Science.gov

Sample records for small-scale spatial variability

  1. Small-Scale Spatial Variability of Ozone in Boulder, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deanes, L. N.; Sadighi, K.; Casey, J. G.; Collier, A. M.; Hannigan, M.

    2015-12-01

    Surface ozone (O3) can pose several health risks to humans, such as an increased number of and intensity of asthma attacks. Considering this, it is important that ozone levels are monitored. While municipal air quality monitors are present in cities like Boulder, Colorado, these monitors often only consider regional analysis, neglecting the variability of compounds, such as ozone or carbon monoxide, over smaller distances. Small-scale (approximately 1 kilometer) spatial variability in ozone is important because humans experience these small scales on a daily basis. Using low-cost, next-generation air quality monitors ("pods") developed at the University of Colorado-Boulder, we assessed small-scale spatial variability of surface ozone in Boulder, Colorado. This was done by placing clusters of 4-5 pods within approximately 1 kilometer of each other at specific sites in the city of Boulder. We collected data at two sites: one on the University of Colorado-Boulder campus (i.e., an urban site) and one outside of the city (i.e., a rural site). Pods were left in their positions for one to two weeks allowing for observation of ozone trends. As expected the typical diurnal trend was observed; however, further analysis revealed differences between these daily trends. Data collected by the pods allows for better understanding of small-scale spatial variability of surface ozone and how this may be driven by nearby sources.

  2. Phytoplankton spatial distribution in south San Francisco Bay: mesoscale and small-scale variability

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Powell, Thomas M.; Cloern, James E.; Walters, Roy A.; Wolfe, Douglas A.

    1986-01-01

    Horizontal transects of surface salinity and in-vivo fluorescence indicate the existence of three distinct spatial regimes in South San Francisco Bay. A mid-Bay region of low phytoplankton biomass with little small-scale variance is bounded to the north and south by water masses having higher in-vivo fluorescence and enhanced small-scale variability. Autocorrelation analyses demonstrate that the length scale of phytoplankton patchiness is longest in the mid-Bay region. The persistent discontinuities of in-vivo fluorescence and salinity are associated with topographic features—a large shoal to the north and a constriction to the south. The three spatial regimes are consistent with measured zooplankton distributions, existing current meter data, estimated longitudinal transports, and numerical simulations of residual circulations that show one (and perhaps two) large-scale gyre(s) bounded by the northern shoal and southern constriction. Topographic features are the most important physical factors controlling mesoscale (~ 10 km) variability of phytoplankton in South San Francisco Bay. We speculate that vertical current shear and salinity stratification (and their effects upon turbulence and diffusion) control small-scale patchiness, but quantitative estimates are needed to determine the influence of large-scale (and local) phytoplankton growth and loss processes.

  3. Small-Scale Spatial Variability of Ice Supersaturation and Cirrus in the TTL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiGangi, J. P.; Podolske, J. R.; Rana, M.; Slate, T. A.; Diskin, G. S.

    2014-12-01

    The processes controlling cloud formation and evolution represent a significant uncertainty in models of global climate change. High altitude cirrus clouds contribute a large portion of this uncertainty due to their altitude and abundance. The mechanism behind the formation of cirrus clouds depends on the characteristics and composition of ice supersaturation (ISS) regions, regions where the relative humidity with respect to ice (RHi) is greater than 100%. Small-scale dynamics have recently been shown to have a strong effect on the RHi of the UT/LS, and therefore on cirrus cloud formation. Until now, there has been insufficient data in the Tropical Tropopause Layer (TTL) to investigate these effects. The Airborne Tropical TRopopause EXperiment (ATTREX) was a series of campaigns focused on improving our understanding of humidity in the TTL. During this campaign, the NASA Langley/Ames Diode Laser Hygrometer was part of the payload on the NASA Global Hawk, resulting in measurements of humidity with as low as 1-2 m vertical resolution at altitudes up to 19 km. We will present observations from ATTREX describing the small scale spatial variability of water vapor along transects of ISSRs and cirrus clouds, as well as the dynamics driving the formation of ISS regions. These results will be discussed in context with results from prior UT/LS campaigns, such as DC3 and HIPPO.

  4. Small Scale Spatial Variability of Soil Properties and Nutrients in a Ferralsol under Corn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, M. C.; Vidal Vázquez, E.; Pereira de Almeida, V.; Paz-Ferreiro, J.

    2012-04-01

    Spatial variability of soil attributes, both in natural and agricultural landscapes can be rather large. This heterogeneity results from interactions between pedogenetic processes and soil formation factors. In cultivated soils much variability can also occur as a result of land use and management effect, i.e. agricultural systems and practices. Therefore, the main objectives of this work were to investigate the statistical and geostatistical variability of selected properties in a soil cultivated with corn. The experimental work was carried out in Ilha Solteira, São Paulostate, Brazil and the soil was classified as an Oxisol (SSA), i.e. "Latossolo Vermelho" according to the Brazilian Soil Classification System. Eighty-four soil samples were collected at each of two different depths (0-10 and 10-20 cm) from the one-hectare plot studied. Sampling included a combination of grid and nesting schemes in order to allow description of the spatial variability at different scales. Soil texture fractions (sand, silt clay), organic matter content and pH (CaCl2) were determined using standard methods. Moreover, exchangeable bases (Ca, Mg, K), cation exchange capacity (CEC) and P were determined after exchange resin extraction. In the two depths studied, extractable P, K and Mg contents were found to be highly variable (C.V. > 30%), organic matter content and CEC showed a medium variability (C.V. ≈ 15-30%) and base percent saturation and pH exhibited a low variation (< 15%). Experimental semivariograms were computed and modeled and used to map the spatial variability of the study properties. Semivariograms provided a description of the pattern of spatial variability and some insight into possible process affecting the spatial distribution of the assessed soil properties. Sensitivity of nutrient spatial requirements to between field variability was discussed on the basis of the results obtained. In addition, the usefulness of kriging maps to improve and optimize productivity

  5. Quantifying spatial variability of indigenous nitrogen supply for precision nitrogen management in small scale farming

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Understanding spatial variability of indigenous nitrogen (N) supply (INS) is important to the implementation of precision nitrogen management strategies in intensive agricultural fields of North China Plain (NCP). The objectives of this study were to determine 1) winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) ...

  6. Small-scale convection induces temporal and spatial variability in Hawaiian plume volcanism (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballmer, M. D.; Ito, G.; van Hunen, J.; Tackley, P. J.

    2010-12-01

    Our understanding of age-progressive intraplate volcanism has yet built on “classical” plume theory. The simplest description of such a classical plume involves a stationary columnar upwelling that rises through the entire mantle to spawn hotspot volcanism. Plume-lithosphere interaction is classically specified as a steady-state process forming a “pancake” of hot mantle that spreads symmetrically beneath the overriding lithosphere, and a parabolic curtain that surrounds it. This paradigm successfully predicts many first-order observations at Hawaii, which is the archetype for plume-fed volcanism. However, it fails to give an explanation for (1) strong variations of volcanic flux at the Hawaiian hotspot over geological time, (2) rejuvenated stage and flexural arch volcanism, both occuring well away from the hotspot, and (3) geochemical non-symmetry of hotspot volcanism as expressed in Loa and Kea volcanic trends. We find that the effects of small-scale sublithospheric convection (SSC) break the symmetry and steady-state behavior of plume-lithosphere interaction explaining parts of these enigmatic observations (1-3) altogether. We simulate mantle flow and melting in fully thermochemical, three-dimensional numerical models with strongly temperature-dependent rheology. In all our models, SSC develops in the ambient mantle beneath seafloor of age ≥70 Myrs (i.e., before the arrival of the Hawaiian plume), and more vigorously within the plume pancake. Plume pancake SSC is predicted to give rise to secondary upwellings that account for rejuvenated stage, and flexural arch volcanism. Ambient mantle SSC shapes sublithospheric topography, and therefore controls the main hotspot volcanic flux. This interplay of SSC and the plume is a time-dependent process therefore entailing volcanic flux variations over geological time. We assume a mantle source that consists of a matrix of depleted peridotite with fine-scale streaks of hydrous peridotite and pyroxenite. For such a

  7. Determination of Spatial and Temporal Variability of Hot Spots/Moments in the Soil on a Small Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodward, C.; Johnson, D.

    2011-12-01

    Nutrient hot spots/moments present in the soil matrix are a new field of research and much is unknown of their formation, period of existence, and how they affect the surrounding environment. It is believed that they play a pertinent role in the biogeochemical cycling of nutrients and may contribute to nutrient loading in streams. The purpose of this study is to understand spatial variability in nutrients on a small scale and to investigate the magnitude and temporal frequency of nutrient hot spots/moments. To test this hypothesis, small grids were set up in the Critical Zone Observatory (CZO) research station, King's River Watershed, California. The grids were 4x4m in size and were composed of cation/anion UniBest° resin capsules, and Western Ag Innovations PRStm-Probes. The capsules and probes were placed in sets of four 8cm apart in the grid. After the first storm of the season two of each sampler was removed. The final sets of samples were left in for the entire precipitation season. Statistical analysis was preformed to extrapolate if trends can be deciphered between the spatial (8cm) and temporal (first precipitation vs. whole season). T-tests show significant differences, [between 0.004 (NO3-N) and 1.4x10-13 (Mg)] among the temporal with NH4-N, NO3-N, Ca, Mg K, P, Fe, Mn, Zn and S. With some nutrients there were positive statistical outliers after the first precipitation event and others appeared after the whole season. This may be because of spatial variability and/or the formation of hot moments versus hot spots within the soil.

  8. Small-scale temporal and spatial variability in the abundance of plastic pellets on sandy beaches: Methodological considerations for estimating the input of microplastics.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Fabiana Tavares; Prantoni, Alessandro Lívio; Martini, Bruno; de Abreu, Michelle Alves; Stoiev, Sérgio Biato; Turra, Alexander

    2016-01-15

    Microplastics such as pellets have been reported for many years on sandy beaches around the globe. Nevertheless, high variability is observed in their estimates and distribution patterns across the beach environment are still to be unravelled. Here, we investigate the small-scale temporal and spatial variability in the abundance of pellets in the intertidal zone of a sandy beach and evaluate factors that can increase the variability in data sets. The abundance of pellets was estimated during twelve consecutive tidal cycles, identifying the position of the high tide between cycles and sampling drift-lines across the intertidal zone. We demonstrate that beach dynamic processes such as the overlap of strandlines and artefacts of the methods can increase the small-scale variability. The results obtained are discussed in terms of the methodological considerations needed to understand the distribution of pellets in the beach environment, with special implications for studies focused on patterns of input. PMID:26677755

  9. Small-scale temporal and spatial variability in the abundance of plastic pellets on sandy beaches: Methodological considerations for estimating the input of microplastics.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Fabiana Tavares; Prantoni, Alessandro Lívio; Martini, Bruno; de Abreu, Michelle Alves; Stoiev, Sérgio Biato; Turra, Alexander

    2016-01-15

    Microplastics such as pellets have been reported for many years on sandy beaches around the globe. Nevertheless, high variability is observed in their estimates and distribution patterns across the beach environment are still to be unravelled. Here, we investigate the small-scale temporal and spatial variability in the abundance of pellets in the intertidal zone of a sandy beach and evaluate factors that can increase the variability in data sets. The abundance of pellets was estimated during twelve consecutive tidal cycles, identifying the position of the high tide between cycles and sampling drift-lines across the intertidal zone. We demonstrate that beach dynamic processes such as the overlap of strandlines and artefacts of the methods can increase the small-scale variability. The results obtained are discussed in terms of the methodological considerations needed to understand the distribution of pellets in the beach environment, with special implications for studies focused on patterns of input.

  10. Small-scale spatial variability of soil microbial community composition and functional diversity in a mixed forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiufeng; Tian, Jing; Yu, Guirui

    2014-05-01

    Patterns in the spatial distribution of organisms provide important information about mechanisms that regulate the diversity and complexity of soil ecosystems. Therefore, information on spatial distribution of microbial community composition and functional diversity is urgently necessary. The spatial variability on a 26×36 m plot and vertical distribution (0-10 cm and 10-20 cm) of soil microbial community composition and functional diversity were studied in a natural broad-leaved Korean pine (Pinus koraiensis) mixed forest soil in Changbai Mountain. The phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) pattern was used to characterize the soil microbial community composition and was compared with the community substrate utilization pattern using Biolog. Bacterial biomass dominated and showed higher variability than fungal biomass at all scales examined. The microbial biomass decreased with soil depths increased and showed less variability in lower 10-20 cm soil layer. The Shannon-Weaver index value for microbial functional diversity showed higher variability in upper 0-10 cm than lower 10-20 cm soil layer. Carbohydrates, carboxylic acids, polymers and amino acids are the main carbon sources possessing higher utilization efficiency or utilization intensity. At the same time, the four carbon source types contributed to the differentiation of soil microbial communities. This study suggests the higher diversity and complexity for this mix forest ecosystem. To determine the driving factors that affect this spatial variability of microorganism is the next step for our study.

  11. A geostatistical analysis of small-scale spatial variability in bacterial abundance and community structure in salt marsh creek bank sediments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franklin, Rima B.; Blum, Linda K.; McComb, Alison C.; Mills, Aaron L.

    2002-01-01

    Small-scale variations in bacterial abundance and community structure were examined in salt marsh sediments from Virginia's eastern shore. Samples were collected at 5 cm intervals (horizontally) along a 50 cm elevation gradient, over a 215 cm horizontal transect. For each sample, bacterial abundance was determined using acridine orange direct counts and community structure was analyzed using randomly amplified polymorphic DNA fingerprinting of whole-community DNA extracts. A geostatistical analysis was used to determine the degree of spatial autocorrelation among the samples, for each variable and each direction (horizontal and vertical). The proportion of variance in bacterial abundance that could be accounted for by the spatial model was quite high (vertical: 60%, horizontal: 73%); significant autocorrelation was found among samples separated by 25 cm in the vertical direction and up to 115 cm horizontally. In contrast, most of the variability in community structure was not accounted for by simply considering the spatial separation of samples (vertical: 11%, horizontal: 22%), and must reflect variability from other parameters (e.g., variation at other spatial scales, experimental error, or environmental heterogeneity). Microbial community patch size based upon overall similarity in community structure varied between 17 cm (vertical) and 35 cm (horizontal). Overall, variability due to horizontal position (distance from the creek bank) was much smaller than that due to vertical position (elevation) for both community properties assayed. This suggests that processes more correlated with elevation (e.g., drainage and redox potential) vary at a smaller scale (therefore producing smaller patch sizes) than processes controlled by distance from the creek bank. c2002 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Small-scale spatial variability of sperm and sei whales in relation to oceanographic and topographic features along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skov, H.; Gunnlaugsson, T.; Budgell, W. P.; Horne, J.; Nøttestad, L.; Olsen, E.; Søiland, H.; Víkingsson, G.; Waring, G.

    2008-01-01

    The 2004 Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR)-ECO expedition on the R.V. G.O. Sars provided the first opportunity to correlate oceanic distributions of cetaceans with synoptic acoustic (ADCP to 700 m depth, multi-beam echosounders) measurements of high-resolution, three-dimensional (3D) potential habitat (spatial scale<100 km). The identified habitat features were tested with independent observations from the Icelandic combined cetacean and redfish cruises in 2001 and 2003 using data from a 3D ocean general circulation model of the MAR region (Regional Oceans Modelling System (ROMS) model 5 km resolution). The spatial autocorrelation of sampled encounter rates of sperm Physeter macrocephalus and sei whales Balaenoptera borealis indicated scale-dependent variability in the distribution of both species. Despite the large area surveyed, the observations of both species exhibited a strong small-scale structure (range parameter 20-50 km), indicating affinities to cross-seamount or cross-frontal structures. Potential cross-seamount and cross-frontal habitat structures were derived from the acoustic transect data by analysing fine-scale gradients in the 3D flow patterns and bathymetry, including interactions between frontal and topographic parameters. PLS regression was used to determine the potential habitat drivers of sperm and sei whales, both during the G.O. Sars cruise and during the Icelandic cruises in 2001 and 2003. The selected parameters, which reflected flow gradients interacting with the steep topography, were finally applied for modelling the habitat suitability of both target species along the northern MAR using Ecological Niche Factor Analysis. The results suggest aggregations of sperm and sei whales along the MAR are primarily associated with fine-scale frontal processes interacting with the topography in the upper 100 m of the water column just north of the Sub-Polar Front (SPF) and the Charlie-Gibbs Fracture Zone (CGFZ). As moderate and high habitat suitabilities

  13. Small-scale variability of metal concentrations in soil leachates

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcke, W.

    2000-02-01

    Soil tests often use composite soil samples to assess metal bioavailability. Composite soil samples cannot address small-scale soil heterogeneity. In this study, the concentrations of Al, Cd, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, Zn, dissolved organic C (DOC), and pH in soil leachates were examined as an index of small-scale soil heterogeneity. Ten undisturbed soil cores from a 1-m{sup 2} area of a Lithic Haplumbrept and a Typic Hapludoll (pH 4.3) under forest canopy were equilibrated with deionized water. The soil cores were then leached with a mock soil solution. In the Haplumbrept, the pH of the first 50-mL fraction of the leachates was 4.2 to 7.4, DOC concentrations were 11.4 to 38.9 mg L{sup {minus}1}. Aluminum, Cd, Mn, and Ni concentrations were significantly correlated with pH; varied little in the first 50-mL fractions; Cr, Cu, and Pb concentrations were correlated with DOC concentrations. The variability in metal concentrations of the first 50-mL fractions was comparable in both soils and did not change with increasing leachate volume except for Zn in the Haplumbrept. In all leachate fractions, variability was markedly higher than those reported for salt extracts of composite soil samples. Thus, the analysis of composite samples may be insufficient to address metal bioavailability in soils.

  14. Small-Scale Variability of Large Cloud Drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshak, Alexander; Knyazikhin, Y.; Wiscombe, Warren

    2004-01-01

    Cloud droplet size distribution is one of the most fundamental subjects in cloud physics. Understanding of spatial distribution and small-scale fluctuations of cloud droplets is essential for both cloud physics and atmospheric radiation. For cloud physics, it relates to the coalescence growth of raindrops while for radiation, it has a strong impact on a cloud's radiative properties. Most of the existing cloud radiation and precipitation formation models assume that the mean number of drops with a given radius varies proportionally to volume. The analysis of microphysical data on liquid water drop sizes shows that, for sufficiently small volumes, the number is proportional to the drop size dependent power of the volume. For abundant small drops present, the exponent is 1 as assumed in the conventional approach. However, for rarer large drops, the exponents fall below unity. At small scales, therefore, the mean number of large drops decreases with volume at a slower rate than the conventional approach assumes, suggesting more large drops at these scales than conventional models account for; their impact is consequently underestimated. Size dependent models of spatial distribution of cloud drops that simulate the observed power laws show strong drop clustering, the more so the larger the drops. The degree of clustering is determined by the observed exponents. The strong clustering of large drops arises naturally from the observed power-law statistics. Current theories of photon-cloud interaction and warm rain formation will need radical revision in order to produce these statistics; their underlying equations are unable to yield the observed power law.

  15. Small scale variability of snow properties on Antarctic sea ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wever, Nander; Leonard, Katherine; Paul, Stephan; Jacobi, Hans-Werner; Proksch, Martin; Lehning, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Snow on sea ice plays an important role in air-ice-sea interactions, as snow accumulation may for example increase the albedo. Snow is also able to smooth the ice surface, thereby reducing the surface roughness, while at the same time it may generate new roughness elements by interactions with the wind. Snow density is a key property in many processes, for example by influencing the thermal conductivity of the snow layer, radiative transfer inside the snow as well as the effects of aerodynamic forcing on the snowpack. By comparing snow density and grain size from snow pits and snow micro penetrometer (SMP) measurements, highly resolved density and grain size profiles were acquired during two subsequent cruises of the RV Polarstern in the Weddell Sea, Antarctica, between June and October 2013. During the first cruise, SMP measurements were done along two approximately 40 m transects with a horizontal resolution of approximately 30 cm. During the second cruise, one transect was made with approximately 7.5 m resolution over a distance of 500 m. Average snow densities are about 300 kg/m3, but the analysis also reveals a high spatial variability in snow density on sea ice in both horizontal and vertical direction, ranging from roughly 180 to 360 kg/m3. This variability is expressed by coherent snow structures over several meters. On the first cruise, the measurements were accompanied by terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) on an area of 50x50 m2. The comparison with the TLS data indicates that the spatial variability is exhibiting similar spatial patterns as deviations in surface topology. This suggests a strong influence from surface processes, for example wind, on the temporal development of density or grain size profiles. The fundamental relationship between variations in snow properties, surface roughness and changes therein as investigated in this study is interpreted with respect to large-scale ice movement and the mass balance.

  16. Small-scale spatial structuring of interstitial invertebrates on three embayed beaches, Sydney, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooke, Belinda C.; Goodwin, Ian D.; Bishop, Melanie J.

    2014-10-01

    An understanding of ecological processes hinges upon an understanding of the spatial structuring of their key biotic components. Interstitial invertebrates are a ubiquitous and ecologically important component of sandy beach ecosystems. As many sandy beach taxa have limited dispersal, it may be expected that their populations exhibit a high degree of spatial structuring, yet the spatial scales across which they display baseline variability remain largely unknown. To assess (1) whether interstitial invertebrates display patchiness on embayed sandy beaches, (2) whether the size of patches they form is consistent across three geographically proximal beaches, (3) the key environmental correlates of this variation and (4) its taxonomic dependence, samples were collected at regular (0.5 m) intervals along 15 m long geomorphically similar stretches of three proximal intermediate beaches and analyses of spatial autocorrelation were conducted. On each of the three beaches, interstitial invertebrate communities formed patches of 2-4.5 m in diameter. Spatial structuring of invertebrate communities was driven by harpacticoid copepods and gastrotrichs, and corresponded to spatial structuring of sediments. Sediments, however, explained only 33% of spatial variation in faunal communities, indicating the importance of other abiotic and/or biotic factors. Our study highlights that even on seemingly homogeneous sandy beaches, faunal communities may display considerable small-scale spatial structuring. Examination of spatial structure may lead to a greater understanding of the ecological processes in this system.

  17. Plant community assembly at small scales: Spatial vs. environmental factors in a European grassland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horn, Sebastian; Hempel, Stefan; Ristow, Michael; Rillig, Matthias C.; Kowarik, Ingo; Caruso, Tancredi

    2015-02-01

    Dispersal limitation and environmental conditions are crucial drivers of plant species distribution and establishment. As these factors operate at different spatial scales, we asked: Do the environmental factors known to determine community assembly at broad scales operate at fine scales (few meters)? How much do these factors account for community variation at fine scales? In which way do biotic and abiotic interactions drive changes in species composition? We surveyed the plant community within a dry grassland along a very steep gradient of soil characteristics like pH and nutrients. We used a spatially explicit sampling design, based on three replicated macroplots of 15 × 15, 12 × 12 and 12 × 12 m in extent. Soil samples were taken to quantify several soil properties (carbon, nitrogen, plant available phosphorus, pH, water content and dehydrogenase activity as a proxy for overall microbial activity). We performed variance partitioning to assess the effect of these variables on plant composition and statistically controlled for spatial autocorrelation via eigenvector mapping. We also applied null model analysis to test for non-random patterns in species co-occurrence using randomization schemes that account for patterns expected under species interactions. At a fine spatial scale, environmental factors explained 18% of variation when controlling for spatial autocorrelation in the distribution of plant species, whereas purely spatial processes accounted for 14% variation. Null model analysis showed that species spatially segregated in a non-random way and these spatial patterns could be due to a combination of environmental filtering and biotic interactions. Our grassland study suggests that environmental factors found to be directly relevant in broad scale studies are present also at small scales, but are supplemented by spatial processes and more direct interactions like competition.

  18. Small-scale spatial variation in population dynamics and fishermen response in a coastal marine fishery.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Jono R; Kay, Matthew C; Colgate, John; Qi, Roy; Lenihan, Hunter S

    2012-01-01

    A major challenge for small-scale fisheries management is high spatial variability in the demography and life history characteristics of target species. Implementation of local management actions that can reduce overfishing and maximize yields requires quantifying ecological heterogeneity at small spatial scales and is therefore limited by available resources and data. Collaborative fisheries research (CFR) is an effective means to collect essential fishery information at local scales, and to develop the social, technical, and logistical framework for fisheries management innovation. We used a CFR approach with fishing partners to collect and analyze geographically precise demographic information for grass rockfish (Sebastes rastrelliger), a sedentary, nearshore species harvested in the live fish fishery on the West Coast of the USA. Data were used to estimate geographically distinct growth rates, ages, mortality, and length frequency distributions in two environmental subregions of the Santa Barbara Channel, CA, USA. Results indicated the existence of two subpopulations; one located in the relatively cold, high productivity western Channel, and another in the relatively warm, low productivity eastern Channel. We parameterized yield per recruit models, the results of which suggested nearly twice as much yield per recruit in the high productivity subregion relative to the low productivity subregion. The spatial distribution of fishing in the two environmental subregions demonstrated a similar pattern to the yield per recruit outputs with greater landings, effort, and catch per unit effort in the high productivity subregion relative to the low productivity subregion. Understanding how spatial variability in stock dynamics translates to variability in fishery yield and distribution of effort is important to developing management plans that maximize fishing opportunities and conservation benefits at local scales. PMID:23300793

  19. Small-Scale Spatial Variation in Population Dynamics and Fishermen Response in a Coastal Marine Fishery

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Jono R.; Kay, Matthew C.; Colgate, John; Qi, Roy; Lenihan, Hunter S.

    2012-01-01

    A major challenge for small-scale fisheries management is high spatial variability in the demography and life history characteristics of target species. Implementation of local management actions that can reduce overfishing and maximize yields requires quantifying ecological heterogeneity at small spatial scales and is therefore limited by available resources and data. Collaborative fisheries research (CFR) is an effective means to collect essential fishery information at local scales, and to develop the social, technical, and logistical framework for fisheries management innovation. We used a CFR approach with fishing partners to collect and analyze geographically precise demographic information for grass rockfish (Sebastes rastrelliger), a sedentary, nearshore species harvested in the live fish fishery on the West Coast of the USA. Data were used to estimate geographically distinct growth rates, ages, mortality, and length frequency distributions in two environmental subregions of the Santa Barbara Channel, CA, USA. Results indicated the existence of two subpopulations; one located in the relatively cold, high productivity western Channel, and another in the relatively warm, low productivity eastern Channel. We parameterized yield per recruit models, the results of which suggested nearly twice as much yield per recruit in the high productivity subregion relative to the low productivity subregion. The spatial distribution of fishing in the two environmental subregions demonstrated a similar pattern to the yield per recruit outputs with greater landings, effort, and catch per unit effort in the high productivity subregion relative to the low productivity subregion. Understanding how spatial variability in stock dynamics translates to variability in fishery yield and distribution of effort is important to developing management plans that maximize fishing opportunities and conservation benefits at local scales. PMID:23300793

  20. Small-scale spatial variation in population dynamics and fishermen response in a coastal marine fishery.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Jono R; Kay, Matthew C; Colgate, John; Qi, Roy; Lenihan, Hunter S

    2012-01-01

    A major challenge for small-scale fisheries management is high spatial variability in the demography and life history characteristics of target species. Implementation of local management actions that can reduce overfishing and maximize yields requires quantifying ecological heterogeneity at small spatial scales and is therefore limited by available resources and data. Collaborative fisheries research (CFR) is an effective means to collect essential fishery information at local scales, and to develop the social, technical, and logistical framework for fisheries management innovation. We used a CFR approach with fishing partners to collect and analyze geographically precise demographic information for grass rockfish (Sebastes rastrelliger), a sedentary, nearshore species harvested in the live fish fishery on the West Coast of the USA. Data were used to estimate geographically distinct growth rates, ages, mortality, and length frequency distributions in two environmental subregions of the Santa Barbara Channel, CA, USA. Results indicated the existence of two subpopulations; one located in the relatively cold, high productivity western Channel, and another in the relatively warm, low productivity eastern Channel. We parameterized yield per recruit models, the results of which suggested nearly twice as much yield per recruit in the high productivity subregion relative to the low productivity subregion. The spatial distribution of fishing in the two environmental subregions demonstrated a similar pattern to the yield per recruit outputs with greater landings, effort, and catch per unit effort in the high productivity subregion relative to the low productivity subregion. Understanding how spatial variability in stock dynamics translates to variability in fishery yield and distribution of effort is important to developing management plans that maximize fishing opportunities and conservation benefits at local scales.

  1. Analysis of small scale turbulent structures and the effect of spatial scales on gas transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnieders, Jana; Garbe, Christoph

    2014-05-01

    The exchange of gases through the air-sea interface strongly depends on environmental conditions such as wind stress and waves which in turn generate near surface turbulence. Near surface turbulence is a main driver of surface divergence which has been shown to cause highly variable transfer rates on relatively small spatial scales. Due to the cool skin of the ocean, heat can be used as a tracer to detect areas of surface convergence and thus gather information about size and intensity of a turbulent process. We use infrared imagery to visualize near surface aqueous turbulence and determine the impact of turbulent scales on exchange rates. Through the high temporal and spatial resolution of these types of measurements spatial scales as well as surface dynamics can be captured. The surface heat pattern is formed by distinct structures on two scales - small-scale short lived structures termed fish scales and larger scale cold streaks that are consistent with the footprints of Langmuir Circulations. There are two key characteristics of the observed surface heat patterns: 1. The surface heat patterns show characteristic features of scales. 2. The structure of these patterns change with increasing wind stress and surface conditions. In [2] turbulent cell sizes have been shown to systematically decrease with increasing wind speed until a saturation at u* = 0.7 cm/s is reached. Results suggest a saturation in the tangential stress. Similar behaviour has been observed by [1] for gas transfer measurements at higher wind speeds. In this contribution a new model to estimate the heat flux is applied which is based on the measured turbulent cell size und surface velocities. This approach allows the direct comparison of the net effect on heat flux of eddies of different sizes and a comparison to gas transfer measurements. Linking transport models with thermographic measurements, transfer velocities can be computed. In this contribution, we will quantify the effect of small scale

  2. Retrievals on Tropical small scale humidity variability from multi-channel microwave radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianhao; Zuidema, Paquita; Turner, David

    2016-04-01

    Small-scale atmospheric humidity structure is important to many atmospheric process studies. In the Tropics especially, convection is sensitive to small variations in humidity. High temporal-resolution humidity profiles and spatially-resolved humidity fields are valuable for understanding the relationship of convection to tropical humidity, such as at convectively-induced cold pools and as part of the shallow-to-deep cloud transition. Radiosondes can provide high resolution vertical profiles of temperature and humidity, but are relatively infrequent. Microwave radiometers (MWR) are able to profile and scan autonomously and output measurements frequently (~1 Hz). To date, few assessments of microwave humidity profiling in the Tropics have been undertaken. Löhnert et al. (2009) provide one evaluation for Darwin, Australia. We build on this using four months of data from the equatorial Indian Ocean, at Gan Island, collected from University of Miami's (UM) multi-channel radiometer during the Dynamics of Madden-Julian Oscillation (DYNAMO) field campaign. Liquid Water Path (LWP) and Water Vapor Path (WVP) are physically retrieved using the MWR RETrieval (MWRRET) algorithm (Turner et al., 2007b), and humidity profiles in the tropics are retrieved using the Integrated Profiling Technique (Löhnert et al., 2004). Tropical temperature variability is weak and a climatological temperature profile is assumed, with humidity information drawn from five channels between 22 to 30 GHz. Scanning measurements were coordinated with the scanning pattern of NCAR's S-Pol-Ka radar. An analysis of the humidity information content gathered from both the profiling and scanning measurements will be presented.

  3. Influence of small scale rainfall variability on standard comparison tools between radar and rain gauge data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gires, Auguste; Tchiguirinskaia, Ioulia; Schertzer, Daniel; Schellart, Alma; Berne, Alexis; Lovejoy, Shaun

    2014-03-01

    Rain gauges and weather radars do not measure rainfall at the same scale; roughly 20 cm for the former and 1 km for the latter. This significant scale gap is not taken into account by standard comparison tools (e.g. cumulative depth curves, normalized bias, RMSE) despite the fact that rainfall is recognized to exhibit extreme variability at all scales. In this paper we suggest to revisit the debate of the representativeness of point measurement by explicitly modelling small scale rainfall variability with the help of Universal Multifractals. First the downscaling process is validated with the help of a dense networks of 16 disdrometers (in Lausanne, Switzerland), and one of 16 rain gauges (Bradford, United Kingdom) both located within a 1 km2 area. Second this downscaling process is used to evaluate the impact of small scale (i.e. sub-radar pixel) rainfall variability on the standard indicators. This is done with rainfall data from the Seine-Saint-Denis County (France). Although not explaining all the observed differences, it appears that this impact is significant which suggests changing some usual practice.

  4. Assessment of small-scale integrated water vapour variability during HOPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinke, S.; Eikenberg, S.; Löhnert, U.; Dick, G.; Klocke, D.; Di Girolamo, P.; Crewell, S.

    2015-03-01

    The spatio-temporal variability of integrated water vapour (IWV) on small scales of less than 10 km and hours is assessed with data from the 2 months of the High Definition Clouds and Precipitation for advancing Climate Prediction (HD(CP)2) Observational Prototype Experiment (HOPE). The statistical intercomparison of the unique set of observations during HOPE (microwave radiometer (MWR), Global Positioning System (GPS), sun photometer, radiosondes, Raman lidar, infrared and near-infrared Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the satellites Aqua and Terra) measuring close together reveals a good agreement in terms of random differences (standard deviation ≤1 kg m-2) and correlation coefficient (≥ 0.98). The exception is MODIS, which appears to suffer from insufficient cloud filtering. For a case study during HOPE featuring a typical boundary layer development, the IWV variability in time and space on scales of less than 10 km and less than 1 h is investigated in detail. For this purpose, the measurements are complemented by simulations with the novel ICOsahedral Nonhydrostatic modelling framework (ICON), which for this study has a horizontal resolution of 156 m. These runs show that differences in space of 3-4 km or time of 10-15 min induce IWV variabilities on the order of 0.4 kg m-2. This model finding is confirmed by observed time series from two MWRs approximately 3 km apart with a comparable temporal resolution of a few seconds. Standard deviations of IWV derived from MWR measurements reveal a high variability (> 1 kg m-2) even at very short time scales of a few minutes. These cannot be captured by the temporally lower-resolved instruments and by operational numerical weather prediction models such as COSMO-DE (an application of the Consortium for Small-scale Modelling covering Germany) of Deutscher Wetterdienst, which is included in the comparison. However, for time scales larger than 1 h, a sampling resolution of 15 min is

  5. Assessment of small-scale integrated water vapour variability during HOPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinke, S.; Eikenberg, S.; Löhnert, U.; Dick, G.; Klocke, D.; Di Girolamo, P.; Crewell, S.

    2014-09-01

    The spatio-temporal variability of integrated water vapour (IWV) on small-scales of less than 10 km and hours is assessed with data from the two months of the High Definition Clouds and Precipitation for advancing Climate Prediction (HD(CP)2) Observational Prototype Experiment (HOPE). The statistical intercomparison of the unique set of observations during HOPE (microwave radiometer (MWR), Global Positioning System (GPS), sunphotometer, radiosondes, Raman Lidar, infrared and near infrared Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the satellites Aqua and Terra) measuring close together reveals a good agreement in terms of standard deviation (≤ 1 kg m-2) and correlation coefficient (≥ 0.98). The exception is MODIS, which appears to suffer from insufficient cloud filtering. For a case study during HOPE featuring a typical boundary layer development, the IWV variability in time and space on scales of less than 10 km and less than 1 h is investigated in detail. For this purpose, the measurements are complemented by simulations with the novel ICOsahedral Non-hydrostatic modelling framework (ICON) which for this study has a horizontal resolution of 156 m. These runs show that differences in space of 3-4 km or time of 10-15 min induce IWV variabilities in the order of 4 kg m-2. This model finding is confirmed by observed time series from two MWRs approximately 3 km apart with a comparable temporal resolution of a few seconds. Standard deviations of IWV derived from MWR measurements reveal a high variability (> 1 kg m-2) even at very short time scales of a few minutes. These cannot be captured by the temporally lower resolved instruments and by operational numerical weather prediction models such as COSMO-DE (an application of the Consortium for Small-scale Modelling covering Germany) of Deutscher Wetterdienst, which is included in the comparison. However, for time scales larger than 1 h, a sampling resolution of 15 min is sufficient to capture the

  6. Direct Numerical Simulations of Small-Scale Gravity Wave Instability Dynamics in Variable Stratification and Shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mixa, T.; Fritts, D. C.; Laughman, B.; Wang, L.; Kantha, L. H.

    2015-12-01

    Multiple observations provide compelling evidence that gravity wave dissipation events often occur in multi-scale environments having highly-structured wind and stability profiles extending from the stable boundary layer into the mesosphere and lower thermosphere. Such events tend to be highly localized and thus yield local energy and momentum deposition and efficient secondary gravity wave generation expected to have strong influences at higher altitudes [e.g., Fritts et al., 2013; Baumgarten and Fritts, 2014]. Lidars, radars, and airglow imagers typically cannot achieve the spatial resolution needed to fully quantify these small-scale instability dynamics. Hence, we employ high-resolution modeling to explore these dynamics in representative environments. Specifically, we describe numerical studies of gravity wave packets impinging on a sheet of high stratification and shear and the resulting instabilities and impacts on the gravity wave amplitude and momentum flux for various flow and gravity wave parameters. References: Baumgarten, Gerd, and David C. Fritts (2014). Quantifying Kelvin-Helmholtz instability dynamics observed in noctilucent clouds: 1. Methods and observations. Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres, 119.15, 9324-9337. Fritts, D. C., Wang, L., & Werne, J. A. (2013). Gravity wave-fine structure interactions. Part I: Influences of fine structure form and orientation on flow evolution and instability. Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, 70(12), 3710-3734.

  7. Estimating the impact of small-scale variability in satellite measurement validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparling, L. C.; Wei, J. C.; Avallone, L. M.

    2006-10-01

    The necessity of validating satellite measurements of atmospheric chemical constituents with supplementary in situ measurements leads to problems with interpretation of the inevitable differences that arise because of measurement resolution or imperfect collocation, especially for highly heterogeneous fields. In this paper the contribution of small-scale structure to measurement differences is estimated from high-resolution aircraft measurements of atmospheric trace gases. The analysis uses the statistics of fractional differences in mixing ratio across a range of scales to estimate the contribution of real variability to differences in noncollocated measurements. The differences depend on the particular chemical tracer, location and season. We find a range of behavior: Differences of 50% across horizontal scales 100 km or less are fairly common for tropospheric water vapor under convective conditions, or carbon monoxide in regions influenced by biomass burning. Ozone varies by about 4-12% in the lower stratosphere and 15-25% in the upper/middle troposphere across scales of about 150 km. The effect of coarse satellite measurement resolution is also estimated by comparing point measurements to locally averaged measurements and is found to reduce the occurrence of large tracer differences. The choice of coincidence lengths should be based on both the scale-dependent variability and a priori estimates of satellite accuracy if real variability is to remain small relative to satellite measurement uncertainties. For satellite instrument uncertainties of about 10%, coincidence lengths for ozone should be less than 50 km in the upper troposphere and less than 100 km in the lower stratosphere.

  8. Small-scale spatial distribution and oogenetic synchrony in brittlestars (Echinodermata: Ophiuroidea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, Gina M.; Hamel, Jean-François; Mercier, Annie

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that spatial factors modulate reproductive processes over large (>150 km) and medium (10-100 km) scales in marine taxa, but few studies have explicitly determined the degree of inter-individual synchrony in gamete development at smaller scales within benthic populations. Using a ubiquitous broadcast-spawning species, the brittlestar Ophiopholis aculeata, we assessed variations in gametogenic activity over the annual reproductive cycle at various scales. Quantitative indices of oogenic maturity were compared in females collected: (1) in two substrata at a given site (distant ˜200-300 m), (2) among clusters of individuals living in relatively close proximity (˜10-50 m), and (3) within each cluster of individuals collected under/inside a given substratum (˜2-20 cm). Gametogenic maturity was also examined in females collected from distant sites (˜50-150 km). At the main study site, oogenic cohesion was greater within and among clusters of a given substratum than between substrata, and differences in reproductive output and spawning periods occurred between individuals from the two substrata studied. At the finest scale (within clusters of individuals) oogenic synchrony was maximal just before spawning. Comparing samples from distant geographic locations (>50 km) showed significant asynchrony outside the pre-spawning period. The present study shows that relatively high levels of asynchrony in gamete maturation may exist among conspecifics of a seemingly homogeneous population, except at the closest scale (within clusters) at the culmination of the reproductive cycle (near spawning). This emphasizes the likely interplay of inter-individual exchanges and small-scale distribution on the fine coordination of reproductive events.

  9. An Experimental Study of Small-Scale Variability of Raindrop Size Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tokay, Ali; Bashor, Paul G.

    2010-01-01

    An experimental study of small-scale variability of raindrop size distributions (DSDs) has been carried out at Wallops Island, Virginia. Three Joss-Waldvogel disdrometers were operated at a distance of 0.65, 1.05, and 1.70 km in a nearly straight line. The main purpose of the study was to examine the variability of DSDs and its integral parameters of liquid water content, rainfall, and reflectivity within a 2-km array: a typical size of Cartesian radar pixel. The composite DSD of rain events showed very good agreement among the disdrometers except where there were noticeable differences in midsize and large drops in a few events. For consideration of partial beam filling where the radar pixel was not completely covered by rain, a single disdrometer reported just over 10% more rainy minutes than the rainy minutes when all three disdrometers reported rainfall. Similarly two out of three disdrometers reported5%more rainy minutes than when all three were reporting rainfall. These percentages were based on a 1-min average, and were less for longer averaging periods. Considering only the minutes when all three disdrometers were reporting rainfall, just over one quarter of the observations showed an increase in the difference in rainfall with distance. This finding was based on a 15-min average and was even less for shorter averaging periods. The probability and cumulative distributions of a gamma-fitted DSD and integral rain parameters between the three disdrometers had a very good agreement and no major variability. This was mainly due to the high percentage of light stratiform rain and to the number of storms that traveled along the track of the disdrometers. At a fixed time step, however, both DSDs and integral rain parameters showed substantial variability. The standard deviation (SD) of rain rate was near 3 mm/h, while the SD of reflectivity exceeded 3 dBZ at the longest separation distance. These standard deviations were at 6-min average and were higher at shorter

  10. Impacts of small-scale variability on the determination of bulk thermal diffusivity in snowpacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldroyd, H. J.; Higgins, C. W.; Huwald, H.; Selker, J. S.; Parlange, M. B.

    2012-04-01

    Thermal diffusivity of snow is an important physical property associated with key hydrological phenomena such as snowmelt and heat and water vapor exchange with the atmosphere. These phenomena have broad implications in studies of climate and heat and water budgets on many scales. Furthermore, sub grid scale phenomena may enhance these heat and mass exchanges in the snow pack due to its porous nature. We hypothesize that the heat transfer effects of these small-scale variabilities may be seen as an increased bulk thermal diffusivity of the snow. Direct measurements of snow thermal diffusivity require coupled measurements of thermal conductivity and density, which are nonstationary due to snow metamorphism. Furthermore, thermal conductivity measurements are typically obtained with specialized heating probes or plates and snow density measurements require digging snow pits. Therefore, direct measurements are difficult to obtain with high enough temporal resolution such that direct comparisons with atmospheric conditions can be made. This study uses highly resolved temperature measurements from the Plaine Morte glacier in Switzerland as initial and boundary conditions to numerically solve the 1D heat equation and iteratively optimize for thermal diffusivity. The method uses flux boundary conditions to constrain thermal diffusivity such that spuriously high values in thermal diffusivity are eliminated. Additionally, a t-test ensuring statistical significance between solutions of varied thermal diffusivity results in further constraints on thermal diffusivity that eliminate spuriously low values. The results show that time resolved thermal diffusivity can be determined from easily implemented and inexpensive temperature measurements of seasonal snow with good agreement to widely used parameterizations based on snow density. This high time resolution further affords the ability to explore possible turbulence-induced enhancements to heat and mass transfer in the snow.

  11. The effect of small scale variablity in isotopic composition of precipitation on hydrograph separation results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Benjamin; van Meerveld, Ilja; Seibert, Jan

    2016-04-01

    Understanding runoff processes is important for predictions of streamflow quantity and quality. The two-component isotope hydrograph separation (IHS) method is a valuable tool to study how catchments transform rainfall into runoff. IHS allows the stormflow hydrograph to be separated into rainfall (event water) and water that was stored in the catchment before the event (pre-event water). To be able to perform an IHS, water samples of baseflow (pre-event water) and stormflow are collected at the stream outlet. Rainfall is usually collected at one location by hand as an event total or sampled sequentially during the event. It is usually assumed that the spatial variability in rainfall and the isotopic composition of rainfall are negligible for small (<10km2) catchments. However, different studies have shown that precipitation can vary within short distances. Subsequently it remains unclear how the spatio-temproal variability of rainfall and the stable isotope composition of rainfall affect the results of an IHS. In this study, we investigated the effects of the spatio-temporal variability in the isotopic composition of rainfall across a small headwater catchment in Switzerland. Rainfall was measured at eight locations and three streams (catchment area of 0.15, 0.23, and 0.7 km2). The isotopic composition of rainfall and streamflow were sampled for 10 different rain events (P: 5 mm intervals, Q: 12 to 51 samples per events). This dataset was used to perform a two-component isotope hydrograph separation. The results show that for some events the spatial variability in total rainfall, mean and maximum rainfall intensity and stable isotope composition of rainfall was high. There was no relation between the stable isotope composition of rainfall and the rainfall sum, rainfall intensity or altitude. The spatial variability of the isotopic composition of rainfall was for 4 out of the 10 events as large as the temporal variability in the isotopic composition. Different

  12. Ensemble reconstruction of small-scale variability in Atlantic sea surface temperatures from 1870 - 2001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karspeck, A. R.; Sain, S.; Kaplan, A.

    2008-12-01

    Existing historical records of sea surface temperature extending back to the mid 1800's are a valuable source of information for understanding climate variability at interannual and decadal time-scales. However, the temporal and spatial irregularity of these data make them difficult to use in scientific climate research, where gridded data fields are preferred for both direct analysis and forcing of numerical models of the atmosphere. Infilling methods based on constraining the leading eigenvectors of the global-scale covariance have proven very successful in creating gridded estimates of sea surface temperature. These methods are especially useful for infilling within the vast regions of unobserved ocean that characterize the earliest segments of the data record. Regional variability, on the other hand, is not well represented by these methods. This is especially true in data-poor regions. Here we present a method for augmenting the existing large-scale reconstruction methods with a statistical model of the regional scale variability. Using high quality sea surface temperature data from the last 25 years, including satellite-derived records, we specify a spatially non-stationary covariance model for the regional scale marine surface temperature variability. The use of a non-stationary, non-isotropic correlation function in the covariance model is a novel aspect in this work. With the covariance model estimated from the modern record, historical observations are used to condition posterior distributions on the regional scales back to the mid 1800's It is common in the geosciences for the expected value of the distribution to be offered as the data reconstruction. If uncertainty information is provided, it often takes the form of a point-wise estimate that neglects the covariability inherent in the full distribution. In contrast to this common practice, we generate multiple realizations from the full posterior distribution. These samples will be made available to

  13. Mercury Exposure Assessment and Spatial Distribution in A Ghanaian Small-Scale Gold Mining Community.

    PubMed

    Rajaee, Mozhgon; Long, Rachel N; Renne, Elisha P; Basu, Niladri

    2015-09-01

    Mercury is utilized worldwide in artisanal and small-scale gold mining (ASGM) and may pose a risk for miners and mining communities. While a number of studies have characterized mercury in ASGM communities, most have focused on a single media and few have taken a holistic approach. Here, a multiple media exposure assessment and cross-sectional study of mercury was conducted in 2010 through 2012 in northeast Ghana with a small-scale gold mining community, Kejetia, a subsistence farming community, Gorogo, and an urban ASGM gold refinery in Bolgatanga. The objective was to assess mercury in a range of human (urine and hair) and ecological (household soil, sediment, fish, and ore) samples to increase understanding of mercury exposure pathways. All participants were interviewed on demographics, occupational and medical histories, and household characteristics. Participants included 90 women of childbearing age and 97 adults from Kejetia and 75 adults from Gorogo. Median total specific gravity-adjusted urinary, hair, and household soil mercury were significantly higher in Kejetia miners (5.18 µg/L, 0.967 µg/g, and 3.77 µg/g, respectively) than Kejetia non-miners (1.18 µg/L, 0.419 µg/g, and 2.00 µg/g, respectively) and Gorogo participants (0.154 µg/L, 0.181 µg/g, and 0.039 µg/g) in 2011. Sediment, fish, and ore Hg concentrations were below guideline values. Median soil mercury from the Bolgatanga refinery was very high (54.6 µg/g). Estimated mean mercury ingestion for Kejetia adults from soil and dust exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency reference dose (0.3 µg Hg/kg·day) for pica (0.409 µg Hg/kg·day) and geophagy (20.5 µg Hg/kg·day) scenarios. Most participants with elevated urinary and household soil mercury were miners, but some non-miners approached and exceeded guideline values, suggesting a health risk for non-mining residents living within these communities.

  14. Mercury Exposure Assessment and Spatial Distribution in A Ghanaian Small-Scale Gold Mining Community

    PubMed Central

    Rajaee, Mozhgon; Long, Rachel N.; Renne, Elisha P.; Basu, Niladri

    2015-01-01

    Mercury is utilized worldwide in artisanal and small-scale gold mining (ASGM) and may pose a risk for miners and mining communities. While a number of studies have characterized mercury in ASGM communities, most have focused on a single media and few have taken a holistic approach. Here, a multiple media exposure assessment and cross-sectional study of mercury was conducted in 2010 through 2012 in northeast Ghana with a small-scale gold mining community, Kejetia, a subsistence farming community, Gorogo, and an urban ASGM gold refinery in Bolgatanga. The objective was to assess mercury in a range of human (urine and hair) and ecological (household soil, sediment, fish, and ore) samples to increase understanding of mercury exposure pathways. All participants were interviewed on demographics, occupational and medical histories, and household characteristics. Participants included 90 women of childbearing age and 97 adults from Kejetia and 75 adults from Gorogo. Median total specific gravity-adjusted urinary, hair, and household soil mercury were significantly higher in Kejetia miners (5.18 µg/L, 0.967 µg/g, and 3.77 µg/g, respectively) than Kejetia non-miners (1.18 µg/L, 0.419 µg/g, and 2.00 µg/g, respectively) and Gorogo participants (0.154 µg/L, 0.181 µg/g, and 0.039 µg/g) in 2011. Sediment, fish, and ore Hg concentrations were below guideline values. Median soil mercury from the Bolgatanga refinery was very high (54.6 µg/g). Estimated mean mercury ingestion for Kejetia adults from soil and dust exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency reference dose (0.3 µg Hg/kg·day) for pica (0.409 µg Hg/kg·day) and geophagy (20.5 µg Hg/kg·day) scenarios. Most participants with elevated urinary and household soil mercury were miners, but some non-miners approached and exceeded guideline values, suggesting a health risk for non-mining residents living within these communities. PMID:26340636

  15. Mercury Exposure Assessment and Spatial Distribution in A Ghanaian Small-Scale Gold Mining Community.

    PubMed

    Rajaee, Mozhgon; Long, Rachel N; Renne, Elisha P; Basu, Niladri

    2015-09-01

    Mercury is utilized worldwide in artisanal and small-scale gold mining (ASGM) and may pose a risk for miners and mining communities. While a number of studies have characterized mercury in ASGM communities, most have focused on a single media and few have taken a holistic approach. Here, a multiple media exposure assessment and cross-sectional study of mercury was conducted in 2010 through 2012 in northeast Ghana with a small-scale gold mining community, Kejetia, a subsistence farming community, Gorogo, and an urban ASGM gold refinery in Bolgatanga. The objective was to assess mercury in a range of human (urine and hair) and ecological (household soil, sediment, fish, and ore) samples to increase understanding of mercury exposure pathways. All participants were interviewed on demographics, occupational and medical histories, and household characteristics. Participants included 90 women of childbearing age and 97 adults from Kejetia and 75 adults from Gorogo. Median total specific gravity-adjusted urinary, hair, and household soil mercury were significantly higher in Kejetia miners (5.18 µg/L, 0.967 µg/g, and 3.77 µg/g, respectively) than Kejetia non-miners (1.18 µg/L, 0.419 µg/g, and 2.00 µg/g, respectively) and Gorogo participants (0.154 µg/L, 0.181 µg/g, and 0.039 µg/g) in 2011. Sediment, fish, and ore Hg concentrations were below guideline values. Median soil mercury from the Bolgatanga refinery was very high (54.6 µg/g). Estimated mean mercury ingestion for Kejetia adults from soil and dust exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency reference dose (0.3 µg Hg/kg·day) for pica (0.409 µg Hg/kg·day) and geophagy (20.5 µg Hg/kg·day) scenarios. Most participants with elevated urinary and household soil mercury were miners, but some non-miners approached and exceeded guideline values, suggesting a health risk for non-mining residents living within these communities. PMID:26340636

  16. Small-scale variability of the current in the Strait of Bonifacio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gérigny, Olivia; Coudray, Sylvain; Lapucci, Chiara; Tomasino, Corinne; Bisgambiglia, Paul-Antoine; Galgani, François

    2015-08-01

    Current dynamics in the Strait of Bonifacio (south Corsica) were investigated at a small scale during the STELLAMARE1 multidisciplinary cruise in summer 2012, using in situ measurements and modeling data. The Strait of Bonifacio is a particularly sensitive marine area in which specific conservation measures have been taken to preserve the natural environment and wild species. Good knowledge of the hydrodynamics in this area is essential to optimize the Marine Protected Area's management rules. Therefore, we used a high-resolution model (400 m) based on the MARS3D code to investigate the main flux exchanges and to formulate certain hypotheses about the formation of possible eddy structures. The aim of the present paper is first to synthetize the results obtained by combining Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler data, hydrological parameters, Lagrangian drifter data, and satellite observations such as MODIS OC5 chlorophyll a data or Metop-A AVHRR Sea Surface Temperature (SST) data. These elements are then used to validate the presence of the mesoscale eddies simulated by the model and their recurrence outside the cruise period. To complete the analysis, the response of the 3D hydrodynamical model was evaluated under two opposing wind systems and certain biases were detected. Strong velocities up to 1 m s-1 were recorded in the east part due to the Venturi effect; a complementary system of vortices governed by Coriolis effect and west wind was observed in the west part, and horizontal stratification in the central part has been identified under typical wind condition.

  17. Variability of macrobenthic assemblages under abnormal climatic conditions in a small scale tropical estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucero R., Carlos H.; Cantera K., Jaime R.; Romero, Isabel C.

    2006-06-01

    Macrobenthic assemblages associated with mangrove mud flats were studied at three stations in the Dagua River Estuary (Colombian coast, Tropical Eastern Pacific) to assess broad distribution patterns with relation to hydrographical and sediment conditions during the cold (La Niña) phase of the 1997-2000 El Niño/Niña Phenomenon (ENSO Niño/Niña). During the study period, abnormal water and interstitial temperature, high dissolved oxygen and low salinity conditions were present in the water column of the small scale (5.5 km long) estuary, reducing its extension and moving estuarine conditions downstream. Sediment samples were collected for sediment analysis (grain size, water content) and biological studies (specific composition, relative abundance, diversity, evenness and trophic structure) from quadrates (25 × 25 cm) located in the lower, middle and upper regions of the estuary. Macrobenthic assemblages at the upper estuary were composed of 78 species and dominated by Tanaidaceans, suggesting the direct effect of freshwater inflow, and by some polychaetes in the lower region, showing marine influence. Diversity and evenness increased along the salinity gradient from the upper region of the estuary towards the lower region. Surface deposit feeders (SDF, 72.2%) and sub-surface deposit feeders (SSDF, 21%) were dominant as trophic groups. SDF were the most abundant group in the upper estuary, SSDF dominated the lower estuary. These patterns were controlled by the abnormal conditions generated by the cold phase of ENSO (Niño/Niña) in water temperature, higher deposition of organic matter and low salinity that changed the estuarine's typical macrobenthic assemblage structure, with dominance of marine species to one characterized by few abundant freshwater species (Tanaidaceans, insects).

  18. Small scale variability of transport and composition of dissolved organic matter in the subsoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leinemann, Timo; Kalbitz, Karsten; Mikutta, Robert; Guggenberger, Georg

    2016-04-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) is the most mobile fraction of carbon in the soil and connects the carbon-rich topsoil with the subsoil where translocated OM may get stabilized. The water flux in soil is highly heterogeneous, both temporarily and spatially. We, therefore, hypothesize that at high flow velocities, DOM can bypass possible mineral binding sites and microorganisms, thus leading to less degraded DOM under high flow velocities. To address this question, we investigated water and DOM fluxes in situ using segmented suction plates (4 x 4 segments on 24 x 24 cm) installed into three soil observatories at three depths (10 cm, 50 cm, and 150 cm) in a Podzolic Cambisol under Beech (Fagus sylvatica) near Hannover, Germany. To follow the transport of carbon from the litter layer through the soil, an in situ 13C-labelling experiment has been conducted in January 2015. Concentration of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and DOM composition was analyzed using high temperature combustion and photometric methods. The amount of transported DOC decreased by ca. 80% from 10 to 50 cm depth and by 40% from 50 to 150 cm depth. Different flow patterns existed at the centimeter scale, which were stable over time for individual suction plate segments. The specific UV280 nm absorbance of DOM decreased with increasing soil depth. This indicates a selective loss of aromatic compounds. The influence of different flow regimes on the DOM quality became apparent in the subsoil samples (>50 cm depth) showing a correlation of increasing UV280 nm absorbance with increasing water flux. Together with juvenile DO14C up to 150 cm depth this can be an indication for the importance of preferential flow on carbon transport to subsoil.

  19. Effect of microtopography and species composition on small-scale variability of CO2 fluxes in a subalpine grassland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galvagno, Marta; Filippa, Gianluca; Cremonese, Edoardo; Morra di Cella, Umberto; Isabellon, Michel

    2015-04-01

    Grassland ecosystems cover around 30% of the Earth's land surface and consequently play an important role in the terrestrial carbon balance. Climate and land use changes have a significant effect on the sink/source strength of grasslands, especially in mountain regions. For these reasons the carbon cycle of high-altitude grasslands has recently received higher attention, however little is know on the within-ecosystem variability in CO2 fluxes. In fact, alpine and subalpine grasslands are often characterized by complex topography which generates differences in snowmelt dynamics at site level and related different microhabitats. The deriving patchy distribution of vegetation leads to the coexistence of different plant functional traits and developmental strategies within the same ecosystem. In this study we evaluated the effect of microtopography and associated vegetation types on the CO2 flux components of an unamanaged subalpine grassland located at 2160 m asl, by means of automated clear and opaque chambers. In order to disentangle the contribution of different growth forms to the whole ecosystem carbon sequestration we compare chambers with eddy covariance CO2 flux data. Results show that: i) different growth forms are associated with concave o convex shapes of the terrain and, in detail, grass species dominate in convex areas while forbs are especially found in concave ones ii) two distinct CO2 flux trajectories associated to these shapes can be distinguished in this ecosystem: graminoids show a later beginning of the carbon uptake period but higher CO2 net uptake (NEE), while forbs develop just after snowmelt but show lower NEE. The observed small-scale patterns of carbon sequestration may reflect the distinct vegetation type responses to snowmelt and different adaptations to resource use efficiency (light, temperature, nutrients) specific of their own microhabitat. Further investigations will be carried on to better evaluate the role of microhabitat

  20. On the effects of small-scale variability on acoustic propagation in Fram Strait: The tomography forward problem.

    PubMed

    Dushaw, Brian D; Sagen, Hanne; Beszczynska-Möller, Agnieszka

    2016-08-01

    Acoustic tomography systems have been deployed in Fram Strait over the past decade to complement existing observing systems there. The observed acoustic arrival patterns are unusual, however, consisting of a single, broad arrival pulse, with no discernible repeating patterns or individual ray arrivals. The nature of these arrivals is caused by vigorous acoustic scattering from the small-scale processes that dominate ocean variability in Fram Strait. Simple models for internal wave and mesoscale variability were constructed and tailored to match the variability observed by moored thermisters in Fram Strait. The internal wave contribution to variability is weak. Acoustic propagation through a simulated ocean consisting of a climatological sound speed plus mesoscale and internal wave scintillations obtains arrival patterns that match the characteristics of those observed, i.e., pulse width and travel time variation. The scintillations cause a proliferation of acoustic ray paths, however, reminiscent of "ray chaos." This understanding of the acoustic forward problem is prerequisite to designing an inverse scheme for estimating temperature from the observed travel times. PMID:27586755

  1. Small-scale spatial heterogeneity as a source for uncertainty of methane fluxes in an extensive near-natural bog-ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hommeltenberg, J.; Schmid, H. P. E.; Bechtold, M.; Tiemeyer, B.

    2015-12-01

    Natural and restored peatlands are often a strong source of the greenhouse gas methane (CH4). CH4 fluxes vary greatly between different peatland ecosystems, depending on temperature, water level and vegetation. In addition, peatlands often show high small-scale spatial heterogeneity that strongly influences the magnitude of CH4 production. This heterogeneity potentially induce a sensor location bias and leads to additional uncertainties due to the flux footprint variability over heterogeneous terrain. To account for such uncertainty, we installed two eddy covariance towers 26 m apart (height: 6 m) to measure the CH4 flux, together with latent heat and CO2 fluxes at the bog ecosystem "Schechenfilz" in southern Germany. The study site is a large near-natural bog (111 ha) with heterogeneity that is characterized by patches of bog-pine forest, sedge meadows, peat mosses and open water areas. Ongoing CH4 measurements on one of the towers began in July 2012, and both towers were operated with a LI-7700 to measure the CH4 flux simultaneously from autumn 2014 to early spring 2015. In a second campaign, from mid-October to mid-November 2014, both instruments were operated at the same tower for comparison. Throughout the investigation, 17 water level gauges were used to measure the temporal variability of the water level in the mean footprint area. The water level was interpolated based on a high-resolution digital terrain model, which also allows us to account for the impact of the spatial variability of the water table. A vegetation map focused on the distribution of plants with aerenchymous tissues was used to determine the influence of the vegetation composition on the CH4 exchange. In this study, we estimated the uncertainty of CH4 fluxes induced by the instrument system and the flux footprint variability. The footprint analyses together with the water table measurements and vegetation map were also used to analyze the impact of small-scale spatial heterogeneity on the

  2. Modelling Pesticide Leaching At Column, Field and Catchment Scales Ii. Influence of Soil Variability On Small Scale Transfer Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roulier, S.; Jarvis, N.

    The aim of this study was to investigate the differences in small scale transfer prop- erties in relation to variability of soil characteristics in a small undulating agricultural catchment (Vemmenhög, 9 km2), where texture and organic C content are strongly related to landscape position (see Gärdenäs et al., this session). Undisturbed soil col- umn samples (20 cm diameter, 20 cm height) were taken at two locations (4 columns at each location): on a hilltop (high clay content), and in a hollow (high C content). Transient leaching experiments for a tracer and a herbicide (MCPA) were carried out in two steps. After a first application of solute and pesticide the columns were ex- posed to natural rainfall. After one pore volume of drainage had flowed through the columns, they were transferred indoors. A second dose of tracer and pesticide was applied, and the columns were irrigated with half a pore volume of natural rainwa- ter. The breakthrough curves obtained for the hilltop columns showed strong evidence of macroporous flow. The flux concentrations and the resident concentration at the end of the experiment measured for the hollow columns suggested that the loss of pesticide from those columns is little. The MACRO model and the inverse modelling package SUFI were used to estimate the small scale parameters for water transfer, so- lute transport, and pesticide. Good agreement was obtained between model and data. Macroporous flow and diffusive transport through hilltop columns was highlighted by the high calibrated values of the effective diffusion pathlength and the dispersivity. As a consequence of the significant organic C content in the hollows, the value of the degradation rate coefficient for hollow columns was important. In both hilltop and hollow columns, the variation of the degradation rate coefficient between the first and the second application of MCPA showed the ability of the micro-organisms to adapt to the pesticide.

  3. Small-scale spatial variation in near-surface turbidites around the JFAST site near the Japan Trench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, Shuro; Kanamatsu, Toshiya; Kasaya, Takafumi

    2016-03-01

    This paper aims to improve our understanding of the depositional processes associated with turbidites related to recent earthquake events. A series of short sediment cores (ca. 20-30 cm long) were recovered from the landward slope of the Japan Trench around JFAST (Japan Trench Fast Drilling Project) site C0019 by a remotely operated vehicle, KAIKO 7000 II, and the sample sites were accurately located using an LBL (long base line) acoustic navigation system. The properties of the cores were analyzed using visual observations, soft X-ray radiographs, smear slides, measurement of anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility, and analysis of radioactive elements (134Cs, 137Cs, and excess 210Pb). For the first time, small-scale (ca. 200-1000 m) spatial variations in recent earthquake-triggered deep-sea turbidites, the formation of which was probably linked to the 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake, are described. We also examine the submarine landslide that probably generated the sediment unit below the turbidites, which is thought to be an important process in the study area. The spatial distribution and characteristics of the near-surface seismoturbidite obtained immediately after the earthquake, presented here, will enable precise calibration of offshore evidence of recent earthquakes, and thus facilitate the use of the sedimentary archive for paleoseismic interpretations. Furthermore, although sampling for turbidite seismology on steep slopes has not been widely performed previously, our results suggest that the recent event deposits may be continuously tracked from the slope to the basin using a combination of the present sampling method and conventional large-scale investigation techniques.

  4. Temporal Evolution of Small-Scale Bio-Optical Variability During the 2008 North Atlantic Bloom Experiment: A Satellite-Based Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sackmann, B. S.

    2008-12-01

    Understanding carbon flux in the north Atlantic requires the resolution and sampling of processes at a variety of spatial and temporal scales. Satellite ocean color data helped provide a larger horizontal context for in situ physical and optical measurements collected using a combination of gliders, mixed-layer floats, and ship-based surveys during the 2008 North Atlantic Bloom Experiment (NAB08; April-June and 58.5-61.5 °N). Similar increases during the spring bloom were observed in both the in-water and satellite-derived proxies for phytoplankton biomass. However, satellite observations were unique in their ability to provide synoptic snapshots of the intense mesoscale (O(10-250 km)) and sub-mesoscale (O(<10 km)) variability which was characteristic of the productive waters north of 60 °N throughout the experiment. While the sequence of satellite imagery is incomplete due to variable cloud cover, a sufficient number of images were collected and used to quantify the temporal evolution of small-scale spatial variability (<100 km) in satellite- derived estimates of chlorophyll a, optical backscatter by particles (bbp), and sea-surface temperature. Variogram analysis is a commonly used statistical method of characterizing spatial structure and dependencies in geographically referenced datasets. After removing large-scale trends (>100 km) from individual scenes by applying a 2D kernel-based high pass filter, the spatial structure of the residual variability was characterized by estimating variograms from data collected in the vicinity of the in-water assets. Using satellite data to quantify near-surface spatial structure at scales <100 km helps to constrain and simplify the interpretation of variability observed in the analogous in-water products which may be highly resolved in depth, but less-so in the horizontal dimensions (thereby making local changes difficult to distinguish from spatial patchiness). This work is a first step towards the optimization of future

  5. Drivers of small scale variability in soil-atmosphere fluxes of CH4, N2O and CO2 in a forest soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, Martin; Nicolai, Clara; Wheeler, Denis; Lang, Friedeike; Paulus, Sinikka

    2016-04-01

    Soil-atmosphere fluxes of CH4, N2O and CO2 can vary on different spatial scales, on large scales between ecosystems but also within apparently homogenous sites. While CO2 and CH4 consumption is rather evenly distibuted in well aerated soils, the production of N2O and CH4 seems to occur at hot spots that can be associated with anoxic or suboxic conditions. Small-scale variability in soil properties is well-known from field soil assesment, affecting also soil aeration and thus theoretically, greenhouse gas fluxes. In many cases different plant species are associated with different soil conditions and vegetation mapping should therefor combined with soil mapping. Our research objective was explaining the small scale variability of greenhouse gas fluxes in an apparently homogeneous 50 years old Scots Pine stand in a former riparian flood plain.We combined greenhouse gas measurements and soil physical lab measurments with field soil assessment and vegetation mapping. Measurements were conducted with at 60 points at a plot of 30 X 30 m at the Hartheim monitoring site (SW Germany). For greenhouse gas measurements a non-steady state chamber system and laser analyser, and a photoacoustic analyser were used. Our study shows that the well aerated site was a substantial sink for atmospheric CH4 (-2.4 nmol/m² s) and also a for N2O (-0.4 nmol/m² s), but less pronounced, whereas CO2 production was a magnitude larger (2.6 μmol/m² s). The spatial variability of the CH4 consumption of the soils could be explained by the variability of the soil gas diffusivity (measured in situ + using soil cores). Deviations of this clear trend were only observed at points where decomposing woody debris was directly under the litter layer. Soil texture ranged from gravel, coarse sand, fine sand to pure silt, with coarser texture having higher soil gas diffusivity. Changes in texture were rather abrupt at some positions or gradual at other positions, and were well reflected in the vegetation

  6. Small-scale variability of chlorophyll, CDOM, and suspended matter in the Lake Balaton as obtained by shipborne UV fluorescent lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelevin, Vadim; Palmer, Stephanie; Khymchenko, Lisa

    2015-04-01

    Despite a long history in oceanography, few attempts have been made to use fluorescent lidars to evaluate water quality in lakes. We report lidar measurements taken on the Lake Balaton over the period of five days in August, 2012. Lake Balaton, the largest lake in Central Europe in area (597 km2), is very shallow (average depth of 3.5m). The lake is mesotrophic exhibiting a strong trophic gradient from SW to NE. The UV fluorescent lidar UFL-9 used in this study was developed at the Shirshov Institute of Oceanology. It can be used for CDOM, organic pollutants, chlorophyll, and suspended matter concentrations measurements at very high spatial resolution (up to ~1 m). The data were collected continuously during daytime while the boat was travelling. The entire area of the lake was covered by the measurement. The lidar data were calibrated against those obtained in situ through water sampling and then converted from the optical units into the mass concentrations of the above mentioned constituents. Based on this data set, we mapped and investigated in detail the small-scale spatial variability of CDOM, chlorophyll-a, and suspended matter concentrations. In particular, the characteristics of patchiness for the selected parameters were quantified and inter-compared, and their relations with the background forcing conditions were analyzed. We also discuss the applicability of lidar techniques for assessing the hydrological and ecological conditions in shallow inland water bodies. The study was partly supported by the Russian Science Foundation, Grant 14-50-00095.

  7. Assessment of small-scale variability of rainfall and multi-satellite precipitation estimates using measurements from a dense rain gauge network in Southeast India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunilkumar, K.; Narayana Rao, T.; Satheeshkumar, S.

    2016-05-01

    This paper describes the establishment of a dense rain gauge network and small-scale variability in rain events (both in space and time) over a complex hilly terrain in Southeast India. Three years of high-resolution gauge measurements are used to validate 3-hourly rainfall and sub-daily variations of four widely used multi-satellite precipitation estimates (MPEs). The network, established as part of the Megha-Tropiques validation program, consists of 36 rain gauges arranged in a near-square grid area of 50 km × 50 km with an intergauge distance of 6-12 km. Morphological features of rainfall in two principal rainy seasons (southwest monsoon, SWM, and northeast monsoon, NEM) show marked differences. The NEM rainfall exhibits significant spatial variability and most of the rainfall is associated with large-scale/long-lived systems (during wet spells), whereas the contribution from small-scale/short-lived systems is considerable during the SWM. Rain events with longer duration and copious rainfall are seen mostly in the western quadrants (a quadrant is 1/4 of the study region) in the SWM and northern quadrants in the NEM, indicating complex spatial variability within the study region. The diurnal cycle also exhibits large spatial and seasonal variability with larger diurnal amplitudes at all the gauge locations (except for 1) during the SWM and smaller and insignificant diurnal amplitudes at many gauge locations during the NEM. On average, the diurnal amplitudes are a factor of 2 larger in the SWM than in the NEM. The 24 h harmonic explains about 70 % of total variance in the SWM and only ˜ 30 % in the NEM. During the SWM, the rainfall peak is observed between 20:00 and 02:00 IST (Indian Standard Time) and is attributed to the propagating systems from the west coast during active monsoon spells. Correlograms with different temporal integrations of rainfall data (1, 3, 12, 24 h) show an increase in the spatial correlation with temporal integration, but the

  8. Wave actions and topography determine the small-scale spatial distribution of newly settled Asari clams Ruditapes philippinarum on a tidal flat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nambu, Ryogen; Saito, Hajime; Tanaka, Yoshio; Higano, Junya; Kuwahara, Hisami

    2012-03-01

    There are many studies on spatial distributions of Asari clam Ruditapes philippinarum adults on tidal flats but few have dealt with spatial distributions of newly settled Asari clam (<0.3 mm shell length, indicative of settlement patterns) in relation to physical/topographical conditions on tidal flats. We examined small-scale spatial distributions of newly settled individuals on the Matsunase tidal flat, central Japan, during the low spring tides on two days 29th-30th June 2007, together with the shear stress from waves and currents on the flat. The characteristics of spatial distribution of newly settled Asari clam markedly varied depending on both of hydrodynamic and topographical conditions on the tidal flat. Using generalized linear models (GLMs), factors responsible for affecting newly settled Asari clam density and its spatial distribution were distinguished between sampling days, with "crest" sites always having a negative influence each on the density and the distribution on both sampling days. The continuously recorded data for the wave-current flows at the "crest" site on the tidal flat showed that newly settled Asari clam, as well as bottom sediment particles, at the "crest" site to be easily displaced. Small-scale spatial distributions of newly settled Asari clam changed with more advanced benthic stages in relation to the wave shear stress.

  9. Small scale variability of soil parameters in different land uses on the southern slopes of Mount Kilimanjaro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogner, Christina; Kühnel, Anna; Hepp, Johannes; Huwe, Bernd

    2016-04-01

    The Kilimanjaro region in Tanzania constitutes a particularity compared to other areas in the country. Because enough water is available the population grows rapidly and large areas are converted from natural ecosystems to agricultural areas. Therefore, the southern slopes of Mt. Kilimanjaro encompass a complex mosaic of different land uses like coffee plantations, maize, agroforestry or natural savannah. Coffee is an important cash crop in the region and is owned mostly by large companies. In contrast, the agroforestry is a traditional way of agriculture and has been sustained by the Chagga tribe for centuries. These so called homegardens are organised as multi-level systems and contain a mixture of different crops. Correlations in soil and vegetation data may serve as indicators for crop and management impacts associated to different types of land use. We hypothesize that Chagga homegardens, for example, show a more pronounced spatial autocorrelation compared to coffee plantations due to manifold above and belowground crop structures, whereas the degree of anisotropy is assumed to be higher in the coffee sites due to linear elements in management. Furthermore, we hypothesize that the overall diversity of soil parameters in homegardens on a larger scale is higher, as individual owners manage their field differently, whereas coffee plantation management often follows general rules. From these general hypotheses we derive two specific research questions: a) Are there characteristic differences in the spatial organisation of soil physical parameters of different land uses? b) Is there a recognizable relationship between vegetation structure and soil physical parameters of topsoils? We measured soil physical parameters in the topsoil (bulk density, stone content, texture, soil moisture and penetration resistance). Additionally, we took spectra of soil samples with a portable VIS-NIR spectrometer to determine C and N and measured leaf area index and troughfall as an

  10. Small Scale Organic Techniques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horak, V.; Crist, DeLanson R.

    1975-01-01

    Discusses the advantages of using small scale experimentation in the undergraduate organic chemistry laboratory. Describes small scale filtration techniques as an example of a semi-micro method applied to small quantities of material. (MLH)

  11. Small Scale Assessment of Spatial and Vertical Redistribution of Fukushima Fallouts Radiocaesium in Contaminated Soil Using in-situ HPGe Gamma Ray Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patin, J.; Onda, Y.; Yoda, H.; Kato, H.

    2011-12-01

    After Tohoku earthquake on March 11th 2011, the subsequent tsunami and the resulting Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant disaster, gamma emitting particles, first release into the atmosphere, were quickly deposited on the soil surface, with potentially harmful level in the surroundings of the nuclear power plant. Thus, the evaluation of soil deposition pattern, depth migration and afterward radionuclides redistribution and export by erosion and hydrological processes is fundamental for contamination assessments and to plan future actions. Our study site is located 37km from Fukushima power plant, inside the evacuated zone. In this study, we used a bounded erosion plot of 22.1m x 5m to assess global export of sediments and 137Cs. This plot, previously cropped with tobacco, is morphologically divided into inter-rill areas separated by rills that formed into former wheel tracks. The bottom of the plot is subject to deposition of sediments. In order to determine and quantify the internal processes responsible of the export of sediment, the depth distribution of 137Cs is estimated using a portable High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detector. Such a portable device, associated to the high radiation levels, allow an acquisition of spatially distributed data within the plot in a reasonable time (1 min/sample). At the same time, depth distribution of 137Cs are measured using the scrapper plate technique, adapted to obtain a fine resolution in the first, highly contaminated, centimeters of soil. Finally, 137Cs depth profiles, associated with in situ and laboratory gamma spectrums acquired with the portable detector, allow for the detector calibration. Although the initial deposit can reasonably be supposed homogeneous at the plot scale, the dataset obtained 3 months later shows high spatial and temporal variability due to erosion processes. Measurements with the portable HPGe detector proved to be useful at this small scale, avoiding the needs of a large number of soil samples

  12. The critical scale of small-scale spatial variation in ecological patterns and processes in intertidal macrobenthic seagrass assemblages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, R. S. K.; Ellwood, M. D. F.

    2012-02-01

    Earlier work on benthic faunal assemblages in intertidal seagrass beds has shown maximal structural variation at spatial scales <150 m. To examine more closely spatial variation of species assemblages within this range, numbers of target taxa in the beds on North Stradbroke Island, Moreton Bay, Australia, were sampled at nested spatial scales of 0.5, 5, 30 and 90 m at two localities 900 m apart. Variance components were largest at the smallest scales, that at 0.5 m comprising 55% of the total and that at 5 m 13%. Individual species were patchily dispersed and their assemblages were randomly structured at all studied spatial scales. Although assemblage composition differed significantly between the two localities, overall faunal abundance and species richness were relatively uniform across the whole study area. These seagrass beds show little turn-over of dominant species and little evidence of niche partitioning through space over scales of <1 km. In this they contrast markedly with the equivalent intertidal dwarf-eelgrass beds of Knysna in South Africa that form a high turn-over, strongly structured, deterministic system.

  13. The effects of biotic and abiotic factors on the spatial heterogeneity of alpine grassland vegetation at a small scale on the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau (QTP), China.

    PubMed

    Wen, Lu; Dong, Shi Kui; Li, Yuan Yuan; Sherman, Ruth; Shi, Jian Jun; Liu, De Mei; Wang, Yan Long; Ma, Yu Shou; Zhu, Lei

    2013-10-01

    Understanding the complex effects of biotic and abiotic factors on the composition of vegetation is very important for developing and implementing strategies for promoting sustainable grassland development. The vegetation-disturbance-environment relationship was examined in degraded alpine grasslands in the headwater areas of three rivers on the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau in this study. The investigated hypotheses were that (1) the heterogeneity of the vegetation of the alpine grassland is due to a combination of biotic and abiotic factors and that (2) at a small scale, biotic factors are more important for the distribution of alpine vegetation. On this basis, four transects were set along altitudinal gradients from 3,770 to 3,890 m on a sunny slope, and four parallel transects were set along altitudinal gradients on a shady slope in alpine grasslands in Guoluo Prefecture of Qinghai Province, China. It was found that biological disturbances were the major forces driving the spatial heterogeneity of the alpine grassland vegetation and abiotic factors were of secondary importance. Heavy grazing and intensive rat activity resulted in increases in unpalatable and poisonous weeds and decreased fine forages in the form of sedges, forbs, and grasses in the vegetation composition. Habitat degradation associated with biological disturbances significantly affected the spatial variation of the alpine grassland vegetation, i.e., more pioneer plants of poisonous or unpalatable weed species, such as Ligularia virgaurea and Euphorbia fischeriana, were found in bare patches. Environmental/abiotic factors were less important than biological disturbances in affecting the spatial distribution of the alpine grassland vegetation at a small scale. It was concluded that rat control and light grazing should be applied first in implementing restoration strategies. The primary vegetation in lightly grazed and less rat-damaged sites should be regarded as a reference for devising vegetation

  14. Contribution of Small-Scale Correlated Fluctuations of Microstructural Properties of a Spatially Extended Geophysical Target Under the Assessment of Radar Backscatter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yurchak, Boris S.

    2010-01-01

    The study of the collective effects of radar scattering from an aggregation of discrete scatterers randomly distributed in a space is important for better understanding the origin of the backscatter from spatially extended geophysical targets (SEGT). We consider the microstructure irregularities of a SEGT as the essential factor that affect radar backscatter. To evaluate their contribution this study uses the "slice" approach: particles close to the front of incident radar wave are considered to reflect incident electromagnetic wave coherently. The radar equation for a SEGT is derived. The equation includes contributions to the total backscatter from correlated small-scale fluctuations of the slice's reflectivity. The correlation contribution changes in accordance with an earlier proposed idea by Smith (1964) based on physical consideration. The slice approach applied allows parameterizing the features of the SEGT's inhomogeneities.

  15. Small-Scale Drop-Size Variability: Empirical Models for Drop-Size-Dependent Clustering in Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshak, Alexander; Knyazikhin, Yuri; Larsen, Michael L.; Wiscombe, Warren J.

    2005-01-01

    By analyzing aircraft measurements of individual drop sizes in clouds, it has been shown in a companion paper that the probability of finding a drop of radius r at a linear scale l decreases as l(sup D(r)), where 0 less than or equals D(r) less than or equals 1. This paper shows striking examples of the spatial distribution of large cloud drops using models that simulate the observed power laws. In contrast to currently used models that assume homogeneity and a Poisson distribution of cloud drops, these models illustrate strong drop clustering, especially with larger drops. The degree of clustering is determined by the observed exponents D(r). The strong clustering of large drops arises naturally from the observed power-law statistics. This clustering has vital consequences for rain physics, including how fast rain can form. For radiative transfer theory, clustering of large drops enhances their impact on the cloud optical path. The clustering phenomenon also helps explain why remotely sensed cloud drop size is generally larger than that measured in situ.

  16. Spatial Variability of VOCl Fluxes From Forest Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svensson, T.; Black, A. T.; Fulton, T.; Molodovskaya, M. S.; Nesic, Z.; Pickering, L.; Pilz, J.; Oberg, G.

    2011-12-01

    Naturally formed volatile chlorinated organic compounds (VOCl) are involved in various atmospheric processes such as ozone depletion. These compounds are present in several environmental compartments and some of them are of ecotoxicological concern. Over the past few years, a small but growing literature has focused on the emission of VOCls from terrestrial environments and there are indications that the emissions vary between ecosystems and that spatial and temporal patterns exist. Due to methodological challenges, the studies have hitherto been based on rather few measurements; subsequently estimates of both the magnitude and the variability of the fluxes are quite uncertain. To enable collection of larger sample sets, which would allow reliable surveying of spatial variability, we developed a portable chamber system. The system consists of a non-steady-state chamber (area 0.20 m2, volume 56.9L), a close-looped air-circulation unit with a diaphragm pump, and a VOCl sampling unit with carbon-based adsorbent tubes for later analysis in the laboratory by gas chromatography (GC7890, Agilent Technologies, USA) with micro-ECD detection (Agilent Technologies, USA), a thermal desorption system (TDSA2, Gerstel Inc., USA) and cryocooled inlet system (CIS4, Gerstel Inc., USA). We are using the portable system to investigate the spatial variability of chloroform fluxes at different scales and at various forested sites in south-west British Columbia, Canada. Our pilot observations strongly indicate that the flux from adjacent chambers (0.5-2 m between locations), may vary ten times or more, and that small-scale variability often overrides any larger scale patterns, or differences between sites. In addition, 'hot' and 'cold' measurement locations were not consistent spatially, indicating non-consistent spatial patterns in time. The study highlights that we need to better understand small-scale spatial heterogeneity of VOCl fluxes to interpret larger scale temporal and spatial

  17. Climate SPHINX: High-resolution present-day and future climate simulations with an improved representation of small-scale variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davini, Paolo; von Hardenberg, Jost; Corti, Susanna; Subramanian, Aneesh; Weisheimer, Antje; Christensen, Hannah; Juricke, Stephan; Palmer, Tim

    2016-04-01

    The PRACE Climate SPHINX project investigates the sensitivity of climate simulations to model resolution and stochastic parameterization. The EC-Earth Earth-System Model is used to explore the impact of stochastic physics in 30-years climate integrations as a function of model resolution (from 80km up to 16km for the atmosphere). The experiments include more than 70 simulations in both a historical scenario (1979-2008) and a climate change projection (2039-2068), using RCP8.5 CMIP5 forcing. A total amount of 20 million core hours will be used at end of the project (March 2016) and about 150 TBytes of post-processed data will be available to the climate community. Preliminary results show a clear improvement in the representation of climate variability over the Euro-Atlantic following resolution increase. More specifically, the well-known atmospheric blocking negative bias over Europe is definitely resolved. High resolution runs also show improved fidelity in representation of tropical variability - such as the MJO and its propagation - over the low resolution simulations. It is shown that including stochastic parameterization in the low resolution runs help to improve some of the aspects of the MJO propagation further. These findings show the importance of representing the impact of small scale processes on the large scale climate variability either explicitly (with high resolution simulations) or stochastically (in low resolution simulations).

  18. Variability of the raindrop size distribution at small spatial scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berne, A.; Jaffrain, J.

    2010-12-01

    Because of the interactions between atmospheric turbulence and cloud microphysics, the raindrop size distribution (DSD) is strongly variable in space and time. The spatial variability of the DSD at small spatial scales (below a few km) is not well documented and not well understood, mainly because of a lack of adequate measurements at the appropriate resolutions. A network of 16 disdrometers (Parsivels) has been designed and set up over EPFL campus in Lausanne, Switzerland. This network covers a typical operational weather radar pixel of 1x1 km2. The question of the significance of the variability of the DSD at such small scales is relevant for radar remote sensing of rainfall because the DSD is often assumed to be uniform within a radar sample volume and because the Z-R relationships used to convert the measured radar reflectivity Z into rain rate R are usually derived from point measurements. Thanks to the number of disdrometers, it was possible to quantify the spatial variability of the DSD at the radar pixel scale and to show that it can be significant. In this contribution, we show that the variability of the total drop concentration, of the median volume diameter and of the rain rate are significant, taking into account the sampling uncertainty associated with disdrometer measurements. The influence of this variability on the Z-R relationship can be non-negligible. Finally, the spatial structure of the DSD is quantified using a geostatistical tool, the variogram, and indicates high spatial correlation within a radar pixel.

  19. Recurrent patterning in the daily foraging routes of hamadryas baboons (Papio hamadryas): spatial memory in large-scale versus small-scale space.

    PubMed

    Schreier, Amy L; Grove, Matt

    2014-05-01

    The benefits of spatial memory for foraging animals can be assessed on two distinct spatial scales: small-scale space (travel within patches) and large-scale space (travel between patches). While the patches themselves may be distributed at low density, within patches resources are likely densely distributed. We propose, therefore, that spatial memory for recalling the particular locations of previously visited feeding sites will be more advantageous during between-patch movement, where it may reduce the distances traveled by animals that possess this ability compared to those that must rely on random search. We address this hypothesis by employing descriptive statistics and spectral analyses to characterize the daily foraging routes of a band of wild hamadryas baboons in Filoha, Ethiopia. The baboons slept on two main cliffs--the Filoha cliff and the Wasaro cliff--and daily travel began and ended on a cliff; thus four daily travel routes exist: Filoha-Filoha, Filoha-Wasaro, Wasaro-Wasaro, Wasaro-Filoha. We use newly developed partial sum methods and distribution-fitting analyses to distinguish periods of area-restricted search from more extensive movements. The results indicate a single peak in travel activity in the Filoha-Filoha and Wasaro-Filoha routes, three peaks of travel activity in the Filoha-Wasaro routes, and two peaks in the Wasaro-Wasaro routes; and are consistent with on-the-ground observations of foraging and ranging behavior of the baboons. In each of the four daily travel routes the "tipping points" identified by the partial sum analyses indicate transitions between travel in small- versus large-scale space. The correspondence between the quantitative analyses and the field observations suggest great utility for using these types of analyses to examine primate travel patterns and especially in distinguishing between movement in small versus large-scale space. Only the distribution-fitting analyses are inconsistent with the field observations, which

  20. Identification of temporal and small-scale spatial variations of phosphate concentration in the near-shore groundwater of an oligotrophic lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pöschke, Franziska; Schlichting, Hendrik; Lewandowski, Jörg

    2016-04-01

    Lake Stechlin is one of the last oligotrophic lakes in the German North-Eastern Lake District. In recent years there was some worry over a small but continuous increase of phosphate concentrations in the open water body. The reasons remain unclear. Since the lake obtains its water only from groundwater and precipitation there is the assumption that the former can be a significant source of phosphate inputs into the lake. In the present study, three different groundwater sampling settings on different scales in time and space were used to investigate the phosphate concentration in the near-shore groundwater. A multi-level sampling grid of twelve samplers and 60 sampling ports was installed to study the temporal small-scale fluctuations of P concentration in the groundwater and the interstitial water. Furthermore, a one-time sampling campaign of shallow near-shore groundwater was conducted every 500 m along the lake shore. Additionally, nests of permanent groundwater wells were sampled monthly for one year to identify concentration patterns in the deeper aquifer. The results indicate a large spatial and small temporal heterogeneity of P concentrations. The range of P concentration is < 0.01 mg/l up to 0.2 mg/l. There was no significant increase of P concentrations downstream of the small near-shore village Neuglobsow. Since the groundwater catchment belongs since 1938 to a natural protected area other anthropogenic impacts are quite unlikely. Hence, the main source for phosphate is probably the decomposition of naturally present organic material under anaerobic and warm conditions.

  1. Scaled Spatial Variability of Soil Moisture Fields

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil moisture spatial variability patterns are identified using measurements across different scales and depths from 18 different experiments. The spatial variability patterns are well represented by negative exponential functions between the mean and the coefficient of variation of soil moisture. R...

  2. Does Knowledge of Spatial Configuration in Adults with Visual Impairments Improve with Tactile Exposure to a Small-Scale Model of Their Urban Environment?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Picard, Delphine; Pry, Rene

    2009-01-01

    This study assessed the efficiency of a model of a familiar urban area for enhancing knowledge of the spatial environment by adults with visual impairments. It found a significant improvement in knowledge of spatial configuration after exposure to the model, suggesting that models are powerful means of developing cognitive mapping in people who…

  3. Hot moments and hot spots in hyporheic nutrient transformation - To what degree does small-scale variability control stream-reach attenuation potential?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, S.; Blume, T.; Binley, A.; Heathwaite, L.; Cassidy, N. J.; Munz, M.; Tecklenburg, C.; Kaeser, D.

    2011-12-01

    Concentrations of nutrients and contaminants in up-welling groundwater can significantly change along the passage through highly heterogeneous streambed sediments with substantial implications for the quality of connected surface water bodies. This study presents investigations into the physical drivers and chemical controls of nutrient transport and transformation at the aquifer-river interfaces of two upland and lowland UK rivers. It combines the application of in-stream geophysical exploration techniques, multi-level mini-piezometer networks, active and passive heat tracing methods (including fibre-optic distributed temperature sensing - FO-DTS) for identifying hyporheic exchange fluxes and residence time distributions with multi-scale approaches of hyporheic pore water sampling and reactive tracers for analysing the patterns of streambed redox conditions and chemical transformation rates. The analysis of hyporheic pore water from nested multi-level mini piezometers and passive gel probe samplers revealed significant spatial variability in streambed redox conditions and concentration changes of nitrogen species, dissolved oxygen and bioavailable organic carbon. Hot spots of increased nitrate attenuation were identified beneath semi-confining peat lenses in the streambed of the investigated lowland river. The intensity of concentration changes underneath the confining peat pockets correlated with the state of anoxia in the pore water as well as the supply of organic carbon and hyporheic residence times. In contrast, at locations where flow inhibiting peat layers were absent or disrupted - fast exchange between aquifer and river caused a break through of nitrate without significant concentration changes along the hyporheic flow path. Fibre-optic distributed temperature sensor networks and streambed electric resistivity tomography were applied for identifying exchange flow patterns between groundwater and surface water in dependency of streambed structural

  4. Measuring spatial variability in soil characteristics

    DOEpatents

    Hoskinson, Reed L.; Svoboda, John M.; Sawyer, J. Wayne; Hess, John R.; Hess, J. Richard

    2002-01-01

    The present invention provides systems and methods for measuring a load force associated with pulling a farm implement through soil that is used to generate a spatially variable map that represents the spatial variability of the physical characteristics of the soil. An instrumented hitch pin configured to measure a load force is provided that measures the load force generated by a farm implement when the farm implement is connected with a tractor and pulled through or across soil. Each time a load force is measured, a global positioning system identifies the location of the measurement. This data is stored and analyzed to generate a spatially variable map of the soil. This map is representative of the physical characteristics of the soil, which are inferred from the magnitude of the load force.

  5. Intra-event and Inter-event Ground Motion Variability from 3-D Broadband (0-8 Hz) Ensemble Simulations of Mw 6.7 Thrust Events Including Rough Fault Descriptions, Small-Scale Heterogeneities and Q(f)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Withers, K.; Olsen, K. B.; Shi, Z.; Day, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    We model blind thrust scenario earthquakes matching the fault geometry of 1994 Mw 6.7 Northridge earthquake up to 8 Hz by first performing dynamic rupture propagation using a support operator method (SORD). We extend the ground motion by converting the slip-rate data to a kinematic source for the finite difference wave propagation code AWP-ODC, which incorporates an improved frequency-dependent attenuation approach. This technique has high accuracy for Q values down to 15. The desired Q function is fit to the 'effective' Q over the coarse grained-cell for low Q, and a simple interpolation formula is used to interpolate the weights for arbitrary Q. Here, we use a power-law model Q above a reference frequency in the form Q 0 f^n with exponents ranging from 0.0-0.9. We find envelope and phase misfits only slightly larger than that of the elastic case when compared with that of the frequency-wavenumber solution for both a homogenous and a layered model with a large-velocity contrast. We also include small-scale medium complexity in both a 1D layered model and a 3D medium extracted from SCEC CVM-S4 including a surface geotechnical layer (GTL). We model additional realizations of the scenario by varying the hypocenter location, and find that similar moment magnitudes are generated. We observe that while the ground motion pattern changes, the median ground motion is not affected significantly, when binned as a function of distance, and is within 1 interevent standard deviation from the median GMPEs. We find that intra-event variability for the layered model simulations is similar to observed values of single-station standard deviation. We show that small-scale heterogeneity can significantly affect the intra-event variability at frequencies greater than ~1 Hz, becoming increasingly important at larger distances from the source. We perform a parameter space study by varying statistical parameters and find that the variability is fairly independent of the correlation length

  6. Hidden founder effects: small-scale spatial genetic structure in recently established populations of the grassland specialist plant Anthyllis vulneraria.

    PubMed

    Helsen, Kenny; Jacquemyn, Hans; Honnay, Olivier

    2015-06-01

    The long-term establishment success of founder plant populations has been commonly assessed based on the measures of population genetic diversity and among population genetic differentiation, with founder populations expected to carry sufficient genetic diversity when population establishment is the result of many colonists from multiple source populations (the 'migrant pool' colonization model). Theory, however, predicts that, after initial colonization, rapid population expansion may result in a fast increase in the extent of spatial genetic structure (SGS), independent of extant genetic diversity. This SGS can reduce long-term population viability by increasing inbreeding. Using 12 microsatellite markers, we inferred colonization patterns in four recent populations of the grassland specialist plant Anthyllis vulneraria and compared the extent of SGS between recently established and old populations. Assignment analyses of the individuals of recent population based on the genetic composition of nine adjacent putative source populations suggested the occurrence of the 'migrant pool' colonization model, further confirmed by high genetic diversity within and low genetic differentiation among recent populations. Population establishment, however, resulted in the build-up of strong SGS, most likely as a result of spatially restricted recruitment of the progeny of initial colonists. Although reduced, significant SGS was nonetheless observed to persist in old populations. The presence of SGS was in all populations associated with elevated inbreeding coefficients, potentially affecting the long-term viability of these populations. In conclusion, this study illustrates the importance of studying SGS next to population genetic diversity and differentiation to adequately infer colonization patterns and long-term establishment success of plant species.

  7. Spatial and Temporal Variability of Aerosol Particles in Arctic Spring

    SciTech Connect

    Shantz, Nicole C.; Gultepe, Ismail; Liu, Peter; Earle, Michael; Zelenyuk, Alla

    2012-10-01

    The objective of this work is to investigate the variability in the particle number concentration that may affect climate change assessment for Arctic regions. The Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) was conducted in April 2008, in the vicinities of Fairbanks and Barrow, Alaska. Measurements of particle number concentrations and size distributions were conducted using a Passive Cavity Aerosol Spectrometer Probe (PCASP-100X) mounted under the Convair-580 aircraft wing. Total number concentration of particles (Na) with diameters in the range 0.12-3 μm was determined for polluted and clean air masses during times when the air was free of clouds and/or precipitation. Variability in Na was considered for both vertical profiles and constant altitude (horizontal) flight legs. This variability can have important implications for estimates of particle properties used in global climate model (GCM) simulations. When aerosol particle layers were encountered, Na rapidly increased from 25 cm-3 up to 550 cm-3 within relatively clean air masses, and reached up to 2200 cm-3 within polluted air masses, dominated by biomass burning pollution. When averaging Na over different distance scales, it was found that Na=140 cm-3 represent an average value for the majority of the encountered clean cases; while Na=720 cm-3 is a mean for polluted cases dominated by biomass burning plumes. These estimates, however, would not capture the details of particle layers encountered during most of the flights. Average aerosol particle characteristics can be difficult to interpret, especially during polluted cases, due to small-scale spatial and temporal variability.

  8. Variability of pigment biomass in the California Current system as determined by satellite imagery. I - Spatial variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Raymond C.; Zhang, Xueyun; Michaelsen, Joel

    1988-01-01

    Spatial variability of chlorophyll in the California Current system was analyzed using Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS) imagery. A total of 48 images were analyzed to produce seasonal averages and variances, gradients, and power spectra. Roughly one third to one half of the variance in pigment biomass can be explained by consistent, large-scale gradients. In general, biomass is higher in the north and in nearshore areas. Nearshore areas also have proportionally more small-scale variability than the areas offshore. Slopes of the power spectra for nearshore areas are about -2.2 (for spatial scales of 10-100 km), while slopes for offshore areas are about -3. In addition, the power spectra show evidence of a change in slope at about 10 km, with slopes of about -1 for shorter-length scales. This may indicate that biological processes dominate the smaller scales, while mesoscale eddies and geostrophic currents dominate the larger scales.

  9. Small-scale variability in the coupling/uncoupling of bacteria, phytoplankton and organic carbon fluxes along the continental margin of the Gulf of Lions, Northwestern Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Wambeke, F.; Heussner, S.; Diaz, F.; Raimbault, P.; Conan, P.

    2002-06-01

    A High Frequency Flux (HFF) experiment was conducted during spring 1997 on the continental slope of the Gulf of Lions (Northwestern Mediterranean Sea) with the aim of examining the dynamical and biological processes controlling particle transfer in this margin environment. Within this general framework, a special attention was paid to short temporal and small spatial variations of phytoplankton and bacterial production through six hydrological and biological surveys performed during a 7-week period at nine sampling stations located on a 10×20-mile grid. Downward fluxes of particulate organic carbon at each station were measured by traps deployed at 240 m depth. The f-ratio and the ratio of integrated bacterial to primary production (IBP/IPP ratio), computed as indexes of biological export for each survey and station, did not provide a clear, unambiguous understanding of the importance of biological processes in the cycling of carbon in the upper water column. However, the data collected allowed to draw up carbon budgets for the different phases of the experiment. The comparison of primary production with measured and estimated organic carbon removal terms (sinking, cycling through the microbial food web, grazing by ciliates and metazoans) showed that a balance was never reached between fluxes of production and removal of organic carbon during the course of the experiment. The system shifted from an initial situation of 'missing' carbon (removal>production) to one of 'excess' carbon (removal

  10. Spatial variability, structure and composition of crustose algal communities in Diadema africanum barrens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangil, Carlos; Sansón, Marta; Díaz-Villa, Tania; Hernández, José Carlos; Clemente, Sabrina; Afonso-Carrillo, Julio

    2014-12-01

    Crustose algal communities were studied in Diadema africanum urchin barrens around Tenerife (Canary Islands, NE Atlantic). A hierarchical nested sampling design was used to study patterns of community variability at different spatial scales (sectors, three sides of the island; sites within each sector, 5-10 km apart; stations within each site, 50-100 m apart). Although noncrustose species contributed the most to community richness, cover was dominated by crustose forms, like the coralline algae Hydrolithon farinosum, H. samoënse, H. onkodes, Neogoniolithon orotavicum and N. hirtum, and the phaeophycean Pseudolithoderma adriaticum. The structure of these communities showed high spatial variability, and we found differences in the structure of urchin barrens when compared across different spatial scales. Multivariate analysis showed that variability in community structure was related to the five environmental variables studied (wave exposure, urchin density, substrate roughness, productivity and depth). Wave exposure was the variable that contributed most to community variability, followed by urchin density and substrate roughness. Productivity and depth had limited influence. The effects of these variables differed depending on the spatial scale; wave exposure and productivity were the main variables influencing community changes at the largest scale (between different sectors of the island), while D. africanum density, roughness and depth were the most influential at medium and small scales.

  11. On the influence of faulting on small-scale soil-gas radon variability: a case study in the Iberian Uranium Province.

    PubMed

    Pereira, A J S C; Godinho, M M; Neves, L J P F

    2010-10-01

    In order to evaluate the influence of faulting on the variability of geogenic radon at detailed scale (1:2000), data on gamma ray fluxes, U and Th concentrations in rocks, radon in soil-gas and radon in groundwater were collected in three target areas on the Oliveira do Hospital region (Central Portugal). This region stands on the Iberian Uranium Province, and is dominantly composed of Hercynian granites and metasedimentary rocks of pre-Ordovician age, crosscut by faults with dominant strike N35 degrees E, N55 degrees E and N75 degrees E. Radiometric anomalies are frequent, associated with faults of the referred systems and metasedimentary enclaves; the analytical data confirms that these anomalies are produced by local high uranium contents in rocks and fault-filling materials (n=34, range 13-724 ppm), while other radiogenic elements are relatively constant (e.g. Th 4-30 ppm). Radon concentration in soil can be extremely high, up to 12,850 kBq m(-3) (n=215), with a large proportion of results above 100 kBq m(-3). Unsurprisingly, groundwater also shows high radon concentrations, with observed values in the range 150-4850 Bq.L(-1) (n=17). From the results it is concluded that metasedimentary enclaves, as well as faults, can accumulate uranium from circulating fluids, and as a consequence, strongly locally enhance geogenic radon potential. Due to this fact, for the purpose of land use planning in such uranium-enriched regions, very detailed geological mapping is needed to precisely recognize radon high risk areas. A correlation between radon concentration in soil or in groundwater and gamma ray fluxes was established pointing to the possible use of these fluxes as a first step in assessing geogenic radon potential, at least to geological setting similar to the study area. PMID:20554356

  12. Spatial impacts of urban structures on micrometeorological variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koelbing, Merle; Schuetz, Tobias; Weiler, Markus

    2016-04-01

    The heterogeneity of urban surfaces including buildings and the urban vegetation causes high variability of micrometeorological variables on small spatial scales which makes it hard to observe or even predict climate conditions and in particular evapotranspiration with high resolution on the scale of entire cities. Regarding future climate changes and their impacts on urban climate and hydrology the predictability of these small scale variations becomes more and more relevant i.e. for city planners to improve the development of appropriate mitigation strategies. Therefore, new transfer functions for meteorological variables are needed, which consider the structural variability in urban areas and its impacts on the energy balance (shading effects, ventilation, lateral longwave energy fluxes). We approach this goal by testing a mobile meteorological station (the station is mounted on a bicycle trailer and transported by an E-Bike) as a means to derive empirical spatial transfer functions for specific urban structures. We observe air temperature and relative air humidity at 2 different heights, wind direction and speed, incoming and outgoing shortwave radiation as well as infrared temperature from above and below and the four directions. First measurements have been performed in December 2015 at 22 locations in four clusters, which represent manifold different characteristics of urban areas within the city of Freiburg. Every location has been monitored two to six times. Overall, nearly 200 measurements of each variable have been taken. Each measurement takes five minutes. Values are logged every 15 seconds. These measurements were analyzed with regard to a climate station mounted on a rooftop in the proximity of all clusters. Results show a systematic pattern in the differences between the values taken with the fixed and those taken with the mobile climate station, depending on the measurement locations. For example, lower air temperature and higher relative air

  13. How does spatial variability of climate affect catchment streamflow predictions?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Spatial variability of climate can negatively affect catchment streamflow predictions if it is not explicitly accounted for in hydrologic models. In this paper, we examine the changes in streamflow predictability when a hydrologic model is run with spatially variable (distribute...

  14. Environmental mapping based on spatial variability.

    PubMed

    Kovalevskaya, Nelley; Pavlov, Vladimir

    2002-01-01

    Environmental maps show the probable environmental states of different types of land use or development of landscape in a geographic context. Remotely sensed data are particularly efficient for environmental mapping in order to outline major environmental types. Multiple schemes of image classification used in environmental mapping are either traditionally statistical or heuristic. While the former methods do not take account of spatial variability in space and aerial data, the latter ones does not lend themselves to optimal solutions we present. Novel probabilistic models of piecewise-homogeneous images are used in environmental mapping to segment real images. The models consider both an image and a land cover map. Such a pair constitutes an example of a Markov random field specified by a joint Gibbs probability distribution of images and maps. Parameters of the model are estimated by using a stochastic approximation technique. Its convergence to the desired values is studied experimentally. Addition of spatial attributes appears to be necessary in most areas where the differences in spatial data between regions in the image occur. Experiments in generating the pairs of images and environmental maps and in segmenting the simulated as well as real images are discussed. PMID:12371162

  15. A new spatially scanning 2.7 µm laser hygrometer and new small-scale wind tunnel for direct analysis of the H2O boundary layer structure at single plant leaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wunderle, K.; Rascher, U.; Pieruschka, R.; Schurr, U.; Ebert, V.

    2015-01-01

    A new spatially scanning TDLAS in situ hygrometer based on a 2.7-µm DFB diode laser was constructed and used to analyse the water vapour concentration boundary layer structure at the surface of a single plant leaf. Using an absorption length of only 5.4 cm, the TDLAS hygrometer permits a H2O vapour concentration resolution of 31 ppmv. This corresponds to a normalized precision of 1.7 ppm m. In order to preserve and control the H2O boundary layer on an individual leaf and to study the boundary layer dependence on the wind speed to which the leaf might be exposed in nature, we also constructed a new, application specific, small-scale, wind tunnel for individual plant leaves. The rectangular, closed-loop tunnel has overall dimensions of 1.2 × 0.6 m and a measurement chamber dimension of 40 × 54 mm (H × W). It allows to generate a laminar flow with a precisely controlled wind speed at the plant leaf surface. Combining honeycombs and a miniaturized compression orifice, we could generate and control stable wind speeds from 0.1 to 0.9 m/s, and a highly laminar and homogeneous flow with an excellent relative spatial homogeneity of 0.969 ± 0.03. Combining the spectrometer and the wind tunnel, we analysed (for the first time) non-invasively the wind speed-dependent vertical structure of the H2O vapour distribution within the boundary layer of a single plant leaf. Using our time-lag-free data acquisition procedure for phase locked signal averaging, we achieved a temporal resolution of 0.2 s for an individual spatial point, while a complete vertical spatial scan at a spatial resolution of 0.18 mm took 77 s. The boundary layer thickness was found to decrease from 6.7 to 3.6 mm at increasing wind speeds of 0.1-0.9 m/s. According to our knowledge, this is the first experimental quantification of wind speed-dependent H2O vapour boundary layer concentration profiles of single plant leaves.

  16. Small Scale High Speed Turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    London, Adam P. (Inventor); Droppers, Lloyd J. (Inventor); Lehman, Matthew K. (Inventor); Mehra, Amitav (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A small scale, high speed turbomachine is described, as well as a process for manufacturing the turbomachine. The turbomachine is manufactured by diffusion bonding stacked sheets of metal foil, each of which has been pre-formed to correspond to a cross section of the turbomachine structure. The turbomachines include rotating elements as well as static structures. Using this process, turbomachines may be manufactured with rotating elements that have outer diameters of less than four inches in size, and/or blading heights of less than 0.1 inches. The rotating elements of the turbomachines are capable of rotating at speeds in excess of 150 feet per second. In addition, cooling features may be added internally to blading to facilitate cooling in high temperature operations.

  17. A semi-urban case study of small scale variability of rainfall and run-off, with C- and X-band radars and the fully distributed hydrological model Multi-Hydro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves de Souza, Bianca; da Silva Rocha Paz, Igor; Gires, Auguste; Tchiguirinskaia, Ioulia; Schertzer, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    The complexity of urban hydrology results both from that of urban systems and the extreme rainfall variability. The latter can display strongly localised rain cells that can be extremely damaging when hitting vulnerable parts of urban systems. This paper investigates this complexity on a semi-urban sub-catchment - located in Massy (South of Paris, France) - of the Bievre river, which is known for its frequent flashfloods. Advanced geo-processing techniques were used to find the ideal pixel size for this 6.326km2 basin. C-band and X-band radar data are multifractally downscaled at various resolutions and input to the fully distributed hydrological model Multi-Hydro. The latter has been developed at Ecole des Ponts ParisTech. It integrates validated modules dealing with surface flow, saturated and unsaturated surface flow, and sewer flow. The C-band radar is located in Trappes, approx. 21km East of the catchment, is operated by Méteo-France and has a resolution of 1km x 1km x 5min. The X-band radar operated by Ecole des Ponts Paris Tech on its campus has a resolution of 125m x 125m x 3.4min. The performed multifractal downscaling enables both the generation of large ensemble realizations and easy change of resolution (e.g. down to 10 m in the present study). This in turn allows a detailed analysis of the impacts of small scale variability and the required resolution to obtain accurate simulations, therefore predictions. This will be shown on two rainy episodes over the chosen sub-catchment of the Bievre river.

  18. Models of Small-Scale Patchiness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGillicuddy Dennis J., Jr.

    2001-01-01

    Patchiness is perhaps the most salient characteristic of plankton populations in the ocean. The scale of this heterogeneity spans many orders of magnitude in its spatial extent, ranging from planetary down to microscale. It has been argued that patchiness plays a fundamental role in the functioning of marine ecosystems, insofar as the mean conditions may not reflect the environment to which organisms are adapted. For example, the fact that some abundant predators cannot thrive on the mean concentration of their prey in the ocean implies that they are somehow capable of exploiting small-scale patches of prey whose concentrations are much larger than the mean. Understanding the nature of this patchiness is thus one of the major challenges of oceanographic ecology. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  19. Spatial variability of the Black Sea surface temperature from high resolution modeling and satellite measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizyuk, Artem; Senderov, Maxim; Korotaev, Gennady

    2016-04-01

    Large number of numerical ocean models were implemented for the Black Sea basin during last two decades. They reproduce rather similar structure of synoptical variability of the circulation. Since 00-s numerical studies of the mesoscale structure are carried out using high performance computing (HPC). With the growing capacity of computing resources it is now possible to reconstruct the Black Sea currents with spatial resolution of several hundreds meters. However, how realistic these results can be? In the proposed study an attempt is made to understand which spatial scales are reproduced by ocean model in the Black Sea. Simulations are made using parallel version of NEMO (Nucleus for European Modelling of the Ocean). A two regional configurations with spatial resolutions 5 km and 2.5 km are described. Comparison of the SST from simulations with two spatial resolutions shows rather qualitative difference of the spatial structures. Results of high resolution simulation are compared also with satellite observations and observation-based products from Copernicus using spatial correlation and spectral analysis. Spatial scales of correlations functions for simulated and observed SST are rather close and differs much from satellite SST reanalysis. Evolution of spectral density for modelled SST and reanalysis showed agreed time periods of small scales intensification. Using of the spectral analysis for satellite measurements is complicated due to gaps. The research leading to this results has received funding from Russian Science Foundation (project № 15-17-20020)

  20. Practical small-scale explosive seam welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, L. J.

    1983-01-01

    A small-scale explosive seam welding process has been developed that can significantly contribute to remote metal joining operations under hazardous or inaccessible conditions, such as nuclear reactor repair and assembly of structure in space. This paper describes this explosive seam welding process in terms of joining principles, variables, types of joints created, capabilities, and applications. Very small quantities of explosive in a ribbon configuration are used to create narrow (less than 0.5 inch), long-length, uniform, hermetically sealed joints that exhibit parent metal properties in a wide variety of metals, alloys, and combinations. The practicality of this process has been demonstrated by its current acceptance, as well as its capabilities that are superior in many applications to the universally accepted joining processes, such as mechanical fasteners, fusion and resistance welding, and adhesives.

  1. Mathematical Modeling of spatial disease variables by Spatial Fuzzy Logic for Spatial Decision Support Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platz, M.; Rapp, J.; Groessler, M.; Niehaus, E.; Babu, A.; Soman, B.

    2014-11-01

    A Spatial Decision Support System (SDSS) provides support for decision makers and should not be viewed as replacing human intelligence with machines. Therefore it is reasonable that decision makers are able to use a feature to analyze the provided spatial decision support in detail to crosscheck the digital support of the SDSS with their own expertise. Spatial decision support is based on risk and resource maps in a Geographic Information System (GIS) with relevant layers e.g. environmental, health and socio-economic data. Spatial fuzzy logic allows the representation of spatial properties with a value of truth in the range between 0 and 1. Decision makers can refer to the visualization of the spatial truth of single risk variables of a disease. Spatial fuzzy logic rules that support the allocation of limited resources according to risk can be evaluated with measure theory on topological spaces, which allows to visualize the applicability of this rules as well in a map. Our paper is based on the concept of a spatial fuzzy logic on topological spaces that contributes to the development of an adaptive Early Warning And Response System (EWARS) providing decision support for the current or future spatial distribution of a disease. It supports the decision maker in testing interventions based on available resources and apply risk mitigation strategies and provide guidance tailored to the geo-location of the user via mobile devices. The software component of the system would be based on open source software and the software developed during this project will also be in the open source domain, so that an open community can build on the results and tailor further work to regional or international requirements and constraints. A freely available EWARS Spatial Fuzzy Logic Demo was developed wich enables a user to visualize risk and resource maps based on individual data in several data formats.

  2. Some Variables Affecting Children's Spatial Conservation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Barbara; Eliot, John

    1973-01-01

    Kindergarten children were tested on Kershner's spatial model, two WISC performance tests, and two Piagetian tasks. Results validated Kershner's work but not his claims that his test measures conservation or dimensional concepts. (ST)

  3. Small scale structure on cosmic strings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albrecht, Andreas

    1989-01-01

    The current understanding of cosmic string evolution is discussed, and the focus placed on the question of small scale structure on strings, where most of the disagreements lie. A physical picture designed to put the role of the small scale structure into more intuitive terms is presented. In this picture it can be seen how the small scale structure can feed back in a major way on the overall scaling solution. It is also argued that it is easy for small scale numerical errors to feed back in just such a way. The intuitive discussion presented here may form the basis for an analytic treatment of the small scale structure, which argued in any case would be extremely valuable in filling the gaps in the present understanding of cosmic string evolution.

  4. Effects of rainfall spatial variability and intermittency on shallow landslide triggering patterns at a catchment scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Ruette, J.; Lehmann, P.; Or, D.

    2014-10-01

    The occurrence of shallow landslides is often associated with intense and prolonged rainfall events, where infiltrating water reduces soil strength and may lead to abrupt mass release. Despite general understanding of the role of rainfall water in slope stability, the prediction of rainfall-induced landslides remains a challenge due to natural heterogeneity that affect hydrologic loading patterns and the largely unobservable internal progressive failures. An often overlooked and potentially important factor is the role of rainfall variability in space and time on landslide triggering that is often obscured by coarse information (e.g., hourly radar data at spatial resolution of a few kilometers). To quantify potential effects of rainfall variability on failure dynamics, spatial patterns, landslide numbers and volumes, we employed a physically based "Catchment-scale Hydromechanical Landslide Triggering" (CHLT) model for a study area where a summer storm in 2002 triggered 51 shallow landslides. In numerical experiments based on the CHLT model, we applied the measured rainfall amount of 53 mm in different artificial spatiotemporal rainfall patterns, resulting in between 30 and 100 landslides and total released soil volumes between 3000 and 60,000 m3 for the various scenarios. Results indicate that low intensity rainfall below soil's infiltration capacity resulted in the largest mechanical perturbation. This study illustrates how small-scale rainfall variability that is often overlooked by present operational rainfall data may play a key role in shaping landslide patterns.

  5. A mobile system for quantifying the spatial variability of the surface energy balance: design and application.

    PubMed

    Wohlfahrt, Georg; Tasser, Erich

    2015-05-01

    We present a mobile device for the quantification of the small-scale (a few square meters) spatial variability in the surface energy balance components and several auxiliary variables of short-statured (<1 m) canopies. The key element of the mobile device is a handheld four-component net radiometer for the quantification of net radiation, albedo and infrared surface temperature, which is complemented with measurements of air temperature, wind speed, soil temperature and soil water content. Data are acquired by a battery-powered data logger, which is mounted on a backpack together with the auxiliary sensors. The proposed device was developed to bridge between the spatial scales of satellite/airborne remote sensing and fixed, stationary tower-based measurements with an emphasis on micrometeorological, catchment hydrological and landscape-ecological research questions. The potential of the new device is demonstrated through four selected case studies, which cover the issues of net radiation heterogeneity within the footprint of eddy covariance flux measurements due to (1) land use and (2) slope and aspect of the underlying surface, (3) controls on landscape-scale variability in soil temperature and albedo and (4) the estimation of evapotranspiration based exclusively on measurements with the mobile device.

  6. A mobile system for quantifying the spatial variability of the surface energy balance: design and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohlfahrt, Georg; Tasser, Erich

    2015-05-01

    We present a mobile device for the quantification of the small-scale (a few square meters) spatial variability in the surface energy balance components and several auxiliary variables of short-statured (<1 m) canopies. The key element of the mobile device is a handheld four-component net radiometer for the quantification of net radiation, albedo and infrared surface temperature, which is complemented with measurements of air temperature, wind speed, soil temperature and soil water content. Data are acquired by a battery-powered data logger, which is mounted on a backpack together with the auxiliary sensors. The proposed device was developed to bridge between the spatial scales of satellite/airborne remote sensing and fixed, stationary tower-based measurements with an emphasis on micrometeorological, catchment hydrological and landscape-ecological research questions. The potential of the new device is demonstrated through four selected case studies, which cover the issues of net radiation heterogeneity within the footprint of eddy covariance flux measurements due to (1) land use and (2) slope and aspect of the underlying surface, (3) controls on landscape-scale variability in soil temperature and albedo and (4) the estimation of evapotranspiration based exclusively on measurements with the mobile device.

  7. A mobile system for quantifying the spatial variability of the surface energy balance: design and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasser, Erich; Wohlfahrt, Georg

    2014-05-01

    We present a mobile device for the quantification of the small-scale spatial variability in the surface energy balance components and several auxiliary variables of short-statured canopies. The key element of the mobile device is a hand-held four-component net radiometer for the quantification of net radiation, albedo and infrared surface temperature, which is complemented with measurements of air temperature, wind speed, soil temperature and soil water content. Data are acquired by a battery-powered data logger, which is mounted on a backpack together with the auxiliary sensors. The proposed device was developed to bridge between the spatial scales of satellite/airborne remote sensing and fixed, stationary tower-based measurements with an emphasis on micrometeorological, catchment hydrological and landscape-ecological research questions. The potential of the new device is demonstrated through four selected case studies, which cover the issues of net radiation heterogeneity within the footprint of eddy covariance flux measurements due to (i) land use and (ii) slope and aspect of the underlying surface, (iii) controls on landscape-scale variability in soil temperature and albedo, and (iv) the estimation of evapotranspiration based exclusively on measurements with the mobile device.

  8. Method and system for small scale pumping

    DOEpatents

    Insepov, Zeke; Hassanein, Ahmed

    2010-01-26

    The present invention relates generally to the field of small scale pumping and, more specifically, to a method and system for very small scale pumping media through microtubes. One preferred embodiment of the invention generally comprises: method for small scale pumping, comprising the following steps: providing one or more media; providing one or more microtubes, the one or more tubes having a first end and a second end, wherein said first end of one or more tubes is in contact with the media; and creating surface waves on the tubes, wherein at least a portion of the media is pumped through the tube.

  9. Small scale bipolar nickel-hydrogen testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manzo, Michelle A.

    1988-01-01

    Bipolar nickel-hydrogen batteries, ranging in capacity from 6 to 40 A-hr, have been tested at the NASA Lewis Research Center over the past six years. Small scale tests of 1 A-hr nickel-hydrogen stacks have been initiated as a means of screening design and component variations for bipolar nickel-hydrogen cells and batteries. Four small-scale batteries have been built and tested. Characterization and limited cycle testing were performed to establish the validity of test results in the scaled down hardware. The results show characterization test results to be valid. LEO test results in the small scale hardware have limited value.

  10. Spatial scales of optical variability in the coastal ocean: Implications for remote sensing and in situ sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moses, Wesley J.; Ackleson, Steven G.; Hair, Johnathan W.; Hostetler, Chris A.; Miller, W. David

    2016-06-01

    Use of ocean color remote sensing to understand the effects of environmental changes and anthropogenic activities on estuarine and coastal waters requires the capability to measure and track optically detectable complex biogeochemical processes. An important remote sensor design consideration is the minimum spatial resolution required to resolve key ocean features of physical and biological significance. The spatial scale of variability in optical properties of coastal waters has been investigated using continuous, along-track measurements collected using instruments deployed from ships, aircraft, and satellites. We defined the average coefficient of variance, CV¯a, within an image pixel as the primary statistical measure of subpixel variability and investigated how CV¯a changes as a function of the Ground Sampling Distance (GSD). In general, dCV¯a/dGSD is positive, indicating that the subpixel variability increases with GSD. The relationship between CV¯a and GSD is generally nonlinear and the greatest rate of change occurs at small spatial scales. Points of distinct transition in the relationship between CV¯a and GSD are evident between 75 and 600 m, varying depending on the location and the optical parameter, and representing the GSD above which most of the spatial variability due to small-scale features is subsumed within a pixel. At GSDs greater than the transition point, most of the small-scale variability occurs at subpixel scales and, therefore, cannot be resolved. On average, the transition GSD is around 200 m. The results have application in both sensor design and in situ sampling strategy in support of coastal remote sensing operations.

  11. Small-scale explosive welding of aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, L. J.

    1972-01-01

    Welding technique uses very small quantities of explosive ribbon to accomplish small-scale lap-welding of aluminum plates. Technique can perform small controlled welding with no length limitations and requires minimal protective shielding.

  12. Small scale structure on cosmic strings

    SciTech Connect

    Albrecht, A.

    1989-10-30

    I discuss our current understanding of cosmic string evolution, and focus on the question of small scale structure on strings, where most of the disagreements lie. I present a physical picture designed to put the role of the small scale structure into more intuitive terms. In this picture one can see how the small scale structure can feed back in a major way on the overall scaling solution. I also argue that it is easy for small scale numerical errors to feed back in just such a way. The intuitive discussion presented here may form the basis for an analytic treatment of the small structure, which I argue in any case would be extremely valuable in filling the gaps in our resent understanding of cosmic string evolution. 24 refs., 8 figs.

  13. Spatial and temporal small-scale variability of nitrogen mobilization in a forest ecosystem with high N deposition in NW-Germany.

    PubMed

    Lorz, Carsten; Eissner, Christel; Lethmate, Jürgen; Schneider, Birgit

    2010-02-01

    For conifer stands in NW-Germany with high DIN load (23-35 kg N ha(-1) a(-1)) and a long history of nitrogen export the risk of N mobilization were investigated. Ammonium is the most mobilized N species, pointing towards either conditions not favoring nitrification or, more likely - under the dominant aerobic conditions - a very high amount of ammonium in the forest floor. Independence of net nitrification and net ammonification from each other indicates the existence of two separate systems. The nitrifying system depends very much on biotic conditions - as a function of energy and moisture - and seems not to be directly related to N deposition. In contrast, for the ammonification system (Oe horizon) a correlation with the sum of ammonium deposition three months prior to sampling was found. However, the role of disturbance, i.e. nitrogen export, during the last centuries and the role of recovery of the N balance during the last 150 years is still not clear.

  14. Small-scale spatial and temporal reproductive variability of the brown macroalga Sargassum thunbergii in contrasting habitats: A study on the island of Xiaoheishan, Changdao Archipelago, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yongqiang; Zhang, Quansheng; Lu, Zhicheng; Tang, Yongzheng; Zhang, Shubao; Chu, Shaohua

    2012-10-01

    A study of the reproductive pattern of Sargassum thunbergii, which is distributed widely around the island of Xiaoheishan (Changdao Archipelago, China), shows that it exhibits a flexibility to adapt to contrasting habitats. Populations of S. thunbergii from two depths at nine field sites exposed to increasing degrees of wave action were studied to determine their spatio-temporal variations in reproductive pattern. The start of the reproductive period was significantly delayed with increasing geographical latitude but independent of depth and wave exposure, and seawater temperature was found to be a significant controlling factor for maturation. In contrast with reproductive onset, two-way ANCOVA showed that there were significant effects of both depth and wave exposure on the peak and end point of the reproductive period. The latter were significantly delayed in the semi-exposed deep-water habitats compared to sheltered shallow-water habitats. The shortest duration of the reproductive period was recorded in the wave-exposed shallow-water habitats, while the longest duration was in the semi-exposed deep-water habitats. In addition, reproductive allocation (RA) in the studied populations showed a similar and significant temporal variation during reproduction, and RA increased as time progressed, followed by a rapid decrease in late summer. Wave exposure as well as depth also influenced significantly the RA whereby thalli from exposed and semi-exposed deep-water habitats allocated significantly more biomass to the production of receptacles than did thalli from sheltered shallow-water habitats.

  15. Spatial variability in airborne pollen concentrations.

    PubMed

    Raynor, G S; Ogden, E C; Hayes, J V

    1975-03-01

    Tests were conducted to determine the relationship between airborne pollen concentrations and distance. Simultaneous samples were taken in 171 tests with sets of eight rotoslide samplers spaced from one to 486 M. apart in straight lines. Use of all possible pairs gave 28 separation distances. Tests were conducted over a 2-year period in urban and rural locations distant from major pollen sources during both tree and ragweed pollen seasons. Samples were taken at a height of 1.5 M. during 5-to 20-minute periods. Tests were grouped by pollen type, location, year, and direction of the wind relative to the line. Data were analyzed to evaluate variability without regard to sampler spacing and variability as a function of separation distance. The mean, standard deviation, coefficient of variation, ratio of maximum to the mean, and ratio of minimum to the mean were calculated for each test, each group of tests, and all cases. The average coefficient of variation is 0.21, the maximum over the mean, 1.39 and the minimum over the mean, 0.69. No relationship was found with experimental conditions. Samples taken at the minimum separation distance had a mean difference of 18 per cent. Differences between pairs of samples increased with distance in 10 of 13 groups. These results suggest that airborne pollens are not always well mixed in the lower atmosphere and that a sample becomes less representative with increasing distance from the sampling location.

  16. Spatial and Temporal Variability of Macronutrients in a Lime-amended Acid Paddy Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal Vázquez, E.; Morales, L. A.; Paz González, A.

    2012-04-01

    tillering could be also attributed to lime addition, but a negative effect of liming on P availability was observed during flowering. Mehlich I extractable K was in general low to very low and decreased from sowing to flowering, irrespective of lime treatment. Semivariogram analysis showed a rather strong spatial dependence of NH4+, P and K concentrations and this all over the three study periods and for the three lime treatments. Empirical semivariograms could be adjusted quite well by a nugget component (C0) plus a spatial structure (C1), which was described by spherical or exponential models with a correlation range between 40 and 85 m. Geostatistical analysis provided insight into possible processes responsible of the observed spatial variability patterns within the rice soil. Kriging was useful in mapping macronutrient variability allowing identifying microrregions with high or low values of the target soil properties clearly showing the presence of small scale variability for the study soil attributes within each liming treatment and during each of the three sampling dates. Also the position of patches with maxima and minima values changed between successive sampling dates illustrating the lack of temporal stability of the pattern of spatial distribution for the study soil attributes. Results illustrate the potential for applying the principles of precision agriculture to control spatiotemporal variability in rice fields.

  17. Spatial and Temporal Variability of Water Storage in Dolomite Karst from Gravity Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Champollion, C.; Fores, B.; Chery, J.; Le Moigne, N.; Khairoun, O.; Erik, D.; Vernant, P.

    2014-12-01

    Karstic hydrosystems are highly nonlinear and heterogeneous but they represent one of the main water resources in the Mediterranean area. Neither local measurements in boreholes nor analysis at the spring can take into account the variability of the water storage. Since few years, ground-based gravity measurements allow the monitoring of the water storage in heterogeneous hydrosystems at intermediate scale between boreholes (local scale) and spring (global scale).From many experiments in the Durzon karstic system in the south of France, we studied the seasonal water storage at different spatial scales. Firstly, all gravity experiments, carried out witha well suited methodology,show significant signals. Surface and depth measurements at small scale (20-50 m in depth and 20-50 m in surface) shows significant gravity variations. The equivalent water storage variations are interpreted in relation with the subsurface observations: topography, geomorphology and lithology. At larger scale (100m - 5000m), equivalent water storage variations is linked with alteration and karstification. The main results are the importance of the seasonal water storage in the epikarst and the spatial coherence of the gravity measurements. These experimental studies show the potential impact of the spatially distributed gravity measurements for further hydrological numerical models.

  18. Small-scale models of multiring basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allemand, Pascal; Thomas, Pierre

    1999-07-01

    Small-scale sand-silicone simulations of multiring impact structures have been undertaken in order to understand the effects of the rheology of the lithosphere on the variability of natural multiring structures. For low sand-silicone thickness ratio (1:3), brittle strain is accommodated by spiral strike-slip faults. For higher sand-silicone ratios (1:1 or 2:1), an inner concentric ring affected by strike-slip faults is relayed by an external ring affected by concentric normal faults. The diameter of the inner ring decreases with the increase of the sand-silicone thickness ratio. It is suggested that the flexure of the brittle layer due to the silicone flow is responsible for the brittle strain field which is enhanced by the channel flow of the lower crust. The characteristic geometry of the intersection of conjugated strike-slip faults can be observed around large multiring basins on silicate crust such as Orientale on the Moon and on icy crust, such as Valhalla on Callisto and Gilgamesh on Ganymede. The strain field around these large craters is discussed in terms of mechanical properties of the lithospheres. On the Moon, large craters without relaxation faults, such as Imbrium are located on thin crust regions. The crust was too thin to have a ductile lower layer at the time of impact. Gilgamesh on Ganymede is surrounded mainly by strike-slip faults. Asgard on Callisto has the same diameter as Gilgamesh but is surrounded by concentric normal faults. The brittle-ductile thickness ratio is thus higher on Callisto than on Ganymede.

  19. Temporal variability in aboveground plant biomass decreases as spatial variability increases.

    PubMed

    McGranahan, Devan Allen; Hovick, Torre J; Elmore, R Dwayne; Engle, David M; Fuhlendorf, Samuel D; Winter, Stephen L; Miller, James R; Debinski, Diane M

    2016-03-01

    Ecological theory predicts that diversity decreases variability in ecosystem function. We predict that, at the landscape scale, spatial variability created by a mosaic of contrasting patches that differ in time since disturbance will decrease temporal variability in aboveground plant biomass. Using data from a multi-year study of seven grazed tallgrass prairie landscapes, each experimentally managed for one to eight patches, we show that increased spatial variability driven by spatially patchy fire and herbivory reduces temporal variability in aboveground plant biomass. This pattern is associated with statistical evidence for the portfolio effect and a positive relationship between temporal variability and functional group synchrony as predicted by metacommunity variability theory. As disturbance from fire and grazing interact to create a shifting mosaic of spatially heterogeneous patches within a landscape, temporal variability in aboveground plant biomass can be dampened. These results suggest that spatially heterogeneous disturbance regimes contribute to a portfolio of ecosystem functions provided by biodiversity, including wildlife habitat, fuel, and forage. We discuss how spatial patterns of disturbance drive variability within and among patches. PMID:27197382

  20. Temporal variability in aboveground plant biomass decreases as spatial variability increases.

    PubMed

    McGranahan, Devan Allen; Hovick, Torre J; Elmore, R Dwayne; Engle, David M; Fuhlendorf, Samuel D; Winter, Stephen L; Miller, James R; Debinski, Diane M

    2016-03-01

    Ecological theory predicts that diversity decreases variability in ecosystem function. We predict that, at the landscape scale, spatial variability created by a mosaic of contrasting patches that differ in time since disturbance will decrease temporal variability in aboveground plant biomass. Using data from a multi-year study of seven grazed tallgrass prairie landscapes, each experimentally managed for one to eight patches, we show that increased spatial variability driven by spatially patchy fire and herbivory reduces temporal variability in aboveground plant biomass. This pattern is associated with statistical evidence for the portfolio effect and a positive relationship between temporal variability and functional group synchrony as predicted by metacommunity variability theory. As disturbance from fire and grazing interact to create a shifting mosaic of spatially heterogeneous patches within a landscape, temporal variability in aboveground plant biomass can be dampened. These results suggest that spatially heterogeneous disturbance regimes contribute to a portfolio of ecosystem functions provided by biodiversity, including wildlife habitat, fuel, and forage. We discuss how spatial patterns of disturbance drive variability within and among patches.

  1. A Survey of Spatial and Seasonal Water Isotope Variability on the Juneau Icefield, Alaksa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennis, D.; Carter, A.; Clinger, A. E.; Eads, O. L.; Gotwals, S.; Gunderson, J.; Hollyday, A. E.; Klein, E. S.; Markle, B. R.; Timms, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    The depletion of stable oxygen-hydrogen isotopes (δ18O and δH) is well correlated with temperature change, which is driven by variation in topography, climate, and atmospheric circulation. This study presents a survey of the spatial and seasonal variability of isotopic signatures on the Juneau Icefield (JI), Alaska, USA which spans over 3,000 square-kilometers. To examine small scale variability in the previous year's accumulation, samples were taken at regular intervals from snow pits and a one square-kilometer surficial grid. Surface snow samples were collected across the icefield to evaluate large scale variability, ranging approximately 1,000 meters in elevation and 100 kilometers in distance. Individual precipitation events were also sampled to track percolation throughout the snowpack and temperature correlations. A survey of this extent has never been undertaken on the JI. Samples were analyzed in the field using a Los Gatos laser isotope analyzer. This survey helps us better understand isotope fractionation on temperate glaciers in coastal environments and provides preliminary information on the suitability of the JI for a future ice core drilling project.

  2. Small-scale physics of the ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caldwell, D. R.

    1983-01-01

    Progress in research on the small-scale physics of the ocean is reviewed. The contribution of such research to the understanding of the large scales is addressed and compared for various depth ranges of the ocean. The traditional framework for discussing small-scale measurements and turbulence is outlined, and recent research in the area is reviewed, citing references. Evidence for the existence of salt fingering in oceanic mixing is discussed. Factors that might inhibit the growth of salt fingers are assessed, and the influence of differences between laboratory tank and ocean in studying the fingers is discussed. The role of salt fingers in creating intrusions is examined. Instruments and methods used to measure the smallest scales at which there is appreciable variation and the stability of the patch of ocean in which the small-scale motions take place are considered.

  3. The Phenomenology of Small-Scale Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreenivasan, K. R.; Antonia, R. A.

    I have sometimes thought that what makes a man's work classic is often just this multiplicity [of interpretations], which invites and at the same time resists our craving for a clear understanding. Wright (1982, p. 34), on Wittgenstein's philosophy Small-scale turbulence has been an area of especially active research in the recent past, and several useful research directions have been pursued. Here, we selectively review this work. The emphasis is on scaling phenomenology and kinematics of small-scale structure. After providing a brief introduction to the classical notions of universality due to Kolmogorov and others, we survey the existing work on intermittency, refined similarity hypotheses, anomalous scaling exponents, derivative statistics, intermittency models, and the structure and kinematics of small-scale structure - the latter aspect coming largely from the direct numerical simulation of homogeneous turbulence in a periodic box.

  4. The Impacts of Water Quality and Food Availability on Children's Health in West Africa: A Spatial Analysis Using Remotely Sensed Data and Small-Scale Water Quality Data and Country-level Health Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frederick, L.; Grace, K.; Lloyd, B.

    2015-12-01

    As the global climate changes and the populations of many African countries grow, ensuring clean drinking water and food has become a pressing concern. Because of their vulnerability to malnutrition and food insecurity, children face the greatest risk for adverse health outcomes related to climate change. Vulnerability, however, is highly variable, with some children in food insecure communities showing healthy growth, while some children in food secure communities show signs of malnutrition. In West Africa, Burkina Faso faces high levels of child malnutrition, loses to farmland and a large share of the population have no access to clean water. Because the overwhelming majority of children rely on locally grown, rainfed agriculture and well/surface water, the combined impact of climate change and population growth decreases water availability and farmland per person. However, there is notable community and individual variation in malnutrition levels suggesting that there are important coping strategies that vulnerable families may use to secure their children's health. No spatially relevant analysis of water and food insecurity and children's health exists for Burkina Faso. The goal of this research is to identify and quantify the combined and inter-related impact of unsafe drinking water and community-level food availability on the physical health outcomes of Burkinabe children under five years of age. To accomplish this goal we rely on a publically available highly detailed, geo-referenced data set (Demographic and Health Survey (DHS)) to provide information on measures of childhood malnutrition and details on parental characteristics related to children's health. Information on water source (covered/uncovered well, piped water, etc.) and water quality (measures of arsenic and pollution) comes from DHS along with a recently collected geo-referenced US Agency for International Development (USAID) data set. Critical information on food production, environmental

  5. The Impacts of Water Quality and Food Availability on Children's Health in West Africa: A Spatial Analysis Using Remotely Sensed Data and Small-Scale Water Quality Data and Country-level Health Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frederick, L.; Grace, K.; Lloyd, B.

    2014-12-01

    As the global climate changes and the populations of many African countries grow, ensuring clean drinking water and food has become a pressing concern. Because of their vulnerability to malnutrition and food insecurity, children face the greatest risk for adverse health outcomes related to climate change. Vulnerability, however, is highly variable, with some children in food insecure communities showing healthy growth, while some children in food secure communities show signs of malnutrition. In West Africa, Burkina Faso faces high levels of child malnutrition, loses to farmland and a large share of the population have no access to clean water. Because the overwhelming majority of children rely on locally grown, rainfed agriculture and well/surface water, the combined impact of climate change and population growth decreases water availability and farmland per person. However, there is notable community and individual variation in malnutrition levels suggesting that there are important coping strategies that vulnerable families may use to secure their children's health. No spatially relevant analysis of water and food insecurity and children's health exists for Burkina Faso. The goal of this research is to identify and quantify the combined and inter-related impact of unsafe drinking water and community-level food availability on the physical health outcomes of Burkinabe children under five years of age. To accomplish this goal we rely on a publically available highly detailed, geo-referenced data set (Demographic and Health Survey (DHS)) to provide information on measures of childhood malnutrition and details on parental characteristics related to children's health. Information on water source (covered/uncovered well, piped water, etc.) and water quality (measures of arsenic and pollution) comes from DHS along with a recently collected geo-referenced US Agency for International Development (USAID) data set. Critical information on food production, environmental

  6. Use of spatially variable data in river flood prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koren, V.; Reed, S.; Zhang, Z.; Seo, D.; Moreda, F.; Kuzmin, V.

    2003-04-01

    Gridded hydrometeorological and physiogeographical datasets are now available at different spatial resolutions for the operational use. While these sources provide much higher spatial resolution data compared to point based measurements, it is not clear how this information can be most effectively used to improve real-time flood forecasting. This study presents research and application results on catchment modeling that are based on the use of new spatially variable information. Most analyses were performed using simulation results from a Hydrology Laboratory Research Modeling System (HL-RMS) that combined lumped conceptual and physically-based distributed model features. Spatial data were critical for the both flood prediction and parameter estimation. Use of high resolution soil-vegetation-topographic data allowed to get reasonable grids of a priori (initial) water balance and routing model parameters. Further use of radar precipitation estimates in lumped and distributed modes simplified a priori parameter adjustment procedure to derive spatially variable parameter sets acceptable for real-time prediction. Simulation results also indicated that the use of spatially variable precipitation grids did not necessarily lead to improved flood prediction. High frequency errors of gridded input data may eliminate the benefit of fine scale simulations if a rainfall spatial pattern is not ‘well organized’. Effective quality control-filtering procedures are critical to benefit from high resolution data. A number of headwater basins and nested sub-basins were used in this analyses.

  7. Geologic utility of small-scale airphotos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, M. M.

    1969-01-01

    The geologic value of small scale airphotos is emphasized by describing the application of high altitude oblique and 1:120,000 to 1:145,000 scale vertical airphotos to several geologic problems in California. These examples show that small-scale airphotos can be of use to geologists in the following ways: (1) high altitude, high oblique airphotos show vast areas in one view; and (2) vertical airphotos offer the most efficient method of discovering the major topographic features and structural and lithologic characteristics of terrain.

  8. Optical measuring technique for small scale water surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahne, Bernd; Waas, Stefan

    1989-10-01

    This paper describes two optical measuring techniques for determining the spatial and temporal structure of small-scale surface waves: (1) the imaging slope gage (ISG) and (2) the reflective stereo slope gage (RSSG). The ISG is based on light refraction at the water surface; it records image sequences of the wave slope at a maximum area of 1 sq m. The RSSG technique involves illumination of the water surface from above by a monochromatic light source; its two CCD camera take stereo images of sequences of the specular reflexes returned by the water surface. Both instruments were successfully used in wind/wave facility investigations. The results show that they permit a much more detailed investigation of the physics of small scale waves than those made using conventional equipment, such as point measuring devices or laser slope gages.

  9. Characterization of the spatial variability of channel morphology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moody, J.A.; Troutman, B.M.

    2002-01-01

    The spatial variability of two fundamental morphological variables is investigated for rivers having a wide range of discharge (five orders of magnitude). The variables, water-surface width and average depth, were measured at 58 to 888 equally spaced cross-sections in channel links (river reaches between major tributaries). These measurements provide data to characterize the two-dimensional structure of a channel link which is the fundamental unit of a channel network. The morphological variables have nearly log-normal probability distributions. A general relation was determined which relates the means of the log-transformed variables to the logarithm of discharge similar to previously published downstream hydraulic geometry relations. The spatial variability of the variables is described by two properties: (1) the coefficient of variation which was nearly constant (0.13-0.42) over a wide range of discharge; and (2) the integral length scale in the downstream direction which was approximately equal to one to two mean channel widths. The joint probability distribution of the morphological variables in the downstream direction was modelled as a first-order, bivariate autoregressive process. This model accounted for up to 76 per cent of the total variance. The two-dimensional morphological variables can be scaled such that the channel width-depth process is independent of discharge. The scaling properties will be valuable to modellers of both basin and channel dynamics. Published in 2002 John Wiley and Sons, Ltd.

  10. IAPSA 2 small-scale system specification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Gerald C.; Torkelson, Thomas C.

    1990-01-01

    The details of a hardware implementation of a representative small scale flight critical system is described using Advanced Information Processing System (AIPS) building block components and simulated sensor/actuator interfaces. The system was used to study application performance and reliability issues during both normal and faulted operation.

  11. SMALL SCALE BIOMASS FUELED GAS TURBINE ENGINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A new generation of small scale (less than 20 MWe) biomass fueled, power plants are being developed based on a gas turbine (Brayton cycle) prime mover. These power plants are expected to increase the efficiency and lower the cost of generating power from fuels such as wood. The n...

  12. Spatial and temporal variability of chlorophyll in Bay of Bengal.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jutla, A.; Akanda, S.; Islam, S.

    2009-04-01

    The Bay of Bengal (BoB) receives approximately 628 km3/ year of freshwater discharge from the Ganges and Brahmaputra rivers. Freshwater discharge from rivers increases the nutrient load and thereby enhances phytoplankton production in the BoB. Cholera, an infectious water-borne disease caused by bacterium Vibrio cholerae, remains endemic in the BoB region. Phytoplankton provides favorable environment for survival of cholera bacteria. Therefore, for development of any predictive model for cholera, it is important to quantify the spatial and temporal variability of phytoplankton in the BoB. Satellite remote sensing is the most effective way to quantify this variability over a range of space and time scales. Using ten years (1998-2007) of daily, weekly and monthly SeaWiFs chlorophyll, a surrogate variable for measuring phytoplankton, imagery we explore the spatial pattern and dominant temporal variability of chlorophyll over the BoB region. We find that chlorophyll in the coastal waters has more variability, both in temporal and spatial scales, than the offshore waters. Mechanism of production and space-time variability of coastal chlorophyll is different from those of offshore chlorophyll. While coastal chlorophyll is dominated by influx of terrestrial nutrients through river discharge, chlorophyll in the offshore region is primarily controlled by oceanic processes. We will also explore issues related to dominant space and time scales of chlorophyll variations in the entire bay.

  13. Variability of Soil Temperature: A Spatial and Temporal Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Stephen J.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Discusses an analysis of the relationship of soil temperatures at 3 depths to various climatic variables along a 200-kilometer transect in west-central Oklahoma. Reports that temperature readings increased from east to west. Concludes that temperature variations were explained by a combination of spatial, temporal, and biophysical factors. (SG)

  14. Spatial variability of water use efficiency in China's terrestrial ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xian-Jin; Yu, Gui-Rui; Wang, Qiu-Feng; Hu, Zhong-Min; Zheng, Han; Li, Sheng-Gong; Sun, Xiao-Min; Zhang, Yi-Ping; Yan, Jun-Hua; Wang, Hui-Min; Zhao, Feng-Hua; Zhang, Jun-Hui; Shi, Pei-Li; Li, Ying-Nian; Zhao, Liang; Zhang, Fa-Wei; Hao, Yan-Bin

    2015-06-01

    Water use efficiency (WUE) reflects the coupling of carbon and water cycles. Analyzing the spatial variability of WUE can improve our understanding on the interaction between carbon and water cycles at a large scale, which also provides a basis for improving the regional carbon budget assessment. Based on China's eddy covariance measurements, we examined the spatial variation of China's WUE and its affecting factors. WUE showed a decreasing trend with the increasing altitude, which was the result of ecosystem type distribution resulting from the climatic gradient. After fully considering the vertical variation of WUE, we found that not only mean annual air temperature (MAT), mean annual precipitation (MAP), and mean leaf area index (MLAI) but also mean annual total photosynthesis active radiation (MAR) affected the spatial variation of WUE. With the increasing MAT, MAP, and MLAI, WUE increased significantly but the increasing MAR decreased WUE. The spatial variation of WUE could be directly depicted by MLAI and altitude, the equation including which explained 65% of the spatial variation of WUE. The effects of MAT and MAP on the spatial variation of WUE may be achieved through altering MLAI, while the mechanism underlying the effect of MAR on the spatial variation of WUE was still unclear, which should be the subject of future investigations. This study reveals the vertical variation of WUE and provides a new approach to generate the spatial variation in WUE, which will benefit the regional carbon budget assessment.

  15. Spatial variability of dielectric properties in field soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendrickx, Jan M. H.; Borchers, Brian; Woolslayer, J.; Dekker, Louis W.; Ritsema, Coen; Paton, S.

    2001-10-01

    Most mine detection sensors are affected by soil properties such as water content, temperature, electrical conductivity, and dielectric constant. The most important of these is water content since it directly influences the three other properties. The variability of these properties may be such that either potential landmine signatures are overshadowed or false alarms result. In this paper we present the results of field measurements in the Netherlands, Panama, and New Mexico on spatial variability of soil water content. We also discuss how the variability of soil water content affects the soils electrical conductivity and dielectric constant and the resulting response of a ground penetrating radar system.

  16. Temporal and spatial variability of the Denmark Strait Overflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moritz, Martin; Nunes, Nuno; Jochumsen, Kerstin; Quadfasel, Detlef

    2016-04-01

    The Denmark Strait Overflow (DSO) represents about half of the export of dense waters formed in the Nordic Seas to the deep circulation in the North Atlantic. The passage connecting the two is wider than the Rossby radius of deformation, and highly variable meso-scale current fluctuations are observed in the overflow. In the summer of 2014, the mooring array used for monitoring the Denmark Strait Overflow was expanded from two to five moorings in order to better resolve its spatial variability. Continuous measurements of the velocity field were made using four acoustic profilers (ADCP) and one point current meter (RCM). The instruments were deployed along the sill between the deepest point and 33 km westward of it, towards the Greenland shelf. A descriptive analysis of the structure of the velocity field at the Denmark Strait sill is presented, along with its spatial and temporal variability. The fluctuations are dominated by passing meso-scale vortices, pulsating changes in the strength of the overflow and shifts in the location of the Polar Front. These changes and their respective contribution to the variability of the flow field are discussed with relation to the different source water masses for the DSO. The relationship between spatial coherence and temporal variability on daily to monthly time scales is explored, and the influence of meso-scale eddies on daily to weekly transport estimates is quantified. The results of the analysis are used to develop a measurement strategy for unbiased DSO transport estimates.

  17. Farmer decision making and spatial variables in northern Thailand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Jefferson; Kanter, Rebekah; Yarnasarn, Sanay; Ekasingh, Methi; Jones, Royce

    1994-05-01

    This research has two interrelated objectives. The first is to determine the extent to which a relationship exists between farmer characteristics and farming practices in three villages in northern Thailand. The second is to use standard statistical methods for incorporating spatial variables into the analysis and to assess the effects of these variables on farmer decision making. The data base includes information on the location and size of villages, roads, streams, and fields; a digital elevation model with information on elevation, slope, and aspect; and information keyed to individual fields on crops and cropping methods and the ethnicity, income, and religion of farmers. The map data (517 plots) were entered into a computerized geographic information systems (GIS). Results suggest several hypotheses about the relationships between land use and owner characteristics. More significantly, the study concludes that spatial analysis appears to be most useful when the dependent variable is either continuous or ordinal. The outlook is not quite as optimistic when the dependent variable is a nonordinal categorical variable. Before spatial analysis can be applied regularly to social science data, better computational tools need to be developed.

  18. Interaction of dynamic rupture with small-scale heterogeneities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galis, Martin; Mai, P. Martin

    2014-05-01

    Broadband ground motion simulations, with frequencies up to 10Hz, are important for engineering purposes, in particular for seismic hazard assessment for critical facilities. One problem in such simulations is the generation of high frequency radiation emitted during the dynamic rupture process. Ad-hoc kinematic rupture characterizations can be tweaked through empirical models to radiate over the desired frequency range, but their physical consistency remains questionable. In contrast, for physically self-consistent dynamic rupture modeling, controlled by friction, material parameters and the adopted physical laws, the mechanism that may lead to appropriate high-frequency radiation require heterogeneity in friction, stress, or fault geometry (or even all three quantities) at unknown but small length scales. Dunham at al. (2011) studied dynamic rupture propagation on rough faults in 2D, and described how fault roughness excites high-frequency radiation. In our study, we focus on the interaction of the dynamic rupture with small-scale heterogeneities on planar faults in 3D. We study effects of the interaction of dynamic rupture with 1) small-scale heterogeneities in the medium (that is, randomized 3D wave speed and density variations), and 2) small-scale heterogeneities in the frictional parameters. Our numerical results show significant variations in rupture velocity or peak slip velocity if small-scale heterogeneities are present. This indicates that the dynamic rupture is sensitive to both types of spatial inhomogeneity. At the same time we observe that the resulting near-source seismic wave fields are not very sensitive to these rupture variations, indicating that wavefront healing effects may "simplify" the complex seismic radiation once the waves propagated several wave-lengths away from the fault.

  19. DOE small scale fuel alcohol plant design

    SciTech Connect

    LaRue, D.M.; Richardson, J.G.

    1980-01-01

    The Department of Energy, in an effort to facilitate the deployment of rural-based ethanol production capability, has undertaken this effort to develop a basic small-scale plant design capable of producing anhydrous ethanol. The design, when completed, will contain all necessary specifications and diagrams sufficient for the construction of a plant. The design concept is modular; that is, sections of the plant can stand alone or be integrated into other designs with comparable throughput rates. The plant design will be easily scaled up or down from the designed flow rate of 25 gallons of ethanol per hour. Conversion factors will be provided with the final design package to explain scale-up and scale-down procedures. The intent of this program is to provide potential small-scale producers with sound information about the size, engineering requirements, costs and level of effort in building such a system.

  20. Impact of rainfall spatial variability on Flash Flood Forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douinot, Audrey; Roux, Hélène; Garambois, Pierre-André; Larnier, Kevin

    2014-05-01

    According to the United States National Hazard Statistics database, flooding and flash flooding have caused the largest number of deaths of any weather-related phenomenon over the last 30 years (Flash Flood Guidance Improvement Team, 2003). Like the storms that cause them, flash floods are very variable and non-linear phenomena in time and space, with the result that understanding and anticipating flash flood genesis is far from straightforward. In the U.S., the Flash Flood Guidance (FFG) estimates the average number of inches of rainfall for given durations required to produce flash flooding in the indicated county. In Europe, flash flood often occurred on small catchments (approximately 100 km2) and it has been shown that the spatial variability of rainfall has a great impact on the catchment response (Le Lay and Saulnier, 2007). Therefore, in this study, based on the Flash flood Guidance method, rainfall spatial variability information is introduced in the threshold estimation. As for FFG, the threshold is the number of millimeters of rainfall required to produce a discharge higher than the discharge corresponding to the first level (yellow) warning of the French flood warning service (SCHAPI: Service Central d'Hydrométéorologie et d'Appui à la Prévision des Inondations). The indexes δ1 and δ2 of Zoccatelli et al. (2010), based on the spatial moments of catchment rainfall, are used to characterize the rainfall spatial distribution. Rainfall spatial variability impacts on warning threshold and on hydrological processes are then studied. The spatially distributed hydrological model MARINE (Roux et al., 2011), dedicated to flash flood prediction is forced with synthetic rainfall patterns of different spatial distributions. This allows the determination of a warning threshold diagram: knowing the spatial distribution of the rainfall forecast and therefore the 2 indexes δ1 and δ2, the threshold value is read on the diagram. A warning threshold diagram is

  1. Small-scale features of temperature and salinity surface fields in the Coral Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maes, Christophe; Dewitte, Boris; Sudre, Joël.; Garçon, Véronique; Varillon, David

    2013-10-01

    The small-scale features in sea surface temperature and salinity fields (SST and SSS) of the Coral Sea are examined using high horizontal spatial and short-term temporal in situ measurements. These features are extracted from thermosalinographs (TSGs) gathered onboard commercial and research vessels and at one long-term fixed station. The analyses are performed along the vessel tracks and the structures of small-scale features are extracted by high-pass spatial filtering the original TSG data. For SSS, it is shown that the features at the scale of mesoscale eddies (˜100 km) vary from about -1.1 to +0.6 psu in the Coral Sea region. Processes sustaining such range include rainfall events, stirring by mesoscale eddies, and the latitudinal displacement of the sharp front associated with the edge of the Western Pacific Warm Pool at the seasonal time scales. The TSG data have revealed the presence of a sharp front (0.4-0.6 psu) between the subtropical and equatorial waters instead of a smooth gradient in the standard SSS climatologies. Within the context of recent remotely sensed observations of salinity, this could represent an important limitation for the validation and calibration of satellite products. In addition to these spatial considerations, temporal variations at one long-term station near Vanuatu show that the coupled air-sea responses to intraseasonal tropical variability, such as the Madden-Julian Oscillation, may have a signature in both SST and SSS fields. However, this response is found to be complex and not necessarily in phase. In the Coral Sea region, our results suggest that MJO-induced variability on SST and SSS exhibit little coherency at the seasonal time scales.

  2. Spatial variability of the dehydrogenase activity in forest soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Błońska, Ewa; Lasota, Jarosław

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the spatial variability of the dehydrogenase activity (DH) in forest soils using geostatistics. We have studied variability soil dehydrogenase and their relationship with variability of some physic-chemical properties. Two study areas (A and B) were set up in southern Poland in the Zlotoryja Forest District. Study areas were covered by different types of vegetation (A- broadleaf forest with beech, ash and sycamore), B- coniferous forest with Norway spruce). The soils were classified as Dystric Cambisols (WRB 2006). The samples for laboratory testing were collected from 49 places on each areas. 15 cm of surface horizon of soil were taken (with previously removed litter). Dehydrogenase activity was marked with Lenhard's method according to the Casida procedure. Soil pH, nitrogen (N) and soil organic carbon (C) content (by LECO CNS 2000 carbon analyzer) was marked. C/N ratio was calculated. Particle size composition was determined using laser diffraction. Statistical analysis were performed using STATISTICA 10 software. Geostatistical analysis and mapping were done by application of GS 9+ (Gamma Design) and Surfer 11 (Golden Software). The activity of DH ranged between 5,02 and 71,20 mg TPP• kg-1 •24 h-1 on the A area and between 0,94 and 16,47 mg TPP• kg-1 •24 h-1. Differences in spatial variability of the analised features were noted. The variability of dehydrogenase activity on the A study area was described by an exponential model, whereas on the B study area the spatial correlation has not been noted. The relationship of dehydrogenase activity with the remaining parameters of soil was noted only in the case of A study area. The variability of organic carbon content on the A and B study areas were described by an exponential model. The variability of nitrogen content on both areas were described by an spherical model.

  3. Analytical model of reactive transport processes with spatially variable coefficients

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Matthew J.; Morrow, Liam C.

    2015-01-01

    Analytical solutions of partial differential equation (PDE) models describing reactive transport phenomena in saturated porous media are often used as screening tools to provide insight into contaminant fate and transport processes. While many practical modelling scenarios involve spatially variable coefficients, such as spatially variable flow velocity, v(x), or spatially variable decay rate, k(x), most analytical models deal with constant coefficients. Here we present a framework for constructing exact solutions of PDE models of reactive transport. Our approach is relevant for advection-dominant problems, and is based on a regular perturbation technique. We present a description of the solution technique for a range of one-dimensional scenarios involving constant and variable coefficients, and we show that the solutions compare well with numerical approximations. Our general approach applies to a range of initial conditions and various forms of v(x) and k(x). Instead of simply documenting specific solutions for particular cases, we present a symbolic worksheet, as supplementary material, which enables the solution to be evaluated for different choices of the initial condition, v(x) and k(x). We also discuss how the technique generalizes to apply to models of coupled multispecies reactive transport as well as higher dimensional problems. PMID:26064648

  4. Sparse modeling of spatial environmental variables associated with asthma

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Timothy S.; Gangnon, Ronald E.; Page, C. David; Buckingham, William R.; Tandias, Aman; Cowan, Kelly J.; Tomasallo, Carrie D.; Arndt, Brian G.; Hanrahan, Lawrence P.; Guilbert, Theresa W.

    2014-01-01

    Geographically distributed environmental factors influence the burden of diseases such as asthma. Our objective was to identify sparse environmental variables associated with asthma diagnosis gathered from a large electronic health record (EHR) dataset while controlling for spatial variation. An EHR dataset from the University of Wisconsin’s Family Medicine, Internal Medicine and Pediatrics Departments was obtained for 199,220 patients aged 5–50 years over a three-year period. Each patient’s home address was geocoded to one of 3,456 geographic census block groups. Over one thousand block group variables were obtained from a commercial database. We developed a Sparse Spatial Environmental Analysis (SASEA). Using this method, the environmental variables were first dimensionally reduced with sparse principal component analysis. Logistic thin plate regression spline modeling was then used to identify block group variables associated with asthma from sparse principal components. The addresses of patients from the EHR dataset were distributed throughout the majority of Wisconsin’s geography. Logistic thin plate regression spline modeling captured spatial variation of asthma. Four sparse principal components identified via model selection consisted of food at home, dog ownership, household size, and disposable income variables. In rural areas, dog ownership and renter occupied housing units from significant sparse principal components were associated with asthma. Our main contribution is the incorporation of sparsity in spatial modeling. SASEA sequentially added sparse principal components to Logistic thin plate regression spline modeling. This method allowed association of geographically distributed environmental factors with asthma using EHR and environmental datasets. SASEA can be applied to other diseases with environmental risk factors. PMID:25533437

  5. Sparse modeling of spatial environmental variables associated with asthma.

    PubMed

    Chang, Timothy S; Gangnon, Ronald E; David Page, C; Buckingham, William R; Tandias, Aman; Cowan, Kelly J; Tomasallo, Carrie D; Arndt, Brian G; Hanrahan, Lawrence P; Guilbert, Theresa W

    2015-02-01

    Geographically distributed environmental factors influence the burden of diseases such as asthma. Our objective was to identify sparse environmental variables associated with asthma diagnosis gathered from a large electronic health record (EHR) dataset while controlling for spatial variation. An EHR dataset from the University of Wisconsin's Family Medicine, Internal Medicine and Pediatrics Departments was obtained for 199,220 patients aged 5-50years over a three-year period. Each patient's home address was geocoded to one of 3456 geographic census block groups. Over one thousand block group variables were obtained from a commercial database. We developed a Sparse Spatial Environmental Analysis (SASEA). Using this method, the environmental variables were first dimensionally reduced with sparse principal component analysis. Logistic thin plate regression spline modeling was then used to identify block group variables associated with asthma from sparse principal components. The addresses of patients from the EHR dataset were distributed throughout the majority of Wisconsin's geography. Logistic thin plate regression spline modeling captured spatial variation of asthma. Four sparse principal components identified via model selection consisted of food at home, dog ownership, household size, and disposable income variables. In rural areas, dog ownership and renter occupied housing units from significant sparse principal components were associated with asthma. Our main contribution is the incorporation of sparsity in spatial modeling. SASEA sequentially added sparse principal components to Logistic thin plate regression spline modeling. This method allowed association of geographically distributed environmental factors with asthma using EHR and environmental datasets. SASEA can be applied to other diseases with environmental risk factors.

  6. Sparse modeling of spatial environmental variables associated with asthma.

    PubMed

    Chang, Timothy S; Gangnon, Ronald E; David Page, C; Buckingham, William R; Tandias, Aman; Cowan, Kelly J; Tomasallo, Carrie D; Arndt, Brian G; Hanrahan, Lawrence P; Guilbert, Theresa W

    2015-02-01

    Geographically distributed environmental factors influence the burden of diseases such as asthma. Our objective was to identify sparse environmental variables associated with asthma diagnosis gathered from a large electronic health record (EHR) dataset while controlling for spatial variation. An EHR dataset from the University of Wisconsin's Family Medicine, Internal Medicine and Pediatrics Departments was obtained for 199,220 patients aged 5-50years over a three-year period. Each patient's home address was geocoded to one of 3456 geographic census block groups. Over one thousand block group variables were obtained from a commercial database. We developed a Sparse Spatial Environmental Analysis (SASEA). Using this method, the environmental variables were first dimensionally reduced with sparse principal component analysis. Logistic thin plate regression spline modeling was then used to identify block group variables associated with asthma from sparse principal components. The addresses of patients from the EHR dataset were distributed throughout the majority of Wisconsin's geography. Logistic thin plate regression spline modeling captured spatial variation of asthma. Four sparse principal components identified via model selection consisted of food at home, dog ownership, household size, and disposable income variables. In rural areas, dog ownership and renter occupied housing units from significant sparse principal components were associated with asthma. Our main contribution is the incorporation of sparsity in spatial modeling. SASEA sequentially added sparse principal components to Logistic thin plate regression spline modeling. This method allowed association of geographically distributed environmental factors with asthma using EHR and environmental datasets. SASEA can be applied to other diseases with environmental risk factors. PMID:25533437

  7. Field scale solute transport in spatially variable soils

    SciTech Connect

    Nedunuri, S.; Govindaraju, R.S.

    1994-12-31

    Spatial variability exhibited by many field soils necessitates the use of stochastic methods for prediction of average solute movement. Data from a field experiment were analyzed to characterize the random nature of the velocity and dispersion of solute (potassium bromide) in field scale vertical transport experiments. Solute concentrations were measured at over fifty spatial locations and at six depths within the soil. The analysis indicates that solute velocities at deeper soil layers exhibit a statistically homogeneous behavior. Dispersion was determined from breakthrough curves using a standard nonlinear regression model. These results will be presented, and the implications of modeling average solute behavior will be discussed.

  8. Spatial uncertainty in remote sensing generated hydrological variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendiguren González, Gorka; Stisen, Simon

    2016-04-01

    The use of satellite remote sensing (RS) has proven its potential to generate different hydrological variables such as Land Surface Temperature (LST), Leaf Area Index (LAI) or Evapotranspiration (ET) among others. In the case of ET different methods combine spectral and thermal information to estimate Actual ET (aET) coincident with satellite overpass. These estimates from space has become popular in the hydrological modeling community. The information obtained from RS estimates can be used to calibrate and validate hydrological models not just at single points or catchment averages, but also the simulated spatial patterns. It is a common assumption that although the RS estimates are uncertain, their strength lies in the spatial pattern information, due to the unprecedented spatial coverage of the observations. When spatial patterns obtained from remote sensing estimates are intended for evaluating the spatial patterns of distributed hydrological models, it will however be necessary to challenge that assumption. This study aims at quantifying the uncertainty of the estimated spatial pattern of temporally aggregated monthly LST and AET maps derived from the MODIS satellite. The proposed approach is based on a cluster analysis performed on hundreds of possible realizations of the estimates generated by sampling within the uncertainty of the individual pixels estimates and taking into account temporal variation and the correlation length of the error. The result is not only monthly maps of LST and AET, but also maps of the uncertainty of the spatial pattern. This type of information is critical when evaluating the spatial pattern performance of hydrological models, because the performance criteria can be adjusted for areas of high and low confidence in the observational data set. The resulting maps are finally utilized for an evaluation of the spatial performance of the 43,000 km2 national hydrological model of Denmark.

  9. Temporal and spatial variability of phytoplankton in a subtropical ecosystem

    SciTech Connect

    Bienfang, P.K.; Szyper, J.P.; Okamoto, M.P.; Noda, E.K.

    1984-05-01

    Phytoplankton conditions were examined at two stations off the leeward coast of Oahu, Hawaii. Significant temporal variability was observed in the chlorophyll and pheopigment data. Significant temporal and spatial variability was observed in the ATP and productivity data. Dissimilar inflection depths for nitrate, phosphate, and silicate indicate nitrate availability and phosphate limitation in the lower photic zone. Production between January and May was 11 times that between May and November; productivity below 44 m accounted for most of this variation. Biological and physical analyses indicate that variations in vertical nutrient supply, related to differences in current shear, caused this temporal variaton.

  10. Small Scale Reconnection : Structure and Electron Jet Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, I.

    2012-04-01

    The effects of small scale processes on the formation and evolution of macroscopic inhomogeneous magnetic configurations and the resulting super-Alfvenic jets have been investigated in space and lab over many years. Various satellite measurements at the magneto-sheath crossings observe features with small spatial scale of the order of electron skin depth, indicating the importance of processes dominated by electron dynamics. The data show structures which are (a) spatially non-symmetric with densities and magnetic field differing substantially on both sides of the region, while (b) the inhomogeneous magnetic and electric field structures consist of narrow, three-dimensional electron diffusion regions, with (c) bifurcated current over electron skin depth or below and (d) ejection of energetic, super-Alfvenic, non-Gaussian electrons perpendicularly to the magnetic field, away from the X-line. At small scales the main Alfven mode which describes the MHD regime is replaced by a helicon/whistler. The eMHD model, which includes the full dynamics of the electrons and stationary ions, with density gradients and asymptotically different values of the magnetic field is implemented for the experimentally observed configurations. Over the small scales the electron fluid follows the lines of the generalized vorticity (GV) as it decouples from the magnetic field. The regions of a significant deviation of the GV from the magnetic field become the potential sites for non-adiabatic electron acceleration. Effects of geometry, compressibility and thermal effects on this deviation will be discussed. The non-thermal jet distribution is conjectured to form when the standard diffusion is replaced by a non Markovian with large jumps random walk process, describing its evolution through the fractional diffusion equation and resulting in a non-Gaussian distribution.

  11. Hydrological response to changing climate conditions: Spatial streamflow variability in the boreal region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teutschbein, Claudia; Grabs, Thomas; Karlsen, Reinert H.; Laudon, Hjalmar; Bishop, Kevin

    2016-04-01

    It has long been recognized that streamflow-generating processes are not only dependent on climatic conditions, but also affected by physical catchment properties such as topography, geology, soils and land cover. We hypothesize that these landscape characteristics do not only lead to highly variable hydrologic behavior of rather similar catchments under the same stationary climate conditions (Karlsen et al., 2014), but that they also play a fundamental role for the sensitivity of a catchment to a changing climate (Teutschbein et al., 2015). A multi-model ensemble based on 15 regional climate models was combined with a multi-catchment approach to explore the hydrologic sensitivity of 14 partially nested and rather similar catchments in Northern Sweden to changing climate conditions and the importance of small-scale spatial variability. Current (1981-2010) and future (2061-2090) streamflow was simulated with the HBV model. As expected, projected increases in temperature and precipitation resulted in increased total available streamflow, with lower spring and summer flows, but substantially higher winter streamflow. Furthermore, significant changes in flow durations with lower chances of both high and low flows can be expected in boreal Sweden in the future. This overall trend in projected streamflow pattern changes was comparable among the analyzed catchments while the magnitude of change differed considerably. This suggests that catchments belonging to the same region can show distinctly different degrees of hydrological responses to the same external climate change signal. We reason that differences in spatially distributed physical catchment properties at smaller scales are not only of great importance for current streamflow behavior, but also play a major role as first-order control for the sensitivity of catchments to changing climate conditions. References Karlsen, R.H., T. Grabs, K. Bishop, H. Laudon, and J. Seibert (2014). Landscape controls on

  12. Effects of spatial variability and scale on areal -average evapotranspiration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Famiglietti, J. S.; Wood, Eric F.

    1993-01-01

    This paper explores the effect of spatial variability and scale on areally-averaged evapotranspiration. A spatially-distributed water and energy balance model is employed to determine the effect of explicit patterns of model parameters and atmospheric forcing on modeled areally-averaged evapotranspiration over a range of increasing spatial scales. The analysis is performed from the local scale to the catchment scale. The study area is King's Creek catchment, an 11.7 sq km watershed located on the native tallgrass prairie of Kansas. The dominant controls on the scaling behavior of catchment-average evapotranspiration are investigated by simulation, as is the existence of a threshold scale for evapotranspiration modeling, with implications for explicit versus statistical representation of important process controls. It appears that some of our findings are fairly general, and will therefore provide a framework for understanding the scaling behavior of areally-averaged evapotranspiration at the catchment and larger scales.

  13. Spatial and temporal variability of hyperspectral signatures of terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, K. F.; Perovich, D. K.; Koenig, G. G.

    2008-04-01

    Electromagnetic signatures of terrain exhibit significant spatial heterogeneity on a range of scales as well as considerable temporal variability. A statistical characterization of the spatial heterogeneity and spatial scaling algorithms of terrain electromagnetic signatures are required to extrapolate measurements to larger scales. Basic terrain elements including bare soil, grass, deciduous, and coniferous trees were studied in a quasi-laboratory setting using instrumented test sites in Hanover, NH and Yuma, AZ. Observations were made using a visible and near infrared spectroradiometer (350 - 2500 nm) and hyperspectral camera (400 - 1100 nm). Results are reported illustrating: i) several difference scenes; ii) a terrain scene time series sampled over an annual cycle; and iii) the detection of artifacts in scenes. A principal component analysis indicated that the first three principal components typically explained between 90 and 99% of the variance of the 30 to 40-channel hyperspectral images. Higher order principal components of hyperspectral images are useful for detecting artifacts in scenes.

  14. Spatial and temporal precipitation variability as a component of site-specific crop yield variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Neal, Monte Ray

    The purpose of this study was to determine spatial and temporal precipitation variability, and the effect of this variability on yield and profitability. On-farm precipitation data is currently being measured by site- specific farmers. One potential use of the data is to provide inputs for corn yield modeling, which has been performed with neural networks and simulation. Profitability of measuring on-farm data depends on spatial precipitation variability and its effect on yield. Precipitation and air temperature from corn silking to dent stages, scale of yield data, and a technology factor were used to model corn yield in east central Indiana at farm (250 ha), county, and state scales, using backpropagation neural networks with five data coding schemes. The best net gave a root-mean-squared error of 11.9% overall (10.9% farm, 10.5% county, 7.9% state yield), with maximum-value interval coding. Four rain gauges on the same farm, spaced apart 1.02 to 3.04 km, gave a median absolute deviation of precipitation among gauges, by corn and soybean phenological phase, of 0.25 to 1.73 mm.day-1 (spatial variability). Median absolute deviation from a reference year was 0.17 to 3.40 mm.day-1 (temporal/year-to- year variability). Spatial variability was less than temporal variability, and frequently less than 1 mm. Three precipitation data sources-a National Weather Service (NWS) station on the same farm, the nearest non- urban NWS station, and a weighted mean of three nearest non-urban NWS stations (27-35 km distance)-were used to simulate corn yield by 1-ha grid cells with CERES-Maize. The percent absolute difference of simulated yield among the three sources (effect of spatial precipitation variability) was 15.8%. The percent absolute difference from long-term mean (temporal variability) was 21.5%, of the same order as spatial variability. A choice among nitrogen application strategies-variable-rate versus whole-field application, starter versus no starter-was made for the

  15. Philippines: Small-scale renewable energy update

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-01

    This paper gives an overview of the application of small scale renewable energy sources in the Philippines. Sources looked at include solar, biomass, micro-hydroelectric, mini-hydroelectric, wind, mini-geothermal, and hybrid. A small power utilities group is being spun off the major utility, to provide a structure for developing rural electrification programs. In some instances, private companies have stepped forward, avoiding what is perceived as overwhelming beaurocracy, and installed systems with private financing. The paper provides information on survey work which has been done on resources, and the status of cooperative programs to develop renewable systems in the nation.

  16. Small-Scale Hydroelectric Power Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Gleeson, L.

    1991-12-01

    The US Department of Energy Field Office, Idaho, Small-Scale Hydroelectric Power Program was initiated in conjunction with the restoration of three power generating plants in Idaho Falls, Idaho, following damage caused by the Teton Dam failure on June 5, 1976. There were many parties interested in this project, including the state and environmental groups, with different concerns. This report was prepared by the developer and describes the design alternatives the applicant provided in an attempt to secure the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission license. Also included are correspondence between the related parties concerning the project, major design alternatives/project plan diagrams, the license, and energy and project economics.

  17. Small-scale physics of the ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caldwell, Douglas R.

    1987-01-01

    Observations and theoretical models of small-scale phenomena in the oceans are reviewed, with a focus on progress during the period 1983-1986. Topics examined include surface layers, equatorial turbulence, off-equator mixed layers, the scaling of mixing, turbulence concepts, laboratory results, internal waves and mixing, rings, the nature of the bottom layer, double diffusion and intrusions, salt fingers, and biological interactions. Also discussed are developments in instrumentation (fast sampling profilers with upward-profiling capability, deep profilers, ship-motion correction, horizontal samplers, small submersibles, submarines, towed packages, conductivity sensors, dissolved-oxygen sensors, and acoustic Doppler current profilers) and goals for future research.

  18. Geomorphic and substrate controls on spatial variability in river solute transport and biogeochemical cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaen, Phillip; Kurz, Marie; Knapp, Julia; Mendoza-Lera, Clara; Lee-Cullin, Joe; Klaar, Megan; Drummond, Jen; Jaeger, Anna; Zarnetske, Jay; Lewandowski, Joerg; Marti, Eugenia; Ward, Adam; Fleckenstein, Jan; Datry, Thibault; Larned, Scott; Krause, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    Nutrient concentrations in surface waters and groundwaters are increasing in many agricultural catchments worldwide as a result of anthropogenic activities. Increasing geomorphological heterogeneity in river channels may help to attenuate nutrient pollution by facilitating water exchange fluxes with the hyporheic zone; a site of intense microbial activity where biogeochemical transformation rates (e.g. denitrification) can be high. However, the controls on spatial variability in biogeochemical cycling, particularly at scales relevant for river managers, are not well understood. Here, we aimed to assess: 1) how differences in geomorphological heterogeneity control river solute transport and rates of biogeochemical cycling at sub-reach scales (102 m); and 2) the relative magnitude of these differences versus those relating to reach scale substrate variability (103 m). We used the reactive 'smart' tracer resazurin (Raz), a weakly fluorescent dye that transforms to highly fluorescent resorufin (Rru) under mildly reducing conditions, as a proxy to assess rates of biogeochemical cycling in a lowland river in southern England. Solute tracer tests were conducted in two reaches with contrasting substrates: one sand-dominated and the other gravel-dominated. Each reach was divided into sub-reaches that varied in geomorphic complexity (e.g. by the presence of pool-riffle sequences or the abundance of large woody debris). Slug injections of Raz and the conservative tracer fluorescein were conducted in each reach during baseflow conditions (Q ≈ 80 L/s) and breakthrough curves monitored using in-situ fluorometers. Preliminary results indicate overall Raz:Rru transformation rates in the gravel-dominated reach were more than 50% higher than those in the sand-dominated reach. However, high sub-reach variability in Raz:Rru transformation rates and conservative solute transport parameters suggests small-scale targeted management interventions to alter geomorphic heterogeneity may be

  19. Multi-scale controls on spatial variability in river biogeochemical cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaen, Phillip; Kurz, Marie; Knapp, Julia; Mendoza-Lera, Clara; Lee-Cullin, Joe; Klaar, Megan; Drummond, Jennifer; Jaeger, Anna; Zarnetske, Jay; Lewandowski, Joerg; Marti, Eugenia; Ward, Adam; Fleckenstein, Jan; Datry, Thibault; Larned, Scott; Krause, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    Excessive nutrient concentrations are common in surface waters and groundwaters in agricultural catchments worldwide. Increasing geomorphological heterogeneity in river channels may help to attenuate nutrient pollution by facilitating water exchange fluxes with the hyporheic zone; a site of intense microbial activity where biogeochemical cycling rates can be high. However, the controls on spatial variability in biogeochemical cycling, particularly at scales relevant for river managers, are largely unknown. Here, we aimed to assess: 1) how differences in river geomorphological heterogeneity control solute transport and rates of biogeochemical cycling at sub-reach scales (102 m); and 2) the relative magnitude of these differences versus those relating to reach scale substrate variability (103 m). We used the reactive tracer resazurin (Raz), a weakly fluorescent dye that transforms to highly fluorescent resorufin (Rru) under mildly reducing conditions, as a proxy to assess rates of biogeochemical cycling in a lowland river in southern England. Solute tracer tests were conducted in two reaches with contrasting substrates: one sand-dominated and the other gravel-dominated. Each reach was divided into sub-reaches that varied in geomorphic complexity (e.g. by the presence of pool-riffle sequences or the abundance of large woody debris). Slug injections of Raz and the conservative tracer fluorescein were conducted in each reach during baseflow conditions (Q ≈ 80 L/s) and breakthrough curves monitored using in-situ fluorometers. Preliminary results indicate overall Raz:Rru transformation rates in the gravel-dominated reach were more than 50% higher than those in the sand-dominated reach. However, high sub-reach variability in Raz:Rru transformation rates and conservative solute transport parameters suggests small scale targeted management interventions to alter geomorphic heterogeneity may be effective in creating hotspots of river biogeochemical cycling and nutrient load

  20. Extreme small-scale wind episodes over the Barents Sea: When, where and why?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolstad, Erik W.

    2015-10-01

    The Barents Sea is mostly ice-free during winter and therefore prone to severe weather associated with marine cold air outbreaks, such as polar lows. With the increasing marine activity in the region, it is important to study the climatology and variability of episodes with strong winds, as well as to understand their causes. Explosive marine cyclogenesis is usually caused by a combination of several mechanisms: upper-level forcing, stratospheric dry intrusions, latent heat release, surface energy fluxes, low-level baroclinicity. An additional factor that has been linked to extremely strong surface winds, is low static stability in the lower atmosphere, which allows for downward transfer of high-momentum air. Here the most extreme small-scale wind episodes in a high-resolution (5 km) 35-year hindcast were analyzed, and it was found that they were associated with unusually strong low-level baroclinicity and surface heat fluxes. And crucially, the 12 most severe episodes had stronger cold-air advection than 12 slightly less severe cases, suggesting that marine cold air outbreaks are the most important mechanism for extreme winds on small spatial scales over the Barents Sea. Because weather models are often unable to explicitly forecast small-scale developments in data-sparse regions such as the Barents Sea, these results can be used by forecasters as supplements to forecast model data.

  1. Shortwave surface radiation budget network for observing small-scale cloud inhomogeneity fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhavan, B. L.; Kalisch, J.; Macke, A.

    2015-03-01

    As part of the High Definition Clouds and Precipitation for advancing Climate Prediction Observational Prototype Experiment (HOPE), a high spatial density network of 99 silicon photodiode pyranometers was set up around Jülich (10 km x 12 km area) from April to July 2013, to capture the variability in the radiation field at the surface induced by small-scale cloud inhomogeneity. Each of these autonomously operated pyranometer stations was equipped with weather sensors for simultaneous measurements of ambient air temperature and relative humidity. In this paper, we provide the details of this unique setup of the pyranometer network and the data analysis with initial quality screening procedure we adopted. We also present some exemplary cases consisting of the days with clear, broken cloudy and overcast skies to assess our spatio-temporal observations from the network, and validate their consistency with other collocated radiation measurements available during the HOPE period.

  2. Observational Evidence for Small Scale Distributed Energy Release and Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilmer, Nicole

    Particle acceleration in solar flares is a challenging issue. Not only, is it necessary to convert a large fraction of the free magnetic energy to supra-thermal particles on relatively short time scales, but it is also required to produce in some flares ultra-relativistic particles on timescales of a few tens of seconds. Several approaches have been considered in the solar physics literature for acceleration models: either the acceleration takes place in large scale features (shocks or current sheets) or it occurs in small scale distributed energy release sites. I shall review here some of the observations which support the scenario of spatially distributed energy release and acceleration sites: existence of narrow-band millisecond bursts in the radio range and spatial distributions of these emissions, distribution of time scales of energy release, statistical properties of flares and HXR pulses, waiting time distributions in flares,. . .

  3. Bayesian Variable Selection for Multivariate Spatially-Varying Coefficient Regression

    PubMed Central

    Reich, Brian J.; Fuentes, Montserrat; Herring, Amy H.; Evenson, Kelly R.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Physical activity has many well-documented health benefits for cardiovascular fitness and weight control. For pregnant women, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists currently recommends 30 minutes of moderate exercise on most, if not all, days; however, very few pregnant women achieve this level of activity. Traditionally, studies have focused on examining individual or interpersonal factors to identify predictors of physical activity. There is a renewed interest in whether characteristics of the physical environment in which we live and work may also influence physical activity levels. We consider one of the first studies of pregnant women that examines the impact of characteristics of the built environment on physical activity levels. Using a socioecologic framework, we study the associations between physical activity and several factors including personal characteristics, meteorological/air quality variables, and neighborhood characteristics for pregnant women in four counties of North Carolina. We simultaneously analyze six types of physical activity and investigate cross-dependencies between these activity types. Exploratory analysis suggests that the associations are different in different regions. Therefore we use a multivariate regression model with spatially-varying regression coefficients. This model includes a regression parameter for each covariate at each spatial location. For our data with many predictors, some form of dimension reduction is clearly needed. We introduce a Bayesian variable selection procedure to identify subsets of important variables. Our stochastic search algorithm determines the probabilities that each covariate’s effect is null, non-null but constant across space, and spatially-varying. We found that individual level covariates had a greater influence on women’s activity levels than neighborhood environmental characteristics, and some individual level covariates had spatially-varying associations with

  4. Wet tropospheric delay spatial variability over terrestrial water bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, E.; Moller, D.; Andreadis, K.; Lettenmaier, D. P.

    2013-12-01

    Among the sources of uncertainty in radar altimetry measurements of inland water bodies is the signal delay associated with space-time variations in water vapor in the atmosphere. Over the ocean, zenith wet tropospheric path delays (PD) can be measured by satellite microwave radiometry; however, the high brightness temperature of land prevents the use of these techniques over inland waters. SAR-based Atmospheric Phase Screens can be estimated over land, but not over water bodies. Radiosonde- and GPS-based estimates of PD over land are available, yet these measurements occur at specific, sparse locations. Atmospheric models are therefore the best source of information about space-time variations in PD, where observations (e.g., from radiosonde and GPS) are incorporated via data assimilation. The upcoming Surface Water and Ocean Topography mission (SWOT) will use Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) in Ka-band, at a high incidence angle, to measure temporal variations in water elevation, slope, and extent in rivers, lakes, and reservoirs. Images will be collected over a 120-km wide swath with <100 m spatial resolution and ~1 cm height precision when averaged over a 1 km2 area, with a 21-day repeat cycle. At present, the spatial and temporal variability of PD at spatial scales relevant to the mission's inland water objectives (e.g., measurement of variations in the storage of reservoirs and lakes with spatial extent order 1 sq. km and larger) is an open question. We report the results of simulations of PD based on simulations from the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) numerical weather prediction model. We consider two domains within the continental U.S.: 1) the Pacific Northwest (at 4-km and 4/3-km spatial resolutions, via WRF results provided by the Northwest Modeling Consortium), and 2) sections of New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas (at 2.33-km spatial resolution, via simulations performed for this study). We then investigate the spatial and temporal

  5. Small-scale structures in the far-infrared background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbstmeier, Uwe; Abraham, Peter; Lemke, Dietrich; Laureijs, R. J.; Klaas, Ulrich; Mattila, Kalevi; Leinert, Christoph; Surace, Christian; Kunkel, Michael

    1998-04-01

    Four fields with areas ranging from 80 to 2000 arcmin(2) have been mapped with the photometer on board of the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) at 90 and around 180mu m in regions of bright and faint cirrus. We examined the spatial characteristics of the infrared background emission with high spatial resolution and found that the fluctuations in the background emission limit the detection sensitivity of ISOPHOT for most of our observations. At 90mu m the power law relation between the power in the fluctuations and the spatial frequencies established from IRAS data could be extended to twice as high spatial frequencies. At 180mu m the small-scale fluctuations were studied for the first time by a cold space telescope with arcminute-resolution. A similar power law and spectral index down to spatial scales of 3arcmin as for the 90mu m component is found. For cirrus clouds the spatial frequency spectrum in the far-infrared has a similar shape as that derived from 21cm line observations of the interstellar neutral hydrogen. In faint regions the fluctuations are caused presumably by randomly distributed extragalactic sources. Future 3m class space telescopes surveying the sky around 200mu m will not be hampered by cirrus over most of the sphere. Based on observations with ISO, an ESA project with instruments funded by ESA Member States (especially the PI countries: France, Germany, the Netherlands and the United Kingdom) and with the participation of ISAS and NASA

  6. Temporal Changes in the Spatial Variability of Soil Nutrients

    SciTech Connect

    R. L. Hoskinson; J. R. Hess; R. S. Alessi

    1999-07-01

    This paper reports the temporal changes in the spatial variability of soil nutrient concentrations across a field during the growing season, over a four-year period. This study is part of the Site-Specific Technologies for Agriculture (SST4Ag) precision farming research project at the INEEL. Uniform fertilization did not produce a uniform increase in fertility. During the growing season, several of the nutrients and micronutrients showed increases in concentration although no additional fertilization had occurred. Potato plant uptake did not explain all of these changes. Some soil micronutrient concentrations increased above levels considered detrimental to potatoes, but the plants did not show the effects in reduced yield. All the nutrients measured changed between the last sampling in the fall and the first sampling the next spring prior to fertilization. The soil microbial community may play a major role in the temporal changes in the spatial variability of soil nutrient concentrations. These temporal changes suggest potential impact when determining fertilizer recommendations, and when evaluating the results of spatially varying fertilizer application.

  7. Small-scale variation of snow in a regional permafrost model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gisnås, Kjersti; Westermann, Sebastian; Vikhamar Schuler, Thomas; Melvold, Kjetil; Etzelmüller, Bernd

    2016-06-01

    The strong winds prevalent in high altitude and arctic environments heavily redistribute the snow cover, causing a small-scale pattern of highly variable snow depths. This has profound implications for the ground thermal regime, resulting in highly variable near-surface ground temperatures on the metre scale. Due to asymmetric snow distributions combined with the nonlinear insulating effect of snow, the spatial average ground temperature in a 1 km2 area cannot be determined based on the average snow cover for that area. Land surface or permafrost models employing a coarsely classified average snow depth will therefore not yield a realistic representation of ground temperatures. In this study we employ statistically derived snow distributions within 1 km2 grid cells as input to a regional permafrost model in order to represent sub-grid variability of ground temperatures. This improves the representation of both the average and the total range of ground temperatures. The model reproduces observed sub-grid ground temperature variations of up to 6 °C, and 98 % of borehole observations match the modelled temperature range. The mean modelled temperature of the grid cell reproduces the observations with an accuracy of 1.5 °C or better. The observed sub-grid variations in ground surface temperatures from two field sites are very well reproduced, with estimated fractions of sub-zero mean annual ground surface temperatures within ±10 %. We also find that snow distributions within areas of 1 km2 in Norwegian mountain environments are closer to a gamma than to a lognormal theoretical distribution. The modelled permafrost distribution seems to be more sensitive to the choice of distribution function than to the fine-tuning of the coefficient of variation. When incorporating the small-scale variation of snow, the modelled total permafrost area of mainland Norway is nearly twice as large compared to the area obtained with grid-cell average snow depths without a sub

  8. Spatial Variability and Interpolation of Stochastic Weather Simulation Model Parameters.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Gregory L.; Daly, Christopher; Taylor, George H.; Hanson, Clayton L.

    2000-06-01

    The spatial variability of 58 precipitation and temperature parameters from the `generation of weather elements for multiple applications' (GEM) weather generator has been investigated over a region of significant complexity in topography and climate. GEM parameters were derived for 80 climate stations in southern Idaho and southeastern Oregon. A technique was developed and used to determine the GEM parameters from high-elevation snowpack telemetry stations that report precipitation in nonstandard 2.5-mm (versus 0.25 mm) increments. Important dependencies were noted between most of these parameters and elevation (both domainwide and local), location, and other factors. The `parameter-elevation regressions on independent slopes model' (PRISM) spatial modeling system was used to develop approximate 4-km gridded data fields of each of these parameters. A feature was developed in PRISM that models temperatures above and below mean inversions differently. Examples of the spatial fields derived from this study and a discussion of the applications of these spatial parameter fields are included.

  9. Nucleation in small scale multicrystalline silicon ingots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brynjulfsen, I.; Arnberg, L.; Autruffe, A.

    2012-12-01

    Small scale solidification experiments were performed in order to study nucleation mechanisms of solar cell silicon. Ingots were grown in a Bridgman furnace; with a high rate (5 cm/min), inducing dendrite-like grains; and at a slow rate (0.2 mm/min), simulating the common slow crystal growth process. Two types of silicon were used, polysilicon and compensated material. The results showed that for the early stages of silicon solidification, the compensated material behaves similar to the polysilicon. A high undercooling of 11±3 K was obtained for one of the fast cooled experiments. This suggests that Si3N4-coating is not the important factor for nucleation, but Si3N4-precipitates in the melt could contribute as inoculants. Grains with similar orientation were observed for both the solidification rates, which indicates that the most important issue for grain growth selection in PV silicon is control of the vertical growth, rather than nucleation substrates.

  10. A small-scale turbulence model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundgren, T. S.

    1992-01-01

    A model for the small-scale structure of turbulence is reformulated in such a way that it may be conveniently computed. The model is an ensemble of randomly oriented structured two dimensional vortices stretched by an axially symmetric strain flow. The energy spectrum of the resulting flow may be expressed as a time integral involving only the enstrophy spectrum of the time evolving two-dimensional cross section flow, which may be obtained numerically. Examples are given in which a k(exp -5/3) spectrum is obtained by this method without using large wave number asymptotic analysis. The k(exp -5/3) inertial range spectrum is shown to be related to the existence of a self-similar enstrophy preserving range in the two-dimensional enstrophy spectrum. The results are insensitive to time dependence of the strain-rate, including even intermittent on-or-off strains.

  11. Small-scale Features in Pulsating Aurora

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, S.; Jaynes, A. N.; Knudsen, D. J.; Trondsen, T.; Lessard, M.

    2011-12-01

    A field study was conducted from March 12-16, 2002 using a narrow-field intensified CCD camera installed at Churchill, Manitoba. The camera was oriented along the local magnetic zenith where small-scale black auroral forms are often visible. This analysis focuses on such forms occurring within a region of pulsating aurora. The observations show black forms with irregular shape and nonuniform drift with respect to the relatively stationary pulsating patches. The pulsating patches occur within a diffuse auroral background as a modulation of the auroral brightness in a localized region. The images analyzed show a decrease in the brightness of the diffuse background in the region of the pulsating patch at the beginning of the 'off' phase of the modulation. Throughout the off phase the brightness of the diffuse aurora gradually increases back to the average intensity. The time constant for this increase is measured as the first step toward determining the physical process.

  12. Cold dark matter: Controversies on small scales

    PubMed Central

    Weinberg, David H.; Bullock, James S.; Governato, Fabio; Kuzio de Naray, Rachel; Peter, Annika H. G.

    2015-01-01

    The cold dark matter (CDM) cosmological model has been remarkably successful in explaining cosmic structure over an enormous span of redshift, but it has faced persistent challenges from observations that probe the innermost regions of dark matter halos and the properties of the Milky Way’s dwarf galaxy satellites. We review the current observational and theoretical status of these “small-scale controversies.” Cosmological simulations that incorporate only gravity and collisionless CDM predict halos with abundant substructure and central densities that are too high to match constraints from galaxy dynamics. The solution could lie in baryonic physics: Recent numerical simulations and analytical models suggest that gravitational potential fluctuations tied to efficient supernova feedback can flatten the central cusps of halos in massive galaxies, and a combination of feedback and low star formation efficiency could explain why most of the dark matter subhalos orbiting the Milky Way do not host visible galaxies. However, it is not clear that this solution can work in the lowest mass galaxies, where discrepancies are observed. Alternatively, the small-scale conflicts could be evidence of more complex physics in the dark sector itself. For example, elastic scattering from strong dark matter self-interactions can alter predicted halo mass profiles, leading to good agreement with observations across a wide range of galaxy mass. Gravitational lensing and dynamical perturbations of tidal streams in the stellar halo provide evidence for an abundant population of low-mass subhalos in accord with CDM predictions. These observational approaches will get more powerful over the next few years. PMID:25646464

  13. Cold dark matter: Controversies on small scales.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, David H; Bullock, James S; Governato, Fabio; Kuzio de Naray, Rachel; Peter, Annika H G

    2015-10-01

    The cold dark matter (CDM) cosmological model has been remarkably successful in explaining cosmic structure over an enormous span of redshift, but it has faced persistent challenges from observations that probe the innermost regions of dark matter halos and the properties of the Milky Way's dwarf galaxy satellites. We review the current observational and theoretical status of these "small-scale controversies." Cosmological simulations that incorporate only gravity and collisionless CDM predict halos with abundant substructure and central densities that are too high to match constraints from galaxy dynamics. The solution could lie in baryonic physics: Recent numerical simulations and analytical models suggest that gravitational potential fluctuations tied to efficient supernova feedback can flatten the central cusps of halos in massive galaxies, and a combination of feedback and low star formation efficiency could explain why most of the dark matter subhalos orbiting the Milky Way do not host visible galaxies. However, it is not clear that this solution can work in the lowest mass galaxies, where discrepancies are observed. Alternatively, the small-scale conflicts could be evidence of more complex physics in the dark sector itself. For example, elastic scattering from strong dark matter self-interactions can alter predicted halo mass profiles, leading to good agreement with observations across a wide range of galaxy mass. Gravitational lensing and dynamical perturbations of tidal streams in the stellar halo provide evidence for an abundant population of low-mass subhalos in accord with CDM predictions. These observational approaches will get more powerful over the next few years.

  14. Cold dark matter: Controversies on small scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinberg, David H.; Bullock, James S.; Governato, Fabio; Kuzio de Naray, Rachel; Peter, Annika H. G.

    2015-10-01

    The cold dark matter (CDM) cosmological model has been remarkably successful in explaining cosmic structure over an enormous span of redshift, but it has faced persistent challenges from observations that probe the innermost regions of dark matter halos and the properties of the Milky Way's dwarf galaxy satellites. We review the current observational and theoretical status of these "small-scale controversies." Cosmological simulations that incorporate only gravity and collisionless CDM predict halos with abundant substructure and central densities that are too high to match constraints from galaxy dynamics. The solution could lie in baryonic physics: Recent numerical simulations and analytical models suggest that gravitational potential fluctuations tied to efficient supernova feedback can flatten the central cusps of halos in massive galaxies, and a combination of feedback and low star formation efficiency could explain why most of the dark matter subhalos orbiting the Milky Way do not host visible galaxies. However, it is not clear that this solution can work in the lowest mass galaxies, where discrepancies are observed. Alternatively, the small-scale conflicts could be evidence of more complex physics in the dark sector itself. For example, elastic scattering from strong dark matter self-interactions can alter predicted halo mass profiles, leading to good agreement with observations across a wide range of galaxy mass. Gravitational lensing and dynamical perturbations of tidal streams in the stellar halo provide evidence for an abundant population of low-mass subhalos in accord with CDM predictions. These observational approaches will get more powerful over the next few years.

  15. Cold dark matter: Controversies on small scales.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, David H; Bullock, James S; Governato, Fabio; Kuzio de Naray, Rachel; Peter, Annika H G

    2015-10-01

    The cold dark matter (CDM) cosmological model has been remarkably successful in explaining cosmic structure over an enormous span of redshift, but it has faced persistent challenges from observations that probe the innermost regions of dark matter halos and the properties of the Milky Way's dwarf galaxy satellites. We review the current observational and theoretical status of these "small-scale controversies." Cosmological simulations that incorporate only gravity and collisionless CDM predict halos with abundant substructure and central densities that are too high to match constraints from galaxy dynamics. The solution could lie in baryonic physics: Recent numerical simulations and analytical models suggest that gravitational potential fluctuations tied to efficient supernova feedback can flatten the central cusps of halos in massive galaxies, and a combination of feedback and low star formation efficiency could explain why most of the dark matter subhalos orbiting the Milky Way do not host visible galaxies. However, it is not clear that this solution can work in the lowest mass galaxies, where discrepancies are observed. Alternatively, the small-scale conflicts could be evidence of more complex physics in the dark sector itself. For example, elastic scattering from strong dark matter self-interactions can alter predicted halo mass profiles, leading to good agreement with observations across a wide range of galaxy mass. Gravitational lensing and dynamical perturbations of tidal streams in the stellar halo provide evidence for an abundant population of low-mass subhalos in accord with CDM predictions. These observational approaches will get more powerful over the next few years. PMID:25646464

  16. Spatial Variability of Streambed Hydraulic Conductivity of a Lowland River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneidewind, Uwe; Thornton, Steven; Van De Vijver, Ellen; Joris, Ingeborg; Seuntjens, Piet

    2015-04-01

    Streambed hydraulic conductivity K is a key physical parameter, which describes flow processes in the hyporheic zone (HZ), i.e. the dynamic interface between aquifers and streams or rivers. Knowledge of the spatial variability of K is also important for the interpretation of contaminant transport processes in the HZ. Streambed K can vary over several magnitudes at small spatial scales. It depends mostly on streambed sediment characteristics (e.g. effective porosity, grain size, packing), streambed processes (e.g. sedimentation, colmation and erosion) and the development of stream channel geometry and streambed morphology (e.g. dunes, anti-dunes, pool-riffle sequences, etc.). Although heterogeneous in natural streambeds, streambed K is often considered to be a constant parameter due to a lack of information on its spatial distribution. Here we show the spatial variability of streambed K for a small section of the River Tern, a lowland river in the UK. Streambed K was determined for more than 120 vertically and horizontally distributed locations from grain size analyses using four empirical approaches (Hazen, Beyer, Kozeny and the USBR model). Additionally, streambed K was estimated from falling head tests in 36 piezometers installed into the streambed on a 4 m by 16 m grid, by applying the Springer-Gelhar Model. For both methods streambed K followed a log-normal distribution. Variogram analysis was used to deduce the spatial variability of the streambed K values within several streambed profiles parallel and perpendicular to the main flow direction in the stream. Hydraulic conductivity Kg estimated from grain size analyses varied between 1 m/d and 155 m/d with standard deviations of 79% to 99% depending on the empirical approach used. Kh estimated from falling head tests varied between 1 m/d and 22 m/d with a standard deviation of about 50%, depending on the degree of anisotropy assumed. After rescaling the data to obtain a common sample support, Pearson correlation

  17. Models of Small-Scale Patchiness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGillicuddy, D. J.

    2001-01-01

    Patchiness is perhaps the most salient characteristic of plankton populations in the ocean. The scale of this heterogeneity spans many orders of magnitude in its spatial extent, ranging from planetary down to microscale. It has been argued that patchiness plays a fundamental role in the functioning of marine ecosystems, insofar as the mean conditions may not reflect the environment to which organisms are adapted. Understanding the nature of this patchiness is thus one of the major challenges of oceanographic ecology. The patchiness problem is fundamentally one of physical-biological-chemical interactions. This interconnection arises from three basic sources: (1) ocean currents continually redistribute dissolved and suspended constituents by advection; (2) space-time fluctuations in the flows themselves impact biological and chemical processes, and (3) organisms are capable of directed motion through the water. This tripartite linkage poses a difficult challenge to understanding oceanic ecosystems: differentiation between the three sources of variability requires accurate assessment of property distributions in space and time, in addition to detailed knowledge of organismal repertoires and the processes by which ambient conditions control the rates of biological and chemical reactions. Various methods of observing the ocean tend to lie parallel to the axes of the space/time domain in which these physical-biological-chemical interactions take place. Given that a purely observational approach to the patchiness problem is not tractable with finite resources, the coupling of models with observations offers an alternative which provides a context for synthesis of sparse data with articulations of fundamental principles assumed to govern functionality of the system. In a sense, models can be used to fill the gaps in the space/time domain, yielding a framework for exploring the controls on spatially and temporally intermittent processes. The following discussion highlights

  18. Spatial variability of soil moisture retrieved by SMOS satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukowski, Mateusz; Marczewski, Wojciech; Usowicz, Boguslaw; Rojek, Edyta; Slominski, Jan; Lipiec, Jerzy

    2015-04-01

    Standard statistical methods assume that the analysed variables are independent. Since the majority of the processes observed in the nature are continuous in space and time, this assumption introduces a significant limitation for understanding the examined phenomena. In classical approach, valuable information about the locations of examined observations is completely lost. However, there is a branch of statistics, called geostatistics, which is the study of random variables, but taking into account the space where they occur. A common example of so-called "regionalized variable" is soil moisture. Using in situ methods it is difficult to estimate soil moisture distribution because it is often significantly diversified. Thanks to the geostatistical methods, by employing semivariance analysis, it is possible to get the information about the nature of spatial dependences and their lengths. Since the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity mission launch in 2009, the estimation of soil moisture spatial distribution for regional up to continental scale started to be much easier. In this study, the SMOS L2 data for Central and Eastern Europe were examined. The statistical and geostatistical features of moisture distributions of this area were studied for selected natural soil phenomena for 2010-2014 including: freezing, thawing, rainfalls (wetting), drying and drought. Those soil water "states" were recognized employing ground data from the agro-meteorological network of ground-based stations SWEX and SMUDP2 data from SMOS. After pixel regularization, without any upscaling, the geostatistical methods were applied directly on Discrete Global Grid (15-km resolution) in ISEA 4H9 projection, on which SMOS observations are reported. Analysis of spatial distribution of SMOS soil moisture, carried out for each data set, in most cases did not show significant trends. It was therefore assumed that each of the examined distributions of soil moisture in the adopted scale satisfies

  19. SPATIAL AND TEMPORAL VARIABILITY AND DRIVERS OF NET ECOSYSTEM METABOLISM IN WESTERN GULF OF MEXICO ESTUARIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Net ecosystem metabolism (NEM) is becoming a commonly used ecological indicator of estuarine ecosystem metabolic rates. Estuarine ecosystem processes are spatially and temporally variable, but the corresponding variability in NEM has not been properly assessed. Spatial and temp...

  20. Controls of Soil Spatial Variability in a Dry Tropical Forest.

    PubMed

    Pulla, Sandeep; Riotte, Jean; Suresh, H S; Dattaraja, H S; Sukumar, Raman

    2016-01-01

    We examined the roles of lithology, topography, vegetation and fire in generating local-scale (<1 km2) soil spatial variability in a seasonally dry tropical forest (SDTF) in southern India. For this, we mapped soil (available nutrients, Al, total C, pH, moisture and texture in the top 10 cm), rock outcrops, topography, all native woody plants ≥1 cm diameter at breast height (DBH), and spatial variation in fire frequency (times burnt during the 17 years preceding soil sampling) in a permanent 50-ha plot. Unlike classic catenas, lower elevation soils had lesser moisture, plant-available Ca, Cu, Mn, Mg, Zn, B, clay and total C. The distribution of plant-available Ca, Cu, Mn and Mg appeared to largely be determined by the whole-rock chemical composition differences between amphibolites and hornblende-biotite gneisses. Amphibolites were associated with summit positions, while gneisses dominated lower elevations, an observation that concurs with other studies in the region which suggest that hillslope-scale topography has been shaped by differential weathering of lithologies. Neither NO3(-)-N nor NH4(+)-N was explained by the basal area of trees belonging to Fabaceae, a family associated with N-fixing species, and no long-term effects of fire on soil parameters were detected. Local-scale lithological variation is an important first-order control over soil variability at the hillslope scale in this SDTF, by both direct influence on nutrient stocks and indirect influence via control of local relief. PMID:27100088

  1. Controls of Soil Spatial Variability in a Dry Tropical Forest.

    PubMed

    Pulla, Sandeep; Riotte, Jean; Suresh, H S; Dattaraja, H S; Sukumar, Raman

    2016-01-01

    We examined the roles of lithology, topography, vegetation and fire in generating local-scale (<1 km2) soil spatial variability in a seasonally dry tropical forest (SDTF) in southern India. For this, we mapped soil (available nutrients, Al, total C, pH, moisture and texture in the top 10 cm), rock outcrops, topography, all native woody plants ≥1 cm diameter at breast height (DBH), and spatial variation in fire frequency (times burnt during the 17 years preceding soil sampling) in a permanent 50-ha plot. Unlike classic catenas, lower elevation soils had lesser moisture, plant-available Ca, Cu, Mn, Mg, Zn, B, clay and total C. The distribution of plant-available Ca, Cu, Mn and Mg appeared to largely be determined by the whole-rock chemical composition differences between amphibolites and hornblende-biotite gneisses. Amphibolites were associated with summit positions, while gneisses dominated lower elevations, an observation that concurs with other studies in the region which suggest that hillslope-scale topography has been shaped by differential weathering of lithologies. Neither NO3(-)-N nor NH4(+)-N was explained by the basal area of trees belonging to Fabaceae, a family associated with N-fixing species, and no long-term effects of fire on soil parameters were detected. Local-scale lithological variation is an important first-order control over soil variability at the hillslope scale in this SDTF, by both direct influence on nutrient stocks and indirect influence via control of local relief.

  2. Modeling circulation patterns induced by spatial cross-shore wind variability in a small-size coastal embayment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerralbo, Pablo; Espino, Manuel; Grifoll, Manel

    2016-08-01

    This contribution shows the importance of the cross-shore spatial wind variability in the water circulation in a small-sized micro-tidal bay. The hydrodynamic wind response at Alfacs Bay (Ebro River delta, NW Mediterranean Sea) is investigated with a numerical model (ROMS) supported by in situ observations. The wind variability observed in meteorological measurements is characterized with meteorological model (WRF) outputs. From the hydrodynamic simulations of the bay, the water circulation response is affected by the cross-shore wind variability, leading to water current structures not observed in the homogeneous-wind case. If the wind heterogeneity response is considered, the water exchange in the longitudinal direction increases significantly, reducing the water exchange time by around 20%. Wind resolutions half the size of the bay (in our case around 9 km) inhibit cross-shore wind variability, which significantly affects the resultant circulation pattern. The characteristic response is also investigated using idealized test cases. These results show how the wind curl contributes to the hydrodynamic response in shallow areas and promotes the exchange between the bay and the open sea. Negative wind curl is related to the formation of an anti-cyclonic gyre at the bay's mouth. Our results highlight the importance of considering appropriate wind resolution even in small-scale domains (such as bays or harbors) to characterize the hydrodynamics, with relevant implications in the water exchange time and the consequent water quality and ecological parameters.

  3. Spatial variability of soils in a seasonally dry tropical forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulla, Sandeep; Riotte, Jean; Suresh, Hebbalalu; Dattaraja, Handanakere; Sukumar, Raman

    2016-04-01

    Soil structures communities of plants and soil organisms in tropical forests. Understanding the controls of soil spatial variability can therefore potentially inform efforts towards forest restoration. We studied the relationship between soils and lithology, topography, vegetation and fire in a seasonally dry tropical forest in southern India. We extensively sampled soil (available nutrients, Al, pH, and moisture), rocks, relief, woody vegetation, and spatial variation in fire burn frequency in a permanent 50-ha plot. Lower elevation soils tended to be less moist and were depleted in several nutrients and clay. The availability of several nutrients was, in turn, linked to whole-rock chemical composition differences since some lithologies were associated with higher elevations, while the others tended to dominate lower elevations. We suggest that local-scale topography in this region has been shaped by the spatial distribution of lithologies, which differ in their susceptibility to weathering. Nitrogen availability was uncorrelated with the presence of trees belonging to Fabaceae, a family associated with N-fixing species. No effect of burning on soil parameters could be discerned at this scale.

  4. Economic analysis of small-scale fuel alcohol plants

    SciTech Connect

    Schafer, J.J. Jr.

    1980-01-01

    To plan Department of Energy support programs, it is essential to understand the fundamental economics of both the large industrial size plants and the small on-farm size alcohol plants. EG and G Idaho, Inc., has designed a 25 gallon per hour anhydrous ethanol plant for the Department of Energy's Alcohol Fuels Office. This is a state-of-the-art reference plant, which will demonstrate the cost and performance of currently available equipment. The objective of this report is to examine the economics of the EG and G small-scale alcohol plant design and to determine the conditions under which a farm plant is a financially sound investment. The reference EG and G Small-Scale Plant is estimated to cost $400,000. Given the baseline conditions defined in this report, it is calculated that this plant will provide an annual after-tax of return on equity of 15%, with alcohol selling at $1.62 per gallon. It is concluded that this plant is an excellent investment in today's market, where 200 proof ethanol sells for between $1.80 and $2.00 per gallon. The baseline conditions which have a significant effect on the economics include plant design parameters, cost estimates, financial assumptions and economic forecasts. Uncertainty associated with operational variables will be eliminated when EG and G's reference plant begins operation in the fall of 1980. Plant operation will verify alcohol yield per bushel of corn, labor costs, maintenance costs, plant availability and by-product value.

  5. Variability in Soil Properties at Different Spatial Scales (1 m to 1 km) in a Deciduous Forest Ecosystem

    SciTech Connect

    Garten Jr, Charles T; Kang, S.; Brice, Deanne Jane; Schadt, Christopher Warren; Zhou, Jizhong

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to test the hypothesis that variability in 11 soil properties, related to soil texture and soil C and N, would increase from small (1 m) to large (1 km) spatial scales in a temperate, mixed-hardwood forest ecosystem in east Tennessee, USA. The results were somewhat surprising and indicated that a fundamental assumption in geospatial analysis, namely that variability increases with increasing spatial scale, did not apply for at least five of the 11 soil properties measured over a 0.5-km2 area. Composite mineral soil samples (15 cm deep) were collected at 1, 5, 10, 50, 250, and 500 m distances from a center point along transects in a north, south, east, and westerly direction. A null hypothesis of equal variance at different spatial scales was rejected (P{le}0.05) for mineral soil C concentration, silt content, and the C-to-N ratios in particulate organic matter (POM), mineral-associated organic matter (MOM), and whole surface soil. Results from different tests of spatial variation, based on coefficients of variation or a Mantel test, led to similar conclusions about measurement variability and geographic distance for eight of the 11 variables examined. Measurements of mineral soil C and N concentrations, C concentrations in MOM, extractable soil NH{sub 4}-N, and clay contents were just as variable at smaller scales (1-10 m) as they were at larger scales (50-500 m). On the other hand, measurement variation in mineral soil C-to-N ratios, MOM C-to-N ratios, and the fraction of soil C in POM clearly increased from smaller to larger spatial scales. With the exception of extractable soil NH4-N, measured soil properties in the forest ecosystem could be estimated (with 95% confidence) to within 15% of their true mean with a relatively modest number of sampling points (n{le}25). For some variables, scaling up variation from smaller to larger spatial domains within the ecosystem could be relatively easy because small-scale variation may be

  6. Preferential Sampling and Small-Scale Clustering of Gyrotactic Microswimmers in Turbulence.

    PubMed

    Gustavsson, K; Berglund, F; Jonsson, P R; Mehlig, B

    2016-03-11

    Recent studies show that spherical motile microorganisms in turbulence subject to gravitational torques gather in down-welling regions of the turbulent flow. By analyzing a statistical model we analytically compute how shape affects the dynamics, preferential sampling, and small-scale spatial clustering. We find that oblong organisms may spend more time in up-welling regions of the flow, and that all organisms are biased to regions of positive fluid-velocity gradients in the upward direction. We analyze small-scale spatial clustering and find that oblong particles may either cluster more or less than spherical ones, depending on the strength of the gravitational torques. PMID:27015512

  7. Preferential Sampling and Small-Scale Clustering of Gyrotactic Microswimmers in Turbulence.

    PubMed

    Gustavsson, K; Berglund, F; Jonsson, P R; Mehlig, B

    2016-03-11

    Recent studies show that spherical motile microorganisms in turbulence subject to gravitational torques gather in down-welling regions of the turbulent flow. By analyzing a statistical model we analytically compute how shape affects the dynamics, preferential sampling, and small-scale spatial clustering. We find that oblong organisms may spend more time in up-welling regions of the flow, and that all organisms are biased to regions of positive fluid-velocity gradients in the upward direction. We analyze small-scale spatial clustering and find that oblong particles may either cluster more or less than spherical ones, depending on the strength of the gravitational torques.

  8. Modeling temporal and spatial variability of crop yield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonetti, S.; Manoli, G.; Scudiero, E.; Morari, F.; Putti, M.; Teatini, P.

    2014-12-01

    In a world of increasing food insecurity the development of modeling tools capable of supporting on-farm decision making processes is highly needed to formulate sustainable irrigation practices in order to preserve water resources while maintaining adequate crop yield. The design of these practices starts from the accurate modeling of soil-plant-atmosphere interaction. We present an innovative 3D Soil-Plant model that couples 3D hydrological soil dynamics with a mechanistic description of plant transpiration and photosynthesis, including a crop growth module. Because of its intrinsically three dimensional nature, the model is able to capture spatial and temporal patterns of crop yield over large scales and under various climate and environmental factors. The model is applied to a 25 ha corn field in the Venice coastland, Italy, that has been continuously monitored over the years 2010 and 2012 in terms of both hydrological dynamics and yield mapping. The model results satisfactorily reproduce the large variability observed in maize yield (from 2 to 15 ton/ha). This variability is shown to be connected to the spatial heterogeneities of the farmland, which is characterized by several sandy paleo-channels crossing organic-rich silty soils. Salt contamination of soils and groundwater in a large portion of the area strongly affects the crop yield, especially outside the paleo-channels, where measured salt concentrations are lower than the surroundings. The developed model includes a simplified description of the effects of salt concentration in soil water on transpiration. The results seem to capture accurately the effects of salt concentration and the variability of the climatic conditions occurred during the three years of measurements. This innovative modeling framework paves the way to future large scale simulations of farmland dynamics.

  9. Temporal and spatial variability of surface fluxes over the ice edge zone in the northern Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brümmer, B.; Schröder, D.; Launiainen, J.; Vihma, T.; Smedman, A.-S.; Magnusson, M.

    2002-08-01

    Three land-fast ice stations (one of them was the Finnish research ice breaker Aranda) and the German research aircraft Falcon were applied to measure the turbulent and radiation fluxes over the ice edge zone in the northern Baltic Sea during the Baltic Air-Sea-Ice Study (BASIS) field experiment from 16 February to 6 March 1998. The temporal and spatial variability of the surface fluxes is discussed. Synoptic weather systems passed the experimental area in a rapid sequence and dominated the conditions (wind speed, air-surface temperature difference, cloud field) for the variability of the turbulent and radiation fluxes. At the ice stations, the largest upward sensible heat fluxes of about 100 Wm-2 were measured during the passage of a cold front when the air cooled faster (-5 K per hour) than the surface. The largest downward flux of about -200 Wm-2 occurred during warm air advection when the air temperature reached +10°C but the surface temperature remained at 0°C. Spatial variability of fluxes was observed from the small scale (scale of ice floes and open water spots) to the mesoscale (width of the ice edge zone). The degree of spatial variability depends on the synoptic situation: during melting conditions downward heat fluxes were the same over ice and open water, whereas during strong cold-air advection upward heat fluxes differed by more than 100 Wm-2. A remarkable amount of grey ice with intermediate surface temperature was observed. The ice in the Baltic Sea cannot be described by one ice type only.

  10. Spatial variability in plant species composition and peatland carbon exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goud, E.; Moore, T. R.; Roulet, N. T.

    2015-12-01

    Plant species shifts in response to global change will have significant impacts on ecosystem carbon (C) exchange and storage arising from changes in hydrology. Spatial variation in peatland C fluxes have largely been attributed to the spatial distribution of microhabitats that arise from variation in surface topography and water table depth, but little is known about how plant species composition impacts peatland C cycling or how these impacts will be influenced by changing environmental conditions. We quantified the effect of species composition and environmental variables on carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) fluxes over 2 years in a temperate peatland for four plant communities situated along a water table gradient from ombrotrophic bog to beaver pond. We hypothesized that (i) spatial heterogeneity in species composition would drive predictable spatial heterogeneity in C fluxes due to variation in plant traits and ecological tolerances, and (ii) increases in peat temperature would increase C fluxes. Species had different effects on C fluxes primarily due to differences in leaf traits. Differences in ecological tolerances among communities resulted in different rates of CO2 exchange in response to changes in water table depth. There was an overall reduction in ecosystem respiration (ER), gross primary productivity (GPP) and CH4 flux in response to colder peat temperatures in the second year, and the additive effects of a deeper water table in the bog margin and pond sites further reduced flux rates in these areas. These results demonstrate that different plant species can increase or decrease the flux of C into and out of peatlands based on differences in leaf traits and ecological tolerances, and that CO2 and CH4 fluxes are sensitive to changes in soil temperature, especially when coupled with changes in moisture availability.

  11. Environmental controls of temporal and spatial variability in CO2 and CH4 fluxes in a neotropical peatland.

    PubMed

    Wright, Emma L; Black, Colin R; Turner, Benjamin L; Sjögersten, Sofie

    2013-12-01

    Tropical peatlands play an important role in the global storage and cycling of carbon (C) but information on carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) fluxes from these systems is sparse, particularly in the Neotropics. We quantified short and long-term temporal and small scale spatial variation in CO2 and CH4 fluxes from three contrasting vegetation communities in a domed ombrotrophic peatland in Panama. There was significant variation in CO2 fluxes among vegetation communities in the order Campnosperma panamensis > Raphia taedigera > Cyperus. There was no consistent variation among sites and no discernible seasonal pattern of CH4 flux despite the considerable range of values recorded (e.g. -1.0 to 12.6 mg m(-2) h(-1) in 2007). CO2 fluxes varied seasonally in 2007, being greatest in drier periods (300-400 mg m(-2) h(-1)) and lowest during the wet period (60-132 mg m(-2) h(-1)) while very high emissions were found during the 2009 wet period, suggesting that peak CO2 fluxes may occur following both low and high rainfall. In contrast, only weak relationships between CH4 flux and rainfall (positive at the C. panamensis site) and solar radiation (negative at the C. panamensis and Cyperus sites) was found. CO2 fluxes showed a diurnal pattern across sites and at the Cyperus sp. site CO2 and CH4 fluxes were positively correlated. The amount of dissolved carbon and nutrients were strong predictors of small scale within-site variability in gas release but the effect was site-specific. We conclude that (i) temporal variability in CO2 was greater than variation among vegetation communities; (ii) rainfall may be a good predictor of CO2 emissions from tropical peatlands but temporal variation in CH4 does not follow seasonal rainfall patterns; and (iii) diurnal variation in CO2 fluxes across different vegetation communities can be described by a Fourier model. PMID:23873747

  12. Slip Dynamics in Small Scale Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maass, Robert; Derlet, Peter; Greer, Julia; Volkert, Cynthia

    2015-03-01

    Classical work showed that dislocation velocities are strongly dependent on applied stress. Numerous experiments have validated this for individual or groups of dislocations in macroscopic crystals by using imaging techniques combined with either mechanical data or time resolved topological data. Developments in small scale mechanical testing allow to correlate the intermittency of collective dislocation motion with the mechanical response. Discrete forward surges in displacement can be related to dislocation avalanches, which are triggered by the evolving dislocation sub-structure. We study the spatiotemporal characteristics of intermittent plastic flow in quasi-statically sheared single crystalline Au crystals with diameters between 300 nm and 10000 nm, whose displacement bursts were recorded at several kHz (Scripta Mater. 2013, 69, 586; Small, available online). Both the crystallographic slip magnitude, as well as the velocity of the slip events are exhibiting power-law scaling as. The obtained slip velocity distribution has a cubic decay at high values, and a saturated flat shoulder at lower velocities. No correlation between the slip velocity and the applied stress or plastic strain is found. Further, we present DD-simulations that are supportive of our experimental findings. The simulations suggest that the dynamics of the internal stress fields dominate the evolving dislocation structure leading to velocities that are insensitive to the applied stress - a regime indicative of microplasticity.

  13. Galaxy alignment on large and small scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, X.; Lin, W. P.; Dong, X.; Wang, Y. O.; Dutton, A.; Macciò, A.

    2016-10-01

    Galaxies are not randomly distributed across the universe but showing different kinds of alignment on different scales. On small scales satellite galaxies have a tendency to distribute along the major axis of the central galaxy, with dependence on galaxy properties that both red satellites and centrals have stronger alignment than their blue counterparts. On large scales, it is found that the major axes of Luminous Red Galaxies (LRGs) have correlation up to 30Mpc/h. Using hydro-dynamical simulation with star formation, we investigate the origin of galaxy alignment on different scales. It is found that most red satellite galaxies stay in the inner region of dark matter halo inside which the shape of central galaxy is well aligned with the dark matter distribution. Red centrals have stronger alignment than blue ones as they live in massive haloes and the central galaxy-halo alignment increases with halo mass. On large scales, the alignment of LRGs is also from the galaxy-halo shape correlation, but with some extent of mis-alignment. The massive haloes have stronger alignment than haloes in filament which connect massive haloes. This is contrary to the naive expectation that cosmic filament is the cause of halo alignment.

  14. Small-scale accelerated pavement testing

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.M.; Hugo, F.; Roesset, J.M.

    1998-03-01

    This paper presents the results of a study conducted to explore the use of small-scale models of accelerated pavement testing (APT) devices to evaluate the performance of pavements in conjunction with full-scale tests. The motivation for the study was the availability of a model mobile load simulator (MMLS), which had been built originally to illustrate the operation of the full-scale mobile load simulator (MLS) under design at the time. The scaling requirements will be different depending on whether dynamic (inertia), viscous, or gravity effects are important. One must thus decide which one of these effects controls the behavior to try to reproduce it exactly. In the preliminary tests conducted with the MMLS, emphasis had been placed in reproducing accurately the viscoelastic behavior of the asphalt layer. The possibility of obtaining valid results, even if similitude is not maintained in relation to inertia forces, is explored in this paper. The effects of load frequency or velocity and the effects of layer thicknesses are studied. The total thickness of the model pavement, which must be finite, and its effects on displacements and strains are also considered. It is concluded that even when full similitude is not satisfied it is possible to obtain valid results that can be extrapolated to predict prototype performance if one were interested primarily in the behavior of the asphalt layer. Preliminary analyses should be conducted, however, to guide on the selection of the model dimensions.

  15. Hoopa Valley Small Scale Hydroelectric Feasibility Project

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis Miller

    2009-03-22

    This study considered assessing the feasibility of developing small scale hydro-electric power from seven major tributaries within the Hoopa Valley Indian Reservation of Northern California (http://www.hoopa-nsn.gov/). This study pursued the assessment of seven major tributaries of the Reservation that flow into the Trinity River. The feasibility of hydropower on the Hoopa Valley Indian Reservation has real potential for development and many alternative options for project locations, designs, operations and financing. In order to realize this opportunity further will require at least 2-3 years of intense data collection focusing on stream flow measurements at multiple locations in order to quantify real power potential. This also includes on the ground stream gradient surveys, road access planning and grid connectivity to PG&E for sale of electricity. Imperative to this effort is the need for negotiations between the Hoopa Tribal Council and PG&E to take place in order to finalize the power rate the Tribe will receive through any wholesale agreement that utilizes the alternative energy generated on the Reservation.

  16. TURBULENT SMALL-SCALE DYNAMO ACTION IN SOLAR SURFACE SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, Jonathan Pietarila; Cameron, Robert; Schuessler, Manfred

    2010-05-10

    We demonstrate that a magneto-convection simulation incorporating essential physical processes governing solar surface convection exhibits turbulent small-scale dynamo action. By presenting a derivation of the energy balance equation and transfer functions for compressible magnetohydrodynamics, we quantify the source of magnetic energy on a scale-by-scale basis. We rule out the two alternative mechanisms for the generation of the small-scale magnetic field in the simulations: the tangling of magnetic field lines associated with the turbulent cascade and Alfvenization of small-scale velocity fluctuations ('turbulent induction'). Instead, we find that the dominant source of small-scale magnetic energy is stretching by inertial-range fluid motions of small-scale magnetic field lines against the magnetic tension force to produce (against Ohmic dissipation) more small-scale magnetic field. The scales involved become smaller with increasing Reynolds number, which identifies the dynamo as a small-scale turbulent dynamo.

  17. Experimental, theoretical, and numerical studies of small scale combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Bo

    Recently, the demand increased for the development of microdevices such as microsatellites, microaerial vehicles, micro reactors, and micro power generators. To meet those demands the biggest challenge is obtaining stable and complete combustion at relatively small scale. To gain a fundamental understanding of small scale combustion in this thesis, thermal and kinetic coupling between the gas phase and the structure at meso and micro scales were theoretically, experimentally, and numerically studied; new stabilization and instability phenomena were identified; and new theories for the dynamic mechanisms of small scale combustion were developed. The reduction of thermal inertia at small scale significantly reduces the response time of the wall and leads to a strong flame-wall coupling and extension of burning limits. Mesoscale flame propagation and extinction in small quartz tubes were theoretically, experimentally and numerically studied. It was found that wall-flame interaction in mesoscale combustion led to two different flame regimes, a heat-loss dominant fast flame regime and a wall-flame coupling slow flame regime. The nonlinear transition between the two flame regimes was strongly dependent on the channel width and flow velocity. It is concluded that the existence of multiple flame regimes is an inherent phenomenon in mesoscale combustion. In addition, all practical combustors have variable channel width in the direction of flame propagation. Quasi-steady and unsteady propagations of methane and propane-air premixed flames in a mesoscale divergent channel were investigated experimentally and theoretically. The emphasis was the impact of variable cross-section area and the flame-wall coupling on the flame transition between different regimes and the onset of flame instability. For the first time, spinning flames were experimentally observed for both lean and rich methane and propane-air mixtures in a broad range of equivalence ratios. An effective Lewis number

  18. [Temporal and spatial variability of livestock and poultry productions and manure nutrients in Shanxi Province, China].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian-jie; Guo, Cai-xia; Qin, Wei; Zhang, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    China's livestock and poultry productions have changed significantly in the last three decades, from mainly traditional and small-scale systems in early 1980s towards more intensive and industrialized ones in recent years, due to the booming economy and the changes in people' diet. There is an urgent need to increase the understanding of the changes in the livestock and poultry productions and the impact of manure recycle on the environment. Here, we reported on a systematic and quantitative analysis on the temporal and spatial variability of livestock and poultry productions and manure nutrients in Shanxi Province, China, using a large database and a coupled food chain nutrient flow model (NUFER) with GIS. In the period of 1978 to 2012, total animal manure production increased from 1.61 x 10⁷ t to 2.75 x 10⁷ t by 171%. The manure N increased from 7.74 x 10⁴ t to 17.32 x 10⁴ t, and the manure P from 1.09x104 t to 3.39x104 t. Besides the huge increase in total animal manure production, the distribution of animal manure was much uneven among regions, with high amounts of manure N and P per unit land in the north, middle and southeastern regions and low values in the north-central and southwestern regions, based on the results of 2012. The uneven distribution of manure was the combined effect of regional specializations in livestock and poultry productions and related policies. Our findings suggested that optimizing the structure of livestock and poultry productions and enhancing interregional collaborations on nutrient management could be two effective measures for reducing pollution and environmental risks, while achieving efficient and sustainable use of manure nutrient in the long term.

  19. Spatial and temporal variability of clouds and precipitation over Germany: multiscale simulations across the "gray zone"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthlott, C.; Hoose, C.

    2015-11-01

    This paper assesses the resolution dependance of clouds and precipitation over Germany by numerical simulations with the COnsortium for Small-scale MOdeling (COSMO) model. Six intensive observation periods of the HOPE (HD(CP)2 Observational Prototype Experiment) measurement campaign conducted in spring 2013 and 1 summer day of the same year are simulated. By means of a series of grid-refinement resolution tests (horizontal grid spacing 2.8, 1 km, 500, and 250 m), the applicability of the COSMO model to represent real weather events in the gray zone, i.e., the scale ranging between the mesoscale limit (no turbulence resolved) and the large-eddy simulation limit (energy-containing turbulence resolved), is tested. To the authors' knowledge, this paper presents the first non-idealized COSMO simulations in the peer-reviewed literature at the 250-500 m scale. It is found that the kinetic energy spectra derived from model output show the expected -5/3 slope, as well as a dependency on model resolution, and that the effective resolution lies between 6 and 7 times the nominal resolution. Although the representation of a number of processes is enhanced with resolution (e.g., boundary-layer thermals, low-level convergence zones, gravity waves), their influence on the temporal evolution of precipitation is rather weak. However, rain intensities vary with resolution, leading to differences in the total rain amount of up to +48 %. Furthermore, the location of rain is similar for the springtime cases with moderate and strong synoptic forcing, whereas significant differences are obtained for the summertime case with air mass convection. Domain-averaged liquid water paths and cloud condensate profiles are used to analyze the temporal and spatial variability of the simulated clouds. Finally, probability density functions of convection-related parameters are analyzed to investigate their dependance on model resolution and their impact on cloud formation and subsequent precipitation.

  20. [Temporal and spatial variability of livestock and poultry productions and manure nutrients in Shanxi Province, China].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian-jie; Guo, Cai-xia; Qin, Wei; Zhang, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    China's livestock and poultry productions have changed significantly in the last three decades, from mainly traditional and small-scale systems in early 1980s towards more intensive and industrialized ones in recent years, due to the booming economy and the changes in people' diet. There is an urgent need to increase the understanding of the changes in the livestock and poultry productions and the impact of manure recycle on the environment. Here, we reported on a systematic and quantitative analysis on the temporal and spatial variability of livestock and poultry productions and manure nutrients in Shanxi Province, China, using a large database and a coupled food chain nutrient flow model (NUFER) with GIS. In the period of 1978 to 2012, total animal manure production increased from 1.61 x 10⁷ t to 2.75 x 10⁷ t by 171%. The manure N increased from 7.74 x 10⁴ t to 17.32 x 10⁴ t, and the manure P from 1.09x104 t to 3.39x104 t. Besides the huge increase in total animal manure production, the distribution of animal manure was much uneven among regions, with high amounts of manure N and P per unit land in the north, middle and southeastern regions and low values in the north-central and southwestern regions, based on the results of 2012. The uneven distribution of manure was the combined effect of regional specializations in livestock and poultry productions and related policies. Our findings suggested that optimizing the structure of livestock and poultry productions and enhancing interregional collaborations on nutrient management could be two effective measures for reducing pollution and environmental risks, while achieving efficient and sustainable use of manure nutrient in the long term. PMID:27228611

  1. Small Scale Variability of Rain: Impact On Radar Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosset, M.; Delrieu, G.

    Most retrieval algorithmes used to convert radar data assume (at least implicitely) that the field observed, rain for example, is uniform within the radar beam. In this presentation we use simple models and simulations tools to analyse some effects of nonuniform beamfilling (NUBF) This study focuses specially on NUBF effects at attenuating frequencies. We find that a combination of non uniform rain and accumulated attenuation can affect the param- eters measured with a radar operating at attenuating wavelength. We analyse how the apparant attenuation is affected and analyse the practical conse- quences on attenuation correction scheme. A second point of interest is polarimetric parameters. We focus in particular on differ- ential polarimetric propagation parameters such as propagation phase shift, which are potentially useful for attenuation correction. We found some interesting and surprising results.

  2. Disturbance History,Spatial Variability, and Patterns of Biodiversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendix, J.; Wiley, J. J.; Commons, M.

    2012-12-01

    The intermediate disturbance hypothesis predicts that species diversity will be maximized in environments experiencing intermediate intensity disturbance, after an intermediate timespan. Because many landscapes comprise mosaics with complex disturbance histories, the theory implies that each patch in those mosaics should have a distinct level of diversity reflecting combined impact of the magnitude of disturbance and the time since it occurred. We modeled the changing patterns of species richness across a landscape experiencing varied scenarios of simulated disturbance. Model outputs show that individual landscape patches have highly variable species richness through time, with the details reflecting the timing, intensity and sequence of their disturbance history. When the results are mapped across the landscape, the resulting temporal and spatial complexity illustrates both the contingent nature of diversity and the danger of generalizing about the impacts of disturbance.

  3. Controls of Soil Spatial Variability in a Dry Tropical Forest

    PubMed Central

    Pulla, Sandeep; Riotte, Jean; Suresh, H. S.; Dattaraja, H. S.; Sukumar, Raman

    2016-01-01

    We examined the roles of lithology, topography, vegetation and fire in generating local-scale (<1 km2) soil spatial variability in a seasonally dry tropical forest (SDTF) in southern India. For this, we mapped soil (available nutrients, Al, total C, pH, moisture and texture in the top 10cm), rock outcrops, topography, all native woody plants ≥1 cm diameter at breast height (DBH), and spatial variation in fire frequency (times burnt during the 17 years preceding soil sampling) in a permanent 50-ha plot. Unlike classic catenas, lower elevation soils had lesser moisture, plant-available Ca, Cu, Mn, Mg, Zn, B, clay and total C. The distribution of plant-available Ca, Cu, Mn and Mg appeared to largely be determined by the whole-rock chemical composition differences between amphibolites and hornblende-biotite gneisses. Amphibolites were associated with summit positions, while gneisses dominated lower elevations, an observation that concurs with other studies in the region which suggest that hillslope-scale topography has been shaped by differential weathering of lithologies. Neither NO3−-N nor NH4+-N was explained by the basal area of trees belonging to Fabaceae, a family associated with N-fixing species, and no long-term effects of fire on soil parameters were detected. Local-scale lithological variation is an important first-order control over soil variability at the hillslope scale in this SDTF, by both direct influence on nutrient stocks and indirect influence via control of local relief. PMID:27100088

  4. Determining the spatial variability of personal sampler inlet locations

    SciTech Connect

    Vinson, R.; Volkwein, J.; Mcwilliams, L.

    2007-09-15

    This article examines the spatial variability of dust concentrations within a coal miner's breathing zone and the impact of sampling location at the cap lamp, nose, and lapel. Tests were conducted in the National Institute for Safety and Health Pittsburgh Research Laboratory full-scale, continuous miner gallery using three prototype personal dust monitors (PDM). The dust masses detected by the PDMs were used to calculate the percentage difference of dust mass between the cap lamp and the nose and between the lapel and the nose. The calculated percentage differences of the masses ranged from plus 12% to minus 25%. Breathing zone tests were also conducted in four underground coal mines using the torso of a mannequin to simulate a miner. Coal mine dust was sampled with multi-cyclone sampling cans mounted directly in front of the mannequin near the cap lamp, nose, and lapel. These four coal mine tests found that the spatial variability of dust levels and imprecision of the current personal sampler is a greater influence than the sampler location within the breathing zone. However, a one-sample t-test of this data did find that the overall mean value of the cap lamp/nose ratio was not significantly different than 1 (p-value = 0.21). However; when applied to the overall mean value of the lapel/nose ratio there was a significant difference from 1 (p-value < 0.0001). This finding is important because the lapel has always been the sampling location for coal mine dust samples. But these results suggest that the cap location is slightly more indicative of what is breathed through the nose area.

  5. Spatial Variability of Electrical Conductivity in North Mississippi Loamy Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Twombly, J. E.; Fancher, C. W.; Sleep, M. D.; Aufman, M. S.; Holland, J. V.; Holt, R. M.; Kuszmaul, J. S.

    2004-05-01

    The use of non-contact electrical geophysical methods, such as electromagnetic induction (EM), to characterize and quantify spatial and temporal variations in soil properties is appealing due to low operational costs, rapid measurements, and device mobility. These methods are sensitive to soil electrical conductivity, which can vary with soil moisture, clay content, soil salinity, and the presence of electrically conductive minerals. We conducted a preliminary study to evaluate the controls on EM response in loamy soils present at the University of Mississippi (UM) Soil Moisture Observatory (SMO). The 5 acre SMO is located in a former agricultural field at the UM Biological Field Station, a 740 acre tract of land located 11 miles from the UM campus in Oxford, Mississippi. EM responses were surveyed along two intersecting transects using a Geonics EM38. The apparent electrical conductivity (EC) of the soil was determined in both a vertical and horizontal dipole position, which correspond to deep (~1m) and shallow (~0.5) measurements, respectively. Continuous soil samples were recovered from the transect points and analyzed for soil properties. Except for a weak negative correlation with moisture content, we found little direct correlation between EC and measured soil properties. EC variograms from surveys conducted on different dates consistently show a similar structure. Following a week of rain, three EM 38 surveys were conducted, each a week apart. During this survey period, a nearby meteorological station reported no significant precipitation, and the soils were drying. All EC variograms show similar spatial structures but decreasing amounts of variability consistent with drying and redistribution of soil moisture. These results suggest that soil physical properties, not soil moisture, control the spatial distribution of EC. Temporal variations in the variograms indicate a complex relationship between soil moisture and EC.

  6. Spatial variability of snow physical properties across northwestern Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courville, Z.; Polashenski, C.; Dibb, J. E.; Domine, F.

    2013-12-01

    In the late spring and early summer of 2013, researchers on the SAGE (Sunlight Absorption on the Greenland ice sheet Experiment) Traverse, embarked on a 4000 km ground traverse across northwestern Greenland in an attempt to quantify spatial variability of snow chemistry, snow physical properties, and snow reflectance. The field team targeted sites first visited by Carl Benson during his series of traverses from 1952 to 1955 as part of his pioneering work to characterize the Greenland Ice Sheet. This route now represents a rapidly changing and variable area of Greenland, as the route passes through several of the ice sheet facies first delimited by Benson. Along the traverse, the SAGE field team made ground-based albedo measurements using a hand-held spectroradiometer and collected snow physical property samples to determine snow specific surface area (SSA) from shallow, 2m pits. In addition, snow density and stratigraphy were measured. Snow layers in the near-surface and at the previous season's melt layer were targeted for sampling. Here we present preliminary snow physical property results from the upper portion of the snow pits and relate these to surface albedo data collected over the route. Further measurements of snow properties in the 2012 melt layer will be analyzed to assess the potential role of snow chemical (see Dibb et al. for a discussion of chemical analysis) and physical property driven albedo feedbacks could have played in contributing to that event. Route of 2013 SAGE Traverse in northwestern Greenland.

  7. Spatial and temporal variability of Antarctic precipitation from atmospheric methods

    SciTech Connect

    Cullather, R.L.; Bromwich, D.H.; Van Woert, M.L.

    1998-03-01

    The spatial and temporal variability of net precipitation (precipitation minus evaporation/sublimation) for Antarctica derived from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts operational analyses via the atmospheric moisture budget is assessed in comparison to a variety of glaciological and meteorological observations and datasets. For the 11-yr period 1985-95, the average continental value is 151 mm yr{sup {minus}1} water equivalent. Large regional differences with other datasets are identified, and the sources of error are considered. Interannual variability in the Southern Ocean storm tracks is found to be an important mechanism for enhanced precipitation minus evaporation (P-E) in both east and west Antarctica. In relation to the present findings, an evaluation of the rawinsonde method for estimating net precipitation in east Antarctica is conducted. Estimates of P-E using synthetic rawinsondes derived from the analyses are found to compare favorably to glaciological estimates. A significant upward trend of 2.4 mm yr{sup {minus}1} is found for the Antarctic continent that is consistent with findings from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction, formerly the National Meteorological Center, and the National Center for Atmospheric Research Reanalysis precipitation dataset. Despite large regional discrepancies, the general agreement on the main features of Antarctic precipitation between studies suggests that a threshold has been reached, where the assessment of the smaller terms including evaporation/sublimation and drift snow loss is required to explain the differences. 76 refs., 24 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Mapping Spatial Variability in Health and Wealth Indicators in Accra, Ghana Using High Spatial Resolution Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engstrom, R.; Ashcroft, E.

    2014-12-01

    There has been a tremendous amount of research conducted that examines disparities in health and wealth of persons between urban and rural areas however, relatively little research has been undertaken to examine variations within urban areas. A major limitation to elucidating differences with urban areas is the lack of social and demographic data at a sufficiently high spatial resolution to determine these differences. Generally the only available data that contain this information are census data which are collected at most every ten years and are often difficult to obtain at a high enough spatial resolution to allow for examining in depth variability in health and wealth indicators at high spatial resolutions, especially in developing countries. High spatial resolution satellite imagery may be able to provide timely and synoptic information that is related to health and wealth variability within a city. In this study we use two dates of Quickbird imagery (2003 and 2010) classified into the vegetation-impervious surface-soil (VIS) model introduced by Ridd (1995). For 2003 we only have partial coverage of the city, while for 2010 we have a mosaic, which covers the entire city of Accra, Ghana. Variations in the VIS values represent the physical variations within the city and these are compared to variations in economic, and/or sociodemographic data derived from the 2000 Ghanaian census at two spatial resolutions, the enumeration area (approximately US Census Tract) and the neighborhood for the city. Results indicate a significant correlation between both vegetation and impervious surface to type of cooking fuel used in the household, population density, housing density, availability of sewers, cooking space usage, and other variables. The correlations are generally stronger at the neighborhood level and the relationships are stable through time and space. Overall, the results indicate that information derived from high resolution satellite data is related to

  9. Small-scale nonlinear dynamics of K-mouflage theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brax, Philippe; Valageas, Patrick

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the small-scale static configurations of K-mouflage models defined by a general function K (χ ) of the kinetic terms. The fifth force is screened by the nonlinear K-mouflage mechanism if K'(χ ) grows sufficiently fast for large negative χ . In the general nonspherically symmetric case, the fifth force is not aligned with the Newtonian force. For spherically symmetric static matter density profiles, we show that the results depend on the potential function W-(y )=y K'(-y2/2 ) ; i.e., W-(y ) must be monotonically increasing to +∞ for y ≥0 to guarantee the existence of a single solution throughout space for any matter density profile. Small radial perturbations around these static profiles propagate as travelling waves with a velocity greater than the speed of light. Starting from vanishing initial conditions for the scalar field and for a time-dependent matter density corresponding to the formation of an overdensity, we numerically check that the scalar field converges to the static solution. If W- is bounded, for high-density objects there are no static solutions throughout space, but one can still define a static solution restricted to large radii. Our dynamical study shows that the scalar field relaxes to this static solution at large radii, whereas spatial gradients keep growing with time at smaller radii. If W- is not bounded but nonmonotonic, there is an infinite number of discontinuous static solutions. However, the Klein-Gordon equation is no longer a well-defined hyperbolic equation, which leads to complex characteristic speeds and exponential instabilities. Therefore, these discontinuous static solutions are not physical, and these models are not theoretically sound. Such K-mouflage scenarios provide an example of theories that can appear viable at the cosmological level, for the cosmological background and perturbative analysis, while being meaningless at a nonlinear level for small-scale configurations. This shows the importance of

  10. Small-scale upper mantle extension beneath a destroyed craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, L.; Zheng, T.; Chen, L.; Ai, Y.; He, Y.; Xu, X.

    2014-12-01

    also show changes with spatially coherency. This consistency in small-scale variations through the crust to the upper mantle implies coupled pattern of deformation at the lithospheric scale of the NCC, and possibly reflects the dominant effect of small-scale mantle flow during the cratonic reactivation in the north edge of the NCC.

  11. Spatial and temporal variability of rainfall in the Nile Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onyutha, C.; Willems, P.

    2015-05-01

    Spatiotemporal variability in annual and seasonal rainfall totals were assessed at 37 locations of the Nile Basin in Africa using quantile perturbation method (QPM). To get insight into the spatial difference in rainfall statistics, the stations were grouped based on the pattern of the long-term mean (LTM) of monthly rainfall and that of temporal variability. To find the origin of the driving forces for the temporal variability in rainfall, correlation analyses were carried out using global monthly sea level pressure (SLP) and sea surface temperature (SST). Further investigations to support the obtained correlations were made using a total of 10 climate indices. It was possible to obtain three groups of stations; those within the equatorial region (A), Sudan and Ethiopia (B), and Egypt (C). For group A, annual rainfall was found to be below (above) the reference during the late 1940s to 1950s (1960s to mid-1980s). Conversely for groups B and C, the period from 1930s to late 1950s (1960s to 1980s) was characterized by anomalies being above (below) the reference. For group A, significant linkages were found to Niño 3, Niño 3.4, and the North Atlantic Ocean and Indian Ocean drivers. Correlations of annual rainfall of group A with Pacific Ocean-related climate indices were inconclusive. With respect to the main wet seasons, the June-September rainfall of group B has strong connection to the influence from the Indian Ocean. For the March-May (October-February) rainfall of group A (C), possible links to the Atlantic and Indian oceans were found.

  12. Spatial and temporal variability of rainfall in the Nile Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onyutha, C.; Willems, P.

    2014-10-01

    Spatio-temporal variability in annual and seasonal rainfall totals were assessed at 37 locations of the Nile Basin in Africa using quantile perturbation method. To get insight into the spatial difference in rainfall statistics, the stations were grouped based on the pattern of the long-term mean of monthly rainfall and that of temporal variability. To find the origin of the driving forces for the temporal variability in rainfall, correlation analyses were carried out using global monthly sea level pressure and surface temperature. Further investigations to support the obtained correlations were made using a total of 10 climate indices. It was possible to obtain 3 groups of stations; those within the equatorial region (A), Sudan and Ethiopia (B), and Egypt (C). For group A, annual rainfall was found to be below (above) the reference during the late 1940s to 1950s (1960s to mid 1980s). Conversely for groups B and C, the period 1930s to late 1950s (1960s to 1980s) was characterized by anomalies being above (below) the reference. For group A, significant linkages were found to Niño 3, Niño 3.4 and the North Atlantic and Indian Ocean drivers. Correlations of annual rainfall of group A with Pacific Ocean-related climate indices were inconclusive. With respect to the main wet seasons, the June to September rainfall of group B has strong connection to the influence from the Indian Ocean. For the March to May (October to February) rainfall of group A (C), possible links to the Atlantic and Indian Oceans were found.

  13. Small-Scale Habitat Structure Modulates the Effects of No-Take Marine Reserves for Coral Reef Macroinvertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Dumas, Pascal; Jimenez, Haizea; Peignon, Christophe; Wantiez, Laurent; Adjeroud, Mehdi

    2013-01-01

    No-take marine reserves are one of the oldest and most versatile tools used across the Pacific for the conservation of reef resources, in particular for invertebrates traditionally targeted by local fishers. Assessing their actual efficiency is still a challenge in complex ecosystems such as coral reefs, where reserve effects are likely to be obscured by high levels of environmental variability. The goal of this study was to investigate the potential interference of small-scale habitat structure on the efficiency of reserves. The spatial distribution of widely harvested macroinvertebrates was surveyed in a large set of protected vs. unprotected stations from eleven reefs located in New Caledonia. Abundance, density and individual size data were collected along random, small-scale (20×1 m) transects. Fine habitat typology was derived with a quantitative photographic method using 17 local habitat variables. Marine reserves substantially augmented the local density, size structure and biomass of the target species. Density of Trochus niloticus and Tridacna maxima doubled globally inside the reserve network; average size was greater by 10 to 20% for T. niloticus. We demonstrated that the apparent success of protection could be obscured by marked variations in population structure occurring over short distances, resulting from small-scale heterogeneity in the reef habitat. The efficiency of reserves appeared to be modulated by the availability of suitable habitats at the decimetric scale (“microhabitats”) for the considered sessile/low-mobile macroinvertebrate species. Incorporating microhabitat distribution could significantly enhance the efficiency of habitat surrogacy, a valuable approach in the case of conservation targets focusing on endangered or emblematic macroinvertebrate or relatively sedentary fish species PMID:23554965

  14. Small-scale habitat structure modulates the effects of no-take marine reserves for coral reef macroinvertebrates.

    PubMed

    Dumas, Pascal; Jimenez, Haizea; Peignon, Christophe; Wantiez, Laurent; Adjeroud, Mehdi

    2013-01-01

    No-take marine reserves are one of the oldest and most versatile tools used across the Pacific for the conservation of reef resources, in particular for invertebrates traditionally targeted by local fishers. Assessing their actual efficiency is still a challenge in complex ecosystems such as coral reefs, where reserve effects are likely to be obscured by high levels of environmental variability. The goal of this study was to investigate the potential interference of small-scale habitat structure on the efficiency of reserves. The spatial distribution of widely harvested macroinvertebrates was surveyed in a large set of protected vs. unprotected stations from eleven reefs located in New Caledonia. Abundance, density and individual size data were collected along random, small-scale (20×1 m) transects. Fine habitat typology was derived with a quantitative photographic method using 17 local habitat variables. Marine reserves substantially augmented the local density, size structure and biomass of the target species. Density of Trochus niloticus and Tridacna maxima doubled globally inside the reserve network; average size was greater by 10 to 20% for T. niloticus. We demonstrated that the apparent success of protection could be obscured by marked variations in population structure occurring over short distances, resulting from small-scale heterogeneity in the reef habitat. The efficiency of reserves appeared to be modulated by the availability of suitable habitats at the decimetric scale ("microhabitats") for the considered sessile/low-mobile macroinvertebrate species. Incorporating microhabitat distribution could significantly enhance the efficiency of habitat surrogacy, a valuable approach in the case of conservation targets focusing on endangered or emblematic macroinvertebrate or relatively sedentary fish species.

  15. Small-scale plasma irregularities in the nightside Venus ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grebowsky, J. M.; Curtis, S. A.; Brace, L. H.

    1991-01-01

    The individual volt-ampere curves from the Pioneer Venus Orbiter electron temperature probe showed evidence for small-scale density irregularities, or short-period plasma waves, in regions of the nightside ionosphere where the Orbiter electric field detector observed waves in its 100-Hz channel. A survey of the nightside volt-ampere curves has revealed several hundred examples of such irregularities. The I-V structures correspond to plasma density structure with spatial scale sizes in the range of about 100-2000 m, or alternatively they could be viewed as waves having frequencies extending toward 100 Hz. They are often seen as isolated events, with spatial extent along the orbit frequently less than 80 km. The density irregularities or waves occur in or near prominent gradients in the ambient plasma concentrations both at low altitudes where molecular ions are dominant and at higher altitudes in regions of reduced plasma density where O(+) is the major ion. Electric field 100-Hz bursts occur simultaneously, with the majority of the structured I-V curves providing demonstrative evidence that at least some of the E field signals are produced within the ionosphere.

  16. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal communities are phylogenetically clustered at small scales

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Sebastian; Caruso, Tancredi; Verbruggen, Erik; Rillig, Matthias C; Hempel, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing technologies with markers covering the full Glomeromycota phylum were used to uncover phylogenetic community structure of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) associated with Festuca brevipila. The study system was a semi-arid grassland with high plant diversity and a steep environmental gradient in pH, C, N, P and soil water content. The AMF community in roots and rhizosphere soil were analyzed separately and consisted of 74 distinct operational taxonomic units (OTUs) in total. Community-level variance partitioning showed that the role of environmental factors in determining AM species composition was marginal when controlling for spatial autocorrelation at multiple scales. Instead, phylogenetic distance and spatial distance were major correlates of AMF communities: OTUs that were more closely related (and which therefore may have similar traits) were more likely to co-occur. This pattern was insensitive to phylogenetic sampling breadth. Given the minor effects of the environment, we propose that at small scales closely related AMF positively associate through biotic factors such as plant-AMF filtering and interactions within the soil biota. PMID:24824667

  17. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal communities are phylogenetically clustered at small scales.

    PubMed

    Horn, Sebastian; Caruso, Tancredi; Verbruggen, Erik; Rillig, Matthias C; Hempel, Stefan

    2014-11-01

    Next-generation sequencing technologies with markers covering the full Glomeromycota phylum were used to uncover phylogenetic community structure of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) associated with Festuca brevipila. The study system was a semi-arid grassland with high plant diversity and a steep environmental gradient in pH, C, N, P and soil water content. The AMF community in roots and rhizosphere soil were analyzed separately and consisted of 74 distinct operational taxonomic units (OTUs) in total. Community-level variance partitioning showed that the role of environmental factors in determining AM species composition was marginal when controlling for spatial autocorrelation at multiple scales. Instead, phylogenetic distance and spatial distance were major correlates of AMF communities: OTUs that were more closely related (and which therefore may have similar traits) were more likely to co-occur. This pattern was insensitive to phylogenetic sampling breadth. Given the minor effects of the environment, we propose that at small scales closely related AMF positively associate through biotic factors such as plant-AMF filtering and interactions within the soil biota.

  18. Meso-Scale Hydrological Modeling Using Small Scale Parameterizations in a Discontinuous Permafrost Watershed in the Boreal Forest Ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endalamaw, A. M.; Bolton, W. R.; Hinzman, L. D.; Morton, D.; Young, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    The sub-Arctic region lies in the transition zone between the warm temperate region to the south and the cold arctic region to the north. The sub-Arctic hosts sharply contrasting ecosystems that vary over short horizontal spatial scales due to the presence or absence of permafrost. In the discontinuous permafrost zone, the presence or absence of permafrost plays a dominant role to many hydrological processes including stream flow, soil moisture, and water storage dynamics. The distribution of permafrost also has a strong influence on ecosystem composition and function. The land cover and vegetation distribution is also an important parameter affecting the stream flow responses due to the large differences in the transpiration rates between coniferous and deciduous vegetation. As a result, accurate simulation of the hydrology in this region is challenging. The objectives of this study are to improve the parameterization of meso-scale hydrologic simulations in the discontinuous permafrost zone through fine-scale observation and modeling. Slope and aspect, derived from 30m Digital Elevation Model (DEM), are used as a proxy for permafrost distribution and vegetation composition. Small-scale parameterizations were conducted at the two sub-basins (area ~11km2 ) of the Caribou-Poker Creeks Research Watershed (CPCRW) using the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) meso-scale hydrological model. The small scale parameterization simulation results indicate that slope and aspect based vegetation cover and soil parameter parameterization improve meso-scale hydrological modeling in these regions. In order to test the extent to which these small-scale parameterizations are valid, the Chena River Basin (area ~5,478 km2), located in Interior Alaska, is being simulated using these small-scale parameterizations. Aspect will be used as the proxy for the parameterization of vegetation cover and soil property. Results from the VIC simulation using the small scale parameterization will

  19. Spatial and temporal variability of the precipitation seasonality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baciu, Madalina; Cheval, Sorin; Dumitrescu, Alexandru; Breza, Traian

    2014-05-01

    Climate change scenarios assume significant modifications in the precipitation characteristics over the South-Eastern Europe (SEE), raising a huge interest from the general public and stakeholders. In the recent period, the scientific community has produced many reports showing that the overall precipitation amounts are likely to decrease until the end of the 21st century with variations related to geography, seasons, and parameters. The distribution of the precipitation along the year is key information for water management in hydrologic and agricultural applications, which are very sensitive issues for the SEE countries. This study investigates the observed variability of the seasonality over the SEE (1961-2020), and the expected changes according to IPCC scenarios for the next decades (2021-2050). The analysis exploits the outputs of the Regional Climate Models (RCMs) RegCM3 (ICTP), Aladin (CNRM), and Promes (UCLM), at 25-km spatial resolution and seasonal focus, while ECA&D, and E-OBS datasets were used for featuring the actual climate. Markham (a), and Walsh & Lawler (b) seasonality indices (SI) were computed and employed for the whole area, while the trend analysis was conducted using the nonparametric Mann-Kendall statistics (c), and the Pettitt test (d) and Rodionov Regime Shift Index (e) tests were employed to identify the shifting points. The results pointed out strong differentiations between the different climates in the studied region (e.g. Mediterranean and Carpathian regions), and significant changes in certain spots. Correlated with the variability of the water resources, consumption and availability, the results can be extremely useful for the water management activities. This study is the result of activities developed within the CC-WARE Project (Mitigating Vulnerability of Water Resources under Climate Change), contract no. SEE/D/0143/2.1/X.

  20. Spatial variability of absorption properties in Lake Balaton, Hungary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riddick, C. A.; Hunter, P. D.; Tyler, A. N.; Vicente, V. M.; Groom, S.; Horváth, H.; Kovacs, A.; Preston, T.; Presing, M.

    2013-12-01

    In order to improve robustness of current remote sensing algorithms for lake monitoring, it is vital to understand the variability of inherent optical properties (IOPs) within a lake. In this study, absorption coefficients were measured in situ at 38 stations in Lake Balaton, Hungary, using a WET Labs AC-S and AC-9 and compared to concurrent absorption measurements by dual beam spectrophotometry in the laboratory. The spatial variability of bulk and chlorophyll-specific absorption coefficients was examined across 5 basins, demonstrating a gradient in total absorption corresponding to the trophic gradient. Our data suggests that sampling conditions had an impact on particulate absorption, affecting the proportion attributed to non-algal particles (aNAP), phytoplankton (aph) or color dissolved organic matter (aCDOM). The specific absorption of phytoplankton (a*ph) spectra showed a distinct peak in the UV portion of the spectra in Basins 3 and 4 (east), which may be due to the presence of phytoplankton photoprotective pigments to compensate for lower CDOM levels in these basins. In contrast to oceans, particulate attenuation (cp) had a weaker relationship to chlorophyll-a (R2=0.15) than to total suspended matter (R2=0.84), particularly the inorganic fraction. Additionally, the relative contribution of particulate scattering (bp) to attenuation was significantly higher in Lake Balaton (up to 85-99%) than that found in previous lacustrine studies. bp also demonstrated a gradient across the lake, where values increased as the water progressed from phytoplankton-dominated to mineral-dominated. These results provide knowledge of the heterogeneity of the IOPs within Lake Balaton, which is to be considered for the future improvement of bio-optical algorithms for constituent retrieval in inland waters.

  1. Methane emission from Minnesota peatlands: Spatial and seasonal variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dise, Nancy. B.

    1993-03-01

    The variability of methane flux with season, year, and habitat type was investigated in northern Minnesota peatlands from September 1988 through September 1990. Average daily fluxes calculated by integration of annual data for an open poor fen, an open bog, a forested bog hollow, a fen lagg in the forested bog and a forested bog hummock were 180,118, 38, 35, and 10 mg CH4 m-2 d-1, respectively. Fluxes among the five ecosystems were significantly different from one another, although emission from all sites was highest in July and lowest in March. Winter fluxes occurred in all sites but the fen lagg. There was no difference in fluxes measured from the same sites in the spring of 1986, 1989, or 1990, but summer fluxes were significantly higher in the wetter year of 1989 than in 1990, and a summer pulse in methane emission occurred in 1989 that was not seen the next year. Concentrations of methane in pore water, reflecting the seasonal balance of production, oxidation, and release, declined during the month of peak flux, then increased to levels of about 500 μM in December. Consistent spatial and temporal differences in flux could be ascribed to differences in water table, temperature, and peat nutrient status, although additional variability remained. Integration gave an annual average flux of 20 g CH4, m-2 ot; for the three bog ecosystems and 39 g CH4, m-2 for the two fen ecosystems. This gives an estimate of 1-2 Tg CH4, yr-1 from peatlands in the Great Lake states of Minnesota, Wisconsin, and Michigan.

  2. Practical small-scale explosive seam welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, L. J.

    1983-01-01

    Joining principles and variables, types of joints, capabilities, and current and potential applications are described for an explosive seam welding process developed at NASA Langley Research Center. Variable small quantities of RDX explosive in a ribbon configuration are used to create narrow (less than 0.5 inch), long length, uniform, hermetrically sealed joints that exhibit parent metal properties in a wide variety of metals, alloys, and combinations. The first major all application of the process is the repair of four nuclear reactors in Canada. Potential applications include pipelines, sealing of vessels, and assembly of large space structures.

  3. Reconnection rates, small scale structures and simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthaeus, W. H.

    1983-01-01

    The study of reconnection in the context of one fluid, two dimensional magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), with spatially uniform constant density, viscosity and resistivity is though to retain most of the physics important in reconnection. Much of the existing reconnection literature makes use of this approach. This discussion focuses on attempts to determine the properties of reconnection solutions to MHD as precisely as possible without regard to the intrinsic limitations of the model.

  4. Form drag in rivers due to small-scale natural topographic features: 2. Irregular sequences

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kean, J.W.; Smith, J.D.

    2006-01-01

    The size, shape, and spacing of small-scale topographic features found on the boundaries of natural streams, rivers, and floodplains can be quite variable. Consequently, a procedure for determining the form drag on irregular sequences of different-sized topographic features is essential for calculating near-boundary flows and sediment transport. A method for carrying out such calculations is developed in this paper. This method builds on the work of Kean and Smith (2006), which describes the flow field for the simpler case of a regular sequence of identical topographic features. Both approaches model topographic features as two-dimensional elements with Gaussian-shaped cross sections defined in terms of three parameters. Field measurements of bank topography are used to show that (1) the magnitude of these shape parameters can vary greatly between adjacent topographic features and (2) the variability of these shape parameters follows a lognormal distribution. Simulations using an irregular set of topographic roughness elements show that the drag on an individual element is primarily controlled by the size and shape of the feature immediately upstream and that the spatial average of the boundary shear stress over a large set of randomly ordered elements is relatively insensitive to the sequence of the elements. In addition, a method to transform the topography of irregular surfaces into an equivalently rough surface of regularly spaced, identical topographic elements also is given. The methods described in this paper can be used to improve predictions of flow resistance in rivers as well as quantify bank roughness.

  5. Form drag in rivers due to small-scale natural topographic features: 2. Irregular sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kean, Jason W.; Smith, J. Dungan

    2006-12-01

    The size, shape, and spacing of small-scale topographic features found on the boundaries of natural streams, rivers, and floodplains can be quite variable. Consequently, a procedure for determining the form drag on irregular sequences of different-sized topographic features is essential for calculating near-boundary flows and sediment transport. A method for carrying out such calculations is developed in this paper. This method builds on the work of Kean and Smith (2006), which describes the flow field for the simpler case of a regular sequence of identical topographic features. Both approaches model topographic features as two-dimensional elements with Gaussian-shaped cross sections defined in terms of three parameters. Field measurements of bank topography are used to show that (1) the magnitude of these shape parameters can vary greatly between adjacent topographic features and (2) the variability of these shape parameters follows a lognormal distribution. Simulations using an irregular set of topographic roughness elements show that the drag on an individual element is primarily controlled by the size and shape of the feature immediately upstream and that the spatial average of the boundary shear stress over a large set of randomly ordered elements is relatively insensitive to the sequence of the elements. In addition, a method to transform the topography of irregular surfaces into an equivalently rough surface of regularly spaced, identical topographic elements also is given. The methods described in this paper can be used to improve predictions of flow resistance in rivers as well as quantify bank roughness.

  6. Spatial variability in hydrologic properties of a volcanic tuff

    SciTech Connect

    Istok, J.D.; Rautman, C.A.; Flint, L.E.; Flint, A.L.

    1994-09-01

    Spatial variability of hydrologic properties was quantified for a nonwelded-to-welded ash flow tuff at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, the potential site of a high-level, nuclear waste repository. Bulk density, porosity, saturated hydraulic conductivity, and sorptivity were measured on core specimens collected from outcrops on a grid that extended vertically through the entire unit thickness and horizontally 1.3 km in the direction of ash transport from the volcanic vent. A strong, geologically determined vertical trend in properties was apparent that correlated with visual trends in degree of welding observed in the outcrop. The trend was accurately described by simple regression models based on stratigraphic elevation. No significant horizontal trends in properties were detected along the length of the transect. The validity of the developed model was tested by comparing model predictions with measured porosity values from additional outcrop sections and boreholes that extended 3,000 m north, 1,500 m northeast, and 6,000 m south of the study area. The model accurately described vertical porosity variations except for locations very close to the source caldera, where the model underpredicted porosity in the upper half of the section. The presence of deterministic geologic trends, such as those demonstrated for an ash flow unit in this study, can simplify the collection of site characterization data and the development of site-scale models.

  7. MMS Multipoint electric field observations of small-scale magnetic holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodrich, Katherine A.; Ergun, Robert E.; Wilder, Frederick D.; Burch, James; Torbert, Roy; Khotyaintsev, Yuri; Lindqvist, Per-Arne; Russell, Christopher; Strangeway, Robert; Magnes, Werner; Gershman, Daniel; Giles, Barbara; Nakamura, Rumi; Stawarz, Julia; Holmes, Justin; Sturner, Andrew; Malaspina, David M.

    2016-06-01

    Small-scale magnetic holes (MHs), local depletions in magnetic field strength, have been observed multiple times in the Earth's magnetosphere in the bursty bulk flow (BBF) braking region. This particular subset of MHs has observed scale sizes perpendicular to the background magnetic field (B) less than the ambient ion Larmor radius (ρi). Previous observations by Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) indicate that this subset of MHs can be supported by a current driven by the E × B drift of electrons. Ions do not participate in the E × B drift due to the small-scale size of the electric field. While in the BBF braking region, during its commissioning phase, the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) spacecraft observed a small-scale MH. The electric field observations taken during this event suggest the presence of electron currents perpendicular to the magnetic field. These observations also suggest that these currents can evolve to smaller spatial scales.

  8. [Fractal theory and its application in the analysis of soil spatial variability: a review].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fa-Sheng; Liu, Zuo-Xin

    2011-05-01

    Soil has spatial variability in its attributes. The analysis of soil spatial variability is of significance for soil management. This paper summarized the fractal theory and its application in spatial analysis of soil variability, with the focus on the utilization of moment method in calculating the fractal dimension of soil attributes, the multi-fractal analysis of soil spatial variability, and the scaling up of soil attributes based on multi-fractal parameters. The studies on the application of fractal theory and multi-fractal method in the analysis of soil spatial variability were also reviewed. Fractal theory could be an important tool in quantifying the spatial variability and scaling up of soil attributes.

  9. Combine Effects of Plate Motions and Small-Scale Convection on Mantle Stirring Efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, S.; Samuel, H.

    2012-04-01

    Convection in Earth's mantle generates large scale, vigorous motions often thought to be the primary mechanism of mantle stirring. However additional thermal instabilities may progressively develop below lithospheric plates, leading to smaller scale convective motions. While there is growing evidence supporting the presence of small-scale convection in Earth's mantle, little is known of its contribution to the mixing of mantle heterogeneities. We have thus investigated the influence of small-scale convection on mantle stirring efficiency using 2D numerical modeling of infinite Prandtl number convection with imposed surface plate motion and temperature and pressure dependent rheology. We measure stirring efficiency using Finite Time Lyapunov Exponents (FTLE) and we vary systematically the Peclet number, Pe, defined as the ratio of the advection time scale based on surface plate velocity to a characteristic diffusion time. Our computational domain has an aspect ratio of 1:3. For moderate Pe, small-scale convection is well developed, leading to efficient stirring. However large Pe numbers do not allow the development of small-scale convection and result in significantly lower stirring efficiency, although plate motions are faster. This indicates that (i) small-scale convection contributes significantly to mantle stirring efficiency, (ii) mantle stirring efficiency many spatially vary significantly due to the local magnitude of plate velocity and (iii) the relationship between mantle stirring efficiency and large-scale convective motions may be more complex than previously thought.

  10. ANALYSIS OF COVARIANCE WITH SPATIALLY CORRELATED SECONDARY VARIABLES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Data sets which contain measurements on a spatially referenced response and covariate are analyzed using either co-kriging or spatial analysis of covariance. While co-kriging accounts for the correlation structure of the covariate, it is purely a predictive tool. Alternatively, spatial analysis of c...

  11. Small-Scale Farming: A Portrait from Polk County, Oregon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, John A.; Caday, Peter

    A study of small-scale farmers in Polk County, Oregon, examined characteristics of, and variations among, small-scale farmers and developed some guidelines for assistance programs targeted for such a group. During the months of May, June, and July of 1978 an average of 4 days a week was spent locating and interviewing 44 small farm operators in…

  12. Performance of small-scale tidal power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fay, J. A.; Smachlo, M. A.

    1983-12-01

    Small-scale tidal power plants - having electric power between 1 and 100 MW, approximately - possess several attractive economic and environmental benefits. The dynamical behavior of such systems is calculated in terms of dimensionless variables and parameters, so that the size of the system is inconsequential (except for one parameter related to the slope of the walls of the tidal basin). Two measures of system performance are defined: capacity factor (ratio of average to rated power) and effectiveness (ratio of average to ideal tidal power). It was found that improving both parameters is mutually incompatible so that an economic analysis will determine the optimum values of the system design and performance parameters. The effects of variation of tidal range and basin shape were determined. Using typical variable flow properties of low-head hydroturbines, a favorable design head could be determined from the analysis. It was found that the change in the area of the intertidal zone relative to the surface area of the tidal pond is greater for small, as compared to large, systems, possibly leading to proportionately greater environmental effects. A comparison of the performance of several tidal power plant designs with the methodology of this paper showed generally good agreement with the dimensionless performance parameters and only a modest difference among them over several orders of magnitude in size of power plant.

  13. Spatial variability in degassing at Erebus volcano, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilanko, Tehnuka; Oppenheimer, Clive; Kyle, Philip; Burgisser, Alain

    2015-04-01

    Erebus volcano on Ross Island, Antarctica, hosts an active phonolitic lava lake, along with a number of persistently degassing vents in its summit crater. Flank degassing also occurs through ice caves and towers. The longevity of the lake, and its stable convection, have been the subject of numerous studies, including Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy of the lava lake. Two distinct gas compositions were previously identified in the main lava lake plume (Oppenheimer et al., 2009; 2011): a persistent 'conduit' gas with a more oxidised signature, ascribed to degassing through a permeable magma conduit; and a H2O- and SO2- enriched 'lake' composition that increases and decreases cyclically due to shallow degassing of incoming magma batches. During the past decade of annual field seasons on Erebus, gas compositions have been measured through FTIR spectroscopy at multiple sites around Erebus volcano, including flank degassing through an ice cave (Warren Cave). We present measurements from four such vents, and compare their compositions to those emitted from the main lava lake. Summit degassing involves variable proportions of H2O, CO2, CO, SO2, HF, HCl, OCS. Cyclicity is evident in some summit vents, but with signatures indicative of shallower magmatic degassing than that of the lava lake. By contrast, flank degassing at Warren Cave is dominated by H2O, CO2, and CH4. The spatial variability in gas compositions within the summit crater suggests an alternative origin for 'conduit' and 'lake' degassing to previous models that assume permeability in the main conduit. Rather, the two compositions observed in main lake degassing may be a result of decoupled 'conduit' gas and pulses of magma rising through discrete fractures before combining in the lake floor or the main plume. Smaller vents around the crater thus emit isolated 'lake' or 'conduit' compositions while their combined signature is observed in the lava lake. We suggest that this separation between gas

  14. Spatial and seasonal variability of carbonaceous aerosol across Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandrini, Silvia; Fuzzi, Sandro; Piazzalunga, Andrea; Prati, Paolo; Bonasoni, Paolo; Cavalli, Fabrizia; Bove, Maria Chiara; Calvello, Mariarosaria; Cappelletti, David; Colombi, Cristina; Contini, Daniele; de Gennaro, Gianluigi; Di Gilio, Alessia; Fermo, Paola; Ferrero, Luca; Gianelle, Vorne; Giugliano, Michele; Ielpo, Pierina; Lonati, Giovanni; Marinoni, Angela; Massabò, Dario; Molteni, Ugo; Moroni, Beatrice; Pavese, Giulia; Perrino, Cinzia; Perrone, Maria Grazia; Perrone, Maria Rita; Putaud, Jean-Philippe; Sargolini, Tiziana; Vecchi, Roberta; Gilardoni, Stefania

    2014-12-01

    This paper analyses elemental (EC), organic (OC) and total carbon (TC) concentration in PM2.5 and PM10 samples collected over the last few years within several national and European projects at 37 remote, rural, urban, and traffic sites across the Italian peninsula. The purpose of the study is to obtain a picture of the spatial and seasonal variability of these aerosol species in Italy, and an insight into sources, processes and effects of meteorological conditions. OC and EC showed winter maxima and summer minima at urban and rural locations and an opposite behaviour at remote high altitude sites, where they increase during the warm period due to the rising of the Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL). The seasonal averages of OC are higher during winter compared to summer at the rural sites in the Po Valley (from 1.4 to 3.5 times), opposite to what usually occurs at rural locations, where OC increases during the warm period. This denotes the marked influence of urban areas on the surrounding rural environment in this densely populated region. The different types of sites exhibit marked differences in the average concentrations of carbonaceous aerosol and OC/EC ratio. This ratio is less sensitive to atmospheric processing than OC and EC concentrations, and hence more representative of different source types. Remote locations are characterised by the lowest levels of OC and especially EC, with OC/EC ratios ranging from 13 to 20, while the maximum OC and EC concentrations are observed at road-traffic influenced urban sites, where the OC/EC ratio ranges between 1 and 3. The highest urban impacts of OC and EC relative to remote and rural background sites occur in the Po Valley, especially in the city of Milan, which has the highest concentrations of PM and TC and low values of the OC/EC ratio.

  15. Spatial variability of leaf wetness duration in different crop canopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sentelhas, Paulo C.; Gillespie, Terry J.; Batzer, Jean C.; Gleason, Mark L.; Monteiro, José Eduardo B. A.; Pezzopane, José Ricardo M.; Pedro, Mário J.

    2005-07-01

    The spatial variability of leaf wetness duration (LWD) was evaluated in four different height-structure crop canopies: apple, coffee, maize, and grape. LWD measurements were made using painted flat plate, printed-circuit wetness sensors deployed in different positions above and inside the crops, with inclination angles ranging from 30 to 45°. For apple trees, the sensors were installed in 12 east-west positions: 4 at each of the top (3.3 m), middle (2.1 m), and bottom (1.1 m) levels. For young coffee plants (80 cm tall), four sensors were installed close to the leaves at heights of 20, 40, 60, and 80 cm. For the maize and grape crops, LWD sensors were installed in two positions, one just below the canopy top and another inside the canopy. Adjacent to each experiment, LWD was measured above nearby mowed turfgrass with the same kind of flat plate sensor, deployed at 30 cm and between 30 and 45°. We found average LWD varied by canopy position for apple and maize (P<0.05). In these cases, LWD was longer at the top, particularly when dew was the source of wetness. For grapes, cultivated in a hedgerow system and for young coffee plants, average LWD did not differ between the top and inside the canopy. The comparison by geometric mean regression analysis between crop and turfgrass LWD measurements showed that sensors at 30 cm over turfgrass provided quite accurate estimates of LWD at the top of the crops, despite large differences in crop height and structure, but poorer estimates for wetness within leaf canopies.

  16. A review of minesoil sampling and spatial variability in Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, J.C.; Brandt, J.E.; Joseph, W.L.

    1997-12-31

    Accurate characterization of minesoil overburden constituents associated with strip mining is an important part of the pre- and post-mine regulatory process. Characterization of soil material requires sampling of some kind, which implies that (1) the sample material selected must be representative of the area to be characterized, and (2) the sample volume (support), size (number of samples), and pattern must be able to support a reasonable decision making process. Therefore, the end use (baseline information, monitoring, or remediation) of this information should dictate the sampling approach; which in turn, is based on the decision to be made and the amount of uncertainty that is allowable. Uncertainties and errors are an integral part of the sampling, laboratory analysis, and spatial characterization processes, arising at each stage. Mathematical approaches such as sampling theory & practice and geostatistics can quantify the amount of error or uncertainty associated with the various stages of sampling, analysis and characterization, as well as distinguishing sampling errors from laboratory errors. These statistical tools can be used to manage errors and uncertainties at each stage of the process, providing confidence to (1) regulatory agencies that compliance has been achieved and (2) mining companies that unnecessary remedial costs will not be incurred. Statistical tools provide a framework for characterizing the wide variety of minesoil constituents and conditions encountered in mine operations. The use of statistically-defined monitoring or remedial decision units of a given area, for example, 5.7-acre grids in Texas, are shown to be consistent with the United States Protection Agency`s long-standing guidelines and recommendations for remedial activities. Site-specific variability must always be taken into account when designing a sampling program and caution is recommended in the selection of sampling methods (i.e. compositing versus discrete samples).

  17. Risk of Resource Failure and Toolkit Variation in Small-Scale Farmers and Herders

    PubMed Central

    Collard, Mark; Ruttle, April; Buchanan, Briggs; O’Brien, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Recent work suggests that global variation in toolkit structure among hunter-gatherers is driven by risk of resource failure such that as risk of resource failure increases, toolkits become more diverse and complex. Here we report a study in which we investigated whether the toolkits of small-scale farmers and herders are influenced by risk of resource failure in the same way. In the study, we applied simple linear and multiple regression analysis to data from 45 small-scale food-producing groups to test the risk hypothesis. Our results were not consistent with the hypothesis; none of the risk variables we examined had a significant impact on toolkit diversity or on toolkit complexity. It appears, therefore, that the drivers of toolkit structure differ between hunter-gatherers and small-scale food-producers. PMID:22844421

  18. Small-scale coexistence of two mouse lemur species (Microcebus berthae and M. murinus) within a homogeneous competitive environment

    PubMed Central

    Kappeler, Peter M.

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the co-occurrence of ecologically similar species remains a puzzling issue in community ecology. The species-rich mouse lemurs (Microcebus spec.) are distributed over nearly all remaining forest areas of Madagascar with a high variability in species distribution patterns. Locally, many congeneric species pairs seem to co-occur, but only little detailed information on spatial patterns is available. Here, we present the results of an intensive capture–mark–recapture study of sympatric Microcebus berthae and M. murinus populations that revealed small-scale mutual spatial exclusion. Nearest neighbour analysis indicated a spatial aggregation in Microcebus murinus but not in M. berthae. Although the diet of both species differed in proportions of food categories, they used the same food sources and had high feeding niche overlap. Also, forest structure related to the spatial distribution of main food sources did not explain spatial segregation because parts used by each species exclusively did not differ in density of trees, dead wood and lianas. We propose that life history trade-offs that result in species aggregation and a relative increase in the strength of intra-specific over inter-specific competition best explain the observed pattern of co-occurrence of ecologically similar congeneric Microcebus species. PMID:18574599

  19. Detecting small scale CO2 emission structures using OCO-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwandner, Florian M.; Eldering, Annmarie; Verhulst, Kristal R.; Miller, Charles E.; Nguyen, Hai M.; Oda, Tomohiro; O'Dell, Christopher; Rao, Preeti; Kahn, Brian; Crisp, David; Gunson, Michael R.; Sanchez, Robert M.; Ashok, Manasa; Pieri, David; Linick, Justin P.; Yuen, Karen

    2016-04-01

    Localized carbon dioxide (CO2) emission structures cover spatial domains of less than 50 km diameter and include cities and transportation networks, as well as fossil fuel production, upgrading and distribution infra-structure. Anthropogenic sources increasingly upset the natural balance between natural carbon sources and sinks. Mitigation of resulting climate change impacts requires management of emissions, and emissions management requires monitoring, reporting and verification. Space-borne measurements provide a unique opportunity to detect, quantify, and analyze small scale and point source emissions on a global scale. NASA's first satellite dedicated to atmospheric CO2 observation, the July 2014 launched Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO-2), now leads the afternoon constellation of satellites (A-Train). Its continuous swath of 2 to 10 km in width and eight footprints across can slice through coincident emission plumes and may provide momentary cross sections. First OCO-2 results demonstrate that we can detect localized source signals in the form of urban total column averaged CO2 enhancements of ~2 ppm against suburban and rural backgrounds. OCO-2's multi-sounding swath observing geometry reveals intra-urban spatial structures reflected in XCO2 data, previously unobserved from space. The transition from single-shot GOSAT soundings detecting urban/rural differences (Kort et al., 2012) to hundreds of soundings per OCO-2 swath opens up the path to future capabilities enabling urban tomography of greenhouse gases. For singular point sources like coal fired power plants, we have developed proxy detections of plumes using bands of imaging spectrometers with sensitivity to SO2 in the thermal infrared (ASTER). This approach provides a means to automate plume detection with subsequent matching and mining of OCO-2 data for enhanced detection efficiency and validation. © California Institute of Technology

  20. Small Scale Structure of the ISM Toward NGC 2264

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, S. D.; Sonnentrucker, P.; Murphy, E. M.

    2001-12-01

    The spatial structure of the Galactic interstellar medium (ISM) is affected by many processes including bulk turbulence, winds from massive stars, and supernovae. But it has only been in the last few years that structure on scales ~1 parsec and less have been recognized. Most studies have been done by observing spatial or temporal changes in optical and radio spectra. For example, ground-based time series observations of Na I toward δ Ori A spanning several decades (Price, Crawford, & Barlow 2000, MNRAS 312, L43) as well as observations of Na I toward stars in globular cluster M92 (Andrews, Meyer, & Lauroesch, 2001, ApJ 552, L73) reveal structure on scales of 102 to 104 AU, respectively. Frail et al. (1991, ApJ 382, 168) inferred variation in the H I column density over tens of AU from 21 cm observations of a pulsar moving through the ISM. We report on observations of four stars in the open cluster NGC 2264, covering 910-1187Å, using the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) satellite. These are among the first UV studies of the small scale structure of the ISM. All target stars are classified as B2V or B3V, and have similar reddening characteristics, 0.05 <= EB-V <= 0.08. At a cluster distance of 750 pc the star-to-star separations range from 1.4 to 3.6 pc. We discuss variations in column densities of several species along these sight lines, including H2 and Fe II. This work is supported by NASA contract NAS5-32985 to the Johns Hopkins University.

  1. Spatial variabilities in Sky Island subalpine hydro/micrometeorology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown-Mitic, C. M.; Harlow, C.; Shuttleworth, J.; Bales, R.

    2003-04-01

    differences in net radiation is reflected in the surface temperature potential for heat transfer. During the winter, although there is similarity in net radiation, air temperature and relative humidity, these two sites exhibit a significant difference in the potential for heat transfer. These variabilities coupled with the added complexities in flow regimes induced my non-flat mountainous terrain, are significant considerations when attempting to scale single tower observations to the canopy or when single tower observations are used to represent conditions over a small watershed for such purposes as spatial snow melt modeling. The observations and results from this network will be presented in relationship to observations from the eddy correlation flux tower.

  2. Spatial variability of soil parameters - subsoils as heterogenic environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinze, Stefanie; John, Stephan; Kirfel, Kristina; Mikutta, Robert; Niebuhr, Jana; Preusser, Sebastian; Marschner, Bernd

    2014-05-01

    Subsoils are known to store a high amount of organic carbon (40-60% of the total C-pool). 14C-dating detected that in subsoils organic matter (OM) age increased with increasing depth and reaches several 1000 years. The high age of subsoil OM might be caused by a complex structure, by limited access of OM for microbial decomposition or a limited input of fresh organic material. The latter, mostly reaches the subsoil through special pathways, like root channels, bioturbation processes or preferential flow pathways where dissolved organic carbon will be transported. The spatially concentrated input of OM supposed that the heterogeneity of physical, chemical, and biological soil parameters is higher in subsoils than in top soils. Within the DFG-FOR 1806 we investigated the heterogeneity of soil parameters in soil profiles (top and subsoil) of a podzolic Cambisol in a 95 years old beech forest in Lower Saxony, Germany. Three transects were established with a vertical and horizontal dimension of 2.00m and 3.15m, respectively. 64 soil samples were taken out of a grid in 10, 35, 60, 85, 110, 135, 160 and 185m depth with increasing horizontal distance to a main tree. To analyze the variability and relationship of soil properties in the soil profiles, analysis of soil physical (e.g. texture), chemical (e.g. organic C, dissolved organic C, total N, pH), and biological (e.g. enzyme activities, microbial biomass C) parameters were conducted within the research group. The results showed a very strong decline of organic C from 1.15% (10cm) to 0.12% (60cm). The differences of SOC were not pronounced with increasing distance to the main tree. Also total nitrogen decreased between 10 and 60cm strongly from 0.05 to 0.005%. The pH showed a slight increase between 10 and 35cm from 3.51 up to 4.27. For microbial biomass measures the same stratification was detected but the variance within biological parameters were higher in the subsoil than in the topsoil. Enzyme activities showed a

  3. A Small-Scale Safety Test for Initiation Components

    SciTech Connect

    Cutting, J; Chow, C; Chau, H; Hodgin, R; Lee, R

    2002-04-22

    We have developed a small-scale safety test for initiation train components. A low-cost test was needed to assess the response of initiation components to an abnormal shock environment and to detect changes in the sensitivity of initiation components as they age. The test uses a disk of Detasheet to transmit a shock through a PMMA barrier into a the test article. A schematic drawing of the fixture is shown. The 10-cm-diameter disk of 3-mm-thick Detasheet, initiated at its center by a RISI, RP detonator, produces a shock wave that is attenuated by a variable-thickness PMMA spacer (gap). Layers of metal and plastic above the test article and the material surrounding the test article may be chosen to mock up the environment of the test article at its location in a warhead. A metal plate at the bottom serves as a witness plate to record whether or not the test article detonated. For articles containing a small amount of explosive, it can be difficult to determine whether or not a detonation has occurred. In such cases, one can use a pressure transducer or laser velocimeter to detect the shock wave from the detonation of the article. The assembly is contained in a 10-cm-ID section of PVC pipe and fired in a containment vessel rated at 100 g. Test results are given for a hemispherical, exploding-bridgewire (EBW) detonator.

  4. The active liquid Earth - importance of temporal and spatial variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arheimer, Berit

    2016-04-01

    The Planet Earth is indeed liquid and active - 71 percent of its surface is water-covered and this water never rests. Thanks to the water cycle, our planet's water supply is constantly moving from one place to another and from one form to another. Only 2.5% of the water is freshwater and it exists in the air as water vapor; it hits the ground as rain and snow; it flows on the surface from higher to lower altitudes in rivers, lakes, and glaciers; and it flows in the ground in soil, aquifers, and in all living organisms until it reaches the sea. On its way over the Earth's crust, some returns quickly to vapor again, while some is trapped and exposed to many "fill and spill" situations for a long journey. The variability in the water balance is crucial for hydrological understanding and modelling. The water cycle may appear simple, but magnitudes and rates in fluxes are very different from one place to another, resulting from variable drivers such as solar energy, precipitation and gravity in co-evolution with geology, soil, vegetation and fauna. The historical evolution, the temporal fluxes and diversity in space continue to fascinate hydrological scientists. Specific physical processes may be well known, but their boundary conditions, interactions and rate often remain unknown at a specific site and are difficult to monitor in nature. This results in mysterious features where trends in drivers do not match runoff, like the Sahelian Paradox or discharge to the Arctic Ocean. Humans have always interfered with the water cycle and engineering is fundamental for water regulation and re-allocation. Some 80% of the river flow from the northern part of the Earth is affected by fragmentation of the river channels by dams. In water management, there is always a tradeoff between upstream and downstream activities, not only regarding total water quantities but also for temporal patterns and water quality aspects. Sharing a water resource can generate conflicts but geopolitical

  5. Small-scale structures in common-volume meteor wind measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser, G. J.; Marsh, S. H.; Baggaley, W. J.; Bennett, R. G. T.; Lawrence, B. N.; McDonald, A. J.; Plank, G. E.

    2006-02-01

    Observational differences occur when different techniques are used for measuring mesospheric winds because the different instruments observe different physical quantities to infer the wind velocity, and have differing time and space resolution. The AMOR meteor wind radar near Christchurch, New Zealand [Marsh et al., 2000. Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics 62,1129 1133.] has good resolution in time (˜0.1 s) and height (˜1 km) and a narrow beam centred in the geographic N S meridian. The meteor echoes randomly sample the atmosphere in a region extending over several hundred kilometres to the South of the radar. The volume of data obtained from the one instrument has made it possible to use correlations between measurements made from individual meteor trails to identify the contribution of atmospheric variability to the observational differences. Measurements of the meridional wind component made from May July 1997 inclusive show that a large part (20 30 m/s r.m.s.) of the atmospheric variation is due to inhomogeneities with small scales, of the order of 10 km and 1 h. There is also a component which has a random time phase over the observation interval but a spatial scale which is coherent over several hundred kilometres, consistent with the behaviour of gravity waves.

  6. Spatial variability of soil properties using nested variograms at multiple scales

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Determining the spatial structure of data is important in understanding within-field variability for site-specific crop management. The structure of variability determines the required spatial intensity of data collection and can be used for directing the delineation of management zones. Especially ...

  7. Simulating maize yield and biomass with spatial variability of soil field capacity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Spatial variability in field soil water and other properties is a challenge for system modelers who use only representative values for model inputs, rather than their distributions. In this study, we compared simulation results from a calibrated model with spatial variability of soil field capacity ...

  8. Small scale thematic mapping - A case for radar imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, F. M.

    1974-01-01

    Small scale thematic maps (1:250,000 and smaller) of physical and cultural phenomena manifested on the landscape are a major concern to scientists and investigators in diverse disciplines. A strip of K-band radar imagery consisting of a traverse from eastern Minnesota to northern Utah was employed to evaluate the potential of radar imagery for small scale land use mapping. In the course of this investigation, it was discovered that certain borders derived from radar imagery were compatible with borders found on the nonland use thematic maps used for comparison. Specifically, numerous borders and regions of small scale maps of landforms, soils, vegetation, and geology are found to be similar to the radar land use regions. Although far from conclusive it appears that radar imagery can be employed in the small scale mapping of landforms and possibly for mapping physiognomic or economic vegetation.

  9. Spatial variability of thorughfall under three sage brush (Artemesia tridentata)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pypker, T. G.; Carlyle-Moses, D. E.; Grzybowski, A.; Brewer, S.; Hill, D.

    2015-12-01

    Rainfall interception loss (I) has been poorly studied in semi-arid systems. Past work suggests that I can range from less than 3 % to 27% of gross precipitation in semi-arid systems. For many years the hydrologic flow paths in vegetation canopies has been treated as a black box. For example, when researching canopy interception loss, researchers typically monitored total rainfall above and below the vegetation canopy. More recently, the spatial pattern of throughfall (TF) and stemflow (SF) have been of interest. Past research on the spatial patterning of TF under forest canopies has documented that persistent patterns of TF can occur. These patterns create "hot spots" of throughfall. Like trees, persistent spatial patterns of TF may exist under shrubs. To test the changes in the throughfall depth and distribution with changing local meteorological conditions, we monitored throughfall and stemflow under three sagebrush shrubs (n=64 throughfall gauges for each shrub). Rainfall interception loss under the shrubs ranged from 31 to 100% for storm events ranging from 0.4 to 52 mm in size. Stemflow only occurred during larger storm events (>10 mm). Stemflow is likely limited because the tortuous nature of the canopy architecture that readily sheds water from the canopy. The canopy architecture also resulted in temporally and spatially persistent drip points. For storms sufficient to saturate the canopy, temporally and spatially persistent drip points generated water inputs that were 1.5 time greater than gross precipitation.

  10. Cost analysis of gas distribution industry with spatial variables

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Tai-Yoo; Lee, Jeong-Dong

    1995-12-31

    Cost assessment is important in the regulatory process, but it is not easy to effect, especially for distribution sector, because the spatial conditions as well as the output quantity play a major role in determining the cost. The hedonic cost function is introduced to incorporate the spatial characteristics (or network configurations) in the analysis of cost behavior of the Korean gas industry. The findings in this paper are that (1) almost all of the firms are exhausting their scale economies, (2) the average cost trend can be expressed as a surface of output quantity and spatial characteristics, and (3) the imaginary firm`s cost trend is derived by the regression approach. Industries that are related to electricity (water, railroad, and telecommunications, etc.) have the same cost property as the gas distribution industry, and the basic result and methodology in this paper would be applicable to these industries.

  11. Spatial and temporal variability of grass cover in two olive grove catchments on contrasting soil types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilera, Laura; Taguas, Encarnación V.; Gimeno, Enrique; Gómez, José A.

    2013-04-01

    Mediterranean climate conditions -characterized by the concentration of the precipitation in the seasons of autumn and spring, the low temperatures in winter and extremely warm and dry summers- determine that ground cover by adventitious (or cover crop) vegetation shows significant seasonal and annual variability. In addition, its spatial variability associates also, partially, to water availability among the landscape. This is especially relevant in olive orchards, an agricultural system under high erosion risk in the region where the establishment of herbaceous cover has proved to improve soil protection reducing erosion risk, as well as the improvement of soil properties (Gómez et al., 2009). All these benefits are based on small scale studies where full ground cover by the cover crop is relatively easy to obtain. However, few information is available about the actual ground cover achieved at farm scale, although preliminary observations suggests that this might be extremely variable (Gómez and Giráldez, 2009). This study presents the preliminary results evaluating the spatial and temporal evolution of ground cover by adventitious vegetation (the preferred option by farmers to achieve a cover crop) in two commercial olive farms during 2 hydrological years (2011-2012). The study was conducted in two farms located in the province of Cordoba, Southern Spain. Both were olive orchards grown under deficit irrigation systems and present a gauge station where rainfall, runoff and sediment loads have been measured from the year 2005. The soil management in "La Conchuela" farm was based in the use of herbicide in the line of olive trees to keep the bare soil all year round, and the application of selective herbicide in the lane between the olive trees to promote the grown of graminaceae grasses . In addition, the grass is mechanically killed in June. In the another farm, "Arroyo Blanco", the grass spontaneous cover is allowed until mid-spring in which is also

  12. Spatial and temporal variability of grass cover in two olive grove catchments on contrasting soil types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilera, Laura; Taguas, Encarnación V.; Gimeno, Enrique; Gómez, José A.

    2013-04-01

    Mediterranean climate conditions -characterized by the concentration of the precipitation in the seasons of autumn and spring, the low temperatures in winter and extremely warm and dry summers- determine that ground cover by adventitious (or cover crop) vegetation shows significant seasonal and annual variability. In addition, its spatial variability associates also, partially, to water availability among the landscape. This is especially relevant in olive orchards, an agricultural system under high erosion risk in the region where the establishment of herbaceous cover has proved to improve soil protection reducing erosion risk, as well as the improvement of soil properties (Gómez et al., 2009). All these benefits are based on small scale studies where full ground cover by the cover crop is relatively easy to obtain. However, few information is available about the actual ground cover achieved at farm scale, although preliminary observations suggests that this might be extremely variable (Gómez and Giráldez, 2009). This study presents the preliminary results evaluating the spatial and temporal evolution of ground cover by adventitious vegetation (the preferred option by farmers to achieve a cover crop) in two commercial olive farms during 2 hydrological years (2011-2012). The study was conducted in two farms located in the province of Cordoba, Southern Spain. Both were olive orchards grown under deficit irrigation systems and present a gauge station where rainfall, runoff and sediment loads have been measured from the year 2005. The soil management in "La Conchuela" farm was based in the use of herbicide in the line of olive trees to keep the bare soil all year round, and the application of selective herbicide in the lane between the olive trees to promote the grown of graminaceae grasses . In addition, the grass is mechanically killed in June. In the another farm, "Arroyo Blanco", the grass spontaneous cover is allowed until mid-spring in which is also

  13. A new framework for analyzing the effects of small scale inhomogeneities in cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Stephen; Wald, Robert

    2011-04-01

    While the universe is spatially homogeneous and isotropic on large scales, it is extremely inhomogeneous on small scales, where fractional density perturbations can be much larger than one. With this in mind, several authors have proposed that, when properly averaged, non-linear terms in the Einstein equation can mimic Dark Energy. We present a non-vacuum generalization of the "short-wave approximation", which takes such large density fluctuations on short scales into account in a mathematically rigorous manner. We prove that if the stress energy tensor of matter satisfies the weak energy condition, then the zeroth order "effective stress energy tensor" associated with the small scale density and metric fluctuations must be trace-free and satisfy the weak energy condition as well. We conclude from this that small scale density inhomogeneities cannot account for the acceleration of the scale factor. However, at first order, we find that linearized cosmological perturbation theory can be corrected to include small but non-zero backreaction effects of small scale density inhomogeneities.

  14. Small Scale Waves on Venus at High Latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limaye, Sanjay; Markiewicz, W. J.; Moissl, R.; Titov, D.

    2008-09-01

    On many occasions, the Venus Monitoring Camera (VMC) on Venus Express has observed several small scale waves or wave trains in high northern latitudes ( 70 to 75°) of Venus for the first time. Such waves were not detected earlier due to a combination of spatial resolution, observed region and duration. Wave trains with different characteristics have been seen at all four wavelengths used by the VMC (centered at 365, 513. 935 and 1010nm with 40, 50, 70 and 20 nm) in and are consistently in the same area on multiple consecutive orbits. Many are similar in appearance to ripples with wavelengths 5 to10 km with extents of some tens of km while others appear as thin straight lines, similar to the Circum Equatorial Belts (CEB) seen previously from Mariner 10 and Pioneer Venus missions at low latitudes. These are distinct from the fine scale transverse waves on the spiral bands on Venus which have been observed by both the VMC and the Visible Infrared Thermal Imaging Spectrometer (VIRTIS). In appearance and perhaps origins, these wave trains appear to be similar to gravity waves observed on Earth, particularly in the airglow images. Their detection on Venus confirms the existence of an atmospheric layer with a very stable lapse rate seen in the thermal structure data at an altitude of 65 to 67 km. The triggering mechanism for these waves could be horizontal or vertical wind shear. The contribution of these waves to momentum transport is not known, but likely is insignificant. However, this could be an observational limitation due to the combination of the eccentric orbit of Venus Express and the camera capabilities. This work has been made possible from a NASA Participating Scientist Grant NNG06GC68G and with the support provided by the VMC Team.

  15. The Physical Character of Small-Scale Interstellar Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauroesch, James T.

    2005-01-01

    The primary objective of this program was to obtain FUSE observations of the multiple interstellar absorption lines of H2 toward the members of 3 resolvable binary/multiple star systems to explore the physical conditions in known interstellar small-scale structures. Each of the selected systems was meant to address a different aspect of the models for the origin of these structures: 1) The stars HD 32039/40 were meant to probe a temporally varying component which probed a cloud with an inferred size of tens to a few hundreds of AU. The goal was to see if there was any significant H2 associated with this component; 2) The star HD 36408B and its companion HD 36408A (observed as part of FUSE GTO program P119) show significant spatial and temporal (proper motion induced) Na I column variations in a strong, relatively isolated component, as well as a relatively simple component structure. The key goal here was to identify any differences in H2 or C I excitation between the sightlines, and to measure the physical conditions (primarily density and temperature) in the temporally varying component; 3) The stars HD 206267C and HD 206267D are highly reddened sightlines which showed significant variations in K I and molecular absorption lines in multiple velocity components. Coupled with FUSE GTO observations of HD 206267A (program P116), the goal was to study the variations in H2 along sightlines which are significantly more distant, with larger separations, and with greater extinctions than the other selected binary systems.

  16. [Spatial Variability and Distribution Pattern of Soil Organic Matter in a Mollisol Watershed of China].

    PubMed

    Gao, Feng-jie; Ma, Quan-lai; Han, Wen-wen; Shan, Pei-ming; Zhou, Jun; Zhang, Shao-liang; Zhang, Zhi-min; Wang, Hong-yan

    2016-05-15

    Spatial variability of soil organic matter and its distribution pattern are the hot issues of soil scientific research. Selecting Haigouhe watershed as the study area, this paper mainly focused on the spatial variability, distribution pattern and its impact factors of SOM in the surface soil by classical statistics, Geo-statistics and "3S" technology. The results showed that: compared with the other black soil areas, the SOM content in Haigouhe watershed was a little lower, there was a spatial autocorrelation, and a moderate variability. Random factors, such as human activities, cultivation measures and so on, had little impact on the spatial variation, while the structural factors had a dominant function, and there was a remarkable spatial anisotropy of SOM. The SOM content reduced gradually from east to west with the familiar changes of height, so the co-kriging interpolation, selecting elevation as the co-variate, was employed to improve the accuracy. The spatial variability of SOM and its distribution pattern in Haigouhe watershed were greatly affected by topography and land use but weakly influenced by traffic, villages and other social factors. The surrounding environment of the samples would increase the uncertainty of spatial variability and interpolation of SOM and it cannot be ignored in future studies. In summary, it was a significant scientific research to analyze the spatial variability, distribution pattern of SOM and its main impact factors in a mollisol hilly watershed of China. PMID:27506048

  17. [Spatial Variability and Distribution Pattern of Soil Organic Matter in a Mollisol Watershed of China].

    PubMed

    Gao, Feng-jie; Ma, Quan-lai; Han, Wen-wen; Shan, Pei-ming; Zhou, Jun; Zhang, Shao-liang; Zhang, Zhi-min; Wang, Hong-yan

    2016-05-15

    Spatial variability of soil organic matter and its distribution pattern are the hot issues of soil scientific research. Selecting Haigouhe watershed as the study area, this paper mainly focused on the spatial variability, distribution pattern and its impact factors of SOM in the surface soil by classical statistics, Geo-statistics and "3S" technology. The results showed that: compared with the other black soil areas, the SOM content in Haigouhe watershed was a little lower, there was a spatial autocorrelation, and a moderate variability. Random factors, such as human activities, cultivation measures and so on, had little impact on the spatial variation, while the structural factors had a dominant function, and there was a remarkable spatial anisotropy of SOM. The SOM content reduced gradually from east to west with the familiar changes of height, so the co-kriging interpolation, selecting elevation as the co-variate, was employed to improve the accuracy. The spatial variability of SOM and its distribution pattern in Haigouhe watershed were greatly affected by topography and land use but weakly influenced by traffic, villages and other social factors. The surrounding environment of the samples would increase the uncertainty of spatial variability and interpolation of SOM and it cannot be ignored in future studies. In summary, it was a significant scientific research to analyze the spatial variability, distribution pattern of SOM and its main impact factors in a mollisol hilly watershed of China.

  18. Spatial variability of heating profiles in windrowed poultry litter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In-house windrow composting of broiler litter has been suggested as a means to reduce microbial populations between flocks. Published time-temperature goals are used to determine the success of the composting process for microbial reductions. Spatial and temporal density of temperature measurement ...

  19. Violation of Bell's inequality with continuous spatial variables

    SciTech Connect

    Abouraddy, Ayman F.; Yarnall, Timothy; Saleh, Bahaa E. A.; Teich, Malvin C.

    2007-05-15

    The Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) argument revealed the paradoxical properties of a two-particle system entangled continuously in the spatial parameter. Yet a direct test of quantum nonlocality exhibited by this state, via a violation of Bell's inequality, has not been forthcoming. In this paper, we identify and construct experimental arrangements comprising simple optical components, without nonlinearities or moving parts, that implement operators in the spatial-parity space of single-photon fields that correspond to the familiar Pauli spin operators. We achieve this by first establishing an isomorphism between the single-mode multiphoton electromagnetic-field space spanned by a Fock-state basis and the single-photon multimode electromagnetic-field space spanned by a spatial-eigenmode basis. We then proceed to construct a Hilbert space with a two-dimensional basis of spatial even-odd parity modes. In particular, we describe an arrangement that implements a rotation in the parity space of each photon of an entangled-photon pair, allowing for a straightforward experimental test of Bell's inequality using the EPR state. Finally, the violation of a Bell inequality is quantified in terms of the physical parameters of the two-photon source.

  20. Spatial variability of fine particle concentrations in three European areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoek, Gerard; Meliefste, Kees; Cyrys, Josef; Lewné, Marie; Bellander, Tom; Brauer, Mike; Fischer, Paul; Gehring, Ulrike; Heinrich, Joachim; van Vliet, Patricia; Brunekreef, Bert

    Epidemiological studies of long-term air pollution effects have been hampered by difficulties in characterizing the spatial variation in air pollution. We conducted a study to assess the risk of long-term exposure to traffic-related air pollution for the development of inhalant allergy and asthma in children in Stockholm county, Munich and the Netherlands. Exposure to traffic-related air pollution was assessed through a 1-year monitoring program and regression modeling using exposure indicators. This paper documents the performance of the exposure monitoring strategy and the spatial variation of ambient particle concentrations. We measured the ambient concentration of PM2.5 and the reflectance of PM2.5 filters ('soot') at 40-42 sites representative of different exposure conditions of the three study populations. Each site was measured during four 14-day average sampling periods spread over one year (spring 1999 to summer 2000). In each study area, a continuous measurement site was operated to remove potential bias due to temporal variation. The selected approach was an efficient method to characterize spatial differences in annual average concentration between a large number of sites in each study area. Adjustment with data from the continuous measurement site improved the precision of the calculated annual averages, especially for PM2.5. Annual average PM2.5 concentrations ranged from 11 to 20 μg/m 3 in Munich, from 8 to 16 μg/m 3 in Stockholm and from 14 to 26 μg/m 3 in the Netherlands. Larger spatial contrasts were found for the absorption coefficient of PM2.5. PM2.5 concentrations were on average 17-18% higher at traffic sites than at urban background sites, but PM2.5 absorption coefficients at traffic sites were between 31% and 55% increased above background. This suggests that spatial variation of traffic-related air pollution may be underestimated if PM2.5 only is measured.

  1. Indian Summer Monsoon Rainfall: Implications of Contrasting Trends in the Spatial Variability of Means and Extremes.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Subimal; Vittal, H; Sharma, Tarul; Karmakar, Subhankar; Kasiviswanathan, K S; Dhanesh, Y; Sudheer, K P; Gunthe, S S

    2016-01-01

    India's agricultural output, economy, and societal well-being are strappingly dependent on the stability of summer monsoon rainfall, its variability and extremes. Spatial aggregate of intensity and frequency of extreme rainfall events over Central India are significantly increasing, while at local scale they are spatially non-uniform with increasing spatial variability. The reasons behind such increase in spatial variability of extremes are poorly understood and the trends in mean monsoon rainfall have been greatly overlooked. Here, by using multi-decadal gridded daily rainfall data over entire India, we show that the trend in spatial variability of mean monsoon rainfall is decreasing as exactly opposite to that of extremes. The spatial variability of extremes is attributed to the spatial variability of the convective rainfall component. Contrarily, the decrease in spatial variability of the mean rainfall over India poses a pertinent research question on the applicability of large scale inter-basin water transfer by river inter-linking to address the spatial variability of available water in India. We found a significant decrease in the monsoon rainfall over major water surplus river basins in India. Hydrological simulations using a Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) model also revealed that the water yield in surplus river basins is decreasing but it is increasing in deficit basins. These findings contradict the traditional notion of dry areas becoming drier and wet areas becoming wetter in response to climate change in India. This result also calls for a re-evaluation of planning for river inter-linking to supply water from surplus to deficit river basins.

  2. Indian Summer Monsoon Rainfall: Implications of Contrasting Trends in the Spatial Variability of Means and Extremes

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Subimal; Vittal, H.; Sharma, Tarul; Karmakar, Subhankar; Kasiviswanathan, K. S.; Dhanesh, Y.; Sudheer, K. P.; Gunthe, S. S.

    2016-01-01

    India’s agricultural output, economy, and societal well-being are strappingly dependent on the stability of summer monsoon rainfall, its variability and extremes. Spatial aggregate of intensity and frequency of extreme rainfall events over Central India are significantly increasing, while at local scale they are spatially non-uniform with increasing spatial variability. The reasons behind such increase in spatial variability of extremes are poorly understood and the trends in mean monsoon rainfall have been greatly overlooked. Here, by using multi-decadal gridded daily rainfall data over entire India, we show that the trend in spatial variability of mean monsoon rainfall is decreasing as exactly opposite to that of extremes. The spatial variability of extremes is attributed to the spatial variability of the convective rainfall component. Contrarily, the decrease in spatial variability of the mean rainfall over India poses a pertinent research question on the applicability of large scale inter-basin water transfer by river inter-linking to address the spatial variability of available water in India. We found a significant decrease in the monsoon rainfall over major water surplus river basins in India. Hydrological simulations using a Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) model also revealed that the water yield in surplus river basins is decreasing but it is increasing in deficit basins. These findings contradict the traditional notion of dry areas becoming drier and wet areas becoming wetter in response to climate change in India. This result also calls for a re-evaluation of planning for river inter-linking to supply water from surplus to deficit river basins. PMID:27463092

  3. Small-Scale Fisheries Bycatch Jeopardizes Endangered Pacific Loggerhead Turtles

    PubMed Central

    Peckham, S. Hoyt; Diaz, David Maldonado; Walli, Andreas; Ruiz, Georgita; Crowder, Larry B.; Nichols, Wallace J.

    2007-01-01

    Background Although bycatch of industrial-scale fisheries can cause declines in migratory megafauna including seabirds, marine mammals, and sea turtles, the impacts of small-scale fisheries have been largely overlooked. Small-scale fisheries occur in coastal waters worldwide, employing over 99% of the world's 51 million fishers. New telemetry data reveal that migratory megafauna frequent coastal habitats well within the range of small-scale fisheries, potentially producing high bycatch. These fisheries occur primarily in developing nations, and their documentation and management are limited or non-existent, precluding evaluation of their impacts on non-target megafauna. Principal Findings/Methodology 30 North Pacific loggerhead turtles that we satellite-tracked from 1996–2005 ranged oceanwide, but juveniles spent 70% of their time at a high use area coincident with small-scale fisheries in Baja California Sur, Mexico (BCS). We assessed loggerhead bycatch mortality in this area by partnering with local fishers to 1) observe two small-scale fleets that operated closest to the high use area and 2) through shoreline surveys for discarded carcasses. Minimum annual bycatch mortality in just these two fleets at the high use area exceeded 1000 loggerheads year−1, rivaling that of oceanwide industrial-scale fisheries, and threatening the persistence of this critically endangered population. As a result of fisher participation in this study and a bycatch awareness campaign, a consortium of local fishers and other citizens are working to eliminate their bycatch and to establish a national loggerhead refuge. Conclusions/Significance Because of the overlap of ubiquitous small-scale fisheries with newly documented high-use areas in coastal waters worldwide, our case study suggests that small-scale fisheries may be among the greatest current threats to non-target megafauna. Future research is urgently needed to quantify small-scale fisheries bycatch worldwide. Localizing

  4. Variable spatial magnetic field influences peripheral nerves regeneration in rats.

    PubMed

    Suszyński, Krzysztof; Marcol, Wiesław; Szajkowski, Sebastian; Pietrucha-Dutczak, Marita; Cieślar, Grzegorz; Sieroń, Aleksander; Lewin-Kowalik, Joanna

    2014-09-01

    Generator of spatial magnetic field is one of most recent achievements among the magnetostimulators. This apparatus allows to obtain the rotating magnetic field. This new method may be more effective than other widely used techniques of magnetostimulation and magnetotherapy. We investigated the influence of alternating, spatial magnetic field on the regeneration of the crushed rat sciatic nerves. Functional and morphological evaluations were used. After crush injury of the right sciatic nerve, Wistar C rats (n = 80) were randomly divided into four groups (control and three experimental). The experimental groups (A, B, C) were exposed (20 min/day, 5 d/week, 4 weeks) to alternating spatial magnetic field of three different intensities. Sciatic Functional Index (SFI) and tensometric assessments were performed every week after nerve crush. Forty-eight hours before the sacrificing of animals, DiI (1,1'-di-octadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethyloindocarbocyanine perchlorate) was applied 5 mm distally to the crush site. Collected nerves and dorsal root ganglia (DRG) were subjected to histological and immunohistochemical staining. The survival rate of DRG neurons was estimated. Regrowth and myelination of the nerves was examined. The results of SFI and tensometric assessment showed improvement in all experimental groups as compared to control, with best outcome observed in group C, exposed to the strongest magnetic field. In addition, DRG survival rate and nerve regeneration intensity were significantly higher in the C group. Above results indicate that strong spatial alternating magnetic field exerts positive effect on peripheral nerve regeneration and its application could be taken under consideration in the therapy of injured peripheral nerves. PMID:23781984

  5. Experiments for comparison of small scale rainfall simulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iserloh, T.; Ries, J. B.

    2012-04-01

    Small scale portable rainfall simulators are an essential tool in research of recent process dynamics of soil erosion. Such rainfall simulators differ in design, rainfall intensities, rain spectra etc., impeding comparison of the results. Due to different research questions a standardisation of rainfall simulation is not in sight. Nevertheless, the data become progressively important for soil erosion modelling and therefore the basis for decision-makers in application-oriented erosion protection. The project aims at providing a criteria catalogue for estimation of the different simulators as well as the comparability of the results and a uniform calibration procedure for generated rainfall. Within the project "Comparability of simulation results of different rainfall simulators as input data for soil erosion modelling (Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft - DFG, Project No. Ri 835/6-1)" many rainfall simulators used by European research groups were compared. The artificially generated rainfall of the rainfall simulators at the Universities Basel, La Rioja, Malaga, Trier, Tübingen, Valencia, Wageningen, Zaragoza and at different Spanish CSIC-institutes (Almeria, Cordoba, Granada, Murcia, Zaragoza) were measured with the same methods (Laser Precipitation Monitor for drop spectra and rain collectors for spatial distribution). The data are very beneficial for improvements of simulators and comparison of simulators and results. Furthermore, they can be used for comparative studies with natural rainfall spectra. A broad range of rainfall data was measured (e.g. intensity: 30 - 149 mmh-1, Christiansen Coefficient for spatial rainfall distribution 61 - 98 %, mean drop diameter 0.375 - 5.0 mm, mean kinetic energy expenditure 25 - 1322 J m-2 h-1, mean kinetic energy per unit area and unit depth of rainfall 4 - 14 J m-2 mm-1). Similarities among the simulators could be found e.g. concerning drop size distributions (maximum drop numbers are reached within the two smallest drop

  6. Community-Weighted Mean Plant Traits Predict Small Scale Distribution of Insect Root Herbivore Abundance.

    PubMed

    Sonnemann, Ilja; Pfestorf, Hans; Jeltsch, Florian; Wurst, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Small scale distribution of insect root herbivores may promote plant species diversity by creating patches of different herbivore pressure. However, determinants of small scale distribution of insect root herbivores, and impact of land use intensity on their small scale distribution are largely unknown. We sampled insect root herbivores and measured vegetation parameters and soil water content along transects in grasslands of different management intensity in three regions in Germany. We calculated community-weighted mean plant traits to test whether the functional plant community composition determines the small scale distribution of insect root herbivores. To analyze spatial patterns in plant species and trait composition and insect root herbivore abundance we computed Mantel correlograms. Insect root herbivores mainly comprised click beetle (Coleoptera, Elateridae) larvae (43%) in the investigated grasslands. Total insect root herbivore numbers were positively related to community-weighted mean traits indicating high plant growth rates and biomass (specific leaf area, reproductive- and vegetative plant height), and negatively related to plant traits indicating poor tissue quality (leaf C/N ratio). Generalist Elaterid larvae, when analyzed independently, were also positively related to high plant growth rates and furthermore to root dry mass, but were not related to tissue quality. Insect root herbivore numbers were not related to plant cover, plant species richness and soil water content. Plant species composition and to a lesser extent plant trait composition displayed spatial autocorrelation, which was not influenced by land use intensity. Insect root herbivore abundance was not spatially autocorrelated. We conclude that in semi-natural grasslands with a high share of generalist insect root herbivores, insect root herbivores affiliate with large, fast growing plants, presumably because of availability of high quantities of food. Affiliation of insect root

  7. Community- Weighted Mean Plant Traits Predict Small Scale Distribution of Insect Root Herbivore Abundance

    PubMed Central

    Jeltsch, Florian; Wurst, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Small scale distribution of insect root herbivores may promote plant species diversity by creating patches of different herbivore pressure. However, determinants of small scale distribution of insect root herbivores, and impact of land use intensity on their small scale distribution are largely unknown. We sampled insect root herbivores and measured vegetation parameters and soil water content along transects in grasslands of different management intensity in three regions in Germany. We calculated community-weighted mean plant traits to test whether the functional plant community composition determines the small scale distribution of insect root herbivores. To analyze spatial patterns in plant species and trait composition and insect root herbivore abundance we computed Mantel correlograms. Insect root herbivores mainly comprised click beetle (Coleoptera, Elateridae) larvae (43%) in the investigated grasslands. Total insect root herbivore numbers were positively related to community-weighted mean traits indicating high plant growth rates and biomass (specific leaf area, reproductive- and vegetative plant height), and negatively related to plant traits indicating poor tissue quality (leaf C/N ratio). Generalist Elaterid larvae, when analyzed independently, were also positively related to high plant growth rates and furthermore to root dry mass, but were not related to tissue quality. Insect root herbivore numbers were not related to plant cover, plant species richness and soil water content. Plant species composition and to a lesser extent plant trait composition displayed spatial autocorrelation, which was not influenced by land use intensity. Insect root herbivore abundance was not spatially autocorrelated. We conclude that in semi-natural grasslands with a high share of generalist insect root herbivores, insect root herbivores affiliate with large, fast growing plants, presumably because of availability of high quantities of food. Affiliation of insect root

  8. AGN Variability Across the Electromagnetic Spectrum and Spatial Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stawarz, Lukasz

    Relativistic jets observed in active galaxies span an enormous range of scales: they are launched from the closest vicinities of supermassive black holes residing in galaxy centers, and extend up to hundreds of kiloparsecs outside of host galaxies. The highly non-stationary nature of such systems manifests in a complex variability pattern of the broad-band emission produced in the innermost parts of the outflows, with the observed variability timescales ranging from minutes up to tens of years. Any variability on even longer timescales cannot be investigated directly in a single object. However, it may be imprinted in the observed morphologies of large-scale jets, being in particular related to formation of their knotty structures, or systems of multiple extended lobes inflated in the surrounding intergalactic medium. All of those temporal and morphological characteristics may reflect modulated/intermittent activity of the central engine, and/or different instabilities developing within relativistic, highly magnetized outflows themselves. In this talk, I will try to link different observational findings across all the accessible electromagnetic spectrum regarding the highly variable, non-stationary nature of relativistic jets on different timescales.

  9. High spatial variability in coral bleaching around Moorea (French Polynesia): patterns across locations and water depths.

    PubMed

    Penin, Lucie; Adjeroud, Mehdi; Schrimm, Muriel; Lenihan, Hunter Stanton

    2007-02-01

    Mass coral bleaching events are one of the main threats to coral reefs. A severe bleaching event impacted Moorea, French Polynesia, between March and July 2002, causing 55+/-14% of colonies to suffer bleaching around the island. However, bleaching varied significantly across coral genera, locations, and as a function of water depth, with a bleaching level as high as 72% at some stations. Corals in deeper water bleached at a higher rate than those in shallow water, and the north coast was more impacted than the west coast. The relatively small scale of variability in bleaching responses probably resulted from the interaction between extrinsic factors, including hydrodynamic condition, and intrinsic factors, such as differential adaptation of the coral/algal association.

  10. Large grazers modify effects of aboveground-belowground interactions on small-scale plant community composition.

    PubMed

    Veen, G F Ciska; Geuverink, Elzemiek; Olff, Han

    2012-02-01

    Aboveground and belowground organisms influence plant community composition by local interactions, and their scale of impact may vary from millimeters belowground to kilometers aboveground. However, it still poorly understood how large grazers that select their forage on large spatial scales interact with small-scale aboveground-belowground interactions on plant community heterogeneity. Here, we investigate how cattle (Bos taurus) modify the effects of interactions between yellow meadow ants (Lasius flavus) and European brown hares (Lepus europaeus) on the formation of small-scale heterogeneity in vegetation composition. In the absence of cattle, hares selectively foraged on ant mounds, while under combined grazing by hares and cattle, vertebrate grazing pressure was similar on and off mounds. Ant mounds that were grazed by only hares had a different plant community composition compared to their surroundings: the cover of the grazing-intolerant grass Elytrigia atherica was reduced on ant mounds, whereas the relative cover of the more grazing-tolerant and palatable grass Festuca rubra was enhanced. Combined grazing by hares and cattle, resulted in homogenization of plant community composition on and off ant mounds, with high overall cover of F. rubra. We conclude that hares can respond to local ant-soil-vegetation interactions, because they are small, selective herbivores that make their foraging decisions on a local scale. This results in small-scale plant patches on mounds of yellow meadow ants. In the presence of cattle, which are less selective aboveground herbivores, local plant community patterns triggered by small-scale aboveground-belowground interactions can disappear. Therefore, cattle modify the consequences of aboveground-belowground interactions for small-scale plant community composition.

  11. Small Scale Equidistribution of Eigenfunctions on the Torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lester, Stephen; Rudnick, Zeév

    2016-08-01

    We study the small scale distribution of the L 2 mass of eigenfunctions of the Laplacian on the flat torus {{T}d} . Given an orthonormal basis of eigenfunctions, we show the existence of a density one subsequence whose L 2 mass equidistributes at small scales. In dimension two our result holds all the way down to the Planck scale. For dimensions d = 3, 4 we can restrict to individual eigenspaces and show small scale equidistribution in that context. We also study irregularities of quantum equidistribution: We construct eigenfunctions whose L 2 mass does not equidistribute at all scales above the Planck scale. Additionally, in dimension d = 4 we show the existence of eigenfunctions for which the proportion of L 2 mass in small balls blows up at certain scales.

  12. Radon emanation from the moon - Spatial and temporal variability.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorenstein, P.; Golub, L.; Bjorkholm, P.

    1973-01-01

    Observations of Rn-222 and Po-210 on the lunar surface with the orbiting Apollo alpha particle spectrometer reveal a number of features in their spatial distribution and indicate the existence of time variations in lunar radon emission. Localized Rn-222 or Po-210 around the craters Aristarchus and Grimaldi and the edges of virtually all maria indicates time varying radon emission and suggests a correlation between alpha 'hot spots' and sites of transient optical events observed from the earth. In a gross sense, the slower variations of Rn-222 seem to correlate with the distribution of gamma activity.

  13. A unified large/small-scale dynamo in helical turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhat, Pallavi; Subramanian, Kandaswamy; Brandenburg, Axel

    2016-09-01

    We use high resolution direct numerical simulations (DNS) to show that helical turbulence can generate significant large-scale fields even in the presence of strong small-scale dynamo action. During the kinematic stage, the unified large/small-scale dynamo grows fields with a shape-invariant eigenfunction, with most power peaked at small scales or large k, as in Subramanian & Brandenburg. Nevertheless, the large-scale field can be clearly detected as an excess power at small k in the negatively polarized component of the energy spectrum for a forcing with positively polarized waves. Its strength overline{B}, relative to the total rms field Brms, decreases with increasing magnetic Reynolds number, ReM. However, as the Lorentz force becomes important, the field generated by the unified dynamo orders itself by saturating on successively larger scales. The magnetic integral scale for the positively polarized waves, characterizing the small-scale field, increases significantly from the kinematic stage to saturation. This implies that the small-scale field becomes as coherent as possible for a given forcing scale, which averts the ReM-dependent quenching of overline{B}/B_rms. These results are obtained for 10243 DNS with magnetic Prandtl numbers of PrM = 0.1 and 10. For PrM = 0.1, overline{B}/B_rms grows from about 0.04 to about 0.4 at saturation, aided in the final stages by helicity dissipation. For PrM = 10, overline{B}/B_rms grows from much less than 0.01 to values of the order the 0.2. Our results confirm that there is a unified large/small-scale dynamo in helical turbulence.

  14. [Spatial variability of some lateral cranial points in chimpanzees].

    PubMed

    Deblock, R; Fenart, R

    1975-06-01

    The differential variability of cranial regions of chimpanzees has been studied, in the three dimensional space defined by the vestibular method, by means of the volume of the ellipsoid surrounding the scatter diagram of each lateral point. Thus the importance of the variation of a given point as a function of its position can be measured and the specific and sexual differences of this variation can be determined.

  15. Modeling the influence of subsurface topography on spatial and temporal variability of subsurface stormflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Verseveld, W. J.; Tromp-van Meerveld, H. J.; Weiler, M.; McDonnell, J. J.

    2003-12-01

    Recent investigations of spatial patterns of soil depth, water table and subsurface flow response at the hillslope scale suggest that the variability in depth to bedrock (or to any other low permeable layer) may be a primary control on the space-time variability of subsurface stormflow. However, simulating or even predicting subsurface flow variability is still a challenge. Even more problematic is the fact that spatially explicit soil depth information is generally lacking at hillslope and catchment scales. We investigate how soil depth variability affects the spatial and temporal response of subsurface stormflow and propose a new way forward to defining these controls on sites without soil depth data. We used long-term data of spatially explicit subsurface flow measurements from a trenched hillslope at the Panola Mountain Research Watershed, as well as soil depth and soil property information, to calibrate and verify the HillVi hillslope model. Then we generated numerous realizations of the subsurface topography using geo-statistical information of the observed soil depth in the watershed. Subsurface flow variability was simulated based on these subsurface topography realizations. The spatial-temporal properties of the modeled flow were compared with the spatial and temporal variability of the observed flow. HillVi is a quasi 3D spatially explicit saturated and unsaturated water balance model and is well suited for this approach as it captures all major subsurface runoff generation processes (matrix and macropore flow and infiltration, lateral subsurface flow and pipe flow). We discuss the potentials and drawbacks of this approach to simulate spatially variable outflow from hillslopes and the general role of subsurface topography on the spatial and temporal patterns of subsurface flow.

  16. SMALL-SCALE ANISOTROPIES OF COSMIC RAYS FROM RELATIVE DIFFUSION

    SciTech Connect

    Ahlers, Markus; Mertsch, Philipp

    2015-12-10

    The arrival directions of multi-TeV cosmic rays show significant anisotropies at small angular scales. It has been argued that this small-scale structure can naturally arise from cosmic ray scattering in local turbulent magnetic fields that distort a global dipole anisotropy set by diffusion. We study this effect in terms of the power spectrum of cosmic ray arrival directions and show that the strength of small-scale anisotropies is related to properties of relative diffusion. We provide a formalism for how these power spectra can be inferred from simulations and motivate a simple analytic extension of the ensemble-averaged diffusion equation that can account for the effect.

  17. Fundamental economic issues in the development of small scale hydro

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-05-01

    Some basic economic issues involved in the development of small-scale hydroelectric power are addressed. The discussion represents an economist's view of the investment process in this resource. Very little investment has been made in small-scale hydro development and an attempt is made to show that the reason for this may not be that the expected present worth of the returns of the project do not exceed the construction cost by a sufficient amount. Rather, a set of factors in combination impose costs on the project not normally incurred in small businesses. The discussion covers costs, supply, demand, and profitability.

  18. Kinks and small-scale structure on cosmic strings

    SciTech Connect

    Copeland, E. J.; Kibble, T. W. B.

    2009-12-15

    We discuss some hitherto puzzling features of the small-scale structure of cosmic strings. We argue that kinks play a key role, and that an important quantity to study is their sharpness distribution. In particular we suggest that for very small scales the two-point correlation function of the string tangent vector varies linearly with the separation and not as a fractional power, as proposed by Polchinski and Rocha [Phys. Rev. D 74, 083504 (2006)]. However, our results are consistent with theirs, because the range of scales to which this linearity applies shrinks as evolution proceeds.

  19. Radiotherapy Adapted to Spatial and Temporal Variability in Tumor Hypoxia

    SciTech Connect

    Sovik, Aste; Malinen, Eirik . E-mail: emalinen@fys.uio.no; Skogmo, Hege K.; Bentzen, Soren M.; Bruland, Oyvind S.; Olsen, Dag Rune

    2007-08-01

    Purpose: To explore the feasibility and clinical potential of adapting radiotherapy to temporal and spatial variations in tumor oxygenation. Methods and Materials: Repeated dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance (DCEMR) images were taken of a canine sarcoma during the course of fractionated radiation therapy. The tumor contrast enhancement was assumed to represent the oxygen distribution. The IMRT plans were retrospectively adapted to the DCEMR images by employing tumor dose redistribution. Optimized nonuniform tumor dose distributions were calculated and compared with a uniform dose distribution delivering the same integral dose to the tumor. Clinical outcome was estimated from tumor control probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) modeling. Results: The biologically adapted treatment was found to give a substantial increase in TCP compared with conventional radiotherapy, even when only pretreatment images were used as basis for the treatment planning. The TCP was further increased by repeated replanning during the course of treatment, and replanning twice a week was found to give near optimal TCP. Random errors in patient positioning were found to give a small decrease in TCP, whereas systematic errors were found to reduce TCP substantially. NTCP for the adapted treatment was similar to or lower than for the conventional treatment, both for parallel and serial normal tissue structures. Conclusion: Biologically adapted radiotherapy is estimated to improve treatment outcome of tumors having spatial and temporal variations in radiosensitivity.

  20. Spatial and temporal variability of droughts in Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, JoãO. Filipe; Pulido-Calvo, Inmaculada; Portela, Maria Manuela

    2010-03-01

    An analysis of droughts in mainland Portugal based on monthly precipitation data, from September 1910 to October 2004, in 144 rain gages distributed uniformly over the country is presented. The drought events were characterized by means of the Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI) applied to different time scales (1, 6, and 12 consecutive months and 6 months from April to September and 12 months from October to September). To assess spatial and temporal patterns of droughts, a principal component analysis (PCA) and K-means clustering (KMC) were applied to the SPI series. In this way, three different and spatially well-defined regions with different temporal evolution of droughts were identified (north, central, and south regions of Portugal). A spectral analysis of the SPI patterns obtained with principal component analysis and clusters analysis, using the fast Fourier transform algorithm (FFT), showed that there is a manifest 3.6-year cycle in the SPI pattern in the south of Portugal and evident 2.4-year and 13.4-year cycles in the north of Portugal. The observation of the drought periods supports the occurrence of more frequent cycles of dry events in the south (droughts from moderate to extreme approximately every 3.6 years) than in the north (droughts from severe to extreme approximately every 13.4 years). These results suggest a much stronger immediate influence of the NAO in the south than in the north of Portugal, although these relations remain a challenging task.

  1. Spatial and Temporal Snow Grain Size Variability across Northwestern Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courville, Z.; Polashenski, C. M.; Domine, F.

    2015-12-01

    The albedo of snow-covered surfaces is influenced by several factors including the presence of water; the inclusion of impurities, in particular black carbon and dust; and snow grain size and shape. The SAGE project (Sunlight Absorption across the Greenland ice sheet Experiment) aims at determining the impact of these interdependent factors. The SAGE project consisted of two overland traverses in 2013 and 2014 between Summit Station in the center of the ice sheet and Thule Air Base, on the northwest coast. This route crosses over several facies of the ice sheet representing different accumulation and melt regimes. The SAGE field objectives included detailed shallow pit studies of snow grain size, stratigraphy, and chemistry. In addition to snow pit data from the SAGE traverses that can be used to examine spatial variations, snow grain size and chemistry data from seasonal campaigns at Summit Station are used to examine temporal variations. Here, we present snow grain and chemistry seasonal and spatial results, and compare the relative effects to available ground-based albedo and meteorological data from co-located weather stations and hand-held spectro-radiometer measurements.

  2. Geostatistical independent simulation of spatially correlated soil variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boluwade, Alaba; Madramootoo, Chandra A.

    2015-12-01

    The selection of best management practices to reduce soil and water pollution often requires estimation of soil properties. It is important to find an efficient and robust technique to simulate spatially correlated soils parameters. Co-kriging and co-simulation are techniques that can be used. These methods are limited in terms of computer simulation due to the problem of solving large co-kriging systems and difficulties in fitting a valid model of coregionalization. The order of complexity increases as the number of covariables increases. This paper presents a technique for the conditional simulation of a non-Gaussian vector random field on point support scale. The technique is termed Independent Component Analysis (ICA). The basic principle underlining ICA is the determination of a linear representation of non-Gaussian data so that the components are considered statistically independent. With such representation, it would be easy and more computationally efficient to develop direct variograms for the components. The process is presented in two stages. The first stage involves the ICA decomposition. The second stage involves sequential Gaussian simulation of the generated components (which are derived from the first stage). This technique was applied for spatially correlated extractable cations such as magnesium (Mg) and iron (Fe) in a Canadian watershed. This paper has a strong application in stochastic quantification of uncertainties of soil attributes in soil remediation and soil rehabilitation.

  3. Subgrid spatial variability of soil hydraulic functions for hydrological modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreye, Phillip; Meon, Günter

    2016-07-01

    State-of-the-art hydrological applications require a process-based, spatially distributed hydrological model. Runoff characteristics are demanded to be well reproduced by the model. Despite that, the model should be able to describe the processes at a subcatchment scale in a physically credible way. The objective of this study is to present a robust procedure to generate various sets of parameterisations of soil hydraulic functions for the description of soil heterogeneity on a subgrid scale. Relations between Rosetta-generated values of saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks) and van Genuchten's parameters of soil hydraulic functions were statistically analysed. An universal function that is valid for the complete bandwidth of Ks values could not be found. After concentrating on natural texture classes, strong correlations were identified for all parameters. The obtained regression results were used to parameterise sets of hydraulic functions for each soil class. The methodology presented in this study is applicable on a wide range of spatial scales and does not need input data from field studies. The developments were implemented into a hydrological modelling system.

  4. Small-scale gradients of charged particles in the heliospheric magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Fan; Giacalone, Joe

    2014-01-01

    Using numerical simulations of charged-particles propagating in the heliospheric magnetic field, we study small-scale gradients, or 'dropouts,' in the intensity of solar energetic particles seen at 1 AU. We use two turbulence models, the foot-point random motion model and the two-component model, to generate fluctuating magnetic fields similar to spacecraft observations at 1 AU. The turbulence models include a Kolmogorov-like magnetic field power spectrum containing a broad range of spatial scales from those that lead to large-scale field-line random walk to small scales leading to resonant pitch-angle scattering of energetic particles. We release energetic protons (20 keV-10 MeV) from a spatially compact and instantaneous source. The trajectories of energetic charged particles in turbulent magnetic fields are numerically integrated. Spacecraft observations are mimicked by collecting particles in small windows when they pass the windows at a distance of 1 AU. We show that small-scale gradients in the intensity of energetic particles and velocity dispersions observed by spacecraft can be reproduced using the foot-point random motion model. However, no dropouts are seen in simulations using the two-component magnetic turbulence model. We also show that particle scattering in the solar wind magnetic field needs to be infrequent for intensity dropouts to form.

  5. The Effects of Spatial Stimulus-Response Compatibility on Choice Time Production Accuracy and Variability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rakitin, Brian C.

    2005-01-01

    Five experiments examined the relations between timing and attention using a choice time production task in which the latency of a spatial choice response is matched to a target interval (3 or 5 s). Experiments 1 and 2 indicated that spatial stimulus-response incompatibility increased nonscalar timing variability without affecting timing accuracy…

  6. The spatial and temporal variability of groundwater recharge in a forested basin in northern Wisconsin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dripps, W.R.; Bradbury, K.R.

    2010-01-01

    Recharge varies spatially and temporally as it depends on a wide variety of factors (e.g. vegetation, precipitation, climate, topography, geology, and soil type), making it one of the most difficult, complex, and uncertain hydrologic parameters to quantify. Despite its inherent variability, groundwater modellers, planners, and policy makers often ignore recharge variability and assume a single average recharge value for an entire watershed. Relatively few attempts have been made to quantify or incorporate spatial and temporal recharge variability into water resource planning or groundwater modelling efforts. In this study, a simple, daily soil-water balance model was developed and used to estimate the spatial and temporal distribution of groundwater recharge of the Trout Lake basin of northern Wisconsin for 1996-2000 as a means to quantify recharge variability. For the 5 years of study, annual recharge varied spatially by as much as 18 cm across the basin; vegetation was the predominant control on this variability. Recharge also varied temporally with a threefold annual difference over the 5-year period. Intra-annually, recharge was limited to a few isolated events each year and exhibited a distinct seasonal pattern. The results suggest that ignoring recharge variability may not only be inappropriate, but also, depending on the application, may invalidate model results and predictions for regional and local water budget calculations, water resource management, nutrient cycling, and contaminant transport studies. Recharge is spatially and temporally variable, and should be modelled as such. Copyright ?? 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Spatial variability of available soil microelements in an ecological functional zone of Beijing.

    PubMed

    Ye, Huichun; Shen, Chongyang; Huang, Yuanfang; Huang, Wenjiang; Zhang, Shiwen; Jia, Xiaohong

    2015-02-01

    Understanding the spatial variability of soil microelements and its influencing factors is of importance for a number of applications such as scientifically formulated fertilizer and environmental protection. This study used descriptive statistics and geostatistics to investigate the spatial variability of available soil Fe, Mn, Cu, and Zn contents in agricultural topsoil (0-20 cm) in an ecological functional zone located at Yanqing County, Beijing, China. Kriging method was applied to map the spatial patterns of available soil Fe, Mn, Cu, and Zn contents. Results showed that the available soil Cu had a widest spatial correlation distance (e.g., 9.6 km), which for available soil Fe, Mn, and Zn were only 1.29, 2.58, and 0.99 km, respectively. The values of C 0/sill for available soil Fe and Zn were 0.12 and 0.11, respectively, demonstrating that the spatial heterogeneity was mainly due to structural factors. The available soil Mn and Cu had the larger values of C 0/sill (i.e., 0.50 and 0.44 for Mn and Cu, respectively), which showed a medium spatial correlation. Mapping of the spatial patterns of the four microelements showed that the decrease trend of available soil Fe and Mn were from northeast to southwest across the study area. The highest amount of available soil Cu was distributed in the middle of the study area surrounding urban region which presented as a "single island". The highest amount of available soil Zn was mainly distributed in the north and south of the study area. One-way analysis of variance for the influencing factors showed that the lithology of parental materials, soil organic matter, and pH were important factors affecting spatial variability of the available microelements. The topography only had a significant influence on the spatial variability of available soil Fe and Mn contents, parental materials, and the land use types had little influence on the spatial variability.

  8. Environmentally Sound Small-Scale Forestry Projects. Guidelines for Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ffolliott, Peter F.; Thames, John L.

    This manual, the third in a series of publications that address community development possibilities in developing nations, provides guidelines for small-scale forestry projects that are integrative and conservation-oriented. Chapters focus on: (1) users and uses (specifying targeted audience and general objectives); (2) planning process (including…

  9. Small Scale Beekeeping. Appropriate Technologies for Development. Manual M-17.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gentry, Curtis

    This manual is designed to assist Peace Corps volunteers in the development and implementation of small-scale beekeeping programs as a tool for development. Addressed in the individual chapters are bees and humans; project planning; the types and habits of bees; the essence of beekeeping; bee space and beehives; intermediate technology beekeeping;…

  10. Small-scale dynamo action in primordial halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schober, Jennifer; Schleicher, Dominik R. G.; Klessen, Ralf S.; Federrath, Christoph; Bovino, Stefano; Glover, Simon; Banerjee, Robi

    2013-07-01

    The first galaxies form due to gravitational collapse of primordial halos. During this collapse, weak magnetic seed fields get amplified exponentially by the small-scale dynamo - a process converting kinetic energy from turbulence into magnetic energy. We use the Kazantsev theory, which describes the small-scale dynamo analytically, to study magnetic field amplification for different turbulent velocity correlation functions. For incompressible turbulence (Kolmogorov turbulence), we find that the growth rate is proportional to the square root of the hydrodynamic Reynolds number, Re1/2. In the case of highly compressible turbulence (Burgers turbulence) the growth rate increases proportional to Re1/3. With a detailed chemical network we are able to follow the chemical evolution and determine the kinetic and magnetic viscosities (due to Ohmic and ambipolar diffusion) during the collapse of the halo. This way, we can calculate the growth rate of the small-scale dynamo quantitatively and predict the evolution of the small-scale magnetic field. As the magnetic energy is transported to larger scales on the local eddy-timescale, we obtain an estimate for the magnetic field on the Jeans scale. Even there, we find that equipartition with the kinetic energy is reached on small timescales. Dynamically relevant field structures can thus be expected already during the formation of the first objects in the Universe.

  11. 2010 Thin Film & Small Scale Mechanical Behavior Gordon Research Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Thomas Balk

    2010-07-30

    Over the past decades, it has been well established that the mechanical behavior of materials changes when they are confined geometrically at least in one dimension to small scale. It is the aim of the 2010 Gordon Conference on 'Thin Film and Small Scale Mechanical Behavior' to discuss cutting-edge research on elastic, plastic and time-dependent deformation as well as degradation mechanisms like fracture, fatigue and wear at small scales. As in the past, the conference will benefit from contributions from fundamental studies of physical mechanisms linked to material science and engineering reaching towards application in modern applications ranging from optical and microelectronic devices and nano- or micro-electrical mechanical systems to devices for energy production and storage. The conference will feature entirely new testing methodologies and in situ measurements as well as recent progress in atomistic and micromechanical modeling. Particularly, emerging topics in the area of energy conversion and storage, such as material for batteries will be highlighted. The study of small-scale mechanical phenomena in systems related to energy production, conversion or storage offer an enticing opportunity to materials scientists, who can provide new insight and investigate these phenomena with methods that have not previously been exploited.

  12. Small Scale Marine Fisheries: An Extension Training Manual. TR-30.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinson, Steven; And Others

    This manual is designed for use in a preservice training program for prospective volunteers whose Peace Corps service will be spent working with small-scale artisanal fishing communities in developing nations. The program consists of 8 weeks of intensive training to develop competencies in marine fisheries technology and fisheries extension work…

  13. Environmentally Sound Small-Scale Water Projects. Guidelines for Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tillman, Gus

    This manual is the second volume in a series of publications on community development programs. Guidelines are suggested for small-scale water projects that would benefit segments of the world's urban or rural poor. Strategies in project planning, implementation and evaluation are presented that emphasize environmental conservation and promote…

  14. Small Scale Charcoal Making: A Manual for Trainers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karch, Ed; And Others

    This training program offers skills training in all stages of the development of technologies related to small-scale charcoal production, including the design, construction, operation, maintenance, repair, and evaluation of prototype kilns. The kiln designs are selected to be as consistent as possible with the realities of rural areas in…

  15. On the Small-Scale Morphology of Asthenospheric Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal, V.; Davaille, A.; Crambes, C.

    2003-12-01

    We investigated the interaction of small-scale cold instabilities dripping from a cooling lithosphere with a shear flow confined in the asthenosphere, using analog experiments. Rayleigh numbers ranged between 104 and 108. The fluids were either polymer solutions (constant viscosity), sugar or corn syrups (viscosity depending on temperature), or wax (phase transition). When cooling away from the ridge, the thickening lithosphere becomes thermally unstable and develops small-scale convective instabilities at its bottom. For sufficiently fast asthenospheric flow, these instabilities are sheared and remain trapped in the asthenosphere, following a helicoidal path aligned with the direction of plate motion. A phase diagram and scaling laws for the flow characteristics were determined. The observed helicoidal pattern could explain some geophysical observables such as small wavelength lineations in the terrestrial gravity field, or seismic anisotropy anomalies under the Pacific plate. Moreover, the distance from the ridge at which the small-scale instabilities form depends on the underlying mantle temperature: for a hotter mantle, they are generated closer to the ridge. Therefore, in the case of a ridge-centered plume, the hot temperature anomaly due to the plume triggers small-scale instabilities almost at the ridge. The heat transfer out of the mantle is accelerated, and the thickening of the lithosphere away from the ridge is delayed. Therefore, a groove at the bottom of the lithosphere may be expected along the track of a ridge-centred hotspot.

  16. Shaping Component Leads for Small-Scale Production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jan, Lawrence

    1987-01-01

    Simple tool makes it easy to bend leads of electronic components quickly and uniformly for assembly on circuit board. Useful in small-scale production of electronic circuits; saves labor but avoids cost of complicated machinery. Made in range of sizes to accommodate components in variety of dimensions.

  17. Environmentally Sound Small-Scale Energy Projects. Guidelines for Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bassan, Elizabeth Ann; Wood, Timothy S., Ed.

    This manual is the fourth volume in a series of publications that provide information for the planning of environmentally sound small-scale projects. Programs that aim to protect the renewable natural resources that supply most of the energy used in developing nations are suggested. Considerations are made for physical environmental factors as…

  18. Three dimensional simulation of spatial and temporal variability of stratospheric hydrogen chloride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaye, Jack A.; Rood, Richard B.; Jackman, Charles H.; Allen, Dale J.; Larson, Edmund M.

    1989-01-01

    Spatial and temporal variability of atmospheric HCl columns are calculated for January 1979 using a three-dimensional chemistry-transport model designed to provide the best possible representation of stratospheric transport. Large spatial and temporal variability of the HCl columns is shown to be correlated with lower stratospheric potential vorticity and thus to be of dynamical origin. Systematic longitudinal structure is correlated with planetary wave structure. These results can help place spatially and temporally isolated column and profile measurements in a regional and/or global perspective.

  19. The Impact of Small-Scale Heterogeneity on Proxies in Biomineral Archives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagnon, A. C.

    2015-12-01

    acidification and aspects of the organic templating process during skeletal nucleation, respectively. Collectively these experiments can help explain small-scale proxy heterogeneity, upscale this variability to bulk composition, and more accurately resolve specific environmental signals from the geochemical record.

  20. Soil spatial variability and symbiotic nitrogen fixation by legumes

    SciTech Connect

    Reichardt, K. )

    1990-09-01

    The isotope dilution method for the estimation of N{sub 2} fixation by legumes is analyzed, comparing the application of {sup 15}N-enriched fertilizer with {sup 15}N-labeled soil. Soil variability of other dynamic processes in the soil are discussed in light of the distribution of the {sup 15}N label in the system. Field data were collected along six transects, 45 m long, with 30 plots (replicates) each. The legume (Vicia faba L.) was used as a fixing crop, barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) and oil radish (Raphinus sativus L.) as nonfixing standard crops. Isotope methods were also compared with the yield difference method. Results show that isotope methods were very sensitive to the distribution of the label in the soil and that dynamic processes involving N can significantly affect this distribution over a whole field. Best results were obtained with {sup 15}N-labeled soil. The particular site used, having been farmed for more than 20 years with {sup 15}N trials, showed a homogeneous residual {sup 15}N label that made it possible to estimate N{sub 2} fixation without the application of extra label. Estimates of N{sub 2} fixation with the isotope method were well correlated with the yield difference method when fertilizer use efficiency of the fixing and nonfixing crops were similar. Results also indicate that a good reference crop for one method might not be the best for the other method, and one reason for this is the variability of soil parameters and of dynamic processes occurring in the soil.

  1. Spatial and temporal variability of SWIR air glow measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allan, Jeffery; Dayton, David; Gonglewski, John; Myers, Michael; Nolasco, Rudolf

    2011-05-01

    It is well known that luminance from photo-chemical reactions of hydroxyl ions in the upper atmosphere (~85 km altitude) produces a significant amount of night time radiation in the short wave infra-red (SWIR) band between 0.9 and 1.7 μm wave length. This phenomenon, often referred to as airglow, has been demonstrated as an effective illumination source for passive low light level night time imaging applications. It addition it has been shown that observation of the spatial and temporal variations of the illumination can be used to characterize atmospheric tidal wave actions in the airglow region. These spatio-temporal variations manifest themselves as traveling wave patterns whose period and velocity are related to the wind velocity at 85 km as well as the turbulence induced by atmospheric vertical instabilities. In this paper we present nearly a year of airglow observations over the whole sky, showing long term and short term fluctuations to characterize SWIR night time image system performance.

  2. Spatial variability of soil hydraulics and remotely sensed soil parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lascano, R. J.; Van Bavel, C. H. M.

    1982-01-01

    The development of methods to correctly interpret remotely sensed information about soil moisture and soil temperature requires an understanding of water and energy flow in soil, because the signals originate from the surface, or from a shallow surface layer, but reflect processes in the entire profile. One formidable difficulty in this application of soil physics is the spatial heterogeneity of natural soils. Earlier work has suggested that the heterogeneity of soil hydraulic properties may be described by the frequency distribution of a single scale factor. The sensitivity of hydraulic and energetic processes to the variation of this scale factor is explored with a suitable numerical model. It is believed that such an analysis can help in deciding how accurately and extensively basic physical properties of field soils need to be known in order to interpret thermal or radar waveband signals. It appears that the saturated hydraulic conductivity needs to be known only to its order of magnitude, and that the required accuracy of the soil water retention function is about 0.02 volume fraction. Furthermore, the results may be helpful in deciding how the total scene or view field, as perceived through a sensor, is composed from the actual mosaic of transient soil properties, such as surface temperature or surface soil moisture. However, the latter proposition presupposes a random distribution of permanent properties, a condition that may not be met in many instances, and no solution of the problem is apparent.

  3. Spatial Variability in Instantaneous Photosynthetic Carbon and Oxygen Isotope Discrimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbour, M. M.

    2007-12-01

    Stable carbon and oxygen isotope ratios of CO2 are useful tracers in studies of carbon and water cycling between the terrestrial biosphere and the atmosphere. Interpretation of variation in 13CO2 and C16O18O relies on models describing physical and biochemical processes and their associated fractionations. A layer of complexity not currently quantified or accounted for in canopy models is spatial variation in photosynthetic discrimination within a single leaf. A new measurement technique, employing tunable diode laser absorption spectrometry coupled to an open gas exchange system, enables online measurement of photosynthetic discrimination at high temporal resolution. Using this system, photosynthetic 13C and 18O discrimination was measured along leaves of a C3 monocot. For the forage cereal Triticale, 13C discrimination increased by 2‰ and 18O by 20‰ from the base to the tip of mature leaves when measured at saturating irradiance. The increase in 13C discrimination was associated with an increase in the leaf internal conductance of CO2, and 18O discrimination with carry-forward of evaporative enrichment along the leaf. When numerical averages are compared to flux- and area-weighted averages, the portion of the leaf approximately one third of the way from the base can be shown to provide the most representative area for scaling up.

  4. Extreme small-scale wind episodes over the Barents Sea: When, where and why?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolstad, Erik W.

    2015-04-01

    The Barents Sea is mostly ice-free during winter and therefore prone to severe weather associated with marine cold air outbreaks, such as polar lows. With the increasing marine activity in the region, it is important to study the climatology and variability of episodes with strong winds, as well as to understand their causes. Explosive marine cyclogenesis is usually caused by a combination of several mechanisms: upper-level forcing, stratospheric dry intrusions, latent heat release, surface energy fluxes, low-level baroclinicity. An additional factor that has been linked to extremely strong surface winds, is low static stability in the lower atmosphere, which allows for downward transfer of high-momentum air. Here the most extreme small-scale wind episodes in a high-resolution (5 km) 35-year hindcast were analyzed from a dynamical perspective, and it was found that they were associated with unusually strong low-level baroclinicity and surface heat fluxes. And crucially, the 12 most severe episodes had stronger cold-air advection than 12 slightly less severe cases, suggesting that marine cold air outbreaks are the most important mechanism for extreme winds on small spatial scales over the Barents Sea. Observational data is sparse in the Arctic, so forecasters are often in need of simple indicators when evaluating the potential for strong winds. Polar low forecasters in northern Norway monitor the vertical difference between the SST and the temperature at 500 hPa, which is a simple and effective indicator of cold air outbreaks. Already 24 hours before the most intense storms' peak intensity, this difference was higher than normal, acting as a possible harbinger of extreme winds for experienced forecasters. As the quality and resolution of the forecast models increase with time, it is in data-sparse regions such as the Barents Sea that human experience still gives a vital edge.

  5. Vertical carbon-14 profiles for resolving spatial variability in recharge in arid environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Cameron; Cook, Peter G.; Harrington, Glenn A.

    2015-01-01

    Groundwater age tracers are often measured to help constrain estimates of groundwater recharge, especially in arid environments where other methods are unsuitable. However multiple processes can influence the shape of vertical tracer profiles in an aquifer including (1) variation in tracer input concentrations from the unsaturated zone, (2) the role of diffusion in transporting tracer into the aquifer when fluxes are low and (3) spatial variability in recharge. This study demonstrates the influence of spatially variable recharge and spatially variable carbon-14 (14C) activities in the unsaturated zone on vertical 14C profiles in groundwater. Through groundwater flow and solute transport modelling, we demonstrate that recharge estimated from single point measurements of 14C may be wrong more than an order of magnitude when unsaturated zone 14C activities and recharge vary spatially. We then present a case study from the Ti Tree Basin in arid central Australia, where detailed profiles of 14C activity in unsaturated zone gas and groundwater have been measured, and spatial variability in unsaturated zone 14C is observed (ranging from 54 to 106 pMC above the watertable). Through modelling our data, we show that when unsaturated zone 14C activities are known, measurement of the 14C profile can help constrain estimates of recharge and its spatial variability. This approach improves our understanding of groundwater flow in the Ti Tree Basin, by showing mountain front recharge to be an important mechanism.

  6. High-speed limnology: using advanced sensors to investigate spatial variability in biogeochemistry and hydrology.

    PubMed

    Crawford, John T; Loken, Luke C; Casson, Nora J; Smith, Colin; Stone, Amanda G; Winslow, Luke A

    2015-01-01

    Advanced sensor technology is widely used in aquatic monitoring and research. Most applications focus on temporal variability, whereas spatial variability has been challenging to document. We assess the capability of water chemistry sensors embedded in a high-speed water intake system to document spatial variability. This new sensor platform continuously samples surface water at a range of speeds (0 to >45 km h(-1)) resulting in high-density, mesoscale spatial data. These novel observations reveal previously unknown variability in physical, chemical, and biological factors in streams, rivers, and lakes. By combining multiple sensors into one platform, we were able to detect terrestrial-aquatic hydrologic connections in a small dystrophic lake, to infer the role of main-channel vs backwater nutrient processing in a large river and to detect sharp chemical changes across aquatic ecosystem boundaries in a stream/lake complex. Spatial sensor data were verified in our examples by comparing with standard lab-based measurements of selected variables. Spatial fDOM data showed strong correlation with wet chemistry measurements of DOC, and optical NO3 concentrations were highly correlated with lab-based measurements. High-frequency spatial data similar to our examples could be used to further understand aquatic biogeochemical fluxes, ecological patterns, and ecosystem processes, and will both inform and benefit from fixed-site data.

  7. Spatial and temporal variability of periglaciation of the Iberian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliva, M.; Serrano, E.; Gómez-Ortiz, A.; González-Amuchastegui, M. J.; Nieuwendam, A.; Palacios, D.; Pérez-Alberti, A.; Pellitero-Ondicol, R.; Ruiz-Fernández, J.; Valcárcel, M.; Vieira, G.; Antoniades, D.

    2016-04-01

    Active periglacial processes are currently marginal in the Iberian Peninsula, spatially limited to the highest mountain ranges. However, a wide variety of periglacial deposits and landforms are distributed in low and mid-altitude environments, which shows evidence of past periods of enhanced periglacial activity. The purpose of this paper is to summarize the present knowledge of past periglacial activity in the Iberian Peninsula. The chronological framework takes four main stages into account: the last glaciation, deglaciation, Holocene and present-day processes. This study focuses on the highest massifs (Pyrenees, Cantabrian Range, NW ranges, Central Range, Iberian Range, Sierra Nevada) as well as other lower elevation environments, namely the central Iberian Meseta. During the last glaciation the periglacial belt extended to much lower altitudes than today, reaching current sea level in the NW corner of the Iberian Peninsula. A wide range of geomorphological landforms and sedimentary records is indicative of very active periglacial processes during that phase, in some cases related to permafrost conditions (i.e., block streams, rock glaciers). Most of the inactive landforms and deposits in low and mid-elevations in Iberia are also related to this phase. The massive deglaciation of the Iberian massifs was caused by a gradual increase in temperatures. The deglaciation phase was only interrupted by a short period with colder conditions (the Younger Dryas) that reactivated periglacial processes in the formerly glaciated cirques of the highest lands, specifically with the widespread development of rock glaciers. During the Holocene, periglacial processes have been only active in the highest ranges, shifting in altitude according to temperature regimes and moisture conditions. The Little Ice Age saw the reactivation of periglacial activity in lower elevations than today. Currently, periglacial processes are only active in elevations exceeding 2500 m in the southern

  8. Spatial variability of functional brain networks in early-blind and sighted subjects.

    PubMed

    Boldt, Robert; Seppä, Mika; Malinen, Sanna; Tikka, Pia; Hari, Riitta; Carlson, Synnöve

    2014-07-15

    To further the understanding how the human brain adapts to early-onset blindness, we searched in early-blind and normally-sighted subjects for functional brain networks showing the most and least spatial variabilities across subjects. We hypothesized that the functional networks compensating for early-onset blindness undergo cortical reorganization. To determine whether reorganization of functional networks affects spatial variability, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to compare brain networks, derived by independent component analysis, of 7 early-blind and 7 sighted subjects while they rested or listened to an audio drama. In both conditions, the blind compared with sighted subjects showed more spatial variability in a bilateral parietal network (comprising the inferior parietal and angular gyri and precuneus) and in a bilateral auditory network (comprising the superior temporal gyri). In contrast, a vision-related left-hemisphere-lateralized occipital network (comprising the superior, middle and inferior occipital gyri, fusiform and lingual gyri, and the calcarine sulcus) was less variable in blind than sighted subjects. Another visual network and a tactile network were spatially more variable in the blind than sighted subjects in one condition. We contemplate whether our results on inter-subject spatial variability of brain networks are related to experience-dependent brain plasticity, and we suggest that auditory and parietal networks undergo a stronger experience-dependent reorganization in the early-blind than sighted subjects while the opposite is true for the vision-related occipital network. PMID:24680867

  9. Spatial Relationships between Polychaete Assemblages and Environmental Variables over Broad Geographical Scales

    PubMed Central

    Benedetti-Cecchi, Lisandro; Iken, Katrin; Konar, Brenda; Cruz-Motta, Juan; Knowlton, Ann; Pohle, Gerhard; Castelli, Alberto; Tamburello, Laura; Mead, Angela; Trott, Tom; Miloslavich, Patricia; Wong, Melisa; Shirayama, Yoshihisa; Lardicci, Claudio; Palomo, Gabriela; Maggi, Elena

    2010-01-01

    This study examined spatial relationships between rocky shore polychaete assemblages and environmental variables over broad geographical scales, using a database compiled within the Census of Marine Life NaGISA (Natural Geography In Shore Areas) research program. The database consisted of abundance measures of polychaetes classified at the genus and family levels for 74 and 93 sites, respectively, from nine geographic regions. We tested the general hypothesis that the set of environmental variables emerging as potentially important drivers of variation in polychaete assemblages depend on the spatial scale considered. Through Moran's eigenvector maps we indentified three submodels reflecting spatial relationships among sampling sites at intercontinental (>10000 km), continental (1000–5000 km) and regional (20–500 km) scales. Using redundancy analysis we found that most environmental variables contributed to explain a large and significant proportion of variation of the intercontinental submodel both for genera and families (54% and 53%, respectively). A subset of these variables, organic pollution, inorganic pollution, primary productivity and nutrient contamination was also significantly related to spatial variation at the continental scale, explaining 25% and 32% of the variance at the genus and family levels, respectively. These variables should therefore be preferably considered when forecasting large-scale spatial patterns of polychaete assemblages in relation to ongoing or predicted changes in environmental conditions. None of the variables considered in this study were significantly related to the regional submodel. PMID:20886075

  10. Relationship Between Shoulder Pain and Kinetic and Temporal-Spatial Variability In Wheelchair Users

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Ian M; Jayaraman, Chandrasekaran; Hsiao-Wecksler, Elizabeth T.; Sosnoff, Jacob J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine intra-individual variability of kinetic and temporal-spatial parameters of wheelchair propulsion as a function of shoulder pain in manual wheelchair users (MWU). Design Cohort Setting University Research Laboratory Participants 26 adults with physical disabilities who use a manual wheelchair for mobility full time (>80% ambulation) Interventions Participants propelled their own wheelchairs with force sensing wheels at a steady state pace on a dynamometer at 3 speeds (self-selected, 0.7m/s, 1.1m/s) for 3 minutes. Temporal-spatial and kinetic data were recorded unilaterally at the hand rim. Main Outcome Measures Shoulder pain was quantified with the wheelchair users shoulder pain index (WUSPI). Intra-individual mean, standard deviation (SD), and coefficient of variation of (CV = mean/SD) with kinetic and temporal spatial metrics were determined at the handrim. Results There were no differences in mean kinetic and temporal spatial metrics as a function of pain group (p's > 0.016). However, individuals with pain displayed less relative variability (CV) in peak resultant force and push time then pain free individuals (p<0.016). Conclusions Shoulder pain had no influence on mean kinetic and temporal-spatial propulsion variables at the handrim however group differences were found in relative variability. These results suggest that intra-individual variability analysis is sensitive to pain. It is proposed that variability analysis may offer an approach of earlier identification of manual wheelchair users at risk for developing shoulder pain. PMID:24291595

  11. Visualization of small scale structures on high resolution DEMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokalj, Žiga; Zakšek, Klemen; Pehani, Peter; Čotar, Klemen; Oštir, Krištof

    2015-04-01

    Knowledge on the terrain morphology is very important for observation of numerous processes and events and digital elevation models are therefore one of the most important datasets in geographic analyses. Furthermore, recognition of natural and anthropogenic microrelief structures, which can be observed on detailed terrain models derived from aerial laser scanning (lidar) or structure-from-motion photogrammetry, is of paramount importance in many applications. In this paper we thus examine and evaluate methods of raster lidar data visualization for the determination (recognition) of microrelief features and present a series of strategies to assist selecting the preferred visualization of choice for structures of various shapes and sizes, set in varied landscapes. Often the answer is not definite and more frequently a combination of techniques has to be used to map a very diverse landscape. Researchers can only very recently benefit from free software for calculation of advanced visualization techniques. These tools are often difficult to understand, have numerous options that confuse the user, or require and produce non-standard data formats, because they were written for specific purposes. We therefore designed the Relief Visualization Toolbox (RVT) as a free, easy-to-use, standalone application to create visualisations from high-resolution digital elevation data. It is tailored for the very beginners in relief interpretation, but it can also be used by more advanced users in data processing and geographic information systems. It offers a range of techniques, such as simple hillshading and its derivatives, slope gradient, trend removal, positive and negative openness, sky-view factor, and anisotropic sky-view factor. All included methods have been proven to be effective for detection of small scale features and the default settings are optimised to accomplish this task. However, the usability of the tool goes beyond computation for visualization purposes, as sky

  12. Spatial and temporal variability of inorganic chlorine in Northwestern Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommariva, R.; Hollis, L. D. J.; Baker, A. R.; Ball, S. M.; Bell, T. G.; Cordell, R. L.; Fleming, Z.; Gaget, M.; Yang, M. X.; Monks, P. S.

    2015-12-01

    Chlorine is well known to be a strong oxidant in the atmosphere;chlorine reactivity impacts the formation of tropospheric ozone, theoxidation of methane and non-methane hydrocarbons, and the cycling ofnitrogen, sulphur and mercury. An accurate assessment of the roleplayed by chlorine in tropospheric chemical processes is complicatedby the scarce knowledge of its sources, sinks and distribution.We report observations of inorganic chlorine species (Cl2, ClNO2,particulate chloride) taken over the period 2014-2015 at threedifferent locations in Britain: an urban site a hundred kilometersfrom the ocean (Leicester), a coastal site mostly affected by shiptraffic (Penlee Point, Cornwall) and a coastal site experiencingeither clean air from the North Sea or polluted air from inland(Weybourne, Norfolk).This dataset provides a first look into the geographical distributionand seasonal variability of chlorine in Northwestern Europe: theresults suggest that, during the night, ClNO2 is ubiquitous withconcentrations in the range of hundreds to thousands of pptV at alllocations, whereas Cl2 can be observed only at coastal sites, withconcentrations of a few tens of pptV. The implications of thewidespread presence of these forms of inorganic chlorine for ozoneproduction and, in general, for the oxidative processes in the loweratmosphere are discussed with the help of a wide range of supportingmeasurements.

  13. Spatial variability and source apportionment of PM2.5 across multiple sampling locations in southwest China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, F.; Xie, S.

    2015-12-01

    contribution of Mo-related manufacturing profile was largest at a rural site which is located in the north of the Chengdu Plain, where several small-scale Mo metal processing factories scattered around. The analysis of the combined data from five sites helped to study the common origins affecting the whole area and the spatial variability of the different locations.

  14. Dryland Precipitation Variability and Desertification Processes: An Assessment of Spatial and Temporal Rain Variability within the Grand Canyon, Arizona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caster, J.; Sankey, J. B.; Draut, A.; Fairley, H.; Collins, B. D.; Bedford, D.

    2014-12-01

    In drylands, spatial and temporal rain variability can result from natural climatic cycles, weather patterns, and physiographic factors. In these environments, minor differences in rainfall distribution can invoke significant ecosystem response. The Grand Canyon, Arizona is an iconic dryland environment that receives less than 430 mm of annual rainfall. Recent monitoring of desertification processes at culturally sensitive landscapes in Grand Canyon has examined variability in vegetation, soil crusts, and runoff induced erosion, and identified a lack of knowledge about the nature, drivers and effects of local rainfall variability. We examine rainfall variability using five years of high resolution data collected from 11 weather stations distributed along the Colorado River within Grand Canyon, coupled with 60 years of lower resolution data from National Weather Service Cooperative Observer (NOAA COOP) stations. We characterize spatial and temporal variability in 10-minute rainfall intensity, an important predictor of soil erosion, and daily rainfall depth, an important predictor of biotic cover. We quantify the intensity-daily depth relationship to infer long-term variability in rainfall intensity from the NOAA COOP data that only record rainfall depth. Results confirm findings from previous studies showing a bi-seasonally rainfall pattern with longer duration-lower intensity storms in the cool season and shorter duration-higher intensity storms during the North American Monsoon (NAM).Seasonal differences in rainfall intensity-depth relationships are significant, and suggest NAM storms have greater potential to produce erosion-generating intensities. As NAM rainfall is spatially and inter-annually more variable than cool season rain, yearly rain depths are strongly influenced by NAM fluctuations. These findings will be useful in future efforts to track desertification processes in this and other drylands characterized by complex topography and extreme rainfall

  15. IM-CRDS for the analysis of matrix-bound water isotopes: a streamlined (and updated) tool for ecohydrologists to probe small-scale variability in plants Yasuhara, S. (syasuhara@picarro.com)1,Carter, J.A. (jcarter@picarro.com)1, Dennis, K.J. (kdennis@picarro.com)1 1Picarro Inc., 3105 Patrick Henry Drive, Santa Clara, CA 95054

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuhara, S.

    2013-12-01

    The ability to measure the isotopic composition of matrix-bound water is valuable to many facets of earth and environmental sciences. For example, ecohydrologists use stable isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen in plant and soil water, in combination with measurements of atmospheric water vapor, surface water and precipitation, to estimate budgets of evapotranspiration. Likewise, water isotopes of oceanic water, brines and other waters with high total dissolved solids (TDS, e.g., juices) are relevant to studying large-scale oceanic circulation, small-scale mixing, groundwater contamination, the balance of evaporation to precipitation, and the provenance of food. Conventionally matrix-bound water has been extracted using cryogenic distillation, whereby water is distilled from the material in question (e.g., a leaf sample) by heating under vacuum and collecting the resultant water vapor using liquid nitrogen. The water can then be analyzed for its stable isotopic composition by a variety of methods, including isotope ratio mass spectrometry and laser techniques, such as Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CRDS). Here we present recent improvements in an alternative, and stream-lined, solution for integrated sample extraction and isotopic measurement using a Picarro Induction Module (IM) coupled to commercially-available CRDS analyzer from Picarro. This technique is also valuable for waters with high TDS, which can have detrimental effects on flash vaporization process, typically used for the introduction of water to Picarro CRDS water isotope analyzers. The IM works by inductively heating a sample held within a metal sample holder in a glass vial flushed with dry air. Tested samples include leaves, stems, twigs, calibration water, juices, and salt water. The heating process evolves water vapor which is then swept through the system at approximately 150 standard cubic centimeters per minute. The evolved water vapor passes through an activated charcoal cartridge for removal of

  16. Why are most aquatic plants widely distributed? Dispersal, clonal growth and small-scale heterogeneity in a stressful environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santamaría, Luis

    2002-06-01

    Non-marine aquatic vascular plants generally show broad distributional ranges. Climatic factors seem to have limited effects on their distributions, besides the determination of major disjunctions (tropical-temperate-subarctic). Dispersal should have been frequent enough to assure the quick colonisation of extensive areas following glacial retreat, but dispersal limitation is still apparent in areas separated by geographic barriers. Aquatic vascular plants also show limited taxonomic differentiation and low within-species genetic variation. Variation within populations is particularly low, but variation among populations seems to be relatively high, mainly due to the persistence of long-lived clones. Ecotypic differentiation is often related to factors that constrain clonal reproduction (salinity and ephemeral inundation). Inland aquatic habitats are heterogeneous environments, but this heterogeneity largely occurs at relatively small scales (within waterbodies and among neighbouring ones). They also represent a stressful environment for plants, characterised by low carbon availability, shaded conditions, sediment anoxia, mechanical damage by currents and waves, significant restrictions to sexual reproduction, and sometimes also osmotic stress and limited nutrient supply. I propose that the generality of broad distributions and low differentiation among the inland aquatic flora is best explained by a combination of: (1) selection for stress-tolerant taxa with broad tolerance ranges. (2) The selective advantages provided by clonal growth and multiplication, which increases plant tolerance to stress, genet survivorship and population viability. (3) Long-distance dispersal of sexual propagules and high local dispersal of asexual clones. (4) The generality of broad plastic responses, promoted by the combination of clonal growth, high local dispersal, small-scale spatial heterogeneity and temporal variability.

  17. Spatial variability in community composition on a granite breakwater versus natural rocky shores: lack of microhabitats suppresses intertidal biodiversity.

    PubMed

    Aguilera, Moisés A; Broitman, Bernardo R; Thiel, Martin

    2014-10-15

    Strong differences have been observed between the assemblages on artificial reefs and on natural hard-bottom habitats worldwide, but little is known about the mechanisms that cause contrasting biodiversity patterns. We examined the influence of spatial attributes in relation to both biogenic and topographic microhabitats, in the distribution and composition of intertidal species on both artificial and natural reefs. We found higher small-scale spatial heterogeneity on the natural reef compared with the study breakwater. Species richness and diversity were associated with a higher availability of crevices, rock pools and mussels in natural habitats. Spatial distribution of certain grazers corresponded well with the spatial structure of microhabitats. In contrast, the lack of microhabitats on the breakwater resulted in the absence of several grazers reflected in lower species richness. Biogenic and topographic microhabitats can have interactive effects providing niche opportunities for multiple species, explaining differences in species diversity between artificial versus natural reefs. PMID:25103901

  18. Spatial variability in community composition on a granite breakwater versus natural rocky shores: lack of microhabitats suppresses intertidal biodiversity.

    PubMed

    Aguilera, Moisés A; Broitman, Bernardo R; Thiel, Martin

    2014-10-15

    Strong differences have been observed between the assemblages on artificial reefs and on natural hard-bottom habitats worldwide, but little is known about the mechanisms that cause contrasting biodiversity patterns. We examined the influence of spatial attributes in relation to both biogenic and topographic microhabitats, in the distribution and composition of intertidal species on both artificial and natural reefs. We found higher small-scale spatial heterogeneity on the natural reef compared with the study breakwater. Species richness and diversity were associated with a higher availability of crevices, rock pools and mussels in natural habitats. Spatial distribution of certain grazers corresponded well with the spatial structure of microhabitats. In contrast, the lack of microhabitats on the breakwater resulted in the absence of several grazers reflected in lower species richness. Biogenic and topographic microhabitats can have interactive effects providing niche opportunities for multiple species, explaining differences in species diversity between artificial versus natural reefs.

  19. Spatial and Seasonal Variability of Extreme Soil Temperature in Croatia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sviličić, Petra; Vučetić, Višnja

    2015-04-01

    In terms of taking the temperature of the Earth in Croatia, first measurements began in 1898 in Križevci, but systematic measurements of soil temperature started in 1951. Today, the measurements are performed at 55 meteorological stations. The process of setting up, calibration, measurement, input, control and data processing is done entirely within the Meteorological and Hydrological Service. Due to the lack of funds, but also as a consequence of the Homeland War, network density in some areas is very rare, leading to aggravating circumstances during analysis. Also, certain temperature series are incomplete or are interrupted and therefore the number of long-term temperature series is very small. This particularly presents problems in coastal area, which is geographically diversified and is very difficult to do a thorough analysis of the area. Using mercury angle geothermometer daily at 7, 14 and 21 h CET, thermal state of soil is measured at 2, 5, 10, 20, 30, 50 and 100 cm depth. Thermometers are placed on the bare ground within the meteorological circle and facing north to reduce the direct impact of solar radiation. Lack of term measurements is noticed in the analysis of extreme soil temperatures, which are not real extreme values, but derived from three observational times. On the basis of fifty year series (1961-2010) at 23 stations, the analysis of trends of the surface maximal and minimal soil temperature, as well as the appearance of freezing is presented. Trends were determined by Sen's slope estimator, and statistical significance on 5% level was determined using the Mann-Kendall test. It was observed that the variability of the surface maximal soil temperature on an annual and seasonal level is much higher than those for surface minimal soil temperature. Trends in the recent period show a statistically significant increase in the maximal soil temperature in the eastern and the coastal regions, especially in the spring and summer season. Also, the

  20. The influence of topographic co-variables on the spatial variability of precipitation over small regions of complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diodato, Nazzareno

    2005-03-01

    Precipitation variability results from atmospheric circulation and complex site-specific bio-geoclimatic characteristics; therefore, climatic variables are expected to be correlated in a scale-dependent way. This paper studies the influence of topographic co-variables on the spatial variability of precipitation over small regions of complex terrain. For this purpose, the mutual benefits of an integrated geographic information system (GIS) and a geostatistics approach was used for spatial precipitation interpolation from rainfall observations measured at 51 climatic stations in a mountainous region of southern Italy (Benevento province). As no single method is optimal for all regions, it is important to compare the results obtained using alternative methods applied to the same data set. Therefore, besides ordinary kriging examination, two auxiliary variables were added for ordinary co-kriging of annual and seasonal precipitation: terrain elevation data and a topographic index. Cross-validation indicated that the ordinary kriging yielded the largest prediction errors. The smallest prediction errors were produced by a multivariate geostatistical method. However, the results favour the ordinary co-kriging with inclusion of information on the topographic index. The application of co-kriging is particularly justified in areas where there are nearby stations and where landform is very complex. We conclude that ordinary co-kriging is a very flexible and robust interpolation method because it may take into account several properties (soft and hard data) of the landscape.

  1. Spatial variability versus parameter uncertainty in freshwater fate and exposure factors of chemicals.

    PubMed

    Nijhof, Carl O P; Huijbregts, Mark A J; Golsteijn, Laura; van Zelm, Rosalie

    2016-04-01

    We compared the influence of spatial variability in environmental characteristics and the uncertainty in measured substance properties of seven chemicals on freshwater fate factors (FFs), representing the residence time in the freshwater environment, and on exposure factors (XFs), representing the dissolved fraction of a chemical. The influence of spatial variability was quantified using the SimpleBox model in which Europe was divided in 100 × 100 km regions, nested in a regional (300 × 300 km) and supra-regional (500 × 500 km) scale. Uncertainty in substance properties was quantified by means of probabilistic modelling. Spatial variability and parameter uncertainty were expressed by the ratio k of the 95%ile and 5%ile of the FF and XF. Our analysis shows that spatial variability ranges in FFs of persistent chemicals that partition predominantly into one environmental compartment was up to 2 orders of magnitude larger compared to uncertainty. For the other (less persistent) chemicals, uncertainty in the FF was up to 1 order of magnitude larger than spatial variability. Variability and uncertainty in freshwater XFs of the seven chemicals was negligible (k < 1.5). We found that, depending on the chemical and emission scenario, accounting for region-specific environmental characteristics in multimedia fate modelling, as well as accounting for parameter uncertainty, can have a significant influence on freshwater fate factor predictions. Therefore, we conclude that it is important that fate factors should not only account for parameter uncertainty, but for spatial variability as well, as this further increases the reliability of ecotoxicological impacts in LCA.

  2. Small-Scale Heterogeneity in Deep-Sea Nematode Communities around Biogenic Structures

    PubMed Central

    Hasemann, Christiane; Soltwedel, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The unexpected high species richness of deep-sea sediments gives rise to the questions, which processes produce and maintain diversity in the deep sea, and at what spatial scales do these processes operate? The idea of a small-scale habitat structure at the deep-sea floor provides the background for this study. At small scales biogenic structures create a heterogeneous environment that influences the structure of the surrounding communities and the dynamics of the meiobenthic populations. As an example for biogenic structures, small deep-sea sponges (Tentorium semisuberites Schmidt 1870) and their sedimentary environment were investigated for small-scale distribution patterns of benthic deep-sea nematodes. Sampling was carried out with the remotely operated vehicle Victor 6000 at the Arctic deep-sea observatory HAUSGARTEN. In order to investigate nematode community patterns sediment cores around three small sponges and corresponding control cores were analysed. A total of approx. 5800 nematodes were identified. The comparison of the nematode communities from sponge and control samples indicated an influence of the biogenic structure “sponge” on diversity patterns and habitat heterogeneity. The increased number of nematode species and functional groups found in the sediments around the sponges suggest that on a small scale the sponge acts as a gradient and creates a more divers habitat structure. The nematode community from the sponge sediments shows a greater taxonomic variance and species richness together with lower relative abundances of the species compared to those from control sediments. Obviously, the more homogeneous habitat conditions of the control sediments offer less micro-habitats than the sediments around the sponges. This seems to reduce the number of functional groups and species coexisting in the control sediments. PMID:22216193

  3. Ground-based measurements of spatial and temporal variability of snow accumulation in East Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisen, Olaf; Frezzotti, Massimo; Genthon, Christophe; Isaksson, Elisabeth; Magand, Olivier; van den Broeke, Michiel R.; Dixon, Daniel A.; Ekaykin, Alexey; Holmlund, Per; Kameda, Takao; KarlöF, Lars; Kaspari, Susan; Lipenkov, Vladimir Y.; Oerter, Hans; Takahashi, Shuhei; Vaughan, David G.

    2008-06-01

    The East Antarctic Ice Sheet is the largest, highest, coldest, driest, and windiest ice sheet on Earth. Understanding of the surface mass balance (SMB) of Antarctica is necessary to determine the present state of the ice sheet, to make predictions of its potential contribution to sea level rise, and to determine its past history for paleoclimatic reconstructions. However, SMB values are poorly known because of logistic constraints in extreme polar environments, and they represent one of the biggest challenges of Antarctic science. Snow accumulation is the most important parameter for the SMB of ice sheets. SMB varies on a number of scales, from small-scale features (sastrugi) to ice-sheet-scale SMB patterns determined mainly by temperature, elevation, distance from the coast, and wind-driven processes. In situ measurements of SMB are performed at single points by stakes, ultrasonic sounders, snow pits, and firn and ice cores and laterally by continuous measurements using ground-penetrating radar. SMB for large regions can only be achieved practically by using remote sensing and/or numerical climate modeling. However, these techniques rely on ground truthing to improve the resolution and accuracy. The separation of spatial and temporal variations of SMB in transient regimes is necessary for accurate interpretation of ice core records. In this review we provide an overview of the various measurement techniques, related difficulties, and limitations of data interpretation; describe spatial characteristics of East Antarctic SMB and issues related to the spatial and temporal representativity of measurements; and provide recommendations on how to perform in situ measurements.

  4. LLNL Small-Scale Friction sensitivity (BAM) Test

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, L.R.; Foltz, M.F.

    1996-06-01

    Small-scale safety testing of explosives, propellants and other energetic materials, is done to determine their sensitivity to various stimuli including friction, static spark, and impact. Testing is done to discover potential handling problems for either newly synthesized materials of unknown behavior, or materials that have been stored for long periods of time. This report describes the existing {open_quotes}BAM{close_quotes} Small-Scale Friction Test, and the methods used to determine the friction sensitivity pertinent to handling energetic materials. The accumulated data for the materials tested is not listed here - that information is in a database. Included is, however, a short list of (1) materials that had an unusual response, and (2), a few {open_quotes}standard{close_quotes} materials representing the range of typical responses usually seen.

  5. Electron Precipitation Associated with Small-Scale Auroral Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michell, R.; Samara, M.; Grubbs, G. A., II; Hampton, D. L.; Bonnell, J. W.; Ogasawara, K.

    2014-12-01

    We present results from the Ground-to-Rocket Electrons Electrodynamics Correlative Experiment (GREECE) sounding rocket mission, where we combined high-resolution ground-based auroral imaging with high time-resolution precipitating electron measurements. The GREECE payload successfully launched from Poker Flat, Alaska on 03 March 2014 and reached an apogee of approximately 335 km. The narrow field-of-view auroral imaging was taken from Venetie, AK, which is directly under apogee. This enabled the small-scale auroral features at the magnetic footpoint of the rocket payload to be imaged in detail. The electron precipitation was measured with the Acute Precipitating Electron Spectrometer (APES) onboard the payload. Features in the electron data are matched up with their corresponding auroral structures and boundaries, enabling measurement of the exact electron distributions responsible for the specific small-scale auroral features. These electron distributions will then be used to infer what the potential electron acceleration processes were.

  6. Leadership solves collective action problems in small-scale societies.

    PubMed

    Glowacki, Luke; von Rueden, Chris

    2015-12-01

    Observation of leadership in small-scale societies offers unique insights into the evolution of human collective action and the origins of sociopolitical complexity. Using behavioural data from the Tsimane forager-horticulturalists of Bolivia and Nyangatom nomadic pastoralists of Ethiopia, we evaluate the traits of leaders and the contexts in which leadership becomes more institutional. We find that leaders tend to have more capital, in the form of age-related knowledge, body size or social connections. These attributes can reduce the costs leaders incur and increase the efficacy of leadership. Leadership becomes more institutional in domains of collective action, such as resolution of intragroup conflict, where collective action failure threatens group integrity. Together these data support the hypothesis that leadership is an important means by which collective action problems are overcome in small-scale societies.

  7. Radar for small-scale land-use mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, F. M.

    1975-01-01

    Small-scale (1:250,000 and smaller) land-use maps are a major concern not only to geographers but also to national and regional planners. Unfortunately, such maps are usually out of date by the time they are printed. An interpretation key consisting of five physical and cultural characteristics of the environment evident on radar imagery is used to create land-use regions. Regions and borders interpreted from radar are compared with those found on two existing land-use maps created by traditional methods. Radar imagery can be used to create a small-scale land-use map with regions comparable to those found on existing land-use maps. However, the radar regions depict something more than land use and should be termed rural landscape regions.

  8. Statistical Evaluation of Small-scale Explosives Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guymon, Clint

    2013-06-01

    Small-scale explosives sensitivity testing is used to qualitatively and quantitatively evaluate risk. Both relative comparison and characterization of the transition from no reaction to reaction is used to estimate that risk. Statistical comparisons and use of statistically efficient methods are critical to accurately and efficiently make risk related decisions. Many public and private entities are not making accurate decisions based on the test data because of the lack of properly applying basic statistical principles. We present methods and examples showing how to use statistics to accurately and efficiently evaluate the risk for relative comparison and in-process risk evaluation. Some of the methods presented include the Significance Chart Method and adaptive step-size techniques like the Neyer D-Optimal method. These methods are compared to the more traditional approaches like Bruceton and Probit. Use of statistical methods can significantly improve the efficiency, accuracy, and applicability of small-scale explosives sensitivity testing.

  9. Response of Fish Communities to Various Environmental Variables across Multiple Spatial Scales

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Yong-Su; Li, Fengqing; Chung, Namil; Bae, Mi-Jung; Hwang, Soon-Jin; Byoen, Myeong-Seop; Park, Sang-Jung; Park, Young-Seuk

    2012-01-01

    A better understanding of the relative importance of different spatial scale determinants on fish communities will eventually increase the accuracy and precision of their bioassessments. Many studies have described the influence of environmental variables on fish communities on multiple spatial scales. However, there is very limited information available on this topic for the East Asian monsoon region, including Korea. In this study, we evaluated the relationship between fish communities and environmental variables at multiple spatial scales using self-organizing map (SOM), random forest, and theoretical path models. The SOM explored differences among fish communities, reflecting environmental gradients, such as a longitudinal gradient from upstream to downstream, and differences in land cover types and water quality. The random forest model for predicting fish community patterns that used all 14 environmental variables was more powerful than a model using any single variable or other combination of environmental variables, and the random forest model was effective at predicting the occurrence of species and evaluating the contribution of environmental variables to that prediction. The theoretical path model described the responses of different species to their environment at multiple spatial scales, showing the importance of altitude, forest, and water quality factors to fish assemblages. PMID:23202766

  10. On the Dynamics of Small-Scale Solar Magnetic Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, T. E.; Title, A. M.

    1996-01-01

    We report on the dynamics of the small-scale solar magnetic field, based on analysis of very high resolution images of the solar photosphere obtained at the Swedish Vacuum Solar Telescope. The data sets are movies from 1 to 4 hr in length, taken in several wavelength bands with a typical time between frames of 20 s. The primary method of tracking small-scale magnetic elements is with very high contrast images of photospheric bright points, taken through a 12 A bandpass filter centered at 4305 A in the Fraunhofer 'G band.' Previous studies have established that such bright points are unambiguously associated with sites of small-scale magnetic flux in the photosphere, although the details of the mechanism responsible for the brightening of the flux elements remain uncertain. The G band bright points move in the intergranular lanes at speeds from 0.5 to 5 km/s. The motions appear to be constrained to the intergranular lanes and are primarily driven by the evolution of the local granular convection flow field. Continual fragmentation and merging of flux is the fundamental evolutionary mode of small-scale magnetic structures in the solar photosphere. Rotation and folding of chains or groups of bright points are also observed. The timescale for magnetic flux evolution in active region plage is on the order of the correlation time of granulation (typically 6-8 minutes), but significant morphological changes can occur on timescales as short as 100 S. Smaller fragments are occasionally seen to fade beyond observable contrast. The concept of a stable, isolated subarcsecond magnetic 'flux tube' in the solar photosphere is inconsistent with the observations presented here.

  11. Financing of private small scale hydroelectric projects: a summary guide

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-05-01

    Small-scale hydroelectric (SSH) projects are increasingly being supported financially by private developers. Increases in fossil fuel prices, difficulties in the siting of large power plants, streamlining of the federal licensing process, changes in the marketing of power, and the extension of tax credits-all contribute to expectations of profitability in SSH projects. This document provides an overview of private financing for SSH projects.

  12. Legal factors affecting the financing of small scale hydroelectric projects

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, W.H.; Ringo, M.J.; Forgione, N.

    1983-09-01

    An introduction to the major business organizational options open to small-scale hydroelectric (SSH) projects is given. The major federal income tax treatments of these options are compared. Significant general federal income tax factors affecting SSH projects are reintroduced and explained. Some of the special federal income tax problem areas in SSH development are isolated. Tax benefit flow through or transfer mechanisms are discussed. Tax exempt financing opportunities for private SSH projects are reviewed. (MHR)

  13. Does small scale structure significantly affect cosmological dynamics?

    PubMed

    Adamek, Julian; Clarkson, Chris; Durrer, Ruth; Kunz, Martin

    2015-02-01

    The large-scale homogeneity and isotropy of the Universe is generally thought to imply a well-defined background cosmological model. It may not. Smoothing over structure adds in an extra contribution, transferring power from small scales up to large. Second-order perturbation theory implies that the effect is small, but suggests that formally the perturbation series may not converge. The amplitude of the effect is actually determined by the ratio of the Hubble scales at matter-radiation equality and today-which are entirely unrelated. This implies that a universe with significantly lower temperature today could have significant backreaction from more power on small scales, and so provides the ideal testing ground for understanding backreaction. We investigate this using two different N-body numerical simulations-a 3D Newtonian and a 1D simulation which includes all relevant relativistic effects. We show that while perturbation theory predicts an increasing backreaction as more initial small-scale power is added, in fact the virialization of structure saturates the backreaction effect at the same level independently of the equality scale. This implies that backreaction is a small effect independently of initial conditions. Nevertheless, it may still contribute at the percent level to certain cosmological observables and therefore it cannot be neglected in precision cosmology. PMID:25699430

  14. Does Small Scale Structure Significantly Affect Cosmological Dynamics?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamek, Julian; Clarkson, Chris; Durrer, Ruth; Kunz, Martin

    2015-02-01

    The large-scale homogeneity and isotropy of the Universe is generally thought to imply a well-defined background cosmological model. It may not. Smoothing over structure adds in an extra contribution, transferring power from small scales up to large. Second-order perturbation theory implies that the effect is small, but suggests that formally the perturbation series may not converge. The amplitude of the effect is actually determined by the ratio of the Hubble scales at matter-radiation equality and today—which are entirely unrelated. This implies that a universe with significantly lower temperature today could have significant backreaction from more power on small scales, and so provides the ideal testing ground for understanding backreaction. We investigate this using two different N -body numerical simulations—a 3D Newtonian and a 1D simulation which includes all relevant relativistic effects. We show that while perturbation theory predicts an increasing backreaction as more initial small-scale power is added, in fact the virialization of structure saturates the backreaction effect at the same level independently of the equality scale. This implies that backreaction is a small effect independently of initial conditions. Nevertheless, it may still contribute at the percent level to certain cosmological observables and therefore it cannot be neglected in precision cosmology.

  15. Dislocation dynamics simulations of plasticity at small scales

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Caizhi

    2010-01-01

    As metallic structures and devices are being created on a dimension comparable to the length scales of the underlying dislocation microstructures, the mechanical properties of them change drastically. Since such small structures are increasingly common in modern technologies, there is an emergent need to understand the critical roles of elasticity, plasticity, and fracture in small structures. Dislocation dynamics (DD) simulations, in which the dislocations are the simulated entities, offer a way to extend length scales beyond those of atomistic simulations and the results from DD simulations can be directly compared with the micromechanical tests. The primary objective of this research is to use 3-D DD simulations to study the plastic deformation of nano- and micro-scale materials and understand the correlation between dislocation motion, interactions and the mechanical response. Specifically, to identify what critical events (i.e., dislocation multiplication, cross-slip, storage, nucleation, junction and dipole formation, pinning etc.) determine the deformation response and how these change from bulk behavior as the system decreases in size and correlate and improve our current knowledge of bulk plasticity with the knowledge gained from the direct observations of small-scale plasticity. Our simulation results on single crystal micropillars and polycrystalline thin films can march the experiment results well and capture the essential features in small-scale plasticity. Furthermore, several simple and accurate models have been developed following our simulation results and can reasonably predict the plastic behavior of small scale materials.

  16. Extraction of Extended Small-Scale Objects in Digital Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, V. Y.

    2015-05-01

    Detection and localization problem of extended small-scale objects with different shapes appears in radio observation systems which use SAR, infra-red, lidar and television camera. Intensive non-stationary background is the main difficulty for processing. Other challenge is low quality of images, blobs, blurred boundaries; in addition SAR images suffer from a serious intrinsic speckle noise. Statistics of background is not normal, it has evident skewness and heavy tails in probability density, so it is hard to identify it. The problem of extraction small-scale objects is solved here on the basis of directional filtering, adaptive thresholding and morthological analysis. New kind of masks is used which are open-ended at one side so it is possible to extract ends of line segments with unknown length. An advanced method of dynamical adaptive threshold setting is investigated which is based on isolated fragments extraction after thresholding. Hierarchy of isolated fragments on binary image is proposed for the analysis of segmentation results. It includes small-scale objects with different shape, size and orientation. The method uses extraction of isolated fragments in binary image and counting points in these fragments. Number of points in extracted fragments is normalized to the total number of points for given threshold and is used as effectiveness of extraction for these fragments. New method for adaptive threshold setting and control maximises effectiveness of extraction. It has optimality properties for objects extraction in normal noise field and shows effective results for real SAR images.

  17. Comparison of spatial variability in visible and near-infrared spectral images

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chavez, P.S., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    The visible and near-infrared bands of the Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) and the Satellite Pour l'Observation de la Terre (SPOT) were analyzed to determine which band contained more spatial variability. It is important for applications that require spatial information, such as those dealing with mapping linear features and automatic image-to-image correlation, to know which spectral band image should be used. Statistical and visual analyses were used in the project. The amount of variance in an 11 by 11 pixel spatial filter and in the first difference at the six spacings of 1, 5, 11, 23, 47, and 95 pixels was computed for the visible and near-infrared bands. The results indicate that the near-infrared band has more spatial variability than the visible band, especially in images covering densely vegetated areas. -Author

  18. The cause of small scale disturbances in the lower ionosphere of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peter, Kerstin Susanne; Pätzold, Martin; González-Galindo, Francisco; Molina-Cuberos, Gregorio; Lillis, Robert J.; Dunn, Patrick A.; Witasse, Olivier; Tellmann, Silvia; Häusler, Bernd

    2016-10-01

    The radio-science experiment MaRS (Mars Express Radio Science) on the Mars Express spacecraft sounds the neutral atmosphere and ionosphere of Mars since 2004. Approximately 800 vertical profiles of the ionospheric electron density have been acquired until today. A subset of these MaRS dayside observations contains small scale disturbances in the lower part of the ionosphere. Those electron density profiles show unusual small scale features in the M1 altitude range which appear either merged with or completely detached from the M1 layer. Possible explanations for this additional ionospheric electron density may be ionospheric NO+, enhanced solar X-ray fluxes, solar energetic particle events (SEPs) or meteoroid influx. A 1D photo-chemical model of the Mars dayside ionosphere (IonA-2) is used to investigate the behavior of planetary NO+ in the lower dayside ionosphere. The influence of variable solar X-ray on the ionospheric electron density is estimated with IonA-2 and the influence of SEPs is discussed. A possible correlation between the meteoroid influx in the Mars atmosphere and the small scale disturbances is investigated based on a model of the ablation/chemical reactions of meteoroids with the atmosphere/ionosphere (MSDM) and on MAVEN IUVS magnesium ion observations.

  19. A small-scale plasmoid formed during the May 13, 1985, AMPTE magnetotail barium release

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, D. N.; Fritz, T. A.; Bernhardt, P. A.

    1989-01-01

    Plasmoids are closed magnetic-loop structures with entrained hot plasma which are inferred to occur on large spatial scales in space plasma systems. A model is proposed here to explain the brightening and rapid tailward movement of the barium cloud released by the AMPTE IRM spacecraft on May 13, 1985. The model suggests that a small-scale plasmoid was formed due to a predicted development of heavy-ion-induced tearing in the thinned near-tail plasma sheet. Thus, a plasmoid may actually have been imaged due to the emissions of the entrained plasma ions within the plasma bubble.

  20. Infrared astronomical satellite (IRAS) catalogs and atlases. Volume 7: The small scale structure catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helou, George (Editor); Walker, D. W. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    The Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) was launched January 26, 1983. During its 300-day mission, it surveyed over 96 pct of the celestial sphere at four infrared wavelengths, centered approximately at 12, 25, 60, and 100 microns. Volume 1 describes the instrument, the mission, and the data reduction process. Volumes 2 through 6 present the observations of the approximately 245,000 individual point sources detected by IRAS; each volume gives sources within a specified range of declination. Volume 7 gives the observations of the approximately 16,000 sources spatially resolved by IRAS and smaller than 8'. This is Volume 7, The Small Scale Structure Catalog.

  1. Estimating electric field enhancement factors on an aircraft utilizing a small scale model: A method evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Easterbrook, Calvin C.; Rudolph, Terence; Easterbrook, Kevin

    1988-01-01

    A method for obtaining field enhancement factors at specific points on an aircraft utilizing a small scale model was evaluated by measuring several canonical shapes. Comparison of the form factors obtained by analytical means with measurements indicate that the experimental method has serious flaws. Errors of 200 to 300 percent were found between analytical values and measured values. As a result of the study, the analytical method is not recommended for calibration of field meters located on aircraft, and should not be relied upon in any application where the local spatial derivatives of the electric field on the model are large over the dimensions of the sensing probe.

  2. Influence of spatial and temporal flow variability on solute transport in catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selroos, Jan-Olof; Destouni, Georgia

    2015-04-01

    The present study quantifies the separate and combined effects of spatial and temporal variability of waterborne solute transport through catchments. The questions addressed are whether, when and why different types of variability may dominate catchment-scale transport. We utilize a versatile numerical solute transport code with a particle-based Monte Carlo time domain random walk method to simulate waterborne transport through a generic catchment. The methodology is exemplified by performing simulations using data on spatiotemporal flow and transport variability from direct stream discharge observations and independently calculated advective solute travel time distributions for catchments within the water management district Northern Baltic Proper (NBP) in Mid-Eastern Sweden. A main conclusion of the study is that projections of catchment mass loading based on spatial variability alone are robust estimates of long-term average solute transport development. This is especially true when annually aggregated mass load rather than finer temporal resolution of mass flux is considered. Temporal variability yields short-term fluctuations around the long-term average solute breakthrough development, and earlier or later arrival than the latter, depending on the timing and duration of solute input relative to the temporal flow variability. The exact temporal characteristics of future solute breakthroughs are thus fundamentally uncertain but their statistical expectation may be well quantified by only spatial variability account.

  3. Small-scale fluctuations in barium drifts at high latitudes and associated Joule heating effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurd, L. D.; Larsen, M. F.

    2016-01-01

    Most previous estimates of Joule heating rates, especially the contribution of small-scale structure in the high-latitude ionosphere, have been based on incoherent scatter or coherent scatter radar measurements. An alternative estimate can be found from the plasma drifts obtained from ionized barium clouds released from sounding rockets. We have used barium drift data from three experiments to estimate Joule heating rates in the high-latitude E region for different magnetic activity levels. In particular, we are interested in the contribution of small-scale plasma drift fluctuations, corresponding to equivalent electric field fluctuations, to the local Joule heating rate on scales smaller than those typically resolved by radar or other measurements. Since Joule heating is a Lagrangian quantity, the inherently Lagrangian estimates provided by the chemical tracer measurements are a full description of the effects of electric field variance and neutral winds on the heating, differing from the Eulerian estimates of the type provided by ground-based measurements. Results suggest that the small-scale contributions to the heating can be more than a factor of 2 greater than the mean field contribution regardless of geomagnetic conditions, and at times the small-scale contribution is even larger. The high-resolution barium drift measurements, moreover, show that the fine structure in the electric field can be more variable than previous studies have reported for similar conditions. The neutral winds also affect the heating, altering the height-integrated Joule heating rates by as much as 12%, for the cases studied here, and modifying the height distribution of the heating profile as well.

  4. Spatial and temporal variability in growth of southern flounder (Paralichthys lethostigma)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Midway, Stephen R.; Wagner, Tyler; Arnott, Stephen A.; Biondo, Patrick; Martinez-Andrade, Fernando; Wadsworth, Thomas F.

    2015-01-01

    Delineation of stock structure is important for understanding the ecology and management of many fish populations, particularly those with wide-ranging distributions and high levels of harvest. Southern flounder (Paralichthys lethostigma) is a popular commercial and recreational species along the southeast Atlantic coast and Gulf of Mexico, USA. Recent studies have provided genetic and otolith morphology evidence that the Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic Ocean stocks differ. Using age and growth data from four states (Texas, Alabama, South Carolina, and North Carolina) we expanded upon the traditional von Bertalanffy model in order to compare growth rates of putative geographic stocks of southern flounder. We improved the model fitting process by adding a hierarchical Bayesian framework to allow each parameter to vary spatially or temporally as a random effect, as well as log transforming the three model parameters (L∞, K, andt0). Multiple comparisons of parameters showed that growth rates varied (even within states) for females, but less for males. Growth rates were also consistent through time, when long-term data were available. Since within-basin populations are thought to be genetically well-mixed, our results suggest that consistent small-scale environmental conditions (i.e., within estuaries) likely drive growth rates and should be considered when developing broader scale management plans.

  5. Interannual variability of the spatial distribution of sea ice in the north polar region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkinson, Claire L.

    1991-01-01

    The interannual variability of the monthly average spatial distributions of northern hemisphere sea ice was examined for the 1973-1987 period of the electrically scanning microwave radiometer on the Nimbus 5 satellite and the scanning multichannel microwave radiometer on the Nimbus 7 satellite passive microwave data record. Strong seasonal and spatial contrasts in the amount of interannual variability are mapped and identified. The maps and analyses provide a baseline against which future northern hemisphere sea ice distributions can be compared in the continuing attempt to analyze global climate and to determine whether or not significant climate change is occurring.

  6. The Use of Rainfall Forecasts as a Decision Guide for Small-Scale Farming in Limpopo Province, South Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moeletsi, M. E.; Mellaart, E. A. R.; Mpandeli, N. S.; Hamandawana, H.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: New innovative ways of communicating agrometeorological information are needed to help farmers, especially subsistence/small-scale farmers, to cope with the high climate variability experienced in most parts of southern Africa. Design/methodology/approach: The article introduces an early warning system for farmers. It utilizes short…

  7. Spatial Variability of the Flow and Turbulence Within a Model Canopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harman, Ian N.; Böhm, Margi; Finnigan, John J.; Hughes, Dale

    2016-09-01

    The spatial variability of the mean flow and turbulence in and above a model canopy is investigated using three-dimensional laser Doppler velocimetry. The mean flow and turbulence are shown to be highly variable in space within the canopy but rapidly converge above the canopy. The coherent variations in the mean flow generate dispersive fluxes contributing almost a fifth to the total flux of momentum, and a greater contribution to the divergence of the flux, within the canopy. The higher-order turbulent statistics are more variable than the mean flow and often strongly correlated in space to variations in the mean flow. The implications of this microscale spatial variability for both field experiments and other laboratory experiments into canopy flow are discussed.

  8. Small-scale expression of proteins in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Zerbs, Sarah; Giuliani, Sarah; Collart, Frank

    2014-01-01

    . Despite these advantages, many targets are unsuitable for expression in E. coli, and attempts will not yield protein that can be utilized in downstream applications. A thorough understanding of the protein target, the requirements of the final application, and available tools are all essential for planning a successful expression experiment. This protocol is designed to optimize expression and solubility using an E. coli host and expression vector with an IPTG-inducible T7 promoter. The general features of the method are easily extended to other organisms and expression systems. Small-scale expression cultures are used to identify the optimum expression parameters for a given target. Thorough analysis of the total cell content and soluble fraction is used to screen out failed targets and those unlikely to succeed in large-scale purification cultures. The protocol listed here can be used in individual tubes for a small number of targets or adapted for use in 48-well plates for high throughput applications (Abdullah et al., 2009). Using the same culture for initial expression analysis and solubility analysis reduces variability between expression trials and saves the time required to produce separate cultures.

  9. Small-scale expression of proteins in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Zerbs, Sarah; Giuliani, Sarah; Collart, Frank

    2014-01-01

    . Despite these advantages, many targets are unsuitable for expression in E. coli, and attempts will not yield protein that can be utilized in downstream applications. A thorough understanding of the protein target, the requirements of the final application, and available tools are all essential for planning a successful expression experiment. This protocol is designed to optimize expression and solubility using an E. coli host and expression vector with an IPTG-inducible T7 promoter. The general features of the method are easily extended to other organisms and expression systems. Small-scale expression cultures are used to identify the optimum expression parameters for a given target. Thorough analysis of the total cell content and soluble fraction is used to screen out failed targets and those unlikely to succeed in large-scale purification cultures. The protocol listed here can be used in individual tubes for a small number of targets or adapted for use in 48-well plates for high throughput applications (Abdullah et al., 2009). Using the same culture for initial expression analysis and solubility analysis reduces variability between expression trials and saves the time required to produce separate cultures. PMID:24423272

  10. Basal respiration - a proxy to understand spatial variability of soil CO2 emissions in urban regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasenev, Viacheslav; Stoorvogel, Jetse; Ananyeva, Nadezhda; Ivashchenko, Kristina; Vizirskaya, Marya; Valentini, Riccardo

    2015-04-01

    Soil respiration (Rs) is an important terrestrial CO2 efflux and received significant attention at different scale levels. However, the sampling density is limited and global Rs databases are biased towards natural ecosystems and towards north America and Europe. This limits our understanding of the spatial variability of Rs. The methodological constraints of direct Rs measurements in the field limit the number of observations. As an alternative approach to approximate the spatial variability of Rs, we used basal respiration (BR) as an indirect measurement. First, the direct Rs and indirect BR measurements were compared at a 10 km2 test area in Moscow city, which included adjacent forests, croplands and urban lawn plots. Rs was monitored by in situ chamber approach with an IR Li-820 gas analyzer at 50 points during the growing season (June-October 2013, 9 time repetitions per point). In the same area, 32 locations were sampled and BR was measured under controlled conditions. Rs was affected by anthropogenic disturbance with the highest values in urban lawns. BR was mainly controlled by soil organic carbon (SOC) with maximum rates in the forested area. Total variability reported by direct observations was 10% higher, than one for BR, although the spatial variability captured by both approaches was similar confirmed by significant correlation between variance coefficients (CV) of the values. This shows that BR is a relevant proxy to analyze the spatial variability of Rs. Subsequently, the sampling area was expanded to the Moscow region for which respiration was mapped using digital soil mapping techniques and BR as a proxy for Rs. Although the absolute levels of respiration remained uncertain, the spatial patterns of BR are likely to correspond well with Rs patterns. Land use largely determined the spatial heterogeneity of soil respiration. Most variation occurred in the urban areas. BR is a relevant and straightforward proxy to understand patterns of Rs especially

  11. Groundwater Variability Across Temporal and Spatial Scales in the Central and Northeastern U.S.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Bailing; Rodell, Matthew; Famiglietti, James S.

    2015-01-01

    Depth-to-water measurements from 181 monitoring wells in unconfined or semi-confined aquifers in nine regions of the central and northeastern U.S. were analyzed. Groundwater storage exhibited strong seasonal variations in all regions, with peaks in spring and lows in autumn, and its interannual variability was nearly unbounded, such that the impacts of droughts, floods, and excessive pumping could persist for many years. We found that the spatial variability of groundwater storage anomalies (deviations from the long term mean) increases as a power function of extent scale (square root of area). That relationship, which is linear on a log-log graph, is common to other hydrological variables but had never before been shown with groundwater data. We describe how the derived power function can be used to determine the number of wells needed to estimate regional mean groundwater storage anomalies with a desired level of accuracy, or to assess uncertainty in regional mean estimates from a set number of observations. We found that the spatial variability of groundwater storage anomalies within a region often increases with the absolute value of the regional mean anomaly, the opposite of the relationship between soil moisture spatial variability and mean. Recharge (drainage from the lowest model soil layer) simulated by the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) model was compatible with observed monthly groundwater storage anomalies and month-to-month changes in groundwater storage.

  12. Monitoring temporal and spatial variability in sandeel (Ammodytes hexapterus) abundance with pigeon guillemot (Cepphus columba) diets

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Litzow, M.A.; Piatt, J.F.; Abookire, A.A.; Prichard, A.K.; Robards, M.D.

    2000-01-01

    We evaluated pigeon guillemots (Cepphus columba) as monitors of nearshore fish abundance and community composition during 1995-1999 at Kachemak Bay, Alaska. We studied the composition of chick diets at 10 colonies and simultaneously measured fish abundance around colonies with beach seines and bottom trawls. Sandeels (Ammodytes hexapterus) formed the majority of the diet at one group of colonies. Temporal variability in sandeel abundance explained 74% of inter-annual variability in diet composition at these colonies and 93% of seasonal variability. Diets at other colonies were dominated by demersal fish. Among these colonies, 81% of the variability in the proportion of sandeels in diets was explained by spatial differences in sanded abundance. Pigeon guillemots exhibited a non-linear functional response to sandeel abundance in the area where these fish were most abundant. Temporal and spatial variability in demersal fish abundance was not consistently reflected in diets. Spatial differences in the proportion of different demersal fishes in the diet may have been driven by differences in guillemot prey preference. Prey specialization by individual pigeon guillemots was common, and may operate at the colony level. Inter-annual variability in sandeel abundance may have been tracked more accurately because the magnitude of change (11-fold) was greater than that of demersal fish (three-fold). (C) 2000 International Council for the Exploration of the Sea.

  13. Relative spatial soil geochemical variability along two transects across the United States and Canada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garrett, Robert G.

    2009-01-01

    The patterns of relative variability differ by transect and horizon. The N–S transect A-horizon soils show significant between-40-km scale variability for 29 elements, with only 4 elements (Ca, Mg, Pb and Sr) showing in excess of 50% of their variability at the within-40-km and ‘at-site’ scales. In contrast, the C-horizon data demonstrate significant between-40-km scale variability for 26 elements, with 21 having in excess of 50% of their variability at the within-40-km and ‘at-site’ scales. In 36 instances, the ‘at-site’ variability is statistically significant in terms of the sample preparation and analysis variability. It is postulated that this contrast between the A- and C- horizons along the N–S transect, that is dominated by agricultural land uses, is due to the local homogenization of Ap-horizon soils by tillage reducing the ‘at-site’ variability. The spatial variability is distributed similarly between scales for the A- and C-horizon soils of the E–W transect. For all elements, there is significant variability at the within-40-km scale. Notwithstanding this, there is significant between-40-km variability for 28 and 20 of the elements in the A- and C-horizon data, respectively. The differences between the two transects are attributed to (1) geology, the N–S transect runs generally parallel to regional strikes, whereas the E–W transect runs across regional structures and lithologies; and (2) land use, with agricultural tillage dominating along the N–S transect. The spatial analysis of the transect data indicates that continental-scale maps demonstrating statistically significant patterns of geochemical variability may be prepared for many elements from data on soil samples collected on a 40 x 40 km grid or similar sampling designs resulting in a sample density of 1 site per 1600 km2.

  14. Incorporating spatial variability into GIS to estimate nitrate leaching at the aquifer scale

    SciTech Connect

    Goerres, J.; Gold, A.J.

    1996-05-01

    We evaluated the effect of spatial variability of selected intrinsic soil properties and extrinsic management practices on the groundwater quality in the 330-ha recharge area of a high yield well site in Rhode Island. The analyses were performed at different support scales, ranging from point level to a support level equal to the entire recharge area. We used a mass balance model that relates leaching from the vadose zone to long-term estimates of NO{sub 3}-N concentration at the well. We used a GIS database and stratified sampling for both soil characterization and assessment of spatial variability of NO{sub 3} leaching. The LEACHA/N rootzone model was used in conjunction with Monte Carlo simulation to generate cumulative distribution functions (CDFs) for leaching from different land strata (given by combinations of soil type and land use). To simulate the spatial variability of properties that served as inputs to the root zone model, we used CDFs of spatial distributions of soil properties and CDFs of the spatial variability of fertilizer application rates within a field. These strata scale CDFs were then combined to generate CDFs of the NO{sub 3}-N concentrations at the well, i.e., at a recharge area support scale. Although considerable variability was found at a point support scale, the analyses generated a markedly lower variability at the recharge area support scale. The results suggest that GIS data bases generated at scales available to resource managers (i.e., 1:12 000 and 1:24 000) may be well suited to manage the water quality of large production scale wells. 31 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Influence of model resolution on spatial and temporal variability of clouds and precipitation over Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthlott, Christian; Hoose, Corinna

    2014-05-01

    To improve our understanding of cloud and precipitation processes and their implication for climate prediction, the research initiative High Definition Clouds and Precipitation (HDCP^2) has been started. Besides the development of a new model system capable of very high-resolution simulations over domains of 1000 km, a fundamental part of the project was a large measurement campaign near Jülich in western Germany which was conducted in spring 2013. These measurements enable a critical model evaluation at the scale of the model simulations and provide information on sub grid variability and microphysical properties that are subject to parameterizations. In order to explore the resolution dependence of clouds and precipitation in that area, numerical simulations with the Consortium for small-scale modeling (COSMO) model were conducted with horizontal grid spacings of 2.8 km, 1 km, 500 m, and 250 m. To analyze different synoptic conditions, simulations were performed for six intensive observation periods of the measurement campaign. It is found that although the representation of a number of processes is enhanced with resolution (e.g. boundary-layer thermals, convergence zones, gravity waves), their influence on the daily precipitation amount is rather weak. Probability density functions of convection- and cloud-relevant parameters are analyzed to investigate their dependence on model resolution and their impact on cloud formation and subsequent precipitation. Furthermore, first comparisons with radar-derived precipitation are shown.

  16. Small-scale Rainfall Challenges Tested with Semi-distributed and Distributed Hydrological Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichiba, Abdellah; Tchiguirinskaia, Ioulia; Gires, Auguste; Schertzer, Daniel; Bompard, Philippe

    2016-04-01

    Nowadays, there is a growing interest on small-scale rainfall information, provided by weather radars, to be used in urban water management and decision-making. Indeed, it helps to better understand the essential interactions between natural and man-made urban environments, both being complex systems. However the integration of this information in hydrological models remains a big challenge. In fact, urban water managers often rely on lumped or semi-distributed models with much coarser data resolution. The scope of this work is to investigate the sensitivity of two hydrological models to small-scale rainfall, and their potential improvements to integrate wholly the small-scale information. The case study selected to perform this study is a small urban catchment (245 ha), located at Val-de-Marne county (southeast of Paris, France). Investigations were conducted using either CANOE model, a semi-distributed conceptual model that is widely used in France for urban modeling, or a fully distributed and physically based model, Multi-Hydro, developed at Ecole des Ponts ParisTech (www hmco-dev.enpc.fr/Tools-Training/Tools/Multi-Hydro.php). Initially, in CANOE model the catchment was divided into 9 sub-catchments with size ranging from 1ha to 76ha. A refinement process was conduced in the framework of this investigation in order to improve the model resolution by considering higher number of smaller sub-catchments. The new configuration consists of 44 sub-catchments with size ranging from 1ha-14ha. The Multi-Hydro modeling approach consists on rasterizing the catchment information to a regular spatial grid of a resolution chosen by the user. Each pixel is then affected by specific information, e.g., a unique land type per pixel, for which hydrological and physical properties are set. First of all, both models were validated with respect to real flow measurements using three types of rainfall data: (1) point measurement data coming form the Sucy-en-Brie rain gauge; (2) Meteo

  17. Multi-hole pressure probes to air data system for subsonic small-scale air vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevchenko, A. M.; Berezin, D. R.; Puzirev, L. N.; Tarasov, A. Z.; Kharitonov, A. M.; Shmakov, A. S.

    2016-10-01

    A brief review of research performed to develop multi-hole probes to measure of aerodynamic angles, dynamic head, and static pressure of a flying vehicle. The basis of these works is the application a well-known classical multi-hole pressure probe technique of measuring of a 3D flow to use in the air data system. Two multi-hole pressure probes with spherical and hemispherical head to air-data system for subsonic small-scale vehicles have been developed. A simple analytical probe model with separation of variables is proposed. The probes were calibrated in the wind tunnel, one of them is in-flight tested.

  18. Spatial variability of shelf sediments in the STRATAFORM natural laboratory, Northern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goff, J.A.; Wheatcroft, R.A.; Lee, H.; Drake, D.E.; Swift, D.J.P.; Fan, S.

    2002-01-01

    -based porosity measurements are only marginally correlated to gamma-ray-bulk density measurements, and are largely independent of mean grain size. Furthermore, porosity displays a high degree of incoherent variability at both sites. Porosity, with a much smaller sample volume than bulk density, may therefore resolve small-scale biogenic variability which is filtered out in the bulk density measurement. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Examples of backreaction of small-scale inhomogeneities in cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Stephen R.; Wald, Robert M.

    2013-06-01

    In previous work, we introduced a new framework to treat large-scale backreaction effects due to small-scale inhomogeneities in general relativity. We considered one-parameter families of spacetimes for which such backreaction effects can occur, and we proved that, provided the weak energy condition on matter is satisfied, the leading effect of small-scale inhomogeneities on large-scale dynamics is to produce a traceless effective stress-energy tensor that itself satisfies the weak energy condition. In this work, we illustrate the nature of our framework by providing two explicit examples of one-parameter families with backreaction. The first, based on previous work of Berger, is a family of polarized vacuum Gowdy spacetimes on a torus, which satisfies all of the assumptions of our framework. As the parameter approaches its limiting value, the metric uniformly approaches a smooth background metric, but spacetime derivatives of the deviation of the metric from the background metric do not converge uniformly to zero. The limiting metric has nontrivial backreaction from the small-scale inhomogeneities, with an effective stress energy that is traceless and satisfies the weak energy condition, in accord with our theorems. Our second one-parameter family consists of metrics which have a uniform Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker limit. This family satisfies all of our assumptions with the exception of the weak energy condition for matter. In this case, the limiting metric has an effective stress-energy tensor which is not traceless. We emphasize the importance of imposing energy conditions on matter in studies of backreaction.

  20. Small-scale Conformity of the Virgo Cluster Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hye-Ran; Lee, Joon Hyeop; Jeong, Hyunjin; Park, Byeong-Gon

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the small-scale conformity in color between bright galaxies and their faint companions in the Virgo Cluster. Cluster member galaxies are spectroscopically determined using the Extended Virgo Cluster Catalog and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 12. We find that the luminosity-weighted mean color of faint galaxies depends on the color of adjacent bright galaxy as well as on the cluster-scale environment (gravitational potential index). From this result for the entire area of the Virgo Cluster, it is not distinguishable whether the small-scale conformity is genuine or if it is artificially produced due to cluster-scale variation of galaxy color. To disentangle this degeneracy, we divide the Virgo Cluster area into three sub-areas so that the cluster-scale environmental dependence is minimized: A1 (central), A2 (intermediate), and A3 (outermost). We find conformity in color between bright galaxies and their faint companions (color-color slope significance S ˜ 2.73σ and correlation coefficient {cc}˜ 0.50) in A2, where the cluster-scale environmental dependence is almost negligible. On the other hand, the conformity is not significant or very marginal (S ˜ 1.75σ and {cc}˜ 0.27) in A1. The conformity is not significant either in A3 (S ˜ 1.59σ and {cc}˜ 0.44), but the sample size is too small in this area. These results are consistent with a scenario in which the small-scale conformity in a cluster is a vestige of infallen groups and these groups lose conformity as they come closer to the cluster center.

  1. Small-scale Conformity of the Virgo Cluster Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hye-Ran; Lee, Joon Hyeop; Jeong, Hyunjin; Park, Byeong-Gon

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the small-scale conformity in color between bright galaxies and their faint companions in the Virgo Cluster. Cluster member galaxies are spectroscopically determined using the Extended Virgo Cluster Catalog and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 12. We find that the luminosity-weighted mean color of faint galaxies depends on the color of adjacent bright galaxy as well as on the cluster-scale environment (gravitational potential index). From this result for the entire area of the Virgo Cluster, it is not distinguishable whether the small-scale conformity is genuine or if it is artificially produced due to cluster-scale variation of galaxy color. To disentangle this degeneracy, we divide the Virgo Cluster area into three sub-areas so that the cluster-scale environmental dependence is minimized: A1 (central), A2 (intermediate), and A3 (outermost). We find conformity in color between bright galaxies and their faint companions (color–color slope significance S ˜ 2.73σ and correlation coefficient {cc}˜ 0.50) in A2, where the cluster-scale environmental dependence is almost negligible. On the other hand, the conformity is not significant or very marginal (S ˜ 1.75σ and {cc}˜ 0.27) in A1. The conformity is not significant either in A3 (S ˜ 1.59σ and {cc}˜ 0.44), but the sample size is too small in this area. These results are consistent with a scenario in which the small-scale conformity in a cluster is a vestige of infallen groups and these groups lose conformity as they come closer to the cluster center.

  2. Small-Scale Chamber Test for Internal Blast Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Richard; Felts, Joshua

    2013-06-01

    The data reported here provides a validation of the use of a small-scale internal-blast test to predict the energy release of explosives in larger scale. The small-scale arrangement consisted of a 2-g booster and 10-g sample mounted in a holder attached at one end of a closed chamber. The internal volume of the chamber was 89 liters not including the charge holder. The design of the charge holder served two purposes. One was to provide confinement around the charge to avoid degradation of performance from explosives with critical diameters larger than that of the sample. The second was to provide a separate space from that of the chamber that retained the fragments from the confinement to minimize the absorption of heat from the products. The energy release was determined from measurements of the peak quasi-static overpressure and the ideal gas law. The results from six different explosives were compared to larger scale tests involving a bombproof chamber (180,000 liters) with bare charges between 1 and 16 kg. The energy release between small and large scale compared favorably with regard to relative ranking of each explosive. The energy release measured in the small chamber was lower than the large chamber analogs, possibly due to heat losses to the holder. Despite these differences, the small-scale chamber test appears to provide a ranking of explosives based on their energy release that correlates with larger scale tests. Hence, this test is a viable tool for optimizing compositional variations for internal blast performance in target scenarios of similar form factor.

  3. Spatial variability in floodplain resistance to erosion on a large meandering, mixed bedrock-alluvial river

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Spatial heterogeneities of the erosion-resistance properties of the channel banks and floodplains, such as grain size characteristics and the presence of vegetation and bedrock, can have a substantial influence on river morphodynamics, resulting in complex planform geometries and highly variable rat...

  4. A preliminary characterization of the spatial variability of precipitation at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Hevesi, J.A.; Flint, A.L.; Ambos, D.S.

    1994-12-31

    Isohyetal maps of precipitation and numerical models for simulating precipitation are needed to characterize natural infiltration at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The objective of this study was to characterize the spatial variability of precipitation within the domain of the natural catchments overlying the potential repository, and to define preliminary geostatistical models based on differences in storm type for the numerical simulation of precipitation.

  5. [Factors influencing the spatial variability in soil respiration under different land use regimes].

    PubMed

    Chen, Shu-Tao; Liu, Qiao-Hui; Hu, Zheng-Hua; Liu, Yan; Ren, Jing-Quan; Xie, Wei

    2013-03-01

    In order to investigate the factors influencing the spatial variability in soil respiration under different land use regimes, field experiments were performed. Soil respiration and relevant environment, vegetation and soil factors were measured. The spatial variability in soil respiration and the relationship between soil respiration and these measured factors were investigated. Results indicated that land use regimes had significant effects on soil respiration. Soil respiration varied significantly (P < 0.001) among different land use regimes. Soil respiration rates ranged from 1.82 to 7.46 micromol x (m2 x s)(-1), with a difference of 5.62 micromol x (m2 x s)(-1) between the highest and lowest respiration rates. Soil organic carbon was a key factor controlling the spatial variability in soil respiration. In all, ecosystems studied, the relationship between soil respiration and soil organic carbon content can be described by a power function. Soil respiration increased with the increase of soil organic carbon. In forest ecosystem, the relationship between soil respiration and diameter at breast height (DBH) of trees can be explained by a natural logarithmic function. A model composed of soil organic carbon (C, %), available phosphorous (AP, g x kg(-1)) and diameter at breast height (DBH, cm) explained 92.8% spatial variability in soil respiration for forest ecosystems. PMID:23745410

  6. Pulling back the soil spatial variability caused by long-term cultivation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Long-term intensive tillage has resulted in high spatial variability in soils throughout the Prairie Pothole Region. Crop yields in these eroded landscapes vary with soil properties. A 6-year study was conducted to determine the feasibility of rehabilitating eroded land by moving topsoil from areas ...

  7. Passive Sampling to Capture the Spatial Variability of Coarse Particles by Composition in Cleveland, OH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Passive samplers deployed at 25 sites for three week-long intervals were used to characterize spatial variability in the mass and composition of coarse particulate matter (PM10-2.5) in Cleveland, OH in summer 2008. The size and composition of individual particles deter...

  8. Overview of the Testing of a Small-Scale Proprotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Larry A.; Yamauchi, Gloria K.; Booth, Earl R., Jr.; Botha, Gavin; Dawson, Seth

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of results from the wind tunnel test of a 1/4-scale V-22 proprotor in the Duits-Nederlandse Windtunnel (DNW) in The Netherlands. The small-scale proprotor was tested on the isolated rotor configuration of the Tilt Rotor Aeroacoustic Model (TRAM). The test was conducted by a joint team from NASA Ames, NASA Langley, U.S. Army Aeroflightdynamics Directorate, and The Boeing Company. The objective of the test was to acquire a benchmark database for validating aeroacoustic analyses. Representative examples of airloads, acoustics, structural loads, and performance data are provided and discussed.

  9. Classification of wetlands vegetation using small scale color infrared imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williamson, F. S. L.

    1975-01-01

    A classification system for Chesapeake Bay wetlands was derived from the correlation of film density classes and actual vegetation classes. The data processing programs used were developed by the Laboratory for the Applications of Remote Sensing. These programs were tested for their value in classifying natural vegetation, using digitized data from small scale aerial photography. Existing imagery and the vegetation map of Farm Creek Marsh were used to determine the optimal number of classes, and to aid in determining if the computer maps were a believable product.

  10. A small scale biomass fueled gas turbine engine

    SciTech Connect

    Craig, J.D.; Purvis, C.R.

    1999-01-01

    A new generation of small scale (less than 20 MWd) biomass fueled, power plants are being developed based on a gas turbine (Brayton cycle) prime mover. These power plants are expected to increase the efficiency and lower the cost of generating power from fuels such as wood. The new power plants are also expected to economically utilize annual plant growth materials (such as rice hulls, cotton gin trash, nut shells, and various straws, grasses, and animal manures) that are not normally considered as fuel for power plants. This paper summarizes the new power generation concept with emphasis on the engineering challenges presented by the gas turbine component.

  11. Mapping human dimensions of small-scale fisheries in the Northern Gulf of California, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno-Baez, Marcia

    Recurrent crises due to overexploitation of fishery resources have been among the biggest natural resource management failures of the 20th century. This problem has both biological and socio-political elements and understanding of human dimensions represents a key step toward the formulation of sound management guidelines for natural resources. One of the strategies proposed to understand human dimensions is through the use of local knowledge. Integrating local peoples' knowledge with scientific research and data analysis, could aid in the design of fisheries management strategies in a cost-effective and participatory way. I introduce an approach to incorporating fishers' local knowledge at a large, regional scale. I focused on the spatial and temporal distribution of fishing activities from 17 communities in the Northern Gulf of California, Mexico. Participatory mapping (maps produced by local fishers) through a rapid appraisal (survey methodology) were used to identify the spatial and temporal dimensions of fishing activities. A geographic information system was used to generate 764 map layers used for a preliminary analysis of rapid-appraisal spatial data. Post-survey workshops with fishers were organized to facilitate an internal validation of spatial information using geographic information system software. We characterized the information based on fishing communities, fishing methods, target species and spawning sites. We also applied spatial analysis techniques to understand the relative importance and use of fishing grounds, fishing seasons and the influence that fishing communities have over the region. This dissertation addressed the problem of integrating the human dimensions of small-scale fisheries using geospatial tools and local knowledge (LK) -- data collection, integration, internal validation, analysis and access -- into a multidisciplinary research to support decision making in natural resource planning for small-scale fisheries management and

  12. Extreme spatial variability in marine picoplankton and its consequences for interpreting Eulerian time-series

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Adrian P; Zubkov, Mikhail V; Burkill, Peter H; Holland, Ross J

    2005-01-01

    A high-resolution mesoscale spatial survey of picoplankton in the Celtic Sea, using flow cytometry, reveals cell concentrations of Synechococcus spp. cyanobacteria and heterotrophic bacteria that vary up to 50-fold over distances as short as 12 km. Furthermore, the range of abundances is comparable to that typically found on seasonal scales at a single location. Advection of such spatial variability through a time-series site would therefore constitute a major source of ‘error’. Consequently, attempts to model and to investigate the ecology of these globally important organisms in situ must take into account and quantify the hitherto ignored local spatial variability as a matter of necessity. PMID:17148208

  13. Small-scale-structure of the interstellar medium probed through diffuse band observations.

    PubMed

    Cordiner, Martin A; Fossey, Stephen J; Smith, Arfon M; Sarre, Peter J

    2006-01-01

    The carriers of the diffuse interstellar band spectrum represent an important baryonic component of the interstellar medium (ISM) and it is expected that their identification will contribute significantly to the understanding of the chemistry and physics of interstellar clouds. It is widely held that the carriers are linked to the presence of dust grains on account of the good correlation of their strengths with interstellar reddening, so they offer an important potential route to improving our understanding of the composition and chemistry of grains and grain surfaces. In addition to the challenge of making the spectral assignments, an important current question concerns the spatial distribution and physical state of interstellar material, with recent observational atomic and molecular line absorption studies suggesting that diffuse clouds are more 'clumpy' than previously thought. We describe here high signal-to-noise optical observations made at the Anglo-Australian Telescope using UCLES that were undertaken to investigate the spatial distribution of diffuse band carriers. We describe the first detection of 'small-scale-structure' in the diffuse band carrier distribution in the ISM, and comment on the possibilities that these data hold for contributing to the solution of the diffuse band problem and our understanding of the nature of small-scale-structure in the diffuse ISM.

  14. Assessing NO2 variability over urban areas at high spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silverman, M. L.; Szykman, J.; Knepp, T. N.; Chen, G.; Crawford, J. H.; Janz, S. J.; Kowalewski, M. G.; Fishman, J.

    2013-12-01

    Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) is a short-lived species within the troposphere, contributing to the production of ozone and aerosols. It is concentrated in urban and industrial areas where an abundance of point and mobile sources exist. Due to its short lifetime, it is difficult to capture the variability of NO2 and represent it within atmospheric chemistry transport models. Understanding this variability is important for emission controls, health impacts, and photochemistry. This analysis uses in situ aircraft measurements collected during ARCTAS-CARB, ICARTT, TexAQS-2000, TexAQS-2006, and DISCOVER-AQ as well as high spatial resolution column measurements of NO2 from the NASA GSFC Airborne Compact Atmospheric Mapper (ACAM) instrument collected during the first DISCOVER-AQ deployment, to assess the variability over urban areas. First order structure functions are used to generate statistics over a range of spatial scales. Column density is calculated from the DISCOVER-AQ profiles to assess the variability of a column within the aircraft profile. Results show that spatial variability depends on the airmass being sampled, polluted versus background conditions.

  15. Using Mobile Monitoring to Assess Spatial Variability in Urban Air Pollution Levels: Opportunities and Challenges (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, T.

    2010-12-01

    Measuring air pollution concentrations from a moving platform is not a new idea. Historically, however, most information on the spatial variability of air pollutants have been derived from fixed site networks operating simultaneously over space. While this approach has obvious advantages from a regulatory perspective, with the increasing need to understand ever finer scales of spatial variability in urban pollution levels, the use of mobile monitoring to supplement fixed site networks has received increasing attention. Here we present examples of the use of this approach: 1) to assess existing fixed-site fine particle networks in Seattle, WA, including the establishment of new fixed-site monitoring locations; 2) to assess the effectiveness of a regulatory intervention, a wood stove burning ban, on the reduction of fine particle levels in the greater Puget Sound region; and 3) to assess spatial variability of both wood smoke and mobile source impacts in both Vancouver, B.C. and Tacoma, WA. Deducing spatial information from the inherently spatio-temporal measurements taken from a mobile platform is an area that deserves further attention. We discuss the use of “fuzzy” points to address the fine-scale spatio-temporal variability in the concentration of mobile source pollutants, specifically to deduce the broader distribution and sources of fine particle soot in the summer in Vancouver, B.C. We also discuss the use of principal component analysis to assess the spatial variability in multivariate, source-related features deduced from simultaneous measurements of light scattering, light absorption and particle-bound PAHs in Tacoma, WA. With increasing miniaturization and decreasing power requirements of air monitoring instruments, the number of simultaneous measurements that can easily be made from a mobile platform is rapidly increasing. Hopefully the methods used to design mobile monitoring experiments for differing purposes, and the methods used to interpret those

  16. A Generalized Subsurface Flow Parameterization Considering Subgrid Spatial Variability of Recharge and Topography

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Maoyi; Liang, Xu; Leung, Lai R.

    2008-12-05

    Subsurface flow is an important hydrologic process and a key component of the water budget, especially in humid regions. In this study, a new subsurface flow formulation is developed that incorporates spatial variability of both topography and recharge. It is shown through theoretical derivation and case studies that the power law and exponential subsurface flow parameterizations and the parameterization proposed by Woods et al.[1997] are all special cases of the new formulation. The subsurface flows calculated using the new formulation compare well with values derived from observations at the Tulpehocken Creek and Walnut Creek watersheds. Sensitivity studies show that when the spatial variability of topography or recharge, or both is increased, the subsurface flows increase at the two aforementioned sites and the Maimai hillslope. This is likely due to enhancement of interactions between the groundwater table and the land surface that reduce the flow path. An important conclusion of this study is that the spatial variability of recharge alone, and/or in combination with the spatial variability of topography can substantially alter the behaviors of subsurface flows. This suggests that in macroscale hydrologic models or land surface models, subgrid variations of recharge and topography can make significant contributions to the grid mean subsurface flow and must be accounted for in regions with large surface heterogeneity. This is particularly true for regions with humid climate and relatively shallow groundwater table where the combined impacts of spatial variability of recharge and topography are shown to be more important. For regions with arid climate and relatively deep groundwater table, simpler formulations, especially the power law, for subsurface flow can work well, and the impacts of subgrid variations of recharge and topography may be ignored.

  17. Effects of Spatial Variability of Soil Properties on the Triggering of Rainfall-Induced Shallow Landslides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Linfeng; Lehmann, Peter; Or, Dani

    2015-04-01

    Naturally-occurring spatial variations in soil properties (e.g., soil depth, moisture, and texture) affect key hydrological processes and potentially the mechanical response of soil to hydromechanical loading (relative to the commonly-assumed uniform soil mantle). We quantified the effects of soil spatial variability on the triggering of rainfall-induced shallow landslides at the hillslope- and catchment-scales, using a physically-based landslide triggering model that considers interacting soil columns with mechanical strength thresholds (represented by the Fiber Bundle Model). The spatial variations in soil properties are represented as Gaussian random distributions and the level of variation is characterized by the coefficient of variation and correlation lengths of soil properties (i.e., soil depth, soil texture and initial water content in this study). The impacts of these spatial variations on landslide triggering characteristics were measured by comparing the times to triggering and landslide volumes for heterogeneous soil properties and homogeneous cases. Results at hillslope scale indicate that for spatial variations of an individual property (without cross correlation), the increasing of coefficient of variation introduces weak spots where mechanical damage is accelerated and leads to earlier onset of landslide triggering and smaller volumes. Increasing spatial correlation length of soil texture and initial water content also induces early landslide triggering and small released volumes due to the transition of failure mode from brittle to ductile failure. In contrast, increasing spatial correlation length of soil depth "reduces" local steepness and postpones landslide triggering. Cross-correlated soil properties generally promote landslide initiation, but depending on the internal structure of spatial distribution of each soil property, landslide triggering may be reduced. The effects of cross-correlation between initial water content and soil texture

  18. Geostatistical Analysis of Spatial Variability of Mineral Abundance and Kd in Frenchman Flat, NTS, Alluvium

    SciTech Connect

    Carle, S F; Zavarin, M; Pawloski, G A

    2002-11-01

    LLNL hydrologic source term modeling at the Cambric site (Pawloski et al., 2000) showed that retardation of radionuclide transport is sensitive to the distribution and amount of radionuclide sorbing minerals. While all mineralogic information available near the Cambric site was used in these early simulations (11 mineral abundance analyses from UE-5n and 9 from RNM-l), these older data sets were qualitative in nature, with detection limits too high to accurately measure many of the important radionuclide sorbing minerals (e.g. iron oxide). Also, the sparse nature of the mineral abundance data permitted only a hypothetical description of the spatial distribution of radionuclide sorbing minerals. Yet, the modeling results predicted that the spatial distribution of sorbing minerals would strongly affect radionuclide transport. Clearly, additional data are needed to improve understanding of mineral abundances and their spatial distributions if model predictions in Frenchman Flat are to be defensible. This report evaluates new high-resolution quantitative X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) data on mineral distributions and their abundances from core samples recently collected from drill hole ER-5-4. The total of 94 samples from ER-5-4 were collected at various spacings to enable evaluation of spatial variability at a variety of spatial scales as small as 0.3 meters and up to hundreds of meters. Additional XRD analyses obtained from drillholes UE-Sn, ER-5-3, and U-11g-1 are used to augment evaluation of vertical spatial variability and permit some evaluation of lateral spatial variability. A total of 163 samples are evaluated. The overall goal of this study is to understand and characterize the spatial variation of sorbing minerals in Frenchman Flat alluvium using geostatistical techniques, with consideration for the potential impact on reactive transport of radionuclides. To achieve this goal requires an effort to ensure that plausible geostatistical models are used to

  19. Contribution of geodiversity, climate and spatial variables for biodiversity across a gradient of human influence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tukiainen, Helena; Alahuhta, Janne; Ala-Hulkko, Terhi; Field, Richard; Lampinen, Raino; Hjort, Jan

    2016-04-01

    Implementation of geodiversity may provide new perspectives for nature conservation. The relation between geodiversity and biodiversity has been established in recent studies but remains underexplored in environments with high human pressure. In this study, we explored the effect of geodiversity (i.e. geological, hydrological and geomorphological diversity), climate and spatial variables on biodiversity (vascular plant species richness) in environments with different human impact. The study area ranged trough the boreal vegetation zone in Finland and included altogether 1401 1-km2 grid cells from urban, rural and natural environments. The contribution of environmental variable groups for species diversity in different environments was statistically analyzed with variation partitioning method. According to the results, the contribution of geodiversity decreased and the contribution of climate and spatial variables increased as the land use became more human-induced. Hence, the connection between geodiversity and species richness was most pronounced in natural state environments.

  20. Spatial variability in bank resistance to erosion on a large meandering, mixed bedrock-alluvial river

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konsoer, Kory M.; Rhoads, Bruce L.; Langendoen, Eddy J.; Best, James L.; Ursic, Mick E.; Abad, Jorge D.; Garcia, Marcelo H.

    2016-01-01

    Spatial heterogeneity in the erosion-resistance properties of the channel banks and floodplains associated with sediment characteristics, vegetation, or bedrock can have a substantial influence on the morphodynamics of meandering rivers, resulting in highly variable rates of bank erosion and complex patterns of planform evolution. Although past studies have examined the spatial variability in bank erodibility within small rivers, this aspect of the erosion-resistance properties for large rivers remains poorly understood. Furthermore, with the exception of recent numerical modeling that incorporates stochastic variability of floodplain erosional resistance, most models of meandering river dynamics have assumed uniform erodibility of the bank and floodplain materials. The present paper investigates the lateral and vertical heterogeneity in bank material properties and riparian vegetation within two elongate meander loops on a large mixed bedrock-alluvial river using several geotechnical field and laboratory methods. Additionally, the bank stability and toe-erosion numerical model (BSTEM) and repeat terrestrial LiDAR surveys are used to evaluate the capacity of the bank material properties to modify the rates and mechanisms of bank retreat. Results show that the textural properties of the bank materials, soil cohesion, and critical shear stress necessary for sediment entrainment differ substantially between the two bends and are also highly variable within each bend - laterally and vertically. Trees growing along the banks increase the resistance to erosion by contributing to the shear strength of the bank materials and are capable of increasing bank stability along a large river. Locally outcropping bedrock also influences bank erodibility in both bends. The results of this study demonstrate that spatial variability in the erosion-resistance properties of the channel banks is an important factor contributing to spatial variability in the rates and mechanisms of bank

  1. Mesoscale spatial variability of selected aquatic invertebrate community metrics from a minimally impaired stream segment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gebler, J.B.

    2004-01-01

    The related topics of spatial variability of aquatic invertebrate community metrics, implications of spatial patterns of metric values to distributions of aquatic invertebrate communities, and ramifications of natural variability to the detection of human perturbations were investigated. Four metrics commonly used for stream assessment were computed for 9 stream reaches within a fairly homogeneous, minimally impaired stream segment of the San Pedro River, Arizona. Metric variability was assessed for differing sampling scenarios using simple permutation procedures. Spatial patterns of metric values suggest that aquatic invertebrate communities are patchily distributed on subsegment and segment scales, which causes metric variability. Wide ranges of metric values resulted in wide ranges of metric coefficients of variation (CVs) and minimum detectable differences (MDDs), and both CVs and MDDs often increased as sample size (number of reaches) increased, suggesting that any particular set of sampling reaches could yield misleading estimates of population parameters and effects that can be detected. Mean metric variabilities were substantial, with the result that only fairly large differences in metrics would be declared significant at ?? = 0.05 and ?? = 0.20. The number of reaches required to obtain MDDs of 10% and 20% varied with significance level and power, and differed for different metrics, but were generally large, ranging into tens and hundreds of reaches. Study results suggest that metric values from one or a small number of stream reach(es) may not be adequate to represent a stream segment, depending on effect sizes of interest, and that larger sample sizes are necessary to obtain reasonable estimates of metrics and sample statistics. For bioassessment to progress, spatial variability may need to be investigated in many systems and should be considered when designing studies and interpreting data.

  2. Atmospheric dispersion modelling over complex terrain at small scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nosek, S.; Janour, Z.; Kukacka, L.; Jurcakova, K.; Kellnerova, R.; Gulikova, E.

    2014-03-01

    Previous study concerned of qualitative modelling neutrally stratified flow over open-cut coal mine and important surrounding topography at meso-scale (1:9000) revealed an important area for quantitative modelling of atmospheric dispersion at small-scale (1:3300). The selected area includes a necessary part of the coal mine topography with respect to its future expansion and surrounding populated areas. At this small-scale simultaneous measurement of velocity components and concentrations in specified points of vertical and horizontal planes were performed by two-dimensional Laser Doppler Anemometry (LDA) and Fast-Response Flame Ionization Detector (FFID), respectively. The impact of the complex terrain on passive pollutant dispersion with respect to the prevailing wind direction was observed and the prediction of the air quality at populated areas is discussed. The measured data will be used for comparison with another model taking into account the future coal mine transformation. Thus, the impact of coal mine transformation on pollutant dispersion can be observed.

  3. Preliminary Scaling Estimate for Select Small Scale Mixing Demonstration Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, Beric E.; Fort, James A.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Rector, David R.; Schonewill, Philip P.

    2013-09-12

    The Hanford Site double-shell tank (DST) system provides the staging location for waste that will be transferred to the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Specific WTP acceptance criteria for waste feed delivery describe the physical and chemical characteristics of the waste that must be met before the waste is transferred from the DSTs to the WTP. One of the more challenging requirements relates to the sampling and characterization of the undissolved solids (UDS) in a waste feed DST because the waste contains solid particles that settle and their concentration and relative proportion can change during the transfer of the waste in individual batches. A key uncertainty in the waste feed delivery system is the potential variation in UDS transferred in individual batches in comparison to an initial sample used for evaluating the acceptance criteria. To address this uncertainty, a number of small-scale mixing tests have been conducted as part of Washington River Protection Solutions’ Small Scale Mixing Demonstration (SSMD) project to determine the performance of the DST mixing and sampling systems.

  4. Interpreting chemical compositions of small scale basaltic systems: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGee, Lucy E.; Smith, Ian E. M.

    2016-10-01

    Small scale basaltic magmatic systems occur in all of the major tectonic environments of planet Earth and are characteristically expressed at the Earth's surface as fields of small monogenetic cones. The chemical compositions of the materials that make up these cones reflect processes of magma generation and differentiation that occur in their plumbing system. The volumes of magmas involved are very small and significantly their compositional ranges reveal remarkably complex processes which are overwhelmed or homogenized in larger scale systems. Commonly, compositions are basaltic, alkalic and enriched in light rare earth elements and large ion lithophile elements, although the spectrum extends from highly enriched nephelinites to subalkalic and tholeiitic basalts. Isotopic analyses of rocks from volcanic fields almost always display compositions which can only be explained by the interaction of two or more mantle sources. Ultimately their basaltic magmas originate by small scale melting of mantle sources. Compositional variety is testament to melting processes at different depths, a range of melting proportions, a heterogeneous source and fractionation, magma mixing and assimilation within the plumbing system that brings magmas to the surface. The fact that such a variety of compositions is preserved in a single field shows that isolation of individual melting events and their ascent is an important and possibly defining feature of monogenetic volcanism, as well as the window their chemical behavior provides into the complex process of melt generation and extraction in the Earth's upper mantle.

  5. Suprathermal Charged Particle Acceleration by Small-scale Flux Ropes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zank, G. P.; le Roux, J. A.; Webb, G. M.

    2015-12-01

    We consider different limits of our recently developed kinetic transport theory to investigate the potential of super-Alvenic solar wind regions containing several small-scale flux ropes to explain the acceleration of suprathermal ions to power-law spectra as observations show. Particle acceleration is modeled in response to flux-rope activity involving contraction, merging (reconnection), and collisions in the limit where the particle gyoradius is smaller than the characteristic flux-rope scale length. The emphasis is mainly on the statistical variance in the electric fields induced by flux-rope dynamics rather than on the mean electric field induced by multiple flux ropes whose acceleration effects are discussed elsewhere. Our steady-state analytical solutions suggest that particle drift acceleration by flux ropes, irrespective of whether displaying incompressible or compressible behavior, can yield power laws asymptotically at higher energies whereas an exponential spectral rollover results asymptotically when field-aligned guiding center motion acceleration occur by reconnection electric fields from merging flux ropes. This implies that at sufficiently high particle energies, drift acceleration might dominate. We also expect compressive flux ropes to yield harder power-law spectra than incompressible flux ropes. Preliminary results will be discussed to illustrate how particle acceleration might be affected when both diffusive shock and small-scale flux acceleration occur simultaneously at interplanetary shocks.

  6. Small-Scale Smart Grid Construction and Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surface, Nicholas James

    The smart grid (SG) is a commonly used catch-phrase in the energy industry yet there is no universally accepted definition. The objectives and most useful concepts have been investigated extensively in economic, environmental and engineering research by applying statistical knowledge and established theories to develop simulations without constructing physical models. In this study, a small-scale version (SSSG) is constructed to physically represent these ideas so they can be evaluated. Results of construction show data acquisition three times more expensive than the grid itself although mainly due to the incapability to downsize 70% of data acquisition costs to small-scale. Experimentation on the fully assembled grid exposes the limitations of low cost modified sine wave power, significant enough to recommend pure sine wave investment in future SSSG iterations. Findings can be projected to full-size SG at a ratio of 1:10, based on the appliance representing average US household peak daily load. However this exposes disproportionalities in the SSSG compared with previous SG investigations and recommended changes for future iterations are established to remedy this issue. Also discussed are other ideas investigated in the literature and their suitability for SSSG incorporation. It is highly recommended to develop a user-friendly bidirectional charger to more accurately represent vehicle-to-grid (V2G) infrastructure. Smart homes, BEV swap stations and pumped hydroelectric storage can also be researched on future iterations of the SSSG.

  7. MODELING THE VERY SMALL SCALE CLUSTERING OF LUMINOUS RED GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, Douglas F.; Berlind, Andreas A.; McBride, Cameron K.; Masjedi, Morad

    2010-01-20

    We model the small-scale clustering of luminous red galaxies (LRGs) in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Specifically, we use the halo occupation distribution formalism to model the projected two-point correlation function of LRGs on scales well within the sizes of their host halos (0.016 h {sup -1} Mpc <= r <= 0.42 h {sup -1} Mpc). We start by varying P(N|M), the probability distribution that a dark matter halo of mass M contains N LRGs, and assuming that the radial distribution of satellite LRGs within halos traces the Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) dark matter density profile. We find that varying P(N|M) alone is not sufficient to match the small-scale data. We next allow the concentration of satellite LRG galaxies to differ from that of dark matter and find that this is also not sufficient. Finally, we relax the assumption of an NFW profile and allow the inner slope of the density profile to vary. We find that this model provides a good fit to the data and the resulting value of the slope is -2.17 +- 0.12. The radial density profile of satellite LRGs within halos is thus not compatible with that of the underlying dark matter, but rather is closer to an isothermal distribution.

  8. Application of Global-Scale Precipitation and Hydrologic Datasets for the Development of Small-Scale Hydropower Resource Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, A. W.; Fung, J.; Wiley, M.; Westrick, K. J.

    2009-12-01

    Small-scale hydropower (SSH) development proceeds around the world in a context of insufficient information. Where streamflow and meteorological observations are sparse, the state of the practice for hydropower resource prospecting and assessment relies heavily on regionalization of statistical relationships between in situ measurements of streamflow and precipitation, and on directly surveyed or remotely sensed land surface (watershed) characteristics. Prior studies have either been project-specific or, at the largest extent, country-specific, and are therefore difficult to generalize into an SSH resource assessment having continental or global coverage. In an effort to create a global assessment having a uniform framework, we evaluate as a baseline the use of global-scale alternatives to the local data sources. We use a gage-corrected satellite precipitation datasets together with global-extent hydrologic simulations and the NASA SRTM-1 DEM to produce an assessment of run-of-river hydropower potential at a 9 arc-second spatial resolution for all global land areas excepting Antartica. The dataset variables include mean annual flow, gross potential head, mean annual potential stream power, and flow frequency curve estimates. This presentation illustrates the resulting dataset and comments on the strengths and weaknesses of the approach, and on potential improvements.

  9. Estimating Spatially Variable Parameters of the Epidemic Type Aftershock Sequence (ETAS) in California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandan, Shyam; Ouillon, Guy; Sornette, Didier; Wiemer, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    The ETAS model is widely employed to model the spatio-temporal distribution of earthquakes, generally using spatially invariant parameters, which is most likely a gross simplification considering the extremely heterogeneous structure of the Earth's crust. We propose an efficient method for the estimation of spatially varying parameters, using an expectation maximization (EM) algorithm and spatial Voronoi tessellations. We assume that each Voronoi cell is characterized by a set of eight constant ETAS parameters. For a given number of randomly distributed cells, Vi=1 to N, we jointly invert the ETAS parameters within each cell using an EM algorithm. This process is progressively repeated several times for a given N (which controls the complexity), which is itself increased incrementally. We use the Bayesian Information Criterion (BIC) to rank all the inverted models given their likelihood and complexity and select the top 1% models to compute the average model at any location. Using a synthetic catalog, we also check that the proposed method correctly inverts the known parameters. We apply the proposed method to earthquakes (M>=3) included in the ANSS catalog that occurred within the time period 1981-2016 in the spatial polygon defined by RELM/CSEP around California. The results indicate significant spatial variation of the ETAS parameters. Using these spatially variable estimates of ETAS parameters, we are better equipped to answer some important questions: (1) What is the seismic hazard (both long- and short-term) in a given region? (2) What kind of earthquakes dominate triggering? (3) are there regions where earthquakes are most likely preceded by foreshocks? Last but not the least, a possible correlation of the spatially varying ETAS parameters with spatially variable geophysical properties can lead to an improved understanding of the physics of earthquake triggering beside providing physical meaning to the parameters of the purely statistical ETAS model.

  10. Covariates affecting spatial variability in bison travel behavior in Yellowstone National Park.

    PubMed

    Bruggeman, Jason E; Garrott, Robert A; White, P J; Watson, Fred G R; Wallen, Rick

    2007-07-01

    Understanding mechanisms influencing the movement paths of animals is essential for comprehending behavior and accurately predicting use of travel corridors. In Yellowstone National Park (USA), the effects of roads and winter road grooming on bison (Bison bison) travel routes and spatial dynamics have been debated for more than a decade. However, no rigorous studies have been conducted on bison spatial movement patterns. We collected 121 380 locations from 14 female bison with GPS collars in central Yellowstone to examine how topography, habitat type, roads, and elevation affected the probability of bison travel year-round. We also conducted daily winter bison road use surveys (2003-2005) to quantify how topography and habitat type influenced spatial variability in the amount of bison road travel. Using model comparison techniques, we found the probability of bison travel and spatial distribution of travel locations were affected by multiple topographic and habitat type attributes including slope, landscape roughness, habitat type, elevation, and distances to streams, foraging areas, forested habitats, and roads. Streams were the most influential natural landscape feature affecting bison travel, and results suggest the bison travel network throughout central Yellowstone is spatially defined largely by the presence of streams that connect foraging areas. Also, the probability of bison travel was higher in regions of variable topography that constrain movements, such as in canyons. Pronounced travel corridors existed both in close association with roads and distant from any roads, and results indicate that roads may facilitate bison travel in certain areas. However, our findings suggest that many road segments used as travel corridors are overlaid upon natural travel pathways because road segments receiving high amounts of bison travel had similar landscape features as natural travel corridors. We suggest that most spatial patterns in bison road travel are a

  11. Conspecific and Heterospecific Plant Densities at Small-Scale Can Drive Plant-Pollinator Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Janovský, Zdeněk; Mikát, Michael; Hadrava, Jiří; Horčičková, Eva; Kmecová, Kateřina; Požárová, Doubravka; Smyčka, Jan; Herben, Tomáš

    2013-01-01

    Generalist pollinators are important in many habitats, but little research has been done on small-scale spatial variation in interactions between them and the plants that they visit. Here, using a spatially explicit approach, we examined whether multiple species of flowering plants occurring within a single meadow showed spatial structure in their generalist pollinator assemblages. We report the results for eight plant species for which at least 200 individual visits were recorded. We found that for all of these species, the proportions of their general pollinator assemblages accounted for by particular functional groups showed spatial heterogeneity at the scale of tens of metres. This heterogeneity was connected either with no or only subtle changes of vegetation and flowering species composition. In five of these species, differences in conspecific plant density influenced the pollinator communities (with greater dominance of main pollinators at low-conspecific plant densities). The density of heterospecific plant individuals influenced the pollinator spectrum in one case. Our results indicate that the picture of plant-pollinator interactions provided by averaging data within large plots may be misleading and that within-site spatial heterogeneity should be accounted for in terms of sampling effort allocation and analysis. Moreover, spatially structured plant-pollinator interactions may have important ecological and evolutionary consequences, especially for plant population biology. PMID:24204818

  12. On the spatial decorrelation of stochastic solar resource variability at long timescales

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, Marc J. R.; Fthenakis, Vasilis M.

    2015-05-16

    Understanding the spatial and temporal characteristics of solar resource variability is important because it helps inform the discussion surrounding the merits of geographic dispersion and subsequent electrical interconnection of photovoltaics as part of a portfolio of future solutions for coping with this variability. The unpredictable resource variability arising from the stochastic nature of meteorological phenomena (from the passage of clouds to the movement of weather systems) is of most concern for achieving high PV penetration because unlike the passage of seasons or the shift from day to night, the uncertainty makes planning a challenge. A suitable proxy for unpredictable solar resource variability at any given location is the series of variations in the clearness index from one time period to the next because the clearness index is largely independent of the predictable influence of solar geometry. At timescales shorter than one day, the correlation between these variations in clearness index at pairs of distinct geographic locations decreases with spatial extent and with timescale. As the aggregate variability across N decorrelated locations decreases as 1/√N, identifying the distance required to achieve this decorrelation is critical to quantifying the expected reduction in variability from geographic dispersion.

  13. On the spatial decorrelation of stochastic solar resource variability at long timescales

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Perez, Marc J. R.; Fthenakis, Vasilis M.

    2015-05-16

    Understanding the spatial and temporal characteristics of solar resource variability is important because it helps inform the discussion surrounding the merits of geographic dispersion and subsequent electrical interconnection of photovoltaics as part of a portfolio of future solutions for coping with this variability. The unpredictable resource variability arising from the stochastic nature of meteorological phenomena (from the passage of clouds to the movement of weather systems) is of most concern for achieving high PV penetration because unlike the passage of seasons or the shift from day to night, the uncertainty makes planning a challenge. A suitable proxy for unpredictable solarmore » resource variability at any given location is the series of variations in the clearness index from one time period to the next because the clearness index is largely independent of the predictable influence of solar geometry. At timescales shorter than one day, the correlation between these variations in clearness index at pairs of distinct geographic locations decreases with spatial extent and with timescale. As the aggregate variability across N decorrelated locations decreases as 1/√N, identifying the distance required to achieve this decorrelation is critical to quantifying the expected reduction in variability from geographic dispersion.« less

  14. Spatial variability in zooplankton abundance near feeding right whales in the Great South Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beardsley, Robert C.; Epstein, Ari W.; Chen, Changsheng; Wishner, Karen F.; Macaulay, Michael C.; Kenney, Robert D.

    On 3 June 1989, during SCOPEX'89, two right whales were observed to be feeding close to the surface at separate sites in the Great South Channel of the Gulf of Maine. The R.V. Marlin deployed and monitored a radio tag on one whale, and underway measurements were made near each whale from the R.V. Endeavor to investigate the small-scale spatial structure of water properties and zooplankton abundance in the upper water column near the whales. These measurements included two CTD tow-yos, zooplankton sampling with a MOCNESS, continuous vertical profiling of currents with a 150-kHz ADCP, and continuous vertical profiling of zooplankton concentration with a towed acoustic profiler operating at 120 and 200 kHz. The whales were feeding on a relatively homogeneous mixture of primarily two stages (copepodite IV and V) of a single copepod species ( Calanus finmarchicus), which was most abundant in the upper 10-20 m of the water column above the seasonal pycnocline. Descriptions of the spatial structure of copepod abundance in patches traversed by the whales were developed based on MOCNESS samples, acoustic backscatter, and light transmission. In particular, a high correlation was found between MOCNESS biomass measurements and certain 200-kHz acoustic biomass estimates, which enabled the acoustic data to be interpreted solely in terms of copepod abundance. Acoustic measurements made in a copepod patch while closely following one whale indicated mean and peak copepod biomasses of 6.0 and 28.4 g m -3 (corresponding to mean and peak concentrations of 8.7 × 10 3 and 4.1 × 10 4) copepods m -3 in the 4-10 m depth band, where the whale was probably feeding. With a mean energy content of 10 -3 kcal copepod -1, that whale's mean energy intake rate was 3.8 × 10 4 kcal h -1. The whale was observed to reverse course and turn back into the patch when it swam into a region of lower copepod abundance, with biomass less than roughly 1-3 g m -3 or 1.5-4.5 × 10 3 copepods m -3. This

  15. Variable impact of chronic stress on spatial learning and memory in BXD mice.

    PubMed

    Shea, Chloe J A; Carhuatanta, Kimberly A K; Wagner, Jessica; Bechmann, Naomi; Moore, Raquel; Herman, James P; Jankord, Ryan

    2015-10-15

    The effects of chronic stress on learning are highly variable across individuals. This variability stems from gene-environment interactions. However, the mechanisms by which stress affects genetic predictors of learning are unclear. Thus, we aim to determine whether the genetic pathways that predict spatial memory performance are altered by previous exposure to chronic stress. Sixty-two BXD recombinant inbred strains of mice, as well as parent strains C57BL/6J and DBA/2J, were randomly assigned as behavioral control or to a chronic variable stress paradigm and then underwent behavioral testing to assess spatial memory and learning performance using the Morris water maze. Quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping was completed for average escape latency times for both control and stress animals. Loci on chromosomes 5 and 10 were found in both control and stress environmental populations; eight additional loci were found to be unique to either the control or stress environment. In sum, results indicate that certain genetic loci predict spatial memory performance regardless of prior stress exposure, while exposure to stress also reveals unique genetic predictors of training during the memory task. Thus, we find that genetic predictors contributing to spatial learning and memory are susceptible to the presence of chronic stress.

  16. Small-Scale Dust Structures in Halley's Coma: Evidence from the Vega-2 Electric Field Records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberc, P.

    1999-07-01

    Owing to simultaneous dust and plasma wave observations onboard the Vega mission to Comet Halley, previous studies have found that the two double probe antennas, short (of APV-N experiment) and long (APV-V), (i) responded to plasma clouds induced by impacts of relatively large particles, (ii) the target area was comparable to the whole spacecraft projection, and (iii) the mass thresholds depended on the ambient plasma conditions. Subsequently, the response mechanisms have been identified, and it was shown that if impacts became continuous, the sensitivity of the antennas to individual plasma clouds was reduced or even cancelled. In the present paper, about 30 short-time events of continuous impact (CIEs), recognized in the Vega-2 records from the two experiments mostly near the closest approach to (at ∼104 km from) the nucleus, are investigated. The high-resolution APV-N waveforms reveal that the respective dust formations were structured. A few types of structure, all belonging to one family, have been distinguished. The basic structure, as seen along the Vega-2 pass, is a sequence of particle clouds. CIEs have time scales shorter than or comparable to the time resolution of the dust experiments (spatial scale less than 200 km) and do not correlate with the SP-1 observations (m≤10-10 g) nor with the published SP-2 fluxes (m≤5.8×10-8 g). But, these dust data, combined with an integral criterion for continuous impact, provide a constraint which implies that the particles responsible were bigger than 10-9-10-8 g. The data from the DUCMA V-detector confirm positively this inference for about 1/3 (∼10) of CIEs and indicate that particles (much) bigger than 10-7 g were decisive in generating several other events. Using an argument from the dusty gas dynamics, it is shown that the small-scale dust structures were not jets but have originated from the disintegration of particle aggregates. An estimate of the total mass contained within a dust structure leads to

  17. Extending acoustic data measured with small-scale supersonic model jets to practical aircraft exhaust jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Ching-Wen

    2010-06-01

    Modern military aircraft jet engines are designed with variable geometry nozzles to provide optimum thrust in different operating conditions within the flight envelope. However, the acoustic measurements for such nozzles are scarce, due to the cost involved in making full-scale measurements and the lack of details about the exact geometry of these nozzles. Thus the present effort at The Pennsylvania State University and the NASA Glenn Research Center, in partnership with GE Aviation, is aiming to study and characterize the acoustic field produced by supersonic jets issuing from converging-diverging military style nozzles. An equally important objective is to develop a scaling methodology for using data obtained from small- and moderate-scale experiments which exhibits the independence of the jet sizes to the measured noise levels. The experimental results presented in this thesis have shown reasonable agreement between small-scale and moderate-scale jet acoustic data, as well as between heated jets and heat-simulated ones. As the scaling methodology is validated, it will be extended to using acoustic data measured with small-scale supersonic model jets to the prediction of the most important components of full-scale engine noise. When comparing the measured acoustic spectra with a microphone array set at different radial locations, the characteristics of the jet noise source distribution may induce subtle inaccuracies, depending on the conditions of jet operation. A close look is taken at the details of the noise generation region in order to better understand the mismatch between spectra measured at various acoustic field radial locations. A processing methodology was developed to correct the effect of the noise source distribution and efficiently compare near-field and far-field spectra with unprecedented accuracy. This technique then demonstrates that the measured noise levels in the physically restricted space of an anechoic chamber can be appropriately

  18. Spatial variability of soil nutrient in paddy plantation: Sites FELCRA Seberang Perak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamarudin, H.; Adnan, N. A.; Mispan, M. R.; Athirah. A, A.

    2016-06-01

    The conventional methods currently used for rice cultivation in Malaysia are unable to give maximum yield although the yield production of paddy is increasing. This is due to the conversional method being unable to include soil properties as one of their parameters in agriculture management. Soil properties vary spatially in farm scale due to differences in topography, parent material, vegetation or land management and soil characteristics; also plantation productivity varies significantly over small spatial scales. Knowledge of spatial variability in soil fertility is important for site specific nutrient management. Analysis of spatial variability of soil nutrient of nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and potassium (K) were conducted in this study with the aid of GIS (i.e ArcGIS) and statistical softwares. In this study different temporal and depths of soil nutrient were extracted on the field and further analysis of N,P,K content were analysed in the chemical laboratory and using spatially technique in GIS sofware. The result indicated that for the Seberang Perak site of 58 hactares area, N and K are met minimum requirements nutrient content as outlines by the MARDI for paddy cultivation. However, P indicated poor condition in the study area; therefore the soil needs further attention and treatment.

  19. Temporal and spatial variability of methane emissions in a northern temperate marsh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Li; Song, Changchun; Miao, Yuqing; Qiao, Tianhua; Gong, Chao

    2013-12-01

    Although methane (CH4) fluxes from northern wetlands in Asia have been described in previous research at different temporal and spatial scales, integrated studies at the ecosystem scale were scarce. In this study, CH4 fluxes were measured using eddy covariance (EC) technique and the chamber method in a cool temperate marsh in northeast China during the growing season (May-September) of 2011. CH4 emissions were highly variable, both temporally and spatially during the measurement period. According to the EC observation data, CH4 fluxes showed a significant diurnal cycle during the mid-growing season with nighttime average flux about 67% of the average daytime values. Daily cumulative CH4 fluxes varied from 54 to 250 mg CH4 m-2 d-1 with an average flux of 136.2 mg CH4 m-2 d-1. The observations of chamber method showed that CH4 emissions differed markedly among the three main plant communities. Average flux at the Carex lasiocarpa site was about 4 times and 13.5 times of that at the Glyceria spiculosa site and Deyeuxia angustifolia site, respectively. The spatial variability of CH4 flux was mainly controlled by the varying water table level as well as the spatial distribution of different vascular plants, while the seasonal dynamic of CH4 emission could be best explained by the change of surface soil temperature and air pressure. A comparison was made between EC measurements and the upscaled chamber based model. The results from the model overestimated CH4 emission by 28% compared to the EC data. Considering the large variability of methane emission, it is necessary to conduct continuous observations on CH4 emission from northern wetlands at different temporal and spatial scales to comprehend the variability and also to predict responses to climate change.

  20. Spatial variability of δ18O-PO4 in soils.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granger, Steve; Blackwell, Martin; Tamburini, Federica; Guo, Rongrong; Peukert, Sabine; McGrath, Steve

    2014-05-01

    There is growing interest in the potential for using the δ18OPO4 values of different phosphate sources in the environment to enable identification of sources of phosphate in surface waters. The basis of the study is the belief that different sources of PO4 may have different δ18O values. One of the primary sources of PO4 in runoff from agricultural land is the soil itself. Therefore, in order to account for the PO4 derived from soils in surface waters, it is vital that the degree of spatial variability of its δ18O isotopic values are known, in order that suitable soil sampling approaches can be taken when assessing the soil as a source in future studies. A spatial study of the variability of the δ18OPO4 variability of soils collected from a grazed pasture on the North Wyke Farm Platform was carried out incorporating grid-sampling at a range of spatial scales. Results show that variability across a range of scales is minimal, meaning that, in this case, a relatively small number of samples would be required in order to identify accurately the mean δ18OPO4 value of the soil. This study represents an important contribution towards the methodological development studies required in this field of research in order that the full potential of the δ18OPO4 technique for biological and environmental research can be achieved.

  1. Spatial variability of soil potassium in sugarcane areas subjected to the application of vinasse.

    PubMed

    De Carvalho, Laércio A; Meurer, Ismael; Da Silva Junior, Carlos A; Santos, Cristiane F B; Libardi, Paulo L

    2014-12-01

    When deposited on land the vinasse can promote improvement in fertility, however, often fertilizer application occurs in areas considered homogeneous, without taking into account the variability of the soil. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of vinasse application on potassium content in two classes of soils cultivated with sugarcane, and characterize the spatial variability of soil using geostatistical techniques. In the 2010 and 2011 crop year, soil samples were collected from an experimental grid at 0-0.2 and 0.2-0.4 m depth in three soils cultivated with sugarcane, totaling 90 samplings in each grid, for the determination of pH, calcium (Ca), magnesium (Mg), potassium (K), phosphorus (P), aluminum (Al) and potential acidity (H + Al). The data have been submitted to analysis of descriptive statistics and the K attribute was subjected to geostatistical analysis. The coefficient of variation indicated medium and high variability of K for the three soils. The results showed that the spatial dependence of K increased in depth to FRce and decreased to PHlv, indicating that the attribute could have followed the pattern of distribution of clay in depth. The investigation of the spatial variability of K on the surface and subsurface soils provided the definition of management zones with different levels of fertility, which can be organized into sub-areas for a more efficient management of the resources and the environment. PMID:25590735

  2. [Spatial pattern of soil fertility in Bashan tea garden: a prediction based on environmental auxiliary variables].

    PubMed

    Qin, Le-feng; Yang, Chao; Lin, Fen-fang; Yang, Ning; Zheng, Xin-yu; Xu, Hong-wei; Wang, Ke

    2010-12-01

    Taking topographic factors and NDVI as auxiliary variables, and by using regression-kriging method, the spatial variation pattern of soil fertility in Bashan tea garden in the hilly area of Fuyang City was explored. The spatial variability of the soil fertility was mainly attributed to the structural factors such as relative elevation and flat/vertical curvature. The lower the relative elevation, the worse the soil fertility was. The overall soil fertility level was relatively high, and the area with lower soil fertility only accounted for 5% of the total. By using regression-kriging method with relative elevation as auxiliary variable, the prediction accuracy of soil fertility was obviously higher than that by using ordinary kriging method, with the mean error and root mean square error being 0. 028 and 0. 108, respectively. It was suggested that the prediction method used in this paper could fully reflect the effects of environmental variables on soil fertility , improve the prediction accuracy about the spatial pattern of soil fertility, and provide scientific basis for the precise management of tea garden.

  3. Spatial variability of soil carbon in forested and cultivated sites: implications for change detection.

    PubMed

    Conant, Richard T; Smith, Gordon R; Paustian, Keith

    2003-01-01

    The potential to sequester atmospheric carbon in agricultural and forest soils to offset greenhouse gas emissions has generated interest in measuring changes in soil carbon resulting from changes in land management. However, inherent spatial variability of soil carbon limits the precision of measurement of changes in soil carbon and hence, the ability to detect changes. We analyzed variability of soil carbon by intensively sampling sites under different land management as a step toward developing efficient soil sampling designs. Sites were tilled cropland and a mixed deciduous forest in Tennessee, and old-growth and second-growth coniferous forest in western Washington, USA. Six soil cores within each of three microplots were taken as an initial sample and an additional six cores were taken to simulate resampling. Soil C variability was greater in Washington than in Tennessee, and greater in less disturbed than in more disturbed sites. Using this protocol, our data suggest that differences on the order of 2.0 Mg C ha(-1) could be detected by collection and analysis of cores from at least five (tilled) or two (forest) microplots in Tennessee. More spatial variability in the forested sites in Washington increased the minimum detectable difference, but these systems, consisting of low C content sandy soil with irregularly distributed pockets of organic C in buried logs, are likely to rank among the most spatially heterogeneous of systems. Our results clearly indicate that consistent intramicroplot differences at all sites will enable detection of much more modest changes if the same microplots are resampled.

  4. Spatial variability of detrended soil plow layer penetrometer resistance transect in a sugarcane field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, Luis D.; Cumbrera, Ramiro; Mato, Juan; Millán, Humberto; Tarquis, Ana M.

    2015-04-01

    Spatial variability of soil properties is relevant for identifying those zones with physical degradation. In this sense, one has to face the problem of identifying the origin and distribution of spatial variability patterns (Brouder et al., 2001; Millán et al., 2012). The objective of the present work was to quantify the spatial structure of soil penetrometer resistance (PR) collected from a transect data consisted of 221 points equidistant. In each sampling, readings were obtained from 0 cm till 70 cm of depth, with an interval of 5 cm (Pérez, 2012). The study was conducted on a Vertisol (Typic Hapludert) dedicated to sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum L.) production during the last sixty years (Pérez et al., 2010). Recently, scaling approach has been applied on the determination of the scaling data properties (Tarquis et al., 2008; Millán et al., 2012; Pérez, 2012). We focus in the Hurst analysis to characterize the data variability for each depth. Previously a detrended analysis was conducted in order to better study de intrinsic variability of the series. The Hurst exponent (H) for each depth was estimated showing a characteristic pattern and differentiating PR evolution in depth. References Brouder, S., Hofmann, B., Reetz, H.F., 2001. Evaluating spatial variability of soil parameters for input management. Better Crops 85, 8-11. Millán, H; AM Tarquís, Luís D. Pérez, Juan Mato, Mario González-Posada, 2012. Spatial variability patterns of some Vertisol properties at a field scale using standardized data. Soil and Tillage Research, 120, 76-84. Pérez, Luís D. 2012. Influencia de la maquinaria agrícola sobre la variabilidad espacial de la compactación del suelo. Aplicación de la metodología geoestadística-fractal. PhD thesis, UPM (In Spanish). Pérez, Luís D., Humberto Millán, Mario González-Posada 2010. Spatial complexity of soil plow layer penetrometer resistance as influenced by sugarcane harvesting: A prefractal approach. Soil and Tillage

  5. Spatial Variability Some Physical and Chemical Prpperties Soil surface In Dasht-e-Tabriz Different Landforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foroughifar, Hamed; Asghar Jafarzadeh, Ali; Torabi, Hosien; Aliasgharzad, Naser; Toomanian, Norair

    2010-05-01

    Spatial distribution of soil properties at the field and watershed scale(region scale) affect yield potential, hydrologic responses , and transport of herbicides and No3 to surface or groundwater.The present study aim was to evaluate some physical and chemical properties spatial variability and frequency distribution within and between landforms of Dash-e-Tabriz in the northwest of Iran.For this evaluation 98 samples from soils surface of layer according to grid sampling design and with 500-1000 meters distance based on soils variability were selected and analysed.Landforms were hill, piedmont plain, plain, river alluvial plain and lowland.The study of soil variables frequency distribution showed that Bd, CEC, Caco3, pH,clay and silt follow normal distribution ,which to study their variation one can use parametric statistical method.Variables such as MWD, N(total), SAR, EC, P(available) and sand showed log-normal distribution,that for their variation study,should first be transformed to a logarithmic scale.The variables frequency distribution increase within landforms,which in lowland, hill, and river alluvial plain they showed normal distribution and only EC in piedmont plain and sand, OC and N(total) in plain had log-normal distributions.The results indicate significantly differences of soil properties distribution among landforms,which clay ,pH, EC ,SAR and MWD, CEC, Bd, N(total), OC, P(available), sand, silt were strongly and moderately spatial dependent respectively and Caco3 had no spatial dependence and it is following nugget model.These results indicate that strong spatial dependence due to the effects of intrinsic factors such as parent material, relief and soil types. Also soil properties variations result from variation in depositional environments and or differences in pedogenic or hydrologic processes for different landform positions,and so it can be affected by the flood irrigation,fertilizeir addition,high watertable level or agriculture practices

  6. Small scale tests on the progressive retreat of soil slopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voulgari, Chrysoula; Utili, Stefano; Castellanza, Riccardo

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, the influence due to the presence of cracks on the morphologic evolution of natural cliffs subject to progressive retreat induced by weathering is investigated through small scale laboratory tests. Weathering turns hard rocks into soft rocks that maintain the structure of the intact rocks, but are characterised by higher void ratios and reduced bond strengths; soft rocks are transformed into granular soils generally called residual soils. A number of landslides develop in slopes due to weathering which results in the progressive retrogression of the slope face and the further degradation within the weathering zone. Cracks, that are widely present, can be a result of weathering and they can cause a significant decrease in their stability, as they provide preferential flow channels which increase the soil permeability and decrease the soil strength. The geological models employed until now are mainly empirical. Several researchers have tried to study the stability of slopes through experimental procedures. Centrifuge modelling is widely used to investigate the failure of slopes. Small scale tests are also an important approach, in order to study the behaviour of a slope under certain conditions, such as the existence of water, as they allow the observation of the infiltration processes, the movement of the weathering front, deformation and failure. However, the deformation response of a slope subject to weathering is not yet thoroughly clarified. In this work, a set of experiments were conducted to investigate weathering induced successive landslides. Weathering was applied to the slope model by wetting the slope crest through a rainfall simulator device. The moisture content of the soil during the tests was monitored by soil moisture sensors that were buried inside the slope model. High resolution cameras were recording the behaviour of the slope model. GeoPIV was used to analyse the frames and obtain the deformations of the slope model during the

  7. Interaction and generation of small-scale waves by medium-scale waves in the MLT region.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heale, C. J.; Snively, J. B.

    2015-12-01

    Interactions between gravity waves of different scales are frequent in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT) region of Earth's atmosphere. Recent coordinated observational studies [e.g., Fritts et al. 2014, Taylor et al. 2015, Bossert et al. 2015 ] have identified numerous cases where small-scale waves (~10s km wavelength, minute periods) are found to be propagating within strong medium-scale wave fields (~100s km wavelength and intrinsic periods of approximately hours). Despite this, it is unclear to what extent the small-scale waves are generated from the same source, are ambient in the atmosphere as generated by other sources, or are generated in-situ by the medium-scale wave and its interactions. A 2D compressible, nonlinear model is used to simulate cases of (1) the refractive effects of medium scale wave-like wind and temperature fields in addition to (2) the full dynamic interactions between small scale and medium scale waves under realistic atmospheric conditions. We investigate possible mechanisms for the medium scale wave to provide favorable regions of propagation for smaller scale waves from other sources in contrast to scenarios favoring in-situ wave generation or the generation of smaller-scale wavelike features. We also examine the propagation of small-scale waves generated from the same source location as the medium-scale waves, and how the propagation characteristics of waves determine which parts of the gravity wave spectrum may be susceptible to possible interactions. Small scale waves are shown to have a significant impact on the momentum and energy budget of the MLT through dissipation, filtering, and instability mechanisms [e.g. Fritts and Alexander 2003, Fritts et al. 2014]. Understanding and separating the roles of larger scale waves in refracting, interacting with, or generating smaller scale waves will be crucial in predicting the location and distribution of small-scale wave energy and momentum depositions and the resulting local

  8. Assessing the importance of climate variables for the spatial distribution of modern pollen data in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianyong; Xu, Qinghai; Zheng, Zhuo; Lu, Houyuan; Luo, Yunli; Li, Yuecong; Li, Chunhai; Seppä, Heikki

    2015-03-01

    To assess the importance of climate variables for the distribution of modern pollen data in China, we present a continental-scale dataset consisting of 1374 samples. Boosted regression trees and constrained ordination techniques are employed to quantify the importance of six climate variables (annual precipitation, PANN; actual/potential evapotranspiration ratio, Alpha; mean annual temperature, TANN; mean temperature of the warmest month, MTWA; mean temperature of the coldest month, MTCO; annual sum of the growing degree days above 5°C, GDD5) for the distribution of individual pollen taxa and modern pollen assemblages. The results show that taxon-specific responses to the climate variables display a wide regional diversity and that the climate variables with low collinearity that best account for the spatial variability of modern pollen assemblages differ regionally. PANN is the most important variable in northwestern and northeastern China and the Tibetan Plateau, while MTWA and MTCO are the dominant variables in east-central and southern China. This suggests that the climate variables that can be optimally reconstructed from fossil pollen data vary in different bioclimatic regions of China. This feature is typical to many continental-scale modern pollen datasets and needs to be considered in pollen-based climate reconstructions.

  9. Mapping spatial variability of soil salinity in a coastal paddy field based on electromagnetic sensors.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yan; Huang, Jingyi; Shi, Zhou; Li, Hongyi

    2015-01-01

    In coastal China, there is an urgent need to increase land area for agricultural production and urban development, where there is a rapid growing population. One solution is land reclamation from coastal tidelands, but soil salinization is problematic. As such, it is very important to characterize and map the within-field variability of soil salinity in space and time. Conventional methods are often time-consuming, expensive, labor-intensive, and unpractical. Fortunately, proximal sensing has become an important technology in characterizing within-field spatial variability. In this study, we employed the EM38 to study spatial variability of soil salinity in a coastal paddy field. Significant correlation relationship between ECa and EC1:5 (i.e. r >0.9) allowed us to use EM38 data to characterize the spatial variability of soil salinity. Geostatistical methods were used to determine the horizontal spatio-temporal variability of soil salinity over three consecutive years. The study found that the distribution of salinity was heterogeneous and the leaching of salts was more significant in the edges of the study field. By inverting the EM38 data using a Quasi-3D inversion algorithm, the vertical spatio-temporal variability of soil salinity was determined and the leaching of salts over time was easily identified. The methodology of this study can be used as guidance for researchers interested in understanding soil salinity development as well as land managers aiming for effective soil salinity monitoring and management practices. In order to better characterize the variations in soil salinity to a deeper soil profile, the deeper mode of EM38 (i.e., EM38v) as well as other EMI instruments (e.g. DUALEM-421) can be incorporated to conduct Quasi-3D inversions for deeper soil profiles.

  10. An Overview of Ozone and Precursor Temporal and Spatial Variability in DISCOVER-AQ Study Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickering, K. E.; Follette-Cook, M. B.; Loughner, C.; Flynn, C.; Crawford, J. H.; Clark, R. D.; Fried, A.; Herman, J. R.; Janz, S. J.; Lamsal, L. N.; Silverman, M. L.; Stein Zweers, D. C.; Szykman, J.; Weinheimer, A. J.

    2014-12-01

    One of the major goals of the NASA Earth Venture - 1 DISCOVER-AQ project is to better quantify the spatial and temporal variability of pollutant gases in the lower troposphere, as this information is required for the design of new atmospheric chemistry satellite instruments. This objective has been addressed through a series of four field experiments (Baltimore-Washington, San Joaquin Valley, Houston, and Denver). DISCOVER-AQ observations that lend themselves to this analysis include in-situ measurements of trace gases by the NASA P-3B aircraft (spiral profiles and constant altitude flight legs), trace gas columns from the surface-based network of Pandora UV/Vis spectrometers, trace gas columns from the Airborne Compact Atmospheric Mapper (ACAM) on board the NASA King Air, and in-situ tethered balloon observations. We make use of the P-3B observations to assess spatial variability and evaluate regional model simulations through the use of structure functions, which yield the mean difference in column abundance or mixing ratio between observation points at specified distances apart over a designated length of time. Agreement between the observations and model output indicates that the model can be used to derive more comprehensive variability analyses than are possible with the aircraft data. Subsequently, the structure function approach can be used to compute the mean difference over various time intervals to yield temporal variability estimates. The continuous Pandora data also allow for comprehensive temporal variability estimates for the tropospheric column, as does the frequent tethered balloon profiling at fixed sites for the lower portion of the boundary layer. Additionally, the fine-resolution pixels of the ACAM data allow further detailed spatial analysis. A second DISCOVER-AQ objective is to assess the relationship between column observations and surface air quality. We examine the temporal variability of these measurements over the daytime hours, and the

  11. Mapping spatial variability of soil salinity in a coastal paddy field based on electromagnetic sensors.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yan; Huang, Jingyi; Shi, Zhou; Li, Hongyi

    2015-01-01

    In coastal China, there is an urgent need to increase land area for agricultural production and urban development, where there is a rapid growing population. One solution is land reclamation from coastal tidelands, but soil salinization is problematic. As such, it is very important to characterize and map the within-field variability of soil salinity in space and time. Conventional methods are often time-consuming, expensive, labor-intensive, and unpractical. Fortunately, proximal sensing has become an important technology in characterizing within-field spatial variability. In this study, we employed the EM38 to study spatial variability of soil salinity in a coastal paddy field. Significant correlation relationship between ECa and EC1:5 (i.e. r >0.9) allowed us to use EM38 data to characterize the spatial variability of soil salinity. Geostatistical methods were used to determine the horizontal spatio-temporal variability of soil salinity over three consecutive years. The study found that the distribution of salinity was heterogeneous and the leaching of salts was more significant in the edges of the study field. By inverting the EM38 data using a Quasi-3D inversion algorithm, the vertical spatio-temporal variability of soil salinity was determined and the leaching of salts over time was easily identified. The methodology of this study can be used as guidance for researchers interested in understanding soil salinity development as well as land managers aiming for effective soil salinity monitoring and management practices. In order to better characterize the variations in soil salinity to a deeper soil profile, the deeper mode of EM38 (i.e., EM38v) as well as other EMI instruments (e.g. DUALEM-421) can be incorporated to conduct Quasi-3D inversions for deeper soil profiles. PMID:26020969

  12. The Impact of Flow on Spatial Variability of Streamwater Chemistry in a Boreal Catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buffam, I.; Laudon, H.; Bishop, K.; Temnerud, J.; Mörth, M.

    2004-12-01

    Spatial variability in water chemistry is one defining characteristic of stream ecosystems. An infrequently studied aspect of this variability is the impact of flow regime: for instance, does the variation in water chemistry within a watershed differ between times of baseflow and flood? We examined this issue in Krycklan, a largely forested till-underlain boreal catchment in Northern Sweden, with an emphasis on changes occurring during the annual spring flood. Utilizing 15 stream sites ranging in catchment size from 0.07-68 km2 and in catchment wetland coverage from 0-40%, the between-site variance in several water parameters was compared between times of stable, relatively low flow and times of dramatically changing, high flow during spring flood. Distinctly different patterns were observed for different solutes. While dissolved organic carbon (DOC) varied widely between streams at baseflow (5-40 mg/l) and was positively correlated with catchment % wetland area, these differences were subdued during peak flood (DOC range 15-25 mg/l), and as such variability was lower. Conversely, differences in inorganic cation concentrations (electrical conductivity ranged from 15-30 μ S/cm) were amplified during the spring flood, resulting in increased spatial variability. Much of the change in variability hinged on the contrasting behavior of streams draining catchments with high % wetland compared to forested catchments: wetland streams had lower concentrations of cations at baseflow, and were also diluted more dramatically than forest streams during the flood. Hydrological flowpaths were explored using isotopic and chemical signatures of streamwater and catchment source waters. Much of the observed patterns in spatial variability could be explained by divergent flowpaths within wetland and forest catchments during spring flood, and by differing source areas for DOC vs. cations.

  13. Throughfall and its spatial variability beneath xerophytic shrub canopies within water-limited arid desert ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ya-feng; Wang, Xin-ping; Hu, Rui; Pan, Yan-xia

    2016-08-01

    Throughfall is known to be a critical component of the hydrological and biogeochemical cycles of forested ecosystems with inherently temporal and spatial variability. Yet little is understood concerning the throughfall variability of shrubs and the associated controlling factors in arid desert ecosystems. Here we systematically investigated the variability of throughfall of two morphological distinct xerophytic shrubs (Caragana korshinskii and Artemisia ordosica) within a re-vegetated arid desert ecosystem, and evaluated the effects of shrub structure and rainfall characteristics on throughfall based on heavily gauged throughfall measurements at the event scale. We found that morphological differences were not sufficient to generate significant difference (P < 0.05) in throughfall between two studied shrub species under the same rainfall and meteorological conditions in our study area, with a throughfall percentage of 69.7% for C. korshinskii and 64.3% for A. ordosica. We also observed a highly variable patchy pattern of throughfall beneath individual shrub canopies, but the spatial patterns appeared to be stable among rainfall events based on time stability analysis. Throughfall linearly increased with the increasing distance from the shrub base for both shrubs, and radial direction beneath shrub canopies had a pronounced impact on throughfall. Throughfall variability, expressed as the coefficient of variation (CV) of throughfall, tended to decline with the increase in rainfall amount, intensity and duration, and stabilized passing a certain threshold. Our findings highlight the great variability of throughfall beneath the canopies of xerophytic shrubs and the time stability of throughfall pattern among rainfall events. The spatially heterogeneous and temporally stable throughfall is expected to generate a dynamic patchy distribution of soil moisture beneath shrub canopies within arid desert ecosystems.

  14. SPATIAL VARIABILITY OF DRY SPELLS A spatial and temporal rainfall analysis of the Pangani basin and Makanya catchment, Tanzania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, B. M. C.; Savenije, H. H. G. H. H. G.

    2009-04-01

    Rainfall and soil moisture are key parameters for food production and which are spatial and temporal variable. In a ever growing world the stress on water for food production increases. Farmers especially in semi arid regions with rain fed agriculture are more often forced to make away from "A" locations where water is available to water scares "B" or worse locations. Obliged by availability of arable land, tradition, customs, natural 6th sense or farmers cleverness. To improve agricultural yields a better water resource planning ,supported by system knowledge, is needed. This study describes a Markov bases dry spell tool which can fulfil in this need. By making use of Markov properties of rainfall, the temporal variability has been analysed. Plotting the derived seasonal transition probabilities vs. the rainfall amount a spatial variable power function could be derived. The spatial and temporal knowledge of rainfall was combined in the Markov based dry spell tool. For a given probability the tool provides a dry spell map. The dry spell tool is a powerful tool to assess vulnerability of dry spells based on meteorological data. The meteorological dry spell in combination with the agricultural dry spell length or critical dry spell length, which is determined by soil and vegetation characteristics, risk maps of an area to the vulnerability of dry spells could be made. The tool was applied in a case study in the Makanya catchment and showed: Compared to the lower middle part of the catchment, high altitude parts of the catchment receive higher amounts of rainfall, have shorter meteorological dry spells and are more resilient to dry spells due to their soil and vegetation characteristics. As a result one can state that farmers living in mountainous areas are blessed by their location. They receive more rain and have lower probability of long dry spells, higher probability of crop success and a higher probability of high yields, in contrast to the farmers in the valley

  15. Robust attitude tracking control of small-scale unmanned helicopter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiafu; Chen, You; Lu, Geng; Zhong, Yisheng

    2015-06-01

    Robust attitude control problem for small-scale unmanned helicopters is investigated to improve attitude control performances of roll and pitch channels under both small and large amplitude manoeuvre flight conditions. The model of the roll or pitch angular dynamics is regarded as a nominal single-input single-output linear system with equivalent disturbances which contain nonlinear uncertainties, coupling-effects, parameter perturbations, and external disturbances. Based on the signal compensation method, a robust controller is designed with two parts: a proportional-derivative controller and a robust compensator. The designed controller is linear and time-invariant, so it can be easily realised. The robust properties of the closed-loop system are proven. According to the ADS-33E-PRF military rotorcraft standard, the controller can achieve top control performances. Experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed control strategy.

  16. Identifying T Tauri Stars using Small Scale Optical Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spuck, Timothy; Saathoff, I.; Rebull, L.

    2010-05-01

    The Spuck-Butchart Optical Survey Method (SBOS) is a simplified method of identifying T Tauri stars using small scale optical telescopes. However, to date the method has only been used in an attempt to distinguish T Tauri stars from standard stars. AGN and active M dwarf stars emit excess in both infrared and H-alpha, similar to T Tauri stars, making it possible that these types of objects will contaminate T Tauri selection. This study uses observations from the Kitt Peak National Observatory 0.9 Meter Telescope to further investigate the SBOS method and its true efficiency. The results of this study indicate that the initial efficiency of 70% is incorrect. Due to potential contamination by active M dwarf stars, the true efficiency is closer to 35%. The study demonstrates that while identification efficiency is much lower than initially thought, the SBOS method shows great promise for both professional and amateur research of young stellar objects.

  17. Minimal length and small scale structure of spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kothawala, Dawood

    2013-11-01

    Many generic arguments support the existence of a minimum spacetime interval L0. Such a “zero-point” length can be naturally introduced in a locally Lorentz invariant manner via Synge’s world function biscalar Ω(p,P) which measures squared geodesic interval between spacetime events p and P. I show that there exists a nonlocal deformation of spacetime geometry given by a disformal coupling of metric to the biscalar Ω(p,P), which yields a geodesic interval of L0 in the limit p→P. Locality is recovered when Ω(p,P)≫L02/2. I discuss several conceptual implications of the resultant small-scale structure of spacetime for QFT propagators as well as spacetime singularities.

  18. Technology Overview and Assessment for Small-Scale EDL Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidrich, Casey R.; Smith, Brandon P.; Braun, Robert D.

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by missions to land large rovers and humans at Mars and other bodies, high-mass EDL technologies are a prevalent trend in the research community. In contrast, EDL systems for low-mass payloads have attracted less attention. Significant potential in science and discovery exists in small-scale EDL systems. Payloads acting secondary to a flagship mission are a currently under-utilzed resource. Before taking advantage of these opportunities, further developed of scaled EDL technologies is required. The key limitations identified in this study are compact decelerators and deformable impact systems. Current technologies may enable rough landing of small payloads, with moderate restrictions in packaging volume. Utilization of passive descent and landing stages will greatly increase the applicability of small systems, allowing for vehicles robust to entry environment uncertainties. These architectures will provide an efficient means of achieving science and support objectives while reducing cost and risk margins of a parent mission.

  19. Formation control for a network of small-scale robots.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yoonsoo

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, a network of small-scale robots (typically centimeter-scale robots) equipped with artificial actuators such as electric motors is considered. The purpose of this network is to have the robots keep a certain formation shape (or change to another formation shape) during maneuvers. The network has a fixed communication topology in the sense that robots have a fixed group of neighbors to communicate during maneuvers. Assuming that each robot and its actuator can be modeled as a linear system, a decentralized control law (such that each robot activates its actuator based on the information from its neighbors only) is introduced to achieve the purpose of formation keeping or change. A linear matrix inequality (LMI) for deriving the upper bound on the actuator's time constant is also presented. Simulation results are shown to demonstrate the merit of the introduced control law.

  20. Small-Scale Geothermal Power Plant Field Verification Projects: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Kutscher, C.

    2001-07-03

    In the spring of 2000, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory issued a Request for Proposal for the construction of small-scale (300 kilowatt [kW] to 1 megawatt [MW]) geothermal power plants in the western United States. Five projects were selected for funding. Of these five, subcontracts have been completed for three, and preliminary design work is being conducted. The three projects currently under contract represent a variety of concepts and locations: a 1-MW evaporatively enhanced, air-cooled binary-cycle plant in Nevada; a 1-MW water-cooled Kalina-cycle plant in New Mexico; and a 750-kW low-temperature flash plant in Utah. All three also incorporate direct heating: onion dehydration, heating for a fish hatchery, and greenhouse heating, respectively. These projects are expected to begin operation between April 2002 and September 2003. In each case, detailed data on performance and costs will be taken over a 3-year period.

  1. Small-Scale Performance Testing for Studying New Explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Gagliardi, F J; Chambers, R D; Tran, T D

    2005-04-29

    The development of new high-explosive (HE) formulations involves characterizing their safety and performance. Small-scale experiments requiring only a small amount of explosives are of interest because they can facilitate development while minimizing hazards and reducing cost. A detonation-spreading, dent test, called the Floret test, was designed to obtain performance data for new explosives. It utilizes the detonation of about a 1.0 g sample of HE, initiated by an accelerated aluminum flyer. Upon impact, the HE sample detonates and a copper witness plate absorbs the ensuing shock wave. The dent of the plate is then measured and correlated to the energetic output of the HE. Additionally, the dent measurement can be used to compare the performance of different explosives. The Floret test is beneficial because it quickly returns important performance information, while requiring only a small explosive sample. This work will explain the Floret test and discuss some exemplary results.

  2. Net energy of seven small-scale hydroelectric power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilliland, M. W.; Klopatek, J. M.; Hildebrand, S. G.

    1981-07-01

    The net energy results are expressed as the ratio of energy output to energy input. Two ratios were developed. In the first (R1), the energy output, expressed as electrically, was divided by the energy subsidy; in the second (R2), the energy output, expressed as the fossil fuel equivalent of electricity, was divided by the energy input. The results indicate that the energy output from the seven plants is 8.6 to 32.9 times greater than the energy input for the R1 case, and 26.3 to 101.4 times greater than the energy input for the R2 case. On the net energy criterion, the small scale plants are better than conventional peak load hydroelectric plants and similar to conventional base load hydroelectric plants.

  3. CAMUI Type Hybrid Rocket as Small Scale Ballistic Flight Testbed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagata, Harunori; Uematsu, Tsutomu; Ito, Kenichi

    The authors have been developing CAMUI (Cascaded Multistage Impinging-jet) type hybrid rockets, explosive-flee small rocket motors. This is to downsize the scale of suborbital flight experiments on space related technology development. A key idea is a new fuel grain design to increase gasification rates of a solid fuels. By the new fuel grain design, the combustion gas repeatedly impinges on fuel surfaces to hasten the heat transfer to the fuel. Suborbital flight experiments by sounding rockets provide variety of test beds to accumulate basic technologies common to the next step of space development in Japan. By using hybrid rockets one can take the cost advantage of small-scale rocket experiments. This cost advantage improves robustness of space technology development projects by dispersion of risk.

  4. Dustiness, silicosis & tuberculosis in small scale pottery workers.

    PubMed

    Saiyed, H N; Ghodasara, N B; Sathwara, N G; Patel, G C; Parikh, D J; Kashyap, S K

    1995-09-01

    Studies were carried out in eight small scale potteries to find out the airborne dust concentrations and the prevalence of dust related diseases like silicosis and tuberculosis in 292 workers. Chest radiography revealed that 44 (15.1%) pottery workers were suffering from silicosis and an equal number showed radiological evidence of tuberculosis. The environmental study showed that the concentrations of airborne dust, containing free silica, in the work environment of all departments (except packing department) of potteries were higher than threshold limit values (TLVs). The prevalence of silicosis and tuberculosis correlated with the levels of airborne dust. The prevalence of tuberculosis increased with radiological severity of silicosis. Dust control measures combined with pre-employment and periodical medical examinations are recommended for the control of silicosis and tuberculosis in the pottery industry.

  5. Small-scale volcanoes on Mars: distribution and types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broz, Petr; Hauber, Ernst

    2015-04-01

    Volcanoes differ in sizes, as does the amount of magma which ascends to a planetary surface. On Earth, the size of volcanoes is anti-correlated with their frequency, i.e. small volcanoes are much more numerous than large ones. The most common terrestrial volcanoes are scoria cones (small-scale volcanoes were not intensely studied for a long time due to a lack of high-resolution data enabling their proper identification; however their existence and basic characteristics were predicted on theoretical grounds. Streams of new high-resolution images now enable discovering and studying kilometer-size volcanoes with various shapes in unprecedented detail. Several types of small-scale volcanoes in various regions on Mars were recently described. Scoria cones provide a record of magmatic volatile content and have been identified in Tharsis (Ulysses Colles), on flanks of large volcanoes (e.g., Pavonis Mons), in the caldera of Ulysses Patera, in chaotic terrains or other large depressions (Hydraotes Colles, Coprates Chasma) and in the northern lowlands. Tuff rings and tuff cones, formed as a result of water-magma interaction, seem to be relatively rare on Mars and were only tentatively identified in three locations (Nepenthes/Amenthes region, Arena Colles and inside Lederberg crater), and alternative interpretations (mud volcanoes) seem possible. Other relatively rare volcanoes seem to be lava domes, reported only from two regions (Acracida Planitia and Terra Sirenum). On the other hand, small shields and rootless cones (which are not primary volcanic landforms) represent widely spread phenomena recognized in Tharsis and Elysium. Based on these new observations, the distribution of small volcanoes on Mars seems to be much more widespread than anticipated a decade

  6. Remote plunger removal device for small-scale incremental pressing

    SciTech Connect

    Burnside, N.J.; Son, S.F.; Asay, B.W.

    1997-09-01

    Small-scale pressing of high explosives (HE) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and elsewhere is routinely performed using pneumatic presses. Blast shields provide protection to the operator during the pressing procedure, but safety of the operator is a concern during removal of the plunger, which is currently performed manually. To minimize this risk, very high tolerances between the plunger and the die are required. These tolerances are often very costly, especially in the case of long, relatively narrow dies. The safety issue is an even greater concern with incremental pressing in which cleaning the die between increments is difficult or impossible. To better protect press operators, a device has been designed and constructed to allow remote plunger removal in a standard HE press. In this report the authors describe this modified press that allows remote removal of the plunger.

  7. Small-Scale Shock Reactivity and Internal Blast Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granholm, R. H.; Sandusky, H. W.

    2006-07-01

    Explosives react from a strong shock, even in quantities too small for detonation. The potential for a new material to be an explosive can be evaluated from this shock reactivity. The recently developed small-scale shock reactivity test (SSRT) uses very high confinement to allow prompt reactions to occur in less than half-gram samples well below critical diameter. Early and late-time reactions are simultaneously measured from a single sample subjected to the output from an RP-80 detonator. Prompt reactions are quantified by a dent in a soft aluminum witness block, while later reactions, such as from fuel/air combustion, are measured by recording blast pressure. Internal blast quasi-static pressure is obtained by confining the sample apparatus within a three-liter chamber. Late-time reaction effects of plastics, and results from HMX, HMX/Aluminum, and a plastic-bonded explosive (PBX) are reported.

  8. Small-scale anisotropy in turbulent shearless mixing.

    PubMed

    Tordella, Daniela; Iovieno, Michele

    2011-11-01

    The generation of small-scale anisotropy in turbulent shearless mixing is numerically investigated. Data from direct numerical simulations at Taylor Reynolds' numbers between 45 and 150 show not only that there is a significant departure of the longitudinal velocity derivative moments from the values found in homogeneous and isotropic turbulence but that the variation of skewness has an opposite sign for the components across the mixing layer and parallel to it. The anisotropy induced by the presence of a kinetic energy gradient has a very different pattern from the one generated by an homogeneous shear. The transversal derivative moments in the mixing are in fact found to be very small, which highlights that smallness of the transversal moments is not a sufficient condition for isotropy.

  9. Accounting for Unresolved Spatial Variability in Large Scale Models: Development and Evaluation of a Statistical Cloud Parameterization with Prognostic Higher Order Moments

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Pincus

    2011-05-17

    This project focused on the variability of clouds that is present across a wide range of scales ranging from the synoptic to the millimeter. In particular, there is substantial variability in cloud properties at scales smaller than the grid spacing of models used to make climate projections (GCMs) and weather forecasts. These models represent clouds and other small-scale processes with parameterizations that describe how those processes respond to and feed back on the largescale state of the atmosphere.

  10. Use of precision agriculture technology to investigate spatial variability in nitrogen yields in cut grassland.

    PubMed

    Bailey, J S; Wang, K; Jordan, C; Higgins, A

    2001-01-01

    Spatial variability in N uptake and utilisation by swards within uniformly managed field units could be responsible for a significant proportion of the NH3, N2O, NO3- and NOx (NO and NO2) 'pollutants' generated by agriculture and released to the environment. An investigation was commenced, therefore, to quantify, map and explain the spatial variability in sward N yield in a 'large' silage field and to assess the potential for managing this variability using some of the latest precision agriculture technology. Sward dry matter (DM) and N yields were predicted from the results of plant tissue analyses using mathematical models. Sward N yields were found to vary greatly across the field seemingly because of differences in net soil N mineralisation, but the pattern of variability appeared to remain constant with time. Conventional soil analysis of a range of soil chemical and physical properties, however, failed to explain this variability. It was concluded that the N-yield distribution map might be used in place of soil analysis as the basis for varying the rates of N application to different parts of the field with the twin objectives of maximising fertiliser use efficiency and minimising N emissions to air and water.

  11. Spatial variable selection methods for investigating acute health effects of fine particulate matter components.

    PubMed

    Boehm Vock, Laura F; Reich, Brian J; Fuentes, Montserrat; Dominici, Francesca

    2015-03-01

    Multi-site time series studies have reported evidence of an association between short term exposure to particulate matter (PM) and adverse health effects, but the effect size varies across the United States. Variability in the effect may partially be due to differing community level exposure and health characteristics, but also due to the chemical composition of PM which is known to vary greatly by location and time. The objective of this article is to identify particularly harmful components of this chemical mixture. Because of the large number of highly-correlated components, we must incorporate some regularization into a statistical model. We assume that, at each spatial location, the regression coefficients come from a mixture model with the flavor of stochastic search variable selection, but utilize a copula to share information about variable inclusion and effect magnitude across locations. The model differs from current spatial variable selection techniques by accommodating both local and global variable selection. The model is used to study the association between fine PM (PM <2.5μm) components, measured at 115 counties nationally over the period 2000-2008, and cardiovascular emergency room admissions among Medicare patients.

  12. Land agroecological quality assessment in conditions of high spatial soil cover variability at the Pereslavskoye Opolye.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morev, Dmitriy; Vasenev, Ivan

    2015-04-01

    The essential spatial variability is mutual feature for most natural and man-changed soils at the Central region of European territory of Russia. The original spatial heterogeneity of forest soils has been further complicated by a specific land-use history and human impacts. For demand-driven land-use planning and decision making the quantitative analysis and agroecological interpretation of representative soil cover spatial variability is an important and challenging task that receives increasing attention from private companies, governmental and environmental bodies. Pereslavskoye Opolye is traditionally actively used in agriculture due to dominated high-quality cultivated soddy-podzoluvisols which are relatively reached in organic matter (especially for conditions of the North part at the European territory of Russia). However, the soil cover patterns are often very complicated even within the field that significantly influences on crop yield variability and have to be considered in farming system development and land agroecological quality evaluation. The detailed investigations of soil regimes and mapping of the winter rye yield have been carried in conditions of two representative fields with slopes sharply contrasted both in aspects and degrees. Rye biological productivity and weed infestation have been measured in elementary plots of 0.25 m2 with the following analysis the quality of the yield. In the same plot soil temperature and moisture have been measured by portable devices. Soil sampling was provided from three upper layers by drilling. The results of ray yield detailed mapping shown high differences both in average values and within-field variability on different slopes. In case of low-gradient slope (field 1) there is variability of ray yield from 39.4 to 44.8 dt/ha. In case of expressed slope (field 2) the same species of winter rye grown with the same technology has essentially lower yield and within-field variability from 20 to 29.6 dt/ha. The

  13. Small-Scale Dissipation in Binary-Species Transitional Mixing Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellan, Josette; Okong'o, Nora

    2011-01-01

    Motivated by large eddy simulation (LES) modeling of supercritical turbulent flows, transitional states of databases obtained from direct numerical simulations (DNS) of binary-species supercritical temporal mixing layers were examined to understand the subgrid-scale dissipation, and its variation with filter size. Examination of the DSN-scale domain- averaged dissipation confirms previous findings that, out of the three modes of viscous, temperature and species-mass dissipation, the species-mass dissipation is the main contributor to the total dissipation. The results revealed that the percentage of species-mass by total dissipation is nearly invariant across species systems and initial conditions. This dominance of the species-mass dissipation is due to high-density-gradient magnitude (HDGM) regions populating the flow under the supercritical conditions of the simulations; such regions have also been observed in fully turbulent supercritical flows. The domain average being the result of both the local values and the extent of the HDGM regions, the expectations were that the response to filtering would vary with these flow characteristics. All filtering here is performed in the dissipation range of the Kolmogorov spectrum, at filter sizes from 4 to 16 times the DNS grid spacing. The small-scale (subgrid scale, SGS) dissipation was found by subtracting the filtered-field dissipation from the DNS-field dissipation. In contrast to the DNS dissipation, the SGS dissipation is not necessarily positive; negative values indicate backscatter. Backscatter was shown to be spatially widespread in all modes of dissipation and in the total dissipation (25 to 60 percent of the domain). The maximum magnitude of the negative subgrid- scale dissipation was as much as 17 percent of the maximum positive subgrid- scale dissipation, indicating that, not only is backscatter spatially widespread in these flows, but it is considerable in magnitude and cannot be ignored for the purposes of

  14. Spatial variability of specific surface area of arable soils in Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolowski, S.; Sokolowska, Z.; Usowicz, B.

    2012-04-01

    Evaluation of soil spatial variability is an important issue in agrophysics and in environmental research. Knowledge of spatial variability of physico-chemical properties enables a better understanding of several processes that take place in soils. In particular, it is well known that mineralogical, organic, as well as particle-size compositions of soils vary in a wide range. Specific surface area of soils is one of the most significant characteristics of soils. It can be not only related to the type of soil, mainly to the content of clay, but also largely determines several physical and chemical properties of soils and is often used as a controlling factor in numerous biological processes. Knowledge of the specific surface area is necessary in calculating certain basic soil characteristics, such as the dielectric permeability of soil, water retention curve, water transport in the soil, cation exchange capacity and pesticide adsorption. The aim of the present study is two-fold. First, we carry out recognition of soil total specific surface area patterns in the territory of Poland and perform the investigation of features of its spatial variability. Next, semivariograms and fractal analysis are used to characterize and compare the spatial variability of soil specific surface area in two soil horizons (A and B). Specific surface area of about 1000 samples was determined by analyzing water vapor adsorption isotherms via the BET method. The collected data of the values of specific surface area of mineral soil representatives for the territory of Poland were then used to describe its spatial variability by employing geostatistical techniques and fractal theory. Using the data calculated for some selected points within the entire territory and along selected directions, the values of semivariance were determined. The slope of the regression line of the log-log plot of semi-variance versus the distance was used to estimate the fractal dimension, D. Specific surface area

  15. ECa-Directed Soil Sampling for Characterizing Spatial Variability: Monitoring Management- Induced Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corwin, D. L.

    2006-05-01

    Characterizing spatial variability is an important consideration of any landscape-scale soil-related problem. Geospatial measurements of apparent soil electrical conductivity (ECa) are useful for characterizing spatial variability by directing soil sampling. The objective of this presentation is to discuss equipment, protocols, sampling designs, and a case study of an ECa survey to characterize spatial variability. Specifically, a preliminary spatio-temporal study of management-induced changes to soil quality will be demonstrated for a drainage water reuse study site. The spatio-temporal study used electromagnetic induction ECa data and a response surface sampling design to select 40 sites that reflected the spatial variability of soil properties (i.e., salinity, Na levels, Mo, and B) impacting the intended agricultural use of a saline-sodic field in California's San Joaquin Valley. Soil samples were collected in August 1999 and April 2002. Data from 1999 indicate the presence of high salinity, which increased with depth, high sodium adsorption ratio (SAR), which also increased with depth, and moderate to high B and Mo, which showed no specific trends with depth. The application of drainage water for 32 months resulted in leaching of B from the top 0.3 of soil, leaching of salinity from the top 0.6 m of soil, and leaching of Na and Mo from the top 1.2 m of soil. The leaching fraction over the time period from 1999-2002 was estimated to be 0.10. The level of salinity in the reused drainage water (i.e., 3-5 dS/m) allowed infiltration and leaching to occur even though high sodium and high expanding-lattice clay levels posed potential water flow problems. The leaching of salinity, Na, Mo, and B has resulted in increased forage yield and improved quality of those yields. Preliminary spatio-temporal analyses indicate at least short-term feasibility of drainage water reuse from the perspective of soil quality when the goal is forage production for grazing livestock. The

  16. Spatial Variability in Column CO2 Inferred from High Resolution GEOS-5 Global Model Simulations: Implications for Remote Sensing and Inversions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ott, L.; Putman, B.; Collatz, J.; Gregg, W.

    2012-01-01

    Column CO2 observations from current and future remote sensing missions represent a major advancement in our understanding of the carbon cycle and are expected to help constrain source and sink distributions. However, data assimilation and inversion methods are challenged by the difference in scale of models and observations. OCO-2 footprints represent an area of several square kilometers while NASA s future ASCENDS lidar mission is likely to have an even smaller footprint. In contrast, the resolution of models used in global inversions are typically hundreds of kilometers wide and often cover areas that include combinations of land, ocean and coastal areas and areas of significant topographic, land cover, and population density variations. To improve understanding of scales of atmospheric CO2 variability and representativeness of satellite observations, we will present results from a global, 10-km simulation of meteorology and atmospheric CO2 distributions performed using NASA s GEOS-5 general circulation model. This resolution, typical of mesoscale atmospheric models, represents an order of magnitude increase in resolution over typical global simulations of atmospheric composition allowing new insight into small scale CO2 variations across a wide range of surface flux and meteorological conditions. The simulation includes high resolution flux datasets provided by NASA s Carbon Monitoring System Flux Pilot Project at half degree resolution that have been down-scaled to 10-km using remote sensing datasets. Probability distribution functions are calculated over larger areas more typical of global models (100-400 km) to characterize subgrid-scale variability in these models. Particular emphasis is placed on coastal regions and regions containing megacities and fires to evaluate the ability of coarse resolution models to represent these small scale features. Additionally, model output are sampled using averaging kernels characteristic of OCO-2 and ASCENDS measurement

  17. Method for measuring the spatial variability of aerosol penetration through respirator filters.

    PubMed

    Huang, C; Willeke, K; Qian, Y; Grinshpun, S; Ulevicius, V

    1998-07-01

    Fibrous filter media are widely used in respirators to remove airborne particulate matter from the inhaled airflow of workers. The N95 half-mask particulate respirator appears to be the most frequently used respirator under the new NIOSH regulation, 42 CFR 84. Considerable spatial variability in light penetration through the fibrous filter medium of an N95 respirator can be seen by visual observation when it is held to the light. This variability is due to the way in which the fibers are manufactured and laid down to form the filter medium. Similar spatial variability is expected in the aerosol penetration through the filters. Therefore, a test method has been developed for measuring the spatial variability in aerosol penetration. The main components of this method are an aerosol generator, a filter test stand with a movable sampling inlet, an aerosol size spectrometer, and an aerosol photometer. Measurements with the filter media of N95 respirators, tested at average filtration velocities corresponding to light, moderate, and heavy work loads, have shown spatial variations in aerosol penetration in excess of 100% relative to the average aerosol penetration for the entire respirator. N95 respirators are required to be at least 95% efficient (i.e., less than 5% penetrating) at the most penetrating particle size, when tested at 85 L/min. Tests with the new method have shown that the aerosol penetration of the most penetrating particles of about 0.1 micron diameter may locally be higher than 5%, while the average aerosol penetration of 0.1 micron particles is less than 5%. PMID:9697293

  18. Land surface hydrology parameterization for atmospheric general circulation models including subgrid scale spatial variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Entekhabi, D.; Eagleson, P. S.

    1989-01-01

    Parameterizations are developed for the representation of subgrid hydrologic processes in atmospheric general circulation models. Reasonable a priori probability density functions of the spatial variability of soil moisture and of precipitation are introduced. These are used in conjunction with the deterministic equations describing basic soil moisture physics to derive expressions for the hydrologic processes that include subgrid scale variation in parameters. The major model sensitivities to soil type and to climatic forcing are explored.

  19. Spatial variability and stocks of soil organic carbon in the Gobi desert of Northwestern China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pingping; Shao, Ming'an

    2014-01-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) plays an important role in improving soil properties and the C global cycle. Limited attention, though, has been given to assessing the spatial patterns and stocks of SOC in desert ecosystems. In this study, we quantitatively evaluated the spatial variability of SOC and its influencing factors and estimated SOC storage in a region (40 km2) of the Gobi desert. SOC exhibited a log-normal depth distribution with means of 1.6, 1.5, 1.4, and 1.4 g kg(-1) for the 0-10, 10-20, 20-30, and 30-40 cm layers, respectively, and was moderately variable according to the coefficients of variation (37-42%). Variability of SOC increased as the sampling area expanded and could be well parameterized as a power function of the sampling area. Significant correlations were detected between SOC and soil physical properties, i.e. stone, sand, silt, and clay contents and soil bulk density. The relatively coarse fractions, i.e. sand, silt, and stone contents, had the largest effects on SOC variability. Experimental semivariograms of SOC were best fitted by exponential models. Nugget-to-sill ratios indicated a strong spatial dependence for SOC concentrations at all depths in the study area. The surface layer (0-10 cm) had the largest spatial dependency compared with the other layers. The mapping revealed a decreasing trend of SOC concentrations from south to north across this region of the Gobi desert, with higher levels close to an oasis and lower levels surrounded by mountains and near the desert. SOC density to depths of 20 and 40 cm for this 40 km2 area was estimated at 0.42 and 0.68 kg C m(-2), respectively. This study provides an important contribution to understanding the role of the Gobi desert in the global carbon cycle. PMID:24733073

  20. Spatial variability and stocks of soil organic carbon in the Gobi desert of Northwestern China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pingping; Shao, Ming'an

    2014-01-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) plays an important role in improving soil properties and the C global cycle. Limited attention, though, has been given to assessing the spatial patterns and stocks of SOC in desert ecosystems. In this study, we quantitatively evaluated the spatial variability of SOC and its influencing factors and estimated SOC storage in a region (40 km2) of the Gobi desert. SOC exhibited a log-normal depth distribution with means of 1.6, 1.5, 1.4, and 1.4 g kg(-1) for the 0-10, 10-20, 20-30, and 30-40 cm layers, respectively, and was moderately variable according to the coefficients of variation (37-42%). Variability of SOC increased as the sampling area expanded and could be well parameterized as a power function of the sampling area. Significant correlations were detected between SOC and soil physical properties, i.e. stone, sand, silt, and clay contents and soil bulk density. The relatively coarse fractions, i.e. sand, silt, and stone contents, had the largest effects on SOC variability. Experimental semivariograms of SOC were best fitted by exponential models. Nugget-to-sill ratios indicated a strong spatial dependence for SOC concentrations at all depths in the study area. The surface layer (0-10 cm) had the largest spatial dependency compared with the other layers. The mapping revealed a decreasing trend of SOC concentrations from south to north across this region of the Gobi desert, with higher levels close to an oasis and lower levels surrounded by mountains and near the desert. SOC density to depths of 20 and 40 cm for this 40 km2 area was estimated at 0.42 and 0.68 kg C m(-2), respectively. This study provides an important contribution to understanding the role of the Gobi desert in the global carbon cycle.

  1. Spatial Variability and Stocks of Soil Organic Carbon in the Gobi Desert of Northwestern China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Pingping; Shao, Ming'an

    2014-01-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) plays an important role in improving soil properties and the C global cycle. Limited attention, though, has been given to assessing the spatial patterns and stocks of SOC in desert ecosystems. In this study, we quantitatively evaluated the spatial variability of SOC and its influencing factors and estimated SOC storage in a region (40 km2) of the Gobi desert. SOC exhibited a log-normal depth distribution with means of 1.6, 1.5, 1.4, and 1.4 g kg−1 for the 0–10, 10–20, 20–30, and 30–40 cm layers, respectively, and was moderately variable according to the coefficients of variation (37–42%). Variability of SOC increased as the sampling area expanded and could be well parameterized as a power function of the sampling area. Significant correlations were detected between SOC and soil physical properties, i.e. stone, sand, silt, and clay contents and soil bulk density. The relatively coarse fractions, i.e. sand, silt, and stone contents, had the largest effects on SOC variability. Experimental semivariograms of SOC were best fitted by exponential models. Nugget-to-sill ratios indicated a strong spatial dependence for SOC concentrations at all depths in the study area. The surface layer (0–10 cm) had the largest spatial dependency compared with the other layers. The mapping revealed a decreasing trend of SOC concentrations from south to north across this region of the Gobi desert, with higher levels close to an oasis and lower levels surrounded by mountains and near the desert. SOC density to depths of 20 and 40 cm for this 40 km2 area was estimated at 0.42 and 0.68 kg C m−2, respectively. This study provides an important contribution to understanding the role of the Gobi desert in the global carbon cycle. PMID:24733073

  2. Controls on Nitrate Spatial Variability in Paine Run Catchment of Shenandoah National Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingram, S. M.; Scanlon, T. M.

    2007-12-01

    This research examines the catchment-scale controls on in-stream nitrate concentrations by (1) quantifying nitrate spatial variability in a headwater catchment and (2) determining the biophysical processes underlying this variability. The Shenandoah Watershed Study (SWAS) established thirty-eight stream sampling sites in the Paine Run catchment to collect field data on stream chemistry, discharge and transient storage. An evaluation of SWAS data at these sites from the early 1990s to 2007 reveals spatial and temporal variability in nitrate concentrations following the gypsy moth defoliation. We observed high in-stream nitrate concentrations with elevation and an apparent dilution at lower elevations. Main topographic descriptors related to the spatial distribution of nitrate, elevation and contributing area, are associated with differing biophysical factors such as soil residence time, bacterial denitrification, vegetation and mineralization. Previous studies have demonstrated that the physical properties of hyporheic zones can strongly influence denitrification rates. We examined this in the Paine Run catchment with tracer tests to evaluate dilution effects and predict stream outflow and inflow from hyporheic zones responsible for denitrification. We then looked for biophysical processes responsible for higher nitrate levels at higher elevation by using the OTIS model for transient storage to evaluate hyporhiec zones in Paine Run. We also established a method to evaluate soil parameters for depth and permeability. By identifying the controls on nitrate inputs, transport and denitrification, we isolated a set of criteria applied to a quantitative model for nitrate spatial variability. This research has important implications for defining nutrient availability both within the stream network and at the outlet of forested headwater catchments.

  3. Charactering Spatial Variability of Soil Properties Measured on a Transect by Multifractal Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paz González, A.; Valcarcel Armesto, M.; Dafonte Dafonte, J.; Mirás Avalos, J. M.; da Silva Días, R.; Marinho, M. A.; de Abreu, C. A.

    2012-04-01

    Spatial variability of soils in landscapes has been studied in different ways, for example in terms of soil survey reliability, soil development and erosive processes. Due to the advent of site-specific management in the 1990s, there is now an increasing interest in measuring the amount of soil variability within a field. Methods for assessing spatial variability also include use of transect techniques to sample soil sequences. On the other hand, over the past few decades fractal and multifractal models have been applied in the evaluation of the spatial variability of soil attributes. Therefore, the aim of this study was to characterize the spatial variability of general soil properties and extractable nutrients measured along a transect by means of multifractal analysis. The field work was conducted at the experimental farm of CIAM located in Mabegondo, A Coruña, Spain on a gently slope. The soil was loamy textured. Soil samples were taken at 66 points located 0.8 m apart along a transect of 52 m. Samples were analyzed for pH, organic matter content (OM), exchangeable K, Mg and Ca, exchangeable H+Al, and DTPA extractable Fe, Mn, Cu and Zn. In addition, sum of bases (SB), cation exchange capacity (CEC) and percent base saturation (V) were calculated from exchangeable cations. For all the studied statistical moments the logarithm of the normalized measures varied linearly (r2 > 0.87) with the logarithm of the measurement scale, meaning that the distribution of the measure could be considered as a fractal. The scaling properties of the soil properties studied were further characterized to determine if the scaling types was monofractal or multifractal. To this effect selected indices were calculated from the generalized dimension function, Dq. So for a distribution with a monofractal tendency values of the correlation dimension D2 and the entropy dimension, D1, become similar to the capacity dimension, D0, however D0 >D1 > D2 if the distribution has a tendency to

  4. Form drag in rivers due to small-scale natural topographic features: 1. Regular sequences

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kean, J.W.; Smith, J.D.

    2006-01-01

    Small-scale topographic features are commonly found on the boundaries of natural rivers, streams, and floodplains. A simple method for determining the form drag on these features is presented, and the results of this model are compared to laboratory measurements. The roughness elements are modeled as Gaussian-shaped features defined in terms of three parameters: a protrusion height, H; a streamwise length scale, ??; and a spacing between crests, ??. This shape is shown to be a good approximation to a wide variety of natural topographic bank features. The form drag on an individual roughness element embedded in a series of identical elements is determined using the drag coefficient of the individual element and a reference velocity that includes the effects of roughness elements further upstream. In addition to calculating the drag on each element, the model determines the spatially averaged total stress, skin friction stress, and roughness height of the boundary. The effects of bank roughness on patterns of velocity and boundary shear stress are determined by combining the form drag model with a channel flow model. The combined model shows that drag on small-scale topographic features substantially alters the near-bank flow field. These methods can be used to improve predictions of flow resistance in rivers and to form the basis for fully predictive (no empirically adjusted parameters) channel flow models. They also provide a foundation for calculating the near-bank boundary shear stress fields necessary for determining rates of sediment transport and lateral erosion.

  5. Form drag in rivers due to small-scale natural topographic features: 1. Regular sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kean, Jason W.; Smith, J. Dungan

    2006-12-01

    Small-scale topographic features are commonly found on the boundaries of natural rivers, streams, and floodplains. A simple method for determining the form drag on these features is presented, and the results of this model are compared to laboratory measurements. The roughness elements are modeled as Gaussian-shaped features defined in terms of three parameters: a protrusion height, H; a streamwise length scale, σ; and a spacing between crests, λ. This shape is shown to be a good approximation to a wide variety of natural topographic bank features. The form drag on an individual roughness element embedded in a series of identical elements is determined using the drag coefficient of the individual element and a reference velocity that includes the effects of roughness elements further upstream. In addition to calculating the drag on each element, the model determines the spatially averaged total stress, skin friction stress, and roughness height of the boundary. The effects of bank roughness on patterns of velocity and boundary shear stress are determined by combining the form drag model with a channel flow model. The combined model shows that drag on small-scale topographic features substantially alters the near-bank flow field. These methods can be used to improve predictions of flow resistance in rivers and to form the basis for fully predictive (no empirically adjusted parameters) channel flow models. They also provide a foundation for calculating the near-bank boundary shear stress fields necessary for determining rates of sediment transport and lateral erosion.

  6. What scatter-hoarding animals have taught us about small-scale navigation.

    PubMed

    Gould, Kristy L; Kelly, Debbie M; Kamil, Alan C

    2010-03-27

    Many animals use cues for small-scale navigation, including beacons, landmarks, compasses and geometric properties. Scatter-hoarding animals are a unique system to study small-scale navigation. They have to remember and relocate many individual spatial locations, be fairly accurate in their searching and have to remember these locations for long stretches of time. In this article, we review what is known about cue use in both scatter-hoarding birds and rodents. We discuss the importance of local versus global cues, the encoding of bearings and geometric rules, the use of external compasses such as the Sun and the influence of the shape of experimental enclosures in relocating caches or hidden food. Scatter-hoarding animals are highly flexible in how and what they encode. There also appear to be differences in what scatter-hoarding birds and rodents encode, as well as what scatter-hoarding animals in general encode compared with other animals. Areas for future research with scatter-hoarding animals are discussed in light of what is currently known.

  7. Observational Criteria For Small-scale Turbulent Dynamo In The Solar Photosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramenko, Valentyna; Goode, P.; Yurchyshyn, V.

    2012-05-01

    Generation and dispersal of the magnetic field on the Sun is a key mechanism responsible for solar activity on all spatial and temporal scales - from the solar cycle down to the evolution of small-scale magnetic elements in the quiet Sun. The solar dynamo operates as a non-linear dynamical process and is thought to be manifested in two types: as a global dynamo responsible for the solar cycle periodicity, and as a small-scale turbulent dynamo (SSTD) responsible for the formation of magnetic carpet in the quiet Sun. Numerous MHD simulations of the solar turbulence did not yet reach a consensus as to the existence and role of SSTD on the Sun. At the same time, high-resolution observations of the quiet Sun are capable to provide certain criteria to prove or rule out SSTD. We suggest to probe four possible criteria: i) mutual behaviour of the kinetic and magnetic power spectra; ii) intermittency/multifractality of the magnetic field; iii) smallest observed scale of magnetic flux tubes; iv) regime of magnetic diffusivity on smallest observable scales. We analyse magnetic, velocity and solar granulation data as derived from Hinode/SOT, SOHO/MDI, SDO/HMI and the New Solar Telescope (NST) of Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO) to explore the possibilities for SSTD in the quiet Sun.

  8. Spatial variability of the properties of marsh soils and their impact on vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidorova, V. A.; Svyatova, E. N.; Tseits, M. A.

    2015-03-01

    Spatial variability of the properties of soils and the character of vegetation was studied on seacoasts of the Velikii Island in the Kandalaksha Bay of the White Sea. It was found that the chemical and physicochemical properties of marsh soils (Tidalic Fluvisols) are largely dictated by the distance from the sea and elevation of the sampling point above sea level. The spatial distribution of the soil properties is described by a quadratic trend surface. With an increase in the distance from the sea, the concentration of ions in the soil solution decreases, and the organic carbon content and soil acidity become higher. The spatial dependence of the degree of variability in the soil properties is moderate. Regular changes in the soil properties along the sea-land gradient are accompanied by the presence of specific spatial patterns related to the system of temporary water streams, huge boulders, and beached heaps of sea algae and wood debris. The cluster analysis made it possible to distinguish between five soil classes corresponding to the following plant communities: barren surface (no permanent vegetation), clayey-sandy littoral with sparse halophytes, marsh with large rhizomatous grasses, and grass-forb-bunchberry vegetation of forest margins. The subdivision into classes is especially distinct with respect to the concentration of chloride ions. The following groups of factors affect the distribution of vegetation: the composition of the soil solution, the height above sea level, the pH of water suspensions, and the humus content.

  9. Small-Scale Hydroelectric Power in the Pacific Northwest: New Impetus for an Old Energy Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1980-07-01

    The small scale hydroelectric power policy projects of the national conference of state legislators (NCSL) was designed to assist state legislators in looking at the benefits of one alternative, small scale hydro. Because of the need for state legislative support in the development of small scale hydroelectric, NCSL, as part of its contract with the Department of Energy, conducted the following conference on small scale hydro in the Pacific Northwest. State obstacles to development and options for change available to policymakers were explored.

  10. Fine scale spatial variability of microbial pesticide degradation in soil: scales, controlling factors, and implications

    PubMed Central

    Dechesne, Arnaud; Badawi, Nora; Aamand, Jens; Smets, Barth F.

    2014-01-01

    Pesticide biodegradation is a soil microbial function of critical importance for modern agriculture and its environmental impact. While it was once assumed that this activity was homogeneously distributed at the field scale, mounting evidence indicates that this is rarely the case. Here, we critically examine the literature on spatial variability of pesticide biodegradation in agricultural soil. We discuss the motivations, methods, and main findings of the primary literature. We found significant diversity in the approaches used to describe and quantify spatial heterogeneity, which complicates inter-studies comparisons. However, it is clear that the presence and activity of pesticide degraders is often highly spatially variable with coefficients of variation often exceeding 50% and frequently displays non-random spatial patterns. A few controlling factors have tentatively been identified across pesticide classes: they include some soil characteristics (pH) and some agricultural management practices (pesticide application, tillage), while other potential controlling factors have more conflicting effects depending on the site or the pesticide. Evidence demonstrating the importance of spatial heterogeneity on the fate of pesticides in soil has been difficult to obtain but modeling and experimental systems that do not include soil's full complexity reveal that this heterogeneity must be considered to improve prediction of pesticide biodegradation rates or of leaching risks. Overall, studying the spatial heterogeneity of pesticide biodegradation is a relatively new field at the interface of agronomy, microbial ecology, and geosciences and a wealth of novel data is being collected from these different disciplinary perspectives. We make suggestions on possible avenues to take full advantage of these investigations for a better understanding and prediction of the fate of pesticides in soil. PMID:25538691

  11. Fine scale spatial variability of microbial pesticide degradation in soil: scales, controlling factors, and implications.

    PubMed

    Dechesne, Arnaud; Badawi, Nora; Aamand, Jens; Smets, Barth F

    2014-01-01

    Pesticide biodegradation is a soil microbial function of critical importance for modern agriculture and its environmental impact. While it was once assumed that this activity was homogeneously distributed at the field scale, mounting evidence indicates that this is rarely the case. Here, we critically examine the literature on spatial variability of pesticide biodegradation in agricultural soil. We discuss the motivations, methods, and main findings of the primary literature. We found significant diversity in the approaches used to describe and quantify spatial heterogeneity, which complicates inter-studies comparisons. However, it is clear that the presence and activity of pesticide degraders is often highly spatially variable with coefficients of variation often exceeding 50% and frequently displays non-random spatial patterns. A few controlling factors have tentatively been identified across pesticide classes: they include some soil characteristics (pH) and some agricultural management practices (pesticide application, tillage), while other potential controlling factors have more conflicting effects depending on the site or the pesticide. Evidence demonstrating the importance of spatial heterogeneity on the fate of pesticides in soil has been difficult to obtain but modeling and experimental systems that do not include soil's full complexity reveal that this heterogeneity must be considered to improve prediction of pesticide biodegradation rates or of leaching risks. Overall, studying the spatial heterogeneity of pesticide biodegradation is a relatively new field at the interface of agronomy, microbial ecology, and geosciences and a wealth of novel data is being collected from these different disciplinary perspectives. We make suggestions on possible avenues to take full advantage of these investigations for a better understanding and prediction of the fate of pesticides in soil.

  12. Quantifying Spatial and Seasonal Variability in Atmospheric Ammonia with In Situ and Space-Based Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinder, Robert W.; Walker, John T.; Bash, Jesse O.; Cady-Pereira, Karen E.; Henze, Daven K.; Luo, Mingzhao; Osterman, Gregory B.; Shepard, Mark W.

    2011-01-01

    Ammonia plays an important role in many biogeochemical processes, yet atmospheric mixing ratios are not well known. Recently, methods have been developed for retrieving NH3 from space-based observations, but they have not been compared to in situ measurements. We have conducted a field campaign combining co-located surface measurements and satellite special observations from the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES). Our study includes 25 surface monitoring sites spanning 350 km across eastern North Carolina, a region with large seasonal and spatial variability in NH3. From the TES spectra, we retrieve a NH3 representative volume mixing ratio (RVMR), and we restrict our analysis to times when the region of the atmosphere observed by TES is representative of the surface measurement. We find that the TES NH3 RVMR qualitatively captures the seasonal and spatial variability found in eastern North Carolina. Both surface measurements and TES NH3 show a strong correspondence with the number of livestock facilities within 10 km of the observation. Furthermore, we find that TES H3 RVMR captures the month-to-month variability present in the surface observations. The high correspondence with in situ measurements and vast spatial coverage make TES NH3 RVMR a valuable tool for understanding regional and global NH3 fluxes.

  13. Three-dimensional spatial variability of chemical properties around a monitored waste emplacement tunnel.

    PubMed

    Glassley, William E; Nitao, John J; Grant, Charles W

    2003-01-01

    Regulatory requirements and scientific needs require that the response of the geological system to emplacement of high level radioactive waste be monitored for long time periods. This monitoring activity is intended to establish the extent to which predicted behavior matches the actual response of the geological system to waste emplacement. To accomplish this goal, field measurements must be made at a spatial resolution that will determine whether the changes in parameters that are monitored conform to predicted evolutionary patterns. From the perspective of thermohydrological and geochemical parameters, key measurements will consider pore water compositional evolution and changes in matrix and fracture saturation in the near vicinity of waste emplacement tunnels. A massively parallel high performance computational platform (a 1200 processor IBM SP-2) was used to conduct three-dimensional, high resolution simulations to ascertain the spatial variability to be expected during a monitoring period. The results show that spatial variability in certain chemical parameters below waste emplacement tunnels provides robust targets for monitoring, but will require sampling on the scale of 10 s of centimeters in some locations, in order to rigorously test models. Chemical variability induced by relatively small changes in waste package heat output suggests that designing a monitoring program that will rigorously test model predictions will likely require high resolution, three-dimensional simulations of the "as-built" monitoring tunnels.

  14. Evaluating Spatial Heterogeneity and Environmental Variability Inferred from Branched Glycerol Dialkyl Glycerol Tetraethers (GDGTs) Distribution in Soils from Valles Caldera, New Mexic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras Quintana, S. H.; Werne, J. P.; Brown, E. T.; Halbur, J.; Sinninghe Damsté, , J.; Schouten, S.; Correa-Metrio, A.; Fawcett, P. J.

    2014-12-01

    Branched glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGTs) are recently discovered bacterial membrane lipids, ubiquitously present in peat bogs and soils, as well as in rivers, lakes and lake sediments. Their distribution appears to be controlled mainly by soil pH and annual mean air temperature (MAT) and they have been increasingly used as paleoclimate proxies in sedimentary records. In order to validate their application as paleoclimate proxies, it is essential evaluate the influence of small scale environmental variability on their distribution. Initial application of the original soil-based branched GDGT distribution proxy to lacustrine sediments from Valles Caldera, New Mexico (NM) was promising, producing a viable temperature record spanning two glacial/interglacial cycles. In this study, we assess the influence of analytical and spatial soil heterogeneity on the concentration and distribution of 9 branched GDGTs in soils from Valles Caldera, and show how this variability is propagated to MAT and pH estimates using multiple soil-based branched GDGT transfer functions. Our results show that significant differences in the abundance and distribution of branched GDGTs in soil can be observed even within a small area such as Valles Caldera. Although the original MBT-CBT calibration appears to give robust MAT estimates and the newest calibration provides pH estimates in better agreement with modern local soils in Valles Caldera, the environmental heterogeneity (e.g. vegetation type and soil moisture) appears to affect the precision of MAT and pH estimates. Furthermore, the heterogeneity of soils leads to significant variability among samples taken even from within a square meter. While such soil heterogeneity is not unknown (and is typically controlled for by combining multiple samples), this study quantifies heterogeneity relative to branched GDGT-based proxies for the first time, indicating that care must be taken with samples from heterogeneous soils in MAT and p

  15. Spatial and temporal variability of snow accumulation in East Antarctica from traverse data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frezzotti, Massimo; Pourchet, Michel; Flora, Onelio; Gandolfi, Stefano; Gay, Michel; Urbini, Stefano; Vincent, Christian; Becagli, Silvia; Gragnani, Roberto; Proposito, Marco; Severi, Mirko; Traversi, Rita; Udisti, Roberto; Fily, Michel

    Recent snow accumulation rate is a key quantity for ice-core and mass-balance studies. Several accumulation measurement methods (stake farm, fin core, snow-radar profiling, surface morphology, remote sensing) were used, compared and integrated at eight sites along a transect from Terra Nova Bay to Dome C, East Antarctica, to provide information about the spatial and temporal variability of snow accumulation. Thirty-nine cores were dated by identifying tritium/β marker levels (1965-66) and non-sea-salt (nss) SO42- spikes of the Tambora (Indonesia) volcanic event (1816) in order to provide information on temporal variability. Cores were linked by snow radar and global positioning system surveys to provide detailed information on spatial variability in snow accumulation. Stake-farm and ice-core accumulation rates are observed to differ significantly, but isochrones (snow radar) correlate well with ice-core derived accumulation. The accumulation/ablation pattern from stake measurements suggests that the annual local noise (metre scale) in snow accumulation can approach 2 years of ablation and more than four times the average annual accumulation, with no accumulation or ablation for a 5 year period in up to 40% of cases. The spatial variability of snow accumulation at the kilometre scale is one order of magnitude higher than temporal variability at the multi-decadal/secular scale. Stake measurements and firn cores at Dome C confirm an approximate 30% increase in accumulation over the last two centuries, with respect to the average over the last 5000 years.

  16. Predictive modelling of NAPL injection tests in variable aperture spatially correlated fractures.

    PubMed

    Steele, A; Lerner, D N

    2001-06-01

    In preparation for a field experiment where a NAPL will be injected into a fractured sandstone aquifer, a 2D invasion percolation model of DNAPL migration in a single horizontal fracture with varying aperture has been developed. This simulation investigated the effect of spatially correlated fracture aperture fields on pressure-saturation relationships as a function of variable aperture mean, standard deviation, and spatial correlation statistics under hydrostatic conditions. Results from spatially correlated variable aperture fields can be significantly different from random fields. Longer ranges decreased entry pressures and higher standard deviations decreased nonwetting phase saturations. Mean aperture is the major control on displacement pressure, entry pressure and the form of the pressure-saturation curve. Simulation results using statistical parameters for a variable aperture natural sandstone fracture as described by Yeo et al. [International Journal of Rock Mechanics and Mining Sciences 35 (1998) 1051] closely resemble a Brooks-Corey pressure-saturation function, and exhibit a distinct entry pressure followed by a rapid increase in nonwetting phase saturation. Graphical estimates of entry pressure provide a good approximation of the critical aperture controlling the formation of a continuous nonwetting phase pathway in a variable aperture fracture. Consequently, we show that multiphase flow concepts developed for porous media can successfully be applied to variable aperture fractures. Entry pressure correlates well to the mean aperture in these simulations when using a Gaussian distribution of fracture aperture. Interpreted aperture distributions from NAPL injection experiments do not fit the true distribution well at low nonwetting phase saturations, but do at higher saturations above the entry pressure. Consequently, true, mechanical aperture variation within a fracture plane cannot be determined from NAPL injection experiments either in the field or

  17. The Structure and Climate of Size: Small Scale Schooling in an Urban District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeChasseur, Kimberly

    2009-01-01

    This study explores mechanisms involved in small scale schooling and student engagement. Specifically, this study questions the validity of arguments for small scale schooling reforms that confound the promised effects of small scale schooling "structures" (such as smaller enrollments, schools-within-schools, and smaller class sizes) with the…

  18. The Trade-Off between Spatial and Temporal Variabilities in Reciprocal Upper-Limb Aiming Movements of Different Durations

    PubMed Central

    Danion, Frederic; Bongers, Raoul M.; Bootsma, Reinoud J.

    2014-01-01

    The spatial and temporal aspects of movement variability have typically been studied separately. As a result the relationship between spatial and temporal variabilities remains largely unknown. In two experiments we examined the evolution and covariation of spatial and temporal variabilities over variations in the duration of reciprocal aiming movements. Experiments differed in settings: In Experiment 1 participants moved unperturbed whereas in Experiment 2 they were confronted with an elastic force field. Different movement durations—for a constant inter-target distance—were either evoked by imposing spatial accuracy constraints while requiring participants to move as fast as possible, or prescribed by means of an auditory metronome while requiring participants to maximize spatial accuracy. Analyses focused on absolute and relative variabilities, respectively captured by the standard deviation (SD) and the coefficient of variation (CV = SD/mean). Spatial variability (both SDspace and CVspace) decreased with movement duration, while temporal variability (both SDtime and CVtime) increased with movement duration. We found strong negative correlations between spatial and temporal variabilities over variations in movement duration, whether the variability examined was absolute or relative. These findings observed at the level of the full movement contrasted with the findings observed at the level of the separate acceleration and deceleration phases of movement. During the separate acceleration and deceleration phases both spatial and temporal variabilities (SD and CV) were found to increase with their respective durations, leading to positive correlations between them. Moreover, variability was generally larger at the level of the constituent movement phases than at the level of the full movement. The general pattern of results was robust, as it emerged in both tasks in each of the two experiments. We conclude that feedback mechanisms operating to maximize task

  19. Determination of Nutrient Laden Preferential Flow Contributing to Hot Spots/Moments in the Soil on a Small Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodward, C.; Johnson, D. W.

    2010-12-01

    Nutrient hot spots/moments in the soil are described by McClain et. al. as “patches [in the soil] that show disproportionately high reaction rates relative to the surrounding matrix, whereas hot moments are defined as short periods of time that exhibit disproportionately high reaction rates relative to longer intervening time periods.” Hot spots/moments are a new field of research and much is unknown of their formation, period of existence in the soil, and hot they effect the surrounding environment. It is believed that they play a pertinent role in the biogeochemical cycling of nutrients and may contribute to nutrient stream loads. The purpose of this study is to understand spatial variability in nutrients on a small scale and to investigate the potential for O-horizon interflow contributing to hot spots/hot moments in the mineral soil. To test this hypothesis small grids were set up in the Critical Zone Observatory (CZO) research station, King’s River Watershed, California. Two grids were 7x7m in size and are composed of; a barrier placed in the O-horizon to truncate interflow, a barrier with a cation/anion UniBest® resin capsule, a capsule with no barrier and a control point. After one year soil cores will be taken at each sampling point and both the organic and mineral horizon will be analyzed for nutrients. Statistical will be performed to determine if the interflow contributed to hot spots/moments in the mineral soil. Two 4x5m grids were also created with 20 sampling points containing leaf litter bags. Out of the 20 bags 10 have barriers around them. These will be left for two years after which the litter bags will be removed and weighed to determine if interflow contributes do decomposition in the organic horizon. The results from this research will be critical for understanding hot spot/moments in the soil on a small scale and what contributes to their formation.

  20. Investigating GRACE Range-Rate Observations over West Africa with respect to Small-Scale Hydrological Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Springer, A.; Eicker, A.; Kusche, J.; Longuevergne, L.; Diekkrüger, B.; Jütten, T.

    2015-12-01

    Here, GRACE K-band range rate (KBRR) observations are analyzed for the effects from small-scale hydrological signals over West Africa including water level changes in reservoirs, extreme weather events, and water storage variability predicted by hydrological models. The presented approach, which is based on level 1B data, avoids the downward continuation and filtering process required for computing monthly gravity field solutions and, thus, enables to assess hydrological signals with a high temporal resolution and at small spatial scales. In a first step, water mass variations derived from tide gauges, altimetry, and from hydrological model output are converted into simulated KBRR observations. Secondly, these simulated observations and a number of geophysical corrections are reduced from the original GRACE K-band observations to obtain the residuals for a time span of ten years. Then, (i) the residuals are used to validate differently modeled water mass variations and (ii) extreme weather events are identified in the residuals. West Africa represents an interesting study region as it is increasingly facing exteme precipitation events and floodings. In this study, monthly and daily output from different global hydrological models is validated for their representation of long-term and short-term (daily) water storage variability over West Africa. The daily RMS of KBRR residuals ranges between 0.1 μm/s and 0.7 μm/s. Smaller residuals imply that the model is able to better explain the observations. For example, we find that in 2007 the Land Surface Discharge Model (LSDM) better agrees with GRACE range-rate observations than the Water-GAP Global Hydrology Model (WGHM) and the GLDAS-Noah land surface model. Furthermore, we confirm previous studies and show that the signal from Lake Volta is distinctly contained in the residuals. Finally, we investigate variations of other smaller reservoirs and the floodings over West Africa in June 2009 and over Benin in October 2010.

  1. Numerical modeling of spatially-variable precipitation and passive margin escarpment evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colberg, J. S.; Anders, A. M.

    2014-02-01

    Passive margin escarpments are long-lasting landforms which can remain steep and high over tens of millions of years. Precipitation variability has seldom been considered as a contributor to passive margin escarpment evolution. However, large and distinct variability in precipitation rates with elevation is observed in mountainous landscapes. We assess the potential impacts of spatially variable precipitation on passive margin escarpment evolution with a numerical model that couples a simple elevation-dependent precipitation rule with the CASCADE surface processes model and a simple flexural uplift model. Modeled topography is more sensitive to the elevation of the precipitation maximum than to the effective elastic thickness of the lithosphere. If precipitation is maximized at the escarpment crest, the escarpment decreases in elevation, slope and proximity to the coast more rapidly than if precipitation is focused at low elevations. Low elevation precipitation maxima contribute to increasing escarpment slope over time and preservation of a high-elevation escarpment. Using Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) precipitation radar data, we establish precipitation/elevation relationships at high-elevation passive margins across the tropics and document the occurrence of patterns similar to those included in our model. Despite uncertainty as to the robustness of precipitation patterns and the simplified tectonic and geomorphic framework of our model we conclude that spatial variability in precipitation is a potentially significant contributor to passive margin escarpment evolution.

  2. Temporal and spatial variability of microphytobenthos in a shallow lagoon: Ria Formosa (Portugal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brito, Ana; Newton, Alice; Tett, Paul; Fernandes, Teresa F.

    2009-06-01

    Microphytobenthos (MPB) are an important, yet highly variable, component of productive shallow systems and intertidal areas. Samples were collected from Ria Formosa, Portugal, to assess the temporal and spatial variability of microphytobenthic chlorophyll in two types of intertidal sediment: mud and sand. Chlorophyll pigments were measured spectrophotometrically after freeze-drying and extraction into an acetone-water mixture. Time-series of superficial chlorophyll measured at two sites during 2006-2007 showed no obvious seasonal peaks. A truncated Fourier series was fitted to the time-series data. Seasonality was very weak: only 5% of the estimated total variance could be explained by annual cycle components up to 3 year -1, while 25% was explained by waves with periods from 14 to 91 days. The residual error of the Fourier series was partitioned into within-day variance (61%) and other components (9%). The within-day variation was made up of roughly equal contributions from: (i) variability associated with sampling within-sites; and (ii) differences between-sites. There were no significant correlations between MPB chlorophyll and tidal range, wind speed, solar irradiance, water temperature and salinity and water nutrient concentrations. Sediment type was once more confirmed to be a key factor to MPB spatial variability. These results are discussed in relation to processes controlling the distribution of benthic microalgae in Ria Formosa, and their implications considered in relation to on-going work to understand and model the role of microphytobenthos in eutrophication in such water bodies.

  3. Spatial Variability in Biodegradation Rates as Evidenced by Methane Production from an Aquifer

    PubMed Central

    Adrian, Neal R.; Robinson, Joseph A.; Suflita, Joseph M.

    1994-01-01

    Accurate predictions of carbon and energy cycling rates in the environment depend on sampling frequencies and on the spatial variability associated with biological activities. We examined the variability associated with anaerobic biodegradation rates at two sites in an alluvial sand aquifer polluted by municipal landfill leachate. In situ rates of methane production were measured for almost a year, using anaerobic wells installed at two sites. Methane production ranged from 0 to 560 μmol · m-2 · day-1 at one site (A), while a range of 0 to 120,000 μmol · m-2 · day-1 was measured at site B. The mean and standard deviations associated with methane production at site A were 17 and 57 μmol · m-2 · day-1, respectively. The comparable summary statistics for site B were 2,000 and 9,900 μmol · m-2 · day-1. The coefficients of variation at sites A and B were 340 and 490%, respectively. Despite these differences, the two sites had similar seasonal trends, with the maximal rate of methane production occurring in summer. However, the relative variability associated with the seasonal rates changed very little. Our results suggest that (i) two spatially distinct sites exist in the aquifer, (ii) methanogenesis is a highly variable process, (iii) the coefficient of variation varied little with the rate of methane production, and (iv) in situ anaerobic biodegradation rates are lognormally distributed. PMID:16349410

  4. Analysis of Large Scale Spatial Variability of Soil Moisture Using a Geostatistical Method

    PubMed Central

    Lakhankar, Tarendra; Jones, Andrew S.; Combs, Cynthia L.; Sengupta, Manajit; Vonder Haar, Thomas H.; Khanbilvardi, Reza

    2010-01-01

    Spatial and temporal soil moisture dynamics are critically needed to improve the parameterization for hydrological and meteorological modeling processes. This study evaluates the statistical spatial structure of large-scale observed and simulated estimates of soil moisture under pre- and post-precipitation event conditions. This large scale variability is a crucial in calibration and validation of large-scale satellite based data assimilation systems. Spatial analysis using geostatistical approaches was used to validate modeled soil moisture by the Agriculture Meteorological (AGRMET) model using in situ measurements of soil moisture from a state-wide environmental monitoring network (Oklahoma Mesonet). The results show that AGRMET data produces larger spatial decorrelation compared to in situ based soil moisture data. The precipitation storms drive the soil moisture spatial structures at large scale, found smaller decorrelation length after precipitation. This study also evaluates the geostatistical approach for mitigation for quality control issues within in situ soil moisture network to estimates at soil moisture at unsampled stations. PMID:22315576

  5. A new method of adjusting spatial and temporal biases for selected climate variables.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grillakis, Manolis; Koutroulis, Aristeidis; Tsanis, Ioannis

    2016-04-01

    Climate models is a valuable source of data for climate change impact studies. Often, the climate model data cannot be used in their native form due to the presence of biases. The lack of an appropriate adjustment of climate forcings may even lead to unrealistic model results. Many methodologies of bias adjustment have been developed and can be found in the literature dealing with the temporal biases in the time-series. Their main task is to adjust the temporal statistical properties of climate simulations for a single point value to resemble those of observations in a common climate period. However, they do not adjust or retain the spatial patterns of the data with respect to the observational datasets. In cases where impact models are sensitive to the spatial distribution of the variables, the adjustment of the spatial patterns is equally or more important to the adjustment of the temporal statistics. Examples of such impact models are cyclone tracking schemes or coastal flooding models that consider the spatial structure of wind and/or atmospheric pressure data. Here we develop a method to deal with this type of biases in space, along with the temporal biases. The methodology considers correction in the entire spectrum of CDF data and then redistribution of the data in time, to adjust the spatial consistency against observations. The methodology is tested on surface pressure and wind data derived from selected global climate models.

  6. Modeling the temporal, spatial and chemical variability in bioaccumulation: Issues and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Thomann, R.V.

    1995-12-31

    As new data are generated, it is becoming increasingly clear that there is considerable variability of chemical concentrations in aquatic organisms over time, space and chemical classes. Examples include the Bioaccumulation Factor (BAF) of PCB congeners in Green Bay and the Hudson estuary, PAHs in river systems, and mercury speciation over trophic space in lakes as well as chemical variability in organs of aquatic animals. Understanding the causes of such variability through food web transfer models is important in predicting the impacts of chemical accumulation on the aquatic and wildlife related ecosystems. Variability is considered from three sources: bioavailable water and sediment concentrations, ecosystem dynamics and chemical type and structure. BAF models are used to evaluate the contribution of these sources of variability to the observed BAF. For example: (1) for the Hudson estuary PCB congeners in the blue fish, a time variable BAF model indicates the significance of organism weight changes on uptake and deputation during migration into the estuary, (2) for methyl Hg in upper trophic levels, a BAF model indicates the potential for methylation by top predators, (3) for Green Bay PCB congeners, a BAF model as a function of log Kow does not explain observed variability within a Kow sub-class, and (4) for cadmium in fish, a pharmacokinetic model shows the significance of within-organism metal transfers. The current BAF models aid significantly in understanding the variability in organism chemical concentrations and also indicate gaps in predicting chemical-specific (e.g., PCB congener) behavior. Since toxicity effects and ecosystem health are ultimately determined by temporal and spatial exposure to specific chemicals, BAF models must be further developed to explain the variability in observed data.

  7. Predicting the Spatial Variability of Fuel Moisture Content in Mountainous Eucalyptus Forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheridan, G. J.; Nyman, P.; Lane, P. N. J.; Metzen, D.

    2014-12-01

    In steep mountainous landscapes, topographic aspect can play a significant role in small-scale (ie. scales in the order of 10's ha) variability in surface fuel moisture. Experimental sites for monitoring microclimate variables and moisture content in litter and in near-surface soils were established at a control site and on four contrasting aspects (north, south, east and west) in southeast Australia. At each of the four microclimate sites sensors are arranged to measure the soil moisture (2 replicates), surface fuel moisture at 2.5cm depth (12 replicates), precipitation throughfall (3 replicates), radiation (3 replicates), and screen level relative humidity, air temperature, leaf wetness, and wind speed (1 replicate of each). Temperature and relative humidity are also measured within the dead fine surface fuel using Ibutton's (4 replicates). All measurements are logged continuously at 15 min intervals. The moisture content of the surface fuel is estimated using a novel method involving high-replication of low-cost continuous soil moisture sensors placed at the centre of a 5cm deep sample of fine dead surface fuel, referred to here as "litter-packs". The litter-packs were constructed from fuels collected from the area surrounding the microclimate site. The initial results show the moisture regime on the forest floor was highly sensitive to the incoming shortwave radiation, which was up to 6 times higher in the north-facing (equatorial) slopes due to slope orientation and the sparse vegetation compared to vegetation on the south-facing (polar facing) slopes. Differences in shortwave radiation resulted in peak temperatures within the litter that were up to 2 times higher on the equatorial-facing site than those on the polar-facing site. For instance, on a day in November 2013 with maximum open air temperature of 35o C, the temperatures within the litter layer at the north-facing and south-facing sites were 54o C and 32o C, respectively, despite air temperature at the

  8. Influence of rainfall spatial variability on hydrological modelling: a simulation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emmanuel, I.; Andrieu, H.; Leblois, E.; Janey, N.

    2012-04-01

    The link between rainfall space-time variability and hydrological modelling at a catchment outlet remains an open research issue in hydrology and it puts the following question: is it relevant to consider the spatial distribution of rainfall in hydrological modelling? Radar images provide a detailed knowledge on rainfall spatial variability which was not available with rain gauge networks. Thus, different case studies, linked to different approaches, have been carried out in order to determine the interest of radar images for flood runoff modelling. However, the results of such analyses are sometimes contradictory and highlight the difficulty to evaluate the contribution of radar data to hydrological modelling since rainfall measurement errors and modelling errors can not be distinguished from the influence of rainfall variability. In order to overcome errors on rainfall data, to control the rainfall variability and the hydrological behaviour of catchments, we suggest proceeding by simulation. In this way, we have developed a simulation chain composed of a rainfall simulator (based on the turning-band method), a catchment simulator (using the Diffusion-Limited Aggregation method) and a distributed hydrological model (composed of a production function and a transfer function which is based on the Hayami model). This chain was used to evaluate for which type of rainfall and for which characteristics of catchments it is worth considering rainfall input with a high spatial resolution for hydrological modelling. Different scenarios of catchments and of rainfall types were considered. The influence of the size, the shape, the production function and the response time of catchments was analysed. The influence of the temporal variability of rainfall fields was studied by considering high life span rainfall fields characterized by different speeds. Rainfall fields of different spatial extent were also used to evaluate the influence of the spatial variability. Finally

  9. Spatial-temporal variability in GHG fluxes and their functional interpretation in RusFluxNet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasenev, Ivan; Meshalkina, Julia; Sarzhanov, Dmitriy; Mazirov, Ilia; Yaroslavtsev, Alex; Komarova, Tatiana; Tikhonova, Maria

    2016-04-01

    High spatial and temporal variability is mutual feature for most modern boreal landscapes in the European Territory of Russia. This variability is result of their relatively young natural and land-use age with very complicated development stories. RusFluxNet includes a functionally-zonal set of representative natural, agricultural and urban ecosystems from the Central Forest Reserve in the north till the Central Chernozemic Reserve in the south (more than 1000 km distance). Especial attention has been traditionally given to their soil cover and land-use detailed variability, morphogenetic and functional dynamics. Central Forest Biosphere Reserve (360 km to North-West from Moscow) is the principal southern-taiga one in the European territory of Russia with long history of mature spruce ecosystem structure and dynamics investigation. Our studies (in frame of RF Governmental projects #11.G34.31.0079 and #14.120.14.4266) have been concentrated on the soil carbon stocks and GHG fluxes spatial variability and dynamics due to dominated there windthrow and fallow-forest successions. In Moscow RTSAU campus gives a good possibility to develop the ecosystem and soil monitoring of GHG fluxes in the comparable sites of urban forest, field crops and lawn ecosystems taking especial attention on their meso- and micro-relief, soil cover patterns and subsoil, vegetation and land-use technologies, temperature and moisture spatial and temporal variability. In the Central Chernozemic Biosphere Reserve and adjacent areas we do the comparative analysis of GHG fluxes and balances in the virgin and mowed meadow-steppe, forest, pasture, cropland and three types of urban ecosystems with similar subsoil and relief conditions. The carried out researches have shown not only sharp (in 2-5 times) changes in GHG ecosystem and soil fluxes and balances due to seasonal and daily microclimate variation, vegetation and crop development but their essential (in 2-4 times) spatial variability due to

  10. Small-Scale Spray Releases: Additional Aerosol Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Schonewill, Philip P.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Kimura, Marcia L.; Brown, G. N.; Mahoney, Lenna A.; Tran, Diana N.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Kurath, Dean E.

    2013-08-01

    One of the events postulated in the hazard analysis at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities is a breach in process piping that produces aerosols with droplet sizes in the respirable range. The current approach for predicting the size and concentration of aerosols produced in a spray leak involves extrapolating from correlations reported in the literature. These correlations are based on results obtained from small engineered spray nozzles using pure liquids with Newtonian fluid behavior. The narrow ranges of physical properties on which the correlations are based do not cover the wide range of slurries and viscous materials that will be processed in the WTP and across processing facilities in the DOE complex. To expand the data set upon which the WTP accident and safety analyses were based, an aerosol spray leak testing program was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL’s test program addressed two key technical areas to improve the WTP methodology (Larson and Allen 2010). The first technical area was to quantify the role of slurry particles in small breaches where slurry particles may plug the hole and prevent high-pressure sprays. The results from an effort to address this first technical area can be found in Mahoney et al. (2012a). The second technical area was to determine aerosol droplet size distribution and total droplet volume from prototypic breaches and fluids, including sprays from larger breaches and sprays of slurries for which literature data are largely absent. To address the second technical area, the testing program collected aerosol generation data at two scales, commonly referred to as small-scale and large-scale. The small-scale testing and resultant data are described in Mahoney et al. (2012b) and the large-scale testing and resultant data are presented in Schonewill et al. (2012). In tests at both scales, simulants were used to mimic the

  11. Short-term spatial and temporal variability in greenhouse gas fluxes in riparian zones.

    PubMed

    Vidon, P; Marchese, S; Welsh, M; McMillan, S

    2015-08-01

    Recent research indicates that riparian zones have the potential to contribute significant amounts of greenhouse gases (GHG: N2O, CO2, CH4) to the atmosphere. Yet, the short-term spatial and temporal variability in GHG emission in these systems is poorly understood. Using two transects of three static chambers at two North Carolina agricultural riparian zones (one restored, one unrestored), we show that estimates of the average GHG flux at the site scale can vary by one order of magnitude depending on whether the mean or the median is used as a measure of central tendency. Because the median tends to mute the effect of outlier points (hot spots and hot moments), we propose that both must be reported or that other more advanced spatial averaging techniques (e.g., kriging, area-weighted average) should be used to estimate GHG fluxes at the site scale. Results also indicate that short-term temporal variability in GHG fluxes (a few days) under seemingly constant temperature and hydrological conditions can be as large as spatial variability at the site scale, suggesting that the scientific community should rethink sampling protocols for GHG at the soil-atmosphere interface to include repeated measures over short periods of time at select chambers to estimate GHG emissions in the field. Although recent advances in technology provide tools to address these challenges, their cost is often too high for widespread implementation. Until technology improves, sampling design strategies will need to be carefully considered to balance cost, time, and spatial and temporal representativeness of measurements.

  12. Investigation on Temporal Changes of Relative Variables to Forest Fire using Spatial Statistical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, H.; Kim, M.; Lee, W.; Won, M.; Koo, K.

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze spatial and temporal changes of forest fire. The most important characteristic of forest fire occurrence in South Korea is that all fires are human-caused. It is very difficult to estimating the relationship between human and a fire occurrence using general method, such as GIS, statistics and process modeling, since forest fire is related to spatial condition as well as temporal variety of climate factors. And the situation related to fire occurrence is being changed through time passes. Thus, integration of analysis on space and time can be a key in terms of a method. However, before this integration, to examine which factors have more relation to forest fire is very important to estimate the occurrence. And spatial autocorrelation is also important to estimate the occurrence of forest fire in South Korea because the forest fires have strong spatial dependency according to previous studies. In this study, we tried to examine the varieties on coefficients of independent variables of statistical model consider spatial autocorrelation. We used generalized linear mixed model (GLMM) which can consider spatial autocorrelation as the series of temporal variation changes. The variables which are used in this statistical model can be classified four categories, human accessibility, topography, forest cover and meteorological factors. The meteorological factors are used to know changes of fire occurrence pattern from the temporal variations. Time scale is set up by 10-days data. In the result, it showed that the range of spatial autocorrelation was changed by the temporal variance. The more fire occurs the more spatial autocorrelation showed. The estimated coefficients of fixed factors are also changed by the temporal series. In April, the significances of factors of human accessibility were increased. These result is attributed to the fact that national and traditional holidays in April made people visit mountain. However, the

  13. Empirical mode decomposition profilometry: small scale capabilities and comparison to Fourier Transform Profilometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagubeau, Guillaume; Cobelli, Pablo; Bobinski, Tomasz; Maurel, Agnes; Pagneux, Vincent; Petitjeans, Philippe

    2015-11-01

    Fringe projection profilometry is an instrument of choice for the instantaneous measurement of the full height map of a free-surface. It is useful to capture interfacial phenomena such as droplet impact and propagation of water waves. We present the Empirical Mode Decomposition Profilometry (EMDP) for the analysis of fringe projection profilometry images. It is based on an iterative filter, using empirical mode decomposition, that is free of spatial filtering and adapted for surfaces characterized by a broadband spectrum of deformation. Examples of such surfaces can be found in nonlinear wave interaction regimes such as wave turbulence in gravity-capillary water waves. We show both numerically and experimentally that using EMDP improves strongly the profilometry small scale capabilities compared to traditionally used Fourier Transform Profilometry. Moreover, the height reconstruction distortion is much lower: the reconstructed height field is now both spectrally and statistically accurate.

  14. Development, characterization and beam tests of a small-scale TORCH prototype module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo García, L.; Brook, N.; Conneely, T.; Cussans, D.; Föhl, K.; Forty, R.; Frei, C.; Gao, R.; Gys, T.; Harnew, N.; Milnes, J.; Piedigrossi, D.; Ros García, A.; van Dijk, M.

    2016-05-01

    Within the TORCH (Time Of internally Reflected CHerenkov light) R&D project, a small-scale TORCH prototype module is currently under study. Circular-shaped micro-channel plate photon detectors with finely segmented square anodes (32 × 32 channels) have been produced for TORCH requirements in industrial partnership. A new generation of custom multi-channel electronics based on the 32-channel NINO and HPTDC ASICs has been developed. The performance of the photon detector coupled to these customized electronics has been assessed in the laboratory and is reported on. A time resolution of 80 ps and a spatial resolution of 0.03 mm have been measured. Finally, tests of the TORCH prototype module illuminated with laser light and in a charged particle beam will be highlighted.

  15. Spatial variability of arsenic and chromium in the soil water at a former wood preserving site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopp, Luisa; Peiffer, Stefan; Durner, Wolfgang

    2006-05-01

    Contamination of industrial sites by wood preservatives such as chromated copper arsenate (CCA) may pose a serious threat to groundwater quality. The objective of this study was to characterise the spatial variability of As and Cr concentrations in the solid phase and in the soil water at a former wood impregnation plant and to reveal the fundamental transport processes. The soil was sampled down to a depth of 2 m. The soil water was extracted in situ from the vadose zone over a period of 10 months at depths of 1 and 1.5 m, using large horizontally installed suction tubes. Groundwater was sampled from a depth of 4.5 m. Results showed that arsenic and chromium had accumulated in the upper region of the profile and exhibited a high spatial variability (As: 21-621 mg kg - 1 ; Cr: 74-2872 mg kg - 1 ). Concentrations in the soil water were high (mean As 167 μg L - 1 ; Cr: 62 μg L - 1 ) and also showed a distinct spatial variability, covering concentration ranges up to three orders of magnitude. The variability was caused by the severe water-repellency of the surface soil, induced by the concurrent application of creosote wood preservatives, which leads to strong preferential flow as evident from a dye experiment. In contrast to soil water concentrations, only low As concentrations (< 12 μg L - 1 ) were detected in the groundwater. High Cr concentrations in the groundwater (approx. 300 μg L - 1 ), however, illustrated the pronounced mobility of chromium. Our study shows that at sites with a heterogeneous flow system in the vadose zone a disparity between flux-averaged and volume-averaged concentrations may occur, and sampling of soil water might not be adequate for assessing groundwater concentrations. In these cases long-term monitoring of the groundwater appears to be the best strategy for a groundwater risk assessment.

  16. Spatial variability of arsenic and chromium in the soil water at a former wood preserving site.

    PubMed

    Hopp, Luisa; Peiffer, Stefan; Durner, Wolfgang

    2006-05-30

    Contamination of industrial sites by wood preservatives such as chromated copper arsenate (CCA) may pose a serious threat to groundwater quality. The objective of this study was to characterise the spatial variability of As and Cr concentrations in the solid phase and in the soil water at a former wood impregnation plant and to reveal the fundamental transport processes. The soil was sampled down to a depth of 2m. The soil water was extracted in situ from the vadose zone over a period of 10 months at depths of 1 and 1.5m, using large horizontally installed suction tubes. Groundwater was sampled from a depth of 4.5m. Results showed that arsenic and chromium had accumulated in the upper region of the profile and exhibited a high spatial variability (As: 21-621 mg kg(-1); Cr: 74-2872 mg kg(-1)). Concentrations in the soil water were high (mean As 167 microg L(-1); Cr: 62 microg L(-1)) and also showed a distinct spatial variability, covering concentration ranges up to three orders of magnitude. The variability was caused by the severe water-repellency of the surface soil, induced by the concurrent application of creosote wood preservatives, which leads to strong preferential flow as evident from a dye experiment. In contrast to soil water concentrations, only low As concentrations (<12 microg L(-1)) were detected in the groundwater. High Cr concentrations in the groundwater (approx. 300 microg L(-1)), however, illustrated the pronounced mobility of chromium. Our study shows that at sites with a heterogeneous flow system in the vadose zone a disparity between flux-averaged and volume-averaged concentrations may occur, and sampling of soil water might not be adequate for assessing groundwater concentrations. In these cases long-term monitoring of the groundwater appears to be the best strategy for a groundwater risk assessment. PMID:16530293

  17. Heterogeneity of gaseous emissions in soils-spatial vs temporal variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardenas, Laura; Chadwick, David; Misselbrook, Tom; Donovan, Neil; Dunn, Rob; Griffith, Bruce; Orr, Robert; Smith, Keith; Rees, Robert M.; Bell, Madeleine; Watson, Catherine; McGeough, Karen; McNeill, Gavin; Williams, John; Cloy, Joanna; Thorman, Rachel; Dhanoa, Dan

    2015-04-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) plays a dual role in the atmosphere as a greenhouse gas and via its influence on stratospheric ozone chemistry. The main source of N2O is agricultural soil, with an estimated 96 kt emitted from this source in the UK in 2012 (ca. 83% of the total UK N2O emissions). Microbial transformations such as nitrification, denitrification and chemodenitrification are responsible for these emissions. Soil texture and structure and land management practices (including presence of livestock) -- soil wetness, aeration, temperature and mineral N content -- influence the magnitude of the emissions. Heterogeneity in nutrient distribution and moisture, i.e. hot spots, create spatial variations in the main drivers of these transformations. Studies at laboratory scale are aimed to minimize the variability encountered in the field but although they provide important information on the controlling factors of the soil processes, they are not useful for real quantification. Daily and seasonal variation (temporal) in soil conditions (chemistry, physics and biology) and thus in emissions also occurs. This variability makes it a difficult challenge to quantify emissions and currently makes the soil source the largest contributor to the overall uncertainty of the UK greenhouse gas inventory. Here we present results of a statistical study on the variability of N2O emissions from measurements using the static chamber technique for a variety of N sources. Results from measurements using automated chambers are also presented. Part of the work was funded by the UK government to improve the quantification of this source by measuring emissions from sites with contrasting soil, climate and land management combinations. We also include results from measurements carried out with automated chambers on the UK National Capability Farm Platform in the South West of England. The results show that spatial variability largely contributes to the uncertainty of emissions but temporal

  18. Spatial variability of arsenic and chromium in the soil water at a former wood preserving site.

    PubMed

    Hopp, Luisa; Peiffer, Stefan; Durner, Wolfgang

    2006-05-30

    Contamination of industrial sites by wood preservatives such as chromated copper arsenate (CCA) may pose a serious threat to groundwater quality. The objective of this study was to characterise the spatial variability of As and Cr concentrations in the solid phase and in the soil water at a former wood impregnation plant and to reveal the fundamental transport processes. The soil was sampled down to a depth of 2m. The soil water was extracted in situ from the vadose zone over a period of 10 months at depths of 1 and 1.5m, using large horizontally installed suction tubes. Groundwater was sampled from a depth of 4.5m. Results showed that arsenic and chromium had accumulated in the upper region of the profile and exhibited a high spatial variability (As: 21-621 mg kg(-1); Cr: 74-2872 mg kg(-1)). Concentrations in the soil water were high (mean As 167 microg L(-1); Cr: 62 microg L(-1)) and also showed a distinct spatial variability, covering concentration ranges up to three orders of magnitude. The variability was caused by the severe water-repellency of the surface soil, induced by the concurrent application of creosote wood preservatives, which leads to strong preferential flow as evident from a dye experiment. In contrast to soil water concentrations, only low As concentrations (<12 microg L(-1)) were detected in the groundwater. High Cr concentrations in the groundwater (approx. 300 microg L(-1)), however, illustrated the pronounced mobility of chromium. Our study shows that at sites with a heterogeneous flow system in the vadose zone a disparity between flux-averaged and volume-averaged concentrations may occur, and sampling of soil water might not be adequate for assessing groundwater concentrations. In these cases long-term monitoring of the groundwater appears to be the best strategy for a groundwater risk assessment.

  19. Small-Scale Thermal Violence Cook Off Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Malcolm; Curtis, John; Stennett, Christopher

    2015-06-01

    The Small-Scale thermal Violence Test (SSVT) is designed to quantify the violence (explosiveness) of test materials by means of observing the velocity history of a metal burst disk that forms one end of a strong thick-walled cylindrical test vehicle. A copper heating block is placed to the rear of, but in contact with, the sample and provides sealing. The difference in thermal conductivity between copper and steel is sufficient that thermal runaway is induced near to the explosive / copper interface in an unlagged test. A series of experiments has been made, in which explosive specimens were confined and heated to explosion. A high-accuracy velocity measurement system was used to record the motion of the bursting disk. These experiments have shown that the early-time motion of the bursting disk corresponds qualitatively to the onset of thermal explosion and growth of reaction within the explosive specimens. However, the velocity history traces are more complex than had been anticipated. In particular, unexplained shoulders were observed in the Phase-Doppler Velocimeter (PDV) data. Some preliminary modelling studies have been carried out in order to shed light on the complex shapes of the projectile velocity histories.

  20. SCALING PROPERTIES OF SMALL-SCALE FLUCTUATIONS IN MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, Jean Carlos; Mason, Joanne; Boldyrev, Stanislav; Cattaneo, Fausto E-mail: j.mason@exeter.ac.uk E-mail: cattaneo@flash.uchicago.edu

    2014-09-20

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence in the majority of natural systems, including the interstellar medium, the solar corona, and the solar wind, has Reynolds numbers far exceeding the Reynolds numbers achievable in numerical experiments. Much attention is therefore drawn to the universal scaling properties of small-scale fluctuations, which can be reliably measured in the simulations and then extrapolated to astrophysical scales. However, in contrast with hydrodynamic turbulence, where the universal structure of the inertial and dissipation intervals is described by the Kolmogorov self-similarity, the scaling for MHD turbulence cannot be established based solely on dimensional arguments due to the presence of an intrinsic velocity scale—the Alfvén velocity. In this Letter, we demonstrate that the Kolmogorov first self-similarity hypothesis cannot be formulated for MHD turbulence in the same way it is formulated for the hydrodynamic case. Besides profound consequences for the analytical consideration, this also imposes stringent conditions on numerical studies of MHD turbulence. In contrast with the hydrodynamic case, the discretization scale in numerical simulations of MHD turbulence should decrease faster than the dissipation scale, in order for the simulations to remain resolved as the Reynolds number increases.