Science.gov

Sample records for small direct effect

  1. Direct and Propagated Effects of Small Molecules on Protein–Protein Interaction Networks

    PubMed Central

    Cesa, Laura C.; Mapp, Anna K.; Gestwicki, Jason E.

    2015-01-01

    Networks of protein–protein interactions (PPIs) link all aspects of cellular biology. Dysfunction in the assembly or dynamics of PPI networks is a hallmark of human disease, and as such, there is growing interest in the discovery of small molecules that either promote or inhibit PPIs. PPIs were once considered undruggable because of their relatively large buried surface areas and difficult topologies. Despite these challenges, recent advances in chemical screening methodologies, combined with improvements in structural and computational biology have made some of these targets more tractable. In this review, we highlight developments that have opened the door to potent chemical modulators. We focus on how allostery is being used to produce surprisingly robust changes in PPIs, even for the most challenging targets. We also discuss how interfering with one PPI can propagate changes through the broader web of interactions. Through this analysis, it is becoming clear that a combination of direct and propagated effects on PPI networks is ultimately how small molecules re-shape biology. PMID:26380257

  2. Effects of small-sided game and change-of-direction training on reactive agility and change-of-direction speed.

    PubMed

    Young, Warren; Rogers, Nathan

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of training change-of-direction speed and small-sided games on performance in the Planned-AFL agility test and reactive agility. Twenty-five elite-standard U-18 Australian Rules football players were randomly allocated either to a change-of-direction group or a small-sided games group. Players participated in one or two 15-min sessions per week with 11 sessions conducted over a 7-week period during the season. Tests conducted immediately before and after the training period included the Planned-AFL agility test and a video-based reactive agility test specific to Australian Rules football. The reactive agility test variables were total time, decision time and movement response time. The small-sided games group improved total time (P = 0.008, effect size = 0.93), which was entirely attributable to a very large reduction in decision time (P < 0.001, effect size = 2.32). Small-sided games produced a trivial change in movement response time as well as in the Planned-AFL agility test (P > 0.05). The change-of-direction training produced small to trivial changes in all of the test variables (P > 0.05, effect size = 0-0.2). The results suggest that small-sided games improve agility performance by enhancing the speed of decision-making rather than movement speed. The change-of-direction training was not effective for developing either change-of-direction speed as measured by the Planned-AFL test or reactive agility.

  3. Diminishing high-frequency directivity due to a source effect: Empirical evidence from small earthquakes in the Abruzzo region, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacor, F.; Gallovič, F.; Puglia, R.; Luzi, L.; D'Amico, M.

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the directivity effects of ~250 aftershocks (magnitudes 3-5.5) of the Mw 6.1 2009 L'Aquila earthquake (central Italy). To this end, we estimate the apparent source spectra at each station removing path and site effects inferred by standard Generalized Inversion Technique. Then, we evaluate the residuals between the apparent source spectra and the event mean source spectrum at selected frequencies. We investigate azimuthal and frequency dependence of the residuals for 40 events with the best station coverage. For most of events with the strongest directivity effect (Mw 3.4-4.0), we observe a remarkable decrease of the directivity amplification at high frequencies, which has not yet been documented for such relatively small-magnitude events. Since there is negligible distance dependence, we ascribe this observation to a source phenomenon such as significant small-scale rupture propagation complexity.

  4. Effect of Stepwise Pressure Change on Porosity Evolution during Directional Solidification in Small Cylindrical Channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, R.N.; Lee, C.P.; Cox, M.C.; Blandford, B.T.; Anilkumar, A.V.

    2008-01-01

    Controlled directional solidification experiments were performed in capillary channels, using nitrogen-saturated succinonitrile, to examine the effect of an in-situ stepwise processing pressure increase on an isolated pore evolution. Two experiments were performed using different processing pressure input profiles. The results indicate that a processing pressure increase has a transient effect on pore growth geometry characterized by an initial phase of decreasing pore diameter, followed by a recovery phase of increasing pore diameter. The experimental results also show that processing pressure can be used as a control parameter to either increase or terminate porosity formation. A theoretical model is introduced which indicates that the pore formation process is limited by the diffusion of solute-gas through the melt, and that the observed response toa pressure increase is attributed to the re-equilibration of solute concentration in the melt associated with the increased melt pressure.

  5. Effect of Processing Pressure on Isolated Pore Formation during Controlled Directional Solidification in Small Channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Matthew C.; Anilkumar, Amrutur V.; Grugel, RIchard N.; Lee, Chun P.

    2008-01-01

    Directional solidification experiments were performed, using succinonitrile saturated with nitrogen gas, to examine the effects of in-situ processing pressure changes on the formation growth, and evolution of an isolated, cylindrical gaseous pore. A novel solidification facility, capable of processing thin cylindrical samples (I.D. < 1.0 mm), under controlled pressure conditions, was used for the experiments. A new experimental method for growing the isolated pore from a seed bubble is introduced. The experimental results indicate that an in-situ processing pressure change will result in either a transient change in pore diameter or a complete termination of pore growth, indicating that pressure changes can be used as a control parameter to terminate bubble growth. A simple analytical model has been introduced to explain the experimental observations.

  6. Small-signal modeling with direct parameter extraction for impact ionization effect in high-electron-mobility transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Guan, He; Lv, Hongliang; Guo, Hui Zhang, Yuming

    2015-11-21

    Impact ionization affects the radio-frequency (RF) behavior of high-electron-mobility transistors (HEMTs), which have narrow-bandgap semiconductor channels, and this necessitates complex parameter extraction procedures for HEMT modeling. In this paper, an enhanced small-signal equivalent circuit model is developed to investigate the impact ionization, and an improved method is presented in detail for direct extraction of intrinsic parameters using two-step measurements in low-frequency and high-frequency regimes. The practicability of the enhanced model and the proposed direct parameter extraction method are verified by comparing the simulated S-parameters with published experimental data from an InAs/AlSb HEMT operating over a wide frequency range. The results demonstrate that the enhanced model with optimal intrinsic parameter values that were obtained by the direct extraction approach can effectively characterize the effects of impact ionization on the RF performance of HEMTs.

  7. Direct effect of elevated CO(2) on nocturnal in situ leaf respiration in nine temperate deciduous tree species is small.

    PubMed

    Amthor, Jeffrey S.

    2000-01-01

    Direct (i.e., short-term) effects of elevated CO(2) on nocturnal in situ leaf respiration rate were measured in nine deciduous tree species (seven genera) in 20 3.5-4.0-h experiments. During the experiments, CO(2) concentration was alternated between 400 and 800 ppm (approximately 40 and 80 Pa of CO(2)). Data analysis accounted for effects on respiration rate of the normal decline in temperature with time after sunset. The median response to a 40-Pa increase in CO(2) was a 1.5% decrease in respiration rate, with responses ranging from a 5.6% inhibition to a 0.4% stimulation. Direct effects of elevated CO(2) on respiration were similar among the species. Thus, the response of nocturnal leaf respiration rate to a short-term CO(2) increase was small, and of little practical importance to the accuracy of measurements of respiration involving similar changes in CO(2) concentration during measurement. These direct respiratory responses of leaves to elevated CO(2) would translate into only slight, if any, effects on the carbon balance of temperate deciduous forests in a future atmosphere containing as much as 80 Pa CO(2).

  8. Multidirectional sprints and small-sided games training effect on agility and change of direction abilities in youth soccer.

    PubMed

    Chaouachi, Anis; Chtara, Moktar; Hammami, Raouf; Chtara, Hichem; Turki, Olfa; Castagna, Carlo

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the training effects of a small-sided game (SSG) and multidirectional sprint intervention on agility and change of direction (COD) ability in young male soccer players. Thirty-six soccer players (age: 14.2 ± 0.9 years; height: 167.2 ± 5.7 cm; body mass: 54.1 ± 6.3 kg, body fat: 12.5 ± 2.2%) participated in a short-term (6 weeks) randomized parallel fully controlled training study, with pre-to-post measurements. Players were randomly assigned to 2 experimental groups: training with preplanned COD drills (CODG, n = 12) or using SSGs (SSGG, n = 12) and to a control group (CONG, n = 12). Pre- and post-training players completed a test battery involving linear sprinting (15- and 30-m sprint), COD sprinting (COD: 15 m, ball: 15 m, 10-8-8-10 m, zigzag: 20 m), reactive agility test (RAT, RAT-ball), and vertical and horizontal jumping (countermovement jump and 5-jump, respectively). A significant (p ≤ 0.05) group × time effect was detected for all variables in CODG and SSGG. Improvements in sprint, agility without ball, COD, and jumping performances, were higher in CODG than in the other groups. The SSGG improved significantly more (p ≤ 0.05) than other groups in agility tests with the ball. The CONG showed significant improvements (p ≤ 0.05) on linear sprinting over a distance longer than 10 m and in all the agility and COD tests used in this study. It is concluded that in young male soccer players, agility can be improved either using purpose-built SSG or preplanned COD sprints. However, the use of specifically designed SSG may provide superior results in match-relevant variables.

  9. The direct and indirect effects of a glyphosate-based herbicide and nutrients on Chironomidae (Diptera) emerging from small wetlands.

    PubMed

    Baker, Leanne F; Mudge, Joseph F; Houlahan, Jeff E; Thompson, Dean G; Kidd, Karen A

    2014-09-01

    Laboratory and mesocosm experiments have demonstrated that some glyphosate-based herbicides can have negative effects on benthic invertebrate species. Although these herbicides are among the most widely used in agriculture, there have been few multiple-stressor, natural system-based investigations of the impacts of glyphosate-based herbicides in combination with fertilizers on the emergence patterns of chironomids from wetlands. Using a replicated, split-wetland experiment, the authors examined the effects of 2 nominal concentrations (2.88 mg acid equivalents/L and 0.21 mg acid equivalents/L) of the glyphosate herbicide Roundup WeatherMax, alone or in combination with nutrient additions, on the emergence of Chironomidae (Diptera) before and after herbicide-induced damage to macrophytes. There were no direct effects of treatment on the structure of the Chironomidae community or on the overall emergence rates. However, after macrophyte cover declined as a result of herbicide application, there were statistically significant increases in emergence in all but the highest herbicide treatment, which had also received no nutrients. There was a negative relationship between chironomid abundance and macrophyte cover on the treated sides of wetlands. Fertilizer application did not appear to compound the effects of the herbicide treatments. Although direct toxicity of Roundup WeatherMax was not apparent, the authors observed longer-term impacts, suggesting that the indirect effects of this herbicide deserve more consideration when assessing the ecological risk of using herbicides in proximity to wetlands. PMID:24899169

  10. The direct and indirect effects of a glyphosate-based herbicide and nutrients on Chironomidae (Diptera) emerging from small wetlands.

    PubMed

    Baker, Leanne F; Mudge, Joseph F; Houlahan, Jeff E; Thompson, Dean G; Kidd, Karen A

    2014-09-01

    Laboratory and mesocosm experiments have demonstrated that some glyphosate-based herbicides can have negative effects on benthic invertebrate species. Although these herbicides are among the most widely used in agriculture, there have been few multiple-stressor, natural system-based investigations of the impacts of glyphosate-based herbicides in combination with fertilizers on the emergence patterns of chironomids from wetlands. Using a replicated, split-wetland experiment, the authors examined the effects of 2 nominal concentrations (2.88 mg acid equivalents/L and 0.21 mg acid equivalents/L) of the glyphosate herbicide Roundup WeatherMax, alone or in combination with nutrient additions, on the emergence of Chironomidae (Diptera) before and after herbicide-induced damage to macrophytes. There were no direct effects of treatment on the structure of the Chironomidae community or on the overall emergence rates. However, after macrophyte cover declined as a result of herbicide application, there were statistically significant increases in emergence in all but the highest herbicide treatment, which had also received no nutrients. There was a negative relationship between chironomid abundance and macrophyte cover on the treated sides of wetlands. Fertilizer application did not appear to compound the effects of the herbicide treatments. Although direct toxicity of Roundup WeatherMax was not apparent, the authors observed longer-term impacts, suggesting that the indirect effects of this herbicide deserve more consideration when assessing the ecological risk of using herbicides in proximity to wetlands.

  11. Small Changes in pH Have Direct Effects on Marine Bacterial Community Composition: A Microcosm Approach

    PubMed Central

    Krause, Evamaria; Wichels, Antje; Giménez, Luis; Lunau, Mirko; Schilhabel, Markus B.; Gerdts, Gunnar

    2012-01-01

    As the atmospheric CO2 concentration rises, more CO2 will dissolve in the oceans, leading to a reduction in pH. Effects of ocean acidification on bacterial communities have mainly been studied in biologically complex systems, in which indirect effects, mediated through food web interactions, come into play. These approaches come close to nature but suffer from low replication and neglect seasonality. To comprehensively investigate direct pH effects, we conducted highly-replicated laboratory acidification experiments with the natural bacterial community from Helgoland Roads (North Sea). Seasonal variability was accounted for by repeating the experiment four times (spring, summer, autumn, winter). Three dilution approaches were used to select for different ecological strategies, i.e. fast-growing or low-nutrient adapted bacteria. The pH levels investigated were in situ seawater pH (8.15–8.22), pH 7.82 and pH 7.67, representing the present-day situation and two acidification scenarios projected for the North Sea for the year 2100. In all seasons, both automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis and 16S ribosomal amplicon pyrosequencing revealed pH-dependent community shifts for two of the dilution approaches. Bacteria susceptible to changes in pH were different members of Gammaproteobacteria, Flavobacteriaceae, Rhodobacteraceae, Campylobacteraceae and further less abundant groups. Their specific response to reduced pH was often context-dependent. Bacterial abundance was not influenced by pH. Our findings suggest that already moderate changes in pH have the potential to cause compositional shifts, depending on the community assembly and environmental factors. By identifying pH-susceptible groups, this study provides insights for more directed, in-depth community analyses in large-scale and long-term experiments. PMID:23071704

  12. [Direct and prolonged effect of thyroliberin in ultra small doses on contractility of the white rat mesentery lymphatic vessels].

    PubMed

    Sanzhieva, L Ts; Lelekova, T V; Ashmarin, I P

    2003-01-01

    The prolonged effect of thyroliberin in ULD after single intramuscular injection on contractility of lymphatic vessels directly was investigated. The controlled group of animals received injection of 0.2 ml of physiological solution. The experimental group was injected by 0.2 ml of thyroliberin in concentrations of 10(-10) or 10(-16) mol/l (1 x 10(-4) and 1 x 10(-10) micrograms/kg of the body weight respectively). During the experiment the animals were grouped in the following way: 1) directly after the injection; 2) 3 hours later; 3) on the 1st day and then every day during 2 weeks. Lymphatic vessels reactivity of the experimental animals as well as controlled was studied by application of thyroliberin and noradrenalin (in concentrations of 1 x 10(-16) and 1 x 10(-6) mol/l respectively) directly on mesentery lymphatic vessels. The lymphatic vessels reaction in control group of animals on the noradrenalin and thyroliberin was the same during the period of observation. Thyroliberin stimulated contractility at concentration of 1 x 10(-16) mol/l. The reaction of experimental group was dramatically decreased to 10(-4) mol/l on the 1st and the 3rd day (in the case i.m. injected concentration 1 x 10(-10) mol/l) and to 10(-10) mol/l (in the case of i.m. injected concentration 10(-16) mol/l). The lymphatic vessels reactivity to exogenous thyroliberin gradually established at the 6-7th days till 12th day from the moment of thyroliberin injection. The mechanisms of the action of thyroliberin in ULD are discussed.

  13. Small-sided games versus interval training in amateur soccer players: effects on the aerobic capacity and the ability to perform intermittent exercises with changes of direction.

    PubMed

    Dellal, Alexandre; Varliette, Christophe; Owen, Adam; Chirico, Erica N; Pialoux, Vincent

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of small-sided games (SSGs) in soccer versus high-intensity intermittent training (HIT) on a continuous aerobic test (Vameval) and the performance in an intermittent test with changes of direction (CODs; 30-15 intermittent fitness test [30-15(IFT)]). Twenty-two amateur soccer players (mean age ± SD: 26.3 ± 4.7 years) were assigned to 3 different groups for 6 weeks: SSG group (n = 8), HIT group (n = 8), and control group (CG; n = 6). In addition to the usual technical and tactical sessions and competitive games, the SSG group performed 9 sessions of 2 versus 2 and 1 versus 1 SSGs, whereas the HIT group performed 9 sessions of intermittent runs in the form of 30 seconds of effort interspersed with 30 seconds of passive recovery (30s-30s), 15s-15s, and 10s-10s. The HIT and SSG groups showed performance improvements in the Vameval test (5.1 and 6.6%, respectively) and the 30-15(IFT) intermittent test with CODs (5.1 and 5.8%, respectively), whereas there was no change in the performance of the CG. Players from HIT and SSG groups showed similar increase in their performance in the 30-15(IFT) and the Vameval tests during the 6-week training period, especially with an increase significantly different to that in a traditional training as in the CG (p < 0.05). This investigation demonstrates that both SSG and HIT interventions are equally effective in developing the aerobic capacity and the ability to perform intermittent exercises with CODs in male amateur soccer players. Furthermore, these 2 methods of training applied during the 6 weeks induce similar effect on the recovery capacity and on the ability to repeat directional changes of 180°. Coaches will now be able to choose between these two methods according to the objective of the training and to optimize the training. PMID:22130398

  14. 75 FR 15756 - Small Business Innovation Research Program Policy Directive

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-30

    ... Phase II award threshold amount from $750,000 to $1,000,000 (FR 48004). Congress established the current... (67 FR 6008, Sept. 24, 2002). SBA has determined that to restore the average economic value of the... ADMINISTRATION RIN 3244-AF61 Small Business Innovation Research Program Policy Directive AGENCY: U.S....

  15. Small earth station antenna synthesized by a direct PO method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlobohm, Bernd; Arndt, Fritz

    1990-11-01

    An efficient direct numerical synthesis method for dual offset reflector antennas is described which is based on the physical optics (PO) procedure. The method involves an evolution-strategy optimization algorithm in order to shape both reflectors directly, so as to generate the desired far field with prescribed criteria. The efficiency of the design method is demonstrated by the example of a compact Gregorian dual-offset earth-station antenna with high offset angle (70 deg) and small subreflector size (13 lambda); 75 percent antenna efficiency, 38 dB cross-polarization attenuation, and a very low sidelobe behavior of about 23-25 log theta dBi are achieved.

  16. Using Response-Prompting Procedures during Small-Group Direct Instruction: Outcomes and Procedural Variations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ledford, Jennifer R.; Lane, Justin D.; Elam, Katherine L.; Wolery, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Research was reviewed on small-group instruction for learners with disabilities. The review was conducted for articles published between 1990 and 2010 on the application of small-group direct instruction to teach discrete skills using prompting procedures. A total of 47 articles with 197 participants and 687 replications of effects was located.…

  17. Directional Solidification and Convection in Small Diameter Crucibles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, J.; Sung, P. K.; Tewari, S. N.; Poirier, D. R.; DeGroh, H. C., III

    2003-01-01

    Pb-2.2 wt% Sb alloy was directionally solidified in 1, 2, 3 and 7 mm diameter crucibles. Pb-Sb alloy presents a solutally unstable case. Under plane-front conditions, the resulting macrosegregation along the solidified length indicates that convection persists even in the 1 mm diameter crucible. Al-2 wt% Cu alloy was directionally solidified because this alloy was expected to be stable with respect to convection. Nevertheless, the resulting macrosegregation pattern and the microstructure in solidified examples indicated the presence of convection. Simulations performed for both alloys show that convection persists for crucibles as small as 0.6 mm of diameter. For the solutally stable alloy, Al-2 wt% Cu, the simulations indicate that the convection arises from a lateral temperature gradient.

  18. An Automated Directed Spectral Search Methodology for Small Target Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossman, Stanley I.

    Much of the current efforts in remote sensing tackle macro-level problems such as determining the extent of wheat in a field, the general health of vegetation or the extent of mineral deposits in an area. However, for many of the remaining remote sensing challenges being studied currently, such as border protection, drug smuggling, treaty verification, and the war on terror, most targets are very small in nature - a vehicle or even a person. While in typical macro-level problems the objective vegetation is in the scene, for small target detection problems it is not usually known if the desired small target even exists in the scene, never mind finding it in abundance. The ability to find specific small targets, such as vehicles, typifies this problem. Complicating the analyst's life, the growing number of available sensors is generating mountains of imagery outstripping the analysts' ability to visually peruse them. This work presents the important factors influencing spectral exploitation using multispectral data and suggests a different approach to small target detection. The methodology of directed search is presented, including the use of scene-modeled spectral libraries, various search algorithms, and traditional statistical and ROC curve analysis. The work suggests a new metric to calibrate analysis labeled the analytic sweet spot as well as an estimation method for identifying the sweet spot threshold for an image. It also suggests a new visualization aid for highlighting the target in its entirety called nearest neighbor inflation (NNI). It brings these all together to propose that these additions to the target detection arena allow for the construction of a fully automated target detection scheme. This dissertation next details experiments to support the hypothesis that the optimum detection threshold is the analytic sweet spot and that the estimation method adequately predicts it. Experimental results and analysis are presented for the proposed directed

  19. Observational Learning of Academic and Social Behaviors during Small-Group Direct Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ledford, Jennifer R.; Wolery, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Many studies have shown that small-group direct instruction is effective and efficient for teaching students with and without disabilities, although relatively few studies have been conducted with heterogeneous groups of preschool participants. In addition, previous studies have primarily assessed whether observational learning occurred for…

  20. Direct-reversible binding of small molecules to G protein βγ subunits

    PubMed Central

    Seneviratne, AMPB; Burroughs, Michael; Giralt, Ernest; Smrcka, Alan V.

    2011-01-01

    Heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins) composed of three subunits α, β, γ mediate activation of multiple intracellular signaling cascades initiated by G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Previously our laboratory identified small molecules that bind to Gβγ and interfere with or enhance binding of select effectors with Gβγ. To understand the molecular mechanisms of selectivity and assess binding of compounds to Gβγ, we used biophysical and biochemical approaches to directly monitor small molecule binding to Gβγ. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analysis indicated that multiple compounds bound directly to Gβγ with affinities in the high nanomolar to low micromolar range but with surprisingly slow on and off rate kinetics. While the koff was slow for most of the compounds in physiological buffers, they could be removed from Gβγ with mild chaotropic salts or mildly dissociating collision energy in a mass-spectrometer indicating that compound-Gβγ interactions were non-covalent. Finally, at concentrations used to observe maximal biological effects the stoichiometry of binding was 1:1. The results from this study show that small molecule modulation of Gβγ-effector interactions is by specific direct non-covalent and reversible binding of small molecules to Gβγ. This is highly relevant to development of Gβγ targeting as a therapeutic approach since reversible, direct binding is a prerequisite for drug development and important for specificity. PMID:21621014

  1. Direct oxide reduction demonstration, small-scale studies

    SciTech Connect

    Long, J.L.; Santi, D.J.; Fisher, D.C.; Humiston, T.J.

    1991-12-09

    This project was initiated to provide process design information to the Plutonium Recovery Project (PRP). Although direct oxide reduction (DOR) has been operated in a production mode both at the Rocky Flats Plant (now operated by EG G, Inc.) and Los Alamos National Laboratory, many aspects of the process are ill-defined. Because the PRP plans include significant DOR capability, a well-defined process should minimize capital cost and maximize productivity. Reduced radiation exposure may also be realized. A detailed, statistically valid investigation of the direct oxide reduction process was carried out utilizing 100 grams or less of plutonium dioxide per experiment. Conditions were established for obtaining 95% + yields. Conclusions drawn from the results of the experimental work were utilized to make recommendations for future large-scale investigative and confirmative work as well large-scale production demonstration work. 4 refs., 5 figs., 14 tabs.

  2. Direct oxide reduction demonstration, small-scale studies

    SciTech Connect

    Long, J.L.; Santi, D.J.; Fisher, D.C.; Humiston, T.J.

    1991-12-09

    This project was initiated to provide process design information to the Plutonium Recovery Project (PRP). Although direct oxide reduction (DOR) has been operated in a production mode both at the Rocky Flats Plant (now operated by EG&G, Inc.) and Los Alamos National Laboratory, many aspects of the process are ill-defined. Because the PRP plans include significant DOR capability, a well-defined process should minimize capital cost and maximize productivity. Reduced radiation exposure may also be realized. A detailed, statistically valid investigation of the direct oxide reduction process was carried out utilizing 100 grams or less of plutonium dioxide per experiment. Conditions were established for obtaining 95% + yields. Conclusions drawn from the results of the experimental work were utilized to make recommendations for future large-scale investigative and confirmative work as well large-scale production demonstration work. 4 refs., 5 figs., 14 tabs.

  3. Aptitude-Treatment Interaction Effects of Variations in Direct Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janicki, Terence C.; Peterson, Penelope L.

    1981-01-01

    Two teachers each taught a 2-week fractions unit to two classes of grades 4-5 students. Each teacher taught one class using direct instruction and the other using a small-group variation of direct instruction. Regression analysis on achievement showed significant aptitude-treatment interaction (ATI) and significant teacher effects. (Author/RL)

  4. EFFECTS OF WATERSHED DISTURBANCE ON SMALL STREAMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation presents the effects of watershed disturbance on small streams. The South Fork Broad River Watershed was studied to evaluate the use of landscape indicators to predict pollutant loading at small spatial scales and to develop indicators of pollutants. Also studie...

  5. The effect of a miniature argon flow rate on the spectral characteristics of a direct current atmospheric pressure glow micro-discharge between an argon microjet and a small sized flowing liquid cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamróz, Piotr; Żyrnicki, Wiesław; Pohl, Paweł

    2012-07-01

    A stable direct current atmospheric pressure glow microdischarge (dc-μAPGD) was generated between a miniature Ar flow microjet and a small sized flowing liquid cathode. The microdischarge was operated in the open to air atmosphere. High energy species, including OH, NH, NO, N2, H, O and Ar were identified in the emission spectra of this microdischarge. Additionally, atomic lines of metals dissolved in water solutions were easily excited. The near cathode and the near anode zones of the microdischarge were investigated as a function of an Ar flow rate up to 300 sccm. The spectroscopic parameters, i.e., the excitation, the vibrational and the rotational temperatures as well as the electron number density, were determined in the near cathode and the near anode regions of the microdischarge. In the near cathode region, the rotational temperatures obtained for OH (2000-2600 K) and N2 bands (1600-1950 K) were significantly lower than the excitation temperatures of Ar (7400 K-7800 K) and H (11 000-15 500 K) atoms. Vibrational temperatures of N2, OH and NO varied from 3400 to 4000 K, from 2900 to 3400 K and from 2700 to 3000 K, respectively. In the near anode region, rotational temperatures of OH (350-1750 K) and N2 (400-1350 K) and excitation temperatures of Ar (5200-5500 K) and H (3600-12 600 K) atoms were lower than those measured in the near cathode region. The effect of the introduction of a liquid sample on the microdischarge radiation and spectroscopic parameters was also investigated in the near cathode zone. The electron number density was calculated from the Stark broadening of the Hβ line and equals to (0.25-1.1) × 1015 cm- 3 and (0.68-1.2) × 1015 cm- 3 in the near cathode and the near anode zones, respectively. The intensity of the Na I emission line and the signal to background ratio (SBR) of this line were investigated in both zones to evaluate the excitation properties of the developed excitation microsource. The limit of detection for Na was determined

  6. Biological Effects of Directed Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dayton, Thomas; Beason, Charles; Hitt, M. K.; Rogers, Walter; Cook, Michael

    2002-11-01

    This Final Report summarizes the biological effects research conducted by Veridian Engineering personnel under contract F41624-96-C-9009 in support of the Air Force Research Laboratory's Radio Frequency Radiation Branch from April 1997 to April 2002. Biological effects research and consultation were provided in five major areas: Active Denial System (also known as Vehicle Mounted Active Denial System), radio frequency radiation (RFR) health and safety, non-lethal weapon biological effects research, the newly formed Joint Non-Lethal Weapons Human Effects Center of Excellence, and Biotechnology. The report is organized by research efforts within the major research areas, providing title, objective, a brief description, relevance to the AF or DoD, funding, and products.

  7. Note: Direct piezoelectric effect microscopy.

    PubMed

    Mori, T J A; Stamenov, P; Dorneles, L S

    2015-07-01

    An alternative method for investigating piezoelectric surfaces is suggested, exploiting the direct piezoeffect. The technique relies on acoustic (ultrasonic) excitation of the imaged surface and mapping of the resulting oscillatory electric potential. The main advantages arise from the spatial resolution of the conductive scanning probe microscopy in combination with the relatively large magnitude of the forward piezo signal Upf, which can be of the order of tens of mV even for non-ferroelectric piezoelectric materials. The potency of this experimental strategy is illustrated with measurements on well-crystallized quartz surfaces, where Upf ∼ 50 mV, for a piezoelectric coefficient of d33 = - 2.27  ×  10(-12) m/V, and applied stress of about T3 ∼ 5.7 kPa.

  8. Catheter-Directed Thrombolysis via Small Saphenous Veins for Treating Acute Deep Venous Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bin; Xu, Xiao-dong; Gao, Peng; Yu, Ji-Xiang; Li, Yu; Zhu, Ai-Dong; Meng, Ran-ran

    2016-01-01

    Background There is little data comparing catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT) via small saphenous veins vs. systematic thrombolysis on complications and efficacy in acute deep venous thrombosis patients. The aim of our study was to compare the efficacy and safety of CDT via the small saphenous veins with systematic thrombolysis for patients with acute deep venous thrombosis (DVT). Material/Methods Sixty-six patients with acute DVT admitted from June 2012 to December 2013 were divided into 2 groups: 27 patients received systemic thrombolysis (ST group) and 39 patients received CDT via the small saphenous veins (CDT group). The thrombolysis efficiency, limb circumference differences, and complications such as post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS) in the 2 groups were recorded. Results The angiograms demonstrated that all or part of the fresh thrombus was dissolved. There was a significant difference regarding thrombolysis efficiency between the CDT group and ST group (71.26% vs. 48.26%, P=0.001). In both groups the postoperative limb circumference changes were higher compared to the preoperative values. The differences between postoperative limb circumferences on postoperative days 7 and 14 were significantly higher in the CDT group than in the ST group (all P<0.05). The incidence of postoperative PTS in the CDT group (17.9%) was significantly lower in comparison to the ST group (51.85%) during the follow-up (P=0.007). Conclusions Catheter-directed thrombolysis via the small saphenous veins is an effective, safe, and feasible approach for treating acute deep venous thrombosis. PMID:27552357

  9. Catheter-Directed Thrombolysis via Small Saphenous Veins for Treating Acute Deep Venous Thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bin; Xu, Xiao-Dong; Gao, Peng; Yu, Ji-Xiang; Li, Yu; Zhu, Ai-Dong; Meng, Ran-Ran

    2016-08-23

    BACKGROUND There is little data comparing catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT) via small saphenous veins vs. systematic thrombolysis on complications and efficacy in acute deep venous thrombosis patients. The aim of our study was to compare the efficacy and safety of CDT via the small saphenous veins with systematic thrombolysis for patients with acute deep venous thrombosis (DVT). MATERIAL AND METHODS Sixty-six patients with acute DVT admitted from June 2012 to December 2013 were divided into 2 groups: 27 patients received systemic thrombolysis (ST group) and 39 patients received CDT via the small saphenous veins (CDT group). The thrombolysis efficiency, limb circumference differences, and complications such as post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS) in the 2 groups were recorded. RESULTS The angiograms demonstrated that all or part of the fresh thrombus was dissolved. There was a significant difference regarding thrombolysis efficiency between the CDT group and ST group (71.26% vs. 48.26%, P=0.001). In both groups the postoperative limb circumference changes were higher compared to the preoperative values. The differences between postoperative limb circumferences on postoperative days 7 and 14 were significantly higher in the CDT group than in the ST group (all P<0.05). The incidence of postoperative PTS in the CDT group (17.9%) was significantly lower in comparison to the ST group (51.85%) during the follow-up (P=0.007). CONCLUSIONS Catheter-directed thrombolysis via the small saphenous veins is an effective, safe, and feasible approach for treating acute deep venous thrombosis.

  10. Process Evaluation Results from the Healthy Directions-Small Business Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Mary K.; Barbeau, Elizabeth M.; Lederman, Ruth; Stoddard, Anne M.; Chetkovich, Carol; Goldman, Roberta; Wallace, Lorraine; Sorensen, Glorian

    2007-01-01

    The Healthy Directions-Small Business randomized, controlled study aimed to reduce cancer risk among multiethnic workers in small manufacturing businesses by increasing fruit and vegetable consumption, physical activity, and daily multivitamin in take and decreasing consumption of red meat. The intervention incorporated participatory strategies…

  11. Direct Instruction News: Effective School Practices, 2003.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarver, Sara G., Ed.

    2003-01-01

    The mission of the Association for Direct Instruction is to promote the improvement of effective educational methods. This journal, "Direct Instruction News," is their publication. The Spring 2003 (Volume 3, Number 1) contains the following articles: "Implementing DI Successfully" (Sara G. Tarver); "Textbooks: What?" (Bob Dixon); "Introduction to…

  12. Effects of roads on small mammals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Adams, L.W.; Geis, A.D.

    1983-01-01

    (1) The study was designed to determine the effects of roads on the diversity, spatial distribution, and density of small mammals. (2) Forty species of small mammal (5859 individuals) were snap-trapped in the study. Data resulted from 144 360 trap-nights of effort for an average of 4.06 captures per 100 trap-nights. (3) Small mammal community structure and density were both influenced by roads. Community structure in right-of-way (ROW) habitat was different from that in adjacent habitat. Five species did not prefer ROW habitat: the golden mouse, dusky-footed woodrat, brush mouse, pinon mouse, and California red-backed vole. However, there were more species present in ROW habitat than in adjacent habitat. Grassland species generally preferred ROW habitat and many less habitat-specific species were distributed in ROW and adjacent habitat. (4) Small mammal density (all species combined) was greater in interstate ROW habitat than in adjacent habitat. This was also true individually for the eastern harvest mouse, white-footed mouse, meadow vole, prairie vole, vagrant shrew. Townsend's vole, and California vole. Small mammal density was less in county road ROWs than in adjacent habitat, probably because of the small size of these areas. The data indicate that ROW habitat and its accompanying edge are attractive no: only to grassland species but also to many less habitat-specific species that make use of the ROW-edge-adjacent habitat complex. (5) Mortality on interstate highways was greatest for those species with highest densities in ROW habitat, and did not appear to be detrimental to populations of these species.

  13. Power generation performance of direct flame fuel cell (DFFC) impinged by small jet flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Yuji; Endo, Shota

    2015-10-01

    This paper investigated the effect of cell temperature and product species concentration induced by a small jet flame on the power generation performance of a direct flame fuel cell (DFFC). The cell is placed above the small-scale jet flame and the heated product’s gases are impinged toward it. This system is considered to be the simplest and smallest unit of such power generation devices to have been developed. Methane is used as fuel and an equivalence ratio (φ ) of the mixture (with oxygen) and the distance between the cell and the burner surface (d) are considered as the experimental parameters. It turns out that open circuit voltage increases linearly with the increase of temperature in a wide range of equivalence ratios. However, it increases drastically to the point at which the equivalence ratio becomes small enough (φ   ⩽  2.0 in the present study) within the specific distance range to bring about the appearance of an inner flame. This could provide sufficient heat and oxygen for the anode, contributing to the generation of the cell’s high electric potential. It is also noted that the appearance of the inner flame does not promise to better the performance unless the preferred conditions (high temperature, low oxygen, rich fuel) near the cell are achieved. The Nernst equation works well for predicting the open circuit voltage under the conditions studied. Systematic design of the entire power generation system is preferable when a miniaturized power generation system is considered by applying DFFC.

  14. Potts model on directed small-world Voronoi-Delaunay lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, R. M.; Lima, F. W. S.; Costa Filho, Raimundo N.

    2016-06-01

    The critical properties of the Potts model with q = 3 and 4 states in two-dimensions on directed small-world Voronoi-Delaunay random lattices with quenched connectivity disorder are investigated. This disordered system is simulated by applying the Monte Carlo update heat bath algorithm. The Potts model on these directed small-world random lattices presents in fact a second-order phase transition with new critical exponents for q = 3 and value of the rewiring probability p = 0.01, but for q = 4 the system exhibits only a first-order phase transition independent of p (0 < p < 1).

  15. Assessing directional effects in spatial data.

    PubMed

    Oden, N L

    1993-10-01

    A variable is measured at two locations separated by a given distance. Are the values more similar to each other if the locations are oriented in one direction than another? This question has application to studies of human genetics, epidemics, and acid rain. One obvious analytic approach, regression on latitude and longitude, fails when data are non-directional (isotropic) but spatially autocorrelated. Moreover, although non-zero slope implies similarity between neighbours, the converse is not true. IDIFF, a statistic derived from Moran's coefficient of spatial autocorrelation, is developed to detect general directional effects that apply to the collection of data points. Simulations suggest that, when data have isotropic spatial autocorrelation but are incorrectly assumed to be independent, IDIFF will at worst reject too little. IDIFF has good power to distinguish epidemics that spread non-directionally from those that spread in a favoured direction.

  16. Nonequilibrium phase transition in directed small-world-Voronoi-Delaunay random lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, F. W. S.

    2016-01-01

    On directed small-world-Voronoi-Delaunay random lattices in two dimensions with quenched connectivity disorder we study the critical properties of the dynamics evolution of public opinion in social influence networks using a simple spin-like model. The system is treated by applying Monte Carlo simulations. We show that directed links on these random lattices may lead to phase diagram with first- and second-order social phase transitions out of equilibrium.

  17. The Effect on the Sperry Directional Gyro in Turning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    RosselliDelTurco, Rossello

    1946-01-01

    The present report is concerned with an analytical treatment of the effects of the transverse inclination of an airplane in a turn on the indication of the directional gyro. It is found that the extreme inclinations which the airplane must necessarily assume for a correct turn in the approaches executed at high speed and small radius of curvature, renders the indications of the instrument worthless during such maneuvers.

  18. A Small Modular Laboratory Hall Effect Thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ty Davis

    Electric propulsion technologies promise to revolutionize access to space, opening the door for mission concepts unfeasible by traditional propulsion methods alone. The Hall effect thruster is a relatively high thrust, moderate specific impulse electric propulsion device that belongs to the class of electrostatic thrusters. Hall effect thrusters benefit from an extensive flight history, and offer significant performance and cost advantages when compared to other forms of electric propulsion. Ongoing research on these devices includes the investigation of mechanisms that tend to decrease overall thruster efficiency, as well as the development of new techniques to extend operational lifetimes. This thesis is primarily concerned with the design and construction of a Small Modular Laboratory Hall Effect Thruster (SMLHET), and its operation on argon propellant gas. Particular attention was addressed at low-cost, modular design principles, that would facilitate simple replacement and modification of key thruster parts such as the magnetic circuit and discharge channel. This capability is intended to facilitate future studies of device physics such as anomalous electron transport and magnetic shielding of the channel walls, that have an impact on thruster performance and life. Preliminary results demonstrate SMLHET running on argon in a manner characteristic of Hall effect thrusters, additionally a power balance method was utilized to estimate thruster performance. It is expected that future thruster studies utilizing heavier though more expensive gases like xenon or krypton, will observe increased efficiency and stability.

  19. Direct Torque Control of a Small Wind Turbine with a Sliding-Mode Speed Controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sri Lal Senanayaka, Jagath; Karimi, Hamid Reza; Robbersmyr, Kjell G.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper. the method of direct torque control in the presence of a sliding-mode speed controller is proposed for a small wind turbine being used in water heating applications. This concept and control system design can be expanded to grid connected or off-grid applications. Direct torque control of electrical machines has shown several advantages including very fast dynamics torque control over field-oriented control. Moreover. the torque and flux controllers in the direct torque control algorithms are based on hvsteretic controllers which are nonlinear. In the presence of a sliding-mode speed control. a nonlinear control system can be constructed which is matched for AC/DC conversion of the converter that gives fast responses with low overshoots. The main control objectives of the proposed small wind turbine can be maximum power point tracking and soft-stall power control. This small wind turbine consists of permanent magnet synchronous generator and external wind speed. and rotor speed measurements are not required for the system. However. a sensor is needed to detect the rated wind speed overpass events to activate proper speed references for the wind turbine. Based on the low-cost design requirement of small wind turbines. an available wind speed sensor can be modified. or a new sensor can be designed to get the required measurement. The simulation results will be provided to illustrate the excellent performance of the closed-loop control system in entire wind speed range (4-25 m/s).

  20. A complex task? Direct modulation of transcription factors with small molecules

    PubMed Central

    Koehler, Angela N.

    2010-01-01

    Transcription factors with aberrant activity in disease are promising yet untested targets for therapeutic development, particularly in oncology. Directly inhibiting or activating the function of a transcription factor requires specific disruption or recruitment of protein-protein or protein-DNA interactions. The discovery or design of small molecules that specifically modulate these interactions has thus far proven to be a significant challenge and the protein class is often perceived to be ‘undruggable.’ This review will summarize recent progress in the development of small-molecule probes of transcription factors and provide evidence to challenge the notion that this important protein class is chemically intractable. PMID:20395165

  1. Analytical fuel property effects--small combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, R. D.; Troth, D. L.; Miles, G. A.

    1984-01-01

    The consequences of using broad-property fuels in both conventional and advanced state-of-the-art small gas turbine combustors are assessed. Eight combustor concepts were selected for initial screening, of these, four final combustor concepts were chosen for further detailed analysis. These included the dual orifice injector baseline combustor (a current production 250-C30 engine combustor) two baseline airblast injected modifications, short and piloted prechamber combustors, and an advanced airblast injected, variable geometry air staged combustor. Final predictions employed the use of the STAC-I computer code. This quasi 2-D model includes real fuel properties, effects of injector type on atomization, detailed droplet dynamics, and multistep chemical kinetics. In general, fuel property effects on various combustor concepts can be classified as chemical or physical in nature. Predictions indicate that fuel chemistry has a significant effect on flame radiation, liner wall temperature, and smoke emission. Fuel physical properties that govern atomization quality and evaporation rates are predicted to affect ignition and lean-blowout limits, combustion efficiency, unburned hydrocarbon, and carbon monoxide emissions.

  2. Direct Observation Of Nanoparticle-Surfactant Interactions Using Small Angle Neutron Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sugam; Aswal, V. K.

    2010-12-01

    Interactions of anionic silica nanoparticles with anionic, cationic and nonionic surfactants have directly been studied by contrast variation small angle neutron scattering (SANS). The measurements are performed on 1 wt% of both silica nanoparticles and surfactants of anionic sodium dodecyle sulphate (SDS), cationic dodecyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (DTAB) and non-ionic polyoxyethylene 10 lauryl ether (C12E10) in aqueous solution. We show that there is no direct interaction in the case of SDS with silica particles, whereas strong interaction for DTAB leads to the aggregation of silica particles. The interaction of C12E10 is found through the micelles adsorbed on the silica particles.

  3. Cost effective data acquisition for small developments

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.D.

    1987-01-01

    A cost effective method for obtaining reservoir fata to define the depletion mechanism in the small Odin gas field is described. The addition of a simple work program to the drilling plan for the first development well provided basic reservoir and aquifer data, and the well completion scheme provided for continuing reservoir surveillance. Cost effective methods for reservoir data acquisition are particularly relevant for marginal developments. This discussion should be of interest for operators of gas fields where the depletion mechanism is not defined, and where early acquisition of additional data can provide an indication of the mechanism. A brief development history of Odin field illustrates the need for good reservoir data. Initially there was some uncertainty surrounding the amount of bottom water influx into the Odin gas sand and the resulting reservoir depletion mechanism. Conclusions about the expected type of reservoir depletion mechanism were drawn from data including conventional cores analysis, measured pressure gradients, fluid saturation logs, and production well tests. Production history is shown which confirms the conclusions made from the initial data acquisition.

  4. Direct Oral Anticoagulants: Monitoring Anticoagulant Effect.

    PubMed

    Konkle, Barbara A

    2016-10-01

    In some clinical settings laboratory measurement of direct oral anticoagulants effect is helpful in guiding medical care, such as life-threatening bleeding, need for emergency surgery, renal impairment, severe hepatic failure, extremes of body weight, or in patients with bleeding or thrombosis on therapy. This article reviews approaches to laboratory testing to assess the anticoagulant effect of these drugs. Because of the wide variation in levels measured in patients on therapy and minimal clinical data from dose adjustment, dose adjustment based on levels is not currently advised. In addition, these drugs interfere with many clot-based laboratory tests and caution is advised in interpreting these tests in patients on direct oral anticoagulants. PMID:27637303

  5. Bayesian Estimation of Small Effects in Exercise and Sports Science.

    PubMed

    Mengersen, Kerrie L; Drovandi, Christopher C; Robert, Christian P; Pyne, David B; Gore, Christopher J

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to provide a Bayesian formulation of the so-called magnitude-based inference approach to quantifying and interpreting effects, and in a case study example provide accurate probabilistic statements that correspond to the intended magnitude-based inferences. The model is described in the context of a published small-scale athlete study which employed a magnitude-based inference approach to compare the effect of two altitude training regimens (live high-train low (LHTL), and intermittent hypoxic exposure (IHE)) on running performance and blood measurements of elite triathletes. The posterior distributions, and corresponding point and interval estimates, for the parameters and associated effects and comparisons of interest, were estimated using Markov chain Monte Carlo simulations. The Bayesian analysis was shown to provide more direct probabilistic comparisons of treatments and able to identify small effects of interest. The approach avoided asymptotic assumptions and overcame issues such as multiple testing. Bayesian analysis of unscaled effects showed a probability of 0.96 that LHTL yields a substantially greater increase in hemoglobin mass than IHE, a 0.93 probability of a substantially greater improvement in running economy and a greater than 0.96 probability that both IHE and LHTL yield a substantially greater improvement in maximum blood lactate concentration compared to a Placebo. The conclusions are consistent with those obtained using a 'magnitude-based inference' approach that has been promoted in the field. The paper demonstrates that a fully Bayesian analysis is a simple and effective way of analysing small effects, providing a rich set of results that are straightforward to interpret in terms of probabilistic statements. PMID:27073897

  6. Bayesian Estimation of Small Effects in Exercise and Sports Science.

    PubMed

    Mengersen, Kerrie L; Drovandi, Christopher C; Robert, Christian P; Pyne, David B; Gore, Christopher J

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to provide a Bayesian formulation of the so-called magnitude-based inference approach to quantifying and interpreting effects, and in a case study example provide accurate probabilistic statements that correspond to the intended magnitude-based inferences. The model is described in the context of a published small-scale athlete study which employed a magnitude-based inference approach to compare the effect of two altitude training regimens (live high-train low (LHTL), and intermittent hypoxic exposure (IHE)) on running performance and blood measurements of elite triathletes. The posterior distributions, and corresponding point and interval estimates, for the parameters and associated effects and comparisons of interest, were estimated using Markov chain Monte Carlo simulations. The Bayesian analysis was shown to provide more direct probabilistic comparisons of treatments and able to identify small effects of interest. The approach avoided asymptotic assumptions and overcame issues such as multiple testing. Bayesian analysis of unscaled effects showed a probability of 0.96 that LHTL yields a substantially greater increase in hemoglobin mass than IHE, a 0.93 probability of a substantially greater improvement in running economy and a greater than 0.96 probability that both IHE and LHTL yield a substantially greater improvement in maximum blood lactate concentration compared to a Placebo. The conclusions are consistent with those obtained using a 'magnitude-based inference' approach that has been promoted in the field. The paper demonstrates that a fully Bayesian analysis is a simple and effective way of analysing small effects, providing a rich set of results that are straightforward to interpret in terms of probabilistic statements.

  7. Bayesian Estimation of Small Effects in Exercise and Sports Science

    PubMed Central

    Mengersen, Kerrie L.; Drovandi, Christopher C.; Robert, Christian P.; Pyne, David B.; Gore, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to provide a Bayesian formulation of the so-called magnitude-based inference approach to quantifying and interpreting effects, and in a case study example provide accurate probabilistic statements that correspond to the intended magnitude-based inferences. The model is described in the context of a published small-scale athlete study which employed a magnitude-based inference approach to compare the effect of two altitude training regimens (live high-train low (LHTL), and intermittent hypoxic exposure (IHE)) on running performance and blood measurements of elite triathletes. The posterior distributions, and corresponding point and interval estimates, for the parameters and associated effects and comparisons of interest, were estimated using Markov chain Monte Carlo simulations. The Bayesian analysis was shown to provide more direct probabilistic comparisons of treatments and able to identify small effects of interest. The approach avoided asymptotic assumptions and overcame issues such as multiple testing. Bayesian analysis of unscaled effects showed a probability of 0.96 that LHTL yields a substantially greater increase in hemoglobin mass than IHE, a 0.93 probability of a substantially greater improvement in running economy and a greater than 0.96 probability that both IHE and LHTL yield a substantially greater improvement in maximum blood lactate concentration compared to a Placebo. The conclusions are consistent with those obtained using a ‘magnitude-based inference’ approach that has been promoted in the field. The paper demonstrates that a fully Bayesian analysis is a simple and effective way of analysing small effects, providing a rich set of results that are straightforward to interpret in terms of probabilistic statements. PMID:27073897

  8. Small molecule–driven direct conversion of human pluripotent stem cells into functional osteoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Heemin; Shih, Yu-Ru V.; Nakasaki, Manando; Kabra, Harsha; Varghese, Shyni

    2016-01-01

    The abilities of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) to proliferate without phenotypic alteration and to differentiate into tissue-specific progeny make them a promising cell source for regenerative medicine and development of physiologically relevant in vitro platforms. Despite this potential, efficient conversion of hPSCs into tissue-specific cells still remains a challenge. Herein, we report direct conversion of hPSCs into functional osteoblasts through the use of adenosine, a naturally occurring nucleoside in the human body. The hPSCs treated with adenosine not only expressed the molecular signatures of osteoblasts but also produced calcified bone matrix. Our findings show that the adenosine-mediated osteogenesis of hPSCs involved the adenosine A2bR. When implanted in vivo, using macroporous synthetic matrices, the human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC)–derived donor cells participated in the repair of critical-sized bone defects through the formation of neobone tissue without teratoma formation. The newly formed bone tissues exhibited various attributes of the native tissue, including vascularization and bone resorption. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of adenosine-induced differentiation of hPSCs into functional osteoblasts and their subsequent use to regenerate bone tissues in vivo. This approach that uses a physiologically relevant single small molecule to generate hPSC-derived progenitor cells is highly appealing because of its simplicity, cost-effectiveness, scalability, and impact in cell manufacturing, all of which are decisive factors for successful translational applications of hPSCs. PMID:27602403

  9. Small molecule-driven direct conversion of human pluripotent stem cells into functional osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Kang, Heemin; Shih, Yu-Ru V; Nakasaki, Manando; Kabra, Harsha; Varghese, Shyni

    2016-08-01

    The abilities of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) to proliferate without phenotypic alteration and to differentiate into tissue-specific progeny make them a promising cell source for regenerative medicine and development of physiologically relevant in vitro platforms. Despite this potential, efficient conversion of hPSCs into tissue-specific cells still remains a challenge. Herein, we report direct conversion of hPSCs into functional osteoblasts through the use of adenosine, a naturally occurring nucleoside in the human body. The hPSCs treated with adenosine not only expressed the molecular signatures of osteoblasts but also produced calcified bone matrix. Our findings show that the adenosine-mediated osteogenesis of hPSCs involved the adenosine A2bR. When implanted in vivo, using macroporous synthetic matrices, the human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC)-derived donor cells participated in the repair of critical-sized bone defects through the formation of neobone tissue without teratoma formation. The newly formed bone tissues exhibited various attributes of the native tissue, including vascularization and bone resorption. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of adenosine-induced differentiation of hPSCs into functional osteoblasts and their subsequent use to regenerate bone tissues in vivo. This approach that uses a physiologically relevant single small molecule to generate hPSC-derived progenitor cells is highly appealing because of its simplicity, cost-effectiveness, scalability, and impact in cell manufacturing, all of which are decisive factors for successful translational applications of hPSCs. PMID:27602403

  10. Small molecule–driven direct conversion of human pluripotent stem cells into functional osteoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Heemin; Shih, Yu-Ru V.; Nakasaki, Manando; Kabra, Harsha; Varghese, Shyni

    2016-01-01

    The abilities of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) to proliferate without phenotypic alteration and to differentiate into tissue-specific progeny make them a promising cell source for regenerative medicine and development of physiologically relevant in vitro platforms. Despite this potential, efficient conversion of hPSCs into tissue-specific cells still remains a challenge. Herein, we report direct conversion of hPSCs into functional osteoblasts through the use of adenosine, a naturally occurring nucleoside in the human body. The hPSCs treated with adenosine not only expressed the molecular signatures of osteoblasts but also produced calcified bone matrix. Our findings show that the adenosine-mediated osteogenesis of hPSCs involved the adenosine A2bR. When implanted in vivo, using macroporous synthetic matrices, the human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC)–derived donor cells participated in the repair of critical-sized bone defects through the formation of neobone tissue without teratoma formation. The newly formed bone tissues exhibited various attributes of the native tissue, including vascularization and bone resorption. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of adenosine-induced differentiation of hPSCs into functional osteoblasts and their subsequent use to regenerate bone tissues in vivo. This approach that uses a physiologically relevant single small molecule to generate hPSC-derived progenitor cells is highly appealing because of its simplicity, cost-effectiveness, scalability, and impact in cell manufacturing, all of which are decisive factors for successful translational applications of hPSCs.

  11. Effect of small scale motions on dynamo actions generated by the Beltrami-like flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Mingtian

    2016-08-01

    The geodynamo and solar dynamo are driven by the turbulent flows which involve motions of various scales. Of particular interest is what role is played by the small scale motions in these dynamos. In this paper, the integral equation approach is employed to investigate the effect of the small scale motions on dynamo actions driven by multiscale Beltrami-like flows in a cylindrical vessel. The result shows that some small scale motions can trigger a transition of a dynamo from a steady to an unsteady state. Our results also show that when the poloidal components of the small and large scale flows share the same direction in the equatorial plane, the small scale flows have more positive or less detrimental effect on the onsets of the dynamo actions in comparison with the case that the poloidal components have different directions. These findings shed light on the effect of the small scale turbulence on dynamo actions.

  12. Efficient Isothermal Titration Calorimetry Technique Identifies Direct Interaction of Small Molecule Inhibitors with the Target Protein.

    PubMed

    Gal, Maayan; Bloch, Itai; Shechter, Nelia; Romanenko, Olga; Shir, Ofer M

    2016-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPI) play a critical role in regulating many cellular processes. Finding novel PPI inhibitors that interfere with specific binding of two proteins is considered a great challenge, mainly due to the complexity involved in characterizing multi-molecular systems and limited understanding of the physical principles governing PPIs. Here we show that the combination of virtual screening techniques, which are capable of filtering a large library of potential small molecule inhibitors, and a unique secondary screening by isothermal titration calorimetry, a label-free method capable of observing direct interactions, is an efficient tool for finding such an inhibitor. In this study we applied this strategy in a search for a small molecule capable of interfering with the interaction of the tumor-suppressor p53 and the E3-ligase MDM2. We virtually screened a library of 15 million small molecules that were filtered to a final set of 80 virtual hits. Our in vitro experimental assay, designed to validate the activity of mixtures of compounds by isothermal titration calorimetry, was used to identify an active molecule against MDM2. At the end of the process the small molecule (4S,7R)-4-(4-chlorophenyl)-5-hydroxy-2,7-dimethyl-N-(6-methylpyridin-2-yl)-4,6,7,8 tetrahydrIoquinoline-3-carboxamide was found to bind MDM2 with a dissociation constant of ~2 µM. Following the identification of this single bioactive compound, spectroscopic measurements were used to further characterize the interaction of the small molecule with the target protein. 2D NMR spectroscopy was used to map the binding region of the small molecule, and fluorescence polarization measurement confirmed that it indeed competes with p53.

  13. Optical effects associated with small particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barber, Peter W.; Chang, Richard K.

    Recent experimental and theoretical investigations of the interaction of light with small particles such as aerosols and hydrosols are discussed in a collection of review essays. Topics addressed include morphology-dependent resonances, spectroscopy of single levitated micron-sized particles, absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy of aerosols, laser-induced droplet heating, and the applicability of bulk optical constants to small particles. Diagrams, drawings, graphs, and spectra from typical measurements are provided.

  14. Evolution of Small Binary Asteroids with the Binary YORP Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frouard, Julien

    2013-05-01

    Abstract (2,250 Maximum Characters): Small, Near-Earth binaries are believed to be created following the fission of an asteroid spun up by the YORP effect. It is then believed that the YORP effect acting on the secondary (Binary YORP) increases or decreases the binary mutual distance on 10^5 yr timescales. How long this mechanism can apply is not yet fully understood. We investigate the binary orbital and rotational dynamics by using non-averaged, direct numerical simulations, taking into account the relative motion of two ellipsoids (primary and secondary) and the solar perturbation. We add the YORP force and torque on the orbital and rotational motion of the secondary. As a check of our code we obtain a ~ 7.2 cm/yr drift in semi-major axis for 1999 KW4 beta, consistent with the values obtained with former analytical studies. The synchronous rotation of the secondary is required for the Binary YORP to be effective. We investigate the synchronous lock of the secondary in function of different parameters ; mutual distance, shape of the secondary, and heliocentric orbit. For example we show that the secondary of 1999 KW4 can be synchronous only up to 7 Rp (primary radius), where the resonance becomes completely chaotic even for very small eccentricities. We use Gaussian Random Spheres to obtain various secondary shapes, and check the evolution of the binaries with the Binary YORP effect.

  15. Rotational effect in two-dimensional cooperative directed transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Li-Yan; Li, Yun-yun; Zheng, Zhi-Gang

    2015-02-01

    In this review we investigate the rotation effect in the motion of coupled dimer in a two-dimensional asymmetric periodic potential. Free rotation does not generate directed transport in translational direction, while we find it plays an critical role in the motors motility when the dimer moves under the effect of asymmetry ratchet potential. In the presence of external force, we study the relation between the average current and the force numerically and theoretically. The numerical results show that only appropriate driving force could produce nonzero current and there are current transitions when the force is large enough. An analysis of stability analysis of limit cycles is applied to explain the occurrence of these transitions. Moreover, we numerically simulate the transport of this coupled dimer driven by the random fluctuations in the rotational direction. The existence of noise smooths the current transitions induced by the driving force and the resonance-like peaks which depend on the rod length emerge in small noise strength. Thanks to the noise in the rotational direction, autonomous motion emerges without the external force and large noise could make the current reversal happen. Eventually, the new mechanism to generate directed transport by the rotation is studied.

  16. Effects of tillage practices and carbofuran exposure on small mammals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Albers, P.H.; Linder, G.; Nichols, J.D.

    1990-01-01

    We compared population estimates, body mass, movement, and blood chemistry of small mammals between conventionally tilled and no-till cornfields in Maryland and Pennsylvania to evaluate the effects of tillage practices and carbofuran exposure on small mammals.

  17. Development of a Direct Drive Permanent Magnet Generator for Small Wind Turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Chertok, Allan; Hablanian, David; McTaggart, Paul; DOE Project Officer - Keith Bennett

    2004-11-16

    In this program, TIAX performed the conceptual design and analysis of an innovative, modular, direct-drive permanent magnet generator (PMG) for use in small wind turbines that range in power rating from 25 kW to 100 kW. TIAX adapted an approach that has been successfully demonstrated in high volume consumer products such as direct-drive washing machines and portable generators. An electromagnetic model was created and the modular PMG design was compared to an illustrative non-modular design. The resulting projections show that the modular design can achieve significant reductions in size, weight, and manufacturing cost without compromising efficiency. Reducing generator size and weight can also lower the size and weight of other wind turbine components and hence their manufacturing cost.

  18. Synchronization transition of identical phase oscillators in a directed small-world network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tönjes, Ralf; Masuda, Naoki; Kori, Hiroshi

    2010-09-01

    We numerically study a directed small-world network consisting of attractively coupled, identical phase oscillators. While complete synchronization is always stable, it is not always reachable from random initial conditions. Depending on the shortcut density and on the asymmetry of the phase coupling function, there exists a regime of persistent chaotic dynamics. By increasing the density of shortcuts or decreasing the asymmetry of the phase coupling function, we observe a discontinuous transition in the ability of the system to synchronize. Using a control technique, we identify the bifurcation scenario of the order parameter. We also discuss the relation between dynamics and topology and remark on the similarity of the synchronization transition to directed percolation.

  19. The average direct current offset values for small digital audio recorders in an acoustically consistent environment.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Bruce E; Lacey, Douglas S

    2014-07-01

    In this research project, nine small digital audio recorders were tested using five sets of 30-min recordings at all available recording modes, with consistent audio material, identical source and microphone locations, and identical acoustic environments. The averaged direct current (DC) offset values and standard deviations were measured for 30-sec and 1-, 2-, 3-, 6-, 10-, 15-, and 30-min segments. The research found an inverse association between segment lengths and the standard deviation values and that lengths beyond 30 min may not meaningfully reduce the standard deviation values. This research supports previous studies indicating that measured averaged DC offsets should only be used for exclusionary purposes in authenticity analyses and exhibit consistent values when the general acoustic environment and microphone/recorder configurations were held constant. Measured average DC offset values from exemplar recorders may not be directly comparable to those of submitted digital audio recordings without exactly duplicating the acoustic environment and microphone/recorder configurations. PMID:24502252

  20. Direct Actuation of Small-Scale Motions for Enhanced Heat Transfer in a Straight Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidalgo, Pablo; Glezer, Ari

    2010-11-01

    Heat transfer enhancement by small-scale flow interactions that are induced within the core flow of a heated, high-aspect ratio straight channel are investigated experimentally. Direct actuation of small scale motions is provided by streamwise-embedded piezoelectrically-driven cantilevered reeds that span the entire channel height. Deliberate interactions between the reeds and a given core flow lead to the formation of time-periodic vorticity concentrations over a range of vibration frequencies that are advected with the core flow and induce small-scale motions near the channel's surfaces. Heat transfer measurements are obtained using novel, microfabricated heaters with integrated temperature sensors that are deposited on a silicon substrate. It is shown that the actuation disrupts the thermal boundary layers and result in a significant enhancement of the local and global heat transfer along the channel compared to the baseline (unactuated) flow. The interactions between the reed-induced motions and the channel internal surfaces and mixing within the core flow are investigated in detail using high resolution particle image velocimetry (PIV) with emphasis on local and global heat transfer across the channel boundaries.

  1. Pulsed Direct Current Electrospray: Enabling Systematic Analysis of Small Volume Sample by Boosting Sample Economy.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zhenwei; Xiong, Xingchuang; Guo, Chengan; Si, Xingyu; Zhao, Yaoyao; He, Muyi; Yang, Chengdui; Xu, Wei; Tang, Fei; Fang, Xiang; Zhang, Sichun; Zhang, Xinrong

    2015-11-17

    We had developed pulsed direct current electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (pulsed-dc-ESI-MS) for systematically profiling and determining components in small volume sample. Pulsed-dc-ESI utilized constant high voltage to induce the generation of single polarity pulsed electrospray remotely. This method had significantly boosted the sample economy, so as to obtain several minutes MS signal duration from merely picoliter volume sample. The elongated MS signal duration enable us to collect abundant MS(2) information on interested components in a small volume sample for systematical analysis. This method had been successfully applied for single cell metabolomics analysis. We had obtained 2-D profile of metabolites (including exact mass and MS(2) data) from single plant and mammalian cell, concerning 1034 components and 656 components for Allium cepa and HeLa cells, respectively. Further identification had found 162 compounds and 28 different modification groups of 141 saccharides in a single Allium cepa cell, indicating pulsed-dc-ESI a powerful tool for small volume sample systematical analysis.

  2. Pulsed Direct Current Electrospray: Enabling Systematic Analysis of Small Volume Sample by Boosting Sample Economy.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zhenwei; Xiong, Xingchuang; Guo, Chengan; Si, Xingyu; Zhao, Yaoyao; He, Muyi; Yang, Chengdui; Xu, Wei; Tang, Fei; Fang, Xiang; Zhang, Sichun; Zhang, Xinrong

    2015-11-17

    We had developed pulsed direct current electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (pulsed-dc-ESI-MS) for systematically profiling and determining components in small volume sample. Pulsed-dc-ESI utilized constant high voltage to induce the generation of single polarity pulsed electrospray remotely. This method had significantly boosted the sample economy, so as to obtain several minutes MS signal duration from merely picoliter volume sample. The elongated MS signal duration enable us to collect abundant MS(2) information on interested components in a small volume sample for systematical analysis. This method had been successfully applied for single cell metabolomics analysis. We had obtained 2-D profile of metabolites (including exact mass and MS(2) data) from single plant and mammalian cell, concerning 1034 components and 656 components for Allium cepa and HeLa cells, respectively. Further identification had found 162 compounds and 28 different modification groups of 141 saccharides in a single Allium cepa cell, indicating pulsed-dc-ESI a powerful tool for small volume sample systematical analysis. PMID:26488206

  3. Small Impacts on Mars: Atmospheric Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, Ronald; Nemtchinov, Ivan V.

    2002-01-01

    The objectives of this investigation were to study the interaction of the atmosphere with the surface of Mars through the impact of small objects that would generate dust and set the dust into motion in the atmosphere. The approach involved numerical simulations of impacts and experiments under controlled conditions. Attachment: Atmospheric disturbances and radiation impulses caused by large-meteoroid impact in the surface of Mars.

  4. Investigating common clinical presentations in first opinion small animal consultations using direct observation

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, N. J.; Dean, R. S.; Cobb, M.; Brennan, M. L.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding more about the clinical presentations encountered in veterinary practice is vital in directing research towards areas relevant to practitioners. The aim of this study was to describe all problems discussed during a convenience sample of consultations using a direct observation method. A data collection tool was used to gather data by direct observation during small animal consultations at eight sentinel practices. Data were recorded for all presenting and non-presenting specific health problems discussed. A total of 1901 patients were presented with 3206 specific health problems discussed. Clinical presentation varied widely between species and between presenting and non-presenting problems. Skin lump, vomiting and inappetence were the most common clinical signs reported by the owner while overweight/obese, dental tartar and skin lump were the most common clinical examination findings. Skin was the most frequently affected body system overall followed by non-specific problems then the gastrointestinal system. Consultations are complex, with a diverse range of different clinical presentations seen. Considering the presenting problem only may give an inaccurate view of the veterinary caseload, as some common problems are rarely the reason for presentation. Understanding the common diagnoses made is the next step and will help to further focus questions for future research. PMID:25564472

  5. Investigating common clinical presentations in first opinion small animal consultations using direct observation.

    PubMed

    Robinson, N J; Dean, R S; Cobb, M; Brennan, M L

    2015-05-01

    Understanding more about the clinical presentations encountered in veterinary practice is vital in directing research towards areas relevant to practitioners. The aim of this study was to describe all problems discussed during a convenience sample of consultations using a direct observation method. A data collection tool was used to gather data by direct observation during small animal consultations at eight sentinel practices. Data were recorded for all presenting and non-presenting specific health problems discussed. A total of 1901 patients were presented with 3206 specific health problems discussed. Clinical presentation varied widely between species and between presenting and non-presenting problems. Skin lump, vomiting and inappetence were the most common clinical signs reported by the owner while overweight/obese, dental tartar and skin lump were the most common clinical examination findings. Skin was the most frequently affected body system overall followed by non-specific problems then the gastrointestinal system. Consultations are complex, with a diverse range of different clinical presentations seen. Considering the presenting problem only may give an inaccurate view of the veterinary caseload, as some common problems are rarely the reason for presentation. Understanding the common diagnoses made is the next step and will help to further focus questions for future research. PMID:25564472

  6. Proton Beam Therapy for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Current Clinical Evidence and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Berman, Abigail T.; St. James, Sara; Rengan, Ramesh

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cancer cause of death in the United States. Radiotherapy is an essential component of the definitive treatment of early-stage and locally-advanced lung cancer, and the palliative treatment of metastatic lung cancer. Proton beam therapy (PBT), through its characteristic Bragg peak, has the potential to decrease the toxicity of radiotherapy, and, subsequently improve the therapeutic ratio. Herein, we provide a primer on the physics of proton beam therapy for lung cancer, present the existing data in early-stage and locally-advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), as well as in special situations such as re-irradiation and post-operative radiation therapy. We then present the technical challenges, such as anatomic changes and motion management, and future directions for PBT in lung cancer, including pencil beam scanning. PMID:26147335

  7. Proton Beam Therapy for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Current Clinical Evidence and Future Directions.

    PubMed

    Berman, Abigail T; James, Sara St; Rengan, Ramesh

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cancer cause of death in the United States. Radiotherapy is an essential component of the definitive treatment of early-stage and locally-advanced lung cancer, and the palliative treatment of metastatic lung cancer. Proton beam therapy (PBT), through its characteristic Bragg peak, has the potential to decrease the toxicity of radiotherapy, and, subsequently improve the therapeutic ratio. Herein, we provide a primer on the physics of proton beam therapy for lung cancer, present the existing data in early-stage and locally-advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), as well as in special situations such as re-irradiation and post-operative radiation therapy. We then present the technical challenges, such as anatomic changes and motion management, and future directions for PBT in lung cancer, including pencil beam scanning. PMID:26147335

  8. Validation of the ultrastable low-noise current amplifier as travelling standard for small direct currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drung, D.; Krause, C.; Giblin, S. P.; Djordjevic, S.; Piquemal, F.; Séron, O.; Rengnez, F.; Götz, M.; Pesel, E.; Scherer, H.

    2015-12-01

    An interlaboratory comparison of small-current generation and measurement capability is presented with the ultrastable low-noise current amplifier (ULCA) acting as travelling standard. Various measurements at direct currents between 0.16 nA and 13 nA were performed to verify the degree of agreement between the three national metrology institutes involved in the study. Consistency well within one part per million (ppm) was found. Due to harsh environmental conditions during shipment, the ULCA’s transfer accuracy had been limited to about  ±0.4 ppm. Supplemental measurements performed at PTB indicate that further improvements in accuracy are possible. Relative uncertainties of 0.1 ppm are achieved by applying on-site calibration of the ULCA with a suitable cryogenic current comparator.

  9. Two Years of Industrial Experience in the Use of a Small, Direct Field Acoustic Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saggini, Nicola; Di Pietro, Vincenzo; Poulain, Nicolas; Herzog, Philippe

    2012-07-01

    Within Thales Alenia Space - Italy small satellite Assembly Integration and Test (AIT) plant, the need to develop a suitable facility for spacecraft acoustic noise test has arisen, with additional constraints posed by the necessity of a low impact on the existing building layout, low cost of procurement and operations, while maintaining a high reliability of the system for a theoretical maximum throughput of one test per week over an extended period of time, e.g. six months. The needs have been answered by developing a small (~40 m3 test volume), direct field (DF A T) acoustic test chamber, christened “Alpha Cabin”, where noise generation is achieved by means of commercial audio drivers equipped with custom enclosures. The paper starts with a brief presentation of the main characteristics of the system, but then concentrates on the lessons learnt and return of experience from the tests conducted in more than two years of continuous use. Starting from test article structural responses and their comparison with reverberant chambers, properties of the acoustic field and their implications on the former are analyzed.

  10. Small-Group Composition and Peer Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkinson, Ian A. G.; Fung, Irene Y. Y.

    2002-01-01

    This paper reviews research on grouping of students within classes and its effects on learning. Primary consideration is given to grouping and mixing students by ability, though consideration is also given to grouping and mixing students by ethnicity and gender as well as to research on the effects of group size. Results of meta-analyses of…

  11. Photodynamic Therapy of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer. Narrative Review and Future Directions.

    PubMed

    Shafirstein, Gal; Battoo, Athar; Harris, Kassem; Baumann, Heinz; Gollnick, Sandra O; Lindenmann, Joerg; Nwogu, Chukwumere E

    2016-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an established treatment modality for non-small cell lung cancer. Phototoxicity, the primary adverse event, is expected to be minimized with the introduction of new photosensitizers that have shown promising results in phase I and II clinical studies. Early-stage and superficial endobronchial lesions less than 1 cm in thickness can be effectively treated with external light sources. Thicker lesions and peripheral lesions may be amenable to interstitial PDT, where the light is delivered intratumorally. The addition of PDT to standard-of-care surgery and chemotherapy can improve survival and outcomes in patients with pleural disease. Intraoperative PDT has shown promise in the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer with pleural spread. Recent preclinical and clinical data suggest that PDT can increase antitumor immunity. Crosslinking of signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 molecules is a reliable biomarker to quantify the photoreaction induced by PDT. Randomized studies are required to test the prognosis value of this biomarker, obtain approval for the new photosensitizers, and test the potential efficacy of interstitial and intraoperative PDT in the treatment of patients with non-small cell lung cancer.

  12. Accuracy Assessment of Direct Georeferencing for Photogrammetric Applications on Small Unmanned Aerial Platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mian, O.; Lutes, J.; Lipa, G.; Hutton, J. J.; Gavelle, E.; Borghini, S.

    2016-03-01

    Efficient mapping from unmanned aerial platforms cannot rely on aerial triangulation using known ground control points. The cost and time of setting ground control, added to the need for increased overlap between flight lines, severely limits the ability of small VTOL platforms, in particular, to handle mapping-grade missions of all but the very smallest survey areas. Applanix has brought its experience in manned photogrammetry applications to this challenge, setting out the requirements for increasing the efficiency of mapping operations from small UAVs, using survey-grade GNSS-Inertial technology to accomplish direct georeferencing of the platform and/or the imaging payload. The Direct Mapping Solution for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (DMS-UAV) is a complete and ready-to-integrate OEM solution for Direct Georeferencing (DG) on unmanned aerial platforms. Designed as a solution for systems integrators to create mapping payloads for UAVs of all types and sizes, the DMS produces directly georeferenced products for any imaging payload (visual, LiDAR, infrared, multispectral imaging, even video). Additionally, DMS addresses the airframe's requirements for high-accuracy position and orientation for such tasks as precision RTK landing and Precision Orientation for Air Data Systems (ADS), Guidance and Control. This paper presents results using a DMS comprised of an Applanix APX-15 UAV with a Sony a7R camera to produce highly accurate orthorectified imagery without Ground Control Points on a Microdrones md4-1000 platform conducted by Applanix and Avyon. APX-15 UAV is a single-board, small-form-factor GNSS-Inertial system designed for use on small, lightweight platforms. The Sony a7R is a prosumer digital RGB camera sensor, with a 36MP, 4.9-micron CCD producing images at 7360 columns by 4912 rows. It was configured with a 50mm AF-S Nikkor f/1.8 lens and subsequently with a 35mm Zeiss Sonnar T* FE F2.8 lens. Both the camera/lens combinations and the APX-15 were mounted to a

  13. Accuracy Assessment of Direct Georeferencing for Photogrammetric Applications on Small Unmanned Aerial Platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mian, O.; Lutes, J.; Lipa, G.; Hutton, J. J.; Gavelle, E.; Borghini, S.

    2016-03-01

    Efficient mapping from unmanned aerial platforms cannot rely on aerial triangulation using known ground control points. The cost and time of setting ground control, added to the need for increased overlap between flight lines, severely limits the ability of small VTOL platforms, in particular, to handle mapping-grade missions of all but the very smallest survey areas. Applanix has brought its experience in manned photogrammetry applications to this challenge, setting out the requirements for increasing the efficiency of mapping operations from small UAVs, using survey-grade GNSS-Inertial technology to accomplish direct georeferencing of the platform and/or the imaging payload. The Direct Mapping Solution for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (DMS-UAV) is a complete and ready-to-integrate OEM solution for Direct Georeferencing (DG) on unmanned aerial platforms. Designed as a solution for systems integrators to create mapping payloads for UAVs of all types and sizes, the DMS produces directly georeferenced products for any imaging payload (visual, LiDAR, infrared, multispectral imaging, even video). Additionally, DMS addresses the airframe's requirements for high-accuracy position and orientation for such tasks as precision RTK landing and Precision Orientation for Air Data Systems (ADS), Guidance and Control. This paper presents results using a DMS comprised of an Applanix APX-15 UAV with a Sony a7R camera to produce highly accurate orthorectified imagery without Ground Control Points on a Microdrones md4-1000 platform conducted by Applanix and Avyon. APX-15 UAV is a single-board, small-form-factor GNSS-Inertial system designed for use on small, lightweight platforms. The Sony a7R is a prosumer digital RGB camera sensor, with a 36MP, 4.9-micron CCD producing images at 7360 columns by 4912 rows. It was configured with a 50mm AF-S Nikkor f/1.8 lens and subsequently with a 35mm Zeiss Sonnar T* FE F2.8 lens. Both the camera/lens combinations and the APX-15 were mounted to a

  14. Direct Demonstration of the Greenhouse Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaffe, D. A.; Malashanka, S.; Call, K.; Bernays, N.

    2012-12-01

    Consider these three "theories:" climate change, evolution, and gravity. Why are two of them hotly debated by non-scientists, but not gravity? In part, the answer is that climate change and evolution are more complex processes and not readily observable over short time scales to most people. In contrast, the "theory of gravity" is tested every day by billions of people world-wide and is therefore not challenged. While there are numerous "demonstrations" of the greenhouse effect available online, unfortunately, many of them are based on poor understanding of the physical principles involved. For this reason, we sought to develop simple and direct experiments that would demonstrate aspects of the greenhouse effect that would be suitable for museums, K-12, and/or college classrooms. We will describe two experiments. In the first, we use a simple plexiglass tube, approximately 12 cm long, with IR transparent windows. The tube is first filled with dry nitrogen and exposed to an IR heat lamp. Following this, the tube is filled with pure, dry CO2. Both tubes warm up, but the tube filled with CO2 ends up about 0.7 degrees C warmer. It is useful to compare this 12 cm column of CO2 to the column in the earth's atmosphere, which is equivalent to approximately 2.7 meters of pure CO2. This demonstration would be suitable for museum exhibits to demonstrate the physical basis of CO2 heating in the atmosphere. In the second experiment, we use FTIR spectroscopy to quantify the CO2 content of ambient air and indoor/classroom air. For this experiment, we use a commercial standard of 350 ppm CO2 to calibrate the absorption features. Once the CO2 content of ambient air is found, it is useful for students to compare their observed value to background data (e.g. NOAA site in Hawaii) and/or the "Keeling Curve". This leads into a discussion on causes for local variations and the long-term trends. This experiment is currently used in our general chemistry class but could be used in many

  15. Detection thresholds for small haptic effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dosher, Jesse A.; Hannaford, Blake

    2002-02-01

    We are interested in finding out whether or not haptic interfaces will be useful in portable and hand held devices. Such systems will have severe constraints on force output. Our first step is to investigate the lower limits at which haptic effects can be perceived. In this paper we report on experiments studying the effects of varying the amplitude, size, shape, and pulse-duration of a haptic feature. Using a specific haptic device we measure the smallest detectable haptics effects, with active exploration of saw-tooth shaped icons sized 3, 4 and 5 mm, a sine-shaped icon 5 mm wide, and static pulses 50, 100, and 150 ms in width. Smooth shaped icons resulted in a detection threshold of approximately 55 mN, almost twice that of saw-tooth shaped icons which had a threshold of 31 mN.

  16. Vegetated treatment area effectiveness at reducing nutrient runoff from small swine operations in central Texas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Numerous modeling and field studies have evaluated the effectiveness of vegetative treatment systems in treating runoff from animal feeding operations; however, none have evaluated the effectiveness of vegetative treatment areas (VTA’s) receiving direct runoff from small swine operations during natu...

  17. Small effects of smoking on visual spatiotemporal processing.

    PubMed

    Kunchulia, Marina; Pilz, Karin S; Herzog, Michael H

    2014-12-04

    Nicotine is an important stimulant that is involved in modulating many neuronal processes, including those related to vision. Nicotine is also thought to play a key role in schizophrenia: A genetic variation of the cholinergic nicotine receptor gene, alpha-7 subunit (CHRNA7) has been shown to be associated with stronger backward masking deficits in schizophrenic patients. In this study, we tested visual backward masking in healthy smokers and non-smokers to further understand the effects of nicotine on spatiotemporal vision. In the first study, we tested 48 participants, a group of non-smokers (n = 12) and three groups of regular smokers that were either nicotine deprived (n = 12), non-deprived (n = 12) or deprived but were allowed to smoke a cigarette directly before the start of the experiment (n = 12). Performance was similar across groups, except for some small negative effects in nicotine-deprived participants. In the second study, we compared backward masking performance between regular smokers and non-smokers for older (n = 37, 13 smokers) and younger (n = 67, 21 smokers) adults. Older adults performed generally worse than younger adults but there were no significant differences in performance between smokers and non-smokers. Taken together, these findings indicate that nicotine has no long-term negative effects on visual spatiotemporal processing as determined by visual backward masking.

  18. Small effects of smoking on visual spatiotemporal processing.

    PubMed

    Kunchulia, Marina; Pilz, Karin S; Herzog, Michael H

    2014-01-01

    Nicotine is an important stimulant that is involved in modulating many neuronal processes, including those related to vision. Nicotine is also thought to play a key role in schizophrenia: A genetic variation of the cholinergic nicotine receptor gene, alpha-7 subunit (CHRNA7) has been shown to be associated with stronger backward masking deficits in schizophrenic patients. In this study, we tested visual backward masking in healthy smokers and non-smokers to further understand the effects of nicotine on spatiotemporal vision. In the first study, we tested 48 participants, a group of non-smokers (n = 12) and three groups of regular smokers that were either nicotine deprived (n = 12), non-deprived (n = 12) or deprived but were allowed to smoke a cigarette directly before the start of the experiment (n = 12). Performance was similar across groups, except for some small negative effects in nicotine-deprived participants. In the second study, we compared backward masking performance between regular smokers and non-smokers for older (n = 37, 13 smokers) and younger (n = 67, 21 smokers) adults. Older adults performed generally worse than younger adults but there were no significant differences in performance between smokers and non-smokers. Taken together, these findings indicate that nicotine has no long-term negative effects on visual spatiotemporal processing as determined by visual backward masking. PMID:25471068

  19. Small effects of smoking on visual spatiotemporal processing

    PubMed Central

    Kunchulia, Marina; Pilz, Karin S.; Herzog, Michael H.

    2014-01-01

    Nicotine is an important stimulant that is involved in modulating many neuronal processes, including those related to vision. Nicotine is also thought to play a key role in schizophrenia: A genetic variation of the cholinergic nicotine receptor gene, alpha-7 subunit (CHRNA7) has been shown to be associated with stronger backward masking deficits in schizophrenic patients. In this study, we tested visual backward masking in healthy smokers and non-smokers to further understand the effects of nicotine on spatiotemporal vision. In the first study, we tested 48 participants, a group of non-smokers (n = 12) and three groups of regular smokers that were either nicotine deprived (n = 12), non-deprived (n = 12) or deprived but were allowed to smoke a cigarette directly before the start of the experiment (n = 12). Performance was similar across groups, except for some small negative effects in nicotine-deprived participants. In the second study, we compared backward masking performance between regular smokers and non-smokers for older (n = 37, 13 smokers) and younger (n = 67, 21 smokers) adults. Older adults performed generally worse than younger adults but there were no significant differences in performance between smokers and non-smokers. Taken together, these findings indicate that nicotine has no long-term negative effects on visual spatiotemporal processing as determined by visual backward masking. PMID:25471068

  20. Implementing effective staff education about advance directives.

    PubMed

    DesRosiers, M; Navin, P

    1997-01-01

    The Patient Self-Determination Act of 1990 guarantees the right to refuse medical or surgical treatment and the right to draft advance directives. This review of the current literature provides those in nursing staff development and inservice education with an overview of advance directives and their implications for nursing education and practice. Possible core subjects for inclusion in planned, purposeful, advance directive education programs are examined, including cultural sensitivity, facilitator skills, interviewing techniques, legal information, patient autonomy, and reasoning and decision making. This review provides a platform for future research.

  1. Direct formation of small Cu2O nanocubes, octahedra, and octapods for efficient synthesis of triazoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Ya-Huei; Chanda, Kaushik; Chu, Yi-Ting; Chiu, Chun-Ya; Huang, Michael H.

    2014-07-01

    In most studies describing the preparation of Cu2O crystals of various morphologies, the particle sizes are normally hundreds of nanometers to micrometers due to rapid particle growth, so they are not exactly nanocrystals. Here we report surfactant-free formation of sub-100 nm Cu2O nanocrystals with systematic shape evolution from cubic to octahedral structures by preparing an aqueous mixture of Cu(OAc)2, NaOH, and N2H4 solution. Adjustment of the hydrazine volume enables the particle shape control. Uniform nanocubes and octahedra were synthesized with edge lengths of 37 and 67 nm, respectively. Novel Cu2O octapods with an edge length of 135 nm were also produced by mixing CuCl2 solution, SDS surfactant, NaOH solution, and NH2OH.HCl reductant solution. All of them are nearly the smallest Cu2O nanocrystals of the same shapes ever reported. These small cubes, octahedra, and octapods were employed as catalysts in the direct synthesis of 1,2,3-triazoles from the reaction of alkynes, organic halides, and NaN3 at 55 °C. All of them displayed high product yields in short reaction times. The octahedra enclosed by the {111} facets are the best catalysts, and can catalyze this cycloaddition reaction with high yields in just 2 h when different alkynes were used to make diverse triazole products. Hence, the small Cu2O particles provide time-saving, energy-efficient, and high product yield benefits to organocatalysis.In most studies describing the preparation of Cu2O crystals of various morphologies, the particle sizes are normally hundreds of nanometers to micrometers due to rapid particle growth, so they are not exactly nanocrystals. Here we report surfactant-free formation of sub-100 nm Cu2O nanocrystals with systematic shape evolution from cubic to octahedral structures by preparing an aqueous mixture of Cu(OAc)2, NaOH, and N2H4 solution. Adjustment of the hydrazine volume enables the particle shape control. Uniform nanocubes and octahedra were synthesized with edge

  2. FY 2011 4th Quarter Metric: Estimate of Future Aerosol Direct and Indirect Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, D

    2011-09-21

    The global and annual mean aerosol direct and indirect effects, relative to 1850 conditions, estimated from CESM simulations are 0.02 W m-2 and -0.39 W m-2, respectively, for emissions in year 2100 under the IPCC RCP8.5 scenario. The indirect effect is much smaller than that for 2000 emissions because of much smaller SO2 emissions in 2100; the direct effects are small due to compensation between warming by black carbon and cooling by sulfate.

  3. Selected achievements, science directions, and new opportunities for the WEBB small watershed research program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Glynn, Pierre D.; Larsen, Matthew C.; Greene, Earl A.; Buss, Heather L.; Clow, David W.; Hunt, Randall J.; Mast, M. Alisa; Murphy, Sheila F.; Peters, Norman E.; Sebestyen, Stephen D.; Shanley, James B.; Walker, John F.

    2009-01-01

    Over nearly two decades, the Water, Energy, and Biogeochemical Budgets (WEBB) small watershed research program of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has documented how water and solute fluxes, nutrient, carbon, and mercury dynamics, and weathering and sediment transport respond to natural and humancaused drivers, including climate, climate change, and atmospheric deposition. Together with a continued and increasing focus on the effects of climate change, more investigations are needed that examine ecological effects (e.g., evapotranspiration, nutrient uptake) and responses (e.g., species abundances, biodiversity) that are coupled with the physical and chemical processes historically observed in the WEBB program. Greater use of remote sensing, geographic modeling, and habitat/watershed modeling tools is needed, as is closer integration with the USGS-led National Phenology Network. Better understanding of process and system response times is needed. The analysis and observation of land-use and climate change effects over time should be improved by pooling data obtained by the WEBB program during the last two decades with data obtained earlier and (or) concurrently from other research and monitoring studies conducted at or near the five WEBB watershed sites. These data can be supplemented with historical and paleo-environmental information, such as could be obtained from tree rings and lake cores. Because of the relatively pristine nature and small size of its watersheds, the WEBB program could provide process understanding and basic data to better characterize and quantify ecosystem services and to develop and apply indicators of ecosystem health. In collaboration with other Federal and State watershed research programs, the WEBB program has an opportunity to contribute to tracking the short-term dynamics and long-term evolution of ecosystem services and health indicators at a multiplicity of scales across the landscape. 

  4. Cooperation in the snowdrift game on directed small-world networks under self-questioning and noisy conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Tian; Hadzibeganovic, Tarik; Chen, Guang; Zhong, Li-Xin; Wu, Xiao-Run

    2010-12-01

    Cooperation in the evolutionary snowdrift game with a self-questioning updating mechanism is studied on annealed and quenched small-world networks with directed couplings. Around the payoff parameter value r=0.5, we find a size-invariant symmetrical cooperation effect. While generally suppressing cooperation for r>0.5 payoffs, rewired networks facilitated cooperative behavior for r<0.5. Fair amounts of noise were found to break the observed symmetry and further weaken cooperation at relatively large values of r. However, in the absence of noise, the self-questioning mechanism recovers symmetrical behavior and elevates altruism even under large-reward conditions. Our results suggest that an updating mechanism of this type is necessary to stabilize cooperation in a spatially structured environment which is otherwise detrimental to cooperative behavior, especially at high cost-to-benefit ratios. Additionally, we employ component and local stability analyses to better understand the nature of the manifested dynamics.

  5. Effectiveness of Small Group Social Skills Lessons with Elementary Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chupp, Amy I.; Boes, Susan R.

    2012-01-01

    This action research study (ARS) describes the effectiveness of small group social skills lessons with elementary students, using "Too Good for Violence: A Curriculum for Non-violent Living" by the Mendez Foundation. The school counselor and school social worker taught the curriculum in a structured small group of 4th grade students in 8 weekly…

  6. Small Reactor Designs Suitable for Direct Nuclear Thermal Propulsion: Interim Report

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce G. Schnitzler

    2012-01-01

    well as open loop systems for direct nuclear thermal propulsion. Although a number of fast spectrum reactor and engine designs suitable for direct nuclear thermal propulsion were proposed and designed, none were built. This report summarizes status results of evaluations of small nuclear reactor designs suitable for direct nuclear thermal propulsion.

  7. Dietary Fatty Acids Directly Impact Central Nervous System Autoimmunity via the Small Intestine.

    PubMed

    Haghikia, Aiden; Jörg, Stefanie; Duscha, Alexander; Berg, Johannes; Manzel, Arndt; Waschbisch, Anne; Hammer, Anna; Lee, De-Hyung; May, Caroline; Wilck, Nicola; Balogh, Andras; Ostermann, Annika I; Schebb, Nils Helge; Akkad, Denis A; Grohme, Diana A; Kleinewietfeld, Markus; Kempa, Stefan; Thöne, Jan; Demir, Seray; Müller, Dominik N; Gold, Ralf; Linker, Ralf A

    2015-10-20

    Growing empirical evidence suggests that nutrition and bacterial metabolites might impact the systemic immune response in the context of disease and autoimmunity. We report that long-chain fatty acids (LCFAs) enhanced differentiation and proliferation of T helper 1 (Th1) and/or Th17 cells and impaired their intestinal sequestration via p38-MAPK pathway. Alternatively, dietary short-chain FAs (SCFAs) expanded gut T regulatory (Treg) cells by suppression of the JNK1 and p38 pathway. We used experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) as a model of T cell-mediated autoimmunity to show that LCFAs consistently decreased SCFAs in the gut and exacerbated disease by expanding pathogenic Th1 and/or Th17 cell populations in the small intestine. Treatment with SCFAs ameliorated EAE and reduced axonal damage via long-lasting imprinting on lamina-propria-derived Treg cells. These data demonstrate a direct dietary impact on intestinal-specific, and subsequently central nervous system-specific, Th cell responses in autoimmunity, and thus might have therapeutic implications for autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis. PMID:26488817

  8. First report of a direct surface plasmon resonance immunosensor for a small molecule seafood toxin.

    PubMed

    Yakes, Betsy Jean; Kanyuck, Kelsey M; DeGrasse, Stacey L

    2014-09-16

    Tetrodotoxin (TTX), a small molecular weight neurotoxin, is responsible for poisoning events that traditionally occur from consumption of contaminated puffer fish. Recent studies have shown a growing number of foods contaminated with TTX and a larger number of waters and associated countries where the toxin may occur. The apparent expanding prevalence of TTX supports a growing need for screening assays that can be used to detect potentially harmful food. In the past few years, surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensors have been developed for rapid, robust detection of TTX; however, these assays focus on detection of unbound antibody from an inhibition reaction with the toxin. This manuscript introduces the first direct immunoassay for a seafood toxin, specifically TTX. Major advantages of this assay compared to indirect assays include increased speed of analysis, decreased use of biological reagents, and improved confidence in the detection of the toxin, along with the ability to characterize the antibody/toxin interaction. The analytical method introduced in this paper could be applied to other seafood toxins, as well as to a wide range of low molecular weight targets.

  9. Direct Simulation of the Self-Assembly of a Small DNA Origami.

    PubMed

    Snodin, Benedict E K; Romano, Flavio; Rovigatti, Lorenzo; Ouldridge, Thomas E; Louis, Ard A; Doye, Jonathan P K

    2016-02-23

    By using oxDNA, a coarse-grained nucleotide-level model of DNA, we are able to directly simulate the self-assembly of a small 384-base-pair origami from single-stranded scaffold and staple strands in solution. In general, we see attachment of new staple strands occurring in parallel, but with cooperativity evident for the binding of the second domain of a staple if the adjacent junction is already partially formed. For a system with exactly one copy of each staple strand, we observe a complete assembly pathway in an intermediate temperature window; at low temperatures successful assembly is prevented by misbonding while at higher temperature the free-energy barriers to assembly become too large for assembly on our simulation time scales. For high-concentration systems involving a large staple strand excess, we never see complete assembly because there are invariably instances where two copies of the same staple both bind to the scaffold, creating a kinetic trap that prevents the complete binding of either staple. This mutual staple blocking could also lead to aggregates of partially formed origamis in real systems, and helps to rationalize certain successful origami design strategies.

  10. An interface for the direct coupling of small liquid samples to AMS

    DOE PAGES

    Ognibene, T. J.; Thomas, A. T.; Daley, P. F.; Bench, G.; Turteltaub, K. W.

    2015-05-28

    We describe the moving wire interface attached to the 1-MV AMS system at LLNL’s Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry for the analysis of nonvolatile liquid samples as either discrete drops or from the direct output of biochemical separatory instrumentation, such as high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Discrete samples containing at least a few 10 s of nanograms of carbon and as little as 50 zmol 14C can be measured with a 3–5% precision in a few minutes. The dynamic range of our system spans approximately 3 orders in magnitude. Sample to sample memory is minimized by the use of fresh targetsmore » for each discrete sample or by minimizing the amount of carbon present in a peak generated by an HPLC containing a significant amount of 14C. As a result, liquid sample AMS provides a new technology to expand our biomedical AMS program by enabling the capability to measure low-level biochemicals in extremely small samples that would otherwise be inaccessible.« less

  11. An interface for the direct coupling of small liquid samples to AMS

    SciTech Connect

    Ognibene, T. J.; Thomas, A. T.; Daley, P. F.; Bench, G.; Turteltaub, K. W.

    2015-05-28

    We describe the moving wire interface attached to the 1-MV AMS system at LLNL’s Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry for the analysis of nonvolatile liquid samples as either discrete drops or from the direct output of biochemical separatory instrumentation, such as high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Discrete samples containing at least a few 10 s of nanograms of carbon and as little as 50 zmol 14C can be measured with a 3–5% precision in a few minutes. The dynamic range of our system spans approximately 3 orders in magnitude. Sample to sample memory is minimized by the use of fresh targets for each discrete sample or by minimizing the amount of carbon present in a peak generated by an HPLC containing a significant amount of 14C. As a result, liquid sample AMS provides a new technology to expand our biomedical AMS program by enabling the capability to measure low-level biochemicals in extremely small samples that would otherwise be inaccessible.

  12. Effects of Directional Exercise on Lingual Strength

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Heather M.; O'Brien, Katy; Calleja, Aimee; Corrie, Sarah Newcomb

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the application of known muscle training principles to tongue strengthening exercises and to answer the following research questions: (a) Did lingual strength increase following 9 weeks of training? (b) Did training conducted using an exercise moving the tongue in one direction result in strength changes for tongue movements in…

  13. Negative effects of an exotic grass invasion on small-mammal communities.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Eric D; Sharp, Tiffanny R; Larsen, Randy T; Knight, Robert N; Slater, Steven J; McMillan, Brock R

    2014-01-01

    Exotic invasive species can directly and indirectly influence natural ecological communities. Cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum) is non-native to the western United States and has invaded large areas of the Great Basin. Changes to the structure and composition of plant communities invaded by cheatgrass likely have effects at higher trophic levels. As a keystone guild in North American deserts, granivorous small mammals drive and maintain plant diversity. Our objective was to assess potential effects of invasion by cheatgrass on small-mammal communities. We sampled small-mammal and plant communities at 70 sites (Great Basin, Utah). We assessed abundance and diversity of the small-mammal community, diversity of the plant community, and the percentage of cheatgrass cover and shrub species. Abundance and diversity of the small-mammal community decreased with increasing abundance of cheatgrass. Similarly, cover of cheatgrass remained a significant predictor of small-mammal abundance even after accounting for the loss of the shrub layer and plant diversity, suggesting that there are direct and indirect effects of cheatgrass. The change in the small-mammal communities associated with invasion of cheatgrass likely has effects through higher and lower trophic levels and has the potential to cause major changes in ecosystem structure and function.

  14. Direct and disequilibrium effects on precipitation in transient climates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McInerney, D.; Moyer, E.

    2012-08-01

    Climate models are in broad agreement that global precipitation increases with surface temperature as atmospheric CO2 concentrations rise, but recent studies have shown that climates that are not yet in equilibrium exhibit additional "transient precipitation effects". In conditions of rising CO2, for example, precipitation at a given temperature is suppressed relative to its equilibrium value. Some authors argue that the primary driver of these effects is ocean heat uptake, but most recent studies assume that they result from some direct radiative effect. We show here that global precipitation and temperature anomalies are insufficient to resolve mechanisms, since the conventional "fast/slow" representation of transient precipitation effects is degenerate with a "disequilibrium" representation that posits control only by ocean heat uptake. We use regional anomalies instead to show in multiple ways that ocean heat uptake is the dominant driver of transient precipitation effects in CO2-forced climates. Precipitation suppression appears predominantly over the ocean, with response over land of the opposite sign. The coefficients of a disequilibrium representation are uncorrelated, suggesting that they capture physically meaningful processes, while those of a fast/slow representation are highly correlated. Further, the regional patterns of transient precipitation response are highly similar for both CO2 and solar forcing, with a relatively small and homogeneous offset between them. Examination of the surface energy budget allows us to conclude that energy balance in solar-forced climates is achieved by the superposition of both disequilibrium and direct processes. Our results highlight the importance of using regional information rather than global aggregates for understanding the physics of transient climate change and its impacts on societies.

  15. The effect of very small air gaps on small field dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charles, P. H.; Crowe, S. B.; Kairn, T.; Kenny, J.; Lehmann, J.; Lye, J.; Dunn, L.; Hill, B.; Knight, R. T.; Langton, C. M.; Trapp, J. V.

    2012-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of very small air gaps (less than 1 mm) on the dosimetry of small photon fields used for stereotactic treatments. Measurements were performed with optically stimulated luminescent dosimeters (OSLDs) for 6 MV photons on a Varian 21iX linear accelerator with a Brainlab µMLC attachment for square field sizes down to 6 mm × 6 mm. Monte Carlo simulations were performed using EGSnrc C++ user code cavity. It was found that the Monte Carlo model used in this study accurately simulated the OSLD measurements on the linear accelerator. For the 6 mm field size, the 0.5 mm air gap upstream to the active area of the OSLD caused a 5.3% dose reduction relative to a Monte Carlo simulation with no air gap. A hypothetical 0.2 mm air gap caused a dose reduction >2%, emphasizing the fact that even the tiniest air gaps can cause a large reduction in measured dose. The negligible effect on an 18 mm field size illustrated that the electronic disequilibrium caused by such small air gaps only affects the dosimetry of the very small fields. When performing small field dosimetry, care must be taken to avoid any air gaps, as can be often present when inserting detectors into solid phantoms. It is recommended that very small field dosimetry is performed in liquid water. When using small photon fields, sub-millimetre air gaps can also affect patient dosimetry if they cannot be spatially resolved on a CT scan. However the effect on the patient is debatable as the dose reduction caused by a 1 mm air gap, starting out at 19% in the first 0.1 mm behind the air gap, decreases to <5% after just 2 mm, and electronic equilibrium is fully re-established after just 5 mm.

  16. Wong's equations and the small x effective action in QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Jalilian-Marian, Jamal; Jeon, Sangyong; Venugopalan, Raju

    2000-07-13

    We propose a new form for the small x effective action in QCD. This form of the effective action is motivated by Wong's equations for classical, colored particles in non-Abelian background fields. We show that the BFKL equation, which sums leading logarithms in x, is efficiently reproduced with this form of the action. We argue that this form of the action may be particularly useful in computing next-to-leading-order results in QCD at small x.

  17. Scaling effects in direct shear tests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Orlando, A.D.; Hanes, D.M.; Shen, H.H.

    2009-01-01

    Laboratory experiments of the direct shear test were performed on spherical particles of different materials and diameters. Results of the bulk friction vs. non-dimensional shear displacement are presented as a function of the non-dimensional particle diameter. Simulations of the direct shear test were performed using the Discrete Element Method (DEM). The simulation results show Considerable differences with the physical experiments. Particle level material properties, such as the coefficients of static friction, restitution and rolling friction need to be known a priori in order to guarantee that the simulation results are an accurate representation of the physical phenomenon. Furthermore, laboratory results show a clear size dependency on the results, with smaller particles having a higher bulk friction than larger ones. ?? 2009 American Institute of Physics.

  18. Effect of DOC on evaporation from small Wisconsin lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watras, C. J.; Morrison, K. A.; Rubsam, J. L.

    2016-09-01

    Evaporation (E) dominates the loss of water from many small lakes, and the balance between precipitation and evaporation (P-E) often governs water levels. In this study, evaporation rates were estimated for three small Wisconsin lakes over several years using 30-min data from floating evaporation pans (E-pans). Measured E was then compared to the output of mass transfer models driven by local conditions over daily time scales. The three lakes were chosen to span a range of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations (3-20 mg L-1), a solute that imparts a dark, tea-stain color which absorbs solar energy and limits light penetration. Since the lakes were otherwise similar, we hypothesized that a DOC-mediated increase in surface water temperature would translate directly to higher rates of evaporation thereby informing climate response models. Our results confirmed a DOC effect on surface water temperature, but that effect did not translate to enhanced evaporation. Instead the opposite was observed: evaporation rates decreased as DOC increased. Ancillary data and prior studies suggest two explanatory mechanisms: (1) disproportionately greater radiant energy outflux from high DOC lakes, and (2) the combined effect of wind speed (W) and the vapor pressure gradient (es - ez), whose product [W(es - ez)] was lowest on the high DOC lake, despite very low wind speeds (<1.5 m s-1) and steep forested uplands surrounding all three lakes. Agreement between measured (E-pan) and modeled evaporation rates was reasonably good, based on linear regression results (r2: 0.6-0.7; slope: 0.5-0.7, for the best model). Rankings based on E were similar whether determined by measured or modeled criteria (high DOC < low DOC). Across the 3 lakes and 4 years, E averaged ˜3 mm d-1 (C.V. 9%), but statistically significant differences between lakes resulted in substantial differences in cumulative E that were consistent from year to year. Daily water budgets for these lakes show that inputs were

  19. Effect of DOC on evaporation from small Wisconsin lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watras, C. J.; Morrison, K. A.; Rubsam, J. L.

    2016-09-01

    Evaporation (E) dominates the loss of water from many small lakes, and the balance between precipitation and evaporation (P-E) often governs water levels. In this study, evaporation rates were estimated for three small Wisconsin lakes over several years using 30-min data from floating evaporation pans (E-pans). Measured E was then compared to the output of mass transfer models driven by local conditions over daily time scales. The three lakes were chosen to span a range of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations (3-20 mg L-1), a solute that imparts a dark, tea-stain color which absorbs solar energy and limits light penetration. Since the lakes were otherwise similar, we hypothesized that a DOC-mediated increase in surface water temperature would translate directly to higher rates of evaporation thereby informing climate response models. Our results confirmed a DOC effect on surface water temperature, but that effect did not translate to enhanced evaporation. Instead the opposite was observed: evaporation rates decreased as DOC increased. Ancillary data and prior studies suggest two explanatory mechanisms: (1) disproportionately greater radiant energy outflux from high DOC lakes, and (2) the combined effect of wind speed (W) and the vapor pressure gradient (es - ez), whose product [W(es - ez)] was lowest on the high DOC lake, despite very low wind speeds (<1.5 m s-1) and steep forested uplands surrounding all three lakes. Agreement between measured (E-pan) and modeled evaporation rates was reasonably good, based on linear regression results (r2: 0.6-0.7; slope: 0.5-0.7, for the best model). Rankings based on E were similar whether determined by measured or modeled criteria (high DOC < low DOC). Across the 3 lakes and 4 years, E averaged ∼3 mm d-1 (C.V. 9%), but statistically significant differences between lakes resulted in substantial differences in cumulative E that were consistent from year to year. Daily water budgets for these lakes show that inputs

  20. Future directions in training of veterinarians for small exotic mammal medicine: expectations, potential, opportunities, and mandates.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, Karen

    2006-01-01

    Small exotic mammals have been companions to people for almost as long as dogs and cats have been. The challenge for veterinary medicine today is to decipher the tea leaves and determine whether small mammals are fad or transient pets or whether they will still be popular in 20 years. This article focuses on pet small-mammal medicine, as the concerns of the laboratory animal are better known and may differ profoundly from those of a pet. Dozens of species of small exotic mammals are kept as pets. These pet small-mammal species have historically served human purposes other than companionship: for hunting, for their pelts, or for meat. Now, they are common pets. At present, most veterinary schools lack courses in the medical care of these animals. Veterinary students need at least one required class to introduce them to these pets. Currently, there are no small-mammal-only residency programs. This does not correspond with current needs. The only way to judge current needs is by assessing what employers are looking for. In a recent JAVMA classified section, almost 30% of small-animal practices in suburban/urban areas were hiring veterinarians with knowledge of exotic pets. All veterinarians must recognize that pet exotic small mammals have changed the landscape of small-animal medicine. It is a reality that, today, many small-animal practices see pet exotic small mammals on a daily basis. PMID:17035210

  1. Direct effects dominate responses to climate perturbations in grassland plant communities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Theory predicts that strong indirect effects of environmental change will impact communities when niche differences between competitors are small and variation in the direct effects experienced by competitors is large, but empirical tests are lacking. Here we estimate negative frequency dependence, ...

  2. Direct measurement of small diffusion coefficients with secondary ion mass spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macht, M.-P.; Naundorf, V.

    1982-11-01

    Sputter sectioning in combination with secondary ion mass spectroscopy enables the determination of very small diffusion coefficients which are not attainable with classical sectioning techniques. The exceedingly good depth resolution of the sputter sectioning and the high sensitivity of the mass spectroscopy allow to resolve penetration profiles of solutes in the 10-nm range at the ppm level. Two perturbing effects, inherent to the method and limiting its sensitivity are discussed: degradation of depth resolution by surface roughening and atomic mixing, and near surface distortion of profiles by transient erosion effects. Degradation of depth resolution was minimized by use of single crystalline specimens and low energy sputtering with reactive ions. To overcome the near surface distortions a special sample preparation technique has been developed, resulting in single crystalline specimens with one or more inserted layers of the solutes to be diffused. The application of the method is demonstrated by examples of thermal- and irradiation-induced diffusion of nickel in copper, and the main errors are discussed.

  3. Direct and indirect ecosystem effects of evolutionary adaptation in the Trinidadian guppy (Poecilia reticulata).

    PubMed

    Bassar, Ronald D; Ferriere, Regis; López-Sepulcre, Andrés; Marshall, Michael C; Travis, Joseph; Pringle, Catherine M; Reznick, David N

    2012-08-01

    Ecological and evolutionary processes may interact on the same timescale, but we are just beginning to understand how. Several studies have examined the net effects of adaptive evolution on ecosystem properties. However, we do not know whether these effects are confined to direct interactions or whether they propagate further through indirect ecological pathways. Even less well understood is how the combination of direct and indirect ecological effects of the phenotype promotes or inhibits evolutionary change. We coupled mesocosm experiments and ecosystem modeling to evaluate the ecological effects of local adaptation in Trinidadian guppies (Poecilia reticulata). The experiments show that guppies adapted to life with and without predators alter the ecosystem directly through differences in diet. The ecosystem model reveals that the small total indirect effect of the phenotype observed in the experiments is likely a combination of several large indirect effects that act in opposing directions. The model further suggests that these indirect effects can reverse the direction of selection that direct effects alone exert back on phenotypic variation. We conclude that phenotypic divergence can have major effects deep in the web of indirect ecological interactions and that even small total indirect effects can radically change the dynamics of adaptation.

  4. Effectiveness of direct and non-direct auditory stimulation on coma arousal after traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Park, Soohyun; Davis, Alice E

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of direct and non-direct auditory stimulation on arousal in coma patients with severe traumatic brain injury and to compare the effects of direct vs. non-direct auditory stimulation. A crossover intervention study design was used. Nine participants who were comatose after a severe traumatic brain injury underwent direct and non-direct auditory stimulation. Direct auditory stimulation requires a higher level of interpersonal interaction between the patient and stimuli such as voices of family members, orientation by a nurse or family member and familiar music. In contrast, non-direct auditory stimuli were characterized as more general, less familiar, less interactive, indirect and not lively such as general music and TV sounds. Participants received both direct and non-direct auditory stimulation in randomized order for 15 minutes. Recovery of consciousness was measured with the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) and Sensory Stimulation Assessment Measure (SSAM). The Friedman test with post hoc analysis by Wilcoxon's signed-rank test comparisons was used for data analysis. Patients who received both direct and non-direct auditory stimulation exhibited significantly increased GCS (p = 0.008) and SSAM scores (p = 0.008) over baseline. The improvement in SSAM scores after direct auditory stimulation was significantly greater than that after non-direct auditory stimulation (p = 0.021), but there was no statistically significant difference in GCS scores (p = 0.139). Auditory stimulation, in particular direct auditory stimulation, might be useful for improving the recovery of consciousness and increasing the arousal of comatose patients. The SSAM is more useful for detecting subtle changes from stimulation intervention than the GCS. PMID:27241789

  5. Direct effects dominate responses to climate perturbations in grassland plant communities.

    PubMed

    Chu, Chengjin; Kleinhesselink, Andrew R; Havstad, Kris M; McClaran, Mitchel P; Peters, Debra P; Vermeire, Lance T; Wei, Haiyan; Adler, Peter B

    2016-01-01

    Theory predicts that strong indirect effects of environmental change will impact communities when niche differences between competitors are small and variation in the direct effects experienced by competitors is large, but empirical tests are lacking. Here we estimate negative frequency dependence, a proxy for niche differences, and quantify the direct and indirect effects of climate change on each species. Consistent with theory, in four of five communities indirect effects are strongest for species showing weak negative frequency dependence. Indirect effects are also stronger in communities where there is greater variation in direct effects. Overall responses to climate perturbations are driven primarily by direct effects, suggesting that single species models may be adequate for forecasting the impacts of climate change in these communities. PMID:27273085

  6. Direct effects dominate responses to climate perturbations in grassland plant communities.

    PubMed

    Chu, Chengjin; Kleinhesselink, Andrew R; Havstad, Kris M; McClaran, Mitchel P; Peters, Debra P; Vermeire, Lance T; Wei, Haiyan; Adler, Peter B

    2016-01-01

    Theory predicts that strong indirect effects of environmental change will impact communities when niche differences between competitors are small and variation in the direct effects experienced by competitors is large, but empirical tests are lacking. Here we estimate negative frequency dependence, a proxy for niche differences, and quantify the direct and indirect effects of climate change on each species. Consistent with theory, in four of five communities indirect effects are strongest for species showing weak negative frequency dependence. Indirect effects are also stronger in communities where there is greater variation in direct effects. Overall responses to climate perturbations are driven primarily by direct effects, suggesting that single species models may be adequate for forecasting the impacts of climate change in these communities.

  7. Direct effects dominate responses to climate perturbations in grassland plant communities

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Chengjin; Kleinhesselink, Andrew R.; Havstad, Kris M.; McClaran, Mitchel P.; Peters, Debra P.; Vermeire, Lance T.; Wei, Haiyan; Adler, Peter B.

    2016-01-01

    Theory predicts that strong indirect effects of environmental change will impact communities when niche differences between competitors are small and variation in the direct effects experienced by competitors is large, but empirical tests are lacking. Here we estimate negative frequency dependence, a proxy for niche differences, and quantify the direct and indirect effects of climate change on each species. Consistent with theory, in four of five communities indirect effects are strongest for species showing weak negative frequency dependence. Indirect effects are also stronger in communities where there is greater variation in direct effects. Overall responses to climate perturbations are driven primarily by direct effects, suggesting that single species models may be adequate for forecasting the impacts of climate change in these communities. PMID:27273085

  8. E-Mentoring for Small Business: An Examination of Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rickard, Kim; Rickard, Alex

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: While information and communications technology provides new opportunities for supporting mentoring, there is a need to explore how effectively these potential benefits are being realized. This paper seeks to evaluate the effectiveness of a program in the small business context as a basis for proposing determinants of e-mentoring…

  9. Colloidal Graphite-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization MS and MSn of Small Molecules. 2. Direct Profiling and MS Imaging of Small Metabolites from Fruits

    SciTech Connect

    Hui Zhang; Sangwon Cha; Edward S. Yeung

    2007-09-01

    Due to a high background in the low-mass region, conventional MALDI is not as useful for detecting small molecules (molecular masses <500 Da) as it is for large ones. Also, spatial inhomogeneity that is inherent to crystalline matrixes can degrade resolution in imaging mass spectrometry (IMS). In this study, colloidal graphite was investigated as an alternative matrix for laser desorption/ionization (GALDI) in IMS. We demonstrate its advantages over conventional MALDI in the detection of small molecules such as organic acids, flavonoids, and oligosaccharides. GALDI provides good sensitivity for such small molecules. The detection limit of fatty acids and flavonoids in the negative-ion mode are in the low-femtomole range. Molecules were detected directly and identified by comparing the MS and MS/MS spectra with those of standards. Various fruits were chosen to evaluate the practical utility of GALDI since many types of small molecules are present in them. Distribution of these small molecules in the fruit was investigated by using IMS and IMS/MS.

  10. Subcellular distribution of small interfering RNA: directed delivery through RNA polymerase III expression cassettes and localization by in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Paul, Cynthia P

    2005-01-01

    Reduction in the expression of specific genes through small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) is dependent on the colocalization of siRNAs with other components of the RNA interference (RNAi) pathways within the cell. The expression of siRNAs within cells from cassettes that are derived from genes transcribed by RNA polymerase III (pol III) and provide for selective subcellular distribution of their products can be used to direct siRNAs to the cellular pathways. Expression from the human U6 promoter, resulting in siRNA accumulation in the nucleus, is effective in reducing gene expression, whereas cytoplasmic and nucleolar localization of the siRNA when expressed from the 5S or 7 SL promoters is not effective. The distribution of siRNA within the cell is determined by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Although the long uninterrupted duplex of siRNA makes it difficult to detect with DNA oligonucleotide probes, labeled oligonucleotide probes with 2'-O-methyl RNA backbones provide the stability needed for a strong signal. These methods contribute to studies of the interconnected cellular RNAi pathways and are useful in adapting RNAi as a tool to determine gene function and develop RNA-based therapeutics. PMID:15644179

  11. A natural small molecule, catechol, induces c-Myc degradation by directly targeting ERK2 in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Do Young; Shin, Seung Ho; Lee, Mee-Hyun; Malakhova, Margarita; Kurinov, Igor; Wu, Qiong; Xu, Jinglong; Jiang, Yanan; Dong, Ziming; Liu, Kangdong; Lee, Kun Yeong; Bae, Ki Beom; Choi, Bu Young; Deng, Yibin; Bode, Ann; Dong, Zigang

    2016-01-01

    Various carcinogens induce EGFR/RAS/MAPK signaling, which is critical in the development of lung cancer. In particular, constitutive activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2 (ERK2) is observed in many lung cancer patients, and therefore developing compounds capable of targeting ERK2 in lung carcinogenesis could be beneficial. We examined the therapeutic effect of catechol in lung cancer treatment. Catechol suppressed anchorage-independent growth of murine KP2 and human H460 lung cancer cell lines in a dose-dependent manner. Catechol inhibited ERK2 kinase activity in vitro, and its direct binding to the ERK2 active site was confirmed by X-ray crystallography. Phosphorylation of c-Myc, a substrate of ERK2, was decreased in catechol-treated lung cancer cells and resulted in reduced protein stability and subsequent down-regulation of total c-Myc. Treatment with catechol induced G1 phase arrest in lung cancer cells and decreased protein expression related to G1-S progression. In addition, we showed that catechol inhibited the growth of both allograft and xenograft lung cancer tumors in vivo. In summary, catechol exerted inhibitory effects on the ERK2/c-Myc signaling axis to reduce lung cancer tumor growth in vitro and in vivo, including a preclinical patient-derived xenograft (PDX) model. These findings suggest that catechol, a natural small molecule, possesses potential as a novel therapeutic agent against lung carcinogenesis in future clinical approaches. PMID:27167001

  12. Subcortical effects of transcranial direct current stimulation in the rat.

    PubMed

    Bolzoni, F; Bączyk, M; Jankowska, E

    2013-08-15

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) affects neurons at both cortical and subcortical levels. The subcortical effects involve several descending motor systems but appeared to be relatively weak, as only small increases in the amplitude of subcortically initiated descending volleys and a minute shortening of latencies of these volleys were found. The aim of the present study was therefore to evaluate the consequences of facilitation of these volleys on the ensuing muscle activation. The experiments were carried out on deeply anaesthetized rats without neuromuscular blockade. Effects of tDCS were tested on EMG potentials recorded from neck muscles evoked by weak (20-60 μA) single, double or triple stimuli applied in the medial longitudinal fascicle (MLF) or in the red nucleus (RN). Short latencies of these potentials were compatible with monosynaptic or disynaptic actions of reticulospinal and disynaptic or trisynaptic actions of rubrospinal neurons on neck motoneurons. Despite only weak effects on indirect descending volleys, the EMG responses from both the MLF and the RN were potently facilitated by cathodal tDCS and depressed by anodal tDCS. Both the facilitation and the depression developed relatively rapidly (within the first minute) but both outlasted tDCS and were present for up to 1 h after tDCS. The study thus demonstrates long-lasting effects of tDCS on subcortical neurons in the rat, albeit evoked by an opposite polarity of tDCS to that found to be effective on subcortical neurons in the cat investigated in the preceding study, or for cortical neurons in the humans. PMID:23774279

  13. Measuring Bi-Directional Reflectance for Gross Primary Productivity with a Constellation of SmallSats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nag, S.; Gatebe, C. K.; Hilker, T.; Hall, F. G.; de Weck, O. L.

    2014-12-01

    The "missing carbon" problem has plagued the carbon cycle field for over 30 years. A newly proposed constellation of satellites promises to finally close the gap and find the missing carbon. This constellation would measure vegetation from multiple angles at solar wavelengths, essentially measuring the bidirectional reflectance (BRDF), and from this retrieve the Gross Primary Productivity (GPP), something that has eluded space remote sensing community up until now, showing up to 40% uncertainty. The science value of such a BRDF retrieval approach has been demonstrated using multi-angle, multi-spectral measurements from various deployments of the Cloud Absorption Radiometer (CAR) as the "gold standard" data for BRDF estimation. CAR is an airborne instrument operated by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. Initial observing system simulations (OSSE) with four satellites launched as secondary payloads and operating in different imaging modes show BRDF error estimates of less than 12% when compared to CAR measurements, a 50% improvement to the worst case BRDF error produced by corresponding monoliths. However, GPP products require estimating the BRDF of photochemical reflectance index (PRI), which needs angular measurements at the xanthophyll sensitive band (533nm) - unavailable in CAR. The satellite OSSEs will be repeated using AMPSEC tower measurements. AMPSEC is a Unispec-DC (PP Systems, Amesbury,MA, USA) spectroradiometer with 256 contiguous bands with a nominal band spacing of 3 nm and a nominal range of operation between 350 and 1200 nm. The data will be used to estimate parameters of the widely-used Rahman-Pinty-Verstraete (RPV) and RossThin-LiSparseReciprocal (RTnLS) BRDF models. Since AMPSEC reflectance data is obtained at 360 view-azimuth directions and 90 view-zenith directions, satellite clusters will be able to sample only a part of this angular space. To make best use of the satellite-cluster BRDF data, a heuristic optimization method is used to find the

  14. Derivative expansion at small mass for the spinor effective action

    SciTech Connect

    Dunne, Gerald V.; Huet, Adolfo; Hur, Jin; Min, Hyunsoo

    2011-05-15

    We study the small-mass limit of the one-loop spinor effective action, comparing the derivative expansion approximation with exact numerical results that are obtained from an extension to spinor theories of the partial-wave cutoff method. In this approach, one can compute numerically the renormalized one-loop effective action for radially separable gauge field background fields in spinor QED. We highlight an important difference between the small-mass limit of the derivative expansion for spinor and scalar theories.

  15. Antidiabetic effects of glucokinase regulatory protein small-molecule disruptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, David J.; St Jean, David J.; Kurzeja, Robert J. M.; Wahl, Robert C.; Michelsen, Klaus; Cupples, Rod; Chen, Michelle; Wu, John; Sivits, Glenn; Helmering, Joan; Komorowski, Renée; Ashton, Kate S.; Pennington, Lewis D.; Fotsch, Christopher; Vazir, Mukta; Chen, Kui; Chmait, Samer; Zhang, Jiandong; Liu, Longbin; Norman, Mark H.; Andrews, Kristin L.; Bartberger, Michael D.; van, Gwyneth; Galbreath, Elizabeth J.; Vonderfecht, Steven L.; Wang, Minghan; Jordan, Steven R.; Véniant, Murielle M.; Hale, Clarence

    2013-12-01

    Glucose homeostasis is a vital and complex process, and its disruption can cause hyperglycaemia and type II diabetes mellitus. Glucokinase (GK), a key enzyme that regulates glucose homeostasis, converts glucose to glucose-6-phosphate in pancreatic β-cells, liver hepatocytes, specific hypothalamic neurons, and gut enterocytes. In hepatocytes, GK regulates glucose uptake and glycogen synthesis, suppresses glucose production, and is subject to the endogenous inhibitor GK regulatory protein (GKRP). During fasting, GKRP binds, inactivates and sequesters GK in the nucleus, which removes GK from the gluconeogenic process and prevents a futile cycle of glucose phosphorylation. Compounds that directly hyperactivate GK (GK activators) lower blood glucose levels and are being evaluated clinically as potential therapeutics for the treatment of type II diabetes mellitus. However, initial reports indicate that an increased risk of hypoglycaemia is associated with some GK activators. To mitigate the risk of hypoglycaemia, we sought to increase GK activity by blocking GKRP. Here we describe the identification of two potent small-molecule GK-GKRP disruptors (AMG-1694 and AMG-3969) that normalized blood glucose levels in several rodent models of diabetes. These compounds potently reversed the inhibitory effect of GKRP on GK activity and promoted GK translocation both in vitro (isolated hepatocytes) and in vivo (liver). A co-crystal structure of full-length human GKRP in complex with AMG-1694 revealed a previously unknown binding pocket in GKRP distinct from that of the phosphofructose-binding site. Furthermore, with AMG-1694 and AMG-3969 (but not GK activators), blood glucose lowering was restricted to diabetic and not normoglycaemic animals. These findings exploit a new cellular mechanism for lowering blood glucose levels with reduced potential for hypoglycaemic risk in patients with type II diabetes mellitus.

  16. Small Fast Spectrum Reactor Designs Suitable for Direct Nuclear Thermal Propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce G. Schnitzler; Stanley K. Borowski

    2012-07-01

    Advancement of U.S. scientific, security, and economic interests through a robust space exploration program requires high performance propulsion systems to support a variety of robotic and crewed missions beyond low Earth orbit. Past studies, in particular those in support of both the Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI) and Space Exploration Initiative (SEI), have shown nuclear thermal propulsion systems provide superior performance for high mass high propulsive delta-V missions. The recent NASA Design Reference Architecture (DRA) 5.0 Study re-examined mission, payload, and transportation system requirements for a human Mars landing mission in the post-2030 timeframe. Nuclear thermal propulsion was again identified as the preferred in-space transportation system. A common nuclear thermal propulsion stage with three 25,000-lbf thrust engines was used for all primary mission maneuvers. Moderately lower thrust engines may also have important roles. In particular, lower thrust engine designs demonstrating the critical technologies that are directly extensible to other thrust levels are attractive from a ground testing perspective. An extensive nuclear thermal rocket technology development effort was conducted from 1955-1973 under the Rover/NERVA Program. Both graphite and refractory metal alloy fuel types were pursued. Reactors and engines employing graphite based fuels were designed, built and ground tested. A number of fast spectrum reactor and engine designs employing refractory metal alloy fuel types were proposed and designed, but none were built. The Small Nuclear Rocket Engine (SNRE) was the last engine design studied by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during the program. At the time, this engine was a state-of-the-art graphite based fuel design incorporating lessons learned from the very successful technology development program. The SNRE was a nominal 16,000-lbf thrust engine originally intended for unmanned applications with relatively short engine

  17. Small Fast Spectrum Reactor Designs Suitable for Direct Nuclear Thermal Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnitzler, Bruce G.; Borowski, Stanley K.

    2012-01-01

    Advancement of U.S. scientific, security, and economic interests through a robust space exploration program requires high performance propulsion systems to support a variety of robotic and crewed missions beyond low Earth orbit. Past studies, in particular those in support of the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI), have shown nuclear thermal propulsion systems provide superior performance for high mass high propulsive delta-V missions. The recent NASA Design Reference Architecture (DRA) 5.0 Study re-examined mission, payload, and transportation system requirements for a human Mars landing mission in the post-2030 timeframe. Nuclear thermal propulsion was again identified as the preferred in-space transportation system. A common nuclear thermal propulsion stage with three 25,000-lbf thrust engines was used for all primary mission maneuvers. Moderately lower thrust engines may also have important roles. In particular, lower thrust engine designs demonstrating the critical technologies that are directly extensible to other thrust levels are attractive from a ground testing perspective. An extensive nuclear thermal rocket technology development effort was conducted from 1955-1973 under the Rover/NERVA Program. Both graphite and refractory metal alloy fuel types were pursued. Reactors and engines employing graphite based fuels were designed, built and ground tested. A number of fast spectrum reactor and engine designs employing refractory metal alloy fuel types were proposed and designed, but none were built. The Small Nuclear Rocket Engine (SNRE) was the last engine design studied by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during the program. At the time, this engine was a state-of-the-art graphite based fuel design incorporating lessons learned from the very successful technology development program. The SNRE was a nominal 16,000-lbf thrust engine originally intended for unmanned applications with relatively short engine operations and the engine and stage design were

  18. Using the sensitive dependence of chaos (the butterfly effect'') to direct trajectories in an experimental chaotic system

    SciTech Connect

    Shinbrot, T.; Ditto, W.; Grebogi, C.; Ott, E.; Spano, M.; Yorke, J.A. Department of Physics, The College of Wooster, Wooster, Ohio 44691 Naval Surface Warfare Center, Silver Spring, Maryland 20902 )

    1992-05-11

    In this paper we present the first experimental verification that the sensitivity of a chaotic system to small perturbations (the butterfly effect'') can be used to rapidly direct orbits from an arbitrary initial state to an arbitrary accessible desired state.

  19. Effects of Racial Composition on Small Work Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruhe, John; Eatman, John

    1977-01-01

    Evaluates the effect of integration and segregation of Blacks and whites in a small group setting in a work environment. Discriminant analysis suggests that while few behavioral and attitudinal differences exist between Blacks and whites, integration is beneficial to Blacks and not detrimental to whites. (Author)

  20. A small molecule inhibitor of tropomyosin dissociates actin binding from tropomyosin-directed regulation of actin dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Bonello, Teresa T.; Janco, Miro; Hook, Jeff; Byun, Alex; Appaduray, Mark; Dedova, Irina; Hitchcock-DeGregori, Sarah; Hardeman, Edna C.; Stehn, Justine R.; Böcking, Till; Gunning, Peter W.

    2016-01-01

    The tropomyosin family of proteins form end-to-end polymers along the actin filament. Tumour cells rely on specific tropomyosin-containing actin filament populations for growth and survival. To dissect out the role of tropomyosin in actin filament regulation we use the small molecule TR100 directed against the C terminus of the tropomyosin isoform Tpm3.1. TR100 nullifies the effect of Tpm3.1 on actin depolymerisation but surprisingly Tpm3.1 retains the capacity to bind F-actin in a cooperative manner. In vivo analysis also confirms that, in the presence of TR100, fluorescently tagged Tpm3.1 recovers normally into stress fibers. Assembling end-to-end along the actin filament is thereby not sufficient for tropomyosin to fulfil its function. Rather, regulation of F-actin stability by tropomyosin requires fidelity of information communicated at the barbed end of the actin filament. This distinction has significant implications for perturbing tropomyosin-dependent actin filament function in the context of anti-cancer drug development. PMID:26804624

  1. Small-Molecule-Directed Hepatocyte-Like Cell Differentiation of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Mathapati, Santosh; Siller, Richard; Impellizzeri, Agata A R; Lycke, Max; Vegheim, Karianne; Almaas, Runar; Sullivan, Gareth J

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs) generated in vitro from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) provide an invaluable resource for basic research, regenerative medicine, drug screening, toxicology, and modeling of liver disease and development. This unit describes a small-molecule-driven protocol for in vitro differentiation of hPSCs into HLCs without the use of growth factors. hPSCs are coaxed through a developmentally relevant route via the primitive streak to definitive endoderm (DE) using the small molecule CHIR99021 (a Wnt agonist), replacing the conventional growth factors Wnt3A and activin A. The small-molecule-derived DE is then differentiated to hepatoblast-like cells in the presence of dimethyl sulfoxide. The resulting hepatoblasts are then differentiated to HLCs with N-hexanoic-Tyr, Ile-6 aminohexanoic amide (Dihexa, a hepatocyte growth factor agonist) and dexamethasone. The protocol provides an efficient and reproducible procedure for differentiation of hPSCs into HLCs utilizing small molecules. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27532814

  2. A Direct, Competitive Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) as a Quantitative Technique for Small Molecules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Jennifer L.; Rippe, Karen Duda; Imarhia, Kelly; Swift, Aileen; Scholten, Melanie; Islam, Naina

    2012-01-01

    ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) is a widely used technique with applications in disease diagnosis, detection of contaminated foods, and screening for drugs of abuse or environmental contaminants. However, published protocols with a focus on quantitative detection of small molecules designed for teaching laboratories are limited. A…

  3. Peer Modeling of Academic and Social Behaviors during Small-Group Direct Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ledford, Jennifer R.; Wolery, Mark

    2013-01-01

    The authors describe an intervention for 3 preschoolers with disabilities who had low peer-related social competence. The intervention taught academic skills tailored to the need of each target student in small groups (triads) with two typically developing peers, using a progressive time delay procedure. Prior to instruction and separate from the…

  4. Peer Modeling of Commenting during Small Group Direct Instruction for Academic Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urlacher, Sarah; Wolery, Mark; Ledford, Jennifer R.

    2016-01-01

    During small group instruction, two groups of children--each group comprised of one child with a disability and two without disabilities--were taught to read words using a progressive time delay procedure (PTD). Apart from the children with disabilities, two typically developing peers in each group were taught to comment on tokens given for…

  5. SUCCESSIVE SOLAR ERUPTIONS TRIGGERED BY THE COLLISION OF TWO SMALL SUNSPOTS WITH OPPOSITE POLARITIES AND MOTIONAL DIRECTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, X. L.; Qu, Z. Q.; Kong, D. F.

    2012-03-15

    We present a study of the two successive M-class flares associated with two coronal mass ejections (CMEs) triggered by the collision of two small sunspots with opposite magnetic polarities and motional directions in NOAA active region (AR) 10484 on 2003 October 22. From the evolution of this AR in the TRACE white-light images and 96 minute line-of-sight magnetograms observed by the Michelson Doppler Imager on board SOHO, a large sunspot and a small sunspot with negative polarity rotated clockwise about 33 Degree-Sign and 18 Degree-Sign , respectively, from the northeast of a quiescent sunspot with negative polarity to the southeast from 15:00 UT on October 21 to 16:24 UT on October 23. During the process of their motion, the small sunspot with negative polarity collided with the small sunspot with positive polarity and opposite motional direction. In the collision, this AR produced two successive M-class flares and CMEs according to the observations of GOES and the Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph. By analyzing the magnetic fields at polarity inversion lines (PILs) between the two small sunspot, it is found that a sudden squeeze occurred near the onset of the two M-class flares and then recovered itself after the flares. We ruled out the emergence of the magnetic fields near the PIL. According to the brightenings in TRACE 1600 A and the hard X-ray sources of the RHESSI of two M-class flares, we found that the locations of the two flares are almost situated in the same location at the PIL between the two small sunspots. We suggest that the sudden squeeze between the opposite magnetic polarities is caused by the pressure of the collision of the two small sunspots and resulted in the magnetic reconnection. These results could contribute to understanding the mechanism of flares and CMEs.

  6. Directional Site Amplification Effect on Tarzana Hill, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graizer, V.; Shakal, A.

    2003-12-01

    amplification from the bottom of the hole to the surface at periods greater than 1.5 sec, in either direction. The directional effect at Tarzana hill seems to be azimuth dependent. Relatively higher amplification at the perpendicular component is produced for the earthquake sources located north of the station. We were not able to see any differences in hill response before and after development (a relatively small part of the hill was developed). The source of the site amplification that produces large motions at Tarzana is still under investigation with "the usual suspects" like topography and shear wave velocity profile not providing the explanation. New data recorded at Tarzana in recent years clearly show that the Tarzana effect is a very localized high-frequency effect observed only at the top of the hill. Drilling at Tarzana was co-funded by CSMIP and by the National Science Foundation through the Resolution of Site Response Issues from the Northridge Earthquake Project (ROSRINE).

  7. Empirical Analysis of Effects of Bank Mergers and Acquisitions on Small Business Lending in Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ita, Asuquo Akabom

    2012-11-01

    Mergers and acquisitions are the major instruments of the recent banking reforms in Nigeria.The effects and the implications of the reforms on the lending practices of merged banks to small businesses were considered in this study. These effects were divided into static and dynamic effects (restructuring, direct and external). Data were collected by cross-sectional research design and were subsequently analyzed by the ordinary least square (OLS) method.The analyses show that bank size, financial characteristics and deposit of non-merged banks are positively related to small business lending. While for the merged banks, the reverse is the case. From the above result, it is evident that merger and acquisition have not only static effect on small business lending but also dynamic effect, therefore, given the central position of small businesses in the current government policy on industrialization in Nigeria, policy makers in Nigeria, should consider both the static and dynamic effects of merger and acquisition on small business lending in their policy thrust.

  8. Combining Small Molecule with Block Copolymer: a Facile Approach to Direct Hierarchical Assembly of Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ting

    2009-03-01

    Precise control over the spatial organization of nanoscopic building blocks over multiple length scales is a bottleneck in the ``bottom-up'' approach to generate technologically important materials. We demonstrate a new paradigm to control the hierarchical assembly of nanoparticles through the synergistic co-assembly of block copolymers (BCP), small molecules and readily available nanoparticles. Organizations of nanoparticles into one, two and three-dimensional arrays with controlled inter-particle separation and ordering were achieved without any chemical modification of either the nanoparticles or BCPs. The ordering and distribution of small molecules between different BCP blocks are temperature dependent, leading to responsive materials where the spatial distribution of the nanoparticles can be varied, changing the local environment and the areal density of the nanoparticles. The approach described is versatile; compatible with existing fabrication processes and enables a nondisruptive approach for the generation of functional devices.

  9. Effects of small halocarbon molecules on reverse osmosis membrane performance

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, R.C.; Glater, J.; Neethling, J.B. )

    1990-01-01

    The reverse osmosis (RO) membrane industry has long been concerned with problems of performance decline due to fouling. Colloidal and biological fouling have been discussed to some extent in the literature but little is known about the effect of small organic molecules on membrane performance. The work reported in this paper involved controlled laboratory experiments with three small halocarbons and three different types of commercial RO membranes. The compounds used were CHCl{sub 3}, CHBr{sub 3} and CCl{sub 4}. The first two represent typical small and large THM's. Carbon tetrachloride was selected as a non-polar model compound. Membranes representing three different polymer systems were provided by E. I. du Pont Inc.

  10. Simple, distance-dependent formulation of the Watts-Strogatz model for directed and undirected small-world networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, H. Francis; Wang, Xiao-Jing

    2014-12-01

    Small-world networks—complex networks characterized by a combination of high clustering and short path lengths—are widely studied using the paradigmatic model of Watts and Strogatz (WS). Although the WS model is already quite minimal and intuitive, we describe an alternative formulation of the WS model in terms of a distance-dependent probability of connection that further simplifies, both practically and theoretically, the generation of directed and undirected WS-type small-world networks. In addition to highlighting an essential feature of the WS model that has previously been overlooked, namely the equivalence to a simple distance-dependent model, this alternative formulation makes it possible to derive exact expressions for quantities such as the degree and motif distributions and global clustering coefficient for both directed and undirected networks in terms of model parameters.

  11. Simple, distance-dependent formulation of the Watts-Strogatz model for directed and undirected small-world networks.

    PubMed

    Song, H Francis; Wang, Xiao-Jing

    2014-12-01

    Small-world networks-complex networks characterized by a combination of high clustering and short path lengths-are widely studied using the paradigmatic model of Watts and Strogatz (WS). Although the WS model is already quite minimal and intuitive, we describe an alternative formulation of the WS model in terms of a distance-dependent probability of connection that further simplifies, both practically and theoretically, the generation of directed and undirected WS-type small-world networks. In addition to highlighting an essential feature of the WS model that has previously been overlooked, namely the equivalence to a simple distance-dependent model, this alternative formulation makes it possible to derive exact expressions for quantities such as the degree and motif distributions and global clustering coefficient for both directed and undirected networks in terms of model parameters.

  12. Direct Reprogramming of Mouse Fibroblasts to Neural Stem Cells by Small Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yan-Chuang; Lim, Yoon; Duffieldl, Michael D.; Li, Hua; Liu, Jia; Abdul Manaph, Nimshitha Pavathuparambil; Yang, Miao; Keating, Damien J.; Zhou, Xin-Fu

    2016-01-01

    Although it is possible to generate neural stem cells (NSC) from somatic cells by reprogramming technologies with transcription factors, clinical utilization of patient-specific NSC for the treatment of human diseases remains elusive. The risk hurdles are associated with viral transduction vectors induced mutagenesis, tumor formation from undifferentiated stem cells, and transcription factors-induced genomic instability. Here we describe a viral vector-free and more efficient method to induce mouse fibroblasts into NSC using small molecules. The small molecule-induced neural stem (SMINS) cells closely resemble NSC in morphology, gene expression patterns, self-renewal, excitability, and multipotency. Furthermore, the SMINS cells are able to differentiate into astrocytes, functional neurons, and oligodendrocytes in vitro and in vivo. Thus, we have established a novel way to efficiently induce neural stem cells (iNSC) from fibroblasts using only small molecules without altering the genome. Such chemical induction removes the risks associated with current techniques such as the use of viral vectors or the induction of oncogenic factors. This technique may, therefore, enable NSC to be utilized in various applications within clinical medicine. PMID:26788068

  13. Effective Practice in the Design of Directed Independent Learning Opportunities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Liz; Jones, Robert; Ottaway, James

    2015-01-01

    This study, commissioned by the HEA and the QAA focuses on directed independent learning practices in UK higher education. It investigates what stakeholders (including academic staff and students) have found to be the most effective practices in the inception, design, quality assurance and enhancement of directed independent learning and explores…

  14. Direct observation of stress accumulation and relaxation in small bundles of superconducting vortices in tungsten thin films.

    PubMed

    Guillamón, I; Suderow, H; Vieira, S; Sesé, J; Córdoba, R; De Teresa, J M; Ibarra, M R

    2011-02-18

    We study the behavior of bundles of superconducting vortices when increasing the magnetic field using scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy at 100 mK. Pinning centers are given by features on the surface corrugation. We find strong net vortex motion in a bundle towards a well-defined direction. We observe continuous changes of the vortex arrangements, and identify small displacements, which stress and deform the vortex bundle, separated by larger rearrangements or avalanches, which release accumulated stress. PMID:21405532

  15. Outward Foreign Direct Investment and Human Capital Development: A Small Country Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonnell, Anthony

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the pattern of outward foreign direct investment (FDI) by Irish MNCs, and more specifically, to investigate their approach to human capital development and how these correspond to foreign MNCs in Ireland. In particular, it seeks to investigate training and development expenditure, adoption of…

  16. Direct radiative effect by multicomponent aerosol over China

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Xin; Song, Yu; Zhao, Chun; Cai, Xuhui; Zhang, Hongsheng; Zhu, Tong

    2015-05-01

    The direct radiative effect (DRE) of multiple aerosol species (sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, black carbon (BC), organic carbon (OC), and mineral aerosol) and their spatiotemporal variations over China were investigated using a fully coupled meteorology–chemistry model (WRF-Chem) for the entire year of 2006. We made modifications to improve model performance, including updating land surface parameters, improving the calculation of transition metal-catalyzed oxidation of SO2, and adding in heterogeneous reactions between mineral aerosol and acid gases. The modified model well reproduced the magnitude, seasonal pattern, and spatial distribution of the measured meteorological conditions, concentrations of PM10 and its components, and aerosol optical depth (AOD). A diagnostic iteration method was used to estimate the overall DRE of aerosols and contributions from different components. At the land surface, all kinds of aerosol species reduced the incident net radiation flux with a total DRE of 10.2 W m-2 over China. Aerosols significantly warm the atmosphere with the national mean DRE of +10.8 W m-2. BC was the leading radiative-heating component (+8.7 W m-2), followed by mineral aerosol (+1.1 W m-2). At the top of the atmosphere (TOA), BC introduced the largest radiative perturbation (+4.5 W m-2), followed by sulfate (-1.4 W m-2). The overall perturbation of aerosols on radiation transfer is quite small over China, demonstrating the counterbalancing effect between scattering and adsorbing aerosols. Aerosol DRE at the TOA had distinct seasonality, generally with a summer maximum and winter minimum, mainly determined by mass loadings, hygroscopic growth, and incident radiation flux.

  17. Laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry for direct profiling and imaging of small molecules from raw biological materials

    SciTech Connect

    Cha, Sangwon

    2008-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization(MALDI) mass spectrometry(MS) has been widely used for analysis of biological molecules, especially macromolecules such as proteins. However, MALDI MS has a problem in small molecule (less than 1 kDa) analysis because of the signal saturation by organic matrixes in the low mass region. In imaging MS (IMS), inhomogeneous surface formation due to the co-crystallization process by organic MALDI matrixes limits the spatial resolution of the mass spectral image. Therefore, to make laser desorption/ionization (LDI) MS more suitable for mass spectral profiling and imaging of small molecules directly from raw biological tissues, LDI MS protocols with various alternative assisting materials were developed and applied to many biological systems of interest. Colloidal graphite was used as a matrix for IMS of small molecules for the first time and methodologies for analyses of small metabolites in rat brain tissues, fruits, and plant tissues were developed. With rat brain tissues, the signal enhancement for cerebroside species by colloidal graphite was observed and images of cerebrosides were successfully generated by IMS. In addition, separation of isobaric lipid ions was performed by imaging tandem MS. Directly from Arabidopsis flowers, flavonoids were successfully profiled and heterogeneous distribution of flavonoids in petals was observed for the first time by graphite-assisted LDI(GALDI) IMS.

  18. The effect of morphine in rat small mesenteric arteries.

    PubMed

    Ozdem, Sadi S; Batu, Ozlem; Tayfun, Fatma; Yalcin, Ozlem; Meiselman, Herbert J; Baskurt, Oguz K

    2005-06-01

    We investigated the effect of morphine in phenylephrine (PE)- or KCl-precontracted rat small mesenteric arteries. Morphine (10(-6)-10(-4) M) administration caused concentration-dependent relaxation responses in small mesenteric arteries precontracted by PE or KCl. Removal of endothelium did not significantly alter the relaxation responses to morphine. The relaxant responses to morphine were partially inhibited by pre-treatment of tissues with naloxone (NAL, 10(-5) M) for 20 min. The inhibitory effect of NAL on relaxant responses to morphine in PE- or KCl-precontracted arteries did not differ significantly between endothelium-intact and endothelium-denuded preparations. Incubation of endothelium-intact or endothelium-denuded arterial segments with NOS inhibitor N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, 10(-4) M) or cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitor indomethacin (10(-5) M) or histamine H(1)-receptor blocker diphenhydramine (10(-6) M), for 20 min did not inhibit the relaxation responses to morphine. Small mesenteric arterial segment contractions induced by stepwise addition of calcium to high KCl solution with no calcium were almost completely inhibited by morphine. These findings suggested that morphine-induced relaxation responses in isolated rat small mesenteric arteries were neither dependent on endothelium nor blocked by NOS or COX inhibition but they rather seem to depend on an interaction of morphine with calcium influx pathways. PMID:15939674

  19. A study of some effects of urbanization on storm runoff from a small watershed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Espey, William Howard, Jr.; Morgan, Carl W.; Masch, Frank D.

    1966-01-01

    The evaluation of the effects of urbanization on the runoff characteristics of a small watershed is a problem that can be studied by either a short-range or a long-range investigation. Because the long-range type of investigation would require several years for hydrologic data accumulation, it cannot provide any immediate information on the changes in watershed behavior arising as a result of urbanization. A short-range investigation, however, based on synthetic evaluation of present data would provide immediate answers. It is in the realm of this short-range objective that this study of a small urban watershed is directed.

  20. Design of Small MEMS Microphone Array Systems for Direction Finding of Outdoors Moving Vehicles

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xin; Huang, Jingchang; Song, Enliang; Liu, Huawei; Li, Baoqing; Yuan, Xiaobing

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a MEMS microphone array system scheme is proposed which implements real-time direction of arrival (DOA) estimation for moving vehicles. Wind noise is the primary source of unwanted noise on microphones outdoors. A multiple signal classification (MUSIC) algorithm is used in this paper for direction finding associated with spatial coherence to discriminate between the wind noise and the acoustic signals of a vehicle. The method is implemented in a SHARC DSP processor and the real-time estimated DOA is uploaded through Bluetooth or a UART module. Experimental results in different places show the validity of the system and the deviation is no bigger than 6° in the presence of wind noise. PMID:24603636

  1. Design of small MEMS microphone array systems for direction finding of outdoors moving vehicles.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; Huang, Jingchang; Song, Enliang; Liu, Huawei; Li, Baoqing; Yuan, Xiaobing

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a MEMS microphone array system scheme is proposed which implements real-time direction of arrival (DOA) estimation for moving vehicles. Wind noise is the primary source of unwanted noise on microphones outdoors. A multiple signal classification (MUSIC) algorithm is used in this paper for direction finding associated with spatial coherence to discriminate between the wind noise and the acoustic signals of a vehicle. The method is implemented in a SHARC DSP processor and the real-time estimated DOA is uploaded through Bluetooth or a UART module. Experimental results in different places show the validity of the system and the deviation is no bigger than 6° in the presence of wind noise.

  2. Development of CNG direct injection (CNGDI) clean fuel system for extra power in small engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Yusoff; Shamsudeen, Azhari; Abdullah, Shahrir; Mahmood, Wan Mohd Faizal Wan

    2012-06-01

    A new design of fuel system for CNG engine with direct injection (CNGDI) was developed for a demonstration project. The development of the fuel system was done on the engine with cylinder head modifications, for fuel injector and spark plug openings included in the new cylinder head. The piston was also redesigned for higher compression ratio. The fuel rails and the regulators are also designed for the direct injection system operating at higher pressure about 2.0 MPa. The control of the injection timing for the direct injectors are also controlled by the Electronic Control Unit specially designed for DI by another group project. The injectors are selected after testing with the various injection pressures and spray angles. For the best performance of the high-pressure system, selection is made from the tests on single cylinder research engine (SCRE). The components in the fuel system have to be of higher quality and complied with codes and standards to secure the safety of engine for high-pressure operation. The results of the CNGDI have shown that better power output is produced and better emissions were achieved compared to the aspirated CNG engine.

  3. Direct current electrical potential measurement of the growth of small cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangloff, Richard P.; Slavik, Donald C.; Piascik, Robert S.; Van Stone, Robert H.

    1992-01-01

    The analytical and experimental aspects of the direct-current electrical potential difference (dcEPD) method for continuous monitoring of the growth kinetics of short (50 to 500 microns) fatigue cracks are reviewed, and successful applications of the deEPD method to study fatigue crack propagation in a variety of metallic alloys exposed to various environments are described. Particular attention is given to the principle of the dcEPD method, the analytical electrical potential calibration relationships, and the experimental procedures and equipment.

  4. Towards Small-Sized Long Tail Business with the Dual-Directed Recommendation System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Masakazu; Yamada, Takashi; Tsuda, Kazuhiko; Terano, Takao

    This paper describes a novel architecture to promote retail businesses using information recommendation systems. The main features of the architecture are 1) Dual-directed Recommendation system, 2) Portal site for three kinds of users: Producers, Retailers, and Consumers, which are considered to be Prosumers, and 3) Agent-based implementation. We have developed a web-based system DAIKOC (Dynamic Advisor for Information and Knowledge Oriented Communities) with the above architecture. In this paper, we focus on the recommendation functions to extract the items that will achieve the large sales in the future from the ID (IDentification)-POS (Point-Of-Sales) data.

  5. Terrestrial matter effects on reactor antineutrino oscillations at JUNO or RENO-50: how small is small?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yu-feng; Wang, Yi-fang; Xing, Zhi-zhong

    2016-09-01

    We have carefully examined, in both analytical and numerical ways, how small the terrestrial matter effects can be in a given medium-baseline reactor antineutrino oscillation experiment like JUNO or RENO-50. Taking the forthcoming JUNO experiment as an example, we show that the inclusion of terrestrial matter effects may reduce the sensitivity of the neutrino mass ordering measurement by and a neglect of such effects may shift the best-fit values of the flavor mixing angle θ12 and the neutrino mass-squared difference Δ21 by about 1σ to 2σ in the future data analysis. In addition, a preliminary estimate indicates that a 2σ sensitivity of establishing the terrestrial matter effects can be achieved for about 10 years of data taking at JUNO with the help of a suitable near detector implementation. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11135009, 11305193), the Strategic Priority Research Program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (XDA10010100) and the CAS Center for Excellence in Particle Physics

  6. Small-molecule-directed nanoparticle assembly towards stimuli-responsive nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yue; Thorkelsson, Kari; Mastroianni, Alexander J.; Schilling, Thomas; Luther, Joseph M.; Rancatore, Benjamin J.; Matsunaga, Kazuyuki; Jinnai, Hiroshi; Wu, Yue; Poulsen, Daniel; Fréchet, Jean M. J.; Paul Alivisatos, A.; Xu, Ting

    2009-12-01

    Precise control of the spatial organization of nanoscopic building blocks, such as nanoparticles, over multiple length scales is a bottleneck in the `bottom-up' generation of technologically important materials. Only a few approaches have been shown to achieve nanoparticle assemblies without surface modification. We demonstrate a simple yet versatile approach to produce stimuli-responsive hierarchical assemblies of readily available nanoparticles by combining small molecules and block copolymers. Organization of nanoparticles into one-, two- and three-dimensional arrays with controlled inter-particle separation and ordering is achieved without chemical modification of either the nanoparticles or block copolymers. Nanocomposites responsive to heat and light are demonstrated, where the spatial distribution of the nanoparticles can be varied by exposure to heat or light or changing the local environment. The approach described is applicable to a wide range of nanoparticles and compatible with existing fabrication processes, thereby enabling a non-disruptive approach for the generation of functional devices.

  7. A small molecule that directs differentiation of human ESCs into the pancreatic lineage.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuibing; Borowiak, Malgorzata; Fox, Julia L; Maehr, René; Osafune, Kenji; Davidow, Lance; Lam, Kelvin; Peng, Lee F; Schreiber, Stuart L; Rubin, Lee L; Melton, Douglas

    2009-04-01

    Stepwise differentiation from embryonic stem cells (ESCs) to functional insulin-secreting beta cells will identify key steps in beta-cell development and may yet prove useful for transplantation therapy for diabetics. An essential step in this schema is the generation of pancreatic progenitors--cells that express Pdx1 and produce all the cell types of the pancreas. High-content chemical screening identified a small molecule, (-)-indolactam V, that induces differentiation of a substantial number of Pdx1-expressing cells from human ESCs. The Pdx1-expressing cells express other pancreatic markers and contribute to endocrine, exocrine and duct cells, in vitro and in vivo. Further analyses showed that (-)-indolactam V works specifically at one stage of pancreatic development, inducing pancreatic progenitors from definitive endoderm. This study describes a chemical screening platform to investigate human ESC differentiation and demonstrates the generation of a cell population that is a key milepost on the path to making beta cells. PMID:19287398

  8. Stimulus characteristics within directives: effects on accuracy of task completion.

    PubMed Central

    Richman, D M; Wacker, D P; Cooper-Brown, L J; Kayser, K; Crosland, K; Stephens, T J; Asmus, J

    2001-01-01

    Three experiments were conducted in an outpatient setting with young children who had been referred for treatment of noncompliant behavior and who had coexisting receptive language or receptive vocabulary difficulties. Experiment 1 studied differential responding of the participants to a brief hierarchical directive analysis (least-to-most complex stimulus prompts) to identify directives that functioned as discriminative stimuli for accurate responding. Experiment 1 identified distinct patterns of accurate responding relative to manipulation of directive stimulus characteristics. Experiment 2 demonstrated that directives identified as effective or ineffective in obtaining stimulus control of accurate responding during Experiment 1 continued to control accurate responding across play activities and academic tasks. Experiment 3 probed effects of the interaction between the type of directive (effective vs. ineffective) and the reinforcement contingency (differential reinforcement for attempts vs. differential reinforcement for accurate responses) on accurate task completion and disruptive behavior. Results suggested that behavioral escalation from inaccurate responding to disruptive behavior occurred only when ineffective directives were combined with differential reinforcement for accurate task completion. The overall results are discussed in terms of developing a methodology for identifying stimulus characteristics of directives that affect accurate responding. PMID:11678525

  9. Stimulus characteristics within directives: effects on accuracy of task completion.

    PubMed

    Richman, D M; Wacker, D P; Cooper-Brown, L J; Kayser, K; Crosland, K; Stephens, T J; Asmus, J

    2001-01-01

    Three experiments were conducted in an outpatient setting with young children who had been referred for treatment of noncompliant behavior and who had coexisting receptive language or receptive vocabulary difficulties. Experiment 1 studied differential responding of the participants to a brief hierarchical directive analysis (least-to-most complex stimulus prompts) to identify directives that functioned as discriminative stimuli for accurate responding. Experiment 1 identified distinct patterns of accurate responding relative to manipulation of directive stimulus characteristics. Experiment 2 demonstrated that directives identified as effective or ineffective in obtaining stimulus control of accurate responding during Experiment 1 continued to control accurate responding across play activities and academic tasks. Experiment 3 probed effects of the interaction between the type of directive (effective vs. ineffective) and the reinforcement contingency (differential reinforcement for attempts vs. differential reinforcement for accurate responses) on accurate task completion and disruptive behavior. Results suggested that behavioral escalation from inaccurate responding to disruptive behavior occurred only when ineffective directives were combined with differential reinforcement for accurate task completion. The overall results are discussed in terms of developing a methodology for identifying stimulus characteristics of directives that affect accurate responding.

  10. Potent Host-Directed Small-Molecule Inhibitors of Myxovirus RNA-Dependent RNA-Polymerases

    PubMed Central

    Krumm, Stefanie A.; Ndungu, J. Maina; Yoon, Jeong-Joong; Dochow, Melanie; Sun, Aiming; Natchus, Michael; Snyder, James P.; Plemper, Richard K.

    2011-01-01

    Therapeutic targeting of host cell factors required for virus replication rather than of pathogen components opens new perspectives to counteract virus infections. Anticipated advantages of this approach include a heightened barrier against the development of viral resistance and a broadened pathogen target spectrum. Myxoviruses are predominantly associated with acute disease and thus are particularly attractive for this approach since treatment time can be kept limited. To identify inhibitor candidates, we have analyzed hit compounds that emerged from a large-scale high-throughput screen for their ability to block replication of members of both the orthomyxovirus and paramyxovirus families. This has returned a compound class with broad anti-viral activity including potent inhibition of different influenza virus and paramyxovirus strains. After hit-to-lead chemistry, inhibitory concentrations are in the nanomolar range in the context of immortalized cell lines and human PBMCs. The compound shows high metabolic stability when exposed to human S-9 hepatocyte subcellular fractions. Antiviral activity is host-cell species specific and most pronounced in cells of higher mammalian origin, supporting a host-cell target. While the compound induces a temporary cell cycle arrest, host mRNA and protein biosynthesis are largely unaffected and treated cells maintain full metabolic activity. Viral replication is blocked at a post-entry step and resembles the inhibition profile of a known inhibitor of viral RNA-dependent RNA-polymerase (RdRp) activity. Direct assessment of RdRp activity in the presence of the reagent reveals strong inhibition both in the context of viral infection and in reporter-based minireplicon assays. In toto, we have identified a compound class with broad viral target range that blocks host factors required for viral RdRp activity. Viral adaptation attempts did not induce resistance after prolonged exposure, in contrast to rapid adaptation to a pathogen-directed

  11. Effect of Direct Grammar Instruction on Student Writing Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Lisa; Feng, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Grammar Instruction has an important role to play in helping students to speak and write more effectively. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of direct grammar instruction on the quality of student's writing skills. The participants in this study included 18 fifth grade students and two fifth grade teachers. Based on the results…

  12. Greenhouse Gas Sensing Using Small Unmanned Aerial Systems - Field Experiment Results and Future Directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubrey, A. D.; Christensen, L. E.; Brockers, R.; Thompson, D. R.

    2014-12-01

    Requirements for greenhouse gas point source detection and quantification often require high spatial resolution on the order of meters. These applications, which help close the gap in emissions estimate uncertainties, also demand sensing with high sensitivity and in a fashion that accounts for spatiotemporal variability on the order of seconds to minutes. Low-cost vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) small unmanned aerial systems (sUAS) provide a means to detect and identify the location of point source gas emissions while offering ease of deployment and high maneuverability. Our current fielded gas sensing sUAS platforms are able to provide instantaneous in situ concentration measurements at locations within line of sight of the operator. Recent results from field experiments demonstrating methane detection and plume characterization will be discussed here, including performance assessment conducted via a controlled release experiment in 2013. The logical extension of sUAS gas concentration measurement is quantification of flux rate. We will discuss the preliminary strategy for quantitative flux determination, including intrinsic challenges and heritage from airborne science campaigns, associated with this point source flux quantification. This system approach forms the basis for intelligent autonomous quantitative characterization of gas plumes, which holds great value for applications in commercial, regulatory, and safety environments.

  13. Small-molecule–directed, efficient generation of retinal pigment epithelium from human pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Maruotti, Julien; Sripathi, Srinivas R.; Bharti, Kapil; Fuller, John; Wahlin, Karl J.; Ranganathan, Vinod; Sluch, Valentin M.; Berlinicke, Cynthia A.; Davis, Janine; Kim, Catherine; Zhao, Lijun; Wan, Jun; Qian, Jiang; Corneo, Barbara; Temple, Sally; Dubey, Ramin; Olenyuk, Bogdan Z.; Bhutto, Imran; Lutty, Gerard A.; Zack, Donald J.

    2015-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is associated with dysfunction and death of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells. Cell-based approaches using RPE-like cells derived from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) are being developed for AMD treatment. However, most efficient RPE differentiation protocols rely on complex, stepwise treatments and addition of growth factors, whereas small-molecule–only approaches developed to date display reduced yields. To identify new compounds that promote RPE differentiation, we developed and performed a high-throughput quantitative PCR screen complemented by a novel orthogonal human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC)-based RPE reporter assay. Chetomin, an inhibitor of hypoxia-inducible factors, was found to strongly increase RPE differentiation; combination with nicotinamide resulted in conversion of over one-half of the differentiating cells into RPE. Single passage of the whole culture yielded a highly pure hPSC-RPE cell population that displayed many of the morphological, molecular, and functional characteristics of native RPE. PMID:26269569

  14. Direct Numerical Simulations of Small-Scale Gravity Wave Instability Dynamics in Variable Stratification and Shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mixa, T.; Fritts, D. C.; Laughman, B.; Wang, L.; Kantha, L. H.

    2015-12-01

    Multiple observations provide compelling evidence that gravity wave dissipation events often occur in multi-scale environments having highly-structured wind and stability profiles extending from the stable boundary layer into the mesosphere and lower thermosphere. Such events tend to be highly localized and thus yield local energy and momentum deposition and efficient secondary gravity wave generation expected to have strong influences at higher altitudes [e.g., Fritts et al., 2013; Baumgarten and Fritts, 2014]. Lidars, radars, and airglow imagers typically cannot achieve the spatial resolution needed to fully quantify these small-scale instability dynamics. Hence, we employ high-resolution modeling to explore these dynamics in representative environments. Specifically, we describe numerical studies of gravity wave packets impinging on a sheet of high stratification and shear and the resulting instabilities and impacts on the gravity wave amplitude and momentum flux for various flow and gravity wave parameters. References: Baumgarten, Gerd, and David C. Fritts (2014). Quantifying Kelvin-Helmholtz instability dynamics observed in noctilucent clouds: 1. Methods and observations. Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres, 119.15, 9324-9337. Fritts, D. C., Wang, L., & Werne, J. A. (2013). Gravity wave-fine structure interactions. Part I: Influences of fine structure form and orientation on flow evolution and instability. Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, 70(12), 3710-3734.

  15. Measurement of plasma momentum exerted on target by a small helicon plasma thruster and comparison with direct thrust measurement.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kazunori; Komuro, Atsushi; Ando, Akira

    2015-02-01

    Momentum, i.e., force, exerted from a small helicon plasma thruster to a target plate is measured simultaneously with a direct thrust measurement using a thrust balance. The calibration coefficient relating a target displacement to a steady-state force is obtained by supplying a dc to a calibration coil mounted on the target, where a force acting to a small permanent magnet located near the coil is directly measured by using a load cell. As the force exerted by the plasma flow to the target plate is in good agreement with the directly measured thrust, the validity of the target technique is demonstrated under the present operating conditions, where the thruster is operated in steady-state. Furthermore, a calibration coefficient relating a swing amplitude of the target to an impulse bit is also obtained by pulsing the calibration coil current. The force exerted by the pulsed plasma, which is estimated from the measured impulse bit and the pulse width, is also in good agreement with that obtained for the steady-state operation; hence, the thrust assessment of the helicon plasma thruster by the target is validated for both the steady-state and pulsed operations. PMID:25725840

  16. The effect of truncation on very small cardiac SPECT camerasystems

    SciTech Connect

    Rohmer, Damien; Eisner, Robert L.; Gullberg, Grant T.

    2006-08-01

    Background: The limited transaxial field-of-view (FOV) of avery small cardiac SPECT camera system causes view-dependent truncationof the projection of structures exterior to, but near the heart. Basictomographic principles suggest that the reconstruction of non-attenuatedtruncated data gives a distortion-free image in the interior of thetruncated region, but the DC term of the Fourier spectrum of thereconstructed image is incorrect, meaning that the intensity scale of thereconstruction is inaccurate. The purpose of this study was tocharacterize the reconstructed image artifacts from truncated data, andto quantify their effects on the measurement of tracer uptake in themyocardial. Particular attention was given to instances where the heartwall is close to hot structures (structures of high activity uptake).Methods: The MCAT phantom was used to simulate a 2D slice of the heartregion. Truncated and non-truncated projections were formed both with andwithout attenuation. The reconstructions were analyzed for artifacts inthe myocardium caused by truncation, and for the effect that attenuationhas relative to increasing those artifacts. Results: The inaccuracy dueto truncation is primarily caused by an incorrect DC component. Forvisualizing theleft ventricular wall, this error is not worse than theeffect of attenuation. The addition of a small hot bowel-like structurenear the left ventricle causes few changes in counts on the wall. Largerartifacts due to the truncation are located at the boundary of thetruncation and can be eliminated by sinogram interpolation. Finally,algebraic reconstruction methods are shown to give better reconstructionresults than an analytical filtered back-projection reconstructionalgorithm. Conclusion: Small inaccuracies in reconstructed images fromsmall FOV camera systems should have little effect on clinicalinterpretation. However, changes in the degree of inaccuracy in countsfrom slice toslice are due to changes in the truncated structures

  17. Simulation-based comparison of noise effects in wavelength modulation spectroscopy and direct absorption TDLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lins, B.; Zinn, P.; Engelbrecht, R.; Schmauss, B.

    2010-08-01

    A simulative investigation of noise effects in wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS) and direct absorption diode laser absorption spectroscopy is presented. Special attention is paid to the impact of quantization noise of the analog-to-digital conversion (ADC) of the photodetector signal in the two detection schemes with the goal of estimating the necessary ADC resolution for each technique. With laser relative intensity noise (RIN), photodetector shot noise and thermal amplifier noise included, the strategies used for noise reduction in direct and wavelength modulation spectroscopy are compared by simulating two respective systems. Results show that because of the combined effects of dithering by RIN and signal averaging, the resolutions required for the direct absorption setup are only slightly higher than for the WMS setup. Only for small contributions of RIN an increase in resolution will significantly improve signal quality in the direct scheme.

  18. Efficient new ribozyme mimics: direct mapping of molecular design principles from small molecules to macromolecular, biomimetic catalysts.

    PubMed

    Putnam, W C; Daniher, A T; Trawick, B N; Bashkin, J K

    2001-05-15

    Dramatic improvements in ribozyme mimics have been achieved by employing the principles of small molecule catalysis to the design of macromolecular, biomimetic reagents. Ribozyme mimics derived from the ligand 2,9-dimethylphenanthroline (neocuproine) show at least 30-fold improvements in efficiency at sequence-specific RNA cleavage when compared with analogous o-phenanthroline- and terpyridine-derived reagents. The suppression of hydroxide-bridged dimers and the greater activation of coordinated water by Cu(II) neocuproine (compared with the o-phenanthroline and terpyridine complexes) better allow Cu(II) to reach its catalytic potential as a biomimetic RNA cleavage agent. This work demonstrates the direct mapping of molecular design principles from small-molecule cleavage to macromolecular cleavage events, generating enhanced biomimetic, sequence-specific RNA cleavage agents.

  19. DIRECT OBSERVATIONS OF MAGNETIC RECONNECTION OUTFLOW AND CME TRIGGERING IN A SMALL ERUPTING SOLAR PROMINENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Reeves, Katharine K.; McCauley, Patrick I.; Tian, Hui

    2015-07-01

    We examine a small prominence eruption that occurred on 2014 May 1 at 01:35 UT and was observed by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrometer (IRIS) and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory. Pre- and post-eruption images were taken by the X-ray Telescope (XRT) on Hinode. Pre-eruption, a dome-like structure exists above the prominence, as demarcated by coronal rain. As the eruption progresses, we find evidence for reconnection between the prominence magnetic field and the overlying field. Fast flows are seen in AIA and IRIS, indicating reconnection outflows. Plane-of-sky flows of 300 km s{sup −1} are observed in the AIA 171 A channel along a potentially reconnected field line. IRIS detects intermittent fast line of sight flows of 200 km s{sup −1} coincident with the AIA flows. Differential emission measure calculations show heating at the origin of the fast flows. Post-eruption XRT images show hot loops probably due to reconfiguration of magnetic fields during the eruption and subsequent heating of plasma in these loops. Although there is evidence for reconnection above the prominence during the eruption, high spatial resolution images from IRIS reveal potential reconnection sites below the prominence. A height–time analysis of the erupting prominence shows a slow initial rise with a velocity of 0.4 km s{sup −1} followed by a rapid acceleration with a final velocity of 250 km s{sup −1}. Brightenings in IRIS during the transition between these two phases indicate the eruption trigger for the fast part of the eruption is likely a tether-cutting mechanism rather than a break-out mechanism.

  20. Direct observation of small cluster mobility and ripening. [during annealing of metal films on amorphous substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinemann, K.; Poppa, H.

    1975-01-01

    Direct evidence is reported for the simultaneous occurrence of Ostwald ripening and short-distance cluster mobility during annealing of discontinuous metal films on clean amorphous substrates. The annealing characteristics of very thin particulate deposits of silver on amorphized clean surfaces of single crystalline thin graphite substrates were studied by in-situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) under controlled environmental conditions (residual gas pressure of 10 to the minus 9th power torr) in the temperature range from 25 to 450 C. Sputter cleaning of the substrate surface, metal deposition, and annealing were monitored by TEM observation. Pseudostereographic presentation of micrographs in different annealing stages, the observation of the annealing behavior at cast shadow edges, and measurements with an electronic image analyzing system were employed to aid the visual perception and the analysis of changes in deposit structure recorded during annealing. Slow Ostwald ripening was found to occur in the entire temperature range, but the overriding surface transport mechanism was short-distance cluster mobility.

  1. Synthesis of stable ultra-small Cu nanoparticles for direct writing flexible electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; Chen, Minfang

    2014-01-01

    In this study, pure Cu nanoparticles (NPs) have been successfully synthesized and the Cu nano-ink was prepared for direct writing on photo paper using a roller pen. The tri-sodium citrate was used as initial reducing-cum-surfactant agent followed by hydrazine as a second massive reducing agent and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) as extra surfactant agent. From the XRD, TEM, and HR-TEM analyses, the synthesized particles are confirmed to be Cu in spherical shape with sizes range of 2.5 ± 1.0 nm. By analyzing the FT-IR spectroscopy and TGA curves, it was found that the obtained particles capped with tri-sodium citrate and CTAB layers are stable to oxidation up to the temperature 228 °C. The reduced size and enhanced air-stability of the Cu NPs result in an improved particle density upon sintering, which is mainly responsible for the increased conductivity of the Cu patterns. The resistivity of Cu patterns sintered in Ar at 160 °C for 2 h is 7.2 ± 0.6 μΩ cm, which is 4.40 times the bulk Cu resistivity. The drawn Cu lines exhibited excellent integrity and good conductivity, which were experimentally tested. Moreover, a Cu electrode and a sample RFID antenna were successfully made.

  2. Cost-Effective Icy Bodies Exploration using Small Satellite Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jonsson, Jonas; Mauro, David; Stupl, Jan; Nayak, Michael; Aziz, Jonathan; Cohen, Aaron; Colaprete, Anthony; Dono-Perez, Andres; Frost, Chad; Klamm, Benjamin; McCafferty, Julian; McKay, Chris; Sears, Derek; Soulage, Michael; Swenson, Jason; Weston, Sasha; Yang Yang, Fan

    2015-01-01

    It has long been known that Saturn's moon Enceladus is expelling water-rich plumes into space, providing passing spacecraft with a window into what is hidden underneath its frozen crust. Recent discoveries indicate that similar events could also occur on other bodies in the solar system, such as Jupiter's moon Europa and the dwarf planet Ceres in the asteroid belt. These plumes provide a possible giant leap forward in the search for organics and assessing habitability beyond Earth, stepping stones toward the long-term goal of finding extraterrestrial life. The United States Congress recently requested mission designs to Europa, to fit within a cost cap of $1B, much less than previous mission designs' estimates. Here, innovative cost-effective small spacecraft designs for the deep-space exploration of these icy worlds, using new and emerging enabling technologies, and how to explore the outer solar system on a budget below the cost horizon of a flagship mission, are investigated. Science requirements, instruments selection, rendezvous trajectories, and spacecraft designs are some topics detailed. The mission concepts revolve around a comparably small-sized and low-cost Plume Chaser spacecraft, instrumented to characterize the vapor constituents encountered on its trajectory. In the event that a plume is not encountered, an ejecta plume can be artificially created by a companion spacecraft, the Plume Maker, on the target body at a location timed with the passage of the Plume Chaser spacecraft. Especially in the case of Ceres, such a mission could be a great complimentary mission to Dawn, as well as a possible future Europa Clipper mission. The comparably small volume of the spacecraft enables a launch to GTO as a secondary payload, providing multiple launch opportunities per year. Plume Maker's design is nearly identical to the Plume Chaser, and fits within the constraints for a secondary payload launch. The cost-effectiveness of small spacecraft missions enables the

  3. Effects of 2D small-scale sedimentary basins on strong ground motion characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Movahedasl, R.; Ghayamghamian, M. R.

    2015-08-01

    A lot of research on the 2D or 3D effects of large-scale basins (within several kilometers depth) have been conducted in the past. However, different 2D aspects of small-scale sedimentary basins (within tens of meters depth) remain in the developing stage. Here, an attempt is made to analyze different aspects of small-scale basins using both numerical and empirical investigations. In the first step, the 2D effects of small-scale basins on strong motion characteristics are numerically examined both in the time and frequency domains. In addition, the effects of input motion are also explained by the results of model excitation in different orthogonal directions. Then, the numerical outcomes are verified by the analysis of actual earthquake data recorded at a downhole array in the Fujisawa small basin, Japan. In the second step, since available recorded earthquake data in small basins with a clear understanding of subsurface geology are very limited, different 2D aspects of the small basin are parametrically investigated. For this purpose, extensive parametrical studies are carried out on the main features of a small basin such as slope angle, shape, infill soil properties, and basin thickness by using the finite difference numerical method. The horizontal and vertical peak ground accelerations of 2D with respect to 1D ones are defined as the horizontal and vertical aggravation factors (AGH and AGV). The AGH and AGV factors show large sensitivity to infill soil properties, shape and thickness, and small sensitivity to slope angle. The values of AGH and AGV factors vary in the range of 0.5-2 with large variations around small basin edges due to wave coupling, conversion, scattering and focusing in the vicinity of small basin edges. These cause a complicated pattern of 2D de-amplification and amplification, which mostly affect the motion in the high frequency range (>1 Hz). Finally, the outcomes provide numerical and field evidence on the 2D effects of small basins

  4. Analytical fuel property effects: Small combustors, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, T. G.; Monty, J. D.; Morton, H. L.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of non-standard aviation fuels on a typical small gas turbine combustor were studied and the effectiveness of design changes intended to counter the effects of these fuels was evaluated. The T700/CT7 turboprop engine family was chosen as being representative of the class of aircraft power plants desired for this study. Fuel properties, as specified by NASA, are characterized by low hydrogen content and high aromatics levels. No. 2 diesel fuel was also evaluated in this program. Results demonstrated the anticipated higher than normal smoke output and flame radiation intensity with resulting increased metal temperatures on the baseline T700 combustor. Three new designs were evaluated using the non standard fuels. The three designs incorporated enhanced cooling features and smoke reduction features. All three designs, when burning the broad specification fuels, exhibited metal temperatures at or below the baseline combustor temperatures on JP-5. Smoke levels were acceptable but higher than predicted.

  5. Direct analytical parameter extraction for SiGe HBTs T-topology small-signal equivalent circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yabin; Fu, Jun; Wang, Yudong; Zhou, Wei; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Zhihong

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, an accurate direct analytical method to extract the model parameters in SiGe HBT T-topology small-signal equivalent circuit is presented. After the pad parasitics and extrinsic circuit elements are determined and removed from the measured S-parameter, the admittance matrix of intrinsic HBT in common-emitter configuration is derived in the form of non-linear rational function, as a function of angular frequency. Eight constants are accurately obtained based on the non-linear rational function fitting over the whole range of frequencies. Then the intrinsic circuit elements are directly determined in an analytical closed-form manner without any numerical optimization or special test structure. The proposed technique is successfully validated with several sized SiGe HBTs from 100 MHz to 20.89 GHz, and excellent agreement is obtained between the measured and simulated S-parameters over the whole frequency range.

  6. Direct analytical parameter extraction for SiGe HBTs T-topology small-signal equivalent circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yabin; Fu, Jun; Wang, Yudong; Zhou, Wei; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Zhihong

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, an accurate direct analytical method to extract the model parameters in SiGe HBT T-topology small-signal equivalent circuit is presented. After the pad parasitics and extrinsic circuit elements are determined and removed from the measured S-parameter, the admittance matrix of intrinsic HBT in common-emitter configuration is derived in the form of non-linear rational function, as a function of angular frequency. Eight constants are accurately obtained based on the non-linear rational function fitting over the whole range of frequencies. Then the intrinsic circuit elements are directly determined in an analytical closed-form manner without any numerical optimization or special test structure. The proposed technique is successfully validated with several sized SiGe HBTs from 100 MHz to 20.89 GHz, and excellent agreement is obtained between the measured and simulated S-parameters over the whole frequency range.

  7. Why is the electrocaloric effect so small in ferroelectrics?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzmán-Verri, G. G.; Littlewood, P. B.

    2016-06-01

    Ferroelectrics are attractive candidate materials for environmentally friendly solid state refrigeration free of greenhouse gases. Their thermal response upon variations of external electric fields is largest in the vicinity of their phase transitions, which may occur near room temperature. The magnitude of the effect, however, is too small for useful cooling applications even when they are driven close to dielectric breakdown. Insight from microscopic theory is therefore needed to characterize materials and provide guiding principles to search for new ones with enhanced electrocaloric performance. Here, we derive from well-known microscopic models of ferroelectricity meaningful figures of merit for a wide class of ferroelectric materials. Such figures of merit provide insight into the relation between the strength of the effect and the characteristic interactions of ferroelectrics such as dipolar forces. We find that the long range nature of these interactions results in a small effect. A strategy is proposed to make it larger by shortening the correlation lengths of fluctuations of polarization. In addition, we bring into question other widely used but empirical figures of merit and facilitate understanding of the recently observed secondary broad peak in the electrocalorics of relaxor ferroelectrics.

  8. [The effect of interpersonal dependency on judgment of gaze direction].

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Kenta; Yamaguchi, Miwako; Sawa, Kosuke; Takata, Natsuko; Okubo, Matia

    2014-04-01

    This study investigated the effect of interpersonal dependency on judgments of gaze direction of individuals with different facial expressions. Based on interpersonal dependency scores, 46 participants were divided into two groups (high interpersonal dependency and low interpersonal dependency). Participants judged the gaze direction of photographs of faces with angry, neutral or happy expressions. Relative to the low interpersonal dependency group, the high interpersonal dependency group was more accurate in the judgments of gaze direction. This tendency was more salient for the happy and neutral expressions than for the angry expressions. Since people with high interpersonal dependency are highly motivated to seek support from others, this result suggests that they are sensitive to signals with pro-social information such as the gaze direction of others with positive attitudes.

  9. Mechanism of induction and suppression of antiviral immunity directed by virus-derived small RNAs in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Aliyari, Roghiyh; Wu, Qingfa; Li, Hong-Wei; Wang, Xiao-Hong; Li, Feng; Green, Lance D; Han, Cliff S; Li, Wan-Xiang; Ding, Shou-Wei

    2008-10-16

    The small RNA-directed viral immunity pathway in plants and invertebrates begins with the production by Dicer nuclease of virus-derived siRNAs (viRNAs), which guide specific antiviral silencing by Argonaute protein in an RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC). Molecular identity of the viral RNA precursor of viRNAs remains a matter of debate. Using Flock house virus (FHV) infection of Drosophila as a model, we show that replication of FHV positive-strand RNA genome produces an approximately 400 bp dsRNA from its 5' terminus that serves as the major Dicer-2 substrate. ViRNAs thus generated are loaded in Argonaute-2 and methylated at their 3' ends. Notably, FHV-encoded RNAi suppressor B2 protein interacts with both viral dsRNA and RNA replicase and inhibits production of the 5'-terminal viRNAs. Our findings, therefore, provide a model in which small RNA-directed viral immunity is induced during the initiation of viral progeny (+)RNA synthesis and suppressed by B2 inside the viral RNA replication complex.

  10. Effective dose from direct and indirect digital panoramic units

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Gun-Sun; Kim, Jin-Soo; Seo, Yo-Seob

    2013-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to provide comparative measurements of the effective dose from direct and indirect digital panoramic units according to phantoms and exposure parameters. Materials and Methods Dose measurements were carried out using a head phantom representing an average man (175 cm tall, 73.5 kg male) and a limbless whole body phantom representing an average woman (155 cm tall, 50 kg female). Lithium fluoride thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) chips were used for the dosimeter. Two direct and 2 indirect digital panoramic units were evaluated in this study. Effective doses were derived using 2007 International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recommendations. Results The effective doses of the 4 digital panoramic units ranged between 8.9 µSv and 37.8 µSv. By using the head phantom, the effective doses from the direct digital panoramic units (37.8 µSv, 27.6 µSv) were higher than those from the indirect units (8.9 µSv, 15.9 µSv). The same panoramic unit showed the difference in effective doses according to the gender of the phantom, numbers and locations of TLDs, and kVp. Conclusion To reasonably assess the radiation risk from various dental radiographic units, the effective doses should be obtained with the same numbers and locations of TLDs, and with standard hospital exposure. After that, it is necessary to survey the effective doses from various dental radiographic units according to the gender with the corresponding phantom. PMID:23807930

  11. Pilot opinions of sampling effects in lateral-directional control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stengel, R. F.; Miller, G. E.

    1982-01-01

    Flight experiments with a microprocessor control system were conducted to determine the effects of variations in sampling parameters on several pilots' opinions of lateral-directional flying qualities. Princeton's variable-response research aircraft (VRA), which is equipped with a microprocessor based digital flight control system (Micro-DFCS), was the test vehicle. Two U.S. Navy pilots evaluated the effects of sampling rate, quantization, and pure time delay during tracking, approach, and landing. Aircraft carrier approach tasks were conducted using a Navy approach mirror. Acquisition and tracking of fixed objects on the ground provided additional information related to the Navy misson. The longitudinal controls were implemented with analog electronics, while the lateral-directional pilot inputs (stick and rudder) were fed to the Micro-DFCS, which commanded the ailerons and rudder. The conceptual relationship between the evaluation pilot's lateral-directional inputs, the flight computer, and the aircraft are illustrated.

  12. Small satellite multi mission C2 for maximum effect

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, E.; Medina, O.; Lane, C.R.; Kirkham, A.; Ivancic, W.; Jones, B.; Risty, R.

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses US Air Force, US Army, US Navy, and NASA demonstrations based around the Virtual Mission Operations Center (VMOC) and its application in fielding a Multi Mission Satellite Operations Center (MMSOC) designed to integrate small satellites into the inherently tiered system environment of operations. The intent is to begin standardizing the spacecraft to ground interfaces needed to reduce costs, maximize space effects to the user, and allow the generation of Tactics, Techniques and Procedures (TTPs) that lead to Responsive Space employment. Combining the US Air Force/Army focus of theater command and control of payloads with the US Navy's user collaboration and FORCEnet consistent approach lays the groundwork for the fundamental change needed to maximize responsive space effects.

  13. Trapping effects in inflation: Blue spectrum at small scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bugaev, Edgar; Klimai, Peter

    2016-07-01

    We consider the inflationary model in which the inflaton ϕ couples to another scalar field χ via the interaction g2(ϕ -ϕ0)2χ2 with a small coupling constant g (g2˜10-7). We assume that there is a sequence of "trapping points" ϕ0 i along the inflationary trajectory where particles of the χ field become massless and are rather effectively produced. We calculate the power spectrum of inflaton field fluctuations originating from a backreaction of χ particles produced using the Schwinger's "in-in" formalism. We show that the primary curvature power spectrum produced by these backreaction effects is blue, which leads to a strong overproduction of primordial black holes (PBHs) in the subsequent radiation era.

  14. Computational approaches to study the effects of small genomic variations.

    PubMed

    Khafizov, Kamil; Ivanov, Maxim V; Glazova, Olga V; Kovalenko, Sergei P

    2015-10-01

    Advances in DNA sequencing technologies have led to an avalanche-like increase in the number of gene sequences deposited in public databases over the last decade as well as the detection of an enormous number of previously unseen nucleotide variants therein. Given the size and complex nature of the genome-wide sequence variation data, as well as the rate of data generation, experimental characterization of the disease association of each of these variations or their effects on protein structure/function would be costly, laborious, time-consuming, and essentially impossible. Thus, in silico methods to predict the functional effects of sequence variations are constantly being developed. In this review, we summarize the major computational approaches and tools that are aimed at the prediction of the functional effect of mutations, and describe the state-of-the-art databases that can be used to obtain information about mutation significance. We also discuss future directions in this highly competitive field.

  15. Changing Directions: Young People and Effective Work against Racism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Paul; Henri, Tom

    2011-01-01

    This article explores effective approaches against racism in work with young people, and the relevance of new policy agendas in the UK. Since the 2001 disturbances, the UK has controversially prioritised "Community Cohesion", with the accusation that this new direction represents the "death of multiculturalism". Drawing on empirical evidence from…

  16. Key Elements of Effective Teaching in the Direct Teaching Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruning, Roger H.

    Summaries and outlines are presented of key elements in effective teaching identified in research studies by Kounin (1970), Brophy (1973), Brophy and Evertson (1976), Stallings (1974; l975), Berliner (1979), and Good and Grouws (1979). These elements are synthesized in a direct teaching model that delineates the characteristics of effective…

  17. Radiation Synovectomy: an effective alternative treatment for inflamed small joints

    PubMed Central

    Karavida, N; Notopoulos, A

    2010-01-01

    An inflamed painful joint is one of the most common indications for the patient to be referred to a rheumatologist or an orthopedician. In relation to the aetiology, the therapeutic approach might be systemic, local or a combination of them in some cases, always with the thought of balancing risk with benefit for the patient. In all cases, independently of the cause, the goal of therapy is to improve the quality of life through the reduction of pain, improvement of mobility and preservation of function. Nuclear Medicine has to offer Radiosynoviorthesis, an effective alternative procedure for treating inflamed small joints. Various radionuclides are available for radiosynoviorthesis. Their selection depends on the size of the joint to be treated. Small joints are mainly treated with [169Er] erbium under a fluoroscopic or sonographic guidance, usually with a simultaneous instillation of a corticoid. Candidates for radiosynoviorthesis should have been under a six-month systemic treatment without encouraging results or should have undergone at least one unsuccessful intra-articular injection of a long acting glucocorticoid. Since 1973, when [169Er] erbium was firstly suggested as a therapeutic agent for radiosynoviorthesis of the finger joints, there has been quite enough experience in its' application. It has been found to be cost effective in providing long term relief of pain and deformity of the inflamed joints in comparison to other therapeutic approaches. Additionally, there is no radiation risk and can be performed on an out patient basis. Therefore it can stand as an effective alternative procedure for treating early stages of chronic synovitis in RA (rheumatoid arthritis) patients, with minor damage of the cartilage and the adjacent bones, and for synovitis secondary to inflammatory arthropathies. PMID:20411055

  18. Modified Habitats Influence Kelp Epibiota via Direct and Indirect Effects

    PubMed Central

    Marzinelli, Ezequiel M.; Underwood, Antony J.; Coleman, Ross A.

    2011-01-01

    Addition of man-made structures alters abiotic and biotic characteristics of natural habitats, which can influence abundances of biota directly and/or indirectly, by altering the ecology of competitors or predators. Marine epibiota in modified habitats were used to test hypotheses to distinguish between direct and indirect processes. In Sydney Harbour, kelps on pier-pilings supported greater covers of bryozoans, particularly of the non-indigenous species Membranipora membranacea, than found on natural reefs. Pilings influenced these patterns and processes directly due to the provision of shade and indirectly by altering abundances of sea-urchins which, in turn, affected covers of bryozoans. Indirect effects were more important than direct effects. This indicates that artificial structures affect organisms living on secondary substrata in complex ways, altering the biodiversity and indirectly affecting abundances of epibiota. Understanding how these components of habitats affect ecological processes is necessary to allow sensible prediction of the effects of modifying habitats on the ecology of organisms. PMID:21755011

  19. Rockot - a new cost effective launcher for small satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosenkis, Regina

    1996-01-01

    Daimler-Benz Aerospace of Germany and the Russian Khrunichev State Research and Production Space Center have formed a jointly owned EUROCKOT Launch Services GmbH to offer worldwide cost effective launch services for the ROCKOT launch vehicle. ROCKOT, produced by Khrunichev, builder of the famous PROTON launcher, aims at the market of small and medium size satellites ranging from 300 to 1800 kg to be launched into low earth or sunsynchronous orbits. These comprize scientific, earth observation and polar meteorological satellites as well as the new generation of small communication satellites in low earth orbits, known as the ``Constellations''. ROCKOT is a three stage liquid propellant launch vehicle, composed of a former Russian SS 19 strategic missile, which has been withdrawn from military use, and a highly sophisticated, flight-proven upper stage named Breeze, which is particularly suited for a variety of civic and commercial space applications. Usable payload envelope has a length of 4.75 meters and a maximum diameter of 2.26 meters for accomodating the payload within the payload fairing. ROCKOT can also accomodate multiple payloads which can be deployed into the same or different orbits. So far ROCKOT has been successfully launched three times from Baikonur. The commercial launch services on ROCKOT from the Plesetsk launch site, Russia, will begin in 1997 and will be available worldwide at a highly competitive price.

  20. Testing the effectiveness of small radiation shields for mobile phones.

    PubMed

    Oliver, J Patrick; Chou, C K; Balzano, Quirino

    2003-01-01

    Nine small radiation shields made to adhere to the case of mobile phones were tested at 914 and 1880 MHz. Five popular products were tested because advertisements typically claim they are up to 99% effective in blocking radio frequency (RF) radiation emitted from mobile phones. Also, four other conceptually unusual products were tested because advertisements typically claim they emit oscillations that counteract the RF radiation from mobile phones. Each shield was tested on the same mobile phone, and measurements were made to compare the absorption of RF energy in the head with and without each shield attached to the phone. The phone was positioned against a head model, and an automated measurement process was used to determine specific absorption rate (SAR) in the same way it is used at Motorola to test the compliance of mobile phones with respect to human exposure limits. The location of the peak SAR was not observed to change with any of the shields attached to the phone, and the 1 g, peak spatial average SAR did not change by any statistically significant amount. These results indicate the small shields are ineffective in reducing the exposure of the head to RF energy emitted by a mobile phone. PMID:12483667

  1. Aerosol direct radiative effect over China estimated with visibility measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, K.; Lin, J.

    2012-12-01

    As a short-lived climate forcer, aerosols exhibit strong radiative effects that vary significantly across the space and time. Current understanding of the long-term variability of aerosol climate forcings is however very poor due to lack of relevant atmospheric measurements. Historic records for visibility measurements from thousands of ground meteorological stations offer a plausible tool to study the decadal and multi-decadal variability of aerosol radiative effects. As a first step, this study presents a method to estimate aerosol direct radiative effect over China based on visibility data for 2006. Visibility data from about 400 ground stations are converted to near-surface aerosol extinction coefficients, which are converted then to aerosol optical depth (AOD) based on spatially and temporally varying vertical distributions of aerosol optical properties simulated by the widely used chemical transport model GEOS-Chem. The resulting AOD data are consistent with direct measurements from the China Aerosol Remote Sensing Network (CARSNET) and the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) in regions where visibility and AOD measurement sites are close in distance. Next, the visibility-derived AOD data are combined with other aerosol optical properties adopted from GEOS-Chem, cloud data from ground stations and surface albedo data from moderate-resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) to derive the direct radiative effect, by employing the Santa Barbara DISORT Atmospheric Radiative Transfer model (SBDART). Spatial and monthly variations of aerosol radiative effects are examined.

  2. Parent socialization effects in different cultures: significance of directive parenting.

    PubMed

    Sorkhabi, Nadia

    2012-06-01

    In this article, the controversy of divergent findings in research on parental socialization effects in different cultures is addressed. Three explanations intended to address divergent findings of socialization effects in different cultures, as advanced by researchers who emphasize cultural differences, are discussed. These include cultural differences in socialization values and goals of parents, parental emotional and cognitive characteristics associated with parenting styles, and adolescents' interpretations or evaluations of their parents' parenting styles. The empirical evidence for and against each of these arguments is examined and an alternative paradigm for understanding and empirical study of developmental outcomes associated with parenting styles in different cultures is suggested. Baumrind's directive parenting style is presented as an alternative to the authoritarian parenting style in understanding the positive developmental effects associated with "strict" parenting in cultures said to have a collectivist orientation. Directions for research on the three explanations are mentioned.

  3. Parent socialization effects in different cultures: significance of directive parenting.

    PubMed

    Sorkhabi, Nadia

    2012-06-01

    In this article, the controversy of divergent findings in research on parental socialization effects in different cultures is addressed. Three explanations intended to address divergent findings of socialization effects in different cultures, as advanced by researchers who emphasize cultural differences, are discussed. These include cultural differences in socialization values and goals of parents, parental emotional and cognitive characteristics associated with parenting styles, and adolescents' interpretations or evaluations of their parents' parenting styles. The empirical evidence for and against each of these arguments is examined and an alternative paradigm for understanding and empirical study of developmental outcomes associated with parenting styles in different cultures is suggested. Baumrind's directive parenting style is presented as an alternative to the authoritarian parenting style in understanding the positive developmental effects associated with "strict" parenting in cultures said to have a collectivist orientation. Directions for research on the three explanations are mentioned. PMID:22897089

  4. Effects of directed and kinetic energy weapons on spacecraft

    SciTech Connect

    Fraas, A P

    1986-12-01

    The characteristics of the various directed energy beams are reviewed, and their damaging effects on typical materials are examined for a wide range of energy pulse intensities and durations. Representative cases are surveyed, and charts are presented to indicate regions in which damage to spacecraft structures, particularly radiators for power plants, would be likely. The effects of kinetic energy weapons, such as bird-shot, are similarly examined. The charts are then applied to evaluate the effectiveness of various measures designed to reduce the vulnerability of spacecraft components, particularly nuclear electric power plants.

  5. Effects of Route Guidance Systems on Small-World Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jian-Jun; Sun, Hui-Jun; Gao, Zi-You; Li, Shu-Bin

    The route guidance systems (RGS) are efficient in alleviating traffic congestion and reducing transit time of transportation networks. This paper studies the effects of RGS on performance of variably weighted small-world networks. The properties of the average shortest path length, the maximum degree, and the largest betweenness, as important indices for characterizing the network structure in complex networks, are simulated. Results show that there is an optimal guided rate of RGS to minimize the total system cost and the average shortest path length, and proper RGS can reduce the load of the node with maximum degree or largest betweenness. In addition, we found that the load distribution of nodes guided by RGS decay as the power laws which is very important for us to understand and control traffic congestion feasible.

  6. Analytical fuel property effects, small combustors, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, J. D.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of nonstandard aviation fuels on a typical small gas turbine combustor was analyzed. The T700/CT7 engine family was chosen as being representative of the class of aircraft power plants desired. Fuel properties, as specified by NASA, are characterized by low hydrogen content and high aromatics levels. Higher than normal smoke output and flame radiation intensity for the current T700 combustor which serves as a baseline were anticipated. It is, therefore, predicted that out of specification smoke visibility and higher than normal shell temperatures will exist when using NASA ERBS fuels with a consequence of severe reduction in cyclic life. Three new designs are proposed to compensate for the deficiencies expected with the existing design. They have emerged as the best of the eight originally proposed redesigns or combinations thereof. After the five choices that were originally made by NASA on the basis of competing performance factors, General Electric narrowed the field to the three proposed.

  7. Differential geodetic stereo SAR with TerraSAR-X by exploiting small multi-directional radar reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gisinger, Christoph; Willberg, Martin; Balss, Ulrich; Klügel, Thomas; Mähler, Swetlana; Pail, Roland; Eineder, Michael

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we report on the direct positioning of small multi-directional radar reflectors, so-called octahedrons, with the synthetic aperture radar (SAR) satellite TerraSAR-X. Its highest resolution imaging mode termed staring spotlight enables the use of such octahedron reflectors with a dimension of only half a meter, but still providing backscatter equivalent to 1-2 cm observation error. Four octahedrons were deployed at Wettzell geodetic observatory, and observed by TerraSAR-X with 12 acquisitions in three different geometries. By applying our least squares stereo SAR algorithm already tested with common trihedral corner reflectors (CRs), and introducing a novel differential extension using one octahedron as reference point, the coordinates of the remaining octahedrons were directly retrieved in the International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF). Contrary to our standard processing, the differential approach does not require external corrections for the atmospheric path delays and the geodynamic displacements, rendering it particularly useful for joint geodetic networks employing SAR and GNSS. In this paper, we present and discuss both methods based on results when applying them to the aforementioned Wettzell data set of the octahedrons. The comparison with the independently determined reference coordinates confirms the positioning accuracy with 2-5 cm for the standard approach, and 2-3 cm for the differential processing. Moreover, we present statistical uncertainty estimates of the observations and the positioning solutions, which are additionally provided by our parameter estimation algorithms. The results also include our 1.5 m CR available at Wettzell, and the outcomes clearly demonstrate the advantage of the multi-directional octahedrons over conventional CRs for global positioning applications with SAR.

  8. Direct observation of the size dependence of Dexter energy transfer from polymer to small PbS quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yating; Xu, Zhangcheng

    2008-08-01

    Small PbS quantum dots (QDs) with diameters ranging from 2.5 to 3 nm were synthesized directly in the conjugated polymer poly[2-methoxy-5-(2'-ethyl-hexyloxy)-p-phenylene vinylene] (MEH-PPV) at 70 °C. To monitor the size dependence of Dexter energy transfer [D. L. Dexter, J. Chem. Phys. 21, 836 (1953)] from MEH-PPV to PbS QDs, the photoluminescence of MEH-PPV is measured for a series of samples with varying QD sizes controlled by the reaction time. A decreased transfer rate is observed for PbS QDs with a diameter of about 2.65 nm due to the minimum overlap between the emission spectrum of MEH-PPV and the 1Se-1Sh and 1Pe-1Sh transitions of PbS QDs.

  9. Closure of autobiographical memories moderates their directive effect on behaviour.

    PubMed

    Beike, Denise R; Adams, Laura P; Naufel, Karen Z

    2010-01-01

    Specific autobiographical memories have been theorised to serve a directive function, whereby the content of the memory directs behaviour outside awareness. The present research tested whether the extent to which a memory feels low in closure, or psychologically not in the past, moderates this directive effect. A total of 163 participants in an online experiment were asked to recollect a specific autobiographical memory of a time they had failed to donate to charity, or were not asked to recollect a memory. Those who recollected a memory were randomly assigned to think of the memory as high versus low in closure. Recollecting an autobiographical memory made to feel low in closure led to more memory-relevant behaviour than either recollecting a memory made to feel high in closure, or no memory at all. Moreover, the directive effect of a low-closure memory occurred whether participants were made aware of an upcoming behavioural opportunity or not. Discussion centres on possible processes linking low closure and behaviour, as well as implications for the self-memory system theory of autobiographical memory.

  10. Recognising faces: effects of lighting direction, inversion, and brightness reversal.

    PubMed

    Johnston, A; Hill, H; Carman, N

    1992-01-01

    When information about three-dimensional shape obtained from shading and shadows is ambiguous, the visual system favours an interpretation of surface geometry which is consistent with illumination from above. If pictures of top-lit faces are rotated the resulting stimulus is both figurally inverted and illuminated from below. In this study the question of whether the effects of figural inversion and lighting orientation on face recognition are independent or interactive is addressed. Although there was a clear inversion effect for faces illuminated from the front and above, the inversion effect was found to be reduced or eliminated for faces illuminated from below. A strong inversion effect for photographic negatives was also found but in this case the effect was not dependent on the direction of illumination. These findings are interpreted as evidence to suggest that lighting faces from below disrupts the formation of surface-based representations of facial shape. PMID:1437456

  11. Recognising faces: effects of lighting direction, inversion, and brightness reversal.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Alan; Hill, Harold; Carman, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    When information about three-dimensional shape obtained from shading and shadows is ambiguous, the visual system favours an interpretation of surface geometry which is consistent with illumination from above. If pictures of top-lit faces are rotated the resulting stimulus is both figurally inverted and illuminated from below. In this study the question of whether the effects of figural inversion and lighting orientation on face recognition are independent or interactive is addressed. Although there was a clear inversion effect for faces illuminated from the front and above, the inversion effect was found to be reduced or eliminated for faces illuminated from below. A strong inversion effect for photographic negatives was also found but in this case the effect was not dependent on the direction of illumination. These findings are interpreted as evidence to suggest that lighting faces from below disrupts the formation of surface-based representations of facial shape. PMID:24601034

  12. Triggering memory recovery: effects of direct and incidental cuing.

    PubMed

    Handy, Justin D; Smith, Steven M

    2012-12-01

    The present study examined forgetting and recovery of narrative passages varying in emotional intensity, using what we refer to as the "dropout" method. Previous studies of this dropout procedure have used word lists as to-be-remembered material, but the present experiments used brief story vignettes with one-word titles (e.g., "Torture", "Insects"). These vignettes showed a strong dropout forgetting effect in free recall. Both text and picture cues from the vignettes eliminated the forgetting effect on a subsequent cued recall test. Vignette-related pictures in an incidental picture naming task, however, triggered little recovery of initially forgotten vignettes, as shown on a post-test. The results extend findings of large forgetting and memory recovery effects to materials that are more naturalistic than word lists. The findings also show that picture cues, which trigger strong memory recovery effects on a direct test of memory, had little effect on recovery when cues were encountered incidentally. PMID:23123684

  13. Direct effects of the resonant magnetic perturbation on turbulent transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlad, M.; Spineanu, F.

    2016-09-01

    The effects of the resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) on the turbulent transport are analyzed in the framework of the test particle approach using a semi-analytical method. The model includes particle collisions. The influence of the RMPs on plasma confinement is determined as function turbulence parameters and of collisionality. A synergy of the turbulent transport and RMPs is found. The increase of the turbulent diffusion is much larger than the diffusion directly produced by the RMPs.

  14. Effect of Speed (Centrifugal Load) on Gear Crack Propagation Direction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, David G.

    2001-01-01

    The effect of rotational speed (centrifugal force) on gear crack propagation direction was explored. Gears were analyzed using finite element analysis and linear elastic fracture mechanics. The analysis was validated with crack propagation experiments performed in a spur gear fatigue rig. The effects of speed, rim thickness, and initial crack location on gear crack propagation direction were investigated. Crack paths from the finite element method correlated well with those deduced from gear experiments. For the test gear with a backup ratio (rim thickness divided by tooth height) of nib = 0.5, cracks initiating in the tooth fillet propagated to rim fractures when run at a speed of 10,000 rpm and became tooth fractures for speeds slower than 10,000 rpm for both the experiments and anal sis. From additional analysis, speed had little effect on crack propagation direction except when initial crack locations were near the tooth/rim fracture transition point for a given backup ratio. When at that point, higher speeds tended to promote rim fracture while lower speeds (or neglecting centrifugal force) produced tooth fractures.

  15. Direct PO optimized dual-offset reflector antennas for small earth stations and for millimeter wave atmospheric sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlobohm, Bernd; Arndt, Fritz; Kless, Juergen

    1992-06-01

    An efficient direct numerical synthesis method for dual-offset reflector antennas is described which is directly based on the physical optics procedure for both reflectors. The reflector surfaces are advantageously characterized in the spatial domain by a two-dimensional Fourier transformation. The method involves an evolution strategy optimization algorithm in order to immediately shape both reflectors so as to generate the desired far field with prescribed criteria. The efficiency of the design method is demonstrated for two computer-optimized dual-offset antenna design examples for space applications. The first is a very compact optimum-shaped Gregorian dual-offset earth-station antenna with high offset angle (70 deg) and small subreflector size (13 wavelengths). It achieved a very low sidelobe attenuation level within the envelope of only 23-25 log theta dBi and low cross-polarization attenuation (38 dB). The second is a shaped dual-offset Cassegrain atmospheric sensor antenna for 200 GHz. It demonstrates that beam scanning by more than 10 half-power beamwidths is possible with nearly constant half-power beamwidth by linearly displacing the subreflector, resulting in a very low mass to be moved.

  16. A Flexible Stent with Small Intestinal Submucosa Covering for Direct Intrahepatic Portocaval Shunt: Experimental Pilot Study in Swine

    SciTech Connect

    Niyyati, Mahtab; Petersen, Bryan D.; Pavcnik, Dusan Uchida, Barry T.; Timmermans, Hans A.; Hiraki, Takao; Wu Renghong; Brountzos, Elias; Keller, Frederick S.; Roesch, Josef

    2005-04-15

    The suitability of the flexible sandwich Zilver stent-graft (SZSG) with a biologically active tissue layer (small intestinal submucosa) for creation of the intravascular ultrasound (IVUS)-guided direct intrahepatic portocaval shunt (DIPS) was explored in six young swine in a search for a flexible system to replace the rigid polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) stent originally used by this group with limited success. The portal vein was punctured from the inferior vena cava through the caudate lobe of the liver using IVUS guidance. After balloon dilation of the puncture tract, DIPS was successfully created in all animals with use of an SZSG 9 mm in diameter and 6 cm or 8 cm long. Only one DIPS remained well patent at 14 days when the animal had to be killed because of encephalopathy. DIPS in the other five animals were found to be either severely stenosed (3 animals) or occluded (2 animals) at 4 weeks due to accelerated formation of neointimal hyperplasia (NIH) in the liver parenchymal portion of the shunt and superimposed thrombosis. The lack of high pressure in the portal system contributed to early endograft closure. The flexible stent and the covering fail badly. The reason for this could be due to either component. More work is required to find a reliable flexible system with long-term patency. Exploration of the IVUS-guided direct extrahepatic portocaval shunt is suggested.

  17. Small Beneficial Effect of Caffeinated Energy Drink Ingestion on Strength.

    PubMed

    Collier, Nora B; Hardy, Michelle A; Millard-Stafford, Mindy L; Warren, Gordon L

    2016-07-01

    Collier, NB, Hardy, MA, Millard-Stafford, ML, and Warren, GL. Small beneficial effect of caffeinated energy drink ingestion on strength. J Strength Cond Res 30(7): 1862-1870, 2016-Because caffeine ingestion has been found to increase muscle strength, our aim was to determine whether caffeine when combined with other potential ergogenic ingredients, such as those in commercial energy drinks, would have a similar effect. Fifteen young healthy subjects were used in a double-blind, repeated-measures experimental design. Each subject performed 3 trials, ingesting either a caffeinated energy drink, an uncaffeinated version of the drink, or a placebo drink. The interpolated twitch procedure was used to assess maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) strength, electrically evoked strength, and percent muscle activation during MVIC of the knee extensors both before and after drink ingestion, and after a fatiguing bout of contractions; electromyographic (EMG) amplitude of the knee extensors during MVIC was also assessed. The mean (±SE) change in MVIC strength from before to after drink ingestion was significantly greater for the caffeinated energy drink compared with placebo [+5.0 (±1.7) vs. -0.5 (±1.5)%] and the difference between the drinks remained after fatigue (p = 0.015); the strength changes for the uncaffeinated energy drink were not significantly different from those of the other 2 drinks at any time. There was no significant effect of drink type on the changes in electrically evoked strength, percent muscle activation, and EMG from before to after drink ingestion. This study indicates that a caffeinated energy drink can increase MVIC strength but the effect is modest and the strength increase cannot be attributed to increased muscle activation. Whether the efficacy of energy drinks can be attributed solely to caffeine remains unclear.

  18. Small Beneficial Effect of Caffeinated Energy Drink Ingestion on Strength.

    PubMed

    Collier, Nora B; Hardy, Michelle A; Millard-Stafford, Mindy L; Warren, Gordon L

    2016-07-01

    Collier, NB, Hardy, MA, Millard-Stafford, ML, and Warren, GL. Small beneficial effect of caffeinated energy drink ingestion on strength. J Strength Cond Res 30(7): 1862-1870, 2016-Because caffeine ingestion has been found to increase muscle strength, our aim was to determine whether caffeine when combined with other potential ergogenic ingredients, such as those in commercial energy drinks, would have a similar effect. Fifteen young healthy subjects were used in a double-blind, repeated-measures experimental design. Each subject performed 3 trials, ingesting either a caffeinated energy drink, an uncaffeinated version of the drink, or a placebo drink. The interpolated twitch procedure was used to assess maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) strength, electrically evoked strength, and percent muscle activation during MVIC of the knee extensors both before and after drink ingestion, and after a fatiguing bout of contractions; electromyographic (EMG) amplitude of the knee extensors during MVIC was also assessed. The mean (±SE) change in MVIC strength from before to after drink ingestion was significantly greater for the caffeinated energy drink compared with placebo [+5.0 (±1.7) vs. -0.5 (±1.5)%] and the difference between the drinks remained after fatigue (p = 0.015); the strength changes for the uncaffeinated energy drink were not significantly different from those of the other 2 drinks at any time. There was no significant effect of drink type on the changes in electrically evoked strength, percent muscle activation, and EMG from before to after drink ingestion. This study indicates that a caffeinated energy drink can increase MVIC strength but the effect is modest and the strength increase cannot be attributed to increased muscle activation. Whether the efficacy of energy drinks can be attributed solely to caffeine remains unclear. PMID:26670991

  19. Spin Rate Distribution of Small Asteroids Shaped by YORP Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pravec, Petr

    2008-09-01

    We studied a distribution of spin rates of main belt/Mars crossing (MB/MC) asteroids with diameters 3-15 km using data obtained within the Photometric Survey of Asynchronous Binary Asteroids (Pravec et al. 2008). We found that the spin distribution of the small asteroids is uniform in the range from f = 1 to 9.5 d-1, and there is an excess of slow rotators with f < 1 d-1. The observed distribution appears to be controlled by the Yarkovsky-O'Keefe-Radzievskii-Paddack (YORP) effect. The magnitude of the excess of slow rotators is related to the residence time of slowed down asteroids in the excess and the rate of spin rate change outside the excess. We estimated a median YORP spin rate change of 0.022 d-1/Myr for asteroids in our sample (i.e., a median time in which the spin rate changes by 1 d-1 is 45 Myr), thus the residence time of slowed down asteroids in the excess is 110 Myr. The spin rate distribution of near-Earth asteroids (NEAs) with sizes in the range 0.2-3 km ( 5-times smaller in median diameter than the MB/MC asteroids sample) shows a similar excess of slow rotators, but there is also a concentration of NEAs at fast spin rates with f = 9-10 d-1. The concentration at fast spin rates is correlated with a narrower distribution of spin rates of primaries of binary systems among NEAs; the difference may be due to the apparently more evolved population of binaries among MB/MC asteroids. Reference: Pravec, P., and 30 colleagues, 2008. Spin rate distribution of small asteroids. Icarus, in press. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.icarus.2008.05.012

  20. Direct mapping of nuclear shell effects in the heaviest elements.

    PubMed

    Minaya Ramirez, E; Ackermann, D; Blaum, K; Block, M; Droese, C; Düllmann, Ch E; Dworschak, M; Eibach, M; Eliseev, S; Haettner, E; Herfurth, F; Heßberger, F P; Hofmann, S; Ketelaer, J; Marx, G; Mazzocco, M; Nesterenko, D; Novikov, Yu N; Plaß, W R; Rodríguez, D; Scheidenberger, C; Schweikhard, L; Thirolf, P G; Weber, C

    2012-09-01

    Quantum-mechanical shell effects are expected to strongly enhance nuclear binding on an "island of stability" of superheavy elements. The predicted center at proton number Z = 114, 120, or 126 and neutron number N = 184 has been substantiated by the recent synthesis of new elements up to Z = 118. However, the location of the center and the extension of the island of stability remain vague. High-precision mass spectrometry allows the direct measurement of nuclear binding energies and thus the determination of the strength of shell effects. Here, we present such measurements for nobelium and lawrencium isotopes, which also pin down the deformed shell gap at N = 152.

  1. Direct mapping of nuclear shell effects in the heaviest elements.

    PubMed

    Minaya Ramirez, E; Ackermann, D; Blaum, K; Block, M; Droese, C; Düllmann, Ch E; Dworschak, M; Eibach, M; Eliseev, S; Haettner, E; Herfurth, F; Heßberger, F P; Hofmann, S; Ketelaer, J; Marx, G; Mazzocco, M; Nesterenko, D; Novikov, Yu N; Plaß, W R; Rodríguez, D; Scheidenberger, C; Schweikhard, L; Thirolf, P G; Weber, C

    2012-09-01

    Quantum-mechanical shell effects are expected to strongly enhance nuclear binding on an "island of stability" of superheavy elements. The predicted center at proton number Z = 114, 120, or 126 and neutron number N = 184 has been substantiated by the recent synthesis of new elements up to Z = 118. However, the location of the center and the extension of the island of stability remain vague. High-precision mass spectrometry allows the direct measurement of nuclear binding energies and thus the determination of the strength of shell effects. Here, we present such measurements for nobelium and lawrencium isotopes, which also pin down the deformed shell gap at N = 152. PMID:22878498

  2. Jointed magnetic skyrmion lattices at a small-angle grain boundary directly visualized by advanced electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Takao; So, Yeong-Gi; Kohno, Yuji; Sawada, Hidetaka; Ishikawa, Ryo; Ikuhara, Yuichi; Shibata, Naoya

    2016-01-01

    The interactions between magnetic skyrmions and structural defects, such as edges, dislocations, and grain boundaries (GBs), which are all considered as topological defects, will be important issues when magnetic skyrmions are utilized for future memory device applications. To investigate such interactions, simultaneous visualization of magnetic skyrmions and structural defects at high spatial resolution, which is not feasible by conventional techniques, is essential. Here, taking advantages of aberration-corrected differential phase-contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy, we investigate the interaction of magnetic skyrmions with a small-angle GB in a thin film of FeGe1−xSix. We found that the magnetic skyrmions and the small-angle GB can coexist each other, but a domain boundary (DB) was formed in the skyrmion lattice along the small-angle GB. At the core of the DB, unexpectedly deformed magnetic skrymions, which appear to be created by joining two portions of magnetic skyrmions in the adjacent lattices, were formed to effectively compensate misorientations between the two adjacent magnetic skyrmion lattices. These observations strongly suggest the flexible nature of individual magnetic skyrmions, and also the significance of defect engineering for future device applications. PMID:27775056

  3. Direct and indirect effects of southern flounder predation on a spot population: Experimental and model analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Crowder, L.B.; Wright, R.A.; Martin, T.H.; Rice, J.A. . Dept. of Zoology); Rose, K.A. )

    1992-01-01

    We have previously shown that southern flounder (Paralichthys lethostigma Jordan and Gilbert) influence the survival and size-distribution of spot (Leiostomus xanthurus Lafayette) and other small estuarine fishes in experimental ponds. In this paper, we seek to determine whether these of effects can be accounted for by direct size-dependent predation or if there is also evidence for indirect behavioral effects on spot foraging which might alter their survival or population size structure. In our experiment, spot were allowed to grow in the presence and absence of southern flounder in an experimental estuarine pond for 101 days. Each treatment was replicated three times. We also apply a recently published simulation model of the flounder-spot interaction to this experiment to independently test the model and to estimate the direct effects of flounder predation on spot survival and size structure.

  4. Why do pitched horizontal lines have such a small effect on visually perceived eye level?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Post, R. B.; Welch, R. B.; Clark, V. D.

    2000-01-01

    In two experiments, visually perceived eye level (VPEL) was measured while subjects viewed two-dimensional displays that were either upright or pitched 20 degrees top-toward or 20 degrees top-away from them. In Experiment 1, it was demonstrated that binocular exposure to a pair of pitched vertical lines or to a pitched random dot pattern caused a substantial upward VPEL shift for the top-toward pitched array and a similarly large downward shift for the top-away array. On the other hand, the same pitches of a pair of horizontal lines (viewed binocularly or monocularly) produced much smaller VPEL shifts. Because the perceived pitch of the pitched horizontal line display was nearly the same as the perceived pitch of the pitched vertical line and dot array, the relatively small influence of pitched horizontal lines on VPEL cannot be attributed simply to an underestimation of their pitch. In Experiment 2, the effects of pitched vertical lines, dots, and horizontal lines on VPEL were again measured, together with their effects on resting gaze direction (in the vertical dimension). As in Experiment 1, vertical lines and dots caused much larger VPEL shifts than did horizontal lines. The effects of the displays on resting gaze direction were highly similar to their effects on VPEL. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that VPEL shifts caused by pitched visual arrays are due to the direct influence of these arrays on the oculomotor system and are not mediated by perceived pitch.

  5. Direction Dependent Effects In Widefield Wideband Full Stokes Radio Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagannathan, Preshanth; Bhatnagar, Sanjay; Rau, Urvashi; Taylor, Russ

    2015-01-01

    Synthesis imaging in radio astronomy is affected by instrumental and atmospheric effects which introduce direction dependent gains.The antenna power pattern varies both as a function of time and frequency. The broad band time varying nature of the antenna power pattern when not corrected leads to gross errors in full stokes imaging and flux estimation. In this poster we explore the errors that arise in image deconvolution while not accounting for the time and frequency dependence of the antenna power pattern. Simulations were conducted with the wideband full stokes power pattern of the Very Large Array(VLA) antennas to demonstrate the level of errors arising from direction-dependent gains. Our estimate is that these errors will be significant in wide-band full-pol mosaic imaging as well and algorithms to correct these errors will be crucial for many up-coming large area surveys (e.g. VLASS)

  6. Dark matter effective field theory scattering in direct detection experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Schneck, K.

    2015-05-01

    We examine the consequences of the effective field theory (EFT) of dark matter–nucleon scattering for current and proposed direct detection experiments. Exclusion limits on EFT coupling constants computed using the optimum interval method are presented for SuperCDMS Soudan, CDMS II, and LUX, and the necessity of combining results from multiple experiments in order to determine dark matter parameters is discussed. We demonstrate that spectral differences between the standard dark matter model and a general EFT interaction can produce a bias when calculating exclusion limits and when developing signal models for likelihood and machine learning techniques. We also discuss the implications of the EFT for the next-generation (G2) direct detection experiments and point out regions of complementarity in the EFT parameter space.

  7. Dark matter effective field theory scattering in direct detection experiments

    DOE PAGES

    Schneck, K.

    2015-05-01

    We examine the consequences of the effective field theory (EFT) of dark matter–nucleon scattering for current and proposed direct detection experiments. Exclusion limits on EFT coupling constants computed using the optimum interval method are presented for SuperCDMS Soudan, CDMS II, and LUX, and the necessity of combining results from multiple experiments in order to determine dark matter parameters is discussed. We demonstrate that spectral differences between the standard dark matter model and a general EFT interaction can produce a bias when calculating exclusion limits and when developing signal models for likelihood and machine learning techniques. We also discuss the implicationsmore » of the EFT for the next-generation (G2) direct detection experiments and point out regions of complementarity in the EFT parameter space.« less

  8. Dark matter effective field theory scattering in direct detection experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneck, K.; Cabrera, B.; Cerdeño, D. G.; Mandic, V.; Rogers, H. E.; Agnese, R.; Anderson, A. J.; Asai, M.; Balakishiyeva, D.; Barker, D.; Basu Thakur, R.; Bauer, D. A.; Billard, J.; Borgland, A.; Brandt, D.; Brink, P. L.; Bunker, R.; Caldwell, D. O.; Calkins, R.; Chagani, H.; Chen, Y.; Cooley, J.; Cornell, B.; Crewdson, C. H.; Cushman, P.; Daal, M.; Di Stefano, P. C. F.; Doughty, T.; Esteban, L.; Fallows, S.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Godfrey, G. L.; Golwala, S. R.; Hall, J.; Harris, H. R.; Hofer, T.; Holmgren, D.; Hsu, L.; Huber, M. E.; Jardin, D. M.; Jastram, A.; Kamaev, O.; Kara, B.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kennedy, A.; Leder, A.; Loer, B.; Lopez Asamar, E.; Lukens, P.; Mahapatra, R.; McCarthy, K. A.; Mirabolfathi, N.; Moffatt, R. A.; Morales Mendoza, J. D.; Oser, S. M.; Page, K.; Page, W. A.; Partridge, R.; Pepin, M.; Phipps, A.; Prasad, K.; Pyle, M.; Qiu, H.; Rau, W.; Redl, P.; Reisetter, A.; Ricci, Y.; Roberts, A.; Saab, T.; Sadoulet, B.; Sander, J.; Schnee, R. W.; Scorza, S.; Serfass, B.; Shank, B.; Speller, D.; Toback, D.; Upadhyayula, S.; Villano, A. N.; Welliver, B.; Wilson, J. S.; Wright, D. H.; Yang, X.; Yellin, S.; Yen, J. J.; Young, B. A.; Zhang, J.; SuperCDMS Collaboration

    2015-05-01

    We examine the consequences of the effective field theory (EFT) of dark matter-nucleon scattering for current and proposed direct detection experiments. Exclusion limits on EFT coupling constants computed using the optimum interval method are presented for SuperCDMS Soudan, CDMS II, and LUX, and the necessity of combining results from multiple experiments in order to determine dark matter parameters is discussed. We demonstrate that spectral differences between the standard dark matter model and a general EFT interaction can produce a bias when calculating exclusion limits and when developing signal models for likelihood and machine learning techniques. We also discuss the implications of the EFT for the next-generation (G2) direct detection experiments and point out regions of complementarity in the EFT parameter space.

  9. Dark matter effective field theory scattering in direct detection experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Schneck, K.; Cabrera, B.; Cerdeno, D. G.; Mandic, V.; Rogers, H. E.; Agnese, R.; Anderson, A. J.; Asai, M.; Balakishiyeva, D.; Barker, D.; Basu Thakur, R.; Bauer, D. A.; Billard, J.; Borgland, A.; Brandt, D.; Brink, P. L.; Bunker, R.; Caldwell, D. O.; Calkins, R.; Chagani, H.; Chen, Y.; Cooley, J.; Cornell, B.; Crewdson, C. H.; Cushman, Priscilla B.; Daal, M.; Di Stefano, P. C.; Doughty, T.; Esteban, L.; Fallows, S.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Godfrey, G. L.; Golwala, S. R.; Hall, Jeter C.; Harris, H. R.; Hofer, T.; Holmgren, D.; Hsu, L.; Huber, M. E.; Jardin, D. M.; Jastram, A.; Kamaev, O.; Kara, B.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kennedy, A.; Leder, A.; Loer, B.; Lopez Asamar, E.; Lukens, W.; Mahapatra, R.; McCarthy, K. A.; Mirabolfathi, N.; Moffatt, R. A.; Morales Mendoza, J. D.; Oser, S. M.; Page, K.; Page, W. A.; Partridge, R.; Pepin, M.; Phipps, A.; Prasad, K.; Pyle, M.; Qiu, H.; Rau, W.; Redl, P.; Reisetter, A.; Ricci, Y.; Roberts, A.; Saab, T.; Sadoulet, B.; Sander, J.; Schnee, R. W.; Scorza, S.; Serfass, B.; Shank, B.; Speller, D.; Toback, D.; Upadhyayula, S.; Villano, A. N.; Welliver, B.; Wilson, J. S.; Wright, D. H.; Yang, X.; Yellin, S.; Yen, J. J.; Young, B. A.; Zhang, J.

    2015-05-01

    We examine the consequences of the effective eld theory (EFT) of dark matter-nucleon scattering or current and proposed direct detection experiments. Exclusion limits on EFT coupling constants computed using the optimum interval method are presented for SuperCDMS Soudan, CDMS II, and LUX, and the necessity of combining results from multiple experiments in order to determine dark matter parameters is discussed. We demonstrate that spectral di*erences between the standard dark matter model and a general EFT interaction can produce a bias when calculating exclusion limits and when developing signal models for likelihood and machine learning techniques. We also discuss the implications of the EFT for the next-generation (G2) direct detection experiments and point out regions of complementarity in the EFT parameter space.

  10. Dark matter effective field theory scattering in direct detection experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Schneck, K.; Cabrera, B.; Cerdeño, D. G.; Mandic, V.; Rogers, H. E.; Agnese, R.; Anderson, A. J.; Asai, M.; Balakishiyeva, D.; Barker, D.; Basu Thakur, R.; Bauer, D. A.; Billard, J.; Borgland, A.; Brandt, D.; Brink, P. L.; Bunker, R.; Caldwell, D. O.; Calkins, R.; Chagani, H.; Chen, Y.; Cooley, J.; Cornell, B.; Crewdson, C. H.; Cushman, P.; Daal, M.; Di Stefano, P. C. F.; Doughty, T.; Esteban, L.; Fallows, S.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Godfrey, G. L.; Golwala, S. R.; Hall, J.; Harris, H. R.; Hofer, T.; Holmgren, D.; Hsu, L.; Huber, M. E.; Jardin, D. M.; Jastram, A.; Kamaev, O.; Kara, B.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kennedy, A.; Leder, A.; Loer, B.; Lopez Asamar, E.; Lukens, P.; Mahapatra, R.; McCarthy, K. A.; Mirabolfathi, N.; Moffatt, R. A.; Morales Mendoza, J. D.; Oser, S. M.; Page, K.; Page, W. A.; Partridge, R.; Pepin, M.; Phipps, A.; Prasad, K.; Pyle, M.; Qiu, H.; Rau, W.; Redl, P.; Reisetter, A.; Ricci, Y.; Roberts, A.; Saab, T.; Sadoulet, B.; Sander, J.; Schnee, R. W.; Scorza, S.; Serfass, B.; Shank, B.; Speller, D.; Toback, D.; Upadhyayula, S.; Villano, A. N.; Welliver, B.; Wilson, J. S.; Wright, D. H.; Yang, X.; Yellin, S.; Yen, J. J.; Young, B. A.; Zhang, J.

    2015-05-18

    We examine the consequences of the effective field theory (EFT) of dark matter-nucleon scattering for current and proposed direct detection experiments. Exclusion limits on EFT coupling constants computed using the optimum interval method are presented for SuperCDMS Soudan, CDMS II, and LUX, and the necessity of combining results from multiple experiments in order to determine dark matter parameters is discussed. Here. we demonstrate that spectral differences between the standard dark matter model and a general EFT interaction can produce a bias when calculating exclusion limits and when developing signal models for likelihood and machine learning techniques. In conclusion, we discuss the implications of the EFT for the next-generation (G2) direct detection experiments and point out regions of complementarity in the EFT parameter space.

  11. Practice and carryover effects when using small interaction devices.

    PubMed

    Sutter, C; Oehl, M; Armbrüster, C

    2011-03-01

    The use of interaction devices in modern work often challenges the human motor system, especially when these devices introduce unfamiliar transformations to the user. In this paper we evaluated expert performance and skill differences between experts and novices when using small motion- and force-controlled interaction devices (touchpad and mini-joystick) in an applied text-editing task. Firstly, experts performed better with their familiar input device than with an unfamiliar one. Particularly touchpad experts operating the unfamiliar mini-joystick showed highly asymmetric carryover costs. Results showed that the efficient performance of experts depended on domain-specific skills, which were not transferable. Secondly, with considerable practice (more than observed for simple and short tasks) novices were brought up to higher levels of performance. The motion-transformation between hand and cursor action was easier in understanding and application than the force-transformation. Thus, the touchpad was used more efficiently than the mini-joystick. In conclusion, practice effects found so far are considerably underestimated when it comes to an applied task. The results give reason to develop and implement skill-sensitive training procedures, since the acquisition of domain-specific skills is critical for expert performance. As a consequence, training procedures might be essential for complex applications and/or unfamiliar device transformations.

  12. Opinion dynamics within a virtual small group: the stubbornness effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guazzini, Andrea; Cini, Alessandro; Bagnoli, Franco; Ramasco, José

    2015-09-01

    The modeling of opinion dynamics is social systems has attracted a good deal of attention in the last decade. Even though based on intuition and observation, the mechanisms behind many of these models need solid empirical grounding. In this work, we investigate the relation among subjective variables (such as the personality), the dynamics of the affinity network dynamics, the communication patterns emerging throughout the social interactions and the opinions dynamics in a series of experiments with five small groups of ten people each. In order to ignite the discussion, the polemic topic of animal experimentation was proposed. The groups essentially polarized in two factions with a set of stubborn individuals (those not changing their opinions in time) playing the role of anchors. Our results suggest that the different layers present in the group dynamics (i.e., individual level, group dynamics and meso-communication) are deeply intermingled, specifically the stubbornness effect appears to be related to the dynamical features of the network topologies, and only in an undirected way to the personality of the participants.

  13. Cost-effective compliance for the small provider.

    PubMed

    Fedor, F P

    2000-07-01

    Small provider organizations often have limited resources with which to implement a compliance program. The Office of Inspector General (OIG) has indicated that a small organization may take a less formal approach to compliance and develop a compliance program that fits its budget and resources. But small providers should take seriously the need for a compliance program despite the OIG's greater latitude toward small organizations. Whatever the size of their budget, small providers should emphasize due diligence and good-faith approaches to compliance to demonstrate to investigators and employees that they have made compliance a priority. These efforts can encourage the OIG to look more favorably upon the organization in the event of a compliance breach and also can improve the organization's financial performance by improving overall management of the organization.

  14. Effects of desert wildfires on desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) and other small vertebrates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Esque, T.C.; Schwalbe, C.R.; DeFalco, L.A.; Duncan, R.B.; Hughes, T.J.

    2003-01-01

    We report the results of standardized surveys to determine the effects of wildfires on desert tortoises (Gopherus agassizii) and their habitats in the northeastern Mojave Desert and northeastern Sonoran Desert. Portions of 6 burned areas (118 to 1,750 ha) were examined for signs of mortality of vertebrates. Direct effects of fire in desert habitats included animal mortality and loss of vegetation cover. A range of 0 to 7 tortoises was encountered during surveys, and live tortoises were found on all transects. In addition to desert tortoises, only small (<1 kg) mammals and reptiles (11 taxa) were found dead on the study areas. We hypothesize that indirect effects of fire on desert habitats might result in changes in the composition of diets and loss of vegetation cover, resulting in an increase in predation and loss of protection from temperature extremes. These changes in habitat also might cause changes in vertebrate communities in burned areas.

  15. Disentangling direct and indirect fitness effects of microbial dormancy.

    PubMed

    Ratcliff, William C; Hoverman, Mitchell; Travisano, Michael; Denison, R Ford

    2013-08-01

    Disentangling individual selection from kin selection is one of the greatest challenges of evolutionary biology. Even solitary organisms that do not interact directly with conspecifics may interact indirectly with them through competition for resources. As a result, traits that appear to affect individual fitness alone can also modify the fitness of relatives nearby and thus may evolve partially through these cryptic indirect fitness effects. Here we develop a method to quantitatively separate direct and indirect fitness consequences when some microbes become dormant, while neighbors of the same genotype remain active. Dormant microbes typically survive stresses that kill metabolically active cells, but dormancy also has a social side effect, sparing resources that may be used by nondormant individuals for growth. In structured populations, spared resources may be preferentially consumed by nondormant clonemates, providing an indirect benefit. Without population structure, however, exploitation by a never-dormant competitor imposes an indirect fitness cost on dormant cells. Cryptic indirect fitness effects may play a significant role in the evolution of many ostensibly asocial traits.

  16. Direct effects of increasing carbon dioxide on vegetation

    SciTech Connect

    Strain, B R; Cure, J D

    1985-12-01

    CO/sub 2/ is an essential environmental resource. It is required as a raw material of the orderly development of all green plants. As the availability of CO/sub 2/ increases, perhaps reaching two or three times the concentration prevailing in preindustrial times, plants and all other organisms dependent on them for food will be affected. Humans are releasing a gaseous fertilizer into the global atmosphere in quantities sufficient to affect all life. This volume considers the direct effects of global CO/sub 2/ fertilization on plants and thus on all other life. Separate abstracts have been prepared for individual papers. (ACR)

  17. Direct measurement of the magnetocaloric effect in cementite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaeswurm, B.; Friemert, K.; Gürsoy, M.; Skokov, K. P.; Gutfleisch, O.

    2016-07-01

    Measurements of the magnetocaloric effect of cementite at its Curie temperature of 475 K are presented. An adiabatic temperature change of 1.76±0.01 K was measured using a direct measurement technique. The isothermal entropy change was determined from measurements of magnetisation isotherms and was shown to be 3.07 J K-1 kg-1 in a field change of 2 T. The field dependencies of both magnetocaloric properties follow the H2/3 dependence typical for ferromagnetic materials with a second order phase transition. The material may be of interest in magnetocaloric applications such as magnetic refrigeration or thermomagnetic power generation.

  18. Effects of direct and indirect bleach on dentin fracture toughness.

    PubMed

    Tam, L E; Noroozi, A

    2007-12-01

    There are concerns that tooth-whitening procedures irreversibly damage tooth structure. We investigated the hypothesis that dental bleaches significantly affect dentin structural integrity. The objective was to evaluate the effects of peroxide bleaches on dentin fracture toughness. Compact test specimens, composed of human dentin, were used (n = 10/group). Bleach (16% or 10% carbamide peroxide or 3% hydrogen peroxide) or control material, containing 0.1% sodium fluoride, was applied directly or indirectly to dentin through enamel (6 hrs/day) for 2 or 8 weeks. Fracture toughness results were analyzed by ANOVA and Fisher's LSD test (p < 0.05). There were significant decreases in mean fracture toughness after two- and eight-week direct (19-34% and 61-68%, respectively) and indirect (up to 17% and 37%, respectively) bleach application. The in vitro reduction in dentin fracture toughness caused by the application of peroxide bleaches was greater for the direct application method, longer application time, and higher bleach concentration.

  19. Gas exchange dependency on diffusion coefficient: direct /sup 222/Rn and /sup 3/He comparisons in a small lake

    SciTech Connect

    Torgersen, T.; Mathieu, G.; Hesslein, R.H.; Broecker, W.S.

    1982-01-20

    A direct field comparison was conducted to determine the dependency of gas exchange coefficient (k/sub x/) on the diffusion coefficient (D/sub x/). The study also sought to confirm the enhanced vertical exchange properties of limnocorrals and similar enclosures. Gas exchange coefficients for /sup 222/Rn and /sup 3/He were determined in a small northern Ontario lake, using a /sup 226/Ra and /sup 3/H spike to gain the necessary precision. The results indicate that the gas exchange coefficient is functionally dependent on the diffusion coefficient raised to the 1.22/sub -35//sup + > 12/ power (k/sub x/ = f(D/sub x//sup 1.22)), clearly supporting the stagnant film model of gas exchange. Limnocorrals were found to have gas exchange rates up to 1.7 times higher than the whole lake in spite of the observation of more calm surface conditions in the corral than in the open lake. 33 references, 6 figures, 8 tables.

  20. Polydopamine-coated magnetic nanoparticles for enrichment and direct detection of small molecule pollutants coupled with MALDI-TOF-MS.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yu-rong; Zhang, Xiao-le; Zeng, Tao; Cao, Dong; Zhou, Zhen; Li, Wen-hui; Niu, Hongyun; Cai, Ya-qi

    2013-02-01

    Polydopamine-coated Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles (Fe(3)O(4)@PDA NPs) were synthesized and applied as matrix for the detection of pollutants by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). The synthesis of Fe(3)O(4)@PDA NPs was accomplished in 30 min by in situ polymerization of dopamine without any toxic reagent. Using Fe(3)O(4)@PDA NPs as matrix of MALDI-TOF, eleven small molecule pollutants (molecular weight from 251.6 to 499.3), including Benzo(a)pyrene (BaP), three perfluorinated compounds (PFCs), and seven antibiotics, were successfully detected in either positive or negative reflection mode without background interference. Furthermore, the Fe(3)O(4)@PDA NPs can also enrich trace amounts of hydrophobic target, such as BaP, from solution to nanoparticles surface. Then the Fe(3)O(4)@PDA-BaP can be isolated through magnetic sedimentation step and directly spotted on the stainless steel plate for MALDI measurement. With Fe(3)O(4)@PDA NPs as adsorbent and matrix, we also realized the analysis of BaP in tap water and lake water samples. Thus, a magnetic solid-phase extraction (MSPE)-MALDI-TOF-MS method was established for the measurement of BaP. PMID:23301525

  1. Direct Determination of a Small-Molecule Drug, Valproic Acid, by an Electrically-Detected Microcantilever Biosensor for Personalized Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Long-Sun; Gunawan, Christian; Yen, Yi-Kuang; Chang, Kai-Fung

    2015-01-01

    Direct, small-molecule determination of the antiepileptic drug, valproic acid, was investigated by a label-free, nanomechanical biosensor. Valproic acid has long been used as an antiepileptic medication, which is administered through therapeutic drug monitoring and has a narrow therapeutic dosage range of 50–100 μg·mL−1 in blood or serum. Unlike labeled and clinically-used measurement techniques, the label-free, electrical detection microcantilever biosensor can be miniaturized and simplified for use in portable or hand-held point-of-care platforms or personal diagnostic tools. A micromachined microcantilever sensor was packaged into the micro-channel of a fluidic system. The measurement of the antiepileptic drug, valproic acid, in phosphate-buffered saline and serum used a single free-standing, piezoresistive microcantilever biosensor in a thermally-controlled system. The measured surface stresses showed a profile over a concentration range of 50–500 μg·mL−1, which covered the clinically therapeutic range of 50–100 μg·mL−1. The estimated limit of detection (LOD) was calculated to be 45 μg·mL−1, and the binding affinity between the drug and the antibody was measured at around 90 ± 21 μg·mL−1. Lastly, the results of the proposed device showed a similar profile in valproic acid drug detection with those of the clinically-used fluorescence polarization immunoassay. PMID:25632826

  2. Geometric Effects When Measuring Small Holes With Micro Contact Probes

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Jack; Muralikrishnan, Bala; Sahay, Chittaranjan

    2011-01-01

    A coordinate measuring machine with a suitably small probe can be used to measure micro-features such as the diameter and form of small holes (often about 100 μm in diameter). When measuring small holes, the clearance between the probe tip and the part is sometimes nearly as small as other characteristic lengths (such as probe deflection or form errors) associated with the measurement. Under these circumstances, the basic geometry of the measurement is much different than it is for the measurement of a macroscopic object. Various geometric errors are greatly magnified, and consequently sources of error that are totally irrelevant when measuring macroscopic artifacts can become important. In this article we discuss errors associated with misalignment or non-orthogonality of the probe axes, probe-tip radius compensation, and mechanical filtering. PMID:26989585

  3. Test Report: Direct and Indirect Lightning Effects on Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, R. W.

    1997-01-01

    Lightning tests were performed on composite materials as a part of an investigation of electromagnetic effects on the materials. Samples were subjected to direct and remote simulated lightning strikes. Samples included various thicknesses of graphite filament reinforced plastic (GFRP), material enhanced by expanded aluminum foil layers, and material with an aluminum honeycomb core. Shielding properties of the material and damage to the sample surfaces and joints were investigated. Adding expanded aluminum foil layers and increasing the thickness of GFRP improves the shielding effectiveness against lightning induced fields and the ability to withstand lightning strikes. A report describing the lightning strike tests performed by the U.S. Army Redstone Technical Test Center, Redstone Arsenal, AL, STERT-TE-E-EM, is included as an appendix.

  4. What Is the Effect of Small-Scale Schooling on Student Achievement? ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howley, Craig B.

    This digest reviews recent evidence of the positive effects of small-scale schooling on student achievement. Historically, larger school size has been viewed as an important educational reform producing cost-effectiveness and educational efficiency. Today, small-scale schooling is found primarily in rural areas and small towns. A 1964 study…

  5. Effect of occlusion, directionality and age on horizontal localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alworth, Lynzee Nicole

    Localization acuity of a given listener is dependent upon the ability discriminate between interaural time and level disparities. Interaural time differences are encoded by low frequency information whereas interaural level differences are encoded by high frequency information. Much research has examined effects of hearing aid microphone technologies and occlusion separately and prior studies have not evaluated age as a factor in localization acuity. Open-fit hearing instruments provide new earmold technologies and varying microphone capabilities; however, these instruments have yet to be evaluated with regard to horizontal localization acuity. Thus, the purpose of this study is to examine the effects of microphone configuration, type of dome in open-fit hearing instruments, and age on the horizontal localization ability of a given listener. Thirty adults participated in this study and were grouped based upon hearing sensitivity and age (young normal hearing, >50 years normal hearing, >50 hearing impaired). Each normal hearing participant completed one localization experiment (unaided/unamplified) where they listened to the stimulus "Baseball" and selected the point of origin. Hearing impaired listeners were fit with the same two receiver-in-the-ear hearing aids and same dome types, thus controlling for microphone technologies, type of dome, and fitting between trials. Hearing impaired listeners completed a total of 7 localization experiments (unaided/unamplified; open dome: omnidirectional, adaptive directional, fixed directional; micromold: omnidirectional, adaptive directional, fixed directional). Overall, results of this study indicate that age significantly affects horizontal localization ability as younger adult listeners with normal hearing made significantly fewer localization errors than older adult listeners with normal hearing. Also, results revealed a significant difference in performance between dome type; however, upon further examination was not

  6. Direct evidence for kinetic effects associated with solar wind reconnection

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaojun; Wang, Yi; Wei, Fengsi; Feng, Xueshang; Deng, Xiaohua; Ma, Yonghui; Zhou, Meng; Pang, Ye; Wong, Hon-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Kinetic effects resulting from the two-fluid physics play a crucial role in the fast collisionless reconnection, which is a process to explosively release massive energy stored in magnetic fields in space and astrophysical plasmas. In-situ observations in the Earth's magnetosphere provide solid consistence with theoretical models on the point that kinetic effects are required in the collisionless reconnection. However, all the observations associated with solar wind reconnection have been analyzed in the context of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) although a lot of solar wind reconnection exhausts have been reported. Because of the absence of kinetic effects and substantial heating, whether the reconnections are still ongoing when they are detected in the solar wind remains unknown. Here, by dual-spacecraft observations, we report a solar wind reconnection with clear Hall magnetic fields. Its corresponding Alfvenic electron outflow jet, derived from the decouple between ions and electrons, is identified, showing direct evidence for kinetic effects that dominate the collisionless reconnection. The turbulence associated with the exhaust is a kind of background solar wind turbulence, implying that the reconnection generated turbulence has not much developed. PMID:25628139

  7. Direct evidence for kinetic effects associated with solar wind reconnection.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaojun; Wang, Yi; Wei, Fengsi; Feng, Xueshang; Deng, Xiaohua; Ma, Yonghui; Zhou, Meng; Pang, Ye; Wong, Hon-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Kinetic effects resulting from the two-fluid physics play a crucial role in the fast collisionless reconnection, which is a process to explosively release massive energy stored in magnetic fields in space and astrophysical plasmas. In-situ observations in the Earth's magnetosphere provide solid consistence with theoretical models on the point that kinetic effects are required in the collisionless reconnection. However, all the observations associated with solar wind reconnection have been analyzed in the context of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) although a lot of solar wind reconnection exhausts have been reported. Because of the absence of kinetic effects and substantial heating, whether the reconnections are still ongoing when they are detected in the solar wind remains unknown. Here, by dual-spacecraft observations, we report a solar wind reconnection with clear Hall magnetic fields. Its corresponding Alfvenic electron outflow jet, derived from the decouple between ions and electrons, is identified, showing direct evidence for kinetic effects that dominate the collisionless reconnection. The turbulence associated with the exhaust is a kind of background solar wind turbulence, implying that the reconnection generated turbulence has not much developed. PMID:25628139

  8. Direct evidence for kinetic effects associated with solar wind reconnection.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaojun; Wang, Yi; Wei, Fengsi; Feng, Xueshang; Deng, Xiaohua; Ma, Yonghui; Zhou, Meng; Pang, Ye; Wong, Hon-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Kinetic effects resulting from the two-fluid physics play a crucial role in the fast collisionless reconnection, which is a process to explosively release massive energy stored in magnetic fields in space and astrophysical plasmas. In-situ observations in the Earth's magnetosphere provide solid consistence with theoretical models on the point that kinetic effects are required in the collisionless reconnection. However, all the observations associated with solar wind reconnection have been analyzed in the context of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) although a lot of solar wind reconnection exhausts have been reported. Because of the absence of kinetic effects and substantial heating, whether the reconnections are still ongoing when they are detected in the solar wind remains unknown. Here, by dual-spacecraft observations, we report a solar wind reconnection with clear Hall magnetic fields. Its corresponding Alfvenic electron outflow jet, derived from the decouple between ions and electrons, is identified, showing direct evidence for kinetic effects that dominate the collisionless reconnection. The turbulence associated with the exhaust is a kind of background solar wind turbulence, implying that the reconnection generated turbulence has not much developed.

  9. The effective field theory of dark matter direct detection

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzpatrick, A. Liam; Katz, Emanuel; Haxton, Wick; Lubbers, Nicholas; Xu, Yiming E-mail: haxton@berkeley.edu E-mail: nlubbers@bu.edu

    2013-02-01

    We extend and explore the general non-relativistic effective theory of dark matter (DM) direct detection. We describe the basic non-relativistic building blocks of operators and discuss their symmetry properties, writing down all Galilean-invariant operators up to quadratic order in momentum transfer arising from exchange of particles of spin 1 or less. Any DM particle theory can be translated into the coefficients of an effective operator and any effective operator can be simply related to most general description of the nuclear response. We find several operators which lead to novel nuclear responses. These responses differ significantly from the standard minimal WIMP cases in their relative coupling strengths to various elements, changing how the results from different experiments should be compared against each other. Response functions are evaluated for common DM targets — F, Na, Ge, I, and Xe — using standard shell model techniques. We point out that each of the nuclear responses is familiar from past studies of semi-leptonic electroweak interactions, and thus potentially testable in weak interaction studies. We provide tables of the full set of required matrix elements at finite momentum transfer for a range of common elements, making a careful and fully model-independent analysis possible. Finally, we discuss embedding non-relativistic effective theory operators into UV models of dark matter.

  10. Cost-Effectiveness of Health Risk Reduction After Lifestyle Education in the Small Workplace

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Jorie C.; Lewis, James B.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Investigations suggest that worksite health promotions in large companies decrease employer health costs and the risk for chronic disease. However, evidence of the success of such programs in small organizations is lacking. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a worksite health promotion program improves health risk and is cost-effective for a small employer. Methods Intervention (n = 29) and comparison (n = 31) participants from a 172-employee organization underwent health screening of risk factors for coronary heart disease at baseline (fall 2006) and at 12 months (fall 2007). The intervention group attended lifestyle education videoconferences and reported physical activity. We used the Framingham Risk Score to calculate risk of coronary heart disease. To calculate cost-effectiveness, we used direct employer costs of the program divided by either the relative reduction in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol or the absolute change in coronary heart disease risk. Results At 12 months, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, total cholesterol, and number of metabolic syndrome markers were significantly higher in the comparison group than in the intervention group. Total cholesterol was significantly lower at 12 months than at baseline in the intervention group. Waist circumference and number of metabolic syndrome markers increased significantly from baseline in the comparison group. Cost-effectiveness of the intervention was $10.17 per percentage-point reduction of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and $454.23 per point reduction in coronary heart disease risk. Conclusion This study demonstrated the cost-effectiveness in a small organization of a worksite health promotion that improved low-density lipoproteins and coronary heart disease risk in participating employees. PMID:22575081

  11. Effective management of acute deep vein thrombosis: direct oral anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    Roussin, A

    2015-02-01

    Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is a manifestation of venous thromboembolism (VTE) and accounts for most venous thromboembolic events. Although DVT is not directly life-threatening, thrombi in the proximal veins of the leg can embolize to the lungs to form a pulmonary embolism, which may prove rapidly fatal. If untreated, DVT can also lead to significant morbidity, including development of post-thrombotic syndrome. Among many risk factors, surgery, hospitalization, older age and active cancer increase the risk of VTE, and a previous event increases the risk of recurrence. Early detection and effective clot resolution are vital in managing DVT. Conventional approaches to acute treatment of VTE involve initial fast-acting parenteral heparin overlapping with and followed by vitamin K antagonist therapy. However, vitamin K antagonists have a narrow therapeutic window, require regular monitoring, and have multiple food and drug interactions. Results from phase III clinical studies involving direct Factor Xa and IIa inhibitors suggest that these agents provide an alternative therapeutic option that overcomes some of the complications associated with conventional treatment with predictable pharmacological properties and convenient dosing schedules. Analysis of data from the rivaroxaban EINSTEIN studies also suggests that these agents have the potential to improve patient-reported treatment satisfaction and reduce the length of hospital stay compared with conventional therapy. This review considers these treatment options, suitable treatment durations to prevent recurrence, and the management of DVT treatment in challenging patient groups. PMID:24927023

  12. Effects of polarization direction on laser-assisted free-free scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    deHarak, B. A.; Kim, B. N.; Weaver, C. M.; Martin, N. L. S.; Siavashpouri, Mahsa; Nosarzewski, Benjamin

    2016-06-01

    This work will detail the effects of laser polarization direction (relative to the momentum transfer direction) on laser-assisted free-free scattering. Such processes play a role in the gas breakdown that occurs in electric discharges as well as providing a method for the laser heating of a plasma (Musa et al 2010 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 43 175201, Mason 1993 Rep. Prog. Phys. 56 1275). Experimental results will be presented for electron-helium scattering in the presence of an Nd:YAG laser field (hν =1.17 eV) where the polarization direction was varied in a plane that is perpendicular to the scattering plane. To date, all of our experimental results are well described by the Kroll-Watson approximation (KWA) (Kroll and Watson 1973 Phys. Rev. A 8 804). The good agreement between our experiments and calculations using the KWA includes the case where the polarization is perpendicular to the momentum transfer direction, for which the KWA predicts vanishing cross section; other workers have found that the KWA tends to be inaccurate for cases where it predicts small cross sections (e.g. Musa et al 2010 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 43 175201). We also present simulations of the effects that multiple scattering might have on experimental measurements. In particular, we examine conditions that are expected to be similar to those of the experiments reported by Wallbank and Holmes (Wallbank and Holmes 1993 Phys. Rev. A 48 R2515).

  13. Effects of polarization direction on laser-assisted free–free scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    deHarak, B. A.; Kim, B. N.; Weaver, C. M.; Martin, N. L. S.; Siavashpouri, Mahsa; Nosarzewski, Benjamin

    2016-06-01

    This work will detail the effects of laser polarization direction (relative to the momentum transfer direction) on laser-assisted free–free scattering. Such processes play a role in the gas breakdown that occurs in electric discharges as well as providing a method for the laser heating of a plasma (Musa et al 2010 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 43 175201, Mason 1993 Rep. Prog. Phys. 56 1275). Experimental results will be presented for electron-helium scattering in the presence of an Nd:YAG laser field (hν =1.17 eV) where the polarization direction was varied in a plane that is perpendicular to the scattering plane. To date, all of our experimental results are well described by the Kroll–Watson approximation (KWA) (Kroll and Watson 1973 Phys. Rev. A 8 804). The good agreement between our experiments and calculations using the KWA includes the case where the polarization is perpendicular to the momentum transfer direction, for which the KWA predicts vanishing cross section; other workers have found that the KWA tends to be inaccurate for cases where it predicts small cross sections (e.g. Musa et al 2010 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 43 175201). We also present simulations of the effects that multiple scattering might have on experimental measurements. In particular, we examine conditions that are expected to be similar to those of the experiments reported by Wallbank and Holmes (Wallbank and Holmes 1993 Phys. Rev. A 48 R2515).

  14. Direct and indirect effects of climate change on amphibian populations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blaustein, Andrew R.; Walls, Susan C.; Bancroft, Betsy A.; Lawler, Joshua J.; Searle, Catherine L.; Gervasi, Stephanie S.

    2010-01-01

    As part of an overall decline in biodiversity, populations of many organisms are declining and species are being lost at unprecedented rates around the world. This includes many populations and species of amphibians. Although numerous factors are affecting amphibian populations, we show potential direct and indirect effects of climate change on amphibians at the individual, population and community level. Shifts in amphibian ranges are predicted. Changes in climate may affect survival, growth, reproduction and dispersal capabilities. Moreover, climate change can alter amphibian habitats including vegetation, soil, and hydrology. Climate change can influence food availability, predator-prey relationships and competitive interactions which can alter community structure. Climate change can also alter pathogen-host dynamics and greatly influence how diseases are manifested. Changes in climate can interact with other stressors such as UV-B radiation and contaminants. The interactions among all these factors are complex and are probably driving some amphibian population declines and extinctions.

  15. Direct and indirect anthelmintic effects of condensed tannins in sheep.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Zafar; Sarwar, Muhammad; Jabbar, Abdul; Ahmed, Shahbaz; Nisa, M; Sajid, Muhammad Sohail; Khan, Muhammad Nisar; Mufti, Kamran Aftab; Yaseen, Muhammad

    2007-03-15

    Anthelmintic activity of condensed tannins (CT) was evaluated both in vitro and in vivo. In vitro tests included egg hatch test and paralysis/mortality assay on adult Haemonchus contortus. In vivo anthelmintic effect was determined by faecal egg count reduction test in lambs. To this end, 18 lambs were divided into three groups (low tannin, high tannin and control). The lambs of low and high tannin groups were fed diets containing 2 and 3% CT while the control group was fed on diets without CT. In vitro trials showed a dose-dependent inhibition of nematode egg hatching; whereas, there was no effect of CT on adult H. contortus. In vivo trials indicated reduction in faecal egg counts in lambs fed diets containing CT. Feed intake and nutrient digestibility of CT-fed sheep was lower and nitrogen balance was higher as compared to control. Maximum weight gain was observed in animals fed diets containing 3% CT. The direct anthelmintic effect of CT, therefore, was evidenced by inhibited egg hatching; whereas, faecal egg counts reduction in sheep was through improved nutrient utilization.

  16. Direct and indirect cellular effects of aspartame on the brain.

    PubMed

    Humphries, P; Pretorius, E; Naudé, H

    2008-04-01

    The use of the artificial sweetener, aspartame, has long been contemplated and studied by various researchers, and people are concerned about its negative effects. Aspartame is composed of phenylalanine (50%), aspartic acid (40%) and methanol (10%). Phenylalanine plays an important role in neurotransmitter regulation, whereas aspartic acid is also thought to play a role as an excitatory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system. Glutamate, asparagines and glutamine are formed from their precursor, aspartic acid. Methanol, which forms 10% of the broken down product, is converted in the body to formate, which can either be excreted or can give rise to formaldehyde, diketopiperazine (a carcinogen) and a number of other highly toxic derivatives. Previously, it has been reported that consumption of aspartame could cause neurological and behavioural disturbances in sensitive individuals. Headaches, insomnia and seizures are also some of the neurological effects that have been encountered, and these may be accredited to changes in regional brain concentrations of catecholamines, which include norepinephrine, epinephrine and dopamine. The aim of this study was to discuss the direct and indirect cellular effects of aspartame on the brain, and we propose that excessive aspartame ingestion might be involved in the pathogenesis of certain mental disorders (DSM-IV-TR 2000) and also in compromised learning and emotional functioning.

  17. Differential effects of dopamine-directed treatments on cognition

    PubMed Central

    Ashby, F Gregory; Valentin, Vivian V; von Meer, Stella S

    2015-01-01

    Dopamine, a prominent neuromodulator, is implicated in many neuropsychiatric disorders. It has wide-ranging effects on both cortical and subcortical brain regions and on many types of cognitive tasks that rely on a variety of different learning and memory systems. As neuroscience and behavioral evidence for the existence of multiple memory systems and their corresponding neural networks accumulated, so did the notion that dopamine’s role is markedly different depending on which memory system is engaged. As a result, dopamine-directed treatments will have different effects on different types of cognitive behaviors. To predict what these effects will be, it is critical to understand: which memory system is mediating the behavior; the neural basis of the mediating memory system; the nature of the dopamine projections into that system; and the time course of dopamine after its release into the relevant brain regions. Consideration of these questions leads to different predictions for how changes in brain dopamine levels will affect automatic behaviors and behaviors mediated by declarative, procedural, and perceptual representation memory systems. PMID:26251602

  18. Evaluating the Effect of Information Technology in Small Businesses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Information technology (IT) has become a strategic vehicle for small businesses to achieve and sustain their competitive advantage. Prior research has suggested that information technology plays an important role in the decision-making process. The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between organizational IT performance and…

  19. Facilitating Effective Small Group Discussions of Controversial Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendrix, Jon R.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Describes four components of a packet of materials designed for small-group discussions on alphafetoprotein (AFP) screening for neural tube defects. Components consist of instructional guidelines for group leader, informational packet on AFP, list of specific discussion questions, and student evaluation form. Copies of these materials are…

  20. Effects of radiation on direct-drive laser target interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colombant, D. G.

    1999-11-01

    Radiation may be useful for reducing laser imprint and Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) growth in direct-drive target pellets. We will discuss the important role of radiation in a proposed direct-drive X-ray preheated target concept(S.Bodner et al., Phys. Plasmas 5,1901(1998)). In this design, a high-Z coating surrounds a thin plastic coat, over a DT-wicked foam and on top of the DT fuel. Radiation effects will be examined and discussed in the context of this design. The soft X-ray radiation emitted during the foot of the laser pulse - at a few 10^12W/cm^2- preheats the foam ablator which contributes to the reduction of the RT instability. The ablator also stops the radiation, allowing the fuel to stay on a low adiabat. Radiation in the blow-off corona of the target establishes a long scalelength plasma. This separates the ablation region from the laser absorption region where the remaining defects in laser uniformity/pellet surface finish constitute the seed for hydrodynamic instabilities. However, when the pulse intensity rises, the pressure generated by the laser in combination with the changing opacity of the plasma causes the plasma to be pushed back toward the ablator. This is called a Radiative Plasma Structure (RPS)(J.Dahlburg et al., J.Q.S.R.T. 54,113(1995)). These RPS's are a potential problem because they may carry with them the imprint which was present in the low-density corona. We will show and discuss these various effects, as well as some of the experimental work(C.Pawley et al., this conference) under way in connection with this program. These experiments are essential in order to validate both the design concepts and the numerical models, which include on-line state-of-the-art atomic physics modeling(M.Klapisch et al.,Phys. Plasmas 5,1919(1998)).

  1. In vivo and in vitro toxicological effects of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on small intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Tassinari, Roberta; La Rocca, Cinzia; Tait, Sabrina; De Berardis, Barbara; Ammendolia, Maria Grazia; Iosi, Francesca; Di Virgilio, Antonio; Martinelli, Andrea; Maranghi, Francesca; Stecca, Laura

    2015-06-23

    In European Union, titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) as bulk material is a food additive (E171) and - as nanoparticle (NP) - is used as a white pigment in several products (e.g. food, cosmetics, drugs). E171 contains approximately 36% of particles less than 100 nm in at least one dimension and TiO{sub 2} NP exposure is estimated fairly below 2.5 mg/person/day. The gastrointestinal tract is a route of entry for NPs, thus representing a potential target of effects. In in vivo study, the effects of TiO{sub 2} NP in adult rat small intestine have been evaluated by oral administration of 0 (CTRL), 1 and 2 mg/kg body weight per day - relevant to human dietary intake. Detailed quali/quantitative histopathological analyses were performed on CTRL and treated rat samples. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis was performed on small intestine. An in vitro study on Caco-2 cells was also used in order to evaluate the potential cytotoxic effects directly on enterocytes through the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay. Suspensions of TiO{sub 2} NPs for in vitro and in vivo study were characterized by EM. Histomorphometrical data showed treatment-related changes of villus height and widths in male rats. Significantly different from CTRL decreased LDH levels in the medium were detected in vitro at 24h with 2.5, 5, 10 and 20 µg/cm{sup 2} levels of TiO{sub 2} NPs. SEM analysis showed no damaged areas. Overall the results showed that enterocytes may represent a target of TiO{sub 2} NP toxicity by direct exposure both in vivo and in vitro models.

  2. In vivo and in vitro toxicological effects of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on small intestine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tassinari, Roberta; La Rocca, Cinzia; Stecca, Laura; Tait, Sabrina; De Berardis, Barbara; Ammendolia, Maria Grazia; Iosi, Francesca; Di Virgilio, Antonio; Martinelli, Andrea; Maranghi, Francesca

    2015-06-01

    In European Union, titanium dioxide (TiO2) as bulk material is a food additive (E171) and - as nanoparticle (NP) - is used as a white pigment in several products (e.g. food, cosmetics, drugs). E171 contains approximately 36% of particles less than 100 nm in at least one dimension and TiO2 NP exposure is estimated fairly below 2.5 mg/person/day. The gastrointestinal tract is a route of entry for NPs, thus representing a potential target of effects. In in vivo study, the effects of TiO2 NP in adult rat small intestine have been evaluated by oral administration of 0 (CTRL), 1 and 2 mg/kg body weight per day - relevant to human dietary intake. Detailed quali/quantitative histopathological analyses were performed on CTRL and treated rat samples. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis was performed on small intestine. An in vitro study on Caco-2 cells was also used in order to evaluate the potential cytotoxic effects directly on enterocytes through the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay. Suspensions of TiO2 NPs for in vitro and in vivo study were characterized by EM. Histomorphometrical data showed treatment-related changes of villus height and widths in male rats. Significantly different from CTRL decreased LDH levels in the medium were detected in vitro at 24h with 2.5, 5, 10 and 20 µg/cm2 levels of TiO2 NPs. SEM analysis showed no damaged areas. Overall the results showed that enterocytes may represent a target of TiO2 NP toxicity by direct exposure both in vivo and in vitro models.

  3. Direct and indirect effects of the glyphosate formulation Glifosato Atanor® on freshwater microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Vera, María Solange; Di Fiori, Eugenia; Lagomarsino, Leonardo; Sinistro, Rodrigo; Escaray, Roberto; Iummato, María Mercedes; Juárez, Angela; Ríos de Molina, María del Carmen; Tell, Guillermo; Pizarro, Haydée

    2012-10-01

    Glyphosate-based formulations are among the most widely used herbicides in the world. The effect of the formulation Glifosato Atanor(®) on freshwater microbial communities (phytoplankton, bacterioplankton, periphyton and zooplankton) was assessed through a manipulative experiment using six small outdoor microcosms of small volume. Three of the microcosms were added with 3.5 mg l(-1) of glyphosate whereas the other three were left as controls without the herbicide. The treated microcosms showed a significant increase in total phosphorus, not fully explained by the glyphosate present in the Glifosato Atanor(®). Therefore, part of the phosphorus should have come from the surfactants of the formulation. The results showed significant direct and indirect effects of Glifosato Atanor(®) on the microbial communities. A single application of the herbicide caused a fast increase both in the abundance of bacterioplankton and planktonic picocyanobacteria and in chlorophyll a concentration in the water column. Although metabolic alterations related to oxidative stress were induced in the periphyton community, the herbicide favored its development, with a large contribution of filamentous algae typical of nutrient-rich systems, with shallow and calm waters. An indirect effect of the herbicide on the zooplankton was observed due to the increase in the abundance of the rotifer Lecane spp. as a consequence of the improved food availability given by picocyanobacteria and bacteria. The formulation affected directly a fraction of copepods as a target. It was concluded that the Glifosato Atanor(®) accelerates the deterioration of the water quality, especially when considering small-volume water systems. PMID:22539117

  4. Effects of Paradoxical and Self-Control Directives in Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez, Frederick G.; Wambach, Cathrine A.

    1982-01-01

    Subjects (N=32) with recurring procrastination problems were assigned to either of two directive interview conditions (paradoxical or self-control) or to a no-interview control condition. Results indicated both directive groups exhibited generally greater improvement over time than controls and that opposing forms of direction promoted different…

  5. Small-crack effects in high-strength aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.; Wu, X. R.; Venneri, S. L.; Li, C. G.

    1994-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the Chinese Aeronautical Establishment participated in a Fatigue and Fracture Mechanics Cooperative Program. The program objectives were to identify and characterize crack initiation and growth of small cracks (10 microns to 2 mm long) in commonly used US and PRC aluminum alloys, to improve fracture mechanics analyses of surface- and corner-crack configurations, and to develop improved life-prediction methods. Fatigue and small-crack tests were performed on single-edgenotch tension (SENT) specimens and large-crack tests were conducted on center-crack tension specimens for constant-amplitude (stress ratios of -1, 0, and 0.5) and Mini-TWIST spectrum loading. The plastic replica method was used to monitor the initiation and growth of small fatigue cracks at the semicircular notch. Crack growth results from each laboratory on 7075-T6 bare and LC9cs clad aluminum alloys agreed well and showed that fatigue life was mostly crack propagation from a material defect (inclusion particles or void) or from the cladding layer. Finite-element and weight-function methods were used to determine stress intensity factors for surface and corner cracks in the SENT specimens. Equations were then developed and used in a crack growth and crack-closure model to correlate small- and large-crack data and to make life predictions for various load histories. The cooperative program produced useful experimental data and efficient analysis methods for improving life predictions. The results should ultimately improve aircraft structural reliability and safety.

  6. 10 CFR 431.446 - Small electric motors energy conservation standards and their effective dates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Small electric motors energy conservation standards and... EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Small Electric Motors Energy Conservation Standards § 431.446 Small electric motors energy conservation standards and their effective dates. (a)...

  7. 10 CFR 431.446 - Small electric motors energy conservation standards and their effective dates. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Small electric motors energy conservation standards and... EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Small Electric Motors Energy Conservation Standards § 431.446 Small electric motors energy conservation standards and their effective dates....

  8. 10 CFR 431.446 - Small electric motors energy conservation standards and their effective dates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Small electric motors energy conservation standards and... EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Small Electric Motors Energy Conservation Standards § 431.446 Small electric motors energy conservation standards and their effective dates. (a)...

  9. 10 CFR 431.446 - Small electric motors energy conservation standards and their effective dates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Small electric motors energy conservation standards and... EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Small Electric Motors Energy Conservation Standards § 431.446 Small electric motors energy conservation standards and their effective dates. (a)...

  10. Template-directed synthesis of a small molecule-antisense conjugate targeting an mRNA structure

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Rodriguez, Lilia; Wolfe, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    The targeting of structural features in mRNA with specificity remains a great chemical challenge. A hairpin structure near exon 10 in the pre-mRNA encoding the tau protein controls its splicing, and dementia-causing mutations that disrupt this structure increase exon 10 splicing. We previously reported the discovery of small molecules, mitoxantrone (MTX) and analogs, which bind to the tau RNA hairpin structure and the design of bipartite antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) that simultaneously bind to the discontinuous sequences that flank this hairpin. Herein we report the synthesis of a bipartite ASO conjugated to MTX using the tau RNA hairpin and flanking sequences as a template. A set of six MTX analogs, each containing a linker-azide, and a set of ten bipartite ASOs, each containing a branched linker-alkyne, were synthesized and tested in combinatorial fashion for their ability to conjugate in the presence or absence of template RNA. A single template-dependent MTX–ASO conjugate was identified from among the 60 reaction mixtures, demonstrating that the MTX and ASO precursors could simultaneously bind the RNA template and allow proper positioning of azide and alkyne for 1,3-cycloaddition. While the MTX–ASO conjugate proved too cytotoxic for cell-based assays, the conjugate inhibited tau exon 10 splicing under cell-free conditions more effectively than MTX or bipartite ASO alone. PMID:24691171

  11. Episodic acidification of small streams in the northeastern united states: Effects on fish populations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baker, J.P.; Van Sickle, J.; Gagen, C.J.; DeWalle, David R.; Sharpe, W.E.; Carline, R.F.; Baldigo, Barry P.; Murdoch, Peter S.; Bath, D.W.; Kretser, W.A.; Simonin, H.A.; Wigington, P.J.

    1996-01-01

    As part of the Episodic Response Project (ERP), we studied the effects of episodic acidification on fish in 13 small streams in the northeastern United States: four streams in the Adirondack region of New York, four streams in the Catskills, New York, and five streams in the northern Appalachian Plateau, Pennsylvania. In situ bioassays with brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) and a forage fish species (blacknose dace (Rhinichthys atratulus], mottled sculpin (Cottus bairdi), or slimy sculpin (Cottus cognatus), depending on the region) measured direct toxicity. Movements of individual brook trout, in relation to stream chemistry, were monitored using radiotelemetry. Electrofishing surveys assessed fish community status and the density and biomass of brook trout in each stream. During low flow, all streams except one had chemical conditions considered suitable for the survival and reproduction of most fish species (median pH 6.0-7.2 during low flow; inorganic Al 100-200 ??g/L. We conclude that episodic acidification can have long-term effects on fish communities in small streams.

  12. Fast-forward generation of effective artificial small RNAs for enhanced antiviral defense in plants

    PubMed Central

    Carbonell, Alberto; Carrington, James C.; Daròs, José-Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Artificial small RNAs (sRNAs) are short ≈21-nt non-coding RNAs engineered to inactivate sequence complementary RNAs. In plants, they have been extensively used to silence cellular transcripts in gene function analyses and to target invading RNA viruses to induce resistance. Current artificial sRNA-based antiviral resistance in plants is mainly limited to a single virus, and is jeopardized by the emergence of mutations in the artificial sRNA target site or by the presence of co-infecting viruses. Hence, there is a need to further develop the artificial sRNA approach to generate more broad and durable antiviral resistance in plants. A recently developed toolbox allows for the time and cost-effective large-scale production of artificial sRNA constructs in plants. The toolbox includes the P-SAMS web tool for the automated design of artificial sRNAs, and a new generation of artificial microRNA and synthetic trans-acting small interfering RNA (syn-tasiRNA) vectors for direct cloning and high expression of artificial sRNAs. Here we describe how the simplicity and high-throughput capability of these new technologies should accelerate the study of artificial sRNA-based antiviral resistance in plants. In particular, we discuss the potential of the syn-tasiRNA approach as a promising strategy for developing more effective, durable and broad antiviral resistance in plants. PMID:26925463

  13. Final Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: Small-Scale Geothermal Power Plant and Direct-Use Geothermal Application at AmeriCulture Inc., Cotton City, NM

    SciTech Connect

    N /A

    2002-08-27

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) conducted an Environmental Assessment (EA) of the Small-Scale Power Plant and Direct-Use Application at AmeriCulture, Inc. to evaluate potential impacts of construction and operations that would be funded in part by DOE. Small geothermal power plants have the potential for widespread application, but achieving cost-effectiveness in small plant sizes presents a number of challenges. To address these challenges, DOE is supporting the small-scale field verification projects to (1) determine and validate the economics, performance, and operational characteristics of small-scale geothermal electric power plants in different regions. and (2) determine their ability to provide distributed power in order to facilitate their increased use in the western United States. Through the Geothermal Energy Program, DOE is considering providing financial assistance to Exergy, Inc., of Hayward, California, for the development and field verification of a small-scale, approximately 1 megawatt (MVV), geothermal power plant. The proposed power plant would be located upstream of an existing geothermally-heated fish hatchery owned by AmeriCulture, Inc., of Cotton City, NM. DOE is also considering partially funding AmeriCulture, Inc., for a direct-use geothermal application using fluid discharged from the proposed power plant to heat water for the hatchery. The EA addresses the construction and operation of the small-scale, geothermal power plant and the direct use of geothermal fluid exhausted from the geothermal power plant as a heating source for the hatchery. Two system concepts were investigated. The preferred concept involves cascading the spent geothermal fluid from the proposed geothermal power plant to various thermal processes used for fish production. In the second concept, the proposed power plant would not be built, and the fluid from the existing geothermal well would be used for all direct-use operations associated with the project. DOE

  14. Biochemical studies of the multicopper oxidase (small laccase) from Streptomyces coelicolor using bioactive phytochemicals and site-directed mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Sherif, Mohammed; Waung, Debbie; Korbeci, Bihter; Mavisakalyan, Valentina; Flick, Robert; Brown, Greg; Abou-Zaid, Mamdouh; Yakunin, Alexander F; Master, Emma R

    2013-01-01

    Summary Multicopper oxidases can act on a broad spectrum of phenolic and non-phenolic compounds. These enzymes include laccases, which are widely distributed in plants and fungi, and were more recently identified in bacteria. Here, we present the results of biochemical and mutational studies of small laccase (SLAC), a multicopper oxidase from Streptomyces coelicolor (SCO6712). In addition to typical laccase substrates, SLAC was tested using phenolic compounds that exhibit antioxidant activity. SLAC showed oxidase activity against 12 of 23 substrates tested, including caffeic acid, ferulic acid, resveratrol, quercetin, morin, kaempferol and myricetin. The kinetic parameters of SLAC were determined for 2,2′-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonic acid), 2,6-dimethoxyphenol, quercetin, morin and myricetin, and maximum reaction rates were observed with myricetin, where kcat and Km values at 60°C were 8.1 (± 0.8) s−1 and 0.9 (± 0.3) mM respectively. SLAC had a broad pH optimum for activity (between pH 4 and 8) and temperature optimum at 60–70°C. It demonstrated remarkable thermostability with a half-life of over 10 h at 80°C and over 7 h at 90°C. Site-directed mutagenesis revealed 17 amino acid residues important for SLAC activity including the 10 His residues involved in copper coordination. Most notably, the Y229A and Y230A mutant proteins showed over 10-fold increase in activity compared with the wild-type SLAC, which was correlated to higher copper incorporation, while kinetic analyses with S929A predicts localization of this residue near the meta-position of aromatic substrates. Funding Information Funding for this research was provided by the Government of Ontario for the project ‘FFABnet: Functionalized Fibre and Biochemicals’ (ORF-RE-05-005), and the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada. PMID:23815400

  15. Investigating preventive-medicine consultations in first-opinion small-animal practice in the United Kingdom using direct observation.

    PubMed

    Robinson, N J; Brennan, M L; Cobb, M; Dean, R S

    2016-02-01

    Preventive-medicine consultations account for a large proportion of the veterinary caseload and previous research has suggested these consultations are fundamentally different from those in which the animal is presented for a specific health problem. There has been recent controversy around some aspects of preventive medicine for cats and dogs, and the full health benefits of the preventive-medicine consultation remain unclear. The aim of this study was to compare characteristics of the consultation and the problems discussed during the consultation between preventive-medicine consultations and other types of consultations. Data were gathered during direct observation of small-animal consultations in seven first-opinion practices in the United Kingdom. Data collected included type of clinical examination performed, patient signalment, and details of all problems discussed (including whether the problem was presenting or non-presenting, new or pre-existing, who had raised the problem, body system affected and whether an action was taken). A two-level multivariable logistic-regression model was developed, with canine and feline patients at Level 1 nested within consulting veterinary surgeons at Level 2, and a binary outcome variable of preventive-medicine consultation versus specific health-problem consultation. A total of 1807 patients were presented, of which 690 (38.2%) presented for a preventive-medicine consultation. Dogs were the most frequently presented species (n=1168; 64.6%) followed by cats (n=510; 28.2%), rabbits (n=86; 4.8%) and patients of other species (n=43; 2.4%). The five variables remaining in the multi-level model were whether multiple patients were presented, patient age, clinical examination type, weighing and number of problems discussed. Species, breed, sex, neutering status and practice did not remain in the final model. Many non-presenting problems, including both preventive-medicine problems and specific-health problems, were discussed and

  16. DNA–DNA Interactions in Tight Supercoils Are Described by a Small Effective Charge Density

    PubMed Central

    Maffeo, Cristopher; Schöpflin, Robert; Brutzer, Hergen; Stehr, René; Aksimentiev, Aleksei; Wedemann, Gero; Seidel, Ralf

    2011-01-01

    DNA-DNA interactions are important for the assembly of DNA nanostructures and during biological processes such as genome compaction and transcription regulation. In studies of these complex processes, DNA is commonly modeled as a homogeneously charged cylinder and its electrostatic interactions are calculated within the framework of the Poisson-Boltzmann equation. Commonly, a charge adaptation factor is used to address limitations of this theoretical approach. Despite considerable theoretical and experimental efforts, a rigorous quantitative assessment of this parameter is lacking. Here, we comprehensively characterized DNA-DNA interactions in the presence of monovalent ions by analyzing the supercoiling behavior of single DNA molecules held under constant tension. Both a theoretical model and coarse-grained simulations of this process revealed a surprisingly small effective DNA charge of 40% of the nominal charge density. These findings were directly supported by atomic-scale molecular dynamics simulations that determined the effective force between two DNA molecules. Our new parameterization has direct impact on many physical models involving DNA-DNA interactions. PMID:21230940

  17. Photoacoustic Doppler Effect from Flowing Small Light-Absorbing Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Hui; Maslov, Konstantin; Wang, Lihong V.

    2007-11-01

    From the flow of a suspension of micrometer-scale carbon particles, the photoacoustic Doppler shift is observed. As predicted theoretically, the observed Doppler shift equals half of that in Doppler ultrasound and does not depend on the direction of laser illumination. This new physical phenomenon provides a basis for developing photoacoustic Doppler flowmetry, which can potentially be used for detecting fluid flow in optically scattering media and especially low-speed blood flow of relatively deep microcirculation in biological tissue.

  18. Photoacoustic Doppler effect from flowing small light-absorbing particles.

    PubMed

    Fang, Hui; Maslov, Konstantin; Wang, Lihong V

    2007-11-01

    From the flow of a suspension of micrometer-scale carbon particles, the photoacoustic Doppler shift is observed. As predicted theoretically, the observed Doppler shift equals half of that in Doppler ultrasound and does not depend on the direction of laser illumination. This new physical phenomenon provides a basis for developing photoacoustic Doppler flowmetry, which can potentially be used for detecting fluid flow in optically scattering media and especially low-speed blood flow of relatively deep microcirculation in biological tissue.

  19. [DIRECTIONALITY OF THE BIOLOGICAL EFFECT OF DRINKING WATER].

    PubMed

    Gibert, K K; Karasev, A K; Marasanov, A V; Stekhin, A A; Iakovleva, G V

    2015-01-01

    There have been performed the studies of the dimensional parameters of peroxide associates in drinking water, per- forming regulatory functions in cellular metabolism, that determine the character of the biological response of the human body to drinking water The direction of action of peroxide associates type Σ [(HO2-(*) ... OH-(*) (H2O) tp)]q, (where (H2O) tp is an associate with the tetragonal structure (Walrafen pentamer Is ice VI), q is the degree of association p--parameter of ion coordination) on the cellular structures of the organism is associated with their quantum properties, determining the macroscopic parameters of the electron wave packets. Research has confirmed the addressness of the nonlocal entering electron to certain cellular structures of the body, which is determined by the structural similarity of centers of condensation of electrons in the cells of systems and organs of the body with the parameters of the electron wave packets in the associates. Methodology for the estimation of the orientation of biological effect of the drinking water to the systems of the body on the base of the analysis of variations in heart rhythm under non-contact influence of water on the human body and its relationship with the dimensional parameters and peroxide activity of associates in drinking water can be suggested for the implementation of screening tests for drinking water quality, taking into account both the individualfeatures of responses of body systems to drinking water and its group action.

  20. Effect of reabsorbed recombination radiation on the saturation current of direct gap p-n junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Roos, O.; Mavromatis, H.

    1984-01-01

    The application of the radiative transfer theory for semiconductors to p-n homojunctions subject to low level injection conditions is discussed. By virtue of the interaction of the radiation field with free carriers across the depletion layer, the saturation current density in Shockley's expression for the diode current is reduced at high doping levels. The reduction, due to self-induced photon generation, is noticeable for n-type material owing to the small electron effective mass in direct band-gap III-V compounds. The effect is insignificant in p-type material. At an equilibrium electron concentration of 2 x 10 to the 18th/cu cm in GaAs, a reduction of the saturation current density by 15 percent is predicted. It is concluded that realistic GaAs p-n junctions possess a finite thickness.

  1. Direct measurement of Lorentz transformation with Doppler effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shao-Guang

    For space science and astronomy the fundamentality of one-way velocity of light (OWVL) is selfevident. The measurement of OWVL (distance/interval) and the clock synchronization with light-signal transfer make a logical circulation. This means that OWVL could not be directly measured but only come indirectly from astronomical method (Romer's Io eclipse and Bradley's sidereal aberration), furthermore, the light-year by definitional OWVL and the trigonometry distance with AU are also un-measurable. For to solve this problem two methods of clock synchronization were proposed: The direct method is that at one end of dual-speed transmissionline with single clock measure the arriving-time difference of longitudinal wave and transverse wave or ordinary light and extraordinary light, again to calculate the collective sending-time of two wave with Yang's /shear elastic-modulus ratio (E/k) or extraordinary/ordinary light refractive-index ratio (ne/no), which work as one earthquake-station with single clock measures first-shake time and the distance to epicenter; The indirect method is that the one-way wavelength l is measured by dual-counters Ca and Cb and computer's real-time operation of reading difference (Nb - Na) of two counters, the frequency f is also simultaneously measured, then l f is just OWVL. Therefore, with classical Newtonian mechanics and ether wave optics, OWVL can be measured in the Galileo coordinate system with an isotropic length unit (1889 international meter definition). Without any hypotheses special relativity can entirely establish on the metrical results. When a certain wavelength l is defined as length unit, foregoing measurement of one-way wavelength l will become as the measurement of rod's length. Let a rigidity-rod connecting Ca and Cb moves relative to lamp-house with velocity v, rod's length L = (Nb - Na) l will change follow v by known Doppler effect, i.e., L(q) =L0 (1+ (v/c) cos q), where L0 is the proper length when v= 0, v• r = v cos q

  2. Loss and Periodic Coupling Effects in Dielectric Directional Couplers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youngquist, Robert Carl

    1984-12-01

    This dissertation is concerned with understanding the causes and effects of a new loss mechanism in dielectric directional couplers, namely dissimilar normal mode loss, as well as introducing a new class of all-fiber devices based on the periodic coupling of fiber modes. A formal introduction to coupled mode theory is developed from which directional couplers can be described by using linear propagation operators. Comparisons to the standard coupling matrix approach are made and examples are given. Theoretical arguments and experimental evidence are presented to demonstrate that the coupler modes usually have different losses. Dissimilar mode loss causes the relative phase between the light in the guides to be modified and prevents complete power transfer from occurring. Interferometers using such couplers will exhibit phase errors in their outputs and all-fiber resonators will display an asymmetry in their resonance peaks. In integrated optics lower limits are set on switching extinction ratios. It is shown that much of the analysis presented in the literature on three waveguide couplers is based on approximations that may not be valid in the regimes where the couplers are to be used. A three-waveguide coupler interferometer with dissimilar mode loss is studied and shown to have two independent outputs whose phases are environmentally insensitive to changes in coupler loss and power transfer. Uniform and periodic coupling functions are analyzed and it is shown that complete power transfer can occur when the period of the sinusoidal coupling matches the beat length between the coupled propagating waves. A birefringent fiber polarization coupler and a two-mode fiber modal coupler are demonstrated and evaluated. These compact and simple devices are used to fabricate all-fiber amplitude modulators, notch filters, in-line Mach Zehnder interferometers, and polarizers. Further applications include polarization controllers, signal processing operations such as fast word

  3. Directional effects on scene complexity in oblique thermal imagery and photographs of a deciduous forest.

    PubMed

    Balick, L K; Doak, E L

    1988-10-01

    This paper presents an examination of thermal IR images and photographs of a mixed-specie deciduous forest in eastern Tennessee. Changes of scene complexity with changes of depression angle and azimuth relative to the sun are examined. Ground-based temperature measurements and canopy structure information are used to support the interpretation of view and solar geometry effects on thermal imagery. The green band of digitized oblique photographs from three azimuths are compared to thermal IR images obtained at similar view directions. Thermal IR scenes of the forest are most complex at small phase angles (angle between vectors to the sensor and to the sun) where photographic images were least complex. At these angles, sunlit subcanopy (nonfoliage) components are visible and much warmer than the leaves. At other directions, visible subcanopy materials are more shaded, and their temperatures are similar to leaf temperature. As view azimuth becomes more aligned with the sun, the transition to the more complex and warmer images is rapid. For visible light in this forest, scene complexity is primarily the result of crown illumination and shadowing. Viewing of shadows is minimized at small phase angles so the uniformly illuminated canopy appears simple.

  4. Direct and indirect effects of UV-B exposure on litter decomposition: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Song, Xinzhang; Peng, Changhui; Jiang, Hong; Zhu, Qiuan; Wang, Weifeng

    2013-01-01

    Ultraviolet-B (UV-B) exposure in the course of litter decomposition may have a direct effect on decomposition rates via changing states of photodegradation or decomposer constitution in litter while UV-B exposure during growth periods may alter chemical compositions and physical properties of plants. Consequently, these changes will indirectly affect subsequent litter decomposition processes in soil. Although studies are available on both the positive and negative effects (including no observable effects) of UV-B exposure on litter decomposition, a comprehensive analysis leading to an adequate understanding remains unresolved. Using data from 93 studies across six biomes, this introductory meta-analysis found that elevated UV-B directly increased litter decomposition rates by 7% and indirectly by 12% while attenuated UV-B directly decreased litter decomposition rates by 23% and indirectly increased litter decomposition rates by 7%. However, neither positive nor negative effects were statistically significant. Woody plant litter decomposition seemed more sensitive to UV-B than herbaceous plant litter except under conditions of indirect effects of elevated UV-B. Furthermore, levels of UV-B intensity significantly affected litter decomposition response to UV-B (P<0.05). UV-B effects on litter decomposition were to a large degree compounded by climatic factors (e.g., MAP and MAT) (P<0.05) and litter chemistry (e.g., lignin content) (P<0.01). Results suggest these factors likely have a bearing on masking the important role of UV-B on litter decomposition. No significant differences in UV-B effects on litter decomposition were found between study types (field experiment vs. laboratory incubation), litter forms (leaf vs. needle), and decay duration. Indirect effects of elevated UV-B on litter decomposition significantly increased with decay duration (P<0.001). Additionally, relatively small changes in UV-B exposure intensity (30%) had significant direct effects on litter

  5. Small mammals cause non-trophic effects on habitat and associated snails in a native system.

    PubMed

    Huntzinger, Mikaela; Karban, Richard; Maron, John L

    2011-12-01

    Legacy effects occur when particular species or their interactions with others have long-lasting impacts, and they are increasingly recognized as important determinants of ecological processes. However, when such legacy effects have been explicitly explored, they most often involve the long-term direct effects of species on systems, as opposed to the indirect effects. Here, we explore how a legacy of small mammal exclusion on the abundance of a shrub, bush lupine (Lupinus arboreus), influences the abundance of a native land snail (Helminthoglypta arrosa) in coastal prairie and dune habitats in central California. The factors that limit populations of land snails are very poorly known despite the threats to the persistence of this group of species. In grasslands, prior vole (Microtus californicus) exclusion created long-lasting gains in bush lupine abundance, mediated through the seedbank, and was associated with increased snail numbers (10×) compared to control plots where mammals were never excluded. Similar plots in dune habitat showed no difference in snail numbers due to previous mammal exclusion. We tested whether increased competition for food, increased predation, and/or lower desiccation explained the decline in snail numbers in plots with reduced lupine cover. Tethering experiments supported the hypothesis that voles can have long-lasting impacts as ecosystem engineers, reducing woody lupine habitat required for successful aestivation by snails. These results add to a growing list of studies that have found that non-trophic interactions can be limiting to invertebrate consumers. PMID:21691854

  6. 26 CFR 1.1202-2 - Qualified small business stock; effect of redemptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 11 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Qualified small business stock; effect of... Qualified small business stock; effect of redemptions. (a) Redemptions from taxpayer or related person—(1... contractors). (d) Exceptions for termination of services, death, disability or mental incompetency, or...

  7. 26 CFR 1.1202-2 - Qualified small business stock; effect of redemptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 11 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Qualified small business stock; effect of... Qualified small business stock; effect of redemptions. (a) Redemptions from taxpayer or related person—(1... contractors). (d) Exceptions for termination of services, death, disability or mental incompetency, or...

  8. 26 CFR 1.1202-2 - Qualified small business stock; effect of redemptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 11 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Qualified small business stock; effect of... Qualified small business stock; effect of redemptions. (a) Redemptions from taxpayer or related person—(1... contractors). (d) Exceptions for termination of services, death, disability or mental incompetency, or...

  9. Microbiota-Independent Ameliorative Effects of Antibiotics on Spontaneous Th2-Associated Pathology of the Small Intestine.

    PubMed

    Han, Daehee; Walsh, Matthew C; Kim, Kwang Soon; Hong, Sung-Wook; Lee, Junyoung; Yi, Jaeu; Rivas, Gloriany; Surh, Charles D; Choi, Yongwon

    2015-01-01

    We have previously generated a mouse model of spontaneous Th2-associated disease of the small intestine called TRAF6ΔDC, in which dendritic cell (DC)-intrinsic expression of the signaling mediator TRAF6 is ablated. Interestingly, broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment ameliorates TRAF6ΔDC disease, implying a role for commensal microbiota in disease development. However, the relationship between the drug effects and commensal microbiota status remains to be formally demonstrated. To directly assess this relationship, we have now generated TRAF6ΔDC bone marrow chimera mice under germ-free (GF) conditions lacking commensal microbiota, and found, unexpectedly, that Th2-associated disease is actually exacerbated in GF TRAF6ΔDC mice compared to specific pathogen-free (SPF) TRAF6ΔDC mice. At the same time, broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment of GF TRAF6ΔDC mice has an ameliorative effect similar to that observed in antibiotics-treated SPF TRAF6ΔDC mice, implying a commensal microbiota-independent effect of broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment. We further found that treatment of GF TRAF6ΔDC mice with broad-spectrum antibiotics increases Foxp3+ Treg populations in lymphoid organs and the small intestine, pointing to a possible mechanism by which treatment may directly exert an immunomodulatory effect. To investigate links between the exacerbated phenotype of the small intestines of GF TRAF6ΔDC mice and local microbiota, we performed microbiotic profiling of the luminal contents specifically within the small intestines of diseased TRAF6ΔDC mice, and, when compared to co-housed control mice, found significantly increased total bacterial content characterized by specific increases in Firmicutes Lactobacillus species. These data suggest a protective effect of Firmicutes Lactobacillus against the spontaneous Th2-related inflammation of the small intestine of the TRAF6ΔDC model, and may represent a potential mechanism for related disease phenotypes.

  10. An Effective Approach for NRSFM of Small-Size Image Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ya-Ping; Sun, Zhan-Li; Lam, Kin-Man

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, non-rigid structure from motion (NRSFM) has become one of the hottest issues in computer vision due to its wide applications. In practice, the number of available high-quality images may be limited in many cases. Under such a condition, the performances may not be satisfactory when existing NRSFM algorithms are applied directly to estimate the 3D coordinates of a small-size image sequence. In this paper, a sub-sequence-based integrated algorithm is proposed to deal with the NRSFM problem with small sequence sizes. In the proposed method, sub-sequences are first extracted from the original sequence. In order to obtain diversified estimations, multiple weaker estimators are constructed by applying the extracted sub-sequences to a recent NRSFM algorithm with a rotation-invariant kernel (RIK). Compared to other first-order statistics, the trimmed mean is a relatively robust statistic. Considering the fact that the estimations of some weaker estimators may have large errors, the trimmed means of the outputs for all the weaker estimators are computed to determine the final estimated 3D shapes. Compared to some existing methods, the proposed algorithm can achieve a higher estimation accuracy, and has better robustness. Experimental results on several widely used image sequences demonstrate the effectiveness and feasibility of the proposed algorithm. PMID:26161521

  11. Direct Radiative Effect of Intense Dust Outbreaks in the Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gkikas, A.; Obiso, V.; Basart, S.; Jorba, O.; Pérez García-Pando, C.; Hatzianastassiou, N.; Gassó, S.; Baldasano, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    The broader Mediterranean basin is affected by intense desert dust outbreaks in spring. In the present study, we make use of satellite observations and modelling to investigate dust radiative impacts during three consecutive dust outbreaks occurred over the Mediterranean in the period 9/4-15/4/2008. The direct radiative effect (DRE) is estimated by using two simulations run with the NMMB/BSC-Dust model, where the interaction between dust aerosols and radiation is activated and deactivated, respectively. The simulation domain covers the North Africa, the Middle East and Europe at 0.25ºx0.25° and 40σ-layers. The first outbreak took place over the central and eastern Mediterranean on the 9th reaching aerosol optical depths (AODs) close to 1. The second one, with AODs up to 2, lasted from 10th to 14th affecting mainly the central Mediterranean. The third one, with AODs up to 5, affected the Iberian Peninsula on the 15th. DREs are computed for the outgoing radiation at the top of the atmosphere (TOA), the absorbed radiation into the atmosphere (ATMAB), for the downwelling (SURF) and the absorbed (NETSURF) radiation at surface, for the shortwave (SW), longwave (LW) and NET (SW+LW) radiation. According to our results, it is evident that DREs' spatial patterns are driven by those of AOD. Negative (cooling) instantaneous DRETOA, DRESURF and DRENETSURF values up to -500W/m2, -700W/m2 and -600W/m2, respectively, and positive (warming) instantaneous DREATMAB up to 340W/m2 are found for the SW spectrum, during daytime. Opposite but less pronounced effects are encountered for the LW radiation and during nightime. Due to these perturbations on the radiation field, the surface temperature is reduced locally by up to 8°C during daytime and increased by up to 4°C during nightime. It is found that the regional average NET DREs can be as large as -12W/m2, -45W/m2, -30W/m2 and 27W/m2 for TOA, SURF, NETSURF and ATMAB, respectively. Impacts on atmospheric stability and dust

  12. Effective and robust infrared small target detection with the fusion of polydirectional first order derivative images under facet model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Bing; Xin, Yunhong

    2015-03-01

    The robust detection of IR small target acts as one of the key techniques in the infrared search and tracking system (IRSTS). This paper presents a new method of small-target detection which formulates the problem as the detection of Gaussian-like spot. Initially, the amendatory first-order directional derivative (AFODD) based on facet model is applied to get the polydirectional derivative IR images, and the direction information of targets is reserved in these images. Then, the AFODD images are fused together to ensure the robustness and effectiveness of target detection. At last, the Principal Component Analysis (PCA) method is carried out to make targets in the fusion image more prominent, so that they can be extracted out by a simple threshold segmentation. Experiment results show that the presented method performs well even in the IR images with complex backgrounds.

  13. Functional Nanostructures for Effective Delivery of Small Interfering RNA Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Cheol Am; Nam, Yoon Sung

    2014-01-01

    Small interfering RNA (siRNA) has proved to be a powerful tool for target-specific gene silencing via RNA interference (RNAi). Its ability to control targeted gene expression gives new hope to gene therapy as a treatment for cancers and genetic diseases. However, siRNA shows poor pharmacological properties, such as low serum stability, off-targeting, and innate immune responses, which present a significant challenge for clinical applications. In addition, siRNA cannot cross the cell membrane for RNAi activity because of its anionic property and stiff structure. Therefore, the development of a safe, stable, and efficient system for the delivery of siRNA therapeutics into the cytoplasm of targeted cells is crucial. Several nanoparticle platforms for siRNA delivery have been developed to overcome the major hurdles facing the therapeutic uses of siRNA. This review covers a broad spectrum of non-viral siRNA delivery systems developed for enhanced cellular uptake and targeted gene silencing in vitro and in vivo and discusses their characteristics and opportunities for clinical applications of therapeutic siRNA. PMID:25285170

  14. Antiobesity Effect of a Small Molecule Repressor of RORγ.

    PubMed

    Chang, Mi Ra; He, Yuanjun; Khan, Tanya M; Kuruvilla, Dana S; Garcia-Ordonez, Ruben; Corzo, Cesar A; Unger, Thaddeus J; White, David W; Khan, Susan; Lin, Li; Cameron, Michael D; Kamenecka, Theodore M; Griffin, Patrick R

    2015-07-01

    The orphan nuclear receptor RORγ is a key regulator for T helper 17 (TH17) cell differentiation, which regulates metabolic and circadian rhythm genes in peripheral tissues. Previously, it was shown that the small molecule inverse agonist of RORγ SR1555 [1-(4-((4'-(1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoro-2-hydroxypropan-2-yl)-[1,1'-biphenyl]-4-yl)methyl)piperazin-1-yl) ethanone] suppressed TH17 differentiation and stimulated induced T regulatory (iTreg) cells. Here, we show that treatment of cultured pre-adipocyctes with SR1555 represses the expression of RORγ while leading to increased expression of FGF21 and adipoQ. Chronic administration of SR1555 to obese diabetic mice resulted in a modest reduction in food intake accompanied with significant reduction in fat mass, resulting in reduced body weight and improved insulin sensitivity. Analysis ex vivo of treated mice demonstrates that SR1555 induced expression of the thermogenic gene program in fat depots. Further studies in cultured cells showed that SR1555 inhibited activation of hormone-sensitive lipase and increased fatty acid oxidation. Combined, these results suggest that pharmacological repression of RORγ may represent a strategy for treatment of obesity by increasing thermogenesis and fatty acid oxidation, while inhibition of hormone-sensitive lipase activity results in a reduction of serum free fatty acids, leading to improved peripheral insulin sensitivity.

  15. Antiobesity Effect of a Small Molecule Repressor of RORγ

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Mi Ra; He, Yuanjun; Khan, Tanya M.; Kuruvilla, Dana S.; Garcia-Ordonez, Ruben; Corzo, Cesar A.; Unger, Thaddeus J.; White, David W.; Khan, Susan; Lin, Li; Cameron, Michael D.; Kamenecka, Theodore M.

    2015-01-01

    The orphan nuclear receptor RORγ is a key regulator for T helper 17 (TH17) cell differentiation, which regulates metabolic and circadian rhythm genes in peripheral tissues. Previously, it was shown that the small molecule inverse agonist of RORγ SR1555 [1-(4-((4′-(1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoro-2-hydroxypropan-2-yl)-[1,1′-biphenyl]-4-yl)methyl)piperazin-1-yl) ethanone] suppressed TH17 differentiation and stimulated induced T regulatory (iTreg) cells. Here, we show that treatment of cultured pre-adipocyctes with SR1555 represses the expression of RORγ while leading to increased expression of FGF21 and adipoQ. Chronic administration of SR1555 to obese diabetic mice resulted in a modest reduction in food intake accompanied with significant reduction in fat mass, resulting in reduced body weight and improved insulin sensitivity. Analysis ex vivo of treated mice demonstrates that SR1555 induced expression of the thermogenic gene program in fat depots. Further studies in cultured cells showed that SR1555 inhibited activation of hormone-sensitive lipase and increased fatty acid oxidation. Combined, these results suggest that pharmacological repression of RORγ may represent a strategy for treatment of obesity by increasing thermogenesis and fatty acid oxidation, while inhibition of hormone-sensitive lipase activity results in a reduction of serum free fatty acids, leading to improved peripheral insulin sensitivity. PMID:25904554

  16. Detection of small cell lung cancer metastases in bone marrow aspirates using monoclonal antibody directed against neuroendocrine differentiation antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Berendsen, H H; de Leij, L; Postmus, P E; Ter Haar, J G; Poppema, S; The, T H

    1988-01-01

    To detect metastases in the bone marrow of patients with small cell lung cancer, immunofluorescence with a monoclonal antibody detecting a membrane antigen (MOC-1) associated with small cell lung cancer was performed on 53 bone marrow aspirates from 30 patients. In 19 (63%) patients MOC-1 reactive cells were detected. Simultaneous histopathological examination of the bone marrow biopsy specimens detected tumour cells in only six (20%). The method is more sensitive than conventional histochemical staining of bone marrow aspirate and may eventually be able to show additional subgroups, such as patients with limited disease who might benefit from adjuvant radiotherapy or surgery. Images p275-a PMID:2834417

  17. Effect of Health Literacy on the Utilization of Advance Directives Based on the Health Belief Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henkelman, Wallace J.

    2010-01-01

    Research has demonstrated that only a small proportion of individuals in the United States complete advance directives as part of their planning for end-of-life care. This study sought to determine if health literacy is a significant factor in advance directive completion as has been posited by previous researchers. Analysis of the data collected…

  18. A small jab - a big effect: nonspecific immunomodulation by vaccines.

    PubMed

    Benn, Christine S; Netea, Mihai G; Selin, Liisa K; Aaby, Peter

    2013-09-01

    Recent epidemiological studies have shown that, in addition to disease-specific effects, vaccines against infectious diseases have nonspecific effects on the ability of the immune system to handle other pathogens. For instance, in randomized trials tuberculosis and measles vaccines are associated with a substantial reduction in overall child mortality, which cannot be explained by prevention of the target disease. New research suggests that the nonspecific effects of vaccines are related to cross-reactivity of the adaptive immune system with unrelated pathogens, and to training of the innate immune system through epigenetic reprogramming. Hence, epidemiological findings are backed by immunological data. This generates a new understanding of the immune system and about how it can be modulated by vaccines to impact the general resistance to disease.

  19. Dark matter directional detection in non-relativistic effective theories

    SciTech Connect

    Catena, Riccardo

    2015-07-20

    We extend the formalism of dark matter directional detection to arbitrary one-body dark matter-nucleon interactions. The new theoretical framework generalizes the one currently used, which is based on 2 types of dark matter-nucleon interaction only. It includes 14 dark matter-nucleon interaction operators, 8 isotope-dependent nuclear response functions, and the Radon transform of the first 2 moments of the dark matter velocity distribution. We calculate the recoil energy spectra at dark matter directional detectors made of CF{sub 4}, CS{sub 2} and {sup 3}He for the 14 dark matter-nucleon interactions, using nuclear response functions recently obtained through numerical nuclear structure calculations. We highlight the new features of the proposed theoretical framework, and present our results for a spherical dark matter halo and for a stream of dark matter particles. This study lays the foundations for model independent analyses of dark matter directional detection experiments.

  20. Dark matter directional detection in non-relativistic effective theories

    SciTech Connect

    Catena, Riccardo

    2015-07-01

    We extend the formalism of dark matter directional detection to arbitrary one-body dark matter-nucleon interactions. The new theoretical framework generalizes the one currently used, which is based on 2 types of dark matter-nucleon interaction only. It includes 14 dark matter-nucleon interaction operators, 8 isotope-dependent nuclear response functions, and the Radon transform of the first 2 moments of the dark matter velocity distribution. We calculate the recoil energy spectra at dark matter directional detectors made of CF{sub 4}, CS{sub 2} and {sup 3}He for the 14 dark matter-nucleon interactions, using nuclear response functions recently obtained through numerical nuclear structure calculations. We highlight the new features of the proposed theoretical framework, and present our results for a spherical dark matter halo and for a stream of dark matter particles. This study lays the foundations for model independent analyses of dark matter directional detection experiments.

  1. Location and direction dependent effects in collider physics from noncommutativity

    SciTech Connect

    Haghighat, Mansour; Okada, Nobuchika; Stern, Allen

    2010-07-01

    We examine the leading order noncommutative corrections to the differential and total cross sections for e{sup +}e{sup -{yields}}qq. After averaging over the Earth's rotation, the results depend on the latitude for the collider, as well as the direction of the incoming beam. They also depend on the scale and direction of the noncommutativity. Using data from LEP, we exclude regions in the parameter space spanned by the noncommutative scale and angle relative to the Earth's axis. We also investigate possible implications for phenomenology at the future International Linear Collider.

  2. Physical and chemical effects of direct aqueous advanced oxidation processing on green sand foundry mold materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clobes, Jason Kenneth

    Iron foundries using the common green sand molding process have increasingly been incorporating aqueous advanced oxidation (AO) systems to reduce the consumption of sand system bentonite clay and coal raw materials by and to decrease their volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions. These AO systems typically use a combination of sonication, ozone aeration, and hydrogen peroxide to treat and recycle slurries of sand system baghouse dust, which is rich in clay and coal. While the overall effects of AO on raw material consumption and organic emissions are known, the mechanisms behind these effects are not well understood. This research examined the effects of bench-scale direct aqueous AO processing on green sand mold materials at the micro level. Bench-scale AO processing, including acoustic sonication, ozone/oxygen aeration, and hydrogen peroxide dramatically decreased the particle sizes of both western bentonite and foundry sand system baghouse dust. Bench-scale AO processing was shown to effectively separate the clay material from the larger silica and coal particles and to extensively break up the larger clay agglomerates. The acoustic sonication component of AO processing was the key contributor to enhanced clay recovery. Acoustic sonication alone was slightly more effective than combined component AO in reducing the particle sizes of the baghouse dust and in the recovery of clay yields in the supernatant during sedimentation experiments. Sedimentation separation results correlated well with the increase in small particle concentrations due to AO processing. Clay suspension viscosity decreased with AO processing due to enhanced dispersion of the particles. X-ray diffraction of freeze-dried baghouse dust indicated that AO processing does not rehydrate calcined montmorillonite and does not increase the level of interlayer water hydration in the dry clays. Zeta potential measurements indicated that AO processing also does not produce any large changes in the

  3. Effect of Directional Array Size on the Measurement of Airframe Noise Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Thomas F.; Humphreys, William M., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    A study was conducted to examine the effects of overall size of directional (or phased) arrays on the measurement of aeroacoustic components. An airframe model was mounted in the potential core of an open-jet windtunnel, with the directional arrays located outside the flow in an anechoic environment. Two array systems were used; one with a solid measurement angle that encompasses 31.6 deg.of source directivity and a smaller one that encompasses 7.2 deg. The arrays, and sub-arrays of various sizes, measured noise from a calibrator source and flap edge model setups. In these cases, noise was emitted from relatively small, but finite size source regions, with intense levels compared to other sources. Although the larger arrays revealed much more source region detail, the measured source levels were substantially reduced due to finer resolution compared to that of the smaller arrays. To better understand the measurements quantitatively, an analytical model was used to define the basic relationships between array to source region sizes and measured output level. Also, the effect of noise scattering by shear layer turbulence was examined using the present data and those of previous studies. Taken together, the two effects were sufficient to explain spectral level differences between arrays of different sizes. An important result of this study is that total (integrated) noise source levels are retrievable and the levels are independent of the array size as long as certain experimental and processing criteria are met. The criteria for both open and closed tunnels are discussed. The success of special purpose diagonal-removal processing in obtaining integrated results is apparently dependent in part on source distribution. Also discussed is the fact that extended sources are subject to substantial measurement error, especially for large arrays.

  4. Effect of wave frequency and directional spread on shoreline runup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guza, R. T.; Feddersen, Falk

    2012-06-01

    Wave breaking across the surf zone elevates the mean water level at the shoreline (setup), and drives fluctuations about the mean (runup). Runup often is divided into sea-swell (0.04-0.3 Hz) and lower frequency infragravity (0.00-0.04 Hz) components. With energetic incident waves, runup is dominated by infragravity frequencies, and total water levels (combined setup and runup) can exceed 3 m, significantly contributing to coastal flooding and erosion. Setup and runup observations on sandy beaches are scattered about empirical parameterizations based on near-shoreline beach slope and deep water wave height and wavelength. Accurate parameterizations are needed to determine flooding and erosion risk to coastal ecosystems and communities. Here, numerical simulations with the Boussinesq wave model funwaveC are shown to statistically reproduce typical empirical setup and runup parameterizations. Furthermore, the model infragravity runup Rs(ig) strongly depends on the incident wave directional and frequency spread (about the mean direction and peak frequency). Realistic directional spread variations change Rs(ig) equivalent to a factor of two variation in incident wave height. The modeled Rs(ig) is shown to vary systematically with a new, non-dimensional spreading parameter that involves peak frequency, frequency spread, and directional spread. This suggests a new parameterization for Rs(ig) potentially useful to predict coastal flooding and erosion.

  5. The Direct Effect of Personal Relevance on Attitudes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liberman, Akiva; Chaiken, Shelly

    1996-01-01

    The personal relevance of several academic and public policy proposals was manipulated in two studies using surveys and two laboratory studies. Results generally showed that high personal relevance attitudes differed from low personal relevance attitudes, and that personal relevance directly affected attitudes in the absence of any persuasion…

  6. Effects of propeller rotation direction on airplane interior noise levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, C. M.; Mayes, W. H.; Daniels, E. F.

    1985-01-01

    Interior noise measurements for upsweeping and downsweeping movement of the propeller blade tips past the fuselage were made on a twin-engine airplane and on two simplified fuselage models. Changes in interior noise levels of as much as 8 dB reversal of propeller rotation direction were measured for some configurations and test conditions.

  7. Goal Direction and Effectiveness, Emotional Maturity, and Nuclear Family Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klever, Phillip

    2009-01-01

    Differentiation of self, a cornerstone concept in Bowen theory, has a profound influence over time on the functioning of the individual and his or her family unit. This 5-year longitudinal study tested this hypothesis with 50 developing nuclear families. The dimensions of differentiation of self that were examined were goal direction and…

  8. Evaluation of in vitro inhibitory potential of small interfering RNAs directed against various regions of foot-and-mouth disease virus genome.

    PubMed

    Mohapatra, Jajati Keshari; Sanyal, Aniket; Hemadri, Divakar; Tosh, Chakradhar; Kumar, R Manoj; Bandyopadhyay, Santanu Kumar

    2005-04-15

    India is endemic for foot-and-mouth disease and it continues to be a major threat to the livestock industry despite vaccination programmes. In the present study, the ability of specific small interfering (si)RNAs directed against different genomic regions of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) to inhibit virus replication in BHK-21 cells was examined. For preliminary evaluation of possible siRNA-mediated FMDV inhibition, a cocktail of several unique populations of 12-30bp siRNAs were successfully produced corresponding to three target regions located at structural (VP3-VP1), non-structural (2A-2C), and non-structural-untranslated (3D-3'UTR) region of serotype Asia1. Once the populations of siRNAs generated were found to reduce the virus titre significantly, two highly conserved 21bp siRNA duplexes were designed by analysing all FMDV sequence entries available in public-domain databases. In virus titration assay, more than 99% inhibition of virus yield for all the four serotypes (type Asia1, O, A, and C) could be demonstrated in cells transfected with each of the FMDV-specific siRNAs at 24h post-infection, compared to control cells transfected with scrambled siRNA. This was well supported by reduction in OD values in FMDV-specific sandwich ELISA. Although 100-fold reduction in virus titre with siRNA1 is substantial considering the transfection efficiency and fixed level of input siRNA, siRNA2 emerged to be a better choice as target where more than 300-fold reduction was observed and its inhibitory effect extended up to 48 h post-infection against all the serotypes. Interestingly, in the present study type A virus (IND 17/77) had a single mismatch at position 2 in the siRNA2 target region but it did not abrogate the inhibitory effect.

  9. The Effect of Extra Small Group Session during PBL Implementation on Student's Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khalil, Mahmoud Salah; Al Rukban, Mohammad Othman

    2010-01-01

    Problem based learning (PBL) started to spread in health professions in Saudi Arabia at the beginning of this century. There are several challenges facing its implementation such as defects on interpersonal communications and self-directed learning. These challenges would affect students' performance in small group discussions and their…

  10. Relevant Prior Knowledge Moderates the Effect of Elaboration during Small Group Discussion on Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Blankenstein, Floris M.; Dolmans, Diana H. J. M.; Van der Vleuten, Cees P. M.; Schmidt, Henk G.

    2013-01-01

    This study set out to test whether relevant prior knowledge would moderate a positive effect on academic achievement of elaboration during small-group discussion. In a 2 × 2 experimental design, 66 undergraduate students observed a video showing a small-group problem-based discussion about thunder and lightning. In the video, a teacher asked…

  11. Effects of Group Size on Students Mathematics Achievement in Small Group Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enu, Justice; Danso, Paul Amoah; Awortwe, Peter K.

    2015-01-01

    An ideal group size is hard to obtain in small group settings; hence there are groups with more members than others. The purpose of the study was to find out whether group size has any effects on students' mathematics achievement in small group settings. Two third year classes of the 2011/2012 academic year were selected from two schools in the…

  12. The effect of baclofen on the locomotor activity of control and small-platform-stressed mice.

    PubMed

    Pokk, P; Vassiljev, V; Väli, M

    2000-09-01

    The effect of baclofen on the locomotor activity of control and small-platform-stressed mice was studied. In the small platform technique, mice are forced to stay on small platforms (d= 3.5 cm) surrounded by water for 24 h. Small platform stress increased the locomotor activity of mice in the actometer. Baclofen administered at doses of 0.25, 0.5 and 1.0 mg kg(-1)(i.p.) had no effect on the locomotor activity of control mice. In small-platform-stressed mice, the locomotor depressant effect of baclofen was pronounced, being statistically significant at a dose of 1.0 mg kg(-1). These data suggest that small platform stress induces hypersensitivity of mice to the motor depressant effect of baclofen. On the basis of these data it could be proposed that small platform stress induces changes in the function of GABA(B)receptors and that GABA(B)receptors participate in the behavioural changes caused by small platform stress.

  13. Limited direct effects of a massive wildfire on its sagebrush steppe bee community

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fire can affect bees directly, through exposure to heating and smoke during the combustion phase. Direct effects include mortality, injury and displacement affecting at most two generations of bees—adults and any progeny produced prior to the fire event. To study the direct effects of fire on a bee ...

  14. Effects of air flow directions on composting process temperature profile

    SciTech Connect

    Kulcu, Recep; Yaldiz, Osman

    2008-07-01

    In this study, chicken manure mixed with carnation wastes was composted by using three different air flow directions: R1-sucking (downward), R2-blowing (upward) and R3-mixed. The aim was to find out the most appropriate air flow direction type for composting to provide more homogenous temperature distribution in the reactors. The efficiency of each aeration method was evaluated by monitoring the evolution of parameters such as temperature, moisture content, CO{sub 2} and O{sub 2} ratio in the material and dry material losses. Aeration of the reactors was managed by radial fans. The results showed that R3 resulted in a more homogenous temperature distribution and high dry material loss throughout the composting process. The most heterogeneous temperature distribution and the lowest dry material loss were obtained in R2.

  15. Effects of scatter modeling on time-activity curves estimated directly from dynamic SPECT projections

    SciTech Connect

    Reutter, Bryan W.; Gullberg, Grant T.; Huesman, Ronald H.

    2003-10-29

    Quantitative analysis of uptake and washout of cardiac single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) radiopharmaceuticals has the potential to provide better contrast between healthy and diseased tissue, compared to conventional reconstruction of static images. Previously, we used B-splines to model time-activity curves (TACs) for segmented volumes of interest and developed fast least-squares algorithms to estimate spline TAC coefficients and their statistical uncertainties directly from dynamic SPECT projection data. This previous work incorporated physical effects of attenuation and depth-dependent collimator response. In the present work, we incorporate scatter and use a computer simulation to study how scatter modeling affects directly estimated TACs and subsequent estimates of compartmental model parameters. An idealized single-slice emission phantom was used to simulate a 15 min dynamic {sup 99m}Tc-teboroxime cardiac patient study in which 500,000 events containing scatter were detected from the slice. When scatter was modeled, unweighted least-squares estimates of TACs had root mean square (RMS) error that was less than 0.6% for normal left ventricular myocardium, blood pool, liver, and background tissue volumes and averaged 3% for two small myocardial defects. When scatter was not modeled, RMS error increased to average values of 16% for the four larger volumes and 35% for the small defects. Noise-to-signal ratios (NSRs) for TACs ranged between 1-18% for the larger volumes and averaged 110% for the small defects when scatter was modeled. When scatter was not modeled, NSR improved by average factors of 1.04 for the larger volumes and 1.25 for the small defects, as a result of the better-posed (though more biased) inverse problem. Weighted least-squares estimates of TACs had slightly better NSR and worse RMS error, compared to unweighted least-squares estimates. Compartmental model uptake and washout parameter estimates obtained from the TACs were less

  16. Analysis of small scale turbulent structures and the effect of spatial scales on gas transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnieders, Jana; Garbe, Christoph

    2014-05-01

    The exchange of gases through the air-sea interface strongly depends on environmental conditions such as wind stress and waves which in turn generate near surface turbulence. Near surface turbulence is a main driver of surface divergence which has been shown to cause highly variable transfer rates on relatively small spatial scales. Due to the cool skin of the ocean, heat can be used as a tracer to detect areas of surface convergence and thus gather information about size and intensity of a turbulent process. We use infrared imagery to visualize near surface aqueous turbulence and determine the impact of turbulent scales on exchange rates. Through the high temporal and spatial resolution of these types of measurements spatial scales as well as surface dynamics can be captured. The surface heat pattern is formed by distinct structures on two scales - small-scale short lived structures termed fish scales and larger scale cold streaks that are consistent with the footprints of Langmuir Circulations. There are two key characteristics of the observed surface heat patterns: 1. The surface heat patterns show characteristic features of scales. 2. The structure of these patterns change with increasing wind stress and surface conditions. In [2] turbulent cell sizes have been shown to systematically decrease with increasing wind speed until a saturation at u* = 0.7 cm/s is reached. Results suggest a saturation in the tangential stress. Similar behaviour has been observed by [1] for gas transfer measurements at higher wind speeds. In this contribution a new model to estimate the heat flux is applied which is based on the measured turbulent cell size und surface velocities. This approach allows the direct comparison of the net effect on heat flux of eddies of different sizes and a comparison to gas transfer measurements. Linking transport models with thermographic measurements, transfer velocities can be computed. In this contribution, we will quantify the effect of small scale

  17. Are tropical small mammals physiologically vulnerable to Arrhenius effects and climate change?

    PubMed

    Lovegrove, Barry G; Canale, Cindy; Levesque, Danielle; Fluch, Gerhard; Reháková-Petrů, Milada; Ruf, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    There is some urgency in the necessity to incorporate physiological data into mechanistic, trait-based, demographic climate change models. Physiological responses at the individual level provide the mechanistic link between environmental changes and individual performances and hence population dynamics. Here we consider the causal relationship between ambient temperature (Ta) and metabolic rate (MR), namely, the Arrhenius effect, which is directly affected by global warming through increases in average global air temperatures and the increase in the frequency and intensity of extreme climate events. We measured and collated data for several small, free-ranging tropical arboreal mammals and evaluated their vulnerability to Arrhenius effects and putative heat stress associated with climate change. Skin temperatures (Tskin) were obtained from free-ranging tarsiers (Tarsius syrichta) on Bohol Island, Philippines. Core body temperature (Tb) was obtained from the greater hedgehog tenrec (Setifer setosus) and the gray brown mouse lemur (Microcebus ravelobensis) from Ankarafantsika, Madagascar. Tskin for another mouse lemur, Microcebus griseorufus, was obtained from the literature. All four species showed evidence of hyperthermia during the daytime rest phase in the form of either Tskin or Tb that was higher than the normothermic Tb during the nighttime active phase. Potentially, tropical arboreal mammals with the lowest MRs and Tb, such as tarsiers, are the most vulnerable to sustained heat stress because their Tb is already close to Ta. Climate change may involve increases in MRs due to Arrhenius effects, especially during the rest phase or during torpor and hibernation. The most likely outcome of increased Arrhenius effects with climate change will be an increase in energy expenditure at the expense of other critical functions such as reproduction or growth and will thus affect fitness. However, we propose that these hypothetical Arrhenius costs can be, and in some

  18. Are tropical small mammals physiologically vulnerable to Arrhenius effects and climate change?

    PubMed

    Lovegrove, Barry G; Canale, Cindy; Levesque, Danielle; Fluch, Gerhard; Reháková-Petrů, Milada; Ruf, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    There is some urgency in the necessity to incorporate physiological data into mechanistic, trait-based, demographic climate change models. Physiological responses at the individual level provide the mechanistic link between environmental changes and individual performances and hence population dynamics. Here we consider the causal relationship between ambient temperature (Ta) and metabolic rate (MR), namely, the Arrhenius effect, which is directly affected by global warming through increases in average global air temperatures and the increase in the frequency and intensity of extreme climate events. We measured and collated data for several small, free-ranging tropical arboreal mammals and evaluated their vulnerability to Arrhenius effects and putative heat stress associated with climate change. Skin temperatures (Tskin) were obtained from free-ranging tarsiers (Tarsius syrichta) on Bohol Island, Philippines. Core body temperature (Tb) was obtained from the greater hedgehog tenrec (Setifer setosus) and the gray brown mouse lemur (Microcebus ravelobensis) from Ankarafantsika, Madagascar. Tskin for another mouse lemur, Microcebus griseorufus, was obtained from the literature. All four species showed evidence of hyperthermia during the daytime rest phase in the form of either Tskin or Tb that was higher than the normothermic Tb during the nighttime active phase. Potentially, tropical arboreal mammals with the lowest MRs and Tb, such as tarsiers, are the most vulnerable to sustained heat stress because their Tb is already close to Ta. Climate change may involve increases in MRs due to Arrhenius effects, especially during the rest phase or during torpor and hibernation. The most likely outcome of increased Arrhenius effects with climate change will be an increase in energy expenditure at the expense of other critical functions such as reproduction or growth and will thus affect fitness. However, we propose that these hypothetical Arrhenius costs can be, and in some

  19. Small molecule structure correctors abolish detrimental effects of apolipoprotein E4 in cultured neurons.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hung-Kai; Liu, Zhaoping; Meyer-Franke, Anke; Brodbeck, Jens; Miranda, Rene D; McGuire, James G; Pleiss, Michael A; Ji, Zhong-Sheng; Balestra, Maureen E; Walker, David W; Xu, Qin; Jeong, Dah-eun; Budamagunta, Madhu S; Voss, John C; Freedman, Stephen B; Weisgraber, Karl H; Huang, Yadong; Mahley, Robert W

    2012-02-17

    Apolipoprotein E4 (apoE4), the major genetic risk factor for late onset Alzheimer disease, assumes a pathological conformation, intramolecular domain interaction. ApoE4 domain interaction mediates the detrimental effects of apoE4, including decreased mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 levels, reduced mitochondrial motility, and reduced neurite outgrowth in vitro. Mutant apoE4 (apoE4-R61T) lacks domain interaction, behaves like apoE3, and does not cause detrimental effects. To identify small molecules that inhibit domain interaction (i.e. structure correctors) and reverse the apoE4 detrimental effects, we established a high throughput cell-based FRET primary assay that determines apoE4 domain interaction and secondary cell- and function-based assays. Screening a ChemBridge library with the FRET assay identified CB9032258 (a phthalazinone derivative), which inhibits domain interaction in neuronal cells. In secondary functional assays, CB9032258 restored mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 levels and rescued impairments of mitochondrial motility and neurite outgrowth in apoE4-expressing neuronal cells. These benefits were apoE4-specific and dose-dependent. Modifying CB9032258 yielded well defined structure-activity relationships and more active compounds with enhanced potencies in the FRET assay (IC(50) of 23 and 116 nm, respectively). These compounds efficiently restored functional activities of apoE4-expressing cells in secondary assays. An EPR binding assay showed that the apoE4 structure correction resulted from direct interaction of a phthalazinone. With these data, a six-feature pharmacophore model was constructed for future drug design. Our results serve as a proof of concept that pharmacological intervention with apoE4 structure correctors negates apoE4 detrimental effects in neuronal cells and could be further developed as an Alzheimer disease therapeutic.

  20. The effect of electron beam geometric deformation errors on the small-signal characteristic of ECRM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yongjian, Yu

    1993-08-01

    In this paper is studied the effect of electron beam geometric deformation errors on the small — signal characteristics of the TE{mn/o} mode Electron Cyclotron Resonance Maser (ECRM), based on the elliptically cross—sectional e—beam deformation model. As an example, the effect of small geometric deformation errors on the TE{01/o} mode fundamental ECRM coupling coefficient is quantitatively shown.

  1. Exploiting the effect of dietary supplementation of small ruminants on resilience and resistance against gastrointestinal nematodes.

    PubMed

    Knox, M R; Torres-Acosta, J F J; Aguilar-Caballero, A J

    2006-07-31

    This paper focuses on targeted nutritional supplementation as a means to reduce the requirement for chemotherapeutic control of gastrointestinal nematode infection of small ruminants and considers the limitations to practical application. Supplementary feeding, particularly with additional dietary protein, can assist resilience to infection during times when metabolic resources are being directed towards dealing with the pathophysiological effects of infection and away from production of meat, milk and fibre. Substantial experimental evidence from studies of both sheep and goats supports this hypothesis particularly in relation to young lambs and kids after weaning and in ewes around parturition. In addition, nutritional supplementation frequently increases resistance to infection, as indicated by decreased faecal worm egg counts and worm burdens. As a result, supplementation has the potential to reduce the requirement for anthelmintic treatment. Practical application of this knowledge can, however, be quite complex in many small ruminant production systems. In general, strategic supplementation should target those times when nutrient requirements are greatest and provide those nutrients which are deficient whether protein, energy, minerals or trace elements. Complexity arises when we consider that nutrient requirements will differ between localities for different species and breed of host, at different stages of growth and reproduction, with differing seasonal availability of forage, with different species of nematodes and different levels of established infections and exposure to infective stages. As a starting point, the provision of nutrients to optimize rumen function and animal performance in the particular production system should assist in maintaining resilience to nematode infection. Provision of nutrients in excess of this requirement, if economically feasible, may yield further benefits in some situations and reduce the need for alternative control

  2. Direct Production of 99mTc via 100Mo(p,2n) on Small Medical Cyclotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaffer, P.; Bénard, F.; Bernstein, A.; Buckley, K.; Celler, A.; Cockburn, N.; Corsaut, J.; Dodd, M.; Economou, C.; Eriksson, T.; Frontera, M.; Hanemaayer, V.; Hook, B.; Klug, J.; Kovacs, M.; Prato, F. S.; McDiarmid, S.; Ruth, T. J.; Shanks, C.; Valliant, J. F.; Zeisler, S.; Zetterberg, U.; Zavodszky, P. A.

    From the efforts of a number of Canadian institutions and private industry collaborations, direct production of 99mTc using medical cyclotrons has recently been advanced from a 1970's academic exercise to a commercial, economically viable solution for regional production. Using GE PETtrace 880 machines our team has established preliminary saturated yields of 2.7 GBq/μA, translating to approximately 174 GBq after a 6 hour irradiation. The team is in the process of assessing the accuracy and reliability of this production value with a goal of optimizing yields by up to 50%.

  3. Direct differentiation of hepatic stem-like WB cells into insulin-producing cells using small molecules.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianping; Liu, Yanmei; Wang, Honggang; Hao, Haojie; Han, Qingwang; Shen, Jing; Shi, Jun; Li, Chunlin; Mu, Yiming; Han, Weidong

    2013-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that experimental induction of hepatocytes into pancreatic cells provides new cell transplantation therapy prospects for type 1 diabetes mellitus. Stepwise differentiation from rat liver epithelial stem-like WB-F344 cells (WB cells) into functional insulin-secreting cells will identify key steps in β-cell development and may yet prove useful for transplantation therapy for diabetic patients. An essential step in this protocol was the generation of pancreatic precursor cell that express Pdx1 based on induction by a combination of 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine, trichostatin A, retinoic acid, and a mix of insulin, transferrin and selenite. The Pdx1-expressing cells express other pancreatic markers and contribute to endocrine cells in vitro and in vivo. This study indicates an efficient chemical protocol for differentiating WB cells into functional insulin-producing cells using small molecules, and represents a promising hepatocyte-based treatment for diabetes mellitus.

  4. Effect of Tributyrin on Electrical Activity in the Small Intestine during Early Postoperative Period.

    PubMed

    Tropskaya, N S; Kislyakova, E A; Popova, T S

    2015-12-01

    The effect of enteral administration of tributyrin on electrical activity in the upper segments of the small intestine was examined in rats on the model of postoperative ileus. This postoperative state is characterized with pronounced and long-term disturbances in generation of migrating myoelectric complex of the small intestine. The enteral administration of tributyrin in the early postoperative period aimed to suppress the non-adrenergic non-cholinergic influences and activation of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathways is an effective procedure to normalize the migrating myoelectric complex and therefore the coordinated propulsive peristalsis in the small intestine.

  5. Dissipation and enstrophy in isotropic turbulence: Resolution effects and scaling in direct numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donzis, D. A.; Yeung, P. K.; Sreenivasan, K. R.

    2008-04-01

    Existing experimental and numerical data suggest that the turbulence energy dissipation and enstrophy (i.e., the square of vorticity) possess different scaling properties, while available theory suggests that there should be no differences at sufficiently high Reynolds numbers. We have performed a series of direct numerical simulations with up to 20483 grid points where advanced computational power is used to increase the Reynolds number (up to 650 on the Taylor scale) or to resolve the small scales better (down to 1/4 of a Kolmogorov scale). Our primary goal is to assess the differences and similarities between dissipation and enstrophy. Special attention is paid to the effects of small-scale resolution on the quality and reliability of the data, in view of recent theoretical work [V. Yakhot and K. R. Sreenivasan, "Anomalous scaling of structure functions and dynamic constraints on turbulence simulations," J. Stat. Phys. 121, 823 (2005)] which stipulates the resolution needed to obtain a moment of a given order. We also provide error estimates as a function of small-scale resolution. Probability density functions of dissipation and enstrophy at high Reynolds number reveal the presence of extreme events several thousands times of the mean. The extreme events in dissipation and enstrophy fields appear to scale alike, substantially overlap in space, and are nearly statistically isotropic, while fluctuations of moderate amplitudes, at least for the present Reynolds numbers, show persistent differences. Conditional sampling shows that intense dissipation is likely to be accompanied by similarly intense enstrophy, but intense enstrophy is not always accompanied by intense dissipation.

  6. Texture analysis of terrain images: exploiting directional properties of a local-feature statistics operator using small masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telfer, Duncan J.; Wilson, Lionel

    1996-06-01

    The texture discrimination properties of a directional operator, using a window based histogram correlation technique, are described for test images and natural scene imagery. The natural image examples are drawn from digitized monochrome aerial photographs of volcanic terrain, and of coastal dune fields in the region of West Lancashire, England. The operator masks use directionally encoded local difference parameters and are of two sizes, 3 by 3 and 2 by 2 pixels, scanning over a window size of 25 by 25 pixels to create an autocorrelation map, normalized to the output gray-scale range. Comparisons of the outputs are discussed in terms of ability to detect specific types of texture feature associated with known lava flow regimes demonstrate the viability of the technique down to single pixel resolution, particularly for folded or striated topography. The vegetation cover of the volcanic terrain is also characterized in terms of its response to these texture operators. The output from the dune field images, which contain a wider variety of vegetation cover, also demonstrates the discrimination capability of the technique and its potential usefulness in environmental and conservation management.

  7. Direct and Indirect Mineralocorticoid Effects Determine Distal Salt Transport.

    PubMed

    Terker, Andrew S; Yarbrough, Bethzaida; Ferdaus, Mohammed Z; Lazelle, Rebecca A; Erspamer, Kayla J; Meermeier, Nicholas P; Park, Hae J; McCormick, James A; Yang, Chao-Ling; Ellison, David H

    2016-08-01

    Excess aldosterone is an important contributor to hypertension and cardiovascular disease. Conversely, low circulating aldosterone causes salt wasting and hypotension. Aldosterone activates mineralocorticoid receptors (MRs) to increase epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) activity. However, aldosterone may also stimulate the thiazide-sensitive Na(+)-Cl(-) cotransporter (NCC). Here, we generated mice in which MRs could be deleted along the nephron to test this hypothesis. These kidney-specific MR-knockout mice exhibited salt wasting, low BP, and hyperkalemia. Notably, we found evidence of deficient apical orientation and cleavage of ENaC, despite the salt wasting. Although these mice also exhibited deficient NCC activity, NCC could be stimulated by restricting dietary potassium, which also returned BP to control levels. Together, these results indicate that MRs regulate ENaC directly, but modulation of NCC is mediated by secondary changes in plasma potassium concentration. Electrolyte balance and BP seem to be determined, therefore, by a delicate interplay between direct and indirect mineralocorticoid actions in the distal nephron.

  8. Direct and Indirect Mineralocorticoid Effects Determine Distal Salt Transport.

    PubMed

    Terker, Andrew S; Yarbrough, Bethzaida; Ferdaus, Mohammed Z; Lazelle, Rebecca A; Erspamer, Kayla J; Meermeier, Nicholas P; Park, Hae J; McCormick, James A; Yang, Chao-Ling; Ellison, David H

    2016-08-01

    Excess aldosterone is an important contributor to hypertension and cardiovascular disease. Conversely, low circulating aldosterone causes salt wasting and hypotension. Aldosterone activates mineralocorticoid receptors (MRs) to increase epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) activity. However, aldosterone may also stimulate the thiazide-sensitive Na(+)-Cl(-) cotransporter (NCC). Here, we generated mice in which MRs could be deleted along the nephron to test this hypothesis. These kidney-specific MR-knockout mice exhibited salt wasting, low BP, and hyperkalemia. Notably, we found evidence of deficient apical orientation and cleavage of ENaC, despite the salt wasting. Although these mice also exhibited deficient NCC activity, NCC could be stimulated by restricting dietary potassium, which also returned BP to control levels. Together, these results indicate that MRs regulate ENaC directly, but modulation of NCC is mediated by secondary changes in plasma potassium concentration. Electrolyte balance and BP seem to be determined, therefore, by a delicate interplay between direct and indirect mineralocorticoid actions in the distal nephron. PMID:26712527

  9. The achromatic locus: effect of navigation direction in color space.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Tushar; Perales, Esther; Xiao, Kaida; Hird, Emily; Karatzas, Dimosthenis; Wuerger, Sophie

    2014-01-24

    An achromatic stimulus is defined as a patch of light that is devoid of any hue. This is usually achieved by asking observers to adjust the stimulus such that it looks neither red nor green and at the same time neither yellow nor blue. Despite the theoretical and practical importance of the achromatic locus, little is known about the variability in these settings. The main purpose of the current study was to evaluate whether achromatic settings were dependent on the task of the observers, namely the navigation direction in color space. Observers could either adjust the test patch along the two chromatic axes in the CIE u*v* diagram or, alternatively, navigate along the unique-hue lines. Our main result is that the navigation method affects the reliability of these achromatic settings. Observers are able to make more reliable achromatic settings when adjusting the test patch along the directions defined by the four unique hues as opposed to navigating along the main axes in the commonly used CIE u*v* chromaticity plane. This result holds across different ambient viewing conditions (Dark, Daylight, Cool White Fluorescent) and different test luminance levels (5, 20, and 50 cd/m(2)). The reduced variability in the achromatic settings is consistent with the idea that internal color representations are more aligned with the unique-hue lines than the u* and v* axes.

  10. Direct MRI detection of the neuronal magnetic field: the effect of the dendrite branch.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ying-Ling; Xiong, Hong-Chuan; Yao, De-Zhong

    2010-09-21

    In recent years, neuronal current MRI (nc-MRI) was proposed as a new imaging method to directly map the magnetic field change caused by neuronal activity. Nc-MRI could offer improved spatial and temporal resolution compared to blood hemodynamics-based functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). In this paper, with a finite current dipole as the model of dendrite or dendrite branch, we investigated the spatial distribution of the magnetic field generated by synchronously activated neurons to evaluate the possibility of nc-MRI. Our simulations imply that the existence of a dendrite branch may not only increase the strength of the neuronal magnetic field (NMF), but also raise the non-uniform and unsymmetry of the NMF; therefore, it can enhance the detectability of the neuronal current magnetic field by MRI directly. The results show that the signal phase shift is enlarged, but it is unstable and is still very small, <1 radian, while the magnitude signal may be strong enough for a typical MRI voxel to be detected. We suggest making further efforts to measure the magnitude signal which may induce a large effect in an nc-MRI experiment.

  11. Direct extraction of nuclear effects in quasielastic scattering on carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, Callum; McFarland, Kevin S.

    2016-07-01

    Nuclear effects on neutrino reactions are expected to be a significant complication in current and future neutrino oscillation experiments seeking precision measurements of neutrino flavor transitions. Calculations of these nuclear effects are hampered by a lack of experimental data comparing neutrino reactions on free nucleons to neutrino reactions on nuclei. We present results from a novel technique that compares neutrino and antineutrino charged current quasielastic scattering on hydrocarbons to extract a cross section ratio of antineutrino charged current elastic reactions on free protons to charged current quasielastic reactions on the protons bound in a carbon nucleus. This measurement of nuclear effects is compared to models.

  12. Survival after total-body irradiation. I. Effects of partial small bowel shielding

    SciTech Connect

    Vigneulle, R.M.; Vriesendorp, H.M.; Taylor, P.; Burns, W.; Pelkey, T. )

    1989-08-01

    The small intestine of the rat was shielded during total-body irradiation (TBI) to evaluate the effects of radiation dose and length of intestine shielded on survival. Sprague-Dawley rats were anesthetized in groups of 10. Using aseptic surgical procedures 80, 40, 20, or 10 cm, or none of the proximal or distal small intestine were temporarily exteriorized and shielded during irradiation with photons from an 18 MeV linear accelerator. Less than 17% of the dose was delivered to the shielded intestines. In unshielded animals deaths occurred from Days 4 to 6 with 13, 15, or 17 Gy and from Days 8 to 30 with 9, 11, and 12 Gy. However, in all animals exposed to 15 Gy with all or part of the small intestine shielded, survival was increased to between 5 and 9 days. Shielding of the distal small intestine was more effective in prolonging survival than shielding of the proximal small intestine. The previously identified target of radiation damage in the small intestine is the crypt stem cell. In this study, the analysis of histological specimens of shielded and irradiated small intestine suggested that humoral factors also influence intestinal histology and survival after irradiation. These humoral factors are thought to originate from the irradiated body tissues, the shielded proximal intestine, and the shielded distal intestine. Further studies are required to identify these factors and to determine their mode of action and their therapeutic potential after radiation damage to the small intestine.

  13. The simulation and analysis of small group effect in crowd evacuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Lei; Hu, Jun; Gu, Musong; Fan, Wenjie; Zhang, Hong

    2016-10-01

    A crowd usually tends to move in small groups during evacuation. Small group has a large proportion in crowd evacuation, and small group effect affects crowd evacuation significantly. In this work, we propose a novel methodology for calculating movement profit based on cellular automaton model. Specifically, this methodology calculates the movement profit for a target at the next moment by comprehensively combining distance profit, density profit, and average velocity profit. In particular, this paper defines three types of small-group formation with totally six different forms of small group in terms of the size, and sets the corresponding movement velocity. At last, we simulate the evacuation process of small groups, and discuss the relationship among evacuation time, average movement velocity, and pedestrian density, and analyze the efficiency of small group evacuation in terms of evacuation strategies. As the simulation results demonstrated, the evacuation efficiency of different types of small groups is greatly different, and the same type of small groups with different forms is also different.

  14. Small satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, P.; Veverka, J.; Dermott, S.

    1986-01-01

    Satellites smaller than Mimas (r = 195 km) are distinguished by irregular overall shapes and by rough limb topography. Material properties and impact cratering dominate the shaping of these objects. Long fragmentation histories can produce a variety of internal structures, but so far there is no direct evidence that any small satellite is an equilibrium ellipsoid made up of noncohesive gravitationally bound rubble. One many bodies that orbit close to their primary the tidal and rotational components of surface gravity strongly affect the directions of local g and thereby affect the redistribution of regolith by mass wasting. Downslope movement of regolith is extensive on Deimos, and is probably effective on many other small satellites. It is shown that in some cases observed patterns of downslope mass wasting cold produce useful constraints on the satellite's mean density. The diversity of features seen in the few high-resolution images of small satellites currently available suggests that these objects have undergone complex histories of cratering, fragmentation, and regolith evolution.

  15. Thermal effects in rapid directional solidification - Linear theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huntley, D. A.; Davis, S. H.

    1993-01-01

    We study the morphological instability of the planar solid/liquid interface for a unidirectionally-solidified dilute binary mixture. We use a model developed by Boettinger et al. (1985, 1986), Aziz (1982), and Jackson et al. (1980), which allows for nonequilibrium effects on the interface through velocity-dependent segregation and attachment kinetics. Two types of instabilities are found in the linear stability analysis: (1) a cellular instability, and (2) an oscillatory instability driven by disequilibrium effects. Merchant and Davis (1990) characterized these instabilities subject to the frozen-temperature approximation (FTA). The present work relaxes the FTA by including the effects of latent heat and the full temperature distribution. Thermal effects slightly postpone the onset of the cellular instability but dramatically postpone the onset of the oscillatory instability; however, the absolute-stability conditions, at which at high speed the cellular and oscillatory instabilities are suppressed, remain unchanged from the FTA.

  16. Observation of Small-scale Anisotropy in the Arrival Direction Distribution of TeV Cosmic Rays with HAWC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abeysekara, A. U.; Alfaro, R.; Alvarez, C.; Álvarez, J. D.; Arceo, R.; Arteaga-Velázquez, J. C.; Ayala Solares, H. A.; Barber, A. S.; Baughman, B. M.; Bautista-Elivar, N.; Belmont, E.; BenZvi, S. Y.; Berley, D.; Bonilla Rosales, M.; Braun, J.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Carramiñana, A.; Castillo, M.; Cotti, U.; Cotzomi, J.; de la Fuente, E.; De León, C.; DeYoung, T.; Diaz Hernandez, R.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; Dingus, B. L.; DuVernois, M. A.; Ellsworth, R. W.; Fiorino, D. W.; Fraija, N.; Galindo, A.; Garfias, F.; González, M. M.; Goodman, J. A.; Gussert, M.; Hampel-Arias, Z.; Harding, J. P.; Hüntemeyer, P.; Hui, C. M.; Imran, A.; Iriarte, A.; Karn, P.; Kieda, D.; Kunde, G. J.; Lara, A.; Lauer, R. J.; Lee, W. H.; Lennarz, D.; León Vargas, H.; Linnemann, J. T.; Longo, M.; Luna-García, R.; Malone, K.; Marinelli, A.; Marinelli, S. S.; Martinez, H.; Martinez, O.; Martínez-Castro, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; McEnery, J.; Mendoza Torres, E.; Miranda-Romagnoli, P.; Moreno, E.; Mostafá, M.; Nellen, L.; Newbold, M.; Noriega-Papaqui, R.; Oceguera-Becerra, T.; Patricelli, B.; Pelayo, R.; Pérez-Pérez, E. G.; Pretz, J.; Rivière, C.; Rosa-González, D.; Ruiz-Velasco, E.; Ryan, J.; Salazar, H.; Salesa Greus, F.; Sandoval, A.; Schneider, M.; Sinnis, G.; Smith, A. J.; Sparks Woodle, K.; Springer, R. W.; Taboada, I.; Toale, P. A.; Tollefson, K.; Torres, I.; Ukwatta, T. N.; Villaseñor, L.; Weisgarber, T.; Westerhoff, S.; Wisher, I. G.; Wood, J.; Yodh, G. B.; Younk, P. W.; Zaborov, D.; Zepeda, A.; Zhou, H.; HAWC Collaboration

    2014-12-01

    The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Observatory is sensitive to gamma rays and charged cosmic rays at TeV energies. The detector is still under construction, but data acquisition with the partially deployed detector started in 2013. An analysis of the cosmic-ray arrival direction distribution based on 4.9 × 1010 events recorded between 2013 June and 2014 February shows anisotropy at the 10-4 level on angular scales of about 10°. The HAWC cosmic-ray sky map exhibits three regions of significantly enhanced cosmic-ray flux; two of these regions were first reported by the Milagro experiment. A third region coincides with an excess recently reported by the ARGO-YBJ experiment. An angular power spectrum analysis of the sky shows that all terms up to l = 15 contribute significantly to the excesses.

  17. Observation of small-scale anisotropy in the arrival direction distribution of TeV cosmic rays with HAWC

    SciTech Connect

    Abeysekara, A. U.; Alfaro, R.; Belmont, E.; Alvarez, C.; Arceo, R.; Álvarez, J. D.; Arteaga-Velázquez, J. C.; Cotti, U.; Ayala Solares, H. A.; Barber, A. S.; Baughman, B. M.; Berley, D.; Braun, J.; Bautista-Elivar, N.; BenZvi, S. Y.; Bonilla Rosales, M.; Carramiñana, A.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Castillo, M.; Cotzomi, J.; Collaboration: HAWC Collaboration; and others

    2014-12-01

    The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Observatory is sensitive to gamma rays and charged cosmic rays at TeV energies. The detector is still under construction, but data acquisition with the partially deployed detector started in 2013. An analysis of the cosmic-ray arrival direction distribution based on 4.9 × 10{sup 10} events recorded between 2013 June and 2014 February shows anisotropy at the 10{sup –4} level on angular scales of about 10°. The HAWC cosmic-ray sky map exhibits three regions of significantly enhanced cosmic-ray flux; two of these regions were first reported by the Milagro experiment. A third region coincides with an excess recently reported by the ARGO-YBJ experiment. An angular power spectrum analysis of the sky shows that all terms up to ℓ = 15 contribute significantly to the excesses.

  18. The influence of small impurity additions and direct electric current on the kinetics of contact melting in metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahkubekov, A. A.; Ahkubekova, S. N.; Enaldieva, O. L.; Orkvasov, T. A.; Sozaev, V. A.

    2008-02-01

    Using the experimental data on contact melting of polycrystalline indium, tin and lead - based solid solutions with low-melting alloys we show that besides the diffusive, adhesive and low - dimensional mechanisms of contact melting it is necessary to take into account the segregational mechanism as well. The surfaces of a contact between the polycrystalline solid solutions and low - melting metals enrich in lower melting components due to the grain-boundary and surface segregation. One can influence on the kinetics of contact melting using alkali metals as impurity additives and applying the direct electric current. For example, the sodium addition to indium results in 3 times expansion of contact layer in the (In + 0.1 at. % Na) - Bi system, but in 2 times shrinking of that layer in the (In + 0.1 at. % Na) - Cd system in comparison to experiments without impurities.

  19. Effects of laxative and nonlaxative hydrophilic polymers on canine small intestinal motor activity.

    PubMed

    Russell, J; Bass, P

    1986-03-01

    Bulk-forming laxatives increase fecal volume and elicit aborally directed colonic motility patterns. Recently, it was demonstrated that test meals of the bulk-laxative fibers (cellulose and bran) elicited organized jejunal motor activity while nonlaxative fiber meals (guar) elicited unorganized jejunal motor activity. However, whether bulk-forming laxatives, as a class of compounds, differentially affect small intestinal motility has not been studied. Therefore, a study was made of the effects of the bulk laxatives psyllium and polycarbophil and the nonlaxative pectin on canine jejunal motor activity. Psyllium and pectin are examples of dietary fiber, while polycarbophil is a synthetic polymer. Pectin and psyllium test meals presented as viscous gels. In contrast, polycarbophil meals presented as a combination of discrete particles plus meal water. After each meal, measurements were made of the jejunal motility index, the time of reappearance of interdigestive burst activity, and overall motility patterns. Pectin and psyllium meals increased in viscosity as meal fiber content increased. As meal content and hence viscosity increased, both the laxative (psyllium) and nonlaxative (pectin) fiber meals elicited increasing jejunal motor activity and delays in the reappearance of the burst interval. For both fiber types, motor activity presented as randomly appearing contractions. In contrast, meals of the laxative polycarbophil elicited no more motor activity than the saline control meal. However, this control-level amount of activity presented as propagated clusters of contractions, ie, the "laxative-induced pattern." Polycarbophil did not delay the reappearance of burst activity.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Direct and semi-direct aerosol radiative effect on the Mediterranean climate variability using a coupled regional climate system model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabat, Pierre; Somot, Samuel; Mallet, Marc; Sevault, Florence; Chiacchio, Marc; Wild, Martin

    2015-02-01

    A fully coupled regional climate system model (CNRM-RCSM4) has been used over the Mediterranean region to investigate the direct and semi-direct effects of aerosols, but also their role in the radiation-atmosphere-ocean interactions through multi-annual ensemble simulations (2003-2009) with and without aerosols and ocean-atmosphere coupling. Aerosols have been taken into account in CNRM-RCSM4 through realistic interannual monthly AOD climatologies. An evaluation of the model has been achieved, against various observations for meteorological parameters, and has shown the ability of CNRM-RCSM4 to reproduce the main patterns of the Mediterranean climate despite some biases in sea surface temperature (SST), radiation and cloud cover. The results concerning the aerosol radiative effects show a negative surface forcing on average because of the absorption and scattering of the incident radiation. The SW surface direct effect is on average -20.9 Wm-2 over the Mediterranean Sea, -14.7 Wm-2 over Europe and -19.7 Wm-2 over northern Africa. The LW surface direct effect is weaker as only dust aerosols contribute (+4.8 Wm-2 over northern Africa). This direct effect is partly counterbalanced by a positive semi-direct radiative effect over the Mediterranean Sea (+5.7 Wm-2 on average) and Europe (+5.0 Wm-2) due to changes in cloud cover and atmospheric circulation. The total aerosol effect is consequently negative at the surface and responsible for a decrease in land (on average -0.4 °C over Europe, and -0.5 °C over northern Africa) and sea surface temperature (on average -0.5 °C for the Mediterranean SST). In addition, the latent heat loss is shown to be weaker (-11.0 Wm-2) in the presence of aerosols, resulting in a decrease in specific humidity in the lower troposphere, and a reduction in cloud cover and precipitation. Simulations also indicate that dust aerosols warm the troposphere by absorbing solar radiation, and prevent radiation from reaching the surface, thus

  1. Direct effects of hypoxia and nitric oxide on ecdysone secretion by insect prothoracic glands.

    PubMed

    DeLalio, Leon J; Dion, Sara M; Bootes, Abigail M; Smith, Wendy A

    2015-05-01

    Insect molting and metamorphosis are controlled by the molt stimulating hormone ecdysone. A recent study suggests that reduced tissue oxygenation correlates with the size-sensing mechanism responsible for triggering molting. When reared in hypoxia, larvae of Manduca sexta and Drosophila melanogaster initiate molting at lower weights than do larvae reared in normoxia. Furthermore, in Drosophila, the signaling gas nitric oxide (NO) appears to be required for normal developmental timing. As observed in Drosophila, NO signaling targets the nuclear hormone receptor beta fushi tarazu transcription factor 1 (βFTZ-F1) through activation of Drosophila hormone receptor 3 (DHR3), two key regulators of ecdysone production and metamorphic tissue progression. We set out to directly examine the effects of hypoxia and NO on ecdysone secretion using prothoracic glands from feeding fifth (last) larval stage M. sexta. Our results indicate that in vitro treatment of prothoracic glands with hypoxia (2% oxygen) or the NO donor DETA-NONOate significantly inhibit ecdysone secretion. Protein markers of glandular activity were also in keeping with an initial inhibition, measured a decrease in phosphorylated ERK (extracellular signal regulated kinase) and an increase in non-phosphorylated 4EBP (eukaryotic initiation factor 4E binding protein). Additionally, gene expression levels of Manduca hormone receptor 3 (mhr3), βftz-f1, nitric oxide synthase (nos), and the PTTH receptor torso, were quantified using real-time PCR. NO treatment increased mhr3 expression and decreased nos expression. Hypoxia increased mhr3 transcription after 2 hr, but decreased transcription after 12 hr, with no effect on nos expression. Both NO and hypoxia had small effects on βftz-f1 expression, yet strongly increased torso transcription. Our results demonstrate that, in isolated prothoracic glands, hypoxia and NO signaling directly inhibit ecdysteroid secretion, but at the same time alter aspects of prothoracic

  2. Non-contact small animal fluorescence imaging system for simultaneous multi-directional angular-dependent data acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong Hwan; Kim, Hyun Keol; Chandhanayingyong, Chandhanarat; Lee, Francis Young-In; Hielscher, Andreas H.

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel non-contact small animal fluorescent molecular tomography (FMT) imaging system. At the heart of the system is a new mirror-based imaging head that was designed to provide 360-degree measurement data from an entire animal surface in one step. This imaging head consists of two conical mirrors, which considerably reduce multiple back reflections between the animal and mirror surfaces. These back reflections are common in existing mirror-based imaging heads and tend to degrade the quality of raw measurement data. In addition, the introduction of a novel ray-transfer operator allows for the inclusion of the angular dependent data in the image reconstruction process, which results in higher image resolution. We describe in detail the system design and implementation of the hardware components as well as the transport-theory-based image reconstruction algorithm. Using numerical simulations, measurements on a well-defined phantom and a live animal, we evaluate the system performance and show the advantages of our approach. PMID:25071965

  3. Palms, peccaries and perturbations: widespread effects of small-scale disturbance in tropical forests

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    plants, most likely on the survival and growth of seedlings and saplings damaged by foraging peccaries. Given the abundance of fruit produced by each palm, the widespread effects of these small-scale disturbances appear, over long time-scales, to cause directional changes in community structure at larger scales. PMID:22429883

  4. Direct Detections of the Yarkovsky Effect: Status and Outlook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chesley, Steven R.; Farnocchia, Davide; Pravec, Petr; Vokrouhlický, David

    2016-01-01

    We report the current results on a comprehensive scan of the near-Earth asteroid catalog for evidence of the Yarkovsky effect in the orbital motion of these bodies. While most objects do not have sufficient observational data to reveal such slight acceleration, we do identify 42 asteroids with a ``valid'' detection of the Yarkovsky effect, i.e., those with a signal at least 3 times greater than the formal uncertainty and a value compatible with the Yarkovsky mechanism. We also identify a special category of non-detection, which we refer to as ``weak signal,'' where the objects are of a size that would permit a clear detection if the Yarkovsky effect is maximized, and yet the orbit is clearly incompatible with such accelerations. The implication is that the Yarkovsky effect is reduced in these cases, presumably due to mid-range obliquity, but possibly also due to size, bulk density, thermal inertia, albedo, or spin rate markedly different from assumptions. Finally, there are a number of asteroids showing a significant signal for nongravitational acceleration, and yet with a magnitude too great to be attributed to the Yarkovsky effect. We term these ``spurious detections'' because most are due to erroneous optical astrometry, often involving a single isolated night from precovery observations. Some cases may be due to other nongravitational accelerations, such as outgassing, mass loss, or micro-meteoroid flux.

  5. Oxygen in GaAs - Direct and indirect effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatos, H. C.; Skowronski, M.; Pawlowicz, L.; Lagowski, J.

    1984-01-01

    Oxygen has profound effects on the key electronic properties and point defects of GaAs crystals. Thus, when added in the growth system, it decreases the free electron concentration and enhances the concentration of deep donors in the resulting crystals. Both of these effects are highly beneficial for achieving semi-insulating material and have been utilized for that purpose. They have been attributed to the tendency of oxygen to getter silicon impurities during crystal growth. Only recently, it has been found that oxygen in GaAs introduces also a midgap level, ELO, with essentially the same activation energy as EL2 but with four times greater electron capture cross section. The present report reassesses the electrical and optical properties of the midgap levels in GaAs crystals grown by the horizontal Bridgman (HB) and the Czochralski-LEC techniques. Emphasis is placed on the identification of the specific effects of ELO.

  6. Temperament, hopelessness, and attempted suicide: direct and indirect effects.

    PubMed

    Rosellini, Anthony J; Bagge, Courtney L

    2014-08-01

    This study evaluated whether hopelessness mediated the relations between temperament and recent suicide attempter status in a psychiatric sample. Negative temperament and positive temperament (particularly the positive emotionality subscale) uniquely predicted levels of hopelessness. Although these temperament constructs also demonstrated significant indirect effects on recent suicide attempter status, the effects were partially (for the broad temperament scales) or fully (for the positive emotionality subscale) mediated by the levels of hopelessness. These findings indicate that a tendency to experience excessive negative emotions as well as a paucity of positive emotions may lead individuals to experience hopelessness. Although temperament may also indirectly influence suicide attempter status, hopelessness mediates these relations.

  7. Effects of Directed Written Disclosure on Grief and Distress Symptoms among Bereaved Individuals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lichtenthal, Wendy G.; Cruess, Dean G.

    2010-01-01

    Bereavement-specific written disclosure trials have generally demonstrated null effects, but these studies have not directed the focus of writing. This randomized controlled trial compared directed writing that focused on either sense-making or benefit-finding, both associated with adjustment to loss, to traditional, non-directed emotional…

  8. Direct and Generalized Effects of Food Satiation in Reducing Rumination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clauser, Brian; Scibak, John W.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of food satiation on rumination and a collateral self-stimulatory behavior were examined in three profoundly retarded individuals. For all three individuals, the provision of unlimited quantities of cereal and milk during mealtime resulted in reductions in rumination and decreases in the collateral behaviors. (Author/DB)

  9. Effectiveness of lethal, directed wolf-depredation control in Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harper, E.K.; Paul, W.J.; Mech, L.D.; Weisberg, S.

    2008-01-01

    Wolf (Canis lupus) depredations on livestock in Minnesota, USA, are an economic problem for many livestock producers, and depredating wolves are lethally controlled. We sought to determine the effectiveness of lethal control through the analysis of data from 923 government-verified wolf depredations from 1979 to 1998. We analyzed the data by 1) assessing the correlations between the number of wolves killed in response to depredations with number of depredations the following year at state and local levels, and 2) the time to the next depredation. No analysis indicated that trapping wolves substantially reduced the following year's depredations at state or local levels. However, more specific analyses indicated that in certain situations, killing wolves was more effective than no action (i.e., not trapping). For example, trapping and killing adult males decreased the re-depredation risk. At sheep farms, killing wolves was generally effective. Attempting to trap, regardless of the results, seemed more effective at reducing depredations than not trapping, suggesting that mere human activity near depredation sites might deter future depredations.

  10. Microscopic effective reaction theory for direct nuclear reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogata, Kazuyuki; Minomo, Kosho; Toyokawa, Masakazu; Kohno, Michio; Matsumoto, Takuma; Yahiro, Masanobu; Kikuchi, Yuma; Fukui, Tokuro; Yoshida, Kazuki; Mizuyama, Kazuhito

    2016-06-01

    Some recent activities with the microscopic effective reaction theory (MERT) on elastic, inelastic, breakup, transfer, and knockout processes are reviewed briefly. As a possible alternative to MERT, a description of elastic and inelastic scattering with the continuum particle-vibration coupling (cPVC) method is also discussed.

  11. Acute Stressor Effects on Goal-Directed Action in Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braun, Stephanie; Hauber, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Here we examined effects of acute stressors that involve either systemic coadministration of corticosterone/yohimbine (3 mg/kg each) to increase glucocorticoid/noradrenaline activity (denoted as "pharmacological" stressor) or one or several distinct restraint stressors (denoted as "single" vs. "multiple" stressor) on…

  12. Effective Peer Assessment Processes: Research Findings and Future Directions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Zundert, Marjo; Sluijsmans, Dominique; van Merrienboer, Jeroen

    2010-01-01

    Despite the popularity of peer assessment (PA), gaps in the literature make it difficult to describe exactly what constitutes effective PA. In a literature review, we divided PA into variables and then investigated their interrelatedness. We found that (a) PA's psychometric qualities are improved by the training and experience of peer assessors;…

  13. Discovery of novel STAT3 small molecule inhibitors via in silico site-directed fragment-based drug design.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wenying; Xiao, Hui; Lin, Jiayuh; Li, Chenglong

    2013-06-13

    Constitutive activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) has been validated as an attractive therapeutic target for cancer therapy. To stop both STAT3 activation and dimerization, a viable strategy is to design inhibitors blocking its SH2 domain phosphotyrosine binding site that is responsible for both actions. A new fragment-based drug design (FBDD) strategy, in silico site-directed FBDD, was applied in this study. A designed novel compound, 5,8-dioxo-6-(pyridin-3-ylamino)-5,8-dihydronaphthalene-1-sulfonamide (LY5), was confirmed to bind to STAT3 SH2 by fluorescence polarization assay. In addition, four out of the five chosen compounds have IC50 values lower than 5 μM for the U2OS cancer cells. 8 (LY5) has an IC50 range in 0.5-1.4 μM in various cancer cell lines. 8 also suppresses tumor growth in an in vivo mouse model. This study has demonstrated the utility of this approach and could be used to other drug targets in general. PMID:23651330

  14. Flow Effects during Directional Solidification of Monotectic Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coriell, S. R.; Murray, B. T.; McFadden, G. B.; Andrews, J. B.

    2000-11-01

    In monotectic alloy solidification, two phases, a solid phase, α, and a liquid phase, L_2, grow cooperatively from a single liquid phase L_1. For example, during the directional solidification of the aluminum-indium monotectic system, a solid-liquid two-phase structure consisting of liquid indium rods in an aluminum rich solid matrix can be grown from an aluminum-indium melt. The indium rods subsequently solidify at a lower temperature, forming a composite material. Theoretical models developed to quantitatively predict the inter-rod spacing observed in monotectic systems are largely based on diffusive solute transport. The role played by transport due to fluid flow is not well understood. Bulk flow may result from density change upon solidification or buoyancy-driven thermosolutal convection due to the thermal and solutal gradients inherent to the solidification process. We have developed numerical models to investigate the impact of an imposed flow on the solute field in the L1 phase. In addition, we propose to model the coupled flow at the L_1--L2 interface driven by surface tension variation. For monotectic growth, since phase equilibrium is maintained at the L_1--L2 interface, the temperature, compositions, pressures, and interface curvature are related by thermodynamic constraints that do not apply in a simple mechanical system.

  15. Direct effects of recurrent hypoglycaemia on adrenal catecholamine release.

    PubMed

    Orban, Branly O; Routh, Vanessa H; Levin, Barry E; Berlin, Joshua R

    2015-01-01

    In Type 1 and advanced Type 2 diabetes mellitus, elevation of plasma epinephrine plays a key role in normalizing plasma glucose during hypoglycaemia. However, recurrent hypoglycaemia blunts this elevation of plasma epinephrine. To determine whether recurrent hypoglycaemia affects peripheral components of the sympatho-adrenal system responsible for epinephrine release, male rats were administered subcutaneous insulin daily for 3 days. These recurrent hypoglycaemic animals showed a smaller elevation of plasma epinephrine than saline-injected controls when subjected to insulin-induced hypoglycaemia. Electrical stimulation of an adrenal branch of the splanchnic nerve in recurrent hypoglycaemic animals elicited less release of epinephrine and norepinephrine than in controls, without a change in adrenal catecholamine content. Responsiveness of isolated, perfused adrenal glands to acetylcholine and other acetylcholine receptor agonists was also unchanged. These results indicate that recurrent hypoglycaemia compromised the efficacy with which peripheral neuronal activity stimulates adrenal catecholamine release and demonstrate that peripheral components of the sympatho-adrenal system were directly affected by recurrent hypoglycaemia.

  16. Directional and polarimetric effects in the optical domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderbilt, V. C.; Leroy, M.

    1994-01-01

    Papers focused on land surface, atmospheric, and ocean properties are reported. Specific comments pertaining to polarization, models and inversion, and measurements, are given. Recommendations are: continued research into the application potential of the BRDF (Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function) and polarization properties of ground surface and atmospheric targets; three dimensional models, which account for the statistical behavior of remotely sensed data, should be extended and inverted in order to support analysis of data potentially covering rolling terrain such that pixels represent heterogeneous mixtures of surface cover types and project ground footprints with sizes between 10 to 6 km, the ground pixel sizes of planned future sensors; available reflectance models should be further validated by means of multi dimensional (directional, spectral, temporal) field data and existing models should be intercompared in more depth to evaluate their performance and limitations; existing methods for model inversion should be validated in more depth in order to quantify the practical limitations and the expected accuracy of the parameters retrieved and new approaches should be developed based upon apriori knowledge of plant canopy development and spectral BRDF properties; there is a need to establish a protocol of validation and intercomparison of the indices and compositing techniques which have been proposed during these last years.

  17. Effect of Increasing Temperature on Carbonaceous Aerosol Direct Radiative Effect over Southeastern US

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mielonen, Tero; Kokkola, Harri; Hienola, Anca; Kühn, Thomas; Merikanto, Joonas; Korhonen, Hannele; Arola, Antti; Kolmonen, Pekka; Sogacheva, Larisa; de Leeuw, Gerrit

    2016-04-01

    Aerosols are an important regulator of the Earth's climate. They scatter and absorb incoming solar radiation and thus cool the climate by reducing the amount of energy reaching the atmospheric layers and the surface below (direct effect). A certain subset of the particles can also act as initial formation sites for cloud droplets and thereby modify the microphysics, dynamics, radiative properties and lifetime of clouds (indirect effects). The magnitude of aerosol radiative effects remains the single largest uncertainty in current estimates of anthropogenic radiative forcing. One of the key quantities needed for accurate estimates of anthropogenic radiative forcing is an accurate estimate of the radiative effects from natural unperturbed aerosol. The dominant source of natural aerosols over Earth's vast forested regions are biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) which, following oxidation in the atmosphere, can condense onto aerosol particles to form secondary organic aerosol (SOA) and significantly modify the particles' properties. In accordance with the expected positive temperature dependence of BVOC emissions, several previous studies have shown that some aerosol properties, such as mass concentration and ability to act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), also correlate positively with temperature at many forested sites. There is conflicting evidence as to whether the aerosol direct effects have a temperature dependence due to increased BVOC emissions. The main objective of this study is to investigate the causes of the observed effect of increasing temperatures on the aerosol direct radiative effect, and to provide a quantitative estimate of this effect and of the resulting negative feedback in a warming climate. More specifically, we will investigate the causes of the positive correlation between aerosol optical depth (AOD) and land surface temperature (LST) over southeastern US where biogenic emissions are a significant source of atmospheric particles. In

  18. Directly Observable Behavioral Effects of Lorcaserin in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Serafine, Katherine M.; Rice, Kenner C.

    2015-01-01

    (1R)-8-chloro-1-methyl-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1H-3-benzazepine (lorcaserin) is approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration for treating obesity, and its therapeutic effects are thought to result from agonist activity at serotonin (5-HT)2C receptors. Lorcaserin has affinity for other 5-HT receptor subtypes, although its activity at those subtypes is not fully described. The current study compared the behavioral effects of lorcaserin (0.0032–32.0 mg/kg) to the effects of other 5-HT receptor selective agonists in rats (n = 8). The 5-HT2C receptor selective agonist 1-(3-chlorophenyl)piperazine (mCPP, 0.032–1.0 mg/kg) and lorcaserin induced yawning which was attenuated by the 5-HT2C receptor selective antagonist 6-chloro-5-methyl-N-(6-[(2-methylpyridin-3-yl)oxy]pydidin-3-yl)indoline-1-carboxamide (1.0 mg/kg). The 5-HT2A receptor selective agonist 2,5-dimethoxy-4-methylamphetamine (0.1–3.2 mg/kg) induced head twitching, which was attenuated by the 5-HT2A receptor selective antagonist R-(+)-2,3-dimethoxyphenyl-1-[2-(4-piperidine)-methanol] (MDL 100907, 0.01 mg/kg), lorcaserin (3.2 mg/kg), and mCPP (3.2 mg/kg). In rats pretreated with MDL 100907 (1.0 mg/kg), lorcaserin also induced head twitching. At larger doses, lorcaserin produced forepaw treading, which was attenuated by the 5-HT1A receptor selective antagonist N-(2-[4-(2-methoxyphenyl)-1-piperazinyl]ethyl)-N-(2-pyridyl)cyclohexanecarboxamide (0.178 mg/kg). While the behavioral effects of lorcaserin in rats are consistent with it having agonist activity at 5-HT2C receptors, these data suggest that at larger doses it also has agonist activity at 5-HT2A and possibly 5-HT1A receptors. Mounting evidence suggests that 5-HT2C receptor agonists might be effective for treating drug abuse. A more complete description of the activity of lorcaserin at 5-HT receptor subtypes will facilitate a better understanding of the mechanisms that mediate its therapeutic effects. PMID:26384326

  19. Recent Advances in the Discovery of Small Molecules Targeting Exchange Proteins Directly Activated by cAMP (EPAC)

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Haijun; Wild, Christopher; Zhou, Xiaobin; Ye, Na; Cheng, Xiaodong; Zhou, Jia

    2014-01-01

    cAMP is a pivotal second messenger that regulates numerous biological processes under physiological and pathological conditions, including cancer, diabetes, heart failure, inflammation and neurological disorders. In the past, all effects of cAMP were initially believed to be mediated by PKA and cyclic nucleotide-regulated ion channels. Since the discovery of EPAC proteins in 1998, accumulating evidence has demonstrated that the net cellular effects of cAMP are also regulated by EPAC. The pursuit of the biological functions of EPAC has benefited from the development and applications of a growing number of pharmacological probes targeting EPAC proteins. In this Perspective, we seek to provide a concise update on recent advances in the development of chemical entities including various membrane-permeable analogues of cAMP and newly discovered EPAC-specific ligands from high throughput assays and hit-to-lead optimizations. PMID:24256330

  20. Direct visualization of memory effects in artificial spin ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, Ian; Chern, Gia-Wei; Fore, Bryce; Lao, Yuyang; Zhang, Sheng; Nisoli, Cristiano; Schiffer, Peter

    2015-09-01

    We experimentally demonstrate that arrays of interacting nanoscale ferromagnetic islands, known as artificial spin ice, develop reproducible microstates upon cycling an applied magnetic field. The onset of this memory effect is determined by the strength of the applied field relative to the array coercivity. Specifically, when the applied field strength is almost exactly equal to the array coercivity, several training cycles are required before the array achieves a nearly completely repeatable microstate, whereas when the applied field strength is stronger or weaker than the array coercivity, a repeatable microstate is achieved after the first minor loop. We show through experiment and simulation that this memory exhibited by artificial spin ice is due to a ratchet effect on interacting, magnetically charged defects in the island moment configuration and to the complexity of the network of strings of reversed moments that forms during magnetization reversal.

  1. Climate change and wildlife health: direct and indirect effects

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hofmeister, Erik; Rogall, Gail Moede; Wesenberg, Katherine; Abbott, Rachel; Work, Thierry; Schuler, Krysten; Sleeman, Jonathan; Winton, James

    2010-01-01

    Climate change, habitat destruction and urbanization, the introduction of exotic and invasive species, and pollution—all affect ecosystem and human health. Climate change can also be viewed within the context of other physical and climate cycles, such as the El Niño Southern Oscillation (El Niño), the North Atlantic Oscillation, and cycles in solar radiation that have profound effects on the Earth’s climate. The effects of climate change on wildlife disease are summarized in several areas of scientific study discussed briefly below: geographic range and distribution of wildlife diseases, plant and animal phenology (Walther and others, 2002), and patterns of wildlife disease, community and ecosystem composition, and habitat degradation.

  2. Effect of Small Transmission Delay on Human Behavior in Audio Communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnishi, Hitoshi; Mochizuki, Kaname

    Transmission delay in audio communications is a well-known obstacle to achieving smooth communication. However, it is not known what kinds of effects are caused by small delays. We hypothesized that the small delay in the listener's responses disturbs the speaker's “verbal conditioning, ” where the verbal behavior of the speaker varies in accordance with the listener's responses. We examined whether the small delays in the listener's responses disturb the speaker's verbal conditioning using an artificial-grammar learning task. The results suggested that a 300-ms delay disturbed the participants' verbal conditioning although they were not adequately aware of the delay.

  3. Workshop 3 (synthesis): innovative processes in small scale agricultural production using water more effectively.

    PubMed

    Bras, R; Gordon, L

    2001-01-01

    The workshop discussed the possibilities of innovative technologies to increase food production. Most of the concepts discussed are based on rainfall management, conservation and recycling. Simple technologies, adopted to local circumstances, can increase farm yields in small-scale agriculture. Small-scale rainfed agriculture is viable with intelligent utilisation of harvested rainfall. These small-scale technologies need however to be complemented with educational programs, incentives and trade to be broadly adopted and effective. The need for better documentation of results was also raised in the discussion. PMID:11379208

  4. Effect of Court Dimensions on Players' External and Internal Load during Small-Sided Handball Games.

    PubMed

    Corvino, Matteo; Tessitore, Antonio; Minganti, Carlo; Sibila, Marko

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of three different court dimensions on the internal and external load during small-sided handball games. Six male amateur handball players took part in this study and participated in three different 8-min 3vs3 (plus goalkeepers) small-sided handball games (each repeated twice). The three court dimensions were 12×24m, 30×15m and 32×16m. Through Global Positioning System devices (SPI pro elite 15Hz, GPSports) and video analysis, the following parameters were recorded: cyclic and acyclic movements (distance covered and number of technical actions executed), heart rate, and rating of perceived exertion (RPE). Total distance travelled increased with court dimensions (885.2m ± 66.6m in 24×12m; 980.0m ± 73.4m in 30×15m; 1095.0m ± 112.9m in 32×16m, p < 0.05). The analysis of distance covered in the four speed zones (0-1.4 m·s(-1); 1.4-3.4 m·s(-1); 3.4-5.2 m·s(-1); >5.2 m·s(-1)) highlighted substantial differences: playing with the 30×15m court in comparison to the 24×12m, the players covered less distance in the first speed zone (p = 0.012; ES = 0.70) and more distance in the second (p = 0.049; ES = 0.73) and third (p = 0.012; ES = 0.51) speed zones. Statistical differences were also found between the 24×12m and 32×16m courts: the players covered more distance in the second and third speed zones (p = 0.013, ES = 0.76; p = 0.023 ES = 0.69) with the 32×16m court in comparison to the 24×12m. There was no significant effect of court dimensions on the technical parameters (number of team actions, passes, piston movements toward goal and defensive activities), the number of specific handball jumps and changes of direction, and the time spent in the different heart rate zones. Considering the average data of all the experimental conditions together (24×12m, 30×15m, 32×16m), a pronounced statistical difference was highlighted between the values in first two HR zones and the last two (p < 0.05; large ES). The

  5. The magnetic shear-current effect: generation of large-scale magnetic fields by the small-scale dynamo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Squire, J.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2016-04-01

    > A novel large-scale dynamo mechanism, the magnetic shear-current effect, is discussed and explored. The effect relies on the interaction of magnetic fluctuations with a mean shear flow, meaning the saturated state of the small-scale dynamo can drive a large-scale dynamo - in some sense the inverse of dynamo quenching. The dynamo is non-helical, with the mean field coefficient zero, and is caused by the interaction between an off-diagonal component of the turbulent resistivity and the stretching of the large-scale field by shear flow. Following up on previous numerical and analytic work, this paper presents further details of the numerical evidence for the effect, as well as an heuristic description of how magnetic fluctuations can interact with shear flow to produce the required electromotive force. The pressure response of the fluid is fundamental to this mechanism, which helps explain why the magnetic effect is stronger than its kinematic cousin, and the basic idea is related to the well-known lack of turbulent resistivity quenching by magnetic fluctuations. As well as being interesting for its applications to general high Reynolds number astrophysical turbulence, where strong small-scale magnetic fluctuations are expected to be prevalent, the magnetic shear-current effect is a likely candidate for large-scale dynamo in the unstratified regions of ionized accretion disks. Evidence for this is discussed, as well as future research directions and the challenges involved with understanding details of the effect in astrophysically relevant regimes.

  6. Direct and indirect effects of ants on a forest-floor food web.

    PubMed

    Moya-Laraño, Jordi; Wise, David H

    2007-06-01

    Interactions among predators that prey on each other and are potential competitors for shared prey (intraguild [IG] predators) are widespread in terrestrial ecosystems and have the potential to strongly influence the dynamics of terrestrial food webs. Ants and spiders are abundant and ubiquitous terrestrial IG predators, yet the strength and consequences of interactions between them are largely unknown. In the leaf-litter food web of a deciduous forest in Kentucky (USA), we tested the direct and indirect effects of ants on spiders and a category of shared prey (Collembola) by experimentally subsidizing ants in open plots in two field experiments. In the first experiment, ant activity was increased, and the density of ants in the litter was doubled, by placing carbohydrate and protein baits in the center of each plot. Gnaphosa spiders were almost twice as abundant and Schizocosa spiders were half as abundant in baited plots relative to controls. There were more tomocerid Collembola in baited plots, suggesting possible indirect effects on Collembola caused by ant-spider interactions. The second experiment, in which screening of two mesh sizes selectively excluded large and small worker ants from a sugar bait, revealed that the large ants, primarily Camponotus, could alone induce similar effects on spiders. Gnaphosa biomass density was almost twice as high in the plots where large ants were more active, whereas Schizocosa biomass density was reduced by half in these plots. Although tomocerid densities did not differ between treatments, tomocerid numbers were negatively correlated with the activity of Formica, another large ant species. Path analysis failed to support the hypothesis that the ant Camponotus indirectly affected tomocerid Collembola through effects on densities of spiders. However, path analysis also revealed other indirect effects of Camponotus affecting tomocerids. These results illustrate the complexity of interactions between and within two major IG

  7. Effect of g-jitter on Directional Solidification of a Binary Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santiviriyapanich, P.; Benjapiyaporn, C.; Timchenko, V.; deVahlDavis, G.; Leonardi, E.; deGroh, H. C., III

    2000-01-01

    A study of directional solidification of a weak binary alloy (specifically, Bi - 1 at% Sn) based on the fixed grid single domain approach is being undertaken. The enthalpy method is used to solve for the temperature field over the computational domain including both the solid and liquid phases; latent heat evolution is treated with the aid of an effective specific heat coefficient. A source term accounting for the release of solute into the liquid during solidification has been incorporated into the solute transport equation. The vorticity-stream function formulation is used to describe thermosolutal convection in the liquid region. In this paper we present a numerical simulation of g-jitter: the small, rapid fluctuations in gravitational acceleration which may be experienced in an orbiting space vehicle. A background gravity of 1 micro-g has been assumed, and new results for the effects of orientation angle of the periodic disturbances over a range of amplitudes and frequencies on solute field and segregation have been presented.

  8. Effect of Ultrasonic Vibration on Direct Reaction Between Solid Ti Powders and Liquid Al

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z. W.; Wang, X. M.; Han, Q. Y.; Li, J. G.

    2014-02-01

    In-situ blocky Al3Ti particles can be synthesized by direct reaction between solid Ti powders and liquid Al in terms of reaction-peeling model. In this research, the effect of high-intensity ultrasonic vibration on the reaction was investigated by means of immersing the ultrasonic radiator in the Al melt at 1003 K (730 °C) during the fabricating process. The results show that the thickness of Al3Ti reaction layers can be decreased to range from 2 to 3 μm, and the sizes of most of Al3Ti particles can be reduced in the ultrasonic fields as well, with the average size ranging from 2 to 3 μm. The two changes are both attributed to the effects of external forces produced in the ultrasonic fields. Thereby, small blocky Al3Ti particles can be peeled off from the reaction layer more quickly, making reaction layers to become thinner and the particles smaller.

  9. Retrieval of the aerosol direct radiative effect over clouds from spaceborne spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graaf, M.; Tilstra, L. G.; Wang, P.; Stammes, P.

    2012-04-01

    The solar radiative absorption by an aerosol layer above clouds is quantified using passive satellite spectrometry from the ultraviolet (UV) to the shortwave infrared (SWIR). UV-absorbing aerosols have a strong signature that can be detected using UV reflectance measurements, even when above clouds. Since the aerosol extinction optical thickness decreases rapidly with increasing wavelength for biomass burning aerosols, the properties of the clouds below the aerosol layer can be retrieved in the SWIR, where aerosol extinction optical thickness is sufficiently small. Using radiative transfer computations, the contribution of the clouds to the reflected radiation can be modeled for the entire solar spectrum. In this way, cloud and aerosol effects can be separated for a scene with aerosols above clouds. Aerosol microphysical assumptions and retrievals are avoided by modeling only the pure (aerosol-free) cloud spectra. An algorithm was developed using the spaceborne spectrometer Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Chartography (SCIAMACHY). The aerosol direct radiative effect (DRE) over clouds over the South Atlantic Ocean west of Africa, averaged through August 2006 was found to be 23 ± 8 Wm-2 with a mean variation over the region in this month of 22 Wm-2. The largest aerosol DRE over clouds found in that month was 132 ± 8 Wm-2. The algorithm can be applied to any instrument, or a combination of instruments, that measures UV, visible and SWIR reflectances at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) simultaneously.

  10. Neurokinin B Exerts Direct Effects on the Ovary to Stimulate Estradiol Production.

    PubMed

    Qi, Xin; Salem, Mohamed; Zhou, Wenyi; Sato-Shimizu, Miwa; Ye, Gang; Smitz, Johan; Peng, Chun

    2016-09-01

    Neurokinin B (NKB) and its receptor, NK3R, play critical roles in reproduction by regulating the secretion of the hypothalamic GnRH. NKB and NK3R genes are also expressed in the ovary; however, their physiological roles within the ovary are unknown. The aim of this study was to determine whether NKB acts directly on the ovary to regulate reproduction. Injection of NKB into zebrafish accelerated follicle development, increased the mRNA levels of cyp11a1 and cyp19a1, and enhanced estradiol production. Similarly, NKB induced cyp11a1 and cyp19a1 expression in primary cultures of zebrafish follicular cells and stimulated estradiol production from cultured follicles. Furthermore, NKB activates cAMP response element-binding protein and ERK, and ERK inhibitors abolished the effect of NKB on cyp11a1, whereas protein kinase A and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II inhibitors that blocked the activation of cAMP response element-binding protein, attenuated the effect of NKB on cyp19a1 expression. In a human granulosa cell line, COV434, a NKB agonist, senktide, also increased CYP11A1 and CYP19A1 mRNA levels and enhanced aromatase protein levels and activities. Small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of NK3R reduced senktide-induced CYP11A1 and CYP19A1 mRNA levels. Finally, we found that NK3R mRNA was strongly down-regulated in granulosa cells obtained from polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) patients when compared with non-PCOS subjects. Taken together, our findings establish a direct action of NKB to induce ovarian estrogen production and raise the possibility that defective signaling of this pathway may contribute to the development of PCOS. PMID:27580802

  11. 77 FR 72868 - Compliance Guidance for Small Business Entities on Labeling and Effectiveness Testing; Sunscreen...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-06

    ... (76 FR 35620) regarding labeling and testing requirements for OTC sunscreen drug products. Under the... and Effectiveness Testing; Sunscreen Drug Products for Over-the-Counter Human Use; Notice of... ``Labeling and Effectiveness Testing: Sunscreen Drug Products for Over-the-Counter Human Use; Small...

  12. Effects of Cocaine on Performance under Fixed-Interval Schedules with a Small Tandem Ratio Requirement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinkston, Jonathan W.; Branch, Marc N.

    2004-01-01

    Daily administration of cocaine often results in the development of tolerance to its effects on responding maintained by fixed-ratio schedules. Such effects have been observed to be greater when the ratio value is small, whereas less or no tolerance has been observed at large ratio values. Similar schedule-parameter-dependent tolerance, however,…

  13. Target- and effect-directed actions towards temporal goals: similar mechanisms?

    PubMed

    Walter, Andrea M; Rieger, Martina

    2012-08-01

    The goal of an action can consist of generating a change in the environment (to produce an effect) or changing one's own situation in the environment (to move to a physical target). To investigate whether the mechanisms of effect-directed and target-directed action control are similar, participants performed continuous reversal movements. They either synchronized movement reversals with regularly presented tones (temporal targets) or produced tones at reversals isochronously (temporal effects). In both goal conditions an irrelevant goal characteristic was integrated into the goal representation (loudness, Experiment 1). When targets and effects were presented within the same reversal movement, similarities were enhanced (Experiment 2). When the task posed spatial demands in addition to temporal demands, target- and effect-directed movement kinematics changed equally with tempo (Experiment 3). Correlations between target-directed and effect-directed movements in temporal variability indicated similar timing mechanisms (Experiments 1 and 2). Only gradual differences between target- and effect-directed movements were observed. We conclude that the same mechanisms of action control, including the anticipation of upcoming events, underlie effect-directed and target-directed movements. Ideomotor theories of action control should incorporate action targets as goals similar to action effects. PMID:22686693

  14. N2O - direct versus indirect effects on emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zechmeister-Boltenstern, Sophie; Kitzler, Barbara

    2013-04-01

    The concentration of N2O in the atmosphere is much lower than that of CO2, but it is an important GHG because on an equivalent mass basis, N2O has c. 300 times the global warming potential of CO2. In addition to being a strong GHG, N2O is the primary stratospheric ozone depleting substance. The dominant sources of N2O are closely related to microbial production processes in soils, sediments and water bodies. Agricultural emissions due to N fertilizer use and manure management (4.3-5.8 Tg N2O-N yr-1) and emissions from natural soils (6-7 Tg N2O-N yr-1) are already representing 56-70% of all global N2O sources. The main agricultural sources of nitrous oxide include emissions from soils after application of inorganic and organic forms of nitrogen (N) as synthetic fertilizers, crop residues, manures or composts. Livestock operations also result in emissions from urine and faeces deposited on soils during grazing. In addition to the direct sources of N2O, there are also indirect ones that include N deposited onto land surfaces following ammonia and NOx volatilization, and nitrate leached from agricultural land in drainage water which, on passing into aquifers or into surface waters and their sediments, can be partially transformed to N2O (Smith et al., 2012). For inventories a default emission factor (EF) of 1.0 % of N fertilizer application has been fixed. The default indirect EFs are 1.0 % of N deposited from the atmosphere, and 0.75 % of N lost to watercourses by leaching or runoff. Depending on fertilizer type and environmental conditions field measurements reveal emission factors which deviate largely from the theoretical values. As soil moisture and temperature are major drivers of N2O emissions, warming and precipitation changes strongly affect the emission of N2O. More difficult is the prediction of climate extremes and their feedback on N2O which may occur via soil processes as well as limitations for plant growth and N uptake. Based on examples of recent

  15. Small scale effects on the mechanical behaviors of protein microtubules based on the nonlocal elasticity theory

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Yuanwen; Lei, Fang-Ming

    2009-09-25

    Based on the nonlocal elastic theory, small scale effects are considered in the investigation of the mechanical properties of protein microtubules. A new prediction formula for the persistence lengths of microtubules with the consideration of the small scale effect is presented. Subsequently, the buckling of microtubules is studied based on a nonlocal elastic beam model. The predicted results of our model indicate that the length-dependence of persistence length is related not only to the shear terms, but also to the small scale effect. The Eular beam model, which is always considered unable to explain the length-dependence of microtubules, can capture the length-dependence of the persistence length of microtubules with the consideration of the small scale effect. The elastic buckling behaviors of microtubules in viscoelastic surrounding cytoplasm are also considered using the nonlocal Timoshenko beam model in this paper, and the results indicate that the small scale effect of microtubules also plays an important role in the buckling of microtubules.

  16. Heterogeneous Effects of Direct Hypoxia Pathway Activation in Kidney Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Salama, Rafik; Masson, Norma; Simpson, Peter; Sciesielski, Lina Katrin; Sun, Min; Tian, Ya-Min; Ratcliffe, Peter John; Mole, David Robert

    2015-01-01

    General activation of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) pathways is classically associated with adverse prognosis in cancer and has been proposed to contribute to oncogenic drive. In clear cell renal carcinoma (CCRC) HIF pathways are upregulated by inactivation of the von-Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor. However HIF-1α and HIF-2α have contrasting effects on experimental tumor progression. To better understand this paradox we examined pan-genomic patterns of HIF DNA binding and associated gene expression in response to manipulation of HIF-1α and HIF-2α and related the findings to CCRC prognosis. Our findings reveal distinct pan-genomic organization of canonical and non-canonical HIF isoform-specific DNA binding at thousands of sites. Overall associations were observed between HIF-1α-specific binding, and genes associated with favorable prognosis and between HIF-2α-specific binding and adverse prognosis. However within each isoform-specific set, individual gene associations were heterogeneous in sign and magnitude, suggesting that activation of each HIF-α isoform contributes a highly complex mix of pro- and anti-tumorigenic effects. PMID:26262842

  17. Influence of Observed Diurnal Cycles of Aerosol Optical Depth on Aerosol Direct Radiative Effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arola, A.; Eck, T. F.; Huttunen, J.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.; Lindfors, A. V.; Myhre, G.; Smirinov, A.; Tripathi, S. N.; Yu, H.

    2013-01-01

    The diurnal variability of aerosol optical depth (AOD) can be significant, depending on location and dominant aerosol type. However, these diurnal cycles have rarely been taken into account in measurement-based estimates of aerosol direct radiative forcing (ADRF) or aerosol direct radiative effect (ADRE). The objective of our study was to estimate the influence of diurnal aerosol variability at the top of the atmosphere ADRE estimates. By including all the possible AERONET sites, we wanted to assess the influence on global ADRE estimates. While focusing also in more detail on some selected sites of strongest impact, our goal was to also see the possible impact regionally.We calculated ADRE with different assumptions about the daily AOD variability: taking the observed daily AOD cycle into account and assuming diurnally constant AOD. Moreover, we estimated the corresponding differences in ADREs, if the single AOD value for the daily mean was taken from the the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Terra or Aqua overpass times, instead of accounting for the true observed daily variability. The mean impact of diurnal AOD variability on 24 h ADRE estimates, averaged over all AERONET sites, was rather small and it was relatively small even for the cases when AOD was chosen to correspond to the Terra or Aqua overpass time. This was true on average over all AERONET sites, while clearly there can be much stronger impact in individual sites. Examples of some selected sites demonstrated that the strongest observed AOD variability (the strongest morning afternoon contrast) does not typically result in a significant impact on 24 h ADRE. In those cases, the morning and afternoon AOD patterns are opposite and thus the impact on 24 h ADRE, when integrated over all solar zenith angles, is reduced. The most significant effect on daily ADRE was induced by AOD cycles with either maximum or minimum AOD close to local noon. In these cases, the impact on 24 h ADRE was

  18. Evidence for direct effect of magnetic fields on neurite outgrowth

    SciTech Connect

    Blackman, C.F. ); Benane, S.G.; House, D.E. )

    1993-06-01

    Electric fields can cause changes in cell responses both in vitro and in vivo. Alternating magnetic fields have been proposed to act through the electric fields induced in the conducting medium surrounding the cells. We have used a simple exposure system to test the relative contribution of magnetic fields compared to induced electric fields in a standard PC-12 cell culture assay, in which cells respond to nerve growth factor by producing neurites. This response to stimulation by nerve growth factor is inhibited by sinusoidal, 50-Hz magnetic fields at field strengths below 10 [mu]T (100 mG). A standard procedure to distinguish magnetic- vs. electric-field effects demonstrates that the induced electric field is not involved. Additional work is necessary to identify the critical reaction site (or sites), and to establish the molecular mechanisms responsible for these result, 27 refs., 5 figs.

  19. Reading direction and attention: effects on lateralized ignoring.

    PubMed

    Eviatar, Z

    1995-11-01

    The effects of the scan for the first element in reading (leftmost in English, rightmost in Hebrew) on the ability of subjects to ignore irrelevant stimuli in one visual field more than in the other were investigated. The hypothesis tested was that English readers would have a harder time ignoring irrelevant stimuli in the left visual field than in the right visual field, with the opposite pattern predicted for readers of Hebrew. The paradigm employed by Banich (Banich & Belger, 1990) was used with two letter matching tasks. The results showed that when an irrelevant letter was present, English readers responded more slowly in the right than in the left visual field, and Hebrew readers showed the opposite pattern (Experiment 1). This interaction did not occur when the irrelevant letter was deleted (Experiment 2). These findings are discussed in terms of their relation to eye movements and covert attention and to the use of bilateral displays in neuropsychological experiments.

  20. Direct observation of resonance effects in laser cluster interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Zweiback, J

    1999-06-01

    Time resolved dynamics of high intensity laser interactions with atomic clusters have been studied with both theoretical analysis and experiment. A short-pulse Ti:sapphire laser system, which could produce 50 mJ of energy in a 50 fs pulse, was built to perform these experiments. The laser used a novel single grating stretcher and was pumped, in part, by a custom Nd:YLF laser system, including 19 mm Nd:YLF amplifiers. It was found that there is an optimal pulse width to maximize absorption for a given cluster size. This optimal pulse width ranged from 400 fs for 85 A radius xenon clusters to 1.2 ps for 205 {angstrom} radius xenon clusters. Using a pump-probe configuration, the absorption of the probe radiation was observed to reach a maximum for a particular time delay between pump and probe, dependent on the cluster size. The delay for peak absorption was 800, 1400, and 2100 fs for 85 {angstrom}, 130 {angstrom}, and 170 {angstrom} radius xenon clusters respectively. Model calculations suggest that these effects are due to resonant heating of the spherical plasma in agreement with the hydrodynamic interpretation of cluster interactions. While this simple hydrodynamic code produces reasonable agreement with data, it does not include bulk plasma or non-linear propagation effects and is limited to the regime where resonant behavior dominates. We also measured the scattered laser light from the laser-cluster interaction. Similar to the absorption measurements, there is an optimal pulse width which maximizes the scattered signal. This pulse width is larger than the optimal pulse width for absorption. This disagrees with model calculations which show both pulse widths being similar. Further experiments measuring the scattered light in a pump-probe configuration should help to resolve this disagreement.

  1. High School Teachers with Significant Teaching Experience Support the Effectiveness of Direct Instructional Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nikolaros, John

    2014-01-01

    This research study was conducted to examine the effectiveness of direct instructional strategies regarding the achievement of students with ED. High school teachers with significant years of teaching experience in an urban setting support the effectiveness of direct instructional strategies. Teachers with 11-20 and 21-30 years of teaching…

  2. Direct effects of energy-related air pollutants on plant sexual reproduction

    SciTech Connect

    Ragsdale, H.L.; Murdy, W.H.

    1987-12-08

    Our completed research program concentrated on the direct in vivo effects of energy-related air pollutants on plant sexual reproduction. Direct air pollution effects on plant sexual reproduction have been studied for SO{sub 2} and NO{sub 2}, two of the three major air pollutants.

  3. Directive Versus Participative Leadership: Two Complementary Approaches to Managing School Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Somech, Anit

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The educational literature reflects the widely shared belief that participative leadership has an overwhelming advantage over the contrasting style of directive leadership in organizational and team effectiveness. The purpose of this study was to examine the relative effect of a directive leadership approach as compared with a…

  4. Academic Self-Concept and Learning Strategies: Direction of Effect on Student Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McInerney, Dennis M.; Cheng, Rebecca Wing-yi; Mok, Magdalena Mo Ching; Lam, Amy Kwok Hap

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the prediction of academic self-concept (English and Mathematics) and learning strategies (deep and surface), and their direction of effect, on academic achievement (English and Mathematics) of 8,354 students from 16 secondary schools in Hong Kong. Two competing models were tested to ascertain the direction of effect: Model A…

  5. A Longitudinal Twin Study of the Direction of Effects between Psychopathic Personality and Antisocial Behaviour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forsman, Mats; Lichtenstein, Paul; Andershed, Henrik; Larsson, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    Background: Antisocial behaviour may partly develop as a consequence of psychopathic personality. However, neither the direction of effects nor the aetiology of the association has previously been clarified. The aim in this study was to investigate the direction of effects between psychopathic personality and antisocial behaviour, and to…

  6. Target- and Effect-Directed Actions towards Temporal Goals: Similar Mechanisms?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walter, Andrea M.; Rieger, Martina

    2012-01-01

    The goal of an action can consist of generating a change in the environment (to produce an effect) or changing one's own situation in the environment (to move to a physical target). To investigate whether the mechanisms of effect-directed and target-directed action control are similar, participants performed continuous reversal movements. They…

  7. Quantitative analysis of the direct effect of aerosols over decadal scale by using ECHAM6-standalone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhammad, K.; Bott, A.; Hense, A.

    2013-12-01

    of up to 80% especially in North African-tropical Atlantic region. Transient aerosol and SST/SIC contributions to solar TOA radiative fluxes are of the order of 10%. Major contributor to the variability of TOA solar fluxes especially at mid-latitudes is internal variability also up to 80-90% outside the above mentioned regions. The results show that the direct effect of (prescribed) aerosols are clearly detectable even on a regional scale on decadal time scale if solar radiative fluxes are analyzed. The annual mean temperature at 850 hPa (dynamical variable) shows contrasting results. Major contributions of its variability at low latitudes come from SST (60-80% at tropical/subtropical latitudes) while the static aerosol effects are small (< 10% except in central equatorial Africa) and transient aerosol effects contribute up to 10% also at higher latitudes with the remaining part (locally 80-90%) coming from internal climate noise. In summary this analysis of variance of radiative fluxes and dynamical variables allows to draw objectively conclusions about the need to include (direct) aerosol effects into decadal climate forecasts. __________________________________________ Kinne. S and M. Schulz (2006). An AeroCom initial assessment-optical properties in aerosol component modules of global models: Atmos. Chem. Phys.,6,1815-1834

  8. Small-Scale Trial for Evaluating Directional Resolution of Single Spherical Biconcave Acoustic Lens in Designing of Ambient Noise Imaging System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Kazuyoshi; Ogasawara, Hanako; Nakamura, Toshiaki

    2008-05-01

    Ambient noise imaging (ANI) is the revolutionary idea of detecting objects by using natural ocean background noise. From the analysis results obtained by the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method in our previous studies, it was supposed that a spherical biconcave lens with an aperture diameter of 2.0 m has a sufficient directional resolution (for example, the beam width is 1° at 60 kHz) for realizing an ANI system. In this study, to confirm the analysis results, we performed a small-scale trial of one-fifth space in a water tank. The lens, made of acrylic resin, has an aperture diameter of 400 mm and a radius of curvature of 500 mm. A burst pulse of 25 cycles at 300 kHz, whose frequency increases 5 times, was radiated from the sound source. The sound pressure after passage through the acoustic lens was measured by moving the receiver around the image point. Results show that the shapes of -3 dB areas are similar to the FDTD analysis results at small incidence angles. It was verified that this lens has a sufficient directional resolution for use in the ANI system, because -3 dB areas do not overlap each other.

  9. Costs and benefits in item-method directed forgetting: differential effects of encoding and retrieval.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yuh-Shiow

    2013-01-01

    This study examined how encoding and retrieval factors affected directed forgetting costs and benefits in an item-method procedure. Experiment 1 used a typical item-method procedure and revealed a levels-of-processing effect in overall recall. However, the deep encoding condition showed a smaller directed forgetting effect than the shallow encoding conditions. More importantly, "remember" (R) words were selectively rehearsed as indicated by greater recall from the primacy portion of the list and more apt to be recalled before "forget" (F) words. Experiment 2 showed that a deep encoding operation reduced directed forgetting costs and that directed forgetting benefits occurred only when R words were recalled before F words. These findings supported the hypotheses that encoding manipulation affected directed forgetting costs and that directed forgetting benefits were associated with output order bias. Results were discussed in terms of mechanisms that produce item-method directed forgetting.

  10. Alpha/sub 2/ adrenergic receptors are located prejunctionally in the Auerbach's plexus of the guinea pig small intestine: direct demonstration by radioligand binding

    SciTech Connect

    Wikberg, J.E.; Lefkowitz, R.J.

    1982-12-20

    Direct evidence that alpha/sub 2/-receptors in the guinea pig small intestine are localized prejunctionally in neurons of the Auerbach's plexus is presented. The alpha/sub 2/-agonist ligand (/sup 3/H)clonidine bound to a single saturable class of sites with a K/sub d/ of 1-2 nM and a capacity of approximately 70 fmol/mg protein in membranes from the innervated longitudinal and circular muscle layers of the intestine. By a special dissection technique the Auerbach's plexus could be completely removed from the longitudinal muscle. In these denervated preparations the clonidine binding sites were virtually completed removed whereas the expected binding sites observed in innervated controls. The innervated preparations also contained a small number of alpha-receptors as revealed by binding with (/sup 3/H)prazosin (capacity approximately 18 fmol/mg protein with a K/sub d/ of 0.4-0.7 nM). Thus, the present study suggests that alpha/sub 2/-receptors ((/sup 3/H)clonidine binding sites) are localized in neurons (i.e., prejunctionally) in the Auerbach's plexus of the guinea pig small intestine.

  11. Survival after total-body irradiation. 1. Effects of partial small bowel shielding

    SciTech Connect

    Vigneulle, R.M.; Vriesendorp, H.M.; Taylor, P.; Burns, W.; Pelkey, T.

    1989-01-01

    The small intestine of the rat was shielded during total-body irradiation (TBI) to evaluate the effects of radiation dose and length of intestine shielded on survival. Sprague-Dawley rats were anesthetized in groups of 10. Using aseptic surgical procedures 80, 40, 20, or 10 cm, or none of the proximal or distal small intestine were temporarily exteriorized and shielded during irradiation with photons from an 18-MeV linear accelerator. Less than 17% of the dose was delivered to the shielded intestines. In unshielded animals deaths occurred from Days 4 to 6 with 13, 15, or 17 Gy and from Days 8 to 30 with 9, 11, and 12 Gy. However, in all animals exposed to 15 Gy with all or part of the small intestine shielded, survival was increased to between 5 and 9 days. Shielding of the distal small intestine. The previously identified target of radiation damage in the small intestine is the crypt stem cell. In this study, the analysis of histological specimens of shielded and irradiated small intestine suggested that humoral factors also influence intestinal histology and survival after irradiation. These humoral factors are thought to originate from the irradiated body tissues, the shielded proximal intestine, and the shielded distal intestine. Further studies are required to identify these factors and to determine their mode of action and their therapeutic potential after radiation damage to the small intestine.

  12. Relating use of effective responsive, structure, and non-directive control vegetable parenting practices to subscales from the Model of Goal Directed Behavior

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Parents may positively influence children's vegetable consumption through effective vegetable parenting practices (VPP). Research has demonstrated three dimensions of effective VPP: Effective Responsiveness, Structure, and Non-Directive Control, but there is limited research investigating each separ...

  13. Effect of diets containing genetically modified potatoes expressing Galanthus nivalis lectin on rat small intestine.

    PubMed

    Ewen, S W; Pusztai, A

    1999-10-16

    Diets containing genetically modified (GM) potatoes expressing the lectin Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA) had variable effects on different parts of the rat gastrointestinal tract. Some effects, such as the proliferation of the gastric mucosa, were mainly due to the expression of the GNA transgene. However, other parts of the construct or the genetic transformation (or both) could also have contributed to the overall biological effects of the GNA-GM potatoes, particularly on the small intestine and caecum.

  14. Effects of gap junction inhibition on contraction waves in the murine small intestine in relation to coupled oscillator theory.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Sean P; Huizinga, Jan D

    2015-02-15

    Waves of contraction in the small intestine correlate with slow waves generated by the myenteric network of interstitial cells of Cajal. Coupled oscillator theory has been used to explain steplike gradients in the frequency (frequency plateaux) of contraction waves along the length of the small intestine. Inhibition of gap junction coupling between oscillators should lead to predictable effects on these plateaux and the wave dislocation (wave drop) phenomena associated with their boundaries. It is these predictions that we wished to test. We used a novel multicamera diameter-mapping system to measure contraction along 25- to 30-cm lengths of murine small intestine. There were typically two to three plateaux per length of intestine. Dislocations could be limited to the wavefronts immediately about the terminated wave, giving the appearance of a three-pronged fork, i.e., a fork dislocation; additionally, localized decreases in velocity developed across a number of wavefronts, ending with the terminated wave, which could appear as a fork, i.e., slip dislocations. The gap junction inhibitor carbenoxolone increased the number of plateaux and dislocations and decreased contraction wave velocity. In some cases, the usual frequency gradient was reversed, with a plateau at a higher frequency than its proximal neighbor; thus fork dislocations were inverted, and the direction of propagation was reversed. Heptanol had no effect on the frequency or velocity of contractions but did reduce their amplitude. To understand intestinal motor patterns, the pacemaker network of the interstitial cells of Cajal is best evaluated as a system of coupled oscillators.

  15. Effects of Side Walls on Pipe Inlet Flow(Drag Reduction by Separated Flow Control Using Ring Shaped Small Obstacle)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Toshitake; Shakouchi, Toshihiko; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Tsujimoto, Koichi

    The flow from a wide space into a pipe has a large annular separated vortex region just after the inlet corner. This vortex region produces large flow resistance, or drag, in this kind of flow. To reduce the drag, a means to control flow in order to suppress the vortex region is needed. In this study, a simple method to reduce the drag of the pipe inlet flow by mounting a small ring-shaped obstacle instead of a bell-mouth has been proposed and examined. The effects of the side-walls and their offset distance on drag reduction were also examined. The small offset distance corresponds to the case in which the pipe inlet is placed near the bottom or corner of the tank. The distributions of pressure and velocity components in the axial direction at several cross-sections were measured, and a visualized flow pattern of the water flow just after the pipe inlet was examined. The effects of the small ring-shaped obstacle on drag reduction were also examined. It was clarified that the inlet loss (drag) coefficient was reduced by a maximum of about 90 percent by mounting the ring-shaped obstacle.

  16. Aerosol direct effect retrieval over clouds from space-borne passive hyperspectral measurements (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Graaf, M.; Tilstra, L.; Stammes, P.

    2013-12-01

    A novel approach for the retrieval of the aerosol direct radiative effect (DRE) over clouds will be presented, which is independent of aerosol parameters estimates. The direct effect at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) of aerosols over clouds can be estimated using hyperspectral reflectance measurements from space-borne spectrometers, when the equivalent aerosol-unpolluted cloud scene reflectance spectrum is known. For smoke over clouds the cloud parameters can be estimated from the shortwave infrared (SWIR), where the absorption of the small smoke particles becomes sufficiently small. Using precomputed tables of cloud reflectance spectra, the unpolluted cloud scene spectrum can then be simulated and compared to the real measured polluted cloud scene reflectance spectrum. The UV-radiation absorption by the smoke will lead to a difference between the measured and simulated spectra, which is proportional to the aerosol DRE at TOA. Aerosol microphysical assumptions and retrievals are avoided by modeling only the aerosol-free scene spectra, all the aerosol effects are in the reflectance measurements. The method works especially well for cloud scenes, which can be simulated relatively accurately. An algorithm was developed to derive the aerosol DRE over marine clouds, using the space-borne spectrometer SCIAMACHY, which produced shortwave reflectance spectra (from 240 to 1700 nm contiguously) from 2002 till 2012. These are ideally suited to study the effect of aerosols on the shortwave spectrum. However, since aerosols in general do not have high resolution spectral features, the algorithm can be adapted to suit data from any combination of instruments that measures UV, visible and SWIR reflectances simultaneously. Examples include OMI and MODIS, flying in the A-Train constellation, and TROPOMI, on the future Sentinel 5 precursor mission, combined with NOAA's NPP VIIRS. This would produce aerosol DRE estimates with unprecedented accuracy and spatial resolution. The

  17. Effects of corridors on home range sizes and interpatch movements of three small mammal species.

    SciTech Connect

    Mabry, Karen, E.; Barrett, Gary, W.

    2002-04-30

    Mabry, K.E., and G.W. Barrett. 2002. Effects of corridors on home range sizes and interpatch movements of three small mammal species. Landscape Ecol. 17:629-636. Corridors are predicted to benefit populations in patchy habitats by promoting movement, which should increase population densities, gene flow, and recolonization of extinct patch populations. However, few investigators have considered use of the total landscape, particularly the possibility of interpatch movement through matrix habitat, by small mammals. This study compares home range sizes of 3 species of small mammals, the cotton mouse, old field mouse and cotton rat between patches with and without corridors. Corridor presence did not have a statistically significant influence on average home range size. Habitat specialization and sex influenced the probability of an individual moving between 2 patches without corridors. The results of this study suggest that small mammals may be more capable of interpatch movement without corridors than is frequently assumed.

  18. Effect of small flares in the neutral component of secondary cosmic radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bondarenko, V. I.; Raychenko, L. V.; Yukhimuk, A. K.

    1974-01-01

    The results are presented of an investigation of the effect of small flares, scale divisions 1 and 1(+), in the neutron component of secondary cosmic radiation from the data of neutron supermonitors at the stations of Kiev, Bukhta Tiksi, and Deep River. It is shown that flares of scale divisions 1 and 1(+) are accompanied by an effect in the neutron component amounting to about 0.4%. A mechanism is presented for calculating the outflow of particles accelerated in small flares, owing to diffusion across the magnetic field of a trap.

  19. Land use and small mammal predation effects on shortgrass prairie birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stanley, T.R.

    2010-01-01

    Grassland birds endemic to the central shortgrass prairie ecoregion of the United States have experienced steep and widespread declines over the last 3 decades, and factors influencing reproductive success have been implicated. Nest predation is the major cause of nest failure in passerines, and nesting success for some shortgrass prairie birds is exceptionally low. The 3 primary land uses in the central shortgrass prairie ecoregion are native shortgrass prairie rangeland (62), irrigated and nonirrigated cropland (29), and Conservation Reserve Program (CRP, 8). Because shortgrasscropland edges and CRP may alter the community of small mammal predators of grassland bird nests, I sampled multiple sites on and near the Pawnee National Grasslands in northeast Colorado, USA, to evaluate 1) whether small mammal species richness and densities were greater in CRP fields and shortgrass prairiecropland edges compared to shortgrass prairie habitats, and 2) whether daily survival probabilities of ground-nesting grassland bird nests were negatively correlated with densities of small mammals. Small mammal species richness and densities, estimated using trapping webs, were generally greater along edges and on CRP sites compared to shortgrass sites. Vegetation did not differ among edges and shortgrass sites but did differ among CRP and shortgrass sites. Daily survival probabilities of artificial nests at edge and CRP sites and natural nests at edge sites did not differ from shortgrass sites, and for natural nests small mammal densities did not affect nest survival. However, estimated daily survival probability of artificial nests was inversely proportional to thirteen-lined ground squirrel (Spermophilus tridecemlineatus) densities. In conclusion, these data suggest that although land-use patterns on the shortgrass prairie area in my study have substantial effects on the small mammal community, insufficient data existed to determine whether land-use patterns or small mammal density

  20. Arabidopsis RNASE THREE LIKE2 Modulates the Expression of Protein-Coding Genes via 24-Nucleotide Small Interfering RNA-Directed DNA Methylation[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Hachet, Mélanie; Comella, Pascale; Zytnicki, Matthias; Vaucheret, Hervé

    2016-01-01

    RNaseIII enzymes catalyze the cleavage of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) and have diverse functions in RNA maturation. Arabidopsis thaliana RNASE THREE LIKE2 (RTL2), which carries one RNaseIII and two dsRNA binding (DRB) domains, is a unique Arabidopsis RNaseIII enzyme resembling the budding yeast small interfering RNA (siRNA)-producing Dcr1 enzyme. Here, we show that RTL2 modulates the production of a subset of small RNAs and that this activity depends on both its RNaseIII and DRB domains. However, the mode of action of RTL2 differs from that of Dcr1. Whereas Dcr1 directly cleaves dsRNAs into 23-nucleotide siRNAs, RTL2 likely cleaves dsRNAs into longer molecules, which are subsequently processed into small RNAs by the DICER-LIKE enzymes. Depending on the dsRNA considered, RTL2-mediated maturation either improves (RTL2-dependent loci) or reduces (RTL2-sensitive loci) the production of small RNAs. Because the vast majority of RTL2-regulated loci correspond to transposons and intergenic regions producing 24-nucleotide siRNAs that guide DNA methylation, RTL2 depletion modifies DNA methylation in these regions. Nevertheless, 13% of RTL2-regulated loci correspond to protein-coding genes. We show that changes in 24-nucleotide siRNA levels also affect DNA methylation levels at such loci and inversely correlate with mRNA steady state levels, thus implicating RTL2 in the regulation of protein-coding gene expression. PMID:26764378

  1. Arabidopsis RNASE THREE LIKE2 Modulates the Expression of Protein-Coding Genes via 24-Nucleotide Small Interfering RNA-Directed DNA Methylation.

    PubMed

    Elvira-Matelot, Emilie; Hachet, Mélanie; Shamandi, Nahid; Comella, Pascale; Sáez-Vásquez, Julio; Zytnicki, Matthias; Vaucheret, Hervé

    2016-02-01

    RNaseIII enzymes catalyze the cleavage of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) and have diverse functions in RNA maturation. Arabidopsis thaliana RNASE THREE LIKE2 (RTL2), which carries one RNaseIII and two dsRNA binding (DRB) domains, is a unique Arabidopsis RNaseIII enzyme resembling the budding yeast small interfering RNA (siRNA)-producing Dcr1 enzyme. Here, we show that RTL2 modulates the production of a subset of small RNAs and that this activity depends on both its RNaseIII and DRB domains. However, the mode of action of RTL2 differs from that of Dcr1. Whereas Dcr1 directly cleaves dsRNAs into 23-nucleotide siRNAs, RTL2 likely cleaves dsRNAs into longer molecules, which are subsequently processed into small RNAs by the DICER-LIKE enzymes. Depending on the dsRNA considered, RTL2-mediated maturation either improves (RTL2-dependent loci) or reduces (RTL2-sensitive loci) the production of small RNAs. Because the vast majority of RTL2-regulated loci correspond to transposons and intergenic regions producing 24-nucleotide siRNAs that guide DNA methylation, RTL2 depletion modifies DNA methylation in these regions. Nevertheless, 13% of RTL2-regulated loci correspond to protein-coding genes. We show that changes in 24-nucleotide siRNA levels also affect DNA methylation levels at such loci and inversely correlate with mRNA steady state levels, thus implicating RTL2 in the regulation of protein-coding gene expression. PMID:26764378

  2. Separation and measurement of direct and indirect effects of light on stomata

    SciTech Connect

    Sharkey, T.D.; Raschke, K.

    1981-07-01

    Conductance for water vapor, assimilation of CO/sub 2/, and intercellular CO/sub 2/ concentration of leaves of five species were determined at various irradiances and ambient CO/sub 2/ concentrations. Conductance and assimilation were then plotted as functions of irradiance and intercellular CO/sub 2/ concentration. On leaves of Xanthium strumarium L., Gossypium hirsutum L., Phaseolus vulgaris L., and Perilla frutescens (L.), Britt., the stomatal response to light was mainly a direct response to light and to a small extent only a response to changes in intercellular CO/sub 2/ concentration. This was also true for stomata of Zea mays L., except at irradiances <150 watts per square meter. Stomata responded to light even in leaves whose net exchange of CO/sub 2/ was reduced to zero. When leaves were inverted and irradiated on the abaxial surface, conductance decreased in the shaded and increased in the illuminated epidermis, indicating that the photoreceptor pigment(s) involved are located in the epidermis. In leaves of X. strumarium, the direct effect of light on conductance is primarily a response to blue light. Stomatal responses to CO/sub 2/ and to light opposed each other. In X. strumarium, stomatal opening in response to light was strongest in CO/sub 2/-free air and saturated at lower irradiances than in CO/sub 2/-containing air. Conversely, stomatal closure in response to CO/sub 2/ was strongest in darkness and it decreased as irradiance increased. In X. strumarium, P. vulgaris, and P. frutescens, an irradiance of 300 watts per square meter was sufficient to eliminate the stomatal response to CO/sub 2/ altogether. Application of abscisic acid, or an increase in vapor pressure deficit, or a decrease in leaf temperature reduced the stomatal conductance at light saturation.

  3. The effect of small intestine heterogeneity on irreversible electroporation treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Mary

    2014-09-01

    Nonthermal irreversible electroporation (NTIRE) is an ablation modality that utilizes microsecond electric fields to produce nanoscale defects in the cell membrane. This results in selective cell death while preserving all other molecules, including the extracellular matrix. Here, finite element analysis and experimental results are utilized to examine the effect of NTIRE on the small intestine due to concern over collateral damage to this organ during NTIRE treatment of abdominal cancers. During previous studies, the electrical treatment parameters were chosen based on a simplified homogeneous tissue model. The small intestine, however, has very distinct layers, and a more realistic model is needed to further develop this technology for precise clinical applications. This study uses a two-dimensional finite element solution of the Laplace and heat conduction equations to investigate how small intestine heterogeneities affect the electric field and temperature distribution. Experimental results obtained by applying NTIRE to the rat small intestine in vivo support the heterogeneous effect of NTIRE on the tissue. The numerical modeling indicates that the electroporation parameters chosen for this study avoid thermal damage to the tissue. This is supported by histology obtained from the in vivo study, which showed preservation of extracellular structures. The finite element model also indicates that the heterogeneous structure of the small intestine has a significant effect on the electric field and volume of cell ablation during electroporation and could have a large impact on the extent of treatment. The heterogeneous nature of the tissue should be accounted for in clinical treatment planning.

  4. Protective effect of vitamin E against ethanol-induced small intestine damage in rats.

    PubMed

    Shirpoor, Alireza; Barmaki, Hanieh; Khadem Ansari, Mohamadhasan; Lkhanizadeh, BehrouzI; Barmaki, Haleh

    2016-03-01

    The role of oxidative stress and inflammatory reaction has been reported in various ethanol-induced complications. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of ethanol-induced structural alteration, oxidative stress, and inflammatory reaction on the small intestine of rats, and plausible protective effect of vitamin E to determine whether it inhibits the abnormality induced by ethanol in the small intestine. Twenty-four male wistar rats were divided into three groups, namely: Control, ethanol, and vitamin E treated ethanol groups. After six weeks of treatment, the small intestine length, villus height, crypt depth and muscular layer thickness, oxidative stress, and inflammatory parameters showed significant changes in the ethanol treated group compared to the control group. Vitamin E consumption along with ethanol ameliorated structural alteration of the small intestine and reduced the elevated amount of oxidative stress and inflammatory markers such as protein carbonyl, OX-LDL, IL-6, Hcy, and TNF-α. Furthermore, their total antioxidant capacity was increased significantly compared to that of the ethanol group. These findings indicate that ethanol induces the small intestine abnormality by oxidative and inflammatory stress, and that these effects can be alleviated by using vitamin E as an antioxidant and anti-inflammatory molecule.

  5. Effect of dietary fibres on small intestine histomorphology and lipid metabolism in young broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Rahmatnejad, E; Saki, A A

    2016-08-01

    Two experiments were conducted to determine the influence of dietary fibres on small intestine histomorphology and lipid metabolism in broilers from 1 to 21 day of age. In experiment 1, diets containing insoluble [cellulose (CEL); 2% and 4%] or soluble [carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC); 2% and 4%] fibre were fed to broilers from day 1 to 21 post-hatch and ileal tissue was collected at day 21 of age for histological evaluation. In experiment 2, broilers diet was supplemented with 0%, 1% or 2% insoluble fibre (Arbocel) during day 7 to 21 post-hatch and plasma and liver lipid metabolism were evaluated at day 21. In experiment 1, inclusion of CMC reduced body weight gain (BWG) and feed intake (FI) and increased feed conversion ratio (FCR) compared with others. Intestinal histomorphology was unaffected by CEL, but CMC led to an increase in crypt depth (CD) and serosa thickness and a decrease in villus height (VH), villus width (VW), VH:CD ratio and villus surface area (VSA), rather than control and CEL groups. Treatment did not affect goblet cell type. Moreover, the CMC-fed birds had greater total goblet cell count (GCC) as compared with others. In experiment 2, fibre inclusion was associated with increases in BWG from 7 to 14 day of age and an improvement in FCR, whereas FI was not influenced by treatments. Inclusion of fibre in the diet decreased the weight of the abdominal fat and cholesterol concentrations of liver and plasma. No significant effects on fatty acid composition of liver lipid were observed by fibre supplementation. These findings suggest dietary fibre affects performance, intestinal histomorphology and lipid metabolism in young chicks, which may directly affect poultry feeding strategies.

  6. Effect of dietary fibres on small intestine histomorphology and lipid metabolism in young broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Rahmatnejad, E; Saki, A A

    2016-08-01

    Two experiments were conducted to determine the influence of dietary fibres on small intestine histomorphology and lipid metabolism in broilers from 1 to 21 day of age. In experiment 1, diets containing insoluble [cellulose (CEL); 2% and 4%] or soluble [carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC); 2% and 4%] fibre were fed to broilers from day 1 to 21 post-hatch and ileal tissue was collected at day 21 of age for histological evaluation. In experiment 2, broilers diet was supplemented with 0%, 1% or 2% insoluble fibre (Arbocel) during day 7 to 21 post-hatch and plasma and liver lipid metabolism were evaluated at day 21. In experiment 1, inclusion of CMC reduced body weight gain (BWG) and feed intake (FI) and increased feed conversion ratio (FCR) compared with others. Intestinal histomorphology was unaffected by CEL, but CMC led to an increase in crypt depth (CD) and serosa thickness and a decrease in villus height (VH), villus width (VW), VH:CD ratio and villus surface area (VSA), rather than control and CEL groups. Treatment did not affect goblet cell type. Moreover, the CMC-fed birds had greater total goblet cell count (GCC) as compared with others. In experiment 2, fibre inclusion was associated with increases in BWG from 7 to 14 day of age and an improvement in FCR, whereas FI was not influenced by treatments. Inclusion of fibre in the diet decreased the weight of the abdominal fat and cholesterol concentrations of liver and plasma. No significant effects on fatty acid composition of liver lipid were observed by fibre supplementation. These findings suggest dietary fibre affects performance, intestinal histomorphology and lipid metabolism in young chicks, which may directly affect poultry feeding strategies. PMID:26667363

  7. Direct, maternal, and sibsocial genetic effects on individual and colony traits in an ant.

    PubMed

    Linksvayer, Timothy A

    2006-12-01

    When social interactions occur, the phenotype of an individual is influenced directly by its own genes (direct genetic effects) but also indirectly by genes expressed in social partners (indirect genetic effects). Social insect colonies are characterized by extensive behavioral interactions among workers, brood, and queens so that indirect genetic effects are particularly relevant. I used a series of experimental manipulations to disentangle the contribution of direct effects, maternal (queen) effects, and sibsocial (worker) effects to variation for worker, gyne, and male mass; caste ratio; and sex ratio in the ant Temnothorax curvispinosus. The results indicate genetic variance for direct, maternal, and sibsocial effects for all traits, except for male mass there was no significant maternal variance, and for sex ratio the variance for direct effects was not separable from maternal variance for the primary sex ratio. Estimates of genetic correlations between direct, maternal, and sibsocial effects were generally negative, indicating that these effects may not evolve independently. These results have broad implications for social insect evolution. For example, the genetic architecture underlying social insect traits may constrain the realization of evolutionary conflicts between social partners.

  8. Treatment of high salinity brines by direct contact membrane distillation: Effect of membrane characteristics and salinity.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianfeng; Guan, Yunshan; Cheng, Fangqin; Liu, Yu

    2015-12-01

    Direct contact membrane distillation (DCMD) is one of the attractive technologies for high salinity brine treatment. In this study, four polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) membranes were examined in treating highly concentrated salt solutions. Results showed that non-supported membranes generally have a higher overall mass transfer coefficient but porosity seems to be the most important parameter controlling membrane flux and thermal efficiency. Supported membranes with large thickness had relatively higher thermal efficiency than small thickness. This can be attributed to their reduced heat loss through heat condition. In addition, KCl, NaCl and MgCl2 solutions showed distinct trends over flux decline at high salt concentrations (⩾2.0M). The difference in flux was largely due to the discrepancy in water activities of these solutions (KCl>NaCl>MgCl2). However, the effect of viscosity on permeate flux could not be neglected for MgCl2 at high salt concentrations as the suddenly increased viscosity could lead to serious temperature polarization. This study indicates that membrane distillation is a promising technology for high salinity brine treatment. PMID:25563165

  9. Treatment of high salinity brines by direct contact membrane distillation: Effect of membrane characteristics and salinity.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianfeng; Guan, Yunshan; Cheng, Fangqin; Liu, Yu

    2015-12-01

    Direct contact membrane distillation (DCMD) is one of the attractive technologies for high salinity brine treatment. In this study, four polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) membranes were examined in treating highly concentrated salt solutions. Results showed that non-supported membranes generally have a higher overall mass transfer coefficient but porosity seems to be the most important parameter controlling membrane flux and thermal efficiency. Supported membranes with large thickness had relatively higher thermal efficiency than small thickness. This can be attributed to their reduced heat loss through heat condition. In addition, KCl, NaCl and MgCl2 solutions showed distinct trends over flux decline at high salt concentrations (⩾2.0M). The difference in flux was largely due to the discrepancy in water activities of these solutions (KCl>NaCl>MgCl2). However, the effect of viscosity on permeate flux could not be neglected for MgCl2 at high salt concentrations as the suddenly increased viscosity could lead to serious temperature polarization. This study indicates that membrane distillation is a promising technology for high salinity brine treatment.

  10. Effect of voxel size when calculating patient specific radionuclide dosimetry estimates using direct Monte Carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    Hickson, Kevin J; O'Keefe, Graeme J

    2014-09-01

    The scalable XCAT voxelised phantom was used with the GATE Monte Carlo toolkit to investigate the effect of voxel size on dosimetry estimates of internally distributed radionuclide calculated using direct Monte Carlo simulation. A uniformly distributed Fluorine-18 source was simulated in the Kidneys of the XCAT phantom with the organ self dose (kidney ← kidney) and organ cross dose (liver ← kidney) being calculated for a number of organ and voxel sizes. Patient specific dose factors (DF) from a clinically acquired FDG PET/CT study have also been calculated for kidney self dose and liver ← kidney cross dose. Using the XCAT phantom it was found that significantly small voxel sizes are required to achieve accurate calculation of organ self dose. It has also been used to show that a voxel size of 2 mm or less is suitable for accurate calculations of organ cross dose. To compensate for insufficient voxel sampling a correction factor is proposed. This correction factor is applied to the patient specific dose factors calculated with the native voxel size of the PET/CT study.

  11. Effect of Agricultural Practices on Hydrology and Water Chemistry in a Small Irrigated Catchment, Yakima River Basin, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCarthy, Kathleen A.; Johnson, Henry M.

    2009-01-01

    The role of irrigation and artificial drainage in the hydrologic cycle and the transport of solutes in a small agricultural catchment in central Washington's Yakima Valley were explored using hydrologic, chemical, isotopic, age-dating, and mineralogical data from several environmental compartments, including stream water, ground water, overland flow, and streambed pore water. A conceptual understanding of catchment hydrology and solute transport was developed and an inverse end-member mixing analysis was used to further explore the effects of agriculture in this small catchment. The median concentrations of major solutes and nitrates were similar for the single field site and for the catchment outflow site, indicating that the net effects of transport processes for these constituents were similar at both scales. However, concentrations of nutrients were different at the two sites, suggesting that field-scale variations in agricultural practices as well as nearstream and instream biochemical processes are important components of agricultural chemical transformation and transport in this catchment. This work indicates that irrigation coupled with artificial drainage networks may exacerbate the ecological effects of agricultural runoff by increasing direct connectivity between fields and streams and minimizing potentially mitigating effects (denitrification and dilution, for example) of longer subsurface pathways.

  12. Effective size and polymorphism of linked neutral loci in populations under directional selection.

    PubMed Central

    Santiago, E; Caballero, A

    1998-01-01

    The general theory of the effective size (Ne) for populations under directional selection is extended to cover linkage. Ne is a function of the association between neutral and selected genes generated by finite sampling. This association is reduced by three factors: the recombination rate, the reduction of genetic variance due to drift, and the reduction of genetic variance of the selected genes due to selection. If the genetic size of the genome (L in Morgans) is not extremely small the equation for Ne is [formula, see text] where N is the number of reproductive individuals, C 2 is the genetic variance for fitness scaled by the squared mean fitness, (1 - Z) = Vm/C2 is the rate of reduction of genetic variation per generation and Vm is the mutational input of genetic variation for fitness. The above predictive equation of Ne is valid for the infinitesimal model and for a model of detrimental mutations. The principles of the theory are also applicable to favorable mutation models if there is a continuous flux of advantageous mutations. The predictions are tested by simulation, and the connection with previous results is found and discussed. The reduction of effective size associated with a neutral mutation is progressive over generations until the asymptotic value (the above expression) is reached after a number of generations. The magnitude of the drift process is, therefore, smaller for recent neutral mutations than for old ones. This produces equilibrium values of average heterozygosity and proportion of segregating sites that cannot be formally predicted from the asymptotic Ne, but both parameters can still be predicted by following the drift along the lineage of genes. The spectrum of gene frequencies in a given generation can also be predicted by considering the overlapping of distributions corresponding to mutations that arose in different generations and with different associated effective sizes. PMID:9691062

  13. Can small intensive case management teams be as effective as large teams?

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Somaia

    2015-02-01

    In 2007, the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) implemented a program to deliver the full array of Assertive Community Treatment services in areas with low population density using teams with small staffs. VHA administrative data were used to compare treatment and outcomes of veterans who received services from teams with only two or three staff (N=805) and veterans served by teams with ten or more staff (N=861). After adjusting for baseline difference, smaller teams had statistically significantly less symptom improvement and smaller declines in suicidality indices but effect sizes were small and there were no differences on 11 other outcomes. These data demonstrate the clinical need, practical feasibility and potential effectiveness of providing intensive case management through small teams.

  14. Analyses of transverse vibrations of axially pretensioned viscoelastic nanobeams with small size and surface effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yongqiang; Pang, Miao; Fan, Lifeng

    2016-07-01

    The general governing equation for transverse vibration of an axially pretensioned viscoelastic nanobeam embedded in elastic substrate medium is formulated on the basis of the Bernoulli-Euler beam theory and the Kelvin model. The factors of structural damping, initial axial tension, surrounding medium, small size, surface elasticity and residual surface tension are incorporated in the formulation. The explicit expression is obtained for the vibrational frequency of a simply supported nanobeam. The impacts of these factors on the properties of transverse vibration of the nanobeam are discussed. It is demonstrated that the dependences of natural frequency on the structural damping, surrounding medium, small size, surface elasticity and residual surface tension are significant, whereas the effect of initial axial tension on the natural frequency is limited. In addition, it can be concluded that the energy dissipation of transverse vibration of the viscoelastic nanobeam is related to the small size effect and structural damping.

  15. SU-E-I-10: Investigation On Detectability of a Small Target for Different Slice Direction of a Volumetric Cone Beam CT Image

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C; Han, M; Baek, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the detectability of a small target for different slice direction of a volumetric cone beam CT image and its impact on dose reduction. Methods: Analytic projection data of a sphere object (1 mm diameter, 0.2/cm attenuation coefficient) were generated and reconstructed by FDK algorithm. In this work, we compared the detectability of the small target from four different backprojection Methods: hanning weighted ramp filter with linear interpolation (RECON 1), hanning weighted ramp filter with Fourier interpolation (RECON2), ramp filter with linear interpolation (RECON 3), and ramp filter with Fourier interpolation (RECON4), respectively. For noise simulation, 200 photons per measurement were used, and the noise only data were reconstructed using FDK algorithm. For each reconstructed volume, axial and coronal slice were extracted and detection-SNR was calculated using channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) with dense difference-of-Gaussian (D-DOG) channels. Results: Detection-SNR of coronal images varies for different backprojection methods, while axial images have a similar detection-SNR. Detection-SNR{sup 2} ratios of coronal and axial images in RECON1 and RECON2 are 1.33 and 1.15, implying that the coronal image has a better detectability than axial image. In other words, using coronal slices for the small target detection can reduce the patient dose about 33% and 15% compared to using axial slices in RECON 1 and RECON 2. Conclusion: In this work, we investigated slice direction dependent detectability of a volumetric cone beam CT image. RECON 1 and RECON 2 produced the highest detection-SNR, with better detectability in coronal slices. These results indicate that it is more beneficial to use coronal slice to improve detectability of a small target in a volumetric cone beam CT image. This research was supported by the MSIP (Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning), Korea, under the IT Consilience Creative Program (NIPA-2014-H0201

  16. Decadal trends in marine reserves reveal differential rates of change in direct and indirect effects

    PubMed Central

    Babcock, R. C.; Shears, N. T.; Alcala, A. C.; Barrett, N. S.; Edgar, G. J.; Lafferty, K. D.; McClanahan, T. R.; Russ, G. R.

    2010-01-01

    Decadal-scale observations of marine reserves suggest that indirect effects on taxa that occur through cascading trophic interactions take longer to develop than direct effects on target species. Combining and analyzing a unique set of long-term time series of ecologic data in and out of fisheries closures from disparate regions, we found that the time to initial detection of direct effects on target species (±SE) was 5.13 ± 1.9 years, whereas initial detection of indirect effects on other taxa, which were often trait mediated, took significantly longer (13.1 ± 2.0 years). Most target species showed initial direct effects, but their trajectories over time were highly variable. Many target species continued to increase, some leveled off, and others decreased. Decreases were due to natural fluctuations, fishing impacts from outside reserves, or indirect effects from target species at higher trophic levels. The average duration of stable periods for direct effects was 6.2 ± 1.2 years, even in studies of more than 15 years. For indirect effects, stable periods averaged 9.1 ± 1.6 years, although this was not significantly different from direct effects. Populations of directly targeted species were more stable in reserves than in fished areas, suggesting increased ecologic resilience. This is an important benefit of marine reserves with respect to their function as a tool for conservation and restoration. PMID:20176941

  17. Decadal trends in marine reserves reveal differential rates of change in direct and indirect effects

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Babcock, R.C.; Shears, N.T.; Alcala, A.C.; Barrett, N.S.; Edgar, G.J.; Lafferty, K.D.; McClanahan, T.R.; Russ, G.R.

    2010-01-01

    Decadal-scale observations of marine reserves suggest that indirect effects on taxa that occur through cascading trophic interactions take longer to develop than direct effects on target species. Combining and analyzing a unique set of long-term time series of ecologic data in and out of fisheries closures from disparate regions, we found that the time to initial detection of direct effects on target species (+ or -SE) was 5.13 + or - 1.9 years, whereas initial detection of indirect effects on other taxa, which were often trait mediated, took significantly longer (13.1 + or - 2.0 years). Most target species showed initial direct effects, but their trajectories over time were highly variable. Many target species continued to increase, some leveled off, and others decreased. Decreases were due to natural fluctuations, fishing impacts from outside reserves, or indirect effects from target species at higher trophic levels. The average duration of stable periods for direct effects was 6.2 + or - 1.2 years, even in studies of more than 15 years. For indirect effects, stable periods averaged 9.1 + or - 1.6 years, although this was not significantly different from direct effects. Populations of directly targeted species were more stable in reserves than in fished areas, suggesting increased ecologic resilience. This is an important benefit of marine reserves with respect to their function as a tool for conservation and restoration.

  18. Environmental Effects of Small Meteorite Impact in Unconsolidated Sediments — Case of Iron Meteorite Shower in Morasko, Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szczuciński, W.; Pleskot, K.; Makohonienko, M.; Tjallingii, R.; Apolinarska, K.; Cerbin, S.; Goslar, T.; Nowaczyk, N.; Rzodkiewicz, M.; Słowiński, M.; Woszczyk, M.; Brauer, A.

    2016-08-01

    We show record of environmental consequences of mid-Holocene small meteorite impact. It is based on sedimentological, geochemical and biological indicators studied in lake deposits, which revealed relatively small extent of the impact effects.

  19. Effects of fire on small mammal communities in frequent-fire forests in California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roberts, Susan L.; Kelt, Douglas A.; Van Wagtendonk, Jan W.; Miles, A. Keith; Meyer, Marc D.

    2015-01-01

    Fire is a natural, dynamic process that is integral to maintaining ecosystem function. The reintroduction of fire (e.g., prescribed fire, managed wildfire) is a critical management tool for protecting many frequent-fire forests against stand-replacing fires while restoring an essential ecological process. Understanding the effects of fire on forests and wildlife communities is important in natural resource planning efforts. Small mammals are key components of forest food webs and essential to ecosystem function. To investigate the relationship of fire to small mammal assemblages, we live trapped small mammals in 10 burned and 10 unburned forests over 2 years in the central Sierra Nevada, California. Small mammal abundance was higher in unburned forests, largely reflecting the greater proportion of closed-canopy species such as Glaucomys sabrinus in unburned forests. The most abundant species across the entire study area was the highly adaptable generalist species, Peromyscus maniculatus. Species diversity was similar between burned and unburned forests, but burned forests were characterized by greater habitat heterogeneity and higher small mammal species evenness. The use and reintroduction of fire to maintain a matrix of burn severities, including large patches of unburned refugia, creates a heterogeneous and resilient landscape that allows for fire-sensitive species to proliferate and, as such, may help maintain key ecological functions and diverse small mammal assemblages.

  20. Effect of Ischemia on the Canine Large Bowel: A Comparison with the Small Intestine1

    PubMed Central

    Takeyoshi, Izumi; Zhang, Shimin; Nakamura, Kenjiro; Ikoma, Akira; Zhu, Yue; Starzl, Thomas E.; Todo, Satoru

    2010-01-01

    Mucosal injury caused by ischemia and reperfusion has been well documented with the small intestine, but little is known about the colon. In the present study, the effect of warm and cold ischemia on the canine colon was studied and compared to that on the small intestine. After in situ flushing, the small intestine and the colon from six beagle dogs were removed and stored for 0.5, 1.5, and 3 hr at 37°C (warm ischemia) or for 1, 6, 12, 24, 36, and 48 hr at 4°C (cold ischemia). Electrophysiology, permeability, biochemistry, and histopathology of the specimens at each ischemic period and after reperfusion in the Ussing chamber were determined. Warm and cold ischemia induced duration-dependent suppression of electrophysiology in both organs, but the colonic mucosa retained higher activity of absorptive enterocytes and cryptic cells than the small intestine. Only the colon showed increased permeability of FITC-conjugated Dextran from the mucosal surface to the submucosal layer after prolonged ischemia. Changes in adenine nucleotides and purine catabolites were not markedly different between the organs. Histopathologic abnormalities during ischemia and after reperfusion were more serious with the small intestine than with the colon. Compared to warm ischemia, hypothermia lessened or delayed these morphofunctional derangements in both organs, which became universally worsened after reperfusion. Colonic mucosa receives morphofunctional derangements from ischemia and reperfusion, but the severity of the damage was much less severe in the colon than in the small intestine. PMID:8606507

  1. Temperature Effects on the Wind Direction Measurement of 2D Solid Thermal Wind Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bei; Zhu, Yan-Qing; Yi, Zhenxiang; Qin, Ming; Huang, Qing-An

    2015-01-01

    For a two-dimensional solid silicon thermal wind sensor with symmetrical structure, the wind speed and direction information can be derived from the output voltages in two orthogonal directions, i.e., the north-south and east-west. However, the output voltages in these two directions will vary linearly with the ambient temperature. Therefore, in this paper, a temperature model to study the temperature effect on the wind direction measurement has been developed. A theoretical analysis has been presented first, and then Finite Element Method (FEM) simulations have been performed. It is found that due to symmetrical structure of the thermal wind sensor, the temperature effects on the output signals in the north-south and east-west directions are highly similar. As a result, the wind direction measurement of the thermal wind sensor is approximately independent of the ambient temperature. The experimental results fit the theoretical analysis and simulation results very well. PMID:26633398

  2. Direct and contextual effects of individual values on organizational citizenship behavior in teams.

    PubMed

    Arthaud-Day, Marne L; Rode, Joseph C; Turnley, William H

    2012-07-01

    The authors use Schwartz's values theory as an integrative framework for testing the relationship between individual values and peer-reported organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) in teams, controlling for sex, satisfaction, and personality traits. Using hierarchical linear modeling in a sample of 582 students distributed across 135 class project teams, the authors find positive, direct effects for achievement on citizenship behaviors directed toward individuals (OCB-I), for benevolence on citizenship behaviors directed toward the group (OCB-O), and for self-direction on both OCB-I and OCB-O. Applying relational demography techniques to test for contextual effects, the authors find that group mean power scores negatively moderate the relationship between individual power and OCB-I, whereas group mean self-direction scores positively moderate the relationship between self-direction and both OCB-I and OCB-O.

  3. Direct and contextual effects of individual values on organizational citizenship behavior in teams.

    PubMed

    Arthaud-Day, Marne L; Rode, Joseph C; Turnley, William H

    2012-07-01

    The authors use Schwartz's values theory as an integrative framework for testing the relationship between individual values and peer-reported organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) in teams, controlling for sex, satisfaction, and personality traits. Using hierarchical linear modeling in a sample of 582 students distributed across 135 class project teams, the authors find positive, direct effects for achievement on citizenship behaviors directed toward individuals (OCB-I), for benevolence on citizenship behaviors directed toward the group (OCB-O), and for self-direction on both OCB-I and OCB-O. Applying relational demography techniques to test for contextual effects, the authors find that group mean power scores negatively moderate the relationship between individual power and OCB-I, whereas group mean self-direction scores positively moderate the relationship between self-direction and both OCB-I and OCB-O. PMID:22369271

  4. New framework for analyzing the effects of small scale inhomogeneities in cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Stephen R.; Wald, Robert M.

    2011-04-01

    We develop a new, mathematically precise framework for treating the effects of nonlinear phenomena occurring on small scales in general relativity. Our approach is an adaptation of Burnett’s formulation of the shortwave approximation, which we generalize to analyze the effects of matter inhomogeneities as well as gravitational radiation. Our framework requires the metric to be close to a background metric, but allows arbitrarily large stress-energy fluctuations on small scales. We prove that, within our framework, if the matter stress-energy tensor satisfies the weak energy condition (i.e., positivity of energy density in all frames), then the only effect that small-scale inhomogeneities can have on the dynamics of the background metric is to provide an effective stress-energy tensor that is traceless and has positive energy density—corresponding to the presence of gravitational radiation. In particular, nonlinear effects produced by small-scale inhomogeneities cannot mimic the effects of dark energy. We also develop perturbation theory off of the background metric. We derive an equation for the long-wavelength part of the leading order deviation of the metric from the background metric, which contains the usual terms occurring in linearized perturbation theory plus additional contributions from the small-scale inhomogeneities. Under various assumptions concerning the absence of gravitational radiation and the nonrelativistic behavior of the matter, we argue that the short-wavelength deviations of the metric from the background metric near a point x should be accurately described by Newtonian gravity, taking into account only the matter lying within a homogeneity length scale of x. Finally, we argue that our framework should provide an accurate description of the actual universe.

  5. Motif analysis for small-number effects in chemical reaction dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Nen; Sughiyama, Yuki; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2016-09-01

    The number of molecules involved in a cell or subcellular structure is sometimes rather small. In this situation, ordinary macroscopic-level fluctuations can be overwhelmed by non-negligible large fluctuations, which results in drastic changes in chemical-reaction dynamics and statistics compared to those observed under a macroscopic system (i.e., with a large number of molecules). In order to understand how salient changes emerge from fluctuations in molecular number, we here quantitatively define small-number effect by focusing on a "mesoscopic" level, in which the concentration distribution is distinguishable both from micro- and macroscopic ones and propose a criterion for determining whether or not such an effect can emerge in a given chemical reaction network. Using the proposed criterion, we systematically derive a list of motifs of chemical reaction networks that can show small-number effects, which includes motifs showing emergence of the power law and the bimodal distribution observable in a mesoscopic regime with respect to molecule number. The list of motifs provided herein is helpful in the search for candidates of biochemical reactions with a small-number effect for possible biological functions, as well as for designing a reaction system whose behavior can change drastically depending on molecule number, rather than concentration.

  6. Motif analysis for small-number effects in chemical reaction dynamics.

    PubMed

    Saito, Nen; Sughiyama, Yuki; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2016-09-01

    The number of molecules involved in a cell or subcellular structure is sometimes rather small. In this situation, ordinary macroscopic-level fluctuations can be overwhelmed by non-negligible large fluctuations, which results in drastic changes in chemical-reaction dynamics and statistics compared to those observed under a macroscopic system (i.e., with a large number of molecules). In order to understand how salient changes emerge from fluctuations in molecular number, we here quantitatively define small-number effect by focusing on a "mesoscopic" level, in which the concentration distribution is distinguishable both from micro- and macroscopic ones and propose a criterion for determining whether or not such an effect can emerge in a given chemical reaction network. Using the proposed criterion, we systematically derive a list of motifs of chemical reaction networks that can show small-number effects, which includes motifs showing emergence of the power law and the bimodal distribution observable in a mesoscopic regime with respect to molecule number. The list of motifs provided herein is helpful in the search for candidates of biochemical reactions with a small-number effect for possible biological functions, as well as for designing a reaction system whose behavior can change drastically depending on molecule number, rather than concentration. PMID:27608993

  7. The Entrance and Exit Effects in Small Electrochemical Filter-Press Reactors Used in the Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frias-Ferrer, Angel; Gonzalez-Garcia, Jose; Saez, Veronica; Exposito, Eduardo; Sanchez-Sanchez, Carlos M.; Mantiel, Vicente; Walsh, Frank C.; Aldaz, Antonio; Walsh, Frank C.

    2005-01-01

    A laboratory experiment designed to examine the entrance and exit effects in small electrochemical filter-press reactors used in the laboratory is presented. The single compartment of the filter-press reactor is filled with different turbulence promoters to study their influence as compared to the empty configuration.

  8. A Small Group Model for Early Intervention in Literacy: Group Size and Program Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Homan, Susan; King, James R.; Hogarty, Kris

    Over the last 2 years, Accelerated Literacy Learning (ALL) has experimented with the small group model in early literacy intervention, with success comparable to that in one-to-one intervention. There can be little doubt that intervention provided to struggling readers is most effectively initiated at an early stage. The ALL program was conceived…

  9. Ambiguity and Communication Effects on Small Group Decision-Making Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salazar, Abran J.

    1996-01-01

    Notes that the literature of group studies is controversial and confusing on the effect of communicative variables on small-group decision making. Postulates that two classes of variables (homogeneity and task) moderate the relationship between group communication and group performance. Advances the ambiguity model to reconcile the contradictory…

  10. A Study of the Effectiveness of Learning Communities at a Small Liberal Arts College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watkins, Paul David

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the effectiveness of the learning community program at a small liberal arts college on educational outcomes as measured by differences in semester GPA between learning community participants and non-participants, as well as differences between types of learning communities, time of participation in…

  11. The Effects of Small Group Vocabulary Instruction on Second Grade Students' Expressive Vocabularies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fariss, Laura Lester

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of small group vocabulary instruction above and beyond whole group, read aloud vocabulary instruction, on second grade students' expressive vocabularies. This experimental study reflected a between-subjects design as three treatment groups were compared using a pretest, posttest within…

  12. Motif analysis for small-number effects in chemical reaction dynamics.

    PubMed

    Saito, Nen; Sughiyama, Yuki; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2016-09-01

    The number of molecules involved in a cell or subcellular structure is sometimes rather small. In this situation, ordinary macroscopic-level fluctuations can be overwhelmed by non-negligible large fluctuations, which results in drastic changes in chemical-reaction dynamics and statistics compared to those observed under a macroscopic system (i.e., with a large number of molecules). In order to understand how salient changes emerge from fluctuations in molecular number, we here quantitatively define small-number effect by focusing on a "mesoscopic" level, in which the concentration distribution is distinguishable both from micro- and macroscopic ones and propose a criterion for determining whether or not such an effect can emerge in a given chemical reaction network. Using the proposed criterion, we systematically derive a list of motifs of chemical reaction networks that can show small-number effects, which includes motifs showing emergence of the power law and the bimodal distribution observable in a mesoscopic regime with respect to molecule number. The list of motifs provided herein is helpful in the search for candidates of biochemical reactions with a small-number effect for possible biological functions, as well as for designing a reaction system whose behavior can change drastically depending on molecule number, rather than concentration.

  13. Cooperative Learning in Small Groups: Recent Methods and Effects on Achievement, Attitudes, and Ethnic Relations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharan, Shlomo

    1980-01-01

    Three peer tutoring methods and two group investigation approaches are examined for effects on academic achievement, students' attitudes, and ethnic relations. The five methods are: Jigsaw classroom (Aronson), Teams-Games-Tournaments (DeVries), Student Teams and Academic Division (Slavin), cooperative learning approach (Johnson), and small-group…

  14. An Experimental Analysis of the Effects of Reading Interventions in a Small Group Reading Instruction Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonfiglio, Christine M.; Daly, Edward J., III; Persampieri, Michael; Andersen, Melissa

    2006-01-01

    The current study examined the effects of several combinations of instructional and motivational interventions on oral reading fluency in the context of small group reading instruction. A treatment package consisting of acquisition, fluency, and motivational components was examined and then dismantled. Results were evaluated individually for each…

  15. Basic steps in establishing effective small group teaching sessions in medical schools.

    PubMed

    Meo, Sultan Ayoub

    2013-07-01

    Small-group teaching and learning has achieved an admirable position in medical education and has become more popular as a means of encouraging the students in their studies and enhance the process of deep learning. The main characteristics of small group teaching are active involvement of the learners in entire learning cycle and well defined task orientation with achievable specific aims and objectives in a given time period. The essential components in the development of an ideal small group teaching and learning sessions are preliminary considerations at departmental and institutional level including educational strategies, group composition, physical environment, existing resources, diagnosis of the needs, formulation of the objectives and suitable teaching outline. Small group teaching increases the student interest, teamwork ability, retention of knowledge and skills, enhance transfer of concepts to innovative issues, and improve the self-directed learning. It develops self-motivation, investigating the issues, allows the student to test their thinking and higher-order activities. It also facilitates an adult style of learning, acceptance of personal responsibility for own progress. Moreover, it enhances student-faculty and peer-peer interaction, improves communication skills and provides opportunity to share the responsibility and clarify the points of bafflement.

  16. Basic steps in establishing effective small group teaching sessions in medical schools.

    PubMed

    Meo, Sultan Ayoub

    2013-07-01

    Small-group teaching and learning has achieved an admirable position in medical education and has become more popular as a means of encouraging the students in their studies and enhance the process of deep learning. The main characteristics of small group teaching are active involvement of the learners in entire learning cycle and well defined task orientation with achievable specific aims and objectives in a given time period. The essential components in the development of an ideal small group teaching and learning sessions are preliminary considerations at departmental and institutional level including educational strategies, group composition, physical environment, existing resources, diagnosis of the needs, formulation of the objectives and suitable teaching outline. Small group teaching increases the student interest, teamwork ability, retention of knowledge and skills, enhance transfer of concepts to innovative issues, and improve the self-directed learning. It develops self-motivation, investigating the issues, allows the student to test their thinking and higher-order activities. It also facilitates an adult style of learning, acceptance of personal responsibility for own progress. Moreover, it enhances student-faculty and peer-peer interaction, improves communication skills and provides opportunity to share the responsibility and clarify the points of bafflement. PMID:24353692

  17. Basic steps in establishing effective small group teaching sessions in medical schools

    PubMed Central

    Meo, Sultan Ayoub

    2013-01-01

    Small-group teaching and learning has achieved an admirable position in medical education and has become more popular as a means of encouraging the students in their studies and enhance the process of deep learning. The main characteristics of small group teaching are active involvement of the learners in entire learning cycle and well defined task orientation with achievable specific aims and objectives in a given time period. The essential components in the development of an ideal small group teaching and learning sessions are preliminary considerations at departmental and institutional level including educational strategies, group composition, physical environment, existing resources, diagnosis of the needs, formulation of the objectives and suitable teaching outline. Small group teaching increases the student interest, teamwork ability, retention of knowledge and skills, enhance transfer of concepts to innovative issues, and improve the self-directed learning. It develops self-motivation, investigating the issues, allows the student to test their thinking and higher-order activities. It also facilitates an adult style of learning, acceptance of personal responsibility for own progress. Moreover, it enhances student-faculty and peer-peer interaction, improves communication skills and provides opportunity to share the responsibility and clarify the points of bafflement. PMID:24353692

  18. A new framework for analyzing the effects of small scale inhomogeneities in cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Stephen; Wald, Robert

    2011-04-01

    While the universe is spatially homogeneous and isotropic on large scales, it is extremely inhomogeneous on small scales, where fractional density perturbations can be much larger than one. With this in mind, several authors have proposed that, when properly averaged, non-linear terms in the Einstein equation can mimic Dark Energy. We present a non-vacuum generalization of the "short-wave approximation", which takes such large density fluctuations on short scales into account in a mathematically rigorous manner. We prove that if the stress energy tensor of matter satisfies the weak energy condition, then the zeroth order "effective stress energy tensor" associated with the small scale density and metric fluctuations must be trace-free and satisfy the weak energy condition as well. We conclude from this that small scale density inhomogeneities cannot account for the acceleration of the scale factor. However, at first order, we find that linearized cosmological perturbation theory can be corrected to include small but non-zero backreaction effects of small scale density inhomogeneities.

  19. The genetics of speciation: genes of small effect underlie sexual isolation in the Hawaiian cricket Laupala.

    PubMed

    Ellison, C K; Wiley, C; Shaw, K L

    2011-05-01

    Sexual behaviours often evolve rapidly and are critical for sexual isolation. We suggest that coordinated sexual signals and preferences generate stabilizing selection, favouring the accumulation of many small-effect mutations in sexual communication traits. Rapid radiation of a sexual behaviour used in signalling, song pulse rate, has been observed in the Hawaiian cricket genus Laupala. Using marker-assisted introgression, we isolated five known quantitative trait loci (QTL) influencing species-level differences in pulse rate from one species, L. paranigra, into a closely related species, L. kohalensis. All five QTL were found to have a significant effect on song and appear to be largely additive in backcross introgression lines. Furthermore, all effect sizes were small in magnitude. Our data provide support for the hypothesis that stabilizing selection on sexual signals in Laupala creates genetic conditions favourable to incremental divergence during speciation, through the evolution of alleles of minor rather than major phenotypic effects.

  20. Small polaron effect on carrier recombination in perovskite manganite thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, G.-R.; Sasaki, M.; Isa, T.; Negishi, H.; Inoue, M.; Gao, W.-X.; Xiong, G.-C.

    2001-05-01

    Photoinduced 'transient thermoelectric effect (TTE)' in perovskite manganite La 0.6Ca 0.4MnO 3 thin film has been measured under magnetic fields. The fast decay process of TTE signals is due to a recombination of photogenerated electron-hole pairs through Mn 4+ ions as capture centers, whose evaluated cross section σ obeys the power law σ∝ T- n ( n=0.75) in the ferromagnetic phase far below Tc and in the paramagnetic phase. From the observed relaxation time τ1, we evaluated the parameter α characterizing a small polaron effect and the effective mass m∗; both are enhanced appreciably near Tc. Such anomaly is attributed to the change in the thermal velocity of diffusing holes with downspin due to a small polaron effect.

  1. Effect of torch jet direction on combustion and performance of a prechamber spark-ignition engine

    SciTech Connect

    Ryu, H.; Chtsu, A.; Asanuma, T.

    1987-01-01

    To examine the effect of torch jet direction on the combustion characteristics and engine performances, a spark-ignition engine with each divided chamber having a torch nozzle of different flow direction is used by changing the torch nozzle area, prechamber volume and air-fuel ratio, while keeping the engine speed of 1000 rpm. Typical pressure diagrams for different torch jet directions are analyzed to obtain such combustion characteristics as the crank angles of combustion start and finish, heat release rate and mass burned fraction. The engine performances, e.g. mean effective pressure and specific fuel consumption, are also measured. As a result, it can be made clear not only the effect of torch jet direction on the combustion characteristics, but also the relationship between the combustion characteristics and the engine performances for different torch jet directions.

  2. Effects of psychological stress on small intestinal motility and bacteria and mucosa in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shao-Xuan; Wu, Wan-Chun

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of psychological stress on small intestinal motility and bacteria and mucosa in mice, and to explore the relationship between small intestinal dysfunction and small intestinal motility and bacteria and mucosa under psychological stress. METHODS: Sixty mice were randomly divided into psychological stress group and control group. Each group were subdivided into small intestinal motility group (n = 10), bacteria group (n = 10), and D-xylose administered to stomach group (n = 10). An animal model with psychological stress was established housing the mice with a hungry cat in separate layers of a two-layer cage. A semi-solid colored marker (carbon-ink) was used for monitoring small intestinal transit. The proximal small intestine was harvested under sterile condition and processed for quantitation for aerobes (Escherichia coli) and anaerobes (Lactobacilli). The quantitation of bacteria was expressed as log10(colony forming units/g). D-xylose levels in plasma were measured for estimating the damage of small intestinal mucosa. RESULTS: Small intestinal transit was inhibited (39.80±9.50% vs 58.79±11.47%, P<0.01) in mice after psychological stress, compared with the controls. Psychological stress resulted in quantitative alterations in the aerobes (E. coli). There was an increase in the number of E. coli in the proximal small intestinal flora (1.78±0.30 log10(CFU/g) vs 1.37±0.21 log10(CFU/g), P<0.01), and there was decrease in relative proportion of Lactobacilli and E. coli of stressed mice (0.53±0.63 vs 1.14±1.07, P<0.05), while there was no significant difference in the anaerobes (Lactobacilli) between the two groups (2.31±0.70 log10(CFU/g) vs 2.44±0.37 log10(CFU/g), P>0.05). D-xylose concentrations in plasma in psychological stress mice were significantly higher than those in the control group (2.90±0.89 mmol/L vs 0.97±0.33 mmol/L, P<0.01). CONCLUSION: Small intestinal dysfunction under psychological stress may be related to the

  3. Effects of casing treatment on a small, transonic axial-flow compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, F. F.; Kidwell, J. R.

    1975-01-01

    Improved axial compressor surge margin through effective rotor casing treatment has been identified from test results on large axial compressors. A modified scale of a large compressor was built and tested to determine if similar improvements in surge margin could be duplicated in small-size turbomachinery. In addition, the effects of rotor radial running clearance, both with and without casing treatment, were investigated and are discussed. Test results of the scale configuration are presented and compared to the parent compressor.

  4. Survey of antimicrobial effects of beef carcass intervention treatments in very small state-inspected slaughter plants.

    PubMed

    Algino, R J; Ingham, S C; Zhu, J

    2007-06-01

    U.S. beef slaughter facilities are required to use a carcass intervention treatment to reduce contamination by Escherichia coli O157:H7. Very small beef slaughter operators generally are unable to carry out challenge studies to validate intervention treatment effectiveness, and in-plant pathogen challenge studies are not permitted. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness, measured by decreases in generic E. coli, coliforms, Enterobacteriaceae, and aerobic plate count, of intervention treatments used at very small beef slaughter facilities in Wisconsin. Over a 9-mo period, 265 head of beef were sampled at 22 very small beef slaughter facilities before and after the intervention treatment. The interventions studied were dry-aging, low-pressure hot-water spray, high-pressure hot-water spray, 2.5% acetic acid spray, and Fresh Bloomtrade mark (a mix of citric acid, ascorbic acid, and erythorbic acid) spray. Sprays were applied using a hand-held nozzle (hot water) or a pump-type sprayer (acid). There was no significant difference (P > 0.10) between intervention treatments and all treatments caused significant reductions (P < 0.10) in indicator organisms. Ranges in average reductions for generic E. coli, coliforms, and Enterobacteriaceae among the treatments were 0.6 to 2.0 log CFU/cm(2), 0.7 to 2.2 log CFU/cm(2), and 0.4 to 2.2 log CFU/cm(2), respectively. For all treatments, rapid decreases in cooler temperature and relative humidity significantly affected indicator reduction, and for hot-water washing, increasing spray time led to significantly greater reductions. Further studies using actual or simulated very-small-plant intervention treatments directly against E. coli O157:H7 would provide additional validation of treatment efficacy. PMID:17995740

  5. Achieving Success in Small Business: A Self-Instruction Program for Small Business Owner-Managers. Improving Profits through Effective Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg. Div. of Vocational-Technical Education.

    This self-instructional module on improving profits through effective management is the seventh in a set of twelve modules designed for small business owner-managers. Competencies for this module are (1) apply planning and organizing skills in the operation of a business and (2) implement effective time management practices. Provided are…

  6. Effects of Positive Reframing and Paradoxical Directives in Counseling for Negative Emotions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraft, Robert G.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Explored the effects of two paradoxical directives on negative emotions. Subjects received either positive reframing or no reframing statements and either paradoxical or nonparadoxical directives. Positive reframing produced greater reduction in negative emotions than no reframing though negative emotions were reduced in all conditions. The two…

  7. Home-Career Conflict Reduction Revisited: The Effect of Experimental Directions on KOIS Scores for Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tittle, Carol Kehr; Denker, Elenor Rubin

    1976-01-01

    The effect of experimental directions designed to reduce a home-career conflict in women's occupational choices on the Kuder Occupational Interest Survey was investigated. Results indicate that the validity of the Kuder survey is not compromised by the experimental directions. Tables are presented and implications are discussed. (Author/JKS)

  8. Effect of hypokinesia on invertase activity of the mucosa of the small intestine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdusattarov, A.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of prolonged hypokinesia on the enzyme activity of the middle portion of the small intestine was investigated. Eighty-four mongrel white male rats weighing 170-180 g were divided into two equal groups. The experimental group were maintained in single cages under 30 days of hypokinetic conditions and the control animals were maintained under ordinary laboratory conditions. It is concluded that rates of invertase formation and its inclusion in the composition if the cellular membrane, if judged by the enzyme activity studied in sections of the small intestine, are subject to phase changes in the course of prolonged hypokinesia.

  9. The effects of small ice crystals on the infrared radiative properties of cirrus clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takano, Y.; Liou, K. N.; Asano, S.; Heymsfield, A.; Minnis, P.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of nonspherical small ice crystals on the IR radiative properties of cirrus clouds are investigated utilizing light scattering properties of spheroidal particles. Employing the anomalous diffraction theory for spheres and results from the exact spheroid scattering program, efficient parameterization equations are developed for calculations of the absorption and scattering properties for small ice crystals. Parameterization formulas are developed for large ice crystals employing results computed from the geometric ray-tracing method and the Fraunhofer diffraction theory for hexagonal crystals and spheroids.

  10. Hybrid graphs as a framework for the small-world effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, Katharina A.; Post, Hendrik D.; Kaufmann, Michael

    2006-05-01

    In this paper we formalize the small-world effect which describes the surprising fact that a hybrid graph composed of a local graph component and a very sparse random graph has a diameter of O(lnn) whereby the diameter of both components alone is much higher. We show that a large family of these hybrid graphs shows this effect and that this generalized family also includes classic small-world models proposed by various authors although not all of them are captured by the small-world definition given by Watts and Strogatz. Furthermore, we give a detailed upper bound of the hybrid’s graph diameter for different choices of the expected number of random edges by applying a new kind of proof pattern that is applicable to a large number of hybrid graphs. The focus in this paper is on presenting a flexible family of hybrid graphs showing the small-world effect that can be tuned closely to real-world systems.

  11. Effects of psychological stress on small intestinal motility and expression of cholecystokinin and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide in plasma and small intestine in mice

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Shu-Guang; Wu, Wan-Chun; Han, Zhen; Wang, Meng-Ya

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of psychological stress on small intestinal motility and expression of cholecystokinin (CCK) and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) in plasma and small intestine, and to explore the relationship between small intestinal motor disorders and gastrointestinal hormones under psychological stress. METHODS: Thirty-six mice were randomly divided into psychological stress group and control group. A mouse model with psychological stress was established by housing the mice with a hungry cat in separate layers of a two-layer cage. A semi-solid colored marker (carbon-ink) was used for monitoring small intestinal transit. CCK and VIP levels in plasma and small intestine in mice were measured by radioimmunoassay (RIA). RESULTS: Small intestinal transit was inhibited (52.18±19.15% vs 70.19±17.79%, P<0.01) in mice after psychological stress, compared to the controls. Small intestinal CCK levels in psychological stress mice were significantly lower than those in the control group (0.75±0.53 μg/g vs 1.98±1.17 μg/g, P<0.01), whereas plasma CCK concentrations were not different between the groups. VIP levels in small intestine were significantly higher in psychological stress mice than those in the control group (8.45±1.09 μg/g vs 7.03±2.36 μg/g, P<0.01), while there was no significant difference in plasma VIP levels between the two groups. CONCLUSION: Psychological stress inhibits the small intestinal transit, probably by down-regulating CCK and up-regulating VIP expression in small intestine. PMID:15655834

  12. Modelling Common Agricultural Policy-Water Framework Directive interactions and cost-effectiveness of measures to reduce nitrogen pollution.

    PubMed

    Mouratiadou, Ioanna; Russell, Graham; Topp, Cairistiona; Louhichi, Kamel; Moran, Dominic

    2010-01-01

    Selecting cost-effective measures to regulate agricultural water pollution to conform to the Water Framework Directive presents multiple challenges. A bio-economic modelling approach is presented that has been used to explore the water quality and economic effects of the 2003 Common Agricultural Policy Reform and to assess the cost-effectiveness of input quotas and emission standards against nitrate leaching, in a representative case study catchment in Scotland. The approach combines a biophysical model (NDICEA) with a mathematical programming model (FSSIM-MP). The results indicate only small changes due to the Reform, with the main changes in farmers' decision making and the associated economic and water quality indicators depending on crop price changes, and suggest the use of target fertilisation in relation to crop and soil requirements, as opposed to measures targeting farm total or average nitrogen use.

  13. [Comparison of cost-effectiveness between Urimem and direct freezing for urinary protein preservation].

    PubMed

    Wang, Mingming; Liu, Xuejiao; Jia, Lulu; Sun, Ying; Gao, Youhe; Li, Mingxi

    2014-07-01

    To compare two enrichment and preservation methods of urinary proteins, stored in polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) membrane (Urimem) or direct freezing, we examined the differences between the two methods in time, space, costs of supplies and electricity, degree of protein degradation and convenience of the sample handling. The urimem method is superior in the storage space, the cost of electricity and the clinical convenience compared to the direct freezing method. However, the direct freezing method is superior in the time and the cost of supplies to the urimem method. The enrichment and preservation of urinary proteins using urimem have more cost-effective benefits compared to those of the direct freezing method.

  14. The differential effects of brief exposures and surrounding contours on direct and indirect tilt illusions.

    PubMed

    Wenderoth, P; Johnstone, S

    1988-01-01

    Four experiments in which logarithmic intervals between 25 and 1600 ms were used for stimulus duration in tests for the tilt illusion are reported. It is demonstrated that the direct and the indirect tilt illusions both increase in magnitude inversely with length of stimulus presentation. The data suggest that whereas the direct effect peaks with a value of about +7 degrees at the shortest flash duration used (25 ms), peak indirect effects (of about +2 degrees) do not occur at this duration. In addition, whereas direct effects level out after 100 ms stimulus exposure times, to the usual magnitude obtained with long presentations (about +2 degrees), indirect effects reach their standard magnitude (-0.5 degrees to -1.0 degrees) later, at exposures of about 400 ms. Even at very short flash durations, a luminance square frame surrounding the illusion display reduces the indirect effect by two thirds of its magnitude but has no effect at all on the direct effect. It is suggested that direct effects arise early in visual processing, in area V1, where there are transient mechanisms and where corruption of orientation analysis by the inducing grating would occur prior to later, extrastriate, global analysis of the surrounding peripheral frame. Indirect effects, on the other hand, may arise later, along the sustained parvocellular colour-form pathway, where more global processing occurs and susceptibility to surrounding fields might be expected.

  15. Comparing the Effectiveness of Two Directive Styles in the Academic Counseling of Foreign Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merta, Rod J.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Examined effectiveness of two directive academic counseling styles (authoritative versus collaborative) on Asian foreign students' (n=50) ratings of peer counselor effectiveness. High-acculturated students rated authoritative peer counselors higher in overall effectiveness, whereas low-acculturated students rated collaborative peer counselors…

  16. Parental Involvement, Homework, and TV Time: Direct and Indirect Effects on High School Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keith, Timothy Z.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    A set of High School and Beyond data was used to study the effect of three variables on academic achievement. Homework had a positive effect, TV a negative, and parental involvement no direct effect on seniors' achievement scores, but influenced the amount of time students spent on homework. (Author/JAZ)

  17. Comparative effects of avoidance and vaccination in disease spread on a dynamic small-world network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, Thomas E.; Jones, Matthew M.; McKay, Susan R.

    2010-12-01

    Dynamic small-world contact networks have fixed short range links and time-varying stochastic long range links. They are used to model mobile populations or as minimal models for traditional small-world networks. Here we study the relative effects of vaccinations and avoidance of infected individuals in a susceptible-infected-recovered (SIR) epidemic model on a dynamic small-world network. We derive the critical mobility required for an outbreak to occur as a function of the disease’s infectivity, recovery rate, avoidance rate, and vaccination rate. We also derive an expression that allows us to calculate the amount of vaccination and/or avoidance necessary to prevent an epidemic. Calculated quantities show excellent agreement with simulations.

  18. Unsteady transonic small-disturbance theory including entropy and vorticity effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batina, John T.

    1988-01-01

    Modifications to unsteady transonic small disturbance theory to include entropy and vorticity effects are presented. The modifications were implemented in the CAP-TSD (Computational Aeroelasticity Program - Transonic Small Disturbance) code. The code permits the aeroelastic analysis of complete aircraft configurations in the flutter critical transonic speed range. Entropy and vorticity effects were incorporated within the solution procedure to more accurately analyze flows with strong shock waves. The modified code includes these effects while retaining the relative simplicity and cost efficiency of the TSD formulation. Detailed descriptions are presented of the entropy and vorticity modifications along with calculated results and comparisons which assess the modified theory. These results are in good agreement with parallel Euler calculations and with experimental data. Therefore, the present method now provides the aeroelastician with an affordable capability to analyze relatively difficult transonic flows without having to solve the computationally more expensive Euler equations.

  19. Unsteady transonic small-disturbance theory including entropy and vorticity effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batina, John T.

    1988-01-01

    Modifications to unsteady transonic small-disturbance theory to include entropy and vorticity effects are presented. The modifications have been implemented in the CAP-TSD (Computational Aeroelasticity Program - Transonic Small Disturbance) code developed recently at the NASA Langley Research Center. The code permits the aeroelastic analysis of complete aircraft configurations in the flutter critical transonic speed range. Entropy and vorticity effects have been incorporated within the solution procedure to more accurately analyze flows with strong shock waves. The modified code includes these effects while retaining the relative simplicity and cost efficiency of the TSD formulation. The paper presents detailed descriptions of the entropy and vorticity modifications along with calculated results and comparisons which assess the modified theory. These results are in good agreement with parallel Euler calculations and with experimental data. Therefore, the present method now provides the aeroelastician with an affordable capability to analyze relatively difficult transonic flows without having to solve the computationally more expensive Euler equations.

  20. The clinical utility of PD-L1 testing in selecting non-small cell lung cancer patients for PD1/PD-L1-directed therapy.

    PubMed

    Villaruz, L C; Socinski, M A

    2016-09-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality in the United States and worldwide. Long thought to be nonimmunogenic, immunotherapy in lung cancer has historically been met with disappointing results. Programmed death-1 (PD-1), and the PD-1 ligand, PD-L1, are immune checkpoint proteins that fine-tune the antigen-specific T-cell response after stimulation of the T-cell receptor and are crucial for self-tolerance. This pathway in particular is co-opted by tumors through expression of PD-L1 on the tumor cell surface and within the tumor microenvironment, allowing for direct suppression of antitumor cytolytic T-cell activity by the tumor. Indeed, induction of the PD1/PD-L1 pathway represents an adaptive immune resistance mechanism exerted by tumor cells in response to endogenous antitumor activity. In 2015, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved two immuno-oncology agents, the PD-1 inhibitors nivolumab and pembrolizumab, for the treatment of previously treated advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Coincident with the clinical trials that led to these regulatory approvals has been the development of several immunohistochemistry (IHC) tests of PD-L1 expression, which may serve to select patients who will derive the most benefit from PD1- or PD-L1-directed therapy. The PD-L1 IHC assays are distinct in their methods and interpretation, which poses a challenge to clinicians selecting patients for these therapies.

  1. Cerebral Small Vessel Disease and Arterial Stiffness: Tsunami Effect in the Brain?

    PubMed Central

    Saji, Naoki; Toba, Kenji; Sakurai, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Background Cerebral small vessel diseases, including silent lacunar infarcts, white matter hyperintensities, and microbleeds, pose a risk for cerebrovascular disease, cognitive impairment, and the geriatric syndrome via effects on arterial stiffness. However, the vascular, physiological, and metabolic roles of arterial stiffness in cerebral small vessel diseases remain unclear. Summary Arterial stiffness can be assessed using various indicators such as the ankle-brachial index, pulse wave velocity, cardio-ankle vascular index, and augmentation index. Arterial stiffness is independently associated with all components of cerebral small vessel disease including silent lacunar infarcts, white matter hyperintensities, and microbleeds, although there are some methodological differences between the various surrogate markers. Evidence of arterial stiffness indicates microvessel arteriosclerosis presenting with vascular endothelial dysfunction. Further, vascular narrowing due to atherosclerosis and vascular stiffness due to lipohyalinosis can accelerate the pulse waves. This hemodynamic stress, pulsatile pressure, or blood pressure variability can cause a ‘tsunami effect’ towards the cerebral parenchyma and lead to cerebral small vessel disease. Previous studies have shown that silent lacunar infarcts and white matter hyperintensities are strongly associated with arterial stiffness. However, the association between microbleeds and arterial stiffness remains controversial, as there are two vessel mechanisms related to microbleeds: cerebral amyloid angiopathy and hypertensive small vessel disease. Key Messages Cerebral small vessel disease with associated arterial stiffness is a risk factor for silent cerebral lesions, stroke, and cognitive impairment. Improvement of the living environment, management of risk factors, and innovation and development of novel drugs that improve arterial stiffness may suppress the progression of cerebral small vessel disease, and may reduce

  2. Enhanced brain small-worldness after sleep deprivation: a compensatory effect.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huan; Li, Hong; Wang, Yulin; Lei, Xu

    2014-10-01

    Sleep deprivation has a variable impact on extrinsic activities during multiple cognitive tasks, especially on mood and emotion processing. There is also a trait-like individual vulnerability or compensatory effect in cognition. Previous studies have elucidated the altered functional connectivity after sleep deprivation. However, it remains unclear whether the small-world properties of resting-state network are sensitive to sleep deprivation. A small-world network is a type of graph that combines a high local connectivity as well as a few long-range connections, which ensures a higher information-processing efficiency at a low cost. The complex network of the brain can be described as a small-world network, in which a node is a brain region and an edge is present when there is a functional correlation between two nodes. Here, we investigated the topological properties of the human brain networks of 22 healthy subjects under sufficient sleep and sleep-deprived conditions. Specifically, small-worldness is utilized to quantify the small-world property, by comparing the clustering coefficient and path length of a given network to an equivalent random network with same degree distribution. After sufficient sleep, the brain networks showed the property of small-worldness. Compared with the resting state under sufficient sleep, the small-world property was significantly enhanced in the sleep deprivation condition, suggesting a possible compensatory adaptation of the human brain. Specifically, the altered measurements were correlated with the neuroticism of subjects, indicating that individuals with low-levels of neuroticism are more resilient to sleep deprivation.

  3. Theory of the Effects of Small Gravitational Levels on Droplet Gasification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beitelmal, A.; Shaw, B. D.

    1995-01-01

    A mathematical model taking into account small (and constant) gravitational levels is developed for vaporization of an isolated liquid droplet suspended in a stagnant atmosphere. A goal of the present analysis is to see how small gravitational levels affect droplet gasification characteristics. Attention is focused upon determining the effects on gas-phase phenomena. The conservation equations arc normalized and nondimensionalized, and a small parameter that accounts for the effects of gravity is identified. This parameter is the square of the inverse of a Froude number based on the gravitational acceleration, the droplet radius, and a characteristic gas-phase velocity at the droplet surface. Asymptotic analyses are developed in terms of this parameter. In the analyses, different spatial regions are identified. Near a droplet, gravitational effects are negligible in the first approximation, and the flowfield is spherically symmetric to the leading order. Analysis shows, however, that outer zones exist where gravitational effects cannot be neglected; it is expected that a stagnation point will be present in an outer zone that is not present when gravity is totally absent. The leading order and higher-order differential equations for each zone are derived and solved. The solutions allow the effects of gravity on vaporization rates and temperature, velocity and species fields to be determined.

  4. The effects of land use change and precipitation change on direct runoff in Wei River watershed, China.

    PubMed

    Dong, Leihua; Xiong, Lihua; Lall, Upmanu; Wang, Jiwu

    2015-01-01

    The principles and degrees to which land use change and climate change affect direct runoff generation are distinctive. In this paper, based on the MODIS data of land use in 1992 and 2003, the impacts of land use and climate change are explored using the Soil Conservation Service Curve Number (SCS-CN) method under two defined scenarios. In the first scenario, the precipitation is assumed to be constant, and thus the consequence of land use change could be evaluated. In the second scenario, the condition of land use is assumed to be constant, so the influence only induced by climate change could be assessed. Combining the conclusions of two scenarios, the effects of land use and climate change on direct runoff volume can be separated. At last, it is concluded: for the study basin, the land use types which have the greatest effect on direct runoff generation are agricultural land and water body. For the big sub basins, the effect of land use change is generally larger than that of climate change; for middle and small sub basins, most of them suffer more from land use change than from climate change. PMID:25633954

  5. The effects of land use change and precipitation change on direct runoff in Wei River watershed, China.

    PubMed

    Dong, Leihua; Xiong, Lihua; Lall, Upmanu; Wang, Jiwu

    2015-01-01

    The principles and degrees to which land use change and climate change affect direct runoff generation are distinctive. In this paper, based on the MODIS data of land use in 1992 and 2003, the impacts of land use and climate change are explored using the Soil Conservation Service Curve Number (SCS-CN) method under two defined scenarios. In the first scenario, the precipitation is assumed to be constant, and thus the consequence of land use change could be evaluated. In the second scenario, the condition of land use is assumed to be constant, so the influence only induced by climate change could be assessed. Combining the conclusions of two scenarios, the effects of land use and climate change on direct runoff volume can be separated. At last, it is concluded: for the study basin, the land use types which have the greatest effect on direct runoff generation are agricultural land and water body. For the big sub basins, the effect of land use change is generally larger than that of climate change; for middle and small sub basins, most of them suffer more from land use change than from climate change.

  6. Effect of downed woody debris on small mammal anti-predator behavior.

    SciTech Connect

    Hinkleman, Travis, M.; Orrock, John, L.; Loeb, Susan, C.

    2011-10-01

    Anti-predator behavior can affect prey growth, reproduction, survival, and generate emergent effects in food webs. Small mammals often lower the cost of predation by altering their behavior in response to shrubs,but the importance of other microhabitat features, such as downed woody debris, for anti-predator behavior is unknown. We used givingup densities to quantify the degree to which downed woody debris alters perceived predation risk by small mammals in southeastern pineforests. We placed 14 foraging trays next to large downed woody debris,shrubs, and in open areas for 12 consecutive nights. Moon illumination, a common indicator of predation risk, led to a similar reduction in small mammal foraging in all three microhabitats (open, downed woody debris,and shrub). Small mammals perceived open microhabitats as riskier than shrub microhabitats, with downed woody debris habitats perceived as being of intermediate risk between shrub and open microhabitats. Despite the presumed benefits of the protective cover of downed woody debris, small mammals may perceive downed woody debris as a relatively risky foraging site in southeastern pine forests where the high diversity and abundance of rodent-eating snakes may provide a primary predatory threat.

  7. Effects of dietary pectin and fat on the small intestinal contents and exocrine pancreas of rats.

    PubMed

    Forman, L P; Schneeman, B O

    1980-10-01

    The effects of dietary pectin and fat level on digestive enzyme activities in the pancreas and small intestine and on intestinal bile acid levels were investigated. In unfed rats, dietary pectin did not influence the pancreatic enzymes studied, but a higher level of corn oil in the diet lowered the amylase activity in the pancreas, increased pancreatic lipase activity and slightly lowered the chymotrypsin and trypsin activities. Diet did not change the dry weight of the pancreas. In the fed rats, dietary pectin increased the dry weight of the small gut wash plus the mucosal scraping. Dietary pectin increased the small intestinal lipase and chymotrypsin levels and at the low level of fat only, increased amylase and trypsin activities in the small intestine of fed rats. Intestinal lipase levels were higher and amylase levels lower in rats consuming the high level of corn oil. These results indicate that changes in dietary fat level led to changes in the amylase and lipase content of secreted pancreatic juice and that differences in absorption associated with diets containing pectin could be the result of increased material in the small intestine.

  8. Aminoguanidine Alleviates Radiation-Induced Small-Bowel Damage Through Its Antioxidant Effect

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, E.-Y.; Wang, F.-S.; Lin, I-H.; Yang, Kuender D.

    2009-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect and its mechanism of aminoguanidine (AG) on small-bowel protection after whole-abdominal irradiation (WAI) in rats. Methods and Materials: Male Sprague-Dawley rats (300-400 g) subjected to 12 Gy WAI were used for the study. Aminoguanidine at a dose of 50-800 mg/kg was administered by the gavage route 2 h before WAI. Mucosal damage of small bowel was evaluated by the grade of diarrhea and crypt survival; oxidative stress was determined by the level of 8-hydroxy 2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) with immunohistochemistry (IHC). Nitrosative stress was evaluated by the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT) with IHC, and systemic and portal vein NOx (nitrite + nitrate) levels were measured and compared with and without AG treatment after WAI. Results: Aminoguanidine showed a dose-dependent effect against WAI-induced diarrhea. Aminoguanidine at a dose of 400 mg/kg had the best protective effect, from 92% to 17% (p = 0.002). Aminoguanidine increased crypt survival from 23% to 46% (p = 0.003). It also significantly attenuated 8-OHdG expression but not 3-NT and iNOS expression at both 4 and 8 h after 12-Gy WAI. Aminoguanidine did not alter the portal vein NOx levels 4 and 8 h after 12-Gy WAI. Conclusion: Aminoguanidine has a radioprotective effect against radiation-induced small-bowel damage due to its antioxidant effect but not inhibition of nitric oxide production. Dietary AG may have a potentially protective effect on the small intestine of patients subjected to pelvic and abdominal radiotherapies.

  9. The effect of poverty and social protection on national homicide rates: Direct and moderating effects.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Meghan L; Pridemore, William Alex

    2013-05-01

    Social protection is the ability of a government to insulate its citizens from the problems associated with poverty and market forces that negatively affect their quality of life. Prior research shows that government policies that provide social protection moderate the influence of inequality on national homicide rates. Recent research, however, reveals a strong association between poverty and national homicide rates. Further, theory and evidence suggest that social protection policies are meant to aid in providing a subsistence level of living, and thus to alleviate the vagaries of poverty not inequality. To this point, however, no studies have examined the potentially moderating effect of social protection on the strength of the association between poverty and homicide rates cross-nationally. We do so in the present study. Employing data for the year 2004 from a sample of 30 nations, we estimate a series of weighted least squares regression models to test three hypotheses: the association between poverty and homicide will remain significant and positive when controlling for social protection, social protection will have a significant negative direct effect on national homicide rates, and social protection will diminish the strength of the poverty-homicide association. The results provided evidence supporting all three hypotheses. We situate our findings in the cross-national empirical literature on social structure and homicide and discuss our results in the theoretical context of social protection.

  10. Effects of normal mode loss in dielectric waveguide directional couplers and interferometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youngquist, R. C.; Stokes, L. F.; Shaw, H. J.

    1983-12-01

    Theoretical arguments and experimental evidence are presented to show that the two fundamental normal modes of a coupled waveguide structure have different attenuations in traversing such a structure. The effects of this phenomenon on evanescent wave directional counters and interferometers are derived. Parasitic effects in Mach-Zehnder and Sagnac interferometers utilizing directional couplers are described. An asymmetric output for the recently demonstrated all-single-mode fiber resonator is predicted and compared to experimental results. Some qualitative results are presented for integrated optic directional coupler switches.

  11. Perception of stereoscopic direct gaze: The effects of interaxial distance and emotional facial expressions.

    PubMed

    Hakala, Jussi; Kätsyri, Jari; Takala, Tapio; Häkkinen, Jukka

    2016-07-01

    Gaze perception has received considerable research attention due to its importance in social interaction. The majority of recent studies have utilized monoscopic pictorial gaze stimuli. However, a monoscopic direct gaze differs from a live or stereoscopic gaze. In the monoscopic condition, both eyes of the observer receive a direct gaze, whereas in live and stereoscopic conditions, only one eye receives a direct gaze. In the present study, we examined the implications of the difference between monoscopic and stereoscopic direct gaze. Moreover, because research has shown that stereoscopy affects the emotions elicited by facial expressions, and facial expressions affect the range of directions where an observer perceives mutual gaze-the cone of gaze-we studied the interaction effect of stereoscopy and facial expressions on gaze perception. Forty observers viewed stereoscopic images wherein one eye of the observer received a direct gaze while the other eye received a horizontally averted gaze at five different angles corresponding to five interaxial distances between the cameras in stimulus acquisition. In addition to monoscopic and stereoscopic conditions, the stimuli included neutral, angry, and happy facial expressions. The observers judged the gaze direction and mutual gaze of four lookers. Our results show that the mean of the directions received by the left and right eyes approximated the perceived gaze direction in the stereoscopic semidirect gaze condition. The probability of perceiving mutual gaze in the stereoscopic condition was substantially lower compared with monoscopic direct gaze. Furthermore, stereoscopic semidirect gaze significantly widened the cone of gaze for happy facial expressions.

  12. Small molecule-directed specification of sclerotome-like chondroprogenitors and induction of a somitic chondrogenesis program from embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jiangang; Li, Songhui; Trilok, Suprita; Tanaka, Makoto; Jokubaitis-Jameson, Vanta; Wang, Bei; Niwa, Hitoshi; Nakayama, Naoki

    2014-10-01

    Pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESCs) generate rostral paraxial mesoderm-like progeny in 5-6 days of differentiation induced by Wnt3a and Noggin (Nog). We report that canonical Wnt signaling introduced either by forced expression of activated β-catenin, or the small-molecule inhibitor of Gsk3, CHIR99021, satisfied the need for Wnt3a signaling, and that the small-molecule inhibitor of BMP type I receptors, LDN193189, was able to replace Nog. Mesodermal progeny generated using such small molecules were chondrogenic in vitro, and expressed trunk paraxial mesoderm markers such as Tcf15 and Meox1, and somite markers such as Uncx, but failed to express sclerotome markers such as Pax1. Induction of the osteochondrogenically committed sclerotome from somite requires sonic hedgehog and Nog. Consistently, Pax1 and Bapx1 expression was induced when the isolated paraxial mesodermal progeny were treated with SAG1 (a hedgehog receptor agonist) and LDN193189, then Sox9 expression was induced, leading to cartilaginous nodules and particles in the presence of BMP, indicative of chondrogenesis via sclerotome specification. By contrast, treatment with TGFβ also supported chondrogenesis and stimulated Sox9 expression, but failed to induce the expression of Pax1 and Bapx1. On ectopic transplantation to immunocompromised mice, the cartilage particles developed under either condition became similarly mineralized and formed pieces of bone with marrow. Thus, the use of small molecules led to the effective generation from ESCs of paraxial mesodermal progeny, and to their further differentiation in vitro through sclerotome specification into growth plate-like chondrocytes, a mechanism resembling in vivo somitic chondrogenesis that is not recapitulated with TGFβ. PMID:25294938

  13. The small length scale effect for a non-local cantilever beam: a paradox solved.

    PubMed

    Challamel, N; Wang, C M

    2008-08-27

    Non-local continuum mechanics allows one to account for the small length scale effect that becomes significant when dealing with microstructures or nanostructures. This paper presents some simplified non-local elastic beam models, for the bending analyses of small scale rods. Integral-type or gradient non-local models abandon the classical assumption of locality, and admit that stress depends not only on the strain value at that point but also on the strain values of all points on the body. There is a paradox still unresolved at this stage: some bending solutions of integral-based non-local elastic beams have been found to be identical to the classical (local) solution, i.e. the small scale effect is not present at all. One example is the Euler-Bernoulli cantilever nanobeam model with a point load which has application in microelectromechanical systems and nanoelectromechanical systems as an actuator. In this paper, it will be shown that this paradox may be overcome with a gradient elastic model as well as an integral non-local elastic model that is based on combining the local and the non-local curvatures in the constitutive elastic relation. The latter model comprises the classical gradient model and Eringen's integral model, and its application produces small length scale terms in the non-local elastic cantilever beam solution. PMID:21730658

  14. Modelling the influence of small-scale effects upon the larger scale: an oceanographic challenge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Alan M.; Jones, John Eric; Xing, Jiuxing

    2010-08-01

    The problem of resolving or parameterising small-scale processes in oceanographic models and the extent to which small-scale effects influence the large scale are briefly discussed and illustrated for a number of cases. For tides and surges in near-shore regions, the advantages of using a graded mesh to resolve coastal and estuarine small-scale features are demonstrated in terms of a west coast of Britain unstructured mesh model. The effect of mesh resolution upon the accuracy of the overall solution is illustrated in terms of a finite element model of the Irish Sea and Mersey estuary. For baroclinic motion at high Froude number, the effect of resolving small-scale topography within a non-hydrostatic model is illustrated in terms of tidally induced mixing at a single sill, or two closely spaced sills. The question of how to parameterise small-scale non-linear interaction processes that lead to significant mixing, in a form suitable for coarser grid hydrostatic models, is briefly considered. In addition, the importance of topographically induced mixing that occurs in the oceanic lateral boundary layer, namely, the shelf edge upon the large-scale ocean circulation is discussed together with the implications for coarse grid oceanic climate models. The use of unstructured grids in these models to enhance resolution in shelf-edge regions in a similar manner to that used in storm surge models to enhance near coastal resolution is suggested as a suitable “way forward” in large-scale ocean circulation modelling.

  15. Direct radiative effect modeled for regional aerosols in central Europe including the effect of relative humidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iorga, G.; Hitzenberger, R.; Kasper-Giebl, A.; Puxbaum, Hans

    2007-01-01

    In view of both the climatic relevance of aerosols and the fact that aerosol burdens in central Europe are heavily impacted by anthropogenic sources, this study is focused on estimating the regional-scale direct radiative effect of aerosols in Austria. The aerosol data (over 80 samples in total) were collected during measurement campaigns at five sampling sites: the urban areas of Vienna, Linz, and Graz and on Mt. Rax (1644 m, regional background aerosol) and Mt. Sonnblick (3106 m, background aerosol). Aerosol mass size distributions were obtained with eight-stage (size range: 0.06-16 μm diameter) and six-stage (size range 0.1-10 μm) low-pressure cascade impactors. The size-segregated samples were analyzed for total carbon (TC), black carbon (BC), and inorganic ions. The aerosol at these five locations is compared in terms of size distributions, optical properties, and direct forcing. Mie calculations are performed for the dry aerosol at 60 wavelengths in the range 0.3-40 μm. Using mass growth factors determined earlier, the optical properties are also estimated for higher relative humidities (60%, 70%, 80%, and 90%). A box model was used to estimate direct radiative forcing (DRF). The presence of absorbing species (BC) was found to reduce the cooling effect of the aerosols. The water-soluble substances dominate radiative forcing at the urban sites, while on Rax and Sonnblick BC plays the most important role. This result can be explained by the effect of the surface albedo, which is much lower in the urban regions (0.16) than at the ice and snow-covered mountain sites. Shortwave (below 4 μm) and longwave surface albedo values for ice were 0.35 and 0.5, while for snow surface albedo, values of 0.8 (shortwave) and 0.5 (longwave) were used. In the case of dry aerosol, especially for urban sites, the unidentified material may contribute a large part to the forcing. Depending on the sampling site the estimated forcing gets more negative with increasing humidity

  16. ASSESSMENT OF SUBUNIT-DEPENDENT DIRECT GATING AND ALLOSTERIC MODULATORY EFFECTS OF CARISOPRODOL AT GABAA RECEPTORS

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Manoj; González, Lorie A.; Dillon, Glenn H.

    2016-01-01

    Carisoprodol is a widely prescribed muscle relaxant, abuse of which has grown considerably in recent years. It directly activates and allosterically modulates α1β2γ2 GABAARs, although the site(s) of action are unknown. To gain insight into the actions of carisoprodol, subunit-dependent effects of this drug were assessed. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings were obtained from HEK293 cells expressing α1β2, α1β3 or αxβzγ2 (where x = 1–6 and z = 1–3) GABAARs, and in receptors incorporating the δ subunit (modeling extrasynaptic receptors). The ability to directly gate and allosterically potentiate GABA-gated currents was observed for all configurations. Presence or absence of the γ2 subunit did not affect the ability of carisoprodol to directly gate or allosterically modulate the receptor. Presence of the β1 subunit conferred highest efficacy for direct activation relative to maximum GABA currents, while presence of the β2 subunit conferred highest efficacy for allosteric modulation of the GABA response. With regard to α subunits, carisoprodol was most efficacious at enhancing the actions of GABA in receptors incorporating the α1 subunit. The ability to directly gate the receptor was generally comparable regardless of the α subunit isoform, although receptors incorporating the α3 subunit showed significantly reduced direct gating efficacy and affinity. In extrasynaptic (α1β3δ and α4β3δ) receptors, carisoprodol had greater efficacy than GABA as a direct gating agonist. In addition, carisoprodol allosterically potentiated both EC20 and saturating GABA concentrations in these receptors. In assessing voltage-dependence, we found direct gating and inhibitory effects were insensitive to membrane voltage, whereas allosteric modulatory effects were affected by membrane voltage. Our findings demonstrate direct and allosteric effects of carisoprodol at synaptic and extrasynpatic GABAARs and that subunit isoform influences these effects. PMID:25896767

  17. Reliance on small samples, the wavy recency effect, and similarity-based learning.

    PubMed

    Plonsky, Ori; Teodorescu, Kinneret; Erev, Ido

    2015-10-01

    Many behavioral phenomena, including underweighting of rare events and probability matching, can be the product of a tendency to rely on small samples of experiences. Why would small samples be used, and which experiences are likely to be included in these samples? Previous studies suggest that a cognitively efficient reliance on the most recent experiences can be very effective. We explore a very different and more cognitively demanding process explaining the tendency to rely on small samples: exploitation of environmental regularities. The first part of our study shows that across wide classes of dynamic binary choice environments, focusing only on experiences that followed the same sequence of outcomes preceding the current task is more effective than focusing on the most recent experiences. The second part of our study examines the psychological significance of these sequence-based rules. It shows that these tractable rules reproduce well-known indications of sensitivity to sequences and predict a nontrivial wavy recency effect of rare events. Analysis of published data supports this wavy recency prediction, but suggests an even wavier effect than these sequence-based rules predict. This pattern, and the main behavioral phenomena documented in basic decisions from experience and probability learning tasks, can be captured with a similarity-based model assuming that people follow sequences of outcomes most of the time but sometimes respond to trends. We conclude with theoretical notes on similarity-based learning. PMID:26075914

  18. Reliance on small samples, the wavy recency effect, and similarity-based learning.

    PubMed

    Plonsky, Ori; Teodorescu, Kinneret; Erev, Ido

    2015-10-01

    Many behavioral phenomena, including underweighting of rare events and probability matching, can be the product of a tendency to rely on small samples of experiences. Why would small samples be used, and which experiences are likely to be included in these samples? Previous studies suggest that a cognitively efficient reliance on the most recent experiences can be very effective. We explore a very different and more cognitively demanding process explaining the tendency to rely on small samples: exploitation of environmental regularities. The first part of our study shows that across wide classes of dynamic binary choice environments, focusing only on experiences that followed the same sequence of outcomes preceding the current task is more effective than focusing on the most recent experiences. The second part of our study examines the psychological significance of these sequence-based rules. It shows that these tractable rules reproduce well-known indications of sensitivity to sequences and predict a nontrivial wavy recency effect of rare events. Analysis of published data supports this wavy recency prediction, but suggests an even wavier effect than these sequence-based rules predict. This pattern, and the main behavioral phenomena documented in basic decisions from experience and probability learning tasks, can be captured with a similarity-based model assuming that people follow sequences of outcomes most of the time but sometimes respond to trends. We conclude with theoretical notes on similarity-based learning.

  19. Evolution in response to direct and indirect ecological effects in pitcher plant inquiline communities.

    PubMed

    terHorst, Casey P

    2010-12-01

    Ecologists have long recognized the importance of indirect ecological effects on species abundances, coexistence, and diversity. However, the evolutionary consequences of indirect interactions are rarely considered. Here I conduct selection experiments and examine the evolutionary response of Colpoda sp., a ciliated protozoan, to other members of the inquiline community of purple pitcher plants (Sarracenia purpurea). I measured the evolution of six traits in response to (1) predation by mosquito larvae, (2) competition from other ciliated protozoans, and (3) simultaneous predation and competition. The latter treatment incorporated both direct effects and indirect effects due to interactions between predators and competitors. Population growth rate and cell size evolved in response to direct effects of predators and competitors. However, trait values in the multispecies treatment were similar to those in the monoculture treatment, indicating that direct effects were offset by strong indirect effects on the evolution of traits. For most of the traits measured, indirect effects were opposed to, and often stronger than, direct effects. These indirect effects occurred as a result of behavioral changes of the predator in the presence of competitors and as a result of reduced densities of competitors in the presence of predators. Incorporating indirect effects provides a more realistic description of how species evolve in complex natural communities.

  20. Interpolated task effects on direct and mediated false recognition: effects of initial recall, recognition, and the ironic effect of guessing.

    PubMed

    Huff, Mark J; Coane, Jennifer H; Hutchison, Keith A; Grasser, Elisabeth B; Blais, Jessica E

    2012-11-01

    In two experiments, participants studied two types of word lists. Direct lists were taken from the Deese-Roediger-McDermott (DRM) paradigm (e.g., water, bridge, run) and contained words directly related to a nonpresented critical item (CI; e.g., river, Roediger & McDermott, 1995). Mediated lists (e.g., faucet, London, jog) contained words related to the CI through a nonpresented mediator. After each study list, participants completed either a recall test, a recall test with a warning about the CI, arithmetic problems, or a recognition test, or they guessed the CI. On a final recognition test, both warning and guessing decreased direct false recognition but increased mediated false recognition, an ironic effect of guessing. An initial recognition test also increased final mediated false recognition. We argue that warning and guessing tasks strengthened associative pathways to the CI, increased the accessibility of associated mediators, and increased monitoring for the CI at test. Increased monitoring was able to reduce CIs from direct, but not mediated, lists.

  1. Direct and indirect trophic effects of predator depletion on basal trophic levels.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huili; Hagerty, Steven; Crotty, Sinead M; Bertness, Mark D

    2016-02-01

    Human population growth and development have heavily degraded coastal ecosystems with cascading impacts across multiple trophic levels. Understanding both the direct and indirect trophic effects of human activities is important for coastal conservation. In New England, recreational overfishing has triggered a regional trophic cascade. Predator depletion releases the herbivorous purple marsh crab from consumer control and leads to overgrazing of marsh cordgrass and salt marsh die-off. The direct and indirect trophic effects of predator depletion on basal trophic levels, however, are not understood. Using observational and experimental data, we examined the hypotheses that (1) direct trophic effects of predator depletion decrease meiofaunal abundance by releasing deposit feeding fiddler crabs from consumer control, and/or (2) indirect trophic effects of predator depletion increase meiofaunal abundance by releasing blue carbon via the erosion of centuries of accreted marsh peat. Experimental deposit feeder removal led to 23% higher meiofaunal density at die-off than at healthy sites, while reciprocally transplanting sediment from die-off and healthy sites revealed that carbon-rich die-off sediment increased meiofauna density by over 164%: six times stronger than direct trophic effects. Recovering sites had both carbon-rich sediment and reduced deposit feeding leading to higher meiofauna densities than both die-off and healthy sites. This suggests that consequences of the trophic downgrading of coastal habitats can be driven by both direct and indirect trophic mechanisms that may vary in direction and magnitude, making their elucidation dependent on experimental manipulations. PMID:27145609

  2. Direct and indirect trophic effects of predator depletion on basal trophic levels.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huili; Hagerty, Steven; Crotty, Sinead M; Bertness, Mark D

    2016-02-01

    Human population growth and development have heavily degraded coastal ecosystems with cascading impacts across multiple trophic levels. Understanding both the direct and indirect trophic effects of human activities is important for coastal conservation. In New England, recreational overfishing has triggered a regional trophic cascade. Predator depletion releases the herbivorous purple marsh crab from consumer control and leads to overgrazing of marsh cordgrass and salt marsh die-off. The direct and indirect trophic effects of predator depletion on basal trophic levels, however, are not understood. Using observational and experimental data, we examined the hypotheses that (1) direct trophic effects of predator depletion decrease meiofaunal abundance by releasing deposit feeding fiddler crabs from consumer control, and/or (2) indirect trophic effects of predator depletion increase meiofaunal abundance by releasing blue carbon via the erosion of centuries of accreted marsh peat. Experimental deposit feeder removal led to 23% higher meiofaunal density at die-off than at healthy sites, while reciprocally transplanting sediment from die-off and healthy sites revealed that carbon-rich die-off sediment increased meiofauna density by over 164%: six times stronger than direct trophic effects. Recovering sites had both carbon-rich sediment and reduced deposit feeding leading to higher meiofauna densities than both die-off and healthy sites. This suggests that consequences of the trophic downgrading of coastal habitats can be driven by both direct and indirect trophic mechanisms that may vary in direction and magnitude, making their elucidation dependent on experimental manipulations.

  3. Understanding the shape effect on the plasmonic response of small ligand coated nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xing; Jensen, Lasse

    2016-07-01

    The plasmonic properties of metallic nanoparticles typically depend strongly on their shapes and local environment. However, not much is known about the shape effects on the plasmonic response in small metallic nanoparticles when quantum size effects become important. In this work, we use atomistic electrodynamics models incorporated with quantum size effects to study the optical properties of both bare and ligand coated Ag nanoparticles in different shapes. Using classical electrodynamics, we find that the plasmonic response of bare metallic nanoparticles depends strongly on the morphology of the nanoparticles due to the presence of higher-order plasmon modes. By including quantum size effects in the simulations, we find a significant blue-shift of the dipole plasmon as well as the smearing-out of the multipole plasmon modes, and both lead to a weak shape dependence. The ligand effects on the nanoparticles cause a significant red-shift of the plasmon resonance arising from the reduction of the conductivity of the Ag atoms where the ligands bind. In contrast to the bare nanoparticles, we find several higher-order plasmon modes in the ligand coated nanoparticles, that are likely caused by the weak electron spill-out effect and the symmetry breaking at the surface in the presence of the ligands. Furthermore, we show that the ligand layer strongly modify the near-field distribution due to the screening of the ligands. This work highlights the importance of quantum size and ligand effects on the optical properties of small metallic nanoparticles.

  4. Investigations of surface-tension effects due to small-scale complex boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jiansheng

    these two different types of surfaces differed by about 50° ˜ 60°, with the low-adhesion surfaces at about 120° ˜ 130° and the high-adhesion surfaces at about 70° ˜ 80°. Characterizations of both the microscopic structures and macroscopic wetting properties of these product surfaces allowed us to pinpoint the structural features responsible for specific wetting properties. It is found that the advancing contact angle was mainly determined by the primary structures while the receding contact angle is largely affected by the side-wall slope of the secondary features. This study established a platform for further exploration of the structure aspects of surface wettability. In the third and final project (Chapter 4), we demonstrated a new type of microfluidic channel that enable asymmetric wicking of wetting fluids based on structure-induced direction-dependent surface-tension effect. By decorating the side-walls of open microfluidic channels with tilted fins, we were able to experimentally demonstrate preferential wicking behaviors of various IPA-water mixtures with a range of contact angles in these channels. A simplified 2D model was established to explain the wicking asymmetry, and a complete 3D model was developed to provide more accurate quantitative predictions. The design principles developed in this study provide an additional scheme for controlling the spreading of fluids. The research presented in this dissertation spreads out across a wide range of physical phenomena (wicking, wetting, and capillarity), and involves a number of computational and experimental techniques, yet all of these projects are intrinsically united under a common theme: we want to better understand how simple fluids respond to small-scale complex surface structures as manifestations of surface-tension effects. We hope our findings can serve as building blocks for a larger scale endeavor of scientific research and engineering development. After all, the pursue of knowledge is most

  5. Measurement of rainfall distribution on a small catchment for the evaluation of canopy interception effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurer, Thomas; Schapp, Andrea; Büchner, Steffen; Menzel, Hannes; Hinz, Christoph

    2014-05-01

    Variability of rainfall and throughfall is an essential characteristic of the water balance at spatial scales ranging from meters to hundreds of meters or even kilometers. The amount of throughfall is governed by the characteristics of the vegetation canopy and the involved interception and stemflow effects. In initial, developing ecosystems, distinct patterns of the growing vegetation (e.g. patchiness) supposedly govern the spatial distribution of water in the system, thereby initiating and supporting hydro-ecological feedback processes. Questions are i) is the spatial variability of vegetation relevant for the system as a whole, and ii) how does the distribution of the effective precipitation (i.e. the infiltration) change over time in dependency of vegetation succession? We present the first results of a spatially distributed measurement approach of surface-near precipitation on the constructed catchment "Hühnerwasser" ("Chicken Creek"). The 6-ha site is located in the recultivation area of the lignite open-cast mine "Welzow-Süd" in Lower Lusatia, Brandenburg, Germany. Here, the free development of an initial ecosystem is investigated since September 2005. After eight years of succession, the spatial distribution of plant species is highly heterogeneous, and gains increasing influence on throughfall patterns, thus impacting the distribution of soil humidity and possibly even surface runoff. For spatially distributed precipitation measurement, 47 tipping bucket rain gauges were installed in heights of 0.5 m and 1.0 m along two transects on the catchment. Rain gauge data were collected by a wireless sensor node network provided by the Sens4U joint research project. The transects run NW-SE and NE-SW and cover the range of plant communities presently existing in the ecosystem: locust copses, dense sallow thorn bushes and reeds, base herbaceous and medium-rise small-reed vegetation, and open areas covered by moss and lichens. The raw measurement data were

  6. Effect of substrate conductivity on the evaporation of small sessile droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazargan, Vahid; Stoeber, Boris

    2016-09-01

    Here we show the effect of the thermal conductivity of the substrate on the evaporation process of small droplets. We deposited small droplets on the order of 100 - 500 μ m in diameter on four different substrates with different thermal conductivities and surface properties, and we measured the evaporation time. Also, a numerical model that describes this process was developed to include thermal effects inside the droplet and heat transfer from the substrate. Our model considers the entire time of evaporation including the pinned and depinned stages. This model uses a new approach for the contact line behavior. It uses experimental results to define the movement of the contact line as a function of the contact angle.

  7. A direct assay of carboxyl-containing small molecules by SALDI-MS on a AgNP/rGO-based nanoporous hybrid film.

    PubMed

    Hong, Min; Xu, Lidan; Wang, Fangli; Geng, Zhirong; Li, Haibo; Wang, Huaisheng; Li, Chen-Zhong

    2016-04-25

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) hybrid nanoporous structures fabricated by the layer-by-layer (LBL) electrostatic self-assembly have been applied as a simple platform for the rapid analysis of carboxyl-containing small molecules by surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization (D/I) mass spectrometry (SALDI-MS). By the simple one-step deposition of analytes onto the (AgNP/rGO)9 multilayer film, the MS measurements of various carboxyl-containing small molecules (including amino acids, fatty acids and organic dicarboxylic acids) can be done. In contrast to other energy transfer materials relative to AgNPs, the signal interferences of a Ag cluster (Agn(+) or Agn(-)) and a C cluster (Cn(+) or Cn(-)) have been effectively reduced or eliminated. The effects of various factors, such as the pore structure and composition of the substrates, on the efficiency of D/I have been investigated by comparing with the (AgNP)9 LBL nanoporous structure, (AgNP/rGO)9/(SiO2NP)6 LBL multilayer film and AgNP/prGO nanocomposites.

  8. Temperature effect on the small-to-large crossover lengthscale of hydrophobic hydration

    SciTech Connect

    Djikaev, Y. S. Ruckenstein, E.

    2013-11-14

    The thermodynamics of hydration is expected to change gradually from entropic for small solutes to enthalpic for large ones. The small-to-large crossover lengthscale of hydrophobic hydration depends on the thermodynamic conditions of the solvent such as temperature, pressure, presence of additives, etc. We attempt to shed some light on the temperature dependence of the crossover lengthscale by using a probabilistic approach to water hydrogen bonding that allows one to obtain an analytic expression for the number of bonds per water molecule as a function of both its distance to a solute and solute radius. Incorporating that approach into the density functional theory, one can examine the solute size effects on its hydration over the entire small-to-large lengthscale range at a series of different temperatures. Knowing the dependence of the hydration free energy on the temperature and solute size, one can also obtain its enthalpic and entropic contributions as functions of both temperature and solute size. These functions can provide some interesting insight into the temperature dependence of the crossover lengthscale of hydrophobic hydration. The model was applied to the hydration of spherical particles of various radii in water in the temperature range from T = 293.15 K to T = 333.15 K. The model predictions for the temperature dependence of the hydration free energy of small hydrophobes are consistent with the experimental and simulational data on the hydration of simple molecular solutes. Three alternative definitions for the small-to-large crossover length-scale of hydrophobic hydration are proposed, and their temperature dependence is obtained. Depending on the definition and temperature, the small-to-large crossover in the hydration mechanism is predicted to occur for hydrophobes of radii from one to several nanometers. Independent of its definition, the crossover length-scale is predicted to decrease with increasing temperature.

  9. Large grazers modify effects of aboveground-belowground interactions on small-scale plant community composition.

    PubMed

    Veen, G F Ciska; Geuverink, Elzemiek; Olff, Han

    2012-02-01

    Aboveground and belowground organisms influence plant community composition by local interactions, and their scale of impact may vary from millimeters belowground to kilometers aboveground. However, it still poorly understood how large grazers that select their forage on large spatial scales interact with small-scale aboveground-belowground interactions on plant community heterogeneity. Here, we investigate how cattle (Bos taurus) modify the effects of interactions between yellow meadow ants (Lasius flavus) and European brown hares (Lepus europaeus) on the formation of small-scale heterogeneity in vegetation composition. In the absence of cattle, hares selectively foraged on ant mounds, while under combined grazing by hares and cattle, vertebrate grazing pressure was similar on and off mounds. Ant mounds that were grazed by only hares had a different plant community composition compared to their surroundings: the cover of the grazing-intolerant grass Elytrigia atherica was reduced on ant mounds, whereas the relative cover of the more grazing-tolerant and palatable grass Festuca rubra was enhanced. Combined grazing by hares and cattle, resulted in homogenization of plant community composition on and off ant mounds, with high overall cover of F. rubra. We conclude that hares can respond to local ant-soil-vegetation interactions, because they are small, selective herbivores that make their foraging decisions on a local scale. This results in small-scale plant patches on mounds of yellow meadow ants. In the presence of cattle, which are less selective aboveground herbivores, local plant community patterns triggered by small-scale aboveground-belowground interactions can disappear. Therefore, cattle modify the consequences of aboveground-belowground interactions for small-scale plant community composition.

  10. Temperature effect on the small-to-large crossover lengthscale of hydrophobic hydration.

    PubMed

    Djikaev, Y S; Ruckenstein, E

    2013-11-14

    The thermodynamics of hydration is expected to change gradually from entropic for small solutes to enthalpic for large ones. The small-to-large crossover lengthscale of hydrophobic hydration depends on the thermodynamic conditions of the solvent such as temperature, pressure, presence of additives, etc. We attempt to shed some light on the temperature dependence of the crossover lengthscale by using a probabilistic approach to water hydrogen bonding that allows one to obtain an analytic expression for the number of bonds per water molecule as a function of both its distance to a solute and solute radius. Incorporating that approach into the density functional theory, one can examine the solute size effects on its hydration over the entire small-to-large lengthscale range at a series of different temperatures. Knowing the dependence of the hydration free energy on the temperature and solute size, one can also obtain its enthalpic and entropic contributions as functions of both temperature and solute size. These functions can provide some interesting insight into the temperature dependence of the crossover lengthscale of hydrophobic hydration. The model was applied to the hydration of spherical particles of various radii in water in the temperature range from T = 293.15 K to T = 333.15 K. The model predictions for the temperature dependence of the hydration free energy of small hydrophobes are consistent with the experimental and simulational data on the hydration of simple molecular solutes. Three alternative definitions for the small-to-large crossover length-scale of hydrophobic hydration are proposed, and their temperature dependence is obtained. Depending on the definition and temperature, the small-to-large crossover in the hydration mechanism is predicted to occur for hydrophobes of radii from one to several nanometers. Independent of its definition, the crossover length-scale is predicted to decrease with increasing temperature.

  11. Effects of teacher-directed versus student-directed instruction on self-management of young children with disabilities.

    PubMed Central

    Mithaug, Deirdre K; Mithaug, Dennis E

    2003-01-01

    In this study, students worked independently by setting goals, selecting assignments, and recording and evaluating their results after receiving one of two different types of self-management training. During teacher-directed training, the teacher set goals, assigned work, and recorded and evaluated results for students. During student-directed training, students performed those tasks themselves. The results indicated that students engaged in the self-management behaviors more frequently during independent work following student-directed instruction than following teacher-directed instruction. PMID:12723878

  12. Effect of cholera enterotoxin on carbohydrate metabolism in the liver and small intestinal mucosa of rabbits

    SciTech Connect

    Vengrov, P.R.; Cherkasova, T.D.; Yurkiv, V.A.; Pokrovskii, V.I.

    1987-09-01

    The effect of cholera enterotoxin injected in vivo on glucose formation from alanine, and also on glucose-6-phosphatase activity in the liver and mucosa of the small intestine was studied. L-(2,3-/sup 3/H)-alanine was added to the incubation medium. Chromatograms were developed with 5% AgNO/sub 3/ with the addition of an aqueous solution of ammonia. The quantity of radioactive glucose was determined in a scintillation counter.

  13. Effect of the concentration of inhomogeneities on the multiple small-angle neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Abov, Yu. G.; Dzheparov, F. S.; Elyutin, N. O.; Lvov, D. V. Tyulyusov, A. N.

    2013-03-15

    The interference effects manifested during multiple small-angle neutron scattering (MSANS) on a chaotically arranged close-packed ensemble of scatterers have been studied. MSANS measurements have been performed for mixtures of Al and Ti-Zr alloy powders. It is shown that the results can be satisfactorily described based on a theory that takes into account spatial correlations in the arrangement of powder grains.

  14. Separation and Measurement of Direct and Indirect Effects of Light on Stomata 1

    PubMed Central

    Sharkey, Thomas D.; Raschke, Klaus

    1981-01-01

    Conductance for water vapor, assimilation of CO2, and intercellular CO2 concentration of leaves of five species were determined at various irradiances and ambient CO2 concentrations. Conductance and assimilation were then plotted as functions of irradiance and intercellular CO2 concentration. The slopes of these curves allowed us to estimate infinitesimal changes in conductance (and assimilation) that occurred when irradiance changed and intercellular CO2 concentration was constant, and when CO2 concentration changed and irradiance was constant. On leaves of Xanthium strumarium L., Gossypium hirsutum L., Phaseolus vulgaris L., and Perilla frutescens (L.), Britt., the stomatal response to light was determined to be mainly a direct response to light and to a small extent only a response to changes in intercellular CO2 concentration. This was also true for stomata of Zea mays L., except at irradiances < 150 watts per square meter, when stomata responded primarily to the depletion of the intercellular spaces of CO2 which in turn was caused by changes in the assimilation of CO2. Stomata responded to light even in leaves whose net exchange of CO2 was reduced to zero through application of the inhibitor of photosynthetic electron transport, cyanazine (2-chloro-4[1-cyano-1-methylethylamino]-6-ethylamino-S-triazine). When leaves were inverted and irradiated on the abaxial surface, conductance decreased in the shaded and increased in the illuminated epidermis, indicating that the photoreceptor pigment(s) involved are located in the epidermis (presumably in the guard cells). In leaves of X. strumarium, the direct effect of light on conductance is primarily a response to blue light. Stomatal responses to CO2 and to light opposed each other. In X. strumarium, stomatal opening in response to light was strongest in CO2 free air and saturated at lower irradiances than in CO2 containing air. Conversely, stomatal closure in response to CO2 was strongest in darkness and it decreased

  15. Spatial Characteristics of Small Green Spaces' Mitigating Effects on Microscopic Urban Heat Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J.; Lee, D. K.; Jeong, W.; Kim, J. H.; Huh, K. Y.

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of the study is to find small greens' disposition, types and sizes to reduce air temperature effectively in urban blocks. The research sites were six high developed blocks in Seoul, Korea. Air temperature was measured with mobile loggers in clear daytime during summer, from August to September, at screen level. Also the measurement repeated over three times a day during three days by walking and circulating around the experimental blocks and the control blocks at the same time. By analyzing spatial characteristics, the averaged air temperatures were classified with three spaces, sunny spaces, building-shaded spaces and small green spaces by using Kruskal-Wallis Test; and small green spaces in 6 blocks were classified into their outward forms, polygonal or linear and single or mixed. The polygonal and mixed types of small green spaces mitigated averaged air temperature of each block which they belonged with a simple linear regression model with adjusted R2 = 0.90**. As the area and volume of these types increased, the effect of air temperature reduction (ΔT; Air temperature difference between sunny space and green space in a block) also increased in a linear relationship. The experimental range of this research is 100m2 ~ 2,000m2 of area, and 1,000m3 ~ 10,000m3 of volume of small green space. As a result, more than 300m2 and 2,300m3 of polygonal green spaces with mixed vegetation is required to lower 1°C; 650m2 and 5,000m3 of them to lower 2°C; about 2,000m2 and about 10,000m3 of them to lower 4°C air temperature reduction in an urban block.

  16. Effect of different treatment plans on irradiated small-bowel volume in gynecologic patients undergoing whole-pelvic irradiation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shih-Chen; Lee, Hsiao-Fei; Ting, Hui-Min; Pan, Tzu-Chao; Liu, Shu-Yu; Chen, Chien-Fu; Wang, Teng-Yi; Juan, Kuo-Jung; Liao, Tsung-I; Huang, Eng-Yen

    2013-09-01

    To evaluate the effect of different treatment plans for whole-pelvic irradiation on small-bowel volumes (SBVs) in patients with gynecologic malignancies, 40 patients were enrolled in this study. Computed tomography (CT) simulations were performed, and the small bowel of each patient was outlined manually. Treatment plans with equal-weighted (EW) and non-equal-weighted (NEW) (70% in bilateral directions) techniques of four-field and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) were performed. The V10-V100 represented the volume (cm³) at different levels of the prescribed doses (10-100%). The V10-V100 was compared among the different treatment planning techniques, and patients who were suitable for IMRT or NEW were identified. IMRT and NEW significantly reduced the V50-V100 and V40-V60 levels compared with EW, respectively. NEW caused a significant reduction in the V30-V60 levels in patients with a BMI ≥26 kg/m². Patients with IMRT demonstrated lower V70-V100 levels compared with those with NEW. In patients with a BMI ≥26 kg/m² or an age ≥55 years, lower V20-V50 levels were noted using NEW compared with IMRT. Treatment planning with larger weighting in the bilateral directions in four-field radiotherapy reduces the low-dose SBV in patients with gynecologic malignancies, especially in those with a high BMI or the elderly. IMRT effectively reduces high-dose SBV, especially in patients with a low BMI.

  17. Quantifying Direct and Indirect Effects of Elevated CO2 on Ecosystem Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatichi, S.; Leuzinger, S.; Paschalis, A.; Donnellan-Barraclough, A.; Hovenden, M. J.; Langley, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    Increasing concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide are expected to affect carbon assimilation, evapotranspiration (ET) and ultimately plant growth. Direct leaf biochemical effects have been widely investigated, while indirect effects, although documented, are very difficult to quantify in experiments. We hypothesize that the interaction of direct and indirect effects is a possible reason for conflicting results concerning the magnitude of CO2 fertilization effects across different climates and ecosystems. A mechanistic ecohydrological model (Tethys-Chloris) is used to investigate the relative contribution of direct (through plant physiology) and indirect (via stomatal closure and thus soil moisture, and changes in Leaf Area Index, LAI) effects of elevated CO2 across a number of ecosystems. We specifically ask in which ecosystems and climate indirect effects are expected to be largest. Data and boundary conditions from flux-towers and free air CO2 enrichment (FACE) experiments are used to force the model and evaluate its performance. Numerical results suggest that indirect effects of elevated CO2, through water savings and increased LAI, are very significant and sometimes larger than direct effects. Indirect effects tend to be considerably larger in water-limited ecosystems, while direct effects correlate positively with mean air temperature. Increasing CO2 from 375 to 550 ppm causes a total effect on Net Primary Production in the order of 15 to 40% and on ET from 0 to -8%, depending on climate and ecosystem type. The total CO2 effect has a significant negative correlation with the wetness index and positive correlation with vapor pressure deficit. These results provide a more general mechanistic understanding of relatively short-term (less than 20 years) implications of elevated CO2 on ecosystem response and suggest plausible magnitudes for the expected changes.

  18. The effect of small-wave modulation on the electromagnetic bias

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, Ernesto; Kim, Yunjin; Martin, Jan M.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of the modulation of small ocean waves by large waves on the physical mechanism of the EM bias is examined by conducting a numerical scattering experiment which does not assume the applicability of geometric optics. The modulation effect of the large waves on the small waves is modeled using the principle of conservation of wave action and includes the modulation of gravity-capillary waves. The frequency dependence and magnitude of the EM bias is examined for a simplified ocean spectral model as a function of wind speed. These calculations make it possible to assess the validity of previous assumptions made in the theory of the EM bias, with respect to both scattering and hydrodynamic effects. It is found that the geometric optics approximation is inadequate for predictions of the EM bias at typical radar altimeter frequencies, while the improved scattering calculations provide a frequency dependence of the EM bias which is in qualitative agreement with observation. For typical wind speeds, the EM bias contribution due to small-wave modulation is of the same order as that due to modulation by the nonlinearities of the large-scale waves.

  19. From hot hands to declining effects: the risks of small numbers.

    PubMed

    Lauer, Michael S

    2012-07-01

    About 25 years ago, a group of researchers demonstrated that there is no such thing as the "hot hand" in professional basketball. When a player hits 5 or 7 shots in a row (or misses 10 in a row), what's at work is random variation, nothing more. However, random causes do not stop players, coaches, fans, and media from talking about and acting on "hot hands," telling stories and making choices that ultimately are based on randomness. The same phenomenon is true in medicine. Some clinical trials with small numbers of events yielded positive findings, which in turn led clinicians, academics, and government officials to talk, telling stories and sometimes making choices that were later shown to be based on randomness. I provide some cardiovascular examples, such as the use of angiotensin receptor blockers for chronic heart failure, nesiritide for acute heart failure, and cytochrome P-450 (CYP) 2C19 genotyping for the acute coronary syndromes. I also review the more general "decline effect," by which drugs appear to yield a lower effect size over time. The decline effect is due at least in part to over interpretation of small studies, which are more likely to be noticed because of publication bias. As funders of research, we at the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute seek to support projects that will yield robust, credible evidence that will affect practice and policy in the right way. We must be alert to the risks of small numbers.

  20. Complementary effects of gaze direction and early saliency in guiding fixations during free viewing.

    PubMed

    Borji, Ali; Parks, Daniel; Itti, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    Gaze direction provides an important and ubiquitous communication channel in daily behavior and social interaction of humans and some animals. While several studies have addressed gaze direction in synthesized simple scenes, few have examined how it can bias observer attention and how it might interact with early saliency during free viewing of natural and realistic scenes. Experiment 1 used a controlled, staged setting in which an actor was asked to look at two different objects in turn, yielding two images that differed only by the actor's gaze direction, to causally assess the effects of actor gaze direction. Over all scenes, the median probability of following an actor's gaze direction was higher than the median probability of looking toward the single most salient location, and higher than chance. Experiment 2 confirmed these findings over a larger set of unconstrained scenes collected from the Web and containing people looking at objects and/or other people. To further compare the strength of saliency versus gaze direction cues, we computed gaze maps by drawing a cone in the direction of gaze of the actors present in the images. Gaze maps predicted observers' fixation locations significantly above chance, although below saliency. Finally, to gauge the relative importance of actor face and eye directions in guiding observer's fixations, in Experiment 3, observers were asked to guess the gaze direction from only an actor's face region (with the rest of the scene masked), in two conditions: actor eyes visible or masked. Median probability of guessing the true gaze direction within ±9° was significantly higher when eyes were visible, suggesting that the eyes contribute significantly to gaze estimation, in addition to face region. Our results highlight that gaze direction is a strong attentional cue in guiding eye movements, complementing low-level saliency cues, and derived from both face and eyes of actors in the scene. Thus gaze direction should be considered

  1. Effective density and morphology of particles emitted from small-scale combustion of various wood fuels.

    PubMed

    Leskinen, Jani; Ihalainen, Mika; Torvela, Tiina; Kortelainen, Miika; Lamberg, Heikki; Tiitta, Petri; Jakobi, Gert; Grigonyte, Julija; Joutsensaari, Jorma; Sippula, Olli; Tissari, Jarkko; Virtanen, Annele; Zimmermann, Ralf; Jokiniemi, Jorma

    2014-11-18

    The effective density of fine particles emitted from small-scale wood combustion of various fuels were determined with a system consisting of an aerosol particle mass analyzer and a scanning mobility particle sizer (APM-SMPS). A novel sampling chamber was combined to the system to enable measurements of highly fluctuating combustion processes. In addition, mass-mobility exponents (relates mass and mobility size) were determined from the density data to describe the shape of the particles. Particle size, type of fuel, combustion phase, and combustion conditions were found to have an effect on the effective density and the particle shape. For example, steady combustion phase produced agglomerates with effective density of roughly 1 g cm(-3) for small particles, decreasing to 0.25 g cm(-3) for 400 nm particles. The effective density was higher for particles emitted from glowing embers phase (ca. 1-2 g cm(-3)), and a clear size dependency was not observed as the particles were nearly spherical in shape. This study shows that a single value cannot be used for the effective density of particles emitted from wood combustion.

  2. Disentangle the Causes of the Road Barrier Effect in Small Mammals through Genetic Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Ascensão, Fernando; Mata, Cristina; Malo, Juan E.; Ruiz-Capillas, Pablo; Silva, Catarina; Silva, André P.; Santos-Reis, Margarida; Fernandes, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Road barrier effect is among the foremost negative impacts of roads on wildlife. Knowledge of the factors responsible for the road barrier effect is crucial to understand and predict species’ responses to roads, and to improve mitigation measures in the context of management and conservation. We built a set of hypothesis aiming to infer the most probable cause of road barrier effect (traffic effect or road surface avoidance), while controlling for the potentially confounding effects road width, traffic volume and road age. The wood mouse Apodemus sylvaticus was used as a model species of small and forest-dwelling mammals, which are more likely to be affected by gaps in cover such as those resulting from road construction. We confront genetic patterns from opposite and same roadsides from samples of three highways and used computer simulations to infer migration rates between opposite roadsides. Genetic patterns from 302 samples (ca. 100 per highway) suggest that the highway barrier effect for wood mouse is due to road surface avoidance. However, from the simulations we estimated a migration rate of about 5% between opposite roadsides, indicating that some limited gene flow across highways does occur. To reduce highway impact on population genetic diversity and structure, possible mitigation measures could include retrofitting of culverts and underpasses to increase their attractiveness and facilitate their use by wood mice and other species, and setting aside roadside strips without vegetation removal to facilitate establishment and dispersal of small mammals. PMID:26978779

  3. Disentangle the Causes of the Road Barrier Effect in Small Mammals through Genetic Patterns.

    PubMed

    Ascensão, Fernando; Mata, Cristina; Malo, Juan E; Ruiz-Capillas, Pablo; Silva, Catarina; Silva, André P; Santos-Reis, Margarida; Fernandes, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Road barrier effect is among the foremost negative impacts of roads on wildlife. Knowledge of the factors responsible for the road barrier effect is crucial to understand and predict species' responses to roads, and to improve mitigation measures in the context of management and conservation. We built a set of hypothesis aiming to infer the most probable cause of road barrier effect (traffic effect or road surface avoidance), while controlling for the potentially confounding effects road width, traffic volume and road age. The wood mouse Apodemus sylvaticus was used as a model species of small and forest-dwelling mammals, which are more likely to be affected by gaps in cover such as those resulting from road construction. We confront genetic patterns from opposite and same roadsides from samples of three highways and used computer simulations to infer migration rates between opposite roadsides. Genetic patterns from 302 samples (ca. 100 per highway) suggest that the highway barrier effect for wood mouse is due to road surface avoidance. However, from the simulations we estimated a migration rate of about 5% between opposite roadsides, indicating that some limited gene flow across highways does occur. To reduce highway impact on population genetic diversity and structure, possible mitigation measures could include retrofitting of culverts and underpasses to increase their attractiveness and facilitate their use by wood mice and other species, and setting aside roadside strips without vegetation removal to facilitate establishment and dispersal of small mammals.

  4. Effective density and morphology of particles emitted from small-scale combustion of various wood fuels.

    PubMed

    Leskinen, Jani; Ihalainen, Mika; Torvela, Tiina; Kortelainen, Miika; Lamberg, Heikki; Tiitta, Petri; Jakobi, Gert; Grigonyte, Julija; Joutsensaari, Jorma; Sippula, Olli; Tissari, Jarkko; Virtanen, Annele; Zimmermann, Ralf; Jokiniemi, Jorma

    2014-11-18

    The effective density of fine particles emitted from small-scale wood combustion of various fuels were determined with a system consisting of an aerosol particle mass analyzer and a scanning mobility particle sizer (APM-SMPS). A novel sampling chamber was combined to the system to enable measurements of highly fluctuating combustion processes. In addition, mass-mobility exponents (relates mass and mobility size) were determined from the density data to describe the shape of the particles. Particle size, type of fuel, combustion phase, and combustion conditions were found to have an effect on the effective density and the particle shape. For example, steady combustion phase produced agglomerates with effective density of roughly 1 g cm(-3) for small particles, decreasing to 0.25 g cm(-3) for 400 nm particles. The effective density was higher for particles emitted from glowing embers phase (ca. 1-2 g cm(-3)), and a clear size dependency was not observed as the particles were nearly spherical in shape. This study shows that a single value cannot be used for the effective density of particles emitted from wood combustion. PMID:25365741

  5. Disentangle the Causes of the Road Barrier Effect in Small Mammals through Genetic Patterns.

    PubMed

    Ascensão, Fernando; Mata, Cristina; Malo, Juan E; Ruiz-Capillas, Pablo; Silva, Catarina; Silva, André P; Santos-Reis, Margarida; Fernandes, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Road barrier effect is among the foremost negative impacts of roads on wildlife. Knowledge of the factors responsible for the road barrier effect is crucial to understand and predict species' responses to roads, and to improve mitigation measures in the context of management and conservation. We built a set of hypothesis aiming to infer the most probable cause of road barrier effect (traffic effect or road surface avoidance), while controlling for the potentially confounding effects road width, traffic volume and road age. The wood mouse Apodemus sylvaticus was used as a model species of small and forest-dwelling mammals, which are more likely to be affected by gaps in cover such as those resulting from road construction. We confront genetic patterns from opposite and same roadsides from samples of three highways and used computer simulations to infer migration rates between opposite roadsides. Genetic patterns from 302 samples (ca. 100 per highway) suggest that the highway barrier effect for wood mouse is due to road surface avoidance. However, from the simulations we estimated a migration rate of about 5% between opposite roadsides, indicating that some limited gene flow across highways does occur. To reduce highway impact on population genetic diversity and structure, possible mitigation measures could include retrofitting of culverts and underpasses to increase their attractiveness and facilitate their use by wood mice and other species, and setting aside roadside strips without vegetation removal to facilitate establishment and dispersal of small mammals. PMID:26978779

  6. Achieving Success in Small Business. A Self-Instruction Program for Small Business Owner-Managers. Creating an Effective Business Image.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg. Div. of Vocational-Technical Education.

    This self-instructional module on creating an effective business image is the fourth in a set of twelve modules designed for small business owner-managers. Competencies for this module are (1) identify the key factors which contribute to formation of a business image and (2) assess your current image and determine if it communicates the…

  7. Effects of Direct Instruction on the Reading Comprehension of Students with Autism and Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flores, Margaret M.; Ganz, Jennifer B.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated effects of a Direct Instruction reading comprehension program implemented with students with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and developmental disabilities (DD). There is little research in the area of reading comprehension for students with ASD and no research as to the effectiveness of reading comprehension Direct…

  8. Direct and Indirect Effects of Teenage Body Weight on Adult Wages. NBER Working Paper No. 15027

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Han, Euna; Norton, Edward C.; Powell, Lisa M.

    2009-01-01

    Previous estimates on the association between body weight and wages in the literature have been contingent on education and occupation. This paper examines the direct effect of BMI on wages and the indirect effects operating through education and occupation choice, particularly for late-teen BMI and adult wages. Using the National Longitudinal…

  9. Predicting use of effective vegetable parenting practices with the Model of Goal Directed Behavior

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our objective was to model effective vegetable parenting practices using the Model of Goal Directed Vegetable Parenting Practices construct scales. An internet survey was conducted with 307 parents (mostly mothers) of preschoolers in Houston, Texas to assess their agreement with effective vegetable ...

  10. The Effect of Direct Instruction Model on Intermediate Class Achievement and Attitudes toward English Grammar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kousar, Rubina

    2010-01-01

    This study was aimed at investigating the effect of the direct instruction model on intermediate class achievement and attitudes toward English grammar. It was an experimental study and the purpose was to explore the relative effectiveness of instructional methodology (independent variable) on students' achievement and attitude (dependent…

  11. Influence of Exercise on Inflammation in Cancer: Direct Effect or Innocent Bystander?

    PubMed

    Murphy, E Angela; Enos, Reilly T; Velázquez, Kandy T

    2015-07-01

    We propose the hypothesis that the benefits of exercise on inflammation in cancer are a result of a direct effect on inflammatory cytokines, including interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1, that are critical for cancer growth as well as a bystander effect of the established relationship between exercise and cancer.

  12. Effects of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) on Behaviour and Electrophysiology of Language Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wirth, Miranka; Rahman, Rasha Abdel; Kuenecke, Janina; Koenig, Thomas; Horn, Helge; Sommer, Werner; Dierks, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Excitatory anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (A-tDCS) over the left dorsal prefrontal cortex (DPFC) has been shown to improve language production. The present study examined neurophysiological underpinnings of this effect. In a single-blinded within-subject design, we traced effects of A-tDCS compared to sham stimulation over the left…

  13. Comparing Direct versus Indirect Measures of the Pedagogical Effectiveness of Team Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bacon, Donald R.

    2011-01-01

    Direct measures (tests) of the pedagogical effectiveness of team testing and indirect measures (student surveys) of pedagogical effectiveness of team testing were collected in several sections of an undergraduate marketing course with varying levels of the use of team testing. The results indicate that although students perceived team testing to…

  14. Small amplitude solitons in a warm plasma with smaller and higher order relativistic effects

    SciTech Connect

    Kalita, B. C.; Das, R.

    2007-07-15

    Solitons have been investigated in a warm plasma through the Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation, considering a smaller relativistic effect for {gamma}{approx_equal}O(v{sup 2}/c{sup 2}) and {gamma}{sub e}{approx_equal}O(u{sup 2}/c{sup 2}) and higher relativistic effects for {gamma}{approx_equal}O(v{sup 4}/c{sup 4}) and {gamma}{sub e}{approx_equal}O(u{sup 4/}c{sup 4}). Compressive fast ion-acoustic solitons are observed to exist in the entire range (u{sub 0}-v{sub 0}) subject to a suitable mathematical condition satisfied by the initial streaming velocities u{sub 0},v{sub 0} of the electrons and the ions, respectively, electron to ion mass ratio Q(=m{sub e}/m{sub i}) and ion to electron temperature ratio {sigma}(=T{sub i}/T{sub e}). Further, rarefactive solitons of pretty small amplitudes are observed in the small upper range of |u{sub 0}-v{sub 0}| for higher order relativistic effect which are found to change parabolically. It is essentially important to report in our model of plasma, that the higher order relativistic effect slows down the soliton speed to V{<=}0.10 for all temperature ratios {sigma} for small amplitude waves. On the other hand, the smaller order relativistic effect permits the soliton to exist even at a relatively much higher speed V<0.30. Solitons of high (negligible) amplitudes are found to generate at the smaller (greater) difference of initial streamings (u{sub 0}-v{sub 0}) corresponding to both the relativistic effects.

  15. Object strength--an accurate measure for small objects that is insensitive to partial volume effects.

    PubMed

    Tofts, P S; Silver, N C; Barker, G J; Gass, A

    2005-07-01

    There are currently four problems in characterising small nonuniform lesions or other objects in Magnetic Resonance images where partial volume effects are significant. Object size is over- or under-estimated; boundaries are often not reproducible; mean object value cannot be measured; and fuzzy borders cannot be accommodated. A new measure, Object Strength, is proposed. This is the sum of all abnormal intensities, above a uniform background value. For a uniform object, this is simply the product of the increase in intensity and the size of the object. Biologically, this could be at least as relevant as existing measures of size or mean intensity. We hypothesise that Object Strength will perform better than traditional area measurements in characterising small objects. In a pilot study, the reproducibility of object strength measurements was investigated using MR images of small multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions. In addition, accuracy was investigated using artificial lesions of known volume (0.3-6.2 ml) and realistic appearance. Reproducibility approached that of area measurements (in 33/90 lesion reports the difference between repeats was less than for area measurements). Total lesion volume was accurate to 0.2%. In conclusion, Object Strength has potential for improved characterisation of small lesions and objects in imaging and possibly spectroscopy.

  16. Animation, Small Multiples, and the Effect of Mental Map Preservation in Dynamic Graphs.

    PubMed

    Archambault, D; Purchase, H; Pinaud, B

    2011-04-01

    In this paper, we present the results of a human-computer interaction experiment that compared the performance of the animation of dynamic graphs to the presentation of small multiples and the effect that mental map preservation had on the two conditions. Questions used in the experiment were selected to test both local and global properties of graph evolution over time. The data sets used in this experiment were derived from standard benchmark data sets of the information visualization community. We found that small multiples gave significantly faster performance than animation overall and for each of our five graph comprehension tasks. In addition, small multiples had significantly more errors than animation for the tasks of determining sets of nodes or edges added to the graph during the same timeslice, although a positive time-error correlation coefficient suggests that, in this case, faster responses did not lead to more errors. This result suggests that, for these two tasks, animation is preferable if accuracy is more important than speed. Preserving the mental map under either the animation or the small multiples condition had little influence in terms of error rate and response time.

  17. Edaravone ameliorates the adverse effects of valproic acid toxicity in small intestine.

    PubMed

    Oktay, S; Alev, B; Tunali, S; Emekli-Alturfan, E; Tunali-Akbay, T; Koc-Ozturk, L; Yanardag, R; Yarat, A

    2015-06-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) is a drug used for the treatment of epilepsy, bipolar psychiatric disorders, and migraine. Previous studies have reported an increased generation of reactive oxygen species and oxidative stress in the toxic mechanism of VPA. Edaravone, a free radical scavenger for clinical use, can quench free radical reaction by trapping a variety of free radical species. In this study, effect of edaravone on some small intestine biochemical parameters in VPA-induced toxicity was investigated. Thirty seven Sprague Dawley female rats were randomly divided into four groups. The groups include control group, edaravone (30 mg(-1) kg(-1) day(-1)) given group, VPA (0.5 g(-1) kg(-1) day(-1)) given group, VPA + edaravone (in same dose) given group. Edaravone and VPA were given intraperitoneally for 7 days. Biochemical parameters such as malondialdehyde, as an index of lipid peroxidation(LPO), sialic acid (SA), glutathione levels and glutathione peroxidase, glutathione-S-transferase, superoxide dismutase, catalase, myeloperoxidase, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and tissue factor (TF) activities were determined in small intestine samples by colorimetric methods. Decreased small intestine antioxidant enzyme activities, increased LPO and SA levels, and increased activities of ALP and TF were detected in the VPA group. Based on our results edaravone may be suggested to reverse the oxidative stress and inflammation due to VPA-induced small intestine toxicity.

  18. Preventative Effects of Sodium Alginate on Indomethacin-induced Small-intestinal Injury in Mice.

    PubMed

    Horibe, Sayo; Tanahashi, Toshihito; Kawauchi, Shoji; Mizuno, Shigeto; Rikitake, Yoshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in diagnostic technologies have revealed that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) can cause serious mucosal injury in the upper and lower gastrointestinal tract (including the small intestine). A drug to treat NSAID-induced small-intestinal injury (SII) is lacking. Sodium alginate is a soluble dietary fiber extracted from brown seaweed and its solution has been used as a hemostatic agent to treat gastrointestinal bleeding due to gastric ulcers. Whether sodium alginate has therapeutic effects on NSAID-induced SII and its mechanism of action are not known. Here, we investigated if administration of two forms (high-molecular-weight (HMW) and low-molecular-weight (LMW)) of sodium alginate could ameliorate indomethacin-induced SII. Pretreatment with HMW sodium alginate or LMW sodium alginate before indomethacin administration improved ulceration and the resultant intestinal shortening was associated with reduced histological severity of mucosal injury and ameliorated mRNA expression of inflammation-related molecules in the small intestine. We found that mRNAs of secretory Muc2 and membrane-associated Muc1, Muc3 and Muc4 were expressed in the small intestine. mRNA expression of Muc1-4 was increased in indomethacin-induced SII, and these increases were prevented by sodium alginate. Thus, administration of sodium alginate could be a therapeutic approach to prevent indomethacin-induced SII. PMID:27647994

  19. Preventative Effects of Sodium Alginate on Indomethacin-induced Small-intestinal Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Horibe, Sayo; Tanahashi, Toshihito; Kawauchi, Shoji; Mizuno, Shigeto; Rikitake, Yoshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in diagnostic technologies have revealed that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) can cause serious mucosal injury in the upper and lower gastrointestinal tract (including the small intestine). A drug to treat NSAID-induced small-intestinal injury (SII) is lacking. Sodium alginate is a soluble dietary fiber extracted from brown seaweed and its solution has been used as a hemostatic agent to treat gastrointestinal bleeding due to gastric ulcers. Whether sodium alginate has therapeutic effects on NSAID-induced SII and its mechanism of action are not known. Here, we investigated if administration of two forms (high-molecular-weight (HMW) and low-molecular-weight (LMW)) of sodium alginate could ameliorate indomethacin-induced SII. Pretreatment with HMW sodium alginate or LMW sodium alginate before indomethacin administration improved ulceration and the resultant intestinal shortening was associated with reduced histological severity of mucosal injury and ameliorated mRNA expression of inflammation-related molecules in the small intestine. We found that mRNAs of secretory Muc2 and membrane-associated Muc1, Muc3 and Muc4 were expressed in the small intestine. mRNA expression of Muc1-4 was increased in indomethacin-induced SII, and these increases were prevented by sodium alginate. Thus, administration of sodium alginate could be a therapeutic approach to prevent indomethacin-induced SII. PMID:27647994

  20. Preventative Effects of Sodium Alginate on Indomethacin-induced Small-intestinal Injury in Mice.

    PubMed

    Horibe, Sayo; Tanahashi, Toshihito; Kawauchi, Shoji; Mizuno, Shigeto; Rikitake, Yoshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in diagnostic technologies have revealed that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) can cause serious mucosal injury in the upper and lower gastrointestinal tract (including the small intestine). A drug to treat NSAID-induced small-intestinal injury (SII) is lacking. Sodium alginate is a soluble dietary fiber extracted from brown seaweed and its solution has been used as a hemostatic agent to treat gastrointestinal bleeding due to gastric ulcers. Whether sodium alginate has therapeutic effects on NSAID-induced SII and its mechanism of action are not known. Here, we investigated if administration of two forms (high-molecular-weight (HMW) and low-molecular-weight (LMW)) of sodium alginate could ameliorate indomethacin-induced SII. Pretreatment with HMW sodium alginate or LMW sodium alginate before indomethacin administration improved ulceration and the resultant intestinal shortening was associated with reduced histological severity of mucosal injury and ameliorated mRNA expression of inflammation-related molecules in the small intestine. We found that mRNAs of secretory Muc2 and membrane-associated Muc1, Muc3 and Muc4 were expressed in the small intestine. mRNA expression of Muc1-4 was increased in indomethacin-induced SII, and these increases were prevented by sodium alginate. Thus, administration of sodium alginate could be a therapeutic approach to prevent indomethacin-induced SII.