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Sample records for small animal radiography

  1. Practical contour segmentation algorithm for small animal digital radiography image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Fang; Hui, Gong

    2008-12-01

    In this paper a practical, automated contour segmentation technique for digital radiography image is described. Digital radiography is an imaging mode based on the penetrability of x-ray. Unlike reflection imaging mode such as visible light camera, the pixel brightness represents the summation of the attenuations on the photon thoroughfare. It is not chromophotograph but gray scale picture. Contour extraction is of great importance in medical applications, especially in non-destructive inspection. Manual segmentation techniques include pixel selection, geometrical boundary selection and tracing. But it relies heavily on the experience of the operators, and is time-consuming. Some researchers try to find contours from the intensity jumping characters around them. However these characters also exist in the juncture of bone and soft tissue. The practical way is back to the primordial threshold algorithm. This research emphasizes on how to find the optimal threshold. A high resolution digital radiography system is used to provide the oriental gray scale image. A mouse is applied as the sample of this paper to show the feasibility of the algorithm.

  2. Proton radiography for inline treatment planning and positioning verification of small animals.

    PubMed

    Müller, Johannes; Neubert, Christian; von Neubeck, Cläre; Baumann, Michael; Krause, Mechthild; Enghardt, Wolfgang; Bütof, Rebecca; Dietrich, Antje; Lühr, Armin

    2017-08-23

    As proton therapy becomes increasingly well established, there is a need for high-quality clinically relevant in vivo data to gain better insight into the radiobiological effects of proton irradiation on both healthy and tumor tissue. This requires the development of easily applicable setups that allow for efficient, fractionated, image-guided proton irradiation of small animals, the most widely used pre-clinical model. Here, a method is proposed to perform dual-energy proton radiography for inline positioning verification and treatment planning. Dual-energy proton radiography exploits the differential enhancement of object features in two successively measured two-dimensional (2D) dose distributions at two different proton energies. The two raw images show structures that are dominated by energy absorption (absorption mode) or scattering (scattering mode) of protons in the object, respectively. Data post-processing allowed for the separation of both signal contributions in the respective images. The images were evaluated regarding recognizable object details and feasibility of rigid registration to acquired planar X-ray scans. Robust, automated rigid registration of proton radiography and planar X-ray images in scattering mode could be reliably achieved with the animal bedding unit used as registration landmark. Distinguishable external and internal features of the imaged mouse included the outer body contour, the skull with substructures, the lung, abdominal structures and the hind legs. Image analysis based on the combined information of both imaging modes allowed image enhancement and calculation of 2D water-equivalent path length (WEPL) maps of the object along the beam direction. Fractionated irradiation of exposed target volumes (e.g., subcutaneous tumor model or brain) can be realized with the suggested method being used for daily positioning and range determination. Robust registration of X-ray and proton radiography images allows for the irradiation of

  3. Small-animal dark-field radiography for pulmonary emphysema evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaroshenko, Andre; Meinel, Felix G.; Hellbach, Katharina; Bech, Martin; Velroyen, Astrid; Müller, Mark; Bamberg, Fabian; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Reiser, Maximilian F.; Yildirim, Ali Ã.-.; Eickelberg, Oliver; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2014-03-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide and emphysema is one of its main components. The disorder is characterized by irreversible destruction of the alveolar walls and enlargement of distal airspaces. Despite the severe changes in the lung tissue morphology, conventional chest radiographs have only a limited sensitivity for the detection of mild to moderate emphysema. X-ray dark-field is an imaging modality that can significantly increase the visibility of lung tissue on radiographic images. The dark-field signal is generated by coherent, small-angle scattering of x-rays on the air-tissue interfaces in the lung. Therefore, morphological changes in the lung can be clearly visualized on dark-field images. This is demonstrated by a preclinical study with a small-animal emphysema model. To generate a murine model of pulmonary emphysema, a female C57BL/6N mouse was treated with a single orotracheal application of porcine pancreatic elastase (80 U/kg body weight) dissolved in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). Control mouse received PBS. The mice were imaged using a small-animal dark-field scanner. While conventional x-ray transmission radiography images revealed only subtle indirect signs of the pulmonary disorder, the difference between healthy and emphysematous lungs could be clearly directly visualized on the dark-field images. The dose applied to the animals is compatible with longitudinal studies. The imaging results correlate well with histology. The results of this study reveal the high potential of dark-field radiography for clinical lung imaging.

  4. Rapid small-animal dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry using digital radiography.

    PubMed

    Holdsworth, D W; Thornton, M M; Drost, D; Watson, P H; Fraher, L J; Hodsman, A B

    2000-12-01

    Although dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) is an established technique for clinical assessment of areal bone mineral density (BMD), the spatial resolution, signal-to-noise ratio, scan time, and availability of clinical DEXA systems may be limiting factors for small-animal investigations using a large number of specimens. To avoid these limitations, we have implemented a clinical digital radiography system to perform rapid area DEXA analysis on in vitro rat bone specimens. A crossed step-wedge (comprised of epoxy-based materials that mimic the radiographic properties of tissue and bone) was used to calibrate the system. Digital radiographs of bone specimens (pelvis, spine, femur, and tibia from sham-ovariectomized [SHAM] and ovariectomized [OVX] rats) were obtained at 40 kilovolt peak (kVp) and 125 kVp, and the resulting areal BMD values were compared with those obtained with a clinical fan-beam DEXA system (Hologics QDR 4500). Our investigation indicates that the cross-wedge calibrated (CWC) DEXA technique provides high-precision measurements of bone mineral content (BMC; CV = 0.6%) and BMD (CV = 0.8%) within a short acquisition time (<30 s). Areal BMD measurements reported by the CWC-DEXA system are within 8.5% of those reported by a clinical fan-beam scanner, and BMC values are within 5% of the known value of test specimens. In an in vivo application, the CWC-DEXA system is capable of reporting significant differences between study groups (SHAM and OVX) that are not reported by a clinical fan-beam DEXA system, because of the reduced variance and improved object segmentation provided by the CWC-DEXA system.

  5. Comparison of computed radiography and conventional radiography in detection of small volume pneumoperitoneum.

    PubMed

    Marolf, Angela; Blaik, Margaret; Ackerman, Norman; Watson, Elizabeth; Gibson, Nicole; Thompson, Margret

    2008-01-01

    The role of digital imaging is increasing as these systems are becoming more affordable and accessible. Advantages of computed radiography compared with conventional film/screen combinations include improved contrast resolution and postprocessing capabilities. Computed radiography's spatial resolution is inferior to conventional radiography; however, this limitation is considered clinically insignificant. This study prospectively compared digital imaging and conventional radiography in detecting small volume pneumoperitoneum. Twenty cadaver dogs (15-30 kg) were injected with 0.25, 0.25, and 0.5 ml for 1 ml total of air intra-abdominally, and radiographed sequentially using computed and conventional radiographic technologies. Three radiologists independently evaluated the images, and receiver operating curve (ROC) analysis compared the two imaging modalities. There was no statistical difference between computed and conventional radiography in detecting free abdominal air, but overall computed radiography was relatively more sensitive based on ROC analysis. Computed radiographic images consistently and significantly demonstrated a minimal amount of 0.5 ml of free air based on ROC analysis. However, no minimal air amount was consistently or significantly detected with conventional film. Readers were more likely to detect free air on lateral computed images than the other projections, with no significant increased sensitivity between film/screen projections. Further studies are indicated to determine the differences or lack thereof between various digital imaging systems and conventional film/screen systems.

  6. Radiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, C. G.

    1973-01-01

    Radiography is discussed as a method for nondestructive evaluation of internal flaws of solids. Gamma ray and X-ray equipment are described along with radiographic film, radiograph interpretation, and neutron radiography.

  7. Small Animal Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Livesey, Dennis W.; Fong, Stephen

    This small animal care course guide is designed for students who will be seeking employment in veterinary hospitals, kennels, grooming shops, pet shops, and small-animal laboratories. The guide begins with an introductory section that gives the educational philosophy of the course, job categories and opportunities, units of instruction required…

  8. Small Animal Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Livesey, Dennis W.; Fong, Stephen

    This small animal care course guide is designed for students who will be seeking employment in veterinary hospitals, kennels, grooming shops, pet shops, and small-animal laboratories. The guide begins with an introductory section that gives the educational philosophy of the course, job categories and opportunities, units of instruction required…

  9. Small Soil Animals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seevers, Elmer R.

    1978-01-01

    Describes an inexpensive technique for providing student opportunities to observe and identify the variety of small animals living in the first few inches below the surface of the soil. A classification key to some small soil animals is also presented. (HM)

  10. Small Animal Retinal Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, WooJhon; Drexler, Wolfgang; Fujimoto, James G.

    Developing and validating new techniques and methods for small animal imaging is an important research area because there are many small animal models of retinal diseases such as diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration, and glaucoma [1-6]. Because the retina is a multilayered structure with distinct abnormalities occurring in different intraretinal layers at different stages of disease progression, there is a need for imaging techniques that enable visualization of these layers individually at different time points. Although postmortem histology and ultrastructural analysis can be performed for investigating microscopic changes in the retina in small animal models, this requires sacrificing animals, which makes repeated assessment of the same animal at different time points impossible and increases the number of animals required. Furthermore, some retinal processes such as neurovascular coupling cannot be fully characterized postmortem.

  11. Small Animal Bone Biomechanics

    PubMed Central

    Vashishth, Deepak

    2008-01-01

    Animal models, in particular mice, offer the possibility of naturally achieving or genetically engineering a skeletal phenotype associated with disease and conducting destructive fracture tests on bone to determine the resulting change in bone’s mechanical properties. Several recent developments, including nano- and micro- indentation testing, microtensile and microcompressive testing, and bending tests on notched whole bone specimens, offer the possibility to mechanically probe small animal bone and investigate the effects of aging, therapeutic treatments, disease, and genetic variation. In contrast to traditional strength tests on small animal bones, fracture mechanics tests display smaller variation and therefore offer the possibility of reducing sample sizes. This article provides an analysis of what such tests measure and proposes methods to reduce errors associated with testing smaller than ideal specimens. PMID:18672104

  12. Clinical feline dental radiography.

    PubMed

    Lemmons, Matthew

    2013-05-01

    Dental radiography is a necessary diagnostic modality in small animal practice. It is not possible to accurately assess and diagnose tooth resorption, periodontal disease, endodontic disease, neoplasia and injury without it. Dental radiography is also necessary for treatment and assessment of the patient postoperatively.

  13. Small animal models of xenotransplantation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao

    2012-01-01

    Organ transplantation has become a successful and acceptable treatment for end-stage organ failure. Such success has allowed transplant patients to resume a normal lifestyle. The demands for transplantation have been steadily increasing, as more patients and new diseases are being deemed eligible for treatment via transplantation. However, it is clear that human organs will never meet the increasing demand of transplantation. Therefore, scientists must continue to pursue alternative therapies and explore new treatments to meet the growing demand for the limited number of organs available. Transplanting organs from animals into humans (xenotransplantation) is one such therapy. The observed enthusiasm for xenotransplantation, irrespective of the severe shortage of human organs and tissues available for transplantation, can be said to stem from at least two factors. First, there is the possibility that animal organs and tissues might be less susceptible than those of humans to the recurrence of disease processes. Second, a xenograft might be used as a vehicle for introducing novel genes or biochemical processes which could be of therapeutic value for the transplant recipient.To date, millions of lives have been saved by organ transplantation. These remarkable achievements would have been impossible without experimental transplantation research in animal models. Presently, more than 95% of organ transplantation research projects are carried out using rodents, such as rats and mice. The key factor to ensure the success of these experiments lies in state-of-the art experimental surgery. Small animal models offer unique advantages for the mechanistic study of xenotransplantation rejection. Currently, multiple models have been developed for investigating the different stages of immunological barriers in xenotransplantation. In this chapter, we describe six valuable small animal models that have been used in xenotransplantation research. The methodology for the small animal

  14. Implantable telemetry for small animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1982-03-01

    A series of totally implantable telemetry devices for use in measuring deep body parameters in small animals were developed. Under a collaborative agreement with NASA, several of these systems; the continuous wave Doppler ultrasonic flowmeter, the multichannel telemetry system, and the inductively-powered dual channel cardiac pacer were evaluated in a series of ten mongrel dogs (15 to 20 kg.). These systems were used to measure ascending aortic and coronary blood flow, aortic pressure, and subcutaneous EKG.

  15. Implantable telemetry for small animals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    A series of totally implantable telemetry devices for use in measuring deep body parameters in small animals were developed. Under a collaborative agreement with NASA, several of these systems; the continuous wave Doppler ultrasonic flowmeter, the multichannel telemetry system, and the inductively-powered dual channel cardiac pacer were evaluated in a series of ten mongrel dogs (15 to 20 kg.). These systems were used to measure ascending aortic and coronary blood flow, aortic pressure, and subcutaneous EKG.

  16. Comparison of radiography and ultrasonography for diagnosing small-intestinal mechanical obstruction in vomiting dogs.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ajay; Thompson, Margret S; Scrivani, Peter V; Dykes, Nathan L; Yeager, Amy E; Freer, Sean R; Erb, Hollis N

    2011-01-01

    A cross-sectional study was performed on acutely vomiting dogs to compare the accuracy of radiography and ultrasonography for the diagnosis of small-intestinal mechanical obstruction and to describe several radiographic and ultrasonographic signs to identify their contribution to the final diagnosis. The sample population consisted of 82 adult dogs and small-intestinal obstruction by foreign body was confirmed in 27/82 (33%) dogs by surgery or necropsy. Radiography produced a definitive result (obstructed or not obstructed) in 58/82 (70%) of dogs; ultrasonography produced a definitive result in 80/82 (97%) of dogs. On radiographs, a diagnosis of obstruction was based on detection of segmental small-intestinal dilatation, plication, or detection of a foreign body. Approximately 30% (8/27) of obstructed dogs did not have radiographic signs of segmental small-intestinal dilatation, of which 50% (4/8) were due to linear foreign bodies. The ultrasonographic diagnosis of small-intestinal obstruction was based on detection of an obstructive lesion, sonographic signs of plication or segmental, small-intestinal dilatation. The ultrasonographic presence or absence of moderate-to-severe intestinal diameter enlargement (due to lumen dilatation) of the jejunum (>1.5 cm) was a useful discriminatory finding and, when present, should prompt a thorough search for a cause of small-intestinal obstruction. In conclusion, both abdominal radiography and abdominal ultrasonography are accurate for diagnosing small-intestinal obstruction in vomiting dogs and either may be used depending on availability and examiner choice. Abdominal ultrasonography had greater accuracy, fewer equivocal results and provided greater diagnostic confidence compared with radiography. © 2010 Veterinary Radiology & Ultrasound.

  17. High School Small Animal Laboratory--Business

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penn, Alan

    1974-01-01

    An Ohio vocational school Small Animal Care program prepares students for entry level employment as veterinary assistants, pet shop salesmen, kennel workers, animal groomers, Humane Society workers, laboratory animal assistants, and riding stable assistants. (EA)

  18. High School Small Animal Laboratory--Business

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penn, Alan

    1974-01-01

    An Ohio vocational school Small Animal Care program prepares students for entry level employment as veterinary assistants, pet shop salesmen, kennel workers, animal groomers, Humane Society workers, laboratory animal assistants, and riding stable assistants. (EA)

  19. Development of a triple modality small animal planar imaging system

    SciTech Connect

    A. G. Weisenberger, Z. Lee, S. Majewski, B. Kross, V. Popov, B. Welch, R. Wojcik, C. Zorn

    2006-02-01

    Recently small animal research utilizing nuclear medicine based imaging has been combined with structural anatomical imaging from x-ray radiography providing a powerful tool for animal researchers. The addition of a third modality is the goal of our instrumentation development. Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility and Case Western Reserve University have been collaborating on the development of a planar imaging system which in addition to radiopharmaceutical based functional imaging and x-ray radiography structural imaging also allows for the in vivo bioluminescence imaging thus providing another functional imaging modality. For the gamma camera we use is a Hamamatsu position sensitive photomultiplier tube coupled to a pixellated NaI(TI) scintillator array with individual crystal elements 1 mm × 1 mm × 5 mm in size and a 0.25 mm septum between each element. The gamma camera has a 10 cm diameter active area and can be used for 125I, 99mT and 111In radionuclide imaging. To acquire anatomical information we are using a Rad-Icon Shad-o-Box X-ray detector that provides a field of view of 5 cm × 10 cm. The x-ray source is a Source-Ray compact x-ray generator. We are using a Princeton Instruments cooled CCD based detector for the imaging of the bio-distribution of bioluminescence. All three imaging instruments will be integrated into a single light tight / x-ray tight enclosure.

  20. A focus on small animals.

    PubMed

    Steward, Jeremy

    2016-07-16

    After qualifying 25 years ago, Jeremy Stewart worked at the RSPCA's Harmsworth Hospital during the years it featured in the BBC television programme Animal Hospital. Having moved to a large group practice, his involvement in the charity sector is now as a trustee of the Blue Cross.

  1. Exploring Small Animal Care. Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Livesey, Dennis W.

    This course guide in small animal care is designed to give students seeking employment in veterinary hospitals, kennels, or pet shops an opportunity to (1) develop basic skills in small animal handling, sanitation of housing, and nutrition, (2) acquire skills in dog and cat grooming, including shop operation, (3) develop attitudes which contribute…

  2. Exploring Small Animal Care. Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Livesey, Dennis W.

    This course guide in small animal care is designed to give students seeking employment in veterinary hospitals, kennels, or pet shops an opportunity to (1) develop basic skills in small animal handling, sanitation of housing, and nutrition, (2) acquire skills in dog and cat grooming, including shop operation, (3) develop attitudes which contribute…

  3. Barium Peritonitis in Small Animals

    PubMed Central

    KO, Jae Jin; MANN, F. A. (Tony)

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Barium peritonitis is extremely rare, but is difficult to treat and may be life-threatening. Barium suspension leakage from the gastrointestinal tract into the abdominal cavity has a time-dependent and synergistically deleterious effect in patients who have generalized bacterial peritonitis. The severity of barium peritonitis is dependent on the quantity of barium in the abdominal cavity. Barium sulfate leakage results in hypovolemia and hypoproteinemia by worsening the exudation of extracellular fluid and albumin. Abdominal fluid analysis is a useful and efficient method to diagnose barium peritonitis. Serial radiographs may not be a reliable or timely diagnostic technique. Initial aggressive fluid resuscitation and empirical broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment should be instituted promptly, followed quickly by celiotomy. During exploratory surgical intervention, copious irrigation and direct wiping with gauze are employed to remove as much barium as possible. Omentectomy should be considered when needed to expedite barium removal. Despite aggressive medical and surgical treatments, postoperative prognosis is guarded to poor due to complications, such as acute vascular shock, sepsis, diffuse peritonitis, hypoproteninemia, electrolyte imbalance, cardiac arrest, small bowel obstruction related to progression of granulomas and adhesions in the abdominal cavity. Therefore, intensive postoperative monitoring and prompt intervention are necessary to maximize chances for a positive outcome. For those that do survive, small bowel obstruction is a potential consequence due to progression of abdominal adhesions. PMID:24430662

  4. Analgesia for small animal thoracic surgery.

    PubMed

    Pavlidou, Kyriaki; Papazoglou, Lysimachos; Savvas, Ioannis; Kazakos, Georgios

    2009-09-01

    Thoracic surgery in small animals is considered a painful procedure, resulting in alterations in pulmonary function and respiratory mechanics. Modifications in surgical approach and technique and selection of the appropriate analgesic protocol may improve outcomes in dogs and cats after thoracic surgery. Systemic administration of opioids and other agents, intercostal and intrapleural blocks, and epidural analgesia are among the most common options for pain management after thoracic surgery in small animals.

  5. In vivo Noninvasive Small Animal Molecular Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Youn, Hyewon; Hong, Kee-Jong

    2012-01-01

    The remarkable efforts that are made on molecular imaging technologies demonstrate its potential importance and range of applications. The generation of disease-specific animal models, and the developments of target-specific probes and genetically encoded reporters are another important component. Continued improvements in the instrumentation, the identification of novel targets and genes, and the availability of improved imaging probes should be made. Multimodal imaging probes should provide easier transitions between laboratory studies, including small animal studies and clinical applications. Here, we reviewed basic strategies of noninvasive in vivo imaging methods in small animals to introducing the concept of molecular imaging. PMID:24159487

  6. A thermocouple thermode for small animals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, B. A.

    1972-01-01

    Thermode composed of two thin-walled stainless steel hypodermic needles and cooper-constantan thermocouple or small thermistor to indicate temperature at point of perfusion is used to measure brain temperature in animals. Because of relatively small size of thermode, structural damage to brain is minimized.

  7. Small-animal research imaging devices.

    PubMed

    Fine, Eugene J; Herbst, Lawrence; Jelicks, Linda A; Koba, Wade; Theele, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The scientific study of living animals may be dated to Aristotle's original dissections, but modern animal studies are perhaps a century in the making, and advanced animal imaging has emerged only during the past few decades. In vivo imaging now occupies a growing role in the scientific research paradigm. Imaging of small animals has been particularly useful to help understand human molecular biology and pathophysiology using rodents, especially using genetically engineered mice (GEM) with spontaneous diseases that closely mimic human diseases. Specific examples of GEM models of veterinary diseases exist, but in general, GEM for veterinary research has lagged behind human research applications. However, the development of spontaneous disease models from GEM may also hold potential for veterinary research. The imaging techniques most widely used in small-animal research are CT, PET, single-photon emission CT, MRI, and optical fluorescent and luminescent imaging. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Design of a small animal biopsy robot.

    PubMed

    Bebek, Ozkan; Hwang, Myun Joong; Fei, Baowei; Cavusoglu, M

    2008-01-01

    Small animals are widely used in biomedical research studies. They have compact anatomy and small organs. Therefore it is difficult to perceive tumors or cells and perform biopsies manually. Robotics technology offers a convenient and reliable solution for accurate needle insertion. In this paper, a novel 5 degrees of freedom (DOF) robot design for inserting needles into small animal subjects is proposed. The design has a compact size, is light weight, and has high resolution. Parallel mechanisms are used in the design for stable and reliable operation. The proposed robot has two gimbal joints that carry the needle mechanism. The robot can realize dexterous alignment of the needle before insertion.

  9. Optical tomographic imaging of small animals.

    PubMed

    Hielscher, Andreas H

    2005-02-01

    Diffuse optical tomography is emerging as a viable new biomedical imaging modality. Using visible and near-infrared light this technique can probe the absorption and scattering properties of biological tissues. The main applications are currently in brain, breast, limb and joint imaging; however, optical tomographic imaging of small animals is attracting increasing attention. This interest is fuelled by recent advances in the transgenic manipulation of small animals that has led to many models of human disease. In addition, an ever increasing number of optically reactive biochemical markers has become available, which allow diseases to be detected at the molecular level long before macroscopic symptoms appear. The past three years have seen an array of novel technological developments that have led to the first optical tomographic studies of small animals in the areas of cerebral ischemia and cancer.

  10. [New drugs for small animals in 2010].

    PubMed

    Emmerich, I U

    2011-01-01

    In 2010, no active pharmaceutical ingredients were released on the German market for small animals. Furthermore, no additional substances were authorized for additional species. Only one drug with an interesting new pharmaceutical form, two products with a new strength and one drug, which is interesting because of other criteria, were added to the market for small animals. In addition, nine active pharmaceutical ingredients with approval for use in human medicine, which are of potential interest for veterinary medicine, entered the market in 2010. Those are the analgesic Tapentadol, the antiallergicum Bilastine, the antiarrhythmics Dronedarone and Vernakalant, the antihaemorrhagic Eltrombopag, the bronchodilator Roflumilast, the hormone Corifollitropin alfa, the laxative Prucalopride and the cytostatic Mifamurtide.

  11. Advances in Small Animal Imaging Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loudos, George K.

    2007-11-01

    The rapid growth in genetics and molecular biology combined with the development of techniques for genetically engineering small animals has led to an increased interest in in vivo laboratory animal imaging during the past few years. For this purpose, new instrumentation, data acquisition strategies, and image processing and reconstruction techniques are being developed, researched and evaluated. The aim of this article is to give a short overview of the state of the art technologies for high resolution and high sensitivity molecular imaging techniques, primarily positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The basic needs of small animal imaging will be described. The evolution in instrumentation in the past two decades, as well as the commercially available systems will be overviewed. Finally, the new trends in detector technology and preliminary results from challenging applications will be presented. For more details a number of references are provided.

  12. COMPARISON OF THORACIC ULTRASONOGRAPHY AND RADIOGRAPHY FOR THE DETECTION OF INDUCED SMALL VOLUME PNEUMOTHORAX IN THE HORSE.

    PubMed

    Partlow, Jessica; David, Florent; Hunt, Luanne Michelle; Relave, Fabien; Blond, Laurent; Pinilla, Manuel; Lavoie, Jean-Pierre

    2017-05-01

    Small volume pneumothorax can be challenging to diagnose in horses. The current standard method for diagnosis is standing thoracic radiography. We hypothesized that thoracic ultrasonography would be more sensitive. Objectives of this prospective, experimental study were to describe a thoracic ultrasound method for detection of small volume pneumothorax in horses and to compare results of radiography and ultrasound in a sample of horses with induced small volume pneumothorax. Six mature healthy horses were recruited for this study. For each horse, five 50 ml air boluses were sequentially introduced via a teat cannula into the pleural space. Lateral thoracic radiographs and standardized ultrasound (2D and M-mode) examinations of both hemithoraces were performed following administration of each 50 ml air bolus. Radiographs and ultrasound images/videos were analyzed for detection of pneumothorax by four independent investigators who were unaware of treatment status. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive values, negative predictive values, and agreement among investigators (Kappa test, κ) were calculated for radiography, 2D and M-mode ultrasound. Comparisons were made using a chi-squared exact test with significance set at P < 0.05. Two-dimensional (84%) and M-mode (80%) ultrasound were more sensitive than radiography (48%) for pneumothorax detection (P = 0.02 and P = 0.04, respectively). Specificity and positive predictive values were similar for all three imaging modalities (P = 1). Agreement between investigators for pneumothorax detection was excellent for 2D ultrasound (κ = 1), very good for M-mode ultrasound (κ = 0.87), and good for radiography (κ = 0.79). Findings from this experimental study supported the use of thoracic ultrasonography as a diagnostic method for detecting pneumothorax in horses. © 2017 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  13. Multi-modality imaging of small animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kastis, Georgios Anthony

    Over the last few years there has been a great demand for noninvasive, dedicated, small-animal imaging systems for biomedical research applications. In this dissertation we will discuss the development and performance of two gamma-ray systems and a dual modality CT/SPECT system. Initially we introduce FASTSPECT, a stationary, scintillator-based, single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system that was originally built as a brain imager. We discuss its transformation into a small-animal imaging system and validate its performance by presenting high-resolution images of phantoms and animals. Furthermore, we discuss the development of an in vivo imaging protocol for rat myocardial models using FASTSPECT. The infarct size obtained from the images is quantified and compared with the myocardial infarct size measured from histology. Semiconductor detectors can exhibit good spatial and energy resolution, and therefore offer a promising alternative to scintillation technology. We discuss the performance of a semiconductor detector system, previously developed in our group, for planar and tomographic imaging of small animals. The same gamma-ray detector is used in a dual modality system for imaging mice. The system combines an anatomical imaging modality, x-ray CT, with a functional modality, SPECT. We present the development of the CT/SPECT system and illustrate its performance by presenting high-resolution images of phantoms and mice. Finally, we introduce a procedure for evaluating estimation methods without the use of a gold standard.

  14. [New drugs for small animals in 2009].

    PubMed

    Emmerich, I U

    2010-01-01

    In 2009, five active pharmaceutical ingredients were released on the German market for small animals. Those are the analgesic Buprenorphin (Buprenovet®), the cytostatic Masitinib (Masivet®), the antiepileptic Phenobarbital (Phenoleptil®) and the cyclooxygenase-2-inhibitors Mavacoxib (Trocoxil®) and Robenacoxib (Onsior®). Six additional substances were authorized for additional species. Benazepril, Cefalexin, Ivermectin und Ramipril are now available for cats, Emodepsid in combination with Praziquantel is likewise authorized for dogs and the combination Imidaclopird + Moxidectin is now also available for ferrets. Furthermore, two new preparations with an interesting new pharmaceutical form were added to the market for small animals. In addition seven active pharmaceutical ingredients with approval for use in human medicine which are of potential interest for veterinary medicine, entered the market in 2009. Those are the antiepileptic Eslicarbazepinacetat, the antihemorrhagic Romiplostim, the anticoagulant Prasugrel, the vasopressin-antagonist Tolvaptan as well as the cytostatics Azacitidin, Plerixafor and Vinflunin.

  15. An atmospheric exposure chamber for small animals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaser, R. M.; Weiss, H. S.; Pitt, J. F.; Grimard, M.

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to design a long-term environmental exposure chamber for small animals. This chamber is capable of producing hypoxic, normoxic and hyperoxic atmospheres which are closely regulated. The chamber, which is of the recycling type, is fashioned after clear plastic germ-free isolators. Oxygen concentration is set and controlled by a paramagnetic O2 analyzer and a 3-way solenoid valve. In this way either O2 or N2 may be provided to the system by way of negative O2 feedback. Relative humidity is maintained at 40-50 percent by a refrigeration type dryer. Carbon dioxide is absorbed by indicating soda lime. A diaphragm pump continuously circulates chamber gas at a high enough flow rate to prevent buildup of CO2 and humidity. This chamber has been used for numerous studies which involve prolonged exposure of small animals to various O2 concentrations.

  16. An atmospheric exposure chamber for small animals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaser, R. M.; Weiss, H. S.; Pitt, J. F.; Grimard, M.

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to design a long-term environmental exposure chamber for small animals. This chamber is capable of producing hypoxic, normoxic and hyperoxic atmospheres which are closely regulated. The chamber, which is of the recycling type, is fashioned after clear plastic germ-free isolators. Oxygen concentration is set and controlled by a paramagnetic O2 analyzer and a 3-way solenoid valve. In this way either O2 or N2 may be provided to the system by way of negative O2 feedback. Relative humidity is maintained at 40-50 percent by a refrigeration type dryer. Carbon dioxide is absorbed by indicating soda lime. A diaphragm pump continuously circulates chamber gas at a high enough flow rate to prevent buildup of CO2 and humidity. This chamber has been used for numerous studies which involve prolonged exposure of small animals to various O2 concentrations.

  17. Precision Radiotherapy for Small Animal Research

    PubMed Central

    Matinfar, Mohammad; Iordachita, Iulian; Ford, Eric; Wong, John; Kazanzides, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Preclinical research using well characterized small animal models has provided tremendous benefits to medical research, enabling low cost, large scale trials with high statistical significance of observed effects. The goal of the Small Animal Radiation Research Platform (SARRP) is to make those models available for the development and evaluation of novel radiation therapies. SARRP demonstrates the capabilities of delivering high resolution, sub-millimeter, optimally planned conformal radiation with on-board cone-beam CT (CBCT) guidance. The system requires accurate calibration of the x-ray beam for both imaging and radiation treatment. In this paper, we present a novel technique using an x-ray camera for calibration of the treatment beam. This technique does not require precise positioning or calibration of the x-ray camera. PMID:18982656

  18. ADAPTIVE SMALL-ANIMAL SPECT/CT

    PubMed Central

    Furenlid, L.R.; Moore, J.W.; Freed, M.; Kupinski, M.A.; Clarkson, E.; Liu, Z.; Wilson, D.W.; Woolfenden, J.M.; Barrett, H.H.

    2015-01-01

    We are exploring the concept of adaptive multimodality imaging, a form of non-linear optimization where the imaging configuration is automatically adjusted in response to the object. Preliminary studies suggest that substantial improvement in objective, task-based measures of image quality can result. We describe here our work to add motorized adjustment capabilities and a matching CT to our existing FastSPECT II system to form an adaptive small-animal SPECT/CT. PMID:26617457

  19. Management of fractures in small animals.

    PubMed

    Roush, James K

    2005-09-01

    Fracture repair in small animals has arrived at a crossroads because of advances in fracture repair and client demands. Research into bone healing and repair techniques, collective professional experience,economics, and client demands are obligating veterinarians to greater expertise in the actual act of repairing fractures. The influx of surgery specialists into burgeoning private practices has improved access to specialty service beyond what the limited number of academic practices could previously provide and has raised the local standard of practice for orthopedic surgery at the same time. The necessity to deal with the preoperative and postoperative management of traumatized small animals by the general practitioner has not changed, however. Treatment of the small animal patient with a fractured bone does involve accurate definition of the fracture, selection of an appropriate method of fracture fixation from the variety of devices available, and correct application of the fixation. Far more than these, however, it involves assessment and treatment of the traumatized patient as a whole,including preanesthetic evaluation of critical body systems, preoperative preparation of the patient and client, and postoperative management of the repaired fracture and patient.

  20. Assessment of image quality in x-ray radiography imaging using a small plasma focus device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanani, A.; Shirani, B.; Jabbari, I.; Mokhtari, J.

    2014-08-01

    This paper offers a comprehensive investigation of image quality parameters for a small plasma focus as a pulsed hard x-ray source for radiography applications. A set of images were captured from some metal objects and electronic circuits using a low energy plasma focus at different voltages of capacitor bank and different pressures of argon gas. The x-ray source focal spot of this device was obtained to be about 0.6 mm using the penumbra imaging method. The image quality was studied by several parameters such as image contrast, line spread function (LSF) and modulation transfer function (MTF). Results showed that the contrast changes by variations in gas pressure. The best contrast was obtained at a pressure of 0.5 mbar and 3.75 kJ stored energy. The results of x-ray dose from the device showed that about 0.6 mGy is sufficient to obtain acceptable images on the film. The measurements of LSF and MTF parameters were carried out by means of a thin stainless steel wire 0.8 mm in diameter and the cut-off frequency was obtained to be about 1.5 cycles/mm.

  1. Small mammalian animal models of heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Camacho, Paula; Fan, Huimin; Liu, Zhongmin; He, Jia-Qiang

    2016-01-01

    There is an urgent clinical need to develop new therapeutic approaches for treating cardiovascular disease, but the biology of cardiovascular regeneration is complex. Model systems are required to advance our understanding of the pathogenesis, progression, and mechanisms underlying cardiovascular disease as well as to test therapeutic approaches to regenerate tissue and restore cardiac function following injury. An ideal model system should be inexpensive, easily manipulated, reproducible, physiologically representative of human disease, and ethically sound. The choice of animal model needs to be considered carefully since it affects experimental outcomes and whether findings of the study can be reasonably translated to humans. This review presents a guideline for the commonly used small animal models (mice, rats, rabbits, and cats) used in cardiac research as an effort to standardize the most relevant procedures and obtain translatable and reproducible results. PMID:27679742

  2. Cyclosporin: applications in small animal dermatology.

    PubMed

    Robson, David C; Burton, Gregory G

    2003-02-01

    Cyclosporin has been increasingly used for the treatment of skin diseases in small animals. Reported uses include the treatment of atopy, cutaneous lupus erythematosus, feline acquired alopecia resembling pseudopelade of humans, pemphigus erythematosus, pemphigus foliaceus, perianal fistulae and sebaceous adenitis. In addition, cyclosporin has been used anecdotally for several other skin diseases. Few side effects have been noted at doses therapeutic for dermatologic diseases. Current suggestions for monitoring, and the value of trough cyclosporin serum concentrations for prediction of toxicity and efficacy are discussed.

  3. Advanced techniques in echocardiography in small animals.

    PubMed

    Chetboul, Valérie

    2010-07-01

    Transthoracic echocardiography has become a major imaging tool for the diagnosis and management of canine and feline cardiovascular diseases. During the last decade, more recent advances in ultrasound technology with the introduction of newer imaging modalities, such as tissue Doppler imaging, strain and strain rate imaging, and 2-dimensional speckle tracking echocardiography, have provided new parameters to assess myocardial performance, including regional myocardial velocities and deformation, ventricular twist, and mechanical synchrony. An outline of these 4 recent ultrasound techniques, their impact on the understanding of right and left ventricular function in small animals, and their application in research and clinical settings are given in this article.

  4. Recent advances in small animal genetics.

    PubMed

    Bannasch, Danika L; Hughes, Angela M

    2006-05-01

    The whole genome sequence of the dog is complete, and partial sequencing of the cat genome is underway. Sequences allow the molecular basis for inherited diseases to be more easily determined, leading to development of DNA tests to verify carrier and affected states as well as potential gene therapy for the treatment of those diseases. To help veterinarians provide genetic services to their clients, the molecular genetic tests currently available are listed in this article. In addition, cloning of small animals is now available to clients on a commercial basis. Information about the cloning process and possible health issues in clones are discussed.

  5. Opinions of Finnish small animal owners about surgery and pain management in small animals.

    PubMed

    Väisänen, M A-M; Tuomikoski-Alin, S K; Brodbelt, D C; Vainio, O M

    2008-12-01

    To examine the opinions among small animal owners regarding the management of pain and surgery in small animals. A questionnaire was presented to 800 owners of dogs or cats who visited one of the four participating clinics in Finland in February 2006. A total of 482 owners completed the questionnaire (60.3 per cent response rate); 90 per cent of the respondents were female. Owners classified surgical procedures (for example, fracture repair, skin tumour removal and neutering) as more painful than medical conditions (otitis externa and lameness). In addition, owners disagreed most with statements that they had received sufficient information on the appropriate methods of management of animal pain and that the recognition of animal pain is easy. With respect to surgical procedures, owners expressed greatest concern in relation to the animal experiencing fear or anxiety during hospitalisation and the presence of postoperative pain. The animal owners had concerns about the presence and management of animal pain, fear and anxiety. Knowledge of these animal owner opinions could aid veterinary practitioners when communicating with their clients on medical and surgical patient management. Furthermore, studies are merited to clearly define how best to successfully respond to these owner attitudes.

  6. [New drugs for small animals in 2011].

    PubMed

    Emmerich, I U

    2012-10-17

    In 2011, nine active pharmaceutical ingredients were released on the German market for small animals. Those are the cyclooxygenase-2-inhibitor Cimicoxib (Cimalgex®), the opium-derived analgesic Methadone (Comfortan®), the antiemetic Metoclopramide (Emeprid®), the corticosteroid Mometasone furoate in combination with the antifungal agent Posaconazole (Posatex®), the fluorchinolone-antibiotic Pradofloxacin (Veraflox®), the insecticide Spinosad (Comfortis®), the cytostatic Toceranib (Palladia®) and the vitamin Phytomenadione (Vitamin K1 Laboratoire TVM). Two additional substances were authorized for additional species. The tetracycline-antibiotic Doxycycline is now available for carrier pigeons and the anticoccidial Toltrazuril in combination with Emodepside is likewise authorized for dogs. Furthermore, one new preparation with an interesting new pharmaceutical form and two products with a new strength were added to the market for small animals. In addition, four active pharmaceutical ingredients with approval for use in human medicine, which are of potential interest to veterinary medicine, entered the market in 2011. Those are the antiepileptic Retigabine, the ophthalmic Bromfenac, the psychotropic drug Dexamfetamine and the cytostatic Eribulin.

  7. [New drugs for small animals in 2014].

    PubMed

    Emmerich, I U

    2015-01-01

    In 2014, six active pharmaceutical ingredients were released on the German market for small animals. Those are the ektoparasiticide of the isoxazoline group afoxolaner (NexGard®) and fluralaner (Bravecto®) and the neonicotinoid dinotefuran (Vectra 3D, Vectra Felis), the antidiabetic protamine zinc insulin of human origin (ProZinc®), the antifungal agent ketoconazole (Fugazid®) as well as the cytostatic drug oclacitinib (Apoquel®). Two substances were authorized for an additional species. The antiparasiticide eprinomectin and the antibiotic clindamycin were also authorized for use in cats. In addition, two active pharmaceutical ingredients, which were approved 2014 for use in human medicine and are of potential interest to veterinary medicine, are discussed. These are the antihypertensive drug riociguat and the urological substance mirabegron.

  8. UTSW Small Animal Positron Emission Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsyganov, E. N.; Anderson, J.; Arbique, G.; Constantinescu, A.; Jennewein, M.; Kulkarni, P. V.; Mason, R. P.; Mccoll, R. W.; Oz, O. K.; Parkey, R. W.; Richer, E.; Rosch, F.; Seliounine, S. Y.; Slavine, N. V.; Srivastava, S. C.; Thorpe, P. E.; Zinchenko, A. I.; Antich, P. P.

    2006-10-01

    A Small Animal Imager (SAI) for PET has been designed, built, tested in phantoms, and applied to investigations in mice and rats. The device uses principles based on gamma-ray induced scintillation in crossed fiber optic detectors connected to Position Sensitive Photomultiplier Tubes (PSPMT). Each detector consists of an epoxied stack of 28 layers of 135 round 1 mm BCF-10 scintillating plastic fibers. The overlap region forms a 13.5times13.5times2.8 cm3 detector volume. Scintillating light from the fibers is detected by two (X and Y directions) Hamamatsu R-2486 PSPMTs with 16 anode wires in each of two orthogonal directions. A centroid-finding algorithm gives the position of a light cluster on the face (photocathode) of a PSPMT. The accuracy of the reconstruction of an interaction position is essentially independent of light cluster position. This translates to a nearly isotropic photon response for the entire detector. The system has been used to test several 3D image reconstruction algorithms, software modifications, and improvements. The sensitivity ( 12.6 cps/kBq at 9 cm inner diameter) and sub-millimeter spatial resolution (better than 1 mm in phantoms) obtained with an iterative algorithm incorporating system modeling make the SAI a relatively inexpensive high performance animal imager. The SAI is currently being used for imaging experiments in mice and rats

  9. Fluorescence lifetime contrast in small animal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramanujan, V. Krishnan; Bandyopadhyay, Abhik; Sun, LuZhe; Herman, Brian A.

    2007-02-01

    Early detection of primary tumors is the key for effective therapeutic intervention and successful patient survival. Small animal models emulating human diseases are powerful tools for our comprehensive understanding of the pathophysiology of tumor formation and metastasis to distant sites. Our long-term goal is to develop a non-invasive, multiphoton-fluorescence lifetime imaging (MP-FLIM) modality that can precisely quantify these steps in animal tumor models at a very early stage. The specific hypothesis is that fluorescence lifetime can be employed as reliable contrast parameter for providing higher detection sensitivity as compared with conventional intensity-based tumor imaging approaches and therefore it is possible to detect smaller tumor volumes (early detection) than those achieved by other prevailing methods. We base this hypothesis on our recent observations that (1) fluorescence lifetime is "intrinsic" to the fluorophore and its measurement is not affected by concentration and/or spectral artifacts as in intensity-based methods, (2) multiphoton excitation can enable increased tissue penetrability and reduced phototoxicity and (3) MP-FLIM approach can discriminate background autofluorescence from the fluorescent proteins in thick tissues thereby achieving a ten-fold increase in signal-to-background ratio over the intensity-based approaches. We present our preliminary data to support this hypothesis in primary tumor detection in nu/nu athymic mouse models.

  10. Surveillance of diarrhoea in small animal practice through the Small Animal Veterinary Surveillance Network (SAVSNET).

    PubMed

    Jones, P H; Dawson, S; Gaskell, R M; Coyne, K P; Tierney, A; Setzkorn, C; Radford, A D; Noble, P-J M

    2014-09-01

    Using the Small Animal Veterinary Surveillance Network (SAVSNET), a national small animal disease-surveillance scheme, information on gastrointestinal disease was collected for a total of 76 days between 10 May 2010 and 8 August 2011 from 16,223 consultations (including data from 9115 individual dogs and 3462 individual cats) from 42 premises belonging to 19 UK veterinary practices. During that period, 7% of dogs and 3% of cats presented with diarrhoea. Adult dogs had a higher proportional morbidity of diarrhoea (PMD) than adult cats (P <0.001). This difference was not observed in animals <1 year old. Younger animals in both species had higher PMDs than adult animals (P < 0.001). Neutering was associated with reduced PMD in young male dogs. In adult dogs, miniature Schnauzers had the highest PMD. Most animals with diarrhoea (51%) presented having been ill for 2-4 days, but a history of vomiting or haemorrhagic diarrhoea was associated with a shorter time to presentation. The most common treatments employed were dietary modification (66% of dogs; 63% of cats) and antibacterials (63% of dogs; 49% of cats). There was variability in PMD between different practices. The SAVNET methodology facilitates rapid collection of cross-sectional data regarding diarrhoea, a recognised sentinel for infectious disease, and characterises data that could benchmark clinical practice and support the development of evidence-based medicine.

  11. Tapered LSO arrays for small animal PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yongfeng; St. James, Sara; Wu, Yibao; Du, Huini; Qi, Jinyi; Farrell, Richard; Dokhale, Purushottam A.; Shah, Kanai S.; Vaigneur, Keith; Cherry, Simon R.

    2011-01-01

    By using detectors with good depth encoding accuracy (~2 mm), an animal PET scanner can be built with a small ring diameter and thick crystals to simultaneously obtain high spatial resolution and high sensitivity. However, there will be large wedge-shaped gaps between detector modules in such a scanner if traditional cuboid crystal arrays are used in a polygonal arrangement. The gaps can be minimized by using tapered scintillator arrays enabling the sensitivity of the scanner to be further improved. In this work, tapered lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO) arrays with different crystal dimensions and different combinations of inter-crystal reflector and crystal surface treatments were manufactured and their performance was evaluated. Arrays were read out from both ends by position-sensitive avalanche photodiodes (PSAPDs). In the optimal configuration, arrays consisting of 0.5 mm LSO elements could be clearly resolved and a depth of interaction resolution of 2.6 mm was obtained for a 20 mm thick array. For this tapered array, the intrinsic spatial is degraded from 0.67 to 0.75 mm compared to a standard cuboidal array with similar dimensions, while the increase in efficiency is 41%. Tapered scintillator arrays offer the prospect of improvements in sensitivity and sampling for small-bore scanners, without large increases in manufacturing complexity.

  12. Tapered LSO Arrays for Small Animal PET

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yongfeng; James, Sara St.; Wu, Yibao; Du, Huini; Qi, Jinyi; Farrell, Richard; Dokhale, Purushottam A.; Shah, Kanai S.; Vaigneur, Keith; Cherry, Simon R.

    2011-01-01

    By using detectors with good depth encoding accuracy (~ 2 mm), an animal PET scanner can be built with a small ring diameter and thick crystals to simultaneously obtain high spatial resolution and high sensitivity. However, there will be large wedge-shaped gaps between detector modules in such a scanner if traditional cuboid crystal arrays are used in a polygonal arrangement. The gaps can be minimized by using tapered scintillator arrays enabling the sensitivity of the scanner to be further improved. In this work, tapered lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO) arrays with different crystal dimensions and different combinations of inter-crystal reflector and crystal surface treatments were manufactured and their performance was evaluated. Arrays were read out from both ends by position-sensitive avalanche photodiodes (PSAPDs). In the optimal configuration, arrays consisting of 0.5 mm LSO elements could be clearly resolved and a depth of interaction resolution of 2.6 mm was obtained for a 20-mm thick array. For this tapered array, the intrinsic spatial is degraded from 0.67 mm to 0.75 mm compared to a standard cuboidal array with similar dimensions, while the increase in efficiency is 41%. Tapered scintillator arrays offer the prospect of improvements in sensitivity and sampling for small-bore scanners, without large increases in manufacturing complexity. PMID:21119228

  13. Enclosure for small animals during awake animal imaging

    DOEpatents

    Goddard, Jr., James S

    2013-11-26

    An enclosure or burrow restrains an awake animal during an imaging procedure. A tubular body, made from a radiolucent material that does not attenuate x-rays or gamma rays, accepts an awake animal. A proximal end of the body includes an attachment surface that corresponds to an attachment surface of an optically transparent and optically uniform window. An anti-reflective coating may be applied to an inner surface, an outer surface, or both surfaces of the window. Since the window is a separate element of the enclosure and it is not integrally formed as part of the body, it can be made with optically uniform thickness properties for improved motion tracking of markers on the animal with a camera during the imaging procedure. The motion tracking information is then used to compensate for animal movement in the image.

  14. Coupler for surgery on small animals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, J. E., Jr.; Swartz, P. F.

    1979-01-01

    Minicoupler simplifies exchange of fluids with organs of laboratory animals enabling one person to perform surgery on experimental animals such as rats and mice. Innovation eliminates obstructing hands and instruments from areas of surgery.

  15. A Very High Spatial Resolution Detector for Small Animal PET

    SciTech Connect

    Kanai Shah, M.S.

    2007-03-06

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is an in vivo analog of autoradiography and has the potential to become a powerful new tool in imaging biological processes in small laboratory animals. PET imaging of small animals can provide unique information that can help in advancement of human disease models as well as drug development. Clinical PET scanners used for human imaging are bulky, expensive and do not have adequate spatial resolution for small animal studies. Hence, dedicated, low cost instruments are required for conducting small animal studies with higher spatial resolution than what is currently achieved with clinical as well as dedicated small animal PET scanners. The goal of the proposed project is to investigate a new all solid-state detector design for small animal PET imaging. Exceptionally high spatial resolution, good timing resolution, and excellent energy resolution are expected from the proposed detector design. The Phase I project was aimed at demonstrating the feasibility of producing high performance solid-state detectors that provide high sensitivity, spatial resolution, and timing characteristics. Energy resolution characteristics of the new detector were also investigated. The goal of the Phase II project is to advance the promising solid-state detector technology for small animal PET and determine its full potential. Detectors modules will be built and characterized and finally, a bench-top small animal PET system will be assembled and evaluated.

  16. Nutritional considerations in small animal dermatology.

    PubMed

    Miller, W H

    1989-05-01

    Aside from food hypersensitivities, nutritional skin diseases in pets fed commercial foods appear to be very uncommon. Nutritional deficiencies all cause seborrheic skin signs and most of the clinical presentations are not pathognomonic for a specific nutrient deficiency. Careful consideration of the history and the results of skin biopsies usually suggest which nutrient is deficient. Because nutritional supplements can unbalance an animal's diet, they should not be used indiscriminately but only when indicated. Balanced nutrition should minimize the need for supplements.

  17. Common rodenticide toxicoses in small animals.

    PubMed

    DeClementi, Camille; Sobczak, Brandy R

    2012-03-01

    This article focuses on the 3 most commonly used rodenticide types: anticoagulants, bromethalin, and cholecalciferol. It is important to verify the active ingredient in any rodenticide exposure. Many animal owners may use the term “D-con” to refer to any rodenticide regardless of the actual brand name or type of rodenticide. The EPA released their final ruling on rodenticide risk mitigation measures in 2008 and all the products on the market had to be compliant by June 2011, changing to consumer products containing either first-generation anticoagulants or nonanticoagulants including bromethalin and cholecalciferol. These regulations are likely to cause an increase in the number of bromethalin and cholecalciferol cases.

  18. Mousepox, a small animal model of smallpox.

    PubMed

    Esteban, David; Parker, Scott; Schriewer, Jill; Hartzler, Hollyce; Buller, R Mark

    2012-01-01

    Ectromelia virus infections in the laboratory mouse have emerged as a valuable model to investigate human orthopoxvirus infections to understand the progression of disease, to discover and characterize antiviral treatments, and to study the host-pathogen relationship as it relates to pathogenesis and the immune response. Here we describe how to safely work with the virus and protocols for common procedures for the study of ectromelia virus in the laboratory mouse including the preparation of virus stocks, the use of various routes of inoculation, and collection of blood and tissue from infected animals. In addition, several procedures are described for assessing the host response to infection: for example, measurement of virus-specific CD8 T cells and the use of ELISA and neutralization assays to measure orthopoxvirus-specific antibody titers.

  19. Genetics of cardiac disease in the small animal patient.

    PubMed

    Meurs, Kathryn M

    2010-07-01

    There is increasing evidence that many forms of congenital and acquired cardiovascular disease in small animal patients are of familial origin. The large number of familial diseases in domestic purebred animals is thought to be associated with the desire to breed related animals to maintain a specific appearance and the selection of animals from a small group of popular founders (founder effect). Clinicians can use knowledge that a particular trait or disease may be inherited to provide guidance to owners and animal breeders to reduce the frequency of the trait. Even if the molecular cause is not known, identification of a pattern of inheritance and information on clinical screening can be useful for a breeder trying to make breeding decisions. Common forms of inheritance for veterinary diseases include autosomal recessive, autosomal dominant, X-linked recessive, and polygenic. These genetic traits and their possible involvement in cardiac disease in small animals are discussed in this article.

  20. Noise limitations for small-animal microcomputed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Nancy L.; Thornton, Michael M.; Holdsworth, David W.

    2002-05-01

    Recent advances in mouse genomics, including the production of transgenic mouse models, have created an interest in developing non-invasive imaging techniques for small-animal imaging applications. X-ray computed tomography (CT) can provide images with high-resolution isotropic voxels and low noise in relatively short acquisition times. In addition, CT provides volume data set, which allows the viewer to clearly visualize the spatial orientation of tissues within the mouse. We propose a model for an ideal, quantum-noise limited CT scanner for small-animal orientation of tissues within the mouse. We propose a model for an ideal, quantum- noise limited CT scanner for small-animal imaging with the objective of examining the fundamental limits of precision as a function of resolution and dose to the animal. The variance was calculated for several doses and voxel sizes to determine the precision in the linear attenuation coefficient values for the idealized small-animal volume CT scanner. For whole-body exposure of 1.5 Gy, our study predicts precision of +/- 5.8 percent in linear attenuation coefficient, with (0.1 mm)3 isotopic voxels. This work shows the effect of photon noise on the precision that can be expected for micro-computed tomography of small animals in vivo for a given isotopic voxel size and x-ray dose to the animal. The predictions of this work ca be used to design novel imaging systems for use in small-animal research.

  1. Do small animals have a biogeography?

    PubMed

    Valdecasas, A G; Camacho, A I; Peláez, M L

    2006-01-01

    It has been stated that small organisms do not have barriers for distribution and will not show biogeographic discreteness. General models for size-mediated biogeographies establish a transition region between ubiquitous dispersal and restricted biogeography at about 1-10 mm. We tested patterns of distribution versus size with water mites, a group of freshwater organisms with sizes between 300 microm and 10 mm. We compiled a list of all known water mite species for Sierra del Guadarrama (a mountain range in the centre of the Iberian Peninsula) from different authors and our own studies in the area. Recorded habitats include lotic, lentic and interstitial environments. Species body size and world distribution were drawn from our work and published specialized taxonomic literature. The null hypothesis was that distribution is size-independent. The relationship between distribution and size was approached via analysis of variance and between size and habitat via logistic regression. Contrary to expectations, there is no special relationship between water mite size and area size distribution. On the other hand, water mite size is differentially distributed among habitats, although this ecological sorting is very weak. Larger water mites are more common in lentic habitats and smaller water mites in lotic habitats. Size-dependent distribution in which small organisms tend to be cosmopolitan breaks down when the particular biology comes into play. Water mites do not fit a previously proposed size-dependent biogeographical distribution, and are in accordance with similar data published on Tardigrada, Rotifera, Gastrotricha and the like.

  2. Tri-modality small animal imaging system

    SciTech Connect

    Kundu, B.K.; Stolin, A.V.; Pole, J.; Baumgart, L.; Fontaine, M.; Wojcik, R.; Kross, B.; Zorn, C.; Majewski, S.; Williams, M.B.

    2006-02-01

    Our group is developing a scanner that combines x-ray, single gamma, and optical imaging on the same rotating gantry. Two functional modalities (SPECT and optical) are included because they have different strengths and weaknesses in terms of spatial and temporal decay lengths in the context of in vivo imaging, and because of the recent advent of multiple reporter gene constructs. The effect of attenuation by biological tissue on the detected intensity of the emitted signal was measured for both gamma and optical imaging. Attenuation by biological tissue was quantified for both the bioluminescent emission of luciferace and for the emission light of the near infrared fluorophore cyanine 5.5, using a fixed excitation light intensity. Experiments were performed to test the feasibility of using either single gamma or x-ray imaging to make depth-dependent corrections to the measured optical signal. Our results suggest that significant improvements in quantitation of optical emission are possible using straightforward correction techniques based on information from other modalities. Development of an integrated scanner in which data from each modality are obtained with the animal in a common configuration will greatly simplify this process.

  3. Controlling airborne cues to study small animal navigation

    PubMed Central

    Gershow, Marc; Berck, Matthew; Mathew, Dennis; Luo, Linjiao; Kane, Elizabeth A.; Carlson, John R.; Samuel, Aravinthan D.T.

    2012-01-01

    Small animals like nematodes and insects analyze airborne chemical cues to infer the direction of favorable and noxious locations. In these animals, the study of navigational behavior evoked by airborne cues has been limited by the difficulty of precise stimulus control. We present a system that enables us to deliver gaseous stimuli in defined spatial and temporal patterns to freely moving small animals. We use this apparatus, in combination with machine vision algorithms, to assess and quantify navigational decision-making of Drosophila larvae in response to ethyl acetate (a volatile attractant) and carbon dioxide (a gaseous repellant). PMID:22245808

  4. Phase-contrast radiography.

    PubMed

    Gao, D; Pogany, A; Stevenson, A W; Wilkins, S W

    1998-01-01

    For the past 100 years, the paradigm for radiography has been premised on absorption as the sole means of contrast formation and on ray optics as the basis for image interpretation. A new conceptual approach to radiography has been developed that includes phase (ie, refractive) contrast and requires wave optics for proper treatment. This new approach greatly increases the amount of information that can be obtained with radiographic techniques and is particularly well suited to the imaging of soft tissue and of very small features in biologic samples. A key feature of the present technique of phase-contrast radiography is the use of a microfocus x-ray source about an order of magnitude (< or = 20 microm) smaller than that used in conventional radiography. Phase-contrast radiography offers a number of improvements over conventional radiography in a clinical setting, especially in soft-tissue imaging. These improvements include increased contrast resulting in improved visualization of anatomic detail, reduced absorbed dose to the patient, inherent image magnification and high spatial resolution, use of harder x rays, and relative ease of implementation. More technologically advanced detectors are currently being developed and commercialized, which will help fully realize the considerable potential of phase-contrast imaging.

  5. Iodine imaging using spectral analysis. [radiography for visualization of small blood vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macovski, A.

    1978-01-01

    Existing radiographic imaging systems provide images which represent an integration or averaging over the energy spectrum. In order to provide noninvasive angiography it is necessary to image the relatively small amounts of iodine which are available following an intravenous administration. This is accomplished by making use of the special spectral characteristics of iodine. Two methods will be presented. One involves a special grating for encoding the iodine information in the form of a fine line pattern. This is subsequently decoded to provide images of iodinated structures which are otherwise almost invisible. The second method utilizes a scanned X-ray beam which is rapidly switched in the high energy region. In this region, iodine experiences significant variations in the attenuation coefficient while bone and soft tissue do not. An efficient and accurate X-ray detector can be used with scanned X-ray beams. This provides a high degree of sensitivity enabling the visualization of small vessels containing relatively dilute iodine.

  6. The value of high resolution computed tomography in the diagnostics of small opacities and complications of silicosis in mine machinery manufacturing workers, compared to radiography.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jinkai; Weng, Dong; Jin, Changshan; Yan, Bo; Xu, Guihua; Jin, Bo; Xia, Shenning; Chen, Jie

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the value and usefulness of high resolution computed tomography (HRCT) in the diagnostics of small opacities and complications of silicosis in mine machinery manufacturing workers, compared to conventional radiograms. The diagnosis of silicosis is mainly based on the radiological findings of workers exposed to the dust causing lung fibrosis. However, on radiograms many parenchymal structures overlap, which limits the sensitivity and specificity of the method. Difficulties in accurate interpretation of conventional radiograms in silicosis also result from their relatively low resolution. We randomly selected 30 I period silicosis patients from 77 I period silicosis patients working at a mine machinery manufacturing company. Out of 1078 non-silicosis and 162 0+ period silicosis subjects, 30 non-silicosis and 30 0+ period silicosis subjects were randomly selected and matched with the 30 I period silicosis subjects by age (+/- 3.0 yr) and occupational exposure time (+/- 2.0 yr). Chest X-rays were taken at maximal inspiration. For the HRCT examination, the GE Somatom plus apparatus was used. Eight, five and six subjects were respectively diagnosed as 0+, I or I+ period silicosis based on HRCT among 90 subjects whose original diagnoses were non-silicosis, 0+ or I period silicosis based on radiography. The numbers of small opacities in HRCT scans were significantly higher than those seen in radiography in all lung zones (p<0.01). HRCT was more sensitive than radiography in detecting small opacities of mid-out zones of the lung, but no statistical significance was found between the two methods in the detection of small opacities of lower zones of the lung. A statistically significant increase in the detectability of bulla, emphysema, pleural, mediastinal and hilar changes was observed (p<0.05). HRCT might be more sensitive than radiography in detecting lung parenchymal changes suggestive of silicosis.

  7. Neutron radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, H.; Iddings, F.

    1998-08-01

    Neutron radiography is becoming a well established nondestructive testing (NDT) method. The American Society for Nondestructive Testing (ASNT) has recognized the method through its recommended practice SNT-TCIA which outlines training, knowledge, and experience necessary to obtain levels of competency in the method. Certification of nondestructive testing personnel is also covered in a military standard. Technical publications in the field of NDT and nuclear technology carry articles on neutron radiography and technical meetings include papers or even entire sessions on neutron radiography. There is an on-going series of international conferences on neutron radiography. Many books are available to provide introductory and advanced material on neutron radiographic techniques and applications. Neutron radiography as a service for hire is available, similar to that offered for other NDT services. The method is being adopted to solve NDT problems in specialty areas. The objective of this report is to provide a brief survey of the current state of the art in the use of neutron radiography. The survey will include information on the technique including principles of the method, sources of neutrons, detection methodology, standards and image quality indicators, and representative applications. An extensive reference list provides additional information for those who wish to investigate further and a Glossary is included which provides definitions for terms used in Neutron Radiography.

  8. Preparing the Small Animal Hospital for Avian and Exotic Animal Emergencies.

    PubMed

    Hildreth, Christina D

    2016-05-01

    Small animal veterinary hospitals will have exotic animal emergencies. Preparing the hospital space, equipment, and staff will provide optimal exotic animal emergency medicine and care. A well-gathered history can be more valuable in exotic pet medicine than most diagnostics. A gentle, well-planned approach, combined with common sense and focused observational skills, is necessary for avian and exotic patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. An image guided small animal stereotactic radiotherapy system

    PubMed Central

    Sha, Hao; Udayakumar, Thirupandiyur S.; Johnson, Perry B.; Dogan, Nesrin; Pollack, Alan; Yang, Yidong

    2016-01-01

    Small animal radiotherapy studies should be performed preferably on irradiators capable of focal tumor irradiation and healthy tissue sparing. In this study, an image guided small animal arc radiation treatment system (iSMAART) was developed which can achieve highly precise radiation targeting through the utilization of onboard cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) guidance. The iSMAART employs a unique imaging and radiation geometry where animals are positioned upright. It consists of a stationary x-ray tube, a stationary flat panel detector, and a rotatable and translational animal stage. System performance was evaluated in regards to imaging, image guidance, animal positioning, and radiation targeting using phantoms and tumor bearing animals. The onboard CBCT achieved good signal, contrast, and sub-millimeter spatial resolution. The iodine contrast CBCT accurately delineated orthotopic prostate tumors. Animal positioning was evaluated with ∼0.3 mm vertical displacement along superior-inferior direction. The overall targeting precision was within 0.4 mm. Stereotactic radiation beams conformal to tumor targets can be precisely delivered from multiple angles surrounding the animal. The iSMAART allows radiobiology labs to utilize an image guided precision radiation technique that can focally irradiate tumors while sparing healthy tissues at an affordable cost. PMID:26958942

  10. Assessment of dental abnormalities by full-mouth radiography in small breed dogs.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chun-Geun; Lee, So-Young; Kim, Ju-Won; Park, Hee-Myung

    2013-01-01

    This study was performed to evaluate full-mouth radiographic findings to determine the prevalence of dental abnormalities and analyze the relationship between dental abnormalities and age in small breed dogs. Sixteen predetermined categories of abnormal radiographic findings were evaluated in 233 small breed dogs. In total, 9,786 possible permanent teeth could be evaluated. Of those, 8,308 teeth were evaluated and abnormal radiographic findings were found in 2,458 teeth (29.6%). The most common teeth with abnormal radiographic findings were the mandibular first molars (74.5% on the left and 63.9% on the right) and the maxillary fourth premolars (40.5% on the left and 38.2% on the right). Bone loss of any type (15.8%) was the most commonly detected radiographic abnormal finding among the 16 categories. Dental conditions with a genetic predisposition were frequently occurred in the mandibular premolar teeth. Shih tzu frequently had unerupted teeth and dentigerous cysts. Among the teeth with abnormal radiographic findings, 4.5%, 19.8%, and 5.3% were considered incidental, additional, and important, respectively. Findings that were only detected on radiographs, which were not noted on routine oral examination, were more common in older dogs. Full-mouth radiographic evaluation should be performed to obtain important information for making accurate diagnoses.

  11. Mechanical ventilation for imaging the small animal lung.

    PubMed

    Hedlund, Laurence W; Johnson, G Allan

    2002-01-01

    This review emphasizes some of the challenges and benefits of in vivo imaging of the small animal lung. Because mechanical ventilation plays a key role in high-quality, high-resolution imaging of the small animal lung, the article focuses particularly on the problems of ventilation support, control of breathing motion and lung volume, and imaging during different phases of the breathing cycle. Solutions for these problems are discussed primarily in relation to magnetic resonance imaging, both conventional proton imaging and the newer, hyperpolarized helium imaging of pulmonary airways. Examples of applications of these imaging solutions to normal and diseased lung are illustrated in the rat and guinea pig. Although difficult to perform, pulmonary imaging in the small animal can be a valuable source of information not only for the normal lung, but also for the lung challenged by disease.

  12. Specific issues in small animal dosimetry and irradiator calibration

    PubMed Central

    Yoshizumi, Terry; Brady, Samuel L.; Robbins, Mike E.; Bourland, J. Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Purpose In response to the increased risk of radiological terrorist attack, a network of Centers for Medical Countermeasures against Radiation (CMCR) has been established in the United States, focusing on evaluating animal model responses to uniform, relatively homogenous whole- or partial-body radiation exposures at relatively high dose rates. The success of such studies is dependent not only on robust animal models but on accurate and reproducible dosimetry within and across CMCR. To address this issue, the Education and Training Core of the Duke University School of Medicine CMCR organised a one-day workshop on small animal dosimetry. Topics included accuracy in animal dosimetry accuracy, characteristics and differences of cesium-137 and X-ray irradiators, methods for dose measurement, and design of experimental irradiation geometries for uniform dose distributions. This paper summarises the information presented and discussed. Conclusions Without ensuring accurate and reproducible dosimetry the development and assessment of the efficacy of putative countermeasures will not prove successful. Radiation physics support is needed, but is often the weakest link in the small animal dosimetry chain. We recommend: (i) A user training program for new irradiator users, (ii) subsequent training updates, and (iii) the establishment of a national small animal dosimetry center for all CMCR members. PMID:21961967

  13. Frequency domain fluorescence diffuse tomography of small animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlova, Anna G.; Turchin, Ilya V.; Kamensky, Vladislav A.; Plehanov, Vladimir I.; Balalaeva, Irina V.; Sergeeva, Ekaterina A.; Shirmanova, Marina V.; Kleshnin, Michail S.

    2007-05-01

    Fluorescent compounds for selective cancer cell marking are used for development of novel medical diagnostic methods, investigation of the influence of external factors on tumor growth, regress and metastasis. Only special tools for turbid media imaging, such as optical diffusion tomography permit noninvasive monitoring of fluorescent-labeled tumor alterations deep in animal tissue. In this work, the results of preliminary experiments utilizing frequency-domain fluorescent diffusion tomography (FD FDT) experimental setup in small animal are presented. Low-frequency modulated light (1 kHz) from Nd:YAG laser with second harmonic generation at the wavelength of 532 nm was used in the setup. The transilluminative planar configuration was used in the setup. A series of model experiments has been conducted and show good agreement between theoretical and experimental fluorescence intensity. Models of deep tumors were created by two methods: (1) glass capsules containing fluorophore solution were inserted into esophagus of small animals to simulate marked tumors; (2) a suspension of transfected HEΚ293-Turbo-RFP cells was subcutaneously injected to small animal. The conducted experiments have shown that FD FDT allows one to detect the presence of labeled tumor cells in small animals, to determine the volume of an experimental tumor, to perform 3D tumor reconstruction, as well as to conduct monitoring investigations. The obtained results demonstrate the potential capability of the FD FDT method for noninvasive whole-body imaging in cancer studies, diagnostics and therapy.

  14. Insect Nicotinic Receptor Agonists as Flea Adulticides in Small Animals

    PubMed Central

    Vo, Dai Tan; Hsu, Walter H.; Martin, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    Fleas are significant ectoparasites of small animals. They can be a severe irritant to animals and serve as a vector for a number of infectious diseases. In this article, we discuss the pharmacological characteristics of four insect nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) agonists used as fleacides in dogs and cats, which include three neonicotinoids (imidacloprid, nitenpyram, and dinotefuran) and spinosad. Insect nAChR agonists are one of the most important new classes of insecticides, which are used to control sucking insects both on plants and on companion animals. These new compounds provide a new approach for practitioners to safely and effectively eliminate fleas. PMID:20646191

  15. 3D localization of ferromagnetic probes for small animal neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Heinig, Maximilian; Schlaefer, Alexander; Schweikard, Achim

    2010-01-01

    We present the design, setup and results for a magnetic navigation system for small animal stereotactic neurosurgery. Our system tracks the position of thin (diameter 0.5 mm), magnetized ferromagnetic probes inserted into brains of small animals, e.g. rats, for electrophysiological recordings. It is used in combination with the spherical assistant for stereotactic surgery (SASSU) robot to obtain online feedback of the probe's position. Navigation is based only on the static magnetic field generated by the probes thus no external excitation or wires are needed.

  16. Treatment planning for a small animal using Monte Carlo simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, James C. L.; Leung, Michael K. K.

    2007-12-15

    The development of a small animal model for radiotherapy research requires a complete setup of customized imaging equipment, irradiators, and planning software that matches the sizes of the subjects. The purpose of this study is to develop and demonstrate the use of a flexible in-house research environment for treatment planning on small animals. The software package, called DOSCTP, provides a user-friendly platform for DICOM computed tomography-based Monte Carlo dose calculation using the EGSnrcMP-based DOSXYZnrc code. Validation of the treatment planning was performed by comparing the dose distributions for simple photon beam geometries calculated through the Pinnacle3 treatment planning system and measurements. A treatment plan for a mouse based on a CT image set by a 360-deg photon arc is demonstrated. It is shown that it is possible to create 3D conformal treatment plans for small animals with consideration of inhomogeneities using small photon beam field sizes in the diameter range of 0.5-5 cm, with conformal dose covering the target volume while sparing the surrounding critical tissue. It is also found that Monte Carlo simulation is suitable to carry out treatment planning dose calculation for small animal anatomy with voxel size about one order of magnitude smaller than that of the human.

  17. Treatment planning for a small animal using Monte Carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    Chow, James C L; Leung, Michael K K

    2007-12-01

    The development of a small animal model for radiotherapy research requires a complete setup of customized imaging equipment, irradiators, and planning software that matches the sizes of the subjects. The purpose of this study is to develop and demonstrate the use of a flexible in-house research environment for treatment planning on small animals. The software package, called DOSCTP, provides a user-friendly platform for DICOM computed tomography-based Monte Carlo dose calculation using the EGSnrcMP-based DOSXYZnrc code. Validation of the treatment planning was performed by comparing the dose distributions for simple photon beam geometries calculated through the Pinnacle3 treatment planning system and measurements. A treatment plan for a mouse based on a CT image set by a 360-deg photon arc is demonstrated. It is shown that it is possible to create 3D conformal treatment plans for small animals with consideration of inhomogeneities using small photon beam field sizes in the diameter range of 0.5-5 cm, with conformal dose covering the target volume while sparing the surrounding critical tissue. It is also found that Monte Carlo simulation is suitable to carry out treatment planning dose calculation for small animal anatomy with voxel size about one order of magnitude smaller than that of the human.

  18. Considerations for setting up a small-animal imaging facility.

    PubMed

    Klaunberg, Brenda A; Lizak, Martin J

    2004-03-01

    Imaging techniques allow for the conduct of noninvasive, in vivo longitudinal small-animal studies, but also require access to expensive and complex equipment, and personnel who are properly trained in their use. The authors describe their planning and staffing of the NIH Mouse Imaging Facility, and highlight important issues to consider when designing a similar facility.

  19. Small-animal whole-body photoacoustic tomography: a review

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Jun; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-01-01

    With the wide use of small animals for biomedical studies, in vivo small-animal whole-body imaging plays an increasingly important role. Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is an emerging whole-body imaging modality that shows great potential for preclinical research. As a hybrid technique, PAT is based on the acoustic detection of optical absorption from either endogenous tissue chromophores, such as oxy-hemoglobin and deoxy-hemoglobin, or exogenous contrast agents. Because ultrasound scatters much less than light in tissue, PAT generates high-resolution images in both the optical ballistic and diffusive regimes. Using near-infrared light, which has relatively low blood absorption, PAT can image through the whole body of small animals with acoustically defined spatial resolution. Anatomical and vascular structures are imaged with endogenous hemoglobin contrast, while functional and molecular images are enabled by the wide choice of exogenous optical contrasts. This paper reviews the rapidly growing field of small-animal whole-body PAT and highlights studies done in the past decade. PMID:24108456

  20. Transmission line based thermoacoustic imaging of small animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omar, Murad; Kellnberger, Stephan; Sergiadis, George; Razansky, Daniel; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2013-06-01

    We have generated high resolution images of RF-Contrast in small animals using nearfield thermoacoustic system. This enables us to see some anatomical features of a mouse such as the heart, the spine and the boundary. OCIS codes: (000.0000) General; (000.0000) General [8-pt. type. For codes, see www.opticsinfobase.org/submit/ocis.

  1. Marketing small animal theriogenology services--one perspective.

    PubMed

    Barber, J A

    2007-08-01

    Once a decision is made to add small animal theriogenology services to a practice, marketing strategies must be developed and implemented to attract clients to the new services. Marketing strategies for the niche market of theriogenology include start-up marketing methods, referral programs, internal marketing, and continued marketing. Marketing theriogenology services is a dynamic, ongoing process that never ends.

  2. Small Animal Radionuclide Imaging With Focusing Gamma-Ray Optics

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, R; Decker, T; Epstein, M; Ziock, K; Pivovaroff, M J; Craig, W W; Jernigan, J G; Barber, W B; Christensen, F E; Funk, T; Hailey, C J; Hasegawa, B H; Taylor, C

    2004-02-27

    Significant effort currently is being devoted to the development of noninvasive imaging systems that allow in vivo assessment of biological and biomolecular interactions in mice and other small animals. While physiological function in small animals can be localized and imaged using conventional radionuclide imaging techniques such as single-photon emission tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET), these techniques inherently are limited to spatial resolutions of 1-2 mm. For this reason, we are developing a small animal radionuclide imaging system (SARIS) using grazing incidence optics to focus gamma-rays emitted by {sup 125}I and other radiopharmaceuticals. We have developed a prototype optic with sufficient accuracy and precision to focus the 27.5 keV photons from {sup 125}I onto a high-resolution imaging detector. Experimental measurements from the prototype have demonstrated that the optic can focus X-rays from a microfocus X-ray tube to a spot having physical dimensions (approximately 1500 microns half-power diameter) consistent with those predicted by theory. Our theoretical and numerical analysis also indicate that an optic can be designed and build that ultimately can achieve 100 {micro}m spatial resolution with sufficient efficiency to perform in vivo single photon emission imaging studies in small animal.

  3. Towards very high resolution RPC-PET for small animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, P.; Blanco, A.; Crespo, P.; Fátima Ferreira Marques, M.; Ferreira Marques, R.; Gordo, P. M.; Kajetanowicz, M.; Korcyl, G.; Lopes, L.; Michel, J.; Palka, M.; Traxler, M.; Fonte, P.

    2014-10-01

    We present imaging results of needle-like and planar 22Na sources obtained with a prototype of a high-acceptance small-animal positron emission tomograph based on resistive plate chambers (RPC-PET). The maximum-likelihood expectation-maximization (MLEM) reconstruction of the acquired data yielded an excellent and stable resolution of 0.4 mm FWHM.

  4. [Infectious factor diseases in domestic small animals (carnivorous and herbivorous fur animals, wool and meat rabbits].

    PubMed

    Löliger, H C; Matthes, S

    1989-11-01

    Infectious factorial diseases of domesticated small animals are infection dependent diseases, whose pathogenesis is finally activated by additional, secondary factors, that influence the multiplying and spreading of latent and clinical symptomless infective agents present in the animals. These factorial diseases are not autonomous infectious processes, but only special types and courses of diseases by secondary activated infective agents. Secondary factors may be of exogenous origin (housing, climate, feeding, managing) or may arise by endogenic processes (immunity, resistance disregulations a.o.). In fur bearing animals and rabbits infectious factorial diseases arise by activation of latent, symptomless infections of mucosal membranes in the nose and oral cavity, in the intestinal tract, in the descending urinary tract and on the external skin. The majority of infection activating secondary factors go back on wrong housing conditions, extreme climate, malnutrition and simultaneous infections, but also animal specific situations and immunosuppression may influence the activation of latent infections. - Typical factorial diseases in fur bearing animals and rabbits are: the infectious coryza (Pasteurella multocida, Bordetella bronchiseptica) in rabbits, the Coli-dysentery and the enterotoxemia in rabbits and herbivorous fur animals, the ascending infections of urinary tract, particular in young male minks, and the different types of microbial dermatitis in all small animals. - In the prevention and control of infectious factorial diseases the improvement of housing and living conditions as well as feeding the animals with species conforming and nonobjectionable food are most important and essential measures.

  5. Robotic Delivery of Complex Radiation Volumes for Small Animal Research

    PubMed Central

    Matinfar, Mohammad; Iordachita, Iulian; Wong, John; Kazanzides, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The Small Animal Radiation Research Platform (SARRP) is a novel and complete system capable of delivering multidirectional (focal), kilo-voltage radiation fields to targets in small animals under robotic control using cone-beam CT (CBCT) image guidance. The capability of the SARRP to deliver highly focused beams to multiple animal models provides new research opportunities that more realistically bridge laboratory research and clinical translation. This paper describes the design and operation of the SARRP for precise radiation delivery. Different delivery procedures are presented which enable the system to radiate through a series of points, representative of a complex shape. A particularly interesting case is shell dose irradiation, where the goal is to deliver a high dose of radiation to the shape surface, with minimal dose to the shape interior. The ability to deliver a dose shell allows mechanistic research of how a tumor interacts with its microenvironment to sustain its growth and lead to its resistance or recurrence. PMID:21643448

  6. Robotically assisted small animal MRI-guided mouse biopsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Emmanuel; Chiodo, Chris; Wong, Kenneth H.; Fricke, Stanley; Jung, Mira; Cleary, Kevin

    2010-02-01

    Small mammals, namely mice and rats, play an important role in biomedical research. Imaging, in conjunction with accurate therapeutic agent delivery, has tremendous value in small animal research since it enables serial, non-destructive testing of animals and facilitates the study of biomarkers of disease progression. The small size of organs in mice lends some difficulty to accurate biopsies and therapeutic agent delivery. Image guidance with the use of robotic devices should enable more accurate and repeatable targeting for biopsies and delivery of therapeutic agents, as well as the ability to acquire tissue from a pre-specified location based on image anatomy. This paper presents our work in integrating a robotic needle guide device, specialized stereotaxic mouse holder, and magnetic resonance imaging, with a long-term goal of performing accurate and repeatable targeting in anesthetized mice studies.

  7. Dissemination of parasites by animal movements in small ruminant farms.

    PubMed

    Vasileiou, N G C; Fthenakis, G C; Papadopoulos, E

    2015-09-30

    The present paper discusses the spread of parasites by animal movements in small ruminant farms; it focuses in dissemination of parasitic forms that would lead to subsequent infection of sheep or goats. Systems of small ruminant production involve a component of animal movement (e.g., grazing) as part of routine husbandry, which favors spread of parasitic forms; that refers mainly to parasites of the digestive system (nematodes, trematodes, cestodes, protozoa), as well as helminthes of the respiratory system, although dissemination of the various parasitic forms in the environment would not always result to subsequent infection; external parasites may also be disseminated during movements, e.g., to inhabit wooden poles used in fencing. New livestock into a farm constitutes a biosecurity hazard and the most common means to introducing new parasitic pathogens into a farm; in contemporary small ruminant health management, this contributes in dissemination of anthelmintic resistant parasitic strains; other parasitic disease agents (e.g., mange mites, ticks) may also be spread into a farm that way. Often, especially in small scale farming, visits of rams or bucks take place from one farm to another during the mating season; in such cases, ectoparasites (e.g., mange mites) can be disseminated through direct contact of animals, as well other pathogens (e.g., Toxoplasma gondii, Neospora caninum) via the semen. During transportation of sheep/goats, parasitic forms can also spread, as well as during movement of sheep or goats to slaughterhouses, in which case dogs present in these places would contribute to their dissemination. Spread of life forms of various parasites can also occur from animal species present in the environment of sheep or goats; these include animals present within a farm, stray dogs roaming around a farm (e.g., for spread of Multiceps multiceps, Echinococcus granulosus, Taenia hydatigena, N. caninum), cats commanding the environment of a farm (e.g., for

  8. Digital radiography.

    PubMed

    Mattoon, J S

    2006-01-01

    Digital radiography has been used in human medical imaging since the 1980s with recent and rapid acceptance into the veterinary profession. Using advanced image capture and computer technology, radiographic images are viewed on a computer monitor. This is advantageous because radiographic images can be adjusted using dedicated computer software to maximize diagnostic image quality. Digital images can be accessed at computer workstations throughout the hospital, instantly retrieved from computer archives, and transmitted via the internet for consultation or case referral. Digital radiographic data can also be incorporated into a hospital information system, making record keeping an entirely paperless process. Digital image acquisition is faster when compared to conventional screen-film radiography, improving workflow and patient throughput. Digital radiography greatly reduces the need for 'retake' radiographs because of wide latitude in exposure factors. Also eliminated are costs associated with radiographic film and x-ray film development. Computed radiography, charged coupled devices, and flat panel detectors are types of digital radiography systems currently available.

  9. Neutron Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heller, A. K.; Brenizer, J. S.

    Neutron radiography and its related two-dimensional (2D) neutron imaging techniques have been established as invaluable nondestructive inspection methods and quantitative measurement tools. They have been used in a wide variety of applications ranging from inspection of aircraft engine turbine blades to study of two-phase fluid flow in operating proton exchange membrane fuel cells. Neutron radiography is similar to X-ray radiography in that the method produces a 2D attenuation map of neutron radiation that has penetrated the object being examined. However, the images produced differ and are often complementary due to the differences between X-ray and neutron interaction mechanisms. The uses and types of 2D neutron imaging have expanded over the past 15 years as a result of advances in imaging technology and improvements in neutron generators/sources and computers. Still, high-intensity sources such as those from reactors and spallation neutron sources, together with conventional film radiography, remain the mainstay of high-resolution, large field-of-view neutron imaging. This chapter presents a summary of the history, methods, and related variations of neutron radiography techniques.

  10. High-field small animal magnetic resonance oncology studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bokacheva, Louisa; Ackerstaff, Ellen; LeKaye, H. Carl; Zakian, Kristen; Koutcher, Jason A.

    2014-01-01

    This review focuses on the applications of high magnetic field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy (MRS) to cancer studies in small animals. High-field MRI can provide information about tumor physiology, the microenvironment, metabolism, vascularity and cellularity. Such studies are invaluable for understanding tumor growth and proliferation, response to treatment and drug development. The MR techniques reviewed here include 1H, 31P, chemical exchange saturation transfer imaging and hyperpolarized 13C MRS as well as diffusion-weighted, blood oxygen level dependent contrast imaging and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI. These methods have been proven effective in animal studies and are highly relevant to human clinical studies.

  11. Applications of penetrating radiation for small animal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Bruce H.; Wu, Max C.; Iwata, Koji; Hwang, Andrew B.; Wong, Kenneth H.; Barber, William C.; Dae, Michael W.; Sakdinawat, Anne E.

    2002-11-01

    Researchers long have relied on research involving small animals to unravel scientific mysteries in the biological sciences, and to develop new diagnostic and therapeutic techniques in the medical and health sciences. Within the past 2 decades, new techniques have been developed to manipulate the genome of the mouse, allowing the development of transgenic and knockout models of mammalian and human disease, development, and physiology. Traditionally, much biological research involving small animals has relied on the use of invasive methods such as organ harvesting, tissue sampling, and autoradiography during which the animal was sacrificed to perform a single measurement. More recently, imaging techniques have been developed that assess anatomy and physiology in the intact animal, in a way that allows the investigator to follow the progression of disease, or to monitor the response to therapeutic interventions. Imaging techniques that use penetrating radiation at millimeter or submillimeter levels to image small animals include x-ray computed tomography (microCT), single-photon emission computed tomography (microSPECT), and imaging positron emission computed tomography (microPET). MicroCT generates cross-sectional slices which reveal the structure of the object with spatial resolution in the range of 50 to 100 microns. MicroSPECT and microPET are radionuclide imaging techniques in which a radiopharmaceutical is injected into the animal that is accumulated to metabolism, blood flow, bone remodeling, tumor growth, or other biological processes. Both microSPECT and microPET offer spatial resolutions in the range of 1-2 millimeters. However, microPET records annihilation photons produced by a positron-emitting radiopharmaceutical using electronic coincidence, and has a sensitivity approximately two orders of magnitude better than microSPECT, while microSPECT is compatible with gamma-ray emitting radiopharmaceuticals that are less expensive and more readily available

  12. Animals In Synchrotrons: Overcoming Challenges For High-Resolution, Live, Small-Animal Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Donnelley, Martin; Parsons, David; Morgan, Kaye; Siu, Karen

    2010-07-23

    Physiological studies in small animals can be complicated, but the complexity is increased dramatically when performing live-animal synchrotron X-ray imaging studies. Our group has extensive experience in high-resolution live-animal imaging at the Japanese SPring-8 synchrotron, primarily examining airways in two-dimensions. These experiments normally image an area of 1.8 mmx1.2 mm at a pixel resolution of 0.45 {mu}m and are performed with live, intact, anaesthetized mice.There are unique challenges in this experimental setting. Importantly, experiments must be performed in an isolated imaging hutch not specifically designed for small-animal imaging. This requires equipment adapted to remotely monitor animals, maintain their anesthesia, and deliver test substances while collecting images. The horizontal synchrotron X-ray beam has a fixed location and orientation that limits experimental flexibility. The extremely high resolution makes locating anatomical regions-of-interest slow and can result in a high radiation dose, and at this level of magnification small animal movements produce motion-artifacts that can render acquired images unusable. Here we describe our experimental techniques and how we have overcome several challenges involved in performing live mouse synchrotron imaging.Experiments have tested different mouse strains, with hairless strains minimizing overlying skin and hair artifacts. Different anesthetics have also be trialed due to the limited choices available at SPring-8. Tracheal-intubation methods have been refined and controlled-ventilation is now possible using a specialized small-animal ventilator. With appropriate animal restraint and respiratory-gating, motion-artifacts have been minimized. The animal orientation (supine vs. head-high) also appears to affect animal physiology, and can alter image quality. Our techniques and image quality at SPring-8 have dramatically improved and in the near future we plan to translate this experience to the

  13. Animals In Synchrotrons: Overcoming Challenges For High-Resolution, Live, Small-Animal Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelley, Martin; Parsons, David; Morgan, Kaye; Siu, Karen

    2010-07-01

    Physiological studies in small animals can be complicated, but the complexity is increased dramatically when performing live-animal synchrotron X-ray imaging studies. Our group has extensive experience in high-resolution live-animal imaging at the Japanese SPring-8 synchrotron, primarily examining airways in two-dimensions. These experiments normally image an area of 1.8 mm×1.2 mm at a pixel resolution of 0.45 μm and are performed with live, intact, anaesthetized mice. There are unique challenges in this experimental setting. Importantly, experiments must be performed in an isolated imaging hutch not specifically designed for small-animal imaging. This requires equipment adapted to remotely monitor animals, maintain their anesthesia, and deliver test substances while collecting images. The horizontal synchrotron X-ray beam has a fixed location and orientation that limits experimental flexibility. The extremely high resolution makes locating anatomical regions-of-interest slow and can result in a high radiation dose, and at this level of magnification small animal movements produce motion-artifacts that can render acquired images unusable. Here we describe our experimental techniques and how we have overcome several challenges involved in performing live mouse synchrotron imaging. Experiments have tested different mouse strains, with hairless strains minimizing overlying skin and hair artifacts. Different anesthetics have also be trialed due to the limited choices available at SPring-8. Tracheal-intubation methods have been refined and controlled-ventilation is now possible using a specialized small-animal ventilator. With appropriate animal restraint and respiratory-gating, motion-artifacts have been minimized. The animal orientation (supine vs. head-high) also appears to affect animal physiology, and can alter image quality. Our techniques and image quality at SPring-8 have dramatically improved and in the near future we plan to translate this experience to the

  14. [Application of paramunity inducers in small animal practice].

    PubMed

    Proksch, A L; Hartmann, K

    2016-01-01

    Paramunity inducers have been used to treat small animals for decades. Paramunity inducers are based on attenuated and inactivated poxviruses (avipox virus and parapox virus). Their applications include both therapeutic and prophylactic use in various diseases. Despite their wide and variable use, only a very small number of placebo-controlled studies has been published. Positive effects in preventing kitten mortality and in treating feline stomatitis have been reported, however, no statistically significant effect of their therapeutic use in canine parvovirus infection, feline leukemia infection virus infection or canine papillomavirus infection could be demonstrated. For these infectious diseases, paramunity inducers do not appear to be effective.

  15. Microtomography with sandwich detectors for small-animal bone imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S. H.; Kim, D. W.; Kim, D.; Youn, H.; Cho, S.; Kim, H. K.

    2016-10-01

    An x-ray radiographic system consisting of two detectors in tandem, or a sandwich detector, can produce dual-energy image from a single-shot exposure. Subtraction of two images obtained from the two detectors can produce a sharper image through an unsharp masking effect if the two images are formed at different spatial resolutions. This is indeed possible by incorporating different thicknesses of x-ray conversion layers in the detectors. In this study, we have developed a microtomography system with a sandwich detector in pursuit of high-resolution bone-enhanced small-animal imaging. The results show that the bone-enhanced images reconstructed from the dual-energy projection data provide higher visibility of bone details than the conventionally reconstructed images. The microtomography with the single-shot dual-energy sandwich detector will be useful for the high-resolution bone-enhanced small-animal imaging.

  16. Angular domain fluorescence imaging for small animal research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasefi, Fartash; Belton, Michelle; Kaminska, Bozena; Chapman, Glenn H.; Carson, Jeffrey J. L.

    2010-01-01

    We describe a novel macroscopic fluorescent imaging technique called angular domain fluorescence imaging (ADFI) applicable to the detection of fluorophores embedded in biological tissues. The method exploits the collimation detection capabilities of an angular filter array (AFA). The AFA uses the principle of acceptance angle filtration to extract minimally scattered photons emitted from fluorophores deep within tissue. Our goal was to develop an ADFI system for imaging near-infrared fluorescent markers for small animal imaging. According to the experimental results, the ADFI system offered higher resolution and contrast compared to a conventional lens and lens-pinhole fluorescent detection system. Furthermore, ADFI of a hairless mouse injected with a fluorescent bone marker revealed vertebral structural and morphometric data that correlated well with data derived from volumetric x-ray computed tomography images. The results suggested that ADFI is a useful technique for submillimeter mapping of the distribution of fluorescent biomarkers in small animals.

  17. Radiation dose estimate in small animal SPECT and PET.

    PubMed

    Funk, Tobias; Sun, Mingshan; Hasegawa, Bruce H

    2004-09-01

    Calculations of radiation dose are important in assessing the medical and biological implications of ionizing radiation in medical imaging techniques such as SPECT and PET. In contrast, radiation dose estimates of SPECT and PET imaging of small animals are not very well established. For that reason we have estimated the whole-body radiation dose to mice and rats for isotopes such as 18F, 99mTc, 201Tl, (111)In, 123I, and 125I that are used commonly for small animal imaging. We have approximated mouse and rat bodies with uniform soft tissue equivalent ellipsoids. The mouse and rat sized ellipsoids had a mass of 30 g and 300 g, respectively, and a ratio of the principal axes of 1:1:4 and 0.7:1:4. The absorbed fractions for various photon energies have been calculated using the Monte Carlo software package MCNP. Using these values, we then calculated MIRD S-values for two geometries that model the distribution of activity in the animal body: (a) a central point source and (b) a homogeneously distributed source, and compared these values against S-value calculations for small ellipsoids tabulated in MIRD Pamphlet 8 to validate our results. Finally we calculated the radiation dose taking into account the biological half-life of the radiopharmaceuticals and the amount of activity administered. Our calculations produced S-values between 1.06 x 10(-13) Gy/Bq s and 2.77 x 10(-13) Gy/Bq s for SPECT agents, and 15.0 x 10(-13) Gy/Bq s for the PET agent 18F, assuming mouse sized ellipsoids with uniform source distribution. The S-values for a central point source in an ellipsoid are about 10% higher than the values obtained for the uniform source distribution. Furthermore, the S-values for mouse sized ellipsoids are approximately 10 times higher than for the rat sized ellipsoids reflecting the difference in mass. We reviewed published data to obtain administered radioactivity and residence times for small animal imaging. From these values and our computed S-values we estimated

  18. Minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis fracture reduction techniques in small animals.

    PubMed

    Peirone, Bruno; Rovesti, Gian Luca; Baroncelli, Alessandro Boero; Piras, Lisa

    2012-09-01

    Indirect fracture reduction is used to align diaphyseal fractures in small animals when using minimally-invasive fracture repair. Indirect reduction achieves functional fracture reduction without opening the fracture site. The limb is restored to length and spatial alignment is achieved to ensure proper angular and rotational alignment. Fracture reduction can be accomplished using a variety of techniques and devices, including hanging the limb, manual traction, distraction table, external fixators, and a fracture distractor. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Advances in endoscopic surgery for small animal reproduction.

    PubMed

    Katic, N; Dupré, G

    2016-09-01

    Although endoscopic surgery entered its "golden era" in the mid-1980s, it is still advancing at a tremendous pace. Novel surgical techniques and devices are continuously developed and applied, and new indications (and/or contraindications) for the use of endoscopic surgery are routinely reported in the literature and subjected to systematic assessments. Although endoscopic surgery (laparoscopy in particular) has already become established as the gold standard in human medicine, it has yet to be proven as a viable alternative to open surgery in the field of veterinary medicine. The advantages of minimally invasive surgery include better intra-operative visualization, reduced postoperative pain, reduced scar formation and increased postoperative mobility. Therefore, it is reasonable to expect that the application of this will continue to expand. Small animal reproduction, a field within the broad discipline of veterinary medicine, has already recognized and begun to reap the benefits of endoscopic surgery. Herein, we retrospectively review the most recent successful novel applications of endoscopic surgery in the small animal reproduction system to provide small animal reproductive surgeons with important knowledge to help improve their own veterinarian medical practice.

  20. Gamma-Ray Focusing Optics for Small Animal Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pivovaroff, M. J.; Barber, W. C.; Craig, W. W.; Hasegawa, B. H.; Ramsey, B. D.; Taylor, C.

    2004-01-01

    There is a well-established need for high-resolution radionuclide imaging techniques that provide non-invasive measurement of physiological function in small animals. We, therefore, have begun developing a small animal radionuclide imaging system using grazing incidence mirrors to focus low-energy gamma-rays emitted by I-125, and other radionuclides. Our initial prototype optic, fabricated from thermally-formed glass, demonstrated a resolution of 1500 microns, consistent with the performance predicted by detailed simulations. More recently, we have begun constructing mirrors using a replication technique that reduces low spatial frequency errors in the mirror surface, greatly improving the resolution. Each technique offers particular advantages: e.g., multilayer coatings are easily deposited on glass, while superior resolution is possible with replicated optics. Scaling the results from our prototype optics, which only have a few nested shells, to system where the lens has a full complement of several tens of nested shells, a sensitivity of approx. 1 cps/micro Ci is possible, with the exact number dependent on system magnification and radionuclide species. (Higher levels of efficiency can be obtained with multi-optic imaging systems.) The gamma-ray lens will achieve a resolution as good as 100 microns, independent of the final sensitivity. The combination of high spatial resolution and modest sensitivity will enable in vivo single photon emission imaging studies in small animals.

  1. In vivo small animal imaging: Current status and future prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Kagadis, George C. E-mail: george.kagadis@med.upatras.gr; Loudos, George; Katsanos, Konstantinos; Langer, Steve G.; Nikiforidis, George C.

    2010-12-15

    The use of small animal models in basic and preclinical sciences constitutes an integral part of testing new pharmaceutical agents prior to commercial translation to clinical practice. Whole-body small animal imaging is a particularly elegant and cost-effective experimental platform for the timely validation and commercialization of novel agents from the bench to the bedside. Biomedical imaging is now listed along with genomics, proteomics, and metabolomics as an integral part of biological and medical sciences. Miniaturized versions of clinical diagnostic modalities, including but not limited to microcomputed tomography, micromagnetic resonance tomography, microsingle-photon-emission tomography, micropositron-emission tomography, optical imaging, digital angiography, and ultrasound, have all greatly improved our investigative abilities to longitudinally study various experimental models of human disease in mice and rodents. After an exhaustive literature search, the authors present a concise and critical review of in vivo small animal imaging, focusing on currently available modalities as well as emerging imaging technologies on one side and molecularly targeted contrast agents on the other. Aforementioned scientific topics are analyzed in the context of cancer angiogenesis and innovative antiangiogenic strategies under-the-way to the clinic. Proposed hybrid approaches for diagnosis and targeted site-specific therapy are highlighted to offer an intriguing glimpse of the future.

  2. Modality comparison for small animal radiotherapy: A simulation study

    SciTech Connect

    Bazalova, Magdalena Nelson, Geoff; Noll, John M.; Graves, Edward E.

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: Small animal radiation therapy has advanced significantly in recent years. Whereas in the past dose was delivered using a single beam and a lead shield for sparing of healthy tissue, conformal doses can be now delivered using more complex dedicated small animal radiotherapy systems with image guidance. The goal of this paper is to investigate dose distributions for three small animal radiation treatment modalities. Methods: This paper presents a comparison of dose distributions generated by the three approaches—a single-field irradiator with a 200 kV beam and no image guidance, a small animal image-guided conformal system based on a modified microCT scanner with a 120 kV beam developed at Stanford University, and a dedicated conformal system, SARRP, using a 220 kV beam developed at Johns Hopkins University. The authors present a comparison of treatment plans for the three modalities using two cases: a mouse with a subcutaneous tumor and a mouse with a spontaneous lung tumor. A 5 Gy target dose was calculated using the EGSnrc Monte Carlo codes. Results: All treatment modalities generated similar dose distributions for the subcutaneous tumor case, with the highest mean dose to the ipsilateral lung and bones in the single-field plan (0.4 and 0.4 Gy) compared to the microCT (0.1 and 0.2 Gy) and SARRP (0.1 and 0.3 Gy) plans. The lung case demonstrated that due to the nine-beam arrangements in the conformal plans, the mean doses to the ipsilateral lung, spinal cord, and bones were significantly lower in the microCT plan (2.0, 0.4, and 1.9 Gy) and the SARRP plan (1.5, 0.5, and 1.8 Gy) than in single-field irradiator plan (4.5, 3.8, and 3.3 Gy). Similarly, the mean doses to the contralateral lung and the heart were lowest in the microCT plan (1.5 and 2.0 Gy), followed by the SARRP plan (1.7 and 2.2 Gy), and they were highest in the single-field plan (2.5 and 2.4 Gy). For both cases, dose uniformity was greatest in the single-field irradiator plan followed by

  3. Small-animal preclinical nuclear medicine instrumentation and methodology.

    PubMed

    Rowland, Douglas J; Cherry, Simon R

    2008-05-01

    Molecular medicine enhances the clinician's ability to accurately diagnose and treat disease, and many technological advances in diverse fields have made the translation of molecular medicine to the clinic possible. Nuclear medicine encompasses 2 technologies--single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET)--that have driven the field of molecular medicine forward. SPECT and PET, inherently molecular imaging techniques, have been at the forefront of molecular medicine for several decades. These modalities exploit the radioactive decay of nuclides with specific decay properties that make them useful for in vivo imaging. As recently as the mid-1990s, SPECT and PET were mostly restricted to use in the clinical setting because their relatively coarse spatial resolution limited their usefulness in studying animal (especially rodent) models of human disease. About a decade ago, several groups began making significant strides in improving resolution to the point that small-animal SPECT and PET as a molecular imaging technique was useful in the study of rodent disease models. The advances in these 2 techniques progressed as the result of improvements in instrumentation and data reconstruction software. Here, we review the impact of small-animal imaging and, specifically, nuclear medicine imaging techniques on the understanding of the biological basis of disease and the expectation that these advances will be translated to clinical medicine.

  4. Assessment of myocardial angiogenesis and vascularity in small animal models.

    PubMed

    Springer, Matthew L

    2010-01-01

    Therapies that aim to prevent myocardial tissue from dying or to regenerate new myocardium all rely on the preservation or growth of a functional vasculature. The amount of blood that supplies the myocardium is dependent on the number and nature of the microvessels, as well as the ability of the arteries to supply blood and the veins to remove it. All of these factors can be assessed when success of an experimental therapy is being evaluated. Different kinds of information can be obtained from these different parameters, and it is important to understand what each one involves and how it can be misinterpreted. This chapter describes the various approaches to the assessment of vascularity in the heart with a focus on small animal models, dealing both with those approaches that are purely histological endpoint studies and those that are functional measurements in living animals.

  5. High Field Small Animal Magnetic Resonance Oncology Studies

    PubMed Central

    Bokacheva, Louisa; Ackerstaff, Ellen; LeKaye, H. Carl; Zakian, Kristen; Koutcher, Jason A.

    2014-01-01

    This review focuses on the applications of high magnetic field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy (MRS) to cancer studies in small animals. High field MRI can provide information about tumor physiology, the microenvironment, metabolism, vascularity and cellularity. Such studies are invaluable for understanding tumor growth and proliferation, response to treatment and drug development. The MR techniques reviewed here include 1H, 31P, Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer (CEST) imaging, and hyperpolarized 13C MR spectroscopy as well as diffusion-weighted, Blood Oxygen Level Dependent (BOLD) contrast imaging, and dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging. These methods have been proven effective in animal studies and are highly relevant to human clinical studies. PMID:24374985

  6. Computer-aided pulmonary image analysis in small animal models

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Ziyue; Mansoor, Awais; Mollura, Daniel J.; Bagci, Ulas; Kramer-Marek, Gabriela; Luna, Brian; Kubler, Andre; Dey, Bappaditya; Jain, Sanjay; Foster, Brent; Papadakis, Georgios Z.; Camp, Jeremy V.; Jonsson, Colleen B.; Bishai, William R.; Udupa, Jayaram K.

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: To develop an automated pulmonary image analysis framework for infectious lung diseases in small animal models. Methods: The authors describe a novel pathological lung and airway segmentation method for small animals. The proposed framework includes identification of abnormal imaging patterns pertaining to infectious lung diseases. First, the authors’ system estimates an expected lung volume by utilizing a regression function between total lung capacity and approximated rib cage volume. A significant difference between the expected lung volume and the initial lung segmentation indicates the presence of severe pathology, and invokes a machine learning based abnormal imaging pattern detection system next. The final stage of the proposed framework is the automatic extraction of airway tree for which new affinity relationships within the fuzzy connectedness image segmentation framework are proposed by combining Hessian and gray-scale morphological reconstruction filters. Results: 133 CT scans were collected from four different studies encompassing a wide spectrum of pulmonary abnormalities pertaining to two commonly used small animal models (ferret and rabbit). Sensitivity and specificity were greater than 90% for pathological lung segmentation (average dice similarity coefficient > 0.9). While qualitative visual assessments of airway tree extraction were performed by the participating expert radiologists, for quantitative evaluation the authors validated the proposed airway extraction method by using publicly available EXACT’09 data set. Conclusions: The authors developed a comprehensive computer-aided pulmonary image analysis framework for preclinical research applications. The proposed framework consists of automatic pathological lung segmentation and accurate airway tree extraction. The framework has high sensitivity and specificity; therefore, it can contribute advances in preclinical research in pulmonary diseases.

  7. Computer-aided pulmonary image analysis in small animal models

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ziyue; Bagci, Ulas; Mansoor, Awais; Kramer-Marek, Gabriela; Luna, Brian; Kubler, Andre; Dey, Bappaditya; Foster, Brent; Papadakis, Georgios Z.; Camp, Jeremy V.; Jonsson, Colleen B.; Bishai, William R.; Jain, Sanjay; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Mollura, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To develop an automated pulmonary image analysis framework for infectious lung diseases in small animal models. Methods: The authors describe a novel pathological lung and airway segmentation method for small animals. The proposed framework includes identification of abnormal imaging patterns pertaining to infectious lung diseases. First, the authors’ system estimates an expected lung volume by utilizing a regression function between total lung capacity and approximated rib cage volume. A significant difference between the expected lung volume and the initial lung segmentation indicates the presence of severe pathology, and invokes a machine learning based abnormal imaging pattern detection system next. The final stage of the proposed framework is the automatic extraction of airway tree for which new affinity relationships within the fuzzy connectedness image segmentation framework are proposed by combining Hessian and gray-scale morphological reconstruction filters. Results: 133 CT scans were collected from four different studies encompassing a wide spectrum of pulmonary abnormalities pertaining to two commonly used small animal models (ferret and rabbit). Sensitivity and specificity were greater than 90% for pathological lung segmentation (average dice similarity coefficient > 0.9). While qualitative visual assessments of airway tree extraction were performed by the participating expert radiologists, for quantitative evaluation the authors validated the proposed airway extraction method by using publicly available EXACT’09 data set. Conclusions: The authors developed a comprehensive computer-aided pulmonary image analysis framework for preclinical research applications. The proposed framework consists of automatic pathological lung segmentation and accurate airway tree extraction. The framework has high sensitivity and specificity; therefore, it can contribute advances in preclinical research in pulmonary diseases. PMID:26133591

  8. Evidence of Echocardiography Validity in Model Experiments on Small Animals.

    PubMed

    Kryzhanovskii, S A; Kolik, L G; Tsorin, I B; Ionova, E O; Stolyaruk, V N; Sorokina, A V; Vititnova, M B; Miroshkina, I A

    2016-07-01

    Dynamic echocardiographic monitoring in rats subjected to forced alcoholization showed the formation of disorders in intracardiac hemodynamics characteristic of ethanol cardiomyopathy formed by the end of 24-week continuous ethanol consumption. The results of echocardiographic monitoring were confirmed by histological and morphometric studies demonstrating fatty infiltration of the myocardium pathognomonic for this condition and bifocal dilatation of cardiac ventricles. These results persuasively demonstrate that echocardiographic studies on small animals are valid and can be used for search for cardiotropic drugs and studies of the mechanisms of their activities.

  9. Determination of Small Animal Long Bone Properties Using Densitometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breit, Gregory A.; Goldberg, BethAnn K.; Whalen, Robert T.; Hargens, Alan R. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Assessment of bone structural property changes due to loading regimens or pharmacological treatment typically requires destructive mechanical testing and sectioning. Our group has accurately and non-destructively estimated three dimensional cross-sectional areal properties (principal moments of inertia, Imax and Imin, and principal angle, Theta) of human cadaver long bones from pixel-by-pixel analysis of three non-coplanar densitometry scans. Because the scanner beam width is on the order of typical small animal diapbyseal diameters, applying this technique to high-resolution scans of rat long bones necessitates additional processing to minimize errors induced by beam smearing, such as dependence on sample orientation and overestimation of Imax and Imin. We hypothesized that these errors are correctable by digital image processing of the raw scan data. In all cases, four scans, using only the low energy data (Hologic QDR-1000W, small animal mode), are averaged to increase image signal-to-noise ratio. Raw scans are additionally processed by interpolation, deconvolution by a filter derived from scanner beam characteristics, and masking using a variable threshold based on image dynamic range. To assess accuracy, we scanned an aluminum step phantom at 12 orientations over a range of 180 deg about the longitudinal axis, in 15 deg increments. The phantom dimensions (2.5, 3.1, 3.8 mm x 4.4 mm; Imin/Imax: 0.33-0.74) were comparable to the dimensions of a rat femur which was also scanned. Cross-sectional properties were determined at 0.25 mm increments along the length of the phantom and femur. The table shows average error (+/- SD) from theory of Imax, Imin, and Theta) over the 12 orientations, calculated from raw and fully processed phantom images, as well as standard deviations about the mean for the femur scans. Processing of phantom scans increased agreement with theory, indicating improved accuracy. Smaller standard deviations with processing indicate increased

  10. Guidance for Efficient Small Animal Imaging Quality Control.

    PubMed

    Osborne, Dustin R; Kuntner, Claudia; Berr, Stuart; Stout, David

    2017-08-01

    Routine quality control is a critical aspect of properly maintaining high-performance small animal imaging instrumentation. A robust quality control program helps produce more reliable data both for academic purposes and as proof of system performance for contract imaging work. For preclinical imaging laboratories, the combination of costs and available resources often limits their ability to produce efficient and effective quality control programs. This work presents a series of simplified quality control procedures that are accessible to a wide range of preclinical imaging laboratories. Our intent is to provide minimum guidelines for routine quality control that can assist preclinical imaging specialists in setting up an appropriate quality control program for their facility.

  11. Determination of Small Animal Long Bone Properties Using Densitometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breit, Gregory A.; Goldberg, BethAnn K.; Whalen, Robert T.; Hargens, Alan R. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Assessment of bone structural property changes due to loading regimens or pharmacological treatment typically requires destructive mechanical testing and sectioning. Our group has accurately and non-destructively estimated three dimensional cross-sectional areal properties (principal moments of inertia, Imax and Imin, and principal angle, Theta) of human cadaver long bones from pixel-by-pixel analysis of three non-coplanar densitometry scans. Because the scanner beam width is on the order of typical small animal diapbyseal diameters, applying this technique to high-resolution scans of rat long bones necessitates additional processing to minimize errors induced by beam smearing, such as dependence on sample orientation and overestimation of Imax and Imin. We hypothesized that these errors are correctable by digital image processing of the raw scan data. In all cases, four scans, using only the low energy data (Hologic QDR-1000W, small animal mode), are averaged to increase image signal-to-noise ratio. Raw scans are additionally processed by interpolation, deconvolution by a filter derived from scanner beam characteristics, and masking using a variable threshold based on image dynamic range. To assess accuracy, we scanned an aluminum step phantom at 12 orientations over a range of 180 deg about the longitudinal axis, in 15 deg increments. The phantom dimensions (2.5, 3.1, 3.8 mm x 4.4 mm; Imin/Imax: 0.33-0.74) were comparable to the dimensions of a rat femur which was also scanned. Cross-sectional properties were determined at 0.25 mm increments along the length of the phantom and femur. The table shows average error (+/- SD) from theory of Imax, Imin, and Theta) over the 12 orientations, calculated from raw and fully processed phantom images, as well as standard deviations about the mean for the femur scans. Processing of phantom scans increased agreement with theory, indicating improved accuracy. Smaller standard deviations with processing indicate increased

  12. Compact CT/SPECT Small-Animal Imaging System

    PubMed Central

    Kastis, George A.; Furenlid, Lars R.; Wilson, Donald W.; Peterson, Todd E.; Barber, H. Bradford; Barrett, Harrison H.

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a dual-modality CT/SPECT imaging system for small-animal imaging applications. The X-ray system comprises a commercially available micro-focus X-ray tube and a CCD-based X-ray camera. X-ray transmission measurements are performed based on cone-beam geometry. Individual projections are acquired by rotating the animal about a vertical axis in front of the CCD detector. A high-resolution CT image is obtained after reconstruction using an ordered subsets-expectation maximization (OS-EM) reconstruction algorithm. The SPECT system utilizes a compact semiconductor camera module previously developed in our group. The module is mounted perpendicular to the X-ray tube/CCD combination. It consists of a 64×64 pixellated CdZnTe detector and a parallel-hole tungsten collimator. The field of view is 1 square inch. Planar projections for SPECT reconstruction are obtained by rotating the animal in front of the detector. Gamma-ray and X-ray images are presented of phantoms and mice. Procedures for merging the anatomical and functional images are discussed. PMID:26538684

  13. A dual micro-CT system for small animal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badea, C. T.; Johnston, S.; Johnson, B.; Lin, M.; Hedlund, L. W.; Johnson, G. Allan

    2008-03-01

    Micro-CT is a non-invasive imaging modality usually used to assess morphology in small animals. In our previous work, we have demonstrated that functional micro-CT imaging is also possible. This paper describes a dual micro-CT system with two fixed x-ray/detectors developed to address such challenging tasks as cardiac or perfusion studies in small animals. A two-tube/detector system ensures simultaneous acquisition of two projections, thus reducing scanning time and the number of contrast injections in perfusion studies by a factor of two. The system is integrated with software developed in-house for cardio-respiratory monitoring and gating. The sampling geometry was optimized for 88 microns in such a way that the geometric blur of the focal spot matches the Nyquist sample at the detector. A geometric calibration procedure allows one to combine projection data from the two chains into a single reconstructed volume. Image quality was measured in terms of spatial resolution, uniformity, noise, and linearity. The modulation transfer function (MTF) at 10% is 3.4 lp/mm for single detector reconstructions and 2.3 lp/mm for dual tube/detector reconstructions. We attribute this loss in spatial resolution to the compounding of slight errors in the separate single chain calibrations. The dual micro-CT system is currently used in studies for morphological and functional imaging of both rats and mice.

  14. Veterinarians' perceptions of behaviour support in small-animal practice

    PubMed Central

    Roshier, A. L.; McBride, E. A.

    2013-01-01

    Veterinarians are professionals considered to be at the forefront of animal welfare, including behaviour medicine. However, concerns raised, both within the profession and without, highlight that the support offered is not optimal, due to deficiencies in veterinary training, which focuses on physical aspects and overlooks psychological aspects. This preliminary study explored the experiences and perceptions of six veterinarians (three male, three female, age range: 23–55 years) in two UK small-animal practices. Seventeen annual booster consultations were videoed and conversations thematically analysed for welfare topics discussed. Both veterinarians and clients completed questionnaires to gather demographic information and perspectives. All veterinarians recognised behaviour as a component of their caseload, and acknowledged that clients expected them to provide behaviour support. Veterinarians varied in their experiences of and confidence in providing behaviour support. Five felt unable to meet client expectations; four did not feel their training had prepared them sufficiently. Only one provided dedicated behaviour consultations, the others referred cases. All provided suggestions for behaviour skills needed for new veterinary graduates. The study has afforded an insight into the experiences of a small opportunistic sample of veterinarians. The data indicated important limitations regarding time available in general consultations to discuss behaviour concerns, and practitioner knowledge and skill in detection, anamnesis, assessment and provision of appropriate behaviour information. Suggestions for veterinary training in behaviour are provided. PMID:23475046

  15. Veterinarians' perceptions of behaviour support in small-animal practice.

    PubMed

    Roshier, A L; McBride, E A

    2013-03-09

    Veterinarians are professionals considered to be at the forefront of animal welfare, including behaviour medicine. However, concerns raised, both within the profession and without, highlight that the support offered is not optimal, due to deficiencies in veterinary training, which focuses on physical aspects and overlooks psychological aspects. This preliminary study explored the experiences and perceptions of six veterinarians (three male, three female, age range: 23-55 years) in two UK small-animal practices. Seventeen annual booster consultations were videoed and conversations thematically analysed for welfare topics discussed. Both veterinarians and clients completed questionnaires to gather demographic information and perspectives. All veterinarians recognised behaviour as a component of their caseload, and acknowledged that clients expected them to provide behaviour support. Veterinarians varied in their experiences of and confidence in providing behaviour support. Five felt unable to meet client expectations; four did not feel their training had prepared them sufficiently. Only one provided dedicated behaviour consultations, the others referred cases. All provided suggestions for behaviour skills needed for new veterinary graduates. The study has afforded an insight into the experiences of a small opportunistic sample of veterinarians. The data indicated important limitations regarding time available in general consultations to discuss behaviour concerns, and practitioner knowledge and skill in detection, anamnesis, assessment and provision of appropriate behaviour information. Suggestions for veterinary training in behaviour are provided.

  16. A Time Domain Fluorescence Tomography System for Small Animal Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, Scott B.; Dunn, Andrew K.; Bacskai, Brian J.; Boas, David A.

    2010-01-01

    We describe the application of a time domain diffuse fluorescence tomography system for whole body small animal imaging. The key features of the system are the use of point excitation in free space using ultrashort laser pulses and noncontact detection using a gated, intensified charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. Mouse shaped epoxy phantoms, with embedded fluorescent inclusions, were used to verify the performance of a recently developed asymptotic lifetime-based tomography algorithm. The asymptotic algorithm is based on a multiexponential analysis of the decay portion of the data. The multiexponential model is shown to enable the use of a global analysis approach for a robust recovery of the lifetime components present within the imaging medium. The surface boundaries of the imaging volume were acquired using a photogrammetric camera integrated with the imaging system, and implemented in a Monte-Carlo model of photon propagation in tissue. The tomography results show that the asymptotic approach is able to separate axially located fluorescent inclusions centered at depths of 4 and 10 mm from the surface of the mouse phantom. The fluorescent inclusions had distinct lifetimes of 0.5 and 0.95 ns. The inclusions were nearly overlapping along the measurement axis and shown to be not resolvable using continuous wave (CW) methods. These results suggest the practical feasibility and advantages of a time domain approach for whole body small animal fluorescence molecular imaging, particularly with the use of lifetime as a contrast mechanism. PMID:18672432

  17. Quantitative tomographic imaging of intermolecular FRET in small animals

    PubMed Central

    Venugopal, Vivek; Chen, Jin; Barroso, Margarida; Intes, Xavier

    2012-01-01

    Forster resonance energy transfer (FRET) is a nonradiative transfer of energy between two fluorescent molecules (a donor and an acceptor) in nanometer range proximity. FRET imaging methods have been applied to proteomic studies and drug discovery applications based on intermolecular FRET efficiency measurements and stoichiometric measurements of FRET interaction as quantitative parameters of interest. Importantly, FRET provides information about biomolecular interactions at a molecular level, well beyond the diffraction limits of standard microscopy techniques. The application of FRET to small animal imaging will allow biomedical researchers to investigate physiological processes occurring at nanometer range in vivo as well as in situ. In this work a new method for the quantitative reconstruction of FRET measurements in small animals, incorporating a full-field tomographic acquisition system with a Monte Carlo based hierarchical reconstruction scheme, is described and validated in murine models. Our main objective is to estimate the relative concentration of two forms of donor species, i.e., a donor molecule involved in FRETing to an acceptor close by and a nonFRETing donor molecule. PMID:23243567

  18. Preliminary study for small animal preclinical hadrontherapy facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, G.; Pisciotta, P.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Romano, F.; Cammarata, F.; Marchese, V.; Forte, G. I.; Lamia, D.; Minafra, L.; Bravatá, V.; Acquaviva, R.; Gilardi, M. C.; Cuttone, G.

    2017-02-01

    Aim of this work is the study of the preliminary steps to perform a particle treatment of cancer cells inoculated in small animals and to realize a preclinical hadrontherapy facility. A well-defined dosimetric protocol was developed to explicate the steps needed in order to perform a precise proton irradiation in small animals and achieve a highly conformal dose into the target. A precise homemade positioning and holding system for small animals was designed and developed at INFN-LNS in Catania (Italy), where an accurate Monte Carlo simulation was developed, using Geant4 code to simulate the treatment in order to choose the best animal position and perform accurately all the necessary dosimetric evaluations. The Geant4 application can also be used to realize dosimetric studies and its peculiarity consists in the possibility to introduce the real target composition in the simulation using the DICOM micro-CT image. This application was fully validated comparing the results with the experimental measurements. The latter ones were performed at the CATANA (Centro di AdroTerapia e Applicazioni Nucleari Avanzate) facility at INFN-LNS by irradiating both PMMA and water solid phantom. Dosimetric measurements were performed using previously calibrated EBT3 Gafchromic films as a detector and the results were compared with the Geant4 simulation ones. In particular, two different types of dosimetric studies were performed: the first one involved irradiation of a phantom made up of water solid slabs where a layer of EBT3 was alternated with two different slabs in a sandwich configuration, in order to validate the dosimetric distribution. The second one involved irradiation of a PMMA phantom made up of a half hemisphere and some PMMA slabs in order to simulate a subcutaneous tumour configuration, normally used in preclinical studies. In order to evaluate the accordance between experimental and simulation results, two different statistical tests were made: Kolmogorov test and

  19. A multipinhole small animal SPECT system with submillimeter spatial resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Funk, Tobias; Despres, Philippe; Barber, William C.; Shah, Kanai S.; Hasegawa, Bruce H.

    2006-05-15

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is an important technology for molecular imaging studies of small animals. In this arena, there is an increasing demand for high performance imaging systems that offer improved spatial resolution and detection efficiency. We have designed a multipinhole small animal imaging system based on position sensitive avalanche photodiode (PSAPD) detectors with the goal of submillimeter spatial resolution and high detection efficiency, which will allow us to minimize the radiation dose to the animal and to shorten the time needed for the imaging study. Our design will use 8x24 mm{sup 2} PSAPD detector modules coupled to thallium-doped cesium iodide [CsI(Tl)] scintillators, which can achieve an intrinsic spatial resolution of 0.5 mm at 140 keV. These detectors will be arranged in rings of 24 modules each; the animal is positioned in the center of the 9 stationary detector rings which capture projection data from the animal with a cylindrical tungsten multipinhole collimator. The animal is supported on a bed which can be rocked about the central axis to increase angular sampling of the object. In contrast to conventional SPECT pinhole systems, in our design each pinhole views only a portion of the object. However, the ensemble of projection data from all of the multipinhole detectors provide angular sampling that is sufficient to reconstruct tomographic data from the object. The performance of this multipinhole PSAPD imaging system was simulated using a ray tracing program that models the appropriate point spread functions and then was compared against the performance of a dual-headed pinhole SPECT system. The detection efficiency of both systems was simulated and projection data of a hot rod phantom were generated and reconstructed to assess spatial resolution. Appropriate Poisson noise was added to the data to simulate an acquisition time of 15 min and an activity of 18.5 MBq distributed in the phantom. Both sets of data

  20. Integration of optical imaging with a small animal irradiator

    SciTech Connect

    Weersink, Robert A.; Ansell, Steve; Wang, An; Wilson, Graham; Shah, Duoaud; Lindsay, Patricia E.; Jaffray, David A.

    2014-10-15

    Purpose: The authors describe the integration of optical imaging with a targeted small animal irradiator device, focusing on design, instrumentation, 2D to 3D image registration, 2D targeting, and the accuracy of recovering and mapping the optical signal to a 3D surface generated from the cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging. The integration of optical imaging will improve targeting of the radiation treatment and offer longitudinal tracking of tumor response of small animal models treated using the system. Methods: The existing image-guided small animal irradiator consists of a variable kilovolt (peak) x-ray tube mounted opposite an aSi flat panel detector, both mounted on a c-arm gantry. The tube is used for both CBCT imaging and targeted irradiation. The optical component employs a CCD camera perpendicular to the x-ray treatment/imaging axis with a computer controlled filter for spectral decomposition. Multiple optical images can be acquired at any angle as the gantry rotates. The optical to CBCT registration, which uses a standard pinhole camera model, was modeled and tested using phantoms with markers visible in both optical and CBCT images. Optically guided 2D targeting in the anterior/posterior direction was tested on an anthropomorphic mouse phantom with embedded light sources. The accuracy of the mapping of optical signal to the CBCT surface was tested using the same mouse phantom. A surface mesh of the phantom was generated based on the CBCT image and optical intensities projected onto the surface. The measured surface intensity was compared to calculated surface for a point source at the actual source position. The point-source position was also optimized to provide the closest match between measured and calculated intensities, and the distance between the optimized and actual source positions was then calculated. This process was repeated for multiple wavelengths and sources. Results: The optical to CBCT registration error was 0.8 mm. Two

  1. Shielding considerations for the small animal radiation research platform (SARRP).

    PubMed

    Sayler, Elaine; Dolney, Derek; Avery, Stephen; Koch, Cameron

    2013-05-01

    The Small Animal Radiation Research Platform (SARRP) is a commercially available platform designed to deliver conformal, image-guided radiation to small animals using a dual-anode kV x-ray source. At the University of Pennsylvania, a free-standing 2 m enclosure was designed to shield the SARRP according to federal code regulating cabinet x-ray systems. The initial design consisted of 4.0-mm-thick lead for all secondary barriers and proved wholly inadequate. Radiation levels outside the enclosure were 15 times higher than expected. Additionally, the leakage appeared to be distributed broadly within the enclosure, so concern arose that a subject might receive significant doses outside the intended treatment field. Thus, a detailed analysis was undertaken to identify and block all sources of leakage. Leakage sources were identified by Kodak X-OmatV (XV) film placed throughout the enclosure. Radiation inside the enclosure was quantified using Gafchromic film. Outside the enclosure, radiation was measured using a survey meter. Sources of leakage included (1) an unnecessarily broad beam exiting the tube, (2) failure of the secondary collimator to confine the primary beam entirely, (3) scatter from the secondary collimator, (4) lack of beam-stop below the treatment volume, and (5) incomplete shielding of the x-ray tube. The exit window was restricted, and a new collimator was designed to address problems (1-3). A beam-stop and additional tube shielding were installed. These modifications reduced internal scatter by more than 100-fold. Radiation outside the enclosure was reduced to levels compliant with federal regulations, provided the SARRP is operated using tube potentials of 175 kV or less. In addition, these simple and relatively inexpensive modifications eliminate the possibility of exposing a larger animal (such as a rat) to significant doses outside the treatment field.

  2. SHIELDING CONSIDERATIONS FOR THE SMALL ANIMAL RADIATION RESEARCH PLATFORM (SARRP)

    PubMed Central

    Sayler, Elaine; Dolney, Derek; Avery, Stephen; Koch, Cameron

    2014-01-01

    The Small Animal Radiation Research Platform (SARRP) is a commercially available platform designed to deliver conformal, image-guided radiation to small animals using a dual-anode kV x-ray source. At the University of Pennsylvania, a free-standing 2 m3 enclosure was designed to shield the SARRP according to federal code regulating cabinet x-ray systems. The initial design consisted of 4.0-mm-thick lead for all secondary barriers and proved wholly inadequate. Radiation levels outside the enclosure were 15 times higher than expected. Additionally, the leakage appeared to be distributed broadly within the enclosure, so concern arose that a subject might receive significant doses outside the intended treatment field. Thus, a detailed analysis was undertaken to identify and block all sources of leakage. Leakage sources were identified by Kodak X-OmatV (XV) film placed throughout the enclosure. Radiation inside the enclosure was quantified using Gafchromic film. Outside the enclosure, radiation was measured using a survey meter. Sources of leakage included (1) an unnecessarily broad beam exiting the tube, (2) failure of the secondary collimator to confine the primary beam entirely, (3) scatter from the secondary collimator, (4) lack of beam-stop below the treatment volume, and (5) incomplete shielding of the x-ray tube. The exit window was restricted, and a new collimator was designed to address problems (1–3). A beam-stop and additional tube shielding were installed. These modifications reduced internal scatter by more than 100-fold. Radiation outside the enclosure was reduced to levels compliant with federal regulations, provided the SARRP is operated using tube potentials of 175 kV or less. In addition, these simple and relatively inexpensive modifications eliminate the possibility of exposing a larger animal (such as a rat) to significant doses outside the treatment field. PMID:23532076

  3. Blood compatible microfluidic system for pharmacokinetic studies in small animals.

    PubMed

    Convert, Laurence; Baril, Frédérique Girard; Boisselle, Vincent; Pratte, Jean-François; Fontaine, Réjean; Lecomte, Roger; Charette, Paul G; Aimez, Vincent

    2012-11-21

    New radiotracer developments for nuclear medicine imaging require the analysis of blood as a function of time in small animal models. A microfluidic device was developed to monitor the radioactivity concentration in the blood of rats and mice in real time. The microfluidic technology enables a large capture solid angle and a reduction in the separation distance between the sample and detector, thus increasing the detection efficiency. This in turn allows a reduction of the required detection volume without compromising sensitivity, an important advantage with rodent models having a small total blood volume (a few ml). A robust fabrication process was developed to manufacture the microchannels on top of unpackaged p-i-n photodiodes without altering detector performance. The microchannels were fabricated with KMPR, an epoxy-based photoresist similar to SU-8 but with improved resistance to stress-induced fissuring. Surface passivation of the KMPR enables non-diluted whole blood to flow through the channel for up to 20 min at low speed without clotting. The microfluidic device was embedded in a portable blood counter with dedicated electronics, pumping unit and computer control software for utilisation next to a small animal nuclear imaging scanner. Experimental measurements confirmed model predictions and showed a 4- to 19-fold improvement in detection efficiency over existing catheter-based devices, enabling a commensurate reduction in sampled blood volume. A linear dose-response relationship was demonstrated for radioactivity concentrations typical of experiments with rodents. The system was successfully used to measure the blood input function of rats in real time after radiotracer injection.

  4. Multispectral Cerenkov luminescence tomography for small animal optical imaging.

    PubMed

    Spinelli, Antonello E; Kuo, Chaincy; Rice, Brad W; Calandrino, Riccardo; Marzola, Pasquina; Sbarbati, Andrea; Boschi, Federico

    2011-06-20

    Quite recently Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) has been introduced as a novel pre-clinical imaging for the in vivo imaging of small animals such as mice. The CLI method is based on the detection of Cerenkov radiation (CR) generated by beta particles as they travel into the animal tissues with an energy such that Cerenkov emission condition is satisfied. This paper describes an image reconstruction method called multi spectral diffuse Cerenkov luminescence tomography (msCLT) in order to obtain 3D images from the detection of CR. The multispectral approach is based on a set of 2D planar images acquired using a number of narrow bandpass filters, and the distinctive information content at each wavelength is used in the 3D image reconstruction process. The proposed msCLT method was tested both in vitro and in vivo using 32P-ATP and all the images were acquired by using the IVIS 200 small animal optical imager (Caliper Life Sciences, Alameda USA). Source depth estimation and spatial resolution measurements were performed using a small capillary source placed between several slices of chicken breast. The theoretical Cerenkov emission spectrum and optical properties of chicken breast were used in the modelling of photon propagation. In vivo imaging was performed by injecting control nude mice with 10 MBq of 32P-ATP and the 3D tracer bio-distribution was reconstructed. Whole body MRI was acquired to provide an anatomical localization of the Cerenkov emission. The spatial resolution obtained from the msCLT reconstructed images of the capillary source showed that the FWHM is about 1.5 mm for a 6 mm depth. Co-registered MRI images showed that the Cerenkov emission regions matches fairly well with anatomical regions, such as the brain, heart and abdomen. Ex vivo imaging of the different organs such as intestine, brain, heart and ribs further confirms these findings. We conclude that in vivo 3D bio-distribution of a pure beta-minus emitting radiopharmaceutical such as 32P

  5. Oral and dental imaging equipment and techniques for small animals.

    PubMed

    Coffman, Curt R; Brigden, Glenn M

    2013-05-01

    In the diagnosis and treatment of oral and dental diseases in dogs and cats, digital intraoral radiography offers many advantages over the use of standard dental radiographic film, including rapid image generation, easier exposure correction, enhancement, and paperless storage. Digital image receptors can be divided into 2 main types, direct digital systems using charged coupled devices and complementary metal oxide semiconductor sensors, and indirect digital systems using phosphor plates with a computerized scanner. Each system is paired with a computer software system to allow handling, visualization, enhancement, sharing, and archiving of the images.

  6. Digital Radiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    System One, a digital radiography system, incorporates a reusable image medium (RIM) which retains an image. No film is needed; the RIM is read with a laser scanner, and the information is used to produce a digital image on an image processor. The image is stored on an optical disc. System allows the radiologist to "dial away" unwanted images to compare views on three screens. It is compatible with existing equipment and cost efficient. It was commercialized by a Stanford researcher from energy selective technology developed under a NASA grant.

  7. Applicability of a high-resolution small semiconductor gamma camera to small animal imaging.

    PubMed

    Kiyono, Yasushi; Kuge, Yuji; Katada, Yumiko; Kawashima, Hidekazu; Magata, Yasuhiro; Saji, Hideo

    2007-09-01

    Recently, small semiconductor gamma cameras (SSGCs) with high resolution and sensitivity, which are much more convenient to use as compared with SPECT and PET, have been developed for mapping the sentinel lymph node. The high resolution and sensitivity of the SSGCs may make them useful for small animal imaging. Therefore, we assessed the applicability of the SSGC to small animal imaging using a rat model of focal cerebral ischaemia. The right middle cerebral artery (MCA) of anaesthetized rats was occluded intraluminally with a nylon monofilament. Twenty-four hours after the occlusion, 99mTc-HMPAO (3.7 MBq) was injected and a static acquisition (5 min) was performed using the SSGC. Regions of interest (ROIs) were set on each hemisphere of the horizontal brain images. After the acquisition, the brains were removed and the radioactivity in each hemisphere was measured using an NaI scintillation counter. Reduced CBF in the right MCA territory was clearly visualized with the SSGC in vivo. The radioactivity in the ROIs determined by the SSGC was significantly correlated with that determined by the ex vivo counting method (P<0.001, R2=0.74). Furthermore, in both of the in-vivo imaging and ex-vivo counting methods, the right to left count ratio (R/L ratio) was significantly lower in the MCA-occluded rats than that in normal rats (MCA-occluded rats: 0.77+/-0.08, normal rats: 1.01+/-0.07, P<0.005). The SSGC clearly visualized and quantitatively detected the reduced CBF in MCA-occluded rats. Furthermore, these high resolution and sensitivity of SSGC can avoid the disadvantage of small animal imaging with PET and SPECT, such as a large mass injected tracer and the exposure of investigators to radiation. Thus, the high resolution and sensitivity of the SSGC make it useful for small animal imaging.

  8. Photoacoustic tomography of small-animal and human peripheral joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xueding; Chamberland, David L.; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Carson, Paul L.; Jamadar, David A.

    2008-02-01

    As an emerging imaging technology that combines the merits of both light and ultrasound, photoacoustic tomography (PAT) holds promise for screening and diagnosis of inflammatory joint diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis. In this study, the feasibility of PAT in imaging small-animal joints and human peripheral joints in a noninvasive manner was explored. Ex vivo rat tail and fresh cadaveric human finger joints were imaged. Based on the intrinsic optical contrast, intra- and extra-articular tissue structures in the joints were visualized successfully. Using light in the near-infrared region, the imaging depth of PAT is sufficient for cross-sectional imaging of a human peripheral joint as a whole organ. PAT, as a novel imaging modality with unique advantages, may contribute significantly to the early diagnosis of inflammatory joint disorders and accurate monitoring of disease progression and response to therapy.

  9. The therapeutic lamp: treating small-animal phobias.

    PubMed

    Wrzesien, Maja; Alcañiz, Mariano; Botella, Cristina; Burkhardt, Jean-Marie; Bretón-López, Juana; Ortega, Mario; Brotons, Daniel Beneito

    2013-01-01

    We all have an irrational fear or two. Some of us get scared by an unexpected visit from a spider in our house; others get nervous when they look down from a high building. Fear is an evolutionary and adaptive function that can promote self-preservation and help us deal with the feared object or situation. However, when this state becomes excessive, it might develop into psychological disorders such as phobias, producing high anxiety and affecting everyday life. The Therapeutic Lamp is an interactive projection-based augmented-reality system for treating small-animal phobias. It aims to increase patient-therapist communication, promote more natural interaction, and improve the patient's engagement in the therapy.

  10. Acoustic method for levitation of small living animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, W. J.; Cao, C. D.; Lü, Y. J.; Hong, Z. Y.; Wei, B.

    2006-11-01

    Ultrasonic levitation of some small living animals such as ant, ladybug, and young fish has been achieved with a single-axis acoustic levitator. The vitality of ant and ladybug is not evidently influenced during the acoustic levitation, whereas that of the young fish is reduced because of the inadequacy of water supply. Numerical analysis shows that the sound pressures on the ladybug's surface almost reach the incident pressure amplitude p0 due to sound scattering. It is estimated that 99.98% of the acoustic energy is reflected away from the ladybug. The acoustic radiation pressure pa on the ladybug's surface is only 1%-3% of p0, which plays a compression role on the central region and a suction role on the peripheral region.

  11. Perioperative physiology and pharmacology in the obese small animal patient.

    PubMed

    Love, Lydia; Cline, Martha G

    2015-03-01

    To review the available literature concerning the physiologic and pharmacologic alterations induced by obesity in canine and feline patients and their relevance to perioperative care. Literature review. PubMed, CAB, Web of Science. Obesity of cats and dogs is a chronic inflammatory condition that is increasingly prevalent. Similar to the situation in humans, small animal obesity may be associated with changes in endocrine, respiratory, and cardiovascular function. In addition, alteration of body composition in obesity can affect pharmacokinetic variables. Modifications in perioperative care may need to be made for obese dogs and cats, including attention to respiratory and cardiovascular supportive care and drug dose adjustments. © 2014 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and the American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia.

  12. Development of the optical biopsy system for small experimental animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Hidetoshi; Hattori, Yusuke; Oshima, Yusuke; Komachi, Yuichi; Katagiri, Takashi; Asakura, Toru; Shimosegawa, Toru; Matsuura, Yuji; Miyagi, Mitsunobu; Kanai, Gen'ichi; Ura, Nobuo; Masutani, Koji; Tashiro, Hideo

    2006-02-01

    Development of the optical biopsy system for experimental small animals is in progress. A prototype of the system which consists of a miniaturized gastro endoscope unit and Raman probes has been completed by now. The system is developed to study a gastric cancer rat model. The endoscope is 2.5 mm in diameter and is equipped an imaging bundle fiber, illumination fibers, a channel and a mechanism to angle the probe head. The head of the Raman probe comes out through the channel and it is possible to aim the probe to the target watching on the monitor. The endoscope was inserted into the anaesthetized healthy rat under the breathing support. It was successfully observed inside of the stomach of the living rat and measured Raman spectra. The spectrum of blood vessels contains the strong contribution from lipids. The present results demonstrate high potential of the system in the in vivo Raman study using the rat model.

  13. Forensic radiography: an overview.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, April

    2010-01-01

    Perhaps the first instance of forensic radiography occurred in the 1890s when Professor AW Wright of Yale University tested Wilhelm Roentgen's newly discovered x-ray photography on a deceased rabbit. Of interest were small, round objects inside the rabbit that appeared as dark spots on the positive film. The objects were extracted and identified as bullets, thereby helping to determine the cause of the rabbit's death. In the years since Roentgen's discovery, the use of radiography and other medical imaging specialties to aid in investigating civil and criminal matters has increased as investigators realize how radiologic technology can yield information that otherwise is unavailable. Radiologic technologists can play a key role in forensic investigations.

  14. Small-animal models for testing macroporous ceramic bone substitutes.

    PubMed

    Le Guehennec, L; Goyenvalle, E; Aguado, E; Houchmand-Cuny, M; Enkel, B; Pilet, P; Daculsi, G; Layrolle, P

    2005-01-15

    The aim of this study was to compare the bone colonization of a macroporous biphasic calcium phosphate (MBCP) ceramic in different sites (femur, tibia, and calvaria) in two animal species (rats and rabbits). A critical size defect model was used in all cases with implantation for 21 days. Bone colonization in the empty and MBCP-filled defects was measured with the use of backscattered electron microscopy (BSEM). In the empty cavities, bone healing remained on the edges, and did not bridge the critical size defects. Bone growth was observed in all the implantation sites in rats (approximately 13.6-36.6% of the total defect area, with ceramic ranging from 46.1 to 51.9%). The bone colonization appeared statistically higher in the femur of rabbits (48.5%) than in the tibia (12.6%) and calvaria (22.9%) sites. This slightly higher degree of bone healing was related to differences in the bone architecture of the implantation sites. Concerning the comparison between animal species, bone colonization appeared greater in rabbits than in rats for the femoral site (48.5% vs. 29.6%). For the other two sites (the tibia and calvaria), there was no statistically significant difference. The increased bone ingrowth observed in rabbit femurs might be due to the large bone surface area in contact with the MBCP ceramics. The femoral epiphysis of rabbits is therefore a favorable model for testing the bone-bonding capacity of materials, but a comparison with other implantation sites is subject to bias. This study shows that well-conducted and fully validated models with the use of small animals are essential in the development of new bone substitutes. Copyright 2004 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Discrete tomography in an in vivo small animal bone study.

    PubMed

    Van de Casteele, Elke; Perilli, Egon; Van Aarle, Wim; Reynolds, Karen J; Sijbers, Jan

    2017-02-27

    This study aimed at assessing the feasibility of a discrete algebraic reconstruction technique (DART) to be used in in vivo small animal bone studies. The advantage of discrete tomography is the possibility to reduce the amount of X-ray projection images, which makes scans faster and implies also a significant reduction of radiation dose, without compromising the reconstruction results. Bone studies are ideal for being performed with discrete tomography, due to the relatively small number of attenuation coefficients contained in the image [namely three: background (air), soft tissue and bone]. In this paper, a validation is made by comparing trabecular bone morphometric parameters calculated from images obtained by using DART and the commonly used standard filtered back-projection (FBP). Female rats were divided into an ovariectomized (OVX) and a sham-operated group. In vivo micro-CT scanning of the tibia was done at baseline and at 2, 4, 8 and 12 weeks after surgery. The cross-section images were reconstructed using first the full set of projection images and afterwards reducing them in number to a quarter and one-sixth (248, 62, 42 projection images, respectively). For both reconstruction methods, similar changes in morphometric parameters were observed over time: bone loss for OVX and bone growth for sham-operated rats, although for DART the actual values were systematically higher (bone volume fraction) or lower (structure model index) compared to FBP, depending on the morphometric parameter. The DART algorithm was, however, more robust when using fewer projection images, where the standard FBP reconstruction was more prone to noise, showing a significantly bigger deviation from the morphometric parameters obtained using all projection images. This study supports the use of DART as a potential alternative method to FBP in X-ray micro-CT animal studies, in particular, when the number of projections has to be drastically minimized, which directly reduces

  16. Dosimetry in small-animal CT using Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C.-L.; Park, S.-J.; Jeon, P.-H.; Jo, B.-D.; Kim, H.-J.

    2016-01-01

    Small-animal computed tomography (micro-CT) imaging devices are increasingly being used in biological research. While investigators are mainly interested in high-contrast, low-noise, and high-resolution anatomical images, relatively large radiation doses are required, and there is also growing concern over the radiological risk from preclinical experiments. This study was conducted to determine the radiation dose in a mouse model for dosimetric estimates using the GEANT4 application for tomographic emission simulations (GATE) and to extend its techniques to various small-animal CT applications. Radiation dose simulations were performed with the same parameters as those for the measured micro-CT data, using the MOBY phantom, a pencil ion chamber and an electrometer with a CT detector. For physical validation of radiation dose, absorbed dose of brain and liver in mouse were evaluated to compare simulated results with physically measured data using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs). The mean difference between simulated and measured data was less than 2.9% at 50 kVp X-ray source. The absorbed doses of 37 brain tissues and major organs of the mouse were evaluated according to kVp changes. The absorbed dose over all of the measurements in the brain (37 types of tissues) consistently increased and ranged from 42.4 to 104.0 mGy. Among the brain tissues, the absorbed dose of the hypothalamus (157.8-414.30 mGy) was the highest for the beams at 50-80 kVp, and that of the corpus callosum (11.2-26.6 mGy) was the lowest. These results can be used as a dosimetric database to control mouse doses and preclinical targeted radiotherapy experiments. In addition, to accurately calculate the mouse-absorbed dose, the X-ray spectrum, detector alignment, and uncertainty in the elemental composition of the simulated materials must be accurately modeled.

  17. Management of genetic diversity in small farm animal populations.

    PubMed

    Fernández, J; Meuwissen, T H E; Toro, M A; Mäki-Tanila, A

    2011-09-01

    Many local breeds of farm animals have small populations and, consequently, are highly endangered. The correct genetic management of such populations is crucial for their survival. Managing an animal population involves two steps: first, the individuals who will be permitted to leave descendants are to be chosen and the number offspring they will be permitted to produce has to be determined; second, the mating scheme has to be identified. Strategies dealing with the first step are directed towards the maximisation of effective population size and, therefore, act jointly on the reduction in the loss of genetic variation and in the increase of inbreeding. In this paper, the most relevant methods are summarised, including the so-called 'Optimum Contribution' methodology (contributions are proportional to the coancestry of each individual with the rest), which has been shown to be the best. Typically, this method is applied to pedigree information, but molecular marker data can be used to complete or replace the genealogy. When the population is subjected to explicit selection on any trait, the above methodology can be used by balancing the response to selection and the increase in coancestry/inbreeding. Different mating strategies also exist. Some of the mating schemes try to reduce the level of inbreeding in the short term by preventing mating between relatives. Others involve regular (circular) schemes that imply higher levels of inbreeding within populations in the short term, but demonstrate better performance in the long term. In addition, other tools such as cryopreservation and reproductive techniques aid in the management of small populations. In the future, genomic marker panels may replace the pedigree information in measuring the coancestry. The paper also includes the results of several experiments and field studies on the effectiveness and on the consequences of the use of the different strategies.

  18. Laser surgery for selected small animal soft-tissue conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartels, Kenneth E.

    1991-05-01

    With the acquisition of a Nd:YAG and a CO2 laser in the College of Veterinary Medicine at Oklahoma State University in 1989, over 100 small animal clinical cases have been managed with these modern modalities for surgical excision and tissue vaporization. Most procedures have been for oncologic problems, but inflammatory, infectious, or congenital conditions including vaporization of acral lick 'granulomas,' excision/vaporization of foreign body induced, infected draining tracts, and resection of elongated soft palates have been successfully accomplished. Laser excision or vaporization of both benign and malignant neoplasms have effectively been performed and include feline nasal squamous cell carcinoma, mast cell tumors, and rectal/anal neoplasms. Results to date have been excellent with animals exhibiting little postoperative pain, swelling, and inflammation. Investigations involving application of laser energy for tissue welding of esophageal lacerations and hepatitic interstitial hyperthermia for metastatic colorectal cancer have also shown potential. A review of cases with an emphasis on survival time and postoperative morbidity suggests that carefully planned laser surgical procedures in clinical veterinary practice done with standardized protocols and techniques offer an acceptable means of treating conditions that were previously considered extremely difficult or virtually impossible to perform.

  19. Television image compression and small animal remote monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haines, Richard F.; Jackson, Robert W.

    1990-01-01

    It was shown that a subject can reliably discriminate a difference in video image quality (using a specific commercial product) for image compression levels ranging from 384 kbits per second to 1536 kbits per second. However, their discriminations are significantly influenced by whether or not the TV camera is stable or moving and whether or not the animals are quiescent or active, which is correlated with illumination level (daylight versus night illumination, respectively). The highest video rate used here was 1.54 megabits per second, which is about 18 percent of the so-called normal TV resolution of 8.4MHz. Since this video rate was judged to be acceptable by 27 of the 34 subjects (79 percent), for monitoring the general health and status of small animals within their illuminated (lights on) cages (regardless of whether the camera was stable or moved), it suggests that an immediate Space Station Freedom to ground bandwidth reduction of about 80 percent can be tolerated without a significant loss in general monitoring capability. Another general conclusion is that the present methodology appears to be effective in quantifying visual judgments of video image quality.

  20. Television image compression and small animal remote monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haines, Richard F.; Jackson, Robert W.

    1990-04-01

    It was shown that a subject can reliably discriminate a difference in video image quality (using a specific commercial product) for image compression levels ranging from 384 kbits per second to 1536 kbits per second. However, their discriminations are significantly influenced by whether or not the TV camera is stable or moving and whether or not the animals are quiescent or active, which is correlated with illumination level (daylight versus night illumination, respectively). The highest video rate used here was 1.54 megabits per second, which is about 18 percent of the so-called normal TV resolution of 8.4MHz. Since this video rate was judged to be acceptable by 27 of the 34 subjects (79 percent), for monitoring the general health and status of small animals within their illuminated (lights on) cages (regardless of whether the camera was stable or moved), it suggests that an immediate Space Station Freedom to ground bandwidth reduction of about 80 percent can be tolerated without a significant loss in general monitoring capability. Another general conclusion is that the present methodology appears to be effective in quantifying visual judgments of video image quality.

  1. In vivo imaging of small animal models by photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Shuoqi; Yang, Ran; Xiong, Jingwei; Shung, K. Kirk; Zhou, Qifa; Li, Changhui; Ren, Qiushi

    2012-02-01

    Small animal models, such as zebrafish, drosophila, C. elegan, is considered to be important models in comparative biology and diseases researches. Traditional imaging methods primarily employ several optical microscopic imaging modalities that rely on fluorescence labeling, which may have potential to affect the natural physiological progress. Thus a label-free imaging method is desired. Photoacoustic (PA) microscopy (PAM) is an emerging biomedical imaging method that combines optical contrast with ultrasonic detection, which is highly sensitive to the optical absorption contrast of living tissues, such as pigments, the vasculature and other optically absorbing organs. In this work, we reported the whole body label-free imaging of zebrafish larvae and drosophila pupa by PAM. Based on intrinsic optical absorption contrast, high resolution images of pigments, microvasculature and several other major organs have been obtained in vivo and non-invasively, and compared with their optical counterparts. We demonstrated that PAM has the potential to be a powerful non-invasive imaging method for studying larvae and pupa of various animal models.

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging for precise radiotherapy of small laboratory animals.

    PubMed

    Frenzel, Thorsten; Kaul, Michael Gerhard; Ernst, Thomas Michael; Salamon, Johannes; Jäckel, Maria; Schumacher, Udo; Krüll, Andreas

    2017-03-01

    Radiotherapy of small laboratory animals (SLA) is often not as precisely applied as in humans. Here we describe the use of a dedicated SLA magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner for precise tumor volumetry, radiotherapy treatment planning, and diagnostic imaging in order to make the experiments more accurate. Different human cancer cells were injected at the lower trunk of pfp/rag2 and SCID mice to allow for local tumor growth. Data from cross sectional MRI scans were transferred to a clinical treatment planning system (TPS) for humans. Manual palpation of the tumor size was compared with calculated tumor size of the TPS and with tumor weight at necropsy. As a feasibility study MRI based treatment plans were calculated for a clinical 6MV linear accelerator using a micro multileaf collimator (μMLC). In addition, diagnostic MRI scans were used to investigate animals which did clinical poorly during the study. MRI is superior in precise tumor volume definition whereas manual palpation underestimates their size. Cross sectional MRI allow for treatment planning so that conformal irradiation of mice with a clinical linear accelerator using a μMLC is in principle feasible. Several internal pathologies were detected during the experiment using the dedicated scanner. MRI is a key technology for precise radiotherapy of SLA. The scanning protocols provided are suited for tumor volumetry, treatment planning, and diagnostic imaging. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  3. Acute small animal preparation--suitable for fetal metabolic studies?

    PubMed

    Lemons, J A; Perez, R; Schreiner, R L; Gresham, E L

    1980-07-01

    To determine the immediate effects of the "acute" experimental preparation, 11 near-term pregnant rabbits and 20 fetuses were studied. Blood samples were obtained from the maternal auricular artery, the fetal umbilical vein, and the fetal heart within 90 s of exposure of the uterus by laparotomy. Samples were assayed for pH, O2 and CO2 tension, O2 content, blood urea nitrogen, and plasma glucose. Results indicated that a pronounced fetal acidosis (primarily respiratory) had developed by the time samples were obtained. Further, fetal cardiac glucose levels were significantly elevated above umbilical vein concentrations in 7 of the 20 fetuses. In addition, maternal arterial O2 tension under light pentobarbital anesthesia was significantly less than that found in 35 unanesthetized does (52 vs. 79 Torr, P less than 0.01). All parameters measured varied over a wide range between animals. The results raise serious questions concerning the feasibility of performing and interpreting certain metabolic or cardiorespiratory studies in the acute small animal preparation.

  4. Optimising rigid motion compensation for small animal brain PET imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spangler-Bickell, Matthew G.; Zhou, Lin; Kyme, Andre Z.; De Laat, Bart; Fulton, Roger R.; Nuyts, Johan

    2016-10-01

    Motion compensation (MC) in PET brain imaging of awake small animals is attracting increased attention in preclinical studies since it avoids the confounding effects of anaesthesia and enables behavioural tests during the scan. A popular MC technique is to use multiple external cameras to track the motion of the animal’s head, which is assumed to be represented by the motion of a marker attached to its forehead. In this study we have explored several methods to improve the experimental setup and the reconstruction procedures of this method: optimising the camera-marker separation; improving the temporal synchronisation between the motion tracker measurements and the list-mode stream; post-acquisition smoothing and interpolation of the motion data; and list-mode reconstruction with appropriately selected subsets. These techniques have been tested and verified on measurements of a moving resolution phantom and brain scans of an awake rat. The proposed techniques improved the reconstructed spatial resolution of the phantom by 27% and of the rat brain by 14%. We suggest a set of optimal parameter values to use for awake animal PET studies and discuss the relative significance of each parameter choice.

  5. In situ synchrotron study of liquid phase separation process in Al-10 wt.% Bi immiscible alloys by radiography and small angle X-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, W. Q.; Zhang, S. G.; Li, J. G.

    2016-03-01

    Liquid phase separation process of immiscible alloys has been repeatedly tuned to create special structure for developing materials with unique properties. However, the fundamental understanding of the liquid phase separation process is still under debate due to the characteristics of immiscible alloys in opacity and high temperature environment of alloy melt. Here, the liquid phase separation process in solidifying Al-Bi immiscible alloys was investigated by synchrotron radiography and small angle X-ray scattering. We provide the first direct evidence of surface segregation prior to liquid decomposition and present that the time dependence on the number of Bi droplets follows Logistic curve. The liquid decomposition results from a nucleation and growth process rather than spinodal decomposition mechanism because of the positive deviation from Porod's law. We also found that the nanometer-sized Bi-rich droplets in Al matrix melt present mass fractal characteristics.

  6. ALBIRA: a small animal PET∕SPECT∕CT imaging system.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, F; Orero, A; Soriano, A; Correcher, C; Conde, P; González, A; Hernández, L; Moliner, L; Rodríguez-Alvarez, M J; Vidal, L F; Benlloch, J M; Chapman, S E; Leevy, W M

    2013-05-01

    The authors have developed a trimodal PET∕SPECT∕CT scanner for small animal imaging. The gamma ray subsystems are based on monolithic crystals coupled to multianode photomultiplier tubes (MA-PMTs), while computed tomography (CT) comprises a commercially available microfocus x-ray tube and a CsI scintillator 2D pixelated flat panel x-ray detector. In this study the authors will report on the design and performance evaluation of the multimodal system. X-ray transmission measurements are performed based on cone-beam geometry. Individual projections were acquired by rotating the x-ray tube and the 2D flat panel detector, thus making possible a transaxial field of view (FOV) of roughly 80 mm in diameter and an axial FOV of 65 mm for the CT system. The single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) component has a dual head detector geometry mounted on a rotating gantry. The distance between the SPECT module detectors can be varied in order to optimize specific user requirements, including variable FOV. The positron emission tomography (PET) system is made up of eight compact modules forming an octagon with an axial FOV of 40 mm and a transaxial FOV of 80 mm in diameter. The main CT image quality parameters (spatial resolution and uniformity) have been determined. In the case of the SPECT, the tomographic spatial resolution and system sensitivity have been evaluated with a (99m)Tc solution using single-pinhole and multi-pinhole collimators. PET and SPECT images were reconstructed using three-dimensional (3D) maximum likelihood and ordered subset expectation maximization (MLEM and OSEM) algorithms developed by the authors, whereas the CT images were obtained using a 3D based FBP algorithm. CT spatial resolution was 85 μm while a uniformity of 2.7% was obtained for a water filled phantom at 45 kV. The SPECT spatial resolution was better than 0.8 mm measured with a Derenzo-like phantom for a FOV of 20 mm using a 1-mm pinhole aperture collimator. The full width at

  7. A high-sensitivity small animal SPECT system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Gregory S.; Cherry, Simon R.

    2009-03-01

    Medical imaging using single gamma-ray-emitting radionuclides typically makes use of parallel hole collimators or pinholes in order to achieve good spatial resolution. However, a tradeoff in sensitivity is inherent in the use of a collimator, and modern preclinical single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) systems detect a very small fraction of emitted gamma rays, often less than 0.1%. A system for small animal SPECT imaging which uses no collimators could potentially achieve very high sensitivity—several tens of percent—with reasonably sized detectors. This would allow two significant improvements in preclinical studies: images could be obtained more rapidly, allowing higher throughput for screening applications, or for dynamic processes to be observed with very good time resolution; and images could be obtained with less radioactive tracer, making possible the in vivo imaging of low-capacity receptor systems, aiding research into new tracer compounds, and reducing the cost and easing the regulatory burden of an experiment. Of course, a system with no collimator will not be able to approach the submillimeter spatial resolutions produced by the most advanced pinhole and collimated systems, but a high-sensitivity system with resolution of order 1 cm could nonetheless find significant and new use in the many molecular imaging applications which do not require good spatial resolution—for example, screening applications for drug development or new imaging agents. Rather than as an alternative to high-resolution SPECT systems, the high-sensitivity system is proposed as a radiotracer alternative to optical imaging for small animals. We have developed a prototype system for mouse imaging applications. The scanner consists of two large, thin, closely spaced scintillation detectors. Simulation studies indicate that a FWHM spatial resolution of 7 mm is possible. In an in vivo mouse imaging study using the 99mTc labeled tracer MAG-3, the sensitivity of the

  8. Simultaneous x-rays/optical tomography of small animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da Silva, A.; Leabad, M.; Bordy, T.; Dinten, J.-M.; Peltié, P.; Rizo, P.

    2007-03-01

    A small animal multimodality tomographer dedicated to the co-registration of fluorescence optical signal and X-rays measurements has been developed in our laboratory. The purpose of such a system is to offer the possibility to get in vivo anatomical and functional information at once. Moreover, anatomical measurements can be used as a regularization factor in order to get the reconstructions of the biodistribution of fluorochromes more accurate and to speed up the treatment. The optical system is basically composed with a CW laser (Krypton, 752 nm) for an optimal excitation of Alexa-Fluor 750 fluorochromes, and a CCD camera coupled with a combination of filters for the fluorescence detection. The animal is placed inside a transparent tube filled with an index matching fluid. In order to perform multiple views of fluorescence data acquisitions, the cylinder is fixed to a rotating stage. The excitation beam is brought to the cylinder via two mirrors mounted on translation plates allowing a vertical scan. The optical data acquisitions are performed with a high sensitivity CCD camera. The X-ray generator and the X-ray detector have been placed perpendicularly to the optical chain. A first study on phantoms was conducted to evaluate the feasibility, to test the linearity and the reproducibility, and to fix the parameters for the co-registration. These test experiments were reproduced by considering mice in the oesophagus of which thin glass tubes containing fluorochromes were inserted. Finally, the performance of the system was evaluated in vivo on mice bearing tumours in the lungs, tagged with Transferin-AlexaFluor 750.

  9. [Digital radiography].

    PubMed

    Haendle, J

    1983-03-01

    Digital radiography is a generally accepted term comprising all x-ray image systems producing a projected image which resembles the conventional x-ray film image, and which are linked to any type of digital image processing. Fundamental criteria of differentiation are based on the production and detection method of the x-ray image. Various systems are employed, viz. the single-detector, line-detector or fanbeam detector and the area-beam or area-detector image converters, which differ from one another mainly in the manner of conversion of the radiation produced by the x-ray tube. The article also deals with the pros and cons of the various principles, the multitude of systems employed, and the varying frequency of their use in x-ray diagnosis work.

  10. Particle Beam Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peach, Ken; Ekdahl, Carl

    2014-02-01

    Particle beam radiography, which uses a variety of particle probes (neutrons, protons, electrons, gammas and potentially other particles) to study the structure of materials and objects noninvasively, is reviewed, largely from an accelerator perspective, although the use of cosmic rays (mainly muons but potentially also high-energy neutrinos) is briefly reviewed. Tomography is a form of radiography which uses multiple views to reconstruct a three-dimensional density map of an object. There is a very wide range of applications of radiography and tomography, from medicine to engineering and security, and advances in instrumentation, specifically the development of electronic detectors, allow rapid analysis of the resultant radiographs. Flash radiography is a diagnostic technique for large high-explosive-driven hydrodynamic experiments that is used at many laboratories. The bremsstrahlung radiation pulse from an intense relativistic electron beam incident onto a high-Z target is the source of these radiographs. The challenge is to provide radiation sources intense enough to penetrate hundreds of g/cm2 of material, in pulses short enough to stop the motion of high-speed hydrodynamic shocks, and with source spots small enough to resolve fine details. The challenge has been met with a wide variety of accelerator technologies, including pulsed-power-driven diodes, air-core pulsed betatrons and high-current linear induction accelerators. Accelerator technology has also evolved to accommodate the experimenters' continuing quest for multiple images in time and space. Linear induction accelerators have had a major role in these advances, especially in providing multiple-time radiographs of the largest hydrodynamic experiments.

  11. Near-field thermoacoustic tomography of small animals.

    PubMed

    Kellnberger, Stephan; Hajiaboli, Amir; Razansky, Daniel; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2011-06-07

    Near-field radiofrequency thermoacoustic (NRT) tomography is a new imaging method that was developed to mitigate limitations of conventional thermoacoustic imaging approaches, related to hard compromises between signal strength and spatial resolution. By utilizing ultrahigh-energy electromagnetic impulses at ∼20 ns duration along with improved energy absorption coupling in the near-field, this method can deliver high-resolution images without compromising signal to noise ratio. NRT is a promising modality, offering cost-effectiveness and ease of implementation and it can be conveniently scaled to image small animals and humans. However, several of the performance metrics of the method are not yet documented. In this paper, we characterize the expected imaging performance via numerical simulations based on a finite-integration time-domain (FITD) technique and experiments using tissue mimicking phantoms and different biological samples. Furthermore, we show for the first time whole-body tomographic imaging results from mice, revealing clear anatomical details along with highly dissipative inclusions introduced for control. The best spatial resolution achieved for those experiments was 150 µm.

  12. Development of a Germanium Small-Animal SPECT System

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Lindsay C.; Ovchinnikov, Oleg; Shokouhi, Sepideh; Peterson, Todd E.

    2015-01-01

    Advances in fabrication techniques, electronics, and mechanical cooling systems have given rise to germanium detectors suitable for biomedical imaging. We are developing a small-animal SPECT system that uses a double-sided Ge strip detector. The detector’s excellent energy resolution may help to reduce scatter and simplify processing of multi-isotope imaging, while its ability to measure depth of interaction has the potential to mitigate parallax error in pinhole imaging. The detector’s energy resolution is <1% FWHM at 140 keV and its spatial resolution is approximately 1.5 mm FWHM. The prototype system described has a single-pinhole collimator with a 1-mm diameter and a 70-degree opening angle with a focal length variable between 4.5 and 9 cm. Phantom images from the gantry-mounted system are presented, including the NEMA NU-2008 phantom and a hot-rod phantom. Additionally, the benefit of energy resolution is demonstrated by imaging a dual-isotope phantom with 99mTc and 123I without cross-talk correction. PMID:26755832

  13. Laser-induced photoacoustic tomography for small animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xueding; Pang, Yongjiang; Stoica, George; Wang, Lihong V.

    2003-06-01

    Photoacoustic tomography, also called opto-acoustic tomography when laser excitation is used, is a novel medical imaging modality that combines the merits of both light and ultrasound. Here, we present our study of laser-induced photoacoustic tomography of organs of small animals. Pulses of 6.5 ns in width from an Nd:YAG laser at 532 nm or 1064 nm are employed to generate the distribution of thermoelastic expansion in the sample. A wide-band ultrasonic transducer that is non-focused in the imaging plane scans around the sample to realize a full-view detection of the imaged cross-section. A modified back-projection algorithm is applied to reconstruct the distribution of optical absorption inside the biological sample. Using optical energy depositions that fall below safe levels, tissue structures in ex-vivo rat kidneys and in-situ mouse brains covered by the skin and skull are imaged successfully with the high intrinsic optical contrast and the high spatial resolution of ultrasound.

  14. Common reversal agents/antidotes in small animal poisoning.

    PubMed

    Khan, Safdar A

    2012-03-01

    Different antidotes counteract the effect of a toxicant in several different ways. Antidotes can reverse, decrease, or prevent action of a toxicant. They can also help in achieving stabilization of vital signs, directly or indirectly, and promote excretion of a toxicant. However, overreliance on an antidote can be unrealistic and dangerous. While expectations of rapid recovery from antidotes are usually high, in a real life situation, there are many impediments in achieving this goal. The timing of its use, availability, cost, and sometimes adverse effects from the antidote itself can influence the results and outcome of a case. The majority of toxicants do not have a specific antidote therapy indicated and patients in these cases equally benefit from supportive care. In this chapter, commonly used antidotes and reversal agents in small animals are listed in a table form. The table lists generic name along with brand name of an antidote/reversal agent whenever available, main indications for their use, and provides comments or cautions in their use as needed. After stabilizing the patient and establishing the etiology, the clinicians must review more detailed management of that particular toxicant discussed here or in other references.

  15. Method to quantify tail vein injection technique in small animals.

    PubMed

    Groman, Ernest V; Reinhardt, Christopher P

    2004-01-01

    Injection errors, which are often not readily recognized, can greatly impact the outcome of a pre-clinical research study. As a result, unrecognized misadministration of test compounds can render a high cost to the biomedical community. In this report, we propose six criteria for a reagent designed to assess tail vein injection technique in small animals and suggest a reagent, colloidal gold labeled with the stable isotope 197Au, that satisfies these criteria, thereby describing and validating for the first time a method to quantify technical compliance in tail vein injections. In an application of this reagent, we show the degree of variation experienced by technologists performing tail vein injection procedures in mice. In this study, mice were manually restrained and received an injection in the tail vein. One hour after injection, the mice were euthanized, various organs including the tail (the site of the injection) were collected, and their gold content was quantified by neutron activation. The three experienced animal technologists in the study were tested for tail vein injection proficiency in 30 mice. Prior to the study, the supervisor stated that a misinjection occurs when more than 10% of the intended volume remains in the tail. In light of this criterion, 12 of the 30 injections were misadministered: two with technologist 1, three with technologist 2, and seven with technologist 3. Although she was able to correctly rank the injection skills of the three technologists used in this experiment, i.e., technologist 1 and 2 more better skilled than technologist 3, the supervisor greatly underestimated the extent and degree of injection failures for the procedure. The results of the study illustrate the potential problems associated with the technical compliance with this common laboratory procedure and suggest that there is a need to validate injection methods and a need to monitor technical competence. Application of reagents similar to colloidal gold and

  16. Fluence compensated photoacoustic tomography in small animals (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Altaf; Pool, Martin; Daoudi, Khalid; de Vries, Liesbeth G.; Steenbergen, Wiendelt

    2017-03-01

    Light fluence inside turbid media can be experimentally mapped by measuring ultrasonically modulated light (Acousto-optics). To demonstrate the feasibility of fluence corrected Photoacoustic (PA) imaging, we have realized a tri-modality (i.e. photoacoustic, acousto-optic and ultrasound) tomographic small animal imaging system. Wherein PA imaging provides high resolution map of absorbed optical energy density, Acousto-optics yields the fluence distribution map in the corresponding PA imaging plane and Ultrasound provides morphological information. Further, normalization of the PA image with the acousto-optically measured fluence map results in an image that directly represents the optical absorption. Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) is commonly found overexpressed in human cancers, among which breast cancers, resulting in a more aggressive tumor phenotype. Identification of HER2-expression is clinically relevant, because cancers overexpressing this marker are amenable to HER2-directed therapies, among which antibodies trastuzumab and pertuzumab. Here, we investigate the feasibility and advantage of acousto-optically assisted fluence compensated PA imaging over PA imaging alone in visualizing and quantifying HER2 expression. For this experiment, nude mice were xenografted with human breast cancer cell lines SKBR3 and BT474 (both HER2 overexpressing), as well as HER2-negative MDA-MB-231. To visualize HER2 expression in these mice, HER2 monoclonal antibody pertuzumab (Perjeta®, Roche), was conjugated to near-infrared dye IRDye 800CW (800CW, LICOR Biosciences) at a ratio of 1∶2 antibody to 800CW. When xenograft tumors measured ≥ 100 mm3, mice received 100 µg 800CW-pertuzumab intravenously. Three days post injection, mice were scanned for fluorescence signal with an IVIS scanner. After fluorescence scans, mice were euthanized and imaged in our PA tomographic imaging system.

  17. Acute spinal cord injury: tetraplegia and paraplegia in small animals.

    PubMed

    Granger, Nicolas; Carwardine, Darren

    2014-11-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a common problem in animals for which definitive treatment is lacking, and information gained from its study has benefit for both companion animals and humans in developing new therapeutic approaches. This review provides an overview of the main concepts that are useful for clinicians in assessing companion animals with severe acute SCI. Current available advanced ancillary tests and those in development are reviewed. In addition, the current standard of care for companion animals following SCI and recent advances in the development of new therapies are presented, and new predictors of recovery discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Small animal models of kidney disease: a review.

    PubMed

    Hewitson, Tim D; Ono, Takahiko; Becker, Gavin J

    2009-01-01

    Animal models of renal disease have provided valuable insights into the pathogenesis of acute and chronic kidney disease. Extension of these models to the mouse has become an increasingly important with the development of gene knockout and transgenic animals. In this review we discuss a range of models that can be used to mimic the mechanisms of human renal disease. While not perfect, the careful and ethical use of these models offers the opportunity to examine individual mechanisms in an accelerated time frame.

  19. Development of automatic movement analysis system for a small laboratory animal using image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagatomo, Satoshi; Kawasue, Kikuhito; Koshimoto, Chihiro

    2013-03-01

    Activity analysis in a small laboratory animal is an effective procedure for various bioscience fields. The simplest way to obtain animal activity data is just observation and recording manually, even though this is labor intensive and rather subjective. In order to analyze animal movement automatically and objectivity, expensive equipment is usually needed. In the present study, we develop animal activity analysis system by means of a template matching method with video recorded movements in laboratory animal at a low cost.

  20. INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY INSTRUCTOR'S GUIDE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Adult, Vocational, and Technical Education (DHEW/OE), Washington, DC. Div. of Vocational and Technical Education.

    THIS LABORATORY GUIDE WAS DEVELOPED FOR AN 80-HOUR COURSE IN INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY FOR HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES TRAINING TO BECOME BEGINNING RADIOGRAPHERS. IT IS USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH TWO OTHER VOLUMES--(1) INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY INSTRUCTOR'S GUIDE, AND (2) INUDSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY MANUAL. THE PROGRAM WAS DEVELOPED BY A COMMITTEE OF REPRESENTATIVES…

  1. Increasing mobile radiography productivity.

    PubMed

    Wong, Edward; Lung, Ngan Tsz; Ng, Kris; Jeor, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Mobile radiography using computed radiography (CR) cassettes is a common equipment combination with a workflow bottleneck limited by location of CR readers. Advent of direct digital radiography (DDR) mobile x-ray machines removes this limitation by immediate image review and quality control. Through the use of key performance indicators (KPIs), the increase in efficiency can be quantified.

  2. Small animal behavioral triage: a guide for practitioners.

    PubMed

    Martin, Kenneth M; Martin, Debbie; Shaw, Julie K

    2014-05-01

    Behavioral concerns are the principal cause of a weakened human-animal bond and pet relinquishment. Triaging behavioral concerns and providing early intervention may be the difference between a patient remaining in its current home or relinquishment. Prevention and intervention behavior services using a team approach may also improve pet retention through client education and appropriate assistance. Identifying and integrating qualified animal behavior professionals to assist with the hospital's behavior team ensures appropriate support is provided to the client and patient. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Embossed radiography utilizing energy subtraction.

    PubMed

    Osawa, Akihiro; Watanabe, Manabu; Sato, Eiichi; Matsukiyo, Hiroshi; Enomoto, Toshiyuki; Nagao, Jiro; Abderyim, Purkhet; Aizawa, Katsuo; Tanaka, Etsuro; Mori, Hidezo; Kawai, Toshiaki; Ehara, Shigeru; Sato, Shigehiro; Ogawa, Akira; Onagawa, Jun

    2009-01-01

    Currently, it is difficult to carry out refraction-contrast radiography by using a conventional X-ray generator. Thus, we developed an embossed radiography system utilizing dual-energy subtraction for decreasing the absorption contrast in unnecessary regions, and the contrast resolution of a target region was increased by use of image-shifting subtraction and a linear-contrast system in a flat panel detector (FPD). The X-ray generator had a 100-microm-focus tube. Energy subtraction was performed at tube voltages of 45 and 65 kV, a tube current of 0.50 mA, and an X-ray exposure time of 5.0 s. A 1.0-mm-thick aluminum filter was used for absorbing low-photon-energy bremsstrahlung X-rays. Embossed radiography was achieved with cohesion imaging by use of the FPD with pixel sizes of 48 x 48 microm, and the shifting dimension of an object in the horizontal direction ranged from 100 to 200 microm. At a shifting distance of 100 mum, the spatial resolutions in the horizontal and vertical directions measured with a lead test chart were both 83 microm. In embossed radiography of non-living animals, we obtained high-contrast embossed images of fine bones, gadolinium oxide particles in the kidney, and coronary arteries approximately 100 microm in diameter.

  4. A novel telemetry system for recording EEG in small animals.

    PubMed

    Chang, Pishan; Hashemi, Kevan S; Walker, Matthew C

    2011-09-30

    It has become increasingly evident that continuous EEG monitoring is necessary to observe the development of epilepsy in animals, and to determine the effect of drugs on spontaneous seizures. Telemetric recording systems have been increasingly used to monitor EEG in freely moving animals. One challenge faced by such systems is to monitor frequencies above 80Hz continuously for weeks. We present an implantable, 2.4-ml, telemetric sensor that can monitor EEG at 512 samples per second for eight weeks in a freely moving animal. With minor modifications, the same transmitter can operate at higher sample rates with a proportional decrease in operating life. Signal transmission is through bursts of 915-MHz radio power. The burst transmission and several other novel techniques reduce the transmitter's power consumption by two orders of magnitude while allowing 8 transmitters to share the same recording system. The use of radio-frequency transmission permits digitization within the sensor to sixteen-bit resolution, thus eliminating transmission-generated signal noise. The result is a signal with dynamic range 9mV, bandwidth 160Hz, input noise 12μV, and AC power interference less than 1μV. All circuit diagrams are open-source. Data acquisition takes place over the Internet using open-source software that works on multiple operating systems. The resulting system permits long-term, continuous, monitoring of EEG signals, therefore providing continuous and reliable data upon which to base studies of epilepsy in freely moving animals. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. A resistive heating system for homeothermic maintenance in small animals

    PubMed Central

    Kersemans, Veerle; Gilchrist, Stuart; Allen, Philip D.; Beech, John S.; Kinchesh, Paul; Vojnovic, Borivoj; Smart, Sean C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To develop an MR-compatible resistive heater for temperature maintenance of anaesthetized animals. Materials and Methods An MR-compatible resistive electrical heater was formed from a tightly-wound twisted pair wire, interfaced to a homeothermic maintenance controller. Fat-suppressed images and localized spectra were acquired with the twisted pair heater and a near-identical single strand heater during operation at maximum power. Data were also acquired in the absence of heating to demonstrate the insensitivity of MR to distortions arising from the passage of current through the heater elements. The efficacy of temperature maintenance was examined by measuring rectal temperature immediately following induction of general anesthesia and throughout and after the acquisition of a heater artifact-prone image series. Results Images and spectra acquired in the presence and absence of DC current through the twisted pair heater were identical whereas the passage of current through the single strand wire created field shifts and lineshape distortions. Temperature that is lost during anesthesia induction was recovered within approximately 10–20 minutes of induction, and a stable temperature is reached as the animal's temperature approaches the set target. Conclusion The twisted pair wire heater does not interfere with MR image quality and maintains adequate thermal input to the animal to maintain body temperature. PMID:25863135

  6. A resistive heating system for homeothermic maintenance in small animals.

    PubMed

    Kersemans, Veerle; Gilchrist, Stuart; Allen, Philip D; Beech, John S; Kinchesh, Paul; Vojnovic, Borivoj; Smart, Sean C

    2015-07-01

    To develop an MR-compatible resistive heater for temperature maintenance of anaesthetized animals. An MR-compatible resistive electrical heater was formed from a tightly-wound twisted pair wire, interfaced to a homeothermic maintenance controller. Fat-suppressed images and localized spectra were acquired with the twisted pair heater and a near-identical single strand heater during operation at maximum power. Data were also acquired in the absence of heating to demonstrate the insensitivity of MR to distortions arising from the passage of current through the heater elements. The efficacy of temperature maintenance was examined by measuring rectal temperature immediately following induction of general anesthesia and throughout and after the acquisition of a heater artifact-prone image series. Images and spectra acquired in the presence and absence of DC current through the twisted pair heater were identical whereas the passage of current through the single strand wire created field shifts and lineshape distortions. Temperature that is lost during anesthesia induction was recovered within approximately 10-20 minutes of induction, and a stable temperature is reached as the animal's temperature approaches the set target. The twisted pair wire heater does not interfere with MR image quality and maintains adequate thermal input to the animal to maintain body temperature. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Construct validation of a small-animal thoracocentesis simulator.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Julie A

    2014-01-01

    Training students to perform emergency procedures is a critical but challenging component of veterinary education. Thoracocentesis is traditionally taught in the classroom, with students progressing to "see one, do one, teach one" during the clinical phase of their education. This method of teaching does not permit students to gain proficiency before performing thoracocentesis on a live animal in a high-stakes, high-stress environment and is dependent on the availability of animals requiring the procedure. A veterinary thoracocentesis simulator has been created to allow students an opportunity for repetitive practice in a low-stakes environment. This study evaluated the face, content, and construct validity of the thoracocentesis simulator. Face and content validation were confirmed by survey results, and construct validity was assessed through comparison of student and veterinarian performance on the simulator. Students' median checklist and global rating scores were significantly lower than those of the veterinarians, and students took significantly longer to perform the procedure, indicating that the simulator was able to differentiate the relative expertise of the user and establishing construct validity. This study supported the use of the thoracocentesis simulator for educators to demonstrate proper technique, for students to practice the steps needed to perform the procedure and experience an approximation of the tactile aspects of the task, and for formative assessment before performing the procedure on client-owned animals.

  8. Theoretical considerations on maximum running speeds for large and small animals.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Mauricio A

    2016-02-07

    Mechanical equations for fast running speeds are presented and analyzed. One of the equations and its associated model predict that animals tend to experience larger mechanical stresses in their limbs (muscles, tendons and bones) as a result of larger stride lengths, suggesting a structural restriction entailing the existence of an absolute maximum possible stride length. The consequence for big animals is that an increasingly larger body mass implies decreasing maximal speeds, given that the stride frequency generally decreases for increasingly larger animals. Another restriction, acting on small animals, is discussed only in preliminary terms, but it seems safe to assume from previous studies that for a given range of body masses of small animals, those which are bigger are faster. The difference between speed scaling trends for large and small animals implies the existence of a range of intermediate body masses corresponding to the fastest animals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. First Observation of Small Fractures on a Human Dried Proximal Phalanx by Synchrotron X-Ray Interference Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Koichi; Hyodo, Kazuyuki; Shikano, Naoto; Ando, Masami

    1999-11-01

    By taking photographs using wiggler synchrotron radiation (SR),clear images of fine fissures on a human dried proximal phalanx wereobtained. This has never been achieved by the conventional X-raymethod. The 40 mm×40 mm exposure field used to coverthe object was prepared by magnifying the original SR beam crosssection (7 mm×7 mm) with two successive asymmetricreflections of Si crystals. The width of the fissures images wasapproximately 20 µm on medical X-ray film. These images can beexplained by X-ray phase contrast. This new method may enable anaccurate diagnostic method in the field of orthopedics, such as thatfor small fractures associated with a bruise.

  10. Contrast radiography of the lower urinary tract in the management of obstructive urolithiasis in small ruminants and swine.

    PubMed

    Palmer, J L; Dykes, N L; Love, K; Fubini, S L

    1998-01-01

    Contrast radiographic visualization of the small ruminant and porcine lower urinary tract is an infrequently used modality for the evaluation and management of obstructive urolithiasis. The administration of contrast medium through a tube cystostomy catheter used to divert urine flow until the resolution of the obstruction may provide an easy method to evaluate the status of the urethral obstruction. Contrast fluoroscopy is utilized to monitor and visualize therapeutic flushing of the urethra. A review of 26 patients seen at the Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital suggested that among the radiographic techniques used, positive contrast normograde cystourethrography through the tube cystostomy catheter allowed the best visualization of the lower urinary tract structures and enabled assessment of the resolution of the obstructive lesion.

  11. High Sensitivity SPECT for Small Animals and Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Gregory S.

    2015-02-28

    Imaging systems using single gamma-ray emitting radioisotopes typically implement collimators in order to form the images. However, a tradeoff in sensitivity is inherent in the use of collimators, and modern preclinical single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) systems detect a very small fraction of emitted gamma-rays (<0.3%). We have built a collimator-less system, which can reach sensitivity of 40% for 99mTc imaging, while still producing images of sufficient spatial resolution for certain applications in thin objects such as mice, small plants, and well plates used for in vitro experiments.

  12. Pet food recalls and pet food contaminants in small animals.

    PubMed

    Bischoff, Karyn; Rumbeiha, Wilson K

    2012-03-01

    Most pet foods are safe, but incidents of chemical contamination occur and lead to illness and recalls. There were 11 major pet food recalls in the United States between 1996 and 2010 that were due to chemical contaminants or misformulations: 3 aflatoxin, 3 excess vitamin D3, 1 excess methionine, 3 inadequate thiamine, and 1 adulteration with melamine and related compounds and an additional 2 warnings concerning a Fanconilike renal syndrome in dogs after ingesting large amounts of chicken jerky treat products. This article describes clinical findings and treatment of animals exposed to the most common pet food contaminants.

  13. Respiratory complications in critical illness of small animals.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Vicki Lynne

    2011-07-01

    The percentage of emergency patients with respiratory problems treated at veterinary emergency and critical care facilities is poorly defined. Regardless of whether an animal has a primary lung disease or develops a secondary lung disease during hospitalization, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a common sequela to the failing lung. ARDS is a frequent sequela to sepsis, systemic inflammatory response (SIRS), and disseminated intravascular coagulation and is frequently the pulmonary manifestation of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS). ARDS, acute lung injury, SIRS, sepsis, and MODS are serious syndromes with grave consequences. Understanding the pathophysiology and consequences of these syndromes is imperative to early recognition.

  14. An Ethanol Vapor Chamber System for Small Animals

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jie; Jiang, Lihong; Du, Hongying; Mason, Graeme F.

    2012-01-01

    Ethanol vapor chambers have been utilized widely in alcohol research since their introduction in 1971, and implementations of these systems are now available commercially. Here, we present a modification of the chamber that can be built at lower cost and greater simplicity of operation. The six-chamber system for rats has multiple air pumps. Ethanol vapor levels are adjusted with the air flow rate, ethanol drip rate, and dilution with room air, without a heater or fans. Ethanol vapor concentrations are measured with a breathalyzer, using room air to dilute the vapor chamber output into the range of the breathalyzer. Multiple pumps provide backup to ensure animal survival in the case of failure of the primary air pump. Tests in animals demonstrated comfortable and stable elevation of blood ethanol, with tight control of the ethanol vapor concentrations and the ability to select from a broad range of levels. The ethanol vapor measurement was rapid and efficient. The parts cost was a few thousand U.S. dollars. This vapor chamber system features low cost, ease of use, and convenient and inexpensive measurement of ethanol vapor concentrations. The lack of a heater and electrical components that could come into contact with ethanol in our case facilitated institutional approval. PMID:22575431

  15. Small animal electric and magnetic field exposure systems. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, R.C.; Dietrich, F.M.

    1993-10-01

    Laboratory evaluation of electric and magnetic fields (EMF) and cancer in animals requires exposure of relatively large numbers of animals, usually rats or mice, to 60-Hz fields under very well controlled conditions for periods of up to two years. This report describes two exposure systems, the first of which is based on modifications of an existing electric field exposure system to include magnetic field exposure capability. In this system, each module houses 576--768 mice, which can be exposed to electric field levels of up to 100 kV/m and magnetic field levels of up to 10 Gauss. When a module was operated at 10 Gauss, measured levels of noise and vibration fell substantially below the detection threshold for humans. Moreover, temperature rise in the coils did not exceed 12{degrees}C at the 10 Gauss level. Specifications and test results for the second system, which provides magnetic field exposure capability only, are similar, except that each module houses 624--780 mice. After installation of the second system at the West Los Angeles Veterans Medical Center in Los Angeles, California, additional results were obtained. This report provides a complete description of the engineering design, specifications, and test results for the completed systems.

  16. Wireless Neural Stimulation in Freely Behaving Small Animals

    PubMed Central

    Arfin, Scott K.; Long, Michael A.; Fee, Michale S.; Sarpeshkar, Rahul

    2009-01-01

    We introduce a novel wireless, low-power neural stimulation system for use in freely behaving animals. The system consists of an external transmitter and a miniature, implantable wireless receiver–stimulator. The implant uses a custom integrated chip to deliver biphasic current pulses to four addressable bipolar electrodes at 32 selectable current levels (10 μA to 1 mA). To achieve maximal battery life, the chip enters a sleep mode when not needed and can be awakened remotely when required. To test our device, we implanted bipolar stimulating electrodes into the songbird motor nucleus HVC (formerly called the high vocal center) of zebra finches. Single-neuron recordings revealed that wireless stimulation of HVC led to a strong increase of spiking activity in its downstream target, the robust nucleus of the arcopallium. When we used this device to deliver biphasic pulses of current randomly during singing, singing activity was prematurely terminated in all birds tested. Thus our device is highly effective for remotely modulating a neural circuit and its corresponding behavior in an untethered, freely behaving animal. PMID:19386759

  17. Photoacoustic microscopy of electronic acupuncture (EA) effect in small animals.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jinge; Wu, Dan; Tang, Yong; Jiang, Huabei

    2017-02-01

    Acupuncture has been an effective treatment for various pain in China for several thousand years. However, the mechanisms underlying this mysterious ancient healing are still largely unknown. Here we applied photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) to investigate brain hemodynamic changes in response to electronic acupuncture (EA) at ST36 (Zusanli). Due to the high optical absorption of blood at 532 nm, PAM could sensitively probe changes in hemoglobin concentration (HbT, i.e., cerebral blood volume [CBV]) of cortical regions in high resolution. Six healthy mice were stimulated at the acupoint and three healthy mice were stimulated at sham points. Remarkable CBV changes in sensorimotor and retrosplenial agranular cortex were observed. Results showed the potential of PAM as a visualization tool to study the acupuncture effect on brain hemodynamics in animal models. (a) Schematic showing the stimulation points. (b) B-scan images overlaid with mouse atlas. (c) & (d) Statistical results of CBV changes from cortical regions.

  18. Pre-clinical research in small animals using radiotherapy technology--a bidirectional translational approach.

    PubMed

    Tillner, Falk; Thute, Prasad; Bütof, Rebecca; Krause, Mechthild; Enghardt, Wolfgang

    2014-12-01

    For translational cancer research, pre-clinical in-vivo studies using small animals have become indispensable in bridging the gap between in-vitro cell experiments and clinical implementation. When setting up such small animal experiments, various biological, technical and methodical aspects have to be considered. In this work we present a comprehensive topical review based on relevant publications on irradiation techniques used for pre-clinical cancer research in mice and rats. Clinical radiotherapy treatment devices for the application of external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy as well as dedicated research irradiation devices are feasible for small animal irradiation depending on the animal model and the experimental goals. In this work, appropriate solutions for the technological transfer of human radiation oncology to small animal radiation research are summarised. Additionally, important information concerning the experimental design is provided such that reliable and clinically relevant results can be attained.

  19. Innovations in Small-Animal PET/MR Imaging Instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Tsoumpas, Charalampos; Visvikis, Dimitris; Loudos, George

    2016-04-01

    Multimodal imaging has led to a more detailed exploration of different physiologic processes with integrated PET/MR imaging being the most recent entry. Although the clinical need is still questioned, it is well recognized that it represents one of the most active and promising fields of medical imaging research in terms of software and hardware. The hardware developments have moved from small detector components to high-performance PET inserts and new concepts in full systems. Conversely, the software focuses on the efficient performance of necessary corrections without the use of CT data. The most recent developments in both directions are reviewed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A fast full-body fluorescence/bioluminescence imaging system for small animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jong Hwan; Kim, Hyun Keol; Jia, Jingfei; Fong, Christopher; Hielscher, Andreas H.

    2013-03-01

    Whole body in vivo optical imaging of small animals has widened its applications and increased the capabilities for preclinical researches. However, most commercial and prototype optical imaging systems are camera-based systems using epi- or trans- illumination mode, with limited views of small animals. And for more accurate tomographic image reconstruction, additional data and information of a target animal is necessary. To overcome these issues, researchers have suggested several approaches such as maximizing the detection area or using the information of other highresolution modalities such as CT, MRI or Ultrasound, or using multi-spectral signals. As one of ways to maximizing the detection area of a target animal, we present a new fluorescence and bioluminescence imaging system for small animals, which can image entire surface of a target animal simultaneously. This system uses double mirror reflection scheme and it consists of input unit, imaging unit with two conical mirrors, the source illumination part and the surface scanner, and the detection unit with an intensified CCD camera system. Two conical mirrors are configured that a larger size mirror captures a target animal surface, and a smaller size mirror projects this captured image onto a CCD camera with one acquisition. With this scheme, we could capture entire surface of a target animal simultaneously and improve back reflection issue between a mirror and an animal surface of a single conical mirror scheme. Additionally, we could increase accessibility to an animal for multi-modality integration by providing unobstructed space around a target animal.

  1. Veterinary compounding in small animals: a clinical pharmacologist's perspective.

    PubMed

    Boothe, Dawn Merton

    2006-09-01

    The advent and growth of veterinary compounding and the increasing role of the pharmacist in drug dispensing, including compounding, should be embraced by the veterinary profession. For selected patients, extemporaneous compounding of prescriptions is necessary and beneficial for optimal treatment. By its nature, however, compounding is individualized and fraught with risks of failure. Pet owners should be informed of the risks associated with using a compounded product and consent to therapy based on disclosure that the use of the product may be scientifically unproven. As the pharmacy profession increases its efforts to define and ensure its role in veterinary medicine, and as the regulatory agencies consider changes in the regulations that increase the flexibility of animal drug compounding, the veterinary profession must implement actions that protect the patient and the public. It is indeed the responsibility of the veterinarian to ensure the safety and therapy of any prescribed therapeutic intervention, and failure to do otherwise places the patient and pet owner as well as the veterinarian at risk.

  2. Age-dependent small-animal internal radiation dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Xie, Tianwu; Zaidi, Habib

    2013-09-01

    Rats at various ages were observed to present with different radiosensitivity and bioavailability for radiotracers commonly used in preclinical research. We evaluated the effect of age-induced changes in body weight on radiation dose calculations. A series of rat models at different age periods were constructed based on the realistic four-dimensional digital rat whole-body (ROBY) computational model. Particle transport was simulated using the MCNPX Monte Carlo code. Absorbed fractions (AFs) and specific absorbed fraction (SAFs) of monoenergetic photons/electrons and S values of eight positron-emitting radionuclides were calculated. The SAFs and S values for most source-target pairs were inversely correlated with body weight. Differences between F-18 S values for most source-target pairs were between -1.5% and -2%/10 g difference in body weight for different computational models. For specific radiotracers, the radiation dose to organs presents a negative correlation with rat body weight. The SAFs for monoenergetic photons/electrons and S values for common positron-emitting radionuclides can be exploited in the assessment of radiation dose delivered to rats at different ages and weights. The absorbed dose to organs is significantly higher in the low-weight young rat model than in the adult model, which would result in steep secondary effects and might be a noteworthy issue in laboratory animal internal dosimetry.

  3. A fully implantable stimulator for use in small laboratory animals

    PubMed Central

    Millard, Rodney E.; Shepherd, Robert K.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes a low cost, fully implantable, single channel stimulator that can be manufactured in a research laboratory. The stimulator generates charge-balanced biphasic current pulses which are delivered to a bipolar electrode array for chronic stimulation of neural tissue in free-running laboratory animals such as rats and mice. The system is magnetically coupled and contains no batteries or external leadwires. The subject is placed in a chamber surrounded by three orthogonal coils of wire which are driven to generate a magnetic field. Currents are induced in wire coils in the implanted stimulator then regulated to produce biphasic current pulses with fixed amplitude of up to 500 μA. Phase duration is adjustable from 25 – 250 μs per phase. Charge balance is maintained by capacitive coupling and shorting of the electrodes between pulses. Stimulus rate can be continuously varied, and the temporal precision of the stimulus means that the stimulator can be used in behavioural experiments or for generating electrically-evoked potentials. We describe the application of this stimulator for chronic electrical stimulation of the auditory nerve (i.e. a cochlear implant); however it will have application in other areas of neuroscience requiring controlled safe electrical stimulation of neural tissue over extended periods. Circuit diagrams and manufacturing details are provided as supplementary data. PMID:17897719

  4. Small animal ocular biometry using optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggeri, Marco; Kocaoglu, Omer; Uhlhorn, Stephen; Borja, David; Urs, Raksha; Chou, Tsung-Han; Porciatti, Vittorio; Parel, Jean-Marie; Manns, Fabrice

    2010-02-01

    A custom-built OCT system was used to obtain images of the whole mouse eye. We developed a semi-automated segmentation method to detect the boundaries of the anterior and posterior corneal, lens and retinal surfaces as well as the anterior surface of the iris. The radii of curvature of the surfaces were calculated using a conic section fit of each boundary. Image distortions due to refraction of the OCT beam at the successive boundaries were corrected using a ray-tracing algorithm. Corrected ocular distances, radii of curvature of the cornea and lens surfaces, and anterior chamber angle were obtained on 3 C57BL/6J mice. In vivo imaging of the whole eye, segmentation, conic function fits and correction were successful in all three animals. The posterior lens surface of one mouse could not be fit accurately with a conic section. Biometric parameters of C57BL/6J mice compared well with previous published data obtained from histological sections. The study demonstrates the feasibility of quantitative in vivo biometry of mouse models.

  5. Synchrotron-based intravenous cerebral angiography in a small animal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Michael E.; Schültke, Elisabeth; Fiedler, Stephan; Nemoz, Christian; Guzman, Raphael; Corde, Stephanie; Esteve, Francois; LeDuc, Geraldine; Juurlink, Bernhard H. J.; Meguro, Kotoo

    2007-02-01

    K-edge digital subtraction angiography (KEDSA), a recently developed synchrotron-based technique, utilizes monochromatic radiation and allows acquisition of high-quality angiography images after intravenous administration of contrast agent. We tested KEDSA for its suitability for intravenous cerebral angiography in an animal model. Adult male New Zealand rabbits were subjected to either angiography with conventional x-ray equipment or synchrotron-based intravenous KEDSA, using an iodine-based contrast agent. Angiography with conventional x-ray equipment after intra-arterial administration of contrast agent demonstrated the major intracranial vessels but no smaller branches. KEDSA was able to visualize the major intracranial vessels as well as smaller branches in both radiography mode (planar images) and tomography mode. Visualization was achieved with as little as 0.5 ml kg-1 of iodinated contrast material. We were able to obtain excellent visualization of the cerebral vasculature in an animal model using intravenous injection of contrast material, using synchrotron-based KEDSA.

  6. Going wild: what a global small-animal tracking system could do for experimental biologists.

    PubMed

    Wikelski, Martin; Kays, Roland W; Kasdin, N Jeremy; Thorup, Kasper; Smith, James A; Swenson, George W

    2007-01-01

    Tracking animals over large temporal and spatial scales has revealed invaluable and spectacular biological information, particularly when the paths and fates of individuals can be monitored on a global scale. However, only large animals (greater than approximately 300 g) currently can be followed globally because of power and size constraints on the tracking devices. And yet the vast majority of animals is small. Tracking small animals is important because they are often part of evolutionary and ecological experiments, they provide important ecosystem services and they are of conservation concern or pose harm to human health. Here, we propose a small-animal satellite tracking system that would enable the global monitoring of animals down to the size of the smallest birds, mammals (bats), marine life and eventually large insects. To create the scientific framework necessary for such a global project, we formed the ICARUS initiative (www.IcarusInitiative.org), the International Cooperation for Animal Research Using Space. ICARUS also highlights how small-animal tracking could address some of the ;Grand Challenges in Environmental Sciences' identified by the US National Academy of Sciences, such as the spread of infectious diseases or the relationship between biological diversity and ecosystem functioning. Small-animal tracking would allow the quantitative assessment of dispersal and migration in natural populations and thus help solve enigmas regarding population dynamics, extinctions and invasions. Experimental biologists may find a global small-animal tracking system helpful in testing, validating and expanding laboratory-derived discoveries in wild, natural populations. We suggest that the relatively modest investment into a global small-animal tracking system will pay off by providing unprecedented insights into both basic and applied nature. Tracking small animals over large spatial and temporal scales could prove to be one of the most powerful techniques of the

  7. Physical agent modalities in physical therapy and rehabilitation of small animals.

    PubMed

    Hanks, June; Levine, David; Bockstahler, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Physical agent modalities can be effective components of the overall rehabilitation of small animals. This article reviews the effects, indications, contraindications, and precautions of cold, superficial heat, therapeutic ultrasound, and electrical stimulation.

  8. [Euthanasia of small rodents. Reasons, methods and assessment of animal welfare].

    PubMed

    Grahwit, G

    2005-03-01

    Euthanasia of vertebrates requires a high extend of responsibility and specified knowledge, according to the regulations of the German Animal Welfare Act. Every day innumerable vertebrates, including small rodents, were euthanized from various reasons. Only part of these cases are supervised by official authorities. In this paper the available methods of euthanasia, especially of small rodents, are explained and an assessment under the aspects of animal welfare is undertaken.

  9. Animal Well-Being in Small Poultry Flocks: Improving bird health and product quality

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Consumer interest in farm animal welfare is increasing and, while there is little legislation, voluntary welfare assurance programs exist; however, most small poultry producers do not participate in these programs. Raising birds in small flocks has some inherent welfare advantages, such as ample sp...

  10. An integrated multimodality image-guided robot system for small-animal imaging research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Wen-Lin; Hsin Wu, Tung; Hsu, Shih-Ming; Chen, Chia-Lin; Lee, Jason J. S.; Huang, Yung-Hui

    2011-10-01

    We design and construct an image-guided robot system for use in small-animal imaging research. This device allows the use of co-registered small-animal PET-MRI images to guide the movements of robotic controllers, which will accurately place a needle probe at any predetermined location inside, for example, a mouse tumor, for biological readouts without sacrificing the animal. This system is composed of three major components: an automated robot device, a CCD monitoring mechanism, and a multimodality registration implementation. Specifically, the CCD monitoring mechanism was used for correction and validation of the robot device. To demonstrate the value of the proposed system, we performed a tumor hypoxia study that involved FMISO small-animal PET imaging and the delivering of a pO 2 probe into the mouse tumor using the image-guided robot system. During our evaluation, the needle positioning error was found to be within 0.153±0.042 mm of desired placement; the phantom simulation errors were within 0.693±0.128 mm. In small-animal studies, the pO 2 probe measurements in the corresponding hypoxia areas showed good correlation with significant, low tissue oxygen tensions (less than 6 mmHg). We have confirmed the feasibility of the system and successfully applied it to small-animal investigations. The system could be easily adapted to extend to other biomedical investigations in the future.

  11. Dry coupling for whole-body small-animal photoacoustic computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Chenghung; Li, Lei; Zhu, Liren; Xia, Jun; Li, Chiye; Chen, Wanyi; Garcia-Uribe, Alejandro; Maslov, Konstantin I.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2017-04-01

    We have enhanced photoacoustic computed tomography with dry acoustic coupling that eliminates water immersion anxiety and wrinkling of the animal and facilitates incorporating complementary modalities and procedures. The dry acoustic coupler is made of a tubular elastic membrane enclosed by a closed transparent water tank. The tubular membrane ensures water-free contact with the animal, and the closed water tank allows pressurization for animal stabilization. The dry coupler was tested using a whole-body small-animal ring-shaped photoacoustic computed tomography system. Dry coupling was found to provide image quality comparable to that of conventional water coupling.

  12. Recommendations on vaccination for Asian small animal practitioners: a report of the WSAVA Vaccination Guidelines Group.

    PubMed

    Day, M J; Karkare, U; Schultz, R D; Squires, R; Tsujimoto, H

    2015-02-01

    In 2012 and 2013, the World Small Animal Veterinary Association (WSAVA) Vaccination Guidelines Group (VGG) undertook fact-finding visits to several Asian countries, with a view to developing advice for small companion animal practitioners in Asia related to the administration of vaccines to dogs and cats. The VGG met with numerous first opinion practitioners, small animal association leaders, academic veterinarians, government regulators and industry representatives and gathered further information from a survey of almost 700 veterinarians in India, China, Japan and Thailand. Although there were substantial differences in the nature and magnitude of the challenges faced by veterinarians in each country, and also differences in the resources available to meet those challenges, overall, the VGG identified insufficient undergraduate and postgraduate training in small companion animal microbiology, immunology and vaccinology. In most of the countries, there has been little academic research into small animal infectious diseases. This, coupled with insufficient laboratory diagnostic support, has limited the growth of knowledge concerning the prevalence and circulating strains of key infectious agents in most of the countries visited. Asian practitioners continue to recognise clinical infections that are now considered uncommon or rare in western countries. In particular, canine rabies virus infection poses a continuing threat to animal and human health in this region. Both nationally manufactured and international dog and cat vaccines are variably available in the Asian countries, but the product ranges are small and dominated by multi-component vaccines with a licensed duration of immunity (DOI) of only 1 year, or no description of DOI. Asian practitioners are largely unaware of current global trends in small animal vaccinology or of the WSAVA vaccination guidelines. Consequently, most practitioners continue to deliver annual revaccination with both core and non

  13. SU-E-T-299: Dosimetric Characterization of Small Field in Small Animal Irradiator with Radiochromic Films

    SciTech Connect

    Han, S; Kim, K; Jung, H; Ji, Y; Choi, S; Park, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The small animal irradiator has been used with small animals to optimize new radiation therapy as preclinical studies. The small animal was irradiated by whole- or partial-body exposure. In this study, the dosimetric characterizations of small animal irradiator were carried out in small field using Radiochromic films Material & Methods: The study was performed in commercial animal irradiator (XRAD-320, Precision x-ray Inc, North Brantford) with Radiochromic films (EBT2, Ashland Inc, Covington). The calibration curve was generated between delivery dose and optical density (red channel) and the films were scanned by and Epson 1000XL scanner (Epson America Inc., Long Beach, CA).We evaluated dosimetric characterization of irradiator using various filter supported by manufacturer in 260 kV. The various filters were F1 (2.0mm Aluminum (HVL = about 1.0mm Cu) and F2 (0.75mm Tin + 0.25mm Copper + 1.5mm Aluminum (HVL = about 3.7mm Cu). According to collimator size (3, 5, 7, 10 mm, we calculated percentage depth dose (PDD) and the surface –source distance(SSD) was 17.3 cm considering dose rate. Results: The films were irradiated in 260 kV, 10mA and we increased exposure time 5sec. intervals from 5sec. to 120sec. The calibration curve of films was fitted with cubic function. The correlation between optical density and dose was Y=0.1405 X{sup 3}−2.916 X{sup 2}+25.566 x+2.238 (R{sup 2}=0.994). Based on the calibration curve, we calculated PDD in various filters depending on collimator size. When compared PDD of specific depth (3mm) considering animal size, the difference by collimator size was 4.50% in free filter and F1 was 1.53% and F2 was within 2.17%. Conclusion: We calculated PDD curve in small animal irradiator depending on the collimator size and the kind of filter using the radiochromic films. The various PDD curve was acquired and it was possible to irradiate various dose using these curve.

  14. Detection of furcation involvement using periapical radiography and 2 cone-beam computed tomography imaging protocols with and without a metallic post: An animal study

    PubMed Central

    Salineiro, Fernanda Cristina Sales; Gialain, Ivan Onone; Kobayashi-Velasco, Solange; Pannuti, Claudio Mendes

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to assess the accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity of the diagnosis of incipient furcation involvement with periapical radiography (PR) and 2 cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging protocols, and to test metal artifact interference. Materials and Methods Mandibular second molars in 10 macerated pig mandibles were divided into those that showed no furcation involvement and those with lesions in the furcation area. Exams using PR and 2 different CBCT imaging protocols were performed with and without a metallic post. Each image was analyzed twice by 2 observers who rated the absence or presence of furcation involvement according to a 5-point scale. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used to evaluate the accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity of the observations. Results The accuracy of the CBCT imaging protocols ranged from 67.5% to 82.5% in the images obtained with a metallic post and from 72.5% to 80% in those without a metallic post. The accuracy of PR ranged from 37.5% to 55% in the images with a metallic post and from 42.5% to 62.5% in those without a metallic post. The area under the ROC curve values for the CBCT imaging protocols ranged from 0.813 to 0.802, and for PR ranged from 0.503 to 0.448. Conclusion Both CBCT imaging protocols showed higher accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity than PR in the detection of incipient furcation involvement. Based on these results, CBCT may be considered a reliable tool for detecting incipient furcation involvement following a clinical periodontal exam, even in the presence of a metallic post. PMID:28361025

  15. Carriage of meticillin-resistant staphylococci between humans and animals on a small farm.

    PubMed

    Loncaric, Igor; Künzel, Frank; Klang, Andrea; Wagner, Regina; Licka, Theresia; Grunert, Tom; Feßler, Andrea T; Geier-Dömling, Dorothe; Rosengarten, Renate; Müller, Elke; Reissig, Annett; Spergser, Joachim; Schwarz, Stefan; Ehricht, Ralf; Monecke, Stefan

    2016-06-01

    Meticillin-resistant staphylococci (MRS) are pathogens of increasing importance to human and animal health worldwide. Transmission of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) between animals and humans has been well documented. By contrast, information about transmission of other Staphylococcus spp. is limited. The aim of this study was to screen animals and humans on a small farm for nasal carriage of MRS and to assess interspecies exchange. After detection of MRSA in a lung sample of a deceased cat, which lived on a small mixed farm, nasal swabs were taken within two weeks, four and 16 months from other animals of various species and humans living on the farm. Swabs were cultured for MRS which were then characterized molecularly. MRSA and meticillin-resistant coagulase negative staphylococci (MRCoNS), including Staphylococcus haemolyticus, S. epidermidis and S. fleurettii, were isolated from humans and different animal species. Typing of the MRS revealed isolates with the same characteristics in different human and animal hosts. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of carriage of both MRSA and MRCoNS among humans and various animals within a shared environment. The detection of strains with indistinguishable molecular characteristics strongly suggested transmission of these MRS between the various animal species and humans. © 2016 ESVD and ACVD.

  16. Performance of the first Japanese large-scale facility for radon inhalation experiments with small animals.

    PubMed

    Ishimori, Yuu; Mitsunobu, Fumihiro; Yamaoka, Kiyonori; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Kataoka, Takahiro; Sakoda, Akihiro

    2011-07-01

    A radon test facility for small animals was developed in order to increase the statistical validity of differences of the biological response in various radon environments. This paper illustrates the performances of that facility, the first large-scale facility of its kind in Japan. The facility has a capability to conduct approximately 150 mouse-scale tests at the same time. The apparatus for exposing small animals to radon has six animal chamber groups with five independent cages each. Different radon concentrations in each animal chamber group are available. Because the first target of this study is to examine the in vivo behaviour of radon and its effects, the major functions to control radon and to eliminate thoron were examined experimentally. Additionally, radon progeny concentrations and their particle size distributions in the cages were also examined experimentally to be considered in future projects.

  17. Introduction to clinical and laboratory (small-animal) image registration and fusion.

    PubMed

    Zanzonico, Pat B; Nehmeh, Sadek A

    2006-01-01

    Imaging has long been a vital component of clinical medicine and, increasingly, of biomedical research in small-animals. Clinical and laboratory imaging modalities can be divided into two general categories, structural (or anatomical) and functional (or physiological). The latter, in particular, has spawned what has come to be known as "molecular imaging". Image registration and fusion have rapidly emerged as invaluable components of both clinical and small-animal imaging and has lead to the development and marketing of a variety of multi-modality, e.g. PET-CT, devices which provide registered and fused three-dimensional image sets. This paper briefly reviews the basics of image registration and fusion and available clinical and small-animal multi-modality instrumentation.

  18. A mask for delivery of inhalation gases to small laboratory animals.

    PubMed

    Levy, D E; Zwies, A; Duffy, T E

    1980-10-01

    A mask was developed for the administration of volatile anesthetics and other gases to small, spontaneously breathing laboratory animals. A vacuum-powered venting system surrounding the inspiratory gas supply prevented potentially hazardous gases from escaping into the environment. This system was used to deliver nitrous oxide, halothane, and methoxyflurane to rats, gerbils, and newborn dogs. It was used to vary the oxygen and carbon dioxide concentrations inspired by spontaneously breathing animals undergoing physiological experiments.

  19. SU-E-T-124: Anthropomorphic Phantoms for Confirmation of Linear Accelerator Based Small Animal Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Perks, J; Benedict, S; Lucero, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To document the support of radiobiological small animal research by a modern radiation oncology facility. This study confirms that a standard, human use linear accelerator can cover the range of experiments called for by researchers performing animal irradiation. A number of representative, anthropomorphic murine phantoms were made. The phantoms confirmed the small field photon and electron beams dosimetry validated the use of the linear accelerator for rodents. Methods: Laser scanning a model, CAD design and 3D printing produced the phantoms. The phantoms were weighed and CT scanned to judge their compatibility to real animals. Phantoms were produced to specifically mimic lung, gut, brain, and othotopic lesion irradiations. Each phantom was irradiated with the same protocol as prescribed to the live animals. Delivered dose was measured with small field ion chambers, MOS/FETs or TLDs. Results: The density of the phantom material compared to density range across the real mice showed that the printed material would yield sufficiently accurate measurements when irradiated. The whole body, lung and gut irradiations were measured within 2% of prescribed doses with A1SL ion chamber. MOSFET measurements of electron irradiations for the orthotopic lesions allowed refinement of the measured small field output factor to better than 2% and validated the immunology experiment of irradiating one lesion and sparing another. Conclusion: Linacs are still useful tools in small animal bio-radiation research. This work demonstrated a strong role for the clinical accelerator in small animal research, facilitating standard whole body dosing as well as conformal treatments down to 1cm field. The accuracy of measured dose, was always within 5%. The electron irradiations of the phantom brain and flank tumors needed adjustment; the anthropomorphic phantoms allowed refinement of the initial output factor measurements for these fields which were made in a large block of solid water.

  20. Veterinarian's dilemma: a study of how Danish small animal practitioners handle financially limited clients.

    PubMed

    Kondrup, S V; Anhøj, K P; Rødsgaard-Rosenbeck, C; Lund, T B; Nissen, M H; Sandøe, P

    2016-12-10

    This study examined the extent to which Danish veterinary practices encounter financially limited clients and how different factors relating to the animal, the client and the veterinarian affect decisions to provide treatment for these clients. 300 small animal practices were invited to participate in an online survey. 195 participated, giving a response rate of 65 per cent. The results show that Danish small animal veterinary practices encounter clients with limited finances regularly: 33.8 per cent of them 3-4 times, 24.6 per cent 5-10 times and 19.5 per cent 1-2 times a month. Only around 9 per cent reported having a written practice policy on handling financially limited clients. Factors affecting decisions to treat include the severity and type of the animal's condition, the medical care needed and the client's expressed emotions. The propensity to treat is significantly higher in female veterinarians and in situations involving unborn animals. The overall conclusion is that small animal veterinary practices often provide treatment to clients who are not able to pay-far beyond what is legally required. This can be considered a major economic and psychological challenge for the practising veterinarians. British Veterinary Association.

  1. Animation, Small Multiples, and the Effect of Mental Map Preservation in Dynamic Graphs.

    PubMed

    Archambault, D; Purchase, H; Pinaud, B

    2011-04-01

    In this paper, we present the results of a human-computer interaction experiment that compared the performance of the animation of dynamic graphs to the presentation of small multiples and the effect that mental map preservation had on the two conditions. Questions used in the experiment were selected to test both local and global properties of graph evolution over time. The data sets used in this experiment were derived from standard benchmark data sets of the information visualization community. We found that small multiples gave significantly faster performance than animation overall and for each of our five graph comprehension tasks. In addition, small multiples had significantly more errors than animation for the tasks of determining sets of nodes or edges added to the graph during the same timeslice, although a positive time-error correlation coefficient suggests that, in this case, faster responses did not lead to more errors. This result suggests that, for these two tasks, animation is preferable if accuracy is more important than speed. Preserving the mental map under either the animation or the small multiples condition had little influence in terms of error rate and response time.

  2. Hand hygiene practices of veterinary support staff in small animal private practice.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, R K; Tompkins, E; Braasch, E L; Martinez, J G; Bianco, D

    2012-03-01

    To evaluate the hand hygiene (HH) practices among veterinary technicians (VT) and veterinary support staff (VSS) in small animal private practice. This was a prospective questionnaire-based study involving 182 VT and VSS from 18 small animal hospitals in the USA. Questions asked included gender, number of animals handled per work shift, frequency of hand washing, reason for not washing more frequently, most common available hand washing agent, education regarding the importance of HH and frequency of ring wearing. Less than half of the respondents [76 of 182 (41·7%)] reported washing their hands regularly between handling patients and 154 of 182 (85·6%) believed they should have washed more frequently. The most commonly employed HH agent was hand soap [154 of 182 (84·6%)] and the most common reason cited for not washing more frequently was being too busy [132 of 182 (72·5%)]. Only 96 of 182 (52·7%) respondents were educated by doctors at their hospital regarding the importance of HH. The HH practices among VT and VSS in small animal private practice is poor. Hand soap was the most commonly employed agent among respondents in this study. Education of VT and VSS regarding the importance of HH requires improvement. © 2012 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  3. Imaging Techniques for Small Animal Models of Pulmonary Disease: MR Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Driehuys, Bastiaan; Hedlund, Laurence W.

    2009-01-01

    In vivo magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM) of the small animal lung has become a valuable research tool, especially for preclinical studies. MRM offers a noninvasive and nondestructive tool for imaging small animals longitudinally and at high spatial resolution. We summarize some of the technical and biologic problems and solutions associated with imaging the small animal lung and describe several important pulmonary disease applications. A major advantage of MR is direct imaging of the gas spaces of the lung using breathable gases such as helium and xenon. When polarized, these gases become rich MR signal sources. In animals breathing hyperpolarized helium, the dynamics of gas distribution can be followed and airway constrictions and obstructions can be detected. Diffusion coefficients of helium can be calculated from diffusion-sensitive images, which can reveal micro-structural changes in the lungs associated with pathologies such as emphysema and fibrosis. Unlike helium, xenon in the lung is absorbed by blood and exhibits different frequencies in gas, tissue, or erythrocytes. Thus, with MR imaging, the movement of xenon gas can be tracked through pulmonary compartments to detect defects of gas transfer. MRM has become a valuable tool for studying morphologic and functional changes in small animal models of lung diseases. PMID:17325972

  4. High energy neutron radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Gavron, A.; Morley, K.; Morris, C.; Seestrom, S.; Ullmann, J.; Yates, G.; Zumbro, J.

    1996-06-01

    High-energy spallation neutron sources are now being considered in the US and elsewhere as a replacement for neutron beams produced by reactors. High-energy and high intensity neutron beams, produced by unmoderated spallation sources, open potential new vistas of neutron radiography. The authors discuss the basic advantages and disadvantages of high-energy neutron radiography, and consider some experimental results obtained at the Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) facility at Los Alamos.

  5. Multimodality imaging combination in small animal via point-based registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, C. C.; Wu, T. H.; Lin, M. H.; Huang, Y. H.; Guo, W. Y.; Chen, C. L.; Wang, T. C.; Yin, W. H.; Lee, J. S.

    2006-12-01

    We present a system of image co-registration in small animal study. Marker-based registration is chosen because of its considerable advantage that the fiducial feature is independent of imaging modality. We also experimented with different scanning protocols and different fiducial marker sizes to improve registration accuracy. Co-registration was conducted using rat phantom fixed by stereotactic frame. Overall, the co-registration accuracy was in sub-millimeter level and close to intrinsic system error. Therefore, we conclude that the system is an accurate co-registration method to be used in small animal studies.

  6. Evaluation of a Cone Beam Computed Tomography Geometry for Image Guided Small Animal Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yidong; Armour, Michael; Wang, Ken Kang-Hsin; Gandhi, Nishant; Iordachita, Iulian; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey; Wong, John

    2015-01-01

    The conventional imaging geometry for small animal cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is that a detector panel rotates around the head-to-tail axis of an imaged animal (“tubular” geometry). Another unusual but possible imaging geometry is that the detector panel rotates around the anterior-to-posterior axis of the animal (“pancake” geometry). The small animal radiation research platform (SARRP) developed at Johns Hopkins University employs the pancake geometry where a prone-positioned animal is rotated horizontally between an x-ray source and detector panel. This study is to assess the CBCT image quality in the pancake geometry and investigate potential methods for improvement. We compared CBCT images acquired in the pancake geometry with those acquired in the tubular geometry when the phantom/animal was placed upright simulating the conventional CBCT geometry. Results showed signal-to-noise and contrast-to-noise ratios in the pancake geometry were reduced in comparison to the tubular geometry at the same dose level. But the overall spatial resolution within the transverse plane of the imaged cylinder/animal was better in the pancake geometry. A modest exposure increase to two folds in the pancake geometry can improve image quality to a level close to the tubular geometry. Image quality can also be improved by inclining the animal, which reduces streak artifacts caused by bony structures. The major factor resulting in the inferior image quality in the pancake geometry is the elevated beam attenuation along the long axis of the phantom/animal and consequently increased scatter-to-primary ratio in that orientation. Notwithstanding, the image quality in the pancake-geometry CBCT is adequate to support image guided animal positioning, while providing unique advantages of non-coplanar and multiple mice irradiation. This study also provides useful knowledge about the image quality in the two very different imaging geometries, i.e., pancake and tubular geometry

  7. Evaluation of a cone beam computed tomography geometry for image guided small animal irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yidong; Armour, Michael; Kang-Hsin Wang, Ken; Gandhi, Nishant; Iordachita, Iulian; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey; Wong, John

    2015-07-01

    The conventional imaging geometry for small animal cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is that a detector panel rotates around the head-to-tail axis of an imaged animal (‘tubular’ geometry). Another unusual but possible imaging geometry is that the detector panel rotates around the anterior-to-posterior axis of the animal (‘pancake’ geometry). The small animal radiation research platform developed at Johns Hopkins University employs the pancake geometry where a prone-positioned animal is rotated horizontally between an x-ray source and detector panel. This study is to assess the CBCT image quality in the pancake geometry and investigate potential methods for improvement. We compared CBCT images acquired in the pancake geometry with those acquired in the tubular geometry when the phantom/animal was placed upright simulating the conventional CBCT geometry. Results showed signal-to-noise and contrast-to-noise ratios in the pancake geometry were reduced in comparison to the tubular geometry at the same dose level. But the overall spatial resolution within the transverse plane of the imaged cylinder/animal was better in the pancake geometry. A modest exposure increase to two folds in the pancake geometry can improve image quality to a level close to the tubular geometry. Image quality can also be improved by inclining the animal, which reduces streak artifacts caused by bony structures. The major factor resulting in the inferior image quality in the pancake geometry is the elevated beam attenuation along the long axis of the phantom/animal and consequently increased scatter-to-primary ratio in that orientation. Not withstanding, the image quality in the pancake-geometry CBCT is adequate to support image guided animal positioning, while providing unique advantages of non-coplanar and multiple mice irradiation. This study also provides useful knowledge about the image quality in the two very different imaging geometries, i.e. pancake and tubular geometry

  8. Evaluation of a cone beam computed tomography geometry for image guided small animal irradiation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yidong; Armour, Michael; Wang, Ken Kang-Hsin; Gandhi, Nishant; Iordachita, Iulian; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey; Wong, John

    2015-07-07

    The conventional imaging geometry for small animal cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is that a detector panel rotates around the head-to-tail axis of an imaged animal ('tubular' geometry). Another unusual but possible imaging geometry is that the detector panel rotates around the anterior-to-posterior axis of the animal ('pancake' geometry). The small animal radiation research platform developed at Johns Hopkins University employs the pancake geometry where a prone-positioned animal is rotated horizontally between an x-ray source and detector panel. This study is to assess the CBCT image quality in the pancake geometry and investigate potential methods for improvement. We compared CBCT images acquired in the pancake geometry with those acquired in the tubular geometry when the phantom/animal was placed upright simulating the conventional CBCT geometry. Results showed signal-to-noise and contrast-to-noise ratios in the pancake geometry were reduced in comparison to the tubular geometry at the same dose level. But the overall spatial resolution within the transverse plane of the imaged cylinder/animal was better in the pancake geometry. A modest exposure increase to two folds in the pancake geometry can improve image quality to a level close to the tubular geometry. Image quality can also be improved by inclining the animal, which reduces streak artifacts caused by bony structures. The major factor resulting in the inferior image quality in the pancake geometry is the elevated beam attenuation along the long axis of the phantom/animal and consequently increased scatter-to-primary ratio in that orientation. Not withstanding, the image quality in the pancake-geometry CBCT is adequate to support image guided animal positioning, while providing unique advantages of non-coplanar and multiple mice irradiation. This study also provides useful knowledge about the image quality in the two very different imaging geometries, i.e. pancake and tubular geometry, respectively.

  9. Endogenous small RNAs in grain: semi-quantification and sequence homology to human and animal genes.

    PubMed

    Ivashuta, Sergey I; Petrick, Jay S; Heisel, Sara E; Zhang, Yuanji; Guo, Liang; Reynolds, Tracey L; Rice, James F; Allen, Edwards; Roberts, James K

    2009-02-01

    Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and microRNAs (miRNAs) are effector molecules of RNA interference (RNAi), a highly conserved RNA-based gene suppression mechanism in plants, mammals and other eukaryotes. Endogenous RNAi-based gene suppression has been harnessed naturally and through conventional breeding to achieve desired plant phenotypes. The present study demonstrates that endogenous small RNAs, such as siRNAs and miRNAs, are abundant in soybean seeds, corn kernels, and rice grain, plant tissues that are traditionally used for food and feed. Numerous endogenous plant small RNAs were found to have perfect complementarity to human genes as well as those of other mammals. The abundance of endogenous small RNA molecules in grain from safely consumed food and feed crops such as soybean, corn, and rice and the homology of a number of these dietary small RNAs to human and animal genomes and transcriptomes establishes a history of safe consumption for dietary small RNAs.

  10. A dual RF resonator system for high-field functional magnetic resonance imaging of small animals.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, R; Bodgdanov, G; King, J; Allard, A; Ferris, C F

    2004-01-30

    A new apparatus has been developed that integrates an animal restrainer arrangement for small animals with an actively tunable/detunable dual radio-frequency (RF) coil system for in vivo anatomical and functional magnetic resonance imaging of small animals at 4.7 T. The radio-frequency coil features an eight-element microstrip line configuration that, in conjunction with a segmented outer copper shield, forms a transversal electromagnetic (TEM) resonator structure. Matching and active tuning/detuning is achieved through fixed/variable capacitors and a PIN diode for each resonator element. These components along with radio-frequency chokes (RFCs) and blocking capacitors are placed on two printed circuit boards (PCBs) whose copper coated ground planes form the front and back of the volume coil and are therefore an integral part of the resonator structure. The magnetic resonance signal response is received with a dome-shaped single-loop surface coil that can be height-adjustable with respect to the animal's head. The conscious animal is immobilized through a mechanical arrangement that consists of a Plexiglas body tube and a head restrainer. This restrainer has a cylindrical holder with a mouthpiece and position screws to receive and restrain the head of the animal. The apparatus is intended to perform anatomical and functional magnetic resonance imaging in conscious animals such as mice, rats, hamsters, and marmosets. Cranial images acquired from fully conscious rats in a 4.7 T Bruker 40 cm bore animal scanner underscore the feasibility of this approach and bode well to extend this system to the imaging of other animals.

  11. [Small animal image-guided radiotherapy: A new era for preclinical studies].

    PubMed

    Delpon, G; Frelin-Labalme, A-M; Heinrich, S; Beaudouin, V; Noblet, C; Begue, M; Le Deroff, C; Pouzoulet, F; Chiavassa, S

    2016-02-01

    Preclinical external beam radiotherapy irradiations used to be delivered with a static broad beam. To promote the transfer from animal to man, the preclinical treatment techniques dedicated to the animal have been optimized to be similar to those delivered to patients in clinical practice. In this context, preclinical irradiators have been developed. Due to the small sizes of the animals, and the irradiation beams, the scaling to the small animal dimensions involves specific problems. Reducing the size and energy of the irradiation beams require very high technical performance, especially for the mechanical stability of the irradiator and the spatial resolution of the imaging system. In addition, the determination of the reference absorbed dose rate must be conducted with a specific methodology and suitable detectors. To date, three systems are used for preclinical studies in France. The aim of this article is to present these new irradiators dedicated to small animals from a physicist point of view, including the commissioning and the quality control. Copyright © 2016 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Practical method for radioactivity distribution analysis in small-animal PET cancer studies

    PubMed Central

    Slavine, Nikolai V.; Antich, Peter P.

    2008-01-01

    We present a practical method for radioactivity distribution analysis in small-animal tumors and organs using positron emission tomography imaging with a calibrated source of known activity and size in the field of view. We reconstruct the imaged mouse together with a source under the same conditions, using an iterative method, Maximum Likelihood Expectation-Maximization with System Modeling, capable of delivering high resolution images. Corrections for the ratios of geometrical efficiencies, radioisotope decay in time and photon attenuation are included in the algorithm. We demonstrate reconstruction results for the amount of radioactivity within the scanned mouse in a sample study of osteolytic and osteoblastic bone metastasis from prostate cancer xenografts. Data acquisition was performed on the small-animal PET system which was tested with different radioactive sources, phantoms and animals to achieve high sensitivity and spatial resolution. Our method uses high resolution images to determine the volume of organ or tumor and the amount of their radioactivity, has the possibility of saving time, effort and the necessity to sacrifice animals. This method has utility for prognosis and quantitative analysis in small-animal cancer studies, and will enhance the assessment of characteristics of tumor growth, identifying metastases, and potentially determining the effectiveness of cancer treatment. The possible application for this technique could be useful for the organ radioactivity dosimetry studies. PMID:18667322

  13. Development of computational small animal models and their applications in preclinical imaging and therapy research.

    PubMed

    Xie, Tianwu; Zaidi, Habib

    2016-01-01

    The development of multimodality preclinical imaging techniques and the rapid growth of realistic computer simulation tools have promoted the construction and application of computational laboratory animal models in preclinical research. Since the early 1990s, over 120 realistic computational animal models have been reported in the literature and used as surrogates to characterize the anatomy of actual animals for the simulation of preclinical studies involving the use of bioluminescence tomography, fluorescence molecular tomography, positron emission tomography, single-photon emission computed tomography, microcomputed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and optical imaging. Other applications include electromagnetic field simulation, ionizing and nonionizing radiation dosimetry, and the development and evaluation of new methodologies for multimodality image coregistration, segmentation, and reconstruction of small animal images. This paper provides a comprehensive review of the history and fundamental technologies used for the development of computational small animal models with a particular focus on their application in preclinical imaging as well as nonionizing and ionizing radiation dosimetry calculations. An overview of the overall process involved in the design of these models, including the fundamental elements used for the construction of different types of computational models, the identification of original anatomical data, the simulation tools used for solving various computational problems, and the applications of computational animal models in preclinical research. The authors also analyze the characteristics of categories of computational models (stylized, voxel-based, and boundary representation) and discuss the technical challenges faced at the present time as well as research needs in the future.

  14. What scatter-hoarding animals have taught us about small-scale navigation

    PubMed Central

    Gould, Kristy L.; Kelly, Debbie M.; Kamil, Alan C.

    2010-01-01

    Many animals use cues for small-scale navigation, including beacons, landmarks, compasses and geometric properties. Scatter-hoarding animals are a unique system to study small-scale navigation. They have to remember and relocate many individual spatial locations, be fairly accurate in their searching and have to remember these locations for long stretches of time. In this article, we review what is known about cue use in both scatter-hoarding birds and rodents. We discuss the importance of local versus global cues, the encoding of bearings and geometric rules, the use of external compasses such as the Sun and the influence of the shape of experimental enclosures in relocating caches or hidden food. Scatter-hoarding animals are highly flexible in how and what they encode. There also appear to be differences in what scatter-hoarding birds and rodents encode, as well as what scatter-hoarding animals in general encode compared with other animals. Areas for future research with scatter-hoarding animals are discussed in light of what is currently known. PMID:20156815

  15. Development of computational small animal models and their applications in preclinical imaging and therapy research

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Tianwu; Zaidi, Habib

    2016-01-15

    The development of multimodality preclinical imaging techniques and the rapid growth of realistic computer simulation tools have promoted the construction and application of computational laboratory animal models in preclinical research. Since the early 1990s, over 120 realistic computational animal models have been reported in the literature and used as surrogates to characterize the anatomy of actual animals for the simulation of preclinical studies involving the use of bioluminescence tomography, fluorescence molecular tomography, positron emission tomography, single-photon emission computed tomography, microcomputed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and optical imaging. Other applications include electromagnetic field simulation, ionizing and nonionizing radiation dosimetry, and the development and evaluation of new methodologies for multimodality image coregistration, segmentation, and reconstruction of small animal images. This paper provides a comprehensive review of the history and fundamental technologies used for the development of computational small animal models with a particular focus on their application in preclinical imaging as well as nonionizing and ionizing radiation dosimetry calculations. An overview of the overall process involved in the design of these models, including the fundamental elements used for the construction of different types of computational models, the identification of original anatomical data, the simulation tools used for solving various computational problems, and the applications of computational animal models in preclinical research. The authors also analyze the characteristics of categories of computational models (stylized, voxel-based, and boundary representation) and discuss the technical challenges faced at the present time as well as research needs in the future.

  16. An intelligent flow control system for long term fluid restriction in small animals.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Can; Li, Meihua; Kawada, Toru; Uemura, Kazunori; Inagaki, Masashi; Sugimachi, Masaru

    2013-01-01

    Fluid retention is one of the most common symptoms in patients with chronic heart failure. Although fluid restriction may be a therapeutic strategy, the degree of fluid restriction necessary for the best therapeutic outcome remains unknown partly due to the lack of proper experimental method to restrict water consumption in small animals. The traditional methods that allow animals to access water only in a limited time window or within pre-determined daily volume can be stressful because the animals may become thirsty during the time of water deprivation. To provide a less stressful water restriction paradigm, we designed a feedback-control system of drinking flow to modulate the drinking behavior of small animals. This system consisted of an infrared droplet sensor for monitoring the drinking flow and a computer controlled electric valve to regulate the water availability. A light signal which synchronized with the command for opening the valve was set to establish a conditioned reflex. An animal test indicated that rats were adaptable to a precisely programmed water supply. This system may warrant investigation into the consequences of fluid restriction in chronic experimental animal study.

  17. Basic Laboratory Techniques for Students of Biology and Small Animal Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoen, Jerome; Berman, Paul

    This document provides descriptions of lessons, activities, and laboratory experiments to be used in a course on basic laboratory techniques for students in biology and small animal care. These learning experiences are designed to be completed during one class period daily for approximately 70 days per semester. (It is assumed that this would…

  18. Basic Laboratory Techniques for Students of Biology and Small Animal Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoen, Jerome; Berman, Paul

    This document provides descriptions of lessons, activities, and laboratory experiments to be used in a course on basic laboratory techniques for students in biology and small animal care. These learning experiences are designed to be completed during one class period daily for approximately 70 days per semester. (It is assumed that this would…

  19. Development of a high frame rate ultrasonic system for cardiac imaging in small animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Lei; Cannata, Jonathan M.; Johnson, Jeffrey A.; Yen, Jesse T.; Feng, Ching; Shung, K. Kirk

    2006-03-01

    Ultrasound imaging is a well established technology for echocardiography on humans. For cardiac imaging in small animals whose hearts beat at a rate higher than 300 beats per minute, the spatial and temporal resolution of current clinical ultrasonic scanners are far from ideal and simply inadequate for such applications. In this research, a real-time high frequency ultrasound imaging system was developed with a frame rate higher than 80 frames per second (fps) for cardiac applications in small animals. The device has a mechanical sector scanner using magnetic drive mechanism to reduce moving parts and ensure longevity. A very lightweight (< 0.28 g) single element transducer was specially designed and constructed for this research to achieve a frame rate of at least 80 fps. The 30-50 MHz transducers swept through an arc at the end of a pendulum for imaging the heart of small animals. The imaging electronics consisted of a low noise pulser/receiver, a high-speed data acquisition board, and digital signal processing algorithms. In vivo results on mouse embryos showed that real time ultrasound imaging at frame rate exceeding 80 fps could demonstrate detailed depiction of cardiac function with a spatial resolution of around 50 microns, which allows researchers to fully examine and monitor small animal cardiac functions.

  20. Precise image-guided irradiation of small animals: a flexible non-profit platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tillner, Falk; Thute, Prasad; Löck, Steffen; Dietrich, Antje; Fursov, Andriy; Haase, Robert; Lukas, Mathias; Rimarzig, Bernd; Sobiella, Manfred; Krause, Mechthild; Baumann, Michael; Bütof, Rebecca; Enghardt, Wolfgang

    2016-04-01

    Preclinical in vivo studies using small animals are essential to develop new therapeutic options in radiation oncology. Of particular interest are orthotopic tumour models, which better reflect the clinical situation in terms of growth patterns and microenvironmental parameters of the tumour as well as the interplay of tumours with the surrounding normal tissues. Such orthotopic models increase the technical demands and the complexity of preclinical studies as local irradiation with therapeutically relevant doses requires image-guided target localisation and accurate beam application. Moreover, advanced imaging techniques are needed for monitoring treatment outcome. We present a novel small animal image-guided radiation therapy (SAIGRT) system, which allows for precise and accurate, conformal irradiation and x-ray imaging of small animals. High accuracy is achieved by its robust construction, the precise movement of its components and a fast high-resolution flat-panel detector. Field forming and x-ray imaging is accomplished close to the animal resulting in a small penumbra and a high image quality. Feasibility for irradiating orthotopic models has been proven using lung tumour and glioblastoma models in mice. The SAIGRT system provides a flexible, non-profit academic research platform which can be adapted to specific experimental needs and therefore enables systematic preclinical trials in multicentre research networks.

  1. Small Animal Imaging using a Clinical Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography and Super-Resolution

    PubMed Central

    DiFilippo, Frank P.; Patel, Sagar; Asosingh, Kewal; Erzurum, Serpil

    2013-01-01

    Considering the high cost of dedicated small animal positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT), an acceptable alternative in many situations might be clinical PET/CT. However spatial resolution and image quality are of concern. The utility of clinical PET/CT for small-animal research and image quality improvements from super-resolution (spatial subsampling) were investigated. National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) NU 4 phantom and mouse data were acquired with a clinical PET/CT scanner, both as conventional static and stepped scans. Static scans were reconstructed with and without point spread function (PSF) modeling. Stepped images were postprocessed with iterative deconvolution to produce super-resolution images. Image quality was markedly improved using the super-resolution technique, avoiding certain artifacts produced by PSF modeling. The 2-mm rod of the NU 4 phantom was visualized with high contrast, and the major structures of the mouse were well resolved. Although not a perfect substitute for a state-of-the-art small animal PET/CT scanner, a clinical PET/CT scanner with super-resolution produces acceptable small-animal image quality for many preclinical research studies. PMID:22554485

  2. A survey for small animal veterinarians regarding flea and tick control pesticide products.

    PubMed

    Turner, Vanessa; Chaffey, Cheryl; Ferrao, Patricia

    2011-10-01

    The Canadian Veterinary Medical Association administered a survey to capture the clinical experiences of small animal veterinarians regarding adverse effects observed in cats and dogs following the use of flea and tick control pesticide products. Results of this survey are discussed and compared with pesticide incident reports collected by Health Canada.

  3. Image quality phantom and parameters for high spatial resolution small-animal SPECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visser, Eric P.; Harteveld, Anita A.; Meeuwis, Antoi P. W.; Disselhorst, Jonathan A.; Beekman, Freek J.; Oyen, Wim J. G.; Boerman, Otto C.

    2011-10-01

    At present, generally accepted standards to characterize small-animal single photon emission tomographs (SPECT) do not exist. Whereas for small-animal positron emission tomography (PET), the NEMA NU 4-2008 guidelines are available, such standards are still lacking for small-animal SPECT. More specifically, a dedicated image quality (IQ) phantom and corresponding IQ parameters are absent. The structures of the existing PET IQ phantom are too large to fully characterize the sub-millimeter spatial resolution of modern multi-pinhole SPECT scanners, and its diameter will not fit into all scanners when operating in high spatial resolution mode. We therefore designed and constructed an adapted IQ phantom with smaller internal structures and external diameter, and a facility to guarantee complete filling of the smallest rods. The associated IQ parameters were adapted from NEMA NU 4. An additional parameter, effective whole-body sensitivity, was defined since this was considered relevant in view of the variable size of the field of view and the use of multiple bed positions as encountered in modern small-animal SPECT scanners. The usefulness of the phantom was demonstrated for 99mTc in a USPECT-II scanner operated in whole-body scanning mode using a multi-pinhole mouse collimator with 0.6 mm pinhole diameter.

  4. Ultrasound techniques for the detection of tumors and metastases in small animals.

    PubMed

    Didié, Michael; Zimmermann, Wolfram-Hubertus

    2014-01-01

    Small animals are widely used for the identification of new therapeutic targets and the evaluation of potential anticancer therapies. To study tumors and metastasis in longitudinal studies of tumor progression, fast noninvasive and easy-to-handle imaging modalities are required. Here, techniques for the analysis of tumors and metastases by ultrasound imaging are described and the potential technical pitfalls are discussed.

  5. Performance evaluation of a mouse-sized camera for dynamic studies in small animals

    SciTech Connect

    Loudos, George; Majewski, Stan; Wojcik, Randy; Weisenberger, Andrew G; Sakellios, Nicolas; Nikita, Konstantina; Uzunglu, Nikolaus; Bouziotis, Penelope; Varvarigou, Alexandra

    2007-02-01

    A mouse sized camera has been built in terms of collaboration between the presenting institutions. The system is used for the performance of dynamic studies in small animals, in order to evaluate novel radiopharmaceuticals. The active area of the detector is approximately 48x96 mm allowing depiction of the entire mouse in a single view. The system is based on two flat-panel Hamamatsu H8500 position sensitive photomultiplier tubes (PSPMT), a pixellated NaI(Tl) scintillator and a copper?beryllium (CuBe) parallel-hole collimator. In this work, the evaluation results of the system are presented, using phantoms and small animals injected with conventional radiophrmaceuticals. Average resolution was ~1.6 mm on the collimator surface and increased to ~4.1 mm in 12 cm distance from the detector. The average energy resolution was measured and found to be ~15.6% for Tc{sup 99m}. Results from imaging thin capillaries demonstrated system's high resolution and sensitivity in activity variations was shown. Initial dynamic studies have been carried out in small animals injected with Tc{sup 99m}-DTPA and Tc{sup 99m}-MDP. The results show system's ability to perform kinetic imaging in small animals.

  6. Clinical canine dental radiography.

    PubMed

    Bannon, Kristin M

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide small animal veterinarians in private practice a guideline for interpretation of the most common findings in canine intraoral radiology. Normal oral and dental anatomy is presented. A brief review of variations of normal, common periodontal and endodontic pathology findings and developmental anomalies is provided.

  7. Small animal imaging platform for quantitative assessment of short-wave infrared-emitting contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Philip; Mingozzi, Marco; Higgins, Laura M.; Ganapathy, Vidya; Zevon, Margot; Riman, Richard E.; Roth, Charles M.; Moghe, Prabhas V.; Pierce, Mark C.

    2015-03-01

    We report the design, calibration, and testing of a pre-clinical small animal imaging platform for use with short-wave infrared (SWIR) emitting contrast agents. Unlike materials emitting at visible or near-infrared wavelengths, SWIR-emitting agents require detection systems with sensitivity in the 1-2 μm wavelength region, beyond the range of commercially available small animal imagers. We used a collimated 980 nm laser beam to excite rare-earth-doped NaYF4:Er,Yb nanocomposites, as an example of a SWIR emitting material under development for biomedical imaging applications. This beam was raster scanned across the animal, with fluorescence in the 1550 nm wavelength region detected by an InGaAs area camera. Background adjustment and intensity non-uniformity corrections were applied in software. The final SWIR fluorescence image was overlaid onto a standard white-light image for registration of contrast agent uptake with respect to anatomical features.

  8. Development of a training model for small animal thoracocentesis and chest tube thoracostomy.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Julie A; Fio Rito, Robin M

    2014-06-01

    Training veterinary students to perform emergency procedures, such as thoracocentesis and chest tube thoracostomy, poses challenges in terms of providing adequate hands-on experience without compromising animal welfare. A small animal thoracocentesis and chest tube thoracostomy model has been developed, that allows repetitive practice in a safe, standardised environment. The model has been incorporated into a clinical skills laboratory, where students work through computerised case studies in small groups, performing thoracocentesis or chest tube thoracostomy where indicated during the case. Student feedback indicated a high degree of satisfaction with the model and the laboratory experience, high perceived value of the case studies in improving learning, and increased confidence to perform the procedures under supervision. This model can replace the use of live animals while students are practising these procedures, improving their technique, and learning the appropriate safeguards used to prevent injuries such as pulmonary trauma. 2014 FRAME.

  9. A simple optogenetic system for behavioral analysis of freely moving small animals.

    PubMed

    Kawazoe, Yuya; Yawo, Hiromu; Kimura, Koutarou D

    2013-01-01

    We present a new and simple optogenetic system for the behavioral analysis of small animals. This system includes a strong LED ring array, a high-resolution CCD camera, and the improved channelrhodopsin ChRGR. We used the system for behavioral analysis with the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans as a model, and we found that it can stimulate ChRGR expressed in the body wall muscles of the animals to modulate the behavior. Our results indicate that this system may be suitable for optogenetic behavioral analysis of freely moving small animals under various conditions to understand the principles underlying brain functions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd and the Japan Neuroscience Society. All rights reserved.

  10. Design, construction and testing of a DC bioeffects test enclosure for small animals. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Frazier, M J; Preache, M M

    1980-11-01

    This final report describes both the engineering development of a DC bioeffects test enclosure for small laboratory animals, and the biological protocol for the use of such enclosures in the testing of animals to determine possible biological effects of the environment associated with HVDC transmission lines. The test enclosure which has been designed is a modular unit, which will house up to eight rat-sized animals in individual compartments. Multiple test enclosures can be used to test larger numbers of animals. A prototype test enclosure has been fabricated and tested to characterize its electrical performance characteristics. The test enclosure provides a simulation of the dominant environment associated with HVDC transmission lines; namely, a static electric field and an ion current density. A biological experimental design has been developed for assessing the effects of the dominant components of the HVDC transmission line environment.

  11. An environmental chamber system for prolonged metabolic studies on small animals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, J. P.; Huston, L. J.; Simmons, J. B., II; Clarkson, D. P.; Martz, W. W.; Schatte, C. L.

    1973-01-01

    Measurement of metabolic adaptation to marginally stressful environments requires both precise regulation of a variety of atmospheric factors for extended periods of time and the capacity to employ sensitive parameters in an undisturbed subject. This paper describes a metabolic chamber system which can simultaneously maintain groups of small animals in two completely separate closed environments having different pressures, temperatures and gas compositions for an indefinite period. Oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production, food and water consumption and animal activity cycles can be continuously monitored and quantified 24 h per day while the animals are in an unrestrained state. Each chamber can be serviced and the animals handled, injected and sacrificed without subjecting them to barometric stress. Several unique electrical and mechanical components allow semi-automated data collection on a continuous basis for indefinite periods of time.

  12. An environmental chamber system for prolonged metabolic studies on small animals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, J. P.; Huston, L. J.; Simmons, J. B., II; Clarkson, D. P.; Martz, W. W.; Schatte, C. L.

    1973-01-01

    Measurement of metabolic adaptation to marginally stressful environments requires both precise regulation of a variety of atmospheric factors for extended periods of time and the capacity to employ sensitive parameters in an undisturbed subject. This paper describes a metabolic chamber system which can simultaneously maintain groups of small animals in two completely separate closed environments having different pressures, temperatures and gas compositions for an indefinite period. Oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production, food and water consumption and animal activity cycles can be continuously monitored and quantified 24 h per day while the animals are in an unrestrained state. Each chamber can be serviced and the animals handled, injected and sacrificed without subjecting them to barometric stress. Several unique electrical and mechanical components allow semi-automated data collection on a continuous basis for indefinite periods of time.

  13. Partial body irradiation of small laboratory animals with an industrial X-ray tube.

    PubMed

    Frenzel, Thorsten; Grohmann, Carsten; Schumacher, Udo; Krüll, Andreas

    2014-12-01

    Dedicated precise small laboratory animal irradiation sources are needed for basic cancer research and to meet this need expensive high precision radiation devices have been developed. To avoid such expenses a cost efficient way is presented to construct a device for partial body irradiation of small laboratory animals by adding specific components to an industrial X-ray tube. A custom made radiation field tube was added to an industrial 200 kV X-ray tube. A light field display as well as a monitor ionization chamber were implemented. The field size can rapidly be changed by individual inserts of MCP96 that are used for secondary collimation of the beam. Depth dose curves and cross sectional profiles were determined with the use of a custom made water phantom. More components like positioning lasers, a custom made treatment couch, and a commercial isoflurane anesthesia unit were added to complete the system. With the accessories described secondary small field sizes down to 10 by 10 mm2 (secondary collimator size) could be achieved. The dosimetry of the beam was constructed like those for conventional stereotactical clinical linear accelerators. The water phantom created showed an accuracy of 1 mm and was well suited for all measurements. With the anesthesia unit attached to the custom made treatment couch the system is ideal for the radiation treatment of small laboratory animals like mice. It was feasible to shrink the field size of an industrial X-ray tube from whole animal irradiation to precise partial body irradiation of small laboratory animals. Even smaller secondary collimator sizes than 10 by 10 mm2 are feasible with adequate secondary collimator inserts. Our custom made water phantom was well suited for the basic dosimetry of the X-ray tube. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  14. 8. VIEW OF RADIOGRAPHY EQUIPMENT, TEST METHODS INCLUDED RADIOGRAPHY AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. VIEW OF RADIOGRAPHY EQUIPMENT, TEST METHODS INCLUDED RADIOGRAPHY AND BETA BACKSCATTERING. (7/13/56) - Rocky Flats Plant, Non-Nuclear Production Facility, South of Cottonwood Avenue, west of Seventh Avenue & east of Building 460, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  15. Development of a combined microSPECT/CT system for small animal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Mingshan

    Modern advances in the biomedical sciences have placed increased attention on small animals such as mice and rats as models of human biology and disease in biological research and pharmaceutical development. Their small size and fast breeding rate, their physiologic similarity to human, and, more importantly, the availability of sophisticated genetic manipulations, all have made mice and rats the laboratory mammals of choice in these experimental studies. However, the increased use of small animals in biomedical research also calls for new instruments that can measure the anatomic and metabolic information noninvasively with adequate spatial resolution and measurement sensitivity to facilitate these studies. This dissertation describes the engineering development of a combined single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and X-ray computed tomography (CT) system dedicated for small animals imaging. The system aims to obtain both the anatomic and metabolic images with submillimeter spatial resolution in a way that the data can be correlated to provide improved image quality and to offer more complete biological evaluation for biomedical studies involving small animals. The project requires development of complete microSPECT and microCT subsystems. Both subsystems are configured with a shared gantry and animal bed with integrated instrumentation for data acquisition and system control. The microCT employs a microfocus X-ray tube and a CCD-based detector for low noise, high resolution imaging. The microSPECT utilizes three semiconductor detectors coupled with pinhole collimators. A significant contribution of this dissertation project is the development of iterative algorithms with geometrical compensation that allows radionuclide images to be reconstructed at submillimeter spatial resolution, but with significantly higher detection efficiency than conventional methods. Both subsystems are capable of helical scans, offering lengthened field of view and improved

  16. Assessment of cardiac function and myocardial morphology using small animal Look-Locker inversion recovery (SALLI) MRI in rats.

    PubMed

    Jeuthe, Sarah; O H-Ici, Darach; Kemnitz, Ulrich; Dietrich, Thore; Schnackenburg, Bernhard; Berger, Felix; Kuehne, Titus; Messroghli, Daniel

    2013-07-19

    Small animal magnetic resonance imaging is an important tool to study cardiac function and changes in myocardial tissue. The high heart rates of small animals (200 to 600 beats/min) have previously limited the role of CMR imaging. Small animal Look-Locker inversion recovery (SALLI) is a T1 mapping sequence for small animals to overcome this problem. T1 maps provide quantitative information about tissue alterations and contrast agent kinetics. It is also possible to detect diffuse myocardial processes such as interstitial fibrosis or edema. Furthermore, from a single set of image data, it is possible to examine heart function and myocardial scarring by generating cine and inversion recovery-prepared late gadolinium enhancement-type MR images. The presented video shows step-by-step the procedures to perform small animal CMR imaging. Here it is presented with a healthy Sprague-Dawley rat, however naturally it can be extended to different cardiac small animal models.

  17. Photoacoustic tomography of small animal brain with a curved array transducer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xinmai; Maurudis, Anastasios; Gamelin, John; Aguirre, Andres; Zhu, Quing; Wang, Lihong V

    2009-01-01

    We present the application of a curved array photoacoustic tomographic imaging system that can provide rapid, high-resolution photoacoustic imaging of small animal brains. The system is optimized to produce a B-mode, 90-deg field-of-view image at sub-200-microm resolution at a frame rate of approximately 1 frame/second when a 10-Hz pulse repetition rate laser is employed. By rotating samples, a complete 360-deg scan can be achieved within 15 s. In previous work, two-dimensional (2-D) ex vivo mouse brain cortex imaging has been reported. We report three-dimensional (3-D) small animal brain imaging obtained with the curved array system. The results are presented as a series of 2-D cross-sectional images. Besides structural imaging, the blood oxygen saturation of the animal brain cortex is also measured in vivo. In addition, the system can measure the time-resolved relative changes in blood oxygen saturation level in the small animal brain cortex. Last, ultrasonic gel coupling, instead of the previously adopted water coupling, is conveniently used in near-real-time 2-D imaging.

  18. Multiplane spectroscopic whole-body photoacoustic imaging of small animals in vivo.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Mansik; Kim, Jeesu; Kim, Chulhong

    2016-03-01

    We have successfully developed a multiscale acoustic-resolution photoacoustic tomography system in a single imaging platform. By switching between ultrasound transducers (center frequencies 5 and 40 MHz) and optical condensers, we have photoacoustically imaged microvasculatures of small animals in vivo at different scales. Further, we have extended the field of view of our imaging system to entire bodies of small animals. At different imaging planes, we have noninvasively imaged the major blood vessels (e.g., descending aorta, intercostal vessels, cephalic vessels, brachial vessels, femoral vessels, popliteal vessels, lateral marginal vessels, cranial mesenteric vessels, mammalian vessels, carotid artery, jugular vein, subclavian vessels, iliac vessels, and caudal vessels) as well as intact internal organs (e.g., spleen, liver, kidney, intestine, cecum, and spinal cord) of the animals in vivo. The spectroscopic whole-body photoacoustic imaging clearly reveals the spectral responses of the internal structures. Similar to other existing preclinical whole-body imaging systems, this whole-body photoacoustic tomography can be a useful tool for small-animal research.

  19. Radiography of the Paranasal Sinuses

    MedlinePlus

    ... your back or over your lap. This head. Radiography of the paranasal sinuses apron will protect your ... face, especially when lowering his or her head. Radiography of sitting and others while you are standing. ...

  20. Animal production systems of small farms in the Kaski district of Nepal.

    PubMed

    Redding, Laurel; Chetri, Dipesh Kumar; Lamichhane, Dirga Kumar; Chay, Yoon; Aldinger, Lauren; Ferguson, James

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this study was to describe animal production on small farms in the Kaski district of Nepal, with the goal of identifying areas where animal health and productivity could be improved. Eighty-five randomly selected farms from four different Village Development Committees were visited. Farmers were interviewed and premises and animals visually inspected on all farms. Feed samples were collected from a subset of farms. The most commonly kept species were water buffalo (used for milk and meat), cattle (used for milk and labor), and goats (used for meat). Average milk production levels were 4.7 kg/day for water buffalo and 1.9 kg/day for cattle. All animals were milked manually, no calves were weaned, and only one farm practiced artificial insemination. A majority of cattle and goats had access to pasture, and a majority of farms fed their working or producing animals concentrates; however, nutritional input was insufficient in terms of energy, protein, and micronutrient content to increase levels of production. Goat-raising was the most profitable endeavor, followed by water buffalo and cattle. We conclude that animals have the potential to contribute significantly to improved livelihoods of farmers in terms of both income generation and non-tangible benefits. However, we found that significant constraints on animal production exist, including insufficient nutritional levels and a lack of preventative care resulting in animal disease. Furthermore, cultural considerations reflecting attitudes toward cattle shape farming in ways that may limit production. Nevertheless, targeted interventions that improve animal health and productivity are possible without being cost prohibitive.

  1. The evaluation of 6 and 18 MeV electron beams for small animal irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, T. C.; Chen, A. M.; Tu, S. J.; Tung, C. J.; Hong, J. H.; Lee, C. C.

    2009-10-01

    A small animal irradiator is critical for providing optimal radiation dose distributions for pre-clinical animal studies. This paper focuses on the evaluation of using 6 or 18 MeV electron beams as small animal irradiators. Compared with all other prototypes which use photons to irradiate small animals, an electron irradiator has many advantages in its shallow dose distribution. Two major approaches including simulation and measurement were used to evaluate the feasibility of applying electron beams in animal irradiation. These simulations and measurements were taken in three different fields (a 6 cm × 6 cm square field, and 4 mm and 30 mm diameter circular fields) and with two different energies (6 MeV and 18 MeV). A PTW Semiflex chamber in a PTW-MP3 water tank, a PTW Markus chamber type 23343, a PTW diamond detector type 60003 and KODAK XV films were used to measure PDDs, lateral beam profiles and output factors for either optimizing parameters of Monte Carlo simulation or to verify Monte Carlo simulation in small fields. Results show good agreement for comparisons of percentage depth doses (<=2.5% for 6 MeV e; <=1.8% for 18 MeV e) and profiles (FWHM <= 0.5 mm) between simulations and measurements on the 6 cm field. Greater deviation can be observed in the 4 mm field, which is mainly caused by the partial volume effects of the detectors. The FWHM of the profiles for the 18 MeV electron beam is 32.6 mm in the 30 mm field, and 4.7 mm in the 4 mm field at d90. It will take 1-13 min to complete one irradiation of 5-10 Gy. In addition, two different digital phantoms were also constructed, including a homogeneous cylindrical water phantom and a CT-based heterogeneous mouse phantom, and were implemented into Monte Carlo to simulate dose distribution with different electron irradiations.

  2. Real-time radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Bossi, R.H.; Oien, C.T.

    1981-02-26

    Real-time radiography is used for imaging both dynamic events and static objects. Fluorescent screens play an important role in converting radiation to light, which is then observed directly or intensified and detected. The radiographic parameters for real-time radiography are similar to conventional film radiography with special emphasis on statistics and magnification. Direct-viewing fluoroscopy uses the human eye as a detector of fluorescent screen light or the light from an intensifier. Remote-viewing systems replace the human observer with a television camera. The remote-viewing systems have many advantages over the direct-viewing conditions such as safety, image enhancement, and the capability to produce permanent records. This report reviews real-time imaging system parameters and components.

  3. Force plate for measuring small animal forces by digital speckle pattern interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arroyo, M. Pilar; Bea, José Antonio; Andrés, Nieves; Osta, Rosario; Doblaré, Manuel

    2007-06-01

    This paper presents a force plate specially designed for measuring ground reaction forces in small animals. Digital Speckle Pattern Interferometry (DSPI) is used to measure the plate deformation produced by the animal. Elasticity theory is used to obtain force magnitude and application position from the vertical displacement field measured with DSPI. The force plate has been tested with static weights of 5g and 10g at various locations on the plate. Some experiments with 20g body weight transgenic mice are also reported.

  4. Small-Animal Molecular Imaging for Preclinical Cancer Research: .μPET and μ.SPECT.

    PubMed

    Cuccurullo, Vincenzo; Di Stasio, Giuseppe D; Schillirò, Maria L; Mansi, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Due to different sizes of humans and rodents, the performance of clinical imaging devices is not enough for a scientifically reliable evaluation in mice and rats; therefore dedicated small-animal systems with a much higher sensitivity and spatial resolution, compared to the ones used in humans, are required. Smallanimal imaging represents a cutting-edge research method able to approach an enormous variety of pathologies in which animal models of disease may be used to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the human condition and/or to allow a translational pharmacological (or other) evaluation of therapeutic tools. Molecular imaging, avoiding animal sacrifice, permits repetitive (i.e. longitudinal) studies on the same animal which becomes its own control. In this way also the over time evaluation of disease progression or of the treatment response is enabled. Many different rodent models have been applied to study almost all kind of human pathologies or to experiment a wide series of drugs and/or other therapeutic instruments. In particular, relevant information has been achieved in oncology by in vivo neoplastic phenotypes, obtained through procedures such as subcutaneous tumor grafts, surgical transplantation of solid tumor, orthotopic injection of tumor cells into specific organs/sites of interest, genetic modification of animals to promote tumor-genesis; in this way traditional or innovative treatments, also including gene therapy, of animals with a cancer induced by a known carcinogen may be experimented. Each model has its own disadvantage but, comparing different studies, it is possible to achieve a panoramic and therefore substantially reliable view on the specific subject. Small-animal molecular imaging has become an invaluable component of modern biomedical research that will gain probably an increasingly important role in the next few years.

  5. Monitoring of small laboratory animal experiments by a designated web-based database.

    PubMed

    Frenzel, T; Grohmann, C; Schumacher, U; Krüll, A

    2015-10-01

    Multiple-parametric small animal experiments require, by their very nature, a sufficient number of animals which may need to be large to obtain statistically significant results.(1) For this reason database-related systems are required to collect the experimental data as well as to support the later (re-) analysis of the information gained during the experiments. In particular, the monitoring of animal welfare is simplified by the inclusion of warning signals (for instance, loss in body weight >20%). Digital patient charts have been developed for human patients but are usually not able to fulfill the specific needs of animal experimentation. To address this problem a unique web-based monitoring system using standard MySQL, PHP, and nginx has been created. PHP was used to create the HTML-based user interface and outputs in a variety of proprietary file formats, namely portable document format (PDF) or spreadsheet files. This article demonstrates its fundamental features and the easy and secure access it offers to the data from any place using a web browser. This information will help other researchers create their own individual databases in a similar way. The use of QR-codes plays an important role for stress-free use of the database. We demonstrate a way to easily identify all animals and samples and data collected during the experiments. Specific ways to record animal irradiations and chemotherapy applications are shown. This new analysis tool allows the effective and detailed analysis of huge amounts of data collected through small animal experiments. It supports proper statistical evaluation of the data and provides excellent retrievable data storage.

  6. An automated robot arm system for small animal tissue biopsy under dual-image modality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Y. H.; Wu, T. H.; Lin, M. H.; Yang, C. C.; Guo, W. Y.; Wang, Z. J.; Chen, C. L.; Lee, J. S.

    2006-12-01

    The ability to non-invasively monitor cell biology in vivo is one of the most important goals of molecular imaging. Imaging procedures could be inter-subject performed repeatedly at different investigating stages; thereby need not sacrifice small animals during the entire study period. Thus, the ultimate goal of this study was to design a stereotactic image-guided system for small animals and integrated it with an automatic robot arm for in vivo tissue biopsy analysis. The system was composed of three main parts, including one small animal stereotactic frame, one imaging-fusion software and an automatic robot arm system. The system has been thoroughly evaluated with three components; the robot position accuracy was 0.05±0.02 mm, the image registration accuracy was 0.37±0.18 mm and the system integration was satisfactorily within 1.20±0.39 mm of error. From these results, the system demonstrated sufficient accuracy to guide the micro-injector from the planned delivery routes into practice. The entire system accuracy was limited by the image fusion and orientation procedures, due to its nature of the blurred PET imaging obtained from the small objects. The primary improvement is to acquire as higher resolution as possible the fused imaging for localizing the targets in the future.

  7. A combined method of small-angle neutron scattering and neutron radiography to visualize water in an operating fuel cell over a wide length scale from nano to millimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwase, H.; Koizumi, S.; Iikura, H.; Matsubayashi, M.; Yamaguchi, D.; Maekawa, Y.; Hashimoto, T.

    2009-06-01

    In order to visualize water generated in an operating polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC), a neutron radiography (NR) apparatus, composed of a scintillator, optical mirrors and a CCD camera, was installed at a sample position of the focusing and polarized neutron small-angle scattering (SANS) spectrometer (SANS-J-II) at research reactor JRR-3 at Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Japan. By combining SANS and NR, we aim to cover a wide length scale from nanometer to millimeter. The new method succeeded in detecting a spatial distribution of the water generated in individual cell elements; NR detected the water in a gas diffusion layer and a flow field, whereas SANS quantitatively determines the water content in a membrane electrode assembly (MEA).

  8. Cone beam computed tomography and intraoral radiography for diagnosis of dental abnormalities in dogs and cats

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Luiz Antonio F.; Barriviera, Mauricio; Januário, Alessandro L.; Bezerra, Ana Cristina B.; Fioravanti, Maria Clorinda S.

    2011-01-01

    The development of veterinary dentistry has substantially improved the ability to diagnose canine and feline dental abnormalities. Consequently, examinations previously performed only on humans are now available for small animals, thus improving the diagnostic quality. This has increased the need for technical qualification of veterinary professionals and increased technological investments. This study evaluated the use of cone beam computed tomography and intraoral radiography as complementary exams for diagnosing dental abnormalities in dogs and cats. Cone beam computed tomography was provided faster image acquisition with high image quality, was associated with low ionizing radiation levels, enabled image editing, and reduced the exam duration. Our results showed that radiography was an effective method for dental radiographic examination with low cost and fast execution times, and can be performed during surgical procedures. PMID:22122905

  9. Prompt-gamma neutron activation analysis facility for in vivo body composition studies in small animals.

    PubMed

    Stamatelatos, I E; Kasviki, K; Green, S; Gainey, M; Kalef-Ezra, J; Beddoe, A

    2004-05-01

    The design, calibration, dosimetry and performance evaluation of a prompt-gamma neutron activation analysis facility for in vivo body composition studies in small animals (i.e. rats or rabbits) is discussed. The system design was guided by Monte Carlo transport calculations using MCNP-4C code. A system was built and performance evaluation was made using a 185-GBq Pu-Be neutron source. Prompt-gamma rays produced by neutron capture reactions were detected by a combination of a NaI(Tl) scintillation and a HPGe semiconductor detectors. Nitrogen and chlorine were quantified by analysis of the 10.83-MeV and 6.11-MeV peaks, respectively. Appropriate corrections for the animal body size were determined. The facility described allows the in vivo determination of protein and extracellular space in sets of experimental animals.

  10. Lightweight, multi-contact, slip-ring commutator for recording and stimulation with small animals.

    PubMed

    Micco, D J

    1977-01-01

    A slip-ring commutator which can be used to electrically stimulate and/or record from the brains of small, unrestrained animals is described. In addition to providing 4 to 10 independent electrical contacts, featues of this model include its small size, low torque characteristics, low rate of contact oxidation, and minimal noise generated at the brush-ring surface. The compactness and light weight of this unit permit it to be suspended from a counterweighted boom assembly, thus providing additional freedom for vertical movement.

  11. Imbibition dynamics on surfaces of legs of a small animal and on artificial surfaces mimicking them

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tani, Marie; Ishii, Daisuke; Ito, Shuto; Hariyama, Takahiko; Shimomura, Masatsugu; Okumura, Ko

    2014-03-01

    Recently, imbibition of textured surfaces covered with homogeneous micro-pillar arrays has been actively studied partly because of the potential for transport of a small amount of liquids. In most cases, the dynamics is described by the Washburn law, in which the imbibition distance scales with the square root of elapsed time, while a different scaling law has been recently found. In this study, we studied imbibition on legs of a small animal that absorbs water via its legs to find yet another scaling law. Furthermore, imbibition of artificial surfaces mimicking the leg surface was found to be described well by a composite theory.

  12. Small animal PET scanner based on monolithic LYSO crystals: performance evaluation.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, F; Moliner, L; Correcher, C; Gonzalez, A; Orero, A; Carles, M; Soriano, A; Rodriguez-Alvarez, M J; Medina, L A; Mora, F; Benlloch, J M

    2012-02-01

    The authors have developed a small animal Positron emission tomography (PET) scanner based on monolithic LYSO crystals coupled to multi-anode photomultiplier tubes (MA-PMTs). In this study, the authors report on the design, calibration procedure, and performance evaluation of a PET system that the authors have developed using this innovative nonpixelated detector design. The scanner is made up of eight compact modules forming an octagon with an axial field of view (FOV) of 40 mm and a transaxial FOV of 80 mm diameter. In order to fully determine its performance, a recently issued National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) NU-4 protocol, specifically developed for small animal PET scanners, has been followed. By measuring the width of light distribution collected in the MA-PMT the authors are able to determine depth of interaction (DOI), thus making the proper identification of lines of response (LORs) with large incidence angles possible. PET performances are compared with those obtained with currently commercially available small animal PET scanners. At axial center when the point-like source is located at 5 mm from the radial center, the spatial resolution measured was 1.65, 1.80, and 1.86 mm full width at half maximum (FWHM) for radial, tangential, and axial image profiles, respectively. A system scatter fraction of 7.5% (mouse-like phantom) and 13% (rat-like phantom) was obtained, while the maximum noise equivalent count rate (NECR) was 16.9 kcps at 12.7 MBq (0.37 MBq/ml) for mouse-like phantom and 12.8 kcps at 12.4 MBq (0.042 MBq/ml) for rat-like phantom The peak absolute sensitivity in the center of the FOV is 2% for a 30% peak energy window. Several animal images are also presented. The overall performance of our small animal PET is comparable to that obtained with much more complex crystal pixelated PET systems. Moreover, the new proposed PET produces high-quality images suitable for studies with small animals.

  13. Small Animal Imaging Center Design: The Facility at the UCLA Crump Institute for Molecular Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Stout, David B.; Chatziioannou, Arion F.; Lawson, Timothy P.; Silverman, Robert W.; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.; Phelps, Michael E.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The growing number of mouse and rat experiments, coupled with advances in small-animal imaging systems such as microPET®, optical, microCAT™, microMR, ultrasound and microSPECT, has necessitated a common technical center for imaging small animals. Procedures At the UCLA Crump Institute for Molecular Imaging, we have designed and built a facility to support the research interests of a wide range of investigators from multiple disciplines. Requirements to satisfy both research and regulatory oversight have been critically examined. Support is provided for investigator training, study scheduling, data acquisition, archiving, image display, and analysis. Results The center has been in operation for more than 18 months, supporting more than 13,000 individual imaging procedures. Conclusions We have created a facility that maximizes our resource utilization while providing optimal investigator support, as well as the means to continually improve the quality and diversity of the science by integrating physical and biological sciences. PMID:16261425

  14. Small animal models to understand pathogenesis of osteoarthritis and use of stem cell in cartilage regeneration.

    PubMed

    Piombo, Virginia

    2017-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the most common diseases, which affect the correct functionality of synovial joints and is characterized by articular cartilage degradation. Limitation in the treatment of OA is mostly due to the very limited regenerative characteristic of articular cartilage once is damaged. Small animal models are of particular importance for mechanistic analysis to understand the processes that affect cartilage degradation. Combination of joint injury techniques with the use of stem cells has been shown to be an important tool for understanding the processes of cartilage degradation and regeneration. Implementation of stem cells and small animal models are important tools to help researchers to find a solution that could ameliorate and prevent the symptoms of OA. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Experimental Acquisitions with ^125I on a Small Animal SPECT Device*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knott, Kevin; Welsh, Robert E.; Bradley, Eric L.; Saha, Margaret S.; Kross, Brian; Majewski, Stan; Popov, Vladimir; Smith, Mark F.; Weisenberger, Andrew G.; Wojcik, Randolph

    2001-04-01

    We have performed single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) studies on a small animal scanning system for which the detector employed position sensitive phototubes (125 mm dia. Hamamatsu R3292 and 18 x 18 mm Hamamatsu M-64) coupled to pixelated scintillators CsI(Tl) and CsI(Na) Phantom acquisitions were used to investigate the effects of angular sampling and scan time on reconstructed image quality and noise. Results from these studies will be described and extended to in vivo studies with small animals. *Supported in part by the Thomas F. and Kate Miller Jeffress Trust, the Department of Energy, The American Diabetes Association, The National Science Foundation, the Howard Hughes Foundation and the Virginia Commonwealth Health Research Board.

  16. Computer- and robot-assisted stereotaxy for high-precision small animal brain exploration.

    PubMed

    Ramrath, Lukas; Vogt, Simon; Jensen, Winnie; Hofmann, Ulrich G; Schweikard, Achim

    2009-02-01

    This contribution introduces a computer- and robot-assisted framework for stereotactic neurosurgery on small animals. Two major elements of this framework are presented in detail: a robotic stereotactic assistant and the software framework for placement of probes into the brain. The latter integrates modules for registration, insertion control, and preoperative path planning. Two options for path planning are addressed: (a) atlas-based planning and (b) image-based planning based on computed tomography data. The framework is tested performing robot-assisted insertion of microelectrodes and acquisition of electrophysiological recordings in vivo. Concepts for data analysis pointing towards a mapping of position and neural structure to functional data are introduced. Results show that the presented framework allows precise small animal stereotaxy and therefore offers new options for brain research.

  17. Angle correction for small animal tumor imaging with spatial frequency domain imaging (SFDI)

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yanyu; Tabassum, Syeda; Piracha, Shaheer; Nandhu, Mohan Sobhana; Viapiano, Mariano; Roblyer, Darren

    2016-01-01

    Spatial frequency domain imaging (SFDI) is a widefield imaging technique that allows for the quantitative extraction of tissue optical properties. SFDI is currently being explored for small animal tumor imaging, but severe imaging artifacts occur for highly curved surfaces (e.g. the tumor edge). We propose a modified Lambertian angle correction, adapted from the Minnaert correction method for satellite imagery, to account for tissue surface angles up to 75°. The method was tested in a hemisphere phantom study as well as a small animal tumor model. The proposed method reduced µa and µs` extraction errors by an average of 64% and 16% respectively compared to performing no angle correction, and provided more physiologically agreeable optical property and chromophore values on tumors. PMID:27375952

  18. Measurement of the toughness of bone: A tutorial with special reference to small animal studies✩

    PubMed Central

    Ritchie, R.O.; Koester, K.J.; Ionova, S.; Yao, W.; Lane, N.E.; Ager, J.W.

    2013-01-01

    Quantitative assessment of the strength and toughness of bone has become an integral part of many biological and bioengineering studies on the structural properties of bone and their degradation due to aging, disease and therapeutic treatment. Whereas the biomechanical techniques for characterizing bone strength are well documented, few studies have focused on the theory, methodology, and various experimental procedures for evaluating the fracture toughness of bone, i.e., its resistance to fracture, with particular reference to whole bone testing in small animal studies. In this tutorial, we consider the many techniques for evaluating toughness and assess their specific relevance and application to the mechanical testing of small animal bones. Parallel experimental studies on wild-type rat and mouse femurs are used to evaluate the utility of these techniques and specifically to determine the coefficient of variation of the measured toughness values. PMID:18647665

  19. Characterization of a high-purity germanium detector for small-animal SPECT.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Lindsay C; Campbell, Desmond L; Hull, Ethan L; Peterson, Todd E

    2011-09-21

    We present an initial evaluation of a mechanically cooled, high-purity germanium double-sided strip detector as a potential gamma camera for small-animal SPECT. It is 90 mm in diameter and 10 mm thick with two sets of 16 orthogonal strips that have a 4.5 mm width with a 5 mm pitch. We found an energy resolution of 0.96% at 140 keV, an intrinsic efficiency of 43.3% at 122 keV and a FWHM spatial resolution of approximately 1.5 mm. We demonstrated depth-of-interaction estimation capability through comparison of pinhole acquisitions with a point source on and off axes. Finally, a flood-corrected flood image exhibited a strip-level uniformity of less than 1%. This high-purity germanium offers many desirable properties for small-animal SPECT.

  20. Tumor glucose metabolism imaged in vivo in small animals with whole-body photoacoustic computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Chatni, Muhammad Rameez; Xia, Jun; Sohn, Rebecca; Maslov, Konstantin; Guo, Zijian; Zhang, Yu; Wang, Kun; Xia, Younan; Anastasio, Mark; Arbeit, Jeffrey; Wang, Lihong V

    2012-07-01

    With the increasing use of small animals for human disease studies, small-animal whole-body molecular imaging plays an important role in biomedical research. Currently, none of the existing imaging modalities can provide both anatomical and glucose molecular information, leading to higher costs of building dual-modality systems. Even with image co-registration, the spatial resolution of the molecular imaging modality is not improved. Utilizing a ring-shaped confocal photoacoustic computed tomography system, we demonstrate, for the first time, that both anatomy and glucose uptake can be imaged in a single modality. Anatomy was imaged with the endogenous hemoglobin contrast, and glucose metabolism was imaged with a near-infrared dye-labeled 2-deoxyglucose.

  1. Tumor glucose metabolism imaged in vivo in small animals with whole-body photoacoustic computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatni, Muhammad Rameez; Xia, Jun; Sohn, Rebecca; Maslov, Konstantin; Guo, Zijian; Zhang, Yu; Wang, Kun; Xia, Younan; Anastasio, Mark; Arbeit, Jeffrey; Wang, Lihong V.

    2012-07-01

    With the increasing use of small animals for human disease studies, small-animal whole-body molecular imaging plays an important role in biomedical research. Currently, none of the existing imaging modalities can provide both anatomical and glucose molecular information, leading to higher costs of building dual-modality systems. Even with image co-registration, the spatial resolution of the molecular imaging modality is not improved. Utilizing a ring-shaped confocal photoacoustic computed tomography system, we demonstrate, for the first time, that both anatomy and glucose uptake can be imaged in a single modality. Anatomy was imaged with the endogenous hemoglobin contrast, and glucose metabolism was imaged with a near-infrared dye-labeled 2-deoxyglucose.

  2. Attenuation correction for small animal SPECT imaging using x-ray CT data

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Andrew B.; Hasegawa, Bruce H.

    2005-09-15

    Photon attenuation in small animal nuclear medicine scans can be significant when using isotopes that emit lower energy photons such as iodine-125. We have developed a method to use microCT data to perform attenuation corrected small animal single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). A microCT calibration phantom was first imaged, and the resulting calibration curve was used to convert microCT image values to linear attenuation coefficient values that were then used in an iterative SPECT reconstruction algorithm. This method was applied to reconstruct a SPECT image of a uniform phantom filled with {sup 125}I-NaI. Without attenuation correction, the image suffered a 30% decrease in intensity in the center of the image, which was removed with the addition of attenuation correction. This reduced the relative standard deviation in the region of interest from 10% to 6%.

  3. Thick Silicon Double-Sided Strip Detectors for Low-Energy Small-Animal SPECT

    PubMed Central

    Shokouhi, Sepideh; McDonald, Benjamin S.; Durko, Heather L.; Fritz, Mark A.; Furenlid, Lars R.; Peterson, Todd E.

    2010-01-01

    This work presents characterization studies of thick silicon double-sided strip detectors for a high-resolution small-animal SPECT. The dimension of these detectors is 60.4 mm × 60.4 mm × 1 mm. There are 1024 strips on each side that give the coordinates of the photon interaction, with each strip processed by a separate ASIC channel. Our measurement shows that intrinsic spatial resolution equivalent to the 59 μm strip pitch is attainable. Good trigger uniformity can be achieved by proper setting of a 4-bit DAC in each ASIC channel to remove trigger threshold variations. This is particularly important for triggering at low energies. The thick silicon DSSD (Double-sided strip detector) shows high potential for small-animal SPECT. PMID:20686626

  4. Performance Evaluation of a Dedicated Camera Suitable for Dynamic Radiopharmaceuticals Evaluation in Small Animals

    SciTech Connect

    Loudos, George; Majewski, Stanislaw; Wojcik, Randolph; Weisenberger, Andrew; Sakelios, Nikolas; Nikita, Konstantina; Uzunoglu, Nikolaos; Bouziotis, Penelope; Xanthopoulos, Stavros; Varvarigou, Alexandra

    2007-06-01

    As the result of a collaboration between the Detector and Imaging Group of Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (US), the Institute of Radioisotopes and Radiodiagnostic Products (IRRP) of N.C.S.R. ldquoDemokritosrdquo and the Biomedical Simulations and Imaging Applications Laboratory (BIOSIM) of National Technical University of Athens (Greece), a mouse sized camera optimized for Tc^99m imaging was developed. The detector was built in Jefferson Lab and transferred to Greece, where it was evaluated with phantoms and small animals. The system will be used initially for planar dynamic studies in small animals, in order to assess the performance of new radiolabeled biomolecules for oncological studies. The active area of the detector is approximately 48 mm times 96 mm. It is based on two flat-panel Hamamatsu H8500 position sensitive photomultiplier tubes (PSPMT), a pixelated NaI(Tl) scintillator and a high resolution lead parallel-hole collimator. The system was developed to optim

  5. Characterization of a high-purity germanium detector for small-animal SPECT

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Lindsay C; Campbell, Desmond L; Hull, Ethan L; Peterson, Todd E

    2011-01-01

    We present an initial evaluation of a mechanically-cooled, high-purity germanium double-sided strip detector as a potential gamma camera for small-animal SPECT. It is 90 mm in diameter and 10 mm thick with two sets of 16 orthogonal strips that have a 4.5 mm width with a 5 mm pitch. We found an energy resolution of 0.96% at 140 keV, an intrinsic efficiency of 43.3% at 122 keV and a FWHM spatial resolution of approximately 1.5 mm. We demonstrated depth-of-interaction estimation capability through comparison of pinhole acquisitions with a point source on and off axis. Finally, a flood-corrected-flood image exhibited a strip-level uniformity of less than 1%. This high-purity germanium offers many desirable properties for small-animal SPECT. PMID:21852723

  6. Increased concentration of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus sp. in small animals exposed to aerospace environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guthrie, R. K.

    1976-01-01

    The effects of increased concentrations of PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA AND STAPHYLOCOCCUS in the total bacterial flora of small animals exposed to simulated spacecraft environments were evaluated. Tests to detect changes in infectivity, effects of antibiotic treatments, immune responses to bacterial antigens, and effectiveness of immune responses in the experimental environment were conducted. The most significant results appear to be the differences in immune responses at simulated altitudes and the production of infection in the presence of a specific antibody.

  7. Development of an ultrahigh resolution Si-PM based PET system for small animals.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Watabe, Hiroshi; Kanai, Yasukazu; Watabe, Tadashi; Kato, Katsuhiko; Hatazawa, Jun

    2013-11-07

    Since a high resolution PET system is needed for small animal imaging, especially for mouse studies, we developed a new small animal PET system that decreased the size of the scintillators to less than 1 mm. Our developed PET system used 0.5 × 0.7 × 5 mm(3) LYSO pixels arranged in an 11 × 13 matrix to form a block with a 0.1 mm BaSO4 reflector between the pixels. Two LYSO blocks were optically coupled to two optical fiber based angled image guides. These LYSO blocks and image guides were coupled to a Si-PM array (Hamamatsu MPPC S11064-050P) to form a block detector. Eight block detectors (16 LYSO blocks) were arranged in a 34 mm inner diameter ring to form a small animal PET system. The block detector showed good separation for the 22 × 13 LYSO pixels in the two-dimensional position histogram. The energy resolution was 20% full-with at half-maximum (FWHM) for 511 keV gamma photons. The transaxial resolution reconstructed by filtered backprojection was 0.71 to 0.75 mm FWHM and the axial resolution was 0.70 mm. The point source sensitivity was 0.24% at the central axial field-of-view. High resolution mouse images were obtained using our PET system. The developed ultrahigh resolution PET system showed attractive images for small animal studies and has a potential to provide new findings in molecular imaging researches.

  8. Assessment of the sources of error affecting the quantitative accuracy of SPECT imaging in small animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Andrew B.; Franc, Benjamin L.; Gullberg, Grant T.; Hasegawa, Bruce H.

    2008-05-01

    Small animal SPECT imaging systems have multiple potential applications in biomedical research. Whereas SPECT data are commonly interpreted qualitatively in a clinical setting, the ability to accurately quantify measurements will increase the utility of the SPECT data for laboratory measurements involving small animals. In this work, we assess the effect of photon attenuation, scatter and partial volume errors on the quantitative accuracy of small animal SPECT measurements, first with Monte Carlo simulation and then confirmed with experimental measurements. The simulations modeled the imaging geometry of a commercially available small animal SPECT system. We simulated the imaging of a radioactive source within a cylinder of water, and reconstructed the projection data using iterative reconstruction algorithms. The size of the source and the size of the surrounding cylinder were varied to evaluate the effects of photon attenuation and scatter on quantitative accuracy. We found that photon attenuation can reduce the measured concentration of radioactivity in a volume of interest in the center of a rat-sized cylinder of water by up to 50% when imaging with iodine-125, and up to 25% when imaging with technetium-99m. When imaging with iodine-125, the scatter-to-primary ratio can reach up to approximately 30%, and can cause overestimation of the radioactivity concentration when reconstructing data with attenuation correction. We varied the size of the source to evaluate partial volume errors, which we found to be a strong function of the size of the volume of interest and the spatial resolution. These errors can result in large (>50%) changes in the measured amount of radioactivity. The simulation results were compared with and found to agree with experimental measurements. The inclusion of attenuation correction in the reconstruction algorithm improved quantitative accuracy. We also found that an improvement of the spatial resolution through the use of resolution

  9. Progress of Focusing X-ray and Gamma-ray Optics for Small Animal Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Pivovaroff, M J; Funk, T; Barber, W C; Ramsey, B D; Hasegawa, B H

    2005-08-05

    Significant effort is currently being devoted to the development of noninvasive imaging systems that allow in vivo assessment of biological and biomolecular interactions in mice and other small animals. Ideally, one would like to discern these functional and metabolic relationships with in vivo radionuclide imaging at spatial resolutions approaching those that can be obtained using the anatomical imaging techniques (i.e., <100 {micro}m), which would help to answer outstanding questions in many areas of biomedicine. In this paper, we report progress on our effort to develop high-resolution focusing X-ray and gamma-ray optics for small-animal radionuclide imaging. The use of reflective optics, in contrast to methods that rely on absorptive collimation like single- or multiple-pinhole cameras, decouples spatial resolution from sensitivity (efficiency). Our feasibility studies have refined and applied ray-tracing routines to design focusing optics for small animal studies. We also have adopted a replication technique to manufacture the X-ray mirrors, and which in experimental studies have demonstrated a spatial resolution of {approx}190 {micro}m. We conclude that focusing optics can be designed and fabricated for gamma-ray energies, and with spatial resolutions, and field of view suitable for in vivo biological studies. While the efficiency of a single optic is limited, fabrication methods now are being developed that may make it possible to develop imaging systems with multiple optics that could collect image data over study times that would be practical for performing radionuclide studies of small animals.

  10. Factors affecting use of veterinarians by small-scale food animal operations.

    PubMed

    Beam, Andrea L; Thilmany, Dawn D; Garber, Lindsey P; Van Metre, David C; Pritchard, Randy W; Kopral, Christine A; Olea-Popelka, Francisco J

    2013-11-01

    To identify factors associated with use of a veterinarian by small-scale food animal operations. Cross-sectional descriptive survey. 16,000 small-scale farm or ranch operations in all 50 states. Surveys were conducted via mail or telephone during 2011 for small-scale operations (gross annual agricultural sales between $10,000 and $499,999) in which an animal or animal product comprised the highest percentage of annual sales. 8,186 (51.2%) operations responded to the survey; 7,849 surveys met the inclusion criteria. For 6,511 (83.0%) operations, beef cattle were the primary animal species. An estimated 82.1% of operations (95% confidence interval [CI], 81.1% to 83.0%) had a veterinarian available ≤ 29 miles away; 1.4% (95% CI, 1.2% to 1.7%) did not have a veterinarian available within 100 miles of the operation. Operations for which the nearest veterinarian was ≥ 100 miles away or for which a veterinarian was not available were located in 40 US states. Overall, 61.7% of operations (95% CI, 60.6% to 62.9%) had used a veterinarian during the 12 months prior to the survey. Producers with college degrees were significantly more likely to use a veterinarian (675%) versus those who did not complete high school (52.9%). Results of this study indicated most small-scale operations had adequate access to veterinarians during 2011, but there seemed to be localized shortages of veterinarians in many states.

  11. An investigation of antimicrobial usage patterns by small animal veterinarians in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Chipangura, John K; Eagar, Hayley; Kgoete, Marcia; Abernethy, Darrell; Naidoo, Vinny

    2017-01-01

    At present very little information is available on antimicrobial use patterns in small animal veterinary practice in South Africa. The aim of this study was firstly to provide some indication of antimicrobial use patterns, and secondly to ascertain if the country's small animal veterinarians make use of prudent use guidelines to optimise their antimicrobial use in order to minimise the development of antimicrobial resistance. In order to understand use patterns, a questionnaire was circulated to registered South African veterinarians, whose responses were evaluated by descriptive statistics. The prevalence of antimicrobial resistance was evaluated for dogs from samples submitted for culture and susceptibility testing for the period 2007-2013 from the only faculty of Veterinary Science in the country. The resistance data was organized into contingency tables and yearly trends in resistance evaluated by means of a chi-square. The use of antimicrobials from the survey were compared to the laboratory result to ascertain the degree of prudent use of the antimicrobials in small animal practice in a developing country. The responses from the questionnaire indicated that South African veterinarians predominantly (91.16%) used antimicrobials empirically before resorting to laboratory testing and that antimicrobial compounding and off label use (86.19%) of human registered medication was common practice. A worrying finding was that a large number of clients attempted antimicrobial treatment of their pets prior to seeking veterinary assistance. In terms of monitored resistance, annual prevalence of resistance was above 10% and multiple drug resistance was above 50% for all the isolates. It is concluded that antimicrobial resistant bacteria are present in small companion animal practice in South Africa which requires better implementation of prudent use guidelines. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Assessment of the sources of error affecting the quantitative accuracy of SPECT imaging in small animals

    SciTech Connect

    Joint Graduate Group in Bioengineering, University of California, San Francisco and University of California, Berkeley; Department of Radiology, University of California; Gullberg, Grant T; Hwang, Andrew B.; Franc, Benjamin L.; Gullberg, Grant T.; Hasegawa, Bruce H.

    2008-02-15

    Small animal SPECT imaging systems have multiple potential applications in biomedical research. Whereas SPECT data are commonly interpreted qualitatively in a clinical setting, the ability to accurately quantify measurements will increase the utility of the SPECT data for laboratory measurements involving small animals. In this work, we assess the effect of photon attenuation, scatter and partial volume errors on the quantitative accuracy of small animal SPECT measurements, first with Monte Carlo simulation and then confirmed with experimental measurements. The simulations modeled the imaging geometry of a commercially available small animal SPECT system. We simulated the imaging of a radioactive source within a cylinder of water, and reconstructed the projection data using iterative reconstruction algorithms. The size of the source and the size of the surrounding cylinder were varied to evaluate the effects of photon attenuation and scatter on quantitative accuracy. We found that photon attenuation can reduce the measured concentration of radioactivity in a volume of interest in the center of a rat-sized cylinder of water by up to 50percent when imaging with iodine-125, and up to 25percent when imaging with technetium-99m. When imaging with iodine-125, the scatter-to-primary ratio can reach up to approximately 30percent, and can cause overestimation of the radioactivity concentration when reconstructing data with attenuation correction. We varied the size of the source to evaluate partial volume errors, which we found to be a strong function of the size of the volume of interest and the spatial resolution. These errors can result in large (>50percent) changes in the measured amount of radioactivity. The simulation results were compared with and found to agree with experimental measurements. The inclusion of attenuation correction in the reconstruction algorithm improved quantitative accuracy. We also found that an improvement of the spatial resolution through the

  13. High-resolution in-vivo micro-CT scanner for small animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasov, Alexander; Dewaele, Daniel

    2002-01-01

    Small laboratory animals (mice and rats) are widely used in development of drugs and treatments. To recognize the internal changes in the very early stage inside the body of alive animal, high-resolution micro-CT scanner has been developed. Initial changes in the bone structure can be found as features in the size range of 10 microns. By this reason a voxel size for reconstructed cross sections has been chosen as small as 10 microns. Full animal body may be up to 80 mm in diameter and up to 200 mm in length. By this reason the reconstructed cross section format selected as 8000 x 8000 pixels (float-point). A new 2D detection system with multibeam geometry produces dataset for reconstruction of hundreds of cross sections after one scan. Object illuminated by microfocus sealed x-ray source with 5 microns spot size. Continuously variable energy in the range of 20- 100 kV and energy filters allows estimate material composition like in DEXA systems. Direct streaming of the projection data to the disk reduce irradiation dose to the animal under scanning. Software package can create realistic 3D images from the set of reconstructed cross sections and calculate internal morphological parameters.

  14. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius among dogs admitted to a small animal hospital.

    PubMed

    Nienhoff, Ulrike; Kadlec, Kristina; Chaberny, Iris F; Verspohl, Jutta; Gerlach, Gerald-F; Kreienbrock, Lothar; Schwarz, Stefan; Simon, Daniela; Nolte, Ingo

    2011-05-12

    The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of carriage of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MRSP) among dogs admitted to a small animal hospital during a 17-month period, to characterize these isolates and to initially screen for possible factors associated with MRSP carriage. Swabs were taken from the nose/pharynx and the perineum as well as from wounds and skin infections (if present) of 814 dogs before entering the small animal hospital. A questionnaire for background information was completed. The staphylococcal species and methicillin resistance were confirmed pheno- and genotypically. The identified MRSP isolates were characterized by SCCmec typing, testing for susceptibility to 25 antimicrobial agents and SmaI-directed pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. A first screening for possible risk factors for MRSP carriage was performed by means of unifactorial contingency tables and CART analysis. Sixty (7.4%) dogs were positive for MRSP. All MRSP isolates harboured a type II-III SCCmec cassette and showed extended resistance to antimicrobial agents. Fifteen different SmaI patterns were observed. The major factors that clustered with MRSP carriage were former hospitalization and antibiotic treatment within the last six months before sampling. This study showed that only a minor part of the sampled dogs carried multi-resistant MRSP isolates. The facts that prior hospitalization and/or antibiotic therapy are potential associated factors for MRSP carriage underline the necessity of a judicious use of antibiotics in small animal medicine.

  15. Development of a Stereotactic Device for Gamma Knife Irradiation of Small Animals

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Hyun-Tai; Kim, Dong Gyu; Paek, Sun Ha; Cho, Keun-Tae

    2008-01-01

    Objective The authors developed a stereotactic device for irradiation of small animals with Leksell Gamma Knife® Model C. Development and verification procedures were described in this article. Methods The device was designed to satisfy three requirements. The mechanical accuracy in positioning was to be managed within 0.5 mm. The strength of the device and structure were to be compromised to provide enough strength to hold a small animal during irradiation and to interfere the gamma ray beam as little as possible. The device was to be used in combination with the Leksell G-frame® and KOPF® rat adaptor. The irradiation point was determined by separate imaging sequences such as plain X-ray images. Results The absolute dose rate with the device in a Leksell Gamma Knife was 3.7% less than the value calculated from Leksell Gamma Plan®. The dose distributions measured with GAFCHROMIC® MD-55 film corresponded to those of Leksell Gamma Plan® within acceptable range. The device was used in a series of rat experiments with a 4 mm helmet of Leksell Gamma Knife. Conclusion A stereotactic device for irradiation of small animals with Leksell Gamma Knife Model C has been developed so that it fulfilled above requirements. Absorbed dose and dose distribution at the center of a Gamma Knife helmet are in acceptable ranges. The device provides enough accuracy for stereotactic irradiation with acceptable practicality. PMID:19096541

  16. Real-time 3D motion tracking for small animal brain PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyme, A. Z.; Zhou, V. W.; Meikle, S. R.; Fulton, R. R.

    2008-05-01

    High-resolution positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of conscious, unrestrained laboratory animals presents many challenges. Some form of motion correction will normally be necessary to avoid motion artefacts in the reconstruction. The aim of the current work was to develop and evaluate a motion tracking system potentially suitable for use in small animal PET. This system is based on the commercially available stereo-optical MicronTracker S60 which we have integrated with a Siemens Focus-220 microPET scanner. We present measured performance limits of the tracker and the technical details of our implementation, including calibration and synchronization of the system. A phantom study demonstrating motion tracking and correction was also performed. The system can be calibrated with sub-millimetre accuracy, and small lightweight markers can be constructed to provide accurate 3D motion data. A marked reduction in motion artefacts was demonstrated in the phantom study. The techniques and results described here represent a step towards a practical method for rigid-body motion correction in small animal PET. There is scope to achieve further improvements in the accuracy of synchronization and pose measurements in future work.

  17. Development of an MCG/MEG system for small animals and its noise reduction method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, M.; Kawai, J.; Adachi, Y.; Haruta, Y.; Komamura, K.; Uehara, G.

    2008-02-01

    Accurate capture of the biomagnetic signals from a rat or a mouse greatly benefits the development of new medicine and pathology. In order to improve the efficiency and accuracy of biomagnetic measurement of small animals, we developed a biomagnetic measurement system specific to small animal measurement. A superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) sensor array and a table for the system were newly developed and were integrated into a transportable chassis having dimensions of 1.3 m width × 0.7 m depth × 1.8 m height and housing all principal components for the system. The integrated 9ch low-Tc SQUIDs magnetometer array designed to improve spatial resolution covers 8 mm × 8mm measurement area. We have also developed a real-time noise canceling method suitable for this system. The advantage of this method is that the noise reduction process is carried out in real time. We have confirmed the efficacy of this method using the measurement system which was installed in typical laboratory environment. The noise reduction effect was measured to be roughly 16 dB at power line frequency and its harmonics. We measured an magnetocardiogram (MCG) of a mouse using the system with the real-time noise canceling method, and the feasibility of small animal MCG measurement was ensured.

  18. Motion gated small animal imaging with a flat-panel CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasruck, M.; Bartling, S.; Dinkel, J.; Kiessling, F.; Semmler, W.; Stierstorfer, K.; Schmidt, B.

    2008-03-01

    Small animal CT gains increasing interest in preclinical research. However, physiological motion compensation like in clinical CT has seldom been employed so far. We present different methods of retrospective motion correction for small animal imaging despite their high respiratory and heart rate. Beside respiratory gating alone the combination of respiratory and simultaneous cardiac gating is shown. In vivo data are acquired with an experimental flat-panel based CT scanner*(Siemens Healthcare, Forchheim Germany). Whole mice or rats fit in the available FOV of 25 * 25 * 4 cm 3, while acquisition rate is 100fps. Extrinsic gating is realized by tracing the physiological motion from a small animal monitoring system with a pneumatic pillow for respiratory motion and ECG for heart motion. At the alternative intrinsic method, the lung motion is directly correlated to the movement of the center of gravity in the acquired projection data. As an advantage of the second method the even low preparation effort per scan is reduced. As long as the rotation time of the gantry is far below the cycle time of heart or the lung a multi-segment reconstruction is used in both methods. Motion artifacts are largely suppressed after gating. While in non gated images, the diaphragm, heart contours, bronchi and lung vessels are already visible, they are more sharply defined in the gated datasets. Four-dimensional assessment of lung motion is possible and lung volume in several phases such as peak inspiration and expiration could be segmented, quantified and compared.

  19. Open-Source Medical Devices (OSMD) Design of a Small Animal Radiotherapy System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prajapati, S.; Mackie, T. R.; Jeraj, R.

    2014-03-01

    Open-Source Medical Devices (OSMD) was initiated with the goal of facilitating medical research by developing medical technologies including both hardware and software on an open-source platform. Our first project was to develop an integrated imaging and radiotherapy device for small animals that includes computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography (PET) and radiation therapy (RT) modalities for which technical specifications were defined in the first OSMD conference held in Madison, Wisconsin, USA in December 2011. This paper specifically focuses on the development of a small animal RT (micro-RT) system by designing a binary micro multileaf collimator (bmMLC) and a small animal treatment planning system (SATPS) to enable intensity modulated RT (IMRT). Both hardware and software projects are currently under development and their current progresses are described. After the development, both bmMLC and TPS will be validated and commissioned for a micro-RT system. Both hardware design and software development will be open-sourced after completion.

  20. Design of a multimodal fibers optic system for small animal optical imaging.

    PubMed

    Spinelli, Antonello E; Pagliazzi, Marco; Boschi, Federico

    2015-02-01

    Small animals optical imaging systems are widely used in pre-clinical research to image in vivo the bio-distribution of light emitting probes using fluorescence or bioluminescence modalities. In this work we presented a set of simulated results of a novel small animal optical imaging module based on a fibers optics matrix, coupled with a position sensitive detector, devoted to acquire bioluminescence and Cerenkov images. Simulations were performed using GEANT 4 code with the GAMOS architecture using the tissue optics plugin. Results showed that it is possible to image a 30 × 30 mm region of interest using a fiber optics array containing 100 optical fibers without compromising the quality of the reconstruction. The number of fibers necessary to cover an adequate portion of a small animal is thus quite modest. This design allows integrating the module with magnetic resonance (MR) in order to acquire optical and MR images at the same time. A detailed model of the mouse anatomy, obtained by segmentation of 3D MRI images, will improve the quality of optical 3D reconstruction.

  1. Towards a high sensitivity small animal PET system based on CZT detectors (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbaszadeh, Shiva; Levin, Craig

    2017-03-01

    Small animal positron emission tomography (PET) is a biological imaging technology that allows non-invasive interrogation of internal molecular and cellular processes and mechanisms of disease. New PET molecular probes with high specificity are under development to target, detect, visualize, and quantify subtle molecular and cellular processes associated with cancer, heart disease, and neurological disorders. However, the limited uptake of these targeted probes leads to significant reduction in signal. There is a need to advance the performance of small animal PET system technology to reach its full potential for molecular imaging. Our goal is to assemble a small animal PET system based on CZT detectors and to explore methods to enhance its photon sensitivity. In this work, we reconstruct an image from a phantom using a two-panel subsystem consisting of six CZT crystals in each panel. For image reconstruction, coincidence events with energy between 450 and 570 keV were included. We are developing an algorithm to improve sensitivity of the system by including multiple interaction events.

  2. GATE simulation of a new design of pinhole SPECT system for small animal brain imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzun Ozsahin, D.; Bläckberg, L.; El Fakhri, G.; Sabet, H.

    2017-01-01

    Small animal SPECT imaging has gained an increased interest over the past decade since it is an excellent tool for developing new drugs and tracers. Therefore, there is a huge effort on the development of cost-effective SPECT detectors with high capabilities. The aim of this study is to simulate the performance characteristics of new designs for a cost effective, stationary SPECT system dedicated to small animal imaging with a focus on mice brain. The conceptual design of this SPECT system platform, Stationary Small Animal SSA-SPECT, is to use many pixelated CsI:TI detector modules with 0.4 mm × 0.4 mm pixels in order to achieve excellent intrinsic detector resolution where each module is backed by a single pinhole collimator with 0.3 mm hole diameter. In this work, we present the simulation results of four variations of the SSA-SPECT platform where the number of detector modules and FOV size is varied while keeping the detector size and collimator hole size constant. Using the NEMA NU-4 protocol, we performed spatial resolution, sensitivity, image quality simulations followed by a Derenzo-like phantom evaluation. The results suggest that all four SSA-SPECT systems can provide better than 0.063% system sensitivity and < 1.5 mm FWHM spatial resolution without resolution recovery or other correction techniques. Specifically, SSA-SPECT-1 showed a system sensitivity of 0.09% in combination with 1.1 mm FWHM spatial resolution.

  3. In Vivo Small Animal Imaging using Micro-CT and Digital Subtraction Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Badea, C.T.; Drangova, M.; Holdsworth, D.W.; Johnson, G.A.

    2009-01-01

    Small animal imaging has a critical role in phenotyping, drug discovery, and in providing a basic understanding of mechanisms of disease. Translating imaging methods from humans to small animals is not an easy task. The purpose of this work is to review in vivo X-ray based small animal imaging, with a focus on in vivo micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) and digital subtraction angiography (DSA). We present the principles, technologies, image quality parameters and types of applications. We show that both methods can be used not only to provide morphological, but also functional information, such as cardiac function estimation or perfusion. Compared to other modalities, x-ray based imaging is usually regarded as being able to provide higher throughput at lower cost and adequate resolution. The limitations are usually associated with the relatively poor contrast mechanisms and potential radiation damage due to ionizing radiation, although the use of contrast agents and careful design of studies can address these limitations. We hope that the information will effectively address how x-ray based imaging can be exploited for successful in vivo preclinical imaging. PMID:18758005

  4. Attitudes of small animal practitioners toward participation in veterinary clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Gruen, Margaret E; Griffith, Emily H; Caney, Sarah M A; Rishniw, Mark; Lascelles, B Duncan X

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine attitudes of small animal practitioners toward veterinary clinical trials and variables influencing their likelihood of participating in such trials. DESIGN Cross-sectional survey. SAMPLE Small animal practitioners with membership in 1 of 2 online veterinary communities (n = 163 and 652). PROCEDURES An online survey was developed for each of 2 veterinary communities, and invitations to participate were sent via email. Each survey included questions designed to collect information on the respondents' willingness to enroll their patients in clinical trials and to recommend participation to clients for their pets. RESULTS More than 80% of respondents to each survey indicated that they spend no time in clinical research. A high proportion of respondents were likely or extremely likely to recommend clinical trial participation to clients for their pets when those trials involved treatments licensed in other countries, novel treatments, respected investigators, or sponsoring by academic institutions, among other reasons. Reasons for not recommending participation included distance, time restrictions, and lack of awareness of ongoing clinical trials; 28% of respondents indicated that they did not usually learn about such clinical trials. Most respondents (79% to 92%) rated their recommendation of a trial as important to their client's willingness to participate. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Participation in veterinary clinical trials by small animal practitioners and their clients and patients appeared low. Efforts should be increased to raise practitioner awareness of clinical trials for which patients might qualify. Specific elements of trial design were identified that could be modified to increase participation.

  5. Transitioning to digital radiography.

    PubMed

    Drost, Wm Tod

    2011-04-01

    To describe the different forms of digital radiography (DR), image file formats, supporting equipment and services required for DR, storage of digital images, and teleradiology. Purchasing a DR system is a major investment for a veterinary practice. Types of DR systems include computed radiography, charge coupled devices, and direct or indirect DR. Comparison of workflow for analog and DR is presented. On the surface, switching to DR involves the purchase of DR acquisition hardware. The X-ray machine, table and grids used in analog radiography are the same for DR. Realistically, a considerable infrastructure supports the image acquisition hardware. This infrastructure includes monitors, computer workstations, a robust computer network and internet connection, a plan for storage and back up of images, and service contracts. Advantages of DR compared with analog radiography include improved image quality (when used properly), ease of use (more forgiving to the errors of radiographic technique), speed of making a complete study (important for critically ill patients), fewer repeat radiographs, less time looking for imaging studies, less physical storage space, and the ability to easily send images for consultation. With an understanding of the infrastructure requirements, capabilities and limitations of DR, an informed veterinary practice should be better able to make a sound decision about transitioning to DR. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2011.

  6. Geo-PET: A novel generic organ-pet for small animal organs and tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sensoy, Levent

    Reconstructed tomographic image resolution of small animal PET imaging systems is improving with advances in radiation detector development. However the trend towards higher resolution systems has come with an increase in price and system complexity. Recent developments in the area of solid-state photomultiplication devices like silicon photomultiplier arrays (SPMA) are creating opportunities for new high performance tools for PET scanner design. Imaging of excised small animal organs and tissues has been used as part of post-mortem studies in order to gain detailed, high-resolution anatomical information on sacrificed animals. However, this kind of ex-vivo specimen imaging has largely been limited to ultra-high resolution muCT. The inherent limitations to PET resolution have, to date, excluded PET imaging from these ex-vivo imaging studies. In this work, we leverage the diminishing physical size of current generation SPMA designs to create a very small, simple, and high-resolution prototype detector system targeting ex-vivo tomographic imaging of small animal organs and tissues. We investigate sensitivity, spatial resolution, and the reconstructed image quality of a prototype small animal PET scanner designed specifically for imaging of excised murine tissue and organs. We aim to demonstrate that a cost-effective silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) array based design with thin crystals (2 mm) to minimize depth of interaction errors might be able to achieve sub-millimeter resolution. We hypothesize that the substantial decrease in sensitivity associated with the thin crystals can be compensated for with increased solid angle detection, longer acquisitions, higher activity and wider acceptance energy windows (due to minimal scatter from excised organs). The constructed system has a functional field of view (FoV) of 40 mm diameter, which is adequate for most small animal specimen studies. We perform both analytical (3D-FBP) and iterative (ML-EM) methods in order to

  7. A Novel Restraining Device for Small Animal Imaging Exams: Validation in Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Carlos Henrique; Carvalho, Antonio Carlos; de Souza, Sérgio; Machado, Fernanda; Guedes, Fábio; Monteiro, André; Schanaider, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    To develop, validate, and patent a Restraining Device for Small Animal Imaging Exams (RDSAIE) that allows exams to be comfortably conducted without risks to animals and professionals. A RDSAIE with a mobile cover and shelf was built with transparent acrylic material. A total of six anesthetized rabbits were used to perform the following imaging exams of the skull: Cone Beam Computed Tomography, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, and Scintigraphy. The device showed great functionality and full visibility of the animal behavior, which remained fully stabilized and immobilized in either the horizontal or vertical position without the need for a person to remain in the test room to assist them. The procedures were performed without difficulty, and images of good resolution and without artifacts were obtained. The RDSAIE is comfortable, safe, efficient, and ergonomic. It allows the easy placement of animals in different body positions, including the vertical, the maintenance of postural stability, and full visibility. It may be constructed for animals heavier than 4 kg and it is adaptable for translational studies in anima nobile.

  8. A Novel Restraining Device for Small Animal Imaging Exams: Validation in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, Carlos Henrique; Carvalho, Antonio Carlos; de Souza, Sérgio; Machado, Fernanda; Guedes, Fábio; Monteiro, André; Schanaider, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To develop, validate, and patent a Restraining Device for Small Animal Imaging Exams (RDSAIE) that allows exams to be comfortably conducted without risks to animals and professionals. Methods. A RDSAIE with a mobile cover and shelf was built with transparent acrylic material. A total of six anesthetized rabbits were used to perform the following imaging exams of the skull: Cone Beam Computed Tomography, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, and Scintigraphy. Results. The device showed great functionality and full visibility of the animal behavior, which remained fully stabilized and immobilized in either the horizontal or vertical position without the need for a person to remain in the test room to assist them. The procedures were performed without difficulty, and images of good resolution and without artifacts were obtained. Conclusion. The RDSAIE is comfortable, safe, efficient, and ergonomic. It allows the easy placement of animals in different body positions, including the vertical, the maintenance of postural stability, and full visibility. It may be constructed for animals heavier than 4 kg and it is adaptable for translational studies in anima nobile. PMID:26114109

  9. First experience with x-ray dark-field radiography for human chest imaging (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noel, Peter B.; Willer, Konstantin; Fingerle, Alexander A.; Gromann, Lukas B.; De Marco, Fabio; Scherer, Kai H.; Herzen, Julia; Achterhold, Klaus; Gleich, Bernhard; Münzel, Daniela; Renz, Martin; Renger, Bernhard C.; Fischer, Florian; Braun, Christian; Auweter, Sigrid; Hellbach, Katharina; Reiser, Maximilian F.; Schröter, Tobias; Mohr, Jürgen; Yaroshenko, Andre; Maack, Hanns-Ingo; Pralow, Thomas; van der Heijden, Hendrik; Proksa, Roland; Köhler, Thomas; Wieberneit, Nataly; Rindt, Karsten; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2017-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the performance of an experimental X-ray dark-field radiography system for chest imaging in humans and to compare with conventional diagnostic imaging. Materials and Methods: The study was institutional review board (IRB) approved. A single human cadaver (52 years, female, height: 173 cm, weight: 84 kg, chest circumference: 97 cm) was imaged within 24 hours post mortem on the experimental x-ray dark-field system. In addition, the cadaver was imaged on a clinical CT system to obtain a reference scan. The grating-based dark-field radiography setup was equipped with a set of three gratings to enable grating-based dark-field contrast x-ray imaging. The prototype operates at an acceleration voltage of up to 70 kVp and with a field-of-view large enough for clinical chest x-ray (>35 x 35 cm2). Results: It was feasible to extract x-ray dark-field signal of the whole human thorax, clearly demonstrating that human x-ray dark-field chest radiography is feasible. Lung tissue produced strong scattering, reflected in a pronounced x-ray dark-field signal. The ribcage and the backbone are less prominent than the lung but are also distinguishable. Finally, the soft tissue is not present in the dark-field radiography. The regions of the lungs affected by edema, as verified by CT, showed less dark-field signal compared to healthy lung tissue. Conclusion: Our results reveal the current status of translating dark-field imaging from a micro (small animal) scale to a macro (patient) scale. The performance of the experimental x-ray dark-field radiography setup offers, for the first time, obtaining multi-contrast chest x-ray images (attenuation and dark-field signal) from a human cadaver.

  10. Optimal energy window selection of a CZT-based small-animal SPECT for quantitative accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Su-Jin; Yu, A. Ram; Choi, Yun Young; Kim, Kyeong Min; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2015-05-01

    Cadmium zinc telluride (CZT)-based small-animal single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) has desirable characteristics such as superior energy resolution, but data acquisition for SPECT imaging has been widely performed with a conventional energy window. The aim of this study was to determine the optimal energy window settings for technetium-99 m (99mTc) and thallium-201 (201Tl), the most commonly used isotopes in SPECT imaging, using CZT-based small-animal SPECT for quantitative accuracy. We experimentally investigated quantitative measurements with respect to primary count rate, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and scatter fraction (SF) within various energy window settings using Triumph X-SPECT. The two ways of energy window settings were considered: an on-peak window and an off-peak window. In the on-peak window setting, energy centers were set on the photopeaks. In the off-peak window setting, the ratios of energy differences between the photopeak from the lower- and higher-threshold varied from 4:6 to 3:7. In addition, the energy-window width for 99mTc varied from 5% to 20%, and that for 201Tl varied from 10% to 30%. The results of this study enabled us to determine the optimal energy windows for each isotope in terms of primary count rate, CNR, and SF. We selected the optimal energy window that increases the primary count rate and CNR while decreasing SF. For 99mTc SPECT imaging, the energy window of 138-145 keV with a 5% width and off-peak ratio of 3:7 was determined to be the optimal energy window. For 201Tl SPECT imaging, the energy window of 64-85 keV with a 30% width and off-peak ratio of 3:7 was selected as the optimal energy window. Our results demonstrated that the proper energy window should be carefully chosen based on quantitative measurements in order to take advantage of desirable characteristics of CZT-based small-animal SPECT. These results provided valuable reference information for the establishment of new protocol for CZT

  11. Development of a Body Shield for Small Animal PET System to Reduce Random and Scatter Coincidences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, Yasuhiro; Yamamoto, Seiichi; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi

    2015-02-01

    For small animal positron emission tomography (PET) research using high radioactivity, such as dynamic studies, the resulting high random coincidence rate of the system degrades image quality. The random coincidence rate is increased not only by the gamma photons from inside the axial-field-of-view (axial-FOV) of the PET system but also by those from outside the axial-FOV. For brain imaging in small animal studies, significant interference is observed from gamma photons emitted from the body. Single gamma photons from the body enter the axial-FOV and increase the random and scatter coincidences. Shielding against the gamma photons from outside the axial-FOV would improve the image quality. For this purpose, we developed a body shield for a small animal PET system, the microPET Primate 4-ring system, and evaluated its performance. The body shield is made of 9-mm-thick lead and it surrounds most of a rat's body. We evaluated the effectiveness of the body shield using a head phantom and a body phantom with a radioactivity concentration ratio of 1:2 and a maximum total activity of approximately 250 MBq. The random coincidence rate was dramatically decreased to 1/10, and the noise equivalent count rate (NECR) was increased 6 times with an activity of 7 MBq in the head phantom. The true count rate was increased to 35% due to the decrease in system deadtime. The average scatter fraction was decreased to 1/2.5 with the body shield. Count rate measurements of rat were also conducted with an injection activity of approximately 25 MBq of [C-11]N,N-dimethyl-2-(2-amino-4-cyanophenylthio) benzylamine ([C-11]DASB) and approximately 70 and 310 MBq of 2-deoxy-2-(F-18)fluoro-D-glucose ([F-18]FDG). Using the body shield, [F-18]FDG images of rats were improved by increasing the amount of radioactivity injected. The body shield designed for small animal PET systems is a promising tool for improving image quality and quantitation accuracy in small animal molecular imaging research.

  12. Animator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tech Directions, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Art and animation work is the most significant part of electronic game development, but is also found in television commercials, computer programs, the Internet, comic books, and in just about every visual media imaginable. It is the part of the project that makes an abstract design idea concrete and visible. Animators create the motion of life in…

  13. Animator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tech Directions, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Art and animation work is the most significant part of electronic game development, but is also found in television commercials, computer programs, the Internet, comic books, and in just about every visual media imaginable. It is the part of the project that makes an abstract design idea concrete and visible. Animators create the motion of life in…

  14. 78 FR 59624 - Guidance for Industry #223: Small Entity Compliance Guide-Declaring Color Additives in Animal...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-27

    ... Compliance Guide--Declaring Color Additives in Animal Foods; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug... Color Additives in Animal Foods.'' This small entity compliance guide (SECG) aids industry in complying... regulations regarding the declaration of certified color additives on the labels of animal food including...

  15. Challenges of general safety evaluations of biologics compared to small molecule pharmaceuticals in animal models.

    PubMed

    Dixit, Rakesh; Iciek, Laurie A; McKeever, Kathleen; Ryan, Patricia Clare

    2010-01-01

    The prediction of human toxicity by employing animal models for nonclinical safety evaluation of pharmaceuticals poses numerous challenges. Each type, biologics, vaccines and small molecules, has unique features, which may impact the ability to effectively assess safety. The importance of taking a case-by-case approach is highlighted in this review of the challenges encountered in general safety evaluations for biologics and vaccines compared to small molecules. The reader will gain insights in specific issues related to building a successful predictive nonclinical safety program for biologics. While there is fair concordance for small molecules, animal models used for the safety evaluation of biologics may have limitations with regard to human relevance. For small molecules, this is commonly because of differences in metabolism profiles or off-target effects. For biologics, which are highly targeted molecules, it may be because of differences in physiological processes or biologic pathways that limit pharmacologic relevance. For vaccines or immunomodulatory biologics, it may be related to the complexities of modeling the human immune system in a nonhuman species. While international guidances are available to govern the nonclinical safety assessment process for human pharmaceuticals (such as ICH M3), in many instances a case-by-case approach is employed for novel agents.

  16. Noninvasive Assessment of Myocardial Viability in a Small Animal Model: Comparison of MRI, SPECT, and PET

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Daniel; Bal, Harshali; Arkles, Jeffrey; Horowitz, James; Araujo, Luis; Acton, Paul D.; Ferrari, Victor A.

    2010-01-01

    Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) research relies increasingly on small animal models and noninvasive imaging methods such as MRI, single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and positron emission tomography (PET). However, a direct comparison among these techniques for characterization of perfusion, viability, and infarct size is lacking. Rats were studied within 18–24 hr post AMI by MRI (4.7 T) and subsequently (40–48 hr post AMI) by SPECT (99Tc-MIBI) and micro-PET (18FDG). A necrosis-specific MRI contrast agent was used to detect AMI, and a fast low angle shot (FLASH) sequence was used to acquire late enhancement and functional images contemporaneously. Infarcted regions showed late enhancement, whereas corresponding radionuclide images had reduced tracer uptake. MRI most accurately depicted AMI, showing the closest correlation and agreement with triphenyl tetrazolium chloride (TTC), followed by SPECT and PET. In some animals a mismatch of reduced uptake in normal myocardium and relatively increased 18FDG uptake in the infarct border zone precluded conventional quantitative analysis. We performed the first quantitative comparison of MRI, PET, and SPECT for reperfused AMI imaging in a small animal model. MRI was superior to the other modalities, due to its greater spatial resolution and ability to detect necrotic myocardium directly. The observed 18FDG mismatch likely represents variable metabolic conditions between stunned myocardium in the infarct border zone and normal myocardium and supports the use of a standardized glucose load or glucose clamp technique for PET imaging of reperfused AMI in small animals. PMID:18228591

  17. 3D image-guided robotic needle positioning system for small animal interventions.

    PubMed

    Bax, Jeffrey S; Waring, Christopher S R; Sherebrin, Shi; Stapleton, Shawn; Hudson, Thomas J; Jaffray, David A; Lacefield, James C; Fenster, Aaron

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the design of a micro-CT guided small animal robotic needle positioning system. In order to simplify the robotic design and maintain a small targeting error, a novel implementation of the remote center of motion is used in the system. The system has been developed with the objective of achieving a mean targeting error of <200 μm while maintaining a high degree of user friendliness. The robot is compact enough to operate within a 25 cm diameter micro-CT bore. Small animals can be imaged and an intervention performed without the need to transport the animal from one workspace to another. Not requiring transport of the animal reduces opportunities for targets to shift from their localized position in the image and simplifies the workflow of interventions. An improved method of needle calibration is presented that better characterizes the calibration using the position of the needle tip in photographs rather than the needle axis. A calibration fixture was also introduced, which dramatically reduces the time requirements of calibration while maintaining calibration accuracy. Two registration modes have been developed to correspond the robot coordinate system with the coordinate system of the micro-CT scanner. The two registration modes offer a balance between the time required to complete a registration and the overall registration accuracy. The development of slow high accuracy and fast low accuracy registration modes provides users with a degree of flexibility in selecting a registration mode best suited for their application. The target registration error (TRE) of the higher accuracy primary registration was TRE(primary) = 31 ± 12 μm. The error in the lower accuracy combined registration was TRE(combined) = 139 ± 63 μm. Both registration modes are therefore suitable for small-animal needle interventions. The targeting accuracy of the robotic system was characterized using targeting experiments in tissue-mimicking gelatin phantoms. The results

  18. The hydrodynamic principle for the caudal fin shape of small aquatic animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jeongsu; Park, Yong-Jai; Cho, Kyu-Jin; Kim, Ho-Young

    2014-11-01

    The shape of caudal fins of small aquatic animals is completely different from that of large cruising animals like dolphin and tuna which have high aspect-ratio lunate tail. To unveil the physical principle behind natural selection of caudal fins of small aquatic animals, here we investigate the hydrodynamics of an angularly reciprocating plate as a model for the caudal fin oscillation. We find that the thrust production of a reciprocating plate at high Strouhal numbers is dominated by generation of two distinct vortical structures associated with the acceleration and deceleration of the plate regardless of their shape. Based on our observations, we construct a scaling law to predict the thrust of the flapping plate, which agrees well with the experimental data. We then seek the optimal aspect ratio to maximize thrust and efficiency of a flapping plate for fixed flapping frequency and amplitude. Thrust is maximized for the aspect ratio of approximately 0.7. We also theoretically explain the power law behaviors of the thrust and efficiency as a function of the aspect ratio.

  19. A small animal holding fixture system with positional reproducibility for longitudinal multimodal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokuryo, Daisuke; Kimura, Yuichi; Obata, Takayuki; Yamaya, Taiga; Kawamura, Kazunori; Zhang, Ming-Rong; Kanno, Iwao; Aoki, Ichio

    2010-07-01

    This study presents a combined small animal holding fixture system, termed a 'bridge capsule', which provides for small animal re-fixation with positional reproducibility. This system comprises separate holding fixtures for the head and lower body and a connecting part to a gas anesthesia system. A mouse is fixed in place by the combination of a head fixture with a movable part made from polyacetal resin, a lower body fixture made from vinyl-silicone and a holder for the legs and tail. For re-fixation, a similar posture could be maintained by the same holding fixtures and a constant distance between the head and lower body fixtures is maintained. Artifacts caused by the bridge capsule system were not observed on magnetic resonance (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) images. The average position differences of the spinal column and the iliac body before and after re-fixation for the same modality were approximately 1.1 mm. The difference between the MRI and PET images was approximately 1.8 mm for the lower body fixture after image registration using fiducial markers. This system would be useful for longitudinal, repeated and multimodal imaging experiments requiring similar animal postures.

  20. Experiments with small animals in BIOLAB and EMCS on the international space station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinckmann, E.; Schiller, P.

    Two ESA facilities will be available for animal research and other biological experiments on the International Space Station: the European Modular Cultivation System (EMCS) in the US Lab "Destiny" and BIOLAB in the European "Columbus" Laboratory. Both facilities use standard Experiment Containers, mounted on two centrifuge rotors allowing either research in microgravity or acceleration studies with variable g-levels from 0.001 to 2.0x g. Standard interface plates provide each container with power and data lines, gas supply (controlled CO 2, O 2 concentration and relative humidity), and -for EMCS only- connectors to fresh and waste water reservoirs. The experiment hardware inside the containers will be developed by the user, but ESA conducted a feasibility study for several kinds of Experiment Support Equipment with potential use for research on small animals: design concepts for experiments with insects, with aquatic organisms like rotifers and nematodes, and with small aquatic animals (sea urchin larvae, tadpoles, fish youngsters) are described in detail in this presentation. Also ESA's initial steps to support experiments with rodents on the Space Station are presented.

  1. Anaphylaxis Imaging: Non-Invasive Measurement of Surface Body Temperature and Physical Activity in Small Animals

    PubMed Central

    Manzano-Szalai, Krisztina; Pali-Schöll, Isabella; Krishnamurthy, Durga; Stremnitzer, Caroline; Flaschberger, Ingo; Jensen-Jarolim, Erika

    2016-01-01

    In highly sensitized patients, the encounter with a specific allergen from food, insect stings or medications may rapidly induce systemic anaphylaxis with potentially lethal symptoms. Countless animal models of anaphylaxis, most often in BALB/c mice, were established to understand the pathophysiology and to prove the safety of different treatments. The most common symptoms during anaphylactic shock are drop of body temperature and reduced physical activity. To refine, improve and objectify the currently applied manual monitoring methods, we developed an imaging method for the automated, non-invasive measurement of the whole-body surface temperature and, at the same time, of the horizontal and vertical movement activity of small animals. We tested the anaphylaxis imaging in three in vivo allergy mouse models for i) milk allergy, ii) peanut allergy and iii) egg allergy. These proof-of-principle experiments suggest that the imaging technology represents a reliable non-invasive method for the objective monitoring of small animals during anaphylaxis over time. We propose that the method will be useful for monitoring diseases associated with both, changes in body temperature and in physical behaviour. PMID:26963393

  2. A new low-turbulence wind tunnel for animal and small vehicle flight experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, Daniel B.; Watts, Anthony; Nagle, Tony; Lentink, David

    2017-03-01

    Our understanding of animal flight benefits greatly from specialized wind tunnels designed for flying animals. Existing facilities can simulate laminar flow during straight, ascending and descending flight, as well as at different altitudes. However, the atmosphere in which animals fly is even more complex. Flow can be laminar and quiet at high altitudes but highly turbulent near the ground, and gusts can rapidly change wind speed. To study flight in both laminar and turbulent environments, a multi-purpose wind tunnel for studying animal and small vehicle flight was built at Stanford University. The tunnel is closed-circuit and can produce airspeeds up to 50 m s-1 in a rectangular test section that is 1.0 m wide, 0.82 m tall and 1.73 m long. Seamless honeycomb and screens in the airline together with a carefully designed contraction reduce centreline turbulence intensities to less than or equal to 0.030% at all operating speeds. A large diameter fan and specialized acoustic treatment allow the tunnel to operate at low noise levels of 76.4 dB at 20 m s-1. To simulate high turbulence, an active turbulence grid can increase turbulence intensities up to 45%. Finally, an open jet configuration enables stereo high-speed fluoroscopy for studying musculoskeletal control in turbulent flow.

  3. High-resolution in-vivo micro-CT scanner for small animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasov, Alexander

    2001-06-01

    Small laboratory animals (mice and rats) are widely used in development of drags and treatments. To recognize the internal changes in the very early stage inside the animal body, Skyscan starts development on high-resolution micro-CT scanner for in-vivo 3D-imaging. Initial changes in the bone structure can be found as features in the size range of 10 microns. By this reason a voxel size for reconstructed cross sections has been chosen as < 10 microns. Because of full animal may be up to 8 cm in diameter the reconstructed cross section format selected as 8000 X 8000-pixels (float- point). A 2D detection system with new multi-beam geometry produce dataset for reconstruction of hundreds cross- sections after one scan. Object illuminated by microfocus sealed X-ray source with 5 microns spot size. Continuously variable energy in the range of 20 - 100 kV and energy filters allows estimate material composition like in DEXA systems. Direct streaming of the projection data to the disk reduce irradiation dose to the animal under scanning. Software package can create realistic 3D-images from the set of reconstructed cross sections and calculate internal morphological parameters.

  4. A new low-turbulence wind tunnel for animal and small vehicle flight experiments

    PubMed Central

    Watts, Anthony; Nagle, Tony; Lentink, David

    2017-01-01

    Our understanding of animal flight benefits greatly from specialized wind tunnels designed for flying animals. Existing facilities can simulate laminar flow during straight, ascending and descending flight, as well as at different altitudes. However, the atmosphere in which animals fly is even more complex. Flow can be laminar and quiet at high altitudes but highly turbulent near the ground, and gusts can rapidly change wind speed. To study flight in both laminar and turbulent environments, a multi-purpose wind tunnel for studying animal and small vehicle flight was built at Stanford University. The tunnel is closed-circuit and can produce airspeeds up to 50 m s−1 in a rectangular test section that is 1.0 m wide, 0.82 m tall and 1.73 m long. Seamless honeycomb and screens in the airline together with a carefully designed contraction reduce centreline turbulence intensities to less than or equal to 0.030% at all operating speeds. A large diameter fan and specialized acoustic treatment allow the tunnel to operate at low noise levels of 76.4 dB at 20 m s−1. To simulate high turbulence, an active turbulence grid can increase turbulence intensities up to 45%. Finally, an open jet configuration enables stereo high-speed fluoroscopy for studying musculoskeletal control in turbulent flow. PMID:28405384

  5. A new low-turbulence wind tunnel for animal and small vehicle flight experiments.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Daniel B; Watts, Anthony; Nagle, Tony; Lentink, David

    2017-03-01

    Our understanding of animal flight benefits greatly from specialized wind tunnels designed for flying animals. Existing facilities can simulate laminar flow during straight, ascending and descending flight, as well as at different altitudes. However, the atmosphere in which animals fly is even more complex. Flow can be laminar and quiet at high altitudes but highly turbulent near the ground, and gusts can rapidly change wind speed. To study flight in both laminar and turbulent environments, a multi-purpose wind tunnel for studying animal and small vehicle flight was built at Stanford University. The tunnel is closed-circuit and can produce airspeeds up to 50 m s(-1) in a rectangular test section that is 1.0 m wide, 0.82 m tall and 1.73 m long. Seamless honeycomb and screens in the airline together with a carefully designed contraction reduce centreline turbulence intensities to less than or equal to 0.030% at all operating speeds. A large diameter fan and specialized acoustic treatment allow the tunnel to operate at low noise levels of 76.4 dB at 20 m s(-1). To simulate high turbulence, an active turbulence grid can increase turbulence intensities up to 45%. Finally, an open jet configuration enables stereo high-speed fluoroscopy for studying musculoskeletal control in turbulent flow.

  6. Validation of fast Monte Carlo dose calculation in small animal radiotherapy with EBT3 radiochromic films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noblet, C.; Chiavassa, S.; Smekens, F.; Sarrut, D.; Passal, V.; Suhard, J.; Lisbona, A.; Paris, F.; Delpon, G.

    2016-05-01

    In preclinical studies, the absorbed dose calculation accuracy in small animals is fundamental to reliably investigate and understand observed biological effects. This work investigated the use of the split exponential track length estimator (seTLE), a new kerma based Monte Carlo dose calculation method for preclinical radiotherapy using a small animal precision micro irradiator, the X-RAD 225Cx. Monte Carlo modelling of the irradiator with GATE/GEANT4 was extensively evaluated by comparing measurements and simulations for half-value layer, percent depth dose, off-axis profiles and output factors in water and water-equivalent material for seven circular fields, from 20 mm down to 1 mm in diameter. Simulated and measured dose distributions in cylinders of water obtained for a 360° arc were also compared using dose, distance-to-agreement and gamma-index maps. Simulations and measurements agreed within 3% for all static beam configurations, with uncertainties estimated to 1% for the simulation and 3% for the measurements. Distance-to-agreement accuracy was better to 0.14 mm. For the arc irradiations, gamma-index maps of 2D dose distributions showed that the success rate was higher than 98%, except for the 0.1 cm collimator (92%). Using the seTLE method, MC simulations compute 3D dose distributions within minutes for realistic beam configurations with a clinically acceptable accuracy for beam diameter as small as 1 mm.

  7. Application study of the optical biopsy system for small experimental animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Hidetoshi; Suzuki, Toshiaki; Morita, Shin-ichi; Maruyama, Atsushi; Shimosegawa, Toru; Matsuura, Yuji; Kanai, Gen'ichi; Ura, Nobuo; Masutani, Koji; Ozaki, Yukihiro

    2008-02-01

    An optical biopsy system for small experimental animals has been developed. The system includes endoscope probe, portable probe and two kinds of miniaturized Raman probes. The micro Raman probe (MRP) is made of optical fibers and the ball lens hollow optical fiber Raman probe (BHRP) is made of hollow fiber. The former has large focal depth and suitable to measure average spectra of subsurface tissue. The latter has rather small focal depth and it is possible to control focal length by selecting ball lens attached at the probe head. It is suitable to survey materials at the fixed depth in the tissue. The system is applied to study various small animal cancer models, such as esophagus and stomach rat models and subcutaneous mouse models of pancreatic cancers. In the studies of subcutaneous tumor model mouse, it is suggested that protein conformational changes occur in the tumor tissue within few minutes after euthanasia of the mouse. No more change is observed for the following ten minutes. Any alterations in the molecular level are not observed in normal skin, muscle tissues. Since the change completes in such a short time, it is suggested that this phenomenon caused by termination of blood circulation.

  8. [The small pox vaccine: its first century in Brazil (from the Jennerian to the animal vaccine)].

    PubMed

    Fernandes, T

    1999-01-01

    Covering a period of roughly hundred years, the article looks at some of the more meaningful events during the period in which the small pox vaccine was institutionalized in Brazil. Discoveries and discussions then taking place in other countries are also examined, particularly as they influenced Brazil. The process is followed from introduction of the human vaccine to the arrival of the animal vaccine and creation of the Municipal Vaccine Institute--a private initative by physician Pedro Affonso Franco, also known as the barao de Pedro Affonso. Adoption of the animal vaccine not only represented progress in controlling the disease but also spurred discussions that saw medical and political groups in Brazil taking sides with either Oswaldo Cruz or the barao de Pedro Affonso. The debate continued within the academic and political arenas until the Vaccine Institute was made part of the Manguinhos laboratories.

  9. RFID Technology for Continuous Monitoring of Physiological Signals in Small Animals.

    PubMed

    Volk, Tobias; Gorbey, Stefan; Bhattacharyya, Mayukh; Gruenwald, Waldemar; Lemmer, Björn; Reindl, Leonhard M; Stieglitz, Thomas; Jansen, Dirk

    2015-02-01

    Telemetry systems enable researchers to continuously monitor physiological signals in unrestrained, freely moving small rodents. Drawbacks of common systems are limited operation time, the need to house the animals separately, and the necessity of a stable communication link. Furthermore, the costs of the typically proprietary telemetry systems reduce the acceptance. The aim of this paper is to introduce a low-cost telemetry system based on common radio frequency identification technology optimized for battery-independent operational time, good reusability, and flexibility. The presented implant is equipped with sensors to measure electrocardiogram, arterial blood pressure, and body temperature. The biological signals are transmitted as digital data streams. The device is able of monitoring several freely moving animals housed in groups with a single reader station. The modular concept of the system significantly reduces the costs to monitor multiple physiological functions and refining procedures in preclinical research.

  10. Optically detunable, inductively coupled coil for self-gating in small animal magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Korn, Matthias; Umathum, Reiner; Schulz, Jessica; Semmler, Wolfhard; Bock, Michael

    2011-03-01

    An inductively coupled coil concept is presented, which improves the compensation of physiological motion by the self-gating (SG) technique. The animal is positioned in a conventional volume coil encompassing the whole animal. A small, resonant surface coil (SG-coil) is placed on the thorax so that its sensitive region includes the heart. Via inductive coupling the SG-coil amplifies selectively the MR signal of the beating heart. With an optical detuning mechanism, this coupling can be switched off during acquisition of the MR image information, whereas it is active during SG data sampling to provide the physiological information. In vivo experiments on a mouse show an amplification of the SG signal by at least 40%.

  11. A programmable closed-loop recording and stimulating wireless system for behaving small laboratory animals

    PubMed Central

    Angotzi, Gian Nicola; Boi, Fabio; Zordan, Stefano; Bonfanti, Andrea; Vato, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    A portable 16-channels microcontroller-based wireless system for a bi-directional interaction with the central nervous system is presented in this work. The device is designed to be used with freely behaving small laboratory animals and allows recording of spontaneous and evoked neural activity wirelessly transmitted and stored on a personal computer. Biphasic current stimuli with programmable duration, frequency and amplitude may be triggered in real-time on the basis of the recorded neural activity as well as by the animal behavior within a specifically designed experimental setup. An intuitive graphical user interface was developed to configure and to monitor the whole system. The system was successfully tested through bench tests and in vivo measurements on behaving rats chronically implanted with multi-channels microwire arrays. PMID:25096831

  12. Small animal model systems for studying hepatitis B virus replication and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Dandri, Maura; Lutgehetmann, Marc; Volz, Tassilo; Petersen, Jörg

    2006-05-01

    The lack of reliable in vitro infection systems and convenient animal models has hindered progress in hepatitis B virus (HBV) research and the development of new treatment options. Due to various restraints encountered using chimpanzees and other models of HBV infection that are based on HBV-related viruses, and due to the necessity to work with small and well-characterized animal systems, it is not surprising that most recent developments have focused on mice. Various strains of transgenic mice harboring the entire HBV genome, or selected viral genes, were developed and proved to be very useful to elucidate mechanisms of HBV replication and pathogenesis. Furthermore, novel, exciting alternative mouse models have been developed recently, which allow not only studies on viral replication, but also the investigation of mechanisms of viral entry and clearance. This article provides an overview and discussion of the different mouse models of HBV replication and infection that are currently available.

  13. Multi-institutional MicroCT image comparison of image-guided small animal irradiators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnstone, Chris D.; Lindsay, Patricia; E Graves, Edward; Wong, Eugene; Perez, Jessica R.; Poirier, Yannick; Ben-Bouchta, Youssef; Kanesalingam, Thilakshan; Chen, Haijian; E Rubinstein, Ashley; Sheng, Ke; Bazalova-Carter, Magdalena

    2017-07-01

    To recommend imaging protocols and establish tolerance levels for microCT image quality assurance (QA) performed on conformal image-guided small animal irradiators. A fully automated QA software SAPA (small animal phantom analyzer) for image analysis of the commercial Shelley micro-CT MCTP 610 phantom was developed, in which quantitative analyses of CT number linearity, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), uniformity and noise, geometric accuracy, spatial resolution by means of modulation transfer function (MTF), and CT contrast were performed. Phantom microCT scans from eleven institutions acquired with four image-guided small animal irradiator units (including the commercial PXi X-RAD SmART and Xstrahl SARRP systems) with varying parameters used for routine small animal imaging were analyzed. Multi-institutional data sets were compared using SAPA, based on which tolerance levels for each QA test were established and imaging protocols for QA were recommended. By analyzing microCT data from 11 institutions, we established image QA tolerance levels for all image quality tests. CT number linearity set to R 2  >  0.990 was acceptable in microCT data acquired at all but three institutions. Acceptable SNR  >  36 and noise levels  <55 HU were obtained at five of the eleven institutions, where failing scans were acquired with current-exposure time of less than 120 mAs. Acceptable spatial resolution (>1.5 lp mm-1 for MTF  =  0.2) was obtained at all but four institutions due to their large image voxel size used (>0.275 mm). Ten of the eleven institutions passed the set QA tolerance for geometric accuracy (<1.5%) and nine of the eleven institutions passed the QA tolerance for contrast (>2000 HU for 30 mgI ml-1). We recommend performing imaging QA with 70 kVp, 1.5 mA, 120 s imaging time, 0.20 mm voxel size, and a frame rate of 5 fps for the PXi X-RAD SmART. For the Xstrahl SARRP, we recommend using 60 kVp, 1.0 mA, 240 s imaging time, 0.20

  14. Multi-institutional MicroCT image comparison of image-guided small animal irradiators.

    PubMed

    Johnstone, Chris D; Lindsay, Patricia; Graves, Edward E; Wong, Eugene; Perez, Jessica R; Poirier, Yannick; Ben-Bouchta, Youssef; Kanesalingam, Thilakshan; Chen, Haijian; Rubinstein, Ashley E; Sheng, Ke; Bazalova-Carter, Magdalena

    2017-06-26

    To recommend imaging protocols and establish tolerance levels for microCT image quality assurance (QA) performed on conformal image-guided small animal irradiators. A fully automated QA software SAPA (small animal phantom analyzer) for image analysis of the commercial Shelley micro-CT MCTP 610 phantom was developed, in which quantitative analyses of CT number linearity, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), uniformity and noise, geometric accuracy, spatial resolution by means of modulation transfer function (MTF), and CT contrast were performed. Phantom microCT scans from eleven institutions acquired with four image-guided small animal irradiator units (including the commercial PXi X-RAD SmART and Xstrahl SARRP systems) with varying parameters used for routine small animal imaging were analyzed. Multi-institutional data sets were compared using SAPA, based on which tolerance levels for each QA test were established and imaging protocols for QA were recommended. By analyzing microCT data from 11 institutions, we established image QA tolerance levels for all image quality tests. CT number linearity set to R (2)  >  0.990 was acceptable in microCT data acquired at all but three institutions. Acceptable SNR  >  36 and noise levels  <55 HU were obtained at five of the eleven institutions, where failing scans were acquired with current-exposure time of less than 120 mAs. Acceptable spatial resolution (>1.5 lp mm(-1) for MTF  =  0.2) was obtained at all but four institutions due to their large image voxel size used (>0.275 mm). Ten of the eleven institutions passed the set QA tolerance for geometric accuracy (<1.5%) and nine of the eleven institutions passed the QA tolerance for contrast (>2000 HU for 30 mgI ml(-1)). We recommend performing imaging QA with 70 kVp, 1.5 mA, 120 s imaging time, 0.20 mm voxel size, and a frame rate of 5 fps for the PXi X-RAD SmART. For the Xstrahl SARRP, we recommend using 60 kVp, 1.0 mA, 240 s imaging time, 0.20

  15. Fully automated intrinsic respiratory and cardiac gating for small animal CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuntz, J.; Dinkel, J.; Zwick, S.; Bäuerle, T.; Grasruck, M.; Kiessling, F.; Gupta, R.; Semmler, W.; Bartling, S. H.

    2010-04-01

    A fully automated, intrinsic gating algorithm for small animal cone-beam CT is described and evaluated. A parameter representing the organ motion, derived from the raw projection images, is used for both cardiac and respiratory gating. The proposed algorithm makes it possible to reconstruct motion-corrected still images as well as to generate four-dimensional (4D) datasets representing the cardiac and pulmonary anatomy of free-breathing animals without the use of electrocardiogram (ECG) or respiratory sensors. Variation analysis of projections from several rotations is used to place a region of interest (ROI) on the diaphragm. The ROI is cranially extended to include the heart. The centre of mass (COM) variation within this ROI, the filtered frequency response and the local maxima are used to derive a binary motion-gating parameter for phase-sensitive gated reconstruction. This algorithm was implemented on a flat-panel-based cone-beam CT scanner and evaluated using a moving phantom and animal scans (seven rats and eight mice). Volumes were determined using a semiautomatic segmentation. In all cases robust gating signals could be obtained. The maximum volume error in phantom studies was less than 6%. By utilizing extrinsic gating via externally placed cardiac and respiratory sensors, the functional parameters (e.g. cardiac ejection fraction) and image quality were equivalent to this current gold standard. This algorithm obviates the necessity of both gating hardware and user interaction. The simplicity of the proposed algorithm enables adoption in a wide range of small animal cone-beam CT scanners.

  16. Biological X-ray irradiator characterization for use with small animals and cells.

    PubMed

    Bruno, A Colello; Mazaro, S J; Amaral, L L; Rego, E M; Oliveira, H F; Pavoni, J F

    2017-03-02

    This study presents the characterization of an X-ray irradiator through dosimetric tests, which confirms the actual dose rate that small animals and cells will be exposed to during radiobiological experiments. We evaluated the linearity, consistency, repeatability, and dose distribution in the positions in which the animals or cells are placed during irradiation. In addition, we evaluated the performance of the X-ray tube (voltage and tube operating current), the radiometric survey (leakage radiation) and safety devices. The irradiator default setting was established as 160 kV and 25 mA. Tests showed that the dose rate was linear overtime (R2=1) and remained stable for long (constant) and short (repeatability) intervals between readings. The mean dose rate inside the animal cages was 1.27±0.06 Gy/min with a uniform beam of 95.40% (above the minimum threshold guaranteed by the manufacturer). The mean dose rate inside the cell plates was 0.92±0.19 Gy/min. The dose rate dependence with tube voltage and current presented a quadratic and linear relationship, respectively. There was no observed mechanical failure during evaluation of the irradiator safety devices and the radiometric survey obtained a maximum ambient equivalent dose rate of 0.26 mSv/h, which exempts it from the radiological protection requirements of the International Atomic Energy Agency. The irradiator characterization enables us to perform radiobiological experiments, and assists or even replaces traditional therapy equipment (e.g., linear accelerators) for cells and small animal irradiation, especially in early research stages.

  17. Biological X-ray irradiator characterization for use with small animals and cells

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, A. Colello; Mazaro, S.J.; Amaral, L.L.; Rego, E.M.; Oliveira, H.F.; Pavoni, J.F.

    2017-01-01

    This study presents the characterization of an X-ray irradiator through dosimetric tests, which confirms the actual dose rate that small animals and cells will be exposed to during radiobiological experiments. We evaluated the linearity, consistency, repeatability, and dose distribution in the positions in which the animals or cells are placed during irradiation. In addition, we evaluated the performance of the X-ray tube (voltage and tube operating current), the radiometric survey (leakage radiation) and safety devices. The irradiator default setting was established as 160 kV and 25 mA. Tests showed that the dose rate was linear overtime (R2=1) and remained stable for long (constant) and short (repeatability) intervals between readings. The mean dose rate inside the animal cages was 1.27±0.06 Gy/min with a uniform beam of 95.40% (above the minimum threshold guaranteed by the manufacturer). The mean dose rate inside the cell plates was 0.92±0.19 Gy/min. The dose rate dependence with tube voltage and current presented a quadratic and linear relationship, respectively. There was no observed mechanical failure during evaluation of the irradiator safety devices and the radiometric survey obtained a maximum ambient equivalent dose rate of 0.26 mSv/h, which exempts it from the radiological protection requirements of the International Atomic Energy Agency. The irradiator characterization enables us to perform radiobiological experiments, and assists or even replaces traditional therapy equipment (e.g., linear accelerators) for cells and small animal irradiation, especially in early research stages. PMID:28273210

  18. Apparatus for proton radiography

    DOEpatents

    Martin, Ronald L.

    1976-01-01

    An apparatus for effecting diagnostic proton radiography of patients in hospitals comprises a source of negative hydrogen ions, a synchrotron for accelerating the negative hydrogen ions to a predetermined energy, a plurality of stations for stripping extraction of a radiography beam of protons, means for sweeping the extracted beam to cover a target, and means for measuring the residual range, residual energy, or percentage transmission of protons that pass through the target. The combination of information identifying the position of the beam with information about particles traversing the subject and the back absorber is performed with the aid of a computer to provide a proton radiograph of the subject. In an alternate embodiment of the invention, a back absorber comprises a plurality of scintillators which are coupled to detectors.

  19. Quantitative film radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Devine, G.; Dobie, D.; Fugina, J.; Hernandez, J.; Logan, C.; Mohr, P.; Moss, R.; Schumacher, B.; Updike, E.; Weirup, D.

    1991-02-26

    We have developed a system of quantitative radiography in order to produce quantitative images displaying homogeneity of parts. The materials that we characterize are synthetic composites and may contain important subtle density variations not discernible by examining a raw film x-radiograph. In order to quantitatively interpret film radiographs, it is necessary to digitize, interpret, and display the images. Our integrated system of quantitative radiography displays accurate, high-resolution pseudo-color images in units of density. We characterize approximately 10,000 parts per year in hundreds of different configurations and compositions with this system. This report discusses: the method; film processor monitoring and control; verifying film and processor performance; and correction of scatter effects.

  20. Cosmic Ray Scattering Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, C. L.

    2015-12-01

    Cosmic ray muons are ubiquitous, are highly penetrating, and can be used to measure material densities by either measuring the stopping rate or by measuring the scattering of transmitted muons. The Los Alamos team has studied scattering radiography for a number of applications. Some results will be shown of scattering imaging for a range of practical applications, and estimates will be made of the utility of scattering radiography for nondestructive assessments of large structures and for geological surveying. Results of imaging the core of the Toshiba Nuclear Critical Assembly (NCA) Reactor in Kawasaki, Japan and simulations of imaging the damaged cores of the Fukushima nuclear reactors will be presented. Below is an image made using muons of a core configuration for the NCA reactor.

  1. Annular phased array transducer for preclinical testing of anti-cancer drug efficacy on small animals.

    PubMed

    Kujawska, Tamara; Secomski, Wojciech; Byra, Michał; Postema, Michiel; Nowicki, Andrzej

    2017-04-01

    A technique using pulsed High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) to destroy deep-seated solid tumors is a promising noninvasive therapeutic approach. A main purpose of this study was to design and test a HIFU transducer suitable for preclinical studies of efficacy of tested, anti-cancer drugs, activated by HIFU beams, in the treatment of a variety of solid tumors implanted to various organs of small animals at the depth of the order of 1-2cm under the skin. To allow focusing of the beam, generated by such transducer, within treated tissue at different depths, a spherical, 2-MHz, 29-mm diameter annular phased array transducer was designed and built. To prove its potential for preclinical studies on small animals, multiple thermal lesions were induced in a pork loin ex vivo by heating beams of the same: 6W, or 12W, or 18W acoustic power and 25mm, 30mm, and 35mm focal lengths. Time delay for each annulus was controlled electronically to provide beam focusing within tissue at the depths of 10mm, 15mm, and 20mm. The exposure time required to induce local necrosis was determined at different depths using thermocouples. Location and extent of thermal lesions determined from numerical simulations were compared with those measured using ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging techniques and verified by a digital caliper after cutting the tested tissue samples. Quantitative analysis of the results showed that the location and extent of necrotic lesions on the magnetic resonance images are consistent with those predicted numerically and measured by caliper. The edges of lesions were clearly outlined although on ultrasound images they were fuzzy. This allows to conclude that the use of the transducer designed offers an effective noninvasive tool not only to induce local necrotic lesions within treated tissue without damaging the surrounding tissue structures but also to test various chemotherapeutics activated by the HIFU beams in preclinical studies on small animals.

  2. Performance evaluation of a very high resolution small animal PET imager using silicon scatter detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sang-June; Rogers, W. Leslie; Huh, Sam; Kagan, Harris; Honscheid, Klaus; Burdette, Don; Chesi, Enrico; Lacasta, Carlos; Llosa, Gabriela; Mikuz, Marko; Studen, Andrej; Weilhammer, Peter; Clinthorne, Neal H.

    2007-05-01

    A very high resolution positron emission tomography (PET) scanner for small animal imaging based on the idea of inserting a ring of high-granularity solid-state detectors into a conventional PET scanner is under investigation. A particularly interesting configuration of this concept, which takes the form of a degenerate Compton camera, is shown capable of providing sub-millimeter resolution with good sensitivity. We present a Compton PET system and estimate its performance using a proof-of-concept prototype. A prototype single-slice imaging instrument was constructed with two silicon detectors 1 mm thick, each having 512 1.4 mm × 1.4 mm pads arranged in a 32 × 16 array. The silicon detectors were located edgewise on opposite sides and flanked by two non-position sensitive BGO detectors. The scanner performance was measured for its sensitivity, energy, timing, spatial resolution and resolution uniformity. Using the experimental scanner, energy resolution for the silicon detectors is 1%. However, system energy resolution is dominated by the 23% FWHM BGO resolution. Timing resolution for silicon is 82.1 ns FWHM due to time-walk in trigger devices. Using the scattered photons, time resolution between the BGO detectors is 19.4 ns FWHM. Image resolution of 980 µm FWHM at the center of the field-of-view (FOV) is obtained from a 1D profile of a 0.254 mm diameter 18F line source image reconstructed using the conventional 2D filtered back-projection (FBP). The 0.4 mm gap between two line sources is resolved in the image reconstructed with both FBP and the maximum likelihood expectation maximization (ML-EM) algorithm. The experimental instrument demonstrates sub-millimeter resolution. A prototype having sensitivity high enough for initial small animal images can be used for in vivo studies of small animal models of metabolism, molecular mechanism and the development of new radiotracers.

  3. Digital radiography in space.

    PubMed

    Hart, Rob; Campbell, Mark R

    2002-06-01

    With the permanent habitation of the International Space Station, the planning of longer duration exploration missions, and the possibility of space tourism, it is likely that digital radiography will be needed in the future to support medical care in space. Ultrasound is currently the medical imaging modality of choice for spaceflight. Digital radiography in space is limited because of prohibitive launch costs (in the region of $20,000/kg) that severely restrict the volume, weight, and power requirements of medical care hardware. Technological increases in radiography, a predicted ten-fold decrease in future launch costs, and an increasing clinical need for definitive medical care in space will drive efforts to expand the ability to provide medical care in space including diagnostic imaging. Normal physiological responses to microgravity, in conjunction with the high-risk environment of spaceflight, increase the risk of injury and could imply an extended recovery period for common injuries. The advantages of gravity on Earth, such as the stabilization of patients undergoing radiography and the drainage of fluids, which provide radiographic contrast, are unavailable in space. This creates significant difficulties in patient immobilization and radiographic positioning. Gravity-dependent radiological signs, such as lipohemarthrosis in knee and shoulder trauma, air or fluid levels in pneumoperitoneum, pleural effusion, or bowel obstruction, and the apical pleural edge in pneumothorax become unavailable. Impaired healing processes such as delayed callus formation following fracture will have implications on imaging, and recovery time lines are unknown. The confined nature of spacecraft and the economic impossibility of launching lead-based personal protective equipment present significant challenges to crew radiation safety. A modified, free-floating radiographic C-arm device equipped with a digital detector and utilizing teleradiology support is proposed as a

  4. Patient care in radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Ehrlich, R.A.; McCloskey, E.D.

    1989-01-01

    This book focuses on patient care procedures for radiographers. The authors focus on the role of the radiographer as a member of the health care team. The authors report on such topics as communication in patient care: safety, medico-legal considerations, transfer and positioning; physical needs; infection control; medication; CPR standards, acute situations; examination of the GI tract; contrast media; special imaging techniques and bedside radiography.

  5. Effect of small and large animal skull bone on photoacoustic signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Qiuyun; Volinski, Bridget; Hariri, Ali; Fatima, Afreen; Nasiriavanaki, Mohammadreza

    2017-03-01

    Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) has proved to be a promising non-invasive technique for diagnosis, prognosis and treatment monitoring of neurological disorders in small and large animals. Skull bone effects both light illumination and ultrasound propagation. Hence, the PA signal is largely affected. This study aims to quantify and compare the attenuation of PA signal due to the skull obstacle in the light illumination path, in the ultrasound propagation path, or in both. The effect of mouse, rat, and mesocephalic dog skull bones, ex-vivo, is quantitatively studied.

  6. First Results of Small Animal Imaging Spect Detector for Cardiovascular Disease Studies on Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magliozzi, M. L.; Ballerini, M.; Cisbani, E.; Colilli, S.; Cusanno, F.; Fratoni, R.; Garibaldi, F.; Giuliani, F.; Gricia, M.; Lucentini, M.; Santavenere, F.; Torrioli, S.; Veneroni, P.; Majewsky, S.; Mok, S. P. G.; Tsui, B. M. W.; Wang, Y.; Marano, G.; Musumeci, M.; Palazzesi, S.; Ciccariello, G.; de Vincentis, G.; Accorsi, R.

    2008-06-01

    We have developed a compact, open, Dual Head pinhole SPECT system for high resolution molecular imaging with radionuclides of mice, dedicated mainly to preclinical study of stem cells capability to recover myocardial infarction. The gamma detector is made of pinhole tungsten collimators, pixellated scintillators, matrix of multi-anode PMTs and individual channel readout. Measurements have been performed on phantoms and live mice devoted initially to test and calibrate the system and to optimize protocols. The implemented system and the first results will be presented, demonstrating the effectiveness of our dedicated SPECT detector for small animal imaging.

  7. A Modified Wire Hanging Apparatus for Small Animal Muscle Function Testing

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Emma; Winder, Steve J

    2016-01-01

    Wire hang tests are simple and cheap methods to assess muscle performance in small rodents, but do not always yield consistent results. We describe a simple wire hang apparatus that comprises a continuous rolling loop. Wire hang times measured using the rolling wire provide consistent and reliable data that more accurately reflect the output of a continuous physical effort. As such data obtained in mice using a rolling wire are more representative of the physical changes in the mouse muscle and less susceptible to individual mouse behaviour and differences in animal handling.  PMID:28966868

  8. Phase contrast x-ray velocimetry of small animal lungs: optimising imaging rates.

    PubMed

    Murrie, R P; Paganin, D M; Fouras, A; Morgan, K S

    2016-01-01

    Chronic lung diseases affect a vast portion of the world's population. One of the key difficulties in accurately diagnosing and treating chronic lung disease is our inability to measure dynamic motion of the lungs in vivo. Phase contrast x-ray imaging (PCXI) allows us to image the lungs in high resolution by exploiting the difference in refractive indices between tissue and air. Combining PCXI with x-ray velocimetry (XV) allows us to track the local motion of the lungs, improving our ability to locate small regions of disease under natural ventilation conditions. Via simulation, we investigate the optimal imaging speed and sequence to capture lung motion in vivo in small animals using XV on both synchrotron and laboratory x-ray sources, balancing the noise inherent in a short exposure with motion blur that results from a long exposure.

  9. Animal health research in the Small Ruminant Collaborative Research Support Program.

    PubMed

    Alexander, A F; DeMartini, J C; McGuire, T C; Olander, H J

    1989-11-01

    Disease is a major constraint in small ruminant production systems in lesser-developed countries throughout the world. Animal health projects have been an integral part of the Small Ruminant Collaborative Research Support Program (SR-CRSP) from its inception. At the onset, these projects were oriented toward herd health care and veterinary extension activities. Later, all the projects developed a sharper focus in that they were directed to more basic studies of infectious disease. Diseases currently being investigated include caseous lymphadenitis, contagious caprine pleuropneumonia, caprine arthritis-encephalitis, ovine pulmonary carcinoma, ovine progressive pneumonia and neonatal mortality of alpaca. Continued, sharply focused studies are projected for the future to take advantage of recombinant technology in the development of multivalent vaccines.

  10. A cheap earphone for small animals with good frequency response in the ultrasonic frequency range.

    PubMed

    Schuller, G

    1997-02-01

    A new type of earphone for binaural stimulation in small animals is described. The characteristic features are: (1) small, 8 mm diameter, can be miniaturised further; (2) cheap, uses no expensive condenser microphone capsule, material costs less than 20 dollars; (3) frequency response flat within 6 dB between 10 kHz and 120 kHz, within 10 dB up to 200 kHz; (4) harmonic distortions at levels of the fundamental frequency below 75 dB SPL is below - 34 dB at worst case (10 kHz); and (5) due to the low price the most stable earphones optimally paired for dichotic stimulation can be selected by screening a number of individual specimen.

  11. Phase contrast x-ray velocimetry of small animal lungs: optimising imaging rates

    PubMed Central

    Murrie, R. P.; Paganin, D. M.; Fouras, A.; Morgan, K. S.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic lung diseases affect a vast portion of the world’s population. One of the key difficulties in accurately diagnosing and treating chronic lung disease is our inability to measure dynamic motion of the lungs in vivo. Phase contrast x-ray imaging (PCXI) allows us to image the lungs in high resolution by exploiting the difference in refractive indices between tissue and air. Combining PCXI with x-ray velocimetry (XV) allows us to track the local motion of the lungs, improving our ability to locate small regions of disease under natural ventilation conditions. Via simulation, we investigate the optimal imaging speed and sequence to capture lung motion in vivo in small animals using XV on both synchrotron and laboratory x-ray sources, balancing the noise inherent in a short exposure with motion blur that results from a long exposure. PMID:26819819

  12. A prototype instrument for single pinhole small animal adaptive SPECT imaging

    PubMed Central

    Freed, Melanie; Kupinski, Matthew A.; Furenlid, Lars R.; Wilson, Donald W.; Barrett, Harrison H.

    2008-01-01

    The authors have designed and constructed a small-animal adaptive SPECT imaging system as a prototype for quantifying the potential benefit of adaptive SPECT imaging over the traditional fixed geometry approach. The optical design of the system is based on filling the detector with the region of interest for each viewing angle, maximizing the sensitivity, and optimizing the resolution in the projection images. Additional feedback rules for determining the optimal geometry of the system can be easily added to the existing control software. Preliminary data have been taken of a phantom with a small, hot, offset lesion in a flat background in both adaptive and fixed geometry modes. Comparison of the predicted system behavior with the actual system behavior is presented, along with recommendations for system improvements. PMID:18561667

  13. Time-gated perturbation Monte Carlo for whole body functional imaging in small animals

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jin; Intes, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores a time-resolved functional imaging method based on Monte Carlo model for whole-body functional imaging of small animals. To improve the spatial resolution and quantitative accuracy of the functional map, a Bayesian hierarchical method with a high resolution spatial prior is applied to guide the optical reconstructions. Simulated data using the proposed approach are employed on an anatomically accurate mouse model where the optical properties range and volume limitations of the diffusion equation model exist. We investigate the performances of using time-gated data type and spatial priors to quantitatively image the functional parameters of multiple organs. Accurate reconstructions of the two main functional parameters of the blood volume and the relative oxygenation are demonstrated by using our method. Moreover, nonlinear optode settings guided by anatomical prior is proved to be critical to imaging small organs such as the heart. PMID:19997176

  14. Small animal deworming protocols, client education, and veterinarian perception of zoonotic parasites in western Canada

    PubMed Central

    Stull, Jason W.; Carr, Anthony P.; Chomel, Bruno B.; Berghaus, Roy D.; Hird, David W.

    2007-01-01

    Questionnaires were mailed to veterinarians in western Canada to determine dog and cat deworming protocols and the association between perceived zoonotic risk and perceived prevalence of endoparasites and deworming protocols. Of the responding veterinarians (545), 13% and 39% recommended deworming protocols consistent with established guidelines for puppies and kittens, respectively. Mixed animal practitioners and high-perceived prevalence of Toxocara cati were associated with increased appropriate kitten deworming (P < 0.01 and P = 0.04, respectively). High-perceived zoonotic concern of Toxocara canis was associated with increased appropriate puppy deworming (P = 0.01). Sixty-eight percent of veterinarians noted an established hospital deworming protocol, although only 78% followed the protocol. Forty-four percent of veterinarians stated they discussed with all clients the zoonotic risk of animal-derived endoparasites, whereas the remainder discussed it only under particular circumstances or not at all. Most small animal deworming protocols recommended in western Canada begin too late to inhibit endoparasite shedding. Increased educational efforts directed at veterinarians are warranted. PMID:17436903

  15. Modelling human drug abuse and addiction with dedicated small animal positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Dalley, Jeffrey W; Fryer, Tim D; Aigbirhio, Franklin I; Brichard, Laurent; Richards, Hugh K; Hong, Young T; Baron, Jean-Claude; Everitt, Barry J; Robbins, Trevor W

    2009-01-01

    Drug addiction is a chronically relapsing brain disorder, which causes substantial harm to the addicted individual and society as a whole. Despite considerable research we still do not understand why some people appear particularly disposed to drug abuse and addiction, nor do we understand how frequently co-morbid brain disorders such as depression and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) contribute causally to the emergence of addiction-like behaviour. In recent years positron emission tomography (PET) has come of age as a translational neuroimaging technique in the study of drug addiction, ADHD and other psychopathological states in humans. PET provides unparalleled quantitative assessment of the spatial distribution of radiolabelled molecules in the brain and because it is non-invasive permits longitudinal assessment of physiological parameters such as binding potential in the same subject over extended periods of time. However, whilst there are a burgeoning number of human PET experiments in ADHD and drug addiction there is presently a paucity of PET imaging studies in animals despite enormous advances in our understanding of the neurobiology of these disorders based on sophisticated animal models. This article highlights recent examples of successful cross-species convergence of findings from PET studies in the context of drug addiction and ADHD and identifies how small animal PET can more effectively be used to model complex psychiatric disorders involving at their core impaired behavioural self-control.

  16. Scalable electrophysiology in intact small animals with nanoscale suspended electrode arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzales, Daniel L.; Badhiwala, Krishna N.; Vercosa, Daniel G.; Avants, Benjamin W.; Liu, Zheng; Zhong, Weiwei; Robinson, Jacob T.

    2017-07-01

    Electrical measurements from large populations of animals would help reveal fundamental properties of the nervous system and neurological diseases. Small invertebrates are ideal for these large-scale studies; however, patch-clamp electrophysiology in microscopic animals typically requires invasive dissections and is low-throughput. To overcome these limitations, we present nano-SPEARs: suspended electrodes integrated into a scalable microfluidic device. Using this technology, we have made the first extracellular recordings of body-wall muscle electrophysiology inside an intact roundworm, Caenorhabditis elegans. We can also use nano-SPEARs to record from multiple animals in parallel and even from other species, such as Hydra littoralis. Furthermore, we use nano-SPEARs to establish the first electrophysiological phenotypes for C. elegans models for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Parkinson's disease, and show a partial rescue of the Parkinson's phenotype through drug treatment. These results demonstrate that nano-SPEARs provide the core technology for microchips that enable scalable, in vivo studies of neurobiology and neurological diseases.

  17. Surface EMG-recordings using a miniaturised matrix electrode: a new technique for small animals.

    PubMed

    Biedermann, F; Schumann, N P; Fischer, M S; Scholle, H C

    2000-04-01

    A new method for multichannel surface-EMG measurements in small animals is presented. The underlying scientific aim is the characterisation of the spreading and the co-ordination of skeletal muscle activation between different muscles or muscle parts, depending on various motor tasks. The myoelectrical signals were recorded monopolarly by a 16-channel matrix electrode on the muscle surface directly under the skin on the fascia of the investigated muscle, without damaging the muscle. Surface-EMG's were recorded for at least 5 days after surgery without electrical interferences. During defined motor tasks, the projection of the myoelectrical activation of the different parts of the M. triceps brachii of rats (Rattus norvegicus), pikas (Ochotona rufescens) and cuis (Galea musteloides) or the M. anconeus of toads (Bufo marinus) on the muscle surface was mapped. The locomotion of the investigated animals was monitored by a three-dimensional kinematic analysis (video and/or high-speed cineradiography). There was no perceptible influence from application of EMG matrix electrode. The miniaturised matrix electrode seemed practicable in gaining insight into changes in myoelectrical activation patterns (EMG mapping). This allows a characterisation of the intramuscular co-ordination processes corresponding to the actual morphofunctional state of the investigated animals.

  18. Small-animal tomography with a liquid-metal-jet x-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsson, D. H.; Lundström, U.; Westermark, U.; Takman, P. A. C.; Burvall, A.; Arsenian Henriksson, M.; Hertz, H. M.

    2012-03-01

    X-ray tomography of small animals is an important tool for medical research. For high-resolution x-ray imaging of few-cm-thick samples such as, e.g., mice, high-brightness x-ray sources with energies in the few-10-keV range are required. In this paper we perform the first small-animal imaging and tomography experiments using liquid-metal-jet-anode x-ray sources. This type of source shows promise to increase the brightness of microfocus x-ray systems, but present sources are typically optimized for an energy of 9 keV. Here we describe the details of a high-brightness 24-keV electron-impact laboratory microfocus x-ray source based on continuous operation of a heated liquid-In/Ga-jet anode. The source normally operates with 40 W of electron-beam power focused onto the metal jet, producing a 7×7 μm2 FWHM x-ray spot. The peak spectral brightness is 4 × 109 photons / ( s × mm2 × mrad2 × 0.1%BW) at the 24.2 keV In Kα line. We use the new In/Ga source and an existing Ga/In/Sn source for high-resolution imaging and tomography of mice.

  19. Small-animal whole-body imaging using a photoacoustic full ring array system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Jun; Guo, Zijian; Aguirre, Andres; Zhu, Quing; Wang, Lihong V.

    2011-03-01

    In this report, we present a novel 3D photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) system for small-animal whole-body imaging. The PACT system, based on a 512-element full-ring transducer array, received photoacoustic signals primarily from a 2-mm-thick slice. The light was generated by a pulse laser, and can either illuminate from the top or be reshaped to illuminate the sample from the side, using a conical lens and an optical condenser. The PACT system was capable of acquiring an in-plane image in 1.6 s; by scanning the sample in the elevational direction, a 3D tomographic image could be constructed. We tested the system by imaging a cylindrical phantom made of human hairs immersed in a scattering medium. The reconstructed image achieved an in-plane resolution of 0.1 mm and an elevational resolution of 1 mm. After deconvolution in the elevational direction, the 3D image was found to match well with the phantom. The system was also used to image a baby mouse in situ; the spinal cord and ribs can be seen easily in the reconstructed image. Our results demonstrate that the PACT system has the potential to be used for fast small-animal whole-body tomographic imaging.

  20. Three-dimensional segmentation and skeletonization to build an airway tree data structure for small animals.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Ashutosh; Lee, Zhenghong

    2005-04-07

    Quantitative analysis of intrathoracic airway tree geometry is important for objective evaluation of bronchial tree structure and function. Currently, there is more human data than small animal data on airway morphometry. In this study, we implemented a semi-automatic approach to quantitatively describe airway tree geometry by using high-resolution computed tomography (CT) images to build a tree data structure for small animals such as rats and mice. Silicon lung casts of the excised lungs from a canine and a mouse were used for micro-CT imaging of the airway trees. The programming language IDL was used to implement a 3D region-growing threshold algorithm for segmenting out the airway lung volume from the CT data. Subsequently, a fully-parallel 3D thinning algorithm was implemented in order to complete the skeletonization of the segmented airways. A tree data structure was then created and saved by parsing through the skeletonized volume using the Python programming language. Pertinent information such as the length of all airway segments was stored in the data structure. This approach was shown to be accurate and efficient for up to six generations for the canine lung cast and ten generations for the mouse lung cast.

  1. Mid-Range Coil Array for Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Small Animals

    SciTech Connect

    Solis, S. E.; Tomasi, D.; Rodriguez, A. O.

    2008-08-11

    The vast majority of articles on MRI RF coils over the past two decades have focused on large coils, where sample losses dominate, or on micro-coils, where sample and capacitor losses are negligible. Few have addressed the mid-range coils, seen in the majority of small-animal applications, where all the sources of loss are important, for example, mouse brain and body coils from 125 to 750 MHz. We developed a four-saddle coil array for magnetic resonance imaging of small animals. The saddle coil elements in the array were evenly distributed to cover the rat's head. The coil array was tuned to the resonant frequency of 170 MHz. Due to the close proximity of the coil elements, it was necessary to decouple the coil array using nonmagnetic trimmers and, it was operated in the transceiver mode and quadrature-driven. To test the coil array performance at high field, phantom images were acquired with our saddle coil array and standard pulse sequences on a research-dedicated 4 Tesla scanner. Ex vivo brain images of a rat were also acquired, and proved the feasibility of the scaled version of a saddle coil array and, its compatibility with standard pulse sequences when used in a high field magnetic resonance imager.

  2. 3D-Printed Small-Animal Immobilizer for Use in Preclinical Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    McCarroll, Rachel E; Rubinstein, Ashley E; Kingsley, Charles V; Yang, Jinzhong; Yang, Peiying; Court, Laurence E

    2015-09-01

    We have designed a method for immobilizing the subjects of small-animal studies using a study group-specific 3D-printed immobilizer that significantly reduces interfraction rotational variation. A cone-beam CT scan acquired from a single specimen in a study group was used to create a 3D-printed immobilizer that can be used for all specimens in the same study group. 3D printing allows for the incorporation of study-specific features into the immobilizer design, including geometries suitable for use in MR and CT scanners, holders for fiducial markers, and anesthesia nose cones of various sizes. Using metrics of rotational setup variations, we compared the current setup in our small-animal irradiation system, a half-pipe bed, with the 3D-printed device. We also assessed translational displacement within the immobilizer. The printed design significantly reduced setup variation, with average reductions in rotational displacement of 76% ± 3% (1.57 to 0.37°) in pitch, 78% ± 3% (1.85 to 0.41°) in yaw, and 87% ± 3% (5.39 to 0.70°) in roll. Translational displacement within the printed immobilizer was less than 1.5 ± 0.3 mm. This method of immobilization allows for repeatable setup when using MR or CT scans for the purpose of radiotherapy, streamlines the workflow, and places little burden on the study subjects.

  3. Small animal imaging by single photon emission using pinhole and coded aperture collimation

    SciTech Connect

    Garibaldi, F.; Accorsi, R.; Cinti, M.N.; Colilli, S.; Cusanno, F.; De Vincentis, G.; Fortuna, A.; Girolami, B.; Giuliani, F.; Gricia, M.; Lanza, R.; Loizzo, A.; Loizzo, S.; Lucentini, M.; Majewski, S.; Santavenere, F.; Pani, R.; Pellegrini, R.; Signore, A.; Scopinaro, F.

    2005-06-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate the basic properties and limits of the small animal imaging systems based on single photon detectors. The detectors for radio imaging of small animals are challenging because of the very high spatial resolution needed, possibly coupled with high efficiency to allow dynamic studies. These performances are hardly attainable with single photon technique because of the collimator that limits both spatial resolution and sensitivity. In this paper we describe a simple desktop detector based on pixellated NaI(Tl) scintillator array coupled with a pinhole collimator and a PSPMT, the Hamamatsu R2486. The limits of such systems as well as the way to overcome them will be shown. In fact better light sampling at the anode level would allow better pixel identification for higher number of pixel that is one of the parameters defining the image quality. Also the spatial resolution would improve. The performances of such layout are compared with others using PSPMTs differing from R2486 for the light sampling at the anode level and different areas. We show how a further step, namely the substitution of the pinhole collimator with a coded aperture, will allow a great improvement in system sensitivity while maintaining very good spatial resolution, possibly submillimetric. Calculations and simulations show that sensitivity would improve by a factor of 50.

  4. Leptospirosis in a small animal veterinarian: reminder to follow standardized infection control procedures.

    PubMed

    Baer, R; Turnberg, W; Yu, D; Wohrle, R

    2010-06-01

    A small animal veterinarian in Washington State developed leptospirosis after an occupational exposure. Approximately 10 days prior to the onset of illness, he examined a healthy appearing pet rat for fleas, which urinated on his un-gloved hands. Although the veterinarian washed his hands after the examination, his hands had abrasions from gardening. The veterinarian was hospitalized for 12 days and was able to return to work part-time 1 month following discharge. This illness may have been prevented if the veterinarian had been wearing gloves during the examination as recommended by the National Association of State Public Health Veterinarians (NASPHV), Veterinary Infection Control Committee, in its Compendium of Veterinary Standard Precautions for Zoonotic Disease Prevention in Veterinary Personnel (2008). This case alerts us to the need for small animal veterinarians to minimize their infection risk by practising recommended infection control procedures. Veterinarians should establish and follow a written infection control plan based on the standardized infection control approach adopted by the NASPHV to minimize their risk of occupational zoonotic infections.

  5. A rebreathing method for measuring lung volume, diffusing capacity and cardiac output in conscious small animals.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Cuneyt; Johnson, Robert L; Hsia, Connie C W

    2005-04-15

    We developed a multiple gas rebreathing technique for measuring lung diffusing capacity (DL(CO)), lung volume (V(L)) and cardiac output simultaneously in conscious spontaneously breathing small animals. Lung volume was measured from the dilution of methane (CH4) or sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) and verified independently by a helium washout technique. Cardiac output and DL(CO) were estimated from the uptake of acetylene and carbon monoxide, respectively. We tested guinea pigs at two levels of alveolar oxygen tension in order to estimate membrane diffusing capacity and pulmonary capillary blood volume by the Roughton-Forster technique. Results show that measured DL(CO) are consistent with reported values in anesthetized guinea pigs as well as with allometric comparison across species. Lung volume estimated from SF6 dilution agreed closely with that estimated independently from helium washout; however, lung volume estimated from CH4 dilution was systematically lower due to the addition of endogenously produced CH4 to the rebreathing system. We conclude that this technique can be used to measure resting lung function in conscious unsedated small animals.

  6. Online virtual isocenter based radiation field targeting for high performance small animal microirradiation.

    PubMed

    Stewart, James M P; Ansell, Steve; Lindsay, Patricia E; Jaffray, David A

    2015-12-07

    Advances in precision microirradiators for small animal radiation oncology studies have provided the framework for novel translational radiobiological studies. Such systems target radiation fields at the scale required for small animal investigations, typically through a combination of on-board computed tomography image guidance and fixed, interchangeable collimators. Robust targeting accuracy of these radiation fields remains challenging, particularly at the millimetre scale field sizes achievable by the majority of microirradiators. Consistent and reproducible targeting accuracy is further hindered as collimators are removed and inserted during a typical experimental workflow. This investigation quantified this targeting uncertainty and developed an online method based on a virtual treatment isocenter to actively ensure high performance targeting accuracy for all radiation field sizes. The results indicated that the two-dimensional field placement uncertainty was as high as 1.16 mm at isocenter, with simulations suggesting this error could be reduced to 0.20 mm using the online correction method. End-to-end targeting analysis of a ball bearing target on radiochromic film sections showed an improved targeting accuracy with the three-dimensional vector targeting error across six different collimators reduced from [Formula: see text] mm (mean  ±  SD) to [Formula: see text] mm for an isotropic imaging voxel size of 0.1 mm.

  7. Online virtual isocenter based radiation field targeting for high performance small animal microirradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, James M. P.; Ansell, Steve; Lindsay, Patricia E.; Jaffray, David A.

    2015-12-01

    Advances in precision microirradiators for small animal radiation oncology studies have provided the framework for novel translational radiobiological studies. Such systems target radiation fields at the scale required for small animal investigations, typically through a combination of on-board computed tomography image guidance and fixed, interchangeable collimators. Robust targeting accuracy of these radiation fields remains challenging, particularly at the millimetre scale field sizes achievable by the majority of microirradiators. Consistent and reproducible targeting accuracy is further hindered as collimators are removed and inserted during a typical experimental workflow. This investigation quantified this targeting uncertainty and developed an online method based on a virtual treatment isocenter to actively ensure high performance targeting accuracy for all radiation field sizes. The results indicated that the two-dimensional field placement uncertainty was as high as 1.16 mm at isocenter, with simulations suggesting this error could be reduced to 0.20 mm using the online correction method. End-to-end targeting analysis of a ball bearing target on radiochromic film sections showed an improved targeting accuracy with the three-dimensional vector targeting error across six different collimators reduced from 0.56+/- 0.05 mm (mean  ±  SD) to 0.05+/- 0.05 mm for an isotropic imaging voxel size of 0.1 mm.

  8. Capillary rise on legs of a small animal and on artificially textured surfaces mimicking them.

    PubMed

    Tani, Marie; Ishii, Daisuke; Ito, Shuto; Hariyama, Takahiko; Shimomura, Masatsugu; Okumura, Ko

    2014-01-01

    The wharf roach Ligia exotica is a small animal that lives by the sea and absorbs water from the sea through its legs by virtue of a remarkable array of small blades of micron scale. We find that the imbibition dynamics on the legs is rather complex on a microscopic scale, but on a macroscopic scale the imbibition length seems to simply scale linearly with elapsed time. This unusual dynamics of imbibition, which usually slows down with time, is advantageous for long-distance water transport and results from repetition of unit dynamics. Inspired by the remarkable features, we study artificially textured surfaces mimicking the structure on the legs of the animal. Unlike the case of the wharf roach, the linear dynamics were not reproduced on the artificial surfaces, which may result from more subtle features on the real legs that are not faithfully reflected on the artificial surfaces. Instead, the nonlinear dynamics revealed that hybrid structures on the artificial surfaces speed up the water transport compared with non-hybrid ones. In addition, the dynamics on the artificial surfaces turn out to be well described by a composite theory developed here, with the theory giving useful guiding principles for designing hybrid textured surfaces for rapid imbibition and elucidating physical advantages of the microscopic design on the legs.

  9. Potential applications of flat-panel volumetric CT in morphologic and functional small animal imaging.

    PubMed

    Greschus, Susanne; Kiessling, Fabian; Lichy, Matthias P; Moll, Jens; Mueller, Margareta M; Savai, Rajkumar; Rose, Frank; Ruppert, Clemens; Günther, Andreas; Luecke, Marcus; Fusenig, Norbert E; Semmler, Wolfhard; Traupe, Horst

    2005-08-01

    Noninvasive radiologic imaging has recently gained considerable interest in basic and preclinical research for monitoring disease progression and therapeutic efficacy. In this report, we introduce flat-panel volumetric computed tomography (fpVCT) as a powerful new tool for noninvasive imaging of different organ systems in preclinical research. The three-dimensional visualization that is achieved by isotropic high-resolution datasets is illustrated for the skeleton, chest, abdominal organs, and brain of mice. The high image quality of chest scans enables the visualization of small lung nodules in an orthotopic lung cancer model and the reliable imaging of therapy side effects such as lung fibrosis. Using contrast-enhanced scans, fpVCT displayed the vascular trees of the brain, liver, and kidney down to the subsegmental level. Functional application of fpVCT in dynamic contrast-enhanced scans of the rat brain delivered physiologically reliable data of perfusion and tissue blood volume. Beyond scanning of small animal models as demonstrated here, fpVCT provides the ability to image animals up to the size of primates.

  10. Evaluation of hardware in a small-animal SPECT system using reconstructed images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hesterman, Jacob Y.; Kupinski, Matthew A.; Clarkson, Eric; Wilson, Donald W.; Barrett, Harrison H.

    2007-03-01

    Evaluation of imaging hardware represents a vital component of system design. In small-animal SPECT imaging, this evaluation has become increasingly diffcult with the emergence of multi-pinhole apertures and adaptive, or patient-specific, imaging. This paper will describe two methods for hardware evaluation using reconstructed images. The first method is a rapid technique incorporating a system-specific non-linear, three-dimensional point response. This point response is easily computed and offers qualitative insight into an aperture's resolution and artifact characteristics. The second method is an objective assessment of signal detection in lumpy backgrounds using the channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) with 3D Laguerre-Gauss and difference-of-Gaussian channels to calculate area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUC). Previous work presented at this meeting described a unique, small-animal SPECT system (M 3R) capable of operating under a myriad of hardware configurations and ideally suited for image quality studies. Measured system matrices were collected for several hardware configurations of M 3R. The data used to implement these two methods was then generated by taking simulated objects through the measured system matrices. The results of these two methods comprise a combination of qualitative and quantitative analysis that is well-suited for hardware assessment.

  11. Feasibility study of small animal imaging using clinical PET/CT scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Wen-Lin; Chen, Chia-Lin; Wang, Ze-Jing; Wu, Tung-Hsin; Liu, Dai-Wei; Lee, Jason J. S.

    2007-02-01

    The feasibility of small animal imaging using a clinical positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) scanner with [F-18]-fluoro-2-deoxy- D-glucose (FDG) was evaluated. Two protocols in PET/CT system, single-mouse high-resolution mode (SHR) and multi-mouse high throughput mode (MHT) protocol were employed to investigate the ability of the scanner and also explored the performance differences between microPET and clinical PET/CT. In this study, we have found that even the clinical PET/CT scanner could not compete with the microPET scanner, especially in spatial resolution; the high-resolution CT image could advance the anatomical information to sub-millimeter level. Besides, CT-based attenuation correction can improve the image uniformity characteristics and quantification accuracy, and the large bore of a human whole-body scanner broadens the possibility of high throughput studies. Considering all the benefits, clinical PET/CT imaging might be a potential alternative for small animal study.

  12. Capturing the complexity of first opinion small animal consultations using direct observation

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, N. J.; Brennan, M. L.; Cobb, M.; Dean, R. S.

    2015-01-01

    Various different methods are currently being used to capture data from small animal consultations. The aim of this study was to develop a tool to record detailed data from consultations by direct observation. A second aim was to investigate the complexity of the consultation by examining the number of problems discussed per patient. A data collection tool was developed and used during direct observation of small animal consultations in eight practices. Data were recorded on consultation type, patient signalment and number of problems discussed. During 16 weeks of data collection, 1901 patients were presented. Up to eight problems were discussed for some patients; more problems were discussed during preventive medicine consultations than during first consultations (P<0.001) or revisits (P<0.001). Fewer problems were discussed for rabbits than cats (P<0.001) or dogs (P<0.001). Age was positively correlated with discussion of specific health problems and negatively correlated with discussion of preventive medicine. Consultations are complex with multiple problems frequently discussed, suggesting comorbidity may be common. Future research utilising practice data should consider how much of this complexity needs to be captured, and use appropriate methods accordingly. The findings here have implications for directing research and education as well as application in veterinary practice. PMID:25262057

  13. In vivo small animal micro-CT using nanoparticle contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Ashton, Jeffrey R; West, Jennifer L; Badea, Cristian T

    2015-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is one of the most valuable modalities for in vivo imaging because it is fast, high-resolution, cost-effective, and non-invasive. Moreover, CT is heavily used not only in the clinic (for both diagnostics and treatment planning) but also in preclinical research as micro-CT. Although CT is inherently effective for lung and bone imaging, soft tissue imaging requires the use of contrast agents. For small animal micro-CT, nanoparticle contrast agents are used in order to avoid rapid renal clearance. A variety of nanoparticles have been used for micro-CT imaging, but the majority of research has focused on the use of iodine-containing nanoparticles and gold nanoparticles. Both nanoparticle types can act as highly effective blood pool contrast agents or can be targeted using a wide variety of targeting mechanisms. CT imaging can be further enhanced by adding spectral capabilities to separate multiple co-injected nanoparticles in vivo. Spectral CT, using both energy-integrating and energy-resolving detectors, has been used with multiple contrast agents to enable functional and molecular imaging. This review focuses on new developments for in vivo small animal micro-CT using novel nanoparticle probes applied in preclinical research.

  14. An implantable MEMS micropump system for drug delivery in small animals.

    PubMed

    Gensler, Heidi; Sheybani, Roya; Li, Po-Ying; Mann, Ronalee Lo; Meng, Ellis

    2012-06-01

    We present the first implantable drug delivery system for controlled timing and location of dosing in small animals. Current implantable drug delivery devices do not provide control over these factors nor are they feasible for implantation in research animals as small as mice. Our system utilizes an integrated electrolysis micropump, is refillable, has an inert drug reservoir for broad drug compatibility, and is capable of adjustment to the delivery regimen while implanted. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was used for characterization of electrodes on glass substrate and a flexible Parylene substrate. Benchtop testing of the electrolysis actuator resulted in flow rates from 1 μL/min to 34 μL/min on glass substrate and up to 6.8 μL/min on Parylene substrate. The fully integrated system generated a flow rate of 4.72 ± 0.35 μL/min under applied constant current of 1.0 mA while maintaining a power consumption of only ~3 mW. Finally, we demonstrated in vivo application of the system for anti-cancer drug delivery in mice.

  15. A method for small-animal PET/CT alignment calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascau, J.; Vaquero, J. J.; Chamorro-Servent, J.; Rodríguez-Ruano, A.; Desco, M.

    2012-06-01

    Small-animal positron-emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) scanners provide anatomical and molecular imaging, which enables the joint visualization and analysis of both types of data. A proper alignment calibration procedure is essential for small-animal imaging since resolution is much higher than that in human devices. This work presents an alignment phantom and two different calibration methods that provide a reliable and repeatable measurement of the spatial geometrical alignment between the PET and the CT subsystems of a hybrid scanner. The phantom can be built using laboratory materials, and it is meant to estimate the rigid spatial transformation that aligns both modalities. It consists of three glass capillaries filled with a positron-emitter solution and positioned in a non-coplanar triangular geometry inside the system field of view. The calibration methods proposed are both based on automatic line detection, but with different approaches to calculate the transformation of the lines between both modalities. Our results show an average accuracy of the alignment estimation of 0.39 mm over the whole field of view.

  16. Three-dimensional segmentation and skeletonization to build an airway tree data structure for small animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaturvedi, Ashutosh; Lee, Zhenghong

    2005-04-01

    Quantitative analysis of intrathoracic airway tree geometry is important for objective evaluation of bronchial tree structure and function. Currently, there is more human data than small animal data on airway morphometry. In this study, we implemented a semi-automatic approach to quantitatively describe airway tree geometry by using high-resolution computed tomography (CT) images to build a tree data structure for small animals such as rats and mice. Silicon lung casts of the excised lungs from a canine and a mouse were used for micro-CT imaging of the airway trees. The programming language IDL was used to implement a 3D region-growing threshold algorithm for segmenting out the airway lung volume from the CT data. Subsequently, a fully-parallel 3D thinning algorithm was implemented in order to complete the skeletonization of the segmented airways. A tree data structure was then created and saved by parsing through the skeletonized volume using the Python programming language. Pertinent information such as the length of all airway segments was stored in the data structure. This approach was shown to be accurate and efficient for up to six generations for the canine lung cast and ten generations for the mouse lung cast.

  17. A force plate system for measuring low-magnitude reaction forces in small laboratory animals.

    PubMed

    Handley, D E; Ross, J F; Carr, G J

    1998-07-01

    We present a force plate system which measures low-magnitude vertical reaction forces generated by small laboratory animals. The force plate mechanical design minimizes radiated transverse waves, acoustic reverberation, and standing waves caused by impacts on the force plate surface. A secondary force plate and PC-based software algorithm minimize floor vibrational artifact. The force plate was used to measure function of rats during two tests: forelimb/hindlimb hopping reaction and surface righting reaction. In control rats, forelimb hopping rate exceeded hindlimb hopping rate during 16 weeks of repeated testing. Subchronic intraperitoneal (i.p.) dosing of 10 mg/kg/day acrylamide produced a selective impairment of hindlimb hopping. In contrast, single doses of haloperidol (1-5 mg/kg, i.p.) slowed the righting reaction and produced a relatively selective impairment of forelimb hopping. The force plate system presents new opportunities for performing quantitative neurological assessments of small laboratory animals when previously such tests had been performed subjectively and qualitatively.

  18. Mid-Range Coil Array for Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Small Animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solis, S. E.; Tomasi, D.; Rodríguez, A. O.

    2008-08-01

    The vast majority of articles on MRI RF coils over the past two decades have focused on large coils, where sample losses dominate, or on micro-coils, where sample and capacitor losses are negligible. Few have addressed the mid-range coils, seen in the majority of small-animal applications, where all the sources of loss are important, for example, mouse brain and body coils from 125 to 750 MHz. We developed a four-saddle coil array for magnetic resonance imaging of small animals. The saddle coil elements in the array were evenly distributed to cover the rat's head. The coil array was tuned to the resonant frequency of 170 MHz. Due to the close proximity of the coil elements, it was necessary to decouple the coil array using nonmagnetic trimmers and, it was operated in the transceiver mode and quadrature-driven. To test the coil array performance at high field, phantom images were acquired with our saddle coil array and standard pulse sequences on a research-dedicated 4 Tesla scanner. Ex vivo brain images of a rat were also acquired, and proved the feasibility of the scaled version of a saddle coil array and, its compatibility with standard pulse sequences when used in a high field magnetic resonance imager.

  19. Development of an Extracorporeal Perfusion Device for Small Animal Free Flaps

    PubMed Central

    Fichter, Andreas M.; Ritschl, Lucas M.; Borgmann, Anna; Humbs, Martin; Luppa, Peter B.; Wolff, Klaus-Dietrich; Mücke, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Background Extracorporeal perfusion (ECP) might prolong the vital storage capabilities of composite free flaps, potentially opening a wide range of clinical applications. Aim of the study was the development a validated low-cost extracorporeal perfusion model for further research in small animal free flaps. Methods After establishing optimal perfusion settings, a specially designed extracorporeal perfusion system was evaluated during 8-hour perfusion of rat epigastric flaps followed by microvascular free flap transfer. Controls comprised sham-operation, ischemia and in vivo perfusion. Flaps and perfusate (diluted blood) were closely monitored by blood gas analysis, combined laser Doppler flowmetry and remission spectroscopy and Indocyanine-Green angiography. Evaluations were complemented by assessment of necrotic area and light microscopy at day 7. Results ECP was established and maintained for 8 hours with constant potassium and pH levels. Subsequent flap transfer was successful. Notably, the rate of necrosis of extracorporeally perfused flaps (27%) was even lower than after in vivo perfusion (49%), although not statistically significant (P = 0,083). After sham-operation, only 6% of the total flap area became necrotic, while 8-hour ischemia led to total flap loss (98%). Angiographic and histological findings confirmed these observations. Conclusions Vital storage capabilities of microvascular flaps can be prolonged by temporary ECP. Our study provides important insights on the pathophysiological processes during extracorporeal tissue perfusion and provides a validated small animal perfusion model for further studies. PMID:26808996

  20. Optical coherence tomography for assessment of microbicide safety in a small animal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Brent A.; Vincent, Kathleen L.; Bourne, Nigel; Vargas, Gracie; Motamedi, Massoud

    2013-04-01

    Sensitive imaging techniques for small animals are needed to assess drug toxicity in preclinical studies. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) provides a noninvasive tool for high-resolution, depth-resolved visualization of drug-induced changes in tissue morphology. In a mouse model, we utilize OCT to assess vaginal tissue integrity following the application of topical microbicides (drugs used to prevent infection). Mice are challenged with herpes simplex virus-2 (HSV-2) to determine the correlation of tissue damage as quantified by OCT to increased susceptibility. The microbicide benzalkonium chloride (BZK) (0.02, 0.2, or 2%) or phosphate buffered saline control is administered intravaginally. In vivo OCT imaging and collection of tissue samples are performed after treatment. A quantitative OCT scoring system is applied to assess epithelial damage, and the results are compared with those of histology. A separate group of mice are treated similarly then challenged with HSV-2. Epithelial morphology quantified noninvasively by OCT and histology are dose-dependent (p<0.0001). The OCT scoring system detected a significant increase in epithelial damage with increasing BZK concentration (p<0.0001). These results paralleled an increase in HSV-2 susceptibility (p<0.005). OCT can be used as a noninvasive tool to assess topical drug toxicity in a small animal model with potential to predict increased susceptibility to vaginal infection.

  1. In vivo small animal micro-CT using nanoparticle contrast agents

    PubMed Central

    Ashton, Jeffrey R.; West, Jennifer L.; Badea, Cristian T.

    2015-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is one of the most valuable modalities for in vivo imaging because it is fast, high-resolution, cost-effective, and non-invasive. Moreover, CT is heavily used not only in the clinic (for both diagnostics and treatment planning) but also in preclinical research as micro-CT. Although CT is inherently effective for lung and bone imaging, soft tissue imaging requires the use of contrast agents. For small animal micro-CT, nanoparticle contrast agents are used in order to avoid rapid renal clearance. A variety of nanoparticles have been used for micro-CT imaging, but the majority of research has focused on the use of iodine-containing nanoparticles and gold nanoparticles. Both nanoparticle types can act as highly effective blood pool contrast agents or can be targeted using a wide variety of targeting mechanisms. CT imaging can be further enhanced by adding spectral capabilities to separate multiple co-injected nanoparticles in vivo. Spectral CT, using both energy-integrating and energy-resolving detectors, has been used with multiple contrast agents to enable functional and molecular imaging. This review focuses on new developments for in vivo small animal micro-CT using novel nanoparticle probes applied in preclinical research. PMID:26581654

  2. Scanner-Dependent Threshold Estimation of Wavelet Denoising for Small-Animal PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jie; Lee, Jhih-Shian; Xu, Hang; Xu, Kai; Ren, Zi-Hui; Chen, Jyh-Cheng; Wu, Cheng-Han

    2017-01-01

    Reducing the noise associated with small-animal positron emission tomography (PET) images is an important and challenging task. Recently, several hybrid denoising techniques based on wavelet transform (WT) have been developed. However, these hybrid methods have complicated mathematical structures and require complex parameter estimations, and they therefore require a high level of manual intervention. Under such circumstances, good performance with respect to image quality using these new methods would only seem to be achievable with an increased computational burden. In this paper, we propose a novel wavelet denoising (WD) method. This method is based on scanner-dependent threshold estimation and the Visushrink method. The method provides a compromise between computational burden and image quality. The experimental results indicate that the proposed method is better than the Visushrink method. Compared with the Visushrink method, the proposed method provides good image quality at higher decomposition levels. In terms of usability and efficiency, the proposed method is better than the hybrid method. The proposed WD method also has several useful properties; therefore, it is possible that it might become an alternative solution to reducing the noise associated with small-animal PET images.

  3. Carriage of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius in small animal veterinarians: indirect evidence of zoonotic transmission.

    PubMed

    Paul, N C; Moodley, A; Ghibaudo, G; Guardabassi, L

    2011-12-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MRSP) is increasingly reported in small animals and cases of human infections have already been described despite its recent emergence in veterinary practice. We investigated the prevalence of MRSP and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) among small animal dermatologists attending a national veterinary conference in Italy. Nasal swabs were obtained from 128 veterinarians, seven of which harboured MRSP (n = 5; 3.9%) or MRSA (n = 2; 1.6%). A follow-up study of two carriers revealed that MRSP persisted for at least 1 month in the nasal cavity. Methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) was isolated from 32 (25%) conference participants, whereas methicillin-susceptible S. pseudintermedius (MSSP) was not detected, suggesting that MRSP may have a particular ability to colonize humans compared to MSSP. All isolates were characterized by spa typing. Methicillin-resistant isolates were further typed by antimicrobial susceptibility testing, SCCmec and multi-locus sequence typing. Two lineages previously associated with pets were identified among the five MRSP isolates; the European epidemic clone ST71-SCCmec II-III and ST106-SCCmec IV. One of the two MRSA isolates displayed a genotype (ST22- SCCmecIV) frequently reported in dogs and cats. MRSP isolates were resistant to more antimicrobial agents compared with MRSA isolates and displayed the typical multidrug resistance patterns of MRSP in pets. The 32 MSSA isolates belonged to 20 spa types and the most frequent types (t12, t15 and t166) were associated with common S. aureus lineages in humans (CC30 and CC45). Although low, the 3.9% MRSP carriage rate found among small animal dermatologists was surprising in consideration of the rare occurrence of S. pseudintermedius in humans, the lack of MSSP detection and the recent appearance of MRSP in Europe. As cases of human MRSP infection have been linked with pets, veterinarians should be aware of this zoonotic risk

  4. Open-source, small-animal magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound system.

    PubMed

    Poorman, Megan E; Chaplin, Vandiver L; Wilkens, Ken; Dockery, Mary D; Giorgio, Todd D; Grissom, William A; Caskey, Charles F

    2016-01-01

    MR-guided focused ultrasound or high-intensity focused ultrasound (MRgFUS/MRgHIFU) is a non-invasive therapeutic modality with many potential applications in areas such as cancer therapy, drug delivery, and blood-brain barrier opening. However, the large financial costs involved in developing preclinical MRgFUS systems represent a barrier to research groups interested in developing new techniques and applications. We aim to mitigate these challenges by detailing a validated, open-source preclinical MRgFUS system capable of delivering thermal and mechanical FUS in a quantifiable and repeatable manner under real-time MRI guidance. A hardware and software package was developed that includes closed-loop feedback controlled thermometry code and CAD drawings for a therapy table designed for a preclinical MRI scanner. For thermal treatments, the modular software uses a proportional integral derivative controller to maintain a precise focal temperature rise in the target given input from MR phase images obtained concurrently. The software computes the required voltage output and transmits it to a FUS transducer that is embedded in the delivery table within the magnet bore. The delivery table holds the FUS transducer, a small animal and its monitoring equipment, and a transmit/receive RF coil. The transducer is coupled to the animal via a water bath and is translatable in two dimensions from outside the magnet. The transducer is driven by a waveform generator and amplifier controlled by real-time software in Matlab. MR acoustic radiation force imaging is also implemented to confirm the position of the focus for mechanical and thermal treatments. The system was validated in tissue-mimicking phantoms and in vivo during murine tumor hyperthermia treatments. Sonications were successfully controlled over a range of temperatures and thermal doses for up to 20 min with minimal temperature overshoot. MR thermometry was validated with an optical temperature probe, and focus

  5. Evaluation of attenuation and scatter correction requirements in small animal PET and SPECT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konik, Arda Bekir

    Positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission tomography (SPECT) are two nuclear emission-imaging modalities that rely on the detection of high-energy photons emitted from radiotracers administered to the subject. The majority of these photons are attenuated (absorbed or scattered) in the body, resulting in count losses or deviations from true detection, which in turn degrades the accuracy of images. In clinical emission tomography, sophisticated correction methods are often required employing additional x-ray CT or radionuclide transmission scans. Having proven their potential in both clinical and research areas, both PET and SPECT are being adapted for small animal imaging. However, despite the growing interest in small animal emission tomography, little scientific information exists about the accuracy of these correction methods on smaller size objects, and what level of correction is required. The purpose of this work is to determine the role of attenuation and scatter corrections as a function of object size through simulations. The simulations were performed using Interactive Data Language (IDL) and a Monte Carlo based package, Geant4 application for emission tomography (GATE). In IDL simulations, PET and SPECT data acquisition were modeled in the presence of attenuation. A mathematical emission and attenuation phantom approximating a thorax slice and slices from real PET/CT data were scaled to 5 different sizes (i.e., human, dog, rabbit, rat and mouse). The simulated emission data collected from these objects were reconstructed. The reconstructed images, with and without attenuation correction, were compared to the ideal (i.e., non-attenuated) reconstruction. Next, using GATE, scatter fraction values (the ratio of the scatter counts to the total counts) of PET and SPECT scanners were measured for various sizes of NEMA (cylindrical phantoms representing small animals and human), MOBY (realistic mouse/rat model) and XCAT (realistic human model

  6. SU-E-T-217: Intrinsic Respiratory Gating in Small Animal CT

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y; Smith, M; Mistry, N

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Preclinical animal models of lung cancer can provide a controlled test-bed for testing dose escalation or function-based-treatment-planning studies. However, to extract lung function, i.e. ventilation, one needs to be able to image the lung at different phases of ventilation (in-hale / ex-hale). Most respiratory-gated imaging using micro-CT involves using an external ventilator and surgical intervention limiting the utility in longitudinal studies. A new intrinsic respiratory retrospective gating method was developed and tested in mice. Methods: A fixed region of interest (ROI) that covers the diaphragm was selected on all projection images to estimate the mean intensity (M). The mean intensity depends on the projection angle and diaphragm position. A 3-point moving average (A) of consecutive M values: Mpre, Mcurrent and Mpost, was calculated to be subtracted from Mcurrent. A fixed threshold was used to enable amplitude based sorting into 4 different phases of respiration. Images at full-inhale and end-exhale phases of respiration were reconstructed using the open source OSCaR. Lung volumes estimated at the 2 phases of respiration were validated against literature values. Results: Intrinsic retrospective gating was accomplished without the use of any external breathing waveform. While projection images were acquired at 360 different angles. Only 138 and 104 projections were used to reconstruct images at full-inhale and end-exhale. This often results in non-uniform under-sampled angular projections leading to some minor streaking artifacts. The calculated expiratory, inspiratory and tidal lung volumes correlated well with the values known from the literature. Conclusion: Our initial result demonstrates an intrinsic gating method that is suitable for flat panel cone beam small animal CT systems. Reduction in streaking artifacts can be accomplished by oversampling the data or using iterative reconstruction methods. This initial experience will enable

  7. Vermicomposting as manure management strategy for urban small-holder animal farms - Kampala case study.

    PubMed

    Lalander, Cecilia Helena; Komakech, Allan John; Vinnerås, Björn

    2015-05-01

    Inadequate organic waste management can contribute to the spread of diseases and have negative impacts on the environment. Vermicomposting organic waste could have dual beneficial effects by generating an economically viable animal feed protein in the form of worm biomass, while alleviating the negative effects of poor organic waste management. In this study, a low-maintenance vermicomposting system was evaluated as manure and food waste management system for small-holder farmers. A vermicomposting system using the earthworm species Eudrilus eugeniae and treating cow manure and food waste was set up in Kampala, Uganda, and monitored for 172days. The material degradation and protein production rates were evaluated after 63days and at the end of the experiment. The material reduction was 45.9% and the waste-to-biomass conversion rate was 3.5% in the vermicomposting process on a total solids basis. A possible increase in the conversion rate could be achieved by increasing the frequency of worm harvesting. Vermicomposting was found to be a viable manure management method in small-scale urban animal agriculture; the return of investment was calculated to be 280% for treating the manure of a 450kg cow. The vermicompost was not sanitised, although hygiene quality could be improved by introducing a post-stabilisation step in which no fresh material is added. The value of the animal feed protein generated in the process can act as an incentive to improve current manure management strategies. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. Canine blastomycosis in Wisconsin: a survey of small-animal veterinary practices.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Jennifer L; Dieckman, Jordan L; Reed, Kurt D; Meece, Jennifer K

    2014-10-01

    The disease burden and impact of canine blastomycosis in Wisconsin is uncertain. We surveyed small-animal veterinary practices to obtain estimates of disease incidence, determine patient outcomes, and investigate variation in diagnostic and treatment strategies used by veterinarians. Veterinarians representing small-animal practices in Wisconsin were contacted by mail with the option to complete a paper or online questionnaire. Questionnaires were returned from 68 of 443 veterinary practices (15%) that estimated diagnosing 239 cases of canine blastomycosis annually, with an overall mortality of 36%. Annual incidence rates of canine blastomycosis were calculated for 43 individual veterinary clinics and differed significantly between clinics in endemic and nonendemic counties (P = 0.01), with the mean in endemic counties being 204/100,000/yr and nonendemic counties being 72/100,000/yr. Veterinarians reported an increase in canine blastomycosis cases from April through August. A wide variety of methods were used for diagnosis, ranging from clinical signs alone to antigen testing and "in-house" cytology. Of note, fungal culture was used rarely for diagnosis. In addition, veterinarians at these 68 clinics estimated diagnosing 36 cases of feline blastomycosis annually. The incidence of canine blastomycosis is high but quite variable among veterinary practices in Wisconsin. Diagnosis is based frequently on clinical signs exclusively due, in part, to the perceived high cost of laboratory tests. Similarly, the mortality associated with blastomycosis is likely negatively impacted because some dog owners defer therapy due to the cost of antifungal drugs. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The International Society for Human and Animal Mycology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Image-guided small animal radiation research platform: calibration of treatment beam alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matinfar, Mohammad; Ford, Eric; Iordachita, Iulian; Wong, John; Kazanzides, Peter

    2009-02-01

    Small animal research allows detailed study of biological processes, disease progression and response to therapy with the potential to provide a natural bridge to the clinical environment. The small animal radiation research platform (SARRP) is a portable system for precision irradiation with beam sizes down to approximately 0.5 mm and optimally planned radiation with on-board cone-beam CT (CBCT) guidance. This paper focuses on the geometric calibration of the system for high-precision irradiation. A novel technique for the calibration of the treatment beam is presented, which employs an x-ray camera whose precise positioning need not be known. Using the camera system we acquired a digitally reconstructed 3D 'star shot' for gantry calibration and then developed a technique to align each beam to a common isocenter with the robotic animal positioning stages. The calibration incorporates localization by cone-beam CT guidance. Uncorrected offsets of the beams with respect to the calibration origin ranged from 0.4 mm to 5.2 mm. With corrections, these alignment errors can be reduced to the sub-millimeter range. The calibration technique was used to deliver a stereotactic-like arc treatment to a phantom constructed with EBT Gafchromic films. All beams were shown to intersect at a common isocenter with a measured beam (FWHM) of approximately 1.07 mm using the 0.5 mm collimated beam. The desired positioning accuracy of the SARRP is 0.25 mm and the results indicate an accuracy of 0.2 mm. To fully realize the radiation localization capabilities of the SARRP, precise geometric calibration is required, as with any such system. The x-ray camera-based technique presented here provides a straightforward and semi-automatic method for system calibration.

  10. Image Guided Small Animal Radiation Research Platform: Calibration of Treatment Beam Alignment

    PubMed Central

    Matinfar, Mohammad; Ford, Eric; Iordachita, Iulian; Wong, John; Kazanzides, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Small animal research allows detailed study of biological processes, disease progression, and response to therapy, with the potential to provide a natural bridge to the clinical environment. The Small Animal Radiation Research Platform (SARRP) is a portable system for precision irradiation with beam sizes down to approximately 0.5 mm and optimally planned radiation with on-board cone-beam CT (CBCT) guidance. This paper focuses on the geometric calibration of the system for high-precision irradiation. A novel technique for calibration of the treatment beam is presented, which employs an x-ray camera whose precise positioning need not be known. Using the camera system we acquired a digitally reconstructed 3D “star shot” for gantry calibration, and then developed a technique to align each beam to a common isocenter with the robotic animal positioning stages. The calibration incorporates localization by cone-beam CT guidance. Uncorrected offsets of the beams with respect to the calibration origin ranged from 0.4 mm to 5.2 mm. With corrections, these alignments can be brought to within < 1 mm. The calibration technique was used to deliver a stereotactic-like arc treatment to a phantom constructed with EBT Gafchromic films. All beams were shown to intersect at a common isocenter with a measured beam (FWHM) of approximately 1.07 mm using the 0.5 mm collimated beam. The desired positioning accuracy of the SARRP is 0.25 mm and the results indicate an accuracy of 0.2 mm. To fully realize the radiation localization capabilities of the SARRP, precise geometric calibration is required, as with any such system. The x-ray camera-based technique presented here provides a straightforward and semi-automatic method for system calibration. PMID:19141881

  11. A Modified Carbon Monoxide Breath Test for Measuring Erythrocyte Lifespan in Small Animals

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yong-Jian; Zhang, Hou-De; Ji, Yong-Qiang; Zhu, Guo-Liang; Huang, Jia-Liang; Du, Li-Tao; Cao, Ping; Zang, De-Yue; Du, Ji-Hui; Li, Rong; Wang, Lei

    2016-01-01

    This study was to develop a CO breath test for RBC lifespan estimation of small animals. The ribavirin induced hemolysis rabbit models were placed individually in a closed rebreath cage and air samples were collected for measurement of CO concentration. RBC lifespan was calculated from accumulated CO, blood volume, and hemoglobin concentration data. RBC lifespan was determined in the same animals with the standard biotin-labeling method. RBC lifespan data obtained by the CO breath test method for control (CON, 49.0 ± 5.9 d) rabbits, rabbits given 10 mg/kg·d−1 of ribavirin (RIB10, 31.0 ± 4.0 d), and rabbits given 20 mg/kg·d−1 of ribavirin (RIB20, 25.0 ± 2.9 d) were statistically similar (all p > 0.05) to and linearly correlated (r = 0.96, p < 0.01) with the RBC lifespan data obtained for the same rabbits by the standard biotin-labeling method (CON, 51.0 ± 2.7 d; RIB10, 33.0 ± 1.3 d; and RIB20, 27.0 ± 0.8 d). The CO breath test method takes less than 3 h to complete, whereas the standard method requires at least several weeks. In conclusion, the CO breath test method provides a simple and rapid means of estimating RBC lifespan and is feasible for use with small animal models. PMID:27294128

  12. Vermicomposting as manure management strategy for urban small-holder animal farms – Kampala case study

    SciTech Connect

    Lalander, Cecilia Helena; Komakech, Allan John; Vinnerås, Björn

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Poor manure management can increase burden of disease and environmental impact. • A low-maintenance vermicompost reactor was set-up in Kampala, Uganda. • High material reduction (45.9%) and waste-to-biomass conversion (3.6% on a TS basis). • Five year return on investment of 275% of system in Uganda. • Technically and economically viable system for improved urban manure management. - Abstract: Inadequate organic waste management can contribute to the spread of diseases and have negative impacts on the environment. Vermicomposting organic waste could have dual beneficial effects by generating an economically viable animal feed protein in the form of worm biomass, while alleviating the negative effects of poor organic waste management. In this study, a low-maintenance vermicomposting system was evaluated as manure and food waste management system for small-holder farmers. A vermicomposting system using the earthworm species Eudrilus eugeniae and treating cow manure and food waste was set up in Kampala, Uganda, and monitored for 172 days. The material degradation and protein production rates were evaluated after 63 days and at the end of the experiment. The material reduction was 45.9% and the waste-to-biomass conversion rate was 3.5% in the vermicomposting process on a total solids basis. A possible increase in the conversion rate could be achieved by increasing the frequency of worm harvesting. Vermicomposting was found to be a viable manure management method in small-scale urban animal agriculture; the return of investment was calculated to be 280% for treating the manure of a 450 kg cow. The vermicompost was not sanitised, although hygiene quality could be improved by introducing a post-stabilisation step in which no fresh material is added. The value of the animal feed protein generated in the process can act as an incentive to improve current manure management strategies.

  13. Prognostic Value of Troponin I for Infarct Size to Improve Preclinical Myocardial Infarction Small Animal Models

    PubMed Central

    Frobert, Aurélien; Valentin, Jérémy; Magnin, Jean-Luc; Riedo, Erwin; Cook, Stéphane; Giraud, Marie-Noëlle

    2015-01-01

    Coronary artery ligations to induce myocardial infarction (MI) in mice and rats are widely used in preclinical investigation. However, myocardial ischemic damage and subsequent infarct size are highly variable. The lack of standardization of the model impairs the probability of effective translation to the clinic. Cardiac Troponin I (cTnI) is a major clinically relevant biomarker. Aim: In the present study, we investigated the prognostic value of cTnI for early estimation of the infarct size. Methods and Results: Infarcts of different sizes were induced in mice and rats by ligation, at a random site, of the coronary artery. Kinetics of the plasma levels of cTnI were measured. Heart function was evaluated by echocardiography, the percentage of infarcted left ventricle and infarct expansion index were assessed from histological section. We observed that plasma cTnI level peaked at 24 h in the infarcted rats and between 24 and 48 h in mice. Sham operated animals had a level of cTnI below 15 ng/mL. Infarct expansion index (EI) assessed 4 weeks after ligation showed a large variation coefficient of 63 and 71% in rats and mice respectively. We showed a significative correlation between cTnI level and the EI demonstrating its predictive value for myocardial injury in small animal models. Conclusion: we demonstrated the importance of cTnI plasma level as a major early marker to assist in the optimal and efficient management of MI in laboratory animals model. The presented results stress the need for comparable biomarkers in the animal model and clinical trials for improved translation. PMID:26640441

  14. The Aachen miniaturized heart-lung machine--first results in a small animal model.

    PubMed

    Schnoering, Heike; Arens, Jutta; Sachweh, Joerg S; Veerman, Melanie; Tolba, Rene; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Steinseifer, Ulrich; Vazquez-Jimenez, Jaime F

    2009-11-01

    Congenital heart surgery most often incorporates extracorporeal circulation. Due to foreign surface contact and the administration of foreign blood in many children, inflammatory response and hemolysis are important matters of debate. This is particularly an issue in premature and low birth-weight newborns. Taking these considerations into account, the Aachen miniaturized heart-lung machine (MiniHLM) with a total static priming volume of 102 mL (including tubing) was developed and tested in a small animal model. Fourteen female Chinchilla Bastard rabbits were operated on using two different kinds of circuits. In eight animals, a conventional HLM with Dideco Kids oxygenator and Stöckert roller pump (Sorin group, Milan, Italy) was used, and the Aachen MiniHLM was employed in six animals. Outcome parameters were hemolysis and blood gas analysis including lactate. The rabbits were anesthetized, and a standard median sternotomy was performed. The ascending aorta and the right atrium were cannulated. After initiating cardiopulmonary bypass, the aorta was cross-clamped, and cardiac arrest was induced by blood cardioplegia. Blood samples for hemolysis and blood gas analysis were drawn before, during, and after cardiopulmonary bypass. After 1 h aortic clamp time, all animals were weaned from cardiopulmonary bypass. Blood gas analysis revealed adequate oxygenation and perfusion during cardiopulmonary bypass, irrespective of the employed perfusion system. The use of the Aachen MiniHLM resulted in a statistically significant reduced decrease in fibrinogen during cardiopulmonary bypass. A trend revealing a reduced increase in free hemoglobin during bypass in the MiniHLM group could also be observed. This newly developed Aachen MiniHLM with low priming volume, reduced hemolysis, and excellent gas transfer (O(2) and CO(2)) may reduce circuit-induced complications during heart surgery in neonates.

  15. A high resolution small animal radiation research platform (SARRP) with x-ray tomographic guidance capabilities

    PubMed Central

    Wong, John; Armour, Elwood; Kazanzides, Peter; Iordachita, Iulian; Tryggestad, Erik; Deng, Hua; Matinfar, Mohammad; Kennedy, Christopher; Liu, Zejian; Chan, Timothy; Gray, Owen; Verhaegen, Frank; McNutt, Todd; Ford, Eric; DeWeese, Theodore L.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To demonstrate the CT imaging, conformal irradiation and treatment planning capabilities of a small animal radiation research platform (SARRP). Methods The SARRP employs a dual-focal spot, constant voltage x-ray source mounted on a gantry with a source-to-isocenter distance of 35 cm. Gantry rotation is limited to 120° from vertical. Eighty to 100 kVp x-rays from the smaller 0.4 mm focal spot are used for imaging. Both 0.4 mm and 3.0 mm focal spots operate at 225 kVp for irradiation. Robotic translate/rotate stages are used to position the animal. Cone-beam (CB) CT imaging is achieved by rotating the horizontal animal between the stationary x-ray source and a flat-panel detector. Radiation beams range from 0.5 mm in diameter to (60 × 60) mm2. Dosimetry is measured with radio-chromic films. Monte Carlo dose calculations are employed for treatment planning. The combination of gantry and robotic stage motions facilitate conformal irradiation. Results The SARRP spans 3 ft × 4 ft × 6 ft (WxLxH). Depending on filtration, the isocenter dose outputs at 1 cm depth in water range from 22 to 375 cGy/min from the smallest to the largest radiation fields. The 20% to 80% dose fall-off spans 0.16 mm. CBCT with (0.6 × 0.6 × 0.6) mm3 voxel resolution is acquired with less than 1 cGy. Treatment planning is performed at sub-mm resolution. Conclusions The capability of the SARRP to deliver highly focal beams to multiple animal model systems provides new research opportunities that more realistically bridge laboratory research and clinical translation. PMID:18640502

  16. Attenuation correction for freely moving small animal brain PET studies based on a virtual scanner geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelis, G. I.; Kyme, A. Z.; Ryder, W. J.; Fulton, R. R.; Meikle, S. R.

    2014-10-01

    Attenuation correction in positron emission tomography brain imaging of freely moving animals is a very challenging problem since the torso of the animal is often within the field of view and introduces a non negligible attenuating factor that can degrade the quantitative accuracy of the reconstructed images. In the context of unrestrained small animal imaging, estimation of the attenuation correction factors without the need for a transmission scan is highly desirable. An attractive approach that avoids the need for a transmission scan involves the generation of the hull of the animal’s head based on the reconstructed motion corrected emission images. However, this approach ignores the attenuation introduced by the animal’s torso. In this work, we propose a virtual scanner geometry which moves in synchrony with the animal’s head and discriminates between those events that traversed only the animal’s head (and therefore can be accurately compensated for attenuation) and those that might have also traversed the animal’s torso. For each recorded pose of the animal’s head a new virtual scanner geometry is defined and therefore a new system matrix must be calculated leading to a time-varying system matrix. This new approach was evaluated on phantom data acquired on the microPET Focus 220 scanner using a custom-made phantom and step-wise motion. Results showed that when the animal’s torso is within the FOV and not appropriately accounted for during attenuation correction it can lead to bias of up to 10% . Attenuation correction was more accurate when the virtual scanner was employed leading to improved quantitative estimates (bias < 2%), without the need to account for the attenuation introduced by the extraneous compartment. Although the proposed method requires increased computational resources, it can provide a reliable approach towards quantitatively accurate attenuation correction for freely moving animal studies.

  17. Improved instrumentation for blood flow velocity measurements in the microcirculation of small animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Mesquita, Jayme Alves; Bouskela, Eliete; Wajnberg, Eliane; de Melo, Pedro Lopes

    2007-02-01

    Microcirculation is the generic name of vessels with internal diameter less than 100μm of the circulatory system, whose main functions are tissue nutrition and oxygen supply. In microcirculatory studies, it is important to know the amount of oxyhemoglobin present in the blood and how fast it is moving. The present work describes improvements introduced in a classical hardware-based instrument that has usually been used to monitor blood flow velocity in the microcirculation of small animals. It consists of a virtual instrument that can be easily incorporated into existing hardware-based systems, contributing to reduce operator related biases and allowing digital processing and storage. The design and calibration of the modified instrument are described as well as in vitro and in vivo results obtained with electrical models and small animals, respectively. Results obtained in in vivo studies showed that this new system is able to detect a small reduction in blood flow velocity comparing arteries and arterioles (p<0.002) and a further reduction in capillaries (p<0.0001). A significant increase in velocity comparing capillaries and venules (p<0.001) and venules and veins (p<0.001) was also observed. These results are in close agreement with biophysical principles. Moreover, the improvements introduced in the device allowed us to clearly observe changes in blood flow introduced by a pharmacological intervention, suggesting that the system has enough temporal resolution to track these microcirculatory events. These results were also in close conformity to physiology, confirming the high scientific potential of the modified system and indicating that this instrument can also be useful for pharmacological evaluations.

  18. The Enigma of Soil Animal Species Diversity Revisited: The Role of Small-Scale Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Uffe N.; Osler, Graham H. R.; Campbell, Colin D.; Neilson, Roy; Burslem, David F. R. P.; van der Wal, René

    2010-01-01

    Background “The enigma of soil animal species diversity” was the title of a popular article by J. M. Anderson published in 1975. In that paper, Anderson provided insights on the great richness of species found in soils, but emphasized that the mechanisms contributing to the high species richness belowground were largely unknown. Yet, exploration of the mechanisms driving species richness has focused, almost exclusively, on above-ground plant and animal communities, and nearly 35 years later we have several new hypotheses but are not much closer to revealing why soils are so rich in species. One persistent but untested hypothesis is that species richness is promoted by small-scale environmental heterogeneity. Methodology/Principal Findings To test this hypothesis we manipulated small-scale heterogeneity in soil properties in a one-year field experiment and investigated the impacts on the richness of soil fauna and evenness of the microbial communities. We found that heterogeneity substantially increased the species richness of oribatid mites, collembolans and nematodes, whereas heterogeneity had no direct influence on the evenness of either the fungal, bacterial or archaeal communities or on species richness of the large and mobile mesostigmatid mites. These results suggest that the heterogeneity-species richness relationship is scale dependent. Conclusions Our results provide direct evidence for the hypothesis that small-scale heterogeneity in soils increase species richness of intermediate-sized soil fauna. The concordance of mechanisms between above and belowground communities suggests that the relationship between environmental heterogeneity and species richness may be a general property of ecological communities. PMID:20644639

  19. Improved instrumentation for blood flow velocity measurements in the microcirculation of small animals

    SciTech Connect

    Mesquita, Jayme Alves Jr. de; Bouskela, Eliete; Wajnberg, Eliane; Lopes de Melo, Pedro

    2007-02-15

    Microcirculation is the generic name of vessels with internal diameter less than 100 {mu}m of the circulatory system, whose main functions are tissue nutrition and oxygen supply. In microcirculatory studies, it is important to know the amount of oxyhemoglobin present in the blood and how fast it is moving. The present work describes improvements introduced in a classical hardware-based instrument that has usually been used to monitor blood flow velocity in the microcirculation of small animals. It consists of a virtual instrument that can be easily incorporated into existing hardware-based systems, contributing to reduce operator related biases and allowing digital processing and storage. The design and calibration of the modified instrument are described as well as in vitro and in vivo results obtained with electrical models and small animals, respectively. Results obtained in in vivo studies showed that this new system is able to detect a small reduction in blood flow velocity comparing arteries and arterioles (p<0.002) and a further reduction in capillaries (p<0.0001). A significant increase in velocity comparing capillaries and venules (p<0.001) and venules and veins (p<0.001) was also observed. These results are in close agreement with biophysical principles. Moreover, the improvements introduced in the device allowed us to clearly observe changes in blood flow introduced by a pharmacological intervention, suggesting that the system has enough temporal resolution to track these microcirculatory events. These results were also in close conformity to physiology, confirming the high scientific potential of the modified system and indicating that this instrument can also be useful for pharmacological evaluations.

  20. An x-ray image guidance system for small animal stereotactic irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, K. H.; Pidikiti, R.; Stojadinovic, S.; Speiser, M.; Seliounine, S.; Saha, D.; Solberg, T. D.

    2010-12-01

    An x-ray image-guided small animal stereotactic irradiator was developed and characterized to enable tumor visualization and accurate target localization for small field, high dose irradiation. The system utilizes a custom collimation system, a motorized positioning system (x, y, θ), a digital imaging panel and operating software, and is integrated with a commercial x-ray unit. The essential characteristics of the irradiator include small radiation fields (1-10 mm), high dose rate (>10 Gy min-1) and submillimeter target localization. The software enables computer-controlled image acquisition, stage motion and target localization providing simple and precise automated target localization. The imaging panel was characterized in terms of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and spatial resolution. Overall localization accuracy and precision were assessed. SNR, CNR and spatial resolution are 24 dB, 21 dB and 2.8 lp mm-1, respectively, and localization accuracy is approximately 65 µm with 6 µm precision. With the aid of image guidance, system performance was subsequently used to evaluate radiation response in a rat orthotopic lung tumor effectively sparing normal tissues and in a mouse normal lung. The capabilities of 3D treatment and cone-beam computed tomography are presented for 3D localization and delivery as a work in progress.

  1. A fast analytic dose calculation method for arc treatments for kilovoltage small animal irradiators.

    PubMed

    Marco-Rius, I; Wack, L; Tsiamas, P; Tryggestad, E; Berbeco, R; Hesser, J; Zygmanski, P

    2013-09-01

    Arc treatments require calculation of dose for collections of discrete gantry angles. The sampling of angles must balance between short computation time of small angle sets and the better calculation reliability of large sets. In this paper, an analytical formula is presented that allows calculation of dose delivered during continuous rotation of the gantry. The formula holds valid for continuous short arcs of up to about 30° and is derived by integrating a dose formula over gantry angles within a small angle approximation. Doses for longer arcs may be obtained in terms of doses for shorter arcs. The formula is derived with an empirical beam model in water and extended to inhomogeneous media. It is validated with experimental data obtained by applying arc treatment using kV small animal irradiator to a phantom of solid water and lung-equivalent material. The results are a promising step towards efficient 3D dose calculation and inverse planning purposes. In principle, this method also applies to VMAT dose calculation and optimization but requires extensions.

  2. Lower Gastrointestinal (GI) Tract X-Ray (Radiography)

    MedlinePlus

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Lower GI Tract Lower gastrointestinal tract radiography ... GI Tract Radiography? What is Lower GI Tract X-ray Radiography (Barium Enema)? Lower gastrointestinal (GI) tract radiography, ...

  3. Adverse event surveillance in small animal anaesthesia: an intervention-based, voluntary reporting audit.

    PubMed

    McMillan, Matthew; Darcy, Hannah

    2016-03-01

    To develop, test and refine an 'intervention-based' system for the surveillance of adverse events (AEs) during small animal anaesthesia. Prospective, voluntary reporting audit. A total of 1386 consecutive small animal anaesthetics (including 972 dogs and 387 cats). Adverse events were defined as undesirable perianaesthetic events requiring remedial intervention to prevent or limit patient morbidity. Using previous reports, 11 common AEs were selected and 'intervention-based' definitions were devised. A voluntary reporting audit was performed over 1 year at a university teaching hospital. Data on AEs were collected via paper checkbox forms completed after each anaesthetic and were assimilated using an electronic database. Interventions were performed entirely at the discretion of the attending anaesthetist. Comparisons between dogs and cats were made using Fisher's exact tests. Forms were completed for 1114 anaesthetics (a compliance of 80.4%), with 1001 AEs reported in 572 patients. The relative frequency of AEs reported were as follows: arousal or breakthrough pain (14.9%), hypoventilation (13.5%), hypotension (10.3%), arrhythmias (5.8%), hyperthermia/hypothermia (5.0%), airway complications (4.8%), recovery excitation (4.6%), aspiration risk (4.5%), desaturation (2.8%), hypertension (1.7%) and 'other' (3.7%). Canine anaesthetics (57.3%) were more likely to involve AEs than were feline anaesthetics (35.5%, p < 0.01). Escalation in postanaesthetic care was required in 20% of cases where an AE was reported (8% of anaesthetics overall). In 6% of cases (2% overall), this involved management in an intensive care unit. There were six intra-anaesthetic fatalities (0.43%) during this period. The tool was widely accepted, being considered quick and easy to complete, but several semantic, logistical and personnel factors were encountered. Simple intervention-based surveillance tools can be easily integrated into small animal anaesthetic practice, providing a valuable

  4. Evaluation of Matrix9 silicon photomultiplier array for small-animal PET.

    PubMed

    Du, Junwei; Schmall, Jeffrey P; Yang, Yongfeng; Di, Kun; Roncali, Emilie; Mitchell, Gregory S; Buckley, Steve; Jackson, Carl; Cherry, Simon R

    2015-02-01

    The MatrixSL-9-30035-OEM (Matrix9) from SensL is a large-area silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) photodetector module consisting of a 3 × 3 array of 4 × 4 element SiPM arrays (total of 144 SiPM pixels) and incorporates SensL's front-end electronics board and coincidence board. Each SiPM pixel measures 3.16 × 3.16 mm(2) and the total size of the detector head is 47.8 × 46.3 mm(2). Using 8 × 8 polished LSO/LYSO arrays (pitch 1.5 mm) the performance of this detector system (SiPM array and readout electronics) was evaluated with a view for its eventual use in small-animal positron emission tomography (PET). Measurements of noise, signal, signal-to-noise ratio, energy resolution, flood histogram quality, timing resolution, and array trigger error were obtained at different bias voltages (28.0-32.5 V in 0.5 V intervals) and at different temperatures (5 °C-25 °C in 5 °C degree steps) to find the optimal operating conditions. The best measured signal-to-noise ratio and flood histogram quality for 511 keV gamma photons were obtained at a bias voltage of 30.0 V and a temperature of 5 °C. The energy resolution and timing resolution under these conditions were 14.2% ± 0.1% and 4.2 ± 0.1 ns, respectively. The flood histograms show that all the crystals in the 1.5 mm pitch LSO array can be clearly identified and that smaller crystal pitches can also be resolved. Flood histogram quality was also calculated using different center of gravity based positioning algorithms. Improved and more robust results were achieved using the local 9 pixels for positioning along with an energy offset calibration. To evaluate the front-end detector readout, and multiplexing efficiency, an array trigger error metric is introduced and measured at different lower energy thresholds. Using a lower energy threshold greater than 150 keV effectively eliminates any mispositioning between SiPM arrays. In summary, the Matrix9 detector system can resolve high-resolution scintillator arrays

  5. Evaluation of Matrix9 silicon photomultiplier array for small-animal PET

    PubMed Central

    Du, Junwei; Schmall, Jeffrey P.; Yang, Yongfeng; Di, Kun; Roncali, Emilie; Mitchell, Gregory S.; Buckley, Steve; Jackson, Carl; Cherry, Simon R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The MatrixSL-9-30035-OEM (Matrix9) from SensL is a large-area silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) photodetector module consisting of a 3 × 3 array of 4 × 4 element SiPM arrays (total of 144 SiPM pixels) and incorporates SensL’s front-end electronics board and coincidence board. Each SiPM pixel measures 3.16 × 3.16 mm2 and the total size of the detector head is 47.8 × 46.3 mm2. Using 8 × 8 polished LSO/LYSO arrays (pitch 1.5 mm) the performance of this detector system (SiPM array and readout electronics) was evaluated with a view for its eventual use in small-animal positron emission tomography (PET). Methods: Measurements of noise, signal, signal-to-noise ratio, energy resolution, flood histogram quality, timing resolution, and array trigger error were obtained at different bias voltages (28.0–32.5 V in 0.5 V intervals) and at different temperatures (5 °C–25 °C in 5 °C degree steps) to find the optimal operating conditions. Results: The best measured signal-to-noise ratio and flood histogram quality for 511 keV gamma photons were obtained at a bias voltage of 30.0 V and a temperature of 5 °C. The energy resolution and timing resolution under these conditions were 14.2% ± 0.1% and 4.2 ± 0.1 ns, respectively. The flood histograms show that all the crystals in the 1.5 mm pitch LSO array can be clearly identified and that smaller crystal pitches can also be resolved. Flood histogram quality was also calculated using different center of gravity based positioning algorithms. Improved and more robust results were achieved using the local 9 pixels for positioning along with an energy offset calibration. To evaluate the front-end detector readout, and multiplexing efficiency, an array trigger error metric is introduced and measured at different lower energy thresholds. Using a lower energy threshold greater than 150 keV effectively eliminates any mispositioning between SiPM arrays. Conclusions: In summary, the Matrix9 detector system can resolve

  6. [Nutrition consultation in small animal practice - a field for specialized veterinarians].

    PubMed

    Bergler, R; Wechsung, S; Kienzle, E; Hoff, T; Dobenecker, B

    2016-01-01

    The study aimed to identify barriers to the implementation of nutrition consultation in veterinary practice. Differences between individual veterinarians in their problem-solving strategies in nutrition consultation were investigated. Representative online survey of 214 veterinarians (female/male) using a standardized questionnaire. Statistical analysis by correlations, t-test, analysis of variance and factor analysis as well as cluster analysis of types of veterinarians. Over 90% of vets had seen an increase in owners' questions on feeding pets. Forty-one percent estimated the percentage of patients suffering from nutrition-related diseases in their practice to be 20-30%. At the same time, 70% of vets agreed that nutrition consultation was neglected in every-day practice. Vets estimated that only 30% of owners complied with recommendations on nutrition. Over 80% of vets presumed that pet owners gave false information on feeding. For other sensitive questions, including domestic and financial situations, the percentage of presumed false information was below 60%. Approximately 50% of the vets did not feel sufficiently competent with regard to nutrition consultation. Less than 50% asked for payment of nutrition consultation. Only 18% had taken part in continuing education in animal nutrition. The cluster analysis identified five different strategies to cope with nutrition consultation, four of which were based on a low priority for nutrition in their own practice. Some vets referred nutrition problems to specialized colleagues (7.2%), others consulted with representatives of pet food companies (28.2%), another group offered free, quick tips (23.4%), and a small percentage ignored nutrition (13.4%). There was one group with a strong interest in nutrition (27.8%). It is remarkable that this group felt the least competent in small-animal nutrition. Conclusion and practical relevance: The study demonstrates that sound nutrition consultation in small-animal practice

  7. Tissue sensitive imaging and tomography without contrast agents for small animals with Timepix based detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trojanova, E.; Schyns, L. E. J. R.; Ludwig, D.; Jakubek, J.; Le Pape, A.; Sefc, L.; Lotte, S.; Sykora, V.; Turecek, D.; Uher, J.; Verhaegen, F.

    2017-01-01

    The tissue type resolving X-ray radiography and tomography can be performed even without contrast agents. The differences between soft tissue types such as kidney, muscles, fat, liver, brain and spleen were measured based on their spectral response. The Timepix based X-ray imaging detector WidePIX2×5 with 300 μm thick silicon sensors was used for most of the measurements presented in this work. These promising results are used for further optimizations of the detector technology and radiographic methods.

  8. Neutron Induced Beta Radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Shaikh, A. M.; Shylaja, D.

    2011-07-15

    In the present paper we give a new methodology named, 'neutron induced beta radiography-NIBR' which makes use of neutron activated Dy or In foils as source of (3-radiation. Radiographs are obtained with an aluminium cassette containing image plate, a sample under inspection and the activated Dy or In foil kept in tight contact. The sensitivity of the technique to thickness was evaluated for different materials in the form of step wedges. Some radiographs are presented to demonstrate potential of method to inspect thin samples.

  9. Performing Repeated Quantitative Small-Animal PET with an Arterial Input Function Is Routinely Feasible in Rats.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chi-Cheng; Wu, Chun-Hu; Huang, Ya-Yao; Tzen, Kai-Yuan; Chen, Szu-Fu; Tsai, Miao-Ling; Wu, Hsiao-Ming

    2017-04-01

    Performing quantitative small-animal PET with an arterial input function has been considered technically challenging. Here, we introduce a catheterization procedure that keeps a rat physiologically stable for 1.5 mo. We demonstrated the feasibility of quantitative small-animal (18)F-FDG PET in rats by performing it repeatedly to monitor the time course of variations in the cerebral metabolic rate of glucose (CMRglc). Methods: Aseptic surgery was performed on 2 rats. Each rat underwent catheterization of the right femoral artery and left femoral vein. The catheters were sealed with microinjection ports and then implanted subcutaneously. Over the next 3 wk, each rat underwent (18)F-FDG quantitative small-animal PET 6 times. The CMRglc of each brain region was calculated using a 3-compartment model and an operational equation that included a k*4Results: On 6 mornings, we completed 12 (18)F-FDG quantitative small-animal PET studies on 2 rats. The rats grew steadily before and after the 6 quantitative small-animal PET studies. The CMRglc of the conscious brain (e.g., right parietal region, 99.6 ± 10.2 μmol/100 g/min; n = 6) was comparable to that for (14)C-deoxyglucose autoradiographic methods. Conclusion: Maintaining good blood patency in catheterized rats is not difficult. Longitudinal quantitative small-animal PET imaging with an arterial input function can be performed routinely. © 2017 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  10. Feasibility of small animal cranial irradiation with the microRT system

    SciTech Connect

    Kiehl, Erich L.; Stojadinovic, Strahinja; Malinowski, Kathleen T.; Limbrick, David; Jost, Sarah C.; Garbow, Joel R.; Rubin, Joshua B.; Deasy, Joseph O.; Khullar, Divya; Izaguirre, Enrique W.; Parikh, Parag J.; Low, Daniel A.; Hope, Andrew J.

    2008-10-15

    Purpose: To develop and validate methods for small-animal CNS radiotherapy using the microRT system. Materials and Methods: A custom head immobilizer was designed and built to integrate with a pre-existing microRT animal couch. The Delrin couch-immobilizer assembly, compatible with multiple imaging modalities (CT, microCT, microMR, microPET, microSPECT, optical), was first imaged via CT in order to verify the safety and reproducibility of the immobilization method. Once verified, the subject animals were CT-scanned while positioned within the couch-immobilizer assembly for treatment planning purposes. The resultant images were then imported into CERR, an in-house-developed research treatment planning system, and registered to the microRTP treatment planning space using rigid registration. The targeted brain was then contoured and conformal radiotherapy plans were constructed for two separate studies: (1) a whole-brain irradiation comprised of two lateral beams at the 90 degree sign and 270 degree sign microRT treatment positions and (2) a hemispheric (left-brain) irradiation comprised of a single A-P vertex beam at the 0 degree sign microRT treatment position. During treatment, subject animals (n=48) were positioned to the CERR-generated treatment coordinates using the three-axis microRT motor positioning system and were irradiated using a clinical Ir-192 high-dose-rate remote after-loading system. The radiation treatment course consisted of 5 Gy fractions, 3 days per week. 90% of the subjects received a total dose of 30 Gy and 10% received a dose of 60 Gy. Results: Image analysis verified the safety and reproducibility of the immobilizer. CT scans generated from repeated reloading and repositioning of the same subject animal in the couch-immobilizer assembly were fused to a baseline CT. The resultant analysis revealed a 0.09 mm average, center-of-mass translocation and negligible volumetric error in the contoured, murine brain. The experimental use of the head

  11. Student Incivility in Radiography Education.

    PubMed

    Clark, Kevin R

    2017-07-01

    To examine student incivility in radiography classrooms by exploring the prevalence of uncivil behaviors along with the classroom management strategies educators use to manage and prevent classroom disruptions. A survey was designed to collect data on the severity and frequency of uncivil student behaviors, classroom management strategies used to address minor and major behavioral issues, and techniques to prevent student incivility. The participants were educators in radiography programs accredited by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology. Findings indicated that severe uncivil student behaviors in radiography classrooms do not occur as often as behaviors classified as less severe. Radiography educators in this study used a variety of strategies and techniques to manage and prevent student incivility; however, radiography educators who received formal training in classroom management reported fewer incidents of student incivility than those who had not received formal training. The participants in this study took a proactive approach to addressing severe behavioral issues in the classroom. Many radiography educators transition from the clinical environment to the classroom setting with little to no formal training in classroom management. Radiography educators are encouraged to attend formal training sessions to learn how to manage the higher education classroom effectively. Student incivility is present in radiography classrooms. This study provides a foundation for future research on incivility. ©2017 American Society of Radiologic Technologists.

  12. Proton Radiography Peers into Metal Solidification

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, Amy J.; Imhoff, Seth D.; Gibbs, Paul J.; Cooley, Jason C.; Morris, Christopher; Merrill, Frank E.; Hollander, Brian J.; Mariam, Fesseha G.; Ott, Thomas J.; Barker, Martha R.; Tucker, Tim J.; Lee, Wah-Keat; Fezzaa, Kamel; Deriy, Alex; Patterson, Brian M.; Clarke, Kester D.; Montalvo, Joel D.; Field, Robert D.; Thoma, Dan J.; Smith, James L.; Teter, David F.

    2013-06-19

    Historically, metals are cut up and polished to see the structure and to infer how processing influences the evolution. We can now peer into a metal during processing without destroying it using proton radiography. Understanding the link between processing and structure is important because structure profoundly affects the properties of engineering materials. Synchrotron x-ray radiography has enabled real-time glimpses into metal solidification. However, x-ray energies favor the examination of small volumes and low density metals. In this study, we use high energy proton radiography for the first time to image a large metal volume (>10,000 mm3) during melting and solidification. We also show complementary x-ray results from a small volume (<1mm3), bridging four orders of magnitude. In conclusion, real-time imaging will enable efficient process development and the control of the structure evolution to make materials with intended properties; it will also permit the development of experimentally informed, predictive structure and process models.

  13. Proton Radiography Peers into Metal Solidification

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Amy; Imhoff, Seth; Gibbs, Paul; Cooley, Jason; Morris, Christopher; Merrill, Frank; Hollander, Brian; Mariam, Fesseha; Ott, Thomas; Barker, Martha; Tucker, Tim; Lee, Wah-Keat; Fezzaa, Kamel; Deriy, Alex; Patterson, Brian; Clarke, Kester; Montalvo, Joel; Field, Robert; Thoma, Dan; Smith, James; Teter, David

    2013-01-01

    Historically, metals are cut up and polished to see the structure and to infer how processing influences the evolution. We can now peer into a metal during processing without destroying it using proton radiography. Understanding the link between processing and structure is important because structure profoundly affects the properties of engineering materials. Synchrotron x-ray radiography has enabled real-time glimpses into metal solidification. However, x-ray energies favor the examination of small volumes and low density metals. Here we use high energy proton radiography for the first time to image a large metal volume (>10,000 mm3) during melting and solidification. We also show complementary x-ray results from a small volume (<1 mm3), bridging four orders of magnitude. Real-time imaging will enable efficient process development and the control of structure evolution to make materials with intended properties; it will also permit the development of experimentally informed, predictive structure and process models. PMID:23779063

  14. Proton Radiography Peers into Metal Solidification

    DOE PAGES

    Clarke, Amy J.; Imhoff, Seth D.; Gibbs, Paul J.; ...

    2013-06-19

    Historically, metals are cut up and polished to see the structure and to infer how processing influences the evolution. We can now peer into a metal during processing without destroying it using proton radiography. Understanding the link between processing and structure is important because structure profoundly affects the properties of engineering materials. Synchrotron x-ray radiography has enabled real-time glimpses into metal solidification. However, x-ray energies favor the examination of small volumes and low density metals. In this study, we use high energy proton radiography for the first time to image a large metal volume (>10,000 mm3) during melting and solidification.more » We also show complementary x-ray results from a small volume (<1mm3), bridging four orders of magnitude. In conclusion, real-time imaging will enable efficient process development and the control of the structure evolution to make materials with intended properties; it will also permit the development of experimentally informed, predictive structure and process models.« less

  15. An alternating focused ultrasound system for thermal therapy studies in small animals

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xin; Novák, Petr; Benson, Donald G.; Webber, Jessica S.; Hennings, Leah; Shafirstein, Gal; Corry, Peter M.; Griffin, Robert J.; Moros, Eduardo G.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To develop an alternating focused ultrasound system (AFUS) for preclinical studies of thermal and acoustic responses of tumors in small animal models. This work was motivated by the need of noninvasively creating relatively small spheroidal thermal lesions in small targets (e.g., a murine tumor) without damaging the surrounding tissues. Methods: The AFUS consists of two lead zirconate titanate (PZT-4) spherically curved ultrasound transducers with focal zones crossing each other at a 90° angle. The transducers were independently powered following a programed alternating firing scheme. Before the device design and construction, an acoustic and biothermal model was developed to simulate the ultrasound pressure field and the resulting temperature and thermal dose distributions. A shape factor, sphericity, to quantify the roundness of the lesions was calculated based on the 240 equivalent minutes at 43 °C thermal dose contours. A prototype of the AFUS was constructed with two identical transducers of an operating frequency of 2.25 MHz, 38 mm in diameter, and F-number equal to 1.33. To evaluate the performance of the AFUS experimentally, a series of heating in polyacrylamide phantoms, ex vivo porcine liver tissues, and in implanted mouse tumors fibrosarcoma (FSaII) in vivo was conducted. In these experimental cases, the sphericity was calculated and compared based on the visible lesion (a marked change in coloration). Results: As shown in the simulations, the lesions induced in polyacrylamide phantoms, ex vivo porcine liver tissues, and in vivo mouse tumors, the sphericities of the lesions yielded by AFUS heating were approximately 50% higher than those of single focused ultrasound heating as long as moderate intensities were used and the duty cycle pulses were distributed equally among the transducers. Conclusions: The AFUS is a device capable of noninvasively creating spheroidal thermal lesions in small targets such as murine tumors. PMID:21626921

  16. Establishing a small animal model for evaluating protective immunity against mumps virus.

    PubMed

    Pickar, Adrian; Xu, Pei; Elson, Andrew; Zengel, James; Sauder, Christian; Rubin, Steve; He, Biao

    2017-01-01

    Although mumps vaccines have been used for several decades, protective immune correlates have not been defined. Recently, mumps outbreaks have occurred in vaccinated populations. To better understand the causes of the outbreaks and to develop means to control outbreaks in mumps vaccine immunized populations, defining protective immune correlates will be critical. Unfortunately, no small animal model for assessing mumps immunity exists. In this study, we evaluated use of type I interferon (IFN) alpha/beta receptor knockout mice (IFN-α/βR-/-) for such a model. We found these mice to be susceptible to mumps virus administered intranasally and intracranially. Passive transfer of purified IgG from immunized mice protected naïve mice from mumps virus infection, confirming the role of antibody in protection and demonstrating the potential for this model to evaluate mumps immunity.

  17. Establishing a small animal model for evaluating protective immunity against mumps virus

    PubMed Central

    Pickar, Adrian; Xu, Pei; Elson, Andrew; Zengel, James; Sauder, Christian; Rubin, Steve

    2017-01-01

    Although mumps vaccines have been used for several decades, protective immune correlates have not been defined. Recently, mumps outbreaks have occurred in vaccinated populations. To better understand the causes of the outbreaks and to develop means to control outbreaks in mumps vaccine immunized populations, defining protective immune correlates will be critical. Unfortunately, no small animal model for assessing mumps immunity exists. In this study, we evaluated use of type I interferon (IFN) alpha/beta receptor knockout mice (IFN-α/βR−/−) for such a model. We found these mice to be susceptible to mumps virus administered intranasally and intracranially. Passive transfer of purified IgG from immunized mice protected naïve mice from mumps virus infection, confirming the role of antibody in protection and demonstrating the potential for this model to evaluate mumps immunity. PMID:28362871

  18. Efficient system modeling for a small animal PET scanner with tapered DOI detectors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Mengxi; Zhou, Jian; Yang, Yongfeng; Rodríguez-Villafuerte, Mercedes; Qi, Jinyi

    2016-01-01

    A prototype small animal positron emission tomography (PET) scanner for mouse brain imaging has been developed at UC Davis. The new scanner uses tapered detector arrays with depth of interaction (DOI) measurement. In this paper, we present an efficient system model for the tapered PET scanner using matrix factorization and a virtual scanner geometry. The factored system matrix mainly consists of two components: a sinogram blurring matrix and a geometrical matrix. The geometric matrix is based on a virtual scanner geometry. The sinogram blurring matrix is estimated by matrix factorization. We investigate the performance of different virtual scanner geometries. Both simulation study and real data experiments are performed in the fully 3D mode to study the image quality under different system models. The results indicate that the proposed matrix factorization can maintain image quality while substantially reduce the image reconstruction time and system matrix storage cost. The proposed method can be also applied to other PET scanners with DOI measurement. PMID:26682623

  19. Balloon Type Elasticity Sensing of Left Ventricular Tissue for Small Experimental Animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higashimori, Mitsuru; Ishii, Ryohei; Tadakuma, Kenjiro; Kaneko, Makoto; Tamaki, Syunsuke; Sakata, Yasushi; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro

    This paper describes an elasticity sensing system for a left ventricular tissue of small experimental animal. We first show the basic concept of the proposed method, where a ring shaped specimen is dilated by a balloon type probe with pressure based control and the elasticity is estimated by using the stress and strain information. We introduce the dual cylinder model for approximating the strengths of material of the specimen and the balloon. Based on this model, we can derive the Young's modulus of the specimen. After showing the developed experimental system, we show basic experiments using silicone specimens. We finally show a couple of experimental results using rat and mouse, where specimens with HFPEF (Heart Failure with Preserved Ejection Fraction) can be separated from normal specimens.

  20. A combined micro-PET/CT scanner for small animal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jan, Meei-Ling; Ni, Yu-Ching; Chen, Kuo-Wei; Liang, Hsing-Ching; Chuang, Keh-Shih; Fu, Ying-Kai

    2006-12-01

    A micro-PET/CT system was developed by combination of an in-house micro-CT and a microPET ® R4 scanner. The cone-beam micro-CT consists of a rotational gantry that fits an X-ray tube, a CCD-based X-ray detector, and motor-driven linear stages. The gantry was designed to be coaxial with the scanner of microPET ® R4. It can be moved for the convenience of mounting the Ge-68 point-source holder for PET's calibration. The image volumes obtained from two modalities is registered by a pre-determined, inherent spatial transformation function. This hardware-approach fusion, which provides accurate and no labor-intensive alignment, is suitable for mass scanning. The micro-PET/CT system has been operated successfully. Merging the anatomical and functional images benefit studies of the small animal imaging.

  1. A small animal time-resolved optical tomography platform using wide-field excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venugopal, Vivek

    Small animal imaging plays a critical role in present day biomedical research by filling an important gap in the translation of research from the bench to the bedside. Optical techniques constitute an emerging imaging modality which have tremendous potential in preclinical applications. Optical imaging methods are capable of non-invasive assessment of the functional and molecular characteristics of biological tissue. The three-dimensional optical imaging technique, referred to as diffuse optical tomography, provides an approach for the whole-body imaging of small animal models and can provide volumetric maps of tissue functional parameters (e.g. blood volume, oxygen saturation etc.) and/or provide 3D localization and quantification of fluorescence-based molecular markers in vivo. However, the complex mathematical reconstruction problem associated with optical tomography and the cumbersome instrumental designs limits its adoption as a high-throughput quantitative whole-body imaging modality in current biomedical research. The development of new optical imaging paradigms is thus necessary for a wide-acceptance of this new technology. In this thesis, the design, development, characterization and optimization of a small animal optical tomography system is discussed. Specifically, the platform combines a highly sensitive time-resolved imaging paradigm with multi-spectral excitation capability and CCD-based detection to provide a system capable of generating spatially, spectrally and temporally dense measurement datasets. The acquisition of such data sets however can take long and translate to often unrealistic acquisition times when using the classical point source based excitation scheme. The novel approach in the design of this platform is the adoption of a wide-field excitation scheme which employs extended excitation sources and in the process allows an estimated ten-fold reduction in the acquisition time. The work described herein details the design of the imaging

  2. Whole-body three-dimensional optoacoustic tomography system for small animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brecht, Hans-Peter; Su, Richard; Fronheiser, Matthew; Ermilov, Sergey A.; Conjusteau, Andre; Oraevsky, Alexander A.

    2009-11-01

    We develop a system for three-dimensional whole-body optoacoustic tomography of small animals for applications in preclinical research. The tomographic images are obtained while the objects of study (phantoms or mice) are rotated within a sphere outlined by a concave arc-shaped array of 64 piezocomposite transducers. Two pulsed lasers operating in the near-IR spectral range (755 and 1064 nm) with an average pulsed energy of about 100 mJ, a repetition rate of 10 Hz, and a pulse duration of 15 to 75 ns are used as optical illumination sources. During the scan, the mouse is illuminated orthogonally to the array with two wide beams of light from a bifurcated fiber bundle. The system is capable of generating images of individual organs and blood vessels through the entire body of a mouse with spatial resolution of ~0.5 mm.

  3. The ANIMAGE project: a multimodal imaging platform for small animal research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sappey-Marinier, D.; Beuf, O.; Billotey, C.; Chereul, E.; Dupuy, J.; Jeandey, M.; Grenier, D.; Hasserodt, J.; Langlois, J. B.; Lartizien, C.; Mai, W.; Odet, C.; Samarut, J.; Vray, D.; Zimmer, L.; Janier, M.

    2004-07-01

    The advent of the molecular era has just generated a revolution in the development of new in vivo imaging techniques to examine the integrative functions of molecules, cells, organ systems and whole organisms. Molecular imaging constitutes a new tool allowing the biologist to characterize, repeatedly and non-invasively, a large number of experimental models developed in rodents. In order to monitor biological processes such as gene expression, normal development, metabolic alterations or medical treatment effects, several methodological and technological challenges have to be raised up. Developments are needed in chemistry to create new radiotracers or contrast agents, and in physic, to adapt the medical imaging techniques to the constraints of small animal investigations. ANIMAGE is a multimodal imaging platform to image the structure and function of systems using and developing different technologies such as autoradiography, ultrasounds, positron emission tomography (PET), X-ray computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy (MRI/MRS). The first biological applications and results are presented.

  4. Development of visible and NIR imaging equipment for small animals with smart pad.

    PubMed

    Eum, Nyeon Sik; Han, Jung Hyun; Seong, Ki Woong; Lee, Jong Ha; Park, Hee Joon

    2014-01-01

    The portable visible and near-infrared (NIR) imaging equipment for a pre-clinical test with small animals was designed and developed in this paper. The developed equipment is composed of a CCD camera, a focusing lens, an objective lens, a NIR band pass filter and a NIR filter driving motor. An NIR ray is mainly used for imaging equipment because it has high light penetration depth in biological tissue. Therefore, NIR fluorescent agents are available for chemical conjugation to targeting molecules in vivo. This equipment can provide a visible image, NIR image and merged image simultaneously. A communication system was specifically established to check obtained images through a smart pad in real time. It is less dependent on space and time than the conventional system.

  5. Evaluation and histological examination of a Campylobacter fetus subsp. venerealis small animal infection model.

    PubMed

    Koya, A; de Wet, S C; Turner, S; Cawdell-Smith, J; Venus, B; Greer, R M; Lew-Tabor, A E; Boe-Hansen, G B

    2015-04-01

    Bovine genital campylobacteriosis (BGC), caused by Campylobacter fetus subsp. venerealis, is associated with production losses in cattle worldwide. This study aimed to develop a reliable BGC guinea pig model to facilitate future studies of pathogenicity, abortion mechanisms and vaccine efficacy. Seven groups of five pregnant guinea pigs (1 control per group) were inoculated with one of three strains via intra-peritoneal (IP) or intra-vaginal routes. Samples were examined using culture, PCR and histology. Abortions ranged from 0% to 100% and re-isolation of causative bacteria from sampled sites varied with strain, dose of bacteria and time to abortion. Histology indicated metritis and placentitis, suggesting that the bacteria induce inflammation, placental detachment and subsequent abortion. Variation of virulence between strains was observed and determined by culture and abortion rates. IP administration of C. fetus subsp. venerealis to pregnant guinea pigs is a promising small animal model for the investigation of BGC abortion.

  6. Whole-body ring-shaped confocal photoacoustic computed tomography of small animals in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Jun; Chatni, Muhammad R.; Maslov, Konstantin; Guo, Zijian; Wang, Kun; Anastasio, Mark; Wang, Lihong V.

    2012-05-01

    We report a novel small-animal whole-body imaging system called ring-shaped confocal photoacoustic computed tomography (RC-PACT). RC-PACT is based on a confocal design of free-space ring-shaped light illumination and 512-element full-ring ultrasonic array signal detection. The free-space light illumination maximizes the light delivery efficiency, and the full-ring signal detection ensures a full two-dimensional view aperture for accurate image reconstruction. Using cylindrically focused array elements, RC-PACT can image a thin cross section with 0.10 to 0.25 mm in-plane resolutions and 1.6 s/frame acquisition time. By translating the mouse along the elevational direction, RC-PACT provides a series of cross-sectional images of the brain, liver, kidneys, and bladder.

  7. RNA Interference against Animal Viruses: How Morbilliviruses Generate Extended Diversity To Escape Small Interfering RNA Control

    PubMed Central

    Holz, Carine L.; Albina, Emmanuel; Minet, Cécile; Lancelot, Renaud; Kwiatek, Olivier; Libeau, Geneviève

    2012-01-01

    Viruses are serious threats to human and animal health. Vaccines can prevent viral diseases, but few antiviral treatments are available to control evolving infections. Among new antiviral therapies, RNA interference (RNAi) has been the focus of intensive research. However, along with the development of efficient RNAi-based therapeutics comes the risk of emergence of resistant viruses. In this study, we challenged the in vitro propensity of a morbillivirus (peste des petits ruminants virus), a stable RNA virus, to escape the inhibition conferred by single or multiple small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) against conserved regions of the N gene. Except with the combination of three different siRNAs, the virus systematically escaped RNAi after 3 to 20 consecutive passages. The genetic modifications involved consisted of single or multiple point nucleotide mutations and a deletion of a stretch of six nucleotides, illustrating that this virus has an unusual genomic malleability. PMID:22072768

  8. Design of a dual slot antenna for small animal microwave ablation studies.

    PubMed

    Moon, Tyler J; Brace, Christopher L; Moon, Tyler J; Brace, Christopher L; Brace, Christopher L; Moon, Tyler J

    2016-08-01

    This study presents the development of a dual-slot antenna for small animal tumor ablation. By using a dual-slot design at 8 GHz, it was hypothesized that smaller and more spherical ablations can be produced. After computer-aided design optimization, antennas were fabricated and ablations performed at 5-20 W for 15-120 s with the objective of creating ablations with a diameter/length aspect ratio of at least 0.9. The new dual-slot design at 8 GHz created significantly more spherical ablations than a commercial antenna at 2.45 GHz in ex vivo liver tissue (Average Aspect Ratio 0.8081 vs. 0.4532, p <;<; 0.05). In vivo studies confirmed the highly spherical results ex vivo. Initial testing shows that the dual-slot antenna and 8 GHz generator can be used to ablate tumors in mice.

  9. Small-animal SPECT and SPECT/CT: application in cardiovascular research

    PubMed Central

    Golestani, Reza; Wu, Chao; Tio, René A.; Zeebregts, Clark J.; Petrov, Artiom D.; Beekman, Freek J.; Dierckx, Rudi A. J. O.; Slart, Riemer H. J. A.

    2010-01-01

    Preclinical cardiovascular research using noninvasive radionuclide and hybrid imaging systems has been extensively developed in recent years. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is based on the molecular tracer principle and is an established tool in noninvasive imaging. SPECT uses gamma cameras and collimators to form projection data that are used to estimate (dynamic) 3-D tracer distributions in vivo. Recent developments in multipinhole collimation and advanced image reconstruction have led to sub-millimetre and sub-half-millimetre resolution SPECT in rats and mice, respectively. In this article we review applications of microSPECT in cardiovascular research in which information about the function and pathology of the myocardium, vessels and neurons is obtained. We give examples on how diagnostic tracers, new therapeutic interventions, pre- and postcardiovascular event prognosis, and functional and pathophysiological heart conditions can be explored by microSPECT, using small-animal models of cardiovascular disease. PMID:20069298

  10. Optimal self-calibration of tomographic reconstruction parameters in whole-body small animal optoacoustic imaging

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Subhamoy; Nasonova, Elena; Deán-Ben, Xosé Luís; Razansky, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    In tomographic optoacoustic imaging, multiple parameters related to both light and ultrasound propagation characteristics of the medium need to be adequately selected in order to accurately recover maps of local optical absorbance. Speed of sound in the imaged object and surrounding medium is a key parameter conventionally assumed to be uniform. Mismatch between the actual and predicted speed of sound values may lead to image distortions but can be mitigated by manual or automatic optimization based on metrics of image sharpness. Although some simple approaches based on metrics of image sharpness may readily mitigate distortions in the presence of highly contrasting and sharp image features, they may not provide an adequate performance for smooth signal variations as commonly present in realistic whole-body optoacoustic images from small animals. Thus, three new hybrid methods are suggested in this work, which are shown to outperform well-established autofocusing algorithms in mouse experiments in vivo. PMID:25431756

  11. Efficient system modeling for a small animal PET scanner with tapered DOI detectors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mengxi; Zhou, Jian; Yang, Yongfeng; Rodríguez-Villafuerte, Mercedes; Qi, Jinyi

    2016-01-21

    A prototype small animal positron emission tomography (PET) scanner for mouse brain imaging has been developed at UC Davis. The new scanner uses tapered detector arrays with depth of interaction (DOI) measurement. In this paper, we present an efficient system model for the tapered PET scanner using matrix factorization and a virtual scanner geometry. The factored system matrix mainly consists of two components: a sinogram blurring matrix and a geometrical matrix. The geometric matrix is based on a virtual scanner geometry. The sinogram blurring matrix is estimated by matrix factorization. We investigate the performance of different virtual scanner geometries. Both simulation study and real data experiments are performed in the fully 3D mode to study the image quality under different system models. The results indicate that the proposed matrix factorization can maintain image quality while substantially reduce the image reconstruction time and system matrix storage cost. The proposed method can be also applied to other PET scanners with DOI measurement.

  12. Efficient system modeling for a small animal PET scanner with tapered DOI detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Mengxi; Zhou, Jian; Yang, Yongfeng; Rodríguez-Villafuerte, Mercedes; Qi, Jinyi

    2016-01-01

    A prototype small animal positron emission tomography (PET) scanner for mouse brain imaging has been developed at UC Davis. The new scanner uses tapered detector arrays with depth of interaction (DOI) measurement. In this paper, we present an efficient system model for the tapered PET scanner using matrix factorization and a virtual scanner geometry. The factored system matrix mainly consists of two components: a sinogram blurring matrix and a geometrical matrix. The geometric matrix is based on a virtual scanner geometry. The sinogram blurring matrix is estimated by matrix factorization. We investigate the performance of different virtual scanner geometries. Both simulation study and real data experiments are performed in the fully 3D mode to study the image quality under different system models. The results indicate that the proposed matrix factorization can maintain image quality while substantially reduce the image reconstruction time and system matrix storage cost. The proposed method can be also applied to other PET scanners with DOI measurement.

  13. Doses to critical organs from dental radiography.

    PubMed

    Antoku, S; Kihara, T; Russell, W J; Beach, D R

    1976-02-01

    Participants in the jointly sponsored Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission and Japanese National Institute of Health (ABCC-JNIH) Adult Health Study, a fixed-population sample under continual observation for late effects of the atomic bombs, are also being evaluated for their exposure to other sources of ionizing radiation. In the present study, the subjects' thyroid, lens, pituitary, bone marrow, and gonadal doses acquired during dental radiography were estimated from dosimetry of simulated human material exposed according to technical factors as ascertained in previously reported surveys of patients, dental clinics and hospitals, and dosimetry with phantom human material containing lithium fluoride thermoluminescence dosimeters and ionization chambers. Dental radiography comprised a relatively small segment of the contaminating sources of ionizing radiation exposure among this population sample. Efforts should be made to improve exposure conditions, especially in view of the increasing frequency of dental x-ray examinations.

  14. A system for fast neutron radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Klann, R.T.

    1996-05-01

    A system has been designed and a neutron generator installed to perform fast neutron radiography. With this sytem, objects as small as a coin or as large as a waste drum can be radiographed. The neutron source is an MF Physics A-711 neutron generator which produces 3x10{sup 10} neutrons/second with an average energy of 14.5 MeV. The radiography system uses x-ray scintillation screens and film in commercially available cassettes. The cassettes have been modified to include a thin sheet of plastic to convert neutrons to protons through elastic scattering from hydrogen and other low Z materials in the plastic. For film densities from 1.8 to 3.0, exposures range from 1.9x10{sup 7} to 3.8x10{sup 8} n/cm{sup 2} depending on the type of screen and film.

  15. New experimental model for single liver lobe hyperthermia in small animals using non-directional microwaves

    PubMed Central

    Iliescu, Radu; Dimofte, Gabriel M.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Our aim was to develop a new experimental model for in vivo hyperthermia using non-directional microwaves, applicable to small experimental animals. We present an affordable approach for targeted microwave heat delivery to an isolated liver lobe in rat, which allows rapid, precise and stable tissue temperature control. Materials and methods A new experimental model is proposed. We used a commercial available magnetron generating 2450 MHz, with 4.4V and 14A in the filament and 4500V anodic voltage. Modifications were required in order to adjust tissue heating such as to prevent overheating and to allow for fine adjustments according to real-time target temperature. The heating is controlled using a virtual instrument application implemented in LabView® and responds to 0.1° C variations in the target. Ten healthy adult male Wistar rats, weighing 250–270 g were used in this study. The middle liver lobe was the target for controlled heating, while the rest of the living animal was protected. Results In vivo microwave delivery using our experimental setting is safe for the animals. Target tissue temperature rises from 30°C to 40°C with 3.375°C / second (R2 = 0.9551), while the increment is lower it the next two intervals (40–42°C and 42–44°C) with 0.291°C/ s (R2 = 0.9337) and 0.136°C/ s (R2 = 0.7894) respectively, when testing in sequences. After reaching the desired temperature, controlled microwave delivery insures a very stable temperature during the experiments. Conclusions We have developed an inexpensive and easy to manufacture system for targeted hyperthermia using non-directional microwave radiation. This system allows for fine and stable temperature adjustments within the target tissue and is ideal for experimental models testing below or above threshold hyperthermia PMID:28934251

  16. Quantitative multi-pinhole small-animal SPECT: uniform versus non-uniform Chang attenuation correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, C.; de Jong, J. R.; Gratama van Andel, H. A.; van der Have, F.; Vastenhouw, B.; Laverman, P.; Boerman, O. C.; Dierckx, R. A. J. O.; Beekman, F. J.

    2011-09-01

    Attenuation of photon flux on trajectories between the source and pinhole apertures affects the quantitative accuracy of reconstructed single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images. We propose a Chang-based non-uniform attenuation correction (NUA-CT) for small-animal SPECT/CT with focusing pinhole collimation, and compare the quantitative accuracy with uniform Chang correction based on (i) body outlines extracted from x-ray CT (UA-CT) and (ii) on hand drawn body contours on the images obtained with three integrated optical cameras (UA-BC). Measurements in phantoms and rats containing known activities of isotopes were conducted for evaluation. In 125I, 201Tl, 99mTc and 111In phantom experiments, average relative errors comparing to the gold standards measured in a dose calibrator were reduced to 5.5%, 6.8%, 4.9% and 2.8%, respectively, with NUA-CT. In animal studies, these errors were 2.1%, 3.3%, 2.0% and 2.0%, respectively. Differences in accuracy on average between results of NUA-CT, UA-CT and UA-BC were less than 2.3% in phantom studies and 3.1% in animal studies except for 125I (3.6% and 5.1%, respectively). All methods tested provide reasonable attenuation correction and result in high quantitative accuracy. NUA-CT shows superior accuracy except for 125I, where other factors may have more impact on the quantitative accuracy than the selected attenuation correction.

  17. Relationship between Small Animal Intern Rank and Performance at a University Teaching Hospital.

    PubMed

    Hofmeister, Erik H; Saba, Corey; Kent, Marc; Creevy, Kate E

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if there is a relationship between selection committee rankings of internship applicants and the performance of small animal interns. The hypothesis was that there would be a relationship between selection committee rank order and intern performance; the more highly an application was ranked, the better the intern's performance scores would be. In 2007, the Department of Small Animal Medicine and Surgery instituted a standardized approach to its intern selection process both to streamline the process and to track its effectiveness. At the end of intern years 2010-2014, every faculty member in the department was provided an intern assessment form for that year's class. There was no relationship between an individual intern's final rank by the selection committee and his/her performance either as a percentile score or a Likert-type score (p=.25, R2=0.04; p=0.31, R2=0.03, respectively). Likewise, when interns were divided into the top and bottom quartile based on their final rank by the selection committee, there was no relationship between their rank and their performance as a percentile score (median rank 15 vs. 20; p=.14) or Likert-type score (median rank 14 vs. 19; p=.27). Institutions that use a similar intern selection method may need to reconsider the time and effort being expended for an outcome that does not predict performance. Alternatively, specific criteria more predictive of performance outcomes should be identified and employed in the internship selection process.

  18. Micro-CT images reconstruction and 3D visualization for small animal studying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Hui; Liu, Qian; Zhong, Aijun; Ju, Shan; Fang, Quan; Fang, Zheng

    2005-01-01

    A small-animal x-ray micro computed tomography (micro-CT) system has been constructed to screen laboratory small animals and organs. The micro-CT system consists of dual fiber-optic taper-coupled CCD detectors with a field-of-view of 25x50 mm2, a microfocus x-ray source, a rotational subject holder. For accurate localization of rotation center, coincidence between the axis of rotation and centre of image was studied by calibration with a polymethylmethacrylate cylinder. Feldkamp"s filtered back-projection cone-beam algorithm is adopted for three-dimensional reconstruction on account of the effective corn-beam angle is 5.67° of the micro-CT system. 200x1024x1024 matrix data of micro-CT is obtained with the magnification of 1.77 and pixel size of 31x31μm2. In our reconstruction software, output image size of micro-CT slices data, magnification factor and rotation sample degree can be modified in the condition of different computational efficiency and reconstruction region. The reconstructed image matrix data is processed and visualization by Visualization Toolkit (VTK). Data parallelism of VTK is performed in surface rendering of reconstructed data in order to improve computing speed. Computing time of processing a 512x512x512 matrix datasets is about 1/20 compared with serial program when 30 CPU is used. The voxel size is 54x54x108 μm3. The reconstruction and 3-D visualization images of laboratory rat ear are presented.

  19. A clinical gamma camera-based pinhole collimated system for high resolution small animal SPECT imaging.

    PubMed

    Mejia, J; Galvis-Alonso, O Y; Castro, A A de; Braga, J; Leite, J P; Simões, M V

    2010-12-01

    The main objective of the present study was to upgrade a clinical gamma camera to obtain high resolution tomographic images of small animal organs. The system is based on a clinical gamma camera to which we have adapted a special-purpose pinhole collimator and a device for positioning and rotating the target based on a computer-controlled step motor. We developed a software tool to reconstruct the target's three-dimensional distribution of emission from a set of planar projections, based on the maximum likelihood algorithm. We present details on the hardware and software implementation. We imaged phantoms and heart and kidneys of rats. When using pinhole collimators, the spatial resolution and sensitivity of the imaging system depend on parameters such as the detector-to-collimator and detector-to-target distances and pinhole diameter. In this study, we reached an object voxel size of 0.6 mm and spatial resolution better than 2.4 and 1.7 mm full width at half maximum when 1.5- and 1.0-mm diameter pinholes were used, respectively. Appropriate sensitivity to study the target of interest was attained in both cases. Additionally, we show that as few as 12 projections are sufficient to attain good quality reconstructions, a result that implies a significant reduction of acquisition time and opens the possibility for radiotracer dynamic studies. In conclusion, a high resolution single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system was developed using a commercial clinical gamma camera, allowing the acquisition of detailed volumetric images of small animal organs. This type of system has important implications for research areas such as Cardiology, Neurology or Oncology.

  20. Split exponential track length estimator for Monte-Carlo simulations of small-animal radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smekens, F.; Létang, J. M.; Noblet, C.; Chiavassa, S.; Delpon, G.; Freud, N.; Rit, S.; Sarrut, D.

    2014-12-01

    We propose the split exponential track length estimator (seTLE), a new kerma-based method combining the exponential variant of the TLE and a splitting strategy to speed up Monte Carlo (MC) dose computation for low energy photon beams. The splitting strategy is applied to both the primary and the secondary emitted photons, triggered by either the MC events generator for primaries or the photon interactions generator for secondaries. Split photons are replaced by virtual particles for fast dose calculation using the exponential TLE. Virtual particles are propagated by ray-tracing in voxelized volumes and by conventional MC navigation elsewhere. Hence, the contribution of volumes such as collimators, treatment couch and holding devices can be taken into account in the dose calculation. We evaluated and analysed the seTLE method for two realistic small animal radiotherapy treatment plans. The effect of the kerma approximation, i.e. the complete deactivation of electron transport, was investigated. The efficiency of seTLE against splitting multiplicities was also studied. A benchmark with analog MC and TLE was carried out in terms of dose convergence and efficiency. The results showed that the deactivation of electrons impacts the dose at the water/bone interface in high dose regions. The maximum and mean dose differences normalized to the dose at the isocenter were, respectively of 14% and 2% . Optimal splitting multiplicities were found to be around 300. In all situations, discrepancies in integral dose were below 0.5% and 99.8% of the voxels fulfilled a 1%/0.3 mm gamma index criterion. Efficiency gains of seTLE varied from 3.2 × 105 to 7.7 × 105 compared to analog MC and from 13 to 15 compared to conventional TLE. In conclusion, seTLE provides results similar to the TLE while increasing the efficiency by a factor between 13 and 15, which makes it particularly well-suited to typical small animal radiation therapy applications.

  1. SU-E-T-89: Comprehensive Quality Assurance Phantom for the Small Animal Radiation Research Platform

    SciTech Connect

    Jermoumi, M; Ngwa, W; Korideck, H; Zygmanski, P; Berbeco, R; Makrigiorgos, G; Cormack, R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Use of Small Animal Radiation Research Platform (SARRP) systems for conducting state-of-the-art image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) research on small animals has become more common over the past years. The purpose of this work is to develop and test the suitability and performance of a comprehensive quality assurance (QA) phantom for the SARRP. Methods: A QA phantom was developed for carrying out daily, monthly and annual QA tasks including imaging, dosimetry and treatment planning system (TPS) performance evaluation of the SARRP. The QA phantom consists of nine (60×60×5 mm3) KV-energy tissue equivalent solid water slabs that can be employed for annual dosimetry QA with film. Three of the top slabs are replaceable with ones incorporating Mosfets or OSLDs arranged in a quincunx pattern, or a slab drilled to accommodate an ion chamber insert. These top slabs are designed to facilitate routine daily and monthly QA tasks such as output constancy, isocenter congruency test, treatment planning system (TPS) QA, etc. One slab is designed with inserts for image QA. A prototype of the phantom was applied to test the performance of the imaging, planning and treatment delivery systems. Results: Output constancy test results showed daily variations within 3%. For isocenter congruency test, the phantom could be used to detect 0.3 mm deviations of the CBCT isocenter from the radiation isocenter. Using the Mosfet in phantom as target, the difference between TPS calculations and measurements was within 5%. Image-quality parameters could also be assessed in terms of geometric accuracy, CT number accuracy, linearity, noise and image uniformity, etc. Conclusion: The developed phantom can be employed as a simple tool for comprehensive performance evaluation of the SARRP. The study provides a reference for development of a comprehensive quality assurance program for the SARRP, with proposed tolerances and frequency of required tests.

  2. High efficiency microfluidic beta detector for pharmacokinetic studies in small animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Convert, Laurence; Girard-Baril, Frédérique; Renaudin, Alan; Grondin, Étienne; Jaouad, Abdelatif; Aimez, Vincent; Charette, Paul; Lecomte, Roger

    2011-10-01

    New radiotracers are continuously being developed to improve diagnostic efficiency using Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) or Positron Emission Tomography (PET). The characterization of their pharmacokinetics requires blood radioactivity monitoring over time during the scan and is very challenging in small animals because of the low volume of blood available. In this work, a prototype microfluidic blood counter made of a microchannel atop a silicon substrate containing PIN photodiodes is proposed to improve beta detection efficiency in a small volume by eliminating unnecessary interfaces between fluid and detector. A flat rectangular-shaped epoxy channel, 36 μm×1.26 mm cross section and 31.5 mm in length, was microfabricated over a die containing an array of 2×2 mm 2 PIN photodiodes, leaving only a few micrometers of epoxy floor layer between the fluid and the photodiode sensitive surface. This geometry leads to a quasi 2D source, optimizing geometrical detection efficiency that was estimated at 41% using solid angle calculation. CV- IV measurements were made at each fabrication step to confirm that the microchannel components had no significant effects on the diodes' electrical characteristics. The chip was wire-bonded to a PCB and connected to charge sensitive preamplifier and amplifier modules for pulse shaping. Energy spectra recorded for different isotopes showed continuous beta distribution for PET isotopes and monoenergetic conversion electron peaks for 99mTc. Absolute sensitivity was determined for the most popular PET and SPECT radioisotopes and ranged from 26% to 33% for PET tracers ( 18F, 13N, 11C, 68Ga) and more than 2% for 99mTc. Input functions were successfully simulated with 18F, confirming the setup's suitability for pharmacokinetic modeling of PET and SPECT radiotracers in animal experiments. By using standard materials and procedures, the fabrication process is well suited to on-chip microfluidic functionality, allowing full

  3. Development of a MicroCT-Based Image-Guided Conformal Radiotherapy System for Small Animals

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hu; Rodriguez, Manuel; van den Haak, Fred; Nelson, Geoffrey; Jogani, Rahil; Xu, Jiali; Zhu, Xinzhi; Xian, Yongjiang; Tran, Phuoc T.; Felsher, Dean W.; Keall, Paul J.; Graves, Edward E.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose The need for clinically-relevant radiation therapy technology for the treatment of preclinical models of disease has spurred the development of a variety of dedicated platforms for small animal irradiation. Our group has taken the approach of adding the ability to deliver conformal radiotherapy to an existing 120 kVp micro-computed tomography (microCT) scanner. Methods A GE eXplore RS120 microCT scanner was modified by the addition of a two-dimensional subject translation stage and a variable aperture collimator. Quality assurance protocols for these devices, including measurement of translation stage positioning accuracy, collimator aperture accuracy, and collimator alignment with the x-ray beam, were devised. Use of this system for image-guided radiotherapy was assessed by irradiation of a solid water phantom as well as of two mice bearing spontaneous MYC-induced lung tumors. Radiation damage was assessed ex vivo by immunohistochemical detection of γH2AX foci. Results The positioning error of the translation stage was found to be less than 0.05 mm, while after alignment of the collimator with the x-ray axis through adjustment of its displacement and rotation, the collimator aperture error was less than 0.1 mm measured at isocenter. CT image-guided treatment of a solid water phantom demonstrated target localization accuracy to within 0.1 mm. γH2AX foci were detected within irradiated lung tumors in mice, with contralateral lung tissue displaying background staining. Conclusions Addition of radiotherapy functionality to a microCT scanner is an effective means of introducing image-guided radiation treatments into the preclinical setting. This approach has been shown to facilitate small animal conformal radiotherapy while leveraging existing technology. PMID:20395069

  4. A detector head design for small-animal PET with silicon photomultipliers (SiPM).

    PubMed

    Moehrs, Sascha; Del Guerra, Alberto; Herbert, Deborah J; Mandelkern, Mark A

    2006-03-07

    Small-animal PET systems are now striving for sub-millimetre resolution. Current systems based upon PSPMTs and finely pixellated scintillators can be pushed to higher resolution, but at the expense of other performance parameters and a rapidly escalating cost. Moreover, depth of interaction (DOI) information is usually difficult to assess in such systems, even though this information is highly desirable to reduce the parallax error, which is often the dominant error for such high-resolution systems. In this study we propose a high-resolution detector head for a small-animal PET imaging system with intrinsic DOI information. Instead of a pixellated scintillator, our design is based upon the classic Anger camera principle, i.e. the head is constructed of modular layers each consisting of a continuous slab of scintillator, viewed by a new type of compact silicon photodetector. The photodetector is the recently developed silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) that as well as being very compact has many other attractive properties: high gain at low bias voltage, excellent single-photoelectron resolution and fast timing. A detector head of about 4 x 4 cm2 in area is proposed, constructed from three modular layers of the type described above. We perform a simulation study, using the Monte Carlo simulation package Geant4. The simulation results are used to optimize the geometry of the detector head and characterize its performance. Additionally, hit estimation algorithms are studied to determine the interaction position of annihilation photons correctly over the whole detector surface. The resulting detector has a nearly uniform efficiency for 511 keV photons of approximately 70% and an intrinsic spatial resolution of less than approximately 0.4 mm full width at half maximum (fwhm).

  5. Effect of National Football League games on small animal emergency room caseload.

    PubMed

    Rozanski, Elizabeth A; Rondeau, Mark P; Shaw, Scott P; Rush, John E

    2009-07-01

    To evaluate whether games of popular professional football teams have an effect on small animal emergency room caseload and percentage of dogs and cats that subsequently are hospitalized, are euthanatized, or die following admission to veterinary emergency rooms located within a dedicated fan base. Prospective study. 818 dogs and cats admitted to the emergency room. During the 2007 New England Patriots (NEP) football season, small animal emergency room caseload was recorded for Sunday (4-hour blocks, 8:00 AM until 12:00 midnight) and Monday night (7:00 PM to 11:00 PM). Number of dogs and cats that subsequently were hospitalized, died, or were euthanatized was recorded. Mean game importance rating (GIR) was determined for NEP games (scale, 1 [mild] to 3 [great]). Percentage of dogs and cats admitted from 12:00 noon to 4:00 PM on Sundays during NEP games (mean GIR, 1.7) versus non-NEP games was not different. Mean +/- SD percentage of dogs and cats admitted from 4:00 PM to 8:00 PM on Sundays during NEP games (mean GIR, 2.4) versus non-NEP games was significantly different (18 +/- 5% and 25 +/- 7% of daily caseload, respectively). Percentage of dogs and cats admitted from 8:00 PM to 12:00 midnight on Sundays during NEP games (mean GIR, 2.1) versus non-NEP games was not different. Game type (NEP vs non-NEP) during emergency room admission did not influence whether dogs and cats subsequently were hospitalized, died, or were euthanatized. Professional sporting events may influence veterinary emergency room caseloads.

  6. Dosimetric characterization of an image-guided stereotactic small animal irradiator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pidikiti, R.; Stojadinovic, S.; Speiser, M.; Song, K. H.; Hager, F.; Saha, D.; Solberg, T. D.

    2011-04-01

    Small animal irradiation provides an important tool used by preclinical studies to assess and optimize new treatment strategies such as stereotactic ablative radiotherapy. Characterization of radiation beams that are clinically and geometrically scaled for the small animal model is uniquely challenging for orthovoltage energies and minute field sizes. The irradiator employs a commercial x-ray device (XRAD 320, Precision x-ray, Inc.) with a custom collimation system to produce 1-10 mm diameter beams and a 50 mm reference beam. Absolute calibrations were performed using the AAPM TG-61 methodology. Beam's half-value layer (HVL) and timer error were measured with an ionization chamber. Percent depth dose (PDD), output factors (OFs) and off-axis ratios were measured using radiochromic film, a diode and a pinpoint ionization chamber at 19.76 and 24.76 cm source-to-surface distance (SSD). PDD measurements were also compared with Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. In-air and in-water absolute calibrations for the reference 50 mm diameter collimator at 19.76 cm SSD were measured as 20.96 and 20.79 Gy min-1, respectively, agreeing within 0.8%. The HVL at 250 kVp and 15 mAs was measured to be 0.45 mm Cu. The reference field PDD MC simulation results agree with measured data within 3.5%. PDD data demonstrate typical increased penetration with increasing field size and SSD. For collimators larger than 5 mm in diameter, OFs measured using film, an ion chamber and a diode were within 3% agreement.

  7. Dosimetric characterization of an image-guided stereotactic small animal irradiator.

    PubMed

    Pidikiti, R; Stojadinovic, S; Speiser, M; Song, K H; Hager, F; Saha, D; Solberg, T D

    2011-04-21

    Small animal irradiation provides an important tool used by preclinical studies to assess and optimize new treatment strategies such as stereotactic ablative radiotherapy. Characterization of radiation beams that are clinically and geometrically scaled for the small animal model is uniquely challenging for orthovoltage energies and minute field sizes. The irradiator employs a commercial x-ray device (XRAD 320, Precision x-ray, Inc.) with a custom collimation system to produce 1-10 mm diameter beams and a 50 mm reference beam. Absolute calibrations were performed using the AAPM TG-61 methodology. Beam's half-value layer (HVL) and timer error were measured with an ionization chamber. Percent depth dose (PDD), output factors (OFs) and off-axis ratios were measured using radiochromic film, a diode and a pinpoint ionization chamber at 19.76 and 24.76 cm source-to-surface distance (SSD). PDD measurements were also compared with Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. In-air and in-water absolute calibrations for the reference 50 mm diameter collimator at 19.76 cm SSD were measured as 20.96 and 20.79 Gy min(-1), respectively, agreeing within 0.8%. The HVL at 250 kVp and 15 mAs was measured to be 0.45 mm Cu. The reference field PDD MC simulation results agree with measured data within 3.5%. PDD data demonstrate typical increased penetration with increasing field size and SSD. For collimators larger than 5 mm in diameter, OFs measured using film, an ion chamber and a diode were within 3% agreement.

  8. Automatic Cardiac Self-Gating of Small-Animal PET Data.

    PubMed

    Herraiz, Joaquin L; Herranz, Elena; Cal-González, Jacobo; Vaquero, Juan J; Desco, Manuel; Cussó, Lorena; Udias, Jose M

    2016-02-01

    The cardiac gating signal (CGS) in positron emission tomography (PET) studies is usually obtained from an electrocardiography (ECG) monitor. In this work, we propose a method to obtain the CGS in small-animal PET using the acquired list-mode data without using any hardware or end-user input. The CGS was obtained from the number of coincidences over time acquired in the lines-of-response connected with the cardiac region. This region is identified in the image as its value changes with frequencies in the range of 3 to 12 Hz. The procedure was tested in a study with 29 Wistar rats and 6 mice injected with 2-deoxy-2-[(18)F]fluoro-D-glucose, which underwent a 45-min single-bed list-mode PET scan of the heart syncronized with an ECG. The estimated signals and the reconstructed images using eight-gated frames were compared with the ones obtained using the ECG signal from the monitor. The differences of the PET-based CGS with respect to the ECG relative to the duration of the heartbeats were 5.6 % in rats and 11.0 % in mice. The reconstructed gated images obtained from the proposed method do not differ qualitatively with respect to the ones obtained with the ECG. The quantitative analysis of both set of images were performed measuring the volume of the left ventricle (LV) of the rats in the end-of-systole and end-of-diastole phase. The differences found in these parameters between both methods were below 12.1 % in the ESV and 9.3 % in the EDV with a 95 % confidence interval, which are comparable to the accuracy (7 %) of the method used for segmenting the LV. The proposed method is able to provide a valid and accurate CGS in small-animal PET list-mode data.

  9. TOPICAL REVIEW: Small animal SPECT and its place in the matrix of molecular imaging technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meikle, Steven R.; Kench, Peter; Kassiou, Michael; Banati, Richard B.

    2005-11-01

    Molecular imaging refers to the use of non-invasive imaging techniques to detect signals that originate from molecules, often in the form of an injected tracer, and observe their interaction with a specific cellular target in vivo. Differences in the underlying physical principles of these measurement techniques determine the sensitivity, specificity and length of possible observation of the signal, characteristics that have to be traded off according to the biological question under study. Here, we describe the specific characteristics of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) relative to other molecular imaging technologies. SPECT is based on the tracer principle and external radiation detection. It is capable of measuring the biodistribution of minute (<10-10 molar) concentrations of radio-labelled biomolecules in vivo with sub-millimetre resolution and quantifying the molecular kinetic processes in which they participate. Like some other imaging techniques, SPECT was originally developed for human use and was subsequently adapted for imaging small laboratory animals at high spatial resolution for basic and translational research. Its unique capabilities include (i) the ability to image endogenous ligands such as peptides and antibodies due to the relative ease of labelling these molecules with technetium or iodine, (ii) the ability to measure relatively slow kinetic processes (compared with positron emission tomography, for example) due to the long half-life of the commonly used isotopes and (iii) the ability to probe two or more molecular pathways simultaneously by detecting isotopes with different emission energies. In this paper, we review the technology developments and design tradeoffs that led to the current state-of-the-art in SPECT small animal scanning and describe the position SPECT occupies within the matrix of molecular imaging technologies.

  10. Evaluation of an educational campaign to increase hand hygiene at a small animal veterinary teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Shea, Annie; Shaw, Scott

    2012-01-01

    To establish baseline data on rates of hand hygiene behavior, evaluate the effectiveness of an educational intervention aimed at improving hand hygiene, and determine whether methods similar to those applied in human hospitals to improve hand hygiene can be successfully applied in a small animal veterinary hospital. Prospective observational study. 568 and 187 observations of interactions between small animal patients and veterinary health-care providers before and after, respectively, educational intervention. Proper hand hygiene practices were defined as use of antibacterial foam or hand washing before or after physical interactions between health-care providers (veterinary medical faculty members, residents, interns, students, and technicians) and patients or proper use of gloves. Data were collected by anonymous direct observation. After an initial observation period, a multimodal educational campaign promoted proper hand hygiene with specific attention to increasing use of antibacterial foam. Two months later, data on proper hand hygiene practices after intervention were collected. At baseline, 117 of 568 (20.6%) interactions met criteria for proper hand hygiene practices; after intervention, a significantly greater proportion (78/187 [41.7%]) of interactions met criteria for proper hand hygiene practices. Use of antibacterial foam significantly increased from 34 of 568 (6.0%) to 67 of 187 (35.8%) interactions. Health-care providers were 4.1 times as likely to wash their hands with soap and water or to use antibacterial foam on their hands after the intervention than before the intervention. Initial low rates of proper hand hygiene practices at baseline were improved substantially 2 months after implementing a low-cost multimodal educational campaign.

  11. Characterization of a Small Animal PET Detector Block Incorporating a Digital Photon Counter Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stortz, Greg; Thompson, Christopher J.; Retière, Fabrice; Goertzen, Andrew L.; Kozlowski, Piotr; Shams, Ehsan; Thiessen, Jonathan D.; Walker, Matthew D.; Sossi, Vesna

    2015-06-01

    A Small Animal PET detector block made with a Dual Layer Offset crystal array with 1.27 mm wide LYSO crystals on a Philips PDC3200-22-44 Digital Photon Counter (DPC) array was characterized while operating near room temperature. Crystal map peak to valley ratio, energy resolution, and timing resolution were characterized as a function of various device settings of the DPC and temperature. In addition, rates of count loss due to the phenomena of incomplete neighbor logic and dark-readout deadtime were measured. Device settings of interest were: Trigger scheme-defining the threshold of when a DPC will generate a timestamp and enter a readout cycle, inhibit fraction-the fraction of noisy cells which are disabled, and RTL-refresh-a setting which reduces the probability of the DPC being triggered from dark noise. At 15°C, peak to valley ratios were measured to be around 11, and energy resolution around 11.5% regardless of device settings. Timing resolution ranged from near 300 ps to 1.5 ns. Count loss from dark readout deadtime was insignificant compared to incomplete neighbor logic, which ranged from as high as 95% to 5% of coincidences. It was found that trade-offs had to be made between timing resolution and count loss. With the most optimal device settings for small animal PET, a timing resolution of 1.4 ns and coincidence losses of 5% were achieved. At these settings, the detector block had little sensitivity to a 5°C temperature fluctuation.

  12. Implementation and assessment of an animal management system for small-animal micro-CT / micro-SPECT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holdsworth, David W.; Detombe, Sarah A.; Chiodo, Chris; Fricke, Stanley T.; Drangova, Maria

    2011-03-01

    Advances in laboratory imaging systems for CT, SPECT, MRI, and PET facilitate routine micro-imaging during pre-clinical investigations. Challenges still arise when dealing with immune-compromised animals, biohazardous agents, and multi-modality imaging. These challenges can be overcome with an appropriate animal management system (AMS), with the capability for supporting and monitoring a rat or mouse during micro-imaging. We report the implementation and assessment of a new AMS system for mice (PRA-3000 / AHS-2750, ASI Instruments, Warren MI), designed to be compatible with a commercial micro-CT / micro-SPECT imaging system (eXplore speCZT, GE Healthcare, London ON). The AMS was assessed under the following criteria: 1) compatibility with the imaging system (i.e. artifact generation, geometric dimensions); 2) compatibility with live animals (i.e. positioning, temperature regulation, anesthetic supply); 3) monitoring capabilities (i.e. rectal temperature, respiratory and cardiac monitoring); 4) stability of co-registration; and 5) containment. Micro-CT scans performed using a standardized live-animal protocol (90 kVp, 40 mA, 900 views, 16 ms per view) exhibited low noise (+/-19 HU) and acceptable artifact from high-density components within the AMS (e.g. ECG pad contacts). Live mice were imaged repeatedly (with removal and replacement of the AMS) and spatial registration was found to be stable to within +/-0.07 mm. All animals tolerated enclosure within the AMS for extended periods (i.e. > one hour) without distress, based on continuous recordings of rectal temperature, ECG waveform and respiratory rate. A sealed AMS system extends the capability of a conventional micro-imaging system to include immune-compromised and biosafety level 2 mouse-imaging protocols.

  13. Animal origins of SARS coronavirus: possible links with the international trade in small carnivores.

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Diana; Roberton, Scott; Hunter, Paul R

    2004-01-01

    The search for animal host origins of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus has so far remained focused on wildlife markets, restaurants and farms within China. A significant proportion of this wildlife enters China through an expanding regional network of illegal, international wildlife trade. We present the case for extending the search for ancestral coronaviruses and their hosts across international borders into countries such as Vietnam and Lao People's Democratic Republic, where the same guilds of species are found on sale in similar wildlife markets or food outlets. The three species that have so far been implicated, a viverrid, a mustelid and a canid, are part of a large suite of small carnivores distributed across this region currently overexploited by this international wildlife trade. A major lesson from SARS is that the underlying roots of newly emergent zoonotic diseases may lie in the parallel biodiversity crisis of massive species loss as a result of overexploitation of wild animal populations and the destruction of their natural habitats by increasing human populations. To address these dual threats to the long-term future of biodiversity, including man, requires a less anthropocentric and more interdisciplinary approach to problems that require the combined research expertise of ecologists, conservation biologists, veterinarians, epidemiologists, virologists, as well as human health professionals. PMID:15306396

  14. "Clean, green and ethical" animal production. Case study: reproductive efficiency in small ruminants.

    PubMed

    Martin, Graeme B; Kadokawa, Hiroya

    2006-02-01

    In response to changes in society and thus the marketplace, we need a vision for the future of our animal industries, including both on-farm and off-farm activities, that is "clean, green and ethical". Using small ruminants as a case study, we describe three "clean, green and ethical" strategies that farmers could use to improve reproductive performance. The first allows control of the timing of reproductive events by using socio-sexual signals (the "male effect") to induce synchronised ovulation in females. The second strategy, "focus feeding", is based on using short periods of nutritional supplements that are precisely timed and specifically designed for each event in the reproductive process (eg, gamete production, embryo survival, fetal programming, colostrum production). The third strategy aims to maximize offspring survival by a combination of management, nutrition and genetic selection for behaviour (temperament). All of these approaches involve non-pharmacological manipulation of the endogenous control systems of the animals and complement the detailed information from ultrasound that is now becoming available. Importantly, these approaches all have a solid foundation in reproductive biology. In several cases, they are currently used in commercial practice, but there is still room for improvement through both basic and applied research. Ultimately, these "clean, green and ethical" tools can be cost-effective, increase productivity and, at the same time, greatly improve the image of meat and milk industries in society and the marketplace.

  15. Monte Carlo dosimetry of iodine contrast objects in a small animal microCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Villafuerte, M.; Martínez-Dávalos, A.

    2011-08-01

    Small animal microcomputed tomography (microCT) studies with iodine-based contrast media are commonly used in preclinical research. While the use of contrast media improves the quality of the images, it can also result in an increase in the absorbed dose to organs with high concentration of the contrast agent, which might cause radiation damage to the animal. In this work we present the results of a Monte Carlo investigation of a microCT dosimetry study using mouse-sized cylindrical water phantoms with iodine contrast insets for different X-ray spectra (Mo and W targets, 30-80 kVp), iodine concentrations (0, 5, 10 and 15 mg mL-1) and contrast object sizes (3 and 10 mm diameter). Our results indicate an absorbed dose increase in the contrast-inset regions with respect to the absorbed dose distribution within a reference uniform water phantom. The calculated spatial absorbed dose distributions show large gradients due to beam hardening effects, and large absorbed dose enhancement as the mean energy of the beam and iodine concentration increase. We have found that absorbed doses in iodine contrast objects can increase by a factor of up to 12 for a realistic 80 kVp X-ray spectra and an iodine concentration of 15 mg mL-1.

  16. Imaging Circulating Tumor Cells in Freely Moving Awake Small Animals Using a Miniaturized Intravital Microscope

    PubMed Central

    Sasportas, Laura Sarah; Gambhir, Sanjiv Sam

    2014-01-01

    Metastasis, the cause for 90% of cancer mortality, is a complex and poorly understood process involving the invasion of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) into blood vessels. These cells have potential prognostic value as biomarkers for early metastatic risk. But their rarity and the lack of specificity and sensitivity in measuring them render their interrogation by current techniques very challenging. How and when these cells are circulating in the blood, on their way to potentially give rise to metastasis, is a question that remains largely unanswered. In order to provide an insight into this "black box" using non-invasive imaging, we developed a novel miniature intravital microscopy (mIVM) strategy capable of real-time long-term monitoring of CTCs in awake small animals. We established an experimental 4T1-GL mouse model of metastatic breast cancer, in which tumor cells express both fluorescent and bioluminescent reporter genes to enable both single cell and whole body tumor imaging. Using mIVM, we monitored blood vessels of different diameters in awake mice in an experimental model of metastasis. Using an in-house software algorithm we developed, we demonstrated in vivo CTC enumeration and computation of CTC trajectory and speed. These data represent the first reported use we know of for a miniature mountable intravital microscopy setup for in vivo imaging of CTCs in awake animals. PMID:24497977

  17. A comparison between a time domain and continuous wave small animal optical imaging system.

    PubMed

    Keren, S; Gheysens, O; Levin, C S; Gambhir, S S

    2008-01-01

    We present a phantom study to evaluate the performance of the eXplore Optix (Advanced Research Technologies-GE Healthcare), the first commercially available time-domain tomography system for small animal fluorescence imaging, and compare its capabilities with the widely used IVIS 200 (Xenogen Corporation-Caliper) continuous wave planar imaging system. The eXplore Optix, based on point-wise illumination and collection scheme, is found to be a log order more sensitive with significantly higher detection depth and spatial resolution as compared with the wide-area illumination IVIS 200 under the conditions tested. A time-resolved detection system allows the eXplore Optix to measure the arrival time distribution of fluorescence photons. This enables fluorescence lifetime measurement, absorption mapping, and estimation of fluorescent inclusion depth, which in turn is used by a reconstruction algorithm to calculate the volumetric distribution of the fluorophore concentration. An increased acquisition time and lack of ability to image multiple animals simultaneously are the main drawbacks of the eXplore Optix as compared with the IVIS 200.

  18. Prescription of perioperative analgesics by UK small animal veterinary surgeons in 2013.

    PubMed

    Hunt, J R; Knowles, T G; Lascelles, B D X; Murrell, J C

    2015-05-09

    Data from a survey conducted in 1996-1997 suggested a low level of perioperative analgesic administration to cats and dogs in the UK. In order to evaluate current practice and attitudes with regards to perioperative analgesic prescription, a cross-sectional survey of UK practising small animal veterinary surgeons was undertaken in spring 2013. Four thousand one hundred paper questionnaires were distributed and the survey was made available online. Seven hundred and twenty valid responses were received and analysed. All respondents had access to at least one non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) and one opioid within their practice. Respondents considered analgesic efficacy, and degree of intraoperative pain, the most important factors governing their selection of NSAID and opioid analgesics. Perioperative NSAIDs were administered by approximately 98 per cent of respondents to dogs and cats undergoing neutering. Multimodal (opioid+NSAID) analgesia was prescribed by the majority of respondents. Neutering was considered more painful in dogs than in cats, and lower rates of opioid and postdischarge NSAID prescription were reported for cats. Orthopaedic, abdominal and dental surgeries were considered equally painful in dogs and cats. Local analgesic techniques were not commonly used. Analgesic prescription has increased since previous surveys, which should translate to improved animal welfare.

  19. Design and performance from an integrated PET/MRI system for small animals.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Imaizumi, Masao; Kanai, Yasukazu; Tatsumi, Mitsuaki; Aoki, Masaaki; Sugiyama, Eiji; Kawakami, Makoto; Shimosegawa, Eku; Hatazawa, Jun

    2010-02-01

    Although simultaneous measurements of PET and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can provide interesting results in molecular imaging research, most of the combined systems are huge and animal handling in the system is not easy. To minimize these problems, we developed a compact integrated PET/MRI (iPET/MRI) system for small animals. For the iPET/MRI system, a new MR-compatible PET and a permanent magnet open MRI were designed. In the MRI, a tunnel is opened at the yoke of the magnet. The position-sensitive photo-multiplier tubes (PSPMTs) of the MR-compatible PET are positioned at the back of the yoke where the magnetic field is sufficiently low. The scintillators for the PET system are positioned at the center of the MRI magnets, and the direction of the scintillation photons is changed by slanted light guides, and they are fed to the PSPMTs by 75 cm long optical fiber bundles. The PET detectors employed two types of LGSO crystals (1.9 mm x 2.2 mm x 6 mm and 7 mm) with different decay times (33 and 43 ns) for depth of interaction detection. Sixteen optical fiber-based block detectors are arranged in a 112 mm diameter ring. The transaxial field-of-view (FOV) of the PET system is ~80 mm, and the axial FOV is 21 mm which can be enlarged by the axial motion of the PET detector ring during MRI acquisition. The transaxial and axial resolutions at the center of the PET system was 2.9 and 2.4 mm FWHM, respectively. The absolute sensitivity was 1.5% at the center of the axial FOV. Phantom images revealed no artifact in either the PET or MRI images. We successfully obtained simultaneously measured small animal images using the iPET/MRI system. The open geometry of the developed iPET/ MRI facilitates easy accessibility to the subject. The iPET/ MRI system appears to be a promising tool for molecular imaging research.

  20. SU-E-I-90: Characterizing Small Animal Lung Properties Using Speckle Observed with An In-Line X-Ray Phase Contrast Benchtop System

    SciTech Connect

    Garson, A; Gunsten, S; Guan, H; Brody, S; Anastasio, M; Vasireddi, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: We demonstrate a novel X-ray phase-contrast (XPC) method for lung imaging representing a paradigm shift in the way small animal functional imaging is performed. In our method, information regarding airway microstructure that is encoded within speckle texture of a single XPC radiograph is decoded to produce 2D parametric images that will spatially resolve changes in lung properties such as microstructure sizes and air volumes. Such information cannot be derived from conventional lung radiography or any other 2D imaging modality. By computing these images at different points within a breathing cycle, dynamic functional imaging will be readily achieved without the need for tomography. Methods: XPC mouse lung radiographs acquired in situ with an in-line X-ray phase contrast benchtop system. The lung air volume is varied and controlled with a small animal ventilator. XPC radiographs will be acquired for various lung air volume levels representing different phases of the respiratory cycle. Similar data will be acquired of microsphere-based lung phantoms containing hollow glass spheres with known distributions of diameters. Image texture analysis is applied to the data to investigate relationships between texture characteristics and airspace/microsphere physical properties. Results: Correlations between Fourier-based texture descriptors (FBTDs) and regional lung air volume indicate that the texture features in 2D radiographs reveal information on 3D properties of the lungs. For example, we find for a 350 × 350 πm2 lung ROI a linear relationship between injected air volume and FBTD value with slope and intercept of 8.9×10{sup 5} and 7.5, respectively. Conclusion: We demonstrate specific image texture measures related to lung speckle features are correlated with physical characteristics of refracting elements (i.e. lung air spaces). Furthermore, we present results indicating the feasibility of implementing the technique with a simple imaging system design, short

  1. A small long-life acoustic transmitter for studying the behavior of aquatic animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, J.; Deng, Z. D.; Li, H.; Myjak, M. J.; Martinez, J. J.; Xiao, J.; Brown, R. S.; Cartmell, S. S.

    2016-11-01

    Acoustic telemetry is an important tool for studying the behavior of aquatic animals and assessing the environmental impact of structures such as hydropower facilities. However, the physical size, signal intensity, and service life of off-the-shelf transmitters are presently insufficient for monitoring certain species. In this study, we developed a small, long-life acoustic transmitter with an approximate length of 24.2 mm, diameter of 5.0 mm, and dry weight of 0.72 g. The transmitter generates a coded acoustic signal at 416.7 kHz with a selectable source level between 159 and 163 dB relative to 1 μPa at 1 m, allowing a theoretical detection range of up to 500 m. The expected operational lifetime is 1 yr at a pulse rate interval of 15 s. The new technology makes long-term acoustic telemetry studies of small fish possible, and is being deployed for a long-term tracking of juvenile sturgeon.

  2. Development of a PET Scanner for Simultaneously Imaging Small Animals with MRI and PET

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Christopher J; Goertzen, Andrew L; Thiessen, Jonathan D; Bishop, Daryl; Stortz, Greg; Kozlowski, Piotr; Retière, Fabrice; Zhang, Xuezhu; Sossi, Vesna

    2014-01-01

    Recently, positron emission tomography (PET) is playing an increasingly important role in the diagnosis and staging of cancer. Combined PET and X-ray computed tomography (PET-CT) scanners are now the modality of choice in cancer treatment planning. More recently, the combination of PET and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is being explored in many sites. Combining PET and MRI has presented many challenges since the photo-multiplier tubes (PMT) in PET do not function in high magnetic fields, and conventional PET detectors distort MRI images. Solid state light sensors like avalanche photo-diodes (APDs) and more recently silicon photo-multipliers (SiPMs) are much less sensitive to magnetic fields thus easing the compatibility issues. This paper presents the results of a group of Canadian scientists who are developing a PET detector ring which fits inside a high field small animal MRI scanner with the goal of providing simultaneous PET and MRI images of small rodents used in pre-clinical medical research. We discuss the evolution of both the crystal blocks (which detect annihilation photons from positron decay) and the SiPM array performance in the last four years which together combine to deliver significant system performance in terms of speed, energy and timing resolution. PMID:25120157

  3. Wireless Neural/EMG Telemetry Systems for Small Freely Moving Animals.

    PubMed

    Harrison, R R; Fotowat, H; Chan, R; Kier, R J; Olberg, R; Leonardo, A; Gabbiani, F

    2011-04-01

    We have developed miniature telemetry systems that capture neural, EMG, and acceleration signals from a freely moving insect or other small animal and transmit the data wirelessly to a remote digital receiver. The systems are based on custom low-power integrated circuits (ICs) that amplify, filter, and digitize four biopotential signals using low-noise circuits. One of the chips also digitizes three acceleration signals from an off-chip microelectromechanical-system accelerometer. All information is transmitted over a wireless ~ 900-MHz telemetry link. The first unit, using a custom chip fabricated in a 0.6- μm BiCMOS process, weighs 0.79 g and runs for two hours on two small batteries. We have used this system to monitor neural and EMG signals in jumping and flying locusts as well as transdermal potentials in weakly swimming electric fish. The second unit, using a custom chip fabricated in a 0.35-μ m complementary metal-oxide semiconductor CMOS process, weighs 0.17 g and runs for five hours on a single 1.5-V battery. This system has been used to monitor neural potentials in untethered perching dragonflies.

  4. A finite difference solution to 2-dimensional radiative transfer equation for small-animal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Meng; Jiao, Yuting; Gao, Feng; Zhao, Huijuan

    2010-02-01

    Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) has been increasingly studied in the past decades. In DOT, the radiative transfer equation (RTE) and its P1 approximation, i.e. the diffuse equation (DE), have been used as the forward models. Since the DE-based DOT fails where biological tissue has a void-like region and when the source-detector separation is less than 5 mean free pathlengths, as in the situations of small animal imaging, the RTE-based DOT methodology has become a focus of investigation. Therefore, the complete formalism of the RTE is attracting more and more interest. It is clear that the quality of the reconstructed image depends strongly on the accuracy of the forward model. In this paper, A FDM was developed for solving two-dimensional RTE in a 2cm×2cm square homogeneous tissue with two groups of the optical properties and different schemes of the spatial and solid angle discretization. The results of the FDM are compared with the MC simulations. It is shown that when the step size of the spatial mesh becomes small, more discretized angle number is needed.

  5. Design and engineering aspects of a high resolution positron tomograph for small animal imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Lecomte, R.; Cadorette, J.; Richard, P.; Rodrique, S.; Rouleau, D. . Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Radiobiology)

    1994-08-01

    The authors describe the Sherbrooke positron emission tomograph, a very high resolution device dedicated to dynamic imaging of small laboratory animals. Its distinctive features are: small discrete scintillation detectors based on avalanche photodiodes (APD) to achieve uniform, isotropic, very high spatial resolution; parallel processing for low deadtime and high count rate capability; multispectral data acquisition hardware to improve sensitivity and scatter correction; modularity to allow design flexibility and upgradability. The system implements the clam-shell'' sampling scheme and a rotating rod transmission source. All acquisition parameters can be adjusted under computer control. Temperature stability at the detector site is ensured by the use of thermoelectric modules. The initial system consists of one layer of 256 modules (two rings of detectors) defining 3 image slices in a 118 mm diameter by 10.5 mm thick field. The axial field can be extended to 50 mm using 4 layers of modules (8 rings of detectors). The design constraints and engineering aspects of an APD-based PET scanner are reviewed and preliminary results are reported.

  6. Use of plain radiography in the diagnosis, surgical management, and postoperative treatment of obstructive urolithiasis in 25 goats and 2 sheep.

    PubMed

    Kinsley, Marc A; Semevolos, Stacy; Parker, Jill E; Duesterdieck-Zellmer, Katja; Huber, Michael

    2013-08-01

    To describe use of plain radiography for diagnosis, surgical management, and postoperative treatment of obstructive urolithiasis in small ruminants. Retrospective case series. Small ruminants (n = 27; 25 goats, 2 sheep). Medical records (January 2002-November 2011) and radiographs for all small ruminants diagnosed with obstructive urolithiasis and having plain abdominal radiographs were reviewed. Signalment, surgical procedures, radiographic findings, ultrasonographic findings, position of calculi, and how plain radiography influenced surgical management and postoperative treatment were recorded. Radiopaque urinary calculi were detected in 23 (85%) plain radiographic studies. Location of uroliths determined by plain radiography included: cystic only (n = 5), distal to the sigmoid flexure and cystic (5), subischial (5), distal to the sigmoid flexure only (3), sigmoid flexure (3), and subischial and cystic (2). In 8 of these animals, postoperative radiographs revealed residual calculi in the urethra and were essential for their targeted removal by urethrotomy in 7 animals. In regions where radiopaque calculi (calcium carbonate, calcium oxalate, silica) are commonly encountered in small ruminants, plain radiographs are recommended to determine the appropriate surgical approach(es) and to confirm resolution of the obstruction. © Copyright 2013 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  7. Effects of radiographic techniques on the low-contrast detail detectability performance of digital radiography systems.

    PubMed

    Alsleem, Haney; U, Paul; Mong, Kam Shan; Davidson, Robert

    2014-01-01

    the kilovolt peak at the different milliampere second settings essentially did not affect the IQFinv of the different digital radiography systems. Increasing milliampere seconds in all digital imaging systems generally improves detectability performance. However, altering the kilovolt peak setting does not significantly change the IQFinv and detectability of objects in a digital radiograph. Imaging system selection should be based on typical radiographic examinations. Indirect digital radiography systems are better for studies that require higher kilovolt peak, such as large organs, and direct digital radiography is better for studies that require low kilovolt peak, such as small organs and mammography, which is used to examine fine tissue details.

  8. Evaluation of Matrix9 silicon photomultiplier array for small-animal PET

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Junwei Schmall, Jeffrey P.; Yang, Yongfeng; Di, Kun; Roncali, Emilie; Mitchell, Gregory S.; Buckley, Steve; Jackson, Carl; Cherry, Simon R.

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: The MatrixSL-9-30035-OEM (Matrix9) from SensL is a large-area silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) photodetector module consisting of a 3 × 3 array of 4 × 4 element SiPM arrays (total of 144 SiPM pixels) and incorporates SensL’s front-end electronics board and coincidence board. Each SiPM pixel measures 3.16 × 3.16 mm{sup 2} and the total size of the detector head is 47.8 × 46.3 mm{sup 2}. Using 8 × 8 polished LSO/LYSO arrays (pitch 1.5 mm) the performance of this detector system (SiPM array and readout electronics) was evaluated with a view for its eventual use in small-animal positron emission tomography (PET). Methods: Measurements of noise, signal, signal-to-noise ratio, energy resolution, flood histogram quality, timing resolution, and array trigger error were obtained at different bias voltages (28.0–32.5 V in 0.5 V intervals) and at different temperatures (5 °C–25 °C in 5 °C degree steps) to find the optimal operating conditions. Results: The best measured signal-to-noise ratio and flood histogram quality for 511 keV gamma photons were obtained at a bias voltage of 30.0 V and a temperature of 5 °C. The energy resolution and timing resolution under these conditions were 14.2% ± 0.1% and 4.2 ± 0.1 ns, respectively. The flood histograms show that all the crystals in the 1.5 mm pitch LSO array can be clearly identified and that smaller crystal pitches can also be resolved. Flood histogram quality was also calculated using different center of gravity based positioning algorithms. Improved and more robust results were achieved using the local 9 pixels for positioning along with an energy offset calibration. To evaluate the front-end detector readout, and multiplexing efficiency, an array trigger error metric is introduced and measured at different lower energy thresholds. Using a lower energy threshold greater than 150 keV effectively eliminates any mispositioning between SiPM arrays. Conclusions: In summary, the Matrix9 detector system

  9. Low relative error in consumer-grade GPS units make them ideal for measuring small-scale animal movement patterns

    PubMed Central

    Severns, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    Consumer-grade GPS units are a staple of modern field ecology, but the relatively large error radii reported by manufacturers (up to 10 m) ostensibly precludes their utility in measuring fine-scale movement of small animals such as insects. Here we demonstrate that for data collected at fine spatio-temporal scales, these devices can produce exceptionally accurate data on step-length and movement patterns of small animals. With an understanding of the properties of GPS error and how it arises, it is possible, using a simple field protocol, to use consumer grade GPS units to collect step-length data for the movement of small animals that introduces a median error as small as 11 cm. These small error rates were measured in controlled observations of real butterfly movement. Similar conclusions were reached using a ground-truth test track prepared with a field tape and compass and subsequently measured 20 times using the same methodology as the butterfly tracking. Median error in the ground-truth track was slightly higher than the field data, mostly between 20 and 30 cm, but even for the smallest ground-truth step (70 cm), this is still a signal-to-noise ratio of 3:1, and for steps of 3 m or more, the ratio is greater than 10:1. Such small errors relative to the movements being measured make these inexpensive units useful for measuring insect and other small animal movements on small to intermediate scales with budgets orders of magnitude lower than survey-grade units used in past studies. As an additional advantage, these units are simpler to operate, and insect or other small animal trackways can be collected more quickly than either survey-grade units or more traditional ruler/gird approaches. PMID:26312190

  10. X-ray and optical multimodality tomographer for small animal examination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da Silva, A.; Leabad, M.; Bordy, T.; Dinten, J.-M.; Peltié, P.; Rizo, P.

    2007-02-01

    A small animal multimodality tomographer dedicated to the co-registration of fluorescence optical signal and X-rays measurements has been developed in our laboratory. The purpose of such a system is to offer the possibility to get in vivo anatomical and functional information at once. Moreover, anatomical measurements can be used as a regularization factor in order to get the reconstructions of the biodistribution of fluorochromes more accurate and to speed up the treatment. The optical system is basically composed with a CW laser (Krypton, 752 nm) for an optimal excitation of Alexa-Fluor 750 fluorochromes, and a CCD camera coupled with a combination of filters for the fluorescence detection. The animal is placed inside a transparent tube filled with an index matching fluid. In order to perform multiple views of fluorescence data acquisitions, the cylinder is fixed to a rotating stage. The excitation beam is brought to the cylinder via two mirrors mounted on translation plates allowing a vertical scan. The optical data acquisitions are performed with a high sensitivity CCD camera. The X-ray generator and the X-ray detector have been placed perpendicularly to the optical chain. A first study on phantoms was conducted to evaluate the feasibility, to test the linearity and the reproducibility, and to fix the parameters for the co-registration. These test experiments were reproduced by considering mice in the oesophagus of which the previous tubes were inserted. Finally, the performance of the system was evaluated in vivo on mice bearing tumours in the lungs, tagged with Transferrin-AlexaFluor 750.

  11. A novel small animal extracorporeal circulation model for studying pathophysiology of cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Yutaka; Shirai, Mikiyasu; Inamori, Shuji; Takewa, Yoshiaki; Tatsumi, Eisuke

    2015-03-01

    Extracorporeal circulation (ECC) is indispensable for cardiac surgery. Despite the fact that ECCcauses damage to blood components and is non-physiologic, its pathophysiology has not been fully elucidated. This is because difficulty in clinical research and animal experiments keeps the knowledge insufficient. Therefore, it is desirable to have a miniature ECC model for small animals, which enables repetitive experiments, to study the mechanism of pathophysiological changes during ECC. We developed a miniature ECC system and applied it to the rat. We measured changes in hemodynamics, blood gases and hemoglobin (Hb) concentration, serum cytokines (TNF-α, IL-6, IL-10), biochemical markers (LDH, AST, ALT), and the wet-to-dry weight (W/D) ratio of the lung for assessing whether the rat ECC model is comparable to the human ECC. The ECC system consisted of a membranous oxygenator (polypropylene, 0.03 m(2)), tubing line (polyvinyl chloride), and roller pump. Priming volume of this system is only 8 ml. Rats (400-450 g) were divided into the SHAM group (n = 7) and the ECC group (n = 7). Blood samples were collected before, 60 and 120 min after initiation of ECC. During ECC, blood pressure and Hb were maintained around 80 mmHg and 10 g/dL, respectively. The levels of the inflammatory and biochemical markers and the W/D ratio were significantly elevated in the ECC group, indicating some organ damages and systemic inflammatory responses during ECC. We successfully established the ECC for the rat. This miniature ECC model could be a useful approach for studying the mechanism of pathophysiology during ECC and basic assessment of the ECC devices.

  12. Preclinical molecular imaging: development of instrumentation for translational research with small laboratory animals

    PubMed Central

    Mejia, Jorge; Miranda, Ana Claudia Camargo; Durante, Ana Claudia Ranucci; de Oliveira, Larissa Rolim; de Barboza, Marycel Rosa Felisa Figols; Rosell, Katerin Taboada; Jardim, Daniele Pereira; Campos, Alexandre Holthausen; dos Reis, Marilia Alves; Catanoso, Marcela Forli; Galvis-Alonso, Orfa Yineth; Cabral, Francisco Romero

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To present the result of upgrading a clinical gamma-camera to be used to obtain in vivo tomographic images of small animal organs, and its application to register cardiac, renal and neurological images. Methods: An updated version of the miniSPECT upgrading device was built, which is composed of mechanical, electronic and software subsystems. The device was attached to a Discovery VH (General Electric Healthcare) gamma-camera, which was retired from the clinical service and installed at the Centro de Imagem Pré-Clínica of the Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein. The combined system was characterized, determining operational parameters, such as spatial resolution, magnification, maximum acceptable target size, number of projections, and acquisition and reconstruction times. Results: Images were obtained with 0.5mm spatial resolution, with acquisition and reconstruction times between 30 and 45 minutes, using iterative reconstruction with 10 to 20 iterations and 4 projection subsets. The system was validated acquiring in vivo tomographic images of the heart, kidneys and brain of normal animals (mice and adult rats), using the radiopharmaceuticals technetium-labeled hexakis-2-methoxy-isobutyl isonitrile (99mTc-Sestamibi), technetium-labeled dimercaptosuccinic acid (99mTc-DMSA) and technetium-labeled hexamethyl propyleneamine oxime (99mTc-HMPAO). Conclusion: This kind of application, which consists in the adaptation for an alternative objective of already existing instrumentation, resulted in a low-cost infrastructure option, allowing to carry out large scale in vivo studies with enhanced quality in several areas, such as neurology, nephrology, cardiology, among others. PMID:27759832

  13. Fluorescence-enhanced optical tomography and nuclear imaging system for small animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, I.-Chih; Lu, Yujie; Darne, Chinmay; Rasmussen, John C.; Zhu, Banghe; Azhdarinia, Ali; Yan, Shikui; Smith, Anne M.; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.

    2012-03-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence is an alternative modality for molecular imaging that has been demonstrated in animals and recently in humans. Fluorescence-enhanced optical tomography (FEOT) using continuous wave or frequency domain photon migration techniques could be used to provide quantitative molecular imaging in vivo if it could be validated against "gold-standard," nuclear imaging modalities, using dual-labeled imaging agents. Unfortunately, developed FEOT systems are not suitable for incorporation with CT/PET/SPECT scanners because they utilize benchtop devices and require a large footprint. In this work, we developed a miniaturized fluorescence imaging system installed in the gantry of the Siemens Inveon PET/CT scanner to enable NIR transillumination measurements. The system consists of a CCD camera equipped with NIR sensitive intensifier, a diode laser controlled by a single board compact controller, a 2-axis galvanometer, and RF circuit modules for homodyne detection of the phase and amplitude of fluorescence signals. The performance of the FEOT system was tested and characterized. A mouse-shaped solid phantom of uniform optical properties with a fluorescent inclusion was scanned using CT, and NIR fluorescence images at several projections were collected. The method of high-order approximation to the radioactive transfer equation was then used to reconstruct the optical images. Dual-labeled agents were also used on a tumor bearing mouse to validate the results of the FEOT against PET/CT image. The results showed that the location of the fluorophore obtained from the FEOT matches the location of tumor obtained from the PET/CT images. Besides validation of FEOT, this hybrid system could allow multimodal molecular imaging (FEOT/PET/CT) for small animal imaging.

  14. Method to reduce non-specific tissue heating of small animals in solenoid coils

    PubMed Central

    KUMAR, ANANDA; ATTALURI, ANILCHANDRA; MALLIPUDI, RAJIV; CORNEJO, CHRISTINE; BORDELON, DAVID; ARMOUR, MICHAEL; MORUA, KATHERINE; DEWEESE, THEODORE L.; IVKOV, ROBERT

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Solenoid coils that generate time-varying or alternating magnetic fields (AMFs) are used in biomedical devices for research, imaging and therapy. Interactions of AMF and tissue produce eddy currents that deposit power within tissue, thus limiting effectiveness and safety. We aim to develop methods that minimise excess heating of mice exposed to AMFs for cancer therapy experiments. Materials and methods Numerical and experimental data were obtained to characterise thermal management properties of water using a continuous, custom water jacket in a four-turn simple solenoid. Theoretical data were obtained with method-of-moments (MoM) numerical field calculations and finite element method (FEM) thermal simulations. Experimental data were obtained from gel phantoms and mice exposed to AMFs having amplitude >50kA/m and frequency of 160 kHz. Results Water has a high specific heat and thermal conductivity, is diamagnetic, polar, and nearly transparent to magnetic fields. We report at least a two-fold reduction of temperature increase from gel phantom and animal models when a continuous layer of circulating water was placed between the sample and solenoid, compared with no water. Thermal simulations indicate the superior efficiency in thermal management by the developed continuous single chamber cooling system over a double chamber non-continuous system. Further reductions of heating were obtained by regulating water temperature and flow for active cooling. Conclusions These results demonstrate the potential value of a contiguous layer of circulating water to permit sustained exposure to high intensity alternating magnetic fields at this frequency for research using small animal models exposed to AMFs. PMID:23402327

  15. Digital radiography: an overview.

    PubMed

    Parks, Edwin T; Williamson, Gail F

    2002-11-15

    Since the discovery of X-rays in 1895, film has been the primary medium for capturing, displaying, and storing radiographic images. It is a technology that dental practitioners are the most familiar and comfortable with in terms of technique and interpretation. Digital radiography is the latest advancement in dental imaging and is slowly being adopted by the dental profession. Digital imaging incorporates computer technology in the capture, display, enhancement, and storage of direct radiographic images. Digital imaging offers some distinct advantages over film, but like any emerging technology, it presents new and different challenges for the practitioner to overcome. This article presents an overview of digital imaging including basic terminology and comparisons with film-based imaging. The principles of direct and indirect digital imaging modalities, intraoral and extraoral applications, image processing, and diagnostic efficacy will be discussed. In addition, the article will provide a list of questions dentists should consider prior to purchasing digital imaging systems for their practice.

  16. Radiography students' clinical learning styles.

    PubMed

    Ward, Patti; Makela, Carole

    2010-01-01

    To examine the common learning styles of radiography students during clinical practice. Descriptive research methodology, using a single self-report questionnaire, helped to identify common learning styles of radiography students during clinical practice. The results indicated that 3 learning styles predominate among radiography students during clinical practice: task oriented, purposeful and tentative. Insight into clinical practice learning styles can help students understand how they learn and allow them to recognize ways to maximize learning. It also heightens awareness among clinical instructors and technologists of the different learning styles and their relevance to clinical practice education.

  17. TH-A-18C-08: Design of a Small Animal Contrast Enhanced Dual Energy CT

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R; Pan, T; Li, B

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Dual energy CT has a variety of uses in a small animal setting including quantification and enhanced visualization of contrast agent. This study aims to determine the best energy combinations for contrast enhanced DECT on the XRAD 225Cx (Precision x-ray), a small animal IGRT system with a nominal energy range of 20 – 225 kVp. Focus was placed on material density accuracy and low contrast detectability. Methods: Simulations of single energy scans of an object containing concentrations of iodine varying from 0.5 to 50 mg/ml were performed using the simulation package ImaSim. Energy spectra from 50 – 220 kVp were calculated using the same software. For approximate Poisson noise modeling, mAs were chosen such that 30% of the total 10cGy dose was assigned to the low energy scan. A calibration involving projections of objects containing different thicknesses of iodine (0–0.5 mm) and water (0–50 mm) was performed for each energy and fit to a cubic equation as the calibration curve for each energy pair. Results: Contrast to noise ratios of the iodine material images and accuracies in iodine density measurements were measured. Gradual improvements in each metric were seen with increasing high energy. Larger improvements in CNR were observed for decreasing the low energy. Errors in iodine density were generally close to 5% for concentrations of iodine above 3 mg/ml but increased to around 15% for 50 kVp, likely due to its proximity to the discontinuity caused by the k-edge of iodine. Conclusion: Based on these simulations, the best energy combination for detecting low concentrations of iodine using a projection space calibration procedure is 50/200 kVp. However, if accuracy is most important 80/220 kVp is ideal, with 60/220 kVp being a good compromise to achieve both goals. Future work is necessary to verify these conclusions with physical data.

  18. Split exponential track length estimator for Monte-Carlo simulations of small-animal radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Smekens, F; Létang, J M; Noblet, C; Chiavassa, S; Delpon, G; Freud, N; Rit, S; Sarrut, D

    2014-12-21

    We propose the split exponential track length estimator (seTLE), a new kerma-based method combining the exponential variant of the TLE and a splitting strategy to speed up Monte Carlo (MC) dose computation for low energy photon beams. The splitting strategy is applied to both the primary and the secondary emitted photons, triggered by either the MC events generator for primaries or the photon interactions generator for secondaries. Split photons are replaced by virtual particles for fast dose calculation using the exponential TLE. Virtual particles are propagated by ray-tracing in voxelized volumes and by conventional MC navigation elsewhere. Hence, the contribution of volumes such as collimators, treatment couch and holding devices can be taken into account in the dose calculation.We evaluated and analysed the seTLE method for two realistic small animal radiotherapy treatment plans. The effect of the kerma approximation, i.e. the complete deactivation of electron transport, was investigated. The efficiency of seTLE against splitting multiplicities was also studied. A benchmark with analog MC and TLE was carried out in terms of dose convergence and efficiency.The results showed that the deactivation of electrons impacts the dose at the water/bone interface in high dose regions. The maximum and mean dose differences normalized to the dose at the isocenter were, respectively of 14% and 2% . Optimal splitting multiplicities were found to be around 300. In all situations, discrepancies in integral dose were below 0.5% and 99.8% of the voxels fulfilled a 1%/0.3 mm gamma index criterion. Efficiency gains of seTLE varied from 3.2 × 10(5) to 7.7 × 10(5) compared to analog MC and from 13 to 15 compared to conventional TLE.In conclusion, seTLE provides results similar to the TLE while increasing the efficiency by a factor between 13 and 15, which makes it particularly well-suited to typical small animal radiation therapy applications.

  19. Design and simulation of a high-resolution stationary SPECT system for small animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beekman, Freek J.; Vastenhouw, Brendan

    2004-10-01

    Exciting new SPECT systems can be created by combining pinhole imaging with compact high-resolution gamma cameras. These new systems are able to solve the problem of the limited sensitivity-resolution trade-off that hampers contemporary small animal SPECT. The design presented here (U-SPECT-III) uses a set of detectors placed in a polygonal configuration and a cylindrical collimator that contains 135 pinholes arranged in nine rings. Each ring contains 15 gold pinhole apertures that focus on the centre of the cylinder. A non-overlapping projection is acquired via each pinhole. Consequently, when a mouse brain is placed in the central field-of-view, each voxel in the cerebrum can be observed via 130 to 135 different pinholes simultaneously. A method for high-resolution scintillation detection is described that eliminates the depth-of-interaction problem encountered with pinhole cameras, and is expected to provide intrinsic detector resolutions better than 150 µm. By means of simulations U-SPECT-III is compared to a simulated dual pinhole SPECT (DP-SPECT) system with a pixelated array consisting of 2.0 × 2.0 mm NaI crystals. Analytic calculations indicate that the proposed U-SPECT-III system yields an almost four times higher linear and about sixty times higher volumetric system resolution than DP-SPECT, when the systems are compared at matching system sensitivity. In addition, it should be possible to achieve a 15 up to 30 times higher sensitivity with U-SPECT-III when the systems are compared at equal resolution. Simulated images of a digital mouse-brain phantom show much more detail with U-SPECT-III than with DP-SPECT. In a resolution phantom, 0.3 mm diameter cold rods are clearly visible with U-SPECT-III, whereas with DP-SPECT the smallest visible rods are about 0.6-0.8 mm. Furthermore, with U-SPECT-III, the image deformations outside the central plane of reconstruction that hamper conventional pinhole SPECT are strongly suppressed. Simulation results indicate

  20. Correction of MRI-induced geometric distortions in whole-body small animal PET-MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Frohwein, Lynn J. Schäfers, Klaus P.; Hoerr, Verena; Faber, Cornelius

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: The fusion of positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data can be a challenging task in whole-body PET-MRI. The quality of the registration between these two modalities in large field-of-views (FOV) is often degraded by geometric distortions of the MRI data. The distortions at the edges of large FOVs mainly originate from MRI gradient nonlinearities. This work describes a method to measure and correct for these kind of geometric distortions in small animal MRI scanners to improve the registration accuracy of PET and MRI data. Methods: The authors have developed a geometric phantom which allows the measurement of geometric distortions in all spatial axes via control points. These control points are detected semiautomatically in both PET and MRI data with a subpixel accuracy. The spatial transformation between PET and MRI data is determined with these control points via 3D thin-plate splines (3D TPS). The transformation derived from the 3D TPS is finally applied to real MRI mouse data, which were acquired with the same scan parameters used in the phantom data acquisitions. Additionally, the influence of the phantom material on the homogeneity of the magnetic field is determined via field mapping. Results: The spatial shift according to the magnetic field homogeneity caused by the phantom material was determined to a mean of 0.1 mm. The results of the correction show that distortion with a maximum error of 4 mm could be reduced to less than 1 mm with the proposed correction method. Furthermore, the control point-based registration of PET and MRI data showed improved congruence after correction. Conclusions: The developed phantom has been shown to have no considerable negative effect on the homogeneity of the magnetic field. The proposed method yields an appropriate correction of the measured MRI distortion and is able to improve the PET and MRI registration. Furthermore, the method is applicable to whole-body small animal

  1. Controversies in the use of hydroxyethyl starch solutions in small animal emergency and critical care.

    PubMed

    Adamik, Katja N; Yozova, Ivayla D; Regenscheit, Nadine

    2015-01-01

    To (1) review the development and medical applications of hydroxyethyl starch (HES) solutions with particular emphasis on its physiochemical properties; (2) critically appraise the available evidence in human and veterinary medicine, and (3) evaluate the potential risks and benefits associated with their use in critically ill small animals. Human and veterinary original research articles, scientific reviews, and textbook sources from 1950 to the present. HES solutions have been used extensively in people for over 30 years and ever since its introduction there has been a great deal of debate over its safety and efficacy. Recently, results of seminal trials and meta-analyses showing increased risks related to kidney dysfunction and mortality in septic and critically ill patients, have led to the restriction of HES use in these patient populations by European regulatory authorities. Although the initial ban on the use of HES in Europe has been eased, proof regarding the benefits and safety profile of HES in trauma and surgical patient populations has been requested by these same European regulatory authorities. The veterinary literature is limited mostly to experimental studies and clinical investigations with small populations of patients with short-term end points and there is insufficient evidence to generate recommendations. Currently, there are no consensus recommendations regarding the use of HES in veterinary medicine. Veterinarians and institutions affected by the HES restrictions have had to critically reassess the risks and benefits related to HES usage based on the available information and sometimes adapt their procedures and policies based on their reassessment. Meanwhile, large, prospective, randomized veterinary studies evaluating HES use are needed to achieve relevant levels of evidence to enable formulation of specific veterinary guidelines. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2015.

  2. The effect of β + energy on performance of a small animal PET camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partridge, M.; Spinelli, A.; Ryder, W.; Hindorf, C.

    2006-12-01

    The effective spatial resolution of a positron emission tomography (PET) scanner is determined in part by the initial energy of the positron, which is a function of the radionuclide. For F-18 ( Emax=0.633 MeV) the mean positron range in water is small (0.6 mm). However, many other useful positron-emitting nuclides have higher energies, for example Ga-68 ( Emax=1.899 MeV, mean range 2.9 mm) has one of the highest. The performance of a non-rotating, 16 module high density avalanche chamber (quad-HIDAC) small animal PET scanner was measured using both F-18 and Ga-68 to represent the extremes of high and low positron energy. The count rate performance—scatter fraction and noise-equivalent count rate (NEC)—were measured for both isotopes. Data were also collected for a spatial resolution phantom with rectangular arrays of holes of diameter 2.0, 1.5, 1.0 and 0.5 mm with the centres separated by 4.0, 3.0, 2.0 and 1.0 mm respectively. The NEC, measured for both 70 and 200 cm 3 cylindrical phantoms, was approximately linear up to 30 MBq, but shows a rapid drop-off above this value. The spatial resolution phantom showed that 1 mm objects are just resolved with F-18, but none of the targets are resolved for Ga-68. In conclusion, spatial resolution is dominated by the choice of isotope down to 1 mm, with sensitivity and count-rate data being largely independent of positron range.

  3. Auditory evoked fields measured noninvasively with small-animal MEG reveal rapid repetition suppression in the guinea pig

    PubMed Central

    Christianson, G. Björn; Chait, Maria; de Cheveigné, Alain

    2014-01-01

    In animal models, single-neuron response properties such as stimulus-specific adaptation have been described as possible precursors to mismatch negativity, a human brain response to stimulus change. In the present study, we attempted to bridge the gap between human and animal studies by characterising responses to changes in the frequency of repeated tone series in the anesthetised guinea pig using small-animal magnetoencephalography (MEG). We showed that 1) auditory evoked fields (AEFs) qualitatively similar to those observed in human MEG studies can be detected noninvasively in rodents using small-animal MEG; 2) guinea pig AEF amplitudes reduce rapidly with tone repetition, and this AEF reduction is largely complete by the second tone in a repeated series; and 3) differences between responses to the first (deviant) and later (standard) tones after a frequency transition resemble those previously observed in awake humans using a similar stimulus paradigm. PMID:25231619

  4. Investigating common clinical presentations in first opinion small animal consultations using direct observation

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, N. J.; Dean, R. S.; Cobb, M.; Brennan, M. L.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding more about the clinical presentations encountered in veterinary practice is vital in directing research towards areas relevant to practitioners. The aim of this study was to describe all problems discussed during a convenience sample of consultations using a direct observation method. A data collection tool was used to gather data by direct observation during small animal consultations at eight sentinel practices. Data were recorded for all presenting and non-presenting specific health problems discussed. A total of 1901 patients were presented with 3206 specific health problems discussed. Clinical presentation varied widely between species and between presenting and non-presenting problems. Skin lump, vomiting and inappetence were the most common clinical signs reported by the owner while overweight/obese, dental tartar and skin lump were the most common clinical examination findings. Skin was the most frequently affected body system overall followed by non-specific problems then the gastrointestinal system. Consultations are complex, with a diverse range of different clinical presentations seen. Considering the presenting problem only may give an inaccurate view of the veterinary caseload, as some common problems are rarely the reason for presentation. Understanding the common diagnoses made is the next step and will help to further focus questions for future research. PMID:25564472

  5. Development of a Si-PM-based high-resolution PET system for small animals.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Imaizumi, Masao; Watabe, Tadashi; Watabe, Hiroshi; Kanai, Yasukazu; Shimosegawa, Eku; Hatazawa, Jun

    2010-10-07

    A Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode (Si-PM) is a promising photodetector for PET, especially for use in a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system, because it has high gain and is less sensitive to a static magnetic field. We developed a Si-PM-based depth-of-interaction (DOI) PET system for small animals. Hamamatsu 4 × 4 Si-PM arrays (S11065-025P) were used for its detector blocks. Two types of LGSO scintillator of 0.75 mol% Ce (decay time: ∼45 ns; 1.1 mm × 1.2 mm × 5 mm) and 0.025 mol% Ce (decay time: ∼31 ns; 1.1 mm × 1.2 mm × 6 mm) were optically coupled in the DOI direction to form a DOI detector, arranged in a 11 × 9 matrix, and optically coupled to the Si-PM array. Pulse shape analysis was used for the DOI detection of these two types of LGSOs. Sixteen detector blocks were arranged in a 68 mm diameter ring to form the PET system. Spatial resolution was 1.6 mm FWHM and sensitivity was 0.6% at the center of the field of view. High-resolution mouse and rat images were successfully obtained using the PET system. We confirmed that the developed Si-PM-based PET system is promising for molecular imaging research.

  6. Extraction of the respiratory signal from small-animal CT projections for a retrospective gating method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavarrías, C.; Vaquero, J. J.; Sisniega, A.; Rodríguez-Ruano, A.; Soto-Montenegro, M. L.; García-Barreno, P.; Desco, M.

    2008-09-01

    We propose a retrospective respiratory gating algorithm to generate dynamic CT studies. To this end, we compared three different methods of extracting the respiratory signal from the projections of small-animal cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scanners. Given a set of frames acquired from a certain axial angle, subtraction of their average image from each individual frame produces a set of difference images. Pixels in these images have positive or negative values (according to the respiratory phase) in those areas where there is lung movement. The respiratory signals were extracted by analysing the shape of the histogram of these difference images: we calculated the first four central and non-central moments. However, only odd-order moments produced the desired breathing signal, as the even-order moments lacked information about the phase. Each of these curves was compared to a reference signal recorded by means of a pneumatic pillow. Given the similar correlation coefficients yielded by all of them, we selected the mean to implement our retrospective protocol. Respiratory phase bins were separated, reconstructed independently and included in a dynamic sequence, suitable for cine playback. We validated our method in five adult rat studies by comparing profiles drawn across the diaphragm dome, with and without retrospective respiratory gating. Results showed a sharper transition in the gated reconstruction, with an average slope improvement of 60.7%.

  7. Digital signal processing applied to crystal identification in Positron Emission Tomography dedicated to small animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontaine, Réjean; Viscogliosi, Nicolas; Semmaoui, Hicham; Bélanger, François; Lemieux, François; Tétrault, Marc-André; Michaud, Jean-Baptiste; Bérard, Philippe; Cadorette, Jules; Pepin, Catherine M.; Lecomte, Roger

    2007-02-01

    The recent introduction of all-digital electronic architecture in Positron Emission Tomography (PET) scanners, enables new paradigms to be explored for extracting relevant information from the detector signals, such as energy, time and crystal identification. The LabPET™ small animal scanner, which implements free-running 45-MHz sampling directly at the output of the charge sensitive preamplifiers, provides an excellent platform to test such advanced digital algorithms. A real-time identification method, based on an Auto-Regressive Moving-Average (ARMA) scheme, was tested for discriminating between LYSO (t r˜40 ns) and LGSO (t r˜65 ns) scintillators in phoswich detectors, coupled to a single Avalanche Photodiode (APD). Even with a low energy threshold of 250 keV applied individually, error rates<4% can be achieved, as compared to >10%, typically with conventional analog pulse shape discrimination techniques. Such digital crystal identification techniques can be readily implemented with phoswich detectors for improving spatial resolution in PET, either by increasing crystal pixellization or by mitigating parallax errors through depth-of-interaction determination. It also allows to reduce the event rate presented to the real-time coincidence engine by applying a low energy limit at the crystal granularity and rejecting more Compton photons.

  8. Climbing Mount Efficiency--small steps, not giant leaps towards higher cloning success in farm animals.

    PubMed

    Oback, Björn

    2008-07-01

    Despite more than a decade of research efforts, farm animal cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is still frustratingly inefficient. Inefficiency manifests itself at different levels, which are currently not well integrated. At the molecular level, it leads to widespread genetic, epigenetic and transcriptional aberrations in cloned embryos. At the organismal level, these genome-wide abnormalities compromise development of cloned foetuses and offspring. Specific molecular defects need to be causally linked to specific cloned phenotypes, in order to design specific treatments to correct them. Cloning efficiency depends on the ability of the nuclear donor cell to be fully reprogrammed into an embryonic state and the ability of the enucleated recipient cell to carry out the reprogramming reactions. It has been postulated that reprogrammability of the somatic donor cell epigenome is influenced by its differentiation status. However, direct comparisons between cells of divergent differentiation status within several somatic lineages have found no conclusive evidence for this. Choosing somatic stem cells as donors has not improved cloning efficiency, indicating that donor cell type may be less critical for cloning success. Different recipient cells, on the other hand, vary in their reprogramming ability. In bovine, using zygotes instead of oocytes has increased cloning success. Other improvements in livestock cloning efficiency include better coordinating donor cell type with cell cycle stage and aggregating cloned embryos. In the future, it will be important to demonstrate if these small increases at every step are cumulative, adding up to an integrated cloning protocol with greatly improved efficiency.

  9. A dual-use imaging system for pre-clinical small animal radiation research.

    PubMed

    Meng Li; Xingchi He; Eslami, Sohrab; Ken Kang-Hsin Wang; Bin Zhang; Wong, John; Iordachita, Iulian

    2015-01-01

    The current cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) system on the small animal radiation research platform (SARRP) is less effective in localizing soft-tissue targets. On the contrary, molecular optical imaging techniques, such as bioluminescence tomography (BLT) and fluorescence tomography (FT), can provide high contrast soft tissue images to complement CBCT and offer functional information. In this study, we present a dual-use optical imaging system that enables BLT/FT for both on-board and stand-alone applications. The system consists of a mobile cart and an imaging unit. Multi-projection optical images can be acquired in a range of -90°~90° angles. An optical fiber driven by an X-Y-Z Cartesian stage serves as an excitation light source specifically for FT. Our results show that the accuracy and reproducibility of the system meets the requirements set by the pre-clinical workflow (<;0.1 mm and 0.5 degree error). Preliminary experiments demonstrate the feasibility of bioluminescent imaging in a tissue-simulating phantom with a luminescent source embedded. In a considerable light-tight environment, we can achieve average background optical intensity significantly lower than the luminescent signal (<; 5%).

  10. Gas exchange in the ice zone: the role of small waves and big animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loose, B.; Takahashi, A.; Bigdeli, A.

    2016-12-01

    The balance of air-sea gas exchange and net biological carbon fixation determine the transport and transformation of carbon dioxide and methane in the ocean. Air-sea gas exchange is mostly driven by upper ocean physics, but biology can also play a role. In the open ocean, gas exchange increases proportionate to the square of wind speed. When sea ice is present, this dependence breaks down in part because breaking waves and air bubble entrainment are damped out by interactions between sea ice and the wave field. At the same time, sea ice motions, formation, melt, and even sea ice-associated organisms can act to introduce turbulence and air bubbles into the upper ocean, thereby enhancing air-sea gas exchange. We take advantage of the knowledge advances of upper ocean physics including bubble dynamics to formulate a model for air-sea gas exchange in the sea ice zone. Here, we use the model to examine the role of small-scale waves and diving animals that trap air for insulation, including penguins, seals and polar bears. We compare these processes to existing parameterizations of wave and bubble dynamics in the open ocean, to observe how sea ice both mitigates and locally enhances air-sea gas transfer.

  11. Small animal fluorescence and bioluminescence tomography: a review of approaches, algorithms and technology update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darne, Chinmay; Lu, Yujie; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.

    2014-01-01

    Emerging fluorescence and bioluminescence tomography approaches have several common, yet several distinct features from established emission tomographies of PET and SPECT. Although both nuclear and optical imaging modalities involve counting of photons, nuclear imaging techniques collect the emitted high energy (100-511 keV) photons after radioactive decay of radionuclides while optical techniques count low-energy (1.5-4.1 eV) photons that are scattered and absorbed by tissues requiring models of light transport for quantitative image reconstruction. Fluorescence imaging has been recently translated into clinic demonstrating high sensitivity, modest tissue penetration depth, and fast, millisecond image acquisition times. As a consequence, the promise of quantitative optical tomography as a complement of small animal PET and SPECT remains high. In this review, we summarize the different instrumentation, methodological approaches and schema for inverse image reconstructions for optical tomography, including luminescence and fluorescence modalities, and comment on limitations and key technological advances needed for further discovery research and translation.

  12. Small animal optoacoustic tomography system for molecular imaging of contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Richard; Liopo, Anton; Ermilov, Sergey A.; Oraevsky, Alexander A.

    2016-03-01

    We developed a new and improved Laser Optoacoustic Imaging System, LOIS-3D for preclinical research applications in small animal models. The advancements include (i) a new stabilized imaging module with a more homogeneous illumination of the mouse yielding a better spatial resolution (<0.2 mm) and (ii) a new low noise amplifier incorporated into the ultrasonic probe and providing the noise equivalent pressure around 2 Pa resulting in increased signal-to-noise ratio and the optical absorption sensitivity of about 0.15 cm-1. We also improved scan time and the image reconstruction times. This prototype has been commercialized for a number of biomedical research applications, such as imaging vascularization and measuring hemoglobin / oxyhemoglobin distribution in the organs as well as imaging exogenous or endogenous optoacoustic contrast agents. As examples, we present in vivo experiments using phantoms and mice with and without tumor injected with contrast agents with indocyanine green (ICG). LOIS-3D was capable of detecting ~1-2 pmole of the ICG, in tissues with relatively low blood content. With its high sensitivity and excellent spatial resolution LOIS-3D is an advanced alternative to fluorescence and bioluminescence based modalities for molecular imaging in live mice.

  13. Study of body composition in small animals by a multifrequency impedancemeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribbe, E.; Khider, N.; Moreno, M. V.

    2010-04-01

    Bioimpedance is essentially used today to study the body composition in the human body but not really in small animals. The aim of this paper is to develop a model for body composition in rats to help pharmaceutical labs assessing effects of medicine on rats. We propose a non invasive, rapid and scientific method. With a multifrequency impedancemeter, Z-Métrix® (BioparHom© Company France), resistances and reactances are measured at 55 frequencies for a population of 40 rats (males and females). With our model, derived from Cole-Cole model, resistances of extracellular (Re) and total body (Rinf) compartment are extrapolated. Three methods were applied: posterior to posterior leg, anterior to posterior leg on the left and on the right side. Measurements by CT imaging were performed on the anesthetized population to determine Fat Mass (FM), Lean Body Mass (LBM) and Bone Mineral Content (BMC), as our reference measurements. With electrical data, age, sex and weight, equations are created to calculate FM, LBM and BMC with the three methods. Graphs of correlation, between tissue masses calculated by bioimpedance and obtained with scanner, indicate that measurements with posterior to posterior leg are better. Moreover, there is no significantly difference between tissue masses measured by bioimpedance and with the scanner.

  14. Photoacoustic tomography guided diffuse optical tomography for small-animal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yihan; Gao, Feng; Wan, Wenbo; Zhang, Yan; Li, Jiao

    2015-03-01

    Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) is a biomedical imaging technology for noninvasive visualization of spatial variation about the optical properties of tissue, which can be applied to in vivo small-animal disease model. However, traditional DOT suffers low spatial resolution due to tissue scattering. To overcome this intrinsic shortcoming, multi-modal approaches that incorporate DOT with other imaging techniques have been intensively investigated, where a priori information provided by the other modalities is normally used to reasonably regularize the inverse problem of DOT. Nevertheless, these approaches usually consider the anatomical structure, which is different from the optical structure. Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is an emerging imaging modality that is particularly useful for visualizing lightabsorbing structures embedded in soft tissue with higher spatial resolution compared with pure optical imaging. Thus, we present a PAT-guided DOT approach, to obtain the location a priori information of optical structure provided by PAT first, and then guide DOT to reconstruct the optical parameters quantitatively. The results of reconstruction of phantom experiments demonstrate that both quantification and spatial resolution of DOT could be highly improved by the regularization of feasible-region information provided by PAT.

  15. Investigating common clinical presentations in first opinion small animal consultations using direct observation.

    PubMed

    Robinson, N J; Dean, R S; Cobb, M; Brennan, M L

    2015-05-02

    Understanding more about the clinical presentations encountered in veterinary practice is vital in directing research towards areas relevant to practitioners. The aim of this study was to describe all problems discussed during a convenience sample of consultations using a direct observation method. A data collection tool was used to gather data by direct observation during small animal consultations at eight sentinel practices. Data were recorded for all presenting and non-presenting specific health problems discussed. A total of 1901 patients were presented with 3206 specific health problems discussed. Clinical presentation varied widely between species and between presenting and non-presenting problems. Skin lump, vomiting and inappetence were the most common clinical signs reported by the owner while overweight/obese, dental tartar and skin lump were the most common clinical examination findings. Skin was the most frequently affected body system overall followed by non-specific problems then the gastrointestinal system. Consultations are complex, with a diverse range of different clinical presentations seen. Considering the presenting problem only may give an inaccurate view of the veterinary caseload, as some common problems are rarely the reason for presentation. Understanding the common diagnoses made is the next step and will help to further focus questions for future research.

  16. A microcomputed tomography guided fluorescence tomography system for small animal molecular imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kepshire, Dax; Mincu, Niculae; Hutchins, Michael; Gruber, Josiah; Dehghani, Hamid; Hypnarowski, Justin; Leblond, Frederic; Khayat, Mario; Pogue, Brian W.

    2009-01-01

    A prototype small animal imaging system was created for coupling fluorescence tomography (FT) with x-ray microcomputed tomography (microCT). The FT system has the potential to provide synergistic information content resultant from using microCT images as prior spatial information and then allows overlay of the FT image onto the original microCT image. The FT system was designed to use single photon counting to provide maximal sensitivity measurements in a noncontact geometry. Five parallel detector locations are used, each allowing simultaneous sampling of the fluorescence and transmitted excitation signals through the tissue. The calibration and linearity range performance of the system are outlined in a series of basic performance tests and phantom studies. The ability to image protoporphyrin IX in mouse phantoms was assessed and the system is ready for in vivo use to study biological production of this endogenous marker of tumors. This multimodality imaging system will have a wide range of applications in preclinical cancer research ranging from studies of the tumor microenvironment and treatment efficacy for emerging cancer therapeutics. PMID:19405660

  17. A multipurpose quality assurance phantom for the small animal radiation research platform (SARRP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngwa, Wilfred; Tsiamas, Panagiotis; Zygmanski, Piotr; Makrigiorgos, G. Mike; Berbeco, Ross I.

    2012-05-01

    In this work, the suitability and performance of a mouse-size MOSFET (Mousefet) phantom is investigated for routine quality assurance (QA) of the small animal radiation research platform (SARRP). This Mousefet phantom is a simple construction consisting of five micro-MOSFETS custom integrated in a quincunx pattern within a tissue-equivalent phantom, allowing repeat/multiple QA tasks to be quickly performed in one experimental set-up. The Mousefet phantom is particularly evaluated for facilitating SARRP QA tasks which may warrant daily evaluation, including output constancy, isocenter congruency test and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) image geometric accuracy. Results for the output constancy measurements showed a maximum daily variation of less than 2.6% for all MOSFETS, in consonance with observations from concurrent ion chamber measurements. It is also shown that the design of the Mousefet phantom allows the output check data to be used for prompt verification of beam energy and cone profile constancy. For the isocenter congruency test, it is demonstrated that the Mousefet phantom can detect 0.3 mm deviations of the CBCT isocenter from the radiation isocenter. Meanwhile, results for CBCT image geometric accuracy were consistently found to be within 2% of the expected value. Other CBCT image quality parameters could also be assessed in terms of image intensity constancy, noise and image uniformity. Overall, the results establish the Mousefet phantom as a simple and time-efficient multipurpose tool that could be employed effectively for routine QA of the SARRP.

  18. Stable Small Animal Mechanical Ventilation for Dynamic Lung Imaging to Support Computational Fluid Dynamics Models

    SciTech Connect

    Jacob, Rick E.; Lamm, W. J.

    2011-11-08

    Pulmonary computational fluid dynamics models require 3D images to be acquired over multiple points in the dynamic breathing cycle, with no breath holds or changes in ventilatory mechanics. With small animals, these requirements result in long imaging times ({approx}90 minutes), over which lung mechanics, such as compliance, can gradually change if not carefully monitored and controlled. These changes, caused by derecruitment of parenchymal tissue, are manifested as an upward drift in peak inspiratory pressure or by changes in the pressure waveform and/or lung volume over the course of the experiment. We demonstrate highly repeatable mechanical ventilation in anesthetized rats over a long duration for pulmonary CT imaging throughout the dynamic breathing cycle. We describe significant updates to a basic commercial ventilator that was acquired for these experiments. Key to achieving consistent results was the implementation of periodic deep breaths, or sighs, of extended duration to maintain lung recruitment. In addition, continuous monitoring of breath-to-breath pressure and volume waveforms and long-term trends in peak inspiratory pressure and flow provide diagnostics of changes in breathing mechanics.

  19. Cystotomy practices and complications among general small animal practitioners in Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    Appel, Sherry; Otto, Simon J; Weese, J Scott

    2012-03-01

    Cystotomy is a common surgical procedure in small animal veterinary medicine, yet common pre-, intra-, and post-operative practices have not been described. This survey evaluated cystotomy practices of 106 veterinarians in Ontario. The majority of respondents reported practices consistent with standard recommendations, but some deficiencies in antimicrobial and analgesic use, as well as intra- and post-operative practices, were identified. Some factors associated with the likelihood that practitioners reported recurrent urolithiasis or urinary tract infection are contrary to typical recommendations, such as the association of the use of absorbable, multifilament suture or a dorsal (versus ventral) incision and a lesser likelihood of reporting post-operative urinary tract infections. While care must be taken interpreting these statistical associations, the results suggest that objective assessment of common cystotomy recommendations (use of monofilament, absorbable suture) is required. Re-assessment of certain peri-operative practices, such as analgesic and antimicrobial administration, and post-operative testing, is required for a minority of practitioners.

  20. MEMS-based side-view endomicroscope for in vivo small animal imaging(Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Xiyu; Li, Haijun; Li, Gaoming; Li, Xue; Oldham, Kenn R.; Wang, Thomas D.

    2017-02-01

    Tremendous advances have been made in technological development of whole body molecular imaging, including PET, SPECT, MRI, bioluminescence, and ultrasound. However, a great unmet need still exists for high resolution imaging of biological processes that occur in the epithelium, the thin layer of tissue where many important cancers originate. Confocal endomicroscopes designed with a fiber bundle are used in the clinic, but they can only create images in the horizontal plane. Imaging in the plane perpendicular to the tissue surface is also important because epithelial cells differentiate in the vertical direction. Subtle changes in normal tissue differentiation patterns can reveal the early expression of cancer biomarkers. In this work, we present a side-viewing confocal endomicroscope that can collect images in either horizontal or oblique plane using an integrated monolithic electrostatic 3D MEMS scanner. The endomicroscope can perform sub-cellular resolution imaging in both the horizontal plane and the oblique plane with FOVs of 500 x 700 µm2 and 500 x 200 µm2. A side-viewing probe will allow optimal contact between the imaging window and the luminal wall, which makes it easy to navigate in the hollow organ. The endomicroscope is packaged into a stainless steel tube with outer diameter of 4.2 mm, which can be used for both small animal and human GI tract imaging. We demonstrate in vivo imaging of colonic dysplasia in mice, showing the endomicroscope can potentially be used for early detection and staging of colon cancer.

  1. A small animal image guided irradiation system study using 3D dosimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Xin; Admovics, John; Wuu, Cheng-Shie

    2015-01-01

    In a high resolution image-guided small animal irradiation platform, a cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is integrated with an irradiation unit for precise targeting. Precise quality assurance is essential for both imaging and irradiation components. The conventional commissioning techniques with films face major challenges due to alignment uncertainty and labour intensive film preparation and scanning. In addition, due to the novel design of this platform the mouse stage rotation for CBCT imaging is perpendicular to the gantry rotation for irradiation. Because these two rotations are associated with different mechanical systems, discrepancy between rotation isocenters exists. In order to deliver x-ray precisely, it is essential to verify coincidence of the imaging and the irradiation isocenters. A 3D PRESAGE dosimeter can provide an excellent tool for checking dosimetry and verifying coincidence of irradiation and imaging coordinates in one system. Dosimetric measurements were performed to obtain beam profiles and percent depth dose (PDD). Isocentricity and coincidence of the mouse stage and gantry rotations were evaluated with starshots acquired using PRESAGE dosimeters. A single PRESAGE dosimeter can provide 3 -D information in both geometric and dosimetric uncertainty, which is crucial for translational studies.

  2. Preliminary results of a Multi-Energy CT system for small animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masetti, S.; Roma, L.; Rossi, P. L.; Lanconelli, N.; Baldazzi, G.

    2009-06-01

    A new multi-energy CT for small animals is being developed at the Physics Department of the University of Bologna, Italy. The system makes use of a set of quasi-monochromatic X-ray beams, with energy tunable in a range from 26 to 72 keV. These beams are produced by Bragg diffraction on a Highly Oriented Pyrolytic Graphite crystal. With quasi-monochromatic sources it is possible to perform multi-energy investigation in a more effective way, as compared with conventional X-ray tubes. Triple-energy projection allows to combine a set of three quasi-monochromatic images of an object, in order to obtain a corresponding set of three single-tissue images, which are the mass-thickness map (product of density and thickness) of three reference materials. The triple-energy technique can be applied to the mass-thickness-map reconstruction of a contrast medium, because it is able to remove completely the signal due to other tissues (i.e. the structural background noise). Here, we present a description of the system and the methods for combining the images at the different energies. We also show some results of images acquired at three different energies and of the reconstructed information about the contrast medium (Iodine). We achieved that the measurement of the Iodine mass-thickness agrees very well with the known concentration of the injected Iodine solution.

  3. Extraction of the respiratory signal from small-animal CT projections for a retrospective gating method.

    PubMed

    Chavarrías, C; Vaquero, J J; Sisniega, A; Rodríguez-Ruano, A; Soto-Montenegro, M L; García-Barreno, P; Desco, M

    2008-09-07

    We propose a retrospective respiratory gating algorithm to generate dynamic CT studies. To this end, we compared three different methods of extracting the respiratory signal from the projections of small-animal cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scanners. Given a set of frames acquired from a certain axial angle, subtraction of their average image from each individual frame produces a set of difference images. Pixels in these images have positive or negative values (according to the respiratory phase) in those areas where there is lung movement. The respiratory signals were extracted by analysing the shape of the histogram of these difference images: we calculated the first four central and non-central moments. However, only odd-order moments produced the desired breathing signal, as the even-order moments lacked information about the phase. Each of these curves was compared to a reference signal recorded by means of a pneumatic pillow. Given the similar correlation coefficients yielded by all of them, we selected the mean to implement our retrospective protocol. Respiratory phase bins were separated, reconstructed independently and included in a dynamic sequence, suitable for cine playback. We validated our method in five adult rat studies by comparing profiles drawn across the diaphragm dome, with and without retrospective respiratory gating. Results showed a sharper transition in the gated reconstruction, with an average slope improvement of 60.7%.

  4. A microcomputed tomography guided fluorescence tomography system for small animal molecular imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kepshire, Dax; Gruber, Josiah; Hypnarowski, Justin; Leblond, Frederic; Pogue, Brian W.; Mincu, Niculae; Hutchins, Michael; Khayat, Mario; Dehghani, Hamid

    2009-04-15

    A prototype small animal imaging system was created for coupling fluorescence tomography (FT) with x-ray microcomputed tomography (microCT). The FT system has the potential to provide synergistic information content resultant from using microCT images as prior spatial information and then allows overlay of the FT image onto the original microCT image. The FT system was designed to use single photon counting to provide maximal sensitivity measurements in a noncontact geometry. Five parallel detector locations are used, each allowing simultaneous sampling of the fluorescence and transmitted excitation signals through the tissue. The calibration and linearity range performance of the system are outlined in a series of basic performance tests and phantom studies. The ability to image protoporphyrin IX in mouse phantoms was assessed and the system is ready for in vivo use to study biological production of this endogenous marker of tumors. This multimodality imaging system will have a wide range of applications in preclinical cancer research ranging from studies of the tumor microenvironment and treatment efficacy for emerging cancer therapeutics.

  5. Investigation of Different Sparsity Transforms for the PICCS Algorithm in Small-Animal Respiratory Gated CT

    PubMed Central

    Sisniega, Alejandro; Vaquero, Juan Jose; Desco, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory gating helps to overcome the problem of breathing motion in cardiothoracic small-animal imaging by acquiring multiple images for each projection angle and then assigning projections to different phases. When this approach is used with a dose similar to that of a static acquisition, a low number of noisy projections are available for the reconstruction of each respiratory phase, thus leading to streak artifacts in the reconstructed images. This problem can be alleviated using a prior image constrained compressed sensing (PICCS) algorithm, which enables accurate reconstruction of highly undersampled data when a prior image is available. We compared variants of the PICCS algorithm with different transforms in the prior penalty function: gradient, unitary, and wavelet transform. In all cases the problem was solved using the Split Bregman approach, which is efficient for convex constrained optimization. The algorithms were evaluated using simulations generated from data previously acquired on a micro-CT scanner following a high-dose protocol (four times the dose of a standard static protocol). The resulting data were used to simulate scenarios with different dose levels and numbers of projections. All compressed sensing methods performed very similarly in terms of noise, spatiotemporal resolution, and streak reduction, and filtered back-projection was greatly improved. Nevertheless, the wavelet domain was found to be less prone to patchy cartoon-like artifacts than the commonly used gradient domain. PMID:25836670

  6. Investigation of different sparsity transforms for the PICCS algorithm in small-animal respiratory gated CT.

    PubMed

    Abascal, Juan F P J; Abella, Monica; Sisniega, Alejandro; Vaquero, Juan Jose; Desco, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory gating helps to overcome the problem of breathing motion in cardiothoracic small-animal imaging by acquiring multiple images for each projection angle and then assigning projections to different phases. When this approach is used with a dose similar to that of a static acquisition, a low number of noisy projections are available for the reconstruction of each respiratory phase, thus leading to streak artifacts in the reconstructed images. This problem can be alleviated using a prior image constrained compressed sensing (PICCS) algorithm, which enables accurate reconstruction of highly undersampled data when a prior image is available. We compared variants of the PICCS algorithm with different transforms in the prior penalty function: gradient, unitary, and wavelet transform. In all cases the problem was solved using the Split Bregman approach, which is efficient for convex constrained optimization. The algorithms were evaluated using simulations generated from data previously acquired on a micro-CT scanner following a high-dose protocol (four times the dose of a standard static protocol). The resulting data were used to simulate scenarios with different dose levels and numbers of projections. All compressed sensing methods performed very similarly in terms of noise, spatiotemporal resolution, and streak reduction, and filtered back-projection was greatly improved. Nevertheless, the wavelet domain was found to be less prone to patchy cartoon-like artifacts than the commonly used gradient domain.

  7. Dual-Energy Technique at Low Tube Voltages for Small Animal Imaging*

    PubMed Central

    CHO, Seungryong; SIDKY, Emil Y; BIAN, Junguo; PAN, Xiaochuan

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the feasibility of dual-energy method for image contrast enhancement in small animal studies using a low kV X-ray radiographic system. A robust method for X-ray spectrum estimation from transmission measurements, based on expectation-maximization (EM) method, is applied to an X-ray specimen radiographic system for dual energy imaging of a mouse. From transmission measurements of two known attenuators at two different X-ray tube voltages, the X-ray energy spectra are reconstructed using the EM-based method. From the spectra information thus obtained, the transmission data for bone and soft tissue in terms of various thicknesses are generated. Two polynomial functions of transmission data are then sought for to fit the inverted thicknesses of bone and soft-tissue. Scatters in cone-beam projection data acquired at two X-ray energies were corrected. From the scatter-corrected data, a bone thickness map is separated from a soft-tissue thickness map by use of the polynomial functions. PMID:20589233

  8. Modern Spirometry Supports Anesthetic Management in Small Animal Clinical Practice: A Case Series.

    PubMed

    Calice, Ivana; Moens, Yves

    2016-01-01

    Modern spirometry, like no other monitoring technique, allows insight into breath-to-breath respiratory mechanics. Spirometers continuously measure volume, airway pressure, and flow while calculating and continuously displaying respiratory system compliance and resistance in the form of loops. The aim of this case series is to show how observation of spirometric loops, similar to electro