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Sample records for small bowel enema

  1. Coffee Enema for Preparation for Small Bowel Video Capsule Endoscopy: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Sun; Keum, Bora; Seo, Yeon Seok; Jeen, Yoon Tae; Lee, Hong Sik; Um, Soon Ho; Kim, Chang Duck; Ryu, Ho Sang

    2014-01-01

    Coffee enemas are believed to cause dilatation of bile ducts and excretion of bile through the colon wall. Proponents of coffee enemas claim that the cafestol palmitate in coffee enhances the activity of glutathione S-transferase, an enzyme that stimulates bile excretion. During video capsule endoscopy (VCE), excreted bile is one of the causes of poor preparation of the small bowel. This study aimed to evaluate the feasibility and effect of coffee enema for preparation of the small bowel during VCE. In this pilot study, 17 of 34 patients were assigned to the coffee enema plus polyethylene glycol (PEG) 2 L ingestion group, whereas the 17 remaining control patients received 2 L of PEG only. The quality of bowel preparation was evaluated in the two patient groups. Bowel preparations in the proximal segments of small bowel were not differ between two groups. In the mid and distal segments of the small intestine, bowel preparations tend to be better in patients who received coffee enemas plus PEG than in patients who received PEG only. The coffee enema group did not experience any complications or side effects. Coffee enemas may be a feasible option, and there were no clinically significant adverse events related to coffee enemas. More prospective randomized studies are warranted to improve small bowel preparation for VCE. PMID:25136541

  2. Coffee enema for preparation for small bowel video capsule endoscopy: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Sun; Chun, Hoon Jai; Keum, Bora; Seo, Yeon Seok; Jeen, Yoon Tae; Lee, Hong Sik; Um, Soon Ho; Kim, Chang Duck; Ryu, Ho Sang

    2014-07-01

    Coffee enemas are believed to cause dilatation of bile ducts and excretion of bile through the colon wall. Proponents of coffee enemas claim that the cafestol palmitate in coffee enhances the activity of glutathione S-transferase, an enzyme that stimulates bile excretion. During video capsule endoscopy (VCE), excreted bile is one of the causes of poor preparation of the small bowel. This study aimed to evaluate the feasibility and effect of coffee enema for preparation of the small bowel during VCE. In this pilot study, 17 of 34 patients were assigned to the coffee enema plus polyethylene glycol (PEG) 2 L ingestion group, whereas the 17 remaining control patients received 2 L of PEG only. The quality of bowel preparation was evaluated in the two patient groups. Bowel preparations in the proximal segments of small bowel were not differ between two groups. In the mid and distal segments of the small intestine, bowel preparations tend to be better in patients who received coffee enemas plus PEG than in patients who received PEG only. The coffee enema group did not experience any complications or side effects. Coffee enemas may be a feasible option, and there were no clinically significant adverse events related to coffee enemas. More prospective randomized studies are warranted to improve small bowel preparation for VCE.

  3. Barium sulfate aspiration: Severe chemical pneumonia induced by a massive reflux of contrast medium during small bowel barium enema.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin; Yang, Yi; Zhang, Ji; Zhou, Xiaowei; Dong, Hongmei; Zhou, Yiwu

    2015-08-01

    Barium contrast radiography is a conventional procedure aimed at revealing lesions of the alimentary tract using barium sulfate on X-ray irradiation. Although it is widely used in clinics, adverse effects and complications are observed, such as anaphylaxis, granuloma, fecalithes, abdomen-leaking, embolism, bacterial contamination, and aspiration. We report a case of death due to a massive barium sulfate aspiration resulted from an air-barium double contrast enema radiography. A 25-year-old female patient was hospitalized with symptoms of abdominal distention, nausea, vomiting and diarrhea for three days. A progressive respiratory distress presented only 1h after a small bowel air-barium double contrast enema. The patient died 11h later. The result of autopsy revealed the cause of death to be severe chemical pneumonitis induced by gastric fluid which was aspirated into her lungs. Barium sulfate is generally recognized to be chemically inert for the respiratory system, but a mixture of barium sulfate with gastric contents is fatal. Here we intend to suggest that, when determining the potential cause of death, medical examiners should consider a patient's status quo as well as the possible adverse effects and complications caused by the barium sulfate preparation during gastrointestinal radiography.

  4. Characteristics of the Contrast Enema Do Not Predict an Effective Bowel Management Regimen for Patients with Constipation or Fecal Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Barnhart, Douglas C; Liechty, Shawn; Zobell, Sarah; Rollins, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    Background: A bowel management program using large volume enemas may be required for children with anorectal malformations (ARM), Hirschsprung’s disease (HD), severe medically refractive idiopathic constipation (IC), and other conditions. A pretreatment contrast enema is often obtained. We sought to determine if the contrast enema findings could predict a final enema regimen. Methods: A retrospective review was performed at a tertiary care children’s hospital from 2011 to 2014 to identify patients treated with enemas in our bowel management program. Patient characteristics, contrast enema findings (including volume to completely fill the colon), and final enema regimen were collected. Results: Eighty-three patients were identified (37 ARM, 7 HD, 34 IC, and 5 other). Age ranged from 10 months to 24 years, and weight ranged from 6.21 kg to 95.6 kg at the time bowel management was initiated. Linear regression showed contrast enema volume was of limited value in predicting effective therapeutic saline enema volume (R2 = 0.21). The addition of diagnosis, colon dilation, and contrast retention on plain x-ray the day after the contrast enema moderately improved the predictive ability of the contrast enema (R2 = 0.35). Median final effective enema volume was 22 mL/kg (range: 5 - 48 mL/kg). Conclusions: We were unable to demonstrate a correlation with contrast enema findings and the effective enema volume. However, no patient required a daily enema volume greater than 48 mL/kg to stay clean. PMID:27688984

  5. Small bowel resection

    MedlinePlus

    Small intestine surgery; Bowel resection - small intestine; Resection of part of the small intestine; Enterectomy ... her hand inside your belly to feel the intestine or remove the diseased segment. Your belly is ...

  6. Transrectal-ultrasound prostatic biopsy preparation: rectal enema vs. mechanical bowel preparation

    PubMed Central

    Lombardo, Riccardo; Presicce, Fabrizio; Bellangino, Mariangela; Agro, Enrico Finazzi; Gambrosier, Matteo Bonetto; Trucchi, Alberto; Petta, Stefano; Tubaro, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Transrectal prostate biopsy (TRUSbx) is the standard for the diagnosis of prostate cancer. Different bowel preparations are used for patients undergoing TRUSbx. The aim of our study was to compare two different bowel preparations for TRUSbx. Material and methods From May 2012 and onwards, a selected group of men undergoing TRUS 12-core prostate biopsy were enrolled into a prospective database. Patients were randomized 1:1 to receive a rectal enema (Group A) the night before the procedure or polyethylene glycol 34.8 grams/4 liters of water the day before the procedure (Group B). A VAS scale to evaluate the patients’ discomfort according to the two preparations was collected. The same antibiotic prophylaxis was performed in both groups. All complications were prospectively recorded and graded according to the Clavien Classification System (CCS). Results A total of 198 patients were consecutively enrolled. Mean age was 67.5 ±7.9 years, mean body mass index (BMI) was 27.1 ±4.2 Kg/m2, mean PSA value was 9.3 ±12.6 ng/ml and the mean prostatic volume was 60.6 ±29 ml. 97 patients were enrolled in Group A and 101 in Group B. Overall post-biopsy morbidity rate was 60%. No significant differences for low-grade and high-grade complications was observed between the two groups. Patients receiving the rectal enema presented with a significantly lower VAS score (3.1 ±1.1 vs. 5.9 ±1.7; p = 0.02). Conclusions Our study confirmed that a rectal enema should be considered as the standard bowel preparation in patients undergoing a TRUS biopsy; it is as effective as PEG and associated with less discomfort. PMID:26251750

  7. [Small-Bowel Cancer].

    PubMed

    Kagaya, Yuka; Sakamoto, Hirotsugu; Yamamoto, Hironori

    2016-05-01

    Diagnosis of small-bowel cancer has become easier thanks to the development of both balloon-assisted endoscopy and capsule endoscopy. Balloon-assisted endoscopy allows not only for observation of the deep intestine but also for biopsies and for establishing a histological diagnosis. Although endoscopic diagnosis is reported to improve the prognosis of small-bowel cancer by early detection, it is still difficult and the prognosis in general is poor. Surgery and chemotherapy protocols for this disease are similar to those for colon cancer. At present, the response rate to chemotherapy for small-bowel cancer is low. There is an urgent need in this patient population to establish a new diagnostic and therapeutic algorithm using balloon-assisted endoscopy and capsule endoscopy. PMID:27210079

  8. Benign small bowel tumor.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, J M; Melvin, D B; Gray, G; Thorbjarnarson, B

    1975-01-01

    The clinical record and histologic sections of 84 cases of benign small bowel tumor are reviewed. Manifestations of systemic diseases, congenital anomalies, and lesions of either the ileocecal valve or periampullary region were excluded. In the same time span there were 96 small bowel malignancies. Clinical presentation, pathologic findings, management and result are compared to the collected published experience of about 2000 cases. There were 36 leiomyomas, 22 lipomas, 9 angiomas, 6 neurofibromas and 4 fibromas. Thirty-six men and 48 women were affected; the majority in their fifth and sixth decade. Seventy-eight were operative and 6 autopsy diagnoses. The most common symptom was obstruction (42%) followed by hemorrhage (34%) and pain (22%), relative frequency differing for the various specific tumors. There were rarely significant physical findings. A diagnosis of small bowel tumor was made radiologically in 30 patients. Because of the nonspecificity of other signs and symptoms, an acute awareness of the possibility of small bowel tumor is mandatory for preoperative anticipation of the diagnosis. Local resection was performed in all with no deaths or significant postoperative complications. PMID:1078626

  9. Small Bowel Transplant

    PubMed Central

    2003-01-01

    EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Objective The Medical Advisory Secretariat undertook a review of the evidence on the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of small bowel transplant in the treatment of intestinal failure. Small Bowel Transplantation Intestinal failure is the loss of absorptive capacity of the small intestine that results in an inability to meet the nutrient and fluid requirements of the body via the enteral route. Patients with intestinal failure usually receive nutrients intravenously, a procedure known as parenteral nutrition. However, long-term parenteral nutrition is associated with complications including liver failure and loss of venous access due to recurrent infections. Small bowel transplant is the transplantation of a cadaveric intestinal allograft for the purpose of restoring intestinal function in patients with irreversible intestinal failure. The transplant may involve the small intestine alone (isolated small bowel ISB), the small intestine and the liver (SB-L) when there is irreversible liver failure, or multiple organs including the small bowel (multivisceral MV or cluster). Although living related donor transplant is being investigated at a limited number of centres, cadaveric donors have been used in most small bowel transplants. The actual transplant procedure takes approximately 12-18 hours. After intestinal transplant, the patient is generally placed on prophylactic antibiotic medication and immunosuppressive regimen that, in the majority of cases, would include tacrolimus, corticosteroids and an induction agent. Close monitoring for infection and rejection are essential for early treatment. Medical Advisory Secretariat Review The Medical Advisory Secretariat undertook a review of 35 reports from 9 case series and 1 international registry. Sample size of the individual studies ranged from 9 to 155. As of May 2001, 651 patients had received small bowel transplant procedures worldwide. According to information from the Canadian Organ Replacement

  10. Small bowel obstruction- a surprise.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Jeffrey Daniel; Cp, Ganesh Babu; M, Balachandar; M, Ramanathan

    2015-01-01

    Trans - omental hernia is very rare, accounting to 1-4% of all internal hernias which is an unusual cause of small bowel obstruction. Here we present a case report of a small bowel obstruction in a female due to trans - omental hernia presenting with central abdominal pain, distension and bilious vomiting. She had no previous history of trauma, surgery. Plain X-ray abdomen erect showed multiple air fluid levels with dilated small bowel loops. Emergency laparotomy revealed a segment of congested small bowel loop (ileum) through a defect in greater omentum. On table the herniated bowel loop was reduced and the defect in greater omentum was closed primarily. There was no necessity for bowel resection as it regained normal colour after reduction. Postoperative period was uneventful with complete resolution of symptoms. This case is presented for its rarity and its importance in clinical differential diagnosis of acute abdomen due to small bowel obstruction.

  11. Small Bowel Obstruction- A Surprise

    PubMed Central

    CP, Ganesh Babu; M, Balachandar; M, Ramanathan

    2015-01-01

    Trans - omental hernia is very rare, accounting to 1-4% of all internal hernias which is an unusual cause of small bowel obstruction. Here we present a case report of a small bowel obstruction in a female due to trans - omental hernia presenting with central abdominal pain, distension and bilious vomiting. She had no previous history of trauma, surgery. Plain X-ray abdomen erect showed multiple air fluid levels with dilated small bowel loops. Emergency laparotomy revealed a segment of congested small bowel loop (ileum) through a defect in greater omentum. On table the herniated bowel loop was reduced and the defect in greater omentum was closed primarily. There was no necessity for bowel resection as it regained normal colour after reduction. Postoperative period was uneventful with complete resolution of symptoms. This case is presented for its rarity and its importance in clinical differential diagnosis of acute abdomen due to small bowel obstruction. PMID:25738033

  12. Small bowel bacterial overgrowth

    MedlinePlus

    Overgrowth - intestinal bacteria; Bacterial overgrowth - intestine; Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth; SIBO ... Most of the time, the small intestine does not have a high number ... in the small intestine may use up the nutrients needed by the ...

  13. Barium enema

    MedlinePlus

    ... series; Colorectal cancer - lower GI series; Colorectal cancer - barium enema; Crohn disease - lower GI series; Crohn disease - barium enema; Intestinal blockage - lower GI series; Intestinal blockage - ...

  14. Neoplasms of the Small Bowel

    PubMed Central

    Silberman, Howard; Crichlow, Robert W.; Caplan, Howard S.

    1974-01-01

    Small bowel tumors are unusual lesions exhibiting nonspecific clinical features often diagnosed at an advanced stage. In the cases studied at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania nearly all the 32 patients with malignancies were symptomatic whereas in the 34 patients with benign lesions the condition was discovered as an incidental finding in about half of the patients. Weight loss, palpable mass or anemia usually indicated malignancy. Small bowel radiography was the most useful diagnostic aid in the present series. While the etiology of these lesions is unknown, villous adenomas probably bear a relationship to carcinoma. The association between chronic regional enteritis and small bowel tumors is unestablished but suggestive. An analysis of reported series reveals a disproportionate incidence of additional primary tumors in patients with small bowel neoplasms. Surgical extirpation is indicated for curative treatment. In the present series, resection in hope of cure was carried out in 25 of 32 malignant tumors resulting in eight five-year survivals. One of these latter lived nine years with disseminated malignant carcinoid reflecting the occasional indolent course of this tumor. PMID:4842978

  15. Small Bowel Imaging: an Update.

    PubMed

    Rimola, Jordi; Panés, Julián

    2016-07-01

    Bowel imaging had experienced relevant technical advances during the last decade. The developments in the field of cross-sectional imaging had a particular impact on the assessment of Crohn's disease. The purpose of this manuscript is to provide a review of the main progress of cross-sectional imaging in the assessment of Crohn's disease and other small bowel diseases with relevance in clinical practice and in research. Also, we outline the technical advances, trends, and potential contributions of new technological cross-sectional imaging improvements that may have potential impact and contribution in the near future. PMID:27315216

  16. Small bowel resection - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Eat small amounts of food several times a day. DO NOT eat 3 big meals. You should: Space out your small meals. Wait the same amount of time between each one. Add new foods back into your diet slowly, one ...

  17. Transabdominal Ultrasonography of the Small Bowel

    PubMed Central

    Trnovsky, Peter; Kopáčová, Marcela

    2013-01-01

    In the era of double balloon enteroscopy, capsule endoscopy, CT, and MRI enterography is transabdominal ultrasonography (TUS) underestimated method for evaluation of small bowel pathology. As often initial imagine method in abdominal complaints, nowadays has TUS much better diagnostic potential than two decades ago. High-resolution ultrasound probes with harmonic imaging significantly improve resolution of bowel wall in real time, with possibility to asses bowel peristalsis. Color flow doppler enables evaluation of intramural bowel vascularisation, pulse wave doppler helps to quantificate flow in coeliac and superior mesenteric arteries. Small intestine contrast ultrasonography with oral contrast fluid, as well as contrast enhanced ultrasonography with intravenous microbubble contrast also improves small bowel imaging. We present a review of small intestine pathology that should be detected during ultrasound examinations, discuss technical requirements, advantages and limitations of TUS, typical ultrasound signs of Crohn's disease, ileus, celiac disease, intussusception, infectious enteritis, tumours, ischemic and haemorrhagic conditions of small bowel. In the hands of experienced investigator, despite some significant limitations(obesity, meteorism), is transabdominal ultrasonography reliable, noninvasive and inexpensive alternative method to computerised tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in small bowel examination. PMID:24348544

  18. Small bowel obstruction caused by dried apple

    PubMed Central

    Ooi, Sally; Hong, Khiem

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Small bowel obstruction in a virgin abdomen is an uncommon surgical condition. While malignancy, inflammatory bowel disease and foreign body are the main reported causes, undigested food bezoar causing bowel obstruction is a rare entity. We report a case of small bowel obstruction secondary to dried preserved apple having re-expanded within the gastrointestinal tract. Presentation of case A 69 year old male presented with severe abdominal distension, generalized abdominal tenderness and obstipation for 1 week. Small bowel obstruction (SBO) was confirmed on plain abdominal X-ray and CT imaging. An emergency explorative laparatomy identified a sausage-shaped intra-luminal foreign body obstructing the distal ileum. An enterotomy was performed which revealed a rehydrated, donut-shaped piece of dried apple. Discussion Swallowed items that pass through the pylorus rarely cause obstruction as they are usually small enough to pass through the rest of the bowel without difficulty. We postulate that in our patient that the dried apple was originally small enough to pass through the pylorus. However during small bowel, its’ highly absorbable nature resulted in an increase in size that prevented its’ passage through the ileocecal valve. A simple in-vitro experiment discovered that dried apple has a potential to reabsorb fluid and expand up to 35% of its initial size within 72 h. Conclusion This report illustrates the potential for dried food substances to cause intra-luminal SBO after significant expansion with rehydration. PMID:25841159

  19. Upper GI and small bowel series

    MedlinePlus

    GI series; Barium swallow x-ray; Upper GI series ... An upper GI and small bowel series is done in a health care office or hospital radiology department. You may get an injection of a medicine that slows muscle ...

  20. Advances in Pediatric Small Bowel Imaging.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tom K

    2016-01-01

    Technological advances for visualizing the small bowel have significantly grown over the past few decades. Balloon-assisted enteroscopy has come to the forefront of these innovations, and has been found to be safe and effective in children with small bowel ailments. The expanding body of research into balloon-assisted enteroscopy will continue to refine the current knowledge base of this technique, along with a growing assessment of the long-term benefits of such interventions. PMID:26616902

  1. Current Role of Ultrasound in Small Bowel Imaging.

    PubMed

    Wale, Anita; Pilcher, James

    2016-08-01

    Bowel ultrasound is cheap, relatively quick, allows dynamic evaluation of the bowel, has no radiation burden, is well tolerated by patients, and allows repeat imaging. Bowel ultrasound requires a systematic assessment of the entire bowel using high-frequency probes. In addition, hydrosonography and contrast-enhanced ultrasound may be performed. We present the normal sonographic appearances of large and small bowel and the sonographic appearances of acute appendicitis, Crohn's disease, celiac disease, intussusception, infectious enteritis, intestinal tuberculosis, small bowel ileus and obstruction, small bowel ischemia, and malignant tumors. PMID:27342894

  2. Laparoscopic Management of Adhesive Small Bowel Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Konjic, Ferid; Idrizovic, Enes; Hasukic, Ismar; Jahic, Alen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Adhesions are the reason for bowel obstruction in 80% of the cases. In well selected patients the adhesive ileus laparoscopic treatment has multiple advantages which include the shorter hospitalization period, earlier food taking, and less postoperative morbidity rate. Case report: Here we have a patient in the age of 35 hospitalized at the clinic due to occlusive symptoms. Two years before an opened appendectomy had been performed on him. He underwent the treatment of exploration laparoscopy and laparoscopic adhesiolysis. Dilated small bowel loops connected with the anterior abdominal wall in the ileocecal region by adhesions were found intraoperatively and then resected harmonically with scalpel. One strangulation around which a small bowel loop was wrapped around was found and dissected. Postoperative course was normal. PMID:27041815

  3. Acute abdomen due to small bowel anisakiasis.

    PubMed

    Pellegrini, M; Occhini, R; Tordini, G; Vindigni, C; Russo, S; Marzocca, G

    2005-01-01

    The popularity in Western countries of dishes based on raw fish has led to an increased incidence of anisakiasis, a human parasitic disease caused by the ingestion of live anisakid larvae. The entire digestive tract may be involved, but the stomach and the small intestine are the most frequently affected sites. We report a case of acute abdomen due to Anisakis simplex infection that caused small bowel obstruction. PMID:15702863

  4. Abdominal apoplexy resulting in small bowel obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Le, Don; Guileyardo, Joseph; Casanova, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal apoplexy is a rare hemorrhagic condition involving the small arteries or veins within the abdominal cavity. A high degree of clinical suspicion, followed by appropriate diagnostic workup and therapeutic intervention, is critical, as nonoperative mortality approaches 100%. Contrary to most previously reported cases, which were associated with hemoperitoneum, we present a patient in which gastroduodenal artery dissection resulted in an organized retroperitoneal hematoma with local compression of the duodenum and subsequent bowel obstruction, resulting in vomiting, aspiration, and death. PMID:27695177

  5. Abdominal apoplexy resulting in small bowel obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Le, Don; Guileyardo, Joseph; Casanova, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal apoplexy is a rare hemorrhagic condition involving the small arteries or veins within the abdominal cavity. A high degree of clinical suspicion, followed by appropriate diagnostic workup and therapeutic intervention, is critical, as nonoperative mortality approaches 100%. Contrary to most previously reported cases, which were associated with hemoperitoneum, we present a patient in which gastroduodenal artery dissection resulted in an organized retroperitoneal hematoma with local compression of the duodenum and subsequent bowel obstruction, resulting in vomiting, aspiration, and death.

  6. Small Bowel Obstruction Due to Suprapubic Catheter Placement.

    PubMed

    Bonasso, Patrick C; Lucke-Wold, Brandon; Khan, Uzer

    2016-07-01

    Suprapubic catheter placement has associated complications such as bowel injury, bladder injury, or bleeding. This case describes the management of an elderly patient who had suprapubic catheter placement complicated by small bowel obstruction. The catheter had continued production of urine. Further patient treatment required abdominal exploration and bowel resection. PMID:27335801

  7. Small Bowel Obstruction Due to Suprapubic Catheter Placement.

    PubMed

    Bonasso, Patrick C; Lucke-Wold, Brandon; Khan, Uzer

    2016-07-01

    Suprapubic catheter placement has associated complications such as bowel injury, bladder injury, or bleeding. This case describes the management of an elderly patient who had suprapubic catheter placement complicated by small bowel obstruction. The catheter had continued production of urine. Further patient treatment required abdominal exploration and bowel resection.

  8. Optimal Diagnostic Approaches for Patients with Suspected Small Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae Hyun; Moon, Won

    2016-01-01

    While the domain of gastrointestinal endoscopy has made great strides over the last several decades, endoscopic assessment of the small bowel continues to be challenging. Recently, with the development of new technology including video capsule endoscopy, device-assisted enteroscopy, and computed tomography/magnetic resonance enterography, a more thorough investigation of the small bowel is possible. In this article, we review the systematic approach for patients with suspected small bowel disease based on these advanced endoscopic and imaging systems. PMID:27334413

  9. Diarrhoea due to small bowel diseases

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Joseph A.; Rubio-Tapia, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Small intestinal diseases are a common, though often overlooked cause of diarrhoeal illness. Fully 1% of the Caucasian population are affected by coeliac disease and a substantial portion of children living in poverty in the developing world are affected by environmental enteropathy. These are but two examples of the many diseases that cause mucosal injury to the primary digestive and absorptive organ in our body. While diarrhoea may be a common, though not universally seen symptom of small bowel mucosal disease, the consequent malabsorption can lead to substantial malnutrition and nutrient deficiencies. The small intestine, unlike the colon, has been relatively inaccessible, and systematic evaluation is often necessary to identify and treat small intestinal mucosal diseases that lead to diarrhoea. Immunodeficiency states, including HIV enteropathy, adult autoimmune enteropathy, drug-associated enteropathy, and tropical sprue continue to occur and require specific therapy. All patients with severe diarrhoea or diarrhoea associated with features suggestive of malabsorption may have a disease of the small intestinal mucosa that requires careful evaluation and targeted management. PMID:23384804

  10. Diarrhoea due to small bowel diseases.

    PubMed

    Murray, Joseph A; Rubio-Tapia, Alberto

    2012-10-01

    Small intestinal diseases are a common, though often overlooked cause of diarrhoeal illness. Fully 1% of the Caucasian population are affected by coeliac disease and a substantial portion of children living in poverty in the developing world are affected by environmental enteropathy. These are but two examples of the many diseases that cause mucosal injury to the primary digestive and absorptive organ in our body. While diarrhoea may be a common, though not universally seen symptom of small bowel mucosal disease, the consequent malabsorption can lead to substantial malnutrition and nutrient deficiencies. The small intestine, unlike the colon, has been relatively inaccessible, and systematic evaluation is often necessary to identify and treat small intestinal mucosal diseases that lead to diarrhoea. Immunodeficiency states, including HIV enteropathy, adult autoimmune enteropathy, drug-associated enteropathy, and tropical sprue continue to occur and require specific therapy. All patients with severe diarrhoea or diarrhoea associated with features suggestive of malabsorption may have a disease of the small intestinal mucosa that requires careful evaluation and targeted management.

  11. Obscure Overt Gastrointestinal Bleeding Due To Isolated Small Bowel Angiomatosis

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Melissa; Chiorean, Michael V.; Cote, Gregory A.

    2016-01-01

    Isolated small bowel angiomatosis is a rare entity with a distinctive endoscopic appearance. A multidisciplinary approach is often required to diagnose and treat these complex lesions. We present 2 cases of isolated small bowel angiomatosis, and illustrate the endoscopic findings that may guide similar diagnoses. PMID:27144197

  12. Small bowel stricture complicating superior mesenteric vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jin; Shen, Laigen; Zheng, Xueyong; Zhu, Yuefeng; Liu, Zhengjie

    2012-02-01

    Superior mesenteric vein (SMV) thrombosis is a relatively rare disease. Most patients may be successfully treated with anti-coagulation alone. However, bowel stricture may develop due to intestinal ischemia which may require surgical treatment. This report describes a rare case of small bowel stricture occurring one month after successful treatment of SMV thrombosis. After segmental resection of strictured bowel, the patient's post-operative course was uneventful.

  13. The role of small bowel endoscopy in small bowel Crohn's disease: when and how?

    PubMed

    Kim, Mikang; Jang, Hyun Joo

    2016-07-01

    Endoscopy has a crucial role in the diagnosis, management, and surveillance of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). It contributes in supporting the diagnosis of IBD with the clinical history, physical examination, laboratory findings, and targeted biopsies. Furthermore, endoscopy has a significant role in assessing disease activity and distribution in treatment efficacy evaluation, post-surgical recurrence risk, and cancer surveillance in patients with long-lasting illness. Endoscopy also provides therapeutic potential for the treatment of IBD, especially with stricture dilatation and treatment of bleeding. Small bowel (SB) endoscopy (capsule endoscopy and device-assisted enteroscopy) and cross-sectional radiologic imaging (computed tomography enterography and magnetic resonance enterography) have become important diagnostic options to diagnose and treat patients with SB Crohn's disease. We reviewed the present role of SB endoscopy in patients with SB Crohn's disease. PMID:27433142

  14. The role of small bowel endoscopy in small bowel Crohn's disease: when and how?

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mikang

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopy has a crucial role in the diagnosis, management, and surveillance of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). It contributes in supporting the diagnosis of IBD with the clinical history, physical examination, laboratory findings, and targeted biopsies. Furthermore, endoscopy has a significant role in assessing disease activity and distribution in treatment efficacy evaluation, post-surgical recurrence risk, and cancer surveillance in patients with long-lasting illness. Endoscopy also provides therapeutic potential for the treatment of IBD, especially with stricture dilatation and treatment of bleeding. Small bowel (SB) endoscopy (capsule endoscopy and device-assisted enteroscopy) and cross-sectional radiologic imaging (computed tomography enterography and magnetic resonance enterography) have become important diagnostic options to diagnose and treat patients with SB Crohn's disease. We reviewed the present role of SB endoscopy in patients with SB Crohn's disease. PMID:27433142

  15. Barium enema (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The barium enema is a valuable diagnostic tool that helps detect abnormalities in the large intestine (colon). The barium enema, along with colonoscopy, remain standards in the diagnosis of colon cancer, ulcerative colitis, and other diseases of the colon.

  16. Barium enema (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A barium enema is performed to examine the walls of the colon. During the procedure, a well lubricated enema tube is inserted gently into the rectum. The barium, a radiopaque (shows up on X-ray) contrast ...

  17. ACG Clinical Guideline: Diagnosis and Management of Small Bowel Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Gerson, Lauren B; Fidler, Jeff L; Cave, David R; Leighton, Jonathan A

    2015-09-01

    Bleeding from the small intestine remains a relatively uncommon event, accounting for ~5-10% of all patients presenting with gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. Given advances in small bowel imaging with video capsule endoscopy (VCE), deep enteroscopy, and radiographic imaging, the cause of bleeding in the small bowel can now be identified in most patients. The term small bowel bleeding is therefore proposed as a replacement for the previous classification of obscure GI bleeding (OGIB). We recommend that the term OGIB should be reserved for patients in whom a source of bleeding cannot be identified anywhere in the GI tract. A source of small bowel bleeding should be considered in patients with GI bleeding after performance of a normal upper and lower endoscopic examination. Second-look examinations using upper endoscopy, push enteroscopy, and/or colonoscopy can be performed if indicated before small bowel evaluation. VCE should be considered a first-line procedure for small bowel investigation. Any method of deep enteroscopy can be used when endoscopic evaluation and therapy are required. VCE should be performed before deep enteroscopy if there is no contraindication. Computed tomographic enterography should be performed in patients with suspected obstruction before VCE or after negative VCE examinations. When there is acute overt hemorrhage in the unstable patient, angiography should be performed emergently. In patients with occult hemorrhage or stable patients with active overt bleeding, multiphasic computed tomography should be performed after VCE or CTE to identify the source of bleeding and to guide further management. If a source of bleeding is identified in the small bowel that is associated with significant ongoing anemia and/or active bleeding, the patient should be managed with endoscopic therapy. Conservative management is recommended for patients without a source found after small bowel investigation, whereas repeat diagnostic investigations are recommended

  18. [Malabsorption is a leading clinical sign of small bowel disease].

    PubMed

    Parfenov, A I; Krums, L M

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents a variety of clinical manifestations of malabsorption syndrome (MAS) in celiac disease, collagenous sprue, Whipple's disease, Crohn's disease, intestinal lymphangiectasia, amyloidosis, common variable immune deficiency, and treatment of short bowel syndrome. It shows the specific features of the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of MAS in small bowel diseases.

  19. [Malabsorption is a leading clinical sign of small bowel disease].

    PubMed

    Parfenov, A I; Krums, L M

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents a variety of clinical manifestations of malabsorption syndrome (MAS) in celiac disease, collagenous sprue, Whipple's disease, Crohn's disease, intestinal lymphangiectasia, amyloidosis, common variable immune deficiency, and treatment of short bowel syndrome. It shows the specific features of the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of MAS in small bowel diseases. PMID:27636919

  20. Small Bowel Obstruction Mimicking Acute ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Nai-Lun; Shulik, Oleg; DePasquale, Joseph; Shamoon, Fayez

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of a 42-year-old female who presented to our institution with a small bowel obstruction and had emergent surgical decompression. Thirteen days postoperatively, the patient became tachycardic and had worsening epigastric pain. Electrocardiogram showed significant ST-segment elevations in leads II, III, aVF, and V3–V6, suggesting the possibility of acute inferolateral myocardial infarction. Subsequent workup revealed the cause of the ST-elevations to be due to recurrent small bowel obstruction. Although intra-abdominal causes of ST-elevation have been reported, our case may be the first to be associated with small bowel obstruction. PMID:25838963

  1. Transanal Evisceration of Small Bowel-A Rare Surgical Emergency

    PubMed Central

    Swamy Chetty Y.V., Narayana; M., Sridhar; S.S., Pankaja

    2014-01-01

    Transanal evisceration of small bowel is an extremely rare surgical emergency. This is the condition in which the small bowel herniates through breach in the anterior rectal wall and seen eviscerating through the anal canal. It is challenging for a surgeon to deal and manage such a case during emergency, especially if he hasn’t dealt with such condition earlier. The present case reported is of 68 year old lady referred to an institution with history of transanal herniation of small bowel for three days duration, following manual reduction of chronic rectal prolapse. The case report illustrates aetiology, management & factors influencing the outcome of this rare emergency have been discussed. PMID:24596766

  2. Fibrofatty Band-Associated Small Bowel Obstruction After Marathon Running

    PubMed Central

    Sunder Raj, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    We report a 57-year-old man who developed subacute small bowel obstruction after running a marathon. A fibrofatty band was identified restricting the terminal ileum upon subsequent imaging. Surgical division of the band resulted in complete resolution of the patient’s symptoms. Fibrofatty bands are embryonic remnants of the vitellointestinal duct and have not previously been reported to cause small bowel obstruction at the terminal ileum. We discuss the origin of remnant fibrofatty bands and physiological impact of running a marathon upon the gastrointestinal tract that would have contributed to development of subacute small bowel obstruction. PMID:27800517

  3. Analysis of Non-Small Bowel Lesions Detected by Capsule Endoscopy in Patients with Potential Small Bowel Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Akin, Fatma Ebru; Yurekli, Oyku Tayfur; Demirezer Bolat, Aylin; Tahtacı, Mustafa; Koseoglu, Huseyin; Selvi, Eyup; Buyukasik, Naciye Semnur; Ersoy, Osman

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding cases in whom source cannot be identified after conventional upper and lower GI endoscopy are defined as potential small bowel bleeding. We aimed to search for lesions in the reach of conventional endoscopy in patients to whom video capsule endoscopy (VCE) had been applied for potential small bowel bleeding. 114 patients who had VCE evaluation for potential small bowel bleeding between January 2009 and August 2015 were retrospectively evaluated. Mean age of the patients was 55 ± 17 years. Female/male ratio is 39/75. In 58 patients (50.9%) bleeding lesion could be determined. Among these 58 patients 8 patients' lesions were in the reach of conventional endoscopes. Overall these 8 patients comprised 7% of patients in whom VCE was performed for potential small bowel bleeding. Among these 8 patients 5 had colonic lesions (4 angiodysplasia, 1 ulcerated polypoid cecal lesion), 2 had gastric lesions (1 GAVE, 1 anastomotic bleeding), and 1 patient had a bleeding lesion in the duodenal bulbus. Although capsule endoscopy is usually performed for potential small bowel bleeding gastroenterologists should always keep in mind that these patients may be suffering from bleeding from non-small bowel segments and should carefully review images captured from non-small bowel areas. PMID:27092029

  4. Primary small bowel melanomas: fact or myth?

    PubMed Central

    Hadjittofi, Christopher; Athanasopoulos, Panagiotis G.; Shah, Rahul; Ala, Aftab A.

    2016-01-01

    Small bowel melanoma (SBM) is a rare entity, which often evades diagnosis and therefore presents late. Its origin, whether arising primarily or metastatically from an unidentified or regressed primary cutaneous melanoma, remains debatable. In this report, we present a rare case of primary SBM and review the current literature. A 60-year-old man presented with melena and microcytic anemia. A series of investigations including abdominal ultrasonography (US), esophago-gastro-duodenoscopy (EGD) and colonoscopy were normal. Abdominal computed tomography revealed no specific pathology. Subsequent capsule endoscopy identified a jejunal mass, which was confirmed on laparotomy, was resected, and histologically diagnosed as melanoma. Extensive postoperative clinical examination revealed no cutaneous lesions. This report discusses gastrointestinal (GI) malignant melanoma, and examines the evidence both for and against the existence of true primary vs. metastatic disease. Furthermore, this case highlights the capabilities of capsule endoscopy in identifying an extremely rare GI tumor, which evaded other diagnostic modalities. Finally, the origins and pathophysiology of this rare cancer are evaluated, with the aim of promoting early diagnosis and treatment, and therefore improving current poor outcomes. PMID:27127766

  5. Oral contrast agents for small bowel MRI: comparison of different additives to optimize bowel distension.

    PubMed

    Ajaj, Waleed; Goehde, Susanne C; Schneemann, Hubert; Ruehm, Stefan G; Debatin, Jörg F; Lauenstein, Thomas C

    2004-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare two osmotic carbohydrate sugar alcohols (mannitol 2.5% and sorbitol 2.5%, 2.0%, and 1.5% watery solutions) in combination with 0.2% locust bean gum (LBG) for small bowel distension for MR imaging. Small bowel distension was quantified on coronal 2D TrueFISP images by measuring the diameters of 16 small bowel loops in each of 12 healthy subjects (age range 31-55 years). Additionally, the grade of small bowel distension was rated qualitatively. Patient acceptance concerning nausea, vomiting, flatulence, and diarrhea was noted for each solution, and all results were compared by a Wilcoxon test or t test, respectively. The ingestion of water combined with LBG and either 2.5% mannitol or 2.0% sorbitol showed the best distension of the small bowel. The lowest side effect rate was observed following ingestion of sorbitol in a concentration of 2.0 and 1.5%. Based on these data, we recommend a combination of LBG and 2% sorbitol use for optimal bowel distension and minimal side effects resulting in enhanced patient acceptance. PMID:14634782

  6. Volvulus of ileum: a rare cause of small bowel obstruction.

    PubMed

    Islam, Shariful; Hosein, Devin; Dan, Dilip; Naraynsingh, Vijay

    2016-01-01

    Small bowel volvulus is a rare but life-threatening surgical emergency. Owing to its rarity, it is seldom entertained as a differential for small bowel obstruction. The aetiology may be either primary or secondary, with secondary being more common in the Western world. Prompt diagnosis and urgent surgical treatment is required if bowel necrosis is to be prevented, which is associated with increased mortality. We present a case of primary ileal volvulus with a gangrenous segment and a brief overview of the current literature. PMID:27646320

  7. Volvulus of ileum: a rare cause of small bowel obstruction.

    PubMed

    Islam, Shariful; Hosein, Devin; Dan, Dilip; Naraynsingh, Vijay

    2016-09-19

    Small bowel volvulus is a rare but life-threatening surgical emergency. Owing to its rarity, it is seldom entertained as a differential for small bowel obstruction. The aetiology may be either primary or secondary, with secondary being more common in the Western world. Prompt diagnosis and urgent surgical treatment is required if bowel necrosis is to be prevented, which is associated with increased mortality. We present a case of primary ileal volvulus with a gangrenous segment and a brief overview of the current literature.

  8. Small bowel perforation: a rare complication of ventriculoperitoneal shunt placement

    PubMed Central

    Bourm, Kelsey; Pfeifer, Cory; Zarchan, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Small bowel perforation is a rare complication of ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt placement. When seen, it most commonly affects the stomach or colon. We describe a case and image findings of an 8-year-old female who presented with sepsis and erosion of the VP shunt into the small bowel. The imaging findings were confirmed surgically. We also provide an overview of the current literature discussing previously reported cases, clinical features, and treatment.

  9. [Experience in examining the small bowel with the agent Enteroview].

    PubMed

    Poliarush, N F

    2003-01-01

    The paper presents data of small bowel X-ray study in 20 patients by using the contrast agent Enteroview. Thirteen patients were found to have changes typical of chronic enteritis (n = 9); atypical location of the cecum and inflammatory ileocecal lesion (n = 2); Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (n = 10); Crohn's disease (n = 1). The X-ray semiotics of the normal and abnormally changed small bowel is given. The advantages of Interview during X-ray study are shown.

  10. Mesenteric air embolism following enteroscopic small bowel tattooing procedure.

    PubMed

    Chen, Natalie; Lamba, Ramit; Lee, John; Lall, Chandana

    2012-01-01

    Double balloon enteroscopy (DBE) is a revolutionary procedure in which the entire small bowel can be visualized endoscopically. DBE has the advantage of both diagnostic and therapeutic capabilities in the setting of small bowel neoplasms and vascular malformations. We present a unique case of a 76-year-old female who underwent small bowel DBE tattoo marking of a distal small bowel tumor complicated by development of severe abdominal pain postprocedure secondary to bowel air embolism into the mesenteric veins. Mesenteric air can be seen after other endoscopic procedures such as biopsy, mucosal clip placement and polypectomy, or following a colonoscopy. Mesenteric air embolism following small bowel tattooing procedure has not been previously reported in the literature. Mesenteric air when present may be attributed to mesenteric ischemia and can subject the patient to unnecessary surgical intervention if misdiagnosed. Thus, this report holds significance for the radiologist as computed tomography (CT) findings of mesenteric air embolism must be evaluated in the context of appropriate clinical history before treatment decisions are made. PMID:23393642

  11. Surgical aspects of radiation enteritis of the small bowel

    SciTech Connect

    Wobbes, T.; Verschueren, R.C.; Lubbers, E.J.; Jansen, W.; Paping, R.H.

    1984-02-01

    Injury to the small bowel is one of the tragic complications of radiotherapy. We performed a retrospective analysis of patients operated upon for stenosis, perforation, fistulization, and chronic blood loss of the small bowel after radiotherapy for multiple malignant diseases. In the period 1970 to 1982 in the Department of General Surgery of the St. Radboud University Hospital, Nijmegen, and the Department of Surgical Oncology of the State University, Groningen, 27 patients were treated surgically. Twenty patients presented with obstruction. In 17 patients a side-to-side ileotransversostomy was performed; in three the injured bowel was resected. Of the five patients with fistulization, three underwent a bypass procedure; in two cases the affected bowel was resected. In one patient with perforation, a resection was performed, as in a patient with chronic blood loss. Two of the 20 patients (10 per cent) in whom the diseased bowel was bypassed died postoperatively. Of the seven patients whose affected bowel was resected four (57 per cent) died of intra-abdominal sepsis. Management of the patient with chronic radiation enteritis is discussed. We conclude, on the basis of our experience, that in patients with obstruction and fistulization, a bypass procedure of the affected bowel is a safe method of treatment. In case of resection, the anastomosis should be performed during a second operation.

  12. Surgical management of irradiation-induced small bowel damage

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, S.T.; Seski, J.C.; Copeland, L.J.; Gershenson, D.M.; Edwards, C.L.; Herson, J.

    1985-04-01

    Seventy-seven patients, presenting with radiation small bowel injuries at the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Hospital and Tumor Institute at Houston between 1962 and 1978, were analyzed retrospectively. The patients were divided into two categories: bowel bypass without resection, and resection of irradiated bowel. Each group was then analyzed for its short- and long-term complications. Ileocolectomy with end-to-end anastomosis was the surgical procedure of choice in those people undergoing resection. There was no difference in short-term complications noted between the two groups. The long-term complications of fistula formation and continued small bowel necrosis could be prevented by resection, as a primary procedure. The surgical details of ileocolectomy with end-to-end anastomosis are presented, along with an analysis of the complications encountered in both groups.

  13. Colitis after Hibiclens enema.

    PubMed

    Hardin, R D; Tedesco, F J

    1986-10-01

    Acute colitis occurred after a Hibiclens cleanser enema. Endoscopic and histologic features were not helpful in distinguishing this colitis from an infectious or idiopathic colitis, and a careful history proved invaluable. We review the complications of using soapsuds and various chemical-containing enemas; these complications range from mild colitis to death. Because soap and other chemicals are damaging to colonic mucosa, these enemas should be included as a cause of acute colitis.

  14. [A case of neurofibromatosis complicated with small bowel obstruction].

    PubMed

    Lingna, Mao; Qingqu, Guo; Guifeng, Wang; Zhenya, Song

    2016-05-25

    Neurofibromatosis type 1(NF-1) with gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is a rare case in clinical practice. But it is even rarer that the GIST tumor in this case is so large that it cause small intestinal obstruction. Here we report such a male case of NF-1,with positive family history of NF-1 and nodules all over the patient's skin and abdominal cavity. The patient came to hospital with a sudden upper abdominal pain and nausea and vomiting over 5 d. Abdominal computerized tomography (CT) showed that there were numerous nodules of different size in his abdominal cavity. And the largest one is about 10 cm in diameter,which oppressed the small bowel and caused the small bowel mesenteric volvulus and obstruction of the bowel. Finally,the tumor was pathologically proved to be a GIST tumor but not NF nodule. The patient stays healthy until now after operation. PMID:27651196

  15. Most small bowel cancers are revealed by a complication

    PubMed Central

    Negoi, Ionut; Paun, Sorin; Hostiuc, Sorin; Stoica, Bodgan; Tanase, Ioan; Negoi, Ruxandra Irina; Beuran, Mircea

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To characterize the pattern of primary small bowel cancers in a tertiary East-European hospital. Methods A retrospective study of patients with small bowel cancers admitted to a tertiary emergency center, over the past 15 years. Results There were 57 patients with small bowel cancer, representing 0.039% of admissions and 0.059% of laparotomies. There were 37 (64.9%) men, mean age of 58 years; and 72 years for females. Out of 57 patients, 48 (84.2%) were admitted due to an emergency situation: obstruction in 21 (38.9%), perforation in 17 (31.5%), upper gastrointestinal bleeding in 8 (14.8%), and lower gastrointestinal bleeding in 2 (3.7%). There were 10 (17.5%) duodenal tumors, 21 (36.8%) jejunal tumors and 26 (45.6%) ileal tumors. The most frequent neoplasms were gastrointestinal stromal tumor in 24 patients (42.1%), adenocarcinoma in 19 (33.3%), lymphoma in 8 (14%), and carcinoids in 2 (3.5%). The prevalence of duodenal adenocarcinoma was 14.55 times greater than that of the small bowel, and the prevalence of duodenal stromal tumors was 1.818 time greater than that of the small bowel. Obstruction was the complication in adenocarcinoma in 57.9% of cases, and perforation was the major local complication (47.8%) in stromal tumors. Conclusion Primary small bowel cancers are usually diagnosed at advanced stages, and revealed by a local complication of the tumor. Their surgical management in emergency setting is associated to significant morbidity and mortality rates. PMID:26676271

  16. No difference in small bowel microbiota between patients with irritable bowel syndrome and healthy controls

    PubMed Central

    Dlugosz, Aldona; Winckler, Björn; Lundin, Elin; Zakikhany, Katherina; Sandström, Gunnar; Ye, Weimin; Engstrand, Lars; Lindberg, Greger

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have indicated that colonic microbiota may exhibit important differences between patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and healthy controls. Less is known about the microbiota of the small bowel. We used massive parallel sequencing to explore the composition of small bowel mucosa-associated microbiota in patients with IBS and healthy controls. We analysed capsule biopsies from the jejunum of 35 patients (26 females) with IBS aged 18-(36)-57 years and 16 healthy volunteers (11 females) aged 20-(32)-48 years. Sequences were analysed based on taxonomic classification. The phyla with the highest total abundance across all samples were: Firmicutes (43%), Proteobacteria (23%), Bacteroidetes (15%), Actinobacteria (9.3%) and Fusobacteria (7.0%). The most abundant genera were: Streptococcus (19%), Veillonella (13%), Prevotella (12%), Rothia (6.4%), Haemophilus (5.7%), Actinobacillus (5.5%), Escherichia (4.6%) and Fusobacterium (4.3%). We found no difference among major phyla or genera between patients with IBS and controls. We identified a cluster of samples in the small bowel microbiota dominated by Prevotella, which may represent a common enterotype of the upper small intestine. The remaining samples formed a gradient, dominated by Streptococcus at one end and Escherichia at the other. PMID:25687743

  17. Small-bowel perforation caused by fish bone.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Sheng-Der; Chan, De-Chuan; Liu, Yao-Chi

    2005-03-28

    A diagnosis of small-bowel perforation, caused by a sharp or pointed foreign body, is rarely made preoperatively because the clinical symptoms are usually nonspecific and can mimic other surgical conditions, such as appendicitis and diverticulitis. We report the case of a 62-year-old woman who experienced severe pain in the right iliac fossa and fever for about five days before arrival at our hospital. The presumptive diagnosis was acute purulent appendicitis and an emergency appendectomy was planned. Swelling and erythema were noted in a segment of the small bowel in the lower right abdomen. A tiny pointed object was found penetrating the inflamed portion of the bowel, which proved to be a sharp fish bone (gray snapper). The bone was removed, followed by segmental resection of the terminal ileum and ascending colon. The postoperative course was uneventful.

  18. Solitary fibrous tumor of small bowel mesentery with postoperative bowel obstruction: a case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guo-Jing; Li, Ruo-Tong; Zhou, Yang; Huang, Fei; Zhao, Zhi-Cheng; Li, Wei-Dong; Fu, Wei-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) which is an extremely rare clinical entity has been reported infrequently. Most commonly it is distinguished into pleural and extrapleural forms, with same morphological resemblance. There has been many literatures reported regarding extrapleural form of SFT but few cases of SFT originating from small bowel mesentery have been reported till now. We here report one case of SFT of small bowel mesentery with some eventful postoperative bowel obstruction and literature review.

  19. Solitary fibrous tumor of small bowel mesentery with postoperative bowel obstruction: a case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guo-Jing; Li, Ruo-Tong; Zhou, Yang; Huang, Fei; Zhao, Zhi-Cheng; Li, Wei-Dong; Fu, Wei-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) which is an extremely rare clinical entity has been reported infrequently. Most commonly it is distinguished into pleural and extrapleural forms, with same morphological resemblance. There has been many literatures reported regarding extrapleural form of SFT but few cases of SFT originating from small bowel mesentery have been reported till now. We here report one case of SFT of small bowel mesentery with some eventful postoperative bowel obstruction and literature review. PMID:26617912

  20. [Primary small bowel volvulus in a young adult].

    PubMed

    Pastor, J; Adámek, S; Polanecký, O

    2014-06-01

    The authors present a rare case of a young male patient with primary small bowel volvulus. They show the main points to be considered in clinical diagnosis of this kind of acute abdomen and the importance of CT scan in such cases.

  1. [Laparoscopic treatment of small bowel obstruction caused by adhesions].

    PubMed

    Kyzer, S; Aloni, Y; Charuzi, I

    1999-05-01

    We describe our experience in 14 patients operated on for small bowel obstruction, who underwent laparoscopic adhesiolysis. In 13 (93%) the obstruction was relieved and only 1 case required conversion to open operation. Bowel activity usually resumed within 24-48 hours, and there were no remarkable intraoperative and postoperative complications. During follow-up none developed recurrent obstruction. Our experience demonstrates that laparoscopic adhesiolysis is a valid therapeutic option. Additional experience is needed to determine which types of cases are suitable for the procedure. PMID:10955087

  2. Incarcerated small bowel within a spontaneous lumbar hernia.

    PubMed

    Teo, K A T; Burns, E; Garcea, G; Abela, J E; McKay, C J

    2010-10-01

    Lumbar hernias are rare, resulting from protrusion through the posterior abdominal wall that may be congenital, acquired or spontaneous. They very rarely present with acute bowel obstruction. We present a case of incarcerated small bowel within a spontaneous inferior (Petit's) lumbar hernia, treated by early open repair with mesh insertion. This case highlights the importance of thorough clinical examination and a high index of suspicion, even in the absence of previous surgery around the anatomical site of the suspected hernia, in order to effect an early repair before the onset of ischaemia in incarcerated contents.

  3. Electrostimulation to move endoscopes in the small bowel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosse, Charles A.; Mills, Timothy N.; Appleyard, Mark; Swain, Paul

    2001-01-01

    Background: Methods are required for propulsion of endoscopes through the small bowel and for propelling capsule endoscopes without cables. Aim: To test the hypothesis that electrical stimulation could propel an endoscope by stimulating muscular contraction. Methods: Prototype acrylic devices of ovoid shape were constructed with two stainless steel electrodes mounted on the tapered section. Five devices of 13 to 23 mm diameter with a taper of 16 degree(s) to 20 degree(s) (half angle) were tested. When in contact with the bowel wall electrostimulation was applied causing circular muscle contraction which when applied to the taper of the ovoid resulted in forward propulsion of the device. The method does not induce peristalsis but works by stimulating local contraction. The device was tested in small bowel and oesophagus of anaesthetized pigs. Results: Electrostimulation caused the ovoid to advance rapidly (6 mm/sec) up and down the oesophagus by inducing circular esophageal muscle contraction. When stimulated at 15 Hz with 30 ms pulses the threshold for movement was 12 mA; at 20 mA the device moved reliably in both directions in the small bowel at speeds of up to 4.5 mm/s, negotiating tight curves.

  4. Small Bowel Stent-in-Stent Placement for Malignant Small Bowel Obstruction Using a Balloon-Assisted Overtube Technique

    PubMed Central

    Popa, Daniel; Ramesh, Jayapal; Peter, Shajan; Wilcox, C. Mel

    2014-01-01

    Self-expanding metal stents are a useful therapy to palliate malignant and benign luminal gastrointestinal obstruction. Self-expanding metal stents has been widely reported for colonic, esophageal, and gastric obstruction. However, endoscopic delivery and placement to the small bowel is more challenging and difficult. This case illustrates the usefulness and technical advantages of the balloon-overtube and enteroscopy technique for the palliative treatment of neoplastic stenosis affecting the small intestine. PMID:24570892

  5. Agenesis of the dorsal mesentery without jejunoilial atresia ("apple peel small bowel").

    PubMed

    Hull, J D; Kiesel, J L; Proudfoot, W H; Belin, R P

    1975-04-01

    Agenesis of the dorsal mesentery with apple peel or Christmas tree deformity but without small-bowel atresia can occur beyond the neonatal period. The recognition of this entity is imperative as it is also associated with a marginal artery which may be the only blood supply to the majority of small bowel. Preservation of this vessel is necessary to avoid catastrophic bowel death.

  6. Small Bowel Perforation as a Postoperative Complication from a Laminectomy.

    PubMed

    Krieger, Robert H; Wojcicki, Katherine M; Berry, Andrew C; Reuther, Warren L; McArthur, Kendrick D

    2015-01-01

    Chronic low back pain is one of the leading chief complaints affecting adults in the United States. As a result, this increases the percentage of patients that will eventually undergo surgical intervention to alleviate debilitating, chronic symptoms. A 37-year-old woman presented ten hours postoperatively after a lumbar laminectomy with an acute abdomen due to the extraordinarily rare complication of small bowel injury secondary to deep surgical penetration. PMID:26236534

  7. Recent advances in small bowel diseases: Part II

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Alan BR; Chopra, Angeli; Clandinin, Michael Tom; Freeman, Hugh

    2012-01-01

    As is the case in all areas of gastroenterology and hepatology, in 2009 and 2010 there were many advances in our knowledge and understanding of small intestinal diseases. Over 1000 publications were reviewed, and the important advances in basic science as well as clinical applications were considered. In Part II we review six topics: absorption, short bowel syndrome, smooth muscle function and intestinal motility, tumors, diagnostic imaging, and cystic fibrosis. PMID:22807605

  8. Phytobezoar: an uncommon cause of small bowel obstruction.

    PubMed Central

    Chisholm, E. M.; Leong, H. T.; Chung, S. C.; Li, A. K.

    1992-01-01

    Phytobezoars are an unusual cause of small bowel obstruction. We report 13 patients presenting with 16 episodes of small bowel obstruction from phytobezoars. Eleven patients had previously undergone surgery for peptic ulceration (eight truncal vagotomy and pyloroplasty). A history of ingestion of persimmon fruit was common and the majority of cases presented in the autumn when this fruit is in season. One phytobezoar causing obstruction at the third part of the duodenum was removed by endoscopic fragmentation, while an episode of jejunal obstruction was precipitated by endoscopic fragmentation of a gastric bezoar. Twelve patients underwent surgery for obstruction on 15 occasions, with milking of the phytobezoar to the caecum performed in ten, enterotomy and removal in four and resection in one patient. Associated gastric phytobezoars were found in two cases and multiple small bowel bezoars in two other cases. These were removed to prevent recurrent obstruction. Phytobezoar should be considered preoperatively as a cause of obstruction in patients with previous ulcer surgery. Wherever possible milking of a phytobezoar to the caecum should be performed. Careful assessment for other phytobezoars should be made. Prevention of phytobezoars is dependent upon dietary counselling of patients by surgeons after gastric resection or vagotomy and drainage for peptic ulcer. PMID:1416706

  9. Small bowel neuroendocrine tumors: From pathophysiology to clinical approach

    PubMed Central

    Xavier, Sofia; Rosa, Bruno; Cotter, José

    2016-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs), defined as epithelial tumors with predominant neuroendocrine differentiation, are among the most frequent types of small bowel neoplasm. They represent a rare, slow-growing neoplasm with some characteristics common to all forms and others attributable to the organ of origin. The diagnosis of this subgroup of neoplasia is not usually straight-forward for several reasons. Being a rare form of neoplasm they are frequently not readily considered in the differential diagnosis. Also, clinical manifestations are nonspecific lending the clinician no clue that points directly to this entity. However, the annual incidence of NETs has risen in the last years to 40 to 50 cases per million probably not due to a real increase in incidence but rather due to better diagnostic tools that have become progressively available. Being a rare malignancy, investigation regarding its pathophysiology and efforts toward better understanding and classification of these tumors has been limited until recently. Clinical societies dedicated to this matter are emerging (NANETS, ENETS and UKINETS) and several guidelines were published in an effort to standardize the nomenclature, grading and staging systems as well as diagnosis and management of NETs. Also, some investigation on the genetic behavior of small bowel NETs has been recently released, shedding some light on the pathophysiology of these tumors, and pointing some new directions on the possible treating options. In this review we focus on the current status of the overall knowledge about small bowel NETs, focusing on recent breakthroughs and its potential application on clinical practice. PMID:26909234

  10. Diospyrobezoar as a Cause of Small Bowel Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    de Toledo, Andréia Padilha; Rodrigues, Fernanda Hurtado; Rodrigues, Murilo Rocha; Sato, Daniela Tiemi; Nonose, Ronaldo; Nascimento, Enzo Fabrício; Martinez, Carlos Augusto Real

    2012-01-01

    Phytobezoar, a concretion of indigestible fibers derived from ingested vegetables and fruits, is the most common type of bezoar. Diospyrobezoar is a subtype of phytobezoar formed after excessive intake of persimmons (Diospyros kaki). We report the case of a diabetic man with a 5-day history of abdominal pain after massive ingestion of persimmons who developed signs of complicated small bowel obstruction. The patient had a previous history of Billroth II hemigastrectomy associated with truncal vagotomy to treat a chronic duodenal ulcer 14 years earlier. Since intestinal obstruction was suspected, he underwent emergency laparotomy that revealed an ileal obstruction with small bowel perforation and local peritonitis due to a phytobezoar that was impacted 15 cm above the ileocecal valve. After segmental intestinal resection, the patient had a good recovery and was discharged on the 6th postoperative day. This report provides evidence that diospyrobezoar should be considered as a possible cause of small bowel obstruction in patients who have previously undergone gastric surgery. PMID:23271989

  11. [Acute small bowel obstruction: conservative or surgical treatment?].

    PubMed

    Schwenter, F; Dominguez, S; Meier, R; Oulhaci-de Saussure, W; Platon, A; Gervaz, P; Morel, P

    2011-06-22

    Small bowel obstruction (SBO) is a common clinical syndrome caused mainly by postoperative adhesions. In complement to clinical and biological evaluations, CT scan has emerged as a valuable imaging modality and may provide reliable information. The early recognition of signs suggesting bowel ischemia is essential for urgent operation. However appropriate management of SBO remains a common clinical challenge. Although a conservative approach can be successful in a substantial percentage of selected patients, regular and close re-assessement is mandatory. Any persistance or progression of the critical symptoms and signs should indeed lead to surgical exploration. Here we review the principles of adhesive SBO management and suggest a decision procedure for conservative versus surgical treatment.

  12. [Small bowel intussusception and Vanek's tumor in an elderly woman].

    PubMed

    Maya, Antonio M; Gallo, Antonio; Castelli, Mariano; Paz, Leonardo; Espinosa, Juan C; Giunippero, Alejandro

    2013-01-01

    Inflammatory fibroid polyps are non-frequent benign lesions, described by Vanek in 1949, originated in the sub mucosa of the gastrointestinal tract. They have an uncertain origin and they are formed of fibroblastic and mesenchymal proliferations with an important eosinophilic proportion. Depending on where are they localized, could present different type of symptoms. The inflammatory fibroid polyps are one of the rare benign conditions causing intestinal intussusception in adults. We present the case of a 82 years old woman, who presented an intestinal intussusception due to an inflammatory fibroid polyp localized in the small bowel.

  13. An unusual cause of small bowel perforation: apricot pit.

    PubMed

    Atila, Koray; Güler, Sanem; Bora, Seymen; Gülay, Hüseyin

    2011-05-01

    Ingestion of foreign bodies can be a common problem, especially among children, alcoholics, and psychiatric and senile patients. Foreign bodies with smooth edges usually do not pose significant problems, but a sharp foreign object that is not retrieved immediately may penetrate the wall and cause complications. Ingested foreign bodies usually pass the intestinal tract uneventfully, and perforation occurs in less than 1%. In this study, we report a case of small bowel obstruction with perforation in a 73-year-old female due to the accidental swallowing of an apricot pit. PMID:21935813

  14. Small bowel mesentery solitary fibrous tumor. A rare neoplasia in a young male.

    PubMed

    Cantarella, F; Graziosi, L; Cavazzoni, E; Donini, A

    2012-01-01

    Extrapleural Solitary Fibrous Tumors (SFT), in particular small bowel mesentery SFTs, are extremely rare neoplasms. We describe the case of a young male hospitalized for unspecific abdominal symptoms and evidence of a well-circumscribed mass arising from the small bowel mesentery. Histopathological and immunohistochemical analysis on the surgical specimen confirmed the diagnosis of SFT. A Pubmed search revealed only another case of small bowel mesentery SFT, confirming the extremely rarity of this tumor.

  15. Small bowel bacterial overgrowth in patients with irritable bowel syndrome: the first study in iran.

    PubMed

    Abbasi, Mehdi HayatBakhsh; Zahedi, MohammadJavad; Darvish Moghadam, Sodaif; Shafieipour, Sara; HayatBakhsh Abbasi, Mahroo

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) may have a role in the pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). So, the aim of this study was to assess the association between SIBO and IBS by using glucose breath test (GBT) in Kerman city as the first study in Iranian population. METHODS 107 patients with IBS and 107 healthy individuals were enrolled in our study. All the participants underwent GBT. A peak of H2 values >20 p.p.m above the basal value after glucose ingestion was considered suggestive of SIBO. SPSS software version 17 was used for data analysis. P value < 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. RESULTS Of the 107 patients with IBS, 40 had positive GBT (37.4%) compared with 14 (12.1%) out of the 107 control participants(p< 0.001). Dominant symptoms in patients with IBS were diarrhea in 36(33.6%), constipation in 12(11.2%), abdominal pain in 22(20.6%), bloating in 28(26.2%), and change in bowel habit in 9(8.4%) patients. There was not statistically significant difference among any of this IBS subgroups and positive GBT (p=0.44). CONCLUSION There is a positive association between IBS and SIBO. We suggest a Placebo-controlled bacterial eradication study for identifying the role of SIBO in IBS. PMID:25628852

  16. An undigested cherry tomato as a rare cause of small bowel obstruction.

    PubMed

    Mortezavi, A; Schneider, P M; Lurje, G

    2015-07-01

    Small bowel obstruction due to undigested fibre from fruits and vegetables is a rare but known medical condition. We report a case of small bowel obstruction caused by a whole cherry tomato in a patient without a past medical history of abdominal surgery. A 66-year-old man presented to the emergency department complaining of lower abdominal pain with nausea and vomiting. His last bowel movement had occurred on the morning of presentation. He underwent abdominal computed tomography (CT), which showed a sudden change of diameter in the distal ileum with complete collapse of the proximal small bowel segment. Laparoscopy confirmed a small bowel obstruction with a transition point close to the ileocaecal valve. An enterotomy was performed and a completely undigested cherry tomato was retrieved. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a small bowel obstruction caused by a whole cherry tomato. PMID:26264111

  17. Phytobezoar in a jejunal diverticulum as a cause of small bowel obstruction: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Phytobezoars are concretions of poorly digested fruit and vegetable fibers found in the alimentary tract. Previous gastric resection, gastrojejunostomy, or pyloroplasty predispose people to bezoar formation. Small-bowel bezoars normally come from the stomach, and primary small-bowel bezoars are very rare. They are seen only in patients with underlying small-bowel diseases such as diverticula, strictures, or tumors. Primary small-bowel bezoars almost always present as intestinal obstructions, although it is a very rare cause, being responsible for less than 3% of all small-bowel obstructions in one series. Jejunal diverticula are rare, with an incidence of less than 0.5%. They are usually asymptomatic pseudodiverticula of pulsion type, and complications are reported in 10% to 30% of patients. A phytobezoar in a jejunal diverticulum is an extremely rare presentation. Case presentation A 78-year-old Pakistani man presented to our clinic with small-bowel obstruction. Upon exploration, we found a primary small-bowel bezoar originating in a jejunal diverticulum and causing jejunal obstruction. Resection and anastomosis of the jejunal segment harboring the diverticulum was performed, and our patient had an uneventful recovery. Conclusion Primary small-bowel bezoars are very rare but must be kept in mind as a possible cause of small-bowel obstruction. PMID:21951579

  18. Acute Small Bowel Obstruction and Small Bowel Perforation as a Clinical Debut of Intestinal Endometriosis: A Report of Four Cases and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Torralba-Morón, Angel; Urbanowicz, Maria; Ibarrola-De Andres, Carolina; Lopez-Alonso, Guadalupe; Colina-Ruizdelgado, Francisco; Guerra-Vales, Juan-Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Endometriosis is a quite common pathology, however, intestinal endometriosis is a rare condition, which typically occurs with chronic symptoms. Its acute presentation is very infrequent. We herein report four cases of intestinal endometriosis, in which the clinical debut occurred acutely: two as an acute small bowel obstruction and two as a small bowel perforation. None of the cases had a preoperative diagnosis of endometriosis. The interest of these cases lies in this exceptional form of presentation, such as a surgical acute abdomen. Therefore, intestinal endometriosis should be taken into account in the differential diagnosis of an acute obstructive or perforative process of the small or large bowel. PMID:27629952

  19. Endoscopic band ligation for bleeding lesions in the small bowel

    PubMed Central

    Ikeya, Takashi; Ishii, Naoki; Shimamura, Yuto; Nakano, Kaoru; Ego, Mai; Nakamura, Kenji; Takagi, Koichi; Fukuda, Katsuyuki; Fujita, Yoshiyuki

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the safety and efficacy of endoscopic band ligation (EBL) for bleeding lesions in the small bowel. METHODS: This is a retrospective study evaluating EBL in six consecutive patients (three males, three females, 46-86 years of age) treated between May 2009 and February 2014: duodenal vascular ectasia; 1, jejunal bleeding diverticulum; 1, ileal Dieulafoy’s lesion; 1 and ileal bleeding diverticula; 3. The success of the initial hemostasis was evaluated, and patients were observed for early rebleeding (within 30 d after EBL), and complications such as perforation and abscess formation. Follow-up endoscopies were performed in four patients. RESULTS: Initial hemostasis was successfully achieved with EBL in all six patients. Eversion was not sufficient in four diverticular lesions. Early rebleeding occurred three days after EBL in one ileal diverticulum, and a repeat endoscopy revealed dislodgement of the O-band and ulcer formation at the banded site. This rebleeding was managed conservatively. Late rebleeding occurred in this case (13 and 21 mo after initial EBL), and re-EBL was performed. Follow-up endoscopies revealed scar formation and the disappearance of vascular lesions at the banded site in the case with a duodenal bleeding lesion, and unresolved ileal diverticula in three cases. Surgery or transarterial embolization was not required without any complications during the median follow-up period of 45 (range, 2-83) mo. CONCLUSION: EBL is a safe and effective endoscopic treatment for hemostasis of bleeding lesions in the small bowel. PMID:25324920

  20. Small bowel ulcerative lesions are common in elderly NSAIDs users with peptic ulcer bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Tsibouris, Panagiotis; Kalantzis, Chissostomos; Apostolopoulos, Periklis; Zalonis, Antonios; Isaacs, Peter Edward Thomas; Hendrickse, Mark; Alexandrakis, Georgios

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To determine the frequency of small bowel ulcerative lesions in patients with peptic ulcer and define the significance of those lesions. METHODS: In our prospective study, 60 consecutive elderly patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding from a peptic ulceration (cases) and 60 matched patients with a non-bleeding peptic ulcer (controls) underwent small bowel capsule endoscopy, after a negative colonoscopy (compulsory in our institution). Controls were evaluated for non-bleeding indications. Known or suspected chronic inflammatory conditions and medication that could harm the gut were excluded. During capsule endoscopy, small bowel ulcerative lesions were counted thoroughly and classified according to Graham classification. Other small bowel lesions were also recorded. Peptic ulcer bleeding was controlled endoscopically, when adequate, proton pump inhibitors were started in both cases and controls, and Helicobacter pylori eradicated whenever present. Both cases and controls were followed up for a year. In case of bleeding recurrence upper gastrointestinal endoscopy was repeated and whenever it remained unexplained it was followed by repeat colonoscopy and capsule endoscopy. RESULTS: Forty (67%) cases and 18 (30%) controls presented small bowel erosions (P = 0.0001), while 22 (37%) cases and 4 (8%) controls presented small bowel ulcers (P < 0.0001). Among non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) consumers, 39 (95%) cases and 17 (33%) controls presented small bowel erosions (P < 0.0001), while 22 (55%) cases and 4 (10%) controls presented small bowel ulcers (P < 0.0001). Small bowel ulcerative lesions were infrequent among patients not consuming NSAIDs. Mean entry hemoglobin was 9.3 (SD = 1.4) g/dL in cases with small bowel ulcerative lesions and 10.5 (SD = 1.3) g/dL in those without (P = 0.002). Cases with small bowel ulcers necessitate more units of packed red blood cells. During their hospitalization, 6 (27%) cases with small bowel ulcers presented

  1. Stationarity study of the myoelectrical signal recorded from small bowel.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Casado, J; Martinez-de-Juan, J L; Meseguer, M; Ponce, J L

    2004-01-01

    Electroenterogram (EEnG) is the myoelectrical signal recorded from small intestine. Due to the relationship between mechanical activity and myoelectrical activity of the intestinal smooth muscle, EEnG could be a solution for quantifying intestinal motility. Motility indexes are traditionally calculated from 1-minute window analysis. However, no prior works have analyzed whether signal properties remain constant or not within this time interval. The aim of present paper is to study time evolution of changes in EEnG spectrum in order to determine if traditional analysis and window length is satisfactory from the signal dynamics point of view. Mechanical and electrical activities are recorded simultaneously in bowel rings (at duodenum, angle of Treitz and jejunum) of three Beagle dogs. Thirteen recording sessions were carried out. A stationary index (SI) based on statistical analysis of time evolution of spectral parameters is defined and calculated over EEnG recording sessions. Results show that myoelectrical signal from bowel muscle is stationary during quiescence periods and maximum contractions periods. However, during irregular contractile activity (i.e. transitions from no-activity to maximum activity, or in fed state) electroenterogram is a non-stationary signal if 1-minute length is chosen for its analysis. Therefore, traditional intestinal motility indexes must be redefined using non-stationary techniques.

  2. Advances in small bowel neuroendocrine neoplasia Banck and Small intestine

    PubMed Central

    Banck, Michaela S.; Beutler, Andreas S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review this review aims at summarizing progress in clinical trials and basic science redefining the diagnosis and treatment of well differentiated small intestine neuroendocrine tumors (SI-NET). Recent findings Two clinical trials demonstrated antitumor activity of the long-acting somatostatin analogues octreotide LAR and lanreotide for advanced SI-NET. The mTOR inhibitor everolimus is another treatment option for patients with SI-NET, but awaits definitive proof of benefit in the ongoing RADIANT-4 study. Two whole exome/genome-sequencing studies reported in the past year provided the first genome-wide analysis of large sets of SI-NET at nucleotide resolution. Candidate therapeutically relevant alterations were found to affect SRC, SMAD genes, AURKA, EGFR, HSP90, and PDGFR as well as mutually exclusive amplification of AKT1 or AKT2 and other alterations of PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling genes. The gene CDKN1B is inactivated by small insertions/deletions in 8% of patients with SI-NET suggesting cell cycle inhibitors as new candidate drugs for SI-NET. Circulating tumor cells and tumor-derived RNA in the blood are promising clinical tests for SI-NET. Summary Clinical and genomic research may merge in the near future to re-shape clinical trials and to define the ‘personalized’ treatment options for patients with SI-NET. PMID:24441281

  3. Small-bowel myeloid sarcoma: Report of a case with atypical presentation

    PubMed Central

    Girelli, Carlo M.; Carsenzuola, Valentina; Latargia, Marilù; Aguzzi, Alessandra; Serio, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Small-bowel myeloid sarcoma is rare. Acute bowel obstruction is its usual clinical presentation. PRESENTATION OF CASE We report a case of small-bowel myeloid sarcoma that occurred in a 64-year-old woman who presented chronic secretory diarrhoea, hypokalaemia, and weight loss. Immature white blood cells in a peripheral smear and small-bowel capsule endoscopic features were the main diagnostic clues. The patient experienced capsule retention and developed acute bowel obstruction. Urgent laparotomy showed a stricturing ileal mass and pathology of the resected bowel specimen unveiled a CD34+, CD117+, and myeloperoxidase-positive myeloid sarcoma. The diarrhoea promptly resolved after surgery, and the patient is now undergoing chemotherapy. DISCUSSION Secretory diarrhoea can be the first manifestation of small-bowel myeloid sarcoma. Capsule endoscopy may provide a diagnostic clue, but it can trigger an acute bowel obstruction. Differential diagnosis of the pathologic specimen may be difficult and a high suspicion index of is mandatory to perform immunophenotyping to determine the correct management. CONCLUSION Chronic diarrhoea with alarm features can be the first manifestation of small-bowel myeloid sarcoma. PMID:25105775

  4. Multiple singing magnet ingestion leading to pressure necrosis of the small bowel

    PubMed Central

    Mirza, M. Bilal; Bux, Nabi; Talat, Nabila; Saleem, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    Multiple Magnet ingestion may cause a number of sinister complications. We report a case of multiple singing magnets ingestion by a 2-year-old girl resulting in intestinal obstruction and pressure necrosis of the small bowel. A bunch of seven magnets present in the small bowel was removed operatively. PMID:25829675

  5. The Nectarine Pit as a Cause for Small Bowel Obstruction and Perforation: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Arthur, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Ingestion of a foreign body is a rare cause of small bowel obstruction. Ingested foreign bodies will usually pass without clinical sequelae, however on occasion can contribute to significant morbidity. Here we present an unusual case of small bowel obstruction and perforation as a result of accidental ingestion of a nectarine pit. PMID:23607039

  6. Small bowel obstruction secondary to transport aircraft: coincidence or reality?

    PubMed

    Massalou, D; Fournier, M; Salucki, B; Baqué, P

    2013-09-01

    Small bowel obstructions (SBO) are a leading cause of admission to general surgery, posing the problem of the aetiology and treatment based on the diagnosis. More than 300 patients were admitted for SBO in 2011 in our institution. In our clinical practice, we have had to care for patients with SBO immediately after air travel, all of whom had an antecedent of abdominal surgery by laparotomy. The finding of episodes of acute SBO immediately following a commercial flight has never been reported in the literature. We report the cases of four patients for whom we offer several pathophysiological hypotheses, and we publish the first dietary rules for people with a history of intraperitoneal surgery to adopt during a flight.

  7. Benign Cystic Peritoneal Mesothelioma Revealed by Small Bowel Obstruction.

    PubMed

    Bray Madoué, Kaimba; Boniface, Moifo; Annick Laure, Edzimbi; Pierre, Herve

    2016-01-01

    Benign cystic peritoneal mesothelioma is a rare tumor which frequently occurs in women of reproductive age. Abdominal pain associated with pelvic or abdominal mass is the common clinical presentation. We report the case of a 22-year-old woman with a pathological proved benign cystic mesothelioma of the peritoneum revealed by a small bowel obstruction and a painful left-sided pelvic mass with signs of psoitis. Contrast enhanced abdominal CT-scan demonstrated a large pelvic cystic mass with mass effect on rectosigmoid and pelvic organs. The patient underwent surgical removal of the tumor. Pathological examination revealed the diagnosis of benign cystic mesothelioma of the peritoneum. The outcome was excellent with a 12-month recoil.

  8. Benign Cystic Peritoneal Mesothelioma Revealed by Small Bowel Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Bray Madoué, Kaimba; Boniface, Moifo; Annick Laure, Edzimbi; Pierre, Herve

    2016-01-01

    Benign cystic peritoneal mesothelioma is a rare tumor which frequently occurs in women of reproductive age. Abdominal pain associated with pelvic or abdominal mass is the common clinical presentation. We report the case of a 22-year-old woman with a pathological proved benign cystic mesothelioma of the peritoneum revealed by a small bowel obstruction and a painful left-sided pelvic mass with signs of psoitis. Contrast enhanced abdominal CT-scan demonstrated a large pelvic cystic mass with mass effect on rectosigmoid and pelvic organs. The patient underwent surgical removal of the tumor. Pathological examination revealed the diagnosis of benign cystic mesothelioma of the peritoneum. The outcome was excellent with a 12-month recoil. PMID:27066288

  9. Small-bowel capsule endoscopy and device-assisted enteroscopy for diagnosis and treatment of small-bowel disorders: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) Clinical Guideline.

    PubMed

    Pennazio, Marco; Spada, Cristiano; Eliakim, Rami; Keuchel, Martin; May, Andrea; Mulder, Chris J; Rondonotti, Emanuele; Adler, Samuel N; Albert, Joerg; Baltes, Peter; Barbaro, Federico; Cellier, Christophe; Charton, Jean Pierre; Delvaux, Michel; Despott, Edward J; Domagk, Dirk; Klein, Amir; McAlindon, Mark; Rosa, Bruno; Rowse, Georgina; Sanders, David S; Saurin, Jean Christophe; Sidhu, Reena; Dumonceau, Jean-Marc; Hassan, Cesare; Gralnek, Ian M

    2015-04-01

    This Guideline is an official statement of the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE). The Guideline was also reviewed and endorsed by the British Society of Gastroenterology (BSG). It addresses the roles of small-bowel capsule endoscopy and device-assisted enteroscopy for diagnosis and treatment of small-bowel disorders. Main recommendations 1 ESGE recommends small-bowel video capsule endoscopy as the first-line investigation in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (strong recommendation, moderate quality evidence). 2 In patients with overt obscure gastrointestinal bleeding, ESGE recommends performing small-bowel capsule endoscopy as soon as possible after the bleeding episode, optimally within 14 days, in order to maximize the diagnostic yield (strong recommendation, moderate quality evidence). 3 ESGE does not recommend the routine performance of second-look endoscopy prior to small-bowel capsule endoscopy; however whether to perform second-look endoscopy before capsule endoscopy in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding or iron-deficiency anaemia should be decided on a case-by-case basis (strong recommendation, low quality evidence). 4 In patients with positive findings at small-bowel capsule endoscopy, ESGE recommends device-assisted enteroscopy to confirm and possibly treat lesions identified by capsule endoscopy (strong recommendation, high quality evidence). 5 ESGE recommends ileocolonoscopy as the first endoscopic examination for investigating patients with suspected Crohn's disease (strong recommendation, high quality evidence). In patients with suspected Crohn's disease and negative ileocolonoscopy findings, ESGE recommends small-bowel capsule endoscopy as the initial diagnostic modality for investigating the small bowel, in the absence of obstructive symptoms or known stenosis (strong recommendation, moderate quality evidence).ESGE does not recommend routine small-bowel imaging or the use of the PillCam patency capsule

  10. The value of the preoperative barium-enema examination in the assessment of pelvic masses

    SciTech Connect

    Gedgaudas, R.K.; Kelvin, F.M.; Thompson, W.M.; Rice, R.P.

    1983-03-01

    The value of the barium-enema examination in the assessment of pelvic masses was studied in 44 patients. Findings from those barium-enema examinations and from pathological specimens from 37 patients who had malignant tumors and seven patients who had endometriosis were retrospectively analyzed to determine if the barium-enema examination is useful in differentiating extrinsic lesions with and without invasion of the colon. None of the 12 patients who had extrinsic lesions had any of the criteria that indicated bowel-wall invasion. These criteria included fixation and serrations of the bowel wall in all patients with invasion, and ulceration and fistulizaton in those patients who had complete transmural invasion. In patients with pelvic masses, the preoperative barium-enema examination may be useful to the surgeon in planning surgery and in preparing the patient for the possibility of partial colectomy or colostomy.

  11. Review of small-bowel cleansing scales in capsule endoscopy: A panoply of choices.

    PubMed

    Ponte, Ana; Pinho, Rolando; Rodrigues, Adélia; Carvalho, João

    2016-09-16

    Evaluation of the quality of small-bowel cleansing is required to assess the reliability of findings in capsule endoscopy (CE). Moreover, consensus regarding the need of intestinal preparation for CE remains to be achieved. The presence of multiple grading scales for small-bowel preparation in CE, which are time-consuming and complicated, adds difficulty to the comparison of different small-bowel cleansing regimens and their application in clinical practice. Nowadays, a validated scale universally accepted for grading small-bowel cleansing is lacking. In fact, there are numerous grading systems with very different technical characteristics, namely, the parameters and the portion of the CE video that are analyzed, the objectivity of the analysis, the lesser or greater dependency on the operator, and the validation of the score. The authors performed a review which aims to systematize and summarize currently available small-bowel grading scales in CE. PMID:27668070

  12. Review of small-bowel cleansing scales in capsule endoscopy: A panoply of choices

    PubMed Central

    Ponte, Ana; Pinho, Rolando; Rodrigues, Adélia; Carvalho, João

    2016-01-01

    Evaluation of the quality of small-bowel cleansing is required to assess the reliability of findings in capsule endoscopy (CE). Moreover, consensus regarding the need of intestinal preparation for CE remains to be achieved. The presence of multiple grading scales for small-bowel preparation in CE, which are time-consuming and complicated, adds difficulty to the comparison of different small-bowel cleansing regimens and their application in clinical practice. Nowadays, a validated scale universally accepted for grading small-bowel cleansing is lacking. In fact, there are numerous grading systems with very different technical characteristics, namely, the parameters and the portion of the CE video that are analyzed, the objectivity of the analysis, the lesser or greater dependency on the operator, and the validation of the score. The authors performed a review which aims to systematize and summarize currently available small-bowel grading scales in CE. PMID:27668070

  13. Small bowel capsule endoscopy: Where are we after almost 15 years of use?

    PubMed Central

    Van de Bruaene, Cedric; De Looze, Danny; Hindryckx, Pieter

    2015-01-01

    The development of capsule endoscopy (CE) in 2001 has given gastroenterologists the opportunity to investigate the small bowel in a non-invasive way. CE is most commonly performed for obscure gastrointestinal bleeding, but other indications include diagnosis or follow-up of Crohn’s disease, suspicion of a small bowel tumor, diagnosis and surveillance of hereditary polyposis syndromes, Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced small bowel lesions and celiac disease. Almost fifteen years have passed since the release of the small bowel capsule. The purpose of this review is to offer the reader a brief but complete overview on small bowel CE anno 2014, including the technical and procedural aspects, the possible complications and the most important indications. We will end with some future perspectives of CE. PMID:25610531

  14. Review of small-bowel cleansing scales in capsule endoscopy: A panoply of choices

    PubMed Central

    Ponte, Ana; Pinho, Rolando; Rodrigues, Adélia; Carvalho, João

    2016-01-01

    Evaluation of the quality of small-bowel cleansing is required to assess the reliability of findings in capsule endoscopy (CE). Moreover, consensus regarding the need of intestinal preparation for CE remains to be achieved. The presence of multiple grading scales for small-bowel preparation in CE, which are time-consuming and complicated, adds difficulty to the comparison of different small-bowel cleansing regimens and their application in clinical practice. Nowadays, a validated scale universally accepted for grading small-bowel cleansing is lacking. In fact, there are numerous grading systems with very different technical characteristics, namely, the parameters and the portion of the CE video that are analyzed, the objectivity of the analysis, the lesser or greater dependency on the operator, and the validation of the score. The authors performed a review which aims to systematize and summarize currently available small-bowel grading scales in CE.

  15. Pilot study of small bowel mucosal gene expression in patients with irritable bowel syndrome with diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Camilleri, Michael; Carlson, Paula; Valentin, Nelson; Acosta, Andres; O'Neill, Jessica; Eckert, Deborah; Dyer, Roy; Na, Jie; Klee, Eric W; Murray, Joseph A

    2016-09-01

    Prior studies in with irritable bowel syndrome with diarrhea (IBS-D) patients showed immune activation, secretion, and barrier dysfunction in jejunal or colorectal mucosa. We measured mRNA expression by RT-PCR of 91 genes reflecting tight junction proteins, chemokines, innate immunity, ion channels, transmitters, housekeeping genes, and controls for DNA contamination and PCR efficiency in small intestinal mucosa from 15 IBS-D and 7 controls (biopsies negative for celiac disease). Fold change was calculated using 2((-ΔΔCT)) formula. Nominal P values (P < 0.05) were interpreted with false detection rate (FDR) correction (q value). Cluster analysis with Lens for Enrichment and Network Studies (LENS) explored connectivity of mechanisms. Upregulated genes (uncorrected P < 0.05) were related to ion transport (INADL, MAGI1, and SONS1), barrier (TJP1, 2, and 3 and CLDN) or immune functions (TLR3, IL15, and MAPKAPK5), or histamine metabolism (HNMT); downregulated genes were related to immune function (IL-1β, TGF-β1, and CCL20) or antigen detection (TLR1 and 8). The following genes were significantly upregulated (q < 0.05) in IBS-D: INADL, MAGI1, PPP2R5C, MAPKAPK5, TLR3, and IL-15. Among the 14 nominally upregulated genes, there was clustering of barrier and PDZ domains (TJP1, TJP2, TJP3, CLDN4, INADL, and MAGI1) and clustering of downregulated genes (CCL20, TLR1, IL1B, and TLR8). Protein expression of PPP2R5C in nuclear lysates was greater in patients with IBS-D and controls. There was increase in INADL protein (median 9.4 ng/ml) in patients with IBS-D relative to controls (median 5.8 ng/ml, P > 0.05). In conclusion, altered transcriptome (and to lesser extent protein) expression of ion transport, barrier, immune, and mast cell mechanisms in small bowel may reflect different alterations in function and deserves further study in IBS-D. PMID:27445342

  16. Pilot study of small bowel mucosal gene expression in patients with irritable bowel syndrome with diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Camilleri, Michael; Carlson, Paula; Valentin, Nelson; Acosta, Andres; O'Neill, Jessica; Eckert, Deborah; Dyer, Roy; Na, Jie; Klee, Eric W; Murray, Joseph A

    2016-09-01

    Prior studies in with irritable bowel syndrome with diarrhea (IBS-D) patients showed immune activation, secretion, and barrier dysfunction in jejunal or colorectal mucosa. We measured mRNA expression by RT-PCR of 91 genes reflecting tight junction proteins, chemokines, innate immunity, ion channels, transmitters, housekeeping genes, and controls for DNA contamination and PCR efficiency in small intestinal mucosa from 15 IBS-D and 7 controls (biopsies negative for celiac disease). Fold change was calculated using 2((-ΔΔCT)) formula. Nominal P values (P < 0.05) were interpreted with false detection rate (FDR) correction (q value). Cluster analysis with Lens for Enrichment and Network Studies (LENS) explored connectivity of mechanisms. Upregulated genes (uncorrected P < 0.05) were related to ion transport (INADL, MAGI1, and SONS1), barrier (TJP1, 2, and 3 and CLDN) or immune functions (TLR3, IL15, and MAPKAPK5), or histamine metabolism (HNMT); downregulated genes were related to immune function (IL-1β, TGF-β1, and CCL20) or antigen detection (TLR1 and 8). The following genes were significantly upregulated (q < 0.05) in IBS-D: INADL, MAGI1, PPP2R5C, MAPKAPK5, TLR3, and IL-15. Among the 14 nominally upregulated genes, there was clustering of barrier and PDZ domains (TJP1, TJP2, TJP3, CLDN4, INADL, and MAGI1) and clustering of downregulated genes (CCL20, TLR1, IL1B, and TLR8). Protein expression of PPP2R5C in nuclear lysates was greater in patients with IBS-D and controls. There was increase in INADL protein (median 9.4 ng/ml) in patients with IBS-D relative to controls (median 5.8 ng/ml, P > 0.05). In conclusion, altered transcriptome (and to lesser extent protein) expression of ion transport, barrier, immune, and mast cell mechanisms in small bowel may reflect different alterations in function and deserves further study in IBS-D.

  17. Early Adaptation of Small Intestine After Massive Small Bowel Resection in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jie; Qin, Zhen; Shan, Hongmei; Xiao, Yongtao; Cai, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Background: It is important that the residual bowel adapts after massive resection. The necessary intestinal adaptation is a progressive recovery from intestinal failure through increase in absorptive surface area and functional capacity and includes both morphological and functional adaptations. Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate intestinal morphological and functional adaptations of small bowel syndrome (SBS) model rats (SBS1W) 7 days after bowel resection. Materials and Methods: Male sprague–dawley rats (n = 20/group) underwent either a 75% proximal small bowel resection (SBS1W group) or a control operation (control group). Markers of morphological adaptation were revealed by TEM analysis of H&E-stained tissue samples. The intestinal barrier condition was assessed by BT, and sIgA concentration in intestinal mucus was measured by ELISA. Contractility and the slow wave rhythm of the entire intestinal remnant were measured and recorded. Results: The SBS1W group experienced more weight loss than control group and had a clearly different intestinal morphology as revealed in TEM images. Compared with control rats, the SBS1W group had a lower sIgA concentration in intestinal mucus and higher BT to lymph nodes (70% vs 40%; level I), portal blood (40% vs 10%; level II), and peripheral blood (60% vs 30%; level III). Disorder of spontaneous rhythmic contraction, irregular amplitude, and slow frequency were detected in the SBS1W group by a muscle strips test. Similarly, the slow wave of the entire intestinal remnant in the SBS1W group was irregular and uncoordinated. Conclusions: The finding of intestinal adaptation following massive SBR in SBS1W rats provides more understanding of the mechanisms of progressive recovery from the intestinal failure that underlies SBS. The mechanical, chemical, immunological, and biological barriers were all impaired at 7 days following bowel resection, indicating that the SBS model rats were still in the intestinal

  18. Retrograde spread of 5-aminosalicylic acid enemas in patients with active ulcerative colitis

    SciTech Connect

    Campieri, M.; Lanfranchi, G.A.; Brignola, C.; Bazzocchi, G.; Gionchetti, P.; Minguzzi, M.R.; Cappello, I.P.; Corbelli, C.; Boschi, S.

    1986-02-01

    In an attempt to know the exact retrograde spread of high-dosage 5-aminosalicylic acid enemas, we have studied eight patients with active left-sided colitis, by adding a small amount of barium sulfate to the enemas and by checking the spread radiologically after 15 minutes, 1 hour, and 6 hours. Four grams of 5-aminosalicylic acid in 100-ml enemas and 4 gm in 200-ml enemas were used. The same experiment was repeated in a subsequent attack, with enemas labeled with technetium-99m and checked by scintiscans in five of these patients. We always have observed a volume-dependent spread of enemas but, interestingly, in the patients studied with technetium-99m there was always a wider spread than that which was detected with barium enemas. In all five patients, 100-ml enemas reached the splenic flexure. In two patients with total colitis, a progression of 100-ml technetium-99m enemas was performed in the transverse colon, but the maximum opacity remained in the left side. We can conclude that 4 gm of 5-aminosalicylic acid in 100-ml enemas can be suitable for treating patients with left-sided colitis, and will represent a valid addition for patients with more extensive colitis.

  19. Durability of the Malone antegrade continence enema in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Wren, Francis J; Reese, Carl T; Decter, Ross M

    2003-03-01

    The Malone antegrade continence enema (MACE) is a therapeutic option to treat chronic constipation and fecal incontinence in patients with neurogenic bowel. Previous reports have described the short-term success of this procedure, but no report has described the durability of the procedure during pregnancy. We present the case of a spinal cord injury patient who underwent an uncomplicated pregnancy after a MACE procedure with no stomal catheterization difficulties or leakage during or after the pregnancy.

  20. Factors affecting poor nutritional status after small bowel resection in patients with Crohn disease.

    PubMed

    Jang, Ki Ung; Yu, Chang Sik; Lim, Seok-Byung; Park, In Ja; Yoon, Yong Sik; Kim, Chan Wook; Lee, Jong Lyul; Yang, Suk-Kyun; Ye, Byong Duk; Kim, Jin Cheon

    2016-07-01

    In Crohn disease, bowel-preserving surgery is necessary to prevent short bowel syndrome due to repeated operations. This study aimed to determine the remnant small bowel length cut-off and to evaluate the clinical factors related to nutritional status after small bowel resection in Crohn disease.We included 394 patients (69.3% male) who underwent small bowel resection for Crohn disease between 1991 and 2012. Patients who were classified as underweight (body mass index < 17.5) or at high risk of nutrition-related problems (modified nutritional risk index < 83.5) were regarded as having a poor nutritional status. Preliminary remnant small bowel length cut-offs were determined using receiver operating characteristic curves. Variables associated with poor nutritional status were assessed retrospectively using Student t tests, chi-squared tests, Fisher exact tests, and logistic regression analyses.The mean follow-up period was 52.9 months and the mean patient ages at the time of the last bowel surgery and last follow-up were 31.2 and 35.7 years, respectively. The mean remnant small bowel length was 331.8 cm. Forty-three patients (10.9%) underwent ileostomy, 309 (78.4%) underwent combined small bowel and colon resection, 111 (28.2%) had currently active disease, and 105 (26.6%) underwent at least 2 operations for recurrent disease. The mean body mass index and modified nutritional risk index were 20.6 and 100.8, respectively. The independent factors affecting underweight status were remnant small bowel length ≤240 cm (odds ratio: 4.84, P < 0.001), ileostomy (odds ratio: 4.70, P < 0.001), and currently active disease (odds ratio: 4.16, P < 0.001). The independent factors affecting high nutritional risk were remnant small bowel length ≤230 cm (odds ratio: 2.84, P = 0.012), presence of ileostomy (odds ratio: 3.36, P = 0.025), and currently active disease (odds ratio: 4.90, P < 0.001).Currently active disease, ileostomy, and remnant small

  1. Double-balloon enteroscopy in small bowel diseases

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wen-Guo; Shan, Guo-Dong; Zhang, Hong; Yang, Ming; L, Lin; Yue, Min; Chen, Guang-Wu; Gu, Qing; Zhu, Hua-Tuo; Xu, Guo-Qiang; Chen, Li-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study was to evaluate the diagnostic and therapeutic value of double-balloon entoroscopy (DBE) in small bowel diseases (SBDs) in China. A retrospective review of 674 consecutive patients who underwent DBE between January 2007 and November 2015 was conducted. Patients were divided into 3 groups by age, young group (<45 years), middle-aged group (45–65 years), and elderly group (>65 years). Data were collected with regard to demographics, clinical, endoscopic findings, complications, diagnostic yield, and management. A total of 729 DBE procedures were performed successfully in our series. More than 20 types of SBDs were found with the detection rate of 70.9%(517/729). The majority of patients were Crohn's disease (33.4%,225/674), followed by tumor (18.8%,127/674) and angioectasia (7.9%, 53/674). Endoscopic treatment was performed in 60 patients in which hemostasis (17,28.3%) and polypectomy (15,25%) were the predominant form of intervention used. Adverse events occurred in 6 patients (0.96%,6/729) including perforation, hemorrhage, aspiration pneumonia. No acute pancreatitis or other major complications occurred. Adenocarcinoma, GIST, and lymphoma were the most common tumor detected, the majority of tumors located in the jejunum (56.7%), The detection rate of angioectasia was also higher in the jejunum (54.7%),77.8% of Crohn's disease was located in the ileum. The positive rate of DBE in small bowel tumor and Crohn's disease were significantly higher than that of angioectasia (P<0.05). In young cohort, Crohn's disease (48.1%) was the most commonly diseases followed by tumor (10.4%) and nonspecific enteritis (7.1%). Yet in the elderly group, the majority of patients were tumor (27.6%); angioectasia (21.3%) was also detected frequently. The positive rate of capsule endoscopy was 75.44 %(202/268) which was a little high than DBE (67.9%, 182/268) (P > 0.05). The obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB) was the most common indication, and

  2. [Non-small bowel lesions detected with capsule endoscopy in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding].

    PubMed

    Juanmartiñena Fernández, J F; Fernández-Urién, I; Saldaña Dueñas, C; Elosua González, A; Borda Martín, A; Vila Costas, J J

    Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding accounts for approximately 5-10% of patients presenting with gastrointestinal haemorrhage. The majority of lesions responsible were found to be located in the small bowel. Currently, capsule en-doscopy is the first-line tool to investigate the small bowel as it is a non-invasive, feasible and simple procedure. Howe-ver, capsule endoscopy sometimes identifies the source of bleeding outside the small bowel and within the reach of conventional endoscopy. We present the case of a 46 year-old man with few prior negative endoscopic procedures and iron-deficiency anaemia due to gastric GIST. PMID:27599960

  3. Effects of high volume saline enemas vs no enema during labour – The N-Ma Randomised Controlled Trial [ISRCTN43153145

    PubMed Central

    Cuervo, Luis Gabriel; Bernal, María del Pilar; Mendoza, Natalia

    2006-01-01

    didn't significantly change episiorraphy dehiscence rates (21/182 [12%] with enema v 32/190 [17%] without enema; P = 0.30). Conclusion This RCT found no evidence to support routine use of enemas during labour. Although these results cannot rule out a small clinical effect, it seems unlikely that enemas will improve maternal and neonatal outcomes and provide an overall benefit. PMID:16545140

  4. Laparoscopy for Small Bowel Obstruction Caused by Single Adhesive Band

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Suk Won

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: There are still concerns about the comparative outcomes of operative treatment (OT) and conservative (nonsurgical) treatment (CT) for small bowel obstruction (SBO), especially that caused by single adhesive bands. We performed a retrospective study to compare surgical with nonsurgical outcomes. Methods: A total of 62 patients were enrolled. The OT group underwent laparoscopy (n = 16), and the CT group (n = 46) did not. We compared early and late outcomes between the 2 groups. Results: Times to first flatus, oral intake, and defecation after treatment were shorter in the OT group (P = .030, .033, and .024), and the recurrence rate was lower in the OT group than in the CT group (6.2% vs 32.6%; P = .038). Time from discharge to first recurrence was longer in the OT group than in the CT group (172 vs 104.6 ± 26.5 days, P = .027). Conclusions: SBO related to a single adhesive band is not effectively treated by CT. However, laparoscopic OT provides notable success if the surgery is performed early. Therefore, it should be the preferred treatment. PMID:27647979

  5. Minimization of small bowel volume within treatment fields utilizing customized belly boards

    SciTech Connect

    Shanahan, T.G.; Mehta, M.P.; Bertelrud, K.L.; Buchler, D.A.; Frank, L.E.; Gehring, M.A.; Kubsad, S.S.; Utrie, P.C.; Kinsella, T.J. )

    1990-08-01

    Thirty consecutive patients with pelvic malignancies were evaluated prospectively for the impact of a novel bowel minimization device (belly board) on the volume of small bowel included within a four field pelvic radiation plan. A customized polyurethane and styrofoam bowel immobilization mold was created for each patient in the prone position. Using contrast enhanced CT scanning on a dedicated radiation treatment planning scanner, we imaged the location of the small intestine in the supine position and the prone position aided by the belly board. Custom in-house interactive image analysis software was developed to allow volumetric determination of small bowel within the treatment portals. The mean small bowel volume was reduced by 66% (299 cm3 to 102 cm3), comparing the standard supine position to the prone position assisted by the belly board. In 13 patients without prior pelvic surgery, the small bowel volume reduction was a more dramatic 74% (334 cm3 to 88 cm3). All patients were found to benefit from this prone belly board setup regardless of body habitus, weight, and age. Compliance with the set-up including use of bladder distension was excellent. All patients completed their pelvic radiotherapy without requiring a treatment break. Weight loss at completion averaged less than 5%. Seventy-six percent of patients experienced little or no diarrhea. This technique is comfortable, inexpensive, highly reproducible, and permits maximal bowel displacement from standard pelvic radiotherapy fields.

  6. Genetic risks and familial associations of small bowel carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Shenoy, Santosh

    2016-01-01

    Adenocarcinoma of small intestines (SBA) is a relatively rare malignancy with poor outcomes due to delayed diagnosis. Fifty percent of patients have metastases on presentation and therefore early detection and treatment offers the best long term outcomes. Certain genetic polyposis syndromes and familial diseases are associated with increased risks for SBA. These include familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), Lynch syndromes (LS), Juvenile polyposis syndrome, Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, Crohn’s disease (CD) and celiac disease. Mutations in APC gene, Mismatch repair genes, STK11 gene, and SMAD4 gene have been implicated for the genetic diseases respectively. While there are no specific inherited genetic mutations for CD, genome-wide association studies have established over 140 loci associated with CD. CpG island mutations with defects in mismatch repair genes have been identified in celiac disease. Significant diagnostic advances have occurred in the past decade and intuitively, it would seem beneficial to use these advanced modalities for surveillance of these patients. At present it is debatable and no clear data exists to support this approach except for established guidelines to diagnose duodenal polyps in FAP, and LS. Here we discuss the genetic alterations, cancer risks, signaling mechanisms and briefly touch the surveillance modalities available for these genetic and clinical syndromes. English language articles from PubMed/Medline and Embase was searched were collected using the phrases “small-bowel adenocarcinoma, genetics, surveillance, familial adenomatous polyposis, lynch syndromes, Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, juvenile polyposis syndrome, CD and celiac disease”. Figures, tables and schematic diagram to illustrate pathways are included in the review. PMID:27326320

  7. Genetic risks and familial associations of small bowel carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Shenoy, Santosh

    2016-06-15

    Adenocarcinoma of small intestines (SBA) is a relatively rare malignancy with poor outcomes due to delayed diagnosis. Fifty percent of patients have metastases on presentation and therefore early detection and treatment offers the best long term outcomes. Certain genetic polyposis syndromes and familial diseases are associated with increased risks for SBA. These include familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), Lynch syndromes (LS), Juvenile polyposis syndrome, Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, Crohn's disease (CD) and celiac disease. Mutations in APC gene, Mismatch repair genes, STK11 gene, and SMAD4 gene have been implicated for the genetic diseases respectively. While there are no specific inherited genetic mutations for CD, genome-wide association studies have established over 140 loci associated with CD. CpG island mutations with defects in mismatch repair genes have been identified in celiac disease. Significant diagnostic advances have occurred in the past decade and intuitively, it would seem beneficial to use these advanced modalities for surveillance of these patients. At present it is debatable and no clear data exists to support this approach except for established guidelines to diagnose duodenal polyps in FAP, and LS. Here we discuss the genetic alterations, cancer risks, signaling mechanisms and briefly touch the surveillance modalities available for these genetic and clinical syndromes. English language articles from PubMed/Medline and Embase was searched were collected using the phrases "small-bowel adenocarcinoma, genetics, surveillance, familial adenomatous polyposis, lynch syndromes, Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, juvenile polyposis syndrome, CD and celiac disease". Figures, tables and schematic diagram to illustrate pathways are included in the review. PMID:27326320

  8. Comparison of the Clinical Characteristics of Patients with Small Bowel and Gastric Anisakiasis in Jeju Island

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Taeyun; Jeong, Seung Uk; Choi, Eun Kwang; Cho, Yoo-Kyung; Kim, Heung Up; Song, Byung-Cheol; Kim, Kwang Sig; Kim, Bong Soo; Kim, Young Ree

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims Anisakiasis is frequent in Jeju Island because of the people's habit of ingesting raw fish. This study evaluated the clinical characteristics of patients with small bowel anisakiasis and compared them with those of patients with gastric anisakiasis. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 109 patients diagnosed with anisakiasis between May 2003 and November 2011. Results Of the 109 patients diagnosed with anisakiasis, those with suspicious anisakiasis (n=38) or possible anisakiasis (n=12) were excluded. The age and gender distributions did not differ between patients with small bowel anisakiasis (n=30; age, 45±13 years) and those with gastric anisakiasis (n=29; age, 46±10 years). The mean duration of hospitalization was 5.4±4.3 days for patients with small bowel anisakiasis and 0.5±1.7 days for patients with gastric anisakiasis. Small bowel anisakiasis was accompanied by leukocytosis (76.7% vs 25.5%, p=0.003) and elevated C-reactive protein levels (3.4±3.2 mg/dL vs 0.5±0.3 mg/dL, p=0.009). Contrast-enhanced abdominopelvic computed tomography showed small bowel wall thickening with dilatation in 93.3% (28/30) of patients and a small amount of ascites in 80.0% (24/30) of patients with small bowel anisakiasis. Conclusions Compared with gastric anisakiasis patients, small bowel anisakiasis patients had a longer hospitalization time, higher inflammatory marker levels, and small bowel wall thickening with ascites. PMID:23423474

  9. Value of cine MRI for better visualization of the proximal small bowel in normal individuals.

    PubMed

    Torkzad, Michael R; Vargas, Roberto; Tanaka, Chikako; Blomqvist, Lennart

    2007-11-01

    While enteroclysis seems to be the most efficacious method in achieving bowel distension, enterographic methods have become widespread due to the unpleasantness of enteroclysis and the radiation involved with positioning the catheter. Cine images in MRI can be done without radiation. Our aim is to see if and how cine MR imaging can improve visualization of bowel loops by capturing them while distended. Ten healthy individuals were asked to drink up to 2,000 ml of an oral solution made locally over a 60-min period. Then they underwent MRI using coronal balanced fast field echo (b-FFE) covering small bowel loops. If the initial exam revealed collapsed bowel loops an additional 50 mg of erythromycine was given intravenously with the subject still in the scanner and then cine imaging was performed. The degree of distension of different segments of the small bowel was measured before and after cine imaging and compared. The distension score was significantly higher after addition of the cine images as well, being only significant for depiction of the duodenum and jejunum. Our preliminary study suggests that cine MRI can give better image depiction of the proximal small bowel in healthy volunteers, perhaps circumventing the need for enteroclysis in some cases. There is a need for validation of these results in patients with small bowel disease. PMID:17661052

  10. A concealed small bowel perforation in an adult secondary to bicycle handlebar trauma

    PubMed Central

    Nolan, GJ; Simpson, RR

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic abdominal wall hernia (TAWH) secondary to bicycle handlebar is a rare injury. The majority of the literature describes abdominal wall herniation in children. We present a rare case of TAWH in an adult with a concealed small bowel perforation. Although clinical examination in conjunction with computed tomography can exclude the majority of solid organ injuries, small bowel injuries can often be missed. Our case initially revealed a serosal tear in the small bowel but, on close inspection, a separate 3mm perforation was identified, hidden in the small bowel mesentery. We strongly support a low threshold for operative intervention if there is any suspicion. Moreover, we stress the importance of meticulous examination during laparotomy as this injury could have been easily missed, resulting in potential morbidity or mortality in a patient sustaining such an injury. PMID:23676803

  11. Small Bowel Neuroendocrine Tumors with Inguinal Metastases: A Diagnostic and Therapeutic Dilemma.

    PubMed

    Inayat, Faisal; Daly, Kevin P; Askarian, Farhad; Saif, Muhammad W

    2016-01-01

    Small bowel neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are frequently characterized by a strong propensity to metastasize to the liver, mesentery, and peritoneum. However, only a few extra-abdominal metastatic sites have been reported in the published literature. The present paper implicates that primary small bowel NETs may unusually metastasize to the inguinal lymph nodes. Furthermore, we discuss the formidable diagnostic and therapeutic challenges associated with the metastatic NETs. PMID:27555990

  12. Small Bowel Neuroendocrine Tumors with Inguinal Metastases: A Diagnostic and Therapeutic Dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Daly, Kevin P; Askarian, Farhad; Saif, Muhammad W

    2016-01-01

    Small bowel neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are frequently characterized by a strong propensity to metastasize to the liver, mesentery, and peritoneum. However, only a few extra-abdominal metastatic sites have been reported in the published literature. The present paper implicates that primary small bowel NETs may unusually metastasize to the inguinal lymph nodes. Furthermore, we discuss the formidable diagnostic and therapeutic challenges associated with the metastatic NETs. PMID:27555990

  13. A potential association between exposure to hepatitis B virus and small bowel adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    DeFilippis, Ersilia M.; Mehta, Mamta

    2016-01-01

    Chronic infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) has never been described as a risk factor for small bowel adenocarcinoma, although infection is a known risk factor for hepatocellular carcinoma. From May 2009 to December 2014, we implemented an institution-wide screening program for hepatitis B viral serologies prior to starting chemotherapy. Evidence of exposure [hepatitis B core antibody (anti-HBc) positivity in the absence of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) positivity] was highest in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (21.1%), followed by small bowel cancer (12.5%). The small bowel adenocarcinoma cases with anti-HBc positivity were reviewed. Special attention was paid to known risk factors for small bowel cancers. One patient had a diagnosis of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). However, the other patients had no genetic syndromes, history of inflammatory bowel disease or other chronic inflammation to explain their risk. We postulate exposure to bile acids, tumorigenesis of hepatocytes and cholangiocytes, and/or damage to the intestinal mucosa secondary to HBV exposure/infection as potential mechanisms for development of small bowel adenocarcinoma. More research is warranted to further elucidate this association. PMID:27284484

  14. Irritable Bowel Syndrome and the Small Intestinal Microflora. What Do We Know?

    PubMed

    Moraru, Ioana G; Moraru, A G; Dumitraşcu, D L

    2015-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome, one of the most common functional gastro intestinal disorders all over the world is considered to have a multi factorial pathogenesis. Recently more and more studies are focusing on the changes that take place in the microbiota of patients with irritable bowel syndrome, underlining the bacterial role in this pathogenesis. As a consequence, bacterial overgrowth, along with intestinal dysmotility, altered brain-gut axis and genetic factors are considered part of this pathophysiology. This report intends to summarize the actual knowledge on irritable bowel syndrome and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth syndrome, from details on the epidemiology, clinical manifestation, pathophysiology, diagnosis, treatment to details on the relationship between these two syndromes.

  15. Exercise capacity in patients undergoing proctocolectomy and small bowel resection for Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Brevinge, H; Berglund, B; Bosaeus, I; Tölli, J; Nordgren, S; Lundholm, K

    1995-08-01

    The effect of proctocolectomy and small bowel resection on working capacity has not been assessed objectively in previous research. Twenty-nine patients with Crohn's disease were investigated with cycle ergometry and a questionnaire, following proctocolectomy with and without small bowel resection. Maximal exercise load is known to correspond well with working capacity, particularly when account is taken of body composition and metabolic variables. Maximal exercise load was reduced marginally (by 9 per cent) in patients without small bowel resection and by 22 per cent in patients with moderate small bowel resection (15-30 per cent resection). Patients with extensive bowel resection (more than 50 per cent) had a 40 per cent reduction in the maximal exercise load. This reduction in maximal exercise load was greater than predicted when accounting for reduction in muscle mass. All patients had a normal oxygen uptake including resting energy expenditure. Urinary sodium and magnesium excretion was low in the group with moderate bowel resection, whereas the extensively resected patients were malnourished and had a reduced body cell mass. The authors conclude that the significantly reduced working capacity was of multifactorial origin secondary to malabsorption. However, the patients seemed unaware of the degree of their diminished working capacity. This reduced capacity makes it unlikely that they would be able to perform any labour involving high energy consumption at the level of 500-700 W, and this inability was reflected by a high rate of unemployment among the patients.

  16. A rare cause of small bowel obstruction due to bezoar in a virgin abdomen

    PubMed Central

    Nasri, Baongoc; Calin, Marius; Shah, Ajay; Gilchrist, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Bezoar is an unusual cause of small bowel obstruction accounting for 0.4–4% of all mechanical bowel obstruction. The common site of obstruction is terminal ileum. Case report A 28-year-old male with no past surgical history, known to have severe mental retardation presented with anorexia. CT scan demonstrated dilated small bowel loops and intraluminal ileal mass with mottled appearance. At exploratory laparotomy, a bezoar was found impacted in the terminal ileum 5–6 inches away from the ileocecal valve and was removed through an enterotomy. Discussion Bezoars are concretions of fibers or foreign bodies in the alimentary tract. Small bowel obstruction is one of common clinical symptoms. The typical finding of well-defined intraluminal mass with mottled gas pattern in CT scan is suggestive of an intestinal bezoar. The treatment option of bezoar is surgery including manual fragmentation of bezoar and pushing it toward cecum, enterotomy or segmental bowel resection. Thorough exploration of abdominal cavity should be done to exclude the presence of concomitant bezoars. Recurrence is common unless underlying predisposing condition is corrected. Conclusions Bezoar-induced small bowel obstruction remains an uncommon diagnosis. It should be suspected in patients with an increased risk of bezoar formation, such as in the presence of previous gastric surgery, a history suggestive of increased fiber intake, or patient with psychiatric disorders. CT scan is helpful for preoperative diagnosis. PMID:26764889

  17. Radiation Dose-Volume Effects in the Stomach and Small Bowel

    SciTech Connect

    Kavanagh, Brian D.; Pan, Charlie C.; Dawson, Laura A.; Das, Shiva K.; Li, X. Allen; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Miften, Moyed

    2010-03-01

    Published data suggest that the risk of moderately severe (>=Grade 3) radiation-induced acute small-bowel toxicity can be predicted with a threshold model whereby for a given dose level, D, if the volume receiving that dose or greater (VD) exceeds a threshold quantity, the risk of toxicity escalates. Estimates of VD depend on the means of structure segmenting (e.g., V15 = 120 cc if individual bowel loops are outlined or V45 = 195 cc if entire peritoneal potential space of bowel is outlined). A similar predictive model of acute toxicity is not available for stomach. Late small-bowel/stomach toxicity is likely related to maximum dose and/or volume threshold parameters qualitatively similar to those related to acute toxicity risk. Concurrent chemotherapy has been associated with a higher risk of acute toxicity, and a history of abdominal surgery has been associated with a higher risk of late toxicity.

  18. Small-bowel dislocation during long-term MRI observation - insights in intestinal physiology.

    PubMed

    Bickelhaupt, Sebastian; Froehlich, Johannes M; Wentz, Klaus-Ulrich; von Weymarn, Constantin; Patak, Michael A

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the abdomen is a widely established imaging modality in the diagnostic workup of patients suffering from abdominal disorders. Small-bowel motility analyses using MRI have recently been introduced to provide functional information about the intestine not provided by morphological analyses. This is of clinical importance as motility disorders correlate with inflammation. Yet motility analyses mainly rely on a series of acquisitions in coronal orientation. Temporal displacement of small-bowel loops out of the coronal slice could falsify qualitative and quantitative motility analyses. Thus, our study quantified three-dimensional (3D) dislocation of small-bowel loops during abdominal MRI examinations with the patient lying in prone position to investigate its influence on motility analyses. Our study revealed segmental small-bowel displacement during MRI examinations in prone position to predominantly occur in craniocaudal orientation and in a smaller extent in lateral and ventrodorsal orientation. However, the displacement amplitudes are rather small and might not significantly influence small-bowel motility analyses in 2D coronal plane in general. PMID:24418110

  19. Lymphangioma of the small bowel mesentery: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Suthiwartnarueput, Worapop; Kiatipunsodsai, Siriphut; Kwankua, Amolchaya; Chaumrattanakul, Utairat

    2012-11-21

    Lymphangioma is a rare benign condition characterized by proliferation of lymphatic spaces. It is usually found in the head and neck of affected children. Lymphangioma of the small-bowel mesentery is rare, having been reported for less than 1% of all lymphangiomas. Importantly, it can cause fatal complications such as volvulus or involvement of the main branch of the mesenteric arteries, requiring emergency surgery. Moreover, the gross and histopathologic findings may resemble benign multicystic mesothelioma and lymphangiomyoma. Immunohistochemical study for factor VIII-related antigen, D2-40, calretinin and human melanoma black-45 (HMB-45) are essential for diagnosis. Factor VIII-related antigen and D2-40 are positive in lymphangioma but negative in benign multicystic mesothelioma. HMB-45 shows positive study in the smooth-muscle cells around the lymphatic spaces of the lymphangiomyoma. We report a case of small-bowel volvulus induced by mesenteric lymphangioma in a 2-year-and-9-mo-old boy who presented with rapid abdominal distension and vomiting. The abdominal computed tomography scan showed a multiseptated mass at the right lower quadrant with a whirl-like small-bowel dilatation, suggestive of a mesenteric cyst with midgut volvulus. The intraoperative findings revealed a huge, lobulated, yellowish pink, cystic mass measuring 20 cm × 20 cm × 10 cm, that was originated from the small bowel mesentery with small-bowel volvulus and small-bowel dilatation. Cut surface of the mass revealed multicystic spaces containing a milky white fluid. The patient underwent tumor removal with small-bowel resection and end-to-end anastomosis. Microscopic examination revealed that the cystic walls were lined with flat endothelial cells and comprised of smooth muscle in the walls. The flat endothelial cells were positive for factor VIII-related antigen and D2-40 but negative for calretinin. HMB-45 showed negative study in the smooth-muscle cells around the lymphatic spaces. Thus

  20. Methods for the assessment of small-bowel and colonic transit.

    PubMed

    Szarka, Lawrence A; Camilleri, Michael

    2012-03-01

    Transit assessment of the small intestine and colon is relevant in the study of physiology, pathophysiology, and pharmacodynamics, and there is increasing use of small-bowel and colonic transit measurements in clinical practice as well. The main methods that are applied in clinical practice are substrate-hydrogen breath tests for small-bowel transit and radiopaque markers for colonic transit. Over the past 2-3 decades, scintigraphy has become the preferred standard in research studies, particularly for studies of pathophysiology and pharmacodynamics. New approaches include experimental stable isotope measurement of orocecal transit and the recently approved method using a wireless motility capsule that is validated as an accurate measurement of small-bowel and colonic transit. PMID:22293166

  1. From Capsule Endoscopy to Balloon-Assisted Deep Enteroscopy: Exploring Small-Bowel Endoscopic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Cooley, D. Matthew; Walker, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    In the past 15 years, the use of endoscopic evaluations in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding has become more common. Indications for further endoscopic interventions include iron deficiency anemia, suspicion of Crohn’s disease or small-bowel tumors, assessment of celiac disease or of ulcers induced by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and screening for familial adenomatous polyposis. Often, capsule endoscopy is performed in concert with other endoscopic studies and can guide decisions regarding whether enteroscopy should be carried out in an anterograde or a retrograde approach. Retrograde endoscopy is beneficial in dealing with disease of the more distal small bowel. Multiple studies have examined the diagnostic yield of balloon-assisted deep enteroscopy and have estimated a diagnostic yield of 40% to 80%. Some of the studies have found that diagnostic yields are higher when capsule endoscopy is performed before balloon-assisted deep enteroscopy in a search for small-bowel bleeds. Each of these procedures has a role when performed alone; however, research suggests that they are especially effective as complementary techniques and together can provide better-directed therapy. Both procedures are relatively safe, with high diagnostic and therapeutic yields that allow evaluation of the small bowel. Because both interventions are relatively new to the world of gastroenterology, much research remains to be done regarding their overall efficacy, cost, and safety, as well as further indications for their use in the detection and treatment of diseases of the small bowel. PMID:27099585

  2. 21 CFR 876.5210 - Enema kit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Enema kit. 876.5210 Section 876.5210 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5210 Enema kit. (a) Identification. An enema kit is...

  3. 21 CFR 876.5210 - Enema kit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Enema kit. 876.5210 Section 876.5210 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5210 Enema kit. (a) Identification. An enema kit is...

  4. 21 CFR 876.5210 - Enema kit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Enema kit. 876.5210 Section 876.5210 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5210 Enema kit. (a) Identification. An enema kit is...

  5. 21 CFR 876.5210 - Enema kit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Enema kit. 876.5210 Section 876.5210 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5210 Enema kit. (a) Identification. An enema kit is...

  6. Inpatient capsule endoscopy leads to frequent incomplete small bowel examinations

    PubMed Central

    Yazici, Cemal; Losurdo, John; Brown, Michael D; Oosterveen, Scott; Rahimi, Robert; Keshavarzian, Ali; Bozorgnia, Leila; Mutlu, Ece

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To examine the predictive factors of capsule endoscopy (CE) completion rate (CECR) including the effect of inpatient and outpatient status. METHODS: We identified 355 consecutive patients who completed CE at Rush University Medical Center between March 2003 and October 2005. Subjects for CE had either nothing by mouth or clear liquids for the afternoon and evening of the day before the procedure. CE exams were reviewed by two physicians who were unaware of the study hypotheses. After retrospective analysis, 21 cases were excluded due to capsule malfunction, prior gastric surgery, endoscopic capsule placement or insufficient data. Of the remaining 334 exams [264 out-patient (OP), 70 in-patient (IP)], CE indications, findings, location of the patients [IP vs OP and intensive care unit (ICU) vs general medical floor (GMF)] and gastrointestinal transit times were analyzed. Statistical analysis was completed using SPSS version 17 (Chicago, IL). Chi-square, t test or fisher exact-tests were used as appropriate. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to identify variables associated with incomplete CE exams. RESULTS: The mean age for the entire study population was 54.7 years. Sixty-one percent of the study population was female, and gender was not different between IPs vs OPs (P = 0.07). The overall incomplete CECR was 14% in our study. Overt obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGB) was significantly more common for the IP CE (P = 0.0001), while abdominal pain and assessment of IBD were more frequent indications for the OP CE exams (P = 0.002 and P = 0.01, respectively). Occult OGB was the most common indication and arteriovenous malformations were the most common finding both in the IPs and OPs. The capsule did not enter the small bowel (SB) in 6/70 IPs and 8/264 OPs (P = 0.04). The capsule never reached the cecum in 31.4% (22/70) of IP vs 9.5% (25/ 264) of OP examinations (P < 0.001). The mean gastric transit time (GTT) was delayed in IPs compared to

  7. Ethanol inhibition of glucose absorption in isolated, perfused small bowel of rats

    SciTech Connect

    Cobb, C.F.; Van Thiel, D.H.; Wargo, J.

    1983-08-01

    There is evidence for both humans and rats that malnutrition frequently occurs when ethanol is chronically ingested. Small bowel /sup 14/C-labelled glucose absorption was measured with an ex vivo system in which the small bowel of the rat was surgically removed and then arterially perfused with an artificial medium. Glucose absorption for a control group of seven rats was 248 +/- 8 microM/min/gm dry weight of small bowel (mean +/- SEM). This was significantly greater than the value 112 +/- 12 microM/min/gm dry weight (P less than 0.005) for a group of five rats in which a competitive inhibitor of glucose absorption, phlorizin (0.2 mM), was added to the bowel lumen. In the presence of 3% ethanol within the gut lumen of five rats, glucose absorption was also reduced (to 131 +/- 12 microM/min/gm dry weight) compared to absorption in the control group (P less than 0.005). The calculated amount of glucose absorbed was corrected for metabolism to lactate and carbon dioxide. We conclude that both phlorizin and ethanol inhibit glucose absorption in the isolated and perfused small bowel of rats and that probably at least part of the malnutrition in ethanol-fed rats is due to glucose malabsorption.

  8. [Mesenteric infarction of the small bowel in the course of portal vein thrombosis - a case report].

    PubMed

    Iyluk, Andrzej; Jagielski, Wojciech

    2013-01-01

    Portal vein thrombosis is a rare entity, usually concomitant with hepatic cirrhosis and malignancies. Spontaneous disease occurs very rarely, and it presents with venous small bowel mesenteric infarction, causing intestinal ischaemia extremely rarely. We present a patient who was operated on because of symptoms and signs of "acute abdomen" and in whom segmental ischaemia of the small bowel and mesenteric thrombosis were found intraoperatively. The correct diagnosis, mesenteric infarction of the small bowel in the course of portal vein thrombosis, was made after performing an abdominal computer tomography scan a week after surgery. The course of the treatment, complications, and data from the literature are presented about this very rare condition, which may constitute a difficult diagnostic problem for a surgeon.

  9. Bedside placement of small-bowel feeding tube in Intensive Care Unit for enteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Gokhale, Antara; Kantoor, Sandeep; Prakash, Sadanandan; Manhas, Yogesh; Chandwani, Juhi; Mahmoud, Ashraf Ezzat

    2016-06-01

    Enteral nutrition is the preferred mode of nutrition in critically ill patients whenever feasible as it has a number of advantages over parenteral feeding. Both gastric and small-bowel feeding can effectively deliver calories. In patients with gastroparesis, small-bowel feeding can help avoid parenteral feeding. We carried out a retrospective observational study to assess the ability to insert the Tiger 2 tube into the small bowel at the bedside in 25 patients who failed to tolerate gastric feeds. The time taken, rate of successful insertion, and ability to feed these patients using a standardized feeding protocol were noted. Success rate of insertion was 78% and feeding could be established. This method reduced the delays and risks associated with transportation and dependence on other specialties. PMID:27390461

  10. Newly Developed Endoscopic Treatment for Small Bowel Polyps: Cold Snare Polypectomy.

    PubMed

    Sato, Junichi; Hirooka, Yoshiki; Watanabe, Osamu; Nakamura, Masanao; Yamamura, Takeshi; Funasaka, Kohei; Ohno, Eizaburo; Kawashima, Hiroki; Miyahara, Ryoji; Goto, Hidemi

    2016-01-01

    A 72-year-old man with the history of small bowel carcinoma was diagnosed to have a sessile polyp in the jejunum during a follow-up examination. We performed double-balloon endoscopy and removed the polyp by means of cold snare polypectomy. The follow-up endoscopy showed no residual lesion. Cold snare polypectomy has been established as a safe and effective method for the endoscopic treatment of colonic polyps with a low risk of causing electrocautery burns and perforation. However, this technique has not yet been applied for small bowel lesions. This case report, for the first time, shows the feasibility of performing cold snare polypectomy for small bowel polyps. PMID:27629953

  11. Bedside placement of small-bowel feeding tube in Intensive Care Unit for enteral nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Gokhale, Antara; Kantoor, Sandeep; Prakash, Sadanandan; Manhas, Yogesh; Chandwani, Juhi; Mahmoud, Ashraf Ezzat

    2016-01-01

    Enteral nutrition is the preferred mode of nutrition in critically ill patients whenever feasible as it has a number of advantages over parenteral feeding. Both gastric and small-bowel feeding can effectively deliver calories. In patients with gastroparesis, small-bowel feeding can help avoid parenteral feeding. We carried out a retrospective observational study to assess the ability to insert the Tiger 2 tube into the small bowel at the bedside in 25 patients who failed to tolerate gastric feeds. The time taken, rate of successful insertion, and ability to feed these patients using a standardized feeding protocol were noted. Success rate of insertion was 78% and feeding could be established. This method reduced the delays and risks associated with transportation and dependence on other specialties. PMID:27390461

  12. Gastric emptying rate and small bowel transit time in patients with irritable bowel syndrome determined with 99mTc-labeled pellets and scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, O.H.; Gjorup, T.; Christensen, F.N.

    1986-12-01

    A new method employing 99mTc-labeled pellets for determination of the gastric emptying rate and small bowel transit time is described. The participants were six normal subjects and 16 patients with irritable bowel syndrome (eight with diarrhea and eight with obstipation as the primary complaint). The gastric emptying rate was the same in the three groups. The patients in the obstipation group had a significantly longer small bowel transit time than the normals (P less than 0.02) and the patients in the diarrhea group (P less than 0.01). There was no demonstrable difference between the small bowel transit time in the normals and in the patients in the diarrhea group.

  13. Small-bowel Diverticulosis:Imaging Findings and Review of Three Cases

    PubMed Central

    De Peuter, B.; Box, I.; Vanheste, R.; Dymarkowski, S.

    2009-01-01

    Complicated small-bowel diverticulosis is a rather uncommon cause of upper abdominal pain. It may lead to symptoms presenting with an acute onset or to chronic and nonspecific complaints. As the presentation is often similar to other pathologies (acute appendicitis, pancreatitis, or acute cholecystis) and in many cases diagnosis is made on basis of surgical findings, careful analysis of the imaging landmarks may be warranted to aid in the early stages of detection. In this report, we present clinical and morphological findings in three patients where small-bowel diverticulitis was surgically proven. The relevant literature is reviewed, and typical imaging properties are discussed. PMID:19657452

  14. Dental impression material: a rare cause of small-bowel obstruction.

    PubMed

    Dent, Lemuel; Peterson, Analeta; Pruett, Danica; Beech, Derrick

    2009-12-01

    Small-bowel obstruction due to foreign bodies is unusual in adults. Intestinal obstruction is occasionally caused by pits, bezoars, endoscopy capsules, and gastrostomy tube buttons. We report a rare case of distal small-bowel obstruction due to dental impression material. Avoidance of this potentially life-threatening complication may be achieved by increased vigilance in accounting for all impression material when dental impression trays are removed. Early detection of swallowed dental material may afford endoscopic removal from the stomach, thus preventing intestinal obstruction.

  15. First Case of Small Bowel Sarcomatoid Carcinoma Found by Video Capsule Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Mohit; Parikh, Dhavan A.; Jess, Heidi; Mann, Surinder K.

    2012-01-01

    Sarcomatoid carcinoma of the small bowel is extremely rare. We report the first case of sarcomatoid carcinoma identified by video capsule endoscopy in a patient referred for obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. Computed tomography and small bowel follow through failed to identify the tumor. The tumor was visualized initially on video capsule endoscopy examination and a 6 x 3 cm polypoid, fungating mass with irregular borders was retrieved on surgical resection. Microscopic examination showed sheets of pleomorphic spindled to epitheliod cells staining positive for cytokeritin and vimentin, indicative of sarcomatoid carcinoma. Forty-one months after surgical resection the patient continued to be free of metastatic disease.

  16. Bag and loop small bowel contouring strategies differentially estimate small bowel dose for post-hysterectomy women receiving pencil beam scanning proton therapy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Melody J; Kirk, Maura; Zhai, Huifang; Lin, Lilie L

    2016-07-01

    Background Small bowel (SB) dose-volume relationships established during initial computed tomography (CT) simulations may change throughout therapy due to organ displacement and motion. We investigated the impact of organ motion on SB dose-volume histograms (DVHs) in women with gynecologic malignancies treated with pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy and compared PBS SB DVHs to intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Material and methods Post-hysterectomy patients (n = 11) treated for gynecologic cancers were enrolled on an image-guided proton therapy protocol involving CT simulation with full (CTF) and empty (CTE) bladders and weekly/biweekly on-treatment scans. IMRT plans were generated for comparative analysis. SB was contoured as bowel loops or bowel bag. Wilcoxon signed-rank tests were used for matched-pair comparisons of SB, bladder, and rectum dose-volumes between CT scans and between PBS and IMRT plans. Results In PBS loops analysis, on-treatment DVH was significantly higher than CTF for doses <45 Gy (p < 0.05), and not significantly different than CTE. Specifically, V15 for loops was higher on-treatment (median 240 cm(3)) compared to CTF (median 169 cm(3), p = 0.03). In PBS bag analysis, on-treatment DVH was not significantly different from CTF across all dose ranges. Bowel bag V45 was not significantly different between on-treatment (median 540 cm(3)) and CTF (median 499 cm(3), p = 0.53). Decreasing bladder volume was associated with increasing V15 for loops and V45 for bowel bag (p < 0.005, both). Comparing PBS and IMRT, PBS resulted in significantly lower DVHs at low dose regions (<38 Gy) and higher DVHs at high dose regions (42.5-45.5 Gy) in both loops and bag analysis. IMRT plans demonstrated higher on-treatment SB loop DVHs and only minimal differences in bowel bag DVHs compared to CTF. Conclusions SB DVHs were well estimated by CTF bowel bag and underestimated by CTF loops in the setting of inconsistent

  17. Bag and loop small bowel contouring strategies differentially estimate small bowel dose for post-hysterectomy women receiving pencil beam scanning proton therapy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Melody J; Kirk, Maura; Zhai, Huifang; Lin, Lilie L

    2016-07-01

    Background Small bowel (SB) dose-volume relationships established during initial computed tomography (CT) simulations may change throughout therapy due to organ displacement and motion. We investigated the impact of organ motion on SB dose-volume histograms (DVHs) in women with gynecologic malignancies treated with pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy and compared PBS SB DVHs to intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Material and methods Post-hysterectomy patients (n = 11) treated for gynecologic cancers were enrolled on an image-guided proton therapy protocol involving CT simulation with full (CTF) and empty (CTE) bladders and weekly/biweekly on-treatment scans. IMRT plans were generated for comparative analysis. SB was contoured as bowel loops or bowel bag. Wilcoxon signed-rank tests were used for matched-pair comparisons of SB, bladder, and rectum dose-volumes between CT scans and between PBS and IMRT plans. Results In PBS loops analysis, on-treatment DVH was significantly higher than CTF for doses <45 Gy (p < 0.05), and not significantly different than CTE. Specifically, V15 for loops was higher on-treatment (median 240 cm(3)) compared to CTF (median 169 cm(3), p = 0.03). In PBS bag analysis, on-treatment DVH was not significantly different from CTF across all dose ranges. Bowel bag V45 was not significantly different between on-treatment (median 540 cm(3)) and CTF (median 499 cm(3), p = 0.53). Decreasing bladder volume was associated with increasing V15 for loops and V45 for bowel bag (p < 0.005, both). Comparing PBS and IMRT, PBS resulted in significantly lower DVHs at low dose regions (<38 Gy) and higher DVHs at high dose regions (42.5-45.5 Gy) in both loops and bag analysis. IMRT plans demonstrated higher on-treatment SB loop DVHs and only minimal differences in bowel bag DVHs compared to CTF. Conclusions SB DVHs were well estimated by CTF bowel bag and underestimated by CTF loops in the setting of inconsistent

  18. Quantification, validation, and follow-up of small bowel motility in Crohn's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerrolaza, Juan J.; Peng, Jennifer Q.; Safdar, Nabile M.; Conklin, Laurie; Sze, Raymond; Linguraru, Marius George

    2015-03-01

    The use of magnetic resonance enterography (MRE) has become a mainstay in the evaluation, assessment and follow up of inflammatory bowel diseases, such as Crohn's disease (CD), thanks to its high image quality and its non-ionizing nature. In particular, the advent of faster MRE sequences less sensitive to image-motion artifacts offers the possibility to obtain visual, structural and functional information of the patient's small bowel. However, the inherent subjectivity of the mere visual inspection of these images often hinders the accurate identification and monitoring of the pathological areas. In this paper, we present a framework that provides quantitative and objective motility information of the small bowel from free-breathing MRE dynamic sequences. After compensating for the breathing motion of the patient, we create personalized peristaltic activity maps via optical flow analysis. The result is the creation of a new set of images providing objective and precise functional information of the small bowel. The accuracy of the new method was also evaluated from two different perspectives: objective accuracy (1.1 ± 0.6 mm/s of error), i.e., the ability of the system to provide quantitative and accurate information about the motility of moving bowel landmarks, and subjective accuracy (avg. difference of 0.7 ± 0.7 in a range of 1 to 5), i.e., the degree of agreement with the subjective evaluation of an expert. Finally, the practical utility of the new method was successfully evaluated in a preliminary study with 32 studies of healthy and CD cases, showing its potential for the fast and accurate assessment and follow up of CD in the small bowel.

  19. Non-invasive quantification of small bowel water content by MRI: a validation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoad, C. L.; Marciani, L.; Foley, S.; Totman, J. J.; Wright, J.; Bush, D.; Cox, E. F.; Campbell, E.; Spiller, R. C.; Gowland, P. A.

    2007-12-01

    Substantial water fluxes across the small intestine occur during digestion of food, but so far measuring these has required invasive intubation techniques. This paper describes a non-invasive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique for measuring small bowel water content which has been validated using naso-duodenal infusion. Eighteen healthy volunteers were intubated, with the tube position being verified by MRI. After a baseline MRI scan, each volunteer had eight 40 ml boluses of a non-absorbable mannitol and saline solution infused into their proximal small bowel with an MRI scan being acquired after each bolus. The MRI sequence used was an adapted magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography sequence. The image data were thresholded to allow for intra- and inter-subject signal variations. The MRI measured volumes were then compared to the known infused volumes. This MRI technique gave excellent images of the small bowel, which closely resemble those obtained using conventional radiology with barium contrast. The mean difference between the measured MRI volumes and infused volumes was 2% with a standard deviation of 10%. The maximum 95% limits of agreement between observers were -15% to +17% while measurements by the same operator on separate occasions differed by only 4%. This new technique can now be applied to study alterations in small bowel fluid absorption and secretion due to gastrointestinal disease or drug intervention.

  20. Left-sided transmesocolic herniation of small bowel in an otherwise unaffected abdomen.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Akshay Anand; Sonkar, Abhinav Arun; Singh, Kul Ranjan; Rai, Anurag

    2015-05-15

    Transmesocolic hernia is an uncommon type of internal hernia with incidence ranging from approximately 5-10%. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a transmesocolic hernia through a gap within the descending mesocolon presenting clinically as an intestinal obstruction. A 75-year-old man was admitted with clinical features of intestinal obstruction. An abdominal X-ray showed multiple small bowel loops with air fluid levels. Contrast-enhanced CT of the abdomen revealed small bowel obstruction not only on the right, but also on the left side of the collapsed descending colon. Emergency surgery was performed. Strangulated bowel loops with gangrenous changes were resected and double-barrel ileostomy was carried out. The postoperative period was uneventful. Restoration of bowel was performed after 6 weeks. Preoperative diagnosis of bowel obstruction caused by a transmesocolic hernia remains difficult despite the currently available imaging techniques. Prompt surgery can prevent serious complications such as peritonitis and sepsis.

  1. A case of small-bowel obstruction after insertion of a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube due to mesenteric penetration.

    PubMed

    Roos, J

    2015-07-01

    A case of small-bowel obstruction after insertion of a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) tube is described. At laparotomy, the PEG tube was found to have penetrated the jejunal mesentery at two points, thereby acting as a focus for a volvulus. Direct injury and obstruction to the small bowel have been described but volvulus due to mesenteric penetration has not. PMID:26264109

  2. Ultrasonographic thickening of the muscularis propria in feline small intestinal small cell T-cell lymphoma and inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Daniaux, Lise A; Laurenson, Michele P; Marks, Stanley L; Moore, Peter F; Taylor, Sandra L; Chen, Rachel X; Zwingenberger, Allison L

    2014-02-01

    Gastrointestinal lymphoma is the most common form of lymphoma in the cat. More recently, an ultrasonographic pattern associated with feline small cell T-cell gastrointestinal lymphoma has been recognized as a diffuse thickening of the muscularis propria of the small intestine. This pattern is also described with feline inflammatory bowel disease. To evaluate the similarities between the diseases, we quantified the thickness of the muscularis propria layer in the duodenum, jejunum and ileum of 14 cats affected by small cell T-cell lymphoma and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and 19 healthy cats. We found a significantly increased thickness of the muscularis propria in cats with lymphoma and IBD compared with healthy cats. The mean thickness of the muscularis propria in cats with lymphoma or IBD was twice the thickness of that of healthy cats, and was the major contributor to significant overall bowel wall thickening in the duodenum and jejunum. A muscularis to submucosa ratio >1 is indicative of an abnormal bowel segment. Colic lymph nodes in cats with lymphoma were increased in size compared with healthy cats. In cats with gastrointestinal lymphoma and histologic transmural infiltration of the small intestines, colic or jejunal lymph nodes were rounded, increased in size and hypoechoic.

  3. Acute small bowel obstruction due to impacted bone: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Mahendrayogam, Vasandhara; Sebastian, Boby John; Senior, Emma; Keeling, Neil

    2009-01-01

    A 71-year-old man was admitted with features of intestinal obstruction. His past surgical history included an appendicectomy as a child and three laparotomies. A CT scan of the abdomen revealed a high attenuation foreign body impacted in the distal ileum, associated with small bowel obstruction. At laparotomy, a bone was removed from the terminal ileum. PMID:21686712

  4. Laparoscopic repair of a small bowel herniation through a broad ligament defect.

    PubMed

    Buero, Agustín; Silberman, Ezequiel A; Medina, Pablo; Morra, Matias E; Bogetti, Diego J; Porto, Eduardo A

    2014-07-01

    A 44-year-old female presented with a diagnosis of intestinal obstruction from unknown origin. Laparoscopy revealed herniation of small bowel trough a defect in the left broad ligament. After reduction, the defect was corrected laparoscopically. The post operative recovery was uneventful.

  5. Small bowel obstruction and perforation attributed to tubo-ovarian abscess following 'D' and 'C'.

    PubMed

    Weledji, Elroy Patrick; Elong, Felix

    2013-10-09

    We report the case of a young woman who was admitted because of small bowel obstruction and localized peritonitis following a dilatation and curettage ('D' and 'C') of uterus in abortion. As infection, like tubo-ovarian abscess may complicate any abortion, it seems wise to ensure that it does not exist prior to performing a 'D' and 'C'.

  6. Treating Small Bowel Obstruction with a Manual Physical Therapy: A Prospective Efficacy Study

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Amanda D.; Patterson, Kimberley; Reed, Evette D.; Wurn, Belinda F.; Klingenberg, Bernhard; King, C. Richard; Wurn, Lawrence J.

    2016-01-01

    Small bowel obstructions (SBOs) caused by adhesions are a common, often life-threatening postsurgical complication with few treatment options available for patients. This study examines the efficacy of a manual physical therapy treatment regimen on the pain and quality of life of subjects with a history of bowel obstructions due to adhesions in a prospective, controlled survey based study. Changes in six domains of quality of life were measured via ratings reported before and after treatment using the validated Small Bowel Obstruction Questionnaire (SBO-Q). Improvements in the domains for pain (p = 0.0087), overall quality of life (p = 0.0016), and pain severity (p = 0.0006) were significant when average scores before treatment were compared with scores after treatment. The gastrointestinal symptoms (p = 0.0258) domain was marginally significant. There was no statistically significant improvement identified in the diet or medication domains in the SBO-Q for this population. Significant improvements in range of motion in the trunk (p ≤ 0.001), often limited by adhesions, were also observed for all measures. This study demonstrates in a small number of subjects that this manual physical therapy protocol is an effective treatment option for patients with adhesive small bowel obstructions as measured by subject reported symptoms and quality of life. PMID:26989690

  7. Mechanical small bowel obstruction due to an inflamed appendix wrapping around the last loop of ileum.

    PubMed

    Assenza, M; Ricci, G; Bartolucci, P; Modini, C

    2005-01-01

    Acute apendicitis rarely presents with a clinical picture of mechanical small-bowel obstruction. The Authors report a case of this inusual clinical occurrence, arised like a complication of a common disease, characterized by a chronically inflamed appendix (mucocele) wrapping around the last loop of ileum that produced volvolus and strangulation. The few similar cases reported in the literature are moreover reviewed.

  8. Peritoneal band containing talc: rare cause of small bowel obstruction in a previously unoperated child.

    PubMed

    Kyzer, S; Gelber, E; Koren, R; Chaimoff, C

    1994-12-01

    The authors report on a 10-year-old boy who was operated on for small bowel obstruction. The obstruction was caused by a peritoneal band that was found to contain talc of an unknown source. The possible explanation for this rare pathology is discussed. PMID:7877051

  9. Laparoscopic versus open adhesiolysis for small bowel obstruction - a multicenter, prospective, randomized, controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Laparoscopic adhesiolysis is emerging as an alternative for open surgery in adhesive small bowel obstruction. Retrospective studies suggest that laparoscopic approach shortens hospital stay and reduces complications in these patients. However, no prospective, randomized, controlled trials comparing laparoscopy to open surgery have been published. Methods/Design This is a multicenter, prospective, open label, randomized, controlled trial comparing laparoscopic adhesiolysis to open surgery in patients with computed-tomography diagnosed adhesive small bowel obstruction that is not resolving with conservative management. The primary study endpoint is the length of postoperative hospital stay in days. Sample size was estimated based on preliminary retrospective cohort, which suggested that 102 patients would provide 80% power to detect a difference of 2.5 days in the length of postoperative hospital stay with significance level of 0.05. Secondary endpoints include passage of stool, commencement of enteral nutrition, 30-day mortality, complications, postoperative pain, and the length of sick leave. Tertiary endpoints consist of the rate of ventral hernia and the recurrence of small bowel obstruction during long-term follow-up. Long-term follow-up by letter or telephone interview will take place at 1, 5, and 10 years. Discussion To the best of our knowledge, this trial is the first one aiming to provide level Ib evidence to assess the use of laparoscopy in the treatment of adhesive small bowel obstruction. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01867528. Date of registration May 26th 2013. PMID:25306234

  10. Unique presentation of heterotopic pancreatic tissue arising from small-bowel mesentery.

    PubMed

    Koshinaga, T; Okabe, I; Kurosu, Y

    1996-03-01

    Heterotopic pancreatic tissue in the small-bowel mesentery is an extremely rare anomaly: no such case has been reported in the English literature. We report a 5-year-old boy in whom the aberrant tissue formed a retroperitoneal cyst. The condition was further complicated by a ventral pancreatic duct defect. The unique clinical manifestations and difficulty in making the diagnosis are discussed.

  11. [Late metastases of cutaneous malignant melanoma on the abdominal wall to the small and large bowel].

    PubMed

    Füredi, Gábor; Altorjay, Aron; Varga, István; Illés, Iván; Kovács, Csaba; Békefi, Péter; Molnár, Anna

    2005-08-01

    We describe the case of a 56 years old man, who was operated on with abdominal wall skin malignant melanoma 5 years ago. He received postoperative DTIC + Intron A treatment. Five years later he presented with complaints of epigastric pain, melena, hematochezia, anorexia and fatigue. Upper gastrointestinal tract endoscopy showed a tumour mass in the duodeno-jejunal flexure and colonoscopy showed a tumour in the large bowel. Histology verified anaplastic carcinoma. The patient was operated on. We found metastases in the small and the large bowel The patient underwent resection of the jejunum and right hemicolectomy. We describe the different types of metastases of malignant melanomas symptoms, therapies and prognosis.

  12. Duodenal and jejunal atresia with agenesis of the dorsal mesentery: "apple peel" small bowel.

    PubMed

    Zivković, S M; Milosević, V R

    1979-05-01

    Two newborn infants with duodenal and jejunal atresia and agenesis of the dorsal mesentery represent our surgical experience with "apple peel" small bowel or "christmas tree" demormity. The first patient had the typical appearance of this condition. The postoperative course was complicated by hyperbilirubinemia, septicemia, and disseminated intravascular coagulation. The infant is in satisfactory condition 1.5 years after operation. The second patient had agenesis of the dorsal mesentery without spiraling of the bowel around its vascular stalk. The child died after 1 month, with complete absence of extrahepatic bile ducts as seen at a second laparotomy. Neither child had been subjected to gastrostomy.

  13. Irritable Bowel Syndrome and the Small Intestinal Microflora. What Do We Know?

    PubMed

    Moraru, Ioana G; Moraru, A G; Dumitraşcu, D L

    2015-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome, one of the most common functional gastro intestinal disorders all over the world is considered to have a multi factorial pathogenesis. Recently more and more studies are focusing on the changes that take place in the microbiota of patients with irritable bowel syndrome, underlining the bacterial role in this pathogenesis. As a consequence, bacterial overgrowth, along with intestinal dysmotility, altered brain-gut axis and genetic factors are considered part of this pathophysiology. This report intends to summarize the actual knowledge on irritable bowel syndrome and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth syndrome, from details on the epidemiology, clinical manifestation, pathophysiology, diagnosis, treatment to details on the relationship between these two syndromes. PMID:26076568

  14. Laparoscopic surgery for small-bowel obstruction caused by Meckel’s diverticulum

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Takatsugu; Nagai, Motoki; Koike, Daisuke; Nomura, Yukihiro; Tanaka, Nobutaka

    2016-01-01

    A 26-year-old woman was referred to our hospital because of abdominal distention and vomiting. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography showed a blind loop of the bowel extending to near the uterus and a fibrotic band connecting the mesentery to the top of the bowel, suggestive of Meckel’s diverticulum (MD) and a mesodiverticular band (MDB). After intestinal decompression, elective laparoscopic surgery was carried out. Using three 5-mm ports, MD was dissected from the surrounding adhesion and MDB was divided intracorporeally. And subsequent Meckel’s diverticulectomy was performed. The presence of heterotopic gastric mucosa was confirmed histologically. The patient had an uneventful postoperative course and was discharged 5 d after the operation. She has remained healthy and symptom-free during 4 years of follow-up. This was considered to be an unusual case of preoperatively diagnosed and laparoscopically treated small-bowel obstruction due to MD in a young adult woman. PMID:26981191

  15. Treatment planning for colorectal cancer: radiation and surgical techniques and value of small-bowel films

    SciTech Connect

    Gunderson, L.L.; Russell, A.H.; Llewellyn, H.J.; Doppke, K.P.; Tepper, J.E.

    1985-07-01

    For colorectal cancer, the adjuvant radiation dose levels required to achieve a high incidence of local control closely parallel the radiation tolerance of small bowel (4500-5000 rad), and for patients with partially resected or unresected disease, the dose levels exceed tolerance (6000-7000 rad). Therefore, both the surgeon and the radiation oncologist should use techniques that localize tumor volumes and decrease the amount of small intestine within the irradiation field. Surgical options include pelvic reconstruction and clip placement. Radiation options include the use of radiographs to define small bowel location and mobility combined with treatment techniques using multiple fields, bladder distention, shrinking or boost fields, and/or patient position changes. When both specialties interact in optimum fashion, local control can be increased with minimal side effects to the small intestine.

  16. Chromium 51-ethylenediaminetetraacetate test: a useful test in the assessment of inflammatory bowel disease

    SciTech Connect

    O'Morain, C.A.; Abelow, A.C.; Chervu, L.R.; Fleischner, G.M.; Das, K.M.

    1986-11-01

    We evaluated the usefulness of urinary excretion values in assessing mucosal damage in inflammatory bowel disease after administration of chromium 51-labeled EDTA either orally or rectally. In the oral study, 19 controls, 18 patients with Crohn's disease, and 13 patients with ulcerative colitis were given 100 microCi /sup 51/Cr-EDTA by mouth. The amount of /sup 51/Cr-EDTA in a 24-hour urine collection was expressed as a percentage of the ingested dose. The patients with Crohn's disease of the small bowel excreted 6.3% +/- 4.3%, which was significantly (P less than 0.001) higher than the percentage in patients with ulcerative colitis (1.7% +/- 1.1%) and controls (1.4% +/- 0.6%). In the enema study, 19 patients with ulcerative colitis, two with Crohn's disease, two with radiation colitis, and four controls (spastic colitis, lactose intolerance) were given 100 microCi /sup 51/Cr-EDTA by retention enema. The patients with active colonic inflammation excreted 8.4% +/- 3.9% of the dose given by enema, which was significantly (P less than 0.01) higher than in other controls (1.9% +/- 0.91%) or patients with inactive colitis (2.2% +/- 1.9%). The /sup 51/Cr-EDTA excretion test is a safe, inexpensive test useful in evaluating patients with inflammatory bowel disease. It can be given orally to screen patients with abdominal complaints who are suspected of having Crohn's disease involving the small intestine, and when given by enema it provides additional objective assessment of idiopathic ulcerative colitis or proctitis.

  17. Small Bowel Dose Parameters Predicting Grade ≥3 Acute Toxicity in Rectal Cancer Patients Treated With Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation: An Independent Validation Study Comparing Peritoneal Space Versus Small Bowel Loop Contouring Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, Robyn; Chakraborty, Santam; Nygren, Ian; Sinha, Richie

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To determine whether volumes based on contours of the peritoneal space can be used instead of individual small bowel loops to predict for grade ≥3 acute small bowel toxicity in patients with rectal cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy. Methods and Materials: A standardized contouring method was developed for the peritoneal space and retrospectively applied to the radiation treatment plans of 67 patients treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy for rectal cancer. Dose-volume histogram (DVH) data were extracted and analyzed against patient toxicity. Receiver operating characteristic analysis and logistic regression were carried out for both contouring methods. Results: Grade ≥3 small bowel toxicity occurred in 16% (11/67) of patients in the study. A highly significant dose-volume relationship between small bowel irradiation and acute small bowel toxicity was supported by the use of both small bowel loop and peritoneal space contouring techniques. Receiver operating characteristic analysis demonstrated that, for both contouring methods, the greatest sensitivity for predicting toxicity was associated with the volume receiving between 15 and 25 Gy. Conclusion: DVH analysis of peritoneal space volumes accurately predicts grade ≥3 small bowel toxicity in patients with rectal cancer receiving neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy, suggesting that the contours of the peritoneal space provide a reasonable surrogate for the contours of individual small bowel loops. The study finds that a small bowel V15 less than 275 cc and a peritoneal space V15 less than 830 cc are associated with a less than 10% risk of grade ≥3 acute toxicity.

  18. More Is Not Always Better: A Randomized Trial Of Low Volume Oral Laxative, Enemas, And Combination Of Both Demonstrate That Enemas Alone Are Most Efficacious For Preparation For Flexible Sigmoidoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hookey, Lawrence; Haimanot, Samson; Marchut, Katherine; Vanner, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Colon cleansing for flexible sigmoidoscopy using a standard fleet enema does not provide adequate cleansing in a significant number of patients. We tested whether the addition of a low-volume oral cleansing agent could mitigate this challenge without significantly compromising patient tolerance. Hypothesis: Oral picosulfate with magnesium citrate (P/MC) would enhance the colon cleansing of patients undergoing sigmoidoscopy, as assessed by the modified Ottawa Bowel Preparation Score. Methods: A randomized single blinded trial comparing (1) a single dose (i.e., one sachet) of oral sodium picosulfate plus magnesium citrate (P/MC) administered the night before, (2) a single dose oral P/MC the night before plus sodium phosphate enema 1 h before leaving home, and (3) sodium phosphate enema alone 1 h before leaving home for flexible sigmoidoscopy was conducted on outpatients referred for sigmoidoscopy for symptom assessment. Results: A total 120 patients were randomized to the study groups. The main indication for sigmoidoscopy was investigation of rectal bleeding (n=80). There was no significant difference in bowel cleansing quality, measured by the endoscopist blinded to preparation, between P/MC, P/MC plus enema, and enema alone as measured by the modified Ottawa Bowel Preparation Scale (P=0.34) or the Aronchick Scale (P=0.13). Both oral P/MC regimens were associated with higher incidence of nausea, abdominal pain, bloating, and interrupted sleep than enema alone (P<0.05). Conclusions: A single dose of oral P/MC administered the night before did not result in better colon cleansing for sigmoidoscopy when used alone or with an enema and was associated with more side effects (NCT 01554111). PMID:26986656

  19. A rare presentation of crush injury: transanal small bowel evisceration. Case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Corduk, Nergul; Koltuksuz, Ugur; Karabul, Murat; Savran, Bircan; Bagci, Senol; Sarioglu-Buke, Akile

    2011-09-01

    Evisceration of the small intestine through the anus is an extremely rare event in children. We report a 2-year-old boy who sustained transanal small bowel evisceration associated with bilateral diaphragmatic rupture, left diaphragmatic herniation, and spinal cord injury without radiographic abnormality which happened after crushing by motor vehicle. We reviewed children with transanal small bowel evisceration and discussed etiological differences between children and adult. We also discussed the basic principles of management and follow up in these patients. PMID:21190115

  20. Interventional digital subtraction angiography for small bowel gastrointestinal stromal tumors with bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yao-Ting; Sun, Hong-Liang; Luo, Jiang-Hong; Ni, Jia-Yan; Chen, Dong; Jiang, Xiong-Ying; Zhou, Jing-Xing; Xu, Lin-Feng

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To retrospectively evaluate the diagnostic efficacy of interventional digital subtraction angiography (DSA) for bleeding small bowel gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs). METHODS: Between January 2006 and December 2013, small bowel tumors in 25 consecutive patients undergoing emergency interventional DSA were histopathologically confirmed as GIST after surgical resection. The medical records of these patients and the effects of interventional DSA and the presentation and management of the condition were retrospectively reviewed. RESULTS: Of the 25 patients with an age range from 34- to 70-year-old (mean: 54 ± 12 years), 8 were male and 17 were female. Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding, including tarry or bloody stool and intermittent melena, was observed in all cases, and one case also involved hematemesis. Nineteen patients required acute blood transfusion. There were a total of 28 small bowel tumors detected by DSA. Among these, 20 were located in the jejunum and 8 were located in the ileum. The DSA characteristics of the GISTs included a hypervascular mass of well-defined, homogeneous enhancement and early developed draining veins. One case involved a complication of intussusception of the small intestine that was discovered during surgery. No pseudoaneurysms, arteriovenous malformations or fistulae, or arterial rupture were observed. The completely excised size was approximately 1.20 to 5.50 cm (mean: 3.05 ± 1.25 cm) in maximum diameter based on measurements after the resection. There were ulcerations (n = 8), erosions (n = 10), hyperemia and edema (n = 10) on the intra-luminal side of the tumors. Eight tumors in patients with a large amount of blood loss were treated with transcatheter arterial embolization with gelfoam particles during interventional DSA. CONCLUSION: Emergency interventional DSA is a useful imaging option for locating and diagnosing small bowel GISTs in patients with bleeding, and is an effective treatment modality. PMID:25548494

  1. CT enteroclysis/enterography findings in drug-induced small-bowel damage

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, K; Hashimoto, S; Onoda, H; Washida, Y; Sakaida, I; Matsunaga, N

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the CT enteroclysis (CTE)/enterography findings of patients with small-bowel mucosal damage induced by aspirin or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and to compare these findings with the duration of drug use and endoscopic findings. Methods: CTE findings of 11 patients (22 lesions) with drug-induced small-bowel damage were reviewed, including 8 NSAID users and 3 aspirin users. Three patients were short-term users (6 months or shorter) and eight were long-term users (3 years or longer). Nine patients also underwent videocapsule endoscopy (VCE) or double-balloon enteroscopy (DBE). Results: Small-bowel abnormalities were visible in 8 of 11 patients (73%) on CTE. Multiple lesions were seen in five patients, including all short-term users. Lesions were classified into three types. Type 1 (mucosal patchy enhancement) was found in four of eight patients (50%, 12 lesions) all were short-term users. Small erosions with mild oedema/redness were shown by DBE. Type 2 (homogeneous hyperenhancement) was found in two of eight patients (25%, four lesions) who were long-term users. Large ulcers with marked oedema/redness were shown by DBE. Type 3 (stratification enhancement) was found in four of eight patients (50%, six lesions), both short-term and long-term users. Annular or large ulcers with strictures were shown by VCE or DBE. Conclusion: On CTE, Type 1 lesions in patients with mostly short-term aspirin or NSAID use, Type 2 lesions in patients with long-term use and Type 3 lesions in both types of patients were detected. CTE may have usefulness for the detection of mild damage. Advances in knowledge: Small-bowel abnormalities owing to aspirin or NSAID present with three different patterns on CTE. PMID:25348282

  2. Glutamine on the luminal microbial environment after massive small bowel resection.

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Seung Hye; Lee, Seong; Lee, Myung Duk

    2002-01-01

    To evaluate the oral glutamine (GLN) on the luminal microbes and bacterial translocation (BT) in short bowel, 45 Wistar rats were utilized in three groups; A (control), and B and C (short bowel, 85% of small bowel resected). The group A was fed with elemental diet (EmD), B with EmD+2% glycine, and C with EmD+2% GLN. The groups B and C were isocaloric and isonitrogenous. Wet weight, DNA, protein, and histomorphometry of the mucosa and parallel microbial culture from cecal contents, caval blood, and tissue blocks of the liver, spleen, and mesenteric lymph nodes were performed on the 5th, 10th, and 15th day. Mucosal growth was higher in group C than B. Colony forming units (CFU) from cecal contents increased more in group B than in C. BTs in A, B, and C were 7/15, 8/15, and 2/15, respectively. Total CFUs in blood and tissues were 5.8 X 10(4)/g, 5.5 X 10(6)/g, and 1.8 X 10(4)/g, respectively. As for BT, the most frequent organism was Klebsiella in A (79.3%), but E. coli in B and C (94.2% and 55.6%). GLN seems to suppress luminal microbes, and reduces BT in short bowel due to enforced barrier function and proliferation of the mucosa. PMID:12483001

  3. Successful treatment of ileocolic intussusception with air enema reduction in an adult patient.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Satoshi; Kanemura, Takashi; Yokouchi, Yukako; Kamiichi, Hideo; Kiriu, Nobuaki; Koike, Yuji

    2014-05-01

    Intussusception is a rare condition in adults, representing only 1% of all bowel obstructions. In adult cases, operative explorations are recommended to treat the bowel obstruction and to diagnose underlying diseases. The objective of the current case report was to describe the successful treatment of ileocolic intussusception with air enema reduction in an adult patient. A previously healthy 21-year-old woman had a 20-hour history of colicky abdominal pain and vomiting and was diagnosed as having idiopathic ileocolic intussusception by abdominal computed tomography. We treated the patient with air enema reduction under fluoroscopic guidance instead of an operative procedure. She received oxygen and intravenous midazolam to provide some degree of pain relief. Air was carefully pumped manually into the rectum, and the air pressure was monitored with a manometer. Because of air leakage from the rectum through the void to the outside the body, we continued to provide air to maintain the air pressure between 40 and 60 mm Hg. Three minutes after initiation of the air enema, when the patient experienced increasing abdominal pain and vomiting, the pressure was temporarily increased to greater than 100 mm Hg, and the air reached the terminal ileum. We considered the reduction successful and confirmed it with an abdominal ultrasound examination. We believe that air enema reduction is effective for treating idiopathic intussusception within 24 hours of symptom onset in young, previously healthy adult patients.

  4. Adhesive small bowel adhesions obstruction: Evolutions in diagnosis, management and prevention

    PubMed Central

    Catena, Fausto; Di Saverio, Salomone; Coccolini, Federico; Ansaloni, Luca; De Simone, Belinda; Sartelli, Massimo; Van Goor, Harry

    2016-01-01

    Intra-abdominal adhesions following abdominal surgery represent a major unsolved problem. They are the first cause of small bowel obstruction. Diagnosis is based on clinical evaluation, water-soluble contrast follow-through and computed tomography scan. For patients presenting no signs of strangulation, peritonitis or severe intestinal impairment there is good evidence to support non-operative management. Open surgery is the preferred method for the surgical treatment of adhesive small bowel obstruction, in case of suspected strangulation or after failed conservative management, but laparoscopy is gaining widespread acceptance especially in selected group of patients. "Good" surgical technique and anti-adhesive barriers are the main current concepts of adhesion prevention. We discuss current knowledge in modern diagnosis and evolving strategies for management and prevention that are leading to stratified care for patients. PMID:27022449

  5. Gastric band connection tube results in small bowel obstruction: an acute emergency

    PubMed Central

    Suter, Katherine J. L.; Rajasagaram, Niruben; Nottle, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The laparoscopic adjustable gastric band (LAGB) is a widely performed procedure for the morbid obesity epidemic. Despite its low mortality compared with other mainstream bariatric surgeries, it is not without its complications. The authors report a late and rare complication of a small bowel obstruction in a 52-year-old woman from an LAGB placed for 2 years. She was diagnosed clinically and radiologically with a small bowel obstruction. However, in the setting of an LAGB, this became a closed-loop obstruction. She proceeded to an emergency laparoscopy, which revealed that the port connection tube had formed dense adhesions to the jejunum causing an obstructive band. This is only the fifth reported case in Australia; as bariatric surgery continues to rise, these patients may present unannounced to any emergency department and as such should be treated as a closed-loop obstruction with immediate resuscitative and surgical management instituted. PMID:27170704

  6. Small Bowel Limb Lengths and Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass: a Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Mahawar, Kamal K; Kumar, Parveen; Parmar, Chetan; Graham, Yitka; Carr, William R J; Jennings, Neil; Schroeder, Norbert; Balupuri, Shlok; Small, Peter K

    2016-03-01

    There is currently no consensus on the combined length of small bowel that should be bypassed as biliopancreatic or alimentary limb for optimum results with Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. A number of different limb lengths exist, and there is significant variation in practice amongst surgeons. Inevitably, this means that some patients have too much small bowel bypassed and end up with malnutrition and others end up with a less effective operation. Lack of standardisation poses further problems with interpretation and comparison of scientific literature. This systematic review concludes that a range of 100-200 cm for combined length of biliopancreatic or alimentary limb gives optimum results with Roux-en-Y gastric bypass in most patients.

  7. Small Bowel Melanoma Metastasing to Inguinal Lymph Node - a Rare Case.

    PubMed

    Chisthi M, Meer; M, Rahul; A, Sreekumar

    2015-06-01

    Malignant Melanoma is one of the commonest cutaneous malignancies affecting human beings. The gastrointestinal tract is a common site for melanoma, both as primary and metastases. However it is rare for gastrointestinal melanoma to metastase oustide of the abdominal cavity. In the literature, there is no evidence about inguinal lymph node metastases from small bowel melanoma. Here we present a case report of an old lady who underwent laparoscopic resection of small bowel for melanoma and presented 4 years later with metastatic lymph node in inguinal lymph node. Though it could not be verified, we hypothesise that the tumour disseminated to the lymph node through a port-site metastases. Literature review shows several mechanisms which were put forward to explain the mechanism of port-site metastases.

  8. Small bowel perforation after extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy of an ureter stone.

    PubMed

    Klug, R; Kurz, F; Dunzinger, M; Aufschnaiter, M

    2001-01-01

    A 60-year-old man was treated by extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) for an impacted ureter stone. Two days after the procedure he developed an acute abdomen. On laparotomy, a small bowel perforation in the area of an adhesion to the abdominal wall was found. The adherent intestinal segment was located exactly in the range of the ESWL field, so that excluding further reasons the shockwave lithotripsy must be assumed to be causative.

  9. Can we improve the diagnostic yield of small bowel video-capsule endoscopy?

    PubMed

    Triantafyllou, Konstantinos

    2010-05-16

    Video-capsule endoscopy has revolutionized the examination of small bowel mucosa. However, this modality is relatively young and its diagnostic yield is low. Herein, we discuss different approaches to improve examination's diagnostic yield. There are strong data supporting some of them while there is speculation about the rest. As capsule endoscopy continues to evolve there is also a strong belief that technology will overcome at least some of the obstacles that hamper capsule endoscopy's diagnostic yield sometime in the near future.

  10. Does magnetically assisted capsule endoscopy improve small bowel capsule endoscopy completion rate? A randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Hale, Melissa F.; Drew, Kaye; Sidhu, Reena; McAlindon, Mark E.

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Delayed gastric emptying is a significant factor in incomplete small bowel capsule examinations. Gastric transit could be hastened by external magnetic control of the capsule. We studied the feasibility of this approach to improve capsule endoscopy completion rates. Patients and methods: Prospective, single-center, randomized controlled trial involving 122 patients attending for small bowel capsule endoscopy using MiroCam Navi. Patients were randomized to either the control group (mobilisation for 30 minutes after capsule ingestion, followed by intramuscular metoclopramide 10 mg if the capsule failed to enter the small bowel) or the intervention group (1000 mL of water prior to capsule ingestion, followed by positional change and magnetic steering). Outcome measures were capsule endoscopy completion rate, gastric clarity and distention, relationship of body habitus to capsule endoscopy completion rate (CECR), and patient comfort scores. Results: 122 patients were recruited (61 each to the control and intervention groups: mean age 49 years [range 21 – 85], 61 females). There was no significant difference in CECR between the two groups (P = 0.39). Time to first pyloric image was significantly shorter in the intervention group (P = 0.03) but there was no difference in gastric transit times (P = 0.12), suggesting that magnetic control hastens capsular transit to the gastric antrum but does not influence duodenal passage. Gastric clarity and distention were significantly better in the intervention group (P < 0.0001 and P < 0.0001 respectively). Conclusions: Magnetic steering of a small bowel capsule is unable to overcome pyloric contractions to enhance gastric emptying and improve capsule endoscope completion rate. Excellent mucosal visualisation within the gastric cavity suggests this technique could be harnessed for capsule examination of the stomach. PMID:26878053

  11. Conservative approach in Peutz-Jeghers syndrome: Single-balloon enteroscopy and small bowel polypectomy

    PubMed Central

    Torroni, Filippo; Romeo, Erminia; Rea, Francesca; Angelis, Paola De; Foschia, Francesca; Faraci, Simona; Abriola, Giovanni Federici di; Contini, Anna Chiara; Caldaro, Tamara; Dall’Oglio, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To assess the usefulness of the balloon assisted enteroscopy in preventing surgical intervention in patients with Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS) having a small bowel large polyps. METHODS: Seven consecutive asymptomatic pts (age 15-38 years) with PJS have been collected; six underwent polypectomy using single balloon enteroscopy (Olympus SIF Q180) with antegrade approach using push and pull technique. SBE system consists of the SIF-Q180 enteroscope, an overtube balloon control unit (OBCU Olympus Balloon Control Unit) and a disposable silicone splinting tube with balloon (ST-SB1). All procedures were performed under general anesthesia. Previously all pts received wireless capsule endoscopy (WCE). Prophylactic polypectomy was reserved mainly in pts who had polyps > 15 mm in diameter. The balloon is inflated and deflated by a balloon control unit with a safety pressure setting range from -6.0 kPa to +5.4 kPa. Informed consent has been obtained from pts or parents for each procedure. RESULTS: Six pts underwent polypectomy of small bowel polyps; in 5 pts a large polyp > 15 mm (range 20-50 mm in diameter) was resected; in 1 patient with WCE negative, SBE was performed for previous surgical resection of gastrointestinal stromal tumors. In 2 pts endoscopic clips were placed due to a polypectomy. No surgical complication have been reported. SBE with resection of small bowel large polyps in PJS pts was useful to avoid gastrointestinal bleeding and emergency laparotomy due to intestinal intussusceptions. No gastrointestinal tumors were found in subsequent enteroscopic surveillance in all seven pts. In order surveillance, all pts received WCE, upper endoscopy, ileocolonoscopy every 2 years. No pts had extraintestinal malignant lesions. SBE was performed when WCE was positive for significant polyps (> 15 mm). CONCLUSION: The effective of prophylactic polypectomy of small bowel large polyps (> 15 mm) could be the first line treatment for conservative approach in management of

  12. Feline small cell lymphosarcoma versus inflammatory bowel disease: treatment and prognosis.

    PubMed

    de Rezende, Chirstian Eriksson; Al-Ghazlat, Suliman

    2013-06-01

    Feline inflammatory bowel disease is a diagnosis of exclusion and a common cause of chronic gastrointestinal signs suhc as weight loss, variation in appetite, vomiting, diarrhea, and lethargy. Patients with intestinal small cell lymphosarcoma can present identical clinical signs, and differentiating between these two conditions can be a challenge. A companion article discusses the value of performing immunohistochemistry and polymerase chain reaction testing on intestinal biopsy samples for this purpose.

  13. Phytobezoar in Meckel's diverticulum: A rare cause of small bowel obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Bini, Roberto; Quiriconi, Fabrizio; Tello, Aurelio; Fusca, Marcella; Loddo, Franca; Leli, Renzo; Addeo, Alfredo

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Meckel's diverticulum (MD) is the prevailing anomaly of the gastrointestinal tract, found in about 2% of the population; it rarely gives rise to symptoms and its discovery is usually accidental. Phytobezoar is a concretion of poorly digested fruit and vegetable fibres that is found in the alimentary tract and rarely can be the cause of small intestinal obstruction. Herein we report a rare case of intestinal obstruction due to phytobezoar formation into a MD. Presentation of case A 50 year-old patient, was admitted to author's institution with an history of abdominal pain, nausea and multiples episodes of vomiting. Plain X-ray showed dilated small-bowel loops. Computed tomography (CT) revealed jejunal loops with air-fluid levels. The patient underwent explorative laparotomy where we found a giant Meckel's diverticulum, filled by a phytobezoar that caused small bowel compression. We performed a segmental ileal, resection, containing the MD. The histological exam confirmed Meckel's diverticulum. Discussion Bowel obstruction due to a phytobezoar in a Meckel's diverticulum is rare: only 7 cases have been reported in literature. MD complications are rare and phytobezoar is one of them with only few cases described in literature. Conclusion The conventional x rays studies were inconclusive whereas abdominal contrast enhanced CT led to a definitive diagnosis. Explorative laparotomy or laparoscopy is mandatory in these cases. PMID:22382033

  14. Recent advances in small bowel diseases: Part I

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Alan BR; Chopra, Angeli; Clandinin, Michael Tom; Freeman, Hugh

    2012-01-01

    As is the case in all parts of gastroenterology and hepatology, there have been many advances in our knowledge and understanding of small intestinal diseases. Over 1000 publications were reviewed for 2008 and 2009, and the important advances in basic science as well as clinical applications were considered. In Part I of this Editorial Review, seven topics are considered: intestinal development; proliferation and repair; intestinal permeability; microbiotica, infectious diarrhea and probiotics; diarrhea; salt and water absorption; necrotizing enterocolitis; and immunology/allergy. These topics were chosen because of their importance to the practicing physician. PMID:22807604

  15. Laparoscopic management of mesh erosion into small bowel and urinary bladder following total extra-peritoneal repair of inguinal hernia.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Sandeep; Praneeth, Kokkula; Rathore, Yashwant; Waran, Vignesh; Singh, Prabhjot

    2016-01-01

    Mesh erosion into visceral organs is a rare complication following laparoscopic mesh repair for inguinal hernia with only 15 cases reported in English literature. We report the first case of complete laparoscopic management of mesh erosion into small bowel and urinary bladder. A 62-year-male underwent laparoscopic total extra-peritoneal repair of left inguinal hernia at another centre in April 2012. He presented to our centre 21 months later with persistent lower urinary tract infection (UTI). On evaluation mesh erosion into bowel and urinary bladder was suspected. At laparoscopy, a small bowel loop was adhered to the area of inflammation in the left lower abdomen. After adhesiolysis, mesh was seen to be eroding into small bowel. The entire infected mesh was pulled out from the pre-peritoneal space and urinary bladder wall using gentle traction. The involved small bowel segment was resected, and bowel continuity restored using endoscopic linear cutter. The resected bowel along with the mesh was extracted in a plastic bag. Intra-operative test for leak from urinary bladder was found to be negative. The patient recovered uneventfully and is doing well at 12 months follow-up with resolution of UTI. Laparoscopic approach to mesh erosion is feasible as the plane of mesh placement during laparoscopic hernia repair is closer to peritoneum than during open hernia repair.

  16. Small bowel obstruction following computed tomography and magnetic resonance enterography using psyllium seed husk as an oral contrast agent

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yingming Amy; Cervini, Patrick; Kirpalani, Anish; Vlachou, Paraskevi A; Grover, Samir C; Colak, Errol

    2014-01-01

    The authors report a case series describing four patients who developed small bowel obstruction following the use of psyllium seed husk as an oral contrast agent for computed tomography or magnetic resonance enterography. Radiologists who oversee computed tomography and magnetic resonance enterography should be aware of this potential complication when using psyllium seed husk and other bulking agents, particularly when imaging patients with known or suspected small bowel strictures or active inflammation. PMID:25157531

  17. The role of the small intestine in ammonia production after gastric blood administration.

    PubMed Central

    Sugarbaker, S P; Revhaug, A; Wilmore, D W

    1987-01-01

    It is commonly believed that the digestion of intraluminal blood by colonic bacteria is the primary cause of increased ammonia production after upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage. To evaluate the role of the small intestine in ammonia production, blood, amino acids, or water (5 mL/kg) was administered as a meal or enema to awake dogs with chronic indwelling catheters. After blood meals, intestinal ammonia production increased rapidly to peak at 60 minutes and returned to basal levels. This response was mimicked by the gastric administration of ammoniagenic amino acids. No change in ammonia production occurred with water administration. In contrast, colonic blood administration resulted in a gradual rise in ammonia production, and peaked at 150 minutes. Amino acid enemas resulted in a similar but somewhat more rapid response. No change occurred with water enemas. After gut decontamination, ammonia production did not increase after blood enemas. However, the rapid increase in ammonia production persisted after blood meals. It is concluded that both the small bowel and colon participate in the augmented ammonia production that occurs after upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Gut decontamination reduces ammonia production by altering the colonic microflora, but is not specific therapy directed towards amino acid metabolism by the enterocytes of the small bowel and thus, does not alter the ammonia produced by the small intestine. PMID:3496861

  18. HLA-DQ Genotype Is Associated with Accelerated Small Bowel Transit in Patients with Diarrhea-Predominant Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Vazquez-Roque, Maria I.; Camilleri, Michael; Carlson, Paula; McKinzie, Sanna; Murray, Joseph A.; Brantner, Tricia L.; Burton, Duane D.; Zinsmeister, Alan R.

    2011-01-01

    Background Colonic transit (CT) is accelerated in 46% of patients with diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-D). Improvement in IBS-D with gluten withdrawal is associated with HLA-DQ2 positivity; the mechanism of improvement is unclear. Objective To determine if HLA-DQ2 or HLA-DQ8 positive IBS-D patients have faster small bowel (SB) or CT than HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 negative patients. Methods Among 94 IBS-D patients who previously provided DNA samples, 64 had undergone validated measurements of CT (geometric center at 24h [GC24]); 50 of the patients also had measurement of gastric emptying (GE) and 54 of SB transit (colonic filling at 6h [CF6h]). HLA-DQ status was determined by tag SNP approach. Associations of CF6h and GC24 with HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 status were assessed using analysis of covariance (ANCOVA), adjusting for BMI. Results Mean age was 40.8±1.6y; 98.5% were female. In 60/64 patients, celiac disease was excluded by serology or histology. There were no significant differences in age or BMI among the different HLA-DQ groups. Independently, patients positive for HLA-DQ2 had numerically greater CF6h compared to HLA-DQ2 negative (p=0.065), and those positive for HLA-DQ8 had greater CF6h compared to HLA-DQ8 negative patients (p=0.021). GE was not associated with HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 status. Patients positive for both HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 had greater CF6 (p=0.013) and numerically higher, but not significant, GC24 (p=0.38) compared to HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 negative patients. Conclusion IBS-D patients positive for HLA-DQ8 or for both HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 have faster SB transit. The mechanism of the accelerated SB transit and the effect of gluten withdrawal on SB function in IBS-D deserve further investigation. PMID:21490506

  19. Small-bowel capsule endoscopy: A ten-point contemporary review

    PubMed Central

    Koulaouzidis, Anastasios; Rondonotti, Emanuele; Karargyris, Alexandros

    2013-01-01

    The introduction of capsule endoscopy (CE) in clinical practice increased the interest for the study of the small-bowel. Consequently, in about 10 years, an impressive quantity of literature on indications, diagnostic yield (DY), safety profile and technical evolution of CE has been published as well as several reviews. At present time, there are 5 small-bowel capsule enteroscopy (SBCE) models in the worldwide market. Head-to-head trials have showed in the great majority of studies comparable results in terms of DY, image quality and completion rate. CE meta-analyses formed the basis of national/international guidelines; these guidelines place CE in a prime position for the diagnostic work-up of patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding, known and/or suspected Crohn’s disease and possible small-bowel neoplasia. A 2-L polyethylene glycol-based purge, administered the day before the procedure, is the most widely practiced preparation regimen. Whether this regimen can be further improved (i.e., by further decreasing its volume, changing the timing of administration, coupling it with prokinetics and/or other factors) or if it can really affect the DY, is still under discussion. Faecal calprotectin has been used in SBCE studies in two settings: in patients taking non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, to evaluate the type and extent of mucosal damage and, more importantly from a clinical point of view, in patients with known or suspected Crohn’s disease for assessment of inflammation activity. Although there is still a lot of debate around the exact reasons of SBCE poor performance in various small-bowel segments, it is worth to remember that the capsule progress is non-steerable, hence more rapid in the proximal than in lower segments of the small-bowel. Capsule aspiration, a relatively unexpected complication, has been reported with increasing frequency. This is probably related with the increase in the mean age of patients undergoing CE. CE video review is

  20. Small Bowel Obstruction Caused by an Incarcerated Hernia after Iliac Crest Bone Harvest

    PubMed Central

    d'Hondt, Steven; Soysal, Savas; Kirchhoff, Philipp; Oertli, Daniel; Heizmann, Oleg

    2011-01-01

    The iliac crest has become an often used site for autogenous bone graft, because of the easy access it affords. One of the less common complications that can occur after removal is a graft-site hernia. It was first reported in 1945 (see the work by Oldfield, 1945). We report a case of iliac crest bone hernia in a 53-year-old male who was admitted for elective resection of a pseudarthrosis and reconstruction of the left femur with iliac crest bone from the right side. One and a half months after initial surgery, the patient presented with increasing abdominal pain and signs of bowel obstruction. A CT scan of the abdominal cavity showed an obstruction of the small bowel caused by the bone defect of the right iliac crest. A laparoscopy showed a herniation of the small bowel. Due to collateral vessels of the peritoneum caused by portal hypertension, an IPOM (intraperitoneal onlay-mesh) occlusion could not be performed. We performed a conventional ventral hernia repair with an onlay mesh. The recovery was uneventful. PMID:22084778

  1. Plasma citrulline level as a biomarker for cancer therapy-induced small bowel mucosal damage.

    PubMed

    Barzał, Justyna A; Szczylik, Cezary; Rzepecki, Piotr; Jaworska, Małgorzata; Anuszewska, Elżbieta

    2014-01-01

    Regimen-related mucosal toxicity is extremely common following cytotoxic chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Mucositis is as an important determinant of the inflammatory response and infectious complications in cancer treated patients. Most assessment scales for mucosal damage are focussed on oral mucositis, since it is easy to evaluate. Measuring gastrointestinal musocal damage objectively remains difficult because it cannot be seen directly or readily detected. One of potential non-invasive biomarkers of gastrointestinal mucosal damage is plasma citrulline level. Citrulline is an amino acid produced by small bowel enterocytes. Low concentration of free circulating citrulline signifies severe intestinal mucosal damage in humans with nonmalignant disorders, such as villous atrophy-associated diseases, short bowel syndrome, Crohn's disease, and is used in follow-up after small bowel transplantation. The plasma citrulline level is a reliable and objective biochemical marker of enterocyte mass and function in humans, and therefore can be used to monitor enterocyte toxicity resulting from chemotherapy and radiotherapy during anticancer therapy in patients with severely disturbed gut integrity. PMID:25473654

  2. Small bowel injury after suprapubic catheter insertion presenting 3 years after initial insertion

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, Kevin M; Good, Daniel W; Brush, John P; Al-hasso, Ammar; Stewart, Grant D

    2013-01-01

    A 77-year-old woman was referred to urology with blockages of her suprapubic catheter (SPC). The catheter was replaced easily in the emergency department, however, no urine was draining, only a cloudy green fluid was visible. On cystoscopy bilious material was identified in the bladder. There was no catheter visible. There seemed to be a fistulous tract entering the bladder at the left dome. The urethra was dilated, a urethral catheter was placed and the SPC was removed. A CT demonstrated that the SPC tract transfixed a loop of pelvic small bowel and entered the bladder with no intraperitoneal contrast leak. The patient recovered well and did not require laparotomy. This case emphasises that bowel perforation, although rare, must be considered as a complication of SPC placement even years after initial insertion when catheter problems arise. Unusually, we learn that this complication may not present with abdominal pain or peritonism. PMID:24326435

  3. Small bowel injury after suprapubic catheter insertion presenting 3 years after initial insertion.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Kevin M; Good, Daniel W; Brush, John P; Alhasso, Ammar; Al-hasso, Ammar; Stewart, Grant D

    2013-01-01

    A 77-year-old woman was referred to urology with blockages of her suprapubic catheter (SPC). The catheter was replaced easily in the emergency department, however, no urine was draining, only a cloudy green fluid was visible. On cystoscopy bilious material was identified in the bladder. There was no catheter visible. There seemed to be a fistulous tract entering the bladder at the left dome. The urethra was dilated, a urethral catheter was placed and the SPC was removed. A CT demonstrated that the SPC tract transfixed a loop of pelvic small bowel and entered the bladder with no intraperitoneal contrast leak. The patient recovered well and did not require laparotomy. This case emphasises that bowel perforation, although rare, must be considered as a complication of SPC placement even years after initial insertion when catheter problems arise. Unusually, we learn that this complication may not present with abdominal pain or peritonism.

  4. Primary Malignancies of the Small Bowel: A Report of 96 Cases and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, James M.; Melvin, David B.; Gray, George F.; Thorbjarnarson, Bjorn

    1974-01-01

    The clinical records and histologic sections of 96 cases of primary small bowel malignancies (excluding lymphomas and periamullary lesions) were reviewed. The location, clinical presentation, pathologic findings, treatment and outcome are compared to the collected published experience, approximately 2400 cases. There were 48 adenocarcinomas, 37 carcinoids, and 11 leiomyosarcomas. Fifty-one men and 45 women ranged from 31 to 83 years old. Eighty-four caused symptoms leading to operative diagnosis; 12 carcinoids were incidental autopsy findings. The most common presentation was pain (33%) followed by weight loss (23%) obstruction (16%), hemorrhage (15%), jaundice (5%), intussusception (3%) and perforation (3%). Masses were felt in 30% of the cases, but were usually dilated bowel or intussusception rather than the tumor per se. Curative resection was attempted in 80 of 84 operatively diagnosed tumors. The 80% mortality among patients followed 5 years is attributed to the late appearance of symptoms and anatomic obstacles to a truly radical operation. PMID:4843046

  5. Small bowel obstruction from barbed suture following laparoscopic myomectomy—A case report

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eric Tat Choi; Wong, Felix Wu Shun

    2015-01-01

    Myomectomy is commonly performed for symptomatic fibroids in women who wish to conserve fertility. Laparoscopic myomectomy provides advantages as a minimally invasive procedure. To facilitate the closure of the uterine wound after enucleation of the fibroid, barbed sutures have been introduced as they can shorten the operative time and reduce the amount of bleeding. However, the use of barbed suture is not without risk. There were a few reports on the risks of barbed sutures in the literature. We report herein a case of acute abdomen because of small bowel entrapment and obstruction following the use of barbed suture in laparoscopic myomectomy. Surgeons using barbed suture in myomectomy should be vigilant on the possibility of this bowel complication whenever adverse clinical situation arises as the outcome could be serious if the condition was left unchecked. PMID:26454501

  6. [Impact of purified drinking water use on the small bowel lymphatic region].

    PubMed

    Baksheeva, Iu A; Astashov, V V; Kazakov, O V; Chepik, V I

    2008-01-01

    The structures of the mesenteric lymph nodes, small bowel, microvascular bed, and a mast cell population of the mesentery of rats were studied by light microscopy. Tap water, filtered water, and macro- and microelement-balanced water were used. The use of the filtered and macro- and micro-element water caused increases in lymph transport in the mesenteric lymph nodes and in the height of small intestinal villi, activated humoral immunity, and produced the most optimum level of a mast cell population and the structure of the mesenteric microvascular bed.

  7. Review article: complementary and alternative therapies for inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Langmead, L; Rampton, D S

    2006-02-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine includes a wide range of practices and therapies outside the realms of conventional western medicine. Despite a lack of scientific data in the form of controlled trials for either efficacy or safety of complementary and alternative medicine, use by patients with inflammatory bowel disease, particularly of herbal therapies, is widespread and increasing. There is limited controlled evidence indicating efficacy of traditional Chinese medicines, aloe vera gel, wheat grass juice, Boswellia serrata and bovine colostrum enemas in ulcerative colitis. Encouraging results have also been reported in small studies of acupuncture for Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Contrary to popular belief, natural therapies are not necessarily safe: fatal hepatic and irreversible renal failure have occurred with some preparations and interactions with conventional drugs are potentially dangerous. There is a need for further controlled clinical trials of the potential efficacy of complementary and alternative approaches in inflammatory bowel disease, together with enhanced legislation to maximize their quality and safety.

  8. Aminoguanidine Alleviates Radiation-Induced Small-Bowel Damage Through Its Antioxidant Effect

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, E.-Y.; Wang, F.-S.; Lin, I-H.; Yang, Kuender D.

    2009-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect and its mechanism of aminoguanidine (AG) on small-bowel protection after whole-abdominal irradiation (WAI) in rats. Methods and Materials: Male Sprague-Dawley rats (300-400 g) subjected to 12 Gy WAI were used for the study. Aminoguanidine at a dose of 50-800 mg/kg was administered by the gavage route 2 h before WAI. Mucosal damage of small bowel was evaluated by the grade of diarrhea and crypt survival; oxidative stress was determined by the level of 8-hydroxy 2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) with immunohistochemistry (IHC). Nitrosative stress was evaluated by the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT) with IHC, and systemic and portal vein NOx (nitrite + nitrate) levels were measured and compared with and without AG treatment after WAI. Results: Aminoguanidine showed a dose-dependent effect against WAI-induced diarrhea. Aminoguanidine at a dose of 400 mg/kg had the best protective effect, from 92% to 17% (p = 0.002). Aminoguanidine increased crypt survival from 23% to 46% (p = 0.003). It also significantly attenuated 8-OHdG expression but not 3-NT and iNOS expression at both 4 and 8 h after 12-Gy WAI. Aminoguanidine did not alter the portal vein NOx levels 4 and 8 h after 12-Gy WAI. Conclusion: Aminoguanidine has a radioprotective effect against radiation-induced small-bowel damage due to its antioxidant effect but not inhibition of nitric oxide production. Dietary AG may have a potentially protective effect on the small intestine of patients subjected to pelvic and abdominal radiotherapies.

  9. Management and outcomes of small bowel obstruction in older adult patients: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Springer, Jeremy E.; Bailey, Jonathan G.; Davis, Philip J.B.; Johnson, Paul M.

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this research was to examine the morbidity, mortality and rate of recurrent bowel obstruction associated with the treatment of small bowel obstruction (SBO) in older adults. Methods We prospectively enrolled all patients 70 years or older with an SBO who were admitted to a tertiary care teaching centre between Jul. 1, 2011, and Sept. 30, 2012. Data regarding presentation, investigations, treatment and outcomes were collected. Results Of the 104 patients admitted with an SBO, 49% were managed nonoperatively and 51% underwent surgery. Patients who underwent surgery experienced more complications (64% v. 27%, p = 0.002) and stayed in hospital longer (10 v. 3 d, p < 0.001) than patients managed nonoperatively. Nonoperative management was associated with a high rate of recurrent SBO: 31% after a median follow-up of 17 months. Of the patients managed operatively, 60% underwent immediate surgery and 40% underwent surgery after attempted nonoperative management. Patients in whom nonoperative management failed underwent surgery after a median of 2 days, and 89% underwent surgery within 5 days. The rate of bowel resection was high (29%) among those who underwent delayed surgery. Surgery after failed nonoperative management was associated with a mortality of 14% versus 3% for those who underwent immediate surgery; however, this difference was not significant. Conclusion These data suggest that some elderly patients with SBO may be waiting too long for surgery. PMID:25421079

  10. Effects of trimebutine on intestinal motility after massive small bowel resection.

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, M; Iwafuchi, M; Yagi, M; Iinuma, Y; Kanada, S; Ohtaki, M; Homma, S

    2000-08-01

    Effects of trimebutine maleate (TM) on intestinal motility in short bowel syndrome (SBS) were studied in conscious canines in both acute and chronic phases following 80% massive distal small bowel resection (MSBR). TM was administered orally to beagles with MSBR or as controls in the postprandial and fasting states, and given simultaneously with meals. Intestinal motility was measured using bipolar electrodes for approximately 1 month after the electrodes were implanted in each beagle and the data compared between treatment groups. When TM was given with meals, the postprandial period without duodenal migrating myoelectric (or motor) complexes (MMCs) was shorter than in those given meals only. When TM was given in the postprandial state in short bowel beagles, the initial duodenal MMCs occurred earlier, i.e. the postprandial period was shorter. Diarrhea did not occur in these beagles. When TM was given in the fasting state, duodenal MMCs occurred and propagated to the distal intestine. In conclusion, oral TM administration can produce a more appropriate intestinal condition for the next food intake and make enteral nutrition possible even in the acute phase after MSBR. Such feeding can be carried out without overloading gut function as a result of the modulation of gastrointestinal motility by TM. PMID:11286295

  11. Increased density of tolerogenic dendritic cells in the small bowel mucosa of celiac patients

    PubMed Central

    Vorobjova, Tamara; Uibo, Oivi; Heilman, Kaire; Uibo, Raivo

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the densities of dendritic cells (DCs) and FOXP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) and their interrelations in the small bowel mucosa in untreated celiac disease (CD) patients with and without type 1 diabetes (T1D). METHODS: Seventy-four patients (45 female, 29 male, mean age 11.1 ± 6.8 years) who underwent small bowel biopsy were studied. CD without T1D was diagnosed in 18 patients, and CD with T1D was diagnosed in 15 patients. Normal small bowel mucosa was found in two T1D patients. Thirty-nine patients (mean age 12.8 ± 4.9 years) with other diagnoses (functional dyspepsia, duodenal ulcer, erosive gastritis, etc.) formed the control group. All CD patients had partial or subtotal villous atrophy according to the Marsh classification: Marsh grade IIIa in 9, grade IIIb in 21 and grade IIIc in 3 cases. Thirty-nine patients without CD and 2 with T1D had normal small bowel mucosa (Marsh grade 0). The densities of CD11c+, IDO+, CD103+, Langerin (CD207+) DCs and FOXP3+ Tregs were investigated by immunohistochemistry (on paraffin-embedded specimens) and immunofluorescence (on cryostat sections) methods using a combination of mono- and double-staining. Sixty-six serum samples were tested for IgA-tissue transglutaminase (tTG) using a fully automated EliA™ Celikey® IgA assay (Pharmacia Diagnostics, Freiburg, Germany). RESULTS: The density of CD11c+ DCs was significantly increased in CD patients compared with patients with normal mucosa (21.67 ± 2.49 vs 13.58 ± 1.51, P = 0.007). The numbers of FOXP3+ cells were significantly higher in CD patients (10.66 ± 1.50 vs 1.92 ± 0.37, P = 0.0002) and in patients with CD and coexisting T1D (8.11 ± 1.64 vs 1.92 ± 0.37, P = 0.002) compared with patients with normal mucosa. The density of FOXP3+ cells significantly correlated with the histological grade of atrophic changes in the small bowel mucosa according to the March classification (r = 0.62; P < 0.0001) and with levels of IgA antibody (r = 0.55; P < 0

  12. Prognosis for nonoperative management of small-bowel obstruction in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Yaffe, B H; Korelitz, B I

    1983-06-01

    Small-bowel obstruction has been the most common indication for surgical intervention in Crohn's disease. If, however, obstruction relents without surgery, new programs of management may reduce or eliminate the need for resection. Over 7 years, 25 of 26 patients were relieved of an index episode of ileal obstruction--in most cases aided by a small-bowel tube and intravenous ACTH. They were then maintained on medical therapy, sulfasalazine (SASZ) alone in seven, SASZ and intermittent prednisone in 18, and then 6-mercaptopurine with or without SASZ in 14 of those 18. Seven patients have had no recurrence of obstruction after an average follow-up of 52 months. Recurrent obstruction occurred 52 times in 18 patients over the next 16-106 months; in all the obstruction was again relieved nonoperatively. Twelve patients underwent elective surgery, for recurrent obstruction in nine. Eight months seemed to offer a useful cutoff criterion for the likelihood of recurrence. When recurrence of obstruction took place within 8 months, surgery was ultimately required in six of seven patients. In contrast, patients who weathered the first 8 months without obstruction did well; only three of 11 ultimately required resection. Of 18 patients without recurrent obstruction for 8 months, only five were eventually operated upon, two for other indications; in 11 of the 13 patients who underwent no operation, the quality of life was excellent or good. We conclude that if the initial episode of small-bowel obstruction can be reversed, subsequent maintenance therapy including SASZ, and/or 6-mercaptopurine with an intermittent liquid diet in some patients eliminates or postpones the need for resection without compromise of the quality of life.

  13. Adenovirus disease in six small bowel, kidney and heart transplant recipients; pathology and clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Vikas; Chou, Pauline C; Picken, Maria M

    2015-11-01

    Adenoviruses are emerging as important viral pathogens in hematopoietic stem cell and solid organ transplant recipients, impacting morbidity, graft survival, and even mortality. The risk seems to be highest in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients as well as heart, lung, and small bowel transplant recipients. Most of the adenovirus diseases develop in the first 6 months after transplantation, particularly in pediatric patients. Among abdominal organ recipients, small bowel grafts are most frequently affected, presumably due to the presence of a virus reservoir in the mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue. Management of these infections may be difficult and includes the reduction of immunosuppression, whenever possible, combined with antiviral therapy, if necessary. Therefore, an awareness of the pathology associated with such infections is important in order to allow early detection and specific treatment. We reviewed six transplant recipients (small bowel, kidney, and heart) with adenovirus graft involvement from two institutions. We sought to compare the diagnostic morphology and the clinical and laboratory findings. The histopathologic features of an adenovirus infection of the renal graft and one native kidney in a heart transplant recipient included a vaguely granulomatous mixed inflammatory infiltrate associated with rare cells showing a cytopathic effect (smudgy nuclei). A lymphocytic infiltrate, simulating T cell rejection, with admixture of eosinophils was also seen. In the small bowel grafts, there was a focal mixed inflammatory infiltrate with associated necrosis in addition to cytopathic effects. In the heart, allograft adenovirus infection was silent with no evidence of inflammatory changes. Immunohistochemical stain for adenovirus was positive in all grafts and in one native kidney. All patients were subsequently cleared of adenovirus infection, as evidenced by follow-up biopsies, with no loss of the grafts. Adenovirus infection can

  14. Endoscopic biliary stent migration with small bowel perforation in a liver transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Esterl, R M; St Laurent, M; Bay, M K; Speeg, K V; Halff, G A

    1997-03-01

    Intestinal perforation from a migrated biliary stent is a rare complication after endoscopic stent placement for benign biliary stricture. We provide the first description of stent migration and distal small-bowel perforation after stent placement for biliary anastomotic stricture in a liver transplant recipient. We review the current literature on the diagnosis and management of stent migration and intestinal perforation after endoscopic or percutaneous stent placement for benign and malignant biliary strictures. Early diagnosis and treatment of biliary stent migration and subsequent intestinal perforation are essential in transplant patients, in whom immunosuppression sometimes blunts signs and symptoms of intestinal perforation.

  15. A comparison of metoclopramide and trimebutine on small bowel motility in humans.

    PubMed

    Grandjouan, S; Chaussade, S; Couturier, D; Thierman-Duffaud, D; Henry, J F

    1989-08-01

    Trimebutine meleate and metoclopramide increase small bowel motility. The present manometric study of the human normal interdigestive duodeno-jejunal motility demonstrated two different pharmacological effects in 15 healthy volunteers. Trimebutine constantly induced a premature phase 3 activity (0.81 +/- 0.4 min after a 100-mg intravenous injection) with patterns similar to spontaneous phase 3. Metoclopramide increased the motility index (contractile activity) during phase 2 without inducing a premature phase 3. No significant variations in plasma motilin concentration were noticed after either trimebutine or metoclopramide. The pancreatic polypeptide concentration rose significantly after metoclopramide injection. PMID:2518853

  16. Small bowel Dieulafoy lesions: An uncommon cause of obscure bleeding in cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Holleran, Grainne; Hussey, Mary; McNamara, Deirdre

    2016-08-25

    Dieulafoy lesions (DLs) are an uncommon cause of gastrointestinal bleeding, accounting for up to 2% of cases overall. They are largely under recognised and difficult to treat. Up to 95% occur in the stomach, and only case reports document their occurrence in the small bowel (SB). Little is known about their pathophysiology, although there have been associations made previously with chronic liver disease, thought to be due to the erosive effects of alcohol on the mucosa overlying the abnormally dilated vessels. We present a case series of 4 patients with a long duration of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding, who were diagnosed with small intestinal DLs and incidentally diagnosed with chronic liver disease. The histories describe the challenges in both diagnosis and treatment of small intestinal DLs. Our case series suggest a previously unreported link between chronic liver disease and SB DLs which may be due to anatomical vasculature changes or a shift in angiogenic factors as a consequence of portal hypertension or liver cirrhosis.

  17. Small bowel Dieulafoy lesions: An uncommon cause of obscure bleeding in cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Holleran, Grainne; Hussey, Mary; McNamara, Deirdre

    2016-01-01

    Dieulafoy lesions (DLs) are an uncommon cause of gastrointestinal bleeding, accounting for up to 2% of cases overall. They are largely under recognised and difficult to treat. Up to 95% occur in the stomach, and only case reports document their occurrence in the small bowel (SB). Little is known about their pathophysiology, although there have been associations made previously with chronic liver disease, thought to be due to the erosive effects of alcohol on the mucosa overlying the abnormally dilated vessels. We present a case series of 4 patients with a long duration of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding, who were diagnosed with small intestinal DLs and incidentally diagnosed with chronic liver disease. The histories describe the challenges in both diagnosis and treatment of small intestinal DLs. Our case series suggest a previously unreported link between chronic liver disease and SB DLs which may be due to anatomical vasculature changes or a shift in angiogenic factors as a consequence of portal hypertension or liver cirrhosis.

  18. Relationship of Bowel MR Imaging to Health-related Quality of Life Measures in Newly Diagnosed Pediatric Small Bowel Crohn Disease.

    PubMed

    Dillman, Jonathan R; Carlos, Ruth C; Smith, Ethan A; Davenport, Matthew S; De Matos Maillard, Vera; Adler, Jeremy

    2016-08-01

    Purpose To determine if utility measures of health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in pediatric small bowel Crohn disease (a) change in response to infliximab therapy, (b) correlate with proxy parent or guardian assessments, and (c) correlate with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and laboratory markers of intestinal active inflammation. Materials and Methods This prospective single-center cohort study was approved by the institutional review board and was compliant with HIPAA. Parental informed consent and subject assent were obtained from all study participants. Twenty-six children with newly diagnosed small bowel Crohn disease receiving infliximab therapy were prospectively enrolled. All subjects underwent measurement of HRQOL utilities (visual analog scale [VAS], time trade-off [TTO], and standard gamble [SG]), MR enterography, and laboratory assessment at baseline and 6 months later. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to compare paired nonparametric data; Spearman correlation (ρ) was used to assess bivariate relationships. Results The median VAS score was 47.5 (interquartile range [IQR]: 20.0-52.2) before infliximab therapy and 83.0 (IQR: 62.0-92.0) at follow-up (P = .0003). There was positive correlation between subject and parent or guardian change in VAS score between baseline and follow-up (ρ = 0.71; P = .0006). The authors identified significant negative correlations between VAS score and MR imaging bowel wall arterial phase enhancement after contrast material administration at baseline (ρ = -0.57, P = .0032) as well as between change in VAS score and change in bowel wall enhancement in the arterial phase at contrast-enhanced MR imaging over time (ρ = -0.51, P = .02). No correlations between VAS score and laboratory inflammatory markers were identified. Conclusion VAS assessment of HRQOL changes over time in response to infliximab therapy in children with small bowel Crohn disease. There are statistically significant correlations between child

  19. Segmental small bowel necrosis associated with antiphospholipid syndrome: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qun-Ying; Ye, Xiao-Hua; Ding, Jin; Wu, Xiao-Kang

    2015-01-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome is a multi-system disease characterized by the formation of thromboembolic complications and/or pregnancy morbidity, and with persistently increased titers of antiphospholipid antibodies. We report the case of a 50-year-old, previously healthy man who presented with fever and new-onset, dull abdominal pain. A contrast-enhanced computed tomography scan showed segmental small bowel obstruction, for which an emergency laparotomy was performed. Histopathologic examination of resected tissues revealed multiple intestinal and mesenteric thromboses of small vessels. Laboratory tests for serum antiphospholipid (anticardiolipin IgM) and anti-β2-glycoprotein I antibodies were positive. Despite proactive implementation of anticoagulation, steroid, and antibiotic therapies, the patient’s condition rapidly deteriorated, and he died 22 d after admission. This case highlights that antiphospholipid syndrome should be suspected in patients with unexplainable ischemic bowel and intestinal necrosis presenting with insidious clinical features that may be secondary to the disease, as early diagnosis is critical to implement timely treatments in order to ameliorate the disease course. PMID:25852299

  20. Comprehensive molecular pathology analysis of small bowel adenocarcinoma reveals novel targets with potential for clinical utility

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Paul; Fuchs, Marc-Aurel; Alderdice, Matthew; McCabe, Clare M.; Bingham, Victoria; McGready, Claire; Tripathi, Shailesh; Emmert-Streib, Frank; Loughrey, Maurice B.; McQuaid, Stephen; Maxwell, Perry; Hamilton, Peter W.; Turkington, Richard; James, Jacqueline A.; Wilson, Richard H.; Salto-Tellez, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Small bowel accounts for only 0.5% of cancer cases in the US but incidence rates have been rising at 2.4% per year over the past decade. One-third of these are adenocarcinomas but little is known about their molecular pathology and no molecular markers are available for clinical use. Using a retrospective 28 patient matched normal-tumor cohort, next-generation sequencing, gene expression arrays and CpG methylation arrays were used for molecular profiling. Next-generation sequencing identified novel mutations in IDH1, CDH1, KIT, FGFR2, FLT3, NPM1, PTEN, MET, AKT1, RET, NOTCH1 and ERBB4. Array data revealed 17% of CpGs and 5% of RNA transcripts assayed to be differentially methylated and expressed respectively (p < 0.01). Merging gene expression and DNA methylation data revealed CHN2 as consistently hypermethylated and downregulated in this disease (Spearman −0.71, p < 0.001). Mutations in TP53 which were found in more than half of the cohort (15/28) and Kazald1 hypomethylation were both were indicative of poor survival (p = 0.03, HR = 3.2 and p = 0.01, HR = 4.9 respectively). By integrating high-throughput mutational, gene expression and DNA methylation data, this study reveals for the first time the distinct molecular profile of small bowel adenocarcinoma and highlights potential clinically exploitable markers. PMID:26315110

  1. Small bowel entrapment and ureteropelvic junction disruption associated with L3 Chance fracture-dislocation.

    PubMed

    Pesenti, Sebastien; Blondel, Benjamin; Faure, Alice; Peltier, Emilie; Launay, Franck; Jouve, Jean-Luc

    2016-09-16

    Paediatric Chance fracture are rare lesions but often associated with abdominal injuries. We herein present the case of a seven years old patient who sustained an entrapment of small bowel and an ureteropelvic disruption associated with a Chance fracture and spine dislocation following a traffic accident. Initial X-rays and computed tomographic (CT) scan showed a Chance fracture with dislocation of L3 vertebra, with an incarceration of a small bowel loop in the spinal canal and a complete section of the left lumbar ureter. Paraplegia was noticed on the initial neurological examination. A posterior L2-L4 osteosynthesis was performed firstly. In a second time she underwent a sus umbilical laparotomy to release the incarcerated jejunum loop in the spinal canal. An end-to-end anastomosis was performed on a JJ probe to suture the left injured ureter. One month after the traumatism, she started to complain of severe headaches related to a leakage of cerebrospinalis fluid. Three months after the traumatism there was a clear regression of the leakage. One year after the trauma, an anterior intervertebral fusion was done. At final follow-up, no neurologic recovery was noticed. In case of Chance fracture, all physicians should think about abdominal injuries even if the patient is asymptomatic. Initial abdominal CT scan and magnetic resonance imaging provide in such case crucial info for management of the spine and the associated lesions. PMID:27672641

  2. The weekend effect: does time of admission impact management and outcomes of small bowel obstruction?

    PubMed Central

    McVay, Derek P.; Walker, Avery S.; Nelson, Daniel W.; Porta, Christopher R.; Causey, Marlin W.; Brown, Tommy A.

    2014-01-01

    Aims: To determine whether day and time of admission influences the practice patterns of the admitting general surgeon and subsequent outcomes for patients diagnosed with small bowel obstruction. Methods: A retrospective database review was carried out, covering patients admitted with the presumed diagnosis of partial small bowel obstruction from 2004–2011. Results: A total of 404 patients met the inclusion criteria. One hundred and thirty-nine were admitted during the day, 93 at night and 172 on the weekend. Overall 30.2% of the patients were managed operatively with no significant difference between the groups (P = 0.89); however, of patients taken to the operating room, patients admitted during the day received operative intervention over 24 hours earlier than those admitted at a weekend, 0.79 days vs 1.90 days, respectively (P = 0.05). Overall mortality was low at 1.7%, with no difference noted between the groups (P = 0.35). Likewise there was no difference in morbidity rates between the three groups (P = 0.90). Conclusions: Despite a faster time to operative intervention in those patients admitted during the day, our study revealed that time of admission does not appear to correlate to patient outcome or mortality. PMID:25008263

  3. Small bowel entrapment and ureteropelvic junction disruption associated with L3 Chance fracture-dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Pesenti, Sebastien; Blondel, Benjamin; Faure, Alice; Peltier, Emilie; Launay, Franck; Jouve, Jean-Luc

    2016-01-01

    Paediatric Chance fracture are rare lesions but often associated with abdominal injuries. We herein present the case of a seven years old patient who sustained an entrapment of small bowel and an ureteropelvic disruption associated with a Chance fracture and spine dislocation following a traffic accident. Initial X-rays and computed tomographic (CT) scan showed a Chance fracture with dislocation of L3 vertebra, with an incarceration of a small bowel loop in the spinal canal and a complete section of the left lumbar ureter. Paraplegia was noticed on the initial neurological examination. A posterior L2-L4 osteosynthesis was performed firstly. In a second time she underwent a sus umbilical laparotomy to release the incarcerated jejunum loop in the spinal canal. An end-to-end anastomosis was performed on a JJ probe to suture the left injured ureter. One month after the traumatism, she started to complain of severe headaches related to a leakage of cerebrospinalis fluid. Three months after the traumatism there was a clear regression of the leakage. One year after the trauma, an anterior intervertebral fusion was done. At final follow-up, no neurologic recovery was noticed. In case of Chance fracture, all physicians should think about abdominal injuries even if the patient is asymptomatic. Initial abdominal CT scan and magnetic resonance imaging provide in such case crucial info for management of the spine and the associated lesions. PMID:27672641

  4. Irritable bowel syndrome and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth: meaningful association or unnecessary hype.

    PubMed

    Ghoshal, Uday C; Srivastava, Deepakshi

    2014-03-14

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common condition characterized by abdominal pain or discomfort, bloating, and altered stool form and passage. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) is a condition in which there is overgrowth of bacteria in small bowel in excess of 10⁵ colony forming units per milliliter on culture of the upper gut aspirate. Frequency of SIBO varied from 4%-78% among patients with IBS and from 1%-40% among controls. Higher frequency in some studies might be due to fallacious criteria [post-lactulose breath-hydrogen rise 20 PPM above basal within 90 min (early-peak)]. Glucose hydrogen breath test (GHBT) has a low sensitivity to diagnose SIBO. Hence, studies based on GHBT might have under-estimated frequency of SIBO. Therefore, it is important to analyze these studies carefully to evaluate whether the reported association between IBS and SIBO is over or under-projected. This review evaluates studies on association between SIBO and IBS, discordance between different studies, their strength and weakness including methodological issues and evidence on therapeutic manipulation of gut flora on symptoms of IBS. PMID:24627585

  5. Comprehensive molecular pathology analysis of small bowel adenocarcinoma reveals novel targets with potential for clinical utility.

    PubMed

    Alvi, Muhammad A; McArt, Darragh G; Kelly, Paul; Fuchs, Marc-Aurel; Alderdice, Matthew; McCabe, Clare M; Bingham, Victoria; McGready, Claire; Tripathi, Shailesh; Emmert-Streib, Frank; Loughrey, Maurice B; McQuaid, Stephen; Maxwell, Perry; Hamilton, Peter W; Turkington, Richard; James, Jacqueline A; Wilson, Richard H; Salto-Tellez, Manuel

    2015-08-28

    Small bowel accounts for only 0.5% of cancer cases in the US but incidence rates have been rising at 2.4% per year over the past decade. One-third of these are adenocarcinomas but little is known about their molecular pathology and no molecular markers are available for clinical use. Using a retrospective 28 patient matched normal-tumor cohort, next-generation sequencing, gene expression arrays and CpG methylation arrays were used for molecular profiling. Next-generation sequencing identified novel mutations in IDH1, CDH1, KIT, FGFR2, FLT3, NPM1, PTEN, MET, AKT1, RET, NOTCH1 and ERBB4. Array data revealed 17% of CpGs and 5% of RNA transcripts assayed to be differentially methylated and expressed respectively (p < 0.01). Merging gene expression and DNA methylation data revealed CHN2 as consistently hypermethylated and downregulated in this disease (Spearman -0.71, p < 0.001). Mutations in TP53 which were found in more than half of the cohort (15/28) and Kazald1 hypomethylation were both were indicative of poor survival (p = 0.03, HR = 3.2 and p = 0.01, HR = 4.9 respectively). By integrating high-throughput mutational, gene expression and DNA methylation data, this study reveals for the first time the distinct molecular profile of small bowel adenocarcinoma and highlights potential clinically exploitable markers.

  6. Irritable bowel syndrome and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth: Meaningful association or unnecessary hype

    PubMed Central

    Ghoshal, Uday C; Srivastava, Deepakshi

    2014-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common condition characterized by abdominal pain or discomfort, bloating, and altered stool form and passage. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) is a condition in which there is overgrowth of bacteria in small bowel in excess of 105 colony forming units per milliliter on culture of the upper gut aspirate. Frequency of SIBO varied from 4%-78% among patients with IBS and from 1%-40% among controls. Higher frequency in some studies might be due to fallacious criteria [post-lactulose breath-hydrogen rise 20 PPM above basal within 90 min (early-peak)]. Glucose hydrogen breath test (GHBT) has a low sensitivity to diagnose SIBO. Hence, studies based on GHBT might have under-estimated frequency of SIBO. Therefore, it is important to analyze these studies carefully to evaluate whether the reported association between IBS and SIBO is over or under-projected. This review evaluates studies on association between SIBO and IBS, discordance between different studies, their strength and weakness including methodological issues and evidence on therapeutic manipulation of gut flora on symptoms of IBS. PMID:24627585

  7. Conservative treatment of early postoperative small bowel obstruction with obliterative peritonitis

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Jian-Feng; Zhu, Wei-Ming; Yu, Wen-Kui; Li, Ning; Li, Jie-Shou

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of somatostatin and dexamethasone on early postoperative small bowel obstruction with obliterative peritonitis (EPSBO-OP). METHODS: This prospective randomized study included 70 patients diagnosed with EPSBO-OP from June 2002 to January 2009. Patients were randomized into two groups: a control group received total parenteral nutrition and nasogastric (NG) tube feeding; and an intervention group received, in addition, somatostatin and dexamethasone treatment. The primary endpoints were time to resolution of bowel obstruction and length of hospital stay, and the secondary endpoints were daily NG output and NG feeding duration, treatment-related complications, postoperative obstruction relapse, and patient satisfaction. RESULTS: Thirty-six patients were allocated to the intervention group and 34 to the control group. No patient needed to undergo surgery. Patients in the intervention group had an earlier resolution of bowel obstruction (22.4 ± 9.1 vs 29.9 ± 10.1 d, P = 0.002). Lower daily NG output (583 ± 208 vs 922 ± 399 mL/d, P < 0.001), shorter duration of NG tube use (16.7 ± 8.8 vs 27.7 ± 9.9 d, P < 0.001), and shorter length of hospital stay (25.8 vs 34.9 d, P = 0.001) were observed in the intervention group. The rate of treatment-related complications (P = 0.770) and relapse of obstruction (P = 0.357) were comparable between the two groups. There were no significant differences in postoperative satisfaction at 1, 2 and 3 years between the two groups. CONCLUSION: Somatostatin and dexamethasone for EPSBO-OP promote resolution of obstruction and shorten hospital stay, and are safe for symptom control without increasing obstruction relapse. PMID:24379592

  8. Double-illumination photoacoustic microscopy of intestinal hemodynamics following massive small bowel resection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Junjie; Rowland, Kathryn J.; Wang, Lidai; Maslov, Konstantin I.; Warner, Brad W.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2012-02-01

    Massive small bowel resection (SBR) results in villus angiogenesis and intestinal adaptation. The exact mechanism that causes intestinal villus angiogenesis remains unknown. We hypothesize that hemodynamic changes within the remnant bowel after SBR will trigger intestinal angiogenesis. To validate this, we used photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) to image the microvascular system of the intestine in C57B6 mice and to measure blood flow and oxygen saturation (sO2) of a supplying artery and vein. Baseline measurements were made 6 cm proximal to the ileal-cecal junction (ICJ) prior to resection. A 50% proximal bowel resection was then performed, and measurements were again recorded at the same location immediately, 1, 3 and 7 days following resection. The results show that arterial and venous sO2 were similar prior to SBR. Immediately following SBR, the arterial and venous sO2 decreased by 14.3 +/- 2.7% and 32.7 +/- 6.6%, respectively, while the arterial and venous flow speed decreased by 62.9 +/- 17.3% and 60.0 +/- 20.1%, respectively. Such significant decreases in sO2 and blood flow indicate a hypoxic state after SBR. Within one week after SBR, both sO2 and blood flow speed had gradually recovered. By 7 days after SBR, arterial and venous sO2 had increased to 101.0 +/- 2.9% and 82.7 +/- 7.3% of the baseline values, respectively, while arterial and venous flow speed had increased to 106.0 +/- 21.4% and 150.0 +/- 29.6% of the baseline values, respectively. Such increases in sO2 and blood flow may result from angiogenesis following SBR.

  9. Adhesive small bowel obstruction (ASBO) in children--role of conservative management.

    PubMed

    Vijay, K; Anindya, C; Bhanu, P; Mohan, M; Rao, P L N G

    2005-03-01

    Adhesive small bowel obstruction (ASBO) is an annoying postoperative complication. Though the diagnosis can be made easily, the role of conservative management in children is controversial. Hence a study was conducted to determine the role of conservative management, and to identify the factors that can predict / influence the outcome of conservative treatment in children with ASBO. Children admitted with ASBO from 1980 to 2002 (22 year period) formed the material for this study. The data was analyzed with respect to the influence of age at the time of presentation, primary disease for which original laparotomy was done, time interval between the primary surgery and the development of ASBO and the number of laparotomies prior to the development of ASBO on the outcome of conservative management. There were 74 episodes of ASBO in 69 children (Five children had two episodes). Out of 74 episodes, 5 episodes (6.75%) needed immediate laparotomy for suspected gangrene. All others were managed conservatively. Of the 69 episodes managed conservatively, 36 responded to conservative treatment (2-5 days) while 33 required subsequent surgical intervention, with 11 of them requiring bowel resection (two for gangrene and 9 for bowel damage during adhesiolysis) and in the rest 22 cases adhesiolysis. A substantial number of children with ASBO respond well to conservative treatment. Majority of the children developed ASBO within three months after the primary laparotomy. Children below the age of one year (at the time of presentation with ASBO) responded poorly to the conservative management. Children who had primary surgery for Hirschsprung's disease and intussusception also appeared to have responded poorly to conservative management, but statistically not significant. Time interval between the primary surgery and the number of laparotomies before the child developed ASBO did not influence the outcome of conservative management.

  10. Unusual presentation of intussusception of the small bowel with peutz jeghers syndrome: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Shrivastava, Ashish; Gupta, Akshara; Gupta, Achal; Shrivastava, Jyoti

    2013-10-01

    The Peutz Jeghers syndrome (PJS) is an autosomal dominant disorder which is characterised by hamartomatous polyposes of the gastrointestinal tract, melanin pigmentation of the skin and mucous membranes, and an increased risk for cancer. We are reporting a case of a 15-year-old male with Peutz Jeghers syndrome, who presented to us with features of chronic intestinal obstruction and anaemia. Initially, patient was managed conservatively, but later on, an elective exploratory laparotomy was done for definitive management of intussusception. Laparotomy revealed a jejuno-jejunal intussusception with spontaneous recanalisation of gut which contained a long segment of gangrenous small bowel in the lumen. Resection and anastomosis of the jejunal segment was done. To the best of our knowledge, this might be the first case report on spontaneous recanalisation of small intestine. PMID:24298508

  11. Quantitative distribution of radiolabeled 5-aminosalicylic acid enemas in patients with left-sided ulcerative colitis

    SciTech Connect

    Vitti, R.A.; Meyers, F.; Knight, L.C.; Siegel, J.A.; Malmud, L.S.; Fisher, R.S. )

    1989-11-01

    Rectally administered suspensions of 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) are topically effective in treating left-sided ulcerative colitis. The extent to which the contents of these enemas are distributed to inflamed mucosal linings has not previously been determined. This study was undertaken to validate a technique for labeling 5-ASA with 99mTc and to quantitate the distribution of (99mTc)5-ASA in eight patients with left-sided ulcerative colitis. Eight patients underwent three colonic scintigraphic exams within five days, receiving a 60-ml radiolabeled 5-ASA enema into the unprepared rectum for each study, with sequential anterior abdominal images obtained for 4 hr. Activity within the rectum, sigmoid, descending, transverse, and ascending colon was quantitated. Over 50% of the labeled enema had advanced beyond the rectum in five of eight patients and in six of eight patients by 30 min and 60 min, respectively. The distribution of (99mTc)5-ASA was quantitatively reproducible when repeated in the same patient on different days, despite apparent visual differences. By 2 hr, the amount of the enema present within the rectum decreased significantly (P less than 0.05) compared to the initial distribution. The amount of enema present within the descending colon was increased significantly at 0.5 hr (P less than 0.05) and at 2 hr (P less than 0.01). There were no significant changes in the distribution from initial values for the sigmoid, transverse, or ascending colon at any time. In each of these cases the spread of the enema to or beyond the extent of disease was documented. In patients with left-sided ulcerative colitis, small volume (99mTc)5-ASA enemas reliably reach the area of inflammation.

  12. A long-Segmental Vascular Malformation in the Small Bowel Presenting With Gastrointestinal Bleeding in a Preschool-Aged Child

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yeoun Joo; Hwang, Jae-Yeon; Cho, Yong Hoon; Kim, Yong-Woo; Kim, Tae Un; Shin, Dong Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding in pediatric patients has several causes. Vascular malformation of the small bowel is a rare disease leading to pediatric GI bleeding. To our knowledge, few reports describe ultrasound and computed tomography findings of venous malformations involving the small bowel. We present a case of long-segmental and circumferential vascular malformation that led to GI bleeding in a pre-school aged child, focusing on the radiologic findings. Although vascular malformation including of the GI tract is rare in children, it should be considered when GI bleeding occurs in pediatric patients. PMID:27110342

  13. Smooth muscle overexpression of IGF-I induces a novel adaptive response to small bowel resection.

    PubMed

    Knott, Andrew W; Juno, Russell J; Jarboe, Marcus D; Profitt, Sherri A; Erwin, Christopher R; Smith, Eric P; Fagin, James A; Warner, Brad W

    2004-09-01

    Prior studies of intestinal adaptation after massive small bowel resection (SBR) have focused on growth factors and their effects on amplification of the gut mucosa. Because adaptive changes have also been described in intestinal smooth muscle, we sought to determine the effect of targeted smooth muscle growth factor overexpression on resection-induced intestinal adaptation. Male transgenic mice with smooth muscle cell overexpression of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) by virtue of an alpha-smooth muscle actin promoter were obtained. SMP8 IGF-I transgenic (IGF-I TG) and nontransgenic (NT) littermates underwent 50% proximal SBR or sham operation and were then killed after 3 or 28 days. NT mice showed the expected alterations in mucosal adaptive parameters after SBR, such as increased wet weight and villus height. The IGF-I TG mice had inherently taller villi, which did not increase significantly after SBR. In addition, IGF-I TG mice had a 50% postresection persistent increase in remnant intestinal length, which was associated with an early decline and later increase in relative mucosal surface area. These results indicate that growth factor overexpression within the muscularis layer of the bowel wall induces significant postresection adaptive intestinal lengthening and a unique mucosal response. IGF-I signaling within the muscle wall may play an important role in the pathogenesis of resection-induced adaptation.

  14. Outcome of Jejuno-Ileal Atresia Associated with Intraoperative Finding of Volvulus of Small Bowel

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Shalini; Sarin, Yogesh Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To compare the outcome of patients with jeuno-ileal atresia (JIA) associated with the intraoperative finding of volvulus of small bowel (group A) with that of JIA without volvulus (group B). Materials and Methods: It is a retrospective observational study conducted at one of the two units of Pediatric Surgery, in a tertiary care public hospital of India, from January 2001 to December 2010. Hospital records were retrieved and analyzed. During this time period, 65 patients with JIA were operated of which 40 (61.5%) had ileal atresia (IA) and 25 (38.5%) had jejunal atresia (JA). Eleven (16.9%) patients had associated intraoperative finding of volvulus of small bowel (Group A) and were studied and compared with group B- not associated with intraoperative findings of volvulus of small bowel (n=54). The demography, clinical features, operative findings, associated anomalies, anastomotic leakage, and outcome were compared. Results: Group A comprising of 6 boys and 5 girls, had 8 IA and 3 JA; one case each of Type 3b and Type 4 JIA was seen. Associated anomalies included meconium ileus (n=2), Down’s syndrome (n=1) and malrotation (n=1). Anastomotic leak rate was 75% for IA and 66.7% for JA. The mortality was 91% in Group A, 100% for IA and 67% for JA. Group B comprising of 37 boys and 17 girls, had 32 IA and 22 JA; 2 cases of Type 4 and 1 case of Type 3b JIA was seen. Associated anomalies were malrotation (n=2), meconium ileus (n=1), exomphalos (n=1), gastroschisis (n=1) and ileal duplication cyst (n=1). The anastomotic leak rate for JA was 8/21 (38.1%) and IA was 3/28 (10.7%); persistent obstruction was seen in 3/21(14.3%) JA and 1/28 (3.6%) IA patients. In group B, overall mortality rate was 8/22 (36.4%) for JA and 9/32 (28%) for IA. The morbidity and mortality was significantly higher in group A when compared to group B. Conclusions: JIA associated with volvulus (without malrotation) is a sinister entity with a dismal outcome in our experience. PMID:26023396

  15. Concurrent Occurrence of Tumor in Colon and Small Bowel following Intestinal Obstruction: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Nejatollahi, Seyed Mohammad Reza; Etemad, Omid

    2016-01-01

    An intestinal obstruction occurs when either the small or large intestine is partly or completely blocked so it prevents passing the food or fluid through the small/large bowel. This blockage is due to the existence of a mechanical obstruction such as foreign material, mass, hernia, or volvulus. Common symptoms include cramping pain, nausea and vomiting, changes in bowel habits, inability to pass stool, and lack of gas. We present a case of an 83-year-old man who had been referred to Taleghani Hospital with symptoms of bowel obstruction. He underwent the surgery. The findings of exploration of the entire abdomen showed two types of mass separately in two different organs. In postoperative workup, pathology reported two types of tumors (adenocarcinoma and neuroendocrine tumors). PMID:27200205

  16. Concurrent Occurrence of Tumor in Colon and Small Bowel following Intestinal Obstruction: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Nejatollahi, Seyed Mohammad Reza; Etemad, Omid

    2016-01-01

    An intestinal obstruction occurs when either the small or large intestine is partly or completely blocked so it prevents passing the food or fluid through the small/large bowel. This blockage is due to the existence of a mechanical obstruction such as foreign material, mass, hernia, or volvulus. Common symptoms include cramping pain, nausea and vomiting, changes in bowel habits, inability to pass stool, and lack of gas. We present a case of an 83-year-old man who had been referred to Taleghani Hospital with symptoms of bowel obstruction. He underwent the surgery. The findings of exploration of the entire abdomen showed two types of mass separately in two different organs. In postoperative workup, pathology reported two types of tumors (adenocarcinoma and neuroendocrine tumors). PMID:27200205

  17. Ventriculoperitoneal shunt with a rare twist: small-bowel ischemia and necrosis secondary to knotting of peritoneal catheter.

    PubMed

    Tan, Lee A; Kasliwal, Manish K; Moftakhar, Roham; Munoz, Lorenzo F

    2014-09-01

    Small-bowel ischemia and necrosis due to knotting of the peritoneal catheter is an extremely rare complication related to a ventriculoperitoneal shunt (VPS). A 3-month-old girl, with a history of Chiari II malformation and myelomeningocele (MM) after undergoing right occipital VPS insertion and MM repair at birth, presented to the emergency department with a high-grade fever. Examination of a CSF sample obtained via shunt tap raised suspicion for the presence of infection. Antibiotic therapy was initiated, and subsequently the VPS was removed and an external ventricular drain was placed. Intraoperatively, as attempts at pulling the distal catheter from the scalp incision were met with resistance, the distal catheter was cut and left in the abdomen while the remainder of the shunt system was successfully removed. While the patient was awaiting definitive shunt revision surgery to replace the VPS, she developed abdominal distension due to small-bowel obstruction. An emergency exploratory laparotomy revealed a knot in the distal catheter looping around and strangulating the distal ileum, causing small-bowel ischemia and necrosis in addition to the obstruction. A small-bowel resection with ileostomy was performed, with subsequent placement of ventriculoatrial shunt for treatment of hydrocephalus. The authors report this exceedingly rare clinical scenario to highlight the fact that any retained distal catheter must be carefully managed with immediate abdominal exploration to remove the distal catheter to avoid bowel necrosis as pulling of a knotted peritoneal catheter may strangulate the bowel and cause ischemia, with significant clinical morbidity and possible mortality.

  18. Small bowel adenocarcinoma arising in a patient with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia: A case report

    PubMed Central

    YOSHIOKA, YUICHIRO; NOZAWA, HIROAKI; TANAKA, JUNICHIRO; NISHIKAWA, TAKESHI; TANAKA, TOSHIAKI; KIYOMATSU, TOMOMICHI; KAWAI, KAZUSHIGE; HATA, KEISUKE; KAZAMA, SHINSUKE; YAMAGUCHI, HIRONORI; ISHIHARA, SOICHIRO; SUNAMI, EIJI; KITAYAMA, JOJI; WATANABE, TOSHIAKI

    2016-01-01

    Patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) are reportedly at a lower overall risk of malignancies, and small bowel adenocarcinoma (SBA) arising in a HHT patient is extremely rare. In this study, the case of a 37-year-old female with HHT who developed a poorly differentiated jejunal adenocarcinoma five years after ileocecal resection for multiple colonic adenomas is presented. The patient underwent curative resection of the cancer invading the ileum and the mesentery of the transverse colon, but had to overcome critical complications perioperatively, stemming from HHT-associated peripheral capillary dilatation and arteriovenous malformation, including nosebleeds and possible infusion-induced air embolism through pulmonary shunts. The patient subsequently received adjuvant chemotherapy including capecitabine and oxaliplatin for 6 months, and currently remains alive without any evidence of recurrence 12 months after the second surgery. This patient with SBA was an instructive case demonstrating the necessity of careful attention during major surgery in HHT. PMID:26998137

  19. Involvement of a Surgical Service Improves Patient Satisfaction in Patients Admitted with Small Bowel Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Schmocker, Ryan K.; Vang, Xia; Cherney Stafford, Linda M.; Leverson, Glen E.; Winslow, Emily R.

    2015-01-01

    Background For patients with small bowel obstruction (SBO), surgical care has been associated with improved outcomes; however it remains unknown how it impacts satisfaction. Methods Patients admitted for SBO who completed the hospital satisfaction survey were eligible. Only those with adhesions or hernias were included. Chart review extracted structural characteristics and outcomes. Results 47 patients were included; 74% (n=35) were admitted to a surgical service. 26% (n=12) were admitted to medicine, and 50% of those (n=6) had surgical consultation. Patients with surgical involvement as the consulting or primary service (SURG) had higher satisfaction with the hospital than those cared for by the medical service (80% SURG; 33% MED, p=0.015). SURG patients also had higher satisfaction with physicians (74% SURG; 44% MED; p=0.015). Conclusions Surgical involvement during SBO admissions is associated with increased patient satisfaction, and adds further weight to the recommendation that these patients be cared for by surgeons. PMID:25886702

  20. Capsule Endoscopy for Ileitis with Potential Involvement of Other Sections of the Small Bowel

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Ileitis is defined as inflammation of the ileum. This condition includes ulcers, aphthous ulcers, erosions, and nodular or erythematous mucosa. Various etiologies are associated with ileitis. Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, medications such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, infectious conditions, neoplasms, infiltrative disorders, vasculitides, spondyloarthritis, endometriosis, and radiation therapy-related conditions involve the ileum. However, the differential diagnosis of terminal ileitis can be difficult in many cases. Video capsule endoscopy (VCE) has become a useful tool for the diagnosis of a variety of small bowel lesions. This review describes each of the various conditions associated with ileitis and the diagnostic value of VCE for ileitis, which may help identify and evaluate these conditions in clinical practice. Based on the information provided by VCE, a definitive diagnosis could be made using the patients' medical history, clinical course, laboratory and ileocolonoscopic findings, radiologic imaging findings, and histologic findings. PMID:26880904

  1. MicroRNAs associated with small bowel neuroendocrine tumours and their metastases.

    PubMed

    Miller, Helen C; Frampton, Adam E; Malczewska, Anna; Ottaviani, Silvia; Stronach, Euan A; Flora, Rashpal; Kaemmerer, Daniel; Schwach, Gert; Pfragner, Roswitha; Faiz, Omar; Kos-Kudła, Beata; Hanna, George B; Stebbing, Justin; Castellano, Leandro; Frilling, Andrea

    2016-09-01

    Novel molecular analytes are needed in small bowel neuroendocrine tumours (SBNETs) to better determine disease aggressiveness and predict treatment response. In this study, we aimed to profile the global miRNome of SBNETs, and identify microRNAs (miRNAs) involved in tumour progression for use as potential biomarkers. Two independent miRNA profiling experiments were performed (n=90), including primary SBNETs (n=28), adjacent normal small bowel (NSB; n=14), matched lymph node (LN) metastases (n=24), normal LNs (n=7), normal liver (n=2) and liver metastases (n=15). We then evaluated potentially targeted genes by performing integrated computational analyses. We discovered 39 miRNAs significantly deregulated in SBNETs compared with adjacent NSB. The most upregulated (miR-204-5p, miR-7-5p and miR-375) were confirmed by qRT-PCR. Two miRNAs (miR-1 and miR-143-3p) were significantly downregulated in LN and liver metastases compared with primary tumours. Furthermore, we identified upregulated gene targets for miR-1 and miR-143-3p in an existing SBNET dataset, which could contribute to disease progression, and show that these miRNAs directly regulate FOSB and NUAK2 oncogenes. Our study represents the largest global miRNA profiling of SBNETs using matched primary tumour and metastatic samples. We revealed novel miRNAs deregulated during SBNET disease progression, and important miRNA-mRNA interactions. These miRNAs have the potential to act as biomarkers for patient stratification and may also be able to guide treatment decisions. Further experiments to define molecular mechanisms and validate these miRNAs in larger tissue cohorts and in biofluids are now warranted. PMID:27353039

  2. Effect of glutamine-supplemented total parenteral nutrition on the small bowel of septic rats.

    PubMed

    Ardawi, M S

    1992-08-01

    In order to study the effect of total parenteral nutrition (TPN) with or without glutamine supplementation in septic rats, septic Wistar albino rats were randomly assigned to receive 0.23 g of nitrogen and 113 kJ (100 g BW)(-1) per day in the form of amino acids with (group 2) or without (group 1) glutamine supplementation or 10% (w/v) glucose only (group 3). After 4 days of TPN treatments, rats receiving glutamine-supplemented TPN had a cumulative nitrogen balance of -24.4 +/- 3.3 mg N, which was significantly (P < 0.001) better compared to other TPN-treated groups. Septic rats of group 2 survived sepsis significantly (P < 0.001) better than those in groups 1 and 3. Glutamine-supplemented TPN treatment resulted in significant increases in jejunal weight (P < 0.001), DNA and protein contents (P < 0.001), villous height (P < 0.001) and crypt depth (P < 0.001) when compared with septic rats of group 1. Septic rats of group 2 extracted and metabolised glutamine by the small bowel at higher rates (P < 0.001) than that observed in septic rats of group 1. Increases in jejunal glutaminase (38.2%, P < 0.001) and decreases in glutamine synthetase (41.7%, P < 0.001) activities were observed in response to glutamine-supplemented TPN treatment. It is concluded that the administration of glutamine-supplemented TPN is beneficial to the small bowel of septic rats.

  3. Jejunal intussusception and small bowel transmural infarction in a baboon (Papio hamadryas anubis).

    PubMed

    Cary, Max E; Suarez-Chavez, Maria; Wolf, Roman F; Kosanke, Stanley D; White, Gary L

    2006-03-01

    A 4.3-y-old, colony-bred female baboon (Papio hamadryas anubis) of low social rank and exhibiting no clinically significant signs of illness or distress was found dead at the Oklahoma University Health Sciences Center baboon breeding facility at El Reno, OK. Prior to death she exhibited excessive grooming behavior both toward herself and other baboons. In addition, she was consistently shy, timid, reclusive, and prone to minimal sustained movement (that is, generally lethargic behavior). Animals of low social rank typically exhibit some degree of these behaviors in order to avoid surplus interactions with other animals within their groups, which can lead to conflict and injury. Accordingly, her death was surprising in view of the apparent lack of clinical signs. Necropsy established the cause for death as systemic shock with resultant cardiovascular collapse resulting from a massive jejunal intussusception. This intussusception and resulting entrapment of the jejunal mesenteric vasculature caused total occlusion of the small bowel blood supply, with resulting hemorrhage and ischemic necrosis (small bowel infarction). Jejunal intussusceptions generally are considered to be uncommon and therefore are rarely reported in either the veterinary or human literature. Of special interest was the cause for this intussusception, determined to have been a large hairball located at the most proximal portion of the jejunum. Extending from this hairball and traversing essentially the entire length of the jejunum was a braided strand of hair acting as a string foreign body about which the intussusception formed. In light of our findings we suggest that animals of low social rank exhibiting excessive grooming behavior and lethargy might merit clinical evaluation to rule out possible abdominal disorders.

  4. Small duct primary sclerosing cholangitis without inflammatory bowel disease is genetically different from large duct disease

    PubMed Central

    Næss, Sigrid; Björnsson, Einar; Anmarkrud, Jarl A.; Al Mamari, Said; Juran, Brian D.; Lazaridis, Konstantinos N.; Chapman, Roger; Bergquist, Annika; Melum, Espen; Marsh, Steven G. E.; Schrumpf, Erik; Lie, Benedicte A.; Boberg, Kirsten Muri; Karlsen, Tom H.; Hov, Johannes R.

    2014-01-01

    Background & aims Small duct primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is phenotypically a mild version of large duct PSC, but it is unknown whether these phenotypes share aetiology. We aimed to characterize their relationship by investigating genetic associations in the HLA complex, which represent the strongest genetic risk factors in large duct PSC. Methods Four classical HLA loci (HLA-A, HLA-B, HLA-C, HLA-DRB1) were genotyped in 87 small duct PSC patients, 485 large duct PSC patients and 1117 controls across three geographical regions. Results HLA-DRB1*13:01 (OR=2.0, 95% CI 1.2–3.4, P=0.01) and HLA-B*08 (OR=1.6, 95% CI 1.1–2.4, P=0.02) were significantly associated with small duct PSC compared with healthy controls. Based on the observed frequency of HLA-B*08 in small duct PSC, the strongest risk factor in large duct PSC, an estimated 32% (95% CI 4%–65%) of this population can be hypothesized to represent early stages or mild variants of large duct PSC. This subgroup may be constituted by small duct PSC patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), which greatly resembled large duct PSC in its HLA association. In contrast, small duct PSC without IBD was only associated with HLA-DRB1*13:01(P=0.03) and was otherwise distinctly dissimilar from large duct PSC. Conclusions Small duct PSC with IBD resembles large duct PSC in its HLA association and may represent early stages or mild variants of large duct disease. Different HLA associations in small duct PSC without IBD could indicate that this subgroup is a different entity. HLA-DRB1*13:01 may represent a specific risk factor for inflammatory bile duct disease. PMID:24517468

  5. Small Bowel Bacterial Overgrowth Associated with Persistence of Abdominal Symptoms in Children Treated with a Proton Pump Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Sieczkowska, Agnieszka; Landowski, Piotr; Zagozdzon, Pawel; Kaminska, Barbara; Lifschitz, Carlos

    2015-05-01

    Small bowel bacterial overgrowth (SBBO) was diagnosed in 22.5% of 40 children treated for 3 months with a proton pump inhibitor (PPI). Compared with those without SBBO, children with SBBO had higher frequency of abdominal pain, bloating, eructation, and flatulence. Patients with gastrointestinal symptoms after PPI treatment should be evaluated for SBBO rather than empirically prolonging PPI therapy. PMID:25681195

  6. Bowel Obstruction.

    PubMed

    Gore, Richard M; Silvers, Robert I; Thakrar, Kiran H; Wenzke, Daniel R; Mehta, Uday K; Newmark, Geraldine M; Berlin, Jonathan W

    2015-11-01

    Small bowel obstruction and large bowel obstruction account for approximately 20% of cases of acute abdominal surgical conditions. The role of the radiologist is to answer several key questions: Is obstruction present? What is the level of the obstruction? What is the cause of the obstruction? What is the severity of the obstruction? Is the obstruction simple or closed loop? Is strangulation, ischemia, or perforation present? In this presentation, the radiologic approach to and imaging findings of patients with known or suspected bowel obstruction are presented. PMID:26526435

  7. Evaluation of radiation exposure dose at double-balloon endoscopy for the patients with small bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Nagura, Asuka; Nakamura, Masanao; Watanabe, Osamu; Yamamura, Takeshi; Funasaka, Kohei; Ohno, Eizaburo; Miyahara, Ryoji; Kawashima, Hiroki; Koyama, Shuji; Hinami, Tomoki; Goto, Hidemi; Hirooka, Yoshiki

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Double-balloon endoscopy (DBE) is useful for the diagnosis and treatment of small bowel diseases. Although fluoroscopy is used to confirm the position of endoscope at DBE, the endoscopist does not have the knowledge with regard to the radiation exposure dose. In this study, we evaluated the absorbed dose during DBE in patients with suspected or established small bowel diseases. This was a retrospective study in which the estimated fluoroscopic radiation absorbed doses loaded on the small bowel and skin were determined according to the data of the referential X-ray experiment with a human body phantom. The subjects were 415 DBEs preformed in total. The mean small bowel absorbed doses on antegrade and retrograde DBEs were 42.2 and 53.8 mGy, respectively, showing that the organ dose applied in retrograde DBE was significantly higher (P<0.0001). The mean skin absorbed doses of them were 79.2 and 101.0 mGy, respectively, showing that the dose was also significantly higher on retrograde DBE (P<0.0001). Of 27 cases who were applied endoscopic balloon dilation, the mean fluoroscopy time was 16.0 minutes, and mean small bowel and skin absorbed doses were 121.9 and 228.9 mGy, respectively. In conclusion, endoscopist should be careful for reducing the organ exposure dose at DBE, particularly for the lower abdominal region. Abbreviations: Double-balloon enteroscopy (DBE), endoscopic balloon dilation (EBD), endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR), double-balloon endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (DBERCP), percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) PMID:27578908

  8. Small bowel Dieulafoy lesions: An uncommon cause of obscure bleeding in cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Holleran, Grainne; Hussey, Mary; McNamara, Deirdre

    2016-01-01

    Dieulafoy lesions (DLs) are an uncommon cause of gastrointestinal bleeding, accounting for up to 2% of cases overall. They are largely under recognised and difficult to treat. Up to 95% occur in the stomach, and only case reports document their occurrence in the small bowel (SB). Little is known about their pathophysiology, although there have been associations made previously with chronic liver disease, thought to be due to the erosive effects of alcohol on the mucosa overlying the abnormally dilated vessels. We present a case series of 4 patients with a long duration of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding, who were diagnosed with small intestinal DLs and incidentally diagnosed with chronic liver disease. The histories describe the challenges in both diagnosis and treatment of small intestinal DLs. Our case series suggest a previously unreported link between chronic liver disease and SB DLs which may be due to anatomical vasculature changes or a shift in angiogenic factors as a consequence of portal hypertension or liver cirrhosis. PMID:27621769

  9. Small bowel Dieulafoy lesions: An uncommon cause of obscure bleeding in cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Holleran, Grainne; Hussey, Mary; McNamara, Deirdre

    2016-08-25

    Dieulafoy lesions (DLs) are an uncommon cause of gastrointestinal bleeding, accounting for up to 2% of cases overall. They are largely under recognised and difficult to treat. Up to 95% occur in the stomach, and only case reports document their occurrence in the small bowel (SB). Little is known about their pathophysiology, although there have been associations made previously with chronic liver disease, thought to be due to the erosive effects of alcohol on the mucosa overlying the abnormally dilated vessels. We present a case series of 4 patients with a long duration of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding, who were diagnosed with small intestinal DLs and incidentally diagnosed with chronic liver disease. The histories describe the challenges in both diagnosis and treatment of small intestinal DLs. Our case series suggest a previously unreported link between chronic liver disease and SB DLs which may be due to anatomical vasculature changes or a shift in angiogenic factors as a consequence of portal hypertension or liver cirrhosis. PMID:27621769

  10. Small bowel transplantation in children: an immunohistochemical study of intestinal grafts.

    PubMed Central

    Fromont, G; Cerf-Bensussan, N; Patey, N; Canioni, D; Rambaud, C; Goulet, O; Jan, D; Révillon, Y; Ricour, C; Brousse, N

    1995-01-01

    Seven children with short bowel syndrome underwent small bowel allografting. Episodes of early rejection were observed in five patients who received a graft from paediatric or adult donors but not in two patients who received a neonatal graft. This study aimed, firstly, to define immunohistochemical parameters accompanying rejection and, secondly, to compare immunohistochemical parameters in neonatal grafts with those in grafts from older donors. An immunohistochemical analysis was performed on 85 intestinal biopsy specimens taken for monitoring the transplant. Acute histological rejection was associated with pericryptic infiltrates of CD3+TcR alpha beta + T cells containing clusters of CD8+ cells, numerous CD25+ cells, and increased numbers of CD68+ macrophages. These changes were associated with the appearance of major histocompatibility (MHC) class II antigens on crypt enterocytes and with an appreciable increase in the expression of E-selectin on mucosal endothelial cells. Immunohistochemistry was useful in predicting rejection by showing the appearance of pericryptic CD25+ T cells 48 hours before the first histological lesions of crypt necrosis. Comparison of neonatal grafts with grafts from older donors did not show any significant difference in the density of CD68+ macrophages or in the endothelial expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, or E-selectin. In contrast to grafts from older donors, however, neonatal grafts did not express MHC class II antigens on epithelial cells and contained very low numbers of intraepithelial lymphocytes. These data indicate, firstly, that immunohistochemistry is useful for monitoring intestinal transplants and, secondly, that the better clinical tolerance of neonatal allografts may be related to the lower immunogenicity of the neonatal epithelium. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8537048

  11. What is the normal small bowel length in humans? first donor-based cohort analysis.

    PubMed

    Gondolesi, G; Ramisch, D; Padin, J; Almau, H; Sandi, M; Schelotto, P B; Fernandez, A; Rumbo, C; Solar, H

    2012-12-01

    Normal small bowel length (SBL) has been reported within a wide range, but never studied in a cohort of either pediatric or adult deceased donors. Between 5/2006 and 2/2011, SBL was measured in all grafts procured for intestinal transplantation at a single center and used for either isolated intestinal transplant (15) or multiorgan transplants (5) employing a standardized method. SBL was the only not significantly different variable among pediatric and adult donors divided by age 16. Furthermore, donors were classified in 3 groups: group 1: Height < 70 cm, group 2: 71-150 cm and group 3: ≥ 151 cm. Mean age was: 0.58, 5.6, 22.01 years, respectively. Mean height and weight were 65.8, 123.2, 166.1 cm (p = 0.001) and 6.9, 23.8, 65.2 kg (p = 0.001), for each group. The SBL by group was: 283.0, 324.7, 356.0 cm, remaining as the only nonsignificant variable (p = 0.06), in contrast to BMI, BSA (p = 0.001). The SBL/height ratio: 4.24, 2.7, 2.12 (p = 0.001; rho: -0.623) or SBL/BSA ratio was 8.36, 3.7, and 2.03, respectively (p : 0.0001; rho: -0.9). SBL does not increase with growth like other anthropometric variables. The SBL/height ratio significantly decreases with growth; however, bowel diameter increases, which needs further evaluation.

  12. Recurrent wound dehiscence and small bowel herniation following Caesarean section in a woman with hidradenitis suppurativa

    PubMed Central

    Fernando, Magage; Schultz, Meleesa J.

    2014-01-01

    Caesarean wound dehiscence that is severe enough to result in bowel herniation is exceptionally rare. This case describes a woman who experienced wound dehiscence following each of her two Caesarean sections, with bowel herniation present in the second case. The contribution of her comorbid hidradenitis suppurativa will be discussed. PMID:24876503

  13. Peritoneal lavage in penetrating injuries of the small bowel and colon: value of enzyme determinations.

    PubMed

    Marx, J A; Moore, E E; Bar-Or, D

    1983-02-01

    The value of lavage alkaline phosphatase determinations following hollow visceral injury was studied. Twenty-nine mongrel dogs were subjected to partial transection of the small intestine or colon, or underwent sham laparotomy. Sequential diagnostic peritoneal lavage was performed. At one hour post injury the lavage red cell count, white cell count, and amylase levels were within normal limits in each group. The lavage alkaline phosphatase, however, was markedly elevated in both bowel-injured groups compared with the sham group. In the five-hour lavage, red cell counts and amylase levels remained normal. White cell counts were now elevated in all three groups, but the results did not distinguish the intestinal injury from the sham model. Lavage alkaline phosphatase was again significantly increased in the injured groups versus the sham model. Serum alkaline phosphatase and amylase levels were normal in all study groups at baseline and one and five hours post injury. This canine study demonstrates the utility of peritoneal lavage alkaline phosphatase levels in identifying isolated small intestine and colon injuries that were otherwise undetected by red cell, white cell, and amylase determinations.

  14. Diagnosis and Treatment of Small Bowel Cancers Using Radioactive Gold Nanoparticles and Wireless Fluorescence Capsule Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Alizadeh, M.; Qaradaghi, V.

    2016-01-01

    Background Therapeutic and diagnosis properties of radioactive gold nanoparticle (198-AuNPs) cause them to be suitable for detection and treatment of tumors. Objective Electrical and optical properties of PEG-198AuNPs were examined in this paper. Polyethylene Glycol (PEG)-198 AuNPs can be used for treatment and diagnosis of small intestine tumors. Methods Wireless fluorescence capsule endoscopy will be able to detect emission lights of triggered Au by external light. First, the output electrical field was calculated by DDSCAT software. Secondly, tumor and distribution of PEG-198 gold nanoparticles were modeled using Monte Carlo simulation and finally dose delivered throughout a solid tumor when the PEG-198 gold nanoparticles linked to each cell was calculated. Results Polyethylene Glycol functionalized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) possess optimized sizes (30 nm core diameter and 70 nm hydrodynamic diameters) to target individual tumor cells. Surface distribution to receive doses of up to 50Gy was simulated.  Activities and absorbed doses by the tumors with 0.25cm and 0.5cm radius were 187.9mCi and 300mCi and 72 and 118 Gy,respectively. Conclusion Therapeutic and diagnosis properties of 198-AuNPs show that it can be used for treatment and detection of small bowel tumors in early stage of growing. PMID:27026950

  15. Arterial hypertension due to fructose ingestion: model based on intermittent osmotic fluid trapping in the small bowel

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Based on recently reported data that fructose ingestion is linked to arterial hypertension, a model of regulatory loops involving the colon role in maintenance of fluid and sodium homeostasis is proposed. In normal digestion of hyperosmolar fluids, also in cases of postprandial hypotension and in patients having the "dumping" syndrome after gastric surgery, any hyperosmolar intestinal content is diluted by water taken from circulation and being trapped in the bowel until reabsorption. High fructose corn sirup (HFCS) soft drinks are among common hyperosmolar drinks. Fructose is slowly absorbed through passive carrier-mediated facilitated diffusion, along the entire small bowel, thus preventing absorption of the trapped water for several hours. Here presented interpretation is that ingestion of hyperosmolar HFCS drinks due to a transient fluid shift into the small bowel increases renin secretion and sympathetic activity, leading to rise in ADH and aldosterone secretions. Their actions spare water and sodium in the large bowel and kidneys. Alteration of colon absorption due to hormone exposure depends on cell renewal and takes days to develop, so the momentary capacity of sodium absorption in the colon depends on the average aldosterone and ADH exposure during few previous days. This inertia in modulation of the colon function can make an individual that often takes HFCS drinks prone to sodium retention, until a new balance is reached with an expanded ECF pool and arterial hypertension. In individuals with impaired fructose absorption, even a higher risk of arterial hypertension can be expected. PMID:20579372

  16. Huge peripheral primitive neuroectodermal tumor of the small bowel mesentery at nonage: A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhe; Xu, Yuan-Hong; Ge, Chun-Lin; Long, Jin; Du, Rui-Xia; Guo, Ke-Jian

    2016-09-16

    Extraskeletal Ewing's sarcoma/peripheral primitive neuroectodermal tumor (E-EWS/pPNET) is a rare aggressive malignant small round cell tumor. In this report, we present the case of a 15-year-old boy who suffered from acute abdominal pain accompanied by hematemesis and melena, and was eventually diagnosed with E-EWS/pPNET. To date, there have been only five reported cases of E-EWS/pPNET of the small bowel including the patient in this report. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first documentation of a pPNET of the small bowel mesentery at nonage. All these have made this report rare and significant. PMID:27672649

  17. Huge peripheral primitive neuroectodermal tumor of the small bowel mesentery at nonage: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhe; Xu, Yuan-Hong; Ge, Chun-Lin; Long, Jin; Du, Rui-Xia; Guo, Ke-Jian

    2016-01-01

    Extraskeletal Ewing’s sarcoma/peripheral primitive neuroectodermal tumor (E-EWS/pPNET) is a rare aggressive malignant small round cell tumor. In this report, we present the case of a 15-year-old boy who suffered from acute abdominal pain accompanied by hematemesis and melena, and was eventually diagnosed with E-EWS/pPNET. To date, there have been only five reported cases of E-EWS/pPNET of the small bowel including the patient in this report. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first documentation of a pPNET of the small bowel mesentery at nonage. All these have made this report rare and significant. PMID:27672649

  18. Ischemic bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Castelli, M. F.; Qizilbash, A. H.; Salem, S.; Fyshe, T. G.

    1974-01-01

    The clinical, radiologic and pathologic features of 25 cases of ischemic bowel disease are presented. The majority of patients presented with the triad of abdominal pain, diarrhea and vomiting. In 13 patients the diarrhea was associated with the passage of bright red blood per rectum. There were 10 cases of infarction, 11 of enterocolitis and 4 had resulted in stricture formation. In five cases of enterocolitis the lesion was transient; symptoms improved with conservative medical management and the radiologic findings returned to normal. Barium enema examination yielded abnormal findings in the majority of the cases in which it was performed. Plain films of the abdomen, however, were not helpful. The actual mortality in this group of patients was 44%, 80% in those with infarction of the bowel and 20% in the other two groups. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 2FIG. 3FIG. 4FIG. 5FIG. 6FIG. 7 PMID:4419659

  19. The scintigraphic determination of small intestinal transit time in patients with irritable bowel syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Marano, A.R.; Caride, V.J.; Shah, R.V.; Prokop, E.K.; Troncale, F.J.; McCallum, R.W.

    1984-01-01

    Diffuse disturbance in gastrointestinal motility may be present in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). To further investigate small intestinal motility in IBS patients small intestinal transit time (SITT) was determined and related to the symptom status. 11 female patients with IBS (mean age 29 years) were divided into those whose predominate symptom was diarrhea (N=6), and those with only constipation (N=5). All subjects ingested an isosmotic solution of lactulose (10 gm in 150cc of water) labeled with 99m-Tc-DTPA (Sn). The patient was studied supine under a 25 inch gamma camera with data collected at 1 frame per minute for 180 minutes or until activity appeared in the ascending colon. Regions of interest were selected over the cecum and ascending colon. The time of first appearance of radioactivity in the region of the cecum was taken as the small intestinal transit time. SITT in the 5 normal females was 98.7 +- 13 min (mean +- SEM). SITT in the IBS patients with diarrhea, 67.3 +- 7 min was significantly faster (p< 0.08). SITT in the constipated IBS patients, 126 +- 12 min, was slower than normals and significantly different from diarrhea patients (p< 0.001). These studies show that IBS patients with diarrhea have significantly faster SITT than normals while constipated IBS patients have significantly slower SITT than the diarrhea subgroup. Further, this study emphasizes the need to study the various symptomatic subgroups of IBs patients independently and indicates a possible role for abnormal SITT in the pathogenesis of IBS.

  20. Small intestine bacterial overgrowth and irritable bowel syndrome-related symptoms: Experience with Rifaximin

    PubMed Central

    Peralta, Sergio; Cottone, Claudia; Doveri, Tiziana; Almasio, Piero Luigi; Craxi, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To estimate the prevalence of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) in our geographical area (Western Sicily, Italy) by means of an observational study, and to gather information on the use of locally active, non-absorbable antibiotics for treatment of SIBO. METHODS: Our survey included 115 patients fulfilling the Rome II criteria for diagnosis of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS); a total of 97 patients accepted to perform a breath test with lactulose (BTLact), and those who had a positive test, received Rifaximin (Normix®, Alfa Wassermann) 1200 mg/d for 7 d; 3 wk after the end of treatment, the BTLact was repeated. RESULTS: Based on the BTLact results, SIBO was present in about 56% of IBS patients, and it was responsible for some IBS-related symptoms, such as abdominal bloating and discomfort, and diarrhoea. 1-wk treatment with Rifaximin turned the BTLact to negative in about 50% of patients and significantly reduced the symptoms, especially in those patients with an alternated constipation/diarrhoea-variant IBS. CONCLUSION: SIBO should be always suspected in patients with IBS, and a differential diagnosis is done by means of a “breath test”. Rifaximin may represent a valid approach to the treatment of SIBO. PMID:19496193

  1. Use of Capsule Small Bowel Transit Time to Determine the Optimal Enteroscopy Approach

    PubMed Central

    Chalazan, Brandon; Gostout, Christopher J; Song, Louis M Wong Kee; Enders, Felicity T; Rajan, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Background Capsule small bowel transit time (SBTT) is used to select the most effective enteroscopy approach when targeting capsule endoscopy (CE) findings. Aim of this study was to determine if capsule SBTT can be used to guide the choice of enteroscopy technique for reaching CE abnormalities. Methods Single center, retrospective study involving 60 patients. Data were abstracted from medical records of patients with abnormal CE who proceeded to enteroscopy which included push enteroscopy (PE) single balloon enteroscopy (SBE) and double balloon enteroscopy (DBE). Results Ninety five findings were documented on CE with presumed identification of 56 (59%) of these abnormalities by enteroscopy. Majority were angioectasias on CE (42%) and enteroscopy (59%). Optimal cutoff values for selection of enteroscopy procedure were: 0-21% SBTT for PE (80% sensitivity, 74% specificity, 83% PPV); 0 - 36% SBTT for antegrade SBE (93% sensitivity, 40% specificity, 82% PPV); 0 - 57% SBTT for antegrade DBE (75% sensitivity, 80% specificity, 75% PPV); and 74 - 100% SBTT for retrograde DBE (88% sensitivity, 78% specificity, 78% PPV). Conclusion Capsule SBTT may be used to guide the selection of enteroscopy approach. PE, antegrade SBE, antegrade DBE and retrograde DBE are optimal when abnormalities on CE are seen at ≤ 21%, ≤ 36%, ≤ 57% and ≥ 74% SBTT respectively.

  2. Early small bowel perforation and cochleovestibular impairment as rare complications of typhoid fever.

    PubMed

    van Wolfswinkel, Marlies E; Lahri, Hakima; Wismans, Pieter J; Petit, Pieter L C; van Genderen, Perry J J

    2009-09-01

    Two Indian migrant workers suffering from fever and malaise were admitted to the hospital directly after arrival in the Netherlands. The first patient was 25-year-old man who had fever and rigors on admission. The patient was treated for presumptive typhoid fever with ciprofloxacin. Cefotaxime was added the following day because of the possibility of a nalidixic-acid resistant strain of S. typhi. The clinical course was complicated by a small bowel perforation on the third day of the disease. Blood cultures grew a nalidixic acid resistant strain of Salmonella enterica serovar typhi. The patient recovered completely. The second patient, a 22-year-old man, suffered from fever, malaise and hearing loss. A sensorineural hearing loss with vestibular dysfunction was diagnosed. Cultures of blood and bone marrow aspirate showed a nalidixic acid resistant strain of S. typhi. Treatment with ciprofloxacin and ceftazidime improved the hearing loss significantly. The clinical features of typhoid fever are heterogeneous and rare complications may occur. The emergence of multidrug and nalidixic acid resistance may complicate further the treatment of this serious systemic infection. PMID:19747660

  3. Acute abdomen secondary to ascaris lumbricoides infestation of the small bowel.

    PubMed

    Schulze, Scott M; Chokshi, R J; Edavettal, M; Tarasov, E

    2005-06-01

    Ascariasis is a helminthic infection commonly found in tropical climates. It often propagates in communities of low socioeconomic status secondary to contamination of the soil and water supply with human feces. We present a case report of a 42-year-old Asian-Indian female presenting with a long-standing history of severe recurrent postprandial epigastric pain, requiring multiple hospital admissions. Ultrasound, computed tomography (CT), and nuclear biliary scan were negative. She underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy that suggested ischemia. Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) and mesenteric angiography were inconclusive. As conservative treatment had been unsuccessful, a small bowel series was performed. The radiographs demonstrated characteristic findings of Ascaris lumbricoides infestation. Although the prevalence, diagnosis, and subsequent treatment of an acute abdomen secondary to Ascaris lumbricoides infestation is commonly seen in developing countries, clinicians in developed countries may not consider this entity when faced with a patient with similar symptoms. We frequently care for immigrants from developing countries and our own citizens who visit the countries where ascariasis is endemic. Therefore, heightened awareness of Ascaris lumbricoides infection (ALI) presenting as an acute abdomen is necessary. The diagnosis requires an experienced radiologist and knowledge by the clinician of treatment options and of when a surgeon should be involved.

  4. RENAL HISTOPATHOLOGY AND CRYSTAL DEPOSITS IN PATIENTS WITH SMALL BOWEL RESECTION AND CALCIUM OXALATE STONE DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Evan, Andrew P.; Lingeman, James E.; Worcester, Elaine M.; Bledsoe, Sharon B.; Sommer, Andre J.; Williams, James C.; Krambeck, Amy E.; Philips, Carrie L.; Coe, Fredric L

    2013-01-01

    To date, the surgical anatomy and histopathology of kidneys from patients with stones and small bowel resection have not been studied. We present here materials from 11 cases, 10 Crohn’s disease and one with resection in infancy for unknown cause. Stones are predominantly calcium oxalate (CaOx). Urine stone risks included hyperoxaluria (urine oxalate excretion > 45 mg/day) in half of the cases, and reduced urine volume and pH. As in ileostomy and obesity bypass, inner medullary collecting ducts (IMCD) contain crystal deposits with associated cell injury, interstitial inflammation and papillary deformity. Cortical changes include modest glomerular sclerosis, tubular atrophy, and interstitial fibrosis. Interstitial papillary apatite (Randall’s) plaque is abundant, and CaOx stones grow over deposits as in ileostomy, idiopathic CaOx stone formers, and primary hyperparathyroidism. Abundant plaque is compatible with the low urine volume and pH. IMCD deposits all contain apatite; in 3 cases CaOx is also present. This is similar to findings in obesity bypass but not ileostomy. Mechanisms for CaOx in IMCD appear to include elevated urine, and presumably tubule fluid CaOx SS with a low calcium to oxalate ratio; mechanisms for the universal presence of IMCD apatite are unknown. PMID:20428098

  5. Fat-reduced diet in the symptomatic treatment of small bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, H.; Isaksson, B.; Sjögren, B.

    1974-01-01

    Thirteen patients suffering from Crohn's disease or subjected to small bowel resection were studied under metabolic ward conditions for an average of 32 days. Most of these patients had chronic, severe diarrhoea and varying degrees of steatorrhoea. All were studied at two levels of fat intake, 100 g and 40 g daily. After the introduction of the low-fat diet, there was a marked reduction in the faecal excretion of water and sodium in most patients and 10 of them passed solid faeces. Two other subjects improved only after the addition of cholestyramine. In one patient with an ileostomy, no improvement occurred. On the low-fat diet, there was a positive balance of nitrogen and potassium in many cases. Faecal fat excretion decreased, but there was no change in the fractional absorption of fat. The most gratifying improvement was seen in patients with a functioning gallbladder. Previous resection of the colon seemed to limit the reduction of faecal water and sodium excretion which followed the reduction in fat intake. A fat-reduced diet is recommended in the symptomatic therapy of chronic diarrhoea in patients suffering from diseases of the ileum. PMID:18668843

  6. Renal histopathology and crystal deposits in patients with small bowel resection and calcium oxalate stone disease.

    PubMed

    Evan, Andrew P; Lingeman, James E; Worcester, Elaine M; Bledsoe, Sharon B; Sommer, Andre J; Williams, James C; Krambeck, Amy E; Philips, Carrie L; Coe, Fredric L

    2010-08-01

    We present here the anatomy and histopathology of kidneys from 11 patients with renal stones following small bowel resection, including 10 with Crohn's disease and 1 resection in infancy for unknown cause. They presented predominantly with calcium oxalate stones. Risks of formation included hyperoxaluria (urine oxalate excretion greater than 45 mg per day) in half of the cases, and acidic urine of reduced volume. As was found with ileostomy and obesity bypass, inner medullary collecting ducts (IMCDs) contained crystal deposits associated with cell injury, interstitial inflammation, and papillary deformity. Cortical changes included modest glomerular sclerosis, tubular atrophy, and interstitial fibrosis. Randall's plaque (interstitial papillary apatite) was abundant, with calcium oxalate stone overgrowth similar to that seen in ileostomy, idiopathic calcium oxalate stone formers, and primary hyperparathyroidism. Abundant plaque was compatible with the low urine volume and pH. The IMCD deposits all contained apatite, with calcium oxalate present in three cases, similar to findings in patients with obesity bypass but not an ileostomy. The mechanisms for calcium oxalate stone formation in IMCDs include elevated urine and presumably tubule fluid calcium oxalate supersaturation, but a low calcium to oxalate ratio. However, the mechanisms for the presence of IMCD apatite remain unknown.

  7. Small bowel transplantation complicated by cytomegalovirus tissue invasive disease without viremia.

    PubMed

    Avsar, Yesim; Cicinnati, Vito R; Kabar, Iyad; Wolters, Heiner; Anthoni, Christoph; Schmidt, Hartmut H J; Beckebaum, Susanne

    2014-06-01

    We report on a small bowel transplant patient, donor/recipient seropositive (D+/R+) for cytomegalovirus (CMV), with a clinical course complicated by CMV disease. Anti-CMV prophylaxis was given for 100 days. Immunosuppression consisted of alemtuzumab, tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil and prednisolone. Five months posttransplant, CMV tissue invasive disease of the upper gastrointestinal tract was evident without the presence of viremia, tested by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Complete viral load suppression was achieved with intravenous ganciclovir, followed by valganciclovir for secondary prophylaxis. Mycophenolate mofetil and prednisolone were discontinued. Shortly thereafter the patient presented with recurrent CMV and candida esophagitis. While on ganciclovir and caspofungin, the patient developed CMV tissue invasive disease of the ileal graft, with persistent absence of viremia. Foscarnet and CMV immunoglobulin were added. Viral load declined to undetectable levels; however, clinical improvement did not occur due to occurrence of graft rejection. Despite infliximab and high dose prednisolone, graft rejection was progressive, requiring surgical explantation of the graft. This case highlights the importance of additional diagnostic tools such as endoscopy including PCR analysis of tissue samples. Extension of primary antiviral prophylaxis interval up to 6 months and prolonged retreatment for recurrent CMV disease may be useful to avoid severe CMV-related complications. PMID:24703746

  8. The Effect of Impaired Angiogenesis on Intestinal Function Following Massive Small Bowel Resection

    PubMed Central

    Diaz-Miron, Jose; Sun, Raphael; Choi, Pamela; Sommovilla, Joshua; Guo, Jun; Erwin, Christopher R.; Mei, Junjie; Worthen, G. Scott; Warner, Brad W.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Intestinal adaptation involves villus lengthening, crypt deepening, and increased capillary density following small bowel resection (SBR). Mice lacking the proangiogenic chemokine CXCL5 have normal structural adaptation but impaired angiogenesis. This work evaluates the impact of incomplete adaptive angiogenesis on the functional capacity of the intestine after SBR. Methods CXCL5 knockout (KO) and C57BL/6 wild-type (WT) mice underwent 50% SBR. Magnetic resonance imaging measured weekly body composition. Intestinal absorptive capacity was evaluated through fecal fat analysis. Gene expression profiles for select macronutrient transporters were measured via RT-PCR. Postoperative crypt and villus measurements assessed for structural adaptation. Submucosal capillary density was measured through CD31 immunohistochemistry. Results Comparable postoperative weight gain occurred initially. Diminished weight gain, impaired fat absorption, and elevated steatorrhea occurred in KO mice after instituting high-fat diet. Greater postoperative upregulation of ABCA1 fat transporter occurred in WT mice, while PEPT1 protein transporter was significantly downregulated in KO mice. KO mice had impaired angiogenesis but intact structural adaptation. Conclusion After SBR, KO mice display an inefficient intestinal absorption profile with perturbed macronutrient transporter expression, impaired fat absorption, and slower postoperative weight gain. In addition to longer villi and deeper crypts, an intact angiogenic response may be required to achieve functional adaptation to SBR. PMID:25818317

  9. IGF-2 is necessary for retinoblastoma-mediated enhanced adaptation after small-bowel resection.

    PubMed

    Choi, Pamela M; Sun, Raphael C; Sommovilla, Josh; Diaz-Miron, Jose; Guo, Jun; Erwin, Christopher R; Warner, Brad W

    2014-11-01

    Previously, we have demonstrated that genetically disrupting retinoblastoma protein (Rb) expression in enterocytes results in taller villi, mimicking resection-induced adaption responses. Rb deficiency also results in elevated insulin-like growth factor-2 (IGF-2) expression in villus enterocytes. We propose that postoperative disruption of Rb results in enhanced adaptation which is driven by IGF-2. Inducible, intestine-specific Rb-null mice (iRbIKO) and wild-type (WT) littermates underwent a 50% proximal small-bowel resection (SBR) at 7-9 weeks of age. They were then given tamoxifen on postoperative days (PODs) 4-6 and harvested on POD 28. The experiment was then repeated on double knockouts of both IGF-2 and Rb (IGF-2 null/iRbIKO). iRbIKO mice demonstrated enhanced resection-induced adaptive villus growth after SBR and increased IGF-2 messenger RNA (mRNA) in ileal villus enterocytes compared to their WT littermates. In the IGF-2 null/iRbIKO double-knockout mice, there was no additional villus growth beyond what was expected of normal resection-induced adaptation. Adult mice in which Rb is inducibly deleted from the intestinal epithelium following SBR have augmented adaptive growth. IGF-2 expression is necessary for enhanced adaptation associated with acute intestinal Rb deficiency.

  10. Small bowel obstruction caused by self-anchoring suture used for peritoneal closure following robotic inguinal hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Khan, Faraz A; Hashmi, Asra; Edelman, David A

    2016-06-23

    Laparoscopic inguinal herniorraphy is a commonly performed procedure given the reported decrease in pain and earlier return to activity when compared with the open approach. Moreover, robotic assistance offers the operating surgeon considerable ergonomic advantages, making it an attractive alternative to conventional laparoscopic herniorraphy. Robotic herniorraphy utilizes the transabdominal preperitoneal approach where following repair peritoneal closure is necessary to avoid mesh exposure to the viscera. Self-anchoring sutures are frequently used to this end given the ease of use and knotless application. We present an unusual case of post-operative small bowel obstruction following robotic inguinal hernia repair caused by the self-anchoring suture used for peritoneal closure. This patient presented 3 days post-procedure with symptoms and cross-sectional imaging indicative of small bowel obstruction with a clear transition point. Underwent laparoscopic lysis of a single adhesive band originating from the loose intraperitoneal end of the suture leading to resolution of symptoms.

  11. Small bowel obstruction caused by self-anchoring suture used for peritoneal closure following robotic inguinal hernia repair

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Faraz A.; Hashmi, Asra; Edelman, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Laparoscopic inguinal herniorraphy is a commonly performed procedure given the reported decrease in pain and earlier return to activity when compared with the open approach. Moreover, robotic assistance offers the operating surgeon considerable ergonomic advantages, making it an attractive alternative to conventional laparoscopic herniorraphy. Robotic herniorraphy utilizes the transabdominal preperitoneal approach where following repair peritoneal closure is necessary to avoid mesh exposure to the viscera. Self-anchoring sutures are frequently used to this end given the ease of use and knotless application. We present an unusual case of post-operative small bowel obstruction following robotic inguinal hernia repair caused by the self-anchoring suture used for peritoneal closure. This patient presented 3 days post-procedure with symptoms and cross-sectional imaging indicative of small bowel obstruction with a clear transition point. Underwent laparoscopic lysis of a single adhesive band originating from the loose intraperitoneal end of the suture leading to resolution of symptoms. PMID:27340230

  12. Short report: effect of two prokinetic drugs on the electrical and motor activity of the small bowel in dogs.

    PubMed

    Defilippi, C; Gomez, E

    1993-06-01

    The effects of trimebutine and domperidone, on the electrical and motor activity of the upper small bowel in dogs, were studied simultaneously by means of a suction electrode and a manometric catheter. Trimebutine, given during phases I and II of the migratory motor complex, was followed by a period of regular spike potentials and contractions; the increased motor activity was significantly greater when the drug was given during phase II. Domperidone, when injected in phase I, was followed by an irregular pattern of spike potentials and contractions of low amplitude. By contrast, activity was not augmented when the drug was given during phase II. We conclude that the effects of drugs, such as trimebutine and domperidone, on the canine small bowel are influenced by the phase of the migratory motor complex. PMID:8364138

  13. Preoperative Helical Tomotherapy and Megavoltage Computed Tomography for Rectal Cancer: Impact on the Irradiated Volume of Small Bowel

    SciTech Connect

    Engels, Benedikt; De Ridder, Mark Tournel, Koen; Sermeus, Alexandra; De Coninck, Peter; Verellen, Dirk; Storme, Guy A.

    2009-08-01

    Purpose: Preoperative (chemo)radiotherapy is considered to be standard of care in locally advanced rectal cancer, but is associated with significant small-bowel toxicity. The aim of this study was to explore to what extent helical tomotherapy and daily megavolt (MV) CT imaging may reduce the irradiated volume of small bowel. Methods and Materials: A 3D-conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) plan with CTV-PTV margins adjusted for laser-skin marks (15, 15, and 10 mm for X, Y, and Z directions, respectively) was compared with helical tomotherapy (IMRT) using the same CTV-PTV margins, and to helical tomotherapy with margins adapted to daily MV-CT imaging (IMRT/IGRT; 8, 11, 7, and 10 mm for X, Y{sub ant}, Y{sub post} and Z resp.) for 11 consecutive patients. The planning goals were to prescribe 43.7 Gy to 95% of the PTV, while minimizing the volume of small bowel receiving more than 15 Gy (V{sub 15} {sub SB}). Results: The mean PTV was reduced from 1857.4 {+-} 256.6 cc to 1462.0 {+-} 222.3 cc, when the CTV-PTV margins were adapted from laser-skin marks to daily MV-CT imaging (p < 0.01). The V{sub 15} {sub SB} decreased from 160.7 {+-} 102.9 cc to 110.9 {+-} 74.0 cc with IMRT and to 81.4 {+-} 53.9 cc with IMRT/IGRT (p < 0.01). The normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) for developing Grade 2+ diarrhea was reduced from 39.5% to 26.5% with IMRT and to 18.0% with IMRT/IGRT (p < 0.01). Conclusion: The combination of helical tomotherapy and daily MV-CT imaging significantly decreases the irradiated volume of small bowel and its NTCP.

  14. Small bowel transit of a bran meal residue in humans: sieving of solids from liquids and response to feeding

    PubMed Central

    Hebden, J; Blackshaw, P; Perkins, A; D'Amato, M; Spiller, R

    1998-01-01

    Background—Ileal motor patterns are adapted to the propulsion of viscous meal residue, such as bran, which accumulates in the distal ileum postprandially. 
Aims—To examine the effects of a second liquid/solid meal on ileal emptying. 
Subjects and methods—Eleven healthy fasting subjects consumed a 1.47 MJ pancake containing 15 g bran and 5 MBq Technetium-99m labelled amberlite resin (meal A). Gastric emptying and transit through the left upper quadrant (proximal) and right lower quadrant (distal) small bowel regions and colon were assessed scintigraphically. Transit was compared with and without a second Indium-111 liquid/solid DTPA labelled 2.28 MJ meal (B) given three hours after the first meal. 
Results—Gastric emptying of meal A was slower than meal B (the time for 50% of the activity to leave the stomach (T50) being 113 (11) minutes versus 48 (3) minutes respectively, p<0.01, n=11). Both meals passed rapidly through the proximal small bowel (T50 meal A = 57 (14) minutes versus T50 meal B = 42 (11) minutes). Transit of meal A through the distal small bowel was much slower (T50 more than 390 minutes versus 176 (29) minutes for meal B, p<0.01), resulting in meal B overtaking meal A and entering the colon earlier. Ingestion of the second meal (B) resulted in significantly less meal A marker entering the colon (5 (3)%) at 11 hours than when meal A was taken alone (18 (4)%) (p<0.05, n=8). 
Conclusions—The distal small bowel selectively retains bran, allowing liquid phase markers through to the colon. Consuming a second liquid/solid meal does not stimulate ileal transit of bran which seems to be propelled quicker by fasting motor patterns. 

 Keywords: ileum; motility; bran; feeding PMID:9659165

  15. [Influence of 50% proximal or distal small bowel resection on gut hormone release after test meal loading in dogs].

    PubMed

    Kato, M; Sasaki, I; Naito, H; Takahashi, M; Matsuno, S

    1991-10-01

    The effect of proximal and distal small bowel resection on gut hormone release after test meal loading in dogs was studied. Ten beagle dogs were subjected to 50% proximal or distal small bowel resection, and test meal loading was performed after one night fasting to examine gut hormone release. Fasting levels of plasma gastrin were not changed after both proximal and distal resection, but response to test meal was increased at 18 weeks of postoperative period in 50% proximal resection. Postprandial release of plasma GIP was significantly decreased in both proximal and distal resection compared with preoperative period. Postprandial release of enteroglucagon was increased at 4 and 8 weeks in proximal resection. In distal resection, it was increased at 4 weeks but returned to preoperative levels at 8 weeks. Villus height of middle part of the intestine was increased in both proximal and distal resection, and significant change was observed in the duodenal mucosa of proximal resection at 4 weeks. These findings suggest that part of the resection of small bowel influences gut hormone release, and these may play an important role in intestinal adaptation.

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Small Bowel in Crohn's Disease: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Osman; Rodrigues, David Mario; Nguyen, Geoffrey C

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Crohn's disease is most commonly found in the terminal ileum and colonic region. Magnetic resonance has become a useful modality for assessing small bowel activity. In this study, we performed a systematic review and meta-analysis on the use of MR in detecting small bowel activity as well as extramural complications in Crohn's patients. Methods. Two independent reviewers sorted through articles until October 2, 2014. We included both studies providing raw data for pooling and studies without raw data. Sensitivity, specificity, likelihood ratios, and 95% confidence intervals were calculated for each study. Results. There were 27 included studies, of which 19 were included in the pooled analysis. Pooled analysis of the 19 studies (1020 patients) with raw data revealed a sensitivity of 0.88 (95% CI 0.86 to 0.91) and specificity was 0.88 (95% CI 0.84 to 0.91). In regard to detecting stenosis, pooled sensitivity was 0.65 (95% CI 0.53 to 0.76) and specificity was 0.93 (95% CI 0.89 to 0.96). Conclusion. MR imaging provides a reliable alternative in detecting small bowel activity in patients with Crohn's disease. Its advantages include high diagnostic accuracy and no radiation exposure while its disadvantages include high cost and limited availability. PMID:27446869

  17. Acute Small Bowel Hemorrhage in Three Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease: Diagnosis and Management by Angiographic Intervention

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Woong; Kim, Jae Kyu; Kim, Heoung Kil; Han, Young Min; Kang, Heoung Keun

    2002-03-15

    Three patients who had undergone hemodialysis for end-stage renal disease, presented with acute small bowel hemorrhage,and were treated with superselective transcatheter arterial embolization via coaxial microcatheters. In all patients pre-procedure upper gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy and colonoscopy had failed to demonstrate the source of the hemorrhage. Selective diagnostic angiography revealed frank extravasations of contrast from the small bowel arteries (one jejunal artery and two ileal arteries). After superselection of feeding arteries with a microcatheter, transcatheter embolization using Gelfoam and microcoils was performed in all three patients. Immediate hemostasis was achieved in all patients and the patients were discharged free from symptoms 3-5 days after embolization. No evidence of intestinal ischemia or infarction was noted, with the time from procedure to last follow-up ranging from 4 to 12 months. We conclude that superselective angiography is a valuable tool for diagnosing and treating acute small bowel hemorrhage inpatients with end-stage renal disease when endoscopic evaluation has failed.

  18. Detection of small bowel tumor based on multi-scale curvelet analysis and fractal technology in capsule endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gang; Yan, Guozheng; Kuang, Shuai; Wang, Yongbing

    2016-03-01

    Wireless capsule endoscopy (WCE) has been a revolutionary technique to noninvasively inspect gastrointestinal (GI) tract diseases, especially small bowel tumor. However, it is a tedious task for physicians to examine captured images. To develop a computer-aid diagnosis tool for relieving the huge burden of physicians, the intestinal video data from 89 clinical patients with the indications of potential tumors was analyzed. Out of the 89 patients, 15(16.8%) were diagnosed with small bowel tumor. A novel set of textural features that integrate multi-scale curvelet and fractal technology were proposed to distinguish normal images from tumor images. The second order textural descriptors as well as higher order moments between different color channels were computed from images synthesized by the inverse curvelet transform of the selected scales. Then, a classification approach based on support vector machine (SVM) and genetic algorithm (GA) was further employed to select the optimal feature set and classify the real small bowel images. Extensive comparison experiments validate that the proposed automatic diagnosis scheme achieves a promising tumor classification performance of 97.8% sensitivity and 96.7% specificity in the selected images from our clinical data. PMID:26829705

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Small Bowel in Crohn's Disease: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Osman; Rodrigues, David Mario

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Crohn's disease is most commonly found in the terminal ileum and colonic region. Magnetic resonance has become a useful modality for assessing small bowel activity. In this study, we performed a systematic review and meta-analysis on the use of MR in detecting small bowel activity as well as extramural complications in Crohn's patients. Methods. Two independent reviewers sorted through articles until October 2, 2014. We included both studies providing raw data for pooling and studies without raw data. Sensitivity, specificity, likelihood ratios, and 95% confidence intervals were calculated for each study. Results. There were 27 included studies, of which 19 were included in the pooled analysis. Pooled analysis of the 19 studies (1020 patients) with raw data revealed a sensitivity of 0.88 (95% CI 0.86 to 0.91) and specificity was 0.88 (95% CI 0.84 to 0.91). In regard to detecting stenosis, pooled sensitivity was 0.65 (95% CI 0.53 to 0.76) and specificity was 0.93 (95% CI 0.89 to 0.96). Conclusion. MR imaging provides a reliable alternative in detecting small bowel activity in patients with Crohn's disease. Its advantages include high diagnostic accuracy and no radiation exposure while its disadvantages include high cost and limited availability. PMID:27446869

  20. Phytobezoar-induced small bowel obstruction associated with a concomitant gastric phytobezoar and ulcer in an elderly woman.

    PubMed

    De Cesare, Alessandro; Fiori, Enrico; Bononi, Marco; Ferraro, Daniele

    2015-01-01

    Bezoars are aggregates of indigested foreign material that accumulate in the gastroenteric tract, expecially in the stomach and in the narrowest points of the small bowel. They often occur in subjects who follow a diet rich in fruit and vegetables and in those one who previously underwent gastric resective surgery for peptic ulcer. Bezoar formation has even been observed in case of reduced gastric motility and secretion due to diabetes, hypothyroidism, pernicious anemia, myotonic syndromes, and Guillain-Barré syndrome. As they are an uncommon cause of small bowel obstruction, phytobezoars are often not considered in the differential diagnosis of occlusive intestinal syndromes and so frequently come as an intraoperative finding. A consequence of this missed diagnosis in the preoperative period is an unnecessary diagnostic delay that can significantly increase morbidity and mortality. This case report illustrates the need to include phytobezoars in the preoperative diagnostic workout of intestinal obstruction in order to rule out the presence of multiple bezoars and prevent recurrent obstruction. Now that phytobezoars are becoming a less infrequent cause of small bowel obstruction than previously thought, such a diagnostic possibility should always be considered.

  1. The antegrade continence enema procedure and total anorectal reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Zbar, Andrew P.

    2014-01-01

    Patients may present with anal incontinence (AI) following repair of a congenital anorectal anomaly years previously, or require total anorectal reconstruction (TAR) following radical rectal extirpation, most commonly for rectal cancer. Others may require removal of their colostomy following sphincter excision for Fournier's gangrene, or in cases of severe perineal trauma. Most of the data pertaining to antegrade continence enema (the ACE or Malone procedure) comes from the pediatric literature in the management of children with AI, but also with supervening chronic constipation, where the quality of life and compliance with this technique appears superior to retrograde colonic washouts. Total anorectal reconstruction requires an anatomical or physical supplement to the performance of a perineal colostomy, which may include an extrinsic muscle interposition (which may or may not be ‘dynamized'), construction of a neorectal reservoir, implantation of an incremental artificial bowel sphincter or creation of a terminal, smooth-muscle neosphincter. The advantages and disadvantages of these techniques and their outcome are presented here. PMID:24759342

  2. Acute small bowel toxicity and preoperative chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer: Investigating dose-volume relationships and role for inverse planning

    SciTech Connect

    Tho, Lye Mun . E-mail: l.tho@beatson.gla.ac.uk; Glegg, Martin; Paterson, Jennifer; Yap, Christina; MacLeod, Alice; McCabe, Marie; McDonald, Alexander C.

    2006-10-01

    Purpose: The relationship between volume of irradiated small bowel (VSB) and acute toxicity in rectal cancer radiotherapy is poorly quantified, particularly in patients receiving concurrent preoperative chemoradiotherapy. Using treatment planning data, we studied a series of such patients. Methods and Materials: Details of 41 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer were reviewed. All received 45 Gy in 25 fractions over 5 weeks, 3-4 fields three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy with daily 5-fluorouracil and folinic acid during Weeks 1 and 5. Toxicity was assessed prospectively in a weekly clinic. Using computed tomography planning software, the VSB was determined at 5 Gy dose intervals (V{sub 5}, V{sub 1}, etc.). Eight patients with maximal VSB had dosimetry and radiobiological modeling outcomes compared between inverse and conformal three-dimensional planning. Results: VSB correlated strongly with diarrheal severity at every dose level (p < 0.03), with strongest correlation at lowest doses. Median VSB differed significantly between patients experiencing Grade 0-1 and Grade 2-4 diarrhea (p {<=} 0.05). No correlation was found with anorexia, nausea, vomiting, abdominal cramps, age, body mass index, sex, tumor position, or number of fields. Analysis of 8 patients showed that inverse planning reduced median dose to small bowel by 5.1 Gy (p = 0.008) and calculated late normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) by 67% (p = 0.016). We constructed a model using mathematical analysis to predict for acute diarrhea occurring at V{sub 5} and V{sub 15}. Conclusions: A strong dose-volume relationship exists between VSB and acute diarrhea at all dose levels during preoperative chemoradiotherapy. Our constructed model may be useful in predicting toxicity, and this has been derived without the confounding influence of surgical excision on bowel function. Inverse planning can reduce calculated dose to small bowel and late NTCP, and its clinical role warrants further

  3. [2000-year history of the ear syringe and its relationship to the enema. Images from the history of otorhinolaryngology, represented by instruments from the collection of the Ingolstadt Medical History Museum].

    PubMed

    Feldmann, H

    1999-08-01

    SYRINGES WITH A PISTON AND THEIR USE AS "CLYSTER ORICULARIUS" IN THE ANCIENT ROME: Syringes with a piston were already known in ancient times and have been mentioned as a device for spraying rose water (Philon of Byzantium, about 230 BC), and for fighting fires (Heron of Alexandria about 110 AD). Celsus mentions it several times in his grand opus "De Medicina" (1st century AD) in the treatment of purulent discharge from the ear and for removing foreign bodies from the external ear canal. He always calls it "clyster oricularius", i.e. ear syringe, even when he describes its use in applications other than otological, such as in urology. Later the ear syringe fell from favor for a very long time and was reinvented only at the beginning of the 19th century. IRRIGATION OF THE BOWELS, FROM THE BAG SYRINGE TO THE PISTON SYRINGE: Irrigations of the bowels, clysters, were performed from ancient times to the 18th century with a baglike syringe using the bladder of animals as a pouch. Syringes with a piston were used by barbers and surgeons only for cleansing wounds or irrigating natural cavities of the body. Irrigation of the external ear canal had completely fallen from favor. In France in the 18th century large syringes with a piston made of tin oder brass came into use for enemas and replaced the old baglike devices. THE REINVENTION OF THE EAR SYRINGE AFTER THE PROTOTYPE OF THE ENEMA SYRINGE: Itard, an otologist in France in 1821, was the first to describe irrigating the ear with a syringe to remove hard wax. He recommended using an enema syringe ("seringue à lavement") for the procedure. Soon after his publication special ear syringes of appropriate size were developed and described by Beck in Freiburg, Germany, in 1827; by Fabrizi in Modena, Italy, 1839; and Schmalz in Dresden, Germany, 1846, who also introduced the kidney-shaped bowel for catching the water. Apart from that, small baglike syringes made of rubber were devised especially for use by the patient himself

  4. INSIGHTS INTO AVICENNA'S KNOWLEDGE OF GASTROINTESTINAL MEDICINE AND HIS ACCOUNT OF AN ENEMA DEVICE.

    PubMed

    Nezhadi, Golnoush Sadat Mahmoudi; Dalfardi, Behnam; Ghanizadeh, Ahmad; Golzari, Samad E J

    2015-01-01

    Avicenna (980-1037 AD), also known as Sheikh or-Raeis, was an Muslim philosopher, physician, surgeon, astronomer, politician, encyclopedist, and mathematician. Avicenna's writings comprise of five books, know as the Al-Qanun fi al-Tibb (The Canon of Medicine) and the canon covers a wide variety of medical issues. This canon of medicine was the main reference for medical education in Western countries up until the 16th century and in the Middle East until the 19th century. Several chapters of the 3rd book of the Canon are devoted to a detailed description of gastrointestinal diseases including bowel obstruction, hemorrhoids anal fissures, perianal fistulas and perianal itching. Additionally, that same volume contains an illustration of an enema device. The aim of this paper was to present a brief review of Avicenna's 11th century views on bowel obstruction and to present his description of an enema device that has remained relatively unnoticed until now. Finally, this article illustrates similarities between Avicenna's explanation and modern medical science that celebrate Avicenna as an important contributor to medieval knowledge on gastrointestinal diseases, the science of which has been passed on to later generations.

  5. INSIGHTS INTO AVICENNA'S KNOWLEDGE OF GASTROINTESTINAL MEDICINE AND HIS ACCOUNT OF AN ENEMA DEVICE.

    PubMed

    Nezhadi, Golnoush Sadat Mahmoudi; Dalfardi, Behnam; Ghanizadeh, Ahmad; Golzari, Samad E J

    2015-01-01

    Avicenna (980-1037 AD), also known as Sheikh or-Raeis, was an Muslim philosopher, physician, surgeon, astronomer, politician, encyclopedist, and mathematician. Avicenna's writings comprise of five books, know as the Al-Qanun fi al-Tibb (The Canon of Medicine) and the canon covers a wide variety of medical issues. This canon of medicine was the main reference for medical education in Western countries up until the 16th century and in the Middle East until the 19th century. Several chapters of the 3rd book of the Canon are devoted to a detailed description of gastrointestinal diseases including bowel obstruction, hemorrhoids anal fissures, perianal fistulas and perianal itching. Additionally, that same volume contains an illustration of an enema device. The aim of this paper was to present a brief review of Avicenna's 11th century views on bowel obstruction and to present his description of an enema device that has remained relatively unnoticed until now. Finally, this article illustrates similarities between Avicenna's explanation and modern medical science that celebrate Avicenna as an important contributor to medieval knowledge on gastrointestinal diseases, the science of which has been passed on to later generations. PMID:26959629

  6. Liver allograft pathology in liver/small bowel or multivisceral recipients.

    PubMed

    Tsamandas, A C; Furukawa, H; Abu-Elmagd, K; Todo, S; Demetris, A J; Lee, R G

    1996-07-01

    Combined liver/small bowel (LSB) and multivisceral (MV) transplantation represents an alternative treatment for patients with short-gut syndrome complicated by end-stage liver disease. However, the question of whether the addition of an intestinal allograft alters the pathologic features of the transplanted liver remains unanswered. We, therefore, evaluated the histologic features of 51 liver biopsy specimens from 13 LSB or MV recipients and compared them with a matched control group of specimens from recipients of isolated liver allografts. In general, the histologic alterations were comparable in the LSB/MV and control groups. The primary difference was that portal and sinusoidal neutrophilia accompanied acute cellular rejection in 10 (63%) of 16 LSB/MV specimens but none of the control specimens. Concurrent culture results were positive in 5 of the 10 cases: bacterial overgrowth of the intestinal allograft was found in 3 cases, and bacteremia in 2 other cases, 1 of which had also a positive liver culture. In contrast, these cultures (n = 7) were negative in the six LSB/MV cases of neutrophil-free acute cellular rejection. Neutrophilia was also present in 26 additional LSB/MV specimens, including instances of preservation injury, sepsis, impaired bile flow due to ampullary dysfunction, and one case without an underlying diagnosis, but its frequency did not significantly differ from that of corresponding control cases. An additional finding was the occurrence of a "fibrosing cholestatic" pattern of acquired hepatitis C in 10 specimens from 2 LSB/MV recipients. Acute cellular reaction-associated neutrophilia in LSB/MV recipients may reflect portal bacteremia resulting from bacterial overgrowth and translocation from the intestinal graft or represent simply a nonspecific hepatic response to intestinal inflammatory processes.

  7. Automatic classification of small bowel mucosa alterations in celiac disease for confocal laser endomicroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boschetto, Davide; Di Claudio, Gianluca; Mirzaei, Hadis; Leong, Rupert; Grisan, Enrico

    2016-03-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an immune-mediated enteropathy triggered by exposure to gluten and similar proteins, affecting genetically susceptible persons, increasing their risk of different complications. Small bowels mucosa damage due to CD involves various degrees of endoscopically relevant lesions, which are not easily recognized: their overall sensitivity and positive predictive values are poor even when zoom-endoscopy is used. Confocal Laser Endomicroscopy (CLE) allows skilled and trained experts to qualitative evaluate mucosa alteration such as a decrease in goblet cells density, presence of villous atrophy or crypt hypertrophy. We present a method for automatically classifying CLE images into three different classes: normal regions, villous atrophy and crypt hypertrophy. This classification is performed after a features selection process, in which four features are extracted from each image, through the application of homomorphic filtering and border identification through Canny and Sobel operators. Three different classifiers have been tested on a dataset of 67 different images labeled by experts in three classes (normal, VA and CH): linear approach, Naive-Bayes quadratic approach and a standard quadratic analysis, all validated with a ten-fold cross validation. Linear classification achieves 82.09% accuracy (class accuracies: 90.32% for normal villi, 82.35% for VA and 68.42% for CH, sensitivity: 0.68, specificity 1.00), Naive Bayes analysis returns 83.58% accuracy (90.32% for normal villi, 70.59% for VA and 84.21% for CH, sensitivity: 0.84 specificity: 0.92), while the quadratic analysis achieves a final accuracy of 94.03% (96.77% accuracy for normal villi, 94.12% for VA and 89.47% for CH, sensitivity: 0.89, specificity: 0.98).

  8. Effect of intravenous amino acids on interdigestive antroduodenal motility and small bowel transit time

    PubMed Central

    Gielkens, H; van den Biggelaar, A; Vecht, J; Onkenhout, W; Lamers, C; Masclee, A

    1999-01-01

    Background—Patients on total parenteral nutrition have an increased risk of developing gallstones because of gall bladder hypomotility. High dose amino acids may prevent biliary stasis by stimulating gall bladder emptying. 
Aims—To investigate whether intravenous amino acids also influence antroduodenal motility. 
Methods—Eight healthy volunteers received, on three separate occasions, intravenous saline (control), low dose amino acids (LDA), or high dose amino acids (HDA). Antroduodenal motility was recorded by perfusion manometry and duodenocaecal transit time (DCTT) using the lactulose breath hydrogen test. 
Results—DCTT was significantly prolonged during LDA and HDA treatment compared with control. The interdigestive motor pattern was maintained and migrating motor complex (MMC) cycle length was significantly reduced during HDA compared with control and LDA due to a significant reduction in phase II duration. Significantly fewer phase IIIs originated in the gastric antrum during LDA and HDA compared with control. Duodenal phase II motility index was significantly reduced during HDA, but not during LDA, compared with control. 
Conclusions—Separate intravenous infusion of high doses of amino acids in healthy volunteers: (1) modulates interdigestive antroduodenal motility; (2) shortens MMC cycle length due to a reduced duration of phase II with a lower contractile incidence both in the antrum and duodenum (phase I remains unchanged whereas the effect on phase III is diverse: in the antrum phase III is suppressed and in the duodenum the frequency is increased); and (3) prolongs interdigestive DCTT. 

 Keywords: amino acids; antroduodenal motility; small bowel transit time; total parenteral nutrition PMID:9895384

  9. Acute small bowel obstruction due to a large intraluminal blood clot after laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass.

    PubMed

    Green, Jessica; Ikuine, Tomoko; Hacker, Shoshana; Urrego, Hernan; Tuggle, Karleena

    2016-01-01

    Small bowel obstructions (SBOs) are a known perioperative complication of laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and common etiologies include internal hernia, port site hernia, jejunojejunostomy stricture, ileus and adhesions. Less commonly, SBO can be caused by superior mesenteric artery syndrome, intussusception and intraluminal blood clot. We present a case of SBO caused by intraluminal blood clot from jejunojejunostomy staple line bleeding in a patient with a normal coagulation profile. Computed tomography was used to elucidate the cause of perioperative SBO, and diagnostic laparoscopy was used to both diagnose and treat the complication. In this case, the intraluminal clot was evacuated laparoscopically by enterotomy, thrombectomy and primary closure without anastomotic revision since there was no evidence of continued bleeding. Administration of enoxaparin and Toradol post-operatively may have exacerbated mild intraluminal bleeding occurring at the stapled jejunojejunal anastomosis. Prompt recognition and treatment of perioperative SBO can prevent catastrophic consequences related to bowel perforation. PMID:27554828

  10. Acute small bowel obstruction due to a large intraluminal blood clot after laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass

    PubMed Central

    Green, Jessica; Ikuine, Tomoko; Hacker, Shoshana; Urrego, Hernan; Tuggle, Karleena

    2016-01-01

    Small bowel obstructions (SBOs) are a known perioperative complication of laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and common etiologies include internal hernia, port site hernia, jejunojejunostomy stricture, ileus and adhesions. Less commonly, SBO can be caused by superior mesenteric artery syndrome, intussusception and intraluminal blood clot. We present a case of SBO caused by intraluminal blood clot from jejunojejunostomy staple line bleeding in a patient with a normal coagulation profile. Computed tomography was used to elucidate the cause of perioperative SBO, and diagnostic laparoscopy was used to both diagnose and treat the complication. In this case, the intraluminal clot was evacuated laparoscopically by enterotomy, thrombectomy and primary closure without anastomotic revision since there was no evidence of continued bleeding. Administration of enoxaparin and Toradol post-operatively may have exacerbated mild intraluminal bleeding occurring at the stapled jejunojejunal anastomosis. Prompt recognition and treatment of perioperative SBO can prevent catastrophic consequences related to bowel perforation. PMID:27554828

  11. Use of tissue expansion to facilitate liver and small bowel transplant in young children with contracted abdominal cavities.

    PubMed

    Vidyadharan, R; van Bommel, A C M; Kuti, K; Gupte, G L; Sharif, K; Richard, B M

    2013-11-01

    Liver and small bowel transplant is an established treatment for infants with IFALD. Despite organ reduction techniques, mortality on the waiting list remains high due to shortage of size-matched pediatric donors. Small abdominal cavity volume due to previous intestinal resection poses a significant challenge to achieve abdominal closure post-transplant. Seven children underwent tissue expansion of abdominal skin prior to multiorgan transplant. In total, 17 tissue expanders were placed subcutaneously in seven children. All seven subjects underwent re-exploration to deal with complications: hematoma, extrusion, infection, or port related. Three expanders had to be removed. Four children went on to have successful combined liver and small bowel transplant. Two children died on the waiting list of causes not related to the expander and one child died from sepsis attributed to an infected expander. Tissue expansion can generate skin to facilitate closure of abdomen post-transplant, thus allowing infants with small abdominal volumes to be considered for transplant surgery. Tissue expansion in children with end-stage liver disease and portal hypertension is associated with a very high complication rate and needs to be closely monitored during the expansion process.

  12. Bacterial translocation in acute rejection after small bowel transplantation in rats.

    PubMed

    Zou, Y; Hernandez, F; Burgos, E; Martinez, L; Gonzalez-Reyes, S; Fernandez-Dumont, V; Lopez, G; Romero, M; Lopez-Santamaria, M; Tovar, J A

    2005-03-01

    Acute rejection after small bowel transplantation (SBTx) may facilitate bacterial translocation (BT) and subsequent changes in the liver, spleen, and lungs. This study investigated whether BT occurs after acute rejection and whether this is followed by changes in the structure of the intestine and the phagocytic organs interposed between the gut and the general circulation. Orthotopic SBTx was performed in allogeneic (ALLO) rat-strain combinations (BN-Wistar, n=5). For comparison we used syngeneic SBTx (SYN) (BN-BN, n=6) controls. Animals were sacrificed on postoperative day 7. Mesenteric lymph nodes and portal and caval blood were cultured for aerobes and anaerobes. Escherichia coli beta-galactosidase DNA was assessed by polymerase chain reaction in the blood samples. Intestine, liver, spleen, and lung protein and DNA contents were measured. Histologic changes were graded according to standard criteria of acute rejection. For comparisons we used chi(2) and nonparametric Mann-Whitney test with a threshold of significance of p<0.05. ALLO rats lost more weight after SBTx than SYN rats (-13.02+/-4.39% vs. -8.04+/-5.08% of preoperative weight), although the difference was not significant (ns). A variable degree of graft rejection was histologically demonstrated in all ALLO rats, and DNA/protein content in the graft was significantly higher in this group (0.245+/-0.85 vs. 0.134+/-0.21, p<0.05). Gram-negative enteric bacteria were found in 4/5 ALLO and 4/6 SYN rats (ns), and aerobic Gram-positive bacteria in 2/5 and 3/6 (ns), respectively. Anaerobic growth occurred in mesenteric lymph nodes in one ALLO rat and in the bloodstream in another one. E. coli DNA was isolated in none of the ALLO but in two SYN rats (ns). BT was frequent after SBTx in both syngeneic and allogeneic strain combinations. Contrary to our expectations, BT after SBTx was not higher in ALLO group rats. However, anaerobic germs were isolated only in this group.

  13. Interstitial cells of Cajal in the human fetal small bowel as shown by c-kit immunohistochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Wester, T; Eriksson, L; Olsson, Y; Olsen, L

    1999-01-01

    Background—Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) express the tyrosine kinase receptor c-kit, which is required for their development and spontaneous pacemaker activity in the bowel. From murine models it has been proposed that ICCs do not develop until after birth, but more recent findings indicate that c-kit is expressed early in the embryonic period. The temporal development of ICCs in the human gut remains unknown. 
Aim—To investigate ICCs in the human fetal small bowel using c-kit immunohistochemistry. 
Subjects—Small bowel specimens were obtained at post mortem examination of 16 fetuses and nine neonates, eight of whom were premature, born at gestational ages of 13 to 41 weeks, without gastrointestinal disorders. 
Methods—Immunohistochemical analysis was performed on material fixed in formalin and embedded in paraffin. The specimens were exposed to antibodies raised against c-kit (an ICC marker) and neurone specific enolase (a general neuronal marker). The ABC complex method was used to visualise binding of antibodies to the corresponding antigens. 
Results—c-kit immunoreactive cells were visualised from 13 weeks of gestation. The immunoreactivity was mainly localised in association with the myenteric plexus. From about 17-18 weeks of gestation, the ICCs formed a layer along the myenteric plexus, whereas this layer appeared to be disrupted at 13-16 weeks of gestation. 
Conclusions—ICCs are c-kit immunoreactive at least from a gestational age of 13 weeks in the human fetal small intestine. From 17-18 weeks of gestation until birth, they form a continuous layer around the myenteric ganglia. 

 Keywords: interstitial cells of Cajal; c-kit; myenteric plexus; human; fetal; development PMID:9862827

  14. Short bowel syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Small intestine insufficiency; Short gut syndrome; Necrotizing enterocolitis - short bowel ... The small intestine absorbs much of the nutrients found in foods we eat. When one half or more of our small ...

  15. Acquired Epidermodysplasia Verruciformis Associated with Human Papilloma Virus Type 14 in a Small Bowel Transplanted Child--A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Hirschman, Derek; Tacastacas, Joselin; Rady, Peter L; Tyring, Stephen K; Cooper, Kevin; Honda, Kord

    2016-01-01

    A 3-year-old African American girl taking sirolimus and tacrolimus for a small bowel transplantation presented with hypopigmented macules and papules throughout her trunk. A biopsy diagnosed epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV) that was found to be associated with human papillomavirus (HPV) type 14 according to polymerase chain reaction analysis. There are few cases of acquired EV in the setting of organ transplantation. Although there is no standardized treatment for acquired EV, prevention and surveillance for transformation to squamous cell carcinoma are primary concerns.

  16. [Myeloid sarcoma of the small bowel with inversion of chromosome 16: a description of 3 clinical cases].

    PubMed

    Gavrilina, O A; Bariakh, E A; Parovichnikova, E N; Troitskaia, V V; Zvonkov, E E; Kravchenko, S K; Sinitsyna, M N; Obukhova, T N; Gitis, M K; Savchenko, V G

    2014-01-01

    Myeloid sarcoma (MS) is a rare malignant solid tumor presented with myeloid blast cells showing varying degrees of maturation. MS may have an extramedullary site, precede, or develop simultaneously with the clinical manifestations of acute myeloid leukemia (AML); it may also occur as an AML relapse. Besides AML, MS may be a manifestation of chronic myeloid leukemia or other chronic myeloproliferative diseases. Due to the fact that this disease is rare, the bulk of the literature on MS is presented with single descriptions of retrospective studies and clinical cases. The paper describes 3 cases of MS with inversion of chromosome 16 and small bowel lesion.

  17. MDCT and clinicopathological features of small bowel gastrointestinal stromal tumours in 102 patients: a single institute experience

    PubMed Central

    Shinagare, A B; O'Neill, A C; Krajewski, K M; Hornick, J L; George, S; Ramaiya, N H; Tirumani, S H

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Small bowel (SB) is the second most common site of gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs). We evaluated clinical presentation, pathology, imaging features and metastatic pattern of SB GIST. Methods: Imaging and clinicopathological data of 102 patients with jejunal/ileal GIST treated at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women's Hospital (Boston, MA) between 2002 and 2013 were evaluated. Imaging of treatment-naive primary tumour (41 patients) and follow-up imaging in all patients was reviewed. Results: 90/102 patients were symptomatic at presentation, abdominal pain and lower gastrointestinal blood loss being the most common symptoms. On pathology, 21 GISTs were low risk, 17 were intermediate and 64 were high risk. The mean tumour size was 8.5 cm. On baseline CT (n = 41), tumours were predominantly well circumscribed, exophytic and smooth/mildly lobulated in contour. Of 41 tumours, 16 (39%) were homogeneous, whereas 25 (61%) were heterogeneous. Of the 41 tumours, cystic/necrotic areas (Hounsfield units < 20) were seen in 16 (39%) and calcifications in 9 (22%). CT demonstrated complications in 13/41 (32%) patients in the form of tumour–bowel fistula (TBF) (7/41), bowel obstruction (4/41) and intraperitoneal rupture (2/41). Amongst 102 total patients, metastases developed in 51 (50%) patients (27 at presentation), predominantly involving peritoneum (40/102) and liver (32/102). 7/8 (87%) patients having intraperitoneal rupture at presentation developed metastases. Metastases elsewhere were always associated with hepatic/peritoneal metastases. At last follow-up, 28 patients were deceased (median survival, 65 months). Conclusion: SB GISTs were predominantly large, well-circumscribed, exophytic tumours with or without cystic/necrotic areas. Complications such as TBF, bowel obstruction and intraperitoneal perforation were visualized at presentation, with patients with perforation demonstrating a high risk of metastatic disease. Exophytic

  18. Occupation and small bowel adenocarcinoma: a European case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Kaerlev, L.; Teglbjaerg, P. S.; Sabroe, S.; Kolstad, H.; Ahrens, W.; Eriksson, M.; Gonzalez, A. L.; Guenel, P.; Hardell, L.; Launoy, G.; Merler, E.; Merletti, F.; Suarez-Varela, M.; Stang, A.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—Because of the rarity of small bowel adenocarcinoma (SBA), little is known about the aetiology of this disease. This study aimed to identify occupational clustering of cases SBA as a systematic approach to new hypotheses on the aetiology of this disease.
METHODS—A European multicentre case-control study was conducted in 1995-7, inclusive. Incident cases aged 35-69 years with SBA (n=168) were recruited before acceptance by a pathologist. Altogether 107 cases and 3915 controls were accepted, of which 79 cases, 579 colon cancer controls, and 2070 population controls were interviewed.
RESULTS—The strongest industrial risk factors for SBA taking account of 10 years' exposure lag were dry cleaning, manufacture of workwear, mixed farming (women), and manufacture of motor vehicles (men). A significantly increased risk of SBA (odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (95% CI)) was found among men employed as building caretakers, OR 6.7 (1.7 to 26.0) and women employed as housekeepers, OR 2.2 (1.1 to 4.9); general farm labourers, OR 4.7 (1.8 to 12.2); dockers, OR 2.9 (1.0 to 8.2); dry cleaners or launderers, OR 4.1 (1.2 to 13.6); and textile workers (sewers or embroiders), OR 2.6 (1.0 to 6.8). For the last four groups, together with welders OR 2.7 (1.1 to 6.6) (men) an exposure-response pattern was found when calculating the ORs for jobs held 1-5 years and >5 years, with never having held the job as reference. The ORs (95% CIs) for 1-5 years and >5 years were 4.3 (0.4 to 44.0) and 3.5 (0.9 to 13.7), 3.0 (0.3 to 26.2) and 4.3 (0.9 to 21.2), 4.6 (0.4 to 48.1) and 11.0 (2.0 to 60.4), 1.3 (0.2 to 11.0) and 5.8 (2.0 to 17.2), and 2.8 (0.3 to 23.8) and 4.6 (1.3 to 16.6), respectively, for each of these occupations. Among welders, people performing semiautomatic arc welding (MIG/MAG) were identified as a high risk group (OR 5.0 (1.3 to 19.6)). 
CONCLUSIONS—This explorative study suggests an increased occurrence

  19. Usefulness of virtual chromoendoscopy in the evaluation of subtle small bowel ulcerative lesions by endoscopists with no experience in videocapsule

    PubMed Central

    Rimbaş, Mihai; Zahiu, Denise Carmen Mihaela; Voiosu, Andrei Mihai; Voiosu, Theodor Alexandru; Zlate, Alina Ana-Maria; Dinu, Roxana; Galasso, Domenico; Minelli Grazioli, Leonardo; Campanale, Mariachiara; Barbaro, Federico; Mateescu, Bogdan Radu; Busuioc, Bogdan; Iordache, Tiberiu; Dolofan, Oana; Popescu, Adelina Maria; Balaban, Vasile Daniel; Raducan, Mircea Mihai; Spada, Cristiano; Băicuş, Cristian Răsvan; Costamagna, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: In videocapsule endoscopy examination (VCE), subtle variations in mucosal hue or pattern such as those seen in ulcerations can be difficult to detect, depending on the experience of the reader. Our aim was to test whether virtual chromoendoscopy (VC) techniques, designed to enhance the contrast between the lesion and the normal mucosa, could improve the characterization of ulcerative mucosal lesions. Patients and methods: Fifteen trainees or young gastroenterologists with no experience in VCE were randomly assigned to evaluate 250 true ulcerative and 100 false ulcerative, difficult-to-interpret small bowel lesions, initially as white light images (WLI) and then, in a second round, with the addition of one VC setting or again as WLI, labeling them as real lesions or artifacts. Results: On the overall image evaluation, an improvement in lesion characterization was observed by adding any chromoendoscopy setting, especially Blue mode and FICE 1, with increases in accuracy of 13 % [95 %CI 0.8, 25.3] and 7.1 % [95 %CI – 17.0, 31.3], respectively. However, when only false ulcerative images were considered, with the same presets (Blue mode and FICE 1), there was a loss in accuracy of 10.7 % [95 %CI – 10.9, 32.3] and 7.3 % [95 %CI – 1.3, 16.0], respectively. The interobserver agreement was poor for both readings. Conclusions: VC helps beginner VCE readers correctly categorize difficult-to-interpret small bowel mucosal ulcerative lesions. However, false lesions tend to be misinterpreted as true ulcerative with the same presets. Therefore care is advised in using VC especially under poor bowel preparation. PMID:27227106

  20. Local glutathione redox status does not regulate ileal mucosal growth after massive small bowel resection in rats.

    PubMed

    Tian, Junqiang; Washizawa, Naohiro; Gu, Li H; Levin, Marc S; Wang, Lihua; Rubin, Deborah C; Mwangi, Simon; Srinivasan, Shanthi; Jones, Dean P; Ziegler, Thomas R

    2007-02-01

    Glutathione (GSH) concentration affects cell proliferation and apoptosis in intestinal and other cell lines in vitro. However, in vivo data on gut mucosal GSH redox status and cell turnover are limited. We investigated the effect of altered GSH redox status on the ileal mucosa in a rat model of short bowel syndrome following massive small bowel resection (SBR). Rats underwent 80% mid-jejunoileal resection (RX) or small bowel transection (TX; as operative controls), with administration of either saline or D, L-buthionine-sulfoximine (BSO), a specific inhibitor of cellular GSH synthesis. Ileal mucosal redox, morphology, and indices of cell proliferation and apoptosis were determined at different days after surgery. Ileal GSH redox status was assessed by GSH and GSH disulfide (GSSG) concentrations and the redox potential of GSH/GSSG (Eh). Ileal lipid peroxidation [free malondialdehyde (MDA)] was measured as an index of lipid peroxidation. BSO markedly decreased ileal mucosal GSH, oxidized GSH/GSSG Eh, and increased MDA content without inducing morphological damage as assessed by light or electron microscopy. As expected, SBR stimulated adaptive growth of ileal villus height and total mucosal height at 7 d after surgery, but this response was unaffected by BSO treatment despite a modest increase in crypt cell apoptosis. Ileal cell proliferation (crypt cell bromodeoxyuridine incorporation) increased at 2 d after SBR but was unaffected by BSO. Collectively, our in vivo data show that marked depletion of ileal GSH and oxidation of the GSH redox pool does not alter indices of ileal epithelial proliferation or SBR-induced ileal mucosal adaptive growth.

  1. Enteroclysis

    MedlinePlus

    ... bowel enema; CT enteroclysis; Small bowel follow-through; Barium enteroclysis ... Possible injury to bowel structures during the study Barium may cause constipation. Tell your health care provider ...

  2. Impaired small-bowel barrier integrity in the presence of lumenal pancreatic digestive enzymes leads to circulatory shock.

    PubMed

    Kistler, Erik B; Alsaigh, Tom; Chang, Marisol; Schmid-Schönbein, Geert W

    2012-08-01

    In bowel ischemia, impaired mucosal integrity may allow intestinal pancreatic enzyme products to become systemic and precipitate irreversible shock and death. This can be attenuated by pancreatic enzyme inhibition in the small-bowel lumen. It is unresolved, however, whether ischemically mediated mucosal disruption is the key event allowing pancreatic enzyme products systemic access and whether intestinal digestive enzyme activity in concert with increased mucosal permeability leads to shock in the absence of ischemia. To test this possibility, the small intestinal lumen of nonischemic rats was perfused for 2 h with either digestive enzymes, a mucin disruption strategy (i.e., mucolytics) designed to increase mucosal permeability, or both, and animals were observed for shock. Digestive enzymes perfused included trypsin, chymotrypsin, elastase, amylase, and lipase. Control (n = 6) and experimental animals perfused with pancreatic enzymes only (n = 6) or single enzymes (n = 3 for each of the five enzyme groups) maintained stable hemodynamics. After mucin disruption using a combination of enteral N-acetylcysteine, atropine, and increased flow rates, rats (n = 6) developed mild hypotension (P < 0.001 compared with groups perfused with pancreatic enzymes only after 90 min) and increased intestinal permeability to intralumenally perfused fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran 20 kd (P < 0.05) compared with control and enzyme-only groups, but there were no deaths. All animals perfused with both digestive enzymes and subjected to mucin disruption (n = 6) developed hypotension and increased intestinal permeability (P < 0.001 after 90 min). Pancreatic enzymes were measured in the intestinal wall of both groups subjected to mucin disruption, but not in the enzyme-only or control groups. Depletion of plasma protease inhibitors was found only in animals perfused with pancreatic enzymes plus mucin disruption, implicating increased permeability and intralumenal pancreatic enzyme egress

  3. Long-acting somatostatin analogues provide significant beneficial effect in patients with refractory small bowel angiodysplasia: Results from a proof of concept open label mono-centre trial

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Barry; Breslin, Niall; McNamara, Deirdre

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Small bowel angiodysplasias account for over 50% of causes of small bowel bleeding and carry a worse prognosis than lesions located elsewhere in the gastrointestinal tract. Re-bleeding rates are high even after first-line endoscopic therapy and are associated with high levels of morbidity for affected patients. Small trials of long-acting somatostatin analogues have shown promising results but have not yet been assessed in patients with refractory small bowel disease. Aim The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of long-acting somatostatin analogues in reducing re-bleeding rates and transfusion requirements, and improving haemoglobin levels in patients with refractory small bowel angiodysplasia. Methods Patients with refractory small bowel angiodysplasia were treated with 20 mg of long-acting octreotide for a minimum of three months. Response was assessed according to: rates of re-bleeding, haemoglobin levels, transfusion requirements, and side effects. Results A total of 24 patients were initially treated and 20 received at least three doses. Rates of complete, partial and non-response were 70%, 20% and 10% respectively. Average haemoglobin rates increased from 9.19 g/dl to 11.35 g/dl (p = 0.0027, 95% confidence interval (CI) −3.5 to −1.1) in the group overall and 70% remained transfusion-free after a mean treatment duration of 8.8 months. The rate of adverse events was higher than previously reported at 30%. Conclusion Long-acting somatostatin analogues offer a therapeutic advantage in a significant proportion of patients with small bowel angiodysplasia. With careful patient selection and close observation, a long-acting somatostatin analogue should be considered in all patients with persistent anaemia attributable to refractory disease in conjunction with other standard treatments. PMID:26966525

  4. An adhesion-related small bowel obstruction occurring within 36 h of a total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy.

    PubMed

    Shah, Neha; Shah, Sonya Pratik; Thakrar, Amit; Rozati, Hamoun

    2014-01-01

    We present a case of adhesion-related small bowel obstruction occurring within only 36 h of a total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy. There has been no previously reported case where there has been such a short interval between surgery and adhesion-related small bowel obstruction. This is important to note, as it ensures that adhesion-related small bowel obstruction is on the list of differential diagnoses for patients who present very soon after surgery with symptoms such as abdominal pain and vomiting. It is also important as it allows the pathogenesis of adhesion formation to be reviewed in light of this rapid onset of adhesion formation and its complications.

  5. Altered Transcription of Murine Genes Induced in the Small Bowel by Administration of Probiotic Strain Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Corinda; Lawley, Blair; Loach, Diane; Gould, Maree; Dunn, Amy C.; McLellan, Alexander D.; Black, Michael A.; McNoe, Les; Dekker, James; Gopal, Pramod; Collett, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001 is a probiotic strain reported to increase resistance to epithelium-adherent and -invasive intestinal pathogens in experimental animals. To increase understanding of the relationship between strain HN001 and the bowel, transcription of selected genes in the mucosa of the murine small bowel was measured. Mice previously naive to lactobacilli (Lactobacillus-free mice) were examined after daily exposure to HN001 in drinking water. Comparisons were made to results from matched Lactobacillus-free mice. Infant and adult mice were investigated to provide a temporal view of gene expression in response to exposure to HN001. Genes sgk1, angptl4, and hspa1b, associated with the apoptosis pathway, were selected for investigation by reverse transcription-quantitative PCR on the basis of a preliminary duodenal DNA microarray screen. Normalized to gapdh gene transcription, these three genes were upregulated after 6 to 10 days exposure of adult mice to HN001. Angptl4 was shown by immunofluorescence to be upregulated in duodenal epithelial cells of mucosal samples. Epithelial cell migration was faster in HN001-exposed mice than in the Lactobacillus-free controls. Transcriptional responses in infant mice differed according to bowel region and age. For example, sgk1 was upregulated in duodenal, jejunal, and ileal mucosa of mice less than 25 days old, whereas angptl4 and hspa1b were upregulated at 10 days in the duodenum but downregulated in the jejunal mucosa until mice were 25 days old. Overall, the results provide links between a probiotic strain, mucosal gene expression, and host phenotype, which may be useful in delineating mechanisms of probiotic action. PMID:24584241

  6. Small bowel intussusception by local recurrence of an inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor: report of a case and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Zuccarello, C; Arena, F; Fazzari, C; Arena, S; Nicòtina, P A

    2006-10-01

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (IMT) of the ileum is a rare, usually solitary lesion, that frequently presents small-intestinal intussusception and obstruction. We describe an IMT of the ileum in a 4.5-year old child who presented a small bowel intussusception. During laparotomy, an annular mass around the ileum was resected, and the IMT was histologically diagnosed. Three months after the operation, the patients were hospitalized with the symptoms of intestinal obstruction. Laparotomy showed a ileal intussusception. Along the previous suture line of anastomosis, a smooth polypoid tumor was evident. Segmental resection of the ileum, including the tumor mass, was performed. The IMT was immunohistochemically diagnosed. The patient was asymptomatic at 3 year follow-up. A review of the literature for this rare entity emphasizes the importance of immunohistochemical confirmation of its benign nature. Because of the risk of local recurrence, IMT cases should have a long-term follow-up.

  7. Idiopathic abdominal cocoon syndrome with unilateral abdominal cryptorchidism and greater omentum hypoplasia in a young case of small bowel obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Fei, Xiang; Yang, Hai-Rui; Yu, Peng-Fei; Sheng, Hai-Bo; Gu, Guo-Li

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal cocoon syndrome (ACS) is a rare cause of intestinal obstruction due to total or partial encapsulation of the small intestine by a fibrocollagenous membrane. Idiopathic ACS with abdominal cryptorchidism and greater omentum hypoplasia is even rarer clinically. We successfully treated a 26-year-old male case of small bowel obstruction with acute peritonitis. He was finally diagnosed with idiopathic ACS with unilateral abdominal cryptorchidism and greater omentum hypoplasia during exploratory laparotomy. He then underwent enterolysis, cryptorchidectomy, and appendectomy. He recovered gradually from the operations and early postoperative inflammatory ileus. There has been no recurrence of intestinal obstruction since the operation, and he is still in follow-up. We analyzed his clinical data and retrospectively reviewed the literature, and our findings may be helpful for the clinical diagnosis and treatment on ACS. PMID:27239122

  8. [Late metastases of abdominal cutaneous malignant melanoma in the small and large bowels].

    PubMed

    Füredi, Gábor; Varga, István; Illés, Iván; Békefi, Péter; Molnár, Anna; Altorjay, Aron

    2005-09-25

    The authors reported the case of a 56 years old man, who was operated with abdominal cutaneous malignant melanoma 5 years ago. He had chemo-immunotherapy. His complaints were epigastric pain, melena, hematochezia, anorexia, lack of appetite, fatigue. The upper panendoscopy showed tumor mass in the duodenojejunal flexure and the colonoscopy showed tumor in the large bowel. The patient underwent jejunal resection and right hemicolectomy. The authors survey the metastases of malignant melanoma as well as their clinical signs, therapeutic measures and prognosis.

  9. Effects of Bolus and Continuous Nasogastric Feeding on Gastric Emptying, Small Bowel Water Content, Superior Mesenteric Artery Blood Flow, and Plasma Hormone Concentrations in Healthy Adults

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Abeed H.; Murray, Kathryn; Hoad, Caroline L.; Costigan, Carolyn; Marciani, Luca; Macdonald, Ian A.; Bowling, Timothy E.; Lobo, Dileep N.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: We aimed to demonstrate the effect of continuous or bolus nasogastric feeding on gastric emptying, small bowel water content, and splanchnic blood flow measured by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the context of changes in plasma gastrointestinal hormone secretion. Background: Nasogastric/nasoenteral tube feeding is often complicated by diarrhea but the contribution of feeding strategy to the etiology is unclear. Methods: Twelve healthy adult male participants who underwent nasogastric intubation before a baseline MRI scan, received 400 mL of Resource Energy (Nestle) as a bolus over 5 minutes or continuously over 4 hours via pump in this randomized crossover study. Changes in gastric volume, small bowel water content, and superior mesenteric artery blood flow and velocity were measured over 4 hours using MRI and blood glucose and plasma concentrations of insulin, peptide YY, and ghrelin were assayed every 30 minutes. Results: Bolus nasogastric feeding led to significant elevations in gastric volume (P < 0.0001), superior mesenteric artery blood flow (P < 0.0001), and velocity (P = 0.0011) compared with continuous feeding. Both types of feeding reduced small bowel water content, although there was an increase in small bowel water content with bolus feeding after 90 minutes (P < 0.0068). Similarly, both types of feeding led to a fall in plasma ghrelin concentration although this fall was greater with bolus feeding (P < 0.0001). Bolus feeding also led to an increase in concentrations of insulin (P = 0.0024) and peptide YY (P < 0.0001), not seen with continuous feeding. Conclusion: Continuous nasogastric feeding does not increase small bowel water content, thus fluid flux within the small bowel is not a major contributor to the etiology of tube feeding-related diarrhea. PMID:25549202

  10. Total Colonic Expulsion with Part of Small Bowel per Vaginum due to Low-Flow Phenomenon and NOMI: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Deen, Suha; Powell, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. Intestinal ischaemia is a devastating disease process that could lead to bowel gangrene and death if either not diagnosed early or left untreated; death is usually caused by irreversible shock, intestinal necrosis, or septicaemia. It is usually seen in elderly patients with atherosclerotic disease. The course of bowel ischaemia may affect variable lengths of the intestine and it is not unusual for the condition to be followed by uneventful recovery. Case presentation. We are reporting an unusually rare case where an elderly patient passed an extraordinarily long segment of bowel, including rectum, the whole of the large bowel, and part of the small bowel, through anus following an episode of nonobstructive mesenteric ischaemia (NOMI) complicating myocardial infarction. To our knowledge, there are only eight cases reported in the literature where the condition was diagnosed upon the passage of short segments of the large bowel particularly of the rectosigmoid segment through the anus. Conclusion. Physician should keep a high level of suspicion in order to prevent it or at least recognise it early on and offer adequate management and hence reducing morbidity and mortality. PMID:21603021

  11. Is virtual chromoendoscopy useful in the evaluation of subtle ulcerative small-bowel lesions detected by video capsule endoscopy?

    PubMed Central

    Rimbaş, Mihai; Negreanu, Lucian; Ciobanu, Lidia; Benguş, Andreea; Spada, Cristiano; Băicuş, Cristian Răsvan; Costamagna, Guido

    2015-01-01

    Background: The identification of subtle small-bowel mucosal lesions by video capsule endoscopy (VCE) can be challenging. Virtual chromoendoscopy techniques, based on narrowing the bandwidth of conventional white light endoscopic imaging (WLI), were developed to improve the analysis of mucosal patterns. However, data on the already-implemented Flexible spectral Imaging (or Fujinon Intelligent) Color Enhancement (FICE) software application in VCE are limited. Materials and methods: An evaluation of 250 difficult-to-interpret small-bowel ulcerative and 50 artifact lesions selected from 64 VCE recordings was conducted by four experienced VCE readers in two steps: initially as WLI, then with the addition of all available virtual chromoendoscopy pre-sets (FICE 1, 2, and 3 and Blue mode). The readers labeled them as real or false ulcerative lesions and rated the usefulness of each of the pre-sets. Results: Between the first (WLI-only) and second (virtual chromoendoscopy-aided) readings, in terms of accuracy there was a global 16.5 % (95 % confidence interval [95 %CI] 13.6 – 19.4 %) improvement (P < 0.001), derived from a 22 % [95 %CI 18.9 – 25.1 %] improvement in the evaluation of true ulcerative images (P < 0.001) and an 11 % (95 %CI 4.1 – 17.7 %) decrease in the evaluation of false ulcerative ones (P = 0.003). The FICE 1 and 2 pre-sets were rated as most useful. Conclusion: The application of virtual chromoendoscopy for VCE is useful to better categorize difficult-to-interpret small-bowel mucosal ulcerative lesions. However, care must be taken, and individual images should be evaluated only as part of a sequence in a recording because the technology can also mistakenly guide to the incorrect interpretation of artifacts as ulcerative lesions. PMID:26716122

  12. Enema ion compositions for enhancing colorectal drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Maisel, Katharina; Chattopadhyay, Sumon; Moench, Thomas; Hendrix, Craig; Cone, Richard; Ensign, Laura M; Hanes, Justin

    2015-07-10

    Delivering drugs to the colorectum by enema has advantages for treating or preventing both local and systemic diseases. However, the properties of the enema itself are not typically exploited for improving drug delivery. Sodium ions are actively pumped out of the lumen of the colon, which is followed by osmotically-driven water absorption, so we hypothesized that this natural mechanism could be exploited to drive nanoparticles and drugs to the colorectal tissue surface. Here, we report that sodium-based, absorption-inducing (hypotonic) enemas rapidly transport hydrophilic drugs and non-mucoadhesive, mucus penetrating nanoparticles (MPP), deep into the colorectal folds to reach virtually the entire colorectal epithelial surface. In contrast, isotonic and secretion-inducing (hypertonic) vehicles led to non-uniform, poor surface coverage. Sodium-based enemas induced rapid fluid absorption even when moderately hyper-osmolal (~350 mOsm) compared to blood (~300 mOsm), which suggests that active sodium absorption plays a key role in osmosis-driven fluid uptake. We then used tenofovir, an antiretroviral drug in clinical trials for preventing HIV, to test the effects of enema composition on local and systemic drug delivery. We found that strongly hypotonic and hypertonic enemas caused rapid systemic drug uptake, whereas moderately hypotonic enemas with ion compositions similar to feces resulted in high local tissue levels with minimal systemic drug exposure. Similarly, moderately hypotonic enemas provided improved local drug retention in colorectal tissue, whereas hypertonic and isotonic enemas provided markedly reduced drug retention in colorectal tissue. Lastly, we found that moderately hypotonic enema formulations caused little to no detectable epithelial damage, while hypertonic solutions caused significant damage, including epithelial sloughing; the epithelial damage caused increased systemic drug absorption and penetration of MPP into colorectal tissue, a potential

  13. Loss of interstitial cells of Cajal and development of electrical dysfunction in murine small bowel obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Chang, In-Youb; Glasgow, Nichola J; Takayama, Ichiro; Horiguchi, Kazuhide; Sanders, Kenton M; Ward, Sean M

    2001-01-01

    Partial obstruction of the murine ileum led to changes in the gross morphology and ultrastructure of the tunica muscularis. Populations of interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) decreased oral, but not aboral, to the site of obstruction. Since ICC generate and propagate electrical slow waves in gastrointestinal muscles, we investigated whether the loss of ICC leads to loss of function in partial bowel obstruction. Changes in ICC networks and electrical activity were monitored in the obstructed murine intestine using immunohistochemistry, electron microscopy and intracellular electrophysiological techniques. Two weeks following the onset of a partial obstruction, the bowel increased in diameter and hypertrophy of the tunica muscularis was observed oral to the obstruction site. ICC networks were disrupted oral to the obstruction, and this disruption was accompanied by the loss of electrical slow waves and responses to enteric nerve stimulation. These defects were not observed aboral to the obstruction. Ultrastructural analysis revealed no evidence of cell death in regions where the lesion in ICC networks was developing. Cells with a morphology intermediate between smooth muscle cells and fibroblasts were found in locations that are typically populated by ICC. These cells may have been the redifferentiated remnants of ICC networks. Removal of the obstruction led to the redevelopment of ICC networks and recovery of slow wave activity within 30 days. Neural responses were partially restored in 30 days. These data describe the plasticity of ICC networks in response to partial obstruction. After obstruction the ICC phenotype was lost, but these cells regenerated when the obstruction was removed. This model may be an important tool for evaluating the cellular/molecular factors responsible for the regulation and maintenance of the ICC phenotype. PMID:11600689

  14. Capsule endoscopy in suspected small bowel Crohn’s disease: Economic impact of disease diagnosis and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Leighton, Jonathan A; Gralnek, Ian M; Richner, Randel E; Lacey, Michael J; Papatheofanis, Frank J

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To model clinical and economic benefits of capsule endoscopy (CE) compared to ileo-colonoscopy and small bowel follow-through (SBFT) for evaluation of suspected Crohn’s disease (CD). METHODS: Using decision analytic modeling, total and yearly costs of diagnostic work-up for suspected CD were calculated, including procedure-related adverse events, hospitalizations, office visits, and medications. The model compared CE to SBFT following ileo-colonoscopy and secondarily compared CE to SBFT for initial evaluation. RESULTS: Aggregate charges for newly diagnosed, medically managed patients are approximately $8295. Patients requiring aggressive medical management costs are $29 508; requiring hospitalization, $49 074. At sensitivity > 98.7% and specificity of > 86.4%, CE is less costly than SBFT. CONCLUSION: Costs of CE for diagnostic evaluation of suspected CD is comparable to SBFT and may be used immediately following ileo-colonoscopy. PMID:19960565

  15. Effect of different treatment plans on irradiated small-bowel volume in gynecologic patients undergoing whole-pelvic irradiation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shih-Chen; Lee, Hsiao-Fei; Ting, Hui-Min; Pan, Tzu-Chao; Liu, Shu-Yu; Chen, Chien-Fu; Wang, Teng-Yi; Juan, Kuo-Jung; Liao, Tsung-I; Huang, Eng-Yen

    2013-09-01

    To evaluate the effect of different treatment plans for whole-pelvic irradiation on small-bowel volumes (SBVs) in patients with gynecologic malignancies, 40 patients were enrolled in this study. Computed tomography (CT) simulations were performed, and the small bowel of each patient was outlined manually. Treatment plans with equal-weighted (EW) and non-equal-weighted (NEW) (70% in bilateral directions) techniques of four-field and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) were performed. The V10-V100 represented the volume (cm³) at different levels of the prescribed doses (10-100%). The V10-V100 was compared among the different treatment planning techniques, and patients who were suitable for IMRT or NEW were identified. IMRT and NEW significantly reduced the V50-V100 and V40-V60 levels compared with EW, respectively. NEW caused a significant reduction in the V30-V60 levels in patients with a BMI ≥26 kg/m². Patients with IMRT demonstrated lower V70-V100 levels compared with those with NEW. In patients with a BMI ≥26 kg/m² or an age ≥55 years, lower V20-V50 levels were noted using NEW compared with IMRT. Treatment planning with larger weighting in the bilateral directions in four-field radiotherapy reduces the low-dose SBV in patients with gynecologic malignancies, especially in those with a high BMI or the elderly. IMRT effectively reduces high-dose SBV, especially in patients with a low BMI.

  16. Prediction of Small Bowel Obstruction Caused by Bezoars Using Risk Factor Categories on Multidetector Computed Tomographic Findings

    PubMed Central

    Kuang, Lian-qin; Cheng, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. The aim of this study was to detect factors associated with small bowel obstruction (SBO) caused by bezoars on multidetector computed tomographic findings. Methods. We retrospectively reviewed 61 patients who had bezoars in the small bowels on MDCT. The patients were divided into SBO patients group and non-SBO patients group. The mean values of the diameter, volume, and CT attenuation as well as location and characteristics of the bezoars were compared between the two groups. Multivariate analysis was performed to determine factors associated with SBO. Results. There were 32 patients (52.5%) in the SBO group and 29 patients (47.5%) in the non-SBO group. The bezoars in the SBO group had greater values of each mean diameter and mean volume than those in the non-SBO group (3.2 ± 0.5 cm versus 1.6 ± 0.7 cm, P < 0.0001, 14.9 ± 6.4 cm3 versus 2.5 ± 2.7 cm3, P < 0.0001, resp.) and had a lower CT attenuation than the non-SBO group (55.5 ± 23.4 versus 173.0 ± 68.0, P < 0.0001). The SBO group had higher prevalence of phytobezoar appearance (75.0% versus 10.3%, P < 0.0001). Major diameters of bezoar and phytobezoar were significant independent risk factors associated with SBO (odds ratio = 36.09, 8.26, resp., and P = 0.0004, 0.044, resp.). Conclusions. Major diameter of bezoar or phytobezoar is a potential risk factor associated with SBO. PMID:27403434

  17. A Peterson's hernia and subsequent small bowel volvulus: surgical reconstruction utilizing transverse colon as a new Roux-en-Y limb - 1 case.

    PubMed

    Jang, Jae Seong; Shin, Dong Gue

    2013-12-01

    Peterson's hernia is an internal hernia that can occur after Roux-en-Y anastomosis. It often accompanies small bowel volvulus and is prone to strangulation. Reconstruction of intestinal continuity after massive small bowel resection in a patient who undergoes near total gastrectomy and Roux-en-Y anastomosis can be difficult. A 74-year-old man who had undergone a near total gastrectomy and Roux-en-Y gastrojejunostomy for stomach cancer presented with abdominal pain. The preoperative computed tomography showed strangulated small bowel volvulus. During the emergent laparotomy, we found a strangulated Peterson's hernia with small bowel volvulus. After resection of the necrotized intestine, we made a new Roux-en-Y anastomosis connecting the remnant stomach and the jejunum with a transverse colon segment. We were safely able to connect the remnant stomach and the jejunum by making a new Roux-en-Y anastomosis utilizing a transverse colon segment as a new Roux-limb by two stage operation.

  18. Effects of robot training on bowel function in patients with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qiuchen; Yu, Lili; Gu, Rui; Zhou, Yue; Hu, Chunying

    2015-05-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of body weight-supported treadmill training (BWSTT) and robot-assisted rehabilitation (RAT) on bowel function in patients with spinal cord injury with respect to defecation time and defecation drug dose (enema). [Subjects] Twenty-four patients with spinal cord injury participated in the study. All subjects had an incomplete injury ranging from level T8 to L2. [Methods] The subjects were randomly divided into BWSTT and RAT groups. Walking training was provided to both groups for 20 minutes, four times a week, for one month. The defecation time and enema dose were measured before and after the experiment. [Results] The RAT group showed significant shortening of defecation time and decrease of enema dose. [Conclusion] The results demonstrated that significantly better improvement in bowel function can be achieved with RAT. PMID:26157223

  19. Conservative management of small bowel perforation in Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV.

    PubMed

    Allaparthi, Satya; Verma, Himanshu; Burns, David L; Joyce, Ann M

    2013-08-16

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is a group of inherited connective tissue disorders caused by collagen synthesis defects. EDS type IV, or vascular EDS, is caused by loss-of-function mutations in the type III pro-collagen gene (COL3A1). Common complications of EDS type IV include gastrointestinal bleeding and bowel perforations, posing diagnostic and therapeutic dilemmas for both surgeons and gastroenterologists. Here, we describe a complicated case of EDS type IV in a 35-year-old caucasian female who presented with overt gastrointestinal bleeding. The patient had a prior history of spontaneous colonic perforation, and an uncomplicated upper endoscopy was performed. A careful ileoscopy was terminated early due to tachycardia and severe abdominal pain, and a subsequent computed tomography scan confirmed the diagnosis of ileal perforation. The patient was managed conservatively, and demonstrated daily improvement. At the time of hospital discharge, no further episodes of gastrointestinal blood loss had occurred. This case highlights the benefit of conservative management for EDS patients with gastrointestinal hemorrhage. It is recommended that surgical treatment should be reserved for patients who fail conservative treatment or in cases of hemodynamic instability. Finally, this case demonstrates the necessity for a higher threshold of operative or endoscopic interventions in EDS type IV patients. PMID:23951395

  20. Explore Small Molecule-induced Genome-wide Transcriptional Profiles for Novel Inflammatory Bowel Disease Drug

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Xiaoshu; Chen, Yang; Gao, Zhen; Xu, Rong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) is a chronic and relapsing disorder, which affects millions people worldwide. Current drug options cannot cure the disease and may cause severe side effects. We developed a systematic framework to identify novel IBD drugs exploiting millions of genomic signatures for chemical compounds. Specifically, we searched all FDA-approved drugs for candidates that share similar genomic profiles with IBD. In the evaluation experiments, our approach ranked approved IBD drugs averagely within top 26% among 858 candidates, significantly outperforming a state-of-art genomics-based drug repositioning method (p-value < e-8). Our approach also achieved significantly higher average precision than the state-of-art approach in predicting potential IBD drugs from clinical trials (0.072 vs. 0.043, p<0.1) and off-label IBD drugs (0.198 vs. 0.138, p<0.1). Furthermore, we found evidences supporting the therapeutic potential of the top-ranked drugs, such as Naloxone, in literature and through analyzing target genes and pathways. PMID:27570643

  1. /sup 14/C-lactose breath tests during pelvic radiotherapy: the effect of the amount of small bowel irradiated

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, R.G.; Stryker, J.A.

    1982-02-01

    Thirty patients who were undergoing pelvic radiotherapy had /sup 14/C-lactose breath tests performed in the first and fifth weeks of treatment. In Group I (21 patients), a significant portion of the small intestine was irradiated, and in Group II (9 patients), only a small portion of the small intestine was irradiated. In Group I, the average reductions in the excretion of ingested /sup 14/C between the first- and fifth-week tests were 41.5% at 1/2 hour postingestion (p less than 0.05), and 21.8% at 1 hour postingestion (p less than 0.05). In Group II, the percentage reductions were 11.8% and 3.7% at 1/2 and 1 hour, respectively (p greater than 0.05). The data suggest that lactose malabsorption is a factor in the etiology of the nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea experienced by patients who are undergoing pelvic radiotherapy, and that the amount of bowel included in the treatment volume significantly influences the degree of malabsorption.

  2. /sup 14/C-lactose breath tests during pelvic radiotherapy: the effect of the amount of small bowel irradiated

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, R.G.; Stryker, J.A.

    1982-02-01

    Thirty patients who were undergoing pelvic radiotherapy had /sup 14/C-lactose breath tests performed in the first and fifth weeks of treatment. In Group I (21 patients), a significant portion of the small intestine was irradiated, and in Group II (9 patients), only a small portion of the small intestine was irradiated. In Group I, the average reductions in the excretion of ingested /sup 14/C between the first- and fifth-week tests were 41.5% at 1/2 hour postingestion (p<0.05), and 21.8% at 1 hour postingestion (p<0.05). In Group II, the prercentage reduction were 11.8% and 3.7% at 1/2 and 1 hour, respectively (p>0.05). The data suggest that lactose malabsorption is a factor in the etiology of the nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea experienced by patients who are undergoing pelvic radiotherapy, and that the amount of bowel included in the treatment volume significantly influences the degree of malabsorption.

  3. 21 CFR 201.304 - Tannic acid and barium enema preparations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... added to barium enemas to improve X-ray pictures. Tannic acid is capable of causing diminished liver... use in enemas. Tannic acid for rectal use to enhance X-ray visualization is regarded as a new...

  4. 21 CFR 201.304 - Tannic acid and barium enema preparations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... added to barium enemas to improve X-ray pictures. Tannic acid is capable of causing diminished liver... use in enemas. Tannic acid for rectal use to enhance X-ray visualization is regarded as a new...

  5. 21 CFR 201.304 - Tannic acid and barium enema preparations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... added to barium enemas to improve X-ray pictures. Tannic acid is capable of causing diminished liver... use in enemas. Tannic acid for rectal use to enhance X-ray visualization is regarded as a new...

  6. 21 CFR 201.304 - Tannic acid and barium enema preparations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... added to barium enemas to improve X-ray pictures. Tannic acid is capable of causing diminished liver... use in enemas. Tannic acid for rectal use to enhance X-ray visualization is regarded as a new...

  7. 21 CFR 201.304 - Tannic acid and barium enema preparations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... added to barium enemas to improve X-ray pictures. Tannic acid is capable of causing diminished liver... use in enemas. Tannic acid for rectal use to enhance X-ray visualization is regarded as a new...

  8. Survival after total-body irradiation. I. Effects of partial small bowel shielding

    SciTech Connect

    Vigneulle, R.M.; Vriesendorp, H.M.; Taylor, P.; Burns, W.; Pelkey, T. )

    1989-08-01

    The small intestine of the rat was shielded during total-body irradiation (TBI) to evaluate the effects of radiation dose and length of intestine shielded on survival. Sprague-Dawley rats were anesthetized in groups of 10. Using aseptic surgical procedures 80, 40, 20, or 10 cm, or none of the proximal or distal small intestine were temporarily exteriorized and shielded during irradiation with photons from an 18 MeV linear accelerator. Less than 17% of the dose was delivered to the shielded intestines. In unshielded animals deaths occurred from Days 4 to 6 with 13, 15, or 17 Gy and from Days 8 to 30 with 9, 11, and 12 Gy. However, in all animals exposed to 15 Gy with all or part of the small intestine shielded, survival was increased to between 5 and 9 days. Shielding of the distal small intestine was more effective in prolonging survival than shielding of the proximal small intestine. The previously identified target of radiation damage in the small intestine is the crypt stem cell. In this study, the analysis of histological specimens of shielded and irradiated small intestine suggested that humoral factors also influence intestinal histology and survival after irradiation. These humoral factors are thought to originate from the irradiated body tissues, the shielded proximal intestine, and the shielded distal intestine. Further studies are required to identify these factors and to determine their mode of action and their therapeutic potential after radiation damage to the small intestine.

  9. Survival after total-body irradiation. 1. Effects of partial small bowel shielding

    SciTech Connect

    Vigneulle, R.M.; Vriesendorp, H.M.; Taylor, P.; Burns, W.; Pelkey, T.

    1989-01-01

    The small intestine of the rat was shielded during total-body irradiation (TBI) to evaluate the effects of radiation dose and length of intestine shielded on survival. Sprague-Dawley rats were anesthetized in groups of 10. Using aseptic surgical procedures 80, 40, 20, or 10 cm, or none of the proximal or distal small intestine were temporarily exteriorized and shielded during irradiation with photons from an 18-MeV linear accelerator. Less than 17% of the dose was delivered to the shielded intestines. In unshielded animals deaths occurred from Days 4 to 6 with 13, 15, or 17 Gy and from Days 8 to 30 with 9, 11, and 12 Gy. However, in all animals exposed to 15 Gy with all or part of the small intestine shielded, survival was increased to between 5 and 9 days. Shielding of the distal small intestine. The previously identified target of radiation damage in the small intestine is the crypt stem cell. In this study, the analysis of histological specimens of shielded and irradiated small intestine suggested that humoral factors also influence intestinal histology and survival after irradiation. These humoral factors are thought to originate from the irradiated body tissues, the shielded proximal intestine, and the shielded distal intestine. Further studies are required to identify these factors and to determine their mode of action and their therapeutic potential after radiation damage to the small intestine.

  10. Effects of dexamethasone on small bowel and kidney oxidative stress and histological alterations in bile duct-ligated rats.

    PubMed

    Ozturk, Hayrettin; Eken, Halil; Ozturk, Hulya; Buyukbayram, Huseyin

    2006-09-01

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathogenesis of toxic liver diseases and other hepatic alterations including obstruction of bile flow. It has been shown that the gastrointestinal tract and renal tissue is particularly affected during obstruction of bile flow. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the effects of dexamethasone on small bowel and kidney oxidative stress and histological alterations in bile duct-ligated (BDL) rats. A total of 40 male Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 200-240 g were used in this study. Group 1 (Sham-control, n = 10) rats underwent laparotomy and bile duct was dissected from the surrounding tissue. Group 2 (Dexa-control, n = 10) rats underwent laparotomy and bile duct was dissected from the surrounding tissue. The rats received daily dexamethasone. Group 3 (BDL/Untreated, n = 10) rats were subjected to bile duct ligation and no drug was applied. Group 4 (BDL/Dexa, n = 10) rats received daily dexamethasone by orogastric tube for 14 days after BDL. At the end of the 2-week period, superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), and malondialdehyde (MDA) were measured and biochemical and histological evaluation were processed. The mean serum bilirubin, liver enzymes, MDA level, and histopathological score significantly decreased and SOD, CAT, and GSH-Px values were significantly increased in group 4 when compared to group 3. Group 3 presented a significant increase in caecal count of E. coli and in aerobe/anaerobe ratio. In group 4, liver was moderately damaged. Ileal biopsies from group 4 demonstrated a significant increase in villus height, total mucosal thickness, and villus density when compared to group 3. Glomerular injury scores (GIS) and arterial injury scores (AIS) in group 3 rats were increased in the juxtamedullary region. In contrast to group 4, tubulo-interstitial lesions were diffuse in group 3 animals. Dexamethasone reduced small bowel and kidney oxidative stress and histological

  11. Overtube-assisted enteroscopy and capsule endoscopy for the diagnosis of small-bowel polyps and tumors: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sulbaran, Marianny; de Moura, Eduardo; Bernardo, Wanderley; Morais, Cintia; Oliveira, Joel; Bustamante-Lopez, Leonardo; Sakai, Paulo; Mönkemüller, Klaus; Safatle-Ribeiro, Adriana

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Several studies have evaluated the utility of double-balloon enteroscopy (DBE) and capsule endoscopy (CE) for patients with small-bowel disease showing inconsistent results. The aim of this study was to determine the sensitivity and specificity of overtube-assisted enteroscopy (OAE) as well as the diagnostic concordance between OAE and CE for small-bowel polyps and tumors. Patients and methods: We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of studies in which the results of OAE were compared with the results of CE for the evaluation of small-bowel polyps and tumors. When data for surgically resected lesions were available, the histopathological results of OAE and surgical specimens were compared. The sensitivity, specificity, positive likelihood ratio, and negative likelihood ratio for the diagnosis of small-bowel polyps and tumors were analyzed. Secondarily, the rates of diagnostic concordance and discordance between OAE and CE were calculated. Results: There were 15 full-length studies with a total of 821 patients that met the inclusion criteria. The pooled sensitivity, specificity, positive likelihood ratio, and negative likelihood ratio were as follows: 0.89 (95 % confidence interval [CI] 0.84 – 0.93), with heterogeneity χ2 = 41.23 (P = 0.0002) and inconsistency (I 2) = 66.0 %; 0.97 (95 %CI 0.95 – 0.98), with heterogeneity χ2 = 45.27 (P = 0.07) and inconsistency (I 2) = 69.1 %; 16.61 (95 %CI 3.74 – 73.82), with heterogeneity Cochrane’s Q = 225.19 (P < 0.01) and inconsistency (I 2) = 93.8 %; and 0.14 (95 %CI 0.05 – 0.35), with heterogeneity Cochrane’s Q = 81.01 (P < .01) and inconsistency (I 2) = 82.7 %, respectively. A summary receiver operating characteristic curve (SROC) curve was constructed, and the area under the curve (AUC) was 0.97. Conclusion: OAE is an accurate test for the detection of small-bowel polyps and tumors. OAE and CE

  12. Effect of Ischemia on the Canine Large Bowel: A Comparison with the Small Intestine1

    PubMed Central

    Takeyoshi, Izumi; Zhang, Shimin; Nakamura, Kenjiro; Ikoma, Akira; Zhu, Yue; Starzl, Thomas E.; Todo, Satoru

    2010-01-01

    Mucosal injury caused by ischemia and reperfusion has been well documented with the small intestine, but little is known about the colon. In the present study, the effect of warm and cold ischemia on the canine colon was studied and compared to that on the small intestine. After in situ flushing, the small intestine and the colon from six beagle dogs were removed and stored for 0.5, 1.5, and 3 hr at 37°C (warm ischemia) or for 1, 6, 12, 24, 36, and 48 hr at 4°C (cold ischemia). Electrophysiology, permeability, biochemistry, and histopathology of the specimens at each ischemic period and after reperfusion in the Ussing chamber were determined. Warm and cold ischemia induced duration-dependent suppression of electrophysiology in both organs, but the colonic mucosa retained higher activity of absorptive enterocytes and cryptic cells than the small intestine. Only the colon showed increased permeability of FITC-conjugated Dextran from the mucosal surface to the submucosal layer after prolonged ischemia. Changes in adenine nucleotides and purine catabolites were not markedly different between the organs. Histopathologic abnormalities during ischemia and after reperfusion were more serious with the small intestine than with the colon. Compared to warm ischemia, hypothermia lessened or delayed these morphofunctional derangements in both organs, which became universally worsened after reperfusion. Colonic mucosa receives morphofunctional derangements from ischemia and reperfusion, but the severity of the damage was much less severe in the colon than in the small intestine. PMID:8606507

  13. DIAGNOSTIC ACCURACY OF BARIUM ENEMA FINDINGS IN HIRSCHSPRUNG'S DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    PEYVASTEH, Mehran; ASKARPOUR, Shahnam; OSTADIAN, Nasrollah; MOGHIMI, Mohammad-Reza; JAVAHERIZADEH, Hazhir

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Hirschsprung's disease is the most common cause of pediatric intestinal obstruction. Contrast enema is used for evaluation of the patients with its diagnosis. Aim: To evaluate sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of radiologic findings for diagnosis of Hirschsprung in patients underwent barium enema. Methods: This cross sectional study was carried out in Imam Khomeini Hospital for one year starting from 2012, April. Sixty patients were enrolled. Inclusion criteria were: neonates with failure to pass meconium, abdominal distention, and refractory constipation who failed to respond with medical treatment. Transitional zone, delay in barium evacuation after 24 h, rectosigmoid index (maximum with of the rectum divided by maximum with of the sigmoid; abnormal if <1), and irregularity of mucosa (jejunization) were evaluated in barium enema. Biopsy was obtained at three locations apart above dentate line. PPV, NPV, specificity , and sensitivity was calculated for each finding. Results: Mean age of the cases with Hirschsprung's disease and without was 17.90±18.29 months and 17.8±18.34 months respectively (p=0.983). It was confirmed in 30 (M=20, F=10) of cases. Failure to pass meconium was found in 21(70%) cases. Sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV were 90%, 80%, 81.8% and 88.8% respectively for transitional zone in barium enema. Sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV were 76.7%, 83.3%, 78.1% and 82.1% respectively for rectosigmoid index .Sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV were 46.7%, 100%, 100% and 65.2% respectively for irregular contraction detected in barium enema. Sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV were 23.3%, 100%, 100% and 56.6% respectively for mucosal irregularity in barium enema. Conclusion: The most sensitive finding was transitional zone. The most specific findings were irregular contraction, mucosal irregularity, and followed by cobblestone appearance. PMID:27759777

  14. Human infection by acanthocephalan parasites belonging to the genus Corynosoma found from small bowel endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Tomoki; Waga, Eriko; Kitaoka, Keisuke; Imagawa, Takayuki; Komatsu, Yuuya; Takanashi, Kunihiro; Anbo, Fumie; Anbo, Tomonori; Katuki, Shinichi; Ichihara, Shin; Fujimori, Shunji; Yamasaki, Hiroshi; Morishima, Yasuyuki; Sugiyama, Hiromu; Katahira, Hirotaka

    2016-10-01

    A 73-year-old man with a suspected ileus in January 2013 and subsequently suffered melena in February 2014 was endoscopically examined. As a result of the examinations, unidentified species of Corynosoma sp. and Corynosoma villosum were recovered from the small intestine, further endoscopic diagnosis suggested relevance between abdominal pain and the present infections in the small intestine. The recovered worms were composed of gravid females with developed eggs, suggesting that these parasites can survive for a long time in the intestine after infection. In this case, the short interval between infections appears to be due to the individual's eating habits which consist of regularly consuming uncooked seafood. PMID:27396515

  15. The role of interdigestive small bowel motility in the regulation of gut microflora, bacterial overgrowth, and bacterial translocation in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Nieuwenhuijs, V B; Verheem, A; van Duijvenbode-Beumer, H; Visser, M R; Verhoef, J; Gooszen, H G; Akkermans, L M

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To clarify the role of the migrating motor complex (MMC) in the regulation of small intestinal microflora and bacterial translocation. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: The intestinal microflora may serve as a source of infectious microorganisms. Failure of regulatory mechanisms of the intestinal flora could therefore play an important role in the pathogenesis of gut-derived infections. METHODS: Rats were fitted with small intestinal myoelectrodes. MMCs were measured on a control day and 3 consecutive days during continuous administration of morphine or placebo. Mesenteric lymph nodes, liver, spleen, peripheral blood, duodenum, and ileum samples were cultured quantitatively. RESULTS: The mean MMC cycle length in placebo-treated animals was 15.1+/-0.5 minutes. MMCs were completely disrupted after morphine treatment. Total bacterial growth in the duodenum was 7.27+/-0.34 10log colony-forming units (CFU)/g with placebo and 8.28+/-0.27 CFU/g with morphine. In placebo-treated animals, the mean MMC cycle length the day before culturing correlated with total bacterial growth in the duodenum. Translocation incidences to the mesenteric lymph nodes, liver, spleen, and blood were 0/8, 1/8, 0/8, and 0/8 with placebo and 7/8, 6/8, 5/8, and 0/8 with morphine. The overall translocation incidence was 1/8 in placebo-treated animals and 8/8 in morphine-treated animals. CONCLUSIONS: The MMC is an important mechanism controlling bacterial growth in the upper small bowel. Its disruption with morphine promotes duodenal bacterial overgrowth and bacterial translocation. PMID:9712563

  16. Ménétrier disease manifested by polyposis and involved in both the small bowel and entire colon

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Qiang; Lu, Panpan; Ding, Shuping; Fan, Yuhui; Yan, Wei; Wang, Ying; Tian, Dean; Xia, Yujia; Liu, Mei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Ménétrier disease (MD) is rare that is involved in both the small bowel and entire colon. The main symptoms and the important clinical findings: We describe a case of a 76-year-old male patient whose clinical presentations include intermittent diarrhea, epigastric pain, nausea, vomiting, asitia, and weight loss. An endoscopy was performed showing a large number of irregular forms and different sizes of polypoid lesions in the gastrointestinal tract, which is rare for MD. The main diagnoses, therapeutics interventions, and outcomes: Herein, this case was diagnosed as MD, mainly dependent on endoscopic evaluation, typical clinical symptoms, and histopathological examination of biopsy. As this patient was also infected with Helicobacter pylori, the eradication of H pylori was administered. Meanwhile, a high-protein diet was enjoined, the aforementioned patient's symptoms were alleviated evidently after 1 month. Conclusion: Although the etiology of MD remained undetermined, we showed that eradication of H pylori in this case might contribute to the disease remission. This study enlarged the present understanding of MD. PMID:27603362

  17. Elevated motility-related transmucosal potential difference in the upper small intestine in the irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Larsson, M H; Simrén, M; Thomas, E A; Bornstein, J C; Lindström, E; Sjövall, H

    2007-10-01

    The pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is complex and incompletely known. Very little has been studied regarding the role of submucous neuronal activity. We therefore measured small intestinal transmural potential difference (PD, reflecting mainly electrogenic chloride secretion), and its linkage with fasting motor activity [migrating motor complex (MMC)] in controls (n = 16) and patients with IBS [n = 23, 14 diarrhoea predominant (d-IBS) and nine constipation predominant (c-IBS)]. Transmural-PD and its relation to MMC phase III was measured by modified multilumen manometry for 3 h in the fasting state using one jejunal and one duodenal infusion line as flowing electrodes. The amplitude and duration of motor phase III was similar in controls and IBS patients, but the propagation speed of phase III was higher in IBS patients. In IBS patients, maximal PD during MMC phase III was significantly elevated in both the duodenum and jejunum (P < 0.05) and the PD decline after phase III was significantly prolonged in the jejunum (P < 0.01). The PD elevation was seen in both duodenum and jejunum in d-IBS patients, but only in the jejunum in the c-IBS patients. On the basis of previous modelling studies, we propose that the enhanced secretion may reflect disturbed enteric network behaviour in some patients with IBS.

  18. Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth in Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome: Clinical Characteristics, Psychological Factors, and Peripheral Cytokines.

    PubMed

    Chu, Hua; Fox, Mark; Zheng, Xia; Deng, Yanyong; Long, Yanqin; Huang, Zhihui; Du, Lijun; Xu, Fei; Dai, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Psychosocial factors and low-grade colonic mucosal immune activation have been suggested to play important roles in the pathophysiology of IBS. In total, 94 patients with IBS and 13 healthy volunteers underwent a 10 g lactulose hydrogen breath test (HBT) with concurrent (99m)Tc scintigraphy. All participants also completed a face-to-face questionnaire survey, including the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Life Event Stress (LES), and general information. Serum tumour necrosis factor-α, interleukin- (IL-) 6, IL-8, and IL-10 levels were measured. The 89 enrolled patients with IBS and 13 healthy controls had no differences in baseline characteristics. The prevalence of SIBO in patients with IBS was higher than that in healthy controls (39% versus 8%, resp.; p = 0.026). Patients with IBS had higher anxiety, depression, and LES scores, but anxiety, depression, and LES scores were similar between the SIBO-positive and SIBO-negative groups. Psychological disorders were not associated with SIBO in patients with IBS. The serum IL-10 level was significantly lower in SIBO-positive than SIBO-negative patients with IBS. PMID:27379166

  19. Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth in Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome: Clinical Characteristics, Psychological Factors, and Peripheral Cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Hua; Fox, Mark; Zheng, Xia; Deng, Yanyong; Long, Yanqin; Huang, Zhihui; Du, Lijun; Xu, Fei; Dai, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Psychosocial factors and low-grade colonic mucosal immune activation have been suggested to play important roles in the pathophysiology of IBS. In total, 94 patients with IBS and 13 healthy volunteers underwent a 10 g lactulose hydrogen breath test (HBT) with concurrent 99mTc scintigraphy. All participants also completed a face-to-face questionnaire survey, including the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Life Event Stress (LES), and general information. Serum tumour necrosis factor-α, interleukin- (IL-) 6, IL-8, and IL-10 levels were measured. The 89 enrolled patients with IBS and 13 healthy controls had no differences in baseline characteristics. The prevalence of SIBO in patients with IBS was higher than that in healthy controls (39% versus 8%, resp.; p = 0.026). Patients with IBS had higher anxiety, depression, and LES scores, but anxiety, depression, and LES scores were similar between the SIBO-positive and SIBO-negative groups. Psychological disorders were not associated with SIBO in patients with IBS. The serum IL-10 level was significantly lower in SIBO-positive than SIBO-negative patients with IBS. PMID:27379166

  20. Culprit for recurrent acute gastrointestinal massive bleeding: "Small bowel Dieulafoy's lesions" - a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Sathyamurthy, Anjana; Winn, Jessica N; Ibdah, Jamal A; Tahan, Veysel

    2016-08-15

    A Dieulafoy's lesion is a dilated, aberrant, submucosal vessel that erodes the overlying epithelium without evidence of a primary ulcer or erosion. It can be located anywhere in the gastrointestinal tract. We describe a case of massive gastrointestinal bleeding from Dieulafoy's lesions in the duodenum. Etiology and precipitating events of a Dieulafoy's lesion are not well known. Bleeding can range from being self-limited to massive life- threatening. Endoscopic hemostasis can be achieved with a combination of therapeutic modalities. The endoscopic management includes sclerosant injection, heater probe, laser therapy, electrocautery, cyanoacrylate glue, banding, and clipping. Endoscopic tattooing can be helpful to locate the lesion for further endoscopic re-treatment or intraoperative wedge resection. Therapeutic options for re-bleeding lesions comprise of repeated endoscopic hemostasis, angiographic embolization or surgical wedge resection of the lesions. We present a 63-year-old Caucasian male with active bleeding from the two small bowel Dieulafoy's lesions, which was successfully controlled with epinephrine injection and clip applications. PMID:27574568

  1. Bezoar-induced small bowel obstruction: Clinical characteristics and diagnostic value of multi-slice spiral computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Pei-Yuan; Wang, Xia; Zhang, Lin; Li, Hai-Fei; Chen, Liang; Wang, Xu; Wang, Bin

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine the possible predisposing factors of bezoar-induced small bowel obstruction (BI-SBO) and to discuss the diagnostic value of multi-slice spiral computed tomography, particularly contrast-enhanced scanning, in this condition. METHODS: A total of 35 BI-SBO cases treated at our hospital from January 2007 to December 2013 were retrospectively analysed. Complete clinical and computed tomography (CT) data of the patients were available and confirmed by surgery. SBO was clinically diagnosed on the basis of clinical manifestations. Of the 35 patients, 18 underwent abdominal and pelvic CT planar scanning with GE 64-slice spiral CT and 17 underwent abdominal and pelvic CT planar scanning with GE 64-slice spiral CT combined with contrast-enhanced examination. Original images were processed using a GE ADW4.3 workstation to obtain MPR, CPR, MIP and CTA images. The images of all patients were evaluated by two abdominal imaging experts. The main analytical contents of planar scanning included intestinal bezoar conditions, changes in the intestinal wall and changes in peri-intestinal conditions. Vascular hyperaemia and arterial blood supply conditions at a specific obstruction site and the distal end of the obstruction site were evaluated through contrast-enhanced examination. RESULTS: The proportion of males to females among the 35 cases was 1:1.69 (13:22); median age was 63.3 years. The following cases were observed: 29 (82.8%) cases occurred in autumn and winter and showed a history of consuming high amounts of persimmon and hawthorn; 19 (54.3%) cases revealed a history of gastrointestinal surgery; 19 exhibited incomplete dentition, with missing partial or whole posterior teeth; 26 suffered from obstruction at the ileum. A total of 51 bezoars were found in these patients, of whom 16 (45.7%) had multiple bezoars. CT planar scanning of bezoars showed lumps with mottled gas inside the intestinal cavity. Furthermore, 9 cases of bezoars had envelopes and 11 cases

  2. Influence of a natural-ingredient diet containing Phaseolus vulgaris on the colonization by segmented, filamentous bacteria of the small bowel of mice.

    PubMed

    Klaasen, H L; Koopman, J P; van den Brink, M E; Bakker, M H; Beynen, A C

    1992-01-01

    The appearance of segmented, filamentous bacteria (SFBs) in the small bowel of mice is influenced by the composition of the diet, but the dietary components responsible are not known. The addition of ground, whole Phaseolus vulgaris to a natural-ingredient diet at the expense of part of the skim milk powder, ground barley and wheat middlings components, caused an increase of the colonization of the mouse small bowel by SFBs. This effect was not seen when whole Phaseolus was added to a purified diet at the expense of part of the casein, corn oil, coconut fat, corn starch, dextrose and cellulose components. In an attempt to identify the fraction of Phaseolus that might contain SFB-inducing substances, the skin and kernel fraction of the bean were added to the natural-ingredient diet. The skin and kernel fraction were found to be as effective in inducing SFB appearance as was whole Phaseolus.

  3. Influence of a natural-ingredient diet containing Phaseolus vulgaris on the colonization by segmented, filamentous bacteria of the small bowel of mice.

    PubMed

    Klaasen, H L; Koopman, J P; van den Brink, M E; Bakker, M H; Beynen, A C

    1992-01-01

    The appearance of segmented, filamentous bacteria (SFBs) in the small bowel of mice is influenced by the composition of the diet, but the dietary components responsible are not known. The addition of ground, whole Phaseolus vulgaris to a natural-ingredient diet at the expense of part of the skim milk powder, ground barley and wheat middlings components, caused an increase of the colonization of the mouse small bowel by SFBs. This effect was not seen when whole Phaseolus was added to a purified diet at the expense of part of the casein, corn oil, coconut fat, corn starch, dextrose and cellulose components. In an attempt to identify the fraction of Phaseolus that might contain SFB-inducing substances, the skin and kernel fraction of the bean were added to the natural-ingredient diet. The skin and kernel fraction were found to be as effective in inducing SFB appearance as was whole Phaseolus. PMID:1291538

  4. Bowel Dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... PCF Spotlight Glossary African American Men Living with Prostate Cancer Bowel Dysfunction Side Effects Urinary Dysfunction Bowel Dysfunction ... rectal worse. Back to Side Effects Print | Understanding Prostate Cancer Research Faces of Prostate Cancer About PCF Take ...

  5. Gastrointestinal bleeding as presentation of small bowel metastases of malignant melanoma: Is surgery a good choice?

    PubMed Central

    Conversano, Angelica; Macina, Simona; Indellicato, Rocco; Lacavalla, Domenico; D’Abbicco, Dario

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Melanoma shows a particular predilection in involving small intestine both in a single site and in multiple localization and acute or chronic gastrointestinal bleedings are often the first sign of tumour. PRESENTATION OF CASE We report two cases of GI metastases of malignant melanoma, one presented with only a big mass that cause intestinal obstruction and the other with a tumour spread throughout the small intestine that produce enterorrhagia. DISCUSSION Diagnosis and follow-up are very difficult: CT scan, PET-CT scan and capsule endoscopy should be complementary for the assessment of patients with GI symptoms and melanoma history. CONCLUSION What is the role of surgery? Several studies suggest metastasectomy to achieve both R0 results and palliative resolutions of acute symptoms, such as obstruction, pain, and bleeding. PMID:25262323

  6. Endocrine tumour in kidney affecting small bowel structure, motility, and absorptive function 1

    PubMed Central

    Gleeson, M. H.; Bloom, S. R.; Polak, J. M.; Henry, K.; Dowling, R. H.

    1971-01-01

    A 44-year-old woman is described with an endocrine tumour arising in the kidney. There were associated abnormalities of small intestinal morphology, motility, and absorptive function. These abnormalities reversed on removal of the tumour. Detailed studies showed that the tumour contained, and was secreting, glucagon. It is postulated that the intestinal abnormalities may have resulted from glucagon itself or another, as yet unidentified, hormone. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6 PMID:4941684

  7. Limitations of indirect methods of estimating small bowel transit in man

    SciTech Connect

    Pressman, J.H.; Hofmann, A.F.; Witztum, K.F.; Gertler, S.L.; Steinbach, J.H.; Stokes, K.; Kelts, D.G.; Stone, D.M.; Jones, B.R.; Dharmsathaphorn, K.

    1987-07-01

    Experiments were carried out in healthy volunteers to explore the utility of a new (/sup 14/C)lactulose breath test for measuring small intestinal transit time in man and to use this procedure to test whether two antidiarrheal agents, codeine and clonidine, alter small intestinal transit time during digestion of a liquid meal. In an initial validation study performed in 12 subjects, a liquid test meal containing 10 g (/sup 14/C)lactulose was administered and the colonic entry time estimated from the time course of /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ excretion in breath compared with that of H/sub 2/ excretion. There was a fair correlation (r = 0.77; P less than 0.001) between results obtained by the two methods; both methods gave similar results, but /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ output was delayed when compared to H/sub 2/ output and was incomplete. The meal also contained xylose and (/sup 13/C)glycine, permitting the duodenal entry time of the meal to be estimated by the appearance of xylose in blood and /sup 13/CO/sub 2/ in breath, respectively. The same liquid meal was then used to examine the effect on small intestinal transit time (colonic entry time minus duodenal entry time) of codeine or clonidine. 99Tc-sulfur colloid was also added to the meal to permit a comparison of small intestinal transit estimated by imaging with that estimated by the /sup 14/CO/sub 2/-lactulose breath test. /sup 99/Tc radioactivity appeared in the cecum (as assessed using gamma scintigraphy) about 2 hr before /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ radioactivity appeared in breath; the correlation between transit time estimated by the two methods was moderate (r = 0.61; P less than 0.05). Based on the (/sup 14/C)lactulose data, small intestinal transit time ranged from less than 1 to 3 hr for a liquid meal containing 10 g lactulose; within-subject variation was considerably less than between-subject variation.

  8. The Relationship between Small-Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth and Intestinal Permeability in Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Park, Dong Il; Kim, Hong Joo; Cho, Yong Kyun; Sohn, Chong Il; Jeon, Woo Kyu; Kim, Byung Ik; Won, Kyoung Hee; Park, Soon Min

    2009-01-01

    Background/Aims Small-intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) is a frequent finding in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Many patients with IBS also have abnormal intestinal permeability, which is probably due to low-grade inflammation in the intestinal mucosa. Our aim was to verify the relationship between SIBO and small-intestinal permeability in IBS patients. Methods A cohort of 38 IBS patients (20 women and 18 men; age range 16-70 years; mean age 40.2 years) with symptoms that fulfilled Rome-II criteria, and 12 healthy controls (5 women and 7 men; age range 25-52 years; mean age: 37.8 years) were recruited. All subjects underwent lactulose breath tests (LBTs) and intestinal permeability tests using the polyethylene glycol (PEG) 3350/400 retrieval ratio. Results A positive LBT was found in 18.4% (7/38) of patients with IBS and 8.3% (1/12) of control subjects. Intestinal permeability was significantly increased in patients with IBS compared with the normal controls (0.82±0.09 vs 0.41±0.05 [mean±SD], respectively; p<0.05). However, the intestinal permeability did not differ significantly between IBS patients with a positive LBT and those with a negative LBT (0.90±0.13 and 0.80±0.11, respectively; p>0.05). Conclusions Intestinal permeability was increased in patients with IBS, but this finding did not correlated with the occurrence of SIBO. PMID:20431742

  9. Intestinal adaptation after extensive small bowel resection: differential changes in growth and insulin-like growth factor system messenger ribonucleic acids in jejunum and ileum.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, T R; Mantell, M P; Chow, J C; Rombeau, J L; Smith, R J

    1998-07-01

    The distal small bowel exhibits greater adaptive growth than proximal segments after partial small intestine resection. To explore this process, we evaluated adaptive cellularity, intestinal insulin-like growth factor (IGF) system messenger RNA (mRNA) transcripts, and effects of recombinant IGF-I treatment in jejunum and ileum of adult rats. Gastrostomy-fed animals underwent 80% jejuno-ileal resection or intestinal transection and reanastomosis without resection, followed by infusion of human recombinant IGF-I (2.4 mg/kgXday) or vehicle. After 7 days, resected rats demonstrated modest adaptive growth in jejunum and marked cell proliferation in ileum. Resection increased IGF-I mRNA in both jejunum (183%) and ileum (249%) and up-regulated IGFBP-4 mRNA levels in both tissues. IGFBP-3 mRNA fell significantly in ileum after resection. IGF-I infusion modestly increased ileal cellularity after resection, but had no effect in jejunum. IGF-I markedly increased IGFBP-3 mRNA levels in jejunum after both transection and resection. These data confirm that bowel resection induces greater adaptive growth in ileum than jejunum. IGF-I administration modestly increases ileal, but not jejunal, growth after resection. Increased levels of intestinal IGF-I and IGFBP-4 mRNA suggest roles for IGF-I and IGFBP-4 in mediating small bowel adaptation. Higher levels of jejunal IGFBP-3 mRNA may be related to limited jejunal vs. ileal growth after extensive jejuno-ileal resection.

  10. Computer-supported analysis of continuous ambulatory manometric recordings in the human small bowel.

    PubMed

    Andrioli, A; Wilmer, A; Coremans, G; Vandewalle, J; Janssens, J

    1996-09-01

    An algorithm has been developed for the offline analysis of prolonged manometric recordings in the upper small intestine of humans. Sample data are acquired in the human duodenum and jejunum six solid-state strain-gauge transducers mounted on a silicon catheter that is connected to a portable digital recording device. The data are sampled at 4 Hz and filtered. For accurate calculations, the filtered signals are converted to cubic B-spline functions of order four. Based on an exponential weighted moving average, a base-line is calculated from the signal. Contractions are recognised on the basis of thresholds for minimum amplitude and duration. The developed algorithm calculates properties of these contractions, such as amplitude, duration, area and a motility index. In addition, the program automatically recognises normal motor patterns of the fasted human small intestine, such as the migrating motor complex, and aids in the identification of the postprandial motor pattern. Motor patterns are defined in terms of properties such as contraction frequency and propagation. In a validation procedure using conventional manual analysis, the program correctly identifies the number of individual contractions with a 98% confidence interval and also correctly recognises 96% of phase 3 motor activity.

  11. Embolization for Acute Small-Bowel Bleeding from the Collateral Artery of the Superior Mesenteric Left Deep Circumflex Iliac Artery Associated with Narrowing of the Bilateral Common External Iliac Arteries

    SciTech Connect

    Shimohira, Masashi Ogino, Hiroyuki; Sasaki, Shigeru; Nishikawa, Hiroko; Shibamoto, Yuta

    2009-03-15

    We present a case of acute small-bowel bleeding from the collateral artery of the superior mesenteric-left deep circumflex iliac artery that was successfully managed by transarterial coil embolization.

  12. Phosphate enema toxicosis in a pygmy goat wether.

    PubMed

    Hickman, Shirani A; Gill, Marjorie S; Marks, Steven L; Smith, Julie A; Sod, Gary A

    2004-10-01

    Phosphate enema toxicity was diagnosed in a 7-month-old, castrated male, pygmy goat. On presentation, clinical findings included mild depression, tachycardia, tachypnea, rumen stasis, muscle tremors, hypocalcemia, hypokalemia, hypochloremia, hyperphosphatemia, azotemia, and metabolic acidosis. Fluid diuresis and parenteral antimicrobial therapy resulted in recovery after 3 d of treatment.

  13. Small bowel volvulus as a complication of von Recklinghausen’s disease: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Werner, Thomas Artur; Kröpil, Feride; Schoppe, Martin Olaf; Kröpil, Patric; Knoefel, Wolfram Trudo; Krieg, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    We report the case of a 25-year-old male with Neurofibromatosis type I (NF-1), who presented at the time of admission with clinical findings of an acute abdomen caused by a mechanical obstruction. Computerized tomography showed a volvulus of the terminal ileum with mesenteric swirling as the cause of the patient’s symptoms. Consecutive exploratory laparotomy confirmed the diagnosis and 70 cm of the small intestine was resected due to an affection of the mesentery by multiple neurofibromas. The gastrointestinal tract is affected in approximately 10% of patients with NF-1, however the mesentery is almost always spared. Here we describe the unique case of a patient with a volvulus caused by mesenteric manifestation of von Recklinghausen’s disease, emphasizing the role of surgery in a team of multidisciplinary specialists to treat this multiorganic disease. PMID:24976735

  14. Use of small bowel imaging for the diagnosis and staging of Crohn’s disease—a survey of current UK practice

    PubMed Central

    Hafeez, R; Greenhalgh, R; Rajan, J; Bloom, S; McCartney, S; Halligan, S; Taylor, S A

    2011-01-01

    Objectives This study used a postal survey to assess the current use of small bowel imaging investigations for Crohn’s disease within National Health Service (NHS) radiological practice and to gauge gastroenterological referral patterns. Methods Similar questionnaires were posted to departments of radiology (n = 240) and gastroenterology (n = 254) identified, by the databases of the Royal College of Radiologists and British Society of Gastroenterologists. Questionnaires enquired about the use of small bowel imaging in the assessment of Crohn’s disease. In particular, questionnaires described clinical scenarios including first diagnosis, disease staging and assessment of suspected extraluminal complications, obstruction and disease flare. The data were stratified according to patient age. Results 63 (27%) departments of radiology (20 in teaching hospitals and 43 in district general hospitals (DGHs)) and 73 (29%) departments of gastroenterology replied. These departments were in 119 institutions. Of the 63 departments of radiology, 55 (90%) routinely performed barium follow-though (BaFT), 50 (80%) CT, 29 (46%) small bowel ultrasound (SbUS) and 24 (38%) small bowel MRI. BaFT was the most commonly used investigation across all age groups and indications. SbUS was used mostly for patients younger than 40 years of age with low index of clinical suspicion for Crohn’s disease (in 44% of radiology departments (28/63)). MRI was most frequently used in patients under 20 years of age for staging new disease (in 27% of radiology departments (17/63)) or in whom obstruction was suspected (in 29% of radiology departments (18/63)). CT was preferred for suspected extraluminal complications or obstruction (in 73% (46/63) and 46% (29/63) of radiology departments, respectively). Gastroenterological referrals largely concurred with the imaging modalities chosen by radiologists, although gastroenterologists were less likely to request SbUS and MRI. Conclusion BaFT remains the

  15. Octreotide acetate induces fasting small bowel motility in patients with dumping syndrome.

    PubMed

    Richards, W O; Geer, R; O'Dorisio, T M; Robarts, T; Parish, K L; Rice, D; Woltering, G; Abumrad, N N

    1990-12-01

    The long acting somatostatin analogue octreotide acetate has been effective in the treatment of early dumping syndrome. We hypothesized that this may be related to its effects on inhibiting gastric emptying and delaying intestinal transit. To study the effect of octreotide acetate on intestinal motility in patients we carried out a randomized, double-blinded study using a subcutaneous injection of either octreotide acetate (100 micrograms) or placebo given 20 min prior to ingestion of a high carbohydrate "dumping" meal in six patients with known severe dumping syndrome. Prior to each study a multilumen polyethylene tube was inserted into the efferent limb to study small intestinal contractions using low compliance pneumo-hydraulic water-perfused manometry. Octreotide acetate prevented dumping symptoms in all six patients and induced the appearance of migrating myoelectric complexes (MMC) characteristic of interdigestive motility. After ingestion of the dumping meal the postprandial "fed" motility pattern lasted for 141 +/- 9 min while after octreotide acetate the fed motility lasted for 29 +/- 5 min (P less than 0.03). The vigor of the fed motility pattern as measured by the motility index (MI = loge (sum of amplitudes X No. of contractions + 1] was lower after octreotide acetate than after placebo (15.1 +/- 0.1 vs 13.4 +/- 0.2, P less than 0.03). The induction of fasting MMC motility pattern and reduction in the duration and vigor of fed motility may explain the symptomatic relief these patients obtained with octreotide acetate. It is not known whether the induction of the MMC is a direct effect of octreotide acetate or secondary to the concomitant inhibition of peptide release (neurotensin, insulin, glucagon, pancreatic polypeptide) that has been demonstrated in earlier studies.

  16. Spectrum of chronic small bowel diarrhea with malabsorption in Indian subcontinent: is the trend really changing?

    PubMed Central

    Ingle, Meghraj; Rathi, Chetan; Poddar, Prateik; Pandav, Nilesh; Sawant, Prabha

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims This study aimed to document the recent etiological spectrum of chronic diarrhea with malabsorption and also to compare features that differentiate tropical sprue from parasitic infections, the two most common etiologies of malabsorption in the tropics. Methods We analyzed 203 consecutive patients with malabsorption. The etiological spectrum and factors that differentiated tropical sprue from parasitic infections were analyzed. Results The most common etiology was tropical sprue (n=98, 48.3%) followed by parasitic infections (n=25, 12.3%) and tuberculosis (n=22, 10.8%). Other causes were immunodeficiency (n=15, 7.3%; 12 with human immunodeficiency virus and 3 with hypogammaglobulinemia), celiac disease (n=11, 5.4%), Crohn's disease (n=11, 5.4%), small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (n=11, 5.4%), hyperthyroidism (n=4, 1.9%), diabetic diarrhea (n=4, 1.9%), systemic lupus erythematosus (n=3, 1.4%), metastatic carcinoid (n=1, 0.5%) and Burkitt's lymphoma (n=1, 0.5%). On multivariate analysis, features that best differentiated tropical sprue from parasitic infections were larger stool volume (P=0.009), severe weight loss (P=0.02), knuckle hyperpigmentation (P=0.008), low serum B12 levels (P=0.05), high mean corpuscular volume (P=0.003), reduced height or scalloping of the duodenal folds on endoscopy (P=0.003) and villous atrophy on histology (P=0.04). Presence of upper gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms like bloating, nausea and vomiting predicted parasitic infections (P=0.01). Conclusions Tropical sprue and parasitic infections still dominate the spectrum of malabsorption in India. Severe symptoms and florid malabsorption indicate tropical sprue while the presence of upper GI symptoms indicates parasitic infections. PMID:26884738

  17. Identification of rifampin-inducible P450IIIA4 (CYP3A4) in human small bowel enterocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Kolars, J C; Schmiedlin-Ren, P; Schuetz, J D; Fang, C; Watkins, P B

    1992-01-01

    Enzymes within the P450IIIA (CYP3A) subfamily appear to account for significant "first pass" metabolism of some drugs in the intestine. To identify which of the known P450IIIA genes are expressed in intestine, enterocyte RNA was hybridized on Northern blots with synthetic oligonucleotides complementary to hypervariable regions of hepatic P450IIIA4, P450IIIA5, and P450IIIA7 cDNAs. Hybridization was detected only with the P450IIIA4-specific oligonucleotide. The identity of the hybridizing mRNA was confirmed to be P450IIIA4 by direct sequencing of a DNA fragment amplified from enterocyte cDNA by the polymerase chain reaction. To determine if enterocyte P450IIIA4 is inducible, biopsies of small bowel mucosa were obtained from five volunteers before and after they received 7d of treatment with rifampin, a known inducer of P450IIIA4 in liver. Rifampin treatment resulted in a five- or eightfold mean increase (P < 0.05) in the biopsy concentration of P450IIIA4 mRNA when normalized for content of sucrase isomaltase or intestinal fatty acid binding protein mRNAs, respectively. Rifampin also induced P450IIIA immunoreactive protein in enterocytes in each of the subjects, as judged by immunohistochemistry, and resulted in a 10-fold increase in P450IIIA4-specific catalytic activity (erythromycin N-demethylation) in the one patient studied. Our identification of inducible P450IIIA4 in enterocytes may in part account for drug interactions characteristic of P450IIIA4 substrates and suggests a strategy for controlling entry into the body of a major class of xenobiotics. Images PMID:1430211

  18. Development of a predictive model of Crohn’s disease proximal small bowel involvement in capsule endoscopy evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues-Pinto, Eduardo; Cardoso, Helder; Rosa, Bruno; Santos-Antunes, João; Rodrigues, Susana; Marques, Margarida; Lopes, Susana; Albuquerque, Andreia; Carvalho, Pedro; Moreira, Maria; Cotter, José; Macedo, Guilherme

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: One of the indications for capsule endoscopy (CE) is the detection of proximal small bowel (SB) involvement in Crohn's disease (CD) patients. Our aim was to assess clinical, laboratory and endoscopic predictors associated with proximal SB involvement in CD patients submitted to CE. Patients and methods: Retrospective multicenter study in which Lewis score (LS) was systematically determined in 190 CE of patients diagnosed with CD between 2003 and 2014. Results: Significant inflammatory activity (LS > 135) was present in 23 % of the patients in the first tertile and in 31 % of the patients in the second tertile. Albumin, haemoglobin, and total proteins were significantly lower in patients with a LS > 790 compared to patients with a LS < 135, while white blood cell counts and C-reactive protein were significantly higher. In the univariable analysis, a higher risk for proximal SB involvement at CE was associated with ileal involvement at ileocolonoscopy (OR 2.858, P = 0.006), higher platelets levels (OR 1.005, P = 0.004) and significant weight loss (OR 2.450, P = 0.006). In logistic regression, ileal involvement at ileocolonoscopy (OR 6.817, P = 0.003), stricturing behavior (OR 8.653, P = 0.011) and significant weight loss (OR 3.629, P = 0.028) were independently associated with proximal SB involvement at CE. Considering the ROC curve of this model, a cut-off > 0.249 predicts proximal SB involvement with 90 % sensitivity and 40 % specificity (AUROC 0.732). Conclusions: One-third of patients had proximal SB involvement. Predictive factors were significant weight loss, stricturing behaviour, and ileal involvement at ileocolonoscopy. These data help to select CD patients that benefit the most from performing a CE. PMID:27556069

  19. Retrospective analysis of systemic chemotherapy and total parenteral nutrition for the treatment of malignant small bowel obstruction.

    PubMed

    Chouhan, Jay; Gupta, Rohan; Ensor, Joe; Raghav, Kanwal; Fogelman, David; Wolff, Robert A; Fisch, Michael; Overman, Michael J

    2016-02-01

    Malignant small bowel obstruction (MSBO) that does not resolve with conservative measures frequently leaves few treatment options other than palliative care. This single-institution retrospective study assesses the outcomes of a more aggressive approach-concurrent systemic chemotherapy and total parenteral nutrition (TPN)-in the treatment of MSBO. The MD Anderson pharmacy database was queried to identify patients who received concurrent systemic chemotherapy and TPN between 2005 and 2013. Only patients with MSBO secondary to peritoneal carcinomatosis requiring TPN for ≥8 days were included. Survival and multivariate analyses were performed using the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox proportional hazard models. The study included 82 patients. MSBO resolution was observed in 10 patients. Radiographic assessments showed a response to chemotherapy in 19 patients; 6 of these patients experienced MSBO resolution. Patients spent an average of 38% of their remaining lives hospitalized, and 28% of patients required admission to the intensive care unit. In multivariate modeling, radiographic response to chemotherapy correlated with MSBO resolution (odds ratio [OR] 6.81; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.68-27.85, P = 0.007). Median overall survival (OS) was 3.1 months, and the 1-year OS rate was 12.6%. Radiographic response to chemotherapy (HR 0.30; 95% CI, 0.16-0.56, P < 0.001), and initiation of new chemotherapy during TPN (HR 0.55; 95% CI, 0.33-0.94, P = 0.026) independently predicted for longer OS. Concurrent treatment with systemic chemotherapy and TPN for persistent MSBO results in low efficacy and a high morbidity and mortality, and thus should not represent a standard approach.

  20. Effects of epidermal growth factor and glutamine-supplemented parenteral nutrition on the small bowel of septic rats.

    PubMed

    Ardawi, M S

    1992-05-01

    1. The effects of parenteral nutrition with or without glutamine supplementation and epidermal growth factor treatment (0.15 microgram/g body weight) was studied in the small bowel of septic rats after 4 days. 2. Septic rats infused with glutamine-supplemented parenteral nutrition with or without epidermal growth factor treatment survived sepsis significantly better than other septic rats given parenteral nutrition. The cumulative percentage of deaths over 4 days in septic rats infused with glutamine-supplemented parenteral nutrition was 20% (without epidermal growth factor) and 15% (with epidermal growth factor) compared with 50% in septic rats treated with parenteral nutrition without glutamine and 35% in septic rats given parenteral nutrition without glutamine but with epidermal growth factor treatment. 3. Glutamine-supplemented parenteral nutrition with or without epidermal growth factor treatment resulted in improved nitrogen balance in septic rats. The cumulative nitrogen balance over the 4 day period was the least negative as compared with other groups of septic rats. 4. Septic rats given parenteral nutrition with glutamine, epidermal growth factor or glutamine and epidermal growth factor exhibited marked increases in intestinal net rates of utilization of glutamine (P less than 0.001) and production of ammonia (P less than 0.001) compared with septic rats given parenteral nutrition without glutamine and/or epidermal growth factor treatment. 5. Septic rats given parenteral nutrition with glutamine, epidermal growth factor or glutamine and epidermal growth factor exhibited significant increases in jejunal wet weight (by 32.4-40.6%), DNA content (by 24.2-34.7%), protein content (by 29.1-50.0%), villus height (by 16.3-26.4%) and crypt depth (by 20.3-29.6%) compared with other groups of septic rats.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Occupational risk factors for small bowel carcinoid tumor: a European population-based case-control study.

    PubMed

    Kaerlev, Linda; Teglbjaerg, Peter Stubbe; Sabroe, Svend; Kolstad, Henrik A; Ahrens, Wolfgang; Eriksson, Mikael; Guénel, Pascal; Hardell, Lennart; Cyr, Diane; Ballard, Terri; Zambon, Paola; Morales Suárez-Varela, María M; Stang, Andreas; Olsen, Jorn

    2002-06-01

    Small bowel carcinoid tumor (SBC) is a rare disease of unknown etiology but with an age-, sex-, and place-specific occurrence that may indicate an occupational origin. A European multicenter population-based case-control study was conducted from 1995 through 1997. Incident SBC cases between 35 and 69 years of age (n = 101) were identified, together with 3335 controls sampled from the catchment area of the cases. Histological review performed by a reference pathologist left 99 cases for study; 84 cases and 2070 population controls were interviewed. The industries most closely associated (a twofold or more odds ratio [OR]) with SBC, taking into account a 10-year time lag after exposure were, among women, employment in wholesale industry of food and beverages (OR, 8.2; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.9 to 34.9]) and among men, manufacture of motor vehicle bodies (OR, 5.2; 95% CI, 1.2 to 22.4), footwear (OR, 3.9; 95% CI, 0.9 to 16.1), and metal structures (OR, 3.3; 95% CI, 1.0 to 10.4). The identified high-risk occupations with an OR above 2 were shoemakers, structural metal preparers, construction painters and other construction workers, bookkeepers, machine fitters, and welders (men). The OR for regular occupational use of organic solvents for at least half a year was 2.0 (95% CI, 1.0 to 4.2). Exposure to rust-preventive paint containing lead was suggested as another potential occupational exposure (OR, 9.1; 95% CI, 0.8 to 107). This explorative study suggests an association between certain occupational exposures and SBC, but some of these associations could be attributable to chance. All findings should be regarded as tentative.

  2. Uncovering the uncertainty: Risk factors and clinical relevance of P1 lesions on small bowel capsule endoscopy of anemic patients

    PubMed Central

    Cúrdia Gonçalves, Tiago; Barbosa, Mara; Rosa, Bruno; Moreira, Maria João; Cotter, José

    2016-01-01

    AIM To identify risk factors for P1 lesions on small bowel capsule endoscopy (SBCE) and to describe the natural history of anemic patients with such type of lesions. METHODS One hundred patients were consecutively selected for a case-control analysis performed between 37 cases with P1 lesions and 63 controls with negative SBCE. Age, gender, comorbidities and regular medication were collected. Rebleeding, further investigational studies and death were also analyzed during the follow-up. RESULTS No significant differences on gender, median age or Charlson index were found between groups. Although no differences were found on the use of proton pump inhibitors, acetylsalicylic acid, anticoagulants or antiplatelet agents, the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) was associated with a higher risk of P1 lesions (OR = 12.00, 95%CI: 1.38-104.1). From the 87 patients followed at our center, 39 were submitted to additional studies for investigation of iron-deficiency anemia (IDA), and this was significantly more common in those patients with no findings on SBCE (53.7% vs 30.3%, P = 0.033). A total of 29 patients had at least one rebleeding or IDA recurrence episode and 9 patients died of non-anemia related causes but no differences were found between cases and controls. CONCLUSION P1 lesions are commonly found in patients with IDA submitted to SBCE. The use of NSAID seems to be a risk factor for P1 lesions. The outcomes of patients with P1 lesions do not differ significantly from those with P0 lesions or normal SBCE. PMID:27784969

  3. Magnetic resonance enterography versus capsule endoscopy activity indices for quantification of small bowel inflammation in Crohn’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Kopylov, Uri; Klang, Eyal; Yablecovitch, Doron; Lahat, Adi; Avidan, Benjamin; Neuman, Sandra; Levhar, Nina; Greener, Tomer; Rozendorn, Noa; Beytelman, Arkadi; Yanai, Henit; Dotan, Iris; Chowers, Yehuda; Weiss, Batya; Ben-Horin, Shomron; Amitai, Marianne M.; Eliakim, Rami

    2016-01-01

    Background: Video capsule endoscopy (VCE) and magnetic resonance enterography (MRE) are the prime modalities for the evaluation of small bowel (SB) Crohn’s disease (CD). Mucosal inflammation on VCE is quantified using the Lewis score (LS). Diffusion-weighted (DW) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allows for accurate assessment of SB inflammation without administration of intravenous contrast material. The Magnetic Resonance Index of Activity (MaRiA) and the Clermont index are quantitative activity indices validated for contrast-enhanced MRE and DW-MRE, respectively. The aim of this study was to compare the quantification of distal SB inflammation by VCE and MR-related activity indices. Methods: Patients with known quiescent SB CD were prospectively recruited and underwent MRE and VCE. LS, MaRIA and Clermont scores were calculated for the distal SB. Results: Both MRI-based indices significantly correlated with the LS and the Clermont index (r = 0.50, p = 0.001 and r = 0.53, p = 0.001, respectively). Both MaRIA and Clermont scores were significantly lower in patients with mucosal healing (LS < 135). The area under the curve (AUC) with both MR scores was moderate for prediction of any mucosal inflammation (LS ⩾ 135) and excellent for prediction of moderate-to-severe inflammation (LS ⩾ 790) (0.71 and 0.74 versus 0.93 and 0.91 for MaRIA and Clermont score, respectively). Conclusions: Modest correlation between VCE- and MRE-based quantitative indices of inflammation in patients with quiescent SB CD was observed. Between-modality correlation was higher in patients with endoscopically severe disease. DW-MRE gauged by Clermont score was at least as accurate as contrast-enhanced MRE for quantification of SB inflammation. PMID:27582877

  4. Inhibitory Effects and Sympathetic Mechanisms of Distension in the Distal Organs on Small Bowel Motility and Slow Waves in Canine.

    PubMed

    Song, Jun; Yin, Jieyun; Chen, Jiande D Z

    2015-12-01

    Rectal distension (RD) is known to induce intestinal dysmotility. Few studies were performed to compare effects of RD, colon distension (CD) and duodenal distension (DD) on small bowel motility. This study aimed to investigate effects and underlying mechanisms of distensions in these regions on intestinal motility and slow waves. Eight dogs chronically implanted with a duodenal fistula, a proximal colon fistula, and intestinal serosal electrodes were studied in six sessions: control, RD, CD, DD, RD + guanethidine, and CD + guanethidine. Postprandial intestinal contractions and slow waves were recorded for the assessment of intestinal motility. The electrocardiogram was recorded for the assessment of autonomic functions. (1) Isobaric RD and CD suppressed intestinal contractions (contractile index: 6.0 ± 0.4 with RD vs. 9.9 ± 0.9 at baseline, P = 0.001, 5.3 ± 0.2 with CD vs. 7.7 ± 0.8 at baseline, P = 0.008). Guanethidine at 3 mg/kg iv was able to partially block the effects. (2) RD and CD reduced the percentage of normal intestinal slow waves from 92.1 ± 2.8 to 64.2 ± 3.4 % (P < 0.001) and from 90 ± 2.7 to 69.2 ± 3.7 % (P = 0.01), respectively. Guanethidine could eliminate these inhibitory effects. (3) DD did not induce any changes in small intestinal contractions and slow waves (P > 0.05). (4) The spectral analysis of the heart rate variability showed that both RD and CD increased sympathetic activity (LF) and reduced vagal activity (HF) (P < 0.05). Isobaric RD and CD could inhibit postprandial intestinal motility and impair intestinal slow waves, which were mediated via the sympathetic pathway. However, DD at a site proximal to the measurement site did not seem to impair small intestinal contractions or slow waves.

  5. Changes in small intestinal chromogranin A-immunoreactive cell densities in patients with irritable bowel syndrome after receiving dietary guidance.

    PubMed

    Mazzawi, Tarek; El-Salhy, Magdy

    2016-05-01

    Chromogranin A (CgA) is a common marker for enteroendocrine cells in the gut, and CgA-immunoreactive cell densities are abnormal in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). The majority of patients with IBS report that their symptoms develop after consuming certain foodstuffs. In the present study, we investigated the effects of dietary guidance on the total enteroendocrine cell densities in the small intestine, as detected by CgA. A total of 14 patients with IBS underwent a gastroscopy with duodenal biopsies and 11 of them also underwent a colonoscopy, with biopsy samples obtained from the ileum. Fourteen control subjects were also included. Each patient received 3 sessions of dietary guidance. Gastroscopies and colonoscopies were performed on both the controls and patients with IBS (at baseline and at 3-9 months after receiving guidance). Biopsy samples obtained from the duodenum and ileum were immunostained for CgA using the avidin-biotin complex (ABC) method and were quantified using computerized image analysis. The density of CgA-immunoreactive cells in the duodenum (mean ± SEM values) in the control subjects was 235.9 ± 31.9 cells/mm2; in the patients with IBS, the density was 36.9 ± 9.8 and 103.7 ± 16.9 cells/mm2 before and after they received dietary guidance, respectively (P=0.007). The density of CgA-immunoreactive cells in the ileum in the control subjects was 47.4 ± 8.3 cells/mm2; in the patients with IBS, the density was 48.4 ± 8.1 and 17.9 ± 4.4 cells/mm2, before and after they received dietary guidance, respectively (P=0.0006). These data indicate that changes in CgA-immunoreactive cell densities in patients with IBS after receiving dietary guidance may reflect a change in the densities of the small intestinal enteroendocrine cells, which may contribute to an improvement in the IBS symptoms. PMID:26987104

  6. Small bowel tissue smear

    MedlinePlus

    A normal result means that there were no indicators of disease when the sample was examined under ... RA, Pincus MR, eds. Henry's Clinical Diagnosis and Management by Laboratory Methods . 22nd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Saunders ...

  7. Small Bowel Bleeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... now be preformed using special scopes with inflatable balloons and/or overtubes. The final option is intraoperative ... to treat the lesion is known as double balloon enteroscopy. Double balloon enteroscopy uses two balloons attached ...

  8. Fooled by the film: delayed diagnosis of incarcerated small-bowel hernia after laparoscopic surgery for endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, Adam N; Heron, Gary; Widschwendter, Martin; Read, Samantha; Brunell, Carol; Mould, Tim A

    2012-02-01

    Prompt recognition of laparoscopic surgical complications is vital. We present a case highlighting the dangers of relying on plain radiography for exclusion of bowel herniation through a port site. Early recourse to cross-sectional imaging is recommended to avoid such pitfalls.

  9. Letting the sun set on small bowel obstruction: can a simple risk score tell us when nonoperative care is inappropriate?

    PubMed

    O'Leary, Elizabeth A; Desale, Sameer Y; Yi, William S; Fujita, Kari A; Hynes, Conor F; Chandra, Suma K; Sava, Jack A

    2014-06-01

    Controversy remains as to which patients with small bowel obstruction (SBO) need immediate surgery and which may be managed conservatively. This study evaluated the ability of clinical risk factors to predict the failure of nonoperative management of SBO. The electronic medical record was used to identify all patients with SBO over one year. Clinical, laboratory, and imaging data were recorded. Univariate and multivariable analyses were performed to identify risk factors predicting need for surgery. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to identify risk factors that influence need and timing for surgery. Two hundred nineteen consecutive patients were included. Most patients did not have a prior history of SBO (75%), radiation therapy (92%), or cancer (70%). The majority had undergone previous abdominal or pelvic surgery (82%). Thirty-five per cent of patients ultimately underwent laparotomy. Univariate analysis showed that persistent abdominal pain, abdominal distention, nausea and vomiting, guarding, obstipation, elevated white blood cell count, fever present 48 hours after hospitalization, and high-grade obstruction on computed tomography (CT) scan were significant predictors of the need for surgery. Multivariable analysis revealed that persistent abdominal pain or distention (hazard ratio [HR], 3.04; P = 0.013), both persistent abdominal pain and distention (HR, 4.96; P < 0.001), fever at 48 hours (HR, 3.66; P = 0.038), and CT-determined high-grade obstruction (HR, 3.45; P = 0.017) independently predicted the need for surgery. Eighty-five per cent of patients with none of these four significant risk factors were successfully managed nonoperatively. Conversely, 92 per cent of patients with three or more risk factors required laparotomy. This analysis revealed four readily evaluable clinical parameters that may be used to predict the need for surgery in patients presenting with SBO: persistent abdominal pain, abdominal distention, fever at 48 hours, and CT

  10. Cochleo-saccular degeneration in one of three sisters with hereditary deafness, absent gastric motility, small bowel diverticulitis and progressive sensory neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Igarashi, M; MacRae, D; O-Uchi, T; Alford, B R

    1981-01-01

    This is a report of cochleo-saccular degeneration found in temporal bones from a patient who had suffered from slowly progressive and total sensorineural deafness which had an inherited origin. At age 8, this patient began to complain of hearing loss, and by age 10 she was totally deaf. The patient was 1 of 3 female siblings who have suffered from an exactly identical progressive disease: deafness, absent gastric motility, small bowel diverticulitis and ulceration, and sensory neuropathy. The temporal bone pathology found in this case was the degenerative change in the cochlear duct and sacculus. No pathology was found in the utriculus and semicircular canals. PMID:6937848

  11. Morpho-functional evaluation of small bowel using wireless motility capsule and video capsule endoscopy in patients with known or suspected Crohn’s disease: pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Yung, Diana; Douglas, Sarah; Hobson, Anthony R.; Giannakou, Andry; Plevris, John N.; Koulaouzidis, Anastasios

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: SmartPill® (Given Imaging Corp.,Yoqneam,Israel) is an ingestible, non-imaging capsule that records physiological data including contractions and pH throughout the gastrointestinal tract. There are scarce data looking at SmartPill® assessment of patients with known/suspected small-bowel Crohn’s Disease (CD). This pilot study aims to investigate feasibility and safety of SmartPill® to assess gut motility in this group.  Patients and methods: Over 1 year, patients with known/suspected CD, referred for small-bowel capsule endoscopy (SBCE), were invited to participate and 12 were recruited (7 female, 5 male, mean age 44.2 ± 16.6 years). They underwent hydrogen breath test to exclude small-bowel bacterial overgrowth, patency capsule (Agile®), and provided stool samples for fecal calprotectin (FC). Patients ingested PillCam®SB2 and SmartPill® 4 hours apart. Using unpublished data, 33 healthy controls also were identified for the study. P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Of the 12 patients enrolled, 10 underwent complete Smartpill® examination (1 stomach retention, 1 dropout). Pillcam® was complete in 10 (1 dropout, 1 stomach retention). Mean fecal calprotectin was 340 ± 307.71 mcg/g. The study group had longer transit times and lower gut motility index than did the controls. The difference in motility appears to be statistically significant (P < 0.05). Longer transit times for SmartPill® (not statistically significant) may have been due to different specifications between the capsules. Limitations included transient Smartpill® signal loss (5/10 studies). Conclusions: This is the first pilot to attempt combining SBCE and SmartPill® to assess small-bowel CD. Data on motility in CD are scarce. Multimodal information can provide a clearer clinical picture. Despite concerns about capsule retention in CD patients, SmartPill® seems safe for use if a patency capsule is employed beforehand. PMID

  12. Diagnosis and Treatment of Small Bowel Strangulation Due To Congenital Band: Three Cases of Congenital Band in Adults Lacking a History of Trauma or Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Nicolas, Gregory; Kfoury, Tony; Shimlati, Rasha; Koury, Elliott; Tohme, Maroon; Gharios, Elie; Wakim, Raja

    2016-01-01

    Case series Patients: Male, 33 • Male, 18 • Male, 19 Final Diagnosis: Congenital band causing a small bowel obstruction Symptoms: Progressive abdominal pain that eventually becomes excessive Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Laparoscopic band removal Specialty: Surgery Objective: Rare disease Background: Among the causes of constipation are bands and adhesions that lead to obstructions at different points in the intestinal tract. These can occur as a consequence of healing following surgery or trauma. However, an entity known as congenital band exists where a band is present from birth. Here we report three such cases of adults with symptoms of intestinal obstruction, in whom a congenital band was discovered through exploratory laparoscopy. Case Reports: All three of these patients presented lacking a history of any abdominal trauma or previous abdominal surgeries, a fact that is often used to exclude an adhesion as a differential. All three recovered quickly and had relief of their symptoms following surgical intervention. Conclusions: Bands and adhesions are common surgical causes of small bowel obstruction, leading to symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, constipation, and obstipation. These bands almost always result from a prior abdominal surgery or from a recent abdominal trauma. The three cases presented here show a far more unusual picture of a band, one that is congenitally present, as there was an absence of such a history. This is significant because clinical suspicion of a band is often very low due to a lack of distinguishing clinical and diagnostic features, and when the past history is negative. PMID:27713389

  13. Predictive Factors for Surgical Intervention in Patients over the Age of 80 with Adhensive Small-Bowel Obstruction.

    PubMed

    Lou, Zheng; Yan, Fei-Hu; Hu, Shi-Jie; Meng, Rong-Gui; Zhang, Wei; Yu, En-da; Fu, Chuan-Gang

    2015-12-01

    Adhensive small-bowel obstruction (SBO) remains a common cause of admission to surgical wards around the world. Given the growing elderly population, the number of elderly patients with adhensive SBO can be expected to increase substantially. Timely and appropriate treatment would improve morbidity and mortality rates in elderly patients with adhensive SBO. However, accurately determining which patients should undergo surgical treatment during the hospitalization remains difficult. The aim of this study was to identify predictive factors for surgical intervention in patients aged over 80 years presenting with SBO due to postoperative adhesions. A clinical and radiological data for the assessment of patients presenting with adhensive SBO were collected. A logistic regression model was applied to identify risk factors that would predict the need of surgical intervention. A total of 21 patients (13 males, 8 females) were treated during a 3.5-year period. The mean age was 85.5 ± 4.7 years, ranging from 80 to 97 years. There is no significant difference in age (group 1 87.6 ± 5.9 years vs. group 2 84.8 ± 4.3 years, p = 0.262) between two groups. Serious coexisting diseases were noted in 13 (61.9 %, 13/21) patients. Primary hypertension, cardiac diseases, and diabetes mellitus were common coexisting conditions. However, there is no significant difference in comorbidities (40 vs. 68.8 %, p = 0.325) between group 1 and group 2. Adhensive SBO was successfully treated with conservative treatment in 16 patients (76.2 %, 16/21, group 2), whereas conservative treatment failed in 5 patients (23.8 %, 5/21, group 1), who subsequently underwent laparotomy. Postoperative complication rate was 14.3 % (wound infection, 1/5) and mortality was 0 % (0/5) in group 1. One patient death was recorded in group 2 (1/16, 6.3 %). The overall mean hospital stay was 10.0 ± 5.9 days (range 3-27 days). Group 1 had a longer hospital stay than group 2. However

  14. Bowel Movement

    MedlinePlus

    A bowel movement is the last stop in the movement of food through your digestive tract. Your stool passes out ... rectum and anus. Another name for stool is feces. It is made of what is left after ...

  15. Bowel retraining

    MedlinePlus

    ... privacy as you can. Some people find that reading while sitting on the toilet helps them relax. If you do not have a bowel movement within 20 minutes, repeat the process. Try to contract the muscles of the abdomen ...

  16. [Magnetic resonance imaging of the small intestine and colon in Crohn's disease].

    PubMed

    Rollandi, G A; Martinoli, C; Conzi, R; Cittadini, G; Molinari, F; Bertolotto, M; Talenti, A; Curone, P

    1996-01-01

    Three normal volunteers and 20 patients with known Crohn's disease were examined with MRI--at 0.5 Tesla and with a superconductive magnet. Coronal T1-weighted GE images were mainly acquired, before and after i.v. Gd-DTPA injection in breath hold (TR 70 ms, TE 13 ms, FA 70 degrees). MR findings were compared with the results of small and large bowel enema. In 6 patients (30%) the abnormal loops were missed. In the other 14 patients (70%) MRI did depict the affected loops in the same sites as depicted by conventional radiography. The bowel wall was thickened (4-10 mm) in all patients. In 10 patients the thickened wall was markedly enhanced after Gd-DTPA injection. In 6 patients MRI demonstrated disease complications--i.e., stenoses, fistulae and abscesses--missed by conventional radiography. In 7 patients MRI showed the bowel to be more involved than demonstrated by conventional studies. Bowel wall thickening appeared to be a constant and reliable sign of disease. Wall enhancement was a less frequent sign but, when present, it was considered as characteristic as wall thickening. In the staging of Crohn's disease, MRI yields more pieces of information than conventional radiography and depicts the involvement of the intestinal wall and of its surrounding spaces. PMID:8614737

  17. Daily Enema Regimen Is Superior to Traditional Therapies for Nonneurogenic Pediatric Overactive Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Hodges, Steve J.; Colaco, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Our objective was to evaluate the efficacy of daily enemas for the treatment of overactive bladder (OAB) in children. This study was a prospective, controlled trial of 60 children with nonneurogenic OAB. The control patients (40) were treated with standard therapies, including timed voiding, constipation treatment with osmotic laxatives, anticholinergics, and biofeedback physical therapy, whereas the treatment patients (20) received only daily enemas and osmotic laxatives. On assessment of improvement of OAB symptoms, only 30% of the traditionally treated patients’ parents reported resolution of symptoms at 3 months, whereas 85% of enema patients did. At the onset of the study, the average pediatric voiding dysfunction score of all patients was 14, whereas on follow-up, the average scores for traditionally treated patients and enema-treated patients were 12 and 4, respectively. This study demonstrated that daily enema therapy is superior to traditional methods for the treatment of OAB. PMID:27336003

  18. Video capsule endoscopy: is bowel preparation necessary?

    PubMed

    Catalano, Carmine; Companioni, Rafael Antonio Ching; Khankhanian, Pouya; Vyas, Neil; Patel, Ishan; Bansal, Raghav; Walfish, Aaron

    2016-08-01

    There is no standardized protocol for bowel preparation prior to video capsule endoscopy, although one is strongly recommended. The purpose of our study was to see if there was a statistical significance between small bowel mucosal visualization rates for those who received bowel preparation and those who did not. We retrospectively analyzed all patients who had a video capsule endoscopy from August 2014 to January 2016 at a tertiary care center. All patients fasted prior to the procedure. Bowel preparation when used consisted of polyethylene glycol. A long fast consisted of 12 or more hours. The grading system used to assess the small bowel was adapted from a previously validated system from Esaki et al Statistical analyses were performed using Fisher's exact test or Welch's 2-sample t-test and statistical significance was present if the p value was ≤0.05. 76 patients were carried forward for analysis. Small bowel mucosal visualization rates were similar between those who received bowel preparation and those who did not (92.5% vs 88.9%, p=0.44). Small bowel mucosal visualization rates were significantly better in those patients who had a long fast compared with those who had a short fast (97.7% vs 81.3%, p=0.019). Our study demonstrates that the addition of bowel preparation prior to video capsule endoscopy does not significantly improve small bowel mucosal visualization rates and, in addition, there is a statistically significant relationship between increased fasting time and improved small bowel mucosal visualization. A prolonged fast without bowel preparation might be satisfactory for an adequate small bowel visualization but further randomized, prospective studies are necessary to confirm these findings. PMID:27271277

  19. Crohn's disease of the small bowel, complicated by primary biliary cirrhosis, Hashimoto thyroiditis, and Raynaud's phenomenon: favorable response of all disorders to adalimumab treatment.

    PubMed

    Triantafillidis, John K; Durakis, Spyros; Merikas, Emmanuel

    2013-01-01

    We describe the case of a male patient suffering from long-lasting Crohn's disease of the small bowel who developed thyroiditis Hassimoto, Raynaud's phenomenon, and primary biliary cirrhosis, during the course of the underlying bowel disease. It is not clear whether these co-morbidities appeared coincidentally, or because they share some common immunopathogenetic mechanisms. In this patient, Crohn's disease favorably responded to the treatment with an anti-TNF-α agent (adalimumab). The serum titers of antimitochondrial antibodyies and cholestatic enzymes considerably reduced during the 3-year treatment with the biologic agent. Raynaud's phenomenon, also, completely disappeared. Bearing in mind the possible involvement of TNF-α in the pathogenesis of primary biliary cirrhosis, it could be argued that the clinical and laboratory improvement of liver disease, as well as the reduction in serum titers of antimitochondrial antibodies, might be due to the anti-TNF-α action of adalimumab. We suggest that it would be worth further investigating the role of biologic agents in the treatment of patients with primary biliary cirrhosis.

  20. Outcomes of Bowel Resection in Patients with Crohn's Disease.

    PubMed

    Moghadamyeghaneh, Zhobin; Carmichael, Joseph C; Mills, Steven D; Pigazzi, Alessio; Stamos, Michael J

    2015-10-01

    There is limited data regarding outcomes of bowel resection in patients with Crohn's disease. We sought to investigate complications of such patients after bowel resection. The Nationwide Inpatient Sample databases were used to examine the clinical data of Crohn's patients who underwent bowel resection during 2002 to 2012. Multivariate regression analysis was performed to investigate outcomes of such patients. We sampled a total of 443,950 patients admitted with the diagnosis of Crohn's disease. Of these, 20.5 per cent had bowel resection. Among patients who had bowel resection, 51 per cent had small bowel Crohn's disease, 19.4 per cent had large bowel Crohn's disease, and 29.6 per cent had both large and small bowel Crohn's disease. Patients with large bowel disease had higher mortality risk compared with small bowel disease [1.8% vs 1%, adjusted odds ratio (AOR): 2.42, P < 0.01]. Risks of postoperative renal failure (AOR: 1.56, P < 0.01) and respiratory failure (AOR: 1.77, P < 0.01) were higher in colonic disease compared with small bowel disease but postoperative enteric fistula was significantly higher in patients with small bowel Crohn's disease (AOR: 1.90, P < 0.01). Of the patients admitted with the diagnosis of Crohn's disease, 20.5 per cent underwent bowel resection during 2002 to 2012. Although colonic disease has a higher mortality risk, small bowel disease has a higher risk of postoperative fistula.

  1. Shooting a moving target: use of real-time cine magnetic resonance imaging in assessment of the small bowel.

    PubMed

    Courtier, Jesse; Ohliger, Michael; Rhee, Sue J; Terreblanche, Owen; Heyman, Melvin B; MacKenzie, John D

    2013-10-01

    The chronic nature of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) creates a lifelong effect on the morbidity of children affected by the disease. The ability to confidently identify and characterize complications resulting from IBD in the pediatric patient is of critical importance. Magnetic resonance enterography (MRE) is especially valuable in the diagnostic assessment of IBD; however, precise elucidation of complications including strictures can be difficult with standard MRE sequences. The recent development of faster MRI pulse sequences provides rapid, real-time imaging of the intestinal tract. In this review, we describe how the addition of cine MRE confidently pinpoints areas of stricture, aids in lesion detection and diagnosis, and provides valuable information on intestinal motility.

  2. Delayed gastric emptying and reduced postprandial small bowel water content of equicaloric whole meal bread versus rice meals in healthy subjects: novel MRI insights

    PubMed Central

    Marciani, L; Pritchard, S E; Hellier-Woods, C; Costigan, C; Hoad, C L; Gowland, P A; Spiller, R C

    2013-01-01

    Background/Objectives: Postprandial bloating is a common symptom in patients with functional gastrointestinal (GI) diseases. Whole meal bread (WMB) often aggravates such symptoms though the mechanisms are unclear. We used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to monitor the intragastric fate of a WMB meal (11% bran) compared with a rice pudding (RP) meal. Subjects/Methods: Twelve healthy volunteers completed this randomised crossover study. They fasted overnight and after an initial MRI scan consumed a glass of orange juice with a 2267 kJ WMB or an equicaloric RP meal. Subjects underwent serial MRI scans every 45 min up to 270 min to assess gastric volumes and small bowel water content, and completed a GI symptom questionnaire. Results: The MRI intragastric appearance of the two meals was markedly different. The WMB meal formed a homogeneous dark bolus with brighter liquid signal surrounding it. The RP meal separated into an upper liquid layer and a lower particulate layer allowing more rapid emptying of the liquid compared with solid phase (sieving). The WMB meal had longer gastric half-emptying times (132±8 min) compared with the RP meal (104±7 min), P<0.008. The WMB meal was associated with markedly reduced MRI-visible small bowel free mobile water content compared with the RP meal, P<0.0001. Conclusions: WMB bread forms a homogeneous bolus in the stomach, which inhibits gastric sieving and hence empties slower than the equicaloric rice meal. These properties may explain why wheat causes postprandial bloating and could be exploited to design foods that prolong satiation. PMID:23594839

  3. Effects of a Glutamine Enema on Anastomotic Healing in an Animal Colon Anastomosis Model

    PubMed Central

    Oner, Osman Zekai; Oruc, Mehmet Tahir; Bulbuller, Nurullah; Ozdem, Sebahat; Ozdemir, Sukru; Alikanooglu, Arsenal Sezgin; Karakoyun, Rojbin; Dogan, Ugur; Ongen, Ayper; Koc, Umit

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Anastomotic leakage in colorectal surgery is a very important issue. Although many studies have shown the positive effects of enteral glutamine (Gln) on anastomotic healing, none has assessed the effects of administering Gln via an enema for anastomotic healing. To fill this study gap, this study investigated the intraluminal effect of administration of Gln enema on the healing of colonic anastomosis in a rat model. Methods Thirty Wistar albino rats were divided into three groups containing 10 rats each and were subjected to distal left colon transection and anastomosis. Postoperatively, group I (the control group) was administered no treatment, group II was administered daily placebo enemas containing physiological saline, and group III was administered daily 2% L-Gln enemas. After sacrifice on postoperative day 5, anastomotic healing, burst pressure, tissue hydroxyproline levels, and histological parameters were measured, and group values were compared via statistical analysis. Results Group III was found to have the highest mean bursting pressure and tissue hydroxyproline levels and the lowest mean ischemia score. While the values of these parameters were not found to differ significantly among the groups, the lack of significance may have been due to the limited number of subjects examined. Conclusion Administration of a Gln enema may have a positive effect on anastomosis in terms of bursting pressure and histopathological parameters. Future research should examine administration of a preoperative Gln enema as a means of decreasing the traumatic effects of the enema and identifying its applicability in surgical practice. PMID:26817016

  4. Small bowel volvulus after transabdominal preperitoneal hernia repair due to improper use of V-Loc™ barbed absorbable wire – do we always “read the instructions first”?

    PubMed Central

    Filser, Joerg; Reibetanz, Joachim; Krajinovic, Katica; Germer, Christoph-Thomas; Dietz, Ulrich Andreas; Seyfried, Florian

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Transabdominal preperitoneal endoscopic hernia repair (TAPP) is part of primary surgical health care. While both, the reported recurrence rate and procedure specific morbidity are consistently low, rare serious complications occur. Presentiation of case A 36-year-old male patient developed bowel obstruction three days after both-sided TAPP for inguinal hernia repair. A computer tomography scan of the abdomen revealed a small bowel volvulus in the right lower quadrant of the abdomen requiring urgent revisional surgery. Intraoperatively, the small bowel and its mesenterial vessels were found to be twisted around a 5 cm long V-Loc™ barbed absorbable suturing wire. After successful laparoscopic adhesiolysis, removal of the wire and detorquing of the bowel conglomerate, resection of small intestine was not necessary. The patient's further postoperative recovery was uneventful. Discussion Due to the barbed configuration of the V-Loc™ wire, a gapless continuous suturing of the peritoneum without laparoscopic knotting is easily and fast to accomplish. In this case the recommendation of the manufacturer to shorten the wire was not strictly followed and neither had the suture stump been extraperitonealized in order to avoid such rare complications. Conclusion Surgeons need to be aware of relevant “tricks and traps” of routinely performed procedures and have to know all tools and material they use very well. This case may therefore increase our attention when it comes to little things which actually do matter. PMID:25704567

  5. Clinical imaging with indium-111 leukocytes: uptake in bowel infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, H.W.; Cuthbert, I.; Richards, J.R.

    1981-08-01

    Leukocytes labeled with indium-111 accumulated in an area of small-bowel infarction, mimicking a paracolic abscess. Evidence of subacute bowel obstruction should alert the nuclear medicine physician to the former possibility.

  6. Changes in Enteric Neurons of Small Intestine in a Rat Model of Irritable Bowel Syndrome with Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shan; Fei, Guijun; Fang, Xiucai; Yang, Xilin; Sun, Xiaohong; Qian, Jiaming; Wood, Jackie D; Ke, Meiyun

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Physical and/or emotional stresses are important factors in the exacerbation of symptoms in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Several lines of evidence support that a major impact of stress on the gastrointestinal tract occurs via the enteric nervous system. We aimed to evaluate histological changes in the submucosal plexus (SMP) and myenteric plexus (MP) of the distal ileum in concert with the intestinal motor function in a rat model of IBS with diarrhea. Methods The rat model was induced by heterotypic chronic and acute stress (CAS). The intestinal transit was measured by administering powdered carbon by gastric gavage. Double immunohistochemical fluorescence staining with whole-mount preparations of SMP and MP of enteric nervous system was used to assess changes in expression of choline acetyltransferase, vasoactive intestinal peptide, or nitric oxide synthase in relation to the pan neuronal marker, anti-Hu. Results The intestinal transit ratio increased significantly from control values of 50.8% to 60.6% in the CAS group. The numbers of enteric ganglia and neurons in the SMP were increased in the CAS group. The proportions of choline acetyltransferase- and vasoactive intestinal peptide-immunoreactive neurons in the SMP were increased (82.1 ± 4.3% vs. 76.0 ± 5.0%, P = 0.021; 40.5 ± 5.9% vs 28.9 ± 3.7%, P = 0.001), while nitric oxide synthase-immunoreactive neurons in the MP were decreased compared with controls (23.3 ± 4.5% vs 32.4 ± 4.5%, P = 0.002). Conclusions These morphological changes in enteric neurons to CAS might contribute to the dysfunction in motility and secretion in IBS with diarrhea. PMID:26645247

  7. The evolution of bowel preparation and new developments.

    PubMed

    Park, Jeong Bae; Lee, Yong Kook; Yang, Chang Heon

    2014-05-01

    Bowel preparation is essential for successful colonoscopy examination, and the most important factor is the bowel preparation agent used. However, selection of a bowel preparation agent invariably involves compromise. Originally, bowel preparation was performed for radiologic and surgical purposes, when the process involved dietary limitations, cathartics, and enemas, which had many side effects. Development of polyethylene glycol (PEG) solution led to substantive advancement of bowel preparation; however, despite its effectiveness and safety, the large volume involved, and its salty taste and unpleasant odor reduce compliance. Accordingly, modified PEG solutions requiring consumption of lower volumes and sulfate-free solutions were developed. Aqueous sodium phosphate is more effective and better tolerated than PEG solutions; however, fatal complications have occurred due to water and electrolyte shifts. Therefore, aqueous sodium phosphate was withdrawn by the US Food and Drug Administration, and currently, only sodium phosphate tablets remain available. In addition, oral sulfate solution and sodium picosulfate/magnesium citrate are also available, and various studies have reported on adjunctive preparations, such as hyperosmolar or stimulant laxatives, antiemetics, and prokinetics, which are now in various stages of development.

  8. End-to-end small bowel anastomosis by temperature controlled CO2 laser soldering and an albumin stent: a feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simhon, David; Kopelman, Doron; Hashmonai, Moshe; Vasserman, Irena; Dror, Michael; Vasilyev, Tamar; Halpern, Marissa; Kariv, Naam; Katzir, Abraham

    2004-07-01

    Introduction: A feasibility study of small intestinal end to end anastomosis was performed in a rabbit model using temperature controlled CO2 laser system and an albumin stent. Compared with standard suturing or clipping, this method does not introduce foreign materials to the repaired wound and therefore, may lead to better and faster wound healing of the anastomotic site. Methods: Transected rabbits small intestines were either laser soldered using 47% bovine serum albumin and intraluminal albumin stent or served as controls in which conventional continuous two-layer end to end anastomosis was performed manually. The integrity of the anastomosis was investigated at the 14th postoperative day. Results: Postoperative course in both treatments was uneventful. The sutured group presented signs of partial bowel obstruction. Macroscopically, no signs of intraluminal fluid leakage were observed in both treatments. Yet, laser soldered intestinal anastomoses demonstrated significant superiority with respect to adhesions and narrowing of the intestinal lumen. Serial histological examinations revealed better wound healing characteristics of the laser soldered anastomotic site. Conclusion: Laser soldering of intestinal end to end anastomosis provide a faster surgical procedure, compared to standard suture technique, with better wound healing results. It is expected that this technique may be adopted in the future for minimal invasive surgeries.

  9. Protocol for a phase III randomised trial of image-guided intensity modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) and conventional radiotherapy for late small bowel toxicity reduction after postoperative adjuvant radiation in Ca cervix

    PubMed Central

    Chopra, Supriya; Engineer, Reena; Mahantshetty, Umesh; Misra, Shagun; Phurailatpam, Reena; Paul, Siji N; Kannan, Sadhna; Kerkar, Rajendra; Maheshwari, Amita; Shylasree, TS; Ghosh, Jaya; Gupta, Sudeep; Thomas, Biji; Singh, Shalini; Sharma, Sanjiv; Chilikuri, Srinivas; Shrivastava, Shyam Kishore

    2012-01-01

    Introduction External beam radiation followed by vaginal brachytherapy (±chemotherapy) leads to reduction in the risk of local recurrence and improves progression-free survival in patients with adverse risk factors following Wertheim's hysterectomy albeit at the risk of late bowel toxicity. Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) results in reduction in bowel doses and has potential to reduce late morbidity, however, needs to be confirmed prospectively in a randomised trial. The present randomised trial tests reduction if any in late small bowel toxicity with the use of IMRT in postoperative setting. Methods and analysis Patients more than 18 years of age who need adjuvant (chemo) radiation will be eligible. Patients with residual pelvic or para-aortic nodal disease, history of multiple abdominal surgeries or any other medical bowel condition will be excluded. The trial will randomise patients into standard radiation or IMRT. The primary aim is to compare differences in late grades II–IV bowel toxicity between the two arms. The secondary aims of the study focus on evaluating correlation of dose–volume parameters and late toxicity and quality of life. The trial is planned as a multicentre randomised study. The trial is designed to detect a 13% difference in late grades II–IV bowel toxicity with an α of 0.05 and β of 0.80. A total of 240 patients will be required to demonstrate the aforesaid difference. Ethics and dissemination The trial is approved by institutional ethics review board and will be routinely monitored as per standard guidelines. The study results will be disseminated via peer reviewed scientific journals, conference presentations and submission to regulatory authorities. Registration The trial is registered with clinicaltrials.gov (NCT 01279135). PMID:23242243

  10. Culprit for recurrent acute gastrointestinal massive bleeding: “Small bowel Dieulafoy’s lesions” - a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Sathyamurthy, Anjana; Winn, Jessica N; Ibdah, Jamal A; Tahan, Veysel

    2016-01-01

    A Dieulafoy's lesion is a dilated, aberrant, submucosal vessel that erodes the overlying epithelium without evidence of a primary ulcer or erosion. It can be located anywhere in the gastrointestinal tract. We describe a case of massive gastrointestinal bleeding from Dieulafoy’s lesions in the duodenum. Etiology and precipitating events of a Dieulafoy’s lesion are not well known. Bleeding can range from being self-limited to massive life- threatening. Endoscopic hemostasis can be achieved with a combination of therapeutic modalities. The endoscopic management includes sclerosant injection, heater probe, laser therapy, electrocautery, cyanoacrylate glue, banding, and clipping. Endoscopic tattooing can be helpful to locate the lesion for further endoscopic re-treatment or intraoperative wedge resection. Therapeutic options for re-bleeding lesions comprise of repeated endoscopic hemostasis, angiographic embolization or surgical wedge resection of the lesions. We present a 63-year-old Caucasian male with active bleeding from the two small bowel Dieulafoy’s lesions, which was successfully controlled with epinephrine injection and clip applications. PMID:27574568

  11. Bologna Guidelines for Diagnosis and Management of Adhesive Small Bowel Obstruction (ASBO): 2010 Evidence-Based Guidelines of the World Society of Emergency Surgery

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background There is no consensus on diagnosis and management of ASBO. Initial conservative management is usually safe, however proper timing for discontinuing non operative treatment is still controversial. Open surgery or laparoscopy are used without standardized indications. Methods A panel of 13 international experts with interest and background in ASBO and peritoneal diseases, participated in a consensus conference during the 1st International Congress of the World Society of Emergency Surgery and 9th Peritoneum and Surgery Society meeting, in Bologna, July 1-3, 2010, for developing evidence-based recommendations for diagnosis and management of ASBO. Whenever was a lack of high-level evidence, the working group formulated guidelines by obtaining consensus. Recommendations In absence of signs of strangulation and history of persistent vomiting or combined CT scan signs (free fluid, mesenteric oedema, small bowel faeces sign, devascularized bowel) patients with partial ASBO can be managed safely with NOM and tube decompression (either with long or NG) should be attempted. These patients are good candidates for Water Soluble Contrast Medium (WSCM) with both diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. The appearance of water-soluble contrast in the colon on X-ray within 24 hours from administration predicts resolution. WSCM may be administered either orally or via NGT (50-150 ml) both immediately at admission or after an initial attempt of conservative treatment of 48 hours. The use of WSCM for ASBO is safe and reduces need for surgery, time to resolution and hospital stay. NOM, in absence of signs of strangulation or peritonitis, can be prolonged up to 72 hours. After 72 hours of NOM without resolution surgery is recommended. Patients treated non-operatively have shorter hospital stay, but higher recurrence rate and shorter time to re-admission, although the risk of new surgically treated episodes of ASBO is unchanged. Risk factors for recurrences are age <40 years and

  12. An Overview of Bowel Incontinence: What Can Go Wrong?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norton, William F.

    2008-01-01

    Bowel incontinence, also called fecal incontinence, is the loss of control over liquid or solid stools. It can occur at any age--as a child, teenager, or adult. Severity can range from infrequent leakage of a small amount of stool to total loss of bowel control. Some persons might feel the urge to have a bowel movement but be unable to control it…

  13. A Thermo-sensitive Delivery Platform for Topical Administration of Inflammatory Bowel Disease Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Sidhartha R.; Nguyen, Linh P.; Inayathullah, Mohammed; Malkovskiy, Andrey; Habte, Frezghi; Rajadas, Jayakumar; Habtezion, Aida

    2015-01-01

    Systemic therapies for inflammatory bowel disease are associated with increased risk of infections and malignancies. Topical therapies reduce systemic exposure, but can be difficult to retain or have limited proximal distribution. To mitigate these issues, we developed a thermo-sensitive platform, using a polymer-based system that is liquid at room temperature but turns into a viscous gel upon reaching body temperature. Following rectal administration to mice with dextran sulphate sodium-induced colitis, the platform carrying budesonide or mesalamine becomes more viscoelastic near body temperature. Mice given the drug-containing platform gained more weight and had reduced histologic and biologic features of colitis than mice given the platform alone or liquid drugs via enema. Image analysis showed that enemas delivered with and without the platform reached similar distances in the colons of mice, but greater colonic retention was achieved by using the platform. PMID:25863215

  14. A Thermo-Sensitive Delivery Platform for Topical Administration of Inflammatory Bowel Disease Therapies.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Sidhartha R; Nguyen, Linh P; Inayathullah, Mohammed; Malkovskiy, Andrey; Habte, Frezghi; Rajadas, Jayakumar; Habtezion, Aida

    2015-07-01

    Systemic therapies for inflammatory bowel disease are associated with an increased risk of infections and malignancies. Topical therapies reduce systemic exposure, but can be difficult to retain or have limited proximal distribution. To mitigate these issues, we developed a thermo-sensitive platform, using a polymer-based system that is liquid at room temperature but turns into a viscous gel on reaching body temperature. After rectal administration to mice with dextran sulfate sodium-induced colitis, the platform carrying budesonide or mesalamine becomes more viscoelastic near body temperature. Mice given the drug-containing platform gained more weight and had reduced histologic and biologic features of colitis than mice given the platform alone or liquid drugs via enema. Image analysis showed that enemas delivered with and without the platform reached similar distances in the colons of mice, but greater colonic retention was achieved by using the platform. PMID:25863215

  15. The Impact of Mechanical Bowel Preparation in Elective Colorectal Surgery: A Propensity Score Matching Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young Wan; Choi, Eun Hee; Kwon, Hyun Jun; Ahn, Sung Ki

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the influence of preoperative mechanical bowel preparation (MBP) based on the occurrence of anastomosis leakage, surgical site infection (SSI), and severity of surgical complication when performing elective colorectal surgery. Materials and Methods MBP and non-MBP patients were matched using propensity score. The outcomes were evaluated according to tumor location such as right- (n=84) and left-sided colon (n=50) and rectum (n=100). In the non-MBP group, patients with right-sided colon cancer did not receive any preparation, and patients with both left-sided colon and rectal cancers were given one rectal enema before surgery. Results In the right-sided colon surgery, there was no anastomosis leakage. SSI occurred in 2 (4.8%) and 4 patients (9.5%) in the non-MBP and MBP groups, respectively. In the left-sided colon cancer surgery, there was one anastomosis leakage (4.0%) in each group. SSI occurred in none in the rectal enema group and in 2 patients (8.0%) in the MBP group. In the rectal cancer surgery, there were 5 anastomosis leakages (10.0%) in the rectal enema group and 2 (4.0%) in the MBP group. SSI occurred in 3 patients (6.0%) in each groups. Severe surgical complications (Grade III, IV, or V) based on Dindo-Clavien classification, occurred in 7 patients (14.0%) in the rectal enema group and 1 patient (2.0%) in the MBP group (p=0.03). Conclusion Right- and left-sided colon cancer surgery can be performed safely without MBP. In rectal cancer surgery, rectal enema only before surgery seems to be dangerous because of the higher rate of severe postoperative complications. PMID:25048485

  16. The impact of langerin (CD207)+ dendritic cells and FOXP3+ Treg cells in the small bowel mucosa of children with celiac disease and atopic dermatitis in comparison to children with functional gastrointestinal disorders.

    PubMed

    Vorobjova, Tamara; Ress, Krista; Luts, Katrin; Uibo, Oivi; Uibo, Raivo

    2016-08-01

    In the present study we aimed to evaluate the impact of langerin (CD207)+ dendritic cells (DCs) and FOXP3+ Treg cells in the intestinal mucosa of children with celiac disease (CD) and atopic dermatitis (AD) in comparison to children with functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGD). Seventy-five children (37 male, mean age 8.4 ± 4.8 years), who randomly underwent small bowel biopsy, were studied. The CD was diagnosed in 14 children, including five persons with concomitant AD (all positive for anti-tissue transglutaminase IgA antibodies and with small bowel atrophy). Normal small bowel mucosa was found in eight patients with AD and in 53 patients with FGD. The sera of all patients were tested for total and specific IgE antibodies to food allergen panels. Staining for CD11c+, langerin (CD207+) DCs, CD4+, and FOXP3+ Treg cells was performed on paraffin-embedded sections of bioptates using immunohistochemistry. The density of CD11c+ DCs, CD4+, and FOXP3+ Treg cells was higher in the CD patients compared to the AD and FGD patients (p = 0.02; p = 0.001). In AD, significantly higher density of CD11c+ DCs was detected in patients positive for specific IgE to food allergen panels (p = 0.02). The FGD patients with elevated total IgE had increased density of langerin (CD207)+ DCs compared to the patients with normal total IgE levels (p = 0.01). The increased density of FOXP3+ Treg cells, CD4+, cells and CD11c+ DCs was associated with CD but not with AD. The elevated level of total IgE or specific IgE to food allergens was associated with more pronounced expression of DCs, indicating a possible link between the presence of these cells in small bowel mucosa with elevated level of serum IgE. PMID:27200487

  17. Infection of Aedes albopictus with chikungunya virus rectally administered by enema.

    PubMed

    Nuckols, John T; Ziegler, Sarah A; Huang, Yan-Jang Scott; McAuley, Alex J; Vanlandingham, Dana L; Klowden, Marc J; Spratt, Heidi; Davey, Robert A; Higgs, Stephen

    2013-02-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is an alphavirus transmitted by Aedes albopictus and Aedes aegypti mosquitoes in tropical areas of Africa, Asia, and the islands of the Indian Ocean. In 2007 and 2009, CHIKV was transmitted outside these tropical areas and caused geographically localized infections in people in Italy and France. To temporally and spatially characterize CHIKV infection of Ae. albopictus midguts, a comparison of viral distribution in mosquitoes infected per os or by enema was conducted. Ae. albopictus infected with CHIKV LR 5' green fluorescent protein (GFP) at a titer 10(6.95) tissue culture infective dose(50) (TCID(50))/mL, were collected and analyzed for virus dissemination by visualizing GFP expression and titration up to 14 days post inoculation (dpi). Additionally, midguts were dissected from the mosquitoes and imaged by fluorescence microscopy for comparison of midgut infection patterns between orally- and enema-infected mosquitoes. When virus was delivered via enema, the anterior midgut appeared more readily infected by 3 dpi, with increased GFP presentation observed in this same location of the midgut at 7 and 14 dpi when compared to orally-infected mosquitoes. This work demonstrates that enema delivery of virus is a viable technique for use of mosquito infection. Enema injection of mosquitoes may be an alternative to intrathoracic inoculation because the enema delivery more closely models natural infection and neither compromises midgut integrity nor involves a wound that can induce immune responses. Furthermore, unlike intrathoracic delivery, the enema does not bypass midgut barriers to infect tissues artificially in the hemocoel of the mosquito.

  18. Effects of Manual Therapy on Bowel Function of Patients with Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Chunying; Ye, Miao; Huang, Qiuchen

    2013-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to observe the effects of manual therapy on bowel function of patients with spinal cord injury. [Subjects] The participants were 20 patients with spinal cord injury. [Methods] Manual therapy was applied to the intestine and along the colon ascendens, transverse colon, colon descendens and colon sigmoidem on the surface of abdomen. The results before and after 60 sessions (5 times/week, continued for 12 weeks) of manual therapy were compared. [Results] It was found that there were significant effects both on shortening of bowel time and decreasing dosage of glycerine enema every time patients needed to excrete. [Conclusion] Manual therapy had significant effects on bowel function of patients with spinal cord injury. PMID:24259830

  19. The Different Volume Effects of Small-Bowel Toxicity During Pelvic Irradiation Between Gynecologic Patients With and Without Abdominal Surgery: A Prospective Study With Computed Tomography-Based Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, E.-Y.; Sung, C.-C.; Ko, S.-F.; Wang, C.-J.; Yang, Kuender D.

    2007-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of abdominal surgery on the volume effects of small-bowel toxicity during whole-pelvic irradiation in patients with gynecologic malignancies. Methods and Materials: From May 2003 through November 2006, 80 gynecologic patients without (Group I) or with (Group II) prior abdominal surgery were analyzed. We used a computed tomography (CT) planning system to measure the small-bowel volume and dosimetry. We acquired the range of small-bowel volume in 10% (V10) to 100% (V100) of dose, at 10% intervals. The onset and grade of diarrhea during whole-pelvic irradiation were recorded as small-bowel toxicity up to 39.6 Gy in 22 fractions. Results: The volume effect of Grade 2-3 diarrhea existed from V10 to V100 in Group I patients and from V60 to V100 in Group II patients on univariate analyses. The V40 of Group I and the V100 of Group II achieved most statistical significance. The mean V40 was 281 {+-} 27 cm{sup 3} and 489 {+-} 34 cm{sup 3} (p < 0.001) in Group I patients with Grade 0-1 and Grade 2-3 diarrhea, respectively. The corresponding mean V100 of Group II patients was 56 {+-} 14 cm{sup 3} and 132 {+-} 19 cm{sup 3} (p = 0.003). Multivariate analyses revealed that V40 (p = 0.001) and V100 (p = 0.027) were independent factors for the development of Grade 2-3 diarrhea in Groups I and II, respectively. Conclusions: Gynecologic patients without and with abdominal surgery have different volume effects on small-bowel toxicity during whole-pelvic irradiation. Low-dose volume can be used as a predictive index of Grade 2 or greater diarrhea in patients without abdominal surgery. Full-dose volume is more important than low-dose volume for Grade 2 or greater diarrhea in patients with abdominal surgery.

  20. Breath test for differential diagnosis between small intestinal bacterial overgrowth and irritable bowel disease: An observation on non-absorbable antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Esposito, I; de Leone, A; Gregorio, G Di; Giaquinto, S; de Magistris, L; Ferrieri, A; Riegler, G

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To estimate the prevalence of small intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) among patients with an earlier diagnosis of irritable bowel disease (IBS) in our geographical area, and to collect information on the use of locally acting non-absorbable antibiotics in the management of SIBO. METHODS: A non-interventional study was conducted in 73 consecutive patients with a symptom-based diagnosis. RESULTS: When the patients underwent a “breath test”, 33 (45.2%) showed the presence of a SIBO. After treatment with rifaximin 1200 mg/d for seven days in 32 patients, 19 (59.4%) showed a negative “breath test” one week later as well as a significant reduction of symptoms, thus confirming the relationship between SIBO and many of the symptoms claimed by patients. In the other 13 patients, “breath test” remained positive, and a further cycle of treatment with ciprofloxacin 500 mg/d was given for 7 additional days, resulting in a negative “breath test” in one patient only. CONCLUSION: (1) about half of the patients with a symptomatic diagnosis of IBS have actually SIBO, which is responsible for most of the symptoms attributed to IBS; (2) only a “breath test” with lactulose (or with glucose in subjects with an intolerance to lactose) can provide a differential diagnosis between IBS and SIBO, with almost identical symptoms; and (3) the use of non-absorbable antibiotics may be useful to reduce the degree of SIBO and related symptoms; it must be accompanied, however, by the correction of the wrong alimentary habits underlying SIBO. PMID:18023092

  1. Protective effect of melatonin-supported adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells against small bowel ischemia-reperfusion injury in rat.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia-Lo; Sung, Pei-Hsun; Sun, Cheuk-Kwan; Chen, Chih-Hung; Chiang, Hsin-Ju; Huang, Tien-Hung; Chen, Yi-Ling; Zhen, Yen-Yi; Chai, Han-Tan; Chung, Sheng-Ying; Tong, Meng-Shen; Chang, Hsueh-Wen; Chen, Hong-Hwa; Yip, Hon-Kan

    2015-09-01

    We tested the hypothesis that combined melatonin and autologous adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADMSC) was superior to either alone against small bowel ischemia-reperfusion (SBIR) injury induced by superior mesenteric artery clamping for 30 min followed by reperfusion for 72 hr. Male adult Sprague Dawley rats (n = 50) were equally categorized into sham-operated controls SC, SBIR, SBIR-ADMSC (1.0 × 10(6) intravenous and 1.0 × 10(6) intrajejunal injection), SBIR-melatonin (intraperitoneal 20 mg/kg at 30 min after SI ischemia and 50 mg/kg at 6 and 18 hr after SI reperfusion), and SBIR-ADMSC-melatonin groups. The results demonstrated that the circulating levels of TNF-α, MPO, LyG6+ cells, CD68+ cells, WBC count, and gut permeability were highest in SBIR and lowest in SC, significantly higher in SBIR-ADMSC group and further increased in SBIR-melatonin group than in the combined therapy group (all P < 0.001). The ischemic mucosal damage score, the protein expressions of inflammation (TNF-α, NF-κB, MMP-9, MPO, and iNOS), oxidative stress (NOX-1, NOX-2, and oxidized protein), apoptosis (APAF-1, mitochondrial Bax, cleaved caspase-3 and PARP), mitochondrial damage (cytosolic cytochrome C) and DNA damage (γ-H2AX) markers, as well as cellular expressions of proliferation (PCNA), apoptosis (caspase-3, TUNEL assay), and DNA damage (γ-H2AX) showed an identical pattern, whereas mitochondrial cytochrome C exhibited an opposite pattern compared to that of inflammation among all groups (all P < 0.001). Besides, antioxidant expressions at protein (NQO-1, GR, and GPx) and cellular (HO-1) levels progressively increased from SC to the combined treatment group (all P < 0.001). In conclusion, combined melatonin-ADMSC treatment offered additive beneficial effect against SBIR injury. PMID:26013733

  2. Rhubarb Enema Attenuates Renal Tubulointerstitial Fibrosis in 5/6 Nephrectomized Rats by Alleviating Indoxyl Sulfate Overload

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Fuhua; Liu, Xusheng; Zou, Chuan

    2015-01-01

    Aim To investigate the effects of rhubarb enema treatment using a 5/6 nephrectomized rat model and study its mechanisms. Methods Twenty-eight Sprague Dawley rats were divided into three groups: sham operation group (n = 8), 5/6 nephrectomized (5/6Nx) (n = 10), and 5/6Nx with rhubarb enema treatment (n = 10). The rhubarb enema was continuous for 1.0 month. Serum creatinine, serum indoxyl sulfate (IS) level, renal pathology, tubulointerstitial fibrosis, and renal oxidative stress were assessed. Results 5/6Nx rats showed increasing levels of serum creatinine and severe pathological lesions. Their serum creatinine levels obviously decreased after rhubarb enema treatment (P < 0.05 vs 5/6Nx group). The administration of rhubarb enema attenuated the histopathological changes in 5/6Nx rats. In addition, 5/6Nx rats showed an enhanced extent of tubulointerstitial fibrosis compared with sham rats, and administration of rhubarb enema to 5/6Nx rats ameliorated tubulointerstitial fibrosis. 5/6Nx rats showed increased serum levels of IS, renal oxidative stress, and NF-κB compared with sham rats, whereas administration of rhubarb enema to 5/6Nx rats decreased serum levels of IS, renal oxidative stress, and NF-κB levels. Conclusion Rhubarb enema treatment ameliorates tubulointerstitial fibrosis in the kidneys of 5/6Nx rats, most likely by alleviating IS overload and reducing kidney oxidative stress and inflammatory injury. PMID:26671452

  3. Development of in situ gelling and bio adhesive 5-Fluorouracil enema.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu-Lu; Zheng, Wen-Sheng; Chen, Shao-Hua; Fang, Xia-Qin

    2013-01-01

    In this study, a novel 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) enema with good bio adhesion and temperature sensitivity was developed using in situ gelling technology. The preparation was formulated as a free-flowing liquid before use, while a layer of gel film was quickly formed when administered in the rectum, with a large contact surface area. It also demonstrated good biocompatibility, appropriate gel strength and bio adhesive force with excellent adhesion to rectal mucosa and prolonged action time, allowing more effective drug absorption and diffusion to surrounding tissues. Poloxamer 407 and poloxamer 188 were applied to adjust the gelling temperature. With the addition of carbopol and polycarbophil (bio adhesive substances), the solubility of 5-FU and gel strength increased, the temperature of gelation and the surface area of drug contact on mucous epithelium decreased. Decreased adhesive force between the preparation and the mucous membrane of the rectum was demonstrated with improving carbopol and polycarbophil's concentration. In vitro release demonstrated that 5-FU in situ gelling enema with different bases had a rapid and almost complete drug release. We used an optimized formulation of P407/P188/polycarbophil/5-FU (17/2.5/0.2/1.0) for animal experiments. The result showed that the drug evenly covered the surface of the rectum and there was no leakage in 6 hours. The in situ gelling enema showed significantly higher rectal tissue levels of 5-FU compared with suppository and intravenous administration, indicating that 5-FU could be well absorbed due to the enlarged releasing area, longer retention time and larger amount of dissolved active ingredients. Systemically, 5-FU levels in the enema group were similar to those in the suppository group and significantly lower than the intravenous group. The enema was not associated with morphological damage to rectal tissue. These results suggest that the bio adhesive and in situ gelling enema could be a more effective rectal

  4. Development of In Situ Gelling and Bio Adhesive 5-Fluorouracil Enema

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lu-Lu; Zheng, Wen-Sheng; Chen, Shao-Hua; Fang, Xia-Qin

    2013-01-01

    In this study, a novel 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) enema with good bio adhesion and temperature sensitivity was developed using in situ gelling technology. The preparation was formulated as a free-flowing liquid before use, while a layer of gel film was quickly formed when administered in the rectum, with a large contact surface area. It also demonstrated good biocompatibility, appropriate gel strength and bio adhesive force with excellent adhesion to rectal mucosa and prolonged action time, allowing more effective drug absorption and diffusion to surrounding tissues. Poloxamer 407 and poloxamer 188 were applied to adjust the gelling temperature. With the addition of carbopol and polycarbophil (bio adhesive substances), the solubility of 5-FU and gel strength increased, the temperature of gelation and the surface area of drug contact on mucous epithelium decreased. Decreased adhesive force between the preparation and the mucous membrane of the rectum was demonstrated with improving carbopol and polycarbophil’s concentration. In vitro release demonstrated that 5-FU in situ gelling enema with different bases had a rapid and almost complete drug release. We used an optimized formulation of P407/P188/polycarbophil/5-FU (17/2.5/0.2/1.0) for animal experiments. The result showed that the drug evenly covered the surface of the rectum and there was no leakage in 6 hours. The in situ gelling enema showed significantly higher rectal tissue levels of 5-FU compared with suppository and intravenous administration, indicating that 5-FU could be well absorbed due to the enlarged releasing area, longer retention time and larger amount of dissolved active ingredients. Systemically, 5-FU levels in the enema group were similar to those in the suppository group and significantly lower than the intravenous group. The enema was not associated with morphological damage to rectal tissue. These results suggest that the bio adhesive and in situ gelling enema could be a more effective rectal

  5. Development of in situ gelling and bio adhesive 5-Fluorouracil enema.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu-Lu; Zheng, Wen-Sheng; Chen, Shao-Hua; Fang, Xia-Qin

    2013-01-01

    In this study, a novel 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) enema with good bio adhesion and temperature sensitivity was developed using in situ gelling technology. The preparation was formulated as a free-flowing liquid before use, while a layer of gel film was quickly formed when administered in the rectum, with a large contact surface area. It also demonstrated good biocompatibility, appropriate gel strength and bio adhesive force with excellent adhesion to rectal mucosa and prolonged action time, allowing more effective drug absorption and diffusion to surrounding tissues. Poloxamer 407 and poloxamer 188 were applied to adjust the gelling temperature. With the addition of carbopol and polycarbophil (bio adhesive substances), the solubility of 5-FU and gel strength increased, the temperature of gelation and the surface area of drug contact on mucous epithelium decreased. Decreased adhesive force between the preparation and the mucous membrane of the rectum was demonstrated with improving carbopol and polycarbophil's concentration. In vitro release demonstrated that 5-FU in situ gelling enema with different bases had a rapid and almost complete drug release. We used an optimized formulation of P407/P188/polycarbophil/5-FU (17/2.5/0.2/1.0) for animal experiments. The result showed that the drug evenly covered the surface of the rectum and there was no leakage in 6 hours. The in situ gelling enema showed significantly higher rectal tissue levels of 5-FU compared with suppository and intravenous administration, indicating that 5-FU could be well absorbed due to the enlarged releasing area, longer retention time and larger amount of dissolved active ingredients. Systemically, 5-FU levels in the enema group were similar to those in the suppository group and significantly lower than the intravenous group. The enema was not associated with morphological damage to rectal tissue. These results suggest that the bio adhesive and in situ gelling enema could be a more effective rectal

  6. Fatal hypermagnesemia caused by an Epsom salt enema: a case illustration.

    PubMed

    Tofil, Nancy M; Benner, Kim W; Winkler, Margaret K

    2005-02-01

    The authors describe a case of fatal hypermagnesemia caused by an Epsom salt enema. A 7-year-old male presented with cardiac arrest and was found to have a serum magnesium level of 41.2 mg/dL (33.9 mEq/L) after having received an Epsom salt enema earlier that day. The medical history of Epsom salt, the common causes and symptoms of hypermagnesemia, and the treatment of hypermagnesemia are reviewed. The easy availability of magnesium, the subtle initial symptoms of hypermagnesemia, and the need for education about the toxicity of magnesium should be of interest to physicians. PMID:15759964

  7. A Simple Evaluation Tool (ET-CET) Indicates Increase of Diagnostic Skills From Small Bowel Capsule Endoscopy Training Courses: A Prospective Observational European Multicenter Study.

    PubMed

    Albert, J G; Humbla, O; McAlindon, M E; Davison, C; Seitz, U; Fraser, C; Hagenmüller, F; Noetzel, E; Spada, C; Riccioni, M E; Barnert, J; Filmann, N; Keuchel, M

    2015-10-01

    Small bowel capsule endoscopy (SBCE) has become a first line diagnostic tool. Several training courses with a similar format have been established in Europe; however, data on learning curve and training in SBCE remain sparse.Between 2008 and 2011, different basic SBCE training courses were organized internationally in UK (n = 2), Italy (n = 2), Germany (n = 2), Finland (n = 1), and nationally in Germany (n = 10), applying similar 8-hour curricula with 50% lectures and 50% hands-on training. The Given PillCam System was used in 12 courses, the Olympus EndoCapsule system in 5, respectively. A simple evaluation tool for capsule endoscopy training (ET-CET) was developed using 10 short SBCE videos including relevant lesions and normal or irrelevant findings. For each video, delegates were required to record a diagnosis (achievable total score from 0 to 10) and the clinical relevance (achievable total score 0 to 10). ET-CET was performed at baseline before the course and repeated, with videos in altered order, after the course.Two hundred ninety-four delegates (79.3% physicians, 16.3% nurses, 4.4% others) were included for baseline analysis, 268 completed the final evaluation. Forty percent had no previous experience in SBCE, 33% had performed 10 or less procedures. Median scores for correct diagnosis improved from 4.0 (IQR 3) to 7.0 (IQR 3) during the courses (P < 0.001, Wilcoxon), and for correct classification of relevance of the lesions from 5.0 (IQR 3) to 7.0 (IQR 3) (P < 0.001), respectively. Improvement was not dependent on experience, profession, SBCE system, or course setting. Previous experience in SBCE was associated with higher baseline scores for correct diagnosis (P < 0.001; Kruskal-Wallis). Additionally, independent nonparametric partial correlation with experience in gastroscopy (rho 0.33) and colonoscopy (rho 0.27) was observed (P < 0.001).A simple ET-CET demonstrated significant improvement of diagnostic skills on

  8. Mebendazole retention enema for severe Trichuris trichiura (whipworm) infection: a case report.

    PubMed

    Sebastian, V J; Bhattacharya, S; Ray, S

    1989-02-01

    The authors report a case of massive Trichuris trichiura infection, resulting in severe anaemia and congestive cardiac failure in a 9-year-old Iban boy, who was resistant to the usual oral anthelmintic treatment, but promptly responded to mebendazole retention enema. This patient also had an associated Entamoeba histolytica infection. PMID:2918577

  9. An inflammation-targeting hydrogel for local drug delivery in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Sufeng; Ermann, Joerg; Succi, Marc D; Zhou, Allen; Hamilton, Matthew J; Cao, Bonnie; Korzenik, Joshua R; Glickman, Jonathan N; Vemula, Praveen K; Glimcher, Laurie H; Traverso, Giovanni; Langer, Robert; Karp, Jeffrey M

    2015-08-12

    There is a clinical need for new, more effective treatments for chronic and debilitating inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Targeting drugs selectively to the inflamed intestine may improve therapeutic outcomes and minimize systemic toxicity. We report the development of an inflammation-targeting hydrogel (IT-hydrogel) that acts as a drug delivery system to the inflamed colon. Hydrogel microfibers were generated from ascorbyl palmitate, an amphiphile that is generally recognized as safe (GRAS) by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. IT-hydrogel microfibers loaded with the anti-inflammatory corticosteroid dexamethasone (Dex) were stable, released drug only upon enzymatic digestion, and demonstrated preferential adhesion to inflamed epithelial surfaces in vitro and in two mouse colitis models in vivo. Dex-loaded IT-hydrogel enemas, but not free Dex enemas, administered every other day to mice with colitis resulted in a significant reduction in inflammation and were associated with lower Dex peak serum concentrations and, thus, less systemic drug exposure. Ex vivo analysis of colon tissue samples from patients with ulcerative colitis demonstrated that IT-hydrogel microfibers adhered preferentially to mucosa from inflamed lesions compared with histologically normal sites. The IT-hydrogel drug delivery platform represents a promising approach for targeted enema-based therapies in patients with colonic IBD.

  10. An inflammation-targeting hydrogel for local drug delivery in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Sufeng; Ermann, Joerg; Succi, Marc D.; Zhou, Allen; Hamilton, Matthew J.; Cao, Bonnie; Korzenik, Joshua R.; Glickman, Jonathan N.; Vemula, Praveen K.; Glimcher, Laurie H.; Traverso, Giovanni; Langer, Robert; Karp, Jeffrey M.

    2016-01-01

    There is a clinical need for new, more effective treatments for chronic and debilitating inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. Targeting drugs selectively to the inflamed intestine may improve therapeutic outcomes and minimize systemic toxicity. We report the development of an inflammation-targeting hydrogel (IT-hydrogel) that acts as a drug delivery system to the inflamed colon. Hydrogel microfibers were generated from ascorbyl palmitate, an amphiphile that is generally recognized as safe (GRAS) by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. IT-hydrogel microfibers loaded with the anti-inflammatory corticosteroid dexamethasone (Dex) were stable, released drug only upon enzymatic digestion, and demonstrated preferential adhesion to inflamed epithelial surfaces in vitro and in two mouse colitis models in vivo. Dex-loaded IT-hydrogel enemas, but not free Dex enemas, administered every other day to mice with colitis resulted in a significant reduction in inflammation and were associated with lower Dex peak serum concentrations and, thus, less systemic drug exposure. Ex vivo analysis of colon tissue samples from patients with ulcerative colitis demonstrated that IT-hydrogel microfibers adhered preferentially to mucosa from inflamed lesions compared with histologically normal sites. The IT-hydrogel drug delivery platform represents a promising approach for targeted enema-based therapies in patients with colonic IBD. PMID:26268315

  11. The comparison of the influence between two different bowel preparation methods on sepsis after prostate biopsies

    PubMed Central

    Yildirim, Mehmet Erol; Badem, Huseyin; Cavis, Mucahit; Karatas, Omer Faruk; Cimentepe, Ersin; Unal, Dogan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Transrectal ultrasonography (TRUS) guided prostate needle biopsy has been performed to diagnose and stage prostate cancer for many years. There are many different bowel preparation protocols to diminish the infectious complications, but there is no standardized consensus among urologists. Therefore, we aimed to assess two different bowel preparation methods on the rate of infectious complications in patients who underwent TRUS–guided prostate biopsy. Material and methods A total of 387 cases of TRUS–guided prostate biopsy were included in this retrospective study. All patients received antibiotic prophylaxis with ciprofloxacin (500 mg) twice a day orally for 7 days starting on the day before the biopsy. The patients were divided into two groups according to the bowel preparation method used. Patients (Group 1, n = 164) only received self–administrated phosphate enema) on the morning of the prostate biopsy. Other patients (Group 2, n = 223) received sennasoid a–b laxatives the night before the prostate biopsy. Infectious complications were classified as sepsis, fever (greater than 38°C) without sepsis, and other clinical infections. Results Major complications developed in 14 cases (3.8%), including 3 cases (0.8%) of urinary retention, and 11 (3%) infectious complications, all of which were sepsis. There were 3 and 8 cases of urosepsis in Group 1 and Group 2, respectively. There were no statistically significant differences between both Groups regarding to the rates of urosepsis (p = 0.358). Conclusions Despite both methods of bowel preparation, sodium phosphate enema or sennasoid a–b calcium laxatives, before TRUS–guided prostate biopsy have similar effect on the rate of urosepsis, so both methods of bowel preparation can be safely used. PMID:25914845

  12. Methylglyoxal induces systemic symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuang; Jiao, Taiwei; Chen, Yushuai; Gao, Nan; Zhang, Lili; Jiang, Min

    2014-01-01

    Patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) show a wide range of symptoms including diarrhea, abdominal pain, changes in bowel habits, nausea, vomiting, headache, anxiety, depression and cognitive impairment. Methylglyoxal has been proved to be a potential toxic metabolite produced by intestinal bacteria. The present study was aimed at investigating the correlation between methylglyoxal and irritable bowel syndrome. Rats were treated with an enema infusion of methylglyoxal. Fecal water content, visceral sensitivity, behavioral tests and serum 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) were assessed after methylglyoxal exposure. Our data showed that fecal water content was significantly higher than controls after methylglyoxal exposure except that of 30 mM group. Threshold volumes on balloon distension decreased in the treatment groups. All exposed rats showed obvious head scratching and grooming behavior and a decrease in sucrose preference. The serum 5-HT values were increased in 30, 60, 90 mM groups and decreased in 150 mM group. Our findings suggested that methylglyoxal could induce diarrhea, visceral hypersensitivity, headache as well as depression-like behaviors in rats, and might be the key role in triggering systemic symptoms of IBS. PMID:25157984

  13. Surgical management of short bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Kishore R

    2014-05-01

    For patients with short bowel syndrome (SBS), surgery can play an important role in preventing, mitigating, and, in some cases, reversing intestinal failure (IF). During intestinal resection, bowel length should be conserved to the fullest extent possible to avoid dependence on parenteral nutrition (PN). Bowel salvage may be improved by initially preserving tissue of questionable viability and later reevaluating during "second-look" procedures. Once the patient is stabilized, ostomy reversal and recruitment of distal unused bowel should be prioritized whenever feasible. Following progression to IF, surgical management of SBS depends on the symptoms and anatomical characteristics of the individual patient. For carefully selected patients with rapid intestinal transit and dilated bowel, longitudinal intestinal lengthening and tailoring (LILT) and serial transverse enteroplasty (STEP) procedures may provide benefit. Outcomes following STEP and LILT are generally similar, and the choice between these procedures may rest on surgeon preference. For patients with rapid intestinal transit in the absence of bowel dilation, segmental reversal of the small bowel may reduce PN requirements. Intestinal transplantation is the standard of care for patients in whom intestinal rehabilitation attempts have failed and who are at risk of life-threatening complications of PN. Because patients awaiting isolated intestine transplant show increased survival compared with patients awaiting combined intestine-liver transplant, early referral of appropriate patients, before the development of advanced liver disease, is critical to enhancing patient outcomes.

  14. A lucky and reversible cause of 'ischaemic bowel'.

    PubMed

    Shea, Y F; Chow, Felix C L; Chan, F; Ip, Janice J K; Chiu, Patrick K C; Chan, Fion S Y; Chu, L W

    2015-10-01

    An 81-year-old man was admitted with an infective exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. He also had clinical and radiological features suggestive of ileus. On day 6 after admission, he developed generalised abdominal pain. Urgent computed tomography of the abdomen showed presence of portovenous gas and dilated small bowel with pneumatosis intestinalis and whirl sign. Emergency laparotomy was performed, which showed a 7-mm perforated ulcer over the first part of the duodenum and small bowel volvulus. Omental patch repair and reduction of small bowel volvulus were performed. No bowel resection was required. The patient had a favourable outcome. Clinicians should suspect small bowel volvulus as a cause of ischaemic bowel. Presence of portovenous gas and pneumatosis intestinalis are normally considered to be signs of frank ischaemic bowel. The absence of bowel ischaemia at laparotomy in this patient shows that this is not necessarily the case and prompt surgical treatment could potentially save the bowels and lives of these patients. PMID:26493080

  15. Enema use among men who have sex with men: a behavioral epidemiologic study with implications for HIV/STI prevention.

    PubMed

    Noor, Syed W; Rosser, B R Simon

    2014-05-01

    Enema use or douching is a risk factor for HIV/STI in men who have sex with men (MSM). However, few studies have explored enema use practices. We examined the frequency of enema use, type of products used, and reasons to use and not to use before and after receptive anal sex in a large sample of MSM (N = 4,992) recruited from 16 U.S. cities. Through online surveys, we examined personal, behavioral, and environmental factors associated with enema use. Most (52 %) participants reported having douched at least once and 35 % reported douching within the last 3 months. While most (88 %) reported enema use before receptive anal sex, 28 % douched after receptive anal sex. Most participants (65 %) used water to douche, 24 % added salt, soap, and/or antibacterial products to water, and 30 % reported using commercially available products. Being a man of color, HIV-positive, diagnosed with an STI, identifying as "versatile" in sex, and having more than two unprotected sex partners were significantly associated with recent enema use. Douching behavior appears closely associated with HIV/STI risk. Douching with water may be a concern since it may increase HIV/STI infection by damaging the epithelium. Development and promotion of a non-damaging, non-water based enema specifically for use in anal sex are recommended. In addition, the seemingly contradictory recommendations that water-based lubricant is recommended for anal sex but water-based enemas are dangerous need to be reconciled into a single consistent message.

  16. Enema use among men who have sex with men: a behavioral epidemiologic study with implications for HIV/STI prevention.

    PubMed

    Noor, Syed W; Rosser, B R Simon

    2014-05-01

    Enema use or douching is a risk factor for HIV/STI in men who have sex with men (MSM). However, few studies have explored enema use practices. We examined the frequency of enema use, type of products used, and reasons to use and not to use before and after receptive anal sex in a large sample of MSM (N = 4,992) recruited from 16 U.S. cities. Through online surveys, we examined personal, behavioral, and environmental factors associated with enema use. Most (52 %) participants reported having douched at least once and 35 % reported douching within the last 3 months. While most (88 %) reported enema use before receptive anal sex, 28 % douched after receptive anal sex. Most participants (65 %) used water to douche, 24 % added salt, soap, and/or antibacterial products to water, and 30 % reported using commercially available products. Being a man of color, HIV-positive, diagnosed with an STI, identifying as "versatile" in sex, and having more than two unprotected sex partners were significantly associated with recent enema use. Douching behavior appears closely associated with HIV/STI risk. Douching with water may be a concern since it may increase HIV/STI infection by damaging the epithelium. Development and promotion of a non-damaging, non-water based enema specifically for use in anal sex are recommended. In addition, the seemingly contradictory recommendations that water-based lubricant is recommended for anal sex but water-based enemas are dangerous need to be reconciled into a single consistent message. PMID:24346864

  17. Salmonella colitis: assessment with double-contrast barium enema examination in seven patients.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, S; Iida, M; Tominaga, M; Yao, T; Hirata, N; Fujishima, M

    1992-08-01

    To completely rule out the possibility of ulcerative colitis, Crohn disease, and other diseases, the authors analyzed the radiographic findings at double-contrast barium enema examination performed in seven patients with colitis caused by Salmonella organisms. In all patients, bacteriologic confirmation of nontyphoid Salmonella infection and radiographs of the upper gastrointestinal tract were obtained. Total colonoscopy was performed in five patients and sigmoidoscopy in one patient. In all patients, the radiographic findings were retrospectively analyzed. The descending colon and sigmoid colon were affected in six patients, whereas the rectum was affected in none. The findings included fine mucosal granularity (seven patients), loss of haustration (six patients), many fine ulcerations (five patients), and multiple ulcers (two patients). The radiographic features simulated those of ulcerative colitis, except for absence of rectal abnormality. It is concluded that double-contrast barium enema examination is useful for detection of fine mucosal changes. PMID:1620861

  18. Failure of 5-aminosalicylic acid enemas to improve chronic radiation proctitis

    SciTech Connect

    Baum, C.A.; Biddle, W.L.; Miner, P.B. Jr.

    1989-05-01

    Radiation proctitis is a well-known complication of abdominal and pelvic radiation. Conventional medical and surgical treatment often is disappointing. 5-Aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) is the active component in sulfasalazine and is effective in the treatment of distal ulcerative colitis. Four patients with radiation proctitis were treated with 4 g 5-ASA by enema nightly for two to six months. Patients were seen monthly, interviewed, and a sigmoidoscopic exam performed. No change was seen in the degree of mucosal inflammation on follow-up sigmoidoscopic exams. Three patients noted no change in their symptoms of bleeding, pain, or tenesmus. One patient noted initial improvement, but this was not sustained. 5-ASA enemas do not appear to be effective in the treatment of radiation proctitis.

  19. Novel and Effective Almagate Enema for Hemorrhagic Chronic Radiation Proctitis and Risk Factors for Fistula Development.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Zi-Xu; Ma, Teng-Hui; Zhong, Qing-Hua; Wang, Huai-Ming; Yu, Xi-Hu; Qin, Qi-Yuan; Chu, Li-Li; Wang, Lei; Wang, Jian-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Radiation proctitis is a common complication after radiotherapy for pelvic malignant tumors. This study was conducted to assess the efficacy of novel almagate enemas in hemorrhagic chronic radiation proctitis (CRP) and evaluate risk factors related to rectal deep ulcer or fistula secondary to CRP. All patients underwent a colonoscopy to confirm the diagnosis of CRP and symptoms were graded. Typical endoscopic and pathological images, risk factors, and quality of life were also recorded. A total of 59 patients were enrolled. Gynecological cancers composed 93.1% of the primary malignancies. Complete or obvious reduction of bleeding was observed in 90% (53/59) patients after almagate enema. The mean score of bleeding improved from 2.17 to 0.83 (P<0.001) after the enemas. The mean response time was 12 days. No adverse effects were found. Moreover, long-term successful rate in controlling bleeding was 69% and the quality of life was dramatically improved (P=0.001). The efficacy was equivalent to rectal sucralfate, but the almagate with its antacid properties acted more rapidly than sucralfate. Furthermore, we firstly found that moderate to severe anemia was the risk factor of CRP patients who developed rectal deep ulcer or fistulas (P= 0.015). We also found abnormal hyaline-like thick wall vessels, which revealed endarteritis obliterans and the fibrosis underlying this disease. These findings indicate that almagate enema is a novel effective, rapid and well-tolerated method for hemorrhagic CRP. Moderate to severe anemia is a risk factor for deep ulceration or fistula. PMID:26925655

  20. Perforated appendix presenting with severe diarrhea: findings on barium-enema examination

    SciTech Connect

    Picus, D.; Shackelford, G.D.

    1983-10-01

    Severe diarrhea and marked lower abdominal cramps are unusual manifestations of appendicitis. The authors performed a barium-enema examination (BE) on 9 pediatric patients who were utlimately shown to have a perforated appendix and pelvic abscesses. In 8 cases, the atypical symptoms initially led to an incorrect clinical diagnosis. In all 9, the BE demonstrated extensive inflammatory changes of the rectosigmoid colon, caused by the surrounding pelvic infection. Recognizing this clinical and radiographic association could lead to earlier diagnosis and treatment.

  1. Accidental embryo irradiation during barium enema examinations: An estimation of absorbed dose

    SciTech Connect

    Damilakis, J.; Perisinakis, K.; Grammatikakis, J.

    1996-04-01

    The purpose of this report is to investigate the possibility of an embryo to receive a dose of more than 10 cGy, the threshold of malformation induction in embryos reported by the International Commission on Radiological Protection, during barium enema examinations. Thermoluminescent dosimeters were place in a phantom to calculate the depth-to-skin conversion coefficient needed for dose estimation at the average embryo depth in patients. Barium enema examinations were performed in 20 women of childbearing age with diagnostic problems demanding longer fluoroscopy times. Doses at 6 cm, the average embryo depth, were determined by measurements at the patients` skin followed by dose calculation at the site of interest. The range of doses estimated at embryo depth for patients was 1.9 to 8.2 cGy. The dose always exceeded 5 cGy when fluoroscopy time was longer than 7 minutes. The dose at the embryo depth never exceeded 10 cGy. This study indicates that fluoroscopy time should not exceed 7 minutes in childbearing-age female patients undergoing barium enema examinations. 6 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  2. Costs in inflammatory bowel diseases

    PubMed Central

    Witczak, Izabela

    2016-01-01

    Variables influencing total direct medical costs in inflammatory bowel diseases include country, diagnosis (generally, patients with Crohn's disease generated higher costs compared with patients with ulcerative colitis), and year since diagnosis. In all studies the mean costs were higher than the median costs, which indicates that a relatively small group of the most severely ill patients significantly affect the total cost of treatment of these diseases. A major component of direct medical costs was attributed to hospitalisation, ranging from 49% to 80% of the total. The costs of surgery constituted 40–61% of inpatient costs. Indirect costs in inflammatory bowel diseases, unappreciated and often underestimated (considered by few authors and as a loss of work), are in fact important and may even exceed direct medical costs. PMID:27110304

  3. Clinical Practice Guideline: Irritable bowel syndrome with constipation and functional constipation in the adult.

    PubMed

    Mearin, Fermín; Ciriza, Constanza; Mínguez, Miguel; Rey, Enrique; Mascort, Juan José; Peña, Enrique; Cañones, Pedro; Júdez, Javier

    2016-06-01

    In this Clinical Practice Guideline we discuss the diagnostic and therapeutic approach of adult patients with constipation and abdominal complaints at the confluence of the irritable bowel syndrome spectrum and functional constipation. Both conditions are included among the functional bowel disorders, and have a significant personal, healthcare, and social impact, affecting the quality of life of the patients who suffer from them. The first one is the irritable bowel syndrome subtype, where constipation represents the predominant complaint, in association with recurrent abdominal pain, bloating, and abdominal distension. Constipation is characterized by difficulties with or low frequency of bowel movements, often accompanied by straining during defecation or a feeling of incomplete evacuation. Most cases have no underlying medical cause, and are therefore considered as a functional bowel disorder. There are many clinical and pathophysiological similarities between both disorders, and both respond similarly to commonly used drugs, their primary difference being the presence or absence of pain, albeit not in an "all or nothing" manner. Severity depends not only upon bowel symptom intensity but also upon other biopsychosocial factors (association of gastrointestinal and extraintestinal symptoms, grade of involvement, and perception and behavior variants). Functional bowel disorders are diagnosed using the Rome criteria. This Clinical Practice Guideline has been made consistent with the Rome IV criteria, which were published late in May 2016, and discuss alarm criteria, diagnostic tests, and referral criteria between Primary Care and gastroenterology settings. Furthermore, all the available treatment options (exercise, fluid ingestion, diet with soluble fiber-rich foods, fiber supplementation, other dietary components, osmotic or stimulating laxatives, probiotics, antibiotics, spasmolytics, peppermint essence, prucalopride, linaclotide, lubiprostone, biofeedback

  4. Clinical Practice Guideline: Irritable bowel syndrome with constipation and functional constipation in the adult.

    PubMed

    Mearin, Fermín; Ciriza, Constanza; Mínguez, Miguel; Rey, Enrique; Mascort, Juan José; Peña, Enrique; Cañones, Pedro; Júdez, Javier

    2016-06-01

    In this Clinical Practice Guideline we discuss the diagnostic and therapeutic approach of adult patients with constipation and abdominal complaints at the confluence of the irritable bowel syndrome spectrum and functional constipation. Both conditions are included among the functional bowel disorders, and have a significant personal, healthcare, and social impact, affecting the quality of life of the patients who suffer from them. The first one is the irritable bowel syndrome subtype, where constipation represents the predominant complaint, in association with recurrent abdominal pain, bloating, and abdominal distension. Constipation is characterized by difficulties with or low frequency of bowel movements, often accompanied by straining during defecation or a feeling of incomplete evacuation. Most cases have no underlying medical cause, and are therefore considered as a functional bowel disorder. There are many clinical and pathophysiological similarities between both disorders, and both respond similarly to commonly used drugs, their primary difference being the presence or absence of pain, albeit not in an "all or nothing" manner. Severity depends not only upon bowel symptom intensity but also upon other biopsychosocial factors (association of gastrointestinal and extraintestinal symptoms, grade of involvement, and perception and behavior variants). Functional bowel disorders are diagnosed using the Rome criteria. This Clinical Practice Guideline has been made consistent with the Rome IV criteria, which were published late in May 2016, and discuss alarm criteria, diagnostic tests, and referral criteria between Primary Care and gastroenterology settings. Furthermore, all the available treatment options (exercise, fluid ingestion, diet with soluble fiber-rich foods, fiber supplementation, other dietary components, osmotic or stimulating laxatives, probiotics, antibiotics, spasmolytics, peppermint essence, prucalopride, linaclotide, lubiprostone, biofeedback

  5. Five Year Follow-Up of a Randomized Controlled Trial on Warming and Humidification of Insufflation Gas in Laparoscopic Colonic Surgery—Impact on Small Bowel Obstruction and Oncologic Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Sammour, Tarik; Hill, Andrew G.

    2015-01-01

    Warming and humidification of insufflation gas has been shown to reduce adhesion formation and tumor implantation in the laboratory setting, but clinical evidence is lacking. We aimed to test the hypothesis that warming and humidification of insufflation CO2 would lead to reduced adhesion formation, and improve oncologic outcomes in laparoscopic colonic surgery. This was a 5-year follow-up of a multicenter, double-blinded, randomized, controlled trial investigating warming and humidification of insufflation gas. The study group received warmed (37°C), humidified (98%) insufflation carbon dioxide, and the control group received standard gas (19°C, 0%). All other aspects of patient care were standardized. Admissions for small bowel obstruction were recorded, as well as whether management was operative or nonoperative. Local and systemic cancer recurrence, 5-year overall survival, and cancer specific survival rates were also recorded. Eighty two patients were randomized, with 41 in each arm. Groups were well matched at baseline. There was no difference between the study and control groups in the rate of clinical small bowel obstruction (5.7% versus 0%, P 0.226); local recurrence (6.5% versus 6.1%, P 1.000); overall survival (85.7% versus 82.1%, P 0.759); or cancer-specific survival (90.3% versus 87.9%, P 1.000). Warming and humidification of insufflation CO2 in laparoscopic colonic surgery does not appear to confer a clinically significant long term benefit in terms of adhesion reduction or oncological outcomes, although a much larger randomized controlled trial (RCT) would be required to confirm this. ClinicalTrials.gov Trial identifier: NCT00642005; US National Library of Medicine, 8600 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20894, USA. PMID:25875541

  6. Twin pregnancy complicated with bowel strangulation

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Tze Fang; Imai, Shunichi; Tomita, Masato

    2014-01-01

    A 31-year-old primigravida at 35 weeks of gestation with twins who had no prior abdominal surgical history presented with worsening nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain. Initial screening ruled out obstetrical causes that may threaten the pregnancy. Twelve hours after the onset of symptoms, a transabdominal ultrasound revealed abdominal free fluid. A CT scan confirmed strangulated ileus involving the small bowels. Owing to non-reassuring fetal status in one of the twins, an emergency caesarean section and subsequent laparotomy were performed. The first twin presenting with fetal distress had to be resuscitated postdelivery but recovered uneventfully and met all developmental milestones by 3 months of age. The mother had a strangulated small bowel that had to be resected. She had an uncomplicated postsurgical course and gained full bowel function prior to discharge from the hospital. PMID:25199197

  7. Postinfectious irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Spiller, Robin C

    2003-05-01

    A small but significant subgroup of patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) report a sudden onset of their IBS symptoms after a bout of gastroenteritis. Population-based surveys show that although a history of neurotic and psychologic disorders, pain-related diseases, and gastroenteritis are all risk factors for developing IBS, gastroenteritis is the most potent. More toxigenic organisms increase the risk 11-fold, as does an initial illness lasting more than 3 weeks. Hypochondriasis and adverse life events double the risk for postinfective (PI)-IBS and may account for the increased proportion of women who develop this syndrome. PI-IBS is associated with modest increases in mucosal T lymphocytes and serotonin-containing enteroendocrine cells. Animal models and some preliminary human data suggest this leads to excessive serotonin release from the mucosa. Both the histologic changes and symptoms in humans may last for many years with only 40% recovering over a 6-year follow-up. Celiac disease, microscopic colitis, lactose intolerance, early stage Crohn's disease, and bile salt malabsorption should be excluded, as should colon cancer in those over the age of 45 years or in those with a positive family history. Treatment with Loperamide, low-fiber diets, and bile salt- binding therapy may help some patients. Serotonin antagonists are logical treatments but have yet to be evaluated. PMID:12761724

  8. Massive large-bowel haemorrhage.

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, P.; Thomas, P. A.

    1981-01-01

    Operative intervention for massive colonic haemorrhage is fortunately rarely necessary, but planned, low-risk segmental resections can only be performed if the bleeding site is known. This information can most frequently be obtained by using a combination of sigmoidoscopy, barium enema examination, and selective mesenteric angiography. PMID:6972724

  9. Diagnosis of Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Winslow LLC, U.S. Govt. has certain rights Lower GI series A lower GI series , also called a Barium Enema, uses x- ... look at your large intestine . During a lower GI series, you’ll be asked to lie on ...

  10. Forensic application of ESEM and XRF-EDS techniques to a fatal case of sodium phosphate enema intoxication.

    PubMed

    Viel, G; Cecchetto, G; Fabbri, L D; Furlan, C; Ferrara, S D; Montisci, M

    2009-07-01

    Sodium phosphate enemas and laxatives are widely used for the treatment of constipation, even if a number of cases of significant toxicity due to alterations of the fluid and electrolyte equilibria (hypernatremia, hyperphosphatemia, and hypocalcemia) have been reported. We present the case of an 83-year-old man who died of fecal and chemical peritonitis secondary to an iatrogenic colon perforation (produced performing a Fleet enema through the patient's iliac colostomy) with peritoneal absorption of sodium phosphate. Environmental scanning electron microscopy coupled with an X-ray fluorescence energy dispersive spectrometry discovered multiple bright crystals formed of calcium, phosphorus, and oxygen in the brain, heart, lung, and kidney sections of the victim. The absence of these kinds of precipitates in two control samples chronically treated with Fleet enemas led us to assume that the deceased had adsorbed a great quantity of phosphorus ions from the peritoneal cavity with subsequent systemic dissemination and precipitation of calcium phosphate bindings. PMID:19347348

  11. Colon polyp morphology on double-contrast berium enema: its pathologic predictive value

    SciTech Connect

    Ott, D.J.; Gelfand, D.W.; Wu, W.C.; Ablin, D.S.

    1983-11-01

    The morphologic appearance of 96 polyps seen on double-contrast barium enema was reviewed to assess the predictive value of various signs described to diagnose malignancy. Size, surface contour, basal indentation, and pedunculation were studied. Sessile polyps had an appreciable incidence of malignancy, with size being the best indicator of that risk. Pedunculation was found to be a reliable sign of benignity in predicting the absence of malignant invasion into the adjacent colonic wall. Polyps under 1 cm and having a smooth contour were invariably benign. Conversely, polyps larger than 1 cm with a lobulated contour and basal indentation had a significant incidence of malignancy.

  12. Irritable bowel syndrome - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) may be a lifelong condition. You may be suffering from cramping and loose stools, diarrhea, constipation, or some combination of these symptoms. For some people, IBS symptoms may interfere with work, travel, and attending ...

  13. Are Your Bowels Moving?

    MedlinePlus

    ... how to prevent accidents in the future. continue Diarrhea Diarrhea means you have to move your bowels often, ... eat or if you're taking certain medicines. Diarrhea also can happen when you don't wash ...

  14. Daily bowel care program

    MedlinePlus

    ... a brain or spinal cord injury. People with multiple sclerosis also have problems with their bowels. Symptoms may ... PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2010:chap 17. Read More Multiple sclerosis Recovering after stroke Patient Instructions Constipation - self-care ...

  15. [Short bowel: from resection to transplantation].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Montes, José Antonio

    2014-09-17

    Short bowel syndrome (SBS) is characterized by a significant reduction in the effective intestinal surface by an anatomical or functional loss of the small intestine. It mainly occurs after extensive bowel resection, intestinal intrinsic disease or surgical bypass. The main complications are malabsorption, maldigestion, malnutrition, dehydratation and, potentially, lethal metabolic lesions. The treatment is based on appropiate, individualized nutritional support; however, the most recent outcomes on bowel transplantation (BT) and a great rate of survivors achieving complete digestive autonomy and able to carry out activities according to their age allow for considering BT as the first choice therapy in patients with irreversible intestinal failure in whom poor prognosis with parenteral nutrition is foreseen. In this paper the most outstanding aspects of SBS are revised.

  16. Role of water-soluble enema before takedown of diverting ileostomy for low pelvic anastomosis.

    PubMed

    Karsten, Benjamin J; King, Justin B; Kumar, Ravin R

    2009-10-01

    The integrity of a low pelvic anastomosis is often studied radiographically before takedown of a diverting ileostomy. The aim of this study is to determine the impact of routine water-soluble enema studies (WSE) in our patient population with low pelvic anastomosis. We retrospectively reviewed the operative database for a county teaching hospital from 1998 to 2008. All patients with low pelvic anastomosis (ultralow colorectal, coloanal, and ileoanal pouch anastomosis) with diverting ileostomy who underwent subsequent takedown were identified. Fifty patients met inclusion criteria. Thirty-eight patients were evaluated by WSE and 12 were not. Twenty-five patients (66%) were noted to have normal WSE studies before ostomy takedown. Thirteen patients (26%) were noted to have abnormalities on WSE. Two stenoses were clinically significant. Water-soluble enema study was 100 per cent sensitive and 69 per cent specific for detecting significant pathology. Digital rectal examination (DRE), colonoscopy, and flexible sigmoidoscopy were also 100 per cent sensitive in detecting substantial pathology. Routine use of WSE failed to demonstrate a significant impact on patients with low pelvic anastomosis undergoing ileostomy takedown. Routine DRE and rigid proctoscopy can be used to evaluate low pelvic anastomosis. WSE can be used selectively on patients with abnormal findings. PMID:19886140

  17. [Traditional enema for newborns and infants in Bobo Dioulasso: health practice or socialisation].

    PubMed

    Huygens, Pierre; Konaté, Blahima; Traoré, Abdullaye; Barennes, Hubert

    2002-01-01

    Kanki demonstrated a high prevalence and frequency of enema practised with newborns in the South-West of Burkina Faso. Little is known about the risks on children's health possibly associated with this practice and about its impact on other treatments in paediatrics. In this study, the authors describe daily administered enema (DAE) and analyse local conceptual frameworks underlying this practice through in-depth-interviews and focus group discussions with 30 mothers, 5 traditional healers and 5 health agents. Various medications are used to compose the liquid introduced by the mothers in the child's anus. Many of these substances are prone to irritate intestinal mucus, others are simply toxic. Practically, enema aims at curing or preventing a variety of diseases caused by an accumulation of impurities (nògò) in the intestines due to the consumption of inappropriate food. With newborns, diseases are transmitted by mothers through breastfeeding after eating food which is too sweet or too fat. In addition to provoking diseases, the nògò also "block" the child's physical and psychic development during his/her first year of life. Therefore, as soon as the child has excreted for the first time, most mothers give enema daily both to protect their children from diseases and to speed their development. In fact, beside prophylaxy and therapy lies a "didactic" function of enema as a medication used to help the child to stand up, to get teeth..., to gain independence from his/her mother. DAE therefore plays an important role in the process of acquiring bio-social aptitudes, i.e., important educational virtues to achieve a successful first step in the socialisation process. Exploring more deeply local perceptions explaining the origin of the n g , the authors found an interesting relationship with religious taboos. Beside prohibited food, the n g are also due to transgression of various taboos surrounding birth and breastfeeding and even suggest a religious, rather than

  18. Video capsule endoscopy in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Collins, Paul D

    2016-07-25

    Video capsule endoscopy (VCE) has evolved to become an important tool for the non-invasive examination of the small bowel, which hitherto had been relatively inaccessible to direct visualisation. VCE has been shown to play a role in monitoring the activity of small bowel Crohn's disease and can be used to assess the response to anti-inflammatory treatment in Crohn's disease. For those patients with Crohn's disease who have undergone an intestinal resection, VCE has been assessed as a tool to detect post-operative recurrence. VCE may also aid in the reclassification of patients with a diagnosis of Inflammatory Bowel Disease Unclassified to Crohn's disease. The evolution of colon capsule endoscopy (CCE) has expanded the application of this technology further. The use of CCE to assess the activity of ulcerative colitis has been described. This advance in capsule technology has also fuelled interest in its potential role as a minimally invasive tool to assess the whole of GI tract opening the possibility of its use for the panenteric assessment of Crohn's disease. VCE is a safe procedure. However, the risk of a retained capsule is higher in patients with suspected or confirmed Crohn's disease compared with patients having VCE examination for other indications. A retained video capsule is rare after successful passage of a patency capsule which may be utilised to pre-screen patients undergoing VCE. This paper describes the use of VCE in the assessment of inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:27499830

  19. [Ileal carcinoid tumors. Value of small intestine transit].

    PubMed

    Mugel-Riwer, B; Bersani, D; Mugel, J L

    1983-05-01

    The authors describe two personnel observations of ileal carcinoid tumors, demonstrated by double contrast small bowel examination. Confirmation came from operation and histology. Small bowel examination can demonstrate limited carcinoid tumors giving no angiographic traduction.

  20. Clinical evaluation of Basti administered by Basti Putak (Pressure method), Enema pot method (Gravity fed method), and syringe method in Kshinashukra (Oligozoospermia)

    PubMed Central

    Juneja, Yashwant M.; Thakar, Anup B.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine which method of administration of Basti is more efficacious. The study design was open randomized clinical trial and main outcome measures are Administration time, Retention time, Pervasion of Basti, Semenogram study, and Sexual parameters. The result: Sperm count was increased by 70.75% in Basti putak group and 54.07% in Enema pot group. Overall average retention time of Asthapana Basti and Anuvasana Basti was 1.5 times more in Basti putak group than the Enema pot group. The conclusion of this study was that Basti putak is more efficacious than Enema pot method. PMID:22408309

  1. Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation response plays an important role in host survival, and it also leads to acute and chronic inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, bowel diseases, allergic rhinitis, asthma, atopic dermatitis and various neurodegenerative diseases. During the course of inflammation, the ROS level increases. In addition to ROS, several inflammatory mediators produced at the site lead to numerous cell-mediated damages. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, is a chronic intestinal disorder resulting from a dysfunctional epithelial, innate and adaptive immune response to intestinal microorganisms. The methods involving indomethacin-induced enterocolitis in rats with macroscopic changes of IBD, myeloperoxidase assay, microscopic (histologic) characters and biochemical parameters are discussed.

  2. Congenital Mesenteric Defect: An Uncommon Cause of Bowel Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Benyamini, Pouya; Lopez, Sarah; Cooper, Matthew; Mohamad, Osama

    2016-01-01

    Congenital mesenteric defects can lead to internal hernias which may result in a bowel obstruction. They are very rare among the adult population, comprising only 0.2%–0.9% incidence rate of all small bowel obstructions. A 40 year old woman presented to the Emergency Department with abdominal pain.Computed tomography scan was obtained and showed a small bowel obstruction.After failed conservative management with bowel rest and nasogastric tube decompression, the patient underwentdiagnostic laparoscopy.An internal hernia was identified though a congenital mesenteric defect at the level of the sigmoid colon. The hernia was reduced and the defect closed. When a patient presents with abdominal pain the diagnosis of a congenital mesenteric defect with internal hernia should be considered with subsequent emergent surgical exploration. PMID:26918208

  3. Effect of traditional Chinese medicinal enemas on ulcerative colitis of rats

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Song-Ming; Tong, Hong-Bin; Bai, Lian-Song; Yang, Wei

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of traditional Chinese medicinal enema (TCME) on inflammatory and immune response of colonic mucosa of rats with ulcerative colitis (UC), and to observe the pathogenic mechanism. METHODS: Thirty UC rats, induced by intestinal enema together with 2.4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB) and acetic acid, were randomly divided into 3 groups, i.e., G I, G II and G III. Groups G I and G II were administered with TCME and salazosulfapyridine enema (SASPE), respectively. Group G III was clystered with only normal saline (NSE), served as control. Group G IV was taken from normal rats as reference, once daily, from the 7th day after the establishment of UC for total 28 d. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) in the colonic mucosa was assayed by 3H-TdR incorporation assay. Colonic mucosal lymphocyte subpopulation adhesive molecules, CD4+CD11a+, CD4+CD18+, CD8+CD11a+, CD8+CD18+ (LSAM), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and interferon-γ (IFN-γ), were detected by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Moreover, the expression of TNF-α mRNA and IFN-γ mRNA in colonic mucosa were detected by polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). RESULTS: Before therapies, in model groups, G I, G II and G III, levels of IL-6, TNF-α, IFN-γ, CD8+CD11a+ and CD8+CD18+ were significantly different (38.29 ± 2.61 U/mL, 16.54 ± 1.23 ng/L, 8.61 ± 0.89 ng/L, 13.51% ± 2.31% and 12.22% ± 1.13%, respectively) compared to those in G IV group (31.56 ± 2.47 U/mL, 12.81 ± 1.38 ng/L, 5.28 ± 0.56 ng/L, 16.68% ± 1.41% and 16.79% ± 1.11%, respectively). After therapeutic enemas, in G I group, the contents of IL-6 (32.48 ± 2.53 U/m), TNF-α (13.42 ± 1.57 ng/L) and IFN-γ (5.87 ± 0.84 ng/L) were reduced; then, the contents of CD8+CD11a+ (16.01% ± 1.05 %) and CD8+CD18+ (16.28% ± 0.19%) were raised. There was no significant difference between groups G I and G IV, but the difference between groups G I and G II was quite obvious (P < 0.05). The expressions of TNF-α mRNA and IFN-γ mRNA in group G

  4. [Diagnostic tools in inflammatory bowel diseases].

    PubMed

    Bouhnik, Yoram

    2005-05-15

    The two major inflammatory bowel diseases, Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), represent clinicopathologic entities that traditionally have been diagnosed on the basis of a combination of clinical, radiologic, endoscopic, and histologic features. The presence of an inflammatory syndrome associated with typical clinical manifestations must lead to perform endoscopic examinations. Ileocolonoscopy plays an integral role in establishing the diagnosis, excluding other etiologies, distinguishing Crohn's disease from ulcerative colitis, defining the patterns, extent, and activity of mucosal inflammation, and obtaining mucosal tissue for histologic evaluation of inflammatory bowel disease. Small bowel follow through is still a major examination. However, the role of CT and MRI (using enteroclysis) in the imaging of inflammatory bowel disease has also increased in importance. Capsule endoscopy could be a valuable diagnostic tool in patients with suspected Crohn's disease that has not been confirmed using standard imaging techniques. Serum perinuclear antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (pANCA) and anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae antibodies (ASCA) have recently been added to our diagnostic armamentarium. Serology may prove to be useful in predicting the evolution of indeterminate colitis. Substantial progress could come from the improving of serologic and genetic tests in the future. PMID:16052968

  5. Management of inflammatory bowel diseases in Eastern Europe.

    PubMed

    Lakatos, L; Lakatos, P L

    2006-04-01

    Limited data are available on the management of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) in East European countries. The diagnostic tools and most treatment options are also available in Eastern Europe. The diagnostic procedures commonly used became more sophisticated in the past few years, with a greater use of computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging and serology testing; however, double contrast barium enema, enteroclysis, and endoscopy remained standard. The medical therapy and surgical strategies are also somewhat different from those applied in Western countries. In ulcerative colitis, besides mesalazine, the use of sulphasalazine is still frequent, while azathioprine is only used in a minority of patients. The use of conventional corticosteroids is common and the rate of non-colorectal cancer associated colectomies is low. In contrast, 5-aminosalicylates are still used for maintenance in Crohn's disease and azathioprine is generally less frequently given compared with Western Europe. Biological agents have also become available about five years ago, yet their use is restricted mainly to specialised centres. PMID:16597815

  6. Pilot study: a randomised, double blind, placebo controlled trial of pancrealipase for the treatment of postprandial irritable bowel syndrome-diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    Money, Mary E; Walkowiak, Jaroslaw; Virgilio, Chris; Talley, Nicholas J

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the efficacy of pancrealipase (PEZ) compared with placebo in the reduction of postprandial irritable bowel syndrome-diarrhoea (IBS-D). DESIGN: An intention to treat, double blind, randomised, crossover trial comparing PEZ to placebo for reduction of postprandial IBS-D. Patients had to recognise at least two different triggering foods, be willing to consume six baseline 'trigger meals' and again blinded with PEZ and placebo. Patients then chose which drug they preferred for another 25 meals. SETTING: Outpatient internal medicine practice clinic. PATIENTS: 255 patients were screened; 83 met the criteria, including 5 years of symptoms, recognised 'food triggers', no other identifiable cause for the symptoms, either a normal colonoscopy or barium enema while symptomatic and able to discontinue all anticholinergic medications. 69 patients were enrolled, 20 withdrew before randomisation, leaving 49 patients: 14 men, 35 women, mean age 52 years (SD 15.3). Over 60% had experienced symptoms for 11-30 years and 16% for more than 40 years. INTERVENTIONS: After completing six baseline meals, patients were randomised in blocks of four to receive either identical PEZ or a placebo for another six meals, and after a washout period of time received the alternative drug. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary analysis was number of patients who chose PEZ over placebo for the extended use. RESULTS: Overall, 30/49 (61%) would have chosen PEZ (p=0.078), with first drug preference for PEZ at 0.002. Among the PEZ subgroup, PEZ use compared with placebo, demonstrated improvement in all symptoms (p≤0.001) for cramping, bloating, borborygami, urge to defecate, global pain and decrease stooling with increase in stool firmness. CONCLUSIONS: PEZ was found in a small group of patients to reduce postprandial IBS-D symptoms and deserves further evaluation. PMID:22095308

  7. Diagnostic accuracy of the double-contrast enema for colonic polyps in patients with or without diverticular disease.

    PubMed

    Morosi, C; Ballardini, G; Pisani, P; Bellomi, M; Cozzi, G; Vidale, M; Spinelli, P; Severini, A

    1991-01-01

    The accuracy of the double-contrast enema for the diagnosis of polypoid lesions in the presence or absence of diverticula was evaluated by retrospectively reviewing the medical records of 202 patients subjected to examination and endoscopy. Analysis of the data on 215 polypoid lesions showed that (a) the diagnostic accuracy of the examination is not affected significantly by the presence of diverticula; (b) the sensitivity of the examination is highly dependent on the size of the polyps (smaller or larger than 0.5 cm) but not on the form (sessile or pedunculated); and (c) the positive predictive value is higher in patients without diverticula. The double-contrast enema was confirmed to be a valid method for the diagnosis of polypoid lesions.

  8. [Colonic radiography by double-contrast enema in the elderly patient with the use of trimebutine maleate].

    PubMed

    Natoli, A; Branca, S; Granata, A; Lavagnini, L

    1992-04-01

    About 15% of hospitalizations of patients over 65 are due to disorders of the colon which means that accurate analysis of history and clinical and instrumental investigation are mandatory. Our attention has been focused on x-ray examination using a double-contrast enema which, together with endoscopy, permits to diagnose colonic disorders with significant reliability. Our aim was to adapt the method to the special needs of the patient over 65 by employing the active substance trimebutine maleate (M.T.) as a "contact" pressure-lowering agent. Thirty-five subjects aged 65-75 with pathologies implying a risk for the use of parasympatholytic agents were examined. None of these patients showed side effects. It can therefore be said that the use of M.T. as a hypotonic agent in double-contrast enemas is an indisputable diagnostic aid. PMID:1587122

  9. A scoring system for the prognosis and treatment of malignant bowel obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Jon C.; Pouly, Severin; Sullivan, Rachael; Sharif, Suhail; Klemanski, Dori; Abdel-Misih, Sherif; Arradaza, Nicole; Jarjoura, David; Schmidt, Carl; Bloomston, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Background Malignant bowel obstruction is a common result of end-stage abdominal cancer that is a treatment dilemma for many physicians. Little has been reported predicting outcomes or determining the role of surgical intervention. We sought to review our experience with surgical and nonsurgical management of malignant bowel obstruction to identify predictors of 30-day mortality and of who would most likely benefit from surgical intervention. Methods A chart review of 523 patients treated between 2000 and 2007 with malignant bowel obstruction were evaluated for factors present at admission to determine return to oral intake, 30-day mortality, and overall survival. Propensity score matching was used to homogenize patients treated with and without surgery to identify those who would benefit most from operative intervention. Results Radiographic evidence of large bowel obstruction was predictive of return to oral intake. Hypoalbuminemia and radiographic evidence of ascites or carcinomatosis were all predictive of increased 30-day mortality and overall survival. A nomogram of 5 identified risk factors correlated with increased 30-day mortality independent of therapy. Patients with large bowel or partial small bowel obstruction benefited most from surgery. A second nomogram was created from 4 identified risk factors that revealed which patients with complete small bowel obstruction might benefit from surgery. Conclusion Two nomograms were created that may guide decisions in the care of patients with malignant bowel obstruction. These nomograms are able to predict 30-day mortality and who may benefit from surgery for small bowel obstruction. PMID:22929404

  10. Butyrate enemas enhance both cholinergic and nitrergic phenotype of myenteric neurons and neuromuscular transmission in newborn rat colon.

    PubMed

    Suply, Etienne; de Vries, Philine; Soret, Rodolphe; Cossais, François; Neunlist, Michel

    2012-06-15

    Postnatal changes in the enteric nervous system (ENS) are involved in the establishment of colonic motility. In adult rats, butyrate induced neuroplastic changes in the ENS, leading to enhanced colonic motility. Whether butyrate can induce similar changes during the postnatal period remains unknown. Enemas (Na-butyrate) were performed daily in rat pups between postnatal day (PND) 7 and PND 17. Effects of butyrate were evaluated on morphological and histological parameters in the distal colon at PND 21. The neurochemical phenotype of colonic submucosal and myenteric neurons was analyzed using antibodies against Hu, choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS). Colonic motility and neuromuscular transmission was assessed in vivo and ex vivo. Butyrate (2.5 mM) enemas had no impact on pup growth and histological parameters compared with control. Butyrate did not modify the number of Hu-immunoreactive (IR) neurons per ganglia. A significant increase in the proportion (per Hu-IR neurons) of nNOS-IR myenteric and submucosal neurons and ChAT-IR myenteric neurons was observed in the distal colon after butyrate enemas compared with control. In addition, butyrate induced a significant increase in both nitrergic and cholinergic components of the neuromuscular transmission compared with control. Finally, butyrate increased distal colonic transit time compared with control. We concluded that butyrate enemas induced neuroplastic changes in myenteric and submucosal neurons, leading to changes in gastrointestinal functions. Our results support exploration of butyrate as potential therapy for motility disorders in preterm infants with delayed maturation of the ENS.

  11. [Selective bowel decontamination].

    PubMed

    Szántó, Zoltán; Pulay, István; Kotsis, Lajos; Dinka, Tibor

    2006-04-01

    Infective complications play major role in mortality of high risk patients demanding intensive care. Selective Bowel Decontamination prevents endogenous infections by reducing the number of potentially pathogen microbes (aerobic bacteria, fungi) in the oropharynx and gastrointestinal tract, saving anaerobic bacteria. It had been used 20 years ago for the first time. Authors survey it's literature ever since. Selective Bowel Decontamination is performed by the mixture of antibiotics and antimycotic drug, administered orally in hydrogel, and suspension form in nasojejunal tube. The number of Gram negative optional aerobic bacteria and fungi decrease significantly in the gut, and the microbial translocation is following this tendency. Foreign authors achieved good results in acute necrotizing pancreatitis, after liver transplant, in polytrauma, in serious burn and in haematological malignancies. According to the literature Selective Bowel Decontamination shows advantages in selected groups of high risk surgical patients. In some studies the administration took few months, but the minimum time was one week. There was no report of increasing MRSA appearance. Regular bacteriological sampling is highly recommended in order to recognize any new antibiotic resistance in time. PMID:16711371

  12. Identification of a Functional TPH1 Polymorphism Associated with Irritable Bowel Syndrome Bowel Habit Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Grasberger, Helmut; Chang, Lin; Shih, Wendy; Presson, Angela P.; Sayuk, Gregory S.; Newberry, Rodney D.; Karagiannides, Iordanis; Pothoulakis, Charalabos; Mayer, Emeran; Merchant, Juanita L.

    2014-01-01

    Background & Aims Alterations in 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) signaling have been implicated as a factor contributing to the altered bowel habit of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) patients. Tryptophan hydroxylase 1 (TPH1) is the rate–limiting enzyme in enterochromaffin cell 5-HT biosynthesis. We hypothesized that genetic variants affecting TPH1 gene expression might alter intestinal 5-HT bioavailability and subsequently the propensity for distinct bowel habit subtypes in IBS. In this study, we assessed the only common TPH1 proximal promoter variant (-347C/A; rs7130929) and its association with bowel habit predominance in IBS. Methods Electrophoretic mobility shift assays were performed to assess whether the -347C/A allele variant affects the DNA-binding of nuclear factors. Genotype distribution was determined for 422 IBS patients subtyped using Rome III criteria and for 495 healthy controls recruited from two university medical centers. Association with bowel habit was tested using a multinomial logistic regression model controlling for race, anxiety, depression, and study site. Results Early growth response factor 1 (EGR-1) bound with higher affinity to a site comprising the minor A-allele of SNP -347C/A. TPH1 genotype frequencies did not differ between IBS patients and controls overall. The CC genotype was more prevalent in the IBS-D subtype (47%) than in the IBS-C (25%) and IBS-M (37%) subtypes (P=0.039) after adjusting for race and other covariates. Colonic biopsies from a small cohort of IBS patients from one center were tested for higher TPH1 mRNA expression in samples with CC compared to CA genotype, but the results did not reach statistical significance. Conclusions The TPH1 promoter SNP -347C/A differentially binds EGR1, correlates with IBS bowel habit subtypes and possibly colonic TPH1 expression consistent with its role in modulating intestinal 5-HT signaling. PMID:24060757

  13. Diet in irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    El-Salhy, Magdy; Gundersen, Doris

    2015-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common chronic gastrointestinal disorder that is characterized by intermittent abdominal pain/discomfort, altered bowel habits and abdominal bloating/distension. This review aimed at presenting the recent developments concerning the role of diet in the pathophysiology and management of IBS. There is no convincing evidence that IBS patients suffer from food allergy/intolerance, and there is no evidence that gluten causes the debated new diagnosis of non-coeliac gluten sensitivity (NCGS). The component in wheat that triggers symptoms in NCGS appears to be the carbohydrates. Patients with NCGS appear to be IBS patients who are self-diagnosed and self-treated with a gluten-free diet. IBS symptoms are triggered by the consumption of the poorly absorbed fermentable oligo-, di-, monosaccharides and polyols (FODMAPs) and insoluble fibre. On reaching the distal small intestine and colon, FODMAPS and insoluble fibre increase the osmotic pressure in the large-intestine lumen and provide a substrate for bacterial fermentation, with consequent gas production, abdominal distension and abdominal pain or discomfort. Poor FODMAPS and insoluble fibres diet reduces the symptom and improve the quality of life in IBS patients. Moreover, it changes favourably the intestinal microbiota and restores the abnormalities in the gastrointestinal endocrine cells. Five gastrointestinal endocrine cell types that produce hormones regulating appetite and food intake are abnormal in IBS patients. Based on these hormonal abnormalities, one would expect that IBS patients to have increased food intake and body weight gain. However, the link between obesity and IBS is not fully studied. Individual dietary guidance for intake of poor FODMAPs and insoluble fibres diet in combination with probiotics intake and regular exercise is to be recommended for IBS patients.

  14. Surgical strategies in paediatric inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Baillie, Colin T; Smith, Jennifer A

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) comprises two distinct but related chronic relapsing inflammatory conditions affecting different parts of the gastrointestinal tract. Crohn’s disease is characterised by a patchy transmural inflammation affecting both small and large bowel segments with several distinct phenotypic presentations. Ulcerative colitis classically presents as mucosal inflammation of the rectosigmoid (distal colitis), variably extending in a contiguous manner more proximally through the colon but not beyond the caecum (pancolitis). This article highlights aspects of the presentation, diagnosis, and management of IBD that have relevance for paediatric practice with particular emphasis on surgical considerations. Since 25% of IBD cases present in childhood or teenage years, the unique considerations and challenges of paediatric management should be widely appreciated. Conversely, we argue that the organizational separation of the paediatric and adult healthcare worlds has often resulted in late adoption of new approaches particularly in paediatric surgical practice. PMID:26034347

  15. [SHORT BOWEL SYNDROME AND NUTRITIONAL ENTERAL].

    PubMed

    Ariadel Cobo, Diana; Pereira Cunill, José Luis; Socas Macías, María; Serrano Aguayo, Pilar; Gómez Liébana, Eulalia; Morales Conde, Salvador; García Luna, Pedro Pablo

    2015-01-01

    The particularity of this case is the nutritional management that has managed to avoid the use of prolonged parenteral nutrition and possible complications by placing jejunal tube at the distal end in patients with short bowel. It is a 34-year-old colecistectomizado complicated with postoperative peritonitis and dehiscence; two years he studied with small bowel obstruction, he was made de-volvulus and was complicated with two leak at different times after the second escape took place jejunostomy side double barreled shotgun level dehiscence, presented high debits by afferent loop of the terminal jejunostomy; during admission, polyurethane probe enteral feeding was inserted by the efferent loop jejunostomy. He received jejunal tube feeding laundry in the efferent loop terminal with decreased weight gain and subsequent reconstruction of intestinal transit debit proximal jejunostomy. PMID:26667759

  16. [SHORT BOWEL SYNDROME AND NUTRITIONAL ENTERAL].

    PubMed

    Ariadel Cobo, Diana; Pereira Cunill, José Luis; Socas Macías, María; Serrano Aguayo, Pilar; Gómez Liébana, Eulalia; Morales Conde, Salvador; García Luna, Pedro Pablo

    2015-12-01

    The particularity of this case is the nutritional management that has managed to avoid the use of prolonged parenteral nutrition and possible complications by placing jejunal tube at the distal end in patients with short bowel. It is a 34-year-old colecistectomizado complicated with postoperative peritonitis and dehiscence; two years he studied with small bowel obstruction, he was made de-volvulus and was complicated with two leak at different times after the second escape took place jejunostomy side double barreled shotgun level dehiscence, presented high debits by afferent loop of the terminal jejunostomy; during admission, polyurethane probe enteral feeding was inserted by the efferent loop jejunostomy. He received jejunal tube feeding laundry in the efferent loop terminal with decreased weight gain and subsequent reconstruction of intestinal transit debit proximal jejunostomy.

  17. Multicentre, open-label, randomised, parallel-group, superiority study to compare the efficacy of octreotide therapy 40 mg monthly versus standard of care in patients with refractory anaemia due to gastrointestinal bleeding from small bowel angiodysplasias: a protocol of the OCEAN trial

    PubMed Central

    van Geenen, E J M; Drenth, J P H

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Gastrointestinal angiodysplasias are an important cause of difficult-to-manage bleeding, especially in older patients. Endoscopic coagulation of angiodysplasias is the mainstay of treatment, but may be difficult for small bowel angiodysplasias because of the inability to reach them for endoscopic intervention. Some patients are red blood cell (RBC) transfusion dependent due to frequent rebleeding despite endoscopic treatment. In small cohort studies, octreotide appears to decrease the number of bleeding episodes in patients with RBC transfusion dependency due to gastrointestinal angiodysplasias. This trial will assess the efficacy of octreotide in decreasing the need for RBC transfusions and parenteral iron in patients with anaemia due to gastrointestinal bleeding of small bowel angiodysplasias despite endoscopic intervention. Study design Randomised controlled, superiority, open-label multicentre trial. Participants 62 patients will be included with refractory anaemia due to small bowel angiodysplasias, who are RBC transfusion or iron infusion dependent despite endoscopic intervention and oral iron supplementation. Intervention Patients will be randomly assigned (1:1) to standard care or 40 mg long-acting octreotide once every 4 weeks for 52 weeks, in addition to standard care. The follow-up period is 8 weeks. Main outcome measures The primary outcome is the difference in the number of blood and iron infusions between the year prior to inclusion and the treatment period of 1 year. Important secondary outcomes are the per cent change in the number of rebleeds from baseline to end point, adverse events and quality of life. Ethics and dissemination The trial received ethical approval from the Central Committee on Research Involving Human Subjects and from the local accredited Medical Research Ethics Committee of the region Arnhem-Nijmegen, the Netherlands (reference number: 2014-1433). Results will be published in a peer-reviewed journal and

  18. Small-bowel perforation after shockwave lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues Netto, Nelson; Ikonomidis, Jean A; Longo, José Antonio; Rodrigues Netto, Mauricio

    2003-11-01

    A 51-year-old woman with a history of stone disease sustained two 3 x 2-mm ileal perforations during SWL (6000 shockwaves; 0.33-0.42 mJ/mm2) for a 14 x 8-mm left-sided midureteral stone. Low energy levels should be applied when ureteral stones are treated by SWL with the patient prone.

  19. Small bowel Ascaris infestation: a diagnostic challenge

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Muhammad Waqas; Ghauri, Sanniya Khan

    2016-01-01

    Ascariasis is a common infestation in developing countries where there is poor hygiene. A majority of the cases are asymptomatic, with a few cases presenting with mild abdominal pain and nutritional deficiencies in the long term. Here we present a case of a young boy who presented as a diagnostic dilemma, with signs of acute intestinal obstruction without any supporting radiological evidence. A barium study revealed the presence of low-burden Ascaris infestation that was managed medically. PMID:27175091

  20. Small bowel perforation during suprapubic tube exchange.

    PubMed

    Mongiu, Anne K; Helfand, Brain T; Kielb, Stephanie J

    2009-02-01

    Suprapubic tube placement is a common urological procedure with a low incidence of complications, including hematuria, catheter blockage, recurrent urinary tract infections, and rarely, injury to adjacent organs. Fortunately, most serious complications are discovered shortly after initial suprapubic tube placement and are readily corrected. Very few cases of delayed complications or injuries have been reported. We report a case of Foley perforation into the ileum during suprapubic tube exchange discovered more than 8 months after initial placement, and preceding numerous monthly changes that occurred without incident. While a rare complication, physicians should be conscious of the potential for delayed injury in patients managed with long term suprapubic tube placement. PMID:19222896

  1. Video capsule endoscopy in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Paul D

    2016-01-01

    Video capsule endoscopy (VCE) has evolved to become an important tool for the non-invasive examination of the small bowel, which hitherto had been relatively inaccessible to direct visualisation. VCE has been shown to play a role in monitoring the activity of small bowel Crohn’s disease and can be used to assess the response to anti-inflammatory treatment in Crohn’s disease. For those patients with Crohn’s disease who have undergone an intestinal resection, VCE has been assessed as a tool to detect post-operative recurrence. VCE may also aid in the reclassification of patients with a diagnosis of Inflammatory Bowel Disease Unclassified to Crohn’s disease. The evolution of colon capsule endoscopy (CCE) has expanded the application of this technology further. The use of CCE to assess the activity of ulcerative colitis has been described. This advance in capsule technology has also fuelled interest in its potential role as a minimally invasive tool to assess the whole of GI tract opening the possibility of its use for the panenteric assessment of Crohn’s disease. VCE is a safe procedure. However, the risk of a retained capsule is higher in patients with suspected or confirmed Crohn’s disease compared with patients having VCE examination for other indications. A retained video capsule is rare after successful passage of a patency capsule which may be utilised to pre-screen patients undergoing VCE. This paper describes the use of VCE in the assessment of inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:27499830

  2. Rectal perforations and fistulae secondary to a glycerin enema: Closure by over-the-scope-clip

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Hirohito; Kobara, Hideki; Fujihara, Shintaro; Nishiyama, Noriko; Kobayashi, Mitsuyoshi; Masaki, Tsutomu; Izuishi, Kunihiko; Suzuki, Yasuyuki

    2012-01-01

    Rectal perforations due to glycerin enemas (GE) typically occur when the patient is in a seated or lordotic standing position. Once the perforation occurs and peritonitis results, death is usually inevitable. We describe two cases of rectal perforation and fistula caused by a GE. An 88-year-old woman presented with a large rectal perforation and a fistula just after receiving a GE. Her case was further complicated by an abscess in the right rectal wall. The second patient was a 78-year-old woman who suffered from a rectovesical fistula after a GE. In both cases, we performed direct endoscopic abscess lavage with a saline solution and closed the fistula using an over-the-scope-clip (OTSC) procedure. These procedures resulted in dramatic improvement in both patients. Direct endoscopic lavage and OTSC closure are very useful for pararectal abscess lavage and fistula closure, respectively, in elderly patients who are in poor general condition. Our two cases are the first reports of the successful endoscopic closure of fistulae using double OTSCs after endoscopic lavage of the debris and an abscess of the rectum secondary to a GE. PMID:22791955

  3. Reducing Antibiotic Use for Young Children with Intussusception following Successful Air Enema Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yinghui; Ye, Weimin; Chen, Xingdong; Liu, Qian; Liu, Huandi; Si, Chunfeng; Jia, Hongying

    2015-01-01

    China introduced a new policy regarding the management of antibiotic use. We evaluated the reasonableness of antibiotic use among children suffering from intussusception before and after policy. A retrospective study was conducted involving 234 young children with intussusception who were treated between January 1, 2011 and December 30, 2013. Demographics and detailed antibiotics regimens were collected. χ2 test was used to evaluate differences between the phase I (preintervention, n = 68) and phase II (postintervention, n = 166). We determined that the overall antibiotic use rate following successful air enema reduction was 41% (97/234), which decreased from 99% (67/68) in phase I to 18% (30/166) in phase II. In phase I, prophylactic antibiotic usage reached up to 84% (56/67). The quantity of aztreonam for injection accounted for 63% (45/71), and cefamandole nafate for injection accounted for 25% (18/71). In phases II, prophylactic antibiotic usage were reduced to 13% (4/30). The quantity of aztreonam for injection was decreased to 12% (4/33) and cefamandole nafate for injection was 3% (1/33). Antibiotics' options were more diverse. In conclusion, policy intervention was effective in addressing some aspects of antibacterial drug usage among young children with intussusception. However, excessive drug use remains a public health problem. The guidelines for the antibiotic management of intussusception for children must be established in China. PMID:26569111

  4. Effect of Basti (oil enema) therapy for the management of cough in pertussis.

    PubMed

    Gujarathi, Rahul H; Gokhale, Vivek M; Tongaonkar, Jayashree N

    2013-10-01

    Bordetella pertussis continues to circulate even in countries with good childhood vaccination coverage. Sporadic cases are still observed either due to no vaccination, incomplete vaccination or as a result of failure of vaccination. Though acute in nature it has a longer disease span with multiple life-threatening complications despite adequate management. This study was undertaken to study the effect of Sneha Basti (oil enema) in pertussis in relation to reduction in intensity of cough and complications of the disease when administered along with the conventional pharmacological therapy. Patients with the clinical picture mimicking pertussis were screened, investigated for pertussis and appropriate conventional pharmacological therapy of Erythromycin a preferred antimicrobial agent was started. Concurrently, Sneha Basti was administered to these two children. Both patients showed favourable results in terms of reduction of Kasa (cough) and the disease period with a faster recovery when compared to conventional therapy alone as has been observed routinely. No complications incurred during the complete disease span. It was concluded that if the pharmacological therapy is augmented with the complimentary systems of medicines, it can reduce the prolonged span and intensity of the disease and prevent other complications. PMID:24696577

  5. Bologna guidelines for diagnosis and management of adhesive small bowel obstruction (ASBO): 2013 update of the evidence-based guidelines from the world society of emergency surgery ASBO working group

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In 2013 Guidelines on diagnosis and management of ASBO have been revised and updated by the WSES Working Group on ASBO to develop current evidence-based algorithms and focus indications and safety of conservative treatment, timing of surgery and indications for laparoscopy. Recommendations In absence of signs of strangulation and history of persistent vomiting or combined CT-scan signs (free fluid, mesenteric edema, small-bowel feces sign, devascularization) patients with partial ASBO can be managed safely with NOM and tube decompression should be attempted. These patients are good candidates for Water-Soluble-Contrast-Medium (WSCM) with both diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. The radiologic appearance of WSCM in the colon within 24 hours from administration predicts resolution. WSCM maybe administered either orally or via NGT both immediately at admission or after failed conservative treatment for 48 hours. The use of WSCM is safe and reduces need for surgery, time to resolution and hospital stay. NOM, in absence of signs of strangulation or peritonitis, can be prolonged up to 72 hours. After 72 hours of NOM without resolution, surgery is recommended. Patients treated non-operatively have shorter hospital stay, but higher recurrence rate and shorter time to re-admission, although the risk of new surgically treated episodes of ASBO is unchanged. Risk factors for recurrences are age <40 years and matted adhesions. WSCM does not decrease recurrence rates or recurrences needing surgery. Open surgery is often used for strangulating ASBO as well as after failed conservative management. In selected patients and with appropriate skills, laparoscopic approach is advisable using open access technique. Access in left upper quadrant or left flank is the safest and only completely obstructing adhesions should be identified and lysed with cold scissors. Laparoscopic adhesiolysis should be attempted preferably if first episode of SBO and/or anticipated single band

  6. [Diagnosis of functional bowel diseases].

    PubMed

    Kruis, W

    2007-02-28

    Functional bowel disorders cause frequent doctor visits. The term comprises various disease entities. Most frequent are the irritable bowel syndrome, functional constipation and functional diarrhea. An exact history plays an outstanding role for the diagnosis of all these entities. History either confirms a positive diagnosis or initiates some complementary investigations. Redundant and dangerous technical procedures should be avoided in the diagnostic work up.

  7. Inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Beattie, R M; Croft, N M; Fell, J M; Afzal, N A; Heuschkel, R B

    2006-01-01

    Twenty five per cent of inflammatory bowel disease presents in childhood. Growth and nutrition are key issues in the management with the aim of treatment being to induce and then maintain disease remission with minimal side effects. Only 25% of Crohn's disease presents with the classic triad of abdominal pain, weight loss, and diarrhoea. Most children with ulcerative colitis have blood in the stool at presentation. Inflammatory markers are usually although not invariably raised at presentation (particularly in Crohn's disease). Full investigation includes upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and ileocolonoscopy. Treatment requires multidisciplinary input as part of a clinical network led by a paediatrician with special expertise in the management of the condition. PMID:16632672

  8. Recommendations on chronic constipation (including constipation associated with irritable bowel syndrome) treatment

    PubMed Central

    Paré, Pierre; Bridges, Ronald; Champion, Malcolm C; Ganguli, Subhas C; Gray, James R; Irvine, E Jan; Plourde, Victor; Poitras, Pierre; Turnbull, Geoffrey K; Moayyedi, Paul; Flook, Nigel; Collins, Stephen M

    2007-01-01

    While chronic constipation (CC) has a high prevalence in primary care, there are no existing treatment recommendations to guide health care professionals. To address this, a consensus group of 10 gastroenterologists was formed to develop treatment recommendations. Although constipation may occur as a result of organic disease, the present paper addresses only the management of primary CC or constipation associated with irritable bowel syndrome. The final consensus group was assembled and the recommendations were created following the exact process outlined by the Canadian Association of Gastroenterology for the following areas: epidemiology, quality of life and threshold for treatment; definitions and diagnostic criteria; lifestyle changes; bulking agents and stool softeners; osmotic agents; prokinetics; stimulant laxatives; suppositories; enemas; other drugs; biofeedback and behavioural approaches; surgery; and probiotics. A treatment algorithm was developed by the group for CC and constipation associated with irritable bowel syndrome. Where possible, an evidence-based approach and expert opinions were used to develop the statements in areas with insufficient evidence. The nature of the underlying pathophysiology for constipation is often unclear, and it can be tricky for physicians to decide on an appropriate treatment strategy for the individual patient. The myriad of treatment options available to Canadian physicians can be confusing; thus, the main aim of the recommendations and treatment algorithm is to optimize the approach in clinical care based on available evidence. PMID:17464377

  9. [Irritable bowel syndrome: a functional disorder?].

    PubMed

    Man, Fernando; Bustos Fernández, Luis María

    2013-12-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome is a highly prevalent condition responsible for almost one third of visits to the gastroenterologist and huge expenses for diagnosis, treatment and loss of working days. A unique pathophysiologic mechanism has not been elucidated yet and several possibilities have been proposed such as senso-perception and motor disturbances, the effect of stress and anxiety, serotonin receptor failures, activation of abnormal brain areas and pain modulation differences, among others. The absence of a biological marker has led the investigators to consider this syndrome as an exclusion diagnostic condition, once the organic diseases have been discarded The changes in gut microbiota have recently raised great interest among gastroenterologists. The study of the small intestinal bowel overgrowth syndrome, the effect of antibiotics upon the flora, the recognition of post-infectious irritable bowel syndrome and the action of probiotics, together with the effect of malabsortion of diet carbohydrates have brought some new light in our knowledge. The present update will focus on the published evidence about the subject, bearing in mind that the mechanisms elicited here are only suitable for a subgroup of patients. PMID:24516961

  10. Irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Enck, Paul; Aziz, Qasim; Barbara, Giovanni; Farmer, Adam D.; Fukudo, Shin; Mayer, Emeran A.; Niesler, Beate; Quigley, Eamonn M. M.; Rajilić-Stojanović, Mirjana; Schemann, Michael; Schwille-Kiuntke, Juliane; Simren, Magnus; Zipfel, Stephan; Spiller, Robin C.

    2016-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional gastrointestinal disease with a high population prevalence. The disorder can be debilitating in some patients, whereas others may have mild or moderate symptoms. The most important single risk factors are female sex, younger age and preceding gastrointestinal infections. Clinical symptoms of IBS include abdominal pain or discomfort, stool irregularities and bloating, as well as other somatic, visceral and psychiatric comorbidities. Currently, the diagnosis of IBS is based on symptoms and the exclusion of other organic diseases, and therapy includes drug treatment of the predominant symptoms, nutrition and psychotherapy. Although the underlying pathogenesis is far from understood, aetiological factors include increased epithelial hyperpermeability, dysbiosis, inflammation, visceral hypersensitivity, epigenetics and genetics, and altered brain–gut interactions. IBS considerably affects quality of life and imposes a profound burden on patients, physicians and the health-care system. The past decade has seen remarkable progress in our understanding of functional bowel disorders such as IBS that will be summarized in this Primer. PMID:27159638

  11. Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wald

    1999-02-01

    I believe there are four essential elements in the management of patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS): to establish a good physician-patient relationship; to educate patients about their condition; to emphasize the excellent prognosis and benign nature of the illness; and to employ therapeutic interventions centering on dietary modifications, pharmacotherapy, and behavioral strategies tailored to the individual. Initially, I establish the diagnosis, exclude organic causes, educate patients about the disease, establish realistic expectations and consistent limits, and involve patients in disease management. I find it critical to determine why the patient is seeking assistance (eg, cancer phobia, disability, interpersonal distress, or exacerbation of symptoms). Most patients can be treated by their primary care physician. However, specialty consultations may be needed to reinforce management strategies, perform additional diagnostic tests, or institute specialized treatment. Psychological co-morbidities do not cause symptoms but do affect how patients respond to them and influence health care-seeking behavior. I find that these issues are best explored over a series of visits when the physician-patient relationship has been established. It can be helpful to have patients fill out a self-administered test to identify psychological co-morbidities. I often use these tests as a basis for extended inquiries into this area, resulting in the initiation of appropriate therapies. I encourage patients to keep a 2-week diary of food intake and gastrointestinal symptoms. In this way, patients become actively involved in management of their disease, and I may be able to obtain information from the diary that will be valuable in making treatment decisions. I do not believe that diagnostic studies for food intolerances are cost-effective or particularly helpful; however, exclusion diets may be beneficial. I introduce fiber supplements gradually and monitor them for

  12. Insights Into Normal and Disordered Bowel Habits From Bowel Diaries

    PubMed Central

    Bharucha, Adil E.; Seide, Barbara M.; Zinsmeister, Alan R.; Melton, L. Joseph

    2008-01-01

    Background While symptom questionnaires provide a snapshot of bowel habits, they may not reflect day-to-day variations or the relationship between bowel symptoms and stool form. Aim To assess bowel habits by daily diaries in women with and without functional bowel disorders. Method From a community-based survey among Olmsted County, MN, women, 278 randomly selected subjects were interviewed by a gastroenterologist, who completed a bowel symptom questionnaire. Subjects also maintained bowel diaries for 2 wk. Results Among 278 subjects, questionnaires revealed diarrhea (26%), constipation (21%), or neither (53%). Asymptomatic subjects reported bowel symptoms (e.g., urgency) infrequently (i.e., <25% of the time) and generally for hard or loose stools. Urgency for soft, formed stools (i.e., Bristol form = 4) was more prevalent in subjects with diarrhea (31%) and constipation (27%) than in normals (16%). Stool form, straining to begin (odds ratio [OR] 4.1, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.7–10.2) and end (OR 4.7, 95% CI 1.6–15.2) defecation increased the odds for constipation. Straining to end defecation (OR 3.7, 95% CI 1.2–12.0), increased stool frequency (OR 1.9, 95% CI 1.02–3.7), incomplete evacuation (OR 2.2, 95% CI 1.04–4.6), and rectal urgency (OR 3.1, 95% CI 1.4–6.6) increased the odds for diarrhea. In contrast, variations in stool frequency and form were not useful for discriminating between health and disease. Conclusions Bowel symptoms occur in association with, but are only partly explained by, stool form disturbances. These observations support a role for other pathophysiological mechanisms in functional bowel disorders. PMID:18021288

  13. Mechanical Extension Implants for Short-Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Luntz, Jonathan; Brei, Diann; Teitelbaum, Daniel; Spencer, Ariel

    2007-01-01

    Short-bowel syndrome (SBS) is a rare, potentially lethal medical condition where the small intestine is far shorter than required for proper nutrient absorption. Current treatment, including nutritional, hormone-based, and surgical modification, have limited success resulting in 30% to 50% mortality rates. Recent advances in mechanotransduction, stressing the bowel to induce growth, show great promise; but for successful clinical use, more sophisticated devices that can be implanted are required. This paper presents two novel devices that are capable of the long-term gentle stressing. A prototype of each device was designed to fit inside a short section of bowel and slowly extend, allowing the bowel section to grow approximately double its initial length. The first device achieves this through a dual concentric hydraulic piston that generated almost 2-fold growth of a pig small intestine. For a fully implantable extender, a second device was developed based upon a shape memory alloy actuated linear ratchet. The proof-of-concept prototype demonstrated significant force generation and almost double extension when tested on the benchtop and inside an ex-vivo section of pig bowel. This work provides the first steps in the development of an implantable extender for treatment of SBS. PMID:17369875

  14. Mechanical extension implants for short-bowel syndrome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luntz, Jonathan; Brei, Diann; Teitelbaum, Daniel; Spencer, Ariel

    2006-03-01

    Short-bowel syndrome (SBS) is a rare, potentially lethal medical condition where the small intestine is far shorter than required for proper nutrient absorption. Current treatment, including nutritional, hormone-based, and surgical modification, have limited success resulting in 30% to 50% mortality rates. Recent advances in mechanotransduction, stressing the bowel to induce growth, show great promise; but for successful clinical use, more sophisticated devices that can be implanted are required. This paper presents two novel devices that are capable of the long-term gentle stressing. A prototype of each device was designed to fit inside a short section of bowel and slowly extend, allowing the bowel section to grow approximately double its initial length. The first device achieves this through a dual concentric hydraulic piston that generated almost 2-fold growth of a pig small intestine. For a fully implantable extender, a second device was developed based upon a shape memory alloy actuated linear ratchet. The proof-of-concept prototype demonstrated significant force generation and almost double extension when tested on the benchtop and inside an ex-vivo section of pig bowel. This work provides the first steps in the development of an implantable extender for treatment of SBS.

  15. Mechanical Extension Implants for Short-Bowel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Luntz, Jonathan; Brei, Diann; Teitelbaum, Daniel; Spencer, Ariel

    2006-01-01

    Short-bowel syndrome (SBS) is a rare, potentially lethal medical condition where the small intestine is far shorter than required for proper nutrient absorption. Current treatment, including nutritional, hormone-based, and surgical modification, have limited success resulting in 30% to 50% mortality rates. Recent advances in mechanotransduction, stressing the bowel to induce growth, show great promise; but for successful clinical use, more sophisticated devices that can be implanted are required. This paper presents two novel devices that are capable of the long-term gentle stressing. A prototype of each device was designed to fit inside a short section of bowel and slowly extend, allowing the bowel section to grow approximately double its initial length. The first device achieves this through a dual concentric hydraulic piston that generated almost 2-fold growth of a pig small intestine. For a fully implantable extender, a second device was developed based upon a shape memory alloy actuated linear ratchet. The proof-of-concept prototype demonstrated significant force generation and almost double extension when tested on the benchtop and inside an ex-vivo section of pig bowel. This work provides the first steps in the development of an implantable extender for treatment of SBS.

  16. Enema reduction of intussusception: the success rate of hydrostatic and pneumatic reduction

    PubMed Central

    Khorana, Jiraporn; Singhavejsakul, Jesda; Ukarapol, Nuthapong; Laohapensang, Mongkol; Wakhanrittee, Junsujee; Patumanond, Jayanton

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Intussusception is a common surgical emergency in infants and children. The incidence of intussusception is from one to four per 2,000 infants and children. If there is no peritonitis, perforation sign on abdominal radiographic studies, and nonresponsive shock, nonoperative reduction by pneumatic or hydrostatic enema can be performed. The purpose of this study was to compare the success rates of both the methods. Methods Two institutional retrospective cohort studies were performed. All intussusception patients (ICD-10 code K56.1) who had visited Chiang Mai University Hospital and Siriraj Hospital from January 2006 to December 2012 were included in the study. The data were obtained by chart reviews and electronic databases, which included demographic data, symptoms, signs, and investigations. The patients were grouped according to the method of reduction followed into pneumatic reduction and hydrostatic reduction groups with the outcome being the success of the reduction technique. Results One hundred and seventy episodes of intussusception occurring in the patients of Chiang Mai University Hospital and Siriraj Hospital were included in this study. The success rate of pneumatic reduction was 61% and that of hydrostatic reduction was 44% (P=0.036). Multivariable analysis and adjusting of the factors by propensity scores were performed; the success rate of pneumatic reduction was 1.48 times more than that of hydrostatic reduction (P=0.036, 95% confidence interval [CI] =1.03–2.13). Conclusion Both pneumatic and hydrostatic reduction can be performed safely according to the experience of the radiologist or pediatric surgeon and hospital setting. This study showed that pneumatic reduction had a higher success rate than hydrostatic reduction. PMID:26719697

  17. Phased surgical treatment of barium enema-induced rectal injury and retention of barium in the pelvic floor space

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xuefei; Xia, Ligang; Huang, Jun; Wang, Jianping

    2014-01-01

    Iatrogenic injuries caused by barium enema are rarely reported. Following a phased surgical protocol for up to one year, we have successfully treated a patient with rectal injury and severe infection of the pelvic floor space complicated with retention of large amounts of barium and vaginal fistula. In this article, the phased surgery planning for the treatment of rectal injury complicated with vaginal fistula is discussed in terms of the pros and cons, and the observed effect and evolution of barium retained in the pelvic floor space are described. PMID:25405155

  18. Inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed Central

    Van Rosendaal, G M

    1989-01-01

    An increasing number of options are available for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease; the selection depends on the extent and severity of the disease. Experience with sulfasalazine and corticosteroids has led to a proliferation of 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) compounds and experimentation with alternative corticosteroid preparations. Given rectally 5-ASA is particularly effective in the treatment of distal ulcerative colitis, and experience is accumulating with several oral formulations. Metronidazole is useful in some cases, and immunosuppressive agents have a role in some patients with chronic refractory disease. A variety of measures, such as nutritional therapy, surgery and psychosocial support, are important elements of therapy. Further therapeutic innovations are expected as the etiology and pathogenesis are clarified. PMID:2568163

  19. Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kaser, Arthur; Zeissig, Sebastian; Blumberg, Richard S.

    2015-01-01

    Insights into inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are advancing rapidly owing to immunologic investigations of a plethora of animal models of intestinal inflammation, ground-breaking advances in the interrogation of diseases that are inherited as complex genetic traits, and the development of culture-independent methods to define the composition of the intestinal microbiota. These advances are bringing a deeper understanding to the genetically determined interplay between the commensal microbiota, intestinal epithelial cells, and the immune system and the manner in which this interplay might be modified by relevant environmental factors in the pathogenesis of IBD. This review examines these interactions and, where possible, potential lessons from IBD-directed, biologic therapies that may allow for elucidation of pathways that are central to disease pathogenesis in humans. PMID:20192811

  20. Future Therapeutic Approaches for Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Plevy, Scott E.; Targan, Stephan R.

    2016-01-01

    In this review, we speculate about future therapeutic approaches for inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs), focusing on the need for better preclinical and clinical models and approaches beyond small molecules and systemically administered biologics. We offer ideas to change clinical trial programs and to use immunologic and genetic biomarkers to personalize medicine. We attempt to reconcile past therapeutic successes and failures to improve future approaches. Some of our ideas might be provocative, but we hope that the examples we provide will stimulate discussion about what will advance the field of IBD therapy. PMID:21530750

  1. Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Changing Associations to Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Click, Benjamin; Whitcomb, David C

    2016-01-01

    Managing the health of individual patients suffering from complex disorders is a challenge and is costly. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a prototypic complex disorder of the small and large intestines. Susceptibility is complex, severity is variable, and response to treatment is unpredictable. Di Narzo et al. (Clin Transl Gastroenterol 7: e177; doi:10.1038/ctg.2016.34) bring diverse teams of physicians and scientists together to break down the mechanisms of IBD by linking pathogenic genetic variants with altered gene expression in specific cell types causing IBD. Framing new findings in the context of other complex diseases provides a roadmap for predictive medicine. PMID:27607898

  2. Brain gut microbiome interactions and functional bowel disorders

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alterations in the bidirectional interactions between the intestine and the nervous system have important roles in the pathogenesis of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). A body of largely preclinical evidence suggests that the gut microbiota can modulate these interactions. A small and poorly defined r...

  3. Nutritional therapy of irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Friedman, G

    1989-09-01

    Nutritional factors relative to IBS include diagnostic and therapeutic considerations. Etiologically, foods do not cause IBS. A small percentage of patients with childhood allergic diatheses, usually in association with atopic dermatitis and asthma, may be intolerant to one or more of wheat, corn, dairy products, coffee, tea, or citrus fruits. Diagnostically, many patients labeled as IBS subjects are in fact intolerant to the ingestion of lactose-containing foods, sorbitol, fructose, or combinations of fructose and sorbitol. A precise dietary history will characterize this group. Taken in its broadest context, IBS involves the entire hollow tract inclusive of esophagus, stomach, small bowel, and colon. The symptomatic presentation relative to the hollow organ involved allows the selection of dietary manipulations that may help to reduce symptoms. Gastroesophageal reflux, a consequence of low LES pressure in some IBS patients, may be treated with the elimination of fatty foods, alcohol, chocolate, and peppermint. Delayed gastric emptying may be helped by the elimination of fatty foods and reduction of soluble fiber. Aberrant small bowel motor function may be ameliorated by reduction of lactose, sorbitol, and fructose and the addition of soluble fiber. Gas syndromes may be improved by reduced intake of beans, cabbage, lentils, legumes, apples, grapes, and raisins. Colonic motor dysfunction may be overcome by the gradual addition of combinations of soluble and insoluble fiber-containing foods and supplements. The selective use of activated charcoal and simethicone may be helpful. PMID:2553606

  4. Octreotide as Palliative Therapy for Cancer-Related Bowel Obstruction That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-05-31

    Colorectal Cancer; Constipation, Impaction, and Bowel Obstruction; Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Gastric Cancer; Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor; Nausea and Vomiting; Ovarian Cancer; Pancreatic Cancer; Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Small Intestine Cancer

  5. Probiotics for inflammatory bowel disease: a critical appraisal.

    PubMed

    Sans, Miquel

    2009-01-01

    The notion that the intestinal microbiota plays a key role for the development of intestinal inflammation, initially based on a series of clinical observations both in human inflammatory bowel disease and experimental colitis, has been reinforced by a growing body of evidence demonstrating that the abnormal recognition of bacterial and other microbiota antigens by the innate immune system is one of the earliest events in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease. In keeping with our present knowledge of inflammatory bowel disease pathophysiology, the search for therapeutic approaches aimed at modifying the composition of the intestinal microbiota to obtain new, more targeted treatments for inflammatory bowel disease that are basically free of side effects has been a subject of intense research activity. Probiotics are defined as live organisms capable of conferring health benefits beyond their nutritional properties. Numerous micro-organisms have been evaluated to induce or maintain remission, or both, in ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease and pouchitis. Overall, probiotics have successfully demonstrated some efficacy in some inflammatory bowel disease scenarios. However, a critical review of the available scientific literature shows that: (1) in spite of great expectations, reflected by a high number of review and editorial articles in top journals, the number of published, well-designed clinical trials using probiotics in inflammatory bowel disease is small, often with few patients; (2) the range of microbial agents makes it particularly difficult to draw global conclusions; (3) the quality of the evidence on the efficacy of probiotics in pouchitis is clearly better than that in ulcerative colitis, while there is virtually no evidence of probiotic efficacy in Crohn's disease. The appropriate selection of probiotic agents combined with convincing clinical trials will determine whether probiotics can jump from promise to reality in inflammatory bowel disease

  6. Complications of inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Gasche, C

    2000-01-01

    Complications in inflammatory bowel disease determine the severity of disease as well as the complexities of medical or surgical treatment opportunities. Therefore, in known inflammatory bowel disease, the prevention, the early detection and the adequate therapeutic response to certain complications are important goals in the follow-up of inflammatory bowel disease patients. Disease complications are separated into intestinal and extraintestinal complications. Intestinal complications are somewhat disease specific, which means that they occur exclusively in either Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis (e.g., enteric fistulas are particularly found in Crohn's disease and toxic megacolon in ulcerative colitis). Most extraintestinal complications occur in both forms of inflammatory bowel disease (e.g., anemia, thromboembolic events or osteoporosis). The current knowledge on pathogenesis, diagnostic tools, prevention and treatment of certain intestinal and extraintestinal complications is reviewed. PMID:10690585

  7. Reversed Intestinal Rotation Presented as Bowel Obstruction in a Pregnant Woman

    PubMed Central

    Schrier, Ilan

    2015-01-01

    A rare case of complete large bowel obstruction in a pregnant woman, without previous surgical history, due to previously undiagnosed reversed intestinal rotation is presented. The young woman was admitted with progressive nausea and vomiting which did not respond to conventional therapy. Her plain abdominal film revealed signs of small bowel obstruction. On laparotomy, her transverse colon was found to be located beneath the root of small bowel mesentery and completely obstructed by congenital fibrous bands. Postoperative recovery was unremarkable. Surgery for this unusual developmental anomaly is discussed. PMID:26075133

  8. Update on Janus Kinase Antagonists in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Boland, Brigid S.; Sandborn, William J.; Chang, John T.

    2014-01-01

    Janus kinase (JAK) inhibitors have emerged as a novel orally administered small molecule therapy for the treatment of ulcerative colitis and possibly Crohn’s disease. These molecules are designed to selectively target the activity of specific JAKs and offer a targeted mechanism of action without risk of immunogenicity. Based on data from clinical trials in rheumatoid arthritis and phase 2 studies in inflammatory bowel disease, tofacitinib and other JAK inhibitors are likely to become a new form of medical therapy for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:25110261

  9. Filiform polyposis in a patient without inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Tsung, Swei H

    2013-01-01

    Filiform polyposis is a rare condition of uncertain pathogenesis that is usually found in patients with a history of inflammatory bowel disease. Here I report a case of filiform polyposis with no associated inflammatory bowel disease. Numerous finger-like polypoid lesions with the appearance of stalactites were noted in the transverse colon at the time of colonoscopy. Filiform polyps may be misinterpreted on colonoscopy as unusual villous adenomas or small carcinomas. Endoscopists should be familiar with the varied morphology of filifform polypsis in order to arrive at a correct diagnosis, and to ensure proper management.

  10. Thromboembolism in inflammatory bowel disease: role of platelets.

    PubMed Central

    Webberley, M J; Hart, M T; Melikian, V

    1993-01-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease are susceptible to thromboembolism and recently small vessel thrombosis has been implicated as an aetiological factor in Crohn's disease. This study therefore investigated platelet function in 104 patients with inflammatory bowel disease of whom eight had previous thromboembolism. Thirty five patients had reproducible spontaneous platelet aggregation of more than 30% (0 in controls) (p < 0.0001). A further 20 patients showed hypersensitivity of platelets to low concentrations of aggregating agents (p < 0.001). Plasma thromboxane B2 and beta thromboglobulin levels were significantly higher than controls (p < 0.001 and p < 0.001), but platelet lifespan studies were normal. There was no correlation with disease activity. Patients with inflammatory bowel disease have abnormal platelet activity, which may contribute to the inflammatory process. PMID:8432482

  11. Prenatal ultrasonic diagnosis of obstructive bowel disease: a retrospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Heydanus, R; Spaargaren, M C; Wladimiroff, J W

    1994-11-01

    Fetal obstructive bowel disease was diagnosed in 29 patients at 22-37 weeks (median 32 weeks) of gestation, seven (24 per cent) of whom also displayed other anomalies. Polyhydramnios was present in 20/29 cases (69 per cent). An abnormal karyotype existed in 7/29 cases (24 per cent), of which six were diagnosed prenatally (trisomy 21, n = 5; 69,XXX, n = 1) and one postnatally (trisomy 21). There was always an association with the ultrasonic 'double bubble' sign. Obstructive bowel disease was confirmed postnatally in 20/29 (69 per cent) cases, i.e., oesophageal atresia (n = 1), duodenal obstruction (n = 12), and small bowel obstruction (n = 7). Other anomalies existed in 6/29 (21 per cent) cases, i.e., multicystic kidney (n = 1) and multiple congenital anomalies (n = 5). The perinatal mortality rate was 35 per cent (7/20). PMID:7877951

  12. Dietary Geraniol by Oral or Enema Administration Strongly Reduces Dysbiosis and Systemic Inflammation in Dextran Sulfate Sodium-Treated Mice.

    PubMed

    De Fazio, Luigia; Spisni, Enzo; Cavazza, Elena; Strillacci, Antonio; Candela, Marco; Centanni, Manuela; Ricci, Chiara; Rizzello, Fernando; Campieri, Massimo; Valerii, Maria C

    2016-01-01

    (Trans)-3,7-Dimethyl-2,6-octadien-1-ol, commonly called geraniol (Ge-OH), is an acyclic monoterpene alcohol with well-known anti-inflammatory, antitumoral, and antimicrobial properties. It is widely used as a preservative in the food industry and as an antimicrobial agent in animal farming. The present study investigated the role of Ge-OH as an anti-inflammatory and anti-dysbiotic agent in the dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis mouse model. Ge-OH was orally administered to C57BL/6 mice at daily doses of 30 and 120 mg kg((-1)) body weight, starting 6 days before DSS treatment and ending the day after DSS removal. Furthermore, Ge-OH 120 mg kg((-1)) dose body weight was administered via enema during the acute phase of colitis to facilitate its on-site action. The results show that orally or enema-administered Ge-OH is a powerful antimicrobial agent able to prevent colitis-associated dysbiosis and decrease the inflammatory systemic profile of colitic mice. As a whole, Ge-OH strongly improved the clinical signs of colitis and significantly reduced cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression in colonocytes and in the gut wall. Ge-OH could be a powerful drug for the treatment of intestinal inflammation and dysbiosis.

  13. Dietary Geraniol by Oral or Enema Administration Strongly Reduces Dysbiosis and Systemic Inflammation in Dextran Sulfate Sodium-Treated Mice

    PubMed Central

    De Fazio, Luigia; Spisni, Enzo; Cavazza, Elena; Strillacci, Antonio; Candela, Marco; Centanni, Manuela; Ricci, Chiara; Rizzello, Fernando; Campieri, Massimo; Valerii, Maria C.

    2016-01-01

    (Trans)-3,7-Dimethyl-2,6-octadien-1-ol, commonly called geraniol (Ge-OH), is an acyclic monoterpene alcohol with well-known anti-inflammatory, antitumoral, and antimicrobial properties. It is widely used as a preservative in the food industry and as an antimicrobial agent in animal farming. The present study investigated the role of Ge-OH as an anti-inflammatory and anti-dysbiotic agent in the dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis mouse model. Ge-OH was orally administered to C57BL/6 mice at daily doses of 30 and 120 mg kg(−1) body weight, starting 6 days before DSS treatment and ending the day after DSS removal. Furthermore, Ge-OH 120 mg kg(−1) dose body weight was administered via enema during the acute phase of colitis to facilitate its on-site action. The results show that orally or enema-administered Ge-OH is a powerful antimicrobial agent able to prevent colitis-associated dysbiosis and decrease the inflammatory systemic profile of colitic mice. As a whole, Ge-OH strongly improved the clinical signs of colitis and significantly reduced cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression in colonocytes and in the gut wall. Ge-OH could be a powerful drug for the treatment of intestinal inflammation and dysbiosis. PMID:26973525

  14. A case of postoperative recurrent intussusception associated with indwelling bowel tube

    PubMed Central

    Furuya, Yoshitaka; Wakahara, Takashi; Akimoto, Harutoshi; Long, Chu Manh; Yanagie, Hironobu; Yasuhara, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    Intussusception is quite uncommon in adults. We report a rare case of a 76-year-old man with small bowel intussusception induced by two indwelling bowel tubes, the first a jejunal feeding tube and the second an ileus tube. After complete reduction of the first intussusception caused by the jejunal feeding tube and adhesion, re-intussusception occurred due to the postoperative adhesion and ileus tube inserted into the bowel after the previous operation for intussusception. Finally, the part of the jejunum with re-intussusception and adhesion, including the place where the previous reduced intussusception had occurred, was resected. This case is a reminder that when there is no mucosal lesion other than an indwelling bowel tube or a hard adhesion/inflammation around intussusception, the patient should be operated on without delay for resection of the intussusception to prevent re-intussusception, even if the resected bowel is predicted to be long. PMID:21160855

  15. Bacterial concepts in irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lin, Henry C; Pimentel, Mark

    2005-01-01

    An overlap of symptoms in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) exists across subtype groups. Symptoms include intestinal gas, diarrhea, dyspepsia, bloating, abdominal pain, and constipation. The unifying symptom may be excessive intestinal gas as a by-product of intestinal microbial fermentation. Abnormal fermentation of food takes place when gut microbes expand proximally into the small intestine instead of being confined predominantly to the colon. Such proximal expansion of indigenous gut microbes or small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) may lead to activation of host mucosal immunity and an increase in intestinal permeability to result in flu-like extra-intestinal symptoms that accompany the classic IBS symptoms of altered bowels. The presence of methane on lactulose breath testing is associated with constipation-predominant IBS. Antibiotic therapy may be appropriate to treat underlying SIBO in IBS patients. Seventy-five percent improvement of IBS symptoms was reported in a double-blind, placebo-controlled study once antibiotics succeeded in treating bacterial overgrowth. Once a good clinical response and normalization of the lactulose breath test are achieved, a prokinetic agent may be used to stimulate phase III of interdigestive motility to delay relapse of bacterial overgrowth. PMID:17713456

  16. Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Corridoni, Daniele; Arseneau, Kristen O.; Cominelli, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), including Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), are chronic, relapsing inflammatory condition of the gastrointestinal tract. CD and UC have distinct pathologic and clinical characteristics and despite the extensive amount of research conducted over the past decades, their pathogenesis remains still poorly understood. So far, the accepted dogma is that IBD results from dysregulated mucosal immune response to environmental factors in genetical susceptible hosts. Various components are implicated in the pathogenesis of IBD, including genetic susceptibility, environmental and microbial factors, intestinal epithelial cells and components of innate and adaptive immune system. Given the complexity of IBD, several different animal models of IBD have been developed during the last years. Animal models are very important tools to study the involvement of various factors in the pathogenesis of IBD and, importantly, to test new therapeutic options. This review examines some of the key components that have been found to be closely associated to IBD and describe the distinct features of some of the most important IBD models. PMID:24938525

  17. Irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Drossman, D A

    1994-12-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common medical disorder that is associated with significant disability and health care costs. A practical approach to diagnosis and management of patients afflicted by this disorder has previously been hampered due to incomplete understanding of its pathophysiology, lack of diagnostic precision, and absence of specific treatments. Over the last decade, epidemiological, physiological, and psychosocial data have emerged to improve our understanding of this disorder and its treatment. IBS is currently believed to result from dysregulation of intestinal motor, sensory, and central nervous system function. Symptoms are due to both disturbances in intestinal motility and enhanced visceral sensitivity. Psychosocial factors, although not part of IBS per se, have an important role in modulating the illness experience and its clinical outcome. Use of multinational symptom-based "Rome" criteria has increased diagnostic specificity and has helped to minimize studies done to exclude other disease. Finally, treatment involves an integrated pharmacological and behavioral approach that is determined by the severity of the illness and its physiological and psychosocial determinants. PMID:7866739

  18. Irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The prevalence of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) varies depending on the criteria used to diagnose it, but it ranges from about 5% to 20%. IBS is associated with abnormal gastrointestinal motor function and enhanced visceral perception, as well as psychosocial and genetic factors. People with IBS often have other bodily and psychiatric symptoms, and have an increased likelihood of having unnecessary surgery compared with people without IBS. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of treatments in people with IBS? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to July 2009 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 18 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: 5HT3 receptor antagonists (alosetron and ramosetron); 5HT4 receptor agonists (tegaserod); antidepressants (tricyclic antidepressants and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors [SSRIs]); antispasmodics (including peppermint oil); cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT); hypnotherapy; soluble and insoluble fibre supplementation; and loperamide. PMID:21718578

  19. Irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The prevalence of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) varies depending on the criteria used to diagnose it, but it ranges from about 5% to 20%. IBS is associated with abnormal gastrointestinal motor function and enhanced visceral perception, as well as psychosocial and genetic factors. People with IBS often have other bodily and psychiatric symptoms, and have an increased likelihood of having unnecessary surgery compared with people without IBS. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of treatments in people with IBS? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to August 2011 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 27 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: 5HT3 receptor antagonists (alosetron and ramosetron), 5HT4 receptor agonists (tegaserod), antidepressants (tricyclic antidepressants and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors [SSRIs]), antispasmodics (including peppermint oil), cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), hypnotherapy, loperamide, and soluble and insoluble fibre supplementation. PMID:22296841

  20. Flexible fiberoptic sigmoidoscopy and double-contrast barium-enema examination in the identification of adenomas and carcinoma of the colon.

    PubMed

    Farrands, P A; Vellacott, K D; Amar, S S; Balfour, T W; Hardcastle, J D

    1983-11-01

    To assess the accuracy of the flexible fiberoptic sigmoidoscope, 227 consecutive patients (mean age 61.8 +/- 13 years) requiring investigation of colonic symptoms were evaluated using rigid and flexible sigmoidoscopy (PAF and KDV) and double-contrast barium enema (SSA). Patients with equivocal findings or adenomatous polyps underwent colonoscopy (TWB). Thirty-four patients had carcinoma and 50 patients had one or more adenomatous polyps (greater than 5mm). The neoplastic yield from rigid sigmoidoscopy was 12 per cent, flexible fiberoptic sigmoidoscopy 90 per cent, and double-contrast barium enema only 76 per cent. Barium enema failed to identify eight carcinomas and 13 adenomatous polyps; seven of the eight carcinomas were polypoid Dukes' Stage A lesions, and associated diverticular disease was present in 62.5 per cent of cases. Flexible fiberoptic sigmoidoscopy failed to identify seven carcinomas and one adenomatous polyp. Five of the carcinomas were beyond range of the instrument; in one patient, a stricture was seen that was caused by the carcinoma; and in the seventh patient, the examination was terminated because of angulation spasm. Double-contrast barium enema is inaccurate in detecting lesions in the sigmoid colon, with flexible sigmoidoscopy being superior. PMID:6628146

  1. Oral 5-Aminosalicylate, Mesalamine Suppository, and Mesalamine Enema as Initial Therapy for Ulcerative Proctitis in Clinical Practice with Quality of Care Implications

    PubMed Central

    Richter, James M.; Arshi, Nabeela K.; Oster, Gerry

    2016-01-01

    Background. Ulcerative proctitis (UP) is typically treated initially with oral 5-aminosalicylate (“5-ASA”), mesalamine suppository, or mesalamine enema (“UP Rx”). Little is known about their effectiveness in practice. Methods. Using a US health insurance database, we identified new-onset UP patients between January 1, 2005, and December 31, 2007, based on the following: (1) initiation of UP Rx; (2) endoscopy in prior 30 days resulting in diagnosis of UP; and (3) no prior encounters for ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease. We examined the incidence of therapy escalation and total costs in relation to initial UP Rx. Results. We identified 548 patients: 327 received mesalamine suppository, 138 received oral 5-ASA, and 83 received mesalamine enema, as initial UP Rx. One-third receiving oral 5-ASA experienced therapy escalation over 12 months, 21% for both mesalamine suppository and enema. Mean cumulative total cost of UP Rx over 12 months was $1552, $996, and $986 for patients beginning therapy with oral 5-ASA, mesalamine enema, and mesalamine suppository, respectively. Contrary to expert recommendations the treatments were often not continued prophylactically. Conclusions. Treatment escalation was common, and total costs of therapy were higher, in patients who initiated treatment with oral 5-ASA. Further study is necessary to assess the significance of these observations. PMID:27446860

  2. Photodynamic therapy of the rabbit bowel and bladder after installation and injection of delta aminolevulinic acid (ALA): uptake of protoporphyrin IX and depth of necrosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merguerian, Paul A.; Pugach, Jeff L.; Park, Jane; Sepers, Marja; Lilge, Lothar D.

    1999-06-01

    Management of neurogenic bladders with high pressures and poor compliance often requires surgical enlargement of the bladder utilizing small or large bowel or stomach. The bowel segments usually retain their absorptive and secretory properties causing several complications which include hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis for small and large bowel segments, hypochloremic metabolic alkalosis for stomach segments, increased risk of bacteriuria, stone formation, altered hepatic metabolism and altered drug metabolism. There is also the potential risk of developing cancer at the anastomotic site.

  3. Genetics of Inflammatory Bowel Diseases.

    PubMed

    McGovern, Dermot P B; Kugathasan, Subra; Cho, Judy H

    2015-10-01

    In this review, we provide an update on genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In addition, we summarize progress in defining the functional consequences of associated alleles for coding and noncoding genetic variation. In the small minority of loci where major association signals correspond to nonsynonymous variation, we summarize studies defining their functional effects and implications for therapeutic targeting. Importantly, the large majority of GWAS-associated loci involve noncoding variation, many of which modulate levels of gene expression. Recent expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) studies have established that the expression of most human genes is regulated by noncoding genetic variations. Significant advances in defining the epigenetic landscape have demonstrated that IBD GWAS signals are highly enriched within cell-specific active enhancer marks. Studies in European ancestry populations have dominated the landscape of IBD genetics studies, but increasingly, studies in Asian and African-American populations are being reported. Common variation accounts for only a modest fraction of the predicted heritability and the role of rare genetic variation of higher effects (ie, odds ratios markedly deviating from 1) is increasingly being identified through sequencing efforts. These sequencing studies have been particularly productive in more severe very early onset cases. A major challenge in IBD genetics will be harnessing the vast array of genetic discovery for clinical utility through emerging precision medical initiatives. In this article, we discuss the rapidly evolving area of direct-to-consumer genetic testing and the current utility of clinical exome sequencing, especially in very early onset, severe IBD cases. We summarize recent progress in the pharmacogenetics of IBD with respect to partitioning patient responses to anti-TNF and thiopurine therapies. Highly collaborative studies across research centers and

  4. Pregnancy and inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Zeldis, J B

    1989-08-01

    Conclusions about the relationship between the pathophysiology and treatment of inflammatory bowel disease and the physiology and management of pregnancy are based on the results of several large physician surveys and retrospective chart reviews. Patients with active disease fare worse than those with inactive disease. There is little evidence that pregnancy affects the course of inflammatory bowel disease or that inactive inflammatory bowel disease affects the course of pregnancy. Judicious medical therapy is effective in controlling inflammatory bowel disease during pregnancy. Sulfasalazine or steroid therapy should not be withdrawn in a patient who needs it to achieve or maintain a quiescent state of inflammatory bowel disease during the course of pregnancy. Immunosuppressive therapy should be avoided. Aggressive medical therapy with total parenteral nutrition in a team approach with a gastroenterologist, surgeon, and perinatologist usually avoids the need for surgical intervention during pregnancy with a good fetal outcome in a patient whose disease is active. Contraception against pregnancy need only be considered in those patients whose disease is so severe that operative therapy is imminent.

  5. [Irritable bowel syndrome in adolescence].

    PubMed

    Shimada, A; Takano, M

    1992-11-01

    We studied seventy patients, 23 males and 47 females with irritable bowel syndrome in adolescence aged 13-19 yrs, who visited the department of psychosomatic medicine in Takano Hospital during about six year period of April, 1986-July, 1992. Takano Hospital is a coloproctological center in Kumamoto. In the clinical pattern of adolescent patients with irritable bowel syndrome the "gas" pattern was dominant (51.4%). Patients with the gas pattern have severe symptoms of flatus, fullness, rumbling sound and abdominal pain as well as bowel dysfunction, constipation and diarrhea in a classroom. Next, the diarrheal pattern occurred in 20.0%. Diarrheal patients complained of frequent bowel movements and retention feelings before attending school. Recurrent abdominal pain-like pattern was found in 7.1% patients. Clinical symptoms in the adolescent patients seem to derived from a mental tension and stress in a close classroom or before attending school. Many adolescenct patients (67.1%) with irritable bowel syndrome are embarrassed in school-maladjustment; leaving class early, late coming, a long absence, and a withdrawal. PMID:1363122

  6. Sensory characterization of bowel cleansing solutions

    PubMed Central

    Sharara, Ala I; Daroub, Hamza; Georges, Camille; Shayto, Rani; Nader, Ralph; Chalhoub, Jean; Olabi, Ammar

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the sensory characteristics of commercial bowel cleansing preparations. METHODS Samples of 4 commercially available bowel cleansing preparations, namely polyethylene glycol electrolyte solution (PEG), PEG + ascorbic acid (PEG-Asc), sodium picosulfate (SPS), and oral sodium sulfate (OSS) were prepared according to the manufacturer’s instructions. Descriptive analysis was conducted (n = 14) using a 15-cm line scale with the Compusense at-hand® sensory evaluation software. Acceptability testing (n = 80) was conducted using the 9-point hedonic scale. In addition, a Just-About-Right (JAR) scale was included for the four basic tastes to determine their intensity compatibility with acceptability levels in the products. RESULTS Samples were significantly different, in descriptive analysis, for all attributes (P < 0.05) except for sweetness. SPS received the highest ratings for turbidity, viscosity appearance, orange odor and orange flavor; PEG-Asc for citrus odor and citrus flavor; OSS for sweetener taste, sweet aftertaste, bitterness, astringency, mouthcoating, bitter aftertaste and throatburn, and along with PEG-Asc, the highest ratings for saltiness, sourness and adhesiveness. Acceptability results showed significant differences between the various samples (P < 0.05). SPS received significantly higher ratings for overall acceptability, acceptability of taste, odor and mouthfeel (P < 0.05). JAR ratings showed that PEG and PEG-Asc were perceived as slightly too salty; SPS and OSS were slightly too sweet, while SPS, PEG-Asc and OSS were slightly too sour and OSS slightly too bitter. While using small sample volumes was necessary to avoid unwanted purgative effects, acceptability ratings do not reflect the true effect of large volumes intake thus limiting the generalization of the results. CONCLUSION Further improvements are needed to enhance the sensory profile and to optimize the acceptability for better compliance with these bowel cleansing solutions

  7. Sensory characterization of bowel cleansing solutions

    PubMed Central

    Sharara, Ala I; Daroub, Hamza; Georges, Camille; Shayto, Rani; Nader, Ralph; Chalhoub, Jean; Olabi, Ammar

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the sensory characteristics of commercial bowel cleansing preparations. METHODS Samples of 4 commercially available bowel cleansing preparations, namely polyethylene glycol electrolyte solution (PEG), PEG + ascorbic acid (PEG-Asc), sodium picosulfate (SPS), and oral sodium sulfate (OSS) were prepared according to the manufacturer’s instructions. Descriptive analysis was conducted (n = 14) using a 15-cm line scale with the Compusense at-hand® sensory evaluation software. Acceptability testing (n = 80) was conducted using the 9-point hedonic scale. In addition, a Just-About-Right (JAR) scale was included for the four basic tastes to determine their intensity compatibility with acceptability levels in the products. RESULTS Samples were significantly different, in descriptive analysis, for all attributes (P < 0.05) except for sweetness. SPS received the highest ratings for turbidity, viscosity appearance, orange odor and orange flavor; PEG-Asc for citrus odor and citrus flavor; OSS for sweetener taste, sweet aftertaste, bitterness, astringency, mouthcoating, bitter aftertaste and throatburn, and along with PEG-Asc, the highest ratings for saltiness, sourness and adhesiveness. Acceptability results showed significant differences between the various samples (P < 0.05). SPS received significantly higher ratings for overall acceptability, acceptability of taste, odor and mouthfeel (P < 0.05). JAR ratings showed that PEG and PEG-Asc were perceived as slightly too salty; SPS and OSS were slightly too sweet, while SPS, PEG-Asc and OSS were slightly too sour and OSS slightly too bitter. While using small sample volumes was necessary to avoid unwanted purgative effects, acceptability ratings do not reflect the true effect of large volumes intake thus limiting the generalization of the results. CONCLUSION Further improvements are needed to enhance the sensory profile and to optimize the acceptability for better compliance with these bowel cleansing solutions.

  8. Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Inflammatory Bowel Disease? Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) includes Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). Symptoms include abdominal ... become pregnant? Women with ulcerative colitis and inactive Crohn’s disease are as likely to become pregnant as women ...

  9. An unusual white blood cell scan in a child with inflammatory bowel disease: a case report.

    PubMed

    Porn, U; Howman-Giles, R; O'Loughlin, E; Uren, R; Chaitow, J

    2000-10-01

    Technetium-99m-labeled leukocyte (WBC) imaging is a valuable screening method for inflammatory bowel disease, especially in children, because of its high rate of sensitivity, low cost, and ease of preparation. A 14-year-old girl is described who had juvenile arthritis and iritis complicated by inflammatory bowel disease. She was examined for recurrent abdominal pain. A Tc-99m stannous colloid WBC scan was performed, and tracer accumulation was seen in the small bowel in the region of the distal ileum on the initial 1-hour image. Delayed imaging at 3 hours also revealed tracer accumulation in the cecum and ascending colon, which was not seen on the early image. A biopsy of the colon during endoscopy showed no evidence of active inflammation in the colon. The small bowel was not seen. Computed tomography revealed changes suggestive of inflammatory bowel disease in the distal ileum. The appearance on the WBC study was most likely a result of inflammatory bowel disease involving the distal ileum, with transit of luminal activity into the large bowel. PMID:11043720

  10. An unusual white blood cell scan in a child with inflammatory bowel disease: a case report.

    PubMed

    Porn, U; Howman-Giles, R; O'Loughlin, E; Uren, R; Chaitow, J

    2000-10-01

    Technetium-99m-labeled leukocyte (WBC) imaging is a valuable screening method for inflammatory bowel disease, especially in children, because of its high rate of sensitivity, low cost, and ease of preparation. A 14-year-old girl is described who had juvenile arthritis and iritis complicated by inflammatory bowel disease. She was examined for recurrent abdominal pain. A Tc-99m stannous colloid WBC scan was performed, and tracer accumulation was seen in the small bowel in the region of the distal ileum on the initial 1-hour image. Delayed imaging at 3 hours also revealed tracer accumulation in the cecum and ascending colon, which was not seen on the early image. A biopsy of the colon during endoscopy showed no evidence of active inflammation in the colon. The small bowel was not seen. Computed tomography revealed changes suggestive of inflammatory bowel disease in the distal ileum. The appearance on the WBC study was most likely a result of inflammatory bowel disease involving the distal ileum, with transit of luminal activity into the large bowel.

  11. Undiagnosed intussusception in an adult ‘small and large bowel’

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Christa; Costello, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Two cases of adult intussusception (large bowel and small bowel) are presented highlighting the challenges posed by their often innocuous presentation in addition to significant morbidity resulting from delayed diagnosis. PMID:24459224

  12. A colonic duplication cyst causing bowel ischaemia in a 74-year-old lady

    PubMed Central

    Fenelon, Christopher; Boland, Michael R; Kenny, Brian; Faul, Peter; Tormey, Shona

    2016-01-01

    Colonic duplication cysts are rare congenital malformations that predominantly present before the age of 2 years. We report the case of a 74-year-old lady who presented with sudden onset abdominal pain. A computed tomography scan noted a calcified structure adjacent to abnormal loops of bowel. Intraoperative findings revealed an ischaemic loop of small bowel wrapped around a mass in the mesentery adjacent to the sigmoid colon. Final histology revealed a colonic duplication cyst. Colonic duplication cysts are rare entities that most commonly cause obstruction or perforation. We present the very rare case of a colonic duplication cyst causing bowel ischaemia in an elderly female. PMID:27572680

  13. Ingested Sharp Bone Fragment: An Unusual Cause of Acute Bowel Obstruction- Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Badai, Samit Kumar; Urugesan, Sadyojata M; Singh, Chabungbam Gyan; Singh, Haobam Manihar

    2016-01-01

    Acute bowel obstruction due to ingested foreign body (FB) like sharp bone fragment is a rare entity. As preoperative diagnosis was uncertain due to lack of proper history, diagnosis is usually done intraoperatively. Even though it is rare, we should consider it as differential diagnosis in patients with recent dietary history. Herein, we are reporting a 38-year-old man, without any psychiatric illness or previous surgery presenting to emergency department with the features of acute bowel obstruction. CT scan shows high density object in ileum suspicious of foreign body. Patient underwent exploratory laparatomy which reveals dilated small bowel with sharp bony object in ileum, which was retrieved with enterotomy. PMID:27042531

  14. Ingested Sharp Bone Fragment: An Unusual Cause of Acute Bowel Obstruction- Case Report.

    PubMed

    Rangaswamy, Raju; Badai, Samit Kumar; Urugesan, Sadyojata M; Singh, Chabungbam Gyan; Singh, Haobam Manihar

    2016-02-01

    Acute bowel obstruction due to ingested foreign body (FB) like sharp bone fragment is a rare entity. As preoperative diagnosis was uncertain due to lack of proper history, diagnosis is usually done intraoperatively. Even though it is rare, we should consider it as differential diagnosis in patients with recent dietary history. Herein, we are reporting a 38-year-old man, without any psychiatric illness or previous surgery presenting to emergency department with the features of acute bowel obstruction. CT scan shows high density object in ileum suspicious of foreign body. Patient underwent exploratory laparatomy which reveals dilated small bowel with sharp bony object in ileum, which was retrieved with enterotomy.

  15. Colon imaging in radiology departments in 2008: goodbye to the routine double contrast barium enema.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Giles

    2008-10-01

    fluoroscopy budgets as barium enemas are discontinued. Some larger hospitals may reserve a scanner purely for alimentary tract work- perhaps CTC and CT enterography. The essential administrative breakthrough will be to establish either a technical fee for CTC or an appropriate increase in the hospital global budget to allow high-volume CTC to flourish Nationally standards and guidelines will be needed, and if we are to play a major role in screening, where high standards have to be evaluated and maintained, we may need nationally organized individual audit feedback, much as we have with breast screening. Should the known data sets have a role in training for radiologists embarking on screening or in demonstrating continued competence? It is an exciting time once again for radiologists interested in colonic disease. We now know that CTC can be done very well. The challenges are going to be achieving consistency and deciding which of the 6 areas of opportunity described above are our priorities.

  16. Overview of pediatric short bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Duro, Debora; Kamin, Daniel; Duggan, Christopher

    2008-08-01

    Short bowel syndrome (SBS) is a malabsorptive state occuring as a result of surgical resection or congenital disease of a significant portion of the small intestine . The amount of resection or remaining bowel generally dictates the degree of malabsorption and consequentely the need for specialized enteral nutrition or parenteral nutrition (PN). Intestinal failure in the context of SBS is defined as a dependence on PN to maintain minimal energy and fluid requirement for growth in children. Common causes of SBS in infants and children include necrotizing enterocolitis, midgut volvulus, intestinal atresia, and gastroschisis. Early identification of patients at risk for long-term PN dependency is the first step toward avoiding severe complications. Close monitoring of nutritional status, steady and early introduction of enteral nutrition, and aggressive prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of infections such as central venous catheter sepsis and bacterial overgrowth can significantly improve the prognosis. Intestinal transplantation is an emerging treatment that may be considered when intestinal failure is irreversible and children are experiencing serious complications related to TPN administration. PMID:18667916

  17. Is irritable bowel syndrome an infectious disease?

    PubMed

    Thompson, John Richard

    2016-01-28

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is the most common of all gastroenterological diseases. While many mechanisms have been postulated to explain its etiology, no single mechanism entirely explains the heterogeneity of symptoms seen with the various phenotypes of the disease. Recent data from both basic and clinical sciences suggest that underlying infectious disease may provide a unifying hypothesis that better explains the overall symptomatology. The presence of small intestinal bowel overgrowth (SIBO) has been documented in patients with IBS and reductions in SIBO as determined by breath testing correlate with IBS symptom improvement in clinical trials. The incidence of new onset IBS symptoms following acute infectious gastroenteritis also suggests an infectious cause. Alterations in microbiota-host interactions may compromise epithelial barrier integrity, immune function, and the development and function of both central and enteric nervous systems explaining alterations in the brain-gut axis. Clinical evidence from treatment trials with both probiotics and antibiotics also support this etiology. Probiotics appear to restore the imbalance in the microflora and improve IBS-specific quality of life. Antibiotic trials with both neomycin and rifaximin show improvement in global IBS symptoms that correlates with breath test normalization in diarrhea-predominant patients. The treatment response to two weeks of rifaximin is sustained for up to ten weeks and comparable results are seen in symptom reduction with retreatment in patients who develop recurrent symptoms. PMID:26819502

  18. Is irritable bowel syndrome an infectious disease?

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, John Richard

    2016-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is the most common of all gastroenterological diseases. While many mechanisms have been postulated to explain its etiology, no single mechanism entirely explains the heterogeneity of symptoms seen with the various phenotypes of the disease. Recent data from both basic and clinical sciences suggest that underlying infectious disease may provide a unifying hypothesis that better explains the overall symptomatology. The presence of small intestinal bowel overgrowth (SIBO) has been documented in patients with IBS and reductions in SIBO as determined by breath testing correlate with IBS symptom improvement in clinical trials. The incidence of new onset IBS symptoms following acute infectious gastroenteritis also suggests an infectious cause. Alterations in microbiota-host interactions may compromise epithelial barrier integrity, immune function, and the development and function of both central and enteric nervous systems explaining alterations in the brain-gut axis. Clinical evidence from treatment trials with both probiotics and antibiotics also support this etiology. Probiotics appear to restore the imbalance in the microflora and improve IBS-specific quality of life. Antibiotic trials with both neomycin and rifaximin show improvement in global IBS symptoms that correlates with breath test normalization in diarrhea-predominant patients. The treatment response to two weeks of rifaximin is sustained for up to ten weeks and comparable results are seen in symptom reduction with retreatment in patients who develop recurrent symptoms. PMID:26819502

  19. Diet and the irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Friedman, G

    1991-06-01

    Food intake plays a key role in triggering or perpetuating symptoms in patients with IBS. Evaluation of the impact of diet in the individual patient requires a precise dietary history and a 7-day prospective dietary analysis, which should include the quality and quantity of food consumed, chronologic sequence and nature of symptoms, and the frequency and consistency of bowel movements. The caloric density of the meal, total fat intake, the quantity and quality of lactose-containing foods, sorbitol, fructose, and the nature and quantity of soluble and insoluble fiber intake must be noted. Patients with reflux esophageal symptoms should eliminate foods that decrease LES pressure, such as chocolate, peppermint, alcohol, and coffee. Direct esophageal mucosal irritants such as tomatoes, citrus juices, sharp condiments, and alcohol should be limited. Gastric emptying is slowed with the ingestion of fats and soluble fiber. Small bowel motility is slowed by soluble fiber and fatty foods. Gaseous syndromes may be reduced by avoidance of smoking, chewing gum, excessive liquid intake, and carbonated drinks. The reduced intake of large amounts of lactose-containing foods, sorbitol, and fructose may limit postprandial bloating. Flatus production can be lowered by reducing fermentable carbohydrates such as beans, cabbage, lentils, brussel sprouts, and legumes. Soluble and insoluble fiber ingestion will reduce sigmoidal intraluminal pressures and overcome spastic constipation when given in progressive graded doses. Effective dietary manipulations remain a key factor in reducing symptoms in IBS. PMID:2066155

  20. Is irritable bowel syndrome an infectious disease?

    PubMed

    Thompson, John Richard

    2016-01-28

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is the most common of all gastroenterological diseases. While many mechanisms have been postulated to explain its etiology, no single mechanism entirely explains the heterogeneity of symptoms seen with the various phenotypes of the disease. Recent data from both basic and clinical sciences suggest that underlying infectious disease may provide a unifying hypothesis that better explains the overall symptomatology. The presence of small intestinal bowel overgrowth (SIBO) has been documented in patients with IBS and reductions in SIBO as determined by breath testing correlate with IBS symptom improvement in clinical trials. The incidence of new onset IBS symptoms following acute infectious gastroenteritis also suggests an infectious cause. Alterations in microbiota-host interactions may compromise epithelial barrier integrity, immune function, and the development and function of both central and enteric nervous systems explaining alterations in the brain-gut axis. Clinical evidence from treatment trials with both probiotics and antibiotics also support this etiology. Probiotics appear to restore the imbalance in the microflora and improve IBS-specific quality of life. Antibiotic trials with both neomycin and rifaximin show improvement in global IBS symptoms that correlates with breath test normalization in diarrhea-predominant patients. The treatment response to two weeks of rifaximin is sustained for up to ten weeks and comparable results are seen in symptom reduction with retreatment in patients who develop recurrent symptoms.