normal human volunteers. Significant increases in activity were associated with these waves in several cortical areas, including the inferior frontal, medial prefrontal, precuneus, and posterior cingulate areas. Compared with baseline activity, slow waves are associated with significant activity in the parahippocampal gyrus, cerebellum, and brainstem, whereas delta waves are related to frontal responses. No decrease in activity was observed. This study demonstrates that SWS is not a state of brain quiescence, but rather is an active state during which brain activity is consistently synchronized to the slow oscillation in specific cerebral regions. The partial overlap between the response pattern related to SWS waves and the waking default mode network is consistent with the fascinating hypothesis that brain responses synchronized by the slow oscillation restore microwake-like activity patterns that facilitate neuronal interactions. PMID:18815373

  15. Spontaneous neural activity during human slow wave sleep.

    PubMed

    Dang-Vu, Thien Thanh; Schabus, Manuel; Desseilles, Martin; Albouy, Geneviève; Boly, Mélanie; Darsaud, Annabelle; Gais, Steffen; Rauchs, Géraldine; Sterpenich, Virginie; Vandewalle, Gilles; Carrier, Julie; Moonen, Gustave; Balteau, Evelyne; Degueldre, Christian; Luxen, André; Phillips, Christophe; Maquet, Pierre

    2008-09-30

    Slow wave sleep (SWS) is associated with spontaneous brain oscillations that are thought to participate in sleep homeostasis and to support the processing of information related to the experiences of the previous awake period. At the cellular level, during SWS, a slow oscillation (<1 Hz) synchronizes firing patterns in large neuronal populations and is reflected on electroencephalography (EEG) recordings as large-amplitude, low-frequency waves. By using simultaneous EEG and event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we characterized the transient changes in brain activity consistently associated with slow waves (>140 microV) and delta waves (75-140 microV) during SWS in 14 non-sleep-deprived normal human volunteers. Significant increases in activity were associated with these waves in several cortical areas, including the inferior frontal, medial prefrontal, precuneus, and posterior cingulate areas. Compared with baseline activity, slow waves are associated with significant activity in the parahippocampal gyrus, cerebellum, and brainstem, whereas delta waves are related to frontal responses. No decrease in activity was observed. This study demonstrates that SWS is not a state of brain quiescence, but rather is an active state during which brain activity is consistently synchronized to the slow oscillation in specific cerebral regions. The partial overlap between the response pattern related to SWS waves and the waking default mode network is consistent with the fascinating hypothesis that brain responses synchronized by the slow oscillation restore microwake-like activity patterns that facilitate neuronal interactions.

  16. Slow wave sleep and recollection in recognition memory.

    PubMed

    Daurat, Agnès; Terrier, Patrice; Foret, Jean; Tiberge, Michel

    2007-06-01

    Recognition memory performance reflects two distinct memory processes: a conscious process of recollection, which allows remembering specific details of a previous event, and familiarity, which emerges in the absence of any conscious information about the context in which the event occurred. Slow wave sleep (SWS) and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep are differentially involved in the consolidation of different types of memory. The study assessed the effects of SWS and REM sleep on recollection, by means of the "remember"/"know" paradigm. Subjects studied three blocks of 12 words before a 3-h retention interval filled with SWS, REM sleep or wakefulness, placed between 3 a.m. and 6 a.m. Afterwards, recognition and recollection were tested. Recollection was higher after a retention interval rich in SWS than after a retention interval rich in REM sleep or filled with wakefulness. The results suggest that SWS facilitates the process of recollection in recognition memory.

  17. Circadian regulation of slow waves in human sleep: Topographical aspects

    PubMed Central

    Lazar, Alpar S.; Lazar, Zsolt I.; Dijk, Derk-Jan

    2015-01-01

    Slow waves (SWs, 0.5–4 Hz) in field potentials during sleep reflect synchronized alternations between bursts of action potentials and periods of membrane hyperpolarization of cortical neurons. SWs decline during sleep and this is thought to be related to a reduction of synaptic strength in cortical networks and to be central to sleep's role in maintaining brain function. A central assumption in current concepts of sleep function is that SWs during sleep, and associated recovery processes, are independent of circadian rhythmicity. We tested this hypothesis by quantifying all SWs from 12 EEG derivations in 34 participants in whom 231 sleep periods were scheduled across the circadian cycle in a 10-day forced-desynchrony protocol which allowed estimation of the separate circadian and sleep-dependent modulation of SWs. Circadian rhythmicity significantly modulated the incidence, amplitude, frequency and the slope of the SWs such that the peaks of the circadian rhythms in these slow-wave parameters were located during the biological day. Topographical analyses demonstrated that the sleep-dependent modulation of SW characteristics was most prominent in frontal brain areas whereas the circadian effect was similar to or greater than the sleep-dependent modulation over the central and posterior brain regions. The data demonstrate that circadian rhythmicity directly modulates characteristics of SWs thought to be related to synaptic plasticity and that this modulation depends on topography. These findings have implications for the understanding of local sleep regulation and conditions such as ageing, depression, and neurodegeneration which are associated with changes in SWs, neural plasticity and circadian rhythmicity. PMID:25979664

  18. Circadian regulation of slow waves in human sleep: Topographical aspects.

    PubMed

    Lazar, Alpar S; Lazar, Zsolt I; Dijk, Derk-Jan

    2015-08-01

    Slow waves (SWs, 0.5-4Hz) in field potentials during sleep reflect synchronized alternations between bursts of action potentials and periods of membrane hyperpolarization of cortical neurons. SWs decline during sleep and this is thought to be related to a reduction of synaptic strength in cortical networks and to be central to sleep's role in maintaining brain function. A central assumption in current concepts of sleep function is that SWs during sleep, and associated recovery processes, are independent of circadian rhythmicity. We tested this hypothesis by quantifying all SWs from 12 EEG derivations in 34 participants in whom 231 sleep periods were scheduled across the circadian cycle in a 10-day forced-desynchrony protocol which allowed estimation of the separate circadian and sleep-dependent modulation of SWs. Circadian rhythmicity significantly modulated the incidence, amplitude, frequency and the slope of the SWs such that the peaks of the circadian rhythms in these slow-wave parameters were located during the biological day. Topographical analyses demonstrated that the sleep-dependent modulation of SW characteristics was most prominent in frontal brain areas whereas the circadian effect was similar to or greater than the sleep-dependent modulation over the central and posterior brain regions. The data demonstrate that circadian rhythmicity directly modulates characteristics of SWs thought to be related to synaptic plasticity and that this modulation depends on topography. These findings have implications for the understanding of local sleep regulation and conditions such as ageing, depression, and neurodegeneration which are associated with changes in SWs, neural plasticity and circadian rhythmicity. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Local origin of slow EEG waves during sleep.

    PubMed

    Timofeev, Igor

    2013-01-01

    Neuronal activity mediating EEG slow waves consists of synchronous alternation of intracellular active and silent states. Recent data demonstrate that each active state of a sleep slow wave originates in a particular cortical location and propagate to involve other cortical areas. Preferential sites of origin of these waves are: the frontal cortex in adult humans, the associative cortex in cats and the somatosensory cortex in mice. In the site of origin of these slow waves any neuron can initiate a particular cycle, however there are neuronal groups with high likelihood of triggering a particular cycle. In epileptic patients, these neurons are mostly located in superficial layers, but in healthy experimental animals, populations ofintrinsically bursting neurons with a high probability of triggering spontaneous active states have been found in deeper cortical layers.

  20. Sleep homeostasis and cortical synchronization: I. Modeling the effects of synaptic strength on sleep slow waves.

    PubMed

    Esser, Steve K; Hill, Sean L; Tononi, Giulio

    2007-12-01

    Sleep slow-wave activity (SWA, electroencephalogram [EEG] power between 0.5 and 4.0 Hz) is homeostatically regulated, increasing with wakefulness and declining with sleep. Sleep SWA is thought to reflect sleep need, but the mechanisms of its homeostatic regulation remain unknown. Based on a recent hypothesis, we sought to determine whether a decrease in cortical synaptic strength can account for changes in sleep SWA. A large-scale computer model of the sleeping thalamocortical system was used to reproduce in detail the cortical slow oscillations underlying EEG slow waves. N/A. N/A. Simulated reductions in the strength of corticocortical synapses. Decreased synaptic strength led to (1) decreased single cell membrane potential oscillations and reduced network synchronization, (2) decreased rate of neural recruitment and decruitment, and (3) emergence of local clusters of synchronized activity. These changes were reflected in the local EEG as (1) decreased incidence of high-amplitude slow waves, (2) decreased wave slope, and (3) increased number of multipeak waves. Spectral analysis confirmed that these changes were associated with a decrease in SWA. A decrease in cortical synaptic strength is sufficient to account for changes in sleep SWA and is accompanied by characteristic changes in slow-wave parameters. Experimental results from rat cortical depth recordings and human high-density EEG show similar changes in slow-wave parameters with decreasing SWA, suggesting that the underlying mechanism may indeed be a net decrease in synaptic strength.

  1. Spike wave location and density disturb sleep slow waves in patients with CSWS (continuous spike waves during sleep).

    PubMed

    Bölsterli Heinzle, Bigna K; Fattinger, Sara; Kurth, Salomé; Lebourgeois, Monique K; Ringli, Maya; Bast, Thomas; Critelli, Hanne; Schmitt, Bernhard; Huber, Reto

    2014-04-01

    In CSWS (continuous spike waves during sleep) activation of spike waves during slow wave sleep has been causally linked to neuropsychological deficits, but the pathophysiologic mechanisms are still unknown. In healthy subjects, the overnight decrease of the slope of slow waves in NREM (non-rapid eye movement) sleep has been linked to brain recovery to regain optimal cognitive performance. Here, we investigated whether the electrophysiologic hallmark of CSWS, the spike waves during sleep, is related to an alteration in the overnight decrease of the slope, and if this alteration is linked to location and density of spike waves. In a retrospective study, the slope of slow waves (0.5-2 Hz) in the first hour and last hour of sleep (19 electroencephalography [EEG] electrodes) of 14 patients with CSWS (3.1-13.5 years) was calculated. The spike wave "focus" was determined as the location of highest spike amplitude and the density of spike waves as spike wave index (SWI). There was no overnight change of the slope of slow waves in the "focus." Instead, in "nonfocal" regions, the slope decreased significantly. This difference in the overnight course resulted in a steeper slope in the "focus" compared to "nonfocal" electrodes during the last hour of sleep. Spike wave density was correlated with the impairment of the overnight slope decrease: The higher the SWI, the more hampered the slope decrease. Location and density of spike waves are related to an alteration of the physiologic overnight decrease of the slow wave slope. This overnight decrease of the slope was shown to be closely related to the recovery function of sleep. Such recovery is necessary for optimal cognitive performance during wakefulness. Therefore we propose the impairment of this process by spike waves as a potential mechanism leading to neuropsychological deficits in CSWS. A PowerPoint slide summarizing this article is available for download in the Supporting Information section here. Wiley Periodicals

  2. Optimizing detection and analysis of slow waves in sleep EEG.

    PubMed

    Mensen, Armand; Riedner, Brady; Tononi, Giulio

    2016-12-01

    Analysis of individual slow waves in EEG recording during sleep provides both greater sensitivity and specificity compared to spectral power measures. However, parameters for detection and analysis have not been widely explored and validated. We present a new, open-source, Matlab based, toolbox for the automatic detection and analysis of slow waves; with adjustable parameter settings, as well as manual correction and exploration of the results using a multi-faceted visualization tool. We explore a large search space of parameter settings for slow wave detection and measure their effects on a selection of outcome parameters. Every choice of parameter setting had some effect on at least one outcome parameter. In general, the largest effect sizes were found when choosing the EEG reference, type of canonical waveform, and amplitude thresholding. Previously published methods accurately detect large, global waves but are conservative and miss the detection of smaller amplitude, local slow waves. The toolbox has additional benefits in terms of speed, user-interface, and visualization options to compare and contrast slow waves. The exploration of parameter settings in the toolbox highlights the importance of careful selection of detection METHODS: The sensitivity and specificity of the automated detection can be improved by manually adding or deleting entire waves and or specific channels using the toolbox visualization functions. The toolbox standardizes the detection procedure, sets the stage for reliable results and comparisons and is easy to use without previous programming experience. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Properties of slow oscillation during slow-wave sleep and anesthesia in cats.

    PubMed

    Chauvette, Sylvain; Crochet, Sylvain; Volgushev, Maxim; Timofeev, Igor

    2011-10-19

    Deep anesthesia is commonly used as a model of slow-wave sleep (SWS). Ketamine-xylazine anesthesia reproduces the main features of sleep slow oscillation: slow, large-amplitude waves in field potential, which are generated by the alternation of hyperpolarized and depolarized states of cortical neurons. However, direct quantitative comparison of field potential and membrane potential fluctuations during natural sleep and anesthesia is lacking, so it remains unclear how well the properties of sleep slow oscillation are reproduced by the ketamine-xylazine anesthesia model. Here, we used field potential and intracellular recordings in different cortical areas in the cat to directly compare properties of slow oscillation during natural sleep and ketamine-xylazine anesthesia. During SWS cortical activity showed higher power in the slow/delta (0.1-4 Hz) and spindle (8-14 Hz) frequency range, whereas under anesthesia the power in the gamma band (30-100 Hz) was higher. During anesthesia, slow waves were more rhythmic and more synchronous across the cortex. Intracellular recordings revealed that silent states were longer and the amplitude of membrane potential around transition between active and silent states was bigger under anesthesia. Slow waves were mostly uniform across cortical areas under anesthesia, but in SWS, they were most pronounced in associative and visual areas but smaller and less regular in somatosensory and motor cortices. We conclude that, although the main features of the slow oscillation in sleep and anesthesia appear similar, multiple cellular and network features are differently expressed during natural SWS compared with ketamine-xylazine anesthesia.

  4. Properties of slow oscillation during slow-wave sleep and anesthesia in cats

    PubMed Central

    Chauvette, Sylvain; Crochet, Sylvain; Volgushev, Maxim; Timofeev, Igor

    2011-01-01

    Deep anesthesia is commonly used as a model of slow-wave sleep (SWS). Ketamine-xylazine anesthesia reproduces the main features of sleep slow oscillation: slow, large amplitude waves in field potential, which are generated by the alternation of hyperpolarized and depolarized states of cortical neurons. However, direct quantitative comparison of field potential and membrane potential fluctuations during natural sleep and anesthesia is lacking, so it remains unclear how well the properties of sleep slow oscillation are reproduced by the ketamine-xylazine anesthesia model. Here, we used field potential and intracellular recordings in different cortical areas in the cat, to directly compare properties of slow oscillation during natural sleep and ketamine-xylazine anesthesia. During SWS cortical activity showed higher power in the slow/delta (0.1-4 Hz) and spindle (8-14 Hz) frequency range, while under anesthesia the power in the gamma band (30-100 Hz) was higher. During anesthesia, slow waves were more rhythmic and more synchronous across the cortex. Intracellular recordings revealed that silent states were longer and the amplitude of membrane potential around transition between active and silent states was bigger under anesthesia. Slow waves were largely uniform across cortical areas under anesthesia, but in SWS they were most pronounced in associative and visual areas, but smaller and less regular in somatosensory and motor cortices. We conclude that although the main features of the slow oscillation in sleep and anesthesia appear similar, multiple cellular and network features are differently expressed during natural SWS as compared to ketamine-xylazine anesthesia. PMID:22016533

  5. Enhancing Slow Wave Sleep with Sodium Oxybate Reduces the Behavioral and Physiological Impact of Sleep Loss

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, James K.; Hall-Porter, Janine M.; Griffin, Kara S.; Dodson, Ehren R.; Forst, Elizabeth H.; Curry, Denise T.; Eisenstein, Rhody D.; Schweitzer, Paula K.

    2010-01-01

    Study Objectives: To investigate whether enhancement of slow wave sleep (SWS) with sodium oxybate reduces the impact of sleep deprivation. Design: Double-blind, parallel group, placebo-controlled design Setting: Sleep research laboratory Participants: Fifty-eight healthy adults (28 placebo, 30 sodium oxybate), ages 18-50 years. Interventions: A 5-day protocol included 2 screening/baseline nights and days, 2 sleep deprivation nights, each followed by a 3-h daytime (08:00-11:00) sleep opportunity and a recovery night. Sodium oxybate or placebo was administered prior to each daytime sleep period. Multiple sleep latency test (MSLT), psychomotor vigilance test (PVT), Karolinska Sleepiness Scale (KSS), and Profile of Mood States were administered during waking hours. Measurements and Results: During daytime sleep, the sodium oxybate group had more SWS, more EEG spectral power in the 1-9 Hz range, and less REM. Mean MSLT latency was longer for the sodium oxybate group on the night following the first daytime sleep period and on the day following the second day sleep period. Median PVT reaction time was faster in the sodium oxybate group following the second day sleep period. The change from baseline in SWS was positively correlated with the change in MSLT and KSS. During recovery sleep the sodium oxybate group had less TST, SWS, REM, and slow wave activity (SWA) than the placebo group. Conclusions: Pharmacological enhancement of SWS with sodium oxybate resulted in a reduced response to sleep loss on measures of alertness and attention. In addition, SWS enhancement during sleep restriction appears to result in a reduced homeostatic response to sleep loss. Citation: Walsh JK; Hall-Porter JM; Griffin KS; Dodson ER; Forst EH; Curry DT; Eisenstein RD; Schweitzer PK. Enhancing slow wave sleep with sodium oxybate reduces the behavioral and physiological impact of sleep loss. SLEEP 2010;33(9):1217-1225. PMID:20857869

  6. Effects of partial sleep deprivation on slow waves during non-rapid eye movement sleep: a high density EEG investigation

    PubMed Central

    Plante, David T.; Goldstein, Michael R.; Cook, Jesse D.; Smith, Richard; Riedner, Brady A.; Rumble, Meredith E.; Jelenchick, Lauren; Roth, Andrea; Tononi, Giulio; Benca, Ruth M.; Peterson, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Changes in slow waves during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep in response to acute total sleep deprivation are well-established measures of sleep homeostasis. This investigation utilized high-density electroencephalography (hdEEG) to examine topographic changes in slow waves during repeated partial sleep deprivation. Methods Twenty-four participants underwent a 6-day sleep restriction protocol. Spectral and period-amplitude analyses of sleep hdEEG data were used to examine changes in slow wave energy, count, amplitude, and slope relative to baseline. Results Changes in slow wave energy were dependent on the quantity of NREM sleep utilized for analysis, with widespread increases during sleep restriction and recovery when comparing data from the first portion of the sleep period, but restricted to recovery sleep if the entire sleep episode was considered. Period-amplitude analysis was less dependent on the quantity of NREM sleep utilized, and demonstrated topographic changes in the count, amplitude, and distribution of slow waves, with frontal increases in slow wave amplitude, numbers of high-amplitude waves, and amplitude/slopes of low amplitude waves resulting from partial sleep deprivation. Conclusions Topographic changes in slow waves occur across the course of partial sleep restriction and recovery. Significance These results demonstrate a homeostatic response to partial sleep loss in humans. PMID:26596212

  7. Effects of partial sleep deprivation on slow waves during non-rapid eye movement sleep: A high density EEG investigation.

    PubMed

    Plante, David T; Goldstein, Michael R; Cook, Jesse D; Smith, Richard; Riedner, Brady A; Rumble, Meredith E; Jelenchick, Lauren; Roth, Andrea; Tononi, Giulio; Benca, Ruth M; Peterson, Michael J

    2016-02-01

    Changes in slow waves during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep in response to acute total sleep deprivation are well-established measures of sleep homeostasis. This investigation utilized high-density electroencephalography (hdEEG) to examine topographic changes in slow waves during repeated partial sleep deprivation. Twenty-four participants underwent a 6-day sleep restriction protocol. Spectral and period-amplitude analyses of sleep hdEEG data were used to examine changes in slow wave energy, count, amplitude, and slope relative to baseline. Changes in slow wave energy were dependent on the quantity of NREM sleep utilized for analysis, with widespread increases during sleep restriction and recovery when comparing data from the first portion of the sleep period, but restricted to recovery sleep if the entire sleep episode was considered. Period-amplitude analysis was less dependent on the quantity of NREM sleep utilized, and demonstrated topographic changes in the count, amplitude, and distribution of slow waves, with frontal increases in slow wave amplitude, numbers of high-amplitude waves, and amplitude/slopes of low amplitude waves resulting from partial sleep deprivation. Topographic changes in slow waves occur across the course of partial sleep restriction and recovery. These results demonstrate a homeostatic response to partial sleep loss in humans. Copyright © 2015 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Glutamate microinjection in the medial septum of rats decreases paradoxical sleep and increases slow wave sleep.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Didhiti; Kaushik, Mahesh K; Jaryal, Ashok Kumar; Kumar, Velayudhan Mohan; Mallick, Hruda Nanda

    2012-05-09

    The role of the medial septum in suppressing paradoxical sleep and promoting slow wave sleep was suggested on the basis of neurotoxic lesion studies. However, these conclusions need to be substantiated with further experiments, including chemical stimulation studies. In this report, the medial septum was stimulated in adult male rats by microinjection of L-glutamate. Sleep-wakefulness was electrophysiologically recorded, through chronically implanted electrodes, for 2 h before the injection and 4 h after the injection. There was a decrease in paradoxical sleep during the first hour and an increase in slow wave sleep during the second hour after the injection. The present findings not only supported the lesion studies but also showed that the major role of the medial septum is to suppress paradoxical sleep.

  9. Developmental aspects of sleep slow waves: linking sleep, brain maturation and behavior.

    PubMed

    Ringli, Maya; Huber, Reto

    2011-01-01

    Sleep slow waves are the major electrophysiological features of non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. Although there is growing understanding of where slow waves originate and how they are generated during sleep, the function of slow waves is still largely unclear. A recently proposed hypothesis relates slow waves to the homeostatic regulation of synaptic plasticity. While several studies confirm a correlation between experimentally triggered synaptic changes and slow-wave activity (SWA), little is known about its association to synaptic changes occurring during cortical maturation. Interestingly, slow waves undergo remarkable changes during development that parallel the time course of cortical maturation. In a recent cross-sectional study including children and adolescents, the topographical distribution of SWA was analyzed with high-density electroencephalography. The results showed age-dependent differences in SWA topography: SWA was highest over posterior regions during early childhood and then shifted over central derivations to the frontal cortex in late adolescence. This trajectory of SWA topography matches the course of cortical gray maturation. In this chapter, the major changes in slow waves during development are highlighted and linked to cortical maturation and behavior. Interestingly, synaptic density and slow-wave amplitude increase during childhood are highest shortly before puberty, decline thereafter during adolescence, reaching overall stable levels during adulthood. The question arises whether SWA is merely reflecting cortical changes or if it plays an active role in brain maturation. We thereby propose a model, by which sleep slow waves may contribute to cortical maturation. We hypothesize that while there is a balance between synaptic strengthening and synaptic downscaling in adults, the balance of strengthening/formation and weakening/elimination is tilted during development. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Detecting slow wave sleep using a single EEG signal channel.

    PubMed

    Su, Bo-Lin; Luo, Yuxi; Hong, Chih-Yuan; Nagurka, Mark L; Yen, Chen-Wen

    2015-03-30

    In addition to the cost and complexity of processing multiple signal channels, manual sleep staging is also tedious, time consuming, and error-prone. The aim of this paper is to propose an automatic slow wave sleep (SWS) detection method that uses only one channel of the electroencephalography (EEG) signal. The proposed approach distinguishes itself from previous automatic sleep staging methods by using three specially designed feature groups. The first feature group characterizes the waveform pattern of the EEG signal. The remaining two feature groups are developed to resolve the difficulties caused by interpersonal EEG signal differences. The proposed approach was tested with 1,003 subjects, and the SWS detection results show kappa coefficient at 0.66, an accuracy level of 0.973, a sensitivity score of 0.644 and a positive predictive value of 0.709. By excluding sleep apnea patients and persons whose age is older than 55, the SWS detection results improved to kappa coefficient, 0.76; accuracy, 0.963; sensitivity, 0.758; and positive predictive value, 0.812. With newly developed signal features, this study proposed and tested a single-channel EEG-based SWS detection method. The effectiveness of the proposed approach was demonstrated by applying it to detect the SWS of 1003 subjects. Our test results show that a low SWS ratio and sleep apnea can degrade the performance of SWS detection. The results also show that a large and accurately staged sleep dataset is of great importance when developing automatic sleep staging methods. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Vocabulary learning benefits from REM after slow-wave sleep.

    PubMed

    Batterink, Laura J; Westerberg, Carmen E; Paller, Ken A

    2017-10-01

    Memory reactivation during slow-wave sleep (SWS) influences the consolidation of recently acquired knowledge. This reactivation occurs spontaneously during sleep but can also be triggered by presenting learning-related cues, a technique known as targeted memory reactivation (TMR). Here we examined whether TMR can improve vocabulary learning. Participants learned the meanings of 60 novel words. Auditory cues for half the words were subsequently presented during SWS in an afternoon nap. Memory performance for cued versus uncued words did not differ at the group level but was systematically influenced by REM sleep duration. Participants who obtained relatively greater amounts of REM showed a significant benefit for cued relative to uncued words, whereas participants who obtained little or no REM demonstrated a significant effect in the opposite direction. We propose that REM after SWS may be critical for the consolidation of highly integrative memories, such as new vocabulary. Reactivation during SWS may allow newly encoded memories to be associated with other information, but this association can include disruptive linkages with pre-existing memories. Subsequent REM sleep may then be particularly beneficial for integrating new memories into appropriate pre-existing memory networks. These findings support the general proposition that memory storage benefits optimally from a cyclic succession of SWS and REM. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of Aging on Slow Wave Sleep Dynamics and Human Spatial Navigational Memory Consolidation

    PubMed Central

    Varga, Andrew W.; Ducca, Emma L.; Kishi, Akifumi; Fischer, Esther; Parekh, Ankit; Koushyk, Viachaslau; Yau, Po Lai; Gumb, Tyler; Leibert, David P.; Wohlleber, Margaret E.; Burschtin, Omar E.; Convit, Antonio; Rapoport, David M.

    2016-01-01

    The consolidation of spatial navigational memory during sleep is supported by electrophysiological and behavioral evidence. The features of sleep that mediate this ability may change with aging, as percentage of slow wave sleep is canonically thought to decrease with age, and slow waves are thought to help orchestrate hippocampal-neocortical dialogue that supports systems level consolidation. In this study, groups of younger and older subjects performed timed trials before and after polysomnographically recorded sleep on a 3D spatial maze navigational task. Although younger subjects performed better than older subjects at baseline, both groups showed similar improvement across pre-sleep trials. However, younger subjects experienced significant improvement in maze performance during sleep that was not observed in older subjects, without differences in morning psychomotor vigilance between groups. Older subjects had sleep quality marked by decreased amount of slow wave sleep and increased fragmentation of slow wave sleep, resulting in decreased slow wave activity. Across all subjects, frontal slow wave activity was positively correlated with both overnight change in maze performance and medial prefrontal cortical volume, illuminating a potential neuroanatomical substrate for slow wave activity changes with aging and underscoring the importance of slow wave activity in sleep-dependent spatial navigational memory consolidation. PMID:27143431

  13. Vagus Nerve Stimulation for Electrographic Status Epilepticus in Slow-Wave Sleep.

    PubMed

    Carosella, Christopher M; Greiner, Hansel M; Byars, Anna W; Arthur, Todd M; Leach, James L; Turner, Michele; Holland, Katherine D; Mangano, Francesco T; Arya, Ravindra

    2016-07-01

    Electrographic status epilepticus in slow sleep or continuous spike and waves during slow-wave sleep is an epileptic encephalopathy characterized by seizures, neurocognitive regression, and significant activation of epileptiform discharges during nonrapid eye movement sleep. There is no consensus on the diagnostic criteria and evidence-based optimal treatment algorithm for children with electrographic status epilepticus in slow sleep. We describe a 12-year-old girl with drug-resistant electrographic status epilepticus in slow wave sleep that was successfully treated with vagus nerve stimulation. Her clinical presentation, presurgical evaluation, decision-making, and course after vagus nerve stimulator implantation are described in detail. After vagus nerve stimulator implantation, the girl remained seizure free for more than a year, resolved the electrographic status epilepticus in slow sleep pattern on electroencephalography, and exhibited significant cognitive improvement. Vagus nerve stimulation may be considered for electrographic status epilepticus in slow sleep. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Cortical thinning explains changes in sleep slow waves during adulthood.

    PubMed

    Dubé, Jonathan; Lafortune, Marjolaine; Bedetti, Christophe; Bouchard, Maude; Gagnon, Jean François; Doyon, Julien; Evans, Alan C; Lina, Jean-Marc; Carrier, Julie

    2015-05-20

    Sleep slow waves (SWs) change considerably throughout normal aging. In humans, SWs are generated and propagate on a structural backbone of highly interconnected cortical regions that form most of the default mode network, such as the insula, cingulate cortices, temporal lobe, parietal lobe, and medial frontal lobe. Regions in this network undergo cortical thinning and breakdown in structural and functional connectivity over the course of normal aging. In this study, we investigated how changes in cortical thickness (CT), a measure of gray matter integrity, are involved in modifications of sleep SWs during adulthood in humans. Thirty young (mean age = 23.49 years; SD = 2.79) and 33 older (mean age = 60.35 years; SD = 5.71) healthy subjects underwent a nocturnal polysomnography and T1 MRI. We show that, when controlling for age, higher SW density (nb/min of nonrapid eye movement sleep) was associated with higher CT in cortical regions involved in SW generation surrounding the lateral fissure (insula, superior temporal, parietal, middle frontal), whereas higher SW amplitude was associated with higher CT in middle frontal, medial prefrontal, and medial posterior regions. Mediation analyses demonstrated that thinning in a network of cortical regions involved in SW generation and propagation, but also in cognitive functions, explained the age-related decrease in SW density and amplitude. Altogether, our results suggest that microstructural degradation of specific cortical regions compromise SW generation and propagation in older subjects, critically contributing to age-related changes in SW oscillations.

  15. Slow Wave Sleep Enhancement with Gaboxadol Reduces Daytime Sleepiness During Sleep Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, James K.; Snyder, Ellen; Hall, Janine; Randazzo, Angela C.; Griffin, Kara; Groeger, John; Eisenstein, Rhody; Feren, Stephen D.; Dickey, Pam; Schweitzer, Paula K.

    2008-01-01

    Study Objectives: To evaluate the impact of enhanced slow wave sleep (SWS) on behavioral, psychological, and physiological changes resulting from sleep restriction. Design: A double-blind, parallel group, placebo-controlled design was used to compare gaboxadol (GBX) 15 mg, a SWS-enhancing drug, to placebo during 4 nights of sleep restriction (5 h/night). Behavioral, psychological, and physiological measures of the impact of sleep restriction were assessed in both groups at baseline, during sleep restriction and following recovery sleep. Setting: Sleep research laboratory. Participants: Forty-one healthy adults; 9 males and 12 females (mean age: 32.0 ± 9.9 y) in the placebo group and 10 males and 10 females (mean age: 31.9 ± 10.2 y) in the GBX group. Interventions: Both experimental groups underwent 4 nights of sleep restriction. Each group received either GBX 15 mg or placebo on all sleep restriction nights, and both groups received placebo on baseline and recovery nights. Measurements and Results: Polysomnography documented a SWS-enhancing effect of GBX with no group difference in total sleep time during sleep restriction. The placebo group displayed the predicted deficits due to sleep restriction on the multiple sleep latency test (MSLT) and on introspective measures of sleepiness and fatigue. Compared to placebo, the GBX group showed significantly less physiological sleepiness on the MSLT and lower levels of introspective sleepiness and fatigue during sleep restriction. There were no differences between groups on the psychomotor vigilance task (PVT) and a cognitive test battery, but these measures were minimally affected by sleep restriction in this study. The correlation between change from baseline in MSLT on Day 6 and change from baseline in SWS on Night 6 was significant in the GBX group and in both groups combined. Conclusions: The results of this study are consistent with the hypothesis that enhanced SWS, in this study produced by GBX, reduces

  16. Regional differences of the human sleep electroencephalogram in response to selective slow-wave sleep deprivation.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, Michele; De Gennaro, Luigi; Curcio, Giuseppe; Cristiani, Riccardo; Corvasce, Chiara; Bertini, Mario

    2002-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the topographic changes in sleep recuperative processes in response to selective slow-wave sleep (SWS) deprivation. SWS was suppressed on two consecutive nights by means of acoustic stimulation. The electroencephalogram (EEG) power of baseline, deprivation and recovery nights was analysed in 1 Hz bins. During the SWS deprivation nights, large decreases of EEG power were found at frontopolar, central and parietal derivations encompassing the delta, theta and alpha range, while only slow delta (0.5-2 Hz) was affected at the frontal derivation. Recovery sleep was characterized by a generalized increase of power during non-REM sleep encompassing the delta, theta and alpha bands, with a clear antero-posterior gradient. The coherent behaviour of different EEG bands with traditionally different electrophysiological meanings during non-REM sleep suggests that, in light of the recent advances in sleep neurophysiology, a re-examination of the functional role of EEG rhythms during sleep is needed. The 'resistance' to selective SWS deprivation of the frontal area, together with its larger increase of EEG power during recovery, may be interpreted as a sign of a greater sleep need of the frontal cortical areas, confirming that some aspects of the regulatory processes of human sleep are local in nature and may show use-dependent characteristics.

  17. Relationship of plasma growth hormone to slow-wave sleep in African sleeping sickness.

    PubMed

    Radomski, M W; Buguet, A; Doua, F; Bogui, P; Tapie, P

    1996-04-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (sleeping sickness) is a unique disease model of disrupted circadian rhythms in the sleep-wake cycle and cortisol and prolactin secretion. This study examined the temporal relationship between growth hormone (GH) secretion and the sleep-wake cycle in 8 infected African patients and 6 healthy indigenous African subjects. Twenty-four-hour sleep patterns were recorded by polysomnography and hourly blood samples analyzed for plasma GH. No relationships between the mean normalized plasma GH levels (Z scores) and the sleep stages (wakefulness, sleep stages 1 and 2 ('light' sleep), slow-wave sleep (stages 3 and 4, SWS), and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep) were found in the patients or healthy subjects. However, when the time of sampling of the plasma GH concentrations was lagged by 16 min with respect to the occurrence of the various sleep stages, significant correlations were found between plasma GH concentrations and SWS in both healthy subjects and patients. Thus, the association between SWS and GH secretion persisted even in the presence of disrupted circadian rhythms, further supporting the concept that sleep and the stimulation of GH secretion are outputs of a common mechanism.

  18. Thalamic Atrophy Contributes to Low Slow Wave Sleep in Neuromyelitis Optica Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Su, Lei; Han, Yujuan; Xue, Rong; Wood, Kristofer; Shi, Fu-Dong; Liu, Yaou; Fu, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Slow wave sleep abnormality has been reported in neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD), but mechanism for such abnormality is unknown. To determine the structural defects in the brain that account for the decrease of slow wave sleep in NMOSD patients. Thirty-three NMOSD patients and 18 matched healthy controls (HC) were enrolled. Polysomnography was used to monitor slow wave sleep and three-dimensional T1-weighted MRIs were obtained to assess the alterations of grey matter volume. The percentage of deep slow wave sleep decreased in 93% NMOSD patients. Compared to HC, a reduction of grey matter volume was found in the bilateral thalamus of patients with a lower percentage of slow wave sleep (FWE corrected at cluster-level, p < 0.05, cluster size > 400 voxels). Furthermore, the right thalamic fraction was positively correlated with the decrease in the percentage of slow wave sleep in NMOSD patients (p < 0.05, FDR corrected, cluster size > 200 voxels). Our study identified that thalamic atrophy is associated with the decrease of slow wave sleep in NMOSD patients. Further studies should evaluate whether neurotransmitters or hormones which stem from thalamus are involved in the decrease of slow wave sleep. PMID:28053819

  19. Thalamic Atrophy Contributes to Low Slow Wave Sleep in Neuromyelitis Optica Spectrum Disorder.

    PubMed

    Su, Lei; Han, Yujuan; Xue, Rong; Wood, Kristofer; Shi, Fu-Dong; Liu, Yaou; Fu, Ying

    2016-12-01

    Slow wave sleep abnormality has been reported in neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD), but mechanism for such abnormality is unknown. To determine the structural defects in the brain that account for the decrease of slow wave sleep in NMOSD patients. Thirty-three NMOSD patients and 18 matched healthy controls (HC) were enrolled. Polysomnography was used to monitor slow wave sleep and three-dimensional T1-weighted MRIs were obtained to assess the alterations of grey matter volume. The percentage of deep slow wave sleep decreased in 93% NMOSD patients. Compared to HC, a reduction of grey matter volume was found in the bilateral thalamus of patients with a lower percentage of slow wave sleep (FWE corrected at cluster-level, p < 0.05, cluster size > 400 voxels). Furthermore, the right thalamic fraction was positively correlated with the decrease in the percentage of slow wave sleep in NMOSD patients (p < 0.05, FDR corrected, cluster size > 200 voxels). Our study identified that thalamic atrophy is associated with the decrease of slow wave sleep in NMOSD patients. Further studies should evaluate whether neurotransmitters or hormones which stem from thalamus are involved in the decrease of slow wave sleep.

  20. Fiber and Saturated Fat Are Associated with Sleep Arousals and Slow Wave Sleep.

    PubMed

    St-Onge, Marie-Pierre; Roberts, Amy; Shechter, Ari; Choudhury, Arindam Roy

    2016-01-01

    Sleep restriction alters food intake, but less is known about how dietary patterns affect sleep. Current goals were to determine whether: (1) sleep is different after consumption of a controlled diet vs. an ad libitum diet, and (2) dietary intake during ad libitum feeding is related to nocturnal sleep. Twenty-six normal weight adults (30-45 y), habitually sleeping 7-9 h/night, participated in a randomized-crossover inpatient study with 2 phases of 5 nights: short (4 h in bed) or habitual (9 h in bed) sleep. Only data from the habitual sleep phase were used for the present analyses. During the first 4 days, participants consumed a controlled diet; on day 5, food intake was self-selected. Linear regression was used to determine relations between daytime food intake and nighttime sleep on day 5. Sleep duration did not differ after 3 days of controlled feeding vs. a day of ad libitum intake. However, sleep after ad libitum eating had less slow wave sleep (SWS, P = 0.0430) and longer onset latency (P = 0.0085). Greater fiber intake predicted less stage 1 (P = 0.0198) and more SWS (P = 0.0286). Percent of energy from saturated fat predicted less SWS (P = 0.0422). Higher percent of energy from sugar and other carbohydrates not considered sugar or fiber was associated with arousals (P = 0.0320 and 0.0481, respectively). Low fiber and high saturated fat and sugar intake is associated with lighter, less restorative sleep with more arousals. Diet could be useful in the management of sleep disorders but this needs to be tested. http://www.clinicaltrials.gov, #NCT00935402. © 2016 American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

  1. Slow wave and REM sleep deprivation effects on explicit and implicit memory during sleep.

    PubMed

    Casey, Sarah J; Solomons, Luke C; Steier, Joerg; Kabra, Neeraj; Burnside, Anna; Pengo, Martino F; Moxham, John; Goldstein, Laura H; Kopelman, Michael D

    2016-11-01

    It has been debated whether different stages in the human sleep cycle preferentially mediate the consolidation of explicit and implicit memories, or whether all of the stages in succession are necessary for optimal consolidation. Here we investigated whether the selective deprivation of slow wave sleep (SWS) or rapid eye movement (REM) sleep over an entire night would have a specific effect on consolidation in explicit and implicit memory tasks. Participants completed a set of explicit and implicit memory tasks at night, prior to sleep. They had 1 control night of undisturbed sleep and 2 experimental nights, during which either SWS or REM sleep was selectively deprived across the entire night (sleep conditions counterbalanced across participants). Polysomnography recordings quantified precisely the amount of SWS and REM sleep that occurred during each of the sleep conditions, and spindle counts were recorded. In the morning, participants completed the experimental tasks in the same sequence as the night before. SWS deprivation disrupted the consolidation of explicit memories for visuospatial information (ηp2 = .23), and both SWS (ηp2 = .53) and REM sleep (ηp2 = .52) deprivation adversely affected explicit verbal recall. Neither SWS nor REM sleep deprivation affected aspects of short-term or working memory, and did not affect measures of verbal implicit memory. Spindle counts did not correlate significantly with memory performance. These findings demonstrate the importance of measuring the sleep cycles throughout the entire night, and the contribution of both SWS and REM sleep to memory consolidation. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  2. Propagated infra-slow intrinsic brain activity reorganizes across wake and slow wave sleep

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Anish; Snyder, Abraham Z; Tagliazucchi, Enzo; Laufs, Helmut; Raichle, Marcus E

    2015-01-01

    Propagation of slow intrinsic brain activity has been widely observed in electrophysiogical studies of slow wave sleep (SWS). However, in human resting state fMRI (rs-fMRI), intrinsic activity has been understood predominantly in terms of zero-lag temporal synchrony (functional connectivity) within systems known as resting state networks (RSNs). Prior rs-fMRI studies have found that RSNs are generally preserved across wake and sleep. Here, we use a recently developed analysis technique to study propagation of infra-slow intrinsic blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signals in normal adults during wake and SWS. This analysis reveals marked changes in propagation patterns in SWS vs. wake. Broadly, ordered propagation is preserved within traditionally defined RSNs but lost between RSNs. Additionally, propagation between cerebral cortex and subcortical structures reverses directions, and intra-cortical propagation becomes reorganized, especially in visual and sensorimotor cortices. These findings show that propagated rs-fMRI activity informs theoretical accounts of the neural functions of sleep. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10781.001 PMID:26551562

  3. Propagated infra-slow intrinsic brain activity reorganizes across wake and slow wave sleep.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Anish; Snyder, Abraham Z; Tagliazucchi, Enzo; Laufs, Helmut; Raichle, Marcus E

    2015-11-09

    Propagation of slow intrinsic brain activity has been widely observed in electrophysiogical studies of slow wave sleep (SWS). However, in human resting state fMRI (rs-fMRI), intrinsic activity has been understood predominantly in terms of zero-lag temporal synchrony (functional connectivity) within systems known as resting state networks (RSNs). Prior rs-fMRI studies have found that RSNs are generally preserved across wake and sleep. Here, we use a recently developed analysis technique to study propagation of infra-slow intrinsic blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signals in normal adults during wake and SWS. This analysis reveals marked changes in propagation patterns in SWS vs. wake. Broadly, ordered propagation is preserved within traditionally defined RSNs but lost between RSNs. Additionally, propagation between cerebral cortex and subcortical structures reverses directions, and intra-cortical propagation becomes reorganized, especially in visual and sensorimotor cortices. These findings show that propagated rs-fMRI activity informs theoretical accounts of the neural functions of sleep.

  4. Midlife Decline in Declarative Memory Consolidation Is Correlated with a Decline in Slow Wave Sleep

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Backhaus, Jutta; Born, Jan; Hoeckesfeld, Ralf; Fokuhl, Sylvia; Hohagen, Fritz; Junghanns, Klaus

    2007-01-01

    Sleep architecture as well as memory function are strongly age dependent. Slow wave sleep (SWS), in particular, decreases dramatically with increasing age, starting already beyond the age of 30. SWS normally predominates during early nocturnal sleep and is implicated in declarative memory consolidation. However, the consequences of changes in…

  5. Midlife Decline in Declarative Memory Consolidation Is Correlated with a Decline in Slow Wave Sleep

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Backhaus, Jutta; Born, Jan; Hoeckesfeld, Ralf; Fokuhl, Sylvia; Hohagen, Fritz; Junghanns, Klaus

    2007-01-01

    Sleep architecture as well as memory function are strongly age dependent. Slow wave sleep (SWS), in particular, decreases dramatically with increasing age, starting already beyond the age of 30. SWS normally predominates during early nocturnal sleep and is implicated in declarative memory consolidation. However, the consequences of changes in…

  6. Age-Related Reduction in Daytime Sleep Propensity and Nocturnal Slow Wave Sleep

    PubMed Central

    Dijk, Derk-Jan; Groeger, John A.; Stanley, Neil; Deacon, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether age-related and experimental reductions in SWS and sleep continuity are associated with increased daytime sleep propensity. Methods: Assessment of daytime sleep propensity under baseline conditions and following experimental disruption of SWS. Healthy young (20-30 y, n = 44), middle-aged (40-55 y, n = 35) and older (66-83 y, n = 31) men and women, completed a 2-way parallel group study. After an 8-h baseline sleep episode, subjects were randomized to 2 nights with selective SWS disruption by acoustic stimuli, or without disruption, followed by 1 recovery night. Objective and subjective sleep propensity were assessed using the Multiple Sleep Latency Test (MSLT) and the Karolinska Sleepiness Scale (KSS). Findings: During baseline sleep, SWS decreased (P < 0.001) and the number of awakenings increased (P < 0.001) across the 3 age groups. During the baseline day, MSLT values increased across the three age groups (P < 0.0001) with mean values of 8.7min (SD: 4.5), 11.7 (5.1) and 14.2 (4.1) in the young, middle-aged, and older adults, respectively. KSS values were 3.7 (1.0), 3.2 (0.9), and 3.4 (0.6) (age-group: P = 0.031). Two nights of SWS disruption led to a reduction in MSLT and increase in KSS in all 3 age groups (SWS disruption vs. control: P < 0.05 in all cases). Conclusions: Healthy aging is associated with a reduction in daytime sleep propensity, sleep continuity, and SWS. In contrast, experimental disruption of SWS leads to an increase in daytime sleep propensity. The age-related decline in SWS and reduction in daytime sleep propensity may reflect a lessening in homeostatic sleep requirement. Healthy older adults without sleep disorders can expect to be less sleepy during the daytime than young adults. Citation: Dijk DJ; Groeger JA; Stanley N; Deacon S. Age-related reduction in daytime sleep propensity and nocturnal slow wave sleep. SLEEP 2010;33(2):211-223. PMID:20175405

  7. Different Effects of Sleep Deprivation and Torpor on EEG Slow-Wave Characteristics in Djungarian Hamsters

    PubMed Central

    Palchykova, S.; Achermann, P.; Tobler, I.; Deboer, T.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract It has been shown previously in Djungarian hamsters that the initial electroencephalography (EEG) slow-wave activity (power in the 0.5–4.0 Hz band; SWA) in non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep following an episode of daily torpor is consistently enhanced, similar to the SWA increase after sleep deprivation (SD). However, it is unknown whether the network mechanisms underlying the SWA increase after torpor and SD are similar. EEG slow waves recorded in the neocortex during sleep reflect synchronized transitions between periods of activity and silence among large neuronal populations. We therefore set out to investigate characteristics of individual cortical EEG slow waves recorded during NREM sleep after 4 h SD and during sleep after emergence from an episode of daily torpor in adult male Djungarian hamsters. We found that during the first hour after both SD and torpor, the SWA increase was associated with an increase in slow-wave incidence and amplitude. However, the slopes of single slow waves during NREM sleep were steeper in the first hour after SD but not after torpor, and, in contrast to sleep after SD, the magnitude of change in slopes after torpor was unrelated to the changes in SWA. Furthermore, slow-wave slopes decreased progressively within the first 2 h after SD, while a progressive increase in slow-wave slopes was apparent during the first 2 h after torpor. The data suggest that prolonged waking and torpor have different effects on cortical network activity underlying slow-wave characteristics, while resulting in a similar homeostatic sleep response of SWA. We suggest that sleep plays an important role in network homeostasis after both waking and torpor, consistent with a recovery function for both states. PMID:28168294

  8. Different Effects of Sleep Deprivation and Torpor on EEG Slow-Wave Characteristics in Djungarian Hamsters.

    PubMed

    Vyazovskiy, V V; Palchykova, S; Achermann, P; Tobler, I; Deboer, T

    2017-02-01

    It has been shown previously in Djungarian hamsters that the initial electroencephalography (EEG) slow-wave activity (power in the 0.5-4.0 Hz band; SWA) in non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep following an episode of daily torpor is consistently enhanced, similar to the SWA increase after sleep deprivation (SD). However, it is unknown whether the network mechanisms underlying the SWA increase after torpor and SD are similar. EEG slow waves recorded in the neocortex during sleep reflect synchronized transitions between periods of activity and silence among large neuronal populations. We therefore set out to investigate characteristics of individual cortical EEG slow waves recorded during NREM sleep after 4 h SD and during sleep after emergence from an episode of daily torpor in adult male Djungarian hamsters. We found that during the first hour after both SD and torpor, the SWA increase was associated with an increase in slow-wave incidence and amplitude. However, the slopes of single slow waves during NREM sleep were steeper in the first hour after SD but not after torpor, and, in contrast to sleep after SD, the magnitude of change in slopes after torpor was unrelated to the changes in SWA. Furthermore, slow-wave slopes decreased progressively within the first 2 h after SD, while a progressive increase in slow-wave slopes was apparent during the first 2 h after torpor. The data suggest that prolonged waking and torpor have different effects on cortical network activity underlying slow-wave characteristics, while resulting in a similar homeostatic sleep response of SWA. We suggest that sleep plays an important role in network homeostasis after both waking and torpor, consistent with a recovery function for both states. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  9. Local Slow Waves in Superficial Layers of Primary Cortical Areas during REM Sleep.

    PubMed

    Funk, Chadd M; Honjoh, Sakiko; Rodriguez, Alexander V; Cirelli, Chiara; Tononi, Giulio

    2016-02-08

    Sleep is traditionally constituted of two global behavioral states, non-rapid eye movement (NREM) and rapid eye movement (REM), characterized by quiescence and reduced responsiveness to sensory stimuli [1]. NREM sleep is distinguished by slow waves and spindles throughout the cerebral cortex and REM sleep by an "activated," low-voltage fast electroencephalogram (EEG) paradoxically similar to that of wake, accompanied by rapid eye movements and muscle atonia. However, recent evidence has shown that cortical activity patterns during wake and NREM sleep are not as global as previously thought. Local slow waves can appear in various cortical regions in both awake humans [2] and rodents [3-5]. Intracranial recordings in humans [6] and rodents [4, 7] have shown that NREM sleep slow waves most often involve only a subset of brain regions that varies from wave to wave rather than occurring near synchronously across all cortical areas. Moreover, some cortical areas can transiently "wake up" [8] in an otherwise sleeping brain. Yet until now, cortical activity during REM sleep was thought to be homogenously wake-like. We show here, using local laminar recordings in freely moving mice, that slow waves occur regularly during REM sleep, but only in primary sensory and motor areas and mostly in layer 4, the main target of relay thalamic inputs, and layer 3. This finding may help explain why, during REM sleep, we remain disconnected from the environment even though the bulk of the cortex shows wake-like, paradoxical activation.

  10. Slow Wave Sleep Induced by GABA Agonist Tiagabine Fails to Benefit Memory Consolidation

    PubMed Central

    Feld, Gordon B.; Wilhelm, Ines; Ma, Ying; Groch, Sabine; Binkofski, Ferdinand; Mölle, Matthias; Born, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: Slow wave sleep (SWS) plays a pivotal role in consolidating memories. Tiagabine has been shown to increase SWS in favor of REM sleep without impacting subjective sleep. However, it is unknown whether this effect is paralleled by an improved sleep-dependent consolidation of memory. Design: This double-blind within-subject crossover study tested sensitivity of overnight retention of declarative neutral and emotional materials (word pairs, pictures) as well as a procedural memory task (sequence finger tapping) to oral administration of placebo or 10 mg tiagabine (at 22:30). Participants: Fourteen healthy young men aged 21.9 years (range 18-28 years). Measurements and Results: Tiagabine significantly increased the time spent in SWS and decreased REM sleep compared to placebo. Tiagabine also enhanced slow wave activity (0.5-4.0 Hz) and density of < 1 Hz slow oscillations during NREM sleep. Fast (12-15 Hz) and slow (9-12 Hz) spindle activity, in particular that occurring phase-locked to the slow oscillation cycle, was decreased following tiagabine. Despite signs of deeper and more SWS, overnight retention of memory tested after sleep the next evening (19:30) was generally not improved after tiagabine, but on average even lower than after placebo, with this impairing effect reaching significance for procedural sequence finger tapping. Conclusions: Our data show that increasing slow wave sleep with tiagabine does not improve memory consolidation. Possibly this is due to functional differences from normal slow wave sleep, i.e., the concurrent suppressive influence of tiagabine on phase-locked spindle activity. Citation: Feld GB; Wilhelm I; Ma Y; Groch S; Binkofski F; Mölle M; Born J. Slow wave sleep induced by GABA agonist tiagabine fails to benefit memory consolidation. SLEEP 2013;36(9):1317-1326. PMID:23997364

  11. Two features of sleep slow waves: homeostatic and reactive aspects--from long term to instant sleep homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Halász, Péter; Bódizs, Róbert; Parrino, Liborio; Terzano, Mario

    2014-10-01

    In this paper we reviewed results of sleep research that have changed the views about sleep slow wave homeostasis, which involve use-dependent and experience-dependent local aspects to understand more of the physiology of plastic changes during sleep. Apart from the traditional homeostatic slow-wave economy, we also overviewed research on the existence and role of reactive aspects of sleep slow waves. Based on the results from spontaneous and artificially evoked slow waves, we offer a new hypothesis on instant slow wave homeostatic regulation. This regulation compensates for any potentially sleep-disturbing events by providing instant "delta injections" to maintain the nightly delta level, thus protecting cognitive functions located in the frontal lobe. We suggest that this double (long-term /instant) homeostasis provides double security for the frontal lobes in order to protect cognitive functions. The incorporation of reactive slow wave activity (SWA) makes sleep regulation more dynamic and provides more room for the internalization of external influences during sleep.

  12. Effects of Tiagabine on Slow Wave Sleep and Arousal Threshold in Patients With Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

    PubMed

    Taranto-Montemurro, Luigi; Sands, Scott A; Edwards, Bradley A; Azarbarzin, Ali; Marques, Melania; de Melo, Camila; Eckert, Danny J; White, David P; Wellman, Andrew

    2017-02-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) severity is markedly reduced during slow-wave sleep (SWS) even in patients with a severe disease. The reason for this improvement is uncertain but likely relates to non-anatomical factors (i.e. reduced arousability, chemosensitivity, and increased dilator muscle activity). The anticonvulsant tiagabine produces a dose-dependent increase in SWS in subjects without OSA. This study aimed to test the hypothesis that tiagabine would reduce OSA severity by raising the overall arousal threshold during sleep. After a baseline physiology night to assess patients' OSA phenotypic traits, a placebo-controlled, double-blind, crossover trial of tiagabine 12 mg administered before sleep was performed in 14 OSA patients. Under each condition, we assessed the effects on sleep and OSA severity using standard clinical polysomnography. Tiagabine increased slow-wave activity (SWA) of the electroencephalogram (1-4 Hz) compared to placebo (1.8 [0.4] vs. 2.0 [0.5] LogμV2, p = .04) but did not reduce OSA severity (apnea-hypopnea index [AHI] 41.5 [20.3] vs. 39.1 [16.5], p > .5). SWS duration (25 [20] vs. 26 [43] mins, p > .5) and arousal threshold (-26.5 [5.0] vs. -27.6 [5.1] cmH2O, p = .26) were also unchanged between nights. Tiagabine modified sleep microstructure (increase in SWA) but did not change the duration of SWS, OSA severity, or arousal threshold in this group of OSA patients. Based on these findings, tiagabine should not be considered as a therapeutic option for OSA treatment.

  13. Slow wave activity and slow oscillations in sleepwalkers and controls: effects of 38 h of sleep deprivation.

    PubMed

    Perrault, Rosemarie; Carrier, Julie; Desautels, Alex; Montplaisir, Jacques; Zadra, Antonio

    2013-08-01

    Sleepwalkers have been shown to have an unusually high number of arousals from slow wave sleep and lower slow wave activity (SWA) power during the night than controls. Because sleep deprivation increases the frequency of slow wave sleep (SWS) arousals in sleepwalkers, it may also affect the expression of the homeostatic process to a greater extent than shown previously. We thus investigated SWA power as well as slow wave oscillation (SWO) density in 10 sleepwalkers and nine controls at baseline and following 38 h of sleep deprivation. There was a significant increase in SWA during participants' recovery sleep, especially during their second non-rapid eye movement (NREM) period. SWO density was similarly increased during recovery sleep's first two NREM periods. A fronto-central gradient in SWA and SWO was also present on both nights. However, no group differences were noted on any of the 2 nights on SWA or SWO. This unexpected result may be related to the heterogeneity of sleepwalkers as a population, as well as our small sample size. SWA pressure after extended sleep deprivation may also result in a ceiling effect in both sleepwalkers and controls.

  14. Facilitation of epileptic activity during sleep is mediated by high amplitude slow waves.

    PubMed

    Frauscher, Birgit; von Ellenrieder, Nicolás; Ferrari-Marinho, Taissa; Avoli, Massimo; Dubeau, François; Gotman, Jean

    2015-06-01

    Epileptic discharges in focal epilepsy are frequently activated during non-rapid eye movement sleep. Sleep slow waves are present during this stage and have been shown to include a deactivated ('down', hyperpolarized) and an activated state ('up', depolarized). The 'up' state enhances physiological rhythms, and we hypothesize that sleep slow waves and particularly the 'up' state are the specific components of non-rapid eye movement sleep that mediate the activation of epileptic activity. We investigated eight patients with pharmaco-resistant focal epilepsies who underwent combined scalp-intracerebral electroencephalography for diagnostic evaluation. We analysed 259 frontal electroencephalographic channels, and manually marked 442 epileptic spikes and 8487 high frequency oscillations during high amplitude widespread slow waves, and during matched control segments with low amplitude widespread slow waves, non-widespread slow waves or no slow waves selected during the same sleep stages (total duration of slow wave and control segments: 49 min each). During the slow waves, spikes and high frequency oscillations were more frequent than during control segments (79% of spikes during slow waves and 65% of high frequency oscillations, both P ∼ 0). The spike and high frequency oscillation density also increased for higher amplitude slow waves. We compared the density of spikes and high frequency oscillations between the 'up' and 'down' states. Spike and high frequency oscillation density was highest during the transition from the 'up' to the 'down' state. Interestingly, high frequency oscillations in channels with normal activity expressed a different peak at the transition from the 'down' to the 'up' state. These results show that the apparent activation of epileptic discharges by non-rapid eye movement sleep is not a state-dependent phenomenon but is predominantly associated with specific events, the high amplitude widespread slow waves that are frequent, but not

  15. Facilitation of epileptic activity during sleep is mediated by high amplitude slow waves

    PubMed Central

    von Ellenrieder, Nicolás; Ferrari-Marinho, Taissa; Avoli, Massimo; Dubeau, François; Gotman, Jean

    2015-01-01

    Epileptic discharges in focal epilepsy are frequently activated during non-rapid eye movement sleep. Sleep slow waves are present during this stage and have been shown to include a deactivated (‘down’, hyperpolarized) and an activated state (‘up’, depolarized). The ‘up’ state enhances physiological rhythms, and we hypothesize that sleep slow waves and particularly the ‘up’ state are the specific components of non-rapid eye movement sleep that mediate the activation of epileptic activity. We investigated eight patients with pharmaco-resistant focal epilepsies who underwent combined scalp-intracerebral electroencephalography for diagnostic evaluation. We analysed 259 frontal electroencephalographic channels, and manually marked 442 epileptic spikes and 8487 high frequency oscillations during high amplitude widespread slow waves, and during matched control segments with low amplitude widespread slow waves, non-widespread slow waves or no slow waves selected during the same sleep stages (total duration of slow wave and control segments: 49 min each). During the slow waves, spikes and high frequency oscillations were more frequent than during control segments (79% of spikes during slow waves and 65% of high frequency oscillations, both P ∼ 0). The spike and high frequency oscillation density also increased for higher amplitude slow waves. We compared the density of spikes and high frequency oscillations between the ‘up’ and ‘down’ states. Spike and high frequency oscillation density was highest during the transition from the ‘up’ to the ‘down’ state. Interestingly, high frequency oscillations in channels with normal activity expressed a different peak at the transition from the ‘down’ to the ‘up’ state. These results show that the apparent activation of epileptic discharges by non-rapid eye movement sleep is not a state-dependent phenomenon but is predominantly associated with specific events, the high amplitude widespread slow

  16. Overnight Changes in the Slope of Sleep Slow Waves during Infancy

    PubMed Central

    Fattinger, Sara; Jenni, Oskar G.; Schmitt, Bernhard; Achermann, Peter; Huber, Reto

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: Slow wave activity (SWA, 0.5-4.5 Hz) is a well-established marker for sleep pressure in adults. Recent studies have shown that increasing sleep pressure is reflected by an increased synchronized firing pattern of cortical neurons, which can be measured by the slope of sleep slow waves. Thus we aimed at investigating whether the slope of sleep slow waves might provide an alternative marker to study the homeostatic regulation of sleep during early human development. Design: All-night sleep electroencephalography (EEG) was recorded longitudinally at 2, 4, 6, and 9 months after birth. Setting: Home recording. Patients or Participants: 11 healthy full-term infants (5 male, 6 female). Interventions: None Measurements and Results: The slope of sleep slow waves increased with age. At all ages the slope decreased from the first to the last hour of non rapid-eye-movement (NREM) sleep, even when controlling for amplitude differences (P < 0.002). The decrease of the slope was also present in the cycle-by-cycle time course across the night (P < 0.001) at the age of 6 months when the alternating pattern of low-delta activity (0.75-1.75 Hz) is most prominent. Moreover, we found distinct topographical differences exhibiting the steepest slope over the occipital cortex. Conclusions: The results suggest an age-dependent increase in synchronization of cortical activity during infancy, which might be due to increasing synaptogenesis. Previous studies have shown that during early postnatal development synaptogenesis is most pronounced over the occipital cortex, which could explain why the steepest slope was found in the occipital derivation. Our results provide evidence that the homeostatic regulation of sleep develops early in human infants. Citation: Fattinger S; Jenni OG; Schmitt B; Achermann P; Huber R. Overnight changes in the slope of sleep slow waves during infancy. SLEEP 2014;37(2):245-253. PMID:24497653

  17. EEG sleep slow-wave activity as a mirror of cortical maturation.

    PubMed

    Buchmann, Andreas; Ringli, Maya; Kurth, Salomé; Schaerer, Margot; Geiger, Anja; Jenni, Oskar G; Huber, Reto

    2011-03-01

    Deep (slow wave) sleep shows extensive maturational changes from childhood through adolescence, which is reflected in a decrease of sleep depth measured as the activity of electroencephalographic (EEG) slow waves. This decrease in sleep depth is paralleled by massive synaptic remodeling during adolescence as observed in anatomical studies, which supports the notion that adolescence represents a sensitive period for cortical maturation. To assess the relationship between slow-wave activity (SWA) and cortical maturation, we acquired sleep EEG and magnetic resonance imaging data in children and adolescents between 8 and 19 years. We observed a tight relationship between sleep SWA and a variety of indexes of cortical maturation derived from magnetic resonance (MR) images. Specifically, gray matter volumes in regions correlating positively with the activity of slow waves largely overlapped with brain areas exhibiting an age-dependent decrease in gray matter. The positive relationship between SWA and cortical gray matter was present also for power in other frequency ranges (theta, alpha, sigma, and beta) and other vigilance states (theta during rapid eye movement sleep). Our findings indicate a strong relationship between sleep EEG activity and cortical maturation. We propose that in particular, sleep SWA represents a good marker for structural changes in neuronal networks reflecting cortical maturation during adolescence.

  18. Neuronal Networks in Children with Continuous Spikes and Waves during Slow Sleep

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siniatchkin, Michael; Groening, Kristina; Moehring, Jan; Moeller, Friederike; Boor, Rainer; Brodbeck, Verena; Michel, Christoph M.; Rodionov, Roman; Lemieux, Louis; Stephani, Ulrich

    2010-01-01

    Epileptic encephalopathy with continuous spikes and waves during slow sleep is an age-related disorder characterized by the presence of interictal epileptiform discharges during at least greater than 85% of sleep and cognitive deficits associated with this electroencephalography pattern. The pathophysiological mechanisms of continuous spikes and…

  19. Neuronal Networks in Children with Continuous Spikes and Waves during Slow Sleep

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siniatchkin, Michael; Groening, Kristina; Moehring, Jan; Moeller, Friederike; Boor, Rainer; Brodbeck, Verena; Michel, Christoph M.; Rodionov, Roman; Lemieux, Louis; Stephani, Ulrich

    2010-01-01

    Epileptic encephalopathy with continuous spikes and waves during slow sleep is an age-related disorder characterized by the presence of interictal epileptiform discharges during at least greater than 85% of sleep and cognitive deficits associated with this electroencephalography pattern. The pathophysiological mechanisms of continuous spikes and…

  20. Landau-Kleffner Syndrome, Electrical Status Epilepticus in Slow Wave Sleep, and Language Regression in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McVicar, Kathryn A.; Shinnar, Shlomo

    2004-01-01

    The Landau-Kleffner syndrome (LKS) and electrical status epilepticus in slow wave sleep (ESES) are rare childhood-onset epileptic encephalopathies in which loss of language skills occurs in the context of an epileptiform EEG activated in sleep. Although in LKS the loss of function is limited to language, in ESES there is a wider spectrum of…

  1. Landau-Kleffner Syndrome, Electrical Status Epilepticus in Slow Wave Sleep, and Language Regression in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McVicar, Kathryn A.; Shinnar, Shlomo

    2004-01-01

    The Landau-Kleffner syndrome (LKS) and electrical status epilepticus in slow wave sleep (ESES) are rare childhood-onset epileptic encephalopathies in which loss of language skills occurs in the context of an epileptiform EEG activated in sleep. Although in LKS the loss of function is limited to language, in ESES there is a wider spectrum of…

  2. Slow wave sleep induced by GABA agonist tiagabine fails to benefit memory consolidation.

    PubMed

    Feld, Gordon B; Wilhelm, Ines; Ma, Ying; Groch, Sabine; Binkofski, Ferdinand; Mölle, Matthias; Born, Jan

    2013-09-01

    Slow wave sleep (SWS) plays a pivotal role in consolidating memories. Tiagabine has been shown to increase SWS in favor of REM sleep without impacting subjective sleep. However, it is unknown whether this effect is paralleled by an improved sleep-dependent consolidation of memory. This double-blind within-subject crossover study tested sensitivity of overnight retention of declarative neutral and emotional materials (word pairs, pictures) as well as a procedural memory task (sequence finger tapping) to oral administration of placebo or 10 mg tiagabine (at 22:30). Fourteen healthy young men aged 21.9 years (range 18-28 years). Tiagabine significantly increased the time spent in SWS and decreased REM sleep compared to placebo. Tiagabine also enhanced slow wave activity (0.5-4.0 Hz) and density of < 1 Hz slow oscillations during NREM sleep. Fast (12-15 Hz) and slow (9-12 Hz) spindle activity, in particular that occurring phase-locked to the slow oscillation cycle, was decreased following tiagabine. Despite signs of deeper and more SWS, overnight retention of memory tested after sleep the next evening (19:30) was generally not improved after tiagabine, but on average even lower than after placebo, with this impairing effect reaching significance for procedural sequence finger tapping. Our data show that increasing slow wave sleep with tiagabine does not improve memory consolidation. Possibly this is due to functional differences from normal slow wave sleep, i.e., the concurrent suppressive influence of tiagabine on phase-locked spindle activity.

  3. Role of Somatostatin-Positive Cortical Interneurons in the Generation of Sleep Slow Waves.

    PubMed

    Funk, Chadd M; Peelman, Kayla; Bellesi, Michele; Marshall, William; Cirelli, Chiara; Tononi, Giulio

    2017-09-20

    During non-rapid eye-movement (NREM) sleep, cortical and thalamic neurons oscillate every second or so between ON periods, characterized by membrane depolarization and wake-like tonic firing, and OFF periods, characterized by membrane hyperpolarization and neuronal silence. Cortical slow waves, the hallmark of NREM sleep, reflect near-synchronous OFF periods in cortical neurons. However, the mechanisms triggering such OFF periods are unclear, as there is little evidence for somatic inhibition. We studied cortical inhibitory interneurons that express somatostatin (SOM), because ∼70% of them are Martinotti cells that target diffusely layer I and can block excitatory transmission presynaptically, at glutamatergic terminals, and postsynaptically, at apical dendrites, without inhibiting the soma. In freely moving male mice, we show that SOM+ cells can fire immediately before slow waves and their optogenetic stimulation during ON periods of NREM sleep triggers long OFF periods. Next, we show that chemogenetic activation of SOM+ cells increases slow-wave activity (SWA), slope of individual slow waves, and NREM sleep duration; whereas their chemogenetic inhibition decreases SWA and slow-wave incidence without changing time spent in NREM sleep. By contrast, activation of parvalbumin+ (PV+) cells, the most numerous population of cortical inhibitory neurons, greatly decreases SWA and cortical firing, triggers short OFF periods in NREM sleep, and increases NREM sleep duration. Thus SOM+ cells, but not PV+ cells, are involved in the generation of sleep slow waves. Whether Martinotti cells are solely responsible for this effect, or are complemented by other classes of inhibitory neurons, remains to be investigated.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Cortical slow waves are a defining feature of non-rapid eye-movement (NREM) sleep and are thought to be important for many of its restorative benefits. Yet, the mechanism by which cortical neurons abruptly and synchronously cease firing, the

  4. Complementary roles of slow-wave sleep and rapid eye movement sleep in emotional memory consolidation.

    PubMed

    Cairney, Scott A; Durrant, Simon J; Power, Rebecca; Lewis, Penelope A

    2015-06-01

    Although rapid eye movement sleep (REM) is regularly implicated in emotional memory consolidation, the role of slow-wave sleep (SWS) in this process is largely uncharacterized. In the present study, we investigated the relative impacts of nocturnal SWS and REM upon the consolidation of emotional memories using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and polysomnography (PSG). Participants encoded emotionally positive, negative, and neutral images (remote memories) before a night of PSG-monitored sleep. Twenty-four hours later, they encoded a second set of images (recent memories) immediately before a recognition test in an MRI scanner. SWS predicted superior memory for remote negative images and a reduction in right hippocampal responses during the recollection of these items. REM, however, predicted an overnight increase in hippocampal-neocortical connectivity associated with negative remote memory. These findings provide physiological support for sequential views of sleep-dependent memory processing, demonstrating that SWS and REM serve distinct but complementary functions in consolidation. Furthermore, these findings extend those ideas to emotional memory by showing that, once selectively reorganized away from the hippocampus during SWS, emotionally aversive representations undergo a comparably targeted process during subsequent REM. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Slow-wave sleep is controlled by a subset of nucleus accumbens core neurons in mice.

    PubMed

    Oishi, Yo; Xu, Qi; Wang, Lu; Zhang, Bin-Jia; Takahashi, Koji; Takata, Yohko; Luo, Yan-Jia; Cherasse, Yoan; Schiffmann, Serge N; de Kerchove d'Exaerde, Alban; Urade, Yoshihiro; Qu, Wei-Min; Huang, Zhi-Li; Lazarus, Michael

    2017-09-29

    Sleep control is ascribed to a two-process model, a widely accepted concept that posits homoeostatic drive and a circadian process as the major sleep-regulating factors. Cognitive and emotional factors also influence sleep-wake behaviour; however, the precise circuit mechanisms underlying their effects on sleep control are unknown. Previous studies suggest that adenosine has a role affecting behavioural arousal in the nucleus accumbens (NAc), a brain area critical for reinforcement and reward. Here, we show that chemogenetic or optogenetic activation of excitatory adenosine A2A receptor-expressing indirect pathway neurons in the core region of the NAc strongly induces slow-wave sleep. Chemogenetic inhibition of the NAc indirect pathway neurons prevents the sleep induction, but does not affect the homoeostatic sleep rebound. In addition, motivational stimuli inhibit the activity of ventral pallidum-projecting NAc indirect pathway neurons and suppress sleep. Our findings reveal a prominent contribution of this indirect pathway to sleep control associated with motivation.In addition to circadian and homoeostatic drives, motivational levels influence sleep-wake cycles. Here the authors demonstrate that adenosine receptor-expressing neurons in the nucleus accumbens core that project to the ventral pallidum are inhibited by motivational stimuli and are causally involved in the control of slow-wave sleep.

  6. Sleep-dependent improvement in visuomotor learning: a causal role for slow waves.

    PubMed

    Landsness, Eric C; Crupi, Domenica; Hulse, Brad K; Peterson, Michael J; Huber, Reto; Ansari, Hidayath; Coen, Michael; Cirelli, Chiara; Benca, Ruth M; Ghilardi, M Felice; Tononi, Giulio

    2009-10-01

    Sleep after learning often benefits memory consolidation, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In previous studies, we found that learning a visuomotor task is followed by an increase in sleep slow wave activity (SWA, the electroencephalographic [EEG] power density between 0.5 and 4.5 Hz during non-rapid eye movement sleep) over the right parietal cortex. The SWA increase correlates with the postsleep improvement in visuomotor performance, suggesting that SWA may be causally responsible for the consolidation of visuomotor learning. Here, we tested this hypothesis by studying the effects of slow wave deprivation (SWD). After learning the task, subjects went to sleep, and acoustic stimuli were timed either to suppress slow waves (SWD) or to interfere as little as possible with spontaneous slow waves (control acoustic stimulation, CAS). Sound-attenuated research room. Healthy subjects (mean age 24.6 +/- 1.0 years; n = 9 for EEG analysis, n = 12 for behavior analysis; 3 women). Sleep time and efficiency were not affected, whereas SWA and the number of slow waves decreased in SWD relative to CAS. Relative to the night before, visuomotor performance significantly improved in the CAS condition (+5.93% +/- 0.88%) but not in the SWD condition (-0.77% +/- 1.16%), and the direct CAS vs SWD comparison showed a significant difference (P = 0.0007, n = 12, paired t test). Changes in visuomotor performance after SWD were correlated with SWA changes over right parietal cortex but not with the number of arousals identified using clinically established criteria, nor with any sign of "EEG lightening" identified using a novel automatic method based on event-related spectral perturbation analysis. These results support a causal role for sleep slow waves in sleep-dependent improvement of visuomotor performance.

  7. Medical management with diazepam for electrical status epilepticus during slow wave sleep in children.

    PubMed

    Francois, Densley; Roberts, Jessica; Hess, Stephany; Probst, Luke; Eksioglu, Yaman

    2014-03-01

    Oral diazepam, administered in varying doses, is among the few proposed treatment options for electrical status epilepticus during slow wave sleep in children. We sought to retrospectively evaluate the long-term efficacy of high-dose oral diazepam in reducing electrographic and clinical evidence of electrical status epilepticus during slow wave sleep in children. Additionally, we surveyed caregivers to assess safety and behavioral outcomes related to ongoing therapy. We collected demographic and clinical data on children treated for electrical status epilepticus during slow wave sleep between October 2010 and March 2013. We sought to identify the number of patients who achieved at least a 50% reduction in spike wave index on electroencephalograph after receiving high-dose oral diazepam. We also administered a questionnaire to caregivers to assess for behavioral problems and side effects. We identified 42 evaluable patients who received high-dose diazepam (range 0.23-2.02 mg/kg per day) to treat electrical status epilepticus during slow wave sleep. Twenty-six patients had spike reduction data and 18/26 (69.2%) children achieved a greater than 50% reduction in spike wave count from an average of 15.54 to 5.05 (P = 0.001). We received 28 responses to the questionnaire. Some patients experienced new onset of difficulties with problem-solving and speech and writing development. Sleep disturbances (50%) and irritability (57.1%) were the most frequent side effects reported. There did not appear to be a dose-related effect with electroencephalograph changes, behavioral effects, or side effects. High-dose oral diazepam significantly reduces the spike wave count on electroencephalograph in children with electrical status epilepticus during slow wave sleep. Although this therapy improves electroencephalograph-related findings, it can be associated with concerning neurological and behavioral side effects in some individuals, so further study is warranted. Copyright © 2014

  8. Slow wave sleep disruption increases cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β levels.

    PubMed

    Ju, Yo-El S; Ooms, Sharon J; Sutphen, Courtney; Macauley, Shannon L; Zangrilli, Margaret A; Jerome, Gina; Fagan, Anne M; Mignot, Emmanuel; Zempel, John M; Claassen, Jurgen A H R; Holtzman, David M

    2017-08-01

    See Mander et al. (doi:10.1093/awx174) for a scientific commentary on this article.Sleep deprivation increases amyloid-β, suggesting that chronically disrupted sleep may promote amyloid plaques and other downstream Alzheimer's disease pathologies including tauopathy or inflammation. To date, studies have not examined which aspect of sleep modulates amyloid-β or other Alzheimer's disease biomarkers. Seventeen healthy adults (age 35-65 years) without sleep disorders underwent 5-14 days of actigraphy, followed by slow wave activity disruption during polysomnogram, and cerebrospinal fluid collection the following morning for measurement of amyloid-β, tau, total protein, YKL-40, and hypocretin. Data were compared to an identical protocol, with a sham condition during polysomnogram. Specific disruption of slow wave activity correlated with an increase in amyloid-β40 (r = 0.610, P = 0.009). This effect was specific for slow wave activity, and not for sleep duration or efficiency. This effect was also specific to amyloid-β, and not total protein, tau, YKL-40, or hypocretin. Additionally, worse home sleep quality, as measured by sleep efficiency by actigraphy in the six nights preceding lumbar punctures, was associated with higher tau (r = 0.543, P = 0.045). Slow wave activity disruption increases amyloid-β levels acutely, and poorer sleep quality over several days increases tau. These effects are specific to neuronally-derived proteins, which suggests they are likely driven by changes in neuronal activity during disrupted sleep. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. The dynamics of spindles and EEG slow-wave activity in NREM sleep in mice.

    PubMed

    Vyazovskiy, V V; Achermann, P; Borbély, A A; Tobler, I

    2004-07-01

    A quantitative analysis of spindles and spindle-related EEG activity was performed in C57BL/6 mice. The hypothesis that spindles are involved in sleep regulatory mechanisms was tested by investigating their occurrence during 24 h and after 6 h sleep deprivation (SD; n = 7). In the frontal derivation distinct spindle events were characterized as EEG oscillations with a dominant frequency approximately at 11 Hz. Spindles were most prominent during NREM sleep and increased before NREM-REM sleep transitions. Whereas spindles increased concomitantly with slow wave activity (SWA, EEG power between 0.5 and 4.0 Hz) at the beginning of the NREM sleep episode, these measures showed an opposite evolution prior to the transition to REM sleep. The 24-h time course of spindles showed a maximum at the end of the 12-h light period, and was a mirror image of SWA in NREM sleep. After 6 h SD the spindles in NREM sleep were initially suppressed, and showed a delayed rebound. In contrast, spindles occurring immediately before the transition to REM sleep were enhanced during the first 2 h of recovery. The data suggest that spindles in NREM sleep may be involved in sleep maintenance, while spindles heralding the transition to REM sleep may be related to mechanisms of REM sleep initiation.

  10. Reduced Slow-Wave Rebound during Daytime Recovery Sleep in Middle-Aged Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Lafortune, Marjolaine; Gagnon, Jean-François; Latreille, Véronique; Vandewalle, Gilles; Martin, Nicolas; Filipini, Daniel; Doyon, Julien; Carrier, Julie

    2012-01-01

    Cortical synchronization during NREM sleep, characterized by electroencephalographic slow waves (SW <4Hz and >75 µV), is strongly related to the number of hours of wakefulness prior to sleep and to the quality of the waking experience. Whether a similar increase in wakefulness length leads to a comparable enhancement in NREM sleep cortical synchronization in young and older subjects is still a matter of debate in the literature. Here we evaluated the impact of 25-hours of wakefulness on SW during a daytime recovery sleep episode in 29 young (27y ±5), and 34 middle-aged (51y ±5) subjects. We also assessed whether age-related changes in NREM sleep cortical synchronization predicts the ability to maintain sleep during daytime recovery sleep. Compared to baseline sleep, sleep efficiency was lower during daytime recovery sleep in both age-groups but the effect was more prominent in the middle-aged than in the young subjects. In both age groups, SW density, amplitude, and slope increased whereas SW positive and negative phase duration decreased during daytime recovery sleep compared to baseline sleep, particularly in anterior brain areas. Importantly, compared to young subjects, middle-aged participants showed lower SW density rebound and SW positive phase duration enhancement after sleep deprivation during daytime recovery sleep. Furthermore, middle-aged subjects showed lower SW amplitude and slope enhancements after sleep deprivation than young subjects in frontal and prefrontal derivations only. None of the SW characteristics at baseline were associated with daytime recovery sleep efficiency. Our results support the notion that anterior brain areas elicit and may necessitate more intense recovery and that aging reduces enhancement of cortical synchronization after sleep loss, particularly in these areas. Age-related changes in the quality of wake experience may underlie age-related reduction in markers of cortical synchronization enhancement after sustained

  11. Increased neural correlations in primate auditory cortex during slow-wave sleep.

    PubMed

    Issa, Elias B; Wang, Xiaoqin

    2013-06-01

    During sleep, changes in brain rhythms and neuromodulator levels in cortex modify the properties of individual neurons and the network as a whole. In principle, network-level interactions during sleep can be studied by observing covariation in spontaneous activity between neurons. Spontaneous activity, however, reflects only a portion of the effective functional connectivity that is activated by external and internal inputs (e.g., sensory stimulation, motor behavior, and mental activity), and it has been shown that neural responses are less correlated during external sensory stimulation than during spontaneous activity. Here, we took advantage of the unique property that the auditory cortex continues to respond to sounds during sleep and used external acoustic stimuli to activate cortical networks for studying neural interactions during sleep. We found that during slow-wave sleep (SWS), local (neuron-neuron) correlations are not reduced by acoustic stimulation remaining higher than in wakefulness and rapid eye movement sleep and remaining similar to spontaneous activity correlations. This high level of correlations during SWS complements previous work finding elevated global (local field potential-local field potential) correlations during sleep. Contrary to the prediction that slow oscillations in SWS would increase neural correlations during spontaneous activity, we found little change in neural correlations outside of periods of acoustic stimulation. Rather, these findings suggest that functional connections recruited in sound processing are modified during SWS and that slow rhythms, which in general are suppressed by sensory stimulation, are not the sole mechanism leading to elevated network correlations during sleep.

  12. A hypothetic aging pathway from skin to hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus via slow wave sleep.

    PubMed

    Cai, Zi-Jian

    2016-01-01

    Many observations have demonstrated that the hypothalamic neuroendocrine change determines the chronological sequence of aging in mammals. However, it remains uncertain on the mechanism to account for the hypothalamic aging manifestations. In this article, it is pointed out that, as constantly exposed to sunshine and oxygen, the skin would undergo both telomere-shortening and oxidative senescent processes. The senescent alterations of skin, such as attenuation in electrodermal activities, would in turn reduce the emotional responses and memories. Whereas previously I demonstrated that the slow wave sleep just functioned to adjust the emotional balance disrupted by accumulated emotional memories, especially capable of ameliorating the symptoms of depressed patients. Therefore, the reduction in emotional responses and memories from skin senescence would reduce the requirement for slow wave sleep in many senescent observations. The decrement in slow wave sleep would in further cause functional but not chronological degeneration of suprachiasmatic nucleus rather than paraventricular nucleus in hypothalamus. In these respects, from skin senescence to slow wave sleep, there forms a new degenerative aging pathway able to account for the hypothalamic chronological sequence of aging, specifically addressed to the suprachiasmatic nucleus.

  13. Mapping Slow Waves by EEG Topography and Source Localization: Effects of Sleep Deprivation.

    PubMed

    Bersagliere, Alessia; Pascual-Marqui, Roberto D; Tarokh, Leila; Achermann, Peter

    2017-10-05

    Slow waves are a salient feature of the electroencephalogram (EEG) during non-rapid eye movement (non-REM) sleep. The aim of this study was to assess the topography of EEG power and the activation of brain structures during slow wave sleep under normal conditions and after sleep deprivation. Sleep EEG recordings during baseline and recovery sleep after 40 h of sustained wakefulness were analyzed (eight healthy young men, 27 channel EEG). Power maps were computed for the first non-REM sleep episode (where sleep pressure is highest) in baseline and recovery sleep, at frequencies between 0.5 and 2 Hz. Power maps had a frontal predominance at all frequencies between 0.5 and 2 Hz. An additional occipital focus of activity was observed below 1 Hz. Power maps ≤ 1 Hz were not affected by sleep deprivation, whereas an increase in power was observed in the maps ≥ 1.25 Hz. Based on the response to sleep deprivation, low-delta (0.5-1 Hz) and mid-delta activity (1.25-2 Hz) were dissociated. Electrical sources within the cortex of low- and mid-delta activity were estimated using eLORETA. Source localization revealed a predominantly frontal distribution of activity for low-delta and mid-delta activity. Sleep deprivation resulted in an increase in source strength only for mid-delta activity, mainly in parietal and frontal regions. Low-delta activity dominated in occipital and temporal regions and mid-delta activity in limbic and frontal regions independent of the level of sleep pressure. Both, power maps and electrical sources exhibited trait-like aspects.

  14. Sleep, Memory, and Aging: The Link Between Slow-Wave Sleep and Episodic Memory Changes from Younger to Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Scullin, Michael K.

    2012-01-01

    In younger adults, recently learned episodic memories are reactivated and consolidated during slow-wave sleep (SWS). Interestingly, SWS declines across the lifespan but little research has examined whether sleep-dependent memory consolidation occurs in older adults. In the present study, younger adults and healthy older adults encoded word pairs in the morning or evening and then returned following a sleep or no-sleep interval. Sleep stage scoring was obtained using a home sleep-stage monitoring system. In the younger adult group, there was a positive correlation between word retention and amount of SWS. In contrast, the older adults demonstrated no significant positive correlations, but one significant negative correlation, between memory and SWS. These findings suggest that the link between episodic memory and SWS that is typically observed in younger adults may be weakened or otherwise changed in the healthy elderly. PMID:22708533

  15. Role of slow oscillatory activity and slow wave sleep in consolidation of episodic-like memory in rats.

    PubMed

    Oyanedel, Carlos N; Binder, Sonja; Kelemen, Eduard; Petersen, Kimberley; Born, Jan; Inostroza, Marion

    2014-12-15

    Our previous experiments showed that sleep in rats enhances consolidation of hippocampus dependent episodic-like memory, i.e. the ability to remember an event bound into specific spatio-temporal context. Here we tested the hypothesis that this enhancing effect of sleep is linked to the occurrence of slow oscillatory and spindle activity during slow wave sleep (SWS). Rats were tested on an episodic-like memory task and on three additional tasks covering separately the where (object place recognition), when (temporal memory), and what (novel object recognition) components of episodic memory. In each task, the sample phase (encoding) was followed by an 80-min retention interval that covered either a period of regular morning sleep or sleep deprivation. Memory during retrieval was tested using preferential exploration of novelty vs. familiarity. Consistent with previous findings, the rats which had slept during the retention interval showed significantly stronger episodic-like memory and spatial memory, and a trend of improved temporal memory (although not significant). Object recognition memory was similarly retained across sleep and sleep deprivation retention intervals. Recall of episodic-like memory was associated with increased slow oscillatory activity (0.85-2.0Hz) during SWS in the retention interval. Spatial memory was associated with increased proportions of SWS. Against our hypothesis, a relationship between spindle activity and episodic-like memory performance was not detected, but spindle activity was associated with object recognition memory. The results provide support for the role of SWS and slow oscillatory activity in consolidating hippocampus-dependent memory, the role of spindles in this process needs to be further examined.

  16. Sustained increase in hippocampal sharp-wave ripple activity during slow-wave sleep after learning

    PubMed Central

    Eschenko, Oxana; Ramadan, Wiâm; Mölle, Matthias; Born, Jan; Sara, Susan J.

    2008-01-01

    High-frequency oscillations, known as sharp-wave/ripple (SPW-R) complexes occurring in hippocampus during slow-wave sleep (SWS), have been proposed to promote synaptic plasticity necessary for memory consolidation. We recorded sleep for 3 h after rats were trained on an odor-reward association task. Learning resulted in an increased number SPW-Rs during the first hour of post-learning SWS. The magnitude of ripple events and their duration were also elevated for up to 2 h after the newly formed memory. Rats that did not learn the discrimination during the training session did not show any change in SPW-Rs. Successful retrieval from remote memory was likewise accompanied by an increase in SPW-R density and magnitude, relative to the previously recorded baseline, but the effects were much shorter lasting and did not include increases in ripple duration and amplitude. A short-lasting increase of ripple activity was also observed when rats were rewarded for performing a motor component of the task only. There were no increases in ripple activity after habituation to the experimental environment. These experiments show that the characteristics of hippocampal high-frequency oscillations during SWS are affected by prior behavioral experience. Associative learning induces robust and sustained (up to 2 h) changes in several SPW-R characteristics, while after retrieval from remote memory or performance of a well-trained procedural aspect of the task, only transient changes in ripple density were induced. PMID:18385477

  17. Cued Memory Reactivation during Slow-Wave Sleep Promotes Explicit Knowledge of a Motor Sequence

    PubMed Central

    El-Deredy, Wael; Parkes, Laura M.; Hennies, Nora; Lewis, Penelope A.

    2014-01-01

    Memories are gradually consolidated after initial encoding, and this can sometimes lead to a transition from implicit to explicit knowledge. The exact physiological processes underlying this reorganization remain unclear. Here, we used a serial reaction time task to determine whether targeted memory reactivation (TMR) of specific memory traces during slow-wave sleep promotes the emergence of explicit knowledge. Human participants learned two 12-item sequences of button presses (A and B). These differed in both cue order and in the auditory tones associated with each of the four fingers (one sequence had four higher-pitched tones). Subsequent overnight sleep was monitored, and the tones associated with one learned sequence were replayed during slow-wave sleep. After waking, participants demonstrated greater explicit knowledge (p = 0.005) and more improved procedural skill (p = 0.04) for the cued sequence relative to the uncued sequence. Furthermore, fast spindles (13.5–15 Hz) at task-related motor regions predicted overnight enhancement in procedural skill (r = 0.71, p = 0.01). Auditory cues had no effect on post-sleep memory performance in a control group who received TMR before sleep. These findings suggest that TMR during sleep can alter memory representations and promote the emergence of explicit knowledge, supporting the notion that reactivation during sleep is a key mechanism in this process. PMID:25429129

  18. Triggering slow waves during NREM sleep in the rat by intracortical electrical stimulation: effects of sleep/wake history and background activity.

    PubMed

    Vyazovskiy, Vladyslav V; Faraguna, Ugo; Cirelli, Chiara; Tononi, Giulio

    2009-04-01

    In humans, non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep slow waves occur not only spontaneously but can also be induced by transcranial magnetic stimulation. Here we investigated whether slow waves can also be induced by intracortical electrical stimulation during sleep in rats. Intracortical local field potential (LFP) recordings were obtained from several cortical locations while the frontal or the parietal area was stimulated intracortically with brief (0.1 ms) electrical pulses. Recordings were performed in early sleep (1st 2-3 h after light onset) and late sleep (6-8 h after light onset). The stimuli reliably triggered LFP potentials that were visually indistinguishable from naturally occurring slow waves. The induced slow waves shared the following features with spontaneous slow waves: they were followed by spindling activity in the same frequency range ( approximately 15 Hz) as spontaneously occurring sleep spindles; they propagated through the neocortex from the area of the stimulation; and compared with late sleep, waves triggered during early sleep were larger, had steeper slopes and fewer multipeaks. Peristimulus background spontaneous activity had a profound influence on the amplitude of the induced slow waves: they were virtually absent if the stimulus was delivered immediately after the spontaneous slow wave. These results show that in the rat a volley of electrical activity that is sufficiently strong to excite and recruit a large cortical neuronal population is capable of inducing slow waves during natural sleep.

  19. Effect of Conditioned Stimulus Exposure during Slow Wave Sleep on Fear Memory Extinction in Humans

    PubMed Central

    He, Jia; Sun, Hong-Qiang; Li, Su-Xia; Zhang, Wei-Hua; Shi, Jie; Ai, Si-Zhi; Li, Yun; Li, Xiao-Jun; Tang, Xiang-Dong; Lu, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Repeated exposure to a neutral conditioned stimulus (CS) in the absence of a noxious unconditioned stimulus (US) elicits fear memory extinction. The aim of the current study was to investigate the effects of mild tone exposure (CS) during slow wave sleep (SWS) on fear memory extinction in humans. Design: The healthy volunteers underwent an auditory fear conditioning paradigm on the experimental night, during which tones served as the CS, and a mild shock served as the US. They were then randomly assigned to four groups. Three groups were exposed to the CS for 3 or 10 min or an irrelevant tone (control stimulus, CtrS) for 10 min during SWS. The fourth group served as controls and was not subjected to any interventions. All of the subjects completed a memory test 4 h after SWS-rich stage to evaluate the effect on fear extinction. Moreover, we conducted similar experiments using an independent group of subjects during the daytime to test whether the memory extinction effect was specific to the sleep condition. Participants: Ninety-six healthy volunteers (44 males) aged 18–28 y. Measurements and Results: Participants exhibited undisturbed sleep during 2 consecutive nights, as assessed by sleep variables (all P > 0.05) from polysomnographic recordings and power spectral analysis. Participants who were re-exposed to the 10 min CS either during SWS and wakefulness exhibited attenuated fear responses (wake-10 min CS, P < 0.05; SWS-10 min CS, P < 0.01). Conclusions: Conditioned stimulus re-exposure during slow wave sleep promoted fear memory extinction without altering sleep profiles. Citation: He J, Sun HQ, Li SX, Zhang WH, Shi J, Ai SZ, Li Y, Li XJ, Tang XD, Lu L. Effect of conditioned stimulus exposure during slow wave sleep on fear memory extinction in humans. SLEEP 2015;38(3):423–431. PMID:25348121

  20. Enhancing influence of intranasal interleukin-6 on slow-wave activity and memory consolidation during sleep.

    PubMed

    Benedict, Christian; Scheller, Jürgen; Rose-John, Stefan; Born, Jan; Marshall, Lisa

    2009-10-01

    The cytokine IL-6 has been considered to exert neuromodulating influences on the brain, with promoting influences on sleep. Sleep enhances the consolidation of memories, and, in particular, late nocturnal sleep also represents a period of enhanced IL-6 signaling, due to a distinctly enhanced availability of soluble IL-6 receptors during this period, enabling trans-signaling of IL-6 to neurons. Thus, a contribution of IL-6 to sleep-dependent memory consolidation is hypothesized. To test this hypothesis, we compared effects of intranasally administered IL-6 (vs. placebo) on sleep-dependent consolidation of declarative (neutral and emotional texts, 2-dimensional object location) and procedural (finger sequence tapping) memories in 17 healthy young men. IL-6 distinctly improved the sleep-related consolidation of emotional text material (P<0.03), which benefits mostly from sleep in the second night-half, in which rapid eye movement sleep (REM) dominates the non-REM-REM sleep cycle. During this second night-half, the amount of electroencephalogram slow-wave activity (0.5-4 Hz) distinctly increased after IL-6 (P<0.01). Other types of memory were not affected. The ability of IL-6 to enhance sleep-associated emotional memory consolidation highlights an example of a functional interaction between the central nervous and immune system.

  1. Symmetrical serotonin release during asymmetrical slow-wave sleep: implications for the neurochemistry of sleep-waking states

    PubMed Central

    Lapierre, Jennifer L; Kosenko, Peter O; Kodama, Tohru; Peever, John H; Mukhametov, Lev M; Lyamin, Oleg I; Siegel, Jerome M

    2013-01-01

    On land, fur seals predominately display bilaterally synchronized electroencephalogram (EEG) activity during slow-wave sleep (SWS), similar to that observed in all terrestrial mammals. In water, however, fur seals exhibit asymmetric slow-wave sleep (ASWS), resembling the unihemispheric slow-wave sleep of odontocetes (toothed whales). The unique sleeping pattern of fur seals allows us to distinguish neuronal mechanisms mediating EEG changes from those mediating behavioral quiescence. In a prior study we found that cortical acetylcholine release is lateralized during ASWS in the northern fur seal, with greater release in the hemisphere displaying low-voltage (waking) EEG activity, linking acetylcholine release to hemispheric EEG activation (Lapierre et al. 2007). In contrast to acetylcholine, we now report that cortical serotonin release is not lateralized during ASWS. Our data demonstrate that bilaterally symmetric levels of serotonin are compatible with interhemispheric EEG asymmetry in the fur seal. We also find greatly elevated levels during eating and hosing the animals with water, suggesting that serotonin is more closely linked to bilateral variables, such as axial motor and autonomic control, than to the lateralized cortical activation manifested in asymmetrical sleep. PMID:23392683

  2. Daytime Ayahuasca administration modulates REM and slow-wave sleep in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Barbanoj, Manel J; Riba, Jordi; Clos, S; Giménez, S; Grasa, E; Romero, S

    2008-02-01

    Ayahuasca is a traditional South American psychoactive beverage and the central sacrament of Brazilian-based religious groups, with followers in Europe and the United States. The tea contains the psychedelic indole N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT) and beta-carboline alkaloids with monoamine oxidase-inhibiting properties that render DMT orally active. DMT interacts with serotonergic neurotransmission acting as a partial agonist at 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(2A/2C) receptor sites. Given the role played by serotonin in the regulation of the sleep/wake cycle, we investigated the effects of daytime ayahuasca consumption in sleep parameters. Subjective sleep quality, polysomnography (PSG), and spectral analysis were assessed in a group of 22 healthy male volunteers after the administration of a placebo, an ayahuasca dose equivalent to 1 mg DMT kg(-1) body weight, and 20 mg d-amphetamine, a proaminergic drug, as a positive control. Results show that ayahuasca did not induce any subjectively perceived deterioration of sleep quality or PSG-measured disruptions of sleep initiation or maintenance, in contrast with d-amphetamine, which delayed sleep initiation, disrupted sleep maintenance, induced a predominance of 'light' vs 'deep' sleep and significantly impaired subjective sleep quality. PSG analysis also showed that similarly to d-amphetamine, ayahuasca inhibits rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, decreasing its duration, both in absolute values and as a percentage of total sleep time, and shows a trend increase in its onset latency. Spectral analysis showed that d-amphetamine and ayahuasca increased power in the high frequency range, mainly during stage 2. Remarkably, whereas slow-wave sleep (SWS) power in the first night cycle, an indicator of sleep pressure, was decreased by d-amphetamine, ayahuasca enhanced power in this frequency band. Results show that daytime serotonergic psychedelic drug administration leads to measurable changes in PSG and sleep power spectrum and suggest an

  3. Involvement of Spindles in Memory Consolidation Is Slow Wave Sleep-Specific

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Roy; Hofman, Winni F.; Talamini, Lucia M.

    2012-01-01

    Both sleep spindles and slow oscillations have been implicated in sleep-dependent memory consolidation. Whereas spindles occur during both light and deep sleep, slow oscillations are restricted to deep sleep, raising the possibility of greater consolidation-related spindle involvement during deep sleep. We assessed declarative memory retention…

  4. Involvement of Spindles in Memory Consolidation Is Slow Wave Sleep-Specific

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Roy; Hofman, Winni F.; Talamini, Lucia M.

    2012-01-01

    Both sleep spindles and slow oscillations have been implicated in sleep-dependent memory consolidation. Whereas spindles occur during both light and deep sleep, slow oscillations are restricted to deep sleep, raising the possibility of greater consolidation-related spindle involvement during deep sleep. We assessed declarative memory retention…

  5. Human longevity is associated with regular sleep patterns, maintenance of slow wave sleep, and favorable lipid profile

    PubMed Central

    Mazzotti, Diego Robles; Guindalini, Camila; Moraes, Walter André dos Santos; Andersen, Monica Levy; Cendoroglo, Maysa Seabra; Ramos, Luiz Roberto; Tufik, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    Some individuals are able to successfully reach very old ages, reflecting higher adaptation against age-associated effects. Sleep is one of the processes deeply affected by aging; however few studies evaluating sleep in long-lived individuals (aged over 85) have been reported to date. The aim of this study was to characterize the sleep patterns and biochemical profile of oldest old individuals (N = 10, age 85–105 years old) and compare them to young adults (N = 15, age 20–30 years old) and older adults (N = 13, age 60–70 years old). All subjects underwent full-night polysomnography, 1-week of actigraphic recording and peripheral blood collection. Sleep electroencephalogram spectral analysis was also performed. The oldest old individuals showed lower sleep efficiency and REM sleep when compared to the older adults, while stage N3 percentage and delta power were similar across the groups. Oldest old individuals maintained strictly regular sleep-wake schedules and also presented higher HDL-cholesterol and lower triglyceride levels than older adults. The present study revealed novel data regarding specific sleep patterns and maintenance of slow wave sleep in the oldest old group. Taken together with the favorable lipid profile, these results contribute with evidence to the importance of sleep and lipid metabolism regulation in the maintenance of longevity in humans. PMID:25009494

  6. Silencing of Cholinergic Basal Forebrain Neurons Using Archaerhodopsin Prolongs Slow-Wave Sleep in Mice.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yu-Feng; Han, Yong; Su, Yun-Ting; Yang, Jun-Hua; Yu, Yan-Qin

    2015-01-01

    The basal forebrain (BF) plays a crucial role in cortical activation. Our previous study showed that activation of cholinergic BF neurons alone is sufficient to suppress slow-wave sleep (SWS) and promote wakefulness and rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep. However, the exact role of silencing cholinergic BF neurons in the sleep-wake cycle remains unclear. We inhibitied the cholinergic BF neurons genetically targeted with archaerhodopsin (Arch) with yellow light to clarify the role of cholinergic BF neurons in the sleep-wake cycle. Bilateral inactivation of cholinergic BF neurons genetically targeted with archaerhodopsin prolonged SWS and decreased the probability of awakening from SWS in mice. However, silencing these neurons changed neither the duration of wakefulness or REM sleep, nor the probability of transitions to other sleep-wake episodes from wakefulness or REM sleep. Furthermore, silencing these neurons for 6 h within the inactive or active period increased the duration of SWS at the expense of the duration of wakefulness, as well as increasing the number of prolonged SWS episodes (120-240 s). The lost wakefulness was compensated by a delayed increase of wakefulness, so the total duration of SWS and wakefulness during 24 h was kept stable. Our results indicate that the main effect of these neurons is to terminate SWS, whereas wakefulness or REM sleep may be determined by co-operation of the cholinergic BF neurons with other arousal-sleep control systems.

  7. Unihemispheric slow wave sleep and the state of the eyes in a white whale.

    PubMed

    Lyamin, O I; Mukhametov, L M; Siegel, J M; Nazarenko, E A; Polyakova, I G; Shpak, O V

    2002-02-01

    We recorded electroencephalogram (EEG) and simultaneously documented the state of both eyelids during sleep and wakefulness in a sub-adult male white whale over a 4-day-period. We showed that the white whale was the fifth species of Cetaceans, which exhibits unihemispheric slow wave sleep. We found that the eye contralateral to the sleeping hemisphere in this whale was usually closed (right eye, 52% of the total sleep time in the contralateral hemisphere; left eye, 40%) or in an intermediate state (31 and 46%, respectively) while the ipsilateral eye was typically open (89 and 80%). Episodes of bilateral eye closure in this whale occupied less than 2% of the observation time and were usually recorded during waking (49% of the bilateral eye closure time) or low amplitude sleep (48%) and rarely in high amplitude sleep (3%). In spite of the evident overall relationship between the sleeping hemisphere and eye state, EEG and eye position in this whale could be independent over short time periods (less than 1 min). Therefore, eye state alone may not accurately reflect sleep state in Cetaceans. Our data support the idea that unihemispheric sleep allows Cetaceans to monitor the environment.

  8. Neuronal networks in children with continuous spikes and waves during slow sleep.

    PubMed

    Siniatchkin, Michael; Groening, Kristina; Moehring, Jan; Moeller, Friederike; Boor, Rainer; Brodbeck, Verena; Michel, Christoph M; Rodionov, Roman; Lemieux, Louis; Stephani, Ulrich

    2010-09-01

    Epileptic encephalopathy with continuous spikes and waves during slow sleep is an age-related disorder characterized by the presence of interictal epileptiform discharges during at least >85% of sleep and cognitive deficits associated with this electroencephalography pattern. The pathophysiological mechanisms of continuous spikes and waves during slow sleep and neuropsychological deficits associated with this condition are still poorly understood. Here, we investigated the haemodynamic changes associated with epileptic activity using simultaneous acquisitions of electroencephalography and functional magnetic resonance imaging in 12 children with symptomatic and cryptogenic continuous spikes and waves during slow sleep. We compared the results of magnetic resonance to electric source analysis carried out using a distributed linear inverse solution at two time points of the averaged epileptic spike. All patients demonstrated highly significant spike-related positive (activations) and negative (deactivations) blood oxygenation-level-dependent changes (P < 0.05, family-wise error corrected). The activations involved bilateral perisylvian region and cingulate gyrus in all cases, bilateral frontal cortex in five, bilateral parietal cortex in one and thalamus in five cases. Electrical source analysis demonstrated a similar involvement of the perisylvian brain regions in all patients, independent of the area of spike generation. The spike-related deactivations were found in structures of the default mode network (precuneus, parietal cortex and medial frontal cortex) in all patients and in caudate nucleus in four. Group analyses emphasized the described individual differences. Despite aetiological heterogeneity, patients with continuous spikes and waves during slow sleep were characterized by activation of the similar neuronal network: perisylvian region, insula and cingulate gyrus. Comparison with the electrical source analysis results suggests that the activations

  9. Effects of Skilled Training on Sleep Slow Wave Activity and Cortical Gene Expression in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Hanlon, Erin C.; Faraguna, Ugo; Vyazovskiy, Vladyslav V.; Tononi, Giulio; Cirelli, Chiara

    2009-01-01

    Study Objective: The best characterized marker of sleep homeostasis is the amount of slow wave activity (SWA, 0.5–4 Hz) during NREM sleep. SWA increases as a function of previous waking time and declines during sleep, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. We have suggested that SWA homeostasis is linked to synaptic potentiation associated with learning during wakefulness. Indeed, studies in rodents and humans found that SWA increases after manipulations that presumably enhance synaptic strength, but the evidence remains indirect. Here we trained rats in skilled reaching, a task known to elicit long-term potentiation in the trained motor cortex, and immediately after learning measured SWA and cortical protein levels of c-fos and Arc, 2 activity-dependent genes involved in motor learning. Design: Intracortical local field potential recordings and training on reaching task. Setting: Basic sleep research laboratory. Patients or Participants: Long Evans adult male rats. Interventions: N/A Measurements and Results: SWA increased post-training in the trained cortex (the frontal cortex contralateral to the limb used to learn the task), with smaller or no increase in other cortical areas. This increase was reversible within 1 hour, specific to NREM sleep, and positively correlated with changes in performance during the prior training session, suggesting that it reflects plasticity and not just motor activity. Fos and Arc levels were higher in the trained relative to untrained motor cortex immediately after training, but this asymmetry was no longer present after 1 hour of sleep. Conclusion: Learning to reach specifically affects gene expression in the trained motor cortex and, in the same area, increases sleep need as measured by a local change in SWA. Citation: Hanlon EC; Faraguna U; Vyazovskiy VV; Tononi G; Cirelli C. Effects of skilled training on sleep slow wave activity and cortical gene expression in the rat. SLEEP 2009;32(6):719-729. PMID:19544747

  10. EEG Σ and slow-wave activity during NREM sleep correlate with overnight declarative and procedural memory consolidation.

    PubMed

    Holz, Johannes; Piosczyk, Hannah; Feige, Bernd; Spiegelhalder, Kai; Baglioni, Chiara; Riemann, Dieter; Nissen, Christoph

    2012-12-01

    Previous studies suggest that sleep-specific brain activity patterns such as sleep spindles and electroencephalographic slow-wave activity contribute to the consolidation of novel memories. The generation of both sleep spindles and slow-wave activity relies on synchronized oscillations in a thalamo-cortical network that might be implicated in synaptic strengthening (spindles) and downscaling (slow-wave activity) during sleep. This study further examined the association between electroencephalographic power during non-rapid eye movement sleep in the spindle (sigma, 12-16 Hz) and slow-wave frequency range (0.1-3.5 Hz) and overnight memory consolidation in 20 healthy subjects (10 men, 27.1 ± 4.6 years). We found that both electroencephalographic sigma power and slow-wave activity were positively correlated with the pre-post-sleep consolidation of declarative (word list) and procedural (mirror-tracing) memories. These results, although only correlative in nature, are consistent with the view that processes of synaptic strengthening (sleep spindles) and synaptic downscaling (slow-wave activity) might act in concert to promote synaptic plasticity and the consolidation of both declarative and procedural memories during sleep.

  11. Selective slow wave sleep but not rapid eye movement sleep suppression impairs morning glucose tolerance in healthy men.

    PubMed

    Herzog, Nina; Jauch-Chara, Kamila; Hyzy, Franziska; Richter, Annekatrin; Friedrich, Alexia; Benedict, Christian; Oltmanns, Kerstin M

    2013-10-01

    Shortened nocturnal sleep impairs morning glucose tolerance. The underlying mechanism of this effect is supposed to involve a reduced fraction of slow wave sleep (SWS). However, it remains unanswered if impaired glucose tolerance occurs due to specific SWS reduction or a general disturbance of sleep. Sixteen healthy men participated in three experimental conditions in a crossover design: SWS suppression, rapid eye movement (REM)-sleep disturbance, and regular sleep. Selective sleep stage disturbance was performed by means of an acoustic tone (532Hz) with gradually rising sound intensity. Blood concentrations of glucoregulatory parameters were measured upon an oral glucose tolerance test the next morning. Our data show that morning plasma glucose and serum insulin responses were significantly increased after selective SWS suppression. Moreover, SWS suppression reduced postprandial insulin sensitivity up to 20%, as determined by Matsuda Index. Contrastingly, disturbed REM-sleep did not affect glucose homeostasis. We conclude that specifically SWS reduction is critically involved in the impairment of glucose tolerance associated with disturbed sleep. Therefore, glucose metabolism in subjects predisposed to reduced SWS (e.g. depression, aging, obstructive sleep apnea, pharmacological treatment) should be thoroughly monitored.

  12. The pattern of slow wave activity in spontaneously occurring long sleep.

    PubMed

    Kecklund; Åkerstedt

    1992-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to estimate the time course of slow wave activity (SWA) in naturally occurring long sleep episodes (ad lib). Sixteen male shift workers were subjected to 24 h ambulatory polysomnography in connection with an afternoon shift. The EEG was subjected to spectral analysis (FFT) as well as to traditional sleep stage scoring. SWA (0.5-4.5 Hz band, both nonREM and REM sleep) declined exponentially and reached an asymptote by the fifth or sixth sleep cycle. However, half the subjects showed a reduced SWA in the first cycle, with a subsequent recovery in the second cycle. The SWA reduction of the first cycle was associated with a reduced REM-latency and it was suggested that uncontrolled external influences of the real life settings may have affected SWA in the first cycle. It was concluded that the decline of SWA across time may deviate from an exponential shape under real life conditions.

  13. [Language and learning disorders in epilepsy with continuous spike-waves during slow sleep].

    PubMed

    Billard-Daudu, C

    2001-01-01

    Efficacy of antiepileptic drugs in children with epilepsy is usually evaluated on the basis of reduction in seizure frequency. However, in a number of cases, the effect of a drug in reducing EEG paroxysmal activity should be considered. This applies particularly to Landau-Kleffner syndrome and to the syndrome of continuous spike-waves during slow sleep. In developmental language disorders, EEG paroxysmal activity is present in almost 30% of the cases. Paroxysmal abnormalities are usually less frequent than what is observed in epilepsy with continuous spike-waves during slow sleep. Pathogenesis remains unknown and the relationship between EEG evolution and language improvement is not as clear as in Landau-Kleffner syndrome.

  14. The epileptic syndromes with continuous spikes and waves during slow sleep: definition and management guidelines.

    PubMed

    Van Bogaert, P; Aeby, A; De Borchgrave, V; De Cocq, C; Deprez, M; De Tiège, X; de Tourtchaninoff, M; Dubru, J M; Foulon, M; Ghariani, S; Grisar, T; Legros, B; Ossemann, M; Tugendhaft, P; van Rijckevorsel, K; Verheulpen, D

    2006-06-01

    The authors propose to define the epileptic syndromes with continuous spikes and waves during slow sleep (CSWS) as a cognitive or behavioral impairment acquired during childhood, associated with a strong activation of the interictal epileptiform discharges during NREM sleep--whatever focal or generalized--and not related to another factor than the presence of CSWS. The type of syndrome will be defined according to the neurological and neuropsychological deficit. These syndromes have to be classified among the localization-related epileptic syndromes. Some cases are idiopathic and others are symptomatic. Guidelines for work-up and treatment are proposed.

  15. The effect of unilateral somatosensory stimulation on hemispheric asymmetries during slow wave sleep.

    PubMed

    Cottone, Lisa A; Adamo, David; Squires, Nancy K

    2004-02-01

    To examine the effect of unilateral somatosensory stimulation on the laterality of delta band activity during slow wave sleep (SWS). Participants napped for two hours on two separate days. Two types of vibratory stimuli were randomly presented to one hand: a short and more intense vibration (rare stimulus) and a long and less intense vibration (frequent stimulus). The vibratory stimuli were presented to participants once in SWS in alternating periods of stimulation and no stimulation. Electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings were obtained from homologous electrode sites and analyzed for asymmetry. State University of New York at Stony Brook. Eight right-handed college students (ages 18 to 24). Delta band activity (>0-3.906 Hz) at homologous electrode sites was obtained and an asymmetry index (AI) was derived. The AI varied as a function of Stimulus Type (rare, frequent, no stimulus). Less asymmetry was observed after rare stimuli than after frequent or no stimuli. There was no difference in AI between right and left hand stimulation. Absolute delta power was greater to rare stimuli than to frequent or no stimuli. Amplitude of ERP (event-related potential) components during wakefulness and sleep were also examined. The results of this study do not support the idea that vibratory stimulation of a given hand will disrupt sleep in the contralateral hemisphere. However, the results do support the idea that the human brain is capable of monitoring the environment without compromising slow wave sleep.

  16. Occipital long-interval paired pulse TMS leads to slow wave components in NREM sleep.

    PubMed

    Stamm, Mihkel; Aru, Jaan; Rutiku, Renate; Bachmann, Talis

    2015-09-01

    Neural correlates of conscious vs unconscious states can be studied by contrasting EEG markers of brain activity between those two states. Here, a task-free experimental setup was used to study the state dependent effects of occipital transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). EEG responses to single and paired pulse TMS with an inter-stimulus-interval (ISI) of 100 ms were investigated under Non-REM (NREM) sleep and wakefulness. In the paired pulse TMS condition adopting this long ISI, a robust positive deflection starting around 200 ms after the second pulse was found. This component was not obtained under wakefulness or when a single TMS pulse was applied in sleep. These findings are discussed in the context of NREM sleep slow waves. The present results indicate that the long interval paired-pulse paradigm could be used to manipulate plasticity processes in the visual cortex. The present setup might also become useful for evaluating states of consciousness.

  17. Predictability of arousal in mouse slow wave sleep by accelerometer data.

    PubMed

    Lima, Gustavo Zampier Dos Santos; Lopes, Sergio Roberto; Prado, Thiago Lima; Lobao-Soares, Bruno; do Nascimento, George C; Fontenele-Araujo, John; Corso, Gilberto

    2017-01-01

    Arousals can be roughly characterized by punctual intrusions of wakefulness into sleep. In a standard perspective, using human electroencephalography (EEG) data, arousals are associated to slow-wave rhythms and K-complex brain activity. The physiological mechanisms that give rise to arousals during sleep are not yet fully understood. Moreover, subtle body movement patterns, which may characterize arousals both in human and in animals, are usually not detectable by eye perception and are not in general present in sleep studies. In this paper, we focus attention on accelerometer records (AR) to characterize and predict arousal during slow wave sleep (SWS) stage of mice. Furthermore, we recorded the local field potentials (LFP) from the CA1 region in the hippocampus and paired with accelerometer data. The hippocampus signal was also used here to identify the SWS stage. We analyzed the AR dynamics of consecutive arousals using recurrence technique and the determinism (DET) quantifier. Recurrence is a fundamental property of dynamical systems, which can be exploited to characterize time series properties. The DET index evaluates how similar are the evolution of close trajectories: in this sense, it computes how accurate are predictions based on past trajectories. For all analyzed mice in this work, we observed, for the first time, the occurrence of a universal dynamic pattern a few seconds that precedes the arousals during SWS sleep stage based only on the AR signal. The predictability success of an arousal using DET from AR is nearly 90%, while similar analysis using LFP of hippocampus brain region reveal 88% of success. Noteworthy, our findings suggest an unique dynamical behavior pattern preceding an arousal of AR data during sleep. Thus, the employment of this technique applied to AR data may provide useful information about the dynamics of neuronal activities that control sleep-waking switch during SWS sleep period. We argue that the predictability of arousals

  18. Antidepressant Effects of Selective Slow Wave Sleep Deprivation in Major Depression: A High-Density EEG Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Landsness, Eric C.; Goldstein, Michael R.; Peterson, Michael J.; Tononi, Giulio; Benca, Ruth M.

    2011-01-01

    Sleep deprivation can acutely reverse depressive symptoms in some patients with major depression. Because abnormalities in slow wave sleep are one of the most consistent biological markers of depression, it is plausible that the antidepressant effects of sleep deprivation are due to the effects on slow wave homeostasis. This study tested the prediction that selectively reducing slow waves during sleep (slow wave deprivation; SWD), without disrupting total sleep time, will lead to an acute reduction in depressive symptomatology. As part of a multi-night, cross-over design study, participants with major depression (non-medicated; n = 17) underwent baseline, SWD, and recovery sleep sessions, and were recorded with high-density EEG (hdEEG). During SWD, acoustic stimuli were played to suppress subsequent slow waves, without waking up the participant. The effects of SWD on depressive symptoms were assessed with both self-rated and researcher-administered scales. Participants experienced a significant decrease in depressive symptoms according to both self-rated (p = .007) and researcher-administered (p = .010) scales, while vigilance was unaffected. The reduction in depressive symptoms correlated with the overnight dissipation of fronto-central slow wave activity (SWA) on baseline sleep, the rebound in right frontal all-night SWA on recovery sleep, and the amount of REM sleep on the SWD night. In addition to highlighting the benefits of hdEEG in detecting regional changes in brain activity, these findings suggest that SWD may help to better understand the pathophysiology of depression and may be a useful tool for the neuromodulatory reversal of depressive symptomatology. PMID:21397252

  19. Increased frontal sleep slow wave activity in adolescents with major depression

    PubMed Central

    Tesler, Noemi; Gerstenberg, Miriam; Franscini, Maurizia; Jenni, Oskar G.; Walitza, Susanne; Huber, Reto

    2015-01-01

    Sleep slow wave activity (SWA), the major electrophysiological characteristic of deep sleep, mirrors both cortical restructuring and functioning. The incidence of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) substantially rises during the vulnerable developmental phase of adolescence, where essential cortical restructuring is taking place. The goal of this study was to assess characteristics of SWA topography in adolescents with MDD, in order to assess abnormalities in both cortical restructuring and functioning on a local level. All night high-density EEG was recorded in 15 patients meeting DSM-5 criteria for MDD and 15 sex- and age-matched healthy controls. The actual symptom severity was assessed using the Children's Depression Rating Scale—Revised (CDRS-R). Topographical power maps were calculated based on the average SWA of the first non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep episode. Depressed adolescents exhibited significantly more SWA in a cluster of frontal electrodes compared to controls. SWA over frontal brain regions correlated positively with the CDRS-R subscore “morbid thoughts”. Self-reported sleep latency was significantly higher in depressed adolescents compared to controls whereas sleep architecture did not differ between the groups. Higher frontal SWA in depressed adolescents may represent a promising biomarker tracing cortical regions of intense use and/or restructuring. PMID:26870661

  20. Increased frontal sleep slow wave activity in adolescents with major depression.

    PubMed

    Tesler, Noemi; Gerstenberg, Miriam; Franscini, Maurizia; Jenni, Oskar G; Walitza, Susanne; Huber, Reto

    2016-01-01

    Sleep slow wave activity (SWA), the major electrophysiological characteristic of deep sleep, mirrors both cortical restructuring and functioning. The incidence of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) substantially rises during the vulnerable developmental phase of adolescence, where essential cortical restructuring is taking place. The goal of this study was to assess characteristics of SWA topography in adolescents with MDD, in order to assess abnormalities in both cortical restructuring and functioning on a local level. All night high-density EEG was recorded in 15 patients meeting DSM-5 criteria for MDD and 15 sex- and age-matched healthy controls. The actual symptom severity was assessed using the Children's Depression Rating Scale-Revised (CDRS-R). Topographical power maps were calculated based on the average SWA of the first non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep episode. Depressed adolescents exhibited significantly more SWA in a cluster of frontal electrodes compared to controls. SWA over frontal brain regions correlated positively with the CDRS-R subscore "morbid thoughts". Self-reported sleep latency was significantly higher in depressed adolescents compared to controls whereas sleep architecture did not differ between the groups. Higher frontal SWA in depressed adolescents may represent a promising biomarker tracing cortical regions of intense use and/or restructuring.

  1. Development of the brain's default mode network from wakefulness to slow wave sleep.

    PubMed

    Sämann, Philipp G; Wehrle, Renate; Hoehn, David; Spoormaker, Victor I; Peters, Henning; Tully, Carolin; Holsboer, Florian; Czisch, Michael

    2011-09-01

    Falling asleep is paralleled by a loss of conscious awareness and reduced capacity to process external stimuli. Little is known on sleep-associated changes of spontaneously synchronized anatomical networks as detected by resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI). We employed functional connectivity analysis of rs-fMRI series obtained from 25 healthy participants, covering all non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep stages. We focused on the default mode network (DMN) and its anticorrelated network (ACN) that are involved in internal and external awareness during wakefulness. Using independent component analysis, cross-correlation analysis (CCA), and intraindividual dynamic network tracking, we found significant changes in DMN/ACN integrity throughout the NREM sleep. With increasing sleep depth, contributions of the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC)/retrosplenial cortex (RspC), parahippocampal gyrus, and medial prefrontal cortex to the DMN decreased. CCA revealed a breakdown of corticocortical functional connectivity, particularly between the posterior and anterior midline node of the DMN and the DMN and the ACN. Dynamic tracking of the DMN from wakefulness into slow wave sleep in a single subject added insights into intraindividual network fluctuations. Results resonate with a role of the PCC/RspC for the regulation of consciousness. We further submit that preserved corticocortical synchronization could represent a prerequisite for maintaining internal and external awareness.

  2. Heightened Delta Power during Slow-Wave-Sleep in Patients with Rett Syndrome Associated with Poor Sleep Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Ammanuel, Simon; Chan, Wesley C.; Adler, Daniel A.; Lakshamanan, Balaji M.; Gupta, Siddharth S.; Ewen, Joshua B.; Johnston, Michael V.; Marcus, Carole L.; Naidu, Sakkubai; Kadam, Shilpa D.

    2015-01-01

    Sleep problems are commonly reported in Rett syndrome (RTT); however the electroencephalographic (EEG) biomarkers underlying sleep dysfunction are poorly understood. The aim of this study was to analyze the temporal evolution of quantitative EEG (qEEG) biomarkers in overnight EEGs recorded from girls (2–9 yrs. old) diagnosed with RTT using a non-traditional automated protocol. In this study, EEG spectral analysis identified high delta power cycles representing slow wave sleep (SWS) in 8–9h overnight sleep EEGs from the frontal, central and occipital leads (AP axis), comparing age-matched girls with and without RTT. Automated algorithms quantitated the area under the curve (AUC) within identified SWS cycles for each spectral frequency wave form. Both age-matched RTT and control EEGs showed similar increasing trends for recorded delta wave power in the EEG leads along the antero-posterior (AP). RTT EEGs had significantly fewer numbers of SWS sleep cycles; therefore, the overall time spent in SWS was also significantly lower in RTT. In contrast, the AUC for delta power within each SWS cycle was significantly heightened in RTT and remained heightened over consecutive cycles unlike control EEGs that showed an overnight decrement of delta power in consecutive cycles. Gamma wave power associated with these SWS cycles was similar to controls. However, the negative correlation of gamma power with age (r = -.59; p<0.01) detected in controls (2–5 yrs. vs. 6–9 yrs.) was lost in RTT. Poor % SWS (i.e., time spent in SWS overnight) in RTT was also driven by the younger age-group. Incidence of seizures in RTT was associated with significantly lower number of SWS cycles. Therefore, qEEG biomarkers of SWS in RTT evolved temporally and correlated significantly with clinical severity. PMID:26444000

  3. Heightened Delta Power during Slow-Wave-Sleep in Patients with Rett Syndrome Associated with Poor Sleep Efficiency.

    PubMed

    Ammanuel, Simon; Chan, Wesley C; Adler, Daniel A; Lakshamanan, Balaji M; Gupta, Siddharth S; Ewen, Joshua B; Johnston, Michael V; Marcus, Carole L; Naidu, Sakkubai; Kadam, Shilpa D

    2015-01-01

    Sleep problems are commonly reported in Rett syndrome (RTT); however the electroencephalographic (EEG) biomarkers underlying sleep dysfunction are poorly understood. The aim of this study was to analyze the temporal evolution of quantitative EEG (qEEG) biomarkers in overnight EEGs recorded from girls (2-9 yrs. old) diagnosed with RTT using a non-traditional automated protocol. In this study, EEG spectral analysis identified high delta power cycles representing slow wave sleep (SWS) in 8-9h overnight sleep EEGs from the frontal, central and occipital leads (AP axis), comparing age-matched girls with and without RTT. Automated algorithms quantitated the area under the curve (AUC) within identified SWS cycles for each spectral frequency wave form. Both age-matched RTT and control EEGs showed similar increasing trends for recorded delta wave power in the EEG leads along the antero-posterior (AP). RTT EEGs had significantly fewer numbers of SWS sleep cycles; therefore, the overall time spent in SWS was also significantly lower in RTT. In contrast, the AUC for delta power within each SWS cycle was significantly heightened in RTT and remained heightened over consecutive cycles unlike control EEGs that showed an overnight decrement of delta power in consecutive cycles. Gamma wave power associated with these SWS cycles was similar to controls. However, the negative correlation of gamma power with age (r = -.59; p<0.01) detected in controls (2-5 yrs. vs. 6-9 yrs.) was lost in RTT. Poor % SWS (i.e., time spent in SWS overnight) in RTT was also driven by the younger age-group. Incidence of seizures in RTT was associated with significantly lower number of SWS cycles. Therefore, qEEG biomarkers of SWS in RTT evolved temporally and correlated significantly with clinical severity.

  4. Dissociating the contributions of slow-wave sleep and rapid eye movement sleep to emotional item and source memory.

    PubMed

    Groch, S; Zinke, K; Wilhelm, I; Born, J

    2015-07-01

    Sleep benefits the consolidation of emotional memories, and this influence is commonly attributed to the rapid eye movement (REM) stage of sleep. However, the contributions of sleep stages to memory for an emotional episode may differ for the event per se (i.e., item memory), and the context in which it occurred (source memory). Here, we examined the effects of slow wave sleep (SWS) and REM sleep on the consolidation of emotionally negative and neutral item (picture recognition) and source memory (recall of picture-location and picture-frame color association) in humans. In Study 1, the participants (n=18) learned 48 negative and 48 neutral pictures which were presented at specific locations and preceded by colored frames that had to be associated with the picture. In a within-subject design, learning was either followed by a 3-h early-night SWS-rich or by a late-night REM sleep-rich retention interval, then retrieval was tested. Only after REM-rich sleep, and not after SWS-rich sleep, was there a significant emotional enhancement, i.e., a significantly superior retention of emotional over neutral pictures. On the other hand, after SWS-rich sleep the retention of picture-frame color associations was better than after REM-rich sleep. However, this benefit was observed only for neutral pictures; and it was completely absent for the emotional pictures. To examine whether this absent benefit reflected a suppressive effect of emotionality on associations of minor task relevance, in Study 2 we manipulated the relevance of the picture-frame color association by combining it with information about monetary reward, following otherwise comparable procedures. Here, rewarded picture-frame color associations were equally well retained over SWS-rich early sleep no matter if the frames were associated with emotional or neutral pictures. Results are consistent with the view that REM sleep favors the emotional enhancement of item memory whereas SWS appears to contribute primarily

  5. Reactivation of emergent task-related ensembles during slow-wave sleep after neuroprosthetic learning

    PubMed Central

    Gulati, Tanuj; Ramanathan, Dhakshin; Wong, Chelsea; Ganguly, Karunesh

    2017-01-01

    Brain-Machine Interfaces can allow neural control over assistive devices. They also provide an important platform to study neural plasticity. Recent studies indicate that optimal engagement of learning is essential for robust neuroprosthetic control. However, little is known about the neural processes that may consolidate a neuroprosthetic skill. Based on the growing body of evidence linking slow-wave activity (SWA) during sleep to consolidation, we examined if there is ‘offline’ processing after neuroprosthetic learning. Using a rodent model, here we show that after successful learning, task-related units specifically experienced increased locking and coherency to SWA during sleep. Moreover, spike-spike coherence among these units was significantly enhanced. These changes were not present with poor skill acquisition or after control awake periods, demonstrating specificity of our observations to learning. Interestingly, time spent in SWA predicted performance gains. Thus, SWA appears to play a role in offline processing after neuroprosthetic learning. PMID:24997761

  6. Fragmentation of slow wave sleep after onset of complete locked-in state.

    PubMed

    Soekadar, Surjo R; Born, Jan; Birbaumer, Niels; Bensch, Michael; Halder, Sebastian; Murguialday, Ander Ramos; Gharabaghi, Alireza; Nijboer, Femke; Schölkopf, Bernhard; Martens, Suzanne

    2013-09-15

    Locked-in syndrome (LIS) as a result of brainstem lesions or progressive neurodegenerative disorders, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), is a severe medical condition in which a person is fully conscious but unable to move or talk. LIS can transition into complete locked-in syndrome (CLIS) in which residual abilities to communicate through muscle twitches are entirely lost. It is unknown how CLIS affects circadian rhythm and sleep/wake patterns. Here we report a 39-year-old ALS patient who transitioned from LIS to CLIS while brain activity was continuously recorded using electrocorticography (ECoG) over one month. While we found no circadian rhythm in heart rate and body temperature, transition into CLIS was associated with increased fragmentation of slow wave sleep (SWS) across the day. Total time in SWS did not change. SWS fragmentation might reflect progressive circadian system impairment and should be considered as a factor further limiting communication capabilities in these patients.

  7. Differences in electroencephalographic non-rapid-eye movement sleep slow-wave characteristics between young and old mice

    PubMed Central

    Panagiotou, Maria; Vyazovskiy, Vladyslav V.; Meijer, Johanna H.; Deboer, Tom

    2017-01-01

    Changes in sleep pattern are typical for the normal aging process. However, aged mice show an increase in the amount of sleep, whereas humans show a decrease when aging. Mice are considered an important model in aging studies, and this divergence warrants further investigation. Recently, insights into the network dynamics of cortical activity during sleep were obtained by investigating characteristics of individual electroencephalogram (EEG) slow waves in young and elderly humans. In this study, we investigated, for the first time, the parameters of EEG slow waves, including their incidence, amplitude, duration and slopes, in young (6 months) and older (18–24 months) C57BL/6J mice during undisturbed 24 h, and after a 6-h sleep deprivation (SD). As expected, older mice slept more but, in contrast to humans, absolute NREM sleep EEG slow-wave activity (SWA, spectral power density between 0.5–4 Hz) was higher in the older mice, as compared to the young controls. Furthermore, slow waves in the older mice were characterized by increased amplitude, steeper slopes and fewer multipeak waves, indicating increased synchronization of cortical neurons in aging, opposite to what was found in humans. Our results suggest that older mice, in contrast to elderly humans, live under a high sleep pressure. PMID:28255162

  8. Retrieval of Recent Autobiographical Memories is Associated with Slow-Wave Sleep in Early AD

    PubMed Central

    Rauchs, Géraldine; Piolino, Pascale; Bertran, Françoise; de La Sayette, Vincent; Viader, Fausto; Eustache, Francis; Desgranges, Béatrice

    2013-01-01

    Autobiographical memory is commonly impaired in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). However, little is known about the very recent past which is though highly important in daily life adaptation. In addition, the impact of sleep disturbances, also frequently reported in AD, on the consolidation, and retrieval of autobiographical memories remains to be assessed. Using an adaptation of the TEMPau task, we investigated the neural substrates of autobiographical memory for recent events and the potential relationship with sleep in 14 patients with mild AD. On day 1, autobiographical memory was explored across three periods: remote (18–30 years), the last 2 years and the last month. After testing, sleep was recorded using polysomnography. The next day, AD patients benefited a resting-state 18FDG-PET scan and a second exploration of autobiographical memory, focusing on the very recent past (today and yesterday). Total recall and episodic recall scores were obtained. In addition, for all events recalled, Remember responses justified by specific factual, spatial, and temporal details were measured using the Remember/Know paradigm. Retrieval of autobiographical memories was impaired in AD, but recall of young adulthood and very recent events was relatively better compared to the two intermediate periods. Recall of recent events (experienced the day and the day preceding the assessment) was correlated with brain glucose consumption in the precuneus and retrosplenial cortex, the calcarine region, the angular gyrus, and lateral temporal areas. AD patients also provided more Justified Remember responses for events experienced the previous-day than for those experienced the day of the assessment. Moreover, Justified Remember responses obtained for events experienced before sleep were positively correlated with the amount of slow-wave sleep. These data provide the first evidence of an association between the ability to retrieve recent autobiographical memories and sleep in mild AD

  9. Effect of conditioned stimulus exposure during slow wave sleep on fear memory extinction in humans.

    PubMed

    He, Jia; Sun, Hong-Qiang; Li, Su-Xia; Zhang, Wei-Hua; Shi, Jie; Ai, Si-Zhi; Li, Yun; Li, Xiao-Jun; Tang, Xiang-Dong; Lu, Lin

    2015-03-01

    Repeated exposure to a neutral conditioned stimulus (CS) in the absence of a noxious unconditioned stimulus (US) elicits fear memory extinction. The aim of the current study was to investigate the effects of mild tone exposure (CS) during slow wave sleep (SWS) on fear memory extinction in humans. The healthy volunteers underwent an auditory fear conditioning paradigm on the experimental night, during which tones served as the CS, and a mild shock served as the US. They were then randomly assigned to four groups. Three groups were exposed to the CS for 3 or 10 min or an irrelevant tone (control stimulus, CtrS) for 10 min during SWS. The fourth group served as controls and was not subjected to any interventions. All of the subjects completed a memory test 4 h after SWS-rich stage to evaluate the effect on fear extinction. Moreover, we conducted similar experiments using an independent group of subjects during the daytime to test whether the memory extinction effect was specific to the sleep condition. Ninety-six healthy volunteers (44 males) aged 18-28 y. Participants exhibited undisturbed sleep during 2 consecutive nights, as assessed by sleep variables (all P > 0.05) from polysomnographic recordings and power spectral analysis. Participants who were re-exposed to the 10 min CS either during SWS and wakefulness exhibited attenuated fear responses (wake-10 min CS, P < 0.05; SWS-10 min CS, P < 0.01). Conditioned stimulus re-exposure during SWS promoted fear memory extinction without altering sleep profiles. © 2015 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  10. Slow wave sleep in the chronically fatigued: Power spectra distribution patterns in chronic fatigue syndrome and primary insomnia.

    PubMed

    Neu, Daniel; Mairesse, Olivier; Verbanck, Paul; Le Bon, Olivier

    2015-10-01

    To investigate slow wave sleep (SWS) spectral power proportions in distinct clinical conditions sharing non-restorative sleep and fatigue complaints without excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS), namely the chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) and primary insomnia (PI). Impaired sleep homeostasis has been suspected in both CFS and PI. We compared perceived sleep quality, fatigue and sleepiness symptom-intensities, polysomnography (PSG) and SWS spectral power distributions of drug-free CFS and PI patients without comorbid sleep or mental disorders, with a good sleeper control group. Higher fatigue without EDS and impaired perceived sleep quality were confirmed in both patient groups. PSG mainly differed in sleep fragmentation and SWS durations. Spectral analysis revealed a similar decrease in central ultra slow power (0.3-0.79Hz) proportion during SWS for both CFS and PI and an increase in frontal power proportions of faster frequencies during SWS in PI only. The latter was correlated to affective symptoms whereas lower central ultra slow power proportions were related to fatigue severity and sleep quality impairment. In combination with normal (PI) or even increased SWS durations (CFS), we found consistent evidence for lower proportions of slow oscillations during SWS in PI and CFS. Observing normal or increased SWS durations but lower proportions of ultra slow power, our findings suggest a possible quantitative compensation of altered homeostatic regulation. Copyright © 2015 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Glucose Induces Slow-Wave Sleep by Exciting the Sleep-Promoting Neurons in the Ventrolateral Preoptic Nucleus: A New Link between Sleep and Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Varin, Christophe; Rancillac, Armelle; Geoffroy, Hélène; Arthaud, Sébastien; Fort, Patrice; Gallopin, Thierry

    2015-07-08

    Sleep-active neurons located in the ventrolateral preoptic nucleus (VLPO) play a crucial role in the induction and maintenance of slow-wave sleep (SWS). However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for their activation at sleep onset remain poorly understood. Here, we test the hypothesis that a rise in extracellular glucose concentration in the VLPO can promote sleep by increasing the activity of sleep-promoting VLPO neurons. We find that infusion of a glucose concentration into the VLPO of mice promotes SWS and increases the density of c-Fos-labeled neurons selectively in the VLPO. Moreover, we show in patch-clamp recordings from brain slices that VLPO neurons exhibiting properties of sleep-promoting neurons are selectively excited by glucose within physiological range. This glucose-induced excitation implies the catabolism of glucose, leading to a closure of ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels. The extracellular glucose concentration monitors the gating of KATP channels of sleep-promoting neurons, highlighting that these neurons can adapt their excitability according to the extracellular energy status. Together, these results provide evidence that glucose may participate in the mechanisms of SWS promotion and/or consolidation. Although the brain circuitry underlying vigilance states is well described, the molecular mechanisms responsible for sleep onset remain largely unknown. Combining in vitro and in vivo experiments, we demonstrate that glucose likely contributes to sleep onset facilitation by increasing the excitability of sleep-promoting neurons in the ventrolateral preoptic nucleus (VLPO). We find here that these neurons integrate energetic signals such as ambient glucose directly to regulate vigilance states accordingly. Glucose-induced excitation of sleep-promoting VLPO neurons should therefore be involved in the drowsiness that one feels after a high-sugar meal. This novel mechanism regulating the activity of VLPO neurons reinforces the

  12. Topographic Differences in the Adolescent Maturation of the Slow Wave EEG during NREM Sleep

    PubMed Central

    Feinberg, Irwin; de Bie, Evan; Davis, Nicole M.; Campbell, Ian G.

    2011-01-01

    Study Objectives: Our ongoing longitudinal study has shown that NREM delta (1-4 Hz) and theta (4-8 Hz) power measured at C3 and C4 decrease by more than 60% between ages 11 and 17 years. Here, we investigate the age trajectories of delta and theta power at frontal, central, and occipital electrodes. Design: Baseline sleep EEG was recorded twice yearly for 6 years in 2 cohorts, spanning ages 9-18 years, with overlap at 12-15 years. Setting: Sleep EEG was recorded in the subjects’ homes with ambulatory recorders. Participants: Sixty-seven subjects in 2 cohorts, one starting at age 9 (n = 30) and one at age 12 years (n = 37). Measurements and Results: Sleep EEG recorded from Fz, Cz, C3, C4, and O1 was referred to mastoids. Visual scoring and artifact elimination was followed by FFT power analysis. Delta and theta EEG power declined steeply across this age range. The maturational trajectories of delta power showed a “back to front” pattern, with O1 delta power declining earliest and Fz delta power declining latest. Theta EEG power did not show this topographic difference in the timing of its decline. Delta, and to a lesser extent, theta power became frontally dominant in early adolescence. Conclusions: We maintain our interpretation that the adolescent decline in EEG power reflects a widespread brain reorganization driven by synaptic pruning. The late decline in frontally recorded delta power indicates that plasticity is maintained in these circuits until a later age. Although delta and theta have similar homeostatic properties, they have different age and topographic patterns that imply different functional correlates. Citation: Feinberg I; de Bie E; Davis NM; Campbell IG. Topographic differences in the adolescent maturation of the slow wave EEG during NREM sleep. SLEEP 2011;34(3):325-333. PMID:21358849

  13. Age-related reduction in daytime sleep propensity and nocturnal slow wave sleep.

    PubMed

    Dijk, Derk-Jan; Groeger, John A; Stanley, Neil; Deacon, Stephen

    2010-02-01

    To investigate whether age-related and experimental reductions in SWS and sleep continuity are associated with increased daytime sleep propensity. Assessment of daytime sleep propensity under baseline conditions and following experimental disruption of SWS. Healthy young (20-30 y, n = 44), middle-aged (40-55 y, n = 35) and older (66-83 y, n = 31) men and women, completed a 2-way parallel group study. After an 8-h baseline sleep episode, subjects were randomized to 2 nights with selective SWS disruption by acoustic stimuli, or without disruption, followed by 1 recovery night. Objective and subjective sleep propensity were assessed using the Multiple Sleep Latency Test (MSLT) and the Karolinska Sleepiness Scale (KSS). During baseline sleep, SWS decreased (P < 0.001) and the number of awakenings increased (P < 0.001) across the 3 age groups. During the baseline day, MSLT values increased across the three age groups (P < 0.0001) with mean values of 8.7 min (SD: 4.5), 11.7 (5.1) and 14.2 (4.1) in the young, middle-aged, and older adults, respectively. KSS values were 3.7 (1.0), 3.2 (0.9), and 3.4 (0.6) (age-group: P = 0.031). Two nights of SWS disruption led to a reduction in MSLT and increase in KSS in all 3 age groups (SWS disruption vs. control: P < 0.05 in all cases). Healthy aging is associated with a reduction in daytime sleep propensity, sleep continuity, and SWS. In contrast, experimental disruption of SWS leads to an increase in daytime sleep propensity. The age-related decline in SWS and reduction in daytime sleep propensity may reflect a lessening in homeostatic sleep requirement. Healthy older adults without sleep disorders can expect to be less sleepy during the daytime than young adults.

  14. Slow eye movements distribution during nocturnal sleep.

    PubMed

    Pizza, Fabio; Fabbri, Margherita; Magosso, Elisa; Ursino, Mauro; Provini, Federica; Ferri, Raffaele; Montagna, Pasquale

    2011-08-01

    To assess the distribution across nocturnal sleep of slow eye movements (SEMs). We evaluated SEMs distribution in the different sleep stages, and across sleep cycles in nocturnal recordings of 10 healthy women. Sleep was scored according to standard criteria, and the percentage of time occupied by the SEMs was automatically detected. SEMs were differently represented during sleep stages with the following order: wakefulness after sleep onset (WASO): 61%, NREM sleep stage 1: 54%, REM sleep: 43%, NREM sleep stage 2: 21%, NREM sleep stage 3: 7%, and NREM sleep stage 4: 3% (p<0.0001). There was no difference between phasic and tonic REM sleep. SEMs progressively decreased across the NREM sleep cycles (38%, 15%, 13% during NREM sleep stage 2 in the first three sleep cycles, p=0.006), whereas no significant difference was found for REM, NREM sleep stage 1, slow-wave sleep and WASO. Our findings confirm that SEMs are a phenomenon typical of the sleep onset period, but are also found in REM sleep. The nocturnal evolution of SEMs during NREM sleep stage 2 parallels the homeostatic process underlying slow-wave sleep. SEMs are a marker of sleepiness and, potentially, of sleep homeostasis. Copyright © 2011 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Effects of playing a computer game using a bright display on presleep physiological variables, sleep latency, slow wave sleep and REM sleep.

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Shigekazu; Motohashi, Yutaka; Liu, Yang; Maeda, Akira

    2005-09-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown that playing a computer game at night delays bedtime and shortens sleeping hours, but the effects on sleep architecture and quality have remained unclear. In the present study, the effects of playing a computer game and using a bright display on nocturnal sleep were examined in a laboratory. Seven male adults (24.7+/-5.6 years old) played exciting computer games with a bright display (game-BD) and a dark display (game-DD) and performed simple tasks with low mental load as a control condition in front of a BD (control-BD) and DD (control-DD) between 23:00 and 1:45 hours in randomized order and then went to bed at 2:00 hours and slept until 8:00 hours. Rectal temperature, electroencephalogram (EEG), heart rate and subjective sleepiness were recorded before sleep and a polysomnogram was recorded during sleep. Heart rate was significantly higher after playing games than after the control conditions, and it was also significantly higher after using the BD than after using the DD. Subjective sleepiness and relative theta power of EEG were significantly lower after playing games than after the control conditions. Sleep latency was significantly longer after playing games than after the control conditions. REM sleep was significantly shorter after the playing games than after the control conditions. No significant effects of either computer games or BD were found on slow-wave sleep. These results suggest that playing an exciting computer game affects sleep latency and REM sleep but that a bright display does not affect sleep variables.

  16. Restricting Time in Bed in Early Adolescence Reduces Both NREM and REM Sleep but Does Not Increase Slow Wave EEG

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Ian G.; Kraus, Amanda M.; Burright, Christopher S.; Feinberg, Irwin

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: School night total sleep time decreases across adolescence (9–18 years) by 10 min/year. This decline is comprised entirely of a selective decrease in NREM sleep; REM sleep actually increases slightly. Decreasing sleep duration across adolescence is often attributed to insufficient time in bed. Here we tested whether sleep restriction in early adolescence produces the same sleep stage changes observed on school nights across adolescence. Methods: All-night sleep EEG was recorded in 76 children ranging in age from 9.9 to 14.0 years. Each participant kept 3 different sleep schedules that consisted of 3 nights of 8.5 h in bed followed by 4 nights of either 7, 8.5, or 10 h in bed. Sleep stage durations and NREM delta EEG activity were compared across the 3 time in bed conditions. Results: Shortening time in bed from 10 to 7 hours reduced sleep duration by approximately 2 hours, roughly equal to the decrease in sleep duration we recorded longitudinally across adolescence. However, sleep restriction significantly reduced both NREM (by 83 min) and REM (by 47 min) sleep. Sleep restriction did not affect NREM delta EEG activity. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that the selective NREM reduction and the small increase in REM we observed longitudinally across 9–18 years are not produced by sleep restriction. We hypothesize that the selective NREM decline reflects adolescent brain maturation (synaptic elimination) that reduces the need for the restorative processes of NREM sleep. Citation: Campbell IG, Kraus AM, Burright CS, Feinberg I. Restricting time in bed in early adolescence reduces both NREM and REM sleep but does not increase slow wave EEG. SLEEP 2016;39(9):1663–1670. PMID:27397569

  17. Light sleep versus slow wave sleep in memory consolidation: a question of global versus local processes?

    PubMed

    Genzel, Lisa; Kroes, Marijn C W; Dresler, Martin; Battaglia, Francesco P

    2014-01-01

    Sleep is strongly involved in memory consolidation, but its role remains unclear. 'Sleep replay', the active potentiation of relevant synaptic connections via reactivation of patterns of network activity that occurred during previous experience, has received considerable attention. Alternatively, sleep has been suggested to regulate synaptic weights homeostatically and nonspecifically, thereby improving the signal:noise ratio of memory traces. Here, we reconcile these theories by highlighting the distinction between light and deep nonrapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. Specifically, we draw on recent studies to suggest a link between light NREM and active potentiation, and between deep NREM and homeostatic regulation. This framework could serve as a key for interpreting the physiology of sleep stages and reconciling inconsistencies in terminology in this field. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Essential Roles of GABA Transporter-1 in Controlling Rapid Eye Movement Sleep and in Increased Slow Wave Activity after Sleep Deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xin-Hong; Qu, Wei-Min; Bian, Min-Juan; Huang, Fang; Fei, Jian; Urade, Yoshihiro; Huang, Zhi-Li

    2013-01-01

    GABA is the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system that has been strongly implicated in the regulation of sleep. GABA transporter subtype 1 (GAT1) constructs high affinity reuptake sites for GABA and regulates GABAergic transmission in the brain. However, the role of GAT1 in sleep-wake regulation remains elusive. In the current study, we characterized the spontaneous sleep-wake cycle and responses to sleep deprivation in GAT1 knock-out (KO) mice. GAT1 KO mice exhibited dominant theta-activity and a remarkable reduction of EEG power in low frequencies across all vigilance stages. Under baseline conditions, spontaneous rapid eye movement (REM) sleep of KO mice was elevated both during the light and dark periods, and non-REM (NREM) sleep was reduced during the light period only. KO mice also showed more state transitions from NREM to REM sleep and from REM sleep to wakefulness, as well as more number of REM and NREM sleep bouts than WT mice. During the dark period, KO mice exhibited more REM sleep bouts only. Six hours of sleep deprivation induced rebound increases in NREM and REM sleep in both genotypes. However, slow wave activity, the intensity component of NREM sleep was briefly elevated in WT mice but remained completely unchanged in KO mice, compared with their respective baselines. These results indicate that GAT1 plays a critical role in the regulation of REM sleep and homeostasis of NREM sleep. PMID:24155871

  19. Essential roles of GABA transporter-1 in controlling rapid eye movement sleep and in increased slow wave activity after sleep deprivation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xin-Hong; Qu, Wei-Min; Bian, Min-Juan; Huang, Fang; Fei, Jian; Urade, Yoshihiro; Huang, Zhi-Li

    2013-01-01

    GABA is the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system that has been strongly implicated in the regulation of sleep. GABA transporter subtype 1 (GAT1) constructs high affinity reuptake sites for GABA and regulates GABAergic transmission in the brain. However, the role of GAT1 in sleep-wake regulation remains elusive. In the current study, we characterized the spontaneous sleep-wake cycle and responses to sleep deprivation in GAT1 knock-out (KO) mice. GAT1 KO mice exhibited dominant theta-activity and a remarkable reduction of EEG power in low frequencies across all vigilance stages. Under baseline conditions, spontaneous rapid eye movement (REM) sleep of KO mice was elevated both during the light and dark periods, and non-REM (NREM) sleep was reduced during the light period only. KO mice also showed more state transitions from NREM to REM sleep and from REM sleep to wakefulness, as well as more number of REM and NREM sleep bouts than WT mice. During the dark period, KO mice exhibited more REM sleep bouts only. Six hours of sleep deprivation induced rebound increases in NREM and REM sleep in both genotypes. However, slow wave activity, the intensity component of NREM sleep was briefly elevated in WT mice but remained completely unchanged in KO mice, compared with their respective baselines. These results indicate that GAT1 plays a critical role in the regulation of REM sleep and homeostasis of NREM sleep.

  20. Effects of oral temazepam on slow waves during non-rapid eye movement sleep in healthy young adults: a high-density EEG investigation

    PubMed Central

    Plante, DT; Goldstein, MR; Cook, JD; Smith, R; Riedner, BA; Rumble, ME; Jelenchick, L; Roth, A; Tononi, G; Benca, RM; Peterson, MJ

    2016-01-01

    Slow waves are characteristic waveforms that occur during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep that play an integral role in sleep quality and brain plasticity. Benzodiazepines are commonly used medications that alter slow waves, however, their effects may depend on the time of night and measure used to characterize slow waves. Prior investigations have utilized minimal scalp derivations to evaluate the effects of benzodiazepines on slow waves, and thus the topography of changes to slow waves induced by benzodiazepines has yet to be fully elucidated. This study used high-density electroencephalography (hdEEG) to evaluate the effects of oral temazepam on slow wave activity, incidence, and morphology during NREM sleep in 18 healthy adults relative to placebo. Temazepam was associated with significant decreases in slow wave activity and incidence, which were most prominent in the latter portions of the sleep period. However, temazepam was also associated with a decrease in the magnitude of high-amplitude slow waves and their slopes in the first NREM sleep episode, which was most prominent in frontal derivations. These findings suggest that benzodiazepines produce changes in slow waves throughout the night that vary depending on cortical topography and measures used to characterize slow waves. Further research that explores the relationships between benzodiazepine-induced changes to slow waves and the functional effects of these waveforms is indicated. PMID:26779596

  1. Effects of oral temazepam on slow waves during non-rapid eye movement sleep in healthy young adults: A high-density EEG investigation.

    PubMed

    Plante, D T; Goldstein, M R; Cook, J D; Smith, R; Riedner, B A; Rumble, M E; Jelenchick, L; Roth, A; Tononi, G; Benca, R M; Peterson, M J

    2016-03-01

    Slow waves are characteristic waveforms that occur during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep that play an integral role in sleep quality and brain plasticity. Benzodiazepines are commonly used medications that alter slow waves, however, their effects may depend on the time of night and measure used to characterize slow waves. Prior investigations have utilized minimal scalp derivations to evaluate the effects of benzodiazepines on slow waves, and thus the topography of changes to slow waves induced by benzodiazepines has yet to be fully elucidated. This study used high-density electroencephalography (hdEEG) to evaluate the effects of oral temazepam on slow wave activity, incidence, and morphology during NREM sleep in 18 healthy adults relative to placebo. Temazepam was associated with significant decreases in slow wave activity and incidence, which were most prominent in the latter portions of the sleep period. However, temazepam was also associated with a decrease in the magnitude of high-amplitude slow waves and their slopes in the first NREM sleep episode, which was most prominent in frontal derivations. These findings suggest that benzodiazepines produce changes in slow waves throughout the night that vary depending on cortical topography and measures used to characterize slow waves. Further research that explores the relationships between benzodiazepine-induced changes to slow waves and the functional effects of these waveforms is indicated.

  2. Effect of Slow Wave Sleep Disruption on Metabolic Parameters in Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Natalie D.; McHill, Andrew W.; Schiavon, Michele; Kangarloo, Tairmae; Mankowski, Piotr W.; Cobelli, Claudio; Klerman, Elizabeth B.; Hall, Janet E.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Cross-sectional studies report a correlation between slow wave sleep (SWS) duration and insulin sensitivity (SI) in children and adults. Suppression of SWS causes insulin resistance in adults but effects in children are unknown. This study was designed to determine the effect of SWS fragmentation on SI in children. Methods: Fourteen pubertal children (11.3–14.1 y, body mass index 29th to 97th percentile) were randomized to sleep studies and mixed meal (MM) tolerance tests with and without SWS disruption. Beta-cell responsiveness (Φ) and SI were determined using oral minimal modeling. Results: During the disruption night, auditory stimuli (68.1 ± 10.7/night; mean ± standard error) decreased SWS by 40.0 ± 8.0%. SWS fragmentation did not affect fasting glucose (non-disrupted 76.9 ± 2.3 versus disrupted 80.6 ± 2.1 mg/dL), insulin (9.2 ± 1.6 versus 10.4 ± 2.0 μIU/mL), or C-peptide (1.9 ± 0.2 versus 1.9 ± 0.1 ng/mL) levels and did not impair SI (12.9 ± 2.3 versus 10.1 ± 1.6 10−4 dL/kg/min per μIU/mL) or Φ (73.4 ± 7.8 versus 74.4 ± 8.4 10−9 min−1) to a MM challenge. Only the subjects in the most insulin-sensitive tertile demonstrated a consistent decrease in SI after SWS disruption. Conclusion: Pubertal children across a range of body mass indices may be resistant to the adverse metabolic effects of acute SWS disruption. Only those subjects with high SI (i.e., having the greatest “metabolic reserve”) demonstrated a consistent decrease in SI. These results suggest that adolescents may have a unique ability to adapt to metabolic stressors, such as acute SWS disruption, to maintain euglycemia. Additional studies are necessary to confirm that this resiliency is maintained in settings of chronic SWS disruption. Citation: Shaw ND, McHill AW, Schiavon M, Kangarloo T, Mankowski PW, Cobelli C, Klerman EB, Hall JE. Effect of slow wave sleep disruption on metabolic parameters in adolescents. SLEEP 2016;39(8):1591–1599. PMID:27166229

  3. Neurochemical aspects of sleep regulation with specific focus on slow-wave sleep.

    PubMed

    Luppi, Pierre-Hervé

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this review is to outline the mechanisms responsible for the succession of the three vigilance states, namely waking, non rapid eye movement (nonREM) and REM (paradoxical) sleep over 24 h. The latest hypothesis on the mechanisms by which cortical activity switches from an activated state during waking to a synchronised state during nonREM sleep is presented. It is proposed that the activated cortical state during waking is induced by the activity of multiple waking systems, including the serotonergic, noradrenergic, cholinergic and hypocretin systems located at different subcortical levels. In contrast, the neurons inducing nonREM sleep are all localized in a single small nucleus named the ventrolateral preoptic nucleus (VLPO) situated above the optic chiasm. These neurons all contain the inhibitory neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid. The notion that the switch from waking to nonREM sleep is due to the inhibition of the waking systems by the VLPO sleep-active neurons is introduced. At the onset of sleep, the sleep neurons are activated by the circadian clock localized in the suprachiasmatic nucleus and a hypnogenic factor, adenosine, which progressively accumulates in the brain during waking.

  4. Polysomnographic measures of sleep in cocaine dependence and alcohol dependence: Implications for age‐related loss of slow wave, stage 3 sleep

    PubMed Central

    Bjurstrom, Martin F.; Olmstead, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background and aims Sleep disturbance is a prominent complaint in cocaine and alcohol dependence. This controlled study evaluated differences of polysomnographic (PSG) sleep in cocaine‐ and alcohol‐dependent subjects, and examined whether substance dependence interacts with age to alter slow wave sleep and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. Design Cross‐sectional comparison. Setting Los Angeles and San Diego, CA, USA. Participants Abstinent cocaine‐dependent subjects (n = 32), abstinent alcohol‐dependent subjects (n = 73) and controls (n = 108); mean age 40.3 years recruited 2005–12. Measurements PSG measures of sleep continuity and sleep architecture primary outcomes of Stage 3 sleep and REM sleep. Covariates included age, ethnicity, education, smoking, body mass index and depressive symptoms. Findings Compared with controls, both groups of substance dependent subjects showed loss of Stage 3 sleep (P < 0.001). A substance dependence × age interaction was found in which both cocaine‐ and alcohol‐dependent groups showed loss of Stage 3 sleep at an earlier age than controls (P < 0.05 for all), and cocaine‐dependent subjects showed loss of Stage 3 sleep at an earlier age than alcoholics (P < 0.05). Compared with controls, REM sleep was increased in both substance‐dependent groups (P < 0.001), and cocaine and alcohol dependence were associated with earlier age‐related increase in REM sleep (P < 0.05 for all). Conclusions Cocaine and alcohol dependence appear to be associated with marked disturbances of sleep architecture, including increased rapid eye movement sleep and accelerated age‐related loss of slow wave, Stage 3 sleep. PMID:26749502

  5. Continuous spike-waves during slow-wave sleep in a mouse model of focal cortical dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qian-Quan; Zhou, Chen; Yang, Weiguo; Petrus, Daniel

    2016-10-01

    To examine if mice with focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) develop spontaneous epileptic seizures and, if so, determine the key electroencephalography (EEG) features. Unilateral single freeze lesions to the S1 region (SFLS1R) were made in postnatal day 0-1 pups to induce a neocortical microgyrus in the right cortical hemisphere. Continuous 24-h recordings with intracranial EEG electrodes and behavioral tests were performed in adult SFLS1R and sham-control mice to assess neurologic status. A high percentage of adult SFLS1R animals (89%, 40/45) exhibited at least one or more spontaneous nonconvulsive seizure events over the course of 24 h. Of these animals, 60% (27/45) presented with a chronic seizure state that was persistent throughout the recording session, consisting of bursts of rhythmic high-amplitude spike-wave activities and primarily occurring during periods of slow-wave sleep. In comparison, none of the control, age-matched, mice (0/12) developed seizures. The epileptic discharge pattern closely resembled a pattern of continuous spike-waves during slow-wave sleep (CSWS) of the human syndrome described as an electrical status epilepticus during slow-wave sleep (ESES). Key findings in the SFLS1R model indicated that the observed CSWS (1) were more prevalent in female (18/23) versus male (9/22, p < 0.05), (2) were strongest in the right S1 region although generalized to other brain regions, (3) were associated with significant cognitive and behavioral deficits, (4) were temporarily alleviated by ethosuximide treatment or optogenetic activation of cortical γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic neurons, and (5) theta and alpha band rhythms may play a key role in the generalization of spike-wave activities. This is the first report of an in vivo animal FCD model that induces chronic spontaneous electrographic brain seizures. Further characterization of the abnormal oscillations in this mouse model may lead to a better understanding of the mechanisms of CSWS/ESES. Wiley

  6. Odors enhance slow-wave activity in non-rapid eye movement sleep.

    PubMed

    Perl, Ofer; Arzi, Anat; Sela, Lee; Secundo, Lavi; Holtzman, Yael; Samnon, Perry; Oksenberg, Arie; Sobel, Noam; Hairston, Ilana S

    2016-05-01

    Most forms of suprathreshold sensory stimulation perturb sleep. In contrast, presentation of pure olfactory or mild trigeminal odorants does not lead to behavioral or physiological arousal. In fact, some odors promote objective and subjective measures of sleep quality in humans and rodents. The brain mechanisms underlying these sleep-protective properties of olfaction remain unclear. Slow oscillations in the electroencephalogram (EEG) are a marker of deep sleep, and K complexes (KCs) are an EEG marker of cortical response to sensory interference. We therefore hypothesized that odorants presented during sleep will increase power in slow EEG oscillations. Moreover, given that odorants do not drive sleep interruption, we hypothesized that unlike other sensory stimuli odorants would not drive KCs. To test these hypotheses we used polysomnography to measure sleep in 34 healthy subjects (19 women, 15 men; mean age 26.5 ± 2.5 yr) who were repeatedly presented with odor stimuli via a computer-controlled air-dilution olfactometer over the course of a single night. Each participant was exposed to one of four odorants, lavender oil (n = 13), vetiver oil (n = 5), vanillin (n = 12), or ammonium sulfide (n = 4), for durations of 5, 10, and 20 s every 9-15 min. Consistent with our hypotheses, we found that odor presentation during sleep enhanced the power of delta (0.5-4 Hz) and slow spindle (9-12 Hz) frequencies during non-rapid eye movement sleep. The increase was proportionate to odor duration. In addition, odor presentation did not modulate the occurrence of KCs. These findings imply a sleep-promoting olfactory mechanism that may deepen sleep through driving increased slow-frequency oscillations. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  7. Odors enhance slow-wave activity in non-rapid eye movement sleep

    PubMed Central

    Perl, Ofer; Arzi, Anat; Sela, Lee; Secundo, Lavi; Holtzman, Yael; Samnon, Perry; Oksenberg, Arie; Sobel, Noam

    2016-01-01

    Most forms of suprathreshold sensory stimulation perturb sleep. In contrast, presentation of pure olfactory or mild trigeminal odorants does not lead to behavioral or physiological arousal. In fact, some odors promote objective and subjective measures of sleep quality in humans and rodents. The brain mechanisms underlying these sleep-protective properties of olfaction remain unclear. Slow oscillations in the electroencephalogram (EEG) are a marker of deep sleep, and K complexes (KCs) are an EEG marker of cortical response to sensory interference. We therefore hypothesized that odorants presented during sleep will increase power in slow EEG oscillations. Moreover, given that odorants do not drive sleep interruption, we hypothesized that unlike other sensory stimuli odorants would not drive KCs. To test these hypotheses we used polysomnography to measure sleep in 34 healthy subjects (19 women, 15 men; mean age 26.5 ± 2.5 yr) who were repeatedly presented with odor stimuli via a computer-controlled air-dilution olfactometer over the course of a single night. Each participant was exposed to one of four odorants, lavender oil (n = 13), vetiver oil (n = 5), vanillin (n = 12), or ammonium sulfide (n = 4), for durations of 5, 10, and 20 s every 9–15 min. Consistent with our hypotheses, we found that odor presentation during sleep enhanced the power of delta (0.5–4 Hz) and slow spindle (9–12 Hz) frequencies during non-rapid eye movement sleep. The increase was proportionate to odor duration. In addition, odor presentation did not modulate the occurrence of KCs. These findings imply a sleep-promoting olfactory mechanism that may deepen sleep through driving increased slow-frequency oscillations. PMID:26888107

  8. Low acetylcholine during slow-wave sleep is critical for declarative memory consolidation.

    PubMed

    Gais, Steffen; Born, Jan

    2004-02-17

    The neurotransmitter acetylcholine is considered essential for proper functioning of the hippocampus-dependent declarative memory system, and it represents a major neuropharmacological target for the treatment of memory deficits, such as those in Alzheimer's disease. During slow-wave sleep (SWS), however, declarative memory consolidation is particularly strong, while acetylcholine levels in the hippocampus drop to a minimum. Observations in rats led to the hypothesis that the low cholinergic tone during SWS is necessary for the replay of new memories in the hippocampus and their long-term storage in neocortical networks. However, this low tone should not affect nondeclarative memory systems. In this study, increasing central nervous cholinergic activation during SWS-rich sleep by posttrial infusion of 0.75 mg of the cholinesterase inhibitor physostigmine completely blocked SWS-related consolidation of declarative memories for word pairs in human subjects. The treatment did not interfere with consolidation of a nondeclarative mirror tracing task. Also, physostigmine did not alter memory consolidation during waking, when the endogenous central nervous cholinergic tone is maximal. These findings are in line with predictions that a low cholinergic tone during SWS is essential for declarative memory consolidation.

  9. Autochthonous intestinal bacteria and coprophagy: a possible contribution to the ontogeny and rhythmicity of slow wave sleep in mammals.

    PubMed

    Brown, R; Price, R J; King, M G; Husband, A J

    1988-07-01

    A sleep-inducing substance Factor S (FS) has been identified as a member of the muramyl peptide family of molecules which constitute the cell wall of bacteria. FS-like substances are unable to be synthesized by mammals suggesting that the symbiotic bacteria of the gastrointestinal tract are a prime source of FS. The present paper considers the relationship between the ontogenesis of Slow Wave Sleep (SWS) and the colonization of the intestine with strictly anaerobic bacteria. The practice of coprophagy in rats and rabbits is considered as an efficient method of FS ingestion during the sleep period.

  10. Rapid eye movement and slow-wave sleep rebound after one night of continuous positive airway pressure for obstructive sleep apnoea.

    PubMed

    Brillante, Ruby; Cossa, Gavina; Liu, Peter Y; Laks, Leon

    2012-04-01

    Rebound of slow-wave sleep (SWS) and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep is observed in patients who are on continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy for obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA); but, neither have been objectively defined. The pressure titration study often represents the first recovery sleep period for patients with OSA. Our aim was to objectively define and identify predictors of SWS and REM sleep rebound following CPAP titration. Paired diagnostic polysomnography and pressure titration studies from 335 patients were reviewed. The mean apnoea-hypopnoea index was 40.7 ± 26.1, and minimum oxygen saturation was 76 ± 14.4%. Comparing eight incremental thresholds, a rebound of 20% in REM sleep and a 40% increase in SWS allowed the best separation of prediction models. A 20% rebound in REM sleep was predicted by REM sleep %, non-REM arousal index (ArI) and total sleep time during diagnostic polysomnography, and male gender (R(2) = 35.3%). A 40% rebound in SWS was predicted by SWS %, total ArI and REM sleep % during diagnostic polysomnography, and body mass index (R(2) = 45.4%). A 40% rebound in SWS, but only a 20% rebound in REM sleep on the pressure titration study, is predicted by abnormal sleep architecture and sleep fragmentation prior to the commencement of treatment. © 2012 The Authors. Respirology © 2012 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  11. Acute Optogenetic Silencing of Orexin/Hypocretin Neurons Induces Slow-Wave Sleep in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tsunematsu, Tomomi; Kilduff, Thomas S.; Boyden, Edward S.; Takahashi, Satoru; Tominaga, Makoto; Yamanaka, Akihiro

    2013-01-01

    Orexin/hypocretin neurons have a crucial role in the regulation of sleep and wakefulness. To help determine how these neurons promote wakefulness, we generated transgenic mice in which orexin neurons expressed halorhodopsin (orexin/Halo mice), an orange light-activated neuronal silencer. Slice patch-clamp recordings of orexin neurons that expressed halorhodopsin demonstrated that orange light photic illumination immediately hyperpolarized membrane potential and inhibited orexin neuron discharge in proportion to illumination intensity. Acute silencing of orexin neurons in vivo during the day (the inactive period) induced synchronization of the electroencephalogram and a reduction in amplitude of the electromyogram that is characteristic of slow-wave sleep (SWS). In contrast, orexin neuron photoinhibition was ineffective during the night (active period). Acute photoinhibition of orexin neurons during the day in orexin/Halo mice also reduced discharge of neurons in an orexin terminal field, the dorsal raphe (DR) nucleus. However, serotonergic DR neurons exhibited normal discharge rates in mice lacking orexin neurons. Thus, although usually highly dependent on orexin neuronal activity, serotonergic DR neuronal activity can be regulated appropriately in the chronic absence of orexin input. Together, these results demonstrate that acute inhibition of orexin neurons results in time-of-day-dependent induction of SWS and in reduced firing rate of neurons in an efferent projection site thought to be involved in arousal state regulation. The results presented here advance our understanding of the role of orexin neurons in the regulation of sleep/wakefulness and may be relevant to the mechanisms that underlie symptom progression in narcolepsy. PMID:21775598

  12. Effect of slow wave and REM sleep on thyropharyngeus and stylopharyngeus activity during induced central apneas.

    PubMed

    Feroah, T R; Forster, H V; Pan, L; Wenninger, J; Martino, P; Rice, T

    2001-01-01

    The pharyngeal constrictors have been hypothesized to play an important role in the regulation of upper airway (UAW) patency in patients with sleep apnea. However, little research has focused on the activation and control of muscles that determine the lateral and posterior wall of the retropalatal airway dimensions. Our aim was to investigate the effects of slow wave sleep (SWS) and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep on the activation of pharyngeal constrictor (thyropharyngeus; TP) and dilator (stylopharyngeus; SP) muscles during eupneic breathing and induced central apneas. In nine goats, we found that eupneic TP and SP activity progressively decreased from awake to SWS (57 and 56%, respectively; P<0.01) and further in REM (25.6 and 19.9%, respectively; P<0.01). In contrast, diaphragm activity decreased equally during SWS and REM (89.3 and 87.7%, respectively; P<0.01) compared to awake. Following induced apneas while SP activity was eliminated in every state, maximal TP activity was highest in awake state (318.6% of control; P<0.02), less in SWS (157.6%; P<0.02), and nearly absent in REM (117.3%; P>0.02). During the recovery from an induced apnea when diaphragm activity was at 95% of its' control, awake TP activity remained significantly elevated and SP reduced (P>0.02) while TP activity during SWS was elevated and SP had returned to control level. During REM, TP and SP activity were not different from their reduced controls (P>0.02). The data supports our hypotheses that SWS and REM sleep causes a reduction in the eupneic TP and SP activity, as well as a reduction in TP response to induced apneas. However, the relative imbalance in TP vs SP activity during the recovery from an apnea (awake and SWS) suggest that an imbalance of active neuromuscular forces may contribute to upper airway narrowing in mixed apneas, but not in central apnea during sleep.

  13. Local increase of sleep slow wave activity after three weeks of working memory training in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Pugin, Fiona; Metz, Andreas J; Wolf, Martin; Achermann, Peter; Jenni, Oskar G; Huber, Reto

    2015-04-01

    Evidence is accumulating that electroencephalographic (EEG) sleep slow wave activity (SWA), the key characteristic of deep sleep, is regulated not only globally, but also locally. Several studies have shown local learning- and use-dependent changes in SWA. In vitro and in vivo animal experiments and studies in humans indicate that these local changes in SWA reflect synaptic plasticity. During maturation, when synaptic changes are most prominent, learning is of utmost importance. Thus, in this study, we aimed to examine whether intensive working memory training for 3 w would lead to a local increase of sleep SWA using high-density EEG recordings in children and young adolescents. Sleep laboratory at the University Children's Hospital Zurich. Fourteen healthy subjects between 10 and 16 y. Three weeks of intensive working memory training. After intensive working memory training, sleep SWA was increased in a small left frontoparietal cluster (11.06 ± 1.24%, mean ± standard error of the mean). In addition, the local increase correlated positively with increased working memory performance assessed immediately (r = 0.66) and 2 to 5 mo (r = 0.68) after the training. The increase in slow wave activity (SWA) correlates with cognitive training-induced plasticity in a region known to be involved in working memory performance. Thus, in future, the mapping of sleep SWA may be used to longitudinally monitor the effects of working memory training in children and adolescents with working memory deficiencies. © 2015 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  14. A review of short naps and sleep inertia: do naps of 30 min or less really avoid sleep inertia and slow-wave sleep?

    PubMed

    Hilditch, Cassie J; Dorrian, Jillian; Banks, Siobhan

    2017-04-01

    Napping is a widely used countermeasure to sleepiness and impaired performance caused by sleep loss and circadian pressure. Sleep inertia, the period of grogginess and impaired performance experienced after waking, is a potential side effect of napping. Many industry publications recommend naps of 30 min or less to avoid this side effect. However, the evidence to support this advice is yet to be thoroughly reviewed. Electronic databases were searched, and defined criteria were applied to select articles for review. The review covers literature on naps of 30 min or less regarding (a) sleep inertia, (b) slow-wave sleep (SWS) and (c) the relationship between sleep inertia and SWS. The review found that although the literature on short afternoon naps is relatively comprehensive, there are very few studies on naps of 30 min or less at night. Studies have mixed results regarding the onset of SWS and the duration and severity of sleep inertia following short naps, making guidelines regarding their use unclear. The varying results are likely due to differing sleep/wake profiles before the nap of interest and the time of the day at waking. The review highlights the need to have more detailed guidelines about the implementation of short naps according to the time of the day and prior sleep/wake history. Without this context, such a recommendation is potentially misleading. Further research is required to better understand the interactions between these factors, especially at night, and to provide more specific recommendations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Interaction with slow waves during sleep improves discrimination of physiologic and pathologic high-frequency oscillations (80-500 Hz).

    PubMed

    von Ellenrieder, Nicolás; Frauscher, Birgit; Dubeau, François; Gotman, Jean

    2016-06-01

    To characterize the interaction between physiologic and pathologic high-frequency oscillations (HFOs) and slow waves during sleep, and to evaluate the practical significance of these interactions by automatically classifying channels as recording from normal or epileptic brain regions. We automatically detected HFOs in intracerebral electroencephalography (EEG) recordings of 45 patients. We characterized the interaction between the HFOs and the amplitude and phase of automatically detected slow waves during sleep. We computed features associated with HFOs, and compared classic features such as rate, amplitude, duration, and frequency to novel features related to the interaction between HFOs and slow waves. To quantify the practical significance of the difference in these features we classified the channels as recording from normal/epileptic regions using logistic regression. We assessed the results in different brain regions to study differences in the HFO characteristics at the lobar level. We found a clear difference in the coupling between the phase of slow waves during sleep and the occurrence of HFOs. In channels recording physiologic activity, the HFOs tend to occur after the peak of the deactivated state of the slow wave, and in channels with epileptic activity, the HFOs occur more often before this peak. This holds for HFOs in the ripple (80-250 Hz) and fast ripple (250-500 Hz) bands, and different regions of the brain. When using this interaction to automatically classify channels as recording from normal/epileptic brain regions, the performance is better than when using other HFO characteristics. We confirmed differences in the HFO characteristics in mesiotemporal structures and in the occipital lobe. We found the association between slow waves and HFOs to be different in normal and epileptic brain regions, emphasizing their different origin. This is also of practical significance, since it improves the separation between channels recording from normal

  16. Temporal coordination of olfactory cortex sharp-wave activity with up- and downstates in the orbitofrontal cortex during slow-wave sleep.

    PubMed

    Onisawa, Naomi; Manabe, Hiroyuki; Mori, Kensaku

    2017-01-01

    During slow-wave sleep, interareal communications via coordinated, slow oscillatory activities occur in the large-scale networks of the mammalian neocortex. Because olfactory cortex (OC) areas, which belong to paleocortex, show characteristic sharp-wave (SPW) activity during slow-wave sleep, we examined whether OC SPWs in freely behaving rats occur in temporal coordination with up- and downstates of the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) slow oscillation. Simultaneous recordings of local field potentials and spike activities in the OC and OFC showed that during the downstate in the OFC, the OC also exhibited downstate with greatly reduced neuronal activity and suppression of SPW generation. OC SPWs occurred during two distinct phases of the upstate of the OFC: early-phase SPWs occurred at the start of upstate shortly after the down-to-up transition in the OFC, whereas late-phase SPWs were generated at the end of upstate shortly before the up-to-down transition. Such temporal coordination between neocortical up- and downstates and olfactory system SPWs was observed between the prefrontal cortex areas (OFC and medial prefrontal cortex) and the OC areas (anterior piriform cortex and posterior piriform cortex). These results suggest that during slow-wave sleep, OC and OFC areas communicate preferentially in specific time windows shortly after the down-to-up transition and shortly before the up-to-down transition. Simultaneous recordings of local field potentials and spike activities in the anterior piriform cortex (APC) and orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) during slow-wave sleep showed that APC sharp waves tended to occur during two distinct phases of OFC upstate: early phase, shortly after the down-to-up transition, and late phase, shortly before the up-to-down transition, suggesting that during slow-wave sleep, olfactory cortex and OFC areas communicate preferentially in the specific time windows. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  17. Epileptic encephalopathy with continuous spike-waves during slow-wave sleep including Landau-Kleffner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Van Bogaert, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Epileptic encephalopathy with continuous spike-waves during slow-wave sleep (CSWS) is a spectrum of epileptic conditions best defined by the association of cognitive or behavioral impairment acquired during childhood and not related to another factor other than the presence of abundant interictal epileptiform discharges (IED) during sleep, which tend to diffuse over the whole scalp. It is part of the childhood focal epileptic syndromes, some cases being idiopathic and overlapping with benign rolandic epilepsy, and others being symptomatic of a structural brain lesion. Landau-Kleffner syndrome (LKS) is a particular presentation where acquired aphasia is the core symptom. Clinical, neurophysiological, and cerebral glucose metabolism data support the hypothesis that IED play a prominent role in the cognitive deficits by interfering with the neuronal networks at the site of the epileptic foci but also at distant connected areas. Therefore, the treatment should aim to suppress IED. This may be achieved using conventional antiepileptic drugs, but corticosteroids seem to have more pronounced and sustained efficacy. Outcome for epilepsy is usually good, CSWS being an age-dependent EEG pattern, whereas outcome for cognition, language, and behavior is variable. Rehabilitation represents an important part of the treatment and visual forms of language should be encouraged in children with LKS. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Age-Dependency of Location of Epileptic Foci in "Continuous Spike-and-Waves during Sleep": A Parallel to the Posterior-Anterior Trajectory of Slow Wave Activity.

    PubMed

    Heinzle, Bigna Katrin Bölsterli; Bast, Thomas; Critelli, Hanne; Huber, Reto; Schmitt, Bernhard

    2017-02-01

    Background Epileptic encephalopathy with continuous spike-and-waves during sleep (CSWS) occurs during childhood and is characterized by an activation of spike wave complexes during slow wave sleep. The location of epileptic foci is variable, as is etiology. A relationship between the epileptic focus and age has been shown in various focal epilepsies following a posterior-anterior trajectory, and a link to brain maturation has been proposed.We hypothesize that in CSWS, maximal spike wave activity, corresponding to the epileptic focus, is related to age and shows a posterior-anterior evolution. Findings In a retrospective cross-sectional study on CSWS (22 EEGs of 22 patients aged 3.1-13.5 years), the location of the epileptic focus is related to age and follows a posterior-anterior course. Younger patients are more likely to have posterior foci than older ones. Conclusions We propose that the posterior-anterior trajectory of maximal spike waves in CSWS might reflect maturational changes of maximal expression of sleep slow waves, which follow a comparable course. Epileptic spike waves, that is, "hyper-synchronized slow waves" may occur at the place where the highest and therefore most synchronized slow waves meet brain tissue with an increased susceptibility to synchronization.

  19. O.H.--a strong slow wave sleep inducing factor in tortoise (Emys orbicularis).

    PubMed

    Vasilescu, E

    1997-01-01

    The paper would be a contribution to the very complex and not yet clarified field of neurochemistry of slow wave sleep (SWS). The study was performed on 30 tortoises (Emys orbicularis): 20 "donors" and 10 "receivers". The animals were equipped with chronic cannula inserted in the third ventricular space and electrodes for electrographic recording (EEG, EOG, EMG and ECG). The controls consisted in administration into the third ventricle of receivers of 30 microliters of saline or concentrated cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF) extracts from awake donors. The results were negative, i.e. the injected tortoises conserved their waking state indefinitely. The experiments were performed by introduction of 30 microliters of concentrated CSF extracts obtained from asleep donors into the third ventricular space of receivers. All the animals presented the behavioural and electrographic signs of the physiological SWS. The logical conclusion is that in the development of reptilian SWS, an endogenous SWS-inducing factor, which I called "O.H." (orbicularis hormone), was secreted by some hypnogenic structures and discharged in the CSF, with the consequences presented above.

  20. [General statistical characteristics of the background firing in cat's cortical neurons during slow-wave sleep].

    PubMed

    Bibikov, N G; Pigarev, I N

    2013-03-01

    Background activity of 62 neurons in cat cerebral cortex was recorded in the state of slow-wave sleep for evaluation of the firing statistics. In according to their statistical characteristics neurons were subdivided in three groups. In the first group deviation from the Poisson process were comparatively small, and revealed as fragments of increased excitability following immediately after the refractory period. Second group demonstrated positive correlation of the neighbouring interspike intervals what was conditioned by the changes of the mean firing rate. In these neurons the number of spikes included into the bursts reduced after random permutation of the interspike intervals. The third group was characterized by the big number of spikes included into the bursts (> 15%), and number of bursts usually dropped down after random permutation. Some neurons of this group had constant interspike intervals within the bursts while in other units these intervals monotonically increased toward the end of the burst. Only limited number of neurons demonstrated maximums of the autocorrelation function corresponded to the frequency of the EEG delta activity.

  1. Early diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of epilepsy with continuous spikes and waves during slow sleep

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Qiang; Li, Fengtong; Zhong, Hongping

    2015-01-01

    The study is to investigate the importance of early diagnosis and treatment to the prognosis of epilepsy with continuous spikes and waves during slow sleep (CSWS). A total of 8 cases of CSWS children were followed up for 6 months to 4 years. Retrospective analysis of the clinical and electroencephalographic (EEG) characteristics, treatment and prognosis was performed in these 8 cases. Of the 8 cases of CSWS patients, 5 were males and 3 were females. Epilepsy onset ages were from 3 years and 1 month to 10 years and 6 months. Five cases of the patients were with brain lesions while the other 3 cases appeared normally by imaging detection. After treatment with valproic acid, clonazepam, lamotrigine and hormone for 3 months, clinical symptoms and EEG were improved significantly in 7 cases. Two cases relapsed at 6 months after comprehensive treatment. For atypical early performance of CSWS, early diagnosis and regular treatment could improve the condition of children with seizures and effectively inhibit the epileptic activity with good prognosis. PMID:26064309

  2. Rats Housed on Corncob Bedding Show Less Slow-Wave Sleep

    PubMed Central

    Leys, Laura J; McGaraughty, Steve; Radek, Richard J

    2012-01-01

    Despite the reported advantages of corncob bedding, questions have emerged about how comfortable animals find this type of bedding as a resting surface. In this study, encephalography (EEG) was used to compare the effects of corncob and aspen-chip bedding on rat slow-wave sleep (SWS). According to a facility-wide initiative, rats that were weaned on aspen-chip bedding were switched to corncob bedding in home cages and EEG recording chambers. Spontaneous EEG recordings obtained for 5 wk after the switch to corncob bedding demonstrated that rats spent significantly less time in SWS as compared with levels measured on aspen chips just prior to the bedding switch. SWS remained low even after a 5-wk acclimation period to the corncob bedding. We then acutely switched back to aspen-chip bedding in EEG recording chambers. Acute reinstatement of aspen-chip bedding during EEG recording was associated with an average 22% increase in time spent in SWS, with overall levels of SWS comparable to the levels measured on aspen chips prior to the change to corncob bedding. Aspen-chip bedding subsequently was reinstated in both home cages and EEG recording chambers, and SWS baseline levels were restored. These data raise important concerns about the effects of corncob bedding on rodents used in research. PMID:23294881

  3. Effect of Slow Wave Sleep Disruption on Metabolic Parameters in Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Natalie D; McHill, Andrew W; Schiavon, Michele; Kangarloo, Tairmae; Mankowski, Piotr W; Cobelli, Claudio; Klerman, Elizabeth B; Hall, Janet E

    2016-08-01

    Cross-sectional studies report a correlation between slow wave sleep (SWS) duration and insulin sensitivity (SI) in children and adults. Suppression of SWS causes insulin resistance in adults but effects in children are unknown. This study was designed to determine the effect of SWS fragmentation on SI in children. Fourteen pubertal children (11.3-14.1 y, body mass index 29(th) to 97(th) percentile) were randomized to sleep studies and mixed meal (MM) tolerance tests with and without SWS disruption. Beta-cell responsiveness (Φ) and SI were determined using oral minimal modeling. During the disruption night, auditory stimuli (68.1 ± 10.7/night; mean ± standard error) decreased SWS by 40.0 ± 8.0%. SWS fragmentation did not affect fasting glucose (non-disrupted 76.9 ± 2.3 versus disrupted 80.6 ± 2.1 mg/dL), insulin (9.2 ± 1.6 versus 10.4 ± 2.0 μIU/mL), or C-peptide (1.9 ± 0.2 versus 1.9 ± 0.1 ng/mL) levels and did not impair SI (12.9 ± 2.3 versus 10.1 ± 1.6 10(-4) dL/kg/min per μIU/mL) or Φ (73.4 ± 7.8 versus 74.4 ± 8.4 10(-9) min(-1)) to a MM challenge. Only the subjects in the most insulin-sensitive tertile demonstrated a consistent decrease in SI after SWS disruption. Pubertal children across a range of body mass indices may be resistant to the adverse metabolic effects of acute SWS disruption. Only those subjects with high SI (i.e., having the greatest "metabolic reserve") demonstrated a consistent decrease in SI. These results suggest that adolescents may have a unique ability to adapt to metabolic stressors, such as acute SWS disruption, to maintain euglycemia. Additional studies are necessary to confirm that this resiliency is maintained in settings of chronic SWS disruption. © 2016 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  4. Slow-wave sleep-imposed replay modulates both strength and precision of memory.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Dylan C; Wilson, Donald A

    2014-04-09

    Odor perception is hypothesized to be an experience-dependent process involving the encoding of odor objects by distributed olfactory cortical ensembles. Olfactory cortical neurons coactivated by a specific pattern of odorant evoked input become linked through association fiber synaptic plasticity, creating a template of the familiar odor. In this way, experience and memory play an important role in odor perception and discrimination. In other systems, memory consolidation occurs partially via slow-wave sleep (SWS)-dependent replay of activity patterns originally evoked during waking. SWS is ideal for replay given hyporesponsive sensory systems, and thus reduced interference. Here, using artificial patterns of olfactory bulb stimulation in a fear conditioning procedure in the rat, we tested the effects of imposed post-training replay during SWS and waking on strength and precision of pattern memory. The results show that imposed replay during post-training SWS enhanced the subsequent strength of memory, whereas the identical replay during waking induced extinction. The magnitude of this enhancement was dependent on the timing of imposed replay relative to cortical sharp-waves. Imposed SWS replay of stimuli, which differed from the conditioned stimulus, did not affect conditioned stimulus memory strength but induced generalization of the fear memory to novel artificial patterns. Finally, post-training disruption of piriform cortex intracortical association fiber synapses, hypothesized to be critical for experience-dependent odor coding, also impaired subsequent memory precision but not strength. These results suggest that SWS replay in the olfactory cortex enhances memory consolidation, and that memory precision is dependent on the fidelity of that replay.

  5. Slow-Wave Sleep-Imposed Replay Modulates Both Strength and Precision of Memory

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Odor perception is hypothesized to be an experience-dependent process involving the encoding of odor objects by distributed olfactory cortical ensembles. Olfactory cortical neurons coactivated by a specific pattern of odorant evoked input become linked through association fiber synaptic plasticity, creating a template of the familiar odor. In this way, experience and memory play an important role in odor perception and discrimination. In other systems, memory consolidation occurs partially via slow-wave sleep (SWS)-dependent replay of activity patterns originally evoked during waking. SWS is ideal for replay given hyporesponsive sensory systems, and thus reduced interference. Here, using artificial patterns of olfactory bulb stimulation in a fear conditioning procedure in the rat, we tested the effects of imposed post-training replay during SWS and waking on strength and precision of pattern memory. The results show that imposed replay during post-training SWS enhanced the subsequent strength of memory, whereas the identical replay during waking induced extinction. The magnitude of this enhancement was dependent on the timing of imposed replay relative to cortical sharp-waves. Imposed SWS replay of stimuli, which differed from the conditioned stimulus, did not affect conditioned stimulus memory strength but induced generalization of the fear memory to novel artificial patterns. Finally, post-training disruption of piriform cortex intracortical association fiber synapses, hypothesized to be critical for experience-dependent odor coding, also impaired subsequent memory precision but not strength. These results suggest that SWS replay in the olfactory cortex enhances memory consolidation, and that memory precision is dependent on the fidelity of that replay. PMID:24719093

  6. Long-term history and immediate preceding state affect EEG slow wave characteristics at NREM sleep onset in C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Cui, N; Mckillop, L E; Fisher, S P; Oliver, P L; Vyazovskiy, V V

    2014-01-01

    The dynamics of cortical activity across the 24-h day and at vigilance state transitions is regulated by an interaction between global subcortical neuromodulatory influences and local shifts in network synchrony and excitability. To address the role of long-term and immediate preceding history in local and global cortical dynamics, we investigated cortical EEG recorded from both frontal and occipital regions during an undisturbed 24-h recording in mice. As expected, at the beginning of the light period, under physiologically increased sleep pressure, EEG slow waves were more frequent and had higher amplitude and slopes, compared to the rest of the light period. Within discrete NREM sleep episodes, the incidence, amplitude and slopes of individual slow waves increased progressively after episode onset in both derivations by approximately 10-30%. Interestingly, at the beginning of NREM sleep episodes slow waves in the frontal and occipital derivations frequently occurred in isolation, as quantified by longer latencies between consecutive slow waves in the two regions. Notably, slow waves during the initial period of NREM sleep following REM sleep episodes were significantly less frequent, lower in amplitude and exhibited shallower slopes, compared to those that occurred in NREM episodes after prolonged waking. Moreover, the latencies between consecutive frontal and occipital NREM slow waves were substantially longer when they occurred directly after REM sleep compared to following consolidated wakefulness. Overall these data reveal a complex picture, where both time of day and preceding state contribute to the characteristics and dynamics of slow waves within NREM sleep. These findings suggest that NREM sleep initiates in a more "local" fashion when it occurs following REM sleep episodes as opposed to sustained waking bouts. While the mechanisms and functional significance of such a re-setting of brain state after individual REM sleep episodes remains to be

  7. Deep sleep after social stress: NREM sleep slow-wave activity is enhanced in both winners and losers of a conflict.

    PubMed

    Kamphuis, Jeanine; Lancel, Marike; Koolhaas, Jaap M; Meerlo, Peter

    2015-07-01

    Sleep is considered to be a recovery process of prior wakefulness. Not only duration of the waking period affects sleep architecture and sleep EEG, the quality of wakefulness is also highly important. Studies in rats have shown that social defeat stress, in which experimental animals are attacked and defeated by a dominant conspecific, is followed by an acute increase in NREM sleep EEG slow wave activity (SWA). However, it is not known whether this effect is specific for the stress of social defeat or a result of the conflict per se. In the present experiment, we examined how sleep is affected in both the winners and losers of a social conflict. Sleep-wake patterns and sleep EEG were recorded in male wild-type Groningen rats that were subjected to 1h of social conflict in the middle of the light phase. All animals were confronted with a conspecific of similar aggression level and the conflict took place in a neutral arena where both individuals had an equal chance to either win or lose the conflict. NREM sleep SWA was significantly increased after the social conflict compared to baseline values and a gentle stimulation control condition. REM sleep was significantly suppressed in the first hours after the conflict. Winners and losers did not differ significantly in NREM sleep time, NREM sleep SWA and REM sleep time immediately after the conflict. Losers tended to have slightly more NREM sleep later in the recovery period. This study shows that in rats a social conflict with an unpredictable outcome has quantitatively and qualitatively largely similar acute effects on subsequent sleep in winners and losers.

  8. Characterization of scale-free properties of human electrocorticography in awake and slow wave sleep States.

    PubMed

    Zempel, John M; Politte, David G; Kelsey, Matthew; Verner, Ryan; Nolan, Tracy S; Babajani-Feremi, Abbas; Prior, Fred; Larson-Prior, Linda J

    2012-01-01

    Like many complex dynamic systems, the brain exhibits scale-free dynamics that follow power-law scaling. Broadband power spectral density (PSD) of brain electrical activity exhibits state-dependent power-law scaling with a log frequency exponent that varies across frequency ranges. Widely divergent naturally occurring neural states, awake and slow wave sleep (SWS), were used to evaluate the nature of changes in scale-free indices of brain electrical activity. We demonstrate two analytic approaches to characterizing electrocorticographic (ECoG) data obtained during awake and SWS states. A data-driven approach was used, characterizing all available frequency ranges. Using an equal error state discriminator (EESD), a single frequency range did not best characterize state across data from all six subjects, though the ability to distinguish awake and SWS ECoG data in individual subjects was excellent. Multi-segment piecewise linear fits were used to characterize scale-free slopes across the entire frequency range (0.2-200 Hz). These scale-free slopes differed between awake and SWS states across subjects, particularly at frequencies below 10 Hz and showed little difference at frequencies above 70 Hz. A multivariate maximum likelihood analysis (MMLA) method using the multi-segment slope indices successfully categorized ECoG data in most subjects, though individual variation was seen. In exploring the differences between awake and SWS ECoG data, these analytic techniques show that no change in a single frequency range best characterizes differences between these two divergent biological states. With increasing computational tractability, the use of scale-free slope values to characterize ECoG and EEG data will have practical value in clinical and research studies.

  9. Correlation of attention deficit, rapid eye movement latency and slow wave sleep in schizophrenia patients.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu-San; Hsu, Chung-Yao; Tang, Shu-Hui; Lin, Ching-Yu; Chen, Ming-Chao

    2009-04-01

    Schizophrenia patients present both reduced slow wave sleep (SWS) and shortened rapid eye movement latency (REML) in polysomnographic (PSG) profiles, which have been linked to dopaminergic and muscarinic impairment, respectively. Two main selective attentional systems involve different anatomical structures. The first system is the parietal cortical areas and thalamic areas, which are linked to cholinergic neurotransmission. This is responsible for automatic attention response. The second system is the frontal regions, which are linked to dopaminergic neurotransmission. This is responsible for voluntary control of attentional resources. It was hypothesized that low attentional performance in schizophrenia patients is associated with shortened REML and reduced SWS. The PSG profile was correlated with the continuous performance test (CPT) in 15 schizophrenia inpatients under treatment with risperidone. Schizophrenia was diagnosed according to DSM-IV criteria, and clinical symptoms were evaluated on the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale. REML was negatively correlated with errors of omission (P < 0.05), reaction time (RT; P < 0.05) and positively correlated with hit rate (HR; P < 0.05). No association was found between SWS and CPT performance. The significant indicators of CPT represent different attention processes. Errors of omission, which are linked to the problems with automatic attention processing, RT, which represent the speed of automatic processing, and HR, are involved in the integration of autonomic and voluntary attention control. The present results suggest that REML is associated with thalamus-related automatic attention response. Due to study limitations, however, confirmation of these findings in a large-scale controlled study of drug-naïve patients is needed.

  10. Enhanced slow wave sleep and improved sleep maintenance after gaboxadol administration during seven nights of exposure to a traffic noise model of transient insomnia.

    PubMed

    Dijk, D-J; Stanley, N; Lundahl, J; Groeger, J A; Legters, A; Trap Huusom, A K; Deacon, S

    2012-08-01

    Slow wave sleep (SWS) has been reported to correlate with sleep maintenance, but whether pharmacological enhancement of SWS also leads to improved sleep maintenance is not known. Here we evaluate the time-course of the effects of gaboxadol, an extra-synaptic gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) agonist, on SWS, sleep maintenance, and other sleep measures in a traffic noise model of transient insomnia. After a placebo run-in, 101 healthy subjects (20-78 y) were randomized to gaboxadol (n = 50; 15 mg in subjects <65 y and 10 mg in subjects ≥65 y) or placebo (n = 51) for 7 nights (N1-N7). The model caused some disruption of sleep initiation and maintenance, with greatest effects on N1. Compared with placebo, gaboxadol increased SWS and slow wave activity throughout N1 to N7 (p < 0.05). Gaboxadol reduced latency to persistent sleep overall (N1-N7) by 4.5 min and on N1 by 11 min (both p < 0.05). Gaboxadol increased total sleep time (TST) overall by 16 min (p < 0.001) and on N1 by 38 min (p < 0.0001). Under gaboxadol, wakefulness after sleep onset was reduced by 11 min overall (p < 0.01) and by 29 min on N1 (p < 0.0001), and poly-somnographic awakenings were reduced on N1 (p < 0.05). Gaboxadol reduced self-reported sleep onset latency overall and on N1 (both p < 0.05) and increased self-reported TST overall (p < 0.05) and on N1 (p < 0.01). Subjective sleep quality improved overall (p < 0.01) and on N1 (p < 0.0001). Increases in SWS correlated with objective and subjective measures of sleep maintenance and subjective sleep quality under placebo and gaboxadol (p < 0.05). Gaboxadol enhanced SWS and reduced the disruptive effects of noise on sleep initiation and maintenance.

  11. Effect of age on the sleep EEG: slow-wave activity and spindle frequency activity in young and middle-aged men.

    PubMed

    Landolt, H P; Dijk, D J; Achermann, P; Borbély, A A

    1996-11-04

    The effect of age on sleep and the sleep EEG was investigated in middle-aged men (mean age: 62.0 years) and in young men (mean age: 22.4 years). Even though the older men reported a higher number of nocturnal awakenings, subjective sleep quality did not differ. Total sleep time, sleep efficiency, and slow wave sleep were lower in the middle-aged, while stage 1 and wakefulness after sleep onset were higher. The differences in wakefulness within nonREM-REM sleep cycles was most pronounced in the third and fourth cycle. In the older men, EEG power density in nonREM sleep was reduced in frequencies below 14.0 Hz, whereas in REM sleep age-related reductions were limited to he delta-theta (0.25-7.0 Hz) and low alpha (8.25-10.0 Hz) band. Slow-wave activity (SWA, power density in the 0.75-4.5 Hz range) decreased in the course of sleep in both age groups. The between-group difference in SWA diminished in the course of sleep, whereas the difference in activity in the frequency range of sleep spindles (12.25-14.0 Hz) increased. It is concluded that frequency and state specific changes occur as a function of age, and that sleep dependent decline in SWA and increase in sleep spindle activity are attenuated with age.

  12. Differences in EEG delta frequency characteristics and patterns in slow-wave sleep between dementia patients and controls: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Bonanni, Enrica; Di Coscio, Elisa; Maestri, Michelangelo; Carnicelli, Luca; Tsekou, Hara; Economou, Nicholas Tiberio; Paparrigopoulos, Thomas; Bonakis, Anastasios; Papageorgiou, Sokratis G; Vassilopoulos, Dimitris; Soldatos, Constantin R; Murri, Luigi; Ktonas, Periklis Y

    2012-02-01

    To evaluate the modifications of EEG activity during slow-wave sleep in patients with dementia compared with healthy elderly subjects, using spectral analysis and period-amplitude analysis. Five patients with dementia and 5 elderly control subjects underwent night polysomnographic recordings. For each of the first three nonrapid eye movement-rapid eye movement sleep cycles, a well-defined slow-wave sleep portion was chosen. The delta frequency band (0.4-3.6 Hz) in these portions was analyzed with both spectral analysis and period-amplitude analysis. Spectral analysis showed an increase in the delta band power in the dementia group, with a decrease across the night observed only in the control group. For the dementia group, period-amplitude analysis showed a decrease in well-defined delta waves of frequency lower than 1.6 Hz and an increase in such waves of frequency higher than 2 Hz, in incidence and amplitude. Our study showed (1) a loss of the dynamics of delta band power across the night sleep, in dementia, and (2) a different distribution of delta waves during slow-wave sleep in dementia compared with control subjects. This kind of computer-based analysis can highlight the presence of a pathologic delta activity during slow-wave sleep in dementia and may support the hypothesis of a dynamic interaction between sleep alteration and cognitive decline.

  13. Slow wave sleep during a daytime nap is necessary for protection from subsequent interference and long-term retention.

    PubMed

    Alger, Sara E; Lau, Hiuyan; Fishbein, William

    2012-09-01

    While it is now generally accepted that sleep facilitates the processing of newly acquired declarative information, questions still remain as to the type and length of sleep necessary to best benefit declarative memories. A better understanding could lend support in one direction or another as to the much-debated role of sleep, be it passive, permissive, or active, in memory processing. The present study employed a napping paradigm and compared performance on a bimodal paired-associates task of those who obtained a 10-min nap, containing only Stages 1 and 2 sleep, to those whose nap contained slow-wave sleep (SWS) and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep (60-min nap), as well as to subjects who remained awake. Measurements were obtained for baseline performance at training, after a sleep/no sleep interval for short-term retention, after a subsequent stimulus-related interference task, and again after a weeklong retention period. While all groups learned the information similarly, both nap groups performed better than the Wake group when examining short-term retention, approximately 1.5h after training (10-min p=.052, 60-min p=.002). However, performance benefits seen in the 10-min nap group proved to be temporary. Performance after a stimulus-related interference task revealed significantly better memory retention in the 60-min nap group, with interference disrupting the memory trace far less than both the Wake and 10-min nap groups (p<.001, p=.006, respectively). After a weeklong retention period, sleep's benefit to memory persisted in the 60-min nap group, with performance significantly greater than both the Wake and 10-min nap groups (p<.001, p=.004, respectively). It is our conclusion that SWS, obtained only by those in the 60-min nap group, served to actively facilitate the consolidation of learned bimodal paired-associates, supported by theories such as the Standard Theory of Consolidation as well as the Synaptic Homeostasis Hypothesis.

  14. Neurobehavioral consequences of continuous spike and waves during slow sleep (CSWS) in a pediatric population: A pattern of developmental hindrance.

    PubMed

    De Giorgis, Valentina; Filippini, Melissa; Macasaet, Joyce Ann; Masnada, Silvia; Veggiotti, Pierangelo

    2017-09-01

    Continuous spike and waves during slow sleep (CSWS) is a typical EEG pattern defined as diffuse, bilateral and recently also unilateral or focal localization spike-wave occurring in slow sleep or non-rapid eye movement sleep. Literature results so far point out a progressive deterioration and decline of intellectual functioning in CSWS patients, i.e. a loss of previously normally acquired skills, as well as persistent neurobehavioral disorders, beyond seizure and EEG control. The objective of this study was to shed light on the neurobehavioral impact of CSWS and to identify the potential clinical risk factors for development. We conducted a retrospective study involving a series of 16 CSWS idiopathic patients age 3-16years, considering the entire duration of epilepsy from the onset to the outcome, i.e. remission of CSWS pattern. All patients were longitudinally assessed taking into account clinical (sex, age at onset, lateralization and localization of epileptiform abnormalities, spike wave index, number of antiepileptic drugs) and behavioral features. Intelligent Quotient (IQ) was measured in the whole sample, whereas visuo-spatial attention, visuo-motor skills, short term memory and academic abilities (reading and writing) were tested in 6 out of 16 patients. Our results showed that the most vulnerable from an intellectual point of view were those children who had an early-onset of CSWS whereas those with later onset resulted less affected (p=0.004). Neuropsychological outcome was better than the behavioral one and the lexical-semantic route in reading and writing resulted more severely affected compared to the phonological route. Cognitive deterioration is one but not the only consequence of CSWS. Especially with respect to verbal skills, CSWS is responsible of a pattern of consequences in terms of developmental hindrance, including slowing of development and stagnation, whereas deterioration is rare. Behavioral and academic problems tend to persist beyond

  15. EEG slow (approximately 1 Hz) waves are associated with nonstationarity of thalamo-cortical sensory processing in the sleeping human.

    PubMed

    Massimini, Marcello; Rosanova, Mario; Mariotti, Maurizio

    2003-03-01

    Intracellular studies reveal that, during slow wave sleep (SWS), the entire cortical network can swing rhythmically between extremely different microstates, ranging from wakefulness-like network activation to functional disconnection in the space of a few hundred milliseconds. This alternation of states also involves the thalamic neurons and is reflected in the EEG by a slow (<1 Hz) oscillation. These rhythmic changes, occurring in the thalamo-cortical circuits during SWS, may have relevant, phasic effects on the transmission and processing of sensory information. However, brain reactivity to sensory stimuli, during SWS, has traditionally been studied by means of sequential averaging, a procedure that necessarily masks any short-term fluctuation of responsiveness. The aim of this study was to provide a dynamic evaluation of brain reactivity to sensory stimuli in naturally sleeping humans. To this aim, single-trial somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) were grouped and averaged as a function of the phase of the ongoing sleep slow (<1 Hz) oscillation. This procedure revealed a dynamic profile of responsiveness, which was conditioned by the phase of the spontaneous sleep EEG. Overall, the amplitude of the evoked potential changed sistematically, increasing and approaching wakefulness levels along the negative slope of the EEG oscillation and decaying below SWS average levels along the positive drift. These marked and fast changes of stimulus-correlated electrical activity involved both short (N20) and long latency (P60 and P100) components of SEPs. In addition, the observed short-term response variability appeared to be centrally generated and specifically related to the evolution of the spontaneous oscillatory pattern. The present findings demonstrate that thalamo-cortical processing of sensory information is not stationary in the very short period (approximately 500 ms) during natural SWS.

  16. Asynchronous ripple oscillations between left and right hippocampi during slow-wave sleep

    PubMed Central

    Villalobos, Claudio

    2017-01-01

    Spatial memory, among many other brain processes, shows hemispheric lateralization. Most of the published evidence suggests that the right hippocampus plays a leading role in the manipulation of spatial information. Concurrently in the hippocampus, memory consolidation during sleep periods is one of the key steps in the formation of newly acquired spatial memory traces. One of the most characteristic oscillatory patterns in the hippocampus are sharp-wave ripple (SWR) complexes. Within this complex, fast-field oscillations or ripples have been demonstrated to be instrumental in the memory consolidation process. Since these ripples are relevant for the consolidation of memory traces associated with spatial navigation, and this process appears to be lateralized, we hypothesize that ripple events between both hippocampi would exhibit different temporal dynamics. We tested this idea by using a modified "split-hyperdrive" that allows us to record simultaneous LFPs from both right and left hippocampi of Sprague-Dawley rats during sleep. We detected individual events and found that during sleep periods these ripples exhibited a different occurrence patterns between hemispheres. Most ripple events were synchronous between intra- rather than inter-hemispherical recordings, suggesting that ripples in the hippocampus are independently generated and locally propagated within a specific hemisphere. In this study, we propose the ripples’ lack of synchrony between left and right hippocampi as the putative physiological mechanism underlying lateralization of spatial memory. PMID:28158285

  17. Asynchronous ripple oscillations between left and right hippocampi during slow-wave sleep.

    PubMed

    Villalobos, Claudio; Maldonado, Pedro E; Valdés, José L

    2017-01-01

    Spatial memory, among many other brain processes, shows hemispheric lateralization. Most of the published evidence suggests that the right hippocampus plays a leading role in the manipulation of spatial information. Concurrently in the hippocampus, memory consolidation during sleep periods is one of the key steps in the formation of newly acquired spatial memory traces. One of the most characteristic oscillatory patterns in the hippocampus are sharp-wave ripple (SWR) complexes. Within this complex, fast-field oscillations or ripples have been demonstrated to be instrumental in the memory consolidation process. Since these ripples are relevant for the consolidation of memory traces associated with spatial navigation, and this process appears to be lateralized, we hypothesize that ripple events between both hippocampi would exhibit different temporal dynamics. We tested this idea by using a modified "split-hyperdrive" that allows us to record simultaneous LFPs from both right and left hippocampi of Sprague-Dawley rats during sleep. We detected individual events and found that during sleep periods these ripples exhibited a different occurrence patterns between hemispheres. Most ripple events were synchronous between intra- rather than inter-hemispherical recordings, suggesting that ripples in the hippocampus are independently generated and locally propagated within a specific hemisphere. In this study, we propose the ripples' lack of synchrony between left and right hippocampi as the putative physiological mechanism underlying lateralization of spatial memory.

  18. Induction of prolonged, continuous slow-wave sleep by blocking cerebral H1 histamine receptors in rats

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda-Sagara, Masami; Ozaki, Tomoya; Shahid, Mohammad; Morioka, Eri; Wada, Kazuma; Honda, Kazuki; Hori, Ayana; Matsuya, Yuji; Toyooka, Naoki; Ikeda, Masayuki

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Classic H1 histamine receptor (H1R) antagonists are non-selective for H1R and known to produce drowsiness. Modern antihistamines are more selective for H1R, and are ‘non-drowsy’ presumably due to reduced permeability through the blood-brain barrier. To characterize both histaminergic sleep regulation and the central actions of antihistamines, in the present study we analysed the effect of classic and modern antihistamines on rats' sleep using continuous i.c.v. infusions. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Effects of classic (d-chlorpheniramine; d-CPA) and second-generation (cetirizine) antihistamines on sleep were compared after i.p. injections or continuous i.c.v. infusions into rats. Fluorescent cetirizine/DBD-pz was synthesized to trace the approximate distribution of cerebral cetirizine. Furthermore, the effects of H1R antagonists on cultured preoptic neurons were examined using calcium imaging. KEY RESULTS d-CPA 4 mg·kg−1 i.p. increased non-rapid eye movement (REM) sleep whereas 10–40 mg·kg−1d-CPA decreased non-REM sleep at dark onset time. Nocturnal i.c.v. infusions of d-CPA (10 µmol·100 µL−1·10 h−1) increased drowsiness but not non-REM sleep, whereas the same i.c.v. infusions of cetirizine significantly increased non-REM sleep, abolished REM sleep, and decreased wakefulness for more than 10 h. The medial preoptic area contained the greatest fluorescent labelling after i.c.v. cetirizine/DBD-pz infusions. Histamine-induced Ca2+ increases in medial preoptic neurons were blocked by d-CPA or cetirizine, whereas d-CPA, but not cetirizine, increased Ca2+ irrespective of antihistaminergic activity at ≥100 µM. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS The excitatory action of d-CPA may explain the seemingly inconsistent actions of d-CPA on sleep. Cerebral H1R inhibition by cetirizine induces synchronization of cerebral activity and prolonged, continuous slow-wave sleep. PMID:21699505

  19. Non-linear EEG analysis in children with epilepsy and electrical status epilepticus during slow-wave sleep (ESES).

    PubMed

    Ferri, R; Elia, M; Musumeci, S A; Stam, C J

    2001-12-01

    The objective of this work was to study the non-linear aspects of electroencephalography (EEG) in children with epilepsy and electrical status epilepticus during slow-wave sleep (ESES). In this study, we recorded the sleep EEG in 5 subjects with ESES (4 males and one female, aged 6.5-10 years) who were also mentally retarded and affected by cerebral palsy (3 subjects) and hydrocephalus (two subjects). The signals were sampled at 128Hz and stored on hard disk. All the subsequent computational steps were performed on EEG epochs (4096 data points) selected from wakefulness and non-rapid eye movement (non-REM) (with ESES) or REM sleep. The dynamic properties of the EEG were assessed by means of the non-linear cross prediction (NLCP) test which uses 3 different 'model' time series in order to predict non-linearly the original data set (Pred, Ama and Tir). Pred is a measure of the predictability of the time series and Ama and Tir are measures of asymmetry, indicating non-linear structure. Moreover, the correlation dimension (D2) was estimated by means of the algorithm by for the epochs showing non-linear nature. The NLCP test provided evidence of significant non-linear dynamics in all epochs of non-REM sleep, when ESES was evident. Only during this stage, the possible presence of low-dimensional chaos could also be suspected (average D2=4.02; range 3.16-6.21). EEG without ESES could not be distinguished from linearly filtered noise. The results of the present study seem to indicate that subjects with ESES show a profound modification of their EEG dynamics with the occurrence, during sleep, of long periods characterized by non-linear dynamics and, probably, low-dimensional chaotic structure able to modify in a substantial way their brain functioning during sleep.

  20. β oscillation during slow wave sleep and rapid eye movement sleep in the electroencephalogram of a transgenic mouse model of Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Jeantet, Yannick; Cayzac, Sebastien; Cho, Yoon H

    2013-01-01

    To search for early abnormalities in electroencephalogram (EEG) during sleep which may precede motor symptoms in a transgenic mouse model of hereditary neurodegenerative Huntington's disease (HD). In the R6/1 transgenic mouse model of HD, rhythmic brain activity in EEG recordings was monitored longitudinally and across vigilance states through the onset and progression of disease. Mice with chronic electrode implants were recorded monthly over wake-sleep cycles (4 hours), beginning at 9-11 weeks (presymptomatic period) through 6-7 months (symptomatic period). Recording data revealed a unique β rhythm (20-35 Hz), present only in R6/1 transgenic mice, which evolves in close parallel with the disease. In addition, there was an unusual relationship between this β oscillation and vigilance states: while nearly absent during the active waking state, the β oscillation appeared with drowsiness and during slow wave sleep (SWS) and, interestingly, strengthened rather than dissipating when the brain returned to an activated state during rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. In addition to providing a new in vivo biomarker and insight into Huntington's disease pathophysiology, this serendipitous observation opens a window onto the rarely explored neurophysiology of the cortico-basal ganglia circuit during SWS and REM sleep.

  1. The dream-lag effect: Selective processing of personally significant events during Rapid Eye Movement sleep, but not during Slow Wave Sleep.

    PubMed

    van Rijn, E; Eichenlaub, J-B; Lewis, P A; Walker, M P; Gaskell, M G; Malinowski, J E; Blagrove, M

    2015-07-01

    Incorporation of details from waking life events into Rapid Eye Movement (REM) sleep dreams has been found to be highest on the night after, and then 5-7 nights after events (termed, respectively, the day-residue and dream-lag effects). In experiment 1, 44 participants kept a daily log for 10 days, reporting major daily activities (MDAs), personally significant events (PSEs), and major concerns (MCs). Dream reports were collected from REM and Slow Wave Sleep (SWS) in the laboratory, or from REM sleep at home. The dream-lag effect was found for the incorporation of PSEs into REM dreams collected at home, but not for MDAs or MCs. No dream-lag effect was found for SWS dreams, or for REM dreams collected in the lab after SWS awakenings earlier in the night. In experiment 2, the 44 participants recorded reports of their spontaneously recalled home dreams over the 10 nights following the instrumental awakenings night, which thus acted as a controlled stimulus with two salience levels, high (sleep lab) and low (home awakenings). The dream-lag effect was found for the incorporation into home dreams of references to the experience of being in the sleep laboratory, but only for participants who had reported concerns beforehand about being in the sleep laboratory. The delayed incorporation of events from daily life into dreams has been proposed to reflect REM sleep-dependent memory consolidation. However, an alternative emotion processing or emotional impact of events account, distinct from memory consolidation, is supported by the finding that SWS dreams do not evidence the dream-lag effect. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Substance P and the neurokinin-1 receptor regulate electroencephalogram non-rapid eye movement sleep slow-wave activity locally.

    PubMed

    Zielinski, M R; Karpova, S A; Yang, X; Gerashchenko, D

    2015-01-22

    The neuropeptide substance P is an excitatory neurotransmitter produced by various cells including neurons and microglia that is involved in regulating inflammation and cerebral blood flow--functions that affect sleep and slow-wave activity (SWA). Substance P is the major ligand for the neurokinin-1 receptor (NK-1R), which is found throughout the brain including the cortex. The NK-1R is found on sleep-active cortical neurons expressing neuronal nitric oxide synthase whose activity is associated with SWA. We determined the effects of local cortical administration of a NK-1R agonist (substance P-fragment 1, 7) and a NK-1R antagonist (CP96345) on sleep and SWA in mice. The NK-1R agonist significantly enhanced SWA for several hours when applied locally to the cortex of the ipsilateral hemisphere as the electroencephalogram (EEG) electrode but not after application to the contralateral hemisphere when compared to saline vehicle control injections. In addition, a significant compensatory reduction in SWA was found after the NK-1R agonist-induced enhancements in SWA. Conversely, injections of the NK-1R antagonist into the cortex of the ipsilateral hemisphere of the EEG electrode attenuated SWA compared to vehicle injections but this effect was not found after injections of the NK-1R antagonist into contralateral hemisphere as the EEG electrode. Non-rapid eye movement sleep and rapid eye movement sleep duration responses after NK-1R agonist and antagonist injections were not significantly different from the responses to the vehicle. Our findings indicate that the substance P and the NK-1R are involved in regulating SWA locally.

  3. Chronic exposure of rats to noise: relationship between long-term memory deficits and slow wave sleep disturbances.

    PubMed

    Rabat, A; Bouyer, J J; George, O; Le Moal, M; Mayo, W

    2006-08-10

    Noise is now recognized as a serious health problem in our modern societies. Although its deleterious and direct effects on cognitive tasks (long-term memory, mental arithmetic activity, visual tasks, etc.) are clearly admitted, no studies have determined a delayed indirect effect of noise on cognitive processes. Furthermore, the link between sleep disturbances related to environmental noise (EN) exposure and these indirect deteriorations of human performances has never been demonstrated. This could be due to inappropriate evaluation of sleep as well as to uncontrolled and confounding factors such as sex, age, and also inter-individual vulnerability. Based on a recently validated animal model [Rabat A, Bouyer JJ, Aran JM, Le Moal M, Mayo W. Chronic exposure to an environmental noise permanently disturbs sleep in rats: inter-individual vulnerability. Brain Res 2005;1059:72-82], aims of the present study were (i) to determine long-term memory (LTM) deficits following a chronic exposure to EN and (ii) to link these behavioral problems to sleep disturbances related to EN. For this purpose in a first experiment, LTM performances were evaluated before and following 9 days of EN. Results show LTM deficits following a chronic exposure to EN with inter-individual vulnerability. Vulnerability profile was related to the psychobiological profile of rats. Results of the second experiment show LTM deficits correlated to both debt of slow wave sleep (SWS) and to daily decrease of SWS bout duration. Our results demonstrate that chronic exposure to noise indirectly disturbs LTM possibly through SWS disturbances and suggest a possible role of the stress hormonal axis in these biological effects of noise.

  4. Redistribution of slow wave activity of sleep during pharmacological treatment of depression with paroxetine but not with nefazodone.

    PubMed

    Argyropoulos, Spilios V; Hicks, Jane A; Nash, John R; Bell, Caroline J; Rich, Anne S; Nutt, David J; Wilson, Sue

    2009-09-01

    It has been suggested that increase in delta sleep ratio (DSR), a marker for the relative distribution of slow wave activity (SWA) over night time, is associated with clinical response to antidepressant treatment. We examined this index and its relationship to rapid eye movement (REM) suppression before and during long-term treatment with nefazodone, which does not suppress REM sleep, and paroxetine which does. The effect of serotonin (5-HT(2A)) receptor blockade on the evolution of SWA during treatment was also investigated. In a double-blind, randomised, parallel group, 8-week study in 29 depressed patients, sleep electroencephalograms were performed at home at baseline, on night 3 and 10, and at 8 weeks of treatment with either paroxetine or nefazodone. SWA was automatically analysed and a modified DSR (mDSR) was derived, being the ratio of amount of SWA in the first 90 min of sleep to that in the second plus third 90-min periods. At baseline, the pattern of SWA over night time was similar to other reports of depressed patients. mDSR improved over the course of treatment; there was no difference between remitters and non-remitters but there was a significant drug effect and a significant drug x time effect with paroxetine patients having a much higher mDSR after treatment, regardless of clinical status. SWA and REM during antidepressant treatment appear to be interdependent and neither of them alone is likely to predict response to treatment. Higher mDSR did not predict therapeutic response. 5-HT(2A) blockade by nefazodone does not increase SWA above normal levels.

  5. Nonlinear dynamical systems effects of homeopathic remedies on multiscale entropy and correlation dimension of slow wave sleep EEG in young adults with histories of coffee-induced insomnia.

    PubMed

    Bell, Iris R; Howerter, Amy; Jackson, Nicholas; Aickin, Mikel; Bootzin, Richard R; Brooks, Audrey J

    2012-07-01

    Investigators of homeopathy have proposed that nonlinear dynamical systems (NDS) and complex systems science offer conceptual and analytic tools for evaluating homeopathic remedy effects. Previous animal studies demonstrate that homeopathic medicines alter delta electroencephalographic (EEG) slow wave sleep. The present study extended findings of remedy-related sleep stage alterations in human subjects by testing the feasibility of using two different NDS analytic approaches to assess remedy effects on human slow wave sleep EEG. Subjects (N=54) were young adult male and female college students with a history of coffee-related insomnia who participated in a larger 4-week study of the polysomnographic effects of homeopathic medicines on home-based all-night sleep recordings. Subjects took one bedtime dose of a homeopathic remedy (Coffea cruda or Nux vomica 30c). We computed multiscale entropy (MSE) and the correlation dimension (Mekler-D2) for stages 3 and 4 slow wave sleep EEG sampled in artifact-free 2-min segments during the first two rapid-eye-movement (REM) cycles for remedy and post-remedy nights, controlling for placebo and post-placebo night effects. MSE results indicate significant, remedy-specific directional effects, especially later in the night (REM cycle 2) (CC: remedy night increases and post-remedy night decreases in MSE at multiple sites for both stages 3 and 4 in both REM cycles; NV: remedy night decreases and post-remedy night increases, mainly in stage 3 REM cycle 2 MSE). D2 analyses yielded more sporadic and inconsistent findings. Homeopathic medicines Coffea cruda and Nux vomica in 30c potencies alter short-term nonlinear dynamic parameters of slow wave sleep EEG in healthy young adults. MSE may provide a more sensitive NDS analytic method than D2 for evaluating homeopathic remedy effects on human sleep EEG patterns. Copyright © 2012 The Faculty of Homeopathy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Nonlinear Dynamical Systems Effects of Homeopathic Remedies on Multiscale Entropy and Correlation Dimension of Slow Wave Sleep EEG in Young Adults with Histories of Coffee-Induced Insomnia

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Iris R.; Howerter, Amy; Jackson, Nicholas; Aickin, Mikel; Bootzin, Richard R.; Brooks, Audrey J.

    2012-01-01

    Background Investigators of homeopathy have proposed that nonlinear dynamical systems (NDS) and complex systems science offer conceptual and analytic tools for evaluating homeopathic remedy effects. Previous animal studies demonstrate that homeopathic medicines alter delta electroencephalographic (EEG) slow wave sleep. The present study extended findings of remedy-related sleep stage alterations in human subjects by testing the feasibility of using two different NDS analytic approaches to assess remedy effects on human slow wave sleep EEG. Methods Subjects (N=54) were young adult male and female college students with a history of coffee-related insomnia who participated in a larger 4-week study of the polysomnographic effects of homeopathic medicines on home-based all-night sleep recordings. Subjects took one bedtime dose of a homeopathic remedy (Coffea cruda or Nux vomica 30c). We computed multiscale entropy (MSE) and the correlation dimension (Mekler-D2) for stage 3 and 4 slow wave sleep EEG sampled in artifact-free 2-minute segments during the first two rapid-eye-movement (REM) cycles for remedy and post-remedy nights, controlling for placebo and post-placebo night effects. Results MSE results indicate significant, remedy-specific directional effects, especially later in the night (REM cycle 2) (CC: remedy night increases and post-remedy night decreases in MSE at multiple sites for both stages 3 and 4 in both REM cycles; NV: remedy night decreases and post-remedy night increases, mainly in stage 3 REM cycle 2 MSE). D2 analyses yielded more sporadic and inconsistent findings. Conclusions Homeopathic medicines Coffea cruda and Nux vomica in 30c potencies alter short-term nonlinear dynamic parameters of slow wave sleep EEG in healthy young adults. MSE may provide a more sensitive NDS analytic method than D2 for evaluating homeopathic remedy effects on human sleep EEG patterns. PMID:22818237

  7. Developmental trajectories of EEG sleep slow wave activity as a marker for motor skill development during adolescence: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Lustenberger, Caroline; Mouthon, Anne-Laure; Tesler, Noemi; Kurth, Salome; Ringli, Maya; Buchmann, Andreas; Jenni, Oskar G; Huber, Reto

    2017-01-01

    Reliable markers for brain maturation are important to identify neural deviations that eventually predict the development of mental illnesses. Recent studies have proposed topographical EEG-derived slow wave activity (SWA) during NREM sleep as a mirror of cortical development. However, studies about the longitudinal stability as well as the relationship with behavioral skills are needed before SWA topography may be considered such a reliable marker. We examined six subjects longitudinally (over 5.1 years) using high-density EEG and a visuomotor learning task. All subjects showed a steady increase of SWA at a frontal electrode and a decrease in central electrodes. Despite these large changes in EEG power, SWA topography was relatively stable within each subject during development indicating individual trait-like characteristics. Moreover, the SWA changes in the central cluster were related to the development of specific visuomotor skills. Taken together with the previous work in this domain, our results suggest that EEG sleep SWA represents a marker for motor skill development and further supports the idea that SWA mirrors cortical development during childhood and adolescence. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Theta-rhythmic drive between medial septum and hippocampus in slow-wave sleep and microarousal: a Granger causality analysis.

    PubMed

    Kang, D; Ding, M; Topchiy, I; Shifflett, L; Kocsis, B

    2015-11-01

    Medial septum (MS) plays a critical role in controlling the electrical activity of the hippocampus (HIPP). In particular, theta-rhythmic burst firing of MS neurons is thought to drive lasting HIPP theta oscillations in rats during waking motor activity and REM sleep. Less is known about MS-HIPP interactions in nontheta states such as non-REM sleep, in which HIPP theta oscillations are absent but theta-rhythmic burst firing in subsets of MS neurons is preserved. The present study used Granger causality (GC) to examine the interaction patterns between MS and HIPP in slow-wave sleep (SWS, a nontheta state) and during its short interruptions called microarousals (a transient theta state). We found that during SWS, while GC revealed a unidirectional MS→HIPP influence over a wide frequency band (2-12 Hz, maximum: ∼8 Hz), there was no theta peak in the hippocampal power spectra, indicating a lack of theta activity in HIPP. In contrast, during microarousals, theta peaks were seen in both MS and HIPP power spectra and were accompanied by bidirectional GC with MS→HIPP and HIPP→MS theta drives being of equal magnitude. Thus GC in a nontheta state (SWS) vs. a theta state (microarousal) primarily differed in the level of HIPP→MS. The present findings suggest a modification of our understanding of the role of MS as the theta generator in two regards. First, a MS→HIPP theta drive does not necessarily induce theta field oscillations in the hippocampus, as found in SWS. Second, HIPP theta oscillations entail bidirectional theta-rhythmic interactions between MS and HIPP.

  9. Exposure to extinction-associated contextual tone during slow-wave sleep and wakefulness differentially modulates fear expression.

    PubMed

    Ai, Si-Zhi; Chen, Jie; Liu, Jian-Feng; He, Jia; Xue, Yan-Xue; Bao, Yan-Ping; Han, Fang; Tang, Xiang-Dong; Lu, Lin; Shi, Jie

    2015-09-01

    Recent research has used context cues (odor or auditory cues) to target memories during sleep and has demonstrated that they can enhance declarative and procedural memories. However, the effects of external cues re-presented during sleep on emotional memory are still not fully understood. In the present study, we conducted a Pavlovian fear conditioning/extinction paradigm and examined the effects of re-exposure to extinction memory associated contextual tones during slow-wave sleep (SWS) and wakefulness on fear expression. The participants underwent fear conditioning on the first day, during which colored squares served as the conditioned stimulus (CS) and a mild shock served as the unconditioned stimulus (US). The next day, they underwent extinction, during which the CSs were presented without the US but accompanied by a contextual tone (pink noise). Immediately after extinction, the participants were required to take a nap or remain awake and randomly assigned to six groups. Four of the groups were separately exposed to the associated tone (i.e. SWS-Tone group and Wake-Tone group) or an irrelevant tone (control tone, CtrT) (i.e. SWS-CtrT group and Wake-CtrT group), while the other two groups were not (i.e. SWS-No Tone group and Wake-No Tone group). Subsequently, the conditioned responses to the CSs were tested to evaluate the fear expression. All of the participants included in the final analysis showed successful levels of fear conditioning and extinction. During the recall test, the fear responses were significantly higher in the SWS-Tone group than that in the SWS-No Tone group or the SWS-CtrT group, while the Wake-Tone group exhibited more attenuated fear responses than either the Wake-No Tone group or Wake-CtrT group. Otherwise, re-exposure to auditory tones during SWS did not affect sleep profiles. These results suggest that distinct conditions during which re-exposure to an extinction memory associated contextual cue contributes to differential effects on

  10. Topographic differences in the adolescent maturation of the slow wave EEG during NREM sleep.

    PubMed

    Feinberg, Irwin; de Bie, Evan; Davis, Nicole M; Campbell, Ian G

    2011-03-01

    Our ongoing longitudinal study has shown that NREM delta (1-4 Hz) and theta (4-8 Hz) power measured at C3 and C4 decrease by more than 60% between ages 11 and 17 years. Here, we investigate the age trajectories of delta and theta power at frontal, central, and occipital electrodes. Baseline sleep EEG was recorded twice yearly for 6 years in 2 cohorts, spanning ages 9-18 years, with overlap at 12-15 years. Sleep EEG was recorded in the subjects' homes with ambulatory recorders. Sixty-seven subjects in 2 cohorts, one starting at age 9 (n = 30) and one at age 12 years (n = 37). Sleep EEG recorded from Fz, Cz, C3, C4, and O1 was referred to mastoids. Visual scoring and artifact elimination was followed by FFT power analysis. Delta and theta EEG power declined steeply across this age range. The maturational trajectories of delta power showed a "back to front" pattern, with O1 delta power declining earliest and Fz delta power declining latest. Theta EEG power did not show this topographic difference in the timing of its decline. Delta, and to a lesser extent, theta power became frontally dominant in early adolescence. We maintain our interpretation that the adolescent decline in EEG power reflects a widespread brain reorganization driven by synaptic pruning. The late decline in frontally recorded delta power indicates that plasticity is maintained in these circuits until a later age. Although delta and theta have similar homeostatic properties, they have different age and topographic patterns that imply different functional correlates.

  11. Acquisition and Processing of Information During States of Rapid Eye Movement (REM) Sleep and Slow-Wave Sleep

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-07-01

    sleep to favor one set of material in preference to others. This could apply to skill learning as well as declarative memory with considerable potential...not be advantageous for an organism to store a large number of specific memories , specific records of the many experiences of each day of its lifetime...be stored in real time in a sequential representation, as on a serial computer tape. Access to this "episodic" memory would be by serial order, by time

  12. Slow frictional waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viswanathan, Koushik; Sundaram, Narayan; Chandrasekar, Srinivasan

    Stick-slip, manifest as intermittent tangential motion between two dry solid surfaces, is a friction instability that governs diverse phenomena from automobile brake squeals to earthquakes. We show, using high-speed in situ imaging of an adhesive polymer interface, that low velocity stick-slip is fundamentally of three kinds, corresponding to passage of three different surface waves -- separation pulses, slip pulses and the well-known Schallamach waves. These waves, traveling much slower than elastic waves, have clear distinguishing properties. Separation pulses and Schallamach waves involve local interface separation, and propagate in opposite directions while slip pulses are characterized by a sharp stress front and do not display any interface detachment. A change in the stick-slip mode from separation to slip pulse is effected simply by increasing the normal force. Together, these three waves constitute all possible stick-slip modes in adhesive friction and are shown to have direct analogues in muscular locomotory waves in soft bodied invertebrates. A theory for slow wave propagation is also presented which is capable of explaining the attendant interface displacements, velocities and stresses.

  13. Increased alpha (8-12 Hz) activity during slow wave sleep as a marker for the transition from implicit knowledge to explicit insight.

    PubMed

    Yordanova, Juliana; Kolev, Vasil; Wagner, Ullrich; Born, Jan; Verleger, Rolf

    2012-01-01

    The number reduction task (NRT) allows us to study the transition from implicit knowledge of hidden task regularities to explicit insight into these regularities. To identify sleep-associated neurophysiological indicators of this restructuring of knowledge representations, we measured frequency-specific power of EEG while participants slept during the night between two sessions of the NRT. Alpha (8-12 Hz) EEG power during slow wave sleep (SWS) emerged as a specific marker of the transformation of presleep implicit knowledge to postsleep explicit knowledge (ExK). Beta power during SWS was increased whenever ExK was attained after sleep, irrespective of presleep knowledge. No such EEG predictors of insight were found during Sleep Stage 2 and rapid eye movement sleep. These results support the view that it is neuronal memory reprocessing during sleep, in particular during SWS, that lays the foundations for restructuring those task-related representations in the brain that are necessary for promoting the gain of ExK.

  14. Learning-dependent, transient increase of activity in noradrenergic neurons of locus coeruleus during slow wave sleep in the rat: brain stem-cortex interplay for memory consolidation?

    PubMed

    Eschenko, Oxana; Sara, Susan J

    2008-11-01

    Memory consolidation during sleep is regaining attention due to a wave of recent reports of memory improvements after sleep or deficits after sleep disturbance. Neuromodulators have been proposed as possible players in this putative off-line memory processing, without much experimental evidence. We recorded neuronal activity in the rat noradrenergic nucleus locus coeruleus (LC) using chronically implanted movable microelectrodes while monitoring the behavioral state via electrocorticogram and online video recording. Extracellular recordings of physiologically identified noradrenergic neurons of LC were made in freely behaving rats for 3 h before and after olfactory discrimination learning. On subsequent days, if LC recording remained stable, additional learning sessions were made within the olfactory discrimination protocol, including extinction, reversals, learning new odors. Contrary to the long-standing dogma about the quiescence of noradrenergic neurons of LC, we found a transient increase in LC activity in trained rats during slow wave sleep (SWS) 2 h after learning. The discovery of learning-dependent engagement of LC neurons during SWS encourages exploration of brain stem-cortical interaction during this delayed phase of memory consolidation and should bring new insights into mechanisms underlying memory formation.

  15. Restricting Time in Bed in Early Adolescence Reduces Both NREM and REM Sleep but Does Not Increase Slow Wave EEG.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Ian G; Kraus, Amanda M; Burright, Christopher S; Feinberg, Irwin

    2016-09-01

    School night total sleep time decreases across adolescence (9-18 years) by 10 min/year. This decline is comprised entirely of a selective decrease in NREM sleep; REM sleep actually increases slightly. Decreasing sleep duration across adolescence is often attributed to insufficient time in bed. Here we tested whether sleep restriction in early adolescence produces the same sleep stage changes observed on school nights across adolescence. All-night sleep EEG was recorded in 76 children ranging in age from 9.9 to 14.0 years. Each participant kept 3 different sleep schedules that consisted of 3 nights of 8.5 h in bed followed by 4 nights of either 7, 8.5, or 10 h in bed. Sleep stage durations and NREM delta EEG activity were compared across the 3 time in bed conditions. Shortening time in bed from 10 to 7 hours reduced sleep duration by approximately 2 hours, roughly equal to the decrease in sleep duration we recorded longitudinally across adolescence. However, sleep restriction significantly reduced both NREM (by 83 min) and REM (by 47 min) sleep. Sleep restriction did not affect NREM delta EEG activity. Our findings suggest that the selective NREM reduction and the small increase in REM we observed longitudinally across 9-18 years are not produced by sleep restriction. We hypothesize that the selective NREM decline reflects adolescent brain maturation (synaptic elimination) that reduces the need for the restorative processes of NREM sleep. © 2016 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  16. Randomised clinical trial of the effects of prolonged-release melatonin, temazepam and zolpidem on slow-wave activity during sleep in healthy people.

    PubMed

    Arbon, Emma L; Knurowska, Malgorzata; Dijk, Derk-Jan

    2015-07-01

    Current pharmacological treatments for insomnia include benzodiazepine and non-benzodiazepine hypnotics targeting γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)A receptors, as well as agonists of the melatonin receptors MT1 and MT2. Melatonin, temazepam and zolpidem are thought to exert their effect through different mechanisms of action, but whether this leads to differential effects on electroencephalogram (EEG) power spectra during sleep in middle-aged people is currently not known. To establish whether the effects of prolonged-release melatonin (2 mg) on the nocturnal sleep EEG are different to those of temazepam (20 mg) and zolpidem (10 mg). Sixteen healthy men and women aged 55-64 years participated in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, four-way cross-over trial. Nocturnal sleep was assessed with polysomnography and spectral analysis of the EEG. The effects of single oral doses of prolonged-release melatonin, temazepam and zolpidem on EEG slow-wave activity (SWA, 0.75-4.5 Hz) and other frequencies during nocturnal non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep were compared. In an entire night analysis prolonged-release melatonin did not affect SWA, whereas temazepam and zolpidem significantly reduced SWA compared with placebo. Temazepam significantly reduced SWA compared with prolonged-release melatonin. Prolonged-release melatonin only reduced SWA during the first third of the night compared with placebo. These data show that the effects of prolonged-release melatonin on the nocturnal sleep EEG are minor and are different from those of temazepam and zolpidem; this is likely due to the different mechanisms of action of the medications.

  17. Oscillating square wave Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) delivered during slow wave sleep does not improve declarative memory more than sham: A randomized sham controlled crossover study

    PubMed Central

    Sahlem, Gregory L.; Badran, Bashar W.; Halford, Jonathan J.; Williams, Nolan R.; Korte, Jeffrey E.; Leslie, Kimberly; Strachan, Martha; Breedlove, Jesse L.; Runion, Jennifer; Bachman, David L.; Uhde, Thomas W.; Borckardt, Jeffery J.; George, Mark S.

    2015-01-01

    Background A 2006 trial in healthy medical students found that anodal slow oscillating tDCS delivered bi-frontally during slow wave sleep had an enhancing effect in declarative, but not procedural memory. Although there have been supporting animal studies, and similar findings in pathological groups, this study has not been replicated, or refuted, in the intervening years. We therefore tested these earlier results for replication using similar methods with the exception of current wave form (square in our study, nearly sinusoidal in the original). Objective/Hypothesis Our objective was to test the findings of a 2006 trial suggesting bi-frontal anodal tDCS during slow wave sleep enhances declarative memory. Methods Twelve students (mean age 25, 9 women) free of medical problems underwent two testing conditions (active, sham) in a randomized counterbalanced fashion. Active stimulation consisted of oscillating square wave tDCS delivered during early Non-Rapid Eye Movement (NREM) sleep. The sham condition consisted of setting-up the tDCS device and electrodes, but not turning it on during sleep. tDCS was delivered bi-frontally with anodes placed at F3/F4, and cathodes placed at mastoids. Current density was 0.517mA/CM2, and oscillated between zero and maximal current at a frequency of 0.75Hz. Stimulation occurred during five-five minute blocks with one-minute inter-block intervals (25 minutes total stimulation). The primary outcomes were both declarative memory consolidation measured by a paired word association test (PWA), and non-declarative memory, measured by a non-dominant finger-tapping test (FTT). We also recorded and analyzed sleep EEG. Results There was no difference in the number of paired word associations remembered before compared to after sleep [(active = 3.1±3.0SD more associations) (sham = 3.8±3.1S.D more associations)]. Finger tapping improved, (non-significantly) following active stimulation [(3.6±2.7 S.D. correctly typed sequences) compared to

  18. Synaptic Mechanisms of Memory Consolidation during Sleep Slow Oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yina; Krishnan, Giri P.

    2016-01-01

    Sleep is critical for regulation of synaptic efficacy, memories, and learning. However, the underlying mechanisms of how sleep rhythms contribute to consolidating memories acquired during wakefulness remain unclear. Here we studied the role of slow oscillations, 0.2–1 Hz rhythmic transitions between Up and Down states during stage 3/4 sleep, on dynamics of synaptic connectivity in the thalamocortical network model implementing spike-timing-dependent synaptic plasticity. We found that the spatiotemporal pattern of Up-state propagation determines the changes of synaptic strengths between neurons. Furthermore, an external input, mimicking hippocampal ripples, delivered to the cortical network results in input-specific changes of synaptic weights, which persisted after stimulation was removed. These synaptic changes promoted replay of specific firing sequences of the cortical neurons. Our study proposes a neuronal mechanism on how an interaction between hippocampal input, such as mediated by sharp wave-ripple events, cortical slow oscillations, and synaptic plasticity, may lead to consolidation of memories through preferential replay of cortical cell spike sequences during slow-wave sleep. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Sleep is critical for memory and learning. Replay during sleep of temporally ordered spike sequences related to a recent experience was proposed to be a neuronal substrate of memory consolidation. However, specific mechanisms of replay or how spike sequence replay leads to synaptic changes that underlie memory consolidation are still poorly understood. Here we used a detailed computational model of the thalamocortical system to report that interaction between slow cortical oscillations and synaptic plasticity during deep sleep can underlie mapping hippocampal memory traces to persistent cortical representation. This study provided, for the first time, a mechanistic explanation of how slow-wave sleep may promote consolidation of recent memory events. PMID

  19. A role for cortical nNOS/NK1 neurons in coupling homeostatic sleep drive to EEG slow wave activity.

    PubMed

    Morairty, Stephen R; Dittrich, Lars; Pasumarthi, Ravi K; Valladao, Daniel; Heiss, Jaime E; Gerashchenko, Dmitry; Kilduff, Thomas S

    2013-12-10

    Although the neural circuitry underlying homeostatic sleep regulation is little understood, cortical neurons immunoreactive for neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and the neurokinin-1 receptor (NK1) have been proposed to be involved in this physiological process. By systematically manipulating the durations of sleep deprivation and subsequent recovery sleep, we show that activation of cortical nNOS/NK1 neurons is directly related to non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep time, NREM bout duration, and EEG δ power during NREM sleep, an index of preexisting homeostatic sleep drive. Conversely, nNOS knockout mice show reduced NREM sleep time, shorter NREM bouts, and decreased power in the low δ range during NREM sleep, despite constitutively elevated sleep drive. Cortical NK1 neurons are still activated in response to sleep deprivation in these mice but, in the absence of nNOS, they are unable to up-regulate NREM δ power appropriately. These findings support the hypothesis that cortical nNOS/NK1 neurons translate homeostatic sleep drive into up-regulation of NREM δ power through an NO-dependent mechanism.

  20. Fast and Slow Spindles during the Sleep Slow Oscillation: Disparate Coalescence and Engagement in Memory Processing

    PubMed Central

    Mölle, Matthias; Bergmann, Til O.; Marshall, Lisa; Born, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Study Objectives: Thalamo-cortical spindles driven by the up-state of neocortical slow (< 1 Hz) oscillations (SOs) represent a candidate mechanism of memory consolidation during sleep. We examined interactions between SOs and spindles in human slow wave sleep, focusing on the presumed existence of 2 kinds of spindles, i.e., slow frontocortical and fast centro-parietal spindles. Design: Two experiments were performed in healthy humans (24.5 ± 0.9 y) investigating undisturbed sleep (Experiment I) and the effects of prior learning (word paired associates) vs. non-learning (Experiment II) on multichannel EEG recordings during sleep. Measurements and Results: Only fast spindles (12-15 Hz) were synchronized to the depolarizing SO up-state. Slow spindles (9-12 Hz) occurred preferentially at the transition into the SO down-state, i.e., during waning depolarization. Slow spindles also revealed a higher probability to follow rather than precede fast spindles. For sequences of individual SOs, fast spindle activity was largest for “initial” SOs, whereas SO amplitude and slow spindle activity were largest for succeeding SOs. Prior learning enhanced this pattern. Conclusions: The finding that fast and slow spindles occur at different times of the SO cycle points to disparate generating mechanisms for the 2 kinds of spindles. The reported temporal relationships during SO sequences suggest that fast spindles, driven by the SO up-state feed back to enhance the likelihood of succeeding SOs together with slow spindles. By enforcing such SO-spindle cycles, particularly after prior learning, fast spindles possibly play a key role in sleep-dependent memory processing. Citation: Mölle M; Bergmann TO; Marshall L; Born J. Fast and slow spindles during the sleep slow oscillation: disparate coalescence and engagement in memory processing. SLEEP 2011;34(10):1411–1421. PMID:21966073

  1. Oscillating Square Wave Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) Delivered During Slow Wave Sleep Does Not Improve Declarative Memory More Than Sham: A Randomized Sham Controlled Crossover Study.

    PubMed

    Sahlem, Gregory L; Badran, Bashar W; Halford, Jonathan J; Williams, Nolan R; Korte, Jeffrey E; Leslie, Kimberly; Strachan, Martha; Breedlove, Jesse L; Runion, Jennifer; Bachman, David L; Uhde, Thomas W; Borckardt, Jeffery J; George, Mark S

    2015-01-01

    A 2006 trial in healthy medical students found that anodal slow oscillating tDCS delivered bi-frontally during slow wave sleep had an enhancing effect in declarative, but not procedural memory. Although there have been supporting animal studies, and similar findings in pathological groups, this study has not been replicated, or refuted, in the intervening years. We therefore tested these earlier results for replication using similar methods with the exception of current waveform (square in our study, nearly sinusoidal in the original). Our objective was to test the findings of a 2006 trial suggesting bi-frontal anodal tDCS during slow wave sleep enhances declarative memory. Twelve students (mean age 25, 9 women) free of medical problems underwent two testing conditions (active, sham) in a randomized counterbalanced fashion. Active stimulation consisted of oscillating square wave tDCS delivered during early Non-Rapid Eye Movement (NREM) sleep. The sham condition consisted of setting-up the tDCS device and electrodes, but not turning it on during sleep. tDCS was delivered bi-frontally with anodes placed at F3/F4, and cathodes placed at mastoids. Current density was 0.517 mA/cm(2), and oscillated between zero and maximal current at a frequency of 0.75 Hz. Stimulation occurred during five-five minute blocks with 1-min inter-block intervals (25 min total stimulation). The primary outcomes were both declarative memory consolidation measured by a paired word association test (PWA), and non-declarative memory, measured by a non-dominant finger-tapping test (FTT). We also recorded and analyzed sleep EEG. There was no difference in the number of paired word associations remembered before compared to after sleep [(active = 3.1 ± 3.0 SD more associations) (sham = 3.8 ± 3.1 SD more associations)]. Finger tapping improved, (non-significantly) following active stimulation [(3.6 ± 2.7 SD correctly typed sequences) compared to sham stimulation (2.3 ± 2.2 SD correctly typed

  2. Encephalopathy with status epilepticus during slow sleep: "the Penelope syndrome".

    PubMed

    Tassinari, Carlo A; Cantalupo, Gaetano; Rios-Pohl, Loreto; Giustina, Elvio Della; Rubboli, Guido

    2009-08-01

    ESES (encephalopathy with status epilepticus during sleep) is an epileptic encephalopathy with heterogeneous clinical manifestations (cognitive, motor, and behavioral disturbances in different associations, and various seizure types) related to a peculiar electroencephalography (EEG) pattern characterized by paroxysmal activity significantly activated during slow sleep-that is, a condition of continuous spikes and waves, or status epilepticus, during sleep. The pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying this condition are still incompletely understood; recent data suggest that the abnormal epileptic EEG activity occurring during sleep might cause the typical clinical symptoms by interfering with sleep-related physiologic functions, and possibly neuroplasticity processes mediating higher cortical functions such as learning and memory consolidation. As in the myth of Penelope, the wife of Odysseus, what is weaved during the day will be unraveled during the night.

  3. FEL on slow cyclotron wave

    SciTech Connect

    Silivra, A.

    1995-12-31

    A physical mechanism of interaction of fast electromagnetic wave with slow cyclotron wave of relativistic electron beam in a FEL with helical wiggler field is described. It is shown that: (1) interaction is possible for both group of steady state electron trajectories (2) positive gain is achieved within certain interval of guide field strength (3) operation wavelength for group 1 trajectories ({Omega}{sub 0}/{gamma} < k{omega}{upsilon}{parallel}) is shorter than for the conventional FEL synchronism. A nonlinear analysis shows that efficiency of slow cyclotron FEL is restricted mainly by a breakdown of a single electron synchronism due to dependence of (modified) electron cyclotron frequency on an energy of electron. Nevertheless, as numerical simulation shows, typical efficiency of 15 % order is achieved in millimeter wavelength band for the midrelativistic ({gamma}= 3 {divided_by} 4) slow cyclotron wave FEL. Tapering of magnetic field results in a substantial increase of efficiency.

  4. EEG Bands of Wakeful Rest, Slow-Wave and Rapid-Eye-Movement Sleep at Different Brain Areas in Rats.

    PubMed

    Jing, Wei; Wang, Yanran; Fang, Guangzhan; Chen, Mingming; Xue, Miaomiao; Guo, Daqing; Yao, Dezhong; Xia, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence reveals that neuronal oscillations with various frequency bands in the brain have different physiological functions. However, the frequency band divisions in rats were typically based on empirical spectral distribution from limited channels information. In the present study, functionally relevant frequency bands across vigilance states and brain regions were identified using factor analysis based on 9 channels EEG signals recorded from multiple brain areas in rats. We found that frequency band divisions varied both across vigilance states and brain regions. In particular, theta oscillations during REM sleep were subdivided into two bands, 5-7 and 8-11 Hz corresponding to the tonic and phasic stages, respectively. The spindle activities of SWS were different along the anterior-posterior axis, lower oscillations (~16 Hz) in frontal regions and higher in parietal (~21 Hz). The delta and theta activities co-varied in the visual and auditory cortex during wakeful rest. In addition, power spectra of beta oscillations were significantly decreased in association cortex during REM sleep compared with wakeful rest. These results provide us some new insights into understand the brain oscillations across vigilance states, and also indicate that the spatial factor should not be ignored when considering the frequency band divisions in rats.

  5. EEG Bands of Wakeful Rest, Slow-Wave and Rapid-Eye-Movement Sleep at Different Brain Areas in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Wei; Wang, Yanran; Fang, Guangzhan; Chen, Mingming; Xue, Miaomiao; Guo, Daqing; Yao, Dezhong; Xia, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence reveals that neuronal oscillations with various frequency bands in the brain have different physiological functions. However, the frequency band divisions in rats were typically based on empirical spectral distribution from limited channels information. In the present study, functionally relevant frequency bands across vigilance states and brain regions were identified using factor analysis based on 9 channels EEG signals recorded from multiple brain areas in rats. We found that frequency band divisions varied both across vigilance states and brain regions. In particular, theta oscillations during REM sleep were subdivided into two bands, 5–7 and 8–11 Hz corresponding to the tonic and phasic stages, respectively. The spindle activities of SWS were different along the anterior-posterior axis, lower oscillations (~16 Hz) in frontal regions and higher in parietal (~21 Hz). The delta and theta activities co-varied in the visual and auditory cortex during wakeful rest. In addition, power spectra of beta oscillations were significantly decreased in association cortex during REM sleep compared with wakeful rest. These results provide us some new insights into understand the brain oscillations across vigilance states, and also indicate that the spatial factor should not be ignored when considering the frequency band divisions in rats. PMID:27536231

  6. Changes in the redox potential of the rabbit cerebral cortex accompanying episodes of ECoG arousal during slow-wave sleep.

    PubMed

    Shvets-Ténéta-Gurii, T B; Troshin, G I; Dubinin, A G

    2008-01-01

    The redox potential (E) is a useful measure of the intensity and quality of shifts in energy metabolism. Brain E depends on the ratio of the rates of processes occurred in two compartments of energy metabolism - the glycolysis compartment, in which glucose is split without oxygen, and the oxidative metabolism compartment. The present report describes recording of local changes in E using platinum electrodes implanted into several points in the cortex. In these conditions, decreases in E correspond to local increases in the rates of glycolytic processes in the tissue surrounding the electrode and are related to mitochondrial processes, while increases in E correspond to local acceleration of processes in oxidative metabolism in the tissues around the electrode. Our previous studies in rats showed that during episodes of slow-wave sleep (SWS), metabolically active points of the rat cerebral cortex show significant decreases in E, and it was suggested that these are associated with increases in the rate of glycolysis. At the same time, E showed characteristic oscillations lasting 20-40 sec with amplitudes of tens of millivolts. The experiments reported here demonstrated that slow oscillations in E developing during SWS are created by regular episodes of ECoG arousal occurring during SWS, accompanied by startling of the animal, decreases in E, and inhibition of respiration. We suggest that a homeostasis system operates during SWS to maintain the animal's level of consciousness at a particular level and that this, like any system with feedback, operates in an oscillatory fashion. The role of glycolysis in supplying energy to the cerebral cortex to support the elevated level of consciousness increases.

  7. Superconductive Microwave Slow Wave Structures.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    etching techniques , non-dispersive microstrip lines with storage times of several tens of microseconds and gigahertz bandwidths can be constructed. The...pulse compression study has shown that compression ratios of over 1,000 may be feasible using a superconductive slow wave structure in which radiation

  8. Slow oscillating transcranial direct current stimulation during sleep has a sleep-stabilizing effect in chronic insomnia: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Saebipour, Mohammad R; Joghataei, Mohammad T; Yoonessi, Ali; Sadeghniiat-Haghighi, Khosro; Khalighinejad, Nima; Khademi, Soroush

    2015-10-01

    Recent evidence suggests that lack of slow-wave activity may play a fundamental role in the pathogenesis of insomnia. Pharmacological approaches and brain stimulation techniques have recently offered solutions for increasing slow-wave activity during sleep. We used slow (0.75 Hz) oscillatory transcranial direct current stimulation during stage 2 of non-rapid eye movement sleeping insomnia patients for resonating their brain waves to the frequency of sleep slow-wave. Six patients diagnosed with either sleep maintenance or non-restorative sleep insomnia entered the study. After 1 night of adaptation and 1 night of baseline polysomnography, patients randomly received sham or real stimulation on the third and fourth night of the experiment. Our preliminary results show that after termination of stimulations (sham or real), slow oscillatory transcranial direct current stimulation increased the duration of stage 3 of non-rapid eye movement sleep by 33 ± 26 min (P = 0.026), and decreased stage 1 of non-rapid eye movement sleep duration by 22 ± 17.7 min (P = 0.028), compared with sham. Slow oscillatory transcranial direct current stimulation decreased stage 1 of non-rapid eye movement sleep and wake time after sleep-onset durations, together, by 55.4 ± 51 min (P = 0.045). Slow oscillatory transcranial direct current stimulation also increased sleep efficiency by 9 ± 7% (P = 0.026), and probability of transition from stage 2 to stage 3 of non-rapid eye movement sleep by 20 ± 17.8% (P = 0.04). Meanwhile, slow oscillatory transcranial direct current stimulation decreased transitions from stage 2 of non-rapid eye movement sleep to wake by 12 ± 6.7% (P = 0.007). Our preliminary results suggest a sleep-stabilizing role for the intervention, which may mimic the effect of sleep slow-wave-enhancing drugs. © 2015 European Sleep Research Society.

  9. Memory Improvement via Slow Oscillatory Stimulation during Sleep in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Westerberg, Carmen E.; Florczak, Susan M.; Weintraub, Sandra; Mesulam, M.-Marsel; Marshall, Lisa; Zee, Phyllis C.; Paller, Ken A.

    2015-01-01

    We examined the intriguing but controversial idea that disrupted sleep-dependent consolidation contributes to age-related memory decline. Slow-wave activity during sleep may help strengthen neural connections and provide memories with long-term stability, in which case decreased slow-wave activity in older adults could contribute to their weaker memories. One prediction from this account is that age-related memory deficits should be reduced by artificially enhancing slow-wave activity. In young adults, applying transcranial current oscillating at a slow frequency (.75 Hz) during sleep improves memory. Here, we tested whether this procedure can improve memory in older adults. In two sessions separated by 1 week, we applied either slow-oscillatory stimulation or sham stimulation during an afternoon nap in a double-blind, crossover design. Memory tests were administered before and after sleep. A larger improvement in word-pair recall and higher slow-wave activity were observed with slow-oscillatory stimulation than with sham stimulation. This is the first demonstration that this procedure can improve memory in older adults, suggesting that declarative memory performance in older adults is partly dependent on slow-wave activity during sleep. PMID:26116933

  10. Memory improvement via slow-oscillatory stimulation during sleep in older adults.

    PubMed

    Westerberg, Carmen E; Florczak, Susan M; Weintraub, Sandra; Mesulam, M-Marsel; Marshall, Lisa; Zee, Phyllis C; Paller, Ken A

    2015-09-01

    We examined the intriguing but controversial idea that disrupted sleep-dependent consolidation contributes to age-related memory decline. Slow-wave activity during sleep may help strengthen neural connections and provide memories with long-term stability, in which case decreased slow-wave activity in older adults could contribute to their weaker memories. One prediction from this account is that age-related memory deficits should be reduced by artificially enhancing slow-wave activity. In young adults, applying transcranial current oscillating at a slow frequency (0.75 Hz) during sleep improves memory. Here, we tested whether this procedure can improve memory in older adults. In 2 sessions separated by 1 week, we applied either slow-oscillatory stimulation or sham stimulation during an afternoon nap in a double-blind, crossover design. Memory tests were administered before and after sleep. A larger improvement in word-pair recall and higher slow-wave activity was observed with slow-oscillatory stimulation than with sham stimulation. This is the first demonstration that this procedure can improve memory in older adults, suggesting that declarative memory performance in older adults is partly dependent on slow-wave activity during sleep. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Slow waves in mutually inhibitory neuronal networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalics, Jozsi

    2004-05-01

    A variety of experimental and modeling studies have been performed to investigate wave propagation in networks of thalamic neurons and their relationship to spindle sleep rhythms. It is believed that spindle oscillations result from the reciprocal interaction between thalamocortical (TC) and thalamic reticular (RE) neurons. We consider a network of TC and RE cells reduced to a one-layer network model and represented by a system of singularly perturbed integral-differential equations. Geometric singular perturbation methods are used to prove the existence of a locally unique slow wave pulse that propagates along the network. By seeking a slow pulse solution, we reformulate the problem to finding a heteroclinic orbit in a 3D system of ODEs with two additional constraints on the location of the orbit at two distinct points in time. In proving the persistence of the singular heteroclinic orbit, difficulties arising from the solution passing near points where normal hyperbolicity is lost on a 2D critical manifold are overcome by employing results by Wechselberger [Singularly perturbed folds and canards in R3, Thesis, TU-Wien, 1998].

  12. Influence of general anaesthesia on slow waves of intracranial pressure.

    PubMed

    Lalou, Despina A; Czosnyka, Marek; Donnelly, Joseph; Lavinio, Andrea; Pickard, John D; Garnett, Matthew; Czosnyka, Zofia

    2016-07-01

    Slow vasogenic intracranial pressure (ICP) waves are spontaneous ICP oscillations with a low frequency bandwidth of 0.3-4 cycles/min (B-waves). B-waves reflect dynamic oscillations in cerebral blood volume associated with autoregulatory cerebral vasodilation and vasoconstriction. This study quantifies the effects of general anaesthesia (GA) on the magnitude of B-waves compared to natural sleep and conscious state. The magnitude of B-waves was assessed in 4 groups of 30 patients each with clinical indications for ICP monitoring. Normal pressure hydrocephalus patients undergoing Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) infusion studies in the conscious state (GROUP A) and under GA (GROUP B), and hydrocephalus patients undergoing overnight ICP monitoring during physiological sleep (GROUP C) were compared to deeply sedated traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients with well-controlled ICP during the first night of Intensive Care Unit (ICU) stay (GROUP D). A total of 120 patients were included. During CSF infusion studies, the magnitude of slow waves was higher in conscious patients ( 0.23+/-0.10 mm Hg) when compared to anaesthetised patients ( 0.15+/-0.10 mm Hg; p = 0.011). Overnight magnitude of slow waves was higher in patients during natural sleep (GROUP C: 0.20+/-0.13 mm Hg) when compared to TBI patients under deep sedation (GROUP D: 0.11+/- 0.09 mm Hg; p = 0.002). GA and deep sedation are associated with a reduced magnitude of B-waves. ICP monitoring carried out under GA is affected by iatrogenic suppression of slow vasogenic waves of ICP. Accounting for the effects of anaesthesia on vasogenic waves may prevent the misidentification of potential shunt-responders as non-responders.

  13. Excitation of a slow wave structure

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Peng; Lau, Y. Y.; Hoff, Brad; French, D. M.; Luginsland, J. W.

    2012-12-15

    The Green's function on a slow wave structure is constructed. The Green's function includes all radial modes, and for each radial mode, all space harmonics. We compare the analytic solution of the frequency response on the slow wave structure with that obtained from a particle-in-cell code. Favorable comparison is obtained when the first few lower order modes are resonantly excited. This gives some confidence in the prediction of converting a pulse train into radiation using a slow wave structure.

  14. Laminar analysis of slow wave activity in humans

    PubMed Central

    Csercsa, Richárd; Dombovári, Balázs; Fabó, Dániel; Wittner, Lucia; Erőss, Loránd; Entz, László; Sólyom, András; Rásonyi, György; Szűcs, Anna; Kelemen, Anna; Jakus, Rita; Juhos, Vera; Grand, László; Magony, Andor; Halász, Péter; Freund, Tamás F.; Maglóczky, Zsófia; Cash, Sydney S.; Papp, László; Karmos, György; Halgren, Eric

    2010-01-01

    Brain electrical activity is largely composed of oscillations at characteristic frequencies. These rhythms are hierarchically organized and are thought to perform important pathological and physiological functions. The slow wave is a fundamental cortical rhythm that emerges in deep non-rapid eye movement sleep. In animals, the slow wave modulates delta, theta, spindle, alpha, beta, gamma and ripple oscillations, thus orchestrating brain electrical rhythms in sleep. While slow wave activity can enhance epileptic manifestations, it is also thought to underlie essential restorative processes and facilitate the consolidation of declarative memories. Animal studies show that slow wave activity is composed of rhythmically recurring phases of widespread, increased cortical cellular and synaptic activity, referred to as active- or up-state, followed by cellular and synaptic inactivation, referred to as silent- or down-state. However, its neural mechanisms in humans are poorly understood, since the traditional intracellular techniques used in animals are inappropriate for investigating the cellular and synaptic/transmembrane events in humans. To elucidate the intracortical neuronal mechanisms of slow wave activity in humans, novel, laminar multichannel microelectrodes were chronically implanted into the cortex of patients with drug-resistant focal epilepsy undergoing cortical mapping for seizure focus localization. Intracortical laminar local field potential gradient, multiple-unit and single-unit activities were recorded during slow wave sleep, related to simultaneous electrocorticography, and analysed with current source density and spectral methods. We found that slow wave activity in humans reflects a rhythmic oscillation between widespread cortical activation and silence. Cortical activation was demonstrated as increased wideband (0.3–200 Hz) spectral power including virtually all bands of cortical oscillations, increased multiple- and single-unit activity and

  15. Slow wave propagation in soft adhesive interfaces.

    PubMed

    Viswanathan, Koushik; Sundaram, Narayan K; Chandrasekar, Srinivasan

    2016-11-16

    Stick-slip in sliding of soft adhesive surfaces has long been associated with the propagation of Schallamach waves, a type of slow surface wave. Recently it was demonstrated using in situ experiments that two other kinds of slow waves-separation pulses and slip pulses-also mediate stick-slip (Viswanathan et al., Soft Matter, 2016, 12, 5265-5275). While separation pulses, like Schallamach waves, involve local interface detachment, slip pulses are moving stress fronts with no detachment. Here, we present a theoretical analysis of the propagation of these three waves in a linear elastodynamics framework. Different boundary conditions apply depending on whether or not local interface detachment occurs. It is shown that the interface dynamics accompanying slow waves is governed by a system of integral equations. Closed-form analytical expressions are obtained for the interfacial pressure, shear stress, displacements and velocities. Separation pulses and Schallamach waves emerge naturally as wave solutions of the integral equations, with oppositely oriented directions of propagation. Wave propagation is found to be stable in the stress regime where linearized elasticity is a physically valid approximation. Interestingly, the analysis reveals that slow traveling wave solutions are not possible in a Coulomb friction framework for slip pulses. The theory provides a unified picture of stick-slip dynamics and slow wave propagation in adhesive contacts, consistent with experimental observations.

  16. The activity of thalamus and cerebral cortex neurons in rabbits during "slow wave-spindle" EEG complexes.

    PubMed

    Burikov, A A; Bereshpolova YuI

    1999-01-01

    "Slow wave-spindle" complexes were studied during slow wave sleep in rabbits at the thalamic (medial thalamus) and cortical (upper and lower layers of the sensorimotor cortex) levels. Slow wave complexes are biphasic positive-negative complexes or triphasic complexes with a predominantly negative component. Spindles have characteristics close to those of spontaneous sleep spindles. Complexes arise singly, as though inserted into the rhythm of spontaneous sleep spindles, or in series with periods similar to the spindle rhythm. Medial thalamus neurons and some cortical neurons had the same activity during waves as during spindles: if the neuron decreased (increased) its spike frequency in a spindle, then decreases (increases) in frequency were also seen in slow waves; if the neuron produced trains of discharges during spindles, then trains of activity were also seen from the slow-wave part of "slow wave-spindle" complexes. The membrane potential changed in a similar fashion: on a background of hyperpolarization which started at the slow wave, individual depolarization oscillations appeared in the EEG wave rhythm; these oscillations were not always accompanied by spike trains. The slow wave mechanism, the rhythms of isolated complexes and simultaneous complexes and spontaneous sleep spindles may share a common underlying mechanism: slow, cyclical variations in excitability in thalamocortical neuronal networks, which have previously been demonstrated for spindle-like activity. The possibility that there are common mechanisms for slow waves in complexes and other EEG slow waves, particularly delta activity, remains hypothetical.

  17. Recovery after prolonged sleep deprivation: residual effects of slow-release caffeine on recovery sleep, sleepiness and cognitive functions.

    PubMed

    Beaumont, Maurice; Batéjat, Denise; Coste, Olivier; Doireau, Philippe; Chauffard, Françoise; Enslen, Marc; Lagarde, Didier; Pierard, Christophe

    2005-01-01

    A long work schedule often results in sleep deprivation, sleepiness, impaired performance and fatigue. We investigated the residual effects of slow-release caffeine (SRC) on sleep, sleepiness and cognitive performance during a 42-hour recovery period following a 64-hour continuous wakefulness period in 16 healthy males, according to a double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled, crossover study. Three hundred milligrams of SRC or placebo was given twice a day at 21:00 and 9:00 during the first 48 h of wakefulness. Recovery sleep was analysed with electroencephalography (EEG) and wrist actigraphy, daytime sleepiness with continuous EEG, sleep latency tests and actigraphy and cognitive functions with computerized tests from the NATO AGARD STRES battery. Both drug groups exhibited almost the same sleep architecture with a rebound of slow-wave sleep during both recovery nights and of REM sleep during the second night. Wakefulness level and cognitive functions were similarly impaired in both groups on the first day of recovery and partially returned to baseline on the second. To conclude, SRC appears to have no unwanted side-effects on recovery sleep, wakefulness and cognitive performance after a long period of sleep deprivation and might therefore be a useful choice over other psychostimulants for a long work schedule.

  18. The role of Biot slow waves in electroseismic wave phenomena.

    PubMed

    Pride, Steven R; Garambois, Stéphane

    2002-02-01

    The electromagnetic fields that are generated as a spherical seismic wave (either P or S) traverses an interface separating two porous materials are numerically modeled both with and without the generation of Biot slow waves at the interface. In the case of an incident fast-P wave, the predicted electric-field amplitudes when slow waves are neglected can easily be off by as much as an order of magnitude. In the case of an incident S wave, the error is much smaller (typically on the order of 10% or less) because not much S-wave energy gets converted into slow waves. In neglecting the slow waves, only six plane waves (reflected and transmitted fast-P, S, and EM waves) are available with which to match the eight continuity conditions that hold at each interface. This overdetermined problem is solved by placing weights on the eight continuity conditions so that those conditions that are most important for obtaining the proper response are emphasized. It is demonstrated that when slow waves are neglected, it is best to also neglect the continuity of the Darcy flow and fluid pressure across an interface. The principal conclusion of this work is that to properly model the electromagnetic (EM) fields generated at an interface by an incident seismic wave, the full Biot theory that allows for generation of slow waves must be employed.

  19. Acoustic Enhancement of Sleep Slow Oscillations and Concomitant Memory Improvement in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Papalambros, Nelly A; Santostasi, Giovanni; Malkani, Roneil G; Braun, Rosemary; Weintraub, Sandra; Paller, Ken A; Zee, Phyllis C

    2017-01-01

    Acoustic stimulation methods applied during sleep in young adults can increase slow wave activity (SWA) and improve sleep-dependent memory retention. It is unknown whether this approach enhances SWA and memory in older adults, who generally have reduced SWA compared to younger adults. Additionally, older adults are at risk for age-related cognitive impairment and therefore may benefit from non-invasive interventions. The aim of this study was to determine if acoustic stimulation can increase SWA and improve declarative memory in healthy older adults. Thirteen participants 60-84 years old completed one night of acoustic stimulation and one night of sham stimulation in random order. During sleep, a real-time algorithm using an adaptive phase-locked loop modeled the phase of endogenous slow waves in midline frontopolar electroencephalographic recordings. Pulses of pink noise were delivered when the upstate of the slow wave was predicted. Each interval of five pulses ("ON interval") was followed by a pause of approximately equal length ("OFF interval"). SWA during the entire sleep period was similar between stimulation and sham conditions, whereas SWA and spindle activity were increased during ON intervals compared to matched periods during the sham night. The increases in SWA and spindle activity were sustained across almost the entire five-pulse ON interval compared to matched sham periods. Verbal paired-associate memory was tested before and after sleep. Overnight improvement in word recall was significantly greater with acoustic stimulation compared to sham and was correlated with changes in SWA between ON and OFF intervals. Using the phase-locked-loop method to precisely target acoustic stimulation to the upstate of sleep slow oscillations, we were able to enhance SWA and improve sleep-dependent memory storage in older adults, which strengthens the theoretical link between sleep and age-related memory integrity.

  20. Acoustic Enhancement of Sleep Slow Oscillations and Concomitant Memory Improvement in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Papalambros, Nelly A.; Santostasi, Giovanni; Malkani, Roneil G.; Braun, Rosemary; Weintraub, Sandra; Paller, Ken A.; Zee, Phyllis C.

    2017-01-01

    Acoustic stimulation methods applied during sleep in young adults can increase slow wave activity (SWA) and improve sleep-dependent memory retention. It is unknown whether this approach enhances SWA and memory in older adults, who generally have reduced SWA compared to younger adults. Additionally, older adults are at risk for age-related cognitive impairment and therefore may benefit from non-invasive interventions. The aim of this study was to determine if acoustic stimulation can increase SWA and improve declarative memory in healthy older adults. Thirteen participants 60–84 years old completed one night of acoustic stimulation and one night of sham stimulation in random order. During sleep, a real-time algorithm using an adaptive phase-locked loop modeled the phase of endogenous slow waves in midline frontopolar electroencephalographic recordings. Pulses of pink noise were delivered when the upstate of the slow wave was predicted. Each interval of five pulses (“ON interval”) was followed by a pause of approximately equal length (“OFF interval”). SWA during the entire sleep period was similar between stimulation and sham conditions, whereas SWA and spindle activity were increased during ON intervals compared to matched periods during the sham night. The increases in SWA and spindle activity were sustained across almost the entire five-pulse ON interval compared to matched sham periods. Verbal paired-associate memory was tested before and after sleep. Overnight improvement in word recall was significantly greater with acoustic stimulation compared to sham and was correlated with changes in SWA between ON and OFF intervals. Using the phase-locked-loop method to precisely target acoustic stimulation to the upstate of sleep slow oscillations, we were able to enhance SWA and improve sleep-dependent memory storage in older adults, which strengthens the theoretical link between sleep and age-related memory integrity. PMID:28337134

  1. EEG slow waves in traumatic brain injury: Convergent findings in mouse and man

    PubMed Central

    Modarres, Mo; Kuzma, Nicholas N.; Kretzmer, Tracy; Pack, Allan I.; Lim, Miranda M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Evidence from previous studies suggests that greater sleep pressure, in the form of EEG-based slow waves, accumulates in specific brain regions that are more active during prior waking experience. We sought to quantify the number and coherence of EEG slow waves in subjects with mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). Methods We developed a method to automatically detect individual slow waves in each EEG channel, and validated this method using simulated EEG data. We then used this method to quantify EEG-based slow waves during sleep and wake states in both mouse and human subjects with mTBI. A modified coherence index that accounts for information from multiple channels was calculated as a measure of slow wave synchrony. Results Brain-injured mice showed significantly higher theta:alpha amplitude ratios and significantly more slow waves during spontaneous wakefulness and during prolonged sleep deprivation, compared to sham-injured control mice. Human subjects with mTBI showed significantly higher theta:beta amplitude ratios and significantly more EEG slow waves while awake compared to age-matched control subjects. We then quantified the global coherence index of slow waves across several EEG channels in human subjects. Individuals with mTBI showed significantly less EEG global coherence compared to control subjects while awake, but not during sleep. EEG global coherence was significantly correlated with severity of post-concussive symptoms (as assessed by the Neurobehavioral Symptom Inventory scale). Conclusion and implications Taken together, our data from both mouse and human studies suggest that EEG slow wave quantity and the global coherence index of slow waves may represent a sensitive marker for the diagnosis and prognosis of mTBI and post-concussive symptoms. PMID:28018987

  2. EEG slow waves in traumatic brain injury: Convergent findings in mouse and man.

    PubMed

    Modarres, Mo; Kuzma, Nicholas N; Kretzmer, Tracy; Pack, Allan I; Lim, Miranda M

    2016-07-01

    Evidence from previous studies suggests that greater sleep pressure, in the form of EEG-based slow waves, accumulates in specific brain regions that are more active during prior waking experience. We sought to quantify the number and coherence of EEG slow waves in subjects with mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). We developed a method to automatically detect individual slow waves in each EEG channel, and validated this method using simulated EEG data. We then used this method to quantify EEG-based slow waves during sleep and wake states in both mouse and human subjects with mTBI. A modified coherence index that accounts for information from multiple channels was calculated as a measure of slow wave synchrony. Brain-injured mice showed significantly higher theta:alpha amplitude ratios and significantly more slow waves during spontaneous wakefulness and during prolonged sleep deprivation, compared to sham-injured control mice. Human subjects with mTBI showed significantly higher theta:beta amplitude ratios and significantly more EEG slow waves while awake compared to age-matched control subjects. We then quantified the global coherence index of slow waves across several EEG channels in human subjects. Individuals with mTBI showed significantly less EEG global coherence compared to control subjects while awake, but not during sleep. EEG global coherence was significantly correlated with severity of post-concussive symptoms (as assessed by the Neurobehavioral Symptom Inventory scale). Taken together, our data from both mouse and human studies suggest that EEG slow wave quantity and the global coherence index of slow waves may represent a sensitive marker for the diagnosis and prognosis of mTBI and post-concussive symptoms.

  3. Phase of Spontaneous Slow Oscillations during Sleep Influences Memory-Related Processing of Auditory Cues

    PubMed Central

    Creery, Jessica D.; Paller, Ken A.

    2016-01-01

    Slow oscillations during slow-wave sleep (SWS) may facilitate memory consolidation by regulating interactions between hippocampal and cortical networks. Slow oscillations appear as high-amplitude, synchronized EEG activity, corresponding to upstates of neuronal depolarization and downstates of hyperpolarization. Memory reactivations occur spontaneously during SWS, and can also be induced by presenting learning-related cues associated with a prior learning episode during sleep. This technique, targeted memory reactivation (TMR), selectively enhances memory consolidation. Given that memory reactivation is thought to occur preferentially during the slow-oscillation upstate, we hypothesized that TMR stimulation effects would depend on the phase of the slow oscillation. Participants learned arbitrary spatial locations for objects that were each paired with a characteristic sound (eg, cat–meow). Then, during SWS periods of an afternoon nap, one-half of the sounds were presented at low intensity. When object location memory was subsequently tested, recall accuracy was significantly better for those objects cued during sleep. We report here for the first time that this memory benefit was predicted by slow-wave phase at the time of stimulation. For cued objects, location memories were categorized according to amount of forgetting from pre- to post-nap. Conditions of high versus low forgetting corresponded to stimulation timing at different slow-oscillation phases, suggesting that learning-related stimuli were more likely to be processed and trigger memory reactivation when they occurred at the optimal phase of a slow oscillation. These findings provide insight into mechanisms of memory reactivation during sleep, supporting the idea that reactivation is most likely during cortical upstates. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Slow-wave sleep (SWS) is characterized by synchronized neural activity alternating between active upstates and quiet downstates. The slow-oscillation upstates are

  4. Phase of Spontaneous Slow Oscillations during Sleep Influences Memory-Related Processing of Auditory Cues.

    PubMed

    Batterink, Laura J; Creery, Jessica D; Paller, Ken A

    2016-01-27

    Slow oscillations during slow-wave sleep (SWS) may facilitate memory consolidation by regulating interactions between hippocampal and cortical networks. Slow oscillations appear as high-amplitude, synchronized EEG activity, corresponding to upstates of neuronal depolarization and downstates of hyperpolarization. Memory reactivations occur spontaneously during SWS, and can also be induced by presenting learning-related cues associated with a prior learning episode during sleep. This technique, targeted memory reactivation (TMR), selectively enhances memory consolidation. Given that memory reactivation is thought to occur preferentially during the slow-oscillation upstate, we hypothesized that TMR stimulation effects would depend on the phase of the slow oscillation. Participants learned arbitrary spatial locations for objects that were each paired with a characteristic sound (eg, cat-meow). Then, during SWS periods of an afternoon nap, one-half of the sounds were presented at low intensity. When object location memory was subsequently tested, recall accuracy was significantly better for those objects cued during sleep. We report here for the first time that this memory benefit was predicted by slow-wave phase at the time of stimulation. For cued objects, location memories were categorized according to amount of forgetting from pre- to post-nap. Conditions of high versus low forgetting corresponded to stimulation timing at different slow-oscillation phases, suggesting that learning-related stimuli were more likely to be processed and trigger memory reactivation when they occurred at the optimal phase of a slow oscillation. These findings provide insight into mechanisms of memory reactivation during sleep, supporting the idea that reactivation is most likely during cortical upstates. Slow-wave sleep (SWS) is characterized by synchronized neural activity alternating between active upstates and quiet downstates. The slow-oscillation upstates are thought to provide a

  5. Slow deterministic vector rogue waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeyev, S. V.; Kolpakov, S. A.; Mou, Ch.; Jacobsen, G.; Popov, S.; Kalashnikov, V.

    2016-03-01

    For an erbium-doped fiber laser mode-locked by carbon nanotubes, we demonstrate experimentally and theoretically a new type of the vector rogue waves emerging as a result of the chaotic evolution of the trajectories between two orthogonal states of polarization on the Poincare sphere. In terms of fluctuation induced phenomena, by tuning polarization controller for the pump wave and in-cavity polarization controller, we are able to control the Kramers time, i.e. the residence time of the trajectory in vicinity of each orthogonal state of polarization, and so can cause the rare events satisfying rogue wave criteria and having the form of transitions from the state with the long residence time to the state with a short residence time.

  6. Particle acceleration by slow magnetosonic wave turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Gallegos-Cruz, A.

    1997-06-01

    An important alternative for particle acceleration in a turbulent plasma is through magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) wave modes. However, particle acceleration by slow magnetosonic mode has been systematically disregarded for some nonquantitative considerations. Slow magnetosonic waves interchange energy with the medium through two basic processes: resonant (Landau and gyroresonant) and nonresonant (as viscosity and thermal conduction). The energized particles lose energy mainly through Coulombian collisions with the plasma particles. In this work, a quantitative study of the time scales involved in several energetic transfer wave{endash}particle processes is done. Comparison of all these time scales allows one to determine the possibilities that particle acceleration by slow magnetosonic wave mode may occur within the solar corona. It is shown that physical conditions can hardly exist within the solar corona, where thermal particles can be energized and form an acceleration spectrum after crossing the collisional barrier. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  7. [Slow pressure waves during intracranial hypertension].

    PubMed

    Lemaire, J J

    1997-01-01

    Intracranial pressure waves include fast waves (pulse and respiration) and slow waves. Only the latter are considered here. Since the definition of three wave types in the pioneering works of Janny (1950) and Lundberg (1960), their study of frequential characteristics shows they are included in a spectrum where three contiguous frequency bands are individualised: the B wave band (BW) between 8 x 10(-3) Hz and 50 x 10(-3) Hz; the Infra B band (IB) below 8 x 10(-3) Hz; and the Ultra B band (UB) beyond 50 x 10(-3) Hz to 200 x 10(-3) Hz. The origin of these waves is vascular and some may be physiological. They are probably generated by central neuro-pacemakers and/or cyclic phenomena of cerebral autoregulation. They are linked with slow peripheral arterial pressure waves, with biological rhythms and with biomechanics and vasomotricity in the craniospinal enclosure. They are pathological for the slowest (IB), particularly if they are plateau waves, but the physiologic-pathologic boundary is not yet established for each type of slow waves. They can cause severe consequences if they result in major cerebral perfusion pressure changes, and if they induce or worsen herniations.

  8. Slow sleep spindle and procedural memory consolidation in patients with major depressive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Nishida, Masaki; Nakashima, Yusaku; Nishikawa, Toru

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Evidence has accumulated, which indicates that, in healthy individuals, sleep enhances procedural memory consolidation, and that sleep spindle activity modulates this process. However, whether sleep-dependent procedural memory consolidation occurs in patients medicated for major depressive disorder remains unclear, as are the pharmacological and physiological mechanisms that underlie this process. Methods Healthy control participants (n=17) and patients medicated for major depressive disorder (n=11) were recruited and subjected to a finger-tapping motor sequence test (MST; nondominant hand) paradigm to compare the averaged scores of different learning phases (presleep, postsleep, and overnight improvement). Participants’ brain activity was recorded during sleep with 16 electroencephalography channels (between MSTs). Sleep scoring and frequency analyses were performed on the electroencephalography data. Additionally, we evaluated sleep spindle activity, which divided the spindles into fast-frequency spindle activity (12.5–16 Hz) and slow-frequency spindle activity (10.5–12.5 Hz). Result Sleep-dependent motor memory consolidation in patients with depression was impaired in comparison with that in control participants. In patients with depression, age correlated negatively with overnight improvement. The duration of slow-wave sleep correlated with the magnitude of motor memory consolidation in patients with depression, but not in healthy controls. Slow-frequency spindle activity was associated with reduction in the magnitude of motor memory consolidation in both groups. Conclusion Because the changes in slow-frequency spindle activity affected the thalamocortical network dysfunction in patients medicated for depression, dysregulated spindle generation may impair sleep-dependent memory consolidation. Our findings may help to elucidate the cognitive deficits that occur in patients with major depression both in the waking state and during sleep. PMID

  9. Increased Alpha (8-12 Hz) Activity during Slow Wave Sleep as a Marker for the Transition from Implicit Knowledge to Explicit Insight

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yordanova, Juliana; Kolev, Vasil; Wagner, Ullrich; Born, Jan; Verleger, Rolf

    2012-01-01

    The number reduction task (NRT) allows us to study the transition from implicit knowledge of hidden task regularities to explicit insight into these regularities. To identify sleep-associated neurophysiological indicators of this restructuring of knowledge representations, we measured frequency-specific power of EEG while participants slept during…

  10. Increased Alpha (8-12 Hz) Activity during Slow Wave Sleep as a Marker for the Transition from Implicit Knowledge to Explicit Insight

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yordanova, Juliana; Kolev, Vasil; Wagner, Ullrich; Born, Jan; Verleger, Rolf

    2012-01-01

    The number reduction task (NRT) allows us to study the transition from implicit knowledge of hidden task regularities to explicit insight into these regularities. To identify sleep-associated neurophysiological indicators of this restructuring of knowledge representations, we measured frequency-specific power of EEG while participants slept during…

  11. Transcranial slow oscillation stimulation during sleep enhances memory consolidation in rats.

    PubMed

    Binder, Sonja; Berg, Karolin; Gasca, Fernando; Lafon, Belen; Parra, Lucas C; Born, Jan; Marshall, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    The importance of slow-wave sleep (SWS), hallmarked by the occurrence of sleep slow oscillations (SO), for the consolidation of hippocampus-dependent memories has been shown in numerous studies. Previously, the application of transcranial direct current stimulation, oscillating at the frequency of endogenous slow oscillations, during SWS enhanced memory consolidation for a hippocampus dependent task in humans suggesting a causal role of slowly oscillating electric fields for sleep dependent memory consolidation. Here, we aimed to replicate and extend these findings to a rodent model. Slow oscillatory direct transcranial current stimulation (SO-tDCS) was applied over the frontal cortex of rats during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep and its effects on memory consolidation in the one-trial object-place recognition task were examined. A retention interval of 24 h was used to investigate the effects of SO-tDCS on long-term memory. Animals' preference for the displaced object was significantly greater than chance only when animals received SO-tDCS. EEG spectral power indicated a trend toward a transient enhancement of endogenous SO activity in the SO-tDCS condition. These results support the hypothesis that slowly oscillating electric fields causal affect sleep dependent memory consolidation, and demonstrate that oscillatory tDCS can be a valuable tool to investigate the function of endogenous cortical network activity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The thalamocortical network as a single slow wave-generating unit.

    PubMed

    Crunelli, Vincenzo; David, Francois; Lőrincz, Magor L; Hughes, Stuart W

    2015-04-01

    During non-REM sleep the EEG is dominated by slow waves which result from synchronized UP and DOWN states in the component neurons of the thalamocortical network. This review focuses on four areas of recent progress in our understanding of these events. Thus, it has now been conclusively demonstrated that the full expression of slow waves, both of natural sleep and anesthesia, requires an essential contribution by the thalamus. Furthermore, the modulatory role of brainstem transmitters, the function of cortical inhibition and the relative contribution of single neocortical neurons to EEG slow waves have started to be carefully investigated. Together, these new data confirm the view that a full understanding of slow waves can only be achieved by considering the thalamocortical network as a single functional and dynamic unit for the generation of this key EEG rhythm. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Slow spontaneous hemodynamic oscillations during sleep measured with near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virtanen, Jaakko; Näsi, Tiina; Noponen, Tommi; Toppila, Jussi; Salmi, Tapani; Ilmoniemi, Risto J.

    2011-07-01

    Spontaneous cerebral hemodynamic oscillations below 100 mHz reflect the level of cerebral activity, modulate hemodynamic responses to tasks and stimuli, and may aid in detecting various pathologies of the brain. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is ideally suited for both measuring spontaneous hemodynamic oscillations and monitoring sleep, but little research has been performed to combine these two applications. We analyzed 30 all-night NIRS-electroencephalography (EEG) sleep recordings to investigate spontaneous hemodynamic activity relative to sleep stages determined by polysomnography. Signal power of hemodynamic oscillations in the low-frequency (LF, 40-150 mHz) and very-low-frequency (VLF, 3-40 mHz) bands decreased in slow-wave sleep (SWS) compared to light sleep (LS) and rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep. No statistically significant (p < 0.05) differences in oscillation power between LS and REM were observed. However, the period of VLF oscillations around 8 mHz increased in REM sleep in line with earlier studies with other modalities. These results increase our knowledge of the physiology of sleep, complement EEG data, and demonstrate the applicability of NIRS to studying spontaneous hemodynamic fluctuations during sleep.

  14. Continuous spike and waves during sleep and electrical status epilepticus in sleep.

    PubMed

    Loddenkemper, Tobias; Fernández, Iván Sánchez; Peters, Jurriaan M

    2011-04-01

    Continuous spike and waves during sleep is an age-related epileptic encephalopathy that presents with neurocognitive regression, seizures, and an EEG pattern of electrical status epilepticus during sleep. Patients usually present around 5 years of age with infrequent nocturnal unilateral motor seizures that progress within 1 to 2 years to a severe epileptic encephalopathy with frequent seizures of different types, marked neurocognitive regression, and an almost continuous spike-wave EEG pattern during slow-wave sleep. The pathophysiology of continuous spike and waves during sleep is not completely understood, but the corticothalamic neuronal network involved in physiologic oscillating patterns of sleep is thought to be switched into a pathologic discharging mode. Early developmental injury and/or genetic predisposition may play a role in the potentiation of age-related hyperexcitability in the immature brain. A better understanding of the mechanisms leading to electrical status epilepticus during sleep may provide additional therapeutic targets that can improve the outcome of seizures, EEG pattern, and cognitive development in patients with continuous spike and waves during sleep.

  15. Influence on Human Sleep Patterns of Lowering and Delaying the Minimum Core Body Temperature by Slow Changes in the Thermal Environment

    PubMed Central

    Togo, Fumiharu; Aizawa, Seika; Arai, Jun-ichiro; Yoshikawa, Shoko; Ishiwata, Takayuki; Shephard, Roy J.; Aoyagi, Yukitoshi

    2007-01-01

    Study Objectives: We hypothesized that appropriate changes in thermal environment would enhance the quality of sleep. Design/Setting: Controlled laboratory study. Participants: Healthy young men (n = 7, mean age 26 years). Interventions: Nocturnal sleep structures in i-nude subjects were compared between a condition where an ambient temperature (Ta) of 29.5°C was maintained throughout the night (constant Ta), and a second condition (dynamic Ta) where Ta changed slowly within the thermoneutral range (from 27.5°C to 29.5°C). Measurements and Results: Statistically significant (P < 0.05) results included a lower and a later occurrence of minimum core body temperature (Tc), and a longer duration of slow-wave (stages 3+4) sleep in dynamic versus constant Ta. However, total sleep time, sleep efficiency, the total durations of light (stages 1+2) and rapid eye movement sleep, and the latencies to sleep onset, slow-wave sleep, and rapid eye movement sleep did not differ between conditions. Conclusions: Lowering the minimum and delaying the nadir of nocturnal Tc increases slow-wave sleep (probably by an increase of dry heat loss); use of this tactic might improve the overall quality of sleep. Citation: Togo F; Aizawa S; Arai J et al. Influence on Human Sleep Patterns of Lowering and Delaying the Minimum Core Body Temperature by Slow Changes in the Thermal Environment. SLEEP 2007;30(6):797-802. PMID:17580602

  16. State-Dependent Modulation of Slow Wave Motifs towards Awakening

    PubMed Central

    Shimaoka, Daisuke; Song, Chenchen; Knöpfel, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Slow cortical waves that propagate across the cerebral cortex forming large-scale spatiotemporal propagation patterns are a hallmark of non-REM sleep and anesthesia, but also occur during resting wakefulness. To investigate how the spatial temporal properties of slow waves change with the depth of anesthetic, we optically imaged population voltage transients generated by mouse layer 2/3 pyramidal neurons across one or two cortical hemispheres dorsally with a genetically encoded voltage indicator (GEVI). From deep barbiturate anesthesia to light barbiturate sedation, depolarizing wave events recruiting at least 50% of the imaged cortical area consistently appeared as a conserved repertoire of distinct wave motifs. Toward awakening, the incidence of individual motifs changed systematically (the motif propagating from visual to motor areas increased while that from somatosensory to visual areas decreased) and both local and global cortical dynamics accelerated. These findings highlight that functional endogenous interactions between distant cortical areas are not only constrained by anatomical connectivity, but can also be modulated by the brain state. PMID:28484371

  17. State-Dependent Modulation of Slow Wave Motifs towards Awakening.

    PubMed

    Shimaoka, Daisuke; Song, Chenchen; Knöpfel, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Slow cortical waves that propagate across the cerebral cortex forming large-scale spatiotemporal propagation patterns are a hallmark of non-REM sleep and anesthesia, but also occur during resting wakefulness. To investigate how the spatial temporal properties of slow waves change with the depth of anesthetic, we optically imaged population voltage transients generated by mouse layer 2/3 pyramidal neurons across one or two cortical hemispheres dorsally with a genetically encoded voltage indicator (GEVI). From deep barbiturate anesthesia to light barbiturate sedation, depolarizing wave events recruiting at least 50% of the imaged cortical area consistently appeared as a conserved repertoire of distinct wave motifs. Toward awakening, the incidence of individual motifs changed systematically (the motif propagating from visual to motor areas increased while that from somatosensory to visual areas decreased) and both local and global cortical dynamics accelerated. These findings highlight that functional endogenous interactions between distant cortical areas are not only constrained by anatomical connectivity, but can also be modulated by the brain state.

  18. Dynamic Analysis of the Conditional Oscillator Underlying Slow Waves in Thalamocortical Neurons.

    PubMed

    David, François; Crunelli, Vincenzo; Leresche, Nathalie; Lambert, Régis C

    2016-01-01

    During non-REM sleep the EEG shows characteristics waves that are generated by the dynamic interactions between cortical and thalamic oscillators. In thalamic neurons, low-threshold T-type Ca(2+) channels play a pivotal role in almost every type of neuronal oscillations, including slow (< 1 Hz) waves, sleep spindles and delta waves. The transient opening of T channels gives rise to the low threshold spikes (LTSs), and associated high frequency bursts of action potentials, that are characteristically present during sleep spindles and delta waves, whereas the persistent opening of a small fraction of T channels, (i.e., ITwindow) is responsible for the membrane potential bistability underlying sleep slow oscillations. Surprisingly thalamocortical (TC) neurons express a very high density of T channels that largely exceed the amount required to generate LTSs and therefore, to support certain, if not all, sleep oscillations. Here, to clarify the relationship between T current density and sleep oscillations, we systematically investigated the impact of the T conductance level on the intrinsic rhythmic activities generated in TC neurons, combining in vitro experiments and TC neuron simulation. Using bifurcation analysis, we provide insights into the dynamical processes taking place at the transition between slow and delta oscillations. Our results show that although stable delta oscillations can be evoked with minimal T conductance, the full range of slow oscillation patterns, including groups of delta oscillations separated by Up states ("grouped-delta slow waves") requires a high density of T channels. Moreover, high levels of T conductance ensure the robustness of different types of slow oscillations.

  19. Dynamic Analysis of the Conditional Oscillator Underlying Slow Waves in Thalamocortical Neurons

    PubMed Central

    David, François; Crunelli, Vincenzo; Leresche, Nathalie; Lambert, Régis C.

    2016-01-01

    During non-REM sleep the EEG shows characteristics waves that are generated by the dynamic interactions between cortical and thalamic oscillators. In thalamic neurons, low-threshold T-type Ca2+ channels play a pivotal role in almost every type of neuronal oscillations, including slow (< 1 Hz) waves, sleep spindles and delta waves. The transient opening of T channels gives rise to the low threshold spikes (LTSs), and associated high frequency bursts of action potentials, that are characteristically present during sleep spindles and delta waves, whereas the persistent opening of a small fraction of T channels, (i.e., ITwindow) is responsible for the membrane potential bistability underlying sleep slow oscillations. Surprisingly thalamocortical (TC) neurons express a very high density of T channels that largely exceed the amount required to generate LTSs and therefore, to support certain, if not all, sleep oscillations. Here, to clarify the relationship between T current density and sleep oscillations, we systematically investigated the impact of the T conductance level on the intrinsic rhythmic activities generated in TC neurons, combining in vitro experiments and TC neuron simulation. Using bifurcation analysis, we provide insights into the dynamical processes taking place at the transition between slow and delta oscillations. Our results show that although stable delta oscillations can be evoked with minimal T conductance, the full range of slow oscillation patterns, including groups of delta oscillations separated by Up states (“grouped-delta slow waves”) requires a high density of T channels. Moreover, high levels of T conductance ensure the robustness of different types of slow oscillations. PMID:26941611

  20. Hippocampal gamma-slow oscillation coupling in macaques during sedation and sleep.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Andrew G; Liu, Xilin; Weigand, Pauline K; Hudgins, Eric D; Stein, Joel M; Das, Sandhitsu R; Proekt, Alexander; Kelz, Max B; Zhang, Milin; Van der Spiegel, Jan; Lucas, Timothy H

    2017-07-01

    Behavioral and neurophysiological evidence suggests that the slow (≤1 Hz) oscillation (SO) during sleep plays a role in consolidating hippocampal (HIPP)-dependent memories. The effects of the SO on HIPP activity have been studied in rodents and cats both during natural sleep and during anesthetic administration titrated to mimic sleep-like slow rhythms. In this study, we sought to document these effects in primates. First, HIPP field potentials were recorded during ketamine-dexmedetomidine sedation and during natural sleep in three rhesus macaques. Sedation produced regionally-specific slow and gamma (∼40 Hz) oscillations with strong coupling between the SO phase and gamma amplitude. These same features were seen in slow-wave sleep (SWS), but the coupling was weaker and the coupled gamma oscillation had a higher frequency (∼70 Hz) during SWS. Second, electrical stimuli were delivered to HIPP afferents in the parahippocampal gyrus (PHG) during sedation to assess the effects of sleep-like SO on excitability. Gamma bursts after the peak of SO cycles corresponded to periods of increased gain of monosynaptic connections between the PHG and HIPP. However, the two PHG-HIPP connectivity gains during sedation were both substantially lower than when the animal was awake. We conclude that the SO is correlated with rhythmic excitation and inhibition of the PHG-HIPP network, modulating connectivity and gamma generators intrinsic to this network. Ketamine-dexmedetomidine sedation produces a similar effect, but with a decreased contribution of the PHG to HIPP activity and gamma generation. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. EEG slow-wave coherence changes in propofol-induced general anesthesia: experiment and theory

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kaier; Steyn-Ross, Moira L.; Steyn-Ross, D. A.; Wilson, Marcus T.; Sleigh, Jamie W.

    2014-01-01

    The electroencephalogram (EEG) patterns recorded during general anesthetic-induced coma are closely similar to those seen during slow-wave sleep, the deepest stage of natural sleep; both states show patterns dominated by large amplitude slow waves. Slow oscillations are believed to be important for memory consolidation during natural sleep. Tracking the emergence of slow-wave oscillations during transition to unconsciousness may help us to identify drug-induced alterations of the underlying brain state, and provide insight into the mechanisms of general anesthesia. Although cellular-based mechanisms have been proposed, the origin of the slow oscillation has not yet been unambiguously established. A recent theoretical study by Steyn-Ross et al. (2013) proposes that the slow oscillation is a network, rather than cellular phenomenon. Modeling anesthesia as a moderate reduction in gap-junction interneuronal coupling, they predict an unconscious state signposted by emergent low-frequency oscillations with chaotic dynamics in space and time. They suggest that anesthetic slow-waves arise from a competitive interaction between symmetry-breaking instabilities in space (Turing) and time (Hopf), modulated by gap-junction coupling strength. A significant prediction of their model is that EEG phase coherence will decrease as the cortex transits from Turing–Hopf balance (wake) to Hopf-dominated chaotic slow-waves (unconsciousness). Here, we investigate changes in phase coherence during induction of general anesthesia. After examining 128-channel EEG traces recorded from five volunteers undergoing propofol anesthesia, we report a significant drop in sub-delta band (0.05–1.5 Hz) slow-wave coherence between frontal, occipital, and frontal–occipital electrode pairs, with the most pronounced wake-vs.-unconscious coherence changes occurring at the frontal cortex. PMID:25400558

  2. Slow EIT waves as gravity modes

    SciTech Connect

    Vranjes, J.

    2011-06-15

    The EIT waves [named after the extreme-ultraviolet imaging telescope (EIT) onboard the solar and heliospheric observatory (SOHO)] are in the literature usually described as fast magneto-acoustic (FMA) modes. However, observations show that a large percentage of these events propagate with very slow speeds that may be as low as 20 km/s. This is far below the FMA wave speed which cannot be below the sound speed, the latter being typically larger than 10{sup 2} km/s in the corona. In the present study, it is shown that, to account for such low propagation speed, a different wave model should be used, based on the theory of gravity waves, both internal (IG) and surface (SG) ones. The gravity modes are physically completely different from the FMA mode, as they are essentially dispersive and in addition the IG wave is a transverse mode. Both the IG and the SG mode separately can provide proper propagation velocities in the whole low speed range.

  3. Coupling between whistler waves and slow-mode solitary waves

    SciTech Connect

    Tenerani, A.; Califano, F.; Pegoraro, F.; Le Contel, O.

    2012-05-15

    The interplay between electron- and ion-scale phenomena is of general interest for both laboratory and space plasma physics. In this paper, we investigate the linear coupling between whistler waves and slow magnetosonic solitons through two-fluid numerical simulations. Whistler waves can be trapped in the presence of inhomogeneous external fields such as a density hump or hole where they can propagate for times much longer than their characteristic time scale, as shown by laboratory experiments and space measurements. Space measurements have detected whistler waves also in correspondence to magnetic holes, i.e., to density humps with magnetic field minima extending on ion-scales. This raises the interesting question of how ion-scale structures can couple to whistler waves. Slow magnetosonic solitons share some of the main features of a magnetic hole. Using the ducting properties of an inhomogeneous plasma as a guide, we present a numerical study of whistler waves that are trapped and transported inside propagating slow magnetosonic solitons.

  4. Slow brain oscillations of sleep, resting state, and vigilance.

    PubMed

    Van Someren, E J W; Van Der Werf, Y D; Roelfsema, P R; Mansvelder, H D; da Silva, F H Lopes

    2011-01-01

    The most important quest of cognitive neuroscience may be to unravel the mechanisms by which the brain selects, links, consolidates, and integrates new information into its neuronal network, while preventing saturation to occur. During the past decade, neuroscientists working within several disciplines have observed an important involvement of the specific types of brain oscillations that occur during sleep--the cortical slow oscillations; during the resting state--the fMRI resting state networks including the default-mode network (DMN); and during task performance--the performance modulations that link as well to modulations in electroencephalography or magnetoencephalography frequency content. Understanding the role of these slow oscillations thus appears to be essential for our fundamental understanding of brain function. Brain activity is characterized by oscillations occurring in spike frequency, field potentials or blood oxygen level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging signals. Environmental stimuli, reaching the brain through our senses, activate or inactivate neuronal populations and modulate ongoing activity. The effect they sort is to a large extent determined by the momentary state of the slow endogenous oscillations of the brain. In the absence of sensory input, as is the case during rest or sleep, brain activity does not cease. Rather, its oscillations continue and change with respect to their dominant frequencies and coupling topography. This chapter briefly introduces the topics that will be addressed in this dedicated volume of Progress in Brain Research on slow oscillations and sets the stage for excellent papers discussing their molecular, cellular, network physiological and cognitive performance aspects. Getting to know about slow oscillations is essential for our understanding of plasticity, memory, brain structure from synapse to DMN, cognition, consciousness, and ultimately for our understanding of the mechanisms and functions of

  5. Napping to renew learning capacity: enhanced encoding after stimulation of sleep slow oscillations.

    PubMed

    Antonenko, Daria; Diekelmann, Susanne; Olsen, Cathrin; Born, Jan; Mölle, Matthias

    2013-04-01

    As well as consolidating memory, sleep has been proposed to serve a second important function for memory, i.e. to free capacities for the learning of new information during succeeding wakefulness. The slow wave activity (SWA) that is a hallmark of slow wave sleep could be involved in both functions. Here, we aimed to demonstrate a causative role for SWA in enhancing the capacity for encoding of information during subsequent wakefulness, using transcranial slow oscillation stimulation (tSOS) oscillating at 0.75 Hz to induce SWA in healthy humans during an afternoon nap. Encoding following the nap was tested for hippocampus-dependent declarative materials (pictures, word pairs, and word lists) and procedural skills (finger sequence tapping). As compared with a sham stimulation control condition, tSOS during the nap enhanced SWA and significantly improved subsequent encoding on all three declarative tasks (picture recognition, cued recall of word pairs, and free recall of word lists), whereas procedural finger sequence tapping skill was not affected. Our results indicate that sleep SWA enhances the capacity for encoding of declarative materials, possibly by down-scaling hippocampal synaptic networks that were potentiated towards saturation during the preceding period of wakefulness. © 2013 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Slow Magnetoacoustic Waves in Coronal Loops?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robbrecht, E.; Berghmans, D.; Nakariakov, V.; Poedts, S.

    1999-10-01

    On May 13, 1998 the EIT and TRACE instruments produced simultaneous high cadence image sequences of the same active region (AR 8218). TRACE achieved a 25 sec cadence in the 171 deg passband while EIT achieved a 15 sec cadence (operating in 'shutterless mode', SOHO JOP 80) in the 195 deg passband. These high cadence observations in two complementary wavelengths have revealed the existence of weak disturbances in an extended coronal loop system. The disturbances originate from small scale brightenings at the footpoints of the loops and propagate along the loops at an apparant speed of the order of 150 km/s which is close to the expected sound speed. To conclude whether these propagating disturbances should be interpreted as slow magnetoacoustic waves or as mass motions ('microflows'), we compare our observational findings with theoretical models. Our results suggest that the recent discovery of DeForest and Gurman (1998) of slow MHD waves in polar plumes, are in fact not typical of polar plumes but occur also in extended coronal structures elsewhere.

  7. Influence on human sleep patterns of lowering and delaying the minimum core body temperature by slow changes in the thermal environment.

    PubMed

    Togo, Fumiharu; Aizawa, Seika; Arai, Jun-ichiro; Yoshikawa, Shoko; Ishiwata, Takayuki; Shephard, Roy J; Aoyagi, Yukitoshi

    2007-06-01

    We hypothesized that appropriate changes in thermal environment would enhance the quality of sleep. Controlled laboratory study. Healthy young men (n = 7, mean age 26 years). Nocturnal sleep structures in semi-nude subjects were compared between a condition where an ambient temperature (Ta) of 29.5 degree C was maintained throughout the night (constant Ta), and a second condition (dynamic Ta) where Ta changed slowly within the thermoneutral range (from 27.5 C to 29.5 degree C). Statistically significant (P < 0.05) results included a lower and a later occurrence of minimum core body temperature (Tc), and a longer duration of slow-wave (stages 3+4) sleep in dynamic versus constant T. However, total sleep time, sleep efficiency, the total durations of light (stages 1+2) and rapid eye movement sleep, and the latencies to sleep onset, slow-wave sleep, and rapid eye movement sleep did not differ between conditions. Lowering the minimum and delaying the nadir of nocturnal Tc increases slow-wave sleep (probably by an increase of dry heat loss); use of this tactic might improve the overall quality of sleep.

  8. REM sleep behaviour disorder is associated with lower fast and higher slow sleep spindle densities.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, Christian; Godin, Isabelle; Montplaisir, Jacques; Nielsen, Tore

    2015-12-01

    To investigate differences in sleep spindle properties and scalp topography between patients with rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder (RBD) and healthy controls, whole-night polysomnograms of 35 patients diagnosed with RBD and 35 healthy control subjects matched for age and sex were compared. Recordings included a 19-lead 10-20 electroencephalogram montage and standard electromyogram, electrooculogram, electrocardiogram and respiratory leads. Sleep spindles were automatically detected using a standard algorithm, and their characteristics (amplitude, duration, density, frequency and frequency slope) compared between groups. Topological analyses of group-discriminative features were conducted. Sleep spindles occurred at a significantly (e.g. t34 = -4.49; P = 0.00008 for C3) lower density (spindles ∙ min(-1) ) for RBD (mean ± SD: 1.61 ± 0.56 for C3) than for control (2.19 ± 0.61 for C3) participants. However, when distinguishing slow and fast spindles using thresholds individually adapted to the electroencephalogram spectrum of each participant, densities smaller (31-96%) for fast but larger (20-120%) for slow spindles were observed in RBD in all derivations. Maximal differences were in more posterior regions for slow spindles, but over the entire scalp for fast spindles. Results suggest that the density of sleep spindles is altered in patients with RBD and should therefore be investigated as a potential marker of future neurodegeneration in these patients.

  9. MEMS Fabricated MM-Wave Slow Wave Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, Mark; Borwick, Robert; Shin, Young-Min; Barnett, Larry; Luhmann, Neville; Kimura, Takuji; Atkinson, John

    2012-02-01

    We report on the fabrication and test of a MEMS slow wave structure designed for a > 40 GHz bandwidth centered on 220 GHz operation, that slows radiation down to group velocity of 8.16 x 10^7 ms-1 where the velocity matches the speed of electrons from a 20 keV source. The slow wave device uses a 40 mm long staggered interdigitated vane structure within a waveguide [1]. Ultimately, such a device will be integrated with an electron beam to become part of a sheet beam travelling wave tube (SBTWT) amplifier. A gold coated deep reactive ion etched (DRIE) silicon test structure was fabricated to test the RF properties of the design. This MEMS structure was coupled to WR-4 waveguide in a metal fixture and the S-parameters measured using a vector network analyzer, allowing extraction of the insertion loss and signal delay as a function of frequency. A further MEMS structure with just 10 cells of the vane structure within a cavity were fabricated which allows points on the dispersion curve to be directly measured as resonances of the structure. Extraction of the dispersion curve verifies the group velocity measurement of the device. [4pt] [1] Y-M. Shin & L.R. Barnett, Appl.Phys. Lett. 2008, 92 pp. 091501.

  10. Superconducting niobium thin film slow-wave structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bautista, J. J.; Petty, S. M.; Allen, L. H.; Beasley, M. R.; Hammond, R. H.

    1983-01-01

    A superconducting comb structure as a slow-wave element in a traveling-wave maser will significantly improve maser noise temperature and gain by reducing the insertion loss. The results of the insertion loss measurements of superconducting niobium slow-wave structures subjected to maser operating conditions at X-Band frequencies are presented.

  11. Slow-wave analysis on double layered substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hindy, M. A.

    Full wave analysis of a slow-wave microstrip transmission line on ferromagnetic semiconductor with insulator is presented. Spectral domain method with sampling theorem are used. A new current distribution is applied. The obtained slow-wave factor is higher than that when using lossless ferromagnetic material only. Phase shifting is achieved also by the same structure.

  12. Review of Slow-Wave Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallett, Thomas M.; Qureshi, A. Haq

    1994-01-01

    The majority of recent theoretical and experimental reports published in the literature dealing with helical slow-wave structures focus on the dispersion characteristics and their effects due to the finite helix wire thickness and attenuation, dielectric loading, metal loading, and the introduction of plasma. In many papers, an effective dielectric constant is used to take into account helix wire dimensions and conductivity losses, while the propagation constant of the signal and the interaction impedance of the structure are found to depend on the surface resistivity of the helix. Also, various dielectric supporting rods are simulated by one or several uniform cylinders having an effective dielectric constant, while metal vane loading and plasma effects are incorporated in the effective dielectric constant. The papers dealing with coupled cavities and folded or loaded wave guides describe equivalent circuit models, efficiency enhancement, and the prediction of instabilities for these structures. Equivalent circuit models of various structures are found using computer software programs SUPERFISH and TOUCHSTONE. Efficiency enhancement in tubes is achieved through dynamic velocity and phase adjusted tapers using computer techniques. The stability threshold of unwanted antisymmetric and higher order modes is predicted using SOS and MAGIC codes and the dependence of higher order modes on beam conductance, section length, and effective Q of a cavity is shown.

  13. Enhanced slow waves at the periphery of human epileptic foci.

    PubMed

    Serafini, Ruggero; Loeb, Jeffrey A

    2015-06-01

    Experimental epilepsy foci are surrounded by an enhanced inhibition zone. We looked for evidence of peripheral inhibition in human epilepsy foci by analyzing the waveforms of discharges. The sharp-wave of an epileptic discharge is thought to reflect EPSP synchronization, and the subsequent slow-wave to reflect inhibition. Ratios of amplitudes of the sharp- and slow-waves in human EEGs may show how excitatory and inhibitory processes relate to discharge spread implicating peripheral inhibition in human epilepsy, too. In electrocorticography from 10 adult patients we compared amplitudes of sharp-waves and of slow-waves and their ratios in each electrodes as a function of their distance from the highest sharp-wave electrode. Sharp-wave amplitude decreases as a function of electrode distance from the highest sharp-wave electrode, but the slow-wave voltage exhibits a slight increase. The ratio slow-wave/sharp-wave increases several-fold within 2-3 cm from the highest sharp-wave electrode. In human cortex epileptic discharges at the periphery of a focus exhibit a prevalent slow-wave consistent with a possible local enhanced inhibition. Waveform analysis of electrocorticography epileptic discharges suggests the presence in human neocortex of surround inhibition, a basic mechanism limiting the spread of epileptic activity, long studied in experimental models. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  14. The adenosine kinase inhibitor ABT-702 augments EEG slow waves in rats.

    PubMed

    Radek, Richard J; Decker, Michael W; Jarvis, Michael F

    2004-11-05

    ABT-702 is a novel and selective non-nucleoside adenosine kinase (AK) inhibitor that produces increases in endogenous extracellular adenosine. Adenosine (ADO) is thought to be an important neuromodulator of sleep, therefore, the effects of ABT-702 and AK inhibition were examined on rat EEG and sleep, and compared to ADO receptor agonists to further evaluate the role of ADO receptor activation on sleep related EEG patterns. ABT-702 (10.0-30.0 micromol/kg, i.p.) increased the amplitude of the 1-4 Hz band (Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) analysis, p<0.05), which is indicative of augmented sleep-related slow waves. Theophylline (5.0 micromol/kg, i.p.), a centrally active, non-selective adenosine receptor antagonist, attenuated the effects of ABT-702 (20.0 micromol/kg, i.p.) on EEG, whereas 8-(p-sulfophenyl)-theophylline (8-PST, 150.0 micromol/kg, i.p.), a peripherally active antagonist, did not, indicating that the EEG effects of ABT-702 are mediated by a central ADO receptor mechanism. The selective A(1) agonist N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA, 30.0 micromol/kg, i.p.) also increased the amplitude of 1-4 Hz band, but was not as efficacious as ABT-702. In contrast, the A(2A) agonist CGS-21680 (1.0-10.0 micromol/kg, i.p.) and the non-selective agonist, N(6)-ethylcarboximidoadenosine (NECA, 0.03-0.1 micromol/kg, ip.), lowered 1-4 Hz amplitude for 2 h after injection. Finally, ABT-702 (10.0 micromol/kg, i.p.) was found to significantly increase slow wave sleep and decrease REM sleep in rats implanted with both EEG and EMG electrodes for evaluation of sleep. These studies demonstrate that increased extracellular adenosine through AK inhibition can elicit modulatory effects on EEG slow waves via an interaction with central ADO receptor subtypes.

  15. Waves in low-beta plasmas - Slow shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinolfson, R. S.; Hundhausen, A. J.

    1989-01-01

    Results from wave theory and numerical simulation of the nonlinear MHD equations are used to study the response of a conducting fluid containing an embedded magnetic field with beta less than 1 to the sudden injection of material along the field lines. It is shown that the injection produces slow shocks with configurations which are concave toward the ejecta driver. Fast-mode waves which have not steepened into the shock precede the slow shock and alter the ambient medium. When beta equals 0.1, the fast mode becomes a transverse wave for parallel propagation, while the slow wave approaches a longitudinal, or sound, wave.

  16. Effects of frequency on the wave form of propagated slow waves in canine gastric antral muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Publicover, N G; Sanders, K M

    1986-01-01

    Experiments were performed to test the effects of frequency on the wave form of electrical slow waves in canine antral circular muscle. At frequencies between 3.0 and 5.6 cycles per minute antral slow waves revealed an alternating wave form pattern. At physiological frequencies antral muscle was incapable of consistently propagating mechanically productive slow waves. Two components of the slow wave were identified on the basis of propagation refractory period. At inter-slow-wave intervals of 3-14 s, the amplitude and duration of the plateau phase wave decreased, but the upstroke phase of the slow wave was minimally affected. Intervals of 2.5-4 s resulted in a normal upstroke event but abolished the plateau. At shorter intervals the upstroke phase of the slow wave was greatly reduced or abolished. The absolute propagation refractory period averaged 2.8 +/- 0.9 s (n = 7) following repolarization of a 'conditioning' slow wave. Slow waves failed to propagate within the absolute propagation refractory period. Acetylcholine decreased the interval required for the plateau phase of the slow wave to recover and permitted conduction of mechanically productive slow waves at or above physiological frequencies. The data presented suggest that gastric motility is modulated by extrinsic and intrinsic factors which regulate slow-wave frequency. PMID:3701649

  17. Sharp Slow Waves in the EEG.

    PubMed

    Janati, A Bruce; AlGhasab, Naif Saad; Alshammari, Raed Ayed; saad AlGhassab, Abdulmohsen; Al-Aslami Yossef Fahad

    2016-06-01

    There exists a paucity of data in the EEG literature on characteristics of "atypical" interictal epileptiform discharges (IEDs), including sharp slow waves (SSWs). This article aims to address the clinical, neurophysiological, and neuropathological significance of SSW The EEGs of 920 patients at a tertiary-care facility were prospectively reviewed over a period of one year. Thirty-six patients had SSWs in their EEG. Of these, 6 patients were excluded because of inadequate clinical data. The clinical and neuroimaging data of the remaining 30 patients were then retrospectively collected and reviewed, and the findings were correlated. The data revealed that SSWs were rare and age-related EEG events occurring primarily in the first two decades of life. All patients with SSWs had documented epilepsy, presenting clinically with partial or generalized epilepsy. It is notable that one-third of the patients with SSWs had chronic or static central nervous system (CNS) pathology, particularly congenital CNS anomalies. Though more than one mechanism may be involved in the pathogenesis of SSWs, this research indicates that the most compelling theory is a deeply seated cortical generator giving rise to this EEG pattern. The presence of SSWs should alert clinicians to the presence of partial or generalized epilepsy or an underlying chronic or static CNS pathology, in particular congenital CNS anomalies, underscoring the significance of brain magnetic resonance imaging in the work-up of this population.

  18. Slow Wave Enhanced Antennas at RF and Optical Frequencies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-21

    RIU . Fig. 1.1 SEM image of (a) an InGaAsP PhC nanobeam slow light slot waveguide, (b) a cavity type InGaAsP PhC nanobeam slow light slot...a high sensitivity of about 900 nm/ RIU . 2. Slow wave RF antenna (a) By introducing complementary split ring resonators (CSRR) and complementary

  19. Slow Magnetoacoustic Wave Oscillation of an Expanding Coronal Loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, J. M.; Ofman, L.

    2011-10-01

    We simulated an expanding loop or slow coronal mass ejection (CME) in the solar corona dimensioned with size parameters taken from real coronal expanding loops observed with the STEREO spacecraft. We find that the loop expands to Sun's size within about one hour, consistent with slow CME observations. At the top of the loop, plasma is being blown off the loop, enabled with the reconnection between the loop's flux rope magnetic field and the radial magnetic field of the Sun, thus yielding feeding material for the formation of the slow solar wind. This mechanism is in accordance with the observed blob formation of the slow solar wind. We find wave packets traveling with local sound speed downward toward the footpoints of the loop, already seen in coronal seismology observations and simulations of stationary coronal loops. Here, we generalize these results for an expanding medium. We also find a reflection of the wave packets, identified as slow magnetoacoustic waves, at the footpoints of the loop. This confirms the formation of standing waves within the coronal loop. In particular, the reflected waves can partly escape the loop top and contribute to the heating of the solar wind. The present study improves our understanding on how loop material can emerge to form blobs, major ingredients of slow CMEs, and how the release of the wave energy stored in slow magnetoacoustic waves, and transported away from the Sun within expanding loops, contributes to the acceleration and formation of the slow solar wind.

  20. Is There a Relation between EEG-Slow Waves and Memory Dysfunction in Epilepsy? A Critical Appraisal.

    PubMed

    Höller, Yvonne; Trinka, Eugen

    2015-01-01

    Is there a relationship between peri-ictal slow waves, loss of consciousness, memory, and slow-wave sleep, in patients with different forms of epilepsy? We hypothesize that mechanisms, which result in peri-ictal slow-wave activity as detected by the electroencephalogram, could negatively affect memory processes. Slow waves (≤4 Hz) can be found in seizures with impairment of consciousness and also occur in focal seizures without impairment of consciousness but with inhibited access to memory functions. Peri-ictal slow waves are regarded as dysfunctional and are probably caused by mechanisms, which are essential to disturb the consolidation of memory entries in these patients. This is in strong contrast to physiological slow-wave activity during deep sleep, which is thought to group memory-consolidating fast oscillatory activity. In patients with epilepsy, slow waves may not only correlate with the peri-ictal clouding of consciousness, but could be the epiphenomenon of mechanisms, which interfere with normal brain function in a wider range. These mechanisms may have transient impacts on memory, such as temporary inhibition of memory systems, altered patterns of hippocampal-neocortical interactions during slow-wave sleep, or disturbed cross-frequency coupling of slow and fast oscillations. In addition, repeated tonic-clonic seizures over the years in uncontrolled chronic epilepsy may cause a progressive cognitive decline. This hypothesis can only be assessed in long-term prospective studies. These studies could disentangle the reversible short-term impacts of seizures, and the impacts of chronic uncontrolled seizures. Chronic uncontrolled seizures lead to irreversible memory impairment. By contrast, short-term impacts do not necessarily lead to a progressive cognitive decline but result in significantly impaired peri-ictal memory performance.

  1. Is There a Relation between EEG-Slow Waves and Memory Dysfunction in Epilepsy? A Critical Appraisal

    PubMed Central

    Höller, Yvonne; Trinka, Eugen

    2015-01-01

    Is there a relationship between peri-ictal slow waves, loss of consciousness, memory, and slow-wave sleep, in patients with different forms of epilepsy? We hypothesize that mechanisms, which result in peri-ictal slow-wave activity as detected by the electroencephalogram, could negatively affect memory processes. Slow waves (≤4 Hz) can be found in seizures with impairment of consciousness and also occur in focal seizures without impairment of consciousness but with inhibited access to memory functions. Peri-ictal slow waves are regarded as dysfunctional and are probably caused by mechanisms, which are essential to disturb the consolidation of memory entries in these patients. This is in strong contrast to physiological slow-wave activity during deep sleep, which is thought to group memory-consolidating fast oscillatory activity. In patients with epilepsy, slow waves may not only correlate with the peri-ictal clouding of consciousness, but could be the epiphenomenon of mechanisms, which interfere with normal brain function in a wider range. These mechanisms may have transient impacts on memory, such as temporary inhibition of memory systems, altered patterns of hippocampal–neocortical interactions during slow-wave sleep, or disturbed cross-frequency coupling of slow and fast oscillations. In addition, repeated tonic–clonic seizures over the years in uncontrolled chronic epilepsy may cause a progressive cognitive decline. This hypothesis can only be assessed in long-term prospective studies. These studies could disentangle the reversible short-term impacts of seizures, and the impacts of chronic uncontrolled seizures. Chronic uncontrolled seizures lead to irreversible memory impairment. By contrast, short-term impacts do not necessarily lead to a progressive cognitive decline but result in significantly impaired peri-ictal memory performance. PMID:26124717

  2. The Impact of Sound on Electroencephalographic Waves during Sleep in Patients Suffering from Tinnitus.

    PubMed

    Pedemonte, Marisa; Testa, Martín; Díaz, Marcela; Suárez-Bagnasco, Diego

    2014-09-01

    Based on the knowledge that sensory processing continues during sleep and that a relationship exists between sleep and learning, a new strategy for treatment of idiopathic subjective tinnitus, consisted of customized sound stimulation presented during sleep, was tested. It has been previously shown that this treatment induces a sustained decrease in tinnitus intensity; however, its effect on brain activity has not yet been studied. In this work, we compared the impact of sound stimulation in tinnitus patients in the different sleep stages. Ten patients with idiopathic tinnitus were treated with sound stimulation mimicking tinnitus during sleep. Power spectra and intra- and inter-hemispheric coherence of electroencephalographic waves from frontal and temporal electrodes were measured with and without sound stimulation for each sleep stage (stages N2 with sleep spindles; N3 with slow wave sleep and REM sleep with Rapid Eye Movements). The main results found were that the largest number of changes, considering both the power spectrum and wave׳s coherence, occurred in stages N2 and N3. The delta and theta bands were the most changed, with important changes also in coherence of spindles during N2. All changes were more frequent in temporal areas. The differences between the two hemispheres do not depend, at least exclusively, on the side where the tinnitus is perceived and, hence, of the stimulated side. These results demonstrate that sound stimulation during sleep in tinnitus patients׳ influences brain activity and open an avenue for investigating the mechanism underlying tinnitus and its treatment.

  3. Theory of Slow Waves in Transversely Nonuniform Plasma Waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzelev, M.V.; Romanov, R.V.; Rukhadze, A.A.

    2005-02-15

    A general method is developed for a numerical analysis of the frequency spectra of internal, internal-surface, and surface slow waves in a waveguide with transverse plasma density variations. For waveguides with a piecewise constant plasma filling, the spectra of slow waves are thoroughly examined in the limits of an infinitely weak and an infinitely strong external magnetic field. For a smooth plasma density profile, the frequency spectrum of long-wavelength surface waves remains unchanged, but a slow damping rate appears that is caused by the conversion of the surface waves into internal plasma waves at the plasma resonance point. As for short-wavelength internal waves, they are strongly damped by this effect. It is pointed out that, for annular plasma geometry, which is of interest from the experimental point of view, the spectrum of the surface waves depends weakly on the magnetic field strength in the waveguide.

  4. Slow oscillating transcranial direct current stimulation during non-rapid eye movement sleep improves behavioral inhibition in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder

    PubMed Central

    Munz, Manuel T.; Prehn-Kristensen, Alexander; Thielking, Frederieke; Mölle, Matthias; Göder, Robert; Baving, Lioba

    2015-01-01

    Background: Behavioral inhibition, which is a later-developing executive function (EF) and anatomically located in prefrontal areas, is impaired in attention-deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). While optimal EFs have been shown to depend on efficient sleep in healthy subjects, the impact of sleep problems, frequently reported in ADHD, remains elusive. Findings of macroscopic sleep changes in ADHD are inconsistent, but there is emerging evidence for distinct microscopic changes with a focus on prefrontal cortical regions and non-rapid eye movement (non-REM) slow-wave sleep. Recently, slow oscillations (SO) during non-REM sleep were found to be less functional and, as such, may be involved in sleep-dependent memory impairments in ADHD. Objective:By augmenting slow-wave power through bilateral, slow oscillating transcranial direct current stimulation (so-tDCS, frequency = 0.75 Hz) during non-REM sleep, we aimed to improve daytime behavioral inhibition in children with ADHD. Methods: Fourteen boys (10–14 years) diagnosed with ADHD were included. In a randomized, double-blind, cross-over design, patients received so-tDCS either in the first or in the second experimental sleep night. Inhibition control was assessed with a visuomotor go/no-go task. Intrinsic alertness was assessed with a simple stimulus response task. To control for visuomotor performance, motor memory was assessed with a finger sequence tapping task. Results: SO-power was enhanced during early non-REM sleep, accompanied by slowed reaction times and decreased standard deviations of reaction times, in the go/no-go task after so-tDCS. In contrast, intrinsic alertness, and motor memory performance were not improved by so-tDCS. Conclusion: Since behavioral inhibition but not intrinsic alertness or motor memory was improved by so-tDCS, our results suggest that lateral prefrontal slow oscillations during sleep might play a specific role for executive functioning in ADHD. PMID:26321911

  5. Driving Sleep Slow Oscillations by Auditory Closed-Loop Stimulation—A Self-Limiting Process

    PubMed Central

    Ngo, Hong-Viet V.; Miedema, Arjan; Faude, Isabel; Martinetz, Thomas; Mölle, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    The <1 Hz EEG slow oscillation (SO) is a hallmark of slow-wave sleep (SWS) and is critically involved in sleep-associated memory formation. Previous studies showed that SOs and associated memory function can be effectively enhanced by closed-loop auditory stimulation, when clicks are presented in synchrony with upcoming SO up states. However, increasing SOs and synchronized excitability also bear the risk of emerging seizure activity, suggesting the presence of mechanisms in the healthy brain that counter developing hypersynchronicity during SOs. Here, we aimed to test the limits of driving SOs through closed-loop auditory stimulation in healthy humans. Study I tested a “Driving stimulation” protocol (vs “Sham”) in which trains of clicks were presented in synchrony with SO up states basically as long as an ongoing SO train was identified on-line. Study II compared Driving stimulation with a “2-Click” protocol where the maximum of stimuli delivered in a train was limited to two clicks. Stimulation was applied during SWS in the first 210 min of nocturnal sleep. Before and after sleep declarative word-pair memories were tested. Compared with the Sham control, Driving stimulation prolonged SO trains and enhanced SO amplitudes, phase-locked spindle activity, and overnight retention of word pairs (all ps < 0.05). Importantly, effects of Driving stimulation did not exceed those of 2-Click stimulation (p > 0.180), indicating the presence of a mechanism preventing the development of hypersynchronicity during SO activity. Assessment of temporal dynamics revealed a rapidly fading phase-locked spindle activity during repetitive click stimulation, suggesting that spindle refractoriness contributes to this protective mechanism. PMID:25926443

  6. Driving sleep slow oscillations by auditory closed-loop stimulation-a self-limiting process.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Hong-Viet V; Miedema, Arjan; Faude, Isabel; Martinetz, Thomas; Mölle, Matthias; Born, Jan

    2015-04-29

    The <1 Hz EEG slow oscillation (SO) is a hallmark of slow-wave sleep (SWS) and is critically involved in sleep-associated memory formation. Previous studies showed that SOs and associated memory function can be effectively enhanced by closed-loop auditory stimulation, when clicks are presented in synchrony with upcoming SO up states. However, increasing SOs and synchronized excitability also bear the risk of emerging seizure activity, suggesting the presence of mechanisms in the healthy brain that counter developing hypersynchronicity during SOs. Here, we aimed to test the limits of driving SOs through closed-loop auditory stimulation in healthy humans. Study I tested a "Driving stimulation" protocol (vs "Sham") in which trains of clicks were presented in synchrony with SO up states basically as long as an ongoing SO train was identified on-line. Study II compared Driving stimulation with a "2-Click" protocol where the maximum of stimuli delivered in a train was limited to two clicks. Stimulation was applied during SWS in the first 210 min of nocturnal sleep. Before and after sleep declarative word-pair memories were tested. Compared with the Sham control, Driving stimulation prolonged SO trains and enhanced SO amplitudes, phase-locked spindle activity, and overnight retention of word pairs (all ps < 0.05). Importantly, effects of Driving stimulation did not exceed those of 2-Click stimulation (p > 0.180), indicating the presence of a mechanism preventing the development of hypersynchronicity during SO activity. Assessment of temporal dynamics revealed a rapidly fading phase-locked spindle activity during repetitive click stimulation, suggesting that spindle refractoriness contributes to this protective mechanism.

  7. The role of fast and slow EEG activity during sleep in males and females with Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Philip; Goldschmied, Jennifer; Deldin, Patricia; Hoffmann, Robert; Armitage, Roseanne

    2015-01-01

    Sleep difficulties are highly prevalent in depression, and appears to be a contributing factor in the development and maintenance of symptoms. However, despite the generally acknowledged relationship between sleep and depression, the neurophysiological substrates underlying this relationship still remain unclear. Two main hypotheses were tested in this study. The first hypothesis states that sleep in depression is characterized by inadequate generation of restorative sleep, as indexed by reduced amounts of slow-wave activity. Conversely, the second hypothesis states that poor sleep in depression is due to intrusions of fast-frequency activity that may be reflective of a hyperaroused central nervous system. This study aimed to test both hypotheses in a large sample of individuals with clinically validated depression, as well as examine sex as a moderator. Results suggest that depression is better characterized by an overall decrease in slow-wave activity, which is related to elevated anxious and depressed mood the following morning. Results also suggest that females may be more likely to experience fast frequency activity related to depression symptom severity. PMID:26175101

  8. Role for T-type Ca2+ channels in sleep waves.

    PubMed

    Crunelli, Vincenzo; David, Francois; Leresche, Nathalie; Lambert, Régis C

    2014-04-01

    Since their discovery more than 30 years ago, low-threshold T-type Ca(2+) channels (T channels) have been suggested to play a key role in many EEG waves of non-REM sleep, which has remained exclusively linked to the ability of these channels to generate low-threshold Ca(2+) potentials and associated high-frequency bursts of action potentials. Our present understanding of the biophysics and physiology of T channels, however, highlights a much more diverse and complex picture of the pivotal contributions that they make to different sleep rhythms. In particular, recent experimental evidence has conclusively demonstrated the essential contribution of thalamic T channels to the expression of slow waves of natural sleep and the key role played by Ca(2+) entry through these channels in the activation or modulation of other voltage-dependent channels that are important for the generation of both slow waves and sleep spindles. However, the precise contribution to sleep rhythms of T channels in cortical neurons and other sleep-controlling neuronal networks remains unknown, and a full understanding of the cellular and network mechanisms of sleep delta waves is still lacking.

  9. Study of Novel Slow Wave Circuit for Miniaturized Millimeter Wave Helical Traveling Wave Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bin; Zhu, Xiaofang; Liao, Li; Yang, Zhonghai; Zeng, Baoqing; Yao, Lieming

    2006-07-01

    Two kinds of novel helical slow wave circuit, supported by Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) diamond, are presented. They are applying in miniaturized millimeter wave helical traveling wave tube. Cold test characteristic of these circuits are simulated by MAFIA code. Higher performances are achieved with smaller size, compared with conventional circuit supported by BeO rods. The nonlinear analysis is implemented by Beam and Wave Interaction (BWI) module, which is a part of TWTCAD Integrated Framework. Results have been found to be consistent with the expectation. It should be wider apply in microwave and millimeter wave vacuum electronic devices.

  10. Global intracellular slow-wave dynamics of the thalamocortical system.

    PubMed

    Sheroziya, Maxim; Timofeev, Igor

    2014-06-25

    It is widely accepted that corticothalamic neurons recruit the thalamus in slow oscillation, but global slow-wave thalamocortical dynamics have never been experimentally shown. We analyzed intracellular activities of neurons either from different cortical areas or from a variety of specific and nonspecific thalamic nuclei in relation to the phase of global EEG signal in ketamine-xylazine anesthetized mice. We found that, on average, slow-wave active states started off within frontal cortical areas as well as higher-order and intralaminar thalamus (posterior and parafascicular nuclei) simultaneously. Then, the leading edge of active states propagated in the anteroposterior/lateral direction over the cortex at ∼40 mm/s. The latest structure we recorded within the slow-wave cycle was the anterior thalamus, which followed active states of the retrosplenial cortex. Active states from different cortical areas tended to terminate simultaneously. Sensory thalamic ventral posterior medial and lateral geniculate nuclei followed cortical active states with major inhibitory and weak tonic-like "modulator" EPSPs. In these nuclei, sharp-rising, large-amplitude EPSPs ("drivers") were not modulated by cortical slow waves, suggesting their origin in ascending pathways. The thalamic active states in other investigated nuclei were composed of depolarization: some revealing "driver"- and "modulator"-like EPSPs, others showing "modulator"-like EPSPs only. We conclude that sensory thalamic nuclei follow the propagating cortical waves, whereas neurons from higher-order thalamic nuclei display "hub dynamics" and thus may contribute to the generation of cortical slow waves.

  11. Shock Formation of Slow Magnetosonic Waves in Coronal Plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuntz, Manfred; Suess, Steven T.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We investigate the height of shock formation in coroner plumes for slow magnetosonic waves. The models take into account plume geometric spreading, heat conduction and radiative damping. The wave parameters as well as the spreading functions of the plumes and the base magnetic field strengths are given by empirical constraints mostly from Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer (SOHO/UVCS). Our models show that shock formation occurs at low coronal heights, i.e., within 1.3 solar radius, depending on the model parameters. The shock formation is calculated using the well-established wave breaking condition given by the intersection of C+ characteristics in the space-time plane. Our models show that shock heating by slow magnetosonic waves is expected to be relevant at most heights in solar coronal plumes, although slow magnetosonic waves are most likely not a solely operating energy supply mechanism.

  12. The role of non-rapid eye movement slow-wave activity in prefrontal metabolism across young and middle-aged adults.

    PubMed

    Wilckens, Kristine A; Aizenstein, Howard J; Nofzinger, Eric A; James, Jeffrey A; Hasler, Brant P; Rosario-Rivera, Bedda L; Franzen, Peter L; Germain, Anne; Hall, Martica H; Kupfer, David J; Price, Julie C; Siegle, Greg J; Buysse, Daniel J

    2016-06-01

    Electroencephalographic slow-wave activity (0.5-4 Hz) during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep is a marker for cortical reorganization, particularly within the prefrontal cortex. Greater slow wave activity during sleep may promote greater waking prefrontal metabolic rate and, in turn, executive function. However, this process may be affected by age. Here we examined whether greater NREM slow wave activity was associated with higher prefrontal metabolism during wakefulness and whether this relationship interacted with age. Fifty-two participants aged 25-61 years were enrolled into studies that included polysomnography and a (18) [F]-fluoro-deoxy-glucose positron emission tomography scan during wakefulness. Absolute and relative measures of NREM slow wave activity were assessed. Semiquantitative and relative measures of cerebral metabolism were collected to assess whole brain and regional metabolism, focusing on two regions of interest: the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and the orbitofrontal cortex. Greater relative slow wave activity was associated with greater dorsolateral prefrontal metabolism. Age and slow wave activity interacted significantly in predicting semiquantitative whole brain metabolism and outside regions of interest in the posterior cingulate, middle temporal gyrus and the medial frontal gyrus, such that greater slow-wave activity was associated with lower metabolism in the younger participants and greater metabolism in the older participants. These results suggest that slow-wave activity is associated with cerebral metabolism during wakefulness across the adult lifespan within regions important for executive function. © 2016 European Sleep Research Society.

  13. Slow Magnetosonic Waves and Fast Flows in Active Region Loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ofman, L.; Wang, T. J.; Davila, J. M.

    2012-01-01

    Recent extreme ultraviolet spectroscopic observations indicate that slow magnetosonic waves are present in active region (AR) loops. Some of the spectral data were also interpreted as evidence of fast (approx 100-300 km/s) quasiperiodic flows. We have performed three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (3D MHD) modeling of a bipolar AR that contains impulsively generated waves and flows in coronal loops. The model AR is initiated with a dipole magnetic field and gravitationally stratified density, with an upflow-driven steadily or periodically in localized regions at the footpoints of magnetic loops. The resulting flows along the magnetic field lines of the AR produce higher density loops compared to the surrounding plasma by injection of material into the flux tubes and the establishment of siphon flow.We find that the impulsive onset of flows with subsonic speeds result in the excitation of damped slow magnetosonic waves that propagate along the loops and coupled nonlinearly driven fast-mode waves. The phase speed of the slow magnetosonic waves is close to the coronal sound speed. When the amplitude of the driving pulses is increased we find that slow shock-like wave trains are produced. When the upflows are driven periodically, undamped oscillations are produced with periods determined by the periodicity of the upflows. Based on the results of the 3D MHD model we suggest that the observed slow magnetosonic waves and persistent upflows may be produced by the same impulsive events at the bases of ARs.

  14. Scattering resonance of elastic wave and low-frequency equivalent slow wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, X.; Liu, H.; Hu, T.; Yang, L.

    2015-12-01

    Transmitted wave occurs as fast p-wave and slow p-wave in certain conditions when seismic waves travel through inhomogeneous layers. Energy of slow p-waves is strongest at some frequency band, but rather weak at both high frequency band and low frequency band, called scattering resonance. For practical seismic exploration, the frequency of slow p-wave occurs is below 10Hz, which cannot be explained by Biot's theory which predicts existence of the slow p-wave at ultrasonic band in the porous media. The slow p-wave equation have been derived, but which only adapted to explaining slow p-wave in the ultrasonic band. Experimental observations exhibit that slow p-wave also exists in nonporous media but with enormous low-velocity interbeds. When vertical incidence, elastic wave is simplified as compressing wave, the generation of slow waves is independent on shear wave. In the case of flat interbed and gas bubble, Liu (2006) has studied the transmission of acoustic waves, and found that the slow waves below the 10Hz frequency band can be explained. In the case of general elastic anisotropy medium, the tiheoretical research on the generation of slow waves is insufficient. Aiming at this problem, this paper presents an exponential mapping method based on transmitted wave (Magnus 1954), which can successfully explain the generation of the slow wave transmission in that case. Using the prediction operator (Claerbout 1985) to represent the transmission wave, this can be derived as first order partial differential equation. Using expansions in the frequency domain and the wave number domain, we find that the solutions have different expressions in the case of weak scattering and strong scattering. Besides, the method of combining the prediction operator and the exponential map is needed to extend to the elastic wave equation. Using the equation (Frazer and Fryer 1984, 1987), we derive the exponential mapping solution for the prediction operator of the general elastic medium

  15. Equivalent circuit model of traveling-wave maser slow-wave structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shell, J.

    1991-01-01

    An approach is presented for deriving transmission line equivalent circuits that can approximately model the S-parameter response of traveling wave maser slow wave structures. The technique is illustrated by computing the S-parameter responses of an X-band and S-band maser slow wave structure and comparing these with experimental measurements.

  16. Characterization of ictal slow waves in epileptic spasms.

    PubMed

    Honda, Ryoko; Saito, Yoshiaki; Okumura, Akihisa; Abe, Shinpei; Saito, Takashi; Nakagawa, Eiji; Sugai, Kenji; Sasaki, Masayuki

    2015-12-01

    We characterized the clinico-neurophysiological features of epileptic spasms, particularly focusing on high-voltage slow waves during ictal EEG. We studied 22 patients with epileptic spasms recorded during digital video-scalp EEG, including five individuals who still had persistent spasms after callosotomy. We analysed the duration, amplitude, latency to onset of electromyographic bursts, and distribution of the highest positive and negative peaks of slow waves in 352 spasms. High-voltage positive slow waves preceded the identifiable muscle contractions of spasms. The mean duration of these positive waves was 569±228 m, and the mean latency to electromyographic onset was 182±127 m. These parameters varied markedly even within a patient. The highest peak of the positive component was distributed in variable regions, which was not consistent with the location of lesions on MRI. The peak of the negative component following the positivity was distributed in the neighbouring or opposite areas of the positive peak distribution. No changes were evident in the pre- or post-surgical distributions of the positive peak, or in the interhemispheric delay between both hemispheres, in individuals with callosotomy. Our data imply that ictal positive slow waves are the most common EEG changes during spasms associated with a massive motor component. Plausible explanations for these widespread positive slow waves include the notion that EEG changes possibly reflect involvement of both cortical and subcortical structures.

  17. Finned-Ladder Slow-Wave Circuit for a TWT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Jeffrey D.; Wintucky, Edwin G.; Kory, Carol L.

    2004-01-01

    A finned-ladder structure has been invented in an effort to improve the design of the slow-wave circuit of a traveling-wave tube (TWT). The point of departure for the design effort was a prototype TWT that contains a ring-plane slow-wave circuit (see Figure 1). The design effort was a response to the observation that despite the high-power capabilities of the ringplane TWT, its requirement for a high supply voltage and its low bandwidth have made it unacceptable for use outside a laboratory setting.

  18. Slow-oscillatory Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Modulates Memory in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy by Altering Sleep Spindle Generators: A Possible Rehabilitation Tool.

    PubMed

    Del Felice, Alessandra; Magalini, Alessandra; Masiero, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is often associated with memory deficits. Given the putative role for sleep spindles memory consolidation, spindle generators skewed toward the affected lobe in TLE subjects may be a neurophysiological marker of defective memory. Slow-oscillatory transcranial direct current stimulation (sotDCS) during slow waves sleep (SWS) has previously been shown to enhance sleep-dependent memory consolidation by increasing slow-wave sleep and modulating sleep spindles. To test if anodal sotDCS over the affected TL prior to a nap affects sleep spindles and whether this improves memory consolidation. Randomized controlled cross-over study. 12 people with TLE underwent sotDCS (0.75 Hz; 0-250 μV, 30 min) or sham before daytime nap. Declarative verbal and visuospatial learning were tested. Fast and slow spindle signals were recorded by 256-channel EEG during sleep. In both study arms, electrical source imaging (ESI) localized cortical generators. Neuropsychological data were analyzed with general linear model statistics or the Kruskal-Wallis test (P or Z < 0.05), and neurophysiological data tested with the Mann-Whitney t test and binomial distribution test (P or Z < 0.05). An improvement in declarative (P = 0.05) and visuospatial memory performance (P = 0.048) emerged after sotDCS. SotDCS increased slow spindle generators current density (Z = 0.001), with a shift to the anterior cortical areas. Anodal sotDCS over the affected temporal lobe improves declarative and visuospatial memory performance by modulating slow sleep spindles cortical source generators. SotDCS appears a promising tool for memory rehabilitation in people with TLE. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Synaptic responsiveness of cortical and thalamic neurones during various phases of slow sleep oscillation in cat.

    PubMed Central

    Timofeev, I; Contreras, D; Steriade, M

    1996-01-01

    1. The fluctuations during various phases of the slow sleep oscillation (< 1 Hz) in synaptic responsiveness of motor cortical (Cx), thalamic reticular (RE) and thalamocortical (TC) neurones were investigated intracellularly in cats under ketamine-xylazine anaesthesia. Orthodromic responses to stimuli applied to brachium conjunctivum (BC) axons and corticothalamic pathways were studied. The phases of slow oscillation consist of a long-hyperpolarized, followed by a sharp depth-negative EEG deflection and a series of faster waves that are associated with the depolarization of Cx and RE neurones, while TC cells display a sequence of IPSPs within the spindle frequency. 2. BC-evoked bisynaptic excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) in Cx and RE neurones were drastically reduced in amplitude during the long-lasting hyperpolarization and the early part of the depolarizing phase. By contrast, the BC-evoked monosynaptic EPSPs of TC cells were not diminished during the depth-positive EEG wave, but the hyperpolarization during this phase of the slow oscillation prevented TC neurones transferring prethalamic signals to the cortex. 3. At variance with the diminished bisynaptic EPSPs evoked in response to BC stimuli during the long-lasting hyperpolarization, Cx-evoked monosynaptic EPSPs in Cx cells increased linearly with hyperpolarization during this phase of the slow oscillation. Similarly, the amplitudes of Cx-evoked EPSPs in RE and TC cells were not diminished during the long-lasting hyperpolarization. 4. The diminished responsiveness of Cx and RE neurones to prethalamic volleys during the long-lasting hyperpolarization is attributed to gating processes at the level of TC cells that, because of their hyperpolarization, do not transfer prethalamic information to further relays. PMID:8814620

  20. Slow strain waves in the Earth: observational evidence and models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bykov, Victor

    2014-05-01

    Recent remarkable progress in theoretical studies of the solitary strain waves, that have contributed greatly to the solution of the fundamental problem of strain waves in the Earth, is overviewed. The concept of strain waves generated in the Earth is based on the results of the study of earthquake distribution and slow tectonic deformation processes and the transfer of geophysical field anomalies. Propagation of strain waves is represented quantitatively by the rates of earthquake migration and geophysical responses to active faulting. These processes, and possibly the related strain waves, are either of global (global tectonic waves) or local (strain waves in faults) scales (Bykov, 2005). Global tectonic waves propagating at velocities from 10 to 100 km/yr are detected from migration of large earthquakes (Stein et al., 1997), seismic velocity anomalies (Nevsky et al., 1987), offsets of water level in wells along faults (Barabanov et al. 1988), or from transient displacement of seismic reflectors (Bazavluk and Yudakhin, 1993). Strain waves along crustal faults at velocities of 1-10 km/day are inferred from radon, electrokinetic and hydrogeodynamic signals, such as solitary waves (Nikolaevskiy, 1998). Migration of episodic tremor and slow slip events along plate boundaries in subduction zones and transform fault zones at a rate of 10 km/day, on an average (Schwartz and Rokosky, 2007), may be new evidence and indication of strain waves in the Earth. The detected mechanisms of strain wave exciting are caused by the block and microplate rotation, relative block displacement in crustal fault zones, transform faults, zones of the lithospheric plate collision and subduction and irregularity of the Earth's rotation (Bykov, 2005). These waves in the shape of kinks or solitons moving at velocities a great number of orders less than those of the ordinary seismic waves provide the possibility to explain slow stress redistribution in the crust. During a recent decade the sine

  1. Slow Wave Excitation in the ICRF and HHFW Regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, C. K.; Valeo, E. J.; Hosea, J. C.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Wilson, J. R.; Jaeger, E. F.; Berry, L. A.; Ryan, P. M.; Bonoli, P. T.; Wright, J. C.; Smithe, D. N.

    2011-12-23

    Theoretical considerations and high spatial resolution numerical simulations of radio frequency (rf) wave heating in tokamaks and in spherical toruses (ST) indicate that fast waves launched into tokamaks in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) or into spherical toruses in the high harmonic fast wave (HHFW) regime may excite a short wavelength slow mode inside of the plasma discharge due to the presence of hot electrons that satisfy the condition {omega}wave frequency, k{sub ||} is the local parallel component of the wave vector, and v{sub te} is the local electron thermal speed. This excited slow wave may be related to the electrostatic ion cyclotron wave that propagates for frequencies above the fundamental ion cyclotron frequency in warm plasmas or to a high frequency version of a kinetic Alfven wave. This slow wave, if physically real, would provide another path for rf power absorption in tokamaks and ST devices.

  2. P- and S-wave Slowness Anomalies in the Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Y.; Thorne, M. S.

    2015-12-01

    Anomalies in the slowness of teleseisms have been observed in numerous studies, with previous efforts focusing on crust and upper mantle sources for their origin. Little attention has been devoted to the global distribution of P- and S-wave slowness anomalies in the deep Earth. In this study, we use large aperture seismic array data to examine slowness anomalies as a function of depth in the lower mantle. We collected seismic recordings from all broadband seismic stations in North America for earthquakes between January 2004 and June 2015 with moment magnitudes between 5.8 and 7.5, event depths greater than 100 km, and epicentral distances from 40° to 90°. We chose the time range to coincide with the Earthscope seismic experiment. The epicentral distance range used in this study ensured the target phases, direct P and S wave arrivals, turned in the mantle at depths ranging from 1000 to 2800 km. The original data set contained 420 events with 171,696 seismograms. We inspected each seismogram manually and discarded traces without clear P or S arrivals. Our final data set consists of 278 events with 129,748 seismograms. For each event, we grouped the data into 3° radius geographic bins and calculated relative time shifts for each bin using the Automated and Interactive Measurement of Body-wave Arrival Times (AIMBAT) technique. AIMBAT is a python tool for measuring teleseismic arrival times based on the multi-channel cross-correlation (MCCC) method. For each bin, we plotted the relative time shifts as a function of epicentral distances and calculated the corresponding least-square regression line. The slowness (dT/dΔ) can be obtained as the slope of the regression line. The slowness values of all geographic bins were collected to build a slowness profile for each event. In order to identify slowness anomalies, these slowness profiles were compared with synthetic slowness profiles calculated using the 2.5-D axi-symmetric finite-difference methods PSVaxi for P waves

  3. Slow sleep spindle activity, declarative memory, and general cognitive abilities in children.

    PubMed

    Hoedlmoser, Kerstin; Heib, Dominik P J; Roell, Judith; Peigneux, Philippe; Sadeh, Avi; Gruber, Georg; Schabus, Manuel

    2014-09-01

    Functional interactions between sleep spindle activity, declarative memory consolidation, and general cognitive abilities in school-aged children. Healthy, prepubertal children (n = 63; mean age 9.56 ± 0.76 y); ambulatory all-night polysomnography (2 nights); investigating the effect of prior learning (word pair association task; experimental night) versus nonlearning (baseline night) on sleep spindle activity; general cognitive abilities assessed using the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-IV (WISC-IV). Analysis of spindle activity during nonrapid eye movement sleep (N2 and N3) evidenced predominant peaks in the slow (11-13 Hz) but not in the fast (13-15 Hz) sleep spindle frequency range (baseline and experimental night). Analyses were restricted to slow sleep spindles. Changes in spindle activity from the baseline to the experimental night were not associated with the overnight change in the number of recalled words reflecting declarative memory consolidation. Children with higher sleep spindle activity as measured at frontal, central, parietal, and occipital sites during both baseline and experimental nights exhibited higher general cognitive abilities (WISC-IV) and declarative learning efficiency (i.e., number of recalled words before and after sleep). Slow sleep spindles (11-13 Hz) in children age 8-11 y are associated with inter-individual differences in general cognitive abilities and learning efficiency. © 2014 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  4. Shock Formation of Slow Magnetosonic Waves in Coronal Plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuntz, Manfred; Suess, Steve; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We investigate the height of shock formation in coronal plumes for slow magnetosonic waves. The models take into account plume geometric spreading, heat conduction, and radiative damping. The wave parameters as well as the spreading functions of the plumes and the base magnetic field strengths are given by empirical constraints mostly from Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO)/ Ultraviolet Coronograph Spectrometer (UVCS), Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT), Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI), and Large Angle Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO). Our models show that shock formation occurs at relatively low coronal heights, typically within 1.2 RsuN, depending on the model parameters. The shock formation is calculated using the well-established wave breaking criterion given by the intersection of C+ characteristics in the space-time plane. Our models show that shock heating by slow magnetosonic waves is expected to be relevant at most heights in solar coronal plumes, although such waves are probably not the main energy supply mechanism.

  5. Shock Formation of Slow Magnetosonic Waves in Coronal Plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuntz, Manfred; Suess, Steve; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We investigate the height of shock formation in coronal plumes for slow magnetosonic waves. The models take into account plume geometric spreading, heat conduction, and radiative damping. The wave parameters as well as the spreading functions of the plumes and the base magnetic field strengths are given by empirical constraints mostly from Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO)/ Ultraviolet Coronograph Spectrometer (UVCS), Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT), Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI), and Large Angle Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO). Our models show that shock formation occurs at relatively low coronal heights, typically within 1.2 RsuN, depending on the model parameters. The shock formation is calculated using the well-established wave breaking criterion given by the intersection of C+ characteristics in the space-time plane. Our models show that shock heating by slow magnetosonic waves is expected to be relevant at most heights in solar coronal plumes, although such waves are probably not the main energy supply mechanism.

  6. ON THE SOURCE OF PROPAGATING SLOW MAGNETOACOUSTIC WAVES IN SUNSPOTS

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, S. Krishna; Jess, D. B.; Khomenko, Elena

    2015-10-10

    Recent high-resolution observations of sunspot oscillations using simultaneously operated ground- and space-based telescopes reveal the intrinsic connection between different layers of the solar atmosphere. However, it is not clear whether these oscillations are externally driven or generated in situ. We address this question by using observations of propagating slow magnetoacoustic waves along a coronal fan loop system. In addition to the generally observed decreases in oscillation amplitudes with distance, the observed wave amplitudes are also found to be modulated with time, with similar variations observed throughout the propagation path of the wave train. Employing multi-wavelength and multi-instrument data, we study the amplitude variations with time as the waves propagate through different layers of the solar atmosphere. By comparing the amplitude modulation period in different layers, we find that slow magnetoacoustic waves observed in sunspots are externally driven by photospheric p-modes, which propagate upward into the corona before becoming dissipated.

  7. Psychomotor slowness is associated with self-reported sleep duration among the general population.

    PubMed

    Kronholm, Erkki; Sallinen, Mikael; Era, Pertti; Suutama, Timo; Sulkava, Raimo; Partonen, Timo

    2011-06-01

    Short and long self-reported sleep durations have been found to be associated with several seemingly disparate health risks and impaired functional abilities, including cognitive functioning. The role of long sleep is especially poorly understood in this context. Psychomotor slowness, shown to have analogous associations with cognitive performance and health risks as self-reported long sleep duration, has not been studied together with sleep duration in epidemiological settings. We hypothesized that self-reported habitual sleep duration, especially long sleep, is associated with slow psychomotor reaction time, and that this association is independent of vigilance-related factors. The hypothesis was tested in a sample of 5352 individuals, representing the general adult population. We found a U-shaped association between self-reported sleep duration and psychomotor speed, which prevailed even after controlling for several pertinent confounders. This novel finding can be interpreted to mean that self-reported sleep duration, at least in the case of long sleep, is an indicator of bodily/brain integrity and, taken together with the results of cognitive epidemiology, may provide some new insights into the mechanisms underlying the associations between habitual self-reported sleep duration, health risks and impaired functional abilities.

  8. Cerebral correlates of delta waves during non-REM sleep revisited.

    PubMed

    Dang-Vu, Thien Thanh; Desseilles, Martin; Laureys, Steven; Degueldre, Christian; Perrin, Fabien; Phillips, Christophe; Maquet, Pierre; Peigneux, Philippe

    2005-10-15

    We aimed at characterizing the neural correlates of delta activity during Non Rapid Eye Movement (NREM) sleep in non-sleep-deprived normal young adults, based on the statistical analysis of a positron emission tomography (PET) sleep data set. One hundred fifteen PET scans were obtained using H(2)(15)O under continuous polygraphic monitoring during stages 2-4 of NREM sleep. Correlations between regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and delta power (1.5-4 Hz) spectral density were analyzed using statistical parametric mapping (SPM2). Delta power values obtained at central scalp locations negatively correlated during NREM sleep with rCBF in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex, the basal forebrain, the striatum, the anterior insula, and the precuneus. These regions embrace the set of brain areas in which rCBF decreases during slow wave sleep (SWS) as compared to Rapid Eye Movement (REM) sleep and wakefulness (Maquet, P., Degueldre, C., Delfiore, G., Aerts, J., Peters, J.M., Luxen, A., Franck, G., 1997. Functional neuroanatomy of human slow wave sleep. J. Neurosci. 17, 2807-S2812), supporting the notion that delta activity is a valuable prominent feature of NREM sleep. A strong association was observed between rCBF in the ventromedial prefrontal regions and delta power, in agreement with electrophysiological studies. In contrast to the results of a previous PET study investigating the brain correlates of delta activity (Hofle, N., Paus, T., Reutens, D., Fiset, P., Gotman, J., Evans, A.C., Jones, B.E., 1997. Regional cerebral blood flow changes as a function of delta and spindle activity during slow wave sleep in humans. J. Neurosci. 17, 4800-4808), in which waking scans were mixed with NREM sleep scans, no correlation was found with thalamus activity. This latter result stresses the importance of an extra-thalamic delta rhythm among the synchronous NREM sleep oscillations. Consequently, this rCBF distribution might preferentially reflect a particular modulation of the

  9. Global Intracellular Slow-Wave Dynamics of the Thalamocortical System

    PubMed Central

    Sheroziya, Maxim

    2014-01-01

    It is widely accepted that corticothalamic neurons recruit the thalamus in slow oscillation, but global slow-wave thalamocortical dynamics have never been experimentally shown. We analyzed intracellular activities of neurons either from different cortical areas or from a variety of specific and nonspecific thalamic nuclei in relation to the phase of global EEG signal in ketamine-xylazine anesthetized mice. We found that, on average, slow-wave active states started off within frontal cortical areas as well as higher-order and intralaminar thalamus (posterior and parafascicular nuclei) simultaneously. Then, the leading edge of active states propagated in the anteroposterior/lateral direction over the cortex at ∼40 mm/s. The latest structure we recorded within the slow-wave cycle was the anterior thalamus, which followed active states of the retrosplenial cortex. Active states from different cortical areas tended to terminate simultaneously. Sensory thalamic ventral posterior medial and lateral geniculate nuclei followed cortical active states with major inhibitory and weak tonic-like “modulator” EPSPs. In these nuclei, sharp-rising, large-amplitude EPSPs (“drivers”) were not modulated by cortical slow waves, suggesting their origin in ascending pathways. The thalamic active states in other investigated nuclei were composed of depolarization: some revealing “driver”- and “modulator”-like EPSPs, others showing “modulator”-like EPSPs only. We conclude that sensory thalamic nuclei follow the propagating cortical waves, whereas neurons from higher-order thalamic nuclei display “hub dynamics” and thus may contribute to the generation of cortical slow waves. PMID:24966387

  10. Epileptic encephalopathy with continuous spike and wave during sleep associated to periventricular leukomalacia.

    PubMed

    De Grandis, Elisa; Mancardi, Maria Margherita; Carelli, Valentina; Carpaneto, Manuela; Morana, Giovanni; Prato, Giulia; Mirabelli-Badenier, Marisol; Pinto, Francesca; Veneselli, Edvige; Baglietto, Maria Giuseppina

    2014-11-01

    Periventricular leukomalacia is the most common type of brain injury in premature infants. Our aim is to describe the frequency and the features of epilepsy in a single-center population of 137 children with periventricular leukomalacia. Forty-two of the 137 (31%) patients presented epilepsy. Twelve percent of these patients presented West syndrome, whereas 19% showed a pattern of continuous spike-waves during slow sleep syndrome. In the latter group, outcome was frequently unfavorable, with a greater number of seizures and more drug resistance. A significant association was found between epilepsy and neonatal seizures, spastic tetraplegia, and mental retardation. Although less common than in other forms of brain injury, epilepsy is nevertheless a significant complication in children with periventricular leukomalacia. The fairly frequent association with continuous spike-waves during slow sleep syndrome deserves particular attention: electroencephalographic sleep monitoring is important in order to provide early treatment and prevent further neurologic deterioration.

  11. Synaptic refinement during development and its effect on slow-wave activity: a computational study

    PubMed Central

    Hoel, Erik P.; Albantakis, Larissa; Cirelli, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that synaptic refinement, the reorganization of synapses and connections without significant change in their number or strength, is important for the development of the visual system of juvenile rodents. Other evidence in rodents and humans shows that there is a marked drop in sleep slow-wave activity (SWA) during adolescence. Slow waves reflect synchronous transitions of neuronal populations between active and inactive states, and the amount of SWA is influenced by the connection strength and organization of cortical neurons. In this study, we investigated whether synaptic refinement could account for the observed developmental drop in SWA. To this end, we employed a large-scale neural model of primary visual cortex and sections of the thalamus, capable of producing realistic slow waves. In this model, we reorganized intralaminar connections according to experimental data on synaptic refinement: during prerefinement, local connections between neurons were homogenous, whereas in postrefinement, neurons connected preferentially to neurons with similar receptive fields and preferred orientations. Synaptic refinement led to a drop in SWA and to changes in slow-wave morphology, consistent with experimental data. To test whether learning can induce synaptic refinement, intralaminar connections were equipped with spike timing-dependent plasticity. Oriented stimuli were presented during a learning period, followed by homeostatic synaptic renormalization. This led to activity-dependent refinement accompanied again by a decline in SWA. Together, these modeling results show that synaptic refinement can account for developmental changes in SWA. Thus sleep SWA may be used to track noninvasively the reorganization of cortical connections during development. PMID:26843602

  12. Synaptic refinement during development and its effect on slow-wave activity: a computational study.

    PubMed

    Hoel, Erik P; Albantakis, Larissa; Cirelli, Chiara; Tononi, Giulio

    2016-04-01

    Recent evidence suggests that synaptic refinement, the reorganization of synapses and connections without significant change in their number or strength, is important for the development of the visual system of juvenile rodents. Other evidence in rodents and humans shows that there is a marked drop in sleep slow-wave activity (SWA) during adolescence. Slow waves reflect synchronous transitions of neuronal populations between active and inactive states, and the amount of SWA is influenced by the connection strength and organization of cortical neurons. In this study, we investigated whether synaptic refinement could account for the observed developmental drop in SWA. To this end, we employed a large-scale neural model of primary visual cortex and sections of the thalamus, capable of producing realistic slow waves. In this model, we reorganized intralaminar connections according to experimental data on synaptic refinement: during prerefinement, local connections between neurons were homogenous, whereas in postrefinement, neurons connected preferentially to neurons with similar receptive fields and preferred orientations. Synaptic refinement led to a drop in SWA and to changes in slow-wave morphology, consistent with experimental data. To test whether learning can induce synaptic refinement, intralaminar connections were equipped with spike timing-dependent plasticity. Oriented stimuli were presented during a learning period, followed by homeostatic synaptic renormalization. This led to activity-dependent refinement accompanied again by a decline in SWA. Together, these modeling results show that synaptic refinement can account for developmental changes in SWA. Thus sleep SWA may be used to track noninvasively the reorganization of cortical connections during development. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  13. Origin of Active States in Local Neocortical Networks during Slow Sleep Oscillation

    PubMed Central

    Chauvette, Sylvain; Volgushev, Maxim

    2010-01-01

    Slow-wave sleep is characterized by spontaneous alternations of activity and silence in corticothalamic networks, but the causes of transition from silence to activity remain unknown. We investigated local mechanisms underlying initiation of activity, using simultaneous multisite field potential, multiunit recordings, and intracellular recordings from 2 to 4 nearby neurons in naturally sleeping or anesthetized cats. We demonstrate that activity may start in any neuron or recording location, with tens of milliseconds delay in other cells and sites. Typically, however, activity originated at deep locations, then involved some superficial cells, but appeared later in the middle of the cortex. Neuronal firing was also found to begin, after the onset of active states, at depths that correspond to cortical layer V. These results support the hypothesis that switch from silence to activity is mediated by spontaneous synaptic events, whereby any neuron may become active first. Due to probabilistic nature of activity onset, the large pyramidal cells from deep cortical layers, which are equipped with the most numerous synaptic inputs and large projection fields, are best suited for switching the whole network into active state. PMID:20200108

  14. Ponderomotive force effects on slow-wave coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, J. R.; Wong, K. L.

    1982-04-01

    Localized plasma density depressions are observed to form near a multi-ring slow-wave structure when the value of the nonlinearity parameter, s = ω2pe‖Ez‖2/8πω2nκT, is of order unity. Consequent changes in the wave propagation and coupling efficiency are reported. For large enough values of s, the coupling efficiency may be reduced by 50% from the linear value.

  15. Slow Sleep Spindle Activity, Declarative Memory, and General Cognitive Abilities in Children

    PubMed Central

    Hoedlmoser, Kerstin; Heib, Dominik P.J.; Roell, Judith; Peigneux, Philippe; Sadeh, Avi; Gruber, Georg; Schabus, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: Functional interactions between sleep spindle activity, declarative memory consolidation, and general cognitive abilities in school-aged children. Design: Healthy, prepubertal children (n = 63; mean age 9.56 ± 0.76 y); ambulatory all-night polysomnography (2 nights); investigating the effect of prior learning (word pair association task; experimental night) versus nonlearning (baseline night) on sleep spindle activity; general cognitive abilities assessed using the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-IV (WISC-IV). Measurements and Results: Analysis of spindle activity during nonrapid eye movement sleep (N2 and N3) evidenced predominant peaks in the slow (11-13 Hz) but not in the fast (13-15 Hz) sleep spindle frequency range (baseline and experimental night). Analyses were restricted to slow sleep spindles. Changes in spindle activity from the baseline to the experimental night were not associated with the overnight change in the number of recalled words reflecting declarative memory consolidation. Children with higher sleep spindle activity as measured at frontal, central, parietal, and occipital sites during both baseline and experimental nights exhibited higher general cognitive abilities (WISC-IV) and declarative learning efficiency (i.e., number of recalled words before and after sleep). Conclusions: Slow sleep spindles (11-13 Hz) in children age 8–11 y are associated with inter-individual differences in general cognitive abilities and learning efficiency. Citation: Hoedlmoser K, Heib DPJ, Roell J, Peigneux P, Sadeh A, Gruber G, Schabus M. Slow sleep spindle activity, declarative memory, and general cognitive abilities in children. SLEEP 2014;37(9):1501-1512. PMID:25142558

  16. Zeta waves: a special type of slow delta waves.

    PubMed

    Magnus, O; Van der Holst, M

    1987-08-01

    A special type of delta waves with a duration of 1-3 sec which, because of their saw-tooth or zed shape in the EEG, we have named 'zeta waves' has been described. They occur particularly in cases with rather severe brain lesions, usually with an acute or subacute onset and a space occupying character. In a period of 2 years during which 2500 EEGs have been reported we have seen zeta waves in 20 patients in whom 76 EEGs have been recorded. The characteristics of these waves and the types of lesions with which they occurred are described. The importance of an adequate recording technique for proper presentation of this EEG pattern is emphasized.

  17. Vascular stiffness determined from a nocturnal digital pulse wave signal: association with sleep, sleep-disordered breathing, and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Svedmyr, Sven; Zou, Ding; Sommermeyer, Dirk; Ficker, Joachim H; Randerath, Winfried; Fietze, Ingo; Sanner, Bernd; Hedner, Jan; Grote, Ludger

    2016-12-01

    Reflection of the finger pulse wave form is a valid measure of arterial stiffness, which may be continuously assessed during sleep. We investigated the relationships between sleep, sleep-disordered breathing, hypertension, and pulse propagation time (PPT) in patients with suspected sleep apnea. The digital photoplethysmographic signal derived from finger pulse oximetry was recorded during overnight sleep studies in 440 patients (64% men, age 55 ± 12 years, BMI 30 ± 6 kg/m, apnea-hypopnea index 19 ± 19 n/h). PPT, defined as the time interval between the systolic and diastolic peak of the finger pulse wave, was calculated. The influence of sleep stages on PPT were assessed in patients undergoing polysomnography. Generalized linear models were used to study predictors of PPT and hypertension. Mean overnight PPT was independently associated with age (β = -1.34, P < 0.001), height (β = 0.47, P = 0.047), history of smoking (β = -9.44, P = 0.005), and apnea-hypopnea index (β = -0.18, P = 0.043). PPT was shorter in hypertensive patients compared with normotensive patients (160 ± 33 vs. 177 ± 47 ms, P < 0.001) and independently associated with a diagnosis of hypertension (P = 0.043). PPT was influenced by sleep stage (highest PPT during slow wave sleep compared with wake and all other sleep stages, all P < 0.001) and varied across sleep apnea severity groups in normotensive but not in hypertensive patients (P = 0.028 and 0.64, respectively). Overnight PPT by oximetry was strongly associated with factors known to determine daytime vascular stiffness. In addition, PTT provides information on functional and structural vascular properties during sleep. This novel technique offers new opportunities to noninvasively monitor vascular function during the sleeping period.

  18. Tactile stimulation during sleep alters slow oscillation and spindle densities but not motor skill.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Sofia Isabel Ribeiro; Beijamini, Felipe; Weber, Frederik D; Vincenzi, Roberta Almeida; da Silva, Felipe Augusto Cini; Louzada, Fernando Mazzilli

    2017-02-01

    Studies using targeted memory reactivation have shown that presentation of auditory or olfactory contextual cues during sleep can bias hippocampal reactivations towards the preferential replay of the cue-associated material, thereby resulting in enhanced consolidation of that information. If the same cortical ensembles are indeed used for encoding and storage of a given piece of information, forcing the sleeping brain to re-engage in task-intrinsic information processing should disturb the natural ongoing consolidation processes and therefore impair possible sleep benefits. Here we aimed at recreating an integral part of the sensory experience of a motor skill in a daytime nap, by means of a tactile stimulation. We hypothesized that tampering with the tactile component of a motor skill during sleep would result in hindered performance at retest, due to interference between the highly congruent incoming stimuli and the core skill trace. Contrary to our predictions, the tactile stimulation did not influence neither speed nor accuracy, when compared to natural sleep. However, an exploratory sleep EEG analysis revealed stimulation-induced alterations in the abundance and cortical topography of slow oscillations and spindles. These findings suggest that despite the lack of a significant effect on motor behavior, tactile stimulation induced changes in EEG features suggestive of a possible uncoupling between the sleep oscillations thought to underlie consolidation processes, i.e. slow oscillations and sleep spindles.

  19. Pilot Study of Propofol-induced Slow Waves as a Pharmacologic Test for Brain Dysfunction after Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Kortelainen, Jukka; Väyrynen, Eero; Huuskonen, Usko; Laurila, Jouko; Koskenkari, Juha; Backman, Janne T; Alahuhta, Seppo; Seppänen, Tapio; Ala-Kokko, Tero

    2017-01-01

    Slow waves (less than 1 Hz) are the most important electroencephalogram signatures of nonrapid eye movement sleep. While considered to have a substantial importance in, for example, providing conditions for single-cell rest and preventing long-term neural damage, a disturbance in this neurophysiologic phenomenon is a potential indicator of brain dysfunction. Since, in healthy individuals, slow waves can be induced with anesthetics, the authors tested the possible association between hypoxic brain injury and slow-wave activity in comatose postcardiac arrest patients (n = 10) using controlled propofol exposure. The slow-wave activity was determined by calculating the low-frequency (less than 1 Hz) power of the electroencephalograms recorded approximately 48 h after cardiac arrest. To define the association between the slow waves and the potential brain injury, the patients' neurologic recovery was then followed up for 6 months. In the patients with good neurologic outcome (n = 6), the low-frequency power of electroencephalogram representing the slow-wave activity was found to substantially increase (mean ± SD, 190 ± 83%) due to the administration of propofol. By contrast, the patients with poor neurologic outcome (n = 4) were unable to generate propofol-induced slow waves. In this experimental pilot study, the comatose postcardiac arrest patients with poor neurologic outcome were unable to generate normal propofol-induced electroencephalographic slow-wave activity 48 h after cardiac arrest. The finding might offer potential for developing a pharmacologic test for prognostication of brain injury by measuring the electroencephalographic response to propofol.

  20. Fear extinction memory consolidation requires potentiation of pontine-wave activity during REM sleep.

    PubMed

    Datta, Subimal; O'Malley, Matthew W

    2013-03-06

    Sleep plays an important role in memory consolidation within multiple memory systems including contextual fear extinction memory, but little is known about the mechanisms that underlie this process. Here, we show that fear extinction training in rats, which extinguished conditioned fear, increased both slow-wave sleep and rapid-eye movement (REM) sleep. Surprisingly, 24 h later, during memory testing, only 57% of the fear-extinguished animals retained fear extinction memory. We found that these animals exhibited an increase in phasic pontine-wave (P-wave) activity during post-training REM sleep, which was absent in the 43% of animals that failed to retain fear extinction memory. The results of this study provide evidence that brainstem activation, specifically potentiation of phasic P-wave activity, during post-training REM sleep is critical for consolidation of fear extinction memory. The results of this study also suggest that, contrary to the popular hypothesis of sleep and memory, increased sleep after training alone does not guarantee consolidation and/or retention of fear extinction memory. Rather, the potentiation of specific sleep-dependent physiological events may be a more accurate predictor for successful consolidation of fear extinction memory. Identification of this unique mechanism will significantly improve our present understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms that underlie the sleep-dependent regulation of emotional memory. Additionally, this discovery may also initiate development of a new, more targeted treatment method for clinical disorders of fear and anxiety in humans that is more efficacious than existing methods such as exposure therapy that incorporate only fear extinction.

  1. Fear Extinction Memory Consolidation Requires Potentiation of Pontine-Wave Activity during REM Sleep

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Subimal; O'Malley, Matthew W .

    2013-01-01

    Sleep plays an important role in memory consolidation within multiple memory systems including contextual fear extinction memory, but little is known about the mechanisms that underlie this process. Here, we show that fear extinction training in rats, which extinguished conditioned fear, increased both slow-wave sleep and rapid-eye movement (REM) sleep. Surprisingly, 24 h later, during memory testing, only 57% of the fear-extinguished animals retained fear extinction memory. We found that these animals exhibited an increase in phasic pontine-wave (P-wave) activity during post-training REM sleep, which was absent in the 43% of animals that failed to retain fear extinction memory. The results of this study provide evidence that brainstem activation, specifically potentiation of phasic P-wave activity, during post-training REM sleep is critical for consolidation of fear extinction memory. The results of this study also suggest that, contrary to the popular hypothesis of sleep and memory, increased sleep after training alone does not guarantee consolidation and/or retention of fear extinction memory. Rather, the potentiation of specific sleep-dependent physiological events may be a more accurate predictor for successful consolidation of fear extinction memory. Identification of this unique mechanism will significantly improve our present understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms that underlie the sleep-dependent regulation of emotional memory. Additionally, this discovery may also initiate development of a new, more targeted treatment method for clinical disorders of fear and anxiety in humans that is more efficacious than existing methods such as exposure therapy that incorporate only fear extinction. PMID:23467372

  2. [Sleep: regulation and phenomenology].

    PubMed

    Vecchierini, M-F

    2013-12-01

    This article describes the two-process model of sleep regulation. The 24-hour sleep-wake cycle is regulated by a homeostatic process and an endogenous, 2 oscillators, circadian process, under the influence of external synchronisers. These two processes are partially independent but influence each other, as shown in the two-sleep-process auto-regulation model. A reciprocal inhibition model of two interconnected neuronal groups, "SP on" and "SP off", explains the regular recurrence of paradoxical sleep. Sleep studies have primarily depended on observation of the subject and have determined the optimal conditions for sleep (position, external conditions, sleep duration and need) and have studied the consequences of sleep deprivation or modifications of sleep schedules. Then, electrophysiological recordings permitted the classification of sleep stages according to the observed EEG patterns. The course of a night's sleep is reported on a "hypnogram". The adult subject falls asleep in non-REM sleep (N1), then sleep deepens progressively to stages N2 and N3 with the appearance of spindles and slow waves (N2). Slow waves become more numerous in stage N3. Every 90minutes REM sleep recurs, with muscle atonia and rapid eye movements. These adult sleep patterns develop progressively during the 2 first years of life as total sleep duration decreases, with the reduction of diurnal sleep and of REM sleep. Around 2 to 4 months, spindles and K complexes appear on the EEG, with the differentiation of light and deep sleep with, however, a predominance of slow wave sleep.

  3. Late feeding in the active period decreases slow-wave activity.

    PubMed

    Oura, Kanna; Otsuka, Airi; Shiuchi, Tetsuya; Chikahisa, Sachiko; Shimizu, Noriyuki; Séi, Hiroyoshi

    2016-09-01

    Sleep and feeding behaviors closely interact to maintain energy homeostasis. While it is known that sleep disorders can lead to various metabolic issues such as insulin resistance, the mechanism for this effect is poorly understood. We thus investigated whether different feeding rhythms during the active period affect sleep-wake regulation. For 2weeks, mice were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 feeding schedules as follows: free access to lab chow during the active period (ZT12-24, Ad-lib group), free access to lab chow during the first half of the active period (ZT12-18; Morning group), or free access to lab chow during the second half of the active period (ZT18-24, Evening group). Food intake, body weight, body temperature, locomotor activity, and sleep were evaluated. The hypothalamus and cerebral cortex were examined post-mortem. No alterations in food intake or body weight were observed among the 3 groups. The Evening group showed lower slow-wave activity (SWA) than the other 2 groups, in addition to higher expression of orexin mRNA in the hypothalamus and higher concentrations of dopamine and its metabolites in the cerebral cortex. AMPK phosphorylation was increased in the hypothalamus of mice in the Evening group; however, AMPK inhibition had no effect on SWA. We concluded that late feeding reduces SWA in NREM sleep via a mechanism that involves orexin-mediated arousal in the hypothalamus and elevated monoamines in the cerebral cortex. These data have important implications for the relationship between sleep-wake disturbances and metabolic disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Laminar wave train structure of collisionless magnetic slow shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coroniti, F. V.

    1970-01-01

    The laminar wave train structure of collisionless magnetic slow shocks is investigated using two fluid hydromagnetics with ion cyclotron radius dispersion. For shock strengths less than the maximally strong switch-off shock, in the shock leading edge dispersive steepening forms a magnetic field gradient, while in the downstream flow dispersive propagation forms a trailing wave train; dispersion scale lengths are the ion inertial length if beta is smaller than 1 and the ion cyclotron radius if beta is greater than 1. In the switch-off slow shock leading edge, dispersion only produced rotations of the magnetic field direction; the gradient of the magnetic field magnitude, and hence the shock steepening length, is determined solely by resistive diffusion. The switch-off shock structure consists of a long trailing of magnetic rotations which are gradually damped by resistivity.

  5. Is state-dependent alternation of slow dynamics in central single neurons during sleep present in the rat ventroposterior thalamic nucleus?

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kazumi; Koyama, Yoshimasa; Kayama, Yukihiko; Nakamura, Kazuhiro; Yamamoto, Mitsuaki

    2004-02-01

    Based upon our previous results in cats, we hypothesized that neurons in the central processor systems of the brain generally exhibit state-dependent dynamics alternation of slow fluctuations in spontaneous activity during sleep. To test the validity of this hypothesis across species, we recorded single neuronal activity during sleep from the ventroposterior (VP) thalamic nucleus in unanesthetized, head-restrained rats. Spectral analysis was performed on successive spike-counts of neuronal activity recorded during three stages of the sleep-wakefulness cycle: wakefulness (W, n=6), slow-wave sleep (SWS, n=20), and paradoxical sleep (PS, n=32). We found that firing of VP neurons displayed white-noise-like dynamics over the range of 0.04-1.0 Hz during SWS and 1/f-noise-like dynamics over the same range during PS. We also demonstrated for the first time that the slow dynamics of neuronal activity during quiet wakefulness (but not drowsiness) are white-noise-like. These results suggest that our hypothesis is true across species. During W and SWS, the brain may be considered as under global inhibition. Conversely, PS may represent a state of global disinhibition in the brain, where neuronal activity exhibits 1/f-noise-like dynamics. Fluctuations observed in living organisms may be involved in essential processes in generation and function of sleep states.

  6. Interictal high-frequency oscillations generated by seizure onset and eloquent areas may be differentially coupled with different slow waves.

    PubMed

    Nonoda, Yutaka; Miyakoshi, Makoto; Ojeda, Alejandro; Makeig, Scott; Juhász, Csaba; Sood, Sandeep; Asano, Eishi

    2016-06-01

    High-frequency oscillations (HFOs) can be spontaneously generated by seizure-onset and functionally-important areas. We determined if consideration of the spectral frequency bands of coupled slow-waves could distinguish between epileptogenic and physiological HFOs. We studied a consecutive series of 13 children with focal epilepsy who underwent extraoperative electrocorticography. We measured the occurrence rate of HFOs during slow-wave sleep at each electrode site. We subsequently determined the performance of HFO rate for localization of seizure-onset sites and undesirable detection of nonepileptic sensorimotor-visual sites defined by neurostimulation. We likewise determined the predictive performance of modulation index: MI(XHz)&(YHz), reflecting the strength of coupling between amplitude of HFOsXHz and phase of slow-waveYHz. The predictive accuracy was quantified using the area under the curve (AUC) on receiver-operating characteristics analysis. Increase in HFO rate localized seizure-onset sites (AUC⩾0.72; p<0.001), but also undesirably detected nonepileptic sensorimotor-visual sites (AUC⩾0.58; p<0.001). Increase in MI(HFOs)&(3-4Hz) also detected both seizure-onset (AUC⩾0.74; p<0.001) and nonepileptic sensorimotor-visual sites (AUC⩾0.59; p<0.001). Increase in subtraction-MIHFOs [defined as subtraction of MI(HFOs)&(0.5-1Hz) from MI(HFOs)&(3-4Hz)] localized seizure-onset sites (AUC⩾0.71; p<0.001), but rather avoided detection of nonepileptic sensorimotor-visual sites (AUC⩽0.42; p<0.001). Our data suggest that epileptogenic HFOs may be coupled with slow-wave3-4Hz more preferentially than slow-wave0.5-1Hz, whereas physiologic HFOs with slow-wave0.5-1Hz more preferentially than slow-wave3-4Hz during slow-wave sleep. Further studies in larger samples are warranted to determine if consideration of the spectral frequency bands of slow-waves coupled with HFOs can positively contribute to presurgical evaluation of patients with focal epilepsy. Copyright

  7. Slow-wave structures application for oil monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yelizarov, Andrey A.

    2000-12-01

    This paper presents new measuring technology based on the application of Slow-Wave Structures (SWS). The use of SWS for RF-measurement transducers makes it possible quite efficiently to monitor and measure parameters of various industrial processes and materials. Difficulties arise when monitoring and measuring parameters of oil-liquids such as the conductivity or the continuity of flow. This is caused by the strong screening action of the monitored oil-liquid on electromagnetic field of the slowed wave in the helical sensitive elements (HSE). As the conductivity increases, the screening becomes even stronger, and this leads to a reduction in the sensitivity and measurement accuracy. The solution of such problems requires the creation and modeling of more complex designs of sensitive elements in which the screening action is weakened. Such an effect can be achieved by matching the field of a hybrid slowed wave to the medium being monitored, utilizing HSE based on layered magnetic and dielectric structures with a smooth variation of the electrodynamic parameters.

  8. Methylphenidate and continuous spike and wave during sleep in a child with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

    PubMed

    Sheen, Volney L; Shankar, Maithreyi; Marin-Valencia, Isaac; Bridgemohan, Carolyn H; Torres, Alcy R

    2013-07-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder is the most common neurobehavioral disorder in children and frequently associated with epilepsy. For patients with both conditions, methylphenidate remains a mainstay in the treatment of behavioral problems. Most studies demonstrate that methylphenidate is effective in treating children with well-controlled epilepsy, and that methylphenidate does not increase the risk of having seizures in patients with EEG abnormalities without epilepsy. However, in patients with active seizures, the results are somewhat contradictory. This article presents the case of a young girl with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and behavioral problems on Depakote (valproic acid) who had an abnormal EEG with left centroparietal spikes but no history of electrographic seizures. She experienced a convulsion the day after her first dose of methylphenidate, and repeat EEG demonstrated continuous spike and slow wave during sleep. This case report suggests that children with continuous spike and slow wave during sleep may have a higher risk of developing seizures with methylphenidate treatment.

  9. Sleep effects on slow-brain-potential reflections of associative learning.

    PubMed

    Verleger, Rolf; Ludwig, Janna; Kolev, Vasil; Yordanova, Juliana; Wagner, Ullrich

    2011-03-01

    Previous research has indicated that information acquired before sleep gets consolidated during sleep. This process of consolidation might be reflected after sleep in changed extent and topography of cortical activation during retrieval of information. Here, we designed an experiment to measure those changes by means of slow event-related EEG potentials (SPs). Retrieval of newly learnt verbal or spatial associations was tested both immediately after learning and two days later. In the night directly following immediate recall, participants either slept or stayed awake. In line with previous studies, SPs measured during retrieval from memory had parietal or left-frontal foci depending on whether the retrieved associations were spatial or verbal. However, contrary to our expectations, sleep-related consolidation did not further accentuate these content-specific topographic profiles. Rather, sleep modified SPs independently of the spatial or verbal type of learned association: SPs were reduced more after sleep than after waking specifically for those stimulus configurations that had been presented in the same combination at retrieval before sleep. The association-independent stimulus-specific effect might generally form a major component of sleep-related effects on memory. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Analysis of the power capacity of overmoded slow wave structures

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Dian; Zhang, Jun; Zhong, Huihuang; Jin, Zhenxing

    2013-07-15

    As the generated wavelength shortens, overmoded slow wave structures (SWSs) with large diameters are employed in O-type Cerenkov high power microwave (HPM) generators to achieve high power capacity. However, reported experimental results suggest that overmoded slow wave HPM generators working at millimeter wavelength output much lower power than those working at X-band do, despite the fact that the value of D/λ (here, D is the average diameter of SWSs and λ is the generated wavelength) of the former is much larger than that of the latter. In order to understand this, the characteristics of the power capacity of the TM{sub 0n} modes in overmoded SWSs are numerically investigated. Our analysis reveals the following facts. First, the power capacity of higher order TM{sub 0n} modes is apparently larger than that of TM{sub 01} mode. This is quite different from the conclusion got in the foregone report, in which the power capacity of overmoded SWSs is estimated by that of smooth cylindrical waveguides. Second, the rate at which the power capacity of TM{sub 01} mode in overmoded SWSs grows with diameter does not slow down as the TM{sub 01} field transforms from “volume wave” to “surface wave.” Third, once the diameter of overmoded SWSs and the beam voltage are fixed, the power capacity of TM{sub 01} wave drops as periodic length L shortens and the generated frequency rises, although the value of D/λ increases significantly. Therefore, it is necessary to investigate the capability of annular electron beam to interact efficiently with higher order TM{sub 0n} modes in overmoded SWSs if we want to improve the power capacity of overmoded O-type Cerenkov HPM generators working at high frequency.

  11. Slow strain waves from seismological and geophysical observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bykov, Victor; Trofimenko, Sergey

    2017-04-01

    Slow strain waves are typically excited due to natural processes that occur within the crust and the lithosphere and are displayed in variations of seismicity and geophysical fields. The concept of strain waves generated in the Earth is based on the results of the study of earthquake distribution and slow tectonic deformation processes and the transfer of geophysical field anomalies. The fast seismicity migration at velocities of 1-10 km/day is observed in various regions of the world (Barabanov et al., 1994; Hill et al., 1995). Strain waves along crustal faults at velocities of 1-10 km/day are inferred from radon, electrokinetic and hydrogeodynamic signals (Nikolaevskiy, 1998). Migration of episodic tremor and slow slip events along plate boundaries in subduction and transform fault zones occurs at a velocity of 10 km/day, on an average (Beroza and Ide, 2011). We obtained complementary field data in support of migration of crustal deformations or strain waves migrating at a similar velocity. The subsequent recordings of displacements associated with magnetic and gravity anomalies were monitored near active tectonic structures on the meridional geodynamic polygon across the northern boundary of the Amurian plate. Monitoring was conducted by a permanent geophysical network of 11 observation sites. The sites for magnetometric and gravimetric observations were spaced at no more than 100 meters. In different observation series, we noticed a coincidence in the time of occurrence and the direction of displacement of the gravity and magnetic anomalies as well as their subsequent site-to-site moving at velocities from 200 to 1200 km/yr (0.7-4.0 km/day). A remarkably good coincidence in magnetic and gravity anomaly displacement velocities may imply a single source of disturbance of the stress state of the crust, migrating at a similar velocity and initiating tectonomagnetic and gravity effects. This source may be the migration of crustal deformations in the form of slow

  12. Analysis of waves in the plasma guided by a periodical vane-type slow wave structure

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, T.J.; Kou, C.S.

    2005-10-01

    In this study, the dispersion relation has been derived to characterize the propagation of the waves in the plasma guided by a periodical vane-type slow wave structure. The plasma is confined by a quartz plate. Results indicate that there are two different waves in this structure. One is the plasma mode that originates from the plasma surface wave propagating along the interface between the plasma and the quartz plate, and the other is the guide mode that originally travels along the vane-type slow wave structure. In contrast to its original slow wave characteristics, the guide mode becomes a fast wave in the low-frequency portion of the passband, and there exists a cut-off frequency for the guide mode. The vane-type guiding structure has been shown to limit the upper frequency of the passband of the plasma mode, compared with that of the plasma surface wave. In addition, the passband of the plasma mode increases with the plasma density while it becomes narrower for the guide mode. The influences of the parameters of the guiding structure and plasma density on the propagation of waves are also presented.

  13. Compact FEL`s based on slow wave wigglers

    SciTech Connect

    Riyopoulos, S.

    1995-12-31

    Slow waves excited in magnetron-type cavities are attractive canditates as wigglers for compact Free Electron Lasers. Because of group velocities much below the speed of light, slow waves offer an order of magnitude increase in FEL gain under given circulating power in the wiggler resonator, compared to fast wave wigglers of similar period. In addition, they offer the versatility of operation either at modest beam energy via upshifing of the fundamental wavelength, or at low beam energy benefiting from the submillimeter wiggler harmonics. Because the main electron undulation is in the transverse direction for all spatial harmonics, the radiated power is increased by a factor {gamma}{sup 2} relative to the Smith-Purcell approach that relies on axial electron undulation. Technical advantages offered by magnetron-type wiggles are: the generation of the wiggler microwaves and the FEL interaction take place inside the same cavity, avoiding the issue of high power coupling between cavities; the excitation of wiggler microwaves relies on distributed electron emission from the cavity wall and does not require separate beam injection.

  14. Enhanced slow-wave EEG activity and thermoregulatory impairment following the inhibition of the lateral hypothalamus in the rat.

    PubMed

    Cerri, Matteo; Del Vecchio, Flavia; Mastrotto, Marco; Luppi, Marco; Martelli, Davide; Perez, Emanuele; Tupone, Domenico; Zamboni, Giovanni; Amici, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Neurons within the lateral hypothalamus (LH) are thought to be able to evoke behavioural responses that are coordinated with an adequate level of autonomic activity. Recently, the acute pharmacological inhibition of LH has been shown to depress wakefulness and promote NREM sleep, while suppressing REM sleep. These effects have been suggested to be the consequence of the inhibition of specific neuronal populations within the LH, i.e. the orexin and the MCH neurons, respectively. However, the interpretation of these results is limited by the lack of quantitative analysis of the electroencephalographic (EEG) activity that is critical for the assessment of NREM sleep quality and the presence of aborted NREM-to-REM sleep transitions. Furthermore, the lack of evaluation of the autonomic and thermoregulatory effects of the treatment does not exclude the possibility that the wake-sleep changes are merely the consequence of the autonomic, in particular thermoregulatory, changes that may follow the inhibition of LH neurons. In the present study, the EEG and autonomic/thermoregulatory effects of a prolonged LH inhibition provoked by the repeated local delivery of the GABAA agonist muscimol were studied in rats kept at thermoneutral (24°C) and at a low (10°C) ambient temperature (Ta), a condition which is known to depress sleep occurrence. Here we show that: 1) at both Tas, LH inhibition promoted a peculiar and sustained bout of NREM sleep characterized by an enhancement of slow-wave activity with no NREM-to-REM sleep transitions; 2) LH inhibition caused a marked transitory decrease in brain temperature at Ta 10°C, but not at Ta 24°C, suggesting that sleep changes induced by LH inhibition at thermoneutrality are not caused by a thermoregulatory impairment. These changes are far different from those observed after the short-term selective inhibition of either orexin or MCH neurons, suggesting that other LH neurons are involved in sleep-wake modulation.

  15. Enhanced Slow-Wave EEG Activity and Thermoregulatory Impairment following the Inhibition of the Lateral Hypothalamus in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Cerri, Matteo; Vecchio, Flavia Del; Mastrotto, Marco; Luppi, Marco; Martelli, Davide; Perez, Emanuele; Tupone, Domenico; Zamboni, Giovanni; Amici, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Neurons within the lateral hypothalamus (LH) are thought to be able to evoke behavioural responses that are coordinated with an adequate level of autonomic activity. Recently, the acute pharmacological inhibition of LH has been shown to depress wakefulness and promote NREM sleep, while suppressing REM sleep. These effects have been suggested to be the consequence of the inhibition of specific neuronal populations within the LH, i.e. the orexin and the MCH neurons, respectively. However, the interpretation of these results is limited by the lack of quantitative analysis of the electroencephalographic (EEG) activity that is critical for the assessment of NREM sleep quality and the presence of aborted NREM-to-REM sleep transitions. Furthermore, the lack of evaluation of the autonomic and thermoregulatory effects of the treatment does not exclude the possibility that the wake-sleep changes are merely the consequence of the autonomic, in particular thermoregulatory, changes that may follow the inhibition of LH neurons. In the present study, the EEG and autonomic/thermoregulatory effects of a prolonged LH inhibition provoked by the repeated local delivery of the GABAA agonist muscimol were studied in rats kept at thermoneutral (24°C) and at a low (10°C) ambient temperature (Ta), a condition which is known to depress sleep occurrence. Here we show that: 1) at both Tas, LH inhibition promoted a peculiar and sustained bout of NREM sleep characterized by an enhancement of slow-wave activity with no NREM-to-REM sleep transitions; 2) LH inhibition caused a marked transitory decrease in brain temperature at Ta 10°C, but not at Ta 24°C, suggesting that sleep changes induced by LH inhibition at thermoneutrality are not caused by a thermoregulatory impairment. These changes are far different from those observed after the short-term selective inhibition of either orexin or MCH neurons, suggesting that other LH neurons are involved in sleep-wake modulation. PMID:25398141

  16. Slow wave conduction patterns in the stomach: from Waller's foundations to current challenges.

    PubMed

    Cheng, L K

    2015-02-01

    This review provides an overview of our understanding of motility and slow wave propagation in the stomach. It begins by reviewing seminal studies conducted by Walter Cannon and Augustus Waller on in vivo motility and slow wave patterns. Then our current understanding of slow wave patterns in common laboratory animals and humans is presented. The implications of slow wave arrhythmic patterns that have been recorded in animals and patients suffering from gastroparesis are discussed. Finally, current challenges in experimental methods and techniques, slow wave modulation and the use of mathematical models are discussed. © 2014 Scandinavian Physiological Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Slow Wave Conduction Patterns in the Stomach: From Waller’s Foundations to Current Challenges

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This review provides an overview of our understanding of motility and slow wave propagation in the stomach. It begins by reviewing seminal studies conducted by Walter Cannon and Augustus Waller on in vivo motility and slow wave patterns. Then our current understanding of slow wave patterns in common laboratory animals and humans is presented. The implications of slow wave dysrhythmic patterns that have been recorded in animals and patients suffering from gastroparesis are discussed. Finally, current challenges in experimental methods and techniques, slow wave modulation and the use of mathematical models are discussed. PMID:25313679

  18. Slow-wave propagation on monolithic microwave integrated circuits with layered and non-layered structures

    SciTech Connect

    Tzuang, C.K.C.

    1986-01-01

    Various MMIC (monolithic microwave integrated circuit) planar waveguides have shown possible existence of a slow-wave propagation. In many practical applications of these slow-wave circuits, the semiconductor devices have nonuniform material properties that may affect the slow-wave propagation. In the first part of the dissertation, the effects of the nonuniform material properties are studied by a finite-element method. In addition, the transient pulse excitations of these slow-wave circuits also have great theoretical and practical interests. In the second part, the time-domain analysis of a slow-wave coplanar waveguide is presented.

  19. Slow light hierarchy and tunable switching in fractal wave guide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandy, Atanu; Chakrabarti, Arunava

    2017-05-01

    An exact analytical description of unraveling hierarchical distribution of slow optical modes in the context of propagation of classical waves through a fractal wave guide is reported using the scale invariance of the underlying geometry in the tight-binding formalism. The flat photonic modes are localized with finite support in the fractal system and getting trapped over clusters of increasing spans displaying the existence of multitude of localization area. The onset of localization can in principal be delayed in space by a suitable choice of the frequency of the incoming radiation. The length scale at which the onset of localization for each bounded optical mode occurs can be tuned at will following real space renormalization group method. Scanning over arbitrary small range of frequency may lead to the possibility of inter-modal switching behavior.

  20. Slow Mode Waves in the Heliospheric Plasma Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Edward. J.; Zhou, Xiaoyan

    2007-01-01

    We report the results of a search for waves/turbulence in the Heliospheric Plasma Sheet (HPS) surrounding the Heliospheric Current Sheet (HCS). The HPS is treated as a distinctive heliospheric structure distinguished by relatively high Beta, slow speed plasma. The data used in the investigation are from a previously published study of the thicknesses of the HPS and HCS that were obtained in January to May 2004 when Ulysses was near aphelion at 5 AU. The advantage of using these data is that the HPS is thicker at large radial distances and the spacecraft spends longer intervals inside the plasma sheet. From the study of the magnetic field and solar wind velocity components, we conclude that, if Alfven waves are present, they are weak and are dominated by variations in the field magnitude, B, and solar wind density, NP, that are anti-correlated.

  1. Relationships Between Questionnaire Ratings of Sleep Quality and Polysomnography in Healthy Adults.

    PubMed

    Westerlund, Anna; Lagerros, Ylva Trolle; Kecklund, Göran; Axelsson, John; Åkerstedt, Torbjörn

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the association between polysomnographic sleep and subjective habitual sleep quality and restoration from sleep. Thirty-one normal sleepers completed the Karolinska Sleep Questionnaire and multiple home polysomnography recordings (n = 2-5). Using linear regression, sleep quality and restoration were separately analyzed as functions of standard polysomnography parameters: sleep efficiency, total sleep time, sleep latency, stage 1 and 2 sleep, slow-wave sleep, rapid eye movement sleep, wake time after sleep onset, and awakenings (n), averaged across recordings. Stage 2 and slow-wave sleep predicted worse and better sleep quality, respectively. Also, slow-wave sleep predicted less subjective restoration, although adjustment for age attenuated this relation. Our findings lend some physiological validity to ratings of habitual sleep quality in normal sleepers. Data were less supportive of a physiological correlate of ratings of restoration from sleep.

  2. Energy and energy flux in axisymmetric slow and fast waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreels, M. G.; Van Doorsselaere, T.; Grant, S. D. T.; Jess, D. B.; Goossens, M.

    2015-06-01

    Aims: We aim to calculate the kinetic, magnetic, thermal, and total energy densities and the flux of energy in axisymmetric sausage modes. The resulting equations should contain as few parameters as possible to facilitate applicability for different observations. Methods: The background equilibrium is a one-dimensional cylindrical flux tube model with a piecewise constant radial density profile. This enables us to use linearised magnetohydrodynamic equations to calculate the energy densities and the flux of energy for axisymmetric sausage modes. Results: The equations used to calculate the energy densities and the flux of energy in axisymmetric sausage modes depend on the radius of the flux tube, the equilibrium sound and Alfvén speeds, the density of the plasma, the period and phase speed of the wave, and the radial or longitudinal components of the Lagrangian displacement at the flux tube boundary. Approximate relations for limiting cases of propagating slow and fast sausage modes are also obtained. We also obtained the dispersive first-order correction term to the phase speed for both the fundamental slow body mode under coronal conditions and the slow surface mode under photospheric conditions. Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  3. Multiple slow waves in metaporous layers for broadband sound absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jieun; Lee, Joong Seok; Kim, Yoon Young

    2017-01-01

    Sound absorption for a broad frequency range requires sound dissipation. The mechanics of acoustic metamaterials for non-dissipative applications has been extensively studied, but sound absorption using dissipative porous metamaterials has been less explored because of the complexity resulting from the coupling of its dissipative mechanism and metamaterial behavior. We investigated broadband sound absorption by engineering dissipative metaporous layers, which absorb sound by the mechanism of multiple slow waves, and combined local and global resonance phenomena. A set of rigid partitions of varying lengths was elaborately inserted in a hard-backed porous layer of a finite thickness. An effective medium theory was used to explain the physics involved; high performance at a low-frequency range was found to be mainly due to the formation of global resonances caused by multiple slow waves over the thickness of the metaporous layer, while enhancement at a high-frequency range was attributed to the combined effects of the global resonances and the local resonances directly related to the sizes of the inserted partitions.

  4. Slow magnetoacoustic waves in coronal loops: EIT and TRACE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robbrecht, E.; Verwichte, E.; Berghmans, D.; Hochedez, J. F.; Poedts, S.; Nakariakov, V. M.

    2001-05-01

    On May 13, 1998 the EIT (Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Telescope) on board of SoHO (Solar and Heliospheric Observatory) and TRACE (Transition Region And Coronal Explorer) instruments produced simultaneous high cadence image sequences of the same active region (AR 8218). TRACE achieved a 25 s cadence in the Fe Ix (171 Å) bandpass while EIT achieved a 15 s cadence (operating in ``shutterless mode'', SoHO JOP 80) in the Fe Xii (195 Å) bandpass. These high cadence observations in two complementary wavelengths have revealed the existence of weak transient disturbances in an extended coronal loop system. These propagating disturbances (PDs) seem to be a common phenomenon in this part of the active region. The disturbances originate from small scale brightenings at the footpoints of the loops and propagate along the loops. The projected propagation speeds roughly vary between 65 and 150 km s-1 for both instruments which is close to and below the expected sound speed in the coronal loops. The measured slow magnetoacoustic propagation speeds seem to suggest that the transients are sound (or slow) wave disturbances. This work differs from previous studies in the sense that it is based on a multi-wavelength observation of an entire loop bundle at high cadence by two EUV imagers. The observation of sound waves along the same path shows that they propagate along the same loop, suggesting that loops contain sharp temperature gradients and consist of either concentric shells or thin loop threads, at different temperatures.

  5. The Propagation of Slow Wave Potentials in Pea Epicotyls.

    PubMed Central

    Stahlberg, R.; Cosgrove, D. J.

    1997-01-01

    Slow wave potentials are considered to be electric long-distance signals specific for plants, although there are conflicting ideas about a chemical, electrical, or hydraulic mode of propagation. These ideas were tested by comparing the propagation of hydraulic and electric signals in epicotyls of pea (Pisum sativum L). A hydraulic signal in the form of a defined step increase in xylem pressure (Px) was applied to the root of intact seedlings and propagated nearly instantly through the epicotyl axis while its amplitude decreased with distance from the pressure chamber. This decremental propagation was caused by a leaky xylem and created an axial Px gradient in the epicotyl. Simultaneously along the epicotyl surface, depolarizations appeared with lag times that increased acropetally with distance from the pressure chamber from 5 s to 3 min. When measured at a constant distance, the lag times increased as the size of the applied pressure steps decreased. We conclude that the Px gradient in the epicotyl caused local depolarizations with acropetally increasing lag times, which have the appearance of an electric signal propagating with a rate of 20 to 30 mm min-1. This static description of the slow wave potentials challenges its traditional classification as a propagating electric signal. PMID:12223601

  6. Comparing the Robustness of High-Frequency Traveling-Wave Tube Slow-Wave Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chevalier, Christine T.; Wilson, Jeffrey D.; Kory, Carol L.

    2007-01-01

    A three-dimensional electromagnetic field simulation software package was used to compute the cold-test parameters, phase velocity, on-axis interaction impedance, and attenuation, for several high-frequency traveling-wave tube slow-wave circuit geometries. This research effort determined the effects of variations in circuit dimensions on cold-test performance. The parameter variations were based on the tolerances of conventional micromachining techniques.

  7. Coupled Transmission Line Based Slow Wave Structures for Traveling Wave Tubes Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuboraj, Md. Rashedul Alam

    High power microwave devices especially Traveling Wave Tubes (TWTs) and Backward Wave Oscillators (BWOs) are largely dependent on Slow Wave Structures for efficient beam to RF coupling. In this work, a novel approach of analyzing SWSs is proposed and investigated. Specifically, a rigorous study of helical geometries is carried out and a novel SWS "Half-Ring-Helix" is designed. This Half-Ring-Helix circuit achieves 27% miniaturization and delivers 10dB more gain than conventional helices. A generalization of the helix structures is also proposed in the form of Coupled Transmission Line (CTL). It is demonstrated that control of coupling among the CTLs leads to new propagation properties. With this in mind, a novel geometry referred to as "Curved Ring-Bar" is introduced. This geometry is shown to deliver 1MW power across a 33% bandwidth. Notably, this is the first demonstration of MW power TWT across large bandwidth. The CTL is further expanded to enable engineered propagation characteristics. This is done by introducing CTLs having non-identical transmission lines and CTLs with as many as four transmission lines in the same slow wave structure circuit. These non-identical CTLs are demonstrated to generate fourth order dispersion curves. Building on the property of CTLs, a `butterfly' slow wave structure is developed and demonstrated to provide degenerate band edge (DBE) mode. This mode are known to provide large feld enhancement that can be exploited to design high power backward wave oscillators.

  8. SLOW MAGNETOACOUSTIC WAVES IN TWO-RIBBON FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Nakariakov, V. M.; Zimovets, I. V.

    2011-04-01

    We demonstrate that disturbances observed to propagate along the axis of the arcade in two-ribbon solar flares at the speed of a few tens of km s{sup -1}, well below the Alfven and sound speeds, can be interpreted in terms of slow magnetoacoustic waves. The waves can propagate across the magnetic field, parallel to the magnetic neutral line, because of the wave-guiding effect due to the reflection from the footpoints. The perpendicular group speed of the perturbation is found to be a fraction of the sound speed, which is consistent with observations. The highest value of the group speed grows with the increase in the ratio of the sound and Alfven speeds. For a broad range of parameters, the highest value of the group speed corresponds to the propagation angle of 25 deg. - 28 deg. to the magnetic field. This effect can explain the temporal and spatial structure of quasi-periodic pulsations observed in two-ribbon flares.

  9. Hippocampal slow EEG frequencies during NREM sleep are involved in spatial memory consolidation in humans.

    PubMed

    Moroni, Fabio; Nobili, Lino; Iaria, Giuseppe; Sartori, Ivana; Marzano, Cristina; Tempesta, Daniela; Proserpio, Paola; Lo Russo, Giorgio; Gozzo, Francesca; Cipolli, Carlo; De Gennaro, Luigi; Ferrara, Michele

    2014-10-01

    The hypothesis that sleep is instrumental in the process of memory consolidation is currently largely accepted. Hippocampal formation is involved in the acquisition of declarative memories and particularly of spatial memories. Nevertheless, although largely investigated in rodents, the relations between spatial memory and hippocampal EEG activity have been scarcely studied in humans. Aimed to evaluate the effects of spatial learning on human hippocampal sleep EEG activity, we recorded hippocampal Stereo-EEG (SEEG) in a group of refractory epilepsy patients undergoing presurgical clinical evaluation, after a training on a spatial navigation task. We observed that hippocampal high-delta (2-4 Hz range) activity increases during the first NREM episode after learning compared to the baseline night. Moreover, the amount of hippocampal NREM high-delta power was correlated with task performance at retest. The effect involved only the hippocampal EEG frequencies inasmuch no differences were observed at the neocortical electrodes and in the traditional polysomnographic measures. The present findings support the crucial role of hippocampal slow EEG frequencies during sleep in the memory consolidation processes. More generally, together with previous results, they suggest that slow frequency rhythms are a fundamental characteristic of human hippocampal EEG during both sleep and wakefulness, and are related to the consolidation of different types of memories.

  10. Equivalent Circuit Analysis of Serpentine Folded-waveguide Slow-wave Structures for Millimeter-wave Traveling-wave Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumathy, M.; Vinoy, K. J.; Datta, S. K.

    2009-02-01

    A simple equivalent circuit model for the analysis of dispersion and interaction impedance characteristics of serpentine folded-waveguide slow-wave structure was developed by considering the straight and curved portions of structure supporting the dominant TE 10-mode of the rectangular waveguide. Expressions for the lumped capacitance and inductance per period of the slow-wave structure were derived in terms of the physical dimensions of the structure, incorporating the effects of the beam-hole in the lumped parameters. The lumped parameters were subsequently interpreted for obtaining the dispersion and interaction impedance characteristics of the structure. The analysis was simple yet accurate in predicting the dispersion and interaction impedance behaviour at millimeter-wave frequencies. The analysis was benchmarked against measurement as well as with 3D electromagnetic modeling using MAFIA for two typical slow-wave structures (one at the Ka-band and the other at the W-band) and close agreement observed.

  11. Delta wave power: an independent sleep phenotype or epiphenomenon?

    PubMed

    Davis, Christopher J; Clinton, James M; Jewett, Kathryn A; Zielinski, Mark R; Krueger, James M

    2011-10-15

    Electroencephalographic (EEG) δ waves during non-rapid eye movement sleep (NREMS) after sleep deprivation are enhanced. That observation eventually led to the use of EEG δ power as a parameter to model process S in the two-process model of sleep. It works remarkably well as a model parameter because it often co-varies with sleep duration and intensity. Nevertheless there is a large volume of literature indicating that EEG δ power is regulated independently of sleep duration. For example, high amplitude EEG δ waves occur in wakefulness after systemic atropine administration or after hyperventilation in children. Human neonates have periods of sleep with an almost flat EEG. Similarly, elderly people have reduced EEG δ power, yet retain substantial NREMS. Rats provided with a cafeteria diet have excess duration of NREMS but simultaneously decreased EEG δ power for days. Mice challenged with influenza virus have excessive EEG δ power and NREMS. In contrast, if mice lacking TNF receptors are infected, they still sleep more but have reduced EEG δ power. Sleep regulatory substances, e.g., IL1, TNF, and GHRH, directly injected unilaterally onto the cortex induce state-dependent ipsilateral enhancement of EEG δ power without changing duration of organism sleep. IL1 given systemically enhances duration of NREMS but reduces EEG δ power in mice. Benzodiazepines enhance NREMS but inhibit EEG δ power. If duration of NREMS is an indicator of prior sleepiness then simultaneous EEG δ power may or may not be a useful index of sleepiness. Finally, most sleep regulatory substances are cerebral vasodilators and blood flow affects EEG δ power. In conclusion, it seems unlikely that a single EEG measure will be reliable as a marker of sleepiness for all conditions.

  12. Stability of Brillouin Flow in Slow-Wave Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, David; Lau, Y. Y.; Greening, Geoffrey; Wong, Patrick; Gilgenbach, Ronald; Hoff, Brad

    2016-10-01

    For the first time, we include a slow-wave structure (SWS) to study the stability of Brillouin flow in the conventional, planar, and inverted magnetron geometry. The resonant interaction of the SWS circuit mode and the corresponding smooth-bore diocotron-like mode is found to be the dominant cause for instability, overwhelming the intrinsic negative (positive) mass property of electrons in the inverted (conventional) magnetron geometry. It severely restricts the wavenumber for instability to the narrow range in which the cold tube frequency of the SWS is within a few percent of the corresponding smooth bore diocotron-like mode in the Brillouin flow. This resonant interaction is absent in a smooth bore magnetron. Work supported by ONR N00014-13-1-0566 and N00014-16-1-2353, AFOSR FA9550-15-1-0097, and L-3 Communications Electron Device Division.

  13. Reduction of nocturnal slow-wave activity affects daytime vigilance lapses and memory encoding but not reaction time or implicit learning.

    PubMed

    Van Der Werf, Ysbrand D; Altena, Ellemarije; Vis, José C; Koene, Teddy; Van Someren, Eus J W

    2011-01-01

    Total sleep deprivation in healthy subjects has a profound effect on the performance on tasks measuring sustained attention or vigilance. We here report how a selective disruption of deep sleep only, that is, selective slow-wave activity (SWA) reduction, affects the performance of healthy well-sleeping subjects on several tasks: a "simple" and a "complex" vigilance task, a declarative learning task, and an implicit learning task despite unchanged duration of sleep. We used automated electroencephalogram (EEG) dependent acoustic feedback aimed at selective interference with-and reduction of-SWA. In a within-subject repeated measures crossover design, performance on the tasks was assessed in 13 elderly adults without sleep complaints after either SWA-reduction or after normal sleep. The number of vigilance lapses increased as a result of SWA reduction, irrespective of the type of vigilance task. Recognition on the declarative memory task was also affected by SWA reduction, associated with a decreased activation of the right hippocampus on encoding (measured with fMRI) suggesting a weaker memory trace. SWA reduction, however, did not affect reaction time on either of the vigilance tasks or implicit memory task performance. These findings suggest a specific role of slow oscillations in the subsequent daytime ability to maintain sustained attention and to encode novel declarative information but not to maintain response speed or to build implicit memories. Of particular interest is that selective SWA reduction can mimic some of the effects of total sleep deprivation, while not affecting sleep duration.

  14. Analysis of Rectangular Folded-Waveguide Millimeter-Wave Slow-wave Structures using Conformal Transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumathy, M.; Vinoy, K. J.; Datta, S. K.

    2009-03-01

    An analysis of rectangular folded-waveguide slow-wave structure was developed using conformal mapping technique through Schwarz’s polygon transformation and closed form expressions for the lumped capacitance and inductance per period of the slow-wave structure were derived in terms of the physical dimensions of the structure, incorporating the effects of the beam hole in the lumped parameters. The lumped parameters were subsequently interpreted for obtaining the dispersion and interaction impedance characteristics of the structure. The analysis was benchmarked for two typical millimeter-wave structures, one operating in Ka-band and the other operating in Q-band, against measurement and 3D electromagnetic modeling using MAFIA.

  15. Slow Wave Vane Structure with Elliptical Cross-Section Slots, an Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosmahl, Henry G.

    1994-01-01

    Mathematical analysis of the wave equation in cylinders with elliptical cross-section slots was performed. Compared to slow wave structures with rectangular slots higher impedance and lower power dissipation losses are evident. These features could lead to improved designs of traveling wave magnetrons and gigahertz backward-wave oscillators as well as linear traveling wave tubes with relatively shallow slots.

  16. Altered slow wave activity in major depressive disorder with hypersomnia: a high density EEG pilot study.

    PubMed

    Plante, David T; Landsness, Eric C; Peterson, Michael J; Goldstein, Michael R; Wanger, Tim; Guokas, Jeff J; Tononi, Giulio; Benca, Ruth M

    2012-03-31

    Hypersomnolence in major depressive disorder (MDD) plays an important role in the natural history of the disorder, but the basis of hypersomnia in MDD is poorly understood. Slow wave activity (SWA) has been associated with sleep homeostasis, as well as sleep restoration and maintenance, and may be altered in MDD. Therefore, we conducted a post-hoc study that utilized high density electroencephalography (hdEEG) to test the hypothesis that MDD subjects with hypersomnia (HYS+) would have decreased SWA relative to age- and sex-matched MDD subjects without hypersomnia (HYS-) and healthy controls (n=7 for each group). After correction for multiple comparisons using statistical non-parametric mapping, HYS+ subjects demonstrated significantly reduced parieto-occipital all-night SWA relative to HYS- subjects. Our results suggest hypersomnolence may be associated with topographic reductions in SWA in MDD. Further research using an adequately powered prospective design is indicated to confirm these findings. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. β-amyloid disrupts human NREM slow waves and related hippocampus-dependent memory consolidation

    PubMed Central

    Mander, Bryce A.; Marks, Shawn M.; Vogel, Jacob W.; Rao, Vikram; Lu, Brandon; Saletin, Jared M.; Ancoli-Israel, Sonia; Jagust, William J.; Walker, Matthew P.

    2015-01-01

    Independent evidence associates β-amyloid pathology with both NREM sleep disruption and memory impairment in older adults. However, whether the influence of β-amyloid pathology on hippocampus-dependent memory is, in part, driven by impairments of NREM slow wave activity (SWA) and associated overnight memory consolidation is unknown. Here, we show that β-amyloid burden within medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) is significantly correlated with the severity of impairment in NREM SWA generation. Moreover, reduced NREM SWA generation was further associated with impaired overnight memory consolidation and impoverished hippocampal-neocortical memory transformation. Furthermore, structural equation models revealed that the association between mPFC β-amyloid pathology and impaired hippocampus-dependent memory consolidation is not direct, but instead, statistically depends on the intermediary factor of diminished NREM SWA. By linking β-amyloid pathology with impaired NREM SWA, these data implicate sleep disruption as a novel mechanistic pathway through which β-amyloid pathology may contribute to hippocampus-dependent cognitive decline in the elderly. PMID:26030850

  18. Continuous wavelet analysis of postprandial EGGs suggests sustained gastric slow waves may be slow to develop in infants with colic.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, G W; Lentle, R G; Janssen, P W M; Hulls, C M

    2017-03-01

    Electrogastrography in conjunction with Fast Fourier transform has limited success in detecting low grade abnormalities in gastric electrophysiological activity owing to the non-stationarity of the signal. Analysis by continuous wavelet transform is suitable for non-stationary signals and was used to analyse EGG activity in babies with and without colic. Thirty minute postprandial EGG recordings were obtained from 23 sleeping breast-fed infants with clinically validated recurrent colic and 26 breast-fed non-colicky infants. Continuous wavelet transform analysis (CWT) identified three principal frequency components. The mean, standard deviation, and the number of frequency maxima that fell below one standard deviation from the mean were determined for each infant and each frequency. Three component frequencies in the ranges 1.4-2.5 cpm, 2.5-4.0 cpm, and 4.0-15 cpm were found in all EGGs. Pairwise comparisons of the characteristics of each of the frequency ranges by univariate analyses showed significant differences between colicky and non-colicky subjects only in the number of maxima in the mid range of frequencies that lay below one standard deviation from the mean. However, CWT based on all frequencies allowed discrimination of the EGGS of colicky from non-colicky babies on a basis of number of frequency maxima below one standard deviation from the mean in the midrange of frequencies and in the mean and standard deviation in the low range of frequencies that was likely a harmonic of the midrange. CWT allowed distinction of EGG signals from colicky and healthy babies. The results indicate that colic may result from tardiness in the establishment of coherent propagation of the gastric slow wave in colicky babies. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Stimulating forebrain communications: Slow sinusoidal electric fields over frontal cortices dynamically modulate hippocampal activity and cortico-hippocampal interplay during slow-wave states.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Anastasia; Whitten, Tara A; Dickson, Clayton T

    2016-06-01

    Slow-wave states are characterized by the most global physiological phenomenon in the mammalian brain, the large-amplitude slow oscillation (SO; ~1Hz) composed of alternating states of activity (ON/UP states) and silence (OFF/DOWN states) at the network and single cell levels. The SO is cortically generated and appears as a traveling wave that can propagate across the cortical surface and can invade the hippocampus. This cortical rhythm is thought to be imperative for sleep-dependent memory consolidation, potentially through increased interactions with the hippocampus. The SO is correlated with learning and its presumed enhancement via slow rhythmic electrical field stimulation improves subsequent mnemonic performance. However, the mechanism by which such field stimulation influences the dynamics of ongoing cortico-hippocampal communication is unknown. Here we show - using multi-site recordings in urethane-anesthetized rats - that sinusoidal electrical field stimulation applied to the frontal region of the cerebral cortex creates a platform for improved cortico-hippocampal communication. Moderate-intensity field stimulation entrained hippocampal slow activity (likely by way of the temporoammonic pathway) and also increased sharp-wave ripples, the signature memory replay events of the hippocampus, and further increased cortical spindles. Following cessation of high-intensity stimulation, SO interactions in the cortical-to-hippocampal direction were reduced, while the reversed hippocampal-to-cortical communication at both SO and gamma bandwidths was enhanced. Taken together, these findings suggest that cortical field stimulation may function to boost memory consolidation by strengthening cortico-hippocampal and hippocampo-cortical interplay at multiple nested frequencies in an intensity-dependent fashion.

  20. Source localization of posterior slow waves of youth using dipole modeling.

    PubMed

    Ohoyama, Keiko; Motomura, Eishi; Inui, Koji; Nishimura, Yukika; Ushiro, Kengo; Matsushima, Nobuyoshi; Maeda, Masayuki; Tanii, Hisashi; Suzuki, Dai; Hamanaka, Kenji; Kakigi, Ryusuke; Okada, Motohiro

    2012-12-01

    Posterior slow waves of youth have a well-known electroencephalographic pattern that peaks in adolescence and usually disappears in adulthood. In general, posterior slow waves of youth are regarded as normal, but some reports have suggested that their presence is related to immature personalities or inappropriate social behavior. The physiological significance of this electroencephalographic pattern, however, remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the neural origins of posterior slow waves of youth using dipole source modeling. Electroencephalographic epochs, including clear posterior slow waves of youth, were visually selected from electroencephalograms obtained from six normal adolescents using 25 scalp electrodes. The selected epochs were then averaged by arranging the negative peak of the slow waves at the occipital area of each epoch on the time axis. The averaged waveforms consisting of six right and one left posterior slow waves of youth were used for dipole source analysis. A single equivalent current dipole was estimated for the averaged waveforms. The best equivalent current dipoles were estimated to be located in or around the fusiform and middle occipital gyrus ipsilateral to the posterior slow waves of youth. The location of the estimated dipoles of posterior slow waves of youth was on the so-called ventral visual pathway. Further research is required to clarify the physiological significance of posterior slow waves of youth with respect to their origin. © 2012 The Authors. Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences © 2012 Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology.

  1. SLOW MAGNETOACOUSTIC WAVES OBSERVED ABOVE A QUIET-SUN REGION IN A DARK CAVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Jiajia; Zhou Zhenjun; Wang Yuming; Liu Rui; Liao Chijian; Shen Chenglong; Zheng Huinan; Miao Bin; Su Zhenpeng; Wang, S.; Wang Bin E-mail: ymwang@ustc.edu.cn

    2012-10-20

    Waves play a crucial role in diagnosing the plasma properties of various structures in the solar corona and coronal heating. Slow magnetoacoustic (MA) waves are one of the important types of magnetohydrodynamic waves. In past decades, numerous slow MA waves were detected above active regions and coronal holes, but were rarely found elsewhere. Here, we investigate a 'tornado'-like structure consisting of quasi-periodic streaks within a dark cavity at about 40-110 Mm above a quiet-Sun region on 2011 September 25. Our analysis reveals that these streaks are actually slow MA wave trains. The properties of these wave trains, including phase speed, compression ratio, and kinetic energy density, are similar to those of the reported slow MA waves, except that the period of these waves is about 50 s, much shorter than the typical reported values (3-5 minutes).

  2. A 0.14 THz relativistic coaxial overmoded surface wave oscillator with metamaterial slow wave structure

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Weijie; Wang, Jianguo Chen, Zaigao; Cai, Libing; Wang, Yue; Wang, Guangqiang; Qiao, Hailiang

    2014-12-15

    This paper presents a new kind of device for generating the high power terahertz wave by using a coaxial overmoded surface wave oscillator with metamaterial slow wave structure (SWS). A metallic metamaterial SWS is used to avoid the damage of the device driven by a high-voltage electron beam pulse. The overmoded structure is adopted to make it much easy to fabricate and assemble the whole device. The coaxial structure is used to suppress the mode competition in the overmoded device. Parameters of an electron beam and geometric structure are provided. Particle-in-cell simulation results show that the high power terahertz wave at the frequency of 0.14 THz is generated with the output power 255 MW and conversion efficiency about 21.3%.

  3. Enhanced traveling wave amplification of co-planar slow wave structure by extended phase-matching

    SciTech Connect

    Palm, Andrew; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar; Shin, Young-Min

    2015-09-15

    The electron beam co-propagating with slow waves in a staggered double grating array (SDGA) efficiently amplifies millimeter and sub-millimeter waves over a wide spectrum. Our theoretical and numerical analyses show that the power amplification in the fundamental passband is enhanced by the extended beam-wave phase-matching. Particle-in-cell simulations on the SDGA slow wave structure, designed with 10.4 keV and 50–100 mA sheet beam, indicate that maintaining beam-wave synchronization along the entire length of the circuit improves the gain by 7.3% leading to a total gain of 28 dB, corresponding to 62 W saturated power at the middle of operating band, and a 3-dB bandwidth of 7 GHz with 10.5% at V-band (73.5 GHz center frequency) with saturated peak power reaching 80 W and 28 dB at 71 GHz. These results also show a reasonably good agreement with analytic calculations based on Pierce small signal gain theory.

  4. Characterization of slow waves generated by myenteric interstitial cells of Cajal of the rabbit small intestine

    PubMed Central

    Mitsui, Retsu; Ward, Sean M.; Sanders, Kenton M.

    2014-01-01

    Slow waves (slow wavesICC) were recorded from myenteric interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC-MY) in situ in the rabbit small intestine, and their properties were compared with those of mouse small intestine. Rabbit slow wavesICC consisted of an upstroke depolarization followed by a distinct plateau component. Ni2+ and nominally Ca2+-free solutions reduced the rate-of-rise and amplitude of the upstroke depolarization. Replacement of Ca2+ with Sr2+ enhanced the upstroke component but decreased the plateau component of rabbit slow wavesICC. In contrast, replacing Ca2+ with Sr2+ decreased both components of mouse slow wavesICC. The plateau component of rabbit slow wavesICC was inhibited in low-extracellular-Cl−-concentration (low-[Cl−]o) solutions and by 4,4′-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2′-disulfonic acid (DIDS), an inhibitor of Cl− channels, cyclopiazonic acid (CPA), an inhibitor of internal Ca2+ pumps, or bumetanide, an inhibitor of Na+-K+-2Cl− cotransporter (NKCC1). Bumetanide also inhibited the plateau component of mouse slow wavesICC. NKCC1-like immunoreactivity was observed mainly in ICC-MY in the rabbit small intestine. Membrane depolarization with a high-K+ solution reduced the upstroke component of rabbit slow wavesICC. In cells depolarized with elevated external K+, DIDS, CPA, and bumetanide blocked slow wavesICC. These results suggest that the upstroke component of rabbit slow wavesICC is partially mediated by voltage-dependent Ca2+ influx, whereas the plateau component is dependent on Ca2+-activated Cl− efflux. NKCC1 is likely to be responsible for Cl− accumulation in ICC-MY. The results also suggest that the mechanism of the upstroke component differs in rabbit and mouse slow wavesICC in the small intestine. PMID:25540230

  5. Characterization of slow waves generated by myenteric interstitial cells of Cajal of the rabbit small intestine.

    PubMed

    Kito, Yoshihiko; Mitsui, Retsu; Ward, Sean M; Sanders, Kenton M

    2015-03-01

    Slow waves (slow wavesICC) were recorded from myenteric interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC-MY) in situ in the rabbit small intestine, and their properties were compared with those of mouse small intestine. Rabbit slow wavesICC consisted of an upstroke depolarization followed by a distinct plateau component. Ni(2+) and nominally Ca(2+)-free solutions reduced the rate-of-rise and amplitude of the upstroke depolarization. Replacement of Ca(2+) with Sr(2+) enhanced the upstroke component but decreased the plateau component of rabbit slow wavesICC. In contrast, replacing Ca(2+) with Sr(2+) decreased both components of mouse slow wavesICC. The plateau component of rabbit slow wavesICC was inhibited in low-extracellular-Cl(-)-concentration (low-[Cl(-)]o) solutions and by 4,4'-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid (DIDS), an inhibitor of Cl(-) channels, cyclopiazonic acid (CPA), an inhibitor of internal Ca(2+) pumps, or bumetanide, an inhibitor of Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) cotransporter (NKCC1). Bumetanide also inhibited the plateau component of mouse slow wavesICC. NKCC1-like immunoreactivity was observed mainly in ICC-MY in the rabbit small intestine. Membrane depolarization with a high-K(+) solution reduced the upstroke component of rabbit slow wavesICC. In cells depolarized with elevated external K(+), DIDS, CPA, and bumetanide blocked slow wavesICC. These results suggest that the upstroke component of rabbit slow wavesICC is partially mediated by voltage-dependent Ca(2+) influx, whereas the plateau component is dependent on Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) efflux. NKCC1 is likely to be responsible for Cl(-) accumulation in ICC-MY. The results also suggest that the mechanism of the upstroke component differs in rabbit and mouse slow wavesICC in the small intestine. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  6. Slow magnetoacoustic waves in coronal loops: EIT vs TRACE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robbrecht, E.; Verwichte, E.; Berghmans, D.; Hochedez, J. F.; Poedts, S.

    2000-10-01

    On May 13, 1998 the EIT (Extreme-Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope) and TRACE (Transition Region And Coronal Explorer) instruments produced simultaneous high cadence image sequences of the same active region (AR 8218). TRACE achieved a 25 sec cadence in the Fe IX/X (171 Å) bandpass while EIT achieved a 15 sec cadence (operating in `shutterless mode,' SOHO JOP 80) in the Fe XII (195 Å) bandpass. These high cadence observations in two complementary wavelengths have revealed the existence of weak transient disturbances in an extended coronal loop system. These propagating disturbances (PDs) seem to be a common phenomenon in this part of the active region. The disturbances originate from small scale brightenings at the footpoints of the loops and propagate along the loops. The apparent propagation speeds roughly vary between 65 and 150 km s-1 which is close to the expected sound speed of the coronal loops. The measured propagation speeds seem to suggest that the transients are sound (or slow) wave disturbances. .

  7. The effect of temperature changes on in vitro slow wave activity in the equine ileum.

    PubMed

    Fintl, C; Hudson, N P H; Handel, I; Pearson, G T

    2016-03-01

    Slow waves are rhythmic pacemaker currents generated by the gastrointestinal pacemaker cells, the interstitial cells of Cajal, and represent the rate-limiting step for small intestinal smooth muscle contractions. Therefore, factors that affect slow wave activity may also influence contractile activity. It is not known how temperature changes may influence slow wave activity in the horse. This could be of relevance during colic surgery if cooling of exposed intestine resulted in reduced slow wave activity potentially exacerbating post operative ileus. To evaluate the effect of temperature changes on in vitro slow wave activity of normal equine ileum using intracellular recording techniques. In vitro experimental study. A segment of ileum was collected immediately following euthanasia from 9 horses for reasons unrelated to the gastrointestinal tract. Intracellular recordings of membrane potentials were made from individual smooth muscle cells. The temperature of the tissue bath was altered during the course of each experiment across a range of 27-41°C. All data were recorded and stored using a computer-interfaced acquisition system. A software package was used to analyse slow wave frequency, duration, amplitude and resting membrane potential. In all 9 horses, slow wave frequency was highly temperature sensitive and approximately linearly related to the temperature over the range studied, increasing by 0.5 cycles/min for each 1°C increase in temperature (P<0.001). The initial slow wave frequency resumed when the temperature was returned to 37°C. The recovery time appeared to be directly related to the duration for which the temperature had been changed. Slow wave frequency in the equine ileum is highly temperature sensitive. As post operative ileus is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the horse, the negative effect of lower temperatures on slow waves, and therefore contractile activity, should be considered. © 2015 EVJ Ltd.

  8. Topography of Slow Sigma Power during Sleep is Associated with Processing Speed in Preschool Children

    PubMed Central

    Doucette, Margaret R.; Kurth, Salome; Chevalier, Nicolas; Munakata, Yuko; LeBourgeois, Monique K.

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive development is influenced by maturational changes in processing speed, a construct reflecting the rapidity of executing cognitive operations. Although cognitive ability and processing speed are linked to spindles and sigma power in the sleep electroencephalogram (EEG), little is known about such associations in early childhood, a time of major neuronal refinement. We calculated EEG power for slow (10–13 Hz) and fast (13.25–17 Hz) sigma power from all-night high-density electroencephalography (EEG) in a cross-sectional sample of healthy preschool children (n = 10, 4.3 ± 1.0 years). Processing speed was assessed as simple reaction time. On average, reaction time was 1409 ± 251 ms; slow sigma power was 4.0 ± 1.5 μV2; and fast sigma power was 0.9 ± 0.2 μV2. Both slow and fast sigma power predominated over central areas. Only slow sigma power was correlated with processing speed in a large parietal electrode cluster (p < 0.05, r ranging from −0.6 to −0.8), such that greater power predicted faster reaction time. Our findings indicate regional correlates between sigma power and processing speed that are specific to early childhood and provide novel insights into the neurobiological features of the EEG that may underlie developing cognitive abilities. PMID:26556377

  9. Slow wave dynamics stalls tropical tropopause ice clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spichtinger, Peter; Krämer, Martina; Borrmann, Stephan

    2010-05-01

    Water vapour is the most important natural green house gas. However, in the stratosphere an increase in water vapour would possibly result in a cooling. The major entrance of trace substances into the stratosphere is the tropical tropopause layer (TTL), localized between the main level of convective outflow, 150 hPa, and 70 hPa. The TTL water vapour budget, and thus the exchange with the stratosphere, depends crucially on the occurrence and properties of ice clouds in this cold region (T < 200 K). It is believed that homogeneous freezing of liquid solution particles, which predominate the particle population, is the preferred pathway of ice formation. High water vapour supersaturation with respect to ice is required to initiate homogeneous ice nucleation. The number of emerging ice crystals depends on temperature and the ambient relative humidity over ice (RHi). Strong increase in RHi due to rising vertical velocity will produce large amounts of ice crystals. In the TTL, very slow large-scale updraughts prevail (≤ 0.01 m/s), which would lead to low ice crystal concentrations (≤ 0.1cm-3). However, tropical deep convection initiates intrinsic gravity waves and consequently, we would expect much higher vertical velocities and therefore higher ice crystal number concentrations. Since the many ice crystals rapidly grow by water vapour diffusion it is also expected that the initially high ice supersaturation quickly reduces to saturation after ice formation. Contrarily, during the last years high and persistent ice supersaturations were observed in the cold TTL in several airborne field campaigns inside and outside of ice clouds (Peter et al., 2006), creating a discussion called the 'supersaturation puzzle'. A step forward in that discussion was made recently: Krämer et al. (2009) observed ice crystal concentrations much lower than expected (most often < 0.1cm-3), but consistent with the measured high supersaturations. These observations turned the 'supersaturation

  10. Reverberation, Storage, and Postsynaptic Propagation of Memories during Sleep

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ribeiro, Sidarta; Nicolelis, Miguel A. L.

    2004-01-01

    In mammals and birds, long episodes of nondreaming sleep ("slow-wave" sleep, SW) are followed by short episodes of dreaming sleep ("rapid-eye-movement" sleep, REM). Both SW and REM sleep have been shown to be important for the consolidation of newly acquired memories, but the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. Here we review…

  11. Reverberation, Storage, and Postsynaptic Propagation of Memories during Sleep

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ribeiro, Sidarta; Nicolelis, Miguel A. L.

    2004-01-01

    In mammals and birds, long episodes of nondreaming sleep ("slow-wave" sleep, SW) are followed by short episodes of dreaming sleep ("rapid-eye-movement" sleep, REM). Both SW and REM sleep have been shown to be important for the consolidation of newly acquired memories, but the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. Here we review…

  12. Late positive slow waves as markers of chunking during encoding

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira, Ana M. L.; Bueno, Orlando F. A.; Manzano, Gilberto M.; Kohn, André F.; Pompéia, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    Electrophysiological markers of chunking of words during encoding have mostly been shown in studies that present pairs of related stimuli. In these cases it is difficult to disentangle cognitive processes that reflect distinctiveness (i.e., conspicuous items because they are related), perceived association between related items and unified representations of various items, or chunking. Here, we propose a paradigm that enables the determination of a separate Event-related Potential (ERP) marker of these cognitive processes using sequentially related word triads. Twenty-three young healthy individuals viewed 80 15-word lists composed of unrelated items except for the three words in the middle serial positions (triads), which could be either unrelated (control list), related perceptually, phonetically or semantically. ERP amplitudes were measured at encoding of each one of the words in the triads. We analyzed two latency intervals (350–400 and 400–800 ms) at midline locations. Behaviorally, we observed a progressive facilitation in the immediate free recall of the words in the triads depending on the relations between their items (control < perceptual < phonetic < semantic), but only semantically related items were recalled as chunks. P300-like deflections were observed for perceptually deviant stimuli. A reduction of amplitude of a component akin to the N400 was found for words that were phonetically and semantically associated with prior items and therefore were not associated to chunking. Positive slow wave (PSW) amplitudes increased as successive phonetically and semantically related items were presented, but they were observed earlier and were more prominent at Fz for semantic associates. PSWs at Fz and Cz also correlated with recall of semantic word chunks. This confirms prior claims that PSWs at Fz are potential markers of chunking which, in the proposed paradigm, were modulated differently from the detection of deviant stimuli and of relations between

  13. A high-power subterahertz surface wave oscillator with separated overmoded slow wave structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guang-Qiang; Wang, Jian-Guo; Zeng, Peng; Wang, Dong-Yang; Li, Shuang

    2016-12-01

    A megawatt-level subterahertz surface wave oscillator (SWO) is proposed to obtain high conversion efficiency by using separated overmoded slow wave structures (SWSs). Aiming at the repetitive operation and practical applications, the device driven by electron beam with modest energy and current is theoretically analyzed and verified. Then, the functions of the two SWS sections and the effect of the drift tube are investigated by using a particle-in-cell code to reveal how the proposed device achieves high efficiency. The mode analysis of the beam-wave interaction region in the device is also carried out, and the results indicate that multi-modes participate in the premodulation of the electron beam in the first SWS section, while the TM01 mode surface wave is successfully and dominantly excited and amplified in the second SWS section. Finally, a typical simulation result demonstrates that at a beam energy of 313 keV, beam current of 1.13 kA, and guiding magnetic field of above 3.5 T, a high-power subterahertz wave is obtained with an output power of about 70 MW at frequency 146.3 GHz, corresponding to the conversion efficiency of 20%. Compared with the results of the previous subterahertz overmoded SWOs with integral SWS and similar beam parameters, the efficiency increases almost 50% in the proposed device. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61231003).

  14. Sleep benefits subsequent hippocampal functioning.

    PubMed

    Van Der Werf, Ysbrand D; Altena, Ellemarije; Schoonheim, Menno M; Sanz-Arigita, Ernesto J; Vis, José C; De Rijke, Wim; Van Someren, Eus J W

    2009-02-01

    Sleep before learning benefits memory encoding through unknown mechanisms. We found that even a mild sleep disruption that suppressed slow-wave activity and induced shallow sleep, but did not reduce total sleep time, was sufficient to affect subsequent successful encoding-related hippocampal activation and memory performance in healthy human subjects. Implicit learning was not affected. Our results suggest that the hippocampus is particularly sensitive to shallow, but intact, sleep.

  15. Electrical slow waves in the mouse oviduct are dependent on extracellular and intracellular calcium sources

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Rose Ellen; Britton, Fiona C.; Baker, Salah A.; Hennig, Grant W.; Rollings, Christina M.; Sanders, Kenton M.

    2011-01-01

    Spontaneous contractions of the myosalpinx are critical for oocyte transport along the oviduct. Slow waves, the electrical events that underlie myosalpinx contractions, are generated by a specialized network of pacemaker cells called oviduct interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC-OVI). The ionic basis of oviduct pacemaker activity is unknown. Intracellular recordings and Ca2+ imaging were performed to examine the role of extracellular and intracellular Ca2+ sources in slow wave generation. RT-PCR was performed to determine the transcriptional expression of Ca2+ channels. Molecular studies revealed most isoforms of L- and T-type calcium channels (Cav1.2,1.3,1.4,3.1,3.2,3.3) were expressed in myosalpinx. Reduction of extracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]o) resulted in the abolition of slow waves and myosalpinx contractions without significantly affecting resting membrane potential (RMP). Spontaneous Ca2+ waves spread through ICC-OVI cells at a similar frequency to slow waves and were inhibited by reduced [Ca2+]o. Nifedipine depolarized RMP and inhibited slow waves; however, pacemaker activity returned when the membrane was repolarized with reduced extracellular K+ concentration ([K+]o). Ni2+ also depolarized RMP but failed to block slow waves. The importance of ryanodine and inositol 1,4,5 trisphosphate-sensitive stores were examined using ryanodine, tetracaine, caffeine, and 2-aminoethyl diphenylborinate. Results suggest that although both stores are involved in regulation of slow wave frequency, neither are exclusively essential. The sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA) pump inhibitor cyclopiazonic acid inhibited pacemaker activity and Ca2+ waves suggesting that a functional SERCA pump is necessary for pacemaker activity. In conclusion, results from this study suggest that slow wave generation in the oviduct is voltage dependent, occurs in a membrane potential window, and is dependent on extracellular calcium and functional SERCA pumps. PMID:21881003

  16. An Investigation of RF Currents in a Magnetized Plasma Using a Slow Wave Structure.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-10-01

    AD-A135 880 AN INVESTIGATION 0F RF CURRENTS IN A MAGNETIZED PLASMA 1/2" USINO A SLOW WAVE..U) P0LYECHNIC INS OF NEW YORK FARMINGDALE DEPT OF...PLASMA USING A SLOW WAVE STRUCTURE ,0Q by B.R. Poole and B.R. Cheo / SCIENTIFIC REPORT Prepared For AIR FORCE OFFICE OF SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH Grant No...in a Scien’-c-’-evoort Magnetized Plasma Using a Slow Wave Structure Oct. 1,1978-December 31, 1982 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER 7. AUTpOI(.) 41

  17. Enhancing the efficiency of slow-wave electron cyclotron masers with the tapered refractive index

    SciTech Connect

    Kong Lingbao; Hou Zhiling; Jing Jian; Jin Haibo; Du Chaohai

    2013-04-15

    The nonlinear analysis of slow-wave electron cyclotron masers (ECM) based on anomalous Doppler effect in a slab waveguide is presented. A method of tapered refractive index (TRI) is proposed to enhance the efficiency of slow-wave ECM. The numerical calculations show that the TRI method can significantly enhance the efficiency of slow-wave ECM with the frequency ranging from the microwave to terahertz band. The effect of beam velocity spread on the efficiency has also been studied. Although the velocity spread suppresses the efficiency significantly, a great enhancement of efficiency can still be introduced by the TRI method.

  18. Large Scale Cortical Functional Networks Associated with Slow-Wave and Spindle-Burst-Related Spontaneous Activity

    PubMed Central

    McVea, David A.; Murphy, Timothy H.; Mohajerani, Majid H.

    2016-01-01

    Cortical sensory systems are active with rich patterns of activity during sleep and under light anesthesia. Remarkably, this activity shares many characteristics with those present when the awake brain responds to sensory stimuli. We review two specific forms of such activity: slow-wave activity (SWA) in the adult brain and spindle bursts in developing brain. SWA is composed of 0.5–4 Hz resting potential fluctuations. Although these fluctuations synchronize wide regions of cortex, recent large-scale imaging has shown spatial details of their distribution that reflect underlying cortical structural projections and networks. These networks are regulated, as prior awake experiences alter both the spatial and temporal features of SWA in subsequent sleep. Activity patterns of the immature brain, however, are very different from those of the adult. SWA is absent, and the dominant pattern is spindle bursts, intermittent high frequency oscillations superimposed on slower depolarizations within sensory cortices. These bursts are driven by intrinsic brain activity, which act to generate peripheral inputs, for example via limb twitches. They are present within developing sensory cortex before they are mature enough to exhibit directed movements and respond to external stimuli. Like in the adult, these patterns resemble those evoked by sensory stimulation when awake. It is suggested that spindle-burst activity is generated purposefully by the developing nervous system as a proxy for true external stimuli. While the sleep-related functions of both slow-wave and spindle-burst activity may not be entirely clear, they reflect robust regulated phenomena which can engage select wide-spread cortical circuits. These circuits are similar to those activated during sensory processing and volitional events. We highlight these two patterns of brain activity because both are prominent and well-studied forms of spontaneous activity that will yield valuable insights into brain function in

  19. Ionic mechanisms underlying electrical slow waves in canine airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Janssen, L J; Hague, C; Nana, R

    1998-09-01

    In canine bronchial smooth muscle (BSM), spasmogens evoke oscillations in membrane potential ("slow waves"). The depolarizing phase of the slow waves is mediated by voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels; we examined the roles played by Cl- and K+ currents and Na+-K+-ATPase activity in mediating the repolarizing phase. Slow waves were evoked using tetraethylammonium (25 mM) in the presence or absence of niflumic acid (100 microM; Cl- channel blocker) or ouabain (10 microM; block Na+-K+-ATPase) or after elevating external K+ concentration ([K+]) to 36 mM (to block K+ currents); curve fitting was performed to quantitate the rates of rise/fall and frequency under these conditions. Slow waves were markedly slowed, and eventually abolished, by niflumic acid but were unaffected by ouabain or high [K+]. Electrically evoked slow waves were also blocked in similar fashion by niflumic acid. We conclude that the repolarization phase is mediated by Ca2+-dependent Cl- currents. This information, together with our earlier finding that the depolarizing phase is due to voltage-dependent Ca2+ current, suggests that slow waves in canine BSM involve alternating opening and closing of Ca2+ and Cl- channels.

  20. Slow-Mode MHD Wave Penetration into a Coronal Null Point due to the Mode Transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afanasyev, Andrey N.; Uralov, Arkadiy M.

    2016-11-01

    Recent observations of magnetohydrodynamic oscillations and waves in solar active regions revealed their close link to quasi-periodic pulsations in flaring light curves. The nature of that link has not yet been understood in detail. In our analytical modelling we investigate propagation of slow magnetoacoustic waves in a solar active region, taking into account wave refraction and transmission of the slow magnetoacoustic mode into the fast one. The wave propagation is analysed in the geometrical acoustics approximation. Special attention is paid to the penetration of waves in the vicinity of a magnetic null point. The modelling has shown that the interaction of slow magnetoacoustic waves with the magnetic reconnection site is possible due to the mode transmission at the equipartition level where the sound speed is equal to the Alfvén speed. The efficiency of the transmission is also calculated.

  1. Design and Characterization of a W-Band Folded-Waveguide Slow-Wave Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumathy, Murugan; Datta, Subrata Kumar

    2016-12-01

    A single-section slow-wave structure for a W-band folded-waveguide traveling-wave tube with operating bandwidth of around 4% was designed for delivering the output power of 50 W at the operating voltage of 13.5 kV and operating beam current of 80 mA. The design was carried out using analytical formulations and 3D electromagnetic simulations. The beam-wave interaction analysis was carried out using large signal Lagrangian analysis and particle-in-cell simulation. The folded-waveguide slow-wave structure along with input-output couplers and RF windows were fabricated. Cold test measurements were carried out for dispersion characteristics of the slow-wave structure and voltage standing-wave ratio and insertion loss characteristics of the RF window. The measured cold circuit parameters show close agreement with the analysis.

  2. Linear and Non-Linear Excitation of Slow Waves in the Ion Cyclotron Frequency Range.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skiff, Frederick Norman

    We present an experimental and theoretical study of linear and nonlinear excitation of slow waves in the ion cyclotron frequency range in a finite-ion-temperature magnetized plasma. Loop antennas designed to induce electric fields either parallel or perpendicular to the static magnetic field are used to investigate coupling to the ion Bernstein wave (IBW). The experiments are modeled and the plasma is described using a self-adjoint equation which includes ion kinetic effects. Both in theory and experiment, the antenna loading is found to be insensitive to antenna polarization. Faraday shielded fast wave polarized antennas (previously thought not to excite slow waves) are shown to couple to the IBW by means of the plasma density gradient. The dependence of Bernstein wave radiation resistance on plasma density, parallel wavenumber, and wave frequency are investigated. Nonlinear (parametric) excitation of ion Bernstein waves is observed and the wave-wave coupling is compared to uniform pump theory. Variation of the decay growth rate with pump wave frequency and plasma density (collisionality) are observed. Harmonic generation associated with the use of electrostatic plate antennas is observed and found to agree with sheath rectification. Subsequent parametric coupling of the second harmonic (lower hybrid) wave with a nonresonant quasimode and with the slow ion cyclotron wave are observed. Decay wave amplitude scaling indicates nonlinear saturation of the process.

  3. Conventional, Bayesian, and Modified Prony's methods for characterizing fast and slow waves in equine cancellous bone

    PubMed Central

    Groopman, Amber M.; Katz, Jonathan I.; Holland, Mark R.; Fujita, Fuminori; Matsukawa, Mami; Mizuno, Katsunori; Wear, Keith A.; Miller, James G.

    2015-01-01

    Conventional, Bayesian, and the modified least-squares Prony's plus curve-fitting (MLSP + CF) methods were applied to data acquired using 1 MHz center frequency, broadband transducers on a single equine cancellous bone specimen that was systematically shortened from 11.8 mm down to 0.5 mm for a total of 24 sample thicknesses. Due to overlapping fast and slow waves, conventional analysis methods were restricted to data from sample thicknesses ranging from 11.8 mm to 6.0 mm. In contrast, Bayesian and MLSP + CF methods successfully separated fast and slow waves and provided reliable estimates of the ultrasonic properties of fast and slow waves for sample thicknesses ranging from 11.8 mm down to 3.5 mm. Comparisons of the three methods were carried out for phase velocity at the center frequency and the slope of the attenuation coefficient for the fast and slow waves. Good agreement among the three methods was also observed for average signal loss at the center frequency. The Bayesian and MLSP + CF approaches were able to separate the fast and slow waves and provide good estimates of the fast and slow wave properties even when the two wave modes overlapped in both time and frequency domains making conventional analysis methods unreliable. PMID:26328678

  4. Conventional, Bayesian, and Modified Prony's methods for characterizing fast and slow waves in equine cancellous bone.

    PubMed

    Groopman, Amber M; Katz, Jonathan I; Holland, Mark R; Fujita, Fuminori; Matsukawa, Mami; Mizuno, Katsunori; Wear, Keith A; Miller, James G

    2015-08-01

    Conventional, Bayesian, and the modified least-squares Prony's plus curve-fitting (MLSP + CF) methods were applied to data acquired using 1 MHz center frequency, broadband transducers on a single equine cancellous bone specimen that was systematically shortened from 11.8 mm down to 0.5 mm for a total of 24 sample thicknesses. Due to overlapping fast and slow waves, conventional analysis methods were restricted to data from sample thicknesses ranging from 11.8 mm to 6.0 mm. In contrast, Bayesian and MLSP + CF methods successfully separated fast and slow waves and provided reliable estimates of the ultrasonic properties of fast and slow waves for sample thicknesses ranging from 11.8 mm down to 3.5 mm. Comparisons of the three methods were carried out for phase velocity at the center frequency and the slope of the attenuation coefficient for the fast and slow waves. Good agreement among the three methods was also observed for average signal loss at the center frequency. The Bayesian and MLSP + CF approaches were able to separate the fast and slow waves and provide good estimates of the fast and slow wave properties even when the two wave modes overlapped in both time and frequency domains making conventional analysis methods unreliable.

  5. Origin and propagation of individual slow waves along the intact feline small intestine.

    PubMed

    Lammers, Wim J E P; Stephen, Betty

    2008-03-01

    The pattern of propagation of slow waves in the small intestine is not clear. Specifically, it is not known whether propagation is determined by a single dominant ICC-MP (Interstitial cells of Cajal located in the Myenteric Plexus) pacemaker unit or whether there are multiple active pacemakers. To determine this pattern of propagation, waveforms were recorded simultaneously from 240 electrodes distributed along the whole length of the intact isolated feline small intestine. After the experiments, the propagation patterns of successive individual slow waves were analysed. In the intact small intestine, there was only a single slow wave pacemaker unit active, and this was located at or 6-10 cm from the pyloric junction. From this site, slow waves propagated in the aboral direction at gradually decreasing velocities. The majority of slow waves (73%) reached the ileocaecal junction while the remaining waves were blocked. Ligation of the intestine at one to four locations led to: (a) decrease in the distal frequencies; (b) disappearance of distal propagation blocks; (c) increase in velocities; (d) emergence of multiple and unstable pacemaker sites; and (e) propagation from these sites in the aboral and oral directions. In conclusion, in the quiescent feline small intestine a single pacemaker unit dominates the organ, with occasional propagation blocks of the slow waves, thereby producing the well-known frequency gradient.

  6. Capillary-gravity waves generated by a slow moving object.

    PubMed

    Chepelianskii, A D; Chevy, F; Raphaël, E

    2008-02-22

    We investigate theoretically and experimentally the capillary-gravity waves created by a small object moving steadily at the water-air interface along a circular trajectory. It is well established that, for straight uniform motion, no steady waves appear at velocities below the minimum phase velocity c(min)=23 cm s(-1). We demonstrate that no such velocity threshold exists for a steady circular motion, for which, even for small velocities, a finite wave drag is experienced by the object. This wave drag originates from the emission of a spiral-like wave pattern. Our results are in good agreement with direct experimental observations of the wave pattern created by a circularly moving needle in contact with water. Our study leads to new insights into the problem of animal locomotion at the water-air interface.

  7. Microfabrication of diamond-based slow-wave circuits for mm-wave and THz vacuum electronic sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lueck, M. R.; Malta, D. M.; Gilchrist, K. H.; Kory, C. L.; Mearini, G. T.; Dayton, J. A.

    2011-06-01

    Planar and helical slow-wave circuits for THz radiation sources have been made using novel microfabrication and assembly methods. A biplanar slow-wave circuit for a 650 GHz backward wave oscillator (BWO) was fabricated through the growth of diamond into high aspect ratio silicon molds and the selective metallization of the tops and sidewalls of 90 µm tall diamond features using lithographically created shadow masks. Helical slow-wave circuits for a 650 GHz BWO and a 95 GHz traveling wave tube were created through the patterning of trenches in thin film diamond, electroplating of gold half-helices, and high accuracy bonding of helix halves. The development of new techniques for the microfabrication of vacuum electronic components will help to facilitate compact and high-power sources for terahertz range radiation.

  8. Propagation of Long-Wavelength Nonlinear Slow Sausage Waves in Stratified Magnetic Flux Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbulescu, M.; Erdélyi, R.

    2016-05-01

    The propagation of nonlinear, long-wavelength, slow sausage waves in an expanding magnetic flux tube, embedded in a non-magnetic stratified environment, is discussed. The governing equation for surface waves, which is akin to the Leibovich-Roberts equation, is derived using the method of multiple scales. The solitary wave solution of the equation is obtained numerically. The results obtained are illustrative of a solitary wave whose properties are highly dependent on the degree of stratification.

  9. Surface Current Density Mapping for Identification of Gastric Slow Wave Propagation

    PubMed Central

    Bradshaw, L. A.; Cheng, L. K.; Richards, W. O.; Pullan, A. J.

    2009-01-01

    The magnetogastrogram records clinically relevant parameters of the electrical slow wave of the stomach noninvasively. Besides slow wave frequency, gastric slow wave propagation velocity is a potentially useful clinical indicator of the state of health of gastric tissue, but it is a difficult parameter to determine from noninvasive bioelectric or biomagnetic measurements. We present a method for computing the surface current density (SCD) from multichannel magnetogastrogram recordings that allows computation of the propagation velocity of the gastric slow wave. A moving dipole source model with hypothetical as well as realistic biomagnetometer parameters demonstrates that while a relatively sparse array of magnetometer sensors is sufficient to compute a single average propagation velocity, more detailed information about spatial variations in propagation velocity requires higher density magnetometer arrays. Finally, the method is validated with simultaneous MGG and serosal EMG measurements in a porcine subject. PMID:19403355

  10. Determining attenuation properties of interfering fast and slow ultrasonic waves in cancellous bone

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Amber M.; Hoffman, Joseph J.; Anderson, Christian C.; Holland, Mark R.; Nagatani, Yoshiki; Mizuno, Katsunori; Matsukawa, Mami; Miller, James G.

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that interference between fast waves and slow waves can lead to observed negative dispersion in cancellous bone. In this study, the effects of overlapping fast and slow waves on measurements of the apparent attenuation as a function of propagation distance are investigated along with methods of analysis used to determine the attenuation properties. Two methods are applied to simulated data that were generated based on experimentally acquired signals taken from a bovine specimen. The first method uses a time-domain approach that was dictated by constraints imposed by the partial overlap of fast and slow waves. The second method uses a frequency-domain log-spectral subtraction technique on the separated fast and slow waves. Applying the time-domain analysis to the broadband data yields apparent attenuation behavior that is larger in the early stages of propagation and decreases as the wave travels deeper. In contrast, performing frequency-domain analysis on the separated fast waves and slow waves results in attenuation coefficients that are independent of propagation distance. Results suggest that features arising from the analysis of overlapping two-mode data may represent an alternate explanation for the previously reported apparent dependence on propagation distance of the attenuation coefficient of cancellous bone. PMID:21973378

  11. Determining attenuation properties of interfering fast and slow ultrasonic waves in cancellous bone.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Amber M; Hoffman, Joseph J; Anderson, Christian C; Holland, Mark R; Nagatani, Yoshiki; Mizuno, Katsunori; Matsukawa, Mami; Miller, James G

    2011-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that interference between fast waves and slow waves can lead to observed negative dispersion in cancellous bone. In this study, the effects of overlapping fast and slow waves on measurements of the apparent attenuation as a function of propagation distance are investigated along with methods of analysis used to determine the attenuation properties. Two methods are applied to simulated data that were generated based on experimentally acquired signals taken from a bovine specimen. The first method uses a time-domain approach that was dictated by constraints imposed by the partial overlap of fast and slow waves. The second method uses a frequency-domain log-spectral subtraction technique on the separated fast and slow waves. Applying the time-domain analysis to the broadband data yields apparent attenuation behavior that is larger in the early stages of propagation and decreases as the wave travels deeper. In contrast, performing frequency-domain analysis on the separated fast waves and slow waves results in attenuation coefficients that are independent of propagation distance. Results suggest that features arising from the analysis of overlapping two-mode data may represent an alternate explanation for the previously reported apparent dependence on propagation distance of the attenuation coefficient of cancellous bone.

  12. Slow Waves in Fractures Filled with Viscous Fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Korneev, Valeri

    2008-01-08

    Stoneley guided waves in a fluid-filled fracture generally have larger amplitudes than other waves, and therefore, their properties need to be incorporated in more realistic models. In this study, a fracture is modeled as an infinite layer of viscous fluid bounded by two elastic half-spaces with identical parameters. For small fracture thickness, I obtain a simple dispersion equation for wave-propagation velocity. This velocity is much smaller than the velocity of a fluid wave in a Biot-type solution, in which fracture walls are assumed to be rigid. At seismic prospecting frequencies and realistic fracture thicknesses, the Stoneley guided wave has wavelengths on the order of several meters and an attenuation Q factor exceeding 10, which indicates the possibility of resonance excitation in fluid-bearing rocks. The velocity and attenuation of Stoneley guided waves are distinctly different at low frequencies for water and oil. The predominant role of fractures in fluid flow at field scales is supported by permeability data showing an increase of several orders of magnitude when compared to values obtained at laboratory scales. These data suggest that Stoneley guided waves should be taken into account in theories describing seismic wave propagation in fluid-saturated rocks.

  13. Linear analysis of a backward wave oscillator with triangular corrugated slow wave structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saber, Md. Ghulam; Sagor, Rakibul Hasan; Amin, Md. Ruhul

    2016-05-01

    In this work, a backward wave oscillator (BWO) with triangularly corrugated periodic metallic slow wave structure (TrCSWS) driven by an infinitely thin annular electron beam is studied using linear theory. The electron beam is assumed to be guided by a strong magnetic field. The triangular axial profile of the SWS is approximated by a Fourier series in order to apply the linear Rayleigh-Fourier (R-F) theory that has long been used in the theoretical analysis of BWOs with sinusoidally corrugated SWS (SCSWS). The dispersion equation for various beam parameters has been solved and the temporal growth rate (TGR) of the electromagnetic wave for the fundamental TM_{01} mode is calculated numerically. The TGR values for different beam parameters have been compared with those of the BWO with SCSWS, semi-circularly corrugated SWS (SCCSWS) and trapezoidally corrugated SWS (TCSWS). In order to compare the TGR values, the amplitude of corrugation of the TrCSWS is varied so that its dispersion curve of TM_{01} mode almost coincides with that of the SCSWS and TCSWS. The study reveals that the performance (in terms of TGR) of the proposed BWO with TrCSWS is comparable to that of other BWOs with SCSWS and TCSWS for the same set of beam parameters and it provides significantly better performance than SCCSWS. So, the proposed TrCSWS that can easily be constructed may replace SCSWS, SCCSWS or TCSWS as their viable alternative.

  14. Mechanisms of long-lasting hyperpolarizations underlying slow sleep oscillations in cat corticothalamic networks.

    PubMed Central

    Contreras, D; Timofeev, I; Steriade, M

    1996-01-01

    1. To explore the nature of the long-lasting hyperpolarizations that characterize slow oscillations in corticothalamic circuits in vivo, intracellular recordings were obtained under ketamine-xylazine anaesthesia from cortical (Cx) cells of the cat precruciate motor cortex, thalamic reticular (RE) cells from the rostrolateral sector, and thalamocortical (TC) cells from the ventrolateral (VL) nucleus. 2. Measurements in the three cell types showed input resistance (Rin) to be highest during the long-lasting hyperpolarizations that correspond to depth-positive waves of the cortical EEG. Rin was lowest during the early phase of high-amplitude depth-negative EEG waves and increased thereafter until the next cycle of the slow oscillation. 3. Spontaneous long-lasting hyperpolarizations were compared with those evoked by dorsal thalamic stimulation. Voltage versus current (V-I) plots showed similar membrane potential (Vm) ranges and slopes for spontaneous and evoked hyperpolarizations in both Cx and RE cells. V-I plots from TC cells had similar slopes, but Vm during evoked hyperpolarizations was displaced towards more negative values. 4. Intracellular injection of constant hyperpolarizing current in Cx cells increased the amplitude of the initial part of the depolarizing plateau of the slow oscillation, but decreased the amplitude of the last part. 5. These results suggest disfacilitation to be the dominant mechanism in the membrane of cortical and thalamic cells during the spontaneous long-lasting hyperpolarizations, which shape and synchronize slow oscillations in corticothalamic networks. In Cx and RE cells, the same mechanism underlies thalamically evoked long-lasting hyperpolarizations. By contrast, evoked responses in TC cells show a strong additional hyperpolarizing factor. We propose that GABAB processes are stronger in TC than in Cx neurones, thus rendering the thalamus an easier target for absence-type epileptic phenomena through potentiation of thalamic rebound

  15. Discrete-State Simulated Annealing For Traveling-Wave Tube Slow-Wave Circuit Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Jeffrey D.; Bulson, Brian A.; Kory, Carol L.; Williams, W. Dan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Algorithms based on the global optimization technique of simulated annealing (SA) have proven useful in designing traveling-wave tube (TWT) slow-wave circuits for high RF power efficiency. The characteristic of SA that enables it to determine a globally optimized solution is its ability to accept non-improving moves in a controlled manner. In the initial stages of the optimization, the algorithm moves freely through configuration space, accepting most of the proposed designs. This freedom of movement allows non-intuitive designs to be explored rather than restricting the optimization to local improvement upon the initial configuration. As the optimization proceeds, the rate of acceptance of non-improving moves is gradually reduced until the algorithm converges to the optimized solution. The rate at which the freedom of movement is decreased is known as the annealing or cooling schedule of the SA algorithm. The main disadvantage of SA is that there is not a rigorous theoretical foundation for determining the parameters of the cooling schedule. The choice of these parameters is highly problem dependent and the designer needs to experiment in order to determine values that will provide a good optimization in a reasonable amount of computational time. This experimentation can absorb a large amount of time especially when the algorithm is being applied to a new type of design. In order to eliminate this disadvantage, a variation of SA known as discrete-state simulated annealing (DSSA), was recently developed. DSSA provides the theoretical foundation for a generic cooling schedule which is problem independent, Results of similar quality to SA can be obtained, but without the extra computational time required to tune the cooling parameters. Two algorithm variations based on DSSA were developed and programmed into a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet graphical user interface (GUI) to the two-dimensional nonlinear multisignal helix traveling-wave amplifier analysis program TWA3

  16. Propagation of slow waves in the guinea-pig gastric antrum.

    PubMed

    Hirst, G David S; Garcia-Londoño, A Pilar; Edwards, Frank R

    2006-02-15

    Intracellular recordings were made from the circular layer of the intact muscular wall of the guinea-pig gastric antrum in preparations where much of the corpus remained attached. When two electrodes were positioned parallel to and near to the greater curvature, slow waves were first detected at the oral site and subsequently at the anal site: the oro-anal conduction velocity was found to be 2.5 mm s(-1). When one electrode was positioned near the greater curvature and the other at a circumferential location, slow waves were first detected near the greater curvature and subsequently at the circumferential site: the circumferential conduction velocity was 13.9 mm s(-1). When recordings were made from preparations in which the circular muscle layer had been removed, the oro-anal and the circumferential conduction velocities were both about 3.5 mm s(-1). When slow waves were recorded from preparations in which much of the myenteric network of antral interstitial cells (ICC(MY)) had been dissected away, slow waves were first detected near the region of intact ICC(MY) and subsequently at a circumferential location: the circumferential conduction velocity of slow waves in regions devoid of ICC(MY) was 14.7 mm s(-1). When the electrical properties of isolated single bundles of circular muscle were determined, their length constants were about 3 mm and their time constant about 230 ms, giving an asymptotic electrotonic propagation velocity of 25 mm s(-1). Oro-anal electrical coupling between adjacent bundles of circular muscle was found to vary widely: some bundles were well connected to neighbouring bundles whereas others were not. Together the observations suggest that the slow oro-anal progression of slow waves results from a slow conduction velocity of pacemaker potentials in the myenteric network of interstitial cells. The rapid circumferential conduction of slow waves results from the electrical properties of the circular muscle layer which allow intramuscular ICC

  17. The Effects of Sleep Continuity Disruption on Positive Mood and Sleep Architecture in Healthy Adults.

    PubMed

    Finan, Patrick H; Quartana, Phillip J; Smith, Michael T

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to test an experimental model of the effects of sleep continuity disturbance on sleep architecture and positive mood in order to better understand the mechanisms linking insomnia and depression. Participants were randomized to receive 3 consecutive nights of sleep continuity disruption via forced nocturnal awakenings (FA, n = 21), or one of two control conditions: restricted sleep opportunity (RSO, n = 17) or uninterrupted sleep (US, n = 24). The study was set in an inpatient clinical research suite. Healthy, good-sleeping men and women were included. Polysomnography was used to measure sleep architecture, and mood was assessed via self-report each day. Compared to restricted sleep opportunity controls, forced awakenings subjects had significantly less slow wave sleep (P < 0.05) after the first night of sleep deprivation, and significantly lower positive mood (P < 0.05) after the second night of sleep deprivation. The differential change in slow wave sleep statistically mediated the observed group differences in positive mood (P = 0.002). To our knowledge, this is the first human experimental study to demonstrate that, despite comparable reductions in total sleep time, partial sleep loss from sleep continuity disruption is more detrimental to positive mood than partial sleep loss from delaying bedtime, even when controlling for concomitant increases in negative mood. With these findings, we provide temporal evidence in support of a putative biologic mechanism (slow wave sleep deficit) that could help explain the strong comorbidity between insomnia and depression. © 2015 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  18. [Sleep as a restorative process under extreme exposure conditions].

    PubMed

    Stoilova, I

    1992-03-01

    In 40 aquanauts, a prolonged stay under increased pressure (11 to 46 kgs/cm2) of the oxygen-helium-nitrogen mixture did not affect the average duration of sleep. Slow-wave sleep, mostly its 3 rd and 4 th stages, and paradoxical sleep were significantly decreased whereas the light sleep/profound sleep ratio increased. The cyclic structure of sleep became altered. The longer the exposure to high pressure led to an augmentation of the slow-wave sleep and REM-phase, but the normal cycles terminating with a REM-phase could not be formed during the experiment.

  19. Transcranial slow oscillation stimulation during NREM sleep enhances acquisition of the radial maze task and modulates cortical network activity in rats

    PubMed Central

    Binder, Sonja; Rawohl, Julia; Born, Jan; Marshall, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Slow wave sleep, hallmarked by the occurrence of slow oscillations (SO), plays an important role for the consolidation of hippocampus-dependent memories. Transcranial stimulation by weak electric currents oscillating at the endogenous SO frequency (SO-tDCS) during post-learning sleep was previously shown by us to boost SO activity and improve the consolidation of hippocampus-dependent memory in human subjects. Here, we aimed at replicating and extending these results to a rodent model. Rats were trained for 12 days at the beginning of their inactive phase in the reference memory version of the radial arm maze. In a between subjects design, animals received SO-tDCS over prefrontal cortex (PFC) or sham stimulation within a time frame of 1 h during subsequent non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. Applied over multiple daily sessions SO-tDCS impacted cortical network activity as measured by EEG and behavior: at the EEG level, SO-tDCS enhanced post-stimulation upper delta (2–4 Hz) activity whereby the first stimulations of each day were preferentially affected. Furthermore, commencing on day 8, SO-tDCS acutely decreased theta activity indicating long-term effects on cortical networks. Behaviorally, working memory for baited maze arms was enhanced up to day 4, indicating enhanced consolidation of task-inherent rules, while reference memory errors did not differ between groups. Taken together, we could show here for the first time an effect of SO-tDCS during NREM sleep on cognitive functions and on cortical activity in a rodent model. PMID:24409131

  20. The influence of learning on sleep slow oscillations and associated spindles and ripples in humans and rats.

    PubMed

    Mölle, Matthias; Eschenko, Oxana; Gais, Steffen; Sara, Susan J; Born, Jan

    2009-03-01

    The mechanisms underlying off-line consolidation of memory during sleep are elusive. Learning of hippocampus-dependent tasks increases neocortical slow oscillation synchrony, and thalamocortical spindle and hippocampal ripple activity during subsequent non-rapid eye movement sleep. Slow oscillations representing an oscillation between global neocortical states of increased (up-state) and decreased (down-state) neuronal firing temporally group thalamic spindle and hippocampal ripple activity, which both occur preferentially during slow oscillation up-states. Here we examined whether slow oscillations also group learning-induced increases in spindle and ripple activity, thereby providing time-frames of facilitated hippocampus-to-neocortical information transfer underlying the conversion of temporary into long-term memories. Learning (word-pairs in humans, odor-reward associations in rats) increased slow oscillation up-states and, in humans, shaped the timing of down-states. Slow oscillations grouped spindle and rat ripple activity into up-states under basal conditions. Prior learning produced in humans an increase in spindle activity focused on slow oscillation up-states. In rats, learning induced a distinct increase in spindle and ripple activity that was not synchronized to up-states. Event-correlation histograms indicated an increase in spindle activity with the occurrence of ripples. This increase was prolonged after learning, suggesting a direct temporal tuning between ripples and spindles. The lack of a grouping effect of slow oscillations on learning-induced spindles and ripples in rats, together with the less pronounced effects of learning on slow oscillations, presumably reflects a weaker dependence of odor learning on thalamo-neocortical circuitry. Slow oscillations might provide an effective temporal frame for hippocampus-to-neocortical information transfer only when thalamo-neocortical systems are already critically involved during learning.

  1. Analyzing critical propagation in a reaction-diffusion-advection model using unstable slow waves.

    PubMed

    Kneer, Frederike; Obermayer, Klaus; Dahlem, Markus A

    2015-02-01

    The effect of advection on the propagation and in particular on the critical minimal speed of traveling waves in a reaction-diffusion model is studied. Previous theoretical studies estimated this effect on the velocity of stable fast waves and predicted the existence of a critical advection strength below which propagating waves are not supported anymore. In this paper, an analytical expression for the advection-velocity relation of the unstable slow wave is derived. In addition, the critical advection strength is calculated taking into account the unstable slow wave solution. We also analyze a two-variable reaction-diffusion-advection model numerically in a wide parameter range. Due to the new control parameter (advection) we can find stable wave propagation in the otherwise non-excitable parameter regime, if the advection strength exceeds a critical value. Comparing theoretical predictions to numerical results, we find that they are in good agreement. Theory provides an explanation for the observed behaviour.

  2. Epileptic encephalopathy with continuous spike-waves during sleep: the need for transition from childhood to adulthood medical care appears to be related to etiology.

    PubMed

    de Saint-Martin, Anne; Rudolf, Gabrielle; Seegmuller, Caroline; Valenti-Hirsch, Maria Paola; Hirsch, Edouard

    2014-08-01

    Epileptic encephalopathy with continuous diffuse spike-waves during slow-wave sleep (ECSWS) presents clinically with infrequent nocturnal focal seizures, atypical absences related to secondary bilateral synchrony, negative myoclonia, and atonic and rare generalized tonic-clonic seizures. The unique electroencephalography (EEG) pattern found in ECSWS consists of continuous, diffuse, bilateral spike-waves during slow-wave sleep. Despite the eventual disappearance of clinical seizures and EEG abnormalities by adolescence, the prognosis is guarded in most cases because of neuropsychological and behavioral deficits. ECSWS has a heterogeneous etiology (genetic, structural, and unknown). Because epilepsy and electroencephalography (EEG) abnormalities in epileptic encephalopathy with continuous diffuse spike-waves during slow-wave sleep (ECSWS) are self-limited and age related, the need for ongoing medical care and transition to adult care might be questioned. For adolescents in whom etiology remains unknown (possibly genetic) and who experience the disappearance of seizures and EEG abnormalities, there is rarely need for long-term neurologic follow-up, because often a relatively normal cognitive and social evolution follows. However, the majority of patients with structural and possibly "genetic syndromic" etiologies will have persistent cognitive deficits and will need suitable socioeducative care. Therefore, the transition process in ECSWS will depend mainly on etiology and its related features (epileptic active phase duration, and cognitive and behavioral evolution) and revolve around neuropsychological and social support rather than medical and pharmacologic follow-up. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2014 International League Against Epilepsy.

  3. Alpha-wave frequency characteristics in health and insomnia during sleep.

    PubMed

    Schwabedal, Justus T C; Riedl, Maik; Penzel, Thomas; Wessel, Niels

    2016-06-01

    Appearances of alpha waves in the sleep electrencephalogram indicate physiological, brief states of awakening that lie in between wakefulness and sleep. These microstates may also cause the loss in sleep quality experienced by individuals suffering from insomnia. To distinguish such pathological awakenings from physiological ones, differences in alpha-wave characteristics between transient awakening and wakefulness observed before the onset of sleep were studied. In polysomnographic datasets of sleep-healthy participants (n = 18) and patients with insomnia (n = 10), alpha waves were extracted from the relaxed, wake state before sleep onset, wake after sleep-onset periods and arousals of sleep. In these, alpha frequency and variability were determined as the median and standard deviation of inverse peak-to-peak intervals. Before sleep onset, patients with insomnia showed a decreased alpha variability compared with healthy participants (P < 0.05). After sleep onset, both groups showed patterns of decreased alpha frequency that was lower for wake after sleep-onset periods of shorter duration. For patients with insomnia, alpha variability increased for short wake after sleep-onset periods. Major differences between the two groups were encountered during arousal. In particular, the alpha frequency in patients with insomnia rebounded to wake levels, while the frequency in healthy participants remained at the reduced level of short wake after sleep-onset periods. Reductions in alpha frequency during wake after sleep-onset periods may be related to the microstate between sleep and wakefulness that was described for such brief awakenings. Reduced alpha variability before sleep may indicate a dysfunction of the alpha generation mechanism in insomnia. Alpha characteristics may also prove valuable in the study of other sleep and attention disorders. © 2016 European Sleep Research Society.

  4. Sleep and manipulations of the sleep-wake rhythm in depression.

    PubMed

    Berger, M; van Calker, D; Riemann, D

    2003-01-01

    Disturbed sleep is typical for most depressed patients and complaints about disordered sleep are the hallmarks of the disorder. Polysomnographic sleep research has demonstrated that besides impaired sleep continuity, sleep in depression is characterized by a reduction of slow wave sleep and a disinhibition of random eye movement (REM) sleep, with a shortening of REM latency, a prolongation of the first REM period and increased REM density. Our own experimental work has focused on the reciprocal interaction hypothesis of non-REM and REM sleep regulation as a model to explain the characteristic features of depressed sleep. In agreement with the major tenet of this model, administration of cholinomimetics provoked shortened REM latency in healthy subjects and led to an even stronger REM sleep disinhibition in depressed patients. Manipulations of the sleep-wake cycle, such as sleep deprivation or a phase advance of the sleep period, alleviate depressive symptoms. These data indicate a strong bidirectional relationship between sleep, sleep alterations and depression.

  5. Origin and propagation of human gastric slow-wave activity defined by high-resolution mapping

    PubMed Central

    Du, Peng; Cheng, Leo K.; Egbuji, John U.; Lammers, Wim J. E. P.; Windsor, John A.; Pullan, Andrew J.

    2010-01-01

    Slow waves coordinate gastric motility, and abnormal slow-wave activity is thought to contribute to motility disorders. The current understanding of normal human gastric slow-wave activity is based on extrapolation from data derived from sparse electrode recordings and is therefore potentially incomplete. This study employed high-resolution (HR) mapping to reevaluate human gastric slow-wave activity. HR mapping was performed in 12 patients with normal stomachs undergoing upper abdominal surgery, using flexible printed circuit board (PCB) arrays (interelectrode distance 7.6 mm). Up to six PCBs (192 electrodes; 93 cm2) were used simultaneously. Slow-wave activity was characterized by spatiotemporal mapping, and regional frequencies, amplitudes, and velocities were defined and compared. Slow-wave activity in the pacemaker region (mid to upper corpus, greater curvature) was of greater amplitude (mean 0.57 mV) and higher velocity (8.0 mm/s) than the corpus (0.25 mV, 3.0 mm/s) (P < 0.001) and displayed isotropic propagation. A marked transition to higher amplitude and velocity activity occurred in the antrum (0.52 mV, 5.9 mm/s) (P < 0.001). Multiple (3–4) wavefronts were found to propagate simultaneously in the organoaxial direction. Frequencies were consistent between regions (2.83 ± 0.35 cycles per min). HR mapping has provided a more complete understanding of normal human gastric slow-wave activity. The pacemaker region is associated with high-amplitude, high-velocity activity, and multiple wavefronts propagate simultaneously. These data provide a baseline for future HR mapping studies in disease states and will inform noninvasive diagnostic strategies. PMID:20595620

  6. Clustering of Ca(2+) transients in interstitial cells of Cajal defines slow wave duration.

    PubMed

    Drumm, Bernard T; Hennig, Grant W; Battersby, Matthew J; Cunningham, Erin K; Sung, Tae Sik; Ward, Sean M; Sanders, Kenton M; Baker, Salah A

    2017-07-03

    Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) in the myenteric plexus region (ICC-MY) of the small intestine are pacemakers that generate rhythmic depolarizations known as slow waves. Slow waves depend on activation of Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channels (ANO1) in ICC, propagate actively within networks of ICC-MY, and conduct to smooth muscle cells where they generate action potentials and phasic contractions. Thus, mechanisms of Ca(2+) regulation in ICC are fundamental to the motor patterns of the bowel. Here, we characterize the nature of Ca(2+) transients in ICC-MY within intact muscles, using mice expressing a genetically encoded Ca(2+) sensor, GCaMP3, in ICC. Ca(2+) transients in ICC-MY display a complex firing pattern caused by localized Ca(2+) release events arising from multiple sites in cell somata and processes. Ca(2+) transients are clustered within the time course of slow waves but fire asynchronously during these clusters. The durations of Ca(2+) transient clusters (CTCs) correspond to slow wave durations (plateau phase). Simultaneous imaging and intracellular electrical recordings revealed that the upstroke depolarization of slow waves precedes clusters of Ca(2+) transients. Summation of CTCs results in relatively uniform Ca(2+) responses from one slow wave to another. These Ca(2+) transients are caused by Ca(2+) release from intracellular stores and depend on ryanodine receptors as well as amplification from IP3 receptors. Reduced extracellular Ca(2+) concentrations and T-type Ca(2+) channel blockers decreased the number of firing sites and firing probability of Ca(2+) transients. In summary, the fundamental electrical events of small intestinal muscles generated by ICC-MY depend on asynchronous firing of Ca(2+) transients from multiple intracellular release sites. These events are organized into clusters by Ca(2+) influx through T-type Ca(2+) channels to sustain activation of ANO1 channels and generate the plateau phase of slow waves. © 2017 Drumm et al.

  7. Giant amplification in degenerate band edge slow-wave structures interacting with an electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Othman, Mohamed A. K.; Veysi, Mehdi; Capolino, Filippo; Figotin, Alexander

    2016-03-15

    We propose a new amplification regime based on a synchronous operation of four degenerate electromagnetic (EM) modes in a slow-wave structure and the electron beam, referred to as super synchronization. These four EM modes arise in a Fabry-Pérot cavity when degenerate band edge (DBE) condition is satisfied. The modes interact constructively with the electron beam resulting in superior amplification. In particular, much larger gains are achieved for smaller beam currents compared to conventional structures based on synchronization with only a single EM mode. We demonstrate giant gain scaling with respect to the length of the slow-wave structure compared to conventional Pierce type single mode traveling wave tube amplifiers. We construct a coupled transmission line model for a loaded waveguide slow-wave structure exhibiting a DBE, and investigate the phenomenon of giant gain via super synchronization using the Pierce model generalized to multimode interaction.

  8. Giant amplification in degenerate band edge slow-wave structures interacting with an electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Othman, Mohamed A. K.; Veysi, Mehdi; Figotin, Alexander; Capolino, Filippo

    2016-03-01

    We propose a new amplification regime based on a synchronous operation of four degenerate electromagnetic (EM) modes in a slow-wave structure and the electron beam, referred to as super synchronization. These four EM modes arise in a Fabry-Pérot cavity when degenerate band edge (DBE) condition is satisfied. The modes interact constructively with the electron beam resulting in superior amplification. In particular, much larger gains are achieved for smaller beam currents compared to conventional structures based on synchronization with only a single EM mode. We demonstrate giant gain scaling with respect to the length of the slow-wave structure compared to conventional Pierce type single mode traveling wave tube amplifiers. We construct a coupled transmission line model for a loaded waveguide slow-wave structure exhibiting a DBE, and investigate the phenomenon of giant gain via super synchronization using the Pierce model generalized to multimode interaction.

  9. Slow waves moving near the openings in highly stressed conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzev, Michail; Makarov, Vladimir

    2017-04-01

    In situ experiments have shown the unusual deformation waves near the openings on high depth of the construction. Process of the wave spreading is beginning after the mining and has two stages of the zonal mesocracking structure formation and development [1]. Extending in a radial direction, the wave poorly fades with distance. For phenomenon modelling the theoretical decision for non-Eucledian models about opening of round cross-section in strongly compressed rock massif is used [2]. The decision qualitatively repeats behaviour of a wave in a rock mass, adjustment of phenomenological parametres is executed. References [1] Vladimir V. Makarov, Mikhail A. Guzev, Vladimir N. Odintsev, Lyudmila S. Ksendzenko (2016) Periodical zonal character of damage near the openings in highly-stressed rock mass conditions. Journal of Rock Mechanics and Geotechnical Engineering. Volume 8, Issue 2, pp. 164-169. [2] M.A. Guzev, V.V. Makarov, 2007. Deforming and failure of the high stressed rocks around the openings, RAS Edit., Vladivostok, 2007, P. 232 (in Russian).

  10. Noninvasive biomagnetic detection of intestinal slow wave dysrhythmias in chronic mesenteric ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Muszynski, N. D.; Cheng, L. K.; Bradshaw, L. A.; Naslund, T. C.; Richards, W. O.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic mesenteric ischemia (CMI) is a challenging clinical problem that is difficult to diagnose noninvasively. Diagnosis early in the disease process would enable life-saving early surgical intervention. Previous studies established that superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometers detect the slow wave changes in the magnetoenterogram (MENG) noninvasively following induction of mesenteric ischemia in animal models. The purpose of this study was to assess functional physiological changes in the intestinal slow wave MENG of patients with chronic mesenteric ischemia. Pre- and postoperative studies were conducted on CMI patients using MENG and intraoperative recordings using invasive serosal electromyograms (EMG). Our preoperative MENG recordings showed that patients with CMI exhibited a significant decrease in intestinal slow wave frequency from 8.9 ± 0.3 cpm preprandial to 7.4 ± 0.1 cpm postprandial (P < 0.01) that was not observed in postoperative recordings (9.3 ± 0.2 cpm preprandial and 9.4 ± 0.4 cpm postprandial, P = 0.86). Intraoperative recording detected multiple frequencies from the ischemic portion of jejunum before revascularization, whereas normal serosal intestinal slow wave frequencies were observed after revascularization. The preoperative MENG data also showed signals with multiple frequencies suggestive of uncoupling and intestinal ischemia similar to intraoperative serosal EMG. Our results showed that multichannel MENG can identify intestinal slow wave dysrhythmias in CMI patients. PMID:25930082

  11. Noninvasive biomagnetic detection of intestinal slow wave dysrhythmias in chronic mesenteric ischemia.

    PubMed

    Somarajan, S; Muszynski, N D; Cheng, L K; Bradshaw, L A; Naslund, T C; Richards, W O

    2015-07-01

    Chronic mesenteric ischemia (CMI) is a challenging clinical problem that is difficult to diagnose noninvasively. Diagnosis early in the disease process would enable life-saving early surgical intervention. Previous studies established that superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometers detect the slow wave changes in the magnetoenterogram (MENG) noninvasively following induction of mesenteric ischemia in animal models. The purpose of this study was to assess functional physiological changes in the intestinal slow wave MENG of patients with chronic mesenteric ischemia. Pre- and postoperative studies were conducted on CMI patients using MENG and intraoperative recordings using invasive serosal electromyograms (EMG). Our preoperative MENG recordings showed that patients with CMI exhibited a significant decrease in intestinal slow wave frequency from 8.9 ± 0.3 cpm preprandial to 7.4 ± 0.1 cpm postprandial (P < 0.01) that was not observed in postoperative recordings (9.3 ± 0.2 cpm preprandial and 9.4 ± 0.4 cpm postprandial, P = 0.86). Intraoperative recording detected multiple frequencies from the ischemic portion of jejunum before revascularization, whereas normal serosal intestinal slow wave frequencies were observed after revascularization. The preoperative MENG data also showed signals with multiple frequencies suggestive of uncoupling and intestinal ischemia similar to intraoperative serosal EMG. Our results showed that multichannel MENG can identify intestinal slow wave dysrhythmias in CMI patients. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  12. [The Function of REM Sleep: Implications from Transgenic Mouse Models].

    PubMed

    Kashiwagi, Mitsuaki; Hayashi, Yu

    2016-10-01

    Our sleep is composed of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep and non-REM (NREM) sleep. REM sleep is the major source of dreams, whereas synchronous cortical oscillations, called slow waves, are observed during NREM sleep. Both stages are unique to certain vertebrate species, and therefore, REM and NREM sleep are thought to be involved in higher-order brain functions. While several studies have revealed the importance of NREM sleep in growth hormone secretion, memory consolidation and brain metabolite clearance, the functions of REM sleep are currently almost totally unknown. REM sleep functions cannot be easily indicated from classical REM sleep deprivation experiments, where animals are forced to wake up whenever they enter REM sleep, because such experiments produce extreme stress due to the stimuli and because REM sleep is under strong homeostatic regulation. To overcome these issues, we developed a novel transgenic mouse model in which REM sleep can be manipulated. Using these mice, we found that REM sleep enhances slow wave activity during the subsequent NREM sleep. Slow wave activity is known to contribute to memory consolidation and synaptic plasticity. Thus, REM sleep might be involved in higher-order brain functions through its role in enhancing slow wave activity.

  13. U-shaped meander-line slow-wave structure with stub-loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Xingwang; Miao, Min; Li, Zhensong; Cui, Xiaole

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, a U-shaped meander-line slow-wave structure (SWS) with stub-loading is proposed for applications in Ka-band traveling-wave tube (TWT). This new slow-wave structure, loaded with a stub at the center of the U-turn section, has higher interaction impedance and lower phase velocity compared with conventional U-shaped meander-line SWSs, indicating that the devices based on this structure may have a lower operating voltage and higher output power. The dispersion characteristic, interaction impedance, transmission characteristics, and beam-wave interaction are simulated by utilizing simulation tool. The simulation result predicts that the millimeter-wave traveling-wave tube design based on this slow-wave structure is capable of delivering over 200 W with a gain of 33 dB and interaction efficiency 14.5% at the center frequency 34 GHz. This design, more compact and powerful in comparison with those based on more conventional vacuum electronic mechanisms, is demonstrated as a prospective option for integrated millimeter-wave power modules (MMPMs) empowering a broad spectrum of fields, from target detection, to imaging and telecommunications, among others.

  14. Characterization of K-Complexes and Slow Wave Activity in a Neural Mass Model

    PubMed Central

    Ngo, Hong-Viet Victor; Claussen, Jens Christian; Martinetz, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    NREM sleep is characterized by two hallmarks, namely K-complexes (KCs) during sleep stage N2 and cortical slow oscillations (SOs) during sleep stage N3. While the underlying dynamics on the neuronal level is well known and can be easily measured, the resulting behavior on the macroscopic population level remains unclear. On the basis of an extended neural mass model of the cortex, we suggest a new interpretation of the mechanisms responsible for the generation of KCs and SOs. As the cortex transitions from wake to deep sleep, in our model it approaches an oscillatory regime via a Hopf bifurcation. Importantly, there is a canard phenomenon arising from a homoclinic bifurcation, whose orbit determines the shape of large amplitude SOs. A KC corresponds to a single excursion along the homoclinic orbit, while SOs are noise-driven oscillations around a stable focus. The model generates both time series and spectra that strikingly resemble real electroencephalogram data and points out possible differences between the different stages of natural sleep. PMID:25392991

  15. Observation of four-wave mixing in slow-light silicon photonic crystal waveguides.

    PubMed

    McMillan, James F; Yu, Mingbin; Kwong, Dim-Lee; Wong, Chee Wei

    2010-07-19

    Four-wave mixing is observed in a silicon W1 photonic crystal waveguide. The dispersion dependence of the idler conversion efficiency is measured and shown to be enhanced at wavelengths exhibiting slow group velocities. A 12-dB increase in the conversion efficiency is observed. Concurrently, a decrease in the conversion bandwidth is observed due to the increase in group velocity dispersion in the slow-light regime. The experimentally observed conversion efficiencies agree with the numerically modeled results.

  16. Multi-channel wireless mapping of gastrointestinal serosal slow wave propagation

    PubMed Central

    Paskaranandavadivel, Niranchan; Wang, Rui; Sathar, Shameer; O’Grady, Gregory; Cheng, Leo K; Farajidavar, Aydin

    2015-01-01

    Background High-resolution (HR) extracellular mapping allows accurate profiling of normal and dysrhythmic slow wave patterns. A current limitation is that cables traverse the abdominal wall or a natural orifice, risking discomfort, dislodgement or infection. Wireless approaches offer advantages, but a multi-channel system is required, capable of recording slow waves and mapping propagation with high fidelity. Methods A novel multi-channel (n=7) wireless mapping system was developed and compared to a wired commercial system. Slow wave signals were recorded from the porcine gastric and intestinal serosa in-vivo. Signals were simultaneously acquired using both systems, and were filtered and processed to map activation wavefronts. For validation, the frequency and amplitude of detected events were compared, together with the speed and direction of mapped wavefronts. Key Results The wireless device achieved comparable signal quality to the reference device, and slow wave frequencies were identical. Amplitudes of the acquired gastric and intestinal slow wave signals were consistent between the devices. During normal propagation, spatiotemporal mapping remained accurate in the wireless system, however, during ectopic dysrhythmic pacemaking, the lower sampling resolution of the wireless device led to reduced accuracy in spatiotemporal mapping. Conclusions and Inferences A novel multichannel wireless device is presented for mapping slow wave activity. The device achieved high quality signals, and has the potential to facilitate chronic monitoring studies and clinical translation of spatiotemporal mapping. The current implementation may be applied to detect normal patterns and dysrhythmia onset, but HR mapping with finely spaced arrays currently remains necessary to accurately define dysrhythmic patterns. PMID:25599978

  17. Every slow-wave impulse is associated with motor activity of the human stomach.

    PubMed

    Hocke, Michael; Schöne, Ulrike; Richert, Hendryk; Görnert, Peter; Keller, Jutta; Layer, Peter; Stallmach, Andreas

    2009-04-01

    Using a newly developed high-resolution three-dimensional magnetic detector system (3D-MAGMA), we observed periodical movements of a small magnetic marker in the human stomach at the typical gastric slow-wave frequency, that is 3 min(-1). Thus we hypothesized that each gastric slow wave induces a motor response that is not strong enough to be detected by conventional methods. Electrogastrographies (EGG, Medtronic, Minneapolis, MN) for measurement of gastric slow waves and 3D-MAGMA (Innovent, Jena, Germany) measurements were simultaneously performed in 21 healthy volunteers (10 men, 40.4+/-13.6 yr; 11 women, 35.8+/-11.6 yr). The 3D-MAGMA system contains 27 highly sensitive magnetic field sensors that are able to locate a magnetic pill inside a human body with an accuracy of +/-5 mm or less in position and +/-2 degrees in orientation at a frequency of 50 Hz. Gastric transit time of the magnetic marker ranged from 19 to 154 min. The mean dominant EGG frequency while the marker was in the stomach was 2.87+/-0.15 cpm. The mean dominant 3D-MAGMA frequency during this interval was nearly identical; that is, 2.85+/-0.15 movements per minute. We observed a strong linear correlation between individual dominant EGG and 3D-MAGMA frequency (R=0.66, P=0.0011). Our findings suggest that each gastric slow wave induces a minute contraction that is too small to be detected by conventional motility investigations but can be recorded by the 3D-MAGMA system. The present slow-wave theory that assumes that the slow wave is a pure electrical signal should be reconsidered.

  18. Excitation of low-frequency waves via coupling between slow Alfven waves in the GAMMA 10 tandem mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikezoe, R.; Ichimura, M.; Okada, T.; Hirata, M.; Sakamoto, M.; Iwamoto, Y.; Sumida, S.; Jang, S.; Itagaki, J.; Onodera, Y.; Yoshikawa, M.; Kohagura, J.; Shima, Y.; Wang, X.; Nakashima, Y.

    2015-11-01

    In normal discharges of the GAMMA 10 tandem mirror, confined energy is saturated against heating power and unstable slow Alfven wave named as Alfven-Ion-Cyclotron (AIC) wave is observed in the saturated phase. This saturation may be partly related to (1) the decay of ICRF heating power, which is the main power source in GAMMA 10, due to the coupling with the AIC waves to produce difference-frequency waves and (2) the enhancement of axial transport of high-energy ions owing to nonlinearly excited low-frequency waves. To investigate these phenomena precisely, reflectometry is applied, which can provide assessment of nonlinear process at the location where the nonlinear process are taking place without any disturbance. Bispectral analysis applied to the density fluctuations measured at a wide radial region clearly shows the occurrence of various wave-wave couplings among the heating ICRF wave and the AIC waves. Generation of low-frequency waves via the coupling between coexisting AIC waves is found to be significant only near the core region. Details of measured nonlinear couplings are presented along with the observation showing the clear relation of generated low-frequency waves with the axial transport of high-energy ions. This work is partly supported by JSPS, Japan (25400531, 15K17797) and by NIFS, Japan (NIFS15KUGM101).

  19. Estimation of fast and slow wave properties in cancellous bone using Prony's method and curve fitting.

    PubMed

    Wear, Keith A

    2013-04-01

    The presence of two longitudinal waves in poroelastic media is predicted by Biot's theory and has been confirmed experimentally in through-transmission measurements in cancellous bone. Estimation of attenuation coefficients and velocities of the two waves is challenging when the two waves overlap in time. The modified least squares Prony's (MLSP) method in conjuction with curve-fitting (MLSP + CF) is tested using simulations based on published values for fast and slow wave attenuation coefficients and velocities in cancellous bone from several studies in bovine femur, human femur, and human calcaneus. The search algorithm is accelerated by exploiting correlations among search parameters. The performance of the algorithm is evaluated as a function of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). For a typical experimental SNR (40 dB), the root-mean-square errors (RMSEs) for one example (human femur) with fast and slow waves separated by approximately half of a pulse duration were 1 m/s (slow wave velocity), 4 m/s (fast wave velocity), 0.4 dB/cm MHz (slow wave attenuation slope), and 1.7 dB/cm MHz (fast wave attenuation slope). The MLSP + CF method is fast (requiring less than 2 s at SNR = 40 dB on a consumer-grade notebook computer) and is flexible with respect to the functional form of the parametric model for the transmission coefficient. The MLSP + CF method provides sufficient accuracy and precision for many applications such that experimental error is a greater limiting factor than estimation error.

  20. Transmission of cochlear distortion products as slow waves: a comparison of experimental and model data.

    PubMed

    Vetešník, Aleš; Gummer, Anthony W

    2012-05-01

    There is a long-lasting question of how distortion products (DPs) arising from nonlinear amplification processes in the cochlea are transmitted from their generation sites to the stapes. Two hypotheses have been proposed: (1) the slow-wave hypothesis whereby transmission is via the transverse pressure difference across the cochlear partition and (2) the fast-wave hypothesis proposing transmission via longitudinal compression waves. Ren with co-workers have addressed this topic experimentally by measuring the spatial vibration pattern of the basilar membrane (BM) in response to two tones of frequency f(1) and f(2). They interpreted the observed negative phase slopes of the stationary BM vibrations at the cubic distortion frequency f(DP) = 2f(1) - f(2) as evidence for the fast-wave hypothesis. Here, using a physically based model, it is shown that their phase data is actually in accordance with the slow-wave hypothesis. The analysis is based on a frequency-domain formulation of the two-dimensional motion equation of a nonlinear hydrodynamic cochlea model. Application of the analysis to their experimental data suggests that the measurement sites of negative phase slope were located at or apical to the DP generation sites. Therefore, current experimental and theoretical evidence supports the slow-wave hypothesis. Nevertheless, the analysis does not allow rejection of the fast-wave hypothesis.

  1. Spectral and spatial shifts of post-ictal slow waves in temporal lobe seizures.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lin; Worrell, Gregory A; Nelson, Cindy; Brinkmann, Benjamin; He, Bin

    2012-10-01

    Temporal lobe seizures have a significant chance to induce impairment of normal brain functions. Even after the termination of ictal discharges, during the post-ictal period, loss of consciousness, decreased responsiveness or other cognitive dysfunctions can persist. Previous studies have found various anatomical and functional abnormalities accompanying temporal lobe seizures, including an abnormal elevation of cortical slow waves. Intracranial electroencephalography studies have shown a prominent increase of lower frequency components during and following seizures that impair (complex partial seizures) but not those that preserve (simple partial seizures) normal consciousness and responsiveness. However, due to the limited spatial coverage of intracranial electroencephalography, the investigation of cortical slow waves cannot be easily extended to the whole brain. In this study, we used scalp electroencephalography to study the spectral features and spatial distribution of post-ictal slow waves with comprehensive spatial coverage. We studied simple partial, complex partial and secondarily generalized seizures in 28 patients with temporal lobe seizures. We used dense-array electroencephalography and source imaging to reconstruct the post-ictal slow-wave distribution. In the studied cohort, we found that a 'global' spectral power shift to lower frequencies accompanied the increased severity of seizures. The delta spectral power relative to higher frequency bands was highest for secondarily generalized seizures, followed by complex partial seizures and lastly simple partial seizures. In addition to this 'global' spectral shift, we found a 'regional' spatial shift in slow-wave activity. Secondarily generalized seizures and complex partial seizures exhibited increased slow waves distributed to frontal areas with spread to contralateral temporal and parietal regions than in simple partial seizures. These results revealed that a widespread cortical network including

  2. Spectral and spatial shifts of post-ictal slow waves in temporal lobe seizures

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lin; Worrell, Gregory A.; Nelson, Cindy; Brinkmann, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    Temporal lobe seizures have a significant chance to induce impairment of normal brain functions. Even after the termination of ictal discharges, during the post-ictal period, loss of consciousness, decreased responsiveness or other cognitive dysfunctions can persist. Previous studies have found various anatomical and functional abnormalities accompanying temporal lobe seizures, including an abnormal elevation of cortical slow waves. Intracranial electroencephalography studies have shown a prominent increase of lower frequency components during and following seizures that impair (complex partial seizures) but not those that preserve (simple partial seizures) normal consciousness and responsiveness. However, due to the limited spatial coverage of intracranial electroencephalography, the investigation of cortical slow waves cannot be easily extended to the whole brain. In this study, we used scalp electroencephalography to study the spectral features and spatial distribution of post-ictal slow waves with comprehensive spatial coverage. We studied simple partial, complex partial and secondarily generalized seizures in 28 patients with temporal lobe seizures. We used dense-array electroencephalography and source imaging to reconstruct the post-ictal slow-wave distribution. In the studied cohort, we found that a ‘global’ spectral power shift to lower frequencies accompanied the increased severity of seizures. The delta spectral power relative to higher frequency bands was highest for secondarily generalized seizures, followed by complex partial seizures and lastly simple partial seizures. In addition to this ‘global’ spectral shift, we found a ‘regional’ spatial shift in slow-wave activity. Secondarily generalized seizures and complex partial seizures exhibited increased slow waves distributed to frontal areas with spread to contralateral temporal and parietal regions than in simple partial seizures. These results revealed that a widespread cortical network

  3. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation induced slow wave activity modification: A possible role in disorder of consciousness differential diagnosis?

    PubMed

    Pisani, Laura Rosa; Naro, Antonino; Leo, Antonino; Aricò, Irene; Pisani, Francesco; Silvestri, Rosalia; Bramanti, Placido; Calabrò, Rocco Salvatore

    2015-12-15

    Slow wave activity (SWA) generation depends on cortico-thalamo-cortical loops that are disrupted in patients with chronic Disorders of Consciousness (DOC), including the Unresponsive Wakefulness Syndrome (UWS) and the Minimally Conscious State (MCS). We hypothesized that the modulation of SWA by means of a repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) could reveal residual patterns of connectivity, thus supporting the DOC clinical differential diagnosis. We enrolled 10 DOC individuals who underwent a 24hh polysomnography followed by a real or sham 5Hz-rTMS over left primary motor area, and a second polysomnographic recording. A preserved sleep-wake cycle, a standard temporal progression of sleep stages, and a SWA perturbation were found in all of the MCS patients and in none of the UWS individuals, only following the real-rTMS. In conclusion, our combined approach may improve the differential diagnosis between MCS patients, who show a partial preservation of cortical plasticity, and UWS individuals, who lack such properties.

  4. Cancellous bone fast and slow waves obtained with Bayesian probability theory correlate with porosity from computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Joseph J; Nelson, Amber M; Holland, Mark R; Miller, James G

    2012-09-01

    A Bayesian probability theory approach for separating overlapping ultrasonic fast and slow waves in cancellous bone has been previously introduced. The goals of this study were to investigate whether the fast and slow waves obtained from Bayesian separation of an apparently single mode signal individually correlate with porosity and to isolate the fast and slow waves from medial-lateral insonification of the calcaneus. The Bayesian technique was applied to trabecular bone data from eight human calcanei insonified in the medial-lateral direction. The phase velocity, slope of attenuation (nBUA), and amplitude were determined for both the fast and slow waves. The porosity was assessed by micro-computed tomography (microCT) and ranged from 78.7% to 94.1%. The method successfully separated the fast and slow waves from medial-lateral insonification of the calcaneus. The phase velocity for both the fast and slow wave modes showed an inverse correlation with porosity (R(2) = 0.73 and R(2) = 0.86, respectively). The slope of attenuation for both wave modes also had a negative correlation with porosity (fast wave: R(2) = 0.73, slow wave: R(2) = 0.53). The fast wave amplitude decreased with increasing porosity (R(2) = 0.66). Conversely, the slow wave amplitude modestly increased with increasing porosity (R(2) = 0.39).

  5. Cancellous bone fast and slow waves obtained with Bayesian probability theory correlate with porosity from computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Joseph J.; Nelson, Amber M.; Holland, Mark R.; Miller, James G.

    2012-01-01

    A Bayesian probability theory approach for separating overlapping ultrasonic fast and slow waves in cancellous bone has been previously introduced. The goals of this study were to investigate whether the fast and slow waves obtained from Bayesian separation of an apparently single mode signal individually correlate with porosity and to isolate the fast and slow waves from medial-lateral insonification of the calcaneus. The Bayesian technique was applied to trabecular bone data from eight human calcanei insonified in the medial-lateral direction. The phase velocity, slope of attenuation (nBUA), and amplitude were determined for both the fast and slow waves. The porosity was assessed by micro-computed tomography (microCT) and ranged from 78.7% to 94.1%. The method successfully separated the fast and slow waves from medial-lateral insonification of the calcaneus. The phase velocity for both the fast and slow wave modes showed an inverse correlation with porosity (R2 = 0.73 and R2 = 0.86, respectively). The slope of attenuation for both wave modes also had a negative correlation with porosity (fast wave: R2 = 0.73, slow wave: R2 = 0.53). The fast wave amplitude decreased with increasing porosity (R2 = 0.66). Conversely, the slow wave amplitude modestly increased with increasing porosity (R2 = 0.39). PMID:22978910

  6. Numerical Simulations of Trapped Slow Magnetosonic Waves in Solar Coronal Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ofman, L.; Deforest, C. E.

    Recent observations of polar plumes in the southern solar coronal hole by the Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) on board the SOHO spacecraft show signatures of quasi-periodic compressional waves. Here, we present the results of a nonlinear, 2D MHD simulation of the slow magnetosonic waves in plumes for typical coronal conditions consistent with observations. Our numerical simulations confirm the interpretation of the observed intensity fluctuations as propagating slow magnetosonic waves. On March 7 1996 DeForest and Gurman (1998) detected quasi-periodic intensity variations of 10-20% in the EIT Fe IX and X line emission at 171A&ring that propagate outward in several polar plumes at 75-150 km s-1 with a period of 10-15 minutes. The observed propagation velocity agrees well with the expected sound velocity inside the plumes. The lower phase speed in the plumes than in the ambient plasma leads to partial trapping of the slow magnetosonic waves in the plumes. The slow magnetosonic waves may contribute to the heating of the lower corona by compressive dissipation

  7. Simulated Obstructive Sleep Apnea Increases P-Wave Duration and P-Wave Dispersion

    PubMed Central

    Wons, Annette M.; Rossi, Valentina; Bratton, Daniel J.; Schlatzer, Christian; Schwarz, Esther I.; Camen, Giovanni; Kohler, Malcolm

    2016-01-01

    Background A high P-wave duration and dispersion (Pd) have been reported to be a prognostic factor for the occurrence of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF), a condition linked to obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). We tested the hypothesis of whether a short-term increase of P-wave duration and Pd can be induced by respiratory manoeuvres simulating OSA in healthy subjects and in patients with PAF. Methods 12-lead-electrocardiography (ECG) was recorded continuously in 24 healthy subjects and 33 patients with PAF, while simulating obstructive apnea (Mueller manoeuvre, MM), obstructive hypopnea (inspiration through a threshold load, ITH), central apnea (AP), and during normal breathing (BL) in randomized order. The P-wave duration and Pd was calculated by using dedicated software for ECG-analysis. Results P-wave duration and Pd significantly increased during MM and ITH compared to BL in all subjects (+13.1ms and +13.8ms during MM; +11.7ms and +12.9ms during ITH; p<0.001 for all comparisons). In MM, the increase was larger in healthy subjects when compared to patients with PAF (p<0.05). Conclusion Intrathoracic pressure swings through simulated obstructive sleep apnea increase P-wave duration and Pd in healthy subjects and in patients with PAF. Our findings imply that intrathoracic pressure swings prolong the intra-atrial and inter-atrial conduction time and therefore may represent an independent trigger factor for the development for PAF. PMID:27071039

  8. Shock Formation and Energy Dissipation of Slow Magnetosonic Waves in Coronal Plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuntz, M.; Suess, S. T.

    2003-01-01

    We study the shock formation and energy dissipation of slow magnetosonic waves in coronal plumes. The wave parameters and the spreading function of the plumes as well as the base magnetic field strength are given by empirical constraints mostly from SOHO/UVCS. Our models show that shock formation occurs at low coronal heights, i.e., within 1.3 bun, depending on the model parameters. In addition, following analytical estimates, we show that scale height of energy dissipation by the shocks ranges between 0.15 and 0.45 Rsun. This implies that shock heating by slow magnetosonic waves is relevant at most heights, even though this type of waves is apparently not a solely operating energy supply mechanism.

  9. Shock Formation and Energy Dissipation of Slow Magnetosonic Waves in Coronal Plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuntz, M.; Suess, S. T.

    2003-01-01

    We study the shock formation and energy dissipation of slow magnetosonic waves in coronal plumes. The wave parameters and the spreading function of the plumes as well as the base magnetic field strength are given by empirical constraints mostly from SOHO/UVCS. Our models show that shock formation occurs at low coronal heights, i.e., within 1.3 bun, depending on the model parameters. In addition, following analytical estimates, we show that scale height of energy dissipation by the shocks ranges between 0.15 and 0.45 Rsun. This implies that shock heating by slow magnetosonic waves is relevant at most heights, even though this type of waves is apparently not a solely operating energy supply mechanism.

  10. Slow wave structures using twisted waveguides for charged particle applications

    DOEpatents

    Kang, Yoon W.; Fathy, Aly E.; Wilson, Joshua L.

    2012-12-11

    A rapidly twisted electromagnetic accelerating structure includes a waveguide body having a central axis, one or more helical channels defined by the body and disposed around a substantially linear central axial channel, with central portions of the helical channels merging with the linear central axial channel. The structure propagates electromagnetic waves in the helical channels which support particle beam acceleration in the central axial channel at a phase velocity equal to or slower than the speed of light in free space. Since there is no variation in the shape of the transversal cross-section along the axis of the structure, inexpensive mechanical fabrication processes can be used to form the structure, such as extrusion, casting or injection molding. Also, because the field and frequency of the resonant mode depend on the whole structure rather than on dimensional tolerances of individual cells, no tuning of individual cells is needed. Accordingly, the overall operating frequency may be varied with a tuning/phase shifting device located outside the resonant waveguide structure.

  11. Observations of dissipation of slow magneto-acoustic waves in a polar coronal hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, G. R.

    2014-08-01

    Aims: We focus on a polar coronal hole region to find any evidence of dissipation of propagating slow magneto-acoustic waves. Methods: We obtained time-distance and frequency-distance maps along the plume structure in a polar coronal hole. We also obtained Fourier power maps of the polar coronal hole in different frequency ranges in 171 Å and 193 Å passbands. We performed intensity distribution statistics in time domain at several locations in the polar coronal hole. Results: We find the presence of propagating slow magneto-acoustic waves having temperature dependent propagation speeds. The wavelet analysis and Fourier power maps of the polar coronal hole show that low-frequency waves are travelling longer distances (longer detection length) as compared to high-frequency waves. We found two distinct dissipation length scales of wave amplitude decay at two different height ranges (between 0-10 Mm and 10-70 Mm) along the observed plume structure. The dissipation lengths obtained at higher height range show some frequency dependence. Individual Fourier power spectrum at several locations show a power-law distribution with frequency whereas probability density function of intensity fluctuations in time show nearly Gaussian distributions. Conclusions: Propagating slow magneto-acoustic waves are getting heavily damped (small dissipation lengths) within the first 10 Mm distance. Beyond that waves are getting damped slowly with height. Frequency dependent dissipation lengths of wave propagation at higher heights may indicate the possibility of wave dissipation due to thermal conduction, however, the contribution from other dissipative parameters cannot be ruled out. Power-law distributed power spectra were also found at lower heights in the solar corona, which may provide viable information on the generation of longer period waves in the solar atmosphere.

  12. A high efficient relativistic backward wave oscillator with coaxial nonuniform slow-wave structure and depth-tunable extractor

    SciTech Connect

    Ge Xingjun; Zhong Huihuang; Zhang Jun; Qian Baoliang

    2013-02-15

    A high efficient relativistic backward wave oscillator with coaxial nonuniform slow-wave structures (SWSs) and depth-tunable extractor is presented. The physical mechanism to increase the power efficiency is investigated theoretically and experimentally. It is shown that the nonuniform SWSs, the guiding magnetic field distribution, and the coaxial extractor depth play key roles in the enhancement of the beam-wave power conversion efficiency. The experimental results show that a 1.609 GHz, 2.3 GW microwave can be generated when the diode voltage is 890 kV and the beam current is 7.7 kA. The corresponding power efficiency reaches 33.6%.

  13. On the possibility of the autoresonant motion of an electron in a slow electromagnetic wave

    SciTech Connect

    Milantiev, V.P.

    1994-12-31

    By autoresonant motion one usually means the motion when the condition of cyclotron resonance of gyrating particle with electromagnetic wave is conserved during all the time of the motion in spite of the relativistic mass increase. Such a motion takes place only in the case of vacuum wave, when the phase velocity {nu}{sub p} is equal to the speed of light in a vacuum C. Otherwise autoresonance is impossible, and energy of the particle oscillates in time. The authors now discuss the possibility of the autoresonance in a slow electromagnetic wave ({nu}{sub p} < c) propagating along the straight lines of the external magnetic field. It turns out that the autoresonant regime of the motion in a slow electromagnetic wave possible if some rather restrictive relations between the electric drift velocity and the phase velocity of wave take place. It depends also on the polarization of wave. The general case of the elliptical polarization is considered. The optimal regime corresponds to the wave with linear polarization in the direction of the constant electric field. For this case the calculations show that energy of the particle can unlimitedly increase (or decrease). The rate of acceleration can be even larger than in the case of vacuum wave. Radiation forces will restrict this process.

  14. Preliminary study of slow and fast ultrasonic waves using MR images of trabecular bone phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Solis-Najera, S. E. E-mail: angel.perez@ciencias.unam.mx Neria-Pérez, J. A. E-mail: angel.perez@ciencias.unam.mx Medina, L. E-mail: angel.perez@ciencias.unam.mx; Garipov, R.; Rodríguez, A. O.

    2014-11-07

    Cancellous bone is a complex tissue that performs physiological and biomechanical functions in all vertebrates. It is made up of trabeculae that, from a simplified structural viewpoint, can be considered as plates and beams in a hyperstatic structure that change with time leading to osteoporosis. Several methods has been developed to study the trabecular bone microstructure among them is the Biot’s model which predicts the existence of two longitudinal waves in porous media; the slow and the fast waves, that can be related to porosity of the media. This paper is focused on the experimental detection of the two Biot’s waves of a trabecular bone phantom, consisting of a trabecular network of inorganic hydroxyapatite. Experimental measurements of both waves were performed using through transmission ultrasound. Results had shown clearly that the propagation of two waves propagation is transversal to the trabecular alignment. Otherwise the waves are overlapped and a single wave seems to be propagated. To validate these results, magnetic resonance images were acquired to assess the trabecular direction, and to assure that the pulses correspond to the slow and fast waves. This approach offers a methodology for non-invasive studies of trabecular bones.

  15. Preliminary study of slow and fast ultrasonic waves using MR images of trabecular bone phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solis-Najera, S. E.; Neria-Pérez, J. A.; Medina, L.; Garipov, R.; Rodríguez, A. O.

    2014-11-01

    Cancellous bone is a complex tissue that performs physiological and biomechanical functions in all vertebrates. It is made up of trabeculae that, from a simplified structural viewpoint, can be considered as plates and beams in a hyperstatic structure that change with time leading to osteoporosis. Several methods has been developed to study the trabecular bone microstructure among them is the Biot's model which predicts the existence of two longitudinal waves in porous media; the slow and the fast waves, that can be related to porosity of the media. This paper is focused on the experimental detection of the two Biot's waves of a trabecular bone phantom, consisting of a trabecular network of inorganic hydroxyapatite. Experimental measurements of both waves were performed using through transmission ultrasound. Results had shown clearly that the propagation of two waves propagation is transversal to the trabecular alignment. Otherwise the waves are overlapped and a single wave seems to be propagated. To validate these results, magnetic resonance images were acquired to assess the trabecular direction, and to assure that the pulses correspond to the slow and fast waves. This approach offers a methodology for non-invasive studies of trabecular bones.

  16. Observations of Alfvén and Slow Waves in the Solar Wind near 1 AU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SHI, M. J.; XIAO, C. J.; LI, Q. S.; WANG, H. G.; WANG, X. G.; LI, H.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves play a significant role in the processes of the solar wind acceleration and the coronal heating. Based on the in situ measurements of the WIND spacecraft, some MHD waves in the quiet solar wind are identified with two criteria: (1) the correlation coefficients between velocity and magnetic field perturbations (δ {\\boldsymbol{v}} and δ {\\boldsymbol{B}}) and between thermal pressure and magnetic pressure perturbations (δpt and δpb), and (2) the dispersion relations of MHD waves. A preliminary statistics of those MHD modes is also achieved by selecting and analyzing the WIND data of 42,279 samples (45050.4 hr) in the 23rd solar cycle. It is found that the time fraction of Alfvén waves is 8% in this period, while the existence time of slow waves is 3.4%, and the fast wave is rare. The statistical result also shows that the Alfvén waves have a higher time fraction in fast solar wind, while the occurrence of slow waves is higher in moderate-speed solar wind. This work will provide more clues to understanding MHD activities in the solar wind, as well as the studies of solar wind acceleration and heating.

  17. 3D Modeling of Antenna Driven Slow Waves Excited by Antennas Near the Plasma Edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smithe, David; Jenkins, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    Prior work with the 3D finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) plasma and sheath model used to model ICRF antennas in fusion plasmas has highlighted the possibility of slow wave excitation at the very low end of the SOL density range, and thus the prudent need for a slow-time evolution model to treat SOL density modifications due to the RF itself. At higher frequency, the DIII-D helicon antenna has much easier access to a parasitic slow wave excitation, and in this case the Faraday screen provides the dominant means of controlling the content of the launched mode, with antenna end-effects remaining a concern. In both cases, the danger is the same, with the slow-wave propagating into a lower-hybrid resonance layer a short distance ( cm) away from the antenna, which would parasitically absorb power, transferring energy to the SOL edge plasma, primarily through electron-neutral collisions. We will present 3D modeling of antennas at both ICRF and helicon frequencies. We've added a slow-time evolution capability for the SOL plasma density to include ponderomotive force driven rarefaction from the strong fields in the vicinity of the antenna, and show initial application to NSTX antenna geometry and plasma configurations. The model is based on a Scalar Ponderomotive Potential method, using self-consistently computed local field amplitudes from the 3D simulation.

  18. Hippocampal Sharp Wave/Ripples during Sleep for Consolidation of Associative Memory

    PubMed Central

    Ramadan, Wiâm; Eschenko, Oxana; Sara, Susan J.

    2009-01-01

    The beneficial effect of sleep on memory has been well-established by extensive research on humans, but the neurophysiological mechanisms remain a matter of speculation. This study addresses the hypothesis that the fast oscillations known as ripples recorded in the CA1 region of the hippocampus during slow wave sleep (SWS) may provide a physiological substrate for long term memory consolidation. We trained rats in a spatial discrimination task to retrieve palatable reward in three fixed locations. Hippocampal local field potentials and cortical EEG were recorded for 2 h after each daily training session. There was an increase in ripple density during SWS after early training sessions, in both trained rats and in rats randomly rewarded for exploring the maze. In rats learning the place -reward association, there was a striking further significant increase in ripple density correlated with subsequent improvements in behavioral performance as the rat learned the spatial discrimination aspect of the task. The results corroborate others showing an experience-dependent increase in ripple activity and associated ensemble replay after exploratory activity, but in addition, for the first time, reveal a clear further increase in ripple activity related to associative learning based on spatial discrimination. PMID:19693273

  19. Dependence of electrical slow waves of canine colonic smooth muscle on calcium gradient.

    PubMed Central

    Ward, S M; Sanders, K M

    1992-01-01

    1. The ionic dependence of the upstroke and plateau components of slow waves of canine colonic circular muscles was studied. 2. Reduced extracellular Ca2+ caused a decrease in the amplitude of the upstroke and plateau components, a decrease in the depolarization velocity, and a decrease in frequency. The reduction in the upstroke phase per 10-fold reduction in external Ca2+ was close to the value predicted by the Nernst relationship, suggesting that the membrane permeability to Ca2+ increases steeply during this phase. 3. Nifedipine (10(-9)-10(-6)) reduced the plateau component, but concentrations of 10(-6) M did not abolish the upstroke component. The data suggest that a nifedipine-resistant component of Ca2+ current may be involved in the upstroke. 4. Inorganic Ca2+ channel blockers (Mn2+ and Ni2+) blocked spontaneous slow waves at concentrations of 1.0 mM or less. 5. The upstroke component was more sensitive to Ni2+ than to Mn2+; a concentration of 0.040 mM-Ni2+ caused more than a 50% reduction in upstroke velocity. Ni2+ also reduced the plateau phase of slow waves. 6. The results suggest that the upstroke and plateau components of slow waves are dependent upon activation of voltage-dependent Ca2+ currents. The current responsible for the upstroke is partially resistant to dihydropyridines (at least at 10(-6) M). The current responsible for the plateau component is nifedipine-sensitive. PMID:1282930

  20. Dependence of electrical slow waves of canine colonic smooth muscle on calcium gradient.

    PubMed

    Ward, S M; Sanders, K M

    1992-09-01

    1. The ionic dependence of the upstroke and plateau components of slow waves of canine colonic circular muscles was studied. 2. Reduced extracellular Ca2+ caused a decrease in the amplitude of the upstroke and plateau components, a decrease in the depolarization velocity, and a decrease in frequency. The reduction in the upstroke phase per 10-fold reduction in external Ca2+ was close to the value predicted by the Nernst relationship, suggesting that the membrane permeability to Ca2+ increases steeply during this phase. 3. Nifedipine (10(-9)-10(-6)) reduced the plateau component, but concentrations of 10(-6) M did not abolish the upstroke component. The data suggest that a nifedipine-resistant component of Ca2+ current may be involved in the upstroke. 4. Inorganic Ca2+ channel blockers (Mn2+ and Ni2+) blocked spontaneous slow waves at concentrations of 1.0 mM or less. 5. The upstroke component was more sensitive to Ni2+ than to Mn2+; a concentration of 0.040 mM-Ni2+ caused more than a 50% reduction in upstroke velocity. Ni2+ also reduced the plateau phase of slow waves. 6. The results suggest that the upstroke and plateau components of slow waves are dependent upon activation of voltage-dependent Ca2+ currents. The current responsible for the upstroke is partially resistant to dihydropyridines (at least at 10(-6) M). The current responsible for the plateau component is nifedipine-sensitive.

  1. Social exclusion in middle childhood: rejection events, slow-wave neural activity, and ostracism distress.

    PubMed

    Crowley, Michael J; Wu, Jia; Molfese, Peter J; Mayes, Linda C

    2010-01-01

    This study examined neural activity with event-related potentials (ERPs) in middle childhood during a computer-simulated ball-toss game, Cyberball. After experiencing fair play initially, children were ultimately excluded by the other players. We focused specifically on “not my turn” events within fair play and rejection events within social exclusion. Dense-array ERPs revealed that rejection events are perceived rapidly. Condition differences (“not my turn” vs. rejection) were evident in a posterior ERP peaking at 420 ms consistent, with a larger P3 effect for rejection events indicating that in middle childhood rejection events are differentiated in <500 ms. Condition differences were evident for slow-wave activity (500-900 ms) in the medial frontal cortical region and the posterior occipital-parietal region, with rejection events more negative frontally and more positive posteriorly. Distress from the rejection experience was associated with a more negative frontal slow wave and a larger late positive slow wave, but only for rejection events. Source modeling with Geosouce software suggested that slow-wave neural activity in cortical regions previously identified in functional imaging studies of ostracism, including subgenual cortex, ventral anterior cingulate cortex, and insula, was greater for rejection events vs. “not my turn” events.

  2. Slow-wave oscillations in the craniosacral space: a hemoliquorodynamic concept of origination.

    PubMed

    Moskalenko, Yu E; Kravchenko, T I; Vainshtein, G B; Halvorson, P; Feilding, A; Mandara, A; Panov, A A; Semernya, V N

    2009-05-01

    The mechanism of formation of rhythmic, slow-wave oscillations in the craniospinal cavity were studied. Synchronous bioimpedance traces were made of the head and lumbosacral part of the spine in five healthy young subjects at rest and during voluntary breath-holding; these reflect changes in the ratios of blood and CSF volumes in these parts of the craniospinal space. Computer amplitude-frequency and spectral analysis of the data (Macintosh G-4, Chart-5.2) demonstrated slow (6-12 cycles/min) and rapid (pulsatile) oscillations in different directions in the cranial and lumbosacral areas. These data suggested a hemoliquorodynamic hypothesis for the craniosacral rhythm. The pulsatile and slow-wave oscillations of cerebrovascular tone and intracranial pressure evidently initiate to-and-fro displacements of the CSF in the caudal direction. The associated tonic contractions of the musculature of the lumbar part of the spine and the mobility of the sacrum are detected manually as the craniosacral rhythm.

  3. Four-wave mixing in slow light engineered silicon photonic crystal waveguides.

    PubMed

    Monat, C; Ebnali-Heidari, M; Grillet, C; Corcoran, B; Eggleton, B J; White, T P; O'Faolain, L; Li, J; Krauss, T F

    2010-10-25

    We experimentally investigate four-wave mixing (FWM) in short (80 μm) dispersion-engineered slow light silicon photonic crystal waveguides. The pump, probe and idler signals all lie in a 14 nm wide low dispersion region with a near-constant group velocity of c/30. We measure an instantaneous conversion efficiency of up to -9dB between the idler and the continuous-wave probe, with 1W peak pump power and 6 nm pump-probe detuning. This conversion efficiency is found to be considerably higher (>10 × ) than that of a Si nanowire with a group velocity ten times larger. In addition, we estimate the FWM bandwidth to be at least that of the flat band slow light window. These results, supported by numerical simulations, emphasize the importance of engineering the dispersion of PhC waveguides to exploit the slow light enhancement of FWM efficiency, even for short device lengths.

  4. Investigation of Slow-wave Activity Saturation during Surgical Anesthesia Reveals a Signature of Neural Inertia in Humans.

    PubMed

    Warnaby, Catherine E; Sleigh, Jamie W; Hight, Darren; Jbabdi, Saad; Tracey, Irene

    2017-10-01

    Previously, we showed experimentally that saturation of slow-wave activity provides a potentially individualized neurophysiologic endpoint for perception loss during anesthesia. Furthermore, it is clear that induction and emergence from anesthesia are not symmetrically reversible processes. The observed hysteresis is potentially underpinned by a neural inertia mechanism as proposed in animal studies. In an advanced secondary analysis of 393 individual electroencephalographic data sets, we used slow-wave activity dose-response relationships to parameterize slow-wave activity saturation during induction and emergence from surgical anesthesia. We determined whether neural inertia exists in humans by comparing slow-wave activity dose responses on induction and emergence. Slow-wave activity saturation occurs for different anesthetics and when opioids and muscle relaxants are used during surgery. There was wide interpatient variability in the hypnotic concentrations required to achieve slow-wave activity saturation. Age negatively correlated with power at slow-wave activity saturation. On emergence, we observed abrupt decreases in slow-wave activity dose responses coincident with recovery of behavioral responsiveness in ~33% individuals. These patients are more likely to have lower power at slow-wave activity saturation, be older, and suffer from short-term confusion on emergence. Slow-wave activity saturation during surgical anesthesia implies that large variability in dosing is required to achieve a targeted potential loss of perception in individual patients. A signature for neural inertia in humans is the maintenance of slow-wave activity even in the presence of very-low hypnotic concentrations during emergence from anesthesia.

  5. Slow and fast ultrasonic wave detection improvement in human trabecular bones using Golay code modulation.

    PubMed

    Lashkari, Bahman; Manbachi, Amir; Mandelis, Andreas; Cobbold, Richard S C

    2012-09-01

    The identification of fast and slow waves propagating through trabecular bone is a challenging task due to temporal wave overlap combined with the high attenuation of the fast wave in the presence of noise. However, it can provide valuable information about bone integrity and become a means for monitoring osteoporosis. The objective of this work is to apply different coded excitation methods for this purpose. The results for single-sine cycle pulse, Golay code, and chirp excitations are compared. It is shown that Golay code is superior to the other techniques due to its signal enhancement while exhibiting excellent resolution without the ambiguity of sidelobes.

  6. Nonlinear elastic wave NDE I : nonlinear resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (NRUS) and slow dynamics diagnostics (SDD)

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Paul; Sutin, A.

    2004-01-01

    The nonlinear elastic response of materials (e.g., wave mixing, harmonic generation) is much more sensitive to the presence of damage than the linear response (e.g., wavespeed, dissipation). An overview of the four primary Nonlinear Elastic Wave Spectroscopy (NEWS) methods used in nonlinear damage detection are presented in this and the following paper. Those presented in this paper are Nonlinear Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy (NRUS), based on measurement of the nonlinear response of one or more resonant modes in a test sample, and Slow Dynamics Diagnostics (SDD), manifest by an alteration in the material dissipation and elastic modulus after application of relatively high-amplitude wave that slowly recovers in time.

  7. Simultaneous realization of negative group velocity, fast and slow acoustic waves in a metamaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiao-juan; Xue, Cheng; Fan, Li; Zhang, Shu-yi; Chen, Zhe; Ding, Jin; Zhang, Hui

    2016-06-01

    An acoustic metamaterial is designed based on a simple and compact structure of one string of side pipes arranged along a waveguide, in which diverse group velocities are achieved. Owing to Fabry-Perot resonance of the side pipes, a negative phase time is achieved, and thus, acoustic waves transmitting with negative group velocities are produced near the resonant frequency. In addition, both fast and slow acoustic waves are also observed in the vicinity of the resonance frequency. The extraordinary group velocities can be explained based on spectral rephasing induced by anomalous dispersion on the analogy of Lorentz dispersion in electromagnetic waves.

  8. Effect of cromakalim and lemakalim on slow waves and membrane currents in colonic smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Post, J M; Stevens, R J; Sanders, K M; Hume, J R

    1991-02-01

    The effects of cromakalim (BRL 34915) and its optical isomer lemakalim (BRL 38227) were investigated in intact tissue and freshly dispersed circular muscle cells from canine proximal colon. Cromakalim and lemakalim hyperpolarized resting membrane potential, shortened the duration of slow waves by abolishing the plateau phase, and decreased the frequency of slow waves. Glyburide, a K channel blocker, prevented the effect of cromakalim on slow-wave activity. The mechanisms of these alterations in slow-wave activity were studied in isolated myocytes under voltage-clamp conditions. Cromakalim and lemakalim increased the magnitude of a time-independent outward K current, but cromakalim also reduced the peak outward K current. Glyburide inhibited lemakalim stimulation of the time-independent background current. Nisoldipine also reduced the peak outward current, and in the presence of nisoldipine, cromakalim did not affect the peak outward component of current. This suggested that cromakalim may block a Ca-dependent component of the outward current. Lemakalim did not affect the peak outward current. We tested whether the effects of cromakalim on outward current might be indirect due to an effect on inward Ca current. Cromakalim, but not lemakalim, was found to inhibit L-type Ca channels; however, glyburide did not alter cromakalim inhibition of inward Ca current. We conclude that the effects of cromakalim and lemakalim on membrane potential and slow waves in colonic smooth muscle appear to result primarily from stimulation of a time-independent background K conductance. The effects of these compounds on channel activity may explain the inhibitory effect of these compounds on contractile activity.

  9. Slow strain waves in blocky geological media from GPS and seismological observations on the Amurian plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bykov, Victor G.; Trofimenko, Sergey V.

    2016-12-01

    Based on the statistical analysis of spatiotemporal distribution of earthquake epicenters and perennial geodetic observation series, new evidence is obtained for the existence of slow strain waves in the Earth. The results of our investigation allow us to identify the dynamics of seismicity along the northern boundary of the Amurian plate as a wave process. Migration of epicenters of weak earthquakes (2 ≤  M ≤ 4) is initiated by the east-west propagation of a strain wave front at an average velocity of 1000 km yr-1. We have found a synchronous quasi-periodic variation of seismicity in equally spaced clusters with spatial periods of 3.5 and 7.26° comparable with the length of slow strain waves. The geodetic observations at GPS sites in proximity to local active faults show that in a number of cases, the GPS site coordinate seasonal variations exhibit a significant phase shift, whereas the time series of these GPS sites differ significantly from a sinusoid. Based on experimental observation data and the developed model of crustal block movement, we have shown that there is one possible interpretation for this fact that the trajectory of GPS station position disturbance is induced by migration of crustal deformation in the form of slow waves.

  10. Near infrared spectroscopy as possible non-invasive monitor of slow vasogenic ICP waves.

    PubMed

    Weerakkody, Ruwan Alwis; Czosnyka, Marek; Zweifel, Christian; Castellani, Gianluca; Smielewski, Peter; Brady, Ken; Pickard, John D; Czosnyka, Zofia

    2012-01-01

    We aimed to study synchronisation between ICP and near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) variables induced by vasogenic waves of ICP during an infusion study in hydrocephalic patients and after TBI. Nineteen patients presenting with hydrocephalus underwent a diagnostic intraventricular constant-flow infusion test. The original concept of the methodology, presented in the current paper, was derived from this material. Then the method was applied in 40 TBI patients, with results reported in an observational manner. During monitoring, NIRS deoxygenated and oxygenated haemoglobin (Hb, HbO(2)) were recorded simultaneously with ICP. Moving correlation coefficient (6 min) between Hb and HbO(2) was tested as a marker of the slow vasogenic waves of ICP.During infusion studies ICP increased from 10.7 (5.1) mmHg to a plateau of 18.9 (7.6) mmHg, which was associated with an increase in the power of slow ICP waves (p = 0.000017). Fluctuations of Hb and HbO(2) at baseline negatively correlated with each other, but switched to high positive values during periods of increased ICP slow-wave activity during infusion (p < 0.001). Similar behaviour was observed in TBI patients: baseline negative Hb/HbO(2) correlation changed to positive values during peaks of ICP of vasogenic nature.Correlating changes in Hb and HbO(2) may be of use as a method of non-invasive detection of vasogenic ICP waves.

  11. Effect of Helical Slow-Wave Circuit Variations on TWT Cold-Test Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kory, Carol L.; Dayton, James A., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    Recent advances in the state of the art of computer modeling offer the possibility for the first time to evaluate the effect that slow-wave structure parameter variations, such as manufacturing tolerances, have on the cold-test characteristics of helical traveling-wave tubes (TWT's). This will enable manufacturers to determine the cost effectiveness of controlling the dimensions of the component parts of the TWT, which is almost impossible to do experimentally without building a large number of tubes and controlling several parameters simultaneously. The computer code MAFIA is used in this analysis to determine the effect on dispersion and on-axis interaction impedance of several helical slow-wave circuit parameter variations, including thickness and relative dielectric constant of the support rods, tape width, and height of the metallized films deposited on the dielectric rods. Previous computer analyses required so many approximations that accurate determinations of the effect of many relevant dimensions on tube performance were practically impossible.

  12. Accurate Cold-Test Model of Helical TWT Slow-Wave Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kory, Carol L.; Dayton, James A., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    Recently, a method has been established to accurately calculate cold-test data for helical slow-wave structures using the three-dimensional electromagnetic computer code, MAFIA. Cold-test parameters have been calculated for several helical traveling-wave tube (TWT) slow-wave circuits possessing various support rod configurations, and results are presented here showing excellent agreement with experiment. The helical models include tape thickness, dielectric support shapes and material properties consistent with the actual circuits. The cold-test data from this helical model can be used as input into large-signal helical TWT interaction codes making it possible, for the first time, to design a complete TWT via computer simulation.

  13. Receptivity characteristics of a hypersonic boundary layer under freestream slow acoustic wave with different amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xiaojun; Zhu, Xusheng; Hui, Tianli; Yu, Wentao; Yang, Fenglong; Cao, Chengyu

    2017-08-01

    An unsteady hypersonic blunt wedge flowfield under freestream slow acoustic wave is solved by direct numerical simulation (DNS), and the receptivity characteristics of the boundary layer under slow acoustic disturbance with different amplitudes are analyzed. Results show that slow acoustic wave in the freestream not only has a significant effect on the aerothermodynamics characteristics of hypersonic flowfield and boundary layer, but also on the bow shock characteristics. It shows that the maximum amplitudes of the disturbance modes in the boundary layer are positively correlated with the disturbance amplitude of the freestream. The bigger the amplitude of the freestream disturbance gets, the earlier the high-frequency disturbance mode exists, and the stronger the high frequency interference is. The larger amplitude of freestream disturbance wave can accelerate the generation of the higher order harmonic modes in boundary layer. Furthermore, the transformation position and the times of the dominant mode in the boundary layer differ under various amplitude of freestream disturbance, and compared with the smaller amplitude's slow acoustic disturbance in the freestream, the larger amplitude disturbance can accelerate the first transformation of the dominant mode in boundary layer, and also delay its second transformation.

  14. Regional differences in cortical electroencephalogram (EEG) slow wave activity and interhemispheric EEG asymmetry in the fur seal.

    PubMed

    Lyamin, Oleg I; Pavlova, Ivetta F; Kosenko, Peter O; Mukhametov, Lev M; Siegel, Jerome M

    2012-12-01

    Slow wave sleep (SWS) in the northern fur seal (Callorhinus ursinus) is characterized by a highly expressed interhemispheric electroencephalogram (EEG) asymmetry, called 'unihemispheric' or 'asymmetrical' SWS. The aim of this study was to examine the regional differences in slow wave activity (SWA; power in the range of 1.2-4.0 Hz) within one hemisphere and differences in the degree of interhemispheric EEG asymmetry within this species. Three seals were implanted with 10 EEG electrodes, positioned bilaterally (five in each hemisphere) over the frontal, occipital and parietal cortex. The expression of interhemispheric SWA asymmetry between symmetrical monopolar recordings was estimated based on the asymmetry index [AI = (L-R)/(L+R), where L and R are the power in the left and right hemispheres, respectively]. Our findings indicate an anterior-posterior gradient in SWA during asymmetrical SWS in fur seals, which is opposite to that described for other mammals, including humans, with a larger SWA recorded in the parietal and occipital cortex. Interhemispheric EEG asymmetry in fur seals was recorded across the entire dorsal cerebral cortex, including sensory (visual and somatosensory), motor and associative (parietal or suprasylvian) cortical areas. The expression of asymmetry was greatest in occipital-lateral and parietal derivations and smallest in frontal-medial derivations. Regardless of regional differences in SWA, the majority (90%) of SWS episodes with interhemispheric EEG asymmetry meet the criteria for 'unihemispheric SWS' (one hemisphere is asleep while the other is awake). The remaining episodes can be described as episodes of bilateral SWS with a local activation in one cerebral hemisphere.

  15. In-situ measurement of permeability of a porous interface using the ultrasonic slow wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Lin

    2011-12-01

    Porous materials are an important class of materials. They occur in natural substances such as oil or water bearing rocks, marine sediment, biological tissues (e.g. bones), granular materials and man made materials such as separation membranes, thermal insulators, ceramics and fuel cells. Porous materials have been used in many areas of applied science and engineering. Understanding of porous media plays an important role in areas such as experimental acoustics, geo-mechanics, geophysics, biophysics, material science. Among the number of parameters describing porous materials, the permeability is often the reason the porous structure is of interest. Permeability is a measurement of the ability of a porous material to transmit fluid. At an interface, permeability describes the flow of fluid into or out of a porous media Ultrasound has been widely used for flaw detection and material characterization. Studies show that there are three waves that exist in porous materials: the longitudinal and shear wave that exist in other solid materials and the slow longitudinal wave that only exists in porous materials. This slow longitudinal wave can only be generated and propagated above a critical frequency. Measuring the critical frequency provides information about the intrinsic permeability of a porous interface. This thesis presents a new technique developed for an in-situ permeability measurement using measurement of slow wave. In this work, an exact solution for the critical wave number for the slow wave has been developed and showed suitable for measuring the permeability of porous materials. A computer model of the reflection coefficient at the interface of fluid/porous media has been developed for the acoustic measurement. Ultrasonic experiments confirmed the sensitivity of this technique to changes in permeability and fluid viscosity. A flow cell test has been performed to show one potential industrial application of this technique by showing open pore and closed pore

  16. Estimation of material parameters from slow and fast shear waves in an incompressible, transversely isotropic material

    PubMed Central

    Tweten, Dennis J.; Okamoto, Ruth J.; Schmidt, John L.; Garbow, Joel R.; Bayly, Philip V.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a method to estimate mechanical properties of soft, anisotropic materials from measurements of shear waves with specific polarization and propagation directions. This method is applicable to data from magnetic resonance elastography (MRE), which is a method for measuring shear waves in live subjects or in vitro samples. Here, we simulate MRE data using finite element analysis. A nearly-incompressible, transversely isotropic (ITI) material model with three parameters (shear modulus, shear anisotropy, and tensile anisotropy) is used, which is appropriate for many fibrous, biological tissues. Both slow and fast shear waves travel concurrently through such a material with speeds that depend on the propagation direction relative to fiber orientation. A three-parameter estimation approach based on directional filtering and isolation of slow and fast shear wave components (directional filter inversion, or DFI) is introduced. Wave speeds of each isolated shear wave component are estimated using local frequency estimation (LFE), and material properties are calculated using weighted least squares. Data from multiple finite element simulations are used to assess the accuracy and reliability of DFI for estimation of anisotropic material parameters. PMID:26476762

  17. Estimation of material parameters from slow and fast shear waves in an incompressible, transversely isotropic material.

    PubMed

    Tweten, Dennis J; Okamoto, Ruth J; Schmidt, John L; Garbow, Joel R; Bayly, Philip V

    2015-11-26

    This paper describes a method to estimate mechanical properties of soft, anisotropic materials from measurements of shear waves with specific polarization and propagation directions. This method is applicable to data from magnetic resonance elastography (MRE), which is a method for measuring shear waves in live subjects or in vitro samples. Here, we simulate MRE data using finite element analysis. A nearly incompressible, transversely isotropic (ITI) material model with three parameters (shear modulus, shear anisotropy, and tensile anisotropy) is used, which is appropriate for many fibrous, biological tissues. Both slow and fast shear waves travel concurrently through such a material with speeds that depend on the propagation direction relative to fiber orientation. A three-parameter estimation approach based on directional filtering and isolation of slow and fast shear wave components (directional filter inversion, or DFI) is introduced. Wave speeds of each isolated shear wave component are estimated using local frequency estimation (LFE), and material properties are calculated using weighted least squares. Data from multiple finite element simulations are used to assess the accuracy and reliability of DFI for estimation of anisotropic material parameters. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Frequency-dependent damping in propagating slow magneto-acoustic waves

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, S. Krishna; Banerjee, D.; Van Doorsselaere, T.

    2014-07-10

    Propagating slow magneto-acoustic waves are often observed in polar plumes and active region fan loops. The observed periodicities of these waves range from a few minutes to a few tens of minutes and their amplitudes were found to decay rapidly as they travel along the supporting structure. Previously, thermal conduction, compressive viscosity, radiation, density stratification, and area divergence were identified to be some of the causes for change in the slow wave amplitude. Our recent studies indicate that the observed damping in these waves is frequency-dependent. We used imaging data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly to study this dependence in detail and for the first time via observations we attempted to deduce a quantitative relation between the damping length and frequency of these oscillations. We developed a new analysis method to obtain this relation. The observed frequency dependence does not seem to agree with the current linear wave theory and it was found that the waves observed in the polar regions show a different dependence from those observed in the on-disk loop structures despite the similarity in their properties.

  19. Convectively coupled equatorial waves within the MJO during CINDY/DYNAMO: slow Kelvin waves as building blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Kazuyoshi; Kiladis, George N.; Dias, Juliana; Nasuno, Tomoe

    2017-08-01

    This study examines the relationship between the MJO and convectively coupled equatorial waves (CCEWs) during the CINDY2011/DYNAMO field campaig