Science.gov

Sample records for small direct effect

  1. Direct and Propagated Effects of Small Molecules on Protein–Protein Interaction Networks

    PubMed Central

    Cesa, Laura C.; Mapp, Anna K.; Gestwicki, Jason E.

    2015-01-01

    Networks of protein–protein interactions (PPIs) link all aspects of cellular biology. Dysfunction in the assembly or dynamics of PPI networks is a hallmark of human disease, and as such, there is growing interest in the discovery of small molecules that either promote or inhibit PPIs. PPIs were once considered undruggable because of their relatively large buried surface areas and difficult topologies. Despite these challenges, recent advances in chemical screening methodologies, combined with improvements in structural and computational biology have made some of these targets more tractable. In this review, we highlight developments that have opened the door to potent chemical modulators. We focus on how allostery is being used to produce surprisingly robust changes in PPIs, even for the most challenging targets. We also discuss how interfering with one PPI can propagate changes through the broader web of interactions. Through this analysis, it is becoming clear that a combination of direct and propagated effects on PPI networks is ultimately how small molecules re-shape biology. PMID:26380257

  2. Effects of small-sided game and change-of-direction training on reactive agility and change-of-direction speed.

    PubMed

    Young, Warren; Rogers, Nathan

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of training change-of-direction speed and small-sided games on performance in the Planned-AFL agility test and reactive agility. Twenty-five elite-standard U-18 Australian Rules football players were randomly allocated either to a change-of-direction group or a small-sided games group. Players participated in one or two 15-min sessions per week with 11 sessions conducted over a 7-week period during the season. Tests conducted immediately before and after the training period included the Planned-AFL agility test and a video-based reactive agility test specific to Australian Rules football. The reactive agility test variables were total time, decision time and movement response time. The small-sided games group improved total time (P = 0.008, effect size = 0.93), which was entirely attributable to a very large reduction in decision time (P < 0.001, effect size = 2.32). Small-sided games produced a trivial change in movement response time as well as in the Planned-AFL agility test (P > 0.05). The change-of-direction training produced small to trivial changes in all of the test variables (P > 0.05, effect size = 0-0.2). The results suggest that small-sided games improve agility performance by enhancing the speed of decision-making rather than movement speed. The change-of-direction training was not effective for developing either change-of-direction speed as measured by the Planned-AFL test or reactive agility.

  3. Small-signal modeling with direct parameter extraction for impact ionization effect in high-electron-mobility transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Guan, He; Lv, Hongliang; Guo, Hui Zhang, Yuming

    2015-11-21

    Impact ionization affects the radio-frequency (RF) behavior of high-electron-mobility transistors (HEMTs), which have narrow-bandgap semiconductor channels, and this necessitates complex parameter extraction procedures for HEMT modeling. In this paper, an enhanced small-signal equivalent circuit model is developed to investigate the impact ionization, and an improved method is presented in detail for direct extraction of intrinsic parameters using two-step measurements in low-frequency and high-frequency regimes. The practicability of the enhanced model and the proposed direct parameter extraction method are verified by comparing the simulated S-parameters with published experimental data from an InAs/AlSb HEMT operating over a wide frequency range. The results demonstrate that the enhanced model with optimal intrinsic parameter values that were obtained by the direct extraction approach can effectively characterize the effects of impact ionization on the RF performance of HEMTs.

  4. Multidirectional sprints and small-sided games training effect on agility and change of direction abilities in youth soccer.

    PubMed

    Chaouachi, Anis; Chtara, Moktar; Hammami, Raouf; Chtara, Hichem; Turki, Olfa; Castagna, Carlo

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the training effects of a small-sided game (SSG) and multidirectional sprint intervention on agility and change of direction (COD) ability in young male soccer players. Thirty-six soccer players (age: 14.2 ± 0.9 years; height: 167.2 ± 5.7 cm; body mass: 54.1 ± 6.3 kg, body fat: 12.5 ± 2.2%) participated in a short-term (6 weeks) randomized parallel fully controlled training study, with pre-to-post measurements. Players were randomly assigned to 2 experimental groups: training with preplanned COD drills (CODG, n = 12) or using SSGs (SSGG, n = 12) and to a control group (CONG, n = 12). Pre- and post-training players completed a test battery involving linear sprinting (15- and 30-m sprint), COD sprinting (COD: 15 m, ball: 15 m, 10-8-8-10 m, zigzag: 20 m), reactive agility test (RAT, RAT-ball), and vertical and horizontal jumping (countermovement jump and 5-jump, respectively). A significant (p ≤ 0.05) group × time effect was detected for all variables in CODG and SSGG. Improvements in sprint, agility without ball, COD, and jumping performances, were higher in CODG than in the other groups. The SSGG improved significantly more (p ≤ 0.05) than other groups in agility tests with the ball. The CONG showed significant improvements (p ≤ 0.05) on linear sprinting over a distance longer than 10 m and in all the agility and COD tests used in this study. It is concluded that in young male soccer players, agility can be improved either using purpose-built SSG or preplanned COD sprints. However, the use of specifically designed SSG may provide superior results in match-relevant variables.

  5. The direct and indirect effects of a glyphosate-based herbicide and nutrients on Chironomidae (Diptera) emerging from small wetlands.

    PubMed

    Baker, Leanne F; Mudge, Joseph F; Houlahan, Jeff E; Thompson, Dean G; Kidd, Karen A

    2014-09-01

    Laboratory and mesocosm experiments have demonstrated that some glyphosate-based herbicides can have negative effects on benthic invertebrate species. Although these herbicides are among the most widely used in agriculture, there have been few multiple-stressor, natural system-based investigations of the impacts of glyphosate-based herbicides in combination with fertilizers on the emergence patterns of chironomids from wetlands. Using a replicated, split-wetland experiment, the authors examined the effects of 2 nominal concentrations (2.88 mg acid equivalents/L and 0.21 mg acid equivalents/L) of the glyphosate herbicide Roundup WeatherMax, alone or in combination with nutrient additions, on the emergence of Chironomidae (Diptera) before and after herbicide-induced damage to macrophytes. There were no direct effects of treatment on the structure of the Chironomidae community or on the overall emergence rates. However, after macrophyte cover declined as a result of herbicide application, there were statistically significant increases in emergence in all but the highest herbicide treatment, which had also received no nutrients. There was a negative relationship between chironomid abundance and macrophyte cover on the treated sides of wetlands. Fertilizer application did not appear to compound the effects of the herbicide treatments. Although direct toxicity of Roundup WeatherMax was not apparent, the authors observed longer-term impacts, suggesting that the indirect effects of this herbicide deserve more consideration when assessing the ecological risk of using herbicides in proximity to wetlands.

  6. The persistence of directivity in small earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boatwright, J.

    2007-01-01

    We derive a simple inversion of peak ground acceleration (PGA) or peak ground velocity (PGV) for rupture direction and rupture velocity and then test this inversion on the peak motions obtained from seven 3.5 ??? M ??? 4.1 earthquakes that occurred in two clusters in November 2002 and February 2003 near San Ramon, California. These clusters were located on two orthogonal strike-slip faults so that the events share the same approximate focal mechanism but not the same fault plane. Three earthquakes exhibit strong directivity, but the other four earthquakes exhibit relatively weak directivity. We use the residual PGAs and PGVs from the other six events to determine station corrections for each earthquake. The inferred rupture directions unambiguously identify the fault plane for the three earthquakes with strong directivity and for three of the four earthquakes with weak directivity. The events with strong directivity have fast rupture velocities (0.63????? v ??? 0.87??); the events with weak directivity either rupture more slowly (0.17????? v ???0.35??) or bilaterally. The simple unilateral inversion cannot distinguish between slow and bilateral ruptures: adding a bilateral rupture component degrades the fit of the rupture directions to the fault planes. By comparing PGAs from the events with strong and weak directivity, we show how an up-dip rupture in small events can distort the attenuation of peak ground motion with distance. When we compare the rupture directions of the earthquakes to the location of aftershocks in the two clusters, we find than almost all the aftershocks of the three earthquakes with strong directivity occur within 70?? of the direction of rupture.

  7. 75 FR 15756 - Small Business Innovation Research Program Policy Directive

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-30

    ... ADMINISTRATION RIN 3244-AF61 Small Business Innovation Research Program Policy Directive AGENCY: U.S. Small... announces a final amendment to the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program Policy Directive (PD... the Policy Directive; Small Business Innovation Research Program To: The Directors, Small...

  8. Small-sided games versus interval training in amateur soccer players: effects on the aerobic capacity and the ability to perform intermittent exercises with changes of direction.

    PubMed

    Dellal, Alexandre; Varliette, Christophe; Owen, Adam; Chirico, Erica N; Pialoux, Vincent

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of small-sided games (SSGs) in soccer versus high-intensity intermittent training (HIT) on a continuous aerobic test (Vameval) and the performance in an intermittent test with changes of direction (CODs; 30-15 intermittent fitness test [30-15(IFT)]). Twenty-two amateur soccer players (mean age ± SD: 26.3 ± 4.7 years) were assigned to 3 different groups for 6 weeks: SSG group (n = 8), HIT group (n = 8), and control group (CG; n = 6). In addition to the usual technical and tactical sessions and competitive games, the SSG group performed 9 sessions of 2 versus 2 and 1 versus 1 SSGs, whereas the HIT group performed 9 sessions of intermittent runs in the form of 30 seconds of effort interspersed with 30 seconds of passive recovery (30s-30s), 15s-15s, and 10s-10s. The HIT and SSG groups showed performance improvements in the Vameval test (5.1 and 6.6%, respectively) and the 30-15(IFT) intermittent test with CODs (5.1 and 5.8%, respectively), whereas there was no change in the performance of the CG. Players from HIT and SSG groups showed similar increase in their performance in the 30-15(IFT) and the Vameval tests during the 6-week training period, especially with an increase significantly different to that in a traditional training as in the CG (p < 0.05). This investigation demonstrates that both SSG and HIT interventions are equally effective in developing the aerobic capacity and the ability to perform intermittent exercises with CODs in male amateur soccer players. Furthermore, these 2 methods of training applied during the 6 weeks induce similar effect on the recovery capacity and on the ability to repeat directional changes of 180°. Coaches will now be able to choose between these two methods according to the objective of the training and to optimize the training.

  9. Direct effects protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Protection of an aircraft and each of its various systems against the direct effects of lightning were analyzed. Components located in different sections of the aircraft were individually examined since they are likely to experience different degrees of susceptibility to lightning, and may be vulnerable to different components of the lightning flash. The basic steps to be followed in establishing lightning protection were presented by discussing the varieties of arc entry and current flow-through damage. The lightning-strike zones and lightning current environments are established, since environmental conditions in the zones are those under which specific protective measures must perform. Airworthiness regulations which apply to lightning protection are cited.

  10. The Problems with Access to Compulsory Education in China and the Effects of the Policy of Direct Subsidies to Students: An Empirical Study Based on a Small Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yanqing, Ding

    2012-01-01

    After a brief review of the achievements and the problems in compulsory education enrollment in the thirty years since the reform and opening up, this study analyzes the current compulsory education enrollment and dropout rates in China's least-developed regions and the factors affecting school enrollment based on survey data from a small sample…

  11. Directional Solidification and Convection in Small Diameter Crucibles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, J.; Sung, P. K.; Tewari, S. N.; Poirier, D. R.; DeGroh, H. C., III

    2003-01-01

    Pb-2.2 wt% Sb alloy was directionally solidified in 1, 2, 3 and 7 mm diameter crucibles. Pb-Sb alloy presents a solutally unstable case. Under plane-front conditions, the resulting macrosegregation along the solidified length indicates that convection persists even in the 1 mm diameter crucible. Al-2 wt% Cu alloy was directionally solidified because this alloy was expected to be stable with respect to convection. Nevertheless, the resulting macrosegregation pattern and the microstructure in solidified examples indicated the presence of convection. Simulations performed for both alloys show that convection persists for crucibles as small as 0.6 mm of diameter. For the solutally stable alloy, Al-2 wt% Cu, the simulations indicate that the convection arises from a lateral temperature gradient.

  12. An Automated Directed Spectral Search Methodology for Small Target Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossman, Stanley I.

    Much of the current efforts in remote sensing tackle macro-level problems such as determining the extent of wheat in a field, the general health of vegetation or the extent of mineral deposits in an area. However, for many of the remaining remote sensing challenges being studied currently, such as border protection, drug smuggling, treaty verification, and the war on terror, most targets are very small in nature - a vehicle or even a person. While in typical macro-level problems the objective vegetation is in the scene, for small target detection problems it is not usually known if the desired small target even exists in the scene, never mind finding it in abundance. The ability to find specific small targets, such as vehicles, typifies this problem. Complicating the analyst's life, the growing number of available sensors is generating mountains of imagery outstripping the analysts' ability to visually peruse them. This work presents the important factors influencing spectral exploitation using multispectral data and suggests a different approach to small target detection. The methodology of directed search is presented, including the use of scene-modeled spectral libraries, various search algorithms, and traditional statistical and ROC curve analysis. The work suggests a new metric to calibrate analysis labeled the analytic sweet spot as well as an estimation method for identifying the sweet spot threshold for an image. It also suggests a new visualization aid for highlighting the target in its entirety called nearest neighbor inflation (NNI). It brings these all together to propose that these additions to the target detection arena allow for the construction of a fully automated target detection scheme. This dissertation next details experiments to support the hypothesis that the optimum detection threshold is the analytic sweet spot and that the estimation method adequately predicts it. Experimental results and analysis are presented for the proposed directed

  13. Making the Most of Small Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Ross A.

    2009-01-01

    The idea that classroom social ecologies are shaped by the aggregate effects of peers' prior care experiences is provocative, even though the evidence is weak that this explains the small and diminishing effect of childcare experience in the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development study. Small effects may indeed be small effects,…

  14. Direct Detection of the Asteroidal YORP Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowry, Stephen C.; Fitzsimmons, A.; Pravec, P.; Vokrouhlicky, D.; Boehnhardt, H.; Taylor, P. A.; Margot, J. L.; Galád, A.; Irwin, M.; Irwin, J.; Kusnirák, P.

    2007-10-01

    The Yarkovsky-O'Keefe-Radzievskii-Paddack (YORP) effect is a torque that can modify the rotation rates and obliquities of small bodies in the solar system via the combined effects of incident solar radiation pressure and the recoil effect from anisotropic emission of thermal photons. The YORP effect is the only realistic mechanism for explaining the intriguing spin-axis alignments within the Koronis asteroid family, and quite possibly explains the anomalous distribution of spin rates for small asteroids. YORP is now thought to be an important mechanism in the formation of binary asteroid systems, and has a direct bearing on the related Yarkovsky effect, which affects the orbital motion of small asteroids. Despite its importance, there exists only indirect evidence for the presence of YORP on solar system objects, until now. We conducted an optical-imaging monitoring campaign from 2001-2005 on a small near-Earth asteroid, 2000 PH5, now known as asteroid (54509) YORP. We found that the asteroid has been continuously increasing its sidereal rotation rate by (2.0 ± 0.2)*10-4 deg./day2, over this 4-yr period (Lowry et al., 2007, Science 316, 272-274). The observed YORP strength is consistent with detailed shape-model-based theoretical calculations of the effect (Taylor et al., 2007, Science 316, 274-277). We simulated the asteroid's close Earth approaches from 2001 to 2005, showing that gravitational torques cannot explain the observed spin rate increase. Dynamical simulations suggest that 2000 PH5 may reach a rotation period of just 20 seconds toward the end of its expected lifetime.

  15. 77 FR 46805 - Small Business Innovation Research Program Policy Directive

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-06

    ... improve the application process, including streamlining that process. B. Section 2--Summary of Statutory... assistance, and make recommendations on ways to improve the program. SBA has amended the directive to...

  16. 77 FR 46855 - Small Business Technology Transfer Program Policy Directive

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-06

    ... ways improve the application process, including simplifying and streamlining that process. B. Section 2... assistance, and make recommendations on ways to improve the program. SBA has amended the directive to...

  17. Glucagon effects on the human small intestine.

    PubMed

    Patel, G K; Whalen, G E; Soergel, K H; Wu, W C; Meade, R C

    1979-07-01

    In healthy volunteers, the effects of intravenously administered glucagon on small intestinal function was investigated. Bolus doses resulting in plasma glucagon concentrations of greater than 800 pg/ml (5 min after injection) abolished jejunal contractions for 4.4 +/- 0.4 (SEM) min after a latency period of 49 +/- 4 sec. During continuous intravenous glucagon infusion, jejunal dilatation and increase in mean transit time (MTT) occurred at plasma levels greater than 720 pg/ml, while inhibition of water and electrolyte absorption was observed only with plasma glucagon concentrations of 1760 +/- 114 pg/ml. Under these conditions, the propulsion of fasting intestinal contents was slowed without change in flow rate. The observed effects cannot be attributed to the simultaneously occurring rise in plasma insulin and glucose concentrations. Short-term increases in circulating glucagon concentration inhibit intestinal tone, contractions, and propulsion with only a minor effect on water and electrolyte absorption limited to a narrow concentration range of plasma glucagon. Neither effect occurs at glucagon levels likely to occur under physiologic concentrations. The latency period preceding the abolition of jejunal contractions suggests that glucagon does not act directly on intestinal smooth muscle cells.

  18. Substrate-directed formation of small biocatalysts under prebiotic conditions.

    PubMed

    Kochavi, E; Bar-Nun, A; Fleminger, G

    1997-10-01

    One of the most debated issues concerning the origin of life, is how enzymes which are essential for existence of any living organism, evolved. It is clear that, regardless of the exact mechanism, the process should have been specific and reproducible, involving interactions between different molecules. We propose that substrate templating played a crucial role in maintaining reproducible and specific formation of prebiotic catalysts. This work demonstrates experimentally, for the first time, substrate-directed formation of an oligopeptide that possesses a specific catalytic activity toward the substrate on which it was formed. In our experiments we used the substrate O-nitrophenol-beta-D-galactopyranoside (ONPG) as a molecular template for the synthesis of a specific catalyst that is capable of cleaving the same substrate. This was achieved by incubation of the substrate with free amino acids and a condensing agent (dicyandiamide) at elevated temperatures. A linear increase with time of the reaction rate (d[product]/d2t), pointed to an acceleration regime, where the substrate generates the formation of the catalyst. The purified catalyst, produced by a substrate-directed mechanism, was analyzed, and identified as Cys2-Fe+2. The mechanism of substrate-directed formation of prebiotic catalysts provides a solution to both the specificity and the reproducibility requirements from any prebiotic system which should evolve into the biological world.

  19. EFFECTS OF WATERSHED DISTURBANCE ON SMALL STREAMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation presents the effects of watershed disturbance on small streams. The South Fork Broad River Watershed was studied to evaluate the use of landscape indicators to predict pollutant loading at small spatial scales and to develop indicators of pollutants. Also studie...

  20. Small molecules increase direct neural conversion of human fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Pfisterer, Ulrich; Ek, Fredrik; Lang, Stefan; Soneji, Shamit; Olsson, Roger; Parmar, Malin

    2016-01-01

    The generation of human induced neurons (hiNs) via exogenous delivery of neural transcription factors represents a novel technique to obtain disease and patient specific neurons. These cells have the potential to be used for disease modeling, diagnostics and drug screening, and also to be further developed for brain repair. In the present study, we utilized hiNs to develop an unbiased screening assay for small molecules that increase the conversion efficiency. Using this assay, we screened 307 compounds from five annotated libraries and identified six compounds that were very potent in potentiating the reprogramming process. When combined in an optimal combination and dose, these compounds increased the reprogramming efficiency of human fibroblasts more than 6-fold. Global gene expression and CellNet analysis at different timepoints during the reprogramming process revealed that neuron-specific genes and gene regulatory networks (GRNs) became progressively more activated while converting cells shut down fibroblast-specific GRNs. Further bioinformatics analysis revealed that the addition of the six compound resulted in the accelerated upregulation of a subset of neuronal genes, and also increased expression of genes associated with transcriptional activity and mediation of cellular stress response. PMID:27917895

  1. Are Teacher Effects Larger in Small Classes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Konstantopoulos, Spyros; Sun, Min

    2014-01-01

    Teachers spend most of their time in school in classrooms, and their instruction and teaching practices may be affected by classroom context such as class size. We examine whether teacher effects interact with classroom context such as class size. Specifically, we seek to determine whether teacher effects are more pronounced in small classes than…

  2. Catheter-Directed Thrombolysis via Small Saphenous Veins for Treating Acute Deep Venous Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bin; Xu, Xiao-dong; Gao, Peng; Yu, Ji-Xiang; Li, Yu; Zhu, Ai-Dong; Meng, Ran-ran

    2016-01-01

    Background There is little data comparing catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT) via small saphenous veins vs. systematic thrombolysis on complications and efficacy in acute deep venous thrombosis patients. The aim of our study was to compare the efficacy and safety of CDT via the small saphenous veins with systematic thrombolysis for patients with acute deep venous thrombosis (DVT). Material/Methods Sixty-six patients with acute DVT admitted from June 2012 to December 2013 were divided into 2 groups: 27 patients received systemic thrombolysis (ST group) and 39 patients received CDT via the small saphenous veins (CDT group). The thrombolysis efficiency, limb circumference differences, and complications such as post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS) in the 2 groups were recorded. Results The angiograms demonstrated that all or part of the fresh thrombus was dissolved. There was a significant difference regarding thrombolysis efficiency between the CDT group and ST group (71.26% vs. 48.26%, P=0.001). In both groups the postoperative limb circumference changes were higher compared to the preoperative values. The differences between postoperative limb circumferences on postoperative days 7 and 14 were significantly higher in the CDT group than in the ST group (all P<0.05). The incidence of postoperative PTS in the CDT group (17.9%) was significantly lower in comparison to the ST group (51.85%) during the follow-up (P=0.007). Conclusions Catheter-directed thrombolysis via the small saphenous veins is an effective, safe, and feasible approach for treating acute deep venous thrombosis. PMID:27552357

  3. Biological Effects of Directed Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dayton, Thomas; Beason, Charles; Hitt, M. K.; Rogers, Walter; Cook, Michael

    2002-11-01

    This Final Report summarizes the biological effects research conducted by Veridian Engineering personnel under contract F41624-96-C-9009 in support of the Air Force Research Laboratory's Radio Frequency Radiation Branch from April 1997 to April 2002. Biological effects research and consultation were provided in five major areas: Active Denial System (also known as Vehicle Mounted Active Denial System), radio frequency radiation (RFR) health and safety, non-lethal weapon biological effects research, the newly formed Joint Non-Lethal Weapons Human Effects Center of Excellence, and Biotechnology. The report is organized by research efforts within the major research areas, providing title, objective, a brief description, relevance to the AF or DoD, funding, and products.

  4. Process Evaluation Results from the Healthy Directions-Small Business Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Mary K.; Barbeau, Elizabeth M.; Lederman, Ruth; Stoddard, Anne M.; Chetkovich, Carol; Goldman, Roberta; Wallace, Lorraine; Sorensen, Glorian

    2007-01-01

    The Healthy Directions-Small Business randomized, controlled study aimed to reduce cancer risk among multiethnic workers in small manufacturing businesses by increasing fruit and vegetable consumption, physical activity, and daily multivitamin in take and decreasing consumption of red meat. The intervention incorporated participatory strategies…

  5. Small Class Size and Its Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biddle, Bruce J.; Berliner, David C.

    2002-01-01

    Describes several prominent early grades small-class-size projects and their effects on student achievement: Indiana's Project Prime Time, Tennessee's Project STAR (Student/Teacher Achievement Ratio), Wisconsin's SAGE (Student Achievement Guarantee in Education) Program, and the California class-size-reduction program. Lists several conclusions,…

  6. Effects of roads on small mammals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Adams, L.W.; Geis, A.D.

    1983-01-01

    (1) The study was designed to determine the effects of roads on the diversity, spatial distribution, and density of small mammals. (2) Forty species of small mammal (5859 individuals) were snap-trapped in the study. Data resulted from 144 360 trap-nights of effort for an average of 4.06 captures per 100 trap-nights. (3) Small mammal community structure and density were both influenced by roads. Community structure in right-of-way (ROW) habitat was different from that in adjacent habitat. Five species did not prefer ROW habitat: the golden mouse, dusky-footed woodrat, brush mouse, pinon mouse, and California red-backed vole. However, there were more species present in ROW habitat than in adjacent habitat. Grassland species generally preferred ROW habitat and many less habitat-specific species were distributed in ROW and adjacent habitat. (4) Small mammal density (all species combined) was greater in interstate ROW habitat than in adjacent habitat. This was also true individually for the eastern harvest mouse, white-footed mouse, meadow vole, prairie vole, vagrant shrew. Townsend's vole, and California vole. Small mammal density was less in county road ROWs than in adjacent habitat, probably because of the small size of these areas. The data indicate that ROW habitat and its accompanying edge are attractive no: only to grassland species but also to many less habitat-specific species that make use of the ROW-edge-adjacent habitat complex. (5) Mortality on interstate highways was greatest for those species with highest densities in ROW habitat, and did not appear to be detrimental to populations of these species.

  7. Direct Instruction News: Effective School Practices, 2003.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarver, Sara G., Ed.

    2003-01-01

    The mission of the Association for Direct Instruction is to promote the improvement of effective educational methods. This journal, "Direct Instruction News," is their publication. The Spring 2003 (Volume 3, Number 1) contains the following articles: "Implementing DI Successfully" (Sara G. Tarver); "Textbooks: What?"…

  8. Direct and indirect effects in causal networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krämer, Andreas

    2013-03-01

    Literature-derived networks of biomolecular interactions representing cause-effect relationships generally contain many indirect relationships where the actually observed causal effect results from a sequence of events represented in the same network. A statistical method is developed, based on an Ising-like spin model operating on the edges of the network, to distinguish between direct and indirect effects using only the network structure itself. This allows to identify paths representing likely causation mechanisms.

  9. Direct Torque Control of a Small Wind Turbine with a Sliding-Mode Speed Controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sri Lal Senanayaka, Jagath; Karimi, Hamid Reza; Robbersmyr, Kjell G.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper. the method of direct torque control in the presence of a sliding-mode speed controller is proposed for a small wind turbine being used in water heating applications. This concept and control system design can be expanded to grid connected or off-grid applications. Direct torque control of electrical machines has shown several advantages including very fast dynamics torque control over field-oriented control. Moreover. the torque and flux controllers in the direct torque control algorithms are based on hvsteretic controllers which are nonlinear. In the presence of a sliding-mode speed control. a nonlinear control system can be constructed which is matched for AC/DC conversion of the converter that gives fast responses with low overshoots. The main control objectives of the proposed small wind turbine can be maximum power point tracking and soft-stall power control. This small wind turbine consists of permanent magnet synchronous generator and external wind speed. and rotor speed measurements are not required for the system. However. a sensor is needed to detect the rated wind speed overpass events to activate proper speed references for the wind turbine. Based on the low-cost design requirement of small wind turbines. an available wind speed sensor can be modified. or a new sensor can be designed to get the required measurement. The simulation results will be provided to illustrate the excellent performance of the closed-loop control system in entire wind speed range (4-25 m/s).

  10. A Small Modular Laboratory Hall Effect Thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ty Davis

    Electric propulsion technologies promise to revolutionize access to space, opening the door for mission concepts unfeasible by traditional propulsion methods alone. The Hall effect thruster is a relatively high thrust, moderate specific impulse electric propulsion device that belongs to the class of electrostatic thrusters. Hall effect thrusters benefit from an extensive flight history, and offer significant performance and cost advantages when compared to other forms of electric propulsion. Ongoing research on these devices includes the investigation of mechanisms that tend to decrease overall thruster efficiency, as well as the development of new techniques to extend operational lifetimes. This thesis is primarily concerned with the design and construction of a Small Modular Laboratory Hall Effect Thruster (SMLHET), and its operation on argon propellant gas. Particular attention was addressed at low-cost, modular design principles, that would facilitate simple replacement and modification of key thruster parts such as the magnetic circuit and discharge channel. This capability is intended to facilitate future studies of device physics such as anomalous electron transport and magnetic shielding of the channel walls, that have an impact on thruster performance and life. Preliminary results demonstrate SMLHET running on argon in a manner characteristic of Hall effect thrusters, additionally a power balance method was utilized to estimate thruster performance. It is expected that future thruster studies utilizing heavier though more expensive gases like xenon or krypton, will observe increased efficiency and stability.

  11. A complex task? Direct modulation of transcription factors with small molecules

    PubMed Central

    Koehler, Angela N.

    2010-01-01

    Transcription factors with aberrant activity in disease are promising yet untested targets for therapeutic development, particularly in oncology. Directly inhibiting or activating the function of a transcription factor requires specific disruption or recruitment of protein-protein or protein-DNA interactions. The discovery or design of small molecules that specifically modulate these interactions has thus far proven to be a significant challenge and the protein class is often perceived to be ‘undruggable.’ This review will summarize recent progress in the development of small-molecule probes of transcription factors and provide evidence to challenge the notion that this important protein class is chemically intractable. PMID:20395165

  12. The Effect on the Sperry Directional Gyro in Turning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    RosselliDelTurco, Rossello

    1946-01-01

    The present report is concerned with an analytical treatment of the effects of the transverse inclination of an airplane in a turn on the indication of the directional gyro. It is found that the extreme inclinations which the airplane must necessarily assume for a correct turn in the approaches executed at high speed and small radius of curvature, renders the indications of the instrument worthless during such maneuvers.

  13. Analytical fuel property effects--small combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, R. D.; Troth, D. L.; Miles, G. A.

    1984-01-01

    The consequences of using broad-property fuels in both conventional and advanced state-of-the-art small gas turbine combustors are assessed. Eight combustor concepts were selected for initial screening, of these, four final combustor concepts were chosen for further detailed analysis. These included the dual orifice injector baseline combustor (a current production 250-C30 engine combustor) two baseline airblast injected modifications, short and piloted prechamber combustors, and an advanced airblast injected, variable geometry air staged combustor. Final predictions employed the use of the STAC-I computer code. This quasi 2-D model includes real fuel properties, effects of injector type on atomization, detailed droplet dynamics, and multistep chemical kinetics. In general, fuel property effects on various combustor concepts can be classified as chemical or physical in nature. Predictions indicate that fuel chemistry has a significant effect on flame radiation, liner wall temperature, and smoke emission. Fuel physical properties that govern atomization quality and evaporation rates are predicted to affect ignition and lean-blowout limits, combustion efficiency, unburned hydrocarbon, and carbon monoxide emissions.

  14. An incrementally non-linear model for clays with directional stiffness and a small strain emphasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Xuxin

    In response to construction activities and loads from permanent structures, soil generally is subjected to a variety of loading modes varying both in time and location. It also has been increasingly appreciated that the strains around well-designed foundations, excavations and tunnels are mostly small, with soil responses at this strain level generally being non-linear and anisotropic. To make accurate prediction of the performance of a geo-system, it is highly desirable to understand soil behavior at small strains along multiple loading directions, and accordingly to incorporate these responses in an appropriate constitutive model implemented in a finite element analysis. This dissertation presents a model based on a series of stress probe tests with small strain measurements performed on compressible Chicago glacial clays. The proposed model is formulated in an original constitutive framework, in which the tangent stiffness matrix is constructed in accordance with the mechanical nature of frictional materials and the tangent moduli therein are described explicitly. The stiffness description includes evolution relations with regard to length of stress path, and directionality relations in terms of stress path direction. The former relations provide distinctive definitions for small-strain and large-strain behaviors, and distinguish soil responses in shearing and compression. The latter relations make this model incrementally non-linear and thus capable of modeling inelastic behavior. A new algorithm based on a classical substepping scheme is developed to numerically integrate this model. A consistent tangent matrix is derived for the proposed model with the upgraded substepping scheme. The code is written in FORTRAN and implemented in FEM via UMAT of ABAQUS. The model is exercised in a variety of applications ranging from oedometer, triaxial and biaxial test simulations to a C-class prediction for a well-instrumented excavation. The computed results indicate that

  15. Bayesian Estimation of Small Effects in Exercise and Sports Science.

    PubMed

    Mengersen, Kerrie L; Drovandi, Christopher C; Robert, Christian P; Pyne, David B; Gore, Christopher J

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to provide a Bayesian formulation of the so-called magnitude-based inference approach to quantifying and interpreting effects, and in a case study example provide accurate probabilistic statements that correspond to the intended magnitude-based inferences. The model is described in the context of a published small-scale athlete study which employed a magnitude-based inference approach to compare the effect of two altitude training regimens (live high-train low (LHTL), and intermittent hypoxic exposure (IHE)) on running performance and blood measurements of elite triathletes. The posterior distributions, and corresponding point and interval estimates, for the parameters and associated effects and comparisons of interest, were estimated using Markov chain Monte Carlo simulations. The Bayesian analysis was shown to provide more direct probabilistic comparisons of treatments and able to identify small effects of interest. The approach avoided asymptotic assumptions and overcame issues such as multiple testing. Bayesian analysis of unscaled effects showed a probability of 0.96 that LHTL yields a substantially greater increase in hemoglobin mass than IHE, a 0.93 probability of a substantially greater improvement in running economy and a greater than 0.96 probability that both IHE and LHTL yield a substantially greater improvement in maximum blood lactate concentration compared to a Placebo. The conclusions are consistent with those obtained using a 'magnitude-based inference' approach that has been promoted in the field. The paper demonstrates that a fully Bayesian analysis is a simple and effective way of analysing small effects, providing a rich set of results that are straightforward to interpret in terms of probabilistic statements.

  16. Small molecule–driven direct conversion of human pluripotent stem cells into functional osteoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Heemin; Shih, Yu-Ru V.; Nakasaki, Manando; Kabra, Harsha; Varghese, Shyni

    2016-01-01

    The abilities of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) to proliferate without phenotypic alteration and to differentiate into tissue-specific progeny make them a promising cell source for regenerative medicine and development of physiologically relevant in vitro platforms. Despite this potential, efficient conversion of hPSCs into tissue-specific cells still remains a challenge. Herein, we report direct conversion of hPSCs into functional osteoblasts through the use of adenosine, a naturally occurring nucleoside in the human body. The hPSCs treated with adenosine not only expressed the molecular signatures of osteoblasts but also produced calcified bone matrix. Our findings show that the adenosine-mediated osteogenesis of hPSCs involved the adenosine A2bR. When implanted in vivo, using macroporous synthetic matrices, the human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC)–derived donor cells participated in the repair of critical-sized bone defects through the formation of neobone tissue without teratoma formation. The newly formed bone tissues exhibited various attributes of the native tissue, including vascularization and bone resorption. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of adenosine-induced differentiation of hPSCs into functional osteoblasts and their subsequent use to regenerate bone tissues in vivo. This approach that uses a physiologically relevant single small molecule to generate hPSC-derived progenitor cells is highly appealing because of its simplicity, cost-effectiveness, scalability, and impact in cell manufacturing, all of which are decisive factors for successful translational applications of hPSCs. PMID:27602403

  17. Nonlinearity effects on the directed momentum current.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wen-Lei; Fu, Li-Bin; Liu, Jie

    2014-08-01

    We investigate the quantum transport dynamics governed by the nonlinear Schrödinger equation with a periodically-δ-kicking potential and discover the emergence of a directed current in momentum space. With the increase of nonlinearity, we find strikingly that the momentum current decreases, reverses, and finally vanishes, indicating that the quantum transport can be effectively manipulated through adjusting the nonlinearity. The underlying dynamic mechanism is uncovered and some important implications are addressed.

  18. Efficient Isothermal Titration Calorimetry Technique Identifies Direct Interaction of Small Molecule Inhibitors with the Target Protein.

    PubMed

    Gal, Maayan; Bloch, Itai; Shechter, Nelia; Romanenko, Olga; Shir, Ofer M

    2016-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPI) play a critical role in regulating many cellular processes. Finding novel PPI inhibitors that interfere with specific binding of two proteins is considered a great challenge, mainly due to the complexity involved in characterizing multi-molecular systems and limited understanding of the physical principles governing PPIs. Here we show that the combination of virtual screening techniques, which are capable of filtering a large library of potential small molecule inhibitors, and a unique secondary screening by isothermal titration calorimetry, a label-free method capable of observing direct interactions, is an efficient tool for finding such an inhibitor. In this study we applied this strategy in a search for a small molecule capable of interfering with the interaction of the tumor-suppressor p53 and the E3-ligase MDM2. We virtually screened a library of 15 million small molecules that were filtered to a final set of 80 virtual hits. Our in vitro experimental assay, designed to validate the activity of mixtures of compounds by isothermal titration calorimetry, was used to identify an active molecule against MDM2. At the end of the process the small molecule (4S,7R)-4-(4-chlorophenyl)-5-hydroxy-2,7-dimethyl-N-(6-methylpyridin-2-yl)-4,6,7,8 tetrahydrIoquinoline-3-carboxamide was found to bind MDM2 with a dissociation constant of ~2 µM. Following the identification of this single bioactive compound, spectroscopic measurements were used to further characterize the interaction of the small molecule with the target protein. 2D NMR spectroscopy was used to map the binding region of the small molecule, and fluorescence polarization measurement confirmed that it indeed competes with p53.

  19. Capturing the complexity of first opinion small animal consultations using direct observation

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, N. J.; Brennan, M. L.; Cobb, M.; Dean, R. S.

    2015-01-01

    Various different methods are currently being used to capture data from small animal consultations. The aim of this study was to develop a tool to record detailed data from consultations by direct observation. A second aim was to investigate the complexity of the consultation by examining the number of problems discussed per patient. A data collection tool was developed and used during direct observation of small animal consultations in eight practices. Data were recorded on consultation type, patient signalment and number of problems discussed. During 16 weeks of data collection, 1901 patients were presented. Up to eight problems were discussed for some patients; more problems were discussed during preventive medicine consultations than during first consultations (P<0.001) or revisits (P<0.001). Fewer problems were discussed for rabbits than cats (P<0.001) or dogs (P<0.001). Age was positively correlated with discussion of specific health problems and negatively correlated with discussion of preventive medicine. Consultations are complex with multiple problems frequently discussed, suggesting comorbidity may be common. Future research utilising practice data should consider how much of this complexity needs to be captured, and use appropriate methods accordingly. The findings here have implications for directing research and education as well as application in veterinary practice. PMID:25262057

  20. Effective monitoring of small river basins.

    PubMed

    Symader, W; Bierl, R; Gasparini, F; Krein, A

    2002-04-13

    As the transport of many pollutants occurs during high floods monitoring programs must focus on these intermittent events. In small rivers the pollutants start their travel as short pulses often associated with fine particles, but disperse on their way downstreams. Therefore the chemical data of a flood event are only representative of a small part of the basin adjacent to the monitoring station. This is usually not taken into account by evaluating water quality data.

  1. Process evaluation results from the Healthy Directions-Small Business study.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Mary K; Barbeau, Elizabeth M; Lederman, Ruth; Stoddard, Anne M; Chetkovich, Carol; Goldman, Roberta; Wallace, Lorraine; Sorensen, Glorian

    2007-02-01

    The Healthy Directions-Small Business randomized, controlled study aimed to reduce cancer risk among multiethnic workers in small manufacturing businesses by increasing fruit and vegetable consumption, physical activity, and daily multivitamin in take and decreasing consumption of red meat. The intervention incorporated participatory strategies and was built on a social-contextual framework that addressed people with varying cultural backgrounds and literacy levels. In addition, the intervention aimed to reduce worker exposure to occupational hazards. Process evaluation was conducted using quantitative and qualitative research methods. Quantitative results showed high levels of worker awareness of and participation in programs. Qualitative findings suggested that management support, worker input, and a history of social interaction between workers and management may have contributed to high participation rates. Future studies need to examine characteristics associated with participation and nonparticipation of both managers and nonmanagers to increase the likelihood of participation and ultimately improve health behavior.

  2. Evolution of Small Binary Asteroids with the Binary YORP Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frouard, Julien

    2013-05-01

    Abstract (2,250 Maximum Characters): Small, Near-Earth binaries are believed to be created following the fission of an asteroid spun up by the YORP effect. It is then believed that the YORP effect acting on the secondary (Binary YORP) increases or decreases the binary mutual distance on 10^5 yr timescales. How long this mechanism can apply is not yet fully understood. We investigate the binary orbital and rotational dynamics by using non-averaged, direct numerical simulations, taking into account the relative motion of two ellipsoids (primary and secondary) and the solar perturbation. We add the YORP force and torque on the orbital and rotational motion of the secondary. As a check of our code we obtain a ~ 7.2 cm/yr drift in semi-major axis for 1999 KW4 beta, consistent with the values obtained with former analytical studies. The synchronous rotation of the secondary is required for the Binary YORP to be effective. We investigate the synchronous lock of the secondary in function of different parameters ; mutual distance, shape of the secondary, and heliocentric orbit. For example we show that the secondary of 1999 KW4 can be synchronous only up to 7 Rp (primary radius), where the resonance becomes completely chaotic even for very small eccentricities. We use Gaussian Random Spheres to obtain various secondary shapes, and check the evolution of the binaries with the Binary YORP effect.

  3. Effects of tillage practices and carbofuran exposure on small mammals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Albers, P.H.; Linder, G.; Nichols, J.D.

    1990-01-01

    We compared population estimates, body mass, movement, and blood chemistry of small mammals between conventionally tilled and no-till cornfields in Maryland and Pennsylvania to evaluate the effects of tillage practices and carbofuran exposure on small mammals.

  4. The average direct current offset values for small digital audio recorders in an acoustically consistent environment.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Bruce E; Lacey, Douglas S

    2014-07-01

    In this research project, nine small digital audio recorders were tested using five sets of 30-min recordings at all available recording modes, with consistent audio material, identical source and microphone locations, and identical acoustic environments. The averaged direct current (DC) offset values and standard deviations were measured for 30-sec and 1-, 2-, 3-, 6-, 10-, 15-, and 30-min segments. The research found an inverse association between segment lengths and the standard deviation values and that lengths beyond 30 min may not meaningfully reduce the standard deviation values. This research supports previous studies indicating that measured averaged DC offsets should only be used for exclusionary purposes in authenticity analyses and exhibit consistent values when the general acoustic environment and microphone/recorder configurations were held constant. Measured average DC offset values from exemplar recorders may not be directly comparable to those of submitted digital audio recordings without exactly duplicating the acoustic environment and microphone/recorder configurations.

  5. Development of a Direct Drive Permanent Magnet Generator for Small Wind Turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Chertok, Allan; Hablanian, David; McTaggart, Paul; DOE Project Officer - Keith Bennett

    2004-11-16

    In this program, TIAX performed the conceptual design and analysis of an innovative, modular, direct-drive permanent magnet generator (PMG) for use in small wind turbines that range in power rating from 25 kW to 100 kW. TIAX adapted an approach that has been successfully demonstrated in high volume consumer products such as direct-drive washing machines and portable generators. An electromagnetic model was created and the modular PMG design was compared to an illustrative non-modular design. The resulting projections show that the modular design can achieve significant reductions in size, weight, and manufacturing cost without compromising efficiency. Reducing generator size and weight can also lower the size and weight of other wind turbine components and hence their manufacturing cost.

  6. [Vascular dementia: big effects of small lesions].

    PubMed

    Gold, G; Kövari, E

    2011-11-09

    Vascular dementia due to multiple large strokes (multi-infarct dementia) is a well known entity. However, new clinicopathologic and neuroimaging data have highlighted the common occurrence of small vessel and microscopic vascular pathology in aging brains and recognized that vascular dementia due to small lesions is probably the most common form. In such cases, cortical microinfarcts are the strongest correlate of global cognitive function followed by basal ganglia and thalamic lacunes. Demyelination is only weekly associated with cognition and this relation is no longer significant after adjustement for the presence of lacunes. Awareness of the importance of small vascular lesions in brain aging, can improve diagnostic accuracy and help identify new targets, that could lead to novel therapeutic approaches in old age dementia.

  7. Rotational effect in two-dimensional cooperative directed transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Li-Yan; Li, Yun-yun; Zheng, Zhi-Gang

    2015-02-01

    In this review we investigate the rotation effect in the motion of coupled dimer in a two-dimensional asymmetric periodic potential. Free rotation does not generate directed transport in translational direction, while we find it plays an critical role in the motors motility when the dimer moves under the effect of asymmetry ratchet potential. In the presence of external force, we study the relation between the average current and the force numerically and theoretically. The numerical results show that only appropriate driving force could produce nonzero current and there are current transitions when the force is large enough. An analysis of stability analysis of limit cycles is applied to explain the occurrence of these transitions. Moreover, we numerically simulate the transport of this coupled dimer driven by the random fluctuations in the rotational direction. The existence of noise smooths the current transitions induced by the driving force and the resonance-like peaks which depend on the rod length emerge in small noise strength. Thanks to the noise in the rotational direction, autonomous motion emerges without the external force and large noise could make the current reversal happen. Eventually, the new mechanism to generate directed transport by the rotation is studied.

  8. Effects of Small Oscillations on the Effective Area

    SciTech Connect

    Cotroneo, V.; Conconi, P.; Pareschi, G.; Spiga, D.; Tagliaferri, G.

    2009-05-11

    We analyze the effective area of the Simbol-X mirrors as a function of the off-axis angle for small oscillations. A reduction is expected due to: 1) geometrical effects, because some of the photons miss the secondary mirror surface; 2) reflectivity effects, caused by the variation of the coating reflectivity with the incidence angle. The former are related to the length of the two mirror surfaces, and can be reduced by making the secondary mirror longer. The second ones are energy-dependent, and strongly related to the characteristics of the reflecting coating. These effects are analyzed by means of ray-tracing simulations in order to optimize the mirror and coating design, aiming to improve the effective area stability.

  9. Effects of Small Oscillations on the Effective Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotroneo, V.; Conconi, P.; Cusumano, G.; Pareschi, G.; Spiga, D.; Tagliaferri, G.

    2009-05-01

    We analyze the effective area of the Simbol-X mirrors as a function of the off-axis angle for small oscillations. A reduction is expected due to: 1) geometrical effects, because some of the photons miss the secondary mirror surface; 2) reflectivity effects, caused by the variation of the coating reflectivity with the incidence angle. The former are related to the length of the two mirror surfaces, and can be reduced by making the secondary mirror longer. The second ones are energy-dependent, and strongly related to the characteristics of the reflecting coating. These effects are analyzed by means of ray-tracing simulations in order to optimize the mirror and coating design, aiming to improve the effective area stability.

  10. Diffraction Effects in Directed Radiation Beams

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-04-03

    Toraldo di Francia, NuoVo Cimento, Suppl. 9, 426 (1952)> 3. W T. Welford, Qptics, (Onfordi University Press, New York, 1981), chap. 3. 4 . C.. J. Bouwkarnp...Naval Research Laboratoy 4 Washington, DC 20375.5000 It) NRL Memorandum Report 6609 Diffraction Effects in Directed Radiation BeamsI B. HAFIZI* AND P...Wq ts :Iiio ’’,t tor VVes-q , .I (), O’at 1 4 , nci,rr itlon ot)$rmtioiI ld AepoTiQ , 21 ,’ tl,’fc sonr [I•11 Fi0r h ci ti’ 204, i litiqtOt VA 220 0

  11. Direct measurement of the Chudakov effect.

    PubMed

    Virkus, T; Thomsen, H D; Uggerhøj, E; Uggerhøj, U I; Ballestrero, S; Sona, P; Mangiarotti, A; Ketel, T J; Dizdar, A; Kartal, S; Pagliarone, C

    2008-04-25

    Experimental results for the restricted energy loss of pairs created from 1-178 GeV photons in a thin Au target and subsequently passing a CCD detector are presented. It is shown that pairs--when detected close to the creation vertex--suffer a reduced energy loss due to the internal screening of the charges constituting the pair. Furthermore, the ability to measure directly the energy of the pair by calorimetry enables a comparison with theory as a function of energy. The observed phenomenon is in good qualitative agreement with general expectations from the Chudakov effect but indicates a quantitative disagreement with either of two mutually disagreeing theories.

  12. Directional support value of Gaussian transformation for infrared small target detection.

    PubMed

    Yang, Changcai; Ma, Jiayi; Qi, Shengxiang; Tian, Jinwen; Zheng, Sheng; Tian, Xin

    2015-03-20

    Robust small target detection is one of the key techniques in IR search and tracking systems for self-defense or attacks. In this paper we present a robust solution for small target detection in a single IR image. The key ideas of the proposed method are to use the directional support value of Gaussian transform (DSVoGT) to enhance the targets, and use the multiscale representation provided by DSVoGT to reduce the false alarm rate. The original image is decomposed into sub-bands in different orientations by convolving the image with the directional support value filters, which are deduced from the weighted mapped least-squares-support vector machines (LS-SVMs). Based on the sub-band images, a support value of Gaussian matrix is constructed, and the trace of this matrix is then defined as the target measure. The corresponding multiscale correlations of the target measures are computed for enhancing target signal while suppressing the background clutter. We demonstrate the advantages of the proposed method on real IR images and compare the results against those obtained from standard detection approaches, including the top-hat filter, max-mean filter, max-median filter, min-local-Laplacian of Gaussian (LoG) filter, as well as LS-SVM. The experimental results on various cluttered background images show that the proposed method outperforms other detectors.

  13. Analytical Fuel Property Effects-Small Combustors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-10-01

    Small droplets in the fuel film are rapidly accelarated by the airblast air velocity. However, partizularly at iower power levels, a smaller pilot...produ’ction of finely divided soot particles in fuel-rich regions of the flame and iray be generated in any part of the combus- tion zone where mixing

  14. Small Force Effectiveness of Direct Fire Weapons: Model Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-09-01

    c Appear: if tgt appears treat, otherwise reschedule appearance include ’meeting.h’ integer tgt,firer, armyf, armyt common / terane / d(2,40), xold(20...include ’meeting.h’ integer tgt,firer common / terane / d(2,40), xold(20), yold(20), dist(20), iseg(20) I format(f8.2,lx,a4,i3,’ aprters ’,9x,’(x=’,f8.1...meeting model to allow both sides to disappear include ’meeting.h’ common / terane / d(2,40), xold(20), yold(20), dist(20), iseg(20) 1 format (’ visible for

  15. Small Impacts on Mars: Atmospheric Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, Ronald; Nemtchinov, Ivan V.

    2002-01-01

    The objectives of this investigation were to study the interaction of the atmosphere with the surface of Mars through the impact of small objects that would generate dust and set the dust into motion in the atmosphere. The approach involved numerical simulations of impacts and experiments under controlled conditions. Attachment: Atmospheric disturbances and radiation impulses caused by large-meteoroid impact in the surface of Mars.

  16. Environmental Effects of Small Arms Ranges

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-10-01

    motor vehicles, and other sources. Land- spreading of sewage sludge may also increase the lead levels in treated areas. 5 Lead contcnt it. soil averages...EXECI1HVE SUMMARY This report is part of a series of reports assessing environmental contaminationi at outdoor small arms ranges, identifying associated...technologies to recover, recycle , and treat contaminated soil and control nonpoint source pollution at abandoned, zurrent, and future ranges. Indoor ranges

  17. Investigating common clinical presentations in first opinion small animal consultations using direct observation

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, N. J.; Dean, R. S.; Cobb, M.; Brennan, M. L.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding more about the clinical presentations encountered in veterinary practice is vital in directing research towards areas relevant to practitioners. The aim of this study was to describe all problems discussed during a convenience sample of consultations using a direct observation method. A data collection tool was used to gather data by direct observation during small animal consultations at eight sentinel practices. Data were recorded for all presenting and non-presenting specific health problems discussed. A total of 1901 patients were presented with 3206 specific health problems discussed. Clinical presentation varied widely between species and between presenting and non-presenting problems. Skin lump, vomiting and inappetence were the most common clinical signs reported by the owner while overweight/obese, dental tartar and skin lump were the most common clinical examination findings. Skin was the most frequently affected body system overall followed by non-specific problems then the gastrointestinal system. Consultations are complex, with a diverse range of different clinical presentations seen. Considering the presenting problem only may give an inaccurate view of the veterinary caseload, as some common problems are rarely the reason for presentation. Understanding the common diagnoses made is the next step and will help to further focus questions for future research. PMID:25564472

  18. Investigating common clinical presentations in first opinion small animal consultations using direct observation.

    PubMed

    Robinson, N J; Dean, R S; Cobb, M; Brennan, M L

    2015-05-02

    Understanding more about the clinical presentations encountered in veterinary practice is vital in directing research towards areas relevant to practitioners. The aim of this study was to describe all problems discussed during a convenience sample of consultations using a direct observation method. A data collection tool was used to gather data by direct observation during small animal consultations at eight sentinel practices. Data were recorded for all presenting and non-presenting specific health problems discussed. A total of 1901 patients were presented with 3206 specific health problems discussed. Clinical presentation varied widely between species and between presenting and non-presenting problems. Skin lump, vomiting and inappetence were the most common clinical signs reported by the owner while overweight/obese, dental tartar and skin lump were the most common clinical examination findings. Skin was the most frequently affected body system overall followed by non-specific problems then the gastrointestinal system. Consultations are complex, with a diverse range of different clinical presentations seen. Considering the presenting problem only may give an inaccurate view of the veterinary caseload, as some common problems are rarely the reason for presentation. Understanding the common diagnoses made is the next step and will help to further focus questions for future research.

  19. Uncertainty in direction estimation: a comparison of small arrays and three-component stations

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, D.B.

    1982-10-08

    This report presents a comparison of the relative capabilities of isolated three-component seismometers and small arrays for ascertaining the back-azimuth of regional events. The Cramer-Rao bound, a method well-known in estimation theory, is used to obtain quantitative predictions of the errors to be expected in estimating direction in the presence of noise. These quantitative error estimates form the basis for comparison. The theoretical approach taken assumes spatially coherent signals and incoherent noise. There are ranges of inter-station separation for which these models are reasonable approximations. Within the limitations on array aperture and element density imposed by the spatial correlation lengths of real signals and noise, the theory demonstrates that arrays have a definite advantage over isolated triaxial seismometers in estimating the direction of P waves. The gain in performance is proportional to the product of the aperture and the square root of the number of array elements. The performance of arrays of three-component elements in estimating P wave direction is examined also. Although such arrays have an advantage over arrays of vertical sensors for this purpose, the advantage is slight compared to the increased data bandwidth required. Consequently, the usefulness of horizontal sensors appears to depend on the importance of horizontally polarized phases for monitoring purposes or on the degree of noise polarization. Conditions of highly polarized noise favor the use of triaxial elements, since such noise can be reduced by polarization filtering.

  20. 77 FR 53769 - Receipts-Based, Small Business Size Standard; Confirmation of Effective Date

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-04

    ... and 171 RIN 3150-AJ14 Receipts-Based, Small Business Size Standard; Confirmation of Effective Date AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Direct final rule; confirmation of effective date. SUMMARY: The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is confirming the effective date of August 22, 2012,...

  1. Elucidation of direct competition and allosteric modulation of small-molecular-weight protein ligands using surface plasmon resonance methods.

    PubMed

    Huber, Walter; Sinopoli, Alessandro; Kohler, Josiane; Hug, Melanie; Ruf, Armin; Huber, Sylwia

    2015-08-01

    The present work introduces a surface plasmon resonance-based method for the discrimination of direct competition and allosteric effects that occur in ternary systems comprising a receptor protein and two small-molecular-weight ligands that bind to it. Fatty acid binding protein 4, fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase and human serum albumin were used as model receptor molecules to demonstrate the performance of the method. For each of the receptor molecules, pairs of ligand molecules were selected for which either direct competition or an allosteric effect had already been determined by other methods. The method of discrimination introduced here is based on the surface plasmon resonance responses observed at equilibrium when an immobilized receptor protein is brought into contact with binary mixtures of interacting ligands. These experimentally determined responses are compared with the responses calculated using a theoretical model that considers both direct competition and allosteric ligand interaction modes. This study demonstrates that the allosteric ternary complex model, which enables calculation of the fractional occupancy of the protein by each ligand in such ternary systems, is well suited for the theoretical calculation of these types of responses. For all of the ternary systems considered in this work, the experimental and calculated responses in the chosen concentration ratio range were identical within a five-σ confidence interval when the calculations considered the correct interaction mode of the ligands (direct competition or different types of allosteric regulation), and in case of allosteric modulation, also the correct strength of this effect. This study also demonstrates that the allosteric ternary complex model-based calculations are well suited to predict the ideal concentration ratio range or even single concentration ratios that can serve as hot spots for discrimination, and such hot spots can drastically reduce the numbers of measurements needed

  2. An Interface for the Direct Coupling of Small Liquid Samples to AMS.

    PubMed

    Ognibene, T J; Thomas, A T; Daley, P F; Bench, G; Turteltaub, K W

    2015-10-15

    We describe the moving wire interface attached to the 1-MV AMS system at LLNL's Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry for the analysis of nonvolatile liquid samples as either discrete drops or from the direct output of biochemical separatory instrumentation, such as high-performance liquid chromatography. Discrete samples containing at least a few 10s of nanograms of carbon and as little as 50 zmol (14)C can be measured with a 3-5% precision in a few minutes. The dynamic range of our system spans approximately 3 orders in magnitude. Sample to sample memory is minimized by the use of fresh targets for each discrete sample or by minimizing the amount of carbon present in a peak generated by an HPLC containing a significant amount of (14)C. Liquid Sample AMS provides a new technology to expand our biomedical AMS program by enabling the capability to measure low-level biochemicals in extremely small samples that would otherwise be inaccessible.

  3. Photodynamic Therapy of Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer. Narrative Review and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Battoo, Athar; Harris, Kassem; Baumann, Heinz; Gollnick, Sandra O.; Lindenmann, Joerg; Nwogu, Chukwumere E.

    2016-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an established treatment modality for non–small cell lung cancer. Phototoxicity, the primary adverse event, is expected to be minimized with the introduction of new photosensitizers that have shown promising results in phase I and II clinical studies. Early-stage and superficial endobronchial lesions less than 1 cm in thickness can be effectively treated with external light sources. Thicker lesions and peripheral lesions may be amenable to interstitial PDT, where the light is delivered intratumorally. The addition of PDT to standard-of-care surgery and chemotherapy can improve survival and outcomes in patients with pleural disease. Intraoperative PDT has shown promise in the treatment of non–small cell lung cancer with pleural spread. Recent preclinical and clinical data suggest that PDT can increase antitumor immunity. Crosslinking of signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 molecules is a reliable biomarker to quantify the photoreaction induced by PDT. Randomized studies are required to test the prognosis value of this biomarker, obtain approval for the new photosensitizers, and test the potential efficacy of interstitial and intraoperative PDT in the treatment of patients with non–small cell lung cancer. PMID:26646726

  4. Accuracy Assessment of Direct Georeferencing for Photogrammetric Applications on Small Unmanned Aerial Platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mian, O.; Lutes, J.; Lipa, G.; Hutton, J. J.; Gavelle, E.; Borghini, S.

    2016-03-01

    Efficient mapping from unmanned aerial platforms cannot rely on aerial triangulation using known ground control points. The cost and time of setting ground control, added to the need for increased overlap between flight lines, severely limits the ability of small VTOL platforms, in particular, to handle mapping-grade missions of all but the very smallest survey areas. Applanix has brought its experience in manned photogrammetry applications to this challenge, setting out the requirements for increasing the efficiency of mapping operations from small UAVs, using survey-grade GNSS-Inertial technology to accomplish direct georeferencing of the platform and/or the imaging payload. The Direct Mapping Solution for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (DMS-UAV) is a complete and ready-to-integrate OEM solution for Direct Georeferencing (DG) on unmanned aerial platforms. Designed as a solution for systems integrators to create mapping payloads for UAVs of all types and sizes, the DMS produces directly georeferenced products for any imaging payload (visual, LiDAR, infrared, multispectral imaging, even video). Additionally, DMS addresses the airframe's requirements for high-accuracy position and orientation for such tasks as precision RTK landing and Precision Orientation for Air Data Systems (ADS), Guidance and Control. This paper presents results using a DMS comprised of an Applanix APX-15 UAV with a Sony a7R camera to produce highly accurate orthorectified imagery without Ground Control Points on a Microdrones md4-1000 platform conducted by Applanix and Avyon. APX-15 UAV is a single-board, small-form-factor GNSS-Inertial system designed for use on small, lightweight platforms. The Sony a7R is a prosumer digital RGB camera sensor, with a 36MP, 4.9-micron CCD producing images at 7360 columns by 4912 rows. It was configured with a 50mm AF-S Nikkor f/1.8 lens and subsequently with a 35mm Zeiss Sonnar T* FE F2.8 lens. Both the camera/lens combinations and the APX-15 were mounted to a

  5. Detection thresholds for small haptic effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dosher, Jesse A.; Hannaford, Blake

    2002-02-01

    We are interested in finding out whether or not haptic interfaces will be useful in portable and hand held devices. Such systems will have severe constraints on force output. Our first step is to investigate the lower limits at which haptic effects can be perceived. In this paper we report on experiments studying the effects of varying the amplitude, size, shape, and pulse-duration of a haptic feature. Using a specific haptic device we measure the smallest detectable haptics effects, with active exploration of saw-tooth shaped icons sized 3, 4 and 5 mm, a sine-shaped icon 5 mm wide, and static pulses 50, 100, and 150 ms in width. Smooth shaped icons resulted in a detection threshold of approximately 55 mN, almost twice that of saw-tooth shaped icons which had a threshold of 31 mN.

  6. Vegetated treatment area effectiveness at reducing nutrient runoff from small swine operations in central Texas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Numerous modeling and field studies have evaluated the effectiveness of vegetative treatment systems in treating runoff from animal feeding operations; however, none have evaluated the effectiveness of vegetative treatment areas (VTA’s) receiving direct runoff from small swine operations during natu...

  7. Small effects of smoking on visual spatiotemporal processing

    PubMed Central

    Kunchulia, Marina; Pilz, Karin S.; Herzog, Michael H.

    2014-01-01

    Nicotine is an important stimulant that is involved in modulating many neuronal processes, including those related to vision. Nicotine is also thought to play a key role in schizophrenia: A genetic variation of the cholinergic nicotine receptor gene, alpha-7 subunit (CHRNA7) has been shown to be associated with stronger backward masking deficits in schizophrenic patients. In this study, we tested visual backward masking in healthy smokers and non-smokers to further understand the effects of nicotine on spatiotemporal vision. In the first study, we tested 48 participants, a group of non-smokers (n = 12) and three groups of regular smokers that were either nicotine deprived (n = 12), non-deprived (n = 12) or deprived but were allowed to smoke a cigarette directly before the start of the experiment (n = 12). Performance was similar across groups, except for some small negative effects in nicotine-deprived participants. In the second study, we compared backward masking performance between regular smokers and non-smokers for older (n = 37, 13 smokers) and younger (n = 67, 21 smokers) adults. Older adults performed generally worse than younger adults but there were no significant differences in performance between smokers and non-smokers. Taken together, these findings indicate that nicotine has no long-term negative effects on visual spatiotemporal processing as determined by visual backward masking. PMID:25471068

  8. Direct Demonstration of the Greenhouse Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaffe, D. A.; Malashanka, S.; Call, K.; Bernays, N.

    2012-12-01

    Consider these three "theories:" climate change, evolution, and gravity. Why are two of them hotly debated by non-scientists, but not gravity? In part, the answer is that climate change and evolution are more complex processes and not readily observable over short time scales to most people. In contrast, the "theory of gravity" is tested every day by billions of people world-wide and is therefore not challenged. While there are numerous "demonstrations" of the greenhouse effect available online, unfortunately, many of them are based on poor understanding of the physical principles involved. For this reason, we sought to develop simple and direct experiments that would demonstrate aspects of the greenhouse effect that would be suitable for museums, K-12, and/or college classrooms. We will describe two experiments. In the first, we use a simple plexiglass tube, approximately 12 cm long, with IR transparent windows. The tube is first filled with dry nitrogen and exposed to an IR heat lamp. Following this, the tube is filled with pure, dry CO2. Both tubes warm up, but the tube filled with CO2 ends up about 0.7 degrees C warmer. It is useful to compare this 12 cm column of CO2 to the column in the earth's atmosphere, which is equivalent to approximately 2.7 meters of pure CO2. This demonstration would be suitable for museum exhibits to demonstrate the physical basis of CO2 heating in the atmosphere. In the second experiment, we use FTIR spectroscopy to quantify the CO2 content of ambient air and indoor/classroom air. For this experiment, we use a commercial standard of 350 ppm CO2 to calibrate the absorption features. Once the CO2 content of ambient air is found, it is useful for students to compare their observed value to background data (e.g. NOAA site in Hawaii) and/or the "Keeling Curve". This leads into a discussion on causes for local variations and the long-term trends. This experiment is currently used in our general chemistry class but could be used in many

  9. Selected achievements, science directions, and new opportunities for the WEBB small watershed research program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Glynn, Pierre D.; Larsen, Matthew C.; Greene, Earl A.; Buss, Heather L.; Clow, David W.; Hunt, Randall J.; Mast, M. Alisa; Murphy, Sheila F.; Peters, Norman E.; Sebestyen, Stephen D.; Shanley, James B.; Walker, John F.

    2009-01-01

    Over nearly two decades, the Water, Energy, and Biogeochemical Budgets (WEBB) small watershed research program of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has documented how water and solute fluxes, nutrient, carbon, and mercury dynamics, and weathering and sediment transport respond to natural and humancaused drivers, including climate, climate change, and atmospheric deposition. Together with a continued and increasing focus on the effects of climate change, more investigations are needed that examine ecological effects (e.g., evapotranspiration, nutrient uptake) and responses (e.g., species abundances, biodiversity) that are coupled with the physical and chemical processes historically observed in the WEBB program. Greater use of remote sensing, geographic modeling, and habitat/watershed modeling tools is needed, as is closer integration with the USGS-led National Phenology Network. Better understanding of process and system response times is needed. The analysis and observation of land-use and climate change effects over time should be improved by pooling data obtained by the WEBB program during the last two decades with data obtained earlier and (or) concurrently from other research and monitoring studies conducted at or near the five WEBB watershed sites. These data can be supplemented with historical and paleo-environmental information, such as could be obtained from tree rings and lake cores. Because of the relatively pristine nature and small size of its watersheds, the WEBB program could provide process understanding and basic data to better characterize and quantify ecosystem services and to develop and apply indicators of ecosystem health. In collaboration with other Federal and State watershed research programs, the WEBB program has an opportunity to contribute to tracking the short-term dynamics and long-term evolution of ecosystem services and health indicators at a multiplicity of scales across the landscape. 

  10. An interface for the direct coupling of small liquid samples to AMS

    SciTech Connect

    Ognibene, T. J.; Thomas, A. T.; Daley, P. F.; Bench, G.; Turteltaub, K. W.

    2015-05-28

    We describe the moving wire interface attached to the 1-MV AMS system at LLNL’s Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry for the analysis of nonvolatile liquid samples as either discrete drops or from the direct output of biochemical separatory instrumentation, such as high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Discrete samples containing at least a few 10 s of nanograms of carbon and as little as 50 zmol 14C can be measured with a 3–5% precision in a few minutes. The dynamic range of our system spans approximately 3 orders in magnitude. Sample to sample memory is minimized by the use of fresh targets for each discrete sample or by minimizing the amount of carbon present in a peak generated by an HPLC containing a significant amount of 14C. As a result, liquid sample AMS provides a new technology to expand our biomedical AMS program by enabling the capability to measure low-level biochemicals in extremely small samples that would otherwise be inaccessible.

  11. An interface for the direct coupling of small liquid samples to AMS

    DOE PAGES

    Ognibene, T. J.; Thomas, A. T.; Daley, P. F.; ...

    2015-05-28

    We describe the moving wire interface attached to the 1-MV AMS system at LLNL’s Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry for the analysis of nonvolatile liquid samples as either discrete drops or from the direct output of biochemical separatory instrumentation, such as high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Discrete samples containing at least a few 10 s of nanograms of carbon and as little as 50 zmol 14C can be measured with a 3–5% precision in a few minutes. The dynamic range of our system spans approximately 3 orders in magnitude. Sample to sample memory is minimized by the use of fresh targetsmore » for each discrete sample or by minimizing the amount of carbon present in a peak generated by an HPLC containing a significant amount of 14C. As a result, liquid sample AMS provides a new technology to expand our biomedical AMS program by enabling the capability to measure low-level biochemicals in extremely small samples that would otherwise be inaccessible.« less

  12. Small Reactor Designs Suitable for Direct Nuclear Thermal Propulsion: Interim Report

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce G. Schnitzler

    2012-01-01

    well as open loop systems for direct nuclear thermal propulsion. Although a number of fast spectrum reactor and engine designs suitable for direct nuclear thermal propulsion were proposed and designed, none were built. This report summarizes status results of evaluations of small nuclear reactor designs suitable for direct nuclear thermal propulsion.

  13. A Study of the Perceived Effectiveness of Kansas Small Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horn, Jerry G.

    Schools for Quality Education, an organization of some 80 small Kansas schools, and the Center for Rural Education and Small Schools (College of Education, Kansas State University) in 1986-87 jointly investigated the effectiveness of representative smaller schools serving Kansas's rural areas. Phase 1 identified the most important indicators of…

  14. Effectiveness of Small Group Social Skills Lessons with Elementary Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chupp, Amy I.; Boes, Susan R.

    2012-01-01

    This action research study (ARS) describes the effectiveness of small group social skills lessons with elementary students, using "Too Good for Violence: A Curriculum for Non-violent Living" by the Mendez Foundation. The school counselor and school social worker taught the curriculum in a structured small group of 4th grade students in 8 weekly…

  15. FY 2011 4th Quarter Metric: Estimate of Future Aerosol Direct and Indirect Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, D

    2011-09-21

    The global and annual mean aerosol direct and indirect effects, relative to 1850 conditions, estimated from CESM simulations are 0.02 W m-2 and -0.39 W m-2, respectively, for emissions in year 2100 under the IPCC RCP8.5 scenario. The indirect effect is much smaller than that for 2000 emissions because of much smaller SO2 emissions in 2100; the direct effects are small due to compensation between warming by black carbon and cooling by sulfate.

  16. Negative effects of an exotic grass invasion on small-mammal communities.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Eric D; Sharp, Tiffanny R; Larsen, Randy T; Knight, Robert N; Slater, Steven J; McMillan, Brock R

    2014-01-01

    Exotic invasive species can directly and indirectly influence natural ecological communities. Cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum) is non-native to the western United States and has invaded large areas of the Great Basin. Changes to the structure and composition of plant communities invaded by cheatgrass likely have effects at higher trophic levels. As a keystone guild in North American deserts, granivorous small mammals drive and maintain plant diversity. Our objective was to assess potential effects of invasion by cheatgrass on small-mammal communities. We sampled small-mammal and plant communities at 70 sites (Great Basin, Utah). We assessed abundance and diversity of the small-mammal community, diversity of the plant community, and the percentage of cheatgrass cover and shrub species. Abundance and diversity of the small-mammal community decreased with increasing abundance of cheatgrass. Similarly, cover of cheatgrass remained a significant predictor of small-mammal abundance even after accounting for the loss of the shrub layer and plant diversity, suggesting that there are direct and indirect effects of cheatgrass. The change in the small-mammal communities associated with invasion of cheatgrass likely has effects through higher and lower trophic levels and has the potential to cause major changes in ecosystem structure and function.

  17. Negative Effects of an Exotic Grass Invasion on Small-Mammal Communities

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Eric D.; Sharp, Tiffanny R.; Larsen, Randy T.; Knight, Robert N.; Slater, Steven J.; McMillan, Brock R.

    2014-01-01

    Exotic invasive species can directly and indirectly influence natural ecological communities. Cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum) is non-native to the western United States and has invaded large areas of the Great Basin. Changes to the structure and composition of plant communities invaded by cheatgrass likely have effects at higher trophic levels. As a keystone guild in North American deserts, granivorous small mammals drive and maintain plant diversity. Our objective was to assess potential effects of invasion by cheatgrass on small-mammal communities. We sampled small-mammal and plant communities at 70 sites (Great Basin, Utah). We assessed abundance and diversity of the small-mammal community, diversity of the plant community, and the percentage of cheatgrass cover and shrub species. Abundance and diversity of the small-mammal community decreased with increasing abundance of cheatgrass. Similarly, cover of cheatgrass remained a significant predictor of small-mammal abundance even after accounting for the loss of the shrub layer and plant diversity, suggesting that there are direct and indirect effects of cheatgrass. The change in the small-mammal communities associated with invasion of cheatgrass likely has effects through higher and lower trophic levels and has the potential to cause major changes in ecosystem structure and function. PMID:25269073

  18. Road zone effects in small-mammal communities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bissonette, J.A.; Rosa, S.A.

    2009-01-01

    Our study focused on the putative effects of roads on small-mammal communities in a high desert region of southern Utah. Specifically, we tested whether or not roads create adjacent zones characterized by lower small- mammal densities, abundance, and diversity. We sampled abundance of small mammals at increasing distances from Interstate 15 during two summers. We recorded 11 genera and 13 species. We detected no clear abundance, density, or diversity effects relative to distance from the road. Only two of 13 species were never captured near roads. The abundance of the remaining 11 small mammal species was either similar at different distances from the road or higher closer to the road. We conclude that although roads may act as barriers and possible sources of mortality, adjacent zones of vegetation often provide favorable microhabitat in the desert landscape for many small mammals. ?? 2009 by the author(s).

  19. Effect of DOC on evaporation from small Wisconsin lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watras, C. J.; Morrison, K. A.; Rubsam, J. L.

    2016-09-01

    Evaporation (E) dominates the loss of water from many small lakes, and the balance between precipitation and evaporation (P-E) often governs water levels. In this study, evaporation rates were estimated for three small Wisconsin lakes over several years using 30-min data from floating evaporation pans (E-pans). Measured E was then compared to the output of mass transfer models driven by local conditions over daily time scales. The three lakes were chosen to span a range of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations (3-20 mg L-1), a solute that imparts a dark, tea-stain color which absorbs solar energy and limits light penetration. Since the lakes were otherwise similar, we hypothesized that a DOC-mediated increase in surface water temperature would translate directly to higher rates of evaporation thereby informing climate response models. Our results confirmed a DOC effect on surface water temperature, but that effect did not translate to enhanced evaporation. Instead the opposite was observed: evaporation rates decreased as DOC increased. Ancillary data and prior studies suggest two explanatory mechanisms: (1) disproportionately greater radiant energy outflux from high DOC lakes, and (2) the combined effect of wind speed (W) and the vapor pressure gradient (es - ez), whose product [W(es - ez)] was lowest on the high DOC lake, despite very low wind speeds (<1.5 m s-1) and steep forested uplands surrounding all three lakes. Agreement between measured (E-pan) and modeled evaporation rates was reasonably good, based on linear regression results (r2: 0.6-0.7; slope: 0.5-0.7, for the best model). Rankings based on E were similar whether determined by measured or modeled criteria (high DOC < low DOC). Across the 3 lakes and 4 years, E averaged ∼3 mm d-1 (C.V. 9%), but statistically significant differences between lakes resulted in substantial differences in cumulative E that were consistent from year to year. Daily water budgets for these lakes show that inputs

  20. Effects of Directional Exercise on Lingual Strength

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Heather M.; O'Brien, Katy; Calleja, Aimee; Corrie, Sarah Newcomb

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the application of known muscle training principles to tongue strengthening exercises and to answer the following research questions: (a) Did lingual strength increase following 9 weeks of training? (b) Did training conducted using an exercise moving the tongue in one direction result in strength changes for tongue movements in…

  1. Direct measurement of effective diffusion coefficients in nanochannels using steady-state dispersion effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durand, Nicolas F. Y.; Bertsch, Arnaud; Todorova, Mina; Renaud, Philippe

    2007-11-01

    We present a method to measure effective diffusion coefficients of fluorescently labeled molecules inside a nanofluidic system. Molecules with small diffusion coefficients show a larger lateral dispersion than highly diffusive species, which is counterintuitive. We performed measurements with wheat germ agglutinin proteins and obtained an effective diffusion coefficient which is four orders of magnitude lower than its free diffusion coefficient. Our technique which is a direct and relatively simple measurement of the effective diffusion coefficients inside nanochannels of well controlled dimensions could help fundamental studies in membranes and separation sciences.

  2. Small RNA directed heterochromatin formation in the context of development: what flies might learn from fission yeast

    PubMed Central

    Huisinga, Kathryn L.; Elgin, Sarah C.R.

    2009-01-01

    Summary A link between the RNAi system and heterochromatin formation has been established in several model organisms including S. pombe and A. thaliana. However, the data to support a role for small RNAs and the associated machinery in transcriptional gene silencing in animal systems is more tenuous. Using the S. pombe system as a model, we analyze the role of small RNA pathway components and associated small RNAs in regulating transposable elements and potentially directing heterochromatin formation at these elements in Drosophila melanogaster. PMID:18789407

  3. Scaling effects in direct shear tests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Orlando, A.D.; Hanes, D.M.; Shen, H.H.

    2009-01-01

    Laboratory experiments of the direct shear test were performed on spherical particles of different materials and diameters. Results of the bulk friction vs. non-dimensional shear displacement are presented as a function of the non-dimensional particle diameter. Simulations of the direct shear test were performed using the Discrete Element Method (DEM). The simulation results show Considerable differences with the physical experiments. Particle level material properties, such as the coefficients of static friction, restitution and rolling friction need to be known a priori in order to guarantee that the simulation results are an accurate representation of the physical phenomenon. Furthermore, laboratory results show a clear size dependency on the results, with smaller particles having a higher bulk friction than larger ones. ?? 2009 American Institute of Physics.

  4. Direct effects dominate responses to climate perturbations in grassland plant communities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Theory predicts that strong indirect effects of environmental change will impact communities when niche differences between competitors are small and variation in the direct effects experienced by competitors is large, but empirical tests are lacking. Here we estimate negative frequency dependence, ...

  5. Atypically small temperature-dependence of the direct band gap in the metastable semiconductor copper nitride Cu3N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birkett, Max; Savory, Christopher N.; Fioretti, Angela N.; Thompson, Paul; Muryn, Christopher A.; Weerakkody, A. D.; Mitrovic, I. Z.; Hall, S.; Treharne, Rob; Dhanak, Vin R.; Scanlon, David O.; Zakutayev, Andriy; Veal, Tim D.

    2017-03-01

    The temperature-dependence of the direct band gap and thermal expansion in the metastable anti-ReO3 semiconductor Cu3N are investigated between 4.2 and 300 K by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction. Complementary refractive index spectra are determined by spectroscopic ellipsometry at 300 K . A direct gap of 1.68 eV is associated with the absorption onset at 300 K , which strengthens continuously and reaches a magnitude of 3.5 ×105cm-1 at 2.7 eV , suggesting potential for photovoltaic applications. Notably, the direct gap redshifts by just 24 meV between 4.2 and 300 K , giving an atypically small band-gap temperature coefficient d Eg/d T of -0.082 meV /K . Additionally, the band structure, dielectric function, phonon dispersion, linear expansion, and heat capacity are calculated using density functional theory; remarkable similarities between the experimental and calculated refractive index spectra support the accuracy of these calculations, which indicate beneficially low hole effective masses and potential negative thermal expansion below 50 K . To assess the lattice expansion contribution to the band-gap temperature-dependence, a quasiharmonic model fit to the observed lattice contraction finds a monotonically decreasing linear expansion (descending past 10-6K-1 below 80 K ), while estimating the Debye temperature, lattice heat capacity, and Grüneisen parameter. Accounting for lattice and electron-phonon contributions to the observed band-gap evolution suggests average phonon energies that are qualitatively consistent with predicted maxima in the phonon density of states. As band-edge temperature-dependence has significant consequences for device performance, copper nitride should be well suited for applications that require a largely temperature-invariant band gap.

  6. Colloidal Graphite-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization MS and MSn of Small Molecules. 2. Direct Profiling and MS Imaging of Small Metabolites from Fruits

    SciTech Connect

    Hui Zhang; Sangwon Cha; Edward S. Yeung

    2007-09-01

    Due to a high background in the low-mass region, conventional MALDI is not as useful for detecting small molecules (molecular masses <500 Da) as it is for large ones. Also, spatial inhomogeneity that is inherent to crystalline matrixes can degrade resolution in imaging mass spectrometry (IMS). In this study, colloidal graphite was investigated as an alternative matrix for laser desorption/ionization (GALDI) in IMS. We demonstrate its advantages over conventional MALDI in the detection of small molecules such as organic acids, flavonoids, and oligosaccharides. GALDI provides good sensitivity for such small molecules. The detection limit of fatty acids and flavonoids in the negative-ion mode are in the low-femtomole range. Molecules were detected directly and identified by comparing the MS and MS/MS spectra with those of standards. Various fruits were chosen to evaluate the practical utility of GALDI since many types of small molecules are present in them. Distribution of these small molecules in the fruit was investigated by using IMS and IMS/MS.

  7. A natural small molecule, catechol, induces c-Myc degradation by directly targeting ERK2 in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Lim, Do Young; Shin, Seung Ho; Lee, Mee-Hyun; Malakhova, Margarita; Kurinov, Igor; Wu, Qiong; Xu, Jinglong; Jiang, Yanan; Dong, Ziming; Liu, Kangdong; Lee, Kun Yeong; Bae, Ki Beom; Choi, Bu Young; Deng, Yibin; Bode, Ann; Dong, Zigang

    2016-06-07

    Various carcinogens induce EGFR/RAS/MAPK signaling, which is critical in the development of lung cancer. In particular, constitutive activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2 (ERK2) is observed in many lung cancer patients, and therefore developing compounds capable of targeting ERK2 in lung carcinogenesis could be beneficial. We examined the therapeutic effect of catechol in lung cancer treatment. Catechol suppressed anchorage-independent growth of murine KP2 and human H460 lung cancer cell lines in a dose-dependent manner. Catechol inhibited ERK2 kinase activity in vitro, and its direct binding to the ERK2 active site was confirmed by X-ray crystallography. Phosphorylation of c-Myc, a substrate of ERK2, was decreased in catechol-treated lung cancer cells and resulted in reduced protein stability and subsequent down-regulation of total c-Myc. Treatment with catechol induced G1 phase arrest in lung cancer cells and decreased protein expression related to G1-S progression. In addition, we showed that catechol inhibited the growth of both allograft and xenograft lung cancer tumors in vivo. In summary, catechol exerted inhibitory effects on the ERK2/c-Myc signaling axis to reduce lung cancer tumor growth in vitro and in vivo, including a preclinical patient-derived xenograft (PDX) model. These findings suggest that catechol, a natural small molecule, possesses potential as a novel therapeutic agent against lung carcinogenesis in future clinical approaches.

  8. A natural small molecule, catechol, induces c-Myc degradation by directly targeting ERK2 in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Do Young; Shin, Seung Ho; Lee, Mee-Hyun; Malakhova, Margarita; Kurinov, Igor; Wu, Qiong; Xu, Jinglong; Jiang, Yanan; Dong, Ziming; Liu, Kangdong; Lee, Kun Yeong; Bae, Ki Beom; Choi, Bu Young; Deng, Yibin; Bode, Ann; Dong, Zigang

    2016-01-01

    Various carcinogens induce EGFR/RAS/MAPK signaling, which is critical in the development of lung cancer. In particular, constitutive activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2 (ERK2) is observed in many lung cancer patients, and therefore developing compounds capable of targeting ERK2 in lung carcinogenesis could be beneficial. We examined the therapeutic effect of catechol in lung cancer treatment. Catechol suppressed anchorage-independent growth of murine KP2 and human H460 lung cancer cell lines in a dose-dependent manner. Catechol inhibited ERK2 kinase activity in vitro, and its direct binding to the ERK2 active site was confirmed by X-ray crystallography. Phosphorylation of c-Myc, a substrate of ERK2, was decreased in catechol-treated lung cancer cells and resulted in reduced protein stability and subsequent down-regulation of total c-Myc. Treatment with catechol induced G1 phase arrest in lung cancer cells and decreased protein expression related to G1-S progression. In addition, we showed that catechol inhibited the growth of both allograft and xenograft lung cancer tumors in vivo. In summary, catechol exerted inhibitory effects on the ERK2/c-Myc signaling axis to reduce lung cancer tumor growth in vitro and in vivo, including a preclinical patient-derived xenograft (PDX) model. These findings suggest that catechol, a natural small molecule, possesses potential as a novel therapeutic agent against lung carcinogenesis in future clinical approaches. PMID:27167001

  9. Direct effects dominate responses to climate perturbations in grassland plant communities

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Chengjin; Kleinhesselink, Andrew R.; Havstad, Kris M.; McClaran, Mitchel P.; Peters, Debra P.; Vermeire, Lance T.; Wei, Haiyan; Adler, Peter B.

    2016-01-01

    Theory predicts that strong indirect effects of environmental change will impact communities when niche differences between competitors are small and variation in the direct effects experienced by competitors is large, but empirical tests are lacking. Here we estimate negative frequency dependence, a proxy for niche differences, and quantify the direct and indirect effects of climate change on each species. Consistent with theory, in four of five communities indirect effects are strongest for species showing weak negative frequency dependence. Indirect effects are also stronger in communities where there is greater variation in direct effects. Overall responses to climate perturbations are driven primarily by direct effects, suggesting that single species models may be adequate for forecasting the impacts of climate change in these communities. PMID:27273085

  10. SWAD: small arms fire warning and direction finding system: a passive IR concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahler, Moti; Danino, Meir

    2007-04-01

    A passive IR approach for stationary system is introduced providing protection to high value infrastructure and strategic areas by detecting and warnings against fire shot from rifles, carbines, sub-machines and various other small arms - SWAD. SWAD provides protected surroundings in which it remotely detects small arms fire. By analyzing their patterns, including duration and intensity, SWAD classifies the type of weapon being used.

  11. Trainable fusion rules. II. Small sample-size effects.

    PubMed

    Raudys, Sarunas

    2006-12-01

    Profound theoretical analysis is performed of small-sample properties of trainable fusion rules to determine in which situations neural network ensembles can improve or degrade classification results. We consider small sample effects, specific only to multiple classifiers system design in the two-category case of two important fusion rules: (1) linear weighted average (weighted voting), realized either by the standard Fisher classifier or by the single-layer perceptron, and (2) the non-linear Behavior-Knowledge-Space method. The small sample effects include: (i) training bias, i.e. learning sample size influence on generalization error of the base experts or of the fusion rule, (ii) optimistic biased outputs of the experts (self-boasting effect) and (iii) sample size impact on determining optimal complexity of the fusion rule. Correction terms developed to reduce the self-boasting effect are studied. It is shown that small learning sets increase classification error of the expert classifiers and damage correlation structure between their outputs. If the sizes of learning sets used to develop the expert classifiers are too small, non-trainable fusion rules can outperform more sophisticated trainable ones. A practical technique to fight sample size problems is a noise injection technique. The noise injection reduces the fusion rule's complexity and diminishes the expert's boasting bias.

  12. Derivative expansion at small mass for the spinor effective action

    SciTech Connect

    Dunne, Gerald V.; Huet, Adolfo; Hur, Jin; Min, Hyunsoo

    2011-05-15

    We study the small-mass limit of the one-loop spinor effective action, comparing the derivative expansion approximation with exact numerical results that are obtained from an extension to spinor theories of the partial-wave cutoff method. In this approach, one can compute numerically the renormalized one-loop effective action for radially separable gauge field background fields in spinor QED. We highlight an important difference between the small-mass limit of the derivative expansion for spinor and scalar theories.

  13. Small Fast Spectrum Reactor Designs Suitable for Direct Nuclear Thermal Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnitzler, Bruce G.; Borowski, Stanley K.

    2012-01-01

    Advancement of U.S. scientific, security, and economic interests through a robust space exploration program requires high performance propulsion systems to support a variety of robotic and crewed missions beyond low Earth orbit. Past studies, in particular those in support of the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI), have shown nuclear thermal propulsion systems provide superior performance for high mass high propulsive delta-V missions. The recent NASA Design Reference Architecture (DRA) 5.0 Study re-examined mission, payload, and transportation system requirements for a human Mars landing mission in the post-2030 timeframe. Nuclear thermal propulsion was again identified as the preferred in-space transportation system. A common nuclear thermal propulsion stage with three 25,000-lbf thrust engines was used for all primary mission maneuvers. Moderately lower thrust engines may also have important roles. In particular, lower thrust engine designs demonstrating the critical technologies that are directly extensible to other thrust levels are attractive from a ground testing perspective. An extensive nuclear thermal rocket technology development effort was conducted from 1955-1973 under the Rover/NERVA Program. Both graphite and refractory metal alloy fuel types were pursued. Reactors and engines employing graphite based fuels were designed, built and ground tested. A number of fast spectrum reactor and engine designs employing refractory metal alloy fuel types were proposed and designed, but none were built. The Small Nuclear Rocket Engine (SNRE) was the last engine design studied by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during the program. At the time, this engine was a state-of-the-art graphite based fuel design incorporating lessons learned from the very successful technology development program. The SNRE was a nominal 16,000-lbf thrust engine originally intended for unmanned applications with relatively short engine operations and the engine and stage design were

  14. Small Fast Spectrum Reactor Designs Suitable for Direct Nuclear Thermal Propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce G. Schnitzler; Stanley K. Borowski

    2012-07-01

    Advancement of U.S. scientific, security, and economic interests through a robust space exploration program requires high performance propulsion systems to support a variety of robotic and crewed missions beyond low Earth orbit. Past studies, in particular those in support of both the Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI) and Space Exploration Initiative (SEI), have shown nuclear thermal propulsion systems provide superior performance for high mass high propulsive delta-V missions. The recent NASA Design Reference Architecture (DRA) 5.0 Study re-examined mission, payload, and transportation system requirements for a human Mars landing mission in the post-2030 timeframe. Nuclear thermal propulsion was again identified as the preferred in-space transportation system. A common nuclear thermal propulsion stage with three 25,000-lbf thrust engines was used for all primary mission maneuvers. Moderately lower thrust engines may also have important roles. In particular, lower thrust engine designs demonstrating the critical technologies that are directly extensible to other thrust levels are attractive from a ground testing perspective. An extensive nuclear thermal rocket technology development effort was conducted from 1955-1973 under the Rover/NERVA Program. Both graphite and refractory metal alloy fuel types were pursued. Reactors and engines employing graphite based fuels were designed, built and ground tested. A number of fast spectrum reactor and engine designs employing refractory metal alloy fuel types were proposed and designed, but none were built. The Small Nuclear Rocket Engine (SNRE) was the last engine design studied by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during the program. At the time, this engine was a state-of-the-art graphite based fuel design incorporating lessons learned from the very successful technology development program. The SNRE was a nominal 16,000-lbf thrust engine originally intended for unmanned applications with relatively short engine

  15. Direct Numerical Simulation of the Leidenfrost Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanguy, Sebastien; Rueda Villegas, Lucia; Fluid Mechanics Institute of Toulouse Team

    2015-11-01

    The development of numerical methods for the direct numerical simulation of two-phase flows with phase changes, is the main topic of this study. We propose a novel numerical method which allows dealing with both evaporation and boiling at the interface between a liquid and a gas. For instance it can occur for a Leidenfrost droplet; a water drop levitating above a hot plate which temperature is much higher than the boiling temperature. In this case, boiling occurs in the film of saturated vapor which is entrapped between the bottom of the drop and the plate, whereas the top of the water droplet evaporates in contact of ambient air. Thus, boiling and evaporation can occur simultaneously on different regions of the same liquid interface or occur successively at different times of the history of an evaporating droplet. Usual numerical methods are not able to perform computations in these transient regimes, therefore, we propose in this paper a novel numerical method to achieve this challenging task. Finally, we present several accurate validations against experimental results on Leidenfrost Droplets to strengthen the relevance of this new method.

  16. Antidiabetic effects of glucokinase regulatory protein small-molecule disruptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, David J.; St Jean, David J.; Kurzeja, Robert J. M.; Wahl, Robert C.; Michelsen, Klaus; Cupples, Rod; Chen, Michelle; Wu, John; Sivits, Glenn; Helmering, Joan; Komorowski, Renée; Ashton, Kate S.; Pennington, Lewis D.; Fotsch, Christopher; Vazir, Mukta; Chen, Kui; Chmait, Samer; Zhang, Jiandong; Liu, Longbin; Norman, Mark H.; Andrews, Kristin L.; Bartberger, Michael D.; van, Gwyneth; Galbreath, Elizabeth J.; Vonderfecht, Steven L.; Wang, Minghan; Jordan, Steven R.; Véniant, Murielle M.; Hale, Clarence

    2013-12-01

    Glucose homeostasis is a vital and complex process, and its disruption can cause hyperglycaemia and type II diabetes mellitus. Glucokinase (GK), a key enzyme that regulates glucose homeostasis, converts glucose to glucose-6-phosphate in pancreatic β-cells, liver hepatocytes, specific hypothalamic neurons, and gut enterocytes. In hepatocytes, GK regulates glucose uptake and glycogen synthesis, suppresses glucose production, and is subject to the endogenous inhibitor GK regulatory protein (GKRP). During fasting, GKRP binds, inactivates and sequesters GK in the nucleus, which removes GK from the gluconeogenic process and prevents a futile cycle of glucose phosphorylation. Compounds that directly hyperactivate GK (GK activators) lower blood glucose levels and are being evaluated clinically as potential therapeutics for the treatment of type II diabetes mellitus. However, initial reports indicate that an increased risk of hypoglycaemia is associated with some GK activators. To mitigate the risk of hypoglycaemia, we sought to increase GK activity by blocking GKRP. Here we describe the identification of two potent small-molecule GK-GKRP disruptors (AMG-1694 and AMG-3969) that normalized blood glucose levels in several rodent models of diabetes. These compounds potently reversed the inhibitory effect of GKRP on GK activity and promoted GK translocation both in vitro (isolated hepatocytes) and in vivo (liver). A co-crystal structure of full-length human GKRP in complex with AMG-1694 revealed a previously unknown binding pocket in GKRP distinct from that of the phosphofructose-binding site. Furthermore, with AMG-1694 and AMG-3969 (but not GK activators), blood glucose lowering was restricted to diabetic and not normoglycaemic animals. These findings exploit a new cellular mechanism for lowering blood glucose levels with reduced potential for hypoglycaemic risk in patients with type II diabetes mellitus.

  17. The effect of beam directivity on the inspection of anisotropic materials using ultrasonic arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, C. J. L.; Wilcox, P. D.

    2012-05-01

    The beam directivity from an ultrasonic transducer in isotropic materials is well documented. However, beam directivities in elastically anisotropic materials and their effect on ultrasonic NDE inspection has been investigated far less extensively. In this paper, analytical and numerical finite element models are developed to predict the beam directivity in a single crystal nickel-based superalloy. This material is highly anisotropic and is used widely in the gas-turbine industry. The developed models are used to investigate the effect of the crystallographic orientation on the beam directivity. In turn, the effect of beam directivity on defect detection sensitivity and characterization capability using an ultrasonic array is demonstrated. It is shown that the effect is particularly important for the accurate sizing of small defects.

  18. Thermodynamics of small systems embedded in a reservoir: a detailed analysis of finite size effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnell, Sondre K.; Vlugt, Thijs J. H.; Simon, Jean-Marc; Bedeaux, Dick; Kjelstrup, Signe

    2012-06-01

    We present a detailed study on the finite size scaling behaviour of thermodynamic properties for small systems of particles embedded in a reservoir. Previously, we derived that the leading finite size effects of thermodynamic properties for small systems scale with the inverse of the linear length of the small system, and we showed how this can be used to describe systems in the thermodynamic limit [Chem. Phys. Lett. 504, 199 (2011)]. This approach takes into account an effective surface energy, as a result of the non-periodic boundaries of the small embedded system. Deviations from the linear behaviour occur when the small system becomes very small, i.e. smaller than three times the particle diameter in each direction. At this scale, so-called nook- and corner effects will become important. In this work, we present a detailed analysis to explain this behaviour. In addition, we present a model for the finite size scaling when the size of the small system is of the same order of magnitude as the reservoir. The developed theory is validated using molecular simulations of systems containing Lennard-Jones and WCA particles, and leads to significant improvements over our previous approach. Our approach eventually leads to an efficient method to compute the thermodynamic factor of macroscopic systems from finite size scaling, which is for example required for converting Fick and Maxwell-Stefan transport diffusivities.

  19. Direct effect of neuroleptics on glutamate release.

    PubMed

    Sherman, A D; Mott, J

    1984-11-01

    In studies designed to assess the pre-synaptic effects of neuroleptics in vitro, synaptosomes were prepared from several regions of rat brain. These preparations were incubated in the presence of a representative of each of the major classes of neuroleptic--chlorpromazine, haloperidol, or clozapine, or with (+) or (-)butaclamol. The calcium-specific release of endogenous glutamic acid was reduced only in synaptosomes derived from the amygdala. In this area, each of these agents [except (-)butaclamol] reduced the release of glutamic acid to a maximum of 40% in a concentration-dependent manner. When [3H]glutamine was included in the incubation media, a reduction in the released [3H]glutamate was present with 10(-8) M haloperidol, and 5 X 10(-8) M (+)butaclamol, clozapine, or chlorpromazine. (-)Butaclamol was inactive at 10(-5) M, a concentration producing complete blockade of the release of [3H]glutamic acid when active agents were included. Again, the effects were observed only in the amygdala. All agents, including (-)butaclamol blocked the uptake of [3H]glutamine into depolarized synaptosomes.

  20. A small molecule inhibitor of tropomyosin dissociates actin binding from tropomyosin-directed regulation of actin dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Bonello, Teresa T.; Janco, Miro; Hook, Jeff; Byun, Alex; Appaduray, Mark; Dedova, Irina; Hitchcock-DeGregori, Sarah; Hardeman, Edna C.; Stehn, Justine R.; Böcking, Till; Gunning, Peter W.

    2016-01-01

    The tropomyosin family of proteins form end-to-end polymers along the actin filament. Tumour cells rely on specific tropomyosin-containing actin filament populations for growth and survival. To dissect out the role of tropomyosin in actin filament regulation we use the small molecule TR100 directed against the C terminus of the tropomyosin isoform Tpm3.1. TR100 nullifies the effect of Tpm3.1 on actin depolymerisation but surprisingly Tpm3.1 retains the capacity to bind F-actin in a cooperative manner. In vivo analysis also confirms that, in the presence of TR100, fluorescently tagged Tpm3.1 recovers normally into stress fibers. Assembling end-to-end along the actin filament is thereby not sufficient for tropomyosin to fulfil its function. Rather, regulation of F-actin stability by tropomyosin requires fidelity of information communicated at the barbed end of the actin filament. This distinction has significant implications for perturbing tropomyosin-dependent actin filament function in the context of anti-cancer drug development. PMID:26804624

  1. A Direct, Competitive Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) as a Quantitative Technique for Small Molecules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Jennifer L.; Rippe, Karen Duda; Imarhia, Kelly; Swift, Aileen; Scholten, Melanie; Islam, Naina

    2012-01-01

    ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) is a widely used technique with applications in disease diagnosis, detection of contaminated foods, and screening for drugs of abuse or environmental contaminants. However, published protocols with a focus on quantitative detection of small molecules designed for teaching laboratories are limited. A…

  2. SUCCESSIVE SOLAR ERUPTIONS TRIGGERED BY THE COLLISION OF TWO SMALL SUNSPOTS WITH OPPOSITE POLARITIES AND MOTIONAL DIRECTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, X. L.; Qu, Z. Q.; Kong, D. F.

    2012-03-15

    We present a study of the two successive M-class flares associated with two coronal mass ejections (CMEs) triggered by the collision of two small sunspots with opposite magnetic polarities and motional directions in NOAA active region (AR) 10484 on 2003 October 22. From the evolution of this AR in the TRACE white-light images and 96 minute line-of-sight magnetograms observed by the Michelson Doppler Imager on board SOHO, a large sunspot and a small sunspot with negative polarity rotated clockwise about 33 Degree-Sign and 18 Degree-Sign , respectively, from the northeast of a quiescent sunspot with negative polarity to the southeast from 15:00 UT on October 21 to 16:24 UT on October 23. During the process of their motion, the small sunspot with negative polarity collided with the small sunspot with positive polarity and opposite motional direction. In the collision, this AR produced two successive M-class flares and CMEs according to the observations of GOES and the Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph. By analyzing the magnetic fields at polarity inversion lines (PILs) between the two small sunspot, it is found that a sudden squeeze occurred near the onset of the two M-class flares and then recovered itself after the flares. We ruled out the emergence of the magnetic fields near the PIL. According to the brightenings in TRACE 1600 A and the hard X-ray sources of the RHESSI of two M-class flares, we found that the locations of the two flares are almost situated in the same location at the PIL between the two small sunspots. We suggest that the sudden squeeze between the opposite magnetic polarities is caused by the pressure of the collision of the two small sunspots and resulted in the magnetic reconnection. These results could contribute to understanding the mechanism of flares and CMEs.

  3. Using the sensitive dependence of chaos (the butterfly effect'') to direct trajectories in an experimental chaotic system

    SciTech Connect

    Shinbrot, T.; Ditto, W.; Grebogi, C.; Ott, E.; Spano, M.; Yorke, J.A. Department of Physics, The College of Wooster, Wooster, Ohio 44691 Naval Surface Warfare Center, Silver Spring, Maryland 20902 )

    1992-05-11

    In this paper we present the first experimental verification that the sensitivity of a chaotic system to small perturbations (the butterfly effect'') can be used to rapidly direct orbits from an arbitrary initial state to an arbitrary accessible desired state.

  4. Small RNA-directed epigenetic programming of embryonic stem cell cardiac differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Ghanbarian, Hossein; Wagner, Nicole; Michiels, Jean-François; Cuzin, François; Wagner, Kay-Dietrich; Rassoulzadegan, Minoo

    2017-01-01

    Microinjection of small noncoding RNAs in one-cell embryos was reported in several instances to result in transcriptional activation of target genes. To determine the molecular mechanisms involved and to explore whether such epigenetic regulations could play a role in early development, we used a cell culture system as close as possible to the embryonic state. We report efficient cardiac differentiation of embryonic stem (ES) cells induced by small non-coding RNAs with sequences of Cdk9, a key player in cardiomyocyte differentiation. Transfer of oligoribonucleotides representing parts of the Cdk9 mRNA into ES and mouse embryo fibroblast cultures resulted in upregulation of transcription. Dependency on Argonaute proteins and endogenous antisense transcripts indicated that the inducer oligoribonucleotides were processed by the RNAi machinery. Upregulation of Cdk9 expression resulted in increased efficiency of cardiac differentiation suggesting a potential tool for stem cell-based regenerative medicine. PMID:28165496

  5. Small RNA-directed epigenetic programming of embryonic stem cell cardiac differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ghanbarian, Hossein; Wagner, Nicole; Michiels, Jean-François; Cuzin, François; Wagner, Kay-Dietrich; Rassoulzadegan, Minoo

    2017-02-06

    Microinjection of small noncoding RNAs in one-cell embryos was reported in several instances to result in transcriptional activation of target genes. To determine the molecular mechanisms involved and to explore whether such epigenetic regulations could play a role in early development, we used a cell culture system as close as possible to the embryonic state. We report efficient cardiac differentiation of embryonic stem (ES) cells induced by small non-coding RNAs with sequences of Cdk9, a key player in cardiomyocyte differentiation. Transfer of oligoribonucleotides representing parts of the Cdk9 mRNA into ES and mouse embryo fibroblast cultures resulted in upregulation of transcription. Dependency on Argonaute proteins and endogenous antisense transcripts indicated that the inducer oligoribonucleotides were processed by the RNAi machinery. Upregulation of Cdk9 expression resulted in increased efficiency of cardiac differentiation suggesting a potential tool for stem cell-based regenerative medicine.

  6. Effects of small halocarbon molecules on reverse osmosis membrane performance

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, R.C.; Glater, J.; Neethling, J.B. )

    1990-01-01

    The reverse osmosis (RO) membrane industry has long been concerned with problems of performance decline due to fouling. Colloidal and biological fouling have been discussed to some extent in the literature but little is known about the effect of small organic molecules on membrane performance. The work reported in this paper involved controlled laboratory experiments with three small halocarbons and three different types of commercial RO membranes. The compounds used were CHCl{sub 3}, CHBr{sub 3} and CCl{sub 4}. The first two represent typical small and large THM's. Carbon tetrachloride was selected as a non-polar model compound. Membranes representing three different polymer systems were provided by E. I. du Pont Inc.

  7. Outward Foreign Direct Investment and Human Capital Development: A Small Country Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonnell, Anthony

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the pattern of outward foreign direct investment (FDI) by Irish MNCs, and more specifically, to investigate their approach to human capital development and how these correspond to foreign MNCs in Ireland. In particular, it seeks to investigate training and development expenditure, adoption of…

  8. Small omni-directional antenna development for Mars Sample Return Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jamnejad, V.; Huang, J.; Endler, H.; Manshadi, F.

    2001-01-01

    This work addresses the design, analysis and test of omni-directional antennas at 401.5 MHz and 437.1 MHz frequencies, on Mars Orbital Sample (OS) return canisters, which are part of a Mars Sample Return (MSR) mission.

  9. Laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry for direct profiling and imaging of small molecules from raw biological materials

    SciTech Connect

    Cha, Sangwon

    2008-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization(MALDI) mass spectrometry(MS) has been widely used for analysis of biological molecules, especially macromolecules such as proteins. However, MALDI MS has a problem in small molecule (less than 1 kDa) analysis because of the signal saturation by organic matrixes in the low mass region. In imaging MS (IMS), inhomogeneous surface formation due to the co-crystallization process by organic MALDI matrixes limits the spatial resolution of the mass spectral image. Therefore, to make laser desorption/ionization (LDI) MS more suitable for mass spectral profiling and imaging of small molecules directly from raw biological tissues, LDI MS protocols with various alternative assisting materials were developed and applied to many biological systems of interest. Colloidal graphite was used as a matrix for IMS of small molecules for the first time and methodologies for analyses of small metabolites in rat brain tissues, fruits, and plant tissues were developed. With rat brain tissues, the signal enhancement for cerebroside species by colloidal graphite was observed and images of cerebrosides were successfully generated by IMS. In addition, separation of isobaric lipid ions was performed by imaging tandem MS. Directly from Arabidopsis flowers, flavonoids were successfully profiled and heterogeneous distribution of flavonoids in petals was observed for the first time by graphite-assisted LDI(GALDI) IMS.

  10. Simulation of the direct production of 99mTc at a small cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eslami, M.; Kakavand, T.

    2014-06-01

    Usually 99mTc is produced indirectly through generator 99Mo/99mTc. In the present study, the direct production of this radioisotope by charged particle irradiation was investigated using Monte Carlo method. After scouting of the reactions that produce 99mTc, excitation functions of these reactions were predicted by optical model components in the TALYS-1.6 code. Suitable energy range of projectile for this production was selected by spotting of maximum cross section and minimum impurity due to other emission channels. Then target geometry was designed based on stopping power calculation by the SRIM code. Thick target yield of 100Mo(p,2n)99mTc, 98Mo(p,γ)99mTc and natMo(p,x)99mTc reactions was predicted by the result of excitation function and stopping power calculations. Finally, 100Mo(p,2n)99mTc reaction was selected as a primary reaction for the direct production of 99mTc and its process was simulated by employing the MCNPX code to calculate the energy distribution of proton in the 100Mo target body and estimation of residual nuclei during irradiation. Good agreement was obtained between the experimental, the theoretical, and the simulation-based (analytical and directly) production yields. This study demonstrated that Monte Carlo provides a method for the design and optimization of targets for the radionuclide production purposes.

  11. Development of CNG direct injection (CNGDI) clean fuel system for extra power in small engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Yusoff; Shamsudeen, Azhari; Abdullah, Shahrir; Mahmood, Wan Mohd Faizal Wan

    2012-06-01

    A new design of fuel system for CNG engine with direct injection (CNGDI) was developed for a demonstration project. The development of the fuel system was done on the engine with cylinder head modifications, for fuel injector and spark plug openings included in the new cylinder head. The piston was also redesigned for higher compression ratio. The fuel rails and the regulators are also designed for the direct injection system operating at higher pressure about 2.0 MPa. The control of the injection timing for the direct injectors are also controlled by the Electronic Control Unit specially designed for DI by another group project. The injectors are selected after testing with the various injection pressures and spray angles. For the best performance of the high-pressure system, selection is made from the tests on single cylinder research engine (SCRE). The components in the fuel system have to be of higher quality and complied with codes and standards to secure the safety of engine for high-pressure operation. The results of the CNGDI have shown that better power output is produced and better emissions were achieved compared to the aspirated CNG engine.

  12. Early season spring small grains direct proportion estimation - Development and evaluation of a Landsat based methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phinney, D. E.; Trichel, M. C.

    1983-01-01

    The Inventory Technology Development (ITD) project of the Agriculture and Resources Inventory Surveys Through Aerospace Remote Sensing (AgRISTARS) program has developed an accurate, automated technology for early season estimation of spring small grains areal proportion from Landsat MSS data. The design criteria for an early season procedure included estimates available within the first 30 days of the growing season, low data processing/preprocessing requirements and no need for scene-to-scene registration. The prototype estimator which meets the design goals is based on a constrained linear model in which the observed spectral response of an entire scene is modeled as a linear combination of the major constituent elements in the scene. The procedure was evaluated over 100 sample segments collected for crop years 1976 through 1979 in the U.S. Northern Great Plains. Analysis of the test results indicated accuracy that compare favorably with both the automated at-harvest technologies tested during the FY81-82 AgRISTARS Spring Small Grains Pilot experiments and earlier analyst-intensive at-harvest technologies.

  13. Effective Practice in the Design of Directed Independent Learning Opportunities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Liz; Jones, Robert; Ottaway, James

    2015-01-01

    This study, commissioned by the HEA and the QAA focuses on directed independent learning practices in UK higher education. It investigates what stakeholders (including academic staff and students) have found to be the most effective practices in the inception, design, quality assurance and enhancement of directed independent learning and explores…

  14. Direct radiative effect by multicomponent aerosol over China

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Xin; Song, Yu; Zhao, Chun; Cai, Xuhui; Zhang, Hongsheng; Zhu, Tong

    2015-05-01

    The direct radiative effect (DRE) of multiple aerosol species (sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, black carbon (BC), organic carbon (OC), and mineral aerosol) and their spatiotemporal variations over China were investigated using a fully coupled meteorology–chemistry model (WRF-Chem) for the entire year of 2006. We made modifications to improve model performance, including updating land surface parameters, improving the calculation of transition metal-catalyzed oxidation of SO2, and adding in heterogeneous reactions between mineral aerosol and acid gases. The modified model well reproduced the magnitude, seasonal pattern, and spatial distribution of the measured meteorological conditions, concentrations of PM10 and its components, and aerosol optical depth (AOD). A diagnostic iteration method was used to estimate the overall DRE of aerosols and contributions from different components. At the land surface, all kinds of aerosol species reduced the incident net radiation flux with a total DRE of 10.2 W m-2 over China. Aerosols significantly warm the atmosphere with the national mean DRE of +10.8 W m-2. BC was the leading radiative-heating component (+8.7 W m-2), followed by mineral aerosol (+1.1 W m-2). At the top of the atmosphere (TOA), BC introduced the largest radiative perturbation (+4.5 W m-2), followed by sulfate (-1.4 W m-2). The overall perturbation of aerosols on radiation transfer is quite small over China, demonstrating the counterbalancing effect between scattering and adsorbing aerosols. Aerosol DRE at the TOA had distinct seasonality, generally with a summer maximum and winter minimum, mainly determined by mass loadings, hygroscopic growth, and incident radiation flux.

  15. Towards Small-Sized Long Tail Business with the Dual-Directed Recommendation System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Masakazu; Yamada, Takashi; Tsuda, Kazuhiko; Terano, Takao

    This paper describes a novel architecture to promote retail businesses using information recommendation systems. The main features of the architecture are 1) Dual-directed Recommendation system, 2) Portal site for three kinds of users: Producers, Retailers, and Consumers, which are considered to be Prosumers, and 3) Agent-based implementation. We have developed a web-based system DAIKOC (Dynamic Advisor for Information and Knowledge Oriented Communities) with the above architecture. In this paper, we focus on the recommendation functions to extract the items that will achieve the large sales in the future from the ID (IDentification)-POS (Point-Of-Sales) data.

  16. Terrestrial matter effects on reactor antineutrino oscillations at JUNO or RENO-50: how small is small?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yu-feng; Wang, Yi-fang; Xing, Zhi-zhong

    2016-09-01

    We have carefully examined, in both analytical and numerical ways, how small the terrestrial matter effects can be in a given medium-baseline reactor antineutrino oscillation experiment like JUNO or RENO-50. Taking the forthcoming JUNO experiment as an example, we show that the inclusion of terrestrial matter effects may reduce the sensitivity of the neutrino mass ordering measurement by and a neglect of such effects may shift the best-fit values of the flavor mixing angle θ12 and the neutrino mass-squared difference Δ21 by about 1σ to 2σ in the future data analysis. In addition, a preliminary estimate indicates that a 2σ sensitivity of establishing the terrestrial matter effects can be achieved for about 10 years of data taking at JUNO with the help of a suitable near detector implementation. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11135009, 11305193), the Strategic Priority Research Program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (XDA10010100) and the CAS Center for Excellence in Particle Physics

  17. Measurement of illite particle thickness using a direct Fourier transform of small-angle X-ray scattering data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shang, C.; Rice, J.A.; Eberl, D.D.; Lin, S.-J.

    2003-01-01

    It has been suggested that interstratified illite-smectite (I-S) minerals are composed of aggregates of fundamental particles. Many attempts have been made to measure the thickness of such fundamental particles, but each of the methods used suffers from its own limitations and uncertainties. Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) can be used to measure the thickness of particles that scatter X-rays coherently. We used SAXS to study suspensions of Na-rectorite and other illites with varying proportions of smectite. The scattering intensity (I) was recorded as a function of the scattering vector, q = (4 ??/??) sin(??/2), where ?? is the X-ray wavelength and ?? is the scattering angle. The experimental data were treated with a direct Fourier transform to obtain the pair distance distribution function (PDDF) that was then used to determine the thickness of illite particles. The Guinier and Porod extrapolation were used to obtain the scattering intensity beyond the experimental q, and the effects of such extrapolations on the PDDF were examined. The thickness of independent rectorite particles (used as a reference mineral) is 18.3 A??. The SAXS results are compared with those obtained by X-ray diffraction peak broadening methods. It was found that the power-law exponent (??) obtained by fitting the data in the region of q = 0.1 -0.6 nm-1 to the power law (I = Ioq-??) is a linear function of illite particle thickness. Therefore, illite particle thickness could be predicted by the linear relationship as long as the thickness is within the limit where ?? <4.0.

  18. Small-group decision making can be effective management tool.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, R

    1978-01-01

    One of the key components of effective management is the ability to make decisions. To more effectively assist hospital supervisors and managers in dealing with and making appropriate judgments, educators need to examine carefully the processes involved in decision making and how they impact on both the individual and the group. The following discussion of structured small-group decision making is adapted from an independent study of the literature undertaken by this author to dissect these processes and how they impact on the decisions made.

  19. Direct detection of the Yarkovsky effect by radar ranging to ateroid 6489 Golevka

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chesley, S. R.; Ostro, S. J.; Vokrouhlicky, D.; Capek, D.; Giorgini, J. D.; Nolan, M. C.; Margot, J. L.; Hine, A. A.; Benner, L. A. M.; Chamberlin, A. B.

    2003-01-01

    Radar ranging from Arecibo, Puerto Rico, to the 0.5-kilometer near-Earth asteroid 6489 Golevka unambiguously reveals a small nongravitational acceleration caused by the anisotropic thermal emission of absorbed sunlight. The magnitude of this perturbation, known as the Yarkovsky effect, is a function of the asteroid's mass and surface thermal characteristics. Direct detection of the Yarkovsky effect on asteroids will help constrain their physical properties, such as bulk density, and refine their orbital paths.

  20. Greenhouse Gas Sensing Using Small Unmanned Aerial Systems - Field Experiment Results and Future Directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubrey, A. D.; Christensen, L. E.; Brockers, R.; Thompson, D. R.

    2014-12-01

    Requirements for greenhouse gas point source detection and quantification often require high spatial resolution on the order of meters. These applications, which help close the gap in emissions estimate uncertainties, also demand sensing with high sensitivity and in a fashion that accounts for spatiotemporal variability on the order of seconds to minutes. Low-cost vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) small unmanned aerial systems (sUAS) provide a means to detect and identify the location of point source gas emissions while offering ease of deployment and high maneuverability. Our current fielded gas sensing sUAS platforms are able to provide instantaneous in situ concentration measurements at locations within line of sight of the operator. Recent results from field experiments demonstrating methane detection and plume characterization will be discussed here, including performance assessment conducted via a controlled release experiment in 2013. The logical extension of sUAS gas concentration measurement is quantification of flux rate. We will discuss the preliminary strategy for quantitative flux determination, including intrinsic challenges and heritage from airborne science campaigns, associated with this point source flux quantification. This system approach forms the basis for intelligent autonomous quantitative characterization of gas plumes, which holds great value for applications in commercial, regulatory, and safety environments.

  1. Facilitating Effects of Directive and Non-Directive Language on Toddler Language.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiStefano, Lynda A.; And Others

    This study examined the effects of maternal directive and nondirective styles of interaction on the emergence of verbal communicative intent in toddlers, and sought to understand the association between maternal interaction styles and young children's pragmatic acquisition. During free play, maternal utterances of 12 mother-child dyads, with…

  2. Local heterogeneity effects on small-sample worths

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, R.W.

    1986-01-01

    One of the parameters usually measured in a fast reactor critical assembly is the reactivity associated with inserting a small sample of a material into the core (sample worth). Local heterogeneities introduced by the worth measurement techniques can have a significant effect on the sample worth. Unfortunately, the capability is lacking to model some of the heterogeneity effects associated with the experimental technique traditionally used at ANL (the radial tube technique). It has been suggested that these effects could account for a large portion of what remains of the longstanding central worth discrepancy. The purpose of this paper is to describe a large body of experimental data - most of which has never been reported - that shows the effect of radial tube-related local heterogeneities.

  3. Small-scale experiments in STOVL ground effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corsiglia, Victor R.; Wardwell, Douglas A.; Kuhn, Richard E.

    1990-01-01

    A series of tests has been completed in which suckdown and fountain forces and pressures were measured on circular plates and twin-tandem-jet generic STOVL (short takeoff and vertical landing) configurations. The tests were conducted using a small-scale hover rig, for jet pressure ratios up to 6 and jet temperatures up to 700 F. The measured suckdown force on a circular plate with a central jet was greater than that found with a commonly used empirical prediction method. The present data showed better agreement with other sets of data. The tests of the generic STOVL configurations were conducted to provide force and pressure data with a parametric variation of parameters so that an empirical prediction method cold be developed. The effects of jet pressure ratio and temperature were found to be small. Lift improvement devices were shown to substantially reduce the net suckdown forces.

  4. Small-scale experiments in STOVL ground effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corsiglia, Victor R.; Wardwell, Douglas A.; Kuhn, Richard E.

    1991-01-01

    A series of tests was completed in which suckdown and fountain forces and pressures were measured on circular plates and twin-tandem-jet generic STOVL (short takeoff and vertical landing) configurations. The tests were conducted using a small-scale hover rig, for jet pressure ratios up to 6 and jet temperatures up to 700 F. The measured suckdown force on a circular plate with a central jet was greater than that found with a commonly used empirical prediction method. The present data showed better agreement with other sets of data. The tests of the generic STOVL configurations were conducted to provide force and pressure data with a parametric variation of parameters so that an empirical prediction method could be developed. The effects of jet pressure ratio and temperature were found to be small. Lift improvement devices were shown to substantially reduce the net suckdown forces.

  5. DIRECT OBSERVATIONS OF MAGNETIC RECONNECTION OUTFLOW AND CME TRIGGERING IN A SMALL ERUPTING SOLAR PROMINENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Reeves, Katharine K.; McCauley, Patrick I.; Tian, Hui

    2015-07-01

    We examine a small prominence eruption that occurred on 2014 May 1 at 01:35 UT and was observed by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrometer (IRIS) and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory. Pre- and post-eruption images were taken by the X-ray Telescope (XRT) on Hinode. Pre-eruption, a dome-like structure exists above the prominence, as demarcated by coronal rain. As the eruption progresses, we find evidence for reconnection between the prominence magnetic field and the overlying field. Fast flows are seen in AIA and IRIS, indicating reconnection outflows. Plane-of-sky flows of 300 km s{sup −1} are observed in the AIA 171 A channel along a potentially reconnected field line. IRIS detects intermittent fast line of sight flows of 200 km s{sup −1} coincident with the AIA flows. Differential emission measure calculations show heating at the origin of the fast flows. Post-eruption XRT images show hot loops probably due to reconfiguration of magnetic fields during the eruption and subsequent heating of plasma in these loops. Although there is evidence for reconnection above the prominence during the eruption, high spatial resolution images from IRIS reveal potential reconnection sites below the prominence. A height–time analysis of the erupting prominence shows a slow initial rise with a velocity of 0.4 km s{sup −1} followed by a rapid acceleration with a final velocity of 250 km s{sup −1}. Brightenings in IRIS during the transition between these two phases indicate the eruption trigger for the fast part of the eruption is likely a tether-cutting mechanism rather than a break-out mechanism.

  6. Modified habitats influence kelp epibiota via direct and indirect effects.

    PubMed

    Marzinelli, Ezequiel M; Underwood, Antony J; Coleman, Ross A

    2011-01-01

    Addition of man-made structures alters abiotic and biotic characteristics of natural habitats, which can influence abundances of biota directly and/or indirectly, by altering the ecology of competitors or predators. Marine epibiota in modified habitats were used to test hypotheses to distinguish between direct and indirect processes. In Sydney Harbour, kelps on pier-pilings supported greater covers of bryozoans, particularly of the non-indigenous species Membranipora membranacea, than found on natural reefs. Pilings influenced these patterns and processes directly due to the provision of shade and indirectly by altering abundances of sea-urchins which, in turn, affected covers of bryozoans. Indirect effects were more important than direct effects. This indicates that artificial structures affect organisms living on secondary substrata in complex ways, altering the biodiversity and indirectly affecting abundances of epibiota. Understanding how these components of habitats affect ecological processes is necessary to allow sensible prediction of the effects of modifying habitats on the ecology of organisms.

  7. Small Changes: Using Assessment to Direct Instructional Practices in Large-Enrollment Biochemistry Courses.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaoying; Lewis, Jennifer E; Loertscher, Jennifer; Minderhout, Vicky; Tienson, Heather L

    2017-01-01

    Multiple-choice assessments provide a straightforward way for instructors of large classes to collect data related to student understanding of key concepts at the beginning and end of a course. By tracking student performance over time, instructors receive formative feedback about their teaching and can assess the impact of instructional changes. The evidence of instructional effectiveness can in turn inform future instruction, and vice versa. In this study, we analyzed student responses on an optimized pretest and posttest administered during four different quarters in a large-enrollment biochemistry course. Student performance and the effect of instructional interventions related to three fundamental concepts-hydrogen bonding, bond energy, and pKa-were analyzed. After instructional interventions, a larger proportion of students demonstrated knowledge of these concepts compared with data collected before instructional interventions. Student responses trended from inconsistent to consistent and from incorrect to correct. The instructional effect was particularly remarkable for the later three quarters related to hydrogen bonding and bond energy. This study supports the use of multiple-choice instruments to assess the effectiveness of instructional interventions, especially in large classes, by providing instructors with quick and reliable feedback on student knowledge of each specific fundamental concept.

  8. Small Changes: Using Assessment to Direct Instructional Practices in Large-Enrollment Biochemistry Courses

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaoying; Lewis, Jennifer E.; Loertscher, Jennifer; Minderhout, Vicky; Tienson, Heather L.

    2017-01-01

    Multiple-choice assessments provide a straightforward way for instructors of large classes to collect data related to student understanding of key concepts at the beginning and end of a course. By tracking student performance over time, instructors receive formative feedback about their teaching and can assess the impact of instructional changes. The evidence of instructional effectiveness can in turn inform future instruction, and vice versa. In this study, we analyzed student responses on an optimized pretest and posttest administered during four different quarters in a large-enrollment biochemistry course. Student performance and the effect of instructional interventions related to three fundamental concepts—hydrogen bonding, bond energy, and pKa—were analyzed. After instructional interventions, a larger proportion of students demonstrated knowledge of these concepts compared with data collected before instructional interventions. Student responses trended from inconsistent to consistent and from incorrect to correct. The instructional effect was particularly remarkable for the later three quarters related to hydrogen bonding and bond energy. This study supports the use of multiple-choice instruments to assess the effectiveness of instructional interventions, especially in large classes, by providing instructors with quick and reliable feedback on student knowledge of each specific fundamental concept. PMID:28188280

  9. Direct observation of small cluster mobility and ripening. [during annealing of metal films on amorphous substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinemann, K.; Poppa, H.

    1975-01-01

    Direct evidence is reported for the simultaneous occurrence of Ostwald ripening and short-distance cluster mobility during annealing of discontinuous metal films on clean amorphous substrates. The annealing characteristics of very thin particulate deposits of silver on amorphized clean surfaces of single crystalline thin graphite substrates were studied by in-situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) under controlled environmental conditions (residual gas pressure of 10 to the minus 9th power torr) in the temperature range from 25 to 450 C. Sputter cleaning of the substrate surface, metal deposition, and annealing were monitored by TEM observation. Pseudostereographic presentation of micrographs in different annealing stages, the observation of the annealing behavior at cast shadow edges, and measurements with an electronic image analyzing system were employed to aid the visual perception and the analysis of changes in deposit structure recorded during annealing. Slow Ostwald ripening was found to occur in the entire temperature range, but the overriding surface transport mechanism was short-distance cluster mobility.

  10. Synthesis of stable ultra-small Cu nanoparticles for direct writing flexible electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; Chen, Minfang

    2014-01-01

    In this study, pure Cu nanoparticles (NPs) have been successfully synthesized and the Cu nano-ink was prepared for direct writing on photo paper using a roller pen. The tri-sodium citrate was used as initial reducing-cum-surfactant agent followed by hydrazine as a second massive reducing agent and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) as extra surfactant agent. From the XRD, TEM, and HR-TEM analyses, the synthesized particles are confirmed to be Cu in spherical shape with sizes range of 2.5 ± 1.0 nm. By analyzing the FT-IR spectroscopy and TGA curves, it was found that the obtained particles capped with tri-sodium citrate and CTAB layers are stable to oxidation up to the temperature 228 °C. The reduced size and enhanced air-stability of the Cu NPs result in an improved particle density upon sintering, which is mainly responsible for the increased conductivity of the Cu patterns. The resistivity of Cu patterns sintered in Ar at 160 °C for 2 h is 7.2 ± 0.6 μΩ cm, which is 4.40 times the bulk Cu resistivity. The drawn Cu lines exhibited excellent integrity and good conductivity, which were experimentally tested. Moreover, a Cu electrode and a sample RFID antenna were successfully made.

  11. Strain induced directional coarsening in nickel based superalloys: Investigation on kinetics using the small angle neutron scattering (SANS) technique

    SciTech Connect

    Veron, M.; Bastie, P.

    1997-08-01

    Using the small angle neutron scattering technique, the authors have observed rafting in nickel based single crystal superalloys. Kinetics of morphological evolution of the precipitates have been studied in situ. Therefore the authors used a special furnace designed for the ageing of prestrained specimens under a neutron beam. The evolution of both the precipitate aspect ratio and the distance between precipitates confirms the importance of strain in the directional coarsening process. Results are presented and discussed regarding kinetics and microstructural aspects. In such conditions, rafts seem to be different from those obtained after a creep test.

  12. A rapid, quantitative assay for direct detection of microRNAs and other small RNAs using splinted ligation

    PubMed Central

    Maroney, Patricia A.; Chamnongpol, Sangpen; Souret, Frédéric; Nilsen, Timothy W.

    2007-01-01

    The discovery and characterization of microRNAs (miRNAs) and other families of short RNAs has led to a rapid expansion of research directed at elucidating their expression patterns and regulatory functions. Here, we describe a convenient, sensitive, and straightforward method to detect and quantitate specific miRNA levels in unfractionated total RNA samples. The method, based on splinted ligation, does not require specialized equipment or any amplification step, and is significantly faster and more sensitive than Northern blotting. We demonstrate that the method can be used to detect various classes of small regulatory RNAs from different organisms. PMID:17456563

  13. Cost-Effective Icy Bodies Exploration using Small Satellite Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jonsson, Jonas; Mauro, David; Stupl, Jan; Nayak, Michael; Aziz, Jonathan; Cohen, Aaron; Colaprete, Anthony; Dono-Perez, Andres; Frost, Chad; Klamm, Benjamin; McCafferty, Julian; McKay, Chris; Sears, Derek; Soulage, Michael; Swenson, Jason; Weston, Sasha; Yang Yang, Fan

    2015-01-01

    It has long been known that Saturn's moon Enceladus is expelling water-rich plumes into space, providing passing spacecraft with a window into what is hidden underneath its frozen crust. Recent discoveries indicate that similar events could also occur on other bodies in the solar system, such as Jupiter's moon Europa and the dwarf planet Ceres in the asteroid belt. These plumes provide a possible giant leap forward in the search for organics and assessing habitability beyond Earth, stepping stones toward the long-term goal of finding extraterrestrial life. The United States Congress recently requested mission designs to Europa, to fit within a cost cap of $1B, much less than previous mission designs' estimates. Here, innovative cost-effective small spacecraft designs for the deep-space exploration of these icy worlds, using new and emerging enabling technologies, and how to explore the outer solar system on a budget below the cost horizon of a flagship mission, are investigated. Science requirements, instruments selection, rendezvous trajectories, and spacecraft designs are some topics detailed. The mission concepts revolve around a comparably small-sized and low-cost Plume Chaser spacecraft, instrumented to characterize the vapor constituents encountered on its trajectory. In the event that a plume is not encountered, an ejecta plume can be artificially created by a companion spacecraft, the Plume Maker, on the target body at a location timed with the passage of the Plume Chaser spacecraft. Especially in the case of Ceres, such a mission could be a great complimentary mission to Dawn, as well as a possible future Europa Clipper mission. The comparably small volume of the spacecraft enables a launch to GTO as a secondary payload, providing multiple launch opportunities per year. Plume Maker's design is nearly identical to the Plume Chaser, and fits within the constraints for a secondary payload launch. The cost-effectiveness of small spacecraft missions enables the

  14. Stimulus characteristics within directives: effects on accuracy of task completion.

    PubMed Central

    Richman, D M; Wacker, D P; Cooper-Brown, L J; Kayser, K; Crosland, K; Stephens, T J; Asmus, J

    2001-01-01

    Three experiments were conducted in an outpatient setting with young children who had been referred for treatment of noncompliant behavior and who had coexisting receptive language or receptive vocabulary difficulties. Experiment 1 studied differential responding of the participants to a brief hierarchical directive analysis (least-to-most complex stimulus prompts) to identify directives that functioned as discriminative stimuli for accurate responding. Experiment 1 identified distinct patterns of accurate responding relative to manipulation of directive stimulus characteristics. Experiment 2 demonstrated that directives identified as effective or ineffective in obtaining stimulus control of accurate responding during Experiment 1 continued to control accurate responding across play activities and academic tasks. Experiment 3 probed effects of the interaction between the type of directive (effective vs. ineffective) and the reinforcement contingency (differential reinforcement for attempts vs. differential reinforcement for accurate responses) on accurate task completion and disruptive behavior. Results suggested that behavioral escalation from inaccurate responding to disruptive behavior occurred only when ineffective directives were combined with differential reinforcement for accurate task completion. The overall results are discussed in terms of developing a methodology for identifying stimulus characteristics of directives that affect accurate responding. PMID:11678525

  15. Direct Digital Boiler Control Systems for the Navy Small Boiler Equipment.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-02-01

    codes , parity and dropout checks, check sums, high level data link control (HDLC) and keyboard response checking. 3. Display types-Typical are overview...Distributed Control can be cost-effective for as few as 8 control loops. Operator Mini-Station: Video Display The high scan-rate CRT otters a corn... high ana "* low alarm limits, the configurationfication-automatic ("A") or manual data than a Group Display (and is re- code and the filter time

  16. Analytical fuel property effects: Small combustors, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, T. G.; Monty, J. D.; Morton, H. L.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of non-standard aviation fuels on a typical small gas turbine combustor were studied and the effectiveness of design changes intended to counter the effects of these fuels was evaluated. The T700/CT7 turboprop engine family was chosen as being representative of the class of aircraft power plants desired for this study. Fuel properties, as specified by NASA, are characterized by low hydrogen content and high aromatics levels. No. 2 diesel fuel was also evaluated in this program. Results demonstrated the anticipated higher than normal smoke output and flame radiation intensity with resulting increased metal temperatures on the baseline T700 combustor. Three new designs were evaluated using the non standard fuels. The three designs incorporated enhanced cooling features and smoke reduction features. All three designs, when burning the broad specification fuels, exhibited metal temperatures at or below the baseline combustor temperatures on JP-5. Smoke levels were acceptable but higher than predicted.

  17. Use of Peltier effect for small signal amplification and conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ageyev, Y. I.; Akperov, M. M.; Kobakhidze, K. Z.; Nebuchinov, M. V.

    1984-04-01

    It is possible to use thermocouples operating as heat pumps with small temperature gradients to effect the control of elements whose properties are temperature dependent. This enables the construction of a number of electrical and optical signal transducers. The cooling or heating gain of a thermocouple used as a heat pump is proportional to the ratio of the cold or hot junction temperature to the temperature drop across the thermocouple. As this temperature gradient becomes quite small, the efficiency of such converters theoretically rises without limit. Under these conditions, the thermocouple can control any device whose properties change sharply in a narrow temperature range. Simple circuits for small signal amplification, frequency conversion, and detection were discussed. The gain of one such amplifier was plotted as a function of the input signal using various metal-semiconductor phase transition devices; the detection gain was plotted as a function of the input signal for a posistor and a metal-semiconductor phase transition device. Gains on the order of 100 and more were obtained with the latter. While such devices have the advantage of electrically isolating the input from the output, the speed is governed primarily by the rate of the thermal processes and is approximately inversely proportional to the square of thermocouple branch length. The speed is presently limited to tens of milliseconds, though with the transition to film technology, it may increase by a few orders of magnitude.

  18. Why is the electrocaloric effect so small in ferroelectrics?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzmán-Verri, G. G.; Littlewood, P. B.

    2016-06-01

    Ferroelectrics are attractive candidate materials for environmentally friendly solid state refrigeration free of greenhouse gases. Their thermal response upon variations of external electric fields is largest in the vicinity of their phase transitions, which may occur near room temperature. The magnitude of the effect, however, is too small for useful cooling applications even when they are driven close to dielectric breakdown. Insight from microscopic theory is therefore needed to characterize materials and provide guiding principles to search for new ones with enhanced electrocaloric performance. Here, we derive from well-known microscopic models of ferroelectricity meaningful figures of merit for a wide class of ferroelectric materials. Such figures of merit provide insight into the relation between the strength of the effect and the characteristic interactions of ferroelectrics such as dipolar forces. We find that the long range nature of these interactions results in a small effect. A strategy is proposed to make it larger by shortening the correlation lengths of fluctuations of polarization. In addition, we bring into question other widely used but empirical figures of merit and facilitate understanding of the recently observed secondary broad peak in the electrocalorics of relaxor ferroelectrics.

  19. Promoting Transfer: Effects of Self-Explanation and Direct Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rittle-Johnson, Bethany

    2006-01-01

    Explaining new ideas to oneself can promote transfer, but how and when such self-explanation is effective is unclear. This study evaluated whether self-explanation leads to lasting improvements in transfer success and whether it is more effective in combination with direct instruction or invention. Third- through fifth-grade children (ages 8-11;…

  20. Effect of Direct Grammar Instruction on Student Writing Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Lisa; Feng, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Grammar Instruction has an important role to play in helping students to speak and write more effectively. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of direct grammar instruction on the quality of student's writing skills. The participants in this study included 18 fifth grade students and two fifth grade teachers. Based on the results…

  1. GRIL-seq provides a method for identifying direct targets of bacterial small regulatory RNA by in vivo proximity ligation.

    PubMed

    Han, Kook; Tjaden, Brian; Lory, Stephen

    2016-12-22

    The first step in the post-transcriptional regulatory function of most bacterial small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs) is base pairing with partially complementary sequences of targeted transcripts. We present a simple method for identifying sRNA targets in vivo and defining processing sites of the regulated transcripts. The technique, referred to as global small non-coding RNA target identification by ligation and sequencing (GRIL-seq), is based on preferential ligation of sRNAs to the ends of base-paired targets in bacteria co-expressing T4 RNA ligase, followed by sequencing to identify the chimaeras. In addition to the RNA chaperone Hfq, the GRIL-seq method depends on the activity of the pyrophosphorylase RppH. Using PrrF1, an iron-regulated sRNA in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, we demonstrated that direct regulatory targets of this sRNA can readily be identified. Therefore, GRIL-seq represents a powerful tool not only for identifying direct targets of sRNAs in a variety of environments, but also for uncovering novel roles for sRNAs and their targets in complex regulatory networks.

  2. Mechanism of induction and suppression of antiviral immunity directed by virus-derived small RNAs in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Aliyari, Roghiyh; Wu, Qingfa; Li, Hong-Wei; Wang, Xiao-Hong; Li, Feng; Green, Lance D; Han, Cliff S; Li, Wan-Xiang; Ding, Shou-Wei

    2008-10-16

    The small RNA-directed viral immunity pathway in plants and invertebrates begins with the production by Dicer nuclease of virus-derived siRNAs (viRNAs), which guide specific antiviral silencing by Argonaute protein in an RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC). Molecular identity of the viral RNA precursor of viRNAs remains a matter of debate. Using Flock house virus (FHV) infection of Drosophila as a model, we show that replication of FHV positive-strand RNA genome produces an approximately 400 bp dsRNA from its 5' terminus that serves as the major Dicer-2 substrate. ViRNAs thus generated are loaded in Argonaute-2 and methylated at their 3' ends. Notably, FHV-encoded RNAi suppressor B2 protein interacts with both viral dsRNA and RNA replicase and inhibits production of the 5'-terminal viRNAs. Our findings, therefore, provide a model in which small RNA-directed viral immunity is induced during the initiation of viral progeny (+)RNA synthesis and suppressed by B2 inside the viral RNA replication complex.

  3. Vascular endothelial growth factor directly stimulates tumour cell proliferation in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Devery, Aoife M; Wadekar, Rekha; Bokobza, Sivan M; Weber, Anika M; Jiang, Yanyan; Ryan, Anderson J

    2015-09-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a key stimulator of physiological and pathological angiogenesis. VEGF signals primarily through VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2), a receptor tyrosine kinase whose expression is found predominantly on endothelial cells. The purpose of this study was to determine the role of VEGFR2 expression in NSCLC cells. NSCLC cells and tissue sections were stained for VEGFR2 expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Immunoblotting and ELISA were used to determine the activation and inhibition of VEGFR2 and its downstream signalling pathways. Five-day proliferation assays were carried out in the presence or absence of VEGF. IHC analysis of NSCLC demonstrated tumour cell VEGFR2 expression in 20% of samples. Immunoblot analysis showed expression of VEGFR2 protein in 3/8 NSCLC cell lines that correlated with VEGFR2 mRNA expression levels. VEGF-dependent VEGFR2 activation was apparent in NSCLC cells, and was associated with increased tumor cell proliferation. Cediranib treatment or siRNA against VEGFR2 inhibited VEGF-dependent increases in cell proliferation. Inhibition of VEGFR2 tyrosine kinase activity using cediranib was more effective than inhibition of AKT (MK2206) or MEK (AZD6244) for overcoming VEGFR2-driven cell proliferation. VEGF treatment did not affect cell survival following treatment with radiation, cisplatin, docetaxel or gemcitabine. Our data suggest that a subset of NSCLC tumour cells express functional VEGFR2 which can act to promote VEGF-dependent tumour cell growth. In this tumour subset, therapies targeting VEGFR2 signalling, such as cediranib, have the potential to inhibit both tumour cell proliferation and angiogenesis.

  4. [Correlation between shape and direction of small articular surface in lower lumbar vertebrae and degeneration of intervertebral disc].

    PubMed

    Tan, L; Bai, X; Li, D

    1997-01-01

    To assess the possible correlation between the shape and the direction of the small articular surface in the lower lumbar vertebrae and the degeneration of the intervertebral disc, we investigated with computed tomography (CT) and evaluated with statistics the small articular surface and the transverse interface-joint angle (TIFA) of the L4-5 and the L5-S1 in 152 cases who had normal or degenerative discs verified through CT, MRI or operation. The small articular surface was found arc in 69.1% of the L4-5 and in 23.0% of the L5-S1. The TIFA of the L4-5 was less than that of the L5-S1. There was no correlation between the ratio of degeneration of the intervertebral disc at the L4-5 and the TIFA of the L4-5 and the L5-S1, but the ratio of degeneration of the intervertebral disc at the L5-S1 had postive correlation with the TIFA of the L4-5, negative correlation with the TIFA of the L5-S1, and particular correlation with the TIFA of the L5-S1 and L4-5. These results suggest that the shape and direction of the lower lumbar facet joint are related to the lumbar degeneration of intervertebral disc and the causes of degeneration at the L4-5 disc differ from those at the L5-S1 disc in biomechanics.

  5. Small satellite multi mission C2 for maximum effect

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, E.; Medina, O.; Lane, C.R.; Kirkham, A.; Ivancic, W.; Jones, B.; Risty, R.

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses US Air Force, US Army, US Navy, and NASA demonstrations based around the Virtual Mission Operations Center (VMOC) and its application in fielding a Multi Mission Satellite Operations Center (MMSOC) designed to integrate small satellites into the inherently tiered system environment of operations. The intent is to begin standardizing the spacecraft to ground interfaces needed to reduce costs, maximize space effects to the user, and allow the generation of Tactics, Techniques and Procedures (TTPs) that lead to Responsive Space employment. Combining the US Air Force/Army focus of theater command and control of payloads with the US Navy's user collaboration and FORCEnet consistent approach lays the groundwork for the fundamental change needed to maximize responsive space effects.

  6. Trapping effects in inflation: Blue spectrum at small scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bugaev, Edgar; Klimai, Peter

    2016-07-01

    We consider the inflationary model in which the inflaton ϕ couples to another scalar field χ via the interaction g2(ϕ -ϕ0)2χ2 with a small coupling constant g (g2˜10-7). We assume that there is a sequence of "trapping points" ϕ0 i along the inflationary trajectory where particles of the χ field become massless and are rather effectively produced. We calculate the power spectrum of inflaton field fluctuations originating from a backreaction of χ particles produced using the Schwinger's "in-in" formalism. We show that the primary curvature power spectrum produced by these backreaction effects is blue, which leads to a strong overproduction of primordial black holes (PBHs) in the subsequent radiation era.

  7. Kinematics invariance in multi-directional complex movements in free space: effect of changing initial direction.

    PubMed

    Cheron, G; Draye, J P; Bengoetxea, A; Dan, B

    1999-04-01

    We investigated in normal human subjects the effect of changing the initial direction on the kinematic properties of figure '8' movement performed as fast as possible by the right arm extended in free space. To this end, the motion of the index finger was monitored by the ELITE system. The figure '8' movement was characterized by a complex tangential velocity profile (Vt) presenting 5 bell-shaped components. It was found that the temporal segmentation following Vt was not significantly different, whatever the initial direction of the movement. The decomposition of Vt into different velocity profiles with respect to vertical (3 phases, Iy-IIIy) and horizontal (5 phases, Iz-Vz) directions showed a significant relationship between the amplitude and the maximal velocity for all the different phases (except the IIy phase), which demonstrated a good conservation of the Isochrony Principle. However, we showed that the transition between the clockwise and counter-clockwise loop (inflection point) induced greater variability in the vertical velocity profile than in the horizontal one. Moreover, some parameters such as the maximal velocity of Iy and the movement amplitude of the last phases (IIIy and Vz) showed significant changes depending on the initial direction. A highly significant positive correlation was observed between the instantaneous curvature and angular velocity. This was expressed by a power law similar to that previously describe for other types of movement. Furthermore, it was found that this covariation between geometrical and kinematic properties of the trajectory is not dependent on the initial direction of movement. In conclusion, these results support the idea that the fast execution in different directions of a figure '8' movement is mainly controlled by two types of invariant commands. The first one is reflected in the 2/3 power law between angular velocity and curvature and the second one is represented by a segmented tangential velocity profile.

  8. Effect of cavitation in high-pressure direct injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aboulhasanzadeh, Bahman; Johnsen, Eric

    2015-11-01

    As we move toward higher pressures for Gasoline Direct Injection and Diesel Direct Injection, cavitation has become an important issue. To better understand the effect of cavitation on the nozzle flow and primary atomization, we use a high-order accurate Discontinuous Galerkin approach using multi-GPU parallelism to simulate the compressible flow inside and outside the nozzle. Phase change is included using the six-equations model. We investigate the effect of nozzle geometry on cavitation inside the injector and on primary atomization outside the nozzle.

  9. [Effective laws for tobacco control: EU directives and Italian legislation].

    PubMed

    Charrier, Lorena; Piccinelli, Cristiano; Coppo, Alessandro; Di Stefano, Francesca; D'Elia, Paolo; Molinar, Roberta; Senore, Carlo; Giordano, Livia; Segnan, Nereo

    2006-01-01

    Effective tobacco control policies include law issuing: bans/restrictions on smoking in public areas and workplaces, increasing of taxes on tobacco products, bans on advertising of tobacco products, warning labels on cigarette boxes. For some of these policies the European Union (EU) has introduced specific directives that EU member states have to put into law. This paper briefly presents literature data, EU directives and the laws consequently issued in Italy. The importance of standardizing European legislation, especially for those policies that are not enforced by EU directives is also discussed. In Italy and in some other European countries smoking is forbidden in public and work-places, despite no EU directive. The positive impact of this ban in these countries suggests that it should be considered a priority in the European policies against tobacco in order to reduce the gap between literature recommendations and actions.

  10. Cost effective propulsion systems for small satellites using butane propellant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbon, D.; Underwood, C.; Sweeting, M.; Amri, R.

    2002-07-01

    This paper will describe the work performed at the Surrey Space Centre to produce cost effective propulsion systems for small spacecraft with relatively low deltaV (ΔV) requirements. Traditionally, cold gas nitrogen systems have been used for this type of application, however they have high storage volume requirements. This can be a problem on small spacecraft, which are typically volume limited. An alternative solution is to use liquefied gases, which store as liquids, hence have reasonable density levels, and can be used in a cold gas thruster. At the Surrey Space Centre, butane has been selected as the propellant of choice. Although it has slightly lower specific impulse performance than nitrogen, it has a significantly higher storage density and it stores at a very low pressure, hence no regulation system is required. On 28 th June 2000 Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd (SSTL) launched it first nanosatellite SNAP-1. This 6.5kg spacecraft was equipped with a small cold gas propulsion system utilising 32.6 grams of butane propellant. During the propulsion system operation phase the spacecraft's semi major axis was raised by nearly 4 kilometers using the propulsion system. The design of the propulsion system will be described and the low cost features highlighted. Telemetry data will be used to describe the propulsion operations and an overall mission specific impulse will be derived. SSTL are currently under contract to build three Earth observation spacecraft for a Disaster Monitoring Constellation (DMC). Each spacecraft will weigh approx 100 kg and have a ΔV requirement of 10 m/sec. A butane system has been designed and manufactured to meet the requirements of these spacecraft. The system is based very much on the flight heritage of the SNAP-1 system, with the addition of greater propellant storage capacity. The lessons learnt from the SNAP-1 operation will be reviewed and the resulting design improvements on the DMC propulsion systems will be detailed.

  11. Rockot - a new cost effective launcher for small satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosenkis, Regina

    1996-01-01

    Daimler-Benz Aerospace of Germany and the Russian Khrunichev State Research and Production Space Center have formed a jointly owned EUROCKOT Launch Services GmbH to offer worldwide cost effective launch services for the ROCKOT launch vehicle. ROCKOT, produced by Khrunichev, builder of the famous PROTON launcher, aims at the market of small and medium size satellites ranging from 300 to 1800 kg to be launched into low earth or sunsynchronous orbits. These comprize scientific, earth observation and polar meteorological satellites as well as the new generation of small communication satellites in low earth orbits, known as the ``Constellations''. ROCKOT is a three stage liquid propellant launch vehicle, composed of a former Russian SS 19 strategic missile, which has been withdrawn from military use, and a highly sophisticated, flight-proven upper stage named Breeze, which is particularly suited for a variety of civic and commercial space applications. Usable payload envelope has a length of 4.75 meters and a maximum diameter of 2.26 meters for accomodating the payload within the payload fairing. ROCKOT can also accomodate multiple payloads which can be deployed into the same or different orbits. So far ROCKOT has been successfully launched three times from Baikonur. The commercial launch services on ROCKOT from the Plesetsk launch site, Russia, will begin in 1997 and will be available worldwide at a highly competitive price.

  12. Correlation effects on the properties of small cobalt clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hancock, Yvette; Iäs, Mari

    2009-03-01

    Demands for higher-density magnetic storage media and smaller memory devices require atomic-scale magnetic components with stable magnetic properties. One such candidate for this application is a small transition metal cluster. The magnetic properties of transition metal clusters are very sensitive to the geometry of the cluster, the local atomic and structural environments, and to the system size. In this work, the GGA + U DFT approach is used for the first time to study the system properties of small cobalt clusters consisting of 2 to 5 atoms. Previous studies using DFT and tight-binding approaches have been found to overestimate the binding energies, dissociation energies and vibrational frequencies of the clusters against their known experimental values. By including a Hubbard U correction between 2 -- 3 eV, the DFT method can then be fitted to reproduce the experimental results, thereby improving upon previous theoretical descriptions of these systems. The effect of U on the calculated magnetic and structural properties of the clusters is also discussed.

  13. Differential geodetic stereo SAR with TerraSAR-X by exploiting small multi-directional radar reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gisinger, Christoph; Willberg, Martin; Balss, Ulrich; Klügel, Thomas; Mähler, Swetlana; Pail, Roland; Eineder, Michael

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we report on the direct positioning of small multi-directional radar reflectors, so-called octahedrons, with the synthetic aperture radar (SAR) satellite TerraSAR-X. Its highest resolution imaging mode termed staring spotlight enables the use of such octahedron reflectors with a dimension of only half a meter, but still providing backscatter equivalent to 1-2 cm observation error. Four octahedrons were deployed at Wettzell geodetic observatory, and observed by TerraSAR-X with 12 acquisitions in three different geometries. By applying our least squares stereo SAR algorithm already tested with common trihedral corner reflectors (CRs), and introducing a novel differential extension using one octahedron as reference point, the coordinates of the remaining octahedrons were directly retrieved in the International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF). Contrary to our standard processing, the differential approach does not require external corrections for the atmospheric path delays and the geodynamic displacements, rendering it particularly useful for joint geodetic networks employing SAR and GNSS. In this paper, we present and discuss both methods based on results when applying them to the aforementioned Wettzell data set of the octahedrons. The comparison with the independently determined reference coordinates confirms the positioning accuracy with 2-5 cm for the standard approach, and 2-3 cm for the differential processing. Moreover, we present statistical uncertainty estimates of the observations and the positioning solutions, which are additionally provided by our parameter estimation algorithms. The results also include our 1.5 m CR available at Wettzell, and the outcomes clearly demonstrate the advantage of the multi-directional octahedrons over conventional CRs for global positioning applications with SAR.

  14. Directions of Effects between Adolescent Psychopathic Traits and Parental Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salihovic, Selma; Kerr, Margaret; Ozdemir, Metin; Pakalniskiene, Vilmante

    2012-01-01

    The present study examined the directions of effects between adolescent psychopathic traits and parental behaviors. The data are from a community-based cohort-sequential study. Data were collected annually over 4 years. Participants were 875 adolescents, aged 13-15 at Time 1, and we analyzed their reports of negative and positive parental…

  15. Direct and Extended Vocabulary Instruction in Kindergarten: Investigating Transfer Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coyne, Michael D.; McCoach, D. Betsy; Loftus, Susan; Zipoli, Richard, Jr.; Ruby, Maureen; Crevecoeur, Yvel C.; Kapp, Sharon

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy of an 18-week program of direct and extended vocabulary instruction with kindergarten students on both proximal measures of target word knowledge and transfer measures of generalized language and literacy. A second purpose was to examine whether treatment effects would be moderated by…

  16. Effects of Route Guidance Systems on Small-World Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jian-Jun; Sun, Hui-Jun; Gao, Zi-You; Li, Shu-Bin

    The route guidance systems (RGS) are efficient in alleviating traffic congestion and reducing transit time of transportation networks. This paper studies the effects of RGS on performance of variably weighted small-world networks. The properties of the average shortest path length, the maximum degree, and the largest betweenness, as important indices for characterizing the network structure in complex networks, are simulated. Results show that there is an optimal guided rate of RGS to minimize the total system cost and the average shortest path length, and proper RGS can reduce the load of the node with maximum degree or largest betweenness. In addition, we found that the load distribution of nodes guided by RGS decay as the power laws which is very important for us to understand and control traffic congestion feasible.

  17. Analytical fuel property effects, small combustors, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, J. D.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of nonstandard aviation fuels on a typical small gas turbine combustor was analyzed. The T700/CT7 engine family was chosen as being representative of the class of aircraft power plants desired. Fuel properties, as specified by NASA, are characterized by low hydrogen content and high aromatics levels. Higher than normal smoke output and flame radiation intensity for the current T700 combustor which serves as a baseline were anticipated. It is, therefore, predicted that out of specification smoke visibility and higher than normal shell temperatures will exist when using NASA ERBS fuels with a consequence of severe reduction in cyclic life. Three new designs are proposed to compensate for the deficiencies expected with the existing design. They have emerged as the best of the eight originally proposed redesigns or combinations thereof. After the five choices that were originally made by NASA on the basis of competing performance factors, General Electric narrowed the field to the three proposed.

  18. Modified Habitats Influence Kelp Epibiota via Direct and Indirect Effects

    PubMed Central

    Marzinelli, Ezequiel M.; Underwood, Antony J.; Coleman, Ross A.

    2011-01-01

    Addition of man-made structures alters abiotic and biotic characteristics of natural habitats, which can influence abundances of biota directly and/or indirectly, by altering the ecology of competitors or predators. Marine epibiota in modified habitats were used to test hypotheses to distinguish between direct and indirect processes. In Sydney Harbour, kelps on pier-pilings supported greater covers of bryozoans, particularly of the non-indigenous species Membranipora membranacea, than found on natural reefs. Pilings influenced these patterns and processes directly due to the provision of shade and indirectly by altering abundances of sea-urchins which, in turn, affected covers of bryozoans. Indirect effects were more important than direct effects. This indicates that artificial structures affect organisms living on secondary substrata in complex ways, altering the biodiversity and indirectly affecting abundances of epibiota. Understanding how these components of habitats affect ecological processes is necessary to allow sensible prediction of the effects of modifying habitats on the ecology of organisms. PMID:21755011

  19. Parent socialization effects in different cultures: significance of directive parenting.

    PubMed

    Sorkhabi, Nadia

    2012-06-01

    In this article, the controversy of divergent findings in research on parental socialization effects in different cultures is addressed. Three explanations intended to address divergent findings of socialization effects in different cultures, as advanced by researchers who emphasize cultural differences, are discussed. These include cultural differences in socialization values and goals of parents, parental emotional and cognitive characteristics associated with parenting styles, and adolescents' interpretations or evaluations of their parents' parenting styles. The empirical evidence for and against each of these arguments is examined and an alternative paradigm for understanding and empirical study of developmental outcomes associated with parenting styles in different cultures is suggested. Baumrind's directive parenting style is presented as an alternative to the authoritarian parenting style in understanding the positive developmental effects associated with "strict" parenting in cultures said to have a collectivist orientation. Directions for research on the three explanations are mentioned.

  20. A Flexible Stent with Small Intestinal Submucosa Covering for Direct Intrahepatic Portocaval Shunt: Experimental Pilot Study in Swine

    SciTech Connect

    Niyyati, Mahtab; Petersen, Bryan D.; Pavcnik, Dusan Uchida, Barry T.; Timmermans, Hans A.; Hiraki, Takao; Wu Renghong; Brountzos, Elias; Keller, Frederick S.; Roesch, Josef

    2005-04-15

    The suitability of the flexible sandwich Zilver stent-graft (SZSG) with a biologically active tissue layer (small intestinal submucosa) for creation of the intravascular ultrasound (IVUS)-guided direct intrahepatic portocaval shunt (DIPS) was explored in six young swine in a search for a flexible system to replace the rigid polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) stent originally used by this group with limited success. The portal vein was punctured from the inferior vena cava through the caudate lobe of the liver using IVUS guidance. After balloon dilation of the puncture tract, DIPS was successfully created in all animals with use of an SZSG 9 mm in diameter and 6 cm or 8 cm long. Only one DIPS remained well patent at 14 days when the animal had to be killed because of encephalopathy. DIPS in the other five animals were found to be either severely stenosed (3 animals) or occluded (2 animals) at 4 weeks due to accelerated formation of neointimal hyperplasia (NIH) in the liver parenchymal portion of the shunt and superimposed thrombosis. The lack of high pressure in the portal system contributed to early endograft closure. The flexible stent and the covering fail badly. The reason for this could be due to either component. More work is required to find a reliable flexible system with long-term patency. Exploration of the IVUS-guided direct extrahepatic portocaval shunt is suggested.

  1. Effects of directed and kinetic energy weapons on spacecraft

    SciTech Connect

    Fraas, A P

    1986-12-01

    The characteristics of the various directed energy beams are reviewed, and their damaging effects on typical materials are examined for a wide range of energy pulse intensities and durations. Representative cases are surveyed, and charts are presented to indicate regions in which damage to spacecraft structures, particularly radiators for power plants, would be likely. The effects of kinetic energy weapons, such as bird-shot, are similarly examined. The charts are then applied to evaluate the effectiveness of various measures designed to reduce the vulnerability of spacecraft components, particularly nuclear electric power plants.

  2. Jointed magnetic skyrmion lattices at a small-angle grain boundary directly visualized by advanced electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Takao; So, Yeong-Gi; Kohno, Yuji; Sawada, Hidetaka; Ishikawa, Ryo; Ikuhara, Yuichi; Shibata, Naoya

    2016-01-01

    The interactions between magnetic skyrmions and structural defects, such as edges, dislocations, and grain boundaries (GBs), which are all considered as topological defects, will be important issues when magnetic skyrmions are utilized for future memory device applications. To investigate such interactions, simultaneous visualization of magnetic skyrmions and structural defects at high spatial resolution, which is not feasible by conventional techniques, is essential. Here, taking advantages of aberration-corrected differential phase-contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy, we investigate the interaction of magnetic skyrmions with a small-angle GB in a thin film of FeGe1−xSix. We found that the magnetic skyrmions and the small-angle GB can coexist each other, but a domain boundary (DB) was formed in the skyrmion lattice along the small-angle GB. At the core of the DB, unexpectedly deformed magnetic skrymions, which appear to be created by joining two portions of magnetic skyrmions in the adjacent lattices, were formed to effectively compensate misorientations between the two adjacent magnetic skyrmion lattices. These observations strongly suggest the flexible nature of individual magnetic skyrmions, and also the significance of defect engineering for future device applications. PMID:27775056

  3. Small Beneficial Effect of Caffeinated Energy Drink Ingestion on Strength.

    PubMed

    Collier, Nora B; Hardy, Michelle A; Millard-Stafford, Mindy L; Warren, Gordon L

    2016-07-01

    Collier, NB, Hardy, MA, Millard-Stafford, ML, and Warren, GL. Small beneficial effect of caffeinated energy drink ingestion on strength. J Strength Cond Res 30(7): 1862-1870, 2016-Because caffeine ingestion has been found to increase muscle strength, our aim was to determine whether caffeine when combined with other potential ergogenic ingredients, such as those in commercial energy drinks, would have a similar effect. Fifteen young healthy subjects were used in a double-blind, repeated-measures experimental design. Each subject performed 3 trials, ingesting either a caffeinated energy drink, an uncaffeinated version of the drink, or a placebo drink. The interpolated twitch procedure was used to assess maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) strength, electrically evoked strength, and percent muscle activation during MVIC of the knee extensors both before and after drink ingestion, and after a fatiguing bout of contractions; electromyographic (EMG) amplitude of the knee extensors during MVIC was also assessed. The mean (±SE) change in MVIC strength from before to after drink ingestion was significantly greater for the caffeinated energy drink compared with placebo [+5.0 (±1.7) vs. -0.5 (±1.5)%] and the difference between the drinks remained after fatigue (p = 0.015); the strength changes for the uncaffeinated energy drink were not significantly different from those of the other 2 drinks at any time. There was no significant effect of drink type on the changes in electrically evoked strength, percent muscle activation, and EMG from before to after drink ingestion. This study indicates that a caffeinated energy drink can increase MVIC strength but the effect is modest and the strength increase cannot be attributed to increased muscle activation. Whether the efficacy of energy drinks can be attributed solely to caffeine remains unclear.

  4. Spin Rate Distribution of Small Asteroids Shaped by YORP Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pravec, Petr

    2008-09-01

    We studied a distribution of spin rates of main belt/Mars crossing (MB/MC) asteroids with diameters 3-15 km using data obtained within the Photometric Survey of Asynchronous Binary Asteroids (Pravec et al. 2008). We found that the spin distribution of the small asteroids is uniform in the range from f = 1 to 9.5 d-1, and there is an excess of slow rotators with f < 1 d-1. The observed distribution appears to be controlled by the Yarkovsky-O'Keefe-Radzievskii-Paddack (YORP) effect. The magnitude of the excess of slow rotators is related to the residence time of slowed down asteroids in the excess and the rate of spin rate change outside the excess. We estimated a median YORP spin rate change of 0.022 d-1/Myr for asteroids in our sample (i.e., a median time in which the spin rate changes by 1 d-1 is 45 Myr), thus the residence time of slowed down asteroids in the excess is 110 Myr. The spin rate distribution of near-Earth asteroids (NEAs) with sizes in the range 0.2-3 km ( 5-times smaller in median diameter than the MB/MC asteroids sample) shows a similar excess of slow rotators, but there is also a concentration of NEAs at fast spin rates with f = 9-10 d-1. The concentration at fast spin rates is correlated with a narrower distribution of spin rates of primaries of binary systems among NEAs; the difference may be due to the apparently more evolved population of binaries among MB/MC asteroids. Reference: Pravec, P., and 30 colleagues, 2008. Spin rate distribution of small asteroids. Icarus, in press. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.icarus.2008.05.012

  5. Small scale turbulence and the finite Reynolds number effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonia, R. A.; Djenidi, L.; Danaila, L.; Tang, S. L.

    2017-02-01

    Failure to recognize the importance of the finite Reynolds number effect on small scale turbulence has, by and large, resulted in misguided assessments of the first two hypotheses of Kolmogorov ["Local structure of turbulence in an incompressible fluid for very large Reynolds numbers," Dokl. Akad. Nauk SSSR 30, 299-303 (1941)] or K41 as well as his third hypothesis [A. N. Kolmogorov, "A refinement of previous hypotheses concerning the local structure of turbulence in a viscous incompressible fluid at high Reynolds number," J. Fluid Mech. 13, 82-85 (1962)] or K62. As formulated by Kolmogorov, all three hypotheses require local isotropy to be valid and the Reynolds number to be very large. In the context of the first hypothesis, there is now strong evidence to suggest that this requirement can be significantly relaxed, at least for dissipative scales and relatively low order moments of the velocity structure function. As the scale increases, the effect of the large scale motion on these moments becomes more prominent and higher Reynolds numbers are needed before K41 and K62 can be tested unambiguously.

  6. Effect of spine hardware on small spinal stereotactic radiosurgery dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin; Yang, James N.; Li, Xiaoqiang; Tailor, Ramesh; Vassilliev, Oleg; Brown, Paul; Rhines, Laurence; Chang, Eric

    2013-10-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) modeling of a 6 MV photon beam was used to study the dose perturbation from a titanium rod 5 mm in diameter in various small fields range from 2 × 2 to 5 × 5 cm2. The results showed that the rod increased the dose to water by ˜6% at the water-rod interface because of electron backscattering and decreased the dose by ˜7% in the shadow of the rod because of photon attenuation. The Pinnacle3 treatment planning system calculations matched the MC results at the depths more than 1 cm past the rod when the correct titanium density of 4.5 g cm-3 was used, but significantly underestimated the backscattering dose at the water-rod interface. A CT-density table with a top density of 1.82 g cm-3 (cortical bone) is a practical way to reduce the dosimetric error from the artifacts by preventing high density assignment to them, but can underestimates the attenuation by the titanium rod by 6%. However, when multi-beam with intensity modulation is used in actual patient spinal stereotactic radiosurgery treatment, the dosimetric effect of assigning 4.5 instead of 1.82 g cm-3 to titanium implants is complicated. It ranged from minimal effect to 2% dose difference affecting 15% target volume in the study. When hardware is in the beam path, density override to the titanium hardware is recommended.

  7. The study of effects of small perturbations on chaotic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Grebogi, C. . Lab. for Plasma Research); Yorke, J.A. . Inst. for Physical Science and Technology)

    1990-12-01

    This report discusses the following topics on small perturbations on chaotic systems: controlling chaos; shadowing and noise reduction; chaotic scattering; random maps; magnetic dynamo; and aids transmission. (LSP)

  8. SU-E-T-757: TMRs Calculated From PDDs Versus the Direct Measurements for Small Field SRS Cones

    SciTech Connect

    Li, H; Zhong, H; Song, K; Qin, Y; Snyder, K; Gordon, J; Chetty, I; Wen, N

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the variation of TMR for SRS cones obtained by TMR scanning, calculation from PDDs, and point measurements. The obtained TMRs were also compared to the representative data from the vendor. Methods: TMRs for conical cones of 4, 5, 7.5, 10, 12.5, 15, and 17.5 mm diameter (jaws set to 5×5 cm) were obtained for 6X FFF and 10X FFF energies on a Varian Edge linac. TMR scanning was performed with a Sun Nuclear 3D scanner and Edge detector at 100 cm SDD. TMR point measurements were measured with a Wellhofer tank and Edge detector, at multiple depths from 0.5 to 20 cm and 100 cm SDD. PDDs for converting to TMR were scanned with a Wellhofer system and SFD detector. The formalism of converting PDD to TMR, given in Khan’s book (4th Edition, p.161) was applied. Sp values at dmax were obtained by measuring Scp and Sc of the cones (jaws set to 5×5 cm) using the Edge detector, and normalized to the 10×10 cm field. Results: Along the central axis beyond dmax, the RMS and maximum percent difference of TMRs obtained with different methods were as follows: (a) 1.3% (max=3.5%) for the calculated TMRs from PDDs versus direct scanning; (b) 1.2% (max=3.3%) for direct scanning versus point measurement; (c) 1.8% (max=5.1%) for the calculated versus point measurements; (d) 1.0% (max=3.6%) for direct scanning versus vendor data; (e) 1.6% (max=7.2%) for the calculated versus vendor data. Conclusion: The overall accuracy of TMRs calculated from PDDs was comparable with that of direct scanning. However, the uncertainty at depths greater than 20 cm, increased up to 5% when compared to point measurements. This issue must be considered when developing a beam model for small field SRS planning using cones.

  9. Effect of Speed (Centrifugal Load) on Gear Crack Propagation Direction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, David G.

    2001-01-01

    The effect of rotational speed (centrifugal force) on gear crack propagation direction was explored. Gears were analyzed using finite element analysis and linear elastic fracture mechanics. The analysis was validated with crack propagation experiments performed in a spur gear fatigue rig. The effects of speed, rim thickness, and initial crack location on gear crack propagation direction were investigated. Crack paths from the finite element method correlated well with those deduced from gear experiments. For the test gear with a backup ratio (rim thickness divided by tooth height) of nib = 0.5, cracks initiating in the tooth fillet propagated to rim fractures when run at a speed of 10,000 rpm and became tooth fractures for speeds slower than 10,000 rpm for both the experiments and anal sis. From additional analysis, speed had little effect on crack propagation direction except when initial crack locations were near the tooth/rim fracture transition point for a given backup ratio. When at that point, higher speeds tended to promote rim fracture while lower speeds (or neglecting centrifugal force) produced tooth fractures.

  10. Direct and indirect effects of southern flounder predation on a spot population: Experimental and model analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Crowder, L.B.; Wright, R.A.; Martin, T.H.; Rice, J.A. . Dept. of Zoology); Rose, K.A. )

    1992-01-01

    We have previously shown that southern flounder (Paralichthys lethostigma Jordan and Gilbert) influence the survival and size-distribution of spot (Leiostomus xanthurus Lafayette) and other small estuarine fishes in experimental ponds. In this paper, we seek to determine whether these of effects can be accounted for by direct size-dependent predation or if there is also evidence for indirect behavioral effects on spot foraging which might alter their survival or population size structure. In our experiment, spot were allowed to grow in the presence and absence of southern flounder in an experimental estuarine pond for 101 days. Each treatment was replicated three times. We also apply a recently published simulation model of the flounder-spot interaction to this experiment to independently test the model and to estimate the direct effects of flounder predation on spot survival and size structure.

  11. Direct mapping of nuclear shell effects in the heaviest elements.

    PubMed

    Minaya Ramirez, E; Ackermann, D; Blaum, K; Block, M; Droese, C; Düllmann, Ch E; Dworschak, M; Eibach, M; Eliseev, S; Haettner, E; Herfurth, F; Heßberger, F P; Hofmann, S; Ketelaer, J; Marx, G; Mazzocco, M; Nesterenko, D; Novikov, Yu N; Plaß, W R; Rodríguez, D; Scheidenberger, C; Schweikhard, L; Thirolf, P G; Weber, C

    2012-09-07

    Quantum-mechanical shell effects are expected to strongly enhance nuclear binding on an "island of stability" of superheavy elements. The predicted center at proton number Z = 114, 120, or 126 and neutron number N = 184 has been substantiated by the recent synthesis of new elements up to Z = 118. However, the location of the center and the extension of the island of stability remain vague. High-precision mass spectrometry allows the direct measurement of nuclear binding energies and thus the determination of the strength of shell effects. Here, we present such measurements for nobelium and lawrencium isotopes, which also pin down the deformed shell gap at N = 152.

  12. Opinion dynamics within a virtual small group: the stubbornness effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guazzini, Andrea; Cini, Alessandro; Bagnoli, Franco; Ramasco, José

    2015-09-01

    The modeling of opinion dynamics is social systems has attracted a good deal of attention in the last decade. Even though based on intuition and observation, the mechanisms behind many of these models need solid empirical grounding. In this work, we investigate the relation among subjective variables (such as the personality), the dynamics of the affinity network dynamics, the communication patterns emerging throughout the social interactions and the opinions dynamics in a series of experiments with five small groups of ten people each. In order to ignite the discussion, the polemic topic of animal experimentation was proposed. The groups essentially polarized in two factions with a set of stubborn individuals (those not changing their opinions in time) playing the role of anchors. Our results suggest that the different layers present in the group dynamics (i.e., individual level, group dynamics and meso-communication) are deeply intermingled, specifically the stubbornness effect appears to be related to the dynamical features of the network topologies, and only in an undirected way to the personality of the participants.

  13. Stochastic Control Problems where Small Intervention Costs Have Big Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Oksendal, B.

    1999-11-15

    We study an impulse control problem where the cost of interfering in a stochastic system with an impulse of size {zeta} element of R is given by c+{lambda} vertical bar {zeta} vertical bar , where c and {lambda} are positive constants. We call {lambda} the proportional cost coefficient and c the intervention cost . We find the value/cost function V{sub c} for this problem for each c>0 and we show that lim{sub c{sup yields}{sub 0}+}V{sub c}=W , where W is the value function for the corresponding singular stochastic control problem. Our main result is that dV{sub c}/dc = {infinity} at c=0. This illustrates that the introduction of an intervention cost c>0 , however small, into a system can have a big effect on the value function: the increase in the value function is in no proportion to the increase in c (from c=0 )

  14. Brisk and Effective Fluency Instruction for Small Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Judith K.

    2012-01-01

    Fluency is known as the bridge between phonics and comprehension. Teachers of reading provide high-quality instruction in phonics and decoding strategies, usually in a small-group format, but may be unsure how to insert fluency instruction into the small-group lesson. This article presents key concepts in fluency instruction and a description of…

  15. Direct Effect of Zinc on Mitochondrial Apoptogenesis in Prostate Cells

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Pei; Li, Tie-Luo; Guan, Zhi-Xin; Franklin, Renty B.; Costello, Leslie C.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Prostate epithelial cells uniquely accumulate significantly higher levels of zinc than other mammalian cells. We previously showed that the accumulation of high intracellular zinc levels in specific prostate cells results in the induction of apoptosis and the inhibition of cell growth. The apoptotic effect is due to zinc induction of mitochondrial apoptogenesis. We now report additional studies that corroborate this effect of zinc and provide insight into the mechanism of this unique effect. METHODS The effect of exposure to physiological levels of zinc on apoptosis was determined for three human prostate cell lines (PC-3, BPH, and HPR-1). Zinc-induced apoptosis was identified by DNA fragmentation. The direct effect of zinc on isolated mitochondrial preparations from each cell line was determined. The mitochondrial release of cytochrome c was determined by Western blot. RESULTS Exposure to zinc induced apoptosis in PC-3 and BPH cells but not in HPR-1 cells. The zinc accumulation in PC-3 (4.3 ± 0.3) and BPH (2.8 ± 0.4) was higher than that in HPR-1 cells (1.8 ± 0.1). The apoptotic effect of zinc on PC-3 cells could be observed as early as 4–6 hr of zinc treatment, and this effect was not reversible. The exposure of isolated mitochondria from PC-3 and BPH cells to zinc resulted in the release of cytochrome c; but zinc had no effect on mitochondria from HPR-1 cells. CONCLUSIONS Exposure to zinc induces apoptosis in PC-3 and BPH cells, which accumulate high intracellular levels of zinc, but not in HPR-1 cells, which do not accumulate high levels of zinc. Once initiated, the induction of apoptosis is not reversed by the removal of zinc, i.e., it is an irreversible process. The apoptogenic effect is due to a direct effect of zinc on mitochondria that results in the release of cytochrome c. The cell specificity of zinc induction of apoptogenesis is dependent on the ability of the cells to accumulate high levels of intracellular zinc and on the ability of

  16. First Isolation and Direct Evidence for the Existence of Large Small-Mammal Reservoirs of Leptospira sp. in Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Rahelinirina, Soanandrasana; Léon, Albertine; Harstskeerl, Rudy A.; Sertour, Natacha; Ahmed, Ahmed; Raharimanana, Claudine; Ferquel, Elisabeth; Garnier, Martine; Chartier, Loïc; Duplantier, Jean-Marc; Rahalison, Lila; Cornet, Muriel

    2010-01-01

    Background Leptospirosis has long been a major public health concern in the southwestern Indian Ocean. However, in Madagascar, only a few, old studies have provided indirect serological evidence of the disease in humans or animals. Methodology/Principal Findings We conducted a large animal study focusing on small-mammal populations. Five field trapping surveys were carried out at five sites, from April 2008 to August 2009. Captures consisted of Rattus norvegicus (35.8%), R. rattus (35.1%), Mus musculus (20.5%) and Suncus murinus (8.6%). We used microbiological culture, serodiagnosis tests (MAT) and real-time PCR to assess Leptospira infection. Leptospira carriage was detected by PCR in 91 (33.9%) of the 268 small mammals, by MAT in 17 of the 151 (11.3%) animals for which serum samples were available and by culture in 9 of the 268 animals (3.3%). Rates of infection based on positive PCR results were significantly higher in Moramanga (54%), Toliara (48%) and Mahajanga (47.4%) than in Antsiranana (8.5%) and Toamasina (14%) (p = 0.001). The prevalence of Leptospira carriage was significantly higher in R. norvegicus (48.9%), S. murinus (43.5%) and R. rattus (30.8%) than in M. musculus (9.1%) (p<0.001). The MAT detected antibodies against the serogroups Canicola and Icterohaemorrhagiae. Isolates were characterized by serology, secY sequence-based phylogeny, partial sequencing of rrs, multi-locus VNTR analysis and pulsed field gel electrophoresis. The 10 isolates obtained from nine rats were all identified as species L. interrogans serogroup Canicola serovar Kuwait and all had identical partial rrs and secY sequences. Conclusions/Significance We present here the first direct evidence of widespread leptospiral carriage in small mammals in Madagascar. Our results strongly suggest a high level of environmental contamination, consistent with probable transmission of the infection to humans. This first isolation of pathogenic Leptospira strains in this country may

  17. Effect of spine hardware on small spinal stereotactic radiosurgery dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Yang, James N; Li, Xiaoqiang; Tailor, Ramesh; Vassilliev, Oleg; Brown, Paul; Rhines, Laurence; Chang, Eric

    2013-10-07

    Monte Carlo (MC) modeling of a 6 MV photon beam was used to study the dose perturbation from a titanium rod 5 mm in diameter in various small fields range from 2 × 2 to 5 × 5 cm(2). The results showed that the rod increased the dose to water by ∼6% at the water-rod interface because of electron backscattering and decreased the dose by ∼7% in the shadow of the rod because of photon attenuation. The Pinnacle(3) treatment planning system calculations matched the MC results at the depths more than 1 cm past the rod when the correct titanium density of 4.5 g cm(-3) was used, but significantly underestimated the backscattering dose at the water-rod interface. A CT-density table with a top density of 1.82 g cm(-3) (cortical bone) is a practical way to reduce the dosimetric error from the artifacts by preventing high density assignment to them, but can underestimates the attenuation by the titanium rod by 6%. However, when multi-beam with intensity modulation is used in actual patient spinal stereotactic radiosurgery treatment, the dosimetric effect of assigning 4.5 instead of 1.82 g cm(-3) to titanium implants is complicated. It ranged from minimal effect to 2% dose difference affecting 15% target volume in the study. When hardware is in the beam path, density override to the titanium hardware is recommended.

  18. Effects of desert wildfires on desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) and other small vertebrates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Esque, T.C.; Schwalbe, C.R.; DeFalco, L.A.; Duncan, R.B.; Hughes, T.J.

    2003-01-01

    We report the results of standardized surveys to determine the effects of wildfires on desert tortoises (Gopherus agassizii) and their habitats in the northeastern Mojave Desert and northeastern Sonoran Desert. Portions of 6 burned areas (118 to 1,750 ha) were examined for signs of mortality of vertebrates. Direct effects of fire in desert habitats included animal mortality and loss of vegetation cover. A range of 0 to 7 tortoises was encountered during surveys, and live tortoises were found on all transects. In addition to desert tortoises, only small (<1 kg) mammals and reptiles (11 taxa) were found dead on the study areas. We hypothesize that indirect effects of fire on desert habitats might result in changes in the composition of diets and loss of vegetation cover, resulting in an increase in predation and loss of protection from temperature extremes. These changes in habitat also might cause changes in vertebrate communities in burned areas.

  19. The effect of direct positron production on relativistic feedback rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vodopiyanov, I. B.; Dwyer, J. R.; Lucia, R. J.; Cramer, E. S.; Arabshahi, S.; Rassoul, H.

    2013-12-01

    Relativistic feedback produces a self-sustaining runaway electron discharge via the production of backward propagating positrons and back-scattered x-rays. To date, only positrons created from pair-production by gamma-rays interacting with the air have been considered. In contrast, direct pair-production involves the creation of electron-positron pairs directly from the interaction of energetic runaway electrons with nuclei, and so it does not require the generation of bremsstrahlung gamma-rays. For high electric fields, where the runaway electron avalanche length scales are short, pair-production involving bremsstrahlung gamma-rays makes a smaller contribution to the total relativistic feedback rates than at lower fields, since both the bremsstrahlung interaction and the pair-production need to occur over a short length. On the other hand, for high fields, because direct positron production only involves one interaction, it may make a significant contribution to relativistic feedback rates in some cases. In this poster, we shall present the direct positron production cross-sections and calculate the effects on the relativistic feedback rates due to this process.

  20. The effect of direction on cursor moving kinematics.

    PubMed

    Meng, Ling-Fu; Chen, Hsin-Yung; Lu, Chiu-Ping; Chen, Ming-Chung; Chu, Chi-Nung

    2012-01-01

    There have been only few studies to substantiate the kinematic characteristics of cursor movement. In this study, a quantitative experimental research method was used to explore the effect of moving direction on the kinematics of cursor movement in 24 typical young persons using our previously developed computerized measuring program. The results of multiple one way repeated measures ANOVAs and post hoc LSD tests demonstrated that the moving direction had effects on average velocity, movement time, movement unit and peak velocity. Moving leftward showed better efficiency than moving rightward, upward and downward from the kinematic evidences such as velocity, movement unit and time. Moreover, the unique pattern of the power spectral density (PSD) of velocity (strategy for power application) explained why the smoothness was still maintained while moving leftward even under an unstable situation with larger momentum. Moreover, the information from this cursor moving study can guide us to relocate the toolbars and icons in the window interface, especially for individuals with physical disabilities whose performances are easily interrupted while controlling the cursor in specific directions.

  1. Small cycloalkane (CN)2C-C(CN)2 structures are highly directional non-covalent carbon-bond donors.

    PubMed

    Bauzá, Antonio; Mooibroek, Tiddo J; Frontera, Antonio

    2014-08-11

    High-level calculations (RI-MP2/def2-TZVP) disclosed that the σ-hole in between two C atoms of cycloalkane X2 CCX2 structures (X=F, CN) is increasingly exposed with decreasing ring size. The interacting energy of complexes of F(-) , HO(-) , N≡C(-) , and H2 CO with cyclopropane and cyclobutane X2 CCX2 derivatives was calculated. For X=F, these energies are small to positive, while for X=CN they are all negative, ranging from -6.8 to -42.3 kcal mol(-1) . These finding are corroborated by a thorough statistical survey of the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD). No clear evidence could be found in support of non-covalent carbon bonding between electron-rich atoms (El.R.) and F2 CCF2 structures. In marked contrast, El.R.⋅⋅⋅(CN)2 CC(CN)2 interactions are abundant and highly directional. Based on these findings, the hydrophobic electrophilic bowl formed by 1,1',2,2'-tetracyano cyclopropane or cyclobutane derivatives is proposed as a new and synthetically accessible supramolecular synthon.

  2. Gas exchange dependency on diffusion coefficient: direct /sup 222/Rn and /sup 3/He comparisons in a small lake

    SciTech Connect

    Torgersen, T.; Mathieu, G.; Hesslein, R.H.; Broecker, W.S.

    1982-01-20

    A direct field comparison was conducted to determine the dependency of gas exchange coefficient (k/sub x/) on the diffusion coefficient (D/sub x/). The study also sought to confirm the enhanced vertical exchange properties of limnocorrals and similar enclosures. Gas exchange coefficients for /sup 222/Rn and /sup 3/He were determined in a small northern Ontario lake, using a /sup 226/Ra and /sup 3/H spike to gain the necessary precision. The results indicate that the gas exchange coefficient is functionally dependent on the diffusion coefficient raised to the 1.22/sub -35//sup + > 12/ power (k/sub x/ = f(D/sub x//sup 1.22)), clearly supporting the stagnant film model of gas exchange. Limnocorrals were found to have gas exchange rates up to 1.7 times higher than the whole lake in spite of the observation of more calm surface conditions in the corral than in the open lake. 33 references, 6 figures, 8 tables.

  3. Polydopamine-coated magnetic nanoparticles for enrichment and direct detection of small molecule pollutants coupled with MALDI-TOF-MS.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yu-rong; Zhang, Xiao-le; Zeng, Tao; Cao, Dong; Zhou, Zhen; Li, Wen-hui; Niu, Hongyun; Cai, Ya-qi

    2013-02-01

    Polydopamine-coated Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles (Fe(3)O(4)@PDA NPs) were synthesized and applied as matrix for the detection of pollutants by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). The synthesis of Fe(3)O(4)@PDA NPs was accomplished in 30 min by in situ polymerization of dopamine without any toxic reagent. Using Fe(3)O(4)@PDA NPs as matrix of MALDI-TOF, eleven small molecule pollutants (molecular weight from 251.6 to 499.3), including Benzo(a)pyrene (BaP), three perfluorinated compounds (PFCs), and seven antibiotics, were successfully detected in either positive or negative reflection mode without background interference. Furthermore, the Fe(3)O(4)@PDA NPs can also enrich trace amounts of hydrophobic target, such as BaP, from solution to nanoparticles surface. Then the Fe(3)O(4)@PDA-BaP can be isolated through magnetic sedimentation step and directly spotted on the stainless steel plate for MALDI measurement. With Fe(3)O(4)@PDA NPs as adsorbent and matrix, we also realized the analysis of BaP in tap water and lake water samples. Thus, a magnetic solid-phase extraction (MSPE)-MALDI-TOF-MS method was established for the measurement of BaP.

  4. Direct prediction of residual dipolar couplings of small molecules in a stretched gel by stochastic molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Frank, Andreas O; Freudenberger, J Christoph; Shaytan, Alexey K; Kessler, Horst; Luy, Burkhard

    2015-03-01

    Residual dipolar couplings are highly useful NMR parameters for calculating and refining molecular structures, dynamics, and interactions. For some applications, however, it is inevitable that the preferred orientation of a molecule in an alignment medium is calculated a priori. Several methods have been developed to predict molecular orientations and residual dipolar couplings. Being beneficial for macromolecules and selected small-molecule applications, such approaches lack sufficient accuracy for a large number of organic compounds for which the fine structure and eventually the flexibility of all involved molecules have to be considered or are limited to specific, well-studied liquid crystals. We introduce a simplified model for detailed all-atom molecular dynamics calculations with a polymer strand lined up along the principal axis as a new approach to simulate the preferred orientation of small to medium-sized solutes in polymer-based, gel-type alignment media. As is shown by a first example of strychnine in a polystyrene/CDCl3 gel, the simulations potentially enable the accurate prediction of residual dipolar couplings taking into account structural details and dynamic averaging effects of both the polymer and the solute.

  5. Comparative Effectiveness and Implementation Research: Directions for Neurology

    PubMed Central

    Vickrey, Barbara G.; Hirtz, Deborah; Waddy, Salina; Cheng, Eric M.; Johnston, S. Claiborne

    2013-01-01

    There is an enormous unmet need for knowledge about how new insights from discovery and translational research can yield measurable, population-level improvements in health and reduction in mortality among those having or at risk for neurological disease. Once several, well-conducted randomized controlled trials establish the efficacy of a given therapy, implementation research can generate new knowledge about barriers to uptake of the therapy into widespread clinical care, and what strategies are effective in overcoming those barriers and in addressing health disparities. Comparative effectiveness research aims to elucidate the relative value (including clinical benefit, clinical harms, and/or costs) of alternative efficacious management approaches to a neurological disorder, generally through direct comparisons, and may include comparisons of methodologies for implementation. Congress has recently appropriated resources and established an institute to prioritize funding for such research. Neurologists and neuroscientists should understand the scope and objectives of comparative effectiveness and implementation research, their range of methodological approaches (formal literature syntheses, randomized trials, observational studies, modeling), and existing research resources (centers for literature synthesis, registries, practice networks) relevant to research for neurological conditions, in order to close the well-documented “evidence-to-practice gap.” Future directions include building this research resource capacity, producing scientists trained to conduct rigorous comparative effectiveness and implementation research, and embracing innovative strategies to set research priorities in these areas. PMID:22718542

  6. Dark matter effective field theory scattering in direct detection experiments

    DOE PAGES

    Schneck, K.

    2015-05-01

    We examine the consequences of the effective field theory (EFT) of dark matter–nucleon scattering for current and proposed direct detection experiments. Exclusion limits on EFT coupling constants computed using the optimum interval method are presented for SuperCDMS Soudan, CDMS II, and LUX, and the necessity of combining results from multiple experiments in order to determine dark matter parameters is discussed. We demonstrate that spectral differences between the standard dark matter model and a general EFT interaction can produce a bias when calculating exclusion limits and when developing signal models for likelihood and machine learning techniques. We also discuss the implicationsmore » of the EFT for the next-generation (G2) direct detection experiments and point out regions of complementarity in the EFT parameter space.« less

  7. Direct-to-consumer advertising: its effects on stakeholders.

    PubMed

    Montoya, Isaac D; Lee-Dukes, Gwen; Shah, Dhvani

    2008-01-01

    The escalating growth in the development of pharmaceutical drugs has caused the pharmaceutical industry to market drugs directly to consumers. Direct-to-consumer (DTC) advertising has increased immensely in the past 15 years and continues to grow each year. The advantages of DTC advertising include an increase in consumer knowledge, patient autonomy, and possibly providing physicians and pharmacists with up-to-date information about the recent trends in the marketplace. However, there is also an equally notable list of disadvantages, which include concerns about the quality of information provided, loss in physician productivity due to time spent convincing patients that what they want is not in their best interest, and increases in the reimbursement expenditure of the insurers. Because of these conflicting outcomes, the issue of DTC advertising has become controversial. This report offers an overview of DTC advertising and focuses on its effects on physicians, pharmacists, consumers, insurers, the government, and pharmaceutical manufacturers.

  8. Dark matter effective field theory scattering in direct detection experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Schneck, K.; Cabrera, B.; Cerdeno, D. G.; Mandic, V.; Rogers, H. E.; Agnese, R.; Anderson, A. J.; Asai, M.; Balakishiyeva, D.; Barker, D.; Basu Thakur, R.; Bauer, D. A.; Billard, J.; Borgland, A.; Brandt, D.; Brink, P. L.; Bunker, R.; Caldwell, D. O.; Calkins, R.; Chagani, H.; Chen, Y.; Cooley, J.; Cornell, B.; Crewdson, C. H.; Cushman, Priscilla B.; Daal, M.; Di Stefano, P. C.; Doughty, T.; Esteban, L.; Fallows, S.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Godfrey, G. L.; Golwala, S. R.; Hall, Jeter C.; Harris, H. R.; Hofer, T.; Holmgren, D.; Hsu, L.; Huber, M. E.; Jardin, D. M.; Jastram, A.; Kamaev, O.; Kara, B.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kennedy, A.; Leder, A.; Loer, B.; Lopez Asamar, E.; Lukens, W.; Mahapatra, R.; McCarthy, K. A.; Mirabolfathi, N.; Moffatt, R. A.; Morales Mendoza, J. D.; Oser, S. M.; Page, K.; Page, W. A.; Partridge, R.; Pepin, M.; Phipps, A.; Prasad, K.; Pyle, M.; Qiu, H.; Rau, W.; Redl, P.; Reisetter, A.; Ricci, Y.; Roberts, A.; Saab, T.; Sadoulet, B.; Sander, J.; Schnee, R. W.; Scorza, S.; Serfass, B.; Shank, B.; Speller, D.; Toback, D.; Upadhyayula, S.; Villano, A. N.; Welliver, B.; Wilson, J. S.; Wright, D. H.; Yang, X.; Yellin, S.; Yen, J. J.; Young, B. A.; Zhang, J.

    2015-05-01

    We examine the consequences of the effective eld theory (EFT) of dark matter-nucleon scattering or current and proposed direct detection experiments. Exclusion limits on EFT coupling constants computed using the optimum interval method are presented for SuperCDMS Soudan, CDMS II, and LUX, and the necessity of combining results from multiple experiments in order to determine dark matter parameters is discussed. We demonstrate that spectral di*erences between the standard dark matter model and a general EFT interaction can produce a bias when calculating exclusion limits and when developing signal models for likelihood and machine learning techniques. We also discuss the implications of the EFT for the next-generation (G2) direct detection experiments and point out regions of complementarity in the EFT parameter space.

  9. Dark matter effective field theory scattering in direct detection experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Schneck, K.; Cabrera, B.; Cerdeño, D. G.; Mandic, V.; Rogers, H. E.; Agnese, R.; Anderson, A. J.; Asai, M.; Balakishiyeva, D.; Barker, D.; Basu Thakur, R.; Bauer, D. A.; Billard, J.; Borgland, A.; Brandt, D.; Brink, P. L.; Bunker, R.; Caldwell, D. O.; Calkins, R.; Chagani, H.; Chen, Y.; Cooley, J.; Cornell, B.; Crewdson, C. H.; Cushman, P.; Daal, M.; Di Stefano, P. C. F.; Doughty, T.; Esteban, L.; Fallows, S.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Godfrey, G. L.; Golwala, S. R.; Hall, J.; Harris, H. R.; Hofer, T.; Holmgren, D.; Hsu, L.; Huber, M. E.; Jardin, D. M.; Jastram, A.; Kamaev, O.; Kara, B.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kennedy, A.; Leder, A.; Loer, B.; Lopez Asamar, E.; Lukens, P.; Mahapatra, R.; McCarthy, K. A.; Mirabolfathi, N.; Moffatt, R. A.; Morales Mendoza, J. D.; Oser, S. M.; Page, K.; Page, W. A.; Partridge, R.; Pepin, M.; Phipps, A.; Prasad, K.; Pyle, M.; Qiu, H.; Rau, W.; Redl, P.; Reisetter, A.; Ricci, Y.; Roberts, A.; Saab, T.; Sadoulet, B.; Sander, J.; Schnee, R. W.; Scorza, S.; Serfass, B.; Shank, B.; Speller, D.; Toback, D.; Upadhyayula, S.; Villano, A. N.; Welliver, B.; Wilson, J. S.; Wright, D. H.; Yang, X.; Yellin, S.; Yen, J. J.; Young, B. A.; Zhang, J.

    2015-05-18

    We examine the consequences of the effective field theory (EFT) of dark matter-nucleon scattering for current and proposed direct detection experiments. Exclusion limits on EFT coupling constants computed using the optimum interval method are presented for SuperCDMS Soudan, CDMS II, and LUX, and the necessity of combining results from multiple experiments in order to determine dark matter parameters is discussed. Here. we demonstrate that spectral differences between the standard dark matter model and a general EFT interaction can produce a bias when calculating exclusion limits and when developing signal models for likelihood and machine learning techniques. In conclusion, we discuss the implications of the EFT for the next-generation (G2) direct detection experiments and point out regions of complementarity in the EFT parameter space.

  10. Dark matter effective field theory scattering in direct detection experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Schneck, K.

    2015-05-01

    We examine the consequences of the effective field theory (EFT) of dark matter–nucleon scattering for current and proposed direct detection experiments. Exclusion limits on EFT coupling constants computed using the optimum interval method are presented for SuperCDMS Soudan, CDMS II, and LUX, and the necessity of combining results from multiple experiments in order to determine dark matter parameters is discussed. We demonstrate that spectral differences between the standard dark matter model and a general EFT interaction can produce a bias when calculating exclusion limits and when developing signal models for likelihood and machine learning techniques. We also discuss the implications of the EFT for the next-generation (G2) direct detection experiments and point out regions of complementarity in the EFT parameter space.

  11. Geometric Effects When Measuring Small Holes With Micro Contact Probes

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Jack; Muralikrishnan, Bala; Sahay, Chittaranjan

    2011-01-01

    A coordinate measuring machine with a suitably small probe can be used to measure micro-features such as the diameter and form of small holes (often about 100 μm in diameter). When measuring small holes, the clearance between the probe tip and the part is sometimes nearly as small as other characteristic lengths (such as probe deflection or form errors) associated with the measurement. Under these circumstances, the basic geometry of the measurement is much different than it is for the measurement of a macroscopic object. Various geometric errors are greatly magnified, and consequently sources of error that are totally irrelevant when measuring macroscopic artifacts can become important. In this article we discuss errors associated with misalignment or non-orthogonality of the probe axes, probe-tip radius compensation, and mechanical filtering. PMID:26989585

  12. Effectiveness of exceptional rainstorms on a small Mediterranean basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grodek, Tamir; Jacoby, Yael; Morin, Efrat; Katz, Oded

    2012-07-01

    A comprehensive investigation of rainstorms and their consequent impacts on landscape evolution is geomorphologically important, but only scant information may be available on exceptional events, because parameters on synoptic conditions, rainstorm, landforms and hydrology for such events may be incomparable with previous knowledge. We studied an exceptional storm on April 2, 2006, in the Ramot Menashe region, Israel. Our investigation of rainfall, landslides, debris flows and channel suggests the effectiveness of such an event on the development of basin-scale morphology. The storm caused damage and casualties although it covered relatively narrow strips. Neither direct rainfall nor runoff measurements exist for the most severely affected area of Ramot Menashe, but the geomorphologic evidence combined with high-resolution meteorological radar data provides the basic understanding of the processes and hazardous conditions which prevailed at the time. In the storm core, based on estimation from meteorological radar data, 263 mm of rain fell within 3 h with a maximum intensity of 220 mm h- 1 for 10 min, triggering both sporadic landslides at the soil/bedrock contact on the upper slopes and widespread landslides at the fractured/massive bedrock contact on the lower slopes. The 1st order channels on the alternation of chalk and marl also underwent erosion, and the produced sediment deposited on alluvial fans at the confluence with the main channel. The specific peak discharges for catchment size of 0.3-10 km2 were 11 to 73 m3 s- 1 km- 2, higher than any recorded floods in the Mediterranean climatic region of Israel. The effectiveness of the flood for geomorphic work, represented by shear stress and stream power per unit boundary area reached 87-398 N m- 2 and 212-2134 W m- 2, respectively. This kind of analysis can be applied to hazard prediction in other areas under similar geomorphological conditions.

  13. Effect-directed analysis: Current status and future challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Seongjin; Giesy, John P.; Lee, Jung-Suk; Lee, Jong-Hyeon; Khim, Jong Seong

    2016-09-01

    Effect-directed analysis (EDA) has become useful for identification of toxicant(s) that occur in mixtures in the environment, especially those that are causative agents of specific adverse effects. Here, we summarize and review EDA methodology including preparation of samples, biological analyses, fractionations, and instrumental analyses, highlighting key scientific advancements. A total of 63 documents since 1999 (Scopus search) including 46 research articles, 13 review papers, and 4 project descriptions, have been collected and reviewed in this study. At the early stage (1999-2010), most studies that applied EDA focused on organic extracts of freshwater and coastal contaminated sediments and wastewater. Toxic effects were often measured using cell-based bioassays ( in vitro) and the causative chemicals were identified by use of low resolution gas chromatography with mass selective detector (GCMSD). More recently (2010-present), EDA has been extended to various matrices such as biota, soil, crude oil, and suspended solids and techniques have been improved to include determination of bioavailability in vivo. In particular, methods for non-target screenings of organic chemicals in environmental samples using cutting-edge instrumentation such as time of flight-mass spectrometry (ToF-MS), Fourier transform-ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR), and Orbitrap mass spectrometer have been developed. This overview provides descriptions of recent improvements of EDA and suggests future research directions based on current understandings and limitations.

  14. Effect-directed analysis supporting monitoring of aquatic ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Aquatic environments are often contaminated with complex mixtures of chemicals that may pose a risk to ecosystems and human health. This contamination cannot be addressed with target analysis alone but tools are required to reduce this complexity and identify those chemicals that might cause adverse effects. Effect-directed analysis (EDA) is designed to meet this challenge and faces increasing interest in water and sediment quality monitoring. Thus, the present paper summarizes current experience with the EDA approach and the tools required,and provides practical advice on their application. The paper highlights the need for proper problem formulation and gives general advice for study design. As the EDA approach is directed by toxicity, basic principles for the selection of bioassays are given as well as a comprehensive compilation of appropriate assays, includingtheir strengths andweaknesses. A specific focus is given to strategies for sampling, extraction and bioassay dosing since they strongly impact prioritization of toxicants in EDA. Reduction of sample complexity mainly relies onfractionation procedures, which are discussed in this paper, including quality assurance and quality control. Automated combinations of fractionation, biotesting and chemical analysis using so-called hyphenated tools can enhance the throughput and might reduce the risk of artifacts in laboratory work. The key to determiningthe chemical structures causing effects is analytical toxi

  15. Direct effects of increasing carbon dioxide on vegetation

    SciTech Connect

    Strain, B R; Cure, J D

    1985-12-01

    CO/sub 2/ is an essential environmental resource. It is required as a raw material of the orderly development of all green plants. As the availability of CO/sub 2/ increases, perhaps reaching two or three times the concentration prevailing in preindustrial times, plants and all other organisms dependent on them for food will be affected. Humans are releasing a gaseous fertilizer into the global atmosphere in quantities sufficient to affect all life. This volume considers the direct effects of global CO/sub 2/ fertilization on plants and thus on all other life. Separate abstracts have been prepared for individual papers. (ACR)

  16. Direction of Effects in Multiple Linear Regression Models.

    PubMed

    Wiedermann, Wolfgang; von Eye, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies analyzed asymmetric properties of the Pearson correlation coefficient using higher than second order moments. These asymmetric properties can be used to determine the direction of dependence in a linear regression setting (i.e., establish which of two variables is more likely to be on the outcome side) within the framework of cross-sectional observational data. Extant approaches are restricted to the bivariate regression case. The present contribution extends the direction of dependence methodology to a multiple linear regression setting by analyzing distributional properties of residuals of competing multiple regression models. It is shown that, under certain conditions, the third central moments of estimated regression residuals can be used to decide upon direction of effects. In addition, three different approaches for statistical inference are discussed: a combined D'Agostino normality test, a skewness difference test, and a bootstrap difference test. Type I error and power of the procedures are assessed using Monte Carlo simulations, and an empirical example is provided for illustrative purposes. In the discussion, issues concerning the quality of psychological data, possible extensions of the proposed methods to the fourth central moment of regression residuals, and potential applications are addressed.

  17. Effects of direct and indirect bleach on dentin fracture toughness.

    PubMed

    Tam, L E; Noroozi, A

    2007-12-01

    There are concerns that tooth-whitening procedures irreversibly damage tooth structure. We investigated the hypothesis that dental bleaches significantly affect dentin structural integrity. The objective was to evaluate the effects of peroxide bleaches on dentin fracture toughness. Compact test specimens, composed of human dentin, were used (n = 10/group). Bleach (16% or 10% carbamide peroxide or 3% hydrogen peroxide) or control material, containing 0.1% sodium fluoride, was applied directly or indirectly to dentin through enamel (6 hrs/day) for 2 or 8 weeks. Fracture toughness results were analyzed by ANOVA and Fisher's LSD test (p < 0.05). There were significant decreases in mean fracture toughness after two- and eight-week direct (19-34% and 61-68%, respectively) and indirect (up to 17% and 37%, respectively) bleach application. The in vitro reduction in dentin fracture toughness caused by the application of peroxide bleaches was greater for the direct application method, longer application time, and higher bleach concentration.

  18. Melt flow effect on interface stability during directional solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, O. P.; Mashkovskiy, A. G.

    2015-03-01

    In the framework of the phenomenological macroscopic continuum theory using the approximation of a flat frontier layer the stability of solid-liquid interface at the directional solidification under melt motion along the interface is studied. The stability conditions are reduced to determination of eigenvalues of boundary value problem for infinitesimal disturbances of stationary process. In case of stagnant melt it is shown that in the plane "wave number-pulling rate" there are two areas of instability for low and large pulling rates divided by the area of steady-steady growth. Neutral stability curve calculated for rather large pulling rates for succinonitrile-acetone (SCN-Ac) system is close to the relevant values received by Mullins and Sekerka, while the absolute values of critical growth rates are of the same order of magnitude as the experimental ones. Melt flow along the interface leads to emergence of the third area of instability which is characterized by small values of wave numbers. When increasing the melt flow rate the area of instability extends towards great values of wave numbers.

  19. Interface dynamics and anisotropy effects in directional solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Cheveigné, S.; Guthmann, C.

    1992-02-01

    A study of the dynamics of the cellular solid-liquid interface in directional solidification of dilute CBr{4} alloy has allowed us to observe a number of secondary instabilities (travelling states, optical modes, anomalous cells, etc.) some of which were well known and traditionally attributed to the effect of crystalline anisotropy. However, most of these instabilities are also observed in a hydrodynamic analog of directional solidification, directional viscous fingering (M. Rabaud, S. Michalland and Y. Couder, Phys. Rev. Lett. 64 (1990) 184). This analogy enables us to discuss the interplay of crystalline anisotropy and of the dynamics generic to one-dimensional systems in directional solidification. Une étude de la dynamique de l'interface cellulaire en solidification directionnelle d'un alliage binaire dilué de CBr4 nous a permis d'observer un certain nombre d'instabilités secondaires (propagation de cellules inclinées, modes optiques, cellules anormales, etc.) dont certaines étaient bien connues et traditionnellement attribuées à des effets de l'anisotropie cristalline. Cependant, la plupart de ces instabilités sont observables dans une expérience qui est l'analogue hydrodynamique de la solidification directionnelle, la digitation visqueuse dirigée ou instabilité de l'imprimeur (M. Rabaud, S. Michalland and Y. Couder, Phys. Rev. Lett. 64 (1990) 184). Cette analogie va nous permettre de discuter les rôles respectifs de l'anisotropie cristalline et de la dynamique propre aux systèmes uni-dimentionnels.

  20. The AMRDEC Process for Analyzing Initiation Effectiveness Against Explosive Filled Small Arms Threats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Dedra

    2011-06-01

    The mortar threats, due to their small size and robust structure, present difficult challenges to new and existing systems for acquisition, tracking, intercept and defeat. Defeat must come through either the fuze or detonation of the explosive. Direct detonation of the explosive payload at the point of intercept via fragment or direct missile impact is considered a more achievable alternative. A pre-detonation of the fuze due to impact can produce similar results. However, fuzes can be a small percentage of the target area. Another possible outcome is the fuze would simply be duded. However, a dudded mortar can be indistinguishable from a non-dudded mortar until it strikes the ground. A robust process must have the capability of analyzing multiple solution types. An extensive database of single fragment impacts against threats with high explosive payloads was utilized to develop and modify models to predict explosive reaction. The goal was to create models or equations that could be incorporated into fast running simulation tools to access potential lethal mechanisms over a wide range of battlespace conditions quickly. A methodology to ascertain impact effectiveness on a typical generic threat fuze was also developed separately to be included in the simulation tools. Computational efforts and trade studies can be conducted with fast running simulation tools whose accuracy had been validated with significant test data.

  1. Small nucleolar RNA host genes and long non-coding RNA responses in directly irradiated and bystander cells.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, M Ahmad

    2014-04-01

    The irradiated cells communicate with unirradiated cells and induce changes in them through a phenomenon known as the bystander effect. The nature of the bystander signal and how it impacts unirradiated cells remains to be discovered. Examination of molecular changes could lead to the identification of pathways underlying the bystander effect. Apart from microRNAs, little is known about the regulation of other non-coding RNAs (ncRNA) in irradiated or bystander cells. In this study we monitored the transcriptional changes of several small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs) host genes and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) that are known to participate in a variety of cellular functions, in irradiated and bystander cells to gain insight into the molecular pathways affected in these cells. We used human lymphoblasts TK6 cells in a medium exchanged bystander effect model system to examine ncRNA expression alterations. The snoRNA host genes SNHG1 and SNHG4 were upregulated in irradiated TK6 cells but were repressed in bystander cells. The SNHG5 and SNHG11 were downregulated in irradiated and bystander cells and the expression levels of these ncRNA were significantly lower in bystander cells. The lncRNA MALAT1, MATR3, SRA1, and SOX2OT were induced in irradiated TK6 cells and their expression levels were repressed in bystander cells. The lncRNA RMST was induced in both irradiated and bystander cells. Taken together, these results indicate that expression levels of ncRNA are modulated in irradiated and bystander cells and these transcriptional changes could be associated with the bystander effect.

  2. Direct effects of leptin on brown and white adipose tissue.

    PubMed Central

    Siegrist-Kaiser, C A; Pauli, V; Juge-Aubry, C E; Boss, O; Pernin, A; Chin, W W; Cusin, I; Rohner-Jeanrenaud, F; Burger, A G; Zapf, J; Meier, C A

    1997-01-01

    Leptin is thought to exert its actions on energy homeostasis through the long form of the leptin receptor (OB-Rb), which is present in the hypothalamus and in certain peripheral organs, including adipose tissue. In this study, we examined whether leptin has direct effects on the function of brown and white adipose tissue (BAT and WAT, respectively) at the metabolic and molecular levels. The chronic peripheral intravenous administration of leptin in vivo for 4 d resulted in a 1.6-fold increase in the in vivo glucose utilization index of BAT, whereas no significant change was found after intracerebroventricular administration compared with pair-fed control rats, compatible with a direct effect of leptin on BAT. The effect of leptin on WAT fat pads from lean Zucker Fa/ fa rats was assessed ex vivo, where a 9- and 16-fold increase in the rate of lipolysis was observed after 2 h of exposure to 0.1 and 10 nM leptin, respectively. In contrast, no increase in lipolysis was observed in the fat pads from obese fa/fa rats, which harbor an inactivating mutation in the OB-Rb. At the level of gene expression, leptin treatment for 24 h increased malic enzyme and lipoprotein lipase RNA 1.8+/-0.17 and 1.9+/-0.14-fold, respectively, while aP2 mRNA levels were unaltered in primary cultures of brown adipocytes from lean Fa/fa rats. Importantly, however, no significant effect of leptin was observed on these genes in brown adipocytes from obese fa/fa animals. The presence of OB-Rb receptors in adipose tissue was substantiated by the detection of its transcripts by RT-PCR, and leptin treatment in vivo and in vitro activated the specific STATs implicated in the signaling pathway of the OB-Rb. Taken together, our data strongly suggest that leptin has direct effects on BAT and WAT, resulting in the activation of the Jak/STAT pathway and the increased expression of certain target genes, which may partially account for the observed increase in glucose utilization and lipolysis in leptin

  3. Test Report: Direct and Indirect Lightning Effects on Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, R. W.

    1997-01-01

    Lightning tests were performed on composite materials as a part of an investigation of electromagnetic effects on the materials. Samples were subjected to direct and remote simulated lightning strikes. Samples included various thicknesses of graphite filament reinforced plastic (GFRP), material enhanced by expanded aluminum foil layers, and material with an aluminum honeycomb core. Shielding properties of the material and damage to the sample surfaces and joints were investigated. Adding expanded aluminum foil layers and increasing the thickness of GFRP improves the shielding effectiveness against lightning induced fields and the ability to withstand lightning strikes. A report describing the lightning strike tests performed by the U.S. Army Redstone Technical Test Center, Redstone Arsenal, AL, STERT-TE-E-EM, is included as an appendix.

  4. Direct effect of bevacizumab on glioblastoma cell lines in vitro.

    PubMed

    Simon, Thomas; Coquerel, Bérénice; Petit, Alexandre; Kassim, Yusra; Demange, Elise; Le Cerf, Didier; Perrot, Valérie; Vannier, Jean-Pierre

    2014-12-01

    Bevacizumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody directed against the pro-angiogenic factor vascular and endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) used in the treatment of glioblastomas. Although most patients respond initially to this treatment, studies have shown that glioblastomas eventually recur. Several non-mutually exclusive theories based on the anti-angiogenic effect of bevacizumab have been proposed to explain these mechanisms of resistance. In this report, we studied whether bevacizumab can act directly on malignant glioblastoma cells. We observe changes in the expression profiles of components of the VEGF/VEGF-R pathway and in the response to a VEGF-A stimulus following bevacizumab treatment. In addition, we show that bevacizumab itself acts on glioblastoma cells by activating the Akt and Erks survival signaling pathways. Bevacizumab also enhances proliferation and invasiveness of glioblastoma cells in hyaluronic acid hydrogel. We propose that the paradoxical effect of bevacizumab on glioblastoma cells could be due to changes in the VEGF-A-dependent autocrine loop as well as in the intracellular survival pathways, leading to the enhancement of tumor aggressiveness. Investigation of how bevacizumab interacts with glioblastoma cells and the resulting downstream signaling pathways will help targeting populations of resistant glioblastoma cells.

  5. Treatment of hepatitis C virus infection with interferon and small molecule direct antivirals: viral kinetics and modeling

    PubMed Central

    Rong, Libin; Perelson, Alan S.

    2010-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection remains a threat to global public health. Treatment with pegylated interferon (IFN) plus ribavirin leads to a sustained virologic response in about 50% of patients. New therapies using direct antiviral agents have the potential to cure patients unresponsive to IFN-based therapies. Mathematical modeling has played an important role in studying HCV kinetics. Using models one can evaluate the effectiveness of new treatment agents, estimate important parameters that govern virus-host interactions, explore possible mechanisms of drug action against HCV, investigate the development of drug resistance and study quasispecies dynamics during therapy. Here we review our current knowledge of HCV kinetics under IFN-based therapy and newly developed antiviral agents specifically targeted to attack HCV, and show how mathematical models have helped improve our understanding of HCV infection and treatment. PMID:20370626

  6. Evaluating the Effect of Information Technology in Small Businesses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Information technology (IT) has become a strategic vehicle for small businesses to achieve and sustain their competitive advantage. Prior research has suggested that information technology plays an important role in the decision-making process. The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between organizational IT performance and…

  7. Facilitating Effective Small Group Discussions of Controversial Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendrix, Jon R.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Describes four components of a packet of materials designed for small-group discussions on alphafetoprotein (AFP) screening for neural tube defects. Components consist of instructional guidelines for group leader, informational packet on AFP, list of specific discussion questions, and student evaluation form. Copies of these materials are…

  8. Direct photon production and jet energy-loss in small systems. The XXVth International Conference on Ultrarelativistic Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Chun; Park, Chanwook; Paquet, Jean-François; Denicol, Gabriel S.; Jeon, Sangyong; Gale, Charles

    2016-12-01

    Two types of penetrating probes, direct photon and QCD jets, are investigated in the background of a small and rapidly expanding droplet of quark-gluon plasma. The additional thermal electromagnetic radiation results in a ∼50% enhancement of the direct photons. In high multiplicity p+Pb collisions, jets can lose a sizeable fraction of their initial energy, leading to a charged hadron RpA of ∼0.8 at a transverse momentum around 10GeV. Those two proposed measurements can help understand the apparent collective behaviour observed in small collision systems.

  9. Ultra-small Tetrametallic Pt-Pd-Rh-Ag Nanoframes with Tunable Behavior for Direct Formic Acid/Methanol Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Saleem, Faisal; Ni, Bing; Yong, Yang; Gu, Lin; Wang, Xun

    2016-10-01

    Reversible tuning of ultra-small multimetallic Pt-Pd-Rh-Ag nanoframes is achieved. These nanoframes showed tunable and reversible modes for the oxidation of small organic molecules by simply inducing segregation with adsorbates, such as SO4(2-) and OH(-) . This is the first example of reversible segregation under electrocatalytic conditions in atomic-sized electrocatalysts. These nanoframes also showed a controllable activity and good stability for the oxidation of small organic molecules.

  10. Rice Stripe Tenuivirus Nonstructural Protein 3 Hijacks the 26S Proteasome of the Small Brown Planthopper via Direct Interaction with Regulatory Particle Non-ATPase Subunit 3

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yi; Wu, Jianxiang; Fu, Shuai; Li, Chenyang; Zhu, Zeng-Rong

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The ubiquitin/26S proteasome system plays a vital role in regulating host defenses against pathogens. Previous studies have highlighted different roles for the ubiquitin/26S proteasome in defense during virus infection in both mammals and plants, but their role in the vectors that transmit those viruses is still unclear. In this study, we determined that the 26S proteasome is present in the small brown planthopper (SBPH) (Laodelphgax striatellus) and has components similar to those in plants and mammals. There was an increase in the accumulation of Rice stripe virus (RSV) in the transmitting vector SBPH after disrupting the 26S proteasome, indicating that the SBPH 26S proteasome plays a role in defense against RSV infection by regulating RSV accumulation. Yeast two-hybrid analysis determined that a subunit of the 26S proteasome, named RPN3, could interact with RSV NS3. Transient overexpression of RPN3 had no effect on the RNA silencing suppressor activity of RSV NS3. However, NS3 could inhibit the ability of SBPH rpn3 to complement an rpn3 mutation in yeast. Our findings also indicate that the direct interaction between RPN3 and NS3 was responsible for inhibiting the complementation ability of RPN3. In vivo, we found an accumulation of ubiquitinated protein in SBPH tissues where the RSV titer was high, and silencing of rpn3 resulted in malfunction of the SBPH proteasome-mediated proteolysis. Consequently, viruliferous SBPH in which RPN3 was repressed transmitted the virus more effectively as a result of higher accumulation of RSV. Our results suggest that the RSV NS3 protein is able to hijack the 26S proteasome in SBPH via a direct interaction with the RPN3 subunit to attenuate the host defense response. IMPORTANCE We show, for the first time, that the 26S proteasome components are present in the small brown planthopper and play a role in defense against its vectored plant virus (RSV). In turn, RSV encodes a protein that subverts the SBPH 26S proteasome

  11. Effect of occlusion, directionality and age on horizontal localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alworth, Lynzee Nicole

    Localization acuity of a given listener is dependent upon the ability discriminate between interaural time and level disparities. Interaural time differences are encoded by low frequency information whereas interaural level differences are encoded by high frequency information. Much research has examined effects of hearing aid microphone technologies and occlusion separately and prior studies have not evaluated age as a factor in localization acuity. Open-fit hearing instruments provide new earmold technologies and varying microphone capabilities; however, these instruments have yet to be evaluated with regard to horizontal localization acuity. Thus, the purpose of this study is to examine the effects of microphone configuration, type of dome in open-fit hearing instruments, and age on the horizontal localization ability of a given listener. Thirty adults participated in this study and were grouped based upon hearing sensitivity and age (young normal hearing, >50 years normal hearing, >50 hearing impaired). Each normal hearing participant completed one localization experiment (unaided/unamplified) where they listened to the stimulus "Baseball" and selected the point of origin. Hearing impaired listeners were fit with the same two receiver-in-the-ear hearing aids and same dome types, thus controlling for microphone technologies, type of dome, and fitting between trials. Hearing impaired listeners completed a total of 7 localization experiments (unaided/unamplified; open dome: omnidirectional, adaptive directional, fixed directional; micromold: omnidirectional, adaptive directional, fixed directional). Overall, results of this study indicate that age significantly affects horizontal localization ability as younger adult listeners with normal hearing made significantly fewer localization errors than older adult listeners with normal hearing. Also, results revealed a significant difference in performance between dome type; however, upon further examination was not

  12. Neurobiological effects of transcranial direct current stimulation: a review.

    PubMed

    Medeiros, Liciane Fernandes; de Souza, Izabel Cristina Custodio; Vidor, Liliane Pinto; de Souza, Andressa; Deitos, Alícia; Volz, Magdalena Sarah; Fregni, Felipe; Caumo, Wolnei; Torres, Iraci L S

    2012-01-01

    Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) is a non-invasive brain stimulation technique that is affordable and easy to operate compared to other neuromodulation techniques. Anodal stimulation increases cortical excitability, while the cathodal stimulation decreases it. Although tDCS is a promising treatment approach for chronic pain as well as for neuropsychiatric diseases and other neurological disorders, several complex neurobiological mechanisms that are not well understood are involved in its effect. The purpose of this systematic review is to summarize the current knowledge regarding the neurobiological mechanisms involved in the effects of tDCS. The initial search resulted in 171 articles. After applying inclusion and exclusion criteria, we screened 32 full-text articles to extract findings about the neurobiology of tDCS effects including investigation of cortical excitability parameters. Overall, these findings show that tDCS involves a cascade of events at the cellular and molecular levels. Moreover, tDCS is associated with glutamatergic, GABAergic, dopaminergic, serotonergic, and cholinergic activity modulation. Though these studies provide important advancements toward the understanding of mechanisms underlying tDCS effects, further studies are needed to integrate these mechanisms as to optimize clinical development of tDCS.

  13. Direct evidence for kinetic effects associated with solar wind reconnection.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaojun; Wang, Yi; Wei, Fengsi; Feng, Xueshang; Deng, Xiaohua; Ma, Yonghui; Zhou, Meng; Pang, Ye; Wong, Hon-Cheng

    2015-01-28

    Kinetic effects resulting from the two-fluid physics play a crucial role in the fast collisionless reconnection, which is a process to explosively release massive energy stored in magnetic fields in space and astrophysical plasmas. In-situ observations in the Earth's magnetosphere provide solid consistence with theoretical models on the point that kinetic effects are required in the collisionless reconnection. However, all the observations associated with solar wind reconnection have been analyzed in the context of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) although a lot of solar wind reconnection exhausts have been reported. Because of the absence of kinetic effects and substantial heating, whether the reconnections are still ongoing when they are detected in the solar wind remains unknown. Here, by dual-spacecraft observations, we report a solar wind reconnection with clear Hall magnetic fields. Its corresponding Alfvenic electron outflow jet, derived from the decouple between ions and electrons, is identified, showing direct evidence for kinetic effects that dominate the collisionless reconnection. The turbulence associated with the exhaust is a kind of background solar wind turbulence, implying that the reconnection generated turbulence has not much developed.

  14. The effective field theory of dark matter direct detection

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzpatrick, A. Liam; Haxton, Wick; Katz, Emanuel; Lubbers, Nicholas; Xu, Yiming

    2013-02-01

    We extend and explore the general non-relativistic effective theory of dark matter (DM) direct detection. We describe the basic non-relativistic building blocks of operators and discuss their symmetry properties, writing down all Galilean-invariant operators up to quadratic order in momentum transfer arising from exchange of particles of spin 1 or less. Any DM particle theory can be translated into the coefficients of an effective operator and any effective operator can be simply related to most general description of the nuclear response. We find several operators which lead to novel nuclear responses. These responses differ significantly from the standard minimal WIMP cases in their relative coupling strengths to various elements, changing how the results from different experiments should be compared against each other. Response functions are evaluated for common DM targets — F, Na, Ge, I, and Xe — using standard shell model techniques. We point out that each of the nuclear responses is familiar from past studies of semi-leptonic electroweak interactions, and thus potentially testable in weak interaction studies. We provide tables of the full set of required matrix elements at finite momentum transfer for a range of common elements, making a careful and fully model-independent analysis possible. Finally, we discuss embedding non-relativistic effective theory operators into UV models of dark matter.

  15. In vivo and in vitro toxicological effects of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on small intestine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tassinari, Roberta; La Rocca, Cinzia; Stecca, Laura; Tait, Sabrina; De Berardis, Barbara; Ammendolia, Maria Grazia; Iosi, Francesca; Di Virgilio, Antonio; Martinelli, Andrea; Maranghi, Francesca

    2015-06-01

    In European Union, titanium dioxide (TiO2) as bulk material is a food additive (E171) and - as nanoparticle (NP) - is used as a white pigment in several products (e.g. food, cosmetics, drugs). E171 contains approximately 36% of particles less than 100 nm in at least one dimension and TiO2 NP exposure is estimated fairly below 2.5 mg/person/day. The gastrointestinal tract is a route of entry for NPs, thus representing a potential target of effects. In in vivo study, the effects of TiO2 NP in adult rat small intestine have been evaluated by oral administration of 0 (CTRL), 1 and 2 mg/kg body weight per day - relevant to human dietary intake. Detailed quali/quantitative histopathological analyses were performed on CTRL and treated rat samples. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis was performed on small intestine. An in vitro study on Caco-2 cells was also used in order to evaluate the potential cytotoxic effects directly on enterocytes through the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay. Suspensions of TiO2 NPs for in vitro and in vivo study were characterized by EM. Histomorphometrical data showed treatment-related changes of villus height and widths in male rats. Significantly different from CTRL decreased LDH levels in the medium were detected in vitro at 24h with 2.5, 5, 10 and 20 µg/cm2 levels of TiO2 NPs. SEM analysis showed no damaged areas. Overall the results showed that enterocytes may represent a target of TiO2 NP toxicity by direct exposure both in vivo and in vitro models.

  16. In vivo and in vitro toxicological effects of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on small intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Tassinari, Roberta; La Rocca, Cinzia; Tait, Sabrina; De Berardis, Barbara; Ammendolia, Maria Grazia; Iosi, Francesca; Di Virgilio, Antonio; Martinelli, Andrea; Maranghi, Francesca; Stecca, Laura

    2015-06-23

    In European Union, titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) as bulk material is a food additive (E171) and - as nanoparticle (NP) - is used as a white pigment in several products (e.g. food, cosmetics, drugs). E171 contains approximately 36% of particles less than 100 nm in at least one dimension and TiO{sub 2} NP exposure is estimated fairly below 2.5 mg/person/day. The gastrointestinal tract is a route of entry for NPs, thus representing a potential target of effects. In in vivo study, the effects of TiO{sub 2} NP in adult rat small intestine have been evaluated by oral administration of 0 (CTRL), 1 and 2 mg/kg body weight per day - relevant to human dietary intake. Detailed quali/quantitative histopathological analyses were performed on CTRL and treated rat samples. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis was performed on small intestine. An in vitro study on Caco-2 cells was also used in order to evaluate the potential cytotoxic effects directly on enterocytes through the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay. Suspensions of TiO{sub 2} NPs for in vitro and in vivo study were characterized by EM. Histomorphometrical data showed treatment-related changes of villus height and widths in male rats. Significantly different from CTRL decreased LDH levels in the medium were detected in vitro at 24h with 2.5, 5, 10 and 20 µg/cm{sup 2} levels of TiO{sub 2} NPs. SEM analysis showed no damaged areas. Overall the results showed that enterocytes may represent a target of TiO{sub 2} NP toxicity by direct exposure both in vivo and in vitro models.

  17. Effects of polarization direction on laser-assisted free-free scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    deHarak, B. A.; Kim, B. N.; Weaver, C. M.; Martin, N. L. S.; Siavashpouri, Mahsa; Nosarzewski, Benjamin

    2016-06-01

    This work will detail the effects of laser polarization direction (relative to the momentum transfer direction) on laser-assisted free-free scattering. Such processes play a role in the gas breakdown that occurs in electric discharges as well as providing a method for the laser heating of a plasma (Musa et al 2010 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 43 175201, Mason 1993 Rep. Prog. Phys. 56 1275). Experimental results will be presented for electron-helium scattering in the presence of an Nd:YAG laser field (hν =1.17 eV) where the polarization direction was varied in a plane that is perpendicular to the scattering plane. To date, all of our experimental results are well described by the Kroll-Watson approximation (KWA) (Kroll and Watson 1973 Phys. Rev. A 8 804). The good agreement between our experiments and calculations using the KWA includes the case where the polarization is perpendicular to the momentum transfer direction, for which the KWA predicts vanishing cross section; other workers have found that the KWA tends to be inaccurate for cases where it predicts small cross sections (e.g. Musa et al 2010 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 43 175201). We also present simulations of the effects that multiple scattering might have on experimental measurements. In particular, we examine conditions that are expected to be similar to those of the experiments reported by Wallbank and Holmes (Wallbank and Holmes 1993 Phys. Rev. A 48 R2515).

  18. Making Meaning with Friends: Exploring the Function, Direction and Tone of Small Group Discussions of Literature in Elementary School Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Katie

    2016-01-01

    The merits of decentralized small groups has been questioned in literature and by practicing teachers; thus this study shows the academic and identity work children do as they attempt to make meaning in these spaces. This study explores the affordances and drawbacks of decentralized small group discussion contexts in a multiage (3rd/4th) grade…

  19. MicroRNAs: Small RNAs with Big Effects

    PubMed Central

    Anglicheau, Dany; Muthukumar, Thangamani; Suthanthiran, Manikkam

    2010-01-01

    MicroRNAs are evolutionarily conserved, small (~20–25 nucleotides), single-stranded molecules that suppress the expression of protein-coding genes by translational repression, messenger RNA degradation, or both. More than 700 microRNAs have been identified in the human genome. Amazingly, a single miRNA can regulate the expression of hundreds of mRNAs/proteins within a cell. The small RNAs are fast emerging as master regulators of innate and adaptive immunity, and very likely to play a pivotal role in transplantation. The clinical application of RNA sequencing (“next – generation sequencing”) should facilitate transcriptome profiling at an unprecedented resolution. We provide an overview of microRNA biology and their hypothesized roles in transplantation. PMID:20574417

  20. 10 CFR 431.446 - Small electric motors energy conservation standards and their effective dates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Small electric motors energy conservation standards and... EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Small Electric Motors Energy Conservation Standards § 431.446 Small electric motors energy conservation standards and their effective dates. (a)...

  1. 10 CFR 431.446 - Small electric motors energy conservation standards and their effective dates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Small electric motors energy conservation standards and... EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Small Electric Motors Energy Conservation Standards § 431.446 Small electric motors energy conservation standards and their effective dates. (a)...

  2. 10 CFR 431.446 - Small electric motors energy conservation standards and their effective dates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Small electric motors energy conservation standards and... EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Small Electric Motors Energy Conservation Standards § 431.446 Small electric motors energy conservation standards and their effective dates. (a)...

  3. 10 CFR 431.446 - Small electric motors energy conservation standards and their effective dates. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Small electric motors energy conservation standards and... EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Small Electric Motors Energy Conservation Standards § 431.446 Small electric motors energy conservation standards and their effective dates....

  4. 10 CFR 431.446 - Small electric motors energy conservation standards and their effective dates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Small electric motors energy conservation standards and... EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Small Electric Motors Energy Conservation Standards § 431.446 Small electric motors energy conservation standards and their effective dates. (a)...

  5. Small-crack effects in high-strength aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.; Wu, X. R.; Venneri, S. L.; Li, C. G.

    1994-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the Chinese Aeronautical Establishment participated in a Fatigue and Fracture Mechanics Cooperative Program. The program objectives were to identify and characterize crack initiation and growth of small cracks (10 microns to 2 mm long) in commonly used US and PRC aluminum alloys, to improve fracture mechanics analyses of surface- and corner-crack configurations, and to develop improved life-prediction methods. Fatigue and small-crack tests were performed on single-edgenotch tension (SENT) specimens and large-crack tests were conducted on center-crack tension specimens for constant-amplitude (stress ratios of -1, 0, and 0.5) and Mini-TWIST spectrum loading. The plastic replica method was used to monitor the initiation and growth of small fatigue cracks at the semicircular notch. Crack growth results from each laboratory on 7075-T6 bare and LC9cs clad aluminum alloys agreed well and showed that fatigue life was mostly crack propagation from a material defect (inclusion particles or void) or from the cladding layer. Finite-element and weight-function methods were used to determine stress intensity factors for surface and corner cracks in the SENT specimens. Equations were then developed and used in a crack growth and crack-closure model to correlate small- and large-crack data and to make life predictions for various load histories. The cooperative program produced useful experimental data and efficient analysis methods for improving life predictions. The results should ultimately improve aircraft structural reliability and safety.

  6. An effective plasma membrane proteomics approach for small tissue samples

    PubMed Central

    Smolders, Katrien; Lombaert, Nathalie; Valkenborg, Dirk; Baggerman, Geert; Arckens, Lutgarde

    2015-01-01

    Advancing the quest for new drug targets demands the development of innovative plasma membrane proteome research strategies applicable to small, functionally defined tissue samples. Biotinylation of acute tissue slices and streptavidin pull-down followed by shotgun proteomics allowed the selective extraction and identification of >1,600 proteins of which >60% are associated with the plasma membrane, including (G-protein coupled) receptors, ion channels and transporters, and this from mm3-scale tissue. PMID:26047021

  7. Natural Direct and Indirect Effects on the Exposed: Effect Decomposition under Weaker Assumptions

    PubMed Central

    Vansteelandt, Stijn; VanderWeele, Tyler J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary We define natural direct and indirect effects on the exposed. We show that these allow for effect decomposition under weaker identification conditions than population natural direct and indirect effects. When no confounders of the mediator-outcome association are affected by the exposure, identification is possible under essentially the same conditions as for controlled direct effects. Otherwise, identification is still possible with additional knowledge on a nonidentifiable selection-bias function which measures the dependence of the mediator effect on the observed exposure within confounder levels, and which evaluates to zero in a large class of realistic data-generating mechanisms. We argue that natural direct and indirect effects on the exposed are of intrinsic interest in various applications. We moreover show that they coincide with the corresponding population natural direct and indirect effects when the exposure is randomly assigned. In such settings, our results are thus also of relevance for assessing population natural direct and indirect effects in the presence of exposure-induced mediator-outcome confounding, which existing methodology has not been able to address. PMID:22989075

  8. Direct and indirect effects of climate change on amphibian populations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blaustein, Andrew R.; Walls, Susan C.; Bancroft, Betsy A.; Lawler, Joshua J.; Searle, Catherine L.; Gervasi, Stephanie S.

    2010-01-01

    As part of an overall decline in biodiversity, populations of many organisms are declining and species are being lost at unprecedented rates around the world. This includes many populations and species of amphibians. Although numerous factors are affecting amphibian populations, we show potential direct and indirect effects of climate change on amphibians at the individual, population and community level. Shifts in amphibian ranges are predicted. Changes in climate may affect survival, growth, reproduction and dispersal capabilities. Moreover, climate change can alter amphibian habitats including vegetation, soil, and hydrology. Climate change can influence food availability, predator-prey relationships and competitive interactions which can alter community structure. Climate change can also alter pathogen-host dynamics and greatly influence how diseases are manifested. Changes in climate can interact with other stressors such as UV-B radiation and contaminants. The interactions among all these factors are complex and are probably driving some amphibian population declines and extinctions.

  9. Wave and Wind Direction Effects on SFMR Brightness Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holbach, Heather; Uhlhorn, Eric; Bourassa, Mark

    2015-04-01

    Surface winds in a tropical cyclone are essential for determining its strength. Currently the Stepped-Frequency Microwave Radiometer (SFMR) and Global Positioning System (GPS) dropwindsondes are the main instruments used for obtaining in situ surface wind measurements. The platforms for these instruments are the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) P-3 and Air Force C-130J hurricane hunter aircraft. The SFMR measures sea surface microwave brightness temperatures at six frequencies ranging from 4.7 to 7.2 GHz. Surface wind speed estimates are obtained from these brightness temperatures by using a retrieval algorithm that employs a geophysical model function relating surface emissivity and wind speed. The SFMR is designed to obtain a single nadir track of surface wind speeds directly beneath the aircraft during level flight and not when turning because of the complexity of the wave field and foam distribution when the SFMR views the surface off-nadir or during aircraft rolls. However, the effects of the wave field on the measurements can be investigated using measurements obtained during the 2008 and 2014 Atlantic hurricane seasons. An SFMR module was flown in precipitation-free regions of the tropical cyclones to collect data at specified roll angles of 15°, 30°, 45°, and 60° in some cases. Excess brightness temperatures are then calculated with respect to zero wind speed values and independent of wind direction. An asymmetry is found in the resulting excess brightness temperatures. It is hypothesized that this asymmetry is caused by the direction of wave propagation and the angle at which the wave field is viewed by the SFMR. Wind direction may also play a role in the asymmetry. To analyze the asymmetry further measurement from WindSat will be used. Once the relationship is determined between surface wind speed, brightness temperature, and incidence angle a technique will be developed to obtain a surface wind speed when the aircraft is

  10. The direct magnetoelectric effect in ferroelectric-ferromagnetic epitaxial heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fina, I.; Dix, N.; Rebled, J. M.; Gemeiner, P.; Martí, X.; Peiró, F.; Dkhil, B.; Sánchez, F.; Fàbrega, L.; Fontcuberta, J.

    2013-08-01

    Ferroelectric (FE) and ferromagnetic (FM) materials engineered in horizontal heterostructures allow interface-mediated magnetoelectric coupling. The so-called converse magnetoelectric effect (CME) has been already demonstrated by electric-field poling of the ferroelectric layers and subsequent modification of the magnetic state of adjacent ferromagnetic layers by strain effects and/or free-carrier density tuning. Here we focus on the direct magnetoelectric effect (DME) where the dielectric state of a ferroelectric thin film is modified by a magnetic field. Ferroelectric BaTiO3 (BTO) and ferromagnetic CoFe2O4 (CFO) oxide thin films have been used to create epitaxial FE/FM and FM/FE heterostructures on SrTiO3(001) substrates buffered with metallic SrRuO3. It will be shown that large ferroelectric polarization and DME can be obtained by appropriate selection of the stacking order of the FE and FM films and their relative thicknesses. The dielectric permittivity, at the structural transitions of BTO, is strongly modified (up to 36%) when measurements are performed under a magnetic field. Due to the insulating nature of the ferromagnetic layer and the concomitant absence of the electric-field effect, the observed DME effect solely results from the magnetostrictive response of CFO elastically coupled to the BTO layer. These findings show that appropriate architecture and materials selection allow overcoming substrate-induced clamping in multiferroic multi-layered films.Ferroelectric (FE) and ferromagnetic (FM) materials engineered in horizontal heterostructures allow interface-mediated magnetoelectric coupling. The so-called converse magnetoelectric effect (CME) has been already demonstrated by electric-field poling of the ferroelectric layers and subsequent modification of the magnetic state of adjacent ferromagnetic layers by strain effects and/or free-carrier density tuning. Here we focus on the direct magnetoelectric effect (DME) where the dielectric state of a

  11. Biochemical studies of the multicopper oxidase (small laccase) from Streptomyces coelicolor using bioactive phytochemicals and site-directed mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Sherif, Mohammed; Waung, Debbie; Korbeci, Bihter; Mavisakalyan, Valentina; Flick, Robert; Brown, Greg; Abou-Zaid, Mamdouh; Yakunin, Alexander F; Master, Emma R

    2013-01-01

    Summary Multicopper oxidases can act on a broad spectrum of phenolic and non-phenolic compounds. These enzymes include laccases, which are widely distributed in plants and fungi, and were more recently identified in bacteria. Here, we present the results of biochemical and mutational studies of small laccase (SLAC), a multicopper oxidase from Streptomyces coelicolor (SCO6712). In addition to typical laccase substrates, SLAC was tested using phenolic compounds that exhibit antioxidant activity. SLAC showed oxidase activity against 12 of 23 substrates tested, including caffeic acid, ferulic acid, resveratrol, quercetin, morin, kaempferol and myricetin. The kinetic parameters of SLAC were determined for 2,2′-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonic acid), 2,6-dimethoxyphenol, quercetin, morin and myricetin, and maximum reaction rates were observed with myricetin, where kcat and Km values at 60°C were 8.1 (± 0.8) s−1 and 0.9 (± 0.3) mM respectively. SLAC had a broad pH optimum for activity (between pH 4 and 8) and temperature optimum at 60–70°C. It demonstrated remarkable thermostability with a half-life of over 10 h at 80°C and over 7 h at 90°C. Site-directed mutagenesis revealed 17 amino acid residues important for SLAC activity including the 10 His residues involved in copper coordination. Most notably, the Y229A and Y230A mutant proteins showed over 10-fold increase in activity compared with the wild-type SLAC, which was correlated to higher copper incorporation, while kinetic analyses with S929A predicts localization of this residue near the meta-position of aromatic substrates. Funding Information Funding for this research was provided by the Government of Ontario for the project ‘FFABnet: Functionalized Fibre and Biochemicals’ (ORF-RE-05-005), and the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada. PMID:23815400

  12. Investigating preventive-medicine consultations in first-opinion small-animal practice in the United Kingdom using direct observation.

    PubMed

    Robinson, N J; Brennan, M L; Cobb, M; Dean, R S

    2016-02-01

    Preventive-medicine consultations account for a large proportion of the veterinary caseload and previous research has suggested these consultations are fundamentally different from those in which the animal is presented for a specific health problem. There has been recent controversy around some aspects of preventive medicine for cats and dogs, and the full health benefits of the preventive-medicine consultation remain unclear. The aim of this study was to compare characteristics of the consultation and the problems discussed during the consultation between preventive-medicine consultations and other types of consultations. Data were gathered during direct observation of small-animal consultations in seven first-opinion practices in the United Kingdom. Data collected included type of clinical examination performed, patient signalment, and details of all problems discussed (including whether the problem was presenting or non-presenting, new or pre-existing, who had raised the problem, body system affected and whether an action was taken). A two-level multivariable logistic-regression model was developed, with canine and feline patients at Level 1 nested within consulting veterinary surgeons at Level 2, and a binary outcome variable of preventive-medicine consultation versus specific health-problem consultation. A total of 1807 patients were presented, of which 690 (38.2%) presented for a preventive-medicine consultation. Dogs were the most frequently presented species (n=1168; 64.6%) followed by cats (n=510; 28.2%), rabbits (n=86; 4.8%) and patients of other species (n=43; 2.4%). The five variables remaining in the multi-level model were whether multiple patients were presented, patient age, clinical examination type, weighing and number of problems discussed. Species, breed, sex, neutering status and practice did not remain in the final model. Many non-presenting problems, including both preventive-medicine problems and specific-health problems, were discussed and

  13. Direct and indirect cellular effects of aspartame on the brain.

    PubMed

    Humphries, P; Pretorius, E; Naudé, H

    2008-04-01

    The use of the artificial sweetener, aspartame, has long been contemplated and studied by various researchers, and people are concerned about its negative effects. Aspartame is composed of phenylalanine (50%), aspartic acid (40%) and methanol (10%). Phenylalanine plays an important role in neurotransmitter regulation, whereas aspartic acid is also thought to play a role as an excitatory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system. Glutamate, asparagines and glutamine are formed from their precursor, aspartic acid. Methanol, which forms 10% of the broken down product, is converted in the body to formate, which can either be excreted or can give rise to formaldehyde, diketopiperazine (a carcinogen) and a number of other highly toxic derivatives. Previously, it has been reported that consumption of aspartame could cause neurological and behavioural disturbances in sensitive individuals. Headaches, insomnia and seizures are also some of the neurological effects that have been encountered, and these may be accredited to changes in regional brain concentrations of catecholamines, which include norepinephrine, epinephrine and dopamine. The aim of this study was to discuss the direct and indirect cellular effects of aspartame on the brain, and we propose that excessive aspartame ingestion might be involved in the pathogenesis of certain mental disorders (DSM-IV-TR 2000) and also in compromised learning and emotional functioning.

  14. Differential effects of dopamine-directed treatments on cognition

    PubMed Central

    Ashby, F Gregory; Valentin, Vivian V; von Meer, Stella S

    2015-01-01

    Dopamine, a prominent neuromodulator, is implicated in many neuropsychiatric disorders. It has wide-ranging effects on both cortical and subcortical brain regions and on many types of cognitive tasks that rely on a variety of different learning and memory systems. As neuroscience and behavioral evidence for the existence of multiple memory systems and their corresponding neural networks accumulated, so did the notion that dopamine’s role is markedly different depending on which memory system is engaged. As a result, dopamine-directed treatments will have different effects on different types of cognitive behaviors. To predict what these effects will be, it is critical to understand: which memory system is mediating the behavior; the neural basis of the mediating memory system; the nature of the dopamine projections into that system; and the time course of dopamine after its release into the relevant brain regions. Consideration of these questions leads to different predictions for how changes in brain dopamine levels will affect automatic behaviors and behaviors mediated by declarative, procedural, and perceptual representation memory systems. PMID:26251602

  15. Differential effects of dopamine-directed treatments on cognition.

    PubMed

    Ashby, F Gregory; Valentin, Vivian V; von Meer, Stella S

    2015-01-01

    Dopamine, a prominent neuromodulator, is implicated in many neuropsychiatric disorders. It has wide-ranging effects on both cortical and subcortical brain regions and on many types of cognitive tasks that rely on a variety of different learning and memory systems. As neuroscience and behavioral evidence for the existence of multiple memory systems and their corresponding neural networks accumulated, so did the notion that dopamine's role is markedly different depending on which memory system is engaged. As a result, dopamine-directed treatments will have different effects on different types of cognitive behaviors. To predict what these effects will be, it is critical to understand: which memory system is mediating the behavior; the neural basis of the mediating memory system; the nature of the dopamine projections into that system; and the time course of dopamine after its release into the relevant brain regions. Consideration of these questions leads to different predictions for how changes in brain dopamine levels will affect automatic behaviors and behaviors mediated by declarative, procedural, and perceptual representation memory systems.

  16. Episodic acidification of small streams in the northeastern united states: Effects on fish populations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baker, J.P.; Van Sickle, J.; Gagen, C.J.; DeWalle, David R.; Sharpe, W.E.; Carline, R.F.; Baldigo, Barry P.; Murdoch, Peter S.; Bath, D.W.; Kretser, W.A.; Simonin, H.A.; Wigington, P.J.

    1996-01-01

    As part of the Episodic Response Project (ERP), we studied the effects of episodic acidification on fish in 13 small streams in the northeastern United States: four streams in the Adirondack region of New York, four streams in the Catskills, New York, and five streams in the northern Appalachian Plateau, Pennsylvania. In situ bioassays with brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) and a forage fish species (blacknose dace (Rhinichthys atratulus], mottled sculpin (Cottus bairdi), or slimy sculpin (Cottus cognatus), depending on the region) measured direct toxicity. Movements of individual brook trout, in relation to stream chemistry, were monitored using radiotelemetry. Electrofishing surveys assessed fish community status and the density and biomass of brook trout in each stream. During low flow, all streams except one had chemical conditions considered suitable for the survival and reproduction of most fish species (median pH 6.0-7.2 during low flow; inorganic Al 100-200 ??g/L. We conclude that episodic acidification can have long-term effects on fish communities in small streams.

  17. Fast-forward generation of effective artificial small RNAs for enhanced antiviral defense in plants.

    PubMed

    Carbonell, Alberto; Carrington, James C; Daròs, José-Antonio

    Artificial small RNAs (sRNAs) are short ≈21-nt non-coding RNAs engineered to inactivate sequence complementary RNAs. In plants, they have been extensively used to silence cellular transcripts in gene function analyses and to target invading RNA viruses to induce resistance. Current artificial sRNA-based antiviral resistance in plants is mainly limited to a single virus, and is jeopardized by the emergence of mutations in the artificial sRNA target site or by the presence of co-infecting viruses. Hence, there is a need to further develop the artificial sRNA approach to generate more broad and durable antiviral resistance in plants. A recently developed toolbox allows for the time and cost-effective large-scale production of artificial sRNA constructs in plants. The toolbox includes the P-SAMS web tool for the automated design of artificial sRNAs, and a new generation of artificial microRNA and synthetic trans-acting small interfering RNA (syn-tasiRNA) vectors for direct cloning and high expression of artificial sRNAs. Here we describe how the simplicity and high-throughput capability of these new technologies should accelerate the study of artificial sRNA-based antiviral resistance in plants. In particular, we discuss the potential of the syn-tasiRNA approach as a promising strategy for developing more effective, durable and broad antiviral resistance in plants.

  18. Effects of lubricants on binary direct compression mixtures.

    PubMed

    Uğurlu, T; Halaçoğlu, M D; Türkoğlu, M

    2010-04-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of conventional lubricants including a new candidate lubricant on binary direct compression mixtures. Magnesium stearate (MGST), stearic acid (STAC), glyceryl behenate (COMP) and hexagonal boron nitride (HBN) were tested. The binary mixtures were 1:1 combinations of spray dried lactose (FlowLac 100), dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (Emcompress), and modified starch (Starch 1500) with microcrystalline cellulose (Avicel PH 102). Tablets were manufactured on a single-station instrumented tablet press with and without lubricants. In the case of unlubricated granules, the modified starch-microcrystalline cellulose mixture provided the highest percent compressibility value at 8.25%, spray dried lactose-microcrystalline cellulose mixture was 7.33%, and the dialcium phosphate dihydrate-microcrystalline cellulose mixture was 5.79%. Their corresponding tablet crushing strength values were: 104 N, 117 N, and 61 N, respectively. The lubricant concentrations studied were 0.5, 1, 2, and 4%. Effects of lubricant type and lubricant concentration on crushing strength were analyzed using a factorial ANOVA model. It was found that the Avicel PH 102-Starch 1500 mixture showed the highest lubricant sensitivity (110 N vs. 9 N), the least affected formulation was FlowLac-Avicel PH 102 mixture (118 N vs. 62 N). The crushing strength vs. concentration curve for MGST showed a typical biphasic profile, a fast drop up to 1% and a slower decline between 1 and 4%. The STAC, COMP, and HBN for all formulations showed a shallow linear decline of tablet crushing strength with increasing lubricant concentration. The HBN was as effective as MGST as a lubricant, and did not show a significant negative effect on the crushing strength of the tablets. The COMP and STAC also did not interfere with the crushing strength, however, they were not as effective lubricants as MGST or HBN.

  19. Gd(iii) and Mn(ii) complexes for dynamic nuclear polarization: small molecular chelate polarizing agents and applications with site-directed spin labeling of proteins.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Monu; Bahrenberg, Thorsten; Can, Thach V; Caporini, Marc A; Silvers, Robert; Heiliger, Jörg; Smith, Albert A; Schwalbe, Harald; Griffin, Robert G; Corzilius, Björn

    2016-10-21

    We investigate complexes of two paramagnetic metal ions Gd(3+) and Mn(2+) to serve as polarizing agents for solid-state dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) of (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N at magnetic fields of 5, 9.4, and 14.1 T. Both ions are half-integer high-spin systems with a zero-field splitting and therefore exhibit a broadening of the mS = -1/2 ↔ +1/2 central transition which scales inversely with the external field strength. We investigate experimentally the influence of the chelator molecule, strong hyperfine coupling to the metal nucleus, and deuteration of the bulk matrix on DNP properties. At small Gd-DOTA concentrations the narrow central transition allows us to polarize nuclei with small gyromagnetic ratio such as (13)C and even (15)N via the solid effect. We demonstrate that enhancements observed are limited by the available microwave power and that large enhancement factors of >100 (for (1)H) and on the order of 1000 (for (13)C) can be achieved in the saturation limit even at 80 K. At larger Gd(iii) concentrations (≥10 mM) where dipolar couplings between two neighboring Gd(3+) complexes become substantial a transition towards cross effect as dominating DNP mechanism is observed. Furthermore, the slow spin-diffusion between (13)C and (15)N, respectively, allows for temporally resolved observation of enhanced polarization spreading from nuclei close to the paramagnetic ion towards nuclei further removed. Subsequently, we present preliminary DNP experiments on ubiquitin by site-directed spin-labeling with Gd(3+) chelator tags. The results hold promise towards applications of such paramagnetically labeled proteins for DNP applications in biophysical chemistry and/or structural biology.

  20. Direct and indirect effects of the glyphosate formulation Glifosato Atanor® on freshwater microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Vera, María Solange; Di Fiori, Eugenia; Lagomarsino, Leonardo; Sinistro, Rodrigo; Escaray, Roberto; Iummato, María Mercedes; Juárez, Angela; Ríos de Molina, María del Carmen; Tell, Guillermo; Pizarro, Haydée

    2012-10-01

    Glyphosate-based formulations are among the most widely used herbicides in the world. The effect of the formulation Glifosato Atanor(®) on freshwater microbial communities (phytoplankton, bacterioplankton, periphyton and zooplankton) was assessed through a manipulative experiment using six small outdoor microcosms of small volume. Three of the microcosms were added with 3.5 mg l(-1) of glyphosate whereas the other three were left as controls without the herbicide. The treated microcosms showed a significant increase in total phosphorus, not fully explained by the glyphosate present in the Glifosato Atanor(®). Therefore, part of the phosphorus should have come from the surfactants of the formulation. The results showed significant direct and indirect effects of Glifosato Atanor(®) on the microbial communities. A single application of the herbicide caused a fast increase both in the abundance of bacterioplankton and planktonic picocyanobacteria and in chlorophyll a concentration in the water column. Although metabolic alterations related to oxidative stress were induced in the periphyton community, the herbicide favored its development, with a large contribution of filamentous algae typical of nutrient-rich systems, with shallow and calm waters. An indirect effect of the herbicide on the zooplankton was observed due to the increase in the abundance of the rotifer Lecane spp. as a consequence of the improved food availability given by picocyanobacteria and bacteria. The formulation affected directly a fraction of copepods as a target. It was concluded that the Glifosato Atanor(®) accelerates the deterioration of the water quality, especially when considering small-volume water systems.

  1. Metastable structures and size effects in small group dynamics.

    PubMed

    Lauro Grotto, Rosapia; Guazzini, Andrea; Bagnoli, Franco

    2014-01-01

    In his seminal works on group dynamics Bion defined a specific therapeutic setting allowing psychoanalytic observations on group phenomena. In describing the setting he proposed that the group was where his voice arrived. This physical limit was later made operative by assuming that the natural dimension of a therapeutic group is around 12 people. Bion introduced a theory of the group aspects of the mind in which proto-mental individual states spontaneously evolve into shared psychological states that are characterized by a series of features: (1) they emerge as a consequence of the natural tendency of (both conscious and unconscious) emotions to combine into structured group patterns; (2) they have a certain degree of stability in time; (3) they tend to alternate so that the dissolution of one is rapidly followed by the emergence of another; (4) they can be described in qualitative terms according to the nature of the emotional mix that dominates the state, in structural terms by a kind of typical "leadership" pattern, and in "cognitive" terms by a set of implicit expectations that are helpful in explaining the group behavior (i.e., the group behaves "as if" it was assuming that). Here we adopt a formal approach derived from Socio-physics in order to explore some of the structural and dynamic properties of this small group dynamics. We will described data from an analytic DS model simulating small group interactions of agents endowed with a very simplified emotional and cognitive dynamic in order to assess the following main points: (1) are metastable collective states allowed to emerge in the model and if so, under which conditions in the parameter space? (2) can these states be differentiated in structural terms? (3) to what extent are the emergent dynamic features of the systems dependent of the system size? We will finally discuss possible future applications of the quantitative descriptions of the interaction structure in the small group clinical setting.

  2. Metastable structures and size effects in small group dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Lauro Grotto, Rosapia; Guazzini, Andrea; Bagnoli, Franco

    2014-01-01

    In his seminal works on group dynamics Bion defined a specific therapeutic setting allowing psychoanalytic observations on group phenomena. In describing the setting he proposed that the group was where his voice arrived. This physical limit was later made operative by assuming that the natural dimension of a therapeutic group is around 12 people. Bion introduced a theory of the group aspects of the mind in which proto-mental individual states spontaneously evolve into shared psychological states that are characterized by a series of features: (1) they emerge as a consequence of the natural tendency of (both conscious and unconscious) emotions to combine into structured group patterns; (2) they have a certain degree of stability in time; (3) they tend to alternate so that the dissolution of one is rapidly followed by the emergence of another; (4) they can be described in qualitative terms according to the nature of the emotional mix that dominates the state, in structural terms by a kind of typical “leadership” pattern, and in “cognitive” terms by a set of implicit expectations that are helpful in explaining the group behavior (i.e., the group behaves “as if” it was assuming that). Here we adopt a formal approach derived from Socio-physics in order to explore some of the structural and dynamic properties of this small group dynamics. We will described data from an analytic DS model simulating small group interactions of agents endowed with a very simplified emotional and cognitive dynamic in order to assess the following main points: (1) are metastable collective states allowed to emerge in the model and if so, under which conditions in the parameter space? (2) can these states be differentiated in structural terms? (3) to what extent are the emergent dynamic features of the systems dependent of the system size? We will finally discuss possible future applications of the quantitative descriptions of the interaction structure in the small group clinical

  3. Mechanisms and Effects of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Giordano, James; Bikson, Marom; Kappenman, Emily S; Clark, Vincent P; Coslett, H Branch; Hamblin, Michael R; Hamilton, Roy; Jankord, Ryan; Kozumbo, Walter J; McKinley, R Andrew; Nitsche, Michael A; Reilly, J Patrick; Richardson, Jessica; Wurzman, Rachel; Calabrese, Edward

    2017-01-01

    The US Air Force Office of Scientific Research convened a meeting of researchers in the fields of neuroscience, psychology, engineering, and medicine to discuss most pressing issues facing ongoing research in the field of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) and related techniques. In this study, we present opinions prepared by participants of the meeting, focusing on the most promising areas of research, immediate and future goals for the field, and the potential for hormesis theory to inform tDCS research. Scientific, medical, and ethical considerations support the ongoing testing of tDCS in healthy and clinical populations, provided best protocols are used to maximize safety. Notwithstanding the need for ongoing research, promising applications include enhancing vigilance/attention in healthy volunteers, which can accelerate training and support learning. Commonly, tDCS is used as an adjunct to training/rehabilitation tasks with the goal of leftward shift in the learning/treatment effect curves. Although trials are encouraging, elucidating the basic mechanisms of tDCS will accelerate validation and adoption. To this end, biomarkers (eg, clinical neuroimaging and findings from animal models) can support hypotheses linking neurobiological mechanisms and behavioral effects. Dosage can be optimized using computational models of current flow and understanding dose-response. Both biomarkers and dosimetry should guide individualized interventions with the goal of reducing variability. Insights from other applied energy domains, including ionizing radiation, transcranial magnetic stimulation, and low-level laser (light) therapy, can be prudently leveraged.

  4. Mechanisms and Effects of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Giordano, James; Bikson, Marom; Kappenman, Emily S.; Clark, Vincent P.; Coslett, H. Branch; Hamblin, Michael R.; Hamilton, Roy; Jankord, Ryan; Kozumbo, Walter J.; McKinley, R. Andrew; Nitsche, Michael A.; Reilly, J. Patrick; Richardson, Jessica; Wurzman, Rachel

    2017-01-01

    The US Air Force Office of Scientific Research convened a meeting of researchers in the fields of neuroscience, psychology, engineering, and medicine to discuss most pressing issues facing ongoing research in the field of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) and related techniques. In this study, we present opinions prepared by participants of the meeting, focusing on the most promising areas of research, immediate and future goals for the field, and the potential for hormesis theory to inform tDCS research. Scientific, medical, and ethical considerations support the ongoing testing of tDCS in healthy and clinical populations, provided best protocols are used to maximize safety. Notwithstanding the need for ongoing research, promising applications include enhancing vigilance/attention in healthy volunteers, which can accelerate training and support learning. Commonly, tDCS is used as an adjunct to training/rehabilitation tasks with the goal of leftward shift in the learning/treatment effect curves. Although trials are encouraging, elucidating the basic mechanisms of tDCS will accelerate validation and adoption. To this end, biomarkers (eg, clinical neuroimaging and findings from animal models) can support hypotheses linking neurobiological mechanisms and behavioral effects. Dosage can be optimized using computational models of current flow and understanding dose–response. Both biomarkers and dosimetry should guide individualized interventions with the goal of reducing variability. Insights from other applied energy domains, including ionizing radiation, transcranial magnetic stimulation, and low-level laser (light) therapy, can be prudently leveraged. PMID:28210202

  5. Direct observation of the spin-dependent Peltier effect.

    PubMed

    Flipse, J; Bakker, F L; Slachter, A; Dejene, F K; van Wees, B J

    2012-02-05

    The Peltier coefficient describes the amount of heat that is carried by an electrical current when it passes through a material. When two materials with different Peltier coefficients are placed in contact with one another, the Peltier effect causes a net flow of heat either towards or away from the interface between them. Spintronics describes the transport of electric charge and spin angular momentum by separate spin-up and spin-down channels in a device. The observation that spin-up and spin-down charge transport channels are able to transport heat independently of each other has raised the possibility that spin currents could be used to heat or cool the interface between materials with different spin-dependent Peltier coefficients. Here, we report the direct observation of the heating and cooling of such an interface by a spin current. We demonstrate this spin-dependent Peltier effect in a spin-valve pillar structure that consists of two ferromagnetic layers separated by a non-ferromagnetic metal. Using a three-dimensional finite-element model, we extract spin-dependent Peltier coefficients in the range -0.9 to -1.3 mV for permalloy. The magnetic control of heat flow could prove useful for the cooling of nanoscale electronic components or devices.

  6. Direct observation of the spin-dependent Peltier effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flipse, J.; Bakker, F. L.; Slachter, A.; Dejene, F. K.; van Wees, B. J.

    2012-03-01

    The Peltier coefficient describes the amount of heat that is carried by an electrical current when it passes through a material. When two materials with different Peltier coefficients are placed in contact with one another, the Peltier effect causes a net flow of heat either towards or away from the interface between them. Spintronics describes the transport of electric charge and spin angular momentum by separate spin-up and spin-down channels in a device. The observation that spin-up and spin-down charge transport channels are able to transport heat independently of each other has raised the possibility that spin currents could be used to heat or cool the interface between materials with different spin-dependent Peltier coefficients. Here, we report the direct observation of the heating and cooling of such an interface by a spin current. We demonstrate this spin-dependent Peltier effect in a spin-valve pillar structure that consists of two ferromagnetic layers separated by a non-ferromagnetic metal. Using a three-dimensional finite-element model, we extract spin-dependent Peltier coefficients in the range -0.9 to -1.3 mV for permalloy. The magnetic control of heat flow could prove useful for the cooling of nanoscale electronic components or devices.

  7. Effects of thermal inflation on small scale density perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Sungwook E.; Lee, Hyung-Joo; Lee, Young Jae; Stewart, Ewan D.; Zoe, Heeseung E-mail: ohsk111@kaist.ac.kr E-mail: jcap@profstewart.org

    2015-06-01

    In cosmological scenarios with thermal inflation, extra eras of moduli matter domination, thermal inflation and flaton matter domination exist between primordial inflation and the radiation domination of Big Bang nucleosynthesis. During these eras, cosmological perturbations on small scales can enter and re-exit the horizon, modifying the power spectrum on those scales. The largest modified scale, k{sub b}, touches the horizon size when the expansion changes from deflation to inflation at the transition from moduli domination to thermal inflation. We analytically calculate the evolution of perturbations from moduli domination through thermal inflation and evaluate the curvature perturbation on the constant radiation density hypersurface at the end of thermal inflation to determine the late time curvature perturbation. Our resulting transfer function suppresses the power spectrum by a factor 0∼ 5 at k >> k{sub b}, with k{sub b} corresponding to anywhere from megaparsec to subparsec scales depending on the parameters of thermal inflation. Thus, thermal inflation might be constrained or detected by small scale observations such as CMB distortions or 21cm hydrogen line observations.

  8. Direct AFM observations of impurity effects on a lysozyme crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakada, Toshitaka; Sazaki, Gen; Miyashita, Satoru; Durbin, Stephen D.; Komatsu, Hiroshi

    1999-01-01

    Impurity effects on the growth of tetragonal lysozyme crystals have been studied using in situ atomic force microscopy. Commercially available hen egg white lysozyme was characterized by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with silver staining, and purified by re-crystallization and successive high pressure liquid chromatography. On the (1 1 0) crystal surface, there was no significant difference in morphology between crystals grown in commercial and in purified solutions. On the (1 0 1) surface, however, a large number of small particles were found when the crystal was grown in the commercial solution, while the surface grown in the purified solution was quite smooth. Among the typical residual impurities contained in commercial lysozyme, only covalently bound lysozyme dimer yielded such particles. From measurements of particle separation and an estimate of the critical nucleation size, we infer that the particles reduced the step velocity according to the mechanism described by Cabrera et al. [N. Cabrera, D.A. Vermilyea, in: R.H. Doremus et al. (Eds.), Growth and Perfection of Crystals, 1958, P. 393].

  9. [Small-scale, homelike care environments for people with dementia: effects on residents, family caregivers and nursing staff].

    PubMed

    Verbeek, H; Zwakhalen, S M G; van Rossum, E; Kempen, G I J M; Hamers, J P H

    2013-12-01

    Institutional dementia care is increasingly directed towards small-scale and homelike care environments, in The Netherlands as well as abroad. In these facilities, a small number of residents, usually six to eight, live together, and normal daily household activities and social participation are emphasized. In a quasi-experimental study, we studied the effects of small-scale, homelike care environments on residents (n = 259), family caregivers (n = 206) and nursing staff (n = 305). We compared two types of institutional nursing care during a 1 year period (baseline assessment and follow-up measurements at 6 and 12 months): (28) small-scale, homelike care environments and (21) psychogeriatric wards in traditional nursing homes. A matching procedure was applied to increase comparability of residents at baseline regarding functional status and cognition. This study was unable to demonstrate convincing overall effects of small-scale, homelike care facilities. On our primary outcome measures, such as quality of life and behaviour of residents and job satisfaction and motivation of nursing staff, no differences were found with traditional nursing homes. We conclude that small-scale, homelike care environments are not necessarily a better care environment than regular nursing homes and other types of living arrangements should be considered carefully. This provides opportunities for residents and their family caregivers to make a choice which care facility suits their wishes and beliefs best.

  10. Effect of longer battery life on small bowel capsule endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ou, George; Shahidi, Neal; Galorport, Cherry; Takach, Oliver; Lee, Terry; Enns, Robert

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine if longer battery life improves capsule endoscopy (CE) completion rates. METHODS: A retrospective study was performed at a tertiary, university-affiliated hospital in Vancouver, Canada. Patients who underwent CE with either PillCam™ SB2 or SB2U between 01/2010 and 12/2013 were considered for inclusion. SB2 and SB2U share identical physical dimensions but differ in their battery lives (8 h vs 12 h). Exclusion criteria included history of gastric or small bowel surgery, endoscopic placement of CE, interrupted view of major landmarks due to technical difficulty or significant amount of debris, and repeat CE using same system. Basic demographics, comorbidities, medications, baseline bowel habits, and previous surgeries were reviewed. Timing of major landmarks in CE were recorded, and used to calculate gastric transit time, small bowel transit time, and total recording time. A complete CE study was defined as visualization of cecum. Transit times and completion rates were compared. RESULTS: Four hundred and eight patients, including 208 (51.0%) males, were included for analysis. The mean age was 55.5 ± 19.3 years. The most common indication for CE was gastrointestinal bleeding (n = 254, 62.3%), followed by inflammatory bowel disease (n = 86, 21.1%). There was no difference in gastric transit times (group difference 0.90, 95%CI: 0.72-1.13, P = 0.352) and small bowel transit times (group difference 1.07, 95%CI: 0.95-1.19, P = 0.261) between SB2U and SB2, but total recording time was about 14% longer in the SB2U group (95%CI: 10%-18%, P < 0.001) and there was a corresponding trend toward higher completion rate (88.2% vs 93.2%, OR = 1.78, 95%CI 0.88-3.63, P = 0.111). There was no statistically significant difference in the rates of positive findings (OR = 0.98, 95%CI: 0.64-1.51, P = 0.918). CONCLUSION: Extending the operating time of CE may be a simple method to improve completion rate although it does not affect the rate of positive findings. PMID

  11. Effects of Small-Group Learning on Transfer: A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pai, Hui-Hua; Sears, David A.; Maeda, Yukiko

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the potential benefit of small-group learning on transfer performance using the method of meta-analysis. Results showed positive support for the hypothesis that small-group learning can increase students' transfer performance (average effect size of 0.30). Unlike reviews of effects of cooperation on learning, this…

  12. Designing Organizational Effectiveness Studies of Rural and Small School Districts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, E. Robert; And Others

    Considerable attention has been given to organizational effectiveness of public sector organizations at all levels: local, state, and federal. Public education has not escaped scrutiny. Current examinations of the effectiveness, efficiency, and quality of education are more intense than that of other public sector organizations. The organizational…

  13. Microbiota-Independent Ameliorative Effects of Antibiotics on Spontaneous Th2-Associated Pathology of the Small Intestine.

    PubMed

    Han, Daehee; Walsh, Matthew C; Kim, Kwang Soon; Hong, Sung-Wook; Lee, Junyoung; Yi, Jaeu; Rivas, Gloriany; Surh, Charles D; Choi, Yongwon

    2015-01-01

    We have previously generated a mouse model of spontaneous Th2-associated disease of the small intestine called TRAF6ΔDC, in which dendritic cell (DC)-intrinsic expression of the signaling mediator TRAF6 is ablated. Interestingly, broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment ameliorates TRAF6ΔDC disease, implying a role for commensal microbiota in disease development. However, the relationship between the drug effects and commensal microbiota status remains to be formally demonstrated. To directly assess this relationship, we have now generated TRAF6ΔDC bone marrow chimera mice under germ-free (GF) conditions lacking commensal microbiota, and found, unexpectedly, that Th2-associated disease is actually exacerbated in GF TRAF6ΔDC mice compared to specific pathogen-free (SPF) TRAF6ΔDC mice. At the same time, broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment of GF TRAF6ΔDC mice has an ameliorative effect similar to that observed in antibiotics-treated SPF TRAF6ΔDC mice, implying a commensal microbiota-independent effect of broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment. We further found that treatment of GF TRAF6ΔDC mice with broad-spectrum antibiotics increases Foxp3+ Treg populations in lymphoid organs and the small intestine, pointing to a possible mechanism by which treatment may directly exert an immunomodulatory effect. To investigate links between the exacerbated phenotype of the small intestines of GF TRAF6ΔDC mice and local microbiota, we performed microbiotic profiling of the luminal contents specifically within the small intestines of diseased TRAF6ΔDC mice, and, when compared to co-housed control mice, found significantly increased total bacterial content characterized by specific increases in Firmicutes Lactobacillus species. These data suggest a protective effect of Firmicutes Lactobacillus against the spontaneous Th2-related inflammation of the small intestine of the TRAF6ΔDC model, and may represent a potential mechanism for related disease phenotypes.

  14. Directionality and maneuvering effects on a surface ship underwater acoustic signature.

    PubMed

    Trevorrow, Mark V; Vasiliev, Boris; Vagle, Svein

    2008-08-01

    This work examines underwater source spectra of a small (560 tons, 40 m length), single-screw oceanographic vessel, focusing on directionality and effects of maneuvers. The measurements utilized a set of four, self-contained buoys with GPS positioning, each recording two calibrated hydrophones with effective acoustic bandwidth from 150 Hz to 5 kHz. In straight, constant-speed runs at speeds up to 6.2 m s(-1), the ship source spectra showed spectral levels in reasonable agreement with reference spectra. The broadband source level was observed to increase as approximately speed to the fourth power over the range of 2.6-6.1 m s(-1), partially biased at low speeds by nonpropulsion machinery signals. Source directionality patterns were extracted from variations in source spectra while the ship transited past the buoy field. The observed spectral source levels exhibited a broadside maximum, with bow and stern aspect reduced by approximately 12-9 dB, respectively, independent of frequency. An empirical model is proposed assuming that spectral source levels exhibit simultaneous variations in aspect angle, speed, and turn rate. After correction for source directionality and speed during turning maneuvers, an excess of up to 18 dB in one-third octave source levels was observed.

  15. Foreign Direct Investment: Effects of a "Cheap" Dollar

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-11

    Direct Investment.” The American Economic Review, June 1997, pp. 447-465. 12 Lipsey , Robert E. and Irving B. Kravis, The Competitive Position of U.S...information on this topic. Nevertheless, direct investment transactions as a whole seem to be tied more directly to the relative rates of economic ...growth between economies, as well as expected long-run rates of return and other economic factors, than to relatively short-term movements in the exchange

  16. Genetic Modulation of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Effects on Cognition

    PubMed Central

    Wiegand, Ariane; Nieratschker, Vanessa; Plewnia, Christian

    2016-01-01

    High inter-individual variability substantially challenges the explanatory power of studies on the modulation of cognitive functions with transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). These differences in responsivity have been linked with a critical state-dependency of stimulation effects. In general, genetic diversity is a decisive biological basis of variations in neuronal network functioning. Therefore, it is most likely that inter-individual variability of tDCS-induced changes in cognitive functions is due to specific interactions between genetically determined network properties and the specific type of stimulation. In this context, predominantly the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) Val66Met and the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) Val108/158Met polymorphisms have been investigated. The studies on the interaction between the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism and the effect of brain stimulation indicate a critical but yet heterogeneous interaction. But up to now, data on the interplay between this polymorphism and tDCS on cognitive functioning are not available. However, recently, the functional Val(108/158)Met polymorphism in the COMT gene, that is particularly involved in the regulation of executive functions by means of the dopaminergic tone in frontal brain areas, has been demonstrated to specifically predict the effect of tDCS on cognitive control. Following an inverted U-shaped function, the high dopaminergic activity in Met allele homozygous individuals has been shown to be associated with a reduction of executive functioning by anodal tDCS to the prefrontal cortex. Consistently, Val homozygous individuals with lower dopaminergic tone show a clear reduction of response inhibition with cathodal tDCS. These findings exemplify the notion of a complex but neurophysiologically consistent interaction between genetically determined variations of neuronal activity and tDCS, particularly in the cognitive domain. Consequently, a systematic analysis and

  17. Health and environmental effects document for direct coal liquefaction - 1981.

    SciTech Connect

    Mellinger, P.J.; Wilson, B.W.; Mahlum, D.D.; Sever, L.E.; Olsen, A.R.

    1982-09-01

    This document presents initial estimates of potential human health effects from inhalation of nonmethane hydrocarbons (NMHC) that may be released from a future hypothetical industry producing about 600,000 bb1/day of synthetic fuel by direct liquefaction of coal. The assessment approach starts wth general assumptions that are then refined in a tiered sequence that considers available epidemiological, environmental and chemical data. The uncertainties involved in such an evaluation have been quantified where possible at this early stage of health risk analysis. Many surrogate data bases were considered for application to coal liquefaction including coke oven, British gas retort, roofing tar and asphalts, and cigarette smoke. The coke oven data base was selected for this assessment because the chemical and physical nature of coke oven emissions are judged to more closely approximate potential coal liquefaction emissions. Utilizing the extensive epidemiological data base for coke oven workers as a surrogate model, health effects from release of coal liquefaction NMHC may be quantified. This method results in estimates of about 1 x 10/sup -3/ excess cancer deaths/yr to an industrial work force of 7800 persons and 5 x 10/sup -2/ excess cancer deaths/yr in the U.S. population as a whole from NMHC that boil above 600/sup 0/F. Sources of uncertainty in the estimates are listed. Using these uncertainties, it is estimated that from 2 x 10/sup -4/ to 5 x 10/sup -3/ lung cancer deaths/yr may occur in the industrial work force and from 1 x 10/sup -2/ to 2.5 x 10/sup -1/ lung cancer deaths/yr in the U.S. population as a whole. On an individual basis, the excess lifetime risk to occupationally exposed workers is estimated to be 500 times greater than to members of the U.S. public.

  18. Ricinoleic acid and loperamide have opposite motor effects in the small and large intestine of the cat.

    PubMed

    Wienbeck, M; Wallenfels, M; Kortenhaus, E

    1987-07-01

    The actions of laxatives and antidiarrheal agents in the gut are incompletely understood. Therefore, the effects of Na ricinoleate 10(-4)-10(-2) g/kg b. w. and of loperamide 10(-4) g/kg b. w. on myoelectric activity and marker propulsion were studied in the small and large intestine of 7 unanesthetized cats. Intraduodenal application of ricinoleate briefly increased and then decreased spike activity in the small intestine; marker transit was delayed (92 +/- 18 min vs. 55 +/- 14 min in controls). Ricinoleate also initiated spike complexes of 10-215 sec duration. Transit from the right to the left colon was sometimes accelerated and sometimes delayed. The number of uncoupled slow waves was increased to 278% of control. Loperamide accelerated small intestinal transit to 17 +/- 6 min and markedly delayed it in the colon. At the same time it caused a strong and prolonged rise in colonic spike activity. When ricinoleate and loperamide were given together, their effects almost compensated for each other. The resulting net effect was similar to the data in the control experiments. It is concluded that laxatives and antidiarrheal agents alter not only transit, but also myoelectric activity in the small and large intestine. The effects are largely in opposite direction. Loperamide may, therefore, antagonize motor effects of ricinoleate in the gut.

  19. The study of effects of small perturbations on chaotic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Grebogi, C.; Yorke, J.A.

    1991-12-01

    This report discusses the following topics: controlling chaotic dynamical systems; embedding of experimental data; effect of noise on critical exponents of crises; transition to chaotic scattering; and distribution of floaters on a fluid surface. (LSP)

  20. Effective and robust infrared small target detection with the fusion of polydirectional first order derivative images under facet model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Bing; Xin, Yunhong

    2015-03-01

    The robust detection of IR small target acts as one of the key techniques in the infrared search and tracking system (IRSTS). This paper presents a new method of small-target detection which formulates the problem as the detection of Gaussian-like spot. Initially, the amendatory first-order directional derivative (AFODD) based on facet model is applied to get the polydirectional derivative IR images, and the direction information of targets is reserved in these images. Then, the AFODD images are fused together to ensure the robustness and effectiveness of target detection. At last, the Principal Component Analysis (PCA) method is carried out to make targets in the fusion image more prominent, so that they can be extracted out by a simple threshold segmentation. Experiment results show that the presented method performs well even in the IR images with complex backgrounds.

  1. Living on the edge: roads and edge effects on small mammal populations.

    PubMed

    Fuentes-Montemayor, Elisa; Cuarón, Alfredo D; Vázquez-Domínguez, Ella; Benítez-Malvido, Julieta; Valenzuela-Galván, David; Andresen, Ellen

    2009-07-01

    1. Roads may affect wildlife populations through habitat loss and disturbances, as they create an abrupt linear edge, increasing the proportion of edge exposed to a different habitat. Three types of edge effects have been recognized: abiotic, direct biotic, and indirect biotic. 2. We explored the direct biotic edge effects of 3- to 4-m wide roads, and also a previously unrecognized type of edge effect: social. We live-trapped two threatened endemic rodents from Cozumel Island (Oryzomys couesi cozumelae and Reithrodontomys spectabilis) in 16 plots delimited by roads on two sides, to compare edge effects between two adjacent edges (corners), single-edge and interior forest, on life history and social variables. 3. No significant edge effects were observed on the life-history variables, with the exception of differences in body condition between males and females of O. c. cozumelae near edges. Both species showed significant and contrasting effects on their social variables. 4. O. c. cozumelae was distributed according to its age and sex: the proportion of adults and males was higher in interior than near edges, while juveniles and females were more abundant near edges. More nonreproductive females were present in corners than in single-edge and interior, while the opposite distribution was observed for nonreproductive males. 5. The distribution of R. spectabilis was related to its age and reproductive condition, but not to its sex. The proportion of adults was significantly higher in corners, while juveniles were only caught in single-edge and interior quadrants. The proportion of reproductive individuals was higher in edge than interior quadrants, while reproductive females were only present in edge quadrants. 6. We found significant differences between the quadrants with the greatest edge exposure in comparison with other quadrants. The social edge effects we identified complement the typology of edge effects recognized in ecological literature. Our study provides

  2. Direct measurement of Lorentz transformation with Doppler effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shao-Guang

    For space science and astronomy the fundamentality of one-way velocity of light (OWVL) is selfevident. The measurement of OWVL (distance/interval) and the clock synchronization with light-signal transfer make a logical circulation. This means that OWVL could not be directly measured but only come indirectly from astronomical method (Romer's Io eclipse and Bradley's sidereal aberration), furthermore, the light-year by definitional OWVL and the trigonometry distance with AU are also un-measurable. For to solve this problem two methods of clock synchronization were proposed: The direct method is that at one end of dual-speed transmissionline with single clock measure the arriving-time difference of longitudinal wave and transverse wave or ordinary light and extraordinary light, again to calculate the collective sending-time of two wave with Yang's /shear elastic-modulus ratio (E/k) or extraordinary/ordinary light refractive-index ratio (ne/no), which work as one earthquake-station with single clock measures first-shake time and the distance to epicenter; The indirect method is that the one-way wavelength l is measured by dual-counters Ca and Cb and computer's real-time operation of reading difference (Nb - Na) of two counters, the frequency f is also simultaneously measured, then l f is just OWVL. Therefore, with classical Newtonian mechanics and ether wave optics, OWVL can be measured in the Galileo coordinate system with an isotropic length unit (1889 international meter definition). Without any hypotheses special relativity can entirely establish on the metrical results. When a certain wavelength l is defined as length unit, foregoing measurement of one-way wavelength l will become as the measurement of rod's length. Let a rigidity-rod connecting Ca and Cb moves relative to lamp-house with velocity v, rod's length L = (Nb - Na) l will change follow v by known Doppler effect, i.e., L(q) =L0 (1+ (v/c) cos q), where L0 is the proper length when v= 0, v• r = v cos q

  3. A review of the direct and indirect effects of neonicotinoids and fipronil on vertebrate wildlife.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, David; Morrissey, Christy; Mineau, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Concerns over the role of pesticides affecting vertebrate wildlife populations have recently focussed on systemic products which exert broad-spectrum toxicity. Given that the neonicotinoids have become the fastest-growing class of insecticides globally, we review here 150 studies of their direct (toxic) and indirect (e.g. food chain) effects on vertebrate wildlife--mammals, birds, fish, amphibians and reptiles. We focus on two neonicotinoids, imidacloprid and clothianidin, and a third insecticide, fipronil, which also acts in the same systemic manner. Imidacloprid and fipronil were found to be toxic to many birds and most fish, respectively. All three insecticides exert sub-lethal effects, ranging from genotoxic and cytotoxic effects, and impaired immune function, to reduced growth and reproductive success, often at concentrations well below those associated with mortality. Use of imidacloprid and clothianidin as seed treatments on some crops poses risks to small birds, and ingestion of even a few treated seeds could cause mortality or reproductive impairment to sensitive bird species. In contrast, environmental concentrations of imidacloprid and clothianidin appear to be at levels below those which will cause mortality to freshwater vertebrates, although sub-lethal effects may occur. Some recorded environmental concentrations of fipronil, however, may be sufficiently high to harm fish. Indirect effects are rarely considered in risk assessment processes and there is a paucity of data, despite the potential to exert population-level effects. Our research revealed two field case studies of indirect effects. In one, reductions in invertebrate prey from both imidacloprid and fipronil uses led to impaired growth in a fish species, and in another, reductions in populations in two lizard species were linked to effects of fipronil on termite prey. Evidence presented here suggests that the systemic insecticides, neonicotinoids and fipronil, are capable of exerting direct

  4. Functional Nanostructures for Effective Delivery of Small Interfering RNA Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Cheol Am; Nam, Yoon Sung

    2014-01-01

    Small interfering RNA (siRNA) has proved to be a powerful tool for target-specific gene silencing via RNA interference (RNAi). Its ability to control targeted gene expression gives new hope to gene therapy as a treatment for cancers and genetic diseases. However, siRNA shows poor pharmacological properties, such as low serum stability, off-targeting, and innate immune responses, which present a significant challenge for clinical applications. In addition, siRNA cannot cross the cell membrane for RNAi activity because of its anionic property and stiff structure. Therefore, the development of a safe, stable, and efficient system for the delivery of siRNA therapeutics into the cytoplasm of targeted cells is crucial. Several nanoparticle platforms for siRNA delivery have been developed to overcome the major hurdles facing the therapeutic uses of siRNA. This review covers a broad spectrum of non-viral siRNA delivery systems developed for enhanced cellular uptake and targeted gene silencing in vitro and in vivo and discusses their characteristics and opportunities for clinical applications of therapeutic siRNA. PMID:25285170

  5. Functional nanostructures for effective delivery of small interfering RNA therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Hong, Cheol Am; Nam, Yoon Sung

    2014-01-01

    Small interfering RNA (siRNA) has proved to be a powerful tool for target-specific gene silencing via RNA interference (RNAi). Its ability to control targeted gene expression gives new hope to gene therapy as a treatment for cancers and genetic diseases. However, siRNA shows poor pharmacological properties, such as low serum stability, off-targeting, and innate immune responses, which present a significant challenge for clinical applications. In addition, siRNA cannot cross the cell membrane for RNAi activity because of its anionic property and stiff structure. Therefore, the development of a safe, stable, and efficient system for the delivery of siRNA therapeutics into the cytoplasm of targeted cells is crucial. Several nanoparticle platforms for siRNA delivery have been developed to overcome the major hurdles facing the therapeutic uses of siRNA. This review covers a broad spectrum of non-viral siRNA delivery systems developed for enhanced cellular uptake and targeted gene silencing in vitro and in vivo and discusses their characteristics and opportunities for clinical applications of therapeutic siRNA.

  6. Direct and indirect effects of UV-B exposure on litter decomposition: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Song, Xinzhang; Peng, Changhui; Jiang, Hong; Zhu, Qiuan; Wang, Weifeng

    2013-01-01

    Ultraviolet-B (UV-B) exposure in the course of litter decomposition may have a direct effect on decomposition rates via changing states of photodegradation or decomposer constitution in litter while UV-B exposure during growth periods may alter chemical compositions and physical properties of plants. Consequently, these changes will indirectly affect subsequent litter decomposition processes in soil. Although studies are available on both the positive and negative effects (including no observable effects) of UV-B exposure on litter decomposition, a comprehensive analysis leading to an adequate understanding remains unresolved. Using data from 93 studies across six biomes, this introductory meta-analysis found that elevated UV-B directly increased litter decomposition rates by 7% and indirectly by 12% while attenuated UV-B directly decreased litter decomposition rates by 23% and indirectly increased litter decomposition rates by 7%. However, neither positive nor negative effects were statistically significant. Woody plant litter decomposition seemed more sensitive to UV-B than herbaceous plant litter except under conditions of indirect effects of elevated UV-B. Furthermore, levels of UV-B intensity significantly affected litter decomposition response to UV-B (P<0.05). UV-B effects on litter decomposition were to a large degree compounded by climatic factors (e.g., MAP and MAT) (P<0.05) and litter chemistry (e.g., lignin content) (P<0.01). Results suggest these factors likely have a bearing on masking the important role of UV-B on litter decomposition. No significant differences in UV-B effects on litter decomposition were found between study types (field experiment vs. laboratory incubation), litter forms (leaf vs. needle), and decay duration. Indirect effects of elevated UV-B on litter decomposition significantly increased with decay duration (P<0.001). Additionally, relatively small changes in UV-B exposure intensity (30%) had significant direct effects on litter

  7. MicroRNA-181b is downregulated in non-small cell lung cancer and inhibits cell motility by directly targeting HMGB1

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yun; Hu, Xu; Xia, Daokui; Zhang, Songlin

    2016-01-01

    The expression of microRNA-181b (miR-181b) has been investigated in various human cancers. However, the expression and functions of miR-181b in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are yet to be studied. In the present study, miR-181b expression in NSCLC tissues and cell lines was analyzed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and was shown to be recurrently downregulated. Following transfection of the H23 and H522 NSCLC cells lines with miR-181b, cell migration and cell invasion assays were performed to evaluate the effect of miR-181b overexpression on the cell motility. It was demonstrated that overexpression of miR-181b inhibited the migration and invasion of NSCLC cells. Subsequently, bioinformatics analysis, western blotting and luciferase reporter assays were conducted to investigate the mechanism underlying the miR-181b-mediated inhibition of NSCLC cell motility. It was found that miR-181b directly targeted high-mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) in NSCLC cells. These results reveal a novel therapeutic target, the miR-181b/HMGB1 axis, in NSCLC. Treatment approaches targeting this axis will be beneficial to prevent NSCLC from becoming invasive. PMID:27895789

  8. MicroRNA-181b is downregulated in non-small cell lung cancer and inhibits cell motility by directly targeting HMGB1.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yun; Hu, Xu; Xia, Daokui; Zhang, Songlin

    2016-11-01

    The expression of microRNA-181b (miR-181b) has been investigated in various human cancers. However, the expression and functions of miR-181b in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are yet to be studied. In the present study, miR-181b expression in NSCLC tissues and cell lines was analyzed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and was shown to be recurrently downregulated. Following transfection of the H23 and H522 NSCLC cells lines with miR-181b, cell migration and cell invasion assays were performed to evaluate the effect of miR-181b overexpression on the cell motility. It was demonstrated that overexpression of miR-181b inhibited the migration and invasion of NSCLC cells. Subsequently, bioinformatics analysis, western blotting and luciferase reporter assays were conducted to investigate the mechanism underlying the miR-181b-mediated inhibition of NSCLC cell motility. It was found that miR-181b directly targeted high-mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) in NSCLC cells. These results reveal a novel therapeutic target, the miR-181b/HMGB1 axis, in NSCLC. Treatment approaches targeting this axis will be beneficial to prevent NSCLC from becoming invasive.

  9. Analysis of small latent transforming growth factor-beta complex formation and dissociation by surface plasmon resonance. Absence of direct interaction with thrombospondins.

    PubMed

    Bailly, S; Brand, C; Chambaz, E M; Feige, J J

    1997-06-27

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGFbeta) is a pluripotent regulator of cell growth and differentiation. The growth factor is expressed as a latent complex that must be converted to an active form before interacting with its ubiquitous high affinity receptors. This conversion involves the release of the mature TGFbeta through disruption of the noncovalent interactions with its propeptide or latency associated protein (LAP). Complex formation or dissociation between LAP and TGFbeta plays a very important role in TGFbeta biological activity at different steps. To further characterize the kinetic parameters of this interaction, we have employed surface plasmon resonance biosensor methodology. Using this technique, we observed real time association of LAP with mature TGFbeta1. The complex formation showed an equilibrium Kd around 3-7 nM. Furthermore, we observed dissociation of the complex in the presence of extreme pH, chaotropic agents, or plasmin, confirming their effects on TGFbeta activation. The same approach was used to examine whether latent TGFbeta1 could interact with thrombospondins, previously described as activators of latent TGFbeta. Using this method, we could not detect any direct interaction of thrombospondins with either LAP alone, TGFbeta1 alone, or the small latent TGFbeta1 complex. This suggests that activation of latent TGFbeta1 complex by thrombospondins is through an indirect mechanism.

  10. EFFECTS OF NEOMYCIN AND PENICILLIN ADMINISTRATION ON MUCOSAL PROLIFERATION OF THE MOUSE SMALL INTESTINE

    PubMed Central

    Khoury, Kenneth A.; Floch, Martin H.; Herskovic, Teodoro

    1969-01-01

    The effects of an oral neomycin and penicillin regimen on intestinal bacteriology and on morphology and function of the small intestine of mice were investigated. Quantitative and qualitative stool cultures on selective media of the treated animals revealed only growth of yeast organisms. The treated animals developed enlargement of the ceca with fluid contents and watery stools, resembling characteristics of germfree animals. Radioautography with tritiated thymidine revealed an increased epithelial cell migration rate in the mice treated with the antibiotics for 3 to 5 wk. A slight increase in villus height was also noted. The treated male mice showed greater variance than the treated females in epithelial cell migration rates. Histochemical staining reactions showed a decrease in nonspecific esterase and in NADH dehydrogenase activity in the proximal gut of the antibiotic animals. Stains of distal gut and those for acid and alkaline phosphatase, NADPH dehydrogenase, lactic dehydrogenase, and succinic dehydrogenase were similar to the controls. A slight increase in sucrase activity and a slight decrease in lactase activity in the antibiotic animals was observed in contrast to control animals. Germfree mice, however, had greater sucrase and lactase activity. Transport of L-methionine was slightly reduced in the distal segment of the treated animals. Since the direction of these changes is away from the intestinal state observed in germfree animals, they are probably the result of the direct action of the antibiotics on the gut. PMID:4388518

  11. Special Education and Direct Instruction: An Effective Combination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinder, Diane; Kubina, Richard; Marchand-Martella, Nancy E.

    2005-01-01

    This paper considers the unique and successful combination of using Direct Instruction programs with special education populations. The introduction establishes the need for valid, scientifically based materials. Next is a description of studies using Direct Instruction with students who have high-incidence disabilities. Thirty-seven studies were…

  12. A small jab - a big effect: nonspecific immunomodulation by vaccines.

    PubMed

    Benn, Christine S; Netea, Mihai G; Selin, Liisa K; Aaby, Peter

    2013-09-01

    Recent epidemiological studies have shown that, in addition to disease-specific effects, vaccines against infectious diseases have nonspecific effects on the ability of the immune system to handle other pathogens. For instance, in randomized trials tuberculosis and measles vaccines are associated with a substantial reduction in overall child mortality, which cannot be explained by prevention of the target disease. New research suggests that the nonspecific effects of vaccines are related to cross-reactivity of the adaptive immune system with unrelated pathogens, and to training of the innate immune system through epigenetic reprogramming. Hence, epidemiological findings are backed by immunological data. This generates a new understanding of the immune system and about how it can be modulated by vaccines to impact the general resistance to disease.

  13. Adiposity Has No Direct Effect on Carotid Intima-Media Thickness in Adolescents and Young Adults: Use of Structural Equation Modeling to Elucidate Indirect & Direct Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Zhiqian; Khoury, Philip R.; McCoy, Connie E.; Shah, Amy S.; Kimball, Thomas R.; Dolan, Lawrence M.; Urbina, Elaine M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) is associated with CV events in adults. Thicker cIMT is found in youth with CV risk factors including obesity. Which risk factors have the most effect upon cIMT in youth and whether obesity has direct or indirect effects is not known. We used structural equation modeling to elucidate direct and indirect pathways through which obesity and other risk factors were associated with cIMT. Methods We collected demographics, anthropometrics and laboratory data on 784 subjects age 10–24 years (mean 18.0 ± 3.3 years). Common, bulb and internal carotid cIMT were measured by ultrasound. Multivariable regression analysis was performed to assess independent determinants of cIMT. Analyses were repeated with structural equation modeling to determine direct and indirect effects. Results Multivariable regression models explained 11%–22% of variation of cIMT. Age, sex and systolic blood pressure (BP) z-score were significant determinants of all cIMT segments. Body mass index (BMI) z-score, race, presence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and non-HDL were significant for some segments (all p=0.05). The largest direct effect on cIMT was age (0.312) followed by BP (0.228), Blood glucose control (0.108) and non-HDL (0.134). BMI only had a significant indirect effect through blood glucose control, BP & non-HDL. High sensitivity C-reactive protein (CRP) had a small indirect effect through blood glucose control (all p=0.05). Conclusions Age and BP are the major factors with direct effect on cIMT. Glucose and non-HDL were also important in this cohort with a high prevalence of T2DM. BMI only has indirect effects, through other risk factors. Traditional CV risk factors have important direct effects on cIMT in the young, but adiposity exerts its influence only through other CV risk factors. PMID:26752690

  14. Application of the radiating effect concept to implement measures stipulated by the European Water Framework Directive.

    PubMed

    Meier, Georg; Zumbroich, Thomas; Roehrig, Jackson; Souvignet, Maxime

    2012-01-01

    Hydromorphological deficits of European rivers and creeks are a major reason for the fact that the good ecological status stipulated by the European Water Framework Directive has not been achieved. In order to overcome these deficits, the German state of North Rhine-Westphalia calls for the implementation of a radiating effect concept to facilitate the planning of cost-effective restoration measures. The radiating effect concept states that natural or near-natural sections of water bodies have a positive impact on adjacent hydromorphologically altered sections. Transforming this concept into concrete measures will contribute to creating and boosting such radiating effects. We have applied the radiating effect concept to 11 small streams in a low mountain range and assessed its efficiency by comparing the biological and hydromorphological data of 48 sampling sites. Our findings show that near-natural stream sections have a positive effect on the ecological status of adjacent hydromorphologically altered sections. This study provides an innovative approach to the implementation of Integrated River Basin Management at a local scale. Its results are potentially of major interest to water managers dealing with the challenge of prioritizing river restoration measures. Nevertheless, specific issues such as assessing the influence of artificial barriers limiting the radiating effects need to be further investigated.

  15. Cystic fibrosis lung disease starts in the small airways: can we treat it more effectively?

    PubMed

    Tiddens, Harm A W M; Donaldson, Scott H; Rosenfeld, Margaret; Paré, Peter D

    2010-02-01

    The aims of this article are to summarize existing knowledge regarding the pathophysiology of small airways disease in cystic fibrosis (CF), to speculate about additional mechanisms that might play a role, and to consider the available or potential options to treat it. In the first section, we review the evidence provided by pathologic, physiologic, and imaging studies suggesting that obstruction of small airways begins early in life and is progressive. In the second section we discuss how the relationships between CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), ion transport, the volume of the periciliary liquid layer and airway mucus might lead to defective mucociliary clearance in small airways. In addition, we discuss how chronic endobronchial bacterial infection and a chronic neutrophilic inflammatory response increase the viscosity of CF secretions and exacerbate the clearance problem. Next, we discuss how the mechanical properties of small airways could be altered early in the disease process and how remodeling can contribute to small airways disease. In the final section, we discuss how established therapies impact small airways disease and new directions that may lead to improvement in the treatment of small airways disease. We conclude that there are many reasons to believe that small airways play an important role in the pathophysiology of (early) CF lung disease. Therapy should be aimed to target the small airways more efficiently, especially with drugs that can correct the basic defect at an early stage of disease.

  16. The effect of crystal tilt on high resolution micrographs of small metal particles

    SciTech Connect

    Malm, J.O.; O`Keefe, M.A.

    1993-01-01

    The structure of small (1.5-5 nm) metal particles has been studied by high resolution transmission electron microscopy. For particles of this size, it is not possible to use tilting techniques (selected area diffraction), which means that the microscopist has to rely on the image when deciding in which direction the particle is viewed. This work points out some of the problems of intuitive determination of the viewing direction. (DLC)

  17. Small Al clusters. I - The effect of basis set and correlation on the geometry of small Al clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Pettersson, Lars G. M.

    1987-01-01

    A detailed study is presented of the basis set requirements and effects of correlation on the geometry and structure of small Al(n) clusters n = 2, 4, and 13. An effective core potential (ECP) is developed from the Huzinaga basis which accurately reproduces the all-electron results. It is found that depolarization functions are very important in computing the bond length, and that the bond contraction obtained is about as large for a 13-atom cluster as for the Al(4) rhombus structure. With d functions on each center in Al(13), a bond distance shorter than the bulk is obtained, as expected. The inclusion of correlation in Al(4) is found to be less important than the addition of polarization functions for determining the bond length, but increases substantially the calculated atomization energy. These calibration calculations allow an accurate treatment for Al(n) clusters to be designed.

  18. Effect of Health Literacy on the Utilization of Advance Directives Based on the Health Belief Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henkelman, Wallace J.

    2010-01-01

    Research has demonstrated that only a small proportion of individuals in the United States complete advance directives as part of their planning for end-of-life care. This study sought to determine if health literacy is a significant factor in advance directive completion as has been posited by previous researchers. Analysis of the data collected…

  19. Photoacoustic microscopy of electronic acupuncture (EA) effect in small animals.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jinge; Wu, Dan; Tang, Yong; Jiang, Huabei

    2017-02-01

    Acupuncture has been an effective treatment for various pain in China for several thousand years. However, the mechanisms underlying this mysterious ancient healing are still largely unknown. Here we applied photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) to investigate brain hemodynamic changes in response to electronic acupuncture (EA) at ST36 (Zusanli). Due to the high optical absorption of blood at 532 nm, PAM could sensitively probe changes in hemoglobin concentration (HbT, i.e., cerebral blood volume [CBV]) of cortical regions in high resolution. Six healthy mice were stimulated at the acupoint and three healthy mice were stimulated at sham points. Remarkable CBV changes in sensorimotor and retrosplenial agranular cortex were observed. Results showed the potential of PAM as a visualization tool to study the acupuncture effect on brain hemodynamics in animal models. (a) Schematic showing the stimulation points. (b) B-scan images overlaid with mouse atlas. (c) & (d) Statistical results of CBV changes from cortical regions.

  20. [Plant sterols, cholesterol precursors and oxysterols: small amounts, big effects].

    PubMed

    Olkkonen, Vesa M; Gylling, Helena; Ikonen, Elina

    2015-01-01

    Noncholesterol sterols are present in the body in very low concentrations compared with cholesterol. Minor structural changes in sterols give them completely individual biological activities. Steroid hormones are the best known example of this. The knowledge of other relatives of cholesterol, particularly plant sterols, cholesterol precursors and oxysterols, their properties, physiological effects, significance in disease processes and diagnostic applications has recently undergone a rapid increase.

  1. Effects of crack aspect ratio on the behavior of small surface cracks in fatigue: Part I. Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravichandran, K. S.

    1997-01-01

    A simple simulation of alternate growth of a small surface crack in the surface and depth directions was performed to illustrate the changes in crack aspect ratio, induced by grain boundaries, as a function of crack size. It is shown that at small crack sizes, large variations in aspect ratio, a/c ( a is the crack depth and c is the half-surface length), occur, due to local crack front perturbations induced by grains that are oriented for crack growth. At these crack sizes, the assumption of a semicircular crack shape ( a/c=1.0) was found to cause errors in stress intensity range (Δ K) calculations. This, in turn, led to significant scatter or “anomaly” in small crack growth rates relative to large cracks. At large crack sizes, the effects of local crack front perturbations on crack aspect ratio and Δ K were found to be insignificant. As a result, the scatter in crack growth data was found to decrease to a negligible level at large crack sizes. It is suggested that the limiting crack size above which the small crack behaves as a large crack, l 2=10 d ( d = grain size), proposed by Taylor and Knott, is related to the crack size above which the effects due to aspect ratio variations are small.

  2. Direct and residual effects of manure on soil chemical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nastri, A.; Triberti, L.; Giordani, G.; Comellini, F.; Baldoni, G.

    2009-04-01

    ha-1 (+ 29%) and + 166 kg ha-1 (+107%), respectively, compared to the control. These significant increments were obtained linearly, at mean annual rates of: 0.15 t ha-1 year-1 for SOC, 20 kg ha-1 for TN and 4.18 kg ha-1 for P2O5. During the first 18 years, doubling the manure supply (M2) caused further increments (72%, 76% and 112% increases for SOC, TN and P2O5, respectively, compared to M1). The complete interruption of M2 application, from 1984 onward, gradually decreased the positive effects. In the 1990-93 period, no differences between M1 and M2 were detected. After 18 years all the amounts were lower in M2 than in M1. However, a residual effect of the double manuring was still evident: M2 plots had higher SOC, TN and P2O5, contents compared to the unfertilized control (+3.1 t ha-1, +0.21 t ha-1 and +88 kg ha-1, respectively). Inorganic fertilization, in the absence of manure, did not affect SOC dynamic, whereas it had significant cumulative effects on TN (+0.94 t ha-1 (+26%) increase in the '99-02 period compared to the initial contents) and P2O5, with 223 kg ha-1 (+160%) increment. Treatments slightly influenced pH (6.43, on average): compared to the unfertilized control, manure increased it a little (+2.7%), while mineral fertilization had an opposite effect (-2.7%). In conclusion, the direct influences of manure on main components of soil fertility appeared cumulative with time and proportional to the application rates, at least up to 40 t ha-1 year-1 of fresh material. Residual effects gradually disappeared, but at low speed, thus their study requires really long experiments, lasting more than 20-years. Inorganic fertilization could increase nitrogen and, even more, available phosphorus content in the soil, but, in our research where crop residues are always removed, it had a null effect on SOC.

  3. Controlled deposition of a high-performance small-molecule organic single-crystal transistor array by direct ink-jet printing.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-Hoon; Yoo, Byungwook; Anthony, John E; Park, Sung Kyu

    2012-01-24

    Ink-jet printed small-molecule organic single-crystal transistors are realized by using selective surface energy modification, precise control of volume density of ink droplets on spatially patterned areas, and a co-solvent system to control solvent evaporation properties. The single-crystal formation in bottom-contact-structured transistors via direct printing is expected to permit high-density array fabrication in large-area electronics.

  4. The effects of mud rheology on annular hole cleaning in directional wells

    SciTech Connect

    Okrajni, S.S.; Azar, J.J.

    1986-08-01

    The effects of field-measured mud rheological properties on cuttings transport in directional well drilling were studied experimentally. Water and bentonite/polymer muds were used, and angles of annulus inclination ranging from 0 to 90/sup 0/ from vertical. Experimental data were processed to express the cuttings transport quantitatively through annular cuttings concentration (vol %) at steady state. Three separate regions of hole inclination can be identified regarding cuttings transport: 0 to 45/sup 0/, 45 to 55/sup 0/, and 55 to 90/sup 0/. The effect of laminar flow dominates cuttings transport in low-angle wells (0 to 45/sup 0/). In high-angle wells (55 to 90/sup 0/), the effect of turbulent flow predominates. In the range of intermediate inclination (45 to 55/sup 0/), turbulent and laminar flow generally have similar effects. In laminar flow, higher mud yield values and yield-point/plastic viscosity (YP/PV) ratio provide better cuttings transport. The effect of mud yield value is significant in the range of 0 to 45/sup 0/ hole inclination and becomes small or even negligible in the range of 55 to 90/sup 0/. The effects of mud yield value and YP/PV ratio are more significant for lower annular fluid velocities. In turbulent flow, the cuttings transport was generally not affected by the mud rheological properties.

  5. Formation of structure in small lead clusters under thermal effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baidyshev, V. S.; Gafner, Yu. Ya.

    2016-12-01

    The thermal effect on lead clusters with radii up to 5.5 nm has been investigated by the molecular dynamics method using a modified tight-binding potential TB-SMA. The melting of Pb nanoparticles of these sizes is strictly homogeneous, without the formation of a surface liquidlike layer. The primary fcc phase in the particles is retained upon heating in the overwhelming majority of model experiments. An analysis of the structure formation during crystallization has shown that structures with pentagonal symmetry are preferred for lead clusters in this case. It is noted that an increase in the nanoparticle size leads to the dominance of the dodecahedral structure over the icosahedral one.

  6. The Effect of Extra Small Group Session during PBL Implementation on Student's Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khalil, Mahmoud Salah; Al Rukban, Mohammad Othman

    2010-01-01

    Problem based learning (PBL) started to spread in health professions in Saudi Arabia at the beginning of this century. There are several challenges facing its implementation such as defects on interpersonal communications and self-directed learning. These challenges would affect students' performance in small group discussions and their…

  7. 76 FR 26948 - Small Business Jobs Act Tour: Selected Provisions Having an Effect on Government Contracting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 13 CFR Parts 121, 124, 125, 126, and 127 Small Business Jobs Act Tour: Selected Provisions Having... Provisions Having an Effect on Government that announced a series of public meetings on the implementation...

  8. Relevant Prior Knowledge Moderates the Effect of Elaboration during Small Group Discussion on Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Blankenstein, Floris M.; Dolmans, Diana H. J. M.; Van der Vleuten, Cees P. M.; Schmidt, Henk G.

    2013-01-01

    This study set out to test whether relevant prior knowledge would moderate a positive effect on academic achievement of elaboration during small-group discussion. In a 2 × 2 experimental design, 66 undergraduate students observed a video showing a small-group problem-based discussion about thunder and lightning. In the video, a teacher asked…

  9. Effects of Group Size on Students Mathematics Achievement in Small Group Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enu, Justice; Danso, Paul Amoah; Awortwe, Peter K.

    2015-01-01

    An ideal group size is hard to obtain in small group settings; hence there are groups with more members than others. The purpose of the study was to find out whether group size has any effects on students' mathematics achievement in small group settings. Two third year classes of the 2011/2012 academic year were selected from two schools in the…

  10. Assessing the Effects of Small School Size on Mathematics Achievement: A Propensity Score-Matching Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyse, Adam E.; Keesler, Venessa; Schneider, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    Background: Small schools have been promoted as an educational reform that is capable of improving student outcomes. However, a survey of the research on small schools indicates that much of the movement for decreasing school size is based primarily on correlational methods that do not control for selection effects in the data. In addition,…

  11. Direct effects of fatty meals and adiposity on oxidised low-density lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Laguna-Camacho, Antonio; Alonso-Barreto, Arely S; Mendieta-Zerón, Hugo

    2015-01-01

    High-fat intake and high adiposity contribute to hyperlipaemia. In a hyperlipaemic state, lipoproteins infiltrate arterial wall where they are modified and cause an immune response characteristic of atherosclerosis. A small fraction of modified lipoproteins including oxidised low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) returns to circulation. The present study tracked high-fat meals during four weeks as to find effects of sustained frequency change on adiposity and ox-LDL. The findings indicated that changes in frequency of consumption of high-fat eating episodes correlated directly with changes in adiposity and ox-LDL. Hence the number of fatty meals consumed by people with overweight or obesity in few weeks could affect the atherogenic process.

  12. Small Effective Population Sizes and Rare Nonsynonymous Variants in Potyviruses

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Austin L.

    2009-01-01

    Analysis of nucleotide sequence polymorphism in complete genomes of 12 species of potyviruses (single-stranded, positive-sense RNA viruses, family Potyviridae) revealed evidence that long-term effective population sizes of these viruses are on the order of 104. Comparison of nucleotide diversity in non-coding regions and at synonymous and nonsynonymous sites in coding regions showed that purifying selection has acted to eliminate numerous deleterious mutations both at nonsynonymous sites and in non-coding regions. The ratio of nonsynonymous to synonymous polymorphic sites increased as a function of the number of genomes sampled, whereas mean gene diversity at nonsynonymous polymorphic sites decreased with increasing sample size at a substantially faster rate than does mean gene diversity at synonymous polymorphic sites. Very similar relationships were observed both in available genomic sequences of 12 potyvirus species and in subsets created by randomly sampling from among 98 TuMV genomes. Taken together, these observations imply that a greater proportion of nonsynonymous than of synonymous variants are relatively rare as the result of ongoing purifying selection, and thus many nonsynonymous variants are unlikely to be discovered without extensive sampling. PMID:19695658

  13. Dark matter directional detection in non-relativistic effective theories

    SciTech Connect

    Catena, Riccardo

    2015-07-01

    We extend the formalism of dark matter directional detection to arbitrary one-body dark matter-nucleon interactions. The new theoretical framework generalizes the one currently used, which is based on 2 types of dark matter-nucleon interaction only. It includes 14 dark matter-nucleon interaction operators, 8 isotope-dependent nuclear response functions, and the Radon transform of the first 2 moments of the dark matter velocity distribution. We calculate the recoil energy spectra at dark matter directional detectors made of CF{sub 4}, CS{sub 2} and {sup 3}He for the 14 dark matter-nucleon interactions, using nuclear response functions recently obtained through numerical nuclear structure calculations. We highlight the new features of the proposed theoretical framework, and present our results for a spherical dark matter halo and for a stream of dark matter particles. This study lays the foundations for model independent analyses of dark matter directional detection experiments.

  14. Dark matter directional detection in non-relativistic effective theories

    SciTech Connect

    Catena, Riccardo

    2015-07-20

    We extend the formalism of dark matter directional detection to arbitrary one-body dark matter-nucleon interactions. The new theoretical framework generalizes the one currently used, which is based on 2 types of dark matter-nucleon interaction only. It includes 14 dark matter-nucleon interaction operators, 8 isotope-dependent nuclear response functions, and the Radon transform of the first 2 moments of the dark matter velocity distribution. We calculate the recoil energy spectra at dark matter directional detectors made of CF{sub 4}, CS{sub 2} and {sup 3}He for the 14 dark matter-nucleon interactions, using nuclear response functions recently obtained through numerical nuclear structure calculations. We highlight the new features of the proposed theoretical framework, and present our results for a spherical dark matter halo and for a stream of dark matter particles. This study lays the foundations for model independent analyses of dark matter directional detection experiments.

  15. Physical and chemical effects of direct aqueous advanced oxidation processing on green sand foundry mold materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clobes, Jason Kenneth

    Iron foundries using the common green sand molding process have increasingly been incorporating aqueous advanced oxidation (AO) systems to reduce the consumption of sand system bentonite clay and coal raw materials by and to decrease their volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions. These AO systems typically use a combination of sonication, ozone aeration, and hydrogen peroxide to treat and recycle slurries of sand system baghouse dust, which is rich in clay and coal. While the overall effects of AO on raw material consumption and organic emissions are known, the mechanisms behind these effects are not well understood. This research examined the effects of bench-scale direct aqueous AO processing on green sand mold materials at the micro level. Bench-scale AO processing, including acoustic sonication, ozone/oxygen aeration, and hydrogen peroxide dramatically decreased the particle sizes of both western bentonite and foundry sand system baghouse dust. Bench-scale AO processing was shown to effectively separate the clay material from the larger silica and coal particles and to extensively break up the larger clay agglomerates. The acoustic sonication component of AO processing was the key contributor to enhanced clay recovery. Acoustic sonication alone was slightly more effective than combined component AO in reducing the particle sizes of the baghouse dust and in the recovery of clay yields in the supernatant during sedimentation experiments. Sedimentation separation results correlated well with the increase in small particle concentrations due to AO processing. Clay suspension viscosity decreased with AO processing due to enhanced dispersion of the particles. X-ray diffraction of freeze-dried baghouse dust indicated that AO processing does not rehydrate calcined montmorillonite and does not increase the level of interlayer water hydration in the dry clays. Zeta potential measurements indicated that AO processing also does not produce any large changes in the

  16. The shielding effect of small-scale martian surface geometry on ultraviolet flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moores, J. E.; Smith, P. H.; Tanner, R.; Schuerger, A. C.; Venkateswaran, K. J.

    2007-12-01

    The atmosphere of Mars does little to attenuate incoming ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Large amounts of UV radiation sterilize the hardiest of terrestrial organisms within minutes, and chemically alter the soil such that organic molecules at or near the surface are rapidly destroyed. Thus the survival of any putative martian life near the surface depends to a large extent on how much UV radiation it receives. Variations in small-scale geometry of the surface such as pits, trenches, flat faces and overhangs can have a significant effect on the incident UV flux and may create "safe havens" for organisms and organic molecules. In order to examine this effect, a 1-D radiative transfer sky model with 836 meshed points (plus the Sun) was developed which includes both diffuse and direct components of the surface irradiance. This model derives the variation of UV flux with latitude and an object's Geometric Shielding Ratio (a ratio which describes the geometry of each situation). The best protection is offered by overhangs with flux reduced to a factor of 1.8±0.2×10 of the unprotected value, a reduction which does not vary significantly by latitude. Pits and cracks are less effective with a reduction in UV flux of only up to 4.5±0.5×10 for the modeled scenarios; however, they are more effective for the same geometric shielding ratio than overhangs at high latitudes due to the low height of the Sun in the sky. Lastly, polar faces of rocks have the least effective shielding geometry with at most a 1.1±0.1×10 reduction in UV flux. Polar faces of rocks are most effective at mid latitudes where the Sun is never directly overhead, as at tropical latitudes, and never exposes the back of the rock, as at polar latitudes. In the most favorable cases, UV flux is sufficiently reduced such that organic in-fall could accumulate beneath overhanging surfaces and in pits and cracks. As well, hardy terrestrial microorganisms such as Bacillus pumilus could persist for up to 100 sols on

  17. Effect of Directional Array Size on the Measurement of Airframe Noise Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Thomas F.; Humphreys, William M., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    A study was conducted to examine the effects of overall size of directional (or phased) arrays on the measurement of aeroacoustic components. An airframe model was mounted in the potential core of an open-jet windtunnel, with the directional arrays located outside the flow in an anechoic environment. Two array systems were used; one with a solid measurement angle that encompasses 31.6 deg.of source directivity and a smaller one that encompasses 7.2 deg. The arrays, and sub-arrays of various sizes, measured noise from a calibrator source and flap edge model setups. In these cases, noise was emitted from relatively small, but finite size source regions, with intense levels compared to other sources. Although the larger arrays revealed much more source region detail, the measured source levels were substantially reduced due to finer resolution compared to that of the smaller arrays. To better understand the measurements quantitatively, an analytical model was used to define the basic relationships between array to source region sizes and measured output level. Also, the effect of noise scattering by shear layer turbulence was examined using the present data and those of previous studies. Taken together, the two effects were sufficient to explain spectral level differences between arrays of different sizes. An important result of this study is that total (integrated) noise source levels are retrievable and the levels are independent of the array size as long as certain experimental and processing criteria are met. The criteria for both open and closed tunnels are discussed. The success of special purpose diagonal-removal processing in obtaining integrated results is apparently dependent in part on source distribution. Also discussed is the fact that extended sources are subject to substantial measurement error, especially for large arrays.

  18. Analysis of small scale turbulent structures and the effect of spatial scales on gas transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnieders, Jana; Garbe, Christoph

    2014-05-01

    The exchange of gases through the air-sea interface strongly depends on environmental conditions such as wind stress and waves which in turn generate near surface turbulence. Near surface turbulence is a main driver of surface divergence which has been shown to cause highly variable transfer rates on relatively small spatial scales. Due to the cool skin of the ocean, heat can be used as a tracer to detect areas of surface convergence and thus gather information about size and intensity of a turbulent process. We use infrared imagery to visualize near surface aqueous turbulence and determine the impact of turbulent scales on exchange rates. Through the high temporal and spatial resolution of these types of measurements spatial scales as well as surface dynamics can be captured. The surface heat pattern is formed by distinct structures on two scales - small-scale short lived structures termed fish scales and larger scale cold streaks that are consistent with the footprints of Langmuir Circulations. There are two key characteristics of the observed surface heat patterns: 1. The surface heat patterns show characteristic features of scales. 2. The structure of these patterns change with increasing wind stress and surface conditions. In [2] turbulent cell sizes have been shown to systematically decrease with increasing wind speed until a saturation at u* = 0.7 cm/s is reached. Results suggest a saturation in the tangential stress. Similar behaviour has been observed by [1] for gas transfer measurements at higher wind speeds. In this contribution a new model to estimate the heat flux is applied which is based on the measured turbulent cell size und surface velocities. This approach allows the direct comparison of the net effect on heat flux of eddies of different sizes and a comparison to gas transfer measurements. Linking transport models with thermographic measurements, transfer velocities can be computed. In this contribution, we will quantify the effect of small scale

  19. Trade-offs between robustness and small-world effect in complex networks

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Guan-Sheng; Tan, Suo-Yi; Wu, Jun; Holme, Petter

    2016-01-01

    Robustness and small-world effect are two crucial structural features of complex networks and have attracted increasing attention. However, little is known about the relation between them. Here we demonstrate that, there is a conflicting relation between robustness and small-world effect for a given degree sequence. We suggest that the robustness-oriented optimization will weaken the small-world effect and vice versa. Then, we propose a multi-objective trade-off optimization model and develop a heuristic algorithm to obtain the optimal trade-off topology for robustness and small-world effect. We show that the optimal network topology exhibits a pronounced core-periphery structure and investigate the structural properties of the optimized networks in detail. PMID:27853301

  20. Trade-offs between robustness and small-world effect in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Guan-Sheng; Tan, Suo-Yi; Wu, Jun; Holme, Petter

    2016-11-01

    Robustness and small-world effect are two crucial structural features of complex networks and have attracted increasing attention. However, little is known about the relation between them. Here we demonstrate that, there is a conflicting relation between robustness and small-world effect for a given degree sequence. We suggest that the robustness-oriented optimization will weaken the small-world effect and vice versa. Then, we propose a multi-objective trade-off optimization model and develop a heuristic algorithm to obtain the optimal trade-off topology for robustness and small-world effect. We show that the optimal network topology exhibits a pronounced core-periphery structure and investigate the structural properties of the optimized networks in detail.

  1. Trade-offs between robustness and small-world effect in complex networks.

    PubMed

    Peng, Guan-Sheng; Tan, Suo-Yi; Wu, Jun; Holme, Petter

    2016-11-17

    Robustness and small-world effect are two crucial structural features of complex networks and have attracted increasing attention. However, little is known about the relation between them. Here we demonstrate that, there is a conflicting relation between robustness and small-world effect for a given degree sequence. We suggest that the robustness-oriented optimization will weaken the small-world effect and vice versa. Then, we propose a multi-objective trade-off optimization model and develop a heuristic algorithm to obtain the optimal trade-off topology for robustness and small-world effect. We show that the optimal network topology exhibits a pronounced core-periphery structure and investigate the structural properties of the optimized networks in detail.

  2. Goal Direction and Effectiveness, Emotional Maturity, and Nuclear Family Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klever, Phillip

    2009-01-01

    Differentiation of self, a cornerstone concept in Bowen theory, has a profound influence over time on the functioning of the individual and his or her family unit. This 5-year longitudinal study tested this hypothesis with 50 developing nuclear families. The dimensions of differentiation of self that were examined were goal direction and…

  3. Effects of propeller rotation direction on airplane interior noise levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, C. M.; Mayes, W. H.; Daniels, E. F.

    1985-01-01

    Interior noise measurements for upsweeping and downsweeping movement of the propeller blade tips past the fuselage were made on a twin-engine airplane and on two simplified fuselage models. Changes in interior noise levels of as much as 8 dB reversal of propeller rotation direction were measured for some configurations and test conditions.

  4. The effect of movement direction on joint torque covariation.

    PubMed

    Shemmell, Jonathan; Hasan, Ziaul; Gottlieb, Gerald L; Corcos, Daniel M

    2007-01-01

    It has been proposed that unconstrained upper limb movements are coordinated via a kinetic constraint that produces dynamic muscle torques at each moving joint that are a linear function of a single torque command. This constraint has been termed linear synergy (Gottlieb et al. J Neurophysiol 75:1760-1764, 1996). The current study tested two hypotheses: (1) that the extent of covariation between dynamic muscle torques at the shoulder and elbow varied with the direction of movement and (2) that the extent to which muscle torques deviated from linear synergy would be reproduced by a simulation of pointing movements in which the path of the hand was constrained to be straight. Dynamic muscle torques were calculated from sagittal plane pointing movements performed by 12 participants to targets in eight different directions. The results of principal component analyses performed on the muscle torque data demonstrated direction-dependent variation in the extent to which dynamic muscle torques covaried at the shoulder and elbow. Linear synergy was deviated from substantially in movement directions for which the magnitude of muscle torque was low at one joint. A simulation of movements with straight hand paths was able to accurately estimate the amount of covariation between muscle torques at the two joints in many directions. These results support the idea that a kinematic constraint is imposed by the central nervous system during unconstrained pointing movements. Linear synergy may also be applied as a coordinating constraint in circumstances where its application allows the path of the moving endpoint to remain close to a straight line.

  5. Direct Production of 99mTc via 100Mo(p,2n) on Small Medical Cyclotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaffer, P.; Bénard, F.; Bernstein, A.; Buckley, K.; Celler, A.; Cockburn, N.; Corsaut, J.; Dodd, M.; Economou, C.; Eriksson, T.; Frontera, M.; Hanemaayer, V.; Hook, B.; Klug, J.; Kovacs, M.; Prato, F. S.; McDiarmid, S.; Ruth, T. J.; Shanks, C.; Valliant, J. F.; Zeisler, S.; Zetterberg, U.; Zavodszky, P. A.

    From the efforts of a number of Canadian institutions and private industry collaborations, direct production of 99mTc using medical cyclotrons has recently been advanced from a 1970's academic exercise to a commercial, economically viable solution for regional production. Using GE PETtrace 880 machines our team has established preliminary saturated yields of 2.7 GBq/μA, translating to approximately 174 GBq after a 6 hour irradiation. The team is in the process of assessing the accuracy and reliability of this production value with a goal of optimizing yields by up to 50%.

  6. Elephants in the understory: opposing direct and indirect effects of consumption and ecosystem engineering by megaherbivores.

    PubMed

    Coverdale, Tyler C; Kartzinel, Tyler R; Grabowski, Kathryn L; Shriver, Robert K; Hassan, Abdikadir A; Goheen, Jacob R; Palmer, Todd M; Pringle, Robert M

    2016-11-01

    Positive indirect effects of consumers on their resources can stabilize food webs by preventing overexploitation, but the coupling of trophic and non-trophic interactions remains poorly integrated into our understanding of community dynamics. Elephants engineer African savanna ecosystems by toppling trees and breaking branches, and although their negative effects on trees are well documented, their effects on small-statured plants remain poorly understood. Using data on 117 understory plant taxa collected over 7 yr within 36 1-ha experimental plots in a semi-arid Kenyan savanna, we measured the strength and direction of elephant impacts on understory vegetation. We found that elephants had neutral effects on most (83-89%) species, with a similar frequency of positive and negative responses among the remainder. Overall, estimated understory biomass was 5-14% greater in the presence of elephants across a range of rainfall levels. Whereas direct consumption likely accounts for the negative effects, positive effects are presumably indirect. We hypothesized that elephants create associational refuges for understory plants by damaging tree canopies in ways that physically inhibit feeding by other large herbivores. As predicted, understory biomass and species richness beneath elephant-damaged trees were 55% and 21% greater, respectively, than under undamaged trees. Experimentally simulated elephant damage increased understory biomass by 37% and species richness by 49% after 1 yr. Conversely, experimentally removing elephant damaged branches decreased understory biomass by 39% and richness by 30% relative to sham-manipulated trees. Camera-trap surveys revealed that elephant damage reduced the frequency of herbivory by 71%, whereas we detected no significant effect of damage on temperature, light, or soil moisture. We conclude that elephants locally facilitate understory plants by creating refuges from herbivory, which countervails the direct negative effects of

  7. Are tropical small mammals physiologically vulnerable to Arrhenius effects and climate change?

    PubMed

    Lovegrove, Barry G; Canale, Cindy; Levesque, Danielle; Fluch, Gerhard; Reháková-Petrů, Milada; Ruf, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    There is some urgency in the necessity to incorporate physiological data into mechanistic, trait-based, demographic climate change models. Physiological responses at the individual level provide the mechanistic link between environmental changes and individual performances and hence population dynamics. Here we consider the causal relationship between ambient temperature (Ta) and metabolic rate (MR), namely, the Arrhenius effect, which is directly affected by global warming through increases in average global air temperatures and the increase in the frequency and intensity of extreme climate events. We measured and collated data for several small, free-ranging tropical arboreal mammals and evaluated their vulnerability to Arrhenius effects and putative heat stress associated with climate change. Skin temperatures (Tskin) were obtained from free-ranging tarsiers (Tarsius syrichta) on Bohol Island, Philippines. Core body temperature (Tb) was obtained from the greater hedgehog tenrec (Setifer setosus) and the gray brown mouse lemur (Microcebus ravelobensis) from Ankarafantsika, Madagascar. Tskin for another mouse lemur, Microcebus griseorufus, was obtained from the literature. All four species showed evidence of hyperthermia during the daytime rest phase in the form of either Tskin or Tb that was higher than the normothermic Tb during the nighttime active phase. Potentially, tropical arboreal mammals with the lowest MRs and Tb, such as tarsiers, are the most vulnerable to sustained heat stress because their Tb is already close to Ta. Climate change may involve increases in MRs due to Arrhenius effects, especially during the rest phase or during torpor and hibernation. The most likely outcome of increased Arrhenius effects with climate change will be an increase in energy expenditure at the expense of other critical functions such as reproduction or growth and will thus affect fitness. However, we propose that these hypothetical Arrhenius costs can be, and in some

  8. Limited direct effects of a massive wildfire on its sagebrush steppe bee community

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fire can affect bees directly, through exposure to heating and smoke during the combustion phase. Direct effects include mortality, injury and displacement affecting at most two generations of bees—adults and any progeny produced prior to the fire event. To study the direct effects of fire on a bee ...

  9. Effects of scatter modeling on time-activity curves estimated directly from dynamic SPECT projections

    SciTech Connect

    Reutter, Bryan W.; Gullberg, Grant T.; Huesman, Ronald H.

    2003-10-29

    Quantitative analysis of uptake and washout of cardiac single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) radiopharmaceuticals has the potential to provide better contrast between healthy and diseased tissue, compared to conventional reconstruction of static images. Previously, we used B-splines to model time-activity curves (TACs) for segmented volumes of interest and developed fast least-squares algorithms to estimate spline TAC coefficients and their statistical uncertainties directly from dynamic SPECT projection data. This previous work incorporated physical effects of attenuation and depth-dependent collimator response. In the present work, we incorporate scatter and use a computer simulation to study how scatter modeling affects directly estimated TACs and subsequent estimates of compartmental model parameters. An idealized single-slice emission phantom was used to simulate a 15 min dynamic {sup 99m}Tc-teboroxime cardiac patient study in which 500,000 events containing scatter were detected from the slice. When scatter was modeled, unweighted least-squares estimates of TACs had root mean square (RMS) error that was less than 0.6% for normal left ventricular myocardium, blood pool, liver, and background tissue volumes and averaged 3% for two small myocardial defects. When scatter was not modeled, RMS error increased to average values of 16% for the four larger volumes and 35% for the small defects. Noise-to-signal ratios (NSRs) for TACs ranged between 1-18% for the larger volumes and averaged 110% for the small defects when scatter was modeled. When scatter was not modeled, NSR improved by average factors of 1.04 for the larger volumes and 1.25 for the small defects, as a result of the better-posed (though more biased) inverse problem. Weighted least-squares estimates of TACs had slightly better NSR and worse RMS error, compared to unweighted least-squares estimates. Compartmental model uptake and washout parameter estimates obtained from the TACs were less

  10. Effects of air flow directions on composting process temperature profile

    SciTech Connect

    Kulcu, Recep; Yaldiz, Osman

    2008-07-01

    In this study, chicken manure mixed with carnation wastes was composted by using three different air flow directions: R1-sucking (downward), R2-blowing (upward) and R3-mixed. The aim was to find out the most appropriate air flow direction type for composting to provide more homogenous temperature distribution in the reactors. The efficiency of each aeration method was evaluated by monitoring the evolution of parameters such as temperature, moisture content, CO{sub 2} and O{sub 2} ratio in the material and dry material losses. Aeration of the reactors was managed by radial fans. The results showed that R3 resulted in a more homogenous temperature distribution and high dry material loss throughout the composting process. The most heterogeneous temperature distribution and the lowest dry material loss were obtained in R2.

  11. Survival after total-body irradiation. I. Effects of partial small bowel shielding

    SciTech Connect

    Vigneulle, R.M.; Vriesendorp, H.M.; Taylor, P.; Burns, W.; Pelkey, T. )

    1989-08-01

    The small intestine of the rat was shielded during total-body irradiation (TBI) to evaluate the effects of radiation dose and length of intestine shielded on survival. Sprague-Dawley rats were anesthetized in groups of 10. Using aseptic surgical procedures 80, 40, 20, or 10 cm, or none of the proximal or distal small intestine were temporarily exteriorized and shielded during irradiation with photons from an 18 MeV linear accelerator. Less than 17% of the dose was delivered to the shielded intestines. In unshielded animals deaths occurred from Days 4 to 6 with 13, 15, or 17 Gy and from Days 8 to 30 with 9, 11, and 12 Gy. However, in all animals exposed to 15 Gy with all or part of the small intestine shielded, survival was increased to between 5 and 9 days. Shielding of the distal small intestine was more effective in prolonging survival than shielding of the proximal small intestine. The previously identified target of radiation damage in the small intestine is the crypt stem cell. In this study, the analysis of histological specimens of shielded and irradiated small intestine suggested that humoral factors also influence intestinal histology and survival after irradiation. These humoral factors are thought to originate from the irradiated body tissues, the shielded proximal intestine, and the shielded distal intestine. Further studies are required to identify these factors and to determine their mode of action and their therapeutic potential after radiation damage to the small intestine.

  12. The simulation and analysis of small group effect in crowd evacuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Lei; Hu, Jun; Gu, Musong; Fan, Wenjie; Zhang, Hong

    2016-10-01

    A crowd usually tends to move in small groups during evacuation. Small group has a large proportion in crowd evacuation, and small group effect affects crowd evacuation significantly. In this work, we propose a novel methodology for calculating movement profit based on cellular automaton model. Specifically, this methodology calculates the movement profit for a target at the next moment by comprehensively combining distance profit, density profit, and average velocity profit. In particular, this paper defines three types of small-group formation with totally six different forms of small group in terms of the size, and sets the corresponding movement velocity. At last, we simulate the evacuation process of small groups, and discuss the relationship among evacuation time, average movement velocity, and pedestrian density, and analyze the efficiency of small group evacuation in terms of evacuation strategies. As the simulation results demonstrated, the evacuation efficiency of different types of small groups is greatly different, and the same type of small groups with different forms is also different.

  13. Observation of small-scale anisotropy in the arrival direction distribution of TeV cosmic rays with HAWC

    SciTech Connect

    Abeysekara, A. U.; Alfaro, R.; Belmont, E.; Alvarez, C.; Arceo, R.; Álvarez, J. D.; Arteaga-Velázquez, J. C.; Cotti, U.; Ayala Solares, H. A.; Barber, A. S.; Baughman, B. M.; Berley, D.; Braun, J.; Bautista-Elivar, N.; BenZvi, S. Y.; Bonilla Rosales, M.; Carramiñana, A.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Castillo, M.; Cotzomi, J.; Collaboration: HAWC Collaboration; and others

    2014-12-01

    The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Observatory is sensitive to gamma rays and charged cosmic rays at TeV energies. The detector is still under construction, but data acquisition with the partially deployed detector started in 2013. An analysis of the cosmic-ray arrival direction distribution based on 4.9 × 10{sup 10} events recorded between 2013 June and 2014 February shows anisotropy at the 10{sup –4} level on angular scales of about 10°. The HAWC cosmic-ray sky map exhibits three regions of significantly enhanced cosmic-ray flux; two of these regions were first reported by the Milagro experiment. A third region coincides with an excess recently reported by the ARGO-YBJ experiment. An angular power spectrum analysis of the sky shows that all terms up to ℓ = 15 contribute significantly to the excesses.

  14. Observation of Small-scale Anisotropy in the Arrival Direction Distribution of TeV Cosmic Rays with HAWC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abeysekara, A. U.; Alfaro, R.; Alvarez, C.; Álvarez, J. D.; Arceo, R.; Arteaga-Velázquez, J. C.; Ayala Solares, H. A.; Barber, A. S.; Baughman, B. M.; Bautista-Elivar, N.; Belmont, E.; BenZvi, S. Y.; Berley, D.; Bonilla Rosales, M.; Braun, J.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Carramiñana, A.; Castillo, M.; Cotti, U.; Cotzomi, J.; de la Fuente, E.; De León, C.; DeYoung, T.; Diaz Hernandez, R.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; Dingus, B. L.; DuVernois, M. A.; Ellsworth, R. W.; Fiorino, D. W.; Fraija, N.; Galindo, A.; Garfias, F.; González, M. M.; Goodman, J. A.; Gussert, M.; Hampel-Arias, Z.; Harding, J. P.; Hüntemeyer, P.; Hui, C. M.; Imran, A.; Iriarte, A.; Karn, P.; Kieda, D.; Kunde, G. J.; Lara, A.; Lauer, R. J.; Lee, W. H.; Lennarz, D.; León Vargas, H.; Linnemann, J. T.; Longo, M.; Luna-García, R.; Malone, K.; Marinelli, A.; Marinelli, S. S.; Martinez, H.; Martinez, O.; Martínez-Castro, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; McEnery, J.; Mendoza Torres, E.; Miranda-Romagnoli, P.; Moreno, E.; Mostafá, M.; Nellen, L.; Newbold, M.; Noriega-Papaqui, R.; Oceguera-Becerra, T.; Patricelli, B.; Pelayo, R.; Pérez-Pérez, E. G.; Pretz, J.; Rivière, C.; Rosa-González, D.; Ruiz-Velasco, E.; Ryan, J.; Salazar, H.; Salesa Greus, F.; Sandoval, A.; Schneider, M.; Sinnis, G.; Smith, A. J.; Sparks Woodle, K.; Springer, R. W.; Taboada, I.; Toale, P. A.; Tollefson, K.; Torres, I.; Ukwatta, T. N.; Villaseñor, L.; Weisgarber, T.; Westerhoff, S.; Wisher, I. G.; Wood, J.; Yodh, G. B.; Younk, P. W.; Zaborov, D.; Zepeda, A.; Zhou, H.; HAWC Collaboration

    2014-12-01

    The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Observatory is sensitive to gamma rays and charged cosmic rays at TeV energies. The detector is still under construction, but data acquisition with the partially deployed detector started in 2013. An analysis of the cosmic-ray arrival direction distribution based on 4.9 × 1010 events recorded between 2013 June and 2014 February shows anisotropy at the 10-4 level on angular scales of about 10°. The HAWC cosmic-ray sky map exhibits three regions of significantly enhanced cosmic-ray flux; two of these regions were first reported by the Milagro experiment. A third region coincides with an excess recently reported by the ARGO-YBJ experiment. An angular power spectrum analysis of the sky shows that all terms up to l = 15 contribute significantly to the excesses.

  15. Effect of wood creosote and loperamide on propulsive motility of mouse colon and small intestine.

    PubMed

    Ogata, N; Ataka, K; Morino, H; Shibata, T

    1999-10-01

    To elucidate a mechanism of the antidiarrheal activity of wood creosote, its effect on the propulsive motility of mouse colon and small intestine was studied using a charcoal meal test and a colonic bead expulsion test. The effect was compared with that of loperamide. At an ordinary therapeutic dose, wood creosote inhibited the propulsive motility of colon, but not of small intestine. On the other hand, loperamide inhibited the propulsive motility of small intestine, but not of colon. The results indicate that at least a part of the antidiarrheal activity of wood creosote and loperamide is attributable to their antikinetic effect predominantly on colon of the former and predominantly on small intestine of the latter.

  16. Non-contact small animal fluorescence imaging system for simultaneous multi-directional angular-dependent data acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong Hwan; Kim, Hyun Keol; Chandhanayingyong, Chandhanarat; Lee, Francis Young-In; Hielscher, Andreas H.

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel non-contact small animal fluorescent molecular tomography (FMT) imaging system. At the heart of the system is a new mirror-based imaging head that was designed to provide 360-degree measurement data from an entire animal surface in one step. This imaging head consists of two conical mirrors, which considerably reduce multiple back reflections between the animal and mirror surfaces. These back reflections are common in existing mirror-based imaging heads and tend to degrade the quality of raw measurement data. In addition, the introduction of a novel ray-transfer operator allows for the inclusion of the angular dependent data in the image reconstruction process, which results in higher image resolution. We describe in detail the system design and implementation of the hardware components as well as the transport-theory-based image reconstruction algorithm. Using numerical simulations, measurements on a well-defined phantom and a live animal, we evaluate the system performance and show the advantages of our approach. PMID:25071965

  17. Non-contact small animal fluorescence imaging system for simultaneous multi-directional angular-dependent data acquisition.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong Hwan; Kim, Hyun Keol; Chandhanayingyong, Chandhanarat; Lee, Francis Young-In; Hielscher, Andreas H

    2014-07-01

    We present a novel non-contact small animal fluorescent molecular tomography (FMT) imaging system. At the heart of the system is a new mirror-based imaging head that was designed to provide 360-degree measurement data from an entire animal surface in one step. This imaging head consists of two conical mirrors, which considerably reduce multiple back reflections between the animal and mirror surfaces. These back reflections are common in existing mirror-based imaging heads and tend to degrade the quality of raw measurement data. In addition, the introduction of a novel ray-transfer operator allows for the inclusion of the angular dependent data in the image reconstruction process, which results in higher image resolution. We describe in detail the system design and implementation of the hardware components as well as the transport-theory-based image reconstruction algorithm. Using numerical simulations, measurements on a well-defined phantom and a live animal, we evaluate the system performance and show the advantages of our approach.

  18. Palms, peccaries and perturbations: widespread effects of small-scale disturbance in tropical forests

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    plants, most likely on the survival and growth of seedlings and saplings damaged by foraging peccaries. Given the abundance of fruit produced by each palm, the widespread effects of these small-scale disturbances appear, over long time-scales, to cause directional changes in community structure at larger scales. PMID:22429883

  19. Direct and indirect genetic and fine-scale location effects on breeding date in song sparrows.

    PubMed

    Germain, Ryan R; Wolak, Matthew E; Arcese, Peter; Losdat, Sylvain; Reid, Jane M

    2016-11-01

    Quantifying direct and indirect genetic effects of interacting females and males on variation in jointly expressed life-history traits is central to predicting microevolutionary dynamics. However, accurately estimating sex-specific additive genetic variances in such traits remains difficult in wild populations, especially if related individuals inhabit similar fine-scale environments. Breeding date is a key life-history trait that responds to environmental phenology and mediates individual and population responses to environmental change. However, no studies have estimated female (direct) and male (indirect) additive genetic and inbreeding effects on breeding date, and estimated the cross-sex genetic correlation, while simultaneously accounting for fine-scale environmental effects of breeding locations, impeding prediction of microevolutionary dynamics. We fitted animal models to 38 years of song sparrow (Melospiza melodia) phenology and pedigree data to estimate sex-specific additive genetic variances in breeding date, and the cross-sex genetic correlation, thereby estimating the total additive genetic variance while simultaneously estimating sex-specific inbreeding depression. We further fitted three forms of spatial animal model to explicitly estimate variance in breeding date attributable to breeding location, overlap among breeding locations and spatial autocorrelation. We thereby quantified fine-scale location variances in breeding date and quantified the degree to which estimating such variances affected the estimated additive genetic variances. The non-spatial animal model estimated nonzero female and male additive genetic variances in breeding date (sex-specific heritabilities: 0·07 and 0·02, respectively) and a strong, positive cross-sex genetic correlation (0·99), creating substantial total additive genetic variance (0·18). Breeding date varied with female, but not male inbreeding coefficient, revealing direct, but not indirect, inbreeding

  20. Effective PSHE Education: Values, Purposes and Future Directions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Ben; Clague, Lucy; Coldwell, Mike

    2013-01-01

    This article explores the perceived effectiveness of personal, social, health and economic (PSHE) education in primary and secondary schools. It outlines the relationship between perceived effectiveness and a range of explanatory factors, linking these to the values and ethos of schools, differing views of the purposes of PSHE education, and…

  1. The achromatic locus: effect of navigation direction in color space.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Tushar; Perales, Esther; Xiao, Kaida; Hird, Emily; Karatzas, Dimosthenis; Wuerger, Sophie

    2014-01-24

    An achromatic stimulus is defined as a patch of light that is devoid of any hue. This is usually achieved by asking observers to adjust the stimulus such that it looks neither red nor green and at the same time neither yellow nor blue. Despite the theoretical and practical importance of the achromatic locus, little is known about the variability in these settings. The main purpose of the current study was to evaluate whether achromatic settings were dependent on the task of the observers, namely the navigation direction in color space. Observers could either adjust the test patch along the two chromatic axes in the CIE u*v* diagram or, alternatively, navigate along the unique-hue lines. Our main result is that the navigation method affects the reliability of these achromatic settings. Observers are able to make more reliable achromatic settings when adjusting the test patch along the directions defined by the four unique hues as opposed to navigating along the main axes in the commonly used CIE u*v* chromaticity plane. This result holds across different ambient viewing conditions (Dark, Daylight, Cool White Fluorescent) and different test luminance levels (5, 20, and 50 cd/m(2)). The reduced variability in the achromatic settings is consistent with the idea that internal color representations are more aligned with the unique-hue lines than the u* and v* axes.

  2. Recent Advances in the Discovery of Small Molecules Targeting Exchange Proteins Directly Activated by cAMP (EPAC)

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Haijun; Wild, Christopher; Zhou, Xiaobin; Ye, Na; Cheng, Xiaodong; Zhou, Jia

    2014-01-01

    cAMP is a pivotal second messenger that regulates numerous biological processes under physiological and pathological conditions, including cancer, diabetes, heart failure, inflammation and neurological disorders. In the past, all effects of cAMP were initially believed to be mediated by PKA and cyclic nucleotide-regulated ion channels. Since the discovery of EPAC proteins in 1998, accumulating evidence has demonstrated that the net cellular effects of cAMP are also regulated by EPAC. The pursuit of the biological functions of EPAC has benefited from the development and applications of a growing number of pharmacological probes targeting EPAC proteins. In this Perspective, we seek to provide a concise update on recent advances in the development of chemical entities including various membrane-permeable analogues of cAMP and newly discovered EPAC-specific ligands from high throughput assays and hit-to-lead optimizations. PMID:24256330

  3. Effect of skin-pass rolling direction on magnetic properties of semiprocessed nonoriented electrical steel sheets

    SciTech Connect

    Kurosaki, Y.; Shimazu, T.; Shiozaki, M.

    1999-09-01

    Effect of skin-pass rolling direction on magnetic properties and directionality in semiprocessed nonoriented electrical steel sheets produced by skin-pass rolling process was studied. Skin-pass rolling direction greatly affects magnetic properties and directionality. By control of skin-pass rolling direction, the value of B{sub 50} in the required directions such as 0{degree}, 90{degree} and circumferential direction can be adjusted and the value of B{sub 50} is higher than that of the usual skin-pass rolling direction of 0{degree}. The textures of the steel sheets developed after batch annealing varied with the skin-pass rolling directions and this result indicates that the residual strain energy by skin-pass rolling varies with skin-pass rolling directions.

  4. Direct and semi-direct aerosol radiative effect on the Mediterranean climate variability using a coupled regional climate system model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabat, Pierre; Somot, Samuel; Mallet, Marc; Sevault, Florence; Chiacchio, Marc; Wild, Martin

    2015-02-01

    A fully coupled regional climate system model (CNRM-RCSM4) has been used over the Mediterranean region to investigate the direct and semi-direct effects of aerosols, but also their role in the radiation-atmosphere-ocean interactions through multi-annual ensemble simulations (2003-2009) with and without aerosols and ocean-atmosphere coupling. Aerosols have been taken into account in CNRM-RCSM4 through realistic interannual monthly AOD climatologies. An evaluation of the model has been achieved, against various observations for meteorological parameters, and has shown the ability of CNRM-RCSM4 to reproduce the main patterns of the Mediterranean climate despite some biases in sea surface temperature (SST), radiation and cloud cover. The results concerning the aerosol radiative effects show a negative surface forcing on average because of the absorption and scattering of the incident radiation. The SW surface direct effect is on average -20.9 Wm-2 over the Mediterranean Sea, -14.7 Wm-2 over Europe and -19.7 Wm-2 over northern Africa. The LW surface direct effect is weaker as only dust aerosols contribute (+4.8 Wm-2 over northern Africa). This direct effect is partly counterbalanced by a positive semi-direct radiative effect over the Mediterranean Sea (+5.7 Wm-2 on average) and Europe (+5.0 Wm-2) due to changes in cloud cover and atmospheric circulation. The total aerosol effect is consequently negative at the surface and responsible for a decrease in land (on average -0.4 °C over Europe, and -0.5 °C over northern Africa) and sea surface temperature (on average -0.5 °C for the Mediterranean SST). In addition, the latent heat loss is shown to be weaker (-11.0 Wm-2) in the presence of aerosols, resulting in a decrease in specific humidity in the lower troposphere, and a reduction in cloud cover and precipitation. Simulations also indicate that dust aerosols warm the troposphere by absorbing solar radiation, and prevent radiation from reaching the surface, thus

  5. Effect of Small Transmission Delay on Human Behavior in Audio Communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnishi, Hitoshi; Mochizuki, Kaname

    Transmission delay in audio communications is a well-known obstacle to achieving smooth communication. However, it is not known what kinds of effects are caused by small delays. We hypothesized that the small delay in the listener's responses disturbs the speaker's “verbal conditioning, ” where the verbal behavior of the speaker varies in accordance with the listener's responses. We examined whether the small delays in the listener's responses disturb the speaker's verbal conditioning using an artificial-grammar learning task. The results suggested that a 300-ms delay disturbed the participants' verbal conditioning although they were not adequately aware of the delay.

  6. Effect of Court Dimensions on Players' External and Internal Load during Small-Sided Handball Games.

    PubMed

    Corvino, Matteo; Tessitore, Antonio; Minganti, Carlo; Sibila, Marko

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of three different court dimensions on the internal and external load during small-sided handball games. Six male amateur handball players took part in this study and participated in three different 8-min 3vs3 (plus goalkeepers) small-sided handball games (each repeated twice). The three court dimensions were 12×24m, 30×15m and 32×16m. Through Global Positioning System devices (SPI pro elite 15Hz, GPSports) and video analysis, the following parameters were recorded: cyclic and acyclic movements (distance covered and number of technical actions executed), heart rate, and rating of perceived exertion (RPE). Total distance travelled increased with court dimensions (885.2m ± 66.6m in 24×12m; 980.0m ± 73.4m in 30×15m; 1095.0m ± 112.9m in 32×16m, p < 0.05). The analysis of distance covered in the four speed zones (0-1.4 m·s(-1); 1.4-3.4 m·s(-1); 3.4-5.2 m·s(-1); >5.2 m·s(-1)) highlighted substantial differences: playing with the 30×15m court in comparison to the 24×12m, the players covered less distance in the first speed zone (p = 0.012; ES = 0.70) and more distance in the second (p = 0.049; ES = 0.73) and third (p = 0.012; ES = 0.51) speed zones. Statistical differences were also found between the 24×12m and 32×16m courts: the players covered more distance in the second and third speed zones (p = 0.013, ES = 0.76; p = 0.023 ES = 0.69) with the 32×16m court in comparison to the 24×12m. There was no significant effect of court dimensions on the technical parameters (number of team actions, passes, piston movements toward goal and defensive activities), the number of specific handball jumps and changes of direction, and the time spent in the different heart rate zones. Considering the average data of all the experimental conditions together (24×12m, 30×15m, 32×16m), a pronounced statistical difference was highlighted between the values in first two HR zones and the last two (p < 0.05; large ES). The

  7. Effect of Court Dimensions on Players’ External and Internal Load during Small-Sided Handball Games

    PubMed Central

    Corvino, Matteo; Tessitore, Antonio; Minganti, Carlo; Sibila, Marko

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of three different court dimensions on the internal and external load during small-sided handball games. Six male amateur handball players took part in this study and participated in three different 8-min 3vs3 (plus goalkeepers) small-sided handball games (each repeated twice). The three court dimensions were 12×24m, 30×15m and 32×16m. Through Global Positioning System devices (SPI pro elite 15Hz, GPSports) and video analysis, the following parameters were recorded: cyclic and acyclic movements (distance covered and number of technical actions executed), heart rate, and rating of perceived exertion (RPE). Total distance travelled increased with court dimensions (885.2m ± 66.6m in 24×12m; 980.0m ± 73.4m in 30×15m; 1095.0m ± 112.9m in 32×16m, p < 0.05). The analysis of distance covered in the four speed zones (0–1.4 m·s-1; 1.4–3.4 m·s-1; 3.4–5.2 m·s-1; >5.2 m·s-1) highlighted substantial differences: playing with the 30×15m court in comparison to the 24×12m, the players covered less distance in the first speed zone (p = 0.012; ES = 0.70) and more distance in the second (p = 0.049; ES = 0.73) and third (p = 0.012; ES = 0.51) speed zones. Statistical differences were also found between the 24×12m and 32×16m courts: the players covered more distance in the second and third speed zones (p = 0.013, ES = 0.76; p = 0.023 ES = 0.69) with the 32×16m court in comparison to the 24×12m. There was no significant effect of court dimensions on the technical parameters (number of team actions, passes, piston movements toward goal and defensive activities), the number of specific handball jumps and changes of direction, and the time spent in the different heart rate zones. Considering the average data of all the experimental conditions together (24×12m, 30×15m, 32×16m), a pronounced statistical difference was highlighted between the values in first two HR zones and the last two (p < 0.05; large ES). The

  8. Magnetized direct current microdischarge I. Effect of the gas pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levko, Dmitry; Raja, Laxminarayan L.

    2017-03-01

    Following Paschen's law, electrical breakdown of gaps with small pd, where p is the gas pressure and d is the interelectrode gap, requires extremely high voltages. This means that the breakdown voltage for low-pressure microdischarges is of the order of a few kilovolts. This makes impractical the generation of low-pressure dc microdischarges. The application of dc magnetic field confines electrons in the cathode-anode gap. This leads to the significant decrease in the breakdown voltage because each electron experiences many collisions during its diffusion toward the anode. However, as was obtained experimentally, magnetized low-pressure microdischarges experience numerous instabilities whose nature is still not completely understood. In the present paper, we study the influence of the magnetic field on the low-pressure microdischarges. We use the self-consistent one-dimensional Particle-in-Cell Monte Carlo collisions model, which takes into account the electron magnetization while ions remain unmagnetized. We obtain striations in the discharge. We show that these striations appear in both homogeneous and non-homogeneous magnetic fields. We find simple expression for the instability growth rate, which shows that the instability results from ionization processes.

  9. Effects produced by multi-parton interactions and color reconnection in small systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuautle, Eleazar; Ortiz, Antonio; Paić, Guy

    2016-12-01

    Multi-parton interactions and color reconnection can produce QGP-like effects in small systems, specifically, radial flow-like patterns. For pp collisions simulated with Pythia 8.212, in this work we investigate their effects on different observables like event multiplicity, event shapes and transverse momentum distributions.

  10. Are Effects of Small Classes Cumulative? Evidence from a Tennessee Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nye, Barbara; Hedges, Larry V.; Konstantopoulos, Spyros

    2001-01-01

    Used data from Tennessee's Project STAR, a longitudinal class size experiment, to study the cumulative effects of reduced class size in the early grades on academic achievement. Results indicated that controlling for achievement in the previous year, small classes in grades 1-3 yielded statistically significant additional positive effects on…

  11. The effect of Coulomb interaction on spasing conditions in small nanoparticles (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pustovit, Vitaliy N.; Shahbazyan, Tigran V.; Chipouline, Arkadi; Urbas, Augustine M.

    2016-09-01

    The prediction of plasmonic laser (spaser) and its experimental realization in various systems have been among the highlights in the rapidly developing field of plasmonics during the past decade. First observed in gold nanoparticles (NP) coated by dye-doped dielectric shells spasing action was reported in hybrid plasmonic waveguides, semiconductor quantum dots on metal film, plasmonic nanocavities and nanocavity arrays, metallic NP and nanorods, and recently was studied in graphene-based structures. The small spaser size well below the diffraction limit gives rise to numerous promising applications, e.g., in sensing or medical diagnostics. However, most experimental realizations of spaser-based nanolasers were carried in relatively large systems, while only a handful of experiments reported spasing action in small systems with overall size below 50 nm. In this work, we perform a numerical study of the role of quenching and direct interactions between gain molecules in reaching the lasing threshold for small spherical NP with metal core and dye-doped dielectric shell. We use a semiclassical approach that combines Maxwell-Bloch equations with the Green function formalism to derive the threshold condition in terms of exact system eigenstates, which we find numerically. We show that for a large number of gain molecules needed to satisfy loss compensation condition, the coupling to nonresonant modes plays no significant role. In contrast, the direct dipole-dipole interactions, by causing random shifts in gain molecules' excitation energies, can hinder reaching the lasing threshold in small NP-based spasers.

  12. Direct estimation of the cost effectiveness of tornado shelters.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Kevin M; Sutter, Daniel

    2006-08-01

    This article estimates the cost effectiveness of tornado shelters using the annual probability of a tornado and new data on fatalities per building struck by a tornado. This approach differs from recent estimates of the cost effectiveness of tornado shelters in Reference 1 that use historical casualties. Historical casualties combine both tornado risk and resident action. If residents of tornado-prone states take greater precautions, observed fatalities might not be much higher than in states with lower risk. Estimation using the tornado probability avoids this potential bias. Despite the very different method used, the estimates are 68 million US dollars in permanent homes and 6.0 million US dollars in mobile homes in Oklahoma using a 3% real discount rate, within about 10% of estimates based on historical fatalities. The findings suggest that shelters provide cost-effective protection for mobile homes in the most tornado-prone states but not for permanent homes.

  13. Chiral effective theory of dark matter direct detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishara, Fady; Brod, Joachim; Grinstein, Benjamin; Zupan, Jure

    2017-02-01

    We present the effective field theory for dark matter interactions with the visible sector that is valid at scales of Script O(1 GeV). Starting with an effective theory describing the interactions of fermionic and scalar dark matter with quarks, gluons and photons via higher dimension operators that would arise from dimension-five and dimension-six operators above electroweak scale, we perform a nonperturbative matching onto a heavy baryon chiral perturbation theory that describes dark matter interactions with light mesons and nucleons. This is then used to obtain the coefficients of the nuclear response functions using a chiral effective theory description of nuclear forces. Our results consistently keep the leading contributions in chiral counting for each of the initial Wilson coefficients.

  14. Oxygen in GaAs - Direct and indirect effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatos, H. C.; Skowronski, M.; Pawlowicz, L.; Lagowski, J.

    1984-01-01

    Oxygen has profound effects on the key electronic properties and point defects of GaAs crystals. Thus, when added in the growth system, it decreases the free electron concentration and enhances the concentration of deep donors in the resulting crystals. Both of these effects are highly beneficial for achieving semi-insulating material and have been utilized for that purpose. They have been attributed to the tendency of oxygen to getter silicon impurities during crystal growth. Only recently, it has been found that oxygen in GaAs introduces also a midgap level, ELO, with essentially the same activation energy as EL2 but with four times greater electron capture cross section. The present report reassesses the electrical and optical properties of the midgap levels in GaAs crystals grown by the horizontal Bridgman (HB) and the Czochralski-LEC techniques. Emphasis is placed on the identification of the specific effects of ELO.

  15. Temperament, hopelessness, and attempted suicide: direct and indirect effects.

    PubMed

    Rosellini, Anthony J; Bagge, Courtney L

    2014-08-01

    This study evaluated whether hopelessness mediated the relations between temperament and recent suicide attempter status in a psychiatric sample. Negative temperament and positive temperament (particularly the positive emotionality subscale) uniquely predicted levels of hopelessness. Although these temperament constructs also demonstrated significant indirect effects on recent suicide attempter status, the effects were partially (for the broad temperament scales) or fully (for the positive emotionality subscale) mediated by the levels of hopelessness. These findings indicate that a tendency to experience excessive negative emotions as well as a paucity of positive emotions may lead individuals to experience hopelessness. Although temperament may also indirectly influence suicide attempter status, hopelessness mediates these relations.

  16. Acute Stressor Effects on Goal-Directed Action in Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braun, Stephanie; Hauber, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Here we examined effects of acute stressors that involve either systemic coadministration of corticosterone/yohimbine (3 mg/kg each) to increase glucocorticoid/noradrenaline activity (denoted as "pharmacological" stressor) or one or several distinct restraint stressors (denoted as "single" vs. "multiple" stressor) on…

  17. Effectiveness of lethal, directed wolf-depredation control in Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harper, E.K.; Paul, W.J.; Mech, L.D.; Weisberg, S.

    2008-01-01

    Wolf (Canis lupus) depredations on livestock in Minnesota, USA, are an economic problem for many livestock producers, and depredating wolves are lethally controlled. We sought to determine the effectiveness of lethal control through the analysis of data from 923 government-verified wolf depredations from 1979 to 1998. We analyzed the data by 1) assessing the correlations between the number of wolves killed in response to depredations with number of depredations the following year at state and local levels, and 2) the time to the next depredation. No analysis indicated that trapping wolves substantially reduced the following year's depredations at state or local levels. However, more specific analyses indicated that in certain situations, killing wolves was more effective than no action (i.e., not trapping). For example, trapping and killing adult males decreased the re-depredation risk. At sheep farms, killing wolves was generally effective. Attempting to trap, regardless of the results, seemed more effective at reducing depredations than not trapping, suggesting that mere human activity near depredation sites might deter future depredations.

  18. DRE Directions: What Makes an Effective Catechetical Leader?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walters, Thomas P.; Walters, Rita Tyson

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the top ten characteristics of effective Catechetical leaders: (1) prayerful/spiritual people; (2) passion for Catechetical Ministry; (3) creativity; (4) cooperative behavior; (5) active in professional organizations; (6) learns continuously; (7) respected by peers; (8) possesses administrative skills and run creative programs; (9)…

  19. Direct and Generalized Effects of Food Satiation in Reducing Rumination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clauser, Brian; Scibak, John W.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of food satiation on rumination and a collateral self-stimulatory behavior were examined in three profoundly retarded individuals. For all three individuals, the provision of unlimited quantities of cereal and milk during mealtime resulted in reductions in rumination and decreases in the collateral behaviors. (Author/DB)

  20. Direct effects of recurrent hypoglycaemia on adrenal catecholamine release.

    PubMed

    Orban, Branly O; Routh, Vanessa H; Levin, Barry E; Berlin, Joshua R

    2015-01-01

    In Type 1 and advanced Type 2 diabetes mellitus, elevation of plasma epinephrine plays a key role in normalizing plasma glucose during hypoglycaemia. However, recurrent hypoglycaemia blunts this elevation of plasma epinephrine. To determine whether recurrent hypoglycaemia affects peripheral components of the sympatho-adrenal system responsible for epinephrine release, male rats were administered subcutaneous insulin daily for 3 days. These recurrent hypoglycaemic animals showed a smaller elevation of plasma epinephrine than saline-injected controls when subjected to insulin-induced hypoglycaemia. Electrical stimulation of an adrenal branch of the splanchnic nerve in recurrent hypoglycaemic animals elicited less release of epinephrine and norepinephrine than in controls, without a change in adrenal catecholamine content. Responsiveness of isolated, perfused adrenal glands to acetylcholine and other acetylcholine receptor agonists was also unchanged. These results indicate that recurrent hypoglycaemia compromised the efficacy with which peripheral neuronal activity stimulates adrenal catecholamine release and demonstrate that peripheral components of the sympatho-adrenal system were directly affected by recurrent hypoglycaemia.

  1. Endoscopic ultrasound-assisted direct peritoneal visualization with a small-caliber scope: A proof of concept study in a swine model

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Rei; Bhutani, Manoop S.; Shin, Dongsuk; Irisawa, Atsushi; Fleming, Jason B.; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca; Ohira, Hiromasa

    2014-01-01

    Background: Laparoscopic and natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery techniques can diagnose peritoneal findings that suggest tumor cell dissemination. However, they have not been incorporated into routine practice, mainly owing to their complexity. To develop a minimally invasive endoscopic technique for the diagnosis of peritoneal findings, we conducted feasibility study using an acute swine model. Materials and Methods: This study involved six domestic pigs. Trans-gastric access to the peritoneal cavity was performed utilizing an endoscopic ultrasound fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) technique. After dilation of the needle hole with a biliary dilatation catheter and balloon, a small-caliber scope was inserted into the peritoneal cavity. Peritoneal images were obtained with the scope and a high-resolution microendoscope (HRME). Main outcome measurements were technical feasibility and time needed to access the peritoneal cavity. Results: Direct visualization of the peritoneum was successful in all six pigs and gained access to the gross appearance of the peritoneal cavity. HRME imaging with topical contrast agent also obtained reasonable quality images representing nuclei of the peritoneal mesothelium. Average operation time from the initiation of EUS-FNA to acquiring peritoneal images was 26.5 min (range 15-40 min). Autopsy found no damage to the adjacent organs, and stomach wall defects were tightly closed with hemostasis clips. Conclusion: EUS-assisted direct peritoneal visualization with small-caliber scope is technically feasible. HRME may assist in the diagnosis of findings on the peritoneum. PMID:25485270

  2. Evaluation of the clinical effect of small-volume resuscitation on uncontrolled hemorrhagic shock in emergency

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Gang; Wu, Wei; Feng, Qi-ming; Sun, Jian

    2017-01-01

    Objective The objective of the present study was to explore the resuscitative effect of small-volume resuscitation on uncontrolled hemorrhagic shock in emergency. Methods In this study, the resuscitative effects in 200 trauma patients with uncontrolled hemorrhagic shock in emergency were studied. Half of these patients were infused with hypertonic/hyperoncotic fluid (small-volume resuscitation group, n=100), whereas the rest were infused with Hespan and lactated Ringer’s solution (conventional fluid resuscitation group, n=100). The changes in hemodynamics, coagulation function, blood biochemistry, blood hematology, and the average infusion volume in both the groups were comparatively studied. Results It was found that the hemodynamics were improved in both the groups after resuscitation. Interestingly, compared with trauma patients infused with Hespan and lactated Ringer’s solution, the growth rate, range, and time duration of the mean arterial pressure of the patients in small-volume resuscitation group increased significantly, and the shock index decreased progressively; in the 60th min after the resuscitation, blood index including hemoglobin, hematocrit, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelet declined, whereas prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time were prolonged in both the groups, but these changes were less obvious in the small-volume group. In addition, the average infusion volume of patients in the small-volume group was less than that of patients in conventional fluid resuscitation group. Conclusion Featured with small infusion volume and less influence to coagulation function and homeostasis of human body, small-volume resuscitation possesses a significantly higher resuscitative effect. Therefore, trauma patients may have a better chance to maintain the hemodynamic stability and the survival rate, or recovery speed will be increased when traditional aggressive fluid resuscitation is replaced by small-volume resuscitation

  3. Alpha/sub 2/ adrenergic receptors are located prejunctionally in the Auerbach's plexus of the guinea pig small intestine: direct demonstration by radioligand binding

    SciTech Connect

    Wikberg, J.E.; Lefkowitz, R.J.

    1982-12-20

    Direct evidence that alpha/sub 2/-receptors in the guinea pig small intestine are localized prejunctionally in neurons of the Auerbach's plexus is presented. The alpha/sub 2/-agonist ligand (/sup 3/H)clonidine bound to a single saturable class of sites with a K/sub d/ of 1-2 nM and a capacity of approximately 70 fmol/mg protein in membranes from the innervated longitudinal and circular muscle layers of the intestine. By a special dissection technique the Auerbach's plexus could be completely removed from the longitudinal muscle. In these denervated preparations the clonidine binding sites were virtually completed removed whereas the expected binding sites observed in innervated controls. The innervated preparations also contained a small number of alpha-receptors as revealed by binding with (/sup 3/H)prazosin (capacity approximately 18 fmol/mg protein with a K/sub d/ of 0.4-0.7 nM). Thus, the present study suggests that alpha/sub 2/-receptors ((/sup 3/H)clonidine binding sites) are localized in neurons (i.e., prejunctionally) in the Auerbach's plexus of the guinea pig small intestine.

  4. Directly Observable Behavioral Effects of Lorcaserin in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Serafine, Katherine M.; Rice, Kenner C.

    2015-01-01

    (1R)-8-chloro-1-methyl-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1H-3-benzazepine (lorcaserin) is approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration for treating obesity, and its therapeutic effects are thought to result from agonist activity at serotonin (5-HT)2C receptors. Lorcaserin has affinity for other 5-HT receptor subtypes, although its activity at those subtypes is not fully described. The current study compared the behavioral effects of lorcaserin (0.0032–32.0 mg/kg) to the effects of other 5-HT receptor selective agonists in rats (n = 8). The 5-HT2C receptor selective agonist 1-(3-chlorophenyl)piperazine (mCPP, 0.032–1.0 mg/kg) and lorcaserin induced yawning which was attenuated by the 5-HT2C receptor selective antagonist 6-chloro-5-methyl-N-(6-[(2-methylpyridin-3-yl)oxy]pydidin-3-yl)indoline-1-carboxamide (1.0 mg/kg). The 5-HT2A receptor selective agonist 2,5-dimethoxy-4-methylamphetamine (0.1–3.2 mg/kg) induced head twitching, which was attenuated by the 5-HT2A receptor selective antagonist R-(+)-2,3-dimethoxyphenyl-1-[2-(4-piperidine)-methanol] (MDL 100907, 0.01 mg/kg), lorcaserin (3.2 mg/kg), and mCPP (3.2 mg/kg). In rats pretreated with MDL 100907 (1.0 mg/kg), lorcaserin also induced head twitching. At larger doses, lorcaserin produced forepaw treading, which was attenuated by the 5-HT1A receptor selective antagonist N-(2-[4-(2-methoxyphenyl)-1-piperazinyl]ethyl)-N-(2-pyridyl)cyclohexanecarboxamide (0.178 mg/kg). While the behavioral effects of lorcaserin in rats are consistent with it having agonist activity at 5-HT2C receptors, these data suggest that at larger doses it also has agonist activity at 5-HT2A and possibly 5-HT1A receptors. Mounting evidence suggests that 5-HT2C receptor agonists might be effective for treating drug abuse. A more complete description of the activity of lorcaserin at 5-HT receptor subtypes will facilitate a better understanding of the mechanisms that mediate its therapeutic effects. PMID:26384326

  5. Effect of Increasing Temperature on Carbonaceous Aerosol Direct Radiative Effect over Southeastern US

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mielonen, Tero; Kokkola, Harri; Hienola, Anca; Kühn, Thomas; Merikanto, Joonas; Korhonen, Hannele; Arola, Antti; Kolmonen, Pekka; Sogacheva, Larisa; de Leeuw, Gerrit

    2016-04-01

    Aerosols are an important regulator of the Earth's climate. They scatter and absorb incoming solar radiation and thus cool the climate by reducing the amount of energy reaching the atmospheric layers and the surface below (direct effect). A certain subset of the particles can also act as initial formation sites for cloud droplets and thereby modify the microphysics, dynamics, radiative properties and lifetime of clouds (indirect effects). The magnitude of aerosol radiative effects remains the single largest uncertainty in current estimates of anthropogenic radiative forcing. One of the key quantities needed for accurate estimates of anthropogenic radiative forcing is an accurate estimate of the radiative effects from natural unperturbed aerosol. The dominant source of natural aerosols over Earth's vast forested regions are biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) which, following oxidation in the atmosphere, can condense onto aerosol particles to form secondary organic aerosol (SOA) and significantly modify the particles' properties. In accordance with the expected positive temperature dependence of BVOC emissions, several previous studies have shown that some aerosol properties, such as mass concentration and ability to act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), also correlate positively with temperature at many forested sites. There is conflicting evidence as to whether the aerosol direct effects have a temperature dependence due to increased BVOC emissions. The main objective of this study is to investigate the causes of the observed effect of increasing temperatures on the aerosol direct radiative effect, and to provide a quantitative estimate of this effect and of the resulting negative feedback in a warming climate. More specifically, we will investigate the causes of the positive correlation between aerosol optical depth (AOD) and land surface temperature (LST) over southeastern US where biogenic emissions are a significant source of atmospheric particles. In

  6. Direct visualization of memory effects in artificial spin ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, Ian; Chern, Gia-Wei; Fore, Bryce; Lao, Yuyang; Zhang, Sheng; Nisoli, Cristiano; Schiffer, Peter

    2015-09-01

    We experimentally demonstrate that arrays of interacting nanoscale ferromagnetic islands, known as artificial spin ice, develop reproducible microstates upon cycling an applied magnetic field. The onset of this memory effect is determined by the strength of the applied field relative to the array coercivity. Specifically, when the applied field strength is almost exactly equal to the array coercivity, several training cycles are required before the array achieves a nearly completely repeatable microstate, whereas when the applied field strength is stronger or weaker than the array coercivity, a repeatable microstate is achieved after the first minor loop. We show through experiment and simulation that this memory exhibited by artificial spin ice is due to a ratchet effect on interacting, magnetically charged defects in the island moment configuration and to the complexity of the network of strings of reversed moments that forms during magnetization reversal.

  7. Climate change and wildlife health: direct and indirect effects

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hofmeister, Erik; Rogall, Gail Moede; Wesenberg, Katherine; Abbott, Rachel; Work, Thierry; Schuler, Krysten; Sleeman, Jonathan; Winton, James

    2010-01-01

    Climate change, habitat destruction and urbanization, the introduction of exotic and invasive species, and pollution—all affect ecosystem and human health. Climate change can also be viewed within the context of other physical and climate cycles, such as the El Niño Southern Oscillation (El Niño), the North Atlantic Oscillation, and cycles in solar radiation that have profound effects on the Earth’s climate. The effects of climate change on wildlife disease are summarized in several areas of scientific study discussed briefly below: geographic range and distribution of wildlife diseases, plant and animal phenology (Walther and others, 2002), and patterns of wildlife disease, community and ecosystem composition, and habitat degradation.

  8. A flexoelectricity effect-based sensor for direct torque measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuwen; Xu, Minglong; Liu, Kaiyuan; Shen, Shengping

    2015-12-01

    In this study, a direct torque sensor based on the flexoelectricity generated by un-polarized polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) via electromechanical coupling is developed as a novel torque measurement mechanism that does not require external electric power excitation. The sensing method is developed based on the shear strain gradient and the shear flexoelectric response of PVDF. A theoretical analysis is primarily presented for the design of the sensing structure. Then the structure of the PVDF sensing module is discussed and designed. The radius ratio of the sensing module is defined and then discussed according to the load, the strain gradient, the electrode area and the general electric charge output. The finite element method is used to analyze the mechanical properties of the designed PVDF sensing module. Then the theoretical sensitivity of the sensor is predicated as 0.9441 pC Nm-1. The experiment system setup is developed, and the sensing properties of the measurement mechanism are tested at frequencies of 0.5 Hz, 1 Hz, 1.5 Hz and 2 Hz using identical modules. The measurement range of the designed sensor is 0-1.68 Nm and the average sensitivity is measured as 0.8950 pC Nm-1. The experimental results agree well with the theoretically predicted results. These results prove that the torque sensing method based on un-polarized PVDF is suitable for measurement of dynamic torque loads with a flexoelectricity-based mechanism. When using this method, external electric power excitation of the sensing module is no longer required.

  9. Effect of furosemide and dietary sodium on kidney and plasma big and small renin

    SciTech Connect

    Iwao, H.; Michelakis, A.M.

    1981-12-01

    Renin was found in mouse plasma in high-molecular-weight forms (big big renin, big renin) and a low-molecular-weight form (small renin). They were measuerd by a radioimmunoassay procedure for the direct measurement of renin. In the kidney, 89% of total renin was small renin and the rest was big big and big renin. This distribution pattern of renins was not changed when the kideny tissue was homogenized in the presence of protease inhibitors. Low-sodium or high-sodium diets changed renal renin content, but not the distribution pattern of renins in the kidney. Acute stimulation of renin release by furosemide increased small renin but not big big and big renin in plasma. However, dietary sodium depletion for 2 weeks significantly increased big big, big, and small renin in plasma of mice with or without submaxillary glands. In contrast, high-sodium intake significantly decreased big big, big, and small renin in plasma of mice with or without submaxillary glands.

  10. Effects of Latent Heating on Atmospheres of Brown Dwarfs and Directly Imaged Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Xianyu; Showman, Adam P.

    2017-02-01

    The growing number of observations of brown dwarfs (BDs) has provided evidence for strong atmospheric circulation on these objects. Directly imaged planets share similar observations and can be viewed as low-gravity versions of BDs. Vigorous condensate cycles of chemical species in their atmospheres are inferred by observations and theoretical studies, and latent heating associated with condensation is expected to be important in shaping atmospheric circulation and influencing cloud patchiness. We present a qualitative description of the mechanisms by which condensational latent heating influences circulation, and then illustrate them using an idealized general circulation model that includes a condensation cycle of silicates with latent heating and molecular weight effect due to the rainout of the condensate. Simulations with conditions appropriate for typical T dwarfs exhibit the development of localized storms and east–west jets. The storms are spatially inhomogeneous, evolving on a timescale of hours to days and extending vertically from the condensation level to the tropopause. The fractional area of the BD covered by active storms is small. Based on a simple analytic model, we quantitatively explain the area fraction of moist plumes and show its dependence on the radiative timescale and convective available potential energy (CAPE). We predict that if latent heating dominates cloud formation processes, the fractional coverage area of clouds decreases as the spectral type goes through the L/T transition from high to lower effective temperature. This is a natural consequence of the variation of the radiative timescale and CAPE with the spectral type.

  11. Survival after total-body irradiation. 1. Effects of partial small bowel shielding

    SciTech Connect

    Vigneulle, R.M.; Vriesendorp, H.M.; Taylor, P.; Burns, W.; Pelkey, T.

    1989-01-01

    The small intestine of the rat was shielded during total-body irradiation (TBI) to evaluate the effects of radiation dose and length of intestine shielded on survival. Sprague-Dawley rats were anesthetized in groups of 10. Using aseptic surgical procedures 80, 40, 20, or 10 cm, or none of the proximal or distal small intestine were temporarily exteriorized and shielded during irradiation with photons from an 18-MeV linear accelerator. Less than 17% of the dose was delivered to the shielded intestines. In unshielded animals deaths occurred from Days 4 to 6 with 13, 15, or 17 Gy and from Days 8 to 30 with 9, 11, and 12 Gy. However, in all animals exposed to 15 Gy with all or part of the small intestine shielded, survival was increased to between 5 and 9 days. Shielding of the distal small intestine. The previously identified target of radiation damage in the small intestine is the crypt stem cell. In this study, the analysis of histological specimens of shielded and irradiated small intestine suggested that humoral factors also influence intestinal histology and survival after irradiation. These humoral factors are thought to originate from the irradiated body tissues, the shielded proximal intestine, and the shielded distal intestine. Further studies are required to identify these factors and to determine their mode of action and their therapeutic potential after radiation damage to the small intestine.

  12. Pharmacodynamic effects of oral oxymorphone: Abuse liability, analgesic profile and direct physiological effects in humans

    PubMed Central

    Babalonis, Shanna; Lofwall, Michelle R.; Nuzzo, Paul A.; Walsh, Sharon L.

    2015-01-01

    Oxymorphone is a semisynthetic μ-opioid agonist, marketed as a prescription analgesic purported to be twice as potent as oxycodone for pain relief. Oral formulations of oxymorphone were re-introduced in the United States in 2006 and reports of abuse ensued; however, there are limited data available on its pharmacodynamic effects. The current study aimed to examine the direct physiological effects, relative abuse liability, analgesic profile, and overall pharmacodynamic potency of oxymorphone in comparison to identical doses of oxycodone. Healthy, non-dependent opioid abusers (n=9) were enrolled in this within-subject, double-blind, placebo-controlled, 3-week inpatient study. Seven experimental sessions (6.5 hr) were conducted, during which an oral dose of immediate-release formulations of oxymorphone (10, 20, 40 mg), oxycodone (10, 20, 40 mg) or placebo was administered. An array of physiological, abuse liability and experimental pain measures was collected. At identical doses, oxymorphone produced approximately two-fold less potent effects on miosis, compared to oxycodone. Oxymorphone also produced lesser magnitude effects on measures of respiratory depression, two experimental pain models, and observer-rated agonist effects. However, 40 mg of oxymorphone was similar to 40 mg of oxycodone on several abuse-related subjective ratings. Formal relative potency analyses were largely invalid due to the substantially greater effects of oxycodone. Overall, oxymorphone is less potent on most pharmacodynamic measures, although at higher doses, its abuse liability is similar to oxycodone. These data suggest that the published clinical equianalgesic estimates may not be consistent with the observed direct physiological effects of opioids, results of experimental pain models or abuse liability measures, as assessed in the human laboratory. PMID:25130052

  13. Effects of gap junction inhibition on contraction waves in the murine small intestine in relation to coupled oscillator theory.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Sean P; Huizinga, Jan D

    2015-02-15

    Waves of contraction in the small intestine correlate with slow waves generated by the myenteric network of interstitial cells of Cajal. Coupled oscillator theory has been used to explain steplike gradients in the frequency (frequency plateaux) of contraction waves along the length of the small intestine. Inhibition of gap junction coupling between oscillators should lead to predictable effects on these plateaux and the wave dislocation (wave drop) phenomena associated with their boundaries. It is these predictions that we wished to test. We used a novel multicamera diameter-mapping system to measure contraction along 25- to 30-cm lengths of murine small intestine. There were typically two to three plateaux per length of intestine. Dislocations could be limited to the wavefronts immediately about the terminated wave, giving the appearance of a three-pronged fork, i.e., a fork dislocation; additionally, localized decreases in velocity developed across a number of wavefronts, ending with the terminated wave, which could appear as a fork, i.e., slip dislocations. The gap junction inhibitor carbenoxolone increased the number of plateaux and dislocations and decreased contraction wave velocity. In some cases, the usual frequency gradient was reversed, with a plateau at a higher frequency than its proximal neighbor; thus fork dislocations were inverted, and the direction of propagation was reversed. Heptanol had no effect on the frequency or velocity of contractions but did reduce their amplitude. To understand intestinal motor patterns, the pacemaker network of the interstitial cells of Cajal is best evaluated as a system of coupled oscillators.

  14. Effects of corridors on home range sizes and interpatch movements of three small mammal species.

    SciTech Connect

    Mabry, Karen, E.; Barrett, Gary, W.

    2002-04-30

    Mabry, K.E., and G.W. Barrett. 2002. Effects of corridors on home range sizes and interpatch movements of three small mammal species. Landscape Ecol. 17:629-636. Corridors are predicted to benefit populations in patchy habitats by promoting movement, which should increase population densities, gene flow, and recolonization of extinct patch populations. However, few investigators have considered use of the total landscape, particularly the possibility of interpatch movement through matrix habitat, by small mammals. This study compares home range sizes of 3 species of small mammals, the cotton mouse, old field mouse and cotton rat between patches with and without corridors. Corridor presence did not have a statistically significant influence on average home range size. Habitat specialization and sex influenced the probability of an individual moving between 2 patches without corridors. The results of this study suggest that small mammals may be more capable of interpatch movement without corridors than is frequently assumed.

  15. Direct Effects of Phosphate on Vascular Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Wei Ling; Pai, Ashwini; Moe, Sharon M.; Giachelli, Cecilia M.

    2011-01-01

    Elevated serum phosphate has clinically been associated with vascular stiffness and cardiovascular mortality. Mechanistic studies over the past decade looking at phosphate’s local effects on the vessel wall have lent insight into various pathways that culminate in vascular calcification.Smooth muscle cell phenotype change and apoptosis play prominent roles. The sodium-phosphate cotransporter PiT-1 is required for the osteochondrogenic differentiation of smooth muscle cellsin vitro. Less is known about phosphate-driven valve interstitial cell calcification and elastin degradation.In this paper, we review the current knowledge about phosphate-induced changes in the vascular wall. PMID:21406295

  16. Influence of Observed Diurnal Cycles of Aerosol Optical Depth on Aerosol Direct Radiative Effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arola, A.; Eck, T. F.; Huttunen, J.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.; Lindfors, A. V.; Myhre, G.; Smirinov, A.; Tripathi, S. N.; Yu, H.

    2013-01-01

    The diurnal variability of aerosol optical depth (AOD) can be significant, depending on location and dominant aerosol type. However, these diurnal cycles have rarely been taken into account in measurement-based estimates of aerosol direct radiative forcing (ADRF) or aerosol direct radiative effect (ADRE). The objective of our study was to estimate the influence of diurnal aerosol variability at the top of the atmosphere ADRE estimates. By including all the possible AERONET sites, we wanted to assess the influence on global ADRE estimates. While focusing also in more detail on some selected sites of strongest impact, our goal was to also see the possible impact regionally.We calculated ADRE with different assumptions about the daily AOD variability: taking the observed daily AOD cycle into account and assuming diurnally constant AOD. Moreover, we estimated the corresponding differences in ADREs, if the single AOD value for the daily mean was taken from the the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Terra or Aqua overpass times, instead of accounting for the true observed daily variability. The mean impact of diurnal AOD variability on 24 h ADRE estimates, averaged over all AERONET sites, was rather small and it was relatively small even for the cases when AOD was chosen to correspond to the Terra or Aqua overpass time. This was true on average over all AERONET sites, while clearly there can be much stronger impact in individual sites. Examples of some selected sites demonstrated that the strongest observed AOD variability (the strongest morning afternoon contrast) does not typically result in a significant impact on 24 h ADRE. In those cases, the morning and afternoon AOD patterns are opposite and thus the impact on 24 h ADRE, when integrated over all solar zenith angles, is reduced. The most significant effect on daily ADRE was induced by AOD cycles with either maximum or minimum AOD close to local noon. In these cases, the impact on 24 h ADRE was

  17. Orientation and expression of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus small RNAs by direct multiplexed measurements using the nCounter of NanoString technology.

    PubMed

    Beaume, Marie; Hernandez, David; Docquier, Mylène; Delucinge-Vivier, Céline; Descombes, Patrick; François, Patrice

    2011-02-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a versatile bacterial opportunist responsible for a wide spectrum of infections. Several genomes of this major human pathogen have been publicly available for almost 10 years, but comprehensive links between virulence or epidemicity and genome content of the bacterium are still missing. This project aims at characterizing a set of small transcribed molecules currently ignored by standard automated annotation algorithms. We assessed the NanoString's nCounter Analysis System for its ability to determine the orientation and quantity of the expressed small RNA (sRNA) molecules that we recently detected with RNA-Sequencing (RNA-Seq). The expression of approximately seventy small RNAs, including sRNA localized in pathogenic islands, was assessed at 5 time points during growth of the bacterium in a rich medium. In addition, two extraction strategies were tested: RNA was either purified on columns or simply prepared from crude lysates in the presence of a chaotropic buffer. The nCounter System allowed us to perform these 64 measurements in a single experiment, without any enzymatic reaction, thus avoiding well-known technical biases. We evaluated the reproducibility and reliability of the nCounter compared to quantitative RT-PCR (RT-qPCR). By using two different designs for the two coding strands, we were able to identify the coding strand of 61 small RNA molecules (95%). Overall, the nCounter System provided an identification of the coding strand in perfect concordance with RNA-Seq data. In addition, expression results were also comparable to those obtained with RT-qPCR. The sensitivity and minimal requirements of the nCounter system open new possibilities in the field of gene expression analysis, for assessing bacterial transcript profiles from complex media (i.e. during host-pathogen interactions) or when starting from poorly purified RNA or even directly from lysed infected tissues.

  18. Land use and small mammal predation effects on shortgrass prairie birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stanley, T.R.

    2010-01-01

    Grassland birds endemic to the central shortgrass prairie ecoregion of the United States have experienced steep and widespread declines over the last 3 decades, and factors influencing reproductive success have been implicated. Nest predation is the major cause of nest failure in passerines, and nesting success for some shortgrass prairie birds is exceptionally low. The 3 primary land uses in the central shortgrass prairie ecoregion are native shortgrass prairie rangeland (62), irrigated and nonirrigated cropland (29), and Conservation Reserve Program (CRP, 8). Because shortgrasscropland edges and CRP may alter the community of small mammal predators of grassland bird nests, I sampled multiple sites on and near the Pawnee National Grasslands in northeast Colorado, USA, to evaluate 1) whether small mammal species richness and densities were greater in CRP fields and shortgrass prairiecropland edges compared to shortgrass prairie habitats, and 2) whether daily survival probabilities of ground-nesting grassland bird nests were negatively correlated with densities of small mammals. Small mammal species richness and densities, estimated using trapping webs, were generally greater along edges and on CRP sites compared to shortgrass sites. Vegetation did not differ among edges and shortgrass sites but did differ among CRP and shortgrass sites. Daily survival probabilities of artificial nests at edge and CRP sites and natural nests at edge sites did not differ from shortgrass sites, and for natural nests small mammal densities did not affect nest survival. However, estimated daily survival probability of artificial nests was inversely proportional to thirteen-lined ground squirrel (Spermophilus tridecemlineatus) densities. In conclusion, these data suggest that although land-use patterns on the shortgrass prairie area in my study have substantial effects on the small mammal community, insufficient data existed to determine whether land-use patterns or small mammal density

  19. Directive Versus Participative Leadership: Two Complementary Approaches to Managing School Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Somech, Anit

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The educational literature reflects the widely shared belief that participative leadership has an overwhelming advantage over the contrasting style of directive leadership in organizational and team effectiveness. The purpose of this study was to examine the relative effect of a directive leadership approach as compared with a…

  20. Direct effects of energy-related air pollutants on plant sexual reproduction

    SciTech Connect

    Ragsdale, H.L.; Murdy, W.H.

    1987-12-08

    Our completed research program concentrated on the direct in vivo effects of energy-related air pollutants on plant sexual reproduction. Direct air pollution effects on plant sexual reproduction have been studied for SO{sub 2} and NO{sub 2}, two of the three major air pollutants.

  1. Academic Self-Concept and Learning Strategies: Direction of Effect on Student Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McInerney, Dennis M.; Cheng, Rebecca Wing-yi; Mok, Magdalena Mo Ching; Lam, Amy Kwok Hap

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the prediction of academic self-concept (English and Mathematics) and learning strategies (deep and surface), and their direction of effect, on academic achievement (English and Mathematics) of 8,354 students from 16 secondary schools in Hong Kong. Two competing models were tested to ascertain the direction of effect: Model A…

  2. High School Teachers with Significant Teaching Experience Support the Effectiveness of Direct Instructional Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nikolaros, John

    2014-01-01

    This research study was conducted to examine the effectiveness of direct instructional strategies regarding the achievement of students with ED. High school teachers with significant years of teaching experience in an urban setting support the effectiveness of direct instructional strategies. Teachers with 11-20 and 21-30 years of teaching…

  3. Target- and Effect-Directed Actions towards Temporal Goals: Similar Mechanisms?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walter, Andrea M.; Rieger, Martina

    2012-01-01

    The goal of an action can consist of generating a change in the environment (to produce an effect) or changing one's own situation in the environment (to move to a physical target). To investigate whether the mechanisms of effect-directed and target-directed action control are similar, participants performed continuous reversal movements. They…

  4. Quantitative analysis of the direct effect of aerosols over decadal scale by using ECHAM6-standalone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhammad, K.; Bott, A.; Hense, A.

    2013-12-01

    of up to 80% especially in North African-tropical Atlantic region. Transient aerosol and SST/SIC contributions to solar TOA radiative fluxes are of the order of 10%. Major contributor to the variability of TOA solar fluxes especially at mid-latitudes is internal variability also up to 80-90% outside the above mentioned regions. The results show that the direct effect of (prescribed) aerosols are clearly detectable even on a regional scale on decadal time scale if solar radiative fluxes are analyzed. The annual mean temperature at 850 hPa (dynamical variable) shows contrasting results. Major contributions of its variability at low latitudes come from SST (60-80% at tropical/subtropical latitudes) while the static aerosol effects are small (< 10% except in central equatorial Africa) and transient aerosol effects contribute up to 10% also at higher latitudes with the remaining part (locally 80-90%) coming from internal climate noise. In summary this analysis of variance of radiative fluxes and dynamical variables allows to draw objectively conclusions about the need to include (direct) aerosol effects into decadal climate forecasts. __________________________________________ Kinne. S and M. Schulz (2006). An AeroCom initial assessment-optical properties in aerosol component modules of global models: Atmos. Chem. Phys.,6,1815-1834

  5. Direct observation of resonance effects in laser cluster interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Zweiback, J. S.

    1999-06-01

    Time resolved dynamics of high intensity laser interactions with atomic clusters have been studied with both theoretical analysis and experiment. A short-pulse Ti:sapphire laser system, which could produce 50 mJ of energy in a 50 fs pulse, was built to perform these experiments. The laser used a novel single grating stretcher and was pumped, in part, by a custom Nd:YLF laser system, including 19 mm Nd:YLF amplifiers. It was found that there is an optimal pulse width to maximize absorption for a given cluster size. This optimal pulse width ranged from 400 fs for 85 A radius xenon clusters to 1.2 ps for 205 {angstrom} radius xenon clusters. Using a pump-probe configuration, the absorption of the probe radiation was observed to reach a maximum for a particular time delay between pump and probe, dependent on the cluster size. The delay for peak absorption was 800, 1400, and 2100 fs for 85 Å, 130 Å, and 170 Å radius xenon clusters respectively. Model calculations suggest that these effects are due to resonant heating of the spherical plasma in agreement with the hydrodynamic interpretation of cluster interactions. While this simple hydrodynamic code produces reasonable agreement with data, it does not include bulk plasma or non-linear propagation effects and is limited to the regime where resonant behavior dominates. We also measured the scattered laser light from the laser-cluster interaction. Similar to the absorption measurements, there is an optimal pulse width which maximizes the scattered signal. This pulse width is larger than the optimal pulse width for absorption. This disagrees with model calculations which show both pulse widths being similar. Further experiments measuring the scattered light in a pump-probe configuration should help to resolve this disagreement.

  6. Protective effect of vitamin E against ethanol-induced small intestine damage in rats.

    PubMed

    Shirpoor, Alireza; Barmaki, Hanieh; Khadem Ansari, Mohamadhasan; Lkhanizadeh, BehrouzI; Barmaki, Haleh

    2016-03-01

    The role of oxidative stress and inflammatory reaction has been reported in various ethanol-induced complications. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of ethanol-induced structural alteration, oxidative stress, and inflammatory reaction on the small intestine of rats, and plausible protective effect of vitamin E to determine whether it inhibits the abnormality induced by ethanol in the small intestine. Twenty-four male wistar rats were divided into three groups, namely: Control, ethanol, and vitamin E treated ethanol groups. After six weeks of treatment, the small intestine length, villus height, crypt depth and muscular layer thickness, oxidative stress, and inflammatory parameters showed significant changes in the ethanol treated group compared to the control group. Vitamin E consumption along with ethanol ameliorated structural alteration of the small intestine and reduced the elevated amount of oxidative stress and inflammatory markers such as protein carbonyl, OX-LDL, IL-6, Hcy, and TNF-α. Furthermore, their total antioxidant capacity was increased significantly compared to that of the ethanol group. These findings indicate that ethanol induces the small intestine abnormality by oxidative and inflammatory stress, and that these effects can be alleviated by using vitamin E as an antioxidant and anti-inflammatory molecule.

  7. Effect of microscopic modeling of skin in electrical and thermal analysis of transcranial direct current stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Tames, Jose; Sugiyama, Yukiya; Laakso, Ilkka; Tanaka, Satoshi; Koyama, Soichiro; Sadato, Norihiro; Hirata, Akimasa

    2016-12-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a neuromodulation scheme where a small current is delivered to the brain via two electrodes attached to the scalp. The electrode design is an important topic, not only as regards efficacy, but also from a safety perspective, as tDCS may be related to skin lesions that are sometimes observed after stimulation. Previous computational models of tDCS have omitted the effects of microscopic structures in the skin, and the different soak conditions of the electrodes, and model validation has been limited. In this study, multiphysics and multiscale analysis are proposed to demonstrate the importance of microscopic modeling of the skin, in order to clarify the effects of the internal electric field, and to examine temperature elevation around the electrodes. This novel microscopic model of the skin layer took into consideration the effect of saline/water penetration in hair follicles and sweat ducts on the field distribution around the electrodes. The temperature elevation in the skin was then computed by solving the bioheat equation. Also, a multiscale model was introduced to account for macroscopic and microscopic tissues of the head and skin, which was validated by measurement of the head resistance during tDCS. As a result, the electric field in the microscopic model of the skin was less localized when the follicles/ducts were filled with saline instead of hair or tap water. Temperature elevation was also lessened with saline, in comparison with other substances. Saline, which may penetrate the hair follicles and sweat ducts, suppressed the field concentration around the electrodes. For conventional magnitudes of current injection, and a head resistance of less than 10 kΩ, the temperature elevation in the skin when using saline-soaked electrodes was low, less than 0.1 °C, and unlikely to cause adverse thermal effects.

  8. Effect of experimental stress on the small bowel and colon in healthy humans

    PubMed Central

    Pritchard, SE; Garsed, KC; Hoad, CL; Lingaya, M; Banwait, R; Thongborisute, W; Roberts, E; Costigan, C; Marciani, L; Gowland, PA; Spiller, RC

    2015-01-01

    Background Symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are frequently reported to be exacerbated by stress. Animal studies suggest that corticotrophin releasing hormone (CRH) mediates the effect of stress on the bowel. We have shown that stressed IBS patients with diarrhea have constricted small bowels. We hypothesized that we could mimic this effect by applying experimental stress in the form of either hand immersion in ice water or CRH injection in healthy volunteers (HV). Methods The postprandial effect of the cold pressor test (repeated hand immersion in ice cold water) and injection of CRH, were assessed vs control in two groups of 18 HVs. Key Results CRH produced a significant rise from baseline salivary cortisol levels (p = 0.004) not seen with the cold pressor test. Small bowel water content (SBWC) fell postprandially on all four treatments. SBWC was significantly reduced by both stressors but CRH caused a greater effect (anova, p < 0.003 vs p = 0.02). Ascending colon (AC) volume was greater after CRH injection compared with saline (p = 0.002) but no differences were seen with the cold pressor test vs warm water. Postprandial increase in colon volume was also reduced by CRH which also increased the sensations of distension and bloating. Conclusions & Inferences Two experimental stressors were shown to constrict the small bowel, mimicking the effect previously seen in IBS-D patients. CRH increased the volume of the AC. We speculate that stress accelerates transfer of water from the small bowel to the AC. PMID:25703609

  9. Directly probing the effect of strain on magnetic exchange interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorr, Kathrin

    2012-02-01

    Thin films of transition metal oxides of the perovskite type ABO3 (B = 3d or 4d metal) have revealed abundant examples for strain-driven changes of magnetic ordering. One most popular is the strain-induced ferromagnetic ferroelectric state of otherwise antiferromagnetic paraelectric EuTiO3. Another promising example is the strain control of orbital occupation and magnetic coupling at oxide interfaces of SrRuO3 with manganites. In spite of strong efforts, the theoretical treatment of magnetic exchange in complex oxides has remained a challenge, and experiments continue to show unpredicted / unexplained large effects of the epitaxial strains in films. In order to provide meaningful experimental data on strain dependences, epitaxial thin films should be grown in various coherent strain states on different substrates without changing anything but the strain. This is inherently difficult: possible problems may arise from a strain-dependent oxidation level or microstructure. As a complementary approach, the in-plane strain of epitaxial oxide films can be controlled reversibly using a piezoelectric substrate, even though the accessible reversible strain of 0.1 -- 0.2% is an order of magnitude smaller. In my talk, I will address reversible-strain studies on La0.7Sr0.3MnO3, La1-xSrxCoO3 (x = 0, 0.2, 0.3) und SrRuO3 films, showing the strain response of the magnetic Curie temperature, the magnetization and the electrical resistance and discussing the current understanding of the strain effects on magnetic ordering. In La0.8Sr0.2CoO3, a strain-driven phase transition between ferromagnetic and spin-glass-like could be established by combining the piezoelectric substrate with a tuned buffer system providing varied as-grown strain states. In SrRuO3, a tetragonal tensile strain state shows a suppression of the ordered magnetic moment. Lattice parameters and symmetries of the films were determined by x-ray diffraction. It is noted that the atomic displacements (bond lengths and

  10. Costs and benefits in item-method directed forgetting: differential effects of encoding and retrieval.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yuh-Shiow

    2013-01-01

    This study examined how encoding and retrieval factors affected directed forgetting costs and benefits in an item-method procedure. Experiment 1 used a typical item-method procedure and revealed a levels-of-processing effect in overall recall. However, the deep encoding condition showed a smaller directed forgetting effect than the shallow encoding conditions. More importantly, "remember" (R) words were selectively rehearsed as indicated by greater recall from the primacy portion of the list and more apt to be recalled before "forget" (F) words. Experiment 2 showed that a deep encoding operation reduced directed forgetting costs and that directed forgetting benefits occurred only when R words were recalled before F words. These findings supported the hypotheses that encoding manipulation affected directed forgetting costs and that directed forgetting benefits were associated with output order bias. Results were discussed in terms of mechanisms that produce item-method directed forgetting.

  11. Effect of Agricultural Practices on Hydrology and Water Chemistry in a Small Irrigated Catchment, Yakima River Basin, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCarthy, Kathleen A.; Johnson, Henry M.

    2009-01-01

    The role of irrigation and artificial drainage in the hydrologic cycle and the transport of solutes in a small agricultural catchment in central Washington's Yakima Valley were explored using hydrologic, chemical, isotopic, age-dating, and mineralogical data from several environmental compartments, including stream water, ground water, overland flow, and streambed pore water. A conceptual understanding of catchment hydrology and solute transport was developed and an inverse end-member mixing analysis was used to further explore the effects of agriculture in this small catchment. The median concentrations of major solutes and nitrates were similar for the single field site and for the catchment outflow site, indicating that the net effects of transport processes for these constituents were similar at both scales. However, concentrations of nutrients were different at the two sites, suggesting that field-scale variations in agricultural practices as well as nearstream and instream biochemical processes are important components of agricultural chemical transformation and transport in this catchment. This work indicates that irrigation coupled with artificial drainage networks may exacerbate the ecological effects of agricultural runoff by increasing direct connectivity between fields and streams and minimizing potentially mitigating effects (denitrification and dilution, for example) of longer subsurface pathways.

  12. SU-E-I-10: Investigation On Detectability of a Small Target for Different Slice Direction of a Volumetric Cone Beam CT Image

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C; Han, M; Baek, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the detectability of a small target for different slice direction of a volumetric cone beam CT image and its impact on dose reduction. Methods: Analytic projection data of a sphere object (1 mm diameter, 0.2/cm attenuation coefficient) were generated and reconstructed by FDK algorithm. In this work, we compared the detectability of the small target from four different backprojection Methods: hanning weighted ramp filter with linear interpolation (RECON 1), hanning weighted ramp filter with Fourier interpolation (RECON2), ramp filter with linear interpolation (RECON 3), and ramp filter with Fourier interpolation (RECON4), respectively. For noise simulation, 200 photons per measurement were used, and the noise only data were reconstructed using FDK algorithm. For each reconstructed volume, axial and coronal slice were extracted and detection-SNR was calculated using channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) with dense difference-of-Gaussian (D-DOG) channels. Results: Detection-SNR of coronal images varies for different backprojection methods, while axial images have a similar detection-SNR. Detection-SNR{sup 2} ratios of coronal and axial images in RECON1 and RECON2 are 1.33 and 1.15, implying that the coronal image has a better detectability than axial image. In other words, using coronal slices for the small target detection can reduce the patient dose about 33% and 15% compared to using axial slices in RECON 1 and RECON 2. Conclusion: In this work, we investigated slice direction dependent detectability of a volumetric cone beam CT image. RECON 1 and RECON 2 produced the highest detection-SNR, with better detectability in coronal slices. These results indicate that it is more beneficial to use coronal slice to improve detectability of a small target in a volumetric cone beam CT image. This research was supported by the MSIP (Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning), Korea, under the IT Consilience Creative Program (NIPA-2014-H0201

  13. Relating use of effective responsive, structure, and non-directive control vegetable parenting practices to subscales from the Model of Goal Directed Behavior

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Parents may positively influence children's vegetable consumption through effective vegetable parenting practices (VPP). Research has demonstrated three dimensions of effective VPP: Effective Responsiveness, Structure, and Non-Directive Control, but there is limited research investigating each separ...

  14. Aerosol direct effect retrieval over clouds from space-borne passive hyperspectral measurements (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Graaf, M.; Tilstra, L.; Stammes, P.

    2013-12-01

    A novel approach for the retrieval of the aerosol direct radiative effect (DRE) over clouds will be presented, which is independent of aerosol parameters estimates. The direct effect at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) of aerosols over clouds can be estimated using hyperspectral reflectance measurements from space-borne spectrometers, when the equivalent aerosol-unpolluted cloud scene reflectance spectrum is known. For smoke over clouds the cloud parameters can be estimated from the shortwave infrared (SWIR), where the absorption of the small smoke particles becomes sufficiently small. Using precomputed tables of cloud reflectance spectra, the unpolluted cloud scene spectrum can then be simulated and compared to the real measured polluted cloud scene reflectance spectrum. The UV-radiation absorption by the smoke will lead to a difference between the measured and simulated spectra, which is proportional to the aerosol DRE at TOA. Aerosol microphysical assumptions and retrievals are avoided by modeling only the aerosol-free scene spectra, all the aerosol effects are in the reflectance measurements. The method works especially well for cloud scenes, which can be simulated relatively accurately. An algorithm was developed to derive the aerosol DRE over marine clouds, using the space-borne spectrometer SCIAMACHY, which produced shortwave reflectance spectra (from 240 to 1700 nm contiguously) from 2002 till 2012. These are ideally suited to study the effect of aerosols on the shortwave spectrum. However, since aerosols in general do not have high resolution spectral features, the algorithm can be adapted to suit data from any combination of instruments that measures UV, visible and SWIR reflectances simultaneously. Examples include OMI and MODIS, flying in the A-Train constellation, and TROPOMI, on the future Sentinel 5 precursor mission, combined with NOAA's NPP VIIRS. This would produce aerosol DRE estimates with unprecedented accuracy and spatial resolution. The

  15. Small high directivity ferrite antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, T. M. B.

    A centimeter-wavelength antenna of millimetric dimensions, which uses the intrinsic angular sensitivity of ferrites, is described, with an emphasis on the modification of the material's permeability. The construction of both the ferrite film lens antenna and the ferrite film cassegrain antenna are detailed; both can be devised in a number of configurations for appropriate beam positioning and rf filtering. The antenna design, discussed primarily in the context of smart missiles, electronic warfare, and satellite systems, presents the possibility of magnetically switching between the transmit and receive modes within the antenna structure itself. Finally, it is noted that for a simple 2-dipole array the angular resolution can be two orders of magnitude higher than with the conventional techniques.

  16. Cost-effective FITL technologies for small business and residential customers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Niels E.; Woolnough, Peter; Seidenberg, Juergen; Ferreira, Mario F. S.

    1995-02-01

    FIRST is a RACE project where 5 main European telecoms operators, 4 equipment manufacturers and one university have joined up to define and test in a field trial in Portugal a cost effective Optical Access Network. The main design target has been a system which gives cost effective provision of wideband services for small and medium business customers. The system however, incorporates provision of telephone, ISDN and analog and digital video for residential customers as well. Technologies have been chosen with the objective of providing a simple, robust and flexible system where initial deployment costs are low and closely related to the service take up. The paper describes the main technical features of the system and network applications which shows how the system may be introduced in network planning. The system is based on Passive Optical Network technology where video is distributed in the 1550 nm window and telecoms services transmitted at 1300 nm in full duplex mode. The telecoms system provides high capacity, flexibility in loop length and robustness towards outside plant performance. The Subcarrier Multiple Access (SCMA) method is used for upstream transmission of bi-directional telecoms services. SCMA has advantages compared to the Time Division Multiple Access technology used in other systems. Bandwidth/cost tradeoff is better and the lower requirements to the outside plant increases the overall cost benefit. Optical beat noise due to overlapping of laser spectra which may be a problem for this technology has been addressed with success through the use of a suitable modulation and control technique. This technology is further validated in the field trial. The video system provides cost effective long distance transmission on standard fiber with externally modulated lasers and cascaded amplifiers. Coexistence of analog and digital video on one fiber with different modulation schemes i.e. BPSK, QPSK and 64 QAM have been validated. Total life cycle cost

  17. Environmental Effects of Small Meteorite Impact in Unconsolidated Sediments — Case of Iron Meteorite Shower in Morasko, Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szczuciński, W.; Pleskot, K.; Makohonienko, M.; Tjallingii, R.; Apolinarska, K.; Cerbin, S.; Goslar, T.; Nowaczyk, N.; Rzodkiewicz, M.; Słowiński, M.; Woszczyk, M.; Brauer, A.

    2016-08-01

    We show record of environmental consequences of mid-Holocene small meteorite impact. It is based on sedimentological, geochemical and biological indicators studied in lake deposits, which revealed relatively small extent of the impact effects.

  18. Effects of fire on small mammal communities in frequent-fire forests in California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roberts, Susan L.; Kelt, Douglas A.; Van Wagtendonk, Jan W.; Miles, A. Keith; Meyer, Marc D.

    2015-01-01

    Fire is a natural, dynamic process that is integral to maintaining ecosystem function. The reintroduction of fire (e.g., prescribed fire, managed wildfire) is a critical management tool for protecting many frequent-fire forests against stand-replacing fires while restoring an essential ecological process. Understanding the effects of fire on forests and wildlife communities is important in natural resource planning efforts. Small mammals are key components of forest food webs and essential to ecosystem function. To investigate the relationship of fire to small mammal assemblages, we live trapped small mammals in 10 burned and 10 unburned forests over 2 years in the central Sierra Nevada, California. Small mammal abundance was higher in unburned forests, largely reflecting the greater proportion of closed-canopy species such as Glaucomys sabrinus in unburned forests. The most abundant species across the entire study area was the highly adaptable generalist species, Peromyscus maniculatus. Species diversity was similar between burned and unburned forests, but burned forests were characterized by greater habitat heterogeneity and higher small mammal species evenness. The use and reintroduction of fire to maintain a matrix of burn severities, including large patches of unburned refugia, creates a heterogeneous and resilient landscape that allows for fire-sensitive species to proliferate and, as such, may help maintain key ecological functions and diverse small mammal assemblages.

  19. Separation and measurement of direct and indirect effects of light on stomata

    SciTech Connect

    Sharkey, T.D.; Raschke, K.

    1981-07-01

    Conductance for water vapor, assimilation of CO/sub 2/, and intercellular CO/sub 2/ concentration of leaves of five species were determined at various irradiances and ambient CO/sub 2/ concentrations. Conductance and assimilation were then plotted as functions of irradiance and intercellular CO/sub 2/ concentration. On leaves of Xanthium strumarium L., Gossypium hirsutum L., Phaseolus vulgaris L., and Perilla frutescens (L.), Britt., the stomatal response to light was mainly a direct response to light and to a small extent only a response to changes in intercellular CO/sub 2/ concentration. This was also true for stomata of Zea mays L., except at irradiances <150 watts per square meter. Stomata responded to light even in leaves whose net exchange of CO/sub 2/ was reduced to zero. When leaves were inverted and irradiated on the abaxial surface, conductance decreased in the shaded and increased in the illuminated epidermis, indicating that the photoreceptor pigment(s) involved are located in the epidermis. In leaves of X. strumarium, the direct effect of light on conductance is primarily a response to blue light. Stomatal responses to CO/sub 2/ and to light opposed each other. In X. strumarium, stomatal opening in response to light was strongest in CO/sub 2/-free air and saturated at lower irradiances than in CO/sub 2/-containing air. Conversely, stomatal closure in response to CO/sub 2/ was strongest in darkness and it decreased as irradiance increased. In X. strumarium, P. vulgaris, and P. frutescens, an irradiance of 300 watts per square meter was sufficient to eliminate the stomatal response to CO/sub 2/ altogether. Application of abscisic acid, or an increase in vapor pressure deficit, or a decrease in leaf temperature reduced the stomatal conductance at light saturation.

  20. Motif analysis for small-number effects in chemical reaction dynamics.

    PubMed

    Saito, Nen; Sughiyama, Yuki; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2016-09-07

    The number of molecules involved in a cell or subcellular structure is sometimes rather small. In this situation, ordinary macroscopic-level fluctuations can be overwhelmed by non-negligible large fluctuations, which results in drastic changes in chemical-reaction dynamics and statistics compared to those observed under a macroscopic system (i.e., with a large number of molecules). In order to understand how salient changes emerge from fluctuations in molecular number, we here quantitatively define small-number effect by focusing on a "mesoscopic" level, in which the concentration distribution is distinguishable both from micro- and macroscopic ones and propose a criterion for determining whether or not such an effect can emerge in a given chemical reaction network. Using the proposed criterion, we systematically derive a list of motifs of chemical reaction networks that can show small-number effects, which includes motifs showing emergence of the power law and the bimodal distribution observable in a mesoscopic regime with respect to molecule number. The list of motifs provided herein is helpful in the search for candidates of biochemical reactions with a small-number effect for possible biological functions, as well as for designing a reaction system whose behavior can change drastically depending on molecule number, rather than concentration.

  1. The Effect of Language on Chinese and American 2- and 3-Year Olds' Small Number Identification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Xia; Sun, Ye; Baroody, Arthur J.; Purpura, David

    2013-01-01

    Recent research has found that linguistic cues may affect children's number word acquisition. Two studies were undertaken to evaluate the use of singular/plural markings and small number words in Chinese and English and its effect on children's number concepts. The first study utilized the CHILDES data and investigated how singular/plural markings…

  2. A Study of the Effectiveness of Learning Communities at a Small Liberal Arts College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watkins, Paul David

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the effectiveness of the learning community program at a small liberal arts college on educational outcomes as measured by differences in semester GPA between learning community participants and non-participants, as well as differences between types of learning communities, time of participation in…

  3. The Entrance and Exit Effects in Small Electrochemical Filter-Press Reactors Used in the Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frias-Ferrer, Angel; Gonzalez-Garcia, Jose; Saez, Veronica; Exposito, Eduardo; Sanchez-Sanchez, Carlos M.; Mantiel, Vicente; Walsh, Frank C.; Aldaz, Antonio; Walsh, Frank C.

    2005-01-01

    A laboratory experiment designed to examine the entrance and exit effects in small electrochemical filter-press reactors used in the laboratory is presented. The single compartment of the filter-press reactor is filled with different turbulence promoters to study their influence as compared to the empty configuration.

  4. Motif analysis for small-number effects in chemical reaction dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Nen; Sughiyama, Yuki; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2016-09-01

    The number of molecules involved in a cell or subcellular structure is sometimes rather small. In this situation, ordinary macroscopic-level fluctuations can be overwhelmed by non-negligible large fluctuations, which results in drastic changes in chemical-reaction dynamics and statistics compared to those observed under a macroscopic system (i.e., with a large number of molecules). In order to understand how salient changes emerge from fluctuations in molecular number, we here quantitatively define small-number effect by focusing on a "mesoscopic" level, in which the concentration distribution is distinguishable both from micro- and macroscopic ones and propose a criterion for determining whether or not such an effect can emerge in a given chemical reaction network. Using the proposed criterion, we systematically derive a list of motifs of chemical reaction networks that can show small-number effects, which includes motifs showing emergence of the power law and the bimodal distribution observable in a mesoscopic regime with respect to molecule number. The list of motifs provided herein is helpful in the search for candidates of biochemical reactions with a small-number effect for possible biological functions, as well as for designing a reaction system whose behavior can change drastically depending on molecule number, rather than concentration.

  5. An Experimental Analysis of the Effects of Reading Interventions in a Small Group Reading Instruction Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonfiglio, Christine M.; Daly, Edward J., III; Persampieri, Michael; Andersen, Melissa

    2006-01-01

    The current study examined the effects of several combinations of instructional and motivational interventions on oral reading fluency in the context of small group reading instruction. A treatment package consisting of acquisition, fluency, and motivational components was examined and then dismantled. Results were evaluated individually for each…

  6. Influence of the large-small split effect on strategy choice in complex subtraction.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Yan Hui; Wu, Hao; Shang, Rui Hong; Chao, Xiaomei; Ren, Ting Ting; Zheng, Li Ling; Mo, Lei

    2016-03-31

    Two main theories have been used to explain the arithmetic split effect: decision-making process theory and strategy choice theory. Using the inequality paradigm, previous studies have confirmed that individuals tend to adopt a plausibility-checking strategy and a whole-calculation strategy to solve large and small split problems in complex addition arithmetic, respectively. This supports strategy choice theory, but it is unknown whether this theory also explains performance in solving different split problems in complex subtraction arithmetic. This study used small, intermediate and large split sizes, with each split condition being further divided into problems requiring and not requiring borrowing. The reaction times (RTs) for large and intermediate splits were significantly shorter than those for small splits, while accuracy was significantly higher for large and middle splits than for small splits, reflecting no speed-accuracy trade-off. Further, RTs and accuracy differed significantly between the borrow and no-borrow conditions only for small splits. This study indicates that strategy choice theory is suitable to explain the split effect in complex subtraction arithmetic. That is, individuals tend to choose the plausibility-checking strategy or the whole-calculation strategy according to the split size.

  7. An assessment of the small-crack effect for 2024-T3 aluminum alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.; Swain, M. H.; Phillips, E. P.

    1986-01-01

    Data on small-crack behavior were obtained for a single-edge-notched tensile specimen made of 2024-T3 Al alloy and used to evaluate the capability of a semiempirical crack-growth and closure model to predict the fatigue life of notched specimens. Fatigue tests were conducted under either constant-amplitude loading (with stress ratios of 0.5, 0, -1, and -2) or spectrum loading, using a replication technique to record growth. It was found that small cracks exhibited the 'small-crack' effect in that they grew faster than large cracks when subjected to the same stress intensity factor range. Experimental small-crack growth rates agreed well with the model predictions. For making predictions of fatigue life, an initial surface defect void size of 3 x 12 x 0.4 microns was used in all calculations; predicted fatigue lives agreed well with experimentally determined values obtained in all tests. The crack-closure model indicated that the 'small-crack' effect on fatigue life was greatest in tests involving significant compressive loads.

  8. "Named Small but Doing Great": An Investigation of Small-Scale Chemistry Experimentation for Effective Undergraduate Practical Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tesfamariam, Gebrekidan Mebrahtu; Lykknes, Annette; Kvittingen, Lise

    2017-01-01

    In theory, practical work is an established part of university-level chemistry courses. However, mainly due to budget constraints, large class size, time constraints and inadequate teacher preparations, practical activities are frequently left out from chemistry classroom instruction in most developing countries. Small-scale chemistry (SSC)…

  9. Treatment of high salinity brines by direct contact membrane distillation: Effect of membrane characteristics and salinity.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianfeng; Guan, Yunshan; Cheng, Fangqin; Liu, Yu

    2015-12-01

    Direct contact membrane distillation (DCMD) is one of the attractive technologies for high salinity brine treatment. In this study, four polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) membranes were examined in treating highly concentrated salt solutions. Results showed that non-supported membranes generally have a higher overall mass transfer coefficient but porosity seems to be the most important parameter controlling membrane flux and thermal efficiency. Supported membranes with large thickness had relatively higher thermal efficiency than small thickness. This can be attributed to their reduced heat loss through heat condition. In addition, KCl, NaCl and MgCl2 solutions showed distinct trends over flux decline at high salt concentrations (⩾2.0M). The difference in flux was largely due to the discrepancy in water activities of these solutions (KCl>NaCl>MgCl2). However, the effect of viscosity on permeate flux could not be neglected for MgCl2 at high salt concentrations as the suddenly increased viscosity could lead to serious temperature polarization. This study indicates that membrane distillation is a promising technology for high salinity brine treatment.

  10. Long-term horizontal vocal directivity of opera singers: effects of singing projection and acoustic environment.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, Densil; Davis, Pamela J; Connolly, Anna

    2011-11-01

    Vocal directivity refers to how directional the sound is that comes from a singer's mouth, that is, whether the sound is focused into a narrow stream of sound projecting in front of the singers or whether it is spread out all around the singer. This study investigates the long-term vocal directivity and acoustic power of professional opera singers and how these vary among subjects, among singing projections, and among vastly different acoustic environments. The vocal sound of eight professional opera singers (six females and two males) was measured in anechoic and reverberant rooms and in a recital hall. Subjects sang in four different ways: (1) paying great attention to intonation; (2) singing as in performance, with all the emotional connection intended by the composer; (3) imagining a large auditorium; and (4) imagining a small theatre. The same song was sung by all singers in all conditions. A head and torso simulator (HATS), radiating sound from its mouth, was used for comparison in all situations. Results show that individual singers have quite consistent long-term average directivity, even across conditions. Directivity varies substantially among singers. Singers are more directional than the standard HATS (which is a physical model of a talking person). The singer's formant region of the spectrum exhibits greater directivity than the lower-frequency range, and results indicate that singers control directivity (at least, incidentally) for different singing conditions as they adjust the spectral emphasis of their voices through their formants.

  11. Direct numerical simulation of two-phase flow: Effective rheology and flow patterns of particle suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deubelbeiss, Y.; Kaus, B. J. P.; Connolly, J. A. D.

    2010-02-01

    We analyze the mechanical behavior of a two-phase system consisting of rigid grains and an interconnected pore fluid. For this purpose we use 2D direct numerical simulations on the spatial scale of individual grains for Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluid rheology. By using the stress-strain rate relation we derive scaling laws for effective viscosity of two-phase particle suspensions. We demonstrate that the effective rheology of the assemblage is non-Newtonian only if the fluid has a non-Newtonian rheology. At small fluid fraction, inter-granular strain rates are up to 3 orders of magnitude higher than the applied background strain rate. We suggest that this effect explains the experimentally observed change at higher strain rates in rheology, from Newtonian to non-Newtonian aggregate rheology. To establish the conditions at which the fluid-solid aggregate deforms coherently as a consequence of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities we studied flow patterns of particle suspensions and characterized them as a function of fluid fraction, viscosity, density, shape and size of the grains. From initial conditions with homogeneously distributed grains and interstitial fluid above a layer of pure fluid, our results show that the Rayleigh-Taylor instability dominates for moderate to large fluid fractions. At large fluid fractions, we observed a transition to a Stokes suspension mode, in which grains do not interact but sink independently. An analytical expression is derived that predicts the transition from Rayleigh-Taylor instability to Stokes suspension mode. The transition is a function of fluid fraction, radius of the grains, height of the interface and initial amplitude. Systematic numerical simulations are in good agreement with the analytical predictions.

  12. Effects of casing treatment on a small, transonic axial-flow compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, F. F.; Kidwell, J. R.

    1975-01-01

    Improved axial compressor surge margin through effective rotor casing treatment has been identified from test results on large axial compressors. A modified scale of a large compressor was built and tested to determine if similar improvements in surge margin could be duplicated in small-size turbomachinery. In addition, the effects of rotor radial running clearance, both with and without casing treatment, were investigated and are discussed. Test results of the scale configuration are presented and compared to the parent compressor.

  13. Continuous Bombardment: Effect of Small Primary and Secondary Impacts on the Lunar Regolith

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speyerer, E. J.; Robinson, M. S.; Wagner, R.

    2015-12-01

    The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) began systematically mapping the Moon in the summer of 2009 with the goal of acquiring an image dataset to facilitate future exploration [1]. With the benefit of the extended science missions, we have acquired and systematically examined over 14,000 before and after Narrow Angle Camera (NAC) observations, called NAC temporal pairs. From this growing dataset, we have discovered a dynamic Moon with over a hundred new resolved craters and over 26,000 smaller features we define as splotches. These splotches lack a distinguishable crater rim, but alter the observed reflectance of the surface by a few percent. Some of these splotches contain very small primary or secondary craters, but the diameter is too small (< 3 pixels) to be clearly identified and measured in NAC images. However, many of the splotches are directly linked to recent impact events and are thought to be secondary disturbances of the regolith. Robinson et al. (2014) identified nearly 250 splotches around an 18 m impact crater that formed on 17 March 2013 [2]. The shape of some of the splotches indicated a direction of emplacement, which pointed back to the primary crater. In addition, other large populations of splotches exist around other new impacts as well, which support the hypothesis that the emplacement of distal ejecta from nearby craters may form them. Using statistics gathered from these NAC temporal pairs and Monte Carlo simulations, we can estimate the timespan in which the entire lunar surface is affected by these small surface changes. This is important, in order to estimate the rate and understand the risk imposed by these small primary and secondary surface changes. References: [1] Robinson et al. (2010) Space Sci. Rev., 150, 1-4, 81-124. [2] Robinson et al. (2015) Icarus, 252, pp. 229-235.

  14. New technique for the direct analysis of food powders confined in a small hole using transversely excited atmospheric CO(2) laser-induced gas plasma.

    PubMed

    Khumaeni, Ali; Ramli, Muliadi; Deguchi, Yoji; Lee, Yong Inn; Idris, Nasrullah; Kurniawan, Koo Hendrik; Lie, Tjung Jie; Kagawa, Kiichiro

    2008-12-01

    Taking advantage of the differences between the interactions of transversely excited atmospheric (TEA) CO(2) lasers with metal and with organic powder, a new technique for the direct analysis of food powder samples has been developed. In this technique, the powder samples were placed into a small hole with a diameter of 2 mm and a depth of 3 mm and covered by a metal mesh. The TEA CO(2) laser (1500 mJ, 200 ns) was focused on the powder sample surfaces, passing through the metal mesh, at atmospheric pressure in nitrogen gas. It is hypothesized that the small hole functions to confine the powder particles and suppresses the blowing-off of sample, while the metal mesh works as the source of electrons to initiate the strong gas breakdown plasma. The confined powder particles are then ablated by laser irradiation and the ablated particles move into the strong gas breakdown plasma region to be atomized and excited; this method cannot be applied for the case of Nd:YAG lasers because in such case the metal mesh itself was ablated by the laser irradiation. A quantitative analysis of a milk powder sample containing different concentrations of Ca was successfully demonstrated, resulting in a good linear calibration curve with high precision.

  15. Effect of hypokinesia on invertase activity of the mucosa of the small intestine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdusattarov, A.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of prolonged hypokinesia on the enzyme activity of the middle portion of the small intestine was investigated. Eighty-four mongrel white male rats weighing 170-180 g were divided into two equal groups. The experimental group were maintained in single cages under 30 days of hypokinetic conditions and the control animals were maintained under ordinary laboratory conditions. It is concluded that rates of invertase formation and its inclusion in the composition if the cellular membrane, if judged by the enzyme activity studied in sections of the small intestine, are subject to phase changes in the course of prolonged hypokinesia.

  16. The effects of small ice crystals on the infrared radiative properties of cirrus clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takano, Y.; Liou, K. N.; Asano, S.; Heymsfield, A.; Minnis, P.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of nonspherical small ice crystals on the IR radiative properties of cirrus clouds are investigated utilizing light scattering properties of spheroidal particles. Employing the anomalous diffraction theory for spheres and results from the exact spheroid scattering program, efficient parameterization equations are developed for calculations of the absorption and scattering properties for small ice crystals. Parameterization formulas are developed for large ice crystals employing results computed from the geometric ray-tracing method and the Fraunhofer diffraction theory for hexagonal crystals and spheroids.

  17. Decadal trends in marine reserves reveal differential rates of change in direct and indirect effects

    PubMed Central

    Babcock, R. C.; Shears, N. T.; Alcala, A. C.; Barrett, N. S.; Edgar, G. J.; Lafferty, K. D.; McClanahan, T. R.; Russ, G. R.

    2010-01-01

    Decadal-scale observations of marine reserves suggest that indirect effects on taxa that occur through cascading trophic interactions take longer to develop than direct effects on target species. Combining and analyzing a unique set of long-term time series of ecologic data in and out of fisheries closures from disparate regions, we found that the time to initial detection of direct effects on target species (±SE) was 5.13 ± 1.9 years, whereas initial detection of indirect effects on other taxa, which were often trait mediated, took significantly longer (13.1 ± 2.0 years). Most target species showed initial direct effects, but their trajectories over time were highly variable. Many target species continued to increase, some leveled off, and others decreased. Decreases were due to natural fluctuations, fishing impacts from outside reserves, or indirect effects from target species at higher trophic levels. The average duration of stable periods for direct effects was 6.2 ± 1.2 years, even in studies of more than 15 years. For indirect effects, stable periods averaged 9.1 ± 1.6 years, although this was not significantly different from direct effects. Populations of directly targeted species were more stable in reserves than in fished areas, suggesting increased ecologic resilience. This is an important benefit of marine reserves with respect to their function as a tool for conservation and restoration. PMID:20176941

  18. Decadal trends in marine reserves reveal differential rates of change in direct and indirect effects

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Babcock, R.C.; Shears, N.T.; Alcala, A.C.; Barrett, N.S.; Edgar, G.J.; Lafferty, K.D.; McClanahan, T.R.; Russ, G.R.

    2010-01-01

    Decadal-scale observations of marine reserves suggest that indirect effects on taxa that occur through cascading trophic interactions take longer to develop than direct effects on target species. Combining and analyzing a unique set of long-term time series of ecologic data in and out of fisheries closures from disparate regions, we found that the time to initial detection of direct effects on target species (+ or -SE) was 5.13 + or - 1.9 years, whereas initial detection of indirect effects on other taxa, which were often trait mediated, took significantly longer (13.1 + or - 2.0 years). Most target species showed initial direct effects, but their trajectories over time were highly variable. Many target species continued to increase, some leveled off, and others decreased. Decreases were due to natural fluctuations, fishing impacts from outside reserves, or indirect effects from target species at higher trophic levels. The average duration of stable periods for direct effects was 6.2 + or - 1.2 years, even in studies of more than 15 years. For indirect effects, stable periods averaged 9.1 + or - 1.6 years, although this was not significantly different from direct effects. Populations of directly targeted species were more stable in reserves than in fished areas, suggesting increased ecologic resilience. This is an important benefit of marine reserves with respect to their function as a tool for conservation and restoration.

  19. Mapping small effect mutations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: impacts of experimental design and mutational properties.

    PubMed

    Duveau, Fabien; Metzger, Brian P H; Gruber, Jonathan D; Mack, Katya; Sood, Natasha; Brooks, Tiffany E; Wittkopp, Patricia J

    2014-04-29

    Genetic variants identified by mapping are biased toward large phenotypic effects because of methodologic challenges for detecting genetic variants with small phenotypic effects. Recently, bulk segregant analysis combined with next-generation sequencing (BSA-seq) was shown to be a powerful and cost-effective way to map small effect variants in natural populations. Here, we examine the power of BSA-seq for efficiently mapping small effect mutations isolated from a mutagenesis screen. Specifically, we determined the impact of segregant population size, intensity of phenotypic selection to collect segregants, number of mitotic generations between meiosis and sequencing, and average sequencing depth on power for mapping mutations with a range of effects on the phenotypic mean and standard deviation as well as relative fitness. We then used BSA-seq to map the mutations responsible for three ethyl methanesulfonate-induced mutant phenotypes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. These mutants display small quantitative variation in the mean expression of a fluorescent reporter gene (-3%, +7%, and +10%). Using a genetic background with increased meiosis rate, a reliable mating type marker, and fluorescence-activated cell sorting to efficiently score large segregating populations and isolate cells with extreme phenotypes, we successfully mapped and functionally confirmed a single point mutation responsible for the mutant phenotype in all three cases. Our simulations and experimental data show that the effects of a causative site not only on the mean phenotype, but also on its standard deviation and relative fitness should be considered when mapping genetic variants in microorganisms such as yeast that require population growth steps for BSA-seq.

  20. Spectral effects on direct-insolation absorptance of five collector coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hotchkiss, G. B.; Simon, F. F.; Burmeister, L. C.

    1979-01-01

    Absorptances for direct insolation of black chrome, black nickel, copper oxide, and two black zinc conversion selective coatings were calculated for a number of typical solar spectrums. Measured spectral reflectances were used while the effects of atmospheric ozone density, turbidity, and air mass were incorporated in calculated direct solar spectrums. Absorptance variation for direct insolation was found to be of the order of 1 percent for a typical range of clear-sky atmospheric conditions.

  1. Comparative effects of avoidance and vaccination in disease spread on a dynamic small-world network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, Thomas E.; Jones, Matthew M.; McKay, Susan R.

    2010-12-01

    Dynamic small-world contact networks have fixed short range links and time-varying stochastic long range links. They are used to model mobile populations or as minimal models for traditional small-world networks. Here we study the relative effects of vaccinations and avoidance of infected individuals in a susceptible-infected-recovered (SIR) epidemic model on a dynamic small-world network. We derive the critical mobility required for an outbreak to occur as a function of the disease’s infectivity, recovery rate, avoidance rate, and vaccination rate. We also derive an expression that allows us to calculate the amount of vaccination and/or avoidance necessary to prevent an epidemic. Calculated quantities show excellent agreement with simulations.

  2. Enhanced brain small-worldness after sleep deprivation: a compensatory effect.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huan; Li, Hong; Wang, Yulin; Lei, Xu

    2014-10-01

    Sleep deprivation has a variable impact on extrinsic activities during multiple cognitive tasks, especially on mood and emotion processing. There is also a trait-like individual vulnerability or compensatory effect in cognition. Previous studies have elucidated the altered functional connectivity after sleep deprivation. However, it remains unclear whether the small-world properties of resting-state network are sensitive to sleep deprivation. A small-world network is a type of graph that combines a high local connectivity as well as a few long-range connections, which ensures a higher information-processing efficiency at a low cost. The complex network of the brain can be described as a small-world network, in which a node is a brain region and an edge is present when there is a functional correlation between two nodes. Here, we investigated the topological properties of the human brain networks of 22 healthy subjects under sufficient sleep and sleep-deprived conditions. Specifically, small-worldness is utilized to quantify the small-world property, by comparing the clustering coefficient and path length of a given network to an equivalent random network with same degree distribution. After sufficient sleep, the brain networks showed the property of small-worldness. Compared with the resting state under sufficient sleep, the small-world property was significantly enhanced in the sleep deprivation condition, suggesting a possible compensatory adaptation of the human brain. Specifically, the altered measurements were correlated with the neuroticism of subjects, indicating that individuals with low-levels of neuroticism are more resilient to sleep deprivation.

  3. Cerebral Small Vessel Disease and Arterial Stiffness: Tsunami Effect in the Brain?

    PubMed Central

    Saji, Naoki; Toba, Kenji; Sakurai, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Background Cerebral small vessel diseases, including silent lacunar infarcts, white matter hyperintensities, and microbleeds, pose a risk for cerebrovascular disease, cognitive impairment, and the geriatric syndrome via effects on arterial stiffness. However, the vascular, physiological, and metabolic roles of arterial stiffness in cerebral small vessel diseases remain unclear. Summary Arterial stiffness can be assessed using various indicators such as the ankle-brachial index, pulse wave velocity, cardio-ankle vascular index, and augmentation index. Arterial stiffness is independently associated with all components of cerebral small vessel disease including silent lacunar infarcts, white matter hyperintensities, and microbleeds, although there are some methodological differences between the various surrogate markers. Evidence of arterial stiffness indicates microvessel arteriosclerosis presenting with vascular endothelial dysfunction. Further, vascular narrowing due to atherosclerosis and vascular stiffness due to lipohyalinosis can accelerate the pulse waves. This hemodynamic stress, pulsatile pressure, or blood pressure variability can cause a ‘tsunami effect’ towards the cerebral parenchyma and lead to cerebral small vessel disease. Previous studies have shown that silent lacunar infarcts and white matter hyperintensities are strongly associated with arterial stiffness. However, the association between microbleeds and arterial stiffness remains controversial, as there are two vessel mechanisms related to microbleeds: cerebral amyloid angiopathy and hypertensive small vessel disease. Key Messages Cerebral small vessel disease with associated arterial stiffness is a risk factor for silent cerebral lesions, stroke, and cognitive impairment. Improvement of the living environment, management of risk factors, and innovation and development of novel drugs that improve arterial stiffness may suppress the progression of cerebral small vessel disease, and may reduce

  4. The effect of a small initial curvature on the free vibration of clamped, rectangular plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adeniji-Fashola, A. A.; Oyediran, A. A.

    1986-01-01

    An analytical method of obtaining the natural frequencies and mode shapes of clamped, rectangular plates having a small initial curvature is presented. Specifically, the singular perturbation technique is used to reduce the fourth-order plate vibration problem to the simpler membrane problem with modified boundary conditions that account for the bending effects. The eigenfrequencies for plates with inverse aspect ratios varying between 0.1 and 1.0 and for the dimensionless normal prestress between 0.1 and 1.0 have been presented for values of epsilon, the normalized bending rigidity, ranging between 0.0010 and 0.2500. It is established that a small initial curvature has no effect on the frequency of vibration of the plate. However, its effect is manifested in the eigenmodes.

  5. Unsteady transonic small-disturbance theory including entropy and vorticity effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batina, John T.

    1988-01-01

    Modifications to unsteady transonic small disturbance theory to include entropy and vorticity effects are presented. The modifications were implemented in the CAP-TSD (Computational Aeroelasticity Program - Transonic Small Disturbance) code. The code permits the aeroelastic analysis of complete aircraft configurations in the flutter critical transonic speed range. Entropy and vorticity effects were incorporated within the solution procedure to more accurately analyze flows with strong shock waves. The modified code includes these effects while retaining the relative simplicity and cost efficiency of the TSD formulation. Detailed descriptions are presented of the entropy and vorticity modifications along with calculated results and comparisons which assess the modified theory. These results are in good agreement with parallel Euler calculations and with experimental data. Therefore, the present method now provides the aeroelastician with an affordable capability to analyze relatively difficult transonic flows without having to solve the computationally more expensive Euler equations.

  6. Theory of the Effects of Small Gravitational Levels on Droplet Gasification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beitelmal, A.; Shaw, B. D.

    1995-01-01

    A mathematical model taking into account small (and constant) gravitational levels is developed for vaporization of an isolated liquid droplet suspended in a stagnant atmosphere. A goal of the present analysis is to see how small gravitational levels affect droplet gasification characteristics. Attention is focused upon determining the effects on gas-phase phenomena. The conservation equations arc normalized and nondimensionalized, and a small parameter that accounts for the effects of gravity is identified. This parameter is the square of the inverse of a Froude number based on the gravitational acceleration, the droplet radius, and a characteristic gas-phase velocity at the droplet surface. Asymptotic analyses are developed in terms of this parameter. In the analyses, different spatial regions are identified. Near a droplet, gravitational effects are negligible in the first approximation, and the flowfield is spherically symmetric to the leading order. Analysis shows, however, that outer zones exist where gravitational effects cannot be neglected; it is expected that a stagnation point will be present in an outer zone that is not present when gravity is totally absent. The leading order and higher-order differential equations for each zone are derived and solved. The solutions allow the effects of gravity on vaporization rates and temperature, velocity and species fields to be determined.

  7. Effect of downed woody debris on small mammal anti-predator behavior.

    SciTech Connect

    Hinkleman, Travis, M.; Orrock, John, L.; Loeb, Susan, C.

    2011-10-01

    Anti-predator behavior can affect prey growth, reproduction, survival, and generate emergent effects in food webs. Small mammals often lower the cost of predation by altering their behavior in response to shrubs,but the importance of other microhabitat features, such as downed woody debris, for anti-predator behavior is unknown. We used givingup densities to quantify the degree to which downed woody debris alters perceived predation risk by small mammals in southeastern pineforests. We placed 14 foraging trays next to large downed woody debris,shrubs, and in open areas for 12 consecutive nights. Moon illumination, a common indicator of predation risk, led to a similar reduction in small mammal foraging in all three microhabitats (open, downed woody debris,and shrub). Small mammals perceived open microhabitats as riskier than shrub microhabitats, with downed woody debris habitats perceived as being of intermediate risk between shrub and open microhabitats. Despite the presumed benefits of the protective cover of downed woody debris, small mammals may perceive downed woody debris as a relatively risky foraging site in southeastern pine forests where the high diversity and abundance of rodent-eating snakes may provide a primary predatory threat.

  8. Correcting Partial Volume Effect in Bi-exponential T2 Estimation of Small Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chuan; Galons, Jean-Philippe; Graff, Christian G.; Clarkson, Eric W.; Bilgin, Ali; Kalb, Bobby; Martin, Diego R.; Altbach, Maria I.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose T2 mapping provides a quantitative approach for focal liver lesion characterization. For small lesions a bi-exponential model should be used to account for partial volume effects (PVE). However, conventional bi-exponential fitting suffers from large uncertainty of the fitted parameters when noise is present. The purpose of this work is to develop a more robust method to correct for PVE affecting small lesions. Methods We developed a ROI-based joint bi-exponential fitting (JBF) algorithm to estimate the T2 of lesions affected by PVE. JBF takes advantage of the lesion fraction variation among voxels within an ROI. JBF is compared to conventional approaches using Cramér-Rao lower bound analysis, numerical simulations, phantom and -vivo data. Results JBF provides more accurate and precise T2 estimates in the presence of PVE. Furthermore, JBF is less sensitive to ROI drawing. Phantom and in-vivo results show that JBF can be combined with a reconstruction method for highly undersampled data, enabling the characterization of small abdominal lesions from data acquired in a single breath-hold. Conclusion The JBF algorithm provides more accurate and stable T2 estimates for small structures than conventional techniques when PVE is present. It should be particularly useful for the characterization of small abdominal lesions. PMID:24753061

  9. Aminoguanidine Alleviates Radiation-Induced Small-Bowel Damage Through Its Antioxidant Effect

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, E.-Y.; Wang, F.-S.; Lin, I-H.; Yang, Kuender D.

    2009-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect and its mechanism of aminoguanidine (AG) on small-bowel protection after whole-abdominal irradiation (WAI) in rats. Methods and Materials: Male Sprague-Dawley rats (300-400 g) subjected to 12 Gy WAI were used for the study. Aminoguanidine at a dose of 50-800 mg/kg was administered by the gavage route 2 h before WAI. Mucosal damage of small bowel was evaluated by the grade of diarrhea and crypt survival; oxidative stress was determined by the level of 8-hydroxy 2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) with immunohistochemistry (IHC). Nitrosative stress was evaluated by the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT) with IHC, and systemic and portal vein NOx (nitrite + nitrate) levels were measured and compared with and without AG treatment after WAI. Results: Aminoguanidine showed a dose-dependent effect against WAI-induced diarrhea. Aminoguanidine at a dose of 400 mg/kg had the best protective effect, from 92% to 17% (p = 0.002). Aminoguanidine increased crypt survival from 23% to 46% (p = 0.003). It also significantly attenuated 8-OHdG expression but not 3-NT and iNOS expression at both 4 and 8 h after 12-Gy WAI. Aminoguanidine did not alter the portal vein NOx levels 4 and 8 h after 12-Gy WAI. Conclusion: Aminoguanidine has a radioprotective effect against radiation-induced small-bowel damage due to its antioxidant effect but not inhibition of nitric oxide production. Dietary AG may have a potentially protective effect on the small intestine of patients subjected to pelvic and abdominal radiotherapies.

  10. Toxicological effects of particulate emissions - A comparison of oil and wood fuels in small- and medium-scale heating systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasurinen, Stefanie; Jalava, Pasi I.; Tapanainen, Maija; Uski, Oskari; Happo, Mikko S.; Mäki-Paakkanen, Jorma; Lamberg, Heikki; Koponen, Hanna; Nuutinen, Ilpo; Kortelainen, Miika; Jokiniemi, Jorma; Hirvonen, Maija-Riitta

    2015-02-01

    The use of wood instead of oil fuels in heating systems is strongly encouraged in many countries. Yet it is unknown to what extent such a large-scale change from oil to wood fuels in heating systems would contribute to any negative health effects from their emissions. We compared the toxicological properties of particulate matter (PM) emissions from wood and oil fuels from two small-scale and two medium-scale heating systems. To assess whether oil or wood combustion emissions cause adverse effects and which PM emissions' effects are more profound, we measured cell viability and proliferation, inflammatory markers, as well as DNA damage in RAW264.7 mouse macrophages. We found that the medium-scale oil-fueled heating system induced a dose-dependent increase of DNA damage, short-term cytotoxic effects, and a cell cycle arrest in the G2/M-phase. We did not detect an induction of DNA damage by the medium-scale wood-fired system. However, we detected significant short-term cytotoxicity. We found that both oil and wood combustion emission samples from the small-scale heating systems induced DNA damage. However, the short-term cytotoxic effects were greater for the PM emissions from the oil-fired heating system. PM mass emissions differed significantly between the tested heating systems. The lowest emissions, 0.1 mg/MJ, were produced by the small-scale oil-fired heating system; the highest emissions, 20.3 mg/MJ, by the medium-scale oil-fired heating system. The wood-fired heating systems' PM mass emissions were in between these concentrations, complicating the direct comparison of the emissions' health related toxic effects. Conclusively, our results indicate that the emissions from both the small- and the medium-scale wood-fueled heating systems cause overall less cytotoxicity and DNA damage in a cell model than the emissions from the corresponding oil-fueled heating systems. Hence, controlled wood-fueled heating systems may be good alternatives to heating systems fired

  11. Effects of Direct Instruction and Metacomprehension Training on Finding Main Ideas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graves, Anne W.

    1986-01-01

    Twenty-four learning disabled children (grades 5-8) with adequate decoding skills, but who demonstrated problems in reading comprehension, received training in finding the main idea. Among several findings was that metacomprehension (self-monitoring) plus direct instruction was more effective than direct instruction alone. (Author/JW)

  12. EFFECT OF DIRECTIONAL SWITCHING FREQUENCY ON TOLUENE DEGRADATION IN A VAPOR-PHASE BIOREACTOR. (R826168)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A potential method to improve biomass distribution and the stability of vapor-phase bioreactors is to operate them in a directionally switching mode such that the contaminant air stream direction is periodically reversed through the reactor. In this study, the effect of switching...

  13. A Variable Syntax of Speech, Gesture, and Sound Effect: Direct Quotations in Spanish.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cameron, Richard

    1998-01-01

    Variationist account of how direct quotations are framed in spoken Spanish requires definition of variable and envelope of variation followed by investigation of linguistic, stylistic, and social constraints. Variable is defined as set of three strategies for directly quoting speech, gestures, and sound effects of people, animals, or things in…

  14. Simulation model of bi-directional pedestrian considering potential effect ahead and behind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qi

    2015-02-01

    This paper presents a simulation model for bi-directional pedestrian behavior. Guide effect and press effect performed by pedestrians with same direction, and contain effect performed by opposite pedestrians were considered as potential effects. Potential field was defined to simulate the complex interactions, which provided an effective and integrated approach to depict the immediate effects imposed by individuals ahead and behind, with different directions. The number of following pedestrians was regarded as a factor for lane change decision. Experiments ran for the model validation and coefficient performance verification. Preventative steering behavior and congestion unlock phenomenon were observed in the simulation. Velocity-density and flow rate-density curves with different coefficients show the effectiveness of the presented model to capture self-organization phenomenon in counter flow. Coefficient performance reveals the flexibility and controllability of the model to apply on various circumstances.

  15. Mediated and direct effects of the North Atlantic Ocean on winter temperatures in northwest Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junge, Martina M.; Stephenson, David B.

    2003-03-01

    This study has used a multiple regression model to quantify the importance of wintertime mean North Atlantic sea-surface temperatures (SSTs) for explaining (simultaneous) variations in wintertime mean temperatures in northwestern Europe. Although wintertime temperature variations are primarily determined by atmospheric flow patterns, it has been speculated that North Atlantic SSTs might also provide some additional information. To test this hypothesis, we have attempted to explain 1900-93 variations in wintertime mean central England temperature (CET) by using multiple regression with contemporaneous winter mean North Atlantic sea-level pressures (SLPs) and SSTs as explanatory variables. With no SST information, the leading SLP patterns (including the North Atlantic oscillation) explain 63% of the total variance in winter mean CET; however, SSTs alone are capable of explaining only 16% of the variance in winter mean CET. Much of the SST effect is indirect in that it supplies no more significant information than already contained in the mean SLP; e.g. both SLP and SST together can only explain 68% of the variance. However, there is a small (5% variance) direct effect due to SST that is not mediated by mean SLP, which has a spatial pattern resembling the Newfoundland SST pattern identified by Ratcliffe and Murray (1970. Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society 96: 226-246). In predictive mode, however, using explanatory variables from preceding seasons, SSTs contain more information than SLP factors. On longer time scales, the variance explained by contemporaneous SST increases, but the SLP explanatory variables still provide a better model than the SST variables.

  16. Effect of Small-Scale Turbulence on the Physiology and Morphology of Two Bloom-Forming Cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yan; Li, Chao; Zhang, Zhen; Guo, Jinsong

    2016-01-01

    The main goal of the present work is to test the hypothesis that small-scale turbulence affected physiological activities and the morphology of cyanobacteria in high turbulence environments. Using quantified turbulence in a stirring device, we conducted one set of experiments on cultures of two strains of cyanobacteria with different phenotypes; i.e., unicellular Microcystis flos-aquae and colonial Anabaena flos-aquae. The effect of small-scale turbulence examined varied from 0 to 8.01×10−2 m2s-3, covering the range of turbulence intensities experienced by cyanobacteria in the field. The results of photosynthesis activity and the cellular chlorophyll a in both strains did not change significantly among the turbulence levels, indicating that the potential indirect effects of a light regime under the gradient of turbulent mixing could be ignored. However, the experiments demonstrated that small-scale turbulence significantly modulated algal nutrient uptake and growth in comparison to the stagnant control. Cellular N and C of the two stains showed approximately the same responses, resulting in a similar pattern of C/N ratios. Moreover, the change in the phosphate uptake rate was similar to that of growth in two strains, which implied that growth characteristic responses to turbulence may be dependent on the P strategy, which was correlated with accumulation of polyphosphate. Additionally, our results also showed the filament length of A. flos-aquae decreased in response to high turbulence, which could favor enhancement of the nutrient uptake. These findings suggested that both M. flos-aquae and A. flos-aquae adjust their growth rates in response to turbulence levels in the ways of asynchronous cellular stoichiometry of C, N, and P, especially the phosphorus strategy, to improve the nutrient application efficiency. The fact that adaptation strategies of cyanobacteria diversely to turbulence depending on their physiological conditions presents a good example to

  17. The Effect of Stimulus Type and Directed Attention on Dichotic Listening with Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Obrzut, John E.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Delineates the effect of attentional bias on preadolescents' dichotic listening performance by using four different types of stimulus material (words, digits, CV syllables, and melodies) under free recall and directed attention conditions. (HOD)

  18. Small-scale effects on the free vibrational behavior of embedded viscoelastic double-nanoplate-systems under thermal environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, M.; Jamalpoor, A.; Bahreman, M.

    2016-12-01

    The present paper deals with the theoretical investigation of small-scale effect on the thermo-mechanical vibration of double viscoelastic nanoplate-system made of functionally graded materials (FGMs). The small scale effect is taken into consideration via Eringen's nonlocal elasticity theory. It is considered that a Kelvin-Voigt viscoelastic layer connects two parallel viscoelastic nano-plates that surrounded by a Pasternak elastic foundation. The material properties in the thickness direction vary according to power low distribution. On the basis of nonlocal elasticity theory and employing Hamilton's principle, the exact solution for complex natural frequencies of a double nanoplate-system is determined for two types of vibrations, out-of-phase and in-phase. The detailed manner of deriving equations based on Navier method are presented and numerical studies are carried out to illustrate the influence of structural damping of the nanoplates, damping coefficient of viscoelastic medium, nonlocal parameter, higher wave numbers, aspect ratio, temperature change and other factors on the behavior of double nanoplate-system. Results from the analytical solution reveal that the temperature raising decreases the natural frequencies.

  19. The effect of urban street gang densities on small area homicide incidence in a large metropolitan county, 1994-2002.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Paul L; Boscardin, W John; George, Sheba M; Teklehaimanot, Senait; Heslin, Kevin C; Bluthenthal, Ricky N

    2009-07-01

    The presence of street gangs has been hypothesized as influencing overall levels of violence in urban communities through a process of gun-drug diffusion and cross-type homicide. This effect is said to act independently of other known correlates of violence, i.e., neighborhood poverty. To test this hypothesis, we independently assessed the impact of population exposure to local street gang densities on 8-year homicide rates in small areas of Los Angeles County, California. Homicide data from the Los Angeles County Coroners Office were analyzed with original field survey data on street gang locations, while controlling for the established covariates of community homicide rates. Bivariate and multivariate regression analyses explicated strong relationships between homicide rates, gang density, race/ethnicity, and socioeconomic structure. Street gang densities alone had cumulative effects on small area homicide rates. Local gang densities, along with high school dropout rates, high unemployment rates, racial and ethnic concentration, and higher population densities, together explained 90% of the variation in local 8-year homicide rates. Several other commonly considered covariates were insignificant in the model. Urban environments with higher densities of street gangs exhibited higher overall homicide rates, independent of other community covariates of homicide. The unique nature of street gang killings and their greater potential to influence future local rates of violence suggests that more direct public health interventions are needed alongside traditional criminal justice mechanisms to combat urban violence and homicides.

  20. Direct investment by stepfathers can mitigate effects on educational outcomes but does not improve behavioural difficulties.

    PubMed

    Emmott, Emily H; Mace, Ruth

    2014-09-01

    In contemporary developed populations, stepfather presence has been associated with detrimental effects on child development. However, the proximate mechanisms behind such effects are yet to be fully explored. From a behavioural ecological perspective, the negative effects associated with stepfathers may be due to the reduced quantity and quality of investments children receive within stepfather households. Here, we build on previous studies by investigating whether the effects of stepfather presence on child outcomes are driven by differences in maternal and partner (i.e., father or stepfather) direct investments. We use data from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children to explore stepfather effects on children's educational achievement and behavioural difficulties at age 7. Our results indicate that, for educational achievement, stepfather effects are due to the lower levels of direct investments children receive. For behavioural difficulty, stepfather effects are due to multiple factors whereby stepfather presence is associated with greater difficulties independent of investment levels, and direct investments from stepfathers are ineffective. Our results suggest that the negative effects of stepfathers on child outcomes can be explained, in part, by the reduced quantity and the ineffectiveness of direct investments children receive from stepfathers. Furthermore, the effects of stepfather direct investments seem to vary between child outcomes.

  1. The effects of land use change and precipitation change on direct runoff in Wei River watershed, China.

    PubMed

    Dong, Leihua; Xiong, Lihua; Lall, Upmanu; Wang, Jiwu

    2015-01-01

    The principles and degrees to which land use change and climate change affect direct runoff generation are distinctive. In this paper, based on the MODIS data of land use in 1992 and 2003, the impacts of land use and climate change are explored using the Soil Conservation Service Curve Number (SCS-CN) method under two defined scenarios. In the first scenario, the precipitation is assumed to be constant, and thus the consequence of land use change could be evaluated. In the second scenario, the condition of land use is assumed to be constant, so the influence only induced by climate change could be assessed. Combining the conclusions of two scenarios, the effects of land use and climate change on direct runoff volume can be separated. At last, it is concluded: for the study basin, the land use types which have the greatest effect on direct runoff generation are agricultural land and water body. For the big sub basins, the effect of land use change is generally larger than that of climate change; for middle and small sub basins, most of them suffer more from land use change than from climate change.

  2. Measurements of Siple transmitter signals on the DE 1 satellite - Wave normal direction and antenna effective length

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonwalker, V. S.; Inan, U. S.

    1986-01-01

    A new experimental technique is developed to simultaneously measure the wave propagation direction and the effective length of a small (L value much smaller than wavelength) electric dipole antenna on a spin-stabilized satellite in the magnetosphere. The technique relies on the near simultaneous measurement of single components of the electric and magnetic fields of a coherent VLF signal injected into the medium from a ground-based source. The spin fading characteristics of the signal received by the electric dipole and the magnetic loop antenna permit the measurement of the wave normal direction assuming whistler-mode propagation. In-situ and remote measurements of the local cold plasma density are used to determine the refractive index. The wave electric field is then inferred from the wave magnetic field as measured on the loop antenna, the refractive index and the direction of propagation. Comparing this electric field with the measured voltage across the dipole antenna leads to the determination of the effective length of the receiving electric dipole. The technique is applied to data from the Dynamics Explorer 1 satellite observations of whistler mode signals injected into the magnetosphere from the Siple, Antarctica, VLF transmitter. In one case, with the measured background cold plasma density being 15 el/cu cm, the effective length of the 200 m-long electric dipole antenna is found to be 222 + or - 56 m, i.e., about twice the conventional value.

  3. The Effectiveness of Direct Instruction in Teaching Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder to Answer "Wh-" Questions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cadette, Jessica N.; Wilson, Cynthia L.; Brady, Michael P.; Dukes, Charles; Bennett, Kyle D.

    2016-01-01

    Research on the effects of Direct Instruction (DI) among students with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) has only recently emerged. A benefit of DI is that it can be implemented with groups of students, which makes it potentially a cost effective method of instruction for some skills. In this study, we examined the effects of DI on teaching secondary…

  4. Small RNAs, big impact: small RNA pathways in transposon control and their effect on the host stress response.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Bayly S

    2013-12-01

    Transposons are mobile genetic elements that are a major constituent of most genomes. Organisms regulate transposable element expression, transposition, and insertion site preference, mitigating the genome instability caused by uncontrolled transposition. A recent burst of research has demonstrated the critical role of small non-coding RNAs in regulating transposition in fungi, plants, and animals. While mechanistically distinct, these pathways work through a conserved paradigm. The presence of a transposon is communicated by the presence of its RNA or by its integration into specific genomic loci. These signals are then translated into small non-coding RNAs that guide epigenetic modifications and gene silencing back to the transposon. In addition to being regulated by the host, transposable elements are themselves capable of influencing host gene expression. Transposon expression is responsive to environmental signals, and many transposons are activated by various cellular stresses. TEs can confer local gene regulation by acting as enhancers and can also confer global gene regulation through their non-coding RNAs. Thus, transposable elements can act as stress-responsive regulators that control host gene expression in cis and trans.

  5. Seagrass response to CO₂ contingent on epiphytic algae: indirect effects can overwhelm direct effects.

    PubMed

    Burnell, Owen W; Russell, Bayden D; Irving, Andrew D; Connell, Sean D

    2014-11-01

    Increased availability of dissolved CO2 in the ocean can enhance the productivity and growth of marine plants such as seagrasses and algae, but realised benefits may be contingent on additional conditions (e.g. light) that modify biotic interactions between these plant groups. The combined effects of future CO2 and differing light on the growth of seagrass and their algal epiphytes were tested by maintaining juvenile seagrasses Amphibolis antarctica under three different CO2 concentrations representing ambient, moderate future and high future forecasts (i.e. 390, 650 vs. 900 µl l(-1)) and two light levels representing low and high PAR (i.e. 43 vs. 167 µmol m(-2) s(-1)). Aboveground and belowground biomass, leaf growth, epiphyte cover, tissue chemistry and photosynthetic parameters of seagrasses were measured. At low light, there was a neutral to positive effect of elevated CO2 on seagrass biomass and growth; at high light, this effect of CO2 switched toward negative, as growth and biomass decreased at the highest CO2 level. These opposing responses to CO2 appeared to be closely linked to the overgrowth of seagrass by filamentous algal epiphytes when high light and CO2 were combined. Importantly, all seagrass plants maintained positive leaf growth throughout the experiment, indicating that growth was inhibited by some experimental conditions but not arrested entirely. Therefore, while greater light or elevated CO2 provided direct physiological benefits for seagrasses, such benefits were likely negated by overgrowth of epiphytic algae when greater light and CO2 were combined. This result demonstrates how indirect ecological effects from epiphytes can modify independent physiological predictions for seagrass associated with global change.

  6. Modelling of hydrologic processes in a small urbanized hillslope basin with comments on the effects of urbanization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Yosihisa; Musiake, Katumi; Takahasi, Yutaka

    1984-02-01

    A small urbanized experimental basin with a catchment area of 2.8 ha, in the Tama hills in the western suburbs of Tokyo, Japan, called the Nagayama Basin, has been studied. The site has rain-recording and streamflow gaugings as well as soil-moisture measuring instruments and groundwater observation wells. Initially, based upon the observed data, the partial hydrologic processes, such as direct runoff, rainfall-loss, groundwater runoff, groundwater recharge, and evapotranspiration, are respectively analyzed. Subsequently, daily and hourly hydrological watershed models are constructed by synthesizing the results, and their applicability is examined. Finally, these models are compared with the models obtained for a natural experimental basin with a catchment area of 4.4 ha, located on the same Tama hills, and the effects of urbanization on hydrologic processes are commented on.

  7. Large grazers modify effects of aboveground-belowground interactions on small-scale plant community composition.

    PubMed

    Veen, G F Ciska; Geuverink, Elzemiek; Olff, Han

    2012-02-01

    Aboveground and belowground organisms influence plant community composition by local interactions, and their scale of impact may vary from millimeters belowground to kilometers aboveground. However, it still poorly understood how large grazers that select their forage on large spatial scales interact with small-scale aboveground-belowground interactions on plant community heterogeneity. Here, we investigate how cattle (Bos taurus) modify the effects of interactions between yellow meadow ants (Lasius flavus) and European brown hares (Lepus europaeus) on the formation of small-scale heterogeneity in vegetation composition. In the absence of cattle, hares selectively foraged on ant mounds, while under combined grazing by hares and cattle, vertebrate grazing pressure was similar on and off mounds. Ant mounds that were grazed by only hares had a different plant community composition compared to their surroundings: the cover of the grazing-intolerant grass Elytrigia atherica was reduced on ant mounds, whereas the relative cover of the more grazing-tolerant and palatable grass Festuca rubra was enhanced. Combined grazing by hares and cattle, resulted in homogenization of plant community composition on and off ant mounds, with high overall cover of F. rubra. We conclude that hares can respond to local ant-soil-vegetation interactions, because they are small, selective herbivores that make their foraging decisions on a local scale. This results in small-scale plant patches on mounds of yellow meadow ants. In the presence of cattle, which are less selective aboveground herbivores, local plant community patterns triggered by small-scale aboveground-belowground interactions can disappear. Therefore, cattle modify the consequences of aboveground-belowground interactions for small-scale plant community composition.

  8. Temperature effect on the small-to-large crossover lengthscale of hydrophobic hydration

    SciTech Connect

    Djikaev, Y. S. Ruckenstein, E.

    2013-11-14

    The thermodynamics of hydration is expected to change gradually from entropic for small solutes to enthalpic for large ones. The small-to-large crossover lengthscale of hydrophobic hydration depends on the thermodynamic conditions of the solvent such as temperature, pressure, presence of additives, etc. We attempt to shed some light on the temperature dependence of the crossover lengthscale by using a probabilistic approach to water hydrogen bonding that allows one to obtain an analytic expression for the number of bonds per water molecule as a function of both its distance to a solute and solute radius. Incorporating that approach into the density functional theory, one can examine the solute size effects on its hydration over the entire small-to-large lengthscale range at a series of different temperatures. Knowing the dependence of the hydration free energy on the temperature and solute size, one can also obtain its enthalpic and entropic contributions as functions of both temperature and solute size. These functions can provide some interesting insight into the temperature dependence of the crossover lengthscale of hydrophobic hydration. The model was applied to the hydration of spherical particles of various radii in water in the temperature range from T = 293.15 K to T = 333.15 K. The model predictions for the temperature dependence of the hydration free energy of small hydrophobes are consistent with the experimental and simulational data on the hydration of simple molecular solutes. Three alternative definitions for the small-to-large crossover length-scale of hydrophobic hydration are proposed, and their temperature dependence is obtained. Depending on the definition and temperature, the small-to-large crossover in the hydration mechanism is predicted to occur for hydrophobes of radii from one to several nanometers. Independent of its definition, the crossover length-scale is predicted to decrease with increasing temperature.

  9. Temperature effect on the small-to-large crossover lengthscale of hydrophobic hydration.

    PubMed

    Djikaev, Y S; Ruckenstein, E

    2013-11-14

    The thermodynamics of hydration is expected to change gradually from entropic for small solutes to enthalpic for large ones. The small-to-large crossover lengthscale of hydrophobic hydration depends on the thermodynamic conditions of the solvent such as temperature, pressure, presence of additives, etc. We attempt to shed some light on the temperature dependence of the crossover lengthscale by using a probabilistic approach to water hydrogen bonding that allows one to obtain an analytic expression for the number of bonds per water molecule as a function of both its distance to a solute and solute radius. Incorporating that approach into the density functional theory, one can examine the solute size effects on its hydration over the entire small-to-large lengthscale range at a series of different temperatures. Knowing the dependence of the hydration free energy on the temperature and solute size, one can also obtain its enthalpic and entropic contributions as functions of both temperature and solute size. These functions can provide some interesting insight into the temperature dependence of the crossover lengthscale of hydrophobic hydration. The model was applied to the hydration of spherical particles of various radii in water in the temperature range from T = 293.15 K to T = 333.15 K. The model predictions for the temperature dependence of the hydration free energy of small hydrophobes are consistent with the experimental and simulational data on the hydration of simple molecular solutes. Three alternative definitions for the small-to-large crossover length-scale of hydrophobic hydration are proposed, and their temperature dependence is obtained. Depending on the definition and temperature, the small-to-large crossover in the hydration mechanism is predicted to occur for hydrophobes of radii from one to several nanometers. Independent of its definition, the crossover length-scale is predicted to decrease with increasing temperature.

  10. Effect of substrate conductivity on the evaporation of small sessile droplets.

    PubMed

    Bazargan, Vahid; Stoeber, Boris

    2016-09-01

    Here we show the effect of the thermal conductivity of the substrate on the evaporation process of small droplets. We deposited small droplets on the order of 100-500 μm in diameter on four different substrates with different thermal conductivities and surface properties, and we measured the evaporation time. Also, a numerical model that describes this process was developed to include thermal effects inside the droplet and heat transfer from the substrate. Our model considers the entire time of evaporation including the pinned and depinned stages. This model uses a new approach for the contact line behavior. It uses experimental results to define the movement of the contact line as a function of the contact angle.

  11. Effect of substrate conductivity on the evaporation of small sessile droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazargan, Vahid; Stoeber, Boris

    2016-09-01

    Here we show the effect of the thermal conductivity of the substrate on the evaporation process of small droplets. We deposited small droplets on the order of 100 - 500 μ m in diameter on four different substrates with different thermal conductivities and surface properties, and we measured the evaporation time. Also, a numerical model that describes this process was developed to include thermal effects inside the droplet and heat transfer from the substrate. Our model considers the entire time of evaporation including the pinned and depinned stages. This model uses a new approach for the contact line behavior. It uses experimental results to define the movement of the contact line as a function of the contact angle.

  12. Measurement of rainfall distribution on a small catchment for the evaluation of canopy interception effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurer, Thomas; Schapp, Andrea; Büchner, Steffen; Menzel, Hannes; Hinz, Christoph

    2014-05-01

    Variability of rainfall and throughfall is an essential characteristic of the water balance at spatial scales ranging from meters to hundreds of meters or even kilometers. The amount of throughfall is governed by the characteristics of the vegetation canopy and the involved interception and stemflow effects. In initial, developing ecosystems, distinct patterns of the growing vegetation (e.g. patchiness) supposedly govern the spatial distribution of water in the system, thereby initiating and supporting hydro-ecological feedback processes. Questions are i) is the spatial variability of vegetation relevant for the system as a whole, and ii) how does the distribution of the effective precipitation (i.e. the infiltration) change over time in dependency of vegetation succession? We present the first results of a spatially distributed measurement approach of surface-near precipitation on the constructed catchment "Hühnerwasser" ("Chicken Creek"). The 6-ha site is located in the recultivation area of the lignite open-cast mine "Welzow-Süd" in Lower Lusatia, Brandenburg, Germany. Here, the free development of an initial ecosystem is investigated since September 2005. After eight years of succession, the spatial distribution of plant species is highly heterogeneous, and gains increasing influence on throughfall patterns, thus impacting the distribution of soil humidity and possibly even surface runoff. For spatially distributed precipitation measurement, 47 tipping bucket rain gauges were installed in heights of 0.5 m and 1.0 m along two transects on the catchment. Rain gauge data were collected by a wireless sensor node network provided by the Sens4U joint research project. The transects run NW-SE and NE-SW and cover the range of plant communities presently existing in the ecosystem: locust copses, dense sallow thorn bushes and reeds, base herbaceous and medium-rise small-reed vegetation, and open areas covered by moss and lichens. The raw measurement data were

  13. Perceptual significance of seat-dip effect related direct sound coloration in concert halls.

    PubMed

    Tahvanainen, Henna; Haapaniemi, Aki; Lokki, Tapio

    2017-03-01

    In concert halls, the spectrum of direct sound (here 0 to 15 ms) is influenced by the seat-dip effect that causes selective low frequency attenuation. The seat-dip effect has been considered to be detrimental to the acoustic quality of halls, yet there is little evidence about the perceptual significance of the effect. This paper studies the discrimination and preference of seat-dip effect related changes in the direct sound, with realistic auralization of multichannel anechoic orchestra recordings in halls measured with the loudspeaker orchestra. Comparisons are made with a free-field direct sound and direct sound magnitude changes typically associated with the seat-dip effect. Overall, the differences were not significantly audible, except with a subgroup of participants in one out of four halls, and two out of three comparisons. Furthermore, participants' preference for the uncolored direct sound was significant in the halls with less reflected energy, but non-significant in the halls with more reflected energy. The results imply that for most seats in adequately reverberant halls, typical seat-dip effect related coloration in the direct sound can be perceptually negligible.

  14. Perception of stereoscopic direct gaze: The effects of interaxial distance and emotional facial expressions.

    PubMed

    Hakala, Jussi; Kätsyri, Jari; Takala, Tapio; Häkkinen, Jukka

    2016-07-01

    Gaze perception has received considerable research attention due to its importance in social interaction. The majority of recent studies have utilized monoscopic pictorial gaze stimuli. However, a monoscopic direct gaze differs from a live or stereoscopic gaze. In the monoscopic condition, both eyes of the observer receive a direct gaze, whereas in live and stereoscopic conditions, only one eye receives a direct gaze. In the present study, we examined the implications of the difference between monoscopic and stereoscopic direct gaze. Moreover, because research has shown that stereoscopy affects the emotions elicited by facial expressions, and facial expressions affect the range of directions where an observer perceives mutual gaze-the cone of gaze-we studied the interaction effect of stereoscopy and facial expressions on gaze perception. Forty observers viewed stereoscopic images wherein one eye of the observer received a direct gaze while the other eye received a horizontally averted gaze at five different angles corresponding to five interaxial distances between the cameras in stimulus acquisition. In addition to monoscopic and stereoscopic conditions, the stimuli included neutral, angry, and happy facial expressions. The observers judged the gaze direction and mutual gaze of four lookers. Our results show that the mean of the directions received by the left and right eyes approximated the perceived gaze direction in the stereoscopic semidirect gaze condition. The probability of perceiving mutual gaze in the stereoscopic condition was substantially lower compared with monoscopic direct gaze. Furthermore, stereoscopic semidirect gaze significantly widened the cone of gaze for happy facial expressions.

  15. Solvent additive effects on small molecule crystallization in bulk heterojunction solar cells probed during spin casting.

    PubMed

    Perez, Louis A; Chou, Kang Wei; Love, John A; van der Poll, Thomas S; Smilgies, Detlef-M; Nguyen, Thuc-Quyen; Kramer, Edward J; Amassian, Aram; Bazan, Guillermo C

    2013-11-26

    Solvent additive processing can lead to drastic improvements in the power conversion efficiency (PCE) in solution processable small molecule (SPSM) bulk heterojunction solar cells. In situ grazing incidence wide-angle X-ray scattering is used to investigate the kinetics of crystallite formation during and shortly after spin casting. The additive is shown to have a complex effect on structural evolution invoking polymorphism and enhanced crystalline quality of the donor SPSM.

  16. Effect of Pressure Anisotropy on the m = 1 Small Wavelength Modes in Z-Pinches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faghihi, M.

    1987-05-01

    A generalization of Freidberg's perpendicular MHD model is used to investigate the effect of pressure anisotropy on the small wavelength internal kink (m = 1) mode instability in a Z-Pinch. A normal mode analysis of perturbed motion of an incompressible, collisionless and cylindrical plasma is performed. The stability criterion is (rΣB2)' <= 0, where Σ = 1 - (P|| - P⊥)/B2. It cannot be fulfilled without violation of the fire hose stability condition Σ >= 0.

  17. Effect of cholera enterotoxin on carbohydrate metabolism in the liver and small intestinal mucosa of rabbits

    SciTech Connect

    Vengrov, P.R.; Cherkasova, T.D.; Yurkiv, V.A.; Pokrovskii, V.I.

    1987-09-01

    The effect of cholera enterotoxin injected in vivo on glucose formation from alanine, and also on glucose-6-phosphatase activity in the liver and mucosa of the small intestine was studied. L-(2,3-/sup 3/H)-alanine was added to the incubation medium. Chromatograms were developed with 5% AgNO/sub 3/ with the addition of an aqueous solution of ammonia. The quantity of radioactive glucose was determined in a scintillation counter.

  18. The effect of stimulus type and directed attention on dichotic listening with children.

    PubMed

    Obrzut, J E; Boliek, C A; Obrzut, A

    1986-02-01

    This research investigated the effect of stimulus type and directed attention on dichotic listening performance with children. A sample of 12 (5 male, 7 female; mean age 10.5 years) high academically performing children were administered four types of dichotic stimuli (words, digits, CV syllables, and melodies) in three experimental conditions (free recall, directed left, and directed right) to examine perceptual asymmetry as reflected by the right-ear advantage (REA). While the expected REA for words and CV syllables and the expected LEA for melodies were found under free recall, the directed conditions produced varied results depending on the nature of the stimuli. Directed condition had no effect on recall of CV syllables but had a dramatic effect on recall of digits. Word stimuli and directed condition interacted to produce inconsistent perceptual asymmetry while directed condition reduced overall recall for melodies. The findings lend support to the hypothesis that perceptual asymmetries can be strongly influenced by the type of stimulus material used and the effect of attentional strategy employed.

  19. From hot hands to declining effects: the risks of small numbers.

    PubMed

    Lauer, Michael S

    2012-07-03

    About 25 years ago, a group of researchers demonstrated that there is no such thing as the "hot hand" in professional basketball. When a player hits 5 or 7 shots in a row (or misses 10 in a row), what's at work is random variation, nothing more. However, random causes do not stop players, coaches, fans, and media from talking about and acting on "hot hands," telling stories and making choices that ultimately are based on randomness. The same phenomenon is true in medicine. Some clinical trials with small numbers of events yielded positive findings, which in turn led clinicians, academics, and government officials to talk, telling stories and sometimes making choices that were later shown to be based on randomness. I provide some cardiovascular examples, such as the use of angiotensin receptor blockers for chronic heart failure, nesiritide for acute heart failure, and cytochrome P-450 (CYP) 2C19 genotyping for the acute coronary syndromes. I also review the more general "decline effect," by which drugs appear to yield a lower effect size over time. The decline effect is due at least in part to over interpretation of small studies, which are more likely to be noticed because of publication bias. As funders of research, we at the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute seek to support projects that will yield robust, credible evidence that will affect practice and policy in the right way. We must be alert to the risks of small numbers.

  20. Effective density and morphology of particles emitted from small-scale combustion of various wood fuels.

    PubMed

    Leskinen, Jani; Ihalainen, Mika; Torvela, Tiina; Kortelainen, Miika; Lamberg, Heikki; Tiitta, Petri; Jakobi, Gert; Grigonyte, Julija; Joutsensaari, Jorma; Sippula, Olli; Tissari, Jarkko; Virtanen, Annele; Zimmermann, Ralf; Jokiniemi, Jorma

    2014-11-18

    The effective density of fine particles emitted from small-scale wood combustion of various fuels were determined with a system consisting of an aerosol particle mass analyzer and a scanning mobility particle sizer (APM-SMPS). A novel sampling chamber was combined to the system to enable measurements of highly fluctuating combustion processes. In addition, mass-mobility exponents (relates mass and mobility size) were determined from the density data to describe the shape of the particles. Particle size, type of fuel, combustion phase, and combustion conditions were found to have an effect on the effective density and the particle shape. For example, steady combustion phase produced agglomerates with effective density of roughly 1 g cm(-3) for small particles, decreasing to 0.25 g cm(-3) for 400 nm particles. The effective density was higher for particles emitted from glowing embers phase (ca. 1-2 g cm(-3)), and a clear size dependency was not observed as the particles were nearly spherical in shape. This study shows that a single value cannot be used for the effective density of particles emitted from wood combustion.

  1. Disentangle the Causes of the Road Barrier Effect in Small Mammals through Genetic Patterns.

    PubMed

    Ascensão, Fernando; Mata, Cristina; Malo, Juan E; Ruiz-Capillas, Pablo; Silva, Catarina; Silva, André P; Santos-Reis, Margarida; Fernandes, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Road barrier effect is among the foremost negative impacts of roads on wildlife. Knowledge of the factors responsible for the road barrier effect is crucial to understand and predict species' responses to roads, and to improve mitigation measures in the context of management and conservation. We built a set of hypothesis aiming to infer the most probable cause of road barrier effect (traffic effect or road surface avoidance), while controlling for the potentially confounding effects road width, traffic volume and road age. The wood mouse Apodemus sylvaticus was used as a model species of small and forest-dwelling mammals, which are more likely to be affected by gaps in cover such as those resulting from road construction. We confront genetic patterns from opposite and same roadsides from samples of three highways and used computer simulations to infer migration rates between opposite roadsides. Genetic patterns from 302 samples (ca. 100 per highway) suggest that the highway barrier effect for wood mouse is due to road surface avoidance. However, from the simulations we estimated a migration rate of about 5% between opposite roadsides, indicating that some limited gene flow across highways does occur. To reduce highway impact on population genetic diversity and structure, possible mitigation measures could include retrofitting of culverts and underpasses to increase their attractiveness and facilitate their use by wood mice and other species, and setting aside roadside strips without vegetation removal to facilitate establishment and dispersal of small mammals.

  2. Disentangle the Causes of the Road Barrier Effect in Small Mammals through Genetic Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Ascensão, Fernando; Mata, Cristina; Malo, Juan E.; Ruiz-Capillas, Pablo; Silva, Catarina; Silva, André P.; Santos-Reis, Margarida; Fernandes, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Road barrier effect is among the foremost negative impacts of roads on wildlife. Knowledge of the factors responsible for the road barrier effect is crucial to understand and predict species’ responses to roads, and to improve mitigation measures in the context of management and conservation. We built a set of hypothesis aiming to infer the most probable cause of road barrier effect (traffic effect or road surface avoidance), while controlling for the potentially confounding effects road width, traffic volume and road age. The wood mouse Apodemus sylvaticus was used as a model species of small and forest-dwelling mammals, which are more likely to be affected by gaps in cover such as those resulting from road construction. We confront genetic patterns from opposite and same roadsides from samples of three highways and used computer simulations to infer migration rates between opposite roadsides. Genetic patterns from 302 samples (ca. 100 per highway) suggest that the highway barrier effect for wood mouse is due to road surface avoidance. However, from the simulations we estimated a migration rate of about 5% between opposite roadsides, indicating that some limited gene flow across highways does occur. To reduce highway impact on population genetic diversity and structure, possible mitigation measures could include retrofitting of culverts and underpasses to increase their attractiveness and facilitate their use by wood mice and other species, and setting aside roadside strips without vegetation removal to facilitate establishment and dispersal of small mammals. PMID:26978779

  3. ASSESSMENT OF SUBUNIT-DEPENDENT DIRECT GATING AND ALLOSTERIC MODULATORY EFFECTS OF CARISOPRODOL AT GABAA RECEPTORS

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Manoj; González, Lorie A.; Dillon, Glenn H.

    2016-01-01

    Carisoprodol is a widely prescribed muscle relaxant, abuse of which has grown considerably in recent years. It directly activates and allosterically modulates α1β2γ2 GABAARs, although the site(s) of action are unknown. To gain insight into the actions of carisoprodol, subunit-dependent effects of this drug were assessed. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings were obtained from HEK293 cells expressing α1β2, α1β3 or αxβzγ2 (where x = 1–6 and z = 1–3) GABAARs, and in receptors incorporating the δ subunit (modeling extrasynaptic receptors). The ability to directly gate and allosterically potentiate GABA-gated currents was observed for all configurations. Presence or absence of the γ2 subunit did not affect the ability of carisoprodol to directly gate or allosterically modulate the receptor. Presence of the β1 subunit conferred highest efficacy for direct activation relative to maximum GABA currents, while presence of the β2 subunit conferred highest efficacy for allosteric modulation of the GABA response. With regard to α subunits, carisoprodol was most efficacious at enhancing the actions of GABA in receptors incorporating the α1 subunit. The ability to directly gate the receptor was generally comparable regardless of the α subunit isoform, although receptors incorporating the α3 subunit showed significantly reduced direct gating efficacy and affinity. In extrasynaptic (α1β3δ and α4β3δ) receptors, carisoprodol had greater efficacy than GABA as a direct gating agonist. In addition, carisoprodol allosterically potentiated both EC20 and saturating GABA concentrations in these receptors. In assessing voltage-dependence, we found direct gating and inhibitory effects were insensitive to membrane voltage, whereas allosteric modulatory effects were affected by membrane voltage. Our findings demonstrate direct and allosteric effects of carisoprodol at synaptic and extrasynpatic GABAARs and that subunit isoform influences these effects. PMID:25896767

  4. Animation, Small Multiples, and the Effect of Mental Map Preservation in Dynamic Graphs.

    PubMed

    Archambault, D; Purchase, H; Pinaud, B

    2011-04-01

    In this paper, we present the results of a human-computer interaction experiment that compared the performance of the animation of dynamic graphs to the presentation of small multiples and the effect that mental map preservation had on the two conditions. Questions used in the experiment were selected to test both local and global properties of graph evolution over time. The data sets used in this experiment were derived from standard benchmark data sets of the information visualization community. We found that small multiples gave significantly faster performance than animation overall and for each of our five graph comprehension tasks. In addition, small multiples had significantly more errors than animation for the tasks of determining sets of nodes or edges added to the graph during the same timeslice, although a positive time-error correlation coefficient suggests that, in this case, faster responses did not lead to more errors. This result suggests that, for these two tasks, animation is preferable if accuracy is more important than speed. Preserving the mental map under either the animation or the small multiples condition had little influence in terms of error rate and response time.

  5. Edaravone ameliorates the adverse effects of valproic acid toxicity in small intestine.

    PubMed

    Oktay, S; Alev, B; Tunali, S; Emekli-Alturfan, E; Tunali-Akbay, T; Koc-Ozturk, L; Yanardag, R; Yarat, A

    2015-06-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) is a drug used for the treatment of epilepsy, bipolar psychiatric disorders, and migraine. Previous studies have reported an increased generation of reactive oxygen species and oxidative stress in the toxic mechanism of VPA. Edaravone, a free radical scavenger for clinical use, can quench free radical reaction by trapping a variety of free radical species. In this study, effect of edaravone on some small intestine biochemical parameters in VPA-induced toxicity was investigated. Thirty seven Sprague Dawley female rats were randomly divided into four groups. The groups include control group, edaravone (30 mg(-1) kg(-1) day(-1)) given group, VPA (0.5 g(-1) kg(-1) day(-1)) given group, VPA + edaravone (in same dose) given group. Edaravone and VPA were given intraperitoneally for 7 days. Biochemical parameters such as malondialdehyde, as an index of lipid peroxidation(LPO), sialic acid (SA), glutathione levels and glutathione peroxidase, glutathione-S-transferase, superoxide dismutase, catalase, myeloperoxidase, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and tissue factor (TF) activities were determined in small intestine samples by colorimetric methods. Decreased small intestine antioxidant enzyme activities, increased LPO and SA levels, and increased activities of ALP and TF were detected in the VPA group. Based on our results edaravone may be suggested to reverse the oxidative stress and inflammation due to VPA-induced small intestine toxicity.

  6. Pulmonary effects of expiratory-assisted small-lumen ventilation during upper airway obstruction in pigs.

    PubMed

    Ziebart, A; Garcia-Bardon, A; Kamuf, J; Thomas, R; Liu, T; Schad, A; Duenges, B; David, M; Hartmann, E K

    2015-10-01

    Novel devices for small-lumen ventilation may enable effective inspiration and expiratory ventilation assistance despite airway obstruction. In this study, we investigated a porcine model of complete upper airway obstruction. After ethical approval, we randomly assigned 13 anaesthetised pigs either to small-lumen ventilation following airway obstruction (n = 8) for 30 min, or to volume-controlled ventilation (sham setting, n = 5). Small-lumen ventilation enabled adequate gas exchange over 30 min. One animal died as a result of a tension pneumothorax in this setting. Redistribution of ventilation from dorsal to central compartments and significant impairment of the distribution of ventilation/perfusion occurred. Histopathology demonstrated considerable lung injury, predominantly through differences in the dorsal dependent lung regions. Small-lumen ventilation maintained adequate gas exchange in a porcine airway obstruction model. The use of this technique for 30 min by inexperienced clinicians was associated with considerable end-expiratory collapse leading to lung injury, and may also carry the risk of severe injury.

  7. Evolution in response to direct and indirect ecological effects in pitcher plant inquiline communities.

    PubMed

    terHorst, Casey P

    2010-12-01

    Ecologists have long recognized the importance of indirect ecological effects on species abundances, coexistence, and diversity. However, the evolutionary consequences of indirect interactions are rarely considered. Here I conduct selection experiments and examine the evolutionary response of Colpoda sp., a ciliated protozoan, to other members of the inquiline community of purple pitcher plants (Sarracenia purpurea). I measured the evolution of six traits in response to (1) predation by mosquito larvae, (2) competition from other ciliated protozoans, and (3) simultaneous predation and competition. The latter treatment incorporated both direct effects and indirect effects due to interactions between predators and competitors. Population growth rate and cell size evolved in response to direct effects of predators and competitors. However, trait values in the multispecies treatment were similar to those in the monoculture treatment, indicating that direct effects were offset by strong indirect effects on the evolution of traits. For most of the traits measured, indirect effects were opposed to, and often stronger than, direct effects. These indirect effects occurred as a result of behavioral changes of the predator in the presence of competitors and as a result of reduced densities of competitors in the presence of predators. Incorporating indirect effects provides a more realistic description of how species evolve in complex natural communities.

  8. Direct and indirect trophic effects of predator depletion on basal trophic levels.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huili; Hagerty, Steven; Crotty, Sinead M; Bertness, Mark D

    2016-02-01

    Human population growth and development have heavily degraded coastal ecosystems with cascading impacts across multiple trophic levels. Understanding both the direct and indirect trophic effects of human activities is important for coastal conservation. In New England, recreational overfishing has triggered a regional trophic cascade. Predator depletion releases the herbivorous purple marsh crab from consumer control and leads to overgrazing of marsh cordgrass and salt marsh die-off. The direct and indirect trophic effects of predator depletion on basal trophic levels, however, are not understood. Using observational and experimental data, we examined the hypotheses that (1) direct trophic effects of predator depletion decrease meiofaunal abundance by releasing deposit feeding fiddler crabs from consumer control, and/or (2) indirect trophic effects of predator depletion increase meiofaunal abundance by releasing blue carbon via the erosion of centuries of accreted marsh peat. Experimental deposit feeder removal led to 23% higher meiofaunal density at die-off than at healthy sites, while reciprocally transplanting sediment from die-off and healthy sites revealed that carbon-rich die-off sediment increased meiofauna density by over 164%: six times stronger than direct trophic effects. Recovering sites had both carbon-rich sediment and reduced deposit feeding leading to higher meiofauna densities than both die-off and healthy sites. This suggests that consequences of the trophic downgrading of coastal habitats can be driven by both direct and indirect trophic mechanisms that may vary in direction and magnitude, making their elucidation dependent on experimental manipulations.

  9. Direct and maternal genetic effects for ascites-related traits in broilers.

    PubMed

    Pakdel, A; Van Arendonk, J A M; Vereijken, A L J; Bovenhuis, H

    2002-09-01

    The objective of the present study was to estimate heritabilities for ascites-related traits in broilers and to assess the importance of maternal genetic effects for these traits. Several traits related to ascites were measured on more than 4,000 broilers kept under cold conditions. Heritabilities were estimated using an animal model with a direct genetic effect and a model with direct and maternal genetic effects. Estimated heritabilities from the direct genetic effects model were 0.46 for hematocrit value, 0.42 for BW, 0.47 for right ventricular weight, 0.46 for total ventricular weight, 0.45 for ratio of right ventricular weight to the total ventricular weight, 0.32 for total mortality, and 0.18 for fluid accumulation in the heart sac. Maternal effects significantly influenced the traits BW, total ventricular weight, and total mortality. Direct and maternal heritabilities, respectively, for BW were 0.21 and 0.04, for total ventricular weights were 0.29 and 0.03, and for total mortality were 0.16 and 0.05. The heritability estimates for ascites-related traits and the significance of maternal genetic effects for most of these traits indicate that direct and maternal genetic effects play an important role in the development of the ascites syndrome.

  10. Small field detector correction factors: effects of the flattening filter for Elekta and Varian linear accelerators.

    PubMed

    Tyler, Madelaine K; Liu, Paul Z Y; Lee, Christopher; McKenzie, David R; Suchowerska, Natalka

    2016-05-08

    Flattening filter-free (FFF) beams are becoming the preferred beam type for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR), as they enable an increase in dose rate and a decrease in treatment time. This work assesses the effects of the flattening filter on small field output factors for 6 MV beams generated by both Elekta and Varian linear accelerators, and determines differences between detector response in flattened (FF) and FFF beams. Relative output factors were measured with a range of detectors (diodes, ionization cham-bers, radiochromic film, and microDiamond) and referenced to the relative output factors measured with an air core fiber optic dosimeter (FOD), a scintillation dosimeter developed at Chris O'Brien Lifehouse, Sydney. Small field correction factors were generated for both FF and FFF beams. Diode measured detector response was compared with a recently published mathematical relation to predict diode response corrections in small fields. The effect of flattening filter removal on detector response was quantified using a ratio of relative detector responses in FFF and FF fields for the same field size. The removal of the flattening filter was found to have a small but measurable effect on ionization chamber response with maximum deviations of less than ± 0.9% across all field sizes measured. Solid-state detectors showed an increased dependence on the flattening filter of up to ± 1.6%. Measured diode response was within ± 1.1% of the published mathematical relation for all fields up to 30 mm, independent of linac type and presence or absence of a flattening filter. For 6 MV beams, detector correction factors between FFF and FF beams are interchangeable for a linac between FF and FFF modes, providing that an additional uncertainty of up to ± 1.6% is accepted.

  11. Effects of neurotensin on small bowel propulsion in intact and vagotomized rats.

    PubMed

    Wilén, T; Gustavsson, S; Jung, B

    1982-09-01

    The effects of intravenous infusion of neurotensin on small bowel motility was studied in conscious rats. During 1 h a standardized test meal of glucose, polyethyleneglycol (PEG) 3000, phenol red and 125I-labelled polyvinylpyrrolidone was administered via a permanent gastric catheter and simultaneously the bile-excreted radio-pharmaceutic 99Tcm-Solco-HIDA was infused intravenously. Immediately after the infusions the gastrointestinal specimen was excised and examined for distribution of radioactivity. Both doses of neurotensin (0.1 and 0.3 microgram . kg-1 . h-1) resulted in an increase in the neurotensin-like immunoreactivity (NTLI) of plasma to levels similar to that found after a fatty meal. Concurrently the small bowel transport pattern was changed from an interdigestive state to one similar to that found after a meal. In animals not receiving the gastric test meal, neurotensin (0.1-0.5 microgram . kg-1 . h-) had no effect on motility. Infusion of the gastric test meal alone did not change the interdigestive motility or the NTLI value. This indicates that the presence of gastric infusates potentiates the effect of neurotensin on small bowel motility. The motility response to neurotensin did not differ between intact and vagotomized animals. This contrasts to earlier findings that the small bowel motility response to a fatty meal is dependent on intact vagal function. Thus, a difference in the mechanism responsible for the motility responses between a fatty meal and neurotensin exists. In view of this finding it seems reasonable to assume that neurotensin cannot be the only factor responsible for the shift in motility found after a fatty meal.

  12. Novel methods to optimize the effects of transcranial direct current stimulation: a systematic review of transcranial direct current stimulation patents.

    PubMed

    Malavera, Alejandra; Vasquez, Alejandra; Fregni, Felipe

    2015-01-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a neuromodulatory technique that has been extensively studied. While there have been initial positive results in some clinical trials, there is still variability in tDCS results. The aim of this article is to review and discuss patents assessing novel methods to optimize the use of tDCS. A systematic review was performed using Google patents database with tDCS as the main technique, with patents filling date between 2010 and 2015. Twenty-two patents met our inclusion criteria. These patents attempt to address current tDCS limitations. Only a few of them have been investigated in clinical trials (i.e., high-definition tDCS), and indeed most of them have not been tested before in human trials. Further clinical testing is required to assess which patents are more likely to optimize the effects of tDCS. We discuss the potential optimization of tDCS based on these patents and the current experience with standard tDCS.

  13. Effects of teacher-directed versus student-directed instruction on self-management of young children with disabilities.

    PubMed Central

    Mithaug, Deirdre K; Mithaug, Dennis E

    2003-01-01

    In this study, students worked independently by setting goals, selecting assignments, and recording and evaluating their results after receiving one of two different types of self-management training. During teacher-directed training, the teacher set goals, assigned work, and recorded and evaluated results for students. During student-directed training, students performed those tasks themselves. The results indicated that students engaged in the self-management behaviors more frequently during independent work following student-directed instruction than following teacher-directed instruction. PMID:12723878

  14. Shape-directed compartmentalized delivery of a nanoparticle-conjugated small-molecule activator of an epigenetic enzyme in the brain.

    PubMed

    Chaturbedy, Piyush; Kumar, Manoj; Salikolimi, Krishnachary; Das, Sadhan; Sinha, Sarmistha Halder; Chatterjee, Snehajyoti; Suma, B S; Kundu, Tapas K; Eswaramoorthy, Muthusamy

    2015-11-10

    Targeted drug delivery to specific subcellular compartments of brain cells is challenging despite their importance in the treatment of several brain-related diseases. Herein, we report on shape-directed intracellular compartmentalization of nanoparticles in brain cells and their ability to deliver therapeutic molecules to specific organelles. Iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles with different morphologies (spheres, spindles, biconcaves, and nanotubes) were synthesized and coated with a fluorescent carbon layer derived from glucose (Fe3O4@C). In vivo studies showed that the Fe3O4@C nanoparticles with biconcave geometry localized predominantly in the nuclei of the brain cells, whereas those with nanotube geometry were contained mostly in the cytoplasm. Remarkably, a small-molecule activator of histone acetyltransferases delivered into the nuclei of the brain cells using nanoparticles with biconcave geometry showed enhancement in enzymatic activity by a factor of three and resulted in specific gene expression (transcription) compared with that of the molecule delivered to the cytoplasm using nanotube geometry.

  15. CREB1 directly activates the transcription of ribonucleotide reductase small subunit M2 and promotes the aggressiveness of human colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Zejun; Lin, Aifen; Chen, Jiaoe; Zhang, Xiaomin; Liu, Hong; Li, Hongzhang; Hu, Yanyan; Zhang, Xia; Zhang, Jiangang; Qiu, Lanlan; Mei, Lingming; Shao, Jimin; Chen, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    As the small subunit of Ribonucleotide reductase (RR), RRM2 displays a very important role in various critical cellular processes such as cell proliferation, DNA repair, and senescence, etc. Importantly, RRM2 functions like a tumor driver in most types of cancer but little is known about the regulatory mechanism of RRM2 in cancer development. In this study, we found that the cAMP responsive element binding protein 1 (CREB1) acted as a transcription factor of RRM2 gene in human colorectal cancer (CRC). CREB1 directly bound to the promoter of RRM2 gene and induced its transcriptional activation. Knockdown of CREB1 decreased the expression of RRM2 at both mRNA and protein levels. Moreover, knockdown of RRM2 attenuated CREB1-induced aggressive phenotypes of CRC cells in vitro and in vivo. Analysis of the data from TCGA database and clinical CRC specimens with immunohistochemical staining also demonstrated a strong correlation between the co-expression of CREB1 and RRM2. Decreased disease survivals were observed in CRC patients with high expression levels of CREB1 or RRM2. Our results indicate CREB1 as a critical transcription factor of RRM2 which promotes tumor aggressiveness, and imply a significant correlation between CREB1 and RRM2 in CRC specimens. These may provide the possibility that CREB1 and RRM2 could be used as biomarkers or targets for CRC diagnosis and treatment. PMID:27801665

  16. Identification of T. gondii myosin light chain-1 as a direct target of TachypleginA-2, a small-molecule inhibitor of parasite motility and invasion.

    PubMed

    Leung, Jacqueline M; Tran, Fanny; Pathak, Ravindra B; Poupart, Séverine; Heaslip, Aoife T; Ballif, Bryan A; Westwood, Nicholas J; Ward, Gary E

    2014-01-01

    Motility of the protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii plays an important role in the parasite's life cycle and virulence within animal and human hosts. Motility is driven by a myosin motor complex that is highly conserved across the Phylum Apicomplexa. Two key components of this complex are the class XIV unconventional myosin, TgMyoA, and its associated light chain, TgMLC1. We previously showed that treatment of parasites with a small-molecule inhibitor of T. gondii invasion and motility, tachypleginA, induces an electrophoretic mobility shift of TgMLC1 that is associated with decreased myosin motor activity. However, the direct target(s) of tachypleginA and the molecular basis of the compound-induced TgMLC1 modification were unknown. We show here by "click" chemistry labelling that TgMLC1 is a direct and covalent target of an alkyne-derivatized analogue of tachypleginA. We also show that this analogue can covalently bind to model thiol substrates. The electrophoretic mobility shift induced by another structural analogue, tachypleginA-2, was associated with the formation of a 225.118 Da adduct on S57 and/or C58, and treatment with deuterated tachypleginA-2 confirmed that the adduct was derived from the compound itself. Recombinant TgMLC1 containing a C58S mutation (but not S57A) was refractory to click labelling and no longer exhibited a mobility shift in response to compound treatment, identifying C58 as the site of compound binding on TgMLC1. Finally, a knock-in parasite line expressing the C58S mutation showed decreased sensitivity to compound treatment in a quantitative 3D motility assay. These data strongly support a model in which tachypleginA and its analogues inhibit the motility of T. gondii by binding directly and covalently to C58 of TgMLC1, thereby causing a decrease in the activity of the parasite's myosin motor.

  17. Separation and Measurement of Direct and Indirect Effects of Light on Stomata 1

    PubMed Central

    Sharkey, Thomas D.; Raschke, Klaus

    1981-01-01

    Conductance for water vapor, assimilation of CO2, and intercellular CO2 concentration of leaves of five species were determined at various irradiances and ambient CO2 concentrations. Conductance and assimilation were then plotted as functions of irradiance and intercellular CO2 concentration. The slopes of these curves allowed us to estimate infinitesimal changes in conductance (and assimilation) that occurred when irradiance changed and intercellular CO2 concentration was constant, and when CO2 concentration changed and irradiance was constant. On leaves of Xanthium strumarium L., Gossypium hirsutum L., Phaseolus vulgaris L., and Perilla frutescens (L.), Britt., the stomatal response to light was determined to be mainly a direct response to light and to a small extent only a response to changes in intercellular CO2 concentration. This was also true for stomata of Zea mays L., except at irradiances < 150 watts per square meter, when stomata responded primarily to the depletion of the intercellular spaces of CO2 which in turn was caused by changes in the assimilation of CO2. Stomata responded to light even in leaves whose net exchange of CO2 was reduced to zero through application of the inhibitor of photosynthetic electron transport, cyanazine (2-chloro-4[1-cyano-1-methylethylamino]-6-ethylamino-S-triazine). When leaves were inverted and irradiated on the abaxial surface, conductance decreased in the shaded and increased in the illuminated epidermis, indicating that the photoreceptor pigment(s) involved are located in the epidermis (presumably in the guard cells). In leaves of X. strumarium, the direct effect of light on conductance is primarily a response to blue light. Stomatal responses to CO2 and to light opposed each other. In X. strumarium, stomatal opening in response to light was strongest in CO2 free air and saturated at lower irradiances than in CO2 containing air. Conversely, stomatal closure in response to CO2 was strongest in darkness and it decreased

  18. Phenotypic and evolutionary consequences of social behaviours: interactions among individuals affect direct genetic effects.

    PubMed

    Trubenová, Barbora; Hager, Reinmar

    2012-01-01

    Traditional quantitative genetics assumes that an individual's phenotype is determined by both genetic and environmental factors. For many animals, part of the environment is social and provided by parents and other interacting partners. When expression of genes in social partners affects trait expression in a focal individual, indirect genetic effects occur. In this study, we explore the effects of indirect genetic effects on the magnitude and range of phenotypic values in a focal individual in a multi-member model analyzing three possible classes of interactions between individuals. We show that social interactions may not only cause indirect genetic effects but can also modify direct genetic effects. Furthermore, we demonstrate that both direct and indirect genetic effects substantially alter the range of phenotypic values, particularly when a focal trait can influence its own expression via interactions with traits in other individuals. We derive a function predicting the relative importance of direct versus indirect genetic effects. Our model reveals that both direct and indirect genetic effects can depend to a large extent on both group size and interaction strength, altering group mean phenotype and variance. This may lead to scenarios where between group variation is much higher than within group variation despite similar underlying genetic properties, potentially affecting the level of selection. Our analysis highlights key properties of indirect genetic effects with important consequences for trait evolution, the level of selection and potentially speciation.

  19. The role of effective discharge in the ocean delivery of particulate organic carbon by small, mountainous river systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wheatcroft, R.A.; Goni, M.A.; Hatten, J.A.; Pasternack, G.B.; Warrick, J.A.

    2010-01-01

    Recent research has shown that small, mountainous river systems (SMRS) account for a significant fraction of the global flux of sediment and particulate organic carbon (POC) to the ocean. The enormous number of SMRS precludes intensive studies of the sort conducted on large systems, necessitating development of a conceptual framework that permits cross-system comparison and scaling up. Herein, we introduce the geomorphic concept of effective discharge to the problem of source-to-sink POC transport. This idea recognizes that transport effectiveness is the product of discharge frequency and magnitude, wherein the latter is quantified as a power-law relationship between discharge and load (the 'rating curve'). An analytical solution for effective discharge (Qe) identifies two key variables: the standard deviation of the natural logarithm of discharge (??q), and the rating exponent of constituent i (bi Data from selected SMRS are used to show that for a given river Qe-POC < Qesediment, Qe for different POC constituents (e.g., POCfossil vs. POC(modern) differs in predictable ways, and Qe for a particular constituent can vary seasonally. When coupled with the idea that discharge peaks of small rivers may be coincident with specific oceanic conditions (e.g., large waves, wind from a certain direction) that determine dispersal and burial, these findings have potentially important implications for POC fate on continental margins. Future studies of POC transport in SMRS should exploit the conceptual framework provided herein and seek to identify how constituent-specific effective discharges vary between rivers and respond to perturbations. ?? 2010, by the American Society of Limnology and Oceanography, Inc.

  20. Effects of tobacco constituents and psychological stress on the beta-adrenergic regulation of non-small cell lung cancer and pancreatic cancer: implications for intervention.

    PubMed

    Schuller, Hildegard M

    2013-01-01

    This review summarizes current preclinical and clinical evidence in support of the hypothesis that smoking and psychological stress have significant cancer promoting effects on non small cell lung cancer and pancreatic cancer via direct and indirect effects on nicotinic receptor-regulated beta-adrenergic signaling. Evidence is provided that targeted pharmacological interference with the resulting hyperactive cAMP-dependent signaling by beta-blockers or by γ-aminobutyric acid as well as positive psychological influences may be highly effective in preventing and improving clinical outcomes of these cancers, provided that appropriate diagnostic protocols are followed to monitor systemic levels of stress neurotransmitters and cAMP.

  1. Dynamic Edge Effects in Small Mammal Communities across a Conservation-Agricultural Interface in Swaziland

    PubMed Central

    Hurst, Zachary M.; McCleery, Robert A.; Collier, Bret A.; Fletcher, Robert J.; Silvy, Nova J.; Taylor, Peter J.; Monadjem, Ara

    2013-01-01

    Across the planet, high-intensity farming has transformed native vegetation into monocultures, decreasing biodiversity on a landscape scale. Yet landscape-scale changes to biodiversity and community structure often emerge from processes operating at local scales. One common process that can explain changes in biodiversity and community structure is the creation of abrupt habitat edges, which, in turn, generate edge effects. Such effects, while incredibly common, can be highly variable across space and time; however, we currently lack a general analytical framework that can adequately capture such spatio-temporal variability. We extend previous approaches for estimating edge effects to a non-linear mixed modeling framework that captures such spatio-temporal heterogeneity and apply it to understand how agricultural land-uses alter wildlife communities. We trapped small mammals along a conservation-agriculture land-use interface extending 375 m into sugarcane plantations and conservation land-uses at three sites during dry and wet seasons in Swaziland, Africa. Sugarcane plantations had significant reductions in species richness and heterogeneity, and showed an increase in community similarity, suggesting a more homogenized small mammal community. Furthermore, our modeling framework identified strong variation in edge effects on communities across sites and seasons. Using small mammals as an indicator, intensive agricultural practices appear to create high-density communities of generalist species while isolating interior species in less than 225 m. These results illustrate how agricultural land-use can reduce diversity across the landscape and that effects can be masked or magnified, depending on local conditions. Taken together, our results emphasize the need to create or retain natural habitat features in agricultural mosaics. PMID:24040269

  2. Detector dose response in megavoltage small photon beams. II. Pencil beam perturbation effects

    SciTech Connect

    Bouchard, Hugo Duane, Simon; Kamio, Yuji; Palmans, Hugo; Seuntjens, Jan

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: To quantify detector perturbation effects in megavoltage small photon fields and support the theoretical explanation on the nature of quality correction factors in these conditions. Methods: In this second paper, a modern approach to radiation dosimetry is defined for any detector and applied to small photon fields. Fano’s theorem is adapted in the form of a cavity theory and applied in the context of nonstandard beams to express four main effects in the form of perturbation factors. The pencil-beam decomposition method is detailed and adapted to the calculation of perturbation factors and quality correction factors. The approach defines a perturbation function which, for a given field size or beam modulation, entirely determines these dosimetric factors. Monte Carlo calculations are performed in different cavity sizes for different detection materials, electron densities, and extracameral components. Results: Perturbation effects are detailed with calculated perturbation functions, showing the relative magnitude of the effects as well as the geometrical extent to which collimating or modulating the beam impacts the dosimetric factors. The existence of a perturbation zone around the detector cavity is demonstrated and the approach is discussed and linked to previous approaches in the literature to determine critical field sizes. Conclusions: Monte Carlo simulations are valuable to describe pencil beam perturbation effects and detail the nature of dosimetric factors in megavoltage small photon fields. In practice, it is shown that dosimetric factors could be avoided if the field size remains larger than the detector perturbation zone. However, given a detector and beam quality, a full account for the detector geometry is necessary to determine critical field sizes.

  3. Dynamic edge effects in small mammal communities across a conservation-agricultural interface in Swaziland.

    PubMed

    Hurst, Zachary M; McCleery, Robert A; Collier, Bret A; Fletcher, Robert J; Silvy, Nova J; Taylor, Peter J; Monadjem, Ara

    2013-01-01

    Across the planet, high-intensity farming has transformed native vegetation into monocultures, decreasing biodiversity on a landscape scale. Yet landscape-scale changes to biodiversity and community structure often emerge from processes operating at local scales. One common process that can explain changes in biodiversity and community structure is the creation of abrupt habitat edges, which, in turn, generate edge effects. Such effects, while incredibly common, can be highly variable across space and time; however, we currently lack a general analytical framework that can adequately capture such spatio-temporal variability. We extend previous approaches for estimating edge effects to a non-linear mixed modeling framework that captures such spatio-temporal heterogeneity and apply it to understand how agricultural land-uses alter wildlife communities. We trapped small mammals along a conservation-agriculture land-use interface extending 375 m into sugarcane plantations and conservation land-uses at three sites during dry and wet seasons in Swaziland, Africa. Sugarcane plantations had significant reductions in species richness and heterogeneity, and showed an increase in community similarity, suggesting a more homogenized small mammal community. Furthermore, our modeling framework identified strong variation in edge effects on communities across sites and seasons. Using small mammals as an indicator, intensive agricultural practices appear to create high-density communities of generalist species while isolating interior species in less than 225 m. These results illustrate how agricultural land-use can reduce diversity across the landscape and that effects can be masked or magnified, depending on local conditions. Taken together, our results emphasize the need to create or retain natural habitat features in agricultural mosaics.

  4. Quantifying Direct and Indirect Effects of Elevated CO2 on Ecosystem Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatichi, S.; Leuzinger, S.; Paschalis, A.; Donnellan-Barraclough, A.; Hovenden, M. J.; Langley, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    Increasing concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide are expected to affect carbon assimilation, evapotranspiration (ET) and ultimately plant growth. Direct leaf biochemical effects have been widely investigated, while indirect effects, although documented, are very difficult to quantify in experiments. We hypothesize that the interaction of direct and indirect effects is a possible reason for conflicting results concerning the magnitude of CO2 fertilization effects across different climates and ecosystems. A mechanistic ecohydrological model (Tethys-Chloris) is used to investigate the relative contribution of direct (through plant physiology) and indirect (via stomatal closure and thus soil moisture, and changes in Leaf Area Index, LAI) effects of elevated CO2 across a number of ecosystems. We specifically ask in which ecosystems and climate indirect effects are expected to be largest. Data and boundary conditions from flux-towers and free air CO2 enrichment (FACE) experiments are used to force the model and evaluate its performance. Numerical results suggest that indirect effects of elevated CO2, through water savings and increased LAI, are very significant and sometimes larger than direct effects. Indirect effects tend to be considerably larger in water-limited ecosystems, while direct effects correlate positively with mean air temperature. Increasing CO2 from 375 to 550 ppm causes a total effect on Net Primary Production in the order of 15 to 40% and on ET from 0 to -8%, depending on climate and ecosystem type. The total CO2 effect has a significant negative correlation with the wetness index and positive correlation with vapor pressure deficit. These results provide a more general mechanistic understanding of relatively short-term (less than 20 years) implications of elevated CO2 on ecosystem response and suggest plausible magnitudes for the expected changes.

  5. From Hot Hands to Declining Effects: The Risks of Small Numbers (News from the NHLBI)

    PubMed Central

    Lauer, Michael S

    2016-01-01

    About 25 years ago a group of researchers demonstrated that there is no such thing as the “hot hand” in professional basketball. When a player hits 5 or 7 shots in a row (or misses 10 in a row), what's at work is random variation, nothing more. However, random causes do not stop players, coaches, fans, and media from talking about and acting on “hot hands,” telling stories and making choices which ultimately are based on randomness. The same phenomenon is true in medicine. Some clinical trials with small numbers of events yield positive findings, which in turn led clinicians, academics, and government officials to talk, telling stories and sometimes making choices which were later shown to be based on randomness. I provide some cardiovascular examples, such as the use of angiotensin-receptor blockers in chronic heart failure, nesiritide in acute heart failure, and CPY2C19 genotyping in acute coronary syndrome. I also review the more general “decline effect,” by which drugs appear to yield a lower effect size over time. The “decline effect” is at least in part due to over-interpretation of small studies which are more likely to be noticed because of publication bias. As funders of research, we at NHLBI seek to support projects that will yield robust, credible evidence that will impact practice and policy in the right way. We must be alert to the risks of small numbers. PMID:22742403

  6. Self-insurance and the potential effects of health reform on the small-group market.

    PubMed

    Linehan, Kathryn

    2010-12-21

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) as amended by the Health Care Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 makes landmark changes to health insurance markets. Individual and small-group insurance plans and markets will see the biggest changes, but PPACA also affects large employer and self-insured plans by imposing rules for benefit design and health plan practices. Over half of workers--most often those in very large firms--are covered by self-insured health plans in which employers (or employee groups) bear all or some of the risk of providing insurance coverage to a defined population of workers and their dependents. As PPACA provisions become effective, some have argued that smaller firms that offer insurance may opt to self-insure their health benefits because of new small-group market rules. Such a shift could affect risk pooling in the small-group market. This paper examines the definition and prevalence of self-insured health plans, the application of PPACA provisions to these plans, and the possible effects on the broader health insurance market, should many more employers decide to self-insure.

  7. Effect of fasting in the digestive system: histological study of the small intestine in house sparrows.

    PubMed

    Funes, Samanta Celeste; Filippa, Verónica Palmira; Cid, Fabricio Damián; Mohamed, Fabián; Caviedes-Vidal, Enrique; Chediack, Juan Gabriel

    2014-10-01

    In birds and mammals the metabolic response to fasting has been studied and can be characterized by three consecutive phases reflecting metabolic and physiological adjustments. An effective way to minimize energy expenditure during food scarcity is to decrease the mass of the organs. As the digestive system is metabolically expensive to maintain, the small intestine and the liver are the most affected organs. We evaluated the effects of phase III starvation on the mass of the different organs and histological parameters on house sparrows, a small non-migrant bird. In a short period of time (34 h) we observed a larger reduction in the digestive organ mass when compared to the mass of the body and non-alimentary tissues. Furthermore, the intestinal mass was proportionally more reduced than its length and nominal surface area. A reduction on the intestinal mucosal layer also resulted in a shortening of villus (length and thickness) and crypt depth. Moreover, the morphology of the enterocytes changed from cylindrical to cubical, suggesting that the surface exposed to the lumen was conserved. This may indicate an adaptive response to the moment of refeeding. The nominal surface area/body mass remained constant in both groups and several histological parameters were reduced, suggesting that starving induces the atrophy of the small intestine. However, the goblet cells were conserved after fasting indicating a protective tendency.

  8. Towards biodiversity hotspots effective for conserving mammals with small geographic ranges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrara, Rodolfo; San Blas, Germán; Agrain, Federico; Roig-Juñent, Sergio

    2017-01-01

    The main goal of using global biodiversity hotspots for conservation purposes is to protect taxa with small geographic ranges because these are highly vulnerable to extinction. However, the extent to what different hotspots types are effective for meeting this goal remains controversial because hotspots have been previously defined as either the richest or most threatened and richest sites in terms of total, endemic or threatened species. In this regard, the use of species richness to set conservation priorities is widely discussed because strategies focused on this diversity measure tend to miss many of the taxa with small geographic ranges. Here we use data on global terrestrial mammal distributions to show that, hotspots of total species, endemism and threat defined in terms of species richness are effective in including 27%, 29% and 11% respectively, of the taxa with small geographic ranges. Whilst, the same hotspot types defined in terms of a simple diversity index, which is a function of species richness and range-size rarity, include 68%, 44% and 90% respectively, of these taxa. In addition, we demonstrate that index hotspot types are highly efficient because they conserve 79% of mammal species (21% more species than richness hotspot types), with 59% of species shared by three hotspot types (31% more than richness hotspot types). These results suggest that selection of different diversity measures to define hotspots may strongly affect the achievement of conservation goals.

  9. Small-world network effects on innovation: evidences from nanotechnology patenting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yuan; Guan, JianCheng

    2016-11-01

    This paper explores the effects of collaboration network on innovation in nanotechnology. We extend the idea of small-world to the heterogeneous network positions of actors by capturing the variation of how closely a given actor is connected to others in the same network and how clustered its neighbors are. We test the effects of small-world network in the context of nanotechnology patenting in China. Empirical results reveal that small-worldness, or the co-existence of high clustering and low path length in the network, displays inverse U-shape relationships with future patent output of the individual inventors and the system. Interestingly, the inflection point of the nonlinear relationship is significantly higher at the individual level. Based on these findings, we suggest that researchers of nanotechnology maintain a balance between friends in close-knit inner circles and colleagues in distant areas in their collaboration decisions and that policymakers interested in furthering the field offer collaboration opportunities for researchers in distant locations and areas.

  10. The Effects of Kinetic Instabilities on Small-scale Turbulence in Earth’s Magnetosheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breuillard, H.; Yordanova, E.; Vaivads, A.; Alexandrova, O.

    2016-09-01

    The Earth's magnetosheath is the region delimited by the bow shock and the magnetopause. It is characterized by highly turbulent fluctuations covering all scales from MHD down to kinetic scales. Turbulence is thought to play a fundamental role in key processes such as energy transport and dissipation in plasma. In addition to turbulence, different plasma instabilities are generated in the magnetosheath because of the large anisotropies in plasma temperature introduced by its boundaries. In this study we use high-quality magnetic field measurements from Cluster spacecraft to investigate the effects of such instabilities on the small-scale turbulence (from ion down to electron scales). We show that the steepening of the power spectrum of magnetic field fluctuations in the magnetosheath occurs at the largest characteristic ion scale. However, the spectrum can be modified by the presence of waves/structures at ion scales, shifting the onset of the small-scale turbulent cascade toward the smallest ion scale. This cascade is therefore highly dependent on the presence of kinetic instabilities, waves, and local plasma parameters. Here we show that in the absence of strong waves the small-scale turbulence is quasi-isotropic and has a spectral index α ≈ -2.8. When transverse or compressive waves are present, we observe an anisotropy in the magnetic field components and a decrease in the absolute value of α. Slab/2D turbulence also develops in the presence of transverse/compressive waves, resulting in gyrotropy/non-gyrotropy of small-scale fluctuations. The presence of both types of waves reduces the anisotropy in the amplitude of fluctuations in the small-scale range.

  11. Disproportionate effects of non-colonial small herbivores on structure and diversity of grassland dominated by large herbivores

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The response of semiarid grasslands to small, non-colonial herbivores has received little attention, focusing primarily on the effects of granivore assemblages on annual plant communities. We studied the long-term effects of small and large herbivores on vegetation structure and species diversity of...

  12. Comprehension of direct extraction of hydrophilic antioxidants using vegetable oils by polar paradox theory and small angle X-ray scattering analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Fabiano-Tixier, Anne Sylvie; Ruiz, Karine; Rossignol Castera, Anne; Bauduin, Pierre; Diat, Olivier; Chemat, Farid

    2015-04-15

    Since the polar paradox theory rationalised the fact that polar antioxidants are more effective in nonpolar media, extractions of phenolic compounds in vegetable oils were inspired and achieved in this study for obtaining oils enriched in phenolic compounds. Moreover, the influence of surfactants on the extractability of phenolic compounds was experimentally studied first, followed by the small angle X-ray scattering analysis for the oil structural observation before and after extraction so as to better understand the dissolving mechanism underpinning the extraction. The results showed a significant difference on the extraction yield of phenolic compounds among oils, which was mainly dependent on their composition instead of the unsaturation of fatty acids. Appropriate surfactant additions could significantly improve extraction yield for refined sunflower oils, which 1% w/w addition of glyceryl oleate was determined as the optimal. Besides, 5% w/w addition of lecithin performed the best in oil enrichments compared with mono- and di-glycerides.

  13. Comparing the Effects of Fuel Treatments and Wildfire on Small Catchment Runoff and Sediment Yield at Two Spatial Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robichaud, P. R.; Wagenbrenner, J. W.; Storrar, K. A.; Elliot, W. J.

    2014-12-01

    The role of wildfire in the Rockies continues to be a major concern—especially fire's effect on water quantity and quality, thus protection of water resources is of great management importance as wildfire occurrence and water needs increase. Since high burn severity wildfires often affect soils, vegetation, and hydrologic processes, fuel treatments are often implemented to reduce the risk of high severity fires. The effects of fuel treatments and wildfire on runoff and sediment yields are often examined separately at the hillslope scale but few studies compare the effects of fuel treatments directly to those of wildfire or allow upscaling effects to the small catchment scale. We studied hillslope scale (0.01 ha) sediment yields and catchment scale (2 to 9 ha) runoff and sediment yields at seven fuel treatment sites and one high severity wildfire site in the northern Rockies. The fuel treatments consisted of thinning or timber harvest followed by low to moderate severity prescribed fire. Mean runoff rates from snowmelt and summer rainfall were often similar between the fuel treatments and wildfire catchments, sediment yields were two to three orders of magnitude higher in the wildfire site than in the fuel treatment sites, and much of the sediment was produced during summer rainfall. Comparing results across scales, sediment yields from the fuel treatments and wildfire sites decreased exponentially with increasing area. These results suggest that fuel treatments that reduce the risk of wildfire do not cause significant erosion.

  14. Setting the question for inquiry: The effects of whole class vs small group on student achievement in elementary science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavagnetto, Andy Roy

    This study was conducted to determine the effects of two different student-centered approaches to setting the question for inquiry. The first approach (whole class) consisted of students setting a single question for inquiry after which students worked in small groups during an investigation phase of the activity with all groups exploring the same question. The second approach (small group) consisted of each group of students setting a question resulting in numerous questions being explored per class. A mixed method quasi-experimental design was utilized. Two grade five teachers from a small rural school district in the Midwestern United States participated, each teaching two sections of science (approximately 25 students per section). Results indicate three major findings. Instructional approach (whole class vs. small group) did not effect student achievement in science or language arts. Observational data indicated the actions and skills teachers utilized to implement the approaches were similar. Specifically, the pedagogical skills of dialogical interaction (which was found to be influenced by teacher level of control of learning and teacher content knowledge) and effective rather than efficient use of time were identified as key factors in teachers' progression toward a student-centered, teacher-managed instructional approach. Unit exams along with qualitative and quantitative teacher observation data indicated that these factors do have an impact on student achievement. Specifically increased dialogical interaction in the forms of greater student voice, and increased cognitive demands placed on students by embedding and emphasizing science argument within the student inquiry corresponded to positive gains in student achievement. Additionally, teacher's perception of student abilities was also found to influence professional growth. Finally, allowing students to set the questions for inquiry and design the experiments impact the classroom environment as teacher

  15. River flow forecasting using a rainfall disaggregation model incorporating small-scale topographic effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misumi, R.; Bell, V. A.; Moore, R. J.

    2001-09-01

    River flow forecasting using rainfall predictions from a mesoscale weather prediction model in combination with a physically-based rainfall disaggregation model incorporating small-scale topographic variability is demonstrated. Rainfall predicted by the UK Met Office Mesoscale Model on a 16.8 km grid is disaggregated onto a 2 km grid using a rainfall model which adds the effect of small-scale topography. River flow is calculated by a distributed rainfall-runoff model using the output from the rainfall model. A thunderstorm event on 7 June 1996 over the Brue catchment in Somerset, England is used to evaluate the models. The rainfall model successfully forecasts the band-shaped rainfall field within the catchment and the error in the total amount of flow during the storm is only -12%. An error of -40% in the peak flow is attributed to the treatment of convective clouds in the model.

  16. Direct, residual and direct + residual effects of sulphur in garlic (Allium sativum)-maize (Zea mays) cropping sequence.

    PubMed

    Jaggi, R C; Raina, S K

    2008-01-01

    Significant positive effects of 30 kg/ha of sulphur as manifested on yield and yield parameters of garlic were further carried over to following maize crop. Garlic bulb and foliage yield (6.3 and 0.8 t/ha respectively) obtained at 30 kg/ha of sulphur dose was significantly higher over without sulphur (3.7 and 0.5 t/ha respectively) as revealed from two years' pooled data. Similarly number of leaves/plant, weight of cloves/5bulbs and weight/100 cloves at the said sulphur dose significantly increased over without sulphur from 10.5 to 11.9, 98.3 to 141.2 g and from 159 to 217 g in respective manner Increase in grain yield of maize (residual effect) and in the economic yield of the whole cropping sequence (Bulb yield of garlic and grain yield of maize) i.e. direct plus residual effect at 30 kg/ha of sulphur dose over without sulphur was from 28.3 to 47.2 and from 71 to 116 q/ha in respective manner i.e. with significant differences. Sulphur use efficiencies (kg yield/kg sulphur) of these crops at 15, 30 and 45 kg/ha over no sulphur were 57, 43 and 32; 53, 63 and 6 and 160, 150 and 67, all in respective order An optimum sulphur dose of 44.3 kg/ha produced increased bulb yield (over no S) worth Rs 34892 over fertilizer cost giving B:C ratio of 31.5:1. Utilization of sulphur added at 15, 30 and 45 kg/ha rates was 24.1, 19.3 and 15.7% by the garlic crop; and 29.6. 24.5 and 9.02% by the following maize crop, thus, adding up to 54.1, 43.8 and 24.9% by the cropping sequence, all in respective order.

  17. Pen size and parity effects on maternal behaviour of Small-Tail Han sheep.

    PubMed

    Lv, S-J; Yang, Y; Dwyer, C M; Li, F-K

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this experiment was to study the effects of pen size and parity on maternal behaviour of twin-bearing Small-Tail Han ewes. A total of 24 ewes were allocated to a 2×2 design (six per pen), with parity (primiparous or multiparous) and pen size (large: 6.0×3.0 m; small: 6.0×1.5 m) as main effects at Linyi University, Shandong Province, China. Behaviour was observed from after parturition until weaning. All ewes were observed for 6 h every 5 days from 0700 to1000 h and from 1400 to 1700 h. Continuous focal animal sampling was used to quantify the duration of maternal behaviours: sucking, grooming and following as well as the frequency of udder accepting, udder refusing and low-pitched bleating. Oestradiol and cortisol concentrations in the faeces (collected in the morning every 5 days) were detected using EIA kits. All lambs were weighed 24 h after parturition and again at weaning at 35 days of age. The small pen size significantly reduced following (P<0.005), grooming (P<0.001) and suckling durations (P<0.05), as well as the frequency of udder refusals (P<0.001). However, there was a significant interaction with ewe parity, with decreased grooming and suckling in the small pen largely seen in the multiparous ewes (P<0.001). Independent of pen size, multiparous ewes accepted more sucking attempts by their lambs (P<0.05) and made more low-pitched bleats than primiparous ewes (P<0.001). Multiparous ewes had higher faecal oestradiol concentrations than primiparous ewes (P<0.001), and ewes in small pens had higher faecal cortisol levels compared with ewes in larger pens (P<0.001). As lambs increased in age, the duration of maternal grooming, following and suckling as well as frequency of udder acceptance and low-pitched bleating all declined, and the frequency of udder refusing increased (P<0.001 for all). Ewe parity, but not pen size, affected lamb weight gain during the period of observation (P<0.001). This is the first study to show that pen size

  18. Looking the Other Way: The Role of Gaze Direction in the Cross-race Memory Effect

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Reginald B.; Pauker, Kristin; Weisbuch, Max

    2010-01-01

    One of the most replicable findings reported in the social psychological literature is the cross-race memory effect. We argue this effect derives from higher-order interactions among social cues that determine the perceived relevance of a face to an observer. The current research tested this hypothesis by examining the combined influences of eye gaze direction and race on face memory. The physical subtlety of eye gaze belies its powerful influence on social perception, and in this case helps specify the relevance of same- versus other-race faces. We found that only in faces making direct eye contact—not those displaying averted eye gaze—was the cross-race memory effect evident. Likewise, only in same-race faces did direct relative to averted gaze enhance face memory. These findings have implications for our general understanding of the combinatorial nature of social perception and help clarify the underlying cause of the cross-race memory effect. PMID:20204166

  19. Lack of Direct Effects of Agrochemicals on Zoonotic Pathogens and Fecal Indicator Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Staley, Zachery R.; Senkbeil, Jacob K.; Rohr, Jason R.

    2012-01-01

    Agrochemicals, fecal indicator bacteria (FIB), and pathogens frequently contaminate water simultaneously. No significant direct effects of fertilizer, atrazine, malathion, and chlorothalonil on the survival of Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis, Salmonella enterica, human polyomaviruses, and adenovirus were detected, supporting the assertion that previously observed effects of agrochemicals on FIB were indirect. PMID:22961900

  20. Influence of Exercise on Inflammation in Cancer: Direct Effect or Innocent Bystander?

    PubMed

    Murphy, E Angela; Enos, Reilly T; Velázquez, Kandy T

    2015-07-01

    We propose the hypothesis that the benefits of exercise on inflammation in cancer are a result of a direct effect on inflammatory cytokines, including interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1, that are critical for cancer growth as well as a bystander effect of the established relationship between exercise and cancer.

  1. Comparing Direct versus Indirect Measures of the Pedagogical Effectiveness of Team Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bacon, Donald R.

    2011-01-01

    Direct measures (tests) of the pedagogical effectiveness of team testing and indirect measures (student surveys) of pedagogical effectiveness of team testing were collected in several sections of an undergraduate marketing course with varying levels of the use of team testing. The results indicate that although students perceived team testing to…

  2. Predicting use of effective vegetable parenting practices with the Model of Goal Directed Behavior

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our objective was to model effective vegetable parenting practices using the Model of Goal Directed Vegetable Parenting Practices construct scales. An internet survey was conducted with 307 parents (mostly mothers) of preschoolers in Houston, Texas to assess their agreement with effective vegetable ...

  3. Effects of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) on Behaviour and Electrophysiology of Language Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wirth, Miranka; Rahman, Rasha Abdel; Kuenecke, Janina; Koenig, Thomas; Horn, Helge; Sommer, Werner; Dierks, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Excitatory anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (A-tDCS) over the left dorsal prefrontal cortex (DPFC) has been shown to improve language production. The present study examined neurophysiological underpinnings of this effect. In a single-blinded within-subject design, we traced effects of A-tDCS compared to sham stimulation over the left…

  4. 49 CFR 385.819 - Effect of failure to comply with remedial directive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... REGULATIONS SAFETY FITNESS PROCEDURES Remedial Directives § 385.819 Effect of failure to comply with remedial... 49 Transportation 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Effect of failure to comply with remedial... with § 385.811, does not meet the safety fitness standard set forth in § 385.5(b). With respect to...

  5. The Effect of Direct Instruction Model on Intermediate Class Achievement and Attitudes toward English Grammar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kousar, Rubina

    2010-01-01

    This study was aimed at investigating the effect of the direct instruction model on intermediate class achievement and attitudes toward English grammar. It was an experimental study and the purpose was to explore the relative effectiveness of instructional methodology (independent variable) on students' achievement and attitude (dependent…

  6. Heterogeneous road networks have no apparent effect on the genetic structure of small mammal populations.

    PubMed

    Grilo, Clara; Del Cerro, Irene; Centeno-Cuadros, Alejandro; Ramiro, Victor; Román, Jacinto; Molina-Vacas, Guillem; Fernández-Aguilar, Xavier; Rodríguez, Juan; Porto-Peter, Flávia; Fonseca, Carlos; Revilla, Eloy; Godoy, José A

    2016-09-15

    Roads are widely recognized to represent a barrier to individual movements and, conversely, verges can act as potential corridors for the dispersal of many small mammals. Both barrier and corridor effects should generate a clear spatial pattern in genetic structure. Nevertheless, the effect of roads on the genetic structure of small mammal populations still remains unclear. In this study, we examine the barrier effect that different road types (4-lane highway, 2-lane roads and single-lane unpaved roads) may have on the population genetic structure of three species differing in relevant life history traits: southern water vole Arvicola sapidus, the Mediterranean pine vole Microtus duodecimcostatus and the Algerian mouse Mus spretus. We also examine the corridor effect of highway verges on the Mediterranean pine vole and the Algerian mouse. We analysed the population structure through pairwise estimates of FST among subpopulations bisected by roads, identified genetic clusters through Bayesian assignment approaches, and used simple and partial Mantel tests to evaluate the relative barrier or corridor effect of roads. No strong evidences were found for an effect of roads on population structure of these three species. The barrier effect of roads seems to be site-specific and no corridor effect of verges was found for the pine vole and Algerian mouse populations. The lack of consistent results among species and for each road type lead us to believe that the ability of individual dispersers to use those crossing structures or the habitat quality in the highway verges may have a relatively higher influence on gene flow among populations than the presence of crossing structures per se. Further research should include microhabitat analysis and the estimates of species abundance to understand the mechanisms that underlie the genetic structure observed at some sites.

  7. Effects of disturbance on small mammal community structure in the New Jersey Pinelands, USA.

    PubMed

    Shenko, Alicia N; Bien, Walter F; Spotila, James R; Avery, Harold W

    2012-03-01

    We compared small mammal community composition among undisturbed habitats and habitats disturbed by military operations on Warren Grove Gunnery Range (WGR) in the New Jersey Pinelands. WGR is one of the largest tracts of protected land within this globally rare ecosystem. Disturbance in the form of fire, mowing, soil disruption and logging has had a large effect on small mammal occurrence and distribution. Of the 14 small mammal species that occur in the Pinelands, 9 live on WGR, including large populations of the southern bog lemming (Synaptomys cooperi Baird, 1858) and meadow jumping mouse [Zapus hudsonius (Zimmermann, 1780)]. Simpson's Index of Diversity was 0 for most disturbed sites and was generally greater in wetlands than in uplands. White-footed mouse [Peromyscus leucopus (Rafinesque, 1818)] was the most common species on WGR and had a dominant effect on species diversity and community similarity indices. It dominated upland habitats and was the only species to occur in several disturbed habitats, whereas all 9 species occurred in wetlands. Principal components analysis indicated that most variation in species diversity was explained by disturbance and differences between upland and wetland habitats, due to presence of white-footed mice in disturbed and upland sites. Meadow jumping mice, southern bog lemmings and red-back voles [Myodes gapperi (Vigors, 1830)] were positively correlated with wetland habitats, and pine voles [Microtus pinetorum (Le Conte, 1830)], short-tail shrews [Blarina brevicauda (Say, 1823)] and eastern chipmunks [Tamias striatus (Linnaeus, 1758)] were associated with uplands. Habitat heterogeneity at WGR, including extensive undisturbed wetlands and uplands supported a rich diversity of small mammal species.

  8. Effects of early feeding and exogenous putrescine on growth and small intestinal development in posthatch ducks.

    PubMed

    Peng, P; Xu, J; Chen, W; Tangara, M; Qi, Z L; Peng, J

    2010-02-01

    1. Effects of early feeding with a diet containing added putrescine on duck intestinal development and growth performance were examined by a 2 x 2 factorial arrangement with two different feeding times (6 and 48 h) and two levels of putrescine (0 and 025%). 2. A significant main effect of early feeding on increasing body weight (BW) was observed from hatch to 35 d, whereas dietary putrescine had no significant effect on BW. 3. In the first week posthatch, enhanced small intestinal weight and intestinal density (weight of intestinal tissue/unit length of intestine), increased villus length and reduced crypt depth were observed in the early feeding group, while no effect was observed when putrescine was added to the diet. 4. Maltase and sucrase activity and protein/DNA ratio in jejunum were increased by early feeding in the first week, while decreased by putrescine supplementation. 5. In conclusion, early feeding methods have great potential for small intestine development and thereafter enhanced the growth performance of ducks, but dietary putrescine used during this period should be used cautiously to avoid toxicity.

  9. Induction system effects on small-scale turbulence in a high-speed diesel engine

    SciTech Connect

    Catania, A.E.; Mittica, A.

    1987-10-01

    The influence of the induction system on small-scale turbulence in a high-speed, automotive diesel engine was investigated under variable swirl conditions. The induction system was made up of two equiverse swirl tangential ducts, and valves of the same size and lift. Variable swirl conditions were obtained by keeping one of the inlet valves either closed or functioning, and by changing engine speed. The investigation was carried out for two induction system configurations: with both ducts operating and with only one of them operating. Two different engine speeds were considered, one relatively low (1600 rpm) and the other quite high (3000 rpm), the latter being the highest speed at which engine turbulence has been measured up to now. Cycle-resolved hot-wire anemometry measurements of air velocity were performed throughout the induction and compression strokes, under motored conditions, along a radial direction at an axial level that was virtually in the middle of the combustion chamber at top dead center. The velocity data were analyzed using the nonstationary time-averaging procedure previously developed by the authors. Correlation and spectral analysis of the small-scale turbulence so determined was also performed. The turbulence intensity and its degree of nonhomogeneity and anisotropy were sensibly influenced by the variable swirl conditions, depending on both the intake system configuration and engine speed.

  10. Direct and indirect effects of warming on aphids, their predators, and ant mutualists.

    PubMed

    Barton, Brandon T; Ives, Anthony R

    2014-06-01

    Species exist within communities of other interacting species, so an exogenous force that directly affects one species can indirectly affect all other members of the community. In the case of climate change, many species may be affected directly and subsequently initiate numerous indirect effects that propagate throughout the community. Therefore, the net effect of climate change on any one species is a function of the direct and indirect effects. We investigated the direct and indirect effects of climate warming on corn leaf aphids, a pest of corn and other grasses, by performing an experimental manipulation of temperature, predators, and two common aphid-tending ants. Although warming had a positive direct effect on aphid population growth rate, warming reduced aphid abundance when ants and predators were present. This occurred because winter ants, which aggressively defend aphids from predators under control temperatures, were less aggressive toward predators and less abundant when temperatures were increased. In contrast, warming increased the abundance of cornfield ants, but they did not protect aphids from predators with the same vigor as winter ants. Thus, warming broke down the ant-aphid mutualism and counterintuitively reduced the abundance of this agricultural pest.

  11. Opposing history effect of preceding decision and action in the free choice of saccade direction.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Kei; Funahashi, Shintaro

    2014-08-15

    When we act voluntarily, we make a decision to do so prior to the actual execution. However, because of the strong tie between decision and action, it has been difficult to dissociate these two processes in an animal's free behavior. In the present study, we tried to characterize the differences in these processes on the basis of their unique history effect. Using simple eye movement tasks in which the direction of a saccade was either instructed by a computer or freely chosen by the subject, we found that the preceding decision and action had different effects on the animal's subsequent behavior. While choosing a direction (previous decision) produced a positive history effect that prompted the choice of the same saccade direction, making a saccadic response to a direction (previous action) produced a negative history effect that discouraged the monkey from choosing the same direction. This result suggests that the history effect in sequential behavior reported in previous studies was a mixture of these two different components. Future studies on decision-making need to consider the importance of the distinction between decision and action in animal behavior.

  12. Listener perception of the effect of abdominal kinematic directives on respiratory behavior in female classical singing.

    PubMed

    Collyer, Sally; Kenny, Dianna T; Archer, Michaele

    2011-01-01

    Breath management training in classical singing is becoming increasingly physiologically focused, despite evidence that directives focusing on chest-wall kinematic (ribcage and abdominal) behavior effect minimal change in acoustical measures of singing. A direct and proportionate relationship between breathing behavior and vocal quality is important in singing training because singing teachers rely primarily on changes in sound quality to assess the efficacy of breath management modification. Pedagogical opinion is also strongly divided over whether the strategy of retarding the reduction in abdominal dimension during singing has a negative effect on vocal quality. This study investigated whether changes in abdominal kinematic strategy were perceptible and whether listeners preferred a particular strategy. Fourteen experienced singing teachers and vocal coaches assessed audio samples of five female classical singers whose respiratory kinematic patterns during singing had been recorded habitually and under two simple, dichotomous directives: Gradually drawing the abdomen inward and gradually expanding the abdomen, during each phrase. Listeners rated the singers on standard of singing and of breath management. Ratings analysis took into consideration changes in kinematic behavior under each directive determined from the respiratory recordings. Listener ratings for two singers were unaffected by directive. For three singers, ratings were lower when the directive opposed habitual kinematic behavior. The results did not support the pedagogical assumption of a direct and proportional link between respiratory behavior and standard of singing or that the abdomen-outward strategy was deleterious to vocal quality. The findings demonstrate the importance of considering habitual breathing behavior in both research and pedagogical contexts.

  13. A microphysical interpretation of the rate-and-state friction direct effect: implications for the seismic cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Ende, Martijn; Niemeijer, André; Spiers, Christopher

    2015-04-01

    For many years, empirical rate-and-state friction laws have been successfully applied to describe the transient frictional behaviour of fault zones, as observed in laboratory experiments and in nature. However, the rate-and-state friction parameters and equations are still poorly understood in terms of the underlying processes that operate at a micro-scale. In addition, there exist large discrepancies between lab-derived values and estimated values for natural fault zones. Because of these discrepancies, extrapolation of the frictional behaviour from sample-scale to the spatial and temporal scales of natural faults is non-trivial. Most notably, there is only a small theoretical basis for the near-instantaneous increase in friction after a sudden increase in sliding velocity (known as the direct effect). Marone et al. (1990) observed a positive relationship between the direct effect and dilatation in quartz gouges. However, the magnitude of the dilatation was significantly higher than expected based on the change in friction, which they explained by non-coaxial dilatation. In more recent years, Beeler et al. (2007) used a normalisation scheme to show that in the case of phyllosilicates, the magnitude of the direct effect is comparable to the stress required for dislocation glide. However, dislocation glide does not explain a-values for "hard" minerals such as quartz and calcite, especially when fluid-rock interactions are rapid. To address these issues, room temperature velocity stepping experiments have been conducted on granular calcite, and granular rock salt as an analogue for quartz under hydrothermal conditions. These experiments clearly demonstrate that the magnitude of the direct effect is much larger in gouges where pressure solution rates are high and deformation is distributed. A large contribution of dilatation to the magnitude of the direct effect becomes apparent in these gouges. In contrast, calcite gouges in which pressure solution is slow, show a

  14. Long-term effects of precommercial thinning on small mammals in northern Maine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Homyack, J.A.; Harrison, D.J.; Krohn, W.B.

    2005-01-01

    Precommercial thinning (PCT) is being practiced increasingly throughout the Acadian forest of eastern North America to meet silvicultural objectives; however, effects of this practice on wildlife, both immediately and several years post-treatment are not well understood. Forest dependent small mammals have ecological roles as prey for numerous avian and mammalian predators, dispersers of seeds, fruit, and spores, and contribute to nutrient cycling. Researchers in the northwestern USA have suggested that thinning of young, regenerating clearcuts may increase the abundance and diversity of some forest-dependent small mammals by increasing rates of forest development and enhancing the ecological representation of mid-successional stands across managed landscapes. We examined the effects of PCT within conifer-dominated forest stands 1-, 6-, 11-, and 16-years post-treatment, on abundances of mice, voles, and shrews, and on within-stand structure in the commercially managed, Acadian forests of northern Maine. We live-trapped small mammals on 24 herbicide-treated clearcuts treated with PCT and on 13 similar, unthinned stands during summers of 2000 and 2001. Thinning of mid-successional conifer stands resulted in increased abundances, (red-backed voles, Clethrionomys gapperi, P = 0.008; masked shrews, Sorex cinereus, P < 0.001) or had no detectable effect on (deer mice, Peromyscus maniculatus, P = 0.544; short-tailed shrews, Blarina brevicauda, P = 0.517) the 4 most common species of Muridae and Soricidae in northern Maine. In general, abundance of deer mice responded more positively to increasing development class and to the number of years since thinning than other species of small mammals. Several within-stand habitat characteristics associated with stand maturity, such as larger stem diameters and a partially open canopy, occurred in thinned stands. Thus, PCT may accelerate the development of habitat attributes typical of mid-successional conifer stands in intensively

  15. Effect of weaning on small intestinal structure and function in the piglet.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xianhong; Li, Defa; She, Ruiping

    2002-08-01

    Fifty-four piglets were selected from 12 litters weaned at 17 (Treatment 1), 21 (Treatment 2), 28 (Treatment 3) and 35 (Treatment 4) days old, respectively, to determine the effect of weaning age on small intestinal villus morphology, immunology and histochemistry. From proximal duodenum, proximal jejunum, distal jejunum and middle ileum, intestinal samples with three replicates (piglets) in each treatment were taken at 18, 22, 28 and 36; 22, 28, 36 and 43; 28, 36, 43, and 50; and 18, 22, 28, 36, 43 and 50 d of age in Treatment 1, 2, 3 and 4, respectively. This was equivalent to 12 h, 3 d, 1 week, 2 week postweaning in Treatment 1; 12 h, 1 week, 2 week, 3 week postweaning in Treatment 2 and 3, and all the same age in Treatment 4 as in Treatment 1, 2, 3, respectively. The results showed that villous height of duodenum and proximal jejunum decreased significantly in Treatment 1 and 3. Crypt depth in the duodenum, proximal jejunum and ileum also decreased significantly in Treatment 1. Date had significant effect on villous height of the duodenum, distal jejunum and ileum with the shortest on day 29 and crypt depth of all positions increased with piglet age except the crypt depth in proximal jejunum decreased on day 50. Weaning age and day of age had significant effects on intraepithelial lymphocyte (IEL) number and goblet cell (GC) number at all positions of small intestinal mucosa in piglets. The number of IEL at all segments of small intestinal mucosa in Treatment 3 increased significantly compared to those in other treatments, but IEL number at all locations of small intestinal mucosa in Treatment 2 decreased significantly compared to those in other treatments. The number of GC in small intestinal mucosa increased significantly in early-weaned (< day 21) piglets. It appears that providing fluid milk replacer for a few days postweaning could dramatically reduce the negative impact of weaning on villous morphology and digestive and absorptive function, especially in

  16. Directional effects of biofeedback on trunk sway during gait tasks in healthy young subjects.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Lindy J F; Verhoeff, Lonneke L; Horlings, Corinne G C; Allum, John H J

    2009-06-01

    Biofeedback of trunk sway is a possible remedy for patients with balance disorders. Because these patients have a tendency to fall more in one direction, we investigated whether biofeedback has a directional effect on trunk sway during gait. Forty healthy young participants (mean age 23.1 years) performed 10 gait tasks with and without biofeedback. Combined vibrotactile, auditory and visual feedback on trunk sway in either the lateral or anterior-posterior (AP) direction was provided by a head-mounted actuator system. Trunk roll and pitch angles, calculated from trunk angular velocities measured with gyroscopes, were used to drive the feedback. A reduction in sway velocities occurred across all tasks regardless of feedback direction. Reductions in sway angles depended on the task. Generally, reductions were greater in pitch. For walking up and down stairs, or over barriers, pitch angle reductions were greater with AP than lateral feedback. For tandem and normal walking, reductions were similar in pitch and roll angles for both feedback directions. For walking while rotating or pitching the head or with eyes closed, only pitch angle was reduced for both feedback directions. These results indicate that the central nervous system is able to incorporate biofeedback of trunk sway from either the AP or lateral direction to achieve a reduction in both pitch and roll sway. Greater reductions in pitch suggest a greater ability to use this direction of trunk sway biofeedback during gait.

  17. Effects of gaze direction, head orientation and valence of facial expression on amygdala activity.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Andreas; Mothes-Lasch, Martin; Miltner, Wolfgang H R; Straube, Thomas

    2014-08-01

    There is increasing evidence for a role of the amygdala in processing gaze direction and emotional relevance of faces. In this event-related functional magnetic resonance study we investigated amygdala responses while we orthogonally manipulated head direction, gaze direction and facial expression (angry, happy and neutral). This allowed us to investigate effects of stimulus ambiguity, low-level factors and non-emotional factors on amygdala activation. Averted vs direct gaze induced increased activation in the right dorsal amygdala regardless of facial expression and head orientation. Furthermore, valence effects were found in the ventral amygdala and strongly dependent on head orientation. We observed enhanced activation to angry and neutral vs happy faces for observer-directed faces in the left ventral amygdala while the averted head condition reversed this pattern resulting in increased activation to happy as compared to angry and neutral faces. These results suggest that gaze direction drives specifically dorsal amygdala activation regardless of facial expression, low-level perceptual factors or stimulus ambiguity. The role of the amygdala is thus not restricted to the detection of potential threat, but has a more general role in attention processes. Furthermore, valence effects are associated with activation of the ventral amygdala and strongly influenced by non-emotional factors.

  18. Charge Disproportionation in Tetragonal La2MoO5 , a Small Band Gap Semiconductor Influenced by Direct Mo–Mo Bonding

    DOE PAGES

    Colabello, Diane M.; Camino, Fernando E.; Huq, Ashfia; ...

    2014-12-31

    The structure of the novel compound La2MoO5 has been solved from powder X-ray and neutron diffraction data and belongs to the tetragonal space group P4/m (no. 83) with a = 12.6847(3) Å and c = 6.0568(2) Å and with Z = 8. It consists of equal proportions of bioctahedral (Mo2O10) and square prismatic (Mo2O8) dimers, both of which contain direct Mo-Mo bonds and are arranged in 1D chains. The Mo-Mo bond length in the Mo2O10dimers is 2.684(8) Å, while there are two types of Mo2O8 dimers with Mo-Mo bonds lengths of 2.22(2) and 2.28(2) Å. Although the average Mo oxidationmore » state in La2MoO5 is 4+, the very different Mo-Mo distances reflect the fact that the Mo2O10 dimers contain only Mo5+ (d(1)), while the prismatic Mo2O8 dimers only contain Mo3+ (d3), a result directly confirmed by density function theory calculations. This is due to the complete disproportionation of Mo4+, a phenomenon which has not previously been observed in solid-state compounds. La2MoO5 is diamagnetic, behavior which is not expected for a nonmetallic transition-metal oxide whose cation sites have an odd number of d-electrons. The resistivity displays the Arrhenius-type activated behavior expected for a semiconductor with a band gap of 0.5 eV, exhibiting an unusually small transport gap relative to other diamagnetic oxides. Diffuse reflectance studies indicate that La2MoO5 is a rare example of a stable oxide semiconductor with strong infrared absorbance. Lastly, we show that the d-orbital splitting associated with the Mo2O8 and Mo2O10 dimeric units can be rationalized using simple molecular orbital bonding concepts.« less

  19. Charge Disproportionation in Tetragonal La2MoO5 , a Small Band Gap Semiconductor Influenced by Direct Mo–Mo Bonding

    SciTech Connect

    Colabello, Diane M.; Camino, Fernando E.; Huq, Ashfia; Hybertsen, Mark; Khalifah, Peter G.

    2014-12-31

    The structure of the novel compound La2MoO5 has been solved from powder X-ray and neutron diffraction data and belongs to the tetragonal space group P4/m (no. 83) with a = 12.6847(3) Å and c = 6.0568(2) Å and with Z = 8. It consists of equal proportions of bioctahedral (Mo2O10) and square prismatic (Mo2O8) dimers, both of which contain direct Mo-Mo bonds and are arranged in 1D chains. The Mo-Mo bond length in the Mo2O10dimers is 2.684(8) Å, while there are two types of Mo2O8 dimers with Mo-Mo bonds lengths of 2.22(2) and 2.28(2) Å. Although the average Mo oxidation state in La2MoO5 is 4+, the very different Mo-Mo distances reflect the fact that the Mo2O10 dimers contain only Mo5+ (d(1)), while the prismatic Mo2O8 dimers only contain Mo3+ (d3), a result directly confirmed by density function theory calculations. This is due to the complete disproportionation of Mo4+, a phenomenon which has not previously been observed in solid-state compounds. La2MoO5 is diamagnetic, behavior which is not expected for a nonmetallic transition-metal oxide whose cation sites have an odd number of d-electrons. The resistivity displays the Arrhenius-type activated behavior expected for a semiconductor with a band gap of 0.5 eV, exhibiting an unusually small transport gap relative to other diamagnetic oxides. Diffuse reflectance studies indicate that La2MoO5 is a rare example of a stable oxide semiconductor with strong infrared absorbance. Lastly, we show that the d-orbital splitting associated with the Mo2O8 and Mo2O10 dimeric units can be rationalized using simple molecular orbital bonding concepts.

  20. Charge disproportionation in tetragonal La2MoO5, a small band gap semiconductor influenced by direct Mo-Mo bonding.

    PubMed

    Colabello, Diane M; Camino, Fernando E; Huq, Ashfia; Hybertsen, Mark; Khalifah, Peter G

    2015-01-28

    The structure of the novel compound La2MoO5 has been solved from powder X-ray and neutron diffraction data and belongs to the tetragonal space group P4/m (no. 83) with a = 12.6847(3) Å and c = 6.0568(2) Å and with Z = 8. It consists of equal proportions of bioctahedral (Mo2O10) and square prismatic (Mo2O8) dimers, both of which contain direct Mo-Mo bonds and are arranged in 1D chains. The Mo-Mo bond length in the Mo2O10 dimers is 2.684(8) Å, while there are two types of Mo2O8 dimers with Mo-Mo bonds lengths of 2.22(2) and 2.28(2) Å. Although the average Mo oxidation state in La2MoO5 is 4+, the very different Mo-Mo distances reflect the fact that the Mo2O10 dimers contain only Mo(5+) (d(1)), while the prismatic Mo2O8 dimers only contain Mo(3+) (d(3)), a result directly confirmed by density function theory calculations. This is due to the complete disproportionation of Mo(4+), a phenomenon which has not previously been observed in solid-state compounds. La2MoO5 is diamagnetic, behavior which is not expected for a nonmetallic transition-metal oxide whose cation sites have an odd number of d-electrons. The resistivity displays the Arrhenius-type activated behavior expected for a semiconductor with a band gap of 0.5 eV, exhibiting an unusually small transport gap relative to other diamagnetic oxides. Diffuse reflectance studies indicate that La2MoO5 is a rare example of a stable oxide semiconductor with strong infrared absorbance. It is shown that the d-orbital splitting associated with the Mo2O8 and Mo2O10 dimeric units can be rationalized using simple molecular orbital bonding concepts.