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Sample records for small coupling behaviour

  1. Health behaviour change interventions for couples: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Arden-Close, Emily; McGrath, Nuala

    2017-05-01

    Partners are a significant influence on individuals' health, and concordance in health behaviours increases over time in couples. Several theories suggest that couple-focused interventions for health behaviour change may therefore be more effective than individual interventions. A systematic review of health behaviour change interventions for couples was conducted. Systematic search methods identified randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and non-randomized interventions of health behaviour change for couples with at least one member at risk of a chronic physical illness, published from 1990-2014. We identified 14 studies, targeting the following health behaviours: cancer prevention (6), obesity (1), diet (2), smoking in pregnancy (2), physical activity (1) and multiple health behaviours (2). In four out of seven trials couple-focused interventions were more effective than usual care. Of four RCTs comparing a couple-focused intervention to an individual intervention, two found that the couple-focused intervention was more effective. The studies were heterogeneous, and included participants at risk of a variety of illnesses. In many cases the intervention was compared to usual care for an individual or an individual-focused intervention, which meant the impact of the couplebased content could not be isolated. Three arm studies could determine whether any added benefits of couple-focused interventions are due to adding the partner or specific content of couple-focused interventions. Statement of contribution What is already known on this subject? Health behaviours and health behaviour change are more often concordant across couples than between individuals in the general population. Couple-focused interventions for chronic conditions are more effective than individual interventions or usual care (Martire, Schulz, Helgeson, Small, & Saghafi, ). What does this study add? Identified studies targeted a variety of health behaviours, with few studies in any one area. Further

  2. Coupled influences of topography and wind on wildland fire behaviour

    Treesearch

    Rodman Linn; Judith Winterkamp; Carleton Edminster; Jonah J. Colman; William S. Smith

    2007-01-01

    Ten simulations were performed with the HIGRAD/FIRETEC wildfire behaviour model in order to explore its utility in studying wildfire behaviour in inhomogeneous topography. The goal of these simulations is to explore the potential extent of the coupling between the fire, atmosphere, and topography. The ten simulations described in this paper include five different...

  3. Veterinarians' perceptions of behaviour support in small-animal practice

    PubMed Central

    Roshier, A. L.; McBride, E. A.

    2013-01-01

    Veterinarians are professionals considered to be at the forefront of animal welfare, including behaviour medicine. However, concerns raised, both within the profession and without, highlight that the support offered is not optimal, due to deficiencies in veterinary training, which focuses on physical aspects and overlooks psychological aspects. This preliminary study explored the experiences and perceptions of six veterinarians (three male, three female, age range: 23–55 years) in two UK small-animal practices. Seventeen annual booster consultations were videoed and conversations thematically analysed for welfare topics discussed. Both veterinarians and clients completed questionnaires to gather demographic information and perspectives. All veterinarians recognised behaviour as a component of their caseload, and acknowledged that clients expected them to provide behaviour support. Veterinarians varied in their experiences of and confidence in providing behaviour support. Five felt unable to meet client expectations; four did not feel their training had prepared them sufficiently. Only one provided dedicated behaviour consultations, the others referred cases. All provided suggestions for behaviour skills needed for new veterinary graduates. The study has afforded an insight into the experiences of a small opportunistic sample of veterinarians. The data indicated important limitations regarding time available in general consultations to discuss behaviour concerns, and practitioner knowledge and skill in detection, anamnesis, assessment and provision of appropriate behaviour information. Suggestions for veterinary training in behaviour are provided. PMID:23475046

  4. Veterinarians' perceptions of behaviour support in small-animal practice.

    PubMed

    Roshier, A L; McBride, E A

    2013-03-09

    Veterinarians are professionals considered to be at the forefront of animal welfare, including behaviour medicine. However, concerns raised, both within the profession and without, highlight that the support offered is not optimal, due to deficiencies in veterinary training, which focuses on physical aspects and overlooks psychological aspects. This preliminary study explored the experiences and perceptions of six veterinarians (three male, three female, age range: 23-55 years) in two UK small-animal practices. Seventeen annual booster consultations were videoed and conversations thematically analysed for welfare topics discussed. Both veterinarians and clients completed questionnaires to gather demographic information and perspectives. All veterinarians recognised behaviour as a component of their caseload, and acknowledged that clients expected them to provide behaviour support. Veterinarians varied in their experiences of and confidence in providing behaviour support. Five felt unable to meet client expectations; four did not feel their training had prepared them sufficiently. Only one provided dedicated behaviour consultations, the others referred cases. All provided suggestions for behaviour skills needed for new veterinary graduates. The study has afforded an insight into the experiences of a small opportunistic sample of veterinarians. The data indicated important limitations regarding time available in general consultations to discuss behaviour concerns, and practitioner knowledge and skill in detection, anamnesis, assessment and provision of appropriate behaviour information. Suggestions for veterinary training in behaviour are provided.

  5. Slime mould foraging behaviour as optically coupled logical operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayne, R.; Adamatzky, A.

    2015-04-01

    Physarum polycephalum is a macroscopic plasmodial slime mould whose apparently 'intelligent' behaviour patterns may be interpreted as computation. We employ plasmodial phototactic responses to construct laboratory prototypes of NOT and NAND logical gates with electrical inputs/outputs and optical coupling in which the slime mould plays dual roles of computing device and electrical conductor. Slime mould logical gates are fault tolerant and resettable. The results presented here demonstrate the malleability and resilience of biological systems and highlight how the innate behaviour patterns of living substrates may be used to implement useful computation.

  6. Small prey species' behaviour and welfare: implications for veterinary professionals.

    PubMed

    McBride, E Anne

    2017-08-01

    People have obligations to ensure the welfare of animals under their care. Offences under the UK Animal Welfare Act are acts, or failures of action, causing unnecessary suffering. Veterinary professionals need to be able to provide current, scientifically based prophylactic advice, and respect the limits of their expertise. The ethical concept of a life worth living and the Five Freedoms are core to welfare. Behaviour is a central component, both influencing and influenced by physical health. Owners frequently misunderstand the behaviour of small prey mammals and how to meet their needs. This review provides insight into the physical-social (external) and the cognitive-emotional (internal) environments of small prey mammals, contextualised within an evolutionary perspective. This is extrapolated to captivity and practical suggestions given for meeting behavioural freedoms and enhancing client understanding and enjoyment of their animals, thereby improving welfare. © 2017 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  7. Small hive beetles survive in honeybee prisons by behavioural mimicry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, J. D.; Pirk, C. W. W.; Hepburn, H. R.; Kastberger, G.; Elzen, P. J.

    2002-05-01

    We report the results of a simple experiment to determine whether honeybees feed their small hive beetle nest parasites. Honeybees incarcerate the beetles in cells constructed of plant resins and continually guard them. The longevity of incarcerated beetles greatly exceeds their metabolic reserves. We show that survival of small hive beetles derives from behavioural mimicry by which the beetles induce the bees to feed them trophallactically. Electronic supplementary material to this paper can be obtained by using the Springer LINK server located at htpp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00114-002-0326-y.

  8. Coherence Resonance of Small World Networks with Adaptive Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyakawa, Kenji

    2015-06-01

    The phenomenon of coherence resonance (CR) in small world networks with adaptive coupling is investigated by modeling a real experimental situation with a photosensitive Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction. We show that both spatial synchronization and temporal coherence of noise-induced firings can be considerably improved by adjusting control parameters, such as the degree of connectivity and the coupling strength. A small fraction of possible long-range connections is enough to obtain a great enhancement in CR.

  9. Age and aggregation trigger mating behaviour in the small hive beetle, Aethina tumida (Nitidulidae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mustafa, Sandra G.; Spooner-Hart, Robert; Duncan, Michael; Pettis, Jeffery S.; Steidle, Johannes L. M.; Rosenkranz, Peter

    2015-10-01

    This study aimed to investigate the poorly documented reproductive behaviour of the small hive beetle, Aethina tumida (Nitidulidae), a honey bee ( Apis mellifera) parasite. We described the mating behaviour in detail and tested the hypothesis that beetle aggregation plays a vital role in mating in this species. Gender preference was examined in the context of age-dependency and possible chemical communication. Beetles started mating at a high frequency 18 days after emergence from the soil but only if they were aggregated ( p < 0.001); mating was infrequent when beetles were paired. Males in aggregation also tried to copulate with males and only copulated more frequently with females at 18 days after emergence from soil ( p < 0.001) in contrast to newly emerged, 7-day-old and 60-day-old beetles. Males and females spent more time in social contact with the opposite sex ( p < 0.01) when they were 18 days old in contrast to 7-day-old beetles. Filter papers which had been in contact with 21-day-old beetles were highly attractive to similar-aged beetles of the opposite sex ( p < 0.01). This suggests that chemical substances produced by the beetles themselves play a role in mating. Mating behaviour was characterised by a short pre-copulation courtship and female aggression towards other females and copulating couples. Both behaviours may be indicative of cryptic female choice. Delayed onset of reproductive behaviour is typical of many polygamous species, whilst the indispensability of aggregation for onset of sexual behaviour seems to be a feature unique to A. tumida. Both strategies support mass reproduction in this parasitic species, enabling A. tumida to overcome its honey bee host colony, and are probably triggered by chemotactic cues.

  10. Age and aggregation trigger mating behaviour in the small hive beetle, Aethina tumida (Nitidulidae).

    PubMed

    Mustafa, Sandra G; Spooner-Hart, Robert; Duncan, Michael; Pettis, Jeffery S; Steidle, Johannes L M; Rosenkranz, Peter

    2015-10-01

    This study aimed to investigate the poorly documented reproductive behaviour of the small hive beetle, Aethina tumida (Nitidulidae), a honey bee (Apis mellifera) parasite. We described the mating behaviour in detail and tested the hypothesis that beetle aggregation plays a vital role in mating in this species. Gender preference was examined in the context of age-dependency and possible chemical communication. Beetles started mating at a high frequency 18 days after emergence from the soil but only if they were aggregated (p < 0.001); mating was infrequent when beetles were paired. Males in aggregation also tried to copulate with males and only copulated more frequently with females at 18 days after emergence from soil (p < 0.001) in contrast to newly emerged, 7-day-old and 60-day-old beetles. Males and females spent more time in social contact with the opposite sex (p < 0.01) when they were 18 days old in contrast to 7-day-old beetles. Filter papers which had been in contact with 21-day-old beetles were highly attractive to similar-aged beetles of the opposite sex (p < 0.01). This suggests that chemical substances produced by the beetles themselves play a role in mating. Mating behaviour was characterised by a short pre-copulation courtship and female aggression towards other females and copulating couples. Both behaviours may be indicative of cryptic female choice. Delayed onset of reproductive behaviour is typical of many polygamous species, whilst the indispensability of aggregation for onset of sexual behaviour seems to be a feature unique to A. tumida. Both strategies support mass reproduction in this parasitic species, enabling A. tumida to overcome its honey bee host colony, and are probably triggered by chemotactic cues..

  11. Couple interdependence impacts HIV-related health behaviours among pregnant couples in southwestern Kenya: a qualitative analysis.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Anna Joy; Achiro, Lillian; Bukusi, Elizabeth A; Hatcher, Abigail M; Kwena, Zachary; Musoke, Pamela L; Turan, Janet M; Weke, Elly; Darbes, Lynae A

    2016-01-01

    HIV infection is frequently transmitted within stable couple partnerships. In order to prevent HIV acquisition in HIV-negative couples, as well as improve coping in couples with an HIV-positive diagnosis, it has been suggested that interventions be aimed at strengthening couple relationships, in addition to addressing individual behaviours. However, little is known about factors that influence relationships to impact joint decision-making related to HIV. We conducted qualitative in-depth interviews with 40 pregnant women and 40 male partners in southwestern Kenya, an area of high HIV prevalence. Drawing from the interdependence model of communal coping and health behaviour change, we employed thematic analysis methods to analyze interview transcripts in Dedoose software with the aim of identifying key relationship factors that could contribute to the development of a couples-based intervention to improve health outcomes for pregnant women and their male partners. In accordance with the interdependence model, we found that couples with greater relationship-centred motivations described jointly engaging in more health-enhancing behaviours, such as couples HIV testing, disclosure of HIV status, and cooperation to improve medication and clinic appointment adherence. These couples often had predisposing factors such as stronger communication skills and shared children, and were less likely to face potential challenges such as polygamous marriages, wife inheritance, living separately, or financial difficulties. For HIV-negative couples, joint decision-making helped them face the health threat of acquiring HIV together. For couples with an HIV-positive diagnosis, communal coping helped reduce risk of interspousal transmission and improve long-term health prospects. Conversely, participants felt that self-centred motivations led to more concurrent sexual partnerships, reduced relationship satisfaction, and mistrust. Couples who lacked interdependence were more likely to

  12. Couple interdependence impacts HIV-related health behaviours among pregnant couples in southwestern Kenya: a qualitative analysis

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Anna Joy; Achiro, Lillian; Bukusi, Elizabeth A; Hatcher, Abigail M; Kwena, Zachary; Musoke, Pamela L; Turan, Janet M; Weke, Elly; Darbes, Lynae A

    2016-01-01

    Introduction HIV infection is frequently transmitted within stable couple partnerships. In order to prevent HIV acquisition in HIV-negative couples, as well as improve coping in couples with an HIV-positive diagnosis, it has been suggested that interventions be aimed at strengthening couple relationships, in addition to addressing individual behaviours. However, little is known about factors that influence relationships to impact joint decision-making related to HIV. Methods We conducted qualitative in-depth interviews with 40 pregnant women and 40 male partners in southwestern Kenya, an area of high HIV prevalence. Drawing from the interdependence model of communal coping and health behaviour change, we employed thematic analysis methods to analyze interview transcripts in Dedoose software with the aim of identifying key relationship factors that could contribute to the development of a couples-based intervention to improve health outcomes for pregnant women and their male partners. Results In accordance with the interdependence model, we found that couples with greater relationship-centred motivations described jointly engaging in more health-enhancing behaviours, such as couples HIV testing, disclosure of HIV status, and cooperation to improve medication and clinic appointment adherence. These couples often had predisposing factors such as stronger communication skills and shared children, and were less likely to face potential challenges such as polygamous marriages, wife inheritance, living separately, or financial difficulties. For HIV-negative couples, joint decision-making helped them face the health threat of acquiring HIV together. For couples with an HIV-positive diagnosis, communal coping helped reduce risk of interspousal transmission and improve long-term health prospects. Conversely, participants felt that self-centred motivations led to more concurrent sexual partnerships, reduced relationship satisfaction, and mistrust. Couples who lacked

  13. Electrically small, complementary electric-field-coupled resonator antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odabasi, H.; Teixeira, F. L.; Guney, D. O.

    2013-02-01

    We study the radiation properties of electrically small resonant antennas (ka <1) composed of electric-field-coupled (ELC) and complementary electric-field-coupled (CELC) resonators and a monopole antenna. We use such parasitic ELC and CELC "metaresonators" to design various electrically small antennas. In particular, monopole-excited and bent-monopole-excited CELC resonator antennas are proposed that provide very low profiles on the order of λ0/20. We compare the performance of the proposed ELC and CELC antennas against more conventional designs based upon split-ring resonators.

  14. A small signal coupling model for predicting the coupling between LNAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Junyu; Cui, Dasheng; Wu, Yuming

    2017-07-01

    A small signal coupling model is developed to analyze the coupling between two LNAs. The mutual inductance between the adjacent on-chip inductors is considered responsible for this coupling. A set of formulas have been derived to quantitatively predict the coupling effects. Based on our analysis, a quick estimation can be made to see which pair of inductors plays a key role in evaluating the coupling between the LNAs. Source inductors of two LNAs are placed closely while the load inductors are far apart according to the analysis. To validate the proposed theory, two 2 GHz LNAs are fabricated. The LNAs have a peak gain of 18 dB and NF of 1.4 dB. The coupling between the LNAs is -30 dB. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 61401025).

  15. Large- and Small-Scale Ring Current Electrodynamic Coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, G. V.

    2003-01-01

    In this talk we will address the two primary issues of ring current (RC) electrodynamic coupling: 1. RC self-consistent magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling that includes calculation of the magnetospheric electric field (large scale electrodynamic coupling); and 2. RC self-consistent coupling with electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves (small scale electrodynamic coupling). Our study will be based on two RC models that we have recently developed in our group. The first model by Khazanov et al. [2002] couples the system of two kinetic equations: one equation which describes the RC ion dynamics and another equation which describes the energy density evolution of EMIC waves. The second model by Khazanov et al. [2003] deals with large scale electrodynamic coupling processes and provides a self-consistent simulation of RC ions and the magnetospheric electric field. There is presently no model that addresses both of these issues simultaneously in a self-consistent calculation. However, the need exists for such a model, because these two processes directly influence each other, with the mesoscale coupling changing the drift paths of the thermal and energetic particle populations in the inner magnetosphere, thereby changing the wave interactions, and the microscale coupling altering the pitch angle distributions and ionospheric conductivities (through increased precipitation), thus changing the field-aligned currents and electric potential structure. The initial thrust of the work will be the development of a combined kinetic model of micro- and meso-scale RC electrodynamic coupling processes and to examine their interactions with each other on a global scale.

  16. Experimental multistable states for small network of coupled pendula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudkowski, Dawid; Grabski, Juliusz; Wojewoda, Jerzy; Perlikowski, Przemyslaw; Maistrenko, Yuri; Kapitaniak, Tomasz

    2016-07-01

    Chimera states are dynamical patterns emerging in populations of coupled identical oscillators where different groups of oscillators exhibit coexisting synchronous and incoherent behaviors despite homogeneous coupling. Although these states are typically observed in the large ensembles of oscillators, recently it has been shown that so-called weak chimera states may occur in the systems with small numbers of oscillators. Here, we show that similar multistable states demonstrating partial frequency synchronization, can be observed in simple experiments with identical mechanical oscillators, namely pendula. The mathematical model of our experiment shows that the observed multistable states are controlled by elementary dynamical equations, derived from Newton’s laws that are ubiquitous in many physical and engineering systems. Our finding suggests that multistable chimera-like states are observable in small networks relevant to various real-world systems.

  17. Experimental multistable states for small network of coupled pendula

    PubMed Central

    Dudkowski, Dawid; Grabski, Juliusz; Wojewoda, Jerzy; Perlikowski, Przemyslaw; Maistrenko, Yuri; Kapitaniak, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    Chimera states are dynamical patterns emerging in populations of coupled identical oscillators where different groups of oscillators exhibit coexisting synchronous and incoherent behaviors despite homogeneous coupling. Although these states are typically observed in the large ensembles of oscillators, recently it has been shown that so-called weak chimera states may occur in the systems with small numbers of oscillators. Here, we show that similar multistable states demonstrating partial frequency synchronization, can be observed in simple experiments with identical mechanical oscillators, namely pendula. The mathematical model of our experiment shows that the observed multistable states are controlled by elementary dynamical equations, derived from Newton’s laws that are ubiquitous in many physical and engineering systems. Our finding suggests that multistable chimera-like states are observable in small networks relevant to various real-world systems. PMID:27445038

  18. The Drosophila small GTPase Rac2 is required for normal feeding and mating behaviour.

    PubMed

    Goergen, Philip; Kasagiannis, Anna; Schiöth, Helgi B; Williams, Michael J

    2014-03-01

    All multicellular organisms require the ability to regulate bodily processes in order to maintain a stable condition, which necessitates fluctuations in internal metabolics, as well as modifications of outward behaviour. Understanding the genetics behind this modulation is important as a general model for the metabolic modification of behaviour. This study demonstrates that the activity of the small GTPase Rac2 is required in Drosophila for the proper regulation of lipid storage and feeding behaviour, as well as aggression and mating behaviours. Rac2 mutant males and females are susceptible to starvation and contain considerably less lipids than controls. Furthermore, Rac2 mutants also have disrupted feeding behaviour, eating fewer but larger meals than controls. Intriguingly, Rac2 mutant males rarely initiate aggressive behaviour and display significantly increased levels of courtship behaviour towards other males and mated females. From these results we conclude that Rac2 has a central role in regulating the Drosophila homeostatic system.

  19. True-slime-mould-inspired hydrostatically coupled oscillator system exhibiting versatile behaviours.

    PubMed

    Umedachi, Takuya; Idei, Ryo; Ito, Kentaro; Ishiguro, Akio

    2013-09-01

    Behavioural diversity is an indispensable attribute of living systems, which makes them intrinsically adaptive and responsive to the demands of a dynamically changing environment. In contrast, conventional engineering approaches struggle to suppress behavioural diversity in artificial systems to reach optimal performance in given environments for desired tasks. The goals of this research include understanding the essential mechanism that endows living systems with behavioural diversity and implementing the mechanism in robots to exhibit adaptive behaviours. For this purpose, we have focused on an amoeba-like unicellular organism: the plasmodium of true slime mould. Despite the absence of a central nervous system, the plasmodium exhibits versatile spatiotemporal oscillatory patterns and switches spontaneously among these patterns. By exploiting this behavioural diversity, it is able to exhibit adaptive behaviour according to the situation encountered. Inspired by this organism, we built a real physical robot using hydrostatically coupled oscillators that produce versatile oscillatory patterns and spontaneous transitions among the patterns. The experimental results show that exploiting physical hydrostatic interplay—the physical dynamics of the robot—allows simple phase oscillators to promote versatile behaviours. The results can contribute to an understanding of how a living system generates versatile and adaptive behaviours with physical interplays among body parts.

  20. Synchronizing large number of nonidentical oscillators with small coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ye; Xiao, Jinghua; Hu, Gang; Zhan, Meng

    2012-02-01

    The topic of synchronization of oscillators has attracted great and persistent interest, and all previous conclusions and intuitions have convinced that large coupling is required for synchronizing a large number of coupled nonidentical oscillators. Here the influences of different spatial frequency distributions on the efficiency of frequency synchronization are investigated by studying arrays of coupled oscillators with diverse natural frequency distributions. A universal log-normal distribution of critical coupling strength Kc for synchronization irrespective of the initial natural frequency is found. In particular, a physical quantity "roughness"R of spatial frequency configuration is defined, and it is found that the efficiency of synchronization increases monotonously with R. For large R we can reach full synchronization of arrays with a large number of oscillators at finite Kc. Two typical kinds of synchronization, the "multiple-clustering" one and the "single-center-clustering" one, are identified for small and large R's, respectively. The mechanism of the latter type is the key reason for synchronizing long arrays with finite Kc.

  1. Modelling small-patterned neuronal networks coupled to microelectrode arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massobrio, Paolo; Martinoia, Sergio

    2008-09-01

    Cultured neurons coupled to planar substrates which exhibit 'well-defined' two-dimensional network architectures can provide valuable insights into cell-to-cell communication, network dynamics versus topology, and basic mechanisms of synaptic plasticity and learning. In the literature several approaches were presented to drive neuronal growth, such as surface modification by silane chemistry, photolithographic techniques, microcontact printing, microfluidic channel flow patterning, microdrop patterning, etc. This work presents a computational model fit for reproducing and explaining the dynamics exhibited by small-patterned neuronal networks coupled to microelectrode arrays (MEAs). The model is based on the concept of meta-neuron, i.e., a small spatially confined number of actual neurons which perform single macroscopic functions. Each meta-neuron is characterized by a detailed morphology, and the membrane channels are modelled by simple Hodgkin-Huxley and passive kinetics. The two main findings that emerge from the simulations can be summarized as follows: (i) the increasing complexity of meta-neuron morphology reflects the variations of the network dynamics as a function of network development; (ii) the dynamics displayed by the patterned neuronal networks considered can be explained by hypothesizing the presence of several short- and a few long-term distance interactions among small assemblies of neurons (i.e., meta-neurons).

  2. Modelling small-patterned neuronal networks coupled to microelectrode arrays.

    PubMed

    Massobrio, Paolo; Martinoia, Sergio

    2008-09-01

    Cultured neurons coupled to planar substrates which exhibit 'well-defined' two-dimensional network architectures can provide valuable insights into cell-to-cell communication, network dynamics versus topology, and basic mechanisms of synaptic plasticity and learning. In the literature several approaches were presented to drive neuronal growth, such as surface modification by silane chemistry, photolithographic techniques, microcontact printing, microfluidic channel flow patterning, microdrop patterning, etc. This work presents a computational model fit for reproducing and explaining the dynamics exhibited by small-patterned neuronal networks coupled to microelectrode arrays (MEAs). The model is based on the concept of meta-neuron, i.e., a small spatially confined number of actual neurons which perform single macroscopic functions. Each meta-neuron is characterized by a detailed morphology, and the membrane channels are modelled by simple Hodgkin-Huxley and passive kinetics. The two main findings that emerge from the simulations can be summarized as follows: (i) the increasing complexity of meta-neuron morphology reflects the variations of the network dynamics as a function of network development; (ii) the dynamics displayed by the patterned neuronal networks considered can be explained by hypothesizing the presence of several short- and a few long-term distance interactions among small assemblies of neurons (i.e., meta-neurons).

  3. Small core fiber coupled 60-W laser diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernie, Douglas P.; Mannonen, Ilkka; Raven, Anthony L.

    1995-05-01

    Semiconductor laser diodes are compact, efficient and reliable sources of laser light and 25 W fiber coupled systems developed by Diomed have been in clinical use for over three years. For certain applications, particularly in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia and flexible endoscopy, higher powers are desirable. In these applications the use of flexible optical fibers of no more than 600 micrometers core diameter is essential for compatibility with most commercial delivery fibers and instrumentation. A high power 60 W diode laser system for driving these small core fibers has been developed. The design requirements for medical applications are analyzed and system performance and results of use in gastroenterology and urology with small core fibers will be presented.

  4. Changing the Environmental Behaviour of Small Business Owners: The Business Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Beth; Redmond, Janice

    2014-01-01

    The importance of the environment is something of a cracked record to many small business owners, as historically any calls to business to change or improve their practices or behaviours were from the "environmental" or "green" perspective, rather than from a business perspective. As a consequence, many small businesses have…

  5. Changing the Environmental Behaviour of Small Business Owners: The Business Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Beth; Redmond, Janice

    2014-01-01

    The importance of the environment is something of a cracked record to many small business owners, as historically any calls to business to change or improve their practices or behaviours were from the "environmental" or "green" perspective, rather than from a business perspective. As a consequence, many small businesses have…

  6. Quality of Life and Marital Adjustment after Cognitive Behavioural Therapy and Behavioural Marital Therapy in Couples with Anxiety Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Kavitha, Chirumamilla; Rangan, Uma

    2014-01-01

    Background: Anxiety disorders may affect nearly one in four persons and may cause significant impairment of interpersonal relationships including marital relationships. The effect of the disorder on the spouse and the impact of including the spouse in therapy are not well studied. Aim: To determine if Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) improves the quality of life of participants with anxiety disorders and if marital adjustment of couples with anxiety disorders can be improved with Behavioural Marital Therapy (BMT), relative to standard care of pharmacotherapy and psychoeducation. Methods: An open label randomised controlled trial. Participants were randomly assigned to CBT+BMT or standard of care. Final assessments were carried out at 3.5 months after baseline. Quality of life was assessed using the WHOQOL-Bref instrument and Marital adjustment was measured using a marital quality scale. Chi-square test, student’s t-test and Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) and Effect sizes with Cohen’s d were used to compare differences between groups. Results: Clinically meaningful effect sizes for the CBT+ BMT intervention were evident for the marital adjustment scores among participants (d=0.63) and their spouses (d=1.29), and for the psychological (d=0.84), social (d=0.72) and environmental (d=0.52) domains of the WHOQOL of participants and psychological (d=0.86), social (d=0.32) and environmental domains (d=1.01) of the WHOQOL of spouses of participants. Conclusion: CBT for the partner with anxiety disorder and BMT for couples with anxiety disorders and marital discord and involvement of the spouse in the therapy will be a useful addition to the management of a couple where one partner has an anxiety disorder. PMID:25302250

  7. Sports teams as complex adaptive systems: manipulating player numbers shapes behaviours during football small-sided games.

    PubMed

    Silva, Pedro; Vilar, Luís; Davids, Keith; Araújo, Duarte; Garganta, Júlio

    2016-01-01

    Small-sided and conditioned games (SSCGs) in sport have been modelled as complex adaptive systems. Research has shown that the relative space per player (RSP) formulated in SSCGs can impact on emergent tactical behaviours. In this study we adopted a systems orientation to analyse how different RSP values, obtained through manipulations of player numbers, influenced four measures of interpersonal coordination observed during performance in SSCGs. For this purpose we calculated positional data (GPS 15 Hz) from ten U-15 football players performing in three SSCGs varying in player numbers (3v3, 4v4 and 5v5). Key measures of SSCG system behaviours included values of (1) players' dispersion, (2) teams' separateness, (3) coupling strength and time delays between participants' emerging movements, respectively. Results showed that values of participants' dispersion increased, but the teams' separateness remained identical across treatments. Coupling strength and time delay also showed consistent values across SSCGs. These results exemplified how complex adaptive systems, like football teams, can harness inherent degeneracy to maintain similar team spatial-temporal relations with opponents through changes in inter-individual coordination modes (i.e., players' dispersion). The results imply that different team behaviours might emerge at different ratios of field dimension/player numbers. Therefore, sport pedagogists should carefully evaluate the effects of changing RSP in SSCGs as a way of promoting increased or decreased pressure on players.

  8. Quantum plasmon resonances and coupling of small nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mario, Zapata-Herrera; Jefferson, Florez; Angela, Camacho

    2013-03-01

    In this work, we propose to extend a theoretical quantum approach to describe the behavior of the optical response as a function of both size and shape of small metal nanoparticles. By using classical models as well as quantum approaches we also want to study the nanoparticle's permittivity in the whole range of nanometers in order to define the different regimes at the nanoscale. In particular, we are interested in examining size and shape effects on the enhancement field factor and the absorption spectra for comparing with possible experiments. We study the role played by Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance in the coupling of small metal nanoparticles pairs by varying the distance between them by using an analogy between molecular electronic states and plasmonic excitations as a function of particle size and shape. We pay special atention on tunnelling and multipolar effects in order to predict the regime of dimer formation. The main interest in understanding the plasmon resonances of small nanoparticles lies in the applications in biology, catalysis and quantum optics.

  9. Experiments with a small behaviour controlled planetary rover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, David P.; Desai, Rajiv S.; Gat, Erann; Ivlev, Robert; Loch, John

    1993-01-01

    A series of experiments that were performed on the Rocky 3 robot is described. Rocky 3 is a small autonomous rover capable of navigating through rough outdoor terrain to a predesignated area, searching that area for soft soil, acquiring a soil sample, and depositing the sample in a container at its home base. The robot is programmed according to a reactive behavior control paradigm using the ALFA programming language. This style of programming produces robust autonomous performance while requiring significantly less computational resources than more traditional mobile robot control systems. The code for Rocky 3 runs on an eight bit processor and uses about ten k of memory.

  10. Experiments with a small behaviour controlled planetary rover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, David P.; Desai, Rajiv S.; Gat, Erann; Ivlev, Robert; Loch, John

    1993-01-01

    A series of experiments that were performed on the Rocky 3 robot is described. Rocky 3 is a small autonomous rover capable of navigating through rough outdoor terrain to a predesignated area, searching that area for soft soil, acquiring a soil sample, and depositing the sample in a container at its home base. The robot is programmed according to a reactive behavior control paradigm using the ALFA programming language. This style of programming produces robust autonomous performance while requiring significantly less computational resources than more traditional mobile robot control systems. The code for Rocky 3 runs on an eight bit processor and uses about ten k of memory.

  11. A cell-based computational model of early embryogenesis coupling mechanical behaviour and gene regulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delile, Julien; Herrmann, Matthieu; Peyriéras, Nadine; Doursat, René

    2017-01-01

    The study of multicellular development is grounded in two complementary domains: cell biomechanics, which examines how physical forces shape the embryo, and genetic regulation and molecular signalling, which concern how cells determine their states and behaviours. Integrating both sides into a unified framework is crucial to fully understand the self-organized dynamics of morphogenesis. Here we introduce MecaGen, an integrative modelling platform enabling the hypothesis-driven simulation of these dual processes via the coupling between mechanical and chemical variables. Our approach relies upon a minimal `cell behaviour ontology' comprising mesenchymal and epithelial cells and their associated behaviours. MecaGen enables the specification and control of complex collective movements in 3D space through a biologically relevant gene regulatory network and parameter space exploration. Three case studies investigating pattern formation, epithelial differentiation and tissue tectonics in zebrafish early embryogenesis, the latter with quantitative comparison to live imaging data, demonstrate the validity and usefulness of our framework.

  12. A cell-based computational model of early embryogenesis coupling mechanical behaviour and gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Delile, Julien; Herrmann, Matthieu; Peyriéras, Nadine; Doursat, René

    2017-01-23

    The study of multicellular development is grounded in two complementary domains: cell biomechanics, which examines how physical forces shape the embryo, and genetic regulation and molecular signalling, which concern how cells determine their states and behaviours. Integrating both sides into a unified framework is crucial to fully understand the self-organized dynamics of morphogenesis. Here we introduce MecaGen, an integrative modelling platform enabling the hypothesis-driven simulation of these dual processes via the coupling between mechanical and chemical variables. Our approach relies upon a minimal 'cell behaviour ontology' comprising mesenchymal and epithelial cells and their associated behaviours. MecaGen enables the specification and control of complex collective movements in 3D space through a biologically relevant gene regulatory network and parameter space exploration. Three case studies investigating pattern formation, epithelial differentiation and tissue tectonics in zebrafish early embryogenesis, the latter with quantitative comparison to live imaging data, demonstrate the validity and usefulness of our framework.

  13. Coupling tendencies during exploratory behaviours of competing players in rugby union dyads.

    PubMed

    Correia, Vanda; Passos, Pedro; Araújo, Duarte; Davids, Keith; Diniz, Ana; Kelso, J A Scott

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated interpersonal coordination tendencies in 1vs.1 dyads in rugby union, here expressed by participants' movement velocity towards or away from the sideline as they competed to score or prevent a try. We examined whether coupling tendencies of members of each dyad shaped key performance outcomes (try or successful tackle). Data on movement displacement trajectories of eight male rugby union players (aged 11-12 years) were analysed during performance in 47 trials. To assess coordination tendencies during exploratory behaviours in the dyads, analyses of performance time series data were undertaken using variable time graphs, running correlations and cross-correlations. Results revealed distinct coupling patterns characterised by shifts between synchronous coordination and asynchronous coordination tendencies and uncoordinated actions. Observed behaviours were interpreted as attempts of competing participants to create and perceive possibilities for action while seeking to achieve specific performance goals. Findings also revealed that a variety of patterned relations between participants resulted in different performance outcomes.

  14. Emergence of global scaling behaviour in the coupled Earth-atmosphere interaction

    PubMed Central

    Fallah, Bijan; Saberi, Abbas Ali; Sodoudi, Sahar

    2016-01-01

    Scale invariance property in the global geometry of Earth may lead to a coupled interactive behaviour between various components of the climate system. One of the most interesting correlations exists between spatial statistics of the global topography and the temperature on Earth. Here we show that the power-law behaviour observed in the Earth topography via different approaches, resembles a scaling law in the global spatial distribution of independent atmospheric parameters. We report on observation of scaling behaviour of such variables characterized by distinct universal exponents. More specifically, we find that the spatial power-law behaviour in the fluctuations of the near surface temperature over the lands on Earth, shares the same universal exponent as of the global Earth topography, indicative of the global persistent role of the static geometry of Earth to control the steady state of a dynamical atmospheric field. Such a universal feature can pave the way to the theoretical understanding of the chaotic nature of the atmosphere coupled to the Earth’s global topography. PMID:27666675

  15. Emergence of global scaling behaviour in the coupled Earth-atmosphere interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallah, Bijan; Saberi, Abbas Ali; Sodoudi, Sahar

    2016-09-01

    Scale invariance property in the global geometry of Earth may lead to a coupled interactive behaviour between various components of the climate system. One of the most interesting correlations exists between spatial statistics of the global topography and the temperature on Earth. Here we show that the power-law behaviour observed in the Earth topography via different approaches, resembles a scaling law in the global spatial distribution of independent atmospheric parameters. We report on observation of scaling behaviour of such variables characterized by distinct universal exponents. More specifically, we find that the spatial power-law behaviour in the fluctuations of the near surface temperature over the lands on Earth, shares the same universal exponent as of the global Earth topography, indicative of the global persistent role of the static geometry of Earth to control the steady state of a dynamical atmospheric field. Such a universal feature can pave the way to the theoretical understanding of the chaotic nature of the atmosphere coupled to the Earth’s global topography.

  16. Timescales for exploratory tactical behaviour in football small-sided games.

    PubMed

    Ric, Angel; Hristovski, Robert; Gonçalves, Bruno; Torres, Lorena; Sampaio, Jaime; Torrents, Carlota

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the dynamics of tactical behaviour emerging on different timescales in football small-sided games and to quantify short- and long-term exploratory behaviour according to the number of opponents. Two teams of four professional male footballers played small-sided games against two different teams with a variable number of opponents (3, 5 and 7). Data were collected using a combination of systematic observation and a non-differential global positioning system (15 Hz). The temporal diversity and structural flexibility of the players were determined by calculating the dynamic overlap order parameter q, entropy and trapping strength. Analysis of the exploratory dynamics revealed two different timescales, forming a different metastable landscape of action for each constraint. Fast dynamics lasted on average a few seconds and consisted of changes in tactical patterns. The long timescale corresponded to the shared tasks of offence and defence lasting tens of seconds. The players' tactical diversity decreased with an increasing number of opponents, especially in defence. Manipulating numerical imbalance is likely to promote changes in the diversity, unpredictability and flexibility of tactical solutions. The fact that the temporally nested structure of constraints shaped the emergence of tactical behaviour provides a new rationale for practice task design. The manipulation of numerical imbalance on the timescale of a few tens of seconds, on which the exploratory behaviour of players saturates, may help coaches to optimise the exploratory efficiency of the small-sided games.

  17. Exploring Early Angiosperm Fire Feedbacks using Coupled Experiments and Modelling Approaches to Estimate Cretaceous Palaeofire Behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belcher, Claire; Hudpsith, Victoria

    2016-04-01

    Using the fossil record we are typically limited to exploring linkages between palaeoecological changes and palaeofire activity by assessing the abundance of charcoals preserved in sediments. However, it is the behaviour of fires that primarily governs their ecological effects. Therefore, the ability to estimate variations in aspects of palaeofire behaviour such as palaeofire intensity and rate of spread would be of key benefit toward understanding the coupled evolutionary history of ecosystems and fire. The Cretaceous Period saw major diversification in land plants. Previously, conifers (gymnosperms) and ferns (pteridophytes) dominated Earth's ecosystems until flowering plants (angiosperms) appear in the fossil record of the Early Cretaceous (~135Ma). We have created surface fire behaviour estimates for a variety of angiosperm invasion scenarios and explored the influence of Cretaceous superambient atmospheric oxygen levels on the fire behaviour occurring in these new Cretaceous ecosystems. These estimates are then used to explore the hypothesis that the early spread of the angiosperms was promoted by the novel fire regimes that they created. In order to achieve this we tested the flammability of Mesozoic analogue fuel types in controlled laboratory experiments using an iCone calorimeter, which measured the ignitability as well as the effective heat of combustion of the fuels. We then used the BehavePlus fire behaviour modelling system to scale up our laboratory results to the ecosystem scale. Our results suggest that fire-angiosperm feedbacks may have occurred in two phases: The first phase being a result of weedy angiosperms providing an additional easily ignitable fuel that enhanced both the seasonality and frequency of surface fires. In the second phase, the addition of shrubby understory fuels likely expanded the number of ecosystems experiencing more intense surface fires, resulting in enhanced mortality and suppressed post-fire recruitment of gymnosperms

  18. Denominational affiliation and fertility behaviour in an African context: an examination of couple data from Ghana.

    PubMed

    Gyimah, Stephen Obeng; Takyi, Baffour; Tenkorang, Eric Yeboah

    2008-05-01

    Although studies have examined religious differences in fertility in sub-Saharan Africa, it is argued in this paper that using women-only sample data may be conceptually problematic in patriarchal African societies where the influence of husbands on their wives' reproductive preferences is paramount. The present study contributes to this discourse by examining the relationship between religion and fertility behaviour using matched-couple data from Ghana. Guided by the 'religious values' and 'characteristics' hypotheses, the results indicate significant religious differences in fertility. Compared with Traditionalists, Christians and Muslims have lower fertility, albeit these differences diminish significantly after controlling for socioeconomic variables. The impact of wife's religious denomination on marital fertility is attenuated after controlling for husband's religious affiliation. Also, fertility was found to be higher if couples belong to the same faith compared with those of different faiths.

  19. A cell-based computational model of early embryogenesis coupling mechanical behaviour and gene regulation

    PubMed Central

    Delile, Julien; Herrmann, Matthieu; Peyriéras, Nadine; Doursat, René

    2017-01-01

    The study of multicellular development is grounded in two complementary domains: cell biomechanics, which examines how physical forces shape the embryo, and genetic regulation and molecular signalling, which concern how cells determine their states and behaviours. Integrating both sides into a unified framework is crucial to fully understand the self-organized dynamics of morphogenesis. Here we introduce MecaGen, an integrative modelling platform enabling the hypothesis-driven simulation of these dual processes via the coupling between mechanical and chemical variables. Our approach relies upon a minimal ‘cell behaviour ontology' comprising mesenchymal and epithelial cells and their associated behaviours. MecaGen enables the specification and control of complex collective movements in 3D space through a biologically relevant gene regulatory network and parameter space exploration. Three case studies investigating pattern formation, epithelial differentiation and tissue tectonics in zebrafish early embryogenesis, the latter with quantitative comparison to live imaging data, demonstrate the validity and usefulness of our framework. PMID:28112150

  20. Coupling metabolism and chemotaxis-dependent behaviours by energy taxis receptors.

    PubMed

    Alexandre, Gladys

    2010-08-01

    Bacteria have evolved the ability to monitor changes in various physico-chemical parameters and to adapt their physiology and metabolism by implementing appropriate cellular responses to these changes. Energy taxis is a metabolism-dependent form of taxis and is the directed movement of motile bacteria in gradients of physico-chemical parameters that affect metabolism. Energy taxis has been described in diverse bacterial species and several dedicated energy sensors have been identified. The molecular mechanism of energy taxis has not been studied in as much detail as chemotaxis, but experimental evidence indicates that this behaviour differs from metabolism-independent taxis only by the presence of dedicated energy taxis receptors. Energy taxis receptors perceive changes in energy-related parameters, including signals related to the redox and/or intracellular energy status of the cell. The best-characterized energy taxis receptors are those that sense the redox state of the electron transport chain via non-covalently bound FAD cofactors. Other receptors shown to mediate energy taxis lack any recognizable redox cofactor or conserved energy-sensing motif, and some have been suggested to monitor changes in the proton motive force. The exact energy-sensing mechanism(s) involved are yet to be elucidated for most of these energy sensors. By monitoring changes in energy-related parameters, energy taxis receptors allow cells to couple motility behaviour with metabolism under diverse environmental conditions. Energy taxis receptors thus provide fruitful models to decipher how cells integrate sensory behaviours with metabolic activities.

  1. Pen size and parity effects on maternal behaviour of Small-Tail Han sheep.

    PubMed

    Lv, S-J; Yang, Y; Dwyer, C M; Li, F-K

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this experiment was to study the effects of pen size and parity on maternal behaviour of twin-bearing Small-Tail Han ewes. A total of 24 ewes were allocated to a 2×2 design (six per pen), with parity (primiparous or multiparous) and pen size (large: 6.0×3.0 m; small: 6.0×1.5 m) as main effects at Linyi University, Shandong Province, China. Behaviour was observed from after parturition until weaning. All ewes were observed for 6 h every 5 days from 0700 to1000 h and from 1400 to 1700 h. Continuous focal animal sampling was used to quantify the duration of maternal behaviours: sucking, grooming and following as well as the frequency of udder accepting, udder refusing and low-pitched bleating. Oestradiol and cortisol concentrations in the faeces (collected in the morning every 5 days) were detected using EIA kits. All lambs were weighed 24 h after parturition and again at weaning at 35 days of age. The small pen size significantly reduced following (P<0.005), grooming (P<0.001) and suckling durations (P<0.05), as well as the frequency of udder refusals (P<0.001). However, there was a significant interaction with ewe parity, with decreased grooming and suckling in the small pen largely seen in the multiparous ewes (P<0.001). Independent of pen size, multiparous ewes accepted more sucking attempts by their lambs (P<0.05) and made more low-pitched bleats than primiparous ewes (P<0.001). Multiparous ewes had higher faecal oestradiol concentrations than primiparous ewes (P<0.001), and ewes in small pens had higher faecal cortisol levels compared with ewes in larger pens (P<0.001). As lambs increased in age, the duration of maternal grooming, following and suckling as well as frequency of udder acceptance and low-pitched bleating all declined, and the frequency of udder refusing increased (P<0.001 for all). Ewe parity, but not pen size, affected lamb weight gain during the period of observation (P<0.001). This is the first study to show that pen size

  2. Large- and small-size advantages in sneaking behaviour in the dusky frillgoby Bathygobius fuscus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takegaki, Takeshi; Kaneko, Takashi; Matsumoto, Yukio

    2012-04-01

    Sneaking tactic, a male alternative reproductive tactic involving sperm competition, is generally adopted by small individuals because of its inconspicuousness. However, large size has an advantage when competition occurs between sneakers for fertilization of eggs. Here, we suggest that both large- and small-size advantages of sneaker males are present within the same species. Large sneaker males of the dusky frillgoby Bathygobius fuscus showed a high success rate in intruding into spawning nests because of their advantage in competition among sneaker males in keeping a suitable position to sneak, whereas small sneakers had few chances to sneak. However, small sneaker males were able to stay in the nests longer than large sneaker males when they succeeded in sneak intrusion. This suggests the possibility of an increase in their paternity. The findings of these size-specific behavioural advantages may be important in considering the evolution of size-related reproductive traits.

  3. Large- and small-size advantages in sneaking behaviour in the dusky frillgoby Bathygobius fuscus.

    PubMed

    Takegaki, Takeshi; Kaneko, Takashi; Matsumoto, Yukio

    2012-04-01

    Sneaking tactic, a male alternative reproductive tactic involving sperm competition, is generally adopted by small individuals because of its inconspicuousness. However, large size has an advantage when competition occurs between sneakers for fertilization of eggs. Here, we suggest that both large- and small-size advantages of sneaker males are present within the same species. Large sneaker males of the dusky frillgoby Bathygobius fuscus showed a high success rate in intruding into spawning nests because of their advantage in competition among sneaker males in keeping a suitable position to sneak, whereas small sneakers had few chances to sneak. However, small sneaker males were able to stay in the nests longer than large sneaker males when they succeeded in sneak intrusion. This suggests the possibility of an increase in their paternity. The findings of these size-specific behavioural advantages may be important in considering the evolution of size-related reproductive traits.

  4. Coupling efficiency of ultra-small gradient-index fiber probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chi; Sun, Jianmei; Sun, Fan; Zhu, Jun; Yuan, Zhiwen; Asundi, Anand

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, the coupling efficiency of ultra-small GRIN fiber probe is studied for its focusing performance. Based on the light transmission characteristics of a Gaussian beam and the principle of optical imaging, with the analytical methods, the theoretical formula is deduced for the coupling efficiency of ultra-small GRIN fiber probe. Experiments were set-up and conducted for verification. Per the experimental results, for an ultra-small GRIN fiber probe with the focal length of 0.4 mm, the coupling efficiency measured at the focusing position was 57%, and above 44% within the 0-0.6 mm range. However, for a single-mode fiber, the coupling efficiency dropped to 17% when the distance increased to 0.2 mm. Thus, the ultra-small GRIN fiber probe boasts a superior focusing performance and coupling efficiency. This paper provides a theoretical basis for the application and research on ultra-small GRIN fiber probe.

  5. Optimizing information flow in small genetic networks. IV. Spatial coupling.

    PubMed

    Sokolowski, Thomas R; Tkačik, Gašper

    2015-06-01

    We typically think of cells as responding to external signals independently by regulating their gene expression levels, yet they often locally exchange information and coordinate. Can such spatial coupling be of benefit for conveying signals subject to gene regulatory noise? Here we extend our information-theoretic framework for gene regulation to spatially extended systems. As an example, we consider a lattice of nuclei responding to a concentration field of a transcriptional regulator (the input) by expressing a single diffusible target gene. When input concentrations are low, diffusive coupling markedly improves information transmission; optimal gene activation functions also systematically change. A qualitatively different regulatory strategy emerges where individual cells respond to the input in a nearly steplike fashion that is subsequently averaged out by strong diffusion. While motivated by early patterning events in the Drosophila embryo, our framework is generically applicable to spatially coupled stochastic gene expression models.

  6. Optimizing information flow in small genetic networks. IV. Spatial coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolowski, Thomas R.; Tkačik, Gašper

    2015-06-01

    We typically think of cells as responding to external signals independently by regulating their gene expression levels, yet they often locally exchange information and coordinate. Can such spatial coupling be of benefit for conveying signals subject to gene regulatory noise? Here we extend our information-theoretic framework for gene regulation to spatially extended systems. As an example, we consider a lattice of nuclei responding to a concentration field of a transcriptional regulator (the input) by expressing a single diffusible target gene. When input concentrations are low, diffusive coupling markedly improves information transmission; optimal gene activation functions also systematically change. A qualitatively different regulatory strategy emerges where individual cells respond to the input in a nearly steplike fashion that is subsequently averaged out by strong diffusion. While motivated by early patterning events in the Drosophila embryo, our framework is generically applicable to spatially coupled stochastic gene expression models.

  7. Saturation behaviour of colloidal PbSe quantum dot exciton emission coupled into silicon photonic circuits.

    PubMed

    Foell, Charles A; Schelew, Ellen; Qiao, Haijun; Abel, Keith A; Hughes, Stephen; van Veggel, Frank C J M; Young, Jeff F

    2012-05-07

    We report coupling of the excitonic photon emission from photoexcited PbSe colloidal quantum dots (QDs) into an optical circuit that was fabricated in a silicon-on-insulator wafer using a CMOS-compatible process. The coupling between excitons and sub-μm sized silicon channel waveguides was mediated by a photonic crystal microcavity. The intensity of the coupled light saturates rapidly with the optical excitation power. The saturation behaviour was quantitatively studied using an isolated photonic crystal cavity with PbSe QDs site-selectively located at the cavity mode antinode position. Saturation occurs when a few μW of continuous wave HeNe pump power excites the QDs with a Gaussian spot size of 2 μm. By comparing the results with a master equation analysis that rigorously accounts for the complex dielectric environment of the QD excitons, the saturation is attributed to ground state depletion due to a non-radiative exciton decay channel with a trap state lifetime ~ 3 μs.

  8. An experimental evaluation of the fully coupled hysteretic electro-mechanical behaviour of piezoelectric actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butcher, Mark; Davino, Daniele; Giustiniani, Alessandro; Masi, Alessandro

    2016-04-01

    Piezoelectrics are the most commonly used of the multifunctional smart materials in industrial applications, because of their relatively low cost and ease of use in electric and electronic oriented applications. Nevertheless, while datasheets usually give just small signal quasi-static parameters, their full potential can only be exploited only if a full characterization is available because the maximum stroke or the higher piezo coupling coefficients are available at different electro-mechanical biases, where often small signal analysis is not valid. In this paper a method to get the quasi-static fully coupled characterization is presented. The method is tested on a commercial piezo actuator but can be extended to similar devices.

  9. Ordinary and Extraordinary Movement Behaviour of Small Resident Fish within a Mediterranean Marine Protected Area

    PubMed Central

    Aspillaga, Eneko; Bartumeus, Frederic; Linares, Cristina; Starr, Richard M.; López-Sanz, Àngel; Díaz, David; Zabala, Mikel; Hereu, Bernat

    2016-01-01

    It is important to account for the movement behaviour of fishes when designing effective marine protected areas (MPAs). Fish movements occur across different spatial and temporal scales and understanding the variety of movements is essential to make correct management decisions. This study describes in detail the movement patterns of an economically and commercially important species, Diplodus sargus, within a well-enforced Mediterranean MPA. We monitored horizontal and vertical movements of 41 adult individuals using passive acoustic telemetry for up to one year. We applied novel analysis and visualization techniques to get a comprehensive view of a wide range of movements. D. sargus individuals were highly territorial, moving within small home ranges (< 1 km2), inside which they displayed repetitive diel activity patterns. Extraordinary movements beyond the ordinary home range were observed under two specific conditions. First, during stormy events D. sargus presented a sheltering behaviour, moving to more protected places to avoid the disturbance. Second, during the spawning season they made excursions to deep areas (> 50 m), where they aggregated to spawn. This study advances our understanding about the functioning of an established MPA and provides important insights into the biology and management of a small sedentary species, suggesting the relevance of rare but important fish behaviours. PMID:27437692

  10. Small signal thermal analysis of local multibarrier behaviour in SiC Schottky diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    León, J.; Perpiñà, X.; Vellvehi, M.; Jordà, X.; Berthou, M.; Godignon, P.

    2014-09-01

    A nickel-based silicon carbide Schottky barrier diode presenting multibarrier behaviour was inspected by Small sIgnal Modulation for Thermal Analysis (SIMTA) to detect the weak spots responsible for this behaviour. SIMTA thermally modulates in frequency such weak spots with a small signal voltage while the device is electrically biased in an operating point of its static I/V curve (20 A-1 kV capability). This allows for quantitative studying of them in a thermal steady state as heat sources by lock-in thermography depending on the device operating regime. Using SIMTA, the barrier height and the area of each weak spot were determined by thermal means, yielding to an electrical model that fits the observed multibarrier behaviour. Results suggest that these spots were caused by surface areas of high density of states (due to 3C-SiC stacking faults) created during the wire bonding process, which locally shifted the Schottky barrier due to Fermi level pinning. Their origin was confirmed by scanning electron microscope inspections after milling these locations with a focused on beam, detecting Schottky metal contact degradation at weak spot locations due to an excessive bonding pressure.

  11. Perpetual postponers? Women's, men's and couple's fertility intentions and subsequent fertility behaviour.

    PubMed

    Berrington, Ann

    2004-01-01

    In this article data from the British Household Panel Study (BHPS) are used to analyse gender differences in fertility intentions, and the correspondence between fertility intentions and subsequent fertility behaviour. By exploiting couple-level data, we examine whether partners have conflicting preferences for future fertility. Focusing on women who remain childless in their thirties we look at socio-demographic factors related to the intention to remain childless, or to start a family later on in life. By following up women over time, the characteristics of women who go on to have a child later on in life are considered. The importance of having a partner and the fertility intention of that partner in predicting whether a birth will occur are also examined.

  12. At the brink of eusociality: transcriptomic correlates of worker behaviour in a small carpenter bee.

    PubMed

    Rehan, Sandra M; Berens, Ali J; Toth, Amy L

    2014-12-17

    There is great interest in understanding the genomic underpinnings of social evolution, in particular, the evolution of eusociality (caste-containing societies with non-reproductives that care for siblings). Subsociality is a key precursor for the evolution of eusociality and characterized by prolonged parental care and parent-offspring interaction. Here, we provide the first transcriptomic data for the small carpenter bee, Ceratina calcarata. This species is of special interest because it is subsocial and in the same family as the highly eusocial honey bee, Apis mellifera. In addition, some C. calcarata females demonstrate alloparental care without reproduction, which provides a unique opportunity to study worker behaviour in a non-eusocial species. We uncovered similar gene expression patterns related to maternal care and sibling care in different groups of females. This agrees with the maternal heterochrony hypothesis, specifically, that changes in timing of offspring care gene expression are related to worker behaviour in incipient insect societies. In addition, we also detected some similarity to caste-related gene expression patterns in highly eusocial honey bees, and uncovered large lifetime changes in gene expression that accompany shifts in reproductive and maternal care behaviour. For Ceratina calcarata, we found that transcript expression profiles were most similar between sibling care and maternal care females. The maternal care behaviour exhibited post-reproductively by Ceratina mothers is concordant in terms of transcript expression with the alloparental care exhibited by workers. In line with theoretical predictions, our data are consistent with the maternal heterochrony hypothesis for the evolutionary development of worker behaviour in subsocial bees.

  13. Coupling submesoscale physics to seabirds behaviour at the ocean-atmosphere interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Monte, S.; Cotté, C.; d'Ovidio, F.; Lévy, M.; Le Corre, M.; Weimerskirch, H.

    2012-04-01

    During their journeys, seabirds are faced to environmental heterogeneity of the scale of tens of Kms in extension and of days in duration, that are induced in the open ocean by mesoscale and submesoscale turbulence. We combine tracking of frigatebirds in the Mozambique channel - available for the first time with 3-D resolution - and multisatellite-based nonlinear diagnostics to inquire how birds respond to the coupled ocean-atmosphere physics. Birds behaviour along their flight trajectory are categorized in 5 classes of vertical displacement, e.g. slow or fast descents, and are superimposed with the submesoscale structures obtained by a Lagrangian reanalysis or remote-sensing measures. We show that frigatebirds modify their behaviour at such scale over and outside transport and thermal fronts. We suggest that birds colocalization with structures generated by horizontal transport is a consequence of their quest for food (preferentially located on thermal fronts) but also for upward vertical wind. Our multidisciplinary method can be applied to forthcoming high-resolution animal tracking data and contribute to elucidate the response of marine ecosystems to environmental change.

  14. Predictors of physical activity among rural and small town breast cancer survivors: an application of the theory of planned behaviour.

    PubMed

    Vallance, Jeff K; Lavallee, Celeste; Culos-Reed, Nicole S; Trudeau, Marc G

    2012-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to investigate the utility of the two-component theory of planned behaviour (TPB) in understanding physical activity intentions and behaviour in rural and small town breast cancer survivors. The secondary objective was to elicit the most common behavioural, normative and control beliefs of rural and small town survivors regarding physical activity. Using a cross-sectional survey design, 524 rural and small town breast cancer survivors completed a mailed survey that assessed physical activity and TPB variables. Physical activity intention explained 12% of the variance in physical activity behaviour (p < 0.01) while the TPB constructs together explained 43% of the variance in physical activity intention (p < 0.01). Unique behavioural, normative and control beliefs were elicited from the sample. The two-component TPB framework appears to be a suitable model to initiate an understanding of physical activity determinants among rural and small town breast cancer survivors. These data can be used in the development and establishment of physical activity behaviour interventions and health promotion materials designed to facilitate physical activity behaviour among rural and small town breast cancer survivors.

  15. Sexual selection and alternative mating behaviours generate demographic stochasticity in small populations.

    PubMed Central

    Calsbeek, Ryan; Alonzo, Suzanne H; Zamudio, Kelly; Sinervo, Barry

    2002-01-01

    Recent theory predicts that environmental variation and small population size facilitate the coexistence of alternative phenotypes despite unequal mean fitness. However, traditional studies of reproductive strategies often assume that the stability of alternative mating behaviours relies on equal male fitness. We present results from field observations and experimental manipulations of thermal resources on territories demonstrating the coexistence of alternative reproductive behaviours with unequal fitness. The side-blotched lizard Uta stansburiana exhibits two alternative strategies for territoriality: "usurp" and "defend". Paternity analysis revealed significantly greater mean fitness for "usurpers" than "defenders" in our study of natural variation. Moreover, variance in fitness was significantly higher for usurpers on both experimental and natural plots, implying that "usurp" is a risky strategy with potentially large pay-offs or none at all. We show theoretically that significantly higher variance in usurper fitness can allow for coexistence with defenders despite higher mean fitness of usurpers. This coexistence is facilitated by small population size. Our results have general implications for the evolution of alternative strategies and the maintenance of genetic diversity in small populations. PMID:11798431

  16. Diffraction aperture non-ideal behaviour of air coupled transducers array elements designed for NDT.

    PubMed

    Prego Borges, J L; Montero de Espinosa, F; Salazar, J; Garcia-Alvarez, J; Chávez, J A; Turó, A; Garcia-Hernandez, M J

    2006-12-22

    Air coupled piezoelectric ultrasonic array transducers are a novel tool that could lead to interesting advances in the area of non-contact laminar material testing using Lamb wave's propagation techniques. A key issue on the development of such transducers is their efficient coupling to air media (impedance mismatch between the piezoelectric material and air is 90 dB or more). Adaptation layers are used in order to attain good matching and avoid possible serious signal degradation. However, the introduction of these matching layers modify the transducer surface behaviour and, consequently, radiation characteristics are altered, making the usual idealization criteria (of uniform surface movement) adopted for field simulation purposes inaccurate. In our system, we have a concave linear-array transducer of 64 elements (electrically coupled by pairs) working at 0.8 MHz made of PZ27 rectangular piezoceramics (15 mm x 0.3 mm) with two matching layers made of polyurethane and porous cellulose bonded on them. Experimental measurements of the acoustic aperture of single excited array elements have shown an increment on the geometrical dimensions of its active surface. A sub-millimeter vibrometer laser scan has revealed an extension of the aperture beyond the supposed physical single array element dimensions. Non-uniform symmetric apodized velocity surface vibration amplitude profile with a concave delay contour indicates the presumed existence of travelling wave phenomena over the surface of the outer array matching layer. Also, asymptotic propagation velocities around 2500 m/s and attenuation coefficient between 15 and 20 dB/mm has been determined for the travelling waves showing clear tendencies. Further comparisons between the experimental measurements of single array element field radiation diagram and simulated equivalent aperture counterpart reveal good agreement versus the ideal (uniform displaced) rectangular aperture. For this purpose an Impulse Response Method

  17. Teachers' and students' verbal behaviours during cooperative and small-group learning.

    PubMed

    Gillies, Robyn M

    2006-06-01

    Teachers play a critical role in promoting interactions between students and engaging them in the learning process. This study builds on a study by Hertz-Lazarowitz and Shachar (1990) who found that during cooperative learning teachers' verbal behaviours were more helpful to and encouraging of their students' efforts while during whole-class instruction, their verbal behaviours tended to be more authoritarian, rigid, and impersonal. This study seeks to determine if teachers who implement cooperative learning engage in more facilitative learning interactions with their students than teachers who implement group work only. The study also seeks to determine if students in the cooperative groups model their teachers' behaviours and engage in more positive helping interactions with each other than their peers in the group work groups. The study involved 26 teachers and 303 students in Grades 8 to 10 from 4 large high schools in Brisbane, Australia. All teachers agreed to establish cooperative, small-group activities in their classrooms for a unit of work (4 to 6 weeks) once a term for 3 school terms. The teachers were audiotaped twice during these lessons and samples of the students' language, as they worked in their groups, were also collected at the same time. The results show that teachers who implement cooperative learning in their classrooms engage in more mediated-learning interactions and make fewer disciplinary comments than teachers who implement group work only. Furthermore, the students model many of these interactions in their groups. The study shows that when teachers implement cooperative learning, their verbal behaviour is affected by the organizational structure of the classroom.

  18. Coupling of small- and large-scale filament eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jia-Yan; Jiang, Yun-Chun; Yang, Bo; Hong, Jun-Chao; Xu, Zhe

    2016-01-01

    We present observations of the eruption of a large-scale quiescent filament (LF) that is associated with the formation and eruption of a miniature filament (MF). As a result of convergence and subsequent cancelation of opposite-polarity magnetic flux, MF was formed just below the spine of the LF's right segment. Probably triggered by a nearby newly emerging flux, MF underwent a failed eruption immediately after its full development, which first ejected away from the spine of LF and then drained back to the Sun. This eruption no sooner started than the overlying LF's right segment began to rise slowly and the LF's other parts were also disturbed, and eventually the whole LF erupted bodily and quickly. These observations suggest that the MF can serve as an intermediary that links the photospheric small-scale magnetic-field activities to the eruption of the overlying large filament. It appears that, rather than directly interacting with the supporting magnetic field of LF, small-scale flux cancelation and emergence in the LF's channel can manifest themselves as the formation and eruption of MF and so indirectly affect the stability of LF.

  19. Energy conserving coupling through small apertures in an infinite perfect conducting screen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petzold, J.; Tkachenko, S.; Vick, R.

    2015-11-01

    Apertures in shielding enclosures are an important issue for determining shielding efficiencies. Various mathematical procedures and theories were employed to describe the coupling between the regions connected via an aperture in a well conducting plane. Bethe's theory describes the coupling via the equivalent problem of field excited dipole moments at the location of the aperture. This approach neglects the reaction of the dipole moments on the exciting field and therefore violates energy conservation. This work emphasizes an analytical approach for coupling between half-spaces through small apertures, inspired by the so called method of small antenna, which allows an understandable generalization of Bethe's theory.

  20. Static and dynamic strain coupling behaviour of ferroic and multiferroic perovskites from resonant ultrasound spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, M A

    2015-07-08

    Resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (RUS) provides a window on the pervasive influence of strain coupling at phase transitions in perovskites through determination of elastic and anelastic relaxations across wide temperature intervals and with the application of external fields. In particular, large variations of elastic constants occur at structural, ferroelectric and electronic transitions and, because of the relatively long interaction length provided by strain fields in a crystal, Landau theory provides an effective formal framework for characterizing their form and magnitude. At the same time, the Debye equations provide a robust description of dynamic relaxational processes involving the mobility of defects which are coupled with strain. Improper ferroelastic transitions driven by octahedral tilting in KMnF3, LaAlO3, (Ca,Sr)TiO3, Sr(Ti,Zr)O3 and BaCeO3 are accompanied by elastic softening of tens of % and characteristic patterns of acoustic loss due to the mobility of twin walls. RUS data for ferroelectrics and ferroelectric relaxors, including BaTiO3, (K,Na)NbO3,Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3 (PMN), Pb(Sc1/2Ta1/2)O3 (PST), (Pb(Zn1/3Nb2/3)O3)0.955(PbTiO3)0.045 (PZN-PT) and (Pb(In1/2Nb1/2)O3)0.26(Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3)0.44(PbTiO3)0.30 (PIN-PMN-PT) show similar patterns of softening and attenuation but also have precursor softening associated with the development of polar nano regions. Defect-induced ferroelectricity occurs in KTaO3, without the development of long range ordering. By way of contrast, spin-lattice coupling is much more variable in strength, as reflected in a greater range of softening behaviour for Pr0.48Ca0.52MnO3 and Sm0.6Y0.4MnO3 as well as for the multiferroic perovskites EuTiO3,BiFeO3, Bi0.9Sm0.1FeO3, Bi0.9Nd0.1FeO3, (BiFeO3)0.64(CaFeO2.5)0.36, (Pb(Fe0.5Ti0.5)O3)0.4(Pb(Zr0.53Ti0.47)O3)0.6. A characteristic feature of transitions in which there is a significant Jahn-Teller component is softening as the transition point is approached from above, as illustrated by

  1. Static and dynamic strain coupling behaviour of ferroic and multiferroic perovskites from resonant ultrasound spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, M. A.

    2015-07-01

    Resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (RUS) provides a window on the pervasive influence of strain coupling at phase transitions in perovskites through determination of elastic and anelastic relaxations across wide temperature intervals and with the application of external fields. In particular, large variations of elastic constants occur at structural, ferroelectric and electronic transitions and, because of the relatively long interaction length provided by strain fields in a crystal, Landau theory provides an effective formal framework for characterizing their form and magnitude. At the same time, the Debye equations provide a robust description of dynamic relaxational processes involving the mobility of defects which are coupled with strain. Improper ferroelastic transitions driven by octahedral tilting in KMnF3, LaAlO3, (Ca,Sr)TiO3, Sr(Ti,Zr)O3 and BaCeO3 are accompanied by elastic softening of tens of % and characteristic patterns of acoustic loss due to the mobility of twin walls. RUS data for ferroelectrics and ferroelectric relaxors, including BaTiO3, (K,Na)NbO3,Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3 (PMN), Pb(Sc1/2Ta1/2)O3 (PST), (Pb(Zn1/3Nb2/3)O3)0.955(PbTiO3)0.045 (PZN-PT) and (Pb(In1/2Nb1/2)O3)0.26(Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3)0.44(PbTiO3)0.30 (PIN-PMN-PT) show similar patterns of softening and attenuation but also have precursor softening associated with the development of polar nano regions. Defect-induced ferroelectricity occurs in KTaO3, without the development of long range ordering. By way of contrast, spin-lattice coupling is much more variable in strength, as reflected in a greater range of softening behaviour for Pr0.48Ca0.52MnO3 and Sm0.6Y0.4MnO3 as well as for the multiferroic perovskites EuTiO3,BiFeO3, Bi0.9Sm0.1FeO3, Bi0.9Nd0.1FeO3, (BiFeO3)0.64(CaFeO2.5)0.36, (Pb(Fe0.5Ti0.5)O3)0.4(Pb(Zr0.53Ti0.47)O3)0.6. A characteristic feature of transitions in which there is a significant Jahn-Teller component is softening as the transition point is approached from above, as illustrated by

  2. Multiple health behaviours among mothers and partners in England: Clustering, social patterning and intra-couple concordance.

    PubMed

    Graham, Hilary; Hutchinson, Jayne; Law, Catherine; Platt, Lucinda; Wardle, Heather

    2016-12-01

    Research on multiple health behaviours is increasing but little is known about parental behaviours and how they covary. Our study investigates cigarette smoking, alcohol intake, fruit and vegetable (F&V) consumption and physical activity among mothers and co-resident partners in England. Using the UK Household Longitudinal Study, we examined (i) clustering of health behaviours using observed-expected ratios and latent class analysis (ii) socio-demographic correlates of the derived latent classes and (iii) intra-couple concordance of individual health behaviours and their latent classes. We identified five latent classes for mothers and partners: Never smoked drinkers (28% of mothers; 29% of partners), Abstainers (25%; 17%), Drinkers and ex-smokers (19%; 26%), Unhealthy low frequency drinkers (18%; 16%) and Unhealthiest behaviour group (11%; 12%). These had distinctive social profiles. Never smoked drinkers were more likely than those in other groups to be white and socially advantaged: married, older, and with higher educational qualifications and incomes. Abstainers were non-smokers who never or occasionally drank, and were disproportionately drawn from ethnic minority groups and middle/lower income families. Drinkers and ex-smokers were the most physically active group and were more likely to be socially advantaged. Unhealthy low frequency drinkers were more likely to be disadvantaged and have a limiting long-standing illness. The Unhealthiest behaviour group had the highest proportion of smokers, heavy smokers and binge drinkers and the lowest F&V intake and physical activity levels. They were largely white and socially disadvantaged: younger, non-married and with lower educational levels. Mothers and their partners typically shared the same risk behaviours, and 44 per cent of partners and mothers belonged to the same latent class. Our findings point to the potential for a broadening of research and policy perspectives, from separate behaviours to combinations

  3. Effect of Couples Counselling on Reported HIV Risk Behaviour among HIV Serodiscordant Couples by ART Use, HIV Status and Gender in Rural Uganda

    PubMed Central

    King, Rachel; Min, Jeong; Birungi, Josephine; Nyonyintono, Maureen; Muldoon, Katherine A.; Khanakwa, Sarah; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Moore, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Background We examined several measures of self-reported HIV risk behaviour in mutually disclosed sero-discordant couples over time to see if a couples counselling intervention was associated with changes in these behaviors. Methods We analysed data from a prospective cohort study of HIV sero-discordant couples in Jinja, Uganda collected between June 2009 and December 2011. Participants received couples counselling, at 3-monthly intervals. We examined trends in reported condom-use, number of concurrent sexual partners, knowledge of HIV serostatus of concurrent partners and condom use of concurrent partners using Generalized Estimating Equation models, comparing responses at study enrollment with responses at six, 12 18 and 24 months of follow-up. Results A total of 586 couples were enrolled and the female member was HIV positive in 255 (44%) of them. The median age for female participants was 35 years and 42 years for men. Reported condom use at last sex with spouse increased over time (p<0.001) with the largest increases found among couples where the positive participant never received ART during the study(an increase from 68.8% at enrollment to 97.1% at 24 months). Male participants reported reductions in the number of concurrent sexual partners (p<0.001), increase in the knowledge of the HIV serostatus of these partners (p = 0.001) and a trend towards improved condom-use among non-primary partners (p = 0.070). Reported reduced risky behaviors did not wane over the study period. Conclusion Couples counselling resulted in increased condom use among all participants and among men the intervention resulted in reductions in risk behaviour with concurrent sexual partners. Routine counselling for serodiscordant couples should be integrated in routine ART care programs. PMID:26384103

  4. The energetics of basking behaviour and torpor in a small marsupial exposed to simulated natural conditions.

    PubMed

    Warnecke, Lisa; Geiser, Fritz

    2010-03-01

    Limited information is available on basking behaviour in torpid mammals and its energetic consequences. We investigated the effects of physiological and behavioural strategies on the energetics of the fat-tailed dunnart (Sminthopsis crassicaudata). Metabolic rate and body temperature during torpor, basking and rest were measured over 24 h in response to simulated environmental conditions: (a) constant ambient temperature (T(a)) of 15 degrees C, (b) constant T(a) of 15 degrees C with access to a radiant heat lamp, (c) a T(a) cycle (range 15-31 degrees C), and (d) a T(a) cycle with access to a radiant heat lamp. When a radiant heat source was provided, all dunnarts (n = 16) basked during all measurements, which resulted in energy savings of up to 74% during rest. Overall, torpor was used on 59% of measurements with a maximum duration of 16.2 h and reductions in metabolic rate of 90% compared to normothermic values. Torpid dunnarts actively moved from a shaded area to position themselves under the heat lamp with body temperatures as low as 17.5 degrees C and thereby reduced rewarming costs by 66%. We demonstrated, for the first time in the laboratory, that torpid animals actively move to a heat source to bask, and that this behaviour results in considerable energy savings. Our finding supports the view that basking during normothermia and rewarming from torpor substantially reduces energetic requirements, which may be important for the survival of small dasyurids living on limited resources in the Australian arid zone.

  5. Effects of emphasising opposition and cooperation on collective movement behaviour during football small-sided games.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, B; Marcelino, R; Torres-Ronda, L; Torrents, C; Sampaio, J

    2016-07-01

    Optimizing collective behaviour helps to increase performance in mutual tasks. In team sports settings, the small-sided games (SSG) have been used as key context tools to stress out the players' awareness about their in-game required behaviours. Research has mostly described these behaviours when confronting teams have the same number of players, disregarding the frequent situations of low and high inequality. This study compared the players' positioning dynamics when manipulating the number of opponents and teammates during professional and amateur football SSG. The participants played 4v3, 4v5 and 4v7 games, where one team was confronted with low-superiority, low- and high-inferiority situations, and their opponents with low-, medium- and high-cooperation situations. Positional data were used to calculate effective playing space and distances from each player to team centroid, opponent team centroid and nearest opponent. Outcomes suggested that increasing the number of opponents in professional teams resulted in moderate/large decrease in approximate entropy (ApEn) values to both distance to team and opponent team centroid (i.e., the variables present higher regularity/predictability pattern). In low-cooperation game scenarios, the ApEn in amateurs' tactical variables presented a moderate/large increase. The professional teams presented an increase in the distance to nearest opponent with the increase of the cooperation level. Increasing the number of opponents was effective to overemphasise the need to use local information in the positioning decision-making process from professionals. Conversely, amateur still rely on external informational feedback. Increasing the cooperation promoted more regularity in spatial organisation in amateurs and emphasise their players' local perceptions.

  6. Control of finite critical behaviour in a small-scale social system

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Bryan C.; Krakauer, David C.; Flack, Jessica C.

    2017-01-01

    Many adaptive systems sit near a tipping or critical point. For systems near a critical point small changes to component behaviour can induce large-scale changes in aggregate structure and function. Criticality can be adaptive when the environment is changing, but entails reduced robustness through sensitivity. This tradeoff can be resolved when criticality can be tuned. We address the control of finite measures of criticality using data on fight sizes from an animal society model system (Macaca nemestrina, n=48). We find that a heterogeneous, socially organized system, like homogeneous, spatial systems (flocks and schools), sits near a critical point; the contributions individuals make to collective phenomena can be quantified; there is heterogeneity in these contributions; and distance from the critical point (DFC) can be controlled through biologically plausible mechanisms exploiting heterogeneity. We propose two alternative hypotheses for why a system decreases the distance from the critical point. PMID:28186194

  7. Control of finite critical behaviour in a small-scale social system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, Bryan C.; Krakauer, David C.; Flack, Jessica C.

    2017-02-01

    Many adaptive systems sit near a tipping or critical point. For systems near a critical point small changes to component behaviour can induce large-scale changes in aggregate structure and function. Criticality can be adaptive when the environment is changing, but entails reduced robustness through sensitivity. This tradeoff can be resolved when criticality can be tuned. We address the control of finite measures of criticality using data on fight sizes from an animal society model system (Macaca nemestrina, n=48). We find that a heterogeneous, socially organized system, like homogeneous, spatial systems (flocks and schools), sits near a critical point; the contributions individuals make to collective phenomena can be quantified; there is heterogeneity in these contributions; and distance from the critical point (DFC) can be controlled through biologically plausible mechanisms exploiting heterogeneity. We propose two alternative hypotheses for why a system decreases the distance from the critical point.

  8. A multilevel analysis of socioeconomic (small area) differences in household food purchasing behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Turrell, G; Blakely, T; Patterson, C; Oldenburg, B

    2004-01-01

    Study objective: To examine the association between area and individual level socioeconomic status (SES) and food purchasing behaviour. Design: The sample comprised 1000 households and 50 small areas. Data were collected by face to face interview (66.4% response rate). SES was measured using a composite area index of disadvantage (mean 1026.8, SD = 95.2) and household income. Purchasing behaviour was scored as continuous indices ranging from 0 to 100 for three food types: fruits (mean 50.5, SD = 17.8), vegetables (61.8, 15.2), and grocery items (51.4, 17.6), with higher scores indicating purchasing patterns more consistent with dietary guideline recommendations. Setting: Brisbane, Australia, 2000. Participants: Persons responsible for their household's food purchasing. Main results: Controlling for age, gender, and household income, a two standard deviation increase on the area SES measure was associated with a 2.01 unit increase on the fruit purchasing index (95% CI -0.49 to 4.50). The corresponding associations for vegetables and grocery foods were 0.60 (-1.36 to 2.56) and 0.94 (-1.35 to 3.23). Before controlling for household income, significant area level differences were found for each food, suggesting that clustering of household income within areas (a composition effect) accounted for the purchasing variability between them. Conclusions: Living in a socioeconomically advantaged area was associated with a tendency to purchase healthier food, however, the association was small in magnitude and the 95% CI for area SES included the null. Although urban areas in Brisbane are differentiated on the basis of their socioeconomic characteristics, it seems unlikely that where you live shapes your procurement of food over and above your personal characteristics. PMID:14966233

  9. Small chimera states without multistability in a globally delay-coupled network of four lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Röhm, André; Böhm, Fabian; Lüdge, Kathy

    2016-10-01

    We present results obtained for a network of four delay-coupled lasers modeled by Lang-Kobayashi-type equations. We find small chimera states consisting of a pair of synchronized lasers and two unsynchronized lasers. One class of these small chimera states can be understood as intermediate steps on the route from synchronization to desynchronization, and we present the entire chain of bifurcations giving birth to them. This class of small chimeras can exhibit limit-cycle or quasiperiodic dynamics. A second type of small chimera states exists apparently disconnected from any region of synchronization, arising from pair synchronization inside the chaotic desynchronized regime. In contrast to previously reported chimera states in globally coupled networks, we find that the small chimera state is the only stable solution of the system for certain parameter regions; i.e., we do not need to specially prepare initial conditions.

  10. Small chimera states without multistability in a globally delay-coupled network of four lasers.

    PubMed

    Röhm, André; Böhm, Fabian; Lüdge, Kathy

    2016-10-01

    We present results obtained for a network of four delay-coupled lasers modeled by Lang-Kobayashi-type equations. We find small chimera states consisting of a pair of synchronized lasers and two unsynchronized lasers. One class of these small chimera states can be understood as intermediate steps on the route from synchronization to desynchronization, and we present the entire chain of bifurcations giving birth to them. This class of small chimeras can exhibit limit-cycle or quasiperiodic dynamics. A second type of small chimera states exists apparently disconnected from any region of synchronization, arising from pair synchronization inside the chaotic desynchronized regime. In contrast to previously reported chimera states in globally coupled networks, we find that the small chimera state is the only stable solution of the system for certain parameter regions; i.e., we do not need to specially prepare initial conditions.

  11. Small Displacement Coupled Analysis of Concrete Gravity Dam Foundations: Static and Dynamic Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farinha, Maria Luísa Braga; Azevedo, Nuno Monteiro; Candeias, Mariline

    2017-02-01

    The explicit formulation of a small displacement model for the coupled hydro-mechanical analysis of concrete gravity dam foundations based on joint finite elements is presented. The proposed coupled model requires a thorough pre-processing stage in order to ensure that the interaction between the various blocks which represent both the rock mass foundation and the dam is always edge to edge. The mechanical part of the model, though limited to small displacements, has the advantage of allowing an accurate representation of the stress distribution along the interfaces, such as rock mass joints. The hydraulic part and the mechanical part of the model are fully compatible. The coupled model is validated using a real case of a dam in operation, by comparison of the results with those obtained with a large displacement discrete model. It is shown that it is possible to assess the sliding stability of concrete gravity dams using small displacement models under both static and dynamic conditions.

  12. Longitudinal Structure Function F L of Proton from Regge Like Behaviour of Structure Function at Small-x

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baruah, Nomita; Das, Mrinal Kumar; Sarma, Jayanta Kumar

    2014-08-01

    The evolutions of longitudinal structure function F L from quantum chromodynamics (QCD) evolution equation in next-to-leading order at small-x is presented using the Regge like behaviour of the structure function. The proposed simple analytical expression for F L structure function provides the t- and x-evolution equations to study the behaviour of F L structure function at small-x. The calculated results are compared with the data of H1, ZEUS collaborations and results of Block model, Donnachie-Landshoff model. Our calculated results can be described within the framework of perturbative QCD.

  13. Self-Organized Criticality, Plasticity and Sensorimotor Coupling. Explorations with a Neurorobotic Model in a Behavioural Preference Task

    PubMed Central

    Aguilera, Miguel; Barandiaran, Xabier E.; Bedia, Manuel G.; Seron, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    During the last two decades, analysis of 1/ƒ noise in cognitive science has led to a considerable progress in the way we understand the organization of our mental life. However, there is still a lack of specific models providing explanations of how 1/ƒ noise is generated in coupled brain-body-environment systems, since existing models and experiments typically target either externally observable behaviour or isolated neuronal systems but do not address the interplay between neuronal mechanisms and sensorimotor dynamics. We present a conceptual model of a minimal neurorobotic agent solving a behavioural task that makes it possible to relate mechanistic (neurodynamic) and behavioural levels of description. The model consists of a simulated robot controlled by a network of Kuramoto oscillators with homeostatic plasticity and the ability to develop behavioural preferences mediated by sensorimotor patterns. With only three oscillators, this simple model displays self-organized criticality in the form of robust 1/ƒ noise and a wide multifractal spectrum. We show that the emergence of self-organized criticality and 1/ƒ noise in our model is the result of three simultaneous conditions: a) non-linear interaction dynamics capable of generating stable collective patterns, b) internal plastic mechanisms modulating the sensorimotor flows, and c) strong sensorimotor coupling with the environment that induces transient metastable neurodynamic regimes. We carry out a number of experiments to show that both synaptic plasticity and strong sensorimotor coupling play a necessary role, as constituents of self-organized criticality, in the generation of 1/ƒ noise. The experiments also shown to be useful to test the robustness of 1/ƒ scaling comparing the results of different techniques. We finally discuss the role of conceptual models as mediators between nomothetic and mechanistic models and how they can inform future experimental research where self-organized critically includes

  14. Self-organized criticality, plasticity and sensorimotor coupling. Explorations with a neurorobotic model in a behavioural preference task.

    PubMed

    Aguilera, Miguel; Barandiaran, Xabier E; Bedia, Manuel G; Seron, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    During the last two decades, analysis of 1/ƒ noise in cognitive science has led to a considerable progress in the way we understand the organization of our mental life. However, there is still a lack of specific models providing explanations of how 1/ƒ noise is generated in coupled brain-body-environment systems, since existing models and experiments typically target either externally observable behaviour or isolated neuronal systems but do not address the interplay between neuronal mechanisms and sensorimotor dynamics. We present a conceptual model of a minimal neurorobotic agent solving a behavioural task that makes it possible to relate mechanistic (neurodynamic) and behavioural levels of description. The model consists of a simulated robot controlled by a network of Kuramoto oscillators with homeostatic plasticity and the ability to develop behavioural preferences mediated by sensorimotor patterns. With only three oscillators, this simple model displays self-organized criticality in the form of robust 1/ƒ noise and a wide multifractal spectrum. We show that the emergence of self-organized criticality and 1/ƒ noise in our model is the result of three simultaneous conditions: a) non-linear interaction dynamics capable of generating stable collective patterns, b) internal plastic mechanisms modulating the sensorimotor flows, and c) strong sensorimotor coupling with the environment that induces transient metastable neurodynamic regimes. We carry out a number of experiments to show that both synaptic plasticity and strong sensorimotor coupling play a necessary role, as constituents of self-organized criticality, in the generation of 1/ƒ noise. The experiments also shown to be useful to test the robustness of 1/ƒ scaling comparing the results of different techniques. We finally discuss the role of conceptual models as mediators between nomothetic and mechanistic models and how they can inform future experimental research where self-organized critically includes

  15. Dry coupling for whole-body small-animal photoacoustic computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Chenghung; Li, Lei; Zhu, Liren; Xia, Jun; Li, Chiye; Chen, Wanyi; Garcia-Uribe, Alejandro; Maslov, Konstantin I.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2017-04-01

    We have enhanced photoacoustic computed tomography with dry acoustic coupling that eliminates water immersion anxiety and wrinkling of the animal and facilitates incorporating complementary modalities and procedures. The dry acoustic coupler is made of a tubular elastic membrane enclosed by a closed transparent water tank. The tubular membrane ensures water-free contact with the animal, and the closed water tank allows pressurization for animal stabilization. The dry coupler was tested using a whole-body small-animal ring-shaped photoacoustic computed tomography system. Dry coupling was found to provide image quality comparable to that of conventional water coupling.

  16. Why small males have big sperm: dimorphic squid sperm linked to alternative mating behaviours

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Sperm cells are the target of strong sexual selection that may drive changes in sperm structure and function to maximize fertilisation success. Sperm evolution is regarded to be one of the major consequences of sperm competition in polyandrous species, however it can also be driven by adaptation to the environmental conditions at the site of fertilization. Strong stabilizing selection limits intra-specific variation, and therefore polymorphism, among fertile sperm (eusperm). Here we analyzed reproductive morphology differences among males employing characteristic alternative mating behaviours, and so potentially different conditions of sperm competition and fertilization environment, in the squid Loligo bleekeri. Results Large consort males transfer smaller (average total length = 73 μm) sperm to a female's internal sperm storage location, inside the oviduct; whereas small sneaker males transfer larger (99 μm) sperm to an external location around the seminal receptacle near the mouth. No significant difference in swimming speed was observed between consort and sneaker sperm. Furthermore, sperm precedence in the seminal receptacle was not biased toward longer sperm, suggesting no evidence for large sperm being favoured in competition for space in the sperm storage organ among sneaker males. Conclusions Here we report the first case, in the squid Loligo bleekeri, where distinctly dimorphic eusperm are produced by different sized males that employ alternative mating behaviours. Our results found no evidence that the distinct sperm dimorphism was driven by between- and within-tactic sperm competition. We propose that presence of alternative fertilization environments with distinct characteristics (i.e. internal or external), whether or not in combination with the effects of sperm competition, can drive the disruptive evolution of sperm size. PMID:21831296

  17. Couples' attributions about behaviours modulated by hearing impairment: links with relationship satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Donnah L; Noble, William

    2005-04-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the link between the nature of attributions made by partners about behaviours modulated by hearing loss, and overall relationship satisfaction. Forty-three hearing-impaired males and 23 hearing-impaired females together with their partners, each rated the hearing-impaired person's hearing ability, their own relationship satisfaction, and their attributions for hypothetical behaviours typically associated with impaired hearing. Attributions covered perceived causes of behaviour and perceived responsibility. The extent to which the behaviours typically associated with impaired hearing, were attributed to personal causes and responsibilities was inversely correlated with relationship satisfaction. Female partners (more than male partners, or females with impaired hearing) made attributions that accentuated the unpleasant implications of behaviour. Where attributions and ratings of degree of hearing loss were greater in partners than in the person with the loss, relationship satisfaction was lower. Implications for rehabilitation counselling are discussed.

  18. Why do large and small scales couple in a turbulent boundary layer?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandyopadhyay, Promode R.

    2011-11-01

    Correlation measurement, which is not definitive, suggests that large and small scales in a turbulent boundary layer (TBL) couple. A TBL is modeled as a jungle of interacting nonlinear oscillators to explore the origin of the coupling. These oscillators have the inherent property of self-sustainability, disturbance rejection, and of self-referential phase reset whereby several oscillators can phase align (or have constant phase difference between them) when an ``external'' impulse is applied. Consequently, these properties of a TBL are accounted for: self-sustainability, return of the wake component after a disturbance is removed, and the formation of the 18o large structures, which are composed of a sequential train of hairpin vortices. The nonlinear ordinary differential equations of the oscillators are solved using an analog circuit for rapid solution. The post-bifurcation limit cycles are determined. A small scale and a large scale are akin to two different oscillators. The state variables from the two disparate interacting oscillators are shown to couple and the small scales appear at certain regions of the phase of the large scale. The coupling is a consequence of the nonlinear oscillatory behavior. Although state planes exist where the disparate scales appear de-superposed, all scales in a TBL are in fact coupled and they cannot be monochromatically isolated.

  19. Small Body Size at Birth and Behavioural Symptoms of ADHD in Children Aged Five to Six Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lahti, J.; Raikkonen, K.; Kajantie, E.; Heinonen, K.; Pesonen, A.-K.; Jarvenpaa, A.-L.; Strandberg, T.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Behavioural disorders with a neurodevelopmental background, such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), have been associated with a non-optimal foetal environment, reflected in small body size at birth. However, the evidence stems from highly selected groups with birth outcomes biased towards the extreme low end of the…

  20. The Dynamics of Small-Sized Ensembles of the Phase-Locked Loops with Unidirectional Couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleshin, K. N.; V. Matrosov, V.; Shalfeev, V. D.

    2016-06-01

    We study collective dynamics of a small-sized chain of the unidirectionally coupled phase-locked loop. The conditions for the synchronous-regime existence are found, the asynchronous selfoscillation regimes and the transitions among them are studied, and the property of inheriting the structure of the parameter space of the chain when a new element is added to it is established.

  1. Ultra-small single-negative electric metamaterials for electromagnetic coupling reduction of microstrip antenna array.

    PubMed

    Xu, He-Xiu; Wang, Guang-Ming; Qi, Mei-Qing; Zeng, Hui-Yong

    2012-09-24

    We report initially the design, fabrication and measurement of using waveguided electric metamaterials (MTM) in the design of closely-spaced microtrip antenna arrays with mutual coupling reduction. The complementary spiral ring resonators (CSRs) which exhibit single negative resonant permittivity around 3.5GHz are used as the basic electric MTM element. For verification, two CSRs with two and three concentric rings are considered, respectively. By properly arranging these well engineered waveguided MTMs between two H-plane coupled patch antennas, both numerical and measured results indicate that more than 8.4 dB mutual coupling reduction is obtained. The mechanism has been studied from a physical insight. The electric MTM element is electrically small, enabling the resultant antenna array to exhibit a small separation (λo/8 at the operating wavelength) and thus a high directivity. The proposed strategy opens an avenue to new types of antenna with super performances and can be generalized for other electric resonators.

  2. Effects of forskolin on electrical behaviour of myenteric neurones in guinea-pig small intestine.

    PubMed Central

    Nemeth, P R; Palmer, J M; Wood, J D; Zafirov, D H

    1986-01-01

    The actions of forskolin on electrical behaviour of myenteric neurones were investigated with intracellular recording methods in guinea-pig small intestine. The actions of forskolin were: membrane depolarization, increased input resistance, suppression of post-spike hyperpolarizing potentials and repetitive spike discharge. These effects occurred always in AH/Type 2 myenteric neurones and never in the cells classified as S/Type 1. Reversal potentials for the depolarizing effects were near the estimated potassium equilibrium potential. Analyses based on the 'constant field equation' indicated that the permeability ratios of K+ to other permeant ionic species were reduced by forskolin. Pretreatment of the neurones with a phosphodiesterase inhibitor potentiated the effects of forskolin. The results suggest that activation of adenylate cyclase by forskolin and subsequent elevation of intraneuronal adenosine 3',5'-phosphate (cyclic AMP) mimic slow synaptic excitation in AH/Type 2 myenteric neurones. They support the possibility that cyclic AMP functions as a second messenger in signal transduction which appears to involve closure of calcium-dependent K+ channels and other membrane changes that lead to depolarization and a dramatic increase in the excitability of the neurones. PMID:2432235

  3. Effects of small particle numbers on long-term behaviour in discrete biochemical systems

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Bashar; Dittrich, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: The functioning of many biological processes depends on the appearance of only a small number of a single molecular species. Additionally, the observation of molecular crowding leads to the insight that even a high number of copies of species do not guarantee their interaction. How single particles contribute to stabilizing biological systems is not well understood yet. Hence, we aim at determining the influence of single molecules on the long-term behaviour of biological systems, i.e. whether they can reach a steady state. Results: We provide theoretical considerations and a tool to analyse Systems Biology Markup Language models for the possibility to stabilize because of the described effects. The theory is an extension of chemical organization theory, which we called discrete chemical organization theory. Furthermore we scanned the BioModels Database for the occurrence of discrete chemical organizations. To exemplify our method, we describe an application to the Template model of the mitotic spindle assembly checkpoint mechanism. Availability and implementation: http://www.biosys.uni-jena.de/Services.html. Contact: bashar.ibrahim@uni-jena.de or dittrich@minet.uni-jena.de Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25161236

  4. Coupled orbit-attitude dynamics and relative state estimation of spacecraft near small Solar System bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, Gaurav; Izadi, Maziar; Sanyal, Amit; Scheeres, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    The effects of dynamical coupling between the rotational (attitude) and translational (orbital) motion of spacecraft near small Solar System bodies is investigated. This coupling arises due to the weak gravity of these bodies, as well as solar radiation pressure. The traditional approach assumes a point-mass spacecraft model to describe the translational motion of the spacecraft, while the attitude motion is considered to be completely decoupled from the translational motion. The model used here to describe the rigid-body spacecraft dynamics includes the non-uniform rotating gravity field of the small body up to second degree and order along with the attitude dependent terms, solar tide, and solar radiation pressure. This model shows that the second degree and order gravity terms due to the small body affect the dynamics of the spacecraft to the same extent as the orbit-attitude coupling due to the primary gravity (zeroth order) term. Variational integrators are used to simulate the dynamics of both the rigid spacecraft and the point mass. The small bodies considered here are modeled after Near-Earth Objects (NEO) 101955 Bennu, and 25143 Itokawa, and are assumed to be triaxial ellipsoids with uniform density. Differences in the numerically obtained trajectories of a rigid spacecraft and a point mass are then compared, to illustrate the impact of the orbit-attitude coupling on spacecraft dynamics in proximity of small bodies. Possible implications on the performance of model-based spacecraft control and on the station-keeping budget, if the orbit-attitude coupling is not accounted for in the model of the dynamics, are also discussed. An almost globally asymptotically stable motion estimation scheme based solely on visual/optical feedback that estimates the relative motion of the asteroid with respect to the spacecraft is also obtained. This estimation scheme does not require a model of the dynamics of the asteroid, which makes it perfectly suited for asteroids whose

  5. Recording the free-living behaviour of small-bodied, shallow-diving animals with data loggers.

    PubMed

    Hays, Graeme C; Forman, Dan W; Harrington, Lauren A; Harrington, Andrew L; MacDonald, David W; Righton, David

    2007-01-01

    1. Time-depth data recorders (TDRs) have been widely used to explore the behaviour of relatively large, deep divers. However, little is known about the dive behaviour of small, shallow divers such as semi-aquatic mammals. 2. We used high-resolution TDRs to record the diving behaviour of American mink Mustela vison (weight of individuals 580-1275 g) in rivers in Oxfordshire (UK) between December 2005 and March 2006. 3. Dives to > 0.2 m were measured in all individuals (n = 6). Modal dive depth and duration were 0.3 m and 10 s, respectively, although dives up to 3 m and 60 s in duration were recorded. Dive duration increased with dive depth. 4. Temperature data recorded by TDRs covaried with diving behaviour: they were relatively cold (modal temperature 4-6 degrees C across individuals) when mink were diving and relatively warm (modal temperature 24-36 degrees C across individuals) when mink were not diving. 5. Individuals differed hugely in their use of rivers, reflecting foraging plasticity across both terrestrial and aquatic environments. For some individuals there was < 1 dive per day while for others there was > 100 dives per day. 6. We have shown it is now possible to record the diving behaviour of small free-living animals that only dive a few tens of centimetres, opening up the way for a new range of TDR studies on shallow diving species.

  6. Gpr176 is a Gz-linked orphan G-protein-coupled receptor that sets the pace of circadian behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Doi, Masao; Murai, Iori; Kunisue, Sumihiro; Setsu, Genzui; Uchio, Naohiro; Tanaka, Rina; Kobayashi, Sakurako; Shimatani, Hiroyuki; Hayashi, Hida; Chao, Hsu-Wen; Nakagawa, Yuuki; Takahashi, Yukari; Hotta, Yunhong; Yasunaga, Jun-ichirou; Matsuoka, Masao; Hastings, Michael H.; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Okamura, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) participate in a broad range of physiological functions. A priority for fundamental and clinical research, therefore, is to decipher the function of over 140 remaining orphan GPCRs. The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the brain's circadian pacemaker, governs daily rhythms in behaviour and physiology. Here we launch the SCN orphan GPCR project to (i) search for murine orphan GPCRs with enriched expression in the SCN, (ii) generate mutant animals deficient in candidate GPCRs, and (iii) analyse the impact on circadian rhythms. We thereby identify Gpr176 as an SCN-enriched orphan GPCR that sets the pace of circadian behaviour. Gpr176 is expressed in a circadian manner by SCN neurons, and molecular characterization reveals that it represses cAMP signalling in an agonist-independent manner. Gpr176 acts independently of, and in parallel to, the Vipr2 GPCR, not through the canonical Gi, but via the unique G-protein subclass Gz. PMID:26882873

  7. Big hearts, small hands: a focus group study exploring parental food portion behaviours.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Kristina; Atkins, Louise; Brown, Katherine

    2017-09-18

    The development of healthy food portion sizes among families is deemed critical to childhood weight management; yet little is known about the interacting factors influencing parents' portion control behaviours. This study aimed to use two synergistic theoretical models of behaviour: the COM-B model (Capability, Opportunity, Motivation - Behaviour) and Theoretical Domains Framework (TDF) to identify a broad spectrum of theoretically derived influences on parents' portion control behaviours including examination of affective and habitual influences often excluded from prevailing theories of behaviour change. Six focus groups exploring family weight management comprised of one with caseworkers (n = 4), four with parents of overweight children (n = 14) and one with parents of healthy weight children (n = 8). A thematic analysis was performed across the dataset where the TDF/COM-B were used as coding frameworks. To achieve the target behaviour, the behavioural analysis revealed the need for eliciting change in all three COM-B domains and nine associated TDF domains. Findings suggest parents' internal processes such as their emotional responses, habits and beliefs, along with social influences from partners and grandparents, and environmental influences relating to items such as household objects, interact to influence portion size behaviours within the home environment. This is the first study underpinned by COM-B/TDF frameworks applied to childhood weight management and provides new targets for intervention development and the opportunity for future research to explore the mediating and moderating effects of these variables on one another.

  8. Children born small for gestational age are not at special risk for preschool emotion and behaviour problems.

    PubMed

    Cornforth, Christine M; Thompson, John M D; Robinson, Elizabeth; Waldie, Karen E; Pryor, Jan E; Clark, Philippa; Becroft, David M O; Sonuga-Barke, Edmund J S; Mitchell, Edwin A

    2012-07-01

    Despite the wealth of literature examining long term outcomes of preterm low birthweight children, few studies have directly assessed the developmental impact of being born full term but small for gestational age (SGA). We aim to determine whether (i) being SGA increases preschool behavioural problems and (ii) other risk factors operate differently in SGA and appropriate for gestational age (AGA) controls. 550 New Zealand European mothers and their 3.5 year old children participated in this study. All children were born at full term (>37 weeks' gestation) and approximately half were SGA (≤sex specific 10th percentile for gestation) the remainder were AGA controls. Extensive data were collected at the child's birth, 1 year and 3.5 years. Behavioural problems were measured when children were 3.5 years, using the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ). Multiple regression analyses were used to examine the associations between risk factors and behavioural problems; statistical weighting was used for analyses of the total study group. There was no significant difference in behavioural problems between SGA and AGA groups. In the total sample the significant predictors of behavioural problems included: mothers' school leaving age; smoking during pregnancy; maternal alcohol use during pregnancy; and absence of the father. Predictors of behavioural problems were found to be the same for SGA and AGA groups. These results do not support the view that SGA is a risk for behavioural preschool difficulties or that SGA children are sensitised to risks known to be associated with such difficulties in the preschool years.

  9. Optically detunable, inductively coupled coil for self-gating in small animal magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Korn, Matthias; Umathum, Reiner; Schulz, Jessica; Semmler, Wolfhard; Bock, Michael

    2011-03-01

    An inductively coupled coil concept is presented, which improves the compensation of physiological motion by the self-gating (SG) technique. The animal is positioned in a conventional volume coil encompassing the whole animal. A small, resonant surface coil (SG-coil) is placed on the thorax so that its sensitive region includes the heart. Via inductive coupling the SG-coil amplifies selectively the MR signal of the beating heart. With an optical detuning mechanism, this coupling can be switched off during acquisition of the MR image information, whereas it is active during SG data sampling to provide the physiological information. In vivo experiments on a mouse show an amplification of the SG signal by at least 40%.

  10. Behavioural and hormonal stress responses during chick rearing do not predict brood desertion by female in a small Arctic seabird.

    PubMed

    Wojczulanis-Jakubas, Katarzyna; Jakubas, Dariusz; Chastel, Olivier

    2013-08-01

    We examined behavioural and hormonal stress responses in a small seabird (little auk, Alle alle), which exhibits a transition from biparental to male-only care towards the end of the nesting period, in order to understand the mechanisms underlying this parental strategy. We hypothesized that the male staying with the chick should be less sensitive to stressors. As such the male might offer the offspring more efficient protection during the fledging period than the female. We tested this hypothesis by observing male and female behaviour in a neophobia test. We also measured the birds' baseline and stress-induced levels of corticosterone and prolactin using the standardized capture-and-restraint protocol. Both sexes respond rapidly to foreign objects, delaying the entry time to the nest with food, consuming the food load, and/or temporarily abandoning feeding. However, we did not find any differences between the sexes in the frequency of each behaviour or in the time of the first reaction to the experimental treatment. Level of both corticosterone and prolactin increased after the experimental treatment. However, we did not find sex differences in baseline and stress-induced hormone levels. The results indicate that the males are as much sensitive to the stress situation as the females. Thus, the pattern of male and female behavioural and hormonal responses to stress does not predict their behaviour at the final breeding stage. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Development of very small-diameter, inductively coupled magnetized plasma device.

    PubMed

    Kuwahara, D; Mishio, A; Nakagawa, T; Shinohara, S

    2013-10-01

    In order to miniaturize a high-density, inductively coupled magnetized plasma or helicon plasma to be applied to, e.g., an industrial application and an electric propulsion field, small helicon device has been developed. The specifications of this device along with the experimental results are described. We have succeeded in generating high-density (~10(19) m(-3)) plasmas using quartz tubes with very small diameters of 10 and 20 mm, with a radio frequency power ~1200 and 700 W, respectively, in the presence of the magnetic field less than 1 kG.

  12. Efficient Radiation by Electrically Small Antennas made of Coupled Split-ring Resonators

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Liang; Chen, Peiwei; Wu, Aiting; Wang, Gaofeng

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, coupled split-ring resonators (SRRs) are used to construct the electrically small antennas. We show that through strong magnetic coupling, the coupled SRRs composite can oscillate at a wavelength much larger than its total size. Due to its magnetic dipole feature, the coupled SRRs composite allows the electromagnetic (EM) power to radiate and hence forms the electrically small antenna (ESA). Because of the high-Q resonance, the ESA could be easily matched to the driving circuit in the microwave region, through mutual induction approach. We also demonstrate that the radiation efficiency of such ESAs can be drastically improved if the current distribution on individual SRRs is similar, which is achievable by carefully designing the ESAs. From our simulations and experimental measurements, the ESAs’ radiation efficiency can reach up to 41%, with relative footprint of 0.05λ0 × 0.05λ0. Our approach would be an effective way to realize ESAs with high efficiency, which can be implemented on chip through the standard planar lithography. PMID:27630076

  13. Efficient Radiation by Electrically Small Antennas made of Coupled Split-ring Resonators.

    PubMed

    Peng, Liang; Chen, Peiwei; Wu, Aiting; Wang, Gaofeng

    2016-09-15

    In this paper, coupled split-ring resonators (SRRs) are used to construct the electrically small antennas. We show that through strong magnetic coupling, the coupled SRRs composite can oscillate at a wavelength much larger than its total size. Due to its magnetic dipole feature, the coupled SRRs composite allows the electromagnetic (EM) power to radiate and hence forms the electrically small antenna (ESA). Because of the high-Q resonance, the ESA could be easily matched to the driving circuit in the microwave region, through mutual induction approach. We also demonstrate that the radiation efficiency of such ESAs can be drastically improved if the current distribution on individual SRRs is similar, which is achievable by carefully designing the ESAs. From our simulations and experimental measurements, the ESAs' radiation efficiency can reach up to 41%, with relative footprint of 0.05λ0 × 0.05λ0. Our approach would be an effective way to realize ESAs with high efficiency, which can be implemented on chip through the standard planar lithography.

  14. Efficient Radiation by Electrically Small Antennas made of Coupled Split-ring Resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Liang; Chen, Peiwei; Wu, Aiting; Wang, Gaofeng

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, coupled split-ring resonators (SRRs) are used to construct the electrically small antennas. We show that through strong magnetic coupling, the coupled SRRs composite can oscillate at a wavelength much larger than its total size. Due to its magnetic dipole feature, the coupled SRRs composite allows the electromagnetic (EM) power to radiate and hence forms the electrically small antenna (ESA). Because of the high-Q resonance, the ESA could be easily matched to the driving circuit in the microwave region, through mutual induction approach. We also demonstrate that the radiation efficiency of such ESAs can be drastically improved if the current distribution on individual SRRs is similar, which is achievable by carefully designing the ESAs. From our simulations and experimental measurements, the ESAs’ radiation efficiency can reach up to 41%, with relative footprint of 0.05λ0 × 0.05λ0. Our approach would be an effective way to realize ESAs with high efficiency, which can be implemented on chip through the standard planar lithography.

  15. Behavioural interventions to reduce sexual risk for HIV in heterosexual couples: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    LaCroix, Jessica M; Pellowski, Jennifer A; Lennon, Carter A; Johnson, Blair T

    2013-12-01

    The current study was conducted to synthesise evaluations of couple-based HIV prevention interventions, assess the efficacy of these interventions in reducing sexual risk, and identify moderators of intervention efficacy. A comprehensive literature search identified 29 interventions (22 reports; N=5168 couples) that met the inclusion criteria, including enrolment of both members of a heterosexual couple, measurement of condom use at baseline and follow-up, and sufficient statistical information to calculate effect sizes. Effect sizes were analysed using fixed-effects and random-effects assumptions; factors related to intervention efficacy were identified using metaregression. Overall, there were significant increases in condom use from baseline to follow-up (d+=0.78, 95% CI 0.48 to 1.09) and significant decreases in partner concurrency (d+=0.37, 95% CI 0.13 to 0.60). Condom use increased to a greater extent when studies were conducted toward the beginning of the epidemic, were located in countries scoring lower on the Human Development Index, enrolled serodiscordant couples, and delivered intervention content in multiple contexts. Couples who had been together longer, reported higher incidence of sexually transmitted infection, were provided voluntary counselling and testing, and provided outcome measures during face-to-face interviews also reported larger increases in condom use. Couple-based interventions are efficacious in reducing unprotected sex within the context of romantic relationships. Future research should continue to improve risk reduction for couples.

  16. On the calculations of the nuclear spin spin coupling constants in small water clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cybulski, Hubert; Pecul, Magdalena; Sadlej, Joanna

    2006-08-01

    The calculations of the nuclear spin-spin coupling constants were carried out for small water clusters (H 2O) n, n = 2-6, 12, and 17, using density functional theory (DFT) and second-order polarization propagator method (SOPPA). A wide range of different standard and modified basis sets was tested to enable the choice of the possibly smallest and most flexible basis set. The changes in the oxygen-proton coupling constants upon the cluster formation between the nuclei involved in hydrogen bonding cover a range of ca. 13 Hz. The range of the calculated changes in intramolecular 1JOH couplings shows that the simple model of rigid water clusters seems to be sufficient to reproduce properly the sign and to estimate the magnitude of the gas-to-liquid shift. The sign of the complexation-induced changes in the intramolecular 2JHH coupling constant is different for molecules with a different coordination number. While the sign is positive for the molecules of the single donor-single acceptor (DA) and single donor-double acceptor (DAA) types, it is negative for the double donor-single acceptor (DDA) molecules. In the four-coordinated double donor-double acceptor (DDAA) molecules the sign of Δ 2JHH varies. The hydrogen-bond transmitted intermolecular coupling constants are substantial: 1hJOH spans the range from 2.8 to 8.4 Hz while 2hJOO varies from -0.6 to 7.5 Hz. The average intermolecular 1hJOH coupling constant decays slowly with the H⋯O distance in the cyclic clusters n = 2-6. The average 2hJOO coupling decreases exponentially with the O⋯O separation for the cyclic clusters n = 2-6.

  17. Model coupling methodology for thermo-hydro-mechanical-chemical numerical simulations in integrated assessment of long-term site behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempka, Thomas; De Lucia, Marco; Kühn, Michael

    2015-04-01

    The integrated assessment of long-term site behaviour taking into account a high spatial resolution at reservoir scale requires a sophisticated methodology to represent coupled thermal, hydraulic, mechanical and chemical processes of relevance. Our coupling methodology considers the time-dependent occurrence and significance of multi-phase flow processes, mechanical effects and geochemical reactions (Kempka et al., 2014). Hereby, a simplified hydro-chemical coupling procedure was developed (Klein et al., 2013) and validated against fully coupled hydro-chemical simulations (De Lucia et al., 2015). The numerical simulation results elaborated for the pilot site Ketzin demonstrate that mechanical reservoir, caprock and fault integrity are maintained during the time of operation and that after 10,000 years CO2 dissolution is the dominating trapping mechanism and mineralization occurs on the order of 10 % to 25 % with negligible changes to porosity and permeability. De Lucia, M., Kempka, T., Kühn, M. A coupling alternative to reactive transport simulations for long-term prediction of chemical reactions in heterogeneous CO2 storage systems (2014) Geosci Model Dev Discuss 7:6217-6261. doi:10.5194/gmdd-7-6217-2014. Kempka, T., De Lucia, M., Kühn, M. Geomechanical integrity verification and mineral trapping quantification for the Ketzin CO2 storage pilot site by coupled numerical simulations (2014) Energy Procedia 63:3330-3338, doi:10.1016/j.egypro.2014.11.361. Klein E, De Lucia M, Kempka T, Kühn M. Evaluation of longterm mineral trapping at the Ketzin pilot site for CO2 storage: an integrative approach using geo-chemical modelling and reservoir simulation. Int J Greenh Gas Con 2013; 19:720-730. doi:10.1016/j.ijggc.2013.05.014.

  18. Nonlinear dynamic behaviour of a rotor-foundation system coupled through passive magnetic bearings with magnetic anisotropy - Theory and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enemark, Søren; Santos, Ilmar F.

    2016-02-01

    In this work, the nonlinear dynamic behaviour of a vertical rigid rotor interacting with a flexible foundation by means of two passive magnetic bearings is quantified and evaluated. The quantification is based on theoretical and experimental investigation of the non-uniformity (anisotropy) of the magnetic field and the weak nonlinearity of the magnetic forces. Through mathematical modelling the nonlinear equations of motion are established for describing the shaft and bearing housing lateral dynamics coupled via the nonlinear and non-uniform magnetic forces. The equations of motion are solved in the frequency domain by the methods of Finite Difference and pseudo-arclength continuation. The theoretical findings are validated against experiments carried out using a dedicated test-rig and a special device for characterisation of the magnetic anisotropy. The characterisation of the magnetic anisotropy shows that it can be quantified as magnetic eccentricities having an amplitude and a phase, which result in linear and parametric excitation. The magnetic eccentricities are also determined using the steady-state response of the rotor-bearing system due to forcing from the magnetic anisotropies and several levels of mass imbalance. Discrepancies in the results from the two methods in terms of magnetic eccentricity magnitude are due to additional geometric eccentricities in the shaft. The steady-state system response shows clear nonlinear phenomena, e.g. bent resonance peaks, jump phenomena and nonlinear cross-coupling between the two orthogonal directions, especially during counter-phase motion between shaft and bearings. The clear nonlinear behaviour is facilitated by the lack of damping resulting in relatively large vibrations. The overall nonlinear dynamic behaviour is well captured by the theoretical model, thereby validating the modelling approach.

  19. Anomalous n-type electrical behaviour of Pd-contacted CNTFET fabricated on small-diameter nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jejurikar, S.; Casterman, D.; Pillai, P. B.; Petrenko, O.; De Souza, M. M.; Tahraoui, A.; Durkan, C.; Milne, W. I.

    2010-05-01

    A Pd-contacted dopant-free CNTFET with small-diameter (0.57 nm) carbon nanotube showing an anomalous n-type electrical characteristic is reported for the first time. This observed behaviour is attributed to a carbon nanotube work function higher than (or close to) palladium as well as a large hole-to-electron effective mass ratio of ~ 2.5 predicted by hybridization in small-diameter nanotubes. A variation of the conduction type with temperature is also observed and is attributed to an increase of the palladium work function and decrease of the CNT work function with increasing temperature.

  20. Anomalous n-type electrical behaviour of Pd-contacted CNTFET fabricated on small-diameter nanotube.

    PubMed

    Jejurikar, S; Casterman, D; Pillai, P B; Petrenko, O; De Souza, M M; Tahraoui, A; Durkan, C; Milne, W I

    2010-05-28

    A Pd-contacted dopant-free CNTFET with small-diameter (0.57 nm) carbon nanotube showing an anomalous n-type electrical characteristic is reported for the first time. This observed behaviour is attributed to a carbon nanotube work function higher than (or close to) palladium as well as a large hole-to-electron effective mass ratio of approximately 2.5 predicted by hybridization in small-diameter nanotubes. A variation of the conduction type with temperature is also observed and is attributed to an increase of the palladium work function and decrease of the CNT work function with increasing temperature.

  1. A 3D skeletal muscle model coupled with active contraction of muscle fibres and hyperelastic behaviour.

    PubMed

    Tang, C Y; Zhang, G; Tsui, C P

    2009-05-11

    This paper presents a three-dimensional finite element model of skeletal muscle which was developed to simulate active and passive non-linear mechanical behaviours of the muscle during lengthening or shortening under either quasi-static or dynamic condition. Constitutive relation of the muscle was determined by using a strain energy approach, while active contraction behaviour of the muscle fibre was simulated by establishing a numerical algorithm based on the concept of the Hill's three-element muscle model. The proposed numerical algorithm could be used to predict concentric, eccentric, isometric and isotonic contraction behaviours of the muscle. The proposed numerical algorithm and constitutive model for the muscle were derived and implemented into a non-linear large deformation finite element programme ABAQUS by using user-defined material subroutines. A number of scenarios have been used to demonstrate capability of the model for simulating both quasi-static and dynamic response of the muscle. Validation of the proposed model has been performed by comparing the simulated results with the experimental ones of frog gastrocenemius muscle deformation. The effects of the fusiform muscle geometry and fibre orientation on the stress and fibre stretch distributions of frog muscle during isotonic contraction have also been investigated by using the proposed model. The predictability of the present model for dynamic response of the muscle has been demonstrated by simulating the extension of a squid tentacle during a strike to catch prey.

  2. A constitutive theory for shape memory polymers: coupling of small and large deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Qiao; Liu, Liwu; Liu, Yanju; Leng, Jinsong; Yan, Xiangqiao; Wang, Haifang

    2013-04-01

    At high temperatures, SMPs share attributes like rubber and exhibit long-range reversibility. In contrast, at low temperatures they become very rigid and are susceptible to plastic, only small strains are allowable. But there relatively little literature has considered the unique small stain (rubber phase) and large stain (glass phase) coupling in SMPs when developing the constitutive modeling. In this work, we present a 3D constitutive model for shape memory polymers in both low temperature small strain regime and high temperature large strain regime. The theory is based on the work of Liu et al. [15]. Four steps of SMP's thermomechanical loadings cycle are considered in the constitutive model completely. The linear elastic and hyperelastic effects of SMP in different temperatures are also fully accounted for in the proposed model by adopt the neo-Hookean model and the Generalized Hooke's laws.

  3. Behaviour of plate anchorage in plate-reinforced composite coupling beams.

    PubMed

    Lam, W Y; Li, Lingzhi; Su, R K L; Pam, H J

    2013-01-01

    As a new alternative design, plate-reinforced composite (PRC) coupling beam achieves enhanced strength and ductility by embedding a vertical steel plate into a conventionally reinforced concrete (RC) coupling beam. Based on a nonlinear finite element model developed in the authors' previous study, a parametric study presented in this paper has been carried out to investigate the influence of several key parameters on the overall performance of PRC coupling beams. The effects of steel plate geometry, span-to-depth ratio of beams, and steel reinforcement ratios at beam spans and in wall regions are quantified. It is found that the anchorage length of the steel plate is primarily controlled by the span-to-depth ratio of the beam. Based on the numerical results, a design curve is proposed for determining the anchorage length of the steel plate. The load-carrying capacity of short PRC coupling beams with high steel ratio is found to be controlled by the steel ratio of wall piers. The maximum shear stress of PRC coupling beams should be limited to 15 MPa.

  4. Behaviour of Plate Anchorage in Plate-Reinforced Composite Coupling Beams

    PubMed Central

    Lam, W. Y.; Li, Lingzhi; Su, R. K. L.; Pam, H. J.

    2013-01-01

    As a new alternative design, plate-reinforced composite (PRC) coupling beam achieves enhanced strength and ductility by embedding a vertical steel plate into a conventionally reinforced concrete (RC) coupling beam. Based on a nonlinear finite element model developed in the authors' previous study, a parametric study presented in this paper has been carried out to investigate the influence of several key parameters on the overall performance of PRC coupling beams. The effects of steel plate geometry, span-to-depth ratio of beams, and steel reinforcement ratios at beam spans and in wall regions are quantified. It is found that the anchorage length of the steel plate is primarily controlled by the span-to-depth ratio of the beam. Based on the numerical results, a design curve is proposed for determining the anchorage length of the steel plate. The load-carrying capacity of short PRC coupling beams with high steel ratio is found to be controlled by the steel ratio of wall piers. The maximum shear stress of PRC coupling beams should be limited to 15 MPa. PMID:24288465

  5. Identifying reproductive events using archival tags: egg-laying behaviour of the small spotted catshark Scyliorhinus canicula.

    PubMed

    Wearmouth, V J; Southall, E J; Morritt, D; Sims, D W

    2013-01-01

    The use of archival depth telemetry as a means of remotely assessing the reproductive rates of free-ranging fishes is explored. This is achieved by electronically tracking the vertical movements of individual female small spotted catsharks Scyliorhinus canicula in the natural environment, whilst simultaneously evaluating the temporal and vertical distributions of egg-laying in this species. Distinctive patterns of short-term (0·3-3·7 h), shallow-water activity are documented in the time-depth profiles of female S. canicula that occur at an appropriate depth (1·0-2·3 m) and periodicity (every 10-12 days) to represent egg-laying behaviour. Putative egg-laying behaviour was exhibited simultaneously by two individually tracked female S. canicula during late-spring and early-summer. The results highlight that, provided species behaviour is suitable and complementary methods such as previous data, laboratory experiments and field surveys can be used to validate the patterns observed, archival depth telemetry offers an unobtrusive means by which egg production and egg-laying behaviour of free-living fishes can be estimated. As precise information regarding life-history parameters is difficult to obtain for free-ranging fish species, this technique could be used to improve the parameterization of species demographic models that are relevant to the management of wild fish populations.

  6. Quantum spectral curve at work: from small spin to strong coupling in = 4 SYM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gromov, Nikolay; Levkovich-Maslyuk, Fedor; Sizov, Grigory; Valatka, Saulius

    2014-07-01

    We apply the recently proposed quantum spectral curve technique to the study of twist operators in planar = 4 SYM theory. We focus on the small spin expansion of anomalous dimensions in the sl(2) sector and compute its first two orders exactly for any value of the `t Hooft coupling. At leading order in the spin S we reproduced Basso's slope function. The next term of order S 2 structurally resembles the Beisert-Eden-Staudacher dressing phase and takes into account wrapping contributions. This expansion contains rich information about the spectrum of local operators at strong coupling. In particular, we found a new coefficient in the strong coupling expansion of the Konishi operator dimension and confirmed several previously known terms. We also obtained several new orders of the strong coupling expansion of the BFKL pomeron intercept. As a by-product we formulated a prescription for the correct analytical continuation in S which opens a way for deriving the BFKL regime of twist two anomalous dimensions from AdS/CFT integrability.

  7. Experiments on the magnetic coupling in a small scale counter rotating marine current turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, I. C.; Lee, N. J.; Wata, J.; Hyun, B. S.; Lee, Y. H.

    2016-05-01

    Modern economies are dependent on energy consumption to ensure growth or sustainable development. Renewable energy sources provide a source of energy that can provide energy security and is renewable. Tidal energy is more predictable than other sources or renewable energy like the sun or wind. Horizontal axis marine current turbines are currently the most advanced and commercially feasible option for tidal current convertors. A dual rotor turbine is theoretically able to produce more power than a single rotor turbine at the same fluid velocity. Previous experiments for a counter rotating dual rotor horizontal axis marine current turbine used a mechanical oil seal coupling that caused mechanical losses when water entered through small gaps at the shaft. A new magnetic coupling assembly eliminates the need for a shaft to connect physically with the internal mechanisms and is water tight. This reduces mechanical losses in the system and the effect on the dual rotor performance is presented in this paper.

  8. Synthesis of Small-Molecule/DNA Hybrids through On-Bead Amide-Coupling Approach.

    PubMed

    Okochi, Kenji D; Monfregola, Luca; Dickerson, Sarah Michelle; McCaffrey, Ryan; Domaille, Dylan W; Yu, Chao; Hafenstine, Glenn R; Jin, Yinghua; Cha, Jennifer N; Kuchta, Robert D; Caruthers, Marvin; Zhang, Wei

    2017-03-20

    Small molecule/DNA hybrids (SMDHs) have been considered as nanoscale building blocks for engineering 2D and 3D supramolecular DNA assembly. Herein, we report an efficient on-bead amide-coupling approach to prepare SMDHs with multiple oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) strands. Our method is high yielding under mild and user-friendly conditions with various organic substrates and homo- or mixed-sequenced ODNs. Metal catalysts and moisture- and air-free conditions are not required. The products can be easily analyzed by LC-MS with accurate mass resolution. We also explored nanometer-sized shape-persistent macrocycles as novel multitopic organic linkers to prepare SMDHs. SMDHs bearing up to six ODNs were successfully prepared through the coupling of arylenethynylene macrocycles with ODNs, which were used to mediate the assembly of gold nanoparticles.

  9. Modelling of the evaporation behaviour of particulate material for slurry nebulization inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merten, D.; Heitland, P.; Broekaert, J. A. C.

    1997-11-01

    This paper is an electronic publication in Spectrochimica Acta Electronica (SAE), the electronic section of Spectrochimica Acta, Part B (SAB). This hardcopy text, comprising the main body and an appendix, is accompanied by a disk with programs, data files and a brief manual. The main body discusses purpose, design principle and usage of the computer software for modelling the evaporation behaviour of particles in inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). Computer software has been developed in FORTRAN 77 language in order to simulate the evaporation behaviour of particles of refractory materials such as encountered in the analysis of advanced ceramic powders by slurry nebulization inductively coupled argon plasma atomic spectrometry. The program simulates the evaporation of single particles in the inductively coupled plasma and also enable it to calculate on the base of a given particle size distribution the evaporation behaviour of all the particles contained in a sample. In a so-called "intensity concept", the intensity is calculated as a function of the observation height in order to determine recovery rates for slurries compared with aqueous solutions. This yields a quick insight whether a calibration with aqueous solutions can be used for analysis of slurries of a given powder by slurry nebulization ICP-AES and also is a help in determining the optimal parameters for analyses of powders by means of slurry nebulization ICP-AES. Applications for the evaporation of Al 2O 3 and SiC powders document the usefulness of the model for the case of a 1.5 kW argon ICP of which the temperature at 8 mm above the load coil has been determined to be 6100 K. The model predicts the maximum particle size for SiC and Al 2O 3 that can be transported (10-15 μm) and evaporated for a given efficiency under given experimental conditions. For both Al 2O 3 and SiC, two ceramic powders of different grain size were investigated. The median particle sizes cover

  10. Observation of nanojet-induced modes with small propagation losses in chains of coupled spherical cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapitonov, A. M.; Astratov, V. N.

    2007-02-01

    Nanojet-induced modes (NIMs) and their attenuation properties are studied in linear chains consisting of tens of touching polystyrene microspheres with sizes in the 2-10 μm range. To couple light to NIMs we used locally excited sources of light formed by several dye-doped fluorescent microspheres from the same chain of cavities. We directly observed the formation and propagation of NIMs by means of the scattering imaging technique. By measuring attenuation at long distances from the source, we demonstrate propagation losses for NIMs as small as 0.5dB per sphere.

  11. Measurement of small scalar and dipolar couplings in purine and pyrimidine bases.

    PubMed

    Zídek, L; Wu, H; Feigon, J; Sklenár, V

    2001-10-01

    A suite of spin-state-selective excitation (S3E) NMR experiments for the measurements of small one-bond (13C-13C, 15N-13C) and two-bond (1H-13C, 1H-15N) coupling constants in 13C,15N labeled purine and pyrimidine bases is presented. The incorporation of band-selective shaped pulses, elimination of the cross talk between alpha and beta sub-spectra, and accuracy and precision of the proposed approach are discussed. Merits of using S3E rather than alpha/beta-half-filter are demonstrated using results obtained on isotopically labeled DNA oligonucleotides.

  12. Small Worlds, Lifeworlds, and Information: The Ramifications of the Information Behaviour of Social Groups in Public Policy and the Public Sphere

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burnett, Gary; Jaeger, Paul T.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: This paper attempts to build bridges between two sets of theoretical concepts related to information behaviour: the macro-level concepts of Jurgen Habermas related to lifeworlds and the micro-level concepts of Elfreda Chatman related to small worlds. Argument: Habermas and Chatman explored similar issues of information behaviour at…

  13. Coupling system dynamics and contact behaviour: Modelling bearings subjected to environmental induced vibrations and ‘false brinelling’ degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massi, Francesco; Rocchi, J.; Culla, A.; Berthier, Y.

    2010-05-01

    During the last decades the increase in power of mechanical systems and the demand for increasing service life leads mechanical components of a system to work in extreme conditions. Moreover, actual mechanical systems include surfaces in sliding contact that are subjected to wear if exposed to high vibration. In fact, the vibration of components in contact results in large oscillations of the local contact stresses, due to the local deformation of the components at the contact interfaces. To approach correctly tribological problems, the coupling between the scale of the mechanism (system dynamics) and the scale of the contact needs to be accounted for. This paper presents an analysis concerning the influence of the vibrations induced by aircraft engines on the contact stresses of rolling bearings of the bleed system valves. To study the wear, resulting from false brinelling at the contact surfaces between balls and races of the bearings, it is then necessary to determine the forces due to the system vibrations and acting at the bearing connections with the structure. In order to perform a numerical transient analysis of the system dynamics a nonlinear simplified model of the valve (mechanism scale) is developed. The model is validated by comparing the numerical results with experimental tests. The time behaviour of the global forces on the bearings, and the respective displacements between the contact surfaces, are then used as inputs for a finite element model of the bearings (contact scale). The model is used to calculate and analyze the behaviour in time of the local contact constraints between race and balls. This analysis, developed in the framework of a European project, is an example of the proposed general approach to contact problems, by coupling the analysis of the mechanism and contact scales.

  14. Small cages with insect couples provide a simple method for a preliminary assessment of mating disruption.

    PubMed

    Briand, Françoise; Guerin, Patrick M; Charmillot, Pierre-Joseph; Kehrli, Patrik

    2012-01-01

    Mating disruption by sex pheromones is a sustainable, effective and widely used pest management scheme. A drawback of this technique is its challenging assessment of effectiveness in the field (e.g., spatial scale, pest density). The aim of this work was to facilitate the evaluation of field-deployed pheromone dispensers. We tested the suitability of small insect field cages for a pre-evaluation of the impact of sex pheromones on mating using the grape moths Eupoecilia ambiguella and Lobesia botrana, two major pests in vineyards. Cages consisted of a cubic metal frame of 35 cm sides, which was covered with a mosquito net of 1500 μm mesh size. Cages were installed in the centre of pheromone-treated and untreated vineyards. In several trials, 1 to 20 couples of grape moths per cage were released for one to three nights. The proportion of mated females was between 15 to 70% lower in pheromone-treated compared to untreated vineyards. Overall, the exposure of eight couples for one night was adequate for comparing different control schemes. Small cages may therefore provide a fast and cheap method to compare the effectiveness of pheromone dispensers under standardised semi-field conditions and may help predict the value of setting-up large-scale field trials.

  15. Small actions, big costs: the behavioural energetics of a commercially important invertebrate

    PubMed Central

    Robson, Anthony A.; Chauvaud, Laurent; Wilson, Rory P.; Halsey, Lewis G.

    2012-01-01

    Anthropogenic disturbance of farmed animals can be detrimental by adversely affecting behaviours and metabolic rate, potentially reducing their commercial value. However, relatively little is known about the normal behavioural time budgets and associated metabolism of many such species, particularly for example pectinid bivalves, which use anaerobic metabolism during periods of short-burst activity. In the present study, we used the accelerometry technique to measure scallop overall dynamic body acceleration in combination with respirometry in order to obtain and compare the behavioural time budgets and associated metabolism of 10 scallops, Pecten maximus, in an aquaculture hatchery and 10 in the wild. Scallops in the wild typically spent only 0.1 per cent of the time moving (less than 2 min d−1), yet, on average, the estimated metabolism of such movement represented 16.8 per cent of daily energy expenditure. Furthermore, owing to their reliance on anaerobic pathways during such activity, movement resulted in the wild scallops having a raised metabolic rate for, on average, an estimated 7.8 per cent of the time, during which oxygen debts accumulated during movement were paid off. Hatchery scallops also typically spent only 0.1 per cent of the time moving but estimated metabolism of such movement represented 41.8 per cent of daily energy expenditure. Estimated mean daily metabolism of scallops in the hatchery was significantly higher than scallops in the wild (169.1 versus 120.7 mg O2 d−1) because anthropogenic disturbance in the hatchery caused energetically costly non-feeding behaviours. Consequently, hatchery scallops also spent a far greater amount of time with a raised metabolic rate (an estimated 26.6% of the time) than wild scallops. While short-term bursts of movement in pectinid bivalves may appear innocuous, they result in large expenditures of energy and an oxygen debt that is paid off over long periods of time that together limit further movement

  16. Divergence and ontogenetic coupling of larval behaviour and thermal reaction norms in three closely related butterflies.

    PubMed

    Berger, David; Friberg, Magne; Gotthard, Karl

    2011-01-22

    Genetic trade-offs such as between generalist-specialist strategies can be masked by changes in compensatory processes involving energy allocation and acquisition which regulation depends on the state of the individual and its ecological surroundings. Failure to account for such state dependence may thus lead to misconceptions about the trade-off structure and nature of constraints governing reaction norm evolution. Using three closely related butterflies, we first show that foraging behaviours differ between species and change remarkably throughout ontogeny causing corresponding differences in the thermal niches experienced by the foraging larvae. We further predicted that thermal reaction norms for larval growth rate would show state-dependent variation throughout development as a result of selection for optimizing feeding strategies in the respective foraging niches of young and old larvae. We found substantial developmental plasticity in reaction norms that was species-specific and reflected the different ontogenetic niche shifts. Any conclusions regarding constraints on performance curves or species-differentiation in thermal physiology depend on when reaction norms were measured. This demonstrates that standardized estimates at single points in development, or in general, allow variation in only one ecological dimension, may sometimes provide incomplete information on reaction norm constraints.

  17. Comparing Tactical Behaviour of Soccer Players in 3 vs. 3 and 6 vs. 6 Small-Sided Games

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Bernardo; Garganta, Júlio; Santos, Rodrigo; Teoldo, Israel

    2014-01-01

    The present study aimed to compare players’ tactical behaviour in 3 vs. 3 and 6 vs. 6 soccer small-sided games (SSGs). The sample comprised 3,482 tactical actions performed by 18 U-11 youth soccer players from a Portuguese club, in 3 vs. 3 and 6 vs. 6 SSGs. All participants played eight minutes in both situations and field size was adapted according to the number of players involved (30 m × 19.5 m for 3 vs. 3 and 60 m × 39 m for 6 vs. 6). The System of Tactical Assessment in Soccer (FUT-SAT) was used for data collection and analyses. Descriptive analysis was conducted to verify frequencies and percentages of the variables assessed. The chi-squared (χ2) test was performed to compare the frequencies of the variables between 3 vs. 3 and 6 vs. 6 SSGs and Standardized Residuals (e) were used to examine the influence of the frequency of one or more variables within 3 vs. 3 and 6 vs. 6 SSGs. Data treatment was performed through SPSS for Windows®, version 18.0. Results indicated that players displayed safer behaviours in 6 vs. 6 SSG and more aggressive behaviours in 3 vs. 3 SSG. Findings can aid coaches and teachers to develop different players’ tactical skills according to the chosen SSG (3 vs. 3 or 6 vs. 6) form. PMID:25114746

  18. Role of a neuronal small non-messenger RNA: behavioural alterations in BC1 RNA-deleted mice.

    PubMed

    Lewejohann, L; Skryabin, B V; Sachser, N; Prehn, C; Heiduschka, P; Thanos, S; Jordan, U; Dell'Omo, G; Vyssotski, A L; Pleskacheva, M G; Lipp, H-P; Tiedge, H; Brosius, J; Prior, H

    2004-09-23

    BC1 RNA is a small non-messenger RNA common in dendritic microdomains of neurons in rodents. In order to investigate its possible role in learning and behaviour, we compared controls and knockout mice from three independent founder lines established from separate embryonic stem cells. Mutant mice were healthy with normal brain morphology and appeared to have no neurological deficits. A series of tests for exploration and spatial memory was carried out in three different laboratories. The tests were chosen as to ensure that different aspects of spatial memory and exploration could be separated and that possible effects of confounding variables could be minimised. Exploration was studied in a barrier test, in an open-field test, and in an elevated plus-maze test. Spatial memory was investigated in a Barnes maze and in a Morris water maze (memory for a single location), in a multiple T-maze and in a complex alley maze (route learning), and in a radial maze (working memory). In addition to these laboratory tasks, exploratory behaviour and spatial memory were assessed under semi-naturalistic conditions in a large outdoor pen. The combined results indicate that BC1 RNA-deficient animals show behavioural changes best interpreted in terms of reduced exploration and increased anxiety. In contrast, spatial memory was not affected. In the outdoor pen, the survival rates of BC1-depleted mice were lower than in controls. Thus, we conclude that the neuron-specific non-messenger BC1 RNA contributes to the aptive modulation of behaviour.

  19. The Interdependence of Adult Relationship Quality and Parenting Behaviours among African American and European Couples in Rural, Low-Income Communities

    PubMed Central

    Zvara, Bharathi J.; Mills-Koonce, W. Roger; Heilbron, Nicole; Clincy, Amanda; Cox, Martha J.

    2015-01-01

    The present study extends the spillover and crossover hypotheses to more carefully model the potential interdependence between parent–parent interaction quality and parent–child interaction quality in family systems. Using propensity score matching, the present study attempted to isolate family processes that are unique across African American and European American couples that are independent of other socio-demographic factors to further clarify how interparental relationships may be related to parenting in a rural, low-income sample. The Actor–Partner Interdependence Model (APIM), a statistical analysis technique that accounts for the interdependence of relationship data, was used with a sample of married and non-married cohabiting African American and European American couples (n = 82 dyads) to evaluate whether mothers' and fathers' observed parenting behaviours are related to their behaviours and their partner's behaviours observed in a couple problem-solving interaction. Findings revealed that interparental withdrawal behaviour, but not conflict behaviour, was associated with less optimal parenting for fathers but not mothers, and specifically so for African American fathers. Our findings support the notion of interdependence across subsystems within the family and suggest that African American fathers may be specifically responsive to variations in interparental relationship quality. PMID:26430390

  20. The Interdependence of Adult Relationship Quality and Parenting Behaviours among African American and European Couples in Rural, Low-Income Communities.

    PubMed

    Zvara, Bharathi J; Mills-Koonce, W Roger; Heilbron, Nicole; Clincy, Amanda; Cox, Martha J

    2015-01-01

    The present study extends the spillover and crossover hypotheses to more carefully model the potential interdependence between parent-parent interaction quality and parent-child interaction quality in family systems. Using propensity score matching, the present study attempted to isolate family processes that are unique across African American and European American couples that are independent of other socio-demographic factors to further clarify how interparental relationships may be related to parenting in a rural, low-income sample. The Actor-Partner Interdependence Model (APIM), a statistical analysis technique that accounts for the interdependence of relationship data, was used with a sample of married and non-married cohabiting African American and European American couples (n = 82 dyads) to evaluate whether mothers' and fathers' observed parenting behaviours are related to their behaviours and their partner's behaviours observed in a couple problem-solving interaction. Findings revealed that interparental withdrawal behaviour, but not conflict behaviour, was associated with less optimal parenting for fathers but not mothers, and specifically so for African American fathers. Our findings support the notion of interdependence across subsystems within the family and suggest that African American fathers may be specifically responsive to variations in interparental relationship quality.

  1. Planetesimal Growth through the Accretion of Small Solids: Hydrodynamics Simulations with Gas-Particle Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Anna; Boley, Aaron C.

    2016-10-01

    The growth and migration of planetesimals in young protoplanetary disks are fundamental to the planet formation process. A number of mechanisms seemingly inhibit small grains from growing to sizes much larger than a centimeter, limiting planetesimal growth. In spite of this, the meteoritic record, abundance of exoplanets, and the lifetimes of disks considered altogether indicate that growth must be rapid and common. If a small number of 100-km sized planetesimals do form by some method such as the streaming instability, then gas drag effects could enable those objects to accrete small solids efficiently. In particular, accretion rates for such planetesimals could be higher or lower than rates based on the geometric cross-section and gravitational focusing alone. The local gas conditions and properties of accreting bodies select a locally optimal accretion size for the pebbles. As planetesimals accrete pebbles, they feel an additional angular momentum exchange - causing the planetesimal to slowly drift inward, which becomes significant at short orbital periods. We present self-consistent hydrodynamic simulations with direct particle integration and gas-drag coupling to evaluate the rate of planetesimal growth due to pebble accretion. We explore a range of particle sizes, planetesimal properties, and disk conditions using wind tunnel simulations. These results are followed by numerical analysis of planetesimal drift rates at a variety of stellar distances.

  2. Global and local synchrony of coupled neurons in small-world networks.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Naoki; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2004-04-01

    Synchronous firing of neurons is thought to play important functional roles such as feature binding and switching of cognitive states. Although synchronization has mainly been investigated so far using model neurons with simple connection topology, real neural networks have more complex structures. Here we examine the behavior of pulse-coupled leaky integrate-and-fire neurons with various network structures. We first show that the dispersion of the number of connections for neurons influences dynamical behavior even if other major topological statistics are kept fixed. The rewiring probability parameter representing the randomness of networks bridges two spatially opposite frameworks: precise local synchrony and rough global synchrony. Finally, cooperation of the global connections and the local clustering property, which is prominent in small-world networks, forces synchrony of distant neuronal groups receiving coherent inputs.

  3. Molecular Evidence for Gender Differences in the Migratory Behaviour of a Small Seabird

    PubMed Central

    Medeiros, Renata J.; King, R. Andrew; Symondson, William O. C.; Cadiou, Bernard; Zonfrillo, Bernard; Bolton, Mark; Morton, Rab; Howell, Stephen; Clinton, Anthony; Felgueiras, Marcial; Thomas, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Molecular sexing revealed an unexpectedly strong female bias in the sex ratio of pre-breeding European Storm Petrels (Hydrobates pelagicus), attracted to playback of conspecific calls during their northwards migration past SW Europe. This bias was consistent across seven years, ranging from 80.8% to 89.7% female (mean annual sex ratio ± SD = 85.5% female ±4.1%). The sex ratio did not differ significantly from unity (i.e., 50% female) among (i) Storm Petrel chicks at a breeding colony in NW France, (ii) adults found dead on beaches in Southern Portugal, (iii) breeding birds attending nest burrows in the UK, captured by hand, and (iv) adults captured near a breeding colony in the UK using copies of the same sound recordings as used in Southern Europe, indicating that females are not inherently more strongly attracted to playback calls than males. A morphological discriminant function analysis failed to provide a good separation of the sexes, showing the importance of molecular sexing for this species. We found no sex difference in the seasonal or nocturnal timing of migration past Southern Europe, but there was a significant tendency for birds to be caught in sex-specific aggregations. The preponderance of females captured in Southern Europe suggests that the sexes may differ in migration route or in their colony-prospecting behaviour during migration, at sites far away from their natal colonies. Such differences in migration behaviour between males and females are poorly understood but have implications for the vulnerability of seabirds to pollution and environmental change at sea during the non-breeding season. PMID:23029481

  4. Molecular evidence for gender differences in the migratory behaviour of a small seabird.

    PubMed

    Medeiros, Renata J; King, R Andrew; Symondson, William O C; Cadiou, Bernard; Zonfrillo, Bernard; Bolton, Mark; Morton, Rab; Howell, Stephen; Clinton, Anthony; Felgueiras, Marcial; Thomas, Robert J

    2012-01-01

    Molecular sexing revealed an unexpectedly strong female bias in the sex ratio of pre-breeding European Storm Petrels (Hydrobates pelagicus), attracted to playback of conspecific calls during their northwards migration past SW Europe. This bias was consistent across seven years, ranging from 80.8% to 89.7% female (mean annual sex ratio ± SD = 85.5% female ±4.1%). The sex ratio did not differ significantly from unity (i.e., 50% female) among (i) Storm Petrel chicks at a breeding colony in NW France, (ii) adults found dead on beaches in Southern Portugal, (iii) breeding birds attending nest burrows in the UK, captured by hand, and (iv) adults captured near a breeding colony in the UK using copies of the same sound recordings as used in Southern Europe, indicating that females are not inherently more strongly attracted to playback calls than males. A morphological discriminant function analysis failed to provide a good separation of the sexes, showing the importance of molecular sexing for this species. We found no sex difference in the seasonal or nocturnal timing of migration past Southern Europe, but there was a significant tendency for birds to be caught in sex-specific aggregations. The preponderance of females captured in Southern Europe suggests that the sexes may differ in migration route or in their colony-prospecting behaviour during migration, at sites far away from their natal colonies. Such differences in migration behaviour between males and females are poorly understood but have implications for the vulnerability of seabirds to pollution and environmental change at sea during the non-breeding season.

  5. Aerodynamic Modeling of Transonic Aircraft Using Vortex Lattice Coupled with Transonic Small Disturbance for Conceptual Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaparro, Daniel; Fujiwara, Gustavo E. C.; Ting, Eric; Nguyen, Nhan

    2016-01-01

    The need to rapidly scan large design spaces during conceptual design calls for computationally inexpensive tools such as the vortex lattice method (VLM). Although some VLM tools, such as Vorview have been extended to model fully-supersonic flow, VLM solutions are typically limited to inviscid, subcritical flow regimes. Many transport aircraft operate at transonic speeds, which limits the applicability of VLM for such applications. This paper presents a novel approach to correct three-dimensional VLM through coupling of two-dimensional transonic small disturbance (TSD) solutions along the span of an aircraft wing in order to accurately predict transonic aerodynamic loading and wave drag for transport aircraft. The approach is extended to predict flow separation and capture the attenuation of aerodynamic forces due to boundary layer viscosity by coupling the TSD solver with an integral boundary layer (IBL) model. The modeling framework is applied to the NASA General Transport Model (GTM) integrated with a novel control surface known as the Variable Camber Continuous Trailing Edge Flap (VCCTEF).

  6. Time dependent quantum thermodynamics of a coupled quantum oscillator system in a small thermal environment

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, George L.; Kellman, Michael E.

    2013-12-07

    Simulations are performed of a small quantum system interacting with a quantum environment. The system consists of various initial states of two harmonic oscillators coupled to give normal modes. The environment is “designed” by its level pattern to have a thermodynamic temperature. A random coupling causes the system and environment to become entangled in the course of time evolution. The approach to a Boltzmann distribution is observed, and effective fitted temperatures close to the designed temperature are obtained. All initial pure states of the system are driven to equilibrium at very similar rates, with quick loss of memory of the initial state. The time evolution of the von Neumann entropy is calculated as a measure of equilibration and of quantum coherence. It is pointed out using spatial density distribution plots that quantum interference is eliminated only with maximal entropy, which corresponds thermally to infinite temperature. Implications of our results for the notion of “classicalizing” behavior in the approach to thermal equilibrium are briefly considered.

  7. Time dependent quantum thermodynamics of a coupled quantum oscillator system in a small thermal environment.

    PubMed

    Barnes, George L; Kellman, Michael E

    2013-12-07

    Simulations are performed of a small quantum system interacting with a quantum environment. The system consists of various initial states of two harmonic oscillators coupled to give normal modes. The environment is "designed" by its level pattern to have a thermodynamic temperature. A random coupling causes the system and environment to become entangled in the course of time evolution. The approach to a Boltzmann distribution is observed, and effective fitted temperatures close to the designed temperature are obtained. All initial pure states of the system are driven to equilibrium at very similar rates, with quick loss of memory of the initial state. The time evolution of the von Neumann entropy is calculated as a measure of equilibration and of quantum coherence. It is pointed out using spatial density distribution plots that quantum interference is eliminated only with maximal entropy, which corresponds thermally to infinite temperature. Implications of our results for the notion of "classicalizing" behavior in the approach to thermal equilibrium are briefly considered.

  8. Time dependent quantum thermodynamics of a coupled quantum oscillator system in a small thermal environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, George L.; Kellman, Michael E.

    2013-12-01

    Simulations are performed of a small quantum system interacting with a quantum environment. The system consists of various initial states of two harmonic oscillators coupled to give normal modes. The environment is "designed" by its level pattern to have a thermodynamic temperature. A random coupling causes the system and environment to become entangled in the course of time evolution. The approach to a Boltzmann distribution is observed, and effective fitted temperatures close to the designed temperature are obtained. All initial pure states of the system are driven to equilibrium at very similar rates, with quick loss of memory of the initial state. The time evolution of the von Neumann entropy is calculated as a measure of equilibration and of quantum coherence. It is pointed out using spatial density distribution plots that quantum interference is eliminated only with maximal entropy, which corresponds thermally to infinite temperature. Implications of our results for the notion of "classicalizing" behavior in the approach to thermal equilibrium are briefly considered.

  9. Field dimension and skill level constrain team tactical behaviours in small-sided and conditioned games in football.

    PubMed

    Silva, Pedro; Duarte, Ricardo; Sampaio, Jaime; Aguiar, Paulo; Davids, Keith; Araújo, Duarte; Garganta, Júlio

    2014-12-01

    Abstract This study analysed the influence of field dimension and players' skill level on collective tactical behaviours during small-sided and conditioned games (SSCGs). Positioning and displacement data were collected using global positioning systems (15 Hz) during SSCGs (Gk+4 v. 4+Gk) played by two groups of participants (NLP- national-level and RLP-regional-level players) on different field dimensions (small: 36.8 × 23.8 m; intermediate: 47.3 × 30.6 and large: 57.8 × 37.4 m). Team tactical performance was assessed through established dynamic team variables (effective playing space, playing length per width ratio and team separateness) and nonlinear signal processing techniques (sample entropy of distances to nearest opponents and the teams' centroids' mutual information). Results showed that the effective playing space and team separateness increased significantly with pitch size regardless of participant skill level (P < 0.001, η(2) = 0.78 and P < 0.001, η(2) = 0.65, respectively). Playing length per width ratio increased with pitch size for the NLP but was maintained at a relatively constant level by RLP across treatments indicating different playing shapes. There was significantly more irregularity in distances to nearest opponents for the NLP in small (P = 0.003) and intermediate fields (P = 0.01). Findings suggest that tactical behaviours in SSCGs are constrained by field size and skill level, which need to be considered by coaches when designing training practices.

  10. Analysis of the sodium recirculation theory of solute-coupled water transport in small intestine

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Erik Hviid; Sørensen, Jakob Balslev; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2002-01-01

    Our previous mathematical model of solute-coupled water transport through the intestinal epithelium is extended for dealing with electrolytes rather than electroneutral solutes. A 3Na+–2K+ pump in the lateral membranes provides the energy-requiring step for driving transjunctional and translateral flows of water across the epithelium with recirculation of the diffusible ions maintained by a 1Na+-1K+–2Cl− cotransporter in the plasma membrane facing the serosal compartment. With intracellular non-diffusible anions and compliant plasma membranes, the model describes the dependence on membrane permeabilities and pump constants of fluxes of water and electrolytes, volumes and ion concentrations of cell and lateral intercellular space (lis), and membrane potentials and conductances. Simulating physiological bioelectrical features together with cellular and paracellular fluxes of the sodium ion, computations predict that the concentration differences between lis and bathing solutions are small for all three ions. Nevertheless, the diffusion fluxes of the ions out of lis significantly exceed their mass transports. It is concluded that isotonic transport requires recirculation of all three ions. The computed sodium recirculation flux that is required for isotonic transport corresponds to that estimated in experiments on toad small intestine. This result is shown to be robust and independent of whether the apical entrance mechanism for the sodium ion is a channel, a SGLT1 transporter driving inward uphill water flux, or an electroneutral Na+–K+–2Cl− cotransporter. PMID:12096047

  11. Eact, a small molecule activator of TMEM16A, activates TRPV1 and elicits pain‐ and itch‐related behaviours

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shenbin; Feng, Jing; Luo, Jialie; Yang, Pu; Brett, Thomas J

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose TMEM16A, also known as anoctamin 1 channel, is a member of the Ca2 +‐activated chloride channels family and serves as a heat sensor in the primary nociceptors. Eact is a recently discovered small molecule activator of the TMEM16A channel. Here, we asked if Eact produces pain‐ and itch‐related responses in vivo and investigated the cellular and molecular basis of Eact‐elicited responses in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons. Experimental Approach We employed behavioural testing combined with pharmacological inhibition and genetic ablation approaches to identify transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) as the prominent mediator for Eact‐evoked itch‐ or pain‐related responses. We investigated the effects of Eact on TRPV1 and TMEM16A channels expressed in HEK293T cells and in DRG neurons isolated from wild type and Trpv1 −/− mice using Ca2 + imaging and patch‐clamp recordings. We also used site‐directed mutagenesis to determine the molecular basis of Eact activation of TRPV1. Key Results Administration of Eact elicited both itch‐ and pain‐related behaviours. Unexpectedly, the Eact‐elicited behavioural responses were dependent on the function of TRPV1, as shown by pharmacological inhibition and genetic ablation studies. Eact activated membrane currents and increased intracellular free Ca2 + in both TRPV1‐expressing HEK293T cells and isolated DRG neurons in a TRPV1‐dependent manner. Eact activation of the TRPV1 channel was severely attenuated by mutations disrupting the capsaicin‐binding sites. Conclusions and Implications Our results suggest that Eact activates primary sensory nociceptors and produces both pain and itch responses mainly through direct activation of TRPV1 channels. PMID:26756551

  12. Eact, a small molecule activator of TMEM16A, activates TRPV1 and elicits pain- and itch-related behaviours.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shenbin; Feng, Jing; Luo, Jialie; Yang, Pu; Brett, Thomas J; Hu, Hongzhen

    2016-04-01

    TMEM16A, also known as anoctamin 1 channel, is a member of the Ca(2+)-activated chloride channels family and serves as a heat sensor in the primary nociceptors. Eact is a recently discovered small molecule activator of the TMEM16A channel. Here, we asked if Eact produces pain- and itch-related responses in vivo and investigated the cellular and molecular basis of Eact-elicited responses in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons. We employed behavioural testing combined with pharmacological inhibition and genetic ablation approaches to identify transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) as the prominent mediator for Eact-evoked itch- or pain-related responses. We investigated the effects of Eact on TRPV1 and TMEM16A channels expressed in HEK293T cells and in DRG neurons isolated from wild type and Trpv1(-/-) mice using Ca(2+) imaging and patch-clamp recordings. We also used site-directed mutagenesis to determine the molecular basis of Eact activation of TRPV1. Administration of Eact elicited both itch- and pain-related behaviours. Unexpectedly, the Eact-elicited behavioural responses were dependent on the function of TRPV1, as shown by pharmacological inhibition and genetic ablation studies. Eact activated membrane currents and increased intracellular free Ca(2+) in both TRPV1-expressing HEK293T cells and isolated DRG neurons in a TRPV1-dependent manner. Eact activation of the TRPV1 channel was severely attenuated by mutations disrupting the capsaicin-binding sites. Our results suggest that Eact activates primary sensory nociceptors and produces both pain and itch responses mainly through direct activation of TRPV1 channels. © 2016 The British Pharmacological Society.

  13. Heterogeneity and nearest-neighbor coupling can explain small-worldness and wave properties in pancreatic islets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappon, Giacomo; Pedersen, Morten Gram

    2016-05-01

    Many multicellular systems consist of coupled cells that work as a syncytium. The pancreatic islet of Langerhans is a well-studied example of such a microorgan. The islets are responsible for secretion of glucose-regulating hormones, mainly glucagon and insulin, which are released in distinct pulses. In order to observe pulsatile insulin secretion from the β-cells within the islets, the cellular responses must be synchronized. It is now well established that gap junctions provide the electrical nearest-neighbor coupling that allows excitation waves to spread across islets to synchronize the β-cell population. Surprisingly, functional coupling analysis of calcium responses in β-cells shows small-world properties, i.e., a high degree of local coupling with a few long-range "short-cut" connections that reduce the average path-length greatly. Here, we investigate how such long-range functional coupling can appear as a result of heterogeneity, nearest-neighbor coupling, and wave propagation. Heterogeneity is also able to explain a set of experimentally observed synchronization and wave properties without introducing all-or-none cell coupling and percolation theory. Our theoretical results highlight how local biological coupling can give rise to functional small-world properties via heterogeneity and wave propagation.

  14. Body charge modelling for accurate simulation of small-signal behaviour in floating body SOI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, James; Redman-White, William; D'Halleweyn, Nele V.; Easson, Craig A.; Uren, Michael J.

    2002-04-01

    We show that careful modelling of body node elements in floating body PD-SOI MOSFET compact models is required in order to obtain accurate small-signal simulation results in the saturation region. The body network modifies the saturation output conductance of the device via the body-source transconductance, resulting in a pole/zero pair being introduced in the conductance-frequency response. We show that neglecting the presence of body charge in the saturation region can often yield inaccurate values for the body capacitances, which in turn can adversely affect the modelling of the output conductance above the pole/zero frequency. We conclude that the underlying cause of this problem is the use of separate models for the intrinsic and extrinsic capacitances. Finally, we present a simple saturation body charge model which can greatly improve small-signal simulation accuracy for floating body devices.

  15. Empirical evidences of owners’ managerial behaviour - the case of small companies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobontiu, G.; Banica, M.; Ravai-Nagy, S.

    2017-05-01

    In a small firm, the founder or the owner-manager often leaves his or her own personal “stamp” on the way things are done, finding solutions for the multitude of problems the firm faces, and maintaining control over the firm’s operations. The paper aims to investigate the degree to which the owner-managers are controlling the operations of their firm on a day-to-day basis or even getting involved into the management of the functional areas. Our empirical research, conducted on a sample of 200 small and medium-sized enterprises (SME) from the North-Western Romania, Maramures (NUTS3 level - RO114), shows that owner-managers tend to be all-powerful, making decisions based on their experience. Furthermore, the survey highlights the focus of owner-managers on two functional areas, namely the production, and sales and marketing. Finally, the correlation analysis states that in the case of small firms, the owner-manager is more involved in managing the functional areas of the firm, as compared to the medium-ones.

  16. The costs of risky male behaviour: sex differences in seasonal survival in a small sexually monomorphic primate

    PubMed Central

    Kraus, Cornelia; Eberle, Manfred; Kappeler, Peter M

    2008-01-01

    Male excess mortality is widespread among mammals and frequently interpreted as a cost of sexually selected traits that enhance male reproductive success. Sex differences in the propensity to engage in risky behaviours are often invoked to explain the sex gap in survival. Here, we aim to isolate and quantify the survival consequences of two potentially risky male behavioural strategies in a small sexually monomorphic primate, the grey mouse lemur Microcebus murinus: (i) most females hibernate during a large part of the austral winter, whereas most males remain active and (ii) during the brief annual mating season males roam widely in search of receptive females. Using a 10-year capture–mark–recapture dataset from a population of M. murinus in Kirindy Forest, western Madagascar, we statistically modelled sex-specific seasonal survival probabilities. Surprisingly, we did not find any evidence for direct survival benefits of hibernation—winter survival did not differ between males and females. By contrast, during the breeding season males survived less well than females (sex gap: 16%). Consistent with the ‘risky male behaviour’ hypothesis, the period for lowered male survival was restricted to the short mating season. Thus, sex differences in survival in a promiscuous mammal can be substantial even in the absence of sexual dimorphism. PMID:18426751

  17. Behavioural effects of near-term acute fetal hypoxia in a small precocial animal, the spiny mouse (Acomys cahirinus).

    PubMed

    Ireland, Zoe; Dickinson, Hayley; Fleiss, Bobbi; Hutton, Lisa C; Walker, David W

    2010-01-01

    We have previously developed a model of near-term intra-uterine hypoxia producing significant neonatal mortality (37%) in a small laboratory animal - the spiny mouse - which has precocial offspring at birth. The aim of the present study was to determine if this insult resulted in the appearance of behavioural abnormalities in those offspring which survived the hypoxic delivery. Behavioural tests assessed gait (using footprint patterns), motor coordination and balance on an accelerating rotarod, and spontaneous locomotion and exploration in an open field. We found that the near-term acute hypoxic episode produced a mild neurological deficit in the early postnatal period. In comparison to vaginally delivered controls, hypoxia pups were able to remain on the accelerating rotarod for significantly shorter durations on postnatal days 1-2, and in the open field they travelled significantly shorter distances, jumped less, and spent a greater percentage of time stationary on postnatal days 5 and 15. No changes were observed in gait. Unlike some rodent models of cerebral hypoxia-ischaemia, macroscopic examination of the brain on postnatal day 5 showed no gross cystic lesions, oedema or infarct. Future studies should be directed at identifying hypoxia-induced alterations in the function of specific brain regions, and assessing if maternal administration of neuroprotective agents can prevent against hypoxia-induced neurological deficits and brain damage that occur at birth.

  18. On the use of three hydrological models as hypotheses to investigate the behaviour of a small Mediterranean catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz Pérez, Guiomar; Latron, Jérôme; Llorens, Pilar; Gallart, Francesc; Francés, Félix

    2017-04-01

    Selecting an adequate hydrological model is the first step to carry out a rainfall-runoff modelling exercise. A hydrological model is a hypothesis of catchment functioning, encompassing a description of dominant hydrological processes and predicting how these processes interact to produce the catchment's response to external forcing. Current research lines emphasize the importance of multiple working hypotheses for hydrological modelling instead of only using a single model. In line with this philosophy, here different hypotheses were considered and analysed to simulate the nonlinear response of a small Mediterranean catchment and to progress in the analysis of its hydrological behaviour. In particular, three hydrological models were considered representing different potential hypotheses: two lumped models called LU3 and LU4, and one distributed model called TETIS. To determine how well each specific model performed and to assess whether a model was more adequate than another, we raised three complementary tests: one based on the analysis of residual errors series, another based on a sensitivity analysis and the last one based on using multiple evaluation criteria associated to the concept of Pareto frontier. This modelling approach, based on multiple working hypotheses, helped to improve our perceptual model of the catchment behaviour and, furthermore, could be used as a guidance to improve the performance of other environmental models.

  19. Dimensional accuracy of small gold alloy castings. Part 1. A brief history and the behaviour of inlay waxes.

    PubMed

    Morey, E F

    1991-08-01

    Part 1 reviews published studies which relate to materials and techniques contributing to the dimensional accuracy of small dental castings. A brief history of the cire perdue or lost-wax method of casting alloys and the development of modern dental casting materials and techniques are presented. Data on the behaviour of inlay wax, in particular its contraction and distortion, are reviewed as is the extensive literature about the casting shrinkage of gold alloys (Part 2) and the setting and thermal expansion of investments under both laboratory and practical conditions (Part 3). Part 4 discusses the role of the casting ring and its asbestos liner. Asbestos as a liner has now largely been replaced by two alternative materials, one based on cellulose and the other on ceramic fibres. The limited literature on the effect of these newer materials on casting accuracy is also reviewed, as their introduction may require significant changes in the traditional technology of dental casting.

  20. Magnetic-resonance-imaging-coupled broadband near-infrared tomography system for small animal brain studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Heng; Springett, Roger; Dehghani, Hamid; Pogue, Brian W.; Paulsen, Keith D.; Dunn, Jeff F.

    2005-04-01

    A novel magnetic-resonance-coupled broadband near-infrared (NIR) tomography system for small animal brain studies is described. Several features of the image formation approach are new in NIR tomography and represent major advances in the path to recovering high-resolution hemoglobin and oxygen saturation images of tissue. The NIR data were broadband and continuous wave and were used along with a second-derivative-based estimation of the path length from water absorption. The path length estimation from water was then used along with the attenuation spectrum to recover absorption and reduced scattering coefficient images at multiple wavelengths and then to recover images of total hemoglobin and oxygen saturation. Going beyond these basics of NIR tomography, software has been developed to allow inclusion of structures derived from MR imaging (MRI) for the external and internal tissue boundaries, thereby improving the accuracy and spatial resolution of the properties in each tissue type. The system has been validated in both tissue-simulating phantoms, with 10% accuracy observed, and in a rat cranium imaging experiment. The latter experiment used variation in inspired oxygen (FiO2) to vary the observed hemoglobin and oxygen saturation images. Quantitative agreement was observed between the changes in deoxyhemoglobin values derived from NIR and the changes predicted with blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) MRI. This system represents the initial stage in what will likely be a larger role for NIR tomography, coupled to MRI, and illustrates that the technological challenges of using continuous-wave broadband data and inclusion of a priori structural information can be met with careful phantom studies.

  1. Coupling instantaneous energy-budget models and behavioural mode analysis to estimate optimal foraging strategy: an example with wandering albatrosses.

    PubMed

    Louzao, Maite; Wiegand, Thorsten; Bartumeus, Frederic; Weimerskirch, Henri

    2014-01-01

    How foragers move across the landscape to search for resources and obtain energy is a central issue in ecology. Direct energetic quantification of animal movements allows for testing optimal foraging theory predictions which assumes that animals forage so as to maximise net energy gain. Thanks to biologging advances, we coupled instantaneous energy-budget models and behavioural mode analysis to test optimal foraging theory predictions on wandering albatross Diomedea exulans during the brooding period. Specifically, the instantaneous energy-budget model considered the energetic balance (i.e., the difference between empirical energy gain data and modelled energy expenditure via heart rate values) along the trajectory of a given individual. Four stereotypic instantaneous behavioural modes were identified based on trajectory properties (e.g., speed and turning angle) by applying a new algorithm called Expectation Maximization Binary Clustering. Previous studies on this species have shown that foraging-in-flight is the optimal foraging strategy during the incubation period when albatrosses undertake long-distance movements but no specific foraging strategy has been determined for shorter foraging movements (e.g., brooding period). The output of our energy-budget model (measured as net energy gain) highlighted the potential optimality of alternative search strategies (e.g., sit-and-wait) during brooding, when birds may be subjected to specific energetic trade-offs and have to adapt their foraging strategies accordingly. However, not all birds showed this pattern, revealing the importance of considering individual variability in foraging strategies, as well as any switching among strategies, before drawing population-level generalizations. Finally, our study unveils the importance of considering fine scale activities to make realistic estimates of trip energy expenditure for flying birds at sea. The up-scaling of accurately measured fine-scale energy patterns is essential

  2. Ensemble Activation of G-Protein -Coupled Receptors Revealed by Small-Angle Neutron Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Xiang-Qiang; Perera, Suchithranga; Shrestha, Utsab; Chawla, Udeep; Struts, Andrey; Qian, Shuo; Brown, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Rhodopsin is a G-protein -coupled receptor (GPCR) involved in visual light perception and occurs naturally in a membrane lipid environment. Rhodopsin photoactivation yields cis-trans isomerization of retinal giving equilibrium between inactive Meta-I and active Meta-II states. Does photoactivation lead to a single Meta-II conformation, or do substates exist as described by an ensemble-activation mechanism (EAM)? We use small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) to investigate conformational changes in rhodopsin-detergent and rhodopsin-lipid complexes upon photoactivation. Meta-I state is stabilized in CHAPS-solubilized rhodopsin, while Meta-II is trapped in DDM-solubilized rhodopsin. SANS data are acquired from 80% D2O solutions and at contrast-matching points for both DDM and CHAPS samples. Our experiments demonstrate that for detergent-solubilized rhodopsin, SANS with contrast variation can detect structural differences between the rhodopsin dark-state, Meta-I, Meta-II, and ligand-free opsin states. Dark-state rhodopsin has more conformational flexibility in DDM micelles compared to CHAPS, which is consistent with an ensemble of activated Meta-II states. Furthermore, time-resolved SANS enables study of the time-dependent structural transitions between Meta-I and Meta-II, which is crucial to understanding the ensemble-based activation.

  3. Numerical study of flow and thermal behaviour of lid-driven flows in cavities of small aspect ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chin-Lung; Cheng, Chin-Hsiang

    2006-11-01

    Numerical study has been performed to investigate the effects of cavity shape on flow and heat transfer characteristics of the lid-driven cavity flows. Dependence of flow and thermal behaviour on the aspect ratio of the cavities is also evaluated. Three types of the cross-sectional shape, namely, circular, triangular, and rectangular, and four aspect ratios, 0.133, 0.207, 0.288, and 0.5, are taken into account to construct twelve possible combinations; however, attention is focused on the small-aspect-ratio situations. Value of the Reynolds number considered in this study is varied between 100 and 1800. For the cases considered in this study a major clockwise vortex driven by the moving lid prevailing in the cavity is always observed. When the Reynolds number is fixed, the rectangular cavity produces strongest lid-driven flow, and the triangular cavity weakest. For the cases at small aspect ratio and low Reynolds number, the streamlines appear symmetric fore-and-aft with respect to the central line at x/L = 0.5. Data for the local and average Nusselt numbers are also provided. For rectangular cavities, it is observed that case 1/5R produces the highest average Nusselt number at any Reynolds number. Among the twelve possible geometric cases considered herein, the highest and lowest average Nusselt numbers are found with cases 1/6T and 1/2C, respectively.

  4. Breakdown of Bragg-Gray behaviour for low-density detectors under electronic disequilibrium conditions in small megavoltage photon fields.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sudhir; Fenwick, John D; Underwood, Tracy S A; Deshpande, Deepak D; Scott, Alison J D; Nahum, Alan E

    2015-10-21

    In small photon fields ionisation chambers can exhibit large deviations from Bragg-Gray behaviour; the EGSnrc Monte Carlo (MC) code system has been employed to investigate this 'Bragg-Gray breakdown'. The total electron (+positron) fluence in small water and air cavities in a water phantom has been computed for a full linac beam model as well as for a point source spectrum for 6 MV and 15 MV qualities for field sizes from 0.25  ×  0.25 cm(2) to 10  ×  10 cm(2). A water-to-air perturbation factor has been derived as the ratio of total electron (+positron) fluence, integrated over all energies, in a tiny water volume to that in a 'PinPoint 3D-chamber-like' air cavity; for the 0.25  ×  0.25 cm(2) field size the perturbation factors are 1.323 and 2.139 for 6 MV and 15 MV full linac geometries respectively. For the 15 MV full linac geometry for field sizes of 1  ×  1 cm(2) and smaller not only the absolute magnitude but also the 'shape' of the total electron fluence spectrum in the air cavity is significantly different to that in the water 'cavity'. The physics of this 'Bragg-Gray breakdown' is fully explained, making reference to the Fano theorem. For the 15 MV full linac geometry in the 0.25  ×  0.25 cm(2) field the directly computed MC dose ratio, water-to-air, differs by 5% from the product of the Spencer-Attix stopping-power ratio (SPR) and the perturbation factor; this 'difference' is explained by the difference in the shapes of the fluence spectra and is also formulated theoretically. We show that the dimensions of an air-cavity with a perturbation factor within 5% of unity would have to be impractically small in these highly non-equilibrium photon fields. In contrast the dose to water in a 0.25  ×  0.25 cm(2) field derived by multiplying the dose in the single-crystal diamond dosimeter (SCDDo) by the Spencer-Attix ratio is within 2.9% of the dose computed directly in the water voxel for full linac

  5. Study on small-strain behaviours of methane hydrate sandy sediments using discrete element method

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Yanxin; Cheng Yipik; Xu Xiaomin; Soga, Kenichi

    2013-06-18

    Methane hydrate bearing soil has attracted increasing interest as a potential energy resource where methane gas can be extracted from dissociating hydrate-bearing sediments. Seismic testing techniques have been applied extensively and in various ways, to detect the presence of hydrates, due to the fact that hydrates increase the stiffness of hydrate-bearing sediments. With the recognition of the limitations of laboratory and field tests, wave propagation modelling using Discrete Element Method (DEM) was conducted in this study in order to provide some particle-scale insights on the hydrate-bearing sandy sediment models with pore-filling and cementation hydrate distributions. The relationship between shear wave velocity and hydrate saturation was established by both DEM simulations and analytical solutions. Obvious differences were observed in the dependence of wave velocity on hydrate saturation for these two cases. From the shear wave velocity measurement and particle-scale analysis, it was found that the small-strain mechanical properties of hydrate-bearing sandy sediments are governed by both the hydrate distribution patterns and hydrate saturation.

  6. The asymptotic behaviour of parton distributions at small and large x.

    PubMed

    Ball, Richard D; Nocera, Emanuele R; Rojo, Juan

    2016-01-01

    It has been argued from the earliest days of quantum chromodynamics that at asymptotically small values of x the parton distribution functions (PDFs) of the proton behave as [Formula: see text], where the values of [Formula: see text] can be deduced from Regge theory, while at asymptotically large values of x the PDFs behave as [Formula: see text], where the values of [Formula: see text] can be deduced from the Brodsky-Farrar quark counting rules. We critically examine these claims by extracting the exponents [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] from various global fits of parton distributions, analysing their scale dependence, and comparing their values to the naive expectations. We find that for valence distributions both Regge theory and counting rules are confirmed, at least within uncertainties, while for sea quarks and gluons the results are less conclusive. We also compare results from various PDF fits for the structure function ratio [Formula: see text] at large x, and caution against unrealistic uncertainty estimates due to overconstrained parametrisations.

  7. COUPLING

    DOEpatents

    Frisch, E.; Johnson, C.G.

    1962-05-15

    A detachable coupling arrangement is described which provides for varying the length of the handle of a tool used in relatively narrow channels. The arrangement consists of mating the key and keyhole formations in the cooperating handle sections. (AEC)

  8. Mini-Spec: A Compact, Fiber-Coupled, VPH Grating Spectrograph for Small Observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nations, H. L.; Haynes, P.; Brewer, P.

    2003-05-01

    We report on the development and testing of what we believe to be the first VPH grating based spectrograph developed primarily for use at telescopes of modest aperture. To date, the most common instrument suite for such observatories is typically that of a CCD camera with attached filter wheel. While there is no doubt that a wide range of interesting and good science has been done with such instrumentation, the addition of a robust and easy to operate spectrograph would greatly increase the utility of such installations. While some commercial spectrographs exist for use on small telescopes, the authors have found them to be, with few exceptions, either inefficient, difficult for inexperienced students or amateurs to use, or not remotely operable. Correcting these deficiencies is thus the primary motivation for Mini-Spec. The design of Mini-Spec has been influenced by previous work the authors have done on a full-sized fiber-coupled spectrograph (Nations and Pierce, 2002). Mini-Spec uses some of those original design features, only reduced drastically in size. This size reduction (the spectrograph fits within a 7 inch cube), along with a much more careful choice of some critical components, has resulted in a dramatic reduction in cost. The spectrograph uses a highly efficient 1200 l/mm, 40 mm diameter vph grating on loan from Richard Rallison. Focus, central wavelength selection, and comparison lamps are all controlled via an RS-232 link and a custom Visual Basic GUI. Sample spectra of stellar and non-stellar targets will be presented along with a discussion of research projects admirably suited for this instrument. Funding for equipment has been provided by a NASA EPSCoR grant to PI Ron Canterna. HLN has been partially funded by a Wyoming Space Grant Faculty Fellowship.

  9. Enhancing Social Integration of Immigrant Pupils at Risk for Social, Emotional and/or Behavioural Difficulties: The Outcomes of a Small-Scale Social-Emotional Learning Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doikou-Avlidou, Maro; Dadatsi, Katerina

    2013-01-01

    The present study aimed to explore the outcomes of a small-scale social and emotional learning (SEL) intervention programme regarding the social behaviour and the social position of pupils from culturally diverse backgrounds. Seven primary and secondary education teachers participated in the study along with the pupils attending their classes;…

  10. The effects of the small-scale behaviour of dark matter power spectrum on CMB spectral distortion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Abir; Sethi, Shiv. K.; Das, Subinoy

    2017-07-01

    After numerous astronomical and experimental searches, the precise particle nature of dark matter is still unknown. The standard Weakly Interacting Massive Particle(WIMP) dark matter, despite successfully explaining the large-scale features of the universe, has long-standing small-scale issues. The spectral distortion in the Cosmic Microwave Background(CMB) caused by Silk damping in the pre-recombination era allows one to access information on a range of small scales 0.3 Mpc < k < 104 Mpc-1, whose dynamics can be precisely described using linear theory. In this paper, we investigate the possibility of using the Silk damping induced CMB spectral distortion as a probe of the small-scale power. We consider four suggested alternative dark matter candidates—Warm Dark Matter (WDM), Late Forming Dark Matter (LFDM), Ultra Light Axion (ULA) dark matter and Charged Decaying Dark Matter (CHDM); the matter power in all these models deviate significantly from the ΛCDM model at small scales. We compute the spectral distortion of CMB for these alternative models and compare our results with the ΛCDM model. We show that the main impact of alternative models is to alter the sub-horizon evolution of the Newtonian potential which affects the late-time behaviour of spectral distortion of CMB. The y-parameter diminishes by a few percent as compared to the ΛCDM model for a range of parameters of these models: LFDM for formation redshift zf = 105 (7%); WDM for mass mwdm = 1 keV (2%); CHDM for decay redshift zdecay = 105 (5%); ULA for mass ma = 10-24 eV (3%). This effect from the pre-recombination era can be masked by orders of magnitude higher y-distortions generated by late-time sources, e.g. the Epoch of Reionization and tSZ from the cluster of galaxies. We also briefly discuss the detectability of this deviation in light of the upcoming CMB experiment PIXIE, which might have the sensitivity to detect this signal from the pre-recombination phase.

  11. SOPPA and CCSD vibrational corrections to NMR indirect spin-spin coupling constants of small hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faber, Rasmus; Sauer, Stephan P. A.

    2015-12-01

    We present zero-point vibrational corrections to the indirect nuclear spin-spin coupling constants in ethyne, ethene, cyclopropene and allene. The calculations have been carried out both at the level of the second order polarization propagator approximation (SOPPA) employing a new implementation in the DALTON program, at the density functional theory level with the B3LYP functional employing also the Dalton program and at the level of coupled cluster singles and doubles (CCSD) theory employing the implementation in the CFOUR program. Specialized coupling constant basis sets, aug-cc-pVTZ-J, have been employed in the calculations. We find that on average the SOPPA results for both the equilibrium geometry values and the zero-point vibrational corrections are in better agreement with the CCSD results than the corresponding B3LYP results. Furthermore we observed that the vibrational corrections are in the order of 5 Hz for the one-bond carbon-hydrogen couplings and about 1 Hz or smaller for the other couplings apart from the one-bond carbon-carbon coupling (11 Hz) and the two-bond carbon-hydrogen coupling (4 Hz) in ethyne. However, not for all couplings lead the inclusion of zero-point vibrational corrections to better agreement with experiment.

  12. SOPPA and CCSD vibrational corrections to NMR indirect spin-spin coupling constants of small hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Faber, Rasmus; Sauer, Stephan P. A.

    2015-12-31

    We present zero-point vibrational corrections to the indirect nuclear spin-spin coupling constants in ethyne, ethene, cyclopropene and allene. The calculations have been carried out both at the level of the second order polarization propagator approximation (SOPPA) employing a new implementation in the DALTON program, at the density functional theory level with the B3LYP functional employing also the Dalton program and at the level of coupled cluster singles and doubles (CCSD) theory employing the implementation in the CFOUR program. Specialized coupling constant basis sets, aug-cc-pVTZ-J, have been employed in the calculations. We find that on average the SOPPA results for both the equilibrium geometry values and the zero-point vibrational corrections are in better agreement with the CCSD results than the corresponding B3LYP results. Furthermore we observed that the vibrational corrections are in the order of 5 Hz for the one-bond carbon-hydrogen couplings and about 1 Hz or smaller for the other couplings apart from the one-bond carbon-carbon coupling (11 Hz) and the two-bond carbon-hydrogen coupling (4 Hz) in ethyne. However, not for all couplings lead the inclusion of zero-point vibrational corrections to better agreement with experiment.

  13. Patterns of sedentary behaviour and physical activity in people following curative intent treatment for non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Cavalheri, Vinicius; Jenkins, Sue; Cecins, Nola; Phillips, Martin; Sanders, Lucas H; Hill, Kylie

    2016-02-01

    This study aimed to compare patterns of sedentary behaviour (SB) and physical activity (PA) in people following curative intent treatment for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with healthy controls. Participants 6-10 weeks following lobectomy for NSCLC and healthy controls wore two activity monitors for 7 days. Waking hours were divided into time spent in SB (<1.5 metabolic equivalent of tasks (METs)), light intensity PA (LIPA ≥ 1.5 to <3.0METs) and moderate-to-vigorous intensity PA (≥3.0METs). Daily steps were also recorded. Data were available in 20 participants with NSCLC (13 females; 68 ± 10 years) and 20 healthy controls (13 females; 69 ± 5 years). The NSCLC group accumulated a greater percentage of time in SB in uninterrupted bouts ≥30 minutes (49% vs. 42%; p = 0.048). Further, the NSCLC group spent a lower percentage of waking hours in LIPA (21 ± 9% vs. 26 ± 8%; p = 0.04) and accumulated a lower percentage of time in this domain in uninterrupted bouts ≥10 minutes (13% vs. 19%; p = 0.025). The NSCLC group also had a lower daily step count (8863 ± 3737 vs. 11,856 ± 3024 steps/day; p = 0.009). Time spent in moderate-to-vigorous intensity PA was similar in both groups (p = 0.92). People following curative intent treatment for NSCLC spend more time in prolonged bouts of SB at the expense of LIPA.

  14. Perspectives in the application of residual dipolar couplings in the structure elucidation of weakly aligned small molecules.

    PubMed

    Schmidts, Volker

    2017-01-01

    This perspective article aims to review the general methodology in the application of residual dipolar couplings (RDCs) in the structure elucidation of small molecules and give the author's view on challenges for future applications. Recent improvements in the availability of alignment media, new pulse sequences for the measurement of couplings and improvements in the analysis software have garnered widespread interest in the technique. However, further generalization is needed in order to make RDC analysis into a truly "routine" method. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Signature effects of spin clustering and distribution of spin couplings on magnetization behaviour in Ni-Fe-Mo and Ni-Fe-W alloys.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Mitali; Singh, Avinash; Majumdar, A K; Nigam, A K

    2011-08-03

    Spontaneous magnetization as a function of temperature is investigated for a number of disordered Ni-Fe-Mo and Ni-Fe-W alloys using superconducting quantum interference device magnetometry, with a focus on the low-T behaviour as well as the critical exponents associated with the magnetic phase transition. While the low-T magnetization is found to be well described by Bloch's T(3/2) law, extraordinary enhancements of the spin-wave parameter B and the reduced coefficient B(3/2) = BT(C)(3/2) are observed with increasing Fe dilution as compared to conventional 3d ferromagnets, whereas the critical amplitudes are found to decrease systematically. Recent locally self-consistent calculations of finite-temperature spin dynamics in a generic diluted magnet provide an understanding in terms of two distinct energy scales associated with weakly coupled bulk spins in the ferromagnetic matrix and strongly coupled cluster spins. In view of the similar behaviour observed in diluted magnetic semiconductors and other ferromagnetic alloys, it is proposed that these distinctive features corresponding to the three important temperature regimes provide macroscopic indicators of signature effects of spin clustering on the magnetization behaviour in disordered ferromagnets.

  16. Breakdown of Bragg-Gray behaviour for low-density detectors under electronic disequilibrium conditions in small megavoltage photon fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sudhir; Fenwick, John D.; Underwood, Tracy S. A.; Deshpande, Deepak D.; Scott, Alison J. D.; Nahum, Alan E.

    2015-10-01

    In small photon fields ionisation chambers can exhibit large deviations from Bragg-Gray behaviour; the EGSnrc Monte Carlo (MC) code system has been employed to investigate this ‘Bragg-Gray breakdown’. The total electron (+positron) fluence in small water and air cavities in a water phantom has been computed for a full linac beam model as well as for a point source spectrum for 6 MV and 15 MV qualities for field sizes from 0.25  ×  0.25 cm2 to 10  ×  10 cm2. A water-to-air perturbation factor has been derived as the ratio of total electron (+positron) fluence, integrated over all energies, in a tiny water volume to that in a ‘PinPoint 3D-chamber-like’ air cavity; for the 0.25  ×  0.25 cm2 field size the perturbation factors are 1.323 and 2.139 for 6 MV and 15 MV full linac geometries respectively. For the 15 MV full linac geometry for field sizes of 1  ×  1 cm2 and smaller not only the absolute magnitude but also the ‘shape’ of the total electron fluence spectrum in the air cavity is significantly different to that in the water ‘cavity’. The physics of this ‘Bragg-Gray breakdown’ is fully explained, making reference to the Fano theorem. For the 15 MV full linac geometry in the 0.25  ×  0.25 cm2 field the directly computed MC dose ratio, water-to-air, differs by 5% from the product of the Spencer-Attix stopping-power ratio (SPR) and the perturbation factor; this ‘difference’ is explained by the difference in the shapes of the fluence spectra and is also formulated theoretically. We show that the dimensions of an air-cavity with a perturbation factor within 5% of unity would have to be impractically small in these highly non-equilibrium photon fields. In contrast the dose to water in a 0.25  ×  0.25 cm2 field derived by multiplying the dose in the single-crystal diamond dosimeter (SCDDo) by the Spencer-Attix ratio is within 2.9% of the dose computed directly in the water voxel

  17. Tribological properties of the disc brake friction couple materials in the range of small and very small speeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoica, N. A.; Petrescu, A. M.; Tudor, A.; Predescu, A.

    2017-02-01

    The tribological properties of the friction couple materials have a major influence on the brake system operation and its failure. One of the main phenomena associated as a symptom of failure in the brake system are the noises and vibrations produced during braking. The stick-slip phenomenon is attributed as the cause of these noises and vibrations. The stick-slip phenomenon usually appears at low and very low sliding speeds and is described as intermittences in the friction process caused by the differences between the values of the kinetic and the static friction coefficients. The present paper addresses an investigation about the influence of the static and kinetic friction on the occurrence of above mentioned noises and vibrations in the disc brake system. For this, extensive experimental work was performed on a laboratory tribometer in the form of pin-on-disc tests, where the pin was manufactured out of an automotive brake pad and the disc was manufactured out of an automotive grey cast iron brake disc. The results highlight the effects of the sliding speed and contact pressure on the friction coefficient and its influence on the brake noises and vibrations caused by the stick-slip phenomenon.

  18. A simple behaviour provides accuracy and flexibility in odour plume tracking--the robotic control of sensory-motor coupling in silkmoths.

    PubMed

    Ando, Noriyasu; Kanzaki, Ryohei

    2015-12-01

    Odour plume tracking is an essential behaviour for animal survival. A fundamental strategy for this is to move upstream and then across-stream. Male silkmoths, Bombyx mori, display this strategy as a pre-programmed sequential behaviour. They walk forward (surge) in response to the female sex pheromone and perform a zigzagging 'mating dance'. Though pre-programmed, the surge direction is modulated by bilateral olfactory input and optic flow. However, the nature of the interaction between these two sensory modalities and contribution of the resultant motor command to localizing an odour source are still unknown. We evaluated the ability of the silkmoth to localize an odour source under conditions of disturbed sensory-motor coupling, using a silkmoth-driven mobile robot. The significance of the bilateral olfaction of the moth was confirmed by inverting the olfactory input to the antennae, or its motor output. Inversion of the motor output induced consecutive circling, which was inhibited by covering the visual field of the moth. This suggests that the corollary discharge from the motor command and the reafference of self-generated optic flow generate compensatory signals to guide the surge accurately. Additionally, after inverting the olfactory input, the robot successfully tracked the odour plume by using a combination of behaviours. These results indicate that accurate guidance of the reflexive surge by integrating bilateral olfactory and visual information with innate pre-programmed behaviours increases the flexibility to track an odour plume even under disturbed circumstances. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  19. Effects of gap junction inhibition on contraction waves in the murine small intestine in relation to coupled oscillator theory.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Sean P; Huizinga, Jan D

    2015-02-15

    Waves of contraction in the small intestine correlate with slow waves generated by the myenteric network of interstitial cells of Cajal. Coupled oscillator theory has been used to explain steplike gradients in the frequency (frequency plateaux) of contraction waves along the length of the small intestine. Inhibition of gap junction coupling between oscillators should lead to predictable effects on these plateaux and the wave dislocation (wave drop) phenomena associated with their boundaries. It is these predictions that we wished to test. We used a novel multicamera diameter-mapping system to measure contraction along 25- to 30-cm lengths of murine small intestine. There were typically two to three plateaux per length of intestine. Dislocations could be limited to the wavefronts immediately about the terminated wave, giving the appearance of a three-pronged fork, i.e., a fork dislocation; additionally, localized decreases in velocity developed across a number of wavefronts, ending with the terminated wave, which could appear as a fork, i.e., slip dislocations. The gap junction inhibitor carbenoxolone increased the number of plateaux and dislocations and decreased contraction wave velocity. In some cases, the usual frequency gradient was reversed, with a plateau at a higher frequency than its proximal neighbor; thus fork dislocations were inverted, and the direction of propagation was reversed. Heptanol had no effect on the frequency or velocity of contractions but did reduce their amplitude. To understand intestinal motor patterns, the pacemaker network of the interstitial cells of Cajal is best evaluated as a system of coupled oscillators.

  20. Ligand coupling symmetry correlates with thermopower enhancement in small-molecule/nanocrystal hybrid materials.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Jared; Kotiuga, Michele; Doan-Nguyen, Vicky V T; Queen, Wendy L; Forster, Jason D; Schlitz, Ruth A; Murray, Christopher B; Neaton, Jeffrey B; Chabinyc, Michael L; Urban, Jeffrey J

    2014-10-28

    We investigate the impact of the coupling symmetry and chemical nature of organic-inorganic interfaces on thermoelectric transport in Cu2-xSe nanocrystal thin films. By coupling ligand-exchange techniques with layer-by-layer assembly methods, we are able to systematically vary nanocrystal-organic linker interfaces, demonstrating how the functionality of the polar headgroup and the coupling symmetry of the organic linkers can change the power factor (S(2)σ) by nearly 2 orders of magnitude. Remarkably, we observe that ligand-coupling symmetry has a profound effect on thermoelectric transport in these hybrid materials. We shed light on these results using intuition from a simplified model for interparticle charge transport via tunneling through the frontier orbital of a bound ligand. Our analysis indicates that ligand-coupling symmetry and binding mechanisms correlate with enhanced conductivity approaching 2000 S/cm, and we employ this concept to demonstrate among the highest power factors measured for quantum-dot based thermoelectric inorganic-organic composite materials of ∼ 30 μW/m · K(2).

  1. A coupled viscoelastic-viscoplastic finite strain model for the dynamic behaviour of particulate composites: numerical issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanget, A.; Trumel, H.; Dragon, A.

    1998-07-01

    The dynamic behaviour of a propellant like material is modelized with viscoelastic-viscoplastic behaviour in the lagrangian finite strain frame work. Employment of logarithmic strain allows elastic-plastic decomposidon. The viscoelastic part is performed in differential form and is integrated by an explicit method. The plastic deformation is split into volumetric and distorsional parts which constitute two distinct state variables for compaction and yielding. This model has been implemented in a finite element 2D code. The algorithm of the implementation is presented and numerical and experimental results are shown.

  2. Behavioural variation in 172 small-scale societies indicates that social learning is the main mode of human adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Sarah; Perreault, Charles

    2015-01-01

    The behavioural variation among human societies is vast and unmatched in the animal world. It is unclear whether this variation is due to variation in the ecological environment or to differences in cultural traditions. Underlying this debate is a more fundamental question: is the richness of humans’ behavioural repertoire due to non-cultural mechanisms, such as causal reasoning, inventiveness, reaction norms, trial-and-error learning and evoked culture, or is it due to the population-level dynamics of cultural transmission? Here, we measure the relative contribution of environment and cultural history in explaining the behavioural variation of 172 Native American tribes at the time of European contact. We find that the effect of cultural history is typically larger than that of environment. Behaviours also persist over millennia within cultural lineages. This indicates that human behaviour is not predominantly determined by single-generation adaptive responses, contra theories that emphasize non-cultural mechanisms as determinants of human behaviour. Rather, the main mode of human adaptation is social learning mechanisms that operate over multiple generations. PMID:26085589

  3. Behavioural variation in 172 small-scale societies indicates that social learning is the main mode of human adaptation.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Sarah; Perreault, Charles

    2015-07-07

    The behavioural variation among human societies is vast and unmatched in the animal world. It is unclear whether this variation is due to variation in the ecological environment or to differences in cultural traditions. Underlying this debate is a more fundamental question: is the richness of humans' behavioural repertoire due to non-cultural mechanisms, such as causal reasoning, inventiveness, reaction norms, trial-and-error learning and evoked culture, or is it due to the population-level dynamics of cultural transmission? Here, we measure the relative contribution of environment and cultural history in explaining the behavioural variation of 172 Native American tribes at the time of European contact. We find that the effect of cultural history is typically larger than that of environment. Behaviours also persist over millennia within cultural lineages. This indicates that human behaviour is not predominantly determined by single-generation adaptive responses, contra theories that emphasize non-cultural mechanisms as determinants of human behaviour. Rather, the main mode of human adaptation is social learning mechanisms that operate over multiple generations.

  4. Small Variations in Early-Life Environment Can Affect Coping Behaviour in Response to Foraging Challenge in the Three-Spined Stickleback.

    PubMed

    Langenhof, M Rohaa; Apperloo, Rienk; Komdeur, Jan

    2016-01-01

    An increasing concern in the face of human expansion throughout natural habitats is whether animal populations can respond adaptively when confronted with challenges like environmental change and novelty. Behavioural flexibility is an important factor in estimating the adaptive potential of both individuals and populations, and predicting the degree to which they can cope with change. This study on the three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) is an empiric illustration of the degree of behavioural variation that can emerge between semi-natural systems within only a single generation. Wild-caught adult sticklebacks (P, N = 400) were randomly distributed in equal densities over 20 standardized semi-natural environments (ponds), and one year later offspring (F1, N = 652) were presented with repeated behavioural assays. Individuals were challenged to reach a food source through a novel transparent obstacle, during which exploration, activity, foraging, sociability and wall-biting behaviours were recorded through video observation. We found that coping responses of individuals from the first generation to this unfamiliar foraging challenge were related to even relatively small, naturally diversified variation in developmental environment. All measured behaviours were correlated with each other. Especially exploration, sociability and wall-biting were found to differ significantly between ponds. These differences could not be explained by stickleback density or the turbidity of the water. Our findings show that a) differences in early-life environment appear to affect stickleback feeding behaviour later in life; b) this is the case even when the environmental differences are only small, within natural parameters and diversified gradually; and c) effects are present despite semi-natural conditions that fluctuate during the year. Therefore, in behaviourally plastic animals like the stickleback, the adaptive response to human-induced habitat disturbance may occur

  5. How do small differences in nonidentical pulse-coupled oscillators induce great changes in their synchronous behavior?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramírez Ávila, G. M.; Kurths, J.; Guisset, J. L.; Deneubourg, J. L.

    2014-12-01

    We studied synchronization and clustering in two types of pulse-coupled oscillators, namely, integrate-and-fire and light-controlled oscillators. We considered for the analysis globally coupled oscillators, either by a mean-field type coupling or a distance-dependent one. Using statistically diverse measures such as the transient, probability of total synchronization, fraction of clustered oscillators, mean size, and mean number of clusters, we describe clustering and synchronous behavior for populations of nonidentical oscillators and perform a comparative analysis of the behavioral differences and similitudes among these types of oscillators. Considering a mean-field approach, we found high probability of total synchronization in all cases for integrate-and-fire oscillators; on the other hand, in a more realistic situation, for light-controlled oscillators, i.e., when oscillators do not fire instantaneously, the probability of total synchronization decreases drastically for small differences among the oscillators and subsequently, for larger differences, it slightly increases. When the coupling strength depends on the distance, the probability of total synchronization plummets dramatically with the number of oscillators especially in the case of integrate-and-fire oscillators. The latter constitutes an interesting result because it indicates that in realistic situations, the probability of total synchronization is not very high for a population of pulse-coupled oscillators; this entails that its utilization as a paradigmatic model of total synchronization does not suit well, especially when the coupling depends on the distance. This article is dedicated to our good friend and colleague Hilda Cerdeira as a tribute to the scientific work developed over her career.

  6. Direct prediction of residual dipolar couplings of small molecules in a stretched gel by stochastic molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Frank, Andreas O; Freudenberger, J Christoph; Shaytan, Alexey K; Kessler, Horst; Luy, Burkhard

    2015-03-01

    Residual dipolar couplings are highly useful NMR parameters for calculating and refining molecular structures, dynamics, and interactions. For some applications, however, it is inevitable that the preferred orientation of a molecule in an alignment medium is calculated a priori. Several methods have been developed to predict molecular orientations and residual dipolar couplings. Being beneficial for macromolecules and selected small-molecule applications, such approaches lack sufficient accuracy for a large number of organic compounds for which the fine structure and eventually the flexibility of all involved molecules have to be considered or are limited to specific, well-studied liquid crystals. We introduce a simplified model for detailed all-atom molecular dynamics calculations with a polymer strand lined up along the principal axis as a new approach to simulate the preferred orientation of small to medium-sized solutes in polymer-based, gel-type alignment media. As is shown by a first example of strychnine in a polystyrene/CDCl3 gel, the simulations potentially enable the accurate prediction of residual dipolar couplings taking into account structural details and dynamic averaging effects of both the polymer and the solute.

  7. Communication: Relativistic Fock-space coupled cluster study of small building blocks of larger uranium complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Tecmer, Paweł Visscher, Lucas; Severo Pereira Gomes, André; Knecht, Stefan

    2014-07-28

    We present a study of the electronic structure of the [UO{sub 2}]{sup +}, [UO{sub 2}]{sup 2} {sup +}, [UO{sub 2}]{sup 3} {sup +}, NUO, [NUO]{sup +}, [NUO]{sup 2} {sup +}, [NUN]{sup −}, NUN, and [NUN]{sup +} molecules with the intermediate Hamiltonian Fock-space coupled cluster method. The accuracy of mean-field approaches based on the eXact-2-Component Hamiltonian to incorporate spin–orbit coupling and Gaunt interactions are compared to results obtained with the Dirac–Coulomb Hamiltonian. Furthermore, we assess the reliability of calculations employing approximate density functionals in describing electronic spectra and quantities useful in rationalizing Uranium (VI) species reactivity (hardness, electronegativity, and electrophilicity)

  8. Title: Chimeras in small, globally coupled networks: Experiments and stability analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, Joseph D.; Bansal, Kanika; Murphy, Thomas E.; Roy, Rajarshi

    Since the initial observation of chimera states, there has been much discussion of the conditions under which these states emerge. The emphasis thus far has mainly been to analyze large networks of coupled oscillators; however, recent studies have begun to focus on the opposite limit: what is the smallest system of coupled oscillators in which chimeras can exist? We experimentally observe chimeras and other partially synchronous patterns in a network of four globally-coupled chaotic opto-electronic oscillators. By examining the equations of motion, we demonstrate that symmetries in the network topology allow a variety of synchronous states to exist, including cluster synchronous states and a chimera state. Using the group theoretical approach recently developed for analyzing cluster synchronization, we show how to derive the variational equations for these synchronous patterns and calculate their linear stability. The stability analysis gives good agreement with our experimental results. Both experiments and simulations suggest that these chimera states often appear in regions of multistability between global, cluster, and desynchronized states.

  9. Performance analysis of small capacity liquid nitrogen generator based on Joule-Thomson refrigerator coupled with air separation membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piotrowska-Hajnus, Agnieszka; Chorowski, Maciej

    2012-06-01

    Joule - Thomson small capacity refrigerators supplied with gas mixture are studied theoretically and experimentally for a variety of applications. They can be especially promising when coupled with membrane air separators. We present liquid nitrogen generation system based on Joule - Thomson cooler joined with air separation membrane. Hollow fiber membrane is used for nitrogen separation from compressed and purified atmospheric air. Joule-Thomson refrigerator operates with a dedicated nitrogen - hydrocarbons mixture and provides a cooling power used for the separated nitrogen liquefaction. Special attention has been paid to a heat exchanger coupling the Joule- Thomson refrigerator with the membrane air separator. This paper describes the system design, the procedure of its working parameters optimization and tests results.

  10. Effects of gap junction inhibition on contraction waves in the murine small intestine in relation to coupled oscillator theory

    PubMed Central

    Huizinga, Jan D.

    2014-01-01

    Waves of contraction in the small intestine correlate with slow waves generated by the myenteric network of interstitial cells of Cajal. Coupled oscillator theory has been used to explain steplike gradients in the frequency (frequency plateaux) of contraction waves along the length of the small intestine. Inhibition of gap junction coupling between oscillators should lead to predictable effects on these plateaux and the wave dislocation (wave drop) phenomena associated with their boundaries. It is these predictions that we wished to test. We used a novel multicamera diameter-mapping system to measure contraction along 25- to 30-cm lengths of murine small intestine. There were typically two to three plateaux per length of intestine. Dislocations could be limited to the wavefronts immediately about the terminated wave, giving the appearance of a three-pronged fork, i.e., a fork dislocation; additionally, localized decreases in velocity developed across a number of wavefronts, ending with the terminated wave, which could appear as a fork, i.e., slip dislocations. The gap junction inhibitor carbenoxolone increased the number of plateaux and dislocations and decreased contraction wave velocity. In some cases, the usual frequency gradient was reversed, with a plateau at a higher frequency than its proximal neighbor; thus fork dislocations were inverted, and the direction of propagation was reversed. Heptanol had no effect on the frequency or velocity of contractions but did reduce their amplitude. To understand intestinal motor patterns, the pacemaker network of the interstitial cells of Cajal is best evaluated as a system of coupled oscillators. PMID:25501550

  11. Synchronization of Arbitrarily Coupled Oscillators: The Master Stability Function and Small World Problem.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pecora, Louis

    2001-03-01

    We show here that it is possible to solve, once and for all, the stability problem of synchronizing any array of identical oscillators , whether chaotic or limit cycle. The scheme gives a master stability function. We apply this to a system of 8 coupled Rossler-like circuits. We further show that this approach allows an experimental probe of the stability of any array of any number of identical oscillators using only three oscillators. Finally, the synchronization of oscillators in smallworld systems is understandable using a master stability approach.

  12. Lateral mode coupling to reduce the electrical impedance of small elements required for high power ultrasound therapy phased arrays

    PubMed Central

    Hynynen, Kullervo; Yin, Jianhua

    2011-01-01

    A method that uses lateral coupling to reduce the electrical impedance of small transducer elements in generating ultrasound waves was tested. Cylindrical, radially-polled transducer elements were driven at their length resonance frequency. Computer simulation and experimental studies showed that the electrical impedance of the transducer element could be controlled by the cylinder wall thickness, while the operation frequency was determined by the cylinder length. Acoustic intensity (averaged over the cylinder diameter) over 10 W/cm2 (a therapeutically relevant intensity) was measured from these elements. PMID:19411214

  13. Hawking radiation from small black holes at strong coupling and large N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddad, Nidal

    2013-10-01

    In a previous work an approximate static metric was found of a test black string that stretches from the boundary to the horizon of the planar Schwarzschild-AdS5 geometry. This is the gravity dual of the Unruh state for {N}=4, SU(N) super Yang-Mills theory on a four-dimensional Schwarzschild background, at large N and large ’tHooft coupling. We compute the holographic stress tensor of the gravitational solution and it turns out to possess many essential features of the Unruh state for weakly coupled Hawking radiation, such as the appearance of a negative energy density near the black hole horizon and a positive energy density at infinity. It also confirms recent results that at leading order in N, the expectation value of the stress tensor in the Unruh state is finite on both the future and past horizons, and that at this order there are no flux terms as is expected in the black droplet phase.

  14. Design and baseline characteristics of the 10 Small Steps Study: a randomised controlled trial of an intervention to promote healthy behaviour using a lifestyle score and personalised feedback.

    PubMed

    Parekh, Sanjoti; Vandelanotte, Corneel; King, David; Boyle, Frances M

    2012-03-12

    Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) are the leading causes of death globally and are associated with a limited set of common, modifiable health behaviours: tobacco use, physical inactivity, harmful use of alcohol and unhealthy diet. General practice offers an ideal avenue for addressing such health behaviours on a population-wide basis. This paper describes the protocol of a multiple health behaviour change intervention designed for implementation in general practice and summarises the baseline characteristics of its participants. The 10 Small Steps (10SS) study, a randomised controlled trial, involved 4,678 adult general practice patients in Queensland, Australia. Self-reported data were collected to establish the proportion of participants meeting recommended guidelines for ten health behaviours: physical activity, body mass index, alcohol, smoking and six dietary behaviours. Participants were randomised to four groups: contact at baseline only ('single intervention' and corresponding control group) and contact at baseline and 3 months ('dual intervention' and corresponding control group). At each contact the participants received a computer-tailored feedback and one page information sheet according to their allocation to intervention or control groups. Change in the intervention group compared to the control group was assessed at 3 and12 months after baseline data collection.Responses were summed to calculate an individual lifestyle score (the Prudence Score), which ranged from 0 to 10. The baseline response was 56.5% (4678 of 8343 invited participants) and the study sample was primarily female (68.7%) with an average age of 47 years. The mean Prudence Score was 5.8 (95%CI 5.75-5.85). Baseline data from the 10SS study show that nearly all participants engage in some health behaviours but relatively few adhere simultaneously to a core set of dietary and lifestyle behaviours associated with risk of NCDs. Ample scope exists to improve health behaviour to reduce NCDs

  15. Small coupling limit and multiple solutions to the Dirichlet problem for Yang-Mills connections in four dimensions. I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isobe, Takeshi; Marini, Antonella

    2012-06-01

    In this paper and its sequel (Part II), we analyze the space of solutions to the ɛ-Dirichlet problem for the Yang-Mills equations on the four-dimensional disk, for small values of the coupling constant ɛ. These are in 1-1 correspondence with solutions to the Dirichlet problem for Yang-Mills, for small boundary data ɛA0. We establish a Morse theory for this non-compact variational problem and prove the existence of multiple solutions, and, also, non minimal ones. Here, we describe the problem, state the main theorems and do the first part of the proof. This consists in making the problem finite dimensional, by seeking solutions approximated by the connected sum of a minimal solution with an instanton, plus a correction term due to the boundary. By introducing an auxiliary equation, we solve the problem orthogonally to the space of the approximate solutions.

  16. Effects of acoustic alarms, designed to reduce small cetacean bycatch in gillnet fisheries, on the behaviour of North Sea fish species in a large tank.

    PubMed

    Kastelein, Ronald A; van der Heul, Sander; van der Veen, Jan; Verboom, Willem C; Jennings, Nancy; de Haan, Dick; Reijnders, Peter J H

    2007-08-01

    World-wide many cetaceans drown incidentally in fishing nets. To reduce the unwanted bycatch in gillnets, pingers (acoustic alarms) have been developed that are attached to the nets. In the European Union, pingers will be made compulsory in some areas in 2005 and in others in 2007. However, pingers may effect non-target marine fauna such as fish. Therefore in this study, the effects of seven commercially-available pingers on the behaviour of five North Sea fish species in a large tank were quantified. The species tested were: sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax), pout (Trisopterus luscus), thicklip mullet (Chelon labrosus), herring (Clupea harengus), and cod (Gadus morhua). The fish were housed as single-species schools of 9-13 individuals in a tank. The behaviour of fish in quiet periods was compared with their behaviour during periods with active pingers. The results varied both between pingers and between fish species. Sea bass decreased their speed in response to one pinger and swam closer to the surface in response to another. Thicklip mullet swam closer to the bottom in response to two pingers and increased their swimming speed in response to one pinger. Herring swam faster in response to one pinger, and pout and cod (close relatives) showed no behavioural responses to any of the pingers. Of the seven pingers tested, four elicited responses in at least one fish species, and three elicited no responses. Whether similar responses would be elicited in these fish species in the wild, and if so, whether such responses would influence the catch rate of fisheries, cannot be derived from the results of this study. However, the results indicate the need for field studies with pingers and fish. Based on the small number of fish species tested, the present study suggests that the higher the frequency of a pinger, the less likely it is to affect the behaviour of marine fish.

  17. Interaction of structure-specific and promiscuous G-protein-coupled receptors mediates small-molecule signaling in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Park, Donha; O'Doherty, Inish; Somvanshi, Rishi K; Bethke, Axel; Schroeder, Frank C; Kumar, Ujendra; Riddle, Donald L

    2012-06-19

    A chemically diverse family of small-molecule signals, the ascarosides, control developmental diapause (dauer), olfactory learning, and social behaviors of the nematode model organism, Caenorhabditis elegans. The ascarosides act upstream of conserved signaling pathways, including the insulin, TGF-β, serotonin, and guanylyl cyclase pathways; however, the sensory processes underlying ascaroside function are poorly understood. Because ascarosides often are multifunctional and show strongly synergistic effects, characterization of their receptors will be essential for understanding ascaroside biology and may provide insight into molecular mechanisms that produce synergistic outcomes in small-molecule sensing. Based on DAF-8 immunoprecipitation, we here identify two G-protein-coupled receptors, DAF-37 and DAF-38, which cooperatively mediate ascaroside perception. daf-37 mutants are defective in all responses to ascr#2, one of the most potent dauer-inducing ascarosides, although this mutant responds normally to other ascarosides. In contrast, daf-38 mutants are partially defective in responses to several different ascarosides. Through cell-specific overexpression, we show that DAF-37 regulates dauer when expressed in ASI neurons and adult behavior when expressed in ASK neurons. Using a photoaffinity-labeled ascr#2 probe and amplified luminescence assays (AlphaScreen), we demonstrate that ascr#2 binds to DAF-37. Photobleaching fluorescent energy transfer assays revealed that DAF-37 and DAF-38 form heterodimers, and we show that heterodimerization strongly increases cAMP inhibition in response to ascr#2. These results suggest that that the ascarosides' intricate signaling properties result in part from the interaction of highly structure-specific G-protein-coupled receptors such as DAF-37 with more promiscuous G-protein-coupled receptors such as DAF-38.

  18. Interaction of structure-specific and promiscuous G-protein–coupled receptors mediates small-molecule signaling in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Park, Donha; O'Doherty, Inish; Somvanshi, Rishi K.; Bethke, Axel; Schroeder, Frank C.; Kumar, Ujendra; Riddle, Donald L.

    2012-01-01

    A chemically diverse family of small-molecule signals, the ascarosides, control developmental diapause (dauer), olfactory learning, and social behaviors of the nematode model organism, Caenorhabditis elegans. The ascarosides act upstream of conserved signaling pathways, including the insulin, TGF-β, serotonin, and guanylyl cyclase pathways; however, the sensory processes underlying ascaroside function are poorly understood. Because ascarosides often are multifunctional and show strongly synergistic effects, characterization of their receptors will be essential for understanding ascaroside biology and may provide insight into molecular mechanisms that produce synergistic outcomes in small-molecule sensing. Based on DAF-8 immunoprecipitation, we here identify two G-protein–coupled receptors, DAF-37 and DAF-38, which cooperatively mediate ascaroside perception. daf-37 mutants are defective in all responses to ascr#2, one of the most potent dauer-inducing ascarosides, although this mutant responds normally to other ascarosides. In contrast, daf-38 mutants are partially defective in responses to several different ascarosides. Through cell-specific overexpression, we show that DAF-37 regulates dauer when expressed in ASI neurons and adult behavior when expressed in ASK neurons. Using a photoaffinity-labeled ascr#2 probe and amplified luminescence assays (AlphaScreen), we demonstrate that ascr#2 binds to DAF-37. Photobleaching fluorescent energy transfer assays revealed that DAF-37 and DAF-38 form heterodimers, and we show that heterodimerization strongly increases cAMP inhibition in response to ascr#2. These results suggest that that the ascarosides' intricate signaling properties result in part from the interaction of highly structure-specific G-protein–coupled receptors such as DAF-37 with more promiscuous G-protein–coupled receptors such as DAF-38. PMID:22665789

  19. Disclosure behaviour and intentions among 111 couples following treatment with oocytes or sperm from identity-release donors: follow-up at offspring age 1-4 years.

    PubMed

    Isaksson, S; Sydsjö, G; Skoog Svanberg, A; Lampic, C

    2012-10-01

    Do heterosexual parents of young children following oocyte donation (OD) and sperm donation (SD) tell or intend to tell their offspring about the way he/she was conceived? Following successful treatment with oocytes or sperm from identity-release donors in Sweden, almost all heterosexual couples intend to tell their offspring about the way he/she was conceived and some start the information-sharing process very early. Although the Swedish legislation on identity-release gamete donors has been in effect since 1985, there is a discrepancy between the behaviour of donor-insemination parents and the legal intention that offspring be informed about their genetic origin. The present study contributes data on a relatively large sample of oocyte and sperm recipient couples' intended compliance with the Swedish legislation. DESIGN AND DATA COLLECTION METHOD: The present study constitutes a follow-up assessment of heterosexual couples who had given birth to a child following treatment with donated oocytes. Data collection was performed during 2007-2011; participants individually completed a questionnaire when the child was between 1 and 4 years of age. The present study is part of the Swedish Study on Gamete Donation, a prospective longitudinal cohort study including all fertility clinics performing gamete donation in Sweden. For children conceived via OD, 107 individuals (including 52 couples and 3 individuals) agreed to participate (73% response). For children conceived via SD, the response rate was 70% (n = 122 individuals, including 59 couples and 4 individuals). Mean age of participants was 34 years (SD 4.4) and they reported a high level of education. The majority of participants (78%) planned to tell the child about the donation, 16% had already started the information-sharing process and 6% planned not to tell their child about the donation or were undecided. Many were unsure about a suitable time to start the disclosure process and desired more information about

  20. Disclosure behaviour and intentions among 111 couples following treatment with oocytes or sperm from identity-release donors: follow-up at offspring age 1–4 years

    PubMed Central

    Isaksson, S.; Sydsjö, G.; Skoog Svanberg, A.; Lampic, C.

    2012-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION Do heterosexual parents of young children following oocyte donation (OD) and sperm donation (SD) tell or intend to tell their offspring about the way he/she was conceived? SUMMARY ANSWER Following successful treatment with oocytes or sperm from identity-release donors in Sweden, almost all heterosexual couples intend to tell their offspring about the way he/she was conceived and some start the information-sharing process very early. WHAT IS KNOWN AND WHAT THIS PAPER ADDS Although the Swedish legislation on identity-release gamete donors has been in effect since 1985, there is a discrepancy between the behaviour of donor-insemination parents and the legal intention that offspring be informed about their genetic origin. The present study contributes data on a relatively large sample of oocyte and sperm recipient couples' intended compliance with the Swedish legislation. DESIGN AND DATA COLLECTION METHOD The present study constitutes a follow-up assessment of heterosexual couples who had given birth to a child following treatment with donated oocytes. Data collection was performed during 2007–2011; participants individually completed a questionnaire when the child was between 1 and 4 years of age. PARTICIPANTS AND SETTING The present study is part of the Swedish Study on Gamete Donation, a prospective longitudinal cohort study including all fertility clinics performing gamete donation in Sweden. For children conceived via OD, 107 individuals (including 52 couples and 3 individuals) agreed to participate (73% response). For children conceived via SD, the response rate was 70% (n = 122 individuals, including 59 couples and 4 individuals). Mean age of participants was 34 years (SD 4.4) and they reported a high level of education. MAIN RESULTS The majority of participants (78%) planned to tell the child about the donation, 16% had already started the information-sharing process and 6% planned not to tell their child about the donation or were undecided

  1. Plasma-field Coupling at Small Length Scales in Solar Wind Near 1 AU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livadiotis, G.; Desai, M. I.

    2016-10-01

    In collisionless plasmas such as the solar wind, the coupling between plasma constituents and the embedded magnetic field occurs on various temporal and spatial scales, and is primarily responsible for the transfer of energy between waves and particles. Recently, it was shown that the transfer of energy between solar wind plasma particles and waves is governed by a new and unique relationship: the ratio between the magnetosonic energy and the plasma frequency is constant, E ms/ω pl ˜ ℏ*. This paper examines the variability and substantial departure of this ratio from ℏ* observed at ˜1 au, which is caused by a dispersion of fast magnetosonic (FMS) waves. In contrast to the efficiently transferred energy in the fast solar wind, the lower efficiency of the slow solar wind can be caused by this dispersion, whose relation and characteristics are derived and studied. In summary, we show that (i) the ratio E ms/ω pl transitions continuously from the slow to the fast solar wind, tending toward the constant ℏ* (ii) the transition is more efficient for larger thermal, Alfvén, or FMS speeds; (iii) the fast solar wind is almost dispersionless, characterized by quasi-constant values of the FMS speed, while the slow wind is subject to dispersion that is less effective for larger wind or magnetosonic speeds; and (iv) the constant ℏ* is estimated with the best known precision, ℏ* ≈ (1.160 ± 0.083) × 10-22 Js.

  2. An Interface for the Direct Coupling of Small Liquid Samples to AMS.

    PubMed

    Ognibene, T J; Thomas, A T; Daley, P F; Bench, G; Turteltaub, K W

    2015-10-15

    We describe the moving wire interface attached to the 1-MV AMS system at LLNL's Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry for the analysis of nonvolatile liquid samples as either discrete drops or from the direct output of biochemical separatory instrumentation, such as high-performance liquid chromatography. Discrete samples containing at least a few 10s of nanograms of carbon and as little as 50 zmol (14)C can be measured with a 3-5% precision in a few minutes. The dynamic range of our system spans approximately 3 orders in magnitude. Sample to sample memory is minimized by the use of fresh targets for each discrete sample or by minimizing the amount of carbon present in a peak generated by an HPLC containing a significant amount of (14)C. Liquid Sample AMS provides a new technology to expand our biomedical AMS program by enabling the capability to measure low-level biochemicals in extremely small samples that would otherwise be inaccessible.

  3. Q.E.COSY: determining sign and size of small deuterium residual quadrupolar couplings using an extended E.COSY principle.

    PubMed

    Tzvetkova, Pavleta; Luy, Burkhard

    2016-05-01

    Residual quadrupolar couplings contain important structural information comparable with residual dipolar couplings. However, the measurement of sign and size of especially small residual quadrupolar couplings is difficult. Here, we present an extension of the E.COSY principle to spin systems consisting of a Spin 1 coupled to a spin ½ nucleus, which allows the determination of the sign of the quadrupolar coupling of the Spin 1 nucleus relative to the heteronuclear coupling between the spins. The so-called Q.E.COSY approach is demonstrated with its sign-sensitivity using variable angle NMR, stretched gels and liquid crystalline phases applied to various CD and CD3 groups. Especially the sign-sensitive measurement of residual quadrupolar couplings that remain unresolved in conventional deuterium 1D spectra is shown.

  4. Age-related effects of practice experience on collective behaviours of football players in small-sided games.

    PubMed

    Barnabé, Luís; Volossovitch, Anna; Duarte, Ricardo; Ferreira, António Paulo; Davids, Keith

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether offensive and defensive collective behaviours emerging in six-a-side football games (GK+5 vs. 5+GK) varied according to age-related practice experience of young, male players (U16, U17 and U19yrs). Players' were not instructed to implement specific tactical plans and their movement trajectories (2D analyses) were recorded using 10 GPS units. Four common measures of team dispersion investigated in previous research (surface area, stretch index, length and width of a team) were used to analyse team performance behaviours. After recording these collective variables, we used sample entropy (SampEn) and cross-sample entropy (Cross-SampEn) measures to assess the regularity and synchronization of participant actions in teams. Results demonstrated clear age-related variations in effects on the collective performance measures analysed. In attacking phases, older and more experienced players occupied a greater surface area and displayed higher values of team width and stretch index. In defensive phases, significant differences were observed in team length and stretch index. Cross-SampEn analysis demonstrated a greater synchronization between offensive and defensive surface areas and team width in older age groups (U17 and U19yrs). Data suggest how coaches can manipulate practice task constraints to enhance development of team tactical performance behaviours in developing footballers between 16 and 19yrs of age. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Can a deterministic spatial microsimulation model provide reliable small-area estimates of health behaviours? An example of smoking prevalence in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Smith, Dianna M; Pearce, Jamie R; Harland, Kirk

    2011-03-01

    Models created to estimate neighbourhood level health outcomes and behaviours can be difficult to validate as prevalence is often unknown at the local level. This paper tests the reliability of a spatial microsimulation model, using a deterministic reweighting method, to predict smoking prevalence in small areas across New Zealand. The difference in the prevalence of smoking between those estimated by the model and those calculated from census data is less than 20% in 1745 out of 1760 areas. The accuracy of these results provides users with greater confidence to utilize similar approaches in countries where local-level smoking prevalence is unknown.

  6. An Interface for the Direct Coupling of Small Liquid Samples to AMS

    PubMed Central

    Ognibene, T.J.; Thomas, A.T.; Daley, P.F.; Bench, G.; Turteltaub, K.W.

    2015-01-01

    We describe the moving wire interface attached to the 1-MV AMS system at LLNL’s Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry for the analysis of nonvolatile liquid samples as either discrete drops or from the direct output of biochemical separatory instrumentation, such as high-performance liquid chromatography. Discrete samples containing at least a few 10s of nanograms of carbon and as little as 50 zmol 14C can be measured with a 3–5% precision in a few minutes. The dynamic range of our system spans approximately 3 orders in magnitude. Sample to sample memory is minimized by the use of fresh targets for each discrete sample or by minimizing the amount of carbon present in a peak generated by an HPLC containing a significant amount of 14C. Liquid Sample AMS provides a new technology to expand our biomedical AMS program by enabling the capability to measure low-level biochemicals in extremely small samples that would otherwise be inaccessible. PMID:26456991

  7. On the equilibrium state of a small system with random matrix coupling to its environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebowitz, J. L.; Pastur, L.

    2015-07-01

    We consider a random matrix model of interaction between a small n-level system, S, and its environment, a N-level heat reservoir, R. The interaction between S and R is modeled by a tensor product of a fixed n× n matrix and a N× N Hermitian random matrix. We show that under certain ‘macroscopicity’ conditions on R, the reduced density matrix of the system {{ρ }S}=T{{r}R}ρ S\\cup R(eq), is given by ρ S(c)˜ exp \\{-β {{H}S}\\}, where HS is the Hamiltonian of the isolated system. This holds for all strengths of the interaction and thus gives some justification for using ρ S(c) to describe some nano-systems, like biopolymers, in equilibrium with their environment (Seifert 2012 Rep. Prog. Phys. 75 126001). Our results extend those obtained previously in (Lebowitz and Pastur 2004 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 37 1517-34) (Lebowitz et al 2007 Contemporary Mathematics (Providence RI: American Mathematical Society) pp 199-218) for a special two-level system.

  8. An interface for the direct coupling of small liquid samples to AMS

    DOE PAGES

    Ognibene, T. J.; Thomas, A. T.; Daley, P. F.; ...

    2015-05-28

    We describe the moving wire interface attached to the 1-MV AMS system at LLNL’s Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry for the analysis of nonvolatile liquid samples as either discrete drops or from the direct output of biochemical separatory instrumentation, such as high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Discrete samples containing at least a few 10 s of nanograms of carbon and as little as 50 zmol 14C can be measured with a 3–5% precision in a few minutes. The dynamic range of our system spans approximately 3 orders in magnitude. Sample to sample memory is minimized by the use of fresh targetsmore » for each discrete sample or by minimizing the amount of carbon present in a peak generated by an HPLC containing a significant amount of 14C. As a result, liquid sample AMS provides a new technology to expand our biomedical AMS program by enabling the capability to measure low-level biochemicals in extremely small samples that would otherwise be inaccessible.« less

  9. An interface for the direct coupling of small liquid samples to AMS

    SciTech Connect

    Ognibene, T. J.; Thomas, A. T.; Daley, P. F.; Bench, G.; Turteltaub, K. W.

    2015-05-28

    We describe the moving wire interface attached to the 1-MV AMS system at LLNL’s Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry for the analysis of nonvolatile liquid samples as either discrete drops or from the direct output of biochemical separatory instrumentation, such as high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Discrete samples containing at least a few 10 s of nanograms of carbon and as little as 50 zmol 14C can be measured with a 3–5% precision in a few minutes. The dynamic range of our system spans approximately 3 orders in magnitude. Sample to sample memory is minimized by the use of fresh targets for each discrete sample or by minimizing the amount of carbon present in a peak generated by an HPLC containing a significant amount of 14C. As a result, liquid sample AMS provides a new technology to expand our biomedical AMS program by enabling the capability to measure low-level biochemicals in extremely small samples that would otherwise be inaccessible.

  10. Understanding Small-Molecule Interactions in Metal-Organic Frameworks: Coupling Experiment with Theory.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jason S; Vlaisavljevich, Bess; Britt, David K; Brown, Craig M; Haranczyk, Maciej; Neaton, Jeffrey B; Smit, Berend; Long, Jeffrey R; Queen, Wendy L

    2015-10-14

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have gained much attention as next-generation porous media for various applications, especially gas separation/storage, and catalysis. New MOFs are regularly reported; however, to develop better materials in a timely manner for specific applications, the interactions between guest molecules and the internal surface of the framework must first be understood. A combined experimental and theoretical approach is presented, which proves essential for the elucidation of small-molecule interactions in a model MOF system known as M2 (dobdc) (dobdc(4-) = 2,5-dioxido-1,4-benzenedicarboxylate; M = Mg, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, or Zn), a material whose adsorption properties can be readily tuned via chemical substitution. It is additionally shown that the study of extensive families like this one can provide a platform to test the efficacy and accuracy of developing computational methodologies in slightly varying chemical environments, a task that is necessary for their evolution into viable, robust tools for screening large numbers of materials. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Coupling soil moisture and precipitation observations for predicting hourly runoff at small catchment scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tayfur, Gokmen; Zucco, Graziano; Brocca, Luca; Moramarco, Tommaso

    2014-03-01

    The importance of soil moisture is recognized in rainfall-runoff processes. This study quantitatively investigates the use of soil moisture measured at 10, 20, and 40 cm soil depths along with rainfall in predicting runoff. For this purpose, two small sub-catchments of Tiber River Basin, in Italy, were instrumented during periods of October 2002-March 2003 and January-April 2004. Colorso Basin is about 13 km2 and Niccone basin 137 km2. Rainfall plus soil moisture at 10, 20, and 40 cm formed the input vector while the discharge was the target output in the model of generalized regression neural network (GRNN). The model for each basin was calibrated and tested using October 2002-March 2003 data. The calibrated and tested GRNN was then employed to predict runoff for each basin for the period of January-April 2004. The model performance was found to be satisfactory with determination coefficient, R2, equal to 0.87 and Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency, NS, equal to 0.86 in the validation phase for both catchments. The investigation of effects of soil moisture on runoff prediction revealed that the addition of soil moisture data, along with rainfall, tremendously improves the performance of the model. The sensitivity analysis indicated that the use of soil moisture data at different depths allows to preserve the memory of the system thus having a similar effect of employing the past values of rainfall, but with improved GRNN performance.

  12. Small terminase couples viral DNA-binding to genome-packaging ATPase activity

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Ankoor; Bhardwaj, Anshul; Datta, Pinaki; Lander, Gabriel C.; Cingolani, Gino

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Packaging of viral genomes into empty procapsids is powered by a large DNA-packaging motor. In most viruses, this machine is composed of a large (L) and a small (S) terminase subunit complexed with a dodecamer of portal protein. Here, we describe the 1.75 Å crystal structure of the bacteriophage P22 S-terminase in a nonameric conformation. The structure presents a central channel ~23 Å in diameter, sufficiently large to accommodate hydrated B-DNA. The last 23 residues of S-terminase are essential for binding to DNA and assembly to L-terminase. Upon binding to its own DNA, S-terminase functions as a specific activator of L-terminase ATPase activity. The DNA-dependent stimulation of ATPase activity thus rationalizes the exclusive specificity of genome-packaging motors for viral DNA in the crowd of host DNA, ensuring fidelity of packaging and avoiding wasteful ATP hydrolysis. This posits a model for DNA-dependent activation of genome-packaging motors of general interest in virology. PMID:22771211

  13. The phase structure of a chirally invariant lattice Higgs-Yukawa model for small and for large values of the Yukawa coupling constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerhold, Philipp; Jansen, Karl

    2007-09-01

    We consider a chirally invariant lattice Higgs-Yukawa model based on the Neuberger overlap operator Script D(ov). As a first step towards the eventual determination of Higgs mass bounds we study the phase diagram of the model analytically in the large Nf-limit. We present an expression for the effective potential at tree-level in the regime of small Yukawa and quartic coupling constants and determine the order of the phase transitions. In the case of strong Yukawa couplings the model effectively becomes an O(4)-symmetric non-linear σ-model for all values of the quartic coupling constant. This leads to the existence of a symmetric phase also in the regime of large values of the Yukawa coupling constant. On finite and small lattices, however, strong finite volume effects prevent the expectation value of the Higgs field from vanishing thus obscuring the existence of the symmetric phase at strong Yukawa couplings.

  14. Broadband microwave photonic phase shifter based on a feedback-coupled microring resonator with small radio frequency power variations.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jian; Li, Ming; Sun, Shuqian; Li, Zhiyong; Li, Wei; Zhu, Ninghua

    2016-10-15

    An on-chip microwave photonic phase shifter based on an electrically tunable feedback-coupled microring resonator (FCMR) is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. By properly adjusting the voltage applied on the FCMR, the transmission spectrum with different optical extinction ratios is realized while the phase shift range remains almost unchanged. This proposal solves the conflict between the large range of phase shift and small radio frequency (RF) power variation in the ring-resonator-based microwave photonics phase shifter. Finally, a microwave photonic phase shifter with phase tuning of over 172 deg from 20 to 30 GHz is obtained, and the RF power variation can be compressed less than 5 dB under a certain status tuned by the bias voltage.

  15. Lamb waves beam deviation due to small inclination of the test structure in air-coupled ultrasonic NDT.

    PubMed

    Kichou, H B; Chavez, J A; Turo, A; Salazar, J; Garcia-Hernandez, M J

    2006-12-22

    In Lamb waves inspection, an air-coupled transmitter transducer is oriented at a specific angle such that it generates a pure Lamb mode which propagates along the structure and interacts with any existing defects. For this inspection system, amplitude losses appears when small inclinations of the tested structure occurs. An important factor which affects directly these losses has been observed, it consists of the Lamb waves beam (LWB) deviation due to this bad alignment. In this work, a simple expression of LWB deviation has been deduced. This expression includes the test structure angle, phase velocity of generated Lamb mode, and the phase velocity of waves propagating in the coupled medium. A(0) Lamb mode is generated and detected in 1 mm thick aluminium plate sample using 1 MHz PZ27 piezoelectric transducers of 20 mm of diameter. Experimental LWB deviation angles are measured for different inclination angles of the test sample. A comparative study is released with theoretical results. For 1 degree of misalignment in the aluminium plate inclination, and transducers separation distance of 35 mm, LWB deviation angle is around 7 degrees and the amplitude is reduced by around 11%. Then, for a large separation distance, we must move the receiver transducer to detect the deviated LWB. It is shown that, for both theoretical and experimental studies, the LWB deviation and its measured amplitude are very sensitive to the alignment of the tested structure with respect to the transmitter-receiver transducers plane. In metal plates it is most satisfactory to use A(0) mode compared with S(0) mode since it is easy to excite and has a large amplitude and small deviation beam angles.

  16. Influence of gate metal engineering on small-signal and noise behaviour of silicon nanowire MOSFET for low-noise amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Neha; Chaujar, Rishu

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we have investigated the small-signal behaviour and RF noise performance of gate electrode workfunction engineered (GEWE) silicon nanowire (SiNW) MOSFET, and the results so obtained are simultaneously compared with SiNW and conventional MOSFET at THz frequency range. This work examines reflection and transmission coefficients, noise conductance, minimum noise figure and cross-correlation factor. Results reveal significant reduction in input/output reflection coefficient and an increase in forward/reverse transmission coefficient owing to improved transconductance in GEWE-SiNW in comparison with conventional counterparts. It is also observed that minimum noise figure and noise conductance of GEWE-SiNW is reduced by 17.4 and 31.2 %, respectively, in comparison with SiNW, thus fortifying its potential application for low-noise amplifiers (LNAs) at radio frequencies. Moreover, the efficacy of gate metal workfunction engineering is also studied and the results validate that tuning of workfunction difference results further improvement in device small-signal behaviour and noise performance.

  17. Single-molecule magnet behaviour in a tetrathiafulvalene-based electroactive antiferromagnetically coupled dinuclear dysprosium(III) complex.

    PubMed

    Pointillart, Fabrice; Le Gal, Yann; Golhen, Stéphane; Cador, Olivier; Ouahab, Lahcène

    2011-09-05

    The reactions between the [Ln(tta)(3)]·2H(2)O precursors (tta(-)=2-thenoyltrifluoroacetonate anion) and the tetrathiafulvalene-3-pyridine-N-oxide ligands (L(1)) lead to dinuclear complexes of formula [{Ln(tta)(3)(L(1))}(2)]·xCH(2)Cl(2) (x=0.5 for Ln=Dy(III) (1) and x=0 for Ln=Gd(III) (2)). The crystal structure reveals that two {Ln(tta)(3)} moieties are bridged by two donors through the nitroxide groups. The Dy(III) centre adopts a distorted square antiprismatic oxygenated polyhedron structure. The antiferromagnetic nature of the exchange interaction between the two Dy(III) ions has been determined by two methods: 1) an empirical method using the [Dy(hfac)(3)(L(2))(2)] mononuclear complex as a model (3) (hfac(-)=1,1,1,5,5,5-hexafluoroacetylacetonate anion, L(2)=tetrathiafulvaleneamido-2-pyridine-N-oxide ligand), and 2) assuming an Ising model for the Dy(III) ion giving an exchange energy of -2.30 cm(-1), g=19.2 in the temperature range of 2-10 K. The antiferromagnetic interactions have been confirmed by a quantitative determination of J for the isotropic Gd(III) derivative (J=-0.031 cm(-1), g=2.003). Compound 1 displays a slow magnetisation relaxation without applied external magnetic fields. Alternating current susceptibility shows a thermally activated behaviour with pre-exponential factors of 5.48(4)×10(-7) s and an energy barrier of 87(1) K. The application of an external field of 1.6 kOe compensates the antiferromagnetic interactions and opens a new quantum tunnelling path. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Four-way coupled simulations of small particles in turbulent channel flow: The effects of particle shape and Stokes number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, F.; George, W. K.; van Wachem, B. G. M.

    2015-08-01

    This paper investigates the effects of particle shape and Stokes number on the behaviour of non-spherical particles in turbulent channel flow. Although there are a number of studies concerning spherical particles in turbulent flows, most important applications occurring in process, energy, and pharmaceutical industries deal with non-spherical particles. The computation employs a unique and novel four-way coupling with the Lagrangian point-particle approach. The fluid phase at low Reynolds number (Reτ = 150) is modelled by direct numerical simulation, while particles are tracked individually. Inter-particle and particle-wall collisions are also taken into account. To explore the effects of particles on the flow turbulence, the statistics of the fluid flow such as the fluid velocity, the terms in the turbulence kinetic energy equation, the slip velocity between the two phases and velocity correlations are analysed considering ellipsoidal particles with different inertia and aspect ratio. The results of the simulations show that the turbulence is considerably attenuated, even in the very dilute regime. The reduction of the turbulence intensity is predominant near the turbulence kinetic energy peak in the near wall region, where particles preferentially accumulate. Moreover, the elongated shape of ellipsoids strengthens the turbulence attenuation. In simulations with ellipsoidal particles, the fluid-particle interactions strongly depend on the orientation of the ellipsoids. In the near wall region, ellipsoids tend to align predominantly within the streamwise (x) and wall-normal (y) planes and perpendicular to the span-wise direction, whereas no preferential orientation in the central region of the channel is observed. Important conclusions from this work include the effective viscosity of the flow is not affected, the direct dissipation by the particles is negligible, and the primary mechanism by which the particles affect the flow is by altering the turbulence

  19. Four-way coupled simulations of small particles in turbulent channel flow: The effects of particle shape and Stokes number

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, F.; Wachem, B. G. M. van; George, W. K.

    2015-08-15

    This paper investigates the effects of particle shape and Stokes number on the behaviour of non-spherical particles in turbulent channel flow. Although there are a number of studies concerning spherical particles in turbulent flows, most important applications occurring in process, energy, and pharmaceutical industries deal with non-spherical particles. The computation employs a unique and novel four-way coupling with the Lagrangian point-particle approach. The fluid phase at low Reynolds number (Re{sub τ} = 150) is modelled by direct numerical simulation, while particles are tracked individually. Inter-particle and particle-wall collisions are also taken into account. To explore the effects of particles on the flow turbulence, the statistics of the fluid flow such as the fluid velocity, the terms in the turbulence kinetic energy equation, the slip velocity between the two phases and velocity correlations are analysed considering ellipsoidal particles with different inertia and aspect ratio. The results of the simulations show that the turbulence is considerably attenuated, even in the very dilute regime. The reduction of the turbulence intensity is predominant near the turbulence kinetic energy peak in the near wall region, where particles preferentially accumulate. Moreover, the elongated shape of ellipsoids strengthens the turbulence attenuation. In simulations with ellipsoidal particles, the fluid-particle interactions strongly depend on the orientation of the ellipsoids. In the near wall region, ellipsoids tend to align predominantly within the streamwise (x) and wall-normal (y) planes and perpendicular to the span-wise direction, whereas no preferential orientation in the central region of the channel is observed. Important conclusions from this work include the effective viscosity of the flow is not affected, the direct dissipation by the particles is negligible, and the primary mechanism by which the particles affect the flow is by altering the turbulence

  20. Direct coupling of annexin A5 to VSOP yields small, protein-covered nanoprobes for MR imaging of apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Figge, Lena; Appler, Franziska; Chen, Howard H; Sosnovik, David E; Schnorr, Jörg; Seitz, Oliver; Taupitz, Matthias; Hamm, Bernd; Schellenberger, Eyk

    2014-01-01

    Annexin A5 (Anx) has been extensively used for imaging apoptosis by single-photon emission computed tomography, positron emission tomography, optical imaging and MRI. Recently we introduced ultrasmall Anx-VSOP (very small iron oxide particles)--the smallest high-relaxivity probe for MRI of apoptosis. Here we present a simplified method for the direct coupling of Anx to VSOP, which resulted in nanoparticles that are nearly completely covered with human Anx. These superparamagnetic nanoparticles are only 14.4 ± 2.3 nm in diameter and have higher T2* relaxivity. Compared with existing probes, the small size and the Anx shielding provide prerequisites for good biocompatibility and bioavailability in target tissues. In vitro characterization showed specific binding of Anx-VSOP to apoptotic cells, which led to a signal loss in T2*-weighted MR measurements, while control probe M1324-VSOP produced no such change. Exploratory MRI was done in vivo in a cardiac model of ischemia-reperfusion damage illustrating the potential of the probe for future studies. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Small coupling limit and multiple solutions to the Dirichlet problem for Yang-Mills connections in four dimensions. II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isobe, Takeshi; Marini, Antonella

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, we complete the proof of the existence of multiple solutions (and, in particular, non minimal ones), to the ɛ-Dirichlet problem obtained as a variational problem for the SU(2)ɛ-Yang-Mills functional. This is equivalent to proving the existence of multiple solutions to the Dirichlet problem for the SU(2)-Yang-Mills functional with small boundary data. In the first paper of this series this non-compact variational problem is transformed into the finite-dimensional problem of finding the critical points of the function J_{ɛ }({q}), which is essentially the Yang-Mills functional evaluated on the approximate solutions, constructed via a gluing technique. In the present paper, we establish a Morse theory for J_{ɛ }({q}), by means of Ljusternik-Schnirelmann theory, thus complete the proofs of Theorems 1-3 given by Isobe and Marini ["Small coupling limit and multiple solutions to the Dirichlet Problem for Yang-Mills connections in 4 dimensions - Part I," J. Math. Phys. 53, 063706 (2012)], 10.1063/1.4728211.

  2. The footprints of typhoons on seismic records and their implications on small-scale coupling mechanisms in South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, H.; Xue, M.; Yang, T.; Liu, C.; Hua, Q.; Xia, S.; Huang, H.; Le, B. M.; Huo, D.; Pan, M.; Li, L.

    2015-12-01

    By investigating the footprints of typhoons on seismic records, we can understand their contributions to seismic noises as well as to small-scale coupling mechanisms of typhoon-land and typhoon-ocean-land. We analyze the signatures of typhoon KAI-TAK and BOPHA using seismic data from the ocean-bottom seismometers (OBSs) deployed in the central basin of South China Sea by Tongji University in 2012 as well as seismic stations (IC.QIZ,HK.HKPS and RM.SZP) on lands.Our preliminary results show that typhoons mainly enhance microseisms at the frequency band of ~0.1-0.5 Hz, including both long period double frequency (LPDF) and short period double frequency (SPDF) microseisms. A positive correlation observed between the amplitude of microseisms and the height of local ocean waves. Because OBSs are deployed at the bottom of ocean, single frequency (SF) microseisms are not prominent on them due to their fast attenuation with depth. During the typhoon KAI-TAK, the increase of LPDF energy is very small in OBSs while that is very high on land stations, indicating that LPDF microseisms are generated at nearby shorelines and can propagate towards the sea through the solid earth. However, the increase of SPDF energy is almost the same level for both OBSs and land stations indicating that the generation of SPDF is probably local.However, we also observe a small amount of energy arrives before the increases of the wave heights at the land station HK.HKPS. We derive that this energy may from a source that is not local: while LPDF can be generated at nearby shorelines and SPDF can be generated everywhere locally, they can both transmit through the solid part of the Earth to a station some distance away, i.e. HK.HKPS. In addition, we find that typhoons enhance not only the microseisms as expected but also the seismic energy from higher frequency bands. The spectrum amplitude during Typhoon periods, normalized by that of no-storm periods, shows that land stations produce stronger higher

  3. COUPLED SPIN AND SHAPE EVOLUTION OF SMALL RUBBLE-PILE ASTEROIDS: SELF-LIMITATION OF THE YORP EFFECT

    SciTech Connect

    Cotto-Figueroa, Desireé; Statler, Thomas S.; Richardson, Derek C.; Tanga, Paolo E-mail: statler@ohio.edu

    2015-04-10

    We present the first self-consistent simulations of the coupled spin-shape evolution of small gravitational aggregates under the influence of the YORP effect. Because of YORP’s sensitivity to surface topography, even small centrifugally driven reconfigurations of aggregates can alter the YORP torque dramatically, resulting in spin evolution that can differ qualitatively from the rigid-body prediction. One-third of our simulations follow a simple evolution described as a modified YORP cycle. Two-thirds exhibit one or more of three distinct behaviors—stochastic YORP, self-governed YORP, and stagnating YORP—which together result in YORP self-limitation. Self-limitation confines rotation rates of evolving aggregates to far narrower ranges than those expected in the classical YORP cycle, greatly prolonging the times over which objects can preserve their sense of rotation. Simulated objects are initially randomly packed, disordered aggregates of identical spheres in rotating equilibrium, with low internal angles of friction. Their shape evolution is characterized by rearrangement of the entire body, including the deep interior. They do not evolve to axisymmetric top shapes with equatorial ridges. Mass loss occurs in one-third of the simulations, typically in small amounts from the ends of a prolate-triaxial body. We conjecture that YORP self-limitation may inhibit formation of top-shapes, binaries, or both, by restricting the amount of angular momentum that can be imparted to a deformable body. Stochastic YORP, in particular, will affect the evolution of collisional families whose orbits drift apart under the influence of Yarkovsky forces, in observable ways.

  4. Coupled Spin and Shape Evolution of Small Rubble-pile Asteroids: Self-limitation of the YORP Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotto-Figueroa, Desireé; Statler, Thomas S.; Richardson, Derek C.; Tanga, Paolo

    2015-04-01

    We present the first self-consistent simulations of the coupled spin-shape evolution of small gravitational aggregates under the influence of the YORP effect. Because of YORP’s sensitivity to surface topography, even small centrifugally driven reconfigurations of aggregates can alter the YORP torque dramatically, resulting in spin evolution that can differ qualitatively from the rigid-body prediction. One-third of our simulations follow a simple evolution described as a modified YORP cycle. Two-thirds exhibit one or more of three distinct behaviors—stochastic YORP, self-governed YORP, and stagnating YORP—which together result in YORP self-limitation. Self-limitation confines rotation rates of evolving aggregates to far narrower ranges than those expected in the classical YORP cycle, greatly prolonging the times over which objects can preserve their sense of rotation. Simulated objects are initially randomly packed, disordered aggregates of identical spheres in rotating equilibrium, with low internal angles of friction. Their shape evolution is characterized by rearrangement of the entire body, including the deep interior. They do not evolve to axisymmetric top shapes with equatorial ridges. Mass loss occurs in one-third of the simulations, typically in small amounts from the ends of a prolate-triaxial body. We conjecture that YORP self-limitation may inhibit formation of top-shapes, binaries, or both, by restricting the amount of angular momentum that can be imparted to a deformable body. Stochastic YORP, in particular, will affect the evolution of collisional families whose orbits drift apart under the influence of Yarkovsky forces, in observable ways.

  5. Evaluating a multicomponent social behaviour change communication strategy to reduce intimate partner violence among married couples: study protocol for a cluster randomized trial in Nepal.

    PubMed

    Clark, Cari Jo; Spencer, Rachael A; Shrestha, Binita; Ferguson, Gemma; Oakes, J Michael; Gupta, Jhumka

    2017-01-13

    Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a significant public health issue that affects 1 in 3 women globally and a similarly large number of women in Nepal. Over the past decade, important policy and programmatic steps have been taken to address violence against women in Nepal. There remains a dearth of evidence on the effectiveness of primary violence prevention strategies. The Change Starts at Home study begins to fill this gap by utilizing a multi-component social behaviour change communication (SBCC) strategy involving a radio drama and community mobilization to shift attitudes, norms and behaviours that underpin IPV perpetration in Nepal. The study uses a concurrent mixed-methods design. The quantitative aspect of the evaluation is a pair-matched, repeated cross-sectional 2-armed, single-blinded cluster trial (RCT: N = 36 clusters, 1440 individuals), comparing a social behaviour change communication (SBCC) strategy to radio programming alone for its impact on physical and / or sexual IPV at the end of programming (12 months' post-baseline) and 6-months post the cessation of project activities (18-months post baseline). The qualitative aspects of the design include several longitudinal approaches to understand the impact of the intervention and to examine mechanisms of change including in-depth interviews with participants (N = 18 couples), and focus group discussions with community leaders (N = 3 groups), and family members of participants (N = 12 groups). Treatment effects will be estimated with generalized logistic mixed models specified to compare differences in primary outcome from baseline to 12-month follow-up, and baseline to 18-months follow-up in accordance with intention-to-treat principles. The study rigorously evaluates the effectiveness of a promising strategy to prevent IPV. The results of the trial will be immediately useful for governmental, nongovernmental, and donor funded programs targeting partner violence or social norms that

  6. Prion Protein—Antibody Complexes Characterized by Chromatography-Coupled Small-Angle X-Ray Scattering

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Lester; Kim, Seung Joong; Schneidman-Duhovny, Dina; Stöhr, Jan; Poncet-Montange, Guillaume; Weiss, Thomas M.; Tsuruta, Hiro; Prusiner, Stanley B.; Sali, Andrej

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant self-assembly, induced by structural misfolding of the prion proteins, leads to a number of neurodegenerative disorders. In particular, misfolding of the mostly α-helical cellular prion protein (PrPC) into a β-sheet-rich disease-causing isoform (PrPSc) is the key molecular event in the formation of PrPSc aggregates. The molecular mechanisms underlying the PrPC-to-PrPSc conversion and subsequent aggregation remain to be elucidated. However, in persistently prion-infected cell-culture models, it was shown that treatment with monoclonal antibodies against defined regions of the prion protein (PrP) led to the clearing of PrPSc in cultured cells. To gain more insight into this process, we characterized PrP-antibody complexes in solution using a fast protein liquid chromatography coupled with small-angle x-ray scattering (FPLC-SAXS) procedure. High-quality SAXS data were collected for full-length recombinant mouse PrP [denoted recPrP(23–230)] and N-terminally truncated recPrP(89–230), as well as their complexes with each of two Fab fragments (HuM-P and HuM-R1), which recognize N- and C-terminal epitopes of PrP, respectively. In-line measurements by fast protein liquid chromatography coupled with SAXS minimized data artifacts caused by a non-monodispersed sample, allowing structural analysis of PrP alone and in complex with Fab antibodies. The resulting structural models suggest two mechanisms for how these Fabs may prevent the conversion of PrPC into PrPSc. PMID:26287631

  7. Coupled simulation of soil energy and water content to compare dielectric behaviour with TDR measurements in frozen soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muerth, Markus; Schlenz, Florian; Loew, Alexander; Mauser, Wolfram

    2010-05-01

    In the field of soil moisture monitoring both, on-site time domain reflectometry (TDR) methods and microwave remote sensing, measure the actual soil water content via the dielectric behavior of the soil-water-air mixture. Basically, the dielectric behavior is not only influenced by soil water content, but also by temperature, soil ice content, soil texture and porosity. However, many TDR and microwave techniques relate soil water content directly to soil dielectric behavior, because they lack the ability to determine the other relevant soil properties directly. The advantage of the combination of modeling and monitoring techniques for soil moisture monitoring is the ability to understand and compare spatial and temporal patterns, especially if other land surface properties influence the retrieved soil moisture signal. In this case, the hydrological land surface model PROMET (Processes of Mass, Energy and Radiation Transfer) is combined with TDR probe measurements taken at multiple sites and multiple depths during the winter 2008/2009 in south-eastern Germany. The harsh conditions, especially during January and February 2009 led to low measured liquid water contents in the upper 20 cm of the investigated soils, although the total water content remained nearly constant over time. Additionally, soil temperature and meteorological drivers were measured at nearby agrometeorological stations. Because PROMET has shown to simulate moisture content of non-frozen soils well, compared to TDR probe and remote sensing data, we investigate its ability to simulate frozen soil water content, when enhanced with an energy balance driven soil temperature module. Furthermore, a semi-empirical dielectric mixing model is implemented to directly compare the simulated soil dielectric behavior with the available TDR probe time series. It is shown that the explicit computation of the soil surface energy balance coupled with a physically based soil temperature model is able to simulate the

  8. Application of a convergent, composite coupled cluster approach to bound state, adiabatic electron affinities in atoms and small molecules.

    PubMed

    Feller, David

    2016-01-07

    Benchmark quality adiabatic electron affinities for a collection of atoms and small molecules were obtained with the Feller-Peterson-Dixon composite coupled cluster theory method. Prior applications of this method demonstrated its ability to accurately predict atomization energies/heats of formation for more than 170 molecules. In the current work, the 1-particle expansion involved very large correlation consistent basis sets, ranging up to aug-cc-pV9Z (aug-cc-pV10Z for H and H2), with the goal of minimizing the residual basis set truncation error that must otherwise be approximated with extrapolation formulas. The n-particle expansion begins with coupled cluster calculations through iterative single and double excitations plus a quasiperturbative treatment of "connected" triple excitations (CCSD(T)) pushed to the complete basis set limit followed by CCSDT, CCSDTQ, or CCSDTQ5 corrections. Due to the small size of the systems examined here, it was possible in many cases to extend the n-particle expansion to the full configuration interaction wave function limit. Additional, smaller corrections associated with core/valence correlation, scalar relativity, anharmonic zero point vibrational energies, and non-adiabatic effects were also included. The overall root mean square (RMS) deviation was 0.005 eV (0.12 kcal/mol). This level of agreement was comparable to what was found with molecular heats of formation. A 95% confidence level corresponds to roughly twice the RMS value or 0.01 eV. While the atomic electron affinities are known experimentally to high accuracy, the molecular values are less certain. This contributes to the difficulty of gauging the accuracy of the theoretical results. A limited number of electron affinities were determined with the explicitly correlated CCSD(T)-F12b method. After extending the VnZ-F12 orbital basis sets with additional diffuse functions, the F12b method was found to accurately reproduce the best F/F(-) value obtained with standard

  9. Application of a convergent, composite coupled cluster approach to bound state, adiabatic electron affinities in atoms and small molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feller, David

    2016-01-01

    Benchmark quality adiabatic electron affinities for a collection of atoms and small molecules were obtained with the Feller-Peterson-Dixon composite coupled cluster theory method. Prior applications of this method demonstrated its ability to accurately predict atomization energies/heats of formation for more than 170 molecules. In the current work, the 1-particle expansion involved very large correlation consistent basis sets, ranging up to aug-cc-pV9Z (aug-cc-pV10Z for H and H2), with the goal of minimizing the residual basis set truncation error that must otherwise be approximated with extrapolation formulas. The n-particle expansion begins with coupled cluster calculations through iterative single and double excitations plus a quasiperturbative treatment of "connected" triple excitations (CCSD(T)) pushed to the complete basis set limit followed by CCSDT, CCSDTQ, or CCSDTQ5 corrections. Due to the small size of the systems examined here, it was possible in many cases to extend the n-particle expansion to the full configuration interaction wave function limit. Additional, smaller corrections associated with core/valence correlation, scalar relativity, anharmonic zero point vibrational energies, and non-adiabatic effects were also included. The overall root mean square (RMS) deviation was 0.005 eV (0.12 kcal/mol). This level of agreement was comparable to what was found with molecular heats of formation. A 95% confidence level corresponds to roughly twice the RMS value or 0.01 eV. While the atomic electron affinities are known experimentally to high accuracy, the molecular values are less certain. This contributes to the difficulty of gauging the accuracy of the theoretical results. A limited number of electron affinities were determined with the explicitly correlated CCSD(T)-F12b method. After extending the VnZ-F12 orbital basis sets with additional diffuse functions, the F12b method was found to accurately reproduce the best F/F- value obtained with standard

  10. HCSE method for detection of small carbon-carbon couplings and their signs, comparison with SLAP pulse sequence.

    PubMed

    Blechta, Vratislav; Schraml, Jan

    2013-11-01

    Performance of homonuclear coupling sign edited (HCSE) experiment applied to detection of signed carbon-carbon couplings is discussed using a set of already measured samples of nine monosubstituted benzenes. It is shown that coupling sign detection is insensitive to the settings of carbon-carbon polarization transfer delays. The HCSE spectra of ten from the total of 43 measured carbon-carbon couplings were considerably influenced by relaxations and proton-proton strong couplings. These effects are quantitatively discussed. The results of HCSE and SLAP experiments are compared. It is shown that the two methods may complement each other in detection of signed carbon-carbon couplings.

  11. Impact of high-resolution SST data on fully-coupled hydro-meteorological forecasts in small Mediterranean catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendicino, Giuseppe; Senatore, Alfonso

    2017-04-01

    Sea surface temperatures (SSTs) play a major role in extreme precipitation events in the Mediterranean region, because sea-atmosphere exchange mechanisms interact with complex coastal orography, leading locally to meteorological processes whose complexity is often interpreted not correctly by models. In the present study, impact of improved SST representation on integrated hydro-meteorological forecasts in Calabria Region (Southern Italy, Central Mediterranean) is assessed. Specifically, two severe hydro-meteorological events affecting the region in the second half of the year 2015 are analyzed, the first focused on a relatively small area and with short and very intense precipitation, the second more persistent and affecting a wider area. For the analysis of both events, the fully two-way dynamically coupled atmosphere-hydrology modeling system WRF-Hydro is used with a 2 km-resolution for the innermost domain. Three reference forecasts are achieved with initial and lateral atmospheric boundary conditions given by both the 0.5° and the recently available 0.25° output resolution GFS grid dataset, and the 16 km resolution ECMWF's Integrated Forecasting System (IFS). Then, in different steps, both initial and lower boundary SST data are replaced with high-resolution datasets (such as the Medspiration L4 Ultra-High Resolution SSTfnd from the Medspiration Project by IFREMER/CERSAT). Precipitation estimates are compared with both ground-based data and observations from a National Civil Protection Department single-polarization Doppler radar. Impacts on discharges of the small rivers and creeks affected by the extreme precipitation events are also assessed. Results highlight that correct representation of SST fields is of paramount importance for hydro-meteorological forecasts in coastal areas of the Mediterranean and suggest that improved space-time monitoring of SST conditions can positively affect weather forecasting in these regions.

  12. Behavioural and physiological responses of brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis to midwinter flow reduction in a small ice-free mountain stream.

    PubMed

    Krimmer, A N; Paul, A J; Hontela, A; Rasmussen, J B

    2011-09-01

    This study presents an experimental analysis of the effects of midwinter flow reduction (50-75%, reduction in discharge in 4 h daily pulses) on the physical habitat and on behaviour and physiology of overwintering brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis in a small mountain stream. Flow reduction did not result in significant lowering of temperature or formation of surface or subsurface ice. The main findings were (1) daily movement by S. fontinalis increased (c. 2·5-fold) during flow reduction, but was limited to small-scale relocations (<10 m). (2) Undercut banks were the preferred habitat and availability of these habitats was reduced during flow reduction. (3) Although both experimental and reference fish did lose mass and condition during the experiment, no effects of flow reduction on stress indicators (blood cortisol or glucose) or bioenergetics (total body fat, water content or mass loss) were detected, probably because access to the preferred type of cover remained available. Like other salmonids, S. fontinalis moves little and seeks physical cover during winter. Unlike many of the more studied salmonids, however, this species overwinters successfully in small groundwater-rich streams that often remain ice-free, and this study identifies undercut banks as the critical winter habitat rather than substratum cover.

  13. Low-cost compact diffuse speckle contrast flowmeter using small laser diode and bare charge-coupled-device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chong; Seong, Myeongsu; Morgan, Joshua Paul; Mazdeyasna, Siavash; Kim, Jae Gwan; Hastings, Jeffrey Todd; Yu, Guoqiang

    2016-08-01

    We report a low-cost compact diffuse speckle contrast flowmeter (DSCF) consisting of a small laser diode and a bare charge-coupled-device (CCD) chip, which can be used for contact measurements of blood flow variations in relatively deep tissues (up to ˜8 mm). Measurements of large flow variations by the contact DSCF probe are compared to a noncontact CCD-based diffuse speckle contrast spectroscopy and a standard contact diffuse correlation spectroscopy in tissue phantoms and a human forearm. Bland-Altman analysis shows no significant bias with good limits of agreement among these measurements: 96.5%±2.2% (94.4% to 100.0%) in phantom experiments and 92.8% in the forearm test. The relatively lower limit of agreement observed in the in vivo measurements (92.8%) is likely due to heterogeneous reactive responses of blood flow in different regions/volumes of the forearm tissues measured by different probes. The low-cost compact DSCF device holds great potential to be broadly used for continuous and longitudinal monitoring of blood flow alterations in ischemic/hypoxic tissues, which are usually associated with various vascular diseases.

  14. Rfc5, a small subunit of replication factor C complex, couples DNA replication and mitosis in budding yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Sugimoto, K; Shimomura, T; Hashimoto, K; Araki, H; Sugino, A; Matsumoto, K

    1996-01-01

    The inhibition of DNA synthesis prevents mitotic entry through the action of the S phase checkpoint. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, an essential protein kinase, Spk1/Mec2/Rad53/Sad1, controls the coupling of S phase to mitosis. In an attempt to identify genes that genetically interact with Spk1, we have isolated a temperature-sensitive mutation, rfc5-1, that can be suppressed by overexpression of SPK1. The RFC5 gene encodes a small subunit of replication factor C complex. At the restrictive temperature, rfc5-1 mutant cells entered mitosis with unevenly separated or fragmented chromosomes, resulting in loss of viability. Thus, the rfc5 mutation defective for DNA replication is also impaired in the S phase checkpoint. Overexpression of POL30, which encodes the proliferating cell nuclear antigen, suppressed the replication defect of the rfc5 mutant but not its checkpoint defect. Taken together, these results suggested that replication factor C has a direct role in sensing the state of DNA replication and transmitting the signal to the checkpoint machinery. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8692942

  15. Effects of pacing, status and unbalance in time motion variables, heart rate and tactical behaviour when playing 5-a-side football small-sided games.

    PubMed

    Sampaio, Jaime E; Lago, Carlos; Gonçalves, Bruno; Maçãs, Victor M; Leite, Nuno

    2014-03-01

    To compare time-motion variables, heart rate and players' tactical behaviour according to game pace (slow, normal or fast), status (winning and losing) and team unbalance (superiority and inferiority) in football 5-a-side small-sided games. To identify the most discriminating variables in classifying performances according to these constraints. Cross-sectional field study. The data were gathered using global positioning systems (5 Hz) in 5-a-side small-sided games (7 × 5 min) played by twenty-four footballers. The tactical performance was measured using dynamical positioning variables, processed by non-linear signal processing techniques (approximate entropy). ANOVA models were used to compare between constraints and discriminant analyses to identify the variables that best discriminate between pacing and status × unbalance constraints. The fast paced games had the highest mean speed value, followed by normal and slow paced games (8.2 ± 0.6 km h(-1), 7.8 ± 0.5 km h(-1) and 6.2 ± 0.4 km h(-1), respectively). The stronger predictor variables of pacing were the randomness in distance to team centroid and the distances covered above 13 km h(-1). The results also changed according to game status and team unbalance. The strongest predictor variables were the distance covered below 6.9 km h(-1), distance and randomness to team centroid, with higher values when winning in superiority conditions. Practice task design manipulating game pace, status and team unbalance significantly influenced the emergent behavioural dynamics. Collective positioning variables were more accurate in discriminating these constraints and, therefore, need to be considered when planning and monitoring performance. Copyright © 2013 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Movement behaviour within and beyond perceptual ranges in three small mammals: effects of matrix type and body mass.

    PubMed

    Prevedello, Jayme Augusto; Forero-Medina, Germán; Vieira, Marcus Vinícius

    2010-11-01

    intensity and direction of plantation rows, may be more important for individuals beyond their perceptual range. 7. Simplistic scenarios considering only intrinsic or extrinsic factors are inadequate to predict path tortuosity, and to infer dispersal success in heterogeneous landscapes. Perceptual range represents a fundamental threshold where the effects of matrix type, body mass and individual behaviour change drastically. © 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2010 British Ecological Society.

  17. The potential utility of predicted one bond carbon-proton coupling constants in the structure elucidation of small organic molecules by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Venkata, Chandrasekhar; Forster, Mark J; Howe, Peter W A; Steinbeck, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy is the most popular technique used for structure elucidation of small organic molecules in solution, but incorrect structures are regularly reported. One-bond proton-carbon J-couplings provide additional information about chemical structure because they are determined by different features of molecular structure than are proton and carbon chemical shifts. However, these couplings are not routinely used to validate proposed structures because few software tools exist to predict them. This study assesses the accuracy of Density Functional Theory for predicting them using 396 published experimental observations from a diverse range of small organic molecules. With the B3LYP functional and the TZVP basis set, Density Functional Theory calculations using the open-source software package NWChem can predict one-bond CH J-couplings with good accuracy for most classes of small organic molecule. The root-mean-square deviation after correction is 1.5 Hz for most sp3 CH pairs and 1.9 Hz for sp2 pairs; larger errors are observed for sp3 pairs with multiple electronegative substituents and for sp pairs. These results suggest that prediction of one-bond CH J-couplings by Density Functional Theory is sufficiently accurate for structure validation. This will be of particular use in strained ring systems and heterocycles which have characteristic couplings and which pose challenges for structure elucidation.

  18. The Potential Utility of Predicted One Bond Carbon-Proton Coupling Constants in the Structure Elucidation of Small Organic Molecules by NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Venkata, Chandrasekhar; Forster, Mark J.; Howe, Peter W. A.; Steinbeck, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy is the most popular technique used for structure elucidation of small organic molecules in solution, but incorrect structures are regularly reported. One-bond proton-carbon J-couplings provide additional information about chemical structure because they are determined by different features of molecular structure than are proton and carbon chemical shifts. However, these couplings are not routinely used to validate proposed structures because few software tools exist to predict them. This study assesses the accuracy of Density Functional Theory for predicting them using 396 published experimental observations from a diverse range of small organic molecules. With the B3LYP functional and the TZVP basis set, Density Functional Theory calculations using the open-source software package NWChem can predict one-bond CH J-couplings with good accuracy for most classes of small organic molecule. The root-mean-square deviation after correction is 1.5 Hz for most sp3 CH pairs and 1.9 Hz for sp2 pairs; larger errors are observed for sp3 pairs with multiple electronegative substituents and for sp pairs. These results suggest that prediction of one-bond CH J-couplings by Density Functional Theory is sufficiently accurate for structure validation. This will be of particular use in strained ring systems and heterocycles which have characteristic couplings and which pose challenges for structure elucidation. PMID:25365289

  19. Analysis of hyperbolic signatures from small discontinuities using an UWB ground-coupled radar: FDTD simulations and field experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagnard, Florence; Tebchrany, Elias; Baltazart, Vincent

    2013-04-01

    Ground penetrating radar (GPR) is a well-known non-destructive technique based on electromagnetic wave propagation that is able to detect by reflection or scattering of waves dielectric discontinuities in the underground. Our application is mainly concerned with civil engineering to perform supervision, inventory, and soil characterization. Because the air-coupled radar suffers from a significant reflection at the ground interface that reduces energy transfer of electromagnetic radiation in the sub-surface and penetration depth, we have developed an ultra-wide band (UWB) ground-coupled radar made of a pair of partially shielded compact planar bowtie slot antennas. As the antenna dimension (36*23 cm2) is close to the A4 sheet size, the maturity of the microstrip technology has allowed to design a particular geometry on the FR4 substrate (h=1.5 mm) which is able to operate at frequencies from 460 MHz to beyond 4 GHz in air. Contrary to a commercial GPR where details on antenna design are not available, it appears here possible to know and control the radiation characteristics and develop full-wave FDTD modeling that can represent field experiments for comparisons and analyses. The objective of this work is to improve, by means of a parametric study, the knowledge of physical phenomena involved in dielectric polarization when waves interact with buried discontinuities and particularly cracks, pipes, delaminations that can be distinguished by their shape, size, dielectric contrast with the surrounding medium, orientation relative to the electric field… Thus, we have first characterized by FDTD modeling and field measurements in a wet sand the radar link in two perpendicular polarizations (parallel and mirror) in the presence of a common soil (epsilon'=5.5, sigma=0.01 S/m) considering variable offsets. Afterwards, we have studied and analyzed the hyperbola signatures generated by the presence of buried canonical objects (pipes, strips) with several dielectric

  20. LDV measurement of small nonlinearities in flat and curved membranes. A model for eardrum nonlinear acoustic behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilian, Gladiné; Pieter, Muyshondt; Joris, Dirckx

    2016-06-01

    Laser Doppler Vibrometry is an intrinsic highly linear measurement technique which makes it a great tool to measure extremely small nonlinearities in the vibration response of a system. Although the measurement technique is highly linear, other components in the experimental setup may introduce nonlinearities. An important source of artificially introduced nonlinearities is the speaker, which generates the stimulus. In this work, two correction methods to remove the effects of stimulus nonlinearity are investigated. Both correction methods were found to give similar results but have different pros and cons. The aim of this work is to investigate the importance of the conical shape of the eardrum as a source of nonlinearity in hearing. We present measurements on flat and indented membranes. The data shows that the curved membrane exhibit slightly higher levels of nonlinearity compared to the flat membrane.

  1. Working With What We've Got: Perceptions of Barriers and Supports Among Small-Metropolitan Same-Sex Adopting Couples.

    PubMed

    Kinkler, Lori A; Goldberg, Abbie E

    2011-10-01

    In seeking to adopt, lesbians and gay men may confront various barriers and obstacles. Ideally they have access to a variety of support resources that can help to buffer the negative effects of these barriers. However, lesbians and gay men living in small-metropolitan communities may have limited access to support resources. The current qualitative study examined the perceptions of 37 same-sex couples who were pursuing adoption while living outside of large metropolitan cities, with attention to the barriers these couples encountered during the adoption process, and the resources they drew upon to cope with such challenges. Findings indicated that same sex couples living in small-metropolitan areas confronted several major barriers in the adoption process, such as a lack of geographically accessible gay-friendly adoption agencies. Despite limited access to support, participants showed evidence of notable resourcefulness. For example, participants with limited access to formal support groups sought out informal supports instead.

  2. Working With What We’ve Got: Perceptions of Barriers and Supports Among Small-Metropolitan Same-Sex Adopting Couples

    PubMed Central

    Kinkler, Lori A.; Goldberg, Abbie E.

    2011-01-01

    In seeking to adopt, lesbians and gay men may confront various barriers and obstacles. Ideally they have access to a variety of support resources that can help to buffer the negative effects of these barriers. However, lesbians and gay men living in small-metropolitan communities may have limited access to support resources. The current qualitative study examined the perceptions of 37 same-sex couples who were pursuing adoption while living outside of large metropolitan cities, with attention to the barriers these couples encountered during the adoption process, and the resources they drew upon to cope with such challenges. Findings indicated that same sex couples living in small-metropolitan areas confronted several major barriers in the adoption process, such as a lack of geographically accessible gay-friendly adoption agencies. Despite limited access to support, participants showed evidence of notable resourcefulness. For example, participants with limited access to formal support groups sought out informal supports instead. PMID:21949461

  3. Current-voltage relations of sodium-coupled sugar transport across the apical membrane of Necturus small intestine.

    PubMed

    Lapointe, J Y; Hudson, R L; Schultz, S G

    1986-01-01

    The current-voltage (I-V) relations of the rheogenic Na-sugar cotransport mechanism at the apical membrane of Necturus small intestine were determined from the relations between the electrical potential difference across the apical membrane, psi mc, and that across the entire epithelium, psi ms, when the latter was varied over the range +/- 200 mV, under steady conditions in the presence of galactose and after the current across the apical membrane carried by the cotransporter, ImSNa, is blocked by the addition of phloridzin to the mucosal solution. ImSNa was found to be strongly dependent upon psi mc over the range -50 mV less than psi mc less than EmSNa where EmSNa is the "zero current" or "reversal" potential. Over the range of values of psi mc encountered under physiological conditions the cotransporter may be modeled as a conductance in series with an electromotive force so that ImSNa = gmSNa (EmSNa - psi mc) where gmSNa is the contribution of this mechanism to the conductance of the apical membrane and is "near constant." In several instances ImSNa "saturated" at large hyperpolarizing or depolarizing values of psi mc. The values of EmSNa determined in the presence of 1, 5, and 15 mM galactose strongly suggest that if the Na-galactose cotransporters are kinetically homogeneous, the stoichiometry of this coupled process is unity. Finally, the shapes of the observed I-V relations are consistent with the predictions of a simple kinetic model which conforms with current notions regarding the mechanico-kinetic properties of this cotransport process.

  4. Evaluation of the relative efficacy of a couple cognitive-behaviour therapy (CBT) for Premenstrual Disorders (PMDs), in comparison to one-to-one CBT and a wait list control: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Design A randomised control trial (RCT) was conducted to examine the efficacy of couple-based cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) for Premenstrual Disorders (PMDs), in comparison to one-to-one CBT and a wait-list control. Methods Triangulation of quantitative and qualitative outcome measures evaluated changes pre-post intervention. Eighty three women were randomly allocated across three conditions, with 63 completing post-intervention measures, a retention rate of 76%. Results Repeated measures analysis of variance found a significant time by group interaction identifying that women in the two CBT conditions reported lower total premenstrual symptoms, emotional reactivity/mood, and premenstrual distress, in comparison to the wait list control. Significantly higher active behavioural coping post-intervention was found in the couple condition than in the one-to-one and wait list control groups. Qualitative analysis provided insight into the subjective experience of PMDs and participation in the intervention study. Across groups, women reported increased awareness and understanding of premenstrual change post-intervention. A larger proportion of women in the CBT conditions reported reduction in intensity and frequency of negative premenstrual emotional reactivity, increased communication and help-seeking, increased understanding and acceptance of embodied change, and the development of coping skills, post-intervention. Increased partner understanding and improved relationship post-intervention was reported by a greater proportion of participants in the CBT conditions, most markedly in the couple condition. Conclusion These findings suggest that one-to-one and couple CBT interventions can significantly reduce women’s premenstrual symptomatology and distress, and improve premenstrual coping. Couple based CBT interventions may have a greater positive impact upon behavioural coping and perceptions of relationship context and support. This suggests that CBT should be

  5. Comparison of light out-coupling enhancements in single-layer blue-phosphorescent organic light emitting diodes using small-molecule or polymer hosts

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Yung-Ting; Liu, Shun-Wei; Yuan, Chih-Hsien; Lee, Chih-Chien; Ho, Yu-Hsuan; Wei, Pei-Kuen; Chen, Kuan-Yu; Lee, Yi-Ting; Wu, Min-Fei; Chen, Chin-Ti E-mail: chihiwu@cc.ee.ntu.edu.tw; Wu, Chih-I E-mail: chihiwu@cc.ee.ntu.edu.tw

    2013-11-07

    Single-layer blue phosphorescence organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) with either small-molecule or polymer hosts are fabricated using solution process and the performances of devices with different hosts are investigated. The small-molecule device exhibits luminous efficiency of 14.7 cd/A and maximum power efficiency of 8.39 lm/W, which is the highest among blue phosphorescence OLEDs with single-layer solution process and small molecular hosts. Using the same solution process for all devices, comparison of light out-coupling enhancement, with brightness enhancement film (BEF), between small-molecule and polymer based OLEDs is realized. Due to different dipole orientation and anisotropic refractive index, polymer-based OLEDs would trap less light than small molecule-based OLEDs internally, about 37% better based simulation results. In spite of better electrical and spectroscopic characteristics, including ambipolar characteristics, higher carrier mobility, higher photoluminescence quantum yield, and larger triplet state energy, the overall light out-coupling efficiency of small molecule-based devices is worse than that of polymer-based devices without BEF. However, with BEF for light out-coupling enhancement, the improved ratio in luminous flux and luminous efficiency for small molecule based device is 1.64 and 1.57, respectively, which are significantly better than those of PVK (poly-9-vinylcarbazole) devices. In addition to the theoretical optical simulation, the experimental data also confirm the origins of differential light-outcoupling enhancement. The maximum luminous efficiency and power efficiency are enhanced from 14.7 cd/A and 8.39 lm/W to 23 cd/A and 13.2 lm/W, respectively, with laminated BEF, which are both the highest so far for single-layer solution-process blue phosphorescence OLEDs with small molecule hosts.

  6. A minimal hypothesis for membrane-linked free-energy transduction. The role of independent, small coupling units.

    PubMed

    Westerhoff, H V; Melandri, B A; Venturoli, G; Azzone, G F; Kell, D B

    1984-12-17

    Experimental data are reviewed that are not in keeping with the scheme of 'delocalized' protonic coupling in membrane-linked free-energy transduction. It turns out that there are three main types of anomalies: (i) rates of electron transfer and of ATP synthesis do not solely depend on their own driving force and on delta mu H, (ii) the ('static head') ratio of delta Gp to delta mu H varies with delta mu H and (iii) inhibition of either some of the electron-transfer chains or some of the H+-ATPases, does not cause an overcapacity in the other, non-inhibited proton pumps. None of the earlier free-energy coupling schemes, alternative to delocalized protonic coupling, can account for these three anomalies. We propose to add a fifth postulate, namely that of the coupling unit, to the four existing postulates of 'delocalized protonic coupling' and show that, with this postulate, protonic coupling can again account for most experimental observations. We also discuss: (i) how experimental data that might seem to be at odds with the 'coupling unit' hypothesis can be accounted for and (ii) the problem of the spatial arrangement of the electrical field in the different free-energy coupling schemes.

  7. Use of novel fibre-coupled radioluminescence and RADPOS dosimetry systems for total scatter factor measurements in small fields.

    PubMed

    Ploquin, N; Kertzscher, G; Vandervoort, E; Cygler, J E; Andersen, C E; Francescon, P

    2015-01-07

    A dosimetry system based on Al2O3:C radioluminescence (RL), and RADPOS, a novel 4D dosimetry system using microMOSFETs, were used to measure total scatter factors, (S(c,p))(f(clin))(det), for the CyberKnife robotic radiosugery system. New Monte Carlo calculated correction factors are presented and applied for the RL detector response for the 5, 7.5 and 10 mm collimators in order to correct for the detector geometry and increased photoelectric cross section of Al2O3:C relative to water. For comparison, measurements were also carried out using a micro MOSFET, PTW60012 diode and GAFCHROMIC(®) film (EBT and EBT2). Uncorrected (S(c,p))(f(clin))(det) were obtained by taking the ratio of the detector response for each collimator to that for the 60 mm diameter reference field. Published Monte Carlo calculated correction factors were applied to the RADPOS, microMOSFET and diode detector measurements to yield corrected field factors, Ω(f(clin),f(msr))(Q(clin),Q(msr)), following the terminology of a recent formalism introduced for small and composite field relative dosimetry. With corrections, the RL measured Ω(f(clin),f(msr))(Q(clin),Q(msr)) were 0.656  ±  0.002, 0.815  ±  0.002 and 0.865  ±  0.003 for the 5, 7.5 and 10 mm collimators, respectively. This was in good agreement with RADPOS corrected field factors of 0.650  ±  0.010, 0.816  ±  0.024 and 0.867  ±  0.010 for the 5, 7.5 and 10 mm collimators, respectively. Both RL and RADPOS total scatter factors agreed within approximately two standard deviations of the GAFCHROMIC film values (average of EBT and EBT2) of 0.640  ±  0.006, 0.806  ±  0.007 and 0.859  ±  0.09. Corrected total scatter factors for all dosimetry systems agreed within one standard deviation for collimator sizes 10-60 mm. Our study suggests that the microMOSFET/RADPOS and optical fibre-coupled RL dosimetry system are well suited for total scatter factor measurements over the entire range of field

  8. Bonding in mercury molecules described by the normalized elimination of the small component and coupled cluster theory.

    PubMed

    Cremer, Dieter; Kraka, Elfi; Filatov, Michael

    2008-12-01

    Bond dissociation energies (BDEs) of neutral HgX and cationic HgX(+) molecules range from less than a kcal mol(-1) to as much as 60 kcal mol(-1). Using NESC/CCSD(T) [normalized elimination of the small component and coupled-cluster theory with all single and double excitations and a perturbative treatment of the triple excitations] in combination with triple-zeta basis sets, bonding in 28 mercury molecules HgX (X = H, Li, Na, K, Rb, CH(3), SiH(3), GeH(3), SnH(3), NH(2), PH(2), AsH(2), SbH(2), OH, SH, SeH, TeH, O, S, Se, Te, F, Cl, Br, I, CN, CF(3), OCF(3)) and their corresponding 28 cations is investigated. Mercury undergoes weak covalent bonding with its partner X in most cases (exceptions: X = alkali atoms, which lead to van der Waals bonding) although the BDEs are mostly smaller than 12 kcal mol(-1). Bonding is weakened by 1) a singly occupied destabilized sigma*-HOMO and 2) lone pair repulsion. The magnitude of sigma*-destabilization can be determined from the energy difference BDE(HgX)-BDE(HgX(+)), which is largest for bonding partners from groups IVb and Vb of the periodic table (up to 80 kcal mol(-1)). BDEs can be enlarged by charge transfer from Hg and increased HgX ionic bonding, provided the bonding partner of Hg is sufficiently electronegative. The fine-tuning of covalent and ionic bonding, sigma-destabilization, and lone-pair repulsion occurs via relativistic effects where 6s AO contraction and 5d AO expansion are decisive. Lone pair repulsion involving the mercury 5d AOs plays an important role in the case of some mercury chalcogenides HgE (E = O, Te) where it leads to (3)Pi rather than (1)Sigma(+) ground states. However, both HgE((3)Pi) and HgE((1)Sigma(+)) should not be experimentally detectable under normal conditions, which is in contrast to experimental predictions suggesting BDE values for HgE between 30 and 53 kcal mol(-1). The results of this work are discussed with regard to their relevance for mercury bonding in general, the chemistry of

  9. Use of novel fibre-coupled radioluminescence and RADPOS dosimetry systems for total scatter factor measurements in small fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ploquin, N.; Kertzscher, G.; Vandervoort, E.; Cygler, J. E.; Andersen, C. E.; Francescon, P.

    2015-01-01

    A dosimetry system based on Al2O3:C radioluminescence (RL), and RADPOS, a novel 4D dosimetry system using microMOSFETs, were used to measure total scatter factors, ≤ft({{S}c,p}\\right)\\text{det}{{f\\text{clin}}}, for the CyberKnife robotic radiosugery system. New Monte Carlo calculated correction factors are presented and applied for the RL detector response for the 5, 7.5 and 10 mm collimators in order to correct for the detector geometry and increased photoelectric cross section of Al2O3:C relative to water. For comparison, measurements were also carried out using a micro MOSFET, PTW60012 diode and GAFCHROMIC® film (EBT and EBT2). Uncorrected ≤ft({{S}c,p}\\right)\\text{det}{{f\\text{clin}}}, were obtained by taking the ratio of the detector response for each collimator to that for the 60 mm diameter reference field. Published Monte Carlo calculated correction factors were applied to the RADPOS, microMOSFET and diode detector measurements to yield corrected field factors, Ω {{Q\\text{clin}},{{Q}\\text{msr}}}{{f\\text{clin}},{{f}\\text{msr}}}, following the terminology of a recent formalism introduced for small and composite field relative dosimetry. With corrections, the RL measured Ω {{Q\\text{clin}},{{Q}\\text{msr}}}{{f\\text{clin}},{{f}\\text{msr}}}, were 0.656  ±  0.002, 0.815  ±  0.002 and 0.865  ±  0.003 for the 5, 7.5 and 10 mm collimators, respectively. This was in good agreement with RADPOS corrected field factors of 0.650  ±  0.010, 0.816  ±  0.024 and 0.867  ±  0.010 for the 5, 7.5 and 10 mm collimators, respectively. Both RL and RADPOS total scatter factors agreed within approximately two standard deviations of the GAFCHROMIC film values (average of EBT and EBT2) of 0.640  ±  0.006, 0.806  ±  0.007 and 0.859  ±  0.09. Corrected total scatter factors for all dosimetry systems agreed within one standard deviation for collimator sizes 10-60 mm. Our study suggests that the micro

  10. Coupling coefficient, hierarchical structure, and earthquake cycle for the source area of the 2011 off the Pacific coast of Tohoku earthquake inferred from small repeating earthquake data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, Naoki; Matsuzawa, Toru

    2011-07-01

    We have estimated the spatial distribution of interplate coupling in and around the source area for the 2011 Tohoku earthquake from small repeating earthquake data. The source area of the 2011 Tohoku earthquake exhibited a relatively high coupling coefficient (>0.5) for the period from 1993 to 2007 and was surrounded by areas of low coupling (<0.5) at its western (down-dip), northern and southern extents. These low-coupling areas probably prevented further propagation of the mainshock rupture. A high coupling coefficient is estimated even near the trench that can act as the source of the large tsunami of the present earthquake. The averaged seismic coupling of 0.5-0.8 in the M 9 earthquake's source area and the seismic moment of the earthquake suggest that the slip deficit for the M 9 earthquake was accumulated over a period of 260-880 years, consistent with the recurrence interval of such great earthquakes from tsunami deposit data. It also suggests that the several M ~ 7 earthquakes which have occurred in the source area since 1926 were minor events that released only a part of the accumulated strain energy. The hierarchical structure of asperities, as in the case of the Kamaishi sequence, may be the key to understanding huge earthquakes that encompass several smaller asperities.

  11. Examining the Needs of Paediatric Nurses Caring for Children and Young People Presenting with Self-Harm/Suicidal Behaviour on General Paediatric Wards: Findings from a Small-Scale Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Gemma; Foster, Celeste

    2016-01-01

    This article reports on the process and findings from a small-scale qualitative research study. The study intended to develop an evidence-based care plan/pathway for children and young people in paediatric inpatient settings presenting with self-harm/suicidal behaviour. The article includes a critical review of unanticipated challenges of…

  12. Examining the Needs of Paediatric Nurses Caring for Children and Young People Presenting with Self-Harm/Suicidal Behaviour on General Paediatric Wards: Findings from a Small-Scale Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Gemma; Foster, Celeste

    2016-01-01

    This article reports on the process and findings from a small-scale qualitative research study. The study intended to develop an evidence-based care plan/pathway for children and young people in paediatric inpatient settings presenting with self-harm/suicidal behaviour. The article includes a critical review of unanticipated challenges of…

  13. Combining density functional theory (DFT) and collision cross-section (CCS) calculations to analyze the gas-phase behaviour of small molecules and their protonation site isomers.

    PubMed

    Boschmans, Jasper; Jacobs, Sam; Williams, Jonathan P; Palmer, Martin; Richardson, Keith; Giles, Kevin; Lapthorn, Cris; Herrebout, Wouter A; Lemière, Filip; Sobott, Frank

    2016-06-20

    Electrospray ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS) data show that for some small molecules, two (or even more) ions with identical sum formula and mass, but distinct drift times are observed. In spite of showing their own unique and characteristic fragmentation spectra in MS/MS, no configurational or constitutional isomers are found to be present in solution. Instead the observation and separation of such ions appears to be inherent to their gas-phase behaviour during ion mobility experiments. The origin of multiple drift times is thought to be the result of protonation site isomers ('protomers'). Although some important properties of protomers have been highlighted by other studies, correlating the experimental collision cross-sections (CCSs) with calculated values has proven to be a major difficulty. As a model, this study uses the pharmaceutical compound melphalan and a number of related molecules with alternative (gas-phase) protonation sites. Our study combines density functional theory (DFT) calculations with modified MobCal methods (e.g. nitrogen-based Trajectory Method algorithm) for the calculation of theoretical CCS values. Calculated structures can be linked to experimentally observed signals, and a strong correlation is found between the difference of the calculated dipole moments of the protomer pairs and their experimental CCS separation.

  14. Applicability of a septic tank/engineered wetland coupled system in the treatment and recycling of wastewater from a small community.

    PubMed

    Mbuligwe, Stephen E

    2005-01-01

    A septic tank (ST)/engineered wetland coupled system used to treat and recycle wastewater from a small community in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania was monitored to assess its performance. The engineered wetland system (EWS) had two parallel units each with two serial beds packed with different sizes of media and vegetated differently. The larger-sized medium bed was upstream and was planted with Phragmites (reeds) and the smaller-sized medium bed was downstream and was planted with Typha (cattails). The ST/EWS coupled system was able to remove ammonia by an average of 60%, nitrate by 71%, sulfate by 55%, chemical oxygen demand by 91%, and fecal coliform as well as total coliform by almost 100%. The effluent from the ST/EWS coupled system is used for irrigation. Notably, users of the recycled irrigation water do not harbor any negative feelings about it. This study demonstrates that it is possible to treat and recycle domestic wastewater using ST/ EWS coupled systems. The study also brings attention to the fact that an ST/EWS coupled system has operation and maintenance (O&M) needs that must be fulfilled for its effectiveness and acceptability. These include removal of unwanted weeds, harvesting of wetland plants when the EWS becomes unappealingly bushy, and routine repair.

  15. Flow behaviour, suspended sediment transport and transmission losses in a small (sub-bank-full) flow event in an Australian desert stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunkerley, David; Brown, Kate

    1999-08-01

    The behaviour of a discrete sub-bank-full flow event in a small desert stream in western NSW, Australia, is analysed from direct observation and sediment sampling during the flow event and from later channel surveys. The flow event, the result of an isolated afternoon thunderstorm, had a peak discharge of 9 m3/s at an upstream station. Transmission loss totally consumed the flow over the following 7·6 km. Suspended sediment concentration was highest at the flow front (not the discharge peak) and declined linearly with the log of time since passage of the flow front, regardless of discharge variation. The transmission loss responsible for the waning and eventual cessation of flow occurred at a mean rate of 13.2% per km. This is quite rapid, and is more than twice the corresponding figure for bank-full flows estimated by Dunkerley (1992) on the same stream system. It is proposed that transmission losses in ephemeral streams of the kind studied may be minimized in flows near bank-full stage, and be higher in both sub-bank-full and overbank flows. Factors contributing to enhanced flow loss in the sub-bank-full flow studied included abstractions of flow to pools, scour holes and other low points along the channel, and overflow abstractions into channel filaments that did not rejoin the main flow. On the other hand, losses were curtailed by the shallow depth of banks wetted and by extensive mud drapes that were set down over sand bars and other porous channel materials during the flow. Thus, in contrast with the relatively regular pattern of transmission loss inferred from large floods, losses from low flows exhibit marked spatial variability and depend to a considerable extent on streamwise variations in channel geometry, in addition to the depth and porosity of channel perimeter sediments.

  16. How does Australia's largest dolphin-watching industry affect the behaviour of a small and resident population of Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins?

    PubMed

    Steckenreuter, Andre; Möller, Luciana; Harcourt, Robert

    2012-04-30

    The small, genetically distinct population of Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops aduncus) in Port Stephens, New South Wales (NSW), is the target of the largest dolphin-watching industry in Australia and is located within the Port Stephens - Great Lakes Marine Park that was created in 2005. The effects of this industry have been identified as of significant management importance by the Marine Parks Authority NSW. Accordingly, the impact of commercial dolphin-watching boats was investigated from boat-based surveys from August 2008 to August 2009. Presence of dolphin-watching boats altered both the dolphins' behavioural states and activity budgets. Dolphins spent 66.5% less time feeding and 44.2% less time socialising, spent four times more milling, and were never observed to rest in the presence of dolphin-watching boats. Moreover, dolphin groups were more cohesive during dolphin-watching boat encounters and dolphins tended to avoid tour boats. These effects were exacerbated as the number of boats increased and the distance from boats decreased. The rate of approach was high with boats approaching each dolphin group three times per day in winter and six times in summer. Moreover, groups of dolphins with newborns were approached closer than state regulated minimum approach distances in nine out of ten encounters. Globally, dolphin-watching industries frequent small resident groups of coastal dolphins and effects are likely to be similar. We suggest that existing controls are inadequate and that these together with additional regulations be enforced by a regular presence of authorities. We suggest no more than one dolphin-watching boat within 50 m of a group of dolphins, or 100 m if calves are present. Operating times of dolphin-watching boats should be restricted in numbers after 1 pm, i.e., during preferred foraging times for dolphins. Additionally, exclusion zones should be considered to reduce pressure on dolphins undertaking critical activities such as

  17. Fano-like resonance emerging from magnetic and electric plasmon mode coupling in small arrays of gold particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakhti, Saïd; Tishchenko, Alexandre V.; Zambrana-Puyalto, Xavier; Bonod, Nicolas; Dhuey, Scott D.; Schuck, P. James; Cabrini, Stefano; Alayoglu, Selim; Destouches, Nathalie

    2016-09-01

    In this work we theoretically and experimentally analyze the resonant behavior of individual 3 × 3 gold particle oligomers illuminated under normal and oblique incidence. While this structure hosts both dipolar and quadrupolar electric and magnetic delocalized modes, only dipolar electric and quadrupolar magnetic modes remain at normal incidence. These modes couple into a strongly asymmetric spectral response typical of a Fano-like resonance. In the basis of the coupled mode theory, an analytical representation of the optical extinction in terms of singular functions is used to identify the hybrid modes emerging from the electric and magnetic mode coupling and to interpret the asymmetric line profiles. Especially, we demonstrate that the characteristic Fano line shape results from the spectral interference of a broad hybrid mode with a sharp one. This structure presents a special feature in which the electric field intensity is confined on different lines of the oligomer depending on the illumination wavelength relative to the Fano dip. This Fano-type resonance is experimentally observed performing extinction cross section measurements on arrays of gold nano-disks. The vanishing of the Fano dip when increasing the incidence angle is also experimentally observed in accordance with numerical simulations.

  18. Fano-like resonance emerging from magnetic and electric plasmon mode coupling in small arrays of gold particles

    PubMed Central

    Bakhti, Saïd; Tishchenko, Alexandre V.; Zambrana-Puyalto, Xavier; Bonod, Nicolas; Dhuey, Scott D.; Schuck, P. James; Cabrini, Stefano; Alayoglu, Selim; Destouches, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    In this work we theoretically and experimentally analyze the resonant behavior of individual 3 × 3 gold particle oligomers illuminated under normal and oblique incidence. While this structure hosts both dipolar and quadrupolar electric and magnetic delocalized modes, only dipolar electric and quadrupolar magnetic modes remain at normal incidence. These modes couple into a strongly asymmetric spectral response typical of a Fano-like resonance. In the basis of the coupled mode theory, an analytical representation of the optical extinction in terms of singular functions is used to identify the hybrid modes emerging from the electric and magnetic mode coupling and to interpret the asymmetric line profiles. Especially, we demonstrate that the characteristic Fano line shape results from the spectral interference of a broad hybrid mode with a sharp one. This structure presents a special feature in which the electric field intensity is confined on different lines of the oligomer depending on the illumination wavelength relative to the Fano dip. This Fano-type resonance is experimentally observed performing extinction cross section measurements on arrays of gold nano-disks. The vanishing of the Fano dip when increasing the incidence angle is also experimentally observed in accordance with numerical simulations. PMID:27580515

  19. Fano-like resonance emerging from magnetic and electric plasmon mode coupling in small arrays of gold particles

    SciTech Connect

    Bakhti, Saïd; Tishchenko, Alexandre V.; Zambrana-Puyalto, Xavier; Bonod, Nicolas; Dhuey, Scott D.; Schuck, P. James; Cabrini, Stefano; Alayoglu, Selim; Destouches, Nathalie

    2016-09-01

    In this work we theoretically and experimentally analyze the resonant behavior of individual 3 × 3 gold particle oligomers illuminated under normal and oblique incidence. While this structure hosts both dipolar and quadrupolar electric and magnetic delocalized modes, only dipolar electric and quadrupolar magnetic modes remain at normal incidence. These modes couple into a strongly asymmetric spectral response typical of a Fano-like resonance. In the basis of the coupled mode theory, an analytical representation of the optical extinction in terms of singular functions is used to identify the hybrid modes emerging from the electric and magnetic mode coupling and to interpret the asymmetric line profiles. Especially, we demonstrate that the characteristic Fano line shape results from the spectral interference of a broad hybrid mode with a sharp one. This structure presents a special feature in which the electric field intensity is confined on different lines of the oligomer depending on the illumination wavelength relative to the Fano dip. This Fano-type resonance is experimentally observed performing extinction cross section measurements on arrays of gold nano-disks. The vanishing of the Fano dip when increasing the incidence angle is also experimentally observed in accordance with numerical simulations.

  20. Fano-like resonance emerging from magnetic and electric plasmon mode coupling in small arrays of gold particles

    DOE PAGES

    Bakhti, Saïd; Tishchenko, Alexandre V.; Zambrana-Puyalto, Xavier; ...

    2016-09-01

    In this work we theoretically and experimentally analyze the resonant behavior of individual 3 × 3 gold particle oligomers illuminated under normal and oblique incidence. While this structure hosts both dipolar and quadrupolar electric and magnetic delocalized modes, only dipolar electric and quadrupolar magnetic modes remain at normal incidence. These modes couple into a strongly asymmetric spectral response typical of a Fano-like resonance. In the basis of the coupled mode theory, an analytical representation of the optical extinction in terms of singular functions is used to identify the hybrid modes emerging from the electric and magnetic mode coupling and tomore » interpret the asymmetric line profiles. Especially, we demonstrate that the characteristic Fano line shape results from the spectral interference of a broad hybrid mode with a sharp one. This structure presents a special feature in which the electric field intensity is confined on different lines of the oligomer depending on the illumination wavelength relative to the Fano dip. This Fano-type resonance is experimentally observed performing extinction cross section measurements on arrays of gold nano-disks. The vanishing of the Fano dip when increasing the incidence angle is also experimentally observed in accordance with numerical simulations.« less

  1. First-principles investigation of the dissociation and coupling of methane on small copper clusters: Interplay of collision dynamics and geometric and electronic effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varghese, Jithin J.; Mushrif, Samir H.

    2015-05-01

    Small metal clusters exhibit unique size and morphology dependent catalytic activity. The search for alternate minimum energy pathways and catalysts to transform methane to more useful chemicals and carbon nanomaterials led us to investigate collision induced dissociation of methane on small Cu clusters. We report here for the first time, the free energy barriers for the collision induced activation, dissociation, and coupling of methane on small Cu clusters (Cun where n = 2-12) using ab initio molecular dynamics and metadynamics simulations. The collision induced activation of the stretching and bending vibrations of methane significantly reduces the free energy barrier for its dissociation. Increase in the cluster size reduces the barrier for dissociation of methane due to the corresponding increase in delocalisation of electron density within the cluster, as demonstrated using the electron localisation function topology analysis. This enables higher probability of favourable alignment of the C-H stretching vibration of methane towards regions of high electron density within the cluster and makes higher number of sites available for the chemisorption of CH3 and H upon dissociation. These characteristics contribute in lowering the barrier for dissociation of methane. Distortion and reorganisation of cluster geometry due to high temperature collision dynamics disturb electron delocalisation within them and increase the barrier for dissociation. Coupling reactions of CHx (x = 1-3) species and recombination of H with CHx have free energy barriers significantly lower than complete dehydrogenation of methane to carbon. Thus, competition favours the former reactions at high hydrogen saturation on the clusters.

  2. Visibility conditions and diel period affect small-scale spatio-temporal behaviour of pike Esox lucius in the absence of prey and conspecifics.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, P A; Baktoft, H; Boel, M; Meier, K; Jacobsen, L; Rokkjaer, E M; Clausen, T; Skov, C

    2012-05-01

    Pike Esox lucius in the absence of prey and conspecifics were shown to have the highest habitat-change activity during dusk and to decrease preference for complex habitats in turbid water. As the behaviours indicate routine responses in the absence of behavioural interactions, E. lucius spatio-temporal distributions should be directly affected and thereby more easily assessed and avoided by prey, with potential consequences for encounter rates.

  3. Prediction of the precipitation profiles of weak base drugs in the small intestine using a simplified transfer ("dumping") model coupled with in silico modeling and simulation approach.

    PubMed

    Kambayashi, Atsushi; Yasuji, Takehiko; Dressman, Jennifer B

    2016-06-01

    Precipitation of poorly soluble, weakly basic drugs upon entering the small intestine may lead to poor bioavailability. It would be useful to be able to predict the extent of in vivo precipitation so that formulation measures to counteract this problem can be taken. The aim of this research was to characterize the precipitation kinetics of two representative weak base drugs, dipyridamole and ketoconazole in vitro using a simplified transfer model approach, and to establish a predictive model for the total and dissolved concentrations in the small intestine after oral administration using in silico modeling and simulation. A simplified transfer ("dumping") method based on the USP paddle apparatus was used to obtain the precipitation profiles of the two weak base drugs by adding a solution of the drug in 0.02N hydrochloric acid to FaSSIF-V2. The observed precipitation curves obtained with various initial concentrations were fitted to first order kinetics. An in silico pharmacokinetic model for weak base drugs with precipitation in the small intestine was designed using STELLA® software and coupled with the precipitation profiles in order to simulate the total and dissolved drug concentrations in the small intestinal lumen in the fasted state in humans. The predicted total and dissolved concentration curves in small intestine for the two weak base drugs were similar to the concentration profiles observed in vivo. The fraction precipitated of the drugs in the small intestine was also well predicted, although the precipitation of ketoconazole at higher initial concentrations was somewhat overestimated. A sensitivity analysis conducted on the simulation of the precipitation of the drugs indicated that a higher fraction precipitated when gastric emptying was faster and/or the concentration of the drug in the added solution was higher. The dumping method provides a useful screen for precipitation in the small intestine, especially in the context of early development

  4. Closely Coupled Multi-Mode Radiators: A New Concept for Improving the Performance of Electrically Small Antennas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-01

    experimentally verify the effect of asymmetry on improving the omni-directionality. Asymmetric coupled loop antenna on  PEC ground. P1 LL CC P2 Ls Zo Zh Zh ( f...phase shifter in (a).(Here, Zo = 50 Ω, Zh = 115 Ω, Ls = 50 mm, L = 23 nH, and C = 3.3 pF.) Fig. 4. Simulated and measured VSWR of the antenna combined...antenna in Fig. 1 obtained by feeding its two ports using the ideal feed network shown in the inset. P1 LL CC P2 Ls Ls Zo Zh Zh (a) (b) 0.5 1.0 1.5

  5. Small repeating earthquake activity, interplate quasi-static slip, and interplate coupling in the Hyuga-nada, southwestern Japan subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Yusuke; Shimizu, Hiroshi; Goto, Kazuhiko

    2012-04-01

    Small repeating earthquake (RE) analysis is a useful method for estimating interplate quasi-static slip, which is a good indicator of interplate coupling. We detected 170 continual-type interplate RE groups and then estimated the spatial variation in quasi-static slip in the Hyuga-nada over the past 17 years. The RE activity in this region has different characteristics compared with that in the northeast Japan subduction zone, presumably reflecting differences in the subduction properties. Our results revealed that interplate coupling spatially changes along the trench-axis and dip-direction—a phenomenon that cannot be resolved by land-based Global Positioning System (GPS) analysis. By comparing seismicity, the low-slip-rate areas correspond with the location of hypocenters and asperities for large- and moderate-sized interplate earthquakes, suggesting strong interplate coupling at these sites. These results indicate that the slip rate distribution estimated from RE activity is reliable and useful for assessing the potential of future large earthquakes.

  6. Small wind turbine performance evaluation using field test data and a coupled aero-electro-mechanical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Brian D.

    A series of field tests and theoretical analyses were performed on various wind turbine rotor designs at two Penn State residential-scale wind-electric facilities. This work involved the prediction and experimental measurement of the electrical and aerodynamic performance of three wind turbines; a 3 kW rated Whisper 175, 2.4 kW rated Skystream 3.7, and the Penn State designed Carolus wind turbine. Both the Skystream and Whisper 175 wind turbines are OEM blades which were originally installed at the facilities. The Carolus rotor is a carbon-fiber composite 2-bladed machine, designed and assembled at Penn State, with the intent of replacing the Whisper 175 rotor at the off-grid system. Rotor aerodynamic performance is modeled using WT_Perf, a National Renewable Energy Laboratory developed Blade Element Momentum theory based performance prediction code. Steady-state power curves are predicted by coupling experimentally determined electrical characteristics with the aerodynamic performance of the rotor simulated with WT_Perf. A dynamometer test stand is used to establish the electromechanical efficiencies of the wind-electric system generator. Through the coupling of WT_Perf and dynamometer test results, an aero-electro-mechanical analysis procedure is developed and provides accurate predictions of wind system performance. The analysis of three different wind turbines gives a comprehensive assessment of the capability of the field test facilities and the accuracy of aero-electro-mechanical analysis procedures. Results from this study show that the Carolus and Whisper 175 rotors are running at higher tip-speed ratios than are optimum for power production. The aero-electro-mechanical analysis predicted the high operating tip-speed ratios of the rotors and was accurate at predicting output power for the systems. It is shown that the wind turbines operate at high tip-speeds because of a miss-match between the aerodynamic drive torque and the operating torque of the wind

  7. Neurobiology of suicidal behaviour.

    PubMed

    Pjevac, Milica; Pregelj, Peter

    2012-10-01

    It is known that suicidal behaviour has multiple causes. If triggers could be mainly attributed to environmental factors, predisposition could be associated with early stressors on one side such as childhood adversities and genetic predisposition. No convincing animal model of suicide has been produced to date. The study of endophenotypes has been proposed as a good strategy to overcome the methodological difficulties. However, research in suicidal behaviours using endophenotypes entrails important methodological problems. Further, serotoninergic system was studied in patients with suicidal behaviour primary due to its involvement of serotonin in impulsive-aggressive behaviour, which has been shown to be a major risk factor in suicidal behaviour. Not only on the level of neurotransmitters but also the regulation of neurotropic factors could be impaired in suicide victims. Multiple lines of evidence including studies of levels of BDNF in blood cells and plasma of suicidal patients, postmortem brain studies in suicidal subjects with or without depression, and genetic association studies linking BDNF to suicide suggest that suicidal behaviour may be associated with a decrease in BDNF functioning. It seems that especially specific gene variants regulating the serotoninergic system and other neuronal systems involved in stress response are associated with suicidal behaviour. Most genetic studies on suicidal behaviour have considered a small set of functional polymorphisms relevant mostly to monoaminergic neurotransmission. However, genes and epigenetic mechanisms involved in regulation of other factors such as BDNF seem to be even more relevant for further research.

  8. First-principles investigation of the dissociation and coupling of methane on small copper clusters: Interplay of collision dynamics and geometric and electronic effects

    SciTech Connect

    Varghese, Jithin J.; Mushrif, Samir H.

    2015-05-14

    Small metal clusters exhibit unique size and morphology dependent catalytic activity. The search for alternate minimum energy pathways and catalysts to transform methane to more useful chemicals and carbon nanomaterials led us to investigate collision induced dissociation of methane on small Cu clusters. We report here for the first time, the free energy barriers for the collision induced activation, dissociation, and coupling of methane on small Cu clusters (Cu{sub n} where n = 2–12) using ab initio molecular dynamics and metadynamics simulations. The collision induced activation of the stretching and bending vibrations of methane significantly reduces the free energy barrier for its dissociation. Increase in the cluster size reduces the barrier for dissociation of methane due to the corresponding increase in delocalisation of electron density within the cluster, as demonstrated using the electron localisation function topology analysis. This enables higher probability of favourable alignment of the C–H stretching vibration of methane towards regions of high electron density within the cluster and makes higher number of sites available for the chemisorption of CH{sub 3} and H upon dissociation. These characteristics contribute in lowering the barrier for dissociation of methane. Distortion and reorganisation of cluster geometry due to high temperature collision dynamics disturb electron delocalisation within them and increase the barrier for dissociation. Coupling reactions of CH{sub x} (x = 1–3) species and recombination of H with CH{sub x} have free energy barriers significantly lower than complete dehydrogenation of methane to carbon. Thus, competition favours the former reactions at high hydrogen saturation on the clusters.

  9. Solid-like and liquid-like behaviour in small benzene clusters. A molecular dynamics simulation of (C 6H 6) 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Mistro, G.; Stace, A. J.

    1990-08-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed on the cluster (C 6H 6) 4 with the individual molecules being treated as rigid rotors. Behaviour characteristic of melting is observed at internal temperatures as low as 80 K. It is concluded that the clusters begin to exhibit liquid-like properties when individual molecules acquire sufficient kinetic energy to execute large-ampli- tude motion.

  10. Coupling High Throughput Microfluidics and Small-Angle X-ray Scattering to Study Protein Crystallization from Solution.

    PubMed

    Pham, Nhat; Radajewski, Dimitri; Round, Adam; Brennich, Martha; Pernot, Petra; Biscans, Béatrice; Bonneté, Françoise; Teychené, Sébastien

    2017-02-21

    In this work, we propose the combination of small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and high throughput, droplet based microfluidics as a powerful tool to investigate macromolecular interactions, directly related to protein solubility. For this purpose, a robust and low cost microfluidic platform was fabricated for achieving the mixing of proteins, crystallization reagents, and buffer in nanoliter volumes and the subsequent generation of nanodroplets by means of a two phase flow. The protein samples are compartmentalized inside droplets, each one acting as an isolated microreactor. Hence their physicochemical conditions (concentration, pH, etc.) can be finely tuned without cross-contamination, allowing the screening of a huge number of saturation conditions with a small amount of biological material. The droplet flow is synchronized with synchrotron radiation SAXS measurements to probe protein interactions while minimizing radiation damage. To this end, the experimental setup was tested with rasburicase (known to be very sensitive to denaturation), proving the structural stability of the protein in the droplets and the absence of radiation damage. Subsequently weak interaction variations as a function of protein saturation was studied for the model protein lysozime. The second virial coefficients (A2) were determined from the X-ray structure factors extrapolated to the origin. A2 obtained values were found to be in good agreement with data previously reported in literature but using only a few milligrams of protein. The experimental results presented here highlight the interest and convenience of using this methodology as a promising and potential candidate for studying protein interactions for the construction of phase diagrams.

  11. Alcohol, cannabis, and methamphetamine use and other risk behaviours among Black and Coloured South African women: a small randomized trial in the Western Cape.

    PubMed

    Wechsberg, Wendee M; Luseno, Winnie K; Karg, Rhonda S; Young, Siobhan; Rodman, Nathaniel; Myers, Bronwyn; Parry, Charles D H

    2008-04-01

    There is a pressing need for brief behavioural interventions to address the intersection of high HIV prevalence, increasing substance use, and high-risk sex practices among South African women. The primary aim of this pilot, randomized trial was to examine whether an adapted evidence-based intervention would be equally, more, or less effective at reducing HIV risk behaviours when delivered using an individual or group format. The secondary aim was to examine differences between Black and Coloured South African women across pre- and post-intervention measures of alcohol and illicit drug use and sex risk behaviours. The Cape Town Women's Health CoOp was adapted from an evidence-based intervention known as the Women's CoOp. Study participants included Black (n=60) and Coloured (n=52) women living in the township communities of Cape Town, South Africa, who reported using illicit drugs and alcohol. Coloured women reported greater methamphetamine use (13 days in the past 30 days) and Black women reported mostly cannabis use (27 days in the past 30 days). Although both groups reported having unprotected sex under the influence of alcohol and/or other drugs, Black women reported greater condom use and having one partner; Coloured women reported having more than one sex partner. One-month post-intervention assessments indicated significant reductions in substance use and sex risk behaviours. After controlling for baseline measures, there were no significant differences between the two intervention conditions. Significant differences in risk behaviours were observed between Black and Coloured South African women. However, both ethnic groups were responsive to the adapted intervention and no differences were found by intervention assignment. These findings support the assertion that group interventions may be more cost-effective in reaching at-risk women in resource-scarce environments. Larger studies are needed to show efficacy and effectiveness of woman-focused group

  12. Coupling spindle position with mitotic exit in budding yeast: The multifaceted role of the small GTPase Tem1.

    PubMed

    Scarfone, Ilaria; Piatti, Simonetta

    2015-10-02

    The budding yeast S. cerevisiae divides asymmetrically and is an excellent model system for asymmetric cell division. As for other asymmetrically dividing cells, proper spindle positioning along the mother-daughter polarity axis is crucial for balanced chromosome segregation. Thus, a surveillance mechanism named Spindle Position Checkpoint (SPOC) inhibits mitotic exit and cytokinesis until the mitotic spindle is properly oriented, thereby preventing the generation of cells with aberrant ploidies. The small GTPase Tem1 is required to trigger a Hippo-like protein kinase cascade, named Mitotic Exit Network (MEN), that is essential for mitotic exit and cytokinesis but also contributes to correct spindle alignment in metaphase. Importantly, Tem1 is the target of the SPOC, which relies on the activity of the GTPase-activating complex (GAP) Bub2-Bfa1 to keep Tem1 in the GDP-bound inactive form. Tem1 forms a hetero-trimeric complex with Bub2-Bfa1 at spindle poles (SPBs) that accumulates asymmetrically on the bud-directed spindle pole during mitosis when the spindle is properly positioned. In contrast, the complex remains symmetrically localized on both poles of misaligned spindles. We have recently shown that Tem1 residence at SPBs depends on its nucleotide state and, importantly, asymmetry of the Bub2-Bfa1-Tem1 complex does not promote mitotic exit but rather controls spindle positioning.

  13. Coupling spindle position with mitotic exit in budding yeast: The multifaceted role of the small GTPase Tem1

    PubMed Central

    Scarfone, Ilaria; Piatti, Simonetta

    2015-01-01

    The budding yeast S. cerevisiae divides asymmetrically and is an excellent model system for asymmetric cell division. As for other asymmetrically dividing cells, proper spindle positioning along the mother-daughter polarity axis is crucial for balanced chromosome segregation. Thus, a surveillance mechanism named Spindle Position Checkpoint (SPOC) inhibits mitotic exit and cytokinesis until the mitotic spindle is properly oriented, thereby preventing the generation of cells with aberrant ploidies. The small GTPase Tem1 is required to trigger a Hippo-like protein kinase cascade, named Mitotic Exit Network (MEN), that is essential for mitotic exit and cytokinesis but also contributes to correct spindle alignment in metaphase. Importantly, Tem1 is the target of the SPOC, which relies on the activity of the GTPase-activating complex (GAP) Bub2-Bfa1 to keep Tem1 in the GDP-bound inactive form. Tem1 forms a hetero-trimeric complex with Bub2-Bfa1 at spindle poles (SPBs) that accumulates asymmetrically on the bud-directed spindle pole during mitosis when the spindle is properly positioned. In contrast, the complex remains symmetrically localized on both poles of misaligned spindles. We have recently shown that Tem1 residence at SPBs depends on its nucleotide state and, importantly, asymmetry of the Bub2-Bfa1-Tem1 complex does not promote mitotic exit but rather controls spindle positioning. PMID:26507466

  14. Creep deformation behavior of Sn-3.5Ag solder/Cu couple at small length scales

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, M.; Chawla, N

    2004-09-06

    In order to adequately characterize the behavior of solder balls in electronic devices, the mechanical behavior of solder joints needs to be studied at small length scales. The creep behavior of single solder ball Sn-Ag/Cu solder joints was studied in shear, at 25, 60, 95, and 130 deg. C, using a microforce testing system. A change in the creep stress exponent with increasing stress was observed and explained in terms of a threshold stress for bypass of Ag{sub 3}Sn particles by dislocations. The stress exponent was also temperature dependent, exhibiting an increase in exponent of two from lower to higher temperature. The activation energy for creep was found to be temperature dependant, correlating with self-diffusion of pure Sn at high temperatures, and dislocation core diffusion of pure Sn at lower temperatures. Normalizing the creep rate for activation energy and the temperature-dependence of shear modulus allowed for unification of the creep data. Microstructure characterization, including preliminary TEM analysis, and fractographic analysis were conducted in order to fully describe the creep behavior of the material.

  15. Polydopamine-coated magnetic nanoparticles for enrichment and direct detection of small molecule pollutants coupled with MALDI-TOF-MS.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yu-rong; Zhang, Xiao-le; Zeng, Tao; Cao, Dong; Zhou, Zhen; Li, Wen-hui; Niu, Hongyun; Cai, Ya-qi

    2013-02-01

    Polydopamine-coated Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles (Fe(3)O(4)@PDA NPs) were synthesized and applied as matrix for the detection of pollutants by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). The synthesis of Fe(3)O(4)@PDA NPs was accomplished in 30 min by in situ polymerization of dopamine without any toxic reagent. Using Fe(3)O(4)@PDA NPs as matrix of MALDI-TOF, eleven small molecule pollutants (molecular weight from 251.6 to 499.3), including Benzo(a)pyrene (BaP), three perfluorinated compounds (PFCs), and seven antibiotics, were successfully detected in either positive or negative reflection mode without background interference. Furthermore, the Fe(3)O(4)@PDA NPs can also enrich trace amounts of hydrophobic target, such as BaP, from solution to nanoparticles surface. Then the Fe(3)O(4)@PDA-BaP can be isolated through magnetic sedimentation step and directly spotted on the stainless steel plate for MALDI measurement. With Fe(3)O(4)@PDA NPs as adsorbent and matrix, we also realized the analysis of BaP in tap water and lake water samples. Thus, a magnetic solid-phase extraction (MSPE)-MALDI-TOF-MS method was established for the measurement of BaP.

  16. Power-law spectrum and small-world structure emerge from coupled evolution of neuronal activity and synaptic dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Hong-Li; Zhu, Chen-Ping; Guo, Yan-Dong; Teng, Ao; Jia, Jing; Kong, Hui; Zhou, Rui; Yang, Juan-Ping; Li, Su-Quan

    2015-04-01

    A co-evolutionary neuronal network model based on previous ones is proposed, and both functional and structural properties are numerically calculated. Recent experiments have revealed power-law behavior in electrocorticogram (ECoG) spectrum related with synaptic plasticity and reorganization. In the present neuronal network model, the network starts its evolution from the initial configuration of random network which is the least biased and without special structure, and the interaction rules among neurons are modified from both models by Bornholdt's and Arcangelis' groups to simulate the process of synaptic development and maturation. The system exhibits dynamic small-world structure which is the result of evolution instead of the assumption beforehand. Meanwhile, the power spectrum of electrical signals reproduces the power-law behavior with the exponent 2.0 just as what is experimentally measured in ECoG spectrum. Moreover, the power spectrum of the average degree per neuron over time also exhibits power-law behavior, with the exponent 2.0 again over more than 5 orders of magnitude. Different from previous results, our network exhibits assortative degree-degree correlation which is expected to be checked by experiments.

  17. Isomer morphology and vibrational mode dependence of the coupling between an excess electron and small water networks.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Mark

    2006-03-01

    Negatively charged water clusters are presently the subject of intense study because of their promise to unravel the surprisingly complex dynamics of the hydrated electron. We focus on the use of vibrational spectroscopy to establish the morphologies and local binding motifs of the water networks that bind an electron. Here we will discuss the rearrangement pathways of the H-bond network in the elementary act of free electron accommodation, where we use argon-mediated population modulation to isolate the geometries of the neutral cluster precursors. We then obtain isomer-selective vibrational spectra of the anions that produced, where we correlate the local binding motifs with the overall electron binding energies. Finally, in the small cluster limit, we reveal how different intramolecular vibrational motions interact with the diffuse electron cloud by analysis of the resulting ``Fano'' lineshapes when vibrations are embedded in the electron continuum. These interactions vary by over an order of magnitude for various ``free OH'' bands. The implications of these observations on the extrapolation to bulk behavior will be considered in light of the trends displayed by the cluster properties up n=30 or so.

  18. Laser Shock Processing of Metallic Materials: Coupling of Laser-Plasma Interaction and Material Behaviour Models for the Assessment of Key Process Issues

    SciTech Connect

    Ocana, J. L.; Morales, M.; Molpeceres, C.; Porro, J. A.

    2010-10-08

    Profiting by the increasing availability of laser sources delivering intensities above 109 W/cm{sup 2} with pulse energies in the range of several Joules and pulse widths in the range of nanoseconds, laser shock processing (LSP) is consolidating as an effective technology for the improvement of surface mechanical and corrosion resistance properties of metals. The main advantage of the laser shock processing technique consists on its capability of inducing a relatively deep compression residual stresses field into metallic alloy pieces allowing an improved mechanical behaviour, explicitly, the life improvement of the treated specimens against wear, crack growth and stress corrosion cracking. Although significant work from the experimental side has been contributed to explore the optimum conditions of application of the treatments and to assess their ultimate capability to provide enhanced mechanical behaviour to work-pieces of typical materials, only limited attempts have been developed in the way of full comprehension and predictive assessment of the characteristic physical processes and material transformations with a specific consideration of real material properties. In the present paper, a review on the physical issues dominating the development of LSP processes from a high intensity laser-matter interaction point of view is presented along with the theoretical and computational methods developed by the authors for their predictive assessment and practical results at laboratory scale on the application of the technique to different materials.

  19. Laser Shock Processing of Metallic Materials: Coupling of Laser-Plasma Interaction and Material Behaviour Models for the Assessment of Key Process Issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ocaña, J. L.; Morales, M.; Molpeceres, C.; Porro, J. A.

    2010-10-01

    Profiting by the increasing availability of laser sources delivering intensities above 109 W/cm2 with pulse energies in the range of several Joules and pulse widths in the range of nanoseconds, laser shock processing (LSP) is consolidating as an effective technology for the improvement of surface mechanical and corrosion resistance properties of metals. The main advantage of the laser shock processing technique consists on its capability of inducing a relatively deep compression residual stresses field into metallic alloy pieces allowing an improved mechanical behaviour, explicitly, the life improvement of the treated specimens against wear, crack growth and stress corrosion cracking. Although significant work from the experimental side has been contributed to explore the optimum conditions of application of the treatments and to assess their ultimate capability to provide enhanced mechanical behaviour to work-pieces of typical materials, only limited attempts have been developed in the way of full comprehension and predictive assessment of the characteristic physical processes and material transformations with a specific consideration of real material properties. In the present paper, a review on the physical issues dominating the development of LSP processes from a high intensity laser-matter interaction point of view is presented along with the theoretical and computational methods developed by the authors for their predictive assessment and practical results at laboratory scale on the application of the technique to different materials.

  20. Communication: Dynamical embedding: Correct quantum response from coupling TDDFT for a small cluster with classical near-field electrodynamics for an extended region

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Yi; Neuhauser, Daniel

    2013-05-14

    We show how to obtain the correct electronic response of a large system by embedding; a small region is propagated by TDDFT (time-dependent density functional theory) simultaneously with a classical electrodynamics evolution using the Near-Field method over a larger external region. The propagations are coupled through a combined time-dependent density yielding a common Coulomb potential. We show that the embedding correctly describes the plasmonic response of a Mg(0001) slab and its influence on the dynamical charge transfer between an adsorbed H{sub 2}O molecule and the substrate, giving the same spectral shape as full TDDFT (similar plasmon peak and molecular-dependent differential spectra) with much less computational effort. The results demonstrate that atomistic embedding electrodynamics is promising for nanoplasmonics and nanopolaritonics.

  1. Communication: dynamical embedding: correct quantum response from coupling TDDFT for a small cluster with classical near-field electrodynamics for an extended region.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yi; Neuhauser, Daniel

    2013-05-14

    We show how to obtain the correct electronic response of a large system by embedding; a small region is propagated by TDDFT (time-dependent density functional theory) simultaneously with a classical electrodynamics evolution using the Near-Field method over a larger external region. The propagations are coupled through a combined time-dependent density yielding a common Coulomb potential. We show that the embedding correctly describes the plasmonic response of a Mg(0001) slab and its influence on the dynamical charge transfer between an adsorbed H2O molecule and the substrate, giving the same spectral shape as full TDDFT (similar plasmon peak and molecular-dependent differential spectra) with much less computational effort. The results demonstrate that atomistic embedding electrodynamics is promising for nanoplasmonics and nanopolaritonics.

  2. Magnetoelectric switching energy in Cr2O3/Pt/Co perpendicular exchange coupled thin film system with small Cr2O3 magnetization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozaki, Tomohiro; Al-Mahdawi, Muftah; Pati, Satya Prakash; Ye, Shujun; Shiokawa, Yohei; Sahashi, Masashi

    2017-07-01

    We investigated perpendicular exchange bias switching by a magnetoelectric field cooling process in a Pt-spacer-inserted Cr2O3/Co exchange-coupled system exhibiting small Cr2O3 magnetization. Although higher magnetoelectric switching energies with decreasing Cr2O3 thickness due to the exchange bias were reported in Cr2O3/Co all-thin-film systems, in this study, we demonstrated low-energy switching in a magnetoelectric field cool process regardless of the exchange-bias magnitude; we balanced the exchange-bias energy with the Zeeman energy associated with finite magnetization in Cr2O3. We proposed a guideline for realizing low-energy switching in thin Cr2O3 samples.

  3. Structure-Function Analyses of the Interactions between Rab11 and Rab14 Small GTPases with Their Shared Effector Rab Coupling Protein (RCP)*

    PubMed Central

    Lall, Patrick; Lindsay, Andrew J.; Hanscom, Sara; Kecman, Tea; Taglauer, Elizabeth S.; McVeigh, Una M.; Franklin, Edward; McCaffrey, Mary W.; Khan, Amir R.

    2015-01-01

    Rab GTPases recruit effector proteins, via their GTP-dependent switch regions, to distinct subcellular compartments. Rab11 and Rab25 are closely related small GTPases that bind to common effectors termed the Rab11 family of interacting proteins (FIPs). The FIPs are organized into two subclasses (class I and class II) based on sequence and domain organization, and both subclasses contain a highly conserved Rab-binding domain at their C termini. Yeast two-hybrid and biochemical studies have revealed that the more distantly related Rab14 also interacts with class I FIPs. Here, we perform detailed structural, thermodynamic, and cellular analyses of the interactions between Rab14 and one of the class I FIPs, the Rab-coupling protein (RCP), to clarify the molecular aspects of the interaction. We find that Rab14 indeed binds to RCP, albeit with reduced affinity relative to conventional Rab11-FIP and Rab25-FIP complexes. However, in vivo, Rab11 recruits RCP onto biological membranes. Furthermore, biophysical analyses reveal a noncanonical 1:2 stoichiometry between Rab14-RCP in dilute solutions, in contrast to Rab11/25 complexes. The structure of Rab14-RCP reveals that Rab14 interacts with the canonical Rab-binding domain and also provides insight into the unusual properties of the complex. Finally, we show that both the Rab coupling protein and Rab14 function in neuritogenesis. PMID:26032412

  4. Structure-Function Analyses of the Interactions between Rab11 and Rab14 Small GTPases with Their Shared Effector Rab Coupling Protein (RCP).

    PubMed

    Lall, Patrick; Lindsay, Andrew J; Hanscom, Sara; Kecman, Tea; Taglauer, Elizabeth S; McVeigh, Una M; Franklin, Edward; McCaffrey, Mary W; Khan, Amir R

    2015-07-24

    Rab GTPases recruit effector proteins, via their GTP-dependent switch regions, to distinct subcellular compartments. Rab11 and Rab25 are closely related small GTPases that bind to common effectors termed the Rab11 family of interacting proteins (FIPs). The FIPs are organized into two subclasses (class I and class II) based on sequence and domain organization, and both subclasses contain a highly conserved Rab-binding domain at their C termini. Yeast two-hybrid and biochemical studies have revealed that the more distantly related Rab14 also interacts with class I FIPs. Here, we perform detailed structural, thermodynamic, and cellular analyses of the interactions between Rab14 and one of the class I FIPs, the Rab-coupling protein (RCP), to clarify the molecular aspects of the interaction. We find that Rab14 indeed binds to RCP, albeit with reduced affinity relative to conventional Rab11-FIP and Rab25-FIP complexes. However, in vivo, Rab11 recruits RCP onto biological membranes. Furthermore, biophysical analyses reveal a noncanonical 1:2 stoichiometry between Rab14-RCP in dilute solutions, in contrast to Rab11/25 complexes. The structure of Rab14-RCP reveals that Rab14 interacts with the canonical Rab-binding domain and also provides insight into the unusual properties of the complex. Finally, we show that both the Rab coupling protein and Rab14 function in neuritogenesis. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. Simulation of Lake Surface Heat Fluxes by the Canadian Small Lake Model: Offline Performance Assessment for Future Coupling with a Regional Climate Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pernica, P.; Guerrero, J. L.; MacKay, M.; Wheater, H. S.

    2014-12-01

    Lakes strongly influence local and regional climate especially in regions where they are abundant. Development of a lake model for the purpose of integration within a regional climate model is therefore a subject of scientific interest. Of particular importance are the heat flux predictions provided by the lake model since they function as key forcings in a fully coupled atmosphere-land-lake system. The first step towards a coupled model is to validate and characterize the accuracy of the lake model over a range of conditions and to identify limitations. In this work, validation results from offline tests of the Canadian Small Lake Model; a deterministic, computationally efficient, 1D integral model, are presented. Heat fluxes (sensible and latent) and surface water temperatures simulated by the model are compared with in situ observations from two lakes; Landing Lake (NWT, Canada) and L239 (ELA, Canada) for the 2007-2009 period. Sensitivity analysis is performed to identify key parameters important for heat flux predictions. The results demonstrate the ability of the 1-D lake model to reproduce both diurnal and seasonal variations in heat fluxes and surface temperatures for the open water period. These results, in context of regional climate modelling are also discussed.

  6. Theoretical Investigation of Small Polyatomic Ions Observed in Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry: HxCO+ and HxN2+ (x = 1, 2, 3)

    SciTech Connect

    Sears, K.; Ferguson, J.; Dudley, T.; Houk, R.; Gordon, M.

    2008-03-01

    Two series of small polyatomic ions, H{sub x}CO{sup +} and H{sub x}N{sub 2}{sup +} (x = 1, 2, 3), were systematically characterized using three correlated theoretical techniques: density functional theory using the B3LYP functional, spin-restricted second-order perturbation theory, and singles + doubles coupled cluster theory with perturbative triples. On the basis of thermodynamic data, the existence of these ions in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) experiments is not surprising since the ions are predicted to be considerably more stable than their corresponding dissociation products (by 30-170 kcal/mol). While each pair of isoelectronic ions exhibit very similar thermodynamic and kinetic characteristics, there are significant differences within each series. While the mechanism for dissociation of the larger ions occurs through hydrogen abstraction, the triatomic ions (HCO{sup +} and HN{sub 2}{sup +}) appear to dissociate by proton abstraction. These differing mechanisms help to explain large differences in the abundances of HN{sub 2}{sup +} and HCO{sup +} observed in ICP-MS experiments.

  7. Theoretical investigation of small polyatomic ions observed in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry: H(x)CO+ and H(x)N2(+) (x = 1, 2, 3).

    PubMed

    Sears, Kyle C; Ferguson, Jill W; Dudley, Timothy J; Houk, R S; Gordon, Mark S

    2008-03-27

    Two series of small polyatomic ions, HxCO+ and HxN2(+) (x = 1, 2, 3), were systematically characterized using three correlated theoretical techniques: density functional theory using the B3LYP functional, spin-restricted second-order perturbation theory, and singles + doubles coupled cluster theory with perturbative triples. On the basis of thermodynamic data, the existence of these ions in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) experiments is not surprising since the ions are predicted to be considerably more stable than their corresponding dissociation products (by 30-170 kcal/mol). While each pair of isoelectronic ions exhibit very similar thermodynamic and kinetic characteristics, there are significant differences within each series. While the mechanism for dissociation of the larger ions occurs through hydrogen abstraction, the triatomic ions (HCO+ and HN2(+)) appear to dissociate by proton abstraction. These differing mechanisms help to explain large differences in the abundances of HN2(+) and HCO+ observed in ICP-MS experiments.

  8. Sedentary behaviour in youth.

    PubMed

    Pate, Russell R; Mitchell, Jonathan A; Byun, Wonwoo; Dowda, Marsha

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this review is to describe the amount of time children spend in sedentary behaviour and to determine if there are specific factors that associate with sedentary behaviour in children. The following search terms were used to identify relevant articles: sedentary behaviour, inactivity, television, computer, video games, small screen, sitting, prevalence, patterns, correlates, factors and determinants. The databases used to conduct the search included PubMed, PsycINFO, ERIC (Education Resources Information Center) and Academic Search Premier. The studies reviewed were limited to those that sampled children (2-18 years), were written in English and used a measure of sedentary behaviour as the dependent variable. Several studies reported the time spent watching television or the proportion of children at or above a threshold for television viewing (eg, ≥3 h/day). Among the accelerometer studies included, the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey is the largest and reported ∼6.1, 7.5 and 8.0 h/day mean sedentary time in children 6-11, 12-15 and 16-19 years old, respectively. Taken together, the existing literature across the world indicates a slightly higher level of sedentary behaviour in older children. Higher levels of sedentary behaviour were also reported in non-white children, children from lower socioeconomic status background and children from households with more access to televisions/computers. Lower levels of sedentary behaviour were reported in children whose parents have rules/limitations on screen time.

  9. Weight loss is coupled with improvements to affective state in obese participants engaged in behavior change therapy based on incremental, self-selected "small changes".

    PubMed

    Paxman, Jenny R; Hall, Anna C; Harden, Charlotte J; O'Keeffe, Jean; Simper, Trevor N

    2011-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a group behavior change intervention involving self-selected, contextualized, and mediated goal setting on anthropometric, affective, and dietary markers of health. It was hypothesized that the intervention would elicit changes consistent with accepted health recommendations for obese individuals. A rolling program of 12-week "Small Changes" interventions during 24 months recruited 71 participants; each program accommodated 10 to 13 adults (body mass index [BMI] ≥ 30 kg/m²). Fifty-eight participants completed Small Changes. Repeated measures were made at baseline, 6 and 12 weeks. Anthropometric measures included height and weight (to calculate BMI), body composition, waist circumference, and blood pressure. Affective state was monitored using relevant validated questionnaires. Dietary assessment used 3-day household measures food diaries with Schofield equations to monitor underreporting. Relevant blood measures were recorded throughout. Across the measurement period, Small Changes elicited a significant reduction in body weight (baseline, 102.95 ± 15.47 vs 12 weeks 100.09 ± 16.01 kg, P < .0005), coupled with associated significant improvements in BMI, body fat percentage, and waist circumference measures. There were additional significant positive changes in measures of affective state including general well-being (baseline, 58.92 ± 21.22 vs 12 weeks 78.04 ± 14.60, P < .0005) and total mood disturbance (baseline, 31.19 ± 34.03 vs 12 weeks 2.67 ± 24.96, P < .0005). Dietary changes that occurred were largely consistent with evidenced-based recommendations for weight management and included significant reductions in total energy intake and in fat and saturated fat as a proportion of energy. The Small Changes approach can elicit a range of health-orientated benefits for obese participants, and although further work is needed to ascertain the longevity of such effects, the outcomes from Small Changes are

  10. Coupling the 3D hydro-morphodynamic model Telemac-3D-sisyphe and seismic measurements to estimate bedload transport rates in a small gravel-bed river.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hostache, Renaud; Krein, Andreas; Barrière, Julien

    2014-05-01

    Coupling the 3D hydro-morphodynamic model Telemac-3D-sisyphe and seismic measurements to estimate bedload transport rates in a small gravel-bed river. Renaud Hostache, Andreas Krein, Julien Barrière During flood events, amounts of river bed material are transported via bedload. This causes problems, like the silting of reservoirs or the disturbance of biological habitats. Some current bedload measuring techniques have limited possibilities for studies in high temporal resolutions. Optical systems are usually not applicable because of high turbidity due to concentrated suspended sediment transported. Sediment traps or bedload samplers yield only summative information on bedload transport with low temporal resolution. An alternative bedload measuring technique is the use of seismological systems installed next to the rivers. The potential advantages are observations in real time and under undisturbed conditions. The study area is a 120 m long reach of River Colpach (21.5 km2), a small gravel bed river in Northern Luxembourg. A combined approach of hydro-climatological observations, hydraulic measurements, sediment sampling, and seismological measurements is used in order to investigate bedload transport phenomena. Information derived from seismic measurements and results from a 3-dimensional hydro-morphodynamic model are exemplarily discussed for a November 2013 flood event. The 3-dimensional hydro-morphodynamic model is based on the Telemac hydroinformatic system. This allows for dynamically coupling a 3D hydrodynamic model (Telemac-3D) and a morphodynamic model (Sisyphe). The coupling is dynamic as these models exchange their information during simulations. This is a main advantage as it allows for taking into account the effects of the morphologic changes of the riverbed on the water hydrodynamic and the bedload processes. The coupled model has been calibrated using time series of gauged water depths and time series of bed material collected sequentially (after

  11. Multisource Synergistic Electrocatalytic Oxidation Effect of Strongly Coupled PdM (M = Sn, Pb)/N-doped Graphene Nanocomposite on Small Organic Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Peng; Huang, Yiyin; Kang, Longtian; Wu, Maoxiang; Wang, Yaobing

    2015-01-01

    A series of palladium-based catalysts of metal alloying (Sn, Pb) and/or (N-doped) graphene support with regular enhanced electrocatalytic activity were investigated. The peak current density (118.05 mA cm−2) of PdSn/NG is higher than the sum current density (45.63 + 47.59 mA cm−2) of Pd/NG and PdSn/G. It reveals a synergistic electrocatalytic oxidation effect in PdSn/N-doped graphene Nanocomposite. Extend experiments show this multisource synergetic catalytic effect of metal alloying and N-doped graphene support in one catalyst on small organic molecule (methanol, ethanol and Ethylene glycol) oxidation is universal in PdM(M = Sn, Pb)/NG catalysts. Further, The high dispersion of small nanoparticles, the altered electron structure and Pd(0)/Pd(II) ratio of Pd in catalysts induced by strong coupled the metal alloying and N-doped graphene are responsible for the multisource synergistic catalytic effect in PdM(M = Sn, Pb) /NG catalysts. Finally, the catalytic durability and stability are also greatly improved. PMID:26434949

  12. Urinary metabolomic study of non-small cell lung carcinoma based on ultra high performance liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qian; Wang, Yan; Gu, Xue; Zhou, Junyi; Zhang, Huiping; Lv, Wang; Chen, Zhe; Yan, Chao

    2014-07-01

    Metabolic profiles from human urine reveal the significant difference of carnitine and acylcarnitines levels between non-small cell lung carcinoma patients and healthy controls. Urine samples from cancer patients and healthy individuals were assayed in this metabolomic study using ultra high performance liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The data were normalized by the sum of all intensities and creatinine calibration, respectively, before orthogonal partial least squares discriminant analysis. Twenty differential metabolites were identified based on standard compounds or tandem mass spectrometry fragments. Among them, some medium-/long-chain acylcarnitines, for example, cis-3,4-methylene heptanoylcarnitine, were found to be downregulated while carnitine was upregulated in urine samples from the cancer group compared to the control group. Receiver operating characteristic analysis of the two groups showed that the area under curve for the combination of carnitine and 11 selected acylcarnitines was 0.958. This study suggests that the developed carnitine and acylcarnitines profiling method has the potential to be used for screening non-small cell lung carcinoma.

  13. Small protein biomarkers of culture in Bacillus spores detected using capillary liquid chromatography coupled with matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Wunschel, David S.; Wahl, Jon H.; Willse, Alan R.; Valentine, Nancy B.; Wahl, Karen L.

    2006-10-20

    Capillary liquid chromatography (cLC) coupled with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF-MS) was used to compare small proteins and peptides extracted from Bacillus subtilis spores grown on four different media. A single, efficient protein separation, compatible with MALDI-MS analysis, was employed to reduce competitive ionization between proteins, and thus interrogate more proteins than possible using direct MALDI-MS. The MALDI-MS data files for each fraction are assembled as two dimensional data sets of retention time and mass information. This method of visualizing small protein data required careful attention to background correction as well as mass and retention time variability. The resulting data sets were used to create comparative displays of differences in protein profiles between different spore preparations. Protein differences were found between two different solid media in both phase bright and phase dark conditions. The protein differences between two different liquid media were also examined. As an extension of this method, we have demonstrated that candidate protein biomarkers can be trypsin digested to provide identifying peptide fragment information following the cLC-MALDI experiment. We have demonstrated this method on two markers and utilized acid breakdown information to identify one additional marker for this organism. The resulting method can be used to identify discriminating proteins as potential biomarkers of growth media, which might ultimately be used for source attribution.

  14. Coupling between phytodetritus deposition and the small-sized benthic biota in the deep Arabian Sea: analyses of biogenic sediment compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfannkuche, Olaf; Sommer, Stefan; Kähler, Anja

    As part of the large-scale, interdisciplinary deep-sea study "BIGSET", the relationship between the monsoon-induced regional and temporal variability of POC deposition and the small-sized benthic community was investigated at several sites 2316-4420 m deep in the Arabian Sea during four cruises between 1995 and 1998. Vertical and horizontal distribution patterns of chloroplastic pigments (a measure of phytodetritus deposition), readily soluble protein and activity, and biomass parameters of the small-sized benthic community (Electron Transport System Activity (ETSA); bacterial ectoenzymatic activity (FDA turnover) and DNA concentrations) were measured concurrently with the vertical fluxes of POC and chloroplastic pigments. Sediment chlorophyll a (chl. a) profiles were used to calculate chl. a flux rates and to estimate POC flux across the sediment water interface using two different transport reaction models. These estimates were compared with corresponding flux rates determined in sediment traps. Regional variability of primary productivity and POC deposition at the deep-sea floor creates a trophic gradient in the Arabian Basin from the NW to the SE, which is primarily related to the activity of monsoon winds and processes associated with the topography of the Arabian Basin and the vicinity of land masses. Inventories of sediment chloroplastic pigments closely corresponded to this trophic gradient. For ETSA, FDA and DNA, however, no clear coupling was found, although stations WAST (western Arabian Sea) and NAST (northern Arabian Sea) were characterised by high concentrations and activities. These parameters exhibited high spatial and temporal variability, making it impossible to recognise clear mechanisms controlling temporal and spatial community patterns of the small-sized benthic biota. Nevertheless, the entire Arabian Basin was recognised as being affected by monsoonal activity. Comparison of two different transport reaction models indicates that labile chl. a

  15. Challenging Student Behaviour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Glyn; Philp, Clare

    2011-01-01

    The issue of poor student behaviour within higher education institutions (HEIs) has been well documented in recent years. Although the number of reported cases constitutes a very small percentage of the overall student population in the UK, the impact of student misconduct on the rest of the student body and staff in HEIs can be substantial. For…

  16. Rotor dynamic behaviour of a high-speed oil-free motor compressor with a rigid coupling supported on four radial magnetic bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmied, J.; Pradetto, J. C.

    1994-01-01

    The combination of a high-speed motor, dry gas seals, and magnetic bearings realized in this unit facilitates the elimination of oil. The motor is coupled with a quill shaft to the compressor. This yields higher natural frequencies of the rotor than with the use of a diaphragm coupling and helps to maintain a sufficient margin of the maximum speed to the frequency of the second compressor bending mode. However, the controller of each bearing then has to take the combined modes of both machines into account. The requirements for the controller to ensure stability and sufficient damping of all critical speeds are designed and compared with the implemented controller. The calculated closed loop behavior was confirmed experimentally, except the stability of some higher modes due to slight frequency deviations of the rotor model to the actual rotor. The influence of a mechanical damper as a device to provide additional damping to high models is demonstrated theoretically. After all, it was not necessary to install the damper, since all modes cold be stabilized by the controller.

  17. Modelling real disease dynamics with behaviourally adaptive complex networks. Comment on "Coupled disease-behavior dynamics on complex networks: A review" by Z. Wang et al.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Small, Michael

    2015-12-01

    Mean field compartmental models of disease transmission have been successfully applied to a host of different scenarios, and the Kermack-McKendrick equations are now a staple of mathematical biology text books. In Susceptible-Infected-Removed format these equations provide three coupled first order ordinary differential equations with a very mild nonlinearity and they are very well understood. However, underpinning these equations are two important assumptions: that the population is (a) homogeneous, and (b) well-mixed. These assumptions become closest to being true for diseases infecting a large portion of the population for which inevitable individual effects can be averaged away. Emerging infectious disease (such as, in recent times, SARS, avian influenza, swine flu and ebola) typically does not conform to this scenario. Individual contacts and peculiarities of the transmission network play a vital role in understanding the dynamics of such relatively rare infections - particularly during the early stages of an outbreak.

  18. Qualitative and quantitative characterization of the arsenic-binding behaviour of sulfur-containing peptides and proteins by the coupling of reversed phase liquid chromatography to electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Anne-Christine; Mickein, Kathleen

    2012-08-01

    Phenylarsenic-substituted cysteine-containing peptides and proteins were completely differentiated from their unbound original forms by the coupling of reversed phase liquid chromatography with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. The analysis of biomolecules possessing structure-stabilizing disulfide bridges after reduction provides new insights into requirements concerning the accessibility of cysteine residues for reducing agents as well as for arsenic compounds in a spatial protein structure. Complementary binding studies performed using direct ESI-MS without chromatographic coupling in different solvent systems demonstrated that more than one binding site were activated for aprotinin and lysozyme in denaturing solvents because of a stronger defolding. From the intensities of the different charge states occurring in the mass spectra as well as from the LC elution behaviour, it can be deduced that the folding state of the arsenic-bound protein species resembles the native, oxidized conformation. In contrast, although the milk protein α-lactalbumin has several disulfide bridges, only one phenylarsenic moiety was bound under strongly denaturing conditions. Because of the charge state distribution in the ESI mass spectra, a conformational change to a molten globule structure is assumed. For the second considered milk protein ß-lactoglobulin, a noncovalent interaction with phenylarsine oxide was detected. In general, smaller apparent binding constants for the condensation reactions of the biomolecules with phenylarsine oxide leading to covalent arsenic-sulfur bindings were determined from direct injection ESI-MS measurements than from LC-ESI-MS coupling. The following order of binding affinities for one phenylarsenic group can be assumed from both ESI-MS and LC-ESI-MS: nonapeptide vasopressin > nonapeptide vasotocin > lysozyme > aprotinin > α-lactalbumin > thioredoxin. Kinetic investigations by LC-ESI-MS yielded a partial reaction order

  19. Motor patterns of the small intestine explained by phase-amplitude coupling of two pacemaker activities: the critical importance of propagation velocity.

    PubMed

    Huizinga, Jan D; Parsons, Sean P; Chen, Ji-Hong; Pawelka, Andrew; Pistilli, Marc; Li, Chunpei; Yu, Yuanjie; Ye, Pengfei; Liu, Qing; Tong, Mengting; Zhu, Yong Fang; Wei, Defei

    2015-09-15

    Phase-amplitude coupling of two pacemaker activities of the small intestine, the omnipresent slow wave activity generated by interstitial cells of Cajal of the myenteric plexus (ICC-MP) and the stimulus-dependent rhythmic transient depolarizations generated by ICC of the deep muscular plexus (ICC-DMP), was recently hypothesized to underlie the orchestration of the segmentation motor pattern. The aim of the present study was to increase our understanding of phase-amplitude coupling through modeling. In particular the importance of propagation velocity of the ICC-DMP component was investigated. The outcome of the modeling was compared with motor patterns recorded from the rat or mouse intestine from which propagation velocities within the different patterns were measured. The results show that the classical segmentation motor pattern occurs when the ICC-DMP component has a low propagation velocity (<0.05 cm/s). When the ICC-DMP component has a propagation velocity in the same order of magnitude as that of the slow wave activity (∼1 cm/s), cluster type propulsive activity occurs which is in fact the dominant propulsive activity of the intestine. Hence, the only difference between the generation of propagating cluster contractions and the Cannon-type segmentation motor pattern is the propagation velocity of the low-frequency component, the rhythmic transient depolarizations originating from the ICC-DMP. Importantly, the proposed mechanism explains why both motor patterns have distinct rhythmic waxing and waning of the amplitude of contractions. The hypothesis is brought forward that the velocity is modulated by neural regulation of gap junction conductance within the ICC-DMP network.

  20. Motor patterns of the small intestine explained by phase-amplitude coupling of two pacemaker activities: the critical importance of propagation velocity

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, Sean P.; Chen, Ji-Hong; Pawelka, Andrew; Pistilli, Marc; Li, Chunpei; Yu, Yuanjie; Ye, Pengfei; Liu, Qing; Tong, Mengting; Zhu, Yong Fang; Wei, Defei

    2015-01-01

    Phase-amplitude coupling of two pacemaker activities of the small intestine, the omnipresent slow wave activity generated by interstitial cells of Cajal of the myenteric plexus (ICC-MP) and the stimulus-dependent rhythmic transient depolarizations generated by ICC of the deep muscular plexus (ICC-DMP), was recently hypothesized to underlie the orchestration of the segmentation motor pattern. The aim of the present study was to increase our understanding of phase-amplitude coupling through modeling. In particular the importance of propagation velocity of the ICC-DMP component was investigated. The outcome of the modeling was compared with motor patterns recorded from the rat or mouse intestine from which propagation velocities within the different patterns were measured. The results show that the classical segmentation motor pattern occurs when the ICC-DMP component has a low propagation velocity (<0.05 cm/s). When the ICC-DMP component has a propagation velocity in the same order of magnitude as that of the slow wave activity (∼1 cm/s), cluster type propulsive activity occurs which is in fact the dominant propulsive activity of the intestine. Hence, the only difference between the generation of propagating cluster contractions and the Cannon-type segmentation motor pattern is the propagation velocity of the low-frequency component, the rhythmic transient depolarizations originating from the ICC-DMP. Importantly, the proposed mechanism explains why both motor patterns have distinct rhythmic waxing and waning of the amplitude of contractions. The hypothesis is brought forward that the velocity is modulated by neural regulation of gap junction conductance within the ICC-DMP network. PMID:26135802

  1. The small GTP-binding protein Rho links G protein-coupled receptors and Gα12 to the serum response element and to cellular transformation

    PubMed Central

    Fromm, Christian; Coso, Omar A.; Montaner, Silvia; Xu, Ningzhi; Gutkind, J. Silvio

    1997-01-01

    Receptors coupled to heterotrimeric G proteins can effectively stimulate growth promoting pathways in a large variety of cell types, and if persistently activated, these receptors can also behave as dominant-acting oncoproteins. Consistently, activating mutations for G proteins of the Gαs and Gαi2 families were found in human tumors; and members of the Gαq and Gα12 families are fully transforming when expressed in murine fibroblasts. In an effort aimed to elucidate the molecular events involved in proliferative signaling through heterotrimeric G proteins we have focused recently on gene expression regulation. Using NIH 3T3 fibroblasts expressing m1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors as a model system, we have observed that activation of this transforming G protein-coupled receptors induces the rapid expression of a variety of early responsive genes, including the c-fos protooncogene. One of the c-fos promoter elements, the serum response element (SRE), plays a central regulatory role, and activation of SRE-dependent transcription has been found to be regulated by several proteins, including the serum response factor and the ternary complex factor. With the aid of reporter plasmids for gene expression, we observed here that stimulation of m1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors potently induced SRE-driven reporter gene activity in NIH 3T3 cells. In these cells, only the Gα12 family of heterotrimeric G protein α subunits strongly induced the SRE, while Gβ1γ2 dimers activated SRE to a more limited extent. Furthermore, our study provides strong evidence that m1, Gα12 and the small GTP-binding protein RhoA are components of a novel signal transduction pathway that leads to the ternary complex factor-independent transcriptional activation of the SRE and to cellular transformation. PMID:9294169

  2. Side Chain Conformational Distributions of a Small Protein Derived from Model-Free Analysis of a Large Set of Residual Dipolar Couplings.

    PubMed

    Li, Fang; Grishaev, Alexander; Ying, Jinfa; Bax, Ad

    2015-11-25

    Accurate quantitative measurement of structural dispersion in proteins remains a prime challenge to both X-ray crystallography and NMR spectroscopy. Here we use a model-free approach based on measurement of many residual dipolar couplings (RDCs) in differentially orienting aqueous liquid crystalline solutions to obtain the side chain χ1 distribution sampled by each residue in solution. Applied to the small well-ordered model protein GB3, our approach reveals that the RDC data are compatible with a single narrow distribution of side chain χ1 angles for only about 40% of the residues. For more than half of the residues, populations greater than 10% for a second rotamer are observed, and four residues require sampling of three rotameric states to fit the RDC data. In virtually all cases, sampled χ1 values are found to center closely around ideal g(-), g(+) and t rotameric angles, even though no rotamer restraint is used when deriving the sampled angles. The root-mean-square difference between experimental (3)JHαHβ couplings and those predicted by the Haasnoot-parametrized, motion-adjusted Karplus equation reduces from 2.05 to 0.75 Hz when using the new rotamer analysis instead of the 1.1-Å X-ray structure as input for the dihedral angles. A comparison between observed and predicted (3)JHαHβ values suggests that the root-mean-square amplitude of χ1 angle fluctuations within a given rotamer well is ca. 20°. The quantitatively defined side chain rotamer equilibria obtained from our study set new benchmarks for evaluating improved molecular dynamics force fields, and also will enable further development of quantitative relations between side chain chemical shift and structure.

  3. The coupling between idealized 2D eddies and 3D small-scale turbulence in the upper ocean and its implications for oil transport simulations using ENDLESS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, B.; Yang, D.; Meneveau, C. V.; Chamecki, M.

    2016-12-01

    As oil plumes from deep-water blowouts reach the ocean mixed layer (OML), they experience considerable horizontal and vertical dilution due to the action of Langmuir turbulence, submesoscale eddies and Ekman transport. Previous studies using large-eddy simulation (LES) have shown that Langmuir turbulence can impact the transport direction, lateral diffusion and geometry of surface oil plume, depending on the size of oil droplets. However, the large range of relevant length scales, from submesoscale eddies down to small-scale 3D Langmuir turbulence, makes it challenging to accurately reproduce the long-term evolution of oil plumes in the upper ocean using conventional large-eddy simulation strategies. The extended nonperiodic domain large-eddy simulation for scalars (ENDLESS) is a new technique developed as a multi-scale approach to simulate long-term oil plume dispersion at a reasonable computational cost. The basic idea is to simulate Langmuir turbulence on a LES domain with a small but sufficient horizontal domain size to capture the essential physics of the flow field, while simulating the oil plume evolution over an effectively horizontally extended large domain. Moreover, this ENDLESS method permits the superposition of large-scale quasi-2D ocean eddies on the oil advection, allowing for coupling with regional ocean circulation models. Using this new numerical tool, the effects of the interactions between 3D turbulence and 2D eddies on the flow field and on oil dispersion are elucidated by comparing the results from ENDLESS with those from conventional LES. This research was made possible by a grant from The Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative.

  4. miR-138-5p reverses gefitinib resistance in non-small cell lung cancer cells via negatively regulating G protein-coupled receptor 124.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yi; Fan, XiaoWu; Li, WeiNa; Ping, Wei; Deng, Yu; Fu, XiangNing

    2014-03-28

    Epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR TKIs) such as gefitinib are clinically effective treatments for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with EGFR activating mutations. However, therapeutic effect is ultimately limited by the development of acquired TKI resistance. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) represent a category of small non-coding RNAs commonly deregulated in human malignancies. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of miRNAs in gefitinib resistance. We established a gefitinib-resistant cell model (PC9GR) by continually exposing PC9 NSCLC cells to gefitinib for 6 months. MiRNA microarray screening revealed miR-138-5p showed the greatest downregulation in PC9GR cells. Re-expression of miR-138-5p was sufficient to sensitize PC9GR cells and another gefitinib-resistant NSCLC cell line, H1975, to gefitinib. Bioinformatics analysis and luciferase reporter assay showed that G protein-coupled receptor124 (GPR124) was a direct target of miR-138-5p. Experimental validation demonstrated that expression of GPR124 was suppressed by miR-138-5p on protein and mRNA levels in NSCLC cells. Furthermore, we observed an inverse correlation between the expression of miR-138-5p and GPR124 in lung adenocarcinoma specimens. Knockdown of GPR124 mimicked the effects of miR-138-5p on the sensitivity to gefitinib. Collectively, our results suggest that downregulation of miR-138-5p contributes to gefitinib resistance and that restoration of miR-138-5p or inhibition GPR124 might serve as potential therapeutic approach for overcoming NSCLC gefitinib resistance.

  5. Measuring the internal concentration of volatile organic compounds in small organisms using micro-QuEChERS coupled to LVI-GC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Kurth, Denise; Krauss, Martin; Schulze, Tobias; Brack, Werner

    2017-08-10

    There is an increasing demand for analytical tools to measure the internal concentrations of xenobiotic pollutants in small organisms. Such tools are required to determine exposure in ecotoxicological studies yet avoid sophisticated clean-up and enrichment techniques or large-scale experimental design. Thus, this paper presents a modified QuEChERS method coupled to gas chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS) for small volume organic samples. Ten zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos were exposed to a 46-compound mixture at 10 ng/mL. After 72 h of exposure, they were extracted in 200 μL glass inserts using 70 μL of both acetonitrile and water. Volumes of 50 μL of extract were injected into a GC-MS/MS with a multi-mode inlet. Internal concentrations of zebrafish embryos could be reproducibly quantified in the lower nanogram per millilitre range at detection limits of 1-25 ng/mL and with recoveries of 63-133%. Internal concentrations varied over the tested range of compounds between 5.88 ± 0.616 ng/mL for dicofol and 232 ± 18.6 ng/mL for diflufenican. Detectability and recovery were best for compounds with a log D greater than four. As internal concentrations did not seem to exclusively depend on log D, biochemical transport processes could play an important role in the uptake kinetics of early zebrafish life stages. Graphical Abstract This paper presents an extraction and quantification method for 46 volatile organic compounds in zebrafish embryos. After exposure, pools of ten embryos were extracted with 70 μL acetonitrile applying a micro-QuEChERS approach. Internal embryo concentrations were analytically determined and quantified by large volumen injection gas chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS).

  6. Development of double-layer coupled coil for improving S/N in 7 T small-animal MRI.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyoung-Nam; Seo, Jeung-Hoon; Han, Sang-Doc; Heo, Phil; Im, Geun Ho; Lee, Jung Hee

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a new double-layer coupled (DLC) surface radiofrequency (RF) coil using a combination of single-layer planar (SLP) and single-layer circular (SLC) coils, for enhancement of magnetic flux (B1 ) sensitivity and RF penetration in 7 T rat-body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The proposed DLC surface coil was fabricated according to an electromagnetic (EM) simulation and validated based on the B1 distribution and bench measurements. The DLC coil performance was quantitatively evaluated based on the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) and coil-response signal intensity curves in phantom and in vivo rat-body images. In the computational EM calculation and 7 T in vivo experimental results, the DLC surface coil clearly showed an increased S/N and higher RF transmit (B1 (+) ) profiles, compared to those of the SLP and SLC coils. While all surface coils displayed a rapid decrease in the MR signal from the near-coil region to the subject, the results reveal that the DLC coil concept may be used to provide sufficient RF penetration and high S/N and degrees of freedom for use in partial body imaging for 7 T ultra-high-field small-animal MRI.

  7. Production of small-scale Alfvén waves by ionospheric depletion, nonlinear magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling and phase mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, A. J. B.; Wright, A. N.; Streltsov, A. V.

    2013-04-01

    Rockets and satellites have previously observed small-scale Alfvén waves inside large-scale downward field-aligned currents, and numerical simulations have associated their formation with self-consistent magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling. The origin of these waves was previously attributed to ionospheric feedback instability; however, we show that they arise in numerical experiments in which the instability is excluded. A new interpretation is proposed in which strong ionospheric depletion and associated current broadening (a nonlinear steepening/wave-breaking process) form magnetosphereionosphere waves inside a downward current region and these oscillations drive upgoing inertial Alfvén waves in the overlying plasma. The resulting waves are governed by characteristic periods, which are a good match to previously observed periods for reasonable assumed conditions. Meanwhile, wavelengths perpendicular to the magnetic field initially map to an ionospheric scale comparable to the electron inertial length for the low-altitude magnetosphere, but become shorter with time due to frequency-based phase mixing of boundary waves (a new manifestation of phase mixing). Under suitable conditions, these could act as seeds for the ionospheric feedback instability.

  8. Gold Nanoparticle Internal Structure and Symmetry Probed by Unified Small-Angle X-ray Scattering and X-ray Diffraction Coupled with Molecular Dynamics Analysis.

    PubMed

    Fleury, Blaise; Cortes-Huerto, Robinson; Taché, Olivier; Testard, Fabienne; Menguy, Nicolas; Spalla, Olivier

    2015-09-09

    Shape and size are known to determine a nanoparticle's properties. Hardly ever studied in synthesis, the internal crystal structure (i.e., particle defects, crystallinity, and symmetry) is just as critical as shape and size since it directly impacts catalytic efficiency, plasmon resonance, and orients anisotropic growth of metallic nanoparticles. Hence, its control cannot be ignored any longer in today's research and applications in nanotechnology. This study implemented an unprecedented reliable measurement combining these three structural aspects. The unified small-angle X-ray scattering and diffraction measurement (SAXS/XRD) was coupled with molecular dynamics to allow simultaneous determination of nanoparticles' shape, size, and crystallinity at the atomic scale. Symmetry distribution (icosahedra-Ih, decahedra-Dh, and truncated octahedra-TOh) of 2-6 nm colloidal gold nanoparticles synthesized in organic solvents was quantified. Nanoparticle number density showed the predominance of Ih, followed by Dh, and little, if any, TOh. This result contradicts some theoretical predictions and highlights the strong effect of the synthesis environment on structure stability. We foresee that this unified SAXS/XRD analysis, yielding both statistical and quantitative counts of nanoparticles' symmetry distribution, will provide new insights into nanoparticle formation, growth, and assembly.

  9. Hangman Catalysis for Photo–and Photoelectro–Chemical Activation of Water Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer Mechanisms of Small Molecule Activation

    SciTech Connect

    Nocera, Daniel G.

    2013-03-15

    The weakest link for the large-scale deployment of solar energy and for that matter, any renewable energy source, is its storage. The energy needs of future society demands are so large that storage must be in the form of fuels owing to their high energy density. Indeed, society has intuitively understood this disparity in energy density as it has developed over the last century as all large-scale energy storage in our society is in the form of fuels. But these fuels are carbon-based. The imperative for the discipline of chemistry, and more generally science, is to develop fuel storage methods that are easily scalable, carbon-neutral and sustainable. These methods demand the creation of catalysts to manage the multi-electron, multi-proton transformations of the conversion of small molecules into fuels. The splitting of water using solar light is a fuel-forming reaction that meets the imperative of large scale energy storage. As light does not directly act on water to engender its splitting into its elemental components, we have designed “hangman” catalysts to effect the energy conversion processes needed for the fuel forming reactions. The hangman construct utilizes a pendant acid/base functionality within the secondary coordination sphere that is “hung” above the redox platform onto which substrate binds. In this way, we can precisely control the delivery of a proton to the substrate, thus ensuring efficient coupling between the proton and electron. An emphasis was on the coupling of electron and proton in the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) on Ni, Co and Fe porphyrin platforms. Electrokinetic rate laws were developed to define the proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) mechanism. The HER of Co and Fe porphyrins was metal-centered. Surprisingly, HER this was not the case for Ni porphyrins. In this system, the PCET occurred at the porphyrin platform to give rise to a phlorin. This is one of the first examples of an HER occurring via ligand non

  10. A time-sequence functional analysis of mating behaviour and genital coupling in Drosophila: role of cryptic female choice and male sex-drive in the evolution of male genitalia.

    PubMed

    Jagadeeshan, S; Singh, R S

    2006-07-01

    Male genitalia in Drosophila exemplify strikingly rapid and divergent evolution, whereas female genitalia are relatively invariable. Whereas precopulatory and post-copulatory sexual selection has been invoked to explain this trend, the functional significance of genital structures during copulation remains obscure. We used time-sequence analysis to study the functional significance of external genitalic structures during the course of copulation, between D. melanogaster and D. simulans. This functional analysis has provided new information that reveals the importance of male-driven copulatory mechanics and strategies in the rapid diversification of genitalia. The posterior process, which is a recently evolved sexual character and present only in males of the melanogaster clade, plays a crucial role in mounting as well as in genital coupling. Whereas there is ample evidence for precopulatory and/or post-copulatory female choice, we show here that during copulation there is little or no physical female choice, consequently, males determine copulation duration. We also found subtle differences in copulatory mechanics between very closely related species. We propose that variation in male usage of novel genitalic structures and shifts in copulatory behaviour have played an important role in the diversification of genitalia in species of the Drosophila subgroup.

  11. Profiling of membrane protein variants in a baculovirus system by coupling cell-surface detection with small-scale parallel expression

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Michael A.; Brooun, Alexei; Baker, Kent A.; Jaakola, Veli-Pekka; Roth, Chris; Chien, Ellen; Alexandrov, Alexander; Velasquez, Jeffrey; Davis, Leila; Griffith, Mark; Moy, Kin; Ganser-Pornillos, Barbie; Kuhn, Peter; Ellis, Sam; Yeager, Mark; Stevens, Raymond C.

    2007-01-01

    Production of structure-grade mammalian membrane proteins in substantial quantities has been hindered by a lack of methods for effectively profiling multiple construct expression in higher eukaryotic systems such as insect or mammalian cells. To address this problem, a specialized small-scale eukaryotic expression platform by Thomson Instrument Company (Vertiga-IM) was developed and coupled with a Guava EasyCyte microcapillary 96-well cytometer to monitor cell density and health and evaluate membrane protein expression. Two proof of concept experiments were conducted using the human β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR) and gap junction protein connexin26 (Cx26) in a baculovirus expression system. First, cell surface expression was used to assess the expression levels of fourteen β2AR truncation variants expressed using the Vertiga-IM shaker. Three of these variants were then compared to wild type β2AR using three metrics: cell surface expression, saturation ligand binding and protein immunoblot analysis of dodecyl maltoside extracted material. Second, a series of systematic Cx26 truncation variants were evaluated for expression by protein immunoblot analysis. The cumulative results for these two systems show that the Vertiga-IM instrument can be used effectively in the parallel insect cell micro-expression of membrane protein variants, and that the expression of cell surface molecules as monitored with the Guava EasyCyte instrument can be used to rapidly assess the production of properly folded proteins in the baculovirus expression system. This approach expedites the in vitro evaluation of a large number of mammalian membrane protein variants. PMID:17723307

  12. Behavioural and Cognitive-Behavioural Treatments of Parasomnias

    PubMed Central

    Galbiati, Andrea; Rinaldi, Fabrizio; Giora, Enrico; Ferini-Strambi, Luigi; Marelli, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Parasomnias are unpleasant or undesirable behaviours or experiences that occur predominantly during or within close proximity to sleep. Pharmacological treatments of parasomnias are available, but their efficacy is established only for few disorders. Furthermore, most of these disorders tend spontaneously to remit with development. Nonpharmacological treatments therefore represent valid therapeutic choices. This paper reviews behavioural and cognitive-behavioural managements employed for parasomnias. Referring to the ICSD-3 nosology we consider, respectively, NREM parasomnias, REM parasomnias, and other parasomnias. Although the efficacy of some of these treatments is proved, in other cases their clinical evidence cannot be provided because of the small size of the samples. Due to the rarity of some parasomnias, further multicentric researches are needed in order to offer a more complete account of behavioural and cognitive-behavioural treatments efficacy. PMID:26101458

  13. Behavioural and Cognitive-Behavioural Treatments of Parasomnias.

    PubMed

    Galbiati, Andrea; Rinaldi, Fabrizio; Giora, Enrico; Ferini-Strambi, Luigi; Marelli, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Parasomnias are unpleasant or undesirable behaviours or experiences that occur predominantly during or within close proximity to sleep. Pharmacological treatments of parasomnias are available, but their efficacy is established only for few disorders. Furthermore, most of these disorders tend spontaneously to remit with development. Nonpharmacological treatments therefore represent valid therapeutic choices. This paper reviews behavioural and cognitive-behavioural managements employed for parasomnias. Referring to the ICSD-3 nosology we consider, respectively, NREM parasomnias, REM parasomnias, and other parasomnias. Although the efficacy of some of these treatments is proved, in other cases their clinical evidence cannot be provided because of the small size of the samples. Due to the rarity of some parasomnias, further multicentric researches are needed in order to offer a more complete account of behavioural and cognitive-behavioural treatments efficacy.

  14. Behaviour and stability of Trivelpiece-Gould modes in non-neutral plasma containing small density fraction of background gas ions

    SciTech Connect

    Yeliseyev, Y. N.

    2013-03-19

    It is shown that the frequencies of Trivelpiece-Gould (TG) modes in non-neutral plasma can get into the low-frequency range due to the Doppler shift caused by plasma rotation in crossed fields. TG modes interact with the ion modes that leads to plasma instability. In paper the frequency spectrum of 'cold' electron plasma completely filling a waveguide and containing small density fraction of ions of background gas is determined numerically. For ions the kinetic description is used. Oscillations having azimuthal number m= 2 are considered. In this case both low- and upper-hybrid TG modes get into the low-frequency range. The spectrum consists of families of 'modified' ion cyclotron (MIC) modes and electron TG modes with the frequencies equal to hybrid frequencies with the Doppler shift. The growth rates of upper-hybrid modes are much faster than the growth rates of low-hybrid and MIC modes.

  15. Asymptotic behaviour of solutions of boundary-value problems for equations with rapidly oscillating coefficients in a domain with a small cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Nazarov, S A; Slutskii, A S

    1998-10-31

    Asymptotic representations of the solutions of boundary-value problems for a second-order equation with rapidly oscillating coefficients in a domain with a small cavity (of diameter comparable with the period of oscillation) are found and substantiated. Dirichlet or Neumann conditions are set at the boundary of the domain. In addition to an asymptotic series of structure standard for homogenization theory there occur terms describing the boundary layer phenomenon near the opening, while the solutions of the homogenized problem and their rapidly oscillating correctors acquire singularities at the contraction point of the openings. The dimension of the domain and some other factors influence even the leading term of the asymptotic formula. Some generalizations, including ones to the system of elasticity theory, are discussed.

  16. Proteochemometric modelling coupled to in silico target prediction: an integrated approach for the simultaneous prediction of polypharmacology and binding affinity/potency of small molecules.

    PubMed

    Paricharak, Shardul; Cortés-Ciriano, Isidro; IJzerman, Adriaan P; Malliavin, Thérèse E; Bender, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    targets and the potency on plasmodial DHFR for the GSK TCAMS dataset, which comprises 13,533 compounds displaying strong anti-malarial activity. 534 of those compounds were identified as DHFR inhibitors by the target prediction algorithm, while the PCM algorithm identified 25 compounds, and 23 compounds (predicted pIC50 > 7) were identified by both methods. Overall, this integrated approach simultaneously provides target and potency/affinity predictions for small molecules. Graphical abstractProteochemometric modelling coupled to in silico target prediction.

  17. Behaviour of radiocaesium in coastal rivers of the Fukushima Prefecture (Japan) during conditions of low flow and low turbidity--Insight on the possible role of small particles and detrital organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Eyrolle-Boyer, Frédérique; Boyer, Patrick; Garcia-Sanchez, Laurent; Métivier, Jean-Michel; Onda, Yuichi; De Vismes, Anne; Cagnat, Xavier; Boulet, Béatrice; Cossonnet, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    To investigate riverine transfers from contaminated soils of the Fukushima Prefecture in Japan to the marine environment, suspended sediments, filtered water, sediments and detrital organic macro debris deposited onto river beds were collected in November 2013 within small coastal rivers during conditions of low flow rates and low turbidity. River waters were directly filtered on the field and high efficiency well-type Ge detectors were used to analyse radiocaesium concentrations in very small quantities of suspended particles and filtered water (a few mg to a few g). For such base-flow conditions, our results show that the watersheds studied present similar hydro-sedimentary behaviours at their outlets and that the exports of dissolved and particulate radiocaesium are comparable. Moreover, the contribution of these rivers to the instantaneous export of radiocaesium to the ocean is similar to that of the Abukuma River. Our preliminary results indicate that, in the estuaries, radiocaesium concentrations in suspended sediments would be reduced by more than 80%, while radiocaesium concentration in filtered waters would be maintained. Significant correlations between radiocaesium concentrations and radiocaesium inventories in the soils of the catchments indicate that there was at that time little intra and inter-watershed variability in the transfer processes of radiocaesium from lands to rivers at this regional scale. The apparent liquid-solid partition coefficient (KD) values acquired for the lowest loads/finest particles complement the values acquired by using sediment traps and highlight the strong capacity of the smallest particles to transfer radiocaesium. Finally, but not least, our observations suggest that there could be a significant transfer of highly contaminated detrital biomass from forest litter to the downstream rivers in a rather conservative way. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Predictors of health behaviours in college students.

    PubMed

    Von Ah, Diane; Ebert, Sheryl; Ngamvitroj, Anchalee; Park, Najin; Kang, Duck-Hee

    2004-12-01

    This paper reports a study examining the direct effects of perceived stress, perceived availability of and satisfaction with social support, and self-efficacy, and examines the intermediary roles of perceived threat (perceived susceptibility x perceived severity), benefits, and barriers on alcohol behaviour, smoking behaviour, physical activity and nutrition behaviour, general safety behaviour and sun-protective behaviour in college students. Health behaviours formed during young adulthood may have a sustaining impact on health across later life. Entering college can be an exciting, yet stressful event for many adolescents and young adults as they face trying to adapt to changes in academic workloads, support networks, and their new environment. Coupled with these changes and new-found responsibilities, they have greater freedom and control over their lifestyles than ever before. However, researchers have shown globally that many college students engage in various risky health behaviours. A cross-sectional sample of 161 college students enrolled in an introductory psychology course completed self-report questionnaires regarding stress; social support; self-efficacy; and components of the Health Belief Model including perceived threat, perceived benefits, perceived barriers; and common health behaviours. Step-wise multiple regression analysis was conducted and significant predictors were retained as modifiers in the path analysis. Self-efficacy significantly predicted alcohol and smoking behaviour, physical activity and nutrition protective behaviour, general safety protective behaviour and sun-protective behaviour. Under high-perceived threat, self-efficacy was mediated by perceived barriers for binge drinking and moderated by perceived barriers for physical activity and nutrition behaviours. In addition, under high-perceived threat, self-efficacy was moderated by perceived threat for alcohol use at 30 days and 6 months. Under low threat, self-efficacy was mediated

  19. Magnetoelectric coupling study in multiferroic Pb(Fe{sub 0.5}Nb{sub 0.5})O{sub 3} ceramics through small and large electric signal standard measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond, Oscar; Siqueiros, Jesus M.; Font, Reynaldo; Portelles, Jorge

    2011-05-01

    Multifunctional multiferroic materials such as the single phase compound Pb(Fe{sub 0.5}Nb{sub 0.5})O{sub 3} (PFN), where ferroelectric and antiferromagnetic order coexist, are very promising and have great interest from the academic and technological points of view. In this work, coupling of the ferroelectric and magnetic moments is reported. For this study, a combination of the small signal response using the impedance spectroscopy technique and the electromechanical resonance method with the large signal response through standard ferroelectric hysteresis measurement, has been used with and without an applied magnetic field. The measurements to determine the electrical properties of the ceramic were performed as functions of the bias and poling electric fields. A simultaneous analysis of the complex dielectric constant {epsilon}-tilde, impedance Z-tilde, electric modulus M-tilde, admittance Y-tilde, and the electromechanical parameters and coupling factors is presented. The results are correlated with a previous study of structural, morphological, small signal dielectric frequency-temperature response, and the ferroelectric hysteretic, magnetic and magnetodielectric behaviors. The observed shifts of the resonance and antiresonance frequency values can be associated with change of the ferroelectric domain size favored by the readjustment of the oxygen octahedron when the magnetic field is applied. From P-E hysteresis loops obtained without and with an external applied magnetic field, a dc magnetoelectric coupling effect with maximum value of 4 kV/cm T (400 mV/cm Oe) was obtained.

  20. Titanium-based transition-edge photon number resolving detector with 98% detection efficiency with index-matched small-gap fiber coupling.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Daiji; Fujii, Go; Numata, Takayuki; Amemiya, Kuniaki; Yoshizawa, Akio; Tsuchida, Hidemi; Fujino, Hidetoshi; Ishii, Hiroyuki; Itatani, Taro; Inoue, Shuichiro; Zama, Tatsuya

    2011-01-17

    We have realized a high-detection-efficiency photon number resolving detector at an operating wavelength of about 850 nm. The detector consists of a titanium superconducting transition edge sensor in an optical cavity, which is directly coupled to an optical fiber using an approximately 300-nm gap. The gap reduces the sensitive area and heat capacity of the device, leading to high photon number resolution of 0.42 eV without sacrificing detection efficiency or signal response speed. Wavelength dependent efficiency in fiber-coupled devices, which is due to optical interference between the fiber and the device, is also decreased to less than 1% in this configuration. The overall system detection efficiency is 98%±1% at wavelengths of around 850 nm, which is the highest value ever reported in this wavelength range.

  1. Effect of adding small amount of inductive fields to O{sub 2}, Ar/O{sub 2} capacitively coupled plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Min-Hyong; Lee, Hyo-Chang; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2012-05-01

    Electron energy distribution functions (EEDFs) of low pressure O{sub 2} plasma were measured by adding small amount of coil power in a capacitive discharge. When the plasma was generated by bias power only, the measured EEDF showed a bi-Maxwellian distribution. However, when a very small coil power (a few Watts) was added, the EEDF evolved abruptly into a Maxwellian distribution, while the electron density was decreased. In an Ar/O{sub 2} mixture discharge, this EEDF evolution to the Maxwellian was also observed at a relatively higher coil power. This abrupt change in EEDFs with a very small coil power appears to be attributed to a combined effect of collisionless heating by capacitive and induced electric fields.

  2. Working with What We've Got: Perceptions of Barriers and Supports among Small-Metropolitan-Area Same-Sex Adopting Couples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinkler, Lori A.; Goldberg, Abbie E.

    2011-01-01

    In seeking to adopt, lesbians and gay men may confront various barriers and obstacles. Ideally, they have access to a variety of support resources that can help to buffer the negative effects of these barriers. Lesbians and gay men living in small metropolitan communities may have limited access to support resources, however. The current…

  3. Working with What We've Got: Perceptions of Barriers and Supports among Small-Metropolitan-Area Same-Sex Adopting Couples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinkler, Lori A.; Goldberg, Abbie E.

    2011-01-01

    In seeking to adopt, lesbians and gay men may confront various barriers and obstacles. Ideally, they have access to a variety of support resources that can help to buffer the negative effects of these barriers. Lesbians and gay men living in small metropolitan communities may have limited access to support resources, however. The current…

  4. A bio-inspired, small molecule electron-coupled-proton buffer for decoupling the half-reactions of electrolytic water splitting.

    PubMed

    Rausch, Benjamin; Symes, Mark D; Cronin, Leroy

    2013-09-18

    Electron-coupled-proton buffers (ECPBs) allow H2 and O2 evolution to be separated from each other in time during the electrolysis of water. Natural photosynthetic systems achieve an analogous feat during water splitting and employ a range of intermediate redox mediators such as quinone derivatives to aid this process. Drawing on this natural example, we show that a low molecular weight quinone derivative is capable of decoupling H2 evolution from O2 evolution at scale during electrochemical water splitting. This work could significantly lower the cost of ECPBs, paving the way for their more widespread adoption in water splitting.

  5. Spin-orbit coupling and chaotic rotation for circumbinary bodies. Application to the small satellites of the Pluto-Charon system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correia, Alexandre C. M.; Leleu, Adrien; Rambaux, Nicolas; Robutel, Philippe

    2015-08-01

    We investigate the resonant rotation of circumbinary bodies in planar quasi-circular orbits. Denoting nb and n the orbital mean motion of the inner binary and of the circumbinary body, respectively, we show that spin-orbit resonances exist at the frequencies n ± kν/2, where ν = nb - n, and k is an integer. Moreover, when the libration at natural frequency has the same magnitude as ν, the resonances overlap and the rotation becomes chaotic. We apply these results to the small satellites in the Pluto-Charon system, and conclude that their rotations are likely chaotic. However, the rotation can also be stable and not synchronous for small axial asymmetries. Figure 4 and Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  6. Demonstration of a fully-coupled end-to-end model for small pelagic fish using sardine and anchovy in the California Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, Kenneth A.; Fiechter, Jerome; Curchitser, Enrique N.; Hedstrom, Kate; Bernal, Miguel; Creekmore, Sean; Haynie, Alan; Ito, Shin-ichi; Lluch-Cota, Salvador; Megrey, Bernard A.; Edwards, Chris A.; Checkley, Dave; Koslow, Tony; McClatchie, Sam; Werner, Francisco; MacCall, Alec; Agostini, Vera

    2015-11-01

    We describe and document an end-to-end model of anchovy and sardine population dynamics in the California Current as a proof of principle that such coupled models can be developed and implemented. The end-to-end model is 3-dimensional, time-varying, and multispecies, and consists of four coupled submodels: hydrodynamics, Eulerian nutrient-phytoplankton-zooplankton (NPZ), an individual-based full life cycle anchovy and sardine submodel, and an agent-based fishing fleet submodel. A predator roughly mimicking albacore was included as individuals that consumed anchovy and sardine. All submodels were coded within the ROMS open-source community model, and used the same resolution spatial grid and were all solved simultaneously to allow for possible feedbacks among the submodels. We used a super-individual approach and solved the coupled models on a distributed memory parallel computer, both of which created challenging but resolvable bookkeeping challenges. The anchovy and sardine growth, mortality, reproduction, and movement, and the fishing fleet submodel, were each calibrated using simplified grids before being inserted into the full end-to-end model. An historical simulation of 1959-2008 was performed, and the latter 45 years analyzed. Sea surface height (SSH) and sea surface temperature (SST) for the historical simulation showed strong horizontal gradients and multi-year scale temporal oscillations related to various climate indices (PDO, NPGO), and both showed responses to ENSO variability. Simulated total phytoplankton was lower during strong El Nino events and higher for the strong 1999 La Nina event. The three zooplankton groups generally corresponded to the spatial and temporal variation in simulated total phytoplankton. Simulated biomasses of anchovy and sardine were within the historical range of observed biomasses but predicted biomasses showed much less inter-annual variation. Anomalies of annual biomasses of anchovy and sardine showed a switch in the mid

  7. Thermoacoustic couple

    DOEpatents

    Wheatley, J.C.; Swift, G.W.; Migliori, A.

    1983-10-04

    An apparatus and method for determining acoustic power density level and its direction in a fluid using a single sensor are disclosed. The preferred embodiment of the apparatus, which is termed a thermoacoustic couple, consists of a stack of thin, spaced apart polymeric plates, selected ones of which include multiple bimetallic thermocouple junctions positioned along opposite end edges thereof. The thermocouple junctions are connected in series in the nature of a thermopile, and are arranged so as to be responsive to small temperature differences between the opposite edges of the plates. The magnitude of the temperature difference, as represented by the magnitude of the electrical potential difference generated by the thermopile, is found to be directly related to the level of acoustic power density in the gas.

  8. Balancing selection shapes density-dependent foraging behaviour.

    PubMed

    Greene, Joshua S; Brown, Maximillian; Dobosiewicz, May; Ishida, Itzel G; Macosko, Evan Z; Zhang, Xinxing; Butcher, Rebecca A; Cline, Devin J; McGrath, Patrick T; Bargmann, Cornelia I

    2016-11-10

    The optimal foraging strategy in a given environment depends on the number of competing individuals and their behavioural strategies. Little is known about the genes and neural circuits that integrate social information into foraging decisions. Here we show that ascaroside pheromones, small glycolipids that signal population density, suppress exploratory foraging in Caenorhabditis elegans, and that heritable variation in this behaviour generates alternative foraging strategies. We find that natural C. elegans isolates differ in their sensitivity to the potent ascaroside icas#9 (IC-asc-C5). A quantitative trait locus (QTL) regulating icas#9 sensitivity includes srx-43, a G-protein-coupled icas#9 receptor that acts in the ASI class of sensory neurons to suppress exploration. Two ancient haplotypes associated with this QTL confer competitive growth advantages that depend on ascaroside secretion, its detection by srx-43 and the distribution of food. These results suggest that balancing selection at the srx-43 locus generates alternative density-dependent behaviours, fulfilling a prediction of foraging game theory.

  9. Rapid Identification of Unknown Organic Iodine in Small-Volume Complex Biological Samples Based on Nanospray Mass Spectrometry Coupled with in-Tube Solid Phase Microextraction.

    PubMed

    Chang, Qing; Peng, Yue'e; Yun, Lifen; Zhu, Qingxin; Hu, Shenghong; Shuai, Qin

    2017-04-04

    A new method for rapid screening of unknown organic iodine (OI) in small-volume complex biological samples was developed using in-tube solid phase microextraction (SPME) nanospray mass spectrometry (MS). The method proposed a new identification scheme for OI based on nanospray high-resolution mass spectrometry (HR-MS). The mass ranges of OI ions were confirmed using the t-MS(2) scan mode first; then, the possible precursor ions of OI were selected and identified orderly in full MS/ddMS(2) and t-MS(2) scan modes. Besides, in-tube SPME was used for the pretreatment of small-volume biological samples, and it was the first time in-tube SPME combined with nanospray MS for OI identification. The whole analysis procedure took only 8 min and consumed 50 μL per sample. Using the new method, six kinds of OI added to urine and an unknown OI C12H23O11I in human milk were successfully identified. Moreover, the proposed identification scheme is also suitable for other ambient mass spectrometry (AMS) to determine unknown compounds with characteristic fragment ions.

  10. Pulse-coupled BZ oscillators with unequal coupling strengths.

    PubMed

    Horvath, Viktor; Kutner, Daniel J; Chavis, John T; Epstein, Irving R

    2015-02-14

    Coupled chemical oscillators are usually studied with symmetric coupling, either between identical oscillators or between oscillators whose frequencies differ. Asymmetric connectivity is important in neuroscience, where synaptic strength inequality in neural networks commonly occurs. While the properties of the individual oscillators in some coupled chemical systems may be readily changed, enforcing inequality between the connection strengths in a reciprocal coupling is more challenging. We recently demonstrated a novel way of coupling chemical oscillators, which allows for manipulation of individual connection strengths. Here we study two identical, pulse-coupled Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) oscillators with unequal connection strengths. When the pulse perturbations contain KBr (inhibitor), this system exhibits simple out-of-phase and complex oscillations, oscillatory-suppressed states as well as temporally periodic patterns (N : M) in which the two oscillators exhibit different numbers of peaks per cycle. The N : M patterns emerge due to the long-term effect of the inhibitory pulse-perturbations, a feature that has not been considered in earlier works. Time delay was previously shown to have a profound effect on the system's behaviour when pulse coupling was inhibitory and the coupling strengths were equal. When the coupling is asymmetric, however, delay produces no qualitative change in behaviour, though the 1 : 2 temporal pattern becomes more robust. Asymmetry in instantaneous excitatory coupling via AgNO3 injection produces a previously unseen temporal pattern (1 : N patterns starting with a double peak) with time delay and high [AgNO3]. Numerical simulations of the behaviour agree well with theoretical predictions in asymmetrical pulse-coupled systems.

  11. Automated coupling of capillary-HPLC to matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry for the analysis of small molecules utilizing a reactive matrix.

    PubMed

    Brombacher, Stephan; Owen, Stacey J; Volmer, Dietrich A

    2003-07-01

    This study describes the application of a novel, reactive matrix for the mass spectral analysis of steroids by capillary-high performance liquid chromatography (capillary-HPLC) coupled to matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI). The mass spectral analysis of steroids was accomplished after fully automated peak deposition of chromatographic peaks onto MALDI targets. The seven corticosteroids used as test compounds were: triamcinolone, prednisone, cortisone, fludrocortisone, dexamethasone, deoxycorticosterone, and budesonide. They were separated using a PepMap C(18) (3 microm particle size, 100 A pore width) column at five different concentration levels of 25, 15, 7.5, 2.5 and 1 ng/microL, and the peaks were detected at a wavelength of 237 nm. The column effluent was mixed with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH) directly following the UV detector. The chromatographic peaks were then deposited onto the MALDI target with a robotic micro-fraction collector triggered by the UV detector signals. A special hydrophobic surface coating allowed the deposition of up to 4 microL (up to 90 % of the chromatographic peak volume) onto one sample spot. The compounds were then identified by MALDI mass spectrometry. Depending on the nature of the analyte, radical cations ([M](+.)) and sodium adduct ions ([M+Na](+)) of the steroids as well as protonated steroid-dinitrophenylhydrazone derivatives ([M(D)+H](+)) were detected in positive ion mode. The detection limits were between 0.5 and 15 ng injected with capillary-HPLC-MALDI-TOF-MS and between 0.3 and 3 ng on target with MALDI-TOF when deposited manually.

  12. Determination of metal concentrations in certified plastic reference materials after small-size autoclave and microwave-assisted digestion followed with inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehtimäki, Esa; Väisänen, Ari

    2017-01-01

    The digestion methods for the determination of As, Cd, Cr, Pb, Sb, Sn and Zn concentrations in plastic samples using microwave-assisted digestion (MW-AD) and small-size autoclave digestion was developed. The certified polyethylene, polypropylene, polyvinyl chloride and acrylonitrile butadiene styrene certified reference materials were used in order to find digestion method working properly for several sample matrices. Efficiency of the digestion methods was evaluated by analyzing the residual carbon in digests by TOC analyzer. MW-AD using a mixture of 7 mL of HNO3 and 3 mL of H2O2 as a digestion solution resulted in excellent recoveries for As, Cd, Pb, Sb and Zn, and were in the range of 92-107% for all the analytes except Pb in polyethylene material. Autoclave digestion using 5 mL of concentrated HNO3 as a digestion solution resulted in similar recoveries with the exception of a higher As recovery (98%). Tin recovery resulted in low level after both MW-AD and autoclave digestion. Autoclave digestion was further developed resulting in a partially open two-step digestion process especially for the determination of Sn and Cr. The method resulted in higher recoveries of Sn and Cr (87 and 76%) but with the lower concentration of easily volatile As, Cd and Sb.

  13. A rapid procedure for the determination of thorium, uranium, cadmium and molybdenum in small sediment samples by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry: Application in Chesapeake Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zheng, Yen; Weinman, B.; Cronin, T.; Fleisher, M.Q.; Anderson, Robert F.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes a rapid procedure that allows precise analysis of Mo, Cd, U and Th in sediment samples as small as 10 mg by using a novel approach that utilizes a "pseudo" isotope dilution for Th and conventional isotope dilution for Mo, Cd and U by ICP-MS. Long-term reproducibility of the method is between 2.5 and 5% with an advantage of rapid analysis on a single digestion of sediment sample and the potential of adding other elements of interest if so desired. Application of this method to two piston cores collected near the mouth of the Patuxent River in Chesapeake Bay showed that the accumulation of authigenic Mo and Cd varied in response to the changing bottom water redox conditions, with anoxia showing consistent oscillations throughout both pre-industrial and industrial times. Accumulation of authigenic U shows consistent oscillations as well, without any apparent increase in productivity related to anoxic trends. Degrees of Mo and Cd enrichment also inversely correlate to halophilic microfaunal assemblages already established as paleoclimate proxies within the bay indicating that bottom water anoxia is driven in part by the amount of freshwater discharge that the area receives. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Distinctive profiles of small RNA couple inverted repeat-induced post-transcriptional gene silencing with endogenous RNA silencing pathways in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Matvienko, Marta; Piskurewicz, Urszula; Xu, Huaqin; Martineau, Belinda; Wong, Joan; Govindarajulu, Manjula; Kozik, Alexander; Michelmore, Richard W.

    2014-01-01

    The experimental induction of RNA silencing in plants often involves expression of transgenes encoding inverted repeat (IR) sequences to produce abundant dsRNAs that are processed into small RNAs (sRNAs). These sRNAs are key mediators of post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS) and determine its specificity. Despite its application in agriculture and broad utility in plant research, the mechanism of IR-PTGS is incompletely understood. We generated four sets of 60 Arabidopsis plants, each containing IR transgenes expressing different configurations of uidA and CHALCONE SYNTHASE (At-CHS) gene fragments. Levels of PTGS were found to depend on the orientation and position of the fragment in the IR construct. Deep sequencing and mapping of sRNAs to corresponding transgene-derived and endogenous transcripts identified distinctive patterns of differential sRNA accumulation that revealed similarities among sRNAs associated with IR-PTGS and endogenous sRNAs linked to uncapped mRNA decay. Detailed analyses of poly-A cleavage products from At-CHS mRNA confirmed this hypothesis. We also found unexpected associations between sRNA accumulation and the presence of predicted open reading frames in the trigger sequence. In addition, strong IR-PTGS affected the prevalence of endogenous sRNAs, which has implications for the use of PTGS for experimental or applied purposes. PMID:25344399

  15. Simulating the Effects of Climate Change on Lakes in a Small Headwater Watershed using a Coupled Groundwater/Surface-Water Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, J. F.; Hunt, R. J.; Regan, R.; Markstrom, S.; Hay, L. E.

    2009-12-01

    A major focus of the U.S. Geological Survey’s Trout Lake Water, Energy and Biogeochemical Budgets (WEBB) project has been the development of a watershed model to allow predictions of hydrologic response to future conditions including land-use and climate change. Because of the highly conductive nature of the outwash sand aquifer and the topography of the watershed, streamflow is dominated by groundwater contributions; however, runoff does occur during intense rainfall periods and spring snowmelt. The coupled groundwater/surface-water model GSFLOW was chosen for this effort because it could easily incorporate an existing groundwater flow model and provides for simulation of surface-water processes. The model was calibrated using data collected from 1992 to 2006 in the study area and included lake levels, groundwater levels and streamflow. The frequency of data collection varied from monthly to daily; in general the more frequently collected data spanned a shorter period during the latter portion of the period monitored. Selecting calibration targets appropriate to desired predictions allowed for reduced uncertainty of model predictions. Calibration was carried out using the PEST suite of automated calibration tools. Several climate models and three emission scenarios were selected from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) climate projections to illustrate the potential effects of climate change on lakes within the watershed. The IPCC results were downscaled to the Trout Lake Watershed using deviations from average monthly climatology over a 12-year window for temperature and percent changes from average monthly precipitation. The deviations were applied to observed daily data from 1996-2007 to represent potential future conditions. Results are presented for three 12-year windows centered on the years 2030, 2060 and 2090. Results across a suite of lakes differ primarily based on their position within the flow system. Seepage lakes near the

  16. Effective Use of Time-Series Data to Calibrate a Coupled Ground Water/Surface Water Model in a Small Headwater Watershed, Northern Wisconsin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, J. F.; Hunt, R. J.; Doherty, J.

    2007-12-01

    A major focus of the U.S. Geological Survey's Trout Lake Water, Energy and Biogeochemical Budgets (WEBB) project is the development of a watershed model to allow predictions of hydrologic response to future conditions including land-use and climate change. Because of the highly conductive nature of the outwash sand aquifer and the topography of the watershed, stream flow is dominated by groundwater contributions; however, runoff does occur during intense rainfall periods and spring snowmelt. The coupled ground water/surface water model GSFLOW was chosen because it could easily incorporate an existing ground-water flow model and provides for simulation of surface-water processes. Data collected from 1992 to 2006 in the study area include lake levels, ground-water levels and streamflow. The frequency of data collection varies from monthly to daily; in general the more frequent data was collected over a shorter period and during the latter portion of the period monitored. The time-series processing software TSPROC (Doherty, 2003) was used to distill the large time-series data set to a smaller set of observations and summary statistics that captured the salient hydrologic information. The TSPROC software was also used to process model output, thus providing equivalent comparisons of modeled and observed variables. Calibration targets for lake and ground-water levels included the mean and range for the entire simulation period as well as incremental differences in monthly measurements. For wells with daily water levels, the time series was first smoothed with a digital filter and then resampled at the middle of each month. Targets for streamflow included monthly volumes, comparison of points on the flow-duration curve, and total streamflow smoothed with a digital filter and then resampled at specific dates to capture the inherent variability of the observed time series. Baseflow separation was also carried out using a recursive digital filter to separate the quick

  17. Profiling of membrane protein variants in a baculovirus system by coupling cell-surface detection with small-scale parallel expression.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Michael A; Brooun, Alexei; Baker, Kent A; Jaakola, Veli-Pekka; Roth, Chris; Chien, Ellen Y T; Alexandrov, Alexander; Velasquez, Jeffrey; Davis, Leila; Griffith, Mark; Moy, Kin; Ganser-Pornillos, Barbie K; Hua, Yuanzi; Kuhn, Peter; Ellis, Sam; Yeager, Mark; Stevens, Raymond C

    2007-11-01

    Production of structure-grade mammalian membrane proteins in substantial quantities has been hindered by a lack of methods for effectively profiling multiple constructs expression in higher eukaryotic systems such as insect or mammalian cells. To address this problem, a specialized small-scale eukaryotic expression platform by Thomson Instrument Company (Vertiga-IM) was developed and used in tandem with a Guava EasyCyte microcapillary 96-well cytometer to monitor cell density and health and evaluate membrane protein expression. Two proof of concept experiments were conducted using the human beta(2)-adrenergic receptor (beta(2)AR) and the gap junction protein connexin26 (Cx26) in a baculovirus expression system. First, cell surface expression was used to assess the expression levels of 14 beta(2)AR truncation variants expressed using the Vertiga-IM shaker. Three of these variants were then compared to wild-type beta(2)AR using three metrics: cell surface expression, saturation ligand binding and protein immunoblot analysis of dodecylmaltoside extracted material. Second, a series of systematic Cx26 truncation variants were evaluated for expression by protein immunoblot analysis. The cumulative results for these two systems show that the Vertiga-IM instrument can be used effectively in the parallel insect cell microexpression of membrane protein variants, and that the expression of cell surface molecules as monitored with the Guava EasyCyte instrument can be used to rapidly assess the production of properly folded proteins in the baculovirus expression system. This approach expedites the in vitro evaluation of a large number of mammalian membrane protein variants.

  18. Ultra-trace plutonium determination in small volume seawater by sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry with application to Fukushima seawater samples.

    PubMed

    Bu, Wenting; Zheng, Jian; Guo, Qiuju; Aono, Tatsuo; Tagami, Keiko; Uchida, Shigeo; Tazoe, Hirofumi; Yamada, Masatoshi

    2014-04-11

    Long-term monitoring of Pu isotopes in seawater is required for assessing Pu contamination in the marine environment from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. In this study, we established an accurate and precise analytical method based on anion-exchange chromatography and SF-ICP-MS. This method was able to determine Pu isotopes in seawater samples with small volumes (20-60L). The U decontamination factor was 3×10(7)-1×10(8), which provided sufficient removal of interfering U from the seawater samples. The estimated limits of detection for (239)Pu and (240)Pu were 0.11fgmL(-1) and 0.08fgmL(-1), respectively, which corresponded to 0.01mBqm(-3) for (239)Pu and 0.03mBqm(-3) for (240)Pu when a 20L volume of seawater was measured. We achieved good precision (2.9%) and accuracy (0.8%) for measurement of the (240)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratio in the standard Pu solution with a (239)Pu concentration of 11fgmL(-1) and (240)Pu concentration of 2.7fgmL(-1). Seawater reference materials were used for the method validation and both the (239+240)Pu activities and (240)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratios agreed well with the expected values. Surface and bottom seawater samples collected off Fukushima in the western North Pacific since March 2011 were analyzed. Our results suggested that there was no significant variation of the Pu distribution in seawater in the investigated areas compared to the distribution before the accident.

  19. Assessment of metal contamination in a small mining- and smelting-affected watershed: high resolution monitoring coupled with spatial analysis by GIS.

    PubMed

    Coynel, Alexandra; Blanc, Gérard; Marache, Antoine; Schäfer, Jörg; Dabrin, Aymeric; Maneux, Eric; Bossy, Cécile; Masson, Matthieu; Lavaux, Gilbert

    2009-05-01

    The Riou Mort River watershed (SW France), representative of a heavily polluted, small, heterogeneous watershed, represents a major source for the polymetallic pollution of the Lot-Garonne-Gironde fluvial-estuarine system due to former mining and ore-treatment activities. In order to assess spatial distribution of the metal/metalloid contamination in the watershed, a high resolution hydrological and geochemical monitoring were performed during one year at four permanent observation stations. Additionally, thirty-five stream sediment samples were collected at representative key sites and analyzed for metal/metalloid (Cd, Zn, Cu, Pb, As, Sb, Mo, V, Cr, Co, Ni, Th, U and Hg) concentrations. The particulate concentrations in water and stream sediments show high spatial differences for most of the studied elements suggesting strong anthropogenic and/or lithogenic influences; for stream sediments, the sequence of the highest variability, ranging from 100% to 300%, is the following: Mo < Cu < Hg < As < Sb < Cd < Zn < Pb. Multidimensional statistical analyses combined with metal/metalloid maps generated by GIS tool were used to establish relationships between elements, to identify metal/metalloid sources and localize geochemical anomalies attributed to local geochemical background, urban and industrial activities. Finally, this study presents an approach to assess anthropogenic trace metal inputs within this watershed by combining lithology-dependent geochemical background values, metal/metalloid concentrations in stream sediments and mass balances of element fluxes at four key sites. The strongest anthropogenic contributions to particulate element fluxes are 90-95% for Cd, Zn and Hg in downstream sub-catchments. The localisation of anthropogenic metal/metalloid sources in restricted areas offers a great opportunity to further significantly reduce metal emissions and restore the Lot-Garonne-Gironde fluvial-estuarine ecosystem.

  20. Metastability and chimera states in modular delay and pulse-coupled oscillator networks.

    PubMed

    Wildie, Mark; Shanahan, Murray

    2012-12-01

    Modular networks of delay-coupled and pulse-coupled oscillators are presented, which display both transient (metastable) synchronization dynamics and the formation of a large number of "chimera" states characterized by coexistent synchronized and desynchronized subsystems. We consider networks based on both community and small-world topologies. It is shown through simulation that the metastable behaviour of the system is dependent in all cases on connection delay, and a critical region is found that maximizes indices of both metastability and the prevalence of chimera states. We show dependence of phase coherence in synchronous oscillation on the level and strength of external connectivity between communities, and demonstrate that synchronization dynamics are dependent on the modular structure of the network. The long-term behaviour of the system is considered and the relevance of the model briefly discussed with emphasis on biological and neurobiological systems.

  1. Dynamics of climate and ecosystem coupling: abrupt changes and multiple equilibria.

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Paul A T; Mastrandrea, Michael D; Schneider, Stephen H

    2002-01-01

    Interactions between subunits of the global climate-biosphere system (e.g. atmosphere, ocean, biosphere and cryosphere) often lead to behaviour that is not evident when each subunit is viewed in isolation. This newly evident behaviour is an emergent property of the coupled subsystems. Interactions between thermohaline circulation and climate illustrate one emergent property of coupling ocean and atmospheric circulation. The multiple thermohaline circulation equilibria that result caused abrupt climate changes in the past and may cause abrupt climate changes in the future. Similarly, coupling between the climate system and ecosystem structure and function produces complex behaviour in certain regions. For example, atmosphere-biosphere interactions in the Sahel region of West Africa lead to multiple stable equilibria. Either wet or dry climate equilibria can occur under otherwise identical forcing conditions. The equilibrium reached is dependent on past history (i.e. initial conditions), and relatively small perturbations to either climate or vegetation can cause switching between the two equilibria. Both thermohaline circulation and the climate-vegetation system in the Sahel are prone to abrupt changes that may be irreversible. This complicates the relatively linear view of global changes held in many scientific and policy communities. Emergent properties of coupled socio-natural systems add yet another layer of complexity to the policy debate. As a result, the social and economic consequences of possible global changes are likely to be underestimated in most conventional analyses because these nonlinear, abrupt and irreversible responses are insufficiently considered. PMID:12079526

  2. Dynamics of climate and ecosystem coupling: abrupt changes and multiple equilibria.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Paul A T; Mastrandrea, Michael D; Schneider, Stephen H

    2002-05-29

    Interactions between subunits of the global climate-biosphere system (e.g. atmosphere, ocean, biosphere and cryosphere) often lead to behaviour that is not evident when each subunit is viewed in isolation. This newly evident behaviour is an emergent property of the coupled subsystems. Interactions between thermohaline circulation and climate illustrate one emergent property of coupling ocean and atmospheric circulation. The multiple thermohaline circulation equilibria that result caused abrupt climate changes in the past and may cause abrupt climate changes in the future. Similarly, coupling between the climate system and ecosystem structure and function produces complex behaviour in certain regions. For example, atmosphere-biosphere interactions in the Sahel region of West Africa lead to multiple stable equilibria. Either wet or dry climate equilibria can occur under otherwise identical forcing conditions. The equilibrium reached is dependent on past history (i.e. initial conditions), and relatively small perturbations to either climate or vegetation can cause switching between the two equilibria. Both thermohaline circulation and the climate-vegetation system in the Sahel are prone to abrupt changes that may be irreversible. This complicates the relatively linear view of global changes held in many scientific and policy communities. Emergent properties of coupled socio-natural systems add yet another layer of complexity to the policy debate. As a result, the social and economic consequences of possible global changes are likely to be underestimated in most conventional analyses because these nonlinear, abrupt and irreversible responses are insufficiently considered.

  3. Flossing behaviour in English adolescents.

    PubMed

    Macgregor, I D; Balding, J W; Regis, D

    1998-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relation between flossing behaviour and other health, cleanliness and social behaviours in adolescents. Data from a survey of 41142, 12-16-year-old children from 244 secondary schools throughout England were analysed to obtain information about flossing frequency, dental attendance and recalled advice about flossing, and some general cleanliness and social behaviours. Subjects completed a questionnaire, anonymously, in class during normal school hours. Flossing frequency was found to change with age, its use becoming less frequent from age 12 through age 16 years. There was a significant relationship between flossing frequency and the time since the last dental attendance, the more recent attenders flossing more frequently. 6% of subjects recalled receiving advice about flossing at their last dental attendance and higher proportions of those who used floss recalled such advice, compared with non-flossers. Flossing frequency was also found to correlate positively with frequencies of washing hands after visiting the lavatory and bathing, and having a current friend of the opposite gender. There was only a small association between smoking habit and flossing, and only in school years 8 and 10: subjects most committed to smoking used floss slightly more frequently than those who did not smoke. Factor analysis showed evidence of gender differences in perceptions of flossing. Males equated use of floss with health-related behaviours while females associated flossing more with cleanliness behaviours. This finding is consistent with gender differences in toothbrushing behaviour reported in previous studies. The present study provides further insights into the history of dental flossing.

  4. Coupled Hydro-Mechanical Model of Bentonite Hydration and Swelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hancilova, Ilona; Hokr, Milan

    2016-10-01

    This paper deals with the modelling of coupled hydro-mechanical processes at the buffer and host rock interface (bentonite and granite) in the context of the safe disposal of spent nuclear fuel. Granite, as one of the barriers, includes fractures which are the source for hydration of bentonite and its subsequent swelling. It affects the mechanical behaviour and possibly the stability of the whole system. A non-linear solution for the stress-deformation problem with swelling was developed. This solution is coupled with the non-linear diffusion problem (for unsaturated flow). The swelling is defined using a coefficient dependent on water content according to literature data, with the effective Young's modulus decreasing close to zero corresponding to the plastic state. Results confirm the expected non-uniform saturation, swelling, and stresses in bentonite and small contribution to a fracture displacement.

  5. Effectiveness of small-group interactive education vs. lecture-based information-only programs on motivation to change and lifestyle behaviours. A prospective controlled trial of rehabilitation inpatients.

    PubMed

    Reusch, Andrea; Ströbl, Veronika; Ellgring, Heiner; Faller, Hermann

    2011-02-01

    Although patient education may promote motivation to change health behaviours, the most effective method has not yet been determined. This prospective, controlled trial compared an interactive, patient-oriented group program with lectures providing only information. We evaluated motivational stages of change and self-reported behaviours in three domains (sports, diet, relaxation) at four times up to one year (60% complete data) among 753 German rehabilitation inpatients (mean age 50 years, 52% male) with orthopaedic (59%) or cardiologic disorders (10%) or diabetes mellitus (31%). We found improvements between baseline and follow up regarding each outcome (p<.001) in both groups. At the end of rehabilitation, participants of the interactive group, as compared to the lectures, showed more advanced motivation regarding diet (p<.10) and sports (p=.006). Interactive group patients reported healthier diets both after 3 months (p=0.013) and 12 months (p=0.047), more relaxation behaviours (p=.029) after 3 months and higher motivation for sports after 12 months (p=.08). The superior effectiveness of the interactive group was only partly confirmed. This short, 5-session interactive program may not be superior to lectures to induce major sustainable changes in motivation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Unintentional behaviour change.

    PubMed

    Aunger, Robert; Curtis, Valerie

    2014-08-01

    We argue that the authors ignore a broad range of possible means of changing behaviour: unintentional change. Most of the behaviours that people seek to change - either in themselves or that are the subject of public health campaigns-are habitual, and hence not necessarily responsive to intentions. An evolutionary approach should take into account all kinds of evolved behavioural responses.

  7. Binge eating behaviours in bipolar disorders.

    PubMed

    Boulanger, Hortense; Tebeka, Sarah; Girod, Chloé; Lloret-Linares, Célia; Meheust, Julie; Scott, Jan; Guillaume, Sébastien; Courtet, Philippe; Bellivier, Frank; Delavest, Marine

    2017-08-30

    Recent research, especially from the USA, suggests that comorbid binge eating (BE) behaviour and BE disorder are frequent in individuals with Bipolar Disorder (BD). Although basic clinical associations between BD and BE have been investigated, less is known about psychological or temperamental dimensions and qualitative aspects of eating habits. In a French cohort of patients with BD, we investigated the prevalence of BE behaviour and any associations with illness characteristics, anxiety, impulsivity, emotional regulation and eating habits. 145 outpatients with BD (I and II) were assessed for the presence of BE behaviour using the Binge Eating Scale (BES). Characteristics identified in univariate analyses as differentiating BD cases with and without BE behaviour were then included in a backward stepwise logistic regression (BSLR) model. In this sample, 18.6% of BD patients met criteria for BE behaviour. Multivariate analysis (BSLR) indicated that shorter duration of BD, and higher levels of anxiety and emotional reactivity were observed in BD with compared to BD without BE behaviour. Relatively small sample referred to specialist BD clinics and cross-sectional evaluation meant that it was not possible to differentiate between state and trait levels of impulsivity, emotional instability and disinhibition. These dimensions may also overlap with mood symptoms. BE behaviour is common in females and males with BD. Emotional dysregulation and anxiety may represent important shared vulnerability factors for worse outcome of BD and increased likelihood of BE behaviour. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. The influence of social norms on the dynamics of vaccinating behaviour for paediatric infectious diseases

    PubMed Central

    Oraby, Tamer; Thampi, Vivek; Bauch, Chris T.

    2014-01-01

    Mathematical models that couple disease dynamics and vaccinating behaviour often assume that the incentive to vaccinate disappears if disease prevalence is zero. Hence, they predict that vaccine refusal should be the rule, and elimination should be difficult or impossible. In reality, countries with non-mandatory vaccination policies have usually been able to maintain elimination or very low incidence of paediatric infectious diseases for long periods of time. Here, we show that including injunctive social norms can reconcile such behaviour-incidence models to observations. Adding social norms to a coupled behaviour-incidence model enables the model to better explain pertussis vaccine uptake and disease dynamics in the UK from 1967 to 2010, in both the vaccine-scare years and the years of high vaccine coverage. The model also illustrates how a vaccine scare can perpetuate suboptimal vaccine coverage long after perceived risk has returned to baseline, pre-vaccine-scare levels. However, at other model parameter values, social norms can perpetuate depressed vaccine coverage during a vaccine scare well beyond the time when the population's baseline vaccine risk perception returns to pre-scare levels. Social norms can strongly suppress vaccine uptake despite frequent outbreaks, as observed in some small communities. Significant portions of the parameter space also exhibit bistability, meaning long-term outcomes depend on the initial conditions. Depending on the context, social norms can either support or hinder immunization goals. PMID:24523276

  9. The influence of social norms on the dynamics of vaccinating behaviour for paediatric infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Oraby, Tamer; Thampi, Vivek; Bauch, Chris T

    2014-04-07

    Mathematical models that couple disease dynamics and vaccinating behaviour often assume that the incentive to vaccinate disappears if disease prevalence is zero. Hence, they predict that vaccine refusal should be the rule, and elimination should be difficult or impossible. In reality, countries with non-mandatory vaccination policies have usually been able to maintain elimination or very low incidence of paediatric infectious diseases for long periods of time. Here, we show that including injunctive social norms can reconcile such behaviour-incidence models to observations. Adding social norms to a coupled behaviour-incidence model enables the model to better explain pertussis vaccine uptake and disease dynamics in the UK from 1967 to 2010, in both the vaccine-scare years and the years of high vaccine coverage. The model also illustrates how a vaccine scare can perpetuate suboptimal vaccine coverage long after perceived risk has returned to baseline, pre-vaccine-scare levels. However, at other model parameter values, social norms can perpetuate depressed vaccine coverage during a vaccine scare well beyond the time when the population's baseline vaccine risk perception returns to pre-scare levels. Social norms can strongly suppress vaccine uptake despite frequent outbreaks, as observed in some small communities. Significant portions of the parameter space also exhibit bistability, meaning long-term outcomes depend on the initial conditions. Depending on the context, social norms can either support or hinder immunization goals.

  10. Imitation as behaviour parsing.

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, R W

    2003-01-01

    Non-human great apes appear to be able to acquire elaborate skills partly by imitation, raising the possibility of the transfer of skill by imitation in animals that have only rudimentary mentalizing capacities: in contrast to the frequent assumption that imitation depends on prior understanding of others' intentions. Attempts to understand the apes' behaviour have led to the development of a purely mechanistic model of imitation, the 'behaviour parsing' model, in which the statistical regularities that are inevitable in planned behaviour are used to decipher the organization of another agent's behaviour, and thence to imitate parts of it. Behaviour can thereby be understood statistically in terms of its correlations (circumstances of use, effects on the environment) without understanding of intentions or the everyday physics of cause-and-effect. Thus, imitation of complex, novel behaviour may not require mentalizing, but conversely behaviour parsing may be a necessary preliminary to attributing intention and cause. PMID:12689378

  11. A meta-analysis of the effects of measuring theory of planned behaviour constructs on behaviour within prospective studies.

    PubMed

    Mankarious, Evon; Kothe, Emily

    2015-01-01

    Measurement reactivity effects, such as the mere measurement effect, have been proposed as a reason for behavioural changes in a number of theory of planned behaviour intervention studies. However, it is unclear whether such changes are the result of the mere measurement effect or of other artefacts of intervention study design. The aim of this study is to determine the size and direction of changes in health behaviours from baseline to follow-up in prospective studies using the theory of planned behaviour. Electronic databases were searched for the theory of planned behaviour studies which measured health behaviours at two or more time points. Change in behaviour was calculated for all studies. Sixty-six studies were included. Mean effect sizes across all studies were small and negative (d = -.03). Effect size was moderated by behaviour, behaviour type and follow-up length. Subgroup analyses showed significant decreases in socially undesirable behaviour (d = -.28), binge drinking (d = -.17), risk driving (d = -.20), sugar snack consumption (d = -.43) and sun-protective behaviour (d = -.18). Measurement of intention at baseline resulted in significant decreases in undesirable behaviour. Changes in undesirable behaviours reported in other studies may be the result of the mere measurement effect.

  12. Motivational wheel running reverses cueing behavioural inflexibility in rodents.

    PubMed

    Chomiak, Taylor; Brown, Andrew R; Teskey, G Campbell; Hu, Bin

    2017-09-18

    Behavioural inflexibility and associated atypical learning behaviours are common clinical manifestations of the autism spectrum disorder (ASD) phenotype. Despite advances in our understanding of ASD, little research has been devoted to experimental interventions that might help to circumvent behavioural inflexibility in ASD. The current paper suggests that motivational locomotion in the form of wheel running can reduce behavioural inflexibility and learning impairments in an ASD rat model, and discusses how the strategy of reward-coupled locomotor activity may lead to clinical interventions for children with ASD.

  13. Behavioural fever in zebrafish larvae.

    PubMed

    Rey, Sonia; Moiche, Visila; Boltaña, Sebastian; Teles, Mariana; MacKenzie, Simon

    2017-02-01

    Behavioural fever has been reported in different species of mobile ectotherms including the zebrafish, Danio rerio, in response to exogenous pyrogens. In this study we report, to our knowledge for the first time, upon the ontogenic onset of behavioural fever in zebrafish (Danio rerio) larvae. For this, zebrafish larvae (from first feeding to juveniles) were placed in a continuous thermal gradient providing the opportunity to select their preferred temperature. The novel thermal preference aquarium was based upon a continuous vertical column system and allows for non-invasive observation of larvae vertical distribution under isothermal (TR at 28 °C) and thermal gradient conditions (TCH: 28-32 °C). Larval thermal preference was assessed under both conditions with or without an immersion challenge, in order to detect the onset of the behavioural fever response. Our results defined the onset of the dsRNA induced behavioural fever at 18-20 days post fertilization (dpf). Significant differences were observed in dsRNA challenged larvae, which prefer higher temperatures (1-4 °C increase) throughout the experimental period as compared to non-challenged larvae. In parallel we measured the abundance of antiviral transcripts; viperin, gig2, irf7, trim25 and Mxb mRNAs in dsRNA challenged larvae under both thermal regimes: TR and TCh. Significant increases in the abundance of all measured transcripts were recorded under thermal choice conditions signifying that thermo-coupling and the resultant enhancement of the immune response to dsRNA challenge occurs from 18 dpf onwards in the zebrafish. The results are of importance as they identify a key developmental stage where the neuro-immune interface matures in the zebrafish likely providing increased resistance to viral infection.

  14. Helix coupling

    DOEpatents

    Ginell, W.S.

    1982-03-17

    A coupling for connecting helix members in series, which consists of a pair of U-shaped elements, one of which is attached to each helix end with the U sections of the elements interlocked. The coupling is particularly beneficial for interconnecting helical Nitinol elements utilized in thermal actuators or engines. Each coupling half is attached to the associated helix at two points, thereby providing axial load while being easily removed from the helix, and reusable.

  15. Helix coupling

    DOEpatents

    Ginell, W.S.

    1989-04-25

    A coupling for connecting helix members in series, which consists of a pair of U-shaped elements, one of which is attached to each helix end with the "U" sections of the elements interlocked. The coupling is particularly beneficial for interconnecting helical Nitinol elements utilized in thermal actuators or engines. Each coupling half is attached to the associated helix at two points, thereby providing axial load while being easily removed from the helix, and reusable.

  16. Helix coupling

    DOEpatents

    Ginell, William S.

    1989-04-25

    A coupling for connecting helix members in series, which consists of a pair of U-shaped elements, one of which is attached to each helix end with the "U" sections of the elements interlocked. The coupling is particularly beneficial for interconnecting helical Nitinol elements utilized in thermal actuators or engines. Each coupling half is attached to the associated helix at two points, thereby providing axial load while being easily removed from the helix, and reusable.

  17. Evolution of central pattern generators and rhythmic behaviours

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Paul S.

    2016-01-01

    Comparisons of rhythmic movements and the central pattern generators (CPGs) that control them uncover principles about the evolution of behaviour and neural circuits. Over the course of evolutionary history, gradual evolution of behaviours and their neural circuitry within any lineage of animals has been a predominant occurrence. Small changes in gene regulation can lead to divergence of circuit organization and corresponding changes in behaviour. However, some behavioural divergence has resulted from large-scale rewiring of the neural network. Divergence of CPG circuits has also occurred without a corresponding change in behaviour. When analogous rhythmic behaviours have evolved independently, it has generally been with different neural mechanisms. Repeated evolution of particular rhythmic behaviours has occurred within some lineages due to parallel evolution or latent CPGs. Particular motor pattern generating mechanisms have also evolved independently in separate lineages. The evolution of CPGs and rhythmic behaviours shows that although most behaviours and neural circuits are highly conserved, the nature of the behaviour does not dictate the neural mechanism and that the presence of homologous neural components does not determine the behaviour. This suggests that although behaviour is generated by neural circuits, natural selection can act separately on these two levels of biological organization. PMID:26598733

  18. Measuring mimicry: general corticospinal facilitation during observation of naturalistic behaviour.

    PubMed

    van Schaik, J E; Sacheli, L M; Bekkering, H; Toni, I; Aglioti, S M

    2017-07-01

    Mimicry of others' postures and behaviours forms an implicit yet indispensable component of social interactions. However, whereas numerous behavioural studies have investigated the occurrence of mimicry and its social sensitivity, the underlying neurocognitive mechanisms remain elusive. In this study, single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation was used to measure corticospinal facilitation during a naturalistic behaviour observation task adapted from the behavioural mimicry literature. Motor evoked potentials (MEPs) in participants' right hands were measured as they observed stimulus videos of a confederate describing photographs. MEPs were recorded while confederates were and were not carrying out hand and leg behaviours that also differed in spatial extent (i.e. large behaviours: face rubbing and leg crossing; small behaviours: finger tapping and foot bouncing). Importantly, the cover task instructions did not refer to the behaviours but instead required participants to focus on the confederates' photograph descriptions in order to later perform a recognition test. A general arousal effect was found, with higher MEPs during stimulus video observation than during a fixation-cross baseline, regardless of whether or not the confederate was carrying out a behaviour at the time of the pulse. When controlling for this general arousal effect, results showed that MEPs during observation of the larger two behaviours were significantly higher than the smaller two behaviours, irrespective of effector. Thus, using a controlled yet naturalistic paradigm, this study suggests that general sensorimotor arousal during social interactions could play a role in implicit behavioural mimicry. © 2017 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Evolution of central pattern generators and rhythmic behaviours.

    PubMed

    Katz, Paul S

    2016-01-05

    Comparisons of rhythmic movements and the central pattern generators (CPGs) that control them uncover principles about the evolution of behaviour and neural circuits. Over the course of evolutionary history, gradual evolution of behaviours and their neural circuitry within any lineage of animals has been a predominant occurrence. Small changes in gene regulation can lead to divergence of circuit organization and corresponding changes in behaviour. However, some behavioural divergence has resulted from large-scale rewiring of the neural network. Divergence of CPG circuits has also occurred without a corresponding change in behaviour. When analogous rhythmic behaviours have evolved independently, it has generally been with different neural mechanisms. Repeated evolution of particular rhythmic behaviours has occurred within some lineages due to parallel evolution or latent CPGs. Particular motor pattern generating mechanisms have also evolved independently in separate lineages. The evolution of CPGs and rhythmic behaviours shows that although most behaviours and neural circuits are highly conserved, the nature of the behaviour does not dictate the neural mechanism and that the presence of homologous neural components does not determine the behaviour. This suggests that although behaviour is generated by neural circuits, natural selection can act separately on these two levels of biological organization. © 2015 The Author(s).

  20. Social behaviour in mesopelagic jellyfish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaartvedt, Stein; Ugland, Karl I.; Klevjer, Thor A.; Røstad, Anders; Titelman, Josefin; Solberg, Ingrid

    2015-06-01

    Gelatinous organisms apparently play a central role in deep pelagic ecosystems, but lack of observational methodologies has restricted information on their behaviour. We made acoustic records of diel migrating jellyfish Periphylla periphylla forming small, ephemeral groups at the upper fringe of an acoustic scattering layer consisting of krill. Groups of P. periphylla were also documented photographically using a remotely operated vehicle (ROV). Although the adaptive value of group formation remains speculative, we clearly demonstrate the ability of these jellyfishes to locate and team up with each other.

  1. Social behaviour in mesopelagic jellyfish.

    PubMed

    Kaartvedt, Stein; Ugland, Karl I; Klevjer, Thor A; Røstad, Anders; Titelman, Josefin; Solberg, Ingrid

    2015-06-11

    Gelatinous organisms apparently play a central role in deep pelagic ecosystems, but lack of observational methodologies has restricted information on their behaviour. We made acoustic records of diel migrating jellyfish Periphylla periphylla forming small, ephemeral groups at the upper fringe of an acoustic scattering layer consisting of krill. Groups of P. periphylla were also documented photographically using a remotely operated vehicle (ROV). Although the adaptive value of group formation remains speculative, we clearly demonstrate the ability of these jellyfishes to locate and team up with each other.

  2. Social behaviour in mesopelagic jellyfish

    PubMed Central

    Kaartvedt, Stein; Ugland, Karl I.; Klevjer, Thor A.; Røstad, Anders; Titelman, Josefin; Solberg, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    Gelatinous organisms apparently play a central role in deep pelagic ecosystems, but lack of observational methodologies has restricted information on their behaviour. We made acoustic records of diel migrating jellyfish Periphylla periphylla forming small, ephemeral groups at the upper fringe of an acoustic scattering layer consisting of krill. Groups of P. periphylla were also documented photographically using a remotely operated vehicle (ROV). Although the adaptive value of group formation remains speculative, we clearly demonstrate the ability of these jellyfishes to locate and team up with each other. PMID:26065904

  3. Emergent patterns in space and time from daisyworld: a simple evolving coupled biosphere-climate model.

    PubMed

    Ackland, Graeme J; Wood, A Jamie

    2010-01-13

    We present a simplified model of a coupled planetary geosphere-biosphere, with two evolving species coupled through a single enviromental variable. The species do not compete directly, but instead compete through, and can evolve their effect on, this environmental parameter. The model produces an evolutionary arms race, with each species evolving extreme behaviour to counteract the other. The result is an apparently stable balance, with the planet supporting a maximum amount of life, in unusually patterned configurations. However, this balance is achieved by two countering effects and is susceptible to very large correlated fluctuations and extinction events if the balance is disturbed. This arms-race evolution is observed even for very small differences between the species: for a coupled evolving system, the 'neutral' theory of identical species is not the limiting case.

  4. Changes in the acoustic environment alter the foraging and sheltering behaviour of the cichlid Amititlania nigrofasciata.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Kirsty Elizabeth; Kunc, Hansjoerg P

    2015-07-01

    Anthropogenic noise can affect behaviour across a wide range of species in both terrestrial and aquatic environments. However, behaviours might not be affected in isolation. Therefore, a more holistic approach investigating how environmental stressors, such as noise pollution, affect different behaviours in concert is necessary. Using tank-based noise exposure experiments, we tested how changes in the acoustic environment affect the behaviour of the cichlid Amatitlania nigrofasciata. We found that exposure to anthropogenic noise affected a couple of behaviours: an increase in sheltering was accompanied by a decrease in foraging. Our results highlight the multiple negative effects of an environmental stressor on an individual's behaviour.

  5. Behaviour and effects of prescribed fire in masticated fuelbeds

    Treesearch

    Eric Knapp; J. Morgan Varner; Matt Busse; Carl Skinner; Carol Shestak

    2011-01-01

    Mechanical mastication converts shrub and small tree fuels into surface fuels, and this method is being widely used as a treatment to reduce fire hazard. The compactness of these fuelbeds is thought to moderate fire behaviour, but whether standard fuel models can accurately predict fire behaviour and effects is poorly understood. Prescribed burns were conducted in...

  6. Behaviour Profile of Hungarian Adolescent Outpatients with a Dual Diagnosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dinya, Elek; Csorba, Janos; Suli, Agota; Grosz, Zsofia

    2012-01-01

    The behaviour dimensions of 244 Hungarian adolescent psychiatric outpatients with a dual diagnosis (intellectual disability and psychiatric diagnosis) were examined by means of the adapted version of the Behaviour Problem Inventory (BPI, Rojahn, Matson, Lott, Esbensen, & Smalls, 2001). Four IQ subgroups were created: borderline, mild, moderate…

  7. Behaviour Profile of Hungarian Adolescent Outpatients with a Dual Diagnosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dinya, Elek; Csorba, Janos; Suli, Agota; Grosz, Zsofia

    2012-01-01

    The behaviour dimensions of 244 Hungarian adolescent psychiatric outpatients with a dual diagnosis (intellectual disability and psychiatric diagnosis) were examined by means of the adapted version of the Behaviour Problem Inventory (BPI, Rojahn, Matson, Lott, Esbensen, & Smalls, 2001). Four IQ subgroups were created: borderline, mild, moderate…

  8. Coexisting Problem Behaviour in Severe Dyslexia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dahle, Anne Elisabeth; Knivsberg, Ann-Mari; Andreassen, Anne Brit

    2011-01-01

    A small group of children and young adolescent with dyslexia has severely impaired reading skills despite prolonged special education. These are the students in focus. In dyslexia, problem behaviour, internalised as well as externalised, has previously been reported, so also for the participants with dyslexia in this study. The aim of the present…

  9. Coexisting Problem Behaviour in Severe Dyslexia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dahle, Anne Elisabeth; Knivsberg, Ann-Mari; Andreassen, Anne Brit

    2011-01-01

    A small group of children and young adolescent with dyslexia has severely impaired reading skills despite prolonged special education. These are the students in focus. In dyslexia, problem behaviour, internalised as well as externalised, has previously been reported, so also for the participants with dyslexia in this study. The aim of the present…

  10. Using Group Cognitive Behavioural Therapy Intervention in School Settings with Pupils Who Have Externalizing Behavioural Difficulties: An Unexpected Result

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Squires, Garry; Caddick, Katie

    2012-01-01

    There has been a growing interest in the use of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) in school settings by educational psychologists in England. This small-scale study set out to explore the effectiveness of a school-based, eight-session CBT intervention for 12-13-year-old children with externalizing behavioural difficulties. Twelve pupils were…

  11. Using Group Cognitive Behavioural Therapy Intervention in School Settings with Pupils Who Have Externalizing Behavioural Difficulties: An Unexpected Result

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Squires, Garry; Caddick, Katie

    2012-01-01

    There has been a growing interest in the use of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) in school settings by educational psychologists in England. This small-scale study set out to explore the effectiveness of a school-based, eight-session CBT intervention for 12-13-year-old children with externalizing behavioural difficulties. Twelve pupils were…

  12. Measuring the Shear-Tension Coupling of Engineering Fabrics

    SciTech Connect

    Abdiwi, F.; Harrison, P.; Guo, Z.; Yu, W. R.; Potluri, P.

    2011-05-04

    Modelling the forming process of engineering fabrics and textile composites using a mechanical approach, such as FEM, requires characterisation of material behaviour. Using Picture Frame (PF) tests, several previous studies have reported a coupling between in-plane tension and fabric shear compliance. However, characterising this behaviour accurately has proven problematic due to the sensitivity of the PF test to small fabric misalignments in the test rig, prompting innovative solutions such as the use of load-cells mounted on the side bars of the PF rig to measure in-plane tension during testing. This paper focuses on an alternative testing technique, the Biaxial Bias Extension test, as a means to investigate this coupling. The approach has several benefits including simple equipment requirements, the ability to vary sample dimensions and boundary conditions. The main difficulty lies in extracting the material contribution to the recorded signal. To do this, an experimental method is demonstrated using two very different textiles; glass fabric and self-reinforced polypropylene both plain weaves. The latter is challenging to characterise and was chosen due to its high propensity to wrinkle at room temperature.

  13. Measuring the Shear-Tension Coupling of Engineering Fabrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdiwi, F.; Harrison, P.; Guo, Z.; Potluri, P.; Yu, W. R.

    2011-05-01

    Modelling the forming process of engineering fabrics and textile composites using a mechanical approach, such as FEM, requires characterisation of material behaviour. Using Picture Frame (PF) tests, several previous studies have reported a coupling between in-plane tension and fabric shear compliance. However, characterising this behaviour accurately has proven problematic due to the sensitivity of the PF test to small fabric misalignments in the test rig, prompting innovative solutions such as the use of load-cells mounted on the side bars of the PF rig to measure in-plane tension during testing. This paper focuses on an alternative testing technique, the Biaxial Bias Extension test, as a means to investigate this coupling. The approach has several benefits including simple equipment requirements, the ability to vary sample dimensions and boundary conditions. The main difficulty lies in extracting the material contribution to the recorded signal. To do this, an experimental method is demonstrated using two very different textiles; glass fabric and self-reinforced polypropylene both plain weaves. The latter is challenging to characterise and was chosen due to its high propensity to wrinkle at room temperature.

  14. Analysis of amino acids using serially coupled columns.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Segura, Tamara; Camacho-Molinero, Carolina; Torres-Lapasió, José Ramón; García-Alvarez-Coque, M Celia

    2017-07-01

    Single conventional columns in reversed-phase liquid chromatography are insufficient for analysing the isoindoles of primary amino acids due to their limited functionality. An interesting possibility for increasing the separation power is the combination of several columns of different nature, where the length is modified by coupling small segments. This approach may require a considerable investment to have multiple lengths for each stationary phase. However, the combination of only two columns of fixed length can be enough to resolve satisfactorily relatively complex mixtures, provided that an optimised gradient program is applied. In this work, a mixture of 19 primary amino acid isoindoles found in proteins was analysed. Four stationary phases were assayed: C18, pentafluorophenyl-C18, C4 and cyano. The mixture of isoindoles was successfully resolved in practical times using a pentafluorophenyl-C18 column coupled to a C4 column, in spite of the extremely poor performance obtained when each column is used isolatedly, independently of the length. The extreme diversity in the polarities of the isoindoles and the need of extrapolating the retention behaviour in certain regions of the solvent content domain makes the modelling of the retention behaviour of the isoindoles particularly difficult. Nevertheless, the predicted optimal separations were very satisfactory. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Towards an integrated approach of pedestrian behaviour and exposure.

    PubMed

    Papadimitriou, Eleonora

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, an integrated methodology for the analysis of pedestrian behaviour and exposure is proposed, allowing to identify and quantify the effect of pedestrian behaviour, road and traffic characteristics on pedestrian risk exposure, for each pedestrian and for populations of pedestrians. The paper builds on existing research on pedestrian exposure, namely the Routledge microscopic indicator, proposes adjustments to take into account road, traffic and human factors and extends the use of this indicator on area-wide level. Moreover, this paper uses integrated choice and latent variables (ICLV) models of pedestrian behaviour, taking into account road, traffic and human factors. Finally, a methodology is proposed for the integrated estimation of pedestrian behaviour and exposure on the basis of road, traffic and human factors. The method is tested with data from a field survey in Athens, Greece, which used pedestrian behaviour observations as well as a questionnaire on human factors of pedestrian behaviour. The data were used (i) to develop ICLV models of pedestrian behaviour and (ii) to estimate the behaviour and exposure of pedestrians for different road, traffic and behavioural scenarios. The results suggest that both pedestrian behaviour and exposure are largely defined by a small number of factors: road type, traffic volume and pedestrian risk-taking. The probability for risk-taking behaviour and the related exposure decrease in less demanding road and traffic environments. A synthesis of the results allows to enhance the understanding of the interactions between behaviour and exposure of pedestrians and to identify conditions of increased risk exposure. These conditions include principal urban arterials (where risk-taking behaviour is low but the related exposure is very high) and minor arterials (where risk-taking behaviour is more frequent, and the related exposure is still high). A "paradox" of increased risk-taking behaviour of pedestrians with low

  16. Behavioural aspects of terrorism.

    PubMed

    Leistedt, Samuel J

    2013-05-10

    Behavioural and social sciences are useful in collecting and analysing intelligence data, understanding terrorism, and developing strategies to combat terrorism. This article aims to examine the psychopathological concepts of terrorism and discusses the developing roles for behavioural scientists. A systematic review was conducted of studies investigating behavioural aspects of terrorism. These studies were identified by a systematic search of databases, textbooks, and a supplementary manual search of references. Several fundamental concepts were identified that continue to influence the motives and the majority of the behaviours of those who support or engage in this kind of specific violence. Regardless of the psychological aspects and new roles for psychiatrists, the behavioural sciences will continue to be called upon to assist in developing better methods to gather and analyse intelligence, to understand terrorism, and perhaps to stem the radicalisation process.

  17. Behavioural determinants of obesity.

    PubMed

    Rennie, Kirsten L; Johnson, Laura; Jebb, Susan A

    2005-09-01

    Obesity in children arises from a complex interplay between genetic susceptibility and behaviour, primarily relating to dietary habits and physical activity. Evidence for specific behavioural factors that promote or protect against excess weight gain in children is more limited than in adults, and the effects of growth and development are not clear. A number of behavioural risk factors has been postulated, including diets with a high energy density, high consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages, large portion sizes, eating patterns, high levels of sedentary behaviour and low levels of physical activity. However, most evidence is derived from cross-sectional studies which frequently yield conflicting results. More prospective studies with accurate measures of exposures and outcomes in terms of body composition are needed to provide more robust evidence on which to base interventions to achieve long-term behavioural change and prevent excess weight gains in children.

  18. Somnambulistic sexual behaviour (sexsomnia).

    PubMed

    Ebrahim, Irshaad Osman

    2006-05-01

    Somnambulism or sleepwalking is a viable defence on the basis of automatism. The behaviours that occur during sleepwalking can be highly complex and include sexual behaviour of all types. Somnambulistic sexual behaviour (also called sexsomnia, sleep sex) is considered a variant of sleepwalking disorder as the overwhelming majority of people with Sexsomnia have a history of parasomnia and a family history of sleepwalking. Sexual behaviour during a sleep automatism can vary from explicit sexual vocalisations, to violent masturbation, to complex sexual acts including anal, oral and vaginal penetration. A recent case in England is reported where the defendant was acquitted on 3 charges of rape on the basis of automatism due to somnambulistic sexual behaviour.

  19. Genetics of impulsive behaviour.

    PubMed

    Bevilacqua, Laura; Goldman, David

    2013-01-01

    Impulsivity, defined as the tendency to act without foresight, comprises a multitude of constructs and is associated with a variety of psychiatric disorders. Dissecting different aspects of impulsive behaviour and relating these to specific neurobiological circuits would improve our understanding of the etiology of complex behaviours for which impulsivity is key, and advance genetic studies in this behavioural domain. In this review, we will discuss the heritability of some impulsivity constructs and their possible use as endophenotypes (heritable, disease-associated intermediate phenotypes). Several functional genetic variants associated with impulsive behaviour have been identified by the candidate gene approach and re-sequencing, and whole genome strategies can be implemented for discovery of novel rare and common alleles influencing impulsivity. Via deep sequencing an uncommon HTR2B stop codon, common in one population, was discovered, with implications for understanding impulsive behaviour in both humans and rodents and for future gene discovery.

  20. Genetics of impulsive behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Bevilacqua, Laura; Goldman, David

    2013-01-01

    Impulsivity, defined as the tendency to act without foresight, comprises a multitude of constructs and is associated with a variety of psychiatric disorders. Dissecting different aspects of impulsive behaviour and relating these to specific neurobiological circuits would improve our understanding of the etiology of complex behaviours for which impulsivity is key, and advance genetic studies in this behavioural domain. In this review, we will discuss the heritability of some impulsivity constructs and their possible use as endophenotypes (heritable, disease-associated intermediate phenotypes). Several functional genetic variants associated with impulsive behaviour have been identified by the candidate gene approach and re-sequencing, and whole genome strategies can be implemented for discovery of novel rare and common alleles influencing impulsivity. Via deep sequencing an uncommon HTR2B stop codon, common in one population, was discovered, with implications for understanding impulsive behaviour in both humans and rodents and for future gene discovery. PMID:23440466

  1. A miniaturized capacitively coupled plasma microtorch optical emission spectrometer and a Rh coiled-filament as small-sized electrothermal vaporization device for simultaneous determination of volatile elements from liquid microsamples: spectral and analytical characterization.

    PubMed

    Frentiu, Tiberiu; Darvasi, Eugen; Butaciu, Sinziana; Ponta, Michaela; Petreus, Dorin; Mihaltan, Alin I; Frentiu, Maria

    2014-11-01

    A low power and low argon consumption (13.56 MHz, 15 W, 150 ml min(-1)) capacitively coupled plasma microtorch interfaced with a low-resolution microspectrometer and a small-sized electrothermal vaporization Rh coiled-filament as liquid microsample introduction device into the plasma was investigated for the simultaneous determination of several volatile elements of interest for environment. Constructive details, spectral and analytical characteristics, and optimum operating conditions of the laboratory equipment for the simultaneous determination of Ag, Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn requiring low vaporization power are provided. The method involves drying of 10 μl sample at 100°C, vaporization at 1500°C and emission measurement by capture of 20 successive spectral episodes each at an integration time of 500 ms. Experiments showed that emission of elements and plasma background were disturbed by the presence of complex matrix and hot Ar flow transporting the microsample into plasma. The emission spectrum of elements is simple, dominated by the resonance lines. The analytical system provided detection limits in the ng ml(-1) range: 0.5(Ag); 1.5(Cd); 5.6(Cu); 20(Pb) and 3(Zn) and absolute detection limits of the order of pg: 5(Ag); 15(Cd); 56(Cu); 200(Pb) and 30(Zn). It was demonstrated the utility and capability of the miniaturized analytical system in the simultaneous determination of elements in soil and water sediment using the standard addition method to compensate for the non-spectral effects of alkali and earth alkaline elements. The analysis of eight certified reference materials exhibited reliable results with recovery in the range of 95-108% and precision of 0.5-9.0% for the five examined elements. The proposed miniaturized analytical system is attractive due to the simple construction of the electrothermal vaporization device and microtorch, low costs associated to plasma generation, high analytical sensitivity and easy-to-run for simultaneous multielemental

  2. Nuclear Quadrupole Coupling Tensors of 2H in the a-Alum RbAl(SO4)2 · 12D2O and the Dynamical Behaviour of the D2O Molecules. An Investigation by NMR and IR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramakrishna, J.; Weiden, Norbert; Weiss, Alarich

    1990-04-01

    By single crystal NMR the nuclear quadrupole coupling constants eQΦzz h-1 (2H), the asymmetry parameters η(2H) and the direction cosines of the principal axes of the electric field gradient tensors of the 2H atoms of the two kinds of D2O molecules have been determined at 295 K in RbAl(SO4)2 · 12D2O. The results show that the D2O molecules surrounding the ion Al3+ are "static" within the time scale of the 2H nuclear quadrupole interaction while the D2O belonging to the octahedron around the Rb+ undergoes fast reorientations around the twofold molecular axis. For the two kinds of D2O in the alum we found: eQΦzz(1)h-1 (2H) = 186.5 kHz, η(1),(2H) = 0.1234; eQΦzz(2)h-1 (2H) = 169.7 kHz,η (2)(2H) = 0.1297; eQΦzz(3)h-1(2H) = 122.1 kHz, (2H) = 0.8087. eQΦzz(1) and eQΦzz(2) belong to the "static" D2O molecules and an assignment to the two different 2H atoms has been performed. The IR spectra of RbAl(SO4)2 · 12(H1-xDx)2O have been investigated, and for the O - D stretching frequencies values of 2145 cm-1 , 2235 cm-1 , 2470 cm-1 and 2525 cm -1 have been obtained. They agree well with the relations between ṽOD and eQΦzz h-1(2H) given in the literature.

  3. Thermomechanical analysis of Natural Rubber behaviour stressed at room temperature.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caborgan, R.; Muracciole, J. M.; Wattrisse, B.; Chrysochoos, A.

    2010-06-01

    Owing to their high molecular mobility, stressed rubber chains can easily change their conformations and get orientated. This phenomena leads to so high reversible draw ratio that this behaviour is called rubber elasticity [1-3]. The analogy with ideal gases leads to an internal energy independent of elongation, the stress being attributed to a so-called configuration entropy. However, this analysis cannot take thermal expansion into account and moreover prohibits predicting standard thermo-elastic effect noticed at small elongations and the thermoelastic inversion effects [4]. This paper aims at : observing and quantifying dissipative and coupling effects associated with deformation energy, generated when Natural Rubber is stretched. re-examine the thermomechanical behaviour model of rubberlike materials, under the generalised standard material concept. From an experimental viewpoint, energy balance is created using infrared and quantitative imaging techniques. Digital Image Correlation (DIC) provides in-the-plane displacement fields and, after derivation, strain and strain-rate fields. We have used those techniques to evidence the thermoelastic inversion effect as shown on Figure 1 where different weights have been fixed to warmed specimen and we monitored the sample deformation while it recovers room temperature. But we have also used those techniques to perform energy balance : analysis of the mechanical equilibrium allows estimates of the stress pattern and computation of deformation energy rates under a plane stress hypothesis [5]. Infrared Thermography (IRT) gives the surface temperature of the sample. To estimate the distribution of heat sources, image processing with a local heat equation and a minimal set of approximation functions (image filtering) was used. The time courses of deformation energy and heat associated with cyclic process are plotted in

  4. Understanding individual routing behaviour.

    PubMed

    Lima, Antonio; Stanojevic, Rade; Papagiannaki, Dina; Rodriguez, Pablo; González, Marta C

    2016-03-01

    Knowing how individuals move between places is fundamental to advance our understanding of human mobility (González et al. 2008 Nature 453, 779-782. (doi:10.1038/nature06958)), improve our urban infrastructure (Prato 2009 J. Choice Model. 2, 65-100. (doi:10.1016/S1755-5345(13)70005-8)) and drive the development of transportation systems. Current route-choice models that are used in transportation planning are based on the widely accepted assumption that people follow the minimum cost path (Wardrop 1952 Proc. Inst. Civ. Eng. 1, 325-362. (doi:10.1680/ipeds.1952.11362)), despite little empirical support. Fine-grained location traces collected by smart devices give us today an unprecedented opportunity to learn how citizens organize their travel plans into a set of routes, and how similar behaviour patterns emerge among distinct individual choices. Here we study 92 419 anonymized GPS trajectories describing the movement of personal cars over an 18-month period. We group user trips by origin-destination and we find that most drivers use a small number of routes for their routine journeys, and tend to have a preferred route for frequent trips. In contrast to the cost minimization assumption, we also find that a significant fraction of drivers' routes are not optimal. We present a spatial probability distribution that bounds the route selection space within an ellipse, having the origin and the destination as focal points, characterized by high eccentricity independent of the scale. While individual routing choices are not captured by path optimization, their spatial bounds are similar, even for trips performed by distinct individuals and at various scales. These basic discoveries can inform realistic route-choice models that are not based on optimization, having an impact on several applications, such as infrastructure planning, routing recommendation systems and new mobility solutions. © 2016 The Author(s).

  5. Understanding individual routing behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Stanojevic, Rade; Papagiannaki, Dina; Rodriguez, Pablo; González, Marta C.

    2016-01-01

    Knowing how individuals move between places is fundamental to advance our understanding of human mobility (González et al. 2008 Nature 453, 779–782. (doi:10.1038/nature06958)), improve our urban infrastructure (Prato 2009 J. Choice Model. 2, 65–100. (doi:10.1016/S1755-5345(13)70005-8)) and drive the development of transportation systems. Current route-choice models that are used in transportation planning are based on the widely accepted assumption that people follow the minimum cost path (Wardrop 1952 Proc. Inst. Civ. Eng. 1, 325–362. (doi:10.1680/ipeds.1952.11362)), despite little empirical support. Fine-grained location traces collected by smart devices give us today an unprecedented opportunity to learn how citizens organize their travel plans into a set of routes, and how similar behaviour patterns emerge among distinct individual choices. Here we study 92 419 anonymized GPS trajectories describing the movement of personal cars over an 18-month period. We group user trips by origin–destination and we find that most drivers use a small number of routes for their routine journeys, and tend to have a preferred route for frequent trips. In contrast to the cost minimization assumption, we also find that a significant fraction of drivers' routes are not optimal. We present a spatial probability distribution that bounds the route selection space within an ellipse, having the origin and the destination as focal points, characterized by high eccentricity independent of the scale. While individual routing choices are not captured by path optimization, their spatial bounds are similar, even for trips performed by distinct individuals and at various scales. These basic discoveries can inform realistic route-choice models that are not based on optimization, having an impact on several applications, such as infrastructure planning, routing recommendation systems and new mobility solutions. PMID:26962031

  6. Oxidative stress, activity behaviour and body mass in captive parrots.

    PubMed

    Larcombe, S D; Tregaskes, C A; Coffey, J; Stevenson, A E; Alexander, L G; Arnold, K E

    2015-01-01

    Many parrot species are kept in captivity for conservation, but often show poor reproduction, health and survival. These traits are known to be influenced by oxidative stress, the imbalance between the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and ability of antioxidant defences to ameliorate ROS damage. In humans, oxidative stress is linked with obesity, lack of exercise and poor nutrition, all of which are common in captive animals. Here, we tested whether small parrots (budgerigars, Melopsittacus undulatus) maintained in typical pet cages and on ad libitum food varied in oxidative profile, behaviour and body mass. Importantly, as with many birds held in captivity, they did not have enough space to engage in extensive free flight. Four types of oxidative damage, single-stranded DNA breaks (low-pH comet assay), alkali-labile sites in DNA (high-pH comet assay), sensitivity of DNA to ROS (H2O2-treated comet assay) and malondialdehyde (a byproduct of lipid peroxidation), were uncorrelated with each other and with plasma concentrations of dietary antioxidants. Without strenuous exercise over 28 days in a relatively small cage, more naturally 'active' individuals had more single-stranded DNA breaks than sedentary birds. High body mass at the start or end of the experiment, coupled with substantial mass gain, were all associated with raised sensitivity of DNA to ROS. Thus, high body mass in these captive birds was associated with oxidative damage. These birds were not lacking dietary antioxidants, because final body mass was positively related to plasma levels of retinol, zeaxanthin and α-tocopherol. Individuals varied widely in activity levels, feeding behaviour, mass gain and oxidative profile despite standardized living conditions. DNA damage is often associated with poor immunocompetence, low fertility and faster ageing. Thus, we have candidate mechanisms for the limited lifespan and fecundity common to many birds kept for conservation purposes.

  7. Oxidative stress, activity behaviour and body mass in captive parrots

    PubMed Central

    Larcombe, S. D.; Tregaskes, C. A.; Coffey, J.; Stevenson, A. E.; Alexander, L. G.; Arnold, K. E.

    2015-01-01

    Many parrot species are kept in captivity for conservation, but often show poor reproduction, health and survival. These traits are known to be influenced by oxidative stress, the imbalance between the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and ability of antioxidant defences to ameliorate ROS damage. In humans, oxidative stress is linked with obesity, lack of exercise and poor nutrition, all of which are common in captive animals. Here, we tested whether small parrots (budgerigars, Melopsittacus undulatus) maintained in typical pet cages and on ad libitum food varied in oxidative profile, behaviour and body mass. Importantly, as with many birds held in captivity, they did not have enough space to engage in extensive free flight. Four types of oxidative damage, single-stranded DNA breaks (low-pH comet assay), alkali-labile sites in DNA (high-pH comet assay), sensitivity of DNA to ROS (H2O2-treated comet assay) and malondialdehyde (a byproduct of lipid peroxidation), were uncorrelated with each other and with plasma concentrations of dietary antioxidants. Without strenuous exercise over 28 days in a relatively small cage, more naturally ‘active’ individuals had more single-stranded DNA breaks than sedentary birds. High body mass at the start or end of the experiment, coupled with substantial mass gain, were all associated with raised sensitivity of DNA to ROS. Thus, high body mass in these captive birds was associated with oxidative damage. These birds were not lacking dietary antioxidants, because final body mass was positively related to plasma levels of retinol, zeaxanthin and α-tocopherol. Individuals varied widely in activity levels, feeding behaviour, mass gain and oxidative profile despite standardized living conditions. DNA damage is often associated with poor immunocompetence, low fertility and faster ageing. Thus, we have candidate mechanisms for the limited lifespan and fecundity common to many birds kept for conservation purposes. PMID

  8. Nonadiabatic Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kryachko, Eugene S.

    The general features of the nonadiabatic coupling and its relation to molecular properties are surveyed. Some consequences of the [`]equation of motion', formally expressing a [`]smoothness' of a given molecular property within the diabatic basis, are demonstrated. A particular emphasis is made on the relation between a [`]smoothness' of the electronic dipole moment and the generalized Mulliken-Hush formula for the diabatic electronic coupling.

  9. Applying One Health to behaviour.

    PubMed

    Bower, Caroline

    2014-11-08

    The British Veterinary Behaviour Association and the Association of Pet Behaviour Counsellors held a meeting last month to highlight the One Health principle with regard to the behaviour of people and animals, particularly pets. Caroline Bower reports. British Veterinary Association.

  10. Fatigue behaviour of composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartwig, G.; Hübner, R.; Knaak, S.; Pannkoke, C.

    An important design parameter for cyclically loaded structures (e.g. transport vessels) is the fatigue endurance limit. The cryogenic fatigue behaviour with different types of fibres and matrices has been investigated. The main emphasis it put on the behaviour of fibre dominated properties. It is surprising that the fatigue strength even of unidirectional fibre composites is strongly influenced by the matrix type. This will be discussed for carbon fibre composites with thermoplastic and duroplastic matrices under tensile and shear loading. For crossplies (with non-woven fabrics) the interaction between laminates controls the fatigue behaviour. The interaction depends on the matrix type and is different for tensile and shear loading.

  11. Cognitive science and behaviourism.

    PubMed

    Skinner, B F

    1985-08-01

    In this paper it is argued that cognitive scientists, claiming the support of brain science and computer simulation, have revived a traditional view that behaviour is initiated by an internal, autonomous mind. In doing so, they have misused the metaphor of storage and retrieval, given neurology a misleading assignment, frequently replaced controlled experimental conditions with mere descriptions of conditions and the assessment of behaviour with statements of expectations and intentions, given feelings and states of mind the status of causes of behaviour rather than the products of the causes, and failed to define many key terms in dimensions acceptable to science.

  12. Boundary Critical Behaviour of Two-Dimensional Layered Ising Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelizzola, Alessandro

    Layered models are models in which the coupling constants depend in an arbitrary way on one spatial coordinate, usually the distance from a free surface or boundary. Here the theory of the boundary critical behaviour of two-dimensional layered Ising models, including the Hilhorst-van Leeuwen model and models for aperiodic systems, is reviewed, with a particular attention to exact results for the critical behaviour and the boundary order parameter.

  13. Early ant trajectories: spatial behaviour before behaviourism.

    PubMed

    Wehner, Rüdiger

    2016-04-01

    In the beginning of the twentieth century, when Jacques Loeb's and John Watson's mechanistic view of life started to dominate animal physiology and behavioural biology, several scientists with different academic backgrounds got engaged in studying the wayfinding behaviour of ants. Largely unaffected by the scientific spirit of the time, they worked independently of each other in different countries: in Algeria, Tunisia, Spain, Switzerland and the United States of America. In the current literature on spatial cognition these early ant researchers--Victor Cornetz, Felix Santschi, Charles Turner and Rudolf Brun--are barely mentioned. Moreover, it is virtually unknown that the great neuroanatomist Santiago Ramón y Cajal had also worked on spatial orientation in ants. This general neglect is certainly due to the fact that nearly all these ant researchers were scientific loners, who did their idiosyncratic investigations outside the realm of comparative physiology, neurobiology and the behavioural sciences of the time, and published their results in French, German, and Spanish at rather inaccessible places. Even though one might argue that much of their work resulted in mainly anecdotal evidence, the conceptual approaches of these early ant researchers preempt much of the present-day discussions on spatial representation in animals.

  14. Auto-Graph: Considering the Utility of Student Behaviour Self-Monitoring for Inclusive Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jull, Stephen K.

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports the outcomes of a small-scale exploratory study that examined the utility of a novel computer-supported student behaviour self-monitoring procedure called Auto-Graph. The Auto-Graph procedure is a universal classroom behaviour management strategy for responding to disruptive antisocial behaviours. It was designed to provide…

  15. Psychology: Inducing green behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thøgersen, John

    2013-02-01

    Economic arguments, such as saving money, are often used to promote pro-environmental actions -- for example, reducing energy use. However, research shows that people's environmental motives are sometimes better drivers of behavioural change.

  16. Equine learning behaviour.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Jack; Arkins, Sean

    2007-09-01

    Scientists and equestrians continually seek to achieve a clearer understanding of equine learning behaviour and its implications for training. Behavioural and learning processes in the horse are likely to influence not only equine athletic success but also the usefulness of the horse as a domesticated species. However given the status and commercial importance of the animal, equine learning behaviour has received only limited investigation. Indeed most experimental studies on equine cognitive function to date have addressed behaviour, learning and conceptualization processes at a moderately basic cognitive level compared to studies in other species. It is however, likely that the horses with the greatest ability to learn and form/understand concepts are those, which are better equipped to succeed in terms of the human-horse relationship and the contemporary training environment. Within equitation generally, interpretation of the behavioural processes and training of the desired responses in the horse are normally attempted using negative reinforcement strategies. On the other hand, experimental designs to actually induce and/or measure equine learning rely almost exclusively on primary positive reinforcement regimes. Employing two such different approaches may complicate interpretation and lead to difficulties in identifying problematic or undesirable behaviours in the horse. The visual system provides the horse with direct access to immediate environmental stimuli that affect behaviour but vision in the horse is of yet not fully investigated or understood. Further investigations of the equine visual system will benefit our understanding of equine perception, cognitive function and the subsequent link with learning and training. More detailed comparative investigations of feral or free-ranging and domestic horses may provide useful evidence of attention, stress and motivational issues affecting behavioural and learning processes in the horse. The challenge for

  17. Wave behaviour and noncomplementary particle behaviour in the same experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangwala, Sadiq; Roy, S. M.

    1994-07-01

    Grangier, Roger and Aspect have recently performed beautiful experiments, which show that the same single photon source shows wave behaviour or particle behaviour depending on the experimental arrangement. We propose experiments in which quantum mechanics predicts wave behaviour and noncomplementary particle behaviour in the same experiment.

  18. FLEXIBLE COUPLING

    DOEpatents

    Babelay, E.F.

    1962-02-13

    A flexible shaft coupling for operation at speeds in excess of 14,000 rpm is designed which requires no lubrication. A driving sleeve member and a driven sleeve member are placed in concentric spaced relationship. A torque force is transmitted to the driven member from the driving member through a plurality of nylon balls symmetrically disposed between the spaced sleeves. The balls extend into races and recesses within the respective sleeve members. The sleeve members have a suitable clearance therebetween and the balls have a suitable radial clearance during operation of the coupling to provide a relatively loose coupling. These clearances accommodate for both parallel and/or angular misalignments and avoid metal-tometal contact between the sleeve members during operation. Thus, no lubrication is needed, and a minimum of vibrations is transmitted between the sleeve members. (AEC)

  19. Prosthesis coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reswick, J. B.; Mooney, V.; Bright, C. W.; Owens, L. J. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A coupling for use in an apparatus for connecting a prosthesis to the bone of a stump of an amputated limb is described which permits a bio-compatible carbon sleeve forming a part of the prosthesis connector to float so as to prevent disturbing the skin seal around the carbon sleeve. The coupling includes a flexible member interposed between a socket that is inserted within an intermedullary cavity of the bone and the sleeve. A lock pin is carried by the prosthesis and has a stem portion which is adapted to be coaxially disposed and slideably within the tubular female socket for securing the prosthesis to the stump. The skin around the percutaneous carbon sleeve is able to move as a result of the flexing coupling so as to reduce stresses caused by changes in the stump shape and/or movement between the bone and the flesh portion of the stump.

  20. Velocity dependant splash behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamlett, C. A. E.; Shirtcliffe, N. J.; McHale, G.; Ahn, S.; Doerr, S. H.; Bryant, R.; Newton, M. I.

    2012-04-01

    Extreme soil water repellency can occur in nature via condensation of volatile organic compounds released during wildfires and can lead to increased erosion rate. Such extreme water repellent soil can be classified as superhydrophobic and shares similar chemical and topographical features to specifically designed superhydrophobic surfaces. Previous studies using high speed videography to investigate single droplet impact behaviour on artificial superhydrophobic have revealed three distinct modes of splash behaviour (rebound, pinned and fragmentation) which are dependent on the impact velocity of the droplet. In our studies, using high-speed videography, we show that such splash behaviour can be replicated on fixed 'model' water repellent soils (hydrophobic glass beads/particles). We show that the type of splash behaviour is dependent on both the size and chemical nature of the fixed particles. The particle shape also influences the splash behaviour as shown by drop impact experiments on fixed sand samples. We have also studied soil samples, as collected from the field, which shows that the type of droplet splash behaviour can lead to enhanced soil particle transport.

  1. Synchronization, stickiness effects and intermittent oscillations in coupled nonlinear stochastic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouvaris, N.; Provata, A.

    2009-08-01

    Long distance reactive and diffusive coupling is introduced in a spatially extended nonlinear stochastic network of interacting particles. The network serves as a substrate for Lotka-Volterra dynamics with 3rd order nonlinearities. If the network includes only local nearest neighbour interactions, the system organizes into a number of local asynchronous oscillators. It is shown that (a) Introduction of all-to-all coupling in the network leads the system into global, center-type, conservative oscillations as dictated by the mean-field dynamics. (b) Introduction of reactive coupling to the network leads the system to intermittent oscillations where the trajectories stick for short times in bounded regions of space, with subsequent jumps between different bounded regions. (c) Introduction of diffusive coupling to the system does not alter the dynamics for small values of the diffusive coupling pdiff, while after a critical value pdiff c the system synchronizes into a limit cycle with specific frequency, deviating non-trivially from the mean-field center-type behaviour. The frequency of the limit cycle oscillations depends on the reaction rates and on the diffusion coupling. The amplitude σ of the limit cycle depends on the control parameter pdiff.

  2. The couple as context: Latino gay male couples and HIV.

    PubMed

    Beougher, Sean C; Gomez, Walter; Hoff, Colleen C

    2011-03-01

    HIV-prevention efforts with gay men in relationships frequently omit primary partners. When they are considered, examinations of race/ethnicity are often overlooked despite higher infection rates among gay men of colour. Acknowledging both the need to contextualise the behaviours that may affect HIV risk for gay men of colour and the disproportionate impact of HIV on Latino gay men, the present study utilised semi-structured, qualitative interviews to explore relationship dynamics, sexual agreements and behaviours, safer sex choices and HIV risk among nine Latino gay male couples. All participants were HIV-negative and in concordant negative relationships. Additionally, nearly all reported closed agreements. Analysis revealed participants engaging in four behaviours that may actively reduce their HIV risk: approaching sexual agreements from a practical standpoint, maintaining a high literacy around HIV, having exposure to social support groups for Latino gay men and finding support in their relationship with another Latino gay man. Additional issues are raised where long-term HIV prevention is concerned. Intimate relationships are an important context for understanding both HIV risk and prevention among Latino gay men. Likewise, race/ethnicity provides an indispensable perspective on all research with gay couples. Future prevention efforts with gay men must strive to include both.

  3. The couple as context: Latino gay male couples and HIV

    PubMed Central

    Beougher, Sean C.; Gómez, Walter; Hoff, Colleen C.

    2011-01-01

    HIV prevention efforts with gay men in relationships frequently omit primary partners. When they are considered, examinations of race/ethnicity are often overlooked despite higher infection rates among gay men of colour. Acknowledging both the need to contextualise the behaviours that may affect HIV risk for gay men of colour and the disproportionate impact of HIV on Latino gay men, the present study utilised semi-structured, qualitative interviews to explore relationship dynamics, sexual agreements and behaviours, and safer sex choices and HIV risk among nine Latino gay male couples. All participants were HIV-negative and in concordant negative relationships. Additionally, nearly all reported closed agreements. Analysis revealed participants engaging in four behaviours that may actively reduce their HIV risk: approaching sexual agreements from a practical standpoint, maintaining a high literacy around HIV, having exposure to social support groups for Latino gay men, and finding support in their relationship with another Latino gay man. Additional issues are raised where long-term HIV prevention is concerned. Intimate relationships are an important context for understanding both HIV risk and prevention among Latino gay men. Likewise, race/ethnicity provides an indispensable perspective on all research with gay couples. Future prevention efforts with gay men must strive to include both. PMID:21082463

  4. A Financial Market Model Incorporating Herd Behaviour

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Herd behaviour in financial markets is a recurring phenomenon that exacerbates asset price volatility, and is considered a possible contributor to market fragility. While numerous studies investigate herd behaviour in financial markets, it is often considered without reference to the pricing of financial instruments or other market dynamics. Here, a trader interaction model based upon informational cascades in the presence of information thresholds is used to construct a new model of asset price returns that allows for both quiescent and herd-like regimes. Agent interaction is modelled using a stochastic pulse-coupled network, parametrised by information thresholds and a network coupling probability. Agents may possess either one or two information thresholds that, in each case, determine the number of distinct states an agent may occupy before trading takes place. In the case where agents possess two thresholds (labelled as the finite state-space model, corresponding to agents’ accumulating information over a bounded state-space), and where coupling strength is maximal, an asymptotic expression for the cascade-size probability is derived and shown to follow a power law when a critical value of network coupling probability is attained. For a range of model parameters, a mixture of negative binomial distributions is used to approximate the cascade-size distribution. This approximation is subsequently used to express the volatility of model price returns in terms of the model parameter which controls the network coupling probability. In the case where agents possess a single pulse-coupling threshold (labelled as the semi-infinite state-space model corresponding to agents’ accumulating information over an unbounded state-space), numerical evidence is presented that demonstrates volatility clustering and long-memory patterns in the volatility of asset returns. Finally, output from the model is compared to both the distribution of historical stock returns and the

  5. A Financial Market Model Incorporating Herd Behaviour.

    PubMed

    Wray, Christopher M; Bishop, Steven R

    2016-01-01

    Herd behaviour in financial markets is a recurring phenomenon that exacerbates asset price volatility, and is considered a possible contributor to market fragility. While numerous studies investigate herd behaviour in financial markets, it is often considered without reference to the pricing of financial instruments or other market dynamics. Here, a trader interaction model based upon informational cascades in the presence of information thresholds is used to construct a new model of asset price returns that allows for both quiescent and herd-like regimes. Agent interaction is modelled using a stochastic pulse-coupled network, parametrised by information thresholds and a network coupling probability. Agents may possess either one or two information thresholds that, in each case, determine the number of distinct states an agent may occupy before trading takes place. In the case where agents possess two thresholds (labelled as the finite state-space model, corresponding to agents' accumulating information over a bounded state-space), and where coupling strength is maximal, an asymptotic expression for the cascade-size probability is derived and shown to follow a power law when a critical value of network coupling probability is attained. For a range of model parameters, a mixture of negative binomial distributions is used to approximate the cascade-size distribution. This approximation is subsequently used to express the volatility of model price returns in terms of the model parameter which controls the network coupling probability. In the case where agents possess a single pulse-coupling threshold (labelled as the semi-infinite state-space model corresponding to agents' accumulating information over an unbounded state-space), numerical evidence is presented that demonstrates volatility clustering and long-memory patterns in the volatility of asset returns. Finally, output from the model is compared to both the distribution of historical stock returns and the market

  6. Measuring tactical behaviour in football.

    PubMed

    Sampaio, J; Maçãs, V

    2012-05-01

    The present study explored how football players' dynamic positional data can be used to assess tactical behaviour by measuring movement patterns and inter-player coordination. A pre post-test design was used to assess the effects of a 13-week constructivist and cognitivist training program by measuring behaviour in a 5 × 5 football small-sided game, played on a 60 × 40 m outdoor natural turf pitch. Data was captured at 5 Hz by GPS devices (SPI Pro, GPSports, Canberra, Australia) and analysed with non-linear signal processing methods. Approximate entropy values were lower in post-test situations suggesting that these time series became more regular with increasing expertise in football. Relative phase post-test values showed frequent periods with a clear trend to moving in anti-phase, as measured by players' distance to the centre of the team. These advances may open new research topics under the tactical scope and allow narrowing the gap between sports sciences and sports coaching. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. [Leadership behaviour and health - current research state].

    PubMed

    Gregersen, S; Kuhnert, S; Zimber, A; Nienhaus, A

    2011-01-01

    The link between leaders' behaviour and health has only recently been the focus of scientific research and the results which already exist on this topic have, to date, not been systematically evaluated or summarized. The objective of this article is to make an attempt to provide a summarised overview of the current state of research. Subject-related databases list 42 publications dealing with the relationship between leaders' behaviour and the state of health and well-being of their employees. The literature discusses leaders' behaviour as being both a stressor (source of stress) and a resource. The publications discussed here also provide the first empirical evidence on the influence of various leadership styles on the health of the employees. In particular, transformational and employee-orientated leadership are considered to be beneficial to health. But the question of how leaders' behaviour influences health has not been satisfactorily explained. In most of the publications included, a direct link was assumed and, in the majority of cases, confirmed empirically. In addition, it also appears that there may be an indirect influence which may be moderated or mediated by, e. g., working conditions or the personality of the individual. The relatively small number of research examinations into the influence of leaders' behaviour on the health and well-being of their staff shows that there is a need for additional research.

  8. Imitation and utilisation behaviour.

    PubMed Central

    De Renzi, E; Cavalleri, F; Facchini, S

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the incidence, anatomical correlates, and clinical features of imitation and utilisation behaviour, which are thought by Lhermitte and coworkers to represent a reliable and frequent index of frontal lobe disease. METHODS: 78 patients with hemispheric local lesions were tested in two separate sessions, in which their reactions to a series of gestures performed by the examiner and to the presentation of a set of objects were recorded. The patients were stratified into a frontal (n = 52) and a non-frontal group (n = 26) on the basis of their CT data. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: Imitation behaviour was present in 39% of the frontal patients and was mainly associated with medial and lateral lesions, at odds with the claim of Lhermitte et al that it is a constant accompaniment of lower, mediobasal lesions. In the non-frontal group it was found in three patients, all with damage to the deep nuclei region. Utilisation behaviour was a much rarer phenomenon, present in only two patients, both of whom had frontal damage. Neither imitation behaviour nor utilisation behaviour were found in patients with retrorolandic cortical lesions. PMID:8890779

  9. Communication and abnormal behaviour.

    PubMed

    Crown, S

    1979-01-01

    In this paper the similarities between normal and abnormal behaviour are emphasized and selected aspects of communication, normal and aberrant, between persons are explored. Communication in a social system may be verbal or non-verbal: one person's actions cause a response in another person. This response may be cognitive, behavioural or physiological. Communication may be approached through the individual, the social situation or social interaction. Psychoanalysis approaches the individual in terms of the coded communications of psychoneurotic symptoms or psychotic behaviour; the humanist-existential approach is concerned more with emotional expression. Both approaches emphasize the development of individual identity. The interaction between persons and their social background is stressed. Relevant are sociological concepts such as illness behaviour, stigma, labelling, institutionalization and compliance. Two approaches to social interactions are considered: the gamesplaying metaphor, e.g. back pain as a psychosocial manipulation--the 'pain game'; and the 'spiral of reciprocal perspectives' which emphasizes the interactional complexities of social perceptions. Communicatory aspects of psychological treatments are noted: learning a particular metaphor such as 'resolution' of the problem (psychotherapy), learning more 'rewarding' behaviour (learning theory) or learning authenticity or self-actualization (humanist-existential).

  10. Behaviour of Arctic charr Salvelinus alpinus during an induced mating season in captivity: how male relative size influences male behavioural investment and female preference over time.

    PubMed

    Bolgan, M; O'Brien, J; Picciulin, M; Manning, L; Gammell, M

    2016-12-20

    The behaviour of sexually mature Arctic charr Salvelinus alpinus specimens (fifth farm generation) was observed in captivity for four consecutive days. Only agonistic interactions between males of different size were facilitated on the first 2 days, while both agonistic and courtship interactions were possible from the third day up to the end of the experiment. The reliability of behavioural analysis was assessed in order to reduce the possibility of observer errors within the generated datasets. The behavioural investment of big males, small males and females was analysed using general linear models (two-way repeated measures ANOVAs with time and male size as factors). A peak in the agonistic interactions between males occurred during the first day of interactions, where the agonistic investment of big males was significantly higher than that of small males. This resulted in an increased investment in submissive behaviour by the small males, who consistently performed submissive behaviours from the second day of interactions up to the end of the trial. Big males were found to invest significantly more than small males in courtship behaviours for the duration of the trial. Even though females performed inter-sexual behaviours towards both big and small males for the entire observation period, female interaction rate towards big males was higher than towards small males. This study suggests that both male investment in mating behaviour and female preference might be related to male characteristics such as body length and that S. alpinus behavioural patterns and mate choice cues might be strongly context-related and characterized by high levels of behavioural plasticity (i.e. presence-absence of certain behavioural units or potential reversal of a mate choice cue) within the same species. Finally, in light of this, some conservation measures are discussed. In particular, effective management plans should take into account the high level of behavioural plasticity

  11. Restoration of rhythmicity in diffusively coupled dynamical networks.

    PubMed

    Zou, Wei; Senthilkumar, D V; Nagao, Raphael; Kiss, István Z; Tang, Yang; Koseska, Aneta; Duan, Jinqiao; Kurths, Jürgen

    2015-07-15

    Oscillatory behaviour is essential for proper functioning of various physical and biological processes. However, diffusive coupling is capable of suppressing intrinsic oscillations due to the manifestation of the phenomena of amplitude and oscillation deaths. Here we present a scheme to revoke these quenching states in diffusively coupled dynamical networks, and demonstrate the approach in experiments with an oscillatory chemical reaction. By introducing a simple feedback factor in the diffusive coupling, we show that the stable (in)homogeneous steady states can be effectively destabilized to restore dynamic behaviours of coupled systems. Even a feeble deviation from the normal diffusive coupling drastically shrinks the death regions in the parameter space. The generality of our method is corroborated in diverse non-linear systems of diffusively coupled paradigmatic models with various death scenarios. Our study provides a general framework to strengthen the robustness of dynamic activity in diffusively coupled dynamical networks.

  12. Restoration of rhythmicity in diffusively coupled dynamical networks

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Wei; Senthilkumar, D. V.; Nagao, Raphael; Kiss, István Z.; Tang, Yang; Koseska, Aneta; Duan, Jinqiao; Kurths, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Oscillatory behaviour is essential for proper functioning of various physical and biological processes. However, diffusive coupling is capable of suppressing intrinsic oscillations due to the manifestation of the phenomena of amplitude and oscillation deaths. Here we present a scheme to revoke these quenching states in diffusively coupled dynamical networks, and demonstrate the approach in experiments with an oscillatory chemical reaction. By introducing a simple feedback factor in the diffusive coupling, we show that the stable (in)homogeneous steady states can be effectively destabilized to restore dynamic behaviours of coupled systems. Even a feeble deviation from the normal diffusive coupling drastically shrinks the death regions in the parameter space. The generality of our method is corroborated in diverse non-linear systems of diffusively coupled paradigmatic models with various death scenarios. Our study provides a general framework to strengthen the robustness of dynamic activity in diffusively coupled dynamical networks. PMID:26173555

  13. Quantifying the strength of the associations of prototype perceptions with behaviour, behavioural willingness and intentions: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    van Lettow, Britt; de Vries, Hein; Burdorf, Alex; van Empelen, Pepijn

    2016-01-01

    Prototypes (i.e., social images representing perceptions of typical persons engaging in or refraining from certain behaviour) have been shown to explain health-related behaviours. The present meta-analysis quantified the strength of the associations of prototype perceptions with health motivation and behaviour. Specifically, the analysis addressed (i) the relationship of prototype favourability (i.e., degree of likability) and similarity (i.e., perceived resemblance to the self) with behaviour, willingness and intentions; (ii) the effect of the interaction between favourability and similarity; and (iii) the extent to which health-risk and health-protective prototypes differed in their association with these outcomes. A total of 80 independent studies were identified based on 69 articles. The results indicated that prototype favourability and similarity were related to behaviour, intentions and willingness with small-to-medium effect sizes (r+ = 0.12-0.43). Direct measures of prototype perceptions generally produced larger effects than indirect measures. The interaction between favourability and similarity produced small-to-large effect sizes (r+ = .22-.54). The results suggest that both health-risk and health-protective prototypes might be useful targets for interventions (r+ = .22-.54). In order to increase health-protective behaviours, intentions and behaviour could be targeted by increasing similarity to health-protective prototypes. Health-risk behaviour might be decreased by targeting willingness by modifying health-risk prototype favourability and similarity.

  14. Microwave interconnects via electromagnetic coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, John J.; Jackson, Robert W.

    1988-01-01

    Two transitions are described which couple coplanar waveguide on one substrate surface (a motherboard) to either coplanar waveguide or microstrip on another substrate surface (a chip). No wire bonds are necessary. A coupled transmission line model, along with a full wave analysis, is used to predict the behavior of these transitions. Experimental results show good agreement with predictions in cases where the coupler length to width ratio is not too small.

  15. Viability of nonminimally coupled f (R) gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertolami, Orfeu; Páramos, Jorge

    2016-03-01

    In this work we explore the viability of nonminimally coupled matter-curvature gravity theories, namely the conditions required for the absence of tachyon instabilities and ghost degrees of freedom. We contrast our finds with recent claims of a pathological behaviour of this class of models, which resorted to, in our view, an incorrect analogy with k-essence.

  16. Simple behavioural interventions for nocturnal enuresis in children.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, Patrina H Y; Nankivell, Gail; Sureshkumar, Premala

    2013-07-19

    , which contains trials identified from the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, MEDLINE in process, and handsearching of journals and conference proceedings (searched 15 December 2011). The reference lists of relevant articles were also searched. All randomised or quasi-randomised trials of simple behavioural interventions for treating nocturnal enuresis in children up to the age of 16. Studies which included children with daytime urinary incontinence or children with organic conditions were also included in this review if the focus of the study was on nocturnal enuresis. Trials focused solely on daytime wetting and trials of adults with nocturnal enuresis were excluded. Two reviewers independently assessed the quality of the eligible trials and extracted data. Differences between reviewers were settled by discussion with a third reviewer. Sixteen trials met the inclusion criteria, involving 1643 children of whom 865 received a simple behavioural intervention. Within each comparison, outcomes were mostly addressed by single trials, precluding meta-analysis. The only exception was bladder training versus enuresis alarm therapy which included two studies and demonstrated that alarm therapy was superior to bladder training.In single small trials, rewards, lifting and waking and bladder training were each associated with significantly fewer wet nights, higher full response rates and lower relapse rates compared to controls. Simple behavioural interventions appeared to be less effective when compared with other known effective interventions (such as enuresis alarm therapy and drug therapies with imipramine and amitriptyline). However, the effect was not sustained at follow-up after completion of treatment for the drug therapies. Based on one small trial, cognitive therapy also appeared to be more effective than rewards. When one simple behavioural therapy was compared with another, there did not appear to be one therapy that was more effective

  17. A few bad apples: a model of disease influenced agent behaviour in a heterogeneous contact environment.

    PubMed

    Enright, Jessica; Kao, Rowland R

    2015-01-01

    For diseases that infect humans or livestock, transmission dynamics are at least partially dependent on human activity and therefore human behaviour. However, the impact of human behaviour on disease transmission is relatively understudied, especially in the context of heterogeneous contact structures such as described by a social network. Here, we use a strategic game, coupled with a simple disease model, to investigate how strategic agent choices impact the spread of disease over a contact network. Using beliefs that are based on disease status and that build up over time, agents choose actions that stochastically determine disease spread on the network. An agent's disease status is therefore a function of both his own and his neighbours actions. The effect of disease on agents is modelled by a heterogeneous payoff structure. We find that the combination of network shape and distribution of payoffs has a non-trivial impact on disease prevalence, even if the mean payoff remains the same. An important scenario occurs when a small percentage (called noncooperators) have little incentive to avoid disease. For diseases that are easily acquired when taking a risk, then even when good behavior can lead to disease eradication, a small increase in the percentage of noncooperators (less than 5%) can yield a large (up to 25%) increase in prevalence.

  18. A Few Bad Apples: A Model of Disease Influenced Agent Behaviour in a Heterogeneous Contact Environment

    PubMed Central

    Enright, Jessica; Kao, Rowland R.

    2015-01-01

    For diseases that infect humans or livestock, transmission dynamics are at least partially dependent on human activity and therefore human behaviour. However, the impact of human behaviour on disease transmission is relatively understudied, especially in the context of heterogeneous contact structures such as described by a social network. Here, we use a strategic game, coupled with a simple disease model, to investigate how strategic agent choices impact the spread of disease over a contact network. Using beliefs that are based on disease status and that build up over time, agents choose actions that stochastically determine disease spread on the network. An agent’s disease status is therefore a function of both his own and his neighbours actions. The effect of disease on agents is modelled by a heterogeneous payoff structure. We find that the combination of network shape and distribution of payoffs has a non-trivial impact on disease prevalence, even if the mean payoff remains the same. An important scenario occurs when a small percentage (called noncooperators) have little incentive to avoid disease. For diseases that are easily acquired when taking a risk, then even when good behavior can lead to disease eradication, a small increase in the percentage of noncooperators (less than 5%) can yield a large (up to 25%) increase in prevalence. PMID:25734661

  19. Rheological behaviour of nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Haisheng; Ding, Yulong; Tan, Chunqing

    2007-10-01

    This work aims at a more fundamental understanding of the rheological behaviour of nanofluids and the interpretation of the discrepancy in the recent literature. Both experiments and theoretical analyses are carried out with the experimental work on ethylene glycol (EG)-based nanofluids containing 0.5-8.0 wt% spherical TiO2 nanoparticles at 20-60 °C and the theoretical analyses on the high shear viscosity, shear thinning behaviour and temperature dependence. The experimental results show that the EG-based nanofluids are Newtonian under the conditions of this work with the shear viscosity as a strong function of temperature and particle concentration. The relative viscosity of the nanofluids is, however, independent of temperature. The theoretical analyses show that the high shear viscosity of nanofluids can be predicted by the Krieger-Dougherty equation if the effective nanoparticle concentration is used. For spherical nanoparticles, an aggregate size of approximately 3 times the primary nanoparticle size gives the best prediction of experimental data of both this work and those from the literature. The shear thinning behaviour of nanofluids depends on the effective particle concentration, the range of shear rate and viscosity of the base liquid. Such non-Newtonian behaviour can be characterized by a characteristic shear rate, which decreases with increasing volume fraction, increasing base liquid viscosity, or increasing aggregate size. These findings explain the reported controversy of the rheological behaviour of nanofluids in the literature. At temperatures not very far from the ambient temperature, the relative high shear viscosity is independent of temperature due to negligible Brownian diffusion in comparison to convection in high shear flows, in agreement with the experimental results. However, the characteristic shear rate can have strong temperature dependence, thus affecting the shear thinning behaviour. The theoretical analyses also lead to a

  20. Cephalopod consciousness: behavioural evidence.

    PubMed

    Mather, Jennifer A

    2008-03-01

    Behavioural evidence suggests that cephalopod molluscs may have a form of primary consciousness. First, the linkage of brain to behaviour seen in lateralization, sleep and through a developmental context is similar to that of mammals and birds. Second, cephalopods, especially octopuses, are heavily dependent on learning in response to both visual and tactile cues, and may have domain generality and form simple concepts. Third, these animals are aware of their position, both within themselves and in larger space, including having a working memory of foraging areas in the recent past. Thus if using a 'global workspace' which evaluates memory input and focuses attention is the criterion, cephalopods appear to have primary consciousness.

  1. Cosmological tests of coupled Galileons

    SciTech Connect

    Brax, Philippe; Davis, Anne-Christine; Gubitosi, Giulia E-mail: Clare.Burrage@nottingham.ac.uk E-mail: g.gubitosi@imperial.ac.uk

    2015-03-01

    We investigate the cosmological properties of Galileon models which admit Minkowski space as a stable solution in vacuum. This is motivated by stable, positive tension brane world constructions that give rise to Galileons. We include both conformal and disformal couplings to matter and focus on constraints on the theory that arise because of these couplings. The disformal coupling to baryonic matter is extremely constrained by astrophysical and particle physics effects. The disformal coupling to photons induces a cosmological variation of the speed of light and therefore distorsions of the Cosmic Microwave Background spectrum which are known to be very small. The conformal coupling to baryons leads to a variation of particle masses since Big Bang Nucleosynthesis which is also tightly constrained. We consider the background cosmology of Galileon models coupled to Cold Dark Matter (CDM), photons and baryons and impose that the speed of light and particle masses respect the observational bounds on cosmological time scales. We find that requiring that the equation of state for the Galileon models must be close to -1 now restricts severely their parameter space and can only be achieved with a combination of the conformal and disformal couplings. This leads to large variations of particle masses and the speed of light which are not compatible with observations. As a result, we find that cosmological Galileon models are viable dark energy theories coupled to dark matter but their couplings, both disformal and conformal, to baryons and photons must be heavily suppressed making them only sensitive to CDM.

  2. Behaviour Centred Design: towards an applied science of behaviour change.

    PubMed

    Aunger, Robert; Curtis, Valerie

    2016-12-01

    Behaviour change has become a hot topic. We describe a new approach, Behaviour Centred Design (BCD), which encompasses a theory of change, a suite of behavioural determinants and a programme design process. The theory of change is generic, assuming that successful interventions must create a cascade of effects via environments, through brains, to behaviour and hence to the desired impact, such as improved health. Changes in behaviour are viewed as the consequence of a reinforcement learning process involving the targeting of evolved motives and changes to behaviour settings, and are produced by three types of behavioural control mechanism (automatic, motivated and executive). The implications are that interventions must create surprise, revalue behaviour and disrupt performance in target behaviour settings. We then describe a sequence of five steps required to design an intervention to change specific behaviours: Assess, Build, Create, Deliver and Evaluate. The BCD approach has been shown to change hygiene, nutrition and exercise-related behaviours and has the advantages of being applicable to product, service or institutional design, as well as being able to incorporate future developments in behaviour science. We therefore argue that BCD can become the foundation for an applied science of behaviour change.

  3. Behaviour Centred Design: towards an applied science of behaviour change

    PubMed Central

    Aunger, Robert; Curtis, Valerie

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Behaviour change has become a hot topic. We describe a new approach, Behaviour Centred Design (BCD), which encompasses a theory of change, a suite of behavioural determinants and a programme design process. The theory of change is generic, assuming that successful interventions must create a cascade of effects via environments, through brains, to behaviour and hence to the desired impact, such as improved health. Changes in behaviour are viewed as the consequence of a reinforcement learning process involving the targeting of evolved motives and changes to behaviour settings, and are produced by three types of behavioural control mechanism (automatic, motivated and executive). The implications are that interventions must create surprise, revalue behaviour and disrupt performance in target behaviour settings. We then describe a sequence of five steps required to design an intervention to change specific behaviours: Assess, Build, Create, Deliver and Evaluate. The BCD approach has been shown to change hygiene, nutrition and exercise-related behaviours and has the advantages of being applicable to product, service or institutional design, as well as being able to incorporate future developments in behaviour science. We therefore argue that BCD can become the foundation for an applied science of behaviour change. PMID:27535821

  4. Infertility, infertility treatment and behavioural problems in the offspring.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jin Liang; Obel, Carsten; Basso, Olga; Henriksen, Tine B; Bech, Bodil H; Hvidtjørn, Dorte; Olsen, Jørn

    2011-09-01

    Behavioural patterns in children of infertile couples may be influenced by both the underlying causes of infertility and stress in the couples. Treatment procedures, such as culture media and manipulation of gametes and embryos, may also result in developmental problems. We examined behavioural problems in children as a function of infertility and infertility treatment, using data from three population-based birth cohorts in Denmark (Aalborg-Odense Birth Cohort, Aarhus Birth Cohort and Danish National Birth Cohort). Information on time to pregnancy and infertility treatment was collected during pregnancy. Children aged between 7 and 21 years were assessed using the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ). The SDQ was completed by mothers in all cohorts and, in addition, by teachers in the Aarhus cohort and by children themselves in the Aalborg-Odense cohort. Children born after a time to pregnancy of >12 months and no infertility treatment had a behavioural pattern similar to children of fertile parents. Teachers reported a higher total difficulties score for children born after infertility treatment, but no significant differences were seen on any subscales of the teachers' report, and neither the mothers nor the children reported any differences on the total difficulties score and the prosocial behaviour score. Our results are thus overall reassuring regarding behavioural problems in children born to infertile couples, regardless of infertility treatment.

  5. Behavioural laterality as a factor in emotional regulation.

    PubMed

    Rempala, Daniel M

    2014-01-01

    Individuals who perform a variety of tasks using one side of their bodies (i.e., high-dominance people) are thought to differ from individuals who perform a variety of tasks with both sides of their body (i.e., low-dominance people) in several neurological and cognitive characteristics. We examined whether behavioural laterality predicted the efficacy of different emotional regulation strategies. Specifically, we thought that behavioural laterality would influence verbal strategies (associated with left hemisphere activation) when regulating anxiety (associated with right hemisphere activation). In three studies participants presented in front of small audiences. Behavioural laterality (as measured by a modified handedness inventory) positively correlated with presentation anxiety, such that "low-dominance" participants reported less anxiety than "high-dominance" participants, but only when using cognitive reappraisal (a verbal strategy), not attention deployment or response modulation (behavioural strategies). These results provide preliminary evidence that individual differences in behavioural laterality mediate the efficacy of certain emotional regulation strategies.

  6. Small Particle Scattering and Absorption

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-07-01

    hybrid results of close coupling with internal vibrational and other wave modes. Within particles 13 small compared to the free space wavelength these...PROJECT TASK WORK UNIT ELEMENT NO. NO. NO. ACCESSION NO. Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21C10-5423 11. TITLE (Include Security Classification) Small ...computational research on electromagnetic scattering by small particles accomplished at the University of Michigan on CRDEC contract DAAA15-86-K-0022

  7. Modelling cellular behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endy, Drew; Brent, Roger

    2001-01-01

    Representations of cellular processes that can be used to compute their future behaviour would be of general scientific and practical value. But past attempts to construct such representations have been disappointing. This is now changing. Increases in biological understanding combined with advances in computational methods and in computer power make it possible to foresee construction of useful and predictive simulations of cellular processes.

  8. Locomotion and postural behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, M.

    2010-05-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide a survey of the diversity of primate locomotor behaviour for people who are involved in research using laboratory primates. The main locomotor modes displayed by primates are introduced with reference to some general morphological adaptations. The relationships between locomotor behaviour and body size, habitat structure and behavioural context will be illustrated because these factors are important determinants of the evolutionary diversity of primate locomotor activities. They also induce the high individual plasticity of the locomotor behaviour for which primates are well known. The article also provides a short overview of the preferred locomotor activities in the various primate families. A more detailed description of locomotor preferences for some of the most common laboratory primates is included which also contains information about substrate preferences and daily locomotor activities which might useful for laboratory practice. Finally, practical implications for primate husbandry and cage design are provided emphasizing the positive impact of physical activity on health and psychological well-being of primates in captivity.

  9. Tubular Coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenbaum, Bernard J. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A system for coupling a vascular overflow graft or cannula to a heart pump. A pump pipe outlet is provided with an external tapered surface which receives the end of a compressible connula. An annular compression ring with a tapered internal bore surface is arranged about the cannula with the tapered internal surface in a facing relationship to the external tapered surface. The angle of inclination of the tapered surfaces is converging such that the spacing between the tapered surfaces decreases from one end of the external tapered surface to the other end thereby providing a clamping action of the tapered surface on a cannula which increases as a function of the length of cannula segment between the tapered surfaces. The annular compression ring is disposed within a tubular locking nut which threadedly couples to the pump and provides a compression force for urging the annular ring onto the cannula between the tapered surfaces. The nut has a threaded connection to the pump body. The threaded coupling to the pump body provides a compression force for the annular ring. The annular ring has an annular enclosure space in which excess cannula material from the compression between the tapered surfaces to "bunch up" in the space and serve as an enlarged annular ring segment to assist holding the cannula in place. The clamped cannula provides a seamless joint connection to the pump pipe outlet where the clamping force is uniformly applied to the cannula because of self alignment of the tapered surfaces. The nut can be easily disconnected to replace the pump if necessary.

  10. Small Families

    MedlinePlus

    ... Each child receives more parental attention and educational advantages, which generally raise her self-esteem. Children in ... they expect of them. Maintain your own adult social life as a couple (or as an individual, ...

  11. Longitudinal Links between Early Coparenting and Infant Behaviour Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeRoy, Michelle; Mahoney, Annette; Pargament, Kenneth I.; DeMaris, Alfred

    2013-01-01

    This study of 164 married couples examined longitudinal links between parents' perceptions of coparenting support and undermining by spouse at 6 months postpartum and infant behaviour problems at the age of 12 months after controlling for marital quality, individual parenting, and infant temperament. Multiple methods (i.e. parent reports and…

  12. Initiation and propagation of small corner cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellyin, Ferdnand; Kujawski, Daniel; Craig, David F.

    1994-01-01

    The behaviour of small corner cracks, inclined or perpendicular to loading direction, is presented. There are two aspects to this investigation: initiation of small cracks and monitoring their subsequent growth. An initial pre-cracking procedure under cyclic compression is adopted to minimize the residual damage at the tip of the growing and self-arresting crack under cyclic compression. A final fatigue specimen, cut from the larger pre-cracked specimen, has two corner flaws. The opening load of corner flaw is monitored using a novel strain gauge approach. The behaviour of small corner cracks is described in terms of growth rate relative to the size of the crack and its shape.

  13. The transitional behaviour of avalanches in cohesive granular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quintanilla, M. A. S.; Valverde, J. M.; Castellanos, A.

    2006-07-01

    We present a statistical analysis of avalanches of granular materials that partially fill a slowly rotated horizontal drum. For large sized noncohesive grains the classical coherent oscillation is reproduced, consisting of a quasi-periodic succession of regularly sized avalanches. As the powder cohesiveness is increased by decreasing the particle size, we observe a gradual crossover to a complex dynamics that resembles the transitional behaviour observed in fusion plasmas. For particle size below ~50 µm, avalanches lose a characteristic size, retain a short term memory and turn gradually decorrelated in the long term as described by a Markov process. In contrast, large grains made cohesive by coating them with adhesive microparticles display a distinct phenomenology, characterized by a quasi-regular succession of well defined small precursors and large relaxation events. The transition from a one-peaked distribution (noncohesive large beads) to a flattened distribution (fine cohesive beads) passing through the two-peaked distribution of cohesive large beads had already been predicted using a coupled-map lattice model, as the relaxation mechanism of grain reorganization becomes dominant to the detriment of inertia.

  14. The evolution of behaviour therapy and cognitive behaviour therapy.

    PubMed

    Rachman, S

    2015-01-01

    The historical background of the development of behaviour therapy is described. It was based on the prevailing behaviourist psychology and constituted a fundamentally different approach to the causes and treatment of psychological disorders. It had a cold reception and the idea of treating the behaviour of neurotic and other patients was regarded as absurd. The opposition of the medical profession and psychoanalysts is explained. Parallel but different forms of behaviour therapy developed in the US and UK. The infusion of cognitive concepts and procedures generated a merger of behaviour therapy and cognitive therapy, cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT). The strengths and limitations of the early and current approaches are evaluated.

  15. Defining and treating challenging behaviour.

    PubMed

    Tarbuck, P; Thompson, T

    Behavioural disorders present extreme problems for clients and careers. In this article, the authors discuss a definition of challenging behaviour. Types of behaviour classified as 'challenging' and possible responses to them, are also considered. Some of the points are illustrated with short case studies.

  16. Dark coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Gavela, M.B.; Hernández, D.; Honorez, L. Lopez; Mena, O.; Rigolin, S. E-mail: d.hernandez@uam.es E-mail: omena@ific.uv.es

    2009-07-01

    The two dark sectors of the universe—dark matter and dark energy—may interact with each other. Background and linear density perturbation evolution equations are developed for a generic coupling. We then establish the general conditions necessary to obtain models free from non-adiabatic instabilities. As an application, we consider a viable universe in which the interaction strength is proportional to the dark energy density. The scenario does not exhibit ''phantom crossing'' and is free from instabilities, including early ones. A sizeable interaction strength is compatible with combined WMAP, HST, SN, LSS and H(z) data. Neutrino mass and/or cosmic curvature are allowed to be larger than in non-interacting models. Our analysis sheds light as well on unstable scenarios previously proposed.

  17. Hygienic behaviour in chromium plating industries.

    PubMed

    Lumens, M E; Ulenbelt, P; Géron, H M; Herber, R F

    1993-01-01

    The impact of hygienic behaviour on the uptake of chromium has been studied in two small chromium plating factories. The correlation between the environmental monitoring measure (Cr-A) and the biological monitoring measure (Cr-U) varied between the two factories. In one factory (I) the correlation between Cr-U and Cr-A was 0.68 (P < 0.001), while in the other factory (II) it was negative (r = -0.64, P = 0.03). However, in both populations a significant impact of hygienic behaviour on the variance in Cr-U levels could be detected. In factory I, explained variance could be enhanced to R2 = 0.94 (P < 0.001) when considering expressions of hygienic behaviour. In factory II, a strong relation proved to exist between Cr-U and dermal uptake. For the various questions referring to skin problems and possible dermal uptake, the correlation with Cr-U is up to 0.70 (P = 0.03). When comparing the results for the two factories, it is shown that in addition to individual differences in hygienic behaviour, general hygienic conditions also have an impact on uptake of chromium. In factory II, where many efforts were made to prevent exposure to chromium, Cr-U was significantly lower than in factory I (P < 0.001).

  18. The behavioural ecology of irrational behaviours.

    PubMed

    Huneman, Philippe; Martens, Johannes

    2017-08-17

    Natural selection is often envisaged as the ultimate cause of the apparent rationality exhibited by organisms in their specific habitat. Given the equivalence between selection and rationality as maximizing processes, one would indeed expect organisms to implement rational decision-makers. Yet, many violations of the clauses of rationality have been witnessed in various species such as starlings, hummingbirds, amoebas and honeybees. This paper attempts to interpret such discrepancies between economic rationality (defined by the main axioms of rational choice theory) and biological rationality (defined by natural selection). After having distinguished two kinds of rationality we introduce irrationality as a negation of economic rationality by biologically rational decision-makers. Focusing mainly on those instances of irrationalities that can be understood as exhibiting inconsistency in making choices, i.e. as non-conformity of a given behaviour to axioms such as transitivity or independence of irrelevant alternatives, we propose two possible families of Darwinian explanations that may account for these apparent irrationalities. First, we consider cases where natural selection may have been an indirect cause of irrationality. Second, we consider putative cases where violations of rationality axioms may have been directly favored by natural selection. Though the latter cases (prima facie) seem to clearly contradict our intuitive representation of natural selection as a process that maximizes fitness, we argue that they are actually unproblematic; for often, they can be redescribed as cases where no rationality axiom is violated, or as situations where no adaptive solution exists in the first place.

  19. Neurodevelopmental and behavioural paediatrics.

    PubMed

    McDowell, Michael

    2015-01-01

    One of the notable shifts in Paediatrics across the last 50 years has been towards disorders that are chronic and qualitative in nature. In addition to physical health, these impact on childhood development, behaviour and wellbeing. Understanding and management of these problems extends the traditional biological toolkit of paediatrics into the complexities of uncertainties of psychological and social context. In Australasia, the profession has responded with the development of Community Paediatrics as a recognised sub-specialty, of which Neurodevelopmental and Behavioural Paediatrics is an important component. These developments are reviewed along with consideration of future challenges for this field of health care. © 2015 The Author. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2015 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  20. Spin-orbit-coupled quantum gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radic, Juraj

    The dissertation explores the effects of synthetic spin-orbit coupling on the behaviour of quantum gases in several different contexts. We first study realistic methods to create vortices in spin-orbit-coupled (SOC) Bose-Einstein condensates (BEC). We propose two different methods to induce thermodynamically stable static vortex configurations: (1) to rotate both the Raman lasers and the anisotropic trap; and (2) to impose a synthetic Abelian field on top of synthetic spin-orbit interactions. We solve the Gross-Pitaevskii equation for several experimentally relevant regimes and find new interesting effects such as spatial separation of left- and right-moving spin-orbit-coupled condensates, and the appearance of unusual vortex arrangements. Next we consider cold atoms in an optical lattice with synthetic SOC in the Mott-insulator regime. We calculate the parameters of the corresponding tight-binding model and derive the low-energy spin Hamiltonian which is a combination of Heisenberg model, quantum compass model and Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction. We find that the Hamiltonian supports a rich classical phase diagram with collinear, spiral and vortex phases. Next we study the time evolution of the magnetization in a Rashba spin-orbit-coupled Fermi gas, starting from a fully-polarized initial state. We model the dynamics using a Boltzmann equation, which we solve in the Hartree-Fock approximation. The resulting non-linear system of equations gives rise to three distinct dynamical regimes controlled by the ratio of interaction and spin-orbit-coupling strength lambda: for small lambda, the magnetization decays to zero. For intermediate lambda, it displays undamped oscillations about zero and for large lambda, a partially magnetized state is dynamically stabilized. Motivated by an interesting stripe phase which appears in BEC with SOC [Li et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 225301 (2011)], we study the finite-temperature phase diagram of a pseudospin-1/2 Bose gas with

  1. The attitudes of nurse tutor students to behavioural objectives: results and discussion.

    PubMed

    Martin, H; Sheehan, J

    1985-05-01

    This small-scale empirical study provides evidence of the attitudes of a group of nurse tutor students to behavioural objectives. The questionnaire items used ranged from questions about behaviourism and the use of behavioural objectives in teaching, to a question on whether the participants would use behavioural objectives in their teaching once they had finished their course. It emerged that while there was not an uncritical acceptance of behavioural objectives, they were seen as having a place in the process of teaching and learning nursing.

  2. Small game

    Treesearch

    John C. Kilgo

    2005-01-01

    Although small game currently is not harvested on the Savannah river Site(SRS) soutside of the Crackerneck Wildlife Management area and logical Reserve (CWMA), several species of small game occur on SRS. these include snipe (Gallinago gallinago), American woodcock (Scolopax minor), morning dove (Zenaida macroura...

  3. Predicting People's Environmental Behaviour: Theory of Planned Behaviour and Model of Responsible Environmental Behaviour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chao, Yu-Long

    2012-01-01

    Using different measures of self-reported and other-reported environmental behaviour (EB), two important theoretical models explaining EB--Hines, Hungerford and Tomera's model of responsible environmental behaviour (REB) and Ajzen's theory of planned behaviour (TPB)--were compared regarding the fit between model and data, predictive ability,…

  4. Predicting People's Environmental Behaviour: Theory of Planned Behaviour and Model of Responsible Environmental Behaviour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chao, Yu-Long

    2012-01-01

    Using different measures of self-reported and other-reported environmental behaviour (EB), two important theoretical models explaining EB--Hines, Hungerford and Tomera's model of responsible environmental behaviour (REB) and Ajzen's theory of planned behaviour (TPB)--were compared regarding the fit between model and data, predictive ability,…

  5. Small Animal Retinal Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, WooJhon; Drexler, Wolfgang; Fujimoto, James G.

    Developing and validating new techniques and methods for small animal imaging is an important research area because there are many small animal models of retinal diseases such as diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration, and glaucoma [1-6]. Because the retina is a multilayered structure with distinct abnormalities occurring in different intraretinal layers at different stages of disease progression, there is a need for imaging techniques that enable visualization of these layers individually at different time points. Although postmortem histology and ultrastructural analysis can be performed for investigating microscopic changes in the retina in small animal models, this requires sacrificing animals, which makes repeated assessment of the same animal at different time points impossible and increases the number of animals required. Furthermore, some retinal processes such as neurovascular coupling cannot be fully characterized postmortem.

  6. On the asymptotic behaviour of 2D stationary Navier–Stokes solutions with symmetry conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decaster, Agathe; Iftimie, Dragoş

    2017-10-01

    We consider the 2D stationary incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in ℝ2. Under suitable symmetry, smallness and decay at infinity conditions on the forcing we determine the behaviour at infinity of the solutions. Moreover, when the forcing is small, satisfies suitable symmetry conditions and decays at infinity like a vector field homogeneous of degree -3, we show that there exists a unique small solution whose asymptotic behaviour at infinity is homogeneous of degree -1.

  7. Positive Behavioural Support in Schools for Children and Adolescents with Intellectual Disabilities Whose Behaviour Challenges: An Exploration of the Economic Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iemmi, Valentina; Knapp, Martin; Brown, Freddy Jackson

    2016-01-01

    Decision-makers with limited budgets want to know the economic consequences of their decisions. Is there an economic case for positive behavioural support (PBS)? A small before-after study assessing the impact of PBS on challenging behaviours and positive social and communication skills in children and adolescents with intellectual disabilities…

  8. Positive Behavioural Support in Schools for Children and Adolescents with Intellectual Disabilities Whose Behaviour Challenges: An Exploration of the Economic Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iemmi, Valentina; Knapp, Martin; Brown, Freddy Jackson

    2016-01-01

    Decision-makers with limited budgets want to know the economic consequences of their decisions. Is there an economic case for positive behavioural support (PBS)? A small before-after study assessing the impact of PBS on challenging behaviours and positive social and communication skills in children and adolescents with intellectual disabilities…

  9. The effect of oxytocin on human-directed social behaviour in dogs (Canis familiaris).

    PubMed

    Kis, Anna; Ciobica, Alin; Topál, József

    2017-08-01

    The oxytocin system has recently received increasing attention due to its effect on complex human behaviours. In parallel to this, over the past couple of decades, the human-analogue social behaviour of dogs has been intensively studied. Combining these two lines of research (e.g. studying the relationship between dog social behaviour and the oxytocin system) is a promising new research area. The present paper reviews the existing literature on how oxytocin is related to different aspects of human-directed social behaviour in dogs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Ecological implications of behavioural syndromes.

    PubMed

    Sih, Andrew; Cote, Julien; Evans, Mara; Fogarty, Sean; Pruitt, Jonathan

    2012-03-01

    Interspecific trait variation has long served as a conceptual foundation for our understanding of ecological patterns and dynamics. In particular, ecologists recognise the important role that animal behaviour plays in shaping ecological processes. An emerging area of interest in animal behaviour, the study of behavioural syndromes (animal personalities) considers how limited behavioural plasticity, as well as behavioural correlations affects an individual's fitness in diverse ecological contexts. In this article we explore how insights from the concept and study of behavioural syndromes provide fresh understanding of major issues in population ecology. We identify several general mechanisms for how population ecology phenomena can be influenced by a species or population's average behavioural type, by within-species variation in behavioural type, or by behavioural correlations across time or across ecological contexts. We note, in particular, the importance of behavioural type-dependent dispersal in spatial ecology. We then review recent literature and provide new syntheses for how these general mechanisms produce novel insights on five major issues in population ecology: (1) limits to species' distribution and abundance; (2) species interactions; (3) population dynamics; (4) relative responses to human-induced rapid environmental change; and (5) ecological invasions.

  11. Intergenerational linkages in antisocial behaviour.

    PubMed

    Thornberry, Terence P; Freeman-Gallant, Adrienne; Lovegrove, Peter J

    2009-01-01

    A life-course perspective was used to examine whether a parent's adolescent antisocial behaviour increases the chances of his or her child being involved in antisocial behaviour and, if so, the extent to which different aspects of parenting mediate this relationship. It was hypothesised that there will be significant levels of intergenerational continuity in antisocial behaviour when parents have ongoing contact with the child, and that stress from parenting and ineffective parenting styles will mediate this relationship. Longitudinal data from the Rochester Intergenerational Study were used to test these issues in structural equation models for fathers and for mothers. Parental antisocial behaviour is significantly related to child antisocial behaviour for mothers and for fathers who have frequent contact with the child, but not for fathers with infrequent contact. For mothers, the impact of adolescent antisocial behaviour on the child's antisocial behaviour is primarily mediated through parenting stress and effective parenting. For high-contact fathers there are multiple mediating pathways that help explain the impact of their adolescent antisocial behaviour on their child's behaviour. The roots of antisocial behaviour extend back at least to the parent's adolescence, and parenting interventions need to consider these long-term processes.

  12. Coupled hydrogeological and geomechanical modelling for the analysis of large slope instabilities.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laloui, Lyesse; Ferrari, Alessio; Bonnard, Christophe

    2010-05-01

    Slowly-moving landslides (average velocity between 2 and 10 cm/year) are quite frequent in mountainous or hilly areas and they may display occasional crises, generally due to exceptional climatic conditions. The hazard related to these events cannot be analysed in terms of probability analysis, as the number of recorded past events is generally very small and climate changes could significantly modify the environmental setting. Quantitative relationships relating climatic condition fluctuations and sliding area velocity must then be pursued by taking into account the most relevant physical processes involved in the landslide behaviours. Conventional stability analyses are unable to deal with such questions because they do not allow the velocity fields to be determined. With regard to the behaviour of large slope instabilities, a methodology is presented which aims to describe the behaviour of slow-moving landslides by means of a coupled hydrogeological and geomechanical modelling framework. As it is well known, the evolution of the pore water pressure within the landslide body is often recognized as the main cause for the occurrence of displacement accelerations. In this sense the interaction among the hydrological and the mechanical responses must be considered to analyse the landslide behaviour, with the aim of quantitatively relating pore water pressure variations and movements. For a given case study, pore water pressure evolutions in space and time are obtained from a duly calibrated finite element hydrogeological model, which can take into account the role of several key factors such as infiltration, preferential flows and vegetation. Computed groundwater pressures resulting from the hydrogeological simulations are introduced as nodal forces in a finite element geomechanical model in order to calculate stress evolutions and displacements. The use of advanced constitutive models based on the generalised effective stress concept allows taking into account

  13. Suicide and suicidal behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Turecki, Gustavo; Brent, David A.

    2017-01-01

    Summary Suicide is a complex public health problem of global dimension. Suicidal behaviour (SB) shows marked differences between genders, age groups, geographic regions and socio-political realities, and variably associates with different risk factors, underscoring likely etiological heterogeneity. Although there is no effective algorithm to predict suicide in clinical practice, improved recognition and understanding of clinical, psychological, sociological, and biological factors may facilitate the detection of high-risk individuals and assist in treatment selection. Psychotherapeutic, pharmacological, or neuromodulatory treatments of mental disorders can often prevent SB; additionally, regular follow-up of suicide attempters by mental health services is key to prevent future SB. PMID:26385066

  14. The need for a behavioural analysis of behavioural addictions.

    PubMed

    James, Richard J E; Tunney, Richard J

    2017-03-01

    This review discusses research on behavioural addictions (i.e. associative learning, conditioning), with reference to contemporary models of substance addiction and ongoing controversies in the behavioural addictions literature. The role of behaviour has been well explored in substance addictions and gambling but this focus is often absent in other candidate behavioural addictions. In contrast, the standard approach to behavioural addictions has been to look at individual differences, psychopathologies and biases, often translating from pathological gambling indicators. An associative model presently captures the core elements of behavioural addiction included in the DSM (gambling) and identified for further consideration (internet gaming). Importantly, gambling has a schedule of reinforcement that shows similarities and differences from other addictions. While this is more likely than not applicable to internet gaming, it is less clear whether it is so for a number of candidate behavioural addictions. Adopting an associative perspective, this paper translates from gambling to video gaming, in light of the existing debates on this matter and the nature of the distinction between these behaviours. Finally, a framework for applying an associative model to behavioural addictions is outlined, and it's application toward treatment. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. Three-spined sticklebacks Gasterosteus aculeatus as a model for exploring behavioural biology.

    PubMed

    Huntingford, F A; Ruiz-Gomez, M L

    2009-11-01

    Niko Tinbergen chose the three-spined stickleback Gasterosteus aculeatus for his classic behavioural studies because they are small, robust, common and easy to house in the laboratory under reasonably natural conditions and also because their behaviour, while sufficiently simple to be tractable, is still sufficiently complex to be interesting. An analysis of citation records shows that this was an inspired choice. Research on these small fish has addressed all four of Tinbergen's famous questions (causation, development, functions and evolution) and has contributed to the understanding of many different behavioural systems. The G. aculeatus literature is used here to explore several themes in fundamental behavioural biology (diet choice, shoaling, behavioural syndromes and sexual signalling) and the extent to which research using G. aculeatus has informed both fundamental and applied behavioural biology, the latter in the context of aquaculture research.

  16. High-brightness organic light-emitting diodes for optogenetic control of Drosophila locomotor behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, Andrew; Murawski, Caroline; Pulver, Stefan R.; Gather, Malte C.

    2016-08-01

    Organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) are in widespread use in today’s mobile phones and are likely to drive the next generation of large area displays and solid-state lighting. Here we show steps towards their utility as a platform technology for biophotonics, by demonstrating devices capable of optically controlling behaviour in live animals. Using devices with a pin OLED architecture, sufficient illumination intensity (0.3 mW.mm-2) to activate channelrhodopsins (ChRs) in vivo was reliably achieved at low operating voltages (5 V). In Drosophila melanogaster third instar larvae expressing ChR2(H134R) in motor neurons, we found that pulsed illumination from blue and green OLEDs triggered robust and reversible contractions in animals. This response was temporally coupled to the timing of OLED illumination. With blue OLED illumination, the initial rate and overall size of the behavioural response was strongest. Green OLEDs achieved roughly 70% of the response observed with blue OLEDs. Orange OLEDs did not produce contractions in larvae, in agreement with the spectral response of ChR2(H134R). The device configuration presented here could be modified to accommodate other small model organisms, cell cultures or tissue slices and the ability of OLEDs to provide patterned illumination and spectral tuning can further broaden their utility in optogenetics experiments.

  17. High-brightness organic light-emitting diodes for optogenetic control of Drosophila locomotor behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Andrew; Murawski, Caroline; Pulver, Stefan R.; Gather, Malte C.

    2016-01-01

    Organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) are in widespread use in today’s mobile phones and are likely to drive the next generation of large area displays and solid-state lighting. Here we show steps towards their utility as a platform technology for biophotonics, by demonstrating devices capable of optically controlling behaviour in live animals. Using devices with a pin OLED architecture, sufficient illumination intensity (0.3 mW.mm−2) to activate channelrhodopsins (ChRs) in vivo was reliably achieved at low operating voltages (5 V). In Drosophila melanogaster third instar larvae expressing ChR2(H134R) in motor neurons, we found that pulsed illumination from blue and green OLEDs triggered robust and reversible contractions in animals. This response was temporally coupled to the timing of OLED illumination. With blue OLED illumination, the initial rate and overall size of the behavioural response was strongest. Green OLEDs achieved roughly 70% of the response observed with blue OLEDs. Orange OLEDs did not produce contractions in larvae, in agreement with the spectral response of ChR2(H134R). The device configuration presented here could be modified to accommodate other small model organisms, cell cultures or tissue slices and the ability of OLEDs to provide patterned illumination and spectral tuning can further broaden their utility in optogenetics experiments. PMID:27484401

  18. Clustering and phase synchronization in populations of coupled phase oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cascallares, Guadalupe; Gleiser, Pablo M.

    2015-10-01

    In many species daily rhythms are endogenously generated by groups of coupled neurons that play the role of a circadian pacemaker. The adaptation of the circadian clock to environmental and seasonal changes has been proposed to be regulated by a dual oscillator system. In order to gain insight into this model, we analyzed the synchronization properties of two fully coupled groups of Kuramoto oscillators. Each group has an internal coupling parameter and the interaction between the two groups can be controlled by two parameters allowing for symmetric or non-symmetric coupling. We show that even for such a simple model counterintuitive behaviours take place, such as a global decrease in synchrony when the coupling between the groups is increased. Through a detailed analysis of the local synchronization processes we explain this behaviour.

  19. Effects of diversity and coupling on transport properties of globally coupled active Brownian particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Dan; Zhu, Shiqun

    2013-03-01

    Based on recent work [B. Lindner and E. M., Nicola, Phys. Rev. Lett. 101 (2008) 190603], the transport of N globally coupled Brownian motors with diversity is investigated. By applying the mean-field approximation, the effects of the diversity disturbance and the coupling strength on the transport of the coupled system are discussed both theoretically and numerically. It is found that the diversity reduces the diffusion dramatically for small bias and increases the diffusion gradually for large bias. The collective motion shows a resonant dependence on the coupling strength in a region of small bias.

  20. Internal charge behaviour of nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, J. Keith; Fothergill, John C.

    2004-05-01

    The incorporation of 23 nm titanium dioxide nanoparticles into an epoxy matrix to form a nanocomposite structure is described. It is shown that the use of nanometric particles results in a substantial change in the behaviour of the composite, which can be traced to the mitigation of internal charge when a comparison is made with conventional TiO2 fillers. A variety of diagnostic techniques (including dielectric spectroscopy, electroluminescence, thermally stimulated current and photoluminescence) have been used to augment pulsed electro-acoustic space charge measurement to provide a basis for understanding the underlying physics of the phenomenon. It would appear that, when the size of the inclusions becomes small enough, they act cooperatively with the host structure and cease to exhibit interfacial properties, leading to Maxwell-Wagner polarization. It is postulated that the particles are surrounded by high charge concentrations in the Gouy-Chapman-Stern layer. Since nanoparticles have very high specific areas, these regions allow limited charge percolation through nano-filled dielectrics. The practical consequences of this have also been explored in terms of the electric strength exhibited. It would appear that there was a window in which real advantages accrue from the nano-formulated material. An optimum loading of about 10% (by weight) is indicated.

  1. Ligand-specific regulation of the extracellular surface of a G-protein-coupled receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Bokoch, Michael P.; Zou, Yaozhong; Rasmussen, Søren G.F.; Liu, Corey W.; Nygaard, Rie; Rosenbaum, Daniel M.; Fung, Juan José; Choi, Hee-Jung; Thian, Foon Sun; Kobilka, Tong Sun; Puglisi, Joseph D.; Weis, William I.; Pardo, Leonardo; Prosser, R. Scott; Mueller, Luciano; Kobilka, Brian K.

    2010-01-14

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are seven-transmembrane proteins that mediate most cellular responses to hormones and neurotransmitters. They are the largest group of therapeutic targets for a broad spectrum of diseases. Recent crystal structures of GPCRs have revealed structural conservation extending from the orthosteric ligand-binding site in the transmembrane core to the cytoplasmic G-protein-coupling domains. In contrast, the extracellular surface (ECS) of GPCRs is remarkably diverse and is therefore an ideal target for the discovery of subtype-selective drugs. However, little is known about the functional role of the ECS in receptor activation, or about conformational coupling of this surface to the native ligand-binding pocket. Here we use NMR spectroscopy to investigate ligand-specific conformational changes around a central structural feature in the ECS of the {beta}{sub 2} adrenergic receptor: a salt bridge linking extracellular loops 2 and 3. Small-molecule drugs that bind within the transmembrane core and exhibit different efficacies towards G-protein activation (agonist, neutral antagonist and inverse agonist) also stabilize distinct conformations of the ECS. We thereby demonstrate conformational coupling between the ECS and the orthosteric binding site, showing that drugs targeting this diverse surface could function as allosteric modulators with high subtype selectivity. Moreover, these studies provide a new insight into the dynamic behaviour of GPCRs not addressable by static, inactive-state crystal structures.

  2. Inclusive Education: Teachers' Intentions and Behaviour Analysed from the Viewpoint of the Theory of Planned Behaviour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yan, Zi; Sin, Kuen-fung

    2014-01-01

    The theory of planned behaviour (TPB) claims that behaviour can be predicted by behavioural intention and perceived behavioural control, while behavioural intention is a function of attitude towards the behaviour, subjective norm, and perceived behavioural control. This study aims at providing explanation and prediction of teachers' inclusive…

  3. Inclusive Education: Teachers' Intentions and Behaviour Analysed from the Viewpoint of the Theory of Planned Behaviour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yan, Zi; Sin, Kuen-fung

    2014-01-01

    The theory of planned behaviour (TPB) claims that behaviour can be predicted by behavioural intention and perceived behavioural control, while behavioural intention is a function of attitude towards the behaviour, subjective norm, and perceived behavioural control. This study aims at providing explanation and prediction of teachers' inclusive…

  4. Simultaneous determination of suspended particulate trace metals (Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd and Pb) in seawater with small volume filtration assisted by microwave digestion and flow injection inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Nakatsuka, Seiji; Okamura, Kei; Norisuye, Kazuhiro; Sohrin, Yoshiki

    2007-06-26

    A new technique for the determination of suspended particulate trace metals (P-metals >0.2 microm), such as Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd and Pb, in open ocean seawater has been developed by using microwave digestion coupled with flow injection inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (FI-ICP-MS). Suspended particulate matter (SPM) was collected from 500 mL of seawater on a Nuclepore filter (0.2 microm) using a closed filtration system. Both the SPM and filter were completely dissolved by microwave digestion. Reagents for the digestion were evaporated using a clean evaporation system, and the metals were redissolved in 0.8 M HNO3. The solution was diluted with buffer solution to give pH 5.0 and the metals were determined by FI-ICP-MS using a chelating adsorbent of 8-hydroxyquinoline immobilized on fluorinated metal alkoxide glass (MAF-8HQ). The procedure blanks with a filter were found to be 0.048+/-0.008, 10.3+/-0.3, 0.27+/-0.05, 3.3+/-1.8, 0.02+/-0.03 and 0.85+/-0.09 ng L(-1) for Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd and Pb, respectively (n=14). Detection limits defined as 3 times the standard deviation of the blanks were 0.023, 0.90, 0.14, 5.3, 0.078 and 0.28 ng L(-1) for Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd and Pb, respectively. Accuracy was evaluated using certified reference materials of chlorella (NES CRM No. 3) and marine sediment (HISS-1). The method was applied to the determination of vertical distributions for P-Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd and Pb in the Western North Pacific.

  5. Social Desirability, Environmental Attitudes, and General Ecological Behaviour in Children

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oerke, Britta; Bogner, Franz X.

    2013-03-01

    Socially desirable responses have been widely discussed as potentially biasing self-reported measures of environmental attitude and behaviour assessment. The direct and moderating effect of social desirability on children has not been analysed before. By applying a Lie scale together with a two-factor environmental attitude set measure and a scale of self-reported General Ecological Behaviour (GEB) to 198 pupils, we found a moderate impact of Lie scores on only one of both attitude measures and a small impact on GEB. In a multiple regression analysis general behaviour was predicted by attitude, social desirability, and the interaction of both. Social desirability had no moderating effect on the relationship between environmental attitudes and behaviour. Implications of these outcomes for research on environmental issues with children are discussed.

  6. Circuit electromechanics with single photon strong coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Zheng-Yuan Yang, Li-Na; Zhou, Jian

    2015-07-13

    In circuit electromechanics, the coupling strength is usually very small. Here, replacing the capacitor in circuit electromechanics by a superconducting flux qubit, we show that the coupling among the qubit and the two resonators can induce effective electromechanical coupling which can attain the strong coupling regime at the single photon level with feasible experimental parameters. We use dispersive couplings among two resonators and the qubit while the qubit is also driven by an external classical field. These couplings form a three-wave mixing configuration among the three elements where the qubit degree of freedom can be adiabatically eliminated, and thus results in the enhanced coupling between the two resonators. Therefore, our work constitutes the first step towards studying quantum nonlinear effect in circuit electromechanics.

  7. Behavioural plasticity in evolving robots.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Jônata Tyska; Nolfi, Stefano

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we show how the development of plastic behaviours, i.e., behaviour displaying a modular organisation characterised by behavioural subunits that are alternated in a context-dependent manner, can enable evolving robots to solve their adaptive task more efficiently also when it does not require the accomplishment of multiple conflicting functions. The comparison of the results obtained in different experimental conditions indicates that the most important prerequisites for the evolution of behavioural plasticity are: the possibility to generate and perceive affordances (i.e., opportunities for behaviour execution), the possibility to rely on flexible regulatory processes that exploit both external and internal cues, and the possibility to realise smooth and effective transitions between behaviours.

  8. [Sedentary behaviour and health].

    PubMed

    Füzéki, E; Vogt, L; Banzer, W

    2015-03-01

    Exercise-related public health recommendations and research for increased fitness and health had long focused on vigorous exercise or the lack thereof. Recently scientific interest in possible effects of sedentary behaviour (SB) (sitting) independent of moderate-vigorous intensity exercise has been growing.We conducted a selective literature search in Pubmed and the Sedentary Research Database with the outcomes SB, risk factors, mortality and morbidity in adults. We included only reviews and systematic reviews.Observational studies suggest an association between SB and all-cause and cardiovascular, but not cancer mortality. SB also seems to be associated with diabetes and overweight/weight gain. Evidence for other diseases, such as cardiovascular diseases, hypertension, cancer, and mental diseases is limited also because of the heterogeneity and poor methodology of the -studies. Intervention studies found inconsistent evidence that SB is associated with detrimental effects on markers of cardiometabolic risk.The evidence on the detrimental effects of sedentary behaviour is decreasingly convincing with the endpoints of mortality, -morbidity, and markers of metabolic risk, in that order. Higher TV and screen time, but not total SB seems to be associated with higher all-cause and cardiovascular, but not cancer mortality. Further intervention studies are needed to establish -dose-response relationships and potentially protective effects of cardiorespiratory fitness and physical activity. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. Responding to unprofessional behaviours.

    PubMed

    Worthington, Roger; Hays, Richard

    2012-04-01

    Medical educators sometimes have to respond to inappropriate behaviours from doctors in training that have the potential to endanger their future careers and affect the safety and well-being of their patients. The authors led workshops at international meetings using case-based discussion and plenary wrap-ups to reinforce and share the learning outcomes. This paper summarises key points of difference and common themes about how to manage challenging professional behaviours presented by doctors in training that may be of value to tutors and clinical educators. Although the problems encountered had elements in common, experiences varied between countries, schools and programmes as regards processes, procedures and thresholds for launching an investigation. Whereas variations are not unexpected it is important to consider the context and background against which decisions are made. Appropriate responses must take account of professional, legal and ethical guidelines, where they exist. Major inconsistencies in hearings and investigations may not be in anyone's best interests: fairness is core to most notions of justice, whether from the perspective of a doctor in training, clinical educator or member of the public. Therefore, schools and programmes need to take this into account when reviewing processes and procedures. Although the career of a doctor in training is important, it is not the only consideration. If systems fail the public has a right to be concerned, and striving to ensure that medical students graduate to become safe, professional doctors is something of concern to all clinical educators. © Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2012.

  10. REM sleep Behaviour Disorder.

    PubMed

    Ferini-Strambi, Luigi; Rinaldi, Fabrizio; Giora, Enrico; Marelli, Sara; Galbiati, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Rapid Eye Movement (REM) sleep Behaviour Disorder (RBD) is a REM sleep parasomnia characterized by loss of the muscle atonia that typically occurs during REM sleep, therefore allowing patients to act out their dreams. RBD manifests itself clinically as a violent behaviour occurring during the night, and is detected at the polysomnography by phasic and/or tonic muscle activity on the electromyography channel. In absence of neurological signs or central nervous system lesions, RBD is defined as idiopathic. Nevertheless, in a large number of cases the development of neurodegenerative diseases in RBD patients has been described, with the duration of the follow-up representing a fundamental aspect. A growing number of clinical, neurophysiologic and neuropsychological studies aimed to detect early markers of neurodegenerative dysfunction in RBD patients. Anyway, the evidence of impaired cortical activity, subtle neurocognitive dysfunction, olfactory and autonomic impairment and neuroimaging brain changes in RBD patients is challenging the concept of an idiopathic form of RBD, supporting the idea of RBD as an early manifestation of a more complex neurodegenerative process.

  11. Driver behaviour at roadworks.

    PubMed

    Walker, Guy; Calvert, Malcolm

    2015-11-01

    There is an incompatibility between how transport engineers think drivers behave in roadworks and how they actually behave. As a result of this incompatibility we are losing approximately a lane's worth of capacity in addition to those closed by the roadworks themselves. The problem would have little significance were it not for the fact a lane of motorway costs approx. £30 m per mile to construct and £43 k a year to maintain, and that many more roadworks are planned as infrastructure constructed 40 or 50 years previously reaches a critical stage in its lifecycle. Given current traffic volumes, and the sensitivity of road networks to congestion, the effects of roadworks need to be accurately assessed. To do this requires a new ergonomic approach. A large-scale observational study of real traffic conditions was used to identify the issues and impacts, which were then mapped to the ergonomic knowledge-base on driver behaviour, and combined to developed practical guidelines to help in modelling future roadworks scenarios with greater behavioural accuracy. Also stemming from the work are novel directions for the future ergonomic design of roadworks themselves.

  12. On self-exciting coupled Faraday disk homopolar dynamos driving series motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moroz, Irene M.; Hide, Raymond; Soward, Andrew M.

    1998-06-01

    We present the results of a preliminary analytical and numerical study of one of the simpler members of a hierarchy of N (where N ≥ 1) coupled self-exciting Faraday disk homopolar dynamos, incorporating motors as additional electrical elements driven by the dynamo-generated current, as proposed by Hide (1997). The hierarchy is a generalisation of a single disk dynamo ( N = 1) with just one electric motor in the system, and crucially, incorporating effects due to mechanical friction in both the disk and the motor, as investigated by Hide et al. (1996). This is describable by a set of three coupled autonomous nonlinear ordinary differential equations, which, due to the presence of the motor, has solutions corresponding to co-existing periodic states of increasing complexity, as well as to chaotic dynamics. We consider the case of two such homopolar dynamos ( N = 2) with generally dissimilar characteristics but coupled together magnetically, with the aim of determining the extent to which this coupled system differs in its behaviour from the single disk dynamo with a series motor (Hide et al. 1996). In the case when the units are identical, the behaviour of the double dynamo system (after initial transients have decayed away) is identical to that of the single dynamo system, with solutions (including “synchronised chaos”) locked in both amplitude and phase. When there is no motor in the system and the coefficient of mechanical friction in the disks is small, these transients resemble the well-known ‘non-synchronous’, but structurally unstable Rikitake solution.

  13. Sexual Agreements among Gay Male Couples

    PubMed Central

    Hoff, Colleen H.; Beougher, Sean C.

    2009-01-01

    Many gay male couples make agreements about whether or not to permit sex with outside partners, yet little is known about the development and maintenance of these agreements, their impact on relationships, and whether they are an effective HIV prevention strategy. Using semi-structured, qualitative interviews, 39 gay male couples were asked about their sexual agreements and about other relationship dynamics that might affect their agreements. Analysis revealed a wide range of agreement types, all of which are presented along a continuum rather than as discrete categories. For couples with open agreements, most placed rules or conditions limiting when, where, how often, and with whom outside sex was permitted. Although motivations for having agreements varied, HIV prevention did not rank as a primary factor for any couple. Most couples had congruous agreements; however, a small number reported discrepancies which may increase HIV transmission risk. How couples handled breaks in their agreements also varied, depending on what condition was broken, whether it was disclosed, and the partner's reaction. Additional results include differences in agreement type and motivations for having an agreement based on couple serostatus. Overall, agreements benefited couples by providing boundaries for the relationship, supporting a non-heteronormative identity, and fulfilling the sexual needs of the couple. Future prevention efforts involving gay couples must address the range of agreement types and the meanings couples ascribe to them, in addition to tempering safety messages with the relationship issues that are important to and faced by gay couples. PMID:18686027

  14. Early detection of health and welfare compromises through automated detection of behavioural changes in pigs.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Stephen G; Miller, Amy L; Clapp, James; Plötz, Thomas; Kyriazakis, Ilias

    2016-11-01

    Early detection of health and welfare compromises in commercial piggeries is essential for timely intervention to enhance treatment success, reduce impact on welfare, and promote sustainable pig production. Behavioural changes that precede or accompany subclinical and clinical signs may have diagnostic value. Often referred to as sickness behaviour, this encompasses changes in feeding, drinking, and elimination behaviours, social behaviours, and locomotion and posture. Such subtle changes in behaviour are not easy to quantify and require lengthy observation input by staff, which is impractical on a commercial scale. Automated early-warning systems may provide an alternative by objectively measuring behaviour with sensors to automatically monitor and detect behavioural changes. This paper aims to: (1) review the quantifiable changes in behaviours with potential diagnostic value; (2) subsequently identify available sensors for measuring behaviours; and (3) describe the progress towards automating monitoring and detection, which may allow such behavioural changes to be captured, measured, and interpreted and thus lead to automation in commercial, housed piggeries. Multiple sensor modalities are available for automatic measurement and monitoring of behaviour, which require humans to actively identify behavioural changes. This has been demonstrated for the detection of small deviations in diurnal drinking, deviations in feeding behaviour, monitoring coughs and vocalisation, and monitoring thermal comfort, but not social behaviour. However, current progress is in the early stages of developing fully automated detection systems that do not require humans to identify behavioural changes; e.g., through automated alerts sent to mobile phones. Challenges for achieving automation are multifaceted and trade-offs are considered between health, welfare, and costs, between analysis of individuals and groups, and between generic and compromise-specific behaviours. Copyright © 2016

  15. Sexual behaviour in young people.

    PubMed

    Gerressu, Makeda; Stephenson, Judith M

    2008-02-01

    The purpose of this review was to synthesize major research findings in relation to young people and sexual behaviour from the period 2006-2007. We found several key reviews that advance knowledge in the field of young people and sexual behaviour, including observational studies, both qualitative and quantitative, and intervention studies designed to reduce sexual transmission of HIV in both developed and developing countries. Other reviews focused on same-sex behaviours, victimization within relationships, HIV infection/sexually transmitted infection in travellers, prevention of HIV/sexually transmitted infection and the determinants of sexual behaviour in young people. Powerful and consistent forces sustain gender differences in sexual behaviour. The design of interventions to reduce sexual risk behaviour should take account of these forces that help explain young people's sexual behaviour. Knowledge about the kind of interventions that reduce risk behaviour and should be implemented has improved, although the impact on health outcomes such as pregnancy and HIV/sexually transmitted infection is often uncertain. Effective school sex education needs to be part of much broader strategies to improve sexual health, and there is an urgent need for better evaluation of interventions, especially community interventions. Further longitudinal studies are needed to provide insight into the development of relationships and sexual behaviour as well as the course of acculturation.

  16. The psychobiology of aggressive behaviour.

    PubMed

    Träskman-Bendz, Lil; Westling, Sofie

    2005-01-01

    Among psychiatric illnesses, genetically determined disorders usually have an early onset and a severe and complicated course. Gene-environmental interaction is of importance for aggressive impulsive behaviour. For example, alcoholism type II has a high family loading, a severe course, and is often associated with antisocial behaviour. In order to gain further understanding of aggressive and impulsive behaviour, genes determining serotonin metabolism, neurosteroids and carbohydrate metabolism should be of interest to investigate. Furthermore, modern brain-imaging studies will reveal the site of action of aggressiveness and impulsivity. Within brain regions of interest, biological studies will promote our knowledge of this deleterious behaviour.

  17. The QCD running coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deur, Alexandre; Brodsky, Stanley J.; de Téramond, Guy F.

    2016-09-01

    We review the present theoretical and empirical knowledge for αs, the fundamental coupling underlying the interactions of quarks and gluons in Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). The dependence of αs(Q2) on momentum transfer Q encodes the underlying dynamics of hadron physics-from color confinement in the infrared domain to asymptotic freedom at short distances. We review constraints on αs(Q2) at high Q2, as predicted by perturbative QCD, and its analytic behavior at small Q2, based on models of nonperturbative dynamics. In the introductory part of this review, we explain the phenomenological meaning of the coupling, the reason for its running, and the challenges facing a complete understanding of its analytic behavior in the infrared domain. In the second, more technical, part of the review, we discuss the behavior of αs(Q2) in the high momentum transfer domain of QCD. We review how αs is defined, including its renormalization scheme dependence, the definition of its renormalization scale, the utility of effective charges, as well as "Commensurate Scale Relations" which connect the various definitions of the QCD coupling without renormalization-scale ambiguity. We also report recent significant measurements and advanced theoretical analyses which have led to precise QCD predictions at high energy. As an example of an important optimization procedure, we discuss the "Principle of Maximum Conformality", which enhances QCD's predictive power by removing the dependence of the predictions for physical observables on the choice of theoretical conventions such as the renormalization scheme. In the last part of the review, we discuss the challenge of understanding the analytic behavior αs(Q2) in the low momentum transfer domain. We survey various theoretical models for the nonperturbative strongly coupled regime, such as the light-front holographic approach to QCD. This new framework predicts the form of the quark-confinement potential underlying hadron spectroscopy and

  18. Small clusters: aerosol precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Castleman, A.W. Jr.; Keesee, R.G.

    1983-01-01

    Studies of the structure, stability, electronic properties, and formation kinetics of small clusters provide information useful in furthering an understanding of nucleation processes, the formation and stability of collodial media, and the nature of surfaces. Using mass spectrometry, coupled with various high pressure ion clustering and molecular beam techniques, the details of the primary clustering steps leading to nucleation from the vapor are obtained by direct observation. This paper is devoted to a review of some recent results on these subjects obtained in the authors' laboratory.

  19. Small obstacle avoidance sensor.

    PubMed

    Vollmerhausen, Richard H

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a laser ranging sensor that is suitable for applications like small unmanned aerial vehicles. The hardware consists of a diode emitter array and line-scan charge coupled devices. A structured-light technique measures ranges up to 30 meters for 64 field angles in a 90 degree field of view. Operation is eye safe, and the laser wavelength is not visible to night vision goggles. This paper describes a specific sensor design in order to illustrate performance for a given package size.

  20. Coupling strength versus coupling impact in nonidentical bidirectionally coupled dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laiou, Petroula; Andrzejak, Ralph G.

    2017-01-01

    The understanding of interacting dynamics is important for the characterization of real-world networks. In general, real-world networks are heterogeneous in the sense that each node of the network is a dynamics with different properties. For coupled nonidentical dynamics symmetric interactions are not straightforwardly defined from the coupling strength values. Thus, a challenging issue is whether we can define a symmetric interaction in this asymmetric setting. To address this problem we introduce the notion of the coupling impact. The coupling impact considers not only the coupling strength but also the energy of the individual dynamics, which is conveyed via the coupling. To illustrate this concept, we follow a data-driven approach by analyzing signals from pairs of coupled model dynamics using two different connectivity measures. We find that the coupling impact, but not the coupling strength, correctly detects a symmetric interaction between pairs of coupled dynamics regardless of their degree of asymmetry. Therefore, this approach allows us to reveal the real impact that one dynamics has on the other and hence to define symmetric interactions in pairs of nonidentical dynamics.

  1. The Association between Bullying Behaviour, Arousal Levels and Behaviour Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, S.; White, E.

    2005-01-01

    Research into bullying behaviour has identified two main categories of bullying behaviour, direct bullying and relational bullying, within which different profiles are evident, namely 'pure' bullies, 'pure' victims, bully/victims and neutral children. The current study examined the relationship between direct and relational bullying profiles,…

  2. Temporal behaviour profiles of Mus musculus in nature are affected by population activity.

    PubMed

    Robbers, Yuri; Koster, Eva A S; Krijbolder, Doortje I; Ruijs, Amanda; van Berloo, Sander; Meijer, Johanna H

    2015-02-01

    Animals have circadian clocks that govern their activity pattern, resulting in 24h rhythms in physiology and behaviour. Under laboratory conditions, light is the major external signal that affects temporal patterns in behaviour, and Mus musculus is strictly nocturnal in its behaviour. In the present study we questioned whether under natural conditions, environmental factors other than light affect the temporal profile of mice. In order to test this, we investigated the activity patterns of free-ranging M. musculus in a natural habitat, using sensors and a camera integrated into a recording unit that the mice could freely enter and leave. Our data show that mice have seasonal fluctuations in activity duration (6.7±0.82 h in summer, 11.3±1.80 h in winter). Furthermore, although primarily nocturnal, wild mice also exhibit daytime activity from spring until late autumn. A multivariate analysis revealed that the major factor correlating with increased daytime activity was population activity, defined as the number of visits to the recording site. Day length had a small but significant effect. Further analysis revealed that the relative population activity (compared to the past couple of days) is a better predictor of daytime activity than absolute population activity. Light intensity and temperature did not have a significant effect on daytime activity. The amount of variance explained by external factors is 51.9%, leaving surprisingly little unexplained variance that might be attributed to the internal clock. Our data further indicate that mice determine population activity by comparing a given night with the preceding 2-7 nights, a time frame suggesting a role for olfactory cues. We conclude that relative population activity is a major factor controlling the temporal activity patterns of M. musculus in an unrestricted natural population.

  3. Characterization of the phase behaviour of a novel polymerizable lyotropic ionic liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Goujon, Nicolas; Forsyth, Maria; Dumée, Ludovic F; Bryant, Gary; Byrne, Nolene

    2015-09-21

    The development of new polymerizable lyotropic liquid crystals (LLCs) utilizing charged amphiphilic molecules such as those based on long chain imidazolium compounds, is a relatively new design direction for producing robust membranes with controllable nano-structures. Here we have developed a novel polymerizable ionic liquid based LLC, 1-hexadecyl-3-methylimidazolium acrylate (C16mimAcr), where the acrylate anion acts as the polymerizable moiety. The phase behaviour of the C16mimAcr upon the addition of water was characterized using small and wide angle X-ray scatterings, differential scanning calorimetry and polarized optical microscopy. We compare the phase behaviour of this new polymerizable LLC to that of the well known LLC chloride analogue, 1-hexadecyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (C16mimCl). We find that the C16mimAcr system has a more complex phase behaviour compared to the C16mimCl system. Additional lyotropic liquid crystalline mesophases such as hexagonal phase (H1) and discontinuous cubic phase (I1) are observed at 20 °C for the acrylate system at 50 and 65 wt% water respectively. The appearance of the hexagonal phase (H1) and discontinuous cubic phase (I1) for the acrylate system is likely due to the strong hydrating nature of the acrylate anion, which increases the head group area. The formation of these additional mesophases seen for the acrylate system, especially the hexagonal phase (H1), coupled with the polymerization functionality offers great potential in the design of advanced membrane materials with selective and anisotropic transport properties.

  4. Analysis of Synchronization in a Slowly Changing Environment: How Slow Coupling Becomes Fast Weak Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, Jonathan J.; Rubin, Jonathan E.; Ermentrout, G. Bard

    2013-05-01

    Many physical and biological oscillators are coupled indirectly through a slowly evolving dynamic medium. We present a perturbation method that shows that slow dynamics of a coupling medium is effectively equivalent to weak coupling of oscillators. Our methods first apply the theory of averaging to obtain a periodic solution to a single system and then exploit small fluctuations around the mean to analyze coupling between systems. We use this method to explain the spike-to-spike asynchrony seen in a model for bursting neurons coupled through extracellular potassium and to explore synchronization in a model for quorum sensing.

  5. Small Magnetometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhnke, Falko; Musmann, Gunter; Glassmeier, K. H.; Tsurutani, Bruce

    1995-01-01

    Small, lightweight, low-power magnetometer measures three-dimensional magnetic field. Includes three toroidal cores - one for each dimension. Exhibits high sensitivity, low zero-point drift, and low noise. Magnetometer circuit includes driver circuit and three analog signal-processing circuits. Output of analog signal-processing circuit proportional to one of components of external magnetic field.

  6. Single nucleotide polymorphisms and suicidal behaviour.

    PubMed

    Pregelj, Peter

    2012-09-01

    The World Health Organization estimates that almost one million deaths each year are attributable to suicide, and suicide attempt is close to 10 times more common than suicide completion. Suicidal behaviour has multiple causes that are broadly divided into proximal stressors or triggers and predisposition such as genetic. It is also known that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) occur throughout a human DNA influencing the structure, quantity and the function of proteins and other molecules. Abnormalities of the serotonergic system were observed in suicide victims. Beside 5-HT1A and other serotonin receptors most studied are the serotonin transporter 5' functional promoter variant, and monoamine oxidase A and the tryptophan-hydroxylase 1 and 2 (TPH) polymorphisms. It seems that especially genes regulating serotoninergic system and neuronal systems involved in stress response are associated with suicidal behaviour. Most genetic studies on suicidal behaviour have considered a small set of functional polymorphisms relevant mostly to monoaminergic neurotransmission. However, genes involved in regulation of other factors such as brain-derived neurotropic factor seems to be even more relevant for further research.

  7. Study of rheological behaviour of wines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trávníček, Petr; Burg, Patrik; Krakowiak-Bal, Anna; Junga, Petr; Vítěz, Tomáš; Ziemiańczyk, Urszula

    2016-10-01

    This study deals with rheological properties of various wine varieties. Samples of the following wines were used for this experiment: André, Cabernet Moravia, Laurot, Saint Laurent, Gruner Veltliner, Pinot Blanc, Müller Thurgau, and Riesling Italico. These samples were obtained from wine produced from the grapes collected in the Czech Republic (Morava region, subregion Velke Pavlovice). In the first phase, the chemical composition of the samples was determined. The following chemical parameters were determined: total acidity, pH, content of the alcohol, reduced sugars, free SO2, total SO2, and volatile acids. In the second phase of the study, the physical properties of the samples were determined and the samples of the wines were subjected to rheological tests. These tests consisted in determination of apparent viscosity in relation to temperature, hysteresis loop tests, and apparent viscosity related to time. The dependence of the shear rate on the shear stress was described with the Herschel-Bulkley mathematical model. The experiment yielded the following findings: seven out of the eight samples behaved as non-Newtonian fluids at low temperature (5°C); non-Newtonian behaviour was changed into Newtonian at the temperature higher than 10°C; non-Newtonian behaviour was characterised as thixotropic behaviour; the degree of thixotropy is relatively small and reaches 1.85 Pa s-1 ml-1.

  8. 2012 Philip S. Portoghese Medicinal Chemistry Lectureship: Structure-Based Approaches to Ligands for G Protein-Coupled Adenosine and P2Y Receptors, From Small Molecules to Nanoconjugates +

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    Adenosine receptor (ARs) and P2Y receptors (P2YRs) that respond to extracellular nucleosides/tides are associated with new directions for therapeutics. The X-ray structures of the A 2A AR complexes with agonists and antagonists are examined in relationship to the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) superfamily and applied to drug discovery. Much of the data on AR ligand structure from early SAR studies, now is explainable from the A 2A AR X-ray crystallography. The ligand-receptor interactions in related GPCR complexes can be identified by means of modeling approaches, e.g. molecular docking. Thus, molecular recognition in binding and activation processes has been studied effectively using homology modeling and applied to ligand design. Virtual screening has yielded new nonnucleoside AR antagonists, and existing ligands have been improved with knowledge of the receptor interactions. New agonists are being explored for CNS and peripheral therapeutics based on in vivo activity, such as chronic neuropathic pain. Ligands for receptors more distantly related to the X-ray template, i.e. P2YRs, have been introduced and are mainly used as pharmacological tools for elucidating the physiological role of extracellular nucleotides. Other ligand tools for drug discovery include fluorescent probes, radioactive probes, multivalent probes, and functionalized nanoparticles. PMID:23597047

  9. Coupled wave sensor technology

    SciTech Connect

    Maki, M.C.

    1988-01-01

    Buried line guided radar sensors have been used successfully for a number of years to provide perimeter security for high value resources. This paper introduces a new complementary sensor advancement at Computing Devices termed 'coupled wave device technology' (CWD). It provides many of the inherent advantages of leakey cable sensors, such as terrain-following and the ability to discriminate between humans and small animals. It also is able to provide a high or wide detection zone, and allows the sensor to be mounted aerially and adjacent to a wall or fence. Several alternative sensors have been developed which include a single-line sensor, a dual-line hybrid sensor that combines the elements of ported coax and CWD technology, and a rapid-deployment portable sensor for temporary or mobile applications. A description of the technology, the sensors, and their characteristics is provided.

  10. Saying Goodbye: An Investigation into Parent-Infant Separation Behaviours on Arrival in Childcare

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jovanovic, Jessie

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this small-scale study was to investigate how parental separation behaviours affect the transitional behaviour of infants aged 6-18 months. Thirty parent-infant pairs were observed during the separation process across three metropolitan childcare centres in Adelaide, South Australia. Observed interactions with both their infants and…

  11. Effects of an Emotional Literacy Intervention for Students Identified with Bullying Behaviour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knowler, Claire; Frederickson, Norah

    2013-01-01

    The effectiveness of a 12-week, small group emotional literacy (EL) intervention in reducing bullying behaviour in school was evaluated. Participants were 50 primary school pupils identified through peer nomination as engaging in bullying behaviours. The intervention was implemented in schools already engaged with a universal social and emotional…

  12. Saying Goodbye: An Investigation into Parent-Infant Separation Behaviours on Arrival in Childcare

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jovanovic, Jessie

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this small-scale study was to investigate how parental separation behaviours affect the transitional behaviour of infants aged 6-18 months. Thirty parent-infant pairs were observed during the separation process across three metropolitan childcare centres in Adelaide, South Australia. Observed interactions with both their infants and…

  13. Effects of an Emotional Literacy Intervention for Students Identified with Bullying Behaviour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knowler, Claire; Frederickson, Norah

    2013-01-01

    The effectiveness of a 12-week, small group emotional literacy (EL) intervention in reducing bullying behaviour in school was evaluated. Participants were 50 primary school pupils identified through peer nomination as engaging in bullying behaviours. The intervention was implemented in schools already engaged with a universal social and emotional…

  14. Linearized holographic isotropization at finite coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atashi, Mahdi; Fadafan, Kazem Bitaghsir; Jafari, Ghadir

    2017-06-01

    We study holographic isotropization of an anisotropic homogeneous non-Abelian strongly coupled plasma in the presence of Gauss-Bonnet corrections. It was verified before that one can linearize Einstein's equations around the final black hole background and simplify the complicated setup. Using this approach, we study the expectation value of the boundary stress tensor. Although we consider small values of the Gauss-Bonnet coupling constant, it is found that finite coupling leads to significant increasing of the thermalization time. By including higher order corrections in linearization, we extend the results to study the effect of the Gauss-Bonnet coupling on the entropy production on the event horizon.

  15. Nonequilibrium thermodynamics in the strong coupling and non-Markovian regime based on a reaction coordinate mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strasberg, Philipp; Schaller, Gernot; Lambert, Neill; Brandes, Tobias

    2016-07-01

    We propose a method to study the thermodynamic behaviour of small systems beyond the weak coupling and Markovian approximation, which is different in spirit from conventional approaches. The idea is to redefine the system and environment such that the effective, redefined system is again coupled weakly to Markovian residual baths and thus, allows to derive a consistent thermodynamic framework for this new system-environment partition. To achieve this goal we make use of the reaction coordinate (RC) mapping, which is a general method in the sense that it can be applied to an arbitrary (quantum or classical and even time-dependent) system coupled linearly to an arbitrary number of harmonic oscillator reservoirs. The core of the method relies on an appropriate identification of a part of the environment (the RC), which is subsequently included as a part of the system. We demonstrate the power of this concept by showing that non-Markovian effects can significantly enhance the steady state efficiency of a three-level-maser heat engine, even in the regime of weak system-bath coupling. Furthermore, we show for a single electron transistor coupled to vibrations that our method allows one to justify master equations derived in a polaron transformed reference frame.

  16. Supporting Positive Behaviour in Alberta Schools: An Intensive Individualized Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Souveny, Dwaine

    2008-01-01

    Drawing on current research and best practices, this third part of the three-part resource, "Supporting Positive Behaviour in Alberta Schools," provides information and strategies for providing intensive, individualized support and instruction for the small percentage of students requiring a high degree of intervention. This system of…

  17. Harmonic and Anharmonic Behaviour of a Simple Oscillator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Shea, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    We consider a simple oscillator that exhibits harmonic and anharmonic regimes and analyse its behaviour over the complete range of possible amplitudes. The oscillator consists of a mass "m" fixed at the midpoint of a horizontal rope. For zero initial rope tension and small amplitude the period of oscillation, tau, varies as tau is approximately…

  18. Multiphysics Application Coupling Toolkit

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Michael T.

    2013-12-02

    This particular consortium implementation of the software integration infrastructure will, in large part, refactor portions of the Rocstar multiphysics infrastructure. Development of this infrastructure originated at the University of Illinois DOE ASCI Center for Simulation of Advanced Rockets (CSAR) to support the center's massively parallel multiphysics simulation application, Rocstar, and has continued at IllinoisRocstar, a small company formed near the end of the University-based program. IllinoisRocstar is now licensing these new developments as free, open source, in hopes to help improve their own and others' access to infrastructure which can be readily utilized in developing coupled or composite software systems; with particular attention to more rapid production and utilization of multiphysics applications in the HPC environment. There are two major pieces to the consortium implementation, the Application Component Toolkit (ACT), and the Multiphysics Application Coupling Toolkit (MPACT). The current development focus is the ACT, which is (will be) the substrate for MPACT. The ACT itself is built up from the components described in the technical approach. In particular, the ACT has the following major components: 1.The Component Object Manager (COM): The COM package provides encapsulation of user applications, and their data. COM also provides the inter-component function call mechanism. 2.The System Integration Manager (SIM): The SIM package provides constructs and mechanisms for orchestrating composite systems of multiply integrated pieces.

  19. Multiphysics Application Coupling Toolkit

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Michael T.

    2013-12-02

    This particular consortium implementation of the software integration infrastructure will, in large part, refactor portions of the Rocstar multiphysics infrastructure. Development of this infrastructure originated at the University of Illinois DOE ASCI Center for Simulation of Advanced Rockets (CSAR) to support the center's massively parallel multiphysics simulation application, Rocstar, and has continued at IllinoisRocstar, a small company formed near the end of the University-based program. IllinoisRocstar is now licensing these new developments as free, open source, in hopes to help improve their own and others' access to infrastructure which can be readily utilized in developing coupled or composite software systems; with particular attention to more rapid production and utilization of multiphysics applications in the HPC environment. There are two major pieces to the consortium implementation, the Application Component Toolkit (ACT), and the Multiphysics Application Coupling Toolkit (MPACT). The current development focus is the ACT, which is (will be) the substrate for MPACT. The ACT itself is built up from the components described in the technical approach. In particular, the ACT has the following major components: 1.The Component Object Manager (COM): The COM package provides encapsulation of user applications, and their data. COM also provides the inter-component function call mechanism. 2.The System Integration Manager (SIM): The SIM package provides constructs and mechanisms for orchestrating composite systems of multiply integrated pieces.

  20. Trapping effect on a small molecular drug with vascular-disrupting agent CA4P in rodent H22 hepatic tumor model: in vivo magnetic resonance imaging and postmortem inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Gao, Meng; Yao, Nan; Huang, Dejian; Jiang, Cuihua; Feng, Yuanbo; Li, Yue; Lou, Bin; Peng, Fei; Sun, Ziping; Ni, Yicheng; Zhang, Jian

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the present study is to verify the trapping effect of combretastatin A-4-phosphate (CA4P) on small molecular drugs in rodent tumors. Mice with H22 hepatocarcinoma were randomized into groups A and B. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of T1WI, T2WI, and DWI was performed as baseline. Mice in group A were injected with Gd-DTPA and PBS. Mice in group B were injected with Gd-DTPA and CA4P. All mice undergo CE-T1WI at 0 h, 3 h, 6 h, 12 h, and 24 h. Enhancing efficacy of the two groups on CE-T1WI was compared with the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) calculated. Concentrations of gadolinium measured by ICP-AES in the tumor were compared between groups. On the early CE-T1WI, tumors were equally enhanced in both groups. On the delayed CE-T1WI, the enhancing effect of group A was weaker than that of group B. The SNR and the concentration of gadolinium within the tumor of group A were lower than that of group B at 6 h, 12 h, and 24 h after administration. This study indicates that CA4P could improve the retention of Gd-DTPA in the tumor and MRI allowed dynamically monitoring trapping effects of CA4P on local retention of Gd-DTPA as a small molecular drug.

  1. Dynamical aspects of coupled Rossler systems: effects of noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pravitha, R.; Indic, P.; Nampoori, V. P. N.

    2002-02-01

    Nonlinear time series analysis is employed to study the complex behaviour exhibited by a coupled pair of Rossler systems. Dimensional analysis with emphasis on the topological correlation dimension and the Kolmogorov entropy of the system is carried out in the coupling parameter space. The regime of phase synchronization is identified and the extent of synchronization between the systems constituting the coupled system is quantified by the phase synchronization index. The effect of noise on the coupling between the systems is also investigated. An exhaustive study of the topological, dynamical and synchronization properties of the nonlinear system under consideration in its characteristic parameter space is attempted.

  2. The role of son preference in reproductive behaviour in Pakistan.

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, R.; Fikree, F. F.; Berendes, H. W.

    2000-01-01

    The sex of surviving children is an important determinant of reproductive behaviour in South Asia in general and Pakistan in particular. This cohort study evaluates the role of the sex of children on reproductive intentions and subsequent behaviour of women in urban slums of Karachi, Pakistan. The analysis is based on two rounds of surveys conducted in 1990-91 and 1995 of a cohort of married women aged 15-49 years. The results show that pregnancies became increasingly unwanted as the number of surviving sons increased. The sex of surviving children was strongly correlated with subsequent fertility and contraceptive behaviour. However, rather than an exclusive son preference, couples strove for one or more sons and at least one surviving daughter. The policy implications of the link between overt son preference and low status of women are discussed. PMID:10812738

  3. Infant Predictors of Behavioural Inhibition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moehler, Eva; Kagan, Jerome; Oelkers-Ax, Rieke; Brunner, Romuald; Poustka, Luise; Haffner, Johann; Resch, Franz

    2008-01-01

    Behavioural inhibition in the second year of life is a hypothesized predictor for shyness, social anxiety and depression in later childhood, adolescence and even adulthood. To search for the earliest indicators of this fundamental temperamental trait, this study examined whether behavioural characteristics in early infancy can predict behavioural…

  4. Infant Predictors of Behavioural Inhibition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moehler, Eva; Kagan, Jerome; Oelkers-Ax, Rieke; Brunner, Romuald; Poustka, Luise; Haffner, Johann; Resch, Franz

    2008-01-01

    Behavioural inhibition in the second year of life is a hypothesized predictor for shyness, social anxiety and depression in later childhood, adolescence and even adulthood. To search for the earliest indicators of this fundamental temperamental trait, this study examined whether behavioural characteristics in early infancy can predict behavioural…

  5. Generic behavior of coupled oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogg, T.; Huberman, B. A.

    1984-01-01

    There exist a number of interesting physical problems, such as the ac-driven, dc SQUID (superconducting quantum interference device) or convection in conducting fluids, which can be described by the dynamics of driven coupled oscillators. In order to study their behavior as a function of coupling strength and nonlinearity, we have considered the dynamics of two coupled maps belonging to the same universality class as the oscillators. We have analytically determined some of the parameter values for which they exhibit locked states as well as bifurcations into aperiodic behavior. Furthermore, we found a set of codimension-two bifurcations into quasiperiodic orbits near which the rotation number becomes vanishingly small. These bifurcations are characterized by the existence of periodic regimes interrupted by episodes of phase slippage. Finally, we show the effect of thermal fluctuations on the bifurcation diagram by computing the Lyapunov exponent in the presence of external and parametric noise.

  6. A simplified LC-MS/MS method for rapid determination of cycloserine in small-volume human plasma using protein precipitation coupled with dilution techniques to overcome matrix effects and its application to a pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Mao, Zhengsheng; Wang, Xin; Li, Bingxin; Jin, Jing; Xu, Ming; Liu, Youping; Di, Xin

    2017-04-01

    Matrix effects have been a major concern when developing LC-MS/MS methods for quantitative bioanalysis of cycloserine. Sample handling procedures including solid phase extraction or derivatization have been reported previously by researchers to overcome matrix effects of cycloserine. In the present study, the possibility of reducing matrix effects of cycloserine using protein precipitation coupled with dilution techniques was investigated. Plasma samples were pretreated by protein precipitation with methanol followed by a 40-fold dilution with methanol-water (50:50, v/v). The analyte and the internal standard (mildronate) were chromatographed on a Shim-pack XR-ODS (100 mm × 2.0 mm, 2.2 μm) column using methanol-0.01% formic acid (70:30, v/v) as mobile phase and detected by multiple reaction monitoring mode via positive electrospray ionization. The total run time was only 2 min per sample. The suppression of cycloserine response was reduced with the matrix effects ranging between 80.5 and 87.9%. A lower limit of quantification (LLOQ) of 0.300 μg/mL was achieved using only 10 μL of plasma. The intra- and inter-day precisions were less than 4.8% and the accuracy ranged from -2.6 to 6.6%. The method was successfully applied to a pharmacokinetic study of cycloserine in 30 healthy Chinese male subjects after oral administration of a single dose of cycloserine at 250, 500 and 750 mg under fasting conditions. The newly developed method is simpler, faster, cost-effective, and more robust than previously reported LC-MS/MS methods.

  7. Unravelling small world networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higham, Desmond J.

    2003-09-01

    New classes of random graphs have recently been shown to exhibit the small world phenomenon--they are clustered like regular lattices and yet have small average pathlengths like traditional random graphs. Small world behaviour has been observed in a number of real life networks, and hence these random graphs represent a useful modelling tool. In particular, Grindrod [Phys. Rev. E 66 (2002) 066702-1] has proposed a class of range dependent random graphs for modelling proteome networks in bioinformatics. A property of these graphs is that, when suitably ordered, most edges in the graph are short-range, in the sense that they connect near-neighbours, and relatively few are long-range. Grindrod also looked at an inverse problem--given a graph that is known to be an instance of a range dependent random graph, but with vertices in arbitrary order, can we reorder the vertices so that the short-range/long-range connectivity structure is apparent? When the graph is viewed in terms of its adjacency matrix, this becomes a problem in sparse matrix theory: find a symmetric row/column reordering that places most nonzeros close to the diagonal. Algorithms of this general nature have been proposed for other purposes, most notably for reordering to reduce fill-in and for clustering large data sets. Here, we investigate their use in the small world reordering problem. Our numerical results suggest that a spectral reordering algorithm is extremely promising, and we give some theoretical justification for this observation via the maximum likelihood principle.

  8. How coupling determines the entrainment of circadian clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordyugov, G.; Granada, A. E.; Herzel, H.

    2011-08-01

    Autonomous circadian clocks drive daily rhythms in physiology and behaviour. A network of coupled neurons, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), serves as a robust self-sustained circadian pacemaker. Synchronization of this timer to the environmental light-dark cycle is crucial for an organism's fitness. In a recent theoretical and experimental study it was shown that coupling governs the entrainment range of circadian clocks. We apply the theory of coupled oscillators to analyse how diffusive and mean-field coupling affects the entrainment range of interacting cells. Mean-field coupling leads to amplitude expansion of weak oscillators and, as a result, reduces the entrainment range. We also show that coupling determines the rigidity of the synchronized SCN network, i.e. the relaxation rates upon perturbation. Our simulations and analytical calculations using generic oscillator models help to elucidate how coupling determines the entrainment of the SCN. Our theoretical framework helps to interpret experimental data.

  9. An aetiology of hominin behaviour.

    PubMed

    Bednarik, Robert G

    2012-10-01

    A rough framework for a first attempt to formulate a preliminary aetiology of hominin behaviour is proposed, based on scientific rather than archaeological evidence and reasoning. Distinctive precursors of modernity in human behaviour were present several million years ago, and since then have become gradually more established. By the beginning of the Middle Pleistocene, modern human cognitive processes seem to have been largely established. However, full modernity of behaviour can only have occurred in recent centuries, and there remain great variations in it even among extant conspecifics. This model differs significantly from all narratives offered by mainstream archaeology, which generally place the advent of modern human behaviour 30 or 40 millennia ago. These notions and the hypotheses they are based on appear to be false, however such behaviour is defined. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. [Forensic psychiatry and behavioural analysis].

    PubMed

    Nitschke, J; Schinke, D; Ottermann, B; Thomas, J; Osterheider, M

    2011-07-01

    A case report shows that a patient could make a progress in his therapy with the help of professional behavioural analysis after a 14-year period of stagnating forensic therapy. The method of behavioural analysis represents a criminalistic tool to reconstruct and to analyse an offence on the basis of objective data. Nowadays this method is also used successfully in individual cases in the field of forensic psychiatry. The article shows and discusses the methodology and the current use of behavioural analysis in forensic psychiatry. professional behavioural analysis of offences of certain forensic patients provides an additional benefit for their therapy and their risk assessment. This kind of approach should be intensified by increasing cooperation with behavioural analysis units and by further training for forensic therapists.

  11. Notch Charge-Coupled Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janesick, James

    1992-01-01

    Notch charge-coupled devices are imaging arrays of photodetectors designed to exhibit high charge-transfer efficiencies necessary for operation in ultra-large array, and less vulnerable to degradation by energetic protons, neutrons, and electrons. Main channel of horizontal register includes deep narrow inner channel (notch). Small packets of charge remain confined to notch. Larger packets spill into rest of channel; transferred in usual way. Degradation of charge-transfer efficiency by energetic particles reduced.

  12. Deceptively Small

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-02-02

    Tiny Epimetheus is dwarfed by adjacent slivers of the A and F rings. But is it really? Looks can be deceiving! There is approximately 10 to 20 times more mass in that tiny dot than in the piece of the A ring visible in this image! In total, Saturn's rings have about as much mass as a few times the mass of the moon Mimas. (This mass estimate comes from measuring the waves raised in the rings by moons like Epimetheus.) The rings look physically larger than any moon because the individual ring particles are very small, giving them a large surface area for a given mass. Epimetheus (70 miles or 113 kilometers across), on the other hand, has a small surface area per mass compared to the rings, making it look deceptively small. This view looks toward the sunlit side of the rings from about 19 degrees above the ringplane. The image was taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on Dec. 5, 2014. The view was obtained at a distance of approximately 1.2 million miles (2 million kilometers) from Epimetheus and at a Sun-Epimetheus-spacecraft, or phase, angle of 40 degrees. Image scale is 7 miles (12 kilometers) per pixel. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA18302

  13. Behavioural biologists don't agree on what constitutes