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Sample records for small high intensity

  1. High Intensity Neutron Beams for Small Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böni, Peter

    2014-04-01

    As novel materials of excellent homogeneity can often only be grown in small quantities it is important to optimize the transport of neutrons from the moderator to the sample while keeping the background low. Using elliptically or parabolically tapered guides the losses can be strongly reduced such that 50% - 90% of the useful neutrons arrive at the sample. If not properly designed, however, the divergence at the sample becomes inhomogeneous. In contrast, pairs of nested Kirkpatrick-Baez mirrors in Montel geometry yield well focused beams with a compact phase space. The mirrors extract only the useful neutrons from the moderator and effectively interrupt the line of sight leading to a very low background. As the focal distances are typically several meters, the extraction of the neutrons and the installation of bulky sample environment is facilitated.

  2. Long term high intensity exercise and damage of small joints in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    de Jong, Z; Munneke, M; Zwinderman, A; Kroon, H; Ronday, K; Lems, W; Dijkmans, B; Breedveld, F; Vliet, V; Hazes, J; Huizinga, T

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of long term high intensity weightbearing exercises on radiological damage of the joints of the hands and feet in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods: Data of the 281 completers of a 2 year randomised controlled trial comparing the effects of usual care physical therapy (UC) with high intensity weightbearing exercises were analysed for the rate of radiological joint damage (Larsen score) of the hands and feet. Potential determinants of outcome were defined: disease activity, use of drugs, change in physical capacity and in bone mineral density, and attendance rate at exercise sessions. Results: After 2 years, the 136 participants in high intensity weightbearing exercises developed significantly less radiological damage than the 145 participants in UC. The mean (SD) increase in damage was 3.5 (7.9) in the exercise group and 5.7 (10.2) in the UC group, p = 0.045. Separate analysis of the damage to the hands and feet suggests that this difference in rate of increase of damage is more pronounced in the joints of the feet than in the hands. The rate of damage was independently associated with less disease activity, less frequent use of glucocorticoids, and with an improvement in aerobic fitness. Conclusion: The progression of radiological joint damage of the hands and feet in patients with RA is not increased by long term high intensity weightbearing exercises. These exercises may have a protective effect on the joints of the feet. PMID:15479889

  3. High-yield maize with large net energy yield and small global warming intensity

    PubMed Central

    Grassini, Patricio; Cassman, Kenneth G.

    2012-01-01

    Addressing concerns about future food supply and climate change requires management practices that maximize productivity per unit of arable land while reducing negative environmental impact. On-farm data were evaluated to assess energy balance and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of irrigated maize in Nebraska that received large nitrogen (N) fertilizer (183 kg of N⋅ha−1) and irrigation water inputs (272 mm or 2,720 m3 ha−1). Although energy inputs (30 GJ⋅ha−1) were larger than those reported for US maize systems in previous studies, irrigated maize in central Nebraska achieved higher grain and net energy yields (13.2 Mg⋅ha−1 and 159 GJ⋅ha−1, respectively) and lower GHG-emission intensity (231 kg of CO2e⋅Mg−1 of grain). Greater input-use efficiencies, especially for N fertilizer, were responsible for better performance of these irrigated systems, compared with much lower-yielding, mostly rainfed maize systems in previous studies. Large variation in energy inputs and GHG emissions across irrigated fields in the present study resulted from differences in applied irrigation water amount and imbalances between applied N inputs and crop N demand, indicating potential to further improve environmental performance through better management of these inputs. Observed variation in N-use efficiency, at any level of applied N inputs, suggests that an N-balance approach may be more appropriate for estimating soil N2O emissions than the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change approach based on a fixed proportion of applied N. Negative correlation between GHG-emission intensity and net energy yield supports the proposition that achieving high yields, large positive energy balance, and low GHG emissions in intensive cropping systems are not conflicting goals. PMID:22232684

  4. High-yield maize with large net energy yield and small global warming intensity.

    PubMed

    Grassini, Patricio; Cassman, Kenneth G

    2012-01-24

    Addressing concerns about future food supply and climate change requires management practices that maximize productivity per unit of arable land while reducing negative environmental impact. On-farm data were evaluated to assess energy balance and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of irrigated maize in Nebraska that received large nitrogen (N) fertilizer (183 kg of N · ha(-1)) and irrigation water inputs (272 mm or 2,720 m(3) ha(-1)). Although energy inputs (30 GJ · ha(-1)) were larger than those reported for US maize systems in previous studies, irrigated maize in central Nebraska achieved higher grain and net energy yields (13.2 Mg · ha(-1) and 159 GJ · ha(-1), respectively) and lower GHG-emission intensity (231 kg of CO(2)e · Mg(-1) of grain). Greater input-use efficiencies, especially for N fertilizer, were responsible for better performance of these irrigated systems, compared with much lower-yielding, mostly rainfed maize systems in previous studies. Large variation in energy inputs and GHG emissions across irrigated fields in the present study resulted from differences in applied irrigation water amount and imbalances between applied N inputs and crop N demand, indicating potential to further improve environmental performance through better management of these inputs. Observed variation in N-use efficiency, at any level of applied N inputs, suggests that an N-balance approach may be more appropriate for estimating soil N(2)O emissions than the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change approach based on a fixed proportion of applied N. Negative correlation between GHG-emission intensity and net energy yield supports the proposition that achieving high yields, large positive energy balance, and low GHG emissions in intensive cropping systems are not conflicting goals.

  5. Repeated sprints, high-intensity interval training, small-sided games: theory and application to field sports.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, James J; Reed, Jacob P; Leiting, Keith; Chiang, Chieh-Ying; Stone, Michael H

    2014-03-01

    Due to the broad spectrum of physical characteristics necessary for success in field sports, numerous training modalities have been used develop physical preparedness. Sports like rugby, basketball, lacrosse, and others require athletes to be not only strong and powerful but also aerobically fit and able to recover from high-intensity intermittent exercise. This provides coaches and sport scientists with a complex range of variables to consider when developing training programs. This can often lead to confusion and the misuse of training modalities, particularly in the development of aerobic and anaerobic conditioning. This review outlines the benefits and general adaptations to 3 commonly used and effective conditioning methods: high-intensity interval training, repeated-sprint training, and small-sided games. The goals and outcomes of these training methods are discussed, and practical implementations strategies for coaches and sport scientists are provided.

  6. High intensity neutrino beams

    SciTech Connect

    Ichikawa, A. K.

    2015-07-15

    High-intensity proton accelerator complex enabled long baseline neutrino oscillation experiments with a precisely controlled neutrino beam. The beam power so far achieved is a few hundred kW with enourmorous efforts of accelerator physicists and engineers. However, to fully understand the lepton mixing structure, MW-class accelerators are desired. We describe the current intensity-frontier high-energy proton accelerators, their plans to go beyond and technical challenges in the neutrino beamline facilities.

  7. High intensity ultrasound.

    PubMed

    ter Haar, G

    2001-03-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is a technique that was first investigated in the 1940s as a method of destroying selective regions within the brain in neuro-surgical An ultrasound beam can be brought to a tight focus at a distance from its source, and if sufficient energy is concentrated within the focus, the cells lying within this focal volume are killed, whereas those lying elsewhere are spared. This is a noninvasive method of producing selective and trackless tissue destruction in deep seated targets in the body, without damage to overlying tissues. This field, known both as HIFU and focused ultrasound surgery (FUS), is reviewed in this article.

  8. High intensity proton synchrotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craddock, M. K.

    1986-10-01

    Strong initiatives are being pursued in a number of countries for the construction of ``kaon factory'' synchrotrons capable of producing 100 times more intense proton beams than those available now from machines such as the Brookhaven AGS and CERN PS. Such machines would yield equivalent increases in the fluxes of secondary particles (kaons, pions, muons, antiprotons, hyperons and neutrinos of all varieties)—or cleaner beams for a smaller increase in flux—opening new avenues to various fundamental questions in both particle and nuclear physics. Major areas of investigation would be rare decay modes, CP violation, meson and hadron spectroscopy, antinucleon interactions, neutrino scattering and oscillations, and hypernuclear properties. Experience with the pion factories has already shown how high beam intensities make it possible to explore the ``precision frontier'' with results complementary to those achievable at the ``energy frontier''. This paper will describe proposals for upgrading and AGS and for building kaon factories in Canada, Europe, Japan and the United States, emphasizing the novel aspects of accelerator design required to achieve the desired performance (typically 100 μA at 30 GeV).

  9. High Intensity Lights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Xenon arc lamps developed during the Apollo program by Streamlight, Inc. are the basis for commercial flashlights and emergency handlights. These are some of the brightest portable lights made. They throw a light some 50 times brighter than automobile high beams and are primarily used by police and military. The light penetrates fog and smoke and returns less back-scatter light. They are operated on portable power packs as boat and auto batteries. An infrared model produces totally invisible light for covert surveillance.

  10. High intensity portable fluorescent light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kendall, F. B.

    1972-01-01

    Eight high intensity portable fluorescent lights were produced. Three prototype lights were also produced, two of which were subsequently updated to the physical and operational configuration of the qualification and flight units. Positioning of lamp apertures and reflectors in these lights is such that the light is concentrated and intensified in a specific pattern rather than widely diffused. Indium amalgam control of mercury vapor pressure in the lamp gives high output at lamp ambient temperatures up to 105 C. A small amount of amalgam applied to each electrode stem helps to obtain fast warm-up. Shrinking a Teflon sleeve on the tube and potting metal caps on each end of the lamp minimizes dispersion of mercury vapor and glass particles in the event of accidental lamp breakage. Operation at 20 kHz allows the lamps to consume more power than at low frequency, thus increasing their light output and raising their efficiency. When used to expose color photographic film, light from the lamps produces results approximately equal to sunlight.

  11. Systolic blood pressure response after high-intensity interval exercise is independently related to decreased small arterial elasticity in normotensive African American women.

    PubMed

    Carter, Stephen J; Goldsby, TaShauna U; Fisher, Gordon; Plaisance, Eric P; Gower, Barbara A; Glasser, Stephen P; Hunter, Gary R

    2016-05-01

    Aerobic exercise transiently lowers blood pressure. However, limited research has concurrently evaluated blood pressure and small arterial elasticity (SAE), an index of endothelial function, among African American (AA) and European American (EA) women the morning after (i.e., ≈22 h later) acute bouts of moderate-intensity continuous (MIC) and high-intensity interval (HII) exercise matched for total work. Because of greater gradients of shear stress, it was hypothesized that HII exercise would elicit a greater reduction in systolic blood pressure (SBP) compared to MIC exercise. After baseline, 22 AA and EA women initiated aerobic exercise training 3 times/week. Beginning at week 8, three follow-up assessments were conducted over the next 8 weeks at random to measure resting blood pressure and SAE. In total all participants completed 16 weeks of training. Follow-up evaluations were made: (i) in the trained state (TS; 8-16 weeks of aerobic training); (ii) ≈22 h after an acute bout of MIC exercise; and (iii) ≈22 h after an acute bout of HII exercise. Among AAs, the acute bout of HII exercise incited a significant increase in SBP (mm Hg) (TS, 121 ± 14 versus HII, 128 ± 14; p = 0.01) whereas responses (TS, 116 ± 12 versus HII, 113 ± 9; p = 0.34) did not differ in EAs. After adjusting for race, changes in SAE were associated (partial r = -0.533; p = 0.01) with changes in SBP following HII exercise. These data demonstrate an acute, unaccustomed bout of HII exercise produces physiological perturbations resulting in a significant increase in SBP that are independently associated with decreased SAE among AA women, but not EA women.

  12. Portable, high intensity isotopic neutron source provides increased experimental accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohr, W. C.; Stewart, D. C.; Wahlgren, M. A.

    1968-01-01

    Small portable, high intensity isotopic neutron source combines twelve curium-americium beryllium sources. This high intensity of neutrons, with a flux which slowly decreases at a known rate, provides for increased experimental accuracy.

  13. Plasmonic terahertz detector response at high intensities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutin, A.; Kachorovskii, V.; Muraviev, A.; Shur, M.

    2012-07-01

    Recent work on plasmonic terahertz detection using field effect transistors (FETs) has yielded detectors with high responsivity. Therefore, deviation from small signal mode of operation, when the detector signal is simply proportional to the THz intensity, must be considered. This work presents a new analytical model to predict terahertz response in a FET at arbitrary intensity levels. The proposed analytical model was experimentally validated using a 0.13 μm InGaAs high electron mobility transistor and optically pumped CO2 gas laser operating at 1.63 THz of varying output intensities. The model is suitable for implementation in circuit simulators and might be used for device optimization and THz circuit design.

  14. High Intensity Polarized Electron Gun

    SciTech Connect

    Redwine, Robert P.

    2012-07-31

    The goal of the project was to investigate the possibility of building a very high intensity polarized electron gun for the Electron-Ion Collider. This development is crucial for the eRHIC project. The gun implements a large area cathode, ring-shaped laser beam and active cathode cooling. A polarized electron gun chamber with a large area cathode and active cathode cooling has been built and tested. A preparation chamber for cathode activation has been built and initial tests have been performed. Major parts for a load-lock chamber, where cathodes are loaded into the vacuum system, have been manufactured.

  15. High intensity protons in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Montag, C.; Ahrens, L.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J. M.; Drees, K. A.; Fischer, W.; Huang, H.; Minty, M.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Thieberger, P.; Yip, K.

    2012-01-05

    During the 2012 summer shutdown a pair of electron lenses will be installed in RHIC, allowing the beam-beam parameter to be increased by roughly 50 percent. To realize the corresponding luminosity increase bunch intensities have to be increased by 50 percent, to 2.5 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} protons per bunch. We list the various RHIC subsystems that are most affected by this increase, and propose beam studies to ensure their readiness. The proton luminosity in RHIC is presently limited by the beam-beam effect. To overcome this limitation, electron lenses will be installed in IR10. With the help of these devices, the headon beam-beam kick experienced during proton-proton collisions will be partially compensated, allowing for a larger beam-beam tuneshift at these collision points, and therefore increasing the luminosity. This will be accomplished by increasing the proton bunch intensity from the presently achieved 1.65 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} protons per bunch in 109 bunches per beam to 2.5 {center_dot} 10{sup 11}, thus roughly doubling the luminosity. In a further upgrade we aim for bunch intensities up to 3 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} protons per bunch. With RHIC originally being designed for a bunch intensity of 1 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} protons per bunch in 56 bunches, this six-fold increase in the total beam intensity by far exceeds the design parameters of the machine, and therefore potentially of its subsystems. In this note, we present a list of major subsystems that are of potential concern regarding this intensity upgrade, show their demonstrated performance at present intensities, and propose measures and beam experiments to study their readiness for the projected future intensities.

  16. Stress intensity and crack displacement for small edge cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orange, Thomas W.

    1988-01-01

    The weight function method was used to derive stress intensity factors and crack mouth displacement coefficients for small edge cracks (less than 20 percent of the specimen width) in common fracture specimen configurations. Contact stresses due to point application of loads were found to be small but significant for three-point bending and insignificant for four-point bending. The results are compared with available equations and numerical solutions from the literature and with unpublished boundary collocation results.

  17. High-Intensity Proton Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Jay L. Hirshfield

    2011-12-27

    Analysis is presented for an eight-cavity proton cyclotron accelerator that could have advantages as compared with other accelerators because of its potentially high acceleration gradient. The high gradient is possible since protons orbit in a sequence of TE111 rotating mode cavities of equally diminishing frequencies with path lengths during acceleration that greatly exceed the cavity lengths. As the cavities operate at sequential harmonics of a basic repetition frequency, phase synchronism can be maintained over a relatively wide injection phase window without undue beam emittance growth. It is shown that use of radial vanes can allow cavity designs with significantly smaller radii, as compared with simple cylindrical cavities. Preliminary beam transport studies show that acceptable extraction and focusing of a proton beam after cyclic motion in this accelerator should be possible. Progress is also reported on design and tests of a four-cavity electron counterpart accelerator for experiments to study effects on beam quality arising from variations injection phase window width. This device is powered by four 500-MW pulsed amplifiers at 1500, 1800, 2100, and 2400 MHz that provide phase synchronous outputs, since they are driven from a with harmonics derived from a phase-locked 300 MHz source.

  18. Hazards from High Intensity Lamps and Arcs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, D. H.

    1970-01-01

    The principal occupational health problem generally associated with high intensity arc lamps results from exposure of the eye and skin to ultraviolet radiation. Occasionally, the chorioretinal burns are of concern. The eye is generally more susceptible than the skin to injury from high intensity optical radiation sources whether ultraviolet, visible or infrared. Recent developments in technology have shown that some high intensity optical radiation sources which have output parameters greatly different from those encountered in the natural environment present a serious chorioretinal burn hazard.

  19. High-Intensity Plasma Glass Melter

    SciTech Connect

    2004-01-01

    Modular high-intensity plasma melter promises improved performance, reduced energy use, and lower emissions. The glass industry has used the same basic equipment for melting glass for the past 100 years.

  20. Fundamental Physics Explored with High Intensity Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajima, T.; Homma, K.

    2012-10-01

    Over the last century the method of particle acceleration to high energies has become the prime approach to explore the fundamental nature of matter in laboratory. It appears that the latest search of the contemporary accelerator based on the colliders shows a sign of saturation (or at least a slow-down) in increasing its energy and other necessary parameters to extend this frontier. We suggest two pronged approach enabled by the recent progress in high intensity lasers. First we envision the laser-driven plasma accelerator may be able to extend the reach of the collider. For this approach to bear fruit, we need to develop the technology of high averaged power laser in addition to the high intensity. For this we mention that the latest research effort of ICAN is an encouraging sign. In addition to this, we now introduce the concept of the noncollider paradigm in exploring fundamental physics with high intensity (and large energy) lasers. One of the examples we mention is the laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) far beyond TeV without large luminosity. If we relax or do not require the large luminosity necessary for colliders, but solely in ultrahigh energy frontier, we are still capable of exploring such a fundamental issue. Given such a high energetic particle source and high-intensity laser fields simultaneously, we expect to be able to access new aspects on the matter and the vacuum structure from fundamental physical point of views. LWFA naturally exploits the nonlinear optical effects in the plasma when it becomes of relativistic intensity. Normally nonlinear optical effects are discussed based upon polarization susceptibility of matter to external fields. We suggest application of this concept even to the vacuum structure as a new kind of order parameter to discuss vacuum-originating phenomena at semimacroscopic scales. This viewpoint unifies the following observables with the unprecedented experimental environment we envision; the dispersion relation of

  1. Rapidly pulsed, high intensity, incoherent light source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, J. C., Jr.; Brandhorst, H. W., Jr. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A rapid pulsing, high intensity, incoherent light is produced by selectively energizing a plurality of discharge lamps with a triggering circuit. Each lamp is connected to a capacitor, and a power supply is electrically connected to all but one of the capacitors. This last named capacitor is electrically connected to a discharge lamp which is connected to the triggering circuit.

  2. Definitive Reirradiation for Locoregionally Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer With Proton Beam Therapy or Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy: Predictors of High-Grade Toxicity and Survival Outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    McAvoy, Sarah; Ciura, Katherine; Wei, Caimiao; Rineer, Justin; Liao, Zhongxing; Chang, Joe Y.; Palmer, Matthew B.; Cox, James D.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Gomez, Daniel R.

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: Intrathoracic recurrence of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) after initial treatment remains a dominant cause of death. We report our experience using proton beam therapy and intensity modulated radiation therapy for reirradiation in such cases, focusing on patterns of failure, criteria for patient selection, and predictors of toxicity. Methods and Materials: A total of 102 patients underwent reirradiation for intrathoracic recurrent NSCLC at a single institution. All doses were recalculated to an equivalent dose in 2-Gy fractions (EQD2). All patients had received radiation therapy for NSCLC (median initial dose of 70 EQD2 Gy), with median interval to reirradiation of 17 months and median reirradiation dose of 60.48 EQD2 Gy. Median follow-up time was 6.5 months (range, 0-72 months). Results: Ninety-nine patients (97%) completed reirradiation. Median local failure-free survival, distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), and overall survival times were 11.43 months (range, 8.6-22.66 months), 11.43 months (range, 6.83-23.84 months), and 14.71 (range, 10.34-20.56 months), respectively. Toxicity was acceptable, with rates of grade ≥3 esophageal toxicity of 7% and grade ≥3 pulmonary toxicity of 10%. Of the patients who developed local failure after reirradiation, 88% had failure in either the original or the reirradiation field. Poor local control was associated with T4 disease, squamous histology, and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status score >1. Concurrent chemotherapy improved DMFS, but T4 disease was associated with poor DMFS. Higher T status, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status ≥1, squamous histology, and larger reirradiation target volumes led to worse overall survival; receipt of concurrent chemotherapy and higher EQD2 were associated with improved OS. Conclusions: Intensity modulated radiation therapy and proton beam therapy are options for treating recurrent non-small cell lung cancer. However, rates of

  3. The High Intensity Horizon at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Tschirhart, R.S.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-01

    Fermilab's high intensity horizon is 'Project-X' which is a US led initiative with strong international participation that aims to realize a next generation proton source that will dramatically extend the reach of Intensity Frontier research. The Project-X research program includes world leading sensitivity in long-baseline and short-baseline neutrino experiments, a rich program of ultra-rare muon and kaon decays, opportunities for next-generation electric dipole moment experiments and other nuclear/particle physics probes, and a platform to investigate technologies for next generation energy applications. A wide range of R&D activities has supported mission critical accelerator subsystems, such as high-gradient superconducting RF accelerating structures, efficient RF power systems, cryo-modules and cryogenic refrigeration plants, advanced beam diagnostics and instrumentation, high-power targetry, as well as the related infrastructure and civil construction preparing for a construction start of a staged program as early as 2017.

  4. Magnets for high intensity proton synchrotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Jean-Francois Ostiguy, Vladimir Kashikhine and Alexander Makarov

    2002-09-19

    Recently, there has been considerable interest at Fermilab for the Proton Driver, a future high intensity proton machine. Various scenarios are under consideration, including a superconducting linac. Each scenario present some special challenges. We describe here the magnets proposed in a recent study, the Proton Driver Study II, which assumes a conventional warm synchrotron, roughly of the size of the existing FNAL booster, but capable of delivering 380 kW at 8 GeV.

  5. Thomson scattering in high-intensity chirped laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Holkundkar, Amol R.; Harvey, Chris Marklund, Mattias

    2015-10-15

    We consider the Thomson scattering of an electron in an ultra-intense laser pulse. It is well known that at high laser intensities, the frequency and brilliance of the emitted radiation will be greatly reduced due to the electron losing energy before it reaches the peak field. In this work, we investigate the use of a small frequency chirp in the laser pulse in order to mitigate this effect of radiation reaction. It is found that the introduction of a negative chirp means the electron enters a high frequency region of the field while it still has a large proportion of its original energy. This results in a significant enhancement of the frequency and intensity of the emitted radiation as compared to the case without chirping.

  6. Intensity fluctuations of ultrasonic scattering in a highly turbulent flow.

    PubMed

    Shen, C; Lemmin, U

    2000-05-01

    Aspects of ultrasound intensity fluctuations backscattered from additive microstructures in a turbulent flow have been investigated theoretically and experimentally for the conditions of a small insonified volume, a high sound frequency and strong turbulence. These conditions are typically found in high resolution Doppler sonar applications. An easily applicable expression for the auto-correlation of scattering intensity fluctuations is obtained by introducing open-channel turbulence theory, a semi-empirical scalar spectrum (including a Batchelor spectrum) and a Gaussian window function. Experiments carried out in a laboratory-clear water, open-channel flow for different turbulence levels verify the underlying assumptions. A good agreement is found with the predictions made with the above-derived expression. The feasibility of extracting flow information from the backscattered intensity fluctuations is discussed.

  7. Computed Tomography–Guided Interstitial High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy in Combination With Regional Positive Lymph Node Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy in Locally Advanced Peripheral Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Phase 1 Clinical Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, Li; Zhang, Jian-wen; Lin, Sheng; Luo, Hui-Qun; Wen, Qing-Lian; He, Li-Jia; Shang, Chang-Ling; Ren, Pei-Rong; Yang, Hong-Ru; Pang, Hao-Wen; Yang, Bo; He, Huai-Lin; Chen, Yue; Wu, Jing-Bo

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: To assess the technical safety, adverse events, and efficacy of computed tomography (CT)-guided interstitial high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy in combination with regional positive lymph node intensity modulated radiation therapy in patients with locally advanced peripheral non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Twenty-six patients with histologically confirmed NSCLC were enrolled in a prospective, officially approved phase 1 trial. Primary tumors were treated with HDR brachytherapy. A single 30-Gy dose was delivered to the 90% isodose line of the gross lung tumor volume. A total dose of at least 70 Gy was administered to the 95% isodose line of the planning target volume of malignant lymph nodes using 6-MV X-rays. The patients received concurrent or sequential chemotherapy. We assessed treatment efficacy, adverse events, and radiation toxicity. Results: The median follow-up time was 28 months (range, 7-44 months). There were 3 cases of mild pneumothorax but no cases of hemothorax, dyspnea, or pyothorax after the procedure. Grade 3 or 4 acute hematologic toxicity was observed in 5 patients. During follow-up, mild fibrosis around the puncture point was observed on the CT scans of 2 patients, but both patients were asymptomatic. The overall response rates (complete and partial) for the primary mass and positive lymph nodes were 100% and 92.3%, respectively. The 1-year and 2-year overall survival (OS) rates were 90.9% and 67%, respectively, with a median OS of 22.5 months. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that HDR brachytherapy is safe and feasible for peripheral locally advanced NSCLC, justifying a phase 2 clinical trial.

  8. Ion Injectors for High-Intensity Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockli, Martin P.; Nakagawa, Takahide

    2014-02-01

    There are a growing number of applications for ion accelerators, with increasingly complex beam requirements and progressively higher beam intensities. The performance of the ion injector is critical to the success of these projects. First, there is the ion source that has to produce the desired ion species, with a large variety of desired species requiring vastly different ion sources. In addition, the ion source has to produce those ions with the desired rate and without debilitating impurities, as well as with the desired duty factor. Several examples will show that very successful ion sources can fail when the duty factor is increased because their lifetime becomes too short or their failure rate too high. Equally important is the extraction of those ions and their transport to the next stage of acceleration, because the slow ion velocities pose a serious challenge to increasing the intensity. As the beam intensity is increased, its emittance, stability and controllability become more important. This article cannot cover this subject in depth. It tries to provide a flavor of the complexities and serve as an introduction to further reading and studies.

  9. Ion source and injection line for high intensity medical cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, XianLu Guan, Fengping; Yao, Hongjuan; Zhang, TianJue; Yang, Jianjun; Song, Guofang; Ge, Tao; Qin, Jiuchang

    2014-02-15

    A 14 MeV high intensity compact cyclotron, CYCIAE-14, was built at China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE). An injection system based on the external H− ion source was used on CYCIAE-14 so as to provide high intensity beam, while most positron emission tomography cyclotrons adopt internal ion source. A beam intensity of 100 μA/14 MeV was extracted from the cyclotron with a small multi-cusp H− ion source (CIAE-CH-I type) and a short injection line, which the H− ion source of 3 mA/25 keV H− beam with emittance of 0.3π mm mrad and the injection line of with only 1.2 m from the extraction of ion source to the medial plane of the cyclotron. To increase the extracted beam intensity of the cyclotron, a new ion source (CIAE-CH-II type) of 9.1 mA was used, with maximum of 500 μA was achieved from the cyclotron. The design and test results of the ion source and injection line optimized for high intensity acceleration will be given in this paper.

  10. Ion source and injection line for high intensity medical cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, XianLu; Guan, Fengping; Yao, Hongjuan; Zhang, TianJue; Yang, Jianjun; Song, Guofang; Ge, Tao; Qin, Jiuchang

    2014-02-01

    A 14 MeV high intensity compact cyclotron, CYCIAE-14, was built at China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE). An injection system based on the external H- ion source was used on CYCIAE-14 so as to provide high intensity beam, while most positron emission tomography cyclotrons adopt internal ion source. A beam intensity of 100 μA/14 MeV was extracted from the cyclotron with a small multi-cusp H- ion source (CIAE-CH-I type) and a short injection line, which the H- ion source of 3 mA/25 keV H- beam with emittance of 0.3π mm mrad and the injection line of with only 1.2 m from the extraction of ion source to the medial plane of the cyclotron. To increase the extracted beam intensity of the cyclotron, a new ion source (CIAE-CH-II type) of 9.1 mA was used, with maximum of 500 μA was achieved from the cyclotron. The design and test results of the ion source and injection line optimized for high intensity acceleration will be given in this paper.

  11. High intensity, pulsed thermal neutron source

    DOEpatents

    Carpenter, J.M.

    1973-12-11

    This invention relates to a high intensity, pulsed thermal neutron source comprising a neutron-producing source which emits pulses of fast neutrons, a moderator block adjacent to the last neutron source, a reflector block which encases the fast neutron source and the moderator block and has a thermal neutron exit port extending therethrough from the moderator block, and a neutron energy- dependent decoupling reflector liner covering the interior surfaces of the thermal neutron exit port and surrounding all surfaces of the moderator block except the surface viewed by the thermal neutron exit port. (Official Gazette)

  12. HELIOS: A high intensity chopper spectrometer at LANSCE

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, T.E.; Broholm, C.; Fultz, B.

    1998-12-31

    A proposal to construct a high intensity chopper spectrometer at LANSCE as part of the SPSS upgrade project is discussed. HELIOS will be optimized for science requiring high sensitivity neutron spectroscopy. This includes studies of phonon density of states in small polycrystalline samples, magnetic excitations in quantum magnets and highly correlated electron systems, as well as parametric studies (as a function of pressure, temperature, or magnetic field) of S(Q,{omega}). By employing a compact design together with the use of supermirror guide in the incident flight path the neutron flux at HELIOS will be significantly higher than any other comparable instrument now operating.

  13. Going Small: Progress & Challenges of Philadelphia's Small High Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartmann, Tracey; Reumann-Moore, Rebecca; Evans, Shani Adia; Haxton, Clarisse; Maluk, Holly; Neild, Ruth Curran

    2009-01-01

    Between 2003 and 2007, and without significant outside funding, the School District of Philadelphia created 25 new small high schools. This study, begun by Research for Action in 2006, follows the start-up and early implementation of these small high schools in Philadelphia. The study found that parents and students are interested in small high…

  14. High intensity discharge device containing oxytrihalides

    DOEpatents

    Lapatovich, Walter P.; Keeffe, William M.; Liebermann, Richard W.; Maya, Jakob

    1987-01-01

    A fill composition for a high intensity discharge device including mercury, niobium oxytrihalide, and a molecular stabilization agent is provided. The molar ratio of niobium oxytrihalide to the molecular stabilization agent in the fill is in the range of from about 5:1 to about 7.5:1. Niobium oxytrihalide is present in the fill in sufficient amount to produce, by dissociation in the discharge, atomic niobium, niobium oxide, NbO, and niobium dioxide, NbO.sub.2, with the molar ratio of niobium-containing vapor species to mercury in the fill being in the range of from about 0.01:1 to about 0.50:1; and mercury pressure of about 1 to about 50 atmospheres at lamp operating temperature. There is also provided a high intensity discharge device comprising a sealed light-transmissive arc tube; the arc tube including the above-described fill; and an energizing means for producing an electric discharge within the arc tube.

  15. High intensity discharge device containing oxytrihalides

    DOEpatents

    Lapatovich, W.P.; Keeffe, W.M.; Liebermann, R.W.; Maya, J.

    1987-06-09

    A fill composition for a high intensity discharge device including mercury, niobium oxytrihalide, and a molecular stabilization agent is provided. The molar ratio of niobium oxytrihalide to the molecular stabilization agent in the fill is in the range of from about 5:1 to about 7.5:1. Niobium oxytrihalide is present in the fill in sufficient amount to produce, by dissociation in the discharge, atomic niobium, niobium oxide, NbO, and niobium dioxide, NbO[sub 2], with the molar ratio of niobium-containing vapor species to mercury in the fill being in the range of from about 0.01:1 to about 0.50:1; and mercury pressure of about 1 to about 50 atmospheres at lamp operating temperature. There is also provided a high intensity discharge device comprising a sealed light-transmissive arc tube; the arc tube including the above-described fill; and an energizing means for producing an electric discharge within the arc tube. 7 figs.

  16. High-intensity laser-atom interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joachain, Charles J.

    2014-11-01

    Following a historical introduction on the nature of light and its interaction with matter, a survey is given of the development of lasers capable of delivering short pulses of very intense radiation. The peak intensities of these laser pulses are so high that the corresponding laser fields can compete with, or even dominate, the Coulomb field in governing the dynamics of atomic systems. As a result, new phenomena, known as multiphoton processes, can occur. An outline is given of the basic properties found in the study of three important multiphoton processes. Firstly, the multiphoton ionization of atoms and the phenomenon of “above-threshold ionization”. Secondly, the emission by atoms of high-order harmonics of the frequency of the driving laser and their use to generate laser pulses having durations in the attosecond range. Thirdly, laser-assisted electron-atom collisions. A review is then given of the main non-perturbative methods which have been used to perform theoretical studies of multiphoton processes.

  17. Final focus system for high intensity beams

    SciTech Connect

    Henestroza, E.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Eylon, S.; Roy, P.K.; Yu, S.S.

    2003-05-01

    The NTX experiment at the Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory is exploring the performance of neutralized final focus systems for high perveance heavy ion beams. The NTX final focus system produces a converging beam at the entrance to the neutralized drift section where it focuses to a small spot. The final focus lattice consists of four pulsed quadrupole magnets. The main issues are the control of emittance growth due to high order fields from magnetic multipoles and image fields. We will present experimental results from NTX on beam envelope and phase space distributions, and compare these results with particle simulations using the particle-in-cell code WARP.

  18. Small Scale High Speed Turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    London, Adam P. (Inventor); Droppers, Lloyd J. (Inventor); Lehman, Matthew K. (Inventor); Mehra, Amitav (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A small scale, high speed turbomachine is described, as well as a process for manufacturing the turbomachine. The turbomachine is manufactured by diffusion bonding stacked sheets of metal foil, each of which has been pre-formed to correspond to a cross section of the turbomachine structure. The turbomachines include rotating elements as well as static structures. Using this process, turbomachines may be manufactured with rotating elements that have outer diameters of less than four inches in size, and/or blading heights of less than 0.1 inches. The rotating elements of the turbomachines are capable of rotating at speeds in excess of 150 feet per second. In addition, cooling features may be added internally to blading to facilitate cooling in high temperature operations.

  19. High-power, high-intensity laser propagation and interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Sprangle, Phillip; Hafizi, Bahman

    2014-05-15

    This paper presents overviews of a number of processes and applications associated with high-power, high-intensity lasers, and their interactions. These processes and applications include: free electron lasers, backward Raman amplification, atmospheric propagation of laser pulses, laser driven acceleration, atmospheric lasing, and remote detection of radioactivity. The interrelated physical mechanisms in the various processes are discussed.

  20. Light-intensity and high-intensity interval training improve cardiometabolic health in rats.

    PubMed

    Batacan, Romeo B; Duncan, Mitch J; Dalbo, Vincent J; Connolly, Kylie J; Fenning, Andrew S

    2016-09-01

    Physical activity has the potential to reduce cardiometabolic risk factors but evaluation of different intensities of physical activity and the mechanisms behind their health effects still need to be fully established. This study examined the effects of sedentary behaviour, light-intensity training, and high-intensity interval training on biometric indices, glucose and lipid metabolism, inflammatory and oxidative stress markers, and vascular and cardiac function in adult rats. Rats (12 weeks old) were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 groups: control (CTL; no exercise), sedentary (SED; no exercise and housed in small cages to reduce activity), light-intensity trained (LIT; four 30-min exercise bouts/day at 8 m/min separated by 2-h rest period, 5 days/week), and high-intensity interval trained (HIIT, four 2.5-min work bouts/day at 50 m/min separated by 3-min rest periods, 5 days/week). After 12 weeks of intervention, SED had greater visceral fat accumulation (p < 0.01) and slower cardiac conduction (p = 0.04) compared with the CTL group. LIT and HIIT demonstrated beneficial changes in body weight, visceral and epididymal fat weight, glucose regulation, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, total cholesterol, and mesenteric vessel contractile response compared with the CTL group (p < 0.05). LIT had significant improvements in insulin sensitivity and cardiac conduction compared with the CTL and SED groups whilst HIIT had significant improvements in systolic blood pressure and endothelium-independent vasodilation to aorta and mesenteric artery compared with the CTL group (p < 0.05). LIT and HIIT induce health benefits by improving traditional cardiometabolic risk factors. LIT improves cardiac health while HIIT promotes improvements in vascular health. PMID:27523646

  1. Light-intensity and high-intensity interval training improve cardiometabolic health in rats.

    PubMed

    Batacan, Romeo B; Duncan, Mitch J; Dalbo, Vincent J; Connolly, Kylie J; Fenning, Andrew S

    2016-09-01

    Physical activity has the potential to reduce cardiometabolic risk factors but evaluation of different intensities of physical activity and the mechanisms behind their health effects still need to be fully established. This study examined the effects of sedentary behaviour, light-intensity training, and high-intensity interval training on biometric indices, glucose and lipid metabolism, inflammatory and oxidative stress markers, and vascular and cardiac function in adult rats. Rats (12 weeks old) were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 groups: control (CTL; no exercise), sedentary (SED; no exercise and housed in small cages to reduce activity), light-intensity trained (LIT; four 30-min exercise bouts/day at 8 m/min separated by 2-h rest period, 5 days/week), and high-intensity interval trained (HIIT, four 2.5-min work bouts/day at 50 m/min separated by 3-min rest periods, 5 days/week). After 12 weeks of intervention, SED had greater visceral fat accumulation (p < 0.01) and slower cardiac conduction (p = 0.04) compared with the CTL group. LIT and HIIT demonstrated beneficial changes in body weight, visceral and epididymal fat weight, glucose regulation, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, total cholesterol, and mesenteric vessel contractile response compared with the CTL group (p < 0.05). LIT had significant improvements in insulin sensitivity and cardiac conduction compared with the CTL and SED groups whilst HIIT had significant improvements in systolic blood pressure and endothelium-independent vasodilation to aorta and mesenteric artery compared with the CTL group (p < 0.05). LIT and HIIT induce health benefits by improving traditional cardiometabolic risk factors. LIT improves cardiac health while HIIT promotes improvements in vascular health.

  2. HIGH-INTENSITY, HIGH CHARGE-STATE HEAVY ION SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    ALESSI,J.G.

    2004-08-16

    There are many accelerator applications for high intensity heavy ion sources, with recent needs including dc beams for RIA, and pulsed beams for injection into synchrotrons such as RHIC and LHC. The present status of sources producing high currents of high charge state heavy ions is reviewed. These sources include ECR, EBIS, and Laser ion sources. Benefits and limitations for these type sources are described. Possible future improvements in these sources are also mentioned.

  3. Applications of High Intensity Proton Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raja, Rajendran; Mishra, Shekhar

    2010-06-01

    Superconducting radiofrequency linac development at Fermilab / S. D. Holmes -- Rare muon decay experiments / Y. Kuno -- Rare kaon decays / D. Bryman -- Muon collider / R. B. Palmer -- Neutrino factories / S. Geer -- ADS and its potential / J.-P. Revol -- ADS history in the USA / R. L. Sheffield and E. J. Pitcher -- Accelerator driven transmutation of waste: high power accelerator for the European ADS demonstrator / J. L. Biarrotte and T. Junquera -- Myrrha, technology development for the realisation of ADS in EU: current status & prospects for realisation / R. Fernandez ... [et al.] -- High intensity proton beam production with cyclotrons / J. Grillenberger and M. Seidel -- FFAG for high intensity proton accelerator / Y. Mori -- Kaon yields for 2 to 8 GeV proton beams / K. K. Gudima, N. V. Mokhov and S. I. Striganov -- Pion yield studies for proton driver beams of 2-8 GeV kinetic energy for stopped muon and low-energy muon decay experiments / S. I. Striganov -- J-Parc accelerator status and future plans / H. Kobayashi -- Simulation and verification of DPA in materials / N. V. Mokhov, I. L. Rakhno and S. I. Striganov -- Performance and operational experience of the CNGS facility / E. Gschwendtner -- Particle physics enabled with super-conducting RF technology - summary of working group 1 / D. Jaffe and R. Tschirhart -- Proton beam requirements for a neutrino factory and muon collider / M. S. Zisman -- Proton bunching options / R. B. Palmer -- CW SRF H linac as a proton driver for muon colliders and neutrino factories / M. Popovic, C. M. Ankenbrandt and R. P. Johnson -- Rapid cycling synchrotron option for Project X / W. Chou -- Linac-based proton driver for a neutrino factory / R. Garoby ... [et al.] -- Pion production for neutrino factories and muon colliders / N. V. Mokhov ... [et al.] -- Proton bunch compression strategies / V. Lebedev -- Accelerator test facility for muon collider and neutrino factory R&D / V. Shiltsev -- The superconducting RF linac for muon

  4. Beta-alanine supplementation in high-intensity exercise.

    PubMed

    Harris, Roger C; Sale, Craig

    2012-01-01

    Glycolysis involves the oxidation of two neutral hydroxyl groups on each glycosyl (or glucosyl) unit metabolised, yielding two carboxylic acid groups. During low-intensity exercise these, along with the remainder of the carbon skeleton, are further oxidised to CO(2) and water. But during high-intensity exercise a major portion (and where blood flow is impaired, then most) is accumulated as lactate anions and H(+). The accumulation of H(+) has deleterious effects on muscle function, ultimately impairing force production and contributing to fatigue. Regulation of intracellular pH is achieved over time by export of H(+) out of the muscle, although physicochemical buffers in the muscle provide the first line of defence against H(+) accumulation. In order to be effective during high-intensity exercise, buffers need to be present in high concentrations in muscle and have pK(a)s within the intracellular exercise pH transit range. Carnosine (β-alanyl-L-histidine) is ideal for this role given that it occurs in millimolar concentrations within the skeletal muscle and has a pK(a) of 6.83. Carnosine is a cytoplasmic dipeptide formed by bonding histidine and β-alanine in a reaction catalysed by carnosine synthase, although it is the availability of β-alanine, obtained in small amounts from hepatic synthesis and potentially in greater amounts from the diet that is limiting to synthesis. Increasing muscle carnosine through increased dietary intake of β-alanine will increase the intracellular buffering capacity, which in turn might be expected to increase high-intensity exercise capacity and performance where this is pH limited. In this study we review the role of muscle carnosine as an H(+) buffer, the regulation of muscle carnosine by β-alanine, and the available evidence relating to the effects of β-alanine supplementation on muscle carnosine synthesis and the subsequent effects of this on high-intensity exercise capacity and performance.

  5. High intensity neutrino oscillation facilities in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edgecock, T. R.; Caretta, O.; Davenne, T.; Densam, C.; Fitton, M.; Kelliher, D.; Loveridge, P.; Machida, S.; Prior, C.; Rogers, C.; Rooney, M.; Thomason, J.; Wilcox, D.; Wildner, E.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Garoby, R.; Gilardoni, S.; Hansen, C.; Benedetto, E.; Jensen, E.; Kosmicki, A.; Martini, M.; Osborne, J.; Prior, G.; Stora, T.; Melo Mendonca, T.; Vlachoudis, V.; Waaijer, C.; Cupial, P.; Chancé, A.; Longhin, A.; Payet, J.; Zito, M.; Baussan, E.; Bobeth, C.; Bouquerel, E.; Dracos, M.; Gaudiot, G.; Lepers, B.; Osswald, F.; Poussot, P.; Vassilopoulos, N.; Wurtz, J.; Zeter, V.; Bielski, J.; Kozien, M.; Lacny, L.; Skoczen, B.; Szybinski, B.; Ustrycka, A.; Wroblewski, A.; Marie-Jeanne, M.; Balint, P.; Fourel, C.; Giraud, J.; Jacob, J.; Lamy, T.; Latrasse, L.; Sortais, P.; Thuillier, T.; Mitrofanov, S.; Loiselet, M.; Keutgen, Th.; Delbar, Th.; Debray, F.; Trophine, C.; Veys, S.; Daversin, C.; Zorin, V.; Izotov, I.; Skalyga, V.; Burt, G.; Dexter, A. C.; Kravchuk, V. L.; Marchi, T.; Cinausero, M.; Gramegna, F.; De Angelis, G.; Prete, G.; Collazuol, G.; Laveder, M.; Mazzocco, M.; Mezzetto, M.; Signorini, C.; Vardaci, E.; Di Nitto, A.; Brondi, A.; La Rana, G.; Migliozzi, P.; Moro, R.; Palladino, V.; Gelli, N.; Berkovits, D.; Hass, M.; Hirsh, T. Y.; Schaumann, M.; Stahl, A.; Wehner, J.; Bross, A.; Kopp, J.; Neuffer, D.; Wands, R.; Bayes, R.; Laing, A.; Soler, P.; Agarwalla, S. K.; Cervera Villanueva, A.; Donini, A.; Ghosh, T.; Gómez Cadenas, J. J.; Hernández, P.; Martín-Albo, J.; Mena, O.; Burguet-Castell, J.; Agostino, L.; Buizza-Avanzini, M.; Marafini, M.; Patzak, T.; Tonazzo, A.; Duchesneau, D.; Mosca, L.; Bogomilov, M.; Karadzhov, Y.; Matev, R.; Tsenov, R.; Akhmedov, E.; Blennow, M.; Lindner, M.; Schwetz, T.; Fernández Martinez, E.; Maltoni, M.; Menéndez, J.; Giunti, C.; González García, M. C.; Salvado, J.; Coloma, P.; Huber, P.; Li, T.; López Pavón, J.; Orme, C.; Pascoli, S.; Meloni, D.; Tang, J.; Winter, W.; Ohlsson, T.; Zhang, H.; Scotto-Lavina, L.; Terranova, F.; Bonesini, M.; Tortora, L.; Alekou, A.; Aslaninejad, M.; Bontoiu, C.; Kurup, A.; Jenner, L. J.; Long, K.; Pasternak, J.; Pozimski, J.; Back, J. J.; Harrison, P.; Beard, K.; Bogacz, A.; Berg, J. S.; Stratakis, D.; Witte, H.; Snopok, P.; Bliss, N.; Cordwell, M.; Moss, A.; Pattalwar, S.; Apollonio, M.

    2013-02-01

    The EUROnu project has studied three possible options for future, high intensity neutrino oscillation facilities in Europe. The first is a Super Beam, in which the neutrinos come from the decay of pions created by bombarding targets with a 4 MW proton beam from the CERN High Power Superconducting Proton Linac. The far detector for this facility is the 500 kt MEMPHYS water Cherenkov, located in the Fréjus tunnel. The second facility is the Neutrino Factory, in which the neutrinos come from the decay of μ+ and μ- beams in a storage ring. The far detector in this case is a 100 kt magnetized iron neutrino detector at a baseline of 2000 km. The third option is a Beta Beam, in which the neutrinos come from the decay of beta emitting isotopes, in particular He6 and Ne18, also stored in a ring. The far detector is also the MEMPHYS detector in the Fréjus tunnel. EUROnu has undertaken conceptual designs of these facilities and studied the performance of the detectors. Based on this, it has determined the physics reach of each facility, in particular for the measurement of CP violation in the lepton sector, and estimated the cost of construction. These have demonstrated that the best facility to build is the Neutrino Factory. However, if a powerful proton driver is constructed for another purpose or if the MEMPHYS detector is built for astroparticle physics, the Super Beam also becomes very attractive.

  6. High Intensity Organic Light-emitting Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Xiangfei

    This thesis is dedicated to the fabrication, modeling, and characterization to achieve high efficiency organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) for illumination applications. Compared to conventional lighting sources, OLEDs enabled the direct conversion of electrical energy into light emission and have intrigued the world's lighting designers with the long-lasting, highly efficient illumination. We begin with a brief overview of organic technology, from basic organic semiconductor physics, to its application in optoelectronics, i.e. light-emitting diodes, photovoltaics, photodetectors and thin-film transistors. Due to the importance of phosphorescent materials, we will focus on the photophysics of metal complexes that is central to high efficiency OLED technology, followed by a transient study to examine the radiative decay dynamics in a series of phosphorescent platinum binuclear complexes. The major theme of this thesis is the design and optimization of a novel architecture where individual red, green and blue phosphorescent OLEDs are vertically stacked and electrically interconnected by the compound charge generation layers. We modeled carrier generation from the metal-oxide/doped organic interface based on a thermally assisted tunneling mechanism. The model provides insights to the optimization of a stacked OLED from both electrical and optical point of view. To realize the high intensity white lighting source, the efficient removal of heat is of a particular concern, especially in large-area devices. A fundamental transfer matrix analysis is introduced to predict the thermal properties in the devices. The analysis employs Laplace transforms to determine the response of the system to the combined effects of conduction, convection, and radiation. This perspective of constructing transmission matrices greatly facilitates the calculation of transient coupled heat transfer in a general multi-layer composite. It converts differential equations to algebraic forms, and

  7. BEAM LOSS MECHANISMS IN HIGH INTENSITY LINACS

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, Michael A

    2012-01-01

    In the present operation of the Oak Ridge Spallation Neutron Source, 60-Hz, 825-us H beam pulses are accelerated to 910 MeV, and then compressed to less than a microsecond in the storage ring, to deliver 1 MW of beam power to the spallation target. The beam loss in the superconducting portion of the linac is higher than expected, and it has shown a surprising counter-intuitive correlation with quadrupole magnetic fields, with a loss minimum occurring when the quadrupoles are set to approximately half their design values. This behavior can now be explained by a recent set of experiments that show the beam loss is primarily due to intra-beam stripping. Beam halo is another important beam loss contributor, and collimation in the 2.5 MeV Medium Energy Beam Transport has proven to be an effective mitigation strategy. In this presentation, we will summarize these and other beam loss mechanisms that are important for high intensity linacs.

  8. High-Intensity Sweeteners and Energy Balance

    PubMed Central

    Swithers, Susan E.; Martin, Ashley A.; Davidson, Terry L.

    2010-01-01

    Recent epidemiological evidence points to a link between a variety of negative health outcomes (e.g. metabolic syndrome, diabetes and cardiovascular disease) and the consumption of both calorically sweetened beverages and beverages sweetened with high-intensity, non-caloric sweeteners. Research on the possibility that non-nutritive sweeteners promote food intake, body weight gain, and metabolic disorders has been hindered by the lack of a physiologically-relevant model that describes the mechanistic basis for these outcomes. We have suggested that based on Pavlovian conditioning principles, consumption of non-nutritive sweeteners could result in sweet tastes no longer serving as consistent predictors of nutritive postingestive consequences. This dissociation between the sweet taste cues and the caloric consequences could lead to a decrease in the ability of sweet tastes to evoke physiological responses that serve to regulate energy balance. Using a rodent model, we have found that intake of foods or fluids containing non-nutritive sweeteners was accompanied by increased food intake, body weight gain, accumulation of body fat, and weaker caloric compensation, compared to consumption of foods and fluids containing glucose. Our research also provided evidence consistent with the hypothesis that these effects of consuming saccharin may be associated with a decrement in the ability of sweet taste to evoke thermic responses, and perhaps other physiological, cephalic phase, reflexes that are thought to help maintain energy balance. PMID:20060008

  9. Physics of intense, high energy radiation effects.

    SciTech Connect

    Hjalmarson, Harold Paul; Hartman, E. Frederick; Magyar, Rudolph J.; Crozier, Paul Stewart

    2011-02-01

    This document summarizes the work done in our three-year LDRD project titled 'Physics of Intense, High Energy Radiation Effects.' This LDRD is focused on electrical effects of ionizing radiation at high dose-rates. One major thrust throughout the project has been the radiation-induced conductivity (RIC) produced by the ionizing radiation. Another important consideration has been the electrical effect of dose-enhanced radiation. This transient effect can produce an electromagnetic pulse (EMP). The unifying theme of the project has been the dielectric function. This quantity contains much of the physics covered in this project. For example, the work on transient electrical effects in radiation-induced conductivity (RIC) has been a key focus for the work on the EMP effects. This physics in contained in the dielectric function, which can also be expressed as a conductivity. The transient defects created during a radiation event are also contained, in principle. The energy loss lead the hot electrons and holes is given by the stopping power of ionizing radiation. This information is given by the inverse dielectric function. Finally, the short time atomistic phenomena caused by ionizing radiation can also be considered to be contained within the dielectric function. During the LDRD, meetings about the work were held every week. These discussions involved theorists, experimentalists and engineers. These discussions branched out into the work done in other projects. For example, the work on EMP effects had influence on another project focused on such phenomena in gases. Furthermore, the physics of radiation detectors and radiation dosimeters was often discussed, and these discussions had impact on related projects. Some LDRD-related documents are now stored on a sharepoint site (https://sharepoint.sandia.gov/sites/LDRD-REMS/default.aspx). In the remainder of this document the work is described in catergories but there is much overlap between the atomistic calculations, the

  10. Proton shock acceleration using a high contrast high intensity laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauthier, Maxence; Roedel, Christian; Kim, Jongjin; Aurand, Bastian; Curry, Chandra; Goede, Sebastian; Propp, Adrienne; Goyon, Clement; Pak, Art; Kerr, Shaun; Ramakrishna, Bhuvanesh; Ruby, John; William, Jackson; Glenzer, Siegfried

    2015-11-01

    Laser-driven proton acceleration is a field of intense research due to the interesting characteristics of this novel particle source including high brightness, high maximum energy, high laminarity, and short duration. Although the ion beam characteristics are promising for many future applications, such as in the medical field or hybrid accelerators, the ion beam generated using TNSA, the acceleration mechanism commonly achieved, still need to be significantly improved. Several new alternative mechanisms have been proposed such as collisionless shock acceleration (CSA) in order to produce a mono-energetic ion beam favorable for those applications. We report the first results of an experiment performed with the TITAN laser system (JLF, LLNL) dedicated to the study of CSA using a high intensity (5x1019W/cm2) high contrast ps laser pulse focused on 55 μm thick CH and CD targets. We show that the proton spectrum generated during the interaction exhibits high-energy mono-energetic features along the laser axis, characteristic of a shock mechanism.

  11. Performances of BNL high-intensity synchrotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Weng, W.T.

    1998-03-01

    The AGS proton synchrotron was completed in 1960 with initial intensity in the 10 to the 10th power proton per pulse (ppp) range. Over the years, through many upgrades and improvements, the AGS now reached an intensity record of 6.3 {times} 10{sup 13} ppp, the highest world intensity record for a proton synchrotron on a single pulse basis. At the same time, the Booster reached 2.2 {times} 10{sup 13} ppp surpassing the design goal of 1.5 {times} 10{sup 13} ppp due to the introduction of second harmonic cavity during injection. The intensity limitation caused by space charge tune spread and its relationship to injection energy at 50 MeV, 200 MeV, and 1,500 MeV will be presented as well as many critical accelerator manipulations. BNL currently participates in the design of an accumulator ring for the SNS project at Oak Ridge. The status on the issues of halo formation, beam losses and collimation are also presented.

  12. Salivary Cortisol Responses and Perceived Exertion during High Intensity and Low Intensity Bouts of Resistance Exercise

    PubMed Central

    McGuigan, Michael R.; Egan, Alison D.; Foster, Carl

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the salivary cortisol response to different intensities of resistance exercise. In addition, we wanted to determine the reliability of the session rating of perceived exertion (RPE) scale to monitor resistance exercise intensity. Subjects (8 men, 9 women) completed 2 trials of acute resistance training bouts in a counterbalanced design. The high intensity resistance exercise protocol consisted of six, ten-repetition sets using 75% of one repetition maximum (RM) on a Smith machine squat and bench press exercise (12 sets total). The low intensity resistance exercise protocol consisted of three, ten-repetition sets at 30% of 1RM of the same exercises as the high intensity protocol. Both exercise bouts were performed with 2 minutes of rest between each exercise and sessions were repeated to test reliability of the measures. The order of the exercise bouts was randomized with least 72 hours between each session. Saliva samples were obtained immediately before, immediately after and 30 mins following each resistance exercise bout. RPE measures were obtained using Borg’s CR-10 scale following each set. Also, the session RPE for the entire exercise session was obtained 30 minutes following completion of the session. There was a significant 97% increase in the level of salivary cortisol immediately following the high intensity exercise session (P<0.05). There was also a significant difference in salivary cortisol of 145% between the low intensity and high intensity exercise session immediately post-exercise (P<0.05). The low intensity exercise did not result in any significant changes in cortisol levels. There was also a significant difference between the session RPE values for the different intensity levels (high intensity 7.1 vs. low intensity 1.9) (P<0.05). The intraclass correlation coefficient for the session RPE measure was 0.95. It was concluded that the session RPE method is a valid and reliable method of quantifying

  13. Is high-intensity exercise better than moderate-intensity exercise for weight loss?

    PubMed

    De Feo, P

    2013-11-01

    This viewpoint debates the state-of-the-art research focusing on the optimal intensity of the exercise programs for inducing a sustained weight or fat-mass loss in overweight/obese people. In our demanding society, the most attractive messages in the popular press are those promising the best results in a short time. This might explain the emphasis given by media to those scientific articles that report the efficacy on weight loss of exercise programs by their shorter duration and higher intensity. However, in the literature on overweight or obese people, there is little conclusive evidence for more favorable effects with high-intensity training than with continuous moderate-intensity exercise on body weight or fat mass loss. Since both exercise protocols have been demonstrated as useful to reduce body weight, the decision on the intensity of exercise prescription should be individualized and based on outcomes different from fat or weight loss. In this regard, there are pro and contra arguments for the prescription of high-intensity aerobic exercise in obese people. Among the pro arguments, is the demonstration that, in several studies, high-intensity training appears to induce superior improvements in aerobic fitness. Among the contra arguments to prescribe high-intensity exercise is the demonstration that prescribing a higher-intensity exercise decreases adherence and results in the completion of less exercise. Thus, a successful exercise program should be proposed at a moderate intensity and a low perceived effort because obese subjects who have low self-efficacy, poor mood status, and are not familiar with high-intensity workouts could easily drop out.

  14. Light shield and cooling apparatus. [high intensity ultraviolet lamp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, T. G., Jr. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A light shield and cooling apparatus was developed for a high intensity ultraviolet lamp including water and high pressure air for cooling and additional apparatus for shielding the light and suppressing the high pressure air noise.

  15. High-intensity beam collimation and targetry

    SciTech Connect

    Mokhov, N.V.; /Fermilab

    2006-11-01

    Principles, design criteria and realization of reliable collimation systems for the high-power accelerators and hadron colliders are described. Functionality of collimators as the key elements of the machine protection system are discussed along with the substantial progress on the crystal collimation front. The key issues are considered in design of high-power target systems and achieving their best performance. Simulation code requirements are presented.

  16. Recent developments for high-intensity proton linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Wangler, T.P.; Garnett, R.W.; Gray, E.R.; Nath, S.

    1996-04-01

    High-intensity proton linacs are being proposed for new projects around the world, especially for tritium production, and for pulsed spallation neutron sources. Typical requirements for these linacs include peak beam current of about 100 mA, and final energies of 1 GeV and higher, APT, a tritium production linac, requires cw operation to obtain sufficient average tritium production linac, requires cw operation to obtain sufficient average beam power, and H{sup +} ion sources appear capable of providing the required current and emittances. The pulsed spallation neutron source requires a linac as an injector to one or more accumulator rings, and favors the use of an H{sup minus} beam to allow charge-exchange injection into the rings. For both applications high availability is demanded; the fraction of scheduled beam time for actual production must be 75% or more. Such a high availability requires low beam-loss to avoid radioactivation of the accelerator, and to allow hands-on maintenance that will keep the mean repair and maintenance times short. To keep the accelerator activation sufficiently low, the beam loss should not exceed about 0.1 to 1.0 nA/m, except perhaps for a few localized places, where special design adaptations could be made. The requirement of such small beam losses at such a high intensity presents a new beam physics challenge. This challenge will require greater understanding of the beam distribution, including the low- density beam halo, which is believed to be responsible for most of the beam losses. Furthermore, it will be necessary to choose the apertures so the beam losses will be acceptably low, and because large aperture size is generally accompanied by an economic penalty resulting from reduced power efficiency, an optimized choice of the aperture will be desirable.

  17. Engineering Food Ingredients with High-Intensity Ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Jochen; Kristbergsson, Kristberg; Kjartansson, Gunnar Thor

    The use of ultrasound in the food industry has increased in the last decades. Ultrasound has been used both to analyze food structure and composition at low ultrasonic intensities and high frequencies and to modify ingredients at high ultrasonic intensities and low frequencies. Application of the latter is referred to as high-intensity (power) ultrasonication and is generally carried out at frequencies of =0.1 MHz and ultrasonic intensities of 10-100 W cm-2. In the food industry, power ultrasonication has proved to be a highly effective food processing and preservation technology, and use of high-intensity ultrasound with or without heat may be used, for example, to denature enzymes, aid in the extraction of valuable compounds from plants and seeds, tenderize meat, and homogenize or disperse two-phase systems such as emulsions or suspensions (Mason et al., 1996).

  18. High-intensity sources for light ions

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, K.N.

    1995-10-01

    The use of the multicusp plasma generator as a source of light ions is described. By employing radio-frequency induction discharge, the performance of the multicusp source is greatly improved, both in lifetime and in high brightness H{sup +} and H{sup {minus}} beam production. A new technique for generating multiply-charged ions in this type of ion source is also presented.

  19. High intensity anthropogenic sound damages fish ears

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCauley, Robert D.; Fewtrell, Jane; Popper, Arthur N.

    2003-01-01

    Marine petroleum exploration involves the repetitive use of high-energy noise sources, air-guns, that produce a short, sharp, low-frequency sound. Despite reports of behavioral responses of fishes and marine mammals to such noise, it is not known whether exposure to air-guns has the potential to damage the ears of aquatic vertebrates. It is shown here that the ears of fish exposed to an operating air-gun sustained extensive damage to their sensory epithelia that was apparent as ablated hair cells. The damage was regionally severe, with no evidence of repair or replacement of damaged sensory cells up to 58 days after air-gun exposure.

  20. An improved high intensity recycling helium-3 beam source

    SciTech Connect

    Hedgeland, H.; Kole, P. R.; Allison, W.; Ellis, J.; Jardine, A. P.

    2009-07-15

    We describe an improved high intensity, recycling, supersonic atomic beam source. Changes address several issues previously limiting performance and reliability of the apparatus, including the use of newly available vacuum pumps and modifications to the recycling system. We achieve a source intensity of 2.5x10{sup 19} atoms/s/sr, almost twice that previously achievable during recycling. Current limits on intensity are discussed.

  1. Neutralized transport of high intensity beams

    SciTech Connect

    Henestroza, E.; Yu, S.S.; Eylon, S.; Roy, P.K.; Anders, A.; Sharp, W.; Efthimion, P.; Gilson, E.; Welch, D.; Rose, D.

    2003-05-01

    The NTX experiment at the Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory is exploring the performance of neutralized final focus systems for high perveance heavy ion beams. A converging ion beam at the exit of the final focus magnetic system is injected into a neutralized drift section. The neutralization is provided by a metal arc source and an RF plasma source. Effects of a ''plasma plug'', where electrons are extracted from a localized plasma in the upstream end of the drift section, and are then dragged along by the ion potential, as well as the ''volumetric plasma'', where neutralization is provided by the plasma laid down along the ion path, are both studied and their relative effects on the beam spot size are compared. Comparisons with 3-D PIC code predictions will also be presented.

  2. High-intensity focused ultrasound therapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Toyoaki; Nakano, Mayura; Hongo, Satoko; Shoji, Sunao; Nagata, Yohishiro; Satoh, Takefumi; Baba, Shiro; Usui, Yukio; Terachi, Toshiro

    2012-03-01

    Recent advances in high-intensity focused ultrasound, which was developed in the 1940s as a viable thermal tissue ablation approach, have increased its popularity. High-intensity focused ultrasound is currently utilized the most in Europe and Japan, but has not yet been approved by the Food and Drug Administration, USA, for this indication. The purpose of the present report is to review the scientific foundation of high-intensity focused ultrasound technology and the clinical outcomes achieved with commercially available devices. Recently published articles were reviewed to evaluate the current status of high-intensity focused ultrasound as a primary or salvage treatment option for localized prostate cancer. Improvements in the clinical outcome as a result of technical, imaging and technological advancements are described herein. A wide range of treatment options for organ-confined prostate cancer is available. However, high-intensity focused ultrasound is an attractive choice for men willing to choose less invasive options, although establishing the efficacy of high-intensity focused ultrasound requires longer follow-up periods. Technological advances, together with cultural and economic factors, have caused a dramatic shift from traditional open, radical prostatectomy to minimally invasive techniques. High-intensity focused ultrasound is likely to play a significant role in the future of oncology practice. PMID:22188161

  3. Light-intensity modulator withstands high heat fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maples, H. G.; Strass, H. K.

    1966-01-01

    Mechanism modulates and controls the intensity of luminous radiation in light beams associated with high-intensity heat flux. This modulator incorporates two fluid-cooled, externally grooved, contracting metal cylinders which when rotated about their longitudinal axes present a circular aperture of varying size depending on the degree of rotation.

  4. ELECTRON CLOUD EFFECTS IN HIGH INTENSITY PROTON ACCELERATORS.

    SciTech Connect

    WEI,J.; MACEK,R.J.

    2002-04-14

    One of the primary concerns in the design and operation of high-intensity proton synchrotrons and accumulators is the electron cloud and associated beam loss and instabilities. Electron-cloud effects are observed at high-intensity proton machines like the Los Alamos National Laboratory's PSR and CERN's SPS, and investigated experimentally and theoretically. In the design of next-generation high-intensity proton accelerators like the Spallation Neutron Source ring, emphasis is made in minimizing electron production and in enhancing Landau damping. This paper reviews the present understanding of the electron-cloud effects and presents mitigation measures.

  5. High Intensity Accelerator and Neutron Source in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Xialing; Wei, J.; Loong, Chun

    2011-06-01

    High intensity Accelerator is being studied all over world for numerous applications, which includes the waste transmutation, spallation neutron source and material irradiation facilities. The R/D activities of the technology of High intensity accelerator are also developed in China for some year, and have some good facilities around China. This paper will reports the status of some high intensity accelerators and neutron source in China, which including ADS/RFQ; CARR; CSNS; PKUNIFTY & CPHS. This paper will emphatically report the Compact Pulsed Hadron Source (CPHS) led by the Department of Engineering Physics of Tsinghua University in Beijing, China.

  6. THE PROBLEM OF THE SMALL HIGH SCHOOL.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SUMPTION, M. R.

    THE AUTHOR PERCEIVES THE JOB OF THE HIGH SCHOOL AS OFFERING GENERAL EDUCATION AND PREVOCATIONAL TRAINING TO ALL ON THE SAME BASIS. DEFINING THE LATTER AS COLLEGE PREPARATORY, COMMERCIAL, AND VOCATIONAL SUBJECTS, HE DISCUSSES THE PROBLEMS IN THIS DUAL PRESENTATION BY A SMALL HIGH SCHOOL. A CURRICULUM PROGRAM FOR A COMPREHENSIVE HIGH SCHOOL, SUITED…

  7. Repeated high-intensity exercise in professional rugby union.

    PubMed

    Austin, Damien; Gabbett, Tim; Jenkins, David

    2011-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to describe the frequency, duration, and nature of repeated high-intensity exercise in Super 14 rugby union. Time-motion analysis was used during seven competition matches over the 2008 and 2009 Super 14 seasons; five players from each of four positional groups (front row forwards, back row forwards, inside backs, and outside backs) were assessed (20 players in total). A repeated high-intensity exercise bout was considered to involve three or more sprints, and/or tackles and/or scrum/ruck/maul activities within 21 s during the same passage of play. The range of repeated high-intensity exercise bouts for each group in a match was as follows: 11-18 for front row forwards, 11-21 for back row forwards, 13-18 for inside backs, and 2-11 for outside backs. The durations of the most intense repeated high-intensity exercise bouts for each position ranged from 53 s to 165 s and the minimum recovery periods between repeated high-intensity exercise bouts ranged from 25 s for the back row forwards to 64 s for the front row forwards. The present results show that repeated high-intensity exercise bouts vary in duration and activities relative to position but all players in a game will average at least 10 changes in activity in the most demanding bouts and complete at least one tackle and two sprints. The most intense periods of activity are likely to last as long as 120 s and as little as 25 s recovery may separate consecutive repeated high-intensity exercise bouts. The present findings can be used by coaches to prepare their players for the most demanding passages of play likely to be experienced in elite rugby union. PMID:21756130

  8. Inelastic scattering in condensed matter with high intensity Moessbauer radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Yelon, W.B.; Schupp, G.

    1993-02-01

    The QUEGS facility at MURR has produced a number of new results and demonstrated the range of potential applications of high resolution, high intensity Moessbauer scattering. This work has been carried out by both MU and Purdue researchers and includes published results on Na, W, pentadecane, polydimethylsiloxane and other systems, manuscripts submitted on alkali halides (Phys. Rev. B) and accurate Moessbauer lineshape measurements (Phys. Rev. C), and manuscripts in preparation on glycerol, NiAl and Moessbauer spectra obtained by modulating a scattering crystal. Recently, new collaborations have been initiated which will substantially enhance our efforts. These are with W. Steiner (Vienna), G. Coddens (Saclay), and R. D. Taylor (Los Alamos). Steiner is experienced with Fe-57 Moessbauer scattering, while Coddens specializes in quasielastic neutron scattering; both of these areas naturally complement our work. R. D. Taylor has pioneered Moessbauer spectroscopy from the time of its discovery and has already made important contributions to our study of lattice dynamics and superconductivity for lead alloyed with small quantities of tin. At the same time, a significant instrument upgrade is underway, funded in part by the DOE-URIP program.

  9. H- Ion Sources for High Intensity Proton Drivers

    SciTech Connect

    Dudnikov, Vadim; Johnson, Rolland P.; Stockli, Martin P; Welton, Robert F; Dudnikova, Galina

    2010-01-01

    Spallation neutron source user facilities require reliable, intense beams of protons. The technique of H- charge exchange injection into a storage ring or synchrotron can provide the needed beam currents, but may be limited by the ion sources that have currents and reliability that do not meet future requirements and emittances that are too large for efficient acceleration. In this project we are developing an H- source which will synthesize the most important developments in the field of negative ion sources to provide high current, small emittance, good lifetime, high reliability, and power efficiency. We describe planned modifications to the present external antenna source at SNS that involve: 1) replacing the present 2 MHz plasma-forming solenoid antenna with a 60 MHz saddle-type antenna and 2) replacing the permanent multicusp magnet with a weaker electromagnet, in order to increase the plasma density near the outlet aperture. The SNS test stand will then be used to verify simulations of this approach that indicate significant improvements in H- output current and efficiency, where lower RF power will allow higher duty factor, longer source lifetime, and/or better reliability.

  10. Space Station Live: High-Intensity Exercise in Space

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Public Affairs Officer Lori Meggs talks with SPRINT Principal Investigator Lori Ploutz-Snyder to learn more about this high-intensity exercise research taking place aboard the International Sp...

  11. Probing new physics using high-intensity laser systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marklund, Mattias; Ilderton, Anton; Lundin, Joakim

    2011-06-01

    Current high-intensity laser sources offer a multitude of research, experiment and application possibilities, ranging from e.g. ionisation studies of atomic and molecular systems to particle acceleration for medical purposes. Planned upgrades of existing laser sources will further increase the deliverable intensities and make certain lowintensity (as compared to the Schwinger field) tests of quantum electrodynamics viable. Moreover, secondary sources of radiation, and planned future facilities, offer several-orders-of-magnitude increases in intensities. Thus, it is highly relevant to ask what kind of physics that may be probed using future light sources.

  12. Effect of high intensity ultrasound on the allergenicity of shrimp*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhen-Xing; Lin, Hong; Cao, Li-Min; Jameel, Khalid

    2006-01-01

    The tropomyosin fraction of shrimp proteins is potentially responsible for allergic reaction in individuals with genetic predisposition to allergy. However, there are no efficient and safe methods to reduce its allergenicity. High intensity ultrasound is known to change the structure of proteins. This study is aimed at assessing high intensity ultrasound’s effect on the allergenicity of shrimp allergen. Shrimp and purified shrimp allergen were treated with high intensity ultrasound for 30~180 min. Extracts of treated samples were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with pool serum of shrimp allergy patients and polyclonal anti-allergen antibodies and by immunoblotting after polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Shrimp treated with high intensity ultrasound showed a decrease in allergenicity measured with ELISA. A linear relationship between the immune response induced by treated shrimp allergen and the applied treatment time was observed. The decrease in allergenicity was confirmed by immunoblot assays with shrimp allergic patients serum. Allergenicity of shrimp allergen extracted from treated shrimp was higher than that of purified shrimp allergen with the same treatment time. Gel-filtration HPLC was applied for analysis of shrimp allergen after treatment with high intensity ultrasound. Some fractions were appeared with increasing treatment time. The results suggested that high intensity ultrasound could be used to reduce the allergenicity of shrimp. PMID:16532525

  13. High-intensity interval training evokes larger serum BDNF levels compared with intense continuous exercise.

    PubMed

    Saucedo Marquez, Cinthia Maria; Vanaudenaerde, Bart; Troosters, Thierry; Wenderoth, Nicole

    2015-12-15

    Exercise can have a positive effect on the brain by activating brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)-related processes. In healthy humans there appears to be a linear relationship between exercise intensity and the positive short-term effect of acute exercise on BDNF levels (i.e., the highest BDNF levels are reported after high-intensity exercise protocols). Here we performed two experiments to test the effectiveness of two high-intensity exercise protocols, both known to improve cardiovascular health, to determine whether they have a similar efficacy in affecting BDNF levels. Participants performed a continuous exercise (CON) protocol at 70% of maximal work rate and a high-intensity interval-training (HIT) protocol at 90% of maximal work rate for periods of 1 min alternating with 1 min of rest (both protocols lasted 20 min). We observed similar BDNF kinetics in both protocols, with maximal BDNF concentrations being reached toward the end of training (experiment 1). We then showed that both exercise protocols significantly increase BDNF levels compared with a rest condition (CON P = 0.04; HIT P < 0.001), with HIT reaching higher BDNF levels than CON (P = 0.035) (experiment 2). These results suggest that shorter bouts of high intensity exercise are slightly more effective than continuous high-intensity exercise for elevating serum BDNF. Additionally, 73% of the participants preferred the HIT protocol (P = 0.02). Therefore, we suggest that the HIT protocol might represent an effective and preferred intervention for elevating BDNF levels and potentially promoting brain health.

  14. High-intensity aerobic interval exercise in chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Philippe; Gayda, Mathieu; Juneau, Martin; Nigam, Anil

    2013-06-01

    Aerobic exercise training is strongly recommended in patients with heart failure (HF) and reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) to improve symptoms and quality of life. Moderate-intensity aerobic continuous exercise (MICE) is the best established training modality in HF patients. For about a decade, however, another training modality, high-intensity aerobic interval exercise (HIIE), has aroused considerable interest in cardiac rehabilitation. Originally used by athletes, HIIE consists of repeated bouts of high-intensity exercise interspersed with recovery periods. The rationale for its use is to increase exercise time spent in high-intensity zones, thereby increasing the training stimulus. Several studies have demonstrated that HIIE is more effective than MICE, notably for improving exercise capacity in patients with HF. The aim of the present review is to describe the general principles of HIIE prescription, the acute physiological effects, the longer-term training effects, and finally the future perspectives of HIIE in patients with HF.

  15. High-intensity intermittent activities at school: controversies and facts.

    PubMed

    Ratel, S; Lazaar, N; Dore, E; Baquet, G; Williams, C A; Berthoin, S; Van Praagh, E; Bedu, M; Duche, P

    2004-09-01

    In comparison to continuous aerobic type activity, little is known about high-intensity intermittent physical activity in children. Repeated short-term high-intensity activities (> maximal aerobic speed and <10 s) are more characteristic of the spontaneous physical activity of children. Recent studies have shown during repetitive bouts of sprints separated by short recovery intervals, that prepubescent children compared with adults are more able to maintain their performance without substantial fatigue. Moreover, repetitive runs at high velocities (near and higher than the maximal aerobic speed) separated by short recovery periods may elicit a high oxygen consumption in children. Several studies using interval training programmes for 7 weeks, twice a week for 30 min in physical education lessons showed that children's aerobic performance (maximal O2 uptake, maximal aerobic speed) could be enhanced. Training based on these repeated short-term high-intensity exercises could also improve children's anaerobic performance (short-term muscle power, strength and speed). Current evidence suggests that recovery from high-intensity exercises is faster in children than in adults and that repeated runs at high velocities separated by short recovery intervals can improve both aerobic and anaerobic performance. Although continuous aerobic type activity is more scientifically established as a training mode, repeated short-term high-intensity exercises in physical education programmes should be considered to enhance aerobic, as well as, anaerobic fitness in children. PMID:15756166

  16. Using a Hexagonal Mirror for Varying Light Intensity in the Measurement of Small-Angle Variation.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Meng-Chang; Lin, Jiun-You; Chang, Chia-Ou

    2016-08-16

    Precision positioning and control are critical to industrial-use processing machines. In order to have components fabricated with excellent precision, the measurement of small-angle variations must be as accurate as possible. To achieve this goal, this study provides a new and simple optical mechanism by varying light intensity. A He-Ne laser beam was passed through an attenuator and into a beam splitter. The reflected light was used as an intensity reference for calibrating the measurement. The transmitted light as a test light entered the optical mechanism hexagonal mirror, the optical mechanism of which was created by us, and then it entered the power detector after four consecutive reflections inside the mirror. When the hexagonal mirror was rotated by a small angle, the laser beam was parallel shifted. Once the laser beam was shifted, the hitting area on the detector was changed; it might be partially outside the sensing zone and would cause the variation of detection intensity. This variation of light intensity can be employed to measure small-angle variations. The experimental results demonstrate the feasibility of this method. The resolution and sensitivity are 3 × 10(-40) and 4 mW/° in the angular range of 0.6°, respectively, and 9.3 × 10(-50) and 13 mW/° in the angular range of 0.25°.

  17. Using a Hexagonal Mirror for Varying Light Intensity in the Measurement of Small-Angle Variation.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Meng-Chang; Lin, Jiun-You; Chang, Chia-Ou

    2016-01-01

    Precision positioning and control are critical to industrial-use processing machines. In order to have components fabricated with excellent precision, the measurement of small-angle variations must be as accurate as possible. To achieve this goal, this study provides a new and simple optical mechanism by varying light intensity. A He-Ne laser beam was passed through an attenuator and into a beam splitter. The reflected light was used as an intensity reference for calibrating the measurement. The transmitted light as a test light entered the optical mechanism hexagonal mirror, the optical mechanism of which was created by us, and then it entered the power detector after four consecutive reflections inside the mirror. When the hexagonal mirror was rotated by a small angle, the laser beam was parallel shifted. Once the laser beam was shifted, the hitting area on the detector was changed; it might be partially outside the sensing zone and would cause the variation of detection intensity. This variation of light intensity can be employed to measure small-angle variations. The experimental results demonstrate the feasibility of this method. The resolution and sensitivity are 3 × 10(-40) and 4 mW/° in the angular range of 0.6°, respectively, and 9.3 × 10(-50) and 13 mW/° in the angular range of 0.25°. PMID:27537893

  18. Using a Hexagonal Mirror for Varying Light Intensity in the Measurement of Small-Angle Variation

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Meng-Chang; Lin, Jiun-You; Chang, Chia-Ou

    2016-01-01

    Precision positioning and control are critical to industrial-use processing machines. In order to have components fabricated with excellent precision, the measurement of small-angle variations must be as accurate as possible. To achieve this goal, this study provides a new and simple optical mechanism by varying light intensity. A He-Ne laser beam was passed through an attenuator and into a beam splitter. The reflected light was used as an intensity reference for calibrating the measurement. The transmitted light as a test light entered the optical mechanism hexagonal mirror, the optical mechanism of which was created by us, and then it entered the power detector after four consecutive reflections inside the mirror. When the hexagonal mirror was rotated by a small angle, the laser beam was parallel shifted. Once the laser beam was shifted, the hitting area on the detector was changed; it might be partially outside the sensing zone and would cause the variation of detection intensity. This variation of light intensity can be employed to measure small-angle variations. The experimental results demonstrate the feasibility of this method. The resolution and sensitivity are 3 × 10−40 and 4 mW/° in the angular range of 0.6°, respectively, and 9.3 × 10−50 and 13 mW/° in the angular range of 0.25°. PMID:27537893

  19. Review of High-intensity Interval Training in Cardiac Rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Ito, Shigenori; Mizoguchi, Tatsuya; Saeki, Tomoaki

    2016-01-01

    For the secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease, comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation is required. This involves optimal medical therapy, education on nutrition and exercise therapy, and smoking cessation. Of these, efficient exercise therapy is a key factor. A highly effective training protocol is therefore warranted, which requires a high rate of compliance. Although moderate-intensity continuous training has been the main training regimen recommended in cardiac rehabilitation guidelines, high-intensity interval training has been reported to be more effective in the clinical and experimental setting from the standpoint of peak oxygen uptake and central and peripheral adaptations. In this review, we illustrate the scientific evidence for high-intensity interval training. We then verify this evidence and discuss its significance and the remaining issues. PMID:27580530

  20. Review of High-intensity Interval Training in Cardiac Rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Ito, Shigenori; Mizoguchi, Tatsuya; Saeki, Tomoaki

    2016-01-01

    For the secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease, comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation is required. This involves optimal medical therapy, education on nutrition and exercise therapy, and smoking cessation. Of these, efficient exercise therapy is a key factor. A highly effective training protocol is therefore warranted, which requires a high rate of compliance. Although moderate-intensity continuous training has been the main training regimen recommended in cardiac rehabilitation guidelines, high-intensity interval training has been reported to be more effective in the clinical and experimental setting from the standpoint of peak oxygen uptake and central and peripheral adaptations. In this review, we illustrate the scientific evidence for high-intensity interval training. We then verify this evidence and discuss its significance and the remaining issues.

  1. High-energy K{alpha} radiography using high-intensity, short-pulse lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H.-S.; Chung, H.-K.; Izumi, N.; Key, M.H.; King, J.A.; Koch, J.A.; Landen, O.L.; Patel, P.K.; Price, D.F.; Remington, B.A.; Robey, H.F.; Snavely, R.A.; Tabak, M.; Town, R.P.J.; Wickersham, J.E.; Chambers, D.M.; Eagleton, R.; Goldsack, T.; Clarke, R.J.; Heathcote, R.

    2006-05-15

    The characteristics of 22-40 keV K{alpha} x-ray sources are measured. These high-energy sources are produced by 100 TW and petawatt high-intensity lasers and will be used to develop and implement workable radiography solutions to probe high-Z and dense materials for the high-energy density experiments. The measurements show that the K{alpha} source size from a simple foil target is larger than 60 {mu}m, too large for most radiography applications. The total K{alpha} yield is independent of target thicknesses, verifying that refluxing plays a major role in photon generation. Smaller radiating volumes emit brighter K{alpha} radiation. One-dimensional radiography experiments using small-edge-on foils resolved 10 {mu}m features with high contrast. Experiments were performed to test a variety of small volume two-dimensional point sources such as cones, wires, and embedded wires, measured photon yields, and compared the measurements with predictions from hybrid-particle-in-cell simulations. In addition to high-energy, high-resolution backlighters, future experiments will also need imaging detectors and diagnostic tools that are workable in the high-energy range. An initial look at some of these detector issues is also presented.

  2. Acoustic intensity near a high-powered military jet aircraft.

    PubMed

    Stout, Trevor A; Gee, Kent L; Neilsen, Tracianne B; Wall, Alan T; James, Michael M

    2015-07-01

    The spatial variation in vector acoustic intensity has been calculated between 100 and 3000 Hz near a high-performance military aircraft. With one engine of a tethered F-22A Raptor operating at military power, a tetrahedral intensity probe was moved to 27 locations in the geometric near and mid-fields to obtain the frequency-dependent intensity vector field. The angles of the maximum intensity region rotate from aft to sideline with increasing frequency, becoming less directional above 800 Hz. Between 100 and 400 Hz, which are principal radiation frequencies, the ray-traced dominant source region rapidly contracts and moves upstream, approaching nearly constant behavior by 1000 Hz. PMID:26233049

  3. Acoustic intensity near a high-powered military jet aircraft.

    PubMed

    Stout, Trevor A; Gee, Kent L; Neilsen, Tracianne B; Wall, Alan T; James, Michael M

    2015-07-01

    The spatial variation in vector acoustic intensity has been calculated between 100 and 3000 Hz near a high-performance military aircraft. With one engine of a tethered F-22A Raptor operating at military power, a tetrahedral intensity probe was moved to 27 locations in the geometric near and mid-fields to obtain the frequency-dependent intensity vector field. The angles of the maximum intensity region rotate from aft to sideline with increasing frequency, becoming less directional above 800 Hz. Between 100 and 400 Hz, which are principal radiation frequencies, the ray-traced dominant source region rapidly contracts and moves upstream, approaching nearly constant behavior by 1000 Hz.

  4. Beam diagnostics at high-intensity storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, M. )

    1994-10-10

    Beam diagnostics at high-intensity facilities feature their own special set of problems and characteristics, issues peculiar to high-intensity storage rings include beam loss, beam halos, extraction efficiency, beam in the gap, clearing electrodes, and beam-profile measurement. The Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring (PSR) is a nice example of a high-intensity storage ring. I will discuss in some detail three diagnostic systems currently in use at the PSR: the beam-loss-monitor system, the electron-clearing system, and the beam-in-the-gap monitor. Much of our discussion is inspired by the problems we have encountered and the useful things we have learned while commissioning and developing the PSR. Another inspiration is our work on the next-generation neutron-spallation source, also known as the National Center for Neutron Research (NCNR).

  5. Beam diagnostics at high-intensity storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, M.

    1993-11-01

    Beam diagnostics at high-intensity facilities feature their own special set of problems and characteristics. Issues peculiar to high-intensity storage rings include beam loss, beam halos, extraction efficiency, beam in the gap, clearing electrodes, and beam-profile measurement. The Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring (PSR) is a nice example of a high-intensity storage ring. The author discusses in some detail three diagnostic systems currently in use at the PSR: the beam-loss-monitor system, the electron-clearing system, and the beam-in-the-gap monitor. Much of the discussion is inspired by the problems that were encountered and the useful things learned while commissioning and developing the PSR. Another inspiration is the work on the next-generation neutron-spallation source, also known as the National Center for Neutron Research (NCNR).

  6. Response of graphene to femtosecond high-intensity laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, Adam; Cormode, Daniel; Reynolds, Collin; Newhouse-Illige, Ty; LeRoy, Brian J.; Sandhu, Arvinder S.

    2011-08-01

    We study the response of graphene to high-intensity, 50-femtosecond laser pulse excitation. We establish that graphene has a high ({approx}3 x 10{sup 12} Wcm{sup -2}) single-shot damage threshold. Above this threshold, a single laser pulse cleanly ablates graphene, leaving microscopically defined edges. Below this threshold, we observe laser-induced defect formation leading to degradation of the lattice over multiple exposures. We identify the lattice modification processes through in-situ Raman microscopy. The effective lifetime of chemical vapor deposition grown graphene under femtosecond near-infrared irradiation and its dependence on laser intensity is determined. These results also define the limits of non-linear applications of graphene in femtosecond high-intensity regime.

  7. Drivers of Intensity and Prevalence of Flea Parasitism on Small Mammals in East African Savanna Ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Young, Hillary S; Dirzo, Rodolfo; McCauley, Douglas J; Agwanda, Bernard; Cattaneo, Lia; Dittmar, Katharina; Eckerlin, Ralph P; Fleischer, Robert C; Helgen, Lauren E; Hintz, Ashley; Montinieri, John; Zhao, Serena; Helgen, Kristofer M

    2015-06-01

    The relative importance of environmental factors and host factors in explaining variation in prevalence and intensity of flea parasitism in small mammal communities is poorly established. We examined these relationships in an East African savanna landscape, considering multiple host levels: across individuals within a local population, across populations within species, and across species within a landscape. We sampled fleas from 2,672 small mammals of 27 species. This included a total of 8,283 fleas, with 5 genera and 12 species identified. Across individual hosts within a site, both rodent body mass and season affected total intensity of flea infestation, although the explanatory power of these factors was generally modest (<10%). Across host populations in the landscape, we found consistently positive effects of host density and negative effects of vegetation cover on the intensity of flea infestation. Other factors explored (host diversity, annual rainfall, anthropogenic disturbance, and soil properties) tended to have lower and less consistent explanatory power. Across host species in the landscape, we found that host body mass was strongly positively correlated with both prevalence and intensity of flea parasitism, while average robustness of a host species to disturbance was not correlated with flea parasitism. Cumulatively, these results provide insight into the intricate roles of both host and environmental factors in explaining complex patterns of flea parasitism across landscape mosaics.

  8. High intensity focused ultrasound calibration - status and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivens, I. H.; ter Haar, G. R.

    2004-01-01

    High intensity focused ultrasound (FUS) is increasingly being used as a cancer treatment. The technique uses focused high power sources located some distance from the target tumour to cause thermal damage, usually in organs such as the liver and kidney. For prostate cancer treatment, the energy is delivered using a trans-rectal probe. FUS usually uses frequencies between 0.5 and 4.0 MHz, with free-field spatial-peak intensity values quoted in the range 1-20 kW cm-2. This emerging therapy presents new challenges for calibration of the acoustic fields used and characterisation of exposures.

  9. The shaped critical surface in high intensity laser plasma interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Schumacher, D. W.; Kemp, G. E.; Link, A.; Freeman, R. R.; Van Woerkom, L. D.

    2011-01-15

    This paper describes an investigation of the properties of the relativistic critical surface in a high intensity laser-plasma interaction, specifically the spatial morphology of the surface and its effect upon the divergence of the reflected light. The particle-in-cell code LSP running in two dimensions (2d3v) was used to model the formation of the critical surface and to show that it resides at a varying depth into the material that is dependent on both the intensity radial dependence of the laser focus as well as the shape of the longitudinal vacuum-material interface. The result is a shaped 'mirror' surface that creates a reflected beam with phase and amplitude information informed by the extent of the preplasma present before the intense laser pulse arrived. A robust, highly effective means of experimentally determining the preplasma conditions for any high intensity laser-matter interaction is proposed using this effect. The important physics is elucidated with a simplified model that, within reasonable intensity bounds, recasts the effect of the complex laser-plasma interaction on the reflected beam into a standard Gaussian optics calculation.

  10. Glassy carbon as an absolute intensity calibration standard for small-angle scattering.

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, F.; Ilavsky, J.; Long, G.; Allen, A.; Quintana, J.; Jemian, P.; NIST

    2010-05-01

    Absolute calibration of small-angle scattering (SAS) intensity data (measured in terms of the differential scattering cross section per unit sample volume per unit solid angle) is essential for many important aspects of quantitative SAS analysis, such as obtaining the number density, volume fraction, and specific surface area of the scatterers. It also enables scattering data from different instruments (light, X-ray, or neutron scattering) to be combined, and it can even be useful to detect the existence of artifacts in the experimental data. Different primary or secondary calibration methods are available. In the latter case, absolute intensity calibration requires a stable artifact with the necessary scattering profile. Glassy carbon has sometimes been selected as this intensity calibration standard. Here we review the spatial homogeneity and temporal stability of one type of commercially available glassy carbon that is being used as an intensity calibration standard at a number of SAS facilities. We demonstrate that glassy carbon is sufficiently homogeneous and stable during routine use to be relied upon as a suitable standard for absolute intensity calibration of SAS data.

  11. Clinical applications of high-intensity focused ultrasound.

    PubMed

    She, W H; Cheung, T T; Jenkins, C R; Irwin, M G

    2016-08-01

    Ultrasound has been developed for therapeutic use in addition to its diagnostic ability. The use of focused ultrasound energy can offer a non-invasive method for tissue ablation, and can therefore be used to treat various solid tumours. High-intensity focused ultrasound is being increasingly used in the treatment of both primary and metastatic tumours as these can be precisely located for ablation. It has been shown to be particularly useful in the treatment of uterine fibroids, and various solid tumours including those of the pancreas and liver. High-intensity focused ultrasound is a valid treatment option for liver tumours in patients with significant medical co-morbidity who are at high risk for surgery or who have relatively poor liver function that may preclude hepatectomy. It has also been used as a form of bridging therapy while patients awaiting cadaveric donor liver transplantation. In this article, we outline the principles of high-intensity focused ultrasound and its clinical applications, including the management protocol development in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma in Hong Kong by performing a search on MEDLINE (OVID), EMBASE, and PubMed. The search of these databases ranged from the date of their establishment until December 2015. The search terms used were: high-intensity focused ultrasound, ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, liver tumour, hepatocellular carcinoma, pancreas, renal cell carcinoma, prostate cancer, breast cancer, fibroids, bone tumour, atrial fibrillation, glaucoma, Parkinson's disease, essential tremor, and neuropathic pain. PMID:27380753

  12. Short-pulse, high-intensity lasers at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, A.J.; Roberts, J.P.; Rodriguez, G.; Fulton, R.D.; Kyrala, G.A.; Schappert, G.T.

    1994-03-01

    Advances in ultrafast lasers and optical amplifiers have spurred the development of terawatt-class laser systems capable of delivering focal spot intensities approaching 10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2}. At these extremely high intensities, the optical field strength is more than twenty times larger than the Bohr electric field, permitting investigations of the optical properties of matter in a previously unexplored regime. The authors describe two laser systems for high intensity laser interaction experiments: The first is a terawatt system based on amplification of femtosecond pulses in XeCl which yields 250 mJ in 275 fs and routinely produces intensifies on target in excess of 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}. The second system is based on chirped pulse amplification of 100-fs pulses in Ti:sapphire.

  13. Can small intensive case management teams be as effective as large teams?

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Somaia

    2015-02-01

    In 2007, the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) implemented a program to deliver the full array of Assertive Community Treatment services in areas with low population density using teams with small staffs. VHA administrative data were used to compare treatment and outcomes of veterans who received services from teams with only two or three staff (N=805) and veterans served by teams with ten or more staff (N=861). After adjusting for baseline difference, smaller teams had statistically significantly less symptom improvement and smaller declines in suicidality indices but effect sizes were small and there were no differences on 11 other outcomes. These data demonstrate the clinical need, practical feasibility and potential effectiveness of providing intensive case management through small teams.

  14. High intensity exercise decreases global brain glucose uptake in humans

    PubMed Central

    Kemppainen, Jukka; Aalto, Sargo; Fujimoto, Toshihiko; Kalliokoski, Kari K; Långsjö, Jaakko; Oikonen, Vesa; Rinne, Juha; Nuutila, Pirjo; Knuuti, Juhani

    2005-01-01

    Physiological activation increases glucose uptake locally in the brain. However, it is not known how high intensity exercise affects regional and global brain glucose uptake. The effect of exercise intensity and exercise capacity on brain glucose uptake was directly measured using positron emission tomography (PET) and [18F]fluoro-deoxy-glucose ([18F]FDG). Fourteen healthy, right-handed men were studied after 35 min of bicycle exercise at exercise intensities corresponding to 30, 55 and 75% of V˙O2max on three separate days. [18F]FDG was injected 10 min after the start of the exercise. Thereafter exercise was continued for another 25 min. PET scanning of the brain was conducted after completion of the exercise. Regional glucose metabolic rate (rGMR) decreased in all measured cortical regions as exercise intensity increased. The mean decrease between the highest and lowest exercise intensity was 32% globally in the brain (38.6 ± 4.6 versus 26.1 ± 5.0 μmol (100 g)−1 min−1, P < 0.001). Lactate availability during exercise tended to correlate negatively with the observed brain glucose uptake. In addition, the decrease in glucose uptake in the dorsal part of the anterior cingulate cortex (37% versus 20%, P < 0.05 between 30% and 75% of V˙O2max) was significantly more pronounced in subjects with higher exercise capacity. These results demonstrate that brain glucose uptake decreases with increase in exercise intensity. Therefore substrates other than glucose, most likely lactate, are utilized by the brain in order to compensate the increased energy needed to maintain neuronal activity during high intensity exercise. Moreover, it seems that exercise training could be related to adaptive metabolic changes locally in the frontal cortical regions. PMID:16037089

  15. High-intensity and resistance training and elite young athletes.

    PubMed

    Ratel, Sébastien

    2011-01-01

    Although in the past resistance and high-intensity exercise training among young children was the subject of numerous controversies, it is now well-documented that this training mode is a safe and effective means of developing maximal strength, maximal power output and athletic performance in youth, provided that exercises are performed with appropriate supervision and precautions. Muscular strength and power output values measured from vertical jump and Wingate anaerobic tests are higher in elite than in non-elite young athletes and normal children, and the specific training effects on maximal power output normalised for body size are clearly more distinct before puberty. At present, there is no scientific evidence to support the view that high-intensity and/or resistance training might hinder growth and maturation in young children. Pre-pubertal growth is not adversely affected by sport at a competitive level and anthropometric factors are of importance for choice of sport in children. However, coaches, teachers and parents should be aware that unsupervised high-intensity and resistance training programmes involving maximal loads or too frequently repeated resistance exercises increase the risk of injury. Resistance training alone is an effective additional means of developing athletic performance throughout planned youth sports training programmes. Strategies for enhancing the effectiveness and safety of youth resistance and high-intensity exercise training are discussed in this chapter. PMID:21178368

  16. Risking Intensity: Reading and Writing Poetry with High School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michaels, Judith Rowe

    Aimed at junior and senior high school teachers and artists in residence, this book urges teachers and students to read and write poetry "as though their lives depended upon it," and to breathe life into classroom writing traditions that are not hands-on or intense. Each chapter is set in the classroom. Poems by students and teacher illustrate…

  17. Conceptual design of a superconducting high-intensity proton linac

    SciTech Connect

    Dominic Chan, K.C.

    1996-09-01

    A SCRF (superconducting RF linac) has been developed for a high-intensity proton linac which will be used as the driver for neutron sources. This design is conservative, using current SCRF technologies. As well as lowering operating cost, the design offers performance advantages in availability, beam loss, and upgradability, which are important for the application as a neutron source.

  18. High-Intensity Interval Training for Improving Postprandial Hyperglycemia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little, Jonathan P.; Francois, Monique E.

    2014-01-01

    High-intensity interval training (HIIT) has garnered attention in recent years as a time-efficient exercise option for improving cardiovascular and metabolic health. New research demonstrates that HIIT may be particularly effective for improving postprandial hyperglycemia in individuals with, or at risk for, type 2 diabetes (T2D). These findings…

  19. Nonlinear behavior in high-intensity discharge lamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, Bernd; Schwieger, Joerg; Wolff, Marcus; Manders, Freddy; Suijker, Jos

    2016-06-01

    The light flicker problem of high intensity discharge lamps is studied numerically and experimentally. It is shown that in some respects the systems behave very similar to the forced Duffing oscillator with a softening spring. In particular, the jump phenomenon and hysteresis are observed in the simulations and in the experiments.

  20. Drift tube suspension for high intensity linear accelerators

    DOEpatents

    Liska, Donald J.; Schamaun, Roger G.; Clark, Donald C.; Potter, R. Christopher; Frank, Joseph A.

    1982-01-01

    The disclosure relates to a drift tube suspension for high intensity linear accelerators. The system comprises a series of box-sections girders independently adjustably mounted on a linear accelerator. A plurality of drift tube holding stems are individually adjustably mounted on each girder.

  1. Drift tube suspension for high intensity linear accelerators

    DOEpatents

    Liska, D.J.; Schamaun, R.G.; Clark, D.C.; Potter, R.C.; Frank, J.A.

    1980-03-11

    The disclosure relates to a drift tube suspension for high intensity linear accelerators. The system comprises a series of box-sections girders independently adjustably mounted on a linear accelerator. A plurality of drift tube holding stems are individually adjustably mounted on each girder.

  2. High Energy K(alpha) Radiography Using High-intensity, Short-pulse Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H; Izumi, N; Key, M H; King, J A; Koch, J A; Landen, O L; Patel, P K; Price, D F; Remington, B A; Robey, H F; Snavely, R A; Tabak, M; Town, R J; Wickersham, J E; Stoeckl, C; Storm, M; Theobald, W; Chambers, D M; Eagelton, R; Goldsack, T; Clarke, R J; Heathcote, R; Giraldez, E; Nikroo, A; Steinman, D A; Stephens, R B; Zhang, B B

    2005-11-16

    We have performed experiments using Callisto, the Vulcan 100 TW and the Vulcan Petawatt high intensity lasers to understand the characteristics of high energy, K{alpha} x-ray sources and to implement workable radiography solutions at 20-100 keV. Our measurements show that the K{alpha} size from a simple foil target is larger than 60 {micro}m, far larger than the experiment resolution requirement. The total K{alpha} yield is independent of target thicknesses verifying that refluxing plays a major role in photon generation. Smaller radiating volumes emit brighter K{alpha} radiation. 1-D radiography experiments using small-edge-on foils resolved 10 {micro}m features with high contrast. We tested a variety of small volume 2-D point sources such as cones, wires, and embedded wires, measuring photon yields and comparing our measurements with predictions from hybrid-PIC LSP simulations. In addition to high-energy, high-resolution backlighters, future experiments will also need imaging detectors and diagnostic tools that are workable in the 20-100 keV energy range. An initial look at some of these detector issues is also presented.

  3. High Intensity Femtosecond XUV Pulse Interactions with Atomic Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffmann, K.; Murphy, B.; Keto, J.; Ditmire, T.

    2009-09-10

    The interactions of large xenon clusters irradiated by intense, femtosecond extreme-ultraviolet pulses at a wavelength of 38 nm have been studied. Using high harmonic generation from a 35 fs near-infrared terawatt laser, clusters have been irradiated by XUV pulses of 10{sup 11} W/cm{sup 2} intensity. Charge states up to Xe{sup 8+} are observed, states well above that produced by single atom illumination, indicating that plasma continuum lowering is important. Furthermore the kinetic energy distribution of the exploding ions is consistent with a quasineutral hydrodynamic expansion, rather than a Coulomb explosion.

  4. High intensity proton operation at the Brookhaven AGS accelerator complex

    SciTech Connect

    Ahrens, L.A.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Bleser, E.; Brennan, J.M.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.W.; Onillon, E.; Reece, R.K.; Roser, T.; Soukas, A.

    1994-08-01

    With the completion of the AGS rf upgrade, and the implementation of a transition {open_quotes}jump{close_quotes}, all of accelerator systems were in place in 1994 to allow acceleration of the proton intensity available from the AGS Booster injector to AGS extraction energy and delivery to the high energy users. Beam commissioning results with these new systems are presented. Progress in identifying and overcoming other obstacles to higher intensity are given. These include a careful exploration of the stopband strengths present on the AGS injection magnetic porch, and implementation of the AGS single bunch transverse dampers throughout the acceleration cycle.

  5. High-intensity laser heating in liquids: Multiphoton absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Longtin, J.P.; Tien, C.L.

    1995-12-31

    At high laser intensities, otherwise transparent liquids can absorb strongly by the mechanism of multiphoton absorption, resulting in absorption and heating several orders of magnitude greater than classical, low-intensity mechanisms. The use of multiphoton absorption provides a new mechanism for strong, controlled energy deposition in liquids without bulk plasma formation, shock waves, liquid ejection, etc., which is of interest for many laser-liquid applications, including laser desorption of liquid films, laser particle removal, and laser water removal from microdevices. This work develops a microscopically based model of the heating during multiphoton absorption in liquids. The dependence on pulse duration, intensity, wavelength, repetition rate, and liquid properties is discussed. Pure water exposed to 266 nm laser radiation is investigated, and a novel heating mechanism for water is proposed that uses multiple-wavelength laser pulses.

  6. The Relationship Between Intensity Indicators in Small-Sided Soccer Games

    PubMed Central

    David, Casamichana; Julen, Castellano

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the relationship between different kinds of intensity indicators in small-sided soccer games. This descriptive correlational study included 14 semi-professional male soccer players (21.3 ± 2.3 years, 174 ± 4.0 cm, 73.4 ± 5.1 kg) from the same team. The players were monitored by means of heart rate monitors and GPS devices during 27 small-sided games of nine different formats, yielding a total of 217 recordings. After each game the Borg scale was used to give a rate of perceived exertion (RPE). The internal load indicators were the mean heart rate relative to the individual maximum (%HRmean) and the RPE, while those for the external load were the player load, total distance covered, distance covered in two intensity ranges (>18 km·h-1 and >21 km·h-1), and frequency of effort (in the same two intensity ranges). There was a significant moderate correlation (r=0.506) between the two internal load measurements (%HRmean and RPE). Although there were significant correlations of different degrees between various external load measurements, only the player load was significantly correlated with the internal load indicators (r=0.331 with %HRmean and r=0.218 with RPE). During training programes of this kind, it is necessary to consider a range of intensity indicators so as to obtain complementary information. This will enable coaches to more accurately assess the load imposed on players and therefore optimize the training process. PMID:26240655

  7. Radiation control in the intensive care unit for high intensity iridium-192 brain implants

    SciTech Connect

    Sewchand, W.; Drzymala, R.E.; Amin, P.P.; Salcman, M.; Salazar, O.M.

    1987-04-01

    A bedside lead cubicle was designed to minimize the radiation exposure of intensive care unit staff during routine interstitial brain irradiation by removable, high intensity iridium-192. The cubicle shields the patient without restricting intensive care routines. The design specifications were confirmed by exposure measurements around the shield with an implanted anthropomorphic phantom simulating the patient situation. The cubicle reduces the exposure rate around an implant patient by as much as 90%, with the exposure level not exceeding 0.1 mR/hour/mg of radium-equivalent /sup 192/Ir. Evaluation of data accumulated for the past 3 years has shown that the exposure levels of individual attending nurses are 0.12 to 0.36 mR/mg of radium-equivalent /sup 192/Ir per 12-hour shift. The corresponding range for entire nursing teams varies between 0.18 and 0.26. A radiation control index (exposure per mg of radium-equivalent /sup 192/Ir per nurse-hour) is thus defined for individual nurses and nursing teams; this index is a significant guide to the planning of nurse rotations for brain implant patients with various /sup 192/Ir loads. The bedside shield reduces exposure from /sup 192/Ir implants by a factor of about 20, as expected, and the exposure from the lower energy radioisotope iodine-125 is barely detectable.

  8. Radiation control in the intensive care unit for high intensity iridium-192 brain implants.

    PubMed

    Sewchand, W; Drzymala, R E; Amin, P P; Salcman, M; Salazar, O M

    1987-04-01

    A bedside lead cubicle was designed to minimize the radiation exposure of intensive care unit staff during routine interstitial brain irradiation by removable, high intensity iridium-192. The cubicle shields the patient without restricting intensive care routines. The design specifications were confirmed by exposure measurements around the shield with an implanted anthropomorphic phantom simulating the patient situation. The cubicle reduces the exposure rate around an implant patient by as much as 90%, with the exposure level not exceeding 0.1 mR/hour/mg of radium-equivalent 192Ir. Evaluation of data accumulated for the past 3 years has shown that the exposure levels of individual attending nurses are 0.12 to 0.36 mR/mg of radium-equivalent 192Ir per 12-hour shift. The corresponding range for entire nursing teams varies between 0.18 and 0.26. A radiation control index (exposure per mg of radium-equivalent 192Ir per nurse-hour) is thus defined for individual nurses and nursing teams; this index is a significant guide to the planning of nurse rotations for brain implant patients with various 192Ir loads. The bedside shield reduces exposure from 192Ir implants by a factor of about 20, as expected, and the exposure from the lower energy radioisotope iodine-125 is barely detectable.

  9. Generation of Ultra-high Intensity Laser Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    N.J. Fisch; V.M. Malkin

    2003-06-10

    Mainly due to the method of chirped pulse amplification, laser intensities have grown remarkably during recent years. However, the attaining of very much higher powers is limited by the material properties of gratings. These limitations might be overcome through the use of plasma, which is an ideal medium for processing very high power and very high total energy. A plasma can be irradiated by a long pump laser pulse, carrying significant energy, which is then quickly depleted in the plasma by a short counterpropagating pulse. This counterpropagating wave effect has already been employed in Raman amplifiers using gases or plasmas at low laser power. Of particular interest here are the new effects which enter in high power regimes. These new effects can be employed so that one high-energy optical system can be used like a flashlamp in what amounts to pumping the plasma, and a second low-power optical system can be used to extract quickly the energy from the plasma and focus it precisely. The combined system can be very compact. Thus, focused intensities more than 10{sup 25} W/cm{sup 2} can be contemplated using existing optical elements. These intensities are several orders of magnitude higher than what is currently available through chirped pump amplifiers.

  10. High-intensity sound in air saturated fibrous bulk porous materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuntz, H. L., II

    1982-01-01

    The interaction high-intensity sound with bulk porous materials in porous materials including Kevlar 29 is reported. The nonlinear behavior of the materials was described by dc flow resistivity tests. Then acoustic propagation and reflection were measured and small signal broadband measurements of phase speed and attenuation were carried out. High-intensity tests were made with 1, 2, and 3 kHz tone bursts to measure harmonic generation and extra attenuation of the fundamental. Small signal standing wave tests measured impedence between 0.1 and 3.5 kHz. High level tests with single cycle tone bursts at 1 to 4 kHz show that impedance increases with intensity. A theoretical analysis is presented for high-porosity, rigid-frame, isothermal materials. One dimensional equations of motion are derived and solved by perturbation. The experiments show that there is excess attenuation of the fundamental component and in some cases a close approach to saturation. A separate theoretical model, developed to explain the excess attenuation, yields predictions that are in good agreement with the measurements. Impedance and attenuation at high intensities are modeled.

  11. High intensity muon beam source for neutrino beam experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamal Sayed, Hisham

    2015-09-01

    High intensity muon beams are essential for Muon accelerators like Neutrino Factories and Muon Colliders. In this study we report on a global optimization of the muon beam production and capture based on end-to-end simulations of the Muon Front End. The study includes the pion beam production target geometry, capture field profile, and forming muon beam into microbunches for further acceleration. The interplay between the transverse and longitudinal beam dynamics during the capture and transport of muon beam is evaluated and discussed. The goal of the optimization is to provide a set of design parameters that delivers high intensity muon beam that could be fit within the acceptance of a muon beam accelerator.

  12. High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Therapy: an Overview for Radiologists

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-sun; Choi, Min Joo; Lim, Hyo Keun; Choi, Dongil

    2008-01-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound therapy is a novel, emerging, therapeutic modality that uses ultrasound waves, propagated through tissue media, as carriers of energy. This completely non-invasive technology has great potential for tumor ablation as well as hemostasis, thrombolysis and targeted drug/gene delivery. However, the application of this technology still has many drawbacks. It is expected that current obstacles to implementation will be resolved in the near future. In this review, we provide an overview of high-intensity focused ultrasound therapy from the basic physics to recent clinical studies with an interventional radiologist's perspective for the purpose of improving the general understanding of this cutting-edge technology as well as speculating on future developments. PMID:18682666

  13. Fermilab main injector: High intensity operation and beam loss control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Bruce C.; Adamson, Philip; Capista, David; Chou, Weiren; Kourbanis, Ioanis; Morris, Denton K.; Seiya, Kiyomi; Wu, Guan Hong; Yang, Ming-Jen

    2013-07-01

    From 2005 through 2012, the Fermilab Main Injector provided intense beams of 120 GeV protons to produce neutrino beams and antiprotons. Hardware improvements in conjunction with improved diagnostics allowed the system to reach sustained operation at 400 kW beam power. Transmission was very high except for beam lost at or near the 8 GeV injection energy where 95% beam transmission results in about 1.5 kW of beam loss. By minimizing and localizing loss, residual radiation levels fell while beam power was doubled. Lost beam was directed to either the collimation system or to the beam abort. Critical apertures were increased while improved instrumentation allowed optimal use of available apertures. We will summarize the improvements required to achieve high intensity, the impact of various loss control tools and the status and trends in residual radiation in the Main Injector.

  14. Investigation of Generation, Acceleration, Transport and Final Focusing of High-Intensity Heavy Ion Beams from Sources to Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Chiping Chen

    2006-10-26

    Under the auspices of the research grant, the Intense Beam Theoretical Research Goup at Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Plasma Science and Fusion Center made significant contributions in a number of important areas in the HIF and HEDP research, including: (a) Derivation of rms envelope equations and study of rms envelope dynamics for high-intensity heavy ion beams in a small-aperture AG focusing transport systems; (b) Identification of a new mechanism for chaotic particle motion, halo formation, and beam loss in high-intensity heavy ion beams in a small-aperture AG focusing systems; Development of elliptic beam theory; (d) Study of Physics Issues in the Neutralization Transport Experiment (NTX).

  15. H- Ion Sources for High Intensity Proton Drivers

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Rolland Paul; Dudnikov, Vadim

    2015-02-20

    Existing RF Surface Plasma Sources (SPS) for accelerators have specific efficiencies for H+ and H- ion generation around 3 to 5 mA/cm2 per kW, where about 50 kW of RF power is typically needed for 50 mA beam current production. The Saddle Antenna (SA) SPS described here was developed to improve H- ion production efficiency, reliability and availability for pulsed operation as used in the ORNL Spallation Neutron Source . At low RF power, the efficiency of positive ion generation in the plasma has been improved to 200 mA/cm2 per kW of RF power at 13.56 MHz. Initial cesiation of the SPS was performed by heating cesium chromate cartridges by discharge as was done in the very first versions of the SPS. A small oven to decompose cesium compounds and alloys was developed and tested. After cesiation, the current of negative ions to the collector was increased from 1 mA to 10 mA with RF power 1.5 kW in the plasma (6 mm diameter emission aperture) and up to 30 mA with 4 kW RF power in the plasma and 250 Gauss longitudinal magnetic field. The ratio of electron current to negative ion current was improved from 30 to 2. Stable generation of H- beam without intensity degradation was demonstrated in the aluminum nitride (AlN) discharge chamber for 32 days at high discharge power in an RF SPS with an external antenna. Some modifications were made to improve the cooling and cesiation stability. The extracted collector current can be increased significantly by optimizing the longitudinal magnetic field in the discharge chamber. While this project demonstrated the advantages of the pulsed version of the SA RF SPS as an upgrade to the ORNL Spallation Neutron Source, it led to a possibility for upgrades to CW machines like the many cyclotrons used for commercial applications. Four appendices contain important details of the work carried out under this grant.

  16. High-intensity re-warm-ups enhance soccer performance.

    PubMed

    Zois, J; Bishop, D; Fairweather, I; Ball, K; Aughey, R J

    2013-09-01

    The effects of high-intensity, short-duration, re-warm-ups on team-sport-related performance were investigated. In a randomised, cross-over study, participants performed 2×26-min periods of an intermittent activity protocol (IAP) on a non-motorized treadmill, interspersed by 15-min of passive recovery (CON); 3-min small-sided game (SSG); or a 5RM leg-press. Measures included counter-movement jump, repeated-sprint, the Loughborough soccer passing test (LSPT), blood lactate concentration, heart-rate, and perceptual measures. Data were analyzed using effect size (90% confidence intervals), and percentage change; determining magnitudes of effects. A 5RM re-warm-up improved flight-time to contraction-time ratio when compared to SSG (9.8%, ES; 0.5±0.3) and CON (ES: 9.4%, 0.7±0.5) re-warm-ups, remaining higher following the second IAP (8.8%, ES; 0.5±0.3 and 10.2%, ES; 0.6±0.6, respectively). Relative-maximum rate-of-force development was greater in the 5RM condition following the second IAP compared to SSG (29.3%, ES; 0.7±0.5) and CON (16.2%, ES; 0.6±0.6). Repeated-sprint ability during the second IAP improved in the 5RM re-warm-up; peak velocity, mean velocity, and acceleration were 4, 3, and 18% greater, respectively. Within groups, the SSG re-warm-up improved LSPT performance post-intervention; 6.4% (ES: 0.6±0.8) and following the second IAP 6.2% (ES: 0.6±0.6), compared to pre-intervention. A 5RM leg-press re-warm-up improved physical performance, while a SSG re-warm-up enhanced skill execution following standardized intermittent exercise.

  17. PULSED POWER APPLICATIONS IN HIGH INTENSITY PROTON RINGS.

    SciTech Connect

    ZHANG, S.Y.; SANDBERG, J.; ET AL.

    2005-05-16

    Pulsed power technology has been applied in particle accelerators and storage rings for over four decades. It is most commonly used in injection, extraction, beam manipulation, source, and focusing systems. These systems belong to the class of repetitive pulsed power. In this presentation, we review and discuss the history, present status, and future challenge of pulsed power applications in high intensity proton accelerators and storage rings.

  18. High intensity muon storage rings for neutrino production: Lattice design

    SciTech Connect

    Johnstone, C>

    1998-05-01

    Five energies, 250, 100, 50, 20, and 10 GeV, have been explored in the design of a muon storage ring for neutrino-beam production. The ring design incorporates exceptionally long straight sections with large beta functions in order to produce an intense, parallel neutrino beam via muon decay. To emphasize compactness and reduce the number of muon decays in the arcs, high-field superconducting dipoles are used in the arc design.

  19. Silicone rubber curing by high intensity infrared radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, T.; Tsai, J.; Cherng, C.; Chen, J.

    1994-08-10

    A high-intensity (12 kW) and compact (80 cm) infrared heating oven for fast curing (12 seconds) of tube-like silicone rubber curing studies is reported. Quality inspection by DSC and DMA and results from pilot-scale curing oven all suggest that infrared heating provides a better way of vulcanization regarding to curing time, quality, cost, and spacing over conventional hot air heating. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  20. NUMERICAL METHODS FOR THE SIMULATION OF HIGH INTENSITY HADRON SYNCHROTRONS.

    SciTech Connect

    LUCCIO, A.; D'IMPERIO, N.; MALITSKY, N.

    2005-09-12

    Numerical algorithms for PIC simulation of beam dynamics in a high intensity synchrotron on a parallel computer are presented. We introduce numerical solvers of the Laplace-Poisson equation in the presence of walls, and algorithms to compute tunes and twiss functions in the presence of space charge forces. The working code for the simulation here presented is SIMBAD, that can be run as stand alone or as part of the UAL (Unified Accelerator Libraries) package.

  1. High-resolution stochastic generation of extreme rainfall intensity for urban drainage modelling applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peleg, Nadav; Blumensaat, Frank; Molnar, Peter; Fatichi, Simone; Burlando, Paolo

    2016-04-01

    Urban drainage response is highly dependent on the spatial and temporal structure of rainfall. Therefore, measuring and simulating rainfall at a high spatial and temporal resolution is a fundamental step to fully assess urban drainage system reliability and related uncertainties. This is even more relevant when considering extreme rainfall events. However, the current space-time rainfall models have limitations in capturing extreme rainfall intensity statistics for short durations. Here, we use the STREAP (Space-Time Realizations of Areal Precipitation) model, which is a novel stochastic rainfall generator for simulating high-resolution rainfall fields that preserve the spatio-temporal structure of rainfall and its statistical characteristics. The model enables a generation of rain fields at 102 m and minute scales in a fast and computer-efficient way matching the requirements for hydrological analysis of urban drainage systems. The STREAP model was applied successfully in the past to generate high-resolution extreme rainfall intensities over a small domain. A sub-catchment in the city of Luzern (Switzerland) was chosen as a case study to: (i) evaluate the ability of STREAP to disaggregate extreme rainfall intensities for urban drainage applications; (ii) assessing the role of stochastic climate variability of rainfall in flow response and (iii) evaluate the degree of non-linearity between extreme rainfall intensity and system response (i.e. flow) for a small urban catchment. The channel flow at the catchment outlet is simulated by means of a calibrated hydrodynamic sewer model.

  2. Transport of intense beams of highly charged ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, M.; Gammino, S.; Ciavola, G.; Celona, L.; Spadtke, P.; Tinschert, K.

    2005-10-01

    The new generation of ion sources delivers beams with intensities of several mA. This requires a careful design of the analysing system and the low-energy beam transport (LEBT) from the source to the subsequent systems. At INFN-LNS, high intensity proton sources (TRIPS [L. Celona, G. Ciavola, S. Gammino et al ., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 75(5) 1423 (2004)], PM-TRIPS [G. Ciavola, L. Celona, S. Gammino et al ., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 75(5) 1453 (2004)]) as well as ECR ion sources for the production of highly charged high-intensity heavy ion beams are developed (SERSE [S. Gammino, G. Ciavola, L. Celona et al ., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 72(11) 4090 (2001), and references therein], GyroSERSE [S. Gammino et al ., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 75(5) 1637 (2004)], MS-ECRIS [G. Ciavola et al ., (2005), 11th Int. Conf. on Ion Sources, Caen, (in press)]). In this paper, we present ion-optical design studies of various LEBT systems for ion-sources devoted to the production of intense beams. Calculations were performed using the computer codes GIOS [H. Wollnik, J. Brezina and M. Berz, NIM A 258 (1987)], GICO [M. Berz, H.C. Hoffmann, and H. Wollnik, NIM A 258 (1987)], and TRANSPORT [K.L. Brown, F. Rothacker and D.C. Carey, SLAC-R-95-462, Fermilab-Pub-95/069, UC-414 (1995)]. Simulations take into account the expected phase space growth of the beam emittance due to space-charge effects and image aberrations introduced by the magnetic elements.

  3. Muscle fatigue during high-intensity exercise in children.

    PubMed

    Ratel, Sébastien; Duché, Pascale; Williams, Craig A

    2006-01-01

    Children are able to resist fatigue better than adults during one or several repeated high-intensity exercise bouts. This finding has been reported by measuring mechanical force or power output profiles during sustained isometric maximal contractions or repeated bouts of high-intensity dynamic exercises. The ability of children to better maintain performance during repeated high-intensity exercise bouts could be related to their lower level of fatigue during exercise and/or faster recovery following exercise. This may be explained by muscle characteristics of children, which are quantitatively and qualitatively different to those of adults. Children have less muscle mass than adults and hence, generate lower absolute power during high-intensity exercise. Some researchers also showed that children were equipped better for oxidative than glycolytic pathways during exercise, which would lead to a lower accumulation of muscle by-products. Furthermore, some reports indicated that the lower ability of children to activate their type II muscle fibres would also explain their greater resistance to fatigue during sustained maximal contractions. The lower accumulation of muscle by-products observed in children may be suggestive of a reduced metabolic signal, which induces lower ratings of perceived exertion. Factors such as faster phosphocreatine resynthesis, greater oxidative capacity, better acid-base regulation, faster readjustment of initial cardiorespiratory parameters and higher removal of metabolic by-products in children could also explain their faster recovery following high-intensity exercise.From a clinical point of view, muscle fatigue profiles are different between healthy children and children with muscle and metabolic diseases. Studies of dystrophic muscles in children indicated contradictory findings of changes in contractile properties and the muscle fatigability. Some have found that the muscle of boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) fatigued less

  4. High intensity line source for x-ray spectrometer calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Thoe, R.S.

    1986-06-01

    A high intensity electron-impact x-ray source using a one-dimensional Pierce lens has been built for the purpose of calibrating a bent crystal x-ray spectrometer. This source focuses up to 100 mA of 20-keV electrons to a line on a liquid-cooled anode. The line (which can serve as a virtual slit for the spectrometer) measures approximately 800 ..mu.. x 2 cm. The source is portable and therefore adaptable to numerous types of spectrometer applications. One particular application, the calibration of a high resolution (r = 10/sup 4/) time-resolved cyrstal spectrometer, will be discussed in detail.

  5. Survey of proposed high intensity accelerators and their applications

    SciTech Connect

    Schriber, S.O.

    1994-09-01

    Many interesting applications are being considered for high intensity accelerators. Implications of the technology developments that are enhancing these opportunities, or making them possible, will be covered in context of the applications. Applications include those for research (in areas such as material science, biological sciences, nuclear and high energy physics), accelerator-driven transmutation technologies, defense, and medicine. Specific examples will be used to demonstrate the impact that technology development can have and how transfer of this technology to industry can have an impact in the consumer and commercial arenas. Technology Development in rf power, controls, beam optics, rf structures, magnets, injectors, and beam halos will be considered.

  6. The different effects of high intensity interval training and moderate intensity interval training for weightlessness countermeasures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lin-Jie; Cheng, Tan; Zhi-Li, Li; Hui-juan, Wang; Wen-juan, Chen; Jianfeng, Zhang; Desheng, Wang; Dongbin, Niu; Qi, Zhao; Chengjia, Yang; Yanqing, Wang

    High intensity interval training (HIIT) has been demonstrated to improve performance in a relatively short training period. But the difference between high intensity interval training and moderate intensity interval training (MIIT) in simulated weightlessness still has not been well studied. This study sought to characterize the difference between 6 weeks high intensity interval training and moderate intensity interval training under reduced weight (RW) gait training device and zero-gravity locomotion system (ZLS). Twenty-three subjects (14M/4F, 32.5±4.5 years) volunteered to participate. They were divided into three groups, that were MITT (alternating 2 min at 40% VO _{2} peak and 2 min at 60% VO _{2} peak for 30min, five days per week) RW group (n=8), HITT (alternating 2 min at 40% VO _{2} peak and 2 min at 90% VO _{2} peak for 30min, three days per week) RW group (n=8) and HITT ZLS group (n=7). The Z-axis load used in RW group was 80% body weight (BW) and in ZLS was 100% BW. Cardiopulmonary function was measured before, after 4-week training and after 6-week training. Isokinetic knee extension-flexion test at 60(°) deg/s and 180(°) deg/s were performed before and after the 6-week training, and isometric knee extension-flexion test at 180(°) deg/s was also examined at the same time. It was found that the VO _{2} peaks, metabolic equivalent (MET), Speedmax and respiratory exchange ratio (RER) were significantly increased after 4 and 6-week training in all three groups and no significant group difference were detected. The peak torque at 60(°) deg/s for right knee flexion were significantly increased after 6 week-training in all three groups, and only in HITT RW group the total power at 60(°) deg/s for right knee flexion enhanced. The total power and average power at 60(°) deg/s for right knee extension decreased significantly after 6-week training in all three groups. The peak torque at 60(°) deg/s for right knee extension in MIIT RW group was

  7. High-intensity positron microprobe at Jefferson Lab

    DOE PAGES

    Golge, Serkan; Vlahovic, Branislav; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan B.

    2014-06-19

    We present a conceptual design for a novel continuous wave electron-linac based high-intensity slow-positron production source with a projected intensity on the order of 1010 e+/s. Reaching this intensity in our design relies on the transport of positrons (T+ below 600 keV) from the electron-positron pair production converter target to a low-radiation and low-temperature area for moderation in a high-efficiency cryogenic rare gas moderator, solid Ne. The performance of the integrated beamline has been verified through computational studies. The computational results include Monte Carlo calculations of the optimized electron/positron beam energies, converter target thickness, synchronized raster system, transport of themore » beam from the converter target to the moderator, extraction of the beam from the channel, and moderation efficiency calculations. For the extraction of positrons from the magnetic channel a magnetic field terminator plug prototype has been built and experimental data on the effectiveness of this prototype are presented. The dissipation of the heat away from the converter target and radiation protection measures are also discussed.« less

  8. Resonant Auger Effect at High X-Ray Intensity

    SciTech Connect

    Rohringer, N; Santra, R

    2008-03-27

    The resonant Auger effect of atomic neon exposed to high-intensity x-ray radiation in resonance with the 1s {yields} 3p transition is discussed. High intensity here means that the x-ray peak intensity is sufficient ({approx} 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}) to induce Rabi oscillations between the neon ground state and the 1s{sup -1}3p ({sup 1}P) state within the relaxation lifetime of the inner-shell vacancy. For the numerical analysis presented, an effective two-level model, including a description of the resonant Auger decay process, is employed. Both coherent and chaotic x-ray pulses are treated. The latter are used to simulate radiation from x-ray free-electron lasers based on the principle of self-amplified spontaneous emission. Observing x-ray-driven atomic population dynamics in the time domain is challenging for chaotic pulse ensembles. A more practical option for experiments using x-ray free-electron lasers is to measure the line profiles in the kinetic energy distribution of the resonant Auger electron. This provides information on both atomic population dynamics and x-ray pulse properties.

  9. High-intensity positron microprobe at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Golge, Serkan; Vlahovic, Branislav; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan B.

    2014-06-19

    We present a conceptual design for a novel continuous wave electron-linac based high-intensity slow-positron production source with a projected intensity on the order of 1010 e+/s. Reaching this intensity in our design relies on the transport of positrons (T+ below 600 keV) from the electron-positron pair production converter target to a low-radiation and low-temperature area for moderation in a high-efficiency cryogenic rare gas moderator, solid Ne. The performance of the integrated beamline has been verified through computational studies. The computational results include Monte Carlo calculations of the optimized electron/positron beam energies, converter target thickness, synchronized raster system, transport of the beam from the converter target to the moderator, extraction of the beam from the channel, and moderation efficiency calculations. For the extraction of positrons from the magnetic channel a magnetic field terminator plug prototype has been built and experimental data on the effectiveness of this prototype are presented. The dissipation of the heat away from the converter target and radiation protection measures are also discussed.

  10. High-intensity terahertz pulses and their applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budiarto, Edward Wibowo

    1997-09-01

    A large aperture transmitter based on an electrically biased photoconductor has been constructed, which is capable of generating ultrashort high-intensity pulses operating in the far-infrared (terahertz) frequency regime. The terahertz pulse is a single-cycle freely propagating electrical pulse with a 600 femtosecond pulse duration and a pulse energy close to 200 nanojoules. A complete characterization of the transmitter and its output pulse has been conducted, resulting in new understandings of the pulse generation mechanism and propagation behavior. More specifically, it was revealed for the first time that near-field diffraction plays a significant role in the propagation behavior of the terahertz pulse from the large aperture transmitter. The pulse alters its temporal shape significantly as it travels away from the transmitter, especially when it is focused by a parabolic mirror. The high-intensity pulse is intended to be utilized as a probe of high-field transport properties of free carriers in semiconductors and superconductors. The transient dynamics of hot-electrons in silicon and gallium arsenide are of particular interest, as they relate to current issues in modern electronic devices. A simulation model has been developed which predicts a nonlinear absorption of the terahertz pulses by free-electrons in the semiconductors due to velocity saturation effects. The high-intensity terahertz pulse has also been used to probe the nonlinear electrodynamics of high-T c superconductors. The results confirm the ability of the pulse to break pairs of superconducting electrons and convert them to normal state electrons. This will allow further studies to be conducted to resolve the exact pair-breaking mechanism, which is ultimately linked to a better understanding of some of the failure mechanisms in today's superconducting microwave devices.

  11. Short-pulse high intensity laser thin foil interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audebert, Patrick

    2003-10-01

    The technology of ultrashort pulse laser generation has progressed to the point that optical pulses larger than 10 J, 300 fs duration or shorter are routinely produced. Such pulses can be focused to intensities exceeding 10^18 W/cm^2. With high contrast pulses, these focused intensities can be used to heat solid matter to high temperatures with minimal hydrodynamic expansion, producing an extremely high energy-density state of matter for a short period of time. This high density, high temperature plasma can be studied by x-ray spectroscopy. We have performed experiments on thin foils of different elements under well controlled conditions at the 100 Terawatt laser at LULI to study the characteristics X-ray emission of laser heated solids. To suppress the ASE effect, the laser was frequency doubled. S-polarized light with a peak intensity of 10^19W/cm^2 was used to minimize resonance absorption. To decrease the effect of longitudinal temperature gradients very thin (800 μ) aluminum foil targets were used. We have also studied the effect of radial gradient by limiting the measured x-ray emission zone using 50μ or 100μ pinhole on target. The spectra, in the range 7-8Å, were recorded using a conical crystal spectrometer coupled to a 800 fs resolution streak camera. A Fourier Domain Interferometry (FDI) of the back of the foil was also performed providing a measurement of the hydrodynamic expansion as function of time for each shot. To simulate the experiment, we used the 1D hydrodynamic code FILM with a given set of plasma parameter (ρ, Te) as initial conditions. The X-ray emission was calculated by post processing hydrodynamic results with a collisional-radiative model which uses super-configuration average atomic data. The simulation reproduces the main features of the experimental time resolved spectrum.

  12. Free-field propagation of high intensity noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welz, Joseph P.; Mcdaniel, Oliver H.

    1990-01-01

    Observed spectral data from supersonic jet aircraft are known to contain much more high frequency energy than can be explained by linear acoustic propagation theory. It is believed that the high frequency energy is an effect of nonlinear distortion due to the extremely high acoustic levels generated by the jet engines. The objective, to measure acoustic waveform distortion for spherically diverging high intensity noise, was reached by using an electropneumatic acoustic source capable of generating sound pressure levels in the range of 140 to 160 decibels (re 20 micro Pa). The noise spectrum was shaped to represent the spectra generated by jet engines. Two microphones were used to capture the acoustic pressure waveform at different points along the propagation path in order to provide a direct measure of the waveform distortion as well as spectral distortion. A secondary objective was to determine that the observed distortion is an acoustic effect. To do this an existing computer prediction code that deals with nonlinear acoustic propagation was used on data representative of the measured data. The results clearly demonstrate that high intensity jet noise does shift the energy in the spectrum to the higher frequencies along the propagation path. In addition, the data from the computer model are in good agreement with the measurements, thus demonstrating that the waveform distortion can be accounted for with nonlinear acoustic theory.

  13. Small high cooling power space cooler

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, T. V.; Raab, J.; Durand, D.; Tward, E.

    2014-01-29

    The small High Efficiency pulse tube Cooler (HEC) cooler, that has been produced and flown on a number of space infrared instruments, was originally designed to provide cooling of 10 W @ 95 K. It achieved its goal with >50% margin when limited by the 180 W output ac power of its flight electronics. It has also been produced in 2 stage configurations, typically for simultaneously cooling of focal planes to temperatures as low as 35 K and optics at higher temperatures. The need for even higher cooling power in such a low mass cryocooler is motivated by the advent of large focal plane arrays. With the current availability at NGAS of much larger power cryocooler flight electronics, reliable long term operation in space with much larger cooling powers is now possible with the flight proven 4 kg HEC mechanical cooler. Even though the single stage cooler design can be re-qualified for those larger input powers without design change, we redesigned both the linear and coaxial version passive pulse tube cold heads to re-optimize them for high power cooling at temperatures above 130 K while rejecting heat to 300 K. Small changes to the regenerator packing, the re-optimization of the tuned inertance and no change to the compressor resulted in the increased performance at 150 K. The cooler operating at 290 W input power achieves 35 W@ 150 K corresponding to a specific cooling power at 150 K of 8.25 W/W and a very high specific power of 72.5 W/Kg. At these powers the cooler still maintains large stroke, thermal and current margins. In this paper we will present the measured data and the changes to this flight proven cooler that were made to achieve this increased performance.

  14. Small high cooling power space cooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, T. V.; Raab, J.; Durand, D.; Tward, E.

    2014-01-01

    The small High Efficiency pulse tube Cooler (HEC) cooler, that has been produced and flown on a number of space infrared instruments, was originally designed to provide cooling of 10 W @ 95 K. It achieved its goal with >50% margin when limited by the 180 W output ac power of its flight electronics. It has also been produced in 2 stage configurations, typically for simultaneously cooling of focal planes to temperatures as low as 35 K and optics at higher temperatures. The need for even higher cooling power in such a low mass cryocooler is motivated by the advent of large focal plane arrays. With the current availability at NGAS of much larger power cryocooler flight electronics, reliable long term operation in space with much larger cooling powers is now possible with the flight proven 4 kg HEC mechanical cooler. Even though the single stage cooler design can be re-qualified for those larger input powers without design change, we redesigned both the linear and coaxial version passive pulse tube cold heads to re-optimize them for high power cooling at temperatures above 130 K while rejecting heat to 300 K. Small changes to the regenerator packing, the re-optimization of the tuned inertance and no change to the compressor resulted in the increased performance at 150 K. The cooler operating at 290 W input power achieves 35 W@ 150 K corresponding to a specific cooling power at 150 K of 8.25 W/W and a very high specific power of 72.5 W/Kg. At these powers the cooler still maintains large stroke, thermal and current margins. In this paper we will present the measured data and the changes to this flight proven cooler that were made to achieve this increased performance.

  15. Laser-enhanced cavitation during high intensity focused ultrasound: An in vivo study

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Huizhong; Zhang, Ti; Yang, Xinmai

    2013-01-01

    Laser-enhanced cavitation during high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) was studied in vivo using a small animal model. Laser light was employed to illuminate the sample concurrently with HIFU radiation. The resulting cavitation was detected with a passive cavitation detector. The in vivo measurements were made under different combinations of HIFU treatment depths, laser wavelengths, and HIFU durations. The results demonstrated that concurrent light illumination during HIFU has the potential to enhance cavitation effect by reducing cavitation threshold in vivo. PMID:23653486

  16. Paramount Deuteron Acceleration Using High-Intensity Short Laser Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, F.; Raymond, A.; Zulick, C.; Willingale, L.; Krushelnick, K.; Maksimchuk, A.; Petrov, G.; Davis, J.

    2012-10-01

    It has long been a challenge to efficiently generate laser-driven ion beams having none-proton ions as the dominant species since protons are generally present as contamination layers on the target surface. During recent experiments at the University of Michigan, ion beams composed mainly of deuterons were produced with only a small relative number of protons and oxygen ions. The experiments were performed with the 400 fs, 20 TW T-cubed laser which has focused intensity up to 4*10^19 W/cm^2 at 1053 nm and ASE intensity contrast of 10-7. The accelerated deuterons originate from liquid deuterium oxide deposited on both the front and rear surfaces of a cryogenically cooled Cu target (normally at -160C) by spraying ˜50 microliters of heavy water from 2 nozzles in the vicinity of the target's front and rear. The ion beams had a Maxwellian spectrum with maximum energy of 8 MeV for deuterons and 10 MeV for protons. Using a Thomson parabola ion spectrometer system combined with CR39 indicated that the forward-propagating deuteron beam had about 10^12 ions per steradian (integrated over spectrum). The FWHM of the beam was 20 degrees, ideal for applications involving neutron generation and isotope activation.

  17. Effects of intensity and duration in aerobic high-intensity interval training in highly trained junior cross-country skiers.

    PubMed

    Sandbakk, Øyvind; Sandbakk, Silvana B; Ettema, Gertjan; Welde, Boye

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to test whether a long duration of aerobic high-intensity interval training is more effective than shorter intervals at a higher intensity in highly trained endurance athletes. The sample comprised of 12 male and 9 female, national-level, junior cross-country skiers (age, 17.5 ± 0.4 years, maximal oxygen uptake (V[Combining Dot Above]O2max): 67.4 ± 7.7 ml min kg), who performed 8-week baseline and 8-week intervention training periods on dry land. During the intervention period, a short-interval group (SIG, n = 7) added 2 weekly sessions with short duration intervals (2- to 4-minute bouts, total duration of 15-20 minutes), a long-interval group (LIG; n = 7) added 2 weekly sessions with long duration intervals (5- to 10-minute bouts, total duration of 40-45 minutes). The interval sessions were performed with the athletes' maximal sustainable intensity. A control group (CG; n = 7) added 2 weekly sessions with low-intensity endurance training at 65-74% of maximal heart rate. Before and after the intervention period, the skiers were tested for time-trial performance on 12-km roller-ski skating and 7-km hill run. V[Combining Dot Above]O2max and oxygen uptake at the ventilatory threshold (V[Combining Dot Above]O2VT) were measured during treadmill running. After the intervention training period, the LIG-improved 12-km roller ski, 7-km hill run, V[Combining Dot Above]O2max, and V[Combining Dot Above]O2VT by 6.8 ± 4.0%, 4.8 ± 2.6%, 3.7 ± 1.6%, and 5.8 ± 3.3%, respectively, from pre- to posttesting, and improved both performance tests and V[Combining Dot Above]O2VT when compared with the SIG and the CG (all p < 0.05). The SIG improved V[Combining Dot Above]O2max by 3.5 ± 3.2% from pre- to posttesting (p < 0.05), whereas the CG remained unchanged. As hypothesized, a long duration of aerobic high-intensity interval training improved endurance performance and oxygen uptake at the ventilatory threshold more than shorter intervals at a higher

  18. Small, high-pressure liquid oxygen turbopump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Csomor, A.; Sutton, R.

    1977-01-01

    A small, high-pressure, liquid oxygen turbopump was designed, fabricated, and tested. The pump was of a single-stage, centrifugal type; power to the pump was supplied by a single-stage, partial emission, axial-impulse turbine. Design conditions included an operating speed of 70,000 rpm, pump discharge pressure of 2977 N/sq cm (4318 psia), and a pump flowrate of 16.4 kg/s (36.21 lb/sec). The turbine was propelled by LO2/LH2 combustion products at 1041 K (1874 R) inlet temperature, and at a design pressure ratio of 1.424. The approaches used in the detail analysis and design of the turbopump are described, and fabrication methods are discussed. Data obtained from gas generator tests, turbine performance calibration, and turbopump testing are presented.

  19. Small, high-pressure, liquid oxygen turbopump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Csomor, A.

    1978-01-01

    A small, high-pressure, LOX turbopump was designed, fabricated, and tested. The pump was of a single-stage, centrifugal type; power to the pump was supplied by a single-stage, partial-admission, axial-impulse turbine. Design conditions included an operating speed of 7330 rad/sec (70,000 rpm) pump discharge pressure of 2977 N/sq cm (4318 psia), and a pump flowrate of 16.4 kg/s (36.21 lb/sec). The turbine was propelled by LOX/LH2 combustion products at 1041 K (1874 R) inlet temperature, and at a design pressure ratio of 1.424. Test data obtained with the turbopump are presented and mechanical performance is discussed.

  20. Max Tech and Beyond: High-Intensity Discharge Lamps

    SciTech Connect

    Scholand, Michael

    2012-04-01

    High-intensity discharge (HID) lamps are most often found in industrial and commercial applications, and are the light source of choice in street and area lighting, and sports stadium illumination. HID lamps are produced in three types - mercury vapor (MV), high pressure sodium (HPS) and metal halide (MH). Of these, MV and MH are considered white-light sources (although the MV exhibits poor color rendering) and HPS produces a yellow-orange color light. A fourth lamp, low-pressure sodium (LPS), is not a HID lamp by definition, but it is used in similar applications and thus is often grouped with HID lamps. With the notable exception of MV which is comparatively inefficient and in decline in the US from both a sales and installed stock point of view; HPS, LPS and MH all have efficacies over 100 lumens per watt. The figure below presents the efficacy trends over time for commercially available HID lamps and LPS, starting with MV and LPS in 1930's followed by the development of HPS and MH in the 1960's. In HID lamps, light is generated by creating an electric arc between two electrodes in an arc tube. The particles in the arc are partially ionized, making them electrically conductive, and a light-emitting 'plasma' is created. This arc occurs within the arc tube, which for most HID lamps is enclosed within an evacuated outer bulb that thermally isolates and protects the hot arc tube from the surroundings. Unlike a fluorescent lamp that produces visible light through down-converting UV light with phosphors, the arc itself is the light source in an HID lamp, emitting visible radiation that is characteristic of the elements present in the plasma. Thus, the mixture of elements included in the arc tube is one critical factor determining the quality of the light emitted from the lamp, including its correlated color temperature (CCT) and color rendering index (CRI). Similar to fluorescent lamps, HID lamps require a ballast to start and maintain stable operating conditions, and

  1. ELECTRON COUD DYNAMICS IN HIGH-INTENSITY RINGS.

    SciTech Connect

    WANG, L.; WEI, J.

    2005-05-16

    Electron cloud due to beam-induced multipacting is one of the main concerns for the high intensity. Electrons generated and accumulated inside the beam pipe form an ''electron cloud'' that interacts with the circulating charged particle beam. With sizeable amount of electrons, this interaction can cause beam instability, beam loss and emittance growth. At the same time, the vacuum pressure will rise due to electron desorption. This talk intends to provide an overview of the mechanism and dynamics of the typical electron multipacting in various magnetic fields and mitigation measures with different beams.

  2. Beam instrumentation for future high intense hadron accelerators at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Wendt, M.; Hu, M.; Tassotto, G.; Thurman-Keup, R.; Scarpine, V.; Shin, S.; Zagel, J.; /Fermilab

    2008-08-01

    High intensity hadron beams of up to 2 MW beam power are a key element of new proposed experimental facilities at Fermilab. Project X, which includes a SCRF 8 GeV H{sup -} linac, will be the centerpiece of future HEP activities in the neutrino sector. After a short overview of this, and other proposed projects, we present the current status of the beam instrumentation activities at Fermilab with a few examples. With upgrades and improvements they can meet the requirements of the new beam facilities, however design and development of new instruments is needed, as shown by the prototype and conceptual examples in the last section.

  3. Magnified Sediment Export of Small Mountainous Rivers in Taiwan: Chain Reactions from Increased Rainfall Intensity under Global Warming.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tsung-Yu; Huang, Jr-Chuan; Lee, Jun-Yi; Jien, Shih-Hao; Zehetner, Franz; Kao, Shuh-Ji

    2015-01-01

    Fluvial sediment export from small mountainous rivers in Oceania has global biogeochemical significance affecting the turnover rate and export of terrestrial carbon, which might be speeding up at the recognized conditions of increased rainfall intensity. In this study, the historical runoff and sediment export from 16 major rivers in Taiwan are investigated and separated into an early stage (1970-1989) and a recent stage (1990-2010) to illustrate the changes of both runoff and sediment export. The mean daily sediment export from Taiwan Island in the recent stage significantly increased by >80% with subtle increase in daily runoff, indicating more sediment being delivered to the ocean per unit of runoff in the recent stage. The medians of the runoff depth and sediment yield extremes (99.0-99.9 percentiles) among the 16 rivers increased by 6.5%-37% and 62%-94%, respectively, reflecting the disproportionately magnified response of sediment export to the increased runoff. Taiwan is facing increasing event rainfall intensity which has resulted in chain reactions on magnified runoff and sediment export responses. As the globe is warming, rainfall extremes, which are proved to be temperature-dependent, very likely intensify runoff and trigger more sediment associated hazards. Such impacts might occur globally because significant increases of high-intensity precipitation have been observed not only in Taiwan but over most land areas of the globe. PMID:26372356

  4. Magnified Sediment Export of Small Mountainous Rivers in Taiwan: Chain Reactions from Increased Rainfall Intensity under Global Warming.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tsung-Yu; Huang, Jr-Chuan; Lee, Jun-Yi; Jien, Shih-Hao; Zehetner, Franz; Kao, Shuh-Ji

    2015-01-01

    Fluvial sediment export from small mountainous rivers in Oceania has global biogeochemical significance affecting the turnover rate and export of terrestrial carbon, which might be speeding up at the recognized conditions of increased rainfall intensity. In this study, the historical runoff and sediment export from 16 major rivers in Taiwan are investigated and separated into an early stage (1970-1989) and a recent stage (1990-2010) to illustrate the changes of both runoff and sediment export. The mean daily sediment export from Taiwan Island in the recent stage significantly increased by >80% with subtle increase in daily runoff, indicating more sediment being delivered to the ocean per unit of runoff in the recent stage. The medians of the runoff depth and sediment yield extremes (99.0-99.9 percentiles) among the 16 rivers increased by 6.5%-37% and 62%-94%, respectively, reflecting the disproportionately magnified response of sediment export to the increased runoff. Taiwan is facing increasing event rainfall intensity which has resulted in chain reactions on magnified runoff and sediment export responses. As the globe is warming, rainfall extremes, which are proved to be temperature-dependent, very likely intensify runoff and trigger more sediment associated hazards. Such impacts might occur globally because significant increases of high-intensity precipitation have been observed not only in Taiwan but over most land areas of the globe.

  5. Magnified Sediment Export of Small Mountainous Rivers in Taiwan: Chain Reactions from Increased Rainfall Intensity under Global Warming

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tsung-Yu; Huang, Jr-Chuan; Lee, Jun-Yi; Jien, Shih-Hao; Zehetner, Franz; Kao, Shuh-Ji

    2015-01-01

    Fluvial sediment export from small mountainous rivers in Oceania has global biogeochemical significance affecting the turnover rate and export of terrestrial carbon, which might be speeding up at the recognized conditions of increased rainfall intensity. In this study, the historical runoff and sediment export from 16 major rivers in Taiwan are investigated and separated into an early stage (1970–1989) and a recent stage (1990–2010) to illustrate the changes of both runoff and sediment export. The mean daily sediment export from Taiwan Island in the recent stage significantly increased by >80% with subtle increase in daily runoff, indicating more sediment being delivered to the ocean per unit of runoff in the recent stage. The medians of the runoff depth and sediment yield extremes (99.0–99.9 percentiles) among the 16 rivers increased by 6.5%-37% and 62%-94%, respectively, reflecting the disproportionately magnified response of sediment export to the increased runoff. Taiwan is facing increasing event rainfall intensity which has resulted in chain reactions on magnified runoff and sediment export responses. As the globe is warming, rainfall extremes, which are proved to be temperature-dependent, very likely intensify runoff and trigger more sediment associated hazards. Such impacts might occur globally because significant increases of high-intensity precipitation have been observed not only in Taiwan but over most land areas of the globe. PMID:26372356

  6. CW high intensity non-scaling FFAG proton drivers

    SciTech Connect

    Johnstone, C.; Berz, M.; Makino, K.; Snopok, P.; /IIT, Chicago

    2011-04-01

    Accelerators are playing increasingly important roles in basic science, technology, and medicine including nuclear power, industrial irradiation, material science, and neutrino production. Proton and light-ion accelerators in particular have many research, energy and medical applications, providing one of the most effective treatments for many types of cancer. Ultra high-intensity and high-energy (GeV) proton drivers are a critical technology for accelerator-driven sub-critical reactors (ADS) and many HEP programs (Muon Collider). These high-intensity GeV-range proton drivers are particularly challenging, encountering duty cycle and space-charge limits in the synchrotron and machine size concerns in the weaker-focusing cyclotrons; a 10-20 MW proton driver is not presently considered technically achievable with conventional re-circulating accelerators. One, as-yet, unexplored re-circulating accelerator, the Fixed-field Alternating Gradient, or FFAG, is an attractive alternative to the cyclotron. Its strong focusing optics are expected to mitigate space charge effects, and a recent innovation in design has coupled stable tunes with isochronous orbits, making the FFAG capable of fixed-frequency, CW acceleration, as in the classical cyclotron. This paper reports on these new advances in FFAG accelerator technology and references advanced modeling tools for fixed-field accelerators developed for and unique to the code COSY INFINITY.

  7. Nanoplasma Formation by High Intensity Hard X-rays

    PubMed Central

    Tachibana, T.; Jurek, Z.; Fukuzawa, H.; Motomura, K.; Nagaya, K.; Wada, S.; Johnsson, P.; Siano, M.; Mondal, S.; Ito, Y.; Kimura, M.; Sakai, T.; Matsunami, K.; Hayashita, H.; Kajikawa, J.; Liu, X.-J.; Robert, E.; Miron, C.; Feifel, R.; Marangos, J. P.; Tono, K.; Inubushi, Y.; Yabashi, M.; Son, S.-K.; Ziaja, B.; Yao, M.; Santra, R.; Ueda, K.

    2015-01-01

    Using electron spectroscopy, we have investigated nanoplasma formation from noble gas clusters exposed to high-intensity hard-x-ray pulses at ~5 keV. Our experiment was carried out at the SPring-8 Angstrom Compact free electron LAser (SACLA) facility in Japan. Dedicated theoretical simulations were performed with the molecular dynamics tool XMDYN. We found that in this unprecedented wavelength regime nanoplasma formation is a highly indirect process. In the argon clusters investigated, nanoplasma is mainly formed through secondary electron cascading initiated by slow Auger electrons. Energy is distributed within the sample entirely through Auger processes and secondary electron cascading following photoabsorption, as in the hard x-ray regime there is no direct energy transfer from the field to the plasma. This plasma formation mechanism is specific to the hard-x-ray regime and may, thus, also be important for XFEL-based molecular imaging studies. In xenon clusters, photo- and Auger electrons contribute more significantly to the nanoplasma formation. Good agreement between experiment and simulations validates our modelling approach. This has wide-ranging implications for our ability to quantitatively predict the behavior of complex molecular systems irradiated by high-intensity hard x-rays. PMID:26077863

  8. Transcranial Clot Lysis Using High Intensity Focused Ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hölscher, Thilo; Zadicario, Eyal; Fisher, David J.; Bradley, William G.

    2010-03-01

    Stroke is the third common cause of death worldwide. The majority of strokes are caused by sudden vessel occlusion, due to a blood clot. Vessel recanalization is the primary goal of all acute stroke treatment strategies. Initial data using ultrasound in combination with a therapeutic agent for clot lysis in stroke are promising. However, sound absorption and defocusing of the ultrasound beam occur during transskull insonation, limiting the efficiency of this approach to high extent. Using a transskull High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) head system we were able to lyse blood clots within seconds and in absence of further lytic agents. We could show that any correction for the distortion might be negligible to focus the ultrasound beam after transskull insonation. The use of transskull HIFU for immediate clot lysis in the human brain without the need of further drugs and disregarding individual skull bone characteristics could become a successful strategy in early stroke treatment. Using magnetic resonance tomography for neuronavigation MRI Guided High Intensity Focused Ultrasound has the potential to open new avenues for therapeutic applications in the brain including Stroke, Intracranial Hemorrhages, Braintumors, Neurodegenerative Diseases, Thalamic Pain, BBB opening, and local drug delivery. First results in transcranial clot lysis will be presented in this paper.

  9. High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Tumor Therapy System and Its Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Fucheng; He, Ye; Li, Rui

    2007-05-01

    At the end of last century, a High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) tumor therapy system was successfully developed and manufactured in China, which has been already applied to clinical therapy. This article aims to discuss the HIFU therapy system and its application. Detailed research includes the following: power amplifiers for high-power ultrasound, ultrasound transducers with large apertures, accurate 3-D mechanical drives, a software control system (both high-voltage control and low-voltage control), and the B-mode ultrasonic diagnostic equipment used for treatment monitoring. Research on the dosage of ultrasound required for tumour therapy in multiple human cases has made it possible to relate a dosage formula, presented in this paper, to other significant parameters such as the volume of thermal tumor solidification, the acoustic intensity (I), and the ultrasound emission time (tn). Moreover, the HIFU therapy system can be applied to the clinical treatment of both benign and malignant tumors in the pelvic and abdominal cavity, such as uterine fibroids, liver cancer and pancreatic carcinoma.

  10. Sympathetic and sensory innervation of small intensely fluorescent (SIF) cells in rat superior cervical ganglion.

    PubMed

    Takaki, Fumiya; Nakamuta, Nobuaki; Kusakabe, Tatsumi; Yamamoto, Yoshio

    2015-02-01

    The sympathetic ganglion contains small intensely fluorescent (SIF) cells derived from the neural crest. We morphologically characterize SIF cells and focus on their relationship with ganglionic cells, preganglionic nerve fibers and sensory nerve endings. SIF cells stained intensely for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), with a few cells also being immunoreactive for dopamine β-hydroxylase (DBH). Vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT)-immunoreactive puncta were distributed around some clusters of SIF cells, whereas some SIF cells closely abutted DBH-immunoreactive ganglionic cells. SIF cells contained bassoon-immunoreactive products beneath the cell membrane at the attachments and on opposite sites to the ganglionic cells. Ganglion neurons and SIF cells were immunoreactive to dopamine D2 receptors. Immunohistochemistry for P2X3 revealed ramified nerve endings with P2X3 immunoreactivity around SIF cells. Triple-labeling for P2X3, TH and VAChT allowed the classification of SIF cells into three types based on their innervation: (1) with only VAChT-immunoreactive puncta, (2) with only P2X3-immunoreactive nerve endings, (3) with both P2X3-immunoreactive nerve endings and VAChT-immunoreactive puncta. The results of retrograde tracing with fast blue dye indicated that most of these nerve endings originated from the petrosal ganglion. Thus, SIF cells in the superior cervical ganglion are innervated by preganglionic fibers and glossopharyngeal sensory nerve endings and can be classified into three types. SIF cells might modulate sympathetic activity in the superior cervical ganglion. PMID:25416508

  11. TRIPS: The high intensity proton source for the TRASCO project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celona, L.; Ciavola, G.; Gammino, S.; Gobin, R.; Ferdinand, R.

    2000-02-01

    The TRASCO project (trasmutazione scorie) is a R&D program whose goal is the design of an accelerator driving system for nuclear waste transmutation. The high current continuous wave proton linear accelerator will drive a subcritical system to transmutate nuclear wastes, while producing energy. The proton source TRIPS is a high intensity microwave source, which should be highly reliable and that should provide a minimum proton current of 50 mA with a r-r' root mean square normalized emittance lower than 0.2 π mm mrad. A program of cooperation has been entered into with CEA-Saclay, where the IPHI project is in progress and the proton source SILHI has been designed and built using goals close to those of TRIPS. The construction of TRIPS is underway and the first beam is scheduled for the first half of 2000. The main features of this source and the results of the optics calculations are presented.

  12. Response of antibiotics and resistance genes to high-intensity and low-intensity manure management.

    PubMed

    Storteboom, Heather N; Kim, Sung-Chul; Doesken, Kathy C; Carlson, Kenneth H; Davis, Jessica G; Pruden, Amy

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the response of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance genes (ARG) to manure management. A pilot field study was conducted using horse manure containing no antibiotics, into which chlortetracycline (CTC), tylosin (TYL), and monensin (MON) were spiked and compared to unspiked controls. Subsequently, a large-scale field study was conducted comparing manure from a dairy with minimal use of antibiotics and a feedlot with regular subtherapeutic use of antibiotics. The manures were subjected to high-intensity management (HIM) (amending, watering, and turning) and low-intensity management (LIM) (no amending, watering, or turning) and were monitored for antibiotic concentrations and levels of tetracycline ARG [tet(W) and tet(O)] using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. All three antibiotics in the pilot study dissipated more rapidly in HIM manure, with half-lives ranging from 4 to 15 d, compared to LIM manure, with half-lives ranging from 8 to 30 d. Levels of tet(W) were significantly higher after 141 d of treatment, but levels of tet(O) were significantly lower in all treatments. In the large-scale study, the feedlot manure had higher initial concentrations than the dairy manure of tetracycline (TC), oxytetracycline (OTC), and CTC as well as tet(W) and tet(O). Tetracycline and OTC dissipated more rapidly in HIM manure, with half-lives ranging from 6 to 15 d, compared to LIM manure, with half-lives ranging from 7 to 31 d. After 6 mo of treatment, tet(W) and tet(O) decreased significantly in feedlot manure, whereas dairy manure required only 4 mo of treatment for similar results.

  13. Transportable high sensitivity small sample radiometric calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Wetzel, J.R.; Biddle, R.S.; Cordova, B.S.; Sampson, T.E.; Dye, H.R.; McDow, J.G.

    1998-12-31

    A new small-sample, high-sensitivity transportable radiometric calorimeter, which can be operated in different modes, contains an electrical calibration method, and can be used to develop secondary standards, will be described in this presentation. The data taken from preliminary tests will be presented to indicate the precision and accuracy of the instrument. The calorimeter and temperature-controlled bath, at present, require only a 30-in. by 20-in. tabletop area. The calorimeter is operated from a laptop computer system using unique measurement module capable of monitoring all necessary calorimeter signals. The calorimeter can be operated in the normal calorimeter equilibration mode, as a comparison instrument, using twin chambers and an external electrical calibration method. The sample chamber is 0.75 in (1.9 cm) in diameter by 2.5 in. (6.35 cm) long. This size will accommodate most {sup 238}Pu heat standards manufactured in the past. The power range runs from 0.001 W to <20 W. The high end is only limited by sample size.

  14. High-Intensity Sweeteners in Alternative Tobacco Products

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Shida; Beach, Evan S.; Sommer, Toby J.; Zimmerman, Julie B.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Sweeteners in tobacco products may influence use initiation and reinforcement, with special appeal to adolescents. Recent analytical studies of smokeless tobacco products (snuff, snus, dissolvables) detected flavorants identical to those added to confectionary products such as hard candy and chewing gum. However, these studies did not determine the levels of sweeteners. The objective of the present study was to quantify added sweeteners in smokeless tobacco products, a dissolvable product, electronic cigarette liquids and to compare with sweetener levels in confectionary products. Methods: Sweetener content of US-sourced smokeless tobacco, electronic cigarette liquid, and confectionary product samples was analyzed by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization–mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS). Results: All smokeless products contained synthetic high intensity sweeteners, with snus and dissolvables exceeding levels in confectionary products (as much as 25-fold). All snus samples contained sucralose and most also aspartame, but no saccharin. In contrast, all moist snuff samples contained saccharin. The dissolvable sample contained sucralose and sorbitol. Ethyl maltol was the most common sweet-associated component in electronic cigarette liquids. Discussion: Sweetener content was dependent on product category, with saccharin in moist snuff, an older category, sucralose added at high levels to more recently introduced products (snus, dissolvable) and ethyl maltol in electronic cigarette liquid. The very high sweetener concentrations may be necessary for the consumer to tolerate the otherwise aversive flavors of tobacco ingredients. Regulation of sweetener levels in smokeless tobacco products may be an effective measure to modify product attractiveness, initiation and use patterns. Implications: Dissolvables, snus and electronic cigarettes have been promoted as risk-mitigation products due to their relatively low content of nitrosamines and other tobacco

  15. Composite cure and shrinkage associated with high intensity curing light.

    PubMed

    Yap, Adrian U J; Wong, N Y; Siow, K S

    2003-01-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of cure and post-gel shrinkage of three visible light-cured composite resins (In Ten-S [IT], Ivoclar Vivadent; Z100 [ZO], 3M-ESPE; Tetric Ceram [TC], Ivoclar Vivadent) when polymerized with a very high intensity (1296 +/- 2 mW/cm2) halogen light (Astralis 10, Ivoclar Vivadent) for 10 seconds. Irradiation with a conventional (494 +/- 3 mW/cm2) halogen light (Spectrum, Dentsply) for 40 seconds was used for comparison. The effectiveness of cure was assessed by computing the hardness gradient between the top and bottom surfaces of 2-mm composite specimens after curing. A strain-monitoring device was used to measure the linear polymerization shrinkage associated with the various composites and curing lights. A sample size of five was used for both experiments. Data was analyzed using ANOVA/Scheffe's post-hoc and Independent Samples t-tests at significance level 0.05. Results showed that the effect of the curing method on the effectiveness of cure and shrinkage was material-dependent. Polymerization of IT and TC with Spectrum for 40 seconds resulted in significantly more effective cure than polymerization with Astralis for 10 seconds. Polymerization of ZO with Spectrum for 40 seconds resulted in significantly more shrinkage than polymerization with Astralis for 10 seconds. In view of the substantial time saving, using high intensity lights may be a viable method to polymerize composites.

  16. Free-field propagation of high intensity noise. [supersonic jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdaniel, O. H.; Roth, S. D.; Welz, J. P.

    1981-01-01

    Research on high intensity (finite amplitude) acoustic waves shows that nonlinear distortion effects generally result in a shift of energy to higher frequencies. The higher intensities associated with supersonic jets would therefore indicate that high frequency enhancement of the spectrum should occur, resulting in the differences observed between subsonic and supersonic jets. A 10,000 acoustic watt source installed in an anechoic chamber generates sound levels such that acoustic shocks are readily observable. Dual frequency excitation of the source produces a strong parametric effect with a difference frequency comparable in level to the primary frequency. The test set up and recording equipment being used to determine the finite amplitude noise representative of an actual supersonic jet are described as well as the development of a computer program based on Burger's equation. The spectra of 1/2 octave band, 1 kHz sine wave, and dual frequency input and output are presented in graphs along with waveforms at Z = .025, 0.1, and 1.0.

  17. High light intensity augments mercury toxicity in cyanobacterium Nostoc muscorum.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ranjana; Dubey, Gunjan; Singh, Vijay Pratap; Srivastava, Prabhat Kumar; Kumar, Sushil; Prasad, Sheo Mohan

    2012-11-01

    The present study is aimed at investigating the role of growth irradiance in determining the extent of mercury (Hg) toxicity on various physiological parameters viz. growth, pigment contents, photosynthesis, respiration, (14)CO(2) fixation, photosynthetic electron transport, photorespiration and enzyme activity of cyanobacterium Nostoc muscorum. A general decline was observed in all these parameters with increasing concentration of Hg except for carotenoids content and respiratory activity which exhibited significant enhancement. This effect was more pronounced in high light (130 μmol photon m(-2) s(-1)) exposed cells as compared to normal (70 μmol photon m(-2) s(-1)) and low (10 μmol photon m(-2) s(-1)) light exposed cells. Among the photosynthetic electron transport activities, whole chain was found to be more sensitive than photosystem II (PSII) and photosystem I (PSI). (14)CO(2) fixation was more affected as compared to O(2) evolution when exposed to Hg and different light intensities. Photorespiratory activity, which is an index of protecting organisms from light-induced damage, also showed a similar declining trend. Enzyme assay revealed that among the carboxylating enzymes, activity of RUBISCO was more severely inhibited than PEPCase. Thus, these results suggest that Hg itself was toxic at all tested concentrations and high light intensity augmented its toxicity in N. muscorum inhibiting the growth, pigment contents and photosynthetic activity of the organism.

  18. Formation of a high intensity low energy positron string

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donets, E. D.; Donets, E. E.; Syresin, E. M.; Itahashi, T.; Dubinov, A. E.

    2004-05-01

    The possibility of a high intensity low energy positron beam production is discussed. The proposed Positron String Trap (PST) is based on the principles and technology of the Electron String Ion Source (ESIS) developed in JINR during the last decade. A linear version of ESIS has been used successfully for the production of intense highly charged ion beams of various elements. Now the Tubular Electron String Ion Source (TESIS) concept is under study and this opens really new promising possibilities in physics and technology. In this report, we discuss the application of the tubular-type trap for the storage of positrons cooled to the cryogenic temperatures of 0.05 meV. It is intended that the positron flux at the energy of 1-5 eV, produced by the external source, is injected into the Tubular Positron Trap which has a similar construction as the TESIS. Then the low energy positrons are captured in the PST Penning trap and are cooled down because of their synchrotron radiation in the strong (5-10 T) applied magnetic field. It is expected that the proposed PST should permit storing and cooling to cryogenic temperature of up to 5×109 positrons. The accumulated cooled positrons can be used further for various physics applications, for example, antihydrogen production.

  19. Photodetachment of H- from intense, short, high-frequency pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Hua-Chieh; Robicheaux, F.

    2016-05-01

    We study the photodetachment of an electron from the hydrogen anion due to short, high-frequency laser pulses by numerically solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. Simulations are performed to investigate the dependence of the photoelectron spectra on the duration, chirp, and intensity of the pulses. Specifically, we concentrate on the low-energy distributions in the spectra that result from the Raman transitions of the broadband pulses. Contrary to the one-photon ionization, the low-energy distribution maintains a similar width as the laser bandwidth is expanded by chirping the pulses. In addition, we study the transitions of the ionization dynamics from the perturbative to strong-field regime. At high intensities, the positions of the net one- and two-photon absorption peaks in the spectrum shifts and the peaks split to multiple subpeaks because of the multiphoton effects. Moreover, although the one- and two-photon peaks and low-energy distribution exhibit saturation of the ionization yields, the latter shows relatively mild saturation. This work has been supported by DOE under Award No. DE-SC0012193.

  20. Disease-control rates following intensity-modulated radiation therapy for small primary oropharyngeal carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Garden, Adam S. . E-mail: agarden@mdanderson.org; Morrison, William H.; Wong, P.-F.; Tung, Sam S.; Rosenthal, David I.; Dong Lei; Mason, Brian M.S.; Perkins, George H.; Ang, K. Kian

    2007-02-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to assess the ability of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to achieve favorable disease-control rates while minimizing parotid gland doses in patients treated for small primary tumors of the oropharynx. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively identified all patients who received IMRT as treatment for a small (<4 cm) primary tumor of the oropharynx between October 2000 and June 2002. Tumor characteristics, IMRT parameters, and patient outcomes were assessed. Results: Fifty-one patients met the criteria for our study. All patients had treatment to gross disease with margin (CTV1), and all but 1 had treatment to the bilateral necks. The most common treatment schedule (39 patients) was a once-daily fractionation of prescribed doses of 63-66 Gy to the CTV1 and 54 Gy to subclinical sites, delivered in 30 fractions. Twenty-one patients (40%) had gastrostomy tubes placed during therapy; in 4 patients, the tube remained in place for more than 6 months after completion of IMRT. The median follow-up was 45 months. The 2-year actuarial locoregional control, recurrence-free, and overall survival rates were 94%, 88%, and 94%, respectively. Conclusions: These preliminary data suggest that treatment with IMRT results in favorable locoregional control of small primary oropharynx tumors. IMRT did not appear to have a more favorable acute toxicity profile in this group with respect to the use of a feeding tube; however, the mean dose of radiation delivered to the parotid gland by IMRT was decreased, because 95% of patients had a mean dose of <30 Gy to at least one gland.

  1. Ultra-High Intensity Magnetic Field Generation in Dense Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Fisch, Nathaniel J

    2014-01-08

    I. Grant Objective The main objective of this grant proposal was to explore the efficient generation of intense currents. Whereasthefficient generation of electric current in low-­energy-­density plasma has occupied the attention of the magnetic fusion community for several decades, scant attention has been paid to carrying over to high-­energy-­density plasma the ideas for steady-­state current drive developed for low-­energy-­density plasma, or, for that matter, to inventing new methodologies for generating electric current in high-­energy-­density plasma. What we proposed to do was to identify new mechanisms to accomplish current generation, and to assess the operation, physics, and engineering basis of new forms of current drive in regimes appropriate for new fusion concepts.

  2. High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Treatment for Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yufeng

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is under high mortality but has few effective treatment modalities. High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is becoming an emerging approach of noninvasively ablating solid tumor in clinics. A variety of solid tumors have been tried on thousands of patients in the last fifteen years with great success. The principle, mechanism, and clinical outcome of HIFU were introduced first. All 3022 clinical cases of HIFU treatment for the advanced pancreatic cancer alone or in combination with chemotherapy or radiotherapy in 241 published papers were reviewed and summarized for its efficacy, pain relief, clinical benefit rate, survival, Karnofsky performance scale (KPS) score, changes in tumor size, occurrence of echogenicity, serum level, diagnostic assessment of outcome, and associated complications. Immune response induced by HIFU ablation may become an effective way of cancer treatment. Comments for a better outcome and current challenges of HIFU technology are also covered. PMID:25053938

  3. The PhIX High Intensity Plasma Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goulding, R. H.; Caughman, J. B. O.; Peng, Y.-K. M.; Rapp, J.; Rasmussen, D. A.; Biewer, T. M.; Canik, J. M.; Chen, G.; Diem, S. J.; Meitner, S. J.; Owen, L. W.

    2012-10-01

    The Physics Integration eXperiment (PhIX) is a linear high-intensity rf plasma source presently being constructed at ORNL that combines a high density helicon plasma generator with an electron heating section. It will be used to explore the physics related to heating an overdense, streaming plasma in a linear geometry by whistler waves and Electron Bernstein Waves (EBW), including optimization of heating efficiency and maximization of particle flux. Interactions between the plasma production and heating regions, and the source and a downstream target, will also be investigated. Experiments using the device will provide data for the design of an rf powered high particle flux (˜10^24/m^2- s), high heat flux(˜10 MW /m^2) steady-state linear plasma-materials test station (PMTS). In preparatory experiments, the helicon device has operated at power levels up to 90 kW, producing high plasma densities in He (6 x10^19 m-3) and D (> 4 x10^19 m-3), and has also operated at high magnetic field strength up to 0.5 T. Separate ECH experiments have demonstrated both whistler and EBW coupling at 6 GHz to an overdense plasma. A review of these experiments will be presented, as well as an overview of PhIX and its status.

  4. Optical Fiber High Temperature Sensor Instrumentation for Energy Intensive Industries

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, Kristie L.; Wang, Anbo; Pickrell, Gary R.

    2006-11-14

    This report summarizes technical progress during the program “Optical Fiber High Temperature Sensor Instrumentation for Energy Intensive Industries”, performed by the Center for Photonics Technology of the Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Virginia Tech. The objective of this program was to use technology recently invented at Virginia Tech to develop and demonstrate the application of self-calibrating optical fiber temperature and pressure sensors to several key energy-intensive industries where conventional, commercially available sensors exhibit greatly abbreviated lifetimes due primarily to environmental degradation. A number of significant technologies were developed under this program, including • a laser bonded silica high temperature fiber sensor with a high temperature capability up to 700°C and a frequency response up to 150 kHz, • the world’s smallest fiber Fabry-Perot high temperature pressure sensor (125 x 20 μm) with 700°C capability, • UV-induced intrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometric sensors for distributed measurement, • a single crystal sapphire fiber-based sensor with a temperature capability up to 1600°C. These technologies have been well demonstrated and laboratory tested. Our work plan included conducting major field tests of these technologies at EPRI, Corning, Pratt & Whitney, and Global Energy; field validation of the technology is critical to ensuring its usefulness to U.S. industries. Unfortunately, due to budget cuts, DOE was unable to follow through with its funding commitment to support Energy Efficiency Science Initiative projects and this final phase was eliminated.

  5. Production of high intensity Beta beams at the ISOLDE facility

    SciTech Connect

    Hodak, Rastislav; Stora, Thierry; Mendonca, Tania M.

    2011-12-16

    We discuss a design study devoted to a construction of the Beta beams facility at CERN, a next generation European facility aiming for a production of pure and collimated ultra-relativistic beam of electron (anti)neutrinos with help of accelerated {beta}-decaying radioactive ions circulating in a storage decay ring. This high intense source of (anti)neutrinos directed towards a remote underground neutrino detector will allow to measure neutrino oscillations with high accuracy offering a unique chance for establishing a value of the {beta}{sub 13} mixing angle and CP violating phase. Recently, a significant progress have been achieved on the conceptual design of high power targets required for a production and an extraction of two baseline isotopes, {sup 6}He and {sup 18}Ne, at the unexampled rate of several 10{sup 13} ions/s. There is a possibility to produce these isotopes using the so-called Isotope Separation On Line (ISOL) method at the ISOLDE facility (CERN). The {sup 6}He production is realized by taking advantage of the {sup 9}Be(n,{alpha}){sup 6}He reaction and with help of spallation neutrons and porous BeO target material. The production of {sup 18}Ne through the {sup 19}F(p,2n){sup 18}Ne reaction at required intensities is even more challenging. Currently, a molten salt (NaF) loop target is proposed for a production of high rate of {sup 18}Ne required for the Beta beams project. The progress on the design study associated with new data and plans for future is briefly presented.

  6. Endurance capacity and high-intensity exercise performance responses to a high fat diet.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Jesse; Sharman, Matthew J; Avery, Neva G; Love, Dawn M; Gómez, Ana L; Scheett, Timothy P; Kraemer, William J; Volek, Jeff S

    2003-12-01

    The effects of adaptation to a high-fat diet on endurance performance are equivocal, and there is little data regarding the effects on high-intensity exercise performance. This study examined the effects of a high-fat/moderate protein diet on submaximal, maximal, and supramaximal performance. Twenty non-highly trained men were assigned to either a high-fat/moderate protein (HFMP; 61% fat diet) (n = 12) or a control (C; 25% fat) group (n = 8). A maximal oxygen consumption test, two 30-s Wingate anaerobic tests, and a 45-min timed ride were performed before and after 6 weeks of diet and training. Body mass decreased significantly (-2.2 kg; p < or = .05) in HFMP subjects. Maximal oxygen consumption significantly decreased in the HFMP group (3.5 +/- 0.14 to 3.27 +/- 0.09 L x min(-1)) but was unaffected when corrected for body mass. Perceived exertion was significantly higher during this test in the HFMP group. Main time effects indicated that peak and mean power decreased significantly during bout 1 of the Wingate sprints in the HFMP (-10 and -20%, respectively) group but not the C (-8 and -16%, respectively) group. Only peak power was lower during bout 1 in the HFMP group when corrected for body mass. Despite significantly reduced RER values in the HFMP group during the 45-min cycling bout, work output was significantly decreased (-18%). Adaptation to a 6-week HFMP diet in non-highly trained men resulted in increased fat oxidation during exercise and small decrements in peak power output and endurance performance. These deleterious effects on exercise performance may be accounted for in part by a reduction in body mass and/or increased ratings of perceived exertion.

  7. Plasmas and Short-Pulse, High-Intensity Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Thomas

    1999-11-01

    Many of the applications of short-pulse, high-intensity laser systems, including coherent UV and X-ray generation, compact particle accelerators, and non-perturbative nonlinear optics as well as the study of laser-matter interaction physics, require large intensity-interaction length products. In recent years, plasma structures resulting from the hydrodynamic evolution of laser-produced plasma filaments have proven to be attractive media for guiding pulses with peak powers approaching the terawatt level over lengths many times the vacuum Rayleigh range. The hydrodynamics of plasma waveguides have been characterized using time- and space-resolved interferometry measurements of electron density profiles. The laser-driven ionization and heating phase of the plasma filament creation is followed by hot electron driven plasma expansion. Density profiles suitable for optical guiding develop within the first few hundred picoseconds after plasma creation, during which rapid cooling occurs. At longer times the plasma expansion closely follows that of a cylindrical blast wave, with further cooling due to expansion work. The observed guided intensity profiles of end-coupled and tunnel-coupled pulses compare favorably with calculations of the quasi-bound waveguide modes based on the measured electron density profiles. Time- and space-resolved electron density measurements of a laser-driven concentric implosion were also performed. The implosion is the result of the interaction of a second laser pulse with an existing plasma waveguide. The two-pulse absorption and ionization significantly exceed that due to a single pulse of the same total energy. The author would like to acknowledge the significant contributions of Prof. Howard M. Milchberg to the work being presented.

  8. High-Intensity Interval Exercise and Postprandial Triacylglycerol.

    PubMed

    Burns, Stephen F; Miyashita, Masashi; Stensel, David J

    2015-07-01

    This review examined if high-intensity interval exercise (HIIE) reduces postprandial triacylglycerol (TAG) levels. Fifteen studies were identified, in which the effect of interval exercise conducted at an intensity of >65% of maximal oxygen uptake was evaluated on postprandial TAG levels. Analysis was divided between studies that included supramaximal exercise and those that included submaximal interval exercise. Ten studies examined the effect of a single session of low-volume HIIE including supramaximal sprints on postprandial TAG. Seven of these studies noted reductions in the postprandial total TAG area under the curve the morning after exercise of between ~10 and 21% compared with rest, but three investigations found no significant difference in TAG levels. Variations in the HIIE protocol used, inter-individual variation or insufficient time post-exercise for an increase in lipoprotein lipase activity are proposed reasons for the divergent results among studies. Five studies examined the effect of high-volume submaximal interval exercise on postprandial TAG. Four of these studies were characterised by high exercise energy expenditure and effectively attenuated total postprandial TAG levels by ~15-30%, but one study with a lower energy expenditure found no effect on TAG. The evidence suggests that supramaximal HIIE can induce large reductions in postprandial TAG levels but findings are inconsistent. Submaximal interval exercise offers no TAG metabolic or time advantage over continuous aerobic exercise but could be appealing in nature to some individuals. Future research should examine if submaximal interval exercise can reduce TAG levels in line with more realistic and achievable exercise durations of 30 min per day.

  9. NASA's New High Intensity Solar Environment Test Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Todd A.; Vaughn, Jason A.; Wright, Kenneth H.

    2012-01-01

    Across the world, new spaceflight missions are being designed and executed that will place spacecraft and instruments into challenging environments throughout the solar system. To aid in the successful completion of these new missions, NASA has developed a new flexible space environment test platform. The High Intensity Solar Environment Test (HISET) capability located at NASA fs Marshall Space Flight Center provides scientists and engineers with the means to test spacecraft materials and systems in a wide range of solar wind and solar photon environments. Featuring a solar simulator capable of delivering approximately 1 MW/m2 of broad spectrum radiation at maximum power, HISET provides a means to test systems or components that could explore the solar corona. The solar simulator consists of three high-power Xenon arc lamps that can be operated independently over a range of power to meet test requirements; i.e., the lamp power can be greatly reduced to simulate the solar intensity at several AU. Integral to the HISET capability are charged particle sources that can provide a solar wind (electron and proton) environment. Used individually or in combination, the charged particle sources can provide fluxes ranging from a few nA/cm2 to 100s of nA/cm2 over an energy range of 50 eV to 100 keV for electrons and 100 eV to 30 keV for protons. Anchored by a high vacuum facility equipped with a liquid nitrogen cold shroud for radiative cooling scenarios, HISET is able to accommodate samples as large as 1 meter in diameter. In this poster, details of the HISET capability will be presented, including the wide ]ranging configurability of the system.

  10. HIGH INTENSITY EFFECTS IN THE SNS ACCUMULATOR RING

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, Jeffrey A; Cousineau, Sarah M; Danilov, Viatcheslav; Plum, Michael A; Shishlo, Andrei P

    2008-01-01

    Currently operating at 0.5 MW beam power on target, the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is already the world's most powerful pulsed neutron source. However, we are only one third of the way to full power. As we ramp toward full power, the control of the beam and beam loss in the ring will be critical. In addition to practical considerations, such as choice of operating point, painting scheme, RF bunching, and beam scattering, it may be necessary to understand and mitigate collective effects due to space charge, impedances, and electron clouds. At each stage of the power ramp-up, we use all available resources to understand and to minimize beam losses. From the standpoint of beam dynamics, the losses observed so far under normal operating conditions have not involved collective phenomena. We are now entering the intensity regime in which this may change. In dedicated high intensity beam studies, we have already observed resistive wall, extraction kicker impedance-driven, and electron cloud activities. The analysis and simulation of this data are important ongoing activities at SNS. This paper discusses the status of this work, as well as other considerations necessary to the successful full power operation of SNS.

  11. High intensity ion beam injection into the 88-inch cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Wutte, Daniela; Clark, Dave J.; Laune, Bernard; Leitner,Matthaeus A.; Lyneis, Claude M.

    2000-05-31

    Low cross section experiments to produce super-heavyelements have increased the demand for high intensity heavy ion beams atenergies of about 5 MeV/nucleon at the 88-Inch Cyclotron at the LawrenceBerkeley National Laboratory. Therefore, efforts are underway to increasethe overall ion beam transmission through the axial injection line andthe cyclotron. The ion beam emittance has been measured for various ionmasses and charge states. Beam transport simulations including spacecharge effects were performed for both of the injection line and the ionsource extraction. The relatively low nominal injection voltage of 10 kVwas found to be the main factor for ion beam losses, because of beam blowup due to space charge forces at higher intensities. Consequently,experiments and simulations have been performed at higherinjectionenergies, and it was demonstrated that the ion beams could still becentered in the cyclotron at these energies. Therefore, the new injectorion source VENUS and its ion beam transport system (currently underconstruction at the 88-Inch Cyclotron) are designed for extractionvoltages up to 30 kV.

  12. Blood coagulation using High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Phuc V.; Oh, Junghwan; Kang, Hyun Wook

    2014-03-01

    High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) technology provides a feasible method of achieving thermal coagulation during surgical procedures. One of the potential clinical benefits of HIFU can induce immediate hemostasis without suturing. The objective of this study was to investigate the efficiency of a HIFU system for blood coagulation on severe vascular injury. ngHIFU treatment was implemented immediately after bleeding in artery. The ultrasound probe was made of piezoelectric material, generating a central frequency of 2.0 MHz as well as an ellipsoidal focal spot of 2 mm in lateral dimension and 10 mm in axial dimension. Acoustic coagulation was employed on a perfused chicken artery model in vitro. A surgical incision (1 to 2 mm long) was made with a scapel on the arterial wall, and heparinized autologous blood was made to leak out from the incision with a syringe pump. A total of 5 femoral artery incisions was treated with the HIFU beam. The intensity of 4500 W/cm2 at the focus was applied for all treatments. Complete hemostasis was achieved in all treatments, along with the treatment times of 25 to 50 seconds. The estimated intraoperative blood loss was from 2 to 5 mL. The proposed HIFU system may provide an effective method for immediate blood coagulation for arteries and veins in clinical applications.

  13. Proceedings of the third ICFA mini-workshop on high intensity, high brightness hadron accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Roser, T.

    1997-11-01

    The third mini-workshop on high intensity, high brightness hadron accelerators was held at Brookhaven National Laboratory on May 7-9, 1997 and had about 30 participants. The workshop focussed on rf and longitudinal dynamics issues relevant to intense and/or bright hadron synchrotrons. A plenary session was followed by four sessions on particular topics. This document contains copies of the viewgraphs used as well as summaries written by the session chairs.

  14. Optimal conditions for tissue perforation using high intensity focused ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochizuki, Takashi; Kihara, Taizo; Ogawa, Kouji; Tanabe, Ryoko; Yosizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-ichiro; Kakimoto, Takashi; Yamashita, Hiromasa; Chiba, Toshio

    2012-10-01

    To perforate tissue lying deep part in body, a large size transducer was assembled by combining four spherical-shaped transducers, and the optimal conditions for tissue perforation have studied using ventricle muscle of chicken as a target. The ex vivo experiments showed that ventricle muscle was successfully perforated both when it was exposed to High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) directly and when it was exposed to HIFU through atrial muscle layer. Moreover, it was shown that calculated acoustic power distributions are well similar to the perforation patterns, and that the acoustic energy distributes very complexly near the focus. Lastly, perforation on the living rabbit bladder wall was demonstrated as a preliminary in vivo experiment.

  15. High intensity neutrino source superconducting solenoid cyrostat design

    SciTech Connect

    Page, T.M.; Nicol, T.H.; Feher, S.; Terechkine, I.; Tompkins, J.; /Fermilab

    2006-06-01

    Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) is involved in the development of a 100 MeV superconducting linac. This linac is part of the High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS) R&D Program. The initial beam acceleration in the front end section of the linac is achieved using room temperature spoke cavities, each of which is combined with a superconducting focusing solenoid. These solenoid magnets are cooled with liquid helium at 4.5K, operate at 250 A and have a maximum magnetic field strength of 7.5 T. The solenoid cryostat will house the helium vessel, suspension system, thermal shield, multilayer insulation, power leads, instrumentation, a vacuum vessel and cryogenic distribution lines. This paper discusses the requirements and detailed design of these superconducting solenoid cryostats.

  16. High-intensity cyclotron for the IsoDAR experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campo, D.; IsoDAR Collaboration

    2015-03-01

    The IsoDAR experiment is the MIT proposal to investigate about several neutrino properties, in order to explain some anomalies experimentally observed. It requires 10mA of proton beam at the energy of 60MeV to produce a high-intensity electron antineutrino flux from the production and the decay of 8Li: it is an ambitious goal for the accelerator design, due also to the fact that the machine has to be placed near a neutrino detector, like KAMLAND or WATCHMAN, located in underground sites. A compact cyclotron able to accelerate H2+ molecule beam up to energy of 60MeV/amu is under study. The critical issues of this machine concern the beam injection due to the effects of space charge, the efficiency of the beam extraction and the technical solutions needed to the machine assembly. Here, the innovative solutions and the preliminary results achieved by the IsoDAR team are discussed.

  17. High Intensity, Pulsed, D-D Neutron Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, D. L.; Vainionpaa, J. H.; Jones, G.; Piestrup, M. A.; Gary, C. K.; Harris, J. L.; Fuller, M. J.; Cremer, J. T.; Ludewigt, Bernhard A.; Kwan, J. W.; Reijonen, J.; Leung, K.-N.; Gough, R. A.

    2008-08-01

    Single ion-beam RF-plasma neutron generators are presented as a laboratory source of intense neutrons. The continuous and pulsed operations of such a neutron generator using the deuterium-deuterium fusion reaction are reported. The neutron beam can be pulsed by switching the RF plasma and/or a gate electrode. These generators are actively vacuum pumped so that a continuous supply of deuterium gas is present for the production of ions and neutrons. This contributes to the generator's long life. These single-beam generators are capable of producing up to 1E10 n/s. Previously, Adelphi and LBNL have demonstrated these generators' applications in fast neutron radiography, Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) and Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA). Together with an inexpensive compact moderator, these high-output neutron generators extend useful applications to home laboratory operations.

  18. High Intensity Neutrino Source Superconducting Solenoid Cryostat Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, T. M.; Nicol, T. H.; Feher, S.; Terechkine, I.; Tompkins, J.

    2008-03-01

    Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) is involved in the development of a 100 MeV superconducting linac. This linac is part of the High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS) R&D Program. The initial beam acceleration in the front end section of the linac is achieved using room temperature spoke cavities, each of which is combined with a superconducting focusing solenoid. These solenoid magnets are cooled with liquid helium at 4.5 K, operate at 250 A and have a maximum magnetic field strength of 7.5 T. The solenoid cryostat will house the helium vessel, suspension system, thermal shield, multilayer insulation, power leads, instrumentation, a vacuum vessel and cryogenic distribution lines. This paper discusses the requirements and detailed design of these superconducting solenoid cryostats.

  19. [High-intensity interval training for young athletes].

    PubMed

    Engel, Florian Azad; Sperlich, Billy

    2014-06-01

    A computer-based literature research during July 2013 using the electronic databases PubMed, MEDLINE, SPORTDiscus and Web of Science was performed to assess the effect of the high intensity interval training (HIIT) on sport performance in healthy children and adolescents. Studies examining the effect of HIIT on aerobic and anaerobic performance pre and post to HIIT-Interventions in children and adolescents (9-18 years) were included. The results indicate increased aerobic and anaerobic performance following two or three HIIT sessions per week for a period of five to ten weeks, additional to normal training. Results regarding long term effects following HIIT have not been documented so far. In addition, due to the physiological characteris-tics during HIIT protocols improved fatigue resistance has been demonstrated in children as compared to adults, which may be interpreted as a prerequisite for the applicability of HIIT in children.

  20. High-intensity intermittent exercise and fat loss.

    PubMed

    Boutcher, Stephen H

    2011-01-01

    The effect of regular aerobic exercise on body fat is negligible; however, other forms of exercise may have a greater impact on body composition. For example, emerging research examining high-intensity intermittent exercise (HIIE) indicates that it may be more effective at reducing subcutaneous and abdominal body fat than other types of exercise. The mechanisms underlying the fat reduction induced by HIIE, however, are undetermined. Regular HIIE has been shown to significantly increase both aerobic and anaerobic fitness. HIIE also significantly lowers insulin resistance and results in a number of skeletal muscle adaptations that result in enhanced skeletal muscle fat oxidation and improved glucose tolerance. This review summarizes the results of HIIE studies on fat loss, fitness, insulin resistance, and skeletal muscle. Possible mechanisms underlying HIIE-induced fat loss and implications for the use of HIIE in the treatment and prevention of obesity are also discussed.

  1. Comparison of Two High Intensity Acoustic Test Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Launay, A.; Tadao Sakita, M.; Kim, Youngkey K.

    2004-08-01

    In two different countries, at the same period of time, the institutes in charge of the development of space activities have decided to extend their satellite integration and test center, and to implement a reverberant acoustic chamber. In Brazil the INPE laboratory (LIT : Laboratorio de Integracao e Testes) and in South Korea the KARI laboratory (SITC : Satellite Integration and Test Center) started their projects in July 2000 for the RATF (Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility) and in May 2001 for the HIAC (High Intensity Acoustic Chamber) respectively, writing the technical specifications. The kick-off meetings took place in December 2000 and in February 2002 and the opening ceremonies in December 19, 2002 in Brazil and in August 22, 2003 in Korea. This paper compares the two projects in terms of design choices, manufacturing processes, equipment installed and technical final characteristics.

  2. Superheavy Elements Production in High Intensive Neutron Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutostansky, Yu. S.; Lyashuk, V. I.; Panov, I. V.

    2013-06-01

    The possibility of superheavy elements production in high intensive neutron fluxes is being studied. A model of the transuranium isotopes production under conditions of pulse nucleosynthesis in a neutron flux with densities of up to ~1025 neutron/cm2 is considered. The pulse process allows us to divide it in time into two stages: the process of multiple neutron captures (with t < 10-6 s) and the subsequent β-decay of neutron-rich nuclei. The modeling of the transuranium yields takes into account the adiabatic character of the process, the probability of delayed fission, and the emission of delayed neutrons. A target with a binary composition of 238U and 239Pu, 248Cm, and 251Cf isotopes is used to predict the yields of heavy and superheavy isotopes.

  3. Ion acceleration using high-contrast ultra-intense lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, J.; Antici, P.; D'Humières, E.; Lefebvre, E.; Borghesi, M.; Brambrink, E.; Cecchetti, C.; Toncian, T.; Pépin, H.; Audebert, P.

    2006-06-01

    We have compared the acceleration of high-energy ions from the rear-surface of thin foils for various contrast conditions of the ultra-intense laser pulse irradiating the targets. The experiments were performed using the LULI 100 TW facility. We used Al targets of variable thicknesses and the laser pulse contrast ratio ahead of the main pulse was varied using either a fast Pockels cell or a single or double plasma mirror. The latter was installed at an intermediate field position, in between the focusing optics and the target, so that its effect was optimized. By improving with these two methods the laser pulse contrast, we have observed that we could significantly reduce the thickness of the target used for proton acceleration and at the same time increase both the cut-off energy of the accelerated protons and the energy conversion efficiency of the process.

  4. Summary of sessions B and F: High intensity linacs and frontend & proton drivers

    SciTech Connect

    Ferdinand, R.; Chou, W.; Galambos, J.; /Oak Ridge

    2005-01-01

    This paper summarizes the sessions B&F of the 33rd ICFA Advanced Beam Dynamics Workshop on High Intensity & High Brightness Hadron Beams held in Bensheim, Germany. It covers high intensity linacs, front ends and proton driver topics.

  5. Nitrate supplementation and high-intensity performance in competitive cyclists.

    PubMed

    Hoon, Matthew W; Hopkins, William G; Jones, Andrew M; Martin, David T; Halson, Shona L; West, Nicholas P; Johnson, Nathan A; Burke, Louise M

    2014-09-01

    Consumption of inorganic nitrate (NO3(-)) is known to enhance endurance exercise performance in recreationally trained subjects. Here we report the effect on a high-intensity performance task in national-level cyclists. The performance test consisted of 2 cycle ergometer time trials of 4 min duration with 75 min between trials. In a randomized crossover design, 26 cyclists performed the test under the following 4 conditions (each separated by a 6-day washout): consumption of 70 mL of nitrate-rich beetroot juice at 150 min or 75 min before the first time trial, addition of a 35 mL "top-up dose" following the first time trial in the 150 min condition, and consumption of a placebo. A linear mixed model with adjustments for learning effects and athlete fitness (peak incremental power) was used to estimate effects on mean power, with probabilistic inferences based on a smallest important effect of 1.0%. Peak plasma nitrite (NO2(-)) concentration was greatest when nitrate was taken 75 min before the first time trial. Relative to placebo, the mean effect of all 3 nitrate treatments was unclear in the first time trial (1.3%, 90% confidence limits: ±1.7%), but possibly harmful in the second time trial (-0.3%, ±1.6%). Differences between nitrate treatments were unclear, as was the estimate of any consistent individual response to the treatments. Allowing for sampling uncertainty, the effect of nitrate on performance was less than previous studies. Under the conditions of our experiment, nitrate supplementation may be ineffective in facilitating high-intensity exercise in competitive athletes.

  6. Frequency conversion of high-intensity, femtosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Banks, P S

    1997-06-01

    Almost since the invention of the laser, frequency conversion of optical pulses via non- linear processes has been an area of active interest. However, third harmonic generation using ~(~1 (THG) in solids is an area that has not received much attention because of ma- terial damage limits. Recently, the short, high-intensity pulses possible with chirped-pulse amplification (CPA) laser systems allow the use of intensities on the order of 1 TW/cm2 in thin solids without damage. As a light source to examine single-crystal THG in solids and other high field inter- actions, the design and construction of a Ti:sapphire-based CPA laser system capable of ultimately producing peak powers of 100 TW is presented. Of special interest is a novel, all-reflective pulse stretcher design which can stretch a pulse temporally by a factor of 20,000. The stretcher design can also compensate for the added material dispersion due to propagation through the amplifier chain and produce transform-limited 45 fs pulses upon compression. A series of laser-pumped amplifiers brings the peak power up to the terawatt level at 10 Hz, and the design calls for additional amplifiers to bring the power level to the 100 TW level for single shot operation. The theory for frequency conversion of these short pulses is presented, focusing on conversion to the third harmonic in single crystals of BBO, KD*P, and d-LAP (deuterated I-arginine phosphate). Conversion efficiencies of up to 6% are obtained with 500 fs pulses at 1053 nm in a 3 mm thick BBO crystal at 200 GW/cm 2. Contributions to this process by unphasematched, cascaded second harmonic generation and sum frequency generation are shown to be very significant. The angular relationship between the two orders is used to measure the tensor elements of C = xt3)/4 with Crs = -1.8 x 1O-23 m2/V2 and .15Cri + .54Crs = 4.0 x 1O-23 m2/V2. Conversion efficiency in d-LAP is about 20% that in BBO and conversion efficiency in KD*P is 1% that of BBO. It is calculated

  7. Factors affecting exercise intensity in rugby-specific small-sided games.

    PubMed

    Kennett, David C; Kempton, Tom; Coutts, Aaron J

    2012-08-01

    Small-sided games (SSGs) have been suggested as a method for concurrently training physical, technical and tactical capabilities of rugby union players. Therefore, it is important to understand how prescriptive variables such as player number and field size influence the training stimulus during rugby-specific SSGs. Twenty semiprofessional rugby union players participated in a series of SSGs of varying player numbers (4 vs. 4, 6 vs. 6, and 8 vs. 8) on small- (32 × 24 m) and large-sized fields (64 × 48 m). The physiological (blood lactate concentration and heart rate [HR]), perceptual (rating of perceived exertion [RPE]), and time-motion demands were assessed for each different SSG format. There were significant differences between the 4 vs. 4, 6 vs. 6, and 8 vs.8 SSG formats in mean speed (meters per minute), high-speed running (HSR) distance (meters), and RPE (all p < 0.05). Blood lactate was greater in 4 vs. 4 compared with that in 8 vs. 8 SSGs. The mean speed, HSR distance, number of sprints, peak speed, blood lactate concentration, and RPE were all significantly different between large- and small-field size (all p < 0.05). There were no significant difference between game formats (4 vs. 4, 6 vs. 6, and 8 vs. 8) or field size (small or large) for either percent HRmax or time spent >85% HRmax. These results show that SSGs with fewer players and larger field sizes elicit greater physiological and perceptual responses and time-motion demands. In contrast, the HR response was similar between all SSG formats, which may be attributable to high levels of individual variability in the HR response. This study provides new information about the influence of player number and field size on the training stimulus provided by rugby-specific SSGs. PMID:21997445

  8. Operation of the Proto-MPEX High Intensity Plasma Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caughman, J. B. O.; Goulding, R. H.; Biewer, T. M.; Bigelow, T. S.; Campbell, I. H.; Diem, S. J.; Martin, E. H.; Pesavento, P. V.; Rapp, J.; Ray, H. B.; Shaw, G. C.; Showers, M. A.; Luo, G.-N.

    2015-11-01

    The Prototype Materials Plasma Experiment (Proto-MPEX) is a linear high-intensity rf plasma source that combines a high-density helicon plasma generator with electron and ion heating sections. It is being used to study the physics of heating over-dense plasmas in a linear configuration. The helicon plasma is produced by coupling 13.56 MHz rf power at levels up to 100 kW. Microwaves at 28 GHz (~ 150 kW) are coupled to the electrons in the over-dense helicon plasma via Electron Bernstein Waves (EBW). Ion cyclotron heating (~ 30 kW) will be via a magnetic beach approach. Plasma diagnostics include Thomson Scattering and a retarding field energy analyzer near the target, while a microwave interferometer and double-Langmuir probes are used to determine plasma parameters elsewhere in the system. Filterscopes are being used to measure D-alpha emission and He line ratios at multiple locations, and IR cameras image the target plates to determine heat deposition. High plasma densities in the helicon region have been produced in He (>3x1019/m3) and D (>1.5x1019/m3) , and operation with on-axis magnetic field strength >1 T has been demonstrated. Details of the experimental results and future plans for studying plasma surface/RF antenna interactions will be presented. ORNL is managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, for the U.S. DOE under contract DE-AC-05-00OR22725.

  9. Resonant high-order harmonic generation from plasma ablation: Laser intensity dependence of the harmonic intensity and phase

    SciTech Connect

    Milosevic, D. B.

    2010-02-15

    Experimentally observed strong enhancement of a single high-order harmonic in harmonic generation from low-ionized laser plasma ablation is explained as resonant harmonic generation. The resonant harmonic intensity increases regularly with the increase of the laser intensity, while the phase of the resonant harmonic is almost independent of the laser intensity. This is in sharp contrast with the usual plateau and cutoff harmonics, the intensity of which exhibits wild oscillations while its phase changes rapidly with the laser intensity. The temporal profile of a group of harmonics, which includes the resonant harmonic, has the form of a broad peak in each laser-field half cycle. These characteristics of resonant harmonics can have an important application in attoscience. We illustrate our results using examples of Sn and Sb plasmas.

  10. Complete recovery time after exhaustion in high-intensity work.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hsin-Chieh; Hsu, Wen-Hsin; Chen, Toly

    2005-05-15

    This study was aimed to investigate complete recovery time (CRT) after exhaustion in high-intensity work. Twenty-four subjects were divided into two groups based on the cardiorespiratory capability index, which was measured in a maximum capacity test. Each subject then performed two cycling tests (at 60% and 70% maximum working capacity). The subject continued cycling until exhaustion in each test and then sat recovering until he/she no longer felt fatigue or until the oxygen uptake (VO2) and heart rate (HR) returned to their baselines, whichever was longer. The results indicated that HR required the longest time to recover and, consequently, HR data were adopted to set the CRT. The CRT was significantly correlated with the cardiorespiratory capability index and the relative workload indices: RVO2 and RHR. The RVO2 was the average elevation in VO2 during work from the resting level as a percentage of maximum VO2 reserve. The RHR's definition was similar to that of RVO2. Based on the obtained CRT-prediction model, the CRT for a high-cardiorespiratory-capability person was 20.8, 22.1, 23.4, and 24.7 min at 50%, 60%, 70%, and 80% RHR levels, respectively. These suggested CRT values should be increased by 10 min for a low-cardiorespiratory-capability person. PMID:16087501

  11. Echinococcus granulosus: protoscolicidal effect of high intensity focused ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Zou, Xiaoyi; Wang, Junan; Zhao, Hailong; Zhang, Jing; Wu, Weihua; Ye, Bin

    2009-04-01

    High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is a new non-invasive technique which can cause cell death and tissue necrosis by focusing high-energy ultrasonic waves on a single location. The aim of our work is to investigate the damaging effect of HIFU on Echinococcus granulosus protoscolices, as well as its inhibitory effect on growth of hydatid cysts derived from protoscolices. The damaging effect of HIFU on protoscolices was investigated by following parasite mortality after irradiation, while the inhibitory effect was investigated by infection experiments in vivo. The results demonstrated that HIFU was able to damage protoscolices and the protoscolicidal effect was dose-dependent and showed late-onset. The growth of protoscolices that survived the exposure to HIFU was obviously suppressed in vitro, and the mean weight of hydatid cysts resulting from such protoscolices in the experimental group was less than that in controls. Evidences including the protoscolicidal effect, fragmentized protoscolices and low post exposure temperatures, suggest that cavitation may contribute to the protoscolicidal effect of HIFU. In addition, the structure of the germinal membrane in cysts developing from the irradiated protoscolices was not as normal or intact as that from non-irradiated ones, and morphological changes related to degeneration were observed, suggesting that HIFU could prevent protoscolices from developing normal germinal membrane and consequently stop the proliferation of secondary hydatid cysts. HIFU demonstrated damaging effect on protoscolices, inhibited the growth of protoscolices in vitro and in vivo, and could be a possible therapeutic option for cystic echinococcosis.

  12. Gigagauss Magnetic Field Generation from High Intensity Laser Solid Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sefcik, J.; Perry, M. D.; Lasinski, B. F.; Langdon, A. B.; Cowan, T.; Hammer, J.; Hatchett, S.; Hunt, A.; Key, M. H.; Moran, M.; Pennington, D.; Snavely, R.; Trebes, J.; Wilks, S. C.

    2004-11-01

    Intense laser (>1021 W/cm2) sources using pulse compression techniques in the sub-picosecond time frame have been used to create dynamic electric field strengths in excess of 100 Megavolts/micron with associated magnetic field strengths in the gigagauss regime. We have begun a series of experiments using the Petawatt Laser system at LLNL to determine the potential of these sources for a variety of applications. Hot electron spectra from laser-target interactions in Au have been measured with energies up to 100 MeV. Hot x-ray production has been measured using filtered thermoluminescent dosimeters and threshold nuclear activation (γ,n) from giant resonance interactions. High-resolution radiographs through ρr ≥ 165 gm/cm2 have been obtained. Dose levels in the x-ray band from 2-8 MeV have been measured at the level of several rads at one meter from the target for a single pulse. The physics of these sources and the scaling relationships and laser technology required to provide high magnetic fields are discussed. Results of preliminary magnetic field calculations are presented along with potential applications of this technology and estimates of the fundamental scaling limits for future development.

  13. Interaction of High Intensity Electromagnetic Waves with Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    G. Shvets

    2008-10-03

    The focus of our work during the duration of this grant was on the following areas: (a) the fundamental plasma physics of intense laser-plasma interactions, including the nonlinear excitation of plasma waves for accelerator applications, as well as the recently discovered by us phenomenon of the relativistic bi-stability of relativistic plasma waves driven by a laser beatwave; (b) interaction of high power microwave beams with magnetized plasma, including some of the recently discovered by us phenomena such as the Undulator Induced Transparency (UIT) as well as the new approaches to dynamic manipulation of microwave pulses; (c) investigations of the multi-color laser pulse interactions in the plasma, including the recently discovered by us phenomenon of Electromagnetic Cascading (EC) and the effect of the EC of three-dimensional dynamics of laser pulses (enhanced/suppressed selffocusing etc.); (d) interaction of high-current electron beams with the ambient plasma in the context of Fast Ignitor (FI) physics, with the emphasis on the nonlinear dynamics of the Weibel instability and beam filamentation.

  14. The disruption of tissue structure using high intensity pulsed ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fowlkes, J. Brian; Parsons, Jessica E.; Xu, Zhen; Cooper, Michol; Tran, Binh C.; Hall, Timothy L.; Roberts, William W.; Cain, Charles A.

    2005-04-01

    Recent investigations of pulsed ultrasound at high acoustic intensities have revealed a regime in which significant breakdown of tissue structure can be achieved. This therapeutic modality, which might be termed histotripsy, is dependent on the presence of highly active cavitation evidenced by significant temporal fluctuations in acoustic backscatter. In the presence of tissue interfaces, erosion can result yielding, for example, well-defined perforations potentially useful in creating temporary shunts for the treatment of hypoplastic left heart syndrome. When applied in bulk tissue, the process results in a near emulsification with little structural integrity remaining or chance of cellular survival. In each case, the process is dependent on acoustic parameters of the field to not only produce damage for a given pulse but also to sustain the cavitation nuclei population for subsequent pulses. Fluctuations in acoustic backscatter indicate both initiation and extinction of the appropriate cavitation activity during application of therapeutic ultrasound, which leads to a potential feedback mechanism to minimize acoustic exposure. This presentation will discuss the observed tissue damage as affected by acoustic parameters and the ability to monitor the presence of cavitation activity expected to be responsible for these effects. [Work supported by NIH grants RO1 RR14450.

  15. Rural Renaissance. Revitalizing Small High Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Edmund A.

    Written in 1961, this document presents the rationales and applications of what were and still are, in most instances, considered innovative practices. Subjects discussed are building designs, teaching machines, educational television, flexible scheduling, multiple classes and small-group techniques, teacher assistants, shared services, and…

  16. Modeling scale-dependent runoff generation in a small semi-arid watershed accounting for rainfall intensity and water depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langhans, Christoph; Govers, Gerard; Diels, Jan; Stone, Jeffry J.; Nearing, Mark A.

    2014-07-01

    Observed scale effects of runoff on hillslopes and small watersheds derive from complex interactions of time-varying rainfall rates with runoff, infiltration and macro- and microtopographic structures. A little studied aspect of scale effects is the concept of water depth-dependent infiltration. For semi-arid rangeland it has been demonstrated that mounds underneath shrubs have a high infiltrability and lower lying compacted or stony inter-shrub areas have a lower infiltrability. It is hypothesized that runoff accumulation further downslope leads to increased water depth, inundating high infiltrability areas, which increases the area-averaged infiltration rate. A model was developed that combines the concepts of water depth-dependent infiltration, partial contributing area under variable rainfall intensity, and the Green-Ampt theory for point-scale infiltration. The model was applied to rainfall simulation data and natural rainfall-runoff data from a small sub-watershed (0.4 ha) of the Walnut Gulch Experimental Watershed in the semi-arid US Southwest. Its performance to reproduce observed hydrographs was compared to that of a conventional Green-Ampt model assuming complete inundation sheet flow, with runon infiltration, which is infiltration of runoff onto pervious downstream areas. Parameters were derived from rainfall simulations and from watershed-scale calibration directly from the rainfall-runoff events. The performance of the water depth-dependent model was better than that of the conventional model on the scale of a rainfall simulator plot, but on the scale of a small watershed the performance of both model types was similar. We believe that the proposed model contributes to a less scale-dependent way of modeling runoff and erosion on the hillslope-scale.

  17. Guide to NYC Small High Schools, 2005-2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Visions for Public Schools, 2005

    2005-01-01

    New Visions for Public Schools has put together "The New York City Guide to Small High Schools" to describe new opportunities in the public high school system: over 200 small secondary schools created over the last five years. These small schools are part of the Department of Education's efforts to create more choices for thousands of students…

  18. Effectiveness of earplugs in high-intensity impulse noise.

    PubMed

    Dancer, A; Grateau, P; Cabanis, A; Barnabé, G; Cagnin, G; Vaillant, T; Lafont, D

    1992-03-01

    The efficiency of different types of earplugs was assessed by means of Békésy audiometry following the exposure of 42 human subjects to weapon impulses. The peak pressure of the impulses ranged from 2.3-27.8 kPa (from 161 to 183-dB peak SPL) and the A-weighted equivalent level (over 8 h) of each exposure ranged from 100-114 dB. All subjects wore earplugs fitted by an experienced individual. The devices tested included one brand of conventional foam earplugs and a number of different models of perforated earplugs, one type of which had been previously shown to provide nonlinear attenuation. Perforated earplugs were tested because they provide better speech communication than conventional passive earplugs, and in the nonlinear case also afford attenuation that increases with the peak pressure of the impulses. The temporary threshold shifts (TTSs) observed in these experiments were very small and indicated no significant hazard for hearing. Well-fitted perforated earplugs seem to be able to protect the ear from infrequent exposures to the high-level impulses produced by small and large weapons while allowing good speech communication, and without impairing the operational capacity of soldiers who must remain aware of their acoustic environment.

  19. Compliance with High-Intensity Radiated Fields Regulations - Emitter's Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Statman, Joseph; Jamnejad, Vahraz; Nguyen, Lee

    2012-01-01

    NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN) uses high-power transmitters on its large antennas to communicate with spacecraft of NASA and its partner agencies. The prime reflectors of the DSN antennas are parabolic, at 34m and 70m in diameter. The DSN transmitters radiate Continuous Wave (CW) signals at 20 kW - 500 kW at X-band and S-band frequencies. The combination of antenna reflector size and high frequency results in a very narrow beam with extensive oscillating near-field pattern. Another unique feature of the DSN antennas is that they (and the radiated beam) move mostly at very slow sidereal rate, essentially identical in magnitude and at the opposite direction of Earth rotation.The DSN is in the process of revamping its documentation to provide analysis of the High Intensity Radiation Fields (HIRF) environment resulting from radio frequency radiation from DSN antennas for comparison to FAA regulations regarding certification of HIRF protection as outlined in the FAA regulations on HIRF protection for aircraft electrical and electronic systems (Title 14, Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) [section sign][section sign] 23.1308, 25.1317, 27.1317, and 29.1317).This paper presents work done at JPL, in consultation with the FAA. The work includes analysis of the radiated field structure created by the unique DSN emitters (combination of transmitters and antennas) and comparing it to the fields defined in the environments in the FAA regulations. The paper identifies areas that required special attention, including the implications of the very narrow beam of the DSN emitters and the sidereal rate motion. The paper derives the maximum emitter power allowed without mitigation and the mitigation zones, where required.Finally, the paper presents summary of the results of the analyses of the DSN emitters and the resulting DSN process documentation.

  20. Beam experiments towards high-intensity beams in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Montag C.; Ahrens, L.; Brennan, J.M.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Drees, A.; Fischer, W.; Hayes, T.; Huang, H.; Mernick, K.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Smith, K.; Than, R.; Thieberger, P.; Yip, K.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

    2012-05-20

    Proton bunch intensities in RHIC are planned to be increased from 2 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} to 3 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} protons per bunch to increase the luminosity, together with head-on beam-beam compensation using electron lenses. To study the feasibility of the intensity increase, beam experiments are being performed. Recent experimental results are presented.

  1. Intensity-modulated stereotactic body radiotherapy for stage I non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Jeong; Yeo, Seung-Gu; Kim, Eun Seok; Min, Chul Kee; Se An, Pyung

    2013-03-01

    This study aimed to investigate the clinical outcomes of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT)-based stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for patients with stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A prospective database of 16 consecutive patients receiving SBRT for pathologically-proven and peripherally-located stage I NSCLC was reviewed. Fifteen patients were medically inoperable and one patient refused to undergo surgery. The median age of the patients was 76 years (range, 69-86). Treatment planning used four-dimensional computed tomography and fixed-field IMRT (n=11) or volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT; n=5). The SBRT scheme was 48 Gy in four fractions (n=9) or 55 Gy in five fractions (n=7), delivered on consecutive days. The overall response rate at 6 months was 78.6%, including a complete response in three (21.4%) patients and a partial response in eight (57.1%). Three patients (21.4%) demonstrated a stable disease status. The median follow-up time was 14 months (range, 6-20) for the surviving patients. One patient developed local failure at 11 months, while another suffered from regional failure in a subcarinal lymph node at 4 months. Two patients did not survive within the first 6 months; one patient died during salvage chemotherapy for mediastinal lymph node metastasis and the other succumbed to a cause unrelated to lung cancer. The Kaplan-Meier estimates of local failure-free, progression-free and overall survival rates at 18 months were 91.0, 85.2 and 87.5%, respectively. The toxicity was mild; no severe (grade ≥3) toxicity was identified. IMRT-based (including VMAT) delivery of SBRT for patients with stage I NSCLC demonstrated favorable responses and local control without severe toxicity.

  2. Treatment of glaucoma with high intensity focused ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Aptel, Florent; Lafon, Cyril

    2015-05-01

    Glaucoma is a common disease mainly due to an increase in pressure inside the eye, leading to a progressive destruction of the optic nerve, potentially to blindness. Intraocular pressure (IOP) is the result of a balance between production of liquid that fills the eye--aqueous humour--and its resorption. All treatments for glaucoma aim to reduce IOP and can therefore have two mechanisms of action: reducing aqueous humour production by the partial destruction or medical inhibition of the ciliary body--the anatomical structure responsible for production of aqueous humour--or facilitating the evacuation of aqueous humour from the eye. Several physical methods can be used to destroy the ciliary body, e.g. laser, cryotherapy, microwave. All these methods have two major drawbacks: they are non-selective for the organ to be treated and they have an unpredictable dose–effect relationship. High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) can be used to coagulate the ciliary body and avoid these drawbacks. A commercially available device was marketed in the 1980s, but later abandoned, essentially for technical reasons. A smaller circular device using miniaturised transducers was recently developed and proposed for clinical practice. Experimental studies have shown selective coagulation necrosis of the treated ciliary body. The first three clinical trials in humans have shown that this device was well tolerated and allowed a significant, predictable and sustained reduction of IOP. The aim of this contribution is to present a summary of the work concerning the use of HIFU to treat glaucoma.

  3. A methodology for assessing high intensity RF effects in aircraft

    SciTech Connect

    Zacharias, R.A.; Avalle, C.A.; Kunz, K.S.; Molau, N.E.; Pennock, S.T.; Poggio, A.J.; Sharpe, R.M.

    1993-07-01

    Optical components have an inherent immunity to the electromagnetic interference (EMI) associated with High Intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF). The optical technology embodied in Fly-by-Light (FBL) might therefore minimize the effects of HIRF on digitally controlled systems while providing lifetime immunity to signal EMI. This is one of the primary motivations for developing FBL systems for aircraft. FBL has the potential to greatly simplify EMI certification by enabling technically acceptable laboratory tests of subsystems, as opposed to expensive full airplane tests. In this paper the authors describe a methodology for assessing EMI effects on FBL aircraft that reduces or potentially eliminates the need for full airplane tests. This methodology is based on comparing the applied EMI stress--the level of interference signal that arrives at a unit under test--versus the EMI strength of the unit--the interference level it can withstand without upset. This approach allows one to use computer models and/or low power coupling measurement and similarity (to other previously tested aircraft) to determine the stress applied to installed subsystems, and to use benchtop cable injection tests and/or mode stirred chamber radiated tests to determine the strength of the subsystem.

  4. The WARP Code: Modeling High Intensity Ion Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Grote, D P; Friedman, A; Vay, J L; Haber, I

    2004-12-09

    The Warp code, developed for heavy-ion driven inertial fusion energy studies, is used to model high intensity ion (and electron) beams. Significant capability has been incorporated in Warp, allowing nearly all sections of an accelerator to be modeled, beginning with the source. Warp has as its core an explicit, three-dimensional, particle-in-cell model. Alongside this is a rich set of tools for describing the applied fields of the accelerator lattice, and embedded conducting surfaces (which are captured at sub-grid resolution). Also incorporated are models with reduced dimensionality: an axisymmetric model and a transverse ''slice'' model. The code takes advantage of modern programming techniques, including object orientation, parallelism, and scripting (via Python). It is at the forefront in the use of the computational technique of adaptive mesh refinement, which has been particularly successful in the area of diode and injector modeling, both steady-state and time-dependent. In the presentation, some of the major aspects of Warp will be overviewed, especially those that could be useful in modeling ECR sources. Warp has been benchmarked against both theory and experiment. Recent results will be presented showing good agreement of Warp with experimental results from the STS500 injector test stand. Additional information can be found on the web page http://hif.lbl.gov/theory/WARP{_}summary.html.

  5. High intensity focused ultrasound in clinical tumor ablation

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yu-Feng

    2011-01-01

    Recent advances in high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU), which was developed in the 1940s as a viable thermal tissue ablation approach, have increased its popularity. In clinics, HIFU has been applied to treat a variety of solid malignant tumors in a well-defined volume, including the pancreas, liver, prostate, breast, uterine fibroids, and soft-tissue sarcomas. In comparison to conventional tumor/cancer treatment modalities, such as open surgery, radio- and chemo-therapy, HIFU has the advantages of non-invasion, non-ionization, and fewer complications after treatment. Over 100 000 cases have been treated throughout the world with great success. The fundamental principles of HIFU ablation are coagulative thermal necrosis due to the absorption of ultrasound energy during transmission in tissue and the induced cavitation damage. This paper reviews the clinical outcomes of HIFU ablation for applicable cancers, and then summarizes the recommendations for a satisfactory HIFU treatment according to clinical experience. In addition, the current challenges in HIFU for engineers and physicians are also included. More recent horizons have broadened the application of HIFU in tumor treatment, such as HIFU-mediated drug delivery, vessel occlusion, and soft tissue erosion (“histotripsy”). In summary, HIFU is likely to play a significant role in the future oncology practice. PMID:21603311

  6. High-intensity and high-brightness source of moderated positrons using a brilliant γ beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hugenschmidt, C.; Schreckenbach, K.; Habs, D.; Thirolf, P. G.

    2012-01-01

    Presently, large efforts are conducted toward the development of highly brilliant γ beams via Compton back scattering of photons from a high-brilliance electron beam, either on the basis of a normal-conducting electron linac or a (super-conducting) Energy Recovery Linac (ERL). Particularly, ERLs provide an extremely brilliant electron beam, thus enabling the generation of highest-quality γ beams. A 2.5 MeV γ beam with an envisaged intensity of 1015 photons s-1, as ultimately envisaged for an ERL-based γ-beam facility, narrow band width (10-3), and extremely low emittance (10-4 mm2 mrad2) offers the possibility to produce a high-intensity bright polarized positron beam. Pair production in a face-on irradiated W converter foil (200 μm thick, 10 mm long) would lead to the emission of 2×1013 (fast) positrons per second, which is four orders of magnitude higher compared to strong radioactive 22Na sources conventionally used in the laboratory. Using a stack of converter foils and subsequent positron moderation, a high-intensity low-energy beam of moderated positrons can be produced. Two different source setups are presented: a high-brightness positron beam with a diameter as low as 0.2 mm, and a high-intensity beam of 3×1011 moderated positrons per second. Hence, profiting from an improved moderation efficiency, the envisaged positron intensity would exceed that of present high-intensity positron sources by a factor of 100.

  7. Tools and techniques for estimating high intensity RF effects

    SciTech Connect

    Zacharias, R.; Pennock, S.; Poggio, A.; Ray, S.

    1991-07-01

    With the ever-increasing dependence of modern aircraft on sophisticated avionics and electronic controls, the need to assure aircraft survivatality when exposed to high Intensity RF (HIRF) signals has become of great Interest. Advisory regulation is currently being proposed which would require testing and/or analysis to assure RF hardness of installed flight critical and flight essential equipment. While full-aircraft, full-threat testing may be the most thorough manner to assure survivability, it is not generally practical in loins of cost. Various combinations of limited full-aircraft testing, box-level testing, modeling, and analysis are also being considered as methods to achieve compliance. Modeling, analysis, and low power measurements may hold the key to making full-system survivability estimates at reasonable cost. In this paper we will describe some of the tools and techniques we use for estimating and measuring coupling and component disturbance. A finite difference time domain modeling code, TSAR, used to predict coupling will be described. This code has the capability to quickly generate a mesh model to represent the test object. Some recent applications as well as the advantages and limitations of using such a code will be described. We will also describe some of the facilities and techniques we have developed for making low power coupling measurements and for making direct injection test measurements of device disturbance. Some scaling laws for coupling and device effects will be presented. A method to extrapolate these low-power test results to high-power full-system effects will be presented.

  8. Inelastic scattering in condensed matter with high intensity Moessbauer radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yelon, W. B.; Schupp, G.

    1991-05-01

    We give a progress report for the work which has been carried out in the last three years with DOE support. A facility for high-intensity Moessbauer scattering is not fully operational at the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) as well as a facility at Purdue, using special isotopes produced at MURR. High precision, fundamental Moessbauer effect studies have been carried out using Bragg scattering filters to suppress unwanted radiation. These have led to a Fourier transform method for describing Moessbauer effect (ME) lineshape and a direct method of fitting ME data to the convolution integral. These methods allow complete correction for source resonance self absorption and the accurate representation of interference effects that add an asymmetric component to the ME lines. We have begun applying these techniques to attenuated ME sources whose central peak has been attenuated by stationary resonant absorbers, to make a novel independent determination of interference parameters and line-shape behavior in the resonance asymptotic region. This analysis is important to both fundamental ME studies and to scattering studies for which a deconvolution is essential for extracting the correct recoilless fractions and interference parameters. A number of scattering studies have been successfully carried out including a study of the thermal diffuse scattering in Si, which led to an analysis of the resolution function for gamma-ray scattering. Also studied was the anharmonic motion in Na metal and the charge density wave satellite reflection Debye-Waller factor in TaS2, which indicate phason rather than phonon behavior. Using a specially constructed sample cell which enables us to vary temperatures from -10 C to 110 C, we have begun quasielastic diffusion studies in viscous liquids and current results are summarized. Included are the temperature and Q dependence of the scattering in pentadecane and diffusion in glycerol.

  9. High intensity ultrasound transducer used in gene transfection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, Kyle P.; Keilman, George W.; Noble, Misty L.; Brayman, Andrew A.; Miao, Carol H.

    2012-11-01

    This paper describes a novel therapeutic high intensity non-focused ultrasound (HIU) transducer designed with uniform pressure distribution to aid in accelerated gene transfer in large animal liver tissues in vivo. The underlying HIU transducer was used to initiate homogeneous cavitation throughout the tissue while delivering up to 2.7 MPa at 1.1 MHz across its radiating surface. The HIU transducer was built into a 6 cm diameter x 1.3 cm tall housing ergonomically designed to avoid collateral damage to the surrounding anatomy during dynamic motion. The ultrasound (US) radiation was applied in a 'paintbrush-like' manner to the surface of the liver. The layers and geometry of the transducer were carefully selected to maximize the active diameter (5.74 cm), maximize the electrical to acoustic conversion efficiency (85%) to achieve 2.7 MPa of peak negative pressure, maximize the frequency operating band at the fundamental resonance to within a power transfer delta of 1 dB, and reduce the pressure delta to within 2 dB across the radiating surface. For maximum peak voltage into the transducer, a high performance piezoceramic was chosen and a DC bias circuit was built integral to the system. An apodized two element annular pattern was made from a single piezoceramic element, resulting in significant pressure uniformity enhancement. In addition to using apodization for pressure uniformity, a proprietary multi-layered structure was used to improve efficiency while sustaining an operating band from 900 kHz to 1.3 MHz. The resultant operating band allowed for dithering techniques using frequency modulation. The underlying HIU transducer for use in large animals enhances gene expression up to 6300-fold.

  10. HIGH ENERGY DENSITY PHYSICS EXPERIMENTS WITH INTENSE HEAVY ION BEAMS

    SciTech Connect

    Bieniosek, F.M.; Henestroza, E.; Leitner, M.; Logan, B.G.; More, R.M.; Roy, P.K.; Ni, P.; Seidl, P.A.; Waldron, W.L.; Barnard, J.J.

    2008-08-01

    The US heavy ion fusion science program has developed techniques for heating ion-beam-driven warm dense matter (WDM) targets. The WDM conditions are to be achieved by combined longitudinal and transverse space-charge neutralized drift compression of the ion beam to provide a hot spot on the target with a beam spot size of about 1 mm, and pulse length about 1-2 ns. As a technique for heating volumetric samples of matter to high energy density, intense beams of heavy ions are capable of delivering precise and uniform beam energy deposition dE/dx, in a relatively large sample size, and the ability to heat any solid-phase target material. Initial experiments use a 0.3 MeV K+ beam (below the Bragg peak) from the NDCX-I accelerator. Future plans include target experiments using the NDCX-II accelerator, which is designed to heat targets at the Bragg peak using a 3-6 MeV lithium ion beam. The range of the beams in solid matter targets is about 1 micron, which can be lengthened by using porous targets at reduced density. We have completed the fabrication of a new experimental target chamber facility for WDM experiments, and implemented initial target diagnostics to be used for the first target experiments in NDCX-1. The target chamber has been installed on the NDCX-I beamline. The target diagnostics include a fast multi-channel optical pyrometer, optical streak camera, VISAR, and high-speed gated cameras. Initial WDM experiments will heat targets by compressed NDCX-I beams and will explore measurement of temperature and other target parameters. Experiments are planned in areas such as dense electronegative targets, porous target homogenization and two-phase equation of state.

  11. HIGH ENERGY DENSITY PHYSICS EXPERIMENTS WITH INTENSE HEAVY ION BEAMS

    SciTech Connect

    Henestroza, E.; Leitner, M.; Logan, B.G.; More, R.M.; Roy, P.K.; Ni, P.; Seidl, P.A.; Waldron, W.L.; Barnard, J.J.

    2010-03-16

    The US heavy ion fusion science program has developed techniques for heating ion-beam-driven warm dense matter (WDM) targets. The WDM conditions are to be achieved by combined longitudinal and transverse space-charge neutralized drift compression of the ion beam to provide a hot spot on the target with a beam spot size of about 1 mm, and pulse length about 1-2 ns. As a technique for heating volumetric samples of matter to high energy density, intense beams of heavy ions are capable of delivering precise and uniform beam energy deposition dE/dx, in a relatively large sample size, and the ability to heat any solid-phase target material. Initial experiments use a 0.3 MeV K+ beam (below the Bragg peak) from the NDCX-I accelerator. Future plans include target experiments using the NDCX-II accelerator, which is designed to heat targets at the Bragg peak using a 3-6 MeV lithium ion beam. The range of the beams in solid matter targets is about 1 micron, which can be lengthened by using porous targets at reduced density. We have completed the fabrication of a new experimental target chamber facility for WDM experiments, and implemented initial target diagnostics to be used for the first target experiments in NDCX-1. The target chamber has been installed on the NDCX-I beamline. The target diagnostics include a fast multi-channel optical pyrometer, optical streak camera, VISAR, and high-speed gated cameras. Initial WDM experiments will heat targets by compressed NDCX-I beams and will explore measurement of temperature and other target parameters. Experiments are planned in areas such as dense electronegative targets, porous target homogenization and two-phase equation of state.

  12. Femtosecond dynamics of energetic electrons in high intensity laser-matter interactions

    PubMed Central

    Pompili, R.; Anania, M. P.; Bisesto, F.; Botton, M.; Castellano, M.; Chiadroni, E.; Cianchi, A.; Curcio, A.; Ferrario, M.; Galletti, M.; Henis, Z.; Petrarca, M.; Schleifer, E.; Zigler, A.

    2016-01-01

    Highly energetic electrons are generated at the early phases of the interaction of short-pulse high-intensity lasers with solid targets. These escaping particles are identified as the essential core of picosecond-scale phenomena such as laser-based acceleration, surface manipulation, generation of intense magnetic fields and electromagnetic pulses. Increasing the number of the escaping electrons facilitate the late time processes in all cases. Up to now only indirect evidences of these important forerunners have been recorded, thus no detailed study of the governing mechanisms was possible. Here we report, for the first time, direct time-dependent measurements of energetic electrons ejected from solid targets by the interaction with a short-pulse high-intensity laser. We measured electron bunches up to 7 nanocoulombs charge, picosecond duration and 12 megaelectronvolts energy. Our ’snapshots’ capture their evolution with an unprecedented temporal resolution, demonstrat- ing a significant boost in charge and energy of escaping electrons when increasing the geometrical target curvature. These results pave the way toward significant improvement in laser acceleration of ions using shaped targets allowing the future development of small scale laser-ion accelerators. PMID:27713541

  13. Femtosecond dynamics of energetic electrons in high intensity laser-matter interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pompili, R.; Anania, M. P.; Bisesto, F.; Botton, M.; Castellano, M.; Chiadroni, E.; Cianchi, A.; Curcio, A.; Ferrario, M.; Galletti, M.; Henis, Z.; Petrarca, M.; Schleifer, E.; Zigler, A.

    2016-10-01

    Highly energetic electrons are generated at the early phases of the interaction of short-pulse high-intensity lasers with solid targets. These escaping particles are identified as the essential core of picosecond-scale phenomena such as laser-based acceleration, surface manipulation, generation of intense magnetic fields and electromagnetic pulses. Increasing the number of the escaping electrons facilitate the late time processes in all cases. Up to now only indirect evidences of these important forerunners have been recorded, thus no detailed study of the governing mechanisms was possible. Here we report, for the first time, direct time-dependent measurements of energetic electrons ejected from solid targets by the interaction with a short-pulse high-intensity laser. We measured electron bunches up to 7 nanocoulombs charge, picosecond duration and 12 megaelectronvolts energy. Our ’snapshots’ capture their evolution with an unprecedented temporal resolution, demonstrat- ing a significant boost in charge and energy of escaping electrons when increasing the geometrical target curvature. These results pave the way toward significant improvement in laser acceleration of ions using shaped targets allowing the future development of small scale laser-ion accelerators.

  14. Development of a High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) Hydrophone System

    SciTech Connect

    Schafer, Mark E.; Gessert, James

    2009-04-14

    The growing clinical use of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) has driven a need for reliable, reproducible measurements of HIFU acoustic fields. We have previously presented data on a reflective scatterer approach, incorporating several novel features for improved bandwidth, reliability, and reproducibility [Proc. 2005 IEEE Ultrasonics Symposium, 1739-1742]. We now report on several design improvements which have increase the signal to noise ratio of the system, and potentially reduced the cost of implementation. For the scattering element, we now use an artificial sapphire material to provide a more uniform radiating surface. The receiver is a segmented, truncated spherical structure with a 10 cm radius; the scattering element is positioned at the center of the sphere. The receiver is made from 25 micron thick, biaxially stretched PVDF, with a Pt-Au electrode on the front surface. In the new design, a specialized backing material provides the stiffness required to maintain structural stability, while at the same time providing both electrical shielding and ultrasonic absorption. Compared with the previous version, the new receiver design has improved the noise performance by 8-12 dB; the new scattering sphere has reduced the scattering loss by another 14 dB, producing an effective sensitivity of -298 dB re 1 microVolt/Pa. The design trade-off still involves receiver sensitivity with effective spot size, and signal distortion from the scatter structure. However, the reduced cost and improved repeatability of the new scatter approach makes the overall design more robust for routine waveform measurements of HIFU systems.

  15. Glass Strengthening via High-Intensity Plasma-Arc Heating

    SciTech Connect

    Wereszczak, Andrew A; Harper, David C; Duty, Chad E; Patel, P

    2010-01-01

    The use of a high-intensity plasma-arc lamp was used to irradiate the surface of soda-lime silicate glass tiles to determine if an increase in strength could be achieved. The lamp had a power density of 3500 W/cm2, a processing area of 1 cm x 10 cm, irradiated near-infrared heating at a wavelength between 0.2 1.4 m, and was controlled to unidirectionally sweep across 50-mm-square tiles at a constant speed of 8 mm/s. Ring-on-ring (RoR) equibiaxial flexure and 4 pt uni-directional flexure testings of entire tiles were used to measure and compare failure stress distributions of treated and untreated glass. Even with non-optimized processing conditions, RoR failure stress increased by approximately 25% and the 4 pt bend failure stress increased by approximately 65%. Strengthening was due to a fire-polishing-like mechanism. The arc-lamp heat-treatment caused the location of the strength-limiting flaws in the 4-pt-bend tiles to change; namely, failure initiation occurred on the gage section surface for the treated glass whereas it occurred at a gage section edge for the untreated. Arc-lamp heat-treatment is attractive not only because it provides strengthening, but because it can (non-contact) process large amounts of glass quickly and inexpensively, and is a process that either a glass manufacturer or end-user can readily employ.

  16. High Intensity Focused Ultrasound induced Gene Activation in Solid Tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yunbo; Kon, Takashi; Li, Chuanyuan; Zhong, Pei

    2006-05-01

    In this work, the feasibility of using high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) to activate trans-gene expression in a mouse tumor model was investigated. 4T1 cancer cells were implanted subcutaneously in the hind limbs of Balb/C mice and adenovirus luciferase gene vectors under the control of heat shock protein 70B promoter (Adeno-hsp70B-Luc) were injected intratumoraly for gene transfection. One day following the virus injection, the transfected tumors were heated to a peak temperature of 55, 65, 75, and 85°C, respectively, in 10s at multiple sites around the center of the tumor using a HIFU transducer operated at either 1.1-MHz (fundamental) or 3.3-MHz (3rd harmonic) frequency. Inducible luciferase gene expression was found to vary from 15-fold to 120-fold of the control group following 1.1-MHz HIFU exposure. The maximum gene activation was produced at a peak temperature of 65˜75°C one day following HIFU exposure and decayed gradually to baseline level within 7 days. The inducible gene activation produced by 3.3-MHz HIFU exposure (75°C-10s) was found to be comparable to that produced by hyperthermia (42°C-30min). Altogether, these results demonstrate the feasibility of using HIFU as a simple and versatile physical means to regulate trans-gene expression in vivo. This unique feature may be explored in the future for a synergistic combination of HIFU-induced thermal ablation with heat-induced gene therapy for improved cancer therapy.

  17. Pedalling rate affects endurance performance during high-intensity cycling.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Jens Steen; Hansen, Ernst Albin; Sjøgaard, Gisela

    2004-06-01

    The purpose of this study into high-intensity cycling was to: (1) test the hypothesis that endurance time is longest at a freely chosen pedalling rate (FCPR), compared to pedalling rates 25% lower (FCPR-25) and higher (FCPR+25) than FCPR, and (2) investigate how physiological variables, such as muscle fibre type composition and power reserve, relate to endurance time. Twenty males underwent testing to determine their maximal oxygen uptake (VO(2max)), power output corresponding to 90% of VO(2max) at 80 rpm (W90), FCPR at W90, percentage of slow twitch muscle fibres (% MHC I), maximal leg power, and endurance time at W90 with FCPR-25, FCPR, and FCPR+25. Power reserve was calculated as the difference between applied power output at a given pedalling rate and peak crank power at this same pedalling rate. W90 was 325 (47) W. FCPR at W90 was 78 (11) rpm, resulting in FCPR-25 being 59 (8) rpm and FCPR+25 being 98 (13) rpm. Endurance time at W90(FCPR+25) [441 (188) s] was significantly shorter than at W90(FCPR) [589 (232) s] and W90(FCPR-25) [547 (170) s]. Metabolic responses such as VO(2) and blood lactate concentration were generally higher at W90(FCPR+25) than at W90(FCPR-25) and W90(FCPR). Endurance time was negatively related to VO(2max), W90 and % MHC I, while positively related to power reserve. In conclusion, at group level, endurance time was longer at FCPR and at a pedalling rate 25% lower compared to a pedalling rate 25% higher than FCPR. Further, inter-individual physiological variables were of significance for endurance time, % MHC I showing a negative and power reserve a positive relationship.

  18. High-intensity cycle interval training improves cycling and running performance in triathletes.

    PubMed

    Etxebarria, Naroa; Anson, Judith M; Pyne, David B; Ferguson, Richard A

    2014-01-01

    Effective cycle training for triathlon is a challenge for coaches. We compared the effects of two variants of cycle high-intensity interval training (HIT) on triathlon-specific cycling and running. Fourteen moderately-trained male triathletes ([Formula: see text]O2peak 58.7 ± 8.1 mL kg(-1) min(-1); mean ± SD) completed on separate occasions a maximal incremental test ([Formula: see text]O2peak and maximal aerobic power), 16 × 20 s cycle sprints and a 1-h triathlon-specific cycle followed immediately by a 5 km run time trial. Participants were then pair-matched and assigned randomly to either a long high-intensity interval training (LONG) (6-8 × 5 min efforts) or short high-intensity interval training (SHORT) (9-11 × 10, 20 and 40 s efforts) HIT cycle training intervention. Six training sessions were completed over 3 weeks before participants repeated the baseline testing. Both groups had an ∼7% increase in [Formula: see text]O2peak (SHORT 7.3%, ±4.6%; mean, ±90% confidence limits; LONG 7.5%, ±1.7%). There was a moderate improvement in mean power for both the SHORT (10.3%, ±4.4%) and LONG (10.7%, ±6.8%) groups during the last eight 20-s sprints. There was a small to moderate decrease in heart rate, blood lactate and perceived exertion in both groups during the 1-h triathlon-specific cycling but only the LONG group had a substantial decrease in the subsequent 5-km run time (64, ±59 s). Moderately-trained triathletes should use both short and long high-intensity intervals to improve cycling physiology and performance. Longer 5-min intervals on the bike are more likely to benefit 5 km running performance.

  19. Whole Abdominopelvic Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor After Surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Pinnix, Chelsea C.; Fontanilla, Hiral P.; Hayes-Jordan, Andrea; Subbiah, Vivek; Bilton, Stephen D.; Chang, Eric L.; Grosshans, David R.; McAleer, Mary F.; Sulman, Eric P.; Woo, Shiao Y.; Anderson, Peter; Green, Holly L.; Mahajan, Anita

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Desmoplastic small round cell tumor (DSCRT) is an uncommon pediatric tumor with a poor prognosis. Aggressive multimodality therapy is the current treatment approach; however. treatment toxicity is of concern. We report our results with whole abdominopelvic intensity-modulated radiation therapy (WAP-IMRT) as a component of multimodality therapy for DSCRT at a single institution. Materials/Methods: Medical records of all patients with DSCRT who received WAP-IMRT as part of definitive treatment at MD Anderson (2006-2010) were identified and reviewed. Results: Eight patients with DSRCT received WAP-IMRT with a median follow-up of 15.2 months. All patients received multiple courses of chemotherapy followed by surgical debulking of intra-abdominal disease; seven also had intraoperative hyperthermic cisplatin. WAP-IMRT was delivered to a total dose of 30 Gy postoperatively; four patients received a simultaneous boost (6-10 Gy) to sites of gross residual disease. Seven patients received concurrent chemotherapy during WAP-IMRT. No Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 4 nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea occurred during RT. Red-cell transfusions were given to two patients to maintain hemoglobin levels >10 g/dL. Grade 4 cytopenia requiring growth factor support occurred in only one patient; no other significant cytopenias were noted. WAP-IMRT resulted in 25% lower radiation doses to the lumbosacral vertebral bodies and pelvic bones than conventional RT plans. The median time to local or distant failure after WAP-IMRT was 8.73 months in seven patients. One patient who had completed RT 20 months before the last follow-up remains alive without evidence of disease. Five patients (63%) experienced treatment failure in the abdomen. Distant failure occurred in three patients (37.5%). Conclusions: WAP-IMRT with concurrent radiosensitizing chemotherapy was well tolerated after aggressive surgery for DSCRT. Enhanced bone sparing with IMRT probably accounts for the low hematologic

  20. High intensity production of high and medium charge state uraniumand other heavy ion beams with VENUS

    SciTech Connect

    Leitner, Daniela; Galloway, Michelle L.; Loew, Timothy J.; Lyneis, Claude M.; Rodriguez, Ingrid Castro; Todd, Damon S.

    2007-11-15

    The next generation, superconducting ECR ion source VENUS(Versatile ECR ion source for NUclear Science) started operation with 28GHzmicrowave heating in 2004. Since then it has produced world recordion beam intensities. For example, 2850 e mu A of O6+, 200 e mu A of U33+or U34+, and in respect to high charge state ions, 1 e mu A of Ar18+, 270e mu A of Ar16+, 28 e mu A of Xe35+ and 4.9 e mu A of U47+ have beenproduced. A brief overview of the latest developments leading to theserecord intensities is given and the production of high intensity uraniumbeams is discussed in more detail.

  1. Are three contact efforts really reflective of a repeated high-intensity effort bout?

    PubMed

    Johnston, Rich D; Gabbett, Tim J; Walker, Shane; Walker, Ben; Jenkins, David G

    2015-03-01

    The use of 3 or more efforts (running and contact), separated by short recovery periods, is widely used to define a "repeated high-intensity effort" (RHIE) bout in rugby league. It has been suggested that due to fatigue, players become less effective after RHIE bouts; however, there is little evidence to support this. This study determined whether physical performance is reduced after performing 1, 2, or 3 efforts with minimal recovery. Twelve semiprofessional rugby league players (age: 24.5 ± 2.9 years) competed in 3 "off-side" small-sided games (2 × 10-minute halves) with a contact bout performed every 2 minutes. The rules of each game were identical except for the number of contact efforts performed in each bout. Players performed 1, 2, or 3 × 5-second wrestling bouts in the single-, double- and triple-contact game, respectively. Movement demands of each game were monitored using global positioning system units. From the first to the second half, there were trivial reductions in relative distance during the single-contact game (ES = -0.13 ± 0.12), small reductions during the double-contact game (ES = -0.47 ± 0.24), and moderate reductions during the triple-contact game (ES = -0.74 ± 0.27). These data show that running intensity is progressively reduced as the number of contact efforts per bout is increased. Targeting defensive players and forcing them to perform 2 or more consecutive contact efforts is likely to lead to greater reductions in running intensity. Conditioning performing multiple contact efforts while maintaining running intensity should therefore be incorporated into training for contact team sports.

  2. Aerobic Fitness for Young Athletes: Combining Game-based and High-intensity Interval Training.

    PubMed

    Harrison, C B; Kinugasa, T; Gill, N; Kilding, A E

    2015-11-01

    This study compared the effect of game-based training (GT) vs. a mix of game-based training and high-intensity interval training (MT) on physical performance characteristics. 26 young athletes (13.9±0.3 years) were assigned to either GT (n=13) or MT (n=13) for 6 weeks. Game-based training consisted of 2×8-11 min 3 vs. 3 'bucketball' SSGs separated by 3 min of passive rest twice per week, while MT consisted of one SSGs session and one high-intensity session of 15 s runs at 90-95% of the speed reached at the end of the 30-15 intermittent fitness test (VIFT) interspersed with 15 s passive recovery. Peak oxygen uptake (V˙ O2peak), VIFT, jump height, and speed were assessed pre- and post-training. Following training, V˙ O2peak (5.5±3.3%; ES=large) improved after MT, whereas VIFT improved after MT (6.6±3.2%; ES, large) and GT (4.2±5.5%, ES=small). 5-m sprint improved after GT (ES=small), while 20 m sprint and jump height were unchanged. In conclusion, while MT and GT were both effective at increasing performance parameters, greater effects were seen following MT. Therefore, MT should be considered as the preferred training method for improving aerobic power in young athletes.

  3. Study of a final focus system for high intensity beams

    SciTech Connect

    Henestroza, Enrique; Eylon, Shmuel; Roy, Prabir K.; Yu, Simon S.; Bieniosek, Frank M.; Shuman, Derek B.; Waldron, William L.

    2004-06-01

    The NTX experiment at the Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory is exploring the performance of neutralized final focus systems for high perveance heavy ion beams. The final focus scenario in an HIF driver consists of several large aperture quadrupole magnets followed by a drift section in which the beam space charge is neutralized by a plasma. This beam is required to hit a millimeter-sized target spot at the end of the drift section. The objective of the NTX experiments and associated theory and simulations is to study the various physical mechanisms that determine the final spot size (radius r{sub s}) at a given distance (f) from the end of the last quadrupole. In a fusion driver, f is the standoff distance required to keep the chamber wall and superconducting magnets properly protected. The NTX final quadrupole focusing system produces a converging beam at the entrance to the neutralized drift section where it focuses to a small spot. The final spot is determined by the conditions of the beam entering the quadrupole section, the beam dynamics in the magnetic lattice, and the plasma neutralization dynamics in the drift section. The main issues are the control of emittance growth due to high order fields from magnetic multipoles and image fields. In this paper, we will describe the theoretical and experimental aspects of the beam dynamics in the quadrupole lattice, and how these physical effects influence the final beam size. In particular, we present theoretical and experimental results on the dependence of final spot size on geometric aberrations and perveance.

  4. LCROSS: A High Return, Small Satellite Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, Daniel R.

    2010-01-01

    Early in 2006, the NASA Exploration Systems Mission Directorate (ESMD) held a competition for NASA Centers to propose innovative ideas for a secondary payload mission to launch with the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) to the Moon. The successful proposal could cost no more than $80 million dollars (less was preferred), would have to be ready to launch with the LRO in 31 months, could weigh no more than 1000 kg (fuelled), and would be designated a risk-tolerant "Class D" mission. In effect, NASA was offering a fixed-price contract to the winning NASA team to stay within a cost and schedule cap by accepting an unusually elevated risk position. To address this Announcement of Opportunity to develop a cost-and-schedule-capped secondary payload mission to fly with LRO, NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) in Moffett Field, CA, USA embarked on a brainstorming effort termed "Blue Ice" in which a small team was asked to explore a number of mission scenarios that might have a good chance for success and still fit within the stated programmatic constraints. From this work, ARC developed and submitted six of the nineteen mission proposals received by ESMD from throughout the Agency, one of which was LCROSS - a collaborative effort between ARC and its industrial partner, Northrop-Grumman (NG) in Redondo Beach, CA, USA.

  5. Distribution of temperature elevation caused by moving high-intensity focused ultrasound transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jungsoon; Jung, Jihee; Kim, Moojoon; Ha, Kanglyeol; Lee, Eunghwa; Lee, Ilkwon

    2015-07-01

    Ultrasonic thermal treatment for dermatology has been developed using a small high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) transducer. The transducer moves horizontally at a constant while it emits focused ultrasound because the treatment needs a high-temperature area in skin tissue over a wide range of depths. In this paper, a tissue-mimicking phantom made of carrageenan and a thermochromic film were adopted to examine the temperature distribution in the phantom noninvasively when the focused ultrasound was irradiated from the moving transducer. The dependence of the high-temperature area on the irradiated acoustic energy and on the movement interval of the HIFU was analyzed experimentally. The results will be useful in ensuring safety and estimating the remedial value of the treatment.

  6. 21 CFR 1040.30 - High-intensity mercury vapor discharge lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false High-intensity mercury vapor discharge lamps. 1040...-intensity mercury vapor discharge lamps. (a) Applicability. The provisions of this section apply to any high-intensity mercury vapor discharge lamp that is designed, intended, or promoted for illumination purposes...

  7. Small, high-pressure liquid hydrogen turbopump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Csomor, A.; Sutton, R.

    1977-01-01

    A high pressure, liquid hydrogen turbopump was designed, fabricated, and tested to a maximum speed of 9739 rad/s and a maximum pump discharge pressure of 2861 N/sq. cm. The approaches used in the analysis and design of the turbopump are described, and fabrication methods are discussed. Data obtained from gas generator tests, turbine performance calibration, and turbopump testing are presented.

  8. Small signal gain based on analytic models of thin intense electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James Elliott, C.; McVey, Brian; Schmitt, Mark

    1991-07-01

    We develop the free electron laser theory of the effective energy distribution and the small signal gain for a thin electron beam. The assumption of thinness allows us to treat various transverse locations and electron beam trajectory angles as introducing phase shifts that have the same effect as those introduced by a change in energy of the electron. These ideas extend previous work of Colson et al., Dattoli et al., Scharlemann, and others in five important ways. The first is the ability to treat electron beams with three different classes of matching or symmetry conditions: (i) electron beams with separate betatron matching in each plane. (ii) those with aspect ratio matching, and (iii) crossed matched beams. Manifestations of these symmetries include elliptical cross-sections and electron beams that have modulated spatial profiles. For these we derive analytical expressions for effective energy distributions. Second, two emittance parameters for the electron beam are shown to consolidate into a single parameter that describes most of the energy variation of the effective energy distributions. Thus, the effective energy distribution for a 1:4 ribbon electron beam is nearly equivalent to a distribution for a beam of circular cross-section. Third, these calculations extend to energy distributions, angular distributions, and spatial distributions that all follow Gaussian profiles. Fourth, this model incorporates the description of the incident Gaussian optical beam and the above electron beam dynamics into a single influence function kernel. Emittance, energy spread, diffraction, and gain may be interpreted as limiting the length over which the bunching contributions of the propagating electric fields downstream are important. Fifth, three-dimensional profiles of the optical fields are computed. This work is complementary to the recent work of Yu, Krinsky and Gluckstern in that ours always describes the transition from low gain to high gain for a thin beam and not

  9. Small, high pressure liquid hydrogen turbopump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Csomor, A.; Warren, D. J.

    1980-01-01

    A high pressure, low capacity, liquid hydrogen turbopump was designed, fabricated, and tested. The design configuration of the turbopump is summarized and the results of the analytical and test efforts are presented. Approaches used to pin point the cause of poor suction performance with the original design are described and performance data are included with an axial inlet design which results in excellent suction capability.

  10. Investigation of the Frohlich hypothesis with high intensity terahertz radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weightman, Peter

    2014-03-01

    This article provides an update to recent reviews of the Frohlich hypothesis that biological organisation is facilitated by the creation of coherent excited states driven by a flow of free energy provided by metabolic processes and mediated by molecular motions in the terahertz range. Sources of intense terahertz radiation have the potential to test this hypothesis since if it is true the growth and development of sensitive systems such as stem cells should be influenced by irradiation with intense terahertz radiation. A brief survey of recent work shows that it is not yet possible to make an assessment of the validity of the Frohlich hypothesis. Under some conditions a variety of cell types respond to irradiation with intense THz radiation in ways that involve changes in the activity of their DNA. In other experiments very intense and prolonged THz radiation has no measureable effect on the behavior of very sensitive systems such as stem cells. The wide variation in experimental conditions makes it impossible to draw any conclusions as to characteristics of THz radiation that will induce a response in living cells. It is possible that in environments suitable for their maintenance and growth cells are capable of compensating for any effects caused by exposure to THz radiation up to some currently unknown level of THz peak power.

  11. Experimental Research at the Intensity Frontier in High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Marshak, Marvin L.

    2014-06-30

    This Final Report describes DOE-supported Intensity Frontier research by the University of Minnesota during the interval April 1, 2011 to March 31, 2014. Primary activities included the MINOS, NOvA and LBNE Experiments and Heavy Quark studies at BES III.

  12. Ultrashort pulse high intensity laser illumination of a simple metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milchberg, H. M.; Freeman, R. R.; Davey, S. C.

    1988-10-01

    We have observed the self-reflection of intense, sub-picosecond 308 nm light pulse incident on a planar Al target and have inferred the electrical conductivity of solid density Al. The pulse lengths were sufficiently short that no significant expansion of the target occurred during the measurement.

  13. Experimental and numerical study of high intensity argon cluster beams

    SciTech Connect

    Korobeishchikov, N. G.; Kalyada, V. V.; Shmakov, A. A.; Zarvin, A. E.; Skovorodko, P. A.

    2014-12-09

    Experimental and numerical investigations of expansion of argon with homogeneous condensation in supersonic conical nozzle and in free jet behind it were carried out. Optimal parameters (stagnation pressure, nozzle-skimmer distance) for the formation of cluster beam with maximum intensity were determined. Two available models for nonequilibrium nucleation were tested. The numerical results are in satisfactory agreement with the measured data.

  14. Retrieval of small-relief marsh morphology from Terrestrial Laser Scanner, optimal spatial filtering, and laser return intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guarnieri, A.; Vettore, A.; Pirotti, F.; Menenti, M.; Marani, M.

    2009-12-01

    Marshes are ubiquitous landforms in estuaries and lagoons, where important hydrological, morphological and ecological processes take place. These areas attenuate sea action on the coast and act as sediment trapping zones. Due to their ecosystem functions and effects on coastal stabilization, marshes are crucial structures in tidal environments, both biologically and geomorphologically, and are fundamental elements in wetland restoration and coastal realignment schemes. The spatially-distributed study of the geomorphology of intertidal areas using remotely-sensed digital terrain models remains problematic, owing to their small relief, often of the order of a few tens of centimetres, and to the presence of short and dense vegetation, which strongly reduces the number of resolvable ground returns. Here, we use high-resolution Terrestrial Laser Scanning (˜ 200 returns/m 2) to retrieve a high-resolution and high-accuracy Digital Terrain Model within a tidal marsh in the Venice lagoon. To this aim we apply a new filtering scheme to Terrestrial Laser Scanner data which selects the lowest values within moving windows, whose optimal size is determined with the aid of a limited number of ancillary Differential GPS data in order to maximize resolution while ensuring the identification of true ground returns. The accuracy of the filtered data is further refined using classifications of the intensity of the returns to extract additional information on the surface (ground or canopy) originating the returning laser beam. Validations against about 200 reference Differential GPS ground elevation observations indicates that the best separation of canopy and ground signals is obtained using a low-pass filter with window size of the order of 1 m and the maximum likelihood classifier to further refine the detection of ground returns. In this case the average estimation error is about 1 cm (slight overestimation of ground elevation), while its standard deviation is about 3 cm. Our

  15. Increased mortality in patients with severe COPD associated with high-intensity exercise: a preliminary cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Schaadt, Lone; Christensen, Robin; Kristensen, Lars Erik; Henriksen, Marius

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Intensity of exercise is believed to be a key determinant of response to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) rehabilitation. We hypothesized that a higher intensity of exercise, in combination with physiotherapist-led instructions and education in management of breathlessness, would lead to better self-management, possibly delaying calls to the emergency service and preventing hospitalization. Objective We aimed to test this hypothesis in a subsequent randomized trial, and in order to test study processes and estimate hospitalization rates, we did a small preliminary prospective cohort study on severe COPD patients referred to outpatient rehabilitation. Methods In 2013, four rehabilitation courses were scheduled (spring, summer, autumn, and winter) each lasting 8 weeks and including eight to ten patients. This preliminary study was designed as a controlled cohort study. The bi-weekly exercise sessions in the spring and autumn courses included a high-intensity walking exercise at 95% of estimated VO2 max for as long as possible. The other two rehabilitation courses included the usual walking exercise intensity (85% of estimated VO2 max). Hospitalization rates were assessed from the participants’ medical records in an 18-month period. Results We were able to enroll 31 patients in total (15 in the high-intensity exercise group and 16 in regular intensity). There were no group differences in the hospitalization rates. However, during review of the medical records, we observed a striking mortality rate among participants who had attended the high-intensity rehabilitation courses (five deaths) compared to the standard rehabilitation (zero deaths). Four of the five deaths were COPD exacerbations. Fisher’s exact test was statistically significant (P=0.046), as was a log-rank test (P=0.019) of the Kaplan–Meier estimated survival rates. Conclusion These results from this small preliminary cohort study are alarming and raise concerns about the

  16. Interleukin-6 and associated cytokine responses to an acute bout of high-intensity interval exercise: the effect of exercise intensity and volume.

    PubMed

    Cullen, Tom; Thomas, Andrew W; Webb, Richard; Hughes, Michael G

    2016-08-01

    Acute increases in interleukin (IL)-6 following prolonged exercise are associated with the induction of a transient anti-inflammatory state (e.g., increases in IL-10) that is partly responsible for the health benefits of regular exercise. The purposes of this study were to investigate the IL-6-related inflammatory response to high-intensity interval exercise (HIIE) and to determine the impact of exercise intensity and volume on this response. Ten participants (5 males and 5 females) completed 3 exercise bouts of contrasting intensity and volume (LOW, MOD, and HIGH). The HIGH protocol was based upon standard HIIE protocols, while the MOD and LOW protocols were designed to enable a comparison of exercise intensity and volume with a fixed duration. Inflammatory cytokine concentrations were measured in plasma (IL-6, IL-10) and also determined the level of gene expression (IL-6, IL-10, and IL-4R) in peripheral blood. The plasma IL-6 response to exercise (reported as fold changes) was significantly greater in HIGH (2.70 ± 1.51) than LOW (1.40 ± 0.32) (P = 0.04) and was also positively correlated to the mean exercise oxygen uptake (r = 0.54, P < 0.01). However, there was no change in anti-inflammatory IL-10 or IL-4R responses in plasma or at the level of gene expression. HIIE caused a significant increase in IL-6 and was greater than that seen in low-intensity exercise of the same duration. The increases in IL-6 were relatively small in magnitude, and appear to have been insufficient to induce the acute systemic anti-inflammatory effects, which are evident following longer duration exercise. PMID:27377137

  17. Interleukin-6 and associated cytokine responses to an acute bout of high-intensity interval exercise: the effect of exercise intensity and volume.

    PubMed

    Cullen, Tom; Thomas, Andrew W; Webb, Richard; Hughes, Michael G

    2016-08-01

    Acute increases in interleukin (IL)-6 following prolonged exercise are associated with the induction of a transient anti-inflammatory state (e.g., increases in IL-10) that is partly responsible for the health benefits of regular exercise. The purposes of this study were to investigate the IL-6-related inflammatory response to high-intensity interval exercise (HIIE) and to determine the impact of exercise intensity and volume on this response. Ten participants (5 males and 5 females) completed 3 exercise bouts of contrasting intensity and volume (LOW, MOD, and HIGH). The HIGH protocol was based upon standard HIIE protocols, while the MOD and LOW protocols were designed to enable a comparison of exercise intensity and volume with a fixed duration. Inflammatory cytokine concentrations were measured in plasma (IL-6, IL-10) and also determined the level of gene expression (IL-6, IL-10, and IL-4R) in peripheral blood. The plasma IL-6 response to exercise (reported as fold changes) was significantly greater in HIGH (2.70 ± 1.51) than LOW (1.40 ± 0.32) (P = 0.04) and was also positively correlated to the mean exercise oxygen uptake (r = 0.54, P < 0.01). However, there was no change in anti-inflammatory IL-10 or IL-4R responses in plasma or at the level of gene expression. HIIE caused a significant increase in IL-6 and was greater than that seen in low-intensity exercise of the same duration. The increases in IL-6 were relatively small in magnitude, and appear to have been insufficient to induce the acute systemic anti-inflammatory effects, which are evident following longer duration exercise.

  18. Estimation of grassland use intensities based on high spatial resolution LAI time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asam, S.; Klein, D.; Dech, S.

    2015-04-01

    The identification and surveillance of agricultural management and the measurement of biophysical canopy parameters in grasslands is relevant for environmental protection as well as for political and economic reasons, as proper grassland management is partly subsidized. An ideal monitoring tool is remote sensing due to its area wide continuous observations. However, due to small-scaled land use patterns in many parts of central Europe, a high spatial resolution is needed. In this study, the feasibility of RapidEye data to derive leaf area index (LAI) time series and to relate them to grassland management practices is assessed. The study area is the catchment of river Ammer in southern Bavaria, where agricultural areas are mainly grasslands. While extensively managed grasslands are maintained with one to two harvests per year and no or little fertilization, intensive cultivation practices compass three to five harvests per year and turnover pasturing. Based on a RapidEye time series from 2011 with spatial resolution of 6.5 meters, LAI is derived using the inverted radiation transfer model PROSAIL. The LAI in this area ranges from 1.5 to 7.5 over the vegetation period and is estimated with an RMSE between 0.7 and 1.1. The derived LAI maps cover 85 % of the study area's grasslands at least seven times. Using statistical metrics of the LAI time series, different grassland management types can be identified: very intensively managed meadows, intensively managed meadows, intensively managed pastures, and extensively managed meadows and moor. However, a precise identification of the mowing dates highly depends on the coincidence with satellite data acquisitions. Further analysis should focus therefor on the selection of the temporal resolution of the time series as well as on the performance of further vegetation parameters and indices compared to LAI.

  19. Near-field vector intensity measurements of a small solid rocket motor.

    PubMed

    Gee, Kent L; Giraud, Jarom H; Blotter, Jonathan D; Sommerfeldt, Scott D

    2010-08-01

    Near-field vector intensity measurements have been made of a 12.7-cm diameter nozzle solid rocket motor. The measurements utilized a test rig comprised of four probes each with four low-sensitivity 6.35-mm pressure microphones in a tetrahedral arrangement. Measurements were made with the rig at nine positions (36 probe locations) within six nozzle diameters of the plume shear layer. Overall levels at these locations range from 135 to 157 dB re 20 microPa. Vector intensity maps reveal that, as frequency increases, the dominant source region contracts and moves upstream with peak directivity at greater angles from the plume axis.

  20. The provision of adult intensive care in Northern Ireland with reference to the role of high dependency care.

    PubMed

    Morrow, B C; Lavery, G G; Blackwood, B M; Ball, I M; McLeod, H N; Fee, J P

    1996-05-01

    In 1991 an audit of Intensive Care Services was carried out by the Northern Ireland Intensive Care Group. In conjunction with this regional overview, all patients in the Regional Intensive Care Unit, (RICU) in the Royal Victoria Hospital were assessed daily, over a 10 month period in 1990-91 and classified as conforming to either intensive care or high dependency status. These data were then used to compare adult intensive care service in Northern Ireland with recent national and international recommendations on intensive care. Ten units in Northern Ireland were surveyed. In regard to national or international guidelines, all ten were deficient to some degree. Four units had significant deficiencies; small patient numbers, lack of 'dedicated' 24 hr medical cover and or deficiencies in the provision of appropriate monitoring and or equipment. There was a large diversity in casemix among the ten units surveyed which suggested differing admission criteria. The bed occupancy of RICU was 100%. Refused admissions constituted a further 13% of unresourced workload. The lack of physically separate, dedicated high dependency unit facilities meant that 26% of bed days were devoted to HDU care (usually for "improved" intensive care unit patients not yet ready for discharge to a general ward. Achieving nationally recommended intensive care standards (on a regional basis) is probably only possible if a number of the smaller intensive care units are redesignated as high dependency units, and patients requiring intensive care are concentrated in a smaller number of larger ICUs. This will increase the frequency of interhospital transfer of critically ill patients.

  1. The TEA CO2-Lasers with High Output Emission Intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panchenko, Yu. N.; Losev, V. F.; Puchikin, А. V.; Jun, Yao

    2014-03-01

    TEA CO2-lasers generating short pulse radiation and operating in a pulse-periodic mode with the repetition rate up to 10 Hz have been developed. It is shown that the addition of nitrogen up to 8% in the mixture of molecular gases СО2:H2 = 500:50 at a total pressure of P = 0.6 bar enhances the peak emission power maintaining the temporary pulse shape. An output beam intensity of 12.3 MW/cm2 was obtained for the 30 ns pulse at a laser efficiency of 2.8%. In a compact TEA СО2-laser with an active medium volume of 6 cm3, a beam with an output intensity of 24 MW/cm2 at pulse duration of 70 ns was obtained.

  2. High-intensity flux mapper for concentrating solar collectors

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, T.W.; Gaul, H.W.

    1982-02-01

    The flux mapper consists of a ceramic scatter plate, video camera with silicon diode array image tube (vidicon), 75 mm focal-length lens with appropriate filters, video frame store, television monitors, disk drive, magnetic tape drive and minicomputer. The camera and scatter plate are installed on a parabolic solar collector at SERI's Advanced Component Research Facility. Calibration was made by focussing the sun directly onto the vidicon target. Light intensity calibration is estimated to be accurate to about 7%. (LEW)

  3. Radiative properties of ceramic metal-halide high intensity discharge lamps containing additives in argon plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cressault, Yann; Teulet, Philippe; Zissis, Georges

    2016-07-01

    The lighting represents a consumption of about 19% of the world electricity production. We are thus searching new effective and environment-friendlier light sources. The ceramic metal-halide high intensity lamps (C-MHL) are one of the options for illuminating very high area. The new C-MHL lamps contain additives species that reduce mercury inside and lead to a richer spectrum in specific spectral intervals, a better colour temperature or colour rendering index. This work is particularly focused on the power radiated by these lamps, estimated using the net emission coefficient, and depending on several additives (calcium, sodium, tungsten, dysprosium, and thallium or strontium iodides). The results show the strong influence of the additives on the power radiated despite of their small quantity in the mixtures and the increase of visible radiation portion in presence of dysprosium.

  4. The Influence of Small Class Size, Duration, Intensity, and Heterogeneity on Head Start Fade

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huss, Christopher D.

    2010-01-01

    The researcher conducted a nonexperimental study to investigate and analyze the influence of reduced class sizes, intensity (all day and every day), duration (five years), and heterogeneity (random class assignment) on the Head Start Fade effect. The researcher employed retrospective data analysis using a longitudinal explanatory design on data…

  5. Fragmentation dynamics of fullerenes in intense femtosecond-laser fields: Loss of small neutral fragments on a picosecond time scale

    SciTech Connect

    Boyle, M.; Laarmann, T.; Shchatsinin, I.; Schulz, C.P.; Hertel, I.V.

    2005-05-08

    The fragmentation dynamics of C{sub 60} irradiated with intense femtosecond laser pulses is studied with one-color pump-probe spectroscopy. Small neutral fragments (C, C{sub 2}, and C{sub 3}) are formed by an 800-nm pump pulse which are then postionized by a delayed probe pulse. The respective ion signals detected by the time-of-flight mass spectrometry dramatically increase on a time scale of 10-20 ps.

  6. Production of high intensity electron bunches for the SLAC Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect

    James, M.B.

    1987-08-01

    This thesis describes the design and performance of a high intensity electron injecfor for the SLAC Linear Collider. Motivation for the collider and the specifications for the injector are discussed. An analytic theory of the bunching and capture of electrons by rf fields is discussed in the limit of low space charge and small signal. The design and performance of SLAC's main injector are described to illustrate a successful application of this theory. The bunching and capture of electrons by rf fields are then discussed in the limit of high space charge and large signal, and a description of the design of the collider injector follows. In the limit of high space charge forces and large rf signals, the beam dynamics are considerably more complex and numerical simulations are required to predict particle motion. A computer code which models the longitudinal dynamics of electrons in the presence of space charge and rf fields is described. The results of the simulations, the resulting collider injector design and the various components which make up the collider injector are described. These include the gun, subharmonic bunchers, traveling-wave buncher and velocity-of-light accelerator section. Finally, the performance of the injector is described including the beam intensity, bunch length, transverse emittance and energy spectrum. While the final operating conditions differ somewaht from the design, the performance of the collider injector is in good agreement with the numerical simulations and meets all of the collider specifications. 28 refs.

  7. Development of a cryogenic hydrogen microjet for high-intensity, high-repetition rate experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J. B.; Göde, S.; Glenzer, S. H.

    2016-11-01

    The advent of high-intensity, high-repetition-rate lasers has led to the need for replenishing targets of interest for high energy density sciences. We describe the design and characterization of a cryogenic microjet source, which can deliver a continuous stream of liquid hydrogen with a diameter of a few microns. The jet has been imaged at 1 μm resolution by shadowgraphy with a short pulse laser. The pointing stability has been measured at well below a mrad, for a stable free-standing filament of solid-density hydrogen.

  8. A high transmission analyzing magnet for intense high charge state beams

    SciTech Connect

    Leitner, M.; Abbott, S.R.; Leitner, D.; Lyneis, C.

    2002-06-11

    The low energy beam transport (LEBT) for VENUS will provide for extraction, mass analysis and transport to the axial injection line for the 88-Inch Cyclotron. The new LEBT was designed from the beginning to handle high intensity beams where space charge forces strongly affect the transmission. The magnet has a unique design with specially shaped poles to apply sextupole correction in both the horizontal and vertical plane.

  9. High-intensity warm-ups: effects during subsequent intermittent exercise.

    PubMed

    Zois, James; Bishop, David; Aughey, Rob

    2015-05-01

    High-intensity, short-duration warm-up techniques improve acute physical performance, but sparse research has examined their consequence when followed by intermittent activity, which is pertinent to team sports. The authors compared a 5-repetitionmaximum (5RM) leg-press, a small-sided game (SSG), and a current team-sport warm-up in 10 semiprofessional soccer players after 2 intermittent-activity protocols consisting of 15 repetitions of a 60-s circuit that included sprinting, slalom, walking, jogging, decelerations, changes of direction, backward running, and striding activities. There was a large improvement in countermovement-jump height in the 5RM after the 1st intermittent-activity protocol (mean, ±90% CL 6.0, ±4.0%, P=.03) and a small improvement after the 2nd (4.6, ±4.0%, P=.04) compared with team sport. Reactive agility was moderately faster via 5RM after the 1st intermittent-activity protocol (3.1, ±2.6%: P=.04) and the 2nd (5.7, ±2.7%, P=.001) than via SSG. There was a small improvement in reactive agility after the 1st intermittent-activity protocol in the 5RM, compared with team sport (3.3, ±2.9%, P=.04). There was a small improvement in mean 20-m-sprint times after both intermittent-activity protocols in the 5RM, compared with SSG (4.2, ±2.0%, P=.01, and 4.3, ±2.0%, P=.01) and, after the 1st intermittent-activity protocol only, compared with team sport (4.2, ±2.1%, P=0.02). Small increases in blood lactate concentration were observed (46.7, ±18.6%, P=.01) in the 5RM compared with the SSG after the 2nd intermittent-activity protocol. Improved performances after the 5RM warm-up should encourage practitioners to reduce activity time and include high-intensity tasks in team-sport warmups aimed at inducing a potentiating effect.

  10. Bedside placement of small-bowel feeding tube in Intensive Care Unit for enteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Gokhale, Antara; Kantoor, Sandeep; Prakash, Sadanandan; Manhas, Yogesh; Chandwani, Juhi; Mahmoud, Ashraf Ezzat

    2016-06-01

    Enteral nutrition is the preferred mode of nutrition in critically ill patients whenever feasible as it has a number of advantages over parenteral feeding. Both gastric and small-bowel feeding can effectively deliver calories. In patients with gastroparesis, small-bowel feeding can help avoid parenteral feeding. We carried out a retrospective observational study to assess the ability to insert the Tiger 2 tube into the small bowel at the bedside in 25 patients who failed to tolerate gastric feeds. The time taken, rate of successful insertion, and ability to feed these patients using a standardized feeding protocol were noted. Success rate of insertion was 78% and feeding could be established. This method reduced the delays and risks associated with transportation and dependence on other specialties. PMID:27390461

  11. Bedside placement of small-bowel feeding tube in Intensive Care Unit for enteral nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Gokhale, Antara; Kantoor, Sandeep; Prakash, Sadanandan; Manhas, Yogesh; Chandwani, Juhi; Mahmoud, Ashraf Ezzat

    2016-01-01

    Enteral nutrition is the preferred mode of nutrition in critically ill patients whenever feasible as it has a number of advantages over parenteral feeding. Both gastric and small-bowel feeding can effectively deliver calories. In patients with gastroparesis, small-bowel feeding can help avoid parenteral feeding. We carried out a retrospective observational study to assess the ability to insert the Tiger 2 tube into the small bowel at the bedside in 25 patients who failed to tolerate gastric feeds. The time taken, rate of successful insertion, and ability to feed these patients using a standardized feeding protocol were noted. Success rate of insertion was 78% and feeding could be established. This method reduced the delays and risks associated with transportation and dependence on other specialties. PMID:27390461

  12. Nakagami imaging for detecting thermal lesions induced by high-intensity focused ultrasound in tissue.

    PubMed

    Rangraz, Parisa; Behnam, Hamid; Tavakkoli, Jahan

    2014-01-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound induces focalized tissue coagulation by increasing the tissue temperature in a tight focal region. Several methods have been proposed to monitor high-intensity focused ultrasound-induced thermal lesions. Currently, ultrasound imaging techniques that are clinically used for monitoring high-intensity focused ultrasound treatment are standard pulse-echo B-mode ultrasound imaging, ultrasound temperature estimation, and elastography-based methods. On the contrary, the efficacy of two-dimensional Nakagami parametric imaging based on the distribution of the ultrasound backscattered signals to quantify properties of soft tissue has recently been evaluated. In this study, ultrasound radio frequency echo signals from ex vivo tissue samples were acquired before and after high-intensity focused ultrasound exposures and then their Nakagami parameter and scaling parameter of Nakagami distribution were estimated. These parameters were used to detect high-intensity focused ultrasound-induced thermal lesions. Also, the effects of changing the acoustic power of the high-intensity focused ultrasound transducer on the Nakagami parameters were studied. The results obtained suggest that the Nakagami distribution's scaling and Nakagami parameters can effectively be used to detect high-intensity focused ultrasound-induced thermal lesions in tissue ex vivo. These parameters can also be used to understand the degree of change in tissue caused by high-intensity focused ultrasound exposures, which could be interpreted as a measure of degree of variability in scatterer concentration in various parts of the high-intensity focused ultrasound lesion. PMID:24264647

  13. Strategic Designs: Lessons from Leading Edge Small Urban High Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shields, Regis Anne; Miles, Karen Hawley

    2008-01-01

    Education Resource Strategies (ERS) works with school and district leaders to help them more strategically use resources--people, time, and money--to improve student performance. They have found that many school districts begin creating small high schools without a clear sense of how much they will spend or how to ensure that small schools…

  14. High temperature, high intensity solar array. [for Venus Radar Mapper mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, B. S.; Brooks, G. R.; Pinkerton, R.

    1985-01-01

    The solar array for the Venus Radar Mapper mission will operate in the high temperature, high intensity conditions of a low Venus orbit environment. To fulfill the performance requirements in this environment at minimum cost and mass while maximizing power density and packing factor on the panel surface, several features were introduced into the design. These features included the use of optical surface reflectors (OSR's) to reduce the operating temperature; new adhesives for conductive bonding of OSR's to avoid electrostatic discharges; custom-designed large area cells and novel shunt diode circuit and panel power harness configurations.

  15. Appearance of Density Cavitations in the Laser Wake in Simulations of High Intensity Laser-Plasma Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, T.-L.

    2009-01-22

    Nonlinear interactions of high intensity, ultrashort laser pulses with underdense plasmas produce many interesting features that may appear in computer simulations. One of these features commonly observed in Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulations is the spontaneous appearance of long-lived density cavitations in the plasma wake region behind the laser pulse. To study these cavitations, several small 2D PIC simulations are run in which plasma density, density ramps, total simulation time, laser pulsewidth, laser intensity, and laser polarization parameters have been varied. Based on the simulation results, some possible aspects of an experiment designed to directly detect these structures are discussed.

  16. HIGH INTENSITY LOW-ENERGY POSITRON SOURCE AT JEFFERSON

    SciTech Connect

    Serkan Golge, Bogdan Wojtsekhowski, Branislav Vlahovic

    2012-07-01

    We present a novel concept of a low-energy e{sup +} source with projected intensity on the order of 10{sup 10} slow e{sup +}/s. The key components of this concept are a continuous wave e{sup -} beam, a rotating positron-production target, a synchronized raster/anti-raster, a transport channel, and extraction of e{sup +} into a field-free area through a magnetic plug for moderation in a cryogenic solid. Components were designed in the framework of GEANT4-based (G4beamline) Monte Carlo simulation and TOSCA magnetic field calculation codes. Experimental data to demonstrate the effectiveness of the magnetic plug is presented.

  17. Towards phasing using high X-ray intensity

    DOE PAGES

    Galli, Lorenzo; Son, Sang -Kil; Barends, Thomas R. M.; White, Thomas A.; Barty, Anton; Botha, Sabine; Boutet, Sébastien; Caleman, Carl; Doak, R. Bruce; Nanao, Max H.; et al

    2015-09-30

    X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) show great promise for macromolecular structure determination from sub-micrometre-sized crystals, using the emerging method of serial femtosecond crystallography. The extreme brightness of the XFEL radiation can multiply ionize most, if not all, atoms in a protein, causing their scattering factors to change during the pulse, with a preferential `bleaching' of heavy atoms. This paper investigates the effects of electronic damage on experimental data collected from a Gd derivative of lysozyme microcrystals at different X-ray intensities, and the degree of ionization of Gd atoms is quantified from phased difference Fourier maps. In conclusion, a pattern sorting schememore » is proposed to maximize the ionization contrast and the way in which the local electronic damage can be used for a new experimental phasing method is discussed.« less

  18. Towards phasing using high X-ray intensity

    SciTech Connect

    Galli, Lorenzo; Son, Sang -Kil; Barends, Thomas R. M.; White, Thomas A.; Barty, Anton; Botha, Sabine; Boutet, Sébastien; Caleman, Carl; Doak, R. Bruce; Nanao, Max H.; Nass, Karol; Shoeman, Robert L.; Timneanu, Nicusor; Santra, Robin; Schlichting, Ilme; Chapman, Henry N.

    2015-09-30

    X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) show great promise for macromolecular structure determination from sub-micrometre-sized crystals, using the emerging method of serial femtosecond crystallography. The extreme brightness of the XFEL radiation can multiply ionize most, if not all, atoms in a protein, causing their scattering factors to change during the pulse, with a preferential `bleaching' of heavy atoms. This paper investigates the effects of electronic damage on experimental data collected from a Gd derivative of lysozyme microcrystals at different X-ray intensities, and the degree of ionization of Gd atoms is quantified from phased difference Fourier maps. In conclusion, a pattern sorting scheme is proposed to maximize the ionization contrast and the way in which the local electronic damage can be used for a new experimental phasing method is discussed.

  19. Towards phasing using high X-ray intensity

    PubMed Central

    Galli, Lorenzo; Son, Sang-Kil; Barends, Thomas R. M.; White, Thomas A.; Barty, Anton; Botha, Sabine; Boutet, Sébastien; Caleman, Carl; Doak, R. Bruce; Nanao, Max H.; Nass, Karol; Shoeman, Robert L.; Timneanu, Nicusor; Santra, Robin; Schlichting, Ilme; Chapman, Henry N.

    2015-01-01

    X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) show great promise for macromolecular structure determination from sub-micrometre-sized crystals, using the emerging method of serial femtosecond crystallography. The extreme brightness of the XFEL radiation can multiply ionize most, if not all, atoms in a protein, causing their scattering factors to change during the pulse, with a preferential ‘bleaching’ of heavy atoms. This paper investigates the effects of electronic damage on experimental data collected from a Gd derivative of lysozyme microcrystals at different X-ray intensities, and the degree of ionization of Gd atoms is quantified from phased difference Fourier maps. A pattern sorting scheme is proposed to maximize the ionization contrast and the way in which the local electronic damage can be used for a new experimental phasing method is discussed. PMID:26594370

  20. The risk of retina damage from high intensity light sources.

    PubMed

    Pollak, V A; Romanchuk, K G

    1980-05-01

    The risk of thermal damage to the retina of the eye by exposure to excessive light intensities from continuous and pulsed man-made sources is discussed. The probability of injury increases, the larger the radiant power absorbed by the retina and the smaller the size of the retinal image of the source. A mehtod of estimating the temperature increase of the immediately affected area of the retina is presented. The time constants involved are also briefly considered. Using numerical values from literature for the relevant parameters of the eye, threshold values for a variety of conditions can be established. Below these values little risk of retina damage should exist. The degree of hazard when these values are exceeded depends upon the circumstances. A case study of a welding accident showed good agreement between the conclusions of the theoretical analysis and clinical findings.

  1. Towards phasing using high X-ray intensity.

    PubMed

    Galli, Lorenzo; Son, Sang-Kil; Barends, Thomas R M; White, Thomas A; Barty, Anton; Botha, Sabine; Boutet, Sébastien; Caleman, Carl; Doak, R Bruce; Nanao, Max H; Nass, Karol; Shoeman, Robert L; Timneanu, Nicusor; Santra, Robin; Schlichting, Ilme; Chapman, Henry N

    2015-11-01

    X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) show great promise for macromolecular structure determination from sub-micrometre-sized crystals, using the emerging method of serial femtosecond crystallography. The extreme brightness of the XFEL radiation can multiply ionize most, if not all, atoms in a protein, causing their scattering factors to change during the pulse, with a preferential 'bleaching' of heavy atoms. This paper investigates the effects of electronic damage on experimental data collected from a Gd derivative of lysozyme microcrystals at different X-ray intensities, and the degree of ionization of Gd atoms is quantified from phased difference Fourier maps. A pattern sorting scheme is proposed to maximize the ionization contrast and the way in which the local electronic damage can be used for a new experimental phasing method is discussed.

  2. Towards phasing using high X-ray intensity.

    PubMed

    Galli, Lorenzo; Son, Sang-Kil; Barends, Thomas R M; White, Thomas A; Barty, Anton; Botha, Sabine; Boutet, Sébastien; Caleman, Carl; Doak, R Bruce; Nanao, Max H; Nass, Karol; Shoeman, Robert L; Timneanu, Nicusor; Santra, Robin; Schlichting, Ilme; Chapman, Henry N

    2015-11-01

    X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) show great promise for macromolecular structure determination from sub-micrometre-sized crystals, using the emerging method of serial femtosecond crystallography. The extreme brightness of the XFEL radiation can multiply ionize most, if not all, atoms in a protein, causing their scattering factors to change during the pulse, with a preferential 'bleaching' of heavy atoms. This paper investigates the effects of electronic damage on experimental data collected from a Gd derivative of lysozyme microcrystals at different X-ray intensities, and the degree of ionization of Gd atoms is quantified from phased difference Fourier maps. A pattern sorting scheme is proposed to maximize the ionization contrast and the way in which the local electronic damage can be used for a new experimental phasing method is discussed. PMID:26594370

  3. The immediate impact of opening an adult high dependency unit on intensive care unit occupancy.

    PubMed

    Fox, A J; Owen-Smith, O; Spiers, P

    1999-03-01

    We assessed the hourly occupancy of our intensive care and high dependency units over an 8-week period commencing on the day our high dependency unit opened. Using criteria established by the working group on 'Guidelines on Admission to and Discharge from Intensive Care and High Dependency Units' published by the National Health Service Executive, we defined each patient daily as intensive care or high dependency status. Compared with hourly occupancy figures obtained before the high dependency unit opened, occupancy of the intensive care unit by high dependency patients has been shown to decrease significantly from 21.6% to 11.2%. Use of intensive care beds became more appropriate, their occupancy increasing significantly from 63.7% to 73.4%. A significant decrease in readmissions occurred, supporting the hypothesis that having high dependency beds reduces the number of patients discharged prematurely to the wards.

  4. A Very High Spatial Resolution Detector for Small Animal PET

    SciTech Connect

    Kanai Shah, M.S.

    2007-03-06

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is an in vivo analog of autoradiography and has the potential to become a powerful new tool in imaging biological processes in small laboratory animals. PET imaging of small animals can provide unique information that can help in advancement of human disease models as well as drug development. Clinical PET scanners used for human imaging are bulky, expensive and do not have adequate spatial resolution for small animal studies. Hence, dedicated, low cost instruments are required for conducting small animal studies with higher spatial resolution than what is currently achieved with clinical as well as dedicated small animal PET scanners. The goal of the proposed project is to investigate a new all solid-state detector design for small animal PET imaging. Exceptionally high spatial resolution, good timing resolution, and excellent energy resolution are expected from the proposed detector design. The Phase I project was aimed at demonstrating the feasibility of producing high performance solid-state detectors that provide high sensitivity, spatial resolution, and timing characteristics. Energy resolution characteristics of the new detector were also investigated. The goal of the Phase II project is to advance the promising solid-state detector technology for small animal PET and determine its full potential. Detectors modules will be built and characterized and finally, a bench-top small animal PET system will be assembled and evaluated.

  5. 25 CFR 39.145 - Can a school receive both a small school adjustment and a small high school adjustment?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... small high school adjustment? 39.145 Section 39.145 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Adjustment § 39.145 Can a school receive both a small school adjustment and a small high school adjustment? A school that meets the criteria in § 39.140 can receive both a small school adjustment and a small...

  6. 25 CFR 39.145 - Can a school receive both a small school adjustment and a small high school adjustment?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... small high school adjustment? 39.145 Section 39.145 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Adjustment § 39.145 Can a school receive both a small school adjustment and a small high school adjustment? A school that meets the criteria in § 39.140 can receive both a small school adjustment and a small...

  7. 25 CFR 39.145 - Can a school receive both a small school adjustment and a small high school adjustment?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... small high school adjustment? 39.145 Section 39.145 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Adjustment § 39.145 Can a school receive both a small school adjustment and a small high school adjustment? A school that meets the criteria in § 39.140 can receive both a small school adjustment and a small...

  8. 25 CFR 39.145 - Can a school receive both a small school adjustment and a small high school adjustment?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... small high school adjustment? 39.145 Section 39.145 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Adjustment § 39.145 Can a school receive both a small school adjustment and a small high school adjustment? A school that meets the criteria in § 39.140 can receive both a small school adjustment and a small...

  9. 25 CFR 39.145 - Can a school receive both a small school adjustment and a small high school adjustment?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... small high school adjustment? 39.145 Section 39.145 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Adjustment § 39.145 Can a school receive both a small school adjustment and a small high school adjustment? A school that meets the criteria in § 39.140 can receive both a small school adjustment and a small...

  10. A high intensity dc H- source for low energy injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, T.; Baartman, R.; Dutto, G.; Hahto, S.; ńrje, J.; Liukkonen, E.

    2002-02-01

    While a 20 mA dc H- source system at 25-30 keV beam energy has been developed at TRIUMF several years ago, another recent demand on the system is to provide a 4 to 5 mA H- at the 4-6 keV energy range. We found that at this low energy range, the existing source/extraction system can only give ˜1 mA with poor emittance due to strong space-charge effect. Fortunately, a very special source/extraction mechanism together with the use of neutralization was discovered and developed to overcome this difficulty. Up to 4 mA with a normalized rms emittance of 0.15 π mm mr has been achieved at 6 keV. This performance finds its usefulness for injection systems where lower beam energy and higher beam intensity are required. A copy of the TRIUMF system was constructed and successfully tested in the summer of 2000 for the "H- Acceleration Project" for the K130 cyclotron at Jyväskylä University, Finland.

  11. A plasma generator utilizing the high intensity ASTROMAG magnets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, James D.; Post, R. S.; Lane, B. G.; Tarrh, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    The magnet configuration for the proposed particle astrophysics magnet facility (ASTROMAG) on the space station includes a cusp magnetic field with an intensity of a few tesla. With these large magnets (or others) located in the outer ionosphere, many quite interesting and unique plasma physics experiments become possible. First there are studies utilizing the magnet alone to examine the supersonic, sub-Alfvenic interaction with the ambient medium; the scale length for the magnet perturbation is approx. 20 m. The magnetic field geometry when combined with the Earth's and their relative motion will give rise to a host of plasma phenomena: ring nulls, x-points, ion-acoustic and lower-hybrid shocks, electron heating (possible shuttle glow without a surface) launching of Alfvenwaves, etc. Second, active experiments are possible for a controlled study of fundamental plasma phenomena. A controlled variable species plasma can be made by using an RF ion source; use of two soft iron rings placed about the line cusp would give an adequate resonance zone (ECH or ICH) and a confining volume suitable for gas efficiency. The emanating plasma can be used to study free expansion of plasma along and across field lines (polar wind), plasma flows around the space platform, turbulent mixing in the wake region, long wavelength spectrum of convecting modes, plasma-dust interactions, etc.

  12. Creating astrophysically relevant jets from locally heated targets irradiated by a high-intensity laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, Holger; Robinson, Alex

    2014-10-01

    The formation mechanism of jets in the vicinity of young stellar objects has been the subject of investigations for many years. It is thought that jets are formed by the stellar wind interacting with an inhomogeneous plasma. A density gradient from the equator to the poles causes the wind to encounter the inward facing reverse shock at an oblique angle. The wind is focused into a conical flow towards the poles where it emerges as a narrow jet. This mechanism is inaccessible to direct observations due to the small scales on which it operates. Using high intensity lasers to produce comparable jets offers a way to investigate the mechanisms in the laboratory. Previous investigations of jets in the laboratory have directly generated the conical flow, skipping the first part of the formation mechanism. We present simulations of a novel method of generating jets in the laboratory by using magnetic fields generated by resistivity gradients to control the fast electron flow. The return current selectively heats a small region inside the target which drives a blast wave into the low density region behind the target. A conical high density shell focuses the outflow into a narrow jet. We find jets with aspect ratios of over 15 and Mach numbers between 2.5 and 4.3. This work is funded by the European Research Council, Grant STRUCMAGFAST.

  13. A Gas-Filled Calorimeter for High Intensity Beam Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrams, Robert; Ankenbrandt, Harles; Flanagan, Gene; Hauptman, John; Kahn, Steven; Lee, Sehwook; Notani, Masahiro

    We describe a novel gas-Cherenkov calorimeter, which detects Cherenkov light showers emitted in an array of thin metal tubes or channels filled with gas. The materials are not vulnerable to radiation damage, and the detector is inherently fast and able to operate in high rate environments. Future accelerators such as the ILC and a muon collider will need fast, radiation-tolerant detectors for monitoring beams and beam halos, and detectors are needed that can operate in the presence of high particle rates. Such detectors will also be useful for high rate environments at upgraded facilities such as RHIC, CEBAF II, and at Fermilab's Project X.

  14. 14 CFR 25.1317 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 25.1317 Section 25.1317 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment General § 25.1317 High-intensity Radiated Fields...

  15. 14 CFR 27.1317 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 27.1317 Section 27.1317 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment General § 27.1317 High-intensity Radiated Fields...

  16. 14 CFR 27.1317 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 27.1317 Section 27.1317 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment General § 27.1317 High-intensity Radiated Fields...

  17. 14 CFR 25.1317 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 25.1317 Section 25.1317 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment General § 25.1317 High-intensity Radiated Fields...

  18. 14 CFR 29.1317 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 29.1317 Section 29.1317 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment General § 29.1317 High-intensity Radiated Fields...

  19. 14 CFR 29.1317 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 29.1317 Section 29.1317 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment General § 29.1317 High-intensity Radiated Fields...

  20. Effect of Short-Term, High-Intensity Exercise on Anaerobic Threshold in Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Blanche W.

    This study investigated the effects of a six-week, high-intensity cycling program on anaerobic threshold (AT) in ten women. Subjects trained four days a week using high-intensity interval-type cycle exercises. Workouts included six 4-minute intervals cycling at 85 percent maximal oxygen uptake (VO sub 2 max), separated by 3-minute intervals of…

  1. 14 CFR 23.1308 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 23.1308 Section 23.1308 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Equipment General § 23.1308 High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. (a) Except as provided...

  2. 14 CFR 23.1308 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF... Equipment General § 23.1308 High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. (a) Except as provided in... reduce the capability of the airplane or the ability of the flightcrew to respond to an adverse...

  3. High-time resolution and size-segregated elemental composition in high-intensity pyrotechnic exposures.

    PubMed

    Crespo, Javier; Yubero, Eduardo; Nicolás, Jose F; Lucarelli, Franco; Nava, Silvia; Chiari, Massimo; Calzolai, Giulia

    2012-11-30

    Typical of festivals in Eastern Spain, mascletàs are high-intensity pyrotechnic events where thousands of firecrackers are burnt in an intense, rapid episode that generates short-lived heavy aerosol clouds. High temporal resolution and size distribution characterisation of aerosol components were performed to evaluate the effects of the brief (<30 min) and acute exposure on the spectators present. Very high concentrations of firework specific elements, especially in the fine fraction, were reached during mascletàs, with values of about 500 μg/m(3) for K and 300 μg/m(3) for Cl. Sr, Al, Mg, Ba, Cu, Co, Zn, and Pb concentration increase factors of more than 100 (1000 for Sr and Ba) were observed in the fine fraction with respect to background levels. Crustal origin elements, like Ca, Fe, Si, Ti, also showed an important concentration rise (~10 times above background levels) but this is due to dust resuspension by pyrotechnic explosions. The crustal components are mainly in the coarse mode (>90% elemental mass), between 2 and 3 μm. Most firework related metals are concentrated in the submicrometric region (>80%) with a trimodal size distribution. This may be interesting to epidemiologists given the toxic effects that such fine, metal-rich particles can have on human health. PMID:23026448

  4. High-time resolution and size-segregated elemental composition in high-intensity pyrotechnic exposures.

    PubMed

    Crespo, Javier; Yubero, Eduardo; Nicolás, Jose F; Lucarelli, Franco; Nava, Silvia; Chiari, Massimo; Calzolai, Giulia

    2012-11-30

    Typical of festivals in Eastern Spain, mascletàs are high-intensity pyrotechnic events where thousands of firecrackers are burnt in an intense, rapid episode that generates short-lived heavy aerosol clouds. High temporal resolution and size distribution characterisation of aerosol components were performed to evaluate the effects of the brief (<30 min) and acute exposure on the spectators present. Very high concentrations of firework specific elements, especially in the fine fraction, were reached during mascletàs, with values of about 500 μg/m(3) for K and 300 μg/m(3) for Cl. Sr, Al, Mg, Ba, Cu, Co, Zn, and Pb concentration increase factors of more than 100 (1000 for Sr and Ba) were observed in the fine fraction with respect to background levels. Crustal origin elements, like Ca, Fe, Si, Ti, also showed an important concentration rise (~10 times above background levels) but this is due to dust resuspension by pyrotechnic explosions. The crustal components are mainly in the coarse mode (>90% elemental mass), between 2 and 3 μm. Most firework related metals are concentrated in the submicrometric region (>80%) with a trimodal size distribution. This may be interesting to epidemiologists given the toxic effects that such fine, metal-rich particles can have on human health.

  5. The study towards high intensity high charge state laser ion sources.

    PubMed

    Zhao, H Y; Jin, Q Y; Sha, S; Zhang, J J; Li, Z M; Liu, W; Sun, L T; Zhang, X Z; Zhao, H W

    2014-02-01

    As one of the candidate ion sources for a planned project, the High Intensity heavy-ion Accelerator Facility, a laser ion source has been being intensively studied at the Institute of Modern Physics in the past two years. The charge state distributions of ions produced by irradiating a pulsed 3 J/8 ns Nd:YAG laser on solid targets of a wide range of elements (C, Al, Ti, Ni, Ag, Ta, and Pb) were measured with an electrostatic ion analyzer spectrometer, which indicates that highly charged ions could be generated from low-to-medium mass elements with the present laser system, while the charge state distributions for high mass elements were relatively low. The shot-to-shot stability of ion pulses was monitored with a Faraday cup for carbon target. The fluctuations within ±2.5% for the peak current and total charge and ±6% for pulse duration were demonstrated with the present setup of the laser ion source, the suppression of which is still possible.

  6. The study towards high intensity high charge state laser ion sources.

    PubMed

    Zhao, H Y; Jin, Q Y; Sha, S; Zhang, J J; Li, Z M; Liu, W; Sun, L T; Zhang, X Z; Zhao, H W

    2014-02-01

    As one of the candidate ion sources for a planned project, the High Intensity heavy-ion Accelerator Facility, a laser ion source has been being intensively studied at the Institute of Modern Physics in the past two years. The charge state distributions of ions produced by irradiating a pulsed 3 J/8 ns Nd:YAG laser on solid targets of a wide range of elements (C, Al, Ti, Ni, Ag, Ta, and Pb) were measured with an electrostatic ion analyzer spectrometer, which indicates that highly charged ions could be generated from low-to-medium mass elements with the present laser system, while the charge state distributions for high mass elements were relatively low. The shot-to-shot stability of ion pulses was monitored with a Faraday cup for carbon target. The fluctuations within ±2.5% for the peak current and total charge and ±6% for pulse duration were demonstrated with the present setup of the laser ion source, the suppression of which is still possible. PMID:24593615

  7. Liquid lithium target as a high intensity, high energy neutron source

    DOEpatents

    Parkin, Don M.; Dudey, Norman D.

    1976-01-01

    This invention provides a target jet for charged particles. In one embodiment the charged particles are high energy deuterons that bombard the target jet to produce high intensity, high energy neutrons. To this end, deuterons in a vacuum container bombard an endlessly circulating, free-falling, sheet-shaped, copiously flowing, liquid lithium jet that gushes by gravity from a rectangular cross-section vent on the inside of the container means to form a moving web in contact with the inside wall of the vacuum container. The neutrons are produced via break-up of the beam in the target by stripping, spallation and compound nuclear reactions in which the projectiles (deuterons) interact with the target (Li) to produce excited nuclei, which then "boil off" or evaporate a neutron.

  8. Charge transport processes in LiNbO3:Fe at high intensity laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jermann, F.; Krätzig, E.

    1992-07-01

    Light-induced refractive index changes in LiNbO3:Fe crystals are investigated at high light intensities (>109 Wm-2). Holographic gratings are recorded and erased with frequency-doubled pulses of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. We find new intensity dependent contributions to the holographic sensitivity, to the photoconductivity, and to the saturation value of refractive index change. Light-induced absorption changes are also detected. These results indicate that the Fe2+/Fe3+ charge transport model, well established for low intensities, has to be modified for high intensities by assuming additional centers which trap and supply electrons.

  9. Changes of colour and carotenoids contents during high intensity pulsed electric field treatment in orange juices.

    PubMed

    Cortés, C; Esteve, M J; Rodrigo, D; Torregrosa, F; Frígola, A

    2006-11-01

    Liquid chromatography (LC) was the method chosen to evaluate the effects of high intensity pulsed electric fields (HIPEF), with different electric field intensities (25, 30, 35 and 40 kV/cm) and different treatment times (30-340 micros), on orange juice cis/trans carotenoid contents. In parallel, a conventional heat treatment (90 degrees C, 20 s) was applied to the orange juice in order to compare the effect on the carotenoid contents. HIPEF processing of orange juice is an alternative to the thermal treatment of pasteurization, provided that it is kept refrigerated, because, when the most extreme conditions of this kind of treatment are applied, the decrease in the concentration of carotenoids with vitamin A activity is very small, and also most of the carotenoids identified have a slightly increased concentration after application of the most intense treatments, although always less than in untreated fresh juice. In any case, pasteurization treatment causes a greater decrease in the concentration of most of the carotenoids identified and the carotenoids with vitamin A activity. The total carotenoid concentration decreased by 12.6% in pasteurized orange juice with respect to untreated fresh orange juice, as opposed to decreases of 9.6%, 6.3% or 7.8% when fields of 25, 30 or 40 kV/cm were applied. Orange juice treated with HIPEF shows a greater tendency towards the colour yellow and a lesser tendency towards red with respect to untreated orange juice, while the luminance of the juice remains practically invariable. This tendency is less than in pasteurized orange juice.

  10. High-power, photofission-inducing bremsstrahlung source for intense pulsed active detection of fissile material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zier, J. C.; Mosher, D.; Allen, R. J.; Commisso, R. J.; Cooperstein, G.; Hinshelwood, D. D.; Jackson, S. L.; Murphy, D. P.; Ottinger, P. F.; Richardson, A. S.; Schumer, J. W.; Swanekamp, S. B.; Weber, B. V.

    2014-06-01

    Intense pulsed active detection (IPAD) is a promising technique for detecting fissile material to prevent the proliferation of special nuclear materials. With IPAD, fissions are induced in a brief, intense radiation burst and the resulting gamma ray or neutron signals are acquired during a short period of elevated signal-to-noise ratio. The 8 MV, 200 kA Mercury pulsed-power generator at the Naval Research Laboratory coupled to a high-power vacuum diode produces an intense 30 ns bremsstrahlung beam to study this approach. The work presented here reports on Mercury experiments designed to maximize the photofission yield in a depleted-uranium (DU) object in the bremsstrahlung far field by varying the anode-cathode (AK) diode gap spacing and by adding an inner-diameter-reducing insert in the outer conductor wall. An extensive suite of diagnostics was fielded to measure the bremsstrahlung beam and DU fission yield as functions of diode geometry. Delayed fission neutrons from the DU proved to be a valuable diagnostic for measuring bremsstrahlung photons above 5 MeV. The measurements are in broad agreement with particle-in-cell and Monte Carlo simulations of electron dynamics and radiation transport. These show that with increasing AK gap, electron losses to the insert and outer conductor wall increase and that the electron angles impacting the bremsstrahlung converter approach normal incidence. The diode conditions for maximum fission yield occur when the gap is large enough to produce electron angles close to normal, yet small enough to limit electron losses.

  11. (Gamma scattering in condensed matter with high intensity Moessbauer radiation)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses: quasielastic scattering studies on glycerol; gamma-ray scattering from alkali halides; lattice dynamics in metals; Moessbauer neutron scattering, x-ray diffraction, and macroscopic studies of high {Tc} superconductors containing tungsten; NiAl scattering studies; and atomic interference factors and nuclear Casimir effect.

  12. Acute high-intensity endurance exercise is more effective than moderate-intensity exercise for attenuation of postprandial triglyceride elevation.

    PubMed

    Trombold, Justin R; Christmas, Kevin M; Machin, Daniel R; Kim, Il-Young; Coyle, Edward F

    2013-03-15

    Acute exercise has been shown to attenuate postprandial plasma triglyceride elevation (PPTG). However, the direct contribution of exercise intensity is less well understood. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of exercise intensity on PPTG and postprandial fat oxidation. One of three experimental treatments was performed in healthy young men (n = 6): nonexercise control (CON), moderate-intensity exercise (MIE; 50% Vo2peak for 60 min), or isoenergetic high-intensity exercise (HIE; alternating 2 min at 25% and 2 min at 90% Vo2peak). The morning after the exercise, a standardized meal was provided (16 kcal/kg BM, 1.02 g fat/kg, 1.36 g CHO/kg, 0.31 g PRO/kg), and measurements of plasma concentrations of triglyceride (TG), glucose, insulin, and β-hydroxybutyrate were made in the fasted condition and hourly for 6 h postprandial. Indirect calorimetry was used to determine fat oxidation in the fasted condition and 2, 4, and 6 h postprandial. Compared with CON, both MIE and HIE significantly attenuated PPTG [incremental AUC; 75.2 (15.5%), P = 0.033, and 54.9 (13.5%), P = 0.001], with HIE also significantly lower than MIE (P = 0.03). Postprandial fat oxidation was significantly higher in MIE [83.3 (10.6%) of total energy expenditure] and HIE [89.1 (9.8) %total] compared with CON [69.0 (16.1) %total, P = 0.039, and P = 0.018, respectively], with HIE significantly greater than MIE (P = 0.012). We conclude that, despite similar energy expenditure, HIE was more effective than MIE for lowering PPTG and increasing postprandial fat oxidation.

  13. Device for providing high-intensity ion or electron beam

    DOEpatents

    McClanahan, Edwin D.; Moss, Ronald W.

    1977-01-01

    A thin film of a low-thermionic-work-function material is maintained on the cathode of a device for producing a high-current, low-pressure gas discharge by means of sputter deposition from an auxiliary electrode. The auxiliary electrode includes a surface with a low-work-function material, such as thorium, uranium, plutonium or one of the rare earth elements, facing the cathode but at a disposition and electrical potential so as to extract ions from the gas discharge and sputter the low-work-function material onto the cathode. By continuously replenishing the cathode film, high thermionic emissions and ion plasmas can be realized and maintained over extended operating periods.

  14. Intensities of high-energy cosmic rays at Mount Kanbala

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ren, J. R.; Kuang, H. H.; Huo, A. X.; Lu, S. L.; Su, S.; Wang, Y. X.; Xue, Y. G.; Wang, C. R.; He, M.; Zhang, N. J.

    1985-01-01

    The energy spectra of atmospheric cosmic rays at Mt. Kanbala (520 g/sq cm.) are measured with emulsion chambers. The power indexes of the spectra are values of about 2.0 for both gamma-rays and hadrons. Those fluxes are consistent with the ones expected from the model of primary cosmic rays with heavy nuclei of high content in the energy around 10 to the 15th power eV.

  15. Cathode Plasma Formation in High Intensity Electron Beam Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Mark; Kiefer, Mark; Oliver, Bryan; Bennett, Nichelle; Droemer, Darryl; Bernshtam, V.; Doron, R.; Maron, Yitzhak

    2013-10-01

    This talk will detail the experimental results and conclusions obtained for cathode plasma formation on the Self-Magnetic Pinch (SMP) diode fielded on the RITS-6 accelerator (4-7.5 MeV) at Sandia National Laboratories. The SMP diode utilizes a hollowed metal cathode to produce high power (TW), focused electron beams (<3 mm diameter) which are used for flash x-ray radiography applications. Optical diagnostics include high speed (<10 ns) framing cameras, optical streak cameras, and spectroscopy. The cathode plasma in this high electric (MV/cm) and magnetic (>10 Tesla) field environment forms well-defined striations. These striations have been examined for a number of different cathode sizes, vacuum gap spacings, and diode voltages. Optical streak images have been taken to determine the time evolution of the plasma, and optical spectroscopy has been employed to determine its constituents as well as their densities and temperatures inferred from detailed time-dependent, collisional-radiative (CR) and radiation transport modelings. Comments will be made as to the overall effect of the cathode plasma in regards to the diode impedance and electron beam focusing. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  16. CT and Ultrasound Guided Stereotactic High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Bradford J.; Yanof, J.; Frenkel, V.; Viswanathan, A.; Dromi, S.; Oh, K.; Kruecker, J.; Bauer, C.; Seip, R.; Kam, A.; Li, K. C. P.

    2006-05-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility of CT and B-mode Ultrasound (US) targeted HIFU, a prototype coaxial focused ultrasound transducer was registered and integrated to a CT scanner. CT and diagnostic ultrasound were used for HIFU targeting and monitoring, with the goals of both thermal ablation and non-thermal enhanced drug delivery. A 1 megahertz coaxial ultrasound transducer was custom fabricated and attached to a passive position-sensing arm and an active six degree-of-freedom robotic arm via a CT stereotactic frame. The outer therapeutic transducer with a 10 cm fixed focal zone was coaxially mounted to an inner diagnostic US transducer (2-4 megahertz, Philips Medical Systems). This coaxial US transducer was connected to a modified commercial focused ultrasound generator (Focus Surgery, Indianapolis, IN) with a maximum total acoustic power of 100 watts. This pre-clinical paradigm was tested for ability to heat tissue in phantoms with monitoring and navigation from CT and live US. The feasibility of navigation via image fusion of CT with other modalities such as PET and MRI was demonstrated. Heated water phantoms were tested for correlation between CT numbers and temperature (for ablation monitoring). The prototype transducer and integrated CT/US imaging system enabled simultaneous multimodality imaging and therapy. Pre-clinical phantom models validated the treatment paradigm and demonstrated integrated multimodality guidance and treatment monitoring. Temperature changes during phantom cooling corresponded to CT number changes. Contrast enhanced or non-enhanced CT numbers may potentially be used to monitor thermal ablation with HIFU. Integrated CT, diagnostic US, and therapeutic focused ultrasound bridges a gap between diagnosis and therapy. Preliminary results show that the multimodality system may represent a relatively inexpensive, accessible, and simple method of both targeting and monitoring HIFU effects. Small animal pre-clinical models may be translated to large

  17. CT and Ultrasound Guided Stereotactic High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU)

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, Bradford J.; Frenkel, V.; Viswanathan, A.; Dromi, S.; Oh, K.; Kam, A.; Li, K. C. P.; Yanof, J.; Bauer, C.; Kruecker, J.; Seip, R.

    2006-05-08

    To demonstrate the feasibility of CT and B-mode Ultrasound (US) targeted HIFU, a prototype coaxial focused ultrasound transducer was registered and integrated to a CT scanner. CT and diagnostic ultrasound were used for HIFU targeting and monitoring, with the goals of both thermal ablation and non-thermal enhanced drug delivery. A 1 megahertz coaxial ultrasound transducer was custom fabricated and attached to a passive position-sensing arm and an active six degree-of-freedom robotic arm via a CT stereotactic frame. The outer therapeutic transducer with a 10 cm fixed focal zone was coaxially mounted to an inner diagnostic US transducer (2-4 megahertz, Philips Medical Systems). This coaxial US transducer was connected to a modified commercial focused ultrasound generator (Focus Surgery, Indianapolis, IN) with a maximum total acoustic power of 100 watts. This pre-clinical paradigm was tested for ability to heat tissue in phantoms with monitoring and navigation from CT and live US. The feasibility of navigation via image fusion of CT with other modalities such as PET and MRI was demonstrated. Heated water phantoms were tested for correlation between CT numbers and temperature (for ablation monitoring). The prototype transducer and integrated CT/US imaging system enabled simultaneous multimodality imaging and therapy. Pre-clinical phantom models validated the treatment paradigm and demonstrated integrated multimodality guidance and treatment monitoring. Temperature changes during phantom cooling corresponded to CT number changes. Contrast enhanced or non-enhanced CT numbers may potentially be used to monitor thermal ablation with HIFU. Integrated CT, diagnostic US, and therapeutic focused ultrasound bridges a gap between diagnosis and therapy. Preliminary results show that the multimodality system may represent a relatively inexpensive, accessible, and simple method of both targeting and monitoring HIFU effects. Small animal pre-clinical models may be translated to large

  18. An improved permanent magnet quadrupole design with larger good field region for high intensity proton linacs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathew, Jose V.; Rao, S. V. L. S.; Krishnagopal, S.; Singh, P.

    2013-11-01

    The Low Energy High Intensity Proton Accelerator (LEHIPA), being developed at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) will produce a 20 MeV, 30 mA, continuous wave (CW) proton beam. At these low velocities, space-charge forces dominate, and could lead to larger beam sizes and beam halos. Hence in the design of the focusing lattice of the LEHIPA drift tube linac (DTL) using permanent magnet quadrupoles (PMQs), a larger good field region is preferred. Here we study, using the two dimensional (2D) and three dimensional (3D) simulation codes PANDIRA and RADIA, four different types of cylindrical PMQ designs: 16-segment trapezoidal Halbach configuration, bullet-nosed geometry and 8- and 16-segment rectangular geometries. The trapezoidal Halbach geometry is used in a variety of accelerators since it provides very high field gradients in small bores, while the bullet-nosed geometry, which is a combination of the trapezoidal and rectangular designs, is used in some DTLs. This study shows that a larger good field region is possible in the 16-segment rectangular design as compared to the Halbach and bullet-nosed designs, making it more attractive for high-intensity proton linacs. An improvement in good-field region by ˜16% over the Halbach design is obtained in the optimized 16-segment rectangular design, although the field gradient is lower by ˜20%. Tolerance studies show that the rectangular segment PMQ design is substantially less sensitive to the easy axis orientation errors and hence will be a better choice for DTLs.

  19. A Highly intense DC muon source, MuSIC and muon CLFV search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hino, Y.; Kuno, Y.; Sato, A.; Sakamoto, H.; Matsumoto, Y.; Tran, N. H.; Hashim, I. H.; Fukuda, M.; Hayashida, Y.; Ogitsu, T.; Yamamoto, A.; Yoshida, M.

    2014-08-01

    MuSIC is a new muon facility, which provides the world's highest intense muon beam with continuous time structure at Research Center of Nuclear Physics (RCNP), Osaka University. It's intensity is designed to be 108 muons per second with only 0.4 kW proton beam. Such a high intense muon beam is very important for searches of rare decay processes, for example search for the muon to electron conversion.

  20. High-intensity drying processes-impulse drying. Yearly report

    SciTech Connect

    Orloff, D.I.

    1991-06-01

    Impulse drying is an innovative process for drying paper that holds great promise for reducing the energy consumed during the manufacture of paper and similar web products. impulse drying occurs when a wet paper web passes through a press nip in which one of the rolls is heated to a high temperature. A steam layer adjacent to the heated surface grows and displaces water from the sheet in a very efficient manner. The energy required for water removal is very much less than that required for conventional evaporative drying. To eliminate sheet delamination, low thermal mass ceramic press roll coatings were developed to reduce heat transfer to the sheet, while maintaining high heat flux during early stages of the process. In so doing, most of the transferred energy is used to form steam that displaces liquid water, rather than in excessively heating the sheet. During this period, a prototype ceramic coating was developed and its impulse drying performance was compared to that of steel surfaces. It was observed that ceramic platens can be operated at higher temperatures and pressures resulting in improved water removal and physical properties without inducing sheet delamination. Heat flux measurement techniques were developed to provide a mechanistic explanation for the superior performance of the prototype. The work confirmed that the prototype ceramic coating is more energy efficient than the steel surface.

  1. Constant Light Output Ballasting For High Intensity Discharge Lamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donkin, Adrian

    1988-02-01

    Since the commercial introduction some twenty years ago of HMI* (Hydragyrum-mercury, Medium, Iodide) type lamps, as a source intended primarily for floodlighting applications, their attraction as a cinematographic light source has been apparent due to their largely desirable characteristics. Use in this field has been restricted due to the absolute requirement for an alternating current supply - with a sine wave supply frame rates are limited to a sub-multiple of the supply frequency with the supply frequency phase locked to the camera frame rate. This has effectively barred metal halide HID lighting from use in high speed photography. The general characteristics of metal halide HID lamps are presented alongside a sample of other light sources. An electronic ballast which has been proven to 12000 Watts in the motion picture industry is then described which overcomes the limitations of the conventional magnetic ballast - the square wave output of the electronic ballast theoretically allows the use of any camera frame rate/shutter angle combination. Finally the suitability of luminaires for high speed photography is discussed.

  2. High-order harmonics from bow wave caustics driven by a high-intensity laser

    SciTech Connect

    Pirozhkov, A.S.; Kando, M.; Esirkepov, T.Zh.; and others

    2012-07-11

    We propose a new mechanism of high-order harmonic generation during an interaction of a high-intensity laser pulse with underdense plasma. A tightly focused laser pulse creates a cavity in plasma pushing electrons aside and exciting the wake wave and the bow wave. At the joint of the cavity wall and the bow wave boundary, an annular spike of electron density is formed. This spike surrounds the cavity and moves together with the laser pulse. Collective motion of electrons in the spike driven by the laser field generates high-order harmonics. A strong localization of the electron spike, its robustness to oscillations imposed by the laser field and, consequently, its ability to produce high-order harmonics is explained by catastrophe theory. The proposed mechanism explains the experimental observations of high-order harmonics with the 9 TW J-KAREN laser (JAEA, Japan) and the 120 TW Astra Gemini laser (CLF RAL, UK) [A. S. Pirozhkov, et al., arXiv:1004.4514 (2010); A. S. Pirozhkov et al, AIP Proceedings, this volume]. The theory is corroborated by high-resolution two-and three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations.

  3. High-order harmonics from bow wave caustics driven by a high-intensity laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Pirozhkov, A. S.; Kando, M.; Gallegos, P.; Ahmed, H.; Ragozin, E. N.; Faenov, A. Ya.; Pikuz, T. A.; Kawachi, T.; Sagisaka, A.; Koga, J. K.; Coury, M.; Green, J.; Foster, P.; Brenner, C.; Dromey, B.; Symes, D. R.; Mori, M.; Kawase, K.; Kameshima, T.; Fukuda, Y.; Chen, L. M.; Daito, I.; Ogura, K.; Hayashi, Y.; Kotaki, H.; Kiriyama, H.; Okada, H.; Nishimori, N.; Imazono, T.; Kondo, K.; Kimura, T.; Tajima, T.; Daido, H.; Rajeev, P.; Mckenna, P.; Borghesi, M.; Neely, D.; Kato, Y.; Bulanov, S. V.

    2012-07-01

    We propose a new mechanism of high-order harmonic generation during an interaction of a high-intensity laser pulse with underdense plasma. A tightly focused laser pulse creates a cavity in plasma pushing electrons aside and exciting the wake wave and the bow wave. At the joint of the cavity wall and the bow wave boundary, an annular spike of electron density is formed. This spike surrounds the cavity and moves together with the laser pulse. Collective motion of electrons in the spike driven by the laser field generates high-order harmonics. A strong localization of the electron spike, its robustness to oscillations imposed by the laser field and, consequently, its ability to produce high-order harmonics is explained by catastrophe theory. The proposed mechanism explains the experimental observations of high-order harmonics with the 9 TW J-KAREN laser (JAEA, Japan) and the 120 TW Astra Gemini laser (CLF RAL, UK) [A. S. Pirozhkov, et al., arXiv:1004.4514 (2010); A. S. Pirozhkov et al, AIP Proceedings, this volume]. The theory is corroborated by high-resolution two-and three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations.

  4. Impact of High-intensity Intermittent and Moderate-intensity Continuous Exercise on Autonomic Modulation in Young Men.

    PubMed

    Cabral-Santos, C; Giacon, T R; Campos, E Z; Gerosa-Neto, J; Rodrigues, B; Vanderlei, L C M; Lira, F S

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to compare heart rate variability (HRV) recovery after two iso-volume (5 km) exercises performed at different intensities. 14 subjects volunteered (25.17±5.08 years; 74.7±6.28 kg; 175±0.05 cm; 59.56±5.15 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1)) and after determination of peak oxygen uptake (VO2Peak) and the speed associated with VO2Peak (sVO2Peak), the subjects completed 2 random experimental trials: high-intensity exercise (HIE - 1:1 at 100% sVO2Peak), and moderate-intensity continuous exercise (MIE - 70% sVO2Peak). HRV and RR intervals were monitored before, during and after the exercise sessions together with, the HRV analysis in the frequency domains (high-frequency - HF: 0.15 to 0.4 Hz and low-frequency - LF: 0.04 to 0.15 Hz components) and the ratio between them (LF/HF). Statistical analysis comparisons between moments and between HIE and MIE were performed using a mixed model. Both exercise sessions modified LFlog, HFlog, and LF/HF (F=16.54, F=19.32 and F=5.17, p<0.05, respectively). A group effect was also found for LFlog (F=23.91, p<0.05), and HFlog (F=57.55, p< 0.05). LF/HF returned to resting value 15 min after MIE exercise and 20 min after HIE exercise. This means that the heavy domain (aerobic and anaerobic threshold) induces dissimilar autonomic modification in physically active subjects. Both HIE and MIE modify HRV, and generally HIE delays parasympathetic autonomic modulation recovery after iso-volume exercise. PMID:26951480

  5. Tools and techniques for estimating high intensity RF effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zacharias, Richard L.; Pennock, Steve T.; Poggio, Andrew J.; Ray, Scott L.

    1992-01-01

    Tools and techniques for estimating and measuring coupling and component disturbance for avionics and electronic controls are described. A finite-difference-time-domain (FD-TD) modeling code, TSAR, used to predict coupling is described. This code can quickly generate a mesh model to represent the test object. Some recent applications as well as the advantages and limitations of using such a code are described. Facilities and techniques for making low-power coupling measurements and for making direct injection test measurements of device disturbance are also described. Some scaling laws for coupling and device effects are presented. A method for extrapolating these low-power test results to high-power full-system effects are presented.

  6. Is Moderate Intensity Exercise Training Combined with High Intensity Interval Training More Effective at Improving Cardiorespiratory Fitness than Moderate Intensity Exercise Training Alone?

    PubMed Central

    Roxburgh, Brendon H.; Nolan, Paul B.; Weatherwax, Ryan M.; Dalleck, Lance C.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effectiveness of either continuous moderate intensity exercise training (CMIET) alone vs. CMIET combined with a single weekly bout of high intensity interval training (HIIT) on cardiorespiratory fitness. Twenty nine sedentary participants (36.3 ± 6.9 yrs) at moderate risk of cardiovascular disease were recruited for 12 weeks of exercise training on a treadmill and cycle ergometer. Participants were randomised into three groups: CMIET + HIIT (n = 7; 8-12 x 60 sec at 100% VO2max, 150 sec active recovery), CMIET (n = 6; 30 min at 45-60% oxygen consumption reserve (VO2R)) and a sedentary control group (n = 7). Participants in the CMIET + HIIT group performed a single weekly bout of HIIT and four weekly sessions of CMIET, whilst the CMIET group performed five weekly CMIET sessions. Probabilistic magnitude-based inferences were determined to assess the likelihood that the true value of the effect represents substantial change. Relative VO2max increased by 10.1% (benefit possible relative to control) in in the CMIET + HIIT group (32.7 ± 9.2 to 36.0 ± 11.5 mL·kg-1·min-1) and 3.9% (benefit possible relative to control) in the CMIET group (33.2 ± 4.0 to 34.5 ± 6.1 mL·kg-1·min-1), whilst there was a 5.7% decrease in the control group (30.0 ± 4.6 to 28.3 ± 6.5 mL·kg-1·min-1). It was ‘unclear’ if a clinically significant difference existed between the effect of CMIET + HIIT and CMIET on the change in VO2max. Both exercising groups showed clinically meaningful improvements in VO2max. Nevertheless, it remains ‘unclear’ whether one type of exercise training regimen elicits a superior improvement in cardiorespiratory fitness relative to its counterpart. Key Points Both continuous moderate intensity exercise training (CMIET) alone and CMIET combined with a single weekly bout of high intensity interval training (CMIET + HIIT) elicit ‘possibly beneficial’ clinically meaningful improvements in cardiorespiratory

  7. High-Intensity Plasma Glass Melter Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Gonterman, J. Ronald; Weinstein, Michael A.

    2006-10-27

    frits. Exploratory melts of non-glassy materials, such as wollastonite, zirconium silicate, and alumino-silicate melts were successfully done indicating that plasma melting has potential application beyond glass. Experimental results were generated that show the high quality of plasma-melted fiberglass compositions, such as E-glass, can result in good fiberizing performance. Fiberizing performance and tensile strength data were achieved during the project to support this conclusion. High seed counts are a feature of the current lab scale melter and must be dealt with via other means, since fining work was outside the scope of this project.

  8. Diffraction Gratings for High-Intensity Laser Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Britten, J

    2008-01-23

    The scattering of light into wavelength-dependent discrete directions (orders) by a device exhibiting a periodic modulation of a physical attribute on a spatial scale similar to the wavelength of light has been the subject of study for over 200 years. Such a device is called a diffraction grating. Practical applications of diffraction gratings, mainly for spectroscopy, have been around for over 100 years. The importance of diffraction gratings in spectroscopy for the measurement of myriad properties of matter can hardly be overestimated. Since the advent of coherent light sources (lasers) in the 1960's, applications of diffraction gratings in spectroscopy have further exploded. Lasers have opened a vast application space for gratings, and apace, gratings have enabled entirely new classes of laser systems. Excellent reviews of the history, fundamental properties, applications and manufacturing techniques of diffraction gratings up to the time of their publication can be found in the books by Hutley (1) and more recently Loewen and Popov (2). The limited scope of this chapter can hardly do justice to such a comprehensive subject, so the focus here will be narrowly limited to characteristics required for gratings suitable for high-power laser applications, and methods to fabricate them. A particular area of emphasis will be on maximally-efficient large-aperture gratings for short-pulse laser generation.

  9. A High Intensity Linac for the National Spallation Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jason, A.; Bhatia, T.; Billen, J.; Schrage, D.; Kurennoy, S.; Krawczyk, F.; Lynch, M.; Nath, S.; Shafer, R.; Takeda, H.; Tallerico, P.; Wangler, T.; Wood, R.; Young, L.; Grand, P.; McKenzie-Wilson, R.

    1997-05-01

    The National Spallation Neutron Source to be constructed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, requires a linac capable of delivering up to 5 MW of beam power to an accumulator ring with a nominal 6.2% duty factor and an energy of 1 GeV. Los Alamos, responsible for the linac design, has developed an appropriate room-temperature linac that consists of a drift-tube section from 2.5 to 20 MeV, a coupled-cavity drift-tube section to 100 MeV, and a coupled-cavity section to 1 GeV. The initial scenario requires an average 1.1-mA beam current with a corresponding 28 mA peak current and a 1.2-Mhz chopped time structure corresponding to the ring period. Upgrade to a 4.4 mA average current requires funneling with a peak current of 112 mA in the high-energy sections. Further parameters are presented along with beam dynamics and structure choices and mechanical and rf engineering considerations.

  10. Improvement of high-voltage staircase drive circuit waveform for high-intensity therapeutic ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamano, Satoshi; Jimbo, Hayato; Azuma, Takashi; Yoshizawa, Shin; Fujiwara, Keisuke; Itani, Kazunori; Umemura, Shin-Ichiro

    2016-07-01

    Recently, in the treatment of diseases such as cancer, noninvasive or low-invasive modality, such as high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU), has been put into practice as an alternative to open surgery. HIFU induces thermal ablation of the target tissue to be treated. To improve the efficiency of HIFU, we have proposed a “triggered-HIFU” technique, which uses the combination of a short-duration, high-voltage transmission and a long-duration, medium-voltage transmission. In this method, the transmission device must endure high peak voltage for the former and the high time-average power for the latter. The triggered-HIFU sequence requires electronic scanning of the HIFU focus to maximize its thermal efficiency. Therefore, the transmission device must drive an array transducer with the number of elements on the order of a hundred or more, which requires that each part of the device that drives each element must be compact. The purpose of this work is to propose and construct such a transmission device by improving the staircase drive circuit, which we previously proposed. The main point of improvement is that both N and P MOSFETs are provided for each staircase voltage level instead of only one of them. Compared with the previous ultrasonic transmission circuit, high-voltage spikes were significantly reduced, the power consumption was decreased by 26.7%, and the transmission circuit temperature rise was decreased by 14.5 °C in the triggered-HIFU heating mode.

  11. A 3 Ghz photoelectron gun for high beam intensity

    SciTech Connect

    Bossart, R.; Braun, H.; Dehler, M.

    1995-12-31

    The CLIC Test Facility (CTF) for new accelerator structures of the proposed Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is to be equipped with a new RF gun containing a laser driven photocathode. The new 3 GHz gun with photocathode shall produce a bunch train of 48 electron bunches of 25 nC charge each with a bunch length of 8 - 15 ps fwhm. The new RF gun consists of 2{1/2} cells and accelerates the beam to an energy of 7 MeV with a peak field gradient Ez = 100 MV/m. The strong space charge forces at low beam energy caused by the high charge density of the electron bunches must be contained by radial and longitudinal RF focusing in the RF gun. Radial RF focusing is applied by a conical backplane around the photocathode in the first cell where the electrons have a low energy. Longitudinal RF focusing is obtained by varying the length of each of the three cells of the gun. The total electric charge of the bunch train exceeds 1{mu}C and causes strong beam loading to the RF structures so that the stored energy is reduced to half of the unloaded RF energy. The RF gun under construction is being optimized by MAFIA beam simulations for an injector assembly comprising a second accelerating RF structure of 4 cells and an intermediate solenoid magnet correcting the beam divergence of the 2{1/2} cell gun. The scheme with two accelerating RF sections will provide a linear energy increase along the bunch suitable for further compression of the bunch length in a magnetic chicane.

  12. Remote Sensing Tertiary Education Meets High Intensity Interval Training

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joyce, K. E.; White, B.

    2015-04-01

    Enduring a traditional lecture is the tertiary education equivalent of a long, slow, jog. There are certainly some educational benefits if the student is able to maintain concentration, but they are just as likely to get caught napping and fall off the back end of the treadmill. Alternatively, a pre-choreographed interactive workshop style class requires students to continually engage with the materials. Appropriately timed breaks or intervals allow students to recover briefly before being increasingly challenged throughout the class. Using an introductory remote sensing class at Charles Darwin University, this case study presents a transition from the traditional stand and deliver style lecture to an active student-led learning experience. The class is taught at undergraduate and postgraduate levels, with both on-campus as well as online distance learning students. Based on the concept that active engagement in learning materials promotes 'stickiness' of subject matter, the remote sensing class was re-designed to encourage an active style of learning. Critically, class content was reviewed to identify the key learning outcomes for the students. This resulted in a necessary sacrifice of topic range for depth of understanding. Graduates of the class reported high levels of enthusiasm for the materials, and the style in which the class was taught. This paper details a number of techniques that were used to engage students in active and problem based learning throughout the semester. It suggests a number of freely available tools that academics in remote sensing and related fields can readily incorporate into their teaching portfolios. Moreover, it shows how simple it can be to provide a far more enjoyable and effective learning experience for students than the one dimensional lecture.

  13. 14 CFR 25.1317 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 25.1317 Section 25.1317 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF...-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (d) of this section,...

  14. 14 CFR 29.1317 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 29.1317 Section 29.1317 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF...-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (d) of this section,...

  15. Wave mixing in nominally undoped Sn2P2S6 at high light intensities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shumelyuk, A.; Wesner, M.; Imlau, M.; Odoulov, S.

    2009-06-01

    The intensity dependence of the photorefractive response of Sn2P2S6 is studied for the Kr+-laser wavelength of 647 nm and pump-beam intensities of up to 10 W/cm2. A considerable enhancement of the two-beam coupling gain factor with increasing intensity at a grating spacing of ≃1 μm is attributed to a light-induced increase of the effective trap density. The large gain reached at high intensities is applied for the build up of a double phase conjugate mirror with a sub-millisecond switch-on time.

  16. Thermosensitivity of muscle: high-intensity thermal stimulation of muscle tissue induces muscle pain in humans

    PubMed Central

    Graven-Nielsen, T; Arendt-Nielsen, L; Mense, S

    2002-01-01

    Small-calibre afferent units responding to thermal stimuli have previously been reported to exist in muscle. The question as to whether these receptors in humans mediate subjective thermal sensations from muscle remains unresolved. The aims of the present study were to determine in humans whether intramuscular injection of warm and cold isotonic saline elicits temperature sensations, muscle pain or any other sensations. In 15 subjects, no thermal sensations assessed on a temperature visual analogue scale (VAS) could be detected with intramuscular injections of isotonic saline (1.5 ml) into the anterior tibial muscle at temperatures ranging from 8 to 48 °C. The same subjects recorded strongly increasing scores on a temperature VAS when thermal stimuli in the same intensity range were applied to the skin overlying the muscle by a contact thermode. However, i.m. isotonic saline of 48 °C induced muscle pain with peak scores of 3.2 ± 0.8 cm on a VAS scale ranging from 0 to 10 cm. Using the the McGill pain questionnaire a subgroup, of subjects qualitatively described the pain using the ‘thermal hot’ and ‘dullness’ word groups. Temperature measurements within the muscle during the stimulating injections showed that the time course of the pain sensation elicited by saline at 48 °C paralleled that of the intramuscular temperature and far outlasted the injection time. The present data show that high-intensity thermal stimulation of muscle is associated with muscle pain. High-threshold warm-sensitive receptors may mediate the pain following activation by temperatures of 48 °C or more. Taken together, the data indicate that thermosensation from a given volume of muscle is less potent than nociception. PMID:11956350

  17. The Effects of High Intensity Interval Training vs Steady State Training on Aerobic and Anaerobic Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Carl; Farland, Courtney V.; Guidotti, Flavia; Harbin, Michelle; Roberts, Brianna; Schuette, Jeff; Tuuri, Andrew; Doberstein, Scott T.; Porcari, John P.

    2015-01-01

    High intensity interval training (HIIT) has become an increasingly popular form of exercise due to its potentially large effects on exercise capacity and small time requirement. This study compared the effects of two HIIT protocols vs steady-state training on aerobic and anaerobic capacity following 8-weeks of training. Fifty-five untrained college-aged subjects were randomly assigned to three training groups (3x weekly). Steady-state (n = 19) exercised (cycle ergometer) 20 minutes at 90% of ventilatory threshold (VT). Tabata (n = 21) completed eight intervals of 20s at 170% VO2max/10s rest. Meyer (n = 15) completed 13 sets of 30s (20 min) @ 100% PVO2 max/ 60s recovery, average PO = 90% VT. Each subject did 24 training sessions during 8 weeks. Results: There were significant (p < 0.05) increases in VO2max (+19, +18 and +18%) and PPO (+17, +24 and +14%) for each training group, as well as significant increases in peak (+8, + 9 and +5%) & mean (+4, +7 and +6%) power during Wingate testing, but no significant differences between groups. Measures of the enjoyment of the training program indicated that the Tabata protocol was significantly less enjoyable (p < 0.05) than the steady state and Meyer protocols, and that the enjoyment of all protocols declined (p < 0.05) across the duration of the study. The results suggest that although HIIT protocols are time efficient, they are not superior to conventional exercise training in sedentary young adults. Key points Steady state training equivalent to HIIT in untrained students Mild interval training presents very similar physiologic challenge compared to steady state training HIIT (particularly very high intensity variants were less enjoyable than steady state or mild interval training Enjoyment of training decreases across the course of an 8 week experimental training program PMID:26664271

  18. The high intensity solar cell: Key to low cost photovoltaic power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sater, B. L.; Goradia, C.

    1975-01-01

    The design considerations and performance characteristics of the 'high intensity' (HI) solar cell are presented. A high intensity solar system was analyzed to determine its cost effectiveness and to assess the benefits of further improving HI cell efficiency. It is shown that residential sized systems can be produced at less than $1000/kW peak electric power. Due to their superior high intensity performance characteristics compared to the conventional and VMJ cells, HI cells and light concentrators may be the key to low cost photovoltaic power.

  19. Can high-intensity exercise be more pleasant?: attentional dissociation using music and video.

    PubMed

    Jones, Leighton; Karageorghis, Costas I; Ekkekakis, Panteleimon

    2014-10-01

    Theories suggest that external stimuli (e.g., auditory and visual) may be rendered ineffective in modulating attention when exercise intensity is high. We examined the effects of music and parkland video footage on psychological measures during and after stationary cycling at two intensities: 10% of maximal capacity below ventilatory threshold and 5% above. Participants (N = 34) were exposed to four conditions at each intensity: music only, video only, music and video, and control. Analyses revealed main effects of condition and exercise intensity for affective valence and perceived activation (p < .001), state attention (p < .05), and exercise enjoyment (p < .001). The music-only and music-and-video conditions led to the highest valence and enjoyment scores during and after exercise regardless of intensity. Findings indicate that attentional manipulations can exert a salient influence on affect and enjoyment even at intensities slightly above ventilatory threshold.

  20. High-intensity activity profiles of elite soccer players at different performance levels.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Paul S; Di Mascio, Michele; Peart, Dan; Olsen, Peter; Sheldon, Bill

    2010-09-01

    The aims of the study were to (a) determine the high-intensity activity patterns of soccer players at different performance levels and playing positions, (b) investigate temporary and end game fatigue in elite domestic and international soccer matches, and (c) quantify acceleration and maximal running speed profiles of elite soccer players. Elite domestic (n = 100) and international (n = 10) soccer players were analyzed using a multicamera computerized tracking system. No differences were found for high-intensity running distance (2,520 +/- 678 vs. 2,745 +/- 332 m), mean recovery time (67 +/- 15 vs. 71 +/- 26 seconds), or maximal running speed (7.76 +/- 0.31 vs. 7.66 +/- 0.34 mxs-1). The distance covered in high-intensity running irrespective of playing level was 18% lower (p < 0.05) in the last than in the first 15-minute period of the game (391 +/- 117 vs. 478 +/- 141 m). The decline in high-intensity running immediately after the most intense 5-minute period was similar between international (222 +/- 33 vs. 109 +/- 37 m or 51% decline) and elite domestic (243 +/- 81 vs. 114 +/- 51 m or 53% decline) players. Wide midfielders, central midfielders, fullbacks, and attackers covered a greater (p < 0.01) distance in high-intensity running than central defenders (3,243 +/- 625, 2,949 +/- 435, 2,806 +/- 408, 2,618 +/- 745 vs. 2,034 +/- 284 m). Results demonstrate that high-intensity running is reduced during various periods of elite soccer matches, and high-intensity activity profiles and fatigue patterns are similar between international and elite domestic players but vary markedly between playing positions. These data provide valuable information to the fitness coach regarding the high-intensity active profile of elite soccer players that could be used to develop soccer-specific training drills.

  1. Improved highly accurate localized motion imaging for monitoring high-intensity focused ultrasound therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Xiaolei; Azuma, Takashi; Sugiyama, Ryusuke; Kanazawa, Kengo; Seki, Mika; Sasaki, Akira; Takeuchi, Hideki; Fujiwara, Keisuke; Itani, Kazunori; Tamano, Satoshi; Takagi, Shu; Sakuma, Ichiro; Matsumoto, Yoichiro

    2016-07-01

    Visualizing an area subjected to high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy is necessary for controlling the amount of HIFU exposure. One of the promising monitoring methods is localized motion imaging (LMI), which estimates coagulation length by detecting the change in stiffness. In this study, we improved the accuracy of our previous LMI by dynamic cross-correlation window (DCCW) and maximum vibration amount (MVA) methods. The DCCW method was used to increase the accuracy of estimating vibration amplitude, and the MVA method was employed to increase signal-noise ratio of the decrease ratio at the coagulated area. The qualitative comparison of results indicated that the two proposed methods could suppress the effect of noise. Regarding the results of the quantitative comparison, coagulation length was estimated with higher accuracy by the improved LMI method, and the root-mean-square error (RMSE) was reduced from 2.51 to 1.69 mm.

  2. Improved highly accurate localized motion imaging for monitoring high-intensity focused ultrasound therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Xiaolei; Azuma, Takashi; Sugiyama, Ryusuke; Kanazawa, Kengo; Seki, Mika; Sasaki, Akira; Takeuchi, Hideki; Fujiwara, Keisuke; Itani, Kazunori; Tamano, Satoshi; Takagi, Shu; Sakuma, Ichiro; Matsumoto, Yoichiro

    2016-07-01

    Visualizing an area subjected to high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy is necessary for controlling the amount of HIFU exposure. One of the promising monitoring methods is localized motion imaging (LMI), which estimates coagulation length by detecting the change in stiffness. In this study, we improved the accuracy of our previous LMI by dynamic cross-correlation window (DCCW) and maximum vibration amount (MVA) methods. The DCCW method was used to increase the accuracy of estimating vibration amplitude, and the MVA method was employed to increase signal–noise ratio of the decrease ratio at the coagulated area. The qualitative comparison of results indicated that the two proposed methods could suppress the effect of noise. Regarding the results of the quantitative comparison, coagulation length was estimated with higher accuracy by the improved LMI method, and the root-mean-square error (RMSE) was reduced from 2.51 to 1.69 mm.

  3. ORNL_SAS: Versatile software for calculation of small-angle x-ray and neutron scattering intensity profiles from arbitrary structures

    SciTech Connect

    Heller, William T; Tjioe, Elina

    2007-01-01

    ORNL{_}SAS is software for calculating solution small-angle scattering intensity profiles from any structure provided in the Protein Data Bank format and can also compare the results with experimental data.

  4. High-Intensity Interval Training as an Efficacious Alternative to Moderate-Intensity Continuous Training for Adults with Prediabetes

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Mary E.; Bourne, Jessica E.; Beauchamp, Mark R.; Robinson, Emily; Little, Jonathan P.

    2015-01-01

    Aims. High-intensity interval training (HIIT) leads to improvements in various markers of cardiometabolic health but adherence to HIIT following a supervised laboratory intervention has yet to be tested. We compared self-report and objective measures of physical activity after one month of independent exercise in individuals with prediabetes who were randomized to HIIT (n = 15) or traditional moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT, n = 17). Method. After completing 10 sessions of supervised training participants were asked to perform HIIT or MICT three times per week for four weeks. Results. Individuals in HIIT (89 ± 11%) adhered to their prescribed protocol to a greater extent than individuals in MICT (71 ± 31%) as determined by training logs completed over one-month follow-up (P = 0.05, Cohen's d = 0.75). Minutes spent in vigorous physical activity per week measured by accelerometer were higher in HIIT (24 ± 18) as compared to MICT (11 ± 10) at one-month follow-up (P = 0.049, Cohen's d = 0.92). Cardiorespiratory fitness and systolic blood pressure assessed at one-month follow-up were equally improved (P's < 0.05). Conclusions. This study provides preliminary evidence that individuals with prediabetes can adhere to HIIT over the short-term and do so at a level that is greater than MICT. PMID:25918728

  5. Intensive lifestyle intervention including high-intensity interval training program improves insulin resistance and fasting plasma glucose in obese patients☆

    PubMed Central

    Marquis-Gravel, Guillaume; Hayami, Douglas; Juneau, Martin; Nigam, Anil; Guilbeault, Valérie; Latour, Élise; Gayda, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To analyze the effects of a long-term intensive lifestyle intervention including high-intensity interval training (HIIT) and Mediterranean diet (MedD) counseling on glycemic control parameters, insulin resistance and β-cell function in obese subjects. Methods The glycemic control parameters (fasting plasma glucose, glycated hemoglobin), insulin resistance, and β-cell function of 72 obese subjects (54 women; mean age = 53 ± 9 years) were assessed at baseline and upon completion of a 9-month intensive lifestyle intervention program conducted at the cardiovascular prevention and rehabilitation center of the Montreal Heart Institute, from 2009 to 2012. The program included 2–3 weekly supervised exercise training sessions (HIIT and resistance exercise), combined to MedD counseling. Results Fasting plasma glucose (FPG) (mmol/L) (before: 5.5 ± 0.9; after: 5.2 ± 0.6; P < 0.0001), fasting insulin (pmol/L) (before: 98 ± 57; after: 82 ± 43; P = 0.003), and insulin resistance, as assessed by the HOMA-IR score (before: 3.6 ± 2.5; after: 2.8 ± 1.6; P = 0.0008) significantly improved, but not HbA1c (%) (before: 5.72 ± 0.55; after: 5.69 ± 0.39; P = 0.448), nor β-cell function (HOMA-β, %) (before: 149 ± 78; after: 144 ± 75; P = 0.58). Conclusion Following a 9-month intensive lifestyle intervention combining HIIT and MedD counseling, obese subjects experienced significant improvements of FPG and insulin resistance. This is the first study to expose the effects of a long-term program combining HIIT and MedD on glycemic control parameters among obese subjects. PMID:26844086

  6. Synergistic effects of local temperature enhancements on cellular responses in the context of high-intensity, ultrashort electric pulses.

    PubMed

    Song, J; Joshi, R P; Schoenbach, K H

    2011-06-01

    Results of self-consistent analyses of cells show the possibility of temperature increases at membranes in response to a single nanosecond, high-voltage pulse, at least over small sections of the membrane. Molecular Dynamics simulations indicate that such a temperature increase could facilitate poration, which is one example of a bio-process at the plasma membrane. Our study thus suggests that the use of repetitive high-intensity voltage pulses could open up possibilities for a host of synergistic bio-responses involving both thermal and electrically driven phenomena.

  7. Problems of Small, High-Technology Firms. Special Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, William L.; Friedman, Norman W.

    Although small, high-technology firms contribute greatly to major scientific and technical innovations, their potential impact is hindered by financial, personnel, regulatory and other problems. In 1977, the National Science Foundation conducted a survey of firms (N=1,232) presumed to be active in research and development (R&D) and sponsored…

  8. Driver assist behaviors for high-speed small UGVs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamauchi, Brian

    2011-05-01

    Currently deployed small UGVs operate at speeds up to around 6 mph and have proven their usefulness in explosives ordnance disposal (EOD) missions. As part of the TARDEC-funded Stingray Project, iRobot is investigating techniques to increase the speed of small UGVs so they can be useful in a wider range of missions, such as high-speed reconnaissance and infantry assault missions. We have developed a prototype Stingray PackBot, using wheels rather than tracks, that is capable of traveling at speeds up to 18 mph. A key issue when traveling at such speeds is how to maintain stability during sharp turns and over rough terrain. We are developing driver assist behaviors that will provide dynamic stability control for high-speed small UGVs using techniques such as dynamic weight shifting to limit oversteer and understeer. These driver assist behaviors will enable operators to use future high-speed small UGVs in high optempo infantry missions and keep warfighters out of harm's way.

  9. Mission Matters: The Cost of Small High Schools Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stiefel, Leanna; Schwartz, Amy Ellen; Iatarola, Patrice; Chellman, Colin C.

    2009-01-01

    With the financial support of several large foundations and the federal government, creating small schools has become a prominent high school reform strategy in many large American cities. While some research supports this strategy, little research assesses the relative costs of these smaller schools. We use data on over 200 New York City high…

  10. From Large to Small: Strategies for Personalizing the High School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinberg, Adria; Allen, Lili

    The conversion of large urban high schools into small, focused learning centers is gaining currency as an education reform strategy. This publication provides guidelines, along with guiding questions, for those considering such a conversion. The first section explores the structural, organizational, and political challenges involved in converting…

  11. "Visit to a Small Planet": Junior High English.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Bend Community School Corp., IN.

    This junior high school study guide supplements Gore Vidal's "Visit to a Small Planet." Included are quizzes (with answer keys) and teaching suggestions on the presentation of the opus, oral reports, reading comprehension, various acts of the play, vocabulary and word analysis, sentence patterns and tranformations, language usage, composition,…

  12. High energy density propulsion systems and small engine dynamometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hays, Thomas

    2009-07-01

    Scope and Method of Study. This study investigates all possible methods of powering small unmanned vehicles, provides reasoning for the propulsion system down select, and covers in detail the design and production of a dynamometer to confirm theoretical energy density calculations for small engines. Initial energy density calculations are based upon manufacturer data, pressure vessel theory, and ideal thermodynamic cycle efficiencies. Engine tests are conducted with a braking type dynamometer for constant load energy density tests, and show true energy densities in excess of 1400 WH/lb of fuel. Findings and Conclusions. Theory predicts lithium polymer, the present unmanned system energy storage device of choice, to have much lower energy densities than other conversion energy sources. Small engines designed for efficiency, instead of maximum power, would provide the most advantageous method for powering small unmanned vehicles because these engines have widely variable power output, loss of mass during flight, and generate rotational power directly. Theoretical predictions for the energy density of small engines has been verified through testing. Tested values up to 1400 WH/lb can be seen under proper operating conditions. The implementation of such a high energy density system will require a significant amount of follow-on design work to enable the engines to tolerate the higher temperatures of lean operation. Suggestions are proposed to enable a reliable, small-engine propulsion system in future work. Performance calculations show that a mature system is capable of month long flight times, and unrefueled circumnavigation of the globe.

  13. High-Intensity Intermittent Exercise: Effect on Young People's Cardiometabolic Health and Cognition.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Simon B; Dring, Karah J; Nevill, Mary E

    2016-01-01

    With only a quarter of young people currently meeting physical activity guidelines, two key areas of concern are the effects of exercise on cardiometabolic health and cognition. Despite the fact that physical activity in young people is typically high intensity and intermittent in nature, much of the literature examines traditional endurance-type exercise. This review provides an update on the effects of high-intensity intermittent exercise on young people's cardiometabolic health and cognition. High-intensity intermittent exercise has acute beneficial effects on endothelial function and postprandial lipemia and chronic positive effects on weight management. In addition, there is emerging evidence regarding chronic benefits on the blood lipid profile, blood pressure, and proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines. Furthermore, emerging evidence suggests beneficial acute and chronic effects of high-intensity intermittent exercise on cognition. However, further research is required in both cardiometabolic health and cognition, particularly regarding the impact of school-based interventions in adolescents. PMID:27399821

  14. Small-crack effects in high-strength aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.; Wu, X. R.; Venneri, S. L.; Li, C. G.

    1994-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the Chinese Aeronautical Establishment participated in a Fatigue and Fracture Mechanics Cooperative Program. The program objectives were to identify and characterize crack initiation and growth of small cracks (10 microns to 2 mm long) in commonly used US and PRC aluminum alloys, to improve fracture mechanics analyses of surface- and corner-crack configurations, and to develop improved life-prediction methods. Fatigue and small-crack tests were performed on single-edgenotch tension (SENT) specimens and large-crack tests were conducted on center-crack tension specimens for constant-amplitude (stress ratios of -1, 0, and 0.5) and Mini-TWIST spectrum loading. The plastic replica method was used to monitor the initiation and growth of small fatigue cracks at the semicircular notch. Crack growth results from each laboratory on 7075-T6 bare and LC9cs clad aluminum alloys agreed well and showed that fatigue life was mostly crack propagation from a material defect (inclusion particles or void) or from the cladding layer. Finite-element and weight-function methods were used to determine stress intensity factors for surface and corner cracks in the SENT specimens. Equations were then developed and used in a crack growth and crack-closure model to correlate small- and large-crack data and to make life predictions for various load histories. The cooperative program produced useful experimental data and efficient analysis methods for improving life predictions. The results should ultimately improve aircraft structural reliability and safety.

  15. High Intensity Laser Therapy (HILT) versus TENS and NSAIDs in low back pain: clinical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zati, Allesandro; Fortuna, Damiano; Valent, A.; Filippi, M. V.; Bilotta, Teresa W.

    2004-09-01

    Low back pain, caused by lumbar disc herniation, is prevalently treated with a conservative approach. In this study we valued the efficacy of High Intensity Laser Therapy (HILT), compared with accepted therapies such as TENS and NSAIDs. Laser therapy obtained similar results in the short term, but better clinical effect over time than TENS and NSAIDs. In conclusion high intensity laser therapy appears to be a interesting new treatment, worthy of further research.

  16. Focal construct geometry for high intensity energy dispersive x-ray diffraction based on x-ray capillary optics.

    PubMed

    Li, Fangzuo; Liu, Zhiguo; Sun, Tianxi; Jiang, Bowen; Zhu, Yu

    2016-03-14

    We presented a focal construct geometry (FCG) method for high intensity energy dispersive X-ray diffraction by utilizing a home-made ellipsoidal single-bounce capillary (ESBC) and a polycapillary parallel X-ray lens (PPXRL). The ESBC was employed to focus the X-rays from a conventional laboratory source into a small focal spot and to produce an annular X-ray beam in the far-field. Additionally, diffracted polychromatic X-rays were confocally collected by the PPXRL attached to a stationary energy-resolved detector. Our FCG method based on ESBC and PPXRL had achieved relatively high intensity diffraction peaks and effectively narrowed the diffraction peak width which was helpful in improving the potential d-spacing resolution for material phase analysis.

  17. High-energy shockwaves and extracorporeal high-intensity focused ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Madersbacher, Stephan; Marberger, Michael

    2003-10-01

    We review the physical interactions of focused ultrasound with tissue, describe technical features of current high-energy shockwave (HESW) and extracorporeal high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) devices, and summarize the experimental and human data available to date. Tissue destruction by extracorporeal HIFU is not new: the first clinical attempts were made almost half a century ago for ablating brain tissue. Despite recent progress in the knowledge of the interactions between HIFU and tissue and significant device modifications, this technique is still in its infancy. The most promising targets for this kind of therapy in the field of urology are the kidney, bladder, and testis. The largest clinical experience with HIFU therapy currently available is for benign prostatic enlargement and prostate cancer using transrectal HIFU devices, which are not the topic of this summary. In parallel with HIFU, HESW therapy has been tested in numerous experimental and preclinical settings. This technique is currently not in routine clinical use. Theoretically, in parallel with HIFU, any organ accessible to conventional diagnostic ultrasound examination is a potential target for this kind of therapy.

  18. High- versus moderate-intensity aerobic exercise training effects on skeletal muscle of infarcted rats.

    PubMed

    Moreira, José B N; Bechara, Luiz R G; Bozi, Luiz H M; Jannig, Paulo R; Monteiro, Alex W A; Dourado, Paulo M; Wisløff, Ulrik; Brum, Patricia C

    2013-04-01

    Poor skeletal muscle performance was shown to strongly predict mortality and long-term prognosis in a variety of diseases, including heart failure (HF). Despite the known benefits of aerobic exercise training (AET) in improving the skeletal muscle phenotype in HF, the optimal exercise intensity to elicit maximal outcomes is still under debate. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to compare the effects of high-intensity AET with those of a moderate-intensity protocol on skeletal muscle of infarcted rats. Wistar rats underwent myocardial infarction (MI) or sham surgery. MI groups were submitted either to an untrained (MI-UNT); moderate-intensity (MI-CMT, 60% Vo(2)(max)); or matched volume, high-intensity AET (MI-HIT, intervals at 85% Vo(2)(max)) protocol. High-intensity AET (HIT) was superior to moderate-intensity AET (CMT) in improving aerobic capacity, assessed by treadmill running tests. Cardiac contractile function, measured by echocardiography, was equally improved by both AET protocols. CMT and HIT prevented the MI-induced decay of skeletal muscle citrate synthase and hexokinase maximal activities, and increased glycogen content, without significant differences between protocols. Similar improvements in skeletal muscle redox balance and deactivation of the ubiquitin-proteasome system were also observed after CMT and HIT. Such intracellular findings were accompanied by prevented skeletal muscle atrophy in both MI-CMT and MI-HIT groups, whereas no major differences were observed between protocols. Taken together, our data suggest that despite superior effects of HIT in improving functional capacity, skeletal muscle adaptations were remarkably similar among protocols, leading to the conclusion that skeletal myopathy in infarcted rats was equally prevented by either moderate-intensity or high-intensity AET.

  19. High-field small animal magnetic resonance oncology studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bokacheva, Louisa; Ackerstaff, Ellen; LeKaye, H. Carl; Zakian, Kristen; Koutcher, Jason A.

    2014-01-01

    This review focuses on the applications of high magnetic field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy (MRS) to cancer studies in small animals. High-field MRI can provide information about tumor physiology, the microenvironment, metabolism, vascularity and cellularity. Such studies are invaluable for understanding tumor growth and proliferation, response to treatment and drug development. The MR techniques reviewed here include 1H, 31P, chemical exchange saturation transfer imaging and hyperpolarized 13C MRS as well as diffusion-weighted, blood oxygen level dependent contrast imaging and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI. These methods have been proven effective in animal studies and are highly relevant to human clinical studies.

  20. Similar Responses of Circulating MicroRNAs to Acute High-Intensity Interval Exercise and Vigorous-Intensity Continuous Exercise.

    PubMed

    Cui, Shu F; Wang, Cheng; Yin, Xin; Tian, Dong; Lu, Qiu J; Zhang, Chen Y; Chen, Xi; Ma, Ji Z

    2016-01-01

    High-intensity interval exercise (HIIE) has been reported to be more beneficial for physical adaptation than low-to-moderate exercise intensity. Recently, it is becoming increasingly evident that circulating miRNAs (c-miRNAs) may distinguish between specific stress signals imposed by variations in the duration, modality, and type of exercise. The aim of this study is to investigate whether or not HIIE is superior to vigorous-intensity continuous exercise (VICE), which is contributing to develop effective fitness assessment. Twenty-six young males were enrolled, and plasma samples were collected prior to exercise and immediately after HIIE or distance-matched VICE. The miRNA level profiles in HIIE were initially determined using TaqMan Low Density Array (TLDA). And the differentially miRNAs levels were validated by stem-loop quantitative reverse-transcription PCR (RT-qPCR). Furthermore, these selective c-miRNAs were measured for VICE. Our results showed that some muscle-related miRNAs levels in the plasma, such as miR-1, miR-133a, miR-133b, and miR-206 significantly increased following HIIE or VICE compared to those at rest (P < 0.05), and there was only a significant reduction in miR-1 level for HIIE compared to VICE (P < 0.05), while no significant differences were observed for other muscle-related miRNAs between both exercises (P > 0.05). In addition, some tissue-related or unknown original miRNA levels, such as miR-485-5p, miR-509-5p, miR-517a, miR-518f, miR-520f, miR-522, miR-553, and miR-888, also significantly increased (P < 0.05) in both exercises compared to rest. However, no significant differences were found between both exercises (P > 0.05). Overall, endurance exercise assessed in this study both led to significant increases in selective c-miRNAs of comparable magnitude, suggesting that both types of endurance exercise have general stress processes. Accordingly, the similar responses to both acute exercises likely indicate both exercises can be used

  1. Similar Responses of Circulating MicroRNAs to Acute High-Intensity Interval Exercise and Vigorous-Intensity Continuous Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Shu F.; Wang, Cheng; Yin, Xin; Tian, Dong; Lu, Qiu J.; Zhang, Chen Y.; Chen, Xi; Ma, Ji Z.

    2016-01-01

    High-intensity interval exercise (HIIE) has been reported to be more beneficial for physical adaptation than low-to-moderate exercise intensity. Recently, it is becoming increasingly evident that circulating miRNAs (c-miRNAs) may distinguish between specific stress signals imposed by variations in the duration, modality, and type of exercise. The aim of this study is to investigate whether or not HIIE is superior to vigorous-intensity continuous exercise (VICE), which is contributing to develop effective fitness assessment. Twenty-six young males were enrolled, and plasma samples were collected prior to exercise and immediately after HIIE or distance-matched VICE. The miRNA level profiles in HIIE were initially determined using TaqMan Low Density Array (TLDA). And the differentially miRNAs levels were validated by stem-loop quantitative reverse-transcription PCR (RT-qPCR). Furthermore, these selective c-miRNAs were measured for VICE. Our results showed that some muscle-related miRNAs levels in the plasma, such as miR-1, miR-133a, miR-133b, and miR-206 significantly increased following HIIE or VICE compared to those at rest (P < 0.05), and there was only a significant reduction in miR-1 level for HIIE compared to VICE (P < 0.05), while no significant differences were observed for other muscle-related miRNAs between both exercises (P > 0.05). In addition, some tissue-related or unknown original miRNA levels, such as miR-485-5p, miR-509-5p, miR-517a, miR-518f, miR-520f, miR-522, miR-553, and miR-888, also significantly increased (P < 0.05) in both exercises compared to rest. However, no significant differences were found between both exercises (P > 0.05). Overall, endurance exercise assessed in this study both led to significant increases in selective c-miRNAs of comparable magnitude, suggesting that both types of endurance exercise have general stress processes. Accordingly, the similar responses to both acute exercises likely indicate both exercises can be used

  2. Similar Responses of Circulating MicroRNAs to Acute High-Intensity Interval Exercise and Vigorous-Intensity Continuous Exercise.

    PubMed

    Cui, Shu F; Wang, Cheng; Yin, Xin; Tian, Dong; Lu, Qiu J; Zhang, Chen Y; Chen, Xi; Ma, Ji Z

    2016-01-01

    High-intensity interval exercise (HIIE) has been reported to be more beneficial for physical adaptation than low-to-moderate exercise intensity. Recently, it is becoming increasingly evident that circulating miRNAs (c-miRNAs) may distinguish between specific stress signals imposed by variations in the duration, modality, and type of exercise. The aim of this study is to investigate whether or not HIIE is superior to vigorous-intensity continuous exercise (VICE), which is contributing to develop effective fitness assessment. Twenty-six young males were enrolled, and plasma samples were collected prior to exercise and immediately after HIIE or distance-matched VICE. The miRNA level profiles in HIIE were initially determined using TaqMan Low Density Array (TLDA). And the differentially miRNAs levels were validated by stem-loop quantitative reverse-transcription PCR (RT-qPCR). Furthermore, these selective c-miRNAs were measured for VICE. Our results showed that some muscle-related miRNAs levels in the plasma, such as miR-1, miR-133a, miR-133b, and miR-206 significantly increased following HIIE or VICE compared to those at rest (P < 0.05), and there was only a significant reduction in miR-1 level for HIIE compared to VICE (P < 0.05), while no significant differences were observed for other muscle-related miRNAs between both exercises (P > 0.05). In addition, some tissue-related or unknown original miRNA levels, such as miR-485-5p, miR-509-5p, miR-517a, miR-518f, miR-520f, miR-522, miR-553, and miR-888, also significantly increased (P < 0.05) in both exercises compared to rest. However, no significant differences were found between both exercises (P > 0.05). Overall, endurance exercise assessed in this study both led to significant increases in selective c-miRNAs of comparable magnitude, suggesting that both types of endurance exercise have general stress processes. Accordingly, the similar responses to both acute exercises likely indicate both exercises can be used

  3. High-resolution and high-intensity neutron diffractometer with linear position-sensitive detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chang-Hee; Moon, Myung-Kook; Em, V. T.; Choi, Young-Nam; Oh, Hwa-Suk; Nam, Uk-Won

    2003-08-01

    The characteristics of a neutron diffractometer using a 3He one-dimensional position-sensitive detector (PSD) with delay line readout, a 200 (length) × 100 (height) mm 2 active window and 2.5 mm spatial resolution have been studied and compared with those of the High-Resolution Powder Diffractometer (HRPD) of KAERI with 32 3He conventional tube (∅50 mm) detectors and Soller collimators (10') before detectors. For the sample to PSD distance R=1200 mm, the PSD subtends 8° angle of 2 θ and provides the resolution and the peak-to-background ratio close to that for HRPD. Time for scanning (with the same statistics) of a 0-160° interval is about 1.6 times longer and the multi-PSD system providing efficiency about 10 times higher than HRPD is proposed. Because of the small angle subtended by the PSD, the parasitic peaks from the sample environment are eliminated and operation without an oscillating radial collimator is possible. Additionally, the proposed diffractometer has an advantage for small samples.

  4. Physics of Neutralization of Intense High-Energy Ion Beam Pulses by Electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Kaganovich, I. D.; Davidson, R. C.; Dorf, M. A.; Startsev, E. A.; Sefkow, A. B.; Lee, E. P.; Friedman, A.

    2010-04-28

    Neutralization and focusing of intense charged particle beam pulses by electrons forms the basis for a wide range of applications to high energy accelerators and colliders, heavy ion fusion, and astrophysics. For example, for ballistic propagation of intense ion beam pulses, background plasma can be used to effectively neutralize the beam charge and current, so that the self-electric and self- magnetic fields do not affect the ballistic propagation of the beam. From the practical perspective of designing advanced plasma sources for beam neutralization, a robust theory should be able to predict the self-electric and self-magnetic fields during beam propagation through the background plasma. The major scaling relations for the self-electric and self-magnetic fields of intense ion charge bunches propagating through background plasma have been determined taking into account the effects of transients during beam entry into the plasma, the excitation of collective plasma waves, the effects of gas ionization, finite electron temperature, and applied solenoidal and dipole magnetic fields. Accounting for plasma production by gas ionization yields a larger self-magnetic field of the ion beam compared to the case without ionization, and a wake of current density and self-magnetic field perturbations is generated behind the beam pulse. A solenoidal magnetic field can be applied for controlling the beam propagation. Making use of theoretical models and advanced numerical simulations, it is shown that even a small applied magnetic field of about 100G can strongly affect the beam neutralization. It has also been demonstrated that in the presence of an applied magnetic field the ion beam pulse can excite large-amplitude whistler waves, thereby producing a complex structure of self-electric and self-magnetic fields. The presence of an applied solenoidal magnetic field may also cause a strong enhancement of the radial self-electric field of the beam pulse propagating through the

  5. Physics of neutralization of intense high-energy ion beam pulses by electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Kaganovich, I. D.; Davidson, R. C.; Dorf, M. A.; Startsev, E. A.; Sefkow, A. B.; Lee, E. P.; Friedman, A.

    2010-05-15

    Neutralization and focusing of intense charged particle beam pulses by electrons form the basis for a wide range of applications to high energy accelerators and colliders, heavy ion fusion, and astrophysics. For example, for ballistic propagation of intense ion beam pulses, background plasma can be used to effectively neutralize the beam charge and current, so that the self-electric and self-magnetic fields do not affect the ballistic propagation of the beam. From the practical perspective of designing advanced plasma sources for beam neutralization, a robust theory should be able to predict the self-electric and self-magnetic fields during beam propagation through the background plasma. The major scaling relations for the self-electric and self-magnetic fields of intense ion charge bunches propagating through background plasma have been determined taking into account the effects of transients during beam entry into the plasma, the excitation of collective plasma waves, the effects of gas ionization, finite electron temperature, and applied solenoidal and dipole magnetic fields. Accounting for plasma production by gas ionization yields a larger self-magnetic field of the ion beam compared to the case without ionization, and a wake of current density and self-magnetic field perturbations is generated behind the beam pulse. A solenoidal magnetic field can be applied for controlling the beam propagation. Making use of theoretical models and advanced numerical simulations, it is shown that even a small applied magnetic field of about 100 G can strongly affect the beam neutralization. It has also been demonstrated that in the presence of an applied magnetic field the ion beam pulse can excite large-amplitude whistler waves, thereby producing a complex structure of self-electric and self-magnetic fields. The presence of an applied solenoidal magnetic field may also cause a strong enhancement of the radial self-electric field of the beam pulse propagating through the

  6. Localised hyperthermia in rodent models using an MRI-compatible high-intensity focused ultrasound system

    PubMed Central

    Bing, Chenchen; Nofiele, Joris; Staruch, Robert; Ladouceur-Wodzak, Michelle; Chatzinoff, Yonatan; Ranjan, Ashish; Chopra, Rajiv

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Localised hyperthermia in rodent studies is challenging due to the small target size. This study describes the development and characterisation of an MRI-compatible high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) system to perform localised mild hyperthermia treatments in rodent models. Material and methods The hyperthermia platform consisted of an MRI-compatible small animal HIFU system, focused transducers with sector-vortex lenses, a custom-made receive coil, and means to maintain systemic temperatures of rodents. The system was integrated into a 3T MR imager. Control software was developed to acquire images, process temperature maps, and adjust output power using a proportional-integral-derivative feedback control algorithm. Hyperthermia exposures were performed in tissue-mimicking phantoms and in a rodent model (n = 9). During heating, an ROI was assigned in the heated region for temperature control and the target temperature was 42 °C; 30 min mild hyperthermia treatment followed by a 10-min cooling procedure was performed on each animal. Results 3D-printed sector-vortex lenses were successful at creating annular focal regions which enables customisation of the heating volume. Localised mild hyperthermia performed in rats produced a mean ROI temperature of 42.1 ± 0.3 °C. The T10 and T90 percentiles were 43.2 ± 0.4 °C and 41.0 ± 0.3 °C, respectively. For a 30-min treatment, the mean time duration between 41–45 °C was 31.1 min within the ROI. Conclusions The MRI-compatible HIFU system was successfully adapted to perform localised mild hyperthermia treatment in rodent models. A target temperature of 42 °C was well-maintained in a rat thigh model for 30 min. PMID:26540488

  7. [The intensity of respiration in pea and corn seedlings under high-altitude hypoxia].

    PubMed

    Astafurova, T P; Ageev, B G; Sapozhnikova, V A; Ponomarev, Iu N; Zaĭtseva, T A; Zotnikova, A P

    1996-01-01

    Dynamics of CO2 gas-exchange and enzymatic activity of the respiratory metabolism of pea (Pisum sativum L.) and maize (Zea mays L.) seedlings during hypobaric hypoxia simulating the altitude of 5000 m above the sea level was studied. In the 48-hour chamber experiment (total barometric pressure is 54 kPa, partial O2 pressure is 11 kPa), the relative intensity of CO2 emission was found to increase and be essentially higher for pea than maize. Periodic reactions with small upward spikes and time offset were recorded in the pea plants. The initial increase of CO2 emission velocity by maize rapidly reached the level of saturation and since then remained constant. High velocity of the main catabolic ways and carboxylating activity in maize seedlings was the effect of hypoxic stress. Utilisation of respiratory substrates by pea seedlings was blocked at the Krebs cycle level, whereas glycolysis and oxidizing pentose phosphate pathways were activated. Weak activity of the carboxylate system does not provide refixation of endogenous carbon dioxide, excessive quantities of which invade the environment.

  8. Characterization of Pulsed High Intensity Focused Ultrasound for Enhanced Drug and Gene Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kam, Anthony W.; Wang, Honghui; Thomasson, David; Farahani, Keyvan; Li, King C. P.

    2006-05-01

    Within a certain range of parameters, pulsed high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) has been shown to increase the delivery of systemically administered drugs and plasmid DNA in tumors in mice. The sonicated tissue is not damaged by light microscopy. The mechanism for the enhanced delivery has not been shown conclusively and can include thermal, cavitational, and non-cavitation mechanical effects. In order to assess the effects of pulsed HIFU in a manner that allows for clinical translation, pulsed HIFU is performed within a magnetic resonance (MR) scanner. In this work, the thermal effect is evaluated with phase-shift MR thermometry in ex vivo chicken muscle. The thermal effect is small at the most common exposure parameters. In the future, non-thermal effects like permeability, diffusion, and elasticity changes will be evaluated with dynamic contrast enhanced MRI, diffusion-weighted MRI, and MR elastography. If changes in permeability, diffusion, and shear modulus are associated with pulsed HIFU enhanced delivery, then these parameters can be used as markers for optimization of pulsed HIFU enhanced delivery.

  9. Comparison of high and moderate intensity of strength training on mood and anxiety in older adults.

    PubMed

    Tsutsumi, T; Don, B M; Zaichkowsky, L D; Takenaka, K; Oka, K; Ohno, T

    1998-12-01

    This study was designed to examine the psychological benefits of anaerobic exercise for older adults. Specifically, strength training was employed to examine the effects on mood and anxiety in a group of healthy but sedentary older women. 36 women (mean age = 68.5 yr.) were randomly assigned to groups given high intensity or moderate intensity strength training or to a control group. Strength training was conducted three days a week for 12 weeks. After the training period, both high and moderate strength-training programs produced marked improvements in muscle strength and body composition compared to the control subjects. The average improvements in the high and moderate intensity strength-training groups for muscle strength were 40.5 and 35.5%, respectively, and for percent body fat 1.52 and 2.50%, respectively. As for psychological changes, both training groups significantly improved positive mood (vigor), and the moderate intensity group significantly reduced trait anxiety compared to means of the control group. Also, both training groups showed some decrease in tension and state anxiety after the training period. These findings provide evidence for the effectiveness of anaerobic training to enhance perception of psychological well-being in older women. A moderate intensity rather than high intensity of training regimen may be more beneficial for sedentary older women to improve psychological health.

  10. High intensity running results in an impaired neuromuscular response in ACL reconstructed individuals.

    PubMed

    Patras, Kostas; Ziogas, Giorgos; Ristanis, Stavros; Tsepis, Elias; Stergiou, Nicholas; Georgoulis, Anastasios D

    2009-08-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction reestablishes electromyographic activity during moderate activities such as walking but is unclear if this is also the case in sports activities such as high intensity running that results in accumulation of metabolic fatigue. Nine bone-patella tendon-bone ACL reconstructed athletes were evaluated 19.2 (5.7) months post-operatively using a telemetric electromyographic system. The neuromuscular response of vastus lateralis and biceps femoris muscles was tested bilaterally on separate occasions during 10 min running at moderate intensity (20% below the lactate threshold) and 10 min running at high intensity (40% above the lactate threshold). During moderate intensity running, electromyographic activity did not change for either leg. During high intensity running, electromyographic activity did not change for the vastus lateralis of the ACL reconstructed leg [267.8 (142.8)-263.8 (128.9) microV, P > 0.05] while it increased significantly [294.2 (120.6)-317.1 (140.5) microV, P = 0.03] for the vastus lateralis of the intact leg. High intensity exercise that is associated with accumulation of metabolic fatigue, results in an impaired neuromuscular response for the vastus lateralis muscle of the ACL reconstructed leg.

  11. High dose intensity combination chemotherapy for advanced epithelial ovarian carcinoma: results of a pilot study.

    PubMed Central

    Sweetenham, J. W.; McKendrick, J. J.; Jones, D. H.; Whitehouse, J. M.; Williams, C. J.

    1990-01-01

    Retrospective studies have recently demonstrated a significant correlation between dose intensity of chemotherapy and response rates and survival in various diseases including epithelial ovarian carcinoma. As part of a proposed randomised trial to assess the effect of dose intensity on outcome in ovarian carcinoma, a pilot study has been undertaken to determine the toxicity and efficacy of the high intensity therapy. Nineteen patients with advanced ovarian carcinoma received initial treatment with cisplatin 120 mg m-2 i.v. day 1, and cyclophosphamide 1,000 mg-2 i.v. day 1, given at 21-day intervals for six cycles. The average relative dose intensity of this therapy is 1.14 when compared with the CHAP regimen. Severe toxicity was experienced by most patients. The median received average relative dose intensity was 0.90, with only one patient receiving treatment to the proposed intensity. Randomised studies of the effect of dose intensity in ovarian carcinoma are essential, but an initial step must be to assess whether the proposed high dose treatment can be delivered. PMID:2155645

  12. Anthropometric, Sprint, and High-Intensity Running Profiles of English Academy Rugby Union Players by Position.

    PubMed

    Darrall-Jones, Joshua D; Jones, Ben; Till, Kevin

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the anthropometric, sprint, and high-intensity running profiles of English academy rugby union players by playing positions, and to investigate the relationships between anthropometric, sprint, and high-intensity running characteristics. Data were collected from 67 academy players after the off-season period and consisted of anthropometric (height, body mass, sum of 8 skinfolds [∑SF]), 40-m linear sprint (5-, 10-, 20-, and 40-m splits), the Yo-Yo intermittent recovery test level 1 (Yo-Yo IRTL-1), and the 30-15 intermittent fitness test (30-15 IFT). Forwards displayed greater stature, body mass, and ∑SF; sprint times and sprint momentum, with lower high-intensity running ability and sprint velocities than backs. Comparisons between age categories demonstrated body mass and sprint momentum to have the largest differences at consecutive age categories for forwards and backs; whereas 20-40-m sprint velocity was discriminate for forwards between under 16s, 18s, and 21s. Relationships between anthropometric, sprint velocity, momentum, and high-intensity running ability demonstrated body mass to negatively impact on sprint velocity (10 m; r = -0.34 to -0.46) and positively affect sprint momentum (e.g., 5 m; r = 0.85-0.93), with large to very large negative relationships with the Yo-Yo IRTL-1 (r = -0.65 to -0.74) and 30-15 IFT (r = -0.59 to -0.79). These findings suggest that there are distinct anthropometric, sprint, and high-intensity running ability differences between and within positions in junior rugby union players. The development of sprint and high-intensity running ability may be impacted by continued increases in body mass as there seems to be a trade-off between momentum, velocity, and the ability to complete high-intensity running.

  13. Small angle neutron scattering on an absolute intensity scale and the internal surface of diatom frustules from three species of differing morphologies.

    PubMed

    Garvey, C J; Strobl, M; Percot, A; Saroun, J; Haug, J; Vyverman, W; Chepurnov, V A; Ferris, J M

    2013-05-01

    The internal nanostructure of the diatoms Cyclotella meneghiniana, Seminavis robusta and Achnanthes subsessilis was investigated using small angle neutron scattering (SANS) to examine thin biosilica samples, consisting of isotropic (powder) from their isolated cell walls. The interpretation of SANS data was assisted by several other measurements. The N2 adsorption, interpreted within the Branuer-Emmet-Teller isotherm, yielded the specific surface area of the material. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopy indicates that the isolated material is amorphous silica with small amounts of organic cell wall materials acting as a filling material between the silica particles. A two-phase (air and amorphous silica) model was used to interpret small angle neutron scattering data. After correction for instrumental resolution, the measurements on two SANS instruments covered an extended range of scattering vectors 0.0011 nm(-1) < q < 5.6 nm(-1), giving an almost continuous SANS curve over a range of scattering vectors, q, on an absolute scale of intensity for each sample. Each of the samples gave a characteristic scattering curve where log (intensity) versus log (q) has a -4 dependence, with other features superimposed. In the high-q regime, departure from this behaviour was observed at a length-scales equivalent to the proposed unitary silica particle. The limiting Porod scattering law was used to determine the specific area per unit of volume of each sample illuminated by the neutron beam. The Porod behaviour, and divergence from this behaviour, is discussed in terms of various structural features and the proposed mechanisms for the bio-assembly of unitary silica particles in frustules.

  14. Calculation of intensity of high energy muon groups observed deep underground

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vavilov, Y. N.; Dedenko, L. G.

    1985-01-01

    The intensity of narrow muon groups observed in Kolar Gold Field (KGF) at the depth of 3375 m.w.e. was calculated in terms of quark-gluon strings model for high energy hadron - air nuclei interactions by the method of direct modeling of nuclear cascade in the air and muon propagation in the ground for normal primary cosmic ray composition. The calculated intensity has been found to be approx. 10 to the 4 times less than one observed experimentally.

  15. 25 CFR 39.144 - What is the small high school adjustment?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What is the small high school adjustment? 39.144 Section... EQUALIZATION PROGRAM Indian School Equalization Formula Small School Adjustment § 39.144 What is the small high school adjustment? (a) The small high school adjustment is a WSU adjustment given to a small high...

  16. 25 CFR 39.144 - What is the small high school adjustment?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What is the small high school adjustment? 39.144 Section... EQUALIZATION PROGRAM Indian School Equalization Formula Small School Adjustment § 39.144 What is the small high school adjustment? (a) The small high school adjustment is a WSU adjustment given to a small high...

  17. 25 CFR 39.144 - What is the small high school adjustment?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false What is the small high school adjustment? 39.144 Section... EQUALIZATION PROGRAM Indian School Equalization Formula Small School Adjustment § 39.144 What is the small high school adjustment? (a) The small high school adjustment is a WSU adjustment given to a small high...

  18. 25 CFR 39.144 - What is the small high school adjustment?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false What is the small high school adjustment? 39.144 Section... EQUALIZATION PROGRAM Indian School Equalization Formula Small School Adjustment § 39.144 What is the small high school adjustment? (a) The small high school adjustment is a WSU adjustment given to a small high...

  19. 25 CFR 39.144 - What is the small high school adjustment?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true What is the small high school adjustment? 39.144 Section... EQUALIZATION PROGRAM Indian School Equalization Formula Small School Adjustment § 39.144 What is the small high school adjustment? (a) The small high school adjustment is a WSU adjustment given to a small high...

  20. Effect of controlled offset of focal position in cavitation-enhanced high-intensity focused ultrasound treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Kota; Takagi, Ryo; Miyashita, Takuya; Jimbo, Hayato; Yoshizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2015-07-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is a noninvasive treatment for tumors such as cancer. In this method, ultrasound is generated outside the body and focused to the target tissue. Therefore, physical and mental stresses on the patient are minimal. A drawback of the HIFU treatment is a long treatment time for a large tumor due to the small therapeutic volume by a single exposure. Enhancing the heating effect of ultrasound by cavitation bubbles may solve this problem. However, this is rather difficult because cavitation clouds tend to be formed backward from the focal point while ultrasonic intensity for heating is centered at the focal point. In this study, the focal points of the trigger pulses to generate cavitation were offset forward from those of the heating ultrasound to match the cavitation clouds with the heating patterns. Results suggest that the controlled offset of focal points makes the thermal coagulation more predictable.

  1. Nutritional strategies to support adaptation to high-intensity interval training in team sports.

    PubMed

    Gibala, Martin J

    2013-01-01

    Team sports are characterized by intermittent high-intensity activity patterns. Typically, play consists of short periods of very intense or all-out efforts interspersed with longer periods of low-intensity activity. Fatigue is a complex, multi-factorial process, but intense intermittent exercise performance can potentially be limited by reduced availability of substrates stored in skeletal muscle and/or metabolic by-products associated with fuel breakdown. High-intensity interval training (HIT) has been shown to induce adaptations in skeletal muscle that enhance the capacity for both oxidative and non-oxidative metabolism. Nutrient availability is a potent modulator of many acute physiological responses to exercise, including various molecular signaling pathways that are believed to regulate cellular adaptation to training. Several nutritional strategies have also been reported to acutely alter metabolism and enhance intermittent high-intensity exercise performance. However, relatively little is known regarding the effect of chronic interventions, and whether supplementation over a period of weeks or months augments HIT-induced physiological remodeling and promotes greater performance adaptations. Theoretically, a nutritional intervention could augment HIT adaptation by improving energy metabolism during exercise, which could facilitate greater total work and an enhanced chronic training stimulus, or promoting some aspect of the adaptive response during recovery, which could lead to enhanced physiological adaptations over time.

  2. Small UAV-Acquired, High-resolution, Georeferenced Still Imagery

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan Hruska

    2005-09-01

    Currently, small Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) are primarily used for capturing and down-linking real-time video. To date, their role as a low-cost airborne platform for capturing high-resolution, georeferenced still imagery has not been fully utilized. On-going work within the Unmanned Vehicle Systems Program at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is attempting to exploit this small UAV-acquired, still imagery potential. Initially, a UAV-based still imagery work flow model was developed that includes initial UAV mission planning, sensor selection, UAV/sensor integration, and imagery collection, processing, and analysis. Components to support each stage of the work flow are also being developed. Critical to use of acquired still imagery is the ability to detect changes between images of the same area over time. To enhance the analysts’ change detection ability, a UAV-specific, GIS-based change detection system called SADI or System for Analyzing Differences in Imagery is under development. This paper will discuss the associated challenges and approaches to collecting still imagery with small UAVs. Additionally, specific components of the developed work flow system will be described and graphically illustrated using varied examples of small UAV-acquired still imagery.

  3. The scavenging of high altitude aerosol by small ice crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrew Bell, D.; Saunders, Clive P. R.

    There have been several global models developed for the theoretical investigation of the removal of high altitude aerosol from the atmosphere, following concern about the injection of particulate material by nuclear explosions and volcanic events. These models lack a knowledge of the scavenging efficiencies of the small ice crystals associated with cirus clouds and storm ice anvils. These are the only hydrometers that could remove the injected particles. In the past there have been a number of practical studies into the scavenging efficiencies of large ice crystaks and snowflakes. A comparison of the extrapolated results of these findings and the theoretical models of Martin et al. (1980, Pure appl. Phys.188, 1109-1129, J. atmos. Sci.37, 1628-1638) for the small crystal situation has been made. It was found that in general the extrapolated results gave efficiencies that were significantly higher than the predicted value. This difference was found to be enhanced as the crystal diameter decreased. Experiments used small ice plates grown at ˜-18.5°C in a cloud chamber, which were then permitted to fall through a dense aerosol cloud, to provide the first direct measurements of the scavenging efficiencies of this small crystals under cloud conditions. Initial results are presented for mono-disperse NaCl aerosol particles of size 4-6 μm.

  4. Overview of the High Intensity Neutrino Source Linac R&D program at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Webber, R.C.; Appollinari, G.; Carneiro, J.P.; Gonin, I.; Hanna, B.; Hays, S.; Khabiboulline, T.; Lanfranco, G.; Madrak, R.L.; Moretti, A.; Nicol, T.; /Fermilab /Argonne

    2008-09-01

    The Fermilab High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS) Linac R&D program is building a first-of-a-kind 60 MeV superconducting H- linac. The HINS Linac incorporates superconducting solenoids for transverse focusing, high power RF vector modulators for independent control of multiple cavities powered from a single klystron, and superconducting spoke-type accelerating cavities starting at 10 MeV. This will be the first application and demonstration of any of these technologies in a low-energy, high-intensity proton/H- linear accelerator. The HINS effort is relevant to a high intensity, superconducting H- linac that might serve the next generation of neutrino physics and muon storage ring/collider experiments. An overview of the HINS program, machine design, status, and outlook is presented.

  5. Physics of high-intensity nanosecond electron source: Charge limit phenomenon in GaAs photocathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Herrera-Gomez, A. |; Vergara, G.; Spicer, W.E.

    1996-05-01

    GaAs negative electron affinity cathodes are used as high-intensity, short-time electron source at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. When the cathodes are illuminated with high-intensity laser pulses draw peak currents that are extremely high, typically of tens of Amperes. Because of the high currents, some nonlinear effects are present. Very noticeable is the so-called charge limit (CL) effect, which consists of a limit on the total charge in each pulse; that is, the total bunch charge stops increasing as the light pulse intensity increases. The CL effect is directly related to a photovoltage built up in the surface as a consequence of the photoelectrons coming from the bulk. We discuss possible ways to minimize the formation of the surface photovoltage. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. Ellipsoidal plasma mirror focusing of high power laser pulses to ultra-high intensities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, R.; King, M.; Gray, R. J.; Carroll, D. C.; Dance, R. J.; Armstrong, C.; Hawkes, S. J.; Clarke, R. J.; Robertson, D. J.; Neely, D.; McKenna, P.

    2016-03-01

    The design and development of an ellipsoidal F/1 focusing plasma mirror capable of increasing the peak intensity achievable on petawatt level laser systems to >1022 W cm-2 is presented. A factor of 2.5 reduction in the focal spot size is achieved when compared to F/3 focusing with a conventional (solid state) optic. We find a factor of 3.6 enhancement in peak intensity, taking into account changes in plasma mirror reflectivity and focal spot quality. The sensitivity of the focusing plasma optic to misalignment is also investigated. It is demonstrated that an increase in the peak laser intensity from 3 ×1020 W cm-2 to 1021 W cm-2 results in a factor of 2 increase in the maximum energy of sheath-accelerated protons from a thin foil positioned at the focus of the intense laser light.

  7. Small magnetic energy storage systems using high temperature superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, B.; Gist, T. E.; Fingers, R. T.; Flake, R. A.

    The purpose is to assess the feasibility of developing and producing smaller superconductive magnetic energy storage (SMES) units using high temperature superconducting materials that may be subsequently used as ground-based power sources for the US Air Force in arctic conditions. The authors discuss the basic principle of SMES devices, analyze structural requirements as the magnetic fields generate ultra-high stress in the structure, present state-of-the-art superconducting properties of high-Tc materials, and cover refrigeration requirements. A review of the SMES technology reveals that the advent of high temperature ceramic superconducting materials and advances in refrigeration technology are likely to facilitate fabrication of smaller SMES units. Helium refrigeration is a major cost for smaller SMES units. Liquid nitrogen-based SMES units as small as 1 kWh to 1 MWh might be efficient enough to provide ground based power sources for numerous types of applications.

  8. High-Intensity Intermittent Swimming Improves Cardiovascular Health Status for Women with Mild Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Mohr, Magni; Nordsborg, Nikolai Baastrup; Lindenskov, Annika; Steinholm, Hildigunn; Nielsen, Hans Petur; Mortensen, Jann; Weihe, Pal; Krustrup, Peter

    2014-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that high-intensity swim training improves cardiovascular health status in sedentary premenopausal women with mild hypertension, sixty-two women were randomized into high-intensity (n = 21; HIT), moderate-intensity (n = 21; MOD), and control groups (n = 20; CON). HIT performed 6–10 × 30 s all-out swimming interspersed by 2 min recovery and MOD swam continuously for 1 h at moderate intensity for a 15-week period completing in total 44 ± 1 and 43 ± 1 sessions, respectively. In CON, all measured variables were similar before and after the intervention period. Systolic BP decreased (P < 0.05) by 6 ± 1 and 4 ± 1 mmHg in HIT and MOD; respectively. Resting heart rate declined (P < 0.05) by 5 ± 1 bpm both in HIT and MOD, fat mass decreased (P < 0.05) by 1.1 ± 0.2 and 2.2 ± 0.3 kg, respectively, while the blood lipid profile was unaltered. In HIT and MOD, performance improved (P < 0.05) for a maximal 10 min swim (13 ± 3% and 22 ± 3%), interval swimming (23 ± 3% and 8 ± 3%), and Yo-Yo IE1 running performance (58 ± 5% and 45 ± 4%). In conclusion, high-intensity intermittent swimming is an effective training strategy to improve cardiovascular health and physical performance in sedentary women with mild hypertension. Adaptations are similar with high- and moderate-intensity training, despite markedly less total time spent and distance covered in the high-intensity group. PMID:24812628

  9. A High School Intensive Summer Mandarin Course: Program Model and Learner Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, Xiaoqiu; Padilla, Amado M.; Silva, Duarte; Masuda, Norman

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a STARTALK intensive summer high school Mandarin language and culture program that was conducted for three summers. Participants across the three years included 40 Mandarin Level II and 53 Mandarin Level III high school students. Quantitative and qualitative data are presented to show the effectiveness of the program.…

  10. 75 FR 52780 - Designation of Nine Counties as High Intensity Drug Trafficking Areas

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-27

    ... PRESIDENT Office of National Drug Control Policy Designation of Nine Counties as High Intensity Drug Trafficking Areas ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Director of the Office of National Drug Control Policy designated nine additional counties as High Drug Trafficking Areas pursuant to 21 U.S.C. 1706. The...

  11. 14 CFR 25.1317 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF... TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment General § 25.1317 High... that performs a function whose failure would significantly reduce the capability of the airplane or...

  12. Small molecule semiconductors for high-efficiency organic photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yuze; Li, Yongfang; Zhan, Xiaowei

    2012-06-01

    Organic photovoltaic cells (OPVs) are a promising cost-effective alternative to silicon-based solar cells, and possess light-weight, low-cost, and flexibility advantages. Significant progress has been achieved in the development of novel photovoltaic materials and device structures in the last decade. Nowadays small molecular semiconductors for OPVs have attracted considerable attention, due to their advantages over their polymer counterparts, including well-defined molecular structure, definite molecular weight, and high purity without batch to batch variations. The highest power conversion efficiencies of OPVs based on small molecular donor/fullerene acceptors or polymeric donor/fullerene acceptors are up to 6.7% and 8.3%, respectively, and meanwhile nonfullerene acceptors have also exhibited some promising results. In this review we summarize the developments in small molecular donors, acceptors (fullerene derivatives and nonfullerene molecules), and donor-acceptor dyad systems for high-performance multilayer, bulk heterojunction, and single-component OPVs. We focus on correlations of molecular chemical structures with properties, such as absorption, energy levels, charge mobilities, and photovoltaic performances. This structure-property relationship analysis may guide rational structural design and evaluation of photovoltaic materials (253 references).

  13. Metabolic and hormonal responses to isoenergetic high-intensity interval exercise and continuous moderate-intensity exercise.

    PubMed

    Peake, Jonathan M; Tan, Sok Joo; Markworth, James F; Broadbent, James A; Skinner, Tina L; Cameron-Smith, David

    2014-10-01

    This study investigated the effects of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) vs. work-matched moderate-intensity continuous exercise (MOD) on metabolism and counterregulatory stress hormones. In a randomized and counterbalanced order, 10 well-trained male cyclists and triathletes completed a HIIT session [81.6 ± 3.7% maximum oxygen consumption (V̇o2 max); 72.0 ± 3.2% peak power output; 792 ± 95 kJ] and a MOD session (66.7 ± 3.5% V̇o2 max; 48.5 ± 3.1% peak power output; 797 ± 95 kJ). Blood samples were collected before, immediately after, and 1 and 2 h postexercise. Carbohydrate oxidation was higher (P = 0.037; 20%), whereas fat oxidation was lower (P = 0.037; -47%) during HIIT vs. MOD. Immediately after exercise, plasma glucose (P = 0.024; 20%) and lactate (P < 0.01; 5.4×) were higher in HIIT vs. MOD, whereas total serum free fatty acid concentration was not significantly different (P = 0.33). Targeted gas chromatography-mass spectromtery metabolomics analysis identified and quantified 49 metabolites in plasma, among which 11 changed after both HIIT and MOD, 13 changed only after HIIT, and 5 changed only after MOD. Notable changes included substantial increases in tricarboxylic acid intermediates and monounsaturated fatty acids after HIIT and marked decreases in amino acids during recovery from both trials. Plasma adrenocorticotrophic hormone (P = 0.019), cortisol (P < 0.01), and growth hormone (P < 0.01) were all higher immediately after HIIT. Plasma norepinephrine (P = 0.11) and interleukin-6 (P = 0.20) immediately after exercise were not significantly different between trials. Plasma insulin decreased during recovery from both HIIT and MOD (P < 0.01). These data indicate distinct differences in specific metabolites and counterregulatory hormones following HIIT vs. MOD and highlight the value of targeted metabolomic analysis to provide more detailed insights into the metabolic demands of exercise.

  14. High Intensity Interval- vs Moderate Intensity- Training for Improving Cardiometabolic Health in Overweight or Obese Males: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Gordon; Brown, Andrew W.; Bohan Brown, Michelle M.; Alcorn, Amy; Noles, Corey; Winwood, Leah; Resuehr, Holly; George, Brandon; Jeansonne, Madeline M.; Allison, David B.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To compare the effects of six weeks of high intensity interval training (HIIT) vs continuous moderate intensity training (MIT) for improving body composition, insulin sensitivity (SI), blood pressure, blood lipids, and cardiovascular fitness in a cohort of sedentary overweight or obese young men. We hypothesized that HIIT would result in similar improvements in body composition, cardiovascular fitness, blood lipids, and SI as compared to the MIT group, despite requiring only one hour of activity per week compared to five hours per week for the MIT group. Methods 28 sedentary overweight or obese men (age, 20 ± 1.5 years, body mass index 29.5 ± 3.3 kg/m2) participated in a six week exercise treatment. Participants were randomly assigned to HIIT or MIT and evaluated at baseline and post-training. DXA was used to assess body composition, graded treadmill exercise test to measure cardiovascular fitness, oral glucose tolerance to measure SI, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to assess lipoprotein particles, and automatic auscultation to measure blood pressure. Results A greater improvement in VO2peak was observed in MIT compared to HIIT (11.1% vs 2.83%, P = 0.0185) in the complete-case analysis. No differences were seen in the intention to treat analysis, and no other group differences were observed. Both exercise conditions were associated with temporal improvements in % body fat, total cholesterol, medium VLDL, medium HDL, triglycerides, SI, and VO2peak (P < 0.05). Conclusion Participation in HIIT or MIT exercise training displayed: 1) improved SI, 2) reduced blood lipids, 3) decreased % body fat, and 4) improved cardiovascular fitness. While both exercise groups led to similar improvements for most cardiometabolic risk factors assessed, MIT led to a greater improvement in overall cardiovascular fitness. Overall, these observations suggest that a relatively short duration of either HIIT or MIT training may improve cardiometabolic risk factors in

  15. Community Dynamics of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi in High-Input and Intensively Irrigated Rice Cultivation Systems

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yutao; Li, Ting; Li, Yingwei; Björn, Lars Olof; Rosendahl, Søren; Olsson, Pål Axel; Fu, Xuelin

    2015-01-01

    Application of a mycorrhizal inoculum could be one way to increase the yield of rice plants and reduce the application of fertilizer. We therefore studied arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) in the roots of wetland rice (Oryza sativa L.) collected at the seedling, tillering, heading, and ripening stages in four paddy wetlands that had been under a high-input and intensively irrigated rice cultivation system for more than 20 years. It was found that AMF colonization was mainly established in the heading and ripening stages. The AMF community structure was characterized in rhizosphere soils and roots from two of the studied paddy wetlands. A fragment covering the partial small subunit (SSU), the whole internal transcribed spacer (ITS), and the partial large subunit (LSU) rRNA operon regions of AMF was amplified, cloned, and sequenced from roots and soils. A total of 639 AMF sequences were obtained, and these were finally assigned to 16 phylotypes based on a phylogenetic analysis, including 12 phylotypes from Glomeraceae, one phylotype from Claroideoglomeraceae, two phylotypes from Paraglomeraceae, and one unidentified phylotype. The AMF phylotype compositions in the soils were similar between the two surveyed sites, but there was a clear discrepancy between the communities obtained from root and soil. The relatively high number of AMF phylotypes at the surveyed sites suggests that the conditions are suitable for some species of AMF and that they may have an important function in conventional rice cultivation systems. The species richness of root-colonizing AMF increased with the growth of rice, and future studies should consider the developmental stages of this crop in the exploration of AMF function in paddy wetlands. PMID:25681190

  16. Community dynamics of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in high-input and intensively irrigated rice cultivation systems.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yutao; Li, Ting; Li, Yingwei; Björn, Lars Olof; Rosendahl, Søren; Olsson, Pål Axel; Li, Shaoshan; Fu, Xuelin

    2015-04-01

    Application of a mycorrhizal inoculum could be one way to increase the yield of rice plants and reduce the application of fertilizer. We therefore studied arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) in the roots of wetland rice (Oryza sativa L.) collected at the seedling, tillering, heading, and ripening stages in four paddy wetlands that had been under a high-input and intensively irrigated rice cultivation system for more than 20 years. It was found that AMF colonization was mainly established in the heading and ripening stages. The AMF community structure was characterized in rhizosphere soils and roots from two of the studied paddy wetlands. A fragment covering the partial small subunit (SSU), the whole internal transcribed spacer (ITS), and the partial large subunit (LSU) rRNA operon regions of AMF was amplified, cloned, and sequenced from roots and soils. A total of 639 AMF sequences were obtained, and these were finally assigned to 16 phylotypes based on a phylogenetic analysis, including 12 phylotypes from Glomeraceae, one phylotype from Claroideoglomeraceae, two phylotypes from Paraglomeraceae, and one unidentified phylotype. The AMF phylotype compositions in the soils were similar between the two surveyed sites, but there was a clear discrepancy between the communities obtained from root and soil. The relatively high number of AMF phylotypes at the surveyed sites suggests that the conditions are suitable for some species of AMF and that they may have an important function in conventional rice cultivation systems. The species richness of root-colonizing AMF increased with the growth of rice, and future studies should consider the developmental stages of this crop in the exploration of AMF function in paddy wetlands.

  17. Low-intensity agricultural landscapes in Transylvania support high butterfly diversity: implications for conservation.

    PubMed

    Loos, Jacqueline; Dorresteijn, Ine; Hanspach, Jan; Fust, Pascal; Rakosy, László; Fischer, Joern

    2014-01-01

    European farmland biodiversity is declining due to land use changes towards agricultural intensification or abandonment. Some Eastern European farming systems have sustained traditional forms of use, resulting in high levels of biodiversity. However, global markets and international policies now imply rapid and major changes to these systems. To effectively protect farmland biodiversity, understanding landscape features which underpin species diversity is crucial. Focusing on butterflies, we addressed this question for a cultural-historic landscape in Southern Transylvania, Romania. Following a natural experiment, we randomly selected 120 survey sites in farmland, 60 each in grassland and arable land. We surveyed butterfly species richness and abundance by walking transects with four repeats in summer 2012. We analysed species composition using Detrended Correspondence Analysis. We modelled species richness, richness of functional groups, and abundance of selected species in response to topography, woody vegetation cover and heterogeneity at three spatial scales, using generalised linear mixed effects models. Species composition widely overlapped in grassland and arable land. Composition changed along gradients of heterogeneity at local and context scales, and of woody vegetation cover at context and landscape scales. The effect of local heterogeneity on species richness was positive in arable land, but negative in grassland. Plant species richness, and structural and topographic conditions at multiple scales explained species richness, richness of functional groups and species abundances. Our study revealed high conservation value of both grassland and arable land in low-intensity Eastern European farmland. Besides grassland, also heterogeneous arable land provides important habitat for butterflies. While butterfly diversity in arable land benefits from heterogeneity by small-scale structures, grasslands should be protected from fragmentation to provide

  18. Low-Intensity Agricultural Landscapes in Transylvania Support High Butterfly Diversity: Implications for Conservation

    PubMed Central

    Loos, Jacqueline; Dorresteijn, Ine; Hanspach, Jan; Fust, Pascal; Rakosy, László; Fischer, Joern

    2014-01-01

    European farmland biodiversity is declining due to land use changes towards agricultural intensification or abandonment. Some Eastern European farming systems have sustained traditional forms of use, resulting in high levels of biodiversity. However, global markets and international policies now imply rapid and major changes to these systems. To effectively protect farmland biodiversity, understanding landscape features which underpin species diversity is crucial. Focusing on butterflies, we addressed this question for a cultural-historic landscape in Southern Transylvania, Romania. Following a natural experiment, we randomly selected 120 survey sites in farmland, 60 each in grassland and arable land. We surveyed butterfly species richness and abundance by walking transects with four repeats in summer 2012. We analysed species composition using Detrended Correspondence Analysis. We modelled species richness, richness of functional groups, and abundance of selected species in response to topography, woody vegetation cover and heterogeneity at three spatial scales, using generalised linear mixed effects models. Species composition widely overlapped in grassland and arable land. Composition changed along gradients of heterogeneity at local and context scales, and of woody vegetation cover at context and landscape scales. The effect of local heterogeneity on species richness was positive in arable land, but negative in grassland. Plant species richness, and structural and topographic conditions at multiple scales explained species richness, richness of functional groups and species abundances. Our study revealed high conservation value of both grassland and arable land in low-intensity Eastern European farmland. Besides grassland, also heterogeneous arable land provides important habitat for butterflies. While butterfly diversity in arable land benefits from heterogeneity by small-scale structures, grasslands should be protected from fragmentation to provide

  19. [Performance enhancement by carbohydrate intake during sport: effects of carbohydrates during and after high-intensity exercise].

    PubMed

    Beelen, Milou; Cermak, Naomi M; van Loon, Luc J C

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous carbohydrate availability does not provide sufficient energy for prolonged moderate to high-intensity exercise. Carbohydrate ingestion during high-intensity exercise can therefore enhance performance.- For exercise lasting 1 to 2.5 hours, athletes are advised to ingest 30-60 g of carbohydrates per hour.- Well-trained endurance athletes competing for longer than 2.5 hours at high intensity can metabolise up to 90 g of carbohydrates per hour, provided that a mixture of glucose and fructose is ingested.- Athletes participating in intermittent or team sports are advised to follow the same strategies but the timing of carbohydrate intake depends on the type of sport.- If top performance is required again within 24 hours after strenuous exercise, the advice is to supplement endogenous carbohydrate supplies quickly within the first few hours post-exercise by ingesting large amounts of carbohydrate (1.2 g/kg/h) or a lower amount of carbohydrate (0.8 g/kg/h) with a small amount of protein (0.2-0.4 g/kg/h).

  20. Improvement in surface fatigue life of hardened gears by high-intensity shot peening

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, Dennis P.

    1992-01-01

    Two groups of carburized, hardened, and ground spur gears that were manufactured from the same heat vacuum induction melted vacuum arc melted (VIM VAR) AISI 9310 steel were endurance tested for surface fatigue. Both groups were manufactured with a standard ground 16 rms surface finish. One group was subjected to a shot peening (SP) intensity of 7 to 9A, and the second group was subjected to a SP intensity of 15 to 17A. All gears were honed after SP to a surface finish of 16 rms. The gear pitch diameter was 8.89 cm. Test conditions were a maximum Hertz stress of 1.71 GPa, a gear temperature of 350 K, and a speed of 10000 rpm. The lubricant used for the tests was a synthetic paraffinic oil with an additive package. The following results were obtained: The 10 pct. surface fatigue (pitting) life of the high intensity (15 to 17A) SPed gears was 2.15 times that of the medium intensity (7 to 9A) SPed gears, the same as that calculated from measured residual stress at a depth of 127 microns. The measured residual stress for the high intensity SPed gears was 57 pct. higher than that for the medium intensity SPed gears at a depth of 127 microns and 540 pct. higher at a depth of 51 microns.

  1. Beating the Odds: High Performing, Small High-Schools in the Rural South

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rural School and Community Trust, 2004

    2004-01-01

    The Southern Rural High School Study Initiative seeks to identify high performing rural high schools in the South, engage education leaders in the region in analyzing the challenges faced by these schools and consider the public policies that might serve to transfer the lessons and strategies used by these schools to other small rural high schools…

  2. Study of ultra-high gradient wakefield excitation by intense ultrashort laser pulses in plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotaki, Hideyuki; Kando, Masaki; Oketa, Takatsugu; Masuda, Shinichi; Koga, James K.; Kondo, Shuji; Kanazawa, Shuhei; Yokoyama, Takashi; Matoba, Toru; Nakajima, Kazuhisa

    2002-10-01

    We investigate a laser wakefield excited by intense laser pulses, and the possibility of generating an intense bright electron source by an intense laser pulse. The coherent wakefield excited by 2 TW, 50 fs laser pulses in a gas-jet plasma around 1018 cm-3 is measured with a time-resolved frequency domain interferometer (FDI). The results show an accelerating wakefield excitation of 20 GeV/m with good coherency. This is the first time-resolved measurement of laser wakefield excitation in a gas-jet plasma. The experimental results agree with the simulation results and linear theory. The pump-probe interferometer system of FDI will be modified to the optical injection system as a relativistic electron beam injector. In 1D particle in cell simulation we obtain results of high quality intense electron beam generation.

  3. Spatial and spectral coherence in propagating high-intensity twin beams.

    PubMed

    Haderka, Ondřej; Machulka, Radek; Peřina, Jan; Allevi, Alessia; Bondani, Maria

    2015-09-25

    Spatial and spectral coherence of high-intensity twin-beam states propagating from the near-field to the far-field configurations is experimentally investigated by measuring intensity auto- and cross-correlation functions. The experimental setup includes a moving crystal and an iCCD camera placed at the output plane of an imaging spectrometer. Evolution from the tight near-field spatial position cross-correlations to the far-field momentum cross-correlations, accompanied by changeless spectral cross-correlations, is observed. Intensity autocorrelation functions and beam profiles are also monitored as they provide the number of degrees of freedom constituting the down-converted beams. The strength of intensity cross-correlations as an alternative quantity for the determination of the number of degrees of freedom is also measured. The relation between the beam coherence and the number of degrees of freedom is discussed.

  4. Spatial and spectral coherence in propagating high-intensity twin beams

    PubMed Central

    Haderka, Ondřej; Machulka, Radek; Peřina, Jan; Allevi, Alessia; Bondani, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Spatial and spectral coherence of high-intensity twin-beam states propagating from the near-field to the far-field configurations is experimentally investigated by measuring intensity auto- and cross-correlation functions. The experimental setup includes a moving crystal and an iCCD camera placed at the output plane of an imaging spectrometer. Evolution from the tight near-field spatial position cross-correlations to the far-field momentum cross-correlations, accompanied by changeless spectral cross-correlations, is observed. Intensity autocorrelation functions and beam profiles are also monitored as they provide the number of degrees of freedom constituting the down-converted beams. The strength of intensity cross-correlations as an alternative quantity for the determination of the number of degrees of freedom is also measured. The relation between the beam coherence and the number of degrees of freedom is discussed. PMID:26403609

  5. Spatially coherent high-order harmonics generated at optimal high gas pressure with high-intensity one- or two-color laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Cheng; Lin, C. D.

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the gas-pressure dependence of macroscopic harmonic spectra generated in a high-ionization medium using intense 800-nm laser pulses. The harmonics obtained at the optimal pressure show good spatial coherence with small divergence (less than 2 mrad) in the far field. By analyzing the evolution of the laser's electric field as it propagates, we find that dynamic phase matching conditions are fulfilled in the second half of the gas cell and that harmonic yields do not depend on the position of the gas cell with respect to the focusing position. We also demonstrate that harmonic yields at the optimal pressure can be further enhanced by increasing input laser energy or by adding a few percent of second or third harmonic to the fundamental.

  6. Low-intensity red and infrared laser effects at high fluences on Escherichia coli cultures.

    PubMed

    Barboza, L L; Campos, V M A; Magalhães, L A G; Paoli, F; Fonseca, A S

    2015-10-01

    Semiconductor laser devices are readily available and practical radiation sources providing wavelength tenability and high monochromaticity. Low-intensity red and near-infrared lasers are considered safe for use in clinical applications. However, adverse effects can occur via free radical generation, and the biological effects of these lasers from unusually high fluences or high doses have not yet been evaluated. Here, we evaluated the survival, filamentation induction and morphology of Escherichia coli cells deficient in repair of oxidative DNA lesions when exposed to low-intensity red and infrared lasers at unusually high fluences. Cultures of wild-type (AB1157), endonuclease III-deficient (JW1625-1), and endonuclease IV-deficient (JW2146-1) E. coli, in exponential and stationary growth phases, were exposed to red and infrared lasers (0, 250, 500, and 1000 J/cm2) to evaluate their survival rates, filamentation phenotype induction and cell morphologies. The results showed that low-intensity red and infrared lasers at high fluences are lethal, induce a filamentation phenotype, and alter the morphology of the E. coli cells. Low-intensity red and infrared lasers have potential to induce adverse effects on cells, whether used at unusually high fluences, or at high doses. Hence, there is a need to reinforce the importance of accurate dosimetry in therapeutic protocols. PMID:26445339

  7. Low-intensity red and infrared laser effects at high fluences on Escherichia coli cultures

    PubMed Central

    Barboza, L.L.; Campos, V.M.A.; Magalhães, L.A.G.; Paoli, F.; Fonseca, A.S.

    2015-01-01

    Semiconductor laser devices are readily available and practical radiation sources providing wavelength tenability and high monochromaticity. Low-intensity red and near-infrared lasers are considered safe for use in clinical applications. However, adverse effects can occur via free radical generation, and the biological effects of these lasers from unusually high fluences or high doses have not yet been evaluated. Here, we evaluated the survival, filamentation induction and morphology of Escherichia coli cells deficient in repair of oxidative DNA lesions when exposed to low-intensity red and infrared lasers at unusually high fluences. Cultures of wild-type (AB1157), endonuclease III-deficient (JW1625-1), and endonuclease IV-deficient (JW2146-1) E. coli, in exponential and stationary growth phases, were exposed to red and infrared lasers (0, 250, 500, and 1000 J/cm2) to evaluate their survival rates, filamentation phenotype induction and cell morphologies. The results showed that low-intensity red and infrared lasers at high fluences are lethal, induce a filamentation phenotype, and alter the morphology of the E. coli cells. Low-intensity red and infrared lasers have potential to induce adverse effects on cells, whether used at unusually high fluences, or at high doses. Hence, there is a need to reinforce the importance of accurate dosimetry in therapeutic protocols. PMID:26445339

  8. Low-intensity red and infrared laser effects at high fluences on Escherichia coli cultures.

    PubMed

    Barboza, L L; Campos, V M A; Magalhães, L A G; Paoli, F; Fonseca, A S

    2015-10-01

    Semiconductor laser devices are readily available and practical radiation sources providing wavelength tenability and high monochromaticity. Low-intensity red and near-infrared lasers are considered safe for use in clinical applications. However, adverse effects can occur via free radical generation, and the biological effects of these lasers from unusually high fluences or high doses have not yet been evaluated. Here, we evaluated the survival, filamentation induction and morphology of Escherichia coli cells deficient in repair of oxidative DNA lesions when exposed to low-intensity red and infrared lasers at unusually high fluences. Cultures of wild-type (AB1157), endonuclease III-deficient (JW1625-1), and endonuclease IV-deficient (JW2146-1) E. coli, in exponential and stationary growth phases, were exposed to red and infrared lasers (0, 250, 500, and 1000 J/cm2) to evaluate their survival rates, filamentation phenotype induction and cell morphologies. The results showed that low-intensity red and infrared lasers at high fluences are lethal, induce a filamentation phenotype, and alter the morphology of the E. coli cells. Low-intensity red and infrared lasers have potential to induce adverse effects on cells, whether used at unusually high fluences, or at high doses. Hence, there is a need to reinforce the importance of accurate dosimetry in therapeutic protocols.

  9. High intensity ion guides and purification techniques for low energy radioactive ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grévy, S.

    2016-06-01

    This report gives an overview of the different devices which can be used for the purification of high intensity low energy radioactive ion beams: high resolution magnetic separators (HRS), multi-reflection time-of-flight mass separators (MR-TOF-MS) and Penning traps (PT). An overview of HRS, existing or in development, and the methods to increase the resolving power are presented. The MR-TOF-MS of ISOLTRAP and other projects having been presented during this conference, only the main characteristics of such devices are discussed. Concerning the PT, intensively used to measure masses with high precisions, we will present the PIPERADE project which aims to provide pure beams of exotic nuclei with unprecedent intensities at the future DESIR/SPIRAL2 facility.

  10. The high intensity solar cell - Key to low cost photovoltaic power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sater, B. L.; Goradia, C.

    1975-01-01

    This paper discusses the problems associated with conventional solar cells at high intensities and presents the design considerations and performance characteristics of the 'high intensity' (HI) solar cell which appears to eliminate the major problems. Test data obtained at greater than 250 AM1 suns gave a peak output power density of 2 W per sq cm at an efficiency exceeding 6% with an unoptimized cell operating at over 100 C. It appears that operation at 1000 AM1 suns at efficiencies greater than 10% is possible. At 1000 AM1 suns and 10% efficiency, the HI cell manufacturing cost is estimated to be $0.25/watt, with multi-megawatt annual production capability already existing within the industrial sector. A high intensity solar system was also analyzed to determine its cost effectiveness and to assess the benefits of further improving HI cell efficiency.

  11. Multiphoton fluorescence microscopy: behavior of biological specimens under high-intensity illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Ping C.; Lin, Bai-Ling; Kao, Fu-Jen; Sun, Chi-Kuang

    2000-07-01

    Recent development in multi-photon fluorescence microscopy, second and third harmonic generation microscopy (SHG and THG) and CARS open new dimensions in biological studies. Not only the technologies allow probing the biological specimen both functionally and structurally with increasing spatial and temporal resolution, but also raise the interest in how biological specimens respond to high intensity illumination commonly used in these types of microscopy. We have used maize leaf protoplast as a model system to evaluate the photo-induced response of living sample under high intensity illumination. It was found that cells can be seriously damaged by high intensity NIR irradiation even the linear absorption coefficient in low in these wavelengths. Micro-spectroscopy of single chloroplast also allows us to gain insight on the possible photo-damage mechanism. In addition to fluorescence emission, second harmonic generation was observed in the maize protoplasts.

  12. Treatment time reduction through parameter optimization in magnetic resonance guided high intensity focused ultrasound treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coon, Joshua

    Magnetic Resonance guided High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (MRgHIFU) treatments are a promising modality for cancer treatments in which a focused beam of ultrasound energy is used to kill tumor tissue. However, obstacles still exist to its widespread clinical implementation, including long treatment times. This research demonstrates reductions in treatment times through intelligent selection of the user-controllable parameters, including: the focal zone treatment path, focal zone size, focal zone spacing, and whether to treat one or several focal zone locations at any given time. Several treatments using various combinations of these parameters were simulated using a finite difference method to solve the Pennes bio-heat transfer equation for an ultrasonically heated tissue region with a wide range of acoustic, thermal, geometric, and tumor properties. The total treatment time was iteratively optimized using either a heuristic method or routines included in the Matlab software package, with constraints imposed for patient safety and treatment efficacy. The results demonstrate that large reductions in treatment time are possible through the intelligent selection of user-controllable treatment parameters. For the treatment path, treatment times are reduced by as much as an order of magnitude if the focal zones are arranged into stacks along the axial direction and a middle-front-back ordering is followed. For situations where normal tissue heating constraints are less stringent, these focal zones should have high levels of adjacency to further decrease treatment times; however, adjacency should be reduced in some cases where normal tissue constraints are more stringent. Also, the use of smaller, more concentrated focal zones produces shorter treatment times than larger, more diluted focal zones, a result verified in an agar phantom model. Further, focal zones should be packed using only a small amount of overlap in the axial direction and with a small gap in the

  13. A prospective comparison of acute intestinal toxicity following whole pelvic versus small field intensity-modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeon Joo; Park, Jin-hong; Yun, In-Ha; Kim, Young Seok

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To compare the acute intestinal toxicity of whole pelvic (WP) and small field (SF) intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for prostate cancer using dosimetric and metabolic parameters as well as clinical findings. Methods Patients who received IMRT in either a definitive or postoperative setting were prospectively enrolled. Target volume and organs at risk including intestinal cavity (IC) were delineated in every patient by a single physician. The IC volume that received a 10–50 Gy dose at 5-Gy intervals (V10–V50) and the percentage of irradiated volume as a fraction of total IC volume were calculated. Plasma citrulline levels, as an objective biological marker, were checked at three time points: baseline and after exposure to 30 Gy and 60 Gy. Results Of the 41 patients, only six experienced grade 1 acute intestinal toxicity. Although all dose–volume parameters were significantly worse following WP than SF IMRT, there was no statistically significant relationship between these dosimetric parameters and clinical symptoms. Plasma citrulline levels did not show a serial decrease by radiotherapy volume difference (WP versus SF) and were not relevant to the irradiated doses. Conclusion Given that WP had comparable acute intestinal toxicities to those associated with SF, WP IMRT appears to be a feasible approach for the treatment of prostate cancer despite dosimetric disadvantages. PMID:27022287

  14. The extended Maxwellian view (BIGMAX): a high-intensity, high-saturation color display for clinical diagnosis and vision research.

    PubMed

    Beer, R Dirk; MacLeod, Donald I A; Miller, Timothy P

    2005-08-01

    We describe a device that can display very high intensity (up to 400,000 cd/m2), high-resolution visual stimuli. The device is inexpensive, is easily controlled by a conventional computer and video card, and can be calibrated for use in vision research or clinical applications. The display is capable of presenting highly saturated, near spectral colors. Unlike Maxwellian view optical systems, our display can be viewed binocularly and does not require exacting head restraint. We describe the construction, give a design example, and describe our calibration procedure. Furthermore, we report measurements of the color gamut, spatial resolution, temporal characteristics, and the dynamic range of light intensity.

  15. High Field Small Animal Magnetic Resonance Oncology Studies

    PubMed Central

    Bokacheva, Louisa; Ackerstaff, Ellen; LeKaye, H. Carl; Zakian, Kristen; Koutcher, Jason A.

    2014-01-01

    This review focuses on the applications of high magnetic field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy (MRS) to cancer studies in small animals. High field MRI can provide information about tumor physiology, the microenvironment, metabolism, vascularity and cellularity. Such studies are invaluable for understanding tumor growth and proliferation, response to treatment and drug development. The MR techniques reviewed here include 1H, 31P, Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer (CEST) imaging, and hyperpolarized 13C MR spectroscopy as well as diffusion-weighted, Blood Oxygen Level Dependent (BOLD) contrast imaging, and dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging. These methods have been proven effective in animal studies and are highly relevant to human clinical studies. PMID:24374985

  16. Rapid response of soil fungal communities to low and high intensity fire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Jane E.; Cowan, Ariel D.; Reazin, Chris; Jumpponen, Ari

    2016-04-01

    Contemporary fires have created high-severity burn areas exceeding historical distributions in forests in the western United States. Until recently, the response of soil ecosystems to high intensity burns has been largely unknown. In complementary studies, we investigated the environmental effect of extreme soil heating, such that occurs with the complete combustion of large down wood during wildfires, on soil fungi and nutrients. We used TRFLP and next generation sequencing (Illumina MiSeq) to investigate the fungal communities. During the burning of large down wood, temperatures lethal to fungi were detected at 0-cm, 5-cm, and 10-cm depths in soils compared to 0-cm depth in soils receiving low intensity broadcast burns. We compared the soil fungal diversity in ten high intensity burned plots paired with adjacent low intensity burned plots before and one week after at 0-10 cm soil depth. Nonmetric Multidimensional Scaling (NMS) ordinations and analyses of taxon frequencies reveal a substantial community turnover and corresponding near complete replacement of the dominant basidiomycetes by ascomycetes in high intensity burns. These coarse-level taxonomic responses were primarily attributable to a few fire-responsive (phoenicoid) fungi, particularly Pyronema sp. and Morchella sp., whose frequencies increased more than 100-fold following high intensity burns. Pinus ponderosa seedlings planted one week post-burn were harvested after four months for EMF root tip analysis. We found: a) greater differences in soil properties and nutrients in high intensity burned soils compared to low intensity burned and unburned soils; b) no differences in EMF richness and diversity; and c) weak differences in community composition based on relative abundance between unburned and either burn treatments. These results confirm the combustion of large downed wood can alter the soil environment directly beneath it. However, an EMF community similar to low burned soils recolonized high

  17. Fluorescent and high intensity discharge lamp use in chambers and greenhouses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langhans, Robert W.

    1994-01-01

    Fluorescent and High Intensity Discharge lamps have opened up great opportunities for researchers to study plant growth under controlled environment conditions and for commercial growers to increase plant production during low/light periods. Specific technical qualities of fluorescent and HID lamps have been critically reviewed. I will direct my remarks to fluorescent and high intensity discharge (HID) lamps in growth chambers, growth rooms, and greenhouses. I will discuss the advantages and disadvantages of using each lamp in growth chambers, growth rooms and greenhouses.

  18. Effect of preseason concurrent muscular strength and high-intensity interval training in professional soccer players.

    PubMed

    Wong, Pui-lam; Chaouachi, Anis; Chamari, Karim; Dellal, Alexandre; Wisloff, Ulrik

    2010-03-01

    This study examined the effect of concurrent muscular strength and high-intensity running interval training on professional soccer players' explosive performances and aerobic endurance. Thirty-nine players participated in the study, where both the experimental group (EG, n = 20) and control group (CG, n = 19) participated in 8 weeks of regular soccer training, with the EG receiving additional muscular strength and high-intensity interval training twice per week throughout. Muscular strength training consisted of 4 sets of 6RM (repetition maximum) of high-pull, jump squat, bench press, back half squat, and chin-up exercises. The high-intensity interval training consisted of 16 intervals each of 15-second sprints at 120% of individual maximal aerobic speed interspersed with 15 seconds of rest. EG significantly increased (p < or = 0.05) 1RM back half squat and bench press but showed no changes in body mass. Within-subject improvement was significantly higher (p < or = 0.01) in the EG compared with the CG for vertical jump height, 10-m and 30-m sprint times, distances covered in the Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery Test and maximal aerobic speed test, and maximal aerobic speed. High-intensity interval running can be concurrently performed with high load muscular strength training to enhance soccer players' explosive performances and aerobic endurance.

  19. Small Cation-Based High-Performance Energetic Nitraminofurazanates.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yongxing; He, Chunlin; Mitchell, Lauren A; Parrish, Damon A; Shreeve, Jean'ne M

    2016-08-01

    Large nitramino-substituted furazan anions were combined with small cations (hydroxylammonium, hydrazinium, and ammonium) to form a series of energetic salts that was fully characterized. The structures of several of the compounds (1 a, 2 a, 3 a, and 4 a) were further confirmed by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Based on their physiochemical properties, such as density, thermal stability, and sensitivity, together with the calculated detonation properties, it was found that they exhibit good detonation performance and have potential application as high-energy-density materials. PMID:27356077

  20. Small Cation-Based High-Performance Energetic Nitraminofurazanates.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yongxing; He, Chunlin; Mitchell, Lauren A; Parrish, Damon A; Shreeve, Jean'ne M

    2016-08-01

    Large nitramino-substituted furazan anions were combined with small cations (hydroxylammonium, hydrazinium, and ammonium) to form a series of energetic salts that was fully characterized. The structures of several of the compounds (1 a, 2 a, 3 a, and 4 a) were further confirmed by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Based on their physiochemical properties, such as density, thermal stability, and sensitivity, together with the calculated detonation properties, it was found that they exhibit good detonation performance and have potential application as high-energy-density materials.

  1. High-resolution numerical simulation of tropical cyclone intensity change with assimilation of satellite, radar, and in-situ data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xuanli

    The forecast of tropical cyclone (TC) intensity change is a challenging problem in tropical meteorology community. Commonly, the forecast of TC intensity change is limited by the initial conditions and physics parameterizations of numerical models. This dissertation explores two questions: (1) How sensitive is the numerical simulation of TC rapid intensity change to the model physical parameterizations? (2) To what extent can data assimilation improve the intensity forecast? High resolution numerical simulations are conducted with the advanced research version of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. Satellite, radar, and in-situ observations, collected during the NASA Tropical Cloud Systems and Processes (TCSP) mission, are assimilated into the model. The assimilation of the NASA QuickSCAT ocean surface winds, NOAA GOES-11 atmospheric motion vector winds, and aircraft dropsonde data improves the simulations of two Tropical Storms, Cindy (2005) and Gert (2005). With the improved initial condition through similar data assimilation procedure, simulations of Hurricane Emily's rapid intensification are performed with various microphysical and planetary boundary layer schemes in the WRF model. The intensity forecast of Emily is highly sensitive to the physical parameterizations due to significantly different structures in the eyewall. However, results also indicate that none of the experiments captures the observed rapid intensification. A diagnostic study is then conducted to investigate the errors in the model by comparing the simulations with the observational data. It is found that the thermal and dynamic structure of the storm in the initial condition has unrealistic features. In addition, the simulated eye is too large and the eyewall contracts too slowly. The simulations of Hurricane Emily suggest that an accurate forecast of TC rapid intensification is closely related to the accuracy of the simulated storm-scale structure. The impact of high

  2. Validation of the Amsterdam Dynamic Facial Expression Set – Bath Intensity Variations (ADFES-BIV): A Set of Videos Expressing Low, Intermediate, and High Intensity Emotions

    PubMed Central

    Wingenbach, Tanja S. H.

    2016-01-01

    Most of the existing sets of facial expressions of emotion contain static photographs. While increasing demand for stimuli with enhanced ecological validity in facial emotion recognition research has led to the development of video stimuli, these typically involve full-blown (apex) expressions. However, variations of intensity in emotional facial expressions occur in real life social interactions, with low intensity expressions of emotions frequently occurring. The current study therefore developed and validated a set of video stimuli portraying three levels of intensity of emotional expressions, from low to high intensity. The videos were adapted from the Amsterdam Dynamic Facial Expression Set (ADFES) and termed the Bath Intensity Variations (ADFES-BIV). A healthy sample of 92 people recruited from the University of Bath community (41 male, 51 female) completed a facial emotion recognition task including expressions of 6 basic emotions (anger, happiness, disgust, fear, surprise, sadness) and 3 complex emotions (contempt, embarrassment, pride) that were expressed at three different intensities of expression and neutral. Accuracy scores (raw and unbiased (Hu) hit rates) were calculated, as well as response times. Accuracy rates above chance level of responding were found for all emotion categories, producing an overall raw hit rate of 69% for the ADFES-BIV. The three intensity levels were validated as distinct categories, with higher accuracies and faster responses to high intensity expressions than intermediate intensity expressions, which had higher accuracies and faster responses than low intensity expressions. To further validate the intensities, a second study with standardised display times was conducted replicating this pattern. The ADFES-BIV has greater ecological validity than many other emotion stimulus sets and allows for versatile applications in emotion research. It can be retrieved free of charge for research purposes from the corresponding author

  3. Effect of the Game Design, the Goal Type and the Number of Players on Intensity of Play in Small-Sided Soccer Games in Youth Elite Players

    PubMed Central

    González-Rodenas, Joaquín; Calabuig, Ferran; Aranda, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of game design modification, the type of the goal and the number of players on the intensity of play in small-sided soccer games (SSGs) in youth elite players. Twenty young soccer players (age 13.7 ± 0.5 years, body mass 57.4 ± 7.8 kg, body height 1.67 ± 7.8 m, maximal heart rate 201.1 ± 8.2 beats/min) performed three types of SSGs (possession play (PP) vs. regular goals (RG) vs. small goals (SG)) in both four-a-side and six-a-side formats. The heart rate responses were recorded and analysed as an indicator of the intensity of play. The four-a-side format obtained higher intensity of play than six-a-side for PP (p<0.05), but not for SG and RG. SG showed higher intensity of play than RG for four-a-side (p<0.001), but not for six-a-side. PP registered higher intensity of play than RG (p<0.05), but not than SG in four-a-side, whereas in six-a-side no differences were found between the three formats. In conclusion, the modification of variables such as the number of players, the game design and the type of the goal influences the intensity of play in small-sided soccer games in youth players. PMID:26839623

  4. Effect of the Game Design, the Goal Type and the Number of Players on Intensity of Play in Small-Sided Soccer Games in Youth Elite Players.

    PubMed

    González-Rodenas, Joaquín; Calabuig, Ferran; Aranda, Rafael

    2015-12-22

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of game design modification, the type of the goal and the number of players on the intensity of play in small-sided soccer games (SSGs) in youth elite players. Twenty young soccer players (age 13.7 ± 0.5 years, body mass 57.4 ± 7.8 kg, body height 1.67 ± 7.8 m, maximal heart rate 201.1 ± 8.2 beats/min) performed three types of SSGs (possession play (PP) vs. regular goals (RG) vs. small goals (SG)) in both four-a-side and six-a-side formats. The heart rate responses were recorded and analysed as an indicator of the intensity of play. The four-a-side format obtained higher intensity of play than six-a-side for PP (p<0.05), but not for SG and RG. SG showed higher intensity of play than RG for four-a-side (p<0.001), but not for six-a-side. PP registered higher intensity of play than RG (p<0.05), but not than SG in four-a-side, whereas in six-a-side no differences were found between the three formats. In conclusion, the modification of variables such as the number of players, the game design and the type of the goal influences the intensity of play in small-sided soccer games in youth players. PMID:26839623

  5. Advantage of annular focus generation by sector-vortex array in cavitation-enhanced high-intensity focused ultrasound treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimbo, Hayato; Takagi, Ryo; Taguchi, Kei; Yoshizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2016-07-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is a noninvasive method for cancer treatment. One of the disadvantages of this method is that it has a long total treatment time because of the smallness of the treatment volume by a single exposure. To solve this problem, we have proposed a method of cavitation-enhanced heating, which utilized the heat generated by oscillating the cavitation bubbles, in combination with the method of lateral enlargement of a HIFU focal zone to minimize the surface volume ratio. In a previous study, focal spot scanning at multiple points was employed for the enlargement. This method involves nonlinear propagation and absorption due to the high spatial-peak temporal-peak (SPTP) intensity in addition to the cavitation-enhanced heating. However, it is difficult to predict the size and position of the coagulation volume because they are significantly affected by the nonlinear parameters of the tissue. In this study, a sector vortex method was employed to directly synthesize an annular focal pattern. Since this method can keep the SPTP intensity at a manageably low level, nonlinear propagation and absorption can be minimized. Experimental results demonstrate that the coagulation was generated only in the region where both the cavitation cloud and the heating ultrasound were matched. The proposed method will make the cavitation-enhanced HIFU treatment more accurate and predictable.

  6. Intensity-dependent enhancements in high-order above-threshold ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Milosevic, D. B.; Hasovic, E.; Gazibegovic-Busuladzic, A.; Busuladzic, M.; Becker, W.

    2007-11-15

    The very pronounced intensity-dependent enhancements of groups of peaks of high-order above-threshold-ionization spectra of rare-gas atoms are investigated using an improved version of the strong-field approximation, which realistically models the respective atom. Two types of enhancements are found and explained in terms of constructive interference of the contributions of a large number of long quantum orbits. The first type is observed for intensities slightly below channel closings. Its intensity dependence is comparatively smooth and it is generated by comparatively few (of the order of 20) orbits. The second type occurs precisely at channel closings and exhibits an extremely sharp intensity dependence. It requires constructive interference of a very large number of long orbits (several hundreds) and generates cusps in the electron spectrum at integer multiples of the laser-photon energy. An interpretation of these enhancements as a threshold phenomenon is also given. An interplay of different types of the threshold anomalies is observed. The position of both types of enhancements, in the photoelectron-energy--laser-intensity plane, shifts to the next channel closing intensity with the change of the ground-state parity. The enhancements gradually disappear with decreasing laser pulse duration. This confirms the interpretation of enhancements as a consequence of the interference of long strong-laser-field-induced quantum orbits.

  7. Novel high-energy physics studies using intense lasers and plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Leemans, Wim P.; Bulanov, Stepan; Esarey, Eric; Schroeder, Carl

    2015-06-29

    In the framework of the project “Novel high-energy physics studies using intense lasers and plasmas” we conducted the study of ion acceleration and “flying mirrors” with high intensity lasers in order to develop sources of ion beams and high frequency radiation for different applications. Since some schemes of laser ion acceleration are also considered a good source of “flying mirrors”, we proposed to investigate the mechanisms of “mirror” formation. As a result we were able to study the laser ion acceleration from thin foils and near critical density targets. We identified several fundamental factors limiting the acceleration in the RPA regime and proposed the target design to compensate these limitations. In the case of near critical density targets, we developed a concept for the laser driven ion source for the hadron therapy. Also we studied the mechanism of “flying mirror” generation during the intense laser interaction with thin solid density targets. As for the laser-based positron creation and capture we initially proposed to study different regimes of positron beam generation and positron beam cooling. Since the for some of these schemes a good quality electron beam is required, we studied the generation of ultra-low emittance electron beams. In order to understand the fundamental physics of high energy electron beam interaction with high intensity laser pulses, which may affect the efficient generation of positron beams, we studied the radiation reaction effects.

  8. Recent numerical results on double-layer simulation in high-intensity laser--plasma interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Szichman, H.

    1988-06-01

    Numerical studies on dynamic electric fields and double layers created inside of plasmas irradiated at laser intensities of 10/sup 17/ and 10/sup 18/ Wcm/sup 2/ were carried out using a macroscopic two-fluid model including nonlinear forces and the complete intensity dependent optical response for heating and dielectric force effects. This was possible only by longer computation times since the temporal and spatial step sizes had to be reduced accordingly. Electrostatic fields as high as 10/sup 9/ and 10/sup 10/ Vcm were, respectively, measured for both laser intensities and the coupling of irradiated electromagnetic waves to generate Langmuir longitudinal waves is shown to be possible for the first time. The development and production of the well-known density minima (cavitons) because of nonlinear forces is also confirmed, their prominent appearance being in direct relation to the stronger effect of the high irradiances applied.

  9. Effects of small misalignments on the intensity and Strehl ratio for a laser beam focused by an off-axis parabola.

    PubMed

    Labate, Luca; Ferrara, Paolo; Fulgentini, Lorenzo; Gizzi, Leonida A

    2016-08-10

    A general procedure is described to calculate the intensity and Strehl ratio, at a generic plane in the focal region, of a beam focused by an off-axis parabolic mirror in the presence of small misalignments. The general theoretical framework is first developed, which allows a full vector diffraction treatment in the case of general misalignments. Then, a parametric numerical study is reported, aimed at highlighting the tolerances of both the intensity and Strehl ratio for small misalignments, for different focusing and off-axis parabola parameters. A set of experimental measurements aimed at validating the theoretical model is also discussed. PMID:27534503

  10. A Comparative Study of Fibroid Ablation Rates Using Radio Frequency or High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound

    SciTech Connect

    Meng Xin; He Guangbin; Zhang Jun; Han Zenghui; Yu Ming; Zhang Miaomiao; Tang Yu; Fang Ling; Zhou Xiaodong

    2010-08-15

    This study compared the technical success of fibroid devascularization using high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) and radio frequency (RF) to provide an experimental basis for the clinical selection of a suitable, minimally invasive method for treating uterine fibroids. Patients were randomly divided into two groups and treated with HIFU or RF accordingly. The two groups of patients were divided again into subgroups A, B, and C based on fibroid diameter and subgroups A', B', and C' based on fibroid blood supply grades. The fibroid diameters in subgroups A, B, and C were 2.0 cm {<=} D < 4.0 cm, 4.0 cm {<=} D<6.0 cm and 6.0 cm {<=} D<8.0 cm, respectively, and fibroid blood supplies were classified into three grades corresponding to subgroups A', B', and C', respectively. The complete ablation rates of the two treatments were compared by contrast-enhanced ultrasound. Both treatments were effective, but the general complete ablation rate of RF was higher than that of HIFU (p < 0.05). The comparison between the two treatments in subgroup A and subgroup A' showed that the complete ablation rate of HIFU was as good as that of RF (p > 0.05). In other subgroups, the complete ablation rates of RF were better than those of HIFU (p < 0.05). No severe complications were observed after these two treatments. RF can be applied for the majority of fibroids. As a noninvasive therapy, HIFU could be the preferred method for the treatment of small, hypovascular fibroids.

  11. Multi-Wavelength Photoacoustic Visualization of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Gray, J. P.; Dana, N.; Dextraze, K. L.; Maier, F.; Emelianov, S.; Bouchard, R. R.

    2016-01-01

    High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) thermal therapies are limited by deficiencies in existing image-guidance techniques. Previous studies using single-wavelength photoacoustic (PA) imaging have demonstrated that HIFU lesions generate contrast with respect to native tissues but have not sufficiently assessed lesion extent. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate feasibility of characterization of in vitro HIFU ablation lesion dimensions using 3D multi-wavelength PA imaging. Fresh porcine cardiac and liver tissue samples were embedded in agar phantoms and ablated using a 2.5 MHz small-animal HIFU system. Both 2D and 3D multi-wavelength photoacoustic-ultrasonic (PAUS) scans were performed in the near-infrared (NIR) range to characterize the change in the absorption spectrum of tissues following ablation and were compared to stained gross pathology to assess treatment margins and lesion extent. Comprehensive 2D multi-wavelength PA imaging yielded a spectrum in ablated tissue that did not display the characteristic local maximum in the optical absorption spectrum of deoxy-hemoglobin (Hb) near 760 nm. Two-dimensional tissue characterization map (TCM) images reconstructed from 3D TCM volumes reliably characterized lesion area and showed >70% area agreement with stained gross pathology. In addition, tissue samples were heated via water bath and concurrently interrogated with 2D PAUS imaging. PA signal exhibited an initial amplitude increase across all wavelengths, corresponding to an initial temperature increase, before then exhibiting a spectral change. This study suggests that multi-wavelength PA imaging has potential to obtain accurate characterization of HIFU lesion extent and may be better suited to guide HIFU ablation therapies during clinical treatments than single-wavelength methods. PMID:26149314

  12. Inhibition of enteric pathogens using integrated high intensity 405 nm LED on the surface of almonds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The disinfecting properties of 405 nm light were investigated against Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella, and their non-pathogenic surrogates inoculated onto the surface of almonds. High intensity monochromatic light was generated from an array of narrow-band 405 nm light emitting diodes (LED). Al...

  13. A High Intensity Multi-Purpose D-D Neutron Generator for Nuclear Engineering Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Ka-Ngo Leung; Jasmina L. Vujic; Edward C. Morse; Per F. Peterson

    2005-11-29

    This NEER project involves the design, construction and testing of a low-cost high intensity D-D neutron generator for teaching nuclear engineering students in a laboratory environment without radioisotopes or a nuclear reactor. The neutron generator was designed, fabricated and tested at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL).

  14. Hydration and muscular performance: does fluid balance affect strength, power and high-intensity endurance?

    PubMed

    Judelson, Daniel A; Maresh, Carl M; Anderson, Jeffrey M; Armstrong, Lawrence E; Casa, Douglas J; Kraemer, William J; Volek, Jeff S

    2007-01-01

    Significant scientific evidence documents the deleterious effects of hypohydration (reduced total body water) on endurance exercise performance; however, the influence of hypohydration on muscular strength, power and high-intensity endurance (maximal activities lasting >30 seconds but <2 minutes) is poorly understood due to the inconsistent results produced by previous investigations. Several subtle methodological choices that exacerbate or attenuate the apparent effects of hypohydration explain much of this variability. After accounting for these factors, hypohydration appears to consistently attenuate strength (by approximately 2%), power (by approximately 3%) and high-intensity endurance (by approximately 10%), suggesting alterations in total body water affect some aspect of force generation. Unfortunately, the relationships between performance decrement and crucial variables such as mode, degree and rate of water loss remain unclear due to a lack of suitably uninfluenced data. The physiological demands of strength, power and high-intensity endurance couple with a lack of scientific support to argue against previous hypotheses that suggest alterations in cardiovascular, metabolic and/or buffering function represent the performance-reducing mechanism of hypohydration. On the other hand, hypohydration might directly affect some component of the neuromuscular system, but this possibility awaits thorough evaluation. A critical review of the available literature suggests hypohydration limits strength, power and high-intensity endurance and, therefore, is an important factor to consider when attempting to maximise muscular performance in athletic, military and industrial settings.

  15. High Intensity Pressure Noise Transmission in Human Ear: A Three Dimensional Simulation Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawa, Takumi; Gan, Rong; Leckness, Kegan

    2015-03-01

    High intensity pressure noise generated by explosions and jet engines causes auditory damage and hearing loss of the military service personals, which are the most common disabilities in the veterans. Authors have investigated the high intensity pressure noise transmission from the ear canal to middle ear cavity. A fluid-structure interaction with a viscoelastic model for the tympanic membrane (TM) as well as the ossicular chain has been considered in the study. For the high intensity pressure simulation the geometry of the ear was based on a 3D finite element (FE) model of the human ear reported by Gan et al. (Ann Biomed Eng 2004). The model consists of the ear canal, TM, ossicular chain, and the middle ear cavity. The numerical approach includes two steps: 1) FE based finite-volume method simulation to compute pressure distributions in the ear canal and the middle ear cavity using CFX; and 2) FE modeling of TM and middle ear ossicles in response to high intensity sound using multi-physics analysis in ANSYS. The simulations provide the displacement of the TM/ossicular chain and the pressure fields in the ear canal and the middle ear cavity. These results are compared with human temporal bone experimental data obtained in our group. This work was supported by DOD W81XWH-14-1-0228.

  16. 14 CFR 23.1308 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 23.1308 Section 23.1308 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment General §...

  17. 14 CFR 23.1308 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 23.1308 Section 23.1308 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment General §...

  18. 76 FR 44613 - Designation of Eight Counties as High Intensity Drug Trafficking Areas

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-26

    ... CONTROL POLICY Designation of Eight Counties as High Intensity Drug Trafficking Areas AGENCY: Office of National Drug Control Policy. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Director of the Office of National Drug Control... Drug Control Policy, Executive Office of the President, Washington, DC 20502; (202) 395-6789. Daniel...

  19. The Edward Teller Medal Lecture: High Intensity Lasers and the Road to Ignition (lirpp Vol. 13)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Key, M. H.

    2016-10-01

    There has been much progress in the development of high intensity lasers and in the science of laser driven inertially confined fusion such that ignition is now a near term prospect. This lecture reviews the field with particular emphasis on areas of my own involvement.

  20. The Edward teller medal lecture: High intensity lasers and the road to ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Key, M. H.

    1997-04-01

    There has been much progress in the development of high intensity lasers and in the science of laser driven inertially confined fusion such that ignition is now a near term prospect. This lecture reviews the field with particular emphasis on areas of my own involvement.

  1. The Edward teller medal lecture: High intensity lasers and the road to ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Key, M.H.

    1997-04-01

    There has been much progress in the development of high intensity lasers and in the science of laser driven inertially confined fusion such that ignition is now a near term prospect. This lecture reviews the field with particular emphasis on areas of my own involvement. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  2. The Edward Teller medal lecture: High intensity lasers and the road to ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Key, M. H.

    1997-04-15

    There has been much progress in the development of high intensity lasers and in the science of laser driven inertially confined fusion such that ignition is now a near term prospect. This lecture reviews the field with particular emphasis on areas of my own involvement.

  3. Effectiveness and Safety of High-Intensity Interval Training in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Francois, Monique E.

    2015-01-01

    IN BRIEF Recent research has shown that high-intensity interval training (HIIT) can promote improvements in glucose control and cardiovascular health in individuals with type 2 diabetes. This article summarizes the evidence and highlights the ways in which HIIT might be safely implemented as an adjunct to more traditional exercise approaches. PMID:25717277

  4. 14 CFR 25.1317 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 25.1317 Section 25.1317 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... adversely affected during and after the time the airplane is exposed to HIRF environment I, as described...

  5. 14 CFR 29.1317 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 29.1317 Section 29.1317 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... adversely affected during and after the time the rotorcraft is exposed to HIRF environment I, as...

  6. 14 CFR 23.1308 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 23.1308 Section 23.1308 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... HIRF environment I, as described in appendix J to this part; (2) The system automatically...

  7. 14 CFR 27.1317 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 27.1317 Section 27.1317 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... adversely affected during and after the time the rotorcraft is exposed to HIRF environment I, as...

  8. Operation of calorimeters based on vacuum and gas photodetectors in high intensity magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ventura, Luigi

    1984-09-01

    Recent attempts to operate counters for calorimetric use inside high intensity magnetic fields have resulted in interesting developments both in the construction of the counters and in the design of the vacuum photosensitive devices. In particular, a new one-stage photomultiplier has been developed. The present status of the development of gas photodiodes will finally be illustrated.

  9. 75 FR 21368 - Designation of Five Counties as High Intensity Drug Trafficking Areas

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-23

    ... PRESIDENT Office of National Drug Control Policy Designation of Five Counties as High Intensity Drug Trafficking Areas ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Director of the Office of National Drug Control Policy..., Office of National Drug Control Policy, Executive Office of the President, Washington, DC 20503;...

  10. Octupole Resonance in the AGS at High Intensity: A SIMBAD study

    SciTech Connect

    Luccio, A.U.; D'Imperio, N.L.

    2005-06-08

    We studied the Octupole (Montague) resonance in the AGS, in its high intensity mode, by tracking with the PIC code SIMBAD. We calculated, turn-by-turn, the betatron tune footprint from the eigenvalues of the one-turn matrix. We show that one should exercise particular caution when the betatron tunes are close together, since the matrix gives ambiguous results at the resonance.

  11. Edward Teller medal lecture: high intensity lasers and the road to ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Key, M.H.

    1997-06-02

    There has been much progress in the development of high intensity lasers and in the science of laser driven inertially confined fusion such that ignition is now a near term prospect. This lecture reviews the field with particular emphasis on areas of my own involvement.

  12. Similar Anti-Inflammatory Acute Responses from Moderate-Intensity Continuous and High-Intensity Intermittent Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Cabral-Santos, Carolina; Gerosa-Neto, José; Inoue, Daniela Sayuri; Panissa, Valéria Leme Gonçalves; Gobbo, Luís Alberto; Zagatto, Alessandro Moura; Campos, Eduardo Zapaterra; Lira, Fábio Santos

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of high-intensity intermittent exercise (HIIE) versus volume matched steady state exercise (SSE) on inflammatory and metabolic responses. Eight physically active male subjects completed two experimental sessions, a 5-km run on a treadmill either continuously (70% vVO2max) or intermittently (1:1 min at vVO2max). Blood samples were collected at rest, immediately, 30 and 60 minutes after the exercise session. Blood was analyzed for glucose, non-ester fatty acid (NEFA), uric acid, lactate, cortisol, and cytokines (IL-6, IL-10 and TNF-α) levels. The lactate levels exhibited higher values immediately post-exercise than at rest (HIIE 1.34 ± 0.24 to 7.11 ± 2.85, and SSE 1.35 ± 0.14 to 4.06±1.60 mmol·L-1, p < 0.05), but HIIE promoted higher values than SSE (p < 0.05); the NEFA levels were higher immediately post-exercise than at rest only in the SSE condition (0.71 ± 0.04 to 0.82±0.09 mEq/L, respectively, p < 0.05), yet, SSE promoted higher values than HIIE immediately after exercise (HIIE 0.72±0.03 vs SSE 0.82±0.09 mEq·L-1, p < 0.05). Glucose and uric acid levels did not show changes under the different conditions (p > 0.05). Cortisol, IL-6, IL-10 and TNF-α levels showed time-dependent changes under the different conditions (p < 0.05), however, the area under the curve of TNF-α in the SSE were higher than HIIE (p < 0.05), and the area under the curve of IL-6 in the HIIE showed higher values than SSE (p < 0.05). In addition, both exercise conditions promote increased IL-10 levels and IL-10/TNF-α ratio (p < 0.05). In conclusion, our results demonstrated that both exercise protocols, when volume is matched, promote similar inflammatory responses, leading to an anti-inflammatory status; however, the metabolic responses are different. Key points Metabolic contribution of both exercise, HIIE and SSE, was different. Both protocols leading to an anti-inflammatory status. HIIE induce a higher energy expenditure take

  13. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: A Dose-Escalation Planning Study

    SciTech Connect

    Lievens, Yolande; Nulens, An; Gaber, Mousa Amr; Defraene, Gilles; De Wever, Walter; Stroobants, Sigrid; Van den Heuvel, Frank

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the potential for dose escalation with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in positron emission tomography-based radiotherapy planning for locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (LA-NSCLC). Methods and Materials: For 35 LA-NSCLC patients, three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and IMRT plans were made to a prescription dose (PD) of 66 Gy in 2-Gy fractions. Dose escalation was performed toward the maximal PD using secondary endpoint constraints for the lung, spinal cord, and heart, with de-escalation according to defined esophageal tolerance. Dose calculation was performed using the Eclipse pencil beam algorithm, and all plans were recalculated using a collapsed cone algorithm. The normal tissue complication probabilities were calculated for the lung (Grade 2 pneumonitis) and esophagus (acute toxicity, grade 2 or greater, and late toxicity). Results: IMRT resulted in statistically significant decreases in the mean lung (p <.0001) and maximal spinal cord (p = .002 and 0005) doses, allowing an average increase in the PD of 8.6-14.2 Gy (p {<=}.0001). This advantage was lost after de-escalation within the defined esophageal dose limits. The lung normal tissue complication probabilities were significantly lower for IMRT (p <.0001), even after dose escalation. For esophageal toxicity, IMRT significantly decreased the acute NTCP values at the low dose levels (p = .0009 and p <.0001). After maximal dose escalation, late esophageal tolerance became critical (p <.0001), especially when using IMRT, owing to the parallel increases in the esophageal dose and PD. Conclusion: In LA-NSCLC, IMRT offers the potential to significantly escalate the PD, dependent on the lung and spinal cord tolerance. However, parallel increases in the esophageal dose abolished the advantage, even when using collapsed cone algorithms. This is important to consider in the context of concomitant chemoradiotherapy schedules using IMRT.

  14. Experiment and simulation of novel liquid crystal plasma mirrors for high contrast, intense laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Poole, P L; Krygier, A; Cochran, G E; Foster, P S; Scott, G G; Wilson, L A; Bailey, J; Bourgeois, N; Hernandez-Gomez, C; Neely, D; Rajeev, P P; Freeman, R R; Schumacher, D W

    2016-01-01

    We describe the first demonstration of plasma mirrors made using freely suspended, ultra-thin films formed dynamically and in-situ. We also present novel particle-in-cell simulations that for the first time incorporate multiphoton ionization and dielectric models that are necessary for describing plasma mirrors. Dielectric plasma mirrors are a crucial component for high intensity laser applications such as ion acceleration and solid target high harmonic generation because they greatly improve pulse contrast. We use the liquid crystal 8CB and introduce an innovative dynamic film formation device that can tune the film thickness so that it acts as its own antireflection coating. Films can be formed at a prolonged, high repetition rate without the need for subsequent realignment. High intensity reflectance above 75% and low-field reflectance below 0.2% are demonstrated, as well as initial ion acceleration experimental results that demonstrate increased ion energy and yield on shots cleaned with these plasma mirrors. PMID:27557592

  15. Experiment and simulation of novel liquid crystal plasma mirrors for high contrast, intense laser pulses

    PubMed Central

    Poole, P. L.; Krygier, A.; Cochran, G. E.; Foster, P. S.; Scott, G. G.; Wilson, L. A.; Bailey, J.; Bourgeois, N.; Hernandez-Gomez, C.; Neely, D.; Rajeev, P. P.; Freeman, R. R.; Schumacher, D. W.

    2016-01-01

    We describe the first demonstration of plasma mirrors made using freely suspended, ultra-thin films formed dynamically and in-situ. We also present novel particle-in-cell simulations that for the first time incorporate multiphoton ionization and dielectric models that are necessary for describing plasma mirrors. Dielectric plasma mirrors are a crucial component for high intensity laser applications such as ion acceleration and solid target high harmonic generation because they greatly improve pulse contrast. We use the liquid crystal 8CB and introduce an innovative dynamic film formation device that can tune the film thickness so that it acts as its own antireflection coating. Films can be formed at a prolonged, high repetition rate without the need for subsequent realignment. High intensity reflectance above 75% and low-field reflectance below 0.2% are demonstrated, as well as initial ion acceleration experimental results that demonstrate increased ion energy and yield on shots cleaned with these plasma mirrors. PMID:27557592

  16. Experiment and simulation of novel liquid crystal plasma mirrors for high contrast, intense laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Poole, P L; Krygier, A; Cochran, G E; Foster, P S; Scott, G G; Wilson, L A; Bailey, J; Bourgeois, N; Hernandez-Gomez, C; Neely, D; Rajeev, P P; Freeman, R R; Schumacher, D W

    2016-08-25

    We describe the first demonstration of plasma mirrors made using freely suspended, ultra-thin films formed dynamically and in-situ. We also present novel particle-in-cell simulations that for the first time incorporate multiphoton ionization and dielectric models that are necessary for describing plasma mirrors. Dielectric plasma mirrors are a crucial component for high intensity laser applications such as ion acceleration and solid target high harmonic generation because they greatly improve pulse contrast. We use the liquid crystal 8CB and introduce an innovative dynamic film formation device that can tune the film thickness so that it acts as its own antireflection coating. Films can be formed at a prolonged, high repetition rate without the need for subsequent realignment. High intensity reflectance above 75% and low-field reflectance below 0.2% are demonstrated, as well as initial ion acceleration experimental results that demonstrate increased ion energy and yield on shots cleaned with these plasma mirrors.

  17. Experiment and simulation of novel liquid crystal plasma mirrors for high contrast, intense laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poole, P. L.; Krygier, A.; Cochran, G. E.; Foster, P. S.; Scott, G. G.; Wilson, L. A.; Bailey, J.; Bourgeois, N.; Hernandez-Gomez, C.; Neely, D.; Rajeev, P. P.; Freeman, R. R.; Schumacher, D. W.

    2016-08-01

    We describe the first demonstration of plasma mirrors made using freely suspended, ultra-thin films formed dynamically and in-situ. We also present novel particle-in-cell simulations that for the first time incorporate multiphoton ionization and dielectric models that are necessary for describing plasma mirrors. Dielectric plasma mirrors are a crucial component for high intensity laser applications such as ion acceleration and solid target high harmonic generation because they greatly improve pulse contrast. We use the liquid crystal 8CB and introduce an innovative dynamic film formation device that can tune the film thickness so that it acts as its own antireflection coating. Films can be formed at a prolonged, high repetition rate without the need for subsequent realignment. High intensity reflectance above 75% and low-field reflectance below 0.2% are demonstrated, as well as initial ion acceleration experimental results that demonstrate increased ion energy and yield on shots cleaned with these plasma mirrors.

  18. Nanochannels fabricated by high-intensity femtosecond laser pulses on dielectric surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Kudryashov, Sergey I.; Mourou, Gerard; Joglekar, Ajit; Herbstman, Jeffrey F.; Hunt, Alan J.

    2007-10-01

    Direct scanning electron microscopy examination reveals a complex structure of narrow, micron-deep, internal nanochannels within shallow, nanoscale, external craters fabricated on glass and sapphire surfaces by single high-intensity femtosecond laser pulses, with nearly the same intensity thresholds for both features. Formation of the channels is accompanied by extensive expulsion of molten material produced via surface spallation and phase explosion mechanisms, and redeposited around the corresponding external craters. Potential mechanisms underlying fabrication of the unexpectedly deep channels in dielectrics are considered.

  19. Shock wave induced by a high-intensity power source in hypersonic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shneider, M. N.; Gimelshein, S. F.; Raizer, Yu. P.

    2010-04-01

    An upstream structure of a parabolic shock wave induced in a hypersonic flow by a steady-state high-intensity heat source is examined. A similarity analysis is used to derive a simple analytic expression that allows one to predict the shock wave upstream stand-off distance. The solution of Navier-Stokes is obtained to provide basis for the validation of the analytic expression; a reasonable agreement is obtained between the analytic and numerical results for a number of power source intensities.

  20. [Degranulation of skin mast cells caused by high frequency electromagnetic irradiation of low intensity].

    PubMed

    Popov, V I; Rogachevskiĭ, V V; Gapeev, A B; Khramov, R N; Fesenko, E E

    2001-01-01

    It was shown by light and electron microscopy that local exposure of the projection of the MC-8 lao-gun acupuncture point in rat pad to low-intensity (0.05 mW/cm2) extremely high-frequency (42.0 GHz) electromagnetic radiation caused a degranulation of derma mast cells. It was suggested that the response of skin mast cells is an important amplifying mechanism in the chain of events leading to a systemic response of the organism to low-intensity electromagnetic radiation.

  1. Salutary effects of high-intensity interval training in persons with elevated cardiovascular risk.

    PubMed

    Fleg, Jerome L

    2016-01-01

    Although moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT) has been the traditional model for aerobic exercise training for over four decades, a growing body of literature has demonstrated equal if not greater improvement in aerobic capacity and similar beneficial effects on body composition, glucose metabolism, blood pressure, and quality of life from high-intensity interval training (HIIT). An advantage of HIIT over MICT is the shorter time required to perform the same amount of energy expenditure. The current brief review summarizes the effects of HIIT on peak aerobic capacity and cardiovascular risk factors in healthy adults and those with various cardiovascular diseases, including coronary artery disease, chronic heart failure, and post heart transplantation.

  2. High intensity induced photocurrent polarity switching in lead sulfide nanowire field effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yiming; Peng, Xingyue; Yu, Dong

    2014-05-16

    We report an optoelectronic investigation of lead sulfide nanowires (NWs) by scanning photocurrent microscopy. The photocurrent in p-type lead sulfide NW field effect transistors has demonstrated unusually nonlinear dependence on the intensity of local excitation. Surprisingly, the photocurrent polarity can be reversed under high illumination intensity on the order of 100 W cm(-2). The origin of this photocurrent polarity switching is that the photo-injected carriers flip the direction of the electric field near the contact. These observations shed light on the nonlinear optoelectronic characteristics in semiconductor nanostructures and may provide an innovative method for optically tailoring local band structures.

  3. Salutary effects of high-intensity interval training in persons with elevated cardiovascular risk

    PubMed Central

    Fleg, Jerome L.

    2016-01-01

    Although moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT) has been the traditional model for aerobic exercise training for over four decades, a growing body of literature has demonstrated equal if not greater improvement in aerobic capacity and similar beneficial effects on body composition, glucose metabolism, blood pressure, and quality of life from high-intensity interval training (HIIT). An advantage of HIIT over MICT is the shorter time required to perform the same amount of energy expenditure. The current brief review summarizes the effects of HIIT on peak aerobic capacity and cardiovascular risk factors in healthy adults and those with various cardiovascular diseases, including coronary artery disease, chronic heart failure, and post heart transplantation.

  4. Fiber optic sensing systems using high frequency resonant sensing heads with intensity sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamovsky, Grigory; Maitland, Duncan J., IV

    1988-01-01

    Optical fibers have an inherent capability of transmitting high bandwidth analog and digital signals. To apply this property of fiber optics to remote sensing, special sensing heads as well as signal processing electronics have to be developed. In systems employing intensity modulating sensors, there is also a need for a referencing technique to compensate for changes in the transmission of the connecting fibers and light source intensity. Fiber optic sensing systems incorporated in sensing heads of a special configuration are discussed. Different modes of operation as well as resonant conditions are explained. Theoretical and experimental analyses are also given.

  5. Rapid Hurricane Intensity Change: Results using High-Resolution Fully Coupled Atmosphere-Wave-Ocean Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S. S.

    2008-12-01

    The extreme active Atlantic hurricane seasons in recent years have highlighted the urgent need for a better understanding of the factors that contribute to rapid hurricane intensity and for development of the corresponding advanced hurricane prediction models to improve intensity forecasts. The lack of skill in present forecasts of hurricane structure and intensity may be attributed in part to deficiencies in the current prediction models: insufficient grid resolution, inadequate surface and boundary layer formulations, and the lack of full coupling to a dynamic ocean. The extreme high winds, intense rainfall, large ocean waves, and copious sea spray in hurricanes push the surface-exchange parameters for temperature, water vapor, and momentum into untested regimes. The recent modeling effort at the University of Miami is to develop and test a fully coupled atmosphere-wave-ocean modeling system (UMCM) that is capable of resolving the eye and eyewall in a hurricane at ~1 km grid resolution. The new challenges for these very high resolution models are the corresponding physical representations at 1-km scale, including microphysics, sub-grid turbulence parameterization, atmospheric boundary layer, physical processes at the air-sea interface with surface waves among others. The lack of accurate initial conditions for high-resolution hurricane modeling presents another major challenge. Improvements in initial conditions rest on the use of airborne and remotely sensed observations (e.g., QuikSCAT and other satellite data) in high-resolution assimilation systems and on the application of advanced assimilation schemes to hurricanes. This study aimed to provide an overview of these new challenges using high-resolution coupled model simulations of hurricanes in 2003-2008. Several cases were observed extensively by two recent field programs, namely, the Coupled Boundary Layer Air-Sea Transfer (CBLAST)-Hurricane in 2003-2004 and the Hurricane Rainbands and Intensity Change

  6. Reliability of a Novel High Intensity One Leg Dynamic Exercise Protocol to Measure Muscle Endurance

    PubMed Central

    Lepers, Romuald; Marcora, Samuele M.

    2016-01-01

    We recently developed a high intensity one leg dynamic exercise (OLDE) protocol to measure muscle endurance and investigate the central and peripheral mechanisms of muscle fatigue. The aims of the present study were to establish the reliability of this novel protocol and describe the isokinetic muscle fatigue induced by high intensity OLDE and its recovery. Eight subjects performed the OLDE protocol (time to exhaustion test of the right leg at 85% of peak power output) three times over a week period. Isokinetic maximal voluntary contraction torque at 60 (MVC60), 100 (MVC100) and 140 (MVC140) deg/s was measured pre-exercise, shortly after exhaustion (13 ± 4 s), 20 s (P20) and 40 s (P40) post-exercise. Electromyographic (EMG) signal was analyzed via the root mean square (RMS) for all three superficial knee extensors. Mean time to exhaustion was 5.96 ± 1.40 min, coefficient of variation was 8.42 ± 6.24%, typical error of measurement was 0.30 min and intraclass correlation was 0.795. MVC torque decreased shortly after exhaustion for all angular velocities (all P < 0.001). MVC60 and MVC100 recovered between P20 (P < 0.05) and exhaustion and then plateaued. MVC140 recovered only at P40 (P < 0.05). High intensity OLDE did not alter maximal EMG RMS of the three superficial knee extensors during MVC. The results of this study demonstrate that this novel high intensity OLDE protocol could be reliably used to measure muscle endurance, and that muscle fatigue induced by high intensity OLDE should be examined within ~ 30 s following exhaustion. PMID:27706196

  7. High intensity production of high and medium charge state uranium and other heavy ion beams with VENUS

    SciTech Connect

    Leitner, D.; Galloway, M. L.; Loew, T. J.; Lyneis, C. M.; Castro Rodriguez, I.; Todd, D. S.

    2008-02-15

    The next generation, superconducting electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source VENUS (versatile ECR ion source for nuclear science) started operation with 28 GHz microwave heating in 2004. Since then it has produced world record ion beam intensities. For example, 2850 e {mu}A of O{sup 6+}, 200 e {mu}A of U{sup 33+} or U{sup 34+}, and in respect to high charge state ions, 1 e {mu}A of Ar{sup 18+}, 270 e {mu}A of Ar{sup 16+}, 28 e {mu}A of Xe{sup 35+}, and 4.9 e {mu}A of U{sup 47+} have been produced. A brief overview of the latest developments leading to these record intensities is given and the production of high intensity uranium beams is discussed in more detail.

  8. Moderate volume of high relative training intensity produces greater strength gains compared with low and high volumes in competitive weightlifters.

    PubMed

    González-Badillo, Juan José; Izquierdo, Mikel; Gorostiaga, Esteban M

    2006-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of 3 volumes of heavy resistance, average relative training intensity (expressed as a percentage of 1 repetition maximum that represented the absolute kilograms lifted divided by the number of repetitions performed) programs on maximal strength (1RM) in Snatch (Sn), Clean & Jerk (C&J), and Squat (Sq). Twenty-nine experienced (>3 years), trained junior weightlifters were randomly assigned into 1 of 3 groups: low-intensity group (LIG; n = 12), moderate-intensity group (MIG; n = 9), and high-intensity group (HIG; n = 8). All subjects trained for 10 weeks, 4-5 days a week, in a periodized routine using the same exercises and training volume (expressed as total number of repetitions performed at intensities equal to or greater than 60% of 1RM), but different programmed total repetitions at intensities of >90-100% of 1RM for the entire 10-week period: LIG (46 repetitions), MIG (93 repetitions), and HIG (184 repetitions). During the training period, MIG and LIG showed a significant increase (p < 0.01-0.05) for C&J (10.5% and 3% for MIG and LIG, respectively) and Sq (9.5% and 5.3% for MIG and LIG, respectively), whereas in HIG the increase took place only in Sq (6.9%, p < 0.05). A calculation of effect sizes revealed greater strength gains in the MIG than in HIG or LIG. There were no significant differences between LIG and HIG training volume-induced strength gains. All the subjects in HIG were unable to fully accomplish the repetitions programmed at relative intensities greater than 90% of 1RM. The present results indicate that short-term resistance training using moderate volumes of high relative intensity tended to produce higher enhancements in weightlifting performance compared with low and high volumes of high relative training intensities of equal total volume in experienced, trained young weightlifters. Therefore, for the present population of weightlifters, it may be beneficial to use the MIG training protocol to

  9. Report from the NSLS workshop: Sources and applications of high intensity uv-vuv light

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, E.D.; Hastings, J.B.

    1990-01-01

    A workshop was held to evaluate sources and applications of high intensity, ultra violet (UV) radiation for biological, chemical, and materials sciences. The proposed sources are a UV free electron laser (FEL) driven by a high brightness linac and undulators in long, straight sections of a specially designed low energy (400 MeV) storage ring. These two distinct types of sources will provide a broad range of scientific opportunities that were discussed in detail during the workshop.

  10. Report from the NSLS workshop: Sources and applications of high intensity uv-vuv light

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, E.D.; Hastings, J.B.

    1990-12-31

    A workshop was held to evaluate sources and applications of high intensity, ultra violet (UV) radiation for biological, chemical, and materials sciences. The proposed sources are a UV free electron laser (FEL) driven by a high brightness linac and undulators in long, straight sections of a specially designed low energy (400 MeV) storage ring. These two distinct types of sources will provide a broad range of scientific opportunities that were discussed in detail during the workshop.

  11. Joint Cooling does not Hinder Athletic Performance during High-intensity Intermittent Exercise.

    PubMed

    Kim, H; Lee, D; Choi, H-M; Park, J

    2016-07-01

    We examined the effects of ankle and knee joint cooling on 20-m sprint times and maximal vertical jump heights during high-intensity intermittent exercise. 21 healthy collegiate male basketball (n=14) and handball players (n=7) underwent 3 experimental sessions. Each session consisted of four 15-min quarters of high-intensity intermittent exercises including various intensities of 20-m shuttle running and jumping. A 20-min bilateral joint cooling (ankle, knee, or control-no cooling: in a counterbalanced order) was applied before quarters 1 and 3. After joint cooling, no warm-up activity other than the exercise protocol was given. The 20-m sprint times and maximal vertical jump heights in each experimental session were recorded at baseline (prior to quarter-1) and during each quarter. To test joint cooling effects over time, we performed 3×5 mixed model ANOVAs. Neither ankle nor knee joint cooling changed 20-m sprint times (F8,280=1.45; p=0.18) or maximal vertical jump heights (F8,280=0.76; p=0.64). However, a trend was observed in which joint cooling immediately decreased (quarters 1 and 3) but active warm-up for approximately 20 min improved 20-min sprint times (quarters 2 and 4). Our study suggests that athletic performance such as sprinting and jumping are not altered by joint cooling applied prior to or during high-intensity intermittent exercise. PMID:27119166

  12. High intensity solar irradiation testing of UV optics. [OSO-8 instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greyerbiehl, J. M.; Oberright, J. E.

    1976-01-01

    The Orbiting Solar Observatory-I (OSO-8 in orbit) incorporates two high resolution solar pointing spectrometers operating from 1000 A to 4000 A. Energy from the sun enters a Cassegrainian telescope and is focused on a slit while the solar disk is scanned to one arc-second resolution. The stability of the secondary mirrors reflectance was of concern since they would be exposed to intense focused solar energy up to 27 suns. A test program was initiated to simulate this energy input on sample UV mirrors of the MgF2 and LiF types and to evaluate their performance after irradiation. Tests were conducted to simulate the solar spectrum at high intensities (25 suns) and at a single wavelength near Lyman-alpha, but with twenty times the solar intensity at Lyman-alpha. Post-test measurements after every exposure were made at wavelengths from 1025 A to 1849 A. After 75 simulated 'orbits', reflectance changes due to temperature effects were noted to be less than 10%. Reductions in reflectance under high intensity solar radiation were generally greater than 10%. Polymerization of surface contaminations on the LiF mirrors reduced reflectances at short wavelengths by 40%.

  13. Joint Cooling does not Hinder Athletic Performance during High-intensity Intermittent Exercise.

    PubMed

    Kim, H; Lee, D; Choi, H-M; Park, J

    2016-07-01

    We examined the effects of ankle and knee joint cooling on 20-m sprint times and maximal vertical jump heights during high-intensity intermittent exercise. 21 healthy collegiate male basketball (n=14) and handball players (n=7) underwent 3 experimental sessions. Each session consisted of four 15-min quarters of high-intensity intermittent exercises including various intensities of 20-m shuttle running and jumping. A 20-min bilateral joint cooling (ankle, knee, or control-no cooling: in a counterbalanced order) was applied before quarters 1 and 3. After joint cooling, no warm-up activity other than the exercise protocol was given. The 20-m sprint times and maximal vertical jump heights in each experimental session were recorded at baseline (prior to quarter-1) and during each quarter. To test joint cooling effects over time, we performed 3×5 mixed model ANOVAs. Neither ankle nor knee joint cooling changed 20-m sprint times (F8,280=1.45; p=0.18) or maximal vertical jump heights (F8,280=0.76; p=0.64). However, a trend was observed in which joint cooling immediately decreased (quarters 1 and 3) but active warm-up for approximately 20 min improved 20-min sprint times (quarters 2 and 4). Our study suggests that athletic performance such as sprinting and jumping are not altered by joint cooling applied prior to or during high-intensity intermittent exercise.

  14. The MERIT(nTOF-11) High Intensity Liquid Mercury Target Experiment at the CERN PS

    SciTech Connect

    Efthymiopoulos, I.; Fabich, A.; Palm, M.; Lettry, J.; Haug, F.; Pernegger, H.; Steerenberg, R.; Grudiev, A.; Kirk, H.g.; Tsang, t.; Mokbov, N.; /Fermilab /Oak Ridge /Princeton U. /Rutherford /SUNY, Stony Brook

    2008-06-01

    The MERIT(nTOF-11) experiment is a proof-of-principle test of a target system for a high power proton beam to be used as front-end for a neutrino factory or a muon collider. The experiment took data in autumn 2007 with the fast-extracted beam from the CERN Proton Synchrotron (PS) to a maximum intensity of 30 x 10{sup 12} per pulse. The target system, based on a free mercury jet, is capable of intercepting a 4-MW proton beam inside a 15-T magnetic field required to capture the low energy secondary pions as the source for intense muon beams. Particle detectors installed around the target setup measure the secondary particle flux out of the target and can probe cavitation effects in the mercury jet when excited by an intense proton beam. Preliminary results of the data analysis will be presented here.

  15. The MERIT (nTOF-11) High Intensity Liquid Mercury Target Experiment at the CERN PS

    SciTech Connect

    Efthymiopoulos, Ilias; Fabich, A.; Grudiev, A.; Haug, F.; Lettry, J.; Palm, M.; Pernegger, Heinz; Steerenberg, R.R.; Bennett, J.R.J.; Caretta, O.; Loveridge, P.; /Rutherford /Oak Ridge /Brookhaven /Princeton U. /Fermilab

    2008-06-01

    The MERIT(nTOF-11) experiment is a proof-of-principle test of a target system for a high power proton beam to be used as front-end for a neutrino factory or a muon collider. The experiment took data in autumn 2007 with the fast-extracted beam from the CERN Proton Synchrotron (PS) to a maximum intensity of 30 x 10{sup 12} per pulse. The target system, based on a free mercury jet, is capable of intercepting a 4-MW proton beam inside a 15-T magnetic field required to capture the low energy secondary pions as the source for intense muon beams. Particle detectors installed around the target setup measure the secondary particle flux out of the target and can probe cavitation effects in the mercury jet when excited by an intense proton beam.Preliminary results of the data analysis will be presented here.

  16. The MERIT(nTOF-11) High Intensity Liquid Mercury Target Experiment at the CERN PS

    SciTech Connect

    Ethymiopoulos,I.; Fabich, A.; Palm, M.; Lettry, J.; Haug, F.; Pernegger, H.; Steerenberg, R.; Grudiev, A.; Kirk, H.G.; Tsang, T.; Mokhov, N.; Striganov, S.; Carroll, A.J.; Graves, V.B.; Spampinato, P.T.; McDonald, K.T.; Bennett, J.R.J.; Caretta, O.; Loveridge, P.; Park, H.

    2008-06-23

    The MERIT(nTOF-11) experiment is a proof-of-principle test of a target system for a high power proton beam to be used as front-end for a neutrino factory or a muon collider. The experiment took data in autumn 2007 with the fast-extracted beam from the CERN Proton Synchrotron (PS) to a maximum intensity of 30 x 10{sup 12} per pulse. The target system, based on a free mercury jet, is capable of intercepting a 4-MW proton beam inside a 15-T magnetic field required to capture the low energy secondary pions as the source for intense muon beams. Particle detectors installed around the target setup measure the secondary particle flux out of the target and can probe cavitation effects in the mercury jet when excited by an intense proton beam.Preliminary results of the data analysis will be presented here.

  17. Factors Influencing the Dosimetry for High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Ablation of Uterine Fibroids

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Song; Zhang, Lian; Hu, Liang; Chen, Jinyun; Ju, Jin; Wang, Xi; Zhang, Rong; Wang, Zhibiao; Chen, Wenzhi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this article is to analyze factors affecting sonication dose and build a dosimetry model of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation for uterine fibroids. Four hundred and three patients with symptomatic uterine fibroids who underwent HIFU were retrospectively analyzed. The energy efficiency factor (EEF) was set as dependent variable, and the factors possibly affecting sonication dose included age, body mass index, size of uterine fibroid, abdominal wall thickness, the distance from uterine fibroid dorsal side to sacrum, the distance from uterine fibroid ventral side to skin, location of uterus, location of uterine fibroids, type of uterine fibroids, abdominal wall scar, signal intensity on T2-weighted imaging (T2WI), and enhancement type on T1-weighted imaging (T1WI) were set as predictors to build a multiple regression model. The size of uterine fibroid, distance from fibroid ventral side to skin, location of uterus, location of uterine fibroids, type of uterine fibroids, signal intensity on T2WI, and enhancement type on T1WI had a linear correlation with EEF. The distance from fibroid ventral side to skin, enhancement type on T1WI, size of uterine fibroid, and signal intensity on T2WI were eventually incorporated into the dosimetry model. The distance from fibroid ventral side to skin, enhancement type on T1WI, size of uterine fibroid, and signal intensity on T2WI can be used as dosimetric predictors for HIFU for uterine fibroids. PMID:25837756

  18. Mandala Networks: ultra-small-world and highly sparse graphs

    PubMed Central

    Sampaio Filho, Cesar I. N.; Moreira, André A.; Andrade, Roberto F. S.; Herrmann, Hans J.; Andrade, José S.

    2015-01-01

    The increasing demands in security and reliability of infrastructures call for the optimal design of their embedded complex networks topologies. The following question then arises: what is the optimal layout to fulfill best all the demands? Here we present a general solution for this problem with scale-free networks, like the Internet and airline networks. Precisely, we disclose a way to systematically construct networks which are robust against random failures. Furthermore, as the size of the network increases, its shortest path becomes asymptotically invariant and the density of links goes to zero, making it ultra-small world and highly sparse, respectively. The first property is ideal for communication and navigation purposes, while the second is interesting economically. Finally, we show that some simple changes on the original network formulation can lead to an improved topology against malicious attacks. PMID:25765450

  19. Mandala networks: ultra-small-world and highly sparse graphs.

    PubMed

    Sampaio Filho, Cesar I N; Moreira, André A; Andrade, Roberto F S; Herrmann, Hans J; Andrade, José S

    2015-03-13

    The increasing demands in security and reliability of infrastructures call for the optimal design of their embedded complex networks topologies. The following question then arises: what is the optimal layout to fulfill best all the demands? Here we present a general solution for this problem with scale-free networks, like the Internet and airline networks. Precisely, we disclose a way to systematically construct networks which are robust against random failures. Furthermore, as the size of the network increases, its shortest path becomes asymptotically invariant and the density of links goes to zero, making it ultra-small world and highly sparse, respectively. The first property is ideal for communication and navigation purposes, while the second is interesting economically. Finally, we show that some simple changes on the original network formulation can lead to an improved topology against malicious attacks.

  20. Mandala Networks: ultra-small-world and highly sparse graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampaio Filho, Cesar I. N.; Moreira, André A.; Andrade, Roberto F. S.; Herrmann, Hans J.; Andrade, José S.

    2015-03-01

    The increasing demands in security and reliability of infrastructures call for the optimal design of their embedded complex networks topologies. The following question then arises: what is the optimal layout to fulfill best all the demands? Here we present a general solution for this problem with scale-free networks, like the Internet and airline networks. Precisely, we disclose a way to systematically construct networks which are robust against random failures. Furthermore, as the size of the network increases, its shortest path becomes asymptotically invariant and the density of links goes to zero, making it ultra-small world and highly sparse, respectively. The first property is ideal for communication and navigation purposes, while the second is interesting economically. Finally, we show that some simple changes on the original network formulation can lead to an improved topology against malicious attacks.

  1. High-intensity interval running is perceived to be more enjoyable than moderate-intensity continuous exercise: implications for exercise adherence.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, Jonathan D; Close, Graeme L; MacLaren, Don P M; Gregson, Warren; Drust, Barry; Morton, James P

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this study was to objectively quantify ratings of perceived enjoyment using the Physical Activity Enjoyment Scale following high-intensity interval running versus moderate-intensity continuous running. Eight recreationally active men performed two running protocols consisting of high-intensity interval running (6 × 3 min at 90% VO(2max) interspersed with 6 × 3 min active recovery at 50% VO(2max) with a 7-min warm-up and cool down at 70% VO(2max)) or 50 min moderate-intensity continuous running at 70% VO(2max). Ratings of perceived enjoyment after exercise were higher (P < 0.05) following interval running compared with continuous running (88 ± 6 vs. 61 ± 12) despite higher (P < 0.05) ratings of perceived exertion (14 ± 1 vs. 13 ± 1). There was no difference (P < 0.05) in average heart rate (88 ± 3 vs. 87 ± 3% maximum heart rate), average VO(2) (71 ± 6 vs. 73 ± 4%VO(2max)), total VO(2) (162 ± 16 vs. 166 ± 27 L) or energy expenditure (811 ± 83 vs. 832 ± 136 kcal) between protocols. The greater enjoyment associated with high-intensity interval running may be relevant for improving exercise adherence, since running is a low-cost exercise intervention requiring no exercise equipment and similar relative exercise intensities have previously induced health benefits in patient populations.

  2. High Intensity Laser Power Beaming Architecture for Space and Terrestrial Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nayfeh, Taysir; Fast, Brian; Raible, Daniel; Dinca, Dragos; Tollis, Nick; Jalics, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    High Intensity Laser Power Beaming (HILPB) has been developed as a technique to achieve Wireless Power Transmission (WPT) for both space and terrestrial applications. In this paper, the system architecture and hardware results for a terrestrial application of HILPB are presented. These results demonstrate continuous conversion of high intensity optical energy at near-IR wavelengths directly to electrical energy at output power levels as high as 6.24 W from the single cell 0.8 cm2 aperture receiver. These results are scalable, and may be realized by implementing receiver arraying and utilizing higher power source lasers. This type of system would enable long range optical refueling of electric platforms, such as MUAV s, airships, robotic exploration missions and provide power to spacecraft platforms which may utilize it to drive electric means of propulsion.

  3. Transverse Beam Halo Measurements at High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS) using Vibrating Wire Monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, M.; Hanna, B.; Scarpine, V.; Shiltsev, V.; Steimel, J.; Artinian, S.; Arutunian, S.

    2015-02-26

    The measurement and control of beam halos will be critical for the applications of future high-intensity hadron linacs. In particular, beam profile monitors require a very high dynamic range when used for the transverse beam halo measurements. In this study, the Vibrating Wire Monitor (VWM) with aperture 60 mm was installed at the High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS) front-end to measure the transverse beam halo. A vibrating wire is excited at its resonance frequency with the help of a magnetic feedback loop, and the vibrating and sensitive wires are connected through a balanced arm. The sensitive wire is moved into the beam halo region by a stepper motor controlled translational stage. We study the feasibility of the vibrating wire for the transverse beam halo measurements in the low-energy front-end of the proton linac.

  4. Optimisation extraction of chondroitin sulfate from fish bone by high intensity pulsed electric fields.

    PubMed

    He, Guidan; Yin, Yongguang; Yan, Xiaoxia; Yu, Qingyu

    2014-12-01

    High intensity pulsed electric fields (PEF) was used to extract chondroitin sulphate (CS) from fish bone. Results show that PEF extraction speed is much faster, and the content of CS is much higher compared with traditional methods. Variation of PEF parameters and the content of CS were determined by single factor experiments. The processing conditions were optimised by quadratic general rotary unitised design experiments. The maximum yield of 6.92 g/L was achieved under the following conditions: material-liquid ratio of 1:15 g/mL, electric field intensity of 16.88 kV/cm, pulse number of 9, and NaOH concentration of 3.24%. The purity of CS was analysed by agarose gel electrophoresis. CS purity was high, and the extract did not contain any other glycosaminoglycans. PEF can be widely used to extract CS with non-thermal performance, high speed, and low pollution.

  5. 25 CFR 39.143 - What is a small high school?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false What is a small high school? 39.143 Section 39.143... PROGRAM Indian School Equalization Formula Small School Adjustment § 39.143 What is a small high school? For purposes of this part, a small high school: (a) Is accredited under 25 U.S.C. 2001(b); (b)...

  6. 25 CFR 39.143 - What is a small high school?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What is a small high school? 39.143 Section 39.143... PROGRAM Indian School Equalization Formula Small School Adjustment § 39.143 What is a small high school? For purposes of this part, a small high school: (a) Is accredited under 25 U.S.C. 2001(b); (b)...

  7. 25 CFR 39.143 - What is a small high school?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false What is a small high school? 39.143 Section 39.143... PROGRAM Indian School Equalization Formula Small School Adjustment § 39.143 What is a small high school? For purposes of this part, a small high school: (a) Is accredited under 25 U.S.C. 2001(b); (b)...

  8. 25 CFR 39.143 - What is a small high school?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What is a small high school? 39.143 Section 39.143... PROGRAM Indian School Equalization Formula Small School Adjustment § 39.143 What is a small high school? For purposes of this part, a small high school: (a) Is accredited under 25 U.S.C. 2001(b); (b)...

  9. Photoionization of highly charged ions from ultra-intense, ultraviolet and near-infrared radiation fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekanayake, Nagitha

    High intensity laser light was instrumental for notable advances across an exceptional range of disciplines including plasma physics, quantum control, attosecond science, molecular dynamics, inertial confinement fusion, and optical science. Current laser technology has brought about the next generation of ultra-high intensities (1019 W/cm2). Our common understanding of light-matter interactions breaks down at these extreme intensities, especially when the liberated photoelectron becomes relativistic and the effect of the laser magnetic field is no longer negligible. As the ultrastrong laser science frontier involves unprecedented energy scales from 1 keV to 1 MeV and opens up an abundance of new high energy atomic and molecular processes, photoionization dynamics of atoms and molecules in super- and ultra-high intensity fields become an area of interest. The work presented in this dissertation is carried out to provide a better answer to the fundamental question "How atoms and molecules interact with super- and ultra-intense light fields?" In particular, the presented work will cover quantitative measurements of ionization products, ions and photoelectrons, from strong- (1013 -- 1016 W/cm2) to ultra-strong (10 16 -- 1019 W/cm2) field ionization of noble gas atoms (Ne, Kr, and Xe) and hydrocarbon molecules (CH4). In order to understand the molecular ionization processes at extreme intensities the ellipticity dependence of the ultrafast photoionization for Cn+ fragments from methane is investigated. The study extends from the strong field (C+, C2+) at 10 14 W/cm2 to the ultrastrong field (C5+) at 1018 W/cm2. The first precision measurements of ionization of Ne and Kr at 400 nm are presented from 1013 to 1017 W/cm2 for charge states up to Kr 8+. The findings indicate that ultraviolet to vacuum ultraviolet wavelengths can give the largest recollision for higher charge states. Experimental photoelectron measurements from single atom photoionization of noble gases

  10. High-intensity interval training has positive effects on performance in ice hockey players.

    PubMed

    Naimo, M A; de Souza, E O; Wilson, J M; Carpenter, A L; Gilchrist, P; Lowery, R P; Averbuch, B; White, T M; Joy, J

    2015-01-01

    In spite of the well-known benefits that have been shown, few studies have looked at the practical applications of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) on athletic performance. This study investigated the effects of a HIIT program compared to traditional continuous endurance exercise training. 24 hockey players were randomly assigned to either a continuous or high-intensity interval group during a 4-week training program. The interval group (IG) was involved in a periodized HIIT program. The continuous group (CG) performed moderate intensity cycling for 45-60 min at an intensity that was 65% of their calculated heart rate reserve. Body composition, muscle thickness, anaerobic power, and on-ice measures were assessed pre- and post-training. Muscle thickness was significantly greater in IG (p=0.01) when compared to CG. The IG had greater values for both ∆ peak power (p<0.003) and ∆ mean power (p<0.02). Additionally, IG demonstrated a faster ∆ sprint (p<0.02) and a trend (p=0.08) for faster ∆ endurance test time to completion for IG. These results indicate that hockey players may utilize short-term HIIT to elicit positive effects in muscle thickness, power and on-ice performance.

  11. High-intensity exercise training for the prevention of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Rynders, Corey A; Weltman, Arthur

    2014-02-01

    Aerobic exercise training and diet are recommended for the primary prevention of type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends that adults with prediabetes engage in ≥ 150 minutes per week of moderate activity and target a 7% weight loss. However, traditional moderate-intensity (MI) exercise training programs are often difficult to sustain for prediabetic adults; a commonly cited barrier to physical activity in this population is the "lack of time" to exercise. When matched for total energy expenditure, high-intensity (HI) exercise training has a lower overall time commitment compared with traditional low-intensity (LI) or MI exercise training. Several recent studies comparing HI exercise training with LI and MI exercise training reported that HI exercise training improves skeletal muscle metabolic control and cardiovascular function in a comparable and/or superior way relative to LI and MI exercise training. Although patients can accrue all exercise benefits by performing LI or MI activities such as walking, HI activities represent a time-efficient alternative to meeting physical activity guidelines. High-intensity exercise training is a potent tool for improving cardiometabolic risk for prediabetic patients with limited time and may be prescribed when appropriate.

  12. Measurement and interpretation of threshold stress intensity factors for steels in high-pressure hydrogen gas.

    SciTech Connect

    Nibur, Kevin A.

    2010-11-01

    Threshold stress intensity factors were measured in high-pressure hydrogen gas for a variety of low alloy ferritic steels using both constant crack opening displacement and rising crack opening displacement procedures. The sustained load cracking procedures are generally consistent with those in ASME Article KD-10 of Section VIII Division 3 of the Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, which was recently published to guide design of high-pressure hydrogen vessels. Three definitions of threshold were established for the two test methods: K{sub THi}* is the maximum applied stress intensity factor for which no crack extension was observed under constant displacement; K{sub THa} is the stress intensity factor at the arrest position for a crack that extended under constant displacement; and K{sub JH} is the stress intensity factor at the onset of crack extension under rising displacement. The apparent crack initiation threshold under constant displacement, K{sub THi}*, and the crack arrest threshold, K{sub THa}, were both found to be non-conservative due to the hydrogen exposure and crack-tip deformation histories associated with typical procedures for sustained-load cracking tests under constant displacement. In contrast, K{sub JH}, which is measured under concurrent rising displacement and hydrogen gas exposure, provides a more conservative hydrogen-assisted fracture threshold that is relevant to structural components in which sub-critical crack extension is driven by internal hydrogen gas pressure.

  13. Measurement and interpretation of threshold stress intensity factors for steels in high-pressure hydrogen gas.

    SciTech Connect

    Dadfarnia, Mohsen; Nibur, Kevin A.; San Marchi, Christopher W.; Sofronis, Petros; Somerday, Brian P.; Foulk, James W., III; Hayden, Gary A.

    2010-07-01

    Threshold stress intensity factors were measured in high-pressure hydrogen gas for a variety of low alloy ferritic steels using both constant crack opening displacement and rising crack opening displacement procedures. The sustained load cracking procedures are generally consistent with those in ASME Article KD-10 of Section VIII Division 3 of the Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, which was recently published to guide design of high-pressure hydrogen vessels. Three definitions of threshold were established for the two test methods: K{sub THi}* is the maximum applied stress intensity factor for which no crack extension was observed under constant displacement; K{sub THa} is the stress intensity factor at the arrest position for a crack that extended under constant displacement; and K{sub JH} is the stress intensity factor at the onset of crack extension under rising displacement. The apparent crack initiation threshold under constant displacement, K{sub THi}*, and the crack arrest threshold, K{sub THa}, were both found to be non-conservative due to the hydrogen exposure and crack-tip deformation histories associated with typical procedures for sustained-load cracking tests under constant displacement. In contrast, K{sub JH}, which is measured under concurrent rising displacement and hydrogen gas exposure, provides a more conservative hydrogen-assisted fracture threshold that is relevant to structural components in which sub-critical crack extension is driven by internal hydrogen gas pressure.

  14. Reflectivity of plasmas created by high-intensity, ultra-short laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Gold, D.M.

    1994-06-01

    Experiments were performed to characterize the creation and evolution of high-temperature (T{sub e}{approximately}100eV), high-density (n{sub e}>10{sup 22}cm{sup {minus}3}) plasmas created with intense ({approximately}10{sup 12}-10{sup 16}W/cm{sup 2}), ultra-short (130fs) laser pulses. The principle diagnostic was plasma reflectivity at optical wavelengths (614nm). An array of target materials (Al, Au, Si, SiO{sub 2}) with widely differing electronic properties tested plasma behavior over a large set of initial states. Time-integrated plasma reflectivity was measured as a function of laser intensity. Space- and time-resolved reflectivity, transmission and scatter were measured with a spatial resolution of {approximately}3{mu}m and a temporal resolution of 130fs. An amplified, mode-locked dye laser system was designed to produce {approximately}3.5mJ, {approximately}130fs laser pulses to create and nonintrusively probe the plasmas. Laser prepulse was carefully controlled to suppress preionization and give unambiguous, high-density plasma results. In metals (Al and Au), it is shown analytically that linear and nonlinear inverse Bremsstrahlung absorption, resonance absorption, and vacuum heating explain time-integrated reflectivity at intensities near 10{sup 16}W/cm{sup 2}. In the insulator, SiO{sub 2}, a non-equilibrium plasma reflectivity model using tunneling ionization, Helmholtz equations, and Drude conductivity agrees with time-integrated reflectivity measurements. Moreover, a comparison of ionization and Saha equilibration rates shows that plasma formed by intense, ultra-short pulses can exist with a transient, non-equilibrium distribution of ionization states. All targets are shown to approach a common reflectivity at intensities {approximately}10{sup 16}W/cm{sup 2}, indicating a material-independent state insensitive to atomic or solid-state details.

  15. High concentration (2500 suns), high throughput, automated flash tester with calibrated color balance and intensity control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludowise, Michael; Taylor, Sean; Lucow, Ewelina; Chan, Hing

    2008-08-01

    SolFocus has designed and built a flexible and adaptable solar flash tester capable of reaching in excess of 2500x suns flux using a commercially available Xenon flash and power supply. Using calibrated isotype cells and photodetectors, the intensity and color balance of the flash are controlled through software algorithms that compensate for tube aging and thermal drift. The data acquisition system dynamically normalizes each of the 1600 I-V data pairs to the lamp intensity during each flash. Up to 32 cells can be measured simultaneously, with a flash re-cycle time of 3 seconds. The dynamic current range is 100μA to 10A over 0 to 5V. Test ranges are limited by user input through a modern GUI screen. The system is mated to a commercially available probe station tester which allows automated testing of up to 150mm diameter wafers, and is capable of testing a 4000 cell wafer in less than 8 minutes. The core software and optical components are easily adaptable to receiver and full panel testing as well. Data on the calibration and performance of the flash tester, the dynamic range achieved in test, and throughputs obtained during operation are presented.

  16. High-intensity ultrasonication as a way to prepare graphene/amorphous iron oxyhydroxide hybrid electrode with high capacity in lithium battery.

    PubMed

    González, José R; Menéndez, Rosa; Alcántara, Ricardo; Nacimiento, Francisco; Tirado, José L; Zhecheva, Ekaterina; Stoyanova, Radostina

    2015-05-01

    The preparation of graphene/iron oxyhydroxide hybrid electrode material with very homogeneous distribution and close contact of graphene and amorphous iron oxyhydroxide nanoparticles has been achieved by using high-intensity ultrasonication. Due to the negative charge of the graphene surface, iron ions are attracted toward the surface of dispersed graphene, according to the zeta potential measurements. The anchoring of the FeO(OH) particles to the graphene layers has been revealed by using mainly TEM, XPS and EPR. TEM observations show that the size of the iron oxide particles is about 4 nm. The ultrasonication treatment is the key parameter to achieve small particle size in these graphene/iron oxyhydroxide hybrid materials. The electrochemical behavior of composite graphene/amorphous iron oxyhydroxide prepared by using high-intensity ultrasonication is outstanding in terms of gravimetric capacity and cycling stability, particularly when metallic foam is used as both the substrate and current collector. The XRD-amorphous character of iron oxyhydroxide in the hybrid electrode material and the small particle size contribute to achieve the improved electrochemical performance.

  17. Rate modulation of human anconeus motor units during high-intensity dynamic elbow extensions.

    PubMed

    Cowling, Brianna L; Harwood, Brad; Copithorne, David B; Rice, Charles L

    2016-08-01

    Investigations of high-intensity isometric fatiguing protocols report decreases in motor unit firing rates (MUFRs), but little is known regarding changes in MUFRs following fatigue induced by high-intensity dynamic contractions. Our purpose was to evaluate MUFRs of the anconeus (an accessory elbow extensor) and elbow extension power production as a function of time to task failure (TTF) during high-velocity fatiguing concentric contractions against a moderately heavy resistance. Fine-wire intramuscular electrode pairs were inserted into the anconeus to record MUs in 12 male participants (25 ± 3 yr), over repeated sessions on separate days. MUs were tracked throughout a three-stage, varying load dynamic elbow extension protocol designed to extend the task duration for >1 min thereby inducing substantial fatigue. Mean MUFRs and peak power were calculated for three relative time ranges: 0-15% TTF (beginning), 45-60% TTF (middle) and 85-100% TTF (end). Mean duration of the overall fatigue protocol was ∼80 s. Following the protocol, isometric maximum voluntary contraction (MVC), highest velocity at 35% MVC load, and peak power decreased 37, 60, and 64% compared with baseline, respectively. Data from 20 anconeus MUs tracked successfully throughout the protocol indicated a reduction in MUFRs in relation to power loss from 36 Hz/160 W (0-15% TTF) to 28 Hz/97 W (45-60% TTF) to 23 Hz/43 W (85-100% TTF). During these high-intensity maximal effort concentric contractions, anconeus MUFRs decreased substantially (>35%). Although the absolute MUFRs were higher in the present study than those reported previously for other muscles during sustained high-intensity isometric tasks, the relative decrease in MUFRs was similar between the two tasks. PMID:27283910

  18. Postprandial lipoprotein profile in two modes of high-intensity intermittent exercise

    PubMed Central

    Panissa, Valéria Leme Gonçalves; Julio, Ursula Ferreira; Diniz, Tiego Aparecido; de Moura Mello Antunes, Barbara; Lira, Fabio Santos; Takito, Monica Yuri; Franchini, Emerson

    2016-01-01

    The aim of present study was to compare blood lipid postprandial profile response in two modes of high-intensity intermittent exercise. Twelve individuals (6 men and 6 women) were submitted to a maximal incremental test (to determine maximal aerobic power [MAP] and V. O2peak [peak oxygen uptake]), high-intensity intermittent all-out exercise (60×8-sec bouts interspersed by 12-sec passive recovery) and fixed high-intensity intermittent exercise (100% maximal aerobic speed, consisted of 1-min repetitions at MAP [70 rpm] separated by 1-min of passive recovery). Blood samples were collected pre, immediately, 45 and 90-min postexercise. Serum was analyzed for total cholesterol and its ratio, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c), very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) cholesterol, and triacylglycerol (TAG). For TAG there was a main effect of moment with higher values immediately postexercise compared to 45-min postexercise. For VLDL there was a main effect to moment with higher values immediately post exercise than pre and 45-min postexercise; higher values 90-min postexercise than 45-min postexercise. There was no effect for HDL-c, LDL-c, and cholesterol. For area under the curve there was no difference for any variable. Our results indicated that both kinds of acute exercise session lead to no improvement in the acute response of serum lipid profile of healthy young. PMID:27807528

  19. Proton Linac Front End for High Intensity Neutrino Source at Fermilab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tam, Wai-Ming; Apollinari, Giorgio; Madrak, Robyn; Moretti, Alfred; Ristori, Leonardo; Romanov, Gennady; Steimel, James; Webber, Robert; Wildman, David

    2008-04-01

    Fermilab has recently proposed the construction of an 8 GeV superconducting linac for the exploration of the high intensity frontier. The High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS) R&D program was established to explore the feasibility of certain technical solutions proposed for the front end of a high intensity linac. The low energy (˜60 MeV) section operates at 325 MHz and comprises an RFQ, two re-buncher cavities, 16 room temperature (RT) and 29 superconducting cross-bar H-type resonators, and superconducting solenoid focusing elements. One of the distinguishing features of this linac is the use of one klystron to feed multiple radio frequency (RF) elements. As an example, the RFQ, the re-bunchers and the 16 RT cavities are powered by a single 2.5 MW pulsed klystron. To achieve individual control over the phase and the voltage amplitude, each of the RF elements is equipped with a high power vector modulator. The RF control system will be discussed. The first RT cavity is completed with a power coupler, two mechanical tuners, vacuum and cooling systems, and has been RF conditioned. Preliminary tests on resonance frequency stability control and tests results of the cavity resonance frequency response to cooling water temperature and tuner position will also be discussed.

  20. Report of the Snowmass M6 Working Group on high intensity proton sources

    SciTech Connect

    Weiren Chou and J. Wei

    2002-08-20

    The U.S. high-energy physics program needs an intense proton source, a 1-4 MW Proton Driver (PD), by the end of this decade. This machine will serve as a stand-alone facility that will provide neutrino superbeams and other high intensity secondary beams such as kaons, muons, neutrons, and anti-protons (cf. E1 and E5 group reports) and also serve as the first stage of a neutrino factory (cf. M1 group report). It can also be a high brightness source for a VLHC. Based on present accelerator technology and project construction experience, it is both feasible and cost-effective to construct a 1-4 MW Proton Driver. Two recent PD design studies have been made, one at FNAL and the other at the BNL. Both designed PD's for 1 MW proton beams at a cost of about U.S. $200M (excluding contingency and overhead) and both designs were upgradeable to 4 MW. An international collaboration between FNAL, BNL and KEK on high intensity proton facilities is addressing a number of key design issues. The superconducting (sc) RF cavities, cryogenics, and RF controls developed for the SNS can be directly adopted to save R&D efforts, cost, and schedule. PD studies are also actively being pursued at Europe and Japan.

  1. REPORT OF THE SNOWMASS M6 WORKING GROUP ON HIGH INTENSITY PROTON SOURCES.

    SciTech Connect

    CHOU,W.; WEI,J.

    2001-08-14

    The M6 working group had more than 40 active participants (listed in Section 4). During the three weeks at Snowmass, there were about 50 presentations, covering a wide range of topics associated with high intensity proton sources. The talks are listed in Section 5. This group also had joint sessions with a number of other working groups, including E1 (Neutrino Factories and Muon Colliders), E5 (Fixed-Target Experiments), M1 (Muon Based Systems), T4 (Particle Sources), T5 (Beam dynamics), T7 (High Performance Computing) and T9 (Diagnostics). The M6 group performed a survey of the beam parameters of existing and proposed high intensity proton sources, in particular, of the proton drivers. The results are listed in Table 1. These parameters are compared with the requirements of high-energy physics users of secondary beams in Working Groups E1 and E5. According to the consensus reached in the E1 and E5 groups, the U.S. HEP program requires an intense proton source, a 1-4 MW Proton Driver, by the end of this decade.

  2. Effect of β-alanine supplementation on high-intensity exercise performance.

    PubMed

    Harris, Roger C; Stellingwerff, Trent

    2013-01-01

    Carnosine is a dipeptide of β-alanine and L-histidine found in high concentrations in skeletal muscle. Combined with β-alanine, the pKa of the histidine imidazole ring is raised to ∼6.8, placing it within the muscle intracellular pH high-intensity exercise transit range. Combination with β-alanine renders the dipeptide inert to intracellular enzymic hydrolysis and blocks the histidinyl residue from participation in proteogenesis, thus making it an ideal, stable intracellular buffer. For vegetarians, synthesis is limited by β-alanine availability; for meat-eaters, hepatic synthesis is supplemented with β-alanine from the hydrolysis of dietary carnosine. Direct oral β-alanine supplementation will compensate for low meat and fish intake, significantly raising the muscle carnosine concentration. This is best achieved with a sustained-release formulation of β-alanine to avoid paresthesia symptoms and decreasing urinary spillover. In humans, increased levels of carnosine through β-alanine supplementation have been shown to increase exercise capacity and performance of several types, particularly where the high-intensity exercise range is 1-4 min. β-Alanine supplementation is used by athletes competing in high-intensity track and field cycling, rowing, swimming events and other competitions.

  3. Effect of β-alanine supplementation on high-intensity exercise performance.

    PubMed

    Harris, Roger C; Stellingwerff, Trent

    2013-01-01

    Carnosine is a dipeptide of β-alanine and L-histidine found in high concentrations in skeletal muscle. Combined with β-alanine, the pKa of the histidine imidazole ring is raised to ∼6.8, placing it within the muscle intracellular pH high-intensity exercise transit range. Combination with β-alanine renders the dipeptide inert to intracellular enzymic hydrolysis and blocks the histidinyl residue from participation in proteogenesis, thus making it an ideal, stable intracellular buffer. For vegetarians, synthesis is limited by β-alanine availability; for meat-eaters, hepatic synthesis is supplemented with β-alanine from the hydrolysis of dietary carnosine. Direct oral β-alanine supplementation will compensate for low meat and fish intake, significantly raising the muscle carnosine concentration. This is best achieved with a sustained-release formulation of β-alanine to avoid paresthesia symptoms and decreasing urinary spillover. In humans, increased levels of carnosine through β-alanine supplementation have been shown to increase exercise capacity and performance of several types, particularly where the high-intensity exercise range is 1-4 min. β-Alanine supplementation is used by athletes competing in high-intensity track and field cycling, rowing, swimming events and other competitions. PMID:23899755

  4. Energy gain and spectral tailoring of ion beams using ultra-high intensity laser beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Rajendra; Swantusch, Marco; Cerchez, Mirela; Spickermann, Sven; Auorand, Bastian; Wowra, Thomas; Boeker, Juergen; Willi, Oswald

    2015-11-01

    The field of laser driven ion acceleration over the past decade has produced a huge amount of research. Nowadays, several multi-beam facilities with high rep rate system, e.g. ELI, are being developed across the world for different kinds of experiments. The study of interaction dynamics of multiple beams possessing ultra-high intensity and ultra-short pulse duration is of vital importance. Here, we present the first experimental results on ion acceleration using two ultra-high intensity beams. Thanks to the unique capability of Arcturus laser at HHU Düsseldorf, two almost identical, independent beams in laser parameters such as intensity (>1020 W/cm2), pulse duration (30 fs) and contrast (>1010), could be accessed. Both beams are focused onto a 5 μm thin Ti target. While ensuring spatial overlap of the two beams, at relative temporal delay of ~ 50 ps (optimum delay), the proton and carbon ion energies were enhanced by factor of 1.5. Moreover, strong modulation in C4+ions near the high energy cut-off is observed later than the optimum delay for the proton enhancement. This offers controlled tailoring of the spectral content of heavy ions.

  5. High-intensity statin therapy and regression of coronary atherosclerosis in patients with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Athyros, Vasilios G; Katsiki, Niki; Karagiannis, Asterios; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P

    2015-01-01

    Recommended low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels for patients with documented cardiovascular disease (CVD) are <100mg/dL (2.6mmol/l) with further reduction to <70mg/dL (1.8mmol/l) for higher-risk patients. High-intensity statin treatment may halt the progression as well as stabilize and induce regression of coronary atheromatous plaques while lowering CVD event rates. Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a major negative determinant of coronary artery plaque regression during statin therapy. However, regression of coronary atherosclerosis in DM patients is feasible to the same degree as in those without DM when very low LDL-C values (<70mg/dL; 1.8mmol/l) are achieved with high intensity statin treatment. The recent 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (ACC/AHA) Guidelines on the Treatment of Blood Cholesterol to Reduce Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Risk in Adults suggest to abandon specific LDL-C treatment targets. This strategy may deprive high risk patients, such as those with DM, from very high intensity statin treatment or drug combinations aiming to achieve very low LDL-C levels in order to reduce clinical events.

  6. High resolution modeling of a small urban catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skouri-Plakali, Ilektra; Ichiba, Abdellah; Gires, Auguste; Tchiguirinskaia, Ioulia; Schertzer, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    Flooding is one of the most complex issues that urban environments have to deal with. In France, flooding remains the first natural risk with 72% of decrees state of natural disaster issued between October 1982 and mid-November 2014. Flooding is a result of meteorological extremes that are usually aggravated by the hydrological behavior of urban catchments and human factors. The continuing urbanization process is indeed changing the whole urban water cycle by limiting the infiltration and promoting runoff. Urban environments are very complex systems due to their extreme variability, the interference between human activities and natural processes but also the effect of the ongoing urbanization process that changes the landscape and hardly influences their hydrologic behavior. Moreover, many recent works highlight the need to simulate all urban water processes at their specific temporal and spatial scales. However, considering urban catchments heterogeneity still challenging for urban hydrology, even after advances noticed in term of high-resolution data collection and computational resources. This issue is more to be related to the architecture of urban models being used and how far these models are ready to take into account the extreme variability of urban catchments. In this work, high spatio-temporal resolution modeling is performed for a small and well-equipped urban catchment. The aim of this work is to identify urban modeling needs in terms of spatial and temporal resolution especially for a very small urban area (3.7 ha urban catchment located in the Perreux-sur-Marne city at the southeast of Paris) MultiHydro model was selected to carry out this work, it is a physical based and fully distributed model that interacts four existing modules each of them representing a portion of the water cycle in urban environments. MultiHydro was implemented at 10m, 5m and 2m resolution. Simulations were performed at different spatio-temporal resolutions and analyzed with

  7. High Performance Regime with Small ELMs in NSTX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maingi, Rajesh

    2004-11-01

    A high performance regime with small edge-localized modes (ELMs) has been observed in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). The ELMS ("type V") are consistent with high bootstrap current operation with line average density approaching Greenwald scaling, and provide enhanced edge particle transport compared with ELM-free discharges. Each individual ELM has no measurable impact on stored energy, The ELM perturbation is observed via ultra-soft X-rays (USXR) to typically originate near the lower divertor region and propagate with a poloidal component toward the outer midplane and often to the top of the machine. An electromagnetic signature is observed before the USXR perturbation on separate poloidal and toroidal Mirnov arrays, indicating a toroidal mode number of n=1, propagation counter to the plasma current, and persistence for up to two toroidal transit times. These type V ELMs are distinct from both type I and type III ELMs, which have also been observed in NSTX, and can co-exist with type I ELMs. When the type V ELMS are present, there is no evidence of an edge harmonic oscillation as observed in DIII-D quiescent H-mode discharges, or of an edge quasi-coherent mode observed in the PDX forced density rise scenario and the C-MOD Enhanced D-alpha H-mode scenario.

  8. Evaluating Intervention Fidelity: An Example from a High-Intensity Interval Training Study

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Kathryn L.; Weston, Matthew; Batterham, Alan M.

    2015-01-01

    Aim Intervention fidelity refers to the degree to which an experimental manipulation has been implemented as intended, but simple, robust methods for quantifying fidelity have not been well documented. Therefore, we aim to illustrate a rigorous quantitative evaluation of intervention fidelity, using data collected during a high-intensity interval training intervention. Design Single-group measurement study. Methods Seventeen adolescents (mean age ± standard deviation [SD] 14.0 ± 0.3 years) attended a 10-week high-intensity interval training intervention, comprising two exercise sessions per week. Sessions consisted of 4-7 45-s maximal effort repetitions, interspersed with 90-s rest. We collected heart rate data at 5-s intervals and recorded the peak heart rate for each repetition. The high-intensity exercise criterion was ≥90% of individual maximal heart rate. For each participant, we calculated the proportion of total exercise repetitions exceeding this threshold. A linear mixed model was applied to properly separate the variability in peak heart rate between- and within-subjects. Results are presented both as intention to treat (including missed sessions) and per protocol (only participants with 100% attendance; n=8). Results For intention to treat, the median (interquartile range) proportion of repetitions meeting the high-intensity criterion was 58% (42% to 68%). The mean peak heart rate was 85% of maximal, with a between-subject SD of 7.8 (95% confidence interval 5.4 to 11.3) percentage points and a within-subject SD of 15.1 (14.6 to 15.6) percentage points. For the per protocol analysis, the median proportion of high-intensity repetitions was 68% (47% to 86%). The mean peak heart rate was 91% of maximal, with between- and within-subject SDs of 3.1 (-1.3 to 4.6) and 3.4 (3.2 to 3.6) percentage points, respectively. Conclusions Synthesising information on exercise session attendance and compliance (exercise intensity) quantifies the intervention dose and

  9. Reactor target from metal chromium for "pure" high-intensive artificial neutrino source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrin, V. N.; Kozlova, Yu. P.; Veretenkin, E. P.; Logachev, A. V.; Logacheva, A. I.; Lednev, I. S.; Okunkova, A. A.

    2016-03-01

    The paper presents the first results of development of manufacturing technology of metallic chromium targets from highly enriched isotope 50Cr for irradiation in a high flux nuclear reactor to obtain a compact high intensity neutrino source with low content of radionuclide impurities and minimum losses of enriched isotope. The main technological stages are the hydrolysis of chromyl fluoride, the electrochemical reduction of metallic chromium, the hot isostatic pressing of chromium powder and the electrical discharge machining of chromium bars. The technological stages of hot isostatic pressing of chromium powder and of electrical discharge machining of Cr rods have been tested.

  10. High intensity compact Compton X-ray sources: Challenges and potential of applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacquet, M.

    2014-07-01

    Thanks to the exceptional development of high power femtosecond lasers in the last 15 years, Compton based X-ray sources are in full development over the world in the recent years. Compact Compton sources are able to combine the compactness of the instrument with a beam of high intensity, high quality, tunable in energy. In various fields of applications such as biomedical science, cultural heritage preservation and material science researches, these sources should provide an easy working environment and the methods currently used at synchrotrons could be largely developed in a lab-size environment as hospitals, labs, or museums.

  11. Ionization and acceleration of heavy ions in high-Z solid target irradiated by high intensity laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawahito, D.; Kishimoto, Y.

    2016-05-01

    In the interaction between high intensity laser and solid film, an ionization dynamics inside the solid is dominated by fast time scale convective propagation of the internal sheath field and the slow one by impact ionization due to heated high energy electrons coupled with nonlocal heat transport. Furthermore, ionization and acceleration due to the localized external sheath field which co- propagates with Al ions constituting the high energy front in the vacuum region. Through this process, the maximum charge state and then q/A increase in the rear side, so that ions near the front are further accelerated to high energy.

  12. Specificity of high-intensity intermittent action remains important to MMA athletes' physical conditioning: response to Paillard (2011).

    PubMed

    Del Vecchio, Fabrício Boscolo; Franchini, Emerson

    2013-02-01

    This response to Paillard (2011) focuses on the intermittent nature of mixed martial arts (MMA). It also emphasizes that the main goal of MMA athletes is to win by knockout or submission and that these actions normally are high-intensity actions or preceded by high-intensity actions. Additionally, there is evidence that high-intensity intermittent exercise protocols are able to improve aerobic fitness. It is important only to adjust physical training to the athletes' techniques and tactics. PMID:23829149

  13. Effects of High-Intensity Blood Flow Restriction Exercise on Muscle Fatigue

    PubMed Central

    Neto, Gabriel R.; Santos, Heleodório H.; Sousa, Juliana B. C.; Júnior, Adenilson T. A.; Araújo, Joamira P.; Aniceto, Rodrigo R.; Sousa, Maria S. C.

    2014-01-01

    Strength training combined with blood flow restriction (BFR) have been used to improve the levels of muscle adaptation. The aim of this paper was to investigate the acute effect of high intensity squats with and without blood flow restriction on muscular fatigue levels. Twelve athletes (aged 25.95 ± 0.84 years) were randomized into two groups: without Blood Flow Restriction (NFR, n = 6) and With Blood Flow Restriction (WFR, n = 6) that performed a series of free weight squats with 80% 1-RM until concentric failure. The strength of the quadriceps extensors was assessed in a maximum voluntary isometric contraction integrated to signals from the surface electromyogram. The average frequency showed significant reductions in the WFR group for the vastus lateralis and vastus medialis muscles, and intergroup only for the vastus medialis. In conclusion, a set of squats at high intensity with BFR could compromise muscle strength immediately after exercise, however, differences were not significant between groups. PMID:25114743

  14. Surface area generation and droplet size control in solvent extraction systems utilizing high intensity electric fields

    DOEpatents

    Scott, Timothy C.; Wham, Robert M.

    1988-01-01

    A method and system for solvent extraction where droplets are shattered by a high intensity electric field. These shattered droplets form a plurality of smaller droplets which have a greater combined surface area than the original droplet. Dispersion, coalescence and phase separation are accomplished in one vessel through the use of the single pulsing high intensity electric field. Electric field conditions are chosen so that simultaneous dispersion and coalescence are taking place in the emulsion formed in the electric field. The electric field creates a large amount of interfacial surface area for solvent extraction when the droplet is disintegrated and is capable of controlling droplet size and thus droplet stability. These operations take place in the presence of a counter current flow of the continuous phase.

  15. Calculation of synchrotron radiation from high intensity electron beam at eRHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Jing Y.; Chubar, O.; Litvinenko, V.

    2012-05-20

    The Electron-Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (eRHIC) at Brookhaven National Lab is an upgrade project for the existing RHIC. A 30 GeV energy recovery linac (ERL) will provide a high charge and high quality electron beam to collide with proton and ion beams. This will improve the luminosity by at least 2 orders of magnitude. The synchrotron radiation (SR) from the bending magnets and strong quadrupoles for such an intense beam could be penetrating the vacuum chamber and producing hazards to electronic devices and undesired background for detectors. In this paper, we calculate the SR spectral intensity, power density distributions and heat load on the chamber wall. We suggest the wall thickness required to stop the SR and estimate spectral characteristics of the residual and scattered background radiation outside the chamber.

  16. High intensity electrical stimulation effect on thigh musculature during immobilization for knee sprain. A case report.

    PubMed

    Nitz, A J; Dobner, J J

    1987-02-01

    We conducted high intensity electrical stimulation of the quadriceps femoris and hamstring muscle groups daily during a three-week period of lower extremity cast immobilization for an athlete who sustained Grade II medial collateral and anterior cruciate ligament sprains. Thigh muscle hypertrophy of the injured (stimulated) leg was suggested by an increase in girth measurement on the day of cast removal. Three weeks after cast removal, single-leg, vertical-leap height was 92% of that accomplished by the dominant, uninjured leg, and the patient was able to return to athletic competition. This case report documents the usefulness of high intensity electrical stimulation for maintaining limb motor function during cast immobilization. Limb stabilization during stimulation and simultaneous excitation of agonist-antagonist muscle pairs also are discussed.

  17. High-intensity interval training for intermittent claudication in a vascular rehabilitation program.

    PubMed

    Adams, Jenny; Ogola, Gerald; Stafford, Pamala; Koutras, Phoebus; Hartman, Julie

    2006-06-01

    This article reports an observational study investigating the safety and effectiveness of a high-intensity interval exercise program for patients with peripheral arterial disease. Patients were asked to walk on a treadmill to maximal claudication pain six times in each exercise session, with 3-minute rests in between. Once a patient could walk continuously for 6 minutes without reaching maximal pain, speed and/or grade was increased. To account for the changes in speed and grade, patients' walking ability was measured as a rehabilitation score, calculated as the product of the two. A total of 47 patients were included in the study. Results showed overall improvement in the rehabilitation score with participation in the program, and specifically showed that participation in more exercise sessions led to greater improvement. Moreover, no adverse events occurred in the study patients, suggesting patients with peripheral arterial disease can safely tolerate high-intensity exercise programs.

  18. High-power and low-intensity noise laser at 1064  nm.

    PubMed

    Guiraud, Germain; Traynor, Nicholas; Santarelli, Giorgio

    2016-09-01

    We have developed a single-frequency, narrow-linewidth (Δν<50  kHz) laser operating at 1064 nm with a high output power (50 W). The laser is based on an ytterbium-doped fiber master oscillator power amplifier architecture with an output beam at the diffraction limit. An output power of 50 W is obtained with two amplification stages using a 50 mW diode laser seeder. We have carefully studied the relative intensity noise at each amplification stage. The detrimental effect due to stimulated Brillouin scattering on residual amplitude noise has been observed on the high-power booster stage. After careful optimization, this laser exhibits low intensity noise with a RMS value equal to 0.012% (1 kHz/10 MHz) at 50 W. PMID:27607967

  19. Intracranial lesions with high signal intensity on T1-weighted MR images - review of pathologies.

    PubMed

    Zimny, Anna; Zińska, Lidia; Bladowska, Joanna; Neska-Matuszewska, Małgorzata; Sąsiadek, Marek

    2013-10-01

    In the article we present pathological intracranial substances and lesions, which produce high signal intensity on T1-weighted MR images. Six groups of substances are discussed: 1. Gadolinium - based contrast agents, 2.hemoglobin degradation products (intra- and extra-cellular methemoglobin), 3. lipid-containing lesions (lipoma, dermoid cyst, implanted fatty materials, laminar cortical necrosis), 4. substances with high concentration of proteins (colloid cyst, craniopharyngioma, Rathke's cleft cyst, ectopic posterior pituitary gland), 5. melanin (metastatic melanoma), 6. lesions containing mineral substances such as: calcium (calcifications, Fahr's disease), copper (Wilson's disease) and manganese (hepatic encephalopathy, manganese intoxication in intravenous drug abusers). Appropriate interpretation of signal intensity as well as analysis of location of lesions and clinical symptoms enables planning of further diagnostics and, in many cases, establishing the final diagnosis based on MR examination. PMID:24505222

  20. Alterations to Functional Analysis Methodology to Clarify the Functions of Low Rate, High Intensity Problem Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Barbara J; Kahng, SungWoo; Schmidt, Jonathan; Bowman, Lynn G; Boelter, Eric W

    2012-01-01

    Current research provides few suggestions for modifications to functional analysis procedures to accommodate low rate, high intensity problem behavior. This study examined the results of the extended duration functional analysis procedures of Kahng, Abt, and Schonbachler (2001) with six children admitted to an inpatient hospital for the treatment of severe problem behavior. Results of initial functional analyses (Iwata, Dorsey, Slifer, Bauman, & Richman, 1982/1994) were inconclusive for all children because of low levels of responding. The altered functional analyses, which changed multiple variables including the duration of the functional analysis (i.e., 6 or 7 hrs), yielded clear behavioral functions for all six participants. These results add additional support for the utility of an altered analysis of low rate, high intensity problem behavior when standard functional analyses do not yield differentiated results. PMID:23326628