Science.gov

Sample records for smart sensor technology

  1. Sensor technology for smart homes.

    PubMed

    Ding, Dan; Cooper, Rory A; Pasquina, Paul F; Fici-Pasquina, Lavinia

    2011-06-01

    A smart home is a residence equipped with technology that observes the residents and provides proactive services. Most recently, it has been introduced as a potential solution to support independent living of people with disabilities and older adults, as well as to relieve the workload from family caregivers and health providers. One of the key supporting features of a smart home is its ability to monitor the activities of daily living and safety of residents, and in detecting changes in their daily routines. With the availability of inexpensive low-power sensors, radios, and embedded processors, current smart homes are typically equipped with a large amount of networked sensors which collaboratively process and make deductions from the acquired data on the state of the home as well as the activities and behaviors of its residents. This article reviews sensor technology used in smart homes with a focus on direct environment sensing and infrastructure mediated sensing. The article also points out the strengths and limitations of different sensor technologies, as well as discusses challenges and opportunities from clinical, technical, and ethical perspectives. It is recommended that sensor technologies for smart homes address actual needs of all stake holders including end users, their family members and caregivers, and their doctors and therapists. More evidence on the appropriateness, usefulness, and cost benefits analysis of sensor technologies for smart homes is necessary before these sensors should be widely deployed into real-world residential settings and successfully integrated into everyday life and health care services. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Sensor technology for smart structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogowski, R. S.; Heyman, J. S.; Holben, M. S., Jr.; Dehart, D. W.; Doederlein, T.

    1989-01-01

    Advanced aerospace structures are discussed that will very likely be fabricated with integral sensors, actuators, and microprocessors for monitoring and dynamic control of configuration. The concept of 'smart structures' integrates fiber-optic sensor technology with advanced composite materials, whereby the optical fibers are embedded in a composite material and provide internal sensing capability for monitoring parameters which are important for the safety, performance, and reliability of the material and the structure. Along with other research facilities, NASA has initiated a cooperative program to design, fabricate, and test composite trusses, tubes, and flat panels with embedded optical fibers for testing and developing prototype smart structures. It is shown that fiber-optic sensor technology can be combined with advanced material and structure concepts to produce a new class of materials with internal sensors for health monitoring of structures.

  3. Sensor technology for smart structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogowski, R. S.; Heyman, J. S.; Holben, M. S., Jr.; Dehart, D. W.; Doederlein, T.

    1989-01-01

    Advanced aerospace structures are discussed that will very likely be fabricated with integral sensors, actuators, and microprocessors for monitoring and dynamic control of configuration. The concept of 'smart structures' integrates fiber-optic sensor technology with advanced composite materials, whereby the optical fibers are embedded in a composite material and provide internal sensing capability for monitoring parameters which are important for the safety, performance, and reliability of the material and the structure. Along with other research facilities, NASA has initiated a cooperative program to design, fabricate, and test composite trusses, tubes, and flat panels with embedded optical fibers for testing and developing prototype smart structures. It is shown that fiber-optic sensor technology can be combined with advanced material and structure concepts to produce a new class of materials with internal sensors for health monitoring of structures.

  4. Smart sensor technology for advanced launch vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoess, Jeff

    1989-07-01

    Next-generation advanced launch vehicles will require improved use of sensor data and the management of multisensor resources to achieve automated preflight checkout, prelaunch readiness assessment and vehicle inflight condition monitoring. Smart sensor technology is a key component in meeting these needs. This paper describes the development of a smart sensor-based condition monitoring system concept referred to as the Distributed Sensor Architecture. A significant event and anomaly detection scheme that provides real-time condition assessment and fault diagnosis of advanced launch system rocket engines is described. The design and flight test of a smart autonomous sensor for Space Shuttle structural integrity health monitoring is presented.

  5. Smart sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corsi, Carlo

    2006-08-01

    The term "Smart Sensors" refer to sensors which contain both sensing and signal processing capabilities with objectives ranging from simple viewing to sophisticated remote sensing, surveillance, search/track, weapon guidance, robotics, perceptronics and intelligence applications. In a broad sense, they include any sensor systems covering the whole electromagnetic spectrum: this paper deals specifically with a new class of smart sensors in infrared spectral bands whose developments started some years ago, when it was recognized that the rapid advances of "very large scale integration" (VLSI) processor technology and mosaic infrared detector array technology could be combined to develop new generations of infrared smart sensor systems with much improved performance. So, sophisticated signal processing operations have been developed for these new systems by integrating microcomputers and other VLSI signal processors within or next to the sensor arrays on the same focal plane avoiding complex computing located far away from the sensors. Recently this approach is achieving higher goals by a new and revolutionary sensors concept which introduce inside the sensor some of the basic function of living eyes, such as dynamic stare, dishomogenity compensation, spatial and temporal filtering. New objectives and requirements of these new focal plane processors are presented for this type of new infrared smart sensor systems. This paper is concerned with the processing techniques for only the front end of the focal plane processing, namely, the enhancement of target-to-noise ratio by background clutter suppression and the improvement in target detection by "smart" and pattern correlation threshold.

  6. Smart sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corsi, Carlo

    1991-09-01

    The term 'smart sensors' refers to sensors which contain both sensing and signal processing capabilities with objectives ranging from simple viewing to sophisticated remote sensing, surveillance, search/track, weapon guidance, robotics, perceptronics, and intelligence applications. In a broad sense, they include any sensor system covering the whole electromagnetic spectrum: this paper deals specifically with a new class of smart sensors in infrared spectral bands whose developments started some years ago, when it was recognized that the rapid advances of very large scale integration (VLSI) processor technology and mosaic infrared detector array technology could be combined to develop new generations of infrared smart sensor systems with much improved performances. Thus, sophisticated signal processing operations will be developed for these new systems by integrating microcomputers and other VLSI signal processors within or next to the sensor arrays, on the same focal plane, avoiding complex computing located far away from the sensors. Recently this approach has achieved higher goals by a new and revolutionary sensor concept which introduces inside the sensor some of the basic functions of living eyes, such as dynamic stare, dishomogeneity compensation, spatial and temporal filtering. New objectives and requirements of these new focal plane processors are presented for this type of new infrared smart sensor system. This paper concerns the processing techniques limited to the front end of the focal plane processing, namely, the enhancement of target-to-noise ratio by background clutter suppression and the improvement in target detection by a smart pattern correlation thresholding.

  7. Health-Enabled Smart Sensor Fusion Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ray

    2012-01-01

    A process was designed to fuse data from multiple sensors in order to make a more accurate estimation of the environment and overall health in an intelligent rocket test facility (IRTF), to provide reliable, high-confidence measurements for a variety of propulsion test articles. The object of the technology is to provide sensor fusion based on a distributed architecture. Specifically, the fusion technology is intended to succeed in providing health condition monitoring capability at the intelligent transceiver, such as RF signal strength, battery reading, computing resource monitoring, and sensor data reading. The technology also provides analytic and diagnostic intelligence at the intelligent transceiver, enhancing the IEEE 1451.x-based standard for sensor data management and distributions, as well as providing appropriate communications protocols to enable complex interactions to support timely and high-quality flow of information among the system elements.

  8. Smart fabric sensors and e-textile technologies: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castano, Lina M.; Flatau, Alison B.

    2014-05-01

    This paper provides a review of recent developments in the rapidly changing and advancing field of smart fabric sensor and electronic textile technologies. It summarizes the basic principles and approaches employed when building fabric sensors as well as the most commonly used materials and techniques used in electronic textiles. This paper shows that sensing functionality can be created by intrinsic and extrinsic modifications to textile substrates depending on the level of integration into the fabric platform. The current work demonstrates that fabric sensors can be tailored to measure force, pressure, chemicals, humidity and temperature variations. Materials, connectors, fabric circuits, interconnects, encapsulation and fabrication methods associated with fabric technologies prove to be customizable and versatile but less robust than their conventional electronics counterparts. The findings of this survey suggest that a complete smart fabric system is possible through the integration of the different types of textile based functional elements. This work intends to be a starting point for standardization of smart fabric sensing techniques and e-textile fabrication methods.

  9. Smart Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corsi, C.

    2007-01-01

    The term "Smart Sensors" refers to sensors which contain both sensing and signal processing capabilities with objectives ranging from simple viewing to sophisticated remote sensing, surveillance, search/track, weapon guidance, robotics, perceptronics and intelligence applications. Recently this approach is achieving higher goals by a new and revolutionary sensors concept which introduced inside the sensor some of the basic functions of living eyes, such as dynamic stare, non-uniformity compensation, spatial and temporal filtering. New objectives and requirements are presented for this type of new infrared smart sensor systems. This paper is concerned with the front end of FPA microbolometers processing, namely, the enhancement of target-to-noise ratio by background clutter suppression and the improvement in target detection by "smart" and pattern correlation thresholding.

  10. Exploitation of Smart Materials and Sensors as Disruptive Technologies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    Australian Submarine Corporation, now ASC Pty Ltd C4I Command, Control, Communications, Computers, and Intelligence CAST-CRC CRC for Cast Metals ...exploitation through channelling of MPD’s finite LRR resources. The history of scientific and technology development allows some confidence in...paper, and are:  Shape memory/change materials, encompassing both metallic alloys and polymeric materials;  Smart sensing and self-healing

  11. Smart image sensors: an emerging key technology for advanced optical measurement and microsystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seitz, Peter

    1996-08-01

    Optical microsystems typically include photosensitive devices, analog preprocessing circuitry and digital signal processing electronics. The advances in semiconductor technology have made it possible today to integrate all photosensitive and electronical devices on one 'smart image sensor' or photo-ASIC (application-specific integrated circuits containing photosensitive elements). It is even possible to provide each 'smart pixel' with additional photoelectronic functionality, without compromising the fill factor substantially. This technological capability is the basis for advanced cameras and optical microsystems showing novel on-chip functionality: Single-chip cameras with on- chip analog-to-digital converters for less than $10 are advertised; image sensors have been developed including novel functionality such as real-time selectable pixel size and shape, the capability of performing arbitrary convolutions simultaneously with the exposure, as well as variable, programmable offset and sensitivity of the pixels leading to image sensors with a dynamic range exceeding 150 dB. Smart image sensors have been demonstrated offering synchronous detection and demodulation capabilities in each pixel (lock-in CCD), and conventional image sensors are combined with an on-chip digital processor for complete, single-chip image acquisition and processing systems. Technological problems of the monolithic integration of smart image sensors include offset non-uniformities, temperature variations of electronic properties, imperfect matching of circuit parameters, etc. These problems can often be overcome either by designing additional compensation circuitry or by providing digital correction routines. Where necessary for technological or economic reasons, smart image sensors can also be combined with or realized as hybrids, making use of commercially available electronic components. It is concluded that the possibilities offered by custom smart image sensors will influence the design

  12. Smart Sensors for Smart Hands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bejczy, A. K.

    1978-01-01

    Proximity, force-torque, touch and slippage sensors developed or applied by the JPL Teleoperator Project for remote manipulator control are described, including sensor data handling by computers for display and control. Examples are quoted showing the significance of these sensors for manual or computer control of manipulators. An interesting example is a proximity sensor system implemented for a four-claw JSC end effector and tested at the Shuttle Manipulator Training Facility of JSC. New sensing concepts aimed at simplifying the implementation of 'Smart Sensors for Smart Hands' in the space environment are discussed.

  13. Senior residents' perceived need of and preferences for "smart home" sensor technologies.

    PubMed

    Demiris, George; Hensel, Brian K; Skubic, Marjorie; Rantz, Marilyn

    2008-01-01

    The goal of meeting the desire of older adults to remain independent in their home setting while controlling healthcare costs has led to the conceptualization of "smart homes." A smart home is a residence equipped with technology that enhances safety of residents and monitors their health conditions. The study aim is to assess older adults' perceptions of specific smart home technologies (i.e., a bed sensor, gait monitor, stove sensor, motion sensor, and video sensor). The study setting is TigerPlace, a retirement community designed according to the Aging in Place model. Focus group sessions with fourteen residents were conducted to assess perceived advantages and concerns associated with specific applications, and preferences for recipients of sensor-generated information pertaining to residents' activity levels, sleep patterns and potential emergencies. Sessions were audio-taped; tapes were transcribed, and a content analysis was performed. A total of fourteen older adults over the age of 65 participated in three focus group sessions Most applications were perceived as useful, and participants would agree to their installation in their own home. Preference for specific sensors related to sensors' appearance and residents' own level of frailty and perceived need. Specific concerns about privacy were raised. The findings indicate an overall positive attitude toward sensor technologies for nonobtrusive monitoring. Researchers and practitioners are called upon to address ethical and technical challenges in this emerging domain.

  14. Distributed structural health monitoring system based on smart wireless sensor and multi-agent technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Shenfang; Lai, Xiaosong; Zhao, Xia; Xu, Xin; Zhang, Liang

    2006-02-01

    This paper presents a new parallel distributed structural health monitoring technology based on the wireless sensor network and multi-agent system for large scale engineering structures. The basic idea of this new technology is that of adopting the smart wireless sensor with on-board microprocessor to form the monitoring sensor network and the multi-agent technology to manage the whole health monitoring system. Using this technology, the health monitoring system becomes a distributing parallel system instead of a serial system with all processing work done by the central computer. The functions, the reliability, the flexibility and the speed of the whole system will be greatly improved. In addition, with wireless communication links instead of wires, the system weight and complexity will be lowered. In this paper, the distributed smart wireless sensor network is designed first based on the Berkeley Mote Mica wireless sensor platform. Two kinds of sensor have been adopted: piezoelectric sensors and electric resistance wires. They are connected to a Mica MPR board though a designed charge amplifier circuit or bridge circuit and MTS101 board. Seven kinds of agents are defined for the structural health monitoring system. A distributed health monitoring architecture based on the defined agents is proposed. Finally, a composite structural health monitoring system based on a Mica wireless platform and multi-agent technology is developed to evaluate the efficacy of the new technology. The developed system can successfully monitor the concentrated load position or a loose bolt position.

  15. Smart sensors in spacecraft - The impact and trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breckenridge, R. A.; Husson, C.

    1978-01-01

    The paper discusses the characteristics of smart sensors. It addresses the impact that the development of smart sensors will have on future spacecraft. In addition, future technology trends that will contribute to the development of smart sensors are assessed.

  16. Smart Sensor Demonstration Payload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmalzel, John; Bracey, Andrew; Rawls, Stephen; Morris, Jon; Turowski, Mark; Franzl, Richard; Figueroa, Fernando

    2010-01-01

    Sensors are a critical element to any monitoring, control, and evaluation processes such as those needed to support ground based testing for rocket engine test. Sensor applications involve tens to thousands of sensors; their reliable performance is critical to achieving overall system goals. Many figures of merit are used to describe and evaluate sensor characteristics; for example, sensitivity and linearity. In addition, sensor selection must satisfy many trade-offs among system engineering (SE) requirements to best integrate sensors into complex systems [1]. These SE trades include the familiar constraints of power, signal conditioning, cabling, reliability, and mass, and now include considerations such as spectrum allocation and interference for wireless sensors. Our group at NASA s John C. Stennis Space Center (SSC) works in the broad area of integrated systems health management (ISHM). Core ISHM technologies include smart and intelligent sensors, anomaly detection, root cause analysis, prognosis, and interfaces to operators and other system elements [2]. Sensor technologies are the base fabric that feed data and health information to higher layers. Cost-effective operation of the complement of test stands benefits from technologies and methodologies that contribute to reductions in labor costs, improvements in efficiency, reductions in turn-around times, improved reliability, and other measures. ISHM is an active area of development at SSC because it offers the potential to achieve many of those operational goals [3-5].

  17. Smart and Intelligent Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lansaw, John; Schmalzel, John; Figueroa, Jorge

    2009-01-01

    a health assessment to inform the data acquisition client when sensor performance is suspect. 3.Distributed sample synchronization. Networks of sensors require new ways for synchronizing samples. Standards that address the distributed timing problem (for example, IEEE STD 1588) provide the means to aggregate samples from many distributed smart sensors with sub-microsecond accuracy. 4. Reduction in interconnect. Alternative means are needed to reduce the frequent problems associated with cabling and connectors. Wireless technologies offer the promise of reducing interconnects and simultaneously making it easy to quickly add a sensor to a system.

  18. An Overview of the Development of High Temperature Wireless Smart Sensor Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Gary W.

    2014-01-01

    The harsh environment inherent in propulsion systems is especially challenging for Smart Sensor Systems; this paper addresses technology development for such applications. A basic sensing system for high temperature wireless pressure monitoring composed of a sensor, electronics, and wireless communication with scavenged power developed for health monitoring of aircraft engines and other high temperature applications has been demonstrated at 475 C. Other efforts will be discussed including a brief overview of the status of high temperature electronics and sensors, as well as their use and applications.

  19. Fiber optic sensor technology - An opportunity for smart aerospace structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, J. S.; Rogowski, R. S.; Claus, R. O.

    1988-01-01

    Fiber optic sensors provide the opportunity for fabricating materials with internal sensors which can serve as lifetime health monitors, analogous to a central nervous system. The embedded fiber optic sensors can be interrogated by various techniques to measure internal strain, temperature, pressure, acoustic waves and other parameters indicative of structural integrity. Experiments have been conducted with composite samples with embedded sensors to measure strain using optical time domain reflectometry, modal interference and an optical phase locked loop. Fiber optic sensors have been developed to detect acoustic emission and impact damage and have been demonstrated for cure monitoring. These sensors have the potential for lifetime monitoring of structural properties, providing real time nondestructive evaluation.

  20. Application of Smart Solid State Sensor Technology in Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Gary W.; Xu, Jennifer C.; Dungan, L.K.; Makel, D.; Ward, B.; Androjna, D.

    2008-01-01

    Aerospace applications require a range of chemical sensing technologies to monitor conditions in both space vehicles and aircraft operations. One example is the monitoring of oxygen. For example, monitoring of ambient oxygen (O2) levels is critical to ensuring the health, safety, and performance of humans living and working in space. Oxygen sensors can also be incorporated in detection systems to determine if hazardous leaks are occurring in space propulsion systems and storage facilities. In aeronautic applications, O2 detection has been investigated for fuel tank monitoring. However, as noted elsewhere, O2 is not the only species of interest in aerospace applications with a wide range of species of interest being relevant to understand an environmental or vehicle condition. These include combustion products such as CO, HF, HCN, and HCl, which are related to both the presence of a fire and monitoring of post-fire clean-up operations. This paper discusses the development of an electrochemical cell platform based on a polymer electrolyte, NAFION, and a three-electrode configuration. The approach has been to mature this basic platform for a range of applications and to test this system, combined with "Lick and Stick" electronics, for its viability to monitor an environment related to astronaut crew health and safety applications with an understanding that a broad range of applications can be addressed with a core technology.

  1. Fiber-Optic Sensor And Smart Structures Research At Florida Institute Of Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossman, Barry G.; Alavie, A. Tino; Ham, Fredric M.; Franke, Jorge E.; Thursby, Michael H.

    1990-02-01

    This paper discusses the fundamental issues being investigated by Florida Institute of Technology (F.I.T.) to implement the technology of smart structural systems for DoD, NASA, and commercial applications. Embedded sensors and actuators controlled by processors can provide a modification of the mechanical characteristics of composite structures to produce smart structures1-3. Recent advances in material science have spurred the development and use of composite materials in a wide range of applications from rotocraft blades and advanced tactical fighter aircraft to undersea and aerospace structures. Along with the advantages of an increased strength-to-weight ratio, the use of these materials has raised a number of questions related to understanding their failure mechanisms. Also, being able to predict structural failures far enough in advance to prevent them and to provide real-time structural health and damage monitoring has become a realistic possibility. Unfortunately, conventional sensors, actuators, and digital processors, although highly developed and well proven for other systems, may not be best suited for most smart structure applications. Our research has concentrated on few-mode and polarimetric single-fiber strain sensors4-7 and optically activated shape memory alloy (SMA) actuators controlled by artificial neural processors. We have constructed and characterized both few-mode and polarimetric sensors for a variety of fiber types, including standard single-mode, high-birefringence polarization preserving, and low-birefringence polarization insensitive fibers. We have investigated signal processing techniques for these sensors and have demonstrated active phase tracking for the high- and low-birefringence polarimetric sensors through the incorporation into the system of an electrooptic modulator designed and fabricated at F.I.T.. We have also started the design and testing of neural network architectures for processing the sensor signal outputs to

  2. Smart sensor technology for joint test assembly flights.

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, Nina M.; Sheaffer, Donald A.; Bierbaum, Rene Lynn; Dimkoff, Jason L.; Walsh, Edward J.; Deyle, Travis Jay ); Marx, Kenneth D.; Pancerella, Carmen M.; Doser, Adele Beatrice; Armstrong, Robert C.

    2003-09-01

    The world relies on sensors to perform a variety of tasks from the mundane to sophisticated. Currently, processors associated with these sensors are sufficient only to handle rudimentary logic tasks. Though multiple sensors are often present in such devices, there is insufficient processing power for situational understanding. Until recently, no processors that met the electrical power constraints for embedded systems were powerful enough to perform sophisticated computations. Sandia performs many expensive tests using sensor arrays. Improving the efficacy, reliability and information content resulting from these sensor arrays is of critical importance. With the advent of powerful commodity processors for embedded use, a new opportunity to do just that has presented itself. This report describes work completed under Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Project 26514, Task 1. The goal of the project was to demonstrate the feasibility of using embedded processors to increase the amount of useable information derived from sensor arrays while improving the believability of the data. The focus was on a system of importance to Sandia: Joint Test Assemblies for ICBM warheads. Topics discussed include: (1) two electromechanical systems to provide data, (2) sensors used to monitor those systems, (3) the processors that provide decision-making capability and data manipulation, (4) the use of artificial intelligence and other decision-making software, and (5) a computer model for the training of artificial intelligence software.

  3. Sensor Management for Applied Research Technologies (SMART)-On Demand Modeling (ODM) Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, M.; Blakeslee, R.; Hood, R.; Jedlovec, G.; Botts, M.; Li, X.

    2006-01-01

    NASA requires timely on-demand data and analysis capabilities to enable practical benefits of Earth science observations. However, a significant challenge exists in accessing and integrating data from multiple sensors or platforms to address Earth science problems because of the large data volumes, varying sensor scan characteristics, unique orbital coverage, and the steep learning curve associated with each sensor and data type. The development of sensor web capabilities to autonomously process these data streams (whether real-time or archived) provides an opportunity to overcome these obstacles and facilitate the integration and synthesis of Earth science data and weather model output. A three year project, entitled Sensor Management for Applied Research Technologies (SMART) - On Demand Modeling (ODM), will develop and demonstrate the readiness of Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Sensor Web Enablement (SWE) capabilities that integrate both Earth observations and forecast model output into new data acquisition and assimilation strategies. The advancement of SWE-enabled systems (i.e., use of SensorML, sensor planning services - SPS, sensor observation services - SOS, sensor alert services - SAS and common observation model protocols) will have practical and efficient uses in the Earth science community for enhanced data set generation, real-time data assimilation with operational applications, and for autonomous sensor tasking for unique data collection.

  4. Sensor Management for Applied Research Technologies (SMART) On Demand Modeling (ODM) Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodman, M.; Blakeslee, R.; Hood, R.; Jedlovec, G.; Botts, M.; Li, X.

    2006-12-01

    NASA requires timely on-demand data and analysis capabilities to enable practical benefits of Earth science observations. However, a significant challenge exists in accessing and integrating data from multiple sensors or platforms to address Earth science problems because of the large data volumes, varying sensor scan characteristics, unique orbital coverage, and the steep "learning curve" associated with each sensor and data type. The development of sensor web capabilities to autonomously process these data streams (whether real- time or archived) provides an opportunity to overcome these obstacles and facilitate the integration and synthesis of Earth science data and weather model output. A three year project, entitled Sensor Management for Applied Research Technologies (SMART) On Demand Modeling (ODM), will develop and demonstrate the readiness of Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Sensor Web Enablement (SWE) capabilities that integrate both Earth observations and forecast model output into new data acquisition and assimilation strategies. The advancement of SWE-enabled systems (i.e., use of SensorML, sensor planning services - SPS, sensor observation services - SOS, sensor alert services - SAS and common observation model protocols) will have practical and efficient uses in the Earth science community for enhanced data set generation, real-time data assimilation with operational applications, and for autonomous sensor tasking for unique data collection.

  5. Sensor Management for Applied Research Technologies (SMART)-On Demand Modeling (ODM) Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, M.; Blakeslee, R.; Hood, R.; Jedlovec, G.; Botts, M.; Li, X.

    2006-01-01

    NASA requires timely on-demand data and analysis capabilities to enable practical benefits of Earth science observations. However, a significant challenge exists in accessing and integrating data from multiple sensors or platforms to address Earth science problems because of the large data volumes, varying sensor scan characteristics, unique orbital coverage, and the steep learning curve associated with each sensor and data type. The development of sensor web capabilities to autonomously process these data streams (whether real-time or archived) provides an opportunity to overcome these obstacles and facilitate the integration and synthesis of Earth science data and weather model output. A three year project, entitled Sensor Management for Applied Research Technologies (SMART) - On Demand Modeling (ODM), will develop and demonstrate the readiness of Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Sensor Web Enablement (SWE) capabilities that integrate both Earth observations and forecast model output into new data acquisition and assimilation strategies. The advancement of SWE-enabled systems (i.e., use of SensorML, sensor planning services - SPS, sensor observation services - SOS, sensor alert services - SAS and common observation model protocols) will have practical and efficient uses in the Earth science community for enhanced data set generation, real-time data assimilation with operational applications, and for autonomous sensor tasking for unique data collection.

  6. The Sensor Management for Applied Research Technologies (SMART) Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Michael; Jedlovec, Gary; Conover, Helen; Botts, Mike; Robin, Alex; Blakeslee, Richard; Hood, Robbie; Ingenthron, Susan; Li, Xiang; Maskey, Manil; hide

    2007-01-01

    NASA seeks on-demand data processing and analysis of Earth science observations to facilitate timely decision-making that can lead to the realization of the practical benefits of satellite instruments, airborne and surface remote sensing systems. However, a significant challenge exists in accessing and integrating data from multiple sensors or platforms to address Earth science problems because of the large data volumes, varying sensor scan characteristics, unique orbital coverage, and the steep "learning curve" associated with each sensor, data type, and associated products. The development of sensor web capabilities to autonomously process these data streams (whether real-time or archived) provides an opportunity to overcome these obstacles and facilitate the integration and synthesis of Earth science data and weather model output.

  7. Smart sensors for the 80's - The status of smart sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breckenridge, R. A.; Katzberg, S. J.

    1980-01-01

    The paper discusses the definition of smart sensor as perceived by three different groups of authors. The agreement and disagreement between the three separate definitions are briefly treated. Recent conferences held by the AIAA and SPIE have addressed smart sensors for a range of applications. The status of smart sensors is discussed in light of the papers presented at the three conferences. Also, the emerging technologies which will facilitate the development of smart sensors are discussed.

  8. Sensor Management for Applied Research Technologies (SMART) On Demand Modeling (ODM) Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conover, H.; Berthiau, G.; Blakeslee, R.; Botts, M.; Goodman, M.; Hood, R.; Jedlovec, G.; Li, X.; Lu, J.; Maskey, M.

    2007-12-01

    On-demand data processing and analysis of Earth science observations will facilitate timely decision making that can lead to the realization of the practical benefits of satellite instruments, airborne and surface remote sensing systems. However, a significant challenge exists in accessing and integrating data from multiple sensors or platforms to address Earth science problems because of the large data volumes, varying sensor scan characteristics, unique orbital coverage, and the steep learning curve associated with each sensor, data type and associated products. The development of sensor web capabilities to autonomously process these data streams (whether real-time or archived) provides an opportunity to overcome these obstacles and facilitate the integration and synthesis of Earth science data and weather model output. The authors will present initial results from Sensor Management for Applied Research Technologies (SMART) On Demand Modeling (ODM). This NASA- funded project is developing and demonstrating the readiness of Open Geospatial Consortium Sensor Web Enablement (SWE) capabilities that integrate both Earth observations and forecast model output into new data acquisition and assimilation strategies. First year accomplishments include development of numerous Sensor Observation Services (SOS) and an SOS registry for sensor data discovery and access, as well as a prototype user application, built on these services, for validating cloud types as observed by multiple instruments. The three-year goal of this project is to demonstration how SWE-enabled systems can have practical and efficient uses in the Earth science community for enhanced data set generation, real-time data assimilation with operational applications, and for autonomous sensor tasking for unique data collection.

  9. Smart card technology

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, R.A.

    1992-09-01

    This report describes smart card techonology and applications, including the use of smart cards as smart badges. The paper illustrates that smart cards are designed with security features, which makes them suitable for security applications. But smart cards also provide multiple functions, so they can support additional applications. The goal of this paper is to inform about the technology, and to inspire thought about possible applications that would benefit if a smart badge were implemented.

  10. Smart and intelligent sensor payload project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Engineers working on the smart and intelligent sensor payload project include (l to r): Ed Conley (NASA), Mark Mitchell (Jacobs Technology), Luke Richards (NASA), Robert Drackett (Jacobs Technology), Mark Turowski (Jacobs Technology) , Richard Franzl (seated, Jacobs Technology), Greg McVay (Jacobs Technology), Brianne Guillot (Jacobs Technology), Jon Morris (Jacobs Technology), Stephen Rawls (NASA), John Schmalzel (NASA) and Andrew Bracey (NASA).

  11. Smart and intelligent sensor payload project

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-04-01

    Engineers working on the smart and intelligent sensor payload project include (l to r): Ed Conley (NASA), Mark Mitchell (Jacobs Technology), Luke Richards (NASA), Robert Drackett (Jacobs Technology), Mark Turowski (Jacobs Technology) , Richard Franzl (seated, Jacobs Technology), Greg McVay (Jacobs Technology), Brianne Guillot (Jacobs Technology), Jon Morris (Jacobs Technology), Stephen Rawls (NASA), John Schmalzel (NASA) and Andrew Bracey (NASA).

  12. Smart and intelligent sensor payload project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Engineers working on the smart and intelligent sensor payload project include (l to r): Ed Conley (NASA), Mark Mitchell (Jacobs Technology), Luke Richards (NASA), Robert Drackett (Jacobs Technology), Mark Turowski (Jacobs Technology) , Richard Franzl (seated, Jacobs Technology), Greg McVay (Jacobs Technology), Brianne Guillot (Jacobs Technology), Jon Morris (Jacobs Technology), Stephen Rawls (NASA), John Schmalzel (NASA) and Andrew Bracey (NASA).

  13. Sensor, signal, and imaging informatics: big data and smart health technologies.

    PubMed

    Voros, S; Moreau-Gaudry, A

    2014-08-15

    This synopsis presents a selection for the IMIA (International Medical Informatics Association) Yearbook 2014 of excellent research in the broad field of Sensor, Signal, and Imaging Informatics published in the year 2013, with a focus on Big Data and Smart Health Technologies Methods: We performed a systematic initial selection and a double blind peer review process to find the best papers in this domain published in 2013, from the PubMed and Web of Science databases. A set of MeSH keywords provided by experts was used. Big Data are collections of large and complex datasets which have the potential to capture the whole variability of a study population. More and more innovative sensors are emerging, allowing to enrich these big databases. However they become more and more challenging to process (i.e. capture, store, search, share, transfer, exploit) because traditional tools are not adapted anymore. This review shows that it is necessary not only to develop new tools specifically designed for Big Data, but also to evaluate their performance on such large datasets.

  14. Smart temperature sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahinpoor, Mohsen; Martinez, David R.

    1999-07-01

    This paper discusses the conceptual design of a family of specially-designed temperature surety sensors made with shape-memory alloys (SMA). These sensors are capable of detecting a one time temperature excursion or variance form a predetermined temperature range. The propose designs can also be used to detect a one-time temperature rise and persistence above a certain pre-selected critical temperature. In that respect, these sensors relate to a family of one-time thaw sensors detecting whether or not frozen food items or other frozen products or objects experience a thawing-refreezing process in their journey from point A to point B. The proposed sensor can also detect a one time temperature excursion into non-allowable temperatures for non-frozen food, as well as pharmaceutical or other medical products. The essential design of these smart sensor is a lever arm attached to an SMA wire whose temperature is initially below Austenite start temperature or well into the Martensite region. As a given product experiences an undesirable temperature range which pushes the SMA material into the Austenite region the wire contracts and moves the lever arm outside a display window area and exposes either a red working indicator or a graduated scale calibrated to the range of temperature excursion experienced by the product. The sensor is designed such that if the temperature returns to normal the excursion indication will not disappear, but will permanently shown the amount of excursion above the temperature surety region for that product. Several possible design variations are presented and discussed. The proposed embodiments include a rupture type thaw sensor made with short SMA springs or bellows, SMA foil roll-up type sensors, SMA wire-loaded shutter type thaw sensors, SMA torsion strut-loaded shutter type thaw sensors, multiple shutter SMA wire-loaded thaw sensors, multiple shutter, SMA torsion-rod-loaded thaw sensors, and rupture-Type SMA spring-loaded thaw sensors.

  15. "Smart" Sensor Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahajan, Ajay

    2007-01-01

    An assembly that contains a sensor, sensor-signal-conditioning circuitry, a sensor-readout analog-to-digital converter (ADC), data-storage circuitry, and a microprocessor that runs special-purpose software and communicates with one or more external computer(s) has been developed as a prototype of "smart" sensor modules for monitoring the integrity and functionality (the "health") of engineering systems. Although these modules are now being designed specifically for use on rocket-engine test stands, it is anticipated that they could also readily be designed to be incorporated into health-monitoring subsystems of such diverse engineering systems as spacecraft, aircraft, land vehicles, bridges, buildings, power plants, oilrigs, and defense installations. The figure is a simplified block diagram of the "smart" sensor module. The analog sensor readout signal is processed by the ADC, the digital output of which is fed to the microprocessor. By means of a standard RS-232 cable, the microprocessor is connected to a local personal computer (PC), from which software is downloaded into a randomaccess memory in the microprocessor. The local PC is also used to debug the software. Once the software is running, the local PC is disconnected and the module is controlled by, and all output data from the module are collected by, a remote PC via an Ethernet bus. Several smart sensor modules like this one could be connected to the same Ethernet bus and controlled by the single remote PC. The software running in the microprocessor includes driver programs for operation of the sensor, programs that implement self-assessment algorithms, programs that implement protocols for communication with the external computer( s), and programs that implement evolutionary methodologies to enable the module to improve its performance over time. The design of the module and of the health-monitoring system of which it is a part reflects the understanding that the main purpose of a health

  16. Smart Sensors Enable Smart Air Conditioning Control

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Chin-Chi; Lee, Dasheng

    2014-01-01

    In this study, mobile phones, wearable devices, temperature and human motion detectors are integrated as smart sensors for enabling smart air conditioning control. Smart sensors obtain feedback, especially occupants' information, from mobile phones and wearable devices placed on human body. The information can be used to adjust air conditioners in advance according to humans' intentions, in so-called intention causing control. Experimental results show that the indoor temperature can be controlled accurately with errors of less than ±0.1 °C. Rapid cool down can be achieved within 2 min to the optimized indoor capacity after occupants enter a room. It's also noted that within two-hour operation the total compressor output of the smart air conditioner is 48.4% less than that of the one using On-Off control. The smart air conditioner with wearable devices could detect the human temperature and activity during sleep to determine the sleeping state and adjusting the sleeping function flexibly. The sleeping function optimized by the smart air conditioner with wearable devices could reduce the energy consumption up to 46.9% and keep the human health. The presented smart air conditioner could provide a comfortable environment and achieve the goals of energy conservation and environmental protection. PMID:24961213

  17. Smart sensors enable smart air conditioning control.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chin-Chi; Lee, Dasheng

    2014-06-24

    In this study, mobile phones, wearable devices, temperature and human motion detectors are integrated as smart sensors for enabling smart air conditioning control. Smart sensors obtain feedback, especially occupants' information, from mobile phones and wearable devices placed on human body. The information can be used to adjust air conditioners in advance according to humans' intentions, in so-called intention causing control. Experimental results show that the indoor temperature can be controlled accurately with errors of less than ±0.1 °C. Rapid cool down can be achieved within 2 min to the optimized indoor capacity after occupants enter a room. It's also noted that within two-hour operation the total compressor output of the smart air conditioner is 48.4% less than that of the one using On-Off control. The smart air conditioner with wearable devices could detect the human temperature and activity during sleep to determine the sleeping state and adjusting the sleeping function flexibly. The sleeping function optimized by the smart air conditioner with wearable devices could reduce the energy consumption up to 46.9% and keep the human health. The presented smart air conditioner could provide a comfortable environment and achieve the goals of energy conservation and environmental protection.

  18. Robust site security using smart seismic array technology and multi-sensor data fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellickson, Dean; Richards, Paul; Reynolds, Zane; Keener, Joshua

    2010-04-01

    Traditional site security systems are susceptible to high individual sensor nuisance alarm rates that reduce the overall system effectiveness. Visual assessment of intrusions can be intensive and manually difficult as cameras are slewed by the system to non intrusion areas or as operators respond to nuisance alarms. Very little system intrusion performance data are available other than discrete sensor alarm indications that provide no real value. This paper discusses the system architecture, integration and display of a multi-sensor data fused system for wide area surveillance, local site intrusion detection and intrusion classification. The incorporation of a novel seismic array of smart sensors using FK Beamforming processing that greatly enhances the overall system detection and classification performance of the system is discussed. Recent test data demonstrates the performance of the seismic array within several different installations and its ability to classify and track moving targets at significant standoff distances with exceptional immunity to background clutter and noise. Multi-sensor data fusion is applied across a suite of complimentary sensors eliminating almost all nuisance alarms while integrating within a geographical information system to feed a visual-fusion display of the area being secured. Real-time sensor detection and intrusion classification data is presented within a visual-fusion display providing greatly enhanced situational awareness, system performance information and real-time assessment of intrusions and situations of interest with limited security operator involvement. This approach scales from a small local perimeter to very large geographical area and can be used across multiple sites controlled at a single command and control station.

  19. Smart Fabrics Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Cory; Potter, Elliott; Potter, Elliott; McCabe, Mary; Baggerman, Clint

    2010-01-01

    Advances in Smart Fabrics technology are enabling an exciting array of new applications for NASA exploration missions, the biomedical community, and consumer electronics. This report summarizes the findings of a brief investigation into the state of the art and potential applications of smart fabrics to address challenges in human spaceflight.

  20. Securing smart grid technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaitanya Krishna, E.; Kosaleswara Reddy, T.; Reddy, M. YogaTeja; Reddy G. M., Sreerama; Madhusudhan, E.; AlMuhteb, Sulaiman

    2013-03-01

    In the developing countries electrical energy is very important for its all-round improvement by saving thousands of dollars and investing them in other sector for development. For Growing needs of power existing hierarchical, centrally controlled grid of the 20th Century is not sufficient. To produce and utilize effective power supply for industries or people we should have Smarter Electrical grids that address the challenges of the existing power grid. The Smart grid can be considered as a modern electric power grid infrastructure for enhanced efficiency and reliability through automated control, high-power converters, modern communications infrastructure along with modern IT services, sensing and metering technologies, and modern energy management techniques based on the optimization of demand, energy and network availability and so on. The main objective of this paper is to provide a contemporary look at the current state of the art in smart grid communications as well as critical issues on smart grid technologies primarily in terms of information and communication technology (ICT) issues like security, efficiency to communications layer field. In this paper we propose new model for security in Smart Grid Technology that contains Security Module(SM) along with DEM which will enhance security in Grid. It is expected that this paper will provide a better understanding of the technologies, potential advantages and research challenges of the smart grid and provoke interest among the research community to further explore this promising research area.

  1. Smart Sensor Systems for Aerospace Applications: From Sensor Development to Application Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, G. W.; Xu, J. C.; Dungan, L. K.; Ward, B. J.; Rowe, S.; Williams, J.; Makel, D. B.; Liu, C. C.; Chang, C. W.

    2008-01-01

    The application of Smart Sensor Systems for aerospace applications is a multidisciplinary process consisting of sensor element development, element integration into Smart Sensor hardware, and testing of the resulting sensor systems in application environments. This paper provides a cross-section of these activities for multiple aerospace applications illustrating the technology challenges involved. The development and application testing topics discussed are: 1) The broadening of sensitivity and operational range of silicon carbide (SiC) Schottky gas sensor elements; 2) Integration of fire detection sensor technology into a "Lick and Stick" Smart Sensor hardware platform for Crew Exploration Vehicle applications; 3) Extended testing for zirconia based oxygen sensors in the basic "Lick and Stick" platform for environmental monitoring applications. It is concluded that that both core sensor platform technology and a basic hardware platform can enhance the viability of implementing smart sensor systems in aerospace applications.

  2. Advanced sensors technology survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Tommy G.; Costello, David J.; Davis, Jerry G.; Horst, Richard L.; Lessard, Charles S.; Peel, H. Herbert; Tolliver, Robert

    1992-01-01

    This project assesses the state-of-the-art in advanced or 'smart' sensors technology for NASA Life Sciences research applications with an emphasis on those sensors with potential applications on the space station freedom (SSF). The objectives are: (1) to conduct literature reviews on relevant advanced sensor technology; (2) to interview various scientists and engineers in industry, academia, and government who are knowledgeable on this topic; (3) to provide viewpoints and opinions regarding the potential applications of this technology on the SSF; and (4) to provide summary charts of relevant technologies and centers where these technologies are being developed.

  3. Smart fabrics: integrating fiber optic sensors and information networks.

    PubMed

    El-Sherif, Mahmoud

    2004-01-01

    "Smart Fabrics" are defined as fabrics capable of monitoring their own "health", and sensing environmental conditions. They consist of special type of sensors, signal processing, and communication network embedded into textile substrate. Available conventional sensors and networking systems are not fully technologically mature for such applications. New classes of miniature sensors, signal processing and networking systems are urgently needed for such application. Also, the methodology for integration into textile structures has to be developed. In this paper, the development of smart fabrics with embedded fiber optic systems is presented for applications in health monitoring and diagnostics. Successful development of such smart fabrics with embedded sensors and networks is mainly dependent on the development of the proper miniature sensors technology, and on the integration of these sensors into textile structures. The developed smart fabrics will be discussed and samples of the results will be presented.

  4. Smart Query Answering for Marine Sensor Data

    PubMed Central

    Shahriar, Md. Sumon; de Souza, Paulo; Timms, Greg

    2011-01-01

    We review existing query answering systems for sensor data. We then propose an extended query answering approach termed smart query, specifically for marine sensor data. The smart query answering system integrates pattern queries and continuous queries. The proposed smart query system considers both streaming data and historical data from marine sensor networks. The smart query also uses query relaxation technique and semantics from domain knowledge as a recommender system. The proposed smart query benefits in building data and information systems for marine sensor networks. PMID:22163772

  5. Smart Sensors Gather Information for Machine Diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2014-01-01

    Stennis Space Center was interested in using smart sensors to monitor components on test stands and avert equipment failures. Partnering with St. Paul, Minnesota-based Lion Precision through a Cooperative Agreement, the team developed a smart sensor and the associated communication protocols. The same sensor is now commercially available for manufacturing.

  6. Environmental Technology Verification Report for Instrumentation Northwest, Inc., Aquistar® TempHion Smart Sensor and Datalogger Nitrate-specific Ion-selective Electrode for Groundwater Remediation Monitoring

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental Technology Verification Report for Instrumentation Northwest, Inc., Aquistar® TempHion Smart Sensor and Datalogger Nitrate-specific Ion-selective Electrode for Groundwater Remediation Monitoring

  7. Environmental Technology Verification Report for Instrumentation Northwest, Inc., Aquistar® TempHion Smart Sensor and Datalogger Nitrate-specific Ion-selective Electrode for Groundwater Remediation Monitoring

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental Technology Verification Report for Instrumentation Northwest, Inc., Aquistar® TempHion Smart Sensor and Datalogger Nitrate-specific Ion-selective Electrode for Groundwater Remediation Monitoring

  8. Establishing trust in decentralized smart sensor networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vagts, H.; Cosar, T.; Beyerer, J.

    2011-06-01

    Smart sensors can gather all kind of information and process it. Cameras are still dominating and smart cameras can offer services for face recognition or person tracking. Operators are building collaborations to cover a larger area, to save costs and to add more and different sensors. Cryptographic methods may achieve integrity and confidentiality between operators, but not trust. Even if a partner or one of his sensors is authenticated, no statements can be made about the quality of the sensor data. Hence, trust must be established between the partners and their sensors. Trust can be built based on past experience. A reputation system collects opinions of operators about the behavior of sensors and calculates trust based on these opinions. Many reputation systems have been proposed, e.g., for authentication of files in peer-topeer networks. This work presents a new reputation system, which is designed to calculate the trustworthiness of smart sensors and smart sensor systems. A new trust model, including functions to calculate and update trust on past experiences, is proposed. When fusing information of multiple sensors, it cannot always be reconstructed, which information led to a bad result. Hence, an approach for fair rating is shown. The proposed system has been realized in a Service-Oriented Architecture for easy integration in existing smart sensor systems, e.g., smart surveillance systems. The model itself can be used in every decentralized heterogeneous smart sensor network.

  9. AGSM Intelligent Devices/Smart Sensors Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harp, Janicce Leshay

    2014-01-01

    This project provides development and qualification of Smart Sensors capable of self-diagnosis and assessment of their capability/readiness to support operations. These sensors will provide pressure and temperature measurements to use in ground systems.

  10. Sensor technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokoloski, Martin M.

    1988-01-01

    The objective is to provide necessary expertise and technology to advance space remote sensing of terrestrial, planetary, and galactic phenomena through the use of electromagnetic and electro-optic properties of gas, liquid, and solid state materials technology. The Sensor Technology Program is divided into two subprograms: a base research and development part and a Civil Space Technology Initiative (CSTI) part. The base research and development consists of research on artificially grown materials such as quantum well and superlattice structure with the potential for new and efficient means for detecting electromagnetic phenomena. Research is also being done on materials and concepts for detector components and devices for measuring high energy phenomena such as UV, X-, and gamma rays that are required observables in astrophysis and solar physics missions. The CSTI program is more mission driven and is balanced among four major disciplines: detector sensors; submillimeter wave sensors; LIDAR/DIAL sensors; and cooler technology.

  11. Smart sensor for terminal homing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panda, D.; Aggarwal, R.; Hummel, R.

    1980-01-01

    The practical scene matching problem is considered to present certain complications which must extend classical image processing capabilities. Certain aspects of the scene matching problem which must be addressed by a smart sensor for terminal homing are discussed. First a philosophy for treating the matching problem for the terminal homing scenario is outlined. Then certain aspects of the feature extraction process and symbolic pattern matching are considered. It is thought that in the future general ideas from artificial intelligence will be more useful for terminal homing requirements of fast scene recognition and pattern matching.

  12. Vehicle Fault Diagnose Based on Smart Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhining, Li; Peng, Wang; Jianmin, Mei; Jianwei, Li; Fei, Teng

    In the vehicle's traditional fault diagnose system, we usually use a computer system with a A/D card and with many sensors connected to it. The disadvantage of this system is that these sensor can hardly be shared with control system and other systems, there are too many connect lines and the electro magnetic compatibility(EMC) will be affected. In this paper, smart speed sensor, smart acoustic press sensor, smart oil press sensor, smart acceleration sensor and smart order tracking sensor were designed to solve this problem. With the CAN BUS these smart sensors, fault diagnose computer and other computer could be connected together to establish a network system which can monitor and control the vehicle's diesel and other system without any duplicate sensor. The hard and soft ware of the smart sensor system was introduced, the oil press, vibration and acoustic signal are resampled by constant angle increment to eliminate the influence of the rotate speed. After the resample, the signal in every working cycle could be averaged in angle domain and do other analysis like order spectrum.

  13. Smart sensors II; Proceedings of the Seminar, San Diego, CA, July 31, August 1, 1980

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbe, D. F.

    1980-01-01

    Topics discussed include technology for smart sensors, smart sensors for tracking and surveillance, and techniques and algorithms for smart sensors. Papers are presented on the application of very large scale integrated circuits to smart sensors, imaging charge-coupled devices for deep-space surveillance, ultra-precise star tracking using charge coupled devices, and automatic target identification of blurred images with super-resolution features. Attention is also given to smart sensors for terminal homing, algorithms for estimating image position, and the computational efficiency of multiple image registration algorithms.

  14. Annotating smart environment sensor data for activity learning.

    PubMed

    Szewcyzk, S; Dwan, K; Minor, B; Swedlove, B; Cook, D

    2009-01-01

    The pervasive sensing technologies found in smart homes offer unprecedented opportunities for providing health monitoring and assistance to individuals experiencing difficulties living independently at home. In order to monitor the functional health of smart home residents, we need to design technologies that recognize and track the activities that people perform at home. Machine learning techniques can perform this task, but the software algorithms rely upon large amounts of sample data that is correctly labeled with the corresponding activity. Labeling, or annotating, sensor data with the corresponding activity can be time consuming, may require input from the smart home resident, and is often inaccurate. Therefore, in this paper we investigate four alternative mechanisms for annotating sensor data with a corresponding activity label. We evaluate the alternative methods along the dimensions of annotation time, resident burden, and accuracy using sensor data collected in a real smart apartment.

  15. Smart Sensors Assess Structural Health

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    NASA frequently inspects launch vehicles, fuel tanks, and other components for structural damage. To perform quick evaluation and monitoring, the Agency pursues the development of structural health monitoring systems. In 2001, Acellent Technologies Inc., of Sunnyvale, California, received Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) funding from Marshall Space Flight Center to develop a hybrid Stanford Multi-Actuator Receiver Transduction (SMART) Layer for aerospace vehicles and structures. As a result, Acellent expanded the technology's capability and now sells it to aerospace and automotive companies; construction, energy, and utility companies; and the defense, space, transportation, and energy industries for structural condition monitoring, damage detection, crack growth monitoring, and other applications.

  16. KEA-71 Smart Current Signature Sensor (SCSS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perotti, Jose M.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the development and uses of the Smart Current Signature Sensor (SCSS), also known as the Valve Health Monitor (VHM) system. SCSS provides a way to not only monitor real-time the valve's operation in a non invasive manner, but also to monitor its health (Fault Detection and Isolation) and identify potential faults and/or degradation in the near future (Prediction/Prognosis). This technology approach is not only applicable for solenoid valves, and it could be extrapolated to other electrical components with repeatable electrical current signatures such as motors.

  17. Smart sensor systems for human health breath monitoring applications.

    PubMed

    Hunter, G W; Xu, J C; Biaggi-Labiosa, A M; Laskowski, D; Dutta, P K; Mondal, S P; Ward, B J; Makel, D B; Liu, C C; Chang, C W; Dweik, R A

    2011-09-01

    Breath analysis techniques offer a potential revolution in health care diagnostics, especially if these techniques can be brought into standard use in the clinic and at home. The advent of microsensors combined with smart sensor system technology enables a new generation of sensor systems with significantly enhanced capabilities and minimal size, weight and power consumption. This paper discusses the microsensor/smart sensor system approach and provides a summary of efforts to migrate this technology into human health breath monitoring applications. First, the basic capability of this approach to measure exhaled breath associated with exercise physiology is demonstrated. Building from this foundation, the development of a system for a portable asthma home health care system is described. A solid-state nitric oxide (NO) sensor for asthma monitoring has been identified, and efforts are underway to miniaturize this NO sensor technology and integrate it into a smart sensor system. It is concluded that base platform microsensor technology combined with smart sensor systems can address the needs of a range of breath monitoring applications and enable new capabilities for healthcare.

  18. Integrating Personalized Technology in Toxicology: Sensors, Smart Glass, and Social Media Applications in Toxicology Research.

    PubMed

    Carreiro, Stephanie; Chai, Peter R; Carey, Jennifer; Chapman, Brittany; Boyer, Edward W

    2017-06-01

    Rapid proliferation of mobile technologies in social and healthcare spaces create an opportunity for advancement in research and clinical practice. The application of mobile, personalized technology in healthcare, referred to as mHealth, has not yet become routine in toxicology. However, key features of our practice environment, such as frequent need for remote evaluation, unreliable historical data from patients, and sensitive subject matter, make mHealth tools appealing solutions in comparison to traditional methods that collect retrospective or indirect data. This manuscript describes the features, uses, and costs associated with several of common sectors of mHealth research including wearable biosensors, ingestible biosensors, head-mounted devices, and social media applications. The benefits and novel challenges associated with the study and use of these applications are then discussed. Finally, opportunities for further research and integration are explored with a particular focus on toxicology-based applications.

  19. Smart motor technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Packard, D.; Schmitt, D.

    1984-01-01

    Current spacecraft design relies upon microprocessor control; however, motors usually require extensive additional electronic circuitry to interface with these microprocessor controls. An improved control technique that allows a smart brushless motor to connect directly to a microprocessor control system is described. An actuator with smart motors receives a spacecraft command directly and responds in a closed loop control mode. In fact, two or more smart motors can be controlled for synchronous operation.

  20. Smart boards: a reemerging technology.

    PubMed

    Brigham, Tara J

    2013-01-01

    Smart boards, also known as interactive whiteboards (IWBs), are large, interactive, touch-sensitive displays that are mainly used for presentation or educational purposes. While some may not consider this an emerging technology today, changes in the design and capabilities challenge that line of thinking. This column will explain what a smart board is, provide a brief history about it, and describe where it is currently used and why it might be a technology to consider having in a library today.

  1. Educating next-generation civil engineers about smart structures technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yunfeng

    2005-05-01

    The implementation of smart structures technology in the design, construction and maintenance of civil and mechanical systems have been shown beneficial to the performance enhancement, operating efficiency and reliability of structural systems. However, most of today's engineering students are unaware of the remarkable properties of smart sensors and many applications of smart structures technology. It is thus desirable to prepare the future engineers of the society for the cutting-edge technologies in smart structures, for which they may see broad application in their generation. Pioneering work in incorporating smart structures technologies into civil engineering curriculum has been done by the writer at Lehigh University and is described in this paper. In particular, a graduate-level course entitled "Smart Structural Systems" has been taught in the Spring Semester of Year 2004 at Lehigh University. To better convey the course material to students, a smart structures test-bed, which is used not only to showcase various technological aspects of a smart structural system but also offer students an opportunity to gain hands-on experience by doing experiments has been under development at Lehigh University. The hands-on experience that could be developed with the smart structures test-bed is believed being essential for students to have a good understanding and mastering of the smart structures technologies.

  2. Aging well with smart technology.

    PubMed

    Cheek, Penny; Nikpour, Linda; Nowlin, Heather D

    2005-01-01

    As baby-boomers age, the need for long-term nursing care services increases. In the future, there will simply not be enough long-term care facilities to accommodate all of these patients. In addition, many people prefer to grow old at home, a concept known as aging-in-place. Smart home technology facilities aging-in-place by assisting patients with emergency assistance, fall prevention/detection, reminder systems, medication administration and assistance for those with hearing, visual or cognitive impairments. Benefits include making aging-in-place a reality, continuous monitoring, and improved psychosocial effects. Concerns of this technology include cost, availability of technology, retrofitting complications, and potential inappropriate use of the technology. Overall, the concept of smart homes is gaining in popularity and will expand the role of the nurse in the future. It is important for all nurses to understand how their practices will be transformed as smart homes become a reality for the aging population.

  3. Green Technology for Smart Cities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casini, M.

    2017-08-01

    In view of the enormous social and environmental changes at the global level, more and more cities worldwide have directed their development strategies towards smart policies aimed at sustainable mobility, energy upgrading of the building stock, increase of energy production from renewable sources, improvement of waste management and implementation of ICT infrastructures. The goal is to turn into Smart Cities, able to improve the quality of life of their inhabitants by offering a lasting opportunity for cultural, economic and social growth within a healthy, safe, stimulating and dynamic environment. After an overview of the role of cities in climate changes and environmental pollution worldwide, the article provides an up to date definition of Smart City and of its main expected features, focussing on technology innovation, smart governance and main financing and support programs. An analysis of the most interesting initiatives at the international level pursued by cities investigating the three main areas of Green Buildings, Smart grid-Smart lighting, and Smart mobility is given, with the objective to offer a broad reference for the identification of development sustainable plans and programs at the urban level within the current legislative framework.

  4. Full-scale decentralized damage identification using wireless smart sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Shinae; Sim, Sung-Han; Jo, Hongki; Spencer, Billie F., Jr.

    2011-04-01

    Wireless Smart Sensor Networks (WSSN) facilitates a new paradigm to structural health monitoring (SHM) for civil infrastructure. Conventionally, SHM systems employing wired sensors and central data acquisition have been used to characterize the state of a structure; however, wide-spread implementation has been limited due to difficulties in cabling and data management, high equipment cost, and long setup time. WSSNs offer a unique opportunity to overcome such difficulties. Recent advances in sensor technology have realized low-cost, smart sensors with on-board computation and wireless communication capabilities, making deployment of a dense array of sensors on large civil structures both feasible and economical. Wireless smart sensors have shown their tremendous potential for SHM in recent full-scale bridge monitoring examples. However, structural damage identification in WSSNs, a primary objective of SHM, has yet to reach its full potential. This paper presents a full-scale validation of the decentralized damage identification application on the Imote2 sensor platform on a historic steel truss bridge. The SHM application for WSSN developed in the previous research is further combined with continuous and autonomous monitoring application. In total, 144 sensor channels and one base station have been deployed on the bridge for damage localization. The efficacy of the developed application has been demonstrated to compare the damage identification results with the traditional centralized processing.

  5. Smart sensor for environmental applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saint-Pierre, Guillaume; Malecha, Michael M.; Saini, Selwayan; Setford, Steven J.

    2005-07-01

    For the past two decades intensive research has been carried out on the development of environmental sensors. Nevertheless, the applicability of such devices has been hindered by harsh work conditions and the complexity of the sample matrices. A novel approach centres on the integration of sample pre-treatment steps, where the technology involved can be used advantageously for the design of a Micro Total Analysis System (fluid motion and detection enhancement). The synergistic mixed surfactant system allows the development an independent "green" target specific extraction scheme. Amphiphiles are routinely used in the electrophoretic separation process for their intrinsic detection signal enhancement (i.e. by optical/electrochemical methods). They can also be regarded as a means of flow generation (e.g. Marangoni's Flow) in micro-systems. In this perspective, we are currently developing micro-systems based on glass and polymeric substrates (e.g. poly dimethyl silicone). Whilst the surface chemistry of glass substrates allows the integration of mesoporous silica and ceramics, soft lithographic methods, such as micro-moulding or prototyping, renders the design of PDMS substrate simple. While the selectivity of the system may be based on molecular imprinted silicates, biologically compatible ceramics such as titanium dioxide can be used for the design of a single optical/ electrochemical detection cell. All of these previously cited technologies form a standing bridge towards independent, automated, at-/on-line sensor systems.

  6. On the Design of Smart Parking Networks in the Smart Cities: An Optimal Sensor Placement Model.

    PubMed

    Bagula, Antoine; Castelli, Lorenzo; Zennaro, Marco

    2015-06-30

    Smart parking is a typical IoT application that can benefit from advances in sensor, actuator and RFID technologies to provide many services to its users and parking owners of a smart city. This paper considers a smart parking infrastructure where sensors are laid down on the parking spots to detect car presence and RFID readers are embedded into parking gates to identify cars and help in the billing of the smart parking. Both types of devices are endowed with wired and wireless communication capabilities for reporting to a gateway where the situation recognition is performed. The sensor devices are tasked to play one of the three roles: (1) slave sensor nodes located on the parking spot to detect car presence/absence; (2) master nodes located at one of the edges of a parking lot to detect presence and collect the sensor readings from the slave nodes; and (3) repeater sensor nodes, also called "anchor" nodes, located strategically at specific locations in the parking lot to increase the coverage and connectivity of the wireless sensor network. While slave and master nodes are placed based on geographic constraints, the optimal placement of the relay/anchor sensor nodes in smart parking is an important parameter upon which the cost and efficiency of the parking system depends. We formulate the optimal placement of sensors in smart parking as an integer linear programming multi-objective problem optimizing the sensor network engineering efficiency in terms of coverage and lifetime maximization, as well as its economic gain in terms of the number of sensors deployed for a specific coverage and lifetime. We propose an exact solution to the node placement problem using single-step and two-step solutions implemented in the Mosel language based on the Xpress-MPsuite of libraries. Experimental results reveal the relative efficiency of the single-step compared to the two-step model on different performance parameters. These results are consolidated by simulation results

  7. On the Design of Smart Parking Networks in the Smart Cities: An Optimal Sensor Placement Model

    PubMed Central

    Bagula, Antoine; Castelli, Lorenzo; Zennaro, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Smart parking is a typical IoT application that can benefit from advances in sensor, actuator and RFID technologies to provide many services to its users and parking owners of a smart city. This paper considers a smart parking infrastructure where sensors are laid down on the parking spots to detect car presence and RFID readers are embedded into parking gates to identify cars and help in the billing of the smart parking. Both types of devices are endowed with wired and wireless communication capabilities for reporting to a gateway where the situation recognition is performed. The sensor devices are tasked to play one of the three roles: (1) slave sensor nodes located on the parking spot to detect car presence/absence; (2) master nodes located at one of the edges of a parking lot to detect presence and collect the sensor readings from the slave nodes; and (3) repeater sensor nodes, also called “anchor” nodes, located strategically at specific locations in the parking lot to increase the coverage and connectivity of the wireless sensor network. While slave and master nodes are placed based on geographic constraints, the optimal placement of the relay/anchor sensor nodes in smart parking is an important parameter upon which the cost and efficiency of the parking system depends. We formulate the optimal placement of sensors in smart parking as an integer linear programming multi-objective problem optimizing the sensor network engineering efficiency in terms of coverage and lifetime maximization, as well as its economic gain in terms of the number of sensors deployed for a specific coverage and lifetime. We propose an exact solution to the node placement problem using single-step and two-step solutions implemented in the Mosel language based on the Xpress-MPsuite of libraries. Experimental results reveal the relative efficiency of the single-step compared to the two-step model on different performance parameters. These results are consolidated by simulation results

  8. Wafer-Level Vacuum Packaging of Smart Sensors.

    PubMed

    Hilton, Allan; Temple, Dorota S

    2016-10-31

    The reach and impact of the Internet of Things will depend on the availability of low-cost, smart sensors-"low cost" for ubiquitous presence, and "smart" for connectivity and autonomy. By using wafer-level processes not only for the smart sensor fabrication and integration, but also for packaging, we can further greatly reduce the cost of sensor components and systems as well as further decrease their size and weight. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art in the wafer-level vacuum packaging technology of smart sensors. We describe the processes needed to create the wafer-scale vacuum microchambers, focusing on approaches that involve metal seals and that are compatible with the thermal budget of complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) integrated circuits. We review choices of seal materials and structures that are available to a device designer, and present techniques used for the fabrication of metal seals on device and window wafers. We also analyze the deposition and activation of thin film getters needed to maintain vacuum in the ultra-small chambers, and the wafer-to-wafer bonding processes that form the hermetic seal. We discuss inherent trade-offs and challenges of each seal material set and the corresponding bonding processes. Finally, we identify areas for further research that could help broaden implementations of the wafer-level vacuum packaging technology.

  9. Automated decentralized smart sensor network for modal analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sim, S. H.; Spencer, B. F., Jr.; Zhang, M.; Xie, H.

    2009-03-01

    Understanding the dynamic behavior of civil engineering structures is important to adequately resolve problems related to structural vibration. The dynamic properties of a structure are commonly obtained by conducting a modal survey that can be used for model updating, design verification, and improvement of serviceability. However, particularly for largescale civil structures, modal surveys using traditional wired sensor systems can be quite challenging to carry out due to difficulties in cabling, high equipment cost, and long setup time. Smart sensor networks (SSN) offer a unique opportunity to overcome such difficulties. Recent advances in sensor technology have realized low-cost smart sensors with on-board computation and wireless communication capabilities, making deployment of a dense array of sensors on large civil structures both feasible and economical. However, as opposed to wired sensor networks in which centralized data acquisition and processing are a common practice, the SSN requires decentralized algorithms due to the limitation associated with wireless communication; to date such algorithms are limited. This paper proposes a new decentralized hierarchical approach for modal analysis that reliably determines the global modal properties and can be implemented on a network of smart sensors. The efficacy of the proposed approach is demonstrated through several numerical examples.

  10. Evaluation of Smart Gun Technologies preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, D.R.

    1996-01-01

    The Smart Gun Technology Project has a goal to eliminate the capability of an unauthorized user from firing a law enforcement officer`s firearm by implementing {open_quote}smart{close_quote} technologies. Smart technologies are those that can in some manner identify an officer. This report will identify, describe, and grade various technologies as compared to the requirements that were obtained from officers. This report does not make a final recommendation for a smart gun technology, nor does it give the complete design of a smart gun system.

  11. Smart CMOS image sensor for lightning detection and imaging.

    PubMed

    Rolando, Sébastien; Goiffon, Vincent; Magnan, Pierre; Corbière, Franck; Molina, Romain; Tulet, Michel; Bréart-de-Boisanger, Michel; Saint-Pé, Olivier; Guiry, Saïprasad; Larnaudie, Franck; Leone, Bruno; Perez-Cuevas, Leticia; Zayer, Igor

    2013-03-01

    We present a CMOS image sensor dedicated to lightning detection and imaging. The detector has been designed to evaluate the potentiality of an on-chip lightning detection solution based on a smart sensor. This evaluation is performed in the frame of the predevelopment phase of the lightning detector that will be implemented in the Meteosat Third Generation Imager satellite for the European Space Agency. The lightning detection process is performed by a smart detector combining an in-pixel frame-to-frame difference comparison with an adjustable threshold and on-chip digital processing allowing an efficient localization of a faint lightning pulse on the entire large format array at a frequency of 1 kHz. A CMOS prototype sensor with a 256×256 pixel array and a 60 μm pixel pitch has been fabricated using a 0.35 μm 2P 5M technology and tested to validate the selected detection approach.

  12. A Ubiquitous Sensor Network Platform for Integrating Smart Devices into the Semantic Sensor Web

    PubMed Central

    de Vera, David Díaz Pardo; Izquierdo, Álvaro Sigüenza; Vercher, Jesús Bernat; Gómez, Luis Alfonso Hernández

    2014-01-01

    Ongoing Sensor Web developments make a growing amount of heterogeneous sensor data available to smart devices. This is generating an increasing demand for homogeneous mechanisms to access, publish and share real-world information. This paper discusses, first, an architectural solution based on Next Generation Networks: a pilot Telco Ubiquitous Sensor Network (USN) Platform that embeds several OGC® Sensor Web services. This platform has already been deployed in large scale projects. Second, the USN-Platform is extended to explore a first approach to Semantic Sensor Web principles and technologies, so that smart devices can access Sensor Web data, allowing them also to share richer (semantically interpreted) information. An experimental scenario is presented: a smart car that consumes and produces real-world information which is integrated into the Semantic Sensor Web through a Telco USN-Platform. Performance tests revealed that observation publishing times with our experimental system were well within limits compatible with the adequate operation of smart safety assistance systems in vehicles. On the other hand, response times for complex queries on large repositories may be inappropriate for rapid reaction needs. PMID:24945678

  13. Study and development of smart sensor using microprocessor and microcontroller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarma, Utpal

    The trend towards replacing dumb sensors with smart ones has been gathering momentum from last two decades. Smart sensors have a number of advantages compared to their dumb counterparts. Ease of installation and operation, field upgradeability, standalone feature, digital communication interface are few of them. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc. (IEEE) and National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in 1993 initiated the standardisation for smart sensor. This process generates IEEE Std. 1451.1TM -1999, IEEE Std. 1451.2TM -1997, IEEE Std. 1451.3TM - 2003, IEEE Std. 1451.4TM -2004, IEEE Std. 1451.10TM -2007, IEEE Std. 1451.5TM -2007. At present IEEE P1451.6 and IEEE P1451.7 are the proposed standards of smart sensor. The basic motive behind these standards is to build a common platform for sensor network, transducer interface module, transducer electronic data sheets etc. In the present work the design, fabrication, calibration, and performance of such smart sensor system with their functionalities are discussed. Results based on field trial of this system in a tea factory are also discussed. Initially a smart industrial temperature monitoring and data logging system using INTEL 8086 microprocessor is designed, the detail of which is explained in Chapter 2. Here, a K-type thermocouple is considered as the sensor. It incorporates automatic reference junction compensation, signal conditioning, 12-bit A/D conversion and data transmission via RS232C interface. At the user end, PC software handles data monitoring and recording. Calibration of the system using a mercury thermometer and an oil bath is described. The stability of the reference junction compensation is also tested. Certain improvements are found to be necessary in this system, so the system is modified adding some more features. As the TC response is not linear it is linearised using least square polynomial fitting method. The improvements in error are discussed in Chapter 3

  14. Point-of-care temperature and respiration monitoring sensors for smart fabric applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Soyoun; Ji, Taeksoo; Varadan, Vijay K.

    2006-12-01

    Advances in smart sensors, miniaturization, and related technologies leading to the emergence of smart fabrics are prerequisites to the construction of a point-of-care (POC) system for continuous health monitoring and illness prevention. Low manufacturing cost, light weight, portability and flexibility are among the requirements for smart sensors when embedded into smart fabrics. Organic semiconductor technology has recently been envisioned to meet these requirements, and to encourage the development of organic semiconductor based sensors because of its low process temperature and potential for very low cost manufacturing. In this paper, we present flexible sensors based on an organic semiconductor capable of measuring physiological parameters such as strain and temperature, adopting pentacene thin film transistors (TFTs) and Wheatstone bridge structures. It is expected that these sensors, integrated into textile structures, will enable real time POC monitoring of a patient's respiration rate, skin temperature, body heat flow and body temperature at an early stage.

  15. Piezoresistive sensors for smart textiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvert, Paul; Patra, Prabir; Lo, Te-Chen; Chen, Chi H.; Sawhney, Amit; Agrawal, Animesh

    2007-04-01

    We have used inkjet printing to deposit silver conducting lines and small PEDOT (conducting polymer) sensors onto fabrics. The printed conductors penetrate into the fabric and can be shown to coat the individual fibers within the yarn, through the full thickness of the cloth. The PEDOT sensor has a resistance in the region of a few kilo-ohms and is connected to measuring equipment by printed silver lines with a resistance of a few ohms. In this way, local strains can be measured at different sites on a fabric. The PEDOT responds to a tensile strain by a reduction in resistance with a gauge factor (change in resistance/strain) from -5 to -20. This compares with conventional strain gauges where the gauge factor is normally +2. These sensors cycle to strains of over 10%. We have measured gauge factors as a function of the orientation of the sensing line to the fabric axes, to the strain axes for different fabric structures. We can correlate the gauge factor with the extent to which the twisted multifilament yarns are expected to become laterally compressed. In preliminary tests we have shown that these printed sensors can be used to monitor knee and wrist motions and so could be used to provide information in applications such as rehabilitation from joint damage.

  16. Wafer-Level Vacuum Packaging of Smart Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Hilton, Allan; Temple, Dorota S.

    2016-01-01

    The reach and impact of the Internet of Things will depend on the availability of low-cost, smart sensors—“low cost” for ubiquitous presence, and “smart” for connectivity and autonomy. By using wafer-level processes not only for the smart sensor fabrication and integration, but also for packaging, we can further greatly reduce the cost of sensor components and systems as well as further decrease their size and weight. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art in the wafer-level vacuum packaging technology of smart sensors. We describe the processes needed to create the wafer-scale vacuum microchambers, focusing on approaches that involve metal seals and that are compatible with the thermal budget of complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) integrated circuits. We review choices of seal materials and structures that are available to a device designer, and present techniques used for the fabrication of metal seals on device and window wafers. We also analyze the deposition and activation of thin film getters needed to maintain vacuum in the ultra-small chambers, and the wafer-to-wafer bonding processes that form the hermetic seal. We discuss inherent trade-offs and challenges of each seal material set and the corresponding bonding processes. Finally, we identify areas for further research that could help broaden implementations of the wafer-level vacuum packaging technology. PMID:27809249

  17. Smart Gun Technology project. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, D.R.

    1996-05-01

    The goal of the Smart Gun Technology project is to eliminate the capability of an unauthorized user form firing a law officer`s firearm by implementing user-recognizing-and-authorizing (or {open_quotes}smart{close_quotes}) surety technologies. This project was funded by the National Institute of Justice. This report lists the findings and results of the project`s three primary objectives. First, to find and document the requirements for a smart firearm technology that law enforcement officers will value. Second, to investigate, evaluate, and prioritize technologies that meet the requirements for a law enforcement officer`s smart firearm. Third, to demonstrate and document the most promising technology`s usefulness in models of a smart firearm.

  18. Smart textile plasmonic fiber dew sensors.

    PubMed

    Esmaeilzadeh, Hamid; Rivard, Maxime; Arzi, Ezatollah; Légaré, François; Hassani, Alireza

    2015-06-01

    We propose a novel Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR)-based sensor that detects dew formation in optical fiber-based smart textiles. The proposed SPR sensor facilitates the observation of two phenomena: condensation of moisture and evaporation of water molecules in air. This sensor detects dew formation in less than 0.25 s, and determines dew point temperature with an accuracy of 4%. It can be used to monitor water layer depth changes during dew formation and evaporation in the range of a plasmon depth probe, i.e., 250 nm, with a resolution of 7 nm. Further, it facilitates estimation of the relative humidity of a medium over a dynamic range of 30% to 70% by measuring the evaporation time via the plasmon depth probe.

  19. Advanced Ground Systems Maintenance Intelligent Devices/Smart Sensors Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perotti, Jose M. (Compiler)

    2015-01-01

    This project provides development and qualification of Smart Sensors capable of self-diagnosis and assessment of their capability/readiness to support operations. These sensors will provide pressure and temperature measurements for use in ground systems.

  20. Smart dental practice: capitalising on smart mobile technology.

    PubMed

    Plangger, K; Bredican, J; Mills, A J; Armstrong, J

    2015-08-14

    To keep pace with consumer adoption of smart mobile devices, such as smartphones and tablets, and the applications ('apps') developed for these devices, dental professionals should consider how this technology could be used to simultaneously improve both patient service experiences and dental practice management. Using U-Commerce as a theoretical lens, this article discusses the potential value of smart mobile technology to the dental practice context, with a particular focus on the unique and customisable capabilities of apps. To take full advantage of this technology, a process is outlined for identifying and designing bespoke dental apps that takes into account the unique advantages of these devices. Dental practices, with increasing financial and competitive pressures, may improve the efficiency and profitability of operations and better manage patients, employees and stakeholders by integrating smart mobile technology.

  1. Smart technical textiles with integrated POF sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krebber, Katerina; Lenke, Philipp; Liehr, Sascha; Witt, Jens; Schukar, Marcus

    2008-03-01

    Fiber optic sensors based on polymer optical fibers (POF) take advantage of the high elasticity and high break-down strain of POF. Because of their outstanding elastic properties, POF are well suited for integration into technical textiles like geotextiles and medical textiles. Smart textiles with incorporated POF sensors, able to sense various mechanical and physical quantities, can be realized. The integration of POF as a sensor into geotextiles for monitoring of displacement of soil is very attractive since POF can be used for distributed strain measurement of strain values of more than 40 %. An online monitoring of critical mechanical deformations of geotechnical structures like dikes, dams, slopes, embankments as well as of masonry structures can be ensured. Medical textiles that incorporate POF sensors can control vital physiological parameters like respiratory movement and can be used for wearable health monitoring of patients requiring a continuous medical assistance and treatment. The biocompatibility of POF is an important criterion for selecting POF as a medical sensor. The paper shows selected examples of using POF sensors for the mentioned monitoring purposes.

  2. Modal control of a rectangular plate using smart sensors and smart actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Nobuo; Sanada, Takeshi

    2007-02-01

    This paper is concerned with modal control of a rectangular plate using both smart sensors and smart actuators. Since filtering and actuation are related, discussion of a smart sensor comes first followed by that of the counterpoint—a smart actuator. This paper begins by discussing an ideal case of modal control comprising extraction and activation of a target structural mode of a plate. Then, for the purpose of implementing a modal control system, three-dimensional smart sensors and actuators are introduced, the design procedure being investigated. Taking into consideration the practicability, two-dimensional smart sensors and actuators for modal filtering and modal actuation, respectively, are presented, and then the number, location and shaping function of the two-dimensional modal sensors and actuators are clarified. Furthermore, the extraction and actuation of the (1, 3) mode of a simply supported rectangular panel using the smart sensors and actuators is shown. Finally, a modal feedback control system is constructed utilizing both the smart sensors and the smart actuators, demonstrating the effectiveness at suppressing the particular structural mode of interest without causing spillover.

  3. Sensor Selection to Support Practical Use of Health-Monitoring Smart Environments

    PubMed Central

    HOLDER, Lawrence B.

    2011-01-01

    The data mining and pervasive sensing technologies found in smart homes offer unprecedented opportunities for providing health monitoring and assistance to individuals experiencing difficulties living independently at home. In order to monitor the functional health of smart home residents, we need to design technologies that recognize and track activities that people normally perform as part of their daily routines. One question that frequently arises, however, is how many smart home sensors are needed and where should they be placed in order to accurately recognize activities? We employ data mining techniques to look at the problem of sensor selection for activity recognition in smart homes. We analyze the results based on six data sets collected in five distinct smart home environments. PMID:21760755

  4. Top 10 "Smart" Technologies for Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fodeman, Doug; Holzberg, Carol S.; Kennedy, Kristen; McIntire, Todd; McLester, Susan; Ohler, Jason; Parham, Charles; Poftak, Amy; Schrock, Kathy; Warlick, David

    2002-01-01

    Describes 10 smart technologies for education, including voice to text software; mobile computing; hybrid computing; virtual reality; artificial intelligence; telementoring; assessment methods; digital video production; fingerprint recognition; and brain functions. Lists pertinent Web sites for each technology. (LRW)

  5. Top 10 "Smart" Technologies for Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fodeman, Doug; Holzberg, Carol S.; Kennedy, Kristen; McIntire, Todd; McLester, Susan; Ohler, Jason; Parham, Charles; Poftak, Amy; Schrock, Kathy; Warlick, David

    2002-01-01

    Describes 10 smart technologies for education, including voice to text software; mobile computing; hybrid computing; virtual reality; artificial intelligence; telementoring; assessment methods; digital video production; fingerprint recognition; and brain functions. Lists pertinent Web sites for each technology. (LRW)

  6. Innovative smart micro sensors for Army weaponry applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruffin, Paul B.; Brantley, Christina; Edwards, Eugene

    2008-03-01

    Micro sensors offer the potential solution to cost, size, and weight issues associated with smart networked sensor systems designed for environmental/missile health monitoring and rocket out-gassing/fuel leak detection, as well as situational awareness on the battlefield. In collaboration with the University of Arkansas (Fayetteville), University of Alabama (Tuscaloosa and Birmingham), Alabama A&M University (Normal), and Streamline Automation (Huntsville, AL), scientists and engineers at the Army Aviation & Missile Research, Development, and Engineering Center (AMRDEC) are investigating several nano-based technologies to solve the problem of sensing extremely small levels of toxic gases associated with both chemical warfare agents (in air and liquids) and potential rocket motor leaks. Innovative techniques are being devised to adapt voltammetry, which is a well established technique for the detection and quantification of substances dissolved in liquids, to low-cost micro sensors for detecting airborne chemical agents and potential missile propellant leakages. In addition, a surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) technique, which enhances Raman scattered light by excitation of surface plasmons on nanoporous metal surfaces (nanospheres), is being investigated to develop novel smart sensors for the detection of chemical agents (including rocket motor out-gassing) and potential detection of home-made explosive devices. In this paper, results are delineated that are associated with experimental studies, which are conducted for the aforementioned cases and for several other nano-based technology approaches. The design challenges of each micro sensor technology approach are discussed. Finally, a comparative analysis of the various innovative micro-sensor techniques is provided.

  7. Smart facility application: exploiting space technology for smart city solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Termizi, A. A. A.; Ahmad, N.; Omar, M. F.; Wahap, N. A.; Zainal, D.; Ismail, N. M.

    2016-06-01

    Facilities and amenities management is amongst the core functionalities of local government. Considering the vast area that local government has to manage, a smart solution is extremely inevitable to solve issues such as inefficient maintenance of public parks, drainage system and so forth. Therefore, this paper aims to offer a smart city solution which exploits the benefit of space technology. This proposed solution is one of the modules developed in Spatial Smart City Service Delivery Engine (SSC SDE) Project undertaken by Agensi Angkasa Negara (ANGKASA). Various levels of local government have been chosen to understand real issues faced by them. Based on this data, a Smart Facility application has been developed with the aim to enhance the service delivery by the local government hence improving citizens’ satisfaction. Since this project is still in progress, this paper will merely discussing the concept of this application.

  8. Border security and surveillance system with smart cameras and motes in a Sensor Web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guler, Sadiye; Cole, Timothy; Silverstein, Jay; Pushee, Ian; Fairgrieve, Scott

    2010-04-01

    In this paper we describe a prototype surveillance system that leverages smart sensor motes, intelligent video, and Sensor Web technologies to aid in large area monitoring operations and to enhance the security of borders and critical infrastructures. Intelligent video has emerged as a promising tool amid growing concern about border security and vulnerable entry points. However, numerous barriers exist that limit the effectiveness of surveillance video in large area protection; such as the number of cameras needed to provide coverage, large volumes of data to be processed and disseminated, lack of smart sensors to detect potential threats and limited bandwidth to capture and distribute video data. We present a concept prototype that addresses these obstacles by employing a Smart Video Node in a Sensor Web framework. Smart Video Node (SVN) is an IP video camera with automated event detection capability. SVNs are cued by inexpensive sensor motes to detect the existence of humans or vehicles. Based on sensor motes' observations cameras are slewed in to observe the activity and automated video analysis detects potential threats to be disseminated as "alerts". Sensor Web framework enables quick and efficient identification of available sensors, collects data from disparate sensors, automatically tasks various sensors based on observations or events received from other sensors, and receives and disseminates alerts from multiple sensors. The prototype system is implemented by leveraging intuVision's intelligent video, Northrop Grumman's sensor motes and SensorWeb technologies. Implementation of a deployable system with Smart Video Nodes and sensor motes within the SensorWeb platform is currently underway. The final product will have many applications in commercial, government and military systems.

  9. Sensor Fusion and Smart Sensor in Sports and Biomedical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Mendes, José Jair Alves; Vieira, Mário Elias Marinho; Pires, Marcelo Bissi; Stevan, Sergio Luiz

    2016-01-01

    The following work presents an overview of smart sensors and sensor fusion targeted at biomedical applications and sports areas. In this work, the integration of these areas is demonstrated, promoting a reflection about techniques and applications to collect, quantify and qualify some physical variables associated with the human body. These techniques are presented in various biomedical and sports applications, which cover areas related to diagnostics, rehabilitation, physical monitoring, and the development of performance in athletes, among others. Although some applications are described in only one of two fields of study (biomedicine and sports), it is very likely that the same application fits in both, with small peculiarities or adaptations. To illustrate the contemporaneity of applications, an analysis of specialized papers published in the last six years has been made. In this context, the main characteristic of this review is to present the largest quantity of relevant examples of sensor fusion and smart sensors focusing on their utilization and proposals, without deeply addressing one specific system or technique, to the detriment of the others. PMID:27669260

  10. Sensor Fusion and Smart Sensor in Sports and Biomedical Applications.

    PubMed

    Mendes, José Jair Alves; Vieira, Mário Elias Marinho; Pires, Marcelo Bissi; Stevan, Sergio Luiz

    2016-09-23

    The following work presents an overview of smart sensors and sensor fusion targeted at biomedical applications and sports areas. In this work, the integration of these areas is demonstrated, promoting a reflection about techniques and applications to collect, quantify and qualify some physical variables associated with the human body. These techniques are presented in various biomedical and sports applications, which cover areas related to diagnostics, rehabilitation, physical monitoring, and the development of performance in athletes, among others. Although some applications are described in only one of two fields of study (biomedicine and sports), it is very likely that the same application fits in both, with small peculiarities or adaptations. To illustrate the contemporaneity of applications, an analysis of specialized papers published in the last six years has been made. In this context, the main characteristic of this review is to present the largest quantity of relevant examples of sensor fusion and smart sensors focusing on their utilization and proposals, without deeply addressing one specific system or technique, to the detriment of the others.

  11. Digital Sensor Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Ted Quinn; Jerry Mauck; Richard Bockhorst; Ken Thomas

    2013-07-01

    The nuclear industry has been slow to incorporate digital sensor technology into nuclear plant designs due to concerns with digital qualification issues. However, the benefits of digital sensor technology for nuclear plant instrumentation are substantial in terms of accuracy, reliability, availability, and maintainability. This report demonstrates these benefits in direct comparisons of digital and analog sensor applications. It also addresses the qualification issues that must be addressed in the application of digital sensor technology.

  12. A Review of Rock Bolt Monitoring Using Smart Sensors.

    PubMed

    Song, Gangbing; Li, Weijie; Wang, Bo; Ho, Siu Chun Michael

    2017-04-05

    Rock bolts have been widely used as rock reinforcing members in underground coal mine roadways and tunnels. Failures of rock bolts occur as a result of overloading, corrosion, seismic burst and bad grouting, leading to catastrophic economic and personnel losses. Monitoring the health condition of the rock bolts plays an important role in ensuring the safe operation of underground mines. This work presents a brief introduction on the types of rock bolts followed by a comprehensive review of rock bolt monitoring using smart sensors. Smart sensors that are used to assess rock bolt integrity are reviewed to provide a firm perception of the application of smart sensors for enhanced performance and reliability of rock bolts. The most widely used smart sensors for rock bolt monitoring are the piezoelectric sensors and the fiber optic sensors. The methodologies and principles of these smart sensors are reviewed from the point of view of rock bolt integrity monitoring. The applications of smart sensors in monitoring the critical status of rock bolts, such as the axial force, corrosion occurrence, grout quality and resin delamination, are highlighted. In addition, several prototypes or commercially available smart rock bolt devices are also introduced.

  13. A Review of Rock Bolt Monitoring Using Smart Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Song, Gangbing; Li, Weijie; Wang, Bo; Ho, Siu Chun Michael

    2017-01-01

    Rock bolts have been widely used as rock reinforcing members in underground coal mine roadways and tunnels. Failures of rock bolts occur as a result of overloading, corrosion, seismic burst and bad grouting, leading to catastrophic economic and personnel losses. Monitoring the health condition of the rock bolts plays an important role in ensuring the safe operation of underground mines. This work presents a brief introduction on the types of rock bolts followed by a comprehensive review of rock bolt monitoring using smart sensors. Smart sensors that are used to assess rock bolt integrity are reviewed to provide a firm perception of the application of smart sensors for enhanced performance and reliability of rock bolts. The most widely used smart sensors for rock bolt monitoring are the piezoelectric sensors and the fiber optic sensors. The methodologies and principles of these smart sensors are reviewed from the point of view of rock bolt integrity monitoring. The applications of smart sensors in monitoring the critical status of rock bolts, such as the axial force, corrosion occurrence, grout quality and resin delamination, are highlighted. In addition, several prototypes or commercially available smart rock bolt devices are also introduced. PMID:28379167

  14. Coupled wave sensor technology

    SciTech Connect

    Maki, M.C.

    1988-01-01

    Buried line guided radar sensors have been used successfully for a number of years to provide perimeter security for high value resources. This paper introduces a new complementary sensor advancement at Computing Devices termed 'coupled wave device technology' (CWD). It provides many of the inherent advantages of leakey cable sensors, such as terrain-following and the ability to discriminate between humans and small animals. It also is able to provide a high or wide detection zone, and allows the sensor to be mounted aerially and adjacent to a wall or fence. Several alternative sensors have been developed which include a single-line sensor, a dual-line hybrid sensor that combines the elements of ported coax and CWD technology, and a rapid-deployment portable sensor for temporary or mobile applications. A description of the technology, the sensors, and their characteristics is provided.

  15. Designing components using smartMOVE electroactive polymer technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenthal, Marcus; Weaber, Chris; Polyakov, Ilya; Zarrabi, Al; Gise, Peter

    2008-03-01

    Designing components using SmartMOVE TM electroactive polymer technology requires an understanding of the basic operation principles and the necessary design tools for integration into actuator, sensor and energy generation applications. Artificial Muscle, Inc. is collaborating with OEMs to develop customized solutions for their applications using smartMOVE. SmartMOVE is an advanced and elegant way to obtain almost any kind of movement using dielectric elastomer electroactive polymers. Integration of this technology offers the unique capability to create highly precise and customized motion for devices and systems that require actuation. Applications of SmartMOVE include linear actuators for medical, consumer and industrial applications, such as pumps, valves, optical or haptic devices. This paper will present design guidelines for selecting a smartMOVE actuator design to match the stroke, force, power, size, speed, environmental and reliability requirements for a range of applications. Power supply and controller design and selection will also be introduced. An overview of some of the most versatile configuration options will be presented with performance comparisons. A case example will include the selection, optimization, and performance overview of a smartMOVE actuator for the cell phone camera auto-focus and proportional valve applications.

  16. Smart Sensors' Role in Integrated System Health Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perotti, Jose M.; Mata, Carlos

    2005-01-01

    During the last decade, there has been a major effort in the aerospace industry to reduce the cost per pond of payload and become competitive in the international market. Competition from Europe, Japan, and China has reduced this cost to almost a third from 1990 to 2000. This cost has leveled in recent years to an average price of around $12,000/pound of payload. One of NASA's goals is to promote the development of technologies to reduce this cost by a factor of 10 or more Exploration of space, specially manned exploration missions, involves very complex launch and flight vehicles, associated ground support systems, and extensive human support during all phases of the mission. When considering the Space Shuttle Program, we can see that vehicle and ground support systems' processing, operation, and maintenance represent a large percentage of the program cost and time. Reducing operating, processing and maintenance costs will greatly reduce the cost of Exploration programs. The Integrated System Health Management (ISHM) concept is one of the technologies that will help reduce these operating, processing and maintenance costs. ISHM is an integrated health monitoring system applicable to both flight and ground systems. It automatically and autonomously acquires information from sensors and actuators and processes that information using the ISHM-embedded knowledge. As a result, it establishes the health of the system based on the acquired information and its prior knowledge. When this concept is fully implemented, ISHM systems shall be able to perform failure prediction and remediation before actual hard failures occurs, preventing its costly consequences. Data sources, sensors, and their associated data acquisition systems, constitute the foundation of the system. A smart sensing architecture is required to support the acquisition of reliable, high quality data, required by the ISHM. A thorough definition of the smart sensor architectures, their embedded diagnostic

  17. Ubiquitous Robotic Technology for Smart Manufacturing System.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenshan; Zhu, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Liyu; Qiu, Qiang; Cao, Qixin

    2016-01-01

    As the manufacturing tasks become more individualized and more flexible, the machines in smart factory are required to do variable tasks collaboratively without reprogramming. This paper for the first time discusses the similarity between smart manufacturing systems and the ubiquitous robotic systems and makes an effort on deploying ubiquitous robotic technology to the smart factory. Specifically, a component based framework is proposed in order to enable the communication and cooperation of the heterogeneous robotic devices. Further, compared to the service robotic domain, the smart manufacturing systems are often in larger size. So a hierarchical planning method was implemented to improve the planning efficiency. A test bed of smart factory is developed. It demonstrates that the proposed framework is suitable for industrial domain, and the hierarchical planning method is able to solve large problems intractable with flat methods.

  18. Ubiquitous Robotic Technology for Smart Manufacturing System

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Liyu; Qiu, Qiang; Cao, Qixin

    2016-01-01

    As the manufacturing tasks become more individualized and more flexible, the machines in smart factory are required to do variable tasks collaboratively without reprogramming. This paper for the first time discusses the similarity between smart manufacturing systems and the ubiquitous robotic systems and makes an effort on deploying ubiquitous robotic technology to the smart factory. Specifically, a component based framework is proposed in order to enable the communication and cooperation of the heterogeneous robotic devices. Further, compared to the service robotic domain, the smart manufacturing systems are often in larger size. So a hierarchical planning method was implemented to improve the planning efficiency. A test bed of smart factory is developed. It demonstrates that the proposed framework is suitable for industrial domain, and the hierarchical planning method is able to solve large problems intractable with flat methods. PMID:27446206

  19. Pure random search for ambient sensor distribution optimisation in a smart home environment.

    PubMed

    Poland, Michael P; Nugent, Chris D; Wang, Hui; Chen, Liming

    2011-01-01

    Smart homes are living spaces facilitated with technology to allow individuals to remain in their own homes for longer, rather than be institutionalised. Sensors are the fundamental physical layer with any smart home, as the data they generate is used to inform decision support systems, facilitating appropriate actuator actions. Positioning of sensors is therefore a fundamental characteristic of a smart home. Contemporary smart home sensor distribution is aligned to either a) a total coverage approach; b) a human assessment approach. These methods for sensor arrangement are not data driven strategies, are unempirical and frequently irrational. This Study hypothesised that sensor deployment directed by an optimisation method that utilises inhabitants' spatial frequency data as the search space, would produce more optimal sensor distributions vs. the current method of sensor deployment by engineers. Seven human engineers were tasked to create sensor distributions based on perceived utility for 9 deployment scenarios. A Pure Random Search (PRS) algorithm was then tasked to create matched sensor distributions. The PRS method produced superior distributions in 98.4% of test cases (n=64) against human engineer instructed deployments when the engineers had no access to the spatial frequency data, and in 92.0% of test cases (n=64) when engineers had full access to these data. These results thus confirmed the hypothesis.

  20. Fragility estimates of smart structures with sensor faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yeesock; Bai, Jong-Wha; Albano, Leonard D.

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, the impact of sensor faults within smart structures is investigated using seismic fragility analysis techniques. Seismic fragility analysis is one of the methods used to evaluate the vulnerability of structural systems under a broad range of earthquake events. It would play an important role in estimating seismic losses and in the decision making process based on vibration control performance of the smart structures during seismic events. In this study, a three-story building employing a highly nonlinear hysteretic magnetorheological (MR) damper is analyzed to estimate the seismic fragility of the smart control system. Different levels of sensor damage scenarios for smart structures are considered to provide a better understanding of the expected fragility estimates due to the impact of sensor failures. Probabilistic demand models are constructed with a Bayesian updating approach while the seismic capacity of smart structures is estimated based on the approximate structural performance of semi-actively controlled structures. Peak ground acceleration (PGA) of ground motion is used as a measure of earthquake intensity. Then the fragility curves for the smart structures are developed and compared with those for the semi-active control systems with different levels of sensor damage scenarios. The responses of an uncontrolled structure are used as a baseline. It is shown from the simulations that the proposed methodology is effective in quantifying the impact of sensor faults within smart structures.

  1. A Trend of Systems Development Technologies toward Smart Public Infrastructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawano, Katsumi; Hirasawa, Shigeki

    Driven by increasing urbanization and serious economic and environmental challenges, what is called smart grid and smart cities, the transformation to smart public infrastructure system will require technological progress. This paper presents an emerging trend of the systems development and a framework of systems technologies to achieve the smart public infrastructure of the future.

  2. A smart indoor air quality sensor network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Jin

    2006-03-01

    The indoor air quality (IAQ) has an important impact on public health. Currently, the indoor air pollution, caused by gas, particle, and bio-aerosol pollutants, is considered as the top five environmental risks to public health and has an estimated cost of $2 billion/year due to medical cost and lost productivity. Furthermore, current buildings are especially vulnerable for chemical and biological warfare (CBW) agent contamination because the central air conditioning and ventilation system serve as a nature carrier to spread the released agent from one location to the whole indoor environment within a short time period. To assure the IAQ and safety for either new or existing buildings, real time comprehensive IAQ and CBW measurements are needed. With the development of new sensing technologies, economic and reliable comprehensive IAQ and CBW sensors become promising. However, few studies exist that examine the design and evaluation issues related to IAQ and CBW sensor network. In this paper, relevant research areas including IAQ and CBW sensor development, demand control ventilation, indoor CBW sensor system design, and sensor system design for other areas such as water system protection, fault detection and diagnosis, are reviewed and summarized. Potential research opportunities for IAQ and CBW sensor system design and evaluation are discussed.

  3. Smart Technology in Lung Disease Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Geller, Nancy L; Kim, Dong-Yun; Tian, Xin

    2016-01-01

    This article describes the use of smart technology by investigators and patients to facilitate lung disease clinical trials and make them less costly and more efficient. By "smart technology" we include various electronic media, such as computer databases, the Internet, and mobile devices. We first describe the use of electronic health records for identifying potential subjects and then discuss electronic informed consent. We give several examples of using the Internet and mobile technology in clinical trials. Interventions have been delivered via the World Wide Web or via mobile devices, and both have been used to collect outcome data. We discuss examples of new electronic devices that recently have been introduced to collect health data. While use of smart technology in clinical trials is an exciting development, comparison with similar interventions applied in a conventional manner is still in its infancy. We discuss advantages and disadvantages of using this omnipresent, powerful tool in clinical trials, as well as directions for future research.

  4. Smart-Pixel Array Processors Based on Optimal Cellular Neural Networks for Space Sensor Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fang, Wai-Chi; Sheu, Bing J.; Venus, Holger; Sandau, Rainer

    1997-01-01

    A smart-pixel cellular neural network (CNN) with hardware annealing capability, digitally programmable synaptic weights, and multisensor parallel interface has been under development for advanced space sensor applications. The smart-pixel CNN architecture is a programmable multi-dimensional array of optoelectronic neurons which are locally connected with their local neurons and associated active-pixel sensors. Integration of the neuroprocessor in each processor node of a scalable multiprocessor system offers orders-of-magnitude computing performance enhancements for on-board real-time intelligent multisensor processing and control tasks of advanced small satellites. The smart-pixel CNN operation theory, architecture, design and implementation, and system applications are investigated in detail. The VLSI (Very Large Scale Integration) implementation feasibility was illustrated by a prototype smart-pixel 5x5 neuroprocessor array chip of active dimensions 1380 micron x 746 micron in a 2-micron CMOS technology.

  5. Smart-Pixel Array Processors Based on Optimal Cellular Neural Networks for Space Sensor Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fang, Wai-Chi; Sheu, Bing J.; Venus, Holger; Sandau, Rainer

    1997-01-01

    A smart-pixel cellular neural network (CNN) with hardware annealing capability, digitally programmable synaptic weights, and multisensor parallel interface has been under development for advanced space sensor applications. The smart-pixel CNN architecture is a programmable multi-dimensional array of optoelectronic neurons which are locally connected with their local neurons and associated active-pixel sensors. Integration of the neuroprocessor in each processor node of a scalable multiprocessor system offers orders-of-magnitude computing performance enhancements for on-board real-time intelligent multisensor processing and control tasks of advanced small satellites. The smart-pixel CNN operation theory, architecture, design and implementation, and system applications are investigated in detail. The VLSI (Very Large Scale Integration) implementation feasibility was illustrated by a prototype smart-pixel 5x5 neuroprocessor array chip of active dimensions 1380 micron x 746 micron in a 2-micron CMOS technology.

  6. Seamonster: A Smart Sensor Web in Southeast Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatland, D. R.; Heavner, M. J.; Hood, E.; Connor, C.; Nagorski, S.

    2006-12-01

    The NASA Research Opportunities in Space and Earth Science (ROSES) program is supporting a wireless sensor network project as part of its Advanced Information Systems Technology "Smart Sensor Web" initiative. The project, entitled Seamonster (for SouthEast Alaska MONitoring Network for Science, Telecomm, and Education Research) is led by the University of Alaska Southeast (Juneau) in collaboration with Microsoft- Vexcel in Boulder Colorado. This paper describes both the data acquisition components and science research objectives of Seamonster. The underlying data acquisition concept is to facilitate geophysics data acquisition by providing a wireless backbone for data recovery. Other researchers would be encouraged to emplace their own sensors together with short-range wireless (ZigBee, Bluetooth, etc). Through a common protocol the backbone will receive data from these sensors and relay them to a wired server. This means that the investigator can receive their data via email on a daily basis thereby cutting cost and monitoring sensor health. With environmental hardening and fairly high bandwidth and long range (100kbps/50km to 5mpbs/15km per hop) the network is intended to cover large areas and operate in harsh environments. Low power sensors and intelligent power management within the backbone are the dual ideas to contend with typical power/cost/data dilemmas. Seamonster science will focus over the next three years on hydrology and glaciology in a succession of valleys near Juneau in various stages of deglaciation, in effect providing a synopsis of a millennium-timescale process in a single moment. The instrumentation will include GPS, geophones, digital photography, met stations, and a suite of stream state and water quality sensors. Initial focus is on the Lemon Creek watershed with expansion to follow in subsequent years. The project will ideally expand to include marine and biological monitoring components.

  7. Printable low-cost sensor systems for healthcare smart textiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Pratyush; Kumar, Prashanth S.; Oh, Sechang; Kwon, Hyeokjun; Mathur, Gyanesh N.; Varadan, Vijay K.

    2011-04-01

    Smart textiles-based wearable health monitoring systems (ST-HMS) have been presented as elegant solutions to the requirements of individuals across a wide range of ages. They can be used to monitor young or elderly recuperating /convalescent patients either in hospital or at home, or they can be used by young athletes to monitor important physiological parameters to better design their training or fitness program. Business and academic interests, all over the world, have fueled a great deal of work in the development of this technology since 1990. However, two important impediments to the development of ST-HMS are:-integration of flexible electrodes, flexible sensors, signal conditioning circuits and data logging or wireless transmission devices into a seamless garment and a means to mass manufacture the same, while keeping the costs low. Roll-to-roll printing and screen printing are two low cost methods for large scale manufacturing on flexible substrates and can be extended to textiles as well. These two methods are, currently, best suited for planar structures. The sensors, integrated with wireless telemetry, facilitate development of a ST-HMS that allows for unobtrusive health monitoring. In this paper, we present our results with planar screen printable sensors based on conductive inks which can be used to monitor EKG, abdominal respiration effort, blood pressure, pulse rate and body temperature. The sensor systems were calibrated, and tested for sensitivity, reliability and robustness to ensure reuse after washing cycles.

  8. Directed network topologies of smart grain sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, David M.; Tordesillas, Antoinette; Nakamura, Tomomichi; Tanizawa, Toshihiro

    2013-03-01

    We employ a recent technique for building complex networks from time series data to construct a directed network embodying time structure to collate the predictive properties of individual granular sensors in a series of biaxial compression tests. For each grain, we reconstruct a static predictive model. This combines a subset selection algorithm and an information theory fitting criterion that selects which other grains in the assembly are best placed to predict a given grain's local stress throughout loading history. The local stress of a grain at each time step is summarized by the magnitude of its particle load vector. A directed network is constructed by representing each grain as a node, and assigning an in-link to a grain from another grain if the latter is selected within the best predictive model of the first grain. The grains with atypically large out-degree are thus the most responsible for predicting the stress history of the other grains: These turn out to be only a few grains which reside inside shear bands. Moreover, these “smart grains” prove to be strongly linked to the mechanism of force chain buckling and intermittent rattler events. That only a small number of grain sensors situated in the shear band are required to accurately capture the rheological response of all other grains in the assembly underlines the crucial importance of nonlocal interactions, espoused by extended continuum theories which posit nonlocal evolution laws. Findings here cast the spotlight on two specific mechanisms as being key to the formulation of robust evolution laws in deforming granular materials under compression and shear: the long held mechanism for energy dissipation of force chain buckling and the sudden switch in roles that a rattler plays as it enters in and out of force chains.

  9. Opportunistic Mobility Support for Resource Constrained Sensor Devices in Smart Cities

    PubMed Central

    Granlund, Daniel; Holmlund, Patrik; Åhlund, Christer

    2015-01-01

    A multitude of wireless sensor devices and technologies are being developed and deployed in cities all over the world. Sensor applications in city environments may include highly mobile installations that span large areas which necessitates sensor mobility support. This paper presents and validates two mechanisms for supporting sensor mobility between different administrative domains. Firstly, EAP-Swift, an Extensible Authentication Protocol (EAP)-based sensor authentication protocol is proposed that enables light-weight sensor authentication and key generation. Secondly, a mechanism for handoffs between wireless sensor gateways is proposed. We validate both mechanisms in a real-life study that was conducted in a smart city environment with several fixed sensors and moving gateways. We conduct similar experiments in an industry-based anechoic Long Term Evolution (LTE) chamber with an ideal radio environment. Further, we validate our results collected from the smart city environment against the results produced under ideal conditions to establish best and real-life case scenarios. Our results clearly validate that our proposed mechanisms can facilitate efficient sensor authentication and handoffs while sensors are roaming in a smart city environment. PMID:25738767

  10. Opportunistic mobility support for resource constrained sensor devices in smart cities.

    PubMed

    Granlund, Daniel; Holmlund, Patrik; Åhlund, Christer

    2015-03-02

    A multitude of wireless sensor devices and technologies are being developed and deployed in cities all over the world. Sensor applications in city environments may include highly mobile installations that span large areas which necessitates sensor mobility support. This paper presents and validates two mechanisms for supporting sensor mobility between different administrative domains. Firstly, EAP-Swift, an Extensible Authentication Protocol (EAP)-based sensor authentication protocol is proposed that enables light-weight sensor authentication and key generation. Secondly, a mechanism for handoffs between wireless sensor gateways is proposed. We validate both mechanisms in a real-life study that was conducted in a smart city environment with several fixed sensors and moving gateways. We conduct similar experiments in an industry-based anechoic Long Term Evolution (LTE) chamber with an ideal radio environment. Further, we validate our results collected from the smart city environment against the results produced under ideal conditions to establish best and real-life case scenarios. Our results clearly validate that our proposed mechanisms can facilitate efficient sensor authentication and handoffs while sensors are roaming in a smart city environment.

  11. Digital Sensor Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Ken D.; Quinn, Edward L.; Mauck, Jerry L.; Bockhorst, Richard M.

    2015-02-01

    The nuclear industry has been slow to incorporate digital sensor technology into nuclear plant designs due to concerns with digital qualification issues. However, the benefits of digital sensor technology for nuclear plant instrumentation are substantial in terms of accuracy and reliability. This paper, which refers to a final report issued in 2013, demonstrates these benefits in direct comparisons of digital and analog sensor applications. Improved accuracy results from the superior operating characteristics of digital sensors. These include improvements in sensor accuracy and drift and other related parameters which reduce total loop uncertainty and thereby increase safety and operating margins. An example instrument loop uncertainty calculation for a pressure sensor application is presented to illustrate these improvements. This is a side-by-side comparison of the instrument loop uncertainty for both an analog and a digital sensor in the same pressure measurement application. Similarly, improved sensor reliability is illustrated with a sample calculation for determining the probability of failure on demand, an industry standard reliability measure. This looks at equivalent analog and digital temperature sensors to draw the comparison. The results confirm substantial reliability improvement with the digital sensor, due in large part to ability to continuously monitor the health of a digital sensor such that problems can be immediately identified and corrected. This greatly reduces the likelihood of a latent failure condition of the sensor at the time of a design basis event. Notwithstanding the benefits of digital sensors, there are certain qualification issues that are inherent with digital technology and these are described in the report. One major qualification impediment for digital sensor implementation is software common cause failure (SCCF).

  12. Sensor Network-Based and User-Friendly User Location Discovery for Future Smart Homes.

    PubMed

    Ahvar, Ehsan; Lee, Gyu Myoung; Han, Son N; Crespi, Noel; Khan, Imran

    2016-06-27

    User location is crucial context information for future smart homes where many location based services will be proposed. This location necessarily means that User Location Discovery (ULD) will play an important role in future smart homes. Concerns about privacy and the need to carry a mobile or a tag device within a smart home currently make conventional ULD systems uncomfortable for users. Future smart homes will need a ULD system to consider these challenges. This paper addresses the design of such a ULD system for context-aware services in future smart homes stressing the following challenges: (i) users' privacy; (ii) device-/tag-free; and (iii) fault tolerance and accuracy. On the other hand, emerging new technologies, such as the Internet of Things, embedded systems, intelligent devices and machine-to-machine communication, are penetrating into our daily life with more and more sensors available for use in our homes. Considering this opportunity, we propose a ULD system that is capitalizing on the prevalence of sensors for the home while satisfying the aforementioned challenges. The proposed sensor network-based and user-friendly ULD system relies on different types of inexpensive sensors, as well as a context broker with a fuzzy-based decision-maker. The context broker receives context information from different types of sensors and evaluates that data using the fuzzy set theory. We demonstrate the performance of the proposed system by illustrating a use case, utilizing both an analytical model and simulation.

  13. Sensor Network-Based and User-Friendly User Location Discovery for Future Smart Homes

    PubMed Central

    Ahvar, Ehsan; Lee, Gyu Myoung; Han, Son N.; Crespi, Noel; Khan, Imran

    2016-01-01

    User location is crucial context information for future smart homes where many location based services will be proposed. This location necessarily means that User Location Discovery (ULD) will play an important role in future smart homes. Concerns about privacy and the need to carry a mobile or a tag device within a smart home currently make conventional ULD systems uncomfortable for users. Future smart homes will need a ULD system to consider these challenges. This paper addresses the design of such a ULD system for context-aware services in future smart homes stressing the following challenges: (i) users’ privacy; (ii) device-/tag-free; and (iii) fault tolerance and accuracy. On the other hand, emerging new technologies, such as the Internet of Things, embedded systems, intelligent devices and machine-to-machine communication, are penetrating into our daily life with more and more sensors available for use in our homes. Considering this opportunity, we propose a ULD system that is capitalizing on the prevalence of sensors for the home while satisfying the aforementioned challenges. The proposed sensor network-based and user-friendly ULD system relies on different types of inexpensive sensors, as well as a context broker with a fuzzy-based decision-maker. The context broker receives context information from different types of sensors and evaluates that data using the fuzzy set theory. We demonstrate the performance of the proposed system by illustrating a use case, utilizing both an analytical model and simulation. PMID:27355951

  14. Smart Structures with Fibre-Optic Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Del Grosso, Andrea; Zangani, Donato; Messervey, Thomas

    2008-07-08

    A number of smart structures have been proposed, and some of them realized, to reduce the effect that seismic motions induce on the structure themselves. In particular, active and semi-active control devices have been studied for being applied to buildings and bridges in seismic prone regions. The heart of the application for these devices consists of a network of sensors and computational nodes that produces the input to the actuating mechanisms. Despite the initial enthusiasm for these developments, only a few practical applications involving active devices have been implemented to-date, the main reason residing in questions concerning the reliability of active systems over time. Nevertheless, the allocation of sensory systems and computational intelligence in structures subjected to earthquakes can provide very important information on the real structural behavior, provide self-diagnosis functions after events, and allow for reliability estimates of critical components. The paper reviews several recently developed sensory devices and diagnostic algorithms that may be applied to existing structures or embedded in new ones for the above purpose. Special emphasis will be given to fibre optic technology and its applications.

  15. Contextual Sensing: Integrating Contextual Information with Human and Technical Geo-Sensor Information for Smart Cities

    PubMed Central

    Sagl, Günther; Resch, Bernd; Blaschke, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    In this article we critically discuss the challenge of integrating contextual information, in particular spatiotemporal contextual information, with human and technical sensor information, which we approach from a geospatial perspective. We start by highlighting the significance of context in general and spatiotemporal context in particular and introduce a smart city model of interactions between humans, the environment, and technology, with context at the common interface. We then focus on both the intentional and the unintentional sensing capabilities of today’s technologies and discuss current technological trends that we consider have the ability to enrich human and technical geo-sensor information with contextual detail. The different types of sensors used to collect contextual information are analyzed and sorted into three groups on the basis of names considering frequently used related terms, and characteristic contextual parameters. These three groups, namely technical in situ sensors, technical remote sensors, and human sensors are analyzed and linked to three dimensions involved in sensing (data generation, geographic phenomena, and type of sensing). In contrast to other scientific publications, we found a large number of technologies and applications using in situ and mobile technical sensors within the context of smart cities, and surprisingly limited use of remote sensing approaches. In this article we further provide a critical discussion of possible impacts and influences of both technical and human sensing approaches on society, pointing out that a larger number of sensors, increased fusion of information, and the use of standardized data formats and interfaces will not necessarily result in any improvement in the quality of life of the citizens of a smart city. This article seeks to improve our understanding of technical and human geo-sensing capabilities, and to demonstrate that the use of such sensors can facilitate the integration of different

  16. Contextual Sensing: Integrating Contextual Information with Human and Technical Geo-Sensor Information for Smart Cities.

    PubMed

    Sagl, Günther; Resch, Bernd; Blaschke, Thomas

    2015-07-14

    In this article we critically discuss the challenge of integrating contextual information, in particular spatiotemporal contextual information, with human and technical sensor information, which we approach from a geospatial perspective. We start by highlighting the significance of context in general and spatiotemporal context in particular and introduce a smart city model of interactions between humans, the environment, and technology, with context at the common interface. We then focus on both the intentional and the unintentional sensing capabilities of today's technologies and discuss current technological trends that we consider have the ability to enrich human and technical geo-sensor information with contextual detail. The different types of sensors used to collect contextual information are analyzed and sorted into three groups on the basis of names considering frequently used related terms, and characteristic contextual parameters. These three groups, namely technical in situ sensors, technical remote sensors, and human sensors are analyzed and linked to three dimensions involved in sensing (data generation, geographic phenomena, and type of sensing). In contrast to other scientific publications, we found a large number of technologies and applications using in situ and mobile technical sensors within the context of smart cities, and surprisingly limited use of remote sensing approaches. In this article we further provide a critical discussion of possible impacts and influences of both technical and human sensing approaches on society, pointing out that a larger number of sensors, increased fusion of information, and the use of standardized data formats and interfaces will not necessarily result in any improvement in the quality of life of the citizens of a smart city. This article seeks to improve our understanding of technical and human geo-sensing capabilities, and to demonstrate that the use of such sensors can facilitate the integration of different

  17. Embedded Acoustic Sensor Array for Engine Fan Noise Source Diagnostic Test: Feasibility of Noise Telemetry via Wireless Smart Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaman, Afroz; Bauch, Matthew; Raible, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Aircraft engines have evolved into a highly complex system to meet ever-increasing demands. The evolution of engine technologies has primarily been driven by fuel efficiency, reliability, as well as engine noise concerns. One of the sources of engine noise is pressure fluctuations that are induced on the stator vanes. These local pressure fluctuations, once produced, propagate and coalesce with the pressure waves originating elsewhere on the stator to form a spinning pressure pattern. Depending on the duct geometry, air flow, and frequency of fluctuations, these spinning pressure patterns are self-sustaining and result in noise which eventually radiate to the far-field from engine. To investigate the nature of vane pressure fluctuations and the resulting engine noise, unsteady pressure signatures from an array of embedded acoustic sensors are recorded as a part of vane noise source diagnostics. Output time signatures from these sensors are routed to a control and data processing station adding complexity to the system and cable loss to the measured signal. "Smart" wireless sensors have data processing capability at the sensor locations which further increases the potential of wireless sensors. Smart sensors can process measured data locally and transmit only the important information through wireless communication. The aim of this wireless noise telemetry task was to demonstrate a single acoustic sensor wireless link for unsteady pressure measurement, and thus, establish the feasibility of distributed smart sensors scheme for aircraft engine vane surface unsteady pressure data transmission and characterization.

  18. Sensors research and technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutts, James A.

    1988-01-01

    Information on sensors research and technology is given in viewgraph form. Information is given on sensing techniques for space science, passive remote sensing techniques and applications, submillimeter coherent sensing, submillimeter mixers and local oscillator sources, non-coherent sensors, active remote sensing, solid state laser development, a low vibration cooler, separation of liquid helium and vapor phase in zero gravity, and future plans.

  19. New Sensor Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Covault, Craig

    2005-01-01

    The three instruments on the Orbiter Boom Sensor System (OBSS) will use a mix of U.S. and Canadian developed laser, television, infrared, and 3D imaging technologies. The sensors are the: 1) Laser Dynamic Range Imager (LDRI); 2) Intensified Television Camera (ITVC); 3) Laser Camera System (LCS).

  20. Study of Smart Campus Development Using Internet of Things Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widya Sari, Marti; Wahyu Ciptadi, Prahenusa; Hafid Hardyanto, R.

    2017-04-01

    This paper describes the development of smart campus using Internet of Things (IoT) technology. Through smart campus, it is possible that a campus is connected via online by the outside entity, so that the teaching approach based on technology can be conducted in real time. This research was conducted in smart education, smart parking and smart room. Observation and literature studies were applied as the research method with the related theme for the sake of system design of smart campus. The result of this research is the design of smart campus system that includes smart education development, smart parking and smart room with the sake of Universitas PGRI Yogyakarta as the case study.

  1. Application of smart submunition technology to agribusiness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wangler, Richard J.; McConnell, Robert E., III; Fowler, Keith L.

    1993-05-01

    A range-image sensor for controlling an agricultural spraying system and the military range- image technology upon which the sensor is based are discussed. Initial testing in an orange grove in Orlando, Florida indicates that sensor control optimizes the chemical spraying process and reduces environmental pollution.

  2. Electron tunnel sensor technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waltman, S. B.; Kaiser, W. J.

    1989-01-01

    The recent development of Scanning Tunneling Microscopy technology allows the application of electron tunneling to position detectors for the first time. The vacuum tunnel junction is one of the most sensitive position detection mechanisms available. It is also compact, simple, and requires little power. A prototype accelerometer based on electron tunneling, and other sensor applications of this promising new technology are described.

  3. Nurses' acceptance of Smart IV pump technology.

    PubMed

    Carayon, Pascale; Hundt, Ann Schoofs; Wetterneck, Tosha B

    2010-06-01

    "Smart" intravenous infusion pumps (Smart IV pumps) are increasingly being implemented in hospitals to reduce medication administration errors. This study examines nurses' experience with the implementation and use of a Smart IV pump in an academic hospital. Data were collected in three longitudinal surveys: (a) a pre-implementation survey, (b) a 6-week-post-implementation survey, and (c) a 1-year-post-implementation survey. We examined: (a) the technology implementation process, (b) technical performance of the pump, (c) usability of the pump, and (d) user acceptance of the pump. Initially, nurses had a somewhat positive acceptance of the Smart IV pump technology that significantly increased one year after implementation. User experiences associated with the pump in general improved over time, especially perceptions of pump efficiency. However, user experience with the pump implementation process and pump technical performance did not consistently improve from the pre-implementation survey to the post-implementation survey. Several characteristics of pump technical performance and usability influenced user acceptance at the one-year post-implementation survey. These data may be useful for other institutions to guide implementation and post-implementation follow-up of IV pump use; other institutions could use the survey instrument from this study to evaluate nurses' perceptions of the technology. Our study identified several characteristics of the implementation process that other institutions may need to pay attention to (e.g., sharing information about the implementation process with nurses). Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Smart Microfluidic Electrochemical DNA Sensors with Signal Processing Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawada, Kazuaki; Oda, Chigusa; Takao, Hidekuni; Ishida, Makoto

    2007-05-01

    A smart microfluidic DNA sensor with an integrated signal-processing circuit for electrochemical analysis has been successfully fabricated. The sensor comprises an integrated electrochemical sensing electrode, a microfluidic channel-type reactor, and operational amplifiers for electrochemical measurement. The microfluidic reactor employs a laminar flow principle. Generally, a relatively large and expensive system is necessary for electrochemical measurement. In the fabricated smart chip, signal-processing circuits for measuring cyclic-voltammogram characteristics are integrated, permitting cyclic-voltammograms to be successively measured, using only two simple sources of electrical power.

  5. Energy-efficient vertical transportation with sensor information in smart green buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahn, H.

    2016-08-01

    In modern smart green buildings, sensors can detect various physical status of a building such as temperature, humidity, motion, and light, which can be used for smart living services. This paper presents an energy-efficient vertical transportation by making use of indoor sensor technologies. Specifically, sensors detect elevator users before they push the call button, and then inform to the elevator control system through building networks. By using this information, our system generates a reservation call and controls the moving time and direction of each elevator efficiently. Simulation experiments with a variety of traffic situations show that our elevator control system exhibits significantly better performance than the conventional system that does not use sensor information with respect to passengers’ waiting time and energy consumption.

  6. A Current Sensor Based on the Giant Magnetoresistance Effect: Design and Potential Smart Grid Applications

    PubMed Central

    Ouyang, Yong; He, Jinliang; Hu, Jun; Wang, Shan X.

    2012-01-01

    Advanced sensing and measurement techniques are key technologies to realize a smart grid. The giant magnetoresistance (GMR) effect has revolutionized the fields of data storage and magnetic measurement. In this work, a design of a GMR current sensor based on a commercial analog GMR chip for applications in a smart grid is presented and discussed. Static, dynamic and thermal properties of the sensor were characterized. The characterizations showed that in the operation range from 0 to ±5 A, the sensor had a sensitivity of 28 mV·A−1, linearity of 99.97%, maximum deviation of 2.717%, frequency response of −1.5 dB at 10 kHz current measurement, and maximum change of the amplitude response of 0.0335%·°C−1 with thermal compensation. In the distributed real-time measurement and monitoring of a smart grid system, the GMR current sensor shows excellent performance and is cost effective, making it suitable for applications such as steady-state and transient-state monitoring. With the advantages of having a high sensitivity, high linearity, small volume, low cost, and simple structure, the GMR current sensor is promising for the measurement and monitoring of smart grids. PMID:23202221

  7. A current sensor based on the giant magnetoresistance effect: design and potential smart grid applications.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Yong; He, Jinliang; Hu, Jun; Wang, Shan X

    2012-11-09

    Advanced sensing and measurement techniques are key technologies to realize a smart grid. The giant magnetoresistance (GMR) effect has revolutionized the fields of data storage and magnetic measurement. In this work, a design of a GMR current sensor based on a commercial analog GMR chip for applications in a smart grid is presented and discussed. Static, dynamic and thermal properties of the sensor were characterized. The characterizations showed that in the operation range from 0 to ±5 A, the sensor had a sensitivity of 28 mV·A(-1), linearity of 99.97%, maximum deviation of 2.717%, frequency response of −1.5 dB at 10 kHz current measurement, and maximum change of the amplitude response of 0.0335%·°C(-1) with thermal compensation. In the distributed real-time measurement and monitoring of a smart grid system, the GMR current sensor shows excellent performance and is cost effective, making it suitable for applications such as steady-state and transient-state monitoring. With the advantages of having a high sensitivity, high linearity, small volume, low cost, and simple structure, the GMR current sensor is promising for the measurement and monitoring of smart grids.

  8. A field programmable gate array-based reconfigurable smart-sensor network for wireless monitoring of new generation computer numerically controlled machines.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Tapia, Sandra Veronica; Vera-Salas, Luis Alberto; Osornio-Rios, Roque Alfredo; Dominguez-Gonzalez, Aurelio; Stiharu, Ion; Romero-Troncoso, Rene de Jesus

    2010-01-01

    Computer numerically controlled (CNC) machines have evolved to adapt to increasing technological and industrial requirements. To cover these needs, new generation machines have to perform monitoring strategies by incorporating multiple sensors. Since in most of applications the online Processing of the variables is essential, the use of smart sensors is necessary. The contribution of this work is the development of a wireless network platform of reconfigurable smart sensors for CNC machine applications complying with the measurement requirements of new generation CNC machines. Four different smart sensors are put under test in the network and their corresponding signal processing techniques are implemented in a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA)-based sensor node.

  9. Smart sprayer project: sensor-based selective herbicide application system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Lei F.; Steward, Brian L.; Tang, Lie

    2000-12-01

    The smart sprayer, a local-vision-sensor-based precision chemical application system, was developed and tested. The long-term objectives of this project were to develop new technologies to estimate weed density and size in real-time, to realize site-specific weed control, and to effectively reduce the amount of herbicide applied to major crop fields. This research integrated a real-time machine vision sensing system and individual nozzle controlling device with a commercial map-driven-ready herbicide sprayer to create an intelligent sensing and spraying system. The machine vision system was specially designed to work under outdoor variable lighting conditions. Multiple vision sensors were used to cover the target area. Instead of trying to identify each individual plant in the field, weed infestation conditions in each control zone (management zone) were detected. To increase the delivery accuracy, each individual spray nozzle was controlled separately. The integrated system was tested to evaluate the effectiveness and performance under varying commercial field conditions. Using the on-board differential GPS, geo-referenced chemical input maps (equivalent to weed maps) were also recorded in real-time. The maps generated with this system have been compared with other sensing and referencing systems.

  10. Software Technology Readiness for the Smart Grid

    SciTech Connect

    Tugurlan, Maria C.; Kirkham, Harold; Chassin, David P.

    2011-06-13

    Abstract Budget and schedule overruns in product development due to the use of immature technologies constitute an important matter for program managers. Moreover, unexpected lack of technology maturity is also a problem for buyers. Both sides of the situation would benefit from an unbiased measure of technology maturity. This paper presents the use of a software maturity metric called Technology Readiness Level (TRL), in the milieu of the smart grid. For most of the time they have been in existence, power utilities have been protected monopolies, guaranteed a return on investment on anything they could justify adding to the rate base. Such a situation did not encourage innovation, and instead led to widespread risk-avoidance behavior in many utilities. The situation changed at the end of the last century, with a series of regulatory measures, beginning with the Public Utility Regulatory Policy Act of 1978. However, some bad experiences have actually served to strengthen the resistance to innovation by some utilities. Some aspects of the smart grid, such as the addition of computer-based control to the power system, face an uphill battle. It is our position that the addition of TRLs to the decision-making process for smart grid power-system projects, will lead to an environment of more confident adoption.

  11. An Architecture for Intelligent Systems Based on Smart Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmalzel, John; Figueroa, Fernando; Morris, Jon; Mandayam, Shreekanth; Polikar, Robi

    2004-01-01

    Based on requirements for a next-generation rocket test facility, elements of a prototype Intelligent Rocket Test Facility (IRTF) have been implemented. A key component is distributed smart sensor elements integrated using a knowledgeware environment. One of the specific goals is to imbue sensors with the intelligence needed to perform self diagnosis of health and to participate in a hierarchy of health determination at sensor, process, and system levels. The preliminary results provide the basis for future advanced development and validation using rocket test stand facilities at Stennis Space Center (SSC). We have identified issues important to further development of health-enabled networks, which should be of interest to others working with smart sensors and intelligent health management systems.

  12. Gesture recognition for smart home applications using portable radar sensors.

    PubMed

    Wan, Qian; Li, Yiran; Li, Changzhi; Pal, Ranadip

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we consider the design of a human gesture recognition system based on pattern recognition of signatures from a portable smart radar sensor. Powered by AAA batteries, the smart radar sensor operates in the 2.4 GHz industrial, scientific and medical (ISM) band. We analyzed the feature space using principle components and application-specific time and frequency domain features extracted from radar signals for two different sets of gestures. We illustrate that a nearest neighbor based classifier can achieve greater than 95% accuracy for multi class classification using 10 fold cross validation when features are extracted based on magnitude differences and Doppler shifts as compared to features extracted through orthogonal transformations. The reported results illustrate the potential of intelligent radars integrated with a pattern recognition system for high accuracy smart home and health monitoring purposes.

  13. Smart gun technology requirements preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, D.R.; Brandt, D.J.; Tweet, K.D.

    1995-05-01

    Goal of the Smart Gun Technology project is to eliminate the capability of an unauthorized user from firing a law enforcement officer`s firearm by implementing user-recognizing-and-authorizing surety technologies. This project is funded by the National Institute of Justice. This document reports the projects first objective: to find and document the requirements for a user-recognizing-and-authorizing firearm technology that law enforcement officers will value. This report details the problem of firearm takeaways in law enforcement, the methodology used to develop the law enforcement officers` requirements, and the requirements themselves.

  14. Implantable Smart Technologies (IST): Defining the 'Sting' in Data and Device.

    PubMed

    Haddow, Gill; Harmon, Shawn H E; Gilman, Leah

    2016-09-01

    In a world surrounded by smart objects from sensors to automated medical devices, the ubiquity of 'smart' seems matched only by its lack of clarity. In this article, we use our discussions with expert stakeholders working in areas of implantable medical devices such as cochlear implants, implantable cardiac defibrillators, deep brain stimulators and in vivo biosensors to interrogate the difference facets of smart in 'implantable smart technologies', considering also whether regulation needs to respond to the autonomy that such artefacts carry within them. We discover that when smart technology is deconstructed it is a slippery and multi-layered concept. A device's ability to sense and transmit data and automate medicine can be associated with the 'sting' of autonomy being disassociated from human control as well as affecting individual, group, and social environments.

  15. Smart storage technologies applied to fresh foods: A review.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingyu; Zhang, Min; Gao, Zhongxue; Adhikari, Benu

    2017-06-30

    Fresh foods are perishable, seasonal and regional in nature and their storage, transportation, and preservation of freshness are quite challenging. Smart storage technologies can online detection and monitor the changes of quality parameters and storage environment of fresh foods during storage, so that operators can make timely adjustments to reduce the loss. This article reviews the smart storage technologies from two aspects: online detection technologies and smartly monitoring technologies for fresh foods. Online detection technologies include electronic nose, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), hyperspectral imaging and computer vision. Smartly monitoring technologies mainly include some intelligent indicators for monitoring the change of storage environment. Smart storage technologies applied to fresh foods need to be highly efficient and nondestructive and need to be competitively priced. In this work, we have critically reviewed the principles, applications, and development trends of smart storage technologies.

  16. Enabling Smart Air Conditioning by Sensor Development: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Chin-Chi; Lee, Dasheng

    2016-01-01

    The study investigates the development of sensors, in particular the use of thermo-fluidic sensors and occupancy detectors, to achieve smart operation of air conditioning systems. Smart operation refers to the operation of air conditioners by the reinforcement of interaction to achieve both thermal comfort and energy efficiency. Sensors related to thermal comfort include those of temperature, humidity, and pressure and wind velocity anemometers. Improvements in their performance in the past years have been studied by a literature survey. Traditional occupancy detection using passive infra-red (PIR) sensors and novel methodologies using smartphones and wearable sensors are both discussed. Referring to the case studies summarized in this study, air conditioning energy savings are evaluated quantitatively. Results show that energy savings of air conditioners before 2000 was 11%, and 30% after 2000 by the integration of thermo-fluidic sensors and occupancy detectors. By utilizing wearable sensing to detect the human motions, metabolic rates and related information, the energy savings can reach up to 46.3% and keep the minimum change of predicted mean vote (∆PMV→0), which means there is no compromise in thermal comfort. This enables smart air conditioning to compensate for the large variations from person to person in terms of physiological and psychological satisfaction, and find an optimal temperature for everyone in a given space. However, this tendency should be evidenced by more experimental results in the future. PMID:27916906

  17. Enabling Smart Air Conditioning by Sensor Development: A Review.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chin-Chi; Lee, Dasheng

    2016-11-30

    The study investigates the development of sensors, in particular the use of thermo-fluidic sensors and occupancy detectors, to achieve smart operation of air conditioning systems. Smart operation refers to the operation of air conditioners by the reinforcement of interaction to achieve both thermal comfort and energy efficiency. Sensors related to thermal comfort include those of temperature, humidity, and pressure and wind velocity anemometers. Improvements in their performance in the past years have been studied by a literature survey. Traditional occupancy detection using passive infra-red (PIR) sensors and novel methodologies using smartphones and wearable sensors are both discussed. Referring to the case studies summarized in this study, air conditioning energy savings are evaluated quantitatively. Results show that energy savings of air conditioners before 2000 was 11%, and 30% after 2000 by the integration of thermo-fluidic sensors and occupancy detectors. By utilizing wearable sensing to detect the human motions, metabolic rates and related information, the energy savings can reach up to 46.3% and keep the minimum change of predicted mean vote (∆PMV→0), which means there is no compromise in thermal comfort. This enables smart air conditioning to compensate for the large variations from person to person in terms of physiological and psychological satisfaction, and find an optimal temperature for everyone in a given space. However, this tendency should be evidenced by more experimental results in the future.

  18. Smart medical textiles with embedded optical fibre sensors for continuous monitoring of respiratory movements during MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witt, J.; Narbonneau, F.; Schukar, M.; Krebber, K.; De Jonckheere, J.; Jeanne, M.; Kinet, D.; Paquet, B.; Depré, A.; D'Angelo, L. T.; Thiel, T.; Logier, R.

    2010-09-01

    We report on three respiration sensors based on pure optical technologies developed during the FP6 EU project OFSETH. The developed smart medical textiles can sense elongation up to 3%, while maintaining the stretching properties of the textile substrates for a good comfort of the patient. The sensors, based on silica and polymer fibre, are developed for monitoring of patients during MRI examination. The OFSETH harness allows a continuous measurement of respiration movements while all vitals organs are free for medical staff actions. The sensors were tested in MRI environment and on healthy adults.

  19. Design and Implementation of a Smart Sensor for Respiratory Rate Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Luis, Juan Aponte; Roa Romero, Laura M.; Gómez-Galán, Juan Antonio; Hernández, David Naranjo; Estudillo-Valderrama, Miguel Ángel; Barbarov-Rostán, Gerardo; Rubia-Marcos, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    This work presents the design, development and implementation of a smart sensor to monitor the respiratory rate. This sensor is aimed at overcoming the drawbacks of other systems currently available in market, namely, devices that are costly, uncomfortable, difficult-to-install, provide low detection sensitivity, and little-to-null patient-to-patient calibration. The device is based on capacitive sensing by means of an LC oscillator. Experimental results show that the sensor meets the necessary requirements, making feasible the proposed monitoring system with the technology used. PMID:24534921

  20. Design and implementation of a smart sensor for respiratory rate monitoring.

    PubMed

    Luis, Juan Aponte; Roa Romero, Laura M; Gómez-Galán, Juan Antonio; Hernández, David Naranjo; Estudillo-Valderrama, Miguel Ángel; Barbarov-Rostán, Gerardo; Rubia-Marcos, Carlos

    2014-02-14

    This work presents the design, development and implementation of a smart sensor to monitor the respiratory rate. This sensor is aimed at overcoming the drawbacks of other systems currently available in market, namely, devices that are costly, uncomfortable, difficult-to-install, provide low detection sensitivity, and little-to-null patient-to-patient calibration. The device is based on capacitive sensing by means of an LC oscillator. Experimental results show that the sensor meets the necessary requirements, making feasible the proposed monitoring system with the technology used.

  1. Smart structures technology and biomechanics research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huston, Dryver R.; Beynnon, Bruce; Krag, Martin

    1996-05-01

    The human musculoskeletal system represents one of the ultimate manifestations of smart structures capabilities. It can sense, actuate, and heal for periods occasionally in excess of one hundred years. As a natural consequence, research and treatment regimes for a variety of musculoskeletal disorders use technologies that are in many respects very similar to that of the more traditional aerospace and civil smart structures technologies. This paper presents an overview of the technologies that are currently in use in orthopaedic practice and research that mimic these more traditional smart structures. This includes a wide variety of instrumentation that can measure loads and motions within the musculoskeletal system, within prostheses (artificial joints and limbs), and within orthoses (devices that limit the motion of joints and limbs). Included are discussions about the instrumentation of spine and hip implants and the use of telemetry to transmit the data, the measurement of spinal motions through goniometers and surface-attached lordosimeters, and the forces involved in ambulation. In addition to the systems that can measure loads and motions, there are some devices that can measure these quantities and respond in such as way as to control the motions or loads. A 'virtual corset' that provides audio and/or tactile feedback to patients to prevent excessive trunk flexion is described.

  2. Nurses’ Acceptance of Smart IV Pump Technology

    PubMed Central

    Carayon, Pascale; Hundt, Ann Schoofs; Wetterneck, Tosha B.

    2010-01-01

    Background “Smart” intravenous infusion pumps (Smart IV pumps) are increasingly being implemented in hospitals to reduce medication administration errors. Objectives This study examines nurses’ experience with the implementation and use of a Smart IV pump in an academic hospital. Method Data were collected in three longitudinal surveys: (a) a pre-implementation survey, (b) a 6-week-post-implementation survey, and (c) a 1-year-post-implementation survey. We examined: (a) the technology implementation process, (b) technical performance of the pump, (c) usability of the pump, and (d) user acceptance of the pump. Results Initially, nurses had a somewhat positive acceptance of the Smart IV pump technology that significantly increased one year after implementation. User experiences associated with the pump in general improved over time, especially perceptions of pump efficiency. However, user experience with the pump implementation process and pump technical performance did not consistently improve from the pre-implementation survey to the post-implementation survey. Several characteristics of pump technical performance and usability influenced user acceptance at the one-year post-implementation survey. Discussion These data may be useful for other institutions to guide implementation and post-implementation follow-up of IV pump use; other institutions could use the survey instrument from this study to evaluate nurses’ perceptions of the technology. Our study identified several characteristics of the implementation process that other institutions may need to pay attention to (e.g., sharing information about the implementation process with nurses). PMID:20219423

  3. Smart wearable body sensors for patient self-assessment and monitoring.

    PubMed

    Appelboom, Geoff; Camacho, Elvis; Abraham, Mickey E; Bruce, Samuel S; Dumont, Emmanuel Lp; Zacharia, Brad E; D'Amico, Randy; Slomian, Justin; Reginster, Jean Yves; Bruyère, Olivier; Connolly, E Sander

    2014-01-01

    Innovations in mobile and electronic healthcare are revolutionizing the involvement of both doctors and patients in the modern healthcare system by extending the capabilities of physiological monitoring devices. Despite significant progress within the monitoring device industry, the widespread integration of this technology into medical practice remains limited. The purpose of this review is to summarize the developments and clinical utility of smart wearable body sensors. We reviewed the literature for connected device, sensor, trackers, telemonitoring, wireless technology and real time home tracking devices and their application for clinicians. Smart wearable sensors are effective and reliable for preventative methods in many different facets of medicine such as, cardiopulmonary, vascular, endocrine, neurological function and rehabilitation medicine. These sensors have also been shown to be accurate and useful for perioperative monitoring and rehabilitation medicine. Although these devices have been shown to be accurate and have clinical utility, they continue to be underutilized in the healthcare industry. Incorporating smart wearable sensors into routine care of patients could augment physician-patient relationships, increase the autonomy and involvement of patients in regards to their healthcare and will provide for novel remote monitoring techniques which will revolutionize healthcare management and spending.

  4. Smart wearable body sensors for patient self-assessment and monitoring

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Innovations in mobile and electronic healthcare are revolutionizing the involvement of both doctors and patients in the modern healthcare system by extending the capabilities of physiological monitoring devices. Despite significant progress within the monitoring device industry, the widespread integration of this technology into medical practice remains limited. The purpose of this review is to summarize the developments and clinical utility of smart wearable body sensors. Methods We reviewed the literature for connected device, sensor, trackers, telemonitoring, wireless technology and real time home tracking devices and their application for clinicians. Results Smart wearable sensors are effective and reliable for preventative methods in many different facets of medicine such as, cardiopulmonary, vascular, endocrine, neurological function and rehabilitation medicine. These sensors have also been shown to be accurate and useful for perioperative monitoring and rehabilitation medicine. Conclusion Although these devices have been shown to be accurate and have clinical utility, they continue to be underutilized in the healthcare industry. Incorporating smart wearable sensors into routine care of patients could augment physician-patient relationships, increase the autonomy and involvement of patients in regards to their healthcare and will provide for novel remote monitoring techniques which will revolutionize healthcare management and spending. PMID:25232478

  5. A Fuzzy-Based Approach for Sensing, Coding and Transmission Configuration of Visual Sensors in Smart City Applications.

    PubMed

    Costa, Daniel G; Collotta, Mario; Pau, Giovanni; Duran-Faundez, Cristian

    2017-01-05

    The advance of technologies in several areas has allowed the development of smart city applications, which can improve the way of life in modern cities. When employing visual sensors in that scenario, still images and video streams may be retrieved from monitored areas, potentially providing valuable data for many applications. Actually, visual sensor networks may need to be highly dynamic, reflecting the changing of parameters in smart cities. In this context, characteristics of visual sensors and conditions of the monitored environment, as well as the status of other concurrent monitoring systems, may affect how visual sensors collect, encode and transmit information. This paper proposes a fuzzy-based approach to dynamically configure the way visual sensors will operate concerning sensing, coding and transmission patterns, exploiting different types of reference parameters. This innovative approach can be considered as the basis for multi-systems smart city applications based on visual monitoring, potentially bringing significant results for this research field.

  6. A Fuzzy-Based Approach for Sensing, Coding and Transmission Configuration of Visual Sensors in Smart City Applications

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Daniel G.; Collotta, Mario; Pau, Giovanni; Duran-Faundez, Cristian

    2017-01-01

    The advance of technologies in several areas has allowed the development of smart city applications, which can improve the way of life in modern cities. When employing visual sensors in that scenario, still images and video streams may be retrieved from monitored areas, potentially providing valuable data for many applications. Actually, visual sensor networks may need to be highly dynamic, reflecting the changing of parameters in smart cities. In this context, characteristics of visual sensors and conditions of the monitored environment, as well as the status of other concurrent monitoring systems, may affect how visual sensors collect, encode and transmit information. This paper proposes a fuzzy-based approach to dynamically configure the way visual sensors will operate concerning sensing, coding and transmission patterns, exploiting different types of reference parameters. This innovative approach can be considered as the basis for multi-systems smart city applications based on visual monitoring, potentially bringing significant results for this research field. PMID:28067777

  7. Fiber optic sensors for smart taxiways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janzen, Douglas D.; Fuerstenau, Norbert; Goetze, Wolfgang

    1995-09-01

    Fiber-optic sensors could offer advantages in the field of airport ground traffic monitoring: immunity to electromagnetic interference, installation without costly and time consuming airfield closures, and low loss, low noise optical connection between sensors and signal processing equipment. This paper describes fiber-optic sensors developed for airport taxiway monitoring and the first steps toward their installation in an experimental surface movement guidance and control system at the Braunschweig airport. Initial results obtained with fiber- optic light barriers and vibration sensors are reported. The feasibility of employing interferometric strain gauges for this application will be discussed based on sensor characteristics obtained through measurements of strain in an aircraft structure in flight.

  8. Online fabric defect inspection using smart visual sensors.

    PubMed

    Li, Yundong; Ai, Jingxuan; Sun, Changqing

    2013-04-09

    Fabric defect inspection is necessary and essential for quality control in the textile industry. Traditionally, fabric inspection to assure textile quality is done by humans, however, in the past years, researchers have paid attention to PC-based automatic inspection systems to improve the detection efficiency. This paper proposes a novel automatic inspection scheme for the warp knitting machine using smart visual sensors. The proposed system consists of multiple smart visual sensors and a controller. Each sensor can scan 800 mm width of web, and can work independently. The following are considered in dealing with broken-end defects caused by a single yarn: first, a smart visual sensor is composed of a powerful DSP processor and a 2-megapixel high definition image sensor. Second, a wavelet transform is used to decompose fabric images, and an improved direct thresholding method based on high frequency coefficients is proposed. Third, a proper template is chosen in a mathematical morphology filter to remove noise. Fourth, a defect detection algorithm is optimized to meet real-time demands. The proposed scheme has been running for six months on a warp knitting machine in a textile factory. The actual operation shows that the system is effective, and its detection rate reaches 98%.

  9. Online Fabric Defect Inspection Using Smart Visual Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yundong; Ai, Jingxuan; Sun, Changqing

    2013-01-01

    Fabric defect inspection is necessary and essential for quality control in the textile industry. Traditionally, fabric inspection to assure textile quality is done by humans, however, in the past years, researchers have paid attention to PC-based automatic inspection systems to improve the detection efficiency. This paper proposes a novel automatic inspection scheme for the warp knitting machine using smart visual sensors. The proposed system consists of multiple smart visual sensors and a controller. Each sensor can scan 800 mm width of web, and can work independently. The following are considered in dealing with broken-end defects caused by a single yarn: first, a smart visual sensor is composed of a powerful DSP processor and a 2-megapixel high definition image sensor. Second, a wavelet transform is used to decompose fabric images, and an improved direct thresholding method based on high frequency coefficients is proposed. Third, a proper template is chosen in a mathematical morphology filter to remove noise. Fourth, a defect detection algorithm is optimized to meet real-time demands. The proposed scheme has been running for six months on a warp knitting machine in a textile factory. The actual operation shows that the system is effective, and its detection rate reaches 98%. PMID:23571669

  10. Flexible technologies and smart clothing for citizen medicine, home healthcare, and disease prevention.

    PubMed

    Axisa, Fabrice; Schmitt, Pierre Michael; Gehin, Claudine; Delhomme, Georges; McAdams, Eric; Dittmar, André

    2005-09-01

    Improvement of the quality and efficiency of healthcare in medicine, both at home and in hospital, is becoming more and more important for patients and society at large. As many technologies (micro technologies, telecommunication, low-power design, new textiles, and flexible sensors) are now available, new user-friendly devices can be developed to enhance the comfort and security of the patient. As clothes and textiles are in direct contact with about 90% of the skin surface, smart sensors and smart clothes with noninvasive sensors are an attractive solution for home-based and ambulatory health monitoring. Moreover, wearable devices or smart homes with exosensors are also potential solutions. All these systems can provide a safe and comfortable environment for home healthcare, illness prevention, and citizen medicine.

  11. SMART- Small Motor AerRospace Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balucani, M.; Crescenzi, R.; Ferrari, A.; Guarrea, G.; Pontetti, G.; Orsini, F.; Quattrino, L.; Viola, F.

    2004-11-01

    This paper presents the "SMART" (Small Motor AerRospace Tecnology) propulsion system, constituted of microthrusters array realised by semiconductor technology on silicon wafers. SMART system is obtained gluing three main modules: combustion chambers, igniters and nozzles. The module was then filled with propellant and closed by gluing a piece of silicon wafer in the back side of the combustion chambers. The complete assembled module composed of 25 micro- thrusters with a 3 x 5 nozzle is presented. The measurement showed a thrust of 129 mN and impulse of 56,8 mNs burning about 70mg of propellant for the micro-thruster with nozzle and a thrust of 21 mN and impulse of 8,4 mNs for the micro-thruster without nozzle.

  12. Technology Readiness and the Smart Grid

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkham, Harold; Marinovici, Maria C.

    2013-02-27

    Technology Readiness Levels (TRLs) originated as a way for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to monitor the development of systems being readied for space. The technique has found wide application as part of the more general topic of system engineering. In this paper, we consider the applicability of TRLs to systems being readied for the smart grid. We find that there are many useful parallels, and much to be gained by this application. However, TRLs were designed for a developer who was also a user. That is not usually the case for smart grid developments. We consider the matter from the point of view of the company responsible for implementation, typically a utility, and we find that there is a need for connecting the many standards in the industry. That connection is explored, and some new considerations are introduced.

  13. Conductive polymer sensor arrays for smart orthopaedic implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micolini, Carolina; Holness, F. B.; Johnson, James A.; Price, Aaron D.

    2017-04-01

    This study proposes and demonstrates the design, implementation, and characterization of a 3D-printed smartpolymer sensor array using conductive polyaniline (PANI) structures embedded in a polymeric substrate. The piezoresistive characteristics of PANI were studied to evaluate the efficacy of the manufacturing of an embedded pressure sensor. PANI's stability throughout loading and unloading cycles together with the response to incremental loading cycles was investigated. It is demonstrated that this specially developed multi-material additive manufacturing process for polyaniline is a good candidate for the manufacture of implant components with smart-polymer sensors embedded for the analysis of joint loads in orthopaedic implants.

  14. Smart Camera Technology Increases Quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    When it comes to real-time image processing, everyone is an expert. People begin processing images at birth and rapidly learn to control their responses through the real-time processing of the human visual system. The human eye captures an enormous amount of information in the form of light images. In order to keep the brain from becoming overloaded with all the data, portions of an image are processed at a higher resolution than others, such as a traffic light changing colors. changing colors. In the same manner, image processing products strive to extract the information stored in light in the most efficient way possible. Digital cameras available today capture millions of pixels worth of information from incident light. However, at frame rates more than a few per second, existing digital interfaces are overwhelmed. All the user can do is store several frames to memory until that memory is full and then subsequent information is lost. New technology pairs existing digital interface technology with an off-the-shelf complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) imager to provide more than 500 frames per second of specialty image processing. The result is a cost-effective detection system unlike any other.

  15. Development of smart textiles with embedded fiber optic chemical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalil, Saif E.; Yuan, Jianming; El-Sherif, Mahmoud A.

    2004-03-01

    Smart textiles are defined as textiles capable of monitoring their own health conditions or structural behavior, as well as sensing external environmental conditions. Smart textiles appear to be a future focus of the textile industry. As technology accelerates, textiles are found to be more useful and practical for potential advanced technologies. The majority of textiles are used in the clothing industry, which set up the idea of inventing smart clothes for various applications. Examples of such applications are medical trauma assessment and medical patients monitoring (heart and respiration rates), and environmental monitoring for public safety officials. Fiber optics have played a major role in the development of smart textiles as they have in smart structures in general. Optical fiber integration into textile structures (knitted, woven, and non-woven) is presented, and defines the proper methodology for the manufacturing of smart textiles. Samples of fabrics with integrated optical fibers were processed and tested for optical signal transmission. This was done in order to investigate the effect of textile production procedures on optical fiber performance. The tests proved the effectiveness of the developed methodology for integration of optical fibers without changing their optical performance or structural integrity.

  16. Flexible pressure sensors for smart protective clothing against impact loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fei; Zhu, Bo; Shu, Lin; Tao, Xiaoming

    2014-01-01

    The development of smart protective clothing will facilitate the quick detection of injuries from contact sports, traffic collisions and other accidents. To obtain real-time information like spatial and temporal pressure distributions on the clothing, flexible pressure sensor arrays are required. Based on a resistive fabric strain sensor we demonstrate all flexible, resistive pressure sensors with a large workable pressure range (0-8 MPa), a high sensitivity (1 MPa-1) and an excellent repeatability (lowest non-repeatability ±2.4% from 0.8 to 8 MPa) that can be inexpensively fabricated using fabric strain sensors and biocompatible polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). The pressure sensitivity is tunable by using elastomers with different elasticities or by the pre-strain control of fabric strain sensors. Finite element simulation further confirms the sensor design. The simple structure, large workable pressure range, high sensitivity, high flexibility, facile fabrication and low cost of these pressure sensors make them promising candidates for smart protective clothing against impact loading.

  17. Biomimetic smart sensors for autonomous robotic behavior I: acoustic processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deligeorges, Socrates; Xue, Shuwan; Soloway, Aaron; Lichtenstein, Lee; Gore, Tyler; Hubbard, Allyn

    2009-05-01

    Robotics are rapidly becoming an integral tool on the battlefield and in homeland security, replacing humans in hazardous conditions. To enhance the effectiveness of robotic assets and their interaction with human operators, smart sensors are required to give more autonomous function to robotic platforms. Biologically inspired sensors are an essential part of this development of autonomous behavior and can increase both capability and performance of robotic systems. Smart, biologically inspired acoustic sensors have the potential to extend autonomous capabilities of robotic platforms to include sniper detection, vehicle tracking, personnel detection, and general acoustic monitoring. The key to enabling these capabilities is biomimetic acoustic processing using a time domain processing method based on the neural structures of the mammalian auditory system. These biologically inspired algorithms replicate the extremely adaptive processing of the auditory system yielding high sensitivity over broad dynamic range. The algorithms provide tremendous robustness in noisy and echoic spaces; properties necessary for autonomous function in real world acoustic environments. These biomimetic acoustic algorithms also provide highly accurate localization of both persistent and transient sounds over a wide frequency range, using baselines on the order of only inches. A specialized smart sensor has been developed to interface with an iRobot Packbot® platform specifically to enhance its autonomous behaviors in response to personnel and gunfire. The low power, highly parallel biomimetic processor, in conjunction with a biomimetic vestibular system (discussed in the companion paper), has shown the system's autonomous response to gunfire in complicated acoustic environments to be highly effective.

  18. Wireless Sensor-Based Smart-Clothing Platform for ECG Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chung-Chih; Yu, Yan-Shuo

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study is to use wireless sensor technologies to develop a smart clothes service platform for health monitoring. Our platform consists of smart clothes, a sensor node, a gateway server, and a health cloud. The smart clothes have fabric electrodes to detect electrocardiography (ECG) signals. The sensor node improves the accuracy of QRS complexes detection by morphology analysis and reduces power consumption by the power-saving transmission functionality. The gateway server provides a reconfigurable finite state machine (RFSM) software architecture for abnormal ECG detection to support online updating. Most normal ECG can be filtered out, and the abnormal ECG is further analyzed in the health cloud. Three experiments are conducted to evaluate the platform's performance. The results demonstrate that the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the smart clothes exceeds 37 dB, which is within the “very good signal” interval. The average of the QRS sensitivity and positive prediction is above 99.5%. Power-saving transmission is reduced by nearly 1980 times the power consumption in the best-case analysis. PMID:26640512

  19. Wireless Sensor-Based Smart-Clothing Platform for ECG Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jie; Lin, Chung-Chih; Yu, Yan-Shuo; Yu, Tsang-Chu

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study is to use wireless sensor technologies to develop a smart clothes service platform for health monitoring. Our platform consists of smart clothes, a sensor node, a gateway server, and a health cloud. The smart clothes have fabric electrodes to detect electrocardiography (ECG) signals. The sensor node improves the accuracy of QRS complexes detection by morphology analysis and reduces power consumption by the power-saving transmission functionality. The gateway server provides a reconfigurable finite state machine (RFSM) software architecture for abnormal ECG detection to support online updating. Most normal ECG can be filtered out, and the abnormal ECG is further analyzed in the health cloud. Three experiments are conducted to evaluate the platform's performance. The results demonstrate that the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the smart clothes exceeds 37 dB, which is within the "very good signal" interval. The average of the QRS sensitivity and positive prediction is above 99.5%. Power-saving transmission is reduced by nearly 1980 times the power consumption in the best-case analysis.

  20. Technology Readiness for the Smart Grid

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkham, Harold; Marinovici, Maria C.; Fitzpatrick, G.; Lindsey, K.; McBride, James; Clark, G. L.

    2013-06-30

    Reluctance to adopt new technology into a utility application is understandable, given the critical nature of the infrastructure and the less-than-ideal experiences of some power companies. The authors of this paper have considered adapting the NASA approach of classifying technology readiness, but find it not quite appropriate because NASA was both the developer and the eventual user of the new technology it was evaluating, whereas a utility is ordinarily in the mode of a customer, acquiring a new product from a manufacturer. Instead of a generic scale of technology readiness, a scale of readiness is proposed specifically for the smart grid, based on the many standards that exist for the relevant technologies. In this paper we present an overall structure for organization those standards. The acceptance of new technology is organized into five SGL (Smart Grid Level) steps, numbered five through 9 to correspond approximately to the last five numbers of the NASA TRL scale. SGL 5 is a certification that the hardware and software of the technology is safe for the system into which is intended to be placed. SGL 6 is documentation that the system is safe for itself, and will have adequate reliability. It is thus clear that the steps differ from NASA’s TRL in that technology development is not required, the transition is more one of documenting already existing system readiness. Since SGL 6 describes a system that is safe for the power system and for itself, it should not be restricted from being in a pilot-scale study, and achieving SGL 7. A larger-scale demonstration in a realistic environment will demonstrate interoperability and achieve SGL 8. Only when systems are installed and operating, and when disposal plans are in place will the designation of fully operable at SGL 9 be granted.

  1. Multiple sensors-based kernel machine learning in smart environment.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun-Bao; Pan, Jeng-Shyang

    2017-01-01

    Sensor-based monitoring systems use multiple sensors to identify high-level information based on the events that take place in a monitored environment. Identification and health care are important tasks in the smart environment. This paper presents a framework for multisensory multimedia data analysis using a kernel optimization-based principal analysis for identification and health care in a smart environment. Images of faces, palmprints, and fingerprints are used to identify a person, and a wrist pulse signal is used to analyze the person's health condition. The recognition performance evaluations are implemented on the complex dataset of face, palmprint, fingerprint, and wrist pulse signals. The experimental results show that the proposed algorithms perform well for identification and heath analysis.

  2. Multiple sensors-based kernel machine learning in smart environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jun-Bao; Pan, Jeng-Shyang

    2017-01-01

    Sensor-based monitoring systems use multiple sensors to identify high-level information based on the events that take place in a monitored environment. Identification and health care are important tasks in the smart environment. This paper presents a framework for multisensory multimedia data analysis using a kernel optimization-based principal analysis for identification and health care in a smart environment. Images of faces, palmprints, and fingerprints are used to identify a person, and a wrist pulse signal is used to analyze the person's health condition. The recognition performance evaluations are implemented on the complex dataset of face, palmprint, fingerprint, and wrist pulse signals. The experimental results show that the proposed algorithms perform well for identification and heath analysis.

  3. SMART-1: key technologies and autonomy implementations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elfving, A.; Stagnaro, L.; Winton, A.

    2003-01-01

    SMART-1 is the first of the Small Missions for Advanced Research in Technology of the ESA Horizons 2000 Science Plan. The main mission objective of SMART-1 is to demonstrate innovative and key technologies for scientific deep-space missions. One of the key technologies is the solar electric propulsion used as primary propulsion. The electric propulsion will be using 1400 W to transfer the 350 kg spacecraft from an Ariane 5 standard GTO to an elliptic Moon polar orbit, 10000×300 km. The total mission time is 24 months including a maximum of 18 months transfer time. The spacecraft development entered the detailed design and implementation phase in October 1999, under the responsibility of the Swedish Space Cooperation as prime contractor, and the flight acceptance is targeted for the 3rd quarter of 2002. The committed total life cost budget is 84 million Euro. Apart from the in-orbit demonstration of electric propulsion as primary propulsion, SMART-1 is implementing many other enabling technologies for deep-space missions such as deep-space transponder with communication in X-band for uplink and in X- and Ka-band for downlink, highly integrated and radiation tolerant microprocessors, FPGAs and memories, high on-board autonomy driven by ground communication only once per 4 days, maximum available power to electric propulsion by centralised and software-controlled power management, minimum propellant consumption through innovative angular momentum management. In addition, the spacecraft avionics design is tailored to the low-cost philosophy by enabling flexible integration of commercial off the shelf (COTS) equipment. The scientific instruments, five in total, support characterisation of the electric propulsion thrust environment during the long transfer phase and detailed imaging and spectroscopy of the lunar surface in visible, infrared and X-ray during the Moon orbiting phase. Several of the instruments implement new enabling technologies, e.g. swept charge devices

  4. Privacy versus autonomy: a tradeoff model for smart home monitoring technologies.

    PubMed

    Townsend, Daphne; Knoefel, Frank; Goubran, Rafik

    2011-01-01

    Smart homes are proposed as a new location for the delivery of healthcare services. They provide healthcare monitoring and communication services, by using integrated sensor network technologies. We validate a hypothesis regarding older adults' adoption of home monitoring technologies by conducting a literature review of articles studying older adults' attitudes and perceptions of sensor technologies. Using current literature to support the hypothesis, this paper applies the tradeoff model to decisions about sensor acceptance. Older adults are willing to trade privacy (by accepting a monitoring technology), for autonomy. As the information captured by the sensor becomes more intrusive and the infringement on privacy increases, sensors are accepted if the loss in privacy is traded for autonomy. Even video cameras, the most intrusive sensor type were accepted in exchange for the height of autonomy which is to remain in the home.

  5. Bridge monitoring based on smart sensor data acquisition system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrlich, Jacques; Eymard, Robert; Coche, Georges

    1996-04-01

    The knowledge of loads applied to bridges has to be enhanced in order to actualize national and international codes, like Eurocodes. The nature of traffic loads is extremely complex including such phenomena as dynamic effects, random distribution of damping techniques over the actual trucks, multiple non-linear visco-elastic links in mechanical description of a given truck. For all these reasons, a system of monitoring bridges has been preferred to an unrigorous modelling, in order to get a statistical knowledge of the traffic loads applied to the bridge over large periods. This knowledge under the form of histograms will be useful in order to evaluate extreme load effects and fatigue load effects over the lifetime of the bridge. To achieve these goals, a data acquisition system based on smart sensors extracting and classifying extrema in the traffic loads signal has been developed. At each measurement site a small microsystem is dedicated to the tasks of signal conditioning and sampling, calculation and communication. Each smart sensor can communicate through a numerical data link with its neighbors or with a PC based system controller. In this paper an outline of the problem, the proposed solution based on the smart sensor paradigm, and the results which have been obtained are presented.

  6. Applications of compound eye configurations to smart sensor design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, W. H.

    1985-02-01

    The application of compound eyes to the design of smart sensors is reviewed. Special attention is given to features of this class of eyes which might be of particular advantage in these applications. It was found that the compound eyes are much more compact than the human eye. It appears that apposition compound eyes are not very promising for application to smart sensors because of their inherent low resolution and sensitivity. The superposition compound eyes might be of more interest if high quality gradient index lens arrays could be obtained in sufficient quality. It does not appear that this is now the case. Some features of insect eyes such as the corneal nipples, and tracheole layer might definitely be of some value in systems design. The present state of knowledge of compound eyes is far from complete. The true functional operation of the clear zone eyes is not a matter of total agreement between all biologists. Several specific suggestions are made for the application of features from compound eyes to smart sensor systems.

  7. Fiber Optic Sensors for Smart Materials and Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, H.; Chang, C. C.; Boyer, T.; Sirkis, J. S.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper we describe recently developed fiber sensors which are capable of monitoring the health of smart-structures. The unobstrusive geometry of these sensors make them an excellent choice for embedding the sensor in composite materials to measure internal states of strain in structures and materials. Some of these sensors have gage lengths that can be tailored from tens of microns to many meters. We will describe various demodulation schemes (Pseudo-Heterodyne, Synthetic-Heterodyne, Homodyne, Differential-Cross Multiplier, and Single Channel Phase-Tracker) to obtain high bandwidth measurements, enabling measurement of static to high frequency impact generated strains with a dynamic response exceeding tens of thousands of microstrains. In addition, we will show that we can tailor the fiber sensor to either measure only strain and reject temperature response or measure only the temperature, or measure both temperature and strain simultaneously. We will also demonstrate the ability to measure multiple strain components inside a host simultaneously using a single fiber sensor embedded in the host using a certain sensor type and transverse strain immunity using another sensor type. Additionally we will show the ability to measure temperature up to 100 C using fiber optic sensors.

  8. Fiber Optic Sensors for Smart Materials and Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, H.; Chang, C. C.; Boyer, T.; Sirkis, J. S.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper we describe recently developed fiber sensors which are capable of monitoring the health of smart-structures. The unobstrusive geometry of these sensors make them an excellent choice for embedding the sensor in composite materials to measure internal states of strain in structures and materials. Some of these sensors have gage lengths that can be tailored from tens of microns to many meters. We will describe various demodulation schemes (Pseudo-Heterodyne, Synthetic-Heterodyne, Homodyne, Differential-Cross Multiplier, and Single Channel Phase-Tracker) to obtain high bandwidth measurements, enabling measurement of static to high frequency impact generated strains with a dynamic response exceeding tens of thousands of microstrains. In addition, we will show that we can tailor the fiber sensor to either measure only strain and reject temperature response or measure only the temperature, or measure both temperature and strain simultaneously. We will also demonstrate the ability to measure multiple strain components inside a host simultaneously using a single fiber sensor embedded in the host using a certain sensor type and transverse strain immunity using another sensor type. Additionally we will show the ability to measure temperature up to 100 C using fiber optic sensors.

  9. Shape deposition manufacturing of smart metallic structures with embedded sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaochun; Golnas, Anastasios; Prinz, Fritz B.

    2000-06-01

    The need to obtain information on the performance and lifetime of a tool in service is of prime importance to many industries. It calls for on-line acquisition of information such as temperature and strain values from tools and structures. With embedded sensors, structures are capable of monitoring parameters at critical locations not accessible to ordinary sensors. To embed sensors in the functional structures, especially structures, Shape Deposition Manufacturing (SDM) is a methodology capable of integrating sensors during the production of tooling or structural components. Thin film sensors and fiber optic sensors have been identified as two promising candidates to be integrated in metallic structures. Embedded thin film strain gages have been characterized in a four-point bending test and the results, showing linearity and no hysteresis, match with those from the theoretical model and commercially available strain gages. Fiber optic sensors have been successfully embedded in nickel and stainless steel structures. The embedded fiber optic sensors have been used to measure temperatures and strains. They provide higher sensitivity, good accuracy, and high temperature capacity. Based on fiber optic sensor embedding techniques, a remote temperature/strain sensing system suitable rotating objects, such as turbine blades, has been developed. The developed techniques can be harnessed for rapid prototyping of smart metallic structures.

  10. Autonomous smart sensor network for full-scale structural health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, Jennifer A.; Mechitov, Kirill A.; Spencer, B. F., Jr.; Agha, Gul A.

    2010-04-01

    The demands of aging infrastructure require effective methods for structural monitoring and maintenance. Wireless smart sensor networks offer the ability to enhance structural health monitoring (SHM) practices through the utilization of onboard computation to achieve distributed data management. Such an approach is scalable to the large number of sensor nodes required for high-fidelity modal analysis and damage detection. While smart sensor technology is not new, the number of full-scale SHM applications has been limited. This slow progress is due, in part, to the complex network management issues that arise when moving from a laboratory setting to a full-scale monitoring implementation. This paper presents flexible network management software that enables continuous and autonomous operation of wireless smart sensor networks for full-scale SHM applications. The software components combine sleep/wake cycling for enhanced power management with threshold detection for triggering network wide tasks, such as synchronized sensing or decentralized modal analysis, during periods of critical structural response.

  11. A Low-Power High-Speed Smart Sensor Design for Space Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fang, Wai-Chi

    1997-01-01

    A low-power high-speed smart sensor system based on a large format active pixel sensor (APS) integrated with a programmable neural processor for space exploration missions is presented. The concept of building an advanced smart sensing system is demonstrated by a system-level microchip design that is composed with an APS sensor, a programmable neural processor, and an embedded microprocessor in a SOI CMOS technology. This ultra-fast smart sensor system-on-a-chip design mimics what is inherent in biological vision systems. Moreover, it is programmable and capable of performing ultra-fast machine vision processing in all levels such as image acquisition, image fusion, image analysis, scene interpretation, and control functions. The system provides about one tera-operation-per-second computing power which is a two order-of-magnitude increase over that of state-of-the-art microcomputers. Its high performance is due to massively parallel computing structures, high data throughput rates, fast learning capabilities, and advanced VLSI system-on-a-chip implementation.

  12. Smart sensor chip based on bioMEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madan, Rajesh; Kumar, Sandeep; Bagga, Ellis; Bajpai, Ram P.; Bharadwaj, Lalit M.

    2004-03-01

    The smart sensor chip for simultaneous detection of a large number of disease markers is the most recent interest in the field of nanobiotechnology. Potential applications include miniaturized sensors to detect biological agents and diseases, biocompatible and improved systems for drug delivery. They are the simplest biomicroelectromechanical system (BioMEMS) devices that offer a very promising future to the development of novel physical, chemical and biological sensors. They can simultaneously detect a large number of antigens, antibodies, DNA molecules, trace metals, hormones, proteins, gases, microorganisms, toxins, chemical warfare agents, explosives etc. in gaseous, vacuum and liquid medium. Smart sensor chips would be of greater use in intensive care units (ICUs) where multiple disease markers are to be assessed precisely in very less time. These sensors employ highly specific biochemical reactions between complementary biomolecules in the same way that nature has used in our body to detect, diagnose and treat various types of diseases. They have aroused considerable interest because of their high specificity, ultra-high sensitivity, simplicity, low cost, less analyte requirement (in μl), less steps involved, non-hazardous procedure, quick response, low power requirement and a unique capability of detecting a large number of analytes simultaneously in a single step.

  13. Distributed wireless sensor for smart car seats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baz, A.; Smoker, Jason

    2009-03-01

    A distributed wireless sensor network is embedded inside car seats to enable the measurements of the weight of the occupants, location of their center of gravity, and spatial orientation of their bodies. Based on these measurements, intelligent decisions can be made to ensure their comfort and safety particularly in case of accidents. Appropriate activation of the inflatable bags according to the weight and position of the occupants will be critical to avoiding unnecessary and undesirable injuries.

  14. Fiber Sensor Technology Today

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotate, Kazuo

    2006-08-01

    Fiber sensor technologies are overviewed. Since the early 1970s, this field has been developed, on the basis of the same devices and photonic principles as fiber communication technologies. Besides simple configurations, in which the fiber acts only as a data transmission line, sophisticated configurations have also been developed, in which the fiber is used as a device to realize unique sensing mechanisms. The fiber optic gyroscope (FOG) is a good example, and has been developed as an absolute rotation sensor used, for example, for navigation and/or attitude control applications. Compared with traditional spinning-mass gyroscopes, the FOG has advantages, such as a short warming-up time, a light weight, and easy handling. A Japanese satellite, which was launched in August 2005 with a mission to observe the aurora, is controlled with a FOG. The FOG has also been used in consumer applications, such as the camera stabilizer, radio-controlled (RC) helicopter navigation, and the control of humanoid robots. Recently, distributed and multiplexed sensing schemes, in particular, have been studied and developed, in which a long fiber acts like a “nerve” for feeling the strain and/or the temperature distribution along the fiber. Performances of artificial nerve systems have markedly improved within the last couple of years, in spatial resolution and measurement speed. By embedding the “fiber-optic nerve system” in aircraft wings, bridges and tall buildings, these materials and structures can sense damage to prevent disasters.

  15. Remote sensing of earth from space: Role of 'smart sensors'; Proceedings of the Conference, Hampton, Va., November 14-16, 1978

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breckenridge, R. A.

    1979-01-01

    The papers in this volume cover a wide range of topics, from user requirements for 'smart' sensors to the development of innovative solid-state devices. By definition, a 'smart' sensor can, by means of its data/information processing capability, extract much more information than a simple sensor from the received physical signals, disregard or discard data with little or no information content, and handle efficiently the large volumes of data to be generated in future spacecraft. User concepts for 'smart' sensors are considered, and the topic of data processing systems is addressed. Attention is given to advanced device technology which brings forth unique device concepts applicable to 'smart' sensors. Also discussed are data preprocessing techniques.

  16. Smart polyoxometalate-based nitrogen monoxide sensors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shaoqin; Volkmer, Dirk; Kurth, Dirk G

    2004-08-01

    An electrochemical sensor design for selective NO detection is presented based on a polyoxometalate (POM) cluster immobilized on an electrode through a polyelectrolyte matrix. It is suggested that the POM can electrocatalyze the reduction of NO. The reduction current is proportional to the NO concentration in the investigated concentration window ranging from 1 nM to 10 microM. The sensitivity of the device can be adjusted by the number of immobilized layers. The response to possible interfering reagents such as nitrate and nitrite can be controlled through the multilayer design. By a predominant negatively charged outer surface, the response to these ions is markedly reduced.

  17. Introduction to smart card technology and initial medical application.

    PubMed

    Quick, G

    1994-10-01

    Smart card technology is the name applied to the use of a plastic card with an embedded computer chip. Recent development of smart card software has allowed storage and retrieval of medical information, affording the opportunity to provide a standardized, portable, accessible medical record for use in prehospital and emergency department patient encounters. We describe the smart card concept and its initial deployment in a section of a large Midwestern urban area.

  18. Smart homes, private homes? An empirical study of technology researchers' perceptions of ethical issues in developing smart-home health technologies.

    PubMed

    Birchley, Giles; Huxtable, Richard; Murtagh, Madeleine; Ter Meulen, Ruud; Flach, Peter; Gooberman-Hill, Rachael

    2017-04-04

    Smart-home technologies, comprising environmental sensors, wearables and video are attracting interest in home healthcare delivery. Development of such technology is usually justified on the basis of the technology's potential to increase the autonomy of people living with long-term conditions. Studies of the ethics of smart-homes raise concerns about privacy, consent, social isolation and equity of access. Few studies have investigated the ethical perspectives of smart-home engineers themselves. By exploring the views of engineering researchers in a large smart-home project, we sought to contribute to dialogue between ethics and the engineering community. Either face-to-face or using Skype, we conducted in-depth qualitative interviews with 20 early- and mid-career smart-home researchers from a multi-centre smart-home project, who were asked to describe their own experience and to reflect more broadly about ethical considerations that relate to smart-home design. With participants' consent, interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed and analysed using a thematic approach. Two overarching themes emerged: in 'Privacy', researchers indicated that they paid close attention to negative consequences of potential unauthorised information sharing in their current work. However, when discussing broader issues in smart-home design beyond the confines of their immediate project, researchers considered physical privacy to a lesser extent, even though physical privacy may manifest in emotive concerns about being watched or monitored. In 'Choice', researchers indicated they often saw provision of choice to end-users as a solution to ethical dilemmas. While researchers indicated that choices of end-users may need to be restricted for technological reasons, ethical standpoints that restrict choice were usually assumed and embedded in design. The tractability of informational privacy may explain the greater attention that is paid to it. However, concerns about physical privacy may

  19. Design of smart home sensor visualizations for older adults.

    PubMed

    Le, Thai; Reeder, Blaine; Chung, Jane; Thompson, Hilaire; Demiris, George

    2014-07-24

    Smart home sensor systems provide a valuable opportunity to continuously and unobtrusively monitor older adult wellness. However, the density of sensor data can be challenging to visualize, especially for an older adult consumer with distinct user needs. We describe the design of sensor visualizations informed by interviews with older adults. The goal of the visualizations is to present sensor activity data to an older adult consumer audience that supports both longitudinal detection of trends and on-demand display of activity details for any chosen day. The design process is grounded through participatory design with older adult interviews during a six-month pilot sensor study. Through a secondary analysis of interviews, we identified the visualization needs of older adults. We incorporated these needs with cognitive perceptual visualization guidelines and the emotional design principles of Norman to develop sensor visualizations. We present a design of sensor visualization that integrate both temporal and spatial components of information. The visualization supports longitudinal detection of trends while allowing the viewer to view activity within a specific date.CONCLUSIONS: Appropriately designed visualizations for older adults not only provide insight into health and wellness, but also are a valuable resource to promote engagement within care.

  20. Design of smart home sensor visualizations for older adults.

    PubMed

    Le, Thai; Reeder, Blaine; Chung, Jane; Thompson, Hilaire; Demiris, George

    2014-01-01

    Smart home sensor systems provide a valuable opportunity to continuously and unobtrusively monitor older adult wellness. However, the density of sensor data can be challenging to visualize, especially for an older adult consumer with distinct user needs. We describe the design of sensor visualizations informed by interviews with older adults. The goal of the visualizations is to present sensor activity data to an older adult consumer audience that supports both longitudinal detection of trends and on-demand display of activity details for any chosen day. The design process is grounded through participatory design with older adult interviews during a six-month pilot sensor study. Through a secondary analysis of interviews, we identified the visualization needs of older adults. We incorporated these needs with cognitive perceptual visualization guidelines and the emotional design principles of Norman to develop sensor visualizations. We present a design of sensor visualization that integrate both temporal and spatial components of information. The visualization supports longitudinal detection of trends while allowing the viewer to view activity within a specific date. Appropriately designed visualizations for older adults not only provide insight into health and wellness, but also are a valuable resource to promote engagement within care.

  1. High precision silicon piezo resistive SMART pressure sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Rod

    2005-01-01

    Instruments for test and calibration require a pressure sensor that is precise and stable. Market forces also dictate a move away from single measurand test equipment and, certainly in the case of pressure, away from single range equipment. A pressure `module' is required which excels in pressure measurement but is interchangble with sensors for other measurands. A communications interface for such a sensor has been specified. Instrument Digital Output Sensor (IDOS) that permits this interchanagability and allows the sensor to be inside or outside the measuring instrument. This paper covers the design and specification of a silicon diaphragm piezo resistive SMART sensor using this interface. A brief history of instrument sensors will be given to establish the background to this development. Design choices of the silicon doping, bridge energisation method, temperature sensing, signal conversion, data processing, compensation method, communications interface will be discussed. The physical format of the `in-instrument' version will be shown and then extended to the packaging design for the external version. Test results will show the accuracy achieved exceeds the target of 0.01%FS over a range of temperatures.

  2. SMART composite high pressure vessels with integrated optical fiber sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blazejewski, Wojciech; Czulak, Andrzej; Gasior, Pawel; Kaleta, Jerzy; Mech, Rafal

    2010-04-01

    In this paper application of integrated Optical Fiber Sensors for strain state monitoring of composite high pressure vessels is presented. The composite tanks find broad application in areas such as: automotive industry, aeronautics, rescue services, etc. In automotive application they are mainly used for gaseous fuels storage (like CNG or compressed Hydrogen). In comparison with standard steel vessels, composite ones have many advantages (i.e. high mechanical strength, significant weight reduction, etc). In the present work a novel technique of vessel manufacturing, according to this construction, was applied. It is called braiding technique, and can be used as an alternative to the winding method. During braiding process, between GFRC layers, two types of optical fiber sensors were installed: point sensors in the form of FBGs as well as interferometric sensors with long measuring arms (SOFO®). Integrated optical fiber sensors create the nervous system of the pressure vessel and are used for its structural health monitoring. OFS register deformation areas and detect construction damages in their early stage (ensure a high safety level for users). Applied sensor system also ensured a possibility of strain state monitoring even during the vessel manufacturing process. However the main application of OFS based monitoring system is to detect defects in the composite structure. An idea of such a SMART vessel with integrated sensor system as well as an algorithm of defect detection was presented.

  3. Development of Miniaturized Optimized Smart Sensors (MOSS) for space plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, D. T.

    1993-01-01

    The cost of space plasma sensors is high for several reasons: (1) Most are one-of-a-kind and state-of-the-art, (2) the cost of launch to orbit is high, (3) ruggedness and reliability requirements lead to costly development and test programs, and (4) overhead is added by overly elaborate or generalized spacecraft interface requirements. Possible approaches to reducing costs include development of small 'sensors' (defined as including all necessary optics, detectors, and related electronics) that will ultimately lead to cheaper missions by reducing (2), improving (3), and, through work with spacecraft designers, reducing (4). Despite this logical approach, there is no guarantee that smaller sensors are necessarily either better or cheaper. We have previously advocated applying analytical 'quality factors' to plasma sensors (and spacecraft) and have begun to develop miniaturized particle optical systems by applying quantitative optimization criteria. We are currently designing a Miniaturized Optimized Smart Sensor (MOSS) in which miniaturized electronics (e.g., employing new power supply topology and extensive us of gate arrays and hybrid circuits) are fully integrated with newly developed particle optics to give significant savings in volume and mass. The goal of the SwRI MOSS program is development of a fully self-contained and functional plasma sensor weighing 1 lb and requiring 1 W. MOSS will require only a typical spacecraft DC power source (e.g., 30 V) and command/data interfaces in order to be fully functional, and will provide measurement capabilities comparable in most ways to current sensors.

  4. Development of Miniaturized Optimized Smart Sensors (MOSS) for space plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, D. T.

    1993-01-01

    The cost of space plasma sensors is high for several reasons: (1) Most are one-of-a-kind and state-of-the-art, (2) the cost of launch to orbit is high, (3) ruggedness and reliability requirements lead to costly development and test programs, and (4) overhead is added by overly elaborate or generalized spacecraft interface requirements. Possible approaches to reducing costs include development of small 'sensors' (defined as including all necessary optics, detectors, and related electronics) that will ultimately lead to cheaper missions by reducing (2), improving (3), and, through work with spacecraft designers, reducing (4). Despite this logical approach, there is no guarantee that smaller sensors are necessarily either better or cheaper. We have previously advocated applying analytical 'quality factors' to plasma sensors (and spacecraft) and have begun to develop miniaturized particle optical systems by applying quantitative optimization criteria. We are currently designing a Miniaturized Optimized Smart Sensor (MOSS) in which miniaturized electronics (e.g., employing new power supply topology and extensive us of gate arrays and hybrid circuits) are fully integrated with newly developed particle optics to give significant savings in volume and mass. The goal of the SwRI MOSS program is development of a fully self-contained and functional plasma sensor weighing 1 lb and requiring 1 W. MOSS will require only a typical spacecraft DC power source (e.g., 30 V) and command/data interfaces in order to be fully functional, and will provide measurement capabilities comparable in most ways to current sensors.

  5. Low data rate architecture for smart image sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darwish, Amani; Sicard, Gilles; Fesquet, Laurent

    2014-03-01

    An innovative smart image sensor architecture based on event-driven asynchronous functioning is presented in this paper. The proposed architecture has been designed in order to control the sensor data flow by extracting only the relevant information from the image sensor and performing spatial and temporal redundancies suppression in video streaming. We believe that this data flow reduction leads to a system power consumption reduction which is essential in mobile devices. In this first proposition, we present our new pixel behaviour as well as our new asynchronous read-out architecture. Simulations using both Matlab and VHDL were performed in order to validate the proposed pixel behaviour and the reading protocol. These simulations results have met our expectations and confirmed the suggested ideas.

  6. CP-OCT sensor guided SMART micro-forceps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Cheol; Gehlbach, Peter L.; Kang, Jin U.

    2014-02-01

    Even the most stable hands have unintended movements on the order of 50-100 microns within 0-15 Hz. Micro-forceps are one of the frequently used microsurgical tools used to grasp thin layers of tissue during microsurgery. Here, a handheld Smart Micromanipulation Aided Robotic-surgery Tool (SMART) micro-forceps is developed by integrating a fiber-optic common-path optical coherence tomography (CP-OCT) sensor into the micro-forceps. This forceps design could significantly improve performance by canceling unwanted hand tremor during the moment of a grasping. The basic grasping and peeling functions of the micro-forceps are evaluated in dry phantoms and in a biological tissue model.

  7. Smart gun technologies: One method of eliminating unauthorized firearm use

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, D.R.

    1994-06-01

    Law enforcement officers work each day with individuals who can become aggressive and violent. Among the worst scenarios, which occur each year and often raise national media attention, an officer has his handgun taken away and used against him. As many as 12 officers per year are killed with their own gun. This problem can be addressed through the integration of modern sensors with control electronics to provide authorized user firearms for law enforcement and even recreational uses. A considerable benefit to law enforcement agencies, as well as society as a whole, would be gained by the application of recommended Smart Gun Technologies (SGT) as a method of limiting the use of firearms to authorized individuals. Sandia National Laboratory has been actively involved in the research and design of technologically sophisticated surety devices for weapons for the DOE and DOD. This experience is now being applied to criminal justice problems by transferring these technologies to commercial industry. In the SGT project Sandia is developing the user requirements that would limit a firearms use to its owner and/or authorized users. Various technologies that are capable of meeting the requirements are being investigated, these range from biometrics identification to radio-controlled devices. Research is presently underway to investigate which technologies represent the best solutions to the problem. Proof of concept demonstration models are being built for the most promising SGT with the intent of technology transfer. Different solutions are recommended for the possible applications: law enforcement, military, and commercial (personal protection/recreational) use.

  8. Smart Sensors and Virtual Physiology Human Approach as a Basis of Personalized Therapies in Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Fernández Peruchena, Carlos M; Prado-Velasco, Manuel

    2010-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) has a growing incidence and prevalence in modern societies, pushed by the aging and change of life styles. Despite the huge resources dedicated to improve their quality of life, mortality and morbidity rates, these are still very poor. In this work, DM pathology is revised from clinical and metabolic points of view, as well as mathematical models related to DM, with the aim of justifying an evolution of DM therapies towards the correction of the physiological metabolic loops involved. We analyze the reliability of mathematical models, under the perspective of virtual physiological human (VPH) initiatives, for generating and integrating customized knowledge about patients, which is needed for that evolution. Wearable smart sensors play a key role in this frame, as they provide patient’s information to the models. A telehealthcare computational architecture based on distributed smart sensors (first processing layer) and personalized physiological mathematical models integrated in Human Physiological Images (HPI) computational components (second processing layer), is presented. This technology was designed for a renal disease telehealthcare in earlier works and promotes crossroads between smart sensors and the VPH initiative. We suggest that it is able to support a truly personalized, preventive, and predictive healthcare model for the delivery of evolved DM therapies. PMID:21625646

  9. Smart sensors and virtual physiology human approach as a basis of personalized therapies in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Fernández Peruchena, Carlos M; Prado-Velasco, Manuel

    2010-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) has a growing incidence and prevalence in modern societies, pushed by the aging and change of life styles. Despite the huge resources dedicated to improve their quality of life, mortality and morbidity rates, these are still very poor. In this work, DM pathology is revised from clinical and metabolic points of view, as well as mathematical models related to DM, with the aim of justifying an evolution of DM therapies towards the correction of the physiological metabolic loops involved. We analyze the reliability of mathematical models, under the perspective of virtual physiological human (VPH) initiatives, for generating and integrating customized knowledge about patients, which is needed for that evolution. Wearable smart sensors play a key role in this frame, as they provide patient's information to the models.A telehealthcare computational architecture based on distributed smart sensors (first processing layer) and personalized physiological mathematical models integrated in Human Physiological Images (HPI) computational components (second processing layer), is presented. This technology was designed for a renal disease telehealthcare in earlier works and promotes crossroads between smart sensors and the VPH initiative. We suggest that it is able to support a truly personalized, preventive, and predictive healthcare model for the delivery of evolved DM therapies.

  10. Hierarchical sensor network architecture for stationary smart node supervision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Ming-Hui; Wu, Wen-Jong; Chen, Chun-Kuang; Chen, Yih-Fan; Wen, Chih-Min; Kao, Cheng-Yan; Yu, Shih-An; Lin, Yun-Han; Huang, Jhen-Gang; Rao, Herman; Hsu, Ching-Hsiang; Lee, Chih-Kung

    2004-07-01

    Most wireless sensor networks base their design on an ad hoc (multi-hop) network technology that focus on organizing and maintaining a network formed by a group of moving objects with a communication device in an area with no fixed base stations or access points. Although ad hoc network technologies are capable of constructing a sensor network, the design and implementation of sensor networks for monitoring stationary nodes such as construction sites and nature-disaster-prone areas can be furthered simplified to reduce power consumption and overhead. Based on the nature of immobile nodes, a hierarchical sensor network architecture and its associated communication protocols are proposed in this paper. In this proposed architecture, most elements in the sensor network are designed to be equipped with no functions for message forwarding or channel scheduling. The local control center uses a centralized communication protocol to communicate with each sensor node. The local control center can also use ad hoc network technology to relay the data between each of the sensors. This approach not only minimizes the complexity of the sensor nodes implemented but also significantly reduces the cost, size and power consumption of each sensor node. In addition, the benefit of using ad-hoc network technology is that the local controller retains its routing capabilities. Therefore, power efficiency and communication reliability can be both achieved and maximized by this type of hierarchical sensor network.

  11. Ambient and smartphone sensor assisted ADL recognition in multi-inhabitant smart environments.

    PubMed

    Roy, Nirmalya; Misra, Archan; Cook, Diane

    2016-02-01

    Activity recognition in smart environments is an evolving research problem due to the advancement and proliferation of sensing, monitoring and actuation technologies to make it possible for large scale and real deployment. While activities in smart home are interleaved, complex and volatile; the number of inhabitants in the environment is also dynamic. A key challenge in designing robust smart home activity recognition approaches is to exploit the users' spatiotemporal behavior and location, focus on the availability of multitude of devices capable of providing different dimensions of information and fulfill the underpinning needs for scaling the system beyond a single user or a home environment. In this paper, we propose a hybrid approach for recognizing complex activities of daily living (ADL), that lie in between the two extremes of intensive use of body-worn sensors and the use of ambient sensors. Our approach harnesses the power of simple ambient sensors (e.g., motion sensors) to provide additional 'hidden' context (e.g., room-level location) of an individual, and then combines this context with smartphone-based sensing of micro-level postural/locomotive states. The major novelty is our focus on multi-inhabitant environments, where we show how the use of spatiotemporal constraints along with multitude of data sources can be used to significantly improve the accuracy and computational overhead of traditional activity recognition based approaches such as coupled-hidden Markov models. Experimental results on two separate smart home datasets demonstrate that this approach improves the accuracy of complex ADL classification by over 30 %, compared to pure smartphone-based solutions.

  12. Ambient and smartphone sensor assisted ADL recognition in multi-inhabitant smart environments

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Archan; Cook, Diane

    2016-01-01

    Activity recognition in smart environments is an evolving research problem due to the advancement and proliferation of sensing, monitoring and actuation technologies to make it possible for large scale and real deployment. While activities in smart home are interleaved, complex and volatile; the number of inhabitants in the environment is also dynamic. A key challenge in designing robust smart home activity recognition approaches is to exploit the users' spatiotemporal behavior and location, focus on the availability of multitude of devices capable of providing different dimensions of information and fulfill the underpinning needs for scaling the system beyond a single user or a home environment. In this paper, we propose a hybrid approach for recognizing complex activities of daily living (ADL), that lie in between the two extremes of intensive use of body-worn sensors and the use of ambient sensors. Our approach harnesses the power of simple ambient sensors (e.g., motion sensors) to provide additional ‘hidden’ context (e.g., room-level location) of an individual, and then combines this context with smartphone-based sensing of micro-level postural/locomotive states. The major novelty is our focus on multi-inhabitant environments, where we show how the use of spatiotemporal constraints along with multitude of data sources can be used to significantly improve the accuracy and computational overhead of traditional activity recognition based approaches such as coupled-hidden Markov models. Experimental results on two separate smart home datasets demonstrate that this approach improves the accuracy of complex ADL classification by over 30 %, compared to pure smartphone-based solutions. PMID:27042240

  13. Validating Knowledge-Based Framework through Mission-Oriented Sensors Array and Smart Sensor Protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Douglas; Pires, Rayner M.; Branco, Kalinka R. L. J. C.

    2015-09-01

    This paper addresses the problem of using Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) in critical embedded systems, mainly in Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs). We present the use of a SOA approach to provide the integration of the payload in the UAV. The integration is provided by a plug and play protocol named Smart Sensor Protocol (SSP) that validates the SOA approach.

  14. Implantable sensor technology: from research to clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Ledet, Eric H; D'Lima, Darryl; Westerhoff, Peter; Szivek, John A; Wachs, Rebecca A; Bergmann, Georg

    2012-06-01

    For decades, implantable sensors have been used in research to provide comprehensive understanding of the biomechanics of the human musculoskeletal system. These complex sensor systems have improved our understanding of the in vivo environment by yielding in vivo measurements of force, torque, pressure, and temperature. Historically, implants have been modified to be used as vehicles for sensors and telemetry systems. Recently, microfabrication and nanofabrication technology have sufficiently evolved that wireless, passive sensor systems can be incorporated into implants or tissue with minimal or no modification to the host implant. At the same time, sensor technology costs per unit have become less expensive, providing opportunities for use in daily clinical practice. Although diagnostic implantable sensors can be used clinically without significant increases in expense or surgical time, to date, orthopaedic smart implants have been used exclusively as research tools. These implantable sensors can facilitate personalized medicine by providing exquisitely accurate in vivo data unique to each patient.

  15. Smart CMOS sensor for wideband laser threat detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarze, Craig R.; Sonkusale, Sameer

    2015-09-01

    The proliferation of lasers has led to their widespread use in applications ranging from short range standoff chemical detection to long range Lidar sensing and target designation operating across the UV to LWIR spectrum. Recent advances in high energy lasers have renewed the development of laser weapons systems. The ability to measure and assess laser source information is important to both identify a potential threat as well as determine safety and nominal hazard zone (NHZ). Laser detection sensors are required that provide high dynamic range, wide spectral coverage, pulsed and continuous wave detection, and large field of view. OPTRA, Inc. and Tufts have developed a custom ROIC smart pixel imaging sensor architecture and wavelength encoding optics for measurement of source wavelength, pulse length, pulse repetition frequency (PRF), irradiance, and angle of arrival. The smart architecture provides dual linear and logarithmic operating modes to provide 8+ orders of signal dynamic range and nanosecond pulse measurement capability that can be hybridized with the appropriate detector array to provide UV through LWIR laser sensing. Recent advances in sputtering techniques provide the capability for post-processing CMOS dies from the foundry and patterning PbS and PbSe photoconductors directly on the chip to create a single monolithic sensor array architecture for measuring sources operating from 0.26 - 5.0 microns, 1 mW/cm2 - 2 kW/cm2.

  16. A real-time smart sensor for high-resolution frequency estimation in power systems.

    PubMed

    Granados-Lieberman, David; Romero-Troncoso, Rene J; Cabal-Yepez, Eduardo; Osornio-Rios, Roque A; Franco-Gasca, Luis A

    2009-01-01

    Power quality monitoring is a theme in vogue and accurate frequency measurement of the power line is a major issue. This problem is particularly relevant for power generating systems since the generated signal must comply with restrictive standards. The novelty of this work is the development of a smart sensor for real-time high-resolution frequency measurement in accordance with international standards for power quality monitoring. The proposed smart sensor utilizes commercially available current clamp, hall-effect sensor or resistor as primary sensor. The signal processing is carried out through the chirp z-transform. Simulations and experimental results show the efficiency of the proposed smart sensor.

  17. Smart focal plane technologies for ELT instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, Colin R.; Ramsay-Howat, Suzanne K.; Garzon, Francisco; Parry, Ian R.; Prieto, Eric; Robertson, David J.; Zamkotsian, Frederic

    2004-07-01

    Smart Focal Planes are devices that enable the efficient sampling of a telescope's focal plane to feed spectroscopic and imaging instruments. Examples are integral field units (fiber and image slicers), cryogenic beam manipulators, and MOEMS (micro-opto-electromechanical systems) such as miniature slit shutters. These technologies are critical in making best use of the current 8m class telescopes for key science goals such as spectroscopic surveys of high redshift galaxies, and will be even more important for Extremely Large Telescope (ELT) instruments. In fact, the density of pixels in an ELT focal plane with several milliarcsecond resolution will mean that sub-sampling of the field will be needed even for imaging. We have proposed a joint European project to develop these technologies, building on expertise from partners in the UK, France, the Netherlands, Spain, Germany and others, and led by the UK. We describe the current status of these technologies, showing how they will contribute to the feasibility and performance of proposed instruments for ELTs, and concentrating on capabilities within Europe. We then outline the proposed future developments, highlighting the technical challenges, such as the difficulties of manufacturing and verifying complex image slicers with thousands of optical surfaces, and building highly reliable cryogenic mechanisms such as pick-off arms, beam steering mirrors and reconfigurble slit mechanisms.

  18. A Brief Review of the Need for Robust Smart Wireless Sensor Systems for Future Propulsion Systems, Distributed Engine Controls, and Propulsion Health Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Gary W.; Behbahani, Alireza

    2012-01-01

    Smart Sensor Systems with wireless capability operational in high temperature, harsh environments are a significant component in enabling future propulsion systems to meet a range of increasingly demanding requirements. These propulsion systems must incorporate technology that will monitor engine component conditions, analyze the incoming data, and modify operating parameters to optimize propulsion system operations. This paper discusses the motivation towards the development of high temperature, smart wireless sensor systems that include sensors, electronics, wireless communication, and power. The challenges associated with the use of traditional wired sensor systems will be reviewed and potential advantages of Smart Sensor Systems will be discussed. A brief review of potential applications for wireless smart sensor networks and their potential impact on propulsion system operation, with emphasis on Distributed Engine Control and Propulsion Health Management, will be given. A specific example related to the development of high temperature Smart Sensor Systems based on silicon carbide electronics will be discussed. It is concluded that the development of a range of robust smart wireless sensor systems are a foundation for future development of intelligent propulsion systems with enhanced capabilities.

  19. A Brief Review of the Need for Robust Smart Wireless Sensor Systems for Future Propulsion Systems, Distributed Engine Controls, and Propulsion Health Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Gary W.; Behbahani, Alireza

    2012-01-01

    Smart Sensor Systems with wireless capability operational in high temperature, harsh environments are a significant component in enabling future propulsion systems to meet a range of increasingly demanding requirements. These propulsion systems must incorporate technology that will monitor engine component conditions, analyze the incoming data, and modify operating parameters to optimize propulsion system operations. This paper discusses the motivation towards the development of high temperature, smart wireless sensor systems that include sensors, electronics, wireless communication, and power. The challenges associated with the use of traditional wired sensor systems will be reviewed and potential advantages of Smart Sensor Systems will be discussed. A brief review of potential applications for wireless smart sensor networks and their potential impact on propulsion system operation, with emphasis on Distributed Engine Control and Propulsion Health Management, will be given. A specific example related to the development of high temperature Smart Sensor Systems based on silicon carbide electronics will be discussed. It is concluded that the development of a range of robust smart wireless sensor systems are a foundation for future development of intelligent propulsion systems with enhanced capabilities.

  20. Smart focal-plane technology for micro-instruments and micro-rovers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossum, Eric R.

    1993-01-01

    It is inevitable that micro-instruments and micro-rovers for space exploration will contain one or more focal-plane arrays for imaging, spectroscopy, or navigation. In this paper, we explore the state-of-the-art in focal-plane technology for visible sensors. Also discussed is present research activity in advanced focal-plane technology with particular emphasis on the development of smart sensors. The paper concludes with a discussion of possible future directions for the advancement of the technology.

  1. Sensor Technologies on Flexible Substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koehne, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    NASA Ames has developed sensor technologies on flexible substrates integrated into textiles for personalized environment monitoring and human performance evaluation. Current technologies include chemical sensing for gas leak and event monitoring and biological sensors for human health and performance monitoring. Targeted integration include next generation EVA suits and flexible habitats.

  2. Ball lens fiber optic sensor based smart handheld microsurgical instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Cheol; Gehlbach, Peter L.; Kang, Jin U.

    2013-03-01

    During freehand performance of vitreoretinal microsurgery the surgeon must perform precise and stable maneuvers that achieve surgical objectives and avoid surgical risk. Here, we present an improved smart handheld microsurgical tool which is based on a ball lens fiber optic sensor that utilizes common path swept source optical coherence tomography. Improvements include incorporation of a ball lens single mode fiber optic probe that increases the working angle of the tool to greater than 45 degrees; and increases the magnitude of the distance sensing signal through water. Also presented is a cutting function with an improved ergonomic design.

  3. Automotive Sensors and MEMS Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nonomura, Yutaka

    - Automotive sensors are used for emission gas purification, energy conservation, car kinematic performance, safety and ITS (intelligent transportation system). The comparison of the sensor characteristics was made for their application area. Many kinds of the principles are applied for the sensors. There are two types of sensors, such as physical and chemical one. Many of the automotive sensors are physical type such as mechanical sensors. And a gas sensor is a chemical type. The sensors have been remarkably developed with the advancement of the MEMS (Micro Electro Mechanical Systems) technology. In this paper, gas, pressure, combustion pressure, acceleration, magnetic, and angular rate sensors for automotive use are explained with their features. The sensors are key devices to control cars in the engine, power train, chassis and safety systems. The environment resistance, long term reliability, and low cost are required for the automotive sensors. They are very hard to be resolved. However, the sensor technology contributes greatly to improving global environment, energy conservation, and safety. The applications of automotive sensors will be expanded with the automobile developments.

  4. Wireless Smart Sensor Network System Using SmartBridge Sensor Nodes for Structural Health Monitoring of Existing Concrete Bridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaviña, J. R.; Uy, F. A.; Carreon, J. D.

    2017-06-01

    There are over 8000 bridges in the Philippines today according to the Department of Public Works and Highways (DPWH). Currently, visual inspection is the most common practice in monitoring the structural integrity of bridges. However, visual inspections have proven to be insufficient in determining the actual health or condition of a bridge. Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) aims to give, in real-time, a diagnosis of the actual condition of the bridge. In this study, SmartBridge Sensor Nodes were installed on an existing concrete bridge with American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) Type IV Girders to gather vibration of the elements of the bridge. Also, standards on the effective installation of SmartBridge Sensor Nodes, such as location and orientation was determined. Acceleration readings from the sensor were then uploaded to a server, wherein they are monitored against certain thresholds, from which, the health of the bridge will be derived. Final output will be a portal or webpage wherein the information, health, and acceleration readings of the bridge will be available for viewing. With levels of access set for different types of users, the main users will have access to download data and reports. Data transmission and webpage access are available online, making the SHM system wireless.

  5. Novel hybrid sol-gel materials for smart sensor windows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wencel, Dorota; Higgins, Clare; Guckian, Adrian; McDonagh, Colette; MacCraith, Brian D.

    2005-06-01

    Current sensor trends, such as multianalyte capability, miniaturisation and patternability are important drivers for materials requirements in optical chemical sensors. In particular, issues such as enhanced sensitivity and printablity are key in developing optimised sensor materials for smart windows for bioprocessing applications. This study focuses on combining novel sol-gel-based hybrid matrices with engineered luminescent complexes to produce stable luminescence-based optical sensors with enhanced sensitivity for a range of analytes including oxygen, pH and carbon dioxide. As well as optimising sensor performance, issues such as surface modification of the plastic substrate and compatibility with different deposition techniques were addressed. Hybrid sol-gel matrices were developed using a range of precursors including tetraethoxysilane (TEOS), methyltriethoxysilane (MTEOS), ethyltriethoxysilane (ETEOS), n-propyltriethoxysilane (PTEOS), phenyltriethoxysilane (PhTEOS), and n-octyltriethoxysilane (C8TEOS). Oxygen sensing, based on luminescence quenching of ruthenium phenanthroline complexes, has been realised with each of these hybrid materials. Furthermore, the possibility of immobilising pH-indicators for pH and carbon dioxide sensing has been investigated with some success. In the context of in-situ monitoring of bioprocesses, issues such as humidity interference as well as the chemical robustness of the multianalyte platform, were addressed.

  6. Optical technologies for space sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hu; Liu, Jie; Xue, Yaoke; Liu, Yang; Liu, Meiying; Wang, Lingguang; Yang, Shaodong; Lin, Shangmin; Chen, Su; Luo, Jianjun

    2015-10-01

    Space sensors are used in navigation sensor fields. The sun, the earth, the moon and other planets are used as frame of reference to obtain stellar position coordinates, and then to control the attitude of an aircraft. Being the "eyes" of the space sensors, Optical sensor system makes images of the infinite far stars and other celestial bodies. It directly affects measurement accuracy of the space sensor, indirectly affecting the data updating rate. Star sensor technology is the pilot for Space sensors. At present more and more attention is paid on all-day star sensor technology. By day and night measurements of the stars, the aircraft's attitude in the inertial coordinate system can be provided. Facing the requirements of ultra-high-precision, large field of view, wide spectral range, long life and high reliability, multi-functional optical system, we integration, integration optical sensors will be future space technology trends. In the meantime, optical technologies for space-sensitive research leads to the development of ultra-precision optical processing, optical and precision test machine alignment technology. It also promotes the development of long-life optical materials and applications. We have achieved such absolute distortion better than ±1um, Space life of at least 15years of space-sensitive optical system.

  7. A smart microelectromechanical sensor and switch triggered by gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchaala, Adam; Jaber, Nizar; Shekhah, Osama; Chernikova, Valeriya; Eddaoudi, Mohamed; Younis, Mohammad I.

    2016-07-01

    There is an increasing interest to realize smarter sensors and actuators that can deliver a multitude of sophisticated functionalities while being compact in size and of low cost. We report here combining both sensing and actuation on the same device based on a single microstructure. Specifically, we demonstrate a smart resonant gas (mass) sensor, which in addition to being capable of quantifying the amount of absorbed gas, can be autonomously triggered as an electrical switch upon exceeding a preset threshold of absorbed gas. Toward this, an electrostatically actuated polymer microbeam is fabricated and is then functionalized with a metal-organic framework, namely, HKUST-1. The microbeam is demonstrated to absorb vapors up to a certain threshold, after which is shown to collapse through the dynamic pull-in instability. Upon pull-in, the microstructure can be made to act as an electrical switch to achieve desirable actions, such as alarming.

  8. An Overview of the Smart Sensor Inter-agency Reference Testbench (SSIART)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, R. S.; Dufour, J.; Braham, S. P.; Barton, R. J.

    In this paper, we present an overview of a proposed collaboration between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the European Space Agency (ESA), which is designed to facilitate the introduction of commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) radios for smart-sensing applications into international spaceflight programs and projects. The proposed work will produce test hardware reference designs, test software reference architectures and example implementations, test plans in reference test environments, and test results, all of which will be shared between the agencies and documented for future use by mission planners. The proposed collaborative structure together with all of the anticipated tools and results produced under the effort is collectively referred to as the Smart Sensor Inter-agency Reference Testbench or SSIART. It is intended to provide guidance in technology selection and in increasing the related readiness levels of projects and missions as well as the space industry.

  9. An Overview of the Smart Sensor Inter-Agency Reference Testbench (SSIART)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, Raymond S.; Braham, Stephen P.; Dufour, Jean-Francois; Barton, Richard J.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we present an overview of a proposed collaboration between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the European Space Agency (ESA), which is designed to facilitate the introduction of commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) radios for smart-sensing applications into international spaceflight programs and projects. The proposed work will produce test hardware reference designs, test software reference architectures and example implementations, test plans in reference test environments, and test results, all of which will be shared between the agencies and documented for future use by mission planners. The proposed collaborative structure together with all of the anticipated tools and results produced under the effort is collectively referred to as the Smart Sensor Inter-agency Reference Testbench or SSIART. It is intended to provide guidance in technology selection and in increasing the related readiness levels of projects and missions as well as the space industry.

  10. An Overview of the Smart Sensor Inter-Agency Reference Testbench (SSIART)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, Raymond S.; Braham, Stephen P.; Dufour, Jean-Francois; Barton, Richard J.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we present an overview of a proposed collaboration between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the European Space Agency (ESA), which is designed to facilitate the introduction of commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) radios for smart-sensing applications into international spaceflight programs and projects. The proposed work will produce test hardware reference designs, test software reference architectures and example implementations, test plans in reference test environments, and test results, all of which will be shared between the agencies and documented for future use by mission planners. The proposed collaborative structure together with all of the anticipated tools and results produced under the effort is collectively referred to as the Smart Sensor Inter-agency Reference Testbench or SSIART. It is intended to provide guidance in technology selection and in increasing the related readiness levels of projects and missions as well as the space industry.

  11. Fully roll-to-roll gravure printable wireless (13.56 MHz) sensor-signage tags for smart packaging.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hwiwon; Park, Hyejin; Park, Yongsu; Jung, Minhoon; Kim, Byung Chul; Wallace, Gordon; Cho, Gyoujin

    2014-06-23

    Integration of sensing capabilities with an interactive signage through wireless communication is enabling the development of smart packaging wherein wireless (13.56 MHz) power transmission is used to interlock the smart packaging with a wireless (13.56 MHz) reader or a smart phone. Assembly of the necessary componentry for smart packaging on plastic or paper foils is limited by the manufacturing costs involved with Si based technologies. Here, the issue of manufacturing cost for smart packaging has been obviated by materials that allow R2R (roll-to-roll) gravure in combination with R2R coating processes to be employed. R2R gravure was used to print the wireless power transmission device, called rectenna (antenna, diode and capacitor), and humidity sensor on poly(ethylene terephtalate) (PET) films while electrochromic signage units were fabricated by R2R coating. The signage units were laminated with the R2R gravure printed rectenna and sensor to complete the prototype smart packaging.

  12. Smart healthcare textile sensor system for unhindered-pervasive health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Pratyush; Kumar, Prashanth S.; Oh, Sechang; Kwon, Hyeokjun; Mathur, Gyanesh N.; Varadan, Vijay K.; Agarwal, M. P.

    2012-04-01

    Simultaneous monitoring of physiological parameters- multi-lead Electrocardiograph (ECG), Heart rate variability, and blood pressure- is imperative to all forms of medical treatments. Using an array of signal recording devices imply that the patient will have to be confined to a bed. Textiles offer durable platform for embedded sensor and communication systems. The smart healthcare textile, presented here, is a mobile system for remote/wireless data recording and conditioning. The wireless textile system has been designed to monitor a patient in a non-obstructive way. It has a potential for facilitating point of care medicine and streamlining ambulatory medicine. The sensor systems were designed and fabricated with textile based components for easy integration on textile platform. An innovative plethysmographic blood pressure monitoring system was designed and tested as an alternative to inflatable blood pressure sphygmomanometer. Flexible dry electrodes technology was implemented for ECG. The sensor systems were tested and conditioned to daily activities of patients, which is not permissible with halter type systems. The signal quality was assessed for it applicability to medical diagnosis. The results were used to corroborate smart textile sensor system's ability to function as a point of care system that can provide quality healthcare.

  13. Context Aware Systems, Methods and Trends in Smart Home Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robles, Rosslin John; Kim, Tai-Hoon

    Context aware applications respond and adapt to changes in the computing environment. It is the concept of leveraging information about the end user to improve the quality of the interaction. New technologies in context-enriched services will use location, presence, social attributes, and other environmental information to anticipate an end user's immediate needs, offering more-sophisticated, situation-aware and usable functions. Smart homes connect all the devices and appliances in your home so they can communicate with each other and with you. Context-awareness can be applied to Smart Home technology. In this paper, we discuss the context-aware tools for development of Smart Home Systems.

  14. FPGA-based fused smart sensor for dynamic and vibration parameter extraction in industrial robot links.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Donate, Carlos; Morales-Velazquez, Luis; Osornio-Rios, Roque Alfredo; Herrera-Ruiz, Gilberto; de Jesus Romero-Troncoso, Rene

    2010-01-01

    Intelligent robotics demands the integration of smart sensors that allow the controller to efficiently measure physical quantities. Industrial manipulator robots require a constant monitoring of several parameters such as motion dynamics, inclination, and vibration. This work presents a novel smart sensor to estimate motion dynamics, inclination, and vibration parameters on industrial manipulator robot links based on two primary sensors: an encoder and a triaxial accelerometer. The proposed smart sensor implements a new methodology based on an oversampling technique, averaging decimation filters, FIR filters, finite differences and linear interpolation to estimate the interest parameters, which are computed online utilizing digital hardware signal processing based on field programmable gate arrays (FPGA).

  15. FPGA-Based Fused Smart Sensor for Dynamic and Vibration Parameter Extraction in Industrial Robot Links

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Donate, Carlos; Morales-Velazquez, Luis; Osornio-Rios, Roque Alfredo; Herrera-Ruiz, Gilberto; de Jesus Romero-Troncoso, Rene

    2010-01-01

    Intelligent robotics demands the integration of smart sensors that allow the controller to efficiently measure physical quantities. Industrial manipulator robots require a constant monitoring of several parameters such as motion dynamics, inclination, and vibration. This work presents a novel smart sensor to estimate motion dynamics, inclination, and vibration parameters on industrial manipulator robot links based on two primary sensors: an encoder and a triaxial accelerometer. The proposed smart sensor implements a new methodology based on an oversampling technique, averaging decimation filters, FIR filters, finite differences and linear interpolation to estimate the interest parameters, which are computed online utilizing digital hardware signal processing based on field programmable gate arrays (FPGA). PMID:22319345

  16. Applying Sensor Web Technology to Marine Sensor Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jirka, Simon; del Rio, Joaquin; Mihai Toma, Daniel; Nüst, Daniel; Stasch, Christoph; Delory, Eric

    2015-04-01

    In this contribution we present two activities illustrating how Sensor Web technology helps to enable a flexible and interoperable sharing of marine observation data based on standards. An important foundation is the Sensor Web Architecture developed by the European FP7 project NeXOS (Next generation Low-Cost Multifunctional Web Enabled Ocean Sensor Systems Empowering Marine, Maritime and Fisheries Management). This architecture relies on the Open Geospatial Consortium's (OGC) Sensor Web Enablement (SWE) framework. It is an exemplary solution for facilitating the interoperable exchange of marine observation data within and between (research) organisations. The architecture addresses a series of functional and non-functional requirements which are fulfilled through different types of OGC SWE components. The diverse functionalities offered by the NeXOS Sensor Web architecture are shown in the following overview: - Pull-based observation data download: This is achieved through the OGC Sensor Observation Service (SOS) 2.0 interface standard. - Push-based delivery of observation data to allow users the subscription to new measurements that are relevant for them: For this purpose there are currently several specification activities under evaluation (e.g. OGC Sensor Event Service, OGC Publish/Subscribe Standards Working Group). - (Web-based) visualisation of marine observation data: Implemented through SOS client applications. - Configuration and controlling of sensor devices: This is ensured through the OGC Sensor Planning Service 2.0 interface. - Bridging between sensors/data loggers and Sensor Web components: For this purpose several components such as the "Smart Electronic Interface for Sensor Interoperability" (SEISI) concept are developed; this is complemented by a more lightweight SOS extension (e.g. based on the W3C Efficient XML Interchange (EXI) format). To further advance this architecture, there is on-going work to develop dedicated profiles of selected OGC

  17. Design of external sensors board based on Bluetooth interface of smart phones for structural health monitoring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yan; Zhou, Yaping; Zhao, Xuefeng; Li, Dongsheng; Ou, Jinping

    2016-04-01

    As an important part of new information technology, the Internet of Things(IoT) is based on intelligent perception, recognition technology, ubiquitous computing, ubiquitous network integration, and it is known as the third wave of the development of information industry in the world after the computer and the Internet. And Smart Phones are the general term for a class of mobile phones with a separate operating system and operational memory, in which the third-party service programs including software, games, navigation, et.al, can be installed. Smart Phones, with not only sensors but also actuators, are widely used in the IoT world. As the current hot issues in the engineering area, Structural health monitoring (SHM) is also facing new problems about design ideas in the IoT environment. The development of IoT, wireless sensor network and mobile communication technology, provides a good technical platform for SHM. Based on these facts, this paper introduces a kind of new idea for Structural Health Monitoring using Smart Phones Technique. The system is described in detail, and the external sensor board based on Bluetooth interface is designed, the test based on Smart Phones is finished to validate the implementation and feasibility. The research is preliminary and more tests need to be carried out before it can be of practical use.

  18. Design of a smart superstructure FBG torsion sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miclos, Sorin; Savastru, Dan; Savastru, Roxana; Lancranjan, Ion I.

    2015-05-01

    The paper presents the results obtained in simulation of a Superstructure Fiber Bragg Grating (SFBG) torsion sensor. The SFBG sensor simulation points to an improved smart composite or metallic parts design to be operated under torsion loads in various applications. SFBG sensor simulation consists of correlating the fiber deformation under applied mechanical loads with the modified FBG characteristic reflection spectrum considering the polarization mode variations. The analyzed SFBG is developed by the selective deposition of on-fiber periodic metal thin films on regular FBGs. The torsion mechanical loads induced shifts in the characteristic reflection spectrum of Bragg wavelength and side bands are analyzed. For obtaining information about an optimal structure of SFBG sensor, simulation is performed for four commercially available photosensitive single mode silica optical fibers having different geometric and optical characteristics, mainly core and clad refractive index values. It is considered that, by using an UV writing technique, Brag gratings are induced into the simulated SFBG. Simulations are performed considering different geometric characteristics of the shaft used as mechanical mount of SFBG. The simulation results are in fairly good agreement with the experimental ones reported in literature.

  19. Smart Capture Modules for Direct Sensor-to-FPGA Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Oballe-Peinado, Óscar; Vidal-Verdú, Fernando; Sánchez-Durán, José A; Castellanos-Ramos, Julián; Hidalgo-López, José A

    2015-12-16

    Direct sensor-digital device interfaces measure time dependent variables of simple circuits to implement analog-to-digital conversion. Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) are devices whose hardware can be reconfigured to work in parallel. They usually do not have analog-to-digital converters, but have many general purpose I/O pins. Therefore, direct sensor-FPGA connection is a good choice in complex systems with many sensors because several capture modules can be implemented to perform parallel analog data acquisition. The possibility to work in parallel and with high frequency clock signals improves the bandwidth compared to sequential devices such as conventional microcontrollers. The price to pay is usually the resolution of measurements. This paper proposes capture modules implemented in an FPGA which are able to perform smart acquisition that filter noise and achieve high precision. A calibration technique is also proposed to improve accuracy. Resolutions of 12 effective number of bits are obtained for the reading of resistors in the range of an example piezoresistive tactile sensor.

  20. A CMOS Smart Temperature and Humidity Sensor with Combined Readout

    PubMed Central

    Eder, Clemens; Valente, Virgilio; Donaldson, Nick; Demosthenous, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    A fully-integrated complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) sensor for combined temperature and humidity measurements is presented. The main purpose of the device is to monitor the hermeticity of micro-packages for implanted integrated circuits and to ensure their safe operation by monitoring the operating temperature and humidity on-chip. The smart sensor has two modes of operation, in which either the temperature or humidity is converted into a digital code representing a frequency ratio between two oscillators. This ratio is determined by the ratios of the timing capacitances and bias currents in both oscillators. The reference oscillator is biased by a current whose temperature dependency is complementary to the proportional to absolute temperature (PTAT) current. For the temperature measurement, this results in an exceptional normalized sensitivity of about 0.77%/°C at the accepted expense of reduced linearity. The humidity sensor is a capacitor, whose value varies linearly with relative humidity (RH) with a normalized sensitivity of 0.055%/% RH. For comparison, two versions of the humidity sensor with an area of either 0.2 mm2 or 1.2 mm2 were fabricated in a commercial 0.18 μm CMOS process. The on-chip readout electronics operate from a 5 V power supply and consume a current of approximately 85 μA. PMID:25230305

  1. A CMOS smart temperature and humidity sensor with combined readout.

    PubMed

    Eder, Clemens; Valente, Virgilio; Donaldson, Nick; Demosthenous, Andreas

    2014-09-16

    A fully-integrated complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) sensor for combined temperature and humidity measurements is presented. The main purpose of the device is to monitor the hermeticity of micro-packages for implanted integrated circuits and to ensure their safe operation by monitoring the operating temperature and humidity on-chip. The smart sensor has two modes of operation, in which either the temperature or humidity is converted into a digital code representing a frequency ratio between two oscillators. This ratio is determined by the ratios of the timing capacitances and bias currents in both oscillators. The reference oscillator is biased by a current whose temperature dependency is complementary to the proportional to absolute temperature (PTAT) current. For the temperature measurement, this results in an exceptional normalized sensitivity of about 0.77%/°C at the accepted expense of reduced linearity. The humidity sensor is a capacitor, whose value varies linearly with relative humidity (RH) with a normalized sensitivity of 0.055%/% RH. For comparison, two versions of the humidity sensor with an area of either 0.2 mm2 or 1.2 mm2 were fabricated in a commercial 0.18 μm CMOS process. The on-chip readout electronics operate from a 5 V power supply and consume a current of approximately 85 µA.

  2. Privacy, technology, and norms: the case of Smart Meters.

    PubMed

    Horne, Christine; Darras, Brice; Bean, Elyse; Srivastava, Anurag; Frickel, Scott

    2015-05-01

    Norms shift and emerge in response to technological innovation. One such innovation is Smart Meters - components of Smart Grid energy systems capable of minute-to-minute transmission of consumer electricity use information. We integrate theory from sociological research on social norms and privacy to examine how privacy threats affect the demand for and expectations of norms that emerge in response to new technologies, using Smart Meters as a test case. Results from three vignette experiments suggest that increased threats to privacy created by Smart Meters are likely to provoke strong demand for and expectations of norms opposing the technology and that the strength of these normative rules is at least partly conditional on the context. Privacy concerns vary little with actors' demographic characteristics. These findings contribute to theoretical understanding of norm emergence and have practical implications for implementing privacy protections that effectively address concerns of electricity users. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Smart structures for application in ceramic barrier filter technology. Final report, August 1991--August 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Weinstein, S.J.; Lippert, T.E

    1994-12-01

    High temperature optical fiber sensors were developed to measure the in-service stressing that occurs in ceramic barrier filter systems. The optical fiber sensors were based on improvements to the sensor design developed under the DOE/METC Smart Structures for Fossil Energy Applications contract no. DE-AC21-89MC25159. In-house application testing of these sensors on both candle and cross-flow filters were performed in the Westinghouse Science and Technology Center High-Temperature, High-Pressure Filter Test Facility and the results analyzed. This report summarizes the sensor developments, methods to apply the sensors to the filters for in-situ testing, and the test results from the four in-house tests that were performed.

  4. Smart sensor-based geospatial architecture for dike monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herle, S.; Becker, R.; Blankenbach, J.

    2016-04-01

    Artificial hydraulic structures like dams or dikes used for water level regulations or flood prevention are continuously under the influence of the weather and variable river regimes. Thus, ongoing monitoring and simulation is crucial in order to determine the inner condition. Potentially life-threatening situations, in extreme case a failure, must be counteracted by all available means. Nowadays flood warning systems rely exclusively on water level forecast without considering the state of the structure itself. Area-covering continuous knowledge of the inner state including time dependent changes increases the capability of recognizing and locating vulnerable spots for early treatment. In case of a predicted breach, advance warning time for alerting affected citizens can be extended. Our approach is composed of smart sensors integrated in a service-oriented geospatial architecture to monitor and simulate artificial hydraulic structures continuously. The sensors observe the inner state of the construction like the soil moisture or the stress and deformation over time but also various external influences like water levels or wind speed. They are interconnected in distributed network architecture by a so-called sensor bus system based on lightweight protocols like Message Queue Telemetry Transport for Sensor Networks (MQTT-SN). These sensor data streams are transferred into an OGC Sensor Web Enablement (SWE) data structure providing high-level geo web services to end users. Bundled with 3rd party geo web services (WMS etc.) powerful processing and simulation tools can be invoked using the Web Processing Service (WPS) standard. Results will be visualized in a geoportal allowing user access to all information.

  5. A Field Programmable Gate Array-Based Reconfigurable Smart-Sensor Network for Wireless Monitoring of New Generation Computer Numerically Controlled Machines

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Tapia, Sandra Veronica; Vera-Salas, Luis Alberto; Osornio-Rios, Roque Alfredo; Dominguez-Gonzalez, Aurelio; Stiharu, Ion; de Jesus Romero-Troncoso, Rene

    2010-01-01

    Computer numerically controlled (CNC) machines have evolved to adapt to increasing technological and industrial requirements. To cover these needs, new generation machines have to perform monitoring strategies by incorporating multiple sensors. Since in most of applications the online Processing of the variables is essential, the use of smart sensors is necessary. The contribution of this work is the development of a wireless network platform of reconfigurable smart sensors for CNC machine applications complying with the measurement requirements of new generation CNC machines. Four different smart sensors are put under test in the network and their corresponding signal processing techniques are implemented in a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA)-based sensor node. PMID:22163602

  6. Image Sensors Enhance Camera Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    In the 1990s, a Jet Propulsion Laboratory team led by Eric Fossum researched ways of improving complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) image sensors in order to miniaturize cameras on spacecraft while maintaining scientific image quality. Fossum s team founded a company to commercialize the resulting CMOS active pixel sensor. Now called the Aptina Imaging Corporation, based in San Jose, California, the company has shipped over 1 billion sensors for use in applications such as digital cameras, camera phones, Web cameras, and automotive cameras. Today, one of every three cell phone cameras on the planet feature Aptina s sensor technology.

  7. Hybrid wireless smart sensor network for full-scale structural health monitoring of a cable-stayed bridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Hongki; Sim, Sung-Han; Mechitov, Kirill A.; Kim, Robin; Li, Jian; Moinzadeh, Parya; Spencer, B. F., Jr.; Park, Jong Woong; Cho, Soojin; Jung, Hyung-Jo; Yun, Chung-Bang; Rice, Jennifer A.; Nagayama, Tomonori

    2011-04-01

    Rapid advancement of sensor technology has been changing the paradigm of Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) toward a wireless smart sensor network (WSSN). While smart sensors have the potential to be a breakthrough to current SHM research and practice, the smart sensors also have several important issues to be resolved that may include robust power supply, stable communication, sensing capability, and in-network data processing algorithms. This study is a hybrid WSSN that addresses those issues to realize a full-scale SHM system for civil infrastructure monitoring. The developed hybrid WSSN is deployed on the Jindo Bridge, a cable-stayed bridge located in South Korea as a continued effort from the previous year's deployment. Unique features of the new deployment encompass: (1) the world's largest WSSN for SHM to date, (2) power harvesting enabled for all sensor nodes, (3) an improved sensing application that provides reliable data acquisition with optimized power consumption, (4) decentralized data aggregation that makes the WSSN scalable to a large, densely deployed sensor network, (5) decentralized cable tension monitoring specially designed for cable-stayed bridges, (6) environmental monitoring. The WSSN implementing all these features are experimentally verified through a long-term monitoring of the Jindo Bridge.

  8. Electron tunnel sensor technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, T. W.; Waltman, S. B.; Reynolds, J. K.; Kaiser, W. J.

    1991-01-01

    Researchers designed and constructed a novel electron tunnel sensor which takes advantage of the mechanical properties of micro-machined silicon. For the first time, electrostatic forces are used to control the tunnel electrode separation, thereby avoiding the thermal drift and noise problems associated with piezoelectric actuators. The entire structure is composed of micro-machined silicon single crystals, including a folded cantilever spring and a tip. The application of this sensor to the development of a sensitive accelerometer is described.

  9. Microencapsulation Technology for Corrosion Mitigation by Smart Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buhrow, Jerry; Li, Wenyan; Jolley, Scott; Calle, Luz M.

    2011-01-01

    A multifunctional, smart coating for the autonomous control of corrosion is being developed based on micro-encapsulation technology. Corrosion indicators as well as corrosion inhibitors have been incorporated into microcapsules, blended into several paint systems, and tested for corrosion detection and protection effectiveness. This paper summarizes the development, optimization, and testing of microcapsules specifically designed to be incorporated into a smart coating that will deliver corrosion inhibitors to mitigate corrosion autonomously. Key words: smart coating, corrosion inhibition, microencapsulation, microcapsule, pH sensitive microcapsule, corrosion inhibitor, corrosion protection pain

  10. A Genetic Algorithm Approach to Motion Sensor Placement in Smart Environments

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Brian L.; Crandall, Aaron S.; Cook, Diane J.

    2016-01-01

    Smart environments and ubiquitous computing technologies hold great promise for a wide range of real world applications. The medical community is particularly interested in high quality measurement of activities of daily living. With accurate computer modeling of older adults, decision support tools may be built to assist care providers. One aspect of effectively deploying these technologies is determining where the sensors should be placed in the home to effectively support these end goals. This work introduces and evaluates a set of approaches for generating sensor layouts in the home. These approaches range from the gold standard of human intuition-based placement to more advanced search algorithms, including Hill Climbing and Genetic Algorithms. The generated layouts are evaluated based on their ability to detect activities while minimizing the number of needed sensors. Sensor-rich environments can provide valuable insights about adults as they go about their lives. These sensors, once in place, provide information on daily behavior that can facilitate an aging-in-place approach to health care. PMID:27453810

  11. A Genetic Algorithm Approach to Motion Sensor Placement in Smart Environments.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Brian L; Crandall, Aaron S; Cook, Diane J

    2016-04-01

    Smart environments and ubiquitous computing technologies hold great promise for a wide range of real world applications. The medical community is particularly interested in high quality measurement of activities of daily living. With accurate computer modeling of older adults, decision support tools may be built to assist care providers. One aspect of effectively deploying these technologies is determining where the sensors should be placed in the home to effectively support these end goals. This work introduces and evaluates a set of approaches for generating sensor layouts in the home. These approaches range from the gold standard of human intuition-based placement to more advanced search algorithms, including Hill Climbing and Genetic Algorithms. The generated layouts are evaluated based on their ability to detect activities while minimizing the number of needed sensors. Sensor-rich environments can provide valuable insights about adults as they go about their lives. These sensors, once in place, provide information on daily behavior that can facilitate an aging-in-place approach to health care.

  12. ENABLING SMART MANUFACTURING TECHNOLOGIES FOR DECISION-MAKING SUPPORT.

    PubMed

    Helu, Moneer; Libes, Don; Lubell, Joshua; Lyons, Kevin; Morris, K C

    2016-01-01

    Smart manufacturing combines advanced manufacturing capabilities and digital technologies throughout the product lifecycle. These technologies can provide decision-making support to manufacturers through improved monitoring, analysis, modeling, and simulation that generate more and better intelligence about manufacturing systems. However, challenges and barriers have impeded the adoption of smart manufacturing technologies. To begin to address this need, this paper defines requirements for data-driven decision making in manufacturing based on a generalized description of decision making. Using these requirements, we then focus on identifying key barriers that prevent the development and use of data-driven decision making in industry as well as examples of technologies and standards that have the potential to overcome these barriers. The goal of this research is to promote a common understanding among the manufacturing community that can enable standardization efforts and innovation needed to continue adoption and use of smart manufacturing technologies.

  13. ENABLING SMART MANUFACTURING TECHNOLOGIES FOR DECISION-MAKING SUPPORT

    PubMed Central

    Helu, Moneer; Libes, Don; Lubell, Joshua; Lyons, Kevin; Morris, KC

    2017-01-01

    Smart manufacturing combines advanced manufacturing capabilities and digital technologies throughout the product lifecycle. These technologies can provide decision-making support to manufacturers through improved monitoring, analysis, modeling, and simulation that generate more and better intelligence about manufacturing systems. However, challenges and barriers have impeded the adoption of smart manufacturing technologies. To begin to address this need, this paper defines requirements for data-driven decision making in manufacturing based on a generalized description of decision making. Using these requirements, we then focus on identifying key barriers that prevent the development and use of data-driven decision making in industry as well as examples of technologies and standards that have the potential to overcome these barriers. The goal of this research is to promote a common understanding among the manufacturing community that can enable standardization efforts and innovation needed to continue adoption and use of smart manufacturing technologies. PMID:28649678

  14. Intelligent monitoring of seismic damage identification using wireless smart sensors: design and validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jinho; Jang, Young-Du; Jang, Won-rak

    2011-04-01

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) has been adopted as a technique to monitor the structure performance to detect damage in aging infrastructure. The ultimate goals of implementing an SHM system are to improve infrastructure maintenance, increase public safety, and minimize the economic impact of an extreme loading event by streamlining repair and retrofit measures. With the recent advances in wireless communication technology, wireless SHM systems have emerged as a promising alternative solution for rapid, accurate and low-cost structural monitoring. This article presents an enabling, developing damage algorithm to advance the detection and diagnosis of damage to structures for SHM using networks of wireless smart sensors. Networks of wireless smart sensors are being used as a vibration based structural monitoring network that allows extraction of mode shapes from output-only vibration data from an underground structure. The mode shape information can further be used in modal methods of damage detection. These sensors are being used to experimentally verify analytical models of post-earthquake evaluation based on system identification analysis. Damage measurement system could play a significant role in monitoring/recording with a higher level of completeness the actual seismic response of structures and in non-destructive seismic damage assessment techniques based on dynamic signature analysis.

  15. Characterization of integrated fiber optic sensors in smart textiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Jianming; El-Sherif, Mahmoud A.; Khalil, Saif; Fairneny, James

    2004-03-01

    Smart textiles with integrated fiber optic sensors have been studied for various applications including in-situ measurement of load/deformation on the textiles. Two types of silica multimode optical fibers were successfully integrated into 4/4 Twill-woven and Plain-woven textiles along the warp direction of the textile structures for sensing of applied load conditions. The sensing mechanism is based on the MPD (Modal Power Distribution) technique, which employs the principle of intensity modulation based on modal power redistribution of the propagating light within multimode fibers caused by external perturbations. In the presence of transverse load applied to an integrated optical fiber, the redistribution of the modal power is an indication of the applied load. The spatial modal power redistribution was clearly recorded as a function of the optical intensity profile. Based on the uni-axial tensile test results, the relationship between the mechanical behavior of the textile and the output of the embedded fiber-optic sensor was established and understood. It is clearly demonstrated that the sensitivity and dynamic range of this type of intensity-based sensor is determined by the interaction between the fabric yarns and optical fibers, which are closely related with the textile structure and the type of optical fiber.

  16. Triboluminescent Materials for Smart Optical Damage Sensors for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aggarwal, M. D.; Penn, B. G.; Miller, J.; Sadate, S.; Batra, A. K.

    2008-01-01

    There is a need to develop a new technique of damage detection for composites, which could detect cracking or delamination from any desired location within a material structure in real time. Recently, triboluminescent materials have been proposed as smart sensors of structural damage. To sense the damage, these materials can be epoxy bonded, coated in a polymer matrix, or embedded in a composite host structure. When the damage or fracture takes place in the host structure, the resultant fracture of triboluminescent crystals creates a light emission. This will warn in real time that structural damage has occurred. The triboluminescent emission of the candidate phosphor has to be bright enough that the light reaching from the point of fracture to the detector through a fiber optic cable is detectable. There are a large number of triboluminescent materials, but few satisfy the above criterion. The authors have synthesized an organic material known as Europium tetrakis (dibenzoylmethide) triethylammonium (EuD4TEA), which is a potential candidate for application as a damage sensor and could be made into a wireless sensor with the addition of microchip, antenna, and electronics. Preliminary results on the synthesis and characterization of this material are presented.

  17. A Framework for Intelligent Rocket Test Facilities with Smart Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Figueroa, Fernando; Solano, Wanda; Morris, Jon; Mandayam, Shreekanth; Polikar, Robi

    2003-01-01

    A long-term center goal at the John C. Stennis Space Center (SSC) is the formulation and implementation of a framework for an Intelligent Rocket Test Facility (IRTF), which incorporates distributed smart sensor elements. The IRTF is to provide reliable, high-confident measurements. Specific objectives include: 1. Definition of a framework and architecture that supports implementation of highly autonomous methodologies founded on basic physical principles and embedded knowledge. 2. Modeling of autonomous sensors and processes as self-sufficient, evolutionary elements. 3. Development of appropriate communications protocols to enable the complex interactions that must take place to allow timely and high-quality flow of of information among all the autonomous elements of the system. 4. Development of lab-scale prototypes of key system elements. Though our application is next-generation rocket test facilities, applications for the approach are much wider and include monitoring of shuttle launch operations, air and spacecraft operations and health monitoring, and other large-scale industrial system operations such as found in processing and manufacturing plans. Elements of prototype IRTF have been implemented in preparation for advanced development and validation using rocket test stand facilities as SSC. This work has identified issues that are important to further development of complex network and should be of interest to other working with sensor networks.

  18. Smart Capture Modules for Direct Sensor-to-FPGA Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Oballe-Peinado, Óscar; Vidal-Verdú, Fernando; Sánchez-Durán, José A.; Castellanos-Ramos, Julián; Hidalgo-López, José A.

    2015-01-01

    Direct sensor–digital device interfaces measure time dependent variables of simple circuits to implement analog-to-digital conversion. Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) are devices whose hardware can be reconfigured to work in parallel. They usually do not have analog-to-digital converters, but have many general purpose I/O pins. Therefore, direct sensor-FPGA connection is a good choice in complex systems with many sensors because several capture modules can be implemented to perform parallel analog data acquisition. The possibility to work in parallel and with high frequency clock signals improves the bandwidth compared to sequential devices such as conventional microcontrollers. The price to pay is usually the resolution of measurements. This paper proposes capture modules implemented in an FPGA which are able to perform smart acquisition that filter noise and achieve high precision. A calibration technique is also proposed to improve accuracy. Resolutions of 12 effective number of bits are obtained for the reading of resistors in the range of an example piezoresistive tactile sensor. PMID:26694403

  19. Decentralized system identification using stochastic subspace identification on wireless smart sensor networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sim, Sung-Han; Spencer, Billie F., Jr.; Park, Jongwoong; Jung, Hyungjo

    2012-04-01

    Wireless Smart Sensor Networks (WSSNs) facilitates a new paradigm to structural identification and monitoring for civil infrastructure. Conventional monitoring systems based on wired sensors and centralized data acquisition and processing have been considered to be challenging and costly due to cabling and expensive equipment and maintenance costs. WSSNs have emerged as a technology that can overcome such difficulties, making deployment of a dense array of sensors on large civil structures both feasible and economical. However, as opposed to wired sensor networks in which centralized data acquisition and processing is common practice, WSSNs require decentralized computing algorithms to reduce data transmission due to the limitation associated with wireless communication. Thus, several system identification methods have been implemented to process sensor data and extract essential information, including Natural Excitation Technique with Eigensystem Realization Algorithm, Frequency Domain Decomposition (FDD), and Random Decrement Technique (RDT); however, Stochastic Subspace Identification (SSI) has not been fully utilized in WSSNs, while SSI has the strong potential to enhance the system identification. This study presents a decentralized system identification using SSI in WSSNs. The approach is implemented on MEMSIC's Imote2 sensor platform and experimentally verified using a 5-story shear building model.

  20. Smart Technology Brings Power to the People

    SciTech Connect

    Hammerstrom, Donald J.; Gephart, Julie M.

    2006-12-01

    Imagine you’re at home one Saturday morning on the computer, as your son takes a shower, your daughter is watching TV, and a load of laundry is in your washer and dryer. Meanwhile, the fragrance of fresh-brewed coffee fills the house. You hear a momentary beep from the dryer that tells you that if you were to look, a high-energy price indicator would be displayed on the front panels of some of your favorite appliances. This tells you that you could save money right now by using less energy. (You’ve agreed to this arrangement to help your utility avoid a substation upgrade. In return, you get a lower rate most of the time.) So you turn off some of the unneeded lights in your home and opt to wait until evening to run the dishwasher. Meanwhile, some of your largest appliances have automatically responded to this signal and have already reduced your home’s energy consumption, saving you money. On January 11, 2006, demonstration projects were launched in 200 homes in the Pacific Northwest region of the United States to test and speed adoption of new smart grid technologies that can make the power grid more resilient and efficient. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, a U.S. Department of Energy national laboratory in Richland, Washington, is managing the yearlong study called the Pacific Northwest GridWise™ Testbed Demonstration, a project funded primarily by DOE. Through the GridWise™ Demonstration projects, researchers are gaining insight into energy consumers’ behavior while testing new technologies designed to bring the electric transmission system into the information age. Northwest utilities, appliance manufacturers and technology companies are also supporting this effort to demonstrate the devices and assess the resulting consumer response. A combination of devices, software and advanced analytical tools will give homeowners more information about their energy use and cost, and we want to know if this will modify their behavior. Approximately 100

  1. Acousto-optic imaging with a smart-pixels sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barjean, K.; Contreras, K.; Laudereau, J.-B.; Tinet, E.; Ettori, D.; Ramaz, F.; Tualle, J.-M.

    2015-03-01

    Acousto-optic imaging (AOI) is an emerging technique in the field of biomedical optics which combines the optical contrast allowed by diffuse optical tomography with the resolution of ultrasound (US) imaging. In this work we report the implementation, for that purpose, of a CMOS smart-pixels sensor dedicated to the real-time analysis of speckle patterns. We implemented a highly sensitive lock-in detection in each pixel in order to extract the tagged photons after an appropriate in-pixel post-processing. With this system we can acquire images in scattering samples with a spatial resolution in the 2mm range, with an integration time compatible with the dynamic of living biological tissue.

  2. Unlocking the potential of smart grid technologies with behavioral science

    DOE PAGES

    Sintov, Nicole D.; Schultz, P. Wesley

    2015-04-09

    Smart grid systems aim to provide a more stable and adaptable electricity infrastructure, and to maximize energy efficiency. Grid-linked technologies vary widely in form and function, but generally share common potentials: to reduce energy consumption via efficiency and/or curtailment, to shift use to off-peak times of day, and to enable distributed storage and generation options. Although end users are central players in these systems, they are sometimes not central considerations in technology or program design, and in some cases, their motivations for participating in such systems are not fully appreciated. Behavioral science can be instrumental in engaging end-users and maximizingmore » the impact of smart grid technologies. In this study, we present emerging technologies made possible by a smart grid infrastructure, and for each we highlight ways in which behavioral science can be applied to enhance their impact on energy savings.« less

  3. Unlocking the potential of smart grid technologies with behavioral science

    PubMed Central

    Sintov, Nicole D.; Schultz, P. Wesley

    2015-01-01

    Smart grid systems aim to provide a more stable and adaptable electricity infrastructure, and to maximize energy efficiency. Grid-linked technologies vary widely in form and function, but generally share common potentials: to reduce energy consumption via efficiency and/or curtailment, to shift use to off-peak times of day, and to enable distributed storage and generation options. Although end users are central players in these systems, they are sometimes not central considerations in technology or program design, and in some cases, their motivations for participating in such systems are not fully appreciated. Behavioral science can be instrumental in engaging end-users and maximizing the impact of smart grid technologies. In this paper, we present emerging technologies made possible by a smart grid infrastructure, and for each we highlight ways in which behavioral science can be applied to enhance their impact on energy savings. PMID:25914666

  4. Unlocking the potential of smart grid technologies with behavioral science

    SciTech Connect

    Sintov, Nicole D.; Schultz, P. Wesley

    2015-04-09

    Smart grid systems aim to provide a more stable and adaptable electricity infrastructure, and to maximize energy efficiency. Grid-linked technologies vary widely in form and function, but generally share common potentials: to reduce energy consumption via efficiency and/or curtailment, to shift use to off-peak times of day, and to enable distributed storage and generation options. Although end users are central players in these systems, they are sometimes not central considerations in technology or program design, and in some cases, their motivations for participating in such systems are not fully appreciated. Behavioral science can be instrumental in engaging end-users and maximizing the impact of smart grid technologies. In this study, we present emerging technologies made possible by a smart grid infrastructure, and for each we highlight ways in which behavioral science can be applied to enhance their impact on energy savings.

  5. Unlocking the potential of smart grid technologies with behavioral science.

    PubMed

    Sintov, Nicole D; Schultz, P Wesley

    2015-01-01

    Smart grid systems aim to provide a more stable and adaptable electricity infrastructure, and to maximize energy efficiency. Grid-linked technologies vary widely in form and function, but generally share common potentials: to reduce energy consumption via efficiency and/or curtailment, to shift use to off-peak times of day, and to enable distributed storage and generation options. Although end users are central players in these systems, they are sometimes not central considerations in technology or program design, and in some cases, their motivations for participating in such systems are not fully appreciated. Behavioral science can be instrumental in engaging end-users and maximizing the impact of smart grid technologies. In this paper, we present emerging technologies made possible by a smart grid infrastructure, and for each we highlight ways in which behavioral science can be applied to enhance their impact on energy savings.

  6. A Reliable TTP-Based Infrastructure with Low Sensor Resource Consumption for the Smart Home Multi-Platform.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jungho; Kim, Mansik; Park, Jong Hyuk

    2016-07-05

    With the ICT technology making great progress in the smart home environment, the ubiquitous environment is rapidly emerging all over the world, but problems are also increasing proportionally to the rapid growth of the smart home market such as multiplatform heterogeneity and new security threats. In addition, the smart home sensors have so low computing resources that they cannot process complicated computation tasks, which is required to create a proper security environment. A service provider also faces overhead in processing data from a rapidly increasing number of sensors. This paper aimed to propose a scheme to build infrastructure in which communication entities can securely authenticate and design security channel with physically unclonable PUFs and the TTP that smart home communication entities can rely on. In addition, we analyze and evaluate the proposed scheme for security and performance and prove that it can build secure channels with low resources. Finally, we expect that the proposed scheme can be helpful for secure communication with low resources in future smart home multiplatforms.

  7. A Reliable TTP-Based Infrastructure with Low Sensor Resource Consumption for the Smart Home Multi-Platform

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jungho; Kim, Mansik; Park, Jong Hyuk

    2016-01-01

    With the ICT technology making great progress in the smart home environment, the ubiquitous environment is rapidly emerging all over the world, but problems are also increasing proportionally to the rapid growth of the smart home market such as multiplatform heterogeneity and new security threats. In addition, the smart home sensors have so low computing resources that they cannot process complicated computation tasks, which is required to create a proper security environment. A service provider also faces overhead in processing data from a rapidly increasing number of sensors. This paper aimed to propose a scheme to build infrastructure in which communication entities can securely authenticate and design security channel with physically unclonable PUFs and the TTP that smart home communication entities can rely on. In addition, we analyze and evaluate the proposed scheme for security and performance and prove that it can build secure channels with low resources. Finally, we expect that the proposed scheme can be helpful for secure communication with low resources in future smart home multiplatforms. PMID:27399699

  8. Palo Alto Research Center - Smart Embedded Network of Sensors with an Optical Readout

    SciTech Connect

    Raghavan, Ajay; Sahu, Saroj; Bringans, Ross; Johnson, Noble; Kiesel, Peter; Saha, Bhaskar

    2014-03-07

    PARC is developing new fiber optic sensors that would be embedded into batteries to monitor and measure key internal parameters during charge and discharge cycles. Two significant problems with today's best batteries are their lack of internal monitoring capabilities and their design oversizing. The lack of monitoring interferes with the ability to identify and manage performance or safety issues as they arise, which are presently managed by very conservative design oversizing and protection approaches that result in cost inefficiencies. PARC's design combines low-cost, embedded optical battery sensors and smart algorithms to overcome challenges faced by today's best battery management systems. These advanced fiber optic sensing technologies have the potential to dramatically improve the safety, performance, and life-time of energy storage systems.

  9. Palo Alto Research Center - Smart Embedded Network of Sensors with an Optical Readout

    ScienceCinema

    Raghavan, Ajay; Sahu, Saroj; Bringans, Ross; Johnson, Noble; Kiesel, Peter; Saha, Bhaskar

    2016-07-12

    PARC is developing new fiber optic sensors that would be embedded into batteries to monitor and measure key internal parameters during charge and discharge cycles. Two significant problems with today's best batteries are their lack of internal monitoring capabilities and their design oversizing. The lack of monitoring interferes with the ability to identify and manage performance or safety issues as they arise, which are presently managed by very conservative design oversizing and protection approaches that result in cost inefficiencies. PARC's design combines low-cost, embedded optical battery sensors and smart algorithms to overcome challenges faced by today's best battery management systems. These advanced fiber optic sensing technologies have the potential to dramatically improve the safety, performance, and life-time of energy storage systems.

  10. SMART-1 technology preparation for future planetary missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marini, A. E.; Racca, G. D.; Foing, B. H.

    SMART-1 is the first ESA Small Mission for Advanced Research in Technology, with the prime objective of demonstrating the use of Solar Electric Primary Propulsion in a planetary mission. Further to this, SMART-1 will test novel spacecraft technologies and will host six instruments carrying out nine technology and science experiments, all aimed at preparing future ESA Cornerstones, including the ESA Mercury Cornerstone (now named BepiColombo) and other future planetary missions under study, as well as solar and fundamental physics missions.

  11. Generic microelectronic smart sensor platform for detection of toxic, hazardous, and flammable gases

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, J.; Corbett, W.; Montague, S.; Knoll, M.; McWhorter, P.

    1993-07-01

    Extensive work has been performed in the past which demonstrates that various metal alloys can be used to detect different toxic, hazardous, and flammable gases. Work has been performed using Pd, Pt, Ir, PdNi, PdAg and Pt/Pd for detecting things such as Hydrogen, Hydrazine, Hydrogen Sulfide, Deuterium, Tritium, Ethanol and Hexane. Perhaps the most familiar is the use of Pd and PdNi for the detection of Hydrogen. These devices work by examining the effect of the gases on the material properties of the metal alloys. Two of the most common material properties examined in these sensors are the resistance of thin film resistors, and the flatband or threshold voltage shifts of MOS structures fabricated with a particular alloy as the gate material. While research into these sensing techniques has shown much promise, few manufacturable, fieldable devices have resulted. These sensing techniques are prone to drift problems due to temperature variations, and typically have large sample to sample variations in performance due to process control issues. Typically, these sensors require significant external instrumentation for measurement and control, making the systems large and expensive. Sandia National Laboratories has designed, fabricated and demonstrated complete functionality of a generic microelectronic based smart sensor platform intended to effectively exploit the research mentioned above into high performance, manufacturable, fieldable devices. This smart sensor platform technology fabricates 2 {mu}m CMOS digital and analog control electronics, sensing elements, and temperature control elements on the same silicon integrated circuit. Our initial demonstration of this technology incorporates PdNi as the sensing alloy for the detection of hydrogen.

  12. Smart Desktops for Teachers. ECS Issue Paper: Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palaich, Robert M.; Good, Dixie Griffin; Stout, Connie; Vickery, Emily

    This report presents the results of a study of how emerging technologies can help educators deliver standards-based education to K-12 students. The first section of the report provides background on the new technology offerings and defines smart desktop systems. The second section lists critical questions for decisionmakers related to general…

  13. Living in a Smart World with Smart Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tech Directions, 2006

    2006-01-01

    Baltimore is an American success story. Since the redevelopment of the Inner Harbor in the late 1970s, Baltimore has set the standard for urban renewal and is now rated as one of the top 10 summer destinations in the world. This year, the city will host the 68th Annual International Technology Education Association (ITEA) Conference. The…

  14. Living in a Smart World with Smart Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tech Directions, 2006

    2006-01-01

    Baltimore is an American success story. Since the redevelopment of the Inner Harbor in the late 1970s, Baltimore has set the standard for urban renewal and is now rated as one of the top 10 summer destinations in the world. This year, the city will host the 68th Annual International Technology Education Association (ITEA) Conference. The…

  15. Control systems using modal domain optical fiber sensors for smart structure applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindner, Douglas K.; Reichard, Karl M.

    1991-01-01

    Recently, a new class of sensors has emerged for structural control which respond to environmental changes over a significant gauge length; these sensors are called distributed-effect sensors. These sensors can be fabricated with spatially varying sensitivity to the distributed measurand, and can be configured to measure a variety of structural parameters which can not be measured directly using point sensors. Examples of distributed-effect sensors include piezoelectric film, holographic sensors, and modal domain optical fiber sensors. Optical fiber sensors are particularly attractive for smart structure applications because they are flexible, have low mass, and can easily be embedded directly into materials. In this paper we describe the implementation of weighted modal domain optical fiber sensors. The mathematical model of the modal domain optical fiber sensor model is described and used to derive an expression for the sensor sensitivity. The effects of parameter variations on the sensor sensitivity are demonstrated to illustrate methods of spatially varying the sensor sensitivity.

  16. Control systems using modal domain optical fiber sensors for smart structure applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindner, Douglas K.; Reichard, Karl M.

    1991-01-01

    Recently, a new class of sensors has emerged for structural control which respond to environmental changes over a significant gauge length; these sensors are called distributed-effect sensors. These sensors can be fabricated with spatially varying sensitivity to the distributed measurand, and can be configured to measure a variety of structural parameters which can not be measured directly using point sensors. Examples of distributed-effect sensors include piezoelectric film, holographic sensors, and modal domain optical fiber sensors. Optical fiber sensors are particularly attractive for smart structure applications because they are flexible, have low mass, and can easily be embedded directly into materials. In this paper we describe the implementation of weighted modal domain optical fiber sensors. The mathematical model of the modal domain optical fiber sensor model is described and used to derive an expression for the sensor sensitivity. The effects of parameter variations on the sensor sensitivity are demonstrated to illustrate methods of spatially varying the sensor sensitivity.

  17. Multiple sensor smart robot hand with force control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Killion, Richard R.; Robinson, Lee R.; Bejczy, Antal

    1987-01-01

    A smart robot hand developed at JPL for the Protoflight Manipulator Arm (PFMA) is described. The development of this smart hand was based on an integrated design and subsystem architecture by considering mechanism, electronics, sensing, control, display, and operator interface in an integrated design approach. The mechanical details of this smart hand and the overall subsystem are described elsewhere. The sensing and electronics components of the JPL/PFMA smart hand are summarized and it is described in some detail in control capabilities.

  18. Investigating coarse sediment particles transport using PTV and "smart-pebbles" instrumented with inertial sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valyrakis, Manousos; Farhadi, Hamed

    2017-04-01

    This study, reports on the analysis of appropriately designed fluvial experiments investigating the transport of coarse bed material using two approaches: particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) to extract bulk transport parameters and inertia sensor data (via the use of "smart-pebbles") to obtain refined statistics for the transport of the particle. The purpose of this study is to provide further insight on the use of technologies (optical techniques and inertial sensors) that are complementary one to another, towards producing improved estimates of bedload transport in natural rivers. The experiments are conducted in the Water Engineering Lab at the University of Glasgow on a tilting recirculating flume with 90 cm width. Ten different discharges have been implemented in this study. A couple of fake beds, made of well-packed beads of three different sizes have been set up in the flume. The particle motion is captured by two high-speed commercial cameras, responsible for recording the top view covering the full length of the fake beds over which the "smart-pebble" is allowed to be transported. "Smart-pebbles" of four different densities are initially located at the upstream end of the configuration, fully exposed to the instream flow. These are instrumented with appropriate inertial sensors that allow recording the particle's motion, in the Langrangian frame, in high resolution. Specifically, the "smart-pebble" employ a tri-axial gyroscope, magnetometer and accelerometer, which are utilized to obtain minute linear and angular displacements in high frequency (up to 200Hz). However, these are not enough to accurately reconstruct the full trajectory of the particles rolling downstream. To that goal optical methods are used. In particular, by using particle tracking velocimetry data and image processing techniques, the location, orientation and velocities of the "smart-pebble" are derived. Specific consideration is given to appropriately preprocess the obtained video, as

  19. The damage assessment methodology in cooperation with smart sensors and inspection robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitta, Yoshihiro; Ishida, Masami; Onai, Toshio; Watakabe, Morimasa; Nishitani, Akira; Matsui, Chisa

    2014-03-01

    This paper proposes a damage assessment methodology for the non-structural elements, especially the ceiling, in cooperation with the smart sensors and the inspection blimp robot with the Wi-Fi camera. The developed smart sensors use the infrared LEDs in sending the measured data to the inspection blimp robot. The inspection blimp robot integrated in the proposed system has a Wi-Fi camera and an infrared remote control receiver for receiving the data from the smart sensor. In the proposed methodology, the distributed smart sensors firstly detect the damage occurrence. Next, the inspection blimp robots can gather the data from the smart sensors, which transmit the measured data by using an infrared remote control receiver and LED signals. The inspection blimp robot also can inspect the damage location and captures the photographic image of the damage condition. The inspection blimp robot will be able to estimate the damage condition without any process of engineers' on-site-inspection involved. To demonstrate the effectiveness of the inspection blimp robot, the blimp robot is utilized to estimate the aging ceiling of a real structure. For demonstrating the feasibility or possibility of the proposed damage assessment methodology in cooperation with the smart sensors and the inspection blimp robot, the conceptual laboratory experiment is conducted. The proposed methodology will provide valuable information for the repair and maintenance decision making of a damaged structure.

  20. Design and Implementation of a Smart Home System Using Multisensor Data Fusion Technology

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Po-Huan; Chang, Hsing-Cheng; Lin, Shyan-Lung; Yang, Shih-Chin; Su, Heng-Yi; Chang, Chih-Chien; Cheng, Yuan-Sheng; Kuo, Yu-Chen

    2017-01-01

    This paper aims to develop a multisensor data fusion technology-based smart home system by integrating wearable intelligent technology, artificial intelligence, and sensor fusion technology. We have developed the following three systems to create an intelligent smart home environment: (1) a wearable motion sensing device to be placed on residents’ wrists and its corresponding 3D gesture recognition algorithm to implement a convenient automated household appliance control system; (2) a wearable motion sensing device mounted on a resident’s feet and its indoor positioning algorithm to realize an effective indoor pedestrian navigation system for smart energy management; (3) a multisensor circuit module and an intelligent fire detection and alarm algorithm to realize a home safety and fire detection system. In addition, an intelligent monitoring interface is developed to provide in real-time information about the smart home system, such as environmental temperatures, CO concentrations, communicative environmental alarms, household appliance status, human motion signals, and the results of gesture recognition and indoor positioning. Furthermore, an experimental testbed for validating the effectiveness and feasibility of the smart home system was built and verified experimentally. The results showed that the 3D gesture recognition algorithm could achieve recognition rates for automated household appliance control of 92.0%, 94.8%, 95.3%, and 87.7% by the 2-fold cross-validation, 5-fold cross-validation, 10-fold cross-validation, and leave-one-subject-out cross-validation strategies. For indoor positioning and smart energy management, the distance accuracy and positioning accuracy were around 0.22% and 3.36% of the total traveled distance in the indoor environment. For home safety and fire detection, the classification rate achieved 98.81% accuracy for determining the conditions of the indoor living environment. PMID:28714884

  1. Design and Implementation of a Smart Home System Using Multisensor Data Fusion Technology.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Yu-Liang; Chou, Po-Huan; Chang, Hsing-Cheng; Lin, Shyan-Lung; Yang, Shih-Chin; Su, Heng-Yi; Chang, Chih-Chien; Cheng, Yuan-Sheng; Kuo, Yu-Chen

    2017-07-15

    This paper aims to develop a multisensor data fusion technology-based smart home system by integrating wearable intelligent technology, artificial intelligence, and sensor fusion technology. We have developed the following three systems to create an intelligent smart home environment: (1) a wearable motion sensing device to be placed on residents' wrists and its corresponding 3D gesture recognition algorithm to implement a convenient automated household appliance control system; (2) a wearable motion sensing device mounted on a resident's feet and its indoor positioning algorithm to realize an effective indoor pedestrian navigation system for smart energy management; (3) a multisensor circuit module and an intelligent fire detection and alarm algorithm to realize a home safety and fire detection system. In addition, an intelligent monitoring interface is developed to provide in real-time information about the smart home system, such as environmental temperatures, CO concentrations, communicative environmental alarms, household appliance status, human motion signals, and the results of gesture recognition and indoor positioning. Furthermore, an experimental testbed for validating the effectiveness and feasibility of the smart home system was built and verified experimentally. The results showed that the 3D gesture recognition algorithm could achieve recognition rates for automated household appliance control of 92.0%, 94.8%, 95.3%, and 87.7% by the 2-fold cross-validation, 5-fold cross-validation, 10-fold cross-validation, and leave-one-subject-out cross-validation strategies. For indoor positioning and smart energy management, the distance accuracy and positioning accuracy were around 0.22% and 3.36% of the total traveled distance in the indoor environment. For home safety and fire detection, the classification rate achieved 98.81% accuracy for determining the conditions of the indoor living environment.

  2. Information and Communication Technology and Electric Vehicles — Paving the Way towards a Smart Community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mase, Kenichi

    A smart community can be considered an essential component to realize a sustainable, low-carbon, and disaster-tolerant society, thereby providing a base for community inhabitants to lead a simple, healthy, and energy-saving way of life as well as ensuring safety, security, and a high quality-of-life in the community. In particular, a smart community can be essential for senior citizens in an aging society. Smart community enablers such as information and communication technology (ICT) and electric vehicles (EVs) can perform essential roles to realize a smart community. With regard to ICT, the necessity of a dedicated wireless sensor backbone has been identified. With regard to EV, a small-sized EV with one or two seats (Mini-EV) has been identified as an emerging player to support personal daily mobility in an aged society. The Mini-EV may be powered by a solar battery, thereby mitigating vehicular maintenance burden for the elderly. It is essential to realize a dependable ICT network and communication service for a smart community. In the study, we present the concept of trans-locatable design to achieve this goal. The two possible roles of EVs in contributing to a dependable ICT network are highlighted; these include EV charging of the batteries of the base stations in the network, and the creation of a Mini-EV based ad-hoc network that can enable applications such as safe driving assistance and secure neighborhoods.

  3. Automated Assessment of Cognitive Health Using Smart Home Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Dawadi, Prafulla N.; Cook, Diane J.; Schmitter-Edgecombe, Maureen; Parsey, Carolyn

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND The goal of this work is to develop intelligent systems to monitor the well being of individuals in their home environments. OBJECTIVE This paper introduces a machine learning-based method to automatically predict activity quality in smart homes and automatically assess cognitive health based on activity quality. METHODS This paper describes an automated framework to extract set of features from smart home sensors data that reflects the activity performance or ability of an individual to complete an activity which can be input to machine learning algorithms. Output from learning algorithms including principal component analysis, support vector machine, and logistic regression algorithms are used to quantify activity quality for a complex set of smart home activities and predict cognitive health of participants. RESULTS Smart home activity data was gathered from volunteer participants (n=263) who performed a complex set of activities in our smart home testbed. We compare our automated activity quality prediction and cognitive health prediction with direct observation scores and health assessment obtained from neuropsychologists. With all samples included, we obtained statistically significant correlation (r=0.54) between direct observation scores and predicted activity quality. Similarly, using a support vector machine classifier, we obtained reasonable classification accuracy (area under the ROC curve = 0.80, g-mean = 0.73) in classifying participants into two different cognitive classes, dementia and cognitive healthy. CONCLUSIONS The results suggest that it is possible to automatically quantify the task quality of smart home activities and perform limited assessment of the cognitive health of individual if smart home activities are properly chosen and learning algorithms are appropriately trained. PMID:23949177

  4. Automated assessment of cognitive health using smart home technologies.

    PubMed

    Dawadi, Prafulla N; Cook, Diane J; Schmitter-Edgecombe, Maureen; Parsey, Carolyn

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this work is to develop intelligent systems to monitor the wellbeing of individuals in their home environments. This paper introduces a machine learning-based method to automatically predict activity quality in smart homes and automatically assess cognitive health based on activity quality. This paper describes an automated framework to extract set of features from smart home sensors data that reflects the activity performance or ability of an individual to complete an activity which can be input to machine learning algorithms. Output from learning algorithms including principal component analysis, support vector machine, and logistic regression algorithms are used to quantify activity quality for a complex set of smart home activities and predict cognitive health of participants. Smart home activity data was gathered from volunteer participants (n=263) who performed a complex set of activities in our smart home testbed. We compare our automated activity quality prediction and cognitive health prediction with direct observation scores and health assessment obtained from neuropsychologists. With all samples included, we obtained statistically significant correlation (r=0.54) between direct observation scores and predicted activity quality. Similarly, using a support vector machine classifier, we obtained reasonable classification accuracy (area under the ROC curve=0.80, g-mean=0.73) in classifying participants into two different cognitive classes, dementia and cognitive healthy. The results suggest that it is possible to automatically quantify the task quality of smart home activities and perform limited assessment of the cognitive health of individual if smart home activities are properly chosen and learning algorithms are appropriately trained.

  5. A FPGA embedded web server for remote monitoring and control of smart sensors networks.

    PubMed

    Magdaleno, Eduardo; Rodríguez, Manuel; Pérez, Fernando; Hernández, David; García, Enrique

    2013-12-27

    This article describes the implementation of a web server using an embedded Altera NIOS II IP core, a general purpose and configurable RISC processor which is embedded in a Cyclone FPGA. The processor uses the μCLinux operating system to support a Boa web server of dynamic pages using Common Gateway Interface (CGI). The FPGA is configured to act like the master node of a network, and also to control and monitor a network of smart sensors or instruments. In order to develop a totally functional system, the FPGA also includes an implementation of the time-triggered protocol (TTP/A). Thus, the implemented master node has two interfaces, the webserver that acts as an Internet interface and the other to control the network. This protocol is widely used to connecting smart sensors and actuators and microsystems in embedded real-time systems in different application domains, e.g., industrial, automotive, domotic, etc., although this protocol can be easily replaced by any other because of the inherent characteristics of the FPGA-based technology.

  6. A FPGA Embedded Web Server for Remote Monitoring and Control of Smart Sensors Networks

    PubMed Central

    Magdaleno, Eduardo; Rodríguez, Manuel; Pérez, Fernando; Hernández, David; García, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the implementation of a web server using an embedded Altera NIOS II IP core, a general purpose and configurable RISC processor which is embedded in a Cyclone FPGA. The processor uses the μCLinux operating system to support a Boa web server of dynamic pages using Common Gateway Interface (CGI). The FPGA is configured to act like the master node of a network, and also to control and monitor a network of smart sensors or instruments. In order to develop a totally functional system, the FPGA also includes an implementation of the time-triggered protocol (TTP/A). Thus, the implemented master node has two interfaces, the webserver that acts as an Internet interface and the other to control the network. This protocol is widely used to connecting smart sensors and actuators and microsystems in embedded real-time systems in different application domains, e.g., industrial, automotive, domotic, etc., although this protocol can be easily replaced by any other because of the inherent characteristics of the FPGA-based technology. PMID:24379047

  7. Smart Sensor-Based Motion Detection System for Hand Movement Training in Open Surgery.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xinyao; Byrns, Simon; Cheng, Irene; Zheng, Bin; Basu, Anup

    2017-02-01

    We introduce a smart sensor-based motion detection technique for objective measurement and assessment of surgical dexterity among users at different experience levels. The goal is to allow trainees to evaluate their performance based on a reference model shared through communication technology, e.g., the Internet, without the physical presence of an evaluating surgeon. While in the current implementation we used a Leap Motion Controller to obtain motion data for analysis, our technique can be applied to motion data captured by other smart sensors, e.g., OptiTrack. To differentiate motions captured from different participants, measurement and assessment in our approach are achieved using two strategies: (1) low level descriptive statistical analysis, and (2) Hidden Markov Model (HMM) classification. Based on our surgical knot tying task experiment, we can conclude that finger motions generated from users with different surgical dexterity, e.g., expert and novice performers, display differences in path length, number of movements and task completion time. In order to validate the discriminatory ability of HMM for classifying different movement patterns, a non-surgical task was included in our analysis. Experimental results demonstrate that our approach had 100 % accuracy in discriminating between expert and novice performances. Our proposed motion analysis technique applied to open surgical procedures is a promising step towards the development of objective computer-assisted assessment and training systems.

  8. Gravitational sensor for LISA and its technology demonstration mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolesi, R.; Bortoluzzi, D.; Bosetti, P.; Carbone, L.; Cavalleri, A.; Cristofolini, I.; Da Lio, M.; Fontana, G.; Fontanari, V.; Foulon, B.; Hoyle, C. D.; Hueller, M.; Nappo, F.; Sarra, P.; Shaul, D. N. A.; Sumner, T.; Weber, W. J.; Vitale, S.

    2003-05-01

    We describe the current design of the European gravitational sensor (GS) for the LISA Technology Package (LTP) that, on board the mission SMART-2, aims to demonstrate geodetic motion within one order of magnitude of the anticipated LISA performance. We report also the development of a noise model used in assessing the performance and determining the feasibility of achieving the overall noise goals for the GS. This analysis includes environmental effects that will be present in the sensor. Finally, we discuss open questions regarding the GS for LTP and LISA, ground testing, and verification issues.

  9. SMART-1 mission to the moon: Technology and science goals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foing, B. H.; Racca, G. D.; Marini, A.; Heather, D. J.; Koschny, D.; Grande, M.; Huovelin, J.; Keller, H. U.; Nathues, A.; Josset, J. L.; Malkki, A.; Schmidt, W.; Noci, G.; Birkl, R.; Iess, L.; Sodnik, Z.; McManamon, P.

    2003-06-01

    SMART-1 is a technology demonstration mission for deep space solar electrical propulsion and Technologies for the Future. SMART-1 will be Europe's first lunar mission and will contribute to developing an international program of lunar exploration. The spacecraft has been readied in April 2003 for a launch in summer 2003, as an auxiliary passenger to GTO on Ariane 5, to reach the Moon after 15 month's cruise. SMART-1 will carry six experiments, including three remote sensing instruments that will be used during the mission's nominal six months in lunar orbit. These instruments will contribute to key planetary scientific questions, related to theories of lunar origin and evolution, the global and local crustal composition, the search for cold traps at the lunar poles and the mapping of potential lunar resources.

  10. Communications technology for unattended sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Fuess, D.A.; Myers, D.W.; Benzel, D.M.; Baker, J.

    1993-08-01

    The objective was designing and demonstrating proof-of-concept communication subsystems for use in unattended sensors. These designs investigated current, advanced technology for frequency synthesis and control, and the use of commercial, highly integrated radio frequency components. The three following subsystems were evaluated: (1) a synthesized (225--400 MHz) exciter/transmitter, (2) a wideband, 100-W, radio-frequency power amplifier (for boosting the level of the exciter/transmitter output), and (3) and a command receiver operating in the 240--270-MHz satellite communication band. These subsystems were integrated into a prototype sensor system. Software was written using the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s Modular Intelligent Sensor System (MISS) specification for microprocessor control of these communication elements. Operation of the sensor system using these subsystems was demonstrated.

  11. How Older Adults Make Decisions regarding Smart Technology: An Ethnographic Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davenport, Rick D.; Mann, William; Lutz, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Comparatively little research has been conducted regarding the smart technology needs of the older adult population despite the proliferation of smart technology prototypes. The purpose of this study was to explore the perceived smart technology needs of older adults with mobility impairments while using an ethnographic research approach to…

  12. How Older Adults Make Decisions regarding Smart Technology: An Ethnographic Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davenport, Rick D.; Mann, William; Lutz, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Comparatively little research has been conducted regarding the smart technology needs of the older adult population despite the proliferation of smart technology prototypes. The purpose of this study was to explore the perceived smart technology needs of older adults with mobility impairments while using an ethnographic research approach to…

  13. A Web of Things-Based Emerging Sensor Network Architecture for Smart Control Systems.

    PubMed

    Khan, Murad; Silva, Bhagya Nathali; Han, Kijun

    2017-02-09

    The Web of Things (WoT) plays an important role in the representation of the objects connected to the Internet of Things in a more transparent and effective way. Thus, it enables seamless and ubiquitous web communication between users and the smart things. Considering the importance of WoT, we propose a WoT-based emerging sensor network (WoT-ESN), which collects data from sensors, routes sensor data to the web, and integrate smart things into the web employing a representational state transfer (REST) architecture. A smart home scenario is introduced to evaluate the proposed WoT-ESN architecture. The smart home scenario is tested through computer simulation of the energy consumption of various household appliances, device discovery, and response time performance. The simulation results show that the proposed scheme significantly optimizes the energy consumption of the household appliances and the response time of the appliances.

  14. A Web of Things-Based Emerging Sensor Network Architecture for Smart Control Systems

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Murad; Silva, Bhagya Nathali; Han, Kijun

    2017-01-01

    The Web of Things (WoT) plays an important role in the representation of the objects connected to the Internet of Things in a more transparent and effective way. Thus, it enables seamless and ubiquitous web communication between users and the smart things. Considering the importance of WoT, we propose a WoT-based emerging sensor network (WoT-ESN), which collects data from sensors, routes sensor data to the web, and integrate smart things into the web employing a representational state transfer (REST) architecture. A smart home scenario is introduced to evaluate the proposed WoT-ESN architecture. The smart home scenario is tested through computer simulation of the energy consumption of various household appliances, device discovery, and response time performance. The simulation results show that the proposed scheme significantly optimizes the energy consumption of the household appliances and the response time of the appliances.  PMID:28208787

  15. Ultralow power, high fill factor smart complementary metal oxide semiconductor image sensor with motion detection capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahbod, Abbas; Karimiyan, Hossein

    2016-11-01

    Bandwidth saving, power consumption, and fill factor improvement are known as vitally important challenges image sensor designers face in order to accomplish high-performance imaging systems. This paper presents an ultralow power, high fill factor smart complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) image sensor with motion detection capability. In this efficient methodology, the amount of redundant data processed in unimportant frames has been reduced significantly, and therefore, the proposed imaging system consumes less power compared with counterpart imagers. Furthermore, a pixel structure is introduced that outputs two consecutive frame voltages in series, with the result that the pixel size is minimized and a higher fill factor is achieved. In order to simulate the image capturing procedure, a state-of-the-art approach based on MATLAB and HSPICE software is devised, which is another important achievement of this paper. The performance of this technique is demonstrated using a 64×64 pixel sensor designed in a 0.18-μm standard CMOS technology. The sensor chip consumes 0.2 mW of power while operating at 100 fps with a fill factor of 45%.

  16. Environmental cognitive remediation in schizophrenia: ethical implications of "smart home" technology.

    PubMed

    Stip, Emmanuel; Rialle, Vincent

    2005-04-01

    In light of the advent of new technologies, we proposed to reexamine certain challenges posed by cognitive remediation and social reintegration (that is, deinstitutionalization) of patients with severe and persistent mental disorders. We reviewed literature on cognition, remediation, smart homes, as well as on objects and utilities, using medical and computer science electronic library and Internet searches. These technologies provide solutions for disabled persons with respect to care delivery, workload reduction, and socialization. Examples include home support, video conferencing, remote monitoring of medical parameters through sensors, teledetection of critical situations (for example, a fall or malaise), measures of daily living activities, and help with tasks of daily living. One of the key concepts unifying all these technologies is the health-smart home. We present the notion of the health-smart home in general and then examine it more specifically in relation to schizophrenia. Management of people with schizophrenia with cognitive deficits who are being rehabilitated in the community can be improved with the use of technology; however, such technology has ethical ramifications.

  17. Triboluminescent Materials for Smart Optical Damage Sensors for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aggarwal, Mohan D.; Penn, Benjamin G.; Miller, Jim

    2007-01-01

    Triboluminescence is light that is produced by pressure, friction or mechanical shock. New composite materials are constantly being reengi neered in an effort to make lightweight spacecrafts for various NASA missions. For these materials there is interest in monitoring the con dition of the composite in real time to detect any delamination or cr acking due to damage, fatigue or external forces. Methods of periodic inspection of composite structures for mechanical damage such as ult rasonic testing are rather mature. However, there is a need to develop a new technique of damage detection for composites, which could dete ct cracking or delamination from any desired location within a materi al structure in real time. This could provide a valuable tool in the confident use of composite materials for various space applications. Recently, triboluminnescent materials have been proposed as smart sen sors of structural damage. To sense the damage, these materials can b e epoxy bonded or coated in a polymer matrix or embedded in a composi te host structure. When the damage or fracture takes place in the hos t structure, it will lead to the fracture of triboluminescent crystal s resulting in a light emission. This will warn, in real time, that a structural damage has occurred. The triboluminescent emission of the candidate phosphor has to be sufficiently bright, so that the light signal reaching from the point of fracture to the detector through a fiber optic cable is sufficiently strong to be detected. There are a large number of triboluminescent materials, but few satisfy the above criterion. Authors have synthesized a Eu based organic material know n as Europium tetrakis (dibenzoylmethide) triethylammonium .(EuD(sub 4)TEA), one of the bright triboluminescent materials, which is a pote ntial candidate for application as a damage sensor and could be made into a wireless sensor with the addition of microchip, antenna and el ectronics. Preliminary results on the synthesis and

  18. Triboluminescent Materials for Smart Optical Damage Sensors for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aggarwal, Mohan D.; Penn, Benjamin G.; Miller, Jim

    2007-01-01

    Triboluminescence is light that is produced by pressure, friction or mechanical shock. New composite materials are constantly being reengi neered in an effort to make lightweight spacecrafts for various NASA missions. For these materials there is interest in monitoring the con dition of the composite in real time to detect any delamination or cr acking due to damage, fatigue or external forces. Methods of periodic inspection of composite structures for mechanical damage such as ult rasonic testing are rather mature. However, there is a need to develop a new technique of damage detection for composites, which could dete ct cracking or delamination from any desired location within a materi al structure in real time. This could provide a valuable tool in the confident use of composite materials for various space applications. Recently, triboluminnescent materials have been proposed as smart sen sors of structural damage. To sense the damage, these materials can b e epoxy bonded or coated in a polymer matrix or embedded in a composi te host structure. When the damage or fracture takes place in the hos t structure, it will lead to the fracture of triboluminescent crystal s resulting in a light emission. This will warn, in real time, that a structural damage has occurred. The triboluminescent emission of the candidate phosphor has to be sufficiently bright, so that the light signal reaching from the point of fracture to the detector through a fiber optic cable is sufficiently strong to be detected. There are a large number of triboluminescent materials, but few satisfy the above criterion. Authors have synthesized a Eu based organic material know n as Europium tetrakis (dibenzoylmethide) triethylammonium .(EuD(sub 4)TEA), one of the bright triboluminescent materials, which is a pote ntial candidate for application as a damage sensor and could be made into a wireless sensor with the addition of microchip, antenna and el ectronics. Preliminary results on the synthesis and

  19. Project Smart-Science and Math Access: Resources & Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimmel, Howard; Muldrow, Diana; O'Shea, Mark; Deek, Fadi

    This paper describes Project SMART (Science and Math Access: Resources & Technology), a multi-year professional development effort that includes components for all adults who regularly have contact with children with disabilities. The common goal of each of the components is the development of both efficacy and capacity to inspire children with…

  20. Integration of Smart Board Technology and Effective Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Min, Kathryn; Siegel, Christine

    2011-01-01

    The proposed paper reports on the results of a study conducted to explore the influence of SMART Board technology on student engagement in and perception of classroom activities. Using momentary time-sampling procedures, this study examined differences in second grade students' on-task and off-task behaviors during 30-minute math and science…

  1. Project SMART (Summer Migrants Access Resources through Technology).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Education Agency, Austin. Div. of Migrant Education.

    The SMART (Summer Migrants Access Resources through Technology) project provides Texas migrant students with supplemental instruction using a multi-media, nontraditional approach. Migrant students who remain in Texas during the summer are taught in their homes or other sites via televised instruction with additional instructional support from…

  2. Development of Green Box sensor module technologies for rail applications

    SciTech Connect

    Rey, D.; Breeding, R.; Hogan, J.; Mitchell, J.; McKeen, R.G.; Brogan, J.

    1996-04-01

    Results of a joint Sandia National Laboratories, University of New Mexico, and New Mexico Engineering Research Institute project to investigate an architecture implementing real-time monitoring and tracking technologies in the railroad industry is presented. The work, supported by the New Mexico State Transportation Authority, examines a family of smart sensor products that can be tailored to the specific needs of the user. The concept uses a strap-on sensor package, designed as a value-added component, integrated into existing industry systems and standards. Advances in sensor microelectronics and digital signal processing permit us to produce a class of smart sensors that interpret raw data and transmit inferred information. As applied to freight trains, the sensors` primary purpose is to minimize operating costs by decreasing losses due to theft, and by reducing the number, severity, and consequence of hazardous materials incidents. The system would be capable of numerous activities including: monitoring cargo integrity, controlling system braking and vehicle acceleration, recognizing component failure conditions, and logging sensor data. A cost-benefit analysis examines the loss of revenue resulting from theft, hazardous materials incidents, and accidents. Customer survey data are combined with the cost benefit analysis and used to guide the product requirements definition for a series of specific applications. A common electrical architecture is developed to support the product line and permit rapid product realization. Results of a concept validation, which used commercial hardware and was conducted on a revenue-generating train, are also reported.

  3. A Computational Architecture Based on RFID Sensors for Traceability in Smart Cities

    PubMed Central

    Mora-Mora, Higinio; Gilart-Iglesias, Virgilio; Gil, David; Sirvent-Llamas, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    Information Technology and Communications (ICT) is presented as the main element in order to achieve more efficient and sustainable city resource management, while making sure that the needs of the citizens to improve their quality of life are satisfied. A key element will be the creation of new systems that allow the acquisition of context information, automatically and transparently, in order to provide it to decision support systems. In this paper, we present a novel distributed system for obtaining, representing and providing the flow and movement of people in densely populated geographical areas. In order to accomplish these tasks, we propose the design of a smart sensor network based on RFID communication technologies, reliability patterns and integration techniques. Contrary to other proposals, this system represents a comprehensive solution that permits the acquisition of user information in a transparent and reliable way in a non-controlled and heterogeneous environment. This knowledge will be useful in moving towards the design of smart cities in which decision support on transport strategies, business evaluation or initiatives in the tourism sector will be supported by real relevant information. As a final result, a case study will be presented which will allow the validation of the proposal. PMID:26067195

  4. A Computational Architecture Based on RFID Sensors for Traceability in Smart Cities.

    PubMed

    Mora-Mora, Higinio; Gilart-Iglesias, Virgilio; Gil, David; Sirvent-Llamas, Alejandro

    2015-06-10

    Information Technology and Communications (ICT) is presented as the main element in order to achieve more efficient and sustainable city resource management, while making sure that the needs of the citizens to improve their quality of life are satisfied. A key element will be the creation of new systems that allow the acquisition of context information, automatically and transparently, in order to provide it to decision support systems. In this paper, we present a novel distributed system for obtaining, representing and providing the flow and movement of people in densely populated geographical areas. In order to accomplish these tasks, we propose the design of a smart sensor network based on RFID communication technologies, reliability patterns and integration techniques. Contrary to other proposals, this system represents a comprehensive solution that permits the acquisition of user information in a transparent and reliable way in a non-controlled and heterogeneous environment. This knowledge will be useful in moving towards the design of smart cities in which decision support on transport strategies, business evaluation or initiatives in the tourism sector will be supported by real relevant information. As a final result, a case study will be presented which will allow the validation of the proposal.

  5. A sensor and video based ontology for activity recognition in smart environments.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, D; Morrow, Philip J; Nugent, Chris D

    2014-01-01

    Activity recognition is used in a wide range of applications including healthcare and security. In a smart environment activity recognition can be used to monitor and support the activities of a user. There have been a range of methods used in activity recognition including sensor-based approaches, vision-based approaches and ontological approaches. This paper presents a novel approach to activity recognition in a smart home environment which combines sensor and video data through an ontological framework. The ontology describes the relationships and interactions between activities, the user, objects, sensors and video data.

  6. Multispectral data acquisition and classification - Computer modeling for smart sensor design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, S. K.; Davis, R. E.; Huck, F. O.; Arduini, R. F.

    1980-01-01

    In this paper a model of the processes involved in multispectral remote sensing and data classification is developed as a tool for designing and evaluating smart sensors. The model has both stochastic and deterministic elements and accounts for solar radiation, atmospheric radiative transfer, surface reflectance, sensor spectral reponses, and classification algorithms. Preliminary results are presented which indicate the validity and usefulness of this approach. Future capabilities of smart sensors will ultimately be limited by the accuracy with which multispectral remote sensing processes and their error sources can be computationally modeled.

  7. Smart infusion technology: a minimum safety standard for intensive care?

    PubMed

    Murdoch, Linda J; Cameron, Victoria L

    There is overwhelming evidence that medication errors present a risk to patients. This risk is highest in the intensive care unit (ICU) setting and even greater when medications are administered via an infusion pump. Standard pumps will not alert for, or prevent, drug calculation, drug unit, button push, or multiple of ten errors when medication delivery data is inputted. However, the literature suggests that smart pumps programmed with hard (unchangeable) limits can significantly reduce drug errors at the point of administration. Staff at St George's Hospital paediatric ICU wanted to implement an infusion pump system that would be immediately effective in reducing medication errors at the point of administration. This article presents an overview of the relevant literature together with clinical examples from the authors' ICU, which demonstrates their experiences with smart pumps. It is the authors' firm belief that smart infusion technology sets a new minimum safety standard for intensive care.

  8. Tree Alignment Based on Needleman-Wunsch Algorithm for Sensor Selection in Smart Homes.

    PubMed

    Chua, Sook-Ling; Foo, Lee Kien

    2017-08-18

    Activity recognition in smart homes aims to infer the particular activities of the inhabitant, the aim being to monitor their activities and identify any abnormalities, especially for those living alone. In order for a smart home to support its inhabitant, the recognition system needs to learn from observations acquired through sensors. One question that often arises is which sensors are useful and how many sensors are required to accurately recognise the inhabitant's activities? Many wrapper methods have been proposed and remain one of the popular evaluators for sensor selection due to its superior accuracy performance. However, they are prohibitively slow during the evaluation process and may run into the risk of overfitting due to the extent of the search. Motivated by this characteristic, this paper attempts to reduce the cost of the evaluation process and overfitting through tree alignment. The performance of our method is evaluated on two public datasets obtained in two distinct smart home environments.

  9. Recent developments in smart freezing technology applied to fresh foods.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ji-Cheng; Zhang, Min; Mujumdar, Arun S; Adhikari, Benu

    2017-09-02

    Due to the increased awareness of consumers in sensorial and nutritional quality of frozen foods, the freezing technology has to seek new and innovative technologies for better retaining the fresh like quality of foods. In this article, we review the recent developments in smart freezing technology applied to fresh foods. The application of these intelligent technologies and the associated underpinning concepts have greatly improved the quality of frozen foods and the freezing efficiency. These technologies are able to automatically collect the information in-line during freezing and help control the freezing process better. Smart freezing technology includes new and intelligent technologies and concepts applied to the pretreatment of the frozen product, freezing processes, cold chain logistics as well as warehouse management. These technologies enable real-time monitoring of quality during the freezing process and help improve product quality and freezing efficiency. We also provide a brief overview of several sensing technologies used to achieve automatic control of individual steps of freezing process. These sensing technologies include computer vision, electronic nose, electronic tongue, digital simulation, confocal laser, near infrared spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance technology and ultrasound. Understanding of the mechanism of these new technologies will be helpful for applying them to improve the quality of frozen foods.

  10. SMART-1 Technology and Science Experiments in Preparation of Future Missions and ESA Cornerstones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marini, A. E.; Racca, G. D.; Foing, B. H.; SMART-1 Project

    1999-12-01

    SMART-1 is the first ESA Small Mission for Advanced Research in Technology, aimed at the demonstration of enabling technologies for future scientific missions. SMART-1's prime technology objective is the demonstration of the solar primary electric propulsion, a key for future interplanetary missions. SMART-1 will use a Stationary Plasma Thruster engine, cruising 15 months to capture a Moon polar orbit. A gallery of images of the spacecraft is available at the web site: http://www.estec.esa.nl/spdwww/smart1/html/11742.html SMART-1 payload aims at monitoring the electric propulsion and its spacecraft environment and to test novel instrument technologies. The Diagnostic Instruments include SPEDE, a spacecraft potential plasma and charged particles detector, to characterise both spacecraft and planetary environment, together with EPDP, a suite of sensors monitoring secondary thrust-ions, charging and deposition effects. Innovative spacecraft technologies will be tested on SMART-1 : Lithium batteries and KATE, an experimental X/Ka-band deep-space transponder, to support radio-science, to monitor the accelerations of the electric propulsion and to test turbo-code technique, enhancing the return of scientific data. The scientific instruments for imaging and spectrometry are: \\begin{itemize} D-CIXS, a compact X-ray spectrometer based on novel SCD detectors and micro-structure optics, to observe X-ray celectial objects and to perform lunar chemistry measurements. SIR, a miniaturised quasi-monolithic point-spectrometer, operating in the Near-IR (0.9 ÷ 2.4 micron), to survey the lunar crust in previously uncovered optical regions. AMIE, a miniature camera based on 3-D integrated electronics, imaging the Moon, and other bodies and supporting LASER-LINK and RSIS. RSIS and LASER-LINK are investigations performed with the SMART-1 Payload: \\begin{itemize} RSIS: A radio-science Experiment to validate in-orbit determination of the libration of the celestial target, based on high

  11. NASA programs in advanced sensors and measurement technology for aeronautical applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conway, Bruce A.

    1990-01-01

    NASA involvement in the development, implementation, and experimental use of advanced aeronautical sensors and measurement technologies is presently discussed within the framework of specific NASA research centers' activities. The technology thrusts are in the fields of high temperature strain gages and microphones, laser light-sheet flow visualization, LTA, LDV, and LDA, tunable laser-based aviation meteorology, and fiber-optic CARS measurements. IR thermography and close-range photogrammetry are undergoing substantial updating and application. It is expected that 'smart' sensors will be increasingly widely used, especially in conjunction with smart structures in aircraft and spacecraft.

  12. NASA programs in advanced sensors and measurement technology for aeronautical applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conway, Bruce A.

    1990-01-01

    NASA involvement in the development, implementation, and experimental use of advanced aeronautical sensors and measurement technologies is presently discussed within the framework of specific NASA research centers' activities. The technology thrusts are in the fields of high temperature strain gages and microphones, laser light-sheet flow visualization, LTA, LDV, and LDA, tunable laser-based aviation meteorology, and fiber-optic CARS measurements. IR thermography and close-range photogrammetry are undergoing substantial updating and application. It is expected that 'smart' sensors will be increasingly widely used, especially in conjunction with smart structures in aircraft and spacecraft.

  13. 75 FR 62515 - Notice of Availability of Report on the Communications Requirements of Smart Grid Technologies

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-12

    ... of Availability of Report on the Communications Requirements of Smart Grid Technologies AGENCY..., ``Communications Requirements of Smart Grid Technologies.'' In this report, DOE sets forth recommendations and observations on current and potential communications requirements of the Smart Grid, as well as the types of...

  14. Initial Analyses and Demonstration of a Soil Moisture Smart Sensor Web Using Data Assimilation and Optimal Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghaddam, M.; Entekhabi, D.; Liu, M.; Teneketzid, D.; Goykhman, Y.; Shuman, D.; Mahajan, A.; Nayyar, A.

    2007-12-01

    We have developed a new concept for a smart sensor web technology for measurements of soil moisture that include spaceborne and in-situ assets. The objective of the technology is to enable a guided/adaptive sampling strategy for the in-situ sensor network to meet the measurement validation objectives of the spaceborne sensors with respect to resolution and accuracy. The sensor nodes are guided to perform as a macro-instrument measuring processes at the scale of the satellite footprint, hence meeting the requirements for the difficult problem of validation of satellite measurements. The science measurement considered is the surface-to-depth profiles of soil moisture estimated from satellite radars and radiometers, with calibration and validation using in- situ sensors. Satellites allow global mapping but with coarse footprints. The total variability in soil-moisture fields comes from variability in processes on various scales. Installing an in-situ network to sample the field for all ranges of variability is impractical. However, a sparser but smarter network can provide the validation estimates by operating in a guided fashion with guidance from its own sparse measurements. The feedback and control take place in the context of a dynamic data assimilation system. The overall design of the smart sensor web including the control architecture, assimilation framework, and actuation hardware will be presented in this paper. The results of initial numerical and laboratory demonstrations of the sensor web concept, which includes a small number of soil moisture sensors and their physical measurement model, a dynamic soil moisture time-evolution model (SWAP), and an optimal control strategy will then be shown.

  15. Deformation reconstruction of a smart Geogrid embedded with fiber Bragg grating sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zheng-fang; Wang, Jing; Sui, Qing-mei; Jia, Lei; Li, Shu-cai; Liang, Xun-mei; Lu, Shi-de

    2015-12-01

    Due to the disadvantages of the current smart Geogrid for geotechnical use only being able measure strain and evaluate load location, a smart Geogrid embedded with fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors has been developed. Also, a deformation reconstruction technique has been investigated, which enables the newly designed smart Geogrid to evaluate the deformation fields of the key areas in geotechnical structures. After the fabricating process of the FBG embedded smart Geogrid was briefly introduced, a curvature information based deformation reconstruction method for the smart Geogrid was detailed. In order to optimize the distribution of the FBG nodes in the smart Geogrid, the finite element (FE) simulation data of the three possible causes of deformation were extracted, and the reconstruction results of the four distributions were compared. The results indicated that equidistantly distributed FBG sensors at the ribs of the smart Geogrid were the optimal distribution for the newly designed smart Geogrid. In addition, a modified deformation reconstruction technique was proposed to reduce reconstruction errors due to the stress concentration on the junctions of the smart Geogrid. The modified method, which employs FBG measured strains for calculating the deformation of the ribs and weighted strains to compute the coordinates of the two junctions, was validated by FE simulations. The simulation results illustrated that the modified method can improve the deformation reconstruction accuracy for both a Geogrid embedded with one fiber optic cable into one warp thread and a Geogrid embedded with multiple fiber optic cables in different warp threads. For the purpose of verifying the feasibility of the deformation measurements for the designed smart Geogrid using the proposed reconstruction techniques, experiments for the smart Geogrid embedded with one fiber optic cable were conducted in constant temperature environments. The curvatures of the smart Geogrid were calibrated

  16. Evaluation of Representative Smart Grid Investment Project Technologies: Demand Response

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, Jason C.; Prakash Kumar, Nirupama; Bonebrake, Christopher A.

    2012-02-14

    This document is one of a series of reports estimating the benefits of deploying technologies similar to those implemented on the Smart Grid Investment Grant (SGIG) projects. Four technical reports cover the various types of technologies deployed in the SGIG projects, distribution automation, demand response, energy storage, and renewables integration. A fifth report in the series examines the benefits of deploying these technologies on a national level. This technical report examines the impacts of a limited number of demand response technologies and implementations deployed in the SGIG projects.

  17. Smart Pebble: wireless sensors for structural health monitoring of bridge decks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watters, David G.; Jayaweera, Palitha; Bahr, Alfred J.; Huestis, David L.; Priyantha, Namal; Meline, Robert; Reis, Robert; Parks, Douglas

    2003-08-01

    SRI International is developing a wireless sensor for monitoring the level of chloride ingress into concrete bridge decks. We call this device a Smart Pebble since it has roughly the size and weight of a typical piece of the rock aggregate that is used in such structures. It is "smart" in that it contains a chloride sensor and a radio-frequency identification (RFID) chip that can be queried remotely both to identify it and to indicate chloride concentration levels. The Smart Pebble is also powered remotely, thus precluding the need for any lifetime-limiting batteries. It is designed to be inserted in the bridge deck either during the initial construction (or during refurbishment) or in a back-filled core hole. This paper will discuss the Smart Pebble design, operation, and status.

  18. Health "Smart" home: information technology for patients at home.

    PubMed

    Rialle, Vincent; Duchene, Florence; Noury, Norbert; Bajolle, Lionel; Demongeot, Jacques

    2002-01-01

    This article reviews the emerging concept of health "Smart" homes (HSH) and its potential through the use of telemedical information systems and communication technologies. HSH systems provide health care services for people with special needs who wish to remain independent and living in their own home. The large diversity of needs in a home-based patient population requires complex technology. Meeting these needs technically requires the use of a distributed approach and the combination of many hardware and software techniques. We also describe the wide scope of new information, communication, and data-acquisition technologies used in home health care. We offer an introduction to the HSH concept in terms of technical, economic, and human requirements. Examples of HSH projects are presented, including a short description of our own smart home and telehealthcare information system project.

  19. Sensor technology workshop: Structure and goals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Barbara A.

    1991-01-01

    The Astrotech 21 charter for the second of three workshops is described. The purpose was to identify technology needs in the areas of electromagnetic radiation sensors, and to recommend a plan to develop the required capabilities that are not currently available. The panels chosen for this workshop focused specifically on those technologies needed for the Astrotech 21 Program including: gamma ray and x ray sensors, ultraviolet and visible sensors, direct infrared sensors, and heterodyne submillimeter wave sensors.

  20. A fast lightstripe rangefinding system with smart VLSI sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruss, Andrew; Carley, L. Richard; Kanade, Takeo

    1989-01-01

    The focus of the research is to build a compact, high performance lightstripe rangefinder using a Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI) smart photosensor array. Rangefinding, the measurement of the three-dimensional profile of an object or scene, is a critical component for many robotic applications, and therefore many techniques were developed. Of these, lightstripe rangefinding is one of the most widely used and reliable techniques available. Though practical, the speed of sampling range data by the conventional light stripe technique is severely limited. A conventional light stripe rangefinder operates in a step-and-repeat manner. A stripe source is projected on an object, a video image is acquired, range data is extracted from the image, the stripe is stepped, and the process repeats. Range acquisition is limited by the time needed to grab the video images, increasing linearly with the desired horizontal resolution. During the acquisition of a range image, the objects in the scene being scanned must be stationary. Thus, the long scene sampling time of step-and-repeat rangefinders limits their application. The fast range sensor proposed is based on the modification of this basic lightstripe ranging technique in a manner described by Sato and Kida. This technique does not require a sampling of images at various stripe positions to build a range map. Rather, an entire range image is acquired in parallel while the stripe source is swept continuously across the scene. Total time to acquire the range image data is independent of the range map resolution. The target rangefinding system will acquire 1,000 100 x 100 point range images per second with 0.5 percent range accuracy. It will be compact and rugged enough to be mounted on the end effector of a robot arm to aid in object manipulation and assembly tasks.

  1. Evaluation of the Impact of Furniture on Communications Performance for Ubiquitous Deployment of Wireless Sensor Networks in Smart Homes

    PubMed Central

    Bleda, Andrés L.; Jara, Antonio J.; Maestre, Rafael; Santa, Guadalupe; Gómez Skarmeta, Antonio F.

    2012-01-01

    The extensions of the environment with the integration of sensing systems in any space, in conjunction with ubiquitous computing are enabling the so-called Smart Space Sensor Networks. This new generation of networks are offering full connectivity with any object, through the Internet of Things (IoT) and/or the Web, i.e., the Web of Things. These connectivity capabilities are making it feasible to sense the behaviours of people at home and act accordingly. These sensing systems must be integrated within typical elements found at home such as furniture. For that reason, this work considers furniture as an interesting element for the transparent location of sensors. Furniture is a ubiquitous object, i.e., it can be found everywhere at home or the office, and it can integrate and hide the sensors of a network. This work addresses the lack of an exhaustive study of the effect of furniture on signal losses. In addition an easy-to-use tool for estimating the robustness of the communication channel among the sensor nodes and gateways is proposed. Specifically, the losses in a sensor network signal due to the materials found within the communication link are evaluated. Then, this work proposes a software tool that gathers the obtained results and is capable of evaluating the impact of a given set of materials on the communications. This tool also provides a mechanism to optimize the sensor network deployments during the definition of smart spaces. Specifically, it provides information such as: maximum distances between sensor nodes, most suitable type of furniture to integrate sensors, or battery life of sensor nodes. This tool has been validated empirically in the lab, and it is currently being used by several enterprise partners of the Technological Centre of Furniture and Wood in the southeast of Spain. PMID:22778653

  2. Evaluation of the impact of furniture on communications performance for ubiquitous deployment of Wireless Sensor Networks in smart homes.

    PubMed

    Bleda, Andrés L; Jara, Antonio J; Maestre, Rafael; Santa, Guadalupe; Gómez Skarmeta, Antonio F

    2012-01-01

    The extensions of the environment with the integration of sensing systems in any space, in conjunction with ubiquitous computing are enabling the so-called Smart Space Sensor Networks. This new generation of networks are offering full connectivity with any object, through the Internet of Things (IoT) and/or the Web, i.e., the Web of Things. These connectivity capabilities are making it feasible to sense the behaviours of people at home and act accordingly. These sensing systems must be integrated within typical elements found at home such as furniture. For that reason, this work considers furniture as an interesting element for the transparent location of sensors. Furniture is a ubiquitous object, i.e., it can be found everywhere at home or the office, and it can integrate and hide the sensors of a network. This work addresses the lack of an exhaustive study of the effect of furniture on signal losses. In addition an easy-to-use tool for estimating the robustness of the communication channel among the sensor nodes and gateways is proposed. Specifically, the losses in a sensor network signal due to the materials found within the communication link are evaluated. Then, this work proposes a software tool that gathers the obtained results and is capable of evaluating the impact of a given set of materials on the communications. This tool also provides a mechanism to optimize the sensor network deployments during the definition of smart spaces. Specifically, it provides information such as: maximum distances between sensor nodes, most suitable type of furniture to integrate sensors, or battery life of sensor nodes. This tool has been validated empirically in the lab, and it is currently being used by several enterprise partners of the Technological Centre of Furniture and Wood in the southeast of Spain.

  3. Demonstration of Resolving Urban Problems by Applying Smart Technology.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Recently, movements to seek various alternatives are becoming more active around the world to resolve urban problems related to energy, water, a greenhouse gas, and disaster by utilizing smart technology system. The purpose of this study is to evaluate service verification aimed at demonstration region applied with actual smart technology in order to raise the efficiency of the service and explore solutions for urban problems. This process must be required for resolving urban problems in the future and establishing `integration platform' for sustainable development. The demonstration region selected in this study to evaluate service verification is `Busan' in Korea. Busan adopted 16 services in 4 sections last year and begun demonstration to improve quality of life and resolve urban environment problems. In addition, Busan participated officially in `Global City Teams Challenge (GCTC)' held by National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in USA last year and can be regarded as representative demonstration region in Korea. The result of survey showed that there were practical difficulties as explained below in the demonstration for resolving urban problems by applying smart technology. First, the participation for demonstration was low because citizens were either not aware or did not realize the demonstration. Second, after demonstrating various services at low cost, it resulted in less effect of service demonstration. Third, as functions get fused, it was found that management department, application criteria of technology and its process were ambiguous. In order to increase the efficiency of the demonstration for the rest of period through the result of this study, it is required to draw demand that citizens requires in order to raise public participation. In addition, it needs to focus more on services which are wanted to demonstrate rather than various service demonstrations. Lastly, it is necessary to build integration platform through cooperation

  4. Spatially distributed smart skin seat sensor for high-resolution real-time occupant position tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubbard, James E., Jr.; Burke, Shawn E.

    1999-07-01

    A 2D spatially distributed smart skin sensor for real-time seat occupant position sensing is presented. The sensor exploits principles of spatial aperture shading of distributed transducers such as piezo-electric polymers and resistors, which are used as the active sensing medium. An example application is presented in which the sensor is used to report passenger position to an automobile air bag control system. The real-time data is used to modulate airbag deployment energies, mitigating passenger injury.

  5. Smart wireless sensor system for lifeline health monitoring under a disaster event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sehwan; Yoon, Eunbae; Chien, Ting-Chou; Mustafa, Hadil; Chou, Pai H.; Shinozuka, Masanobu

    2011-04-01

    This paper discusses issues of using wireless sensor systems to monitor structures and pipelines in the case of disastrous events. The platforms are deployed and monitored remotely on lifetime systems, such as underground water pipelines. Although similar systems have been proposed for monitoring seismic events and the structure health of bridges and buildings, several fundamental differences necessitate adaptation or redesign of the module. Specifically, rupture detection in water delivery networks must respond to higher frequency and wider bandwidth than those used in the monitoring of seismic events, structures, or bridges. The monitoring and detection algorithms can also impose a wide range of requirements on the fidelity of the acquired data and the flexibility of wireless communication technologies. We employ a non-invasive methodology based on MEMS accelerometers to identify the damage location and to estimate the extent of the damage. The key issues are low-noise power supply, noise floor of sensors, higher sampling rate, and the relationship among displacement, frequency, and acceleration. Based on the mentioned methodology, PipeTECT, a smart wireless sensor platform was developed. The platform was validated on a bench-scale uniaxial shake table, a small-scale water pipe network, and portions of several regional water supply networks. The laboratory evaluation and the results obtained from a preliminary field deployment show that such key factors in the implementation are crucial to ensure high fidelity of the acquired data. This is expected to be helpful in the understanding of lifeline infrastructure behavior under disastrous events.

  6. Smart sensors development based on a distributed bus for microsystems applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrer, Carles; Lorente, Bibiana

    2003-04-01

    Our main objective in this work has been to develop a comunication system applicable between sensors and actuators and the data processing circuitry inside the microsystem in order to develop a flexible and modular architecture. This communication system is based on the use of a dedicated sensor bus composed by only two wires (a bidirectional data line and a clock line for sincronization). The basic philosophy of this development has been to create an IP model with VHDL for the bus driver that can be added to the sensor or the actuator to create an smart device that could be easily plugged with the other componets of the microsystem architecture. This methodology can be applied to a high integrated microsystem based on an extensively use of microelectronics technologies (ASICs, SoCs & MCMs). The reduced number of wires is an extraordinary advatage because produce a minimal interconnection between all the components and as a consequence the size of the microinstrument becomes smaller. The second aspect that we have considered in this development has been to reach a communication protocol that permits to built-up a very simple but robust bus driver interface that minimize the circuit overhead. This interconnection system has been applied to biomedical and aerospatial microsystems applications.

  7. Performance Analysis of AODV Routing Protocol for Wireless Sensor Network based Smart Metering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    >Hasan Farooq, Low Tang Jung,

    2013-06-01

    Today no one can deny the need for Smart Grid and it is being considered as of utmost importance to upgrade outdated electric infrastructure to cope with the ever increasing electric load demand. Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) is considered a promising candidate for internetworking of smart meters with the gateway using mesh topology. This paper investigates the performance of AODV routing protocol for WSN based smart metering deployment. Three case studies are presented to analyze its performance based on four metrics of (i) Packet Delivery Ratio, (ii) Average Energy Consumption of Nodes (iii) Average End-End Delay and (iv) Normalized Routing Load.

  8. Smart printing technology for counterfeit deterrence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrop, Peter J.

    1996-03-01

    Smart (intelligent) printing is the creation of useful patterns beyond alphanumerics and graphics immediately obvious to the human eye. It employs smart inks, patterns, surfaces and substrates. Recent proliferation of color copiers, personal computers and scanners has facilitated a tenfold increase in counterfeiting in many countries over the past three years. Banknotes, cheques, academic certificates, art work, visitors passes, venue tickets and many other artifacts have been compromised. Paradoxically, the best counterfeits produced by some foreign governments and organized crime are rarely the main problem. The secret services of many countries use forensic science to great effect in pursuing these fairly readily identified sources of limited number. Bad counterfeits usually made on color copiers or computers, with or without color scanners, are the most difficult to combat because they are made by very large numbers of casual counterfeiters who may never commit crime again. For instance, counterfeit banknotes intercepted by the Bundesbank have been photocopies in a fluctuating range of 50 - 84% of cases in the last four reported years. Cheque and other document fraud is also inflated by these burgeoning bad copies and here we must add amateurish alterations using copiers or scanners. For instance, a better academic degree can mean a better job, an interbank transfer form can be 'raised' in value by enormous amounts. The issuer of a 'bad' counterfeit does not mind that it is usually picked up on a second transferral. They are long gone by then or, with banknotes, they can deny that they issued it. First priority in reversing the upward trend of counterfeiting must not therefore be the creation of better secret features traceable by forensic laboratories over extended periods of time. Rather we need better and more obvious optically unique features, not easily emulated, that can be spotted in the split second when several, say, banknotes are handed over in a

  9. Branch-based centralized data collection for smart grids using wireless sensor networks.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwangsoo; Jin, Seong-il

    2015-05-21

    A smart grid is one of the most important applications in smart cities. In a smart grid, a smart meter acts as a sensor node in a sensor network, and a central device collects power usage from every smart meter. This paper focuses on a centralized data collection problem of how to collect every power usage from every meter without collisions in an environment in which the time synchronization among smart meters is not guaranteed. To solve the problem, we divide a tree that a sensor network constructs into several branches. A conflict-free query schedule is generated based on the branches. Each power usage is collected according to the schedule. The proposed method has important features: shortening query processing time and avoiding collisions between a query and query responses. We evaluate this method using the ns-2 simulator. The experimental results show that this method can achieve both collision avoidance and fast query processing at the same time. The success rate of data collection at a sink node executing this method is 100%. Its running time is about 35 percent faster than that of the round-robin method, and its memory size is reduced to about 10% of that of the depth-first search method.

  10. Branch-Based Centralized Data Collection for Smart Grids Using Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kwangsoo; Jin, Seong-il

    2015-01-01

    A smart grid is one of the most important applications in smart cities. In a smart grid, a smart meter acts as a sensor node in a sensor network, and a central device collects power usage from every smart meter. This paper focuses on a centralized data collection problem of how to collect every power usage from every meter without collisions in an environment in which the time synchronization among smart meters is not guaranteed. To solve the problem, we divide a tree that a sensor network constructs into several branches. A conflict-free query schedule is generated based on the branches. Each power usage is collected according to the schedule. The proposed method has important features: shortening query processing time and avoiding collisions between a query and query responses. We evaluate this method using the ns-2 simulator. The experimental results show that this method can achieve both collision avoidance and fast query processing at the same time. The success rate of data collection at a sink node executing this method is 100%. Its running time is about 35 percent faster than that of the round-robin method, and its memory size is reduced to about 10% of that of the depth-first search method. PMID:26007734

  11. Smart unattended sensor networks with scene understanding capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuvich, Gary

    2006-05-01

    Unattended sensor systems are new technologies that are supposed to provide enhanced situation awareness to military and law enforcement agencies. A network of such sensors cannot be very effective in field conditions only if it can transmit visual information to human operators or alert them on motion. In the real field conditions, events may happen in many nodes of a network simultaneously. But the real number of control personnel is always limited, and attention of human operators can be simply attracted to particular network nodes, while more dangerous threat may be unnoticed at the same time in the other nodes. Sensor networks would be more effective if equipped with a system that is similar to human vision in its abilities to understand visual information. Human vision uses for that a rough but wide peripheral system that tracks motions and regions of interests, narrow but precise foveal vision that analyzes and recognizes objects in the center of selected region of interest, and visual intelligence that provides scene and object contexts and resolves ambiguity and uncertainty in the visual information. Biologically-inspired Network-Symbolic models convert image information into an 'understandable' Network-Symbolic format, which is similar to relational knowledge models. The equivalent of interaction between peripheral and foveal systems in the network-symbolic system is achieved via interaction between Visual and Object Buffers and the top-level knowledge system.

  12. Wearable smart systems: from technologies to integrated systems.

    PubMed

    Lymberis, A

    2011-01-01

    Wearable technology and integrated systems, so called Smart Wearable Systems (SWS) have demonstrated during the last 10-15 years significant advances in terms of, miniaturisation, seamless integration, data processing & communication, functionalisation and comfort. This is mainly due to the huge progress in sciences and technologies e.g. biomedical and micro & nano technologies, but also to a strong demand for new applications such as continuous personal health monitoring, healthy lifestyle support, human performance monitoring and support of professionals at risk. Development of wearable systems based of smart textile have, in addition, benefited from the eagerness of textile industry to develop new value-added apparel products like functionalized garments and smart clothing. Research and development in these areas has been strongly promoted worldwide. In Europe the major R&D activities were supported through the Information & Communication Technologies (ICT) priority of the R&D EU programs. The paper presents and discusses the main achievements towards integrated systems as well as future challenges to be met in order to reach a market with reliable and high value-added products.

  13. Wireless structural health monitoring of cable-stayed bridge using Imote2-platformed smart sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Duc-Duy; Nguyen, Khac-Duy; Lee, Po-Young; Hong, Dong-Soo; Lee, So-Young; Kim, Jeong-Tae; Shin, Sung-Woo; Yun, Chung-Bang; Shinozuka, Masanobu

    2012-04-01

    In this study, wireless structural health monitoring (SHM) system of cable-stayed bridge is developed using Imote2- platformed smart sensors. In order to achieve the objective, the following approaches are proposed. Firstly, vibrationand impedance-based SHM methods suitable for the pylon-cable-deck system in cable-stayed bridge are briefly described. Secondly, the multi-scale vibration-impedance sensor node on Imote2-platform is presented on the design of hardware components and embedded software for vibration- and impedance-based SHM. In this approach, a solarpowered energy harvesting is implemented for autonomous operation of the smart sensor node. Finally, the feasibility and practicality of the multi-scale sensor system is experimentally evaluated on a real cable-stayed bridge, Hwamyung Bridge in Korea. Successful level of wireless communication and solar-power supply for smart sensor nodes are verified. Also, vibration and impedance responses measured from the target bridge which experiences various weather conditions are examined for the robust long-term monitoring capability of the smart sensor system.

  14. SMART micro-scissors with dual motors and OCT sensors (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, Chaebeom; Jang, Seonjin; Park, Hyun-cheol; Gehlbach, Peter L.; Song, Cheol

    2017-02-01

    Various end-effectors of microsurgical instruments have been developed and studied. Also, many approaches to stabilize the tool-tip using robotics have been studied such as the steady hand robot system, Micron, and SMART system. In our previous study, the horizontal SMART micro-scissors with a common path swept source OCT distance and one linear piezoelectric (PZT) motor was demonstrated as a microsurgical system. Because the outer needle is connected with a mechanical handle and moved to engage the tool tip manually, the tool tip position is instantaneously changed during the engaging. The undesirable motion can make unexpected tissue damages and low surgical accuracy. In this study, we suggest a prototype horizontal SMART micro-scissors which has dual OCT sensors and two motors to improve the tremor cancellation. Dual OCT sensors provide two distance information. Front OCT sensor detects a distance from the sample surface to the tool tip. Rear OCT sensors gives current PZT motor movement, acting like a motor encoder. The PZT motor can compensate the hand tremor with a feedback loop control. The manual engaging of tool tip in previous SMART system is replaced by electrical engaging using a squiggle motor. Compared with previous study, this study showed better performance in the hand tremor reduction. From the result, the SMART with automatic engaging may become increasingly valuable in microsurgical instruments.

  15. Seeker multispectral atmospheric reentry technology (SMART) window development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gal, G.; Herman, B.; Morrow, H.; Anderson, W.; Hsu, I.; Stubbs, D.

    1992-05-01

    Seeker Multispectral Atmospheric Reentry Technology (SMART) window development is concerned with the application of innovative technologies to develop an internally cooled window with minimum aperture size for a large field-of-regard (FOR) multispectral seeker installed in an endoatmospheric hypersonic kill vehicle. The window should be very small and lightweight and have a built-in scanner to cover the FOR. The design of such a window requires input from several critical areas, including system requirements, optical design, fabrication of micro-optical components, cooling, optomechanical design, mechanical stress analysis, and flow-field analysis. This paper describes our approach to the development of a SMART window and the current state of our design.

  16. Enabling Smart Workflows over Heterogeneous ID-Sensing Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Giner, Pau; Cetina, Carlos; Lacuesta, Raquel; Palacios, Guillermo

    2012-01-01

    Sensing technologies in mobile devices play a key role in reducing the gap between the physical and the digital world. The use of automatic identification capabilities can improve user participation in business processes where physical elements are involved (Smart Workflows). However, identifying all objects in the user surroundings does not automatically translate into meaningful services to the user. This work introduces Parkour, an architecture that allows the development of services that match the goals of each of the participants in a smart workflow. Parkour is based on a pluggable architecture that can be extended to provide support for new tasks and technologies. In order to facilitate the development of these plug-ins, tools that automate the development process are also provided. Several Parkour-based systems have been developed in order to validate the applicability of the proposal. PMID:23202193

  17. Enabling smart workflows over heterogeneous ID-sensing technologies.

    PubMed

    Giner, Pau; Cetina, Carlos; Lacuesta, Raquel; Palacios, Guillermo

    2012-11-05

    Sensing technologies in mobile devices play a key role in reducing the gap between the physical and the digital world. The use of automatic identification capabilities can improve user participation in business processes where physical elements are involved(Smart Workflows). However, identifying all objects in the user surroundings does not automatically translate into meaningful services to the user. This work introduces Parkour,an architecture that allows the development of services that match the goals of each of the participants in a smart workflow. Parkour is based on a pluggable architecture that can be extended to provide support for new tasks and technologies. In order to facilitatethe development of these plug-ins, tools that automate the development process are also provided. Several Parkour-based systems have been developed in order to validate the applicability of the proposal.

  18. Entity Recognition Via Multimodal Sensor Fusion With Smart Phones

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-26

    familial and communal benefits inherent in better com- munication. The introduction of the smart phone ushered in yet another explosion in capability...been developed to recognize whether a user is walking, jogging, climbing or descending stairs, biking , sitting, standing, taking off or landing in an...beyond the task of activity classification and identification; using the community of smart phones present in the population , they have begun to

  19. MEMSWear - Biomonitoring - Incorporating sensors into smart shirt for wireless sentinel medical detection and alarm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Po, Samuel Ng Choon; Dagang, Guo; Mohyi Hapipi, Mohammad Dzulkifli Bin; Tay Eng Hock, Francis

    2006-04-01

    This paper presents a method of using a body-distributed smart sensor platform for continuous detection of vital physiological signs in a body area network (BAN) system. An overview of the approach utilising predefined sentinel vital sign events is mentioned in order to optimise the platform in both hardware and software level. A BAN system consisting of smart sensor platform with short range ISM transmission will be used to communicate with a communication gateway. This communication gateway will encode and send the signals via Bluetooth to designated devices to inform caregivers, family members or transmit information to internet server.

  20. Study on smart city construction of Jiujiang based on IOT technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zeliang; Wang, Ying; Xu, Qin; Yan, Tao

    2017-06-01

    At present, with the technology of the Internet of things (IOT), building smart city is forming a powerful wave of city, which promotes economic and social development of city. This paper expounds the connotation of smart city, explores the social and economic significance of the construction of smart city, analyzes the present situation of smart city construction in Jiujiang, studies the basic principles development altar get and key construction projects, and puts forward relevant of Jiujiang smart city construction, and puts forward relevant proposals about smart construction in Jiujiang, Jiangxi.

  1. Development of mine explosion ground truth smart sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Steven R.; Harben, Phillip E.; Jarpe, Steve; Harris, David B.

    2015-09-14

    Accurate seismo-acoustic source location is one of the fundamental aspects of nuclear explosion monitoring. Critical to improved location is the compilation of ground truth data sets for which origin time and location are accurately known. Substantial effort by the National Laboratories and other seismic monitoring groups have been undertaken to acquire and develop ground truth catalogs that form the basis of location efforts (e.g. Sweeney, 1998; Bergmann et al., 2009; Waldhauser and Richards, 2004). In particular, more GT1 (Ground Truth 1 km) events are required to improve three-dimensional velocity models that are currently under development. Mine seismicity can form the basis of accurate ground truth datasets. Although the location of mining explosions can often be accurately determined using array methods (e.g. Harris, 1991) and from overhead observations (e.g. MacCarthy et al., 2008), accurate origin time estimation can be difficult. Occasionally, mine operators will share shot time, location, explosion size and even shot configuration, but this is rarely done, especially in foreign countries. Additionally, shot times provided by mine operators are often inaccurate. An inexpensive, ground truth event detector that could be mailed to a contact, placed in close proximity (< 5 km) to mining regions or earthquake aftershock regions that automatically transmits back ground-truth parameters, would greatly aid in development of ground truth datasets that could be used to improve nuclear explosion monitoring capabilities. We are developing an inexpensive, compact, lightweight smart sensor unit (or units) that could be used in the development of ground truth datasets for the purpose of improving nuclear explosion monitoring capabilities. The units must be easy to deploy, be able to operate autonomously for a significant period of time (> 6 months) and inexpensive enough to be discarded after useful operations have expired (although this may not be part of our business

  2. Long-term mechanical properties of smart cable based on FBG desensitized encapsulation sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Sheng; Zhou, Min

    2014-09-01

    In order to ensure the testing range and long-term reliability of the fiber Bragg grating (FBG) used for the smart cable, a smart cable embedded with FBG strain sensors based on the desensitized encapsulation structure was designed. For a smart cable specimen, the fatigue loading experiments with the cycle from 100 thousands to 2 million and 0.95 times nominal breaking cable force ( P b ) were carried out, which tested the long-serving effects of the smart cable. The test results of the static tension loading and unloading during the stepwise fatigue cycle process showed that the encapsulated FBG strain sensors had the good linearity and repeatability. Also all sensors survived after 2 million times fatigue cycle. 0.95 P b static tension test showed that the encapsulated FBG strain sensors embedded inside the cable reached 4.5% testing accuracy in the 0.86 P b working range. After 0.95 P b static tension test, the dissection test was carried out by breaking the force tension. The results showed that the appearances of the encapsulated sensors were good, and the design structures were not changed and damaged.

  3. Fully Roll-to-Roll Gravure Printable Wireless (13.56 MHz) Sensor-Signage Tags for Smart Packaging

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Hwiwon; Park, Hyejin; Park, Yongsu; Jung, Minhoon; Kim, Byung Chul; Wallace, Gordon; Cho, Gyoujin

    2014-01-01

    Integration of sensing capabilities with an interactive signage through wireless communication is enabling the development of smart packaging wherein wireless (13.56 MHz) power transmission is used to interlock the smart packaging with a wireless (13.56 MHz) reader or a smart phone. Assembly of the necessary componentry for smart packaging on plastic or paper foils is limited by the manufacturing costs involved with Si based technologies. Here, the issue of manufacturing cost for smart packaging has been obviated by materials that allow R2R (roll-to-roll) gravure in combination with R2R coating processes to be employed. R2R gravure was used to print the wireless power transmission device, called rectenna (antenna, diode and capacitor), and humidity sensor on poly(ethylene terephtalate) (PET) films while electrochromic signage units were fabricated by R2R coating. The signage units were laminated with the R2R gravure printed rectenna and sensor to complete the prototype smart packaging. PMID:24953037

  4. Potentials and problems in space applications of smart structures technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eaton, D. C.; Bashford, D. P.

    1994-09-01

    The well known addage 'don't run before you can walk emerging materials. It typically takes ten years before a material is sufficiently well characterized for commercial aerospace application. Much has to be learnt not only about the material properties and their susceptibility to the effects of their working environment but also about the manufacturing process and the most effective configuration related application. No project will accept a product which has no proven reliability and attractive cost effectiveness in its application. The writers firmly believe that smart structures and their related technologies must follow a similar development pattern. Indeed, faced with a range of interdisciplinary problems it seems likely that 'partially smart' techniques may well be the first applications. These will place emphasis on the more readily realizable features for any structural application. Prior use may well have been achieved in other engineering sectors. Because ground based applications are more readily accessible to check and maintain, these are generally the front runners of smart technology usage. Nevertheless, there is a strong potential for the use of smart techniques in space applications if their capabilities can be advantageously introduced when compared with traditional solutions. This paper endeavors to give a critical appraisal of the possibilities and the accompanying problems. A sample overview of related developing space technology is included. The reader is also referred to chapters 90 to 94 in ESA's Structural Materials Handbook (ESA PSS 03 203, issue 1.). It is envisaged that future space applications may include the realization and maintenance of large deployable reflector profiles, the dimensional stability of optical payloads, active noise and vibration control and in orbit health monitoring and control for largely unmanned spacecraft. The possibility of monitoring the health of items such as large cryogenic fuel tanks is a typical longer

  5. Park Smart

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The Parking Garage Automation System (PGAS) is based on a technology developed by a NASA-sponsored project called Robot sensorSkin(TM). Merritt Systems, Inc., of Orlando, Florida, teamed up with NASA to improve robots working with critical flight hardware at Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The system, containing smart sensor modules and flexible printed circuit board skin, help robots to steer clear of obstacles using a proximity sensing system. Advancements in the sensor designs are being applied to various commercial applications, including the PGAS. The system includes a smartSensor(TM) network installed around and within public parking garages to autonomously guide motorists to open facilities, and once within, to free parking spaces. The sensors use non-invasive reflective-ultrasonic technology for high accuracy, high reliability, and low maintenance. The system is remotely programmable: it can be tuned to site-specific requirements, has variable range capability, and allows remote configuration, monitoring, and diagnostics. The sensors are immune to interference from metallic construction materials, such as rebar and steel beams. Inside the garage, smart routing signs mounted overhead or on poles in front of each row of parking spots guide the motorist precisely to free spaces.

  6. Smart Home Technologies: Insights into Generation-Specific Acceptance Motives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaul, Sylvia; Ziefle, Martina

    In this research we examine the generation specific acceptance motives of eHealth technologies in order to assess the likelihood of success for these new technologies. 280 participants (14 - 92 years of age) volunteered to participate in a survey, in which using motives and barriers toward smart home technologies were explored. The scenario envisaged was the use of a medical stent implemented into the body, which monitors automatically the health status and which is able to remotely communicate with the doctor. Participants were asked to evaluate the pros and cons of the usage of this technology, their acceptance motives and potential utilization barriers. In order to understand the complex nature of acceptance, personal variables (age, technical expertise, health status), individual's cognitive concepts toward ageing as well as perceived usefulness were related. Outcomes show that trust, believe in the reliability of technology, privacy and security as well as intimacy facets are essential for acceptance and should be considered in order to proactively design a successful rollout of smart home technologies.

  7. Pedestrian dead reckoning using a novel sensor module that interfaces with modern smart devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stimac, Philip J.; Demar, Richard W.; Hewitt, Gregory F. S.; McKenna, Mark J.; Jordan, Eric M.; Fordham, Matthew; Haas, John W.

    2015-05-01

    Tracking individuals in areas such as dense urban environments and building interiors is desirable for numerous critical applications, but has been problematic mainly because of the unreliability or unavailability of GPS in many locations of interest. To date, tracking applications that utilize inertial sensors within smart devices have had varied degrees of success: accuracy typically dips below that of standard GPS within minutes and depends strongly on the quality of the sensors in the device, as well as the location that the device is carried on the body. In this paper we present a sensor module that interfaces with modern smart devices and which utilizes a low-cost, commercial-off-the-shelf, 9-axis IMU and pressure sensor to provide an advanced pedestrian dead reckoning solution. The sensor module is designed to communicate with the smart device (e.g., iOS, Android or Windows) via the audio jack and is intended for use as a beltmounted pedestrian tracker. In addition to describing the device hardware and functionality, we present our approach to processing the sensor module data streams to determine a user's position. Results using the prototype sensor module in operationally relevant scenarios is presented and discussed.

  8. Tech Smart: Making Discerning Technology Choices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKenzie, Jamie

    2002-01-01

    Addresses the need for careful planning and discernment when adopting new educational technology to ensure gains in student performance and to achieve learning goals. Topics include focusing on philosophical commitments and program purposes; challenging claims; testing; reviewing previous experiences; evaluating; and slowing down the purchase and…

  9. Mobile Sensor Technologies Being Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greer, Lawrence C.; Oberle, Lawrence G.

    2003-01-01

    central command location. Web-based control and interrogation of similar mobile sensor platforms have also been demonstrated. Expected applications of this technology include robotic planetary exploration, astronaut-to-equipment communication, and remote aerospace engine inspections.

  10. Surface 12 lead electrocardiogram recordings using smart phone technology.

    PubMed

    Baquero, Giselle A; Banchs, Javier E; Ahmed, Shameer; Naccarelli, Gerald V; Luck, Jerry C

    2015-01-01

    AliveCor ECG is an FDA approved ambulatory cardiac rhythm monitor that records a single channel (lead I) ECG rhythm strip using an iPhone. In the past few years, the use of smartphones and tablets with health related applications has significantly proliferated. In this initial feasibility trial, we attempted to reproduce the 12 lead ECG using the bipolar arrangement of the AliveCor monitor coupled to smart phone technology. We used the AliveCor heart monitor coupled with an iPhone cellular phone and the AliveECG application (APP) in 5 individuals. In our 5 individuals, recordings from both a standard 12 lead ECG and the AliveCor generated 12 lead ECG had the same interpretation. This study demonstrates the feasibility of creating a 12 lead ECG with a smart phone. The validity of the recordings would seem to suggest that this technology could become an important useful tool for clinical use. This new hand held smart phone 12 lead ECG recorder needs further development and validation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Smart border: ad-hoc wireless sensor networks for border surveillance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jun; Fallahi, Mahmoud; Norwood, Robert A.; Peyghambarian, Nasser

    2011-06-01

    Wireless sensor networks have been proposed as promising candidates to provide automated monitoring, target tracking, and intrusion detection for border surveillance. In this paper, we demonstrate an ad-hoc wireless sensor network system for border surveillance. The network consists of heterogeneously autonomous sensor nodes that distributively cooperate with each other to enable a smart border in remote areas. This paper also presents energy-aware and sleeping algorithms designed to maximize the operating lifetime of the deployed sensor network. Lessons learned in building the network and important findings from field experiments are shared in the paper.

  12. Design of a smart, survivable sensor system for rapid transit applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, J.R.; Mitchell, J.L.

    1994-08-01

    An application of smart sensor technology developed by Sandia National Laboratories has been proposed for real-time monitoring and tracking in the transportation industry. Its primary purpose is to reduce operating costs by improving preventative maintenance scheduling, reducing the number, severity and consequence of accidents and by reducing losses due to theft. The concept uses a strap-on sensor package, the Green Box, that can be attached to any vehicle. The Green Box is designed as a valued-added component, integrated into existing transportation industry systems and standards. The device, designed to provide advanced warning of component failures, would be capable of surviving most typical accidents. In an accident, the system would send a distress signal notifying authorities of the location and condition of the cargo; permitting them to respond in the most effective manner. In addition, the Green Box is adaptable for use as a notification/locator system to enhance the security of operators and passengers for various modes of public transportation. The modular architecture which facilitates system integration in a number of different applications is discussed. A test plan for evaluating performance in both normal and abnormal operating and accident conditions is described.

  13. Flexible Time-Triggered Sampling in Smart Sensor-Based Wireless Control Systems

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Feng; Zhao, Wenhong

    2007-01-01

    Wireless control systems (WCSs) often have to operate in dynamic environments where the network traffic load may vary unpredictably over time. The sampling in sensors is conventionally time triggered with fixed periods. In this context, only worse-than-possible quality of control (QoC) can be achieved when the network is underloaded, while overloaded conditions may significantly degrade the QoC, even causing system instability. This is particularly true when the bandwidth of the wireless network is limited and shared by multiple control loops. To address these problems, a flexible time-triggered sampling scheme is presented in this work. Smart sensors are used to facilitate dynamic adjustment of sampling periods, which enhances the flexibility and resource efficiency of the system based on time-triggered sampling. Feedback control technology is exploited for adapting sampling periods in a periodic manner. The deadline miss ratio in each control loop is maintained at/around a desired level, regardless of workload variations. Simulation results show that the proposed sampling scheme is able to deal with dynamic and unpredictable variations in network traffic load. Compared to conventional time-triggered sampling, it leads to much better QoC in WCSs operating in dynamic environments.

  14. Flexible Time-Triggered Sampling in Smart Sensor-Based Wireless Control Systems.

    PubMed

    Xia, Feng; Zhao, Wenhong

    2007-10-31

    Wireless control systems (WCSs) often have to operate in dynamic environmentswhere the network traffic load may vary unpredictably over time. The sampling in sensors isconventionally time triggered with fixed periods. In this context, only worse-than-possiblequality of control (QoC) can be achieved when the network is underloaded, whileoverloaded conditions may significantly degrade the QoC, even causing system instability.This is particularly true when the bandwidth of the wireless network is limited and sharedby multiple control loops. To address these problems, a flexible time-triggered samplingscheme is presented in this work. Smart sensors are used to facilitate dynamic adjustment ofsampling periods, which enhances the flexibility and resource efficiency of the system basedon time-triggered sampling. Feedback control technology is exploited for adapting samplingperiods in a periodic manner. The deadline miss ratio in each control loop is maintainedat/around a desired level, regardless of workload variations. Simulation results show that theproposed sampling scheme is able to deal with dynamic and unpredictable variations innetwork traffic load. Compared to conventional time-triggered sampling, it leads to muchbetter QoC in WCSs operating in dynamic environments.

  15. Integrating novel technologies to fabricate smart scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Moroni, L; de Wijn, J R; van Blitterswijk, C A

    2008-01-01

    Tissue engineering aims at restoring or regenerating a damaged tissue by combining cells, derived from a patient biopsy, with a 3D porous matrix functioning as a scaffold. After isolation and eventual in vitro expansion, cells are seeded on the 3D scaffolds and implanted directly or at a later stage in the patient's body. 3D scaffolds need to satisfy a number of requirements: (i) biocompatibility, (ii) biodegradability and/or bioresorbability, (iii) suitable mechanical properties, (iv) adequate physicochemical properties to direct cell-material interactions matching the tissue to be replaced and (v) ease in regaining the original shape of the damaged tissue and the integration with the surrounding environment. Still, it appears to be a challenge to satisfy all the aforementioned requisites with the biomaterials and the scaffold fabrication technologies nowadays available. 3D scaffolds can be fabricated with various techniques, among which rapid prototyping and electrospinning seem to be the most promising. Rapid prototyping technologies allow manufacturing scaffolds with a controlled, completely accessible pore network--determinant for nutrient supply and diffusion--in a CAD/CAM fashion. Electrospinning (ESP) allows mimicking the extracellular matrix (ECM) environment of the cells and can provide fibrous scaffolds with instructive surface properties to direct cell faith into the proper lineage. Yet, these fabrication methods have some disadvantages if considered alone. This review aims at summarizing conventional and novel scaffold fabrication techniques and the biomaterials used for tissue engineering and drug-delivery applications. A new trend seems to emerge in the field of scaffold design where different scaffolds fabrication technologies and different biomaterials are combined to provide cells with mechanical, physicochemical and biological cues at the macro-, micro- and nano-scale. If merged together, these integrated technologies may lead to the generation

  16. ePave: A Self-Powered Wireless Sensor for Smart and Autonomous Pavement.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jian; Zou, Xiang; Xu, Wenyao

    2017-09-26

    "Smart Pavement" is an emerging infrastructure for various on-road applications in transportation and road engineering. However, existing road monitoring solutions demand a certain periodic maintenance effort due to battery life limits in the sensor systems. To this end, we present an end-to-end self-powered wireless sensor-ePave-to facilitate smart and autonomous pavements. The ePave system includes a self-power module, an ultra-low-power sensor system, a wireless transmission module and a built-in power management module. First, we performed an empirical study to characterize the piezoelectric module in order to optimize energy-harvesting efficiency. Second, we developed an integrated sensor system with the optimized energy harvester. An adaptive power knob is designated to adjust the power consumption according to energy budgeting. Finally, we intensively evaluated the ePave system in real-world applications to examine the system's performance and explore the trade-off.

  17. The need to know caregiver perspectives toward using smart home technology.

    PubMed

    Giger, Jarod T; Markward, Martha

    2011-01-01

    This article reviews the literature on adults with serious mental illness, their caregivers, and smart home technology. The article provides compelling evidence for social workers to undertake research aimed at investigating caregivers' perceptions toward using smart home technology for care of adult family members or friends with a serious mental illness. Empirical support for using smart home technologies with adults with serious mental illness is provided, and recommendations for future social work research are offered.

  18. Medical smart textiles based on fiber optic technology: an overview.

    PubMed

    Massaroni, Carlo; Saccomandi, Paola; Schena, Emiliano

    2015-04-13

    The growing interest in the development of smart textiles for medical applications is driven by the aim to increase the mobility of patients who need a continuous monitoring of such physiological parameters. At the same time, the use of fiber optic sensors (FOSs) is gaining large acceptance as an alternative to traditional electrical and mechanical sensors for the monitoring of thermal and mechanical parameters. The potential impact of FOSs is related to their good metrological properties, their small size and their flexibility, as well as to their immunity from electromagnetic field. Their main advantage is the possibility to use textile based on fiber optic in a magnetic resonance imaging environment, where standard electronic sensors cannot be employed. This last feature makes FOSs suitable for monitoring biological parameters (e.g., respiratory and heartbeat monitoring) during magnetic resonance procedures. Research interest in combining FOSs and textiles into a single structure to develop wearable sensors is rapidly growing. In this review we provide an overview of the state-of-the-art of textiles, which use FOSs for monitoring of mechanical parameters of physiological interest. In particular we briefly describe the working principle of FOSs employed in this field and their relevant advantages and disadvantages. Also reviewed are their applications for the monitoring of mechanical parameters of physiological interest.

  19. Medical Smart Textiles Based on Fiber Optic Technology: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Massaroni, Carlo; Saccomandi, Paola; Schena, Emiliano

    2015-01-01

    The growing interest in the development of smart textiles for medical applications is driven by the aim to increase the mobility of patients who need a continuous monitoring of such physiological parameters. At the same time, the use of fiber optic sensors (FOSs) is gaining large acceptance as an alternative to traditional electrical and mechanical sensors for the monitoring of thermal and mechanical parameters. The potential impact of FOSs is related to their good metrological properties, their small size and their flexibility, as well as to their immunity from electromagnetic field. Their main advantage is the possibility to use textile based on fiber optic in a magnetic resonance imaging environment, where standard electronic sensors cannot be employed. This last feature makes FOSs suitable for monitoring biological parameters (e.g., respiratory and heartbeat monitoring) during magnetic resonance procedures. Research interest in combining FOSs and textiles into a single structure to develop wearable sensors is rapidly growing. In this review we provide an overview of the state-of-the-art of textiles, which use FOSs for monitoring of mechanical parameters of physiological interest. In particular we briefly describe the working principle of FOSs employed in this field and their relevant advantages and disadvantages. Also reviewed are their applications for the monitoring of mechanical parameters of physiological interest. PMID:25871010

  20. Encapsulation for smart textile electronics - humidity and temperature sensor.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Andreas; Tran, Thanh-Nam; Aasmundtveit, Knut E; Seeberg, Trine M

    2015-01-01

    A combined humidity and temperature sensor was packaged by vacuum casting onto three different types of textiles; cotton, nylon and a waterproof fabric. This was done in order to integrate the sensor in a jacket in a soft and reliable way without changing the sensor performance. A membrane was custom made and integrated into the device to protect the sensor from the environment. The packaged sensors performance was characterized in a climate chamber were the relative humidity and temperature ranged from 25 % to 95 % and -10 °C to 75 °C respectively. The packaged sensors showed insignificant to limited performance degradation.

  1. A Combined Research/Educational Curriculum in Smart Sensors and Integrated Devices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auner, G. W.; Siy, P.; Naik, R.; Wenger, L.; Liu, G-Y.; Schwiebert, L. J.

    The researchers are developing a new curriculum which integrates ongoing research efforts in the Center for Smart Sensors and Integrated Devices into a cooperative educational and traineeship program. A forerunner to this program was initiated with funding by a National Science Foundation (NSF) Combined Research and Curriculum Development (CRCD)…

  2. Full-scale experimental validation of decentralized damage identification using wireless smart sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Shinae; Sim, Sung-Han; Jo, Hongki; Spencer, Billie F., Jr.

    2012-11-01

    Wireless smart sensor networks (WSSN) facilitate a new paradigm for structural health monitoring (SHM) of civil infrastructure. Conventionally, SHM systems employing wired sensors and centralized data acquisition have been used to characterize the state of a structure; however, widespread implementation has been limited due to high costs and difficulties in installation. WSSN offer a unique opportunity to overcome such difficulties. Recent developments have realized low-cost, smart sensors with on-board computation and wireless communication capabilities, making deployment of a dense array of sensors on large civil structures both economical and feasible. Wireless smart sensors (WSS) have shown their tremendous potential for SHM in recent full-scale bridge monitoring examples. However, structural damage identification using on-board computation capability in a WSSN, a primary objective of SHM, has yet to reach its full potential. This paper presents full-scale validation of a damage identification strategy using a decentralized network of Imote2 nodes on a historic steel truss bridge. A total of 24 WSS nodes with 144 sensor channels are deployed on the bridge to validate the developed damage identification software. The performance of this decentralized damage identification strategy is demonstrated on the WSSN by comparing its results with those from the traditional centralized approach, as well as visual inspection.

  3. Space Missions for Automation and Robotics Technologies (SMART) Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliffone, D. L.; Lum, H., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    NASA is currently considering the establishment of a Space Mission for Automation and Robotics Technologies (SMART) Program to define, develop, integrate, test, and operate a spaceborne national research facility for the validation of advanced automation and robotics technologies. Initially, the concept is envisioned to be implemented through a series of shuttle based flight experiments which will utilize telepresence technologies and real time operation concepts. However, eventually the facility will be capable of a more autonomous role and will be supported by either the shuttle or the space station. To ensure incorporation of leading edge technology in the facility, performance capability will periodically and systematically be upgraded by the solicitation of recommendations from a user advisory group. The facility will be managed by NASA, but will be available to all potential investigators. Experiments for each flight will be selected by a peer review group. Detailed definition and design is proposed to take place during FY 86, with the first SMART flight projected for FY 89.

  4. Suitability of Strain Gage Sensors for Integration into Smart Sport Equipment: A Golf Club Example

    PubMed Central

    Umek, Anton; Zhang, Yuan; Tomažič, Sašo; Kos, Anton

    2017-01-01

    Wearable devices and smart sport equipment are being increasingly used in amateur and professional sports. Smart sport equipment employs various sensors for detecting its state and actions. The correct choice of the most appropriate sensor(s) is of paramount importance for efficient and successful operation of sport equipment. When integrated into the sport equipment, ideal sensors are unobstructive, and do not change the functionality of the equipment. The article focuses on experiments for identification and selection of sensors that are suitable for the integration into a golf club with the final goal of their use in real time biofeedback applications. We tested two orthogonally affixed strain gage (SG) sensors, a 3-axis accelerometer, and a 3-axis gyroscope. The strain gage sensors are calibrated and validated in the laboratory environment by a highly accurate Qualisys Track Manager (QTM) optical tracking system. Field test results show that different types of golf swing and improper movement in early phases of golf swing can be detected with strain gage sensors attached to the shaft of the golf club. Thus they are suitable for biofeedback applications to help golfers to learn repetitive golf swings. It is suggested that the use of strain gage sensors can improve the golf swing technical error detection accuracy and that strain gage sensors alone are enough for basic golf swing analysis. Our final goal is to be able to acquire and analyze as many parameters of a smart golf club in real time during the entire duration of the swing. This would give us the ability to design mobile and cloud biofeedback applications with terminal or concurrent feedback that will enable us to speed-up motor skill learning in golf. PMID:28430147

  5. Suitability of Strain Gage Sensors for Integration into Smart Sport Equipment: A Golf Club Example.

    PubMed

    Umek, Anton; Zhang, Yuan; Tomažič, Sašo; Kos, Anton

    2017-04-21

    Wearable devices and smart sport equipment are being increasingly used in amateur and professional sports. Smart sport equipment employs various sensors for detecting its state and actions. The correct choice of the most appropriate sensor(s) is of paramount importance for efficient and successful operation of sport equipment. When integrated into the sport equipment, ideal sensors are unobstructive, and do not change the functionality of the equipment. The article focuses on experiments for identification and selection of sensors that are suitable for the integration into a golf club with the final goal of their use in real time biofeedback applications. We tested two orthogonally affixed strain gage (SG) sensors, a 3-axis accelerometer, and a 3-axis gyroscope. The strain gage sensors are calibrated and validated in the laboratory environment by a highly accurate Qualisys Track Manager (QTM) optical tracking system. Field test results show that different types of golf swing and improper movement in early phases of golf swing can be detected with strain gage sensors attached to the shaft of the golf club. Thus they are suitable for biofeedback applications to help golfers to learn repetitive golf swings. It is suggested that the use of strain gage sensors can improve the golf swing technical error detection accuracy and that strain gage sensors alone are enough for basic golf swing analysis. Our final goal is to be able to acquire and analyze as many parameters of a smart golf club in real time during the entire duration of the swing. This would give us the ability to design mobile and cloud biofeedback applications with terminal or concurrent feedback that will enable us to speed-up motor skill learning in golf.

  6. Adaptive electric potential sensors for smart signal acquisition and processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prance, R. J.; Beardsmore-Rust, S.; Prance, H.; Harland, C. J.; Stiffell, P. B.

    2007-07-01

    Current applications of the Electric Potential Sensor operate in a strongly (capacitively) coupled limit, with the sensor physically close to or touching the source. This mode of operation screens the sensor effectively from the majority of external noise. To date however the full capability of these sensors operating in a remote mode has not been realised outside of a screened environment (Faraday cage). This paper describes the results of preliminary work in tailoring the response of the sensors to particular signals and so reject background noise, thereby enhancing both the dynamic range and signal to noise ratio significantly.

  7. Integrating Dynamic Data and Sensors with Semantic 3D City Models in the Context of Smart Cities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaturvedi, K.; Kolbe, T. H.

    2016-10-01

    Smart cities provide effective integration of human, physical and digital systems operating in the built environment. The advancements in city and landscape models, sensor web technologies, and simulation methods play a significant role in city analyses and improving quality of life of citizens and governance of cities. Semantic 3D city models can provide substantial benefits and can become a central information backbone for smart city infrastructures. However, current generation semantic 3D city models are static in nature and do not support dynamic properties and sensor observations. In this paper, we propose a new concept called Dynamizer allowing to represent highly dynamic data and providing a method for injecting dynamic variations of city object properties into the static representation. The approach also provides direct capability to model complex patterns based on statistics and general rules and also, real-time sensor observations. The concept is implemented as an Application Domain Extension for the CityGML standard. However, it could also be applied to other GML-based application schemas including the European INSPIRE data themes and national standards for topography and cadasters like the British Ordnance Survey Mastermap or the German cadaster standard ALKIS.

  8. Direction-sensitive smart monitoring of structures using heterogeneous smartphone sensor data and coordinate system transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozer, Ekin; Feng, Maria Q.

    2017-04-01

    Mobile, heterogeneous, and smart sensor networks produce pervasive structural health monitoring (SHM) information. With various embedded sensors, smartphones have emerged to innovate SHM by empowering citizens to serve as sensors. By default, smartphones meet the fundamental smart sensor criteria, thanks to the built-in processor, memory, wireless communication units and mobile operating system. SHM using smartphones, however, faces technical challenges due to citizen-induced uncertainties, undesired sensor-structure integration, and lack of control over the sensing platform. Previously, the authors presented successful applications of smartphone accelerometers for structural vibration measurement and proposed a monitoring framework under citizen-induced spatiotemporal uncertainties. This study aims at extending the capabilities of smartphone-based SHM with a special focus on the lack of control over the sensor (i.e., the phone) positioning by citizens resulting in unknown sensor orientations. Using smartphone gyroscope, accelerometer, and magnetometer; instantaneous sensor orientation can be obtained with respect to gravitational and magnetic north directions. Using these sensor data, mobile operating system frameworks return processed features such as attitude and heading that can be used to correct misaligned sensor signals. For this purpose, a coordinate transformation procedure is proposed and illustrated on a two-story laboratory structural model and real-scale bridges with various sensor positioning examples. The proposed method corrects the sensor signals by tracking their orientations and improves measurement accuracy. Moreover, knowing structure’s coordinate system a priori, even the data from arbitrarily positioned sensors can automatically be transformed to the structural coordinates. In addition, this paper also touches some secondary mobile and heterogeneous data issues including imperfect sampling and geolocation services. The coordinate system

  9. Sense, decide, act, communicate (SDAC): next generation of smart sensor systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, Nina; Davis, Jesse; Ko, Teresa H.; Kyker, Ron; Pate, Ron; Stark, Doug; Stinnett, Regan; Baker, James; Cushner, Adam; Van Dyke, Colin; Kyckelhahn, Brian

    2004-09-01

    The recent war on terrorism and increased urban warfare has been a major catalysis for increased interest in the development of disposable unattended wireless ground sensors. While the application of these sensors to hostile domains has been generally governed by specific tasks, this research explores a unique paradigm capitalizing on the fundamental functionality related to sensor systems. This functionality includes a sensors ability to Sense - multi-modal sensing of environmental events, Decide - smart analysis of sensor data, Act - response to environmental events, and Communication - internal to system and external to humans (SDAC). The main concept behind SDAC sensor systems is to integrate the hardware, software, and networking to generate 'knowledge and not just data'. This research explores the usage of wireless SDAC units to collectively make up a sensor system capable of persistent, adaptive, and autonomous behavior. These systems are base on the evaluation of scenarios and existing systems covering various domains. This paper presents a promising view of sensor network characteristics, which will eventually yield smart (intelligent collectives) network arrays of SDAC sensing units generally applicable to multiple related domains. This paper will also discuss and evaluate the demonstration system developed to test the concepts related to SDAC systems.

  10. Smart Cities Intelligence System (SMACiSYS) Integrating Sensor Web with Spatial Data Infrastructures (sensdi)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, D.; Painho, M.

    2017-09-01

    The paper endeavours to enhance the Sensor Web with crucial geospatial analysis capabilities through integration with Spatial Data Infrastructure. The objective is development of automated smart cities intelligence system (SMACiSYS) with sensor-web access (SENSDI) utilizing geomatics for sustainable societies. There has been a need to develop automated integrated system to categorize events and issue information that reaches users directly. At present, no web-enabled information system exists which can disseminate messages after events evaluation in real time. Research work formalizes a notion of an integrated, independent, generalized, and automated geo-event analysing system making use of geo-spatial data under popular usage platform. Integrating Sensor Web With Spatial Data Infrastructures (SENSDI) aims to extend SDIs with sensor web enablement, converging geospatial and built infrastructure, and implement test cases with sensor data and SDI. The other benefit, conversely, is the expansion of spatial data infrastructure to utilize sensor web, dynamically and in real time for smart applications that smarter cities demand nowadays. Hence, SENSDI augments existing smart cities platforms utilizing sensor web and spatial information achieved by coupling pairs of otherwise disjoint interfaces and APIs formulated by Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) keeping entire platform open access and open source. SENSDI is based on Geonode, QGIS and Java, that bind most of the functionalities of Internet, sensor web and nowadays Internet of Things superseding Internet of Sensors as well. In a nutshell, the project delivers a generalized real-time accessible and analysable platform for sensing the environment and mapping the captured information for optimal decision-making and societal benefit.

  11. Neuro-inspired smart image sensor: analog Hmax implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paindavoine, Michel; Dubois, Jérôme; Musa, Purnawarman

    2015-03-01

    Neuro-Inspired Vision approach, based on models from biology, allows to reduce the computational complexity. One of these models - The Hmax model - shows that the recognition of an object in the visual cortex mobilizes V1, V2 and V4 areas. From the computational point of view, V1 corresponds to the area of the directional filters (for example Sobel filters, Gabor filters or wavelet filters). This information is then processed in the area V2 in order to obtain local maxima. This new information is then sent to an artificial neural network. This neural processing module corresponds to area V4 of the visual cortex and is intended to categorize objects present in the scene. In order to realize autonomous vision systems (consumption of a few milliwatts) with such treatments inside, we studied and realized in 0.35μm CMOS technology prototypes of two image sensors in order to achieve the V1 and V2 processing of Hmax model.

  12. Fused smart sensor network for multi-axis forward kinematics estimation in industrial robots.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Donate, Carlos; Osornio-Rios, Roque Alfredo; Rivera-Guillen, Jesus Rooney; Romero-Troncoso, Rene de Jesus

    2011-01-01

    Flexible manipulator robots have a wide industrial application. Robot performance requires sensing its position and orientation adequately, known as forward kinematics. Commercially available, motion controllers use high-resolution optical encoders to sense the position of each joint which cannot detect some mechanical deformations that decrease the accuracy of the robot position and orientation. To overcome those problems, several sensor fusion methods have been proposed but at expenses of high-computational load, which avoids the online measurement of the joint's angular position and the online forward kinematics estimation. The contribution of this work is to propose a fused smart sensor network to estimate the forward kinematics of an industrial robot. The developed smart processor uses Kalman filters to filter and to fuse the information of the sensor network. Two primary sensors are used: an optical encoder, and a 3-axis accelerometer. In order to obtain the position and orientation of each joint online a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) is used in the hardware implementation taking advantage of the parallel computation capabilities and reconfigurability of this device. With the aim of evaluating the smart sensor network performance, three real-operation-oriented paths are executed and monitored in a 6-degree of freedom robot.

  13. A decentralized receptance-based damage detection strategy for wireless smart sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Shinae; Spencer, Billie F., Jr.; Sim, Sung-Han

    2012-05-01

    Various structural health monitoring strategies have been proposed recently that can be implemented in the decentralized computing environment intrinsic to wireless smart sensor networks (WSSN). Many are based on changes in the experimentally determined flexibility matrix for the structure under consideration. However, the flexibility matrix contains only static information; much richer information is available by considering the dynamic flexibility, or receptance, of the structure. Recently, the stochastic dynamic damage locating vector (SDDLV) method was proposed based on changes of dynamic flexibility matrices employing centrally collected output-only measurements. This paper investigates the potential of the SDDLV method for implementation on a network of wireless smart sensors, where a decentralized, hierarchical, in-network processing approach is used to address issues of scalability of the SDDLV algorithm. Two approaches to aggregate results are proposed that provide robust estimates of damage locations. The efficacy of the developed strategy is first verified using wired sensors emulating a wireless sensor network. Subsequently, the decentralized damage detection strategy is implemented on MEMSIC’s Imote2 smart sensor platform and validated experimentally on a laboratory scale truss bridge.

  14. Smart Sensor for Online Detection of Multiple-Combined Faults in VSD-Fed Induction Motors

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Ramirez, Armando G.; Osornio-Rios, Roque A.; Granados-Lieberman, David; Garcia-Perez, Arturo; Romero-Troncoso, Rene J.

    2012-01-01

    Induction motors fed through variable speed drives (VSD) are widely used in different industrial processes. Nowadays, the industry demands the integration of smart sensors to improve the fault detection in order to reduce cost, maintenance and power consumption. Induction motors can develop one or more faults at the same time that can be produce severe damages. The combined fault identification in induction motors is a demanding task, but it has been rarely considered in spite of being a common situation, because it is difficult to identify two or more faults simultaneously. This work presents a smart sensor for online detection of simple and multiple-combined faults in induction motors fed through a VSD in a wide frequency range covering low frequencies from 3 Hz and high frequencies up to 60 Hz based on a primary sensor being a commercially available current clamp or a hall-effect sensor. The proposed smart sensor implements a methodology based on the fast Fourier transform (FFT), RMS calculation and artificial neural networks (ANN), which are processed online using digital hardware signal processing based on field programmable gate array (FPGA).

  15. Fused Smart Sensor Network for Multi-Axis Forward Kinematics Estimation in Industrial Robots

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Donate, Carlos; Osornio-Rios, Roque Alfredo; Rivera-Guillen, Jesus Rooney; de Jesus Romero-Troncoso, Rene

    2011-01-01

    Flexible manipulator robots have a wide industrial application. Robot performance requires sensing its position and orientation adequately, known as forward kinematics. Commercially available, motion controllers use high-resolution optical encoders to sense the position of each joint which cannot detect some mechanical deformations that decrease the accuracy of the robot position and orientation. To overcome those problems, several sensor fusion methods have been proposed but at expenses of high-computational load, which avoids the online measurement of the joint’s angular position and the online forward kinematics estimation. The contribution of this work is to propose a fused smart sensor network to estimate the forward kinematics of an industrial robot. The developed smart processor uses Kalman filters to filter and to fuse the information of the sensor network. Two primary sensors are used: an optical encoder, and a 3-axis accelerometer. In order to obtain the position and orientation of each joint online a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) is used in the hardware implementation taking advantage of the parallel computation capabilities and reconfigurability of this device. With the aim of evaluating the smart sensor network performance, three real-operation-oriented paths are executed and monitored in a 6-degree of freedom robot. PMID:22163850

  16. Optical signal processing of spatially distributed sensor data in smart structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, K. D.; Claus, R. O.; Murphy, K. A.; Goette, A. M.

    1989-01-01

    Smart structures which contain dense two- or three-dimensional arrays of attached or embedded sensor elements inherently require signal multiplexing and processing capabilities to permit good spatial data resolution as well as the adequately short calculation times demanded by real time active feedback actuator drive circuitry. This paper reports the implementation of an in-line optical signal processor and its application in a structural sensing system which incorporates multiple discrete optical fiber sensor elements. The signal processor consists of an array of optical fiber couplers having tailored s-parameters and arranged to allow gray code amplitude scaling of sensor inputs. The use of this signal processor in systems designed to indicate the location of distributed strain and damage in composite materials, as well as to quantitatively characterize that damage, is described. Extension of similar signal processing methods to more complicated smart materials and structures applications are discussed.

  17. Characterization monitoring & sensor technology crosscutting program

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-01

    The purpose of the Characterization, Monitoring, and Sensor Technology Crosscutting Program (CMST-CP) is to deliver appropriate characterization, monitoring, and sensor technology (CMST) to the OFfice of Waste Management (EM-30), the Office of Environmental Restoration (EM-40), and the Office of Facility Transition and Management (EM-60).

  18. Development of an on-column affinity smart polymer gel glucose sensor.

    PubMed

    Thammakhet, Chongdee; Thavarungkul, Panote; Kanatharana, Proespichaya

    2011-06-10

    An on-column affinity smart polymer gel glucose sensor was developed as a non-enzymatic glucose sensor. A copolymer of 3-acrylamidophenylboronic acid and acrylamide, the so called "smart polymer", was synthesized in situ in a 5 cm long capillary tube with a detection window to provide the on-column detection. The optical density of this semitransparent affinity smart polymer gel, coated inside the tube, decreased with increasing glucose concentration and was detected using a UV-vis detector at 500 nm. The capillary tube was incorporated into a flow injection system. Under optimum conditions, a linear dynamic range of 0.5-16.0mM with a limit of detection of 0.5mM (S/N ≥ 3) was obtained. A single coated affinity smart polymer gel had good stability for up to 250 consecutive injections with relative standard deviation of less than 5%. The analysis time for each injection was 6 min. Ten glucose samples prepared in distilled water were analyzed by the developed method and the results compared well with those obtained from the conventional dinitrosalicylic acid (DNS) method (P>0.05). Real urine samples with known glucose levels were analyzed and the developed sensor provided comparable results to those from the normal strip test technique. Acceptable percentage recoveries, ranging from 88 ± 2% to 103 ± 4% from the spiked urine sample, were obtained. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Unconventional optical imaging using a high-speed neural network based smart sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrasmith, William W.

    2006-05-01

    The advancement of neural network methods and technologies is finding applications in many fields and disciplines of interest to the defense, intelligence, and homeland security communities. Rapidly reconfigurable sensors for real or near-real time signal or image processing can be used for multi-functional purposes such as image compression, target tracking, image fusion, edge detection, thresholding, pattern recognition, and atmospheric turbulence compensation to name a few. A neural network based smart sensor is described that can accomplish these tasks individually or in combination, in real-time or near real-time. As a computationally intensive example, the case of optical imaging through volume turbulence is addressed. For imaging systems in the visible and near infrared part of the electromagnetic spectrum, the atmosphere is often the dominant factor in reducing the imaging system's resolution and image quality. The neural network approach described in this paper is shown to present a viable means for implementing turbulence compensation techniques for near-field and distributed turbulence scenarios. Representative high-speed neural network hardware is presented. Existing 2-D cellular neural network (CNN) hardware is capable of 3 trillion operations per second with peta-operations per second possible using current 3-D manufacturing processes. This hardware can be used for high-speed applications that require fast convolutions and de-convolutions. Existing 3-D artificial neural network technology is capable of peta-operations per second and can be used for fast array processing operations. Methods for optical imaging through distributed turbulence are discussed, simulation results are presented and computational and performance assessments are provided.

  20. Integrate modelling of smart structures for astronomy: design future technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riva, M.; Moschetti, M.

    2016-07-01

    The astronomical instrumentation needs high level of image quality and stability. The quality of images processed by an optical instrument can be referred to the size of the spot and/or the point spread function (p.s.f.), while the stability is related to the displacement of the spot centroid during the observations. The importance of new design procedures for astronomical instruments through the direct design of the materials taking into account their functionalities integrating different approaches (FEM + raytracing) is then enhanced by the new upcoming requirement. Different functional materials can be joined together exploiting each peculiar property in order to realize an integrated structure better known as Smart Structure. They are capable of sensing and reacting to their environment in a predictable and desired manner, through the integration of various elements, such as sensors, actuators, power sources, signal processors, and communications network. The Paper describes possible application related to two main functional materials: piezoelectric materials and Shape Memory Alloys.

  1. SMART-1 Technology and Science Experiments and their Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marini, A.; Lumb, R.; Dias-Almeida, M.; Foing, B. H.

    2002-01-01

    SMART-1, the first European mission to the Moon, hosts 10 Technology and science experiments run by 7 on-board instruments. The primary objective of the mission is the demonstration of the solar electric propulsion. Therefore the monitoring of the spacecraft plasma environment and the contamination produced by the Stationary Plasma thruster is a key-task, which will be carried out by two experiments (SPEDE - Spacecraft Potential, Electron and Dust Experiment - and EPDP - Electric propulsion diagnostic Package). SPEDE and EPDP will contribute also to the characterisation of the near-Earth and interplanetary plasma environment and to study the solar wind. A package of three spectroscopy and imaging instruments has been selected to run technology demonstration of miniaturised compact instrument for planetary remote sensing and for carrying out valuable science at the Moon. AMIE (Asteroid-Moon micro-Imager Experiment) is a miniature medium-resolution (30 m at 300 km height) camera, equipped with a fixed panchromatic and 3-colour filter, for Moon topography and imaging support to other experiments. D-CIXS (Demonstration of a Compact Imaging X-ray Spectrometer) is based on novel detector and filter/collimator technologies, and will perform the first global mapping of the lunar elemental composition, by looking at X-ray fluorescence in the 0.5-10 keV range. It is supported in its operation by XSM (X-ray Solar Monitor) that also monitors long-term coronal X-ray emission and solar flares. SIR is a miniature near-infrared spectrometer operating in the 0.9-2.6 μm wavelength range and will carry out mineralogical survey of the lunar crust in a previously uncovered bandwidth. Technology experiments for deep space communications are: The SMART-1 Instruments have been integrated in the Spacecraft in the current year and have undergone functional verification following environmental tests. The Experiments will be performed during two distinct phases of the SMART-1 mission

  2. Smart structures technologies for parallel kinematics in handling and assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keimer, Ralf; Algermissen, Stephan; Pavlovic, Nenad; Budde, Christoph

    2007-04-01

    Parallel kinematics offer a high potential for increasing performance of machines for handling and assembly. Due to greater stiffness and reduced moving masses compared to typical serial kinematics, higher accelerations and thus lower cycle times can be achieved, which is an essential benchmark for high performance in handling and assembly. However, there are some challenges left to be able to fully exploit the potential of such machines. Some of these challenges are inherent to parallel kinematics, like a low ratio between work and installation space or a considerably changing structural elasticity as a function of the position in work space. Other difficulties arise from high accelerations, which lead to high dynamic loads inducing significant vibrations. While it is essential to cope with the challenges of parallel kinematics in the design-process, smart structures technologies lend themselves as means to face some of these challenges. In this paper a 4-degree of freedom parallel mechanism based on a triglide structure is presented. This machine was designed in a way to overcome the problem of low ratio between work and installation space, by allowing for a change of the structure's configuration with the purpose of increasing the work space. Furthermore, an active vibration suppression was designed and incorporated using rods with embedded piezoceramic actuators. The design of these smart structural parts is discussed and experimental results regarding the vibration suppression are shown. Adaptive joints are another smart structures technology, which can be used to increase the performance of parallel kinematics. The adaptiveness of such joints is reflected in their ability to change their friction attributes, whereas they can be used on one hand to suppress vibrations and on the other hand to change the degrees of freedom (DOF). The vibration suppression is achieved by increasing structural damping at the end of a trajectory and by maintaining low friction

  3. Piezoelectric Actuator/Sensor Technology at Rockwell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neurgaonkar, Ratnakar R.

    1996-01-01

    We describe the state-of-the art of piezoelectric materials based on perovskite and tungsten bronze families for sensor, actuator and smart structure applications. The microstructural defects in these materials have been eliminated to a large extent and the resulting materials exhibit exceedingly high performance for various applications. The performance of Rockwell actuators/sensors is at least 3 times better than commercially available products. These high performance actuators are being incorporated into various applications including, DOD, NASA and commercial. The multilayer actuator stacks fabricated from our piezoceramics are advantageous for sensing and high capacitance applications. In this presentation, we will describe the use of our high performance piezo-ceramics for actuators and sensors, including multilayer stacks and composite structures.

  4. Piezoelectric Actuator/Sensor Technology at Rockwell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neurgaonkar, Ratnakar R.

    1996-01-01

    We describe the state-of-the art of piezoelectric materials based on perovskite and tungsten bronze families for sensor, actuator and smart structure applications. The microstructural defects in these materials have been eliminated to a large extent and the resulting materials exhibit exceedingly high performance for various applications. The performance of Rockwell actuators/sensors is at least 3 times better than commercially available products. These high performance actuators are being incorporated into various applications including, DOD, NASA and commercial. The multilayer actuator stacks fabricated from our piezoceramics are advantageous for sensing and high capacitance applications. In this presentation, we will describe the use of our high performance piezo-ceramics for actuators and sensors, including multilayer stacks and composite structures.

  5. A Smart Wearable Sensor System for Counter-Fighting Overweight in Teenagers.

    PubMed

    Standoli, Carlo Emilio; Guarneri, Maria Renata; Perego, Paolo; Mazzola, Marco; Mazzola, Alessandra; Andreoni, Giuseppe

    2016-08-10

    PEGASO is a FP7-funded project whose goal is to develop an ICT and mobile-based platform together with an appropriate strategy to tackle the diffusion of obesity and other lifestyle-related illnesses among teenagers. Indeed, the design of an engaging strategy, leveraging a complementary set of technologies, is the approach proposed by the project to promote the adoption of healthy habits such as active lifestyle and balanced nutrition and to effectively counter-fight the emergence of overweight and obesity in the younger population. A technological key element of such a strategy sees the adoption of wearable sensors to monitor teenagers' activities, which is at the basis of developing awareness about the current lifestyle. This paper describes the experience carried out in the framework of the PEGASO project in developing and evaluating wearable monitoring systems addressed to adolescents. The paper describes the methodological approach based on the co-designing of such a wearable system and the main results that, in the first phase, involved a total of 407 adolescents across Europe in a series of focus groups conducted in three countries for the requirements definition phase. Moreover, it describes an evaluation process of signal reliability during the usage of the wearable system. The main results described here are: (a) a prototype of the standardized experimental protocol that has been developed and applied to test signal reliability in smart garments; (b) the requirements definition methodology through a co-design activity and approach to address user requirements and preferences and not only technological specifications. Such co-design approach is able to support a higher system acceptance and usability together with a sustained adoption of the solution with respect to the traditional technology push system development strategy.

  6. A Smart Wearable Sensor System for Counter-Fighting Overweight in Teenagers

    PubMed Central

    Standoli, Carlo Emilio; Guarneri, Maria Renata; Perego, Paolo; Mazzola, Marco; Mazzola, Alessandra; Andreoni, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    PEGASO is a FP7-funded project whose goal is to develop an ICT and mobile-based platform together with an appropriate strategy to tackle the diffusion of obesity and other lifestyle-related illnesses among teenagers. Indeed, the design of an engaging strategy, leveraging a complementary set of technologies, is the approach proposed by the project to promote the adoption of healthy habits such as active lifestyle and balanced nutrition and to effectively counter-fight the emergence of overweight and obesity in the younger population. A technological key element of such a strategy sees the adoption of wearable sensors to monitor teenagers’ activities, which is at the basis of developing awareness about the current lifestyle. This paper describes the experience carried out in the framework of the PEGASO project in developing and evaluating wearable monitoring systems addressed to adolescents. The paper describes the methodological approach based on the co-designing of such a wearable system and the main results that, in the first phase, involved a total of 407 adolescents across Europe in a series of focus groups conducted in three countries for the requirements definition phase. Moreover, it describes an evaluation process of signal reliability during the usage of the wearable system. The main results described here are: (a) a prototype of the standardized experimental protocol that has been developed and applied to test signal reliability in smart garments; (b) the requirements definition methodology through a co-design activity and approach to address user requirements and preferences and not only technological specifications. Such co-design approach is able to support a higher system acceptance and usability together with a sustained adoption of the solution with respect to the traditional technology push system development strategy. PMID:27517929

  7. Smart MEMS for smart structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoess, Jeffrey N.; Zook, J. David

    1995-05-01

    Future advanced fixed and rotary-wing aircraft, launch vehicles, and spacecraft will incorporate smart MEMS devices to monitor structural integrity and manage overall structural health. These smart structures will be capable of assessing vehicle structural damage in real time and ultimately reconfiguring the vehicle flight control to prevent catastrophic failures. This paper describes an overview of Honeywell's MEM technology for new and aging aircraft applications to assess preflight readiness, in- flight structural integrity, and postflight time-based maintenance. Honeywell's MEMS approach combines silicon micromachining, free-space optical waveguides, high-speed optical interconnects, and supervisory sensor management to monitor structural integrity and health. A unique second-generation polysilicon resonance microbeam sensor is described. It incorporates a micron-level vacuum-encapsulated microbeam to optically sense structural-integrity parameters such as acoustic- mission, strain, and to optically power the sensor pickoff. Its principle of operation and significant payoffs and benefits are summarized.

  8. Smart composite structure based on integrated passive wireless strain sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Zi Jing; Kim, Chun-Gon

    2008-03-01

    This paper reports the development of low-cost inductively coupled passive wireless strain sensors which could be easily embedded within composite prepreg layers for structural health monitoring application. The sensors of 5 different patterns were fabricated and were experimentally tested. Theoretical modeling utilizing two different approaches and electromagnetic simulation were performed to estimate both the strain-free resonant frequency and the shift of resonant frequency of the sensor due to strain. Both the modeling and simulation results showed satisfactory agreement with the experimental data. The Terman model was found to give a better approximation of the strain-free resonant frequency, but the CAD model managed to predict the resonant frequency shift caused by strain more closer to the simulation result. Experimentally, all the sensors showed great strain sensing potential, as good linearity between resonant frequency and strain and relatively low hysteresis characteristics were observed. Finally, the feasibility of constructing sensor array was verified.

  9. Smart Technology for Training: Promise and Current Status. Research Report 1412.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Wayne D.; And Others

    Intended for use by managers and developers of Army training, this report provides an introduction to "smart technology," which represents the application of cognitive and computer science to Army training problems. Differences between "intelligent tutors"--a major component of smart technology--and conventional…

  10. The Impact of SMART Board Technology on Growth in Mathematics Achievement of Gifted Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riska, Patricia A.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined whether SMART Board technology increased growth in mathematics performance of fourth grade gifted students. Gifted students in North Carolina were studied to determine if the use of SMART Board technology during mathematics instruction impacted their growth on standardized state tests. The sample consisted of 175 students from…

  11. Development of built-in type and noninvasive sensor systems for smart artificial heart.

    PubMed

    Yamagishi, Hiromasa; Sankai, Yoshiyuki; Yamane, Takashi; Jikuya, Tomoaki; Tsutsui, Tatsuo

    2003-01-01

    It is very important to grasp the artificial heart condition and the physiologic conditions for the implantable artificial heart. In our laboratory, a smart artificial heart (SAH) has been proposed and developed. An SAH is an artificial heart with a noninvasive sensor; it is a sensorized and intelligent artificial heart for safe and effective treatment. In this study, the following sensor systems for SAH are described: noninvasive blood temperature sensor system, noninvasive blood pressure sensor system, and noninvasive small blood flow sensor system. These noninvasive sensor systems are integrated and included around the artificial heart to evaluate these sensor systems for SAH by the mockup experiments and the animal experiments. The blood temperature could be measured stably by the temperature sensor system. Aortic pressure was estimated, and sucking condition was detected by the pressure sensor system. The blood flow was measured by the flow meter system within 10% error. As a result of these experiments, we confirmed the effectiveness of the sensor systems for SAH.

  12. A Human-Centered Smart Home System with Wearable-Sensor Behavior Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Jianting; Liu, Ting; Shen, Chao; Wu, Hongyu; Liu, Wenyi; Su, Man; Chen, Siyun; Jia, Zhanpei

    2016-11-17

    Smart home has recently attracted much research interest owing to its potential in improving the quality of human life. How to obtain user's demand is the most important and challenging task for appliance optimal scheduling in smart home, since it is highly related to user's unpredictable behavior. In this paper, a human-centered smart home system is proposed to identify user behavior, predict their demand and schedule the household appliances. Firstly, the sensor data from user's wearable devices are monitored to profile user's full-day behavior. Then, the appliance-demand matrix is constructed to predict user's demand on home environment, which is extracted from the history of appliance load data and user behavior. Two simulations are designed to demonstrate user behavior identification, appliance-demand matrix construction and strategy of appliance optimal scheduling generation.

  13. IEEE 1451.2 based Smart sensor system using ADuc847

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreejithlal, A.; Ajith, Jose

    IEEE 1451 standard defines a standard interface for connecting transducers to microprocessor based data acquisition systems, instrumentation systems, control and field networks. Smart transducer interface module (STIM) acts as a unit which provides signal conditioning, digitization and data packet generation functions to the transducers connected to it. This paper describes the implementation of a microcontroller based smart transducer interface module based on IEEE 1451.2 standard. The module, implemented using ADuc847 microcontroller has 2 transducer channels and is programmed using Embedded C language. The Sensor system consists of a Network Controlled Application Processor (NCAP) module which controls the Smart transducer interface module (STIM) over an IEEE1451.2-RS232 bus. The NCAP module is implemented as a software module in C# language. The hardware details, control principles involved and the software implementation for the STIM are described in detail.

  14. Improving Biometric-Based Authentication Schemes with Smart Card Revocation/Reissue for Wireless Sensor Networks.

    PubMed

    Moon, Jongho; Lee, Donghoon; Lee, Youngsook; Won, Dongho

    2017-04-25

    User authentication in wireless sensor networks is more difficult than in traditional networks owing to sensor network characteristics such as unreliable communication, limited resources, and unattended operation. For these reasons, various authentication schemes have been proposed to provide secure and efficient communication. In 2016, Park et al. proposed a secure biometric-based authentication scheme with smart card revocation/reissue for wireless sensor networks. However, we found that their scheme was still insecure against impersonation attack, and had a problem in the smart card revocation/reissue phase. In this paper, we show how an adversary can impersonate a legitimate user or sensor node, illegal smart card revocation/reissue and prove that Park et al.'s scheme fails to provide revocation/reissue. In addition, we propose an enhanced scheme that provides efficiency, as well as anonymity and security. Finally, we provide security and performance analysis between previous schemes and the proposed scheme, and provide formal analysis based on the random oracle model. The results prove that the proposed scheme can solve the weaknesses of impersonation attack and other security flaws in the security analysis section. Furthermore, performance analysis shows that the computational cost is lower than the previous scheme.

  15. Design, optimization and evaluation of a "smart" pixel sensor array for low-dose digital radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kai; Liu, Xinghui; Ou, Hai; Chen, Jun

    2016-04-01

    Amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin-film transistors (TFTs) have been widely used to build flat-panel X-ray detectors for digital radiography (DR). As the demand for low-dose X-ray imaging grows, a detector with high signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) pixel architecture emerges. "Smart" pixel is intended to use a dual-gate photosensitive TFT for sensing, storage, and switch. It differs from a conventional passive pixel sensor (PPS) and active pixel sensor (APS) in that all these three functions are combined into one device instead of three separate units in a pixel. Thus, it is expected to have high fill factor and high spatial resolution. In addition, it utilizes the amplification effect of the dual-gate photosensitive TFT to form a one-transistor APS that leads to a potentially high SNR. This paper addresses the design, optimization and evaluation of the smart pixel sensor and array for low-dose DR. We will design and optimize the smart pixel from the scintillator to TFT levels and validate it through optical and electrical simulation and experiments of a 4x4 sensor array.

  16. Improving Biometric-Based Authentication Schemes with Smart Card Revocation/Reissue for Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Jongho; Lee, Donghoon; Lee, Youngsook; Won, Dongho

    2017-01-01

    User authentication in wireless sensor networks is more difficult than in traditional networks owing to sensor network characteristics such as unreliable communication, limited resources, and unattended operation. For these reasons, various authentication schemes have been proposed to provide secure and efficient communication. In 2016, Park et al. proposed a secure biometric-based authentication scheme with smart card revocation/reissue for wireless sensor networks. However, we found that their scheme was still insecure against impersonation attack, and had a problem in the smart card revocation/reissue phase. In this paper, we show how an adversary can impersonate a legitimate user or sensor node, illegal smart card revocation/reissue and prove that Park et al.’s scheme fails to provide revocation/reissue. In addition, we propose an enhanced scheme that provides efficiency, as well as anonymity and security. Finally, we provide security and performance analysis between previous schemes and the proposed scheme, and provide formal analysis based on the random oracle model. The results prove that the proposed scheme can solve the weaknesses of impersonation attack and other security flaws in the security analysis section. Furthermore, performance analysis shows that the computational cost is lower than the previous scheme. PMID:28441331

  17. Integrating smart container technology into existing shipping and law enforcement infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferriere, Dale; Pysareva, Khrystyna; Rucinski, Andrzej

    2006-05-01

    While there has been important research and development in the area of smart container technologies, no system design methodologies have yet emerged for integrating this technology into the existing shipping and law enforcement infrastructure. A successful deployment of smart containers requires a precise understanding of how to integrate this new technology into the existing shipping and law enforcement infrastructure, how to establish communication interoperability, and how to establish procedures and protocols related to the operation of smart containers. In addition, this integration needs to be seamless, unobtrusive to commerce, and cost-effective. In order to address these issues, we need to answer the following series of questions: 1) Who will own and operate the smart container technology; 2) Who will be responsible for monitoring the smart container data and notifying first responders; 3) What communication technologies currently used by first responders might be adopted for smart container data transmission; and 4) How will existing cargo manifest data be integrated into smart container data. In short, we need to identify the best practices for smart container ownership and operation. In order to help provide answers to these questions, we have surveyed a sample group of representatives from law enforcement, first responder, regulatory, and private sector organizations. This paper presents smart container infrastructure best practices recommendations obtained from the results of the survey.

  18. A low-power CMOS smart temperature sensor for RFID application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liangbo, Xie; Jiaxin, Liu; Yao, Wang; Guangjun, Wen

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents the design and implement of a CMOS smart temperature sensor, which consists of a low power analog front-end and a 12-bit low-power successive approximation register (SAR) analog-to-digital converter (ADC). The analog front-end generates a proportional-to-absolute-temperature (PTAT) voltage with MOSFET circuits operating in the sub-threshold region. A reference voltage is also generated and optimized in order to minimize the temperature error and the 12-bit SAR ADC is used to digitize the PTAT voltage. Using 0.18 μm CMOS technology, measurement results show that the temperature error is -0.69/+0.85 °C after one-point calibration over a temperature range of -40 to 100 °C. Under a conversion speed of 1K samples/s, the power consumption is only 2.02 μW while the chip area is 230 × 225 μm2, and it is suitable for RFID application.

  19. Smart sensors wireless measurement network based on Bluetooth standard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weremczuk, Jerzy; Jachowicz, Ryszard; Jablonski, Michal

    2003-09-01

    The paper briefly describes Bluetooth standard and authors" Bluetoth sensors modules construction. At the beginning the short comparison of existing on the market standards of wireless data transmission (IEEE802.11, IEEE802.11b/g, IEEE802.11a, HomeRF, Bluetooth, Radiometrix, Motorola, IrDA) brought out by main firms is presented. Next selected Bluetooth features and functions useful to sensors wireless network creations are discussed. At the end our own Bluetooth sensor based on the newest Ericsson ROK 101 007 module is specified.

  20. Sensor technology more than a support.

    PubMed

    Olsson, Anna; Persson, Ann-Christine; Bartfai, Aniko; Boman, Inga-Lill

    2017-02-17

    This interview study is a part of a project that evaluated sensor technology as a support in everyday activities for patients with memory impairment. To explore patients with memory impairment and their partners' experiences of using sensor technology in their homes. Five patients with memory impairment after stroke and three partners were interviewed. Individual semi-structured interviews were analyzed with qualitative content analysis. Installing sensor technology with individually prerecorded voice reminders as memory support in the home had a broad impact on patients' and their families' lives. These effects were both positive and negative. The sensor technology not only supported activities but also influenced the patients by changing behavior, providing a sense of security, independence and increased self-confidence. For the partners, the sensor technology eased daily life, but also gave increased responsibility for maintenance. Technical problems led to frustration and stress for the patients. The results indicate that sensor technology has potential to increase opportunities for persons with memory impairment to perform and participate in activities and to unburden their partners. The results may promote an understanding of how sensor technology can be used to support persons with memory impairment in their homes.

  1. Older adults' attitudes towards and perceptions of "smart home" technologies: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Demiris, George; Rantz, Marilyn; Aud, Myra; Marek, Karen; Tyrer, Harry; Skubic, Marjorie; Hussam, Ali

    2004-06-01

    The study aim is to explore the perceptions and expectations of seniors in regard to "smart home" technology installed and operated in their homes with the purpose of improving their quality of life and/or monitoring their health status. Three focus group sessions were conducted within this pilot study to assess older adults' perceptions of the technology and ways they believe technology can improve their daily lives. Themes discussed in these groups included participants' perceptions of the usefulness of devices and sensors in health-related issues such as preventing or detecting falls, assisting with visual or hearing impairments, improving mobility, reducing isolation, managing medications, and monitoring of physiological parameters. The audiotapes were transcribed and a content analysis was performed. A total of 15 older adults participated in three focus group sessions. Areas where advanced technologies would benefit older adult residents included emergency help, prevention and detection of falls, monitoring of physiological parameters, etc. Concerns were expressed about the user-friendliness of the devices, lack of human response and the need for training tailored to older learners. All participants had an overall positive attitude towards devices and sensors that can be installed in their homes in order to enhance their lives.

  2. Using smart phone sensors to detect transportation modes.

    PubMed

    Xia, Hao; Qiao, Yanyou; Jian, Jun; Chang, Yuanfei

    2014-11-04

    The proliferation of mobile smart devices has led to a rapid increase of location-based services, many of which are amassing large datasets of user trajectory information. Unfortunately, current trajectory information is not yet sufficiently rich to support classification of user transportation modes. In this paper, we propose a method that employs both the Global Positioning System and accelerometer data from smart devices to classify user outdoor transportation modes. The classified modes include walking, bicycling, and motorized transport, in addition to the motionless (stationary) state, for which we provide new depth analysis. In our classification, stationary mode has two sub-modes: stay (remaining in the same place for a prolonged time period; e.g., in a parked vehicle) and wait (remaining at a location for a short period; e.g., waiting at a red traffic light). These two sub-modes present different semantics for data mining applications. We use support vector machines with parameters that are optimized for pattern recognition. In addition, we employ ant colony optimization to reduce the dimension of features and analyze their relative importance. The resulting classification system achieves an accuracy rate of 96.31% when applied to a dataset obtained from 18 mobile users.

  3. Using Smart Phone Sensors to Detect Transportation Modes

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Hao; Qiao, Yanyou; Jian, Jun; Chang, Yuanfei

    2014-01-01

    The proliferation of mobile smart devices has led to a rapid increase of location-based services, many of which are amassing large datasets of user trajectory information. Unfortunately, current trajectory information is not yet sufficiently rich to support classification of user transportation modes. In this paper, we propose a method that employs both the Global Positioning System and accelerometer data from smart devices to classify user outdoor transportation modes. The classified modes include walking, bicycling, and motorized transport, in addition to the motionless (stationary) state, for which we provide new depth analysis. In our classification, stationary mode has two sub-modes: stay (remaining in the same place for a prolonged time period; e.g., in a parked vehicle) and wait (remaining at a location for a short period; e.g., waiting at a red traffic light). These two sub-modes present different semantics for data mining applications. We use support vector machines with parameters that are optimized for pattern recognition. In addition, we employ ant colony optimization to reduce the dimension of features and analyze their relative importance. The resulting classification system achieves an accuracy rate of 96.31% when applied to a dataset obtained from 18 mobile users. PMID:25375756

  4. Development of Mine Explosion Ground Truth Smart Sensors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    Mountain Geophysics1, Jarpe Data Solutions2, and Deschutes Signal Processing3 Sponsored by the National Nuclear Security Administration Award No. DE...sensor, and a pressure sensor. Because we expect the signals may clip the geophone, the MEMS operates in standby mode (thereby saving power) and...mining region and we treat the group velocities of the P, Rg, and acoustic waves as random and have some prior distribution that can be either uniform or

  5. Application of smart BFRP bars with distributed fiber optic sensors into concrete structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yongsheng; Wu, Zhishen; Yang, Caiqian; Wu, Gang; Zhao, Lihua; Song, Shiwei

    2010-04-01

    In this paper, the self-sensing and mechanical properties of concrete structures strengthened with a novel type of smart basalt fiber reinforced polymer (BFRP) bars were experimentally studied, wherein the sensing element is Brillouin scattering-based distributed optical fiber sensing technique. First, one of the smart bars was applied to strengthen a 2m concrete beam under a 4-points static loading manner in the laboratory. During the experiment, the bar can measure the inner strain changes and monitor the randomly distributed cracks well. With the distributed strain information along the bar, the distributed deformation of the beam can be calculated, and the structural health can be monitored and evaluated as well. Then, two smart bars with a length of about 70m were embedded into a concrete airfield pavement reinforced by long BFRP bars. In the field test, all the optical fiber sensors in the smart bars survived the whole concrete casting process and worked well. From the measured data, the concrete cracks along the pavement length can be easily monitored. The experimental results also confirmed that the bars can strengthen the structures especially after the yielding of steel bars. All the results confirm that this new type of smart BFRP bars show not only good sensing performance but also mechanical performance in the concrete structures.

  6. Advancing Sensor Technology for Aerospace Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Figueroa, Fernando; Mercer, Carolyn R.

    2002-01-01

    NASA's Stennis Space Center (SSC) and Glenn Research Center (GRC) participate in the development of technologies for propulsion testing and propulsion applications in air and space transportation. Future transportation systems and the test facilities needed to develop and sustain them are becoming increasingly complex. Sensor technology is a fundamental pillar that makes possible development of complex systems that must operate in automatic mode (closed loop systems), or even in assisted-autonomous mode (highly self-sufficient systems such as planetary exploration spacecraft). Hence, a great deal of effort is dedicated to develop new sensors and related technologies to be used in research facilities, test facilities, and in vehicles and equipment. This paper describes sensor technologies being developed and in use at SSC and GRC, including new technologies in integrated health management involving sensors, components, processes, and vehicles.

  7. Designing Smart Health Care Technology into the Home of the Future

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, S.; Craft, R.L.; Bosma, J.T.

    1999-04-07

    The US health care industry is experiencing a substantial paradigm shift with regard to home care due to the convergence of several technology areas. Increasingly-capable telehealth systems and the internet are not only moving the point of care closer to the patient, but the patient can now assume a more active role in his or her own care. These technologies, coupled with (1) the migration of the health care industry to electronic patient records and (2) the emergence of a growing number of enabling health care technologies (e.g., novel biosensors, wearable devices, and intelligent software agents), demonstrate unprecedented potential for delivering highly automated, intelligent health care in the home. This editorial paper presents a vision for the implementation of intelligent health care technology in the home of the future, focusing on areas of research that have the highest potential payoff given targeted government funding over the next ten years. Here, intelligent health care technology means smart devices and systems that are aware of their context and can therefore assimilate information to support care decisions. A systems perspective is used to describe a framework under which devices can interact with one another in a plug-and-play manner. Within this infrastructure, traditionally passive sensors and devices will have read/write access to appropriate portions of an individual's electronic medical record. Through intelligent software agents, plug-and-play mechanisms, messaging standards, and user authentication tools, these smart home-based medical devices will be aware of their own capabilities, their relationship to the other devices in the home system, and the identity of the individual(s) from whom they acquire data. Information surety technology will be essential to maintain the confidentiality of patient-identifiable medical information and to protect the integrity of geographically dispersed electronic medical records with which each home

  8. Towards the Development of a Smart Flying Sensor: Illustration in the Field of Precision Agriculture.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Andres; Murcia, Harold; Copot, Cosmin; De Keyser, Robin

    2015-07-10

    Sensing is an important element to quantify productivity, product quality and to make decisions. Applications, such as mapping, surveillance, exploration and precision agriculture, require a reliable platform for remote sensing. This paper presents the first steps towards the development of a smart flying sensor based on an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV). The concept of smart remote sensing is illustrated and its performance tested for the task of mapping the volume of grain inside a trailer during forage harvesting. Novelty lies in: (1) the development of a position-estimation method with time delay compensation based on inertial measurement unit (IMU) sensors and image processing; (2) a method to build a 3D map using information obtained from a regular camera; and (3) the design and implementation of a path-following control algorithm using model predictive control (MPC). Experimental results on a lab-scale system validate the effectiveness of the proposed methodology.

  9. Towards the Development of a Smart Flying Sensor: Illustration in the Field of Precision Agriculture

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Andres; Murcia, Harold; Copot, Cosmin; De Keyser, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Sensing is an important element to quantify productivity, product quality and to make decisions. Applications, such as mapping, surveillance, exploration and precision agriculture, require a reliable platform for remote sensing. This paper presents the first steps towards the development of a smart flying sensor based on an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV). The concept of smart remote sensing is illustrated and its performance tested for the task of mapping the volume of grain inside a trailer during forage harvesting. Novelty lies in: (1) the development of a position-estimation method with time delay compensation based on inertial measurement unit (IMU) sensors and image processing; (2) a method to build a 3D map using information obtained from a regular camera; and (3) the design and implementation of a path-following control algorithm using model predictive control (MPC). Experimental results on a lab-scale system validate the effectiveness of the proposed methodology. PMID:26184205

  10. Shape Morphing Adaptive Radiator Technology (SMART) Updates to Techport Entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, Lisa; Bertagne, Christopher; Hartl, Darren; Witcomb, John; Cognata, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    The Shape-Morphing Adaptive Radiator Technology (SMART) project builds off the FY16 research effort that developed a flexible composite radiator panel and demonstrated its ability to actuate from SMA's attached to it. The proposed FY17 Shape-Morphing Adaptive Radiator Technology (SMART) project's goal is to 1) develop a practical radiator design with shape memory alloys (SMAs) bonded to the radiator's panel, and 2) build a multi-panel radiator prototype for subsequent system level thermal vacuum tests. The morphing radiator employs SMA materials to passively change its shape to adapt its rate of heat rejection to vehicle requirements. Conceptually, the radiator panel has a naturally closed position (like a cylinder) in a cold environment. Whenever the radiator's temperature gradually rises, SMA's affixed to the face sheet will pull the face sheet open a commensurate amount - increasing the radiators view to space and causing it to reject more heat. In a vehicle, the radiator's variable heat rejection capabilities would reduce the number of additional heat rejection devices in a vehicle's thermal control system. This technology aims to help achieve the required maximum to minimum heat rejection ratio required for manned space vehicles to adopt a lighter, simpler, single loop thermal control architecture (ATCS). Single loop architectures are viewed as an attractive means to reduce mass and complexity over traditional dual-loop solutions. However, fluids generally considered safe enough to flow within crewed cabins (e.g. propylene glycol-water mixtures) have much higher freezing points and viscosities than those used in the external sides of dual loop ATCSs (e.g. Ammonia and HFE7000).

  11. Smart home technologies for health and social care support.

    PubMed

    Martin, Suzanne; Kelly, Greg; Kernohan, W George; McCreight, Bernadette; Nugent, Christopher

    2008-10-08

    The integration of smart home technology to support health and social care is acquiring an increasing global significance. Provision is framed within the context of a rapidly changing population profile, which is impacting on the number of people requiring health and social care, workforce availability and the funding of healthcare systems. To explore the effectiveness of smart home technologies as an intervention for people with physical disability, cognitive impairment or learning disability, who are living at home, and to consider the impact on the individual's health status and on the financial resources of health care. We searched the following databases for primary studies: (a) the Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care (EPOC) Group Register, (b) the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), (The Cochrane Library, issue 1, 2007), and (c) bibliographic databases, including MEDLINE (1966 to March 2007), EMBASE (1980 to March 2007) and CINAHL (1982 to March 2007). We also searched the Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effectiveness (DARE). We searched the electronic databases using a strategy developed by the EPOC Trials Search Co-ordinator. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs), quasi-experimental studies, controlled before and after studies (CBAs) and interrupted time series analyses (ITS). Participants included adults over the age of 18, living in their home in a community setting. Participants with a physical disability, dementia or a learning disability were included. The included interventions were social alarms, electronic assistive devices, telecare social alert platforms, environmental control systems, automated home environments and 'ubiquitous homes'. Outcome measures included any objective measure that records an impact on a participant's quality of life, healthcare professional workload, economic outcomes, costs to healthcare provider or costs to participant. We included measures of service satisfaction

  12. Independence and shared decision making: the role of smart home technology in empowering older adults.

    PubMed

    Demiris, George

    2009-01-01

    This study aims to explore the concepts of independence and shared decision making in the context of smart home technologies for older adults. We conducted a Delphi study with three rounds involving smart home designers, and researchers as well as community dwelling older adults. While there were differences in the way different stakeholders define these concepts, the study findings provide clear implications for the design, implementation and evaluation of smart home applications.

  13. Sensor Technology and Performance Characteristics

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US EPA is currently involved in detailed laboratory and/or field studies involving a wide variety of low cost air quality sensors currently being made available to potential citizen scientists. These devices include sensors associated with the monitoring of nitrogen dioxide (...

  14. Sensor Technology and Performance Characteristics

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US EPA is currently involved in detailed laboratory and/or field studies involving a wide variety of low cost air quality sensors currently being made available to potential citizen scientists. These devices include sensors associated with the monitoring of nitrogen dioxide (...

  15. Integrating modelling and smart sensors for environmental and human health

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Stefan; Seto, Edmund; Northcross, Amanda; Quinn, Nigel W.T.; Convertino, Matteo; Jones, Rod L.; Maier, Holger R.; Schlink, Uwe; Steinle, Susanne; Vieno, Massimo; Wimberly, Michael C.

    2015-01-01

    Sensors are becoming ubiquitous in everyday life, generating data at an unprecedented rate and scale. However, models that assess impacts of human activities on environmental and human health, have typically been developed in contexts where data scarcity is the norm. Models are essential tools to understand processes, identify relationships, associations and causality, formalize stakeholder mental models, and to quantify the effects of prevention and interventions. They can help to explain data, as well as inform the deployment and location of sensors by identifying hotspots and areas of interest where data collection may achieve the best results. We identify a paradigm shift in how the integration of models and sensors can contribute to harnessing ‘Big Data’ and, more importantly, make the vital step from ‘Big Data’ to ‘Big Information’. In this paper, we illustrate current developments and identify key research needs using human and environmental health challenges as an example. PMID:26644778

  16. Smart optical distance sensor for automatic welding detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahl, Michael; Rinner, Stefan; Ettemeyer, Andreas

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we describe a simple and cost-effective method and measuring device for automatic detection of welding. The sensor is to be used in automatic darkening filters (ADF) of welding helmets protecting the operator from intensive hazardous UV radiation. For reasons discussed in detail below, conventional sensor principles used in ADF are being out-dated. Here, we critically revise some alternatives and propose an approach comprising an optical distance sensor. Its underlying principle is triangulation with two pin-hole cameras. The absence of optical components such as lenses results in very low cost. At first, feasibility is tested with optical simulations. Additionally, we present measurement results that prove the practicability of our proposal.

  17. Integrating modelling and smart sensors for environmental and human health.

    PubMed

    Reis, Stefan; Seto, Edmund; Northcross, Amanda; Quinn, Nigel W T; Convertino, Matteo; Jones, Rod L; Maier, Holger R; Schlink, Uwe; Steinle, Susanne; Vieno, Massimo; Wimberly, Michael C

    2015-12-01

    Sensors are becoming ubiquitous in everyday life, generating data at an unprecedented rate and scale. However, models that assess impacts of human activities on environmental and human health, have typically been developed in contexts where data scarcity is the norm. Models are essential tools to understand processes, identify relationships, associations and causality, formalize stakeholder mental models, and to quantify the effects of prevention and interventions. They can help to explain data, as well as inform the deployment and location of sensors by identifying hotspots and areas of interest where data collection may achieve the best results. We identify a paradigm shift in how the integration of models and sensors can contribute to harnessing 'Big Data' and, more importantly, make the vital step from 'Big Data' to 'Big Information'. In this paper, we illustrate current developments and identify key research needs using human and environmental health challenges as an example.

  18. Development of High Temperature Gas Sensor Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Gary W.; Chen, Liang-Yu; Neudeck, Philip G.; Knight, Dak; Liu, Chung-Chiun; Wu, Quing-Hai; Zhou, Huan-Jun

    1997-01-01

    The measurement of engine emissions is important for their monitoring and control. However, the ability to measure these emissions in-situ is limited. We are developing a family of high temperature gas sensors which are intended to operate in harsh environments such as those in an engine. The development of these sensors is based on progress in two types of technology: (1) The development of SiC-based semiconductor technology; and (2) Improvements in micromachining and microfabrication technology. These technologies are being used to develop point-contact sensors to measure gases which are important in emission control especially hydrogen, hydrocarbons, nitrogen oxides, and oxygen. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the development of this point-contact sensor technology. The detection of each type of gas involves its own challenges in the fields of materials science and fabrication technology. Of particular importance is sensor sensitivity, selectivity, and stability in long-term, high temperature operation. An overview is presented of each sensor type with an evaluation of its stage of development. It is concluded that this technology has significant potential for use in engine applications but further development is necessary.

  19. Long-term real-time structural health monitoring using wireless smart sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Shinae; Mensah-Bonsu, Priscilla O.; Li, Jingcheng; Dahal, Sushil

    2013-04-01

    Improving the safety and security of civil infrastructure has become a critical issue for decades since it plays a central role in the economics and politics of a modern society. Structural health monitoring of civil infrastructure using wireless smart sensor network has emerged as a promising solution recently to increase structural reliability, enhance inspection quality, and reduce maintenance costs. Though hardware and software framework are well prepared for wireless smart sensors, the long-term real-time health monitoring strategy are still not available due to the lack of systematic interface. In this paper, the Imote2 smart sensor platform is employed, and a graphical user interface for the long-term real-time structural health monitoring has been developed based on Matlab for the Imote2 platform. This computer-aided engineering platform enables the control, visualization of measured data as well as safety alarm feature based on modal property fluctuation. A new decision making strategy to check the safety is also developed and integrated in this software. Laboratory validation of the computer aided engineering platform for the Imote2 on a truss bridge and a building structure has shown the potential of the interface for long-term real-time structural health monitoring.

  20. A Novel Secure IoT-Based Smart Home Automation System Using a Wireless Sensor Network.

    PubMed

    Pirbhulal, Sandeep; Zhang, Heye; E Alahi, Md Eshrat; Ghayvat, Hemant; Mukhopadhyay, Subhas Chandra; Zhang, Yuan-Ting; Wu, Wanqing

    2016-12-30

    Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) provide noteworthy benefits over traditional approaches for several applications, including smart homes, healthcare, environmental monitoring, and homeland security. WSNs are integrated with the Internet Protocol (IP) to develop the Internet of Things (IoT) for connecting everyday life objects to the internet. Hence, major challenges of WSNs include: (i) how to efficiently utilize small size and low-power nodes to implement security during data transmission among several sensor nodes; (ii) how to resolve security issues associated with the harsh and complex environmental conditions during data transmission over a long coverage range. In this study, a secure IoT-based smart home automation system was developed. To facilitate energy-efficient data encryption, a method namely Triangle Based Security Algorithm (TBSA) based on efficient key generation mechanism was proposed. The proposed TBSA in integration of the low power Wi-Fi were included in WSNs with the Internet to develop a novel IoT-based smart home which could provide secure data transmission among several associated sensor nodes in the network over a long converge range. The developed IoT based system has outstanding performance by fulfilling all the necessary security requirements. The experimental results showed that the proposed TBSA algorithm consumed less energy in comparison with some existing methods.

  1. A Novel Secure IoT-Based Smart Home Automation System Using a Wireless Sensor Network

    PubMed Central

    Pirbhulal, Sandeep; Zhang, Heye; E Alahi, Md Eshrat; Ghayvat, Hemant; Mukhopadhyay, Subhas Chandra; Zhang, Yuan-Ting; Wu, Wanqing

    2016-01-01

    Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) provide noteworthy benefits over traditional approaches for several applications, including smart homes, healthcare, environmental monitoring, and homeland security. WSNs are integrated with the Internet Protocol (IP) to develop the Internet of Things (IoT) for connecting everyday life objects to the internet. Hence, major challenges of WSNs include: (i) how to efficiently utilize small size and low-power nodes to implement security during data transmission among several sensor nodes; (ii) how to resolve security issues associated with the harsh and complex environmental conditions during data transmission over a long coverage range. In this study, a secure IoT-based smart home automation system was developed. To facilitate energy-efficient data encryption, a method namely Triangle Based Security Algorithm (TBSA) based on efficient key generation mechanism was proposed. The proposed TBSA in integration of the low power Wi-Fi were included in WSNs with the Internet to develop a novel IoT-based smart home which could provide secure data transmission among several associated sensor nodes in the network over a long converge range. The developed IoT based system has outstanding performance by fulfilling all the necessary security requirements. The experimental results showed that the proposed TBSA algorithm consumed less energy in comparison with some existing methods. PMID:28042831

  2. TOPICAL REVIEW: Smart aggregates: multi-functional sensors for concrete structures—a tutorial and a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Gangbing; Gu, Haichang; Mo, Yi-Lung

    2008-06-01

    This paper summarizes the authors' recent pioneering research work in piezoceramic-based smart aggregates and their innovative applications in concrete civil structures. The basic operating principle of smart aggregates is first introduced. The proposed smart aggregate is formed by embedding a waterproof piezoelectric patch with lead wires into a small concrete block. The proposed smart aggregates are multi-functional and can perform three major tasks: early-age concrete strength monitoring, impact detection and structural health monitoring. The proposed smart aggregates are embedded into the desired location before the casting of the concrete structure. The concrete strength development is monitored by observing the high frequency harmonic wave response of the smart aggregate. Impact on the concrete structure is detected by observing the open-circuit voltage of the piezoceramic patch in the smart aggregate. For structural health monitoring purposes, a smart aggregate-based active sensing system is designed for the concrete structure. Wavelet packet analysis is used as a signal-processing tool to analyze the sensor signal. A damage index based on the wavelet packet analysis is used to determine the structural health status. To better describe the time-history and location information of damage, two types of damage index matrices are proposed: a sensor-history damage index matrix and an actuator-sensor damage index matrix. To demonstrate the multi-functionality of the proposed smart aggregates, different types of concrete structures have been used as test objects, including concrete bridge bent-caps, concrete cylinders and a concrete frame. Experimental results have verified the effectiveness and the multi-functionality of the proposed smart aggregates. The multi-functional smart aggregates have the potential to be applied to the comprehensive monitoring of concrete structures from their earliest stages and throughout their lifetime.

  3. Detection of Social Interaction in Smart Spaces

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Diane J.; Crandall, Aaron; Singla, Geetika; Thomas, Brian

    2010-01-01

    The pervasive sensing technologies found in smart environments offer unprecedented opportunities for monitoring and assisting the individuals who live and work in these spaces. An aspect of daily life that is important for one's emotional and physical health is social interaction. In this paper we investigate the use of smart environment technologies to detect and analyze interactions in smart spaces. We introduce techniques for collect and analyzing sensor information in smart environments to help in interpreting resident behavior patterns and determining when multiple residents are interacting. The effectiveness of our techniques is evaluated using two physical smart environment testbeds. PMID:20953347

  4. Gaussian beam displacement sensor for monitoring interstory drift in smart buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Kim D.; Hoover, C. W., III; Chen, Ru Z.; Plone, M. D.

    1994-05-01

    A method for measuring lateral displacements in structures is proposed based on the motion of a Gaussian optical beam. A sensor is designed and constructed using the free space output of a single mode optical fiber, which well approximates the Gaussian intensity distribution, and is tested in both quasi-static and dynamic displacement modes. Good agreement between the experimental data and the predicted output is obtained for small displacements of the size expected in real buildings. It is envisioned that this sensor could serve as the input to an active control system used to stabilize smart buildings experiencing earthquake and wind loads.

  5. Overview of Fiber Optic Sensor Technologies for Strain/Temperature Sensing Applications in Composite Materials

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishnan, Manjusha; Rajan, Ginu; Semenova, Yuliya; Farrell, Gerald

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the different types of fiber optic sensors (FOS) that can be used with composite materials and also their compatibility with and suitability for embedding inside a composite material. An overview of the different types of FOS used for strain/temperature sensing in composite materials is presented. Recent trends, and future challenges for FOS technology for condition monitoring in smart composite materials are also discussed. This comprehensive review provides essential information for the smart materials industry in selecting of appropriate types of FOS in accordance with end-user requirements. PMID:26784192

  6. A smart sensor system for trace organic vapor detection using a temperature-controlled array of surface acoustic wave vapor sensors, automated preconcentrator tubes, and pattern recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Grate, J.W.; Rose-Pehrsson, S.L.; Klusty, M.; Wohltjen, H.

    1993-05-01

    A smart sensor system for the detection, of toxic organophosphorus and toxic organosulfur vapors at trace concentrations has been designed, fabricated, and tested against a wide variety of vapor challenges. The key features of the system are: An array of four surface acoustic wave (SAW) vapor sensors, temperature control of the vapor sensors, the use of pattern recognition to analyze the sensor data, and an automated sampling system including thermally-desorbed preconcentrator tubes (PCTs).

  7. A technology roadmap of smart biosensors from conventional glucose monitoring systems.

    PubMed

    Shende, Pravin; Sahu, Pratiksha; Gaud, Ram

    2017-06-01

    The objective of this review article is to focus on technology roadmap of smart biosensors from a conventional glucose monitoring system. The estimation of glucose with commercially available devices involves analysis of blood samples that are obtained by pricking finger or extracting blood from the forearm. Since pain and discomfort are associated with invasive methods, the non-invasive measurement techniques have been investigated. The non-invasive methods show advantages like non-exposure to sharp objects such as needles and syringes, due to which there is an increase in testing frequency, improved control of glucose concentration and absence of pain and biohazard materials. This review study is aimed to describe recent invasive techniques and major noninvasive techniques, viz. biosensors, optical techniques and sensor-embedded contact lenses for glucose estimation.

  8. FPGA-based fused smart sensor for real-time plant-transpiration dynamic estimation.

    PubMed

    Millan-Almaraz, Jesus Roberto; de Jesus Romero-Troncoso, Rene; Guevara-Gonzalez, Ramon Gerardo; Contreras-Medina, Luis Miguel; Carrillo-Serrano, Roberto Valentin; Osornio-Rios, Roque Alfredo; Duarte-Galvan, Carlos; Rios-Alcaraz, Miguel Angel; Torres-Pacheco, Irineo

    2010-01-01

    Plant transpiration is considered one of the most important physiological functions because it constitutes the plants evolving adaptation to exchange moisture with a dry atmosphere which can dehydrate or eventually kill the plant. Due to the importance of transpiration, accurate measurement methods are required; therefore, a smart sensor that fuses five primary sensors is proposed which can measure air temperature, leaf temperature, air relative humidity, plant out relative humidity and ambient light. A field programmable gate array based unit is used to perform signal processing algorithms as average decimation and infinite impulse response filters to the primary sensor readings in order to reduce the signal noise and improve its quality. Once the primary sensor readings are filtered, transpiration dynamics such as: transpiration, stomatal conductance, leaf-air-temperature-difference and vapor pressure deficit are calculated in real time by the smart sensor. This permits the user to observe different primary and calculated measurements at the same time and the relationship between these which is very useful in precision agriculture in the detection of abnormal conditions. Finally, transpiration related stress conditions can be detected in real time because of the use of online processing and embedded communications capabilities.

  9. FPGA-based Fused Smart Sensor for Real-Time Plant-Transpiration Dynamic Estimation

    PubMed Central

    Millan-Almaraz, Jesus Roberto; de Jesus Romero-Troncoso, Rene; Guevara-Gonzalez, Ramon Gerardo; Contreras-Medina, Luis Miguel; Carrillo-Serrano, Roberto Valentin; Osornio-Rios, Roque Alfredo; Duarte-Galvan, Carlos; Rios-Alcaraz, Miguel Angel; Torres-Pacheco, Irineo

    2010-01-01

    Plant transpiration is considered one of the most important physiological functions because it constitutes the plants evolving adaptation to exchange moisture with a dry atmosphere which can dehydrate or eventually kill the plant. Due to the importance of transpiration, accurate measurement methods are required; therefore, a smart sensor that fuses five primary sensors is proposed which can measure air temperature, leaf temperature, air relative humidity, plant out relative humidity and ambient light. A field programmable gate array based unit is used to perform signal processing algorithms as average decimation and infinite impulse response filters to the primary sensor readings in order to reduce the signal noise and improve its quality. Once the primary sensor readings are filtered, transpiration dynamics such as: transpiration, stomatal conductance, leaf-air-temperature-difference and vapor pressure deficit are calculated in real time by the smart sensor. This permits the user to observe different primary and calculated measurements at the same time and the relationship between these which is very useful in precision agriculture in the detection of abnormal conditions. Finally, transpiration related stress conditions can be detected in real time because of the use of online processing and embedded communications capabilities. PMID:22163656

  10. The Next-Generation Power Electronics Technology for Smart Grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akagi, Hirofumi

    This paper presents an overview of the next-generation power electronics technology for the Japanese-version smart grid. It focuses on a grid-level battery energy storage system, a grid-level STATCOM (STATic synchronous COMpensator), and a 6.6-kV BTB (Back-To-Back) system for power flow control between two power distribution feeders. These power electronic devices play an important role in achieving load frequency control and voltage regulation. Their circuit configurations based on modular multilevel cascade PWM converters are characterized by flexible system design, low voltage steps, and low EMI (Electro-Magnetic Interference) emission. Their downscaled laboratory models are designed, constructed, and tested to verify the viability and effectiveness of the circuit configurations and control methods.

  11. Emerging roles for telemedicine and smart technologies in dementia care

    PubMed Central

    Bossen, Ann L; Kim, Heejung; Williams, Kristine N; Steinhoff, Andreanna E; Strieker, Molly

    2015-01-01

    Demographic aging of the world population contributes to an increase in the number of persons diagnosed with dementia (PWD), with corresponding increases in health care expenditures. In addition, fewer family members are available to care for these individuals. Most care for PWD occurs in the home, and family members caring for PWD frequently suffer negative outcomes related to the stress and burden of observing their loved one’s progressive memory and functional decline. Decreases in cognition and self-care also necessitate that the caregiver takes on new roles and responsibilities in care provision. Smart technologies are being developed to support family caregivers of PWD in a variety of ways, including provision of information and support resources online, wayfinding technology to support independent mobility of the PWD, monitoring systems to alert caregivers to changes in the PWD and their environment, navigation devices to track PWD experiencing wandering, and telemedicine and e-health services linking caregivers and PWD with health care providers. This paper will review current uses of these advancing technologies to support care of PWD. Challenges unique to widespread acceptance of technology will be addressed and future directions explored. PMID:26636049

  12. Smart catheter flow sensor for real-time continuous regional cerebral blood flow monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunyan; Wu, Pei-Ming; Hartings, Jed A.; Wu, Zhizhen; Ahn, Chong H.; LeDoux, David; Shutter, Lori A.; Narayan, Raj K.

    2011-12-01

    We present a smart catheter flow sensor for real-time, continuous, and quantitative measurement of regional cerebral blood flow using in situ temperature and thermal conductivity compensation. The flow sensor operates in a constant-temperature mode and employs a periodic heating and cooling technique. This approach ensures zero drift and provides highly reliable data with microelectromechanical system-based thin film sensors. The developed flow sensor has a sensitivity of 0.973 mV/ml/100 g/min in the range from 0 to 160 ml/100 g/min with a linear correlation coefficient of R2 = 0.9953. It achieves a resolution of 0.25 ml/100 g/min and an accuracy better than 5 ml/100 g/min.

  13. Smart Sensing Strip Using Monolithically Integrated Flexible Flow Sensor for Noninvasively Monitoring Respiratory Flow.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Peng; Zhao, Shuai; Zhu, Rong

    2015-12-15

    This paper presents a smart sensing strip for noninvasively monitoring respiratory flow in real time. The monitoring system comprises a monolithically-integrated flexible hot-film flow sensor adhered on a molded flexible silicone case, where a miniaturized conditioning circuit with a Bluetooth4.0 LE module are packaged, and a personal mobile device that wirelessly acquires respiratory data transmitted from the flow sensor, executes extraction of vital signs, and performs medical diagnosis. The system serves as a wearable device to monitor comprehensive respiratory flow while avoiding use of uncomfortable nasal cannula. The respiratory sensor is a flexible flow sensor monolithically integrating four elements of a Wheatstone bridge on single chip, including a hot-film resistor, a temperature-compensating resistor, and two balancing resistors. The monitor takes merits of small size, light weight, easy operation, and low power consumption. Experiments were conducted to verify the feasibility and effectiveness of monitoring and diagnosing respiratory diseases using the proposed system.

  14. Sensor technology to support Aging in Place.

    PubMed

    Rantz, Marilyn J; Skubic, Marjorie; Miller, Steven J; Galambos, Colleen; Alexander, Greg; Keller, James; Popescu, Mihail

    2013-06-01

    Older adults want to age in place at home. Sensor technology has the potential to help by monitoring individuals' health status, detecting emergency situations, and notifying health care providers. Researchers at the University of Missouri are investigating the impact of registered nurse care coordination and technology on the ability of older adults to age in place. Technology coupled with care coordination has improved clinical outcomes. This article presents an overview of the Aging in Place research, TigerPlace as a Missouri-sponsored Aging in Place facility, and the sensor technology developed to support Aging in Place. Copyright © 2013 American Medical Directors Association, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A depth video sensor-based life-logging human activity recognition system for elderly care in smart indoor environments.

    PubMed

    Jalal, Ahmad; Kamal, Shaharyar; Kim, Daijin

    2014-07-02

    Recent advancements in depth video sensors technologies have made human activity recognition (HAR) realizable for elderly monitoring applications. Although conventional HAR utilizes RGB video sensors, HAR could be greatly improved with depth video sensors which produce depth or distance information. In this paper, a depth-based life logging HAR system is designed to recognize the daily activities of elderly people and turn these environments into an intelligent living space. Initially, a depth imaging sensor is used to capture depth silhouettes. Based on these silhouettes, human skeletons with joint information are produced which are further used for activity recognition and generating their life logs. The life-logging system is divided into two processes. Firstly, the training system includes data collection using a depth camera, feature extraction and training for each activity via Hidden Markov Models. Secondly, after training, the recognition engine starts to recognize the learned activities and produces life logs. The system was evaluated using life logging features against principal component and independent component features and achieved satisfactory recognition rates against the conventional approaches. Experiments conducted on the smart indoor activity datasets and the MSRDailyActivity3D dataset show promising results. The proposed system is directly applicable to any elderly monitoring system, such as monitoring healthcare problems for elderly people, or examining the indoor activities of people at home, office or hospital.

  16. A Depth Video Sensor-Based Life-Logging Human Activity Recognition System for Elderly Care in Smart Indoor Environments

    PubMed Central

    Jalal, Ahmad; Kamal, Shaharyar; Kim, Daijin

    2014-01-01

    Recent advancements in depth video sensors technologies have made human activity recognition (HAR) realizable for elderly monitoring applications. Although conventional HAR utilizes RGB video sensors, HAR could be greatly improved with depth video sensors which produce depth or distance information. In this paper, a depth-based life logging HAR system is designed to recognize the daily activities of elderly people and turn these environments into an intelligent living space. Initially, a depth imaging sensor is used to capture depth silhouettes. Based on these silhouettes, human skeletons with joint information are produced which are further used for activity recognition and generating their life logs. The life-logging system is divided into two processes. Firstly, the training system includes data collection using a depth camera, feature extraction and training for each activity via Hidden Markov Models. Secondly, after training, the recognition engine starts to recognize the learned activities and produces life logs. The system was evaluated using life logging features against principal component and independent component features and achieved satisfactory recognition rates against the conventional approaches. Experiments conducted on the smart indoor activity datasets and the MSRDailyActivity3D dataset show promising results. The proposed system is directly applicable to any elderly monitoring system, such as monitoring healthcare problems for elderly people, or examining the indoor activities of people at home, office or hospital. PMID:24991942

  17. All-Digital Time-Domain CMOS Smart Temperature Sensor with On-Chip Linearity Enhancement.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Chi; Chen, Chao-Lieh; Lin, Yi

    2016-01-30

    This paper proposes the first all-digital on-chip linearity enhancement technique for improving the accuracy of the time-domain complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) smart temperature sensor. To facilitate on-chip application and intellectual property reuse, an all-digital time-domain smart temperature sensor was implemented using 90 nm Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs). Although the inverter-based temperature sensor has a smaller circuit area and lower complexity, two-point calibration must be used to achieve an acceptable inaccuracy. With the help of a calibration circuit, the influence of process variations was reduced greatly for one-point calibration support, reducing the test costs and time. However, the sensor response still exhibited a large curvature, which substantially affected the accuracy of the sensor. Thus, an on-chip linearity-enhanced circuit is proposed to linearize the curve and achieve a new linearity-enhanced output. The sensor was implemented on eight different Xilinx FPGA using 118 slices per sensor in each FPGA to demonstrate the benefits of the linearization. Compared with the unlinearized version, the maximal inaccuracy of the linearized version decreased from 5 °C to 2.5 °C after one-point calibration in a range of -20 °C to 100 °C. The sensor consumed 95 μW using 1 kSa/s. The proposed linearity enhancement technique significantly improves temperature sensing accuracy, avoiding costly curvature compensation while it is fully synthesizable for future Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI) system.

  18. All-Digital Time-Domain CMOS Smart Temperature Sensor with On-Chip Linearity Enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chun-Chi; Chen, Chao-Lieh; Lin, Yi

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes the first all-digital on-chip linearity enhancement technique for improving the accuracy of the time-domain complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) smart temperature sensor. To facilitate on-chip application and intellectual property reuse, an all-digital time-domain smart temperature sensor was implemented using 90 nm Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs). Although the inverter-based temperature sensor has a smaller circuit area and lower complexity, two-point calibration must be used to achieve an acceptable inaccuracy. With the help of a calibration circuit, the influence of process variations was reduced greatly for one-point calibration support, reducing the test costs and time. However, the sensor response still exhibited a large curvature, which substantially affected the accuracy of the sensor. Thus, an on-chip linearity-enhanced circuit is proposed to linearize the curve and achieve a new linearity-enhanced output. The sensor was implemented on eight different Xilinx FPGA using 118 slices per sensor in each FPGA to demonstrate the benefits of the linearization. Compared with the unlinearized version, the maximal inaccuracy of the linearized version decreased from 5 °C to 2.5 °C after one-point calibration in a range of −20 °C to 100 °C. The sensor consumed 95 μW using 1 kSa/s. The proposed linearity enhancement technique significantly improves temperature sensing accuracy, avoiding costly curvature compensation while it is fully synthesizable for future Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI) system. PMID:26840316

  19. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT; ULTRASONIC AQUEOUS CLEANING SYSTEMS, SMART SONIC CORPORATION, SMART SONIC

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report is a product of the U.S. EPA's Environmental Technoloy Verification (ETV) Program and is focused on the Smart Sonics Ultrasonic Aqueous Cleaning Systems. The verification is based on three main objectives. (1) The Smart Sonic Aqueous Cleaning Systems, Model 2000 and...

  20. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT; ULTRASONIC AQUEOUS CLEANING SYSTEMS, SMART SONIC CORPORATION, SMART SONIC

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report is a product of the U.S. EPA's Environmental Technoloy Verification (ETV) Program and is focused on the Smart Sonics Ultrasonic Aqueous Cleaning Systems. The verification is based on three main objectives. (1) The Smart Sonic Aqueous Cleaning Systems, Model 2000 and...

  1. Smart Telecare Technology in Health and Social Primary Care Management for Personalized Approach in Greece.

    PubMed

    Alexandri, Danae; Tsirintani, Maria

    2017-01-01

    The paper studies the smart telecare utility in health & social care fields for the satisfactory increase of external and internal user through personalized approach and the capability proof of continuing management improvement through quality indicators. Primary survey studies of aged people's satisfaction through smart telecare in Greece - maybe in good health or patients or socially isolated - interviewing four types involved - aged, caregivers, health or social care providers and smart technology providers or producers. The sample seems positive to smart telecare for prevention, protection, safety and security. To sum up, they believe there are organizational problems in Greece due to lack of information.

  2. Designing and Securing an Event Processing System for Smart Spaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Zang

    2011-01-01

    Smart spaces, or smart environments, represent the next evolutionary development in buildings, banking, homes, hospitals, transportation systems, industries, cities, and government automation. By riding the tide of sensor and event processing technologies, the smart environment captures and processes information about its surroundings as well as…

  3. Designing and Securing an Event Processing System for Smart Spaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Zang

    2011-01-01

    Smart spaces, or smart environments, represent the next evolutionary development in buildings, banking, homes, hospitals, transportation systems, industries, cities, and government automation. By riding the tide of sensor and event processing technologies, the smart environment captures and processes information about its surroundings as well as…

  4. Applications of internal translating mass technologies to smart weapons systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Jonathan

    The field of guided projectile research has continually grown over the past several decades. Guided projectiles, typically encompassing bullets, mortars, and artillery shells, incorporate some sort of guidance and control mechanism to generate trajectory alterations. This serves to increase accuracy and decrease collateral damage. Control mechanisms for smart weapons must be able to withstand extreme acceleration loads at launch while remaining simple to reduce cost and enhance reliability. Controllable internal moving masses can be incorporated into the design of smart weapons as a mechanism to directly apply control force, to actively alter static stability in flight, and to protect sensitive components within sensor packages. This dissertation examined techniques for using internal translating masses (ITM's) for smart weapon flight control. It was first shown that oscillating a mass orthogonal to the projectile axis of symmetry generates reasonable control force in statically-stable rounds. Trade studies examined the impact of mass size, mass offset from the center of gravity, and reductions in static stability on control authority. A more detailed analysis followed in which a physical internal translating mass control mechanism was designed that minimizes force and power required using a vibrating beam as the internal moving mass. Results showed that this relatively simple mechanism provides adequate control authority while requiring low on-board power. Trade studies revealed the affect of varying beam lengths, stiffness, and damping properties. Then, the topic of static margin control through mass center modification was explored. This is accomplished by translating a mass in flight along the projectile axis of symmetry. Results showed that this system allows for greater control authority and reduced throw-off error at launch. Finally, a nonlinear sliding mode controller was designed for a projectile equipped with an internal moving mass as well as for a

  5. Biomimetic smart sensors for autonomous robotic behavior II: vestibular processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Shuwan; Deligeorges, Socrates; Soloway, Aaron; Lichtenstein, Lee; Gore, Tyler; Hubbard, Allyn

    2009-05-01

    Limited autonomous behaviors are fast becoming a critical capability in the field of robotics as robotic applications are used in more complicated and interactive environments. As additional sensory capabilities are added to robotic platforms, sensor fusion to enhance and facilitate autonomous behavior becomes increasingly important. Using biology as a model, the equivalent of a vestibular system needs to be created in order to orient the system within its environment and allow multi-modal sensor fusion. In mammals, the vestibular system plays a central role in physiological homeostasis and sensory information integration (Fuller et al, Neuroscience 129 (2004) 461-471). At the level of the Superior Colliculus in the brain, there is multimodal sensory integration across visual, auditory, somatosensory, and vestibular inputs (Wallace et al, J Neurophysiol 80 (1998) 1006-1010), with the vestibular component contributing a strong reference frame gating input. Using a simple model for the deep layers of the Superior Colliculus, an off-the-shelf 3-axis solid state gyroscope and accelerometer was used as the equivalent representation of the vestibular system. The acceleration and rotational measurements are used to determine the relationship between a local reference frame of a robotic platform (an iRobot Packbot®) and the inertial reference frame (the outside world), with the simulated vestibular input tightly coupled with the acoustic and optical inputs. Field testing of the robotic platform using acoustics to cue optical sensors coupled through a biomimetic vestibular model for "slew to cue" gunfire detection have shown great promise.

  6. A Comparative Study of Anomaly Detection Techniques for Smart City Wireless Sensor Networks.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Font, Victor; Garrigues, Carles; Rifà-Pous, Helena

    2016-06-13

    In many countries around the world, smart cities are becoming a reality. These cities contribute to improving citizens' quality of life by providing services that are normally based on data extracted from wireless sensor networks (WSN) and other elements of the Internet of Things. Additionally, public administration uses these smart city data to increase its efficiency, to reduce costs and to provide additional services. However, the information received at smart city data centers is not always accurate, because WSNs are sometimes prone to error and are exposed to physical and computer attacks. In this article, we use real data from the smart city of Barcelona to simulate WSNs and implement typical attacks. Then, we compare frequently used anomaly detection techniques to disclose these attacks. We evaluate the algorithms under different requirements on the available network status information. As a result of this study, we conclude that one-class Support Vector Machines is the most appropriate technique. We achieve a true positive rate at least 56% higher than the rates achieved with the other compared techniques in a scenario with a maximum false positive rate of 5% and a 26% higher in a scenario with a false positive rate of 15%.

  7. A Comparative Study of Anomaly Detection Techniques for Smart City Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Font, Victor; Garrigues, Carles; Rifà-Pous, Helena

    2016-01-01

    In many countries around the world, smart cities are becoming a reality. These cities contribute to improving citizens’ quality of life by providing services that are normally based on data extracted from wireless sensor networks (WSN) and other elements of the Internet of Things. Additionally, public administration uses these smart city data to increase its efficiency, to reduce costs and to provide additional services. However, the information received at smart city data centers is not always accurate, because WSNs are sometimes prone to error and are exposed to physical and computer attacks. In this article, we use real data from the smart city of Barcelona to simulate WSNs and implement typical attacks. Then, we compare frequently used anomaly detection techniques to disclose these attacks. We evaluate the algorithms under different requirements on the available network status information. As a result of this study, we conclude that one-class Support Vector Machines is the most appropriate technique. We achieve a true positive rate at least 56% higher than the rates achieved with the other compared techniques in a scenario with a maximum false positive rate of 5% and a 26% higher in a scenario with a false positive rate of 15%. PMID:27304957

  8. The smart highway project: Smart highways, smart vehicles, smart engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pethtel, Ray D.

    1996-01-01

    The Smart Highway project is a six mile, limited access roadway being built between Interstate 81 and Blacksburg, Virginia. The initial construction segment will be two miles long and is designed to serve as a test bed and test track for Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) research. The Center for Transportation Research (CTR) at Virginia Tech is developing three evaluation tools for its ITS research including DYNAVIMTS (a software framework), and the FLASH Lab (a 1/15th scale model highway and vehicle system). The Smart Highway rounds out the Center's evaluation methodology by allowing full scale operational tests, evaluations, and research under both experimental and conventional traffic conditions. Currently under development is a concept for a fully automated highway using a 'Cooperative Infrastructure Managed System' which involves ultra wide band communication beacons installed in the infrastructure with appropriate sensors, receivers and processors on board the vehicles. The project is part of the research program funded by the National Automated Highway System Consortium. The CTR hopes to develop the automated concept to prototype status by 1997. Other smart transportation and smart engineering concepts are proposed. This presentation will address the goals and objectives of the Smart Highway project, overview its status and importance to the region, and identify some of the transportation technology now under development and planned in the future.

  9. Implications of smart wear technology for family caregiving relationships: focus group perceptions.

    PubMed

    Hall, Scott S; Kandiah, Jayanthi; Saiki, Diana; Nam, Jinhee; Harden, Amy; Park, Soonjee

    2014-10-01

    Technological advances in monitoring vulnerable care-recipients are on the rise. Recent and future development of Smart Wear technology (devices integrated into clothing that monitor care-recipients) might assist family caregivers with tasks related to caring for young children, relatives with disabilities, and frail spouses or parents. However, the development and use of this technology in family caregiving contexts is in its infancy. Focus group interviews of family caregivers were conducted to explore perspectives regarding the potential integration of Smart Wear technology into their family caregiving. Responses were analyzed qualitatively for themes related to perceptions of how Smart Wear could impact relationships between caregivers and care-recipients. Three major themes emerged: quality and quantity of interaction, boundary issues, and implications for anxiety. Implications and recommendations are discussed regarding maximizing the potential benefits of Smart Wear technology in ways that promote and protect healthy relationships among caregivers and care-recipients.

  10. Small pixel infrared sensor technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caulfield, John; Curzan, Jon

    2017-02-01

    We report on product maturation of small pixel high definition high charge capacity 2.4 Mpixel MWIR Infrared Focal Plane Arrays. This high definition (HD) FPA utilizes a small 5 um pitch pixel size which enables near Nyquist limited sampling with by the optical system of many IR lenses. These smaller sub diffraction pitch pixels enable improved sensitivity and resolution resulting in clear, crisp high contrast imaging with excellent IFOVs even with small focal length lenses. The small pixel IR sensor allows the designer to trade off field of view, MTF, optics F/# to obtain a more compact and high performance IR sensor. This enables lower size, power and weight reductions of the entire IR Sensor System. The highly sensitive MWIR small pixel HD FPA has the capability to detect dimmer signals at longer ranges than previously demonstrated.

  11. SCRMS: An RFID and Sensor Web-Enabled Smart Cultural Relics Management System

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Changjiang; Chen, Nengcheng; Li, Dandan; Lv, You; Gong, Jianya

    2016-01-01

    Cultural relics represent national or even global resources of inestimable value. How to efficiently manage and preserve these cultural relics is a vitally important issue. To achieve this goal, this study proposed, designed, and implemented an RFID and Sensor Web–enabled smart cultural relics management system (SCRMS). In this system, active photovoltaic subtle energy-powered Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) is used for long-range contactless identification and lifecycle management of cultural relics during their storage and circulation. In addition, different types of ambient sensors are integrated with the RFID tags and deployed around cultural relics to monitor their environmental parameters, helping to ensure that they remain in good condition. An Android-based smart mobile application, as middleware, is used in collaboration with RFID readers to collect information and provide convenient management for the circulation of cultural relics. Moreover, multiple sensing techniques are taken advantage of simultaneously for preservation of cultural relics. The proposed system was successfully applied to a museum in the Yongding District, Fujian Province, China, demonstrating its feasibility and advantages for smart and efficient management and preservation of cultural relics. PMID:28042820

  12. SmartPort: A Platform for Sensor Data Monitoring in a Seaport Based on FIWARE.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Pablo; Santana, José Miguel; Ortega, Sebastián; Trujillo, Agustín; Suárez, José Pablo; Domínguez, Conrado; Santana, Jaisiel; Sánchez, Alejandro

    2016-03-22

    Seaport monitoring and management is a significant research area, in which infrastructure automatically collects big data sets that lead the organization in its multiple activities. Thus, this problem is heavily related to the fields of data acquisition, transfer, storage, big data analysis and information visualization. Las Palmas de Gran Canaria port is a good example of how a seaport generates big data volumes through a network of sensors. They are placed on meteorological stations and maritime buoys, registering environmental parameters. Likewise, the Automatic Identification System (AIS) registers several dynamic parameters about the tracked vessels. However, such an amount of data is useless without a system that enables a meaningful visualization and helps make decisions. In this work, we present SmartPort, a platform that offers a distributed architecture for the collection of the port sensors' data and a rich Internet application that allows the user to explore the geolocated data. The presented SmartPort tool is a representative, promising and inspiring approach to manage and develop a smart system. It covers a demanding need for big data analysis and visualization utilities for managing complex infrastructures, such as a seaport.

  13. SCRMS: An RFID and Sensor Web-Enabled Smart Cultural Relics Management System.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Changjiang; Chen, Nengcheng; Li, Dandan; Lv, You; Gong, Jianya

    2016-12-30

    Cultural relics represent national or even global resources of inestimable value. How to efficiently manage and preserve these cultural relics is a vitally important issue. To achieve this goal, this study proposed, designed, and implemented an RFID and Sensor Web-enabled smart cultural relics management system (SCRMS). In this system, active photovoltaic subtle energy-powered Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) is used for long-range contactless identification and lifecycle management of cultural relics during their storage and circulation. In addition, different types of ambient sensors are integrated with the RFID tags and deployed around cultural relics to monitor their environmental parameters, helping to ensure that they remain in good condition. An Android-based smart mobile application, as middleware, is used in collaboration with RFID readers to collect information and provide convenient management for the circulation of cultural relics. Moreover, multiple sensing techniques are taken advantage of simultaneously for preservation of cultural relics. The proposed system was successfully applied to a museum in the Yongding District, Fujian Province, China, demonstrating its feasibility and advantages for smart and efficient management and preservation of cultural relics.

  14. Health smart cards: merging technology and medical information.

    PubMed

    Ward, Sherry R

    2003-01-01

    Smart cards are credit card-sized plastic cards, with an embedded dime-sized Integrated Circuit microprocessor chip. Smart cards can be used for keyless entry, electronic medical records, etc. Health smart cards have been in limited use since 1982 in Europe and the United States, and several barriers including lack of infrastructure, low consumer confidence, competing standards, and cost continue to be addressed.

  15. A Review on Development Practice of Smart Grid Technology in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Liu; Chen, Wei; Zhuang, Bo; Shen, Hongming

    2017-05-01

    Smart grid has become an inexorable trend of energy and economy development worldwide. Since the development of smart grid was put forward in China in 2009, we have obtained abundant research results and practical experiences as well as extensive attention from international community in this field. This paper reviews the key technologies and demonstration projects on new energy connection forecasts; energy storage; smart substations; disaster prevention and reduction for power transmission lines; flexible DC transmission; distribution automation; distributed generation access and micro grid; smart power consumption; the comprehensive demonstration of power distribution and utilization; smart power dispatching and control systems; and the communication networks and information platforms of China, systematically, on the basis of 5 fields, i.e., renewable energy integration, smart power transmission and transformation, smart power distribution and consumption, smart power dispatching and control systems and information and communication platforms. Meanwhile, it also analyzes and compares with the developmental level of similar technologies abroad, providing an outlook on the future development trends of various technologies.

  16. The Savannah River Technology Center, a leader in sensor technology

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, W.C.

    1993-12-01

    This publication highlights the capabilities and achievements of the Savannah River Technology Center in the field of sensor technology. Sensors are developed to provide solutions for environmental and chemical analysis. Most of their sensor systems are based upon fiber optics. Fiber optic probes function in three main modes: as a reflected light probe, from opaque samples; as a transreflectance probe, which sample light reflected back from samples which can pass light; and a flow cell, which monitors light transmitted through a path which passes the process stream being tested. The sensor group has developed fiber optic based temperature probes, has combined fiber optics with sol-gel technology to monitor process streams using chemical indicators, has done development work on slip stream on-line sampling of chemical process streams, has developed software to aid in the analysis of chemical solutions, and has applied this technology in a wide range of emerging areas.

  17. Optical waveguide tamper sensor technology

    SciTech Connect

    Carson, R.F.; Butler, M.A.; Sinclair, M.B.

    1997-03-01

    Dielectric optical waveguides exhibit properties that are well suited to sensor applications. They have low refractive index and are transparent to a wide range of wavelengths. They can react with the surrounding environment in a variety of controllable ways. In certain sensor applications, it is advantageous to integrate the dielectric waveguide on a semiconductor substrate with active devices. In this work, we demonstrate a tamper sensor based on dielectric waveguides that connect epitaxial GaAs-GaAlAs sources and detectors. The tamper sensing function is realized by attaching particles of absorbing material with high refractive index to the surface of the waveguides. These absorbers are then attached to a lid or cover, as in an integrated circuit package or multi-chip module. The absorbers attenuate the light in the waveguides as a function of absorber interaction. In the tamper indicating mode, the absorbers are placed randomly on the waveguides, to form a unique attenuation pattern that is registered by the relative signal levels on the photodetectors. When the lid is moved, the pattern of absorbers changes, altering the photodetector signals. This dielectric waveguide arrangement is applicable to a variety of sensor functions, and specifically can be fabricated as a chemical sensor by the application of cladding layers that change their refractive index and/or optical absorption properties upon exposure to selected chemical species. An example is found in palladium claddings that are sensitive to hydrogen. A description of designs and a basic demonstration of the tamper sensing and chemical sensing functions is described herein.

  18. Foot Modeling and Smart Plantar Pressure Reconstruction from Three Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Ghaida, Hussein Abou; Mottet, Serge; Goujon, Jean-Marc

    2014-01-01

    In order to monitor pressure under feet, this study presents a biomechanical model of the human foot. The main elements of the foot that induce the plantar pressure distribution are described. Then the link between the forces applied at the ankle and the distribution of the plantar pressure is established. Assumptions are made by defining the concepts of a 3D internal foot shape, which can be extracted from the plantar pressure measurements, and a uniform elastic medium, which describes the soft tissues behaviour. In a second part, we show that just 3 discrete pressure sensors per foot are enough to generate real time plantar pressure cartographies in the standing position or during walking. Finally, the generated cartographies are compared with pressure cartographies issued from the F-SCAN system. The results show 0.01 daN (2% of full scale) average error, in the standing position. PMID:25400713

  19. Smart Sensors Based on Integrated Optics and Microelectromechanical Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    systems (MEMS), and digital signal processing (DSP). The synergistic integration of these three technologies provides the advantages of high...the digital battlefield. MEMS technology enables the fabrication of three dimensional , miniature (micron-sized features), and environmentally...MEMS Flexure Beam ………………………………………. 6 2.3 A Novel Digital Demodulation Algorithm ……………………………………………….. 11 2.3.1 Dynamic Range of

  20. Smart Cruise Control: UAV sensor operator intent estimation and its application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Hui; Butler, Darren; Kumar, Rakesh

    2006-05-01

    Due to their long endurance, superior mobility and the low risk posed to the pilot and sensor operator, UAVs have become the preferred platform for persistent ISR missions. However, currently most UAV based ISR missions are conducted through manual operation. Event the simplest tasks, such as vehicle tracking, route reconnaissance and site monitoring, need the sensor operator's undivided attention and constant adjustment of the sensor control. The lack of autonomous behaviour greatly limits of the effectiveness and the capability of UAV-based ISR, especially the use of a large number of UAVs simultaneously. Although fully autonomous UAV based ISR system is desirable, it is still a distant dream due to the complexity and diversity of combat and ISR missions. In this paper, we propose a Smart Cruise Control system that can learn UAV sensor operator's intent and use it to complete tasks automatically, such as route reconnaissance and site monitoring. Using an operator attention model, the proposed system can estimate the operator's intent from how they control the sensor (e.g. camera) and the content of the imagery that is acquired. Therefore, for example, from initially manually controlling the UAV sensor to follow a road, the system can learn not only the preferred operation, "tracking", but also the road appearance, "what to track" in real-time. Then, the learnt models of both road and the desired operation can be used to complete the task automatically. We have demonstrated the Smart Cruise Control system using real UAV videos where roads need to be tracked and buildings need to be monitored.

  1. In situ fabricated smart material active sensors for structural health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giurgiutiu, Victor; Lin, Bin

    2004-02-01

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) is currently using piezoelectric wafer active sensors (PWAS) permanently attached to the structure with adhesives. This is often a burdensome and time-consuming task, especially for large structures such as aircraft, bridges, etc. In addition, there are critical applications where the rigid piezoceramic wafers cannot conform to curved surfaces. Another important issue is the long term durability of the bonded interface between the PWAS and the structure, which is often the durability weak link. An in-situ fabricated smart sensor may offer better durability. This paper considers the possibility of fabricating the PWAS directly to the substrate structure in order to alleviate these problems. The paper starts with a review of the state of the art in active composite fabrication. Then, two concepts are considered: the piezomagnetic composite sensor and the piezoelectric composite PWAS. The piezomagnetic composite was fabricated using Terfenol-D magnetostrictive powder in a fiber reinforced composite beam. The strain-induced magnetic field was detected with a Lakeshore gaussmeter. The piezoelectric composite sensor was prepared by mixing lead zirconate titanate (PZT) particles in an epoxy resin. The mixture was applied onto the structural surface using a mask. After curing, the piezo composite was sanded down to the desired thickness and poled under a high electric field. The resulting in-situ composite PWAS was utilized as a sensor for dynamic vibration and impact. Characterization of the in-situ composite PWAS on aluminum structure have been recorded and compared with ceramic PWAS before and after poling. To evaluate the performance of the in-situ composite PWAS, both vibration and impact tests were conducted. Both experiments indicated that in-situ fabrication of active materials composites poses itself as a good candidate for reliable low-cost option for SHM smart sensor fabrication.

  2. A linearization time-domain CMOS smart temperature sensor using a curvature compensation oscillator.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Chi; Chen, Hao-Wen

    2013-08-28

    This paper presents an area-efficient time-domain CMOS smart temperature sensor using a curvature compensation oscillator for linearity enhancement with a -40 to 120 °C temperature range operability. The inverter-based smart temperature sensors can substantially reduce the cost and circuit complexity of integrated temperature sensors. However, a large curvature exists on the temperature-to-time transfer curve of the inverter-based delay line and results in poor linearity of the sensor output. For cost reduction and error improvement, a temperature-to-pulse generator composed of a ring oscillator and a time amplifier was used to generate a thermal sensing pulse with a sufficient width proportional to the absolute temperature (PTAT). Then, a simple but effective on-chip curvature compensation oscillator is proposed to simultaneously count and compensate the PTAT pulse with curvature for linearization. With such a simple structure, the proposed sensor possesses an extremely small area of 0.07 mm2 in a TSMC 0.35-mm CMOS 2P4M digital process. By using an oscillator-based scheme design, the proposed sensor achieves a fine resolution of 0.045 °C without significantly increasing the circuit area. With the curvature compensation, the inaccuracy of -1.2 to 0.2 °C is achieved in an operation range of -40 to 120 °C after two-point calibration for 14 packaged chips. The power consumption is measured as 23 mW at a sample rate of 10 samples/s.

  3. Implementing Smart School Technology at the Secondary Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stallard, Charles K.

    This paper describes the characteristics of "smart schools" and offers guidelines for developing such schools. Smart schools are defined as having three features: (1) they are computer networked via local area networks in order to share information through teleconferencing, databases, and electronic mail; (2) they are connected beyond…

  4. Implementing Smart School Technology at the Secondary Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stallard, Charles K.

    This paper describes the characteristics of "smart schools" and offers guidelines for developing such schools. Smart schools are defined as having three features: (1) they are computer networked via local area networks in order to share information through teleconferencing, databases, and electronic mail; (2) they are connected beyond…

  5. Electric Energy Management in the Smart Home: Perspectives on Enabling Technologies and Consumer Behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Zipperer, A.; Aloise-Young, P. A.; Suryanarayanan, S.; Zimmerle, D.; Roche, R.; Earle, L.; Christensen, D.; Bauleo, P.

    2013-08-01

    Smart homes hold the potential for increasing energy efficiency, decreasing costs of energy use, decreasing the carbon footprint by including renewable resources, and trans-forming the role of the occupant. At the crux of the smart home is an efficient electric energy management system that is enabled by emerging technologies in the electricity grid and consumer electronics. This article presents a discussion of the state-of-the-art in electricity management in smart homes, the various enabling technologies that will accelerate this concept, and topics around consumer behavior with respect to energy usage.

  6. Electric Energy Management in the Smart Home: Perspectives on Enabling Technologies and Consumer Behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Zipperer, Adam; Aloise-Young, Patricia A.; Suryanarayanan, Siddharth; Roche, Robin; Earle, Lieko; Christensen, Dane; Bauleo, Pablo; Zimmerle, Daniel

    2013-11-01

    Smart homes hold the potential for increasing energy efficiency, decreasing costs of energy use, decreasing the carbon footprint by including renewable resources, and transforming the role of the occupant. At the crux of the smart home is an efficient electric energy management system that is enabled by emerging technologies in the electric grid and consumer electronics. This article presents a discussion of the state-of-the-art in electricity management in smart homes, the various enabling technologies that will accelerate this concept, and topics around consumer behavior with respect to energy usage.

  7. Semantic agent technologies for tactical sensor networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Guofei; Chung, Wayne W.; Cybenko, George

    2003-09-01

    Recent advances in wireless communication and microelectronics have enabled the development of low-cost sensor devices leading to interest in large-scale sensor networks for military applications. Sensor networks consist of large numbers of networked sensors that can be dynamically deployed and used for tactical situational awareness. One critical challenge is how to dynamically integrate these sensor networks with information fusion processes to support real-time sensing, exploitation and decision-making in a rich tactical environment. In this paper, we describe our work on an extensible prototype to address the challenge. The prototype and its constituent technologies provide a proof-of-concept that demonstrates several fundamental new approaches for implementing next generation battlefield information systems. Many cutting-edge technologies are used to implement this system, including semantic web, web services, peer-to-peer network and content-based routing. This prototype system is able to dynamically integrate various distributed sensors and multi-level information fusion services into new applications and run them across a distributed network to support different mission goals. Agent technology plays a role in two fundamental ways: resources are described, located and tasked using semantic descriptions based on ontologies and semantic services; tracking, fusion and decision-making logic is implemented using agent objects and semantic descriptions as well.

  8. A Wirelessly Powered Smart Contact Lens with Reconfigurable Wide Range and Tunable Sensitivity Sensor Readout Circuitry

    PubMed Central

    Chiou, Jin-Chern; Hsu, Shun-Hsi; Huang, Yu-Chieh; Yeh, Guan-Ting; Liou, Wei-Ting; Kuei, Cheng-Kai

    2017-01-01

    This study presented a wireless smart contact lens system that was composed of a reconfigurable capacitive sensor interface circuitry and wirelessly powered radio-frequency identification (RFID) addressable system for sensor control and data communication. In order to improve compliance and reduce user discomfort, a capacitive sensor was embedded on a soft contact lens of 200 μm thickness using commercially available bio-compatible lens material and a standard manufacturing process. The results indicated that the reconfigurable sensor interface achieved sensitivity and baseline tuning up to 120 pF while consuming only 110 μW power. The range and sensitivity tuning of the readout circuitry ensured a reliable operation with respect to sensor fabrication variations and independent calibration of the sensor baseline for individuals. The on-chip voltage scaling allowed the further extension of the detection range and prevented the implementation of large on-chip elements. The on-lens system enabled the detection of capacitive variation caused by pressure changes in the range of 2.25 to 30 mmHg and hydration level variation from a distance of 1 cm using incident power from an RFID reader at 26.5 dBm. PMID:28067859

  9. A Wirelessly Powered Smart Contact Lens with Reconfigurable Wide Range and Tunable Sensitivity Sensor Readout Circuitry.

    PubMed

    Chiou, Jin-Chern; Hsu, Shun-Hsi; Huang, Yu-Chieh; Yeh, Guan-Ting; Liou, Wei-Ting; Kuei, Cheng-Kai

    2017-01-07

    This study presented a wireless smart contact lens system that was composed of a reconfigurable capacitive sensor interface circuitry and wirelessly powered radio-frequency identification (RFID) addressable system for sensor control and data communication. In order to improve compliance and reduce user discomfort, a capacitive sensor was embedded on a soft contact lens of 200 μm thickness using commercially available bio-compatible lens material and a standard manufacturing process. The results indicated that the reconfigurable sensor interface achieved sensitivity and baseline tuning up to 120 pF while consuming only 110 μW power. The range and sensitivity tuning of the readout circuitry ensured a reliable operation with respect to sensor fabrication variations and independent calibration of the sensor baseline for individuals. The on-chip voltage scaling allowed the further extension of the detection range and prevented the implementation of large on-chip elements. The on-lens system enabled the detection of capacitive variation caused by pressure changes in the range of 2.25 to 30 mmHg and hydration level variation from a distance of 1 cm using incident power from an RFID reader at 26.5 dBm.

  10. Wireless Hydrogen Smart Sensor Based on Pt/Graphene-Immobilized Radio-Frequency Identification Tag.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun Seop; Oh, Jungkyun; Jun, Jaemoon; Jang, Jyongsik

    2015-08-25

    Hydrogen, a clean-burning fuel, is of key importance to various industrial applications, including fuel cells and the aerospace and automotive industries. However, hydrogen gas is odorless, colorless, and highly flammable; thus, appropriate safety protocol implementation and monitoring are essential. Highly sensitive hydrogen-gas leak detection and surveillance systems are needed; additionally, the ability to monitor large areas (e.g., cities) via wireless networks is becoming increasingly important. In this report, we introduce a radio frequency identification (RFID)-based wireless smart-sensor system, composed of a Pt-decorated reduced graphene oxide (Pt_rGO)-immobilized RFID sensor tag and an RFID-reader antenna-connected network analyzer to detect hydrogen gas. The Pt_rGOs, produced using a simple chemical reduction process, were immobilized on an antenna pattern in the sensor tag through spin coating. The resulting Pt_rGO-based RFID sensor tag exhibited a high sensitivity to hydrogen gas at unprecedentedly low concentrations (1 ppm), with wireless communication between the sensor tag and RFID-reader antenna. The wireless sensor tag demonstrated flexibility and a long lifetime due to the strong immobilization of Pt_rGOs on the substrate and battery-independent operation during hydrogen sensing, respectively.

  11. [Vision on and use of physical restraints and 'smart technology' in nursing homes in Flanders].

    PubMed

    Carlassara, V; Lampo, E; Degryse, B; Van Audenhove, C; Spruytte, N

    2017-04-01

    The STAFF-project investigates in what way 'smart technology' can offer an alternative for physical restraints in nursing homes. A survey is realized aimed at gaining more insight into the vision on and the use of physical restraints and 'smart technology'. Two partly overlapping structured questionnaires were developed and sent to nursing home staff in Flanders (Belgium). One hundred fifty six administrators (managers or assistant-managers) and 238 caregiving staff (nurses, nursing aids, paramedical staff and other) completed the online questionnaire. In general there is a low acceptability of physical restraint use, however, a more nuanced picture of acceptability is present depending on the specific motivation for using physical restraints and on the specific means of physical restraints. About half of the administrators say they use smart technology in the nursing home. The two main reasons for not applying (yet) smart technology are 'too high price for smart technology' and 'inadequate infrastructure of the nursing home'. All respondents underscore the importance of multiple strategies to diminish the use of physical restraints in nursing homes. Physical restraint use is a complex theme and needs a nuanced analysis and management. This study shows that there is still room for improvement in diminishing the use of physical restraints and that nursing homes in Flanders are open to use smart technology.

  12. Characterization, Monitoring and Sensor Technology Integrated Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    This booklet contains summary sheets that describe FY 1993 characterization, monitoring, and sensor technology (CMST) development projects. Currently, 32 projects are funded, 22 through the OTD Characterization, Monitoring, and Sensor Technology Integrated Program (CMST-IP), 8 through the OTD Program Research and Development Announcement (PRDA) activity managed by the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC), and 2 through Interagency Agreements (IAGs). This booklet is not inclusive of those CMST projects which are funded through Integrated Demonstrations (IDs) and other Integrated Programs (IPs). The projects are in six areas: Expedited Site Characterization; Contaminants in Soils and Groundwater; Geophysical and Hydrogeological Measurements; Mixed Wastes in Drums, Burial Grounds, and USTs; Remediation, D&D, and Waste Process Monitoring; and Performance Specifications and Program Support. A task description, technology needs, accomplishments and technology transfer information is given for each project.

  13. Responsive hydrogels--structurally and dimensionally optimized smart frameworks for applications in catalysis, micro-system technology and material science.

    PubMed

    Döring, Artjom; Birnbaum, Wolfgang; Kuckling, Dirk

    2013-09-07

    Although the technological and scientific importance of functional polymers has been well established over the last few decades, the most recent focus that has attracted much attention has been on stimuli-responsive polymers. This group of materials is of particular interest due to its ability to respond to internal and/or external chemico-physical stimuli, which is often manifested as large macroscopic responses. Aside from scientific challenges of designing stimuli-responsive polymers, the main technological interest lies in their numerous applications ranging from catalysis through microsystem technology and chemomechanical actuators to sensors that have been extensively explored. Since the phase transition phenomenon of hydrogels is theoretically well understood advanced materials based on the predictions can be prepared. Since the volume phase transition of hydrogels is a diffusion-limited process the size of the synthesized hydrogels is an important factor. Consistent downscaling of the gel size will result in fast smart gels with sufficient response times. In order to apply smart gels in microsystems and sensors, new preparation techniques for hydrogels have to be developed. For the up-coming nanotechnology, nano-sized gels as actuating materials would be of great interest.

  14. Flexible sensors for biomedical technology.

    PubMed

    Vilela, Diana; Romeo, Agostino; Sánchez, Samuel

    2016-02-07

    Flexible sensing devices have gained a great deal of attention among the scientific community in recent years. The application of flexible sensors spans over several fields, including medicine, industrial automation, robotics, security, and human-machine interfacing. In particular, non-invasive health-monitoring devices are expected to play a key role in the improvement of patient life and in reducing costs associated with clinical and biomedical diagnostic procedures. Here, we focus on recent advances achieved in flexible devices applied on the human skin for biomedical and healthcare purposes.

  15. Investigation of various criteria for evaluation of aluminum thin foil ''smart sensors'' images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panin, S. V.; Eremin, A. V.; Lyubutin, P. S.; Burkov, M. V.

    2014-10-01

    Various criteria for processing of aluminum foil ''smart sensors'' images for fatigue evaluation of carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) were analyzed. There are informative parameters used to assess image quality and surface relief and accordingly to characterize the fatigue damage state of CFRP. The sensitivity of all criteria to distortion influences, particularly, to Gaussian noise, blurring and JPEG compression was investigated. The main purpose of the research is related to the search of informative parameters for fatigue evaluation, which are the least sensitive to different distortions.

  16. Smart City Surveillance Through Low-Cost Fiber Sensors in Metropolitan Optical Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourmpos, Michail; Argyris, Apostolos; Syvridis, Dimitris

    2014-05-01

    A continuously growing number of municipalities has optical fiber networks supporting communications at their disposal. These fiber installations can also be utilized to convey low data optical signals from a large number of deployed sensing elements, usually positioned in critical infrastructure locations, providing a variety of useful information. Such information can be used in the context of a "smart city" to provide citizens with higher-level services or even to proactively ensure public security and safety. This work demonstrates a fiber sensing network based on low-cost fiber Bragg grating sensors that are able to appropriately oversee diverse monitoring parameters.

  17. Optic fiber sensor-based smart bridge cable with functionality of self-sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jianping; Zhou, Zhi; Jinping, Ou

    2013-02-01

    Bridge cables, characterized by distributed large span, serving in harsh environment and vulnerability to random damage, are the key load-sustaining components of cable-based bridges. To ensure the safety of the bridge structure, it is critical to monitor the loading conditions of these cables under lengthwise random damages. Aiming at obtaining accurate monitoring at the critical points as well as the general information of the cable force distributed along the entire cable, this paper presents a study on cable force monitoring by combining optical fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors and Brillouin optical time domain analysis/reflectory (BOTDA/R) sensing technique in one single optical fiber. A smart FRP-OF-FBG rebar based cable was fabricated by protruding a FRP packaged OF-FBG sensor into the bridge cable. And its sensing characteristics, stability under high stress state temperature self-compensation as well as BOTDA/R distributed data improvement by local FBG sensors have been investigated. The results show that FRP-OF-FBG rebar in the smart cable can deform consistantly along with the steel wire and the cable force obtained from the optical fiber sensors agree well with theoretical value with relative error less than ±5%. Besides, the temperature self-compensation method provides a significant cost-effective technique for the FRP-OF-FBG based cables' in situ cable force measurement. And furthermore, potential damages of the bridge cable, e.g. wire breaking and corrosion, can be characterized and symbolized by the discontinuity and fluctuation of the distributed BOTDA data thereafter accuracy improved by local FBG sensors.

  18. Brain temperature measurement: A study of in vitro accuracy and stability of smart catheter temperature sensors.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunyan; Wu, Pei-Ming; Wu, Zhizhen; Ahn, Chong H; LeDoux, David; Shutter, Lori A; Hartings, Jed A; Narayan, Raj K

    2012-02-01

    The injured brain is vulnerable to increases in temperature after severe head injury. Therefore, accurate and reliable measurement of brain temperature is important to optimize patient outcome. In this work, we have fabricated, optimized and characterized temperature sensors for use with a micromachined smart catheter for multimodal intracranial monitoring. Developed temperature sensors have resistance of 100.79 ± 1.19Ω and sensitivity of 67.95 mV/°C in the operating range from15-50°C, and time constant of 180 ms. Under the optimized excitation current of 500 μA, adequate signal-to-noise ratio was achieved without causing self-heating, and changes in immersion depth did not introduce clinically significant errors of measurements (<0.01°C). We evaluated the accuracy and long-term drift (5 days) of twenty temperature sensors in comparison to two types of commercial temperature probes (USB Reference Thermometer, NIST-traceable bulk probe with 0.05°C accuracy; and IT-21, type T type clinical microprobe with guaranteed 0.1°C accuracy) under controlled laboratory conditions. These in vitro experimental data showed that the temperature measurement performance of our sensors was accurate and reliable over the course of 5 days. The smart catheter temperature sensors provided accuracy and long-term stability comparable to those of commercial tissue-implantable microprobes, and therefore provide a means for temperature measurement in a microfabricated, multimodal cerebral monitoring device.

  19. ENERGY SMART SCHOOLS APPLIED RESEARCH, FIELD TESTING, AND TECHNOLOGY INTEGRATION

    SciTech Connect

    Frank Bishop

    2003-04-01

    This multi-state collaborative project brings together federal, state, and private sector resources in order to move the design and use of high-performance energy technologies in schools to the forefront. NASEO and its contractors continue to make progress on completion of the statement of work. The high watermark for this period is the installation and operation of the micro-turbine in the Canton School District. The school is pleased to begin the monitoring phase of the project and looks forward to a ribbon cutting this Spring. The other projects continue to move forward and NYSERDA has now begun work in earnest. We expect the NASEO/NYSERDA workshop sometime this Spring as well. By the time the next Annual Technical Progress Report is submitted, we plan to have finished all of the work. The next year should be filled with dissemination of information to interested parties on the success of the project in an effort to get others to duplicate the high performance, and energy smart schools initiatives. We expect all of the deliverables to be completed with the possible exception of the high-performance schools retrofits in California. We expect that 2 of the 3 campuses undergoing retrofits will be complete and the third will be nearly complete. All other activities are on schedule for 10/1/03 completion at this time.

  20. Smart Order Routing Technology in the New European Equity Trading Landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ende, Bartholomäus; Gomber, Peter; Lutat, Marco

    In Europe, fragmentation of execution venues has been triggered by increasing competition among markets and a new regulatory environment set up by MiFID. Against this background, IT-based sophisticated order routing systems (Smart Order Routing systems) promise to assure efficiency despite fragmented markets. This raises the question on the relevance and economic value of this technology in European equity trading. Based on order book data for EURO STOXX 50 securities of ten European electronic execution venues, this paper assesses the potential of Smart Order Routing technology by measuring the performance of actual executions in European order book trading relative to a Smart Order Router implementation that detects and accesses best European prices. We identify 6.71% full trade troughs and 6.45% partial trade-throughs in our dataset enabling for significant absolute and relative savings. This indicates that Smart Order Routing technology can provide business value by improving order executions in European cross-tradable equities.

  1. Fluorescent sensors for the basic metabolic panel enable measurement with a smart phone device over the physiological range.

    PubMed

    Awqatty, Becker; Samaddar, Shayak; Cash, Kevin J; Clark, Heather A; Dubach, J Matthew

    2014-10-21

    The advanced functionality of portable devices such as smart phones provides the necessary hardware to potentially perform complex diagnostic measurements in any setting. Recent research and development have utilized cameras and data acquisition properties of smart phones to create diagnostic approaches for a variety of diseases or pollutants. However, in concentration measurements, such as blood glucose, the performance of handheld diagnostic devices depends largely on the sensing mechanism. To expand measurements to multiple components, often necessary in medical tests, with a single diagnostic device, robust platform based sensors are needed. Here, we developed a suite of dual wavelength fluorescent sensors with response characteristics necessary to measure each component of a basic metabolic panel, a common clinical measurement. Furthermore, the response of these sensors could be measured with a simple optical setup to convert a smart phone into a fluorescence measurement instrument. This approach could be used as a mobile basic metabolic panel measurement system for point of care diagnostics.

  2. Mining Productive-Associated Periodic-Frequent Patterns in Body Sensor Data for Smart Home Care

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, Walaa N.; Hassan, Mohammad Mehedi

    2017-01-01

    The understanding of various health-oriented vital sign data generated from body sensor networks (BSNs) and discovery of the associations between the generated parameters is an important task that may assist and promote important decision making in healthcare. For example, in a smart home scenario where occupants’ health status is continuously monitored remotely, it is essential to provide the required assistance when an unusual or critical situation is detected in their vital sign data. In this paper, we present an efficient approach for mining the periodic patterns obtained from BSN data. In addition, we employ a correlation test on the generated patterns and introduce productive-associated periodic-frequent patterns as the set of correlated periodic-frequent items. The combination of these measures has the advantage of empowering healthcare providers and patients to raise the quality of diagnosis as well as improve treatment and smart care, especially for elderly people in smart homes. We develop an efficient algorithm named PPFP-growth (Productive Periodic-Frequent Pattern-growth) to discover all productive-associated periodic frequent patterns using these measures. PPFP-growth is efficient and the productiveness measure removes uncorrelated periodic items. An experimental evaluation on synthetic and real datasets shows the efficiency of the proposed PPFP-growth algorithm, which can filter a huge number of periodic patterns to reveal only the correlated ones. PMID:28445441

  3. Mining Productive-Associated Periodic-Frequent Patterns in Body Sensor Data for Smart Home Care.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Walaa N; Hassan, Mohammad Mehedi

    2017-04-26

    The understanding of various health-oriented vital sign data generated from body sensor networks (BSNs) and discovery of the associations between the generated parameters is an important task that may assist and promote important decision making in healthcare. For example, in a smart home scenario where occupants' health status is continuously monitored remotely, it is essential to provide the required assistance when an unusual or critical situation is detected in their vital sign data. In this paper, we present an efficient approach for mining the periodic patterns obtained from BSN data. In addition, we employ a correlation test on the generated patterns and introduce productive-associated periodic-frequent patterns as the set of correlated periodic-frequent items. The combination of these measures has the advantage of empowering healthcare providers and patients to raise the quality of diagnosis as well as improve treatment and smart care, especially for elderly people in smart homes. We develop an efficient algorithm named PPFP-growth (Productive Periodic-Frequent Pattern-growth) to discover all productive-associated periodic frequent patterns using these measures. PPFP-growth is efficient and the productiveness measure removes uncorrelated periodic items. An experimental evaluation on synthetic and real datasets shows the efficiency of the proposed PPFP-growth algorithm, which can filter a huge number of periodic patterns to reveal only the correlated ones.

  4. SmartPort: A Platform for Sensor Data Monitoring in a Seaport Based on FIWARE

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Pablo; Santana, José Miguel; Ortega, Sebastián; Trujillo, Agustín; Suárez, José Pablo; Domínguez, Conrado; Santana, Jaisiel; Sánchez, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    Seaport monitoring and management is a significant research area, in which infrastructure automatically collects big data sets that lead the organization in its multiple activities. Thus, this problem is heavily related to the fields of data acquisition, transfer, storage, big data analysis and information visualization. Las Palmas de Gran Canaria port is a good example of how a seaport generates big data volumes through a network of sensors. They are placed on meteorological stations and maritime buoys, registering environmental parameters. Likewise, the Automatic Identification System (AIS) registers several dynamic parameters about the tracked vessels. However, such an amount of data is useless without a system that enables a meaningful visualization and helps make decisions. In this work, we present SmartPort, a platform that offers a distributed architecture for the collection of the port sensors’ data and a rich Internet application that allows the user to explore the geolocated data. The presented SmartPort tool is a representative, promising and inspiring approach to manage and develop a smart system. It covers a demanding need for big data analysis and visualization utilities for managing complex infrastructures, such as a seaport. PMID:27011192

  5. The Potential for Quantum Technology Gravity Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boddice, Daniel; Metje, Nicole; Tuckwell, George

    2016-04-01

    Gravity measurements are widely used in geophysics for the detection of subsurface cavities such as sinkhole and past mine workings. The chief advantage of gravity compared to other geophysical techniques is that it is passive method which cannot be shielded by intervening features or ground giving it no theoretical limitations on penetration depth beyond the resolution of the instrument, and that it responds to an absence of mass as opposed to a proxy ground property like other techniques. However, current instruments are limited both by their resolution and by sources of environmental noise. This can be overcome with the imminent arrival of gravity sensors using quantum technology (QT) currently developed and constructed by the QT-Hub in Sensors and Metrology, which promise a far greater resolution. The QT sensor uses a technique called atom interferometry, where cold atoms are used as ideal test-masses to create a gravity sensor which can measure a gravity gradient rather than an absolute value. This suppresses several noise sources and creates a sensor useful in everyday applications. The paper will present computer simulations of buried targets and noise sources to explore the potential uses of these new sensors for a range of applications including pipes, tunnels and mine shafts. This will provide information on the required resolution and sensitivity of any new sensor if it is to deliver the promised step change in geophysical detection capability.

  6. Assessment of Sensor Technologies for Advanced Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Korsah, Kofi; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Vlim, R.; Kisner, Roger A.; Britton, Jr, Charles L.; Wootan, D. W.; Anheier, Jr, N. C.; Diaz, A. A.; Hirt, E. H.; Chien, H. T.; Sheen, S.; Bakhtiari, Sasan; Gopalsami, S.; Heifetz, A.; Tam, S. W.; Park, Y.; Upadhyaya, B. R.; Stanford, A.

    2016-10-01

    Sensors and measurement technologies provide information on processes, support operations and provide indications of component health. They are therefore crucial to plant operations and to commercialization of advanced reactors (AdvRx). This report, developed by a three-laboratory team consisting of Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), provides an assessment of sensor technologies and a determination of measurement needs for AdvRx. It provides the technical basis for identifying and prioritizing research targets within the instrumentation and control (I&C) Technology Area under the Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Advanced Reactor Technology (ART) program and contributes to the design and implementation of AdvRx concepts.

  7. Sensing Models and Sensor Network Architectures for Transport Infrastructure Monitoring in Smart Cities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonis, Ingo

    2015-04-01

    Transport infrastructure monitoring and analysis is one of the focus areas in the context of smart cities. With the growing number of people moving into densely populated urban metro areas, precise tracking of moving people and goods is the basis for profound decision-making and future planning. With the goal of defining optimal extensions and modifications to existing transport infrastructures, multi-modal transport has to be monitored and analysed. This process is performed on the basis of sensor networks that combine a variety of sensor models, types, and deployments within the area of interest. Multi-generation networks, consisting of a number of sensor types and versions, are causing further challenges for the integration and processing of sensor observations. These challenges are not getting any smaller with the development of the Internet of Things, which brings promising opportunities, but is currently stuck in a type of protocol war between big industry players from both the hardware and network infrastructure domain. In this paper, we will highlight how the OGC suite of standards, with the Sensor Web standards developed by the Sensor Web Enablement Initiative together with the latest developments by the Sensor Web for Internet of Things community can be applied to the monitoring and improvement of transport infrastructures. Sensor Web standards have been applied in the past to pure technical domains, but need to be broadened now in order to meet new challenges. Only cross domain approaches will allow to develop satisfying transport infrastructure approaches that take into account requirements coming form a variety of sectors such as tourism, administration, transport industry, emergency services, or private people. The goal is the development of interoperable components that can be easily integrated within data infrastructures and follow well defined information models to allow robust processing.

  8. Assessment of the Impact of Smart Board Technology System Use on Student Learning, Satisfaction, and Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warnock, Stuart H.; Boykin, Nancy J.; Tung, Wei Chih

    2011-01-01

    Literature on educational technology touts its potential for enhancing student outcomes such as learning, satisfaction, and performance. But are these benefits universal and do they apply to all applications and/or forms of educational technology? This study focuses on one such system, the Smart Board Technology System (SBTS) and the impact its…

  9. Indoor-Outdoor Detection Using a Smart Phone Sensor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weiping; Chang, Qiang; Li, Qun; Shi, Zesen; Chen, Wei

    2016-09-22

    In the era of mobile internet, Location Based Services (LBS) have developed dramatically. Seamless Indoor and Outdoor Navigation and Localization (SNAL) has attracted a lot of attention. No single positioning technology was capable of meeting the various positioning requirements in different environments. Selecting different positioning techniques for different environments is an alternative method. Detecting the users' current environment is crucial for this technique. In this paper, we proposed to detect the indoor/outdoor environment automatically without high energy consumption. The basic idea was simple: we applied a machine learning algorithm to classify the neighboring Global System for Mobile (GSM) communication cellular base station's signal strength in different environments, and identified the users' current context by signal pattern recognition. We tested the algorithm in four different environments. The results showed that the proposed algorithm was capable of identifying open outdoors, semi-outdoors, light indoors and deep indoors environments with 100% accuracy using the signal strength of four nearby GSM stations. The required hardware and signal are widely available in our daily lives, implying its high compatibility and availability.

  10. Indoor-Outdoor Detection Using a Smart Phone Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weiping; Chang, Qiang; Li, Qun; Shi, Zesen; Chen, Wei

    2016-01-01

    In the era of mobile internet, Location Based Services (LBS) have developed dramatically. Seamless Indoor and Outdoor Navigation and Localization (SNAL) has attracted a lot of attention. No single positioning technology was capable of meeting the various positioning requirements in different environments. Selecting different positioning techniques for different environments is an alternative method. Detecting the users’ current environment is crucial for this technique. In this paper, we proposed to detect the indoor/outdoor environment automatically without high energy consumption. The basic idea was simple: we applied a machine learning algorithm to classify the neighboring Global System for Mobile (GSM) communication cellular base station’s signal strength in different environments, and identified the users’ current context by signal pattern recognition. We tested the algorithm in four different environments. The results showed that the proposed algorithm was capable of identifying open outdoors, semi-outdoors, light indoors and deep indoors environments with 100% accuracy using the signal strength of four nearby GSM stations. The required hardware and signal are widely available in our daily lives, implying its high compatibility and availability. PMID:27669252

  11. Research on linguistic concept creation method applied to environmental comfort sensors in health smart home.

    PubMed

    Xin, Li; Wenxue, Hong; Jialin, Song; Jiannan, Kang

    2005-01-01

    We endeavor to provide a novel tool to evaluate environmental comfort level in Health Smart Home (HSH). HSH is regarded a good alternative for the independent life of elders and people with disability. Numerous intelligent devices, installed within a home environment, can provide the resident with continuous monitoring and comfortable environment. In this paper, a novel method of evaluating environmental comfort level is provided. An intelligent sensor is a fuzzy comfort sensor that can measure and fusion the environmental parameters. Based upon the results, it will further give a linguistic description about the environmental comfort level, in the manner of an expert system. The core of the sensor is multi-parameter information fusion. Similar to human behavior, the sensor makes all the evaluation about the surrounding environment's comfort level based on the symbolic measurement theory. We applied chart representation theory in multivariate analysis in the biomedical engineering field to complete the human comfortable sensor's linguistic concept creation. We achieved better performance when using this method to complete multi-parameter fusion and fuzziness. It is our belief that this method can be used in both biology intelligent sensing and many other areas, where the quantitative and qualitative information transform is needed.

  12. Real-time improvement of continuous glucose monitoring accuracy: the smart sensor concept.

    PubMed

    Facchinetti, Andrea; Sparacino, Giovanni; Guerra, Stefania; Luijf, Yoeri M; DeVries, J Hans; Mader, Julia K; Ellmerer, Martin; Benesch, Carsten; Heinemann, Lutz; Bruttomesso, Daniela; Avogaro, Angelo; Cobelli, Claudio

    2013-04-01

    Reliability of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) sensors is key in several applications. In this work we demonstrate that real-time algorithms can render CGM sensors smarter by reducing their uncertainty and inaccuracy and improving their ability to alert for hypo- and hyperglycemic events. The smart CGM (sCGM) sensor concept consists of a commercial CGM sensor whose output enters three software modules, able to work in real time, for denoising, enhancement, and prediction. These three software modules were recently presented in the CGM literature, and here we apply them to the Dexcom SEVEN Plus continuous glucose monitor. We assessed the performance of the sCGM on data collected in two trials, each containing 12 patients with type 1 diabetes. The denoising module improves the smoothness of the CGM time series by an average of ∼57%, the enhancement module reduces the mean absolute relative difference from 15.1 to 10.3%, increases by 12.6% the pairs of values falling in the A-zone of the Clarke error grid, and finally, the prediction module forecasts hypo- and hyperglycemic events an average of 14 min ahead of time. We have introduced and implemented the sCGM sensor concept. Analysis of data from 24 patients demonstrates that incorporation of suitable real-time signal processing algorithms for denoising, enhancement, and prediction can significantly improve the performance of CGM applications. This can be of great clinical impact for hypo- and hyperglycemic alert generation as well in artificial pancreas devices.

  13. Report of the sensor cooler technology panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Ronald; Castles, S.; Gautier, N.; Kittel, P.; Ludwigsen, J.

    1991-01-01

    The Sensor Cooler Technology Panel identified three major areas in which technology development must be supported in order to meet the system performance requirements for the Astrotech 21 mission set science objectives. They are: long life vibration free refrigerators; mechanical refrigeration for 2 K to 5 K; and flight testing of emerging prototype refrigerators. A development strategy and schedule were recommended for each of the three areas.

  14. On Methodological and Technological Challenges for Proactive Health Management in Smart Homes.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Klaus-Hendrik; Dehling, Tobias; Haux, Reinhold; Sick, Bernhard; Sunyaev, Ali; Tomforde, Sven

    2017-01-01

    Health management in smart homes has advanced during the last years. With proactive health management in such environments further progress for health prevention and care is to be expected. Challenges for proactive health management in three areas are summarized and briefly discussed: pattern recognition and machine learning, information privacy and user-oriented design, and sensor-enhanced health information systems architectures.

  15. A smart sensor architecture based on emergent computation in an array of outer-totalistic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogaru, Radu; Dogaru, Ioana; Glesner, Manfred

    2005-06-01

    A novel smart-sensor architecture is proposed, capable to segment and recognize characters in a monochrome image. It is capable to provide a list of ASCII codes representing the recognized characters from the monochrome visual field. It can operate as a blind's aid or for industrial applications. A bio-inspired cellular model with simple linear neurons was found the best to perform the nontrivial task of cropping isolated compact objects such as handwritten digits or characters. By attaching a simple outer-totalistic cell to each pixel sensor, emergent computation in the resulting cellular automata lattice provides a straightforward and compact solution to the otherwise computationally intensive problem of character segmentation. A simple and robust recognition algorithm is built in a compact sequential controller accessing the array of cells so that the integrated device can provide directly a list of codes of the recognized characters. Preliminary simulation tests indicate good performance and robustness to various distortions of the visual field.

  16. JPL CMOS Active Pixel Sensor Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossum, E. R.

    1995-01-01

    This paper will present the JPL-developed complementary metal- oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) active pixel sensor (APS) technology. The CMOS APS has achieved performance comparable to charge coupled devices, yet features ultra low power operation, random access readout, on-chip timing and control, and on-chip analog to digital conversion. Previously published open literature will be reviewed.

  17. Technology and science from Earth to Moon: SMART-1 experiments and their operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marini, A. E.; Lumb, R.; Racca, G. D.; Foing, B. H.; Dias-Almeida, M.

    2002-10-01

    SMART-1, the first European mission to the Moon aimed at demonstrating the Solar Electric propulsion hosts 10 Technology and Science experiments. The monitoring of the spacecraft plasma environment and the thruster contamination produced by thruster is carried out by SPEDE (Spacecraft Potential, Electron and Dust Experiment) and EPDP (Electric Propulsion Diagnostic Package). The miniaturised remote sensing instruments on-board SMART-1 are: AMIE (Advanced Moon micro-Imager Experiment), D-CIXS (Demonstration of a Compact Imaging X-ray Spectrometer), supported in its operation by XSM (X-ray Solar Monitor), and SIR (SMART-1 Infrared Spectrometer). Technology experiments for deep-space communications and navigation are: KATE (Ka-Band TT&C Experiment), based on X/Kaband transponder which also supports RSIS (Radio-Science Investigations for SMART-1), Laser-link, demonstrating a deep-space laser communication link and OBAN (On-Board Autonomous Navigation experiment). The Experiments will be performed during two distinct phases of the SMART-1 mission, including 17-month Earth escape phase and a nominal 6-month operational phase in elliptical Moon orbit. The SMART-1 STOC (Science and Technology Operations Co-ordination) carries out the planning and co-ordination of the Technology and science experiments.

  18. Organizational and technological correlates of nurses’ trust in a smart IV pump

    PubMed Central

    Montague, Enid; Asan, Onur; Chiou, Erin

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to understand technology and system characteristics that contribute to nurses’ ratings of trust in a smart IV pump. Nurse’s trust in new technologies can influence how technologies are used. Trust in technology is defined as a person’s belief that a technology will not fail them. Potential outcomes of trust in technology are appropriate trust, over trust, distrust, and mistrust. Trust in technology is also related to several use specific outcomes, including appropriate use and inappropriate use such as over reliance, disuse or rejection, or misuse. Understanding trust in relation to outcomes can contribute to designs that facilitate appropriate trust in new technologies. A survey was completed by 391 nurses a year after the implementation of a new smart IV pump. The survey assessed trust in the IV pump and other elements of the sociotechnical system, individual characteristics, technology characteristics and organizational characteristics. Results show perceptions of usefulness, safety, ease of use and usability are related to ratings of trust in smart IV pumps. Other work system factors such as perception of work environment, age, experience, quality of work, and perception of work performance are also related to ratings of trust. Nurses’ trust in smart IV pumps is influenced by both characteristics of the technology and the sociotechnical system. Findings from this research have implications for the design of future smart IV pumps and health systems. Recommendations for appropriately trustworthy smart IV pumps are discussed. Findings also have implications for how trust in health technologies can be measured and conceptualized in complex sociotechnical systems. PMID:23321482

  19. Organizational and technological correlates of nurses' trust in a smart intravenous pump.

    PubMed

    Montague, Enid; Asan, Onur; Chiou, Erin

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to understand technology and system characteristics that contribute to nurses' ratings of trust in a smart intravenous pump. Nurses' trust in new technologies can influence how technologies are used. Trust in technology is defined as a person's belief that a technology will not fail them. Potential outcomes of trust in technology are appropriate trust, overtrust, distrust, and mistrust. Trust in technology is also related to several use-specific outcomes, including appropriate use and inappropriate use such as overreliance, disuse or rejection, or misuse. Understanding trust in relation to outcomes can contribute to designs that facilitate appropriate trust in new technologies. A survey was completed by 391 nurses a year after the implementation of a new smart intravenous pump. The survey assessed trust in the intravenous pump and other elements of the sociotechnical system, individual characteristics, technology characteristics, and organizational characteristics. Results show that perceptions of usefulness, safety, ease of use, and usability are related to ratings of trust in smart intravenous pumps. Other work systemfactors such as perception of work environment, age, experience, quality of work, and perception of work performance are also related to ratings of trust. Nurses' trust in smart intravenous pumps is influenced by both characteristics of the technology and the sociotechnical system. Findings from this research have implications for the design of future smart intravenous pumps and health systems. Recommendations for appropriately trustworthy smart intravenous pumps are discussed. Findings also have implications for how trust in health technologies can be measured and conceptualized in complex sociotechnical systems.

  20. A technique for autonomous structural damage detection with smart wireless sensor network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Y.; Mao, Y. K.; Tang, Y. L.; Wang, J. X.

    2010-03-01

    In this paper, a distributed structural damage detection approach is proposed for large size structures under limited input and output measurements. A large size structure is decomposed into small size substructures based on its finite element formulation. Interaction effect between adjacent substructures is considered as 'additional unknown inputs' to each substructure. By sequentially utilizing the extended Kalman estimator for the extended state vector and the least squares estimation for the unmeasured inputs, the approach can not only estimate the 'additional unknown inputs' based on their formulations but also identify structural dynamic parameters, such as the stiffness and damping of each substructure. Local structural damage in the large size structure can be detected by tracking the changes in the identified values of structural dynamic parameters at element level, e.g., the degrading of stiffness parameters. Numerical example of detecting structural local damages in a large-size plane truss bridge illustrates the efficiency of the proposed approach. A new smart wireless sensor network is developed by the authors to combine with the proposed approach for autonomous structural damage detection of large size structures. The distributed structural damage detection approach can be embedded into the smart wireless sensor network based on its two-level cluster-tree topology architecture and the distributed computation capacity of each cluster head.

  1. A Hilbert Transform-Based Smart Sensor for Detection, Classification, and Quantification of Power Quality Disturbances

    PubMed Central

    Granados-Lieberman, David; Valtierra-Rodriguez, Martin; Morales-Hernandez, Luis A.; Romero-Troncoso, Rene J.; Osornio-Rios, Roque A.

    2013-01-01

    Power quality disturbance (PQD) monitoring has become an important issue due to the growing number of disturbing loads connected to the power line and to the susceptibility of certain loads to their presence. In any real power system, there are multiple sources of several disturbances which can have different magnitudes and appear at different times. In order to avoid equipment damage and estimate the damage severity, they have to be detected, classified, and quantified. In this work, a smart sensor for detection, classification, and quantification of PQD is proposed. First, the Hilbert transform (HT) is used as detection technique; then, the classification of the envelope of a PQD obtained through HT is carried out by a feed forward neural network (FFNN). Finally, the root mean square voltage (Vrms), peak voltage (Vpeak), crest factor (CF), and total harmonic distortion (THD) indices calculated through HT and Parseval's theorem as well as an instantaneous exponential time constant quantify the PQD according to the disturbance presented. The aforementioned methodology is processed online using digital hardware signal processing based on field programmable gate array (FPGA). Besides, the proposed smart sensor performance is validated and tested through synthetic signals and under real operating conditions, respectively. PMID:23698264

  2. A Hilbert transform-based smart sensor for detection, classification, and quantification of power quality disturbances.

    PubMed

    Granados-Lieberman, David; Valtierra-Rodriguez, Martin; Morales-Hernandez, Luis A; Romero-Troncoso, Rene J; Osornio-Rios, Roque A

    2013-04-25

    Power quality disturbance (PQD) monitoring has become an important issue due to the growing number of disturbing loads connected to the power line and to the susceptibility of certain loads to their presence. In any real power system, there are multiple sources of several disturbances which can have different magnitudes and appear at different times. In order to avoid equipment damage and estimate the damage severity, they have to be detected, classified, and quantified. In this work, a smart sensor for detection, classification, and quantification of PQD is proposed. First, the Hilbert transform (HT) is used as detection technique; then, the classification of the envelope of a PQD obtained through HT is carried out by a feed forward neural network (FFNN). Finally, the root mean square voltage (Vrms), peak voltage (Vpeak), crest factor (CF), and total harmonic distortion (THD) indices calculated through HT and Parseval's theorem as well as an instantaneous exponential time constant quantify the PQD according to the disturbance presented. The aforementioned methodology is processed online using digital hardware signal processing based on field programmable gate array (FPGA). Besides, the proposed smart sensor performance is validated and tested through synthetic signals and under real operating conditions, respectively.

  3. Smart Sensor for Real-Time Quantification of Common Symptoms Present in Unhealthy Plants

    PubMed Central

    Contreras-Medina, Luis M.; Osornio-Rios, Roque A.; Torres-Pacheco, Irineo; Romero-Troncoso, Rene de J.; Guevara-González, Ramon G.; Millan-Almaraz, Jesus R.

    2012-01-01

    Plant responses to physiological function disorders are called symptoms and they are caused principally by pathogens and nutritional deficiencies. Plant symptoms are commonly used as indicators of the health and nutrition status of plants. Nowadays, the most popular method to quantify plant symptoms is based on visual estimations, consisting on evaluations that raters give based on their observation of plant symptoms; however, this method is inaccurate and imprecise because of its obvious subjectivity. Computational Vision has been employed in plant symptom quantification because of its accuracy and precision. Nevertheless, the systems developed so far lack in-situ, real-time and multi-symptom analysis. There exist methods to obtain information about the health and nutritional status of plants based on reflectance and chlorophyll fluorescence, but they use expensive equipment and are frequently destructive. Therefore, systems able of quantifying plant symptoms overcoming the aforementioned disadvantages that can serve as indicators of health and nutrition in plants are desirable. This paper reports an FPGA-based smart sensor able to perform non-destructive, real-time and in-situ analysis of leaf images to quantify multiple symptoms presented by diseased and malnourished plants; this system can serve as indicator of the health and nutrition in plants. The effectiveness of the proposed smart-sensor was successfully tested by analyzing diseased and malnourished plants. PMID:22368496

  4. Smart sensor for real-time quantification of common symptoms present in unhealthy plants.

    PubMed

    Contreras-Medina, Luis M; Osornio-Rios, Roque A; Torres-Pacheco, Irineo; Romero-Troncoso, Rene de J; Guevara-González, Ramon G; Millan-Almaraz, Jesus R

    2012-01-01

    Plant responses to physiological function disorders are called symptoms and they are caused principally by pathogens and nutritional deficiencies. Plant symptoms are commonly used as indicators of the health and nutrition status of plants. Nowadays, the most popular method to quantify plant symptoms is based on visual estimations, consisting on evaluations that raters give based on their observation of plant symptoms; however, this method is inaccurate and imprecise because of its obvious subjectivity. Computational Vision has been employed in plant symptom quantification because of its accuracy and precision. Nevertheless, the systems developed so far lack in-situ, real-time and multi-symptom analysis. There exist methods to obtain information about the health and nutritional status of plants based on reflectance and chlorophyll fluorescence, but they use expensive equipment and are frequently destructive. Therefore, systems able of quantifying plant symptoms overcoming the aforementioned disadvantages that can serve as indicators of health and nutrition in plants are desirable. This paper reports an FPGA-based smart sensor able to perform non-destructive, real-time and in-situ analysis of leaf images to quantify multiple symptoms presented by diseased and malnourished plants; this system can serve as indicator of the health and nutrition in plants. The effectiveness of the proposed smart-sensor was successfully tested by analyzing diseased and malnourished plants.

  5. Self-Powered Wireless Smart Sensor Node Enabled by an Ultrastable, Highly Efficient, and Superhydrophobic-Surface-Based Triboelectric Nanogenerator.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Kun; Wang, Zhong Lin; Yang, Ya

    2016-09-27

    Wireless sensor networks will be responsible for a majority of the fast growth in intelligent systems in the next decade. However, most of the wireless smart sensor nodes require an external power source such as a Li-ion battery, where the labor cost and environmental waste issues of replacing batteries have largely limited the practical applications. Instead of using a Li-ion battery, we report an ultrastable, highly efficient, and superhydrophobic-surface-based triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) to scavenge wind energy for sustainably powering a wireless smart temperature sensor node. There is no decrease in the output voltage and current of the TENG after continuous working for about 14 h at a wind speed of 12 m/s. Through a power management circuit, the TENG can deliver a constant output voltage of 3.3 V and a pulsed output current of about 100 mA to achieve highly efficient energy storage in a capacitor. A wireless smart temperature sensor node can be sustainably powered by the TENG for sending the real-time temperature data to an iPhone under a working distance of 26 m, demonstrating the feasibility of the self-powered wireless smart sensor networks.

  6. Smart technologies to enhance social connectedness in older people who live at home.

    PubMed

    Morris, Meg E; Adair, Brooke; Ozanne, Elizabeth; Kurowski, William; Miller, Kimberly J; Pearce, Alan J; Santamaria, Nick; Long, Maureen; Ventura, Cameron; Said, Catherine M

    2014-09-01

    To examine the effectiveness of smart technologies in improving or maintaining the social connectedness of older people living at home. We conducted a systematic review and critical evaluation of research articles published between 2000 and 2013. Article screening, data extraction and quality assessment (using the Downs and Black checklist) were conducted by two independent researchers. Eighteen publications were identified that evaluated the effect of smart technologies on dimensions of social connectedness. Fourteen studies reported positive outcomes in aspects such as social support, isolation and loneliness. There was emerging evidence that some technologies augmented the beneficial effects of more traditional aged-care services. Smart technologies, such as tailored internet programs, may help older people better manage and understand various health conditions, resulting in subsequent improvements in aspects of social connectedness. Further research is required regarding how technological innovations could be promoted, marketed and implemented to benefit older people. © 2014 ACOTA.

  7. Passive autonomous infrared sensor technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadjadi, Firooz

    1987-10-01

    This study was conducted in response to the DoD's need for establishing understanding of algorithm's modules for passive infrared sensors and seekers and establishing a standardized systematic procedure for applying this understanding to DoD applications. We quantified the performances of Honeywell's Background Adaptive Convexity Operator Region Extractor (BACORE) detection and segmentation modules, as functions of a set of image metrics for both single-frame and multiframe processing. We established an understanding of the behavior of the BACORE's internal parameters. We characterized several sets of stationary and sequential imagery and extracted TIR squared, TBIR squared, ESR, and range for each target. We generated a set of performance models for multi-frame processing BACORE that could be used to predict the behavior of BACORE in image metric space. A similar study was conducted for another of Honeywell's segmentors, namely Texture Boundary Locator (TBL), and its performances were quantified. Finally, a comparison of TBL and BACORE on the same data base and same number of frames was made.

  8. Characterization, monitoring, and sensor technology crosscutting program: Technology summary

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    The purpose of the Characterization, Monitoring, and Sensor Technology Crosscutting Program (CMST-CP) is to deliver appropriate characterization, monitoring, and sensor technology (CMST) to the Office of Waste Management (EM-30), the Office of Environmental Restoration (EM-40), and the Office of Facility Transition and Management (EM-60). The technology development must also be cost effective and appropriate to EM-30/40/60 needs. Furthermore, the required technologies must be delivered and implemented when needed. Accordingly, and to ensure that available DOE and other national resources are focused an the most pressing needs, management of the technology development is concentrated on the following Focus Areas: Contaminant Plume Containment and Remediation (PFA); Landfill Stabilization (LSFA); High-Level Waste Tank Remediation (TFA); Mixed Waste Characterization, Treatment, and Disposal (MWFA); and Facility Deactivation, Decommissioning, and Material Disposition (FDDMDFA). Brief descriptions of CMST-CP projects funded in FY95 are presented.

  9. Integration of GMR Sensors with Different Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Cubells-Beltrán, María-Dolores; Reig, Càndid; Madrenas, Jordi; De Marcellis, Andrea; Santos, Joana; Cardoso, Susana; Freitas, Paulo P.

    2016-01-01

    Less than thirty years after the giant magnetoresistance (GMR) effect was described, GMR sensors are the preferred choice in many applications demanding the measurement of low magnetic fields in small volumes. This rapid deployment from theoretical basis to market and state-of-the-art applications can be explained by the combination of excellent inherent properties with the feasibility of fabrication, allowing the real integration with many other standard technologies. In this paper, we present a review focusing on how this capability of integration has allowed the improvement of the inherent capabilities and, therefore, the range of application of GMR sensors. After briefly describing the phenomenological basis, we deal on the benefits of low temperature deposition techniques regarding the integration of GMR sensors with flexible (plastic) substrates and pre-processed CMOS chips. In this way, the limit of detection can be improved by means of bettering the sensitivity or reducing the noise. We also report on novel fields of application of GMR sensors by the recapitulation of a number of cases of success of their integration with different heterogeneous complementary elements. We finally describe three fully functional systems, two of them in the bio-technology world, as the proof of how the integrability has been instrumental in the meteoric development of GMR sensors and their applications. PMID:27338415

  10. Smart homes and home health monitoring technologies for older adults: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lili; Stroulia, Eleni; Nikolaidis, Ioanis; Miguel-Cruz, Antonio; Rios Rincon, Adriana

    2016-07-01

    Around the world, populations are aging and there is a growing concern about ways that older adults can maintain their health and well-being while living in their homes. The aim of this paper was to conduct a systematic literature review to determine: (1) the levels of technology readiness among older adults and, (2) evidence for smart homes and home-based health-monitoring technologies that support aging in place for older adults who have complex needs. We identified and analyzed 48 of 1863 relevant papers. Our analyses found that: (1) technology-readiness level for smart homes and home health monitoring technologies is low; (2) the highest level of evidence is 1b (i.e., one randomized controlled trial with a PEDro score ≥6); smart homes and home health monitoring technologies are used to monitor activities of daily living, cognitive decline and mental health, and heart conditions in older adults with complex needs; (3) there is no evidence that smart homes and home health monitoring technologies help address disability prediction and health-related quality of life, or fall prevention; and (4) there is conflicting evidence that smart homes and home health monitoring technologies help address chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The level of technology readiness for smart homes and home health monitoring technologies is still low. The highest level of evidence found was in a study that supported home health technologies for use in monitoring activities of daily living, cognitive decline, mental health, and heart conditions in older adults with complex needs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Smart nanosystems: Bio-inspired technologies that interact with the host environment

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Ester J.; Lo, Justin H.; Bhatia, Sangeeta N.

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticle technologies intended for human administration must be designed to interact with, and ideally leverage, a living host environment. Here, we describe smart nanosystems classified in two categories: (i) those that sense the host environment and respond and (ii) those that first prime the host environment to interact with engineered nanoparticles. Smart nanosystems have the potential to produce personalized diagnostic and therapeutic schema by using the local environment to drive material behavior and ultimately improve human health. PMID:26598694

  12. Predicting Air Quality in Smart Environments

    PubMed Central

    Deleawe, Seun; Kusznir, Jim; Lamb, Brian; Cook, Diane J.

    2011-01-01

    The pervasive sensing technologies found in smart environments offer unprecedented opportunities for monitoring and assisting the individuals who live and work in these spaces. As aspect of daily life that is often overlooked in maintaining a healthy lifestyle is the air quality of the environment. In this paper we investigate the use of machine learning technologies to predict CO2 levels as an indicator of air quality in smart environments. We introduce techniques for collecting and analyzing sensor information in smart environments and analyze the correlation between resident activities and air quality levels. The effectiveness of our techniques is evaluated using three physical smart environment testbeds. PMID:21617739

  13. Chemical sensors technology development planning workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Bastiaans, G.J.; Haas, W.J. Jr.; Junk, G.A.

    1993-03-01

    The workshop participants were asked to: (1) Assess the current capabilities of chemical sensor technologies for addressing US Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) needs; (2) Estimate potential near term (one to two years) and intermediate term (three to five years) capabilities for addressing those needs; and (3) Generate a ranked list of specific recommendations on what research and development (R&D) should be funded to provide the necessary capabilities. The needs were described in terms of two pervasive EM problems, the in situ determination of chlorinated volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and selected metals in various matrices at DOE sites. The R&D recommendations were to be ranked according to the estimated likelihood that the product technology will be ready for application within the time frame it is needed and the estimated return on investment. The principal conclusions and recommendations of the workshop are as follows: Chemical sensors capable of in situ determinations can significantly reduce analytical costs; Chemical sensors have been developed for certain VOCs in gases and water but none are currently capable of in situ determination of VOCs in soils; The DOE need for in situ determination of metals in soils cannot be addressed with existing chemical sensors and the prospects for their availability in three to five years are uncertain; Adaptation, if necessary, and field application of laboratory analytical instruments and those few chemical sensors that are already in field testing is the best approach for the near term; The chemical sensor technology development plan should include balanced support for near- and intermediate-term efforts.

  14. NSF/ESF Workshop on Smart Structures and Advanced Sensors, Santorini Island, Greece, June 26-28, 2005: Structural Actuation and Adaptation Working Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Figueroa, Fernando; Tomizuka, Masayoshi; Bergman, Lawrence; Carpenter, Bernie; Salzano, Carmine; Bairrao, rogerio; Deraemaker, Arnaud; Magonette, Georges; Rodellar, Jose; Kadirkamanathan, Visaken

    2005-01-01

    This document is a result of discussions that took place during the workshop. It describes current state of research and development (R&D) in the areas of structural actuation and adaptation in the context of smart structures and advanced sensors (SS&AS), and provides an outlook to guide future R&D efforts to develop technologies needed to build SS&AS. The discussions took place among the members of the Structural Actuation and Adaptation Working Group, as well as in general sessions including all four working groups. Participants included me