Science.gov

Sample records for smear-positive tuberculosis treatment

  1. Treatment outcome of new smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis patients in Penang, Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background According to the World Health Organization’s recent report, in Malaysia, tuberculosis (TB) treatment success rate for new smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) patients is still below the global success target of 85%. In this study, we evaluated TB treatment outcome among new smear positive PTB patients, and identified the predictors of unsuccessful treatment outcome and longer duration of treatment (i.e., > 6 months). Methods The population in this study consisted of all new smear positive PTB patients who were diagnosed at the chest clinic of Penang General Hospital between March 2010 and February 2011. During the study period, a standardized data collection form was used to obtain socio-demographic, clinical and treatment related data of the patients from their medical charts and TB notification forms (Tuberculosis Information System; TBIS). These data sources were reviewed at the time of the diagnosis of the patients and then at the subsequent follow-up visits until their final treatment outcomes were available. The treatment outcomes of the patients were reported in line with six outcome categories recommended by World Health Organization. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to find the independent risk factors for unsuccessful treatment outcome and longer treatment duration. Data were analyzed using the PASW (Predictive Analysis SoftWare, version 19.0. Armonk, NY: IBM Corp). Results Among the 336 PTB patients (236 male and 100 female) notified during the study period, the treatment success rate was 67.26% (n = 226). Out of 110 patients in unsuccessful outcome category, 30 defaulted from the treatment, 59 died and 21 were transferred to other health care facilities. The mean duration of TB treatment was 8.19 (SD 1.65) months. In multiple logistic regression analysis, risk factors for unsuccessful treatment outcome were foreign nationality, male gender and being illiterate. Similarly, risk factors for mortality due to TB

  2. Treatment outcome of new smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis patients in Penang, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Atif, Muhammad; Sulaiman, Syed Azhar Syed; Shafie, Asrul Akmal; Ali, Irfhan; Asif, Muhammad; Babar, Zaheer-Ud-Din

    2014-07-19

    According to the World Health Organization's recent report, in Malaysia, tuberculosis (TB) treatment success rate for new smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) patients is still below the global success target of 85%. In this study, we evaluated TB treatment outcome among new smear positive PTB patients, and identified the predictors of unsuccessful treatment outcome and longer duration of treatment (i.e., > 6 months). The population in this study consisted of all new smear positive PTB patients who were diagnosed at the chest clinic of Penang General Hospital between March 2010 and February 2011. During the study period, a standardized data collection form was used to obtain socio-demographic, clinical and treatment related data of the patients from their medical charts and TB notification forms (Tuberculosis Information System; TBIS). These data sources were reviewed at the time of the diagnosis of the patients and then at the subsequent follow-up visits until their final treatment outcomes were available. The treatment outcomes of the patients were reported in line with six outcome categories recommended by World Health Organization. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to find the independent risk factors for unsuccessful treatment outcome and longer treatment duration. Data were analyzed using the PASW (Predictive Analysis SoftWare, version 19.0. Armonk, NY: IBM Corp). Among the 336 PTB patients (236 male and 100 female) notified during the study period, the treatment success rate was 67.26% (n = 226). Out of 110 patients in unsuccessful outcome category, 30 defaulted from the treatment, 59 died and 21 were transferred to other health care facilities. The mean duration of TB treatment was 8.19 (SD 1.65) months. In multiple logistic regression analysis, risk factors for unsuccessful treatment outcome were foreign nationality, male gender and being illiterate. Similarly, risk factors for mortality due to TB included high-grade sputum and presence

  3. Treatment outcome of smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis patients in Tigray Region, Northern Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Berhe, Gebretsadik; Enquselassie, Fikre; Aseffa, Abraham

    2012-07-23

    Monitoring the outcome of tuberculosis treatment and understanding the specific reasons for unsuccessful treatment outcome are important in evaluating the effectiveness of tuberculosis control program. This study investigated tuberculosis treatment outcomes and predictors for unsuccessful treatment outcome in the Tigray region of Ethiopia. Medical records of smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) patients registered from September 2009 to June 2011 in 15 districts of Tigray region, Northern Ethiopia, were reviewed. Additional data were collected using a structured questionnaire administered through house-to-house visits by trained nurses. Tuberculosis treatment outcomes were assessed according to WHO guidelines. The association of unsuccessful treatment outcome with socio-demographic and clinical factors was analyzed using logistic regression model. Out of the 407 PTB patients (221 males and 186 females) aged 15 years and above, 89.2% had successful and 10.8% had unsuccessful treatment outcome. In the final multivariate logistic model, the odds of unsuccessful treatment outcome was higher among patients older than 40 years of age (adj. OR=2.50, 95% CI: 1.12-5.59), family size greater than 5 persons (adj. OR=3.26, 95% CI: 1.43-7.44), unemployed (adj. OR=3.10, 95% CI: 1.33-7.24) and among retreatment cases (adj. OR=2.00, 95% CI: 1.37-2.92) as compared to their respective comparison groups. Treatment outcome among smear-positive PTB patients was satisfactory in the Tigray region of Ethiopia. Nonetheless, those patients at high risk of an unfavorable treatment outcome should be identified early and given additional follow-up and social support.

  4. Tuberculosis treatment outcome and associated factors among smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis patients in Afar, Eastern Ethiopia: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Zenebe, Tizazu; Tefera, Ermias

    Evaluating the outcomes of tuberculosis treatment and understanding the specific reasons for unfavorable treatment outcome are important in evaluating the effectiveness of tuberculosis control program. A retrospective study was conducted to assess tuberculosis treatment outcomes and associated factors among smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis patients in zone-one health facilities of Afar regional state, Ethiopia. A total of 380 smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis patients' registration book recorded with complete information from Jan 2011 to Dec 2013 were analyzed. Of 380 patients included in the analysis, 238 were male and 142 female with mean age of 30.7. Overall treatment outcome were 128 (33.7%) cured, 192 (50.2%) completed, 17 (4.5%) died, 1 (0.3%) treatment failure, 34 (8.9%) default and 8 (2.1%) transfer out. Treatment success rate was 81.8%. There was statistically significance association between age (p-value=0.000), sex (p-value=0.018), HIV status (p-value=0.000), four week attendance (p-value=0.000), sputum follow up test (p-value=0.000), and treatment outcome year (p-value=0.000), and treatment success (p-value=0.000). Treatment success rate almost reached to the WHO targets although yet need to work a lot for fulfillment of global targets. Regular four week attendance in continuation phase and doing follow up sputum test with unsuccessful outcome for smear positive tuberculosis patient were vital. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Infectologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  5. Isoniazid preventive treatment among child contacts of adults with smear-positive tuberculosis in The Gambia

    PubMed Central

    Sillah, A.; Togun, T.; Kandeh, S.; Cole, F.; Jallow, A.; Able-Thomas, A.; Hoelscher, M.; Heinrich, N.; Hill, P. C.; Kampmann, B.

    2016-01-01

    Setting: Greater Banjul area of The Gambia. Objectives: To evaluate uptake, adherence and completion of treatment among tuberculosis (TB) exposed children in The Gambia when isoniazid preventive treatment (IPT) is delivered at home Design: Child (age <5 years) contacts of adults with smear-positive TB were prospectively enrolled. Following symptom screening, tuberculin skin testing and clinical evaluation where indicated, those without disease were placed on daily isoniazid, provided monthly at home. Adherence was assessed by pill counts and IsoScreen™ urine test. Results: Of 404 contacts aged <5 years, 368 (91.1%) were offered IPT. Of the 328 (89.4%) for whom consent was received and who commenced IPT, 18 (5.5%) dropped out and 310 (94.5%) remained on IPT to the end of the 6-month regimen. Altogether, 255/328 children (77.7%, 95%CI 73.2–82.2) completed all 6 months, with good adherence. The IsoScreen test was positive in 85.3% (435/510) of all tests among those defined as having good adherence by pill count and in 16% (8/50) of those defined as having poor adherence (P < 0.001). A cascade of care analysis showed an overall completion rate with good adherence of 61% for all child contacts. Conclusion: Home-delivered IPT among child contacts of adults with smear-positive TB in The Gambia achieved verifiable high uptake and adherence rates. System rather than patient factors are likely to determine the success of IPT at national level. PMID:28123958

  6. Isoniazid preventive treatment among child contacts of adults with smear-positive tuberculosis in The Gambia.

    PubMed

    Egere, U; Sillah, A; Togun, T; Kandeh, S; Cole, F; Jallow, A; Able-Thomas, A; Hoelscher, M; Heinrich, N; Hill, P C; Kampmann, B

    2016-12-21

    Setting: Greater Banjul area of The Gambia. Objectives: To evaluate uptake, adherence and completion of treatment among tuberculosis (TB) exposed children in The Gambia when isoniazid preventive treatment (IPT) is delivered at home Design: Child (age <5 years) contacts of adults with smear-positive TB were prospectively enrolled. Following symptom screening, tuberculin skin testing and clinical evaluation where indicated, those without disease were placed on daily isoniazid, provided monthly at home. Adherence was assessed by pill counts and IsoScreen(™) urine test. Results: Of 404 contacts aged <5 years, 368 (91.1%) were offered IPT. Of the 328 (89.4%) for whom consent was received and who commenced IPT, 18 (5.5%) dropped out and 310 (94.5%) remained on IPT to the end of the 6-month regimen. Altogether, 255/328 children (77.7%, 95%CI 73.2-82.2) completed all 6 months, with good adherence. The IsoScreen test was positive in 85.3% (435/510) of all tests among those defined as having good adherence by pill count and in 16% (8/50) of those defined as having poor adherence (P < 0.001). A cascade of care analysis showed an overall completion rate with good adherence of 61% for all child contacts. Conclusion: Home-delivered IPT among child contacts of adults with smear-positive TB in The Gambia achieved verifiable high uptake and adherence rates. System rather than patient factors are likely to determine the success of IPT at national level.

  7. Diabetes mellitus and its influence on sputum smear positivity at the 2nd month of treatment among pulmonary tuberculosis patients in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia: A case control study.

    PubMed

    Shariff, Noorsuzana Mohd; Safian, Nazarudin

    2015-12-01

    Many studies have suggested that sputum smear conversion after 2 months of antituberculosis treatment is an important determinant of treatment success and can be a predictor for relapse. The objective of this study is to determine the factors that influence sputum smear conversion after 2 months of treatment among pulmonary tuberculosis patients receiving treatment in the Institute of Respiratory Medicine in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. A total of 75 cases and 75 controls were interviewed, and their medical records were retrieved in order to extract the information needed. All analyses were conducted using SPSS version 17, and binary logistic regression analysis was used to determine the predictors of sputum smear nonconversion. Results showed that the following factors were associated with sputum smear positivity after 2 months of intensive treatment: diabetes mellitus (p=.013, odds ratio [OR]=2.59, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.27-5.33), underweight body mass index (p=.025, OR=1.67, 95% CI 0.80-3.49), nonadherent to tuberculosis treatment (p=.024, OR=2.85, 95% CI 1.21-6.74), and previous history of tuberculosis (p=.043, OR=2.53, 95% CI 1.09-5.83). Multivariable analysis identified diabetes mellitus (p=.003, OR=4.01, 95% CI 1.61-9.96) as being independently associated with the risk of persistent sputum smear positivity after 2 months of intensive treatment. Based on the findings, identification of these factors is valuable in strengthening the management and treatment of tuberculosis in Malaysia in the future. This study emphasizes the importance of diabetes screening and integration of diabetic controls among tuberculosis patients in achieving better treatment outcome. Copyright © 2015 Asian-African Society for Mycobacteriology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Incidence of smear-positive tuberculosis in Dabat, northern Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Tadesse, T; Demissie, M; Berhane, Y; Kebede, Y; Abebe, M

    2013-05-01

    To determine the incidence of smear-positive tuberculosis (TB) in Dabat District, northern Ethiopia. Using a population-based longitudinal design, a TB surveillance system was initiated among 46,165 residents at the Dabat Health and Demographic Surveillance System site. Trained field workers visited each household every third month and interviewed all individuals aged ≥14 years using a uniform questionnaire to detect suspected cases of TB (cough ≥15 days), at which time two sputum (spot-morning) samples were collected for smear microscopy. A total of 281,820 person-months were observed during the 1-year period, which generated 74 smear-positive TB cases. The incidence of smear-positive TB was calculated at 311 per 100,000 person-years (95%CI 240-382). Higher rates were observed among females (incidence rate ratio [IRR] 2.08, 95%CI 1.24-3.52), persons with no schooling (IRR 2.74, 95%CI 1.11-6.78) and urban residents (IRR 2.39, 95%CI 1.39-4.12). The incidence of smear-positive TB is high in Dabat District, suggesting a high risk of transmission in the communities. TB control programmes thus need to improve case-finding mechanisms at the community level in Ethiopia, with greater emphasis on risk groups.

  9. Smear positive extra pulmonary tuberculosis disease at University of Gondar Hospital, Northwest Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Zenebe, Yohannes; Anagaw, Belay; Tesfay, Wogahta; Debebe, Tewodros; Gelaw, Baye

    2013-01-18

    smear positive extra pulmonary tuberculosis infection in Gondar is high. Screening of lymph node and other body fluid specimens for extra pulmonary tuberculosis could help for treatment, control and prevention of the disease.

  10. Identifying risk factors associated with smear positivity of pulmonary tuberculosis in Kazakhstan

    PubMed Central

    You, Paul; Aifah, Angela; Abildayev, Tleukhan; Akilzhanova, Ainur; Kozhamkulov, Ulan; Muminov, Talgat; Darisheva, Meruert; Zhussupov, Baurzhan; Terlikbayeva, Assel; El-Bassel, Nabila; Schluger, Neil

    2017-01-01

    Background Sputum smear-positive tuberculosis (TB) patients have a high risk of transmission and are of great epidemiological and infection control significance. Little is known about the smear-positive populations in high TB burden regions, such as Kazakhstan. The objective of this study is to characterize the smear-positive population in Kazakhstan and identify associated modifiable risk factors. Methods Data on incident TB cases’ (identified between April 2012 and March 2014) socio-demographic, risk behavior, and comorbidity characteristics were collected in four regions of Kazakhstan through structured survey and medical record review. We used multivariable logistic regression to determine factors associated with smear positivity. Results Of the total sample, 193 (34.3%) of the 562 study participants tested smear-positive. In the final adjusted multivariable logistic regression model, sex (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 2.0, 95% CI:1.3–3.1, p < 0.01), incarceration (aOR = 3.6, 95% CI:1.2–11.1, p = 0.03), alcohol dependence (aOR = 2.6, 95% CI:1.2–5.7, p = 0.02), diabetes (aOR = 5.0, 95% CI:2.4–10.7, p < 0.01), and physician access (aOR = 2.7, 95% CI:1.3–5.5p < 0.01) were associated with smear-positivity. Conclusions Incarceration, alcohol dependence, diabetes, and physician access are associated with smear positivity among incident TB cases in Kazakhstan. To stem the TB epidemic, screening, treatment and prevention policies should address these factors. PMID:28249005

  11. Decreased IL-17 during treatment of sputum smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis due to increased regulatory T cells and IL-10.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lichen; Cui, Guangying; Jia, Hongyu; Zhu, Yunan; Ding, Yulong; Chen, Jianing; Lu, Chong; Ye, Ping; Gao, Hainv; Li, Lanjuan; Ma, Weihang; Lyu, Jianxin; Diao, Hongyan

    2016-06-16

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a major public health concern worldwide. Previous studies have demonstrated that IL-17 plays an important role in initial immune response and is involved in both immune-mediated protection and pathology following infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB). However, the alterations and regulation of plasma IL-17 level during TB treatment remain unclear. Moreover, the cell type responsible for the production of IL-17 in TB patients requires further study. A total of 20 acid-fast bacilli smear-positive (AFB-positive) pulmonary TB patients and 20 age- and gender-matched healthy volunteers were included in our study. Blood samples were collected in heparinized tubes at the time of diagnosis (AFB-positive group) and 3 weeks after the initiation of therapy, when the sputum smear conversion (AFB-negative group) occurred, followed by symptomatic improvement. IL-17 levels and IL-17-producing cells in PBMCs were detected. Lymphocyte populations in the peripheral blood between the AFB-positive and AFB-negative groups were compared by flow-cytometry. A549 cells, a cell line of alveolar epithelial cells, were applied to determine the extent of the pathological damage mediated by IL-17 following MTB infection. Recombinant human IL-10 was used to investigate the regulation of IL-17 expression after sputum smear conversion in AFB-positive pulmonary TB patients. Plasma IL-17 level were elevated in patients with sputum AFB-positive pulmonary TB, but substantially decreased after TB treatment and smear conversion. Our data indicate that NKT-like cells might be the main source of IL-17, in addition to conventional T cells in AFB-positive pulmonary TB patients. The secretion of IL-17 may be suppressed by regulatory T (Treg) cells and IL-10 during TB treatment. Moreover, the IL-17 levels were positively correlated to both the C-reactive protein and erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Therefore, IL-17 was capable of alveolar epithelial cell damage following MTB

  12. Fifteen-year trend in treatment outcomes among patients with pulmonary smear-positive tuberculosis and its determinants in Arsi Zone, Central Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Hamusse, Shallo D; Demissie, Meaza; Teshome, Dejene; Lindtjørn, Bernt

    2014-12-01

    Background Directly Observed Treatment Short course (DOTS) strategy is aimed at diagnosing 70% of infectious tuberculosis (TB) and curing 85% of it. Arsi Zone of Ethiopia piloted DOTS strategy in 1992. Since then, the trend in treatment outcomes in general and at district-level in particular has not been assessed. The aim of this study was to analyse the trend in TB treatment outcomes and audit district-level treatment outcomes in the 25 districts of Arsi Zone. Design A retrospective cohort study design was employed to audit pulmonary smear-positive (PTB + ) patients registered between 1997 and 2011. Demographic and related data were collected from the TB unit registers between January and March 2013. The 15-year trend in treatment outcomes among PTB+ patients and district-level treatment outcomes was computed. Results From 14,221 evaluated PTB+ cases, 11,888 (83.6%) were successfully treated. The treatment success rate (TSR) varied from 69.3 to 92.5%, defaulter rate from 2.5 to 21.6%, death rate from 1.6 to 11.1%, and failure rate from 0 to 3.6% across the 25 districts of the zone. The trend in TSR increased from 61 to 91% with the increase of population DOTS coverage from 18 to 70%. There was a declining trend in defaulter rate from 29.9 to 2.1% and death rate from 8.8 to 5.4% over 15 years. Patients aged 25-49 years (Adjusted Odd Ratio (AOR), 0.23; 95% CI: 0.21-0.26) and ≥50 years (AOR, 0.43; 95% CI: 0.32-0.59), re-treatment cases (AOR, 0.61; 0.41, 0.67), and TB/HIV co-infection cases (AOR, 0.45; 95% CI: 0.31-0.53) were associated with unsuccessful treatment outcomes. Conclusions DOTS expansion and improving population DOTS coverage in Arsi has led to a significant increase in treatment success and decrease in death and defaulter rates. However, there is a major variation in treatment outcomes across the 25 districts of the zone, so district-specific intervention strategy needs to be considered. The low TSR among re-treatment cases might be due to the high

  13. Fifteen-year trend in treatment outcomes among patients with pulmonary smear-positive tuberculosis and its determinants in Arsi Zone, Central Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Hamusse, Shallo D; Demissie, Meaza; Teshome, Dejene; Lindtjørn, Bernt

    2014-01-01

    Directly Observed Treatment Short course (DOTS) strategy is aimed at diagnosing 70% of infectious tuberculosis (TB) and curing 85% of it. Arsi Zone of Ethiopia piloted DOTS strategy in 1992. Since then, the trend in treatment outcomes in general and at district-level in particular has not been assessed. The aim of this study was to analyse the trend in TB treatment outcomes and audit district-level treatment outcomes in the 25 districts of Arsi Zone. A retrospective cohort study design was employed to audit pulmonary smear-positive (PTB + ) patients registered between 1997 and 2011. Demographic and related data were collected from the TB unit registers between January and March 2013. The 15-year trend in treatment outcomes among PTB+ patients and district-level treatment outcomes was computed. From 14,221 evaluated PTB+ cases, 11,888 (83.6%) were successfully treated. The treatment success rate (TSR) varied from 69.3 to 92.5%, defaulter rate from 2.5 to 21.6%, death rate from 1.6 to 11.1%, and failure rate from 0 to 3.6% across the 25 districts of the zone. The trend in TSR increased from 61 to 91% with the increase of population DOTS coverage from 18 to 70%. There was a declining trend in defaulter rate from 29.9 to 2.1% and death rate from 8.8 to 5.4% over 15 years. Patients aged 25-49 years (Adjusted Odd Ratio (AOR), 0.23; 95% CI: 0.21-0.26) and ≥50 years (AOR, 0.43; 95% CI: 0.32-0.59), re-treatment cases (AOR, 0.61; 0.41, 0.67), and TB/HIV co-infection cases (AOR, 0.45; 95% CI: 0.31-0.53) were associated with unsuccessful treatment outcomes. DOTS expansion and improving population DOTS coverage in Arsi has led to a significant increase in treatment success and decrease in death and defaulter rates. However, there is a major variation in treatment outcomes across the 25 districts of the zone, so district-specific intervention strategy needs to be considered. The low TSR among re-treatment cases might be due to the high rate of MDR-TB among this group, and

  14. [The association between smoking and sputum smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis in Osaka City].

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Kenji; Arima, Kazuyo; Komukai, Jun; Danno, Katsura; Yoshida, Hideki; Hirota, Satoshi; Koda, Shinichi; Terakawa, Kazuhiko; Shimouchi, Akira

    2012-08-01

    This study aimed to analyze and evaluate the association between tuberculosis (TB) and smoking in order to obtain basic information for the control of smoking. Of the 637 patients with sputum smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis who were newly registered in Osaka City in 2009, 581 patients whose smoking status was identified were selected as study subjects. Data on the following were collected: patient characteristics, presence or absence of underlying conditions, patient's delay and doctor's delay in the diagnosis of TB, presence or absence of cavities, and degree of smear positivity. The patients were divided into the following three groups according to their smoking status: (1) never smokers (those who have never smoked), (2) former smokers (those who had smoked, but quitted), and (3) current smokers (those who smoke currently). (1) PATIENT CHARACTERISTICS: The subjects consisted of 413 males and 168 females, with mean ages of 65.7, 55.4, and 70.2 years for never smokers, current smokers, and former smokers, respectively. (2) Comparison with the national adult smoking rate (National health and nutrition survey 2009, Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare): The prevalence of current smoking among male patients with sputum smear-positive pulmonary TB in Osaka was 62.4-82.4% among men in their 20s to 60s, and 27.5% among men in their 70s, which is higher than the national average. For female patients, the prevalence of current smoking was 46.2% among women in their 20s and 45.5% among women in their 30s, which is clearly higher than the national average. This was also true for those aged 40 years or older. (3) Severity of TB disease and smoking status: The presence of a cavity was significantly associated with being a male patient, being a current smoker, and longer patient's delay. Sputum smear grades (2+) and (3 +) were significantly correlated with being under 59 years old, being a current smoker, and longer patient's delay. The prevalence of current smokers

  15. True status of smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis defaulters in Malawi.

    PubMed Central

    Kruyt, M. L.; Kruyt, N. D.; Boeree, M. J.; Harries, A. D.; Salaniponi, F. M.; van Noord, P. A.

    1999-01-01

    The article reports the results of a study to determine the true outcome of 8 months of treatment received by smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) patients who had been registered as defaulters in the Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital (QECH) and Mlambe Mission Hospital (MMH), Blantyre, Malawi. The treatment outcomes were documented from the tuberculosis registers of all patients registered between 1 October 1994 and 30 September 1995. The true treatment outcome for patients who had been registered as defaulters was determined by making personal inquiries at the treatment units and the residences of patients or relatives and, in a few cases, by writing to the appropriate postal address. Interviews were carried out with patients who had defaulted and were still alive and with matched, fully compliant PTB patients who had successfully completed the treatment to determine the factors associated with defaulter status. Of the 1099 patients, 126 (11.5%) had been registered as defaulters, and the true treatment outcome was determined for 101 (80%) of the latter; only 22 were true defaulters, 31 had completed the treatment, 31 had died during the treatment period, and 17 had left the area. A total of 8 of the 22 true defaulters were still alive and were compared with the compliant patients. Two significant characteristics were associated with the defaulters; they were unmarried; and they did not know the correct duration of antituberculosis treatment. Many of the smear-positive tuberculosis patients who had been registered as defaulters in the Blantyre district were found to have different treatment outcomes, without defaulting. The quality of reporting in the health facilities must therefore be improved in order to exclude individuals who are not true defaulters. PMID:10361755

  16. The clustering of smear-positive tuberculosis in Dabat, Ethiopia: a population based cross sectional study.

    PubMed

    Tadesse, Takele; Demissie, Meaza; Berhane, Yemane; Kebede, Yigzaw; Abebe, Markos

    2013-01-01

    In Ethiopia where tuberculosis epidemic remains high, studies that describe hotspots of the disease are unavailable. This study tried to detect the spatial distribution and clustering of smear-positive tuberculosis cases in Dabat, Ethiopia. A population-based cross sectional study conducted in the Dabat Health and Demographic Surveillance System site from October 2010 to September 2011 identified smear-positive tuberculosis cases. Trained field workers collected demographic and location data from each study participant through house-to-house visits. A spatial scan statistic was used to identify purely spatial and space-time clusters of tuberculosis among permanent residents. Two significant (p<0.001) spatial and space-time clusters were identified in the study district. Tuberculosis is concentrated in certain geographic locations in Dabat, Ethiopia. This kind of clustering can be common in the country, so the National Tuberculosis Control Program can be more effective by identifying such clusters and targeting interventions.

  17. Local spatial variations analysis of smear-positive tuberculosis in Xinjiang using Geographically Weighted Regression model.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wang; Yuan-Yuan, Jin; Ci, Yan; Ahan, Alayi; Ming-Qin, Cao

    2016-10-06

    The spatial interplay between socioeconomic factors and tuberculosis (TB) cases contributes to the understanding of regional tuberculosis burdens. Historically, local Poisson Geographically Weighted Regression (GWR) has allowed for the identification of the geographic disparities of TB cases and their relevant socioeconomic determinants, thereby forecasting local regression coefficients for the relations between the incidence of TB and its socioeconomic determinants. Therefore, the aims of this study were to: (1) identify the socioeconomic determinants of geographic disparities of smear positive TB in Xinjiang, China (2) confirm if the incidence of smear positive TB and its associated socioeconomic determinants demonstrate spatial variability (3) compare the performance of two main models: one is Ordinary Least Square Regression (OLS), and the other local GWR model. Reported smear-positive TB cases in Xinjiang were extracted from the TB surveillance system database during 2004-2010. The average number of smear-positive TB cases notified in Xinjiang was collected from 98 districts/counties. The population density (POPden), proportion of minorities (PROmin), number of infectious disease network reporting agencies (NUMagen), proportion of agricultural population (PROagr), and per capita annual gross domestic product (per capita GDP) were gathered from the Xinjiang Statistical Yearbook covering a period from 2004 to 2010. The OLS model and GWR model were then utilized to investigate socioeconomic determinants of smear-positive TB cases. Geoda 1.6.7, and GWR 4.0 software were used for data analysis. Our findings indicate that the relations between the average number of smear-positive TB cases notified in Xinjiang and their socioeconomic determinants (POPden, PROmin, NUMagen, PROagr, and per capita GDP) were significantly spatially non-stationary. This means that in some areas more smear-positive TB cases could be related to higher socioeconomic determinant regression

  18. Smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis among HIV patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Bwana, Veneranda; Tenu, Filemoni; Magesa, Stephen M; Mfinanga, Sayoki G

    2011-01-01

    Globally, tuberculosis-HIV co-infections are on the increase. In 2007, 15% (1.37 million) of the tuberculosis cases were HIV-positive tuberculosis (TB). This cross-sectional study was conducted in February 2009 to assess the effect of the level of CD4 lymphocyte counts on the development of smear positive pulmonary TB (PTB) among HIV patients before and after initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). A total of 155 HIV patients who were on HAART programme were enrolled and out of these 42 (27.1%) were smear positive PTB. Of the 42 PTB patients, 38 (90.5%) were also infected with HIV and were already at initiation of HAART. There was no association between the development of smear positive PTB and socio-demographic characteristics among HIV patients before and after HAART initiation (P>0.05). A larger proportion of HIV+PTB patients diagnosed before and after HAART initiation was found with CD4 lymphocyte count <200cells/microl. However, the difference was not statistically significant (P =0.092). Among HIV patients who were diagnosed to be smear positive PTB after HAART initiation, their CD4 lymphocyte counts at time of TB diagnosis was lower than their CD4 lymphocyte counts at time of HAART initiation. The four patients diagnosed with PTB after HAART initiation had mean CD4 lymphocyte counts at HAART initiation not statistically different from that at TB diagnosis (t=0.715, P=0.526). The median time period within which the diagnosis of smear positive PTB was made after HAART initiation was 22 weeks and the mean time was 66.75 weeks. These findings provide evidence that development of smear positive PTB after HAART initiation may occur at any level of CD4 lymphocyte count (P<0.05). This study was limited by the relatively small sample size, we therefore recommend more studies involving a larger sample size in order to estimate more accurately the effect of both level of CD4 lymphocyte count and HAART on the development of smear positive PTB among

  19. Adverse Events in Treating Smear-Positive Tuberculosis Patients in China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Du, Jian; Yin, Xiaoyan; Xue, Fuzhong; Liu, Yanxun; Li, Runzi; Luo, Cheng; Li, Liang; Li, Xiujun

    2015-12-29

    This study aimed to estimate the adverse events (AE) rate during anti-tuberculosis treatment and to explore AE-related risk factors. New and previously treated smear-positive tuberculosis (TB) cases were enrolled from eight regions in China between April 2009 and October 2010. The AE rate was estimated, and AE risk factors during anti-TB treatment were assessed using Cox proportional models. Among 2091 Chinese subjects with anti-TB treatment, 462 (22.1%, 95% confidence interval (CI), 20.3-23.9) patients developed AE, with liver injury and gastrointestinal reactions constituting the most common AE. Specifically, 9.8% (95% CI, 8.5-11.1) and 6.3% (95% CI, 5.3-7.4) developed liver injuries and gastrointestinal reactions, respectively. We found that AE rate differed by regions, TB knowledge score, symptoms score and smoking status. Liver injuries were associated with age, sex and smoking status; gastrointestinal reactions were associated with education level and symptom score. Improving patients' knowledge on TB could reduce AE rate.

  20. Adverse Events in Treating Smear-Positive Tuberculosis Patients in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tao; Du, Jian; Yin, Xiaoyan; Xue, Fuzhong; Liu, Yanxun; Li, Runzi; Luo, Cheng; Li, Liang; Li, Xiujun

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to estimate the adverse events (AE) rate during anti-tuberculosis treatment and to explore AE-related risk factors. New and previously treated smear-positive tuberculosis (TB) cases were enrolled from eight regions in China between April 2009 and October 2010. The AE rate was estimated, and AE risk factors during anti-TB treatment were assessed using Cox proportional models. Among 2091 Chinese subjects with anti-TB treatment, 462 (22.1%, 95% confidence interval (CI), 20.3–23.9) patients developed AE, with liver injury and gastrointestinal reactions constituting the most common AE. Specifically, 9.8% (95% CI, 8.5–11.1) and 6.3% (95% CI, 5.3–7.4) developed liver injuries and gastrointestinal reactions, respectively. We found that AE rate differed by regions, TB knowledge score, symptoms score and smoking status. Liver injuries were associated with age, sex and smoking status; gastrointestinal reactions were associated with education level and symptom score. Improving patients’ knowledge on TB could reduce AE rate. PMID:26729141

  1. Smear microscopy and culture conversion rates among smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis patients by HIV status in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Senkoro, Mbazi; Mfinanga, Sayoki G; Mørkve, Odd

    2010-07-16

    Tanzania ranks 15th among the world's 22 countries with the largest tuberculosis burden and tuberculosis has continued to be among the major public health problems in the country. Limited data, especially in patients co infected with HIV, are available to predict the duration of time required for a smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis patient to achieve sputum conversion after starting effective treatment. In this study we assessed the sputum smear and culture conversion rates among HIV positive and HIV negative smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis patients in Dar es Salaam The study was a prospective cohort study which lasted for nine months, from April to December 2008 A total of 502 smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis patients were recruited. HIV test results were obtained for 498 patients, of which 33.7% were HIV positive. After two weeks of treatment the conversion rate by standard sputum microscopy was higher in HIV positive(72.8%) than HIV negative(63.3%) patients by univariate analysis(P = 0.046), but not in multivariate analysis. Also after two weeks of treatment the conversion rate by fluorescence microscopy was higher in HIV positive (72.8%) than in HIV negative(63.2%) patients by univariate analysis (P = 0.043) but not in the multivariate analysis. The conversion rates by both methods during the rest of the treatment period (8, 12, and 20 weeks) were not significantly different between HIV positive and HIV negative patients.With regards to culture, the conversion rate during the whole period of the treatment (2, 8, 12 and 20 weeks) were not significantly different between HIV positive and HIV negative patients. Conversion rates of standard smear microscopy, fluorescence microscopy and culture did not differ between HIV positive and HIV negative pulmonary tuberculosis patients.

  2. Patterns of delays in diagnosis amongst patients with smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis at a teaching hospital in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Okur, E; Yilmaz, A; Saygi, A; Selvi, A; Süngün, F; Oztürk, E; Dabak, G

    2006-01-01

    In total, 151 newly diagnosed patients with smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis were studied. The mean time from the onset of symptoms to the first visit to a physician was 46.4 days; the mean referral delay was 28.9 days; the mean delay in diagnosis was 2.4 days; and the mean delay in treatment initiation was 0.8 days. There was a delay in consulting a physician by 49% of patients. A low index of suspicion for tuberculosis on the part of the physician and healthcare system and laboratory delays were the most common reasons for delays in diagnosis.

  3. Smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis and associated risk factors among tuberculosis suspects attending spiritual holy water sites in Northwest Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Derseh, Dejene; Moges, Feleke; Tessema, Belay

    2017-01-26

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains one of the world's deadliest communicable diseases. In Ethiopia, tuberculosis patients have different pattern of health care seeking behavior. They usually adopt other approaches like traditional healers and spiritual holy water sites before consulting public health facilities. This study was aimed to assess the prevalence of smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis and associated risk factors among tuberculosis suspects attending spiritual holy water sites. A cross-sectional study was conducted from February 01, 2015 to March 30, 2015 in seven selected holy water sites in Northwest Ethiopia. During the study period, a total of 1384 adult holy water users were screened for PTB symptoms. A total of 382 pulmonary tuberculosis suspects participated in the study. Socio-demographic data were collected using a semi-structured questionnaire. Spot-morning-spot sputum specimens were collected and examined for acid fast bacilli using Auramine O fluorescence staining technique. Smear positive sputum samples were tested by GeneXpert MTB/RIF assay for rifampicin resistance. Descriptive statistics, binary and multivariate logistic regression analysis were employed using SPSS-16 software. The prevalence of smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis was 2.9% with point prevalence of 795/100, 000 holy water users. History of contact with tuberculosis patient (AOR = 9.174, 95% C.I = 2.195-38.34) and the number of family members > 5 per household (AOR = 9.258, 95% C.I = 1.14-74.97) were significantly associated with smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis. Rifampicin resistance was not detected from all smear positives by GeneXpert MTB/RIF assay. The prevalence of smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis in spiritual holy water sites was 7.4 fold higher than the general population. History of contact with active tuberculosis patients and increased family size were significantly associated with smear positive pulmonary TB. The national tuberculosis

  4. Serum albumin and creatinine clearance rate among smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis patients in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Hoque, M R; Chakraborty, P K; Paul, U K; Sarkar, S; Akhter, S; Shahidullah, S M; Gautam, B; Sultana, S; Ferdous, N; Samsunnahar, M

    2014-07-01

    This case control study was carried out in the Department of Biochemistry, Mymensingh Medical College in cooperation with the Outpatient Department and Medicine Units of Mymensingh Medical College Hospital, Fulbaria Upazilla Health Complex, Mymensingh and some DOTS centers of BRAC, a non-government organization during the period of July 2006 to June 2007. The aim of the study was to explore the status of serum albumin & creatinine clearance levels in smear positive Bangladeshi pulmonary tuberculosis patients as a means to monitor the possibility of management of these patients as these levels decrease significantly. Serum albumin level was investigated in TB patients for monitoring the nutritional status of TB patients and also for the adjustment of serum calcium level. Creatinine clearance rate was investigated in TB patients for monitoring the impairment of renal function and nutritional depletion in tuberculosis patients. A total of 120 people of different age groups were included in this study. Subjects were divided into two groups- Group I (Control; n=60) - apparently healthy people selected matching by age, sex and socioeconomic status with the cases and Group II (Case; n=60) - people with smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis. Serum albumin was estimated by colorimetric principle. Serum creatinine was also estimated by colorimetric principle & creatinine clearance rate was estimated from serum creatinine by Cockcroft- Gault equation. Statistical analysis was done by using SPSS windows package. Among the groups, mean±SD of serum albumin in Group II (3.74±0.44gm/dl) was significantly lower (p<0.001) than that in Group I (4.85±0.31gm/dl). Mean±SD of creatinine clearance rate in Group II (35.36±8.29ml/min) was also significantly lower than that in Group I (84.16±20.20ml/min). It is evident from the study that serum albumin & creatinine clearance rate levels significantly decrease in smear positive Bangladeshi pulmonary tuberculosis patients.

  5. Sputum smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis: Is sputum smear examination required to discontinue airborne precautions?

    PubMed

    Argemi, X; Albrecht, M; Hansmann, Y; Jaulhac, B; Koebel, C; Schramm, F

    2015-10-01

    Our aim was to evaluate the criteria required to discontinue airborne precautions for patients presenting with sputum smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis as the need for sputum smear examinations is still a matter of debate. We conducted a retrospective study in the University Hospitals of Strasbourg (France) from July 2011 to July 2013. Our aim was to describe the results of sputum smear examinations and cultures obtained from treated patients presenting with drug-sensitive pulmonary tuberculosis. We included 97 patients in the study. Nearly half of patients for whom a sputum smear examination was performed had a negative sputum direct examination but a positive culture. According to the literature, those patients are still likely to be contagious. This questions the safety of discontinuing airborne precautions in this situation. We also observed a great disparity in physicians' behaviors. Only half of them waited to get a negative sputum direct examination before discontinuing airborne precautions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Patient and Doctor Delays in Smear-Negative and Smear-Positive Pulmonary Tuberculosis Patients Attending a Referral Hospital in Istanbul, Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Ekinci, Gulbanu Horzum; Karakaya, Esra; Ongel, Esra Akkutuk; Haciomeroglu, Osman

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. To measure delays from onset of symptoms to initiation of treatment in patients with smear-negative and smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis and to identify reasons for these delays. Methods. A total of 136 newly diagnosed pulmonary tuberculosis patients were interviewed using a structured questionnaire. Results. The patients were divided into two groups. Group 1 included 65 smear-negative patients. There were 71 smear-positive patients in group 2. The median application interval was 10 days in group 1 and 14 days in group 2. While 24.6% of the patients had patient delay in group 1, patient delay was present in 33.8% of the patients in group 2 (P > 0.05). The median health care system interval was 41 days in group 1 and 16 days in group 2 (P < 0.0001). The most common reason for patient delay was neglect of symptoms by patient in both groups. A low index of suspicion for tuberculosis by physicians was the most common reason for doctor delays. Conclusions. Delays are common problem in smear-negative and smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis patients. Delays should be reduced to reach an effective tuberculosis control. Education of public and physicians about tuberculosis is the most important effort to reduce delays. PMID:25379517

  7. Impact of sputum gross appearance and volume on smear positivity of pulmonary tuberculosis: a prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Soon Ho; Lee, Nyoung Keun; Yim, Jae Joon

    2012-08-01

    Although checking specimen quality upon sputum collection for acid-fast smear of suspected tuberculosis (TB) cases is recommended, this procedure is based on expert opinion. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the impact of sputum gross appearance and volume on smear positivity among patients with suspected pulmonary TB, according to sex. From November 2010 through June 2011, we enrolled consecutive patients suspected to have active pulmonary TB. The association of sputum gross appearance and volume with smear positivity, along with other variables possibly affecting smear positivity such as symptoms, disease extent, and cavity on chest radiograph, were investigated. Among 2,439 patients undergoing TB examination, 170 (113 men, 57 women) with active pulmonary TB were enrolled. They submitted 492 sputa. There were 73 smear-positive patients (42.9%) and 164 smear-positive sputa (33.3%). While gross appearance was associated with smear positivity in both sexes (purulent or blood-tinged sputum (rather than mucoid sputum or saliva); odds ratio (OR), 2.05, 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.21-3.47 in men; OR, 2.78, 95% CI, 1.23-6.26 in women), the amount of sputum specimens was associated with smear positivity in only female patients (≥4 ml versus <4 ml; OR, 4.96, 95% CI, 1.98-12.37). Sputum gross appearance and volume were associated with smear positivity. A volume of 4 ml seems to be the the minimum sputum volume acceptable for smear microscopy in females suspected of TB. Those suspected of TB should be encouraged to expectorate grossly qualified sputum specimens.

  8. Impact of sputum gross appearance and volume on smear positivity of pulmonary tuberculosis: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Although checking specimen quality upon sputum collection for acid-fast smear of suspected tuberculosis (TB) cases is recommended, this procedure is based on expert opinion. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the impact of sputum gross appearance and volume on smear positivity among patients with suspected pulmonary TB, according to sex. Methods From November 2010 through June 2011, we enrolled consecutive patients suspected to have active pulmonary TB. The association of sputum gross appearance and volume with smear positivity, along with other variables possibly affecting smear positivity such as symptoms, disease extent, and cavity on chest radiograph, were investigated. Results Among 2,439 patients undergoing TB examination, 170 (113 men, 57 women) with active pulmonary TB were enrolled. They submitted 492 sputa. There were 73 smear-positive patients (42.9%) and 164 smear-positive sputa (33.3%). While gross appearance was associated with smear positivity in both sexes (purulent or blood-tinged sputum (rather than mucoid sputum or saliva); odds ratio (OR), 2.05, 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.21–3.47 in men; OR, 2.78, 95% CI, 1.23–6.26 in women), the amount of sputum specimens was associated with smear positivity in only female patients (≥4 ml versus <4 ml; OR, 4.96, 95% CI, 1.98–12.37). Conclusions Sputum gross appearance and volume were associated with smear positivity. A volume of 4 ml seems to be the the minimum sputum volume acceptable for smear microscopy in females suspected of TB. Those suspected of TB should be encouraged to expectorate grossly qualified sputum specimens. PMID:22853561

  9. Early detection of multidrug- and pre-extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis from smear-positive sputum by direct sequencing.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun; Peng, Peng; Du, Yixiang; Ren, Yi; Chen, Lifeng; Rao, Youyi; Wang, Weihua

    2017-04-24

    Emergence of multidrug- and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (M/XDR-TB) is a major hurdle for TB control programs especially in developing countries like China. Resistance to fluoroquinolones is high among MDR-TB patients. Early diagnosis of MDR/pre-XDR-TB is essential for lowering transmission of drug-resistant TB and adjusting the treatment regimen. Smear-positive sputum specimens (n = 186) were collected from Wuhan Institute for Tuberculosis Control. The DNA was extracted from the specimens and run through a Sanger sequencing assay to detect mutations associated with MDR/pre-XDR-TB including the rpoB core region for rifampicin (RIF) resistance; katG and inhA promoter for isoniazid (INH) resistance; and gyrA for fluoroquinolone (FQ) resistance. Sequencing data were compared to phenotypic Lowenstein-Jensen (L-J) proportion method drug susceptibility testing (DST) results for performance analysis. By comparing the mutation data with phenotypic results, the detection rates of MDR-TB and pre-XDR-TB were 84.31% (43/51) and 83.33% (20/24), respectively. The sequencing assay illustrated good sensitivity for the detection of resistance to RIF (96.92%), INH (86.89%), FQ (77.50%). The specificities of the assay were 98.35% for RIF, 99.20% for INH, and 97.26% for FQ. The sequencing assay is an efficient, accurate method for detection of MDR-TB and pre-XDR-TB from clinical smear-positive sputum specimens, should be considered as a supplemental method for obtaining early DST results before the availability of phenotypic DST results. This could be of benefit to early diagnosis, adjusting the treatment regimen and controlling transmission of drug-resistant TB.

  10. Pre-treatment loss to follow-up among smear-positive TB patients in tertiary hospitals, Quetta, Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, A. M. V.; Hinderaker, S. G.; Heldal, E.; Qadeer, E.; Fatima, R.; Ullah, A.; Safdar, N.; Yaqoob, A.; Anwar, K.; Ul Haq, M.

    2017-01-01

    Setting: Three public sector tertiary care hospitals in Quetta, Balochistan, Pakistan, with anecdotal evidence of gaps between the diagnosis and treatment of patients with tuberculosis (TB). Objectives: To assess the proportion of pre-treatment loss to follow-up (LTFU), defined as no documented evidence of treatment initiation or referral in TB registers, among smear-positive pulmonary TB patients diagnosed in 2015, and the associated sociodemographic factors. Design: A retrospective cohort study involving the review of laboratory and TB registers. Results: Of 1110 smear-positive TB patients diagnosed (58% female, median age 40 years, 5% from outside the province or the country), 235 (21.2%) were lost to follow-up before starting treatment. Pre-treatment LTFU was higher among males; in patients residing far away, in rural areas, outside the province or the country; and in those without a mobile phone number. Conclusion: About one fifth of the smear-positive TB patients were lost to follow-up before starting treatment. Strengthening the referral and feedback mechanisms and using information technology to improve the tracing of patients is urgently required. Further qualitative research is needed to understand the reasons for pre-treatment LTFU from the patient's perspective. PMID:28775939

  11. Pre-treatment loss to follow-up among smear-positive TB patients in tertiary hospitals, Quetta, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Wali, A; Kumar, A M V; Hinderaker, S G; Heldal, E; Qadeer, E; Fatima, R; Ullah, A; Safdar, N; Yaqoob, A; Anwar, K; Ul Haq, M

    2017-03-21

    Setting: Three public sector tertiary care hospitals in Quetta, Balochistan, Pakistan, with anecdotal evidence of gaps between the diagnosis and treatment of patients with tuberculosis (TB). Objectives: To assess the proportion of pre-treatment loss to follow-up (LTFU), defined as no documented evidence of treatment initiation or referral in TB registers, among smear-positive pulmonary TB patients diagnosed in 2015, and the associated sociodemographic factors. Design: A retrospective cohort study involving the review of laboratory and TB registers. Results: Of 1110 smear-positive TB patients diagnosed (58% female, median age 40 years, 5% from outside the province or the country), 235 (21.2%) were lost to follow-up before starting treatment. Pre-treatment LTFU was higher among males; in patients residing far away, in rural areas, outside the province or the country; and in those without a mobile phone number. Conclusion: About one fifth of the smear-positive TB patients were lost to follow-up before starting treatment. Strengthening the referral and feedback mechanisms and using information technology to improve the tracing of patients is urgently required. Further qualitative research is needed to understand the reasons for pre-treatment LTFU from the patient's perspective.

  12. Prevalence of smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis among prisoners in North Gondar Zone Prison, northwest Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Moges, Beyene; Amare, Bemnet; Asfaw, Fanaye; Tesfaye, Wogahta; Tiruneh, Moges; Belyhun, Yeshambel; Mulu, Andargachew; Kassu, Afework

    2012-12-15

    People concentrated in congregated systems, such as prisons, are important but often neglected reservoirs for TB transmission, and threaten those in the outside community. Therefore, this study was conducted to determine the prevalence of tuberculosis in a prison system of North Gondar Zone. An active case-finding survey in North Gondar Prison was carried out from March to May 2011. All prison inmates who had history of cough for at least a week were included in the study. Three morning sputum samples were collected from suspected inmates and examined through fluorescence microscopy. Fine needle aspiration cytology was done for those having significant lymphadenopathy. Pre and post HIV test counseling was provided after written consent. Binary logistic and multivariable analysis was performed using SPSS version 16. A total of 250 prisoners were included in the survey. Among these, 26 (10.4%) prisoners were found to have TB giving a point prevalence of 1482.3 per 100,000 populations of smear positive TB among the TB suspects. All the inmates who participated in the study volunteered for HIV testing and a total of 19(7.6%) inmates were found to be reactive for the HIV antibody test amongst of which 9(47.4%) had TB co-infection. The prevalence of HIV infection in the TB infected inmates was found to be 34.6% (9/26). From the 26 TB cases identified 12 (46.2%) were having under nutrition (BMI < 18.5kg/m(2)). There is high prevalence of TB in North Gondar Prison with possible active transmission of TB within the prison. There was a high prevalence of HIV among the TB suspects. Strong cooperation between prison authorities and the national tuberculosis control programmes is urgently required to develop locally appropriate interventions to reduce transmission. The determinants for poor nutrition in the prison need also further investigation.

  13. Effect of Poor Glycemic Control in Newly Diagnosed Patients with Smear-Positive Pulmonary Tuberculosis and Type-2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Mahishale, Vinay; Avuthu, Sindhuri; Patil, Bhagyashri; Lolly, Mitchelle; Eti, Ajith; Khan, Sujeer

    2017-01-01

    Background: There is growing evidence that diabetes mellitus (DM) is an important risk factor for tuberculosis (TB). A significant number of DM patients have poor glycemic control. This study was carried out to find the impact of poor glycemic control on newly diagnosed smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis patients with type-2 diabetes mellitus in a tertiary care hospital. Methods: In a hospital-based prospective study, newly diagnosed smear-positive pulmonary TB with DM patients were classified as poorly controlled diabetes (HBA1C≥7%) and optimal control diabetics (HbA1c<7%). Patients were started on anti-TB treatment and followed for 2 years for severity and treatment outcome. ANOVA was used for numerical variables in the univariable analysis. Logistic regression analysis was used for multivariable analysis of treatment outcome. The significance level was kept at a P≤0.05. Results: A total of 630 individuals who met the inclusion criteria were analyzed; of which 423 patients had poor glycemic control (PGC) and 207 patients had optimal glycemic control (OGC). The average HbA1c was 10±2.6 and 5±1.50 in the PGC and OGC groups, respectively. The mean symptom score was significantly higher in the PGC group compared with patients in the OGC group (4.55±0.80 vs. 2.70±0.82, P<0.001). PGC was associated with more extensive lung disease, lung cavitation, and positive sputum smear at the baseline. In PGC, sputum smears were significantly more likely to remain positive after 2 months of treatment. PGC patients had significantly higher rates of treatment failure (adj. OR 0.72, 95% CI 0.58-0.74, P<0.001) and relapse (adj. OR 2.83, 95% CI 2.60-2.92, P<0.001). Conclusion: Poor glycemic control is associated with an increased risk of advanced and more severe TB disease in the form of lung cavitations, positive sputum smear, and slower smear conversion. It has a profound negative effect on treatment completion, cure, and relapse rates in patients with pulmonary

  14. Beijing strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in smear-positive tuberculosis patients in North-West and West of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Sahebi, Leyla; Ansarin, Khalil; Hoffner, Sven; Mohajeri, Parviz; Mohammadi, Abolghasem

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tuberculosis (TB) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality among chronic infectious diseases. The goal of this cross-sectional study (2012–2014) was to examine the prevalence of Mycobacterium TB (MTB) Beijing strains in regions near the Iranian border and to identify any epidemiological links. Materials and Methods: To this end, MTB isolates were harvested, from 64 HIV-negative, pulmonary smear-positive TB patients from the Iranian border provinces of East Azerbaijan (North-West), Kurdistan (West), and Kermanshah (West) (2012–2014). Isolates were subjected to restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis, using the insertion sequence IS6110 as a probe (IS6110 RFLP), and drug susceptibility testing by the proportion method. We gathered demographic and clinical data using a questionnaire and reviewing patient records. Results were analyzed with Gel Compare II 6.6 and SPSS-18. Results: The mean age of the patients was 54.4 years and 46.9% were male. The prevalence of Beijing strains among the isolates was 9.4% (17.6% in the Western provinces and 0% in East Azerbaijan). There was a statistically significant relationship between the Beijing strains and drug resistance and also between these strains, and the recurrence of TB in patients that had previously received treatment (P = 0.02 and P = 0.04, respectively). Conclusions: Finally, the prevalence of Beijing strains in Western Iran was greater than expected. Our results therefore indicate that regional and cross-border tracing may be necessary to control spread of this organism. PMID:28028521

  15. LED fluorescence microscopy increases the detection of smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis in medical colleges of India.

    PubMed

    Reza, L W; Satyanarayana, S; Pandey, A; Kumar, S; Devendrappa, N M; Anand, L; Singh, G; Kumar, A M V; Chadha, S S; Wilson, N; Sachdeva, K S; Nair, S A

    2013-09-21

    In July 2012, light-emitting diode fluorescence microscopy (LED-FM) replaced conventional light microscopy using Ziehl-Neelsen stain in the detection of sputum-positive pulmonary tuberculosis in 190 microscopy centres of medical colleges operating under India's Revised National Tuberculosis Control Programme. We compared the performance of LED-FM (July-December 2012) to that of conventional microscopy (July-December 2011) across 190 sites. Of 222 658 patients examined using conventional microscopy, 28 042 (12.6%) were smear-positive, while of 224 714 examined using LED-FM, 33 552 (14.9%) were smear-positive, an additional yield of 5251 cases after adjusting for the increase in patients examined. We recommend replacing conventional microscopy with LED-FM in high workload microscopy centres in India.

  16. Factors influencing early health facility contact and low default rate among new sputum smear positive tuberculosis patients, India.

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, Ashok Kumar; Kashyap, Surender; Bansal, Pradeep; Kumar, Dinesh; Raina, Sunil Kumar; Chander, Vishav; Sharma, Sushant

    2014-01-01

    Early case identification and prompt treatment of new sputum smear positive case are important to reduce the spread of tuberculosis (TB). Present study was planned to study the associated factors for duration to contact the health facility since appearance of symptoms and treatment default. Methodology. It was prospective cohort study of TB patients already registered for treatment in randomly selected TB units (TUs) in Himachal Pradesh, India. Relative risk (RR) was calculated as risk estimate to find out the explanatory variables for early contact and default. Results. Total 1607 patients were recruited and 25 (1.5%) defaulted treatment. Patients from nuclear family (aRR: 1.37; 1.09-1.73), ashamed of TB (aRR: 1.32; 1.03-1.70), wishing to disclose disease status (aRR: 1.79; 1.43-2.24), but aware of curable nature (aRR: 1.67; 1.17-2.39) and preventable (aRR: 1.35; 1.07-1.70) nature of disease, contacted health facility early since appearance of symptoms. Conclusion. Better awareness and less misconceptions about disease influences the early contact of health facility and low default rate in North India.

  17. Impact of Educational Intervention on Patients Behavior with Smear-positive Pulmonary Tuberculosis: A Study Using the Health Belief Model

    PubMed Central

    Jadgal, Khair Mohammad; Nakhaei-Moghadam, Tayebeh; Alizadeh-Seiouki, Hadi; Zareban, Iraj; Sharifi-Rad, Javad

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Tuberculosis is a single-agent infectious disease, which is the major cause of death around the world. Approximately one third of the world’s population is infected with tuberculosis (TB) bacilli and at risk of developing active TB. The purpose of this study was determined the impact of education based on health belief model in promoting behavior of smear-positive pulmonary TB among patients in Chabahar city, Iran. Material and methods: Of the 80 smear-positive pulmonary TB who referred to health centers in Chabahar voluntarily participated in this interventional study. The data collected using questionnaire based on health belief model. The data were analyzed by using paired t-test, independent t-test, pearson correlation and chi-square test with SPSS 16. Results: The cognitive skills were increased significantly from 6.10 to 6.88 after intervention. All behavioral skills were increased significantly from 2.08 to 2.88 after implementing the intervention. Perceived severity was increased from11.08to12.19 significantly. Percepted benefits were enhanced significantly from 11.48 to 12.23. Mean percepted barrier was decreased significantly from 17.52 to 16.68. Conclusion: Findings demonstrated that implementing educational intervention programs can increase the level of knowledge and behavior of patients regarding smear- positive pulmonary TB initiatives. PMID:26543411

  18. Impact of Educational Intervention on Patients Behavior with Smear-positive Pulmonary Tuberculosis: A Study Using the Health Belief Model.

    PubMed

    Jadgal, Khair Mohammad; Nakhaei-Moghadam, Tayebeh; Alizadeh-Seiouki, Hadi; Zareban, Iraj; Sharifi-Rad, Javad

    2015-08-01

    Tuberculosis is a single-agent infectious disease, which is the major cause of death around the world. Approximately one third of the world's population is infected with tuberculosis (TB) bacilli and at risk of developing active TB. The purpose of this study was determined the impact of education based on health belief model in promoting behavior of smear-positive pulmonary TB among patients in Chabahar city, Iran. Of the 80 smear-positive pulmonary TB who referred to health centers in Chabahar voluntarily participated in this interventional study. The data collected using questionnaire based on health belief model. The data were analyzed by using paired t-test, independent t-test, pearson correlation and chi-square test with SPSS 16. The cognitive skills were increased significantly from 6.10 to 6.88 after intervention. All behavioral skills were increased significantly from 2.08 to 2.88 after implementing the intervention. Perceived severity was increased from11.08to12.19 significantly. Percepted benefits were enhanced significantly from 11.48 to 12.23. Mean percepted barrier was decreased significantly from 17.52 to 16.68. Findings demonstrated that implementing educational intervention programs can increase the level of knowledge and behavior of patients regarding smear- positive pulmonary TB initiatives.

  19. Molecular detection of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis among smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis patients in Jigjiga town, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Brhane, Mussie; Kebede, Ameha; Petros, Yohannes

    2017-01-01

    Molecular methods that target drug resistance mutations are suitable approaches for rapid drug susceptibility testing to detect multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). The aim of the study was to determine MDR-TB cases and to analyze the frequency of gene mutations associated with rifampicin (RIF) and/or isoniazid (INH) resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis among smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis patients. Institution-based cross-sectional study design was employed. Sputum specimens were collected, and using a pretested questionnaire, data for associated risk factors for drug resistance were collected from 105 consecutive smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis patients in Karamara General Hospital. Specimens were transported to Harar Health Research and Regional Laboratory, Harar, where molecular drug susceptibility testing was performed using GenoType(®) MTBDRplus assay. Of the total 105 sputum specimens, 98 (93.3%) gave interpretable results, in which 67 (68.4%) were new cases and 31 (31.6%) were previously treated cases. Of these, 80 (81.6%) were sensitive to both drugs and 18 (18.4%) were resistant to RIF and/or INH. The prevalences of MDR-TB in total cases, new, and previously treated cases were 10 (10.2%), 3 (4.5%), and 7 (22.6%), respectively. Among the ten total RIF-resistant specimens, eight (80%) had resulted because of absence of rpoB WT8 and presence of MUT3 and in all specimens, the amino acids changed were Ser531Lue. Of the 18 total INH-resistant specimens, 15 (83.3%) had mutations in the katG gene (katG MUT1, Ser315Thr1), indicating high-level resistance, while 3 (14.7%) had mutations in the inhA promoter gene (Cys15Thr), indicating low-level resistance. Among the mutations associated with resistance to RIF and INH, the majority were in codon 531 of the rpoB gene and codon 315 of the katG gene. Relatively high prevalence of MDR-TB was observed in the study.

  20. Molecular detection of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis among smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis patients in Jigjiga town, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Brhane, Mussie; Kebede, Ameha; Petros, Yohannes

    2017-01-01

    Background Molecular methods that target drug resistance mutations are suitable approaches for rapid drug susceptibility testing to detect multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). The aim of the study was to determine MDR-TB cases and to analyze the frequency of gene mutations associated with rifampicin (RIF) and/or isoniazid (INH) resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis among smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis patients. Methods Institution-based cross-sectional study design was employed. Sputum specimens were collected, and using a pretested questionnaire, data for associated risk factors for drug resistance were collected from 105 consecutive smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis patients in Karamara General Hospital. Specimens were transported to Harar Health Research and Regional Laboratory, Harar, where molecular drug susceptibility testing was performed using GenoType® MTBDRplus assay. Results Of the total 105 sputum specimens, 98 (93.3%) gave interpretable results, in which 67 (68.4%) were new cases and 31 (31.6%) were previously treated cases. Of these, 80 (81.6%) were sensitive to both drugs and 18 (18.4%) were resistant to RIF and/or INH. The prevalences of MDR-TB in total cases, new, and previously treated cases were 10 (10.2%), 3 (4.5%), and 7 (22.6%), respectively. Among the ten total RIF-resistant specimens, eight (80%) had resulted because of absence of rpoB WT8 and presence of MUT3 and in all specimens, the amino acids changed were Ser531Lue. Of the 18 total INH-resistant specimens, 15 (83.3%) had mutations in the katG gene (katG MUT1, Ser315Thr1), indicating high-level resistance, while 3 (14.7%) had mutations in the inhA promoter gene (Cys15Thr), indicating low-level resistance. Conclusion Among the mutations associated with resistance to RIF and INH, the majority were in codon 531 of the rpoB gene and codon 315 of the katG gene. Relatively high prevalence of MDR-TB was observed in the study. PMID:28331348

  1. Assessment of sputum smear-positive but culture-negative results among newly diagnosed pulmonary tuberculosis patients in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Mnyambwa, Nicholaus Peter; Ngadaya, Esther S; Kimaro, Godfather; Kim, Dong-Jin; Kazwala, Rudovick; Petrucka, Pammla; Mfinanga, Sayoki G

    2017-01-01

    Diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) in technology-limited countries is widely achieved by smear microscopy, which has limited sensitivity and specificity. The frequency and clinical implication of smear-positive but culture-negative among presumptive TB patients remains unclear. A cross-sectional substudy was conducted which aimed to identify the proportion of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) infections among 94 "smear-positive culture-negative" patients diagnosed between January 2013 and June 2016 in selected health facilities in Tanzania. Out of 94 sputa, 25 (26.60%) were GeneXpert® mycobacteria TB positive and 11/94 (11.70%) repeat-culture positive; 5 were Capilia TB-Neo positive and confirmed by GenoType MTBC to be Mycobacterium tuberculosis/Mycobacterium canettii. The remaining 6 Capilia TB-Neo negative samples were genotyped by GenoType® CM/AS, identifying 3 (3.19%) NTM, 2 Gram positive bacteria, and 1 isolate testing negative, together, making a total of 6/94 (6.38%) confirmed false smear-positives. Twenty-eight (29.79%) were confirmed TB cases, while 60 (63.83%) remained unconfirmed cases. Out of 6 (6.38%) patients who were HIV positive, 2 patients were possibly coinfected with mycobacteria. The isolation of NTM and other bacteria among smear-positive culture-negative samples and the presence of over two third of unconfirmed TB cases emphasize the need of both advanced differential TB diagnostic techniques and good clinical laboratory practices to avoid unnecessary administration of anti-TB drugs.

  2. Incidence of tuberculosis among children living in contact with smear-positive tuberculosis: Advantages and limits of the Quantiferon TB gold in tube test.

    PubMed

    Hannoun, Djohar; Boulahbal, Fadila

    2016-12-01

    Children living in contact with smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) patients are highly exposed to TB infection. Our objective was to estimate the incidence of TB in children living in contact with a Smear Positive (M+) pulmonary tuberculosis (PTM+) index case during 2years following exposure. This was a descriptive, cohort, prospective, multicenter study of children aged from 6months to 15years in contact with a PTM+ case. The recruitment of children has been based on the diagnosed PTM+ index case and taken in charge by the Services of Control of Tuberculosis and Respiratory Diseases located in Algiers during 2014. Seven centers were selected. All children were tested using the Quantiferon TB gold in tube (QTR) test and the tuberculin skin test (TST). For TST, an induration diameter ⩾10mm was considered positive. We included 456 children living in contact with a PTM+ patient. The results for TST and QFT were available for 319 children. The mean age of the children was 6.7years (standard deviation=3.9). The sex ratio (Male/Female) was 1.26, and 15.8% (50) did not have a Bacilli of Calmette & Guerin (BCG) vaccination scar. Among the children, 46.1% (147) and 43.4% (138) were positive for QFT and TST, respectively, and 6.1% (19) have received isoniazid preventive therapy. Fifty-one children progressed to TB and received antitubercular treatment. We analyzed and compared our results between children who progressed to TB and those who did not progress to TB. Finally, we discuss our methodology and results in relation to the literature. Copyright © 2016.

  3. Cost-effectiveness of chemotherapy for sputum smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis in Malawi, Mozambique and Tanzania.

    PubMed

    de Jonghe, E; Murray, C J; Chum, H J; Nyangulu, D S; Salomao, A; Styblo, K

    1994-01-01

    The cost-effectiveness of chemotherapy for pulmonary sputum smear-positive tuberculosis was examined in the national tuberculosis control programmes of Malawi, Mozambique and Tanzania. In these three programmes, routine cure rates have exceeded 80 per cent. Average, average incremental and marginal unit costs for standard, short-course and retreatment regimens with and without hospitalization have been measured. The average incremental cost per year of life saved through chemotherapy ranged from US $0.90-3.10. In all conditions, short-course chemotherapy is preferable to standard 12-month chemotherapy. When hospitalization during the intensive phase of chemotherapy increases the cure rate by 10-15 percentage points, it can be relatively cost-effective. Analysing the cost-effectiveness of short-course and standard chemotherapy, where the depth of the margin of benefit is different, illustrates some of the dangers of simplistic use of cost-effectiveness ratios.

  4. Prevalence of smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis and associated risk factors among prisoners in Hadiya Zone prison, Southern Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Fuge, Terefe G; Ayanto, Samuel Y

    2016-04-02

    People concentrated in congregated systems such as prisons, are important but often neglected reservoirs for tuberculosis transmission, and threaten those in the outside community. The condition is more serious in Africa particularly in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) due to its poor living conditions and ineffective health services. This study was conducted to determine the prevalence of smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis and associated risk factors among prisoners in Hadiya Zone prison. A cross-sectional survey was carried out from May to June 2013 in Hadiya Zone prison. Prison inmates who had history of cough for at least a week were included in the study. Three morning sputum samples were collected from suspected inmates and examined through compound light microscopy. The data obtained was analyzed using statistical software like Epidata and STATA. A total of 164 prisoners were included in the survey using active screening strategy and the point prevalence of smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) in the prison was 349.2 per 100,000 populations; about three times higher than its prevalence in the general population. Even though lack of visit from family was the only variable identified as a risk factor for PTB (P = 0.029), almost all of the PTB positive cases were rural residents, farmers, male youngsters and those who shared cell with TB patients and chronically coughing persons as well as those who stayed in a cell that contains >100 inmates. There is high prevalence of TB in Hadiya Zone prison with possible active transmission of TB within the prison. The study also documented a number of factors which may facilitate exposures to TB though most of them are not significantly associated. Therefore, strong cooperation between prison authorities and the national tuberculosis control programmes is urgently required to develop locally appropriate interventions to reduce transmission.

  5. Did FIDELIS projects contribute to the detection of new smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis cases in China?

    PubMed Central

    Rusen, I. D.; Hinderaker, S. G.; Roldan, A.; Heldal, E.; Enarson, D. A.; Zhang, L-X.

    2016-01-01

    Setting: The first phase of the Fund for Innovative DOTS Expansion through Local Initiatives to Stop TB (FIDELIS) projects in China started in 2003. Objective: To determine whether the FIDELIS projects contributed to the increased case detection rate for new smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) in China. Methods: We compared the case notification rates (CNRs) in the intervention year with those of the previous year in the FIDELIS areas, then compared the difference between the CNRs of the intervention year and the previous year in the FIDELIS areas with those in the non-FI-DELIS areas within the province. Results: There was an increase in the CNR in the intervention year compared with the previous year for all the project sites. The differences between the CNR in the intervention year and the previous year ranged from 6.4 to 31.1 per 100 000 population in the FIDELIS areas and from 2.9 to 20.4/100 000 in the non-FIDELIS areas. Differences-in-differences analysis shows that the differences in the CNRs in the FIDELIS areas were not statistically significantly different from those in the non-FIDELIS areas (P = 0.393). Conclusion: The FIDELIS projects may have contributed to the increase in case detection of new smear-positive PTB in China, but the level of evidence is low. PMID:27695680

  6. Did FIDELIS projects contribute to the detection of new smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis cases in China?

    PubMed

    Lin, Y; Chiang, C-Y; Rusen, I D; Hinderaker, S G; Roldan, A; Heldal, E; Enarson, D A; Zhang, L-X

    2016-09-01

    Setting: The first phase of the Fund for Innovative DOTS Expansion through Local Initiatives to Stop TB (FIDELIS) projects in China started in 2003. Objective: To determine whether the FIDELIS projects contributed to the increased case detection rate for new smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) in China. Methods: We compared the case notification rates (CNRs) in the intervention year with those of the previous year in the FIDELIS areas, then compared the difference between the CNRs of the intervention year and the previous year in the FIDELIS areas with those in the non-FI-DELIS areas within the province. Results: There was an increase in the CNR in the intervention year compared with the previous year for all the project sites. The differences between the CNR in the intervention year and the previous year ranged from 6.4 to 31.1 per 100 000 population in the FIDELIS areas and from 2.9 to 20.4/100 000 in the non-FIDELIS areas. Differences-in-differences analysis shows that the differences in the CNRs in the FIDELIS areas were not statistically significantly different from those in the non-FIDELIS areas (P = 0.393). Conclusion: The FIDELIS projects may have contributed to the increase in case detection of new smear-positive PTB in China, but the level of evidence is low.

  7. High initial default in patients with smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis at a regional hospital in Accra, Ghana.

    PubMed

    Afutu, F K; Zachariah, R; Hinderaker, S G; Ntoah-Boadi, H; Obeng, E Apori; Bonsu, F Adae; Harries, A D

    2012-08-01

    Sputum smear-positive TB patients, diagnosed in the laboratory, who never start anti-TB treatment are classified as 'initial defaulters'. In Ridge Hospital, Accra, Ghana, there were 84 laboratory confirmed TB cases in 2009, of whom 32 (38%) were initial defaulters. Cure and default rates based on this cohort were 54% and 43% respectively, compared with rates of 87% and 8% when using the cohort based on 52 patients registered for treatment. This study highlights the problem of initial defaulters, and shows that programme performance may be poor when patients in laboratory registers are used as the cohort to evaluate treatment outcomes.

  8. Real-Time Molecular Epidemiology of Tuberculosis by Direct Genotyping of Smear-Positive Clinical Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, María; Herranz, Marta; Martínez Lirola, Miguel; González-Rivera, Milagros; Bouza, Emilio

    2012-01-01

    We applied MIRU-VNTR (mycobacterial interspersed repetitive-unit–variable-number tandem-repeat typing) to directly analyze the bacilli present in 61 stain-positive specimens from tuberculosis patients. A complete MIRU type (24 loci) was obtained for all but one (no amplification in one locus) of the specimens (98.4%), and the allelic values fully correlated with those obtained from the corresponding cultures. Our study is the first to demonstrate that real-time genotyping of Mycobacterium tuberculosis can be achieved, fully transforming the way in which molecular epidemiology techniques can be integrated into control programs. PMID:22378907

  9. Trend of Smear-positive Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Iran during 1995–2012: A Segmented Regression Model

    PubMed Central

    Khazaei, Salman; Soheilyzad, Mokhtar; Molaeipoor, Leila; Khazaei, Zaher; Rezaeian, Shahab; Khazaei, Somayeh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Describing trend in tuberculosis (TB) over time can play an important role to assess the disease control strategies and predict the future morbidity and mortality. This study aimed to determine the incidence trend of smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis (SPPT) in sub-age and sex groups during the years of 1995–2012. Methods: This retrospective cohort study was performed in 2015 by using the dataset regarding National Statistics of SPPT reported by World Health Organization during 1995–2012. Annual percent changes (APCs) and average annual percent changes (AAPCs) were estimated to determine the summery statistics of trend using segmented regression model. Results: During 1995–2012, there were 96,579 SPPT case notifications in Iran (male to female ratio: 0.99). There was only one change point in 1997 for SPPT incidence in subgroups of age and sex during 1995–2012. The AAPCs for both genders and also all three age groups had a significant descending trend during the time period (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Our results showed a downward trend in the SPPT incidence. It seems that to achieve the set goals and high successful in TB control program especially reduction in SPPT, pay more attention to old age and males should be considered. In addition, improvement of clinical and medical care services and notification processes would be imperative. PMID:27413517

  10. Trend of Smear-positive Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Iran during 1995-2012: A Segmented Regression Model.

    PubMed

    Khazaei, Salman; Soheilyzad, Mokhtar; Molaeipoor, Leila; Khazaei, Zaher; Rezaeian, Shahab; Khazaei, Somayeh

    2016-01-01

    Describing trend in tuberculosis (TB) over time can play an important role to assess the disease control strategies and predict the future morbidity and mortality. This study aimed to determine the incidence trend of smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis (SPPT) in sub-age and sex groups during the years of 1995-2012. This retrospective cohort study was performed in 2015 by using the dataset regarding National Statistics of SPPT reported by World Health Organization during 1995-2012. Annual percent changes (APCs) and average annual percent changes (AAPCs) were estimated to determine the summery statistics of trend using segmented regression model. During 1995-2012, there were 96,579 SPPT case notifications in Iran (male to female ratio: 0.99). There was only one change point in 1997 for SPPT incidence in subgroups of age and sex during 1995-2012. The AAPCs for both genders and also all three age groups had a significant descending trend during the time period (P < 0.05). Our results showed a downward trend in the SPPT incidence. It seems that to achieve the set goals and high successful in TB control program especially reduction in SPPT, pay more attention to old age and males should be considered. In addition, improvement of clinical and medical care services and notification processes would be imperative.

  11. Vitamin D deficiency among smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis patients and their tuberculosis negative household contacts in Northwest Ethiopia: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Tessema, Belay; Moges, Feleke; Habte, Dereje; Hiruy, Nebiyu; Yismaw, Shewaye; Melkieneh, Kassahun; Kassie, Yewulsew; Girma, Belaineh; Melese, Muluken; Suarez, Pedro G

    2017-05-11

    Vitamin D is a fat-soluble vitamin that increases the immunity against tuberculosis (TB), decreases the re-activation of latent TB and reduces the severity of active TB disease. Epidemiological studies on the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency, and its association with TB showed inconsistent results in different countries. This study was aimed to determine the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency and its association with TB in Northwest Ethiopia. A case-control study was conducted among smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis patients and their household contacts without symptoms suggestive of TB. Study participants were recruited at 11 TB diagnostic health facilities in North and South Gondar zones of Amhara region between May 2013 and April 2015. The spot-morning-spot sputum samples and 5 ml blood sample were collected prior to commencing TB treatment for the diagnosis of TB and serum vitamin D assay, respectively. The diagnosis of TB was performed using smear microscopy and GeneXpert. Serum vitamin D level was analyzed using VIDAS 25 OH Vitamin D Total testing kits (Biomerieux, Marcy I'Etoile, France) on mini VIDAS automated immunoassay platform. Vitamin D status was interpreted as deficient (<20 ng/ml), insufficient (20-29 ng/ml), sufficient (30-100 ng/ml) and potential toxicity (>100 ng/ml). Of the total study participants, 134 (46.2%) were vitamin D deficient, and only 56 (19.3%) had sufficient vitamin D level. A total of 59 (61.5%) TB patients and 75 (38.7%) non TB controls were vitamin D deficient. Results of multivariate logistic regression analyses showed a significantly higher vitamin D deficiency among tuberculosis cases (p < 0.001), females (p = 0.002), and urban residents (p < 0.001) than their respective comparison groups. Moreover, age groups of 35-44 (p = 0.001), 45-54 (p = 0.003) and ≥55 (p = 0.001) years had significantly higher vitamin D deficiency compared with age group <15 years. Vitamin D deficiency is highly prevalent

  12. Evaluation of high-dose rifampin in patients with new, smear-positive tuberculosis (HIRIF): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Milstein, Meredith; Lecca, Leonid; Peloquin, Charles; Mitchison, Denis; Seung, Kwonjune; Pagano, Marcello; Coleman, David; Osso, Elna; Coit, Julia; Vargas Vasquez, Dante Elmo; Sanchez Garavito, Epifanio; Calderon, Roger; Contreras, Carmen; Davies, Geraint; Mitnick, Carole D

    2016-08-27

    Evidence has existed for decades that higher doses of rifampin may be more effective, but potentially more toxic, than standard doses used in tuberculosis treatment. Whether increased doses of rifampin could safely shorten treatment remains an open question. The HIRIF study is a phase II randomized trial comparing rifampin doses of 20 and 15 mg/kg/day to the standard 10 mg/kg/day for the first 2 months of tuberculosis treatment. All participants receive standard doses of companion drugs and a standard continuation-phase treatment (4 months, 2 drugs). They are followed for 6 months post treatment. Study participants are adults with newly diagnosed, previously untreated, smear positive (≥2+) pulmonary tuberculosis. The primary outcome is rifampin area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC0-24) after at least 14 days of study treatment/minimum inhibitory concentration. 180 randomized participants affords 90 % statistical power to detect a difference of at least 14 mcg/mL*hr between the 20 mg/kg group and the 10 mg/kg group, assuming a loss to follow-up of up to 17 %. Extant evidence suggests the potential for increased doses of rifampin to shorten tuberculosis treatment duration. Early studies that explored this potential using intermittent, higher dosing were derailed by toxicity. Given the continued large, global burden of tuberculosis with nearly 10 million new cases annually, shortened regimens with existing drugs would offer an important advantage to patients and health systems. This trial was registered with clinicaltrials.gov (registration number: NCT01408914 ) on 2 August 2011.

  13. Rate of Recovery of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from Frozen Acid-Fast-Bacillus Smear-Positive Sputum Samples Subjected to Long-Term Storage in Northwest Ethiopia ▿

    PubMed Central

    Tessema, Belay; Beer, Joerg; Emmrich, Frank; Sack, Ulrich; Rodloff, Arne C.

    2011-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a major public health problem in Ethiopia. The diagnosis and treatment of drug-resistant tuberculosis remain a challenge in the country. This study aimed to assess whether single morning sputum samples could be stored at −20°C for extended periods of time at remote settings and then transported and successfully cultured for Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Single morning sputum samples were collected from all smear-positive tuberculosis patients diagnosed at Gondar Hospital, Gondar Health Center, Metemma Hospital, Bahir Dar Hospital, and Debre Markos Hospital in Northwest Ethiopia between March and July 2009. Specimens were stored at the study sites and sent to the mycobacteriology laboratory at the University Hospital, Leipzig, Germany, where specimens were processed and inoculated into the BacT/Alert 3D system and Lowenstein-Jensen and Gottsacker media. Ice packs were added in the package of the specimens during transport. A total of 319 patients were enrolled in this study. The median specimen storage time was 132 days (range, 16 to 180 days). Of all specimens, 283 (88.7%) were culture positive by any of the three culturing systems. M. tuberculosis isolates from four contaminated specimens in all culturing systems were successfully isolated on Middlebrook 7H10 agar; thereby, the recovery rate increased to 287 (90.0%). The length of time of sputum storage had no significant effect on the rate of recovery of M. tuberculosis in all culturing systems. In conclusion, single morning sputum specimens collected at remote settings stored at −20°C for long periods of time without the addition of preservatives can yield a high recovery rate. These findings suggest a simple and cost-effective alternative method of sputum storage for epidemiological and drug resistance studies in low-resource countries. PMID:21562105

  14. Effects of a food supplement rich in arginine in patients with smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis--a randomised trial.

    PubMed

    Schön, T; Idh, J; Westman, A; Elias, D; Abate, E; Diro, E; Moges, F; Kassu, A; Ayele, B; Forslund, T; Getachew, A; Britton, S; Stendahl, O; Sundqvist, T

    2011-09-01

    In tuberculosis (TB), the production of nitric oxide (NO) is confirmed but its importance in host defense is debated. Our aim was to investigate whether a food supplement rich in arginine could enhance clinical improvement in TB patients by increased NO production. Smear positive TB patients from Gondar, Ethiopia (n = 180) were randomized to a food supplementation rich in arginine (peanuts, equivalent to 1 g of arginine/day) or with a low arginine content (wheat crackers, locally called daboqolo) during four weeks. The primary outcome was cure rate according to the WHO classification and secondary outcomes were sputum smear conversion, weight gain, sedimentation rate, reduction of cough and chest X-ray improvement as well as levels of NO in urine (uNO) or exhaled air (eNO) at two months. There was no effect of the intervention on the primary outcome (OR 1.44, 95% CI: 0.69-3.0, p = 0.39) or secondary outcomes. In the subgroup analysis according to HIV status, peanut supplemented HIV+/TB patients showed increased cure rate (83.8% (31/37) vs 53.1% (17/32), p < 0.01). A low baseline eNO (<10 ppb) in HIV+/TB patients was associated with a decreased cure rate. We conclude that nutritional supplementation with a food supplement rich in arginine did not have any overall clinical effect. In the subgroup of HIV positive TB patients, it significantly increased the cure rate and as an additional finding in this subgroup, low initial levels of NO in exhaled air were associated with a poor clinical outcome but this needs to be confirmed in further studies.

  15. Randomized dose-ranging study of the 14-day early bactericidal activity of bedaquiline (TMC207) in patients with sputum microscopy smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Diacon, Andreas H; Dawson, Rodney; Von Groote-Bidlingmaier, Florian; Symons, Gregory; Venter, Amour; Donald, Peter R; Conradie, Almari; Erondu, Ngozi; Ginsberg, Ann M; Egizi, Erica; Winter, Helen; Becker, Piet; Mendel, Carl M

    2013-05-01

    Bedaquiline is a new antituberculosis agent targeting ATP synthase. This randomized, double-blinded study enrolling 68 sputum smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis patients evaluated the 14-day early bactericidal activity of daily doses of 100 mg, 200 mg, 300 mg, and 400 mg bedaquiline, preceded by loading doses of 200 mg, 400 mg, 500 mg, and 700 mg, respectively, on the first treatment day and 100 mg, 300 mg, 400 mg, and 500 mg on the second treatment day. All groups showed activity with a mean (standard deviation) daily fall in log10 CFU over 14 days of 0.040 (0.068), 0.056 (0.051), 0.077 (0.064), and 0.104 (0.077) in the 100-mg, 200-mg, 300-mg, and 400-mg groups, respectively. The linear trend for dose was significant (P = 0.001), and activity in the 400-mg dose group was greater than that in the 100-mg group (P = 0.014). All of the bedaquiline groups showed significant bactericidal activity that was continued to the end of the 14-day evaluation period. The finding of a linear trend for dose suggests that the highest dose compatible with safety considerations should be taken forward to longer-term clinical studies.

  16. A Retrospective Analysis of Two-Month Sputum Smear Non-Conversion in New Sputum Smear Positive Tuberculosis Patients in the Free State Province, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Chikobvu, Perpetual; Heunis, James Christoffel; van der Merwe, Sonja

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about the drivers of two-month sputum smear non-conversion in the South African context. Our study sought to determine these factors in new sputum smear positive tuberculosis (TB) patients in South Africa’s Free State Province. A retrospective record review was conducted for all TB patients on treatment between 2003 and 2009. Two-month sputum smear non-conversion was defined by a positive sputum smear result. Data was subjected to univariate, bivariate and regression analyses. Generalized linear regression models were used to estimate the risk for two-month sputum smear non-conversion. Age, pre-treatment sputum smear grading, HIV status and TB disease classification influenced two-month sputum smear non-conversion. Significant associations were thus established between health systems, microbiological, clinical and demographic factors, and two-month sputum smear non-conversion. This study provides program managers with evidence to support the development of more tailored TB care. PMID:28299125

  17. Effect of a comprehensive programme to provide universal access to care for sputum-smear-positive multidrug-resistant tuberculosis in China: a before-and-after study.

    PubMed

    Li, Renzhong; Ruan, Yunzhou; Sun, Qiang; Wang, Xiexiu; Chen, Mingting; Zhang, Hui; Zhao, Yanlin; Zhao, Jin; Chen, Cheng; Xu, Caihong; Su, Wei; Pang, Yu; Cheng, Jun; Chi, Junying; Wang, Qian; Fu, Yunting; Huan, Shitong; Wang, Lixia; Wang, Yu; Chin, Daniel P

    2015-04-01

    China has a quarter of all patients with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDRTB) worldwide, but less than 5% are in quality treatment programmes. In a before-and-after study we aimed to assess the effect of a comprehensive programme to provide universal access to diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up for MDRTB in four Chinese cities (population 18 million). We designated city-level hospitals in each city to diagnose and treat MDRTB. All patients with smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis diagnosed in Center for Disease Control (CDC) clinics and hospitals were tested for MDRTB with molecular and conventional drug susceptibility tests. Patients were treated with a 24 month treatment package for MDRTB based on WHO guidelines. Outpatients were referred to the CDC for directly observed therapy. We capped total treatment package cost at US$4644. Insurance reimbursement and project subsidies limited patients' expenses to 10% of charges for services within the package. We compared data from a 12 month programme period (2011) to those from a retrospective survey of all patients with MDRTB diagnosed in the same cities during a baseline period (2006-09). 243 patients were diagnosed with MDRTB or rifampicin-resistant tuberculosis during the 12 month programme period compared with 92 patients (equivalent to 24 per year) during the baseline period. 172 (71%) of 243 individuals were enrolled in the programme. Time from specimen collection for resistance testing to treatment initiation decreased by 90% (from median 139 days [IQR 69-207] to 14 days [10-21]), the proportion of patients who started on appropriate drug regimen increased 2·7 times (from nine [35%] of 26 patients treated to 166 [97%] of 172), and follow-up by the CDC after initial hospitalisation increased 24 times (from one [4%] of 23 patients to 163 [99%] of 164 patients). 6 months after starting treatment, the proportion of patients remaining on treatment increased ten times (from two [8%] of 26 patients to 137 [80

  18. A Novel Reading Scheme for Assessing the Extent of Radiographic Abnormalities and Its Association with Disease Severity in Sputum Smear-Positive Tuberculosis: An Observational Study in Hyderabad/India

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Surabhi; Hussain, Abid; Klassert, Tilman E.; Driesch, Dominik; Tokaryeva, Viktoriya; Löschmann, Yvonne Yi-Na; Sumanlatha, Gadamm; Ahmed, Niyaz; Valluri, Vijayalakshmi; Schumann, Ralf R.; Lala, Birgit; Slevogt, Hortense

    2015-01-01

    Background Existing reading schemes for chest X-ray (CXR) used to grade the extent of disease severity at diagnosis in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) are often based on numerical scores that summate specific radiographic features. However, since PTB is known to exhibit a wide heterogeneity in pathology, certain features might be differentially associated with clinical parameters of disease severity. Objective We aimed to grade disease severity in PTB patients at diagnosis and after completion of DOTS treatment by developing a reading scheme based on five different radiographic manifestations and analyze their association with the clinical parameters of systemic involvement and infectivity. Methods 141 HIV-negative adults with newly diagnosed sputum smear-positive PTB were enrolled in a prospective observational study in Hyderabad, India. The presence and extent on CXRs of five radiographic manifestations, i.e., lung involvement, alveolar infiltration, cavitation, lymphadenopathy and pleural effusion, were classified using the new reading scheme by using a four-quadrant approach. We evaluated the inter-reader reliability of each manifestation, and its association with BMI and sputum smear positivity at diagnosis. The presence and extent of these radiographic manifestations were further compared with CXRs on completion of DOTS treatment. Results At diagnosis, an average lung area of 51.7% +/- 23.3% was affected by radiographic abnormalities. 94% of the patients had alveolar infiltrates, with 89.4% located in the upper quadrants, suggesting post primary PTB and in 34.8% of patients cavities were found. We further showed that the extent of affected lung area was a negative predictor of BMI (β value -0.035, p 0.019). No significant association of BMI with any of the other CXR features was found. The extent of alveolar infiltrates, along with the presence of cavitation, were strongly associated with sputum smear positivity. The microbiological cure rate in

  19. The additional yield of GeneXpert MTB/RIF test in the diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis among household contacts of smear positive TB cases.

    PubMed

    Habte, Dereje; Melese, Muluken; Hiruy, Nebiyu; Gashu, Zewdu; Jerene, Degu; Moges, Feleke; Yifru, Sisay; Girma, Belaineh; Kassie, Yewulsew; Haile, Yared Kebede; Suarez, Pedro Guillermo; Tessema, Belay

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the diagnostic yield of GeneXpert MTB/RIF with Ziehl-Neelson (ZN) sputum smear microscopy among index TB cases and their household contacts. A cross sectional study was conducted among sputum smear positive index TB cases and their household contacts in Northern Ethiopia. Of 353 contacts screened, 41 (11%) were found to have presumptive TB. GeneXpert test done among 39 presumptive TB cases diagnosed 14 (35.9%) cases of TB (one being rifampicin resistant), whereas the number of TB cases diagnosed by microscopy was only 5 (12.8%): a 64.3% increased positivity rate by GeneXpert versus ZN microscopy. The number needed to screen and number needed to test to diagnose a single case of TB was significantly lower with the use of GeneXpert than ZN microscopy. Of 119 index TB cases, GeneXpert test revealed that 106 (89.1%) and 5 (4.2%) were positive for rifampicin sensitive and rifampicin resistant TB, respectively. GeneXpert test led to increased TB case detection among household contacts in addition to its advantage in the diagnosis of Rifampicin resistance among contacts and index TB cases. There should be a consideration in using GeneXpert MTB/RIF as a point of care TB testing tool among high risk groups. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. Outcome for adult contacts of smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis in the absence of X-ray follow-up: 2000-03.

    PubMed

    Ormerod, L P; Green, R M; Broadfield, E

    2004-06-01

    The effects of the policy change in X-ray follow-up of adult tuberculin-positive close contacts of sputum microscopy positive pulmonary tuberculosis made by the Joint Tuberculosis Committee of the British Thoracic Society in 2000 were monitored prospectively from late 2000 until the end of 2003. No cases in contacts that could have been detected by interval X-rays at three and 12 months were found. The data, on 291 cases, support the abandonment of X-ray follow-up in favour of an 'inform and advise' strategy after an initial normal chest X-ray in this category of tuberculosis contact.

  1. Age, Dehydration, Respiratory Failure, Orientation Disturbance, and Blood Pressure Score Predicts In-hospital Mortality in HIV-negative Non-multidrug-resistant Smear-positive Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Japan.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Kenjiro; Horita, Nobuyuki; Sato, Takashi; Yamamoto, Masaki; Nagakura, Hideyuki; Kaneko, Takeshi

    2016-02-17

    The A-DROP scoring system was originally designed to assess clinical severity of community acquired pneumonia using the following parameters: advanced Age, Dehydration, Respiratory failure, Orientation disturbance (confusion); and, low blood Pressure. Total A-DROP score ranges zero to five assigning one point for each component, wherein five indicates the poorest prognosis. The purpose of this single-center retrospective study was to determine whether A-DROP could predict the risk for death in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis. We reviewed consecutive HIV-negative, non-multidrug-resistant smear-positive adult pulmonary tuberculosis patients. The cohort consisted of 134 men (38.8%), 211 women (61.2%), 272 who discharged alive (28.8%), and 73 who died in-hospital (21.2%) with a median age of 72 (IQR: 54-82) years. A one-point increase in the A-DROP score was associated with a higher risk for in-hospital mortality with odds ratio of 3.8 (95% confidence interval 2.8-5.2, P < 0.001). The area under receiver operating characteristics curve was 0.86. The total score cutoff of 1.5 provided the best Youden Index of 0.61. Using this criteria, total score >1.5, sensitivity was 85% and specificity was 76%. Kaplan-Meier curve clearly indicated that in-hospital mortality increased with higher A-DROP scores (Log-rank test <0.001). In conclusion, A-DROP score clearly indicate pulmonary tuberculosis in-hospital mortality.

  2. Direct Application of the INNO-LiPA Rif.TB Line-Probe Assay for Rapid Identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex Strains and Detection of Rifampin Resistance in 360 Smear-Positive Respiratory Specimens from an Area of High Incidence of Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Viveiros, Miguel; Leandro, Clara; Rodrigues, Liliana; Almeida, Josefina; Bettencourt, Rosário; Couto, Isabel; Carrilho, Lurdes; Diogo, José; Fonseca, Ana; Lito, Luís; Lopes, João; Pacheco, Teresa; Pessanha, Mariana; Quirim, Judite; Sancho, Luísa; Salfinger, Max; Amaral, Leonard

    2005-01-01

    The INNO-LiPA Rif.TB assay for the identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex strains and the detection of rifampin (RIF) resistance has been evaluated with 360 smear-positive respiratory specimens from an area of high incidence of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). The sensitivity when compared to conventional identification/culture methods was 82.2%, and the specificity was 66.7%; the sensitivity and specificity were 100.0% and 96.9%, respectively, for the detection of RIF resistance. This assay has the potential to provide rapid information that is essential for the effective management of MDR-TB. PMID:16145166

  3. Clinical tuberculosis and treatment outcomes.

    PubMed

    Jordan, T S; Davies, P D

    2010-06-01

    The global targets for tuberculosis (TB) control set by the World Health Assembly (WHA) in 1991 were detection of at least 70% and cure of at least 85% of new sputum smear-positive TB cases by 2000, later revised to 2005. The DOTS strategy was introduced in the mid-1990s, and later became the cornerstone of the Stop TB Strategy, which was launched along with the Global Plan to Stop TB 2006-2015 in 2006. The Global Plan sets out how and to what extent the Stop TB Strategy should be implemented between 2006 and 2015 to achieve the TB-related Millennium Development Goal (MDG) to halt and reverse the incidence of TB by 2015 and the Stop TB Partnership targets to reduce TB prevalence and death rates to 50% of 1990 levels by 2015, and to eliminate TB as a public health concern by 2050. Treatment success and case detection rates are outcome indicators used to measure the effectiveness of TB control along with the impact indicators incidence, prevalence and death rates. Globally, the rate of treatment success for smear-positive cases treated exceeded the WHA global target of 85% for the first time in 2007. This review focuses on articles related to treatment outcome in TB published in the International Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease in 2009.

  4. Tuberculosis (TB): Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Education & Training Home Conditions Tuberculosis (TB) Tuberculosis: Treatment Tuberculosis: Treatment Make an Appointment Refer a Patient Ask ... or bones is treated longer. NEXT: Preventive Treatment Tuberculosis: Diagnosis Tuberculosis: History Clinical Trials For more than ...

  5. Tuberculosis (TB): Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Training Home Conditions Tuberculosis (TB) Treating Tuberculosis Treating Tuberculosis Make an Appointment Refer a Patient Ask a ... bones is treated longer. NEXT: Preventive Treatment Diagnosing Tuberculosis History of TB Clinical Trials Tuberculosis (TB) Causes ...

  6. Pretreatment sputum smear grade and smear positivity during follow-up of TB patients in Ahmedabad, India.

    PubMed

    Patel, J; Dave, P; Satyanarayana, S; Kumar, A M V; Shah, A; Ananthakrishnan, R; Ratnu, A

    2013-12-21

    In Ahmedabad, India, a retrospective record review was undertaken among 2842 sputum smear-positive tuberculosis patients registered for treatment from April to September 2011 to assess the association of pretreatment sputum smear grade with sputum positivity and the additional yield of a second sputum sample during each follow-up examination. Respectively 39%, 26%, 28% and 7% of patients had pretreatment sputum grade 3+, 2+, 1+ and scanty. The higher the pretreatment sputum grade, the higher the proportion found positive during various follow-up periods. Overall, the additional yield of the second sputum sample was <2%; it did not vary with pretreatment smear grading.

  7. Delays in diagnosis and treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis in AFB smear-negative patients with pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z X; Sng, L-H; Yong, Y; Lin, L M; Cheng, T W; Seong, N H; Yong, F K

    2017-03-16

    BACKGROUND:

    Diagnostic and treatment delays increase the severity and transmission of pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB). This study aimed to evaluate TB diagnostic and treatment delays in acid-fast bacilli (AFB) smear-negative patients.

    METHODS:

    This was a retrospective observational study. Patients with positive AFB culture of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC) were selected from among hospitalised patients with a diagnosis of pneumonia. Admission ward, anti-tuberculosis treatment and the duration of AFB culture were compared between smear-positive and smear-negative patients.

    RESULTS:

    Of the 70 patients with positive isolation of MTC in AFB culture, 27 (38.5%) were smear-negative; of these, 18 (66.7%) were not isolated while in hospital, and 17 (63%) were neither diagnosed nor treated for TB. In contrast, 41 of the 43 smear-positive patients (95.3%) were directly admitted or quickly transferred to the isolation room and started on anti-tuberculosis treatment (P < 0.001). Samples from smear-negative patients required more time to grow MTC in AFB culture than those of smear-positive patients (23 days vs. 14 days, P < 0.001). Diabetes was significantly associated with AFB smear positivity, with an odds ratio of 12.2.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Negative AFB smears caused significant diagnostic and treatment delay. Patients staying in the general ward were exposed to TB patients who were not diagnosed in time.

  8. [Treatment of tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Ben Amar, J; Dhahri, B; Aouina, H; Azzabi, S; Baccar, M A; El Gharbi, L; Bouacha, H

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this article is to give practicing physicians a practical approach to the treatment of latent and active tuberculosis. Most patients follow TB standard treatment recommended by WHO that depend on category of patient. It is a combination of four essential tuberculosis drugs of the first group: isoniazid, rifampicin, pyrazinamid and ethambutol; in some cases streptomycin can replace ethambutol. This initial phase of intensive treatment is followed by a consolidation phase. Drugs should be administered in the morning on an empty stomach one hour before meals. Treatment of latent tuberculosis (TB) infection is an important component of TB control programs. Preventive treatment can reduce the risk of developing active TB. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Patient delay in the diagnosis and treatment of tuberculosis in China: findings of case detection projects

    PubMed Central

    Enarson, D. A.; Chiang, C-Y.; Rusen, I. D.; Qiu, L-X.; Kan, X-H.; Yuan, Y-L.; Du, J.; Zhang, T-H.; Li, Y.; Li, X-F.; Du, C-T.; Zhang, L-X.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: 1) To assess patient delay among new smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) patients in accessing health services in seven FIDELIS (Fund for Innovative DOTS Expansion through Local Initiatives to Stop TB) projects from 2003 to 2008 in China; 2) to compare treatment delay by province; and 3) to assess factors associated with delay. Method: Records of new smear-positive PTB patients were reviewed. Data sources were the consultation book, laboratory register, patient record, treatment card and the PWLAHS (people with limited access to health services) evaluation form. Data were collected using a standard questionnaire, cross-checked by staff from the sites and by the International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease (The Union) and analysed by The Union. Results: Of the 75 401 new smear-positive PTB patients included in the study, 63–89% were PWLAHS. The average gross domestic product of the project sites and at national level were respectively US$557 and US$998. The median patient delay was 93 days (range 68–128). Delays were longer among females, older patients, rural residents and PWLAHS. Delayed access to health services was significantly associated with a greater number of symptoms. Conclusion: Patient delay in accessing health care in China was lengthy; TB care and control needs to be improved. PMID:26400603

  10. Diabetes mellitus and tuberculosis: pattern of tuberculosis, two-month smear conversion and treatment outcomes in Guangzhou, China.

    PubMed

    Mi, Fengling; Tan, Shouyong; Liang, Li; Harries, Anthony D; Hinderaker, Sven G; Lin, Yan; Yue, Wentao; Chen, Xi; Liang, Bing; Gong, Fang; Du, Jian

    2013-11-01

    There is a high burden of both diabetes (DM) and tuberculosis (TB) in China. We evaluated the association between DM and the pattern of disease, 2-month sputum smear conversion and treatment outcomes of patients with TB in Guangzhou, China. All patients registered with TB from September 2011 to June 2012 were screened for DM and assessed for treatment outcomes in relation to presence or absence of DM and quality of DM control using patient registers, treatment cards and electronic record systems. There were 1589 patients with TB of whom 189 (12%) had DM. Among those with DM, there was a significantly higher proportion of men, persons aged 35 years and older and persons with smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) (P < 0.01). In patients with DM and new smear-positive PTB, there was a higher proportion who had positive sputum smears at 2 months (21.7% vs. 5.6%, RR 3.85, 95%CI 2.24-6.63), who were lost-to-follow-up (5.2% vs. 1.7%, RR 3.23, 95%CI 1.08-9.63) and who failed treatment (10.3% vs. 2.3%, RR 4.46, 95%CI 1.96-10.18) compared with patients who had no DM. There was no significant association between these adverse outcomes and DM control as measured by 2 and 6-month fasting blood glucose. Diabetes mellitus in new smear-positive patients with PTB was associated with failure to sputum smear convert at 2 months and adverse treatment outcomes of loss-to-follow-up and failure. Further research is needed to understand the reasons for these findings and to determine whether the current length of treatment of 6 months is adequate. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Treatment outcome of tuberculosis patients at Gondar University Teaching Hospital, Northwest Ethiopia. A five - year retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Tessema, Belay; Muche, Abebe; Bekele, Assegedech; Reissig, Dieter; Emmrich, Frank; Sack, Ulrich

    2009-01-01

    Background In Gondar University Teaching Hospital standardized tuberculosis prevention and control programme, incorporating Directly Observed Treatment, Short Course (DOTS) started in 2000. According to the proposal of World Health Organization (WHO), treatment outcome is an important indicator of tuberculosis control programs. This study investigated the outcome of tuberculosis treatment at Gondar University Teaching Hospital in Northwest Ethiopia. Methods We analyzed the records of 4000 tuberculosis patients registered at Gondar University Teaching Hospital from September 2003 to May 2008. Treatment outcome and tuberculosis type were categorized according to the national tuberculosis control program guideline. Multivariate analysis using logistic regression model was used to analyse the association between treatment outcome and potential predictor variables. Results From the total of 4000 patients, tuberculosis type was categorized as extrapulmonary in 1133 (28.3%), smear negative pulmonary tuberculosis in 2196 (54.9%) and smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis in 671 (16.8%) cases. Of all patients, treatment outcome was classified as successfully treated in 1181(29.5%), defaulted in 730 (18.3%), died in 403 (10.1%), treatment failed in six (0.2%) and transferred out in 1680 (42.0%) patients. Males had the trend to be more likely to experience death or default than females, and the elderly were more likely to die than younger. The proportion of default rate was increased across the years from 97(9.2%) to 228(42.9%). Being female, age group 15-24 years, smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis and being urban resident were associated with higher treatment success rate. Conclusion The treatment success rate of tuberculosis patients was unsatisfactorily low (29.5%). A high proportion of patients died (10.1%) or defaulted (18.3%), which is a serious public health concern that needs to be addressed urgently. PMID:19799801

  12. Treatment outcome of tuberculosis patients at Gondar University Teaching Hospital, Northwest Ethiopia. A five--year retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Tessema, Belay; Muche, Abebe; Bekele, Assegedech; Reissig, Dieter; Emmrich, Frank; Sack, Ulrich

    2009-10-04

    In Gondar University Teaching Hospital standardized tuberculosis prevention and control programme, incorporating Directly Observed Treatment, Short Course (DOTS) started in 2000. According to the proposal of World Health Organization (WHO), treatment outcome is an important indicator of tuberculosis control programs. This study investigated the outcome of tuberculosis treatment at Gondar University Teaching Hospital in Northwest Ethiopia. We analyzed the records of 4000 tuberculosis patients registered at Gondar University Teaching Hospital from September 2003 to May 2008. Treatment outcome and tuberculosis type were categorized according to the national tuberculosis control program guideline. Multivariate analysis using logistic regression model was used to analyse the association between treatment outcome and potential predictor variables. From the total of 4000 patients, tuberculosis type was categorized as extrapulmonary in 1133 (28.3%), smear negative pulmonary tuberculosis in 2196 (54.9%) and smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis in 671 (16.8%) cases. Of all patients, treatment outcome was classified as successfully treated in 1181(29.5%), defaulted in 730 (18.3%), died in 403 (10.1%), treatment failed in six (0.2%) and transferred out in 1680 (42.0%) patients. Males had the trend to be more likely to experience death or default than females, and the elderly were more likely to die than younger. The proportion of default rate was increased across the years from 97(9.2%) to 228(42.9%). Being female, age group 15-24 years, smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis and being urban resident were associated with higher treatment success rate. The treatment success rate of tuberculosis patients was unsatisfactorily low (29.5%). A high proportion of patients died (10.1%) or defaulted (18.3%), which is a serious public health concern that needs to be addressed urgently.

  13. [Tuberculosis annual report 2009 --series 10. Treatment outcome and TB deaths].

    PubMed

    2012-05-01

    Evaluation of the treatment outcome by the cohort analysis method is an important part of tuberculosis (TB) control. In the Japanese TB surveillance system, the treatment outcome is automatically classified by computer according to a pre-set algorithm, so the treatment outcome is evaluated very rigidly. In the case of new sputum smear positive pulmonary TB cases (n = 8,999) newly notified in 2008, the patients' treatment outcomes based on the annual report 2009 database were as follows: "success," which combined "cured" and "completed," was 47.7%, "died" was 19.1%, "failed" was 1.1%, "defaulted" was 3.8%, "transferred out" was 2.8%, "on treatment after 12 months" was 11.8% and "not evaluated" was 13.6%. In addition to evaluation of the treatment outcome by the cohort method, the proportion of deaths was observed among all forms of TB patients (n = 24,571) who were newly registered in 2008. In total, 17.3% of all forms of TB cases died within one year after the beginning of treatment. The proportion corresponding to this was 23.7% for new sputum smear positive pulmonary TB and 23.5% for re-treatment sputum smear positive pulmonary TB. Among the new sputum smear positive pulmonary TB patients (n = 2,136) who died within one year after the beginning of treatment, 37.0% of them died within one month after the beginning of treatment, 51.6% died within two months and 61.9% died within three months.

  14. COBAS® TaqMan® MTB, smear positivity grade and MGIT culture; correlation analyses of three methods for bacillary quantification.

    PubMed

    Chikamatsu, Kinuyo; Aono, Akio; Kato, Tomoko; Takaki, Akiko; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Sasaki, Yuka; Izumi, Kiyohiko; Yi, Lina; Mitarai, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the correlation between the cycle threshold (Ct) value of the COBAS(®) TaqMan(®) MTB (TaqMan MTB), the mycobacterial smear positivity grade, and the time to detection (TTD) in the Mycobacteria Growth Indicator Tube (MGIT) for quantification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB). For 57 sputum samples, significant correlations were observed between the Ct value, the smear positivity grade, and the MGIT TTD (Spearman's rank correlation coefficient: r(s) = -0.940, P < 0.001 and Pearson's correlation coefficient: r(p) = 0.737, P < 0.001). In addition, a correlation was observed between the number of bacteria estimated based on the smear positivity grade and the number of MTB bacilli calculated by the Ct value (r(s) = 0.930, P < 0.001). This study has demonstrated the possible estimation of the smear positivity grade and MGIT TTD using the Ct value of TaqMan MTB, which is based on a real-time PCR system, for diagnostic samples.

  15. Treatment delay among tuberculosis patients in Tanzania: Data from the FIDELIS Initiative

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Several FIDELIS projects (Fund for Innovative DOTS Expansion through Local Initiatives to Stop TB) in Tanzania were conducted by the National Tuberculosis and Leprosy Programme (NTLP) during the years 2004-2008 to strengthen diagnostic and treatment services. These projects collected information on treatment delay and some of it was available for research purposes. With this database our objective was to assess the duration and determinants of treatment delay among new smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) patients in FIDELIS projects, and to compare delay according to provider visited prior to diagnosis. Methods Treatment delay among new smear positive TB patients was recorded for each patient at treatment initiation and this information was available and fairly complete in 6 out of 57 districts with FIDELIS projects enrolling patients between 2004 and 2007; other districts had discarded their forms at the time of analysis. It was analysed as a cross sectional study. Results We included 1161 cases, 10% of all patients recruited in the FIDELIS projects in Tanzania. Median delay was 12 weeks. The median duration of cough, weight loss and haemoptysis was 12, 8 and 3 weeks, respectively. Compared to Hai district Handeni had patients with longer delays and Mbozi had patients with shorter delays. Urban and rural patients reported similar delays. Patients aged 15-24 years and patients of 65 years or older had longer delays. Patients reporting contact with traditional healers before diagnosis had a median delay of 15 weeks compared to 12 weeks among those who did not. Patients with dyspnoea and with diarrhoea had longer delays. Conclusion In this patient sample in Tanzania half of the new smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis patients had a treatment delay longer than 12 weeks. Delay was similar in men and women and among urban and rural patients, but longer in the young and older age groups. Patients using traditional healers had a 25% longer median delay

  16. Characteristics and treatment response in patients with tuberculosis and diabetes mellitus in New Delhi, India.

    PubMed

    Khanna, A; Lohya, S; Sharath, B N; Harries, A D

    2013-11-04

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is known to increase the risk of tuberculosis (TB) and adversely affect TB treatment outcomes. A descriptive study was carried out in registered TB patients screened for DM at Lok Nayak Hospital, New Delhi, India. Of 458 TB patients, 66 (14%) had DM. In those with dual disease, age ≥40 years, smear-positive pulmonary TB and recurrent TB were significantly more common. There was no effect of DM on TB treatment outcomes, although there was a trend towards smear non-conversion at 2 months. Screening for DM works well, and certain patient characteristics are more common in those with dual disease.

  17. Does decentralisation of tuberculosis care influence treatment outcomes? The case of Oromia Region, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Raya, J.; Workineh, T.; Klinkenberg, E.; Enquselassie, F.

    2014-01-01

    Setting: Oromia Region, Ethiopia. Objective: To investigate the effect of decentralised care on anti-tuberculosis treatment outcomes and identify factors affecting outcome among new smear-positive tuberculosis (TB) patients. Design: This was a retrospective cohort study comparing patients treated in the community during the continuation phase with those managed throughout treatment in health facilities. Data were collected from TB registers and patient cards using a pre-tested data capture form. Results: Of the 2226 new smear-positive TB patients registered from July 2010 to June 2012 who were included in the study, 1599 (72.6%) received treatment in health facilities, and the rest in the community. Overall treatment success was 94.7%. Patients treated in the community had comparable treatment success with those managed in health facilities (aOR 1.7, 95%CI 0.80–3.57). Missing doses (OR 0.22, 95%CI 0.08–0.55), supervision during the continuation phase (OR 2.6, 95%CI 1.34–5.05), positive sputum at month 2 (OR 0.07, 95%CI 0.04–0.13) and human immunodeficiency virus infection (OR 0.25, 95%CI 0.13–0.46) were independent predictors of treatment success. Conclusion: Overall treatment success is high in new smear-positive TB patients in Oromia. Patients receiving treatment in the community during the continuation phase have treatment success comparable with that of patients managed in health facilities. PMID:26478507

  18. Directly Observed Treatment Short-course (DOTS) for tuberculosis control program in Gambella Regional State, Ethiopia: ten years experience.

    PubMed

    Sisay, Solomon; Mengistu, Belete; Erku, Woldaregay; Woldeyohannes, Desalegn

    2014-01-20

    Tuberculosis is still the leading cause of illness in the world which accounted for 2.5% of the global burden of disease, and 25% of all avoidable deaths in developing countries. The aim of study was to assess impact of DOTS strategy on tuberculosis case finding and treatment outcome in Gambella Regional State, Ethiopia from 2003 up to 2012 and from 2002 up to 2011, respectively. Health facility-based retrospective study was conducted. Data were collected and reported in quarterly basis using WHO reporting format for TB case finding and treatment outcome from all DOTS implementing health facilities in all zones of the region to Federal Ministry of Health. A total of 10024 all form of TB cases had been registered between the periods from 2003 up to 2012. Of them, 4100 (40.9%) were smear-positive pulmonary TB, 3164 (31.6%) were smear-negative pulmonary TB and 2760(27.5%) had extra-pulmonary TB. Case detection rate of smear-positive pulmonary TB had increased from 31.7% to 46.5% from the total TB cases and treatment success rate increased from 13% to 92% with average mean value of being 40.9% (SD = 0.1) and 55.7% (SD = 0.28), respectively for the specified year periods. Moreover, the average values of treatment defaulter and treatment failure rates were 4.2% and 0.3%, respectively. It is possible to achieve the recommended WHO target which is 70% of CDR for smear-positive pulmonary TB, and 85% of TSR as it was already been fulfilled the targets for treatments more than 85% from 2009 up to 2011 in the region. However, it requires strong efforts to enhance case detection rate of 40.9% for smear-positive pulmonary TB through implementing alternative case finding strategies.

  19. Community vs. facility-based directly observed treatment for tuberculosis in Tanzania's Kilimanjaro Region.

    PubMed

    van den Boogaard, J; Lyimo, R; Irongo, C F; Boeree, M J; Schaalma, H; Aarnoutse, R E; Kibiki, G S

    2009-12-01

    Kilimanjaro Region, northern Tanzania. To assess the effect of the introduction of the patient-centred tuberculosis treatment (PCT) approach-which allows tuberculosis (TB) patients to choose between community and facility-based directly observed treatment (DOT)-on treatment outcomes, and to analyse factors that contribute to opting for community DOT. Retrospective analysis of treatment outcomes of TB patients registered in the Kilimanjaro Region in 2007, differentiating between patients under community vs. facility-based DOT and taking into account demographic factors, disease classification, TB diagnosis and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) status. Data from 2769 TB patients were analysed. Treatment success rates were respectively 81% and 70% in patients under community vs. facility-based DOT (P < 0.001). Cure rates were respectively 73% and 72% in smear-positive pulmonary TB patients under community vs. facility-based DOT (P = 0.62). Women, children, patients residing in districts other than Hai, patients with newly diagnosed TB and patients with smear-negative pulmonary TB were most likely to be under community DOT. The PCT approach was shown to be effective in terms of treatment outcomes. Treatment success rates were higher in patients who opted for community DOT than in patients who chose facility-based DOT (all cases), and were similar in smear-positive pulmonary TB patients under community or facility-based DOT.

  20. Risk factors for tuberculosis treatment failure among pulmonary tuberculosis patients in four health regions of Burkina Faso, 2009: case control study

    PubMed Central

    Sawadogo, Bernard; Tint, Khin San; Tshimanga, Mufuta; Kuonza, Lazarus; Ouedraogo, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Introduction In Burkina Faso, the tuberculosis (TB) treatment failure rate increased from 2.5% in 2000 to 8.3% in 2006. The risk factors for TB treatment failure in the country are not well known. The study aims to determine the risk factors for treatment failure among pulmonary tuberculosis patients in four health region of Burkina Faso and to recommend appropriate interventions. Methods A case control study was conducted among pulmonary TB patients who began TB treatment in 2009. A case was any patient who remained smear-positive at fifth month of TB treatment and a control was a patient who tested smear-negative at fifth month of treatment. A structured questionnaire was administered to one hundred cases and one hundred controls to collect information on exposure factors. Odds ratio were calculated using bivariate and multivariate analysis to determine the association between exposures and outcome. Results Multivariate analysis showed that independent risk factors for TB treatment failure were fail to take TB drugs for more than 14 consecutive days (OR = 18.53; 95% CI:4.56 - 75.22), sputum smear-positive at two months of treatment (OR = 11.52; 95%CI:5.18-25.60), existence of comorbidity (OR = 5.74; 95%CI:1.69-19.44), and use of traditional medicines or herbs (OR = 2.97; 95%CI:1.12-7.85). Conclusion Early identification of patients with the above risk factors for intense case management will improve TB treatment outcome. Patient with smear positive at 2ndnd month of treatment require more intense follow-up, and involving traditional healers who provide traditional medicines or herbs in the educational programme on TB are required. The national referral laboratory capacity needs to be strengthened to do drug susceptibility testing and routine drug monitoring on cases of non conversion at 2nd month of treatment. PMID:26327989

  1. Social inclusion: An effort to end loss-to-treatment follow-up in tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Balakrishnan, S; Manikantan, J; Sreenivas, A; Jayasankar, S; Sunilkumar, M; Rakesh, P S; Karthickeyan, D S A; Mohandas, C R

    2015-10-01

    Pathanamthitta district is implementing Revised National Tuberculosis Control Program as a pilot district since 1993. The district programme was reporting approximately 5% of their diagnosed smear positive patients as never put on treatment (Initial lost to follow up - ILFU) and 5% of the new smear positive [NSP] Pulmonary TB patients as lost to follow up [LFU] during treatment. Attempts based on reengineering of DOTS were not largely successful in bringing down these proportions. A treatment support group [TSG] is a non-statutory body of socially responsible citizens and volunteers to provide social support to each needy TB patient safeguarding his dignity and confidentiality by ensuring access to information, free and quality services and social welfare programs, empowering the patient for making decision to complete treatment successfully. It is a complete fulfilment of social inclusion standards enumerated by Standards for TB Care in India. Pathanamthitta district started implementing this strategy since 2013. After intervention, proportion of LFU among NSPTB cases dropped markedly and no LFU were reported among the latest treatment cohorts. Proportion of ILFU keeps similar trend and none were reported among the latest diagnostic cohorts. Social support for TB care is feasible under routine program conditions. Addition of standards for social inclusion in STCI is meaningful. Its meaning is translated well by a society empowered with literacy and political sense. Copyright © 2015 Tuberculosis Association of India. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Active pulmonary tuberculosis: Role for amikacin in early treatment.

    PubMed

    Méchaï, F; Figoni, J; Leblanc, C; Gousseff, M; Vignier, N; Bouchaud, O

    2016-09-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of amikacin on sputum conversion during initial sputum smear positive tuberculosis treatment. Single-center observational cohort study (2012-2013) evaluating time to sputum smear conversion with standard treatment (ST) versus standard treatment+amikacin (IV 15mg/kg/day) for seven days (STamK). Forty-five patients were included. Median time to smear negative samples was 26.5 days (14-56) for the 30 (66.7%) patients included in the ST group and 48 days (19.5-69.5) for the 15 patients (33.3%) included in the STamK group (P=0.76). Time to negative culture was only known for 27 patients (61.4%): 47.5 days (26-58) for 18 patients in the ST group and 40 days (14-77) for nine patients in the STamK group. Despite our small sample size, the addition of amikacin in active tuberculosis treatment did not seem to impact time to smear conversion or period of contagiousness. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Tuberculosis Treatment and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Tuberculosis (TB) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Tuberculosis Basic TB Facts How TB Spreads Latent TB ...

  4. Influence of previous tuberculosis treatment history on acid-fast bacilli smear and culture conversion.

    PubMed

    Lee, J; Lee, B J; Yoon, H I; Lee, C-T; Lee, J H

    2012-10-01

    A teaching hospital in the Republic of Korea, 2003-2009. To evaluate the effect of previous tuberculosis (TB) treatment history on sputum smear and culture conversion. Data, including sputum acid-fast bacilli (AFB) results at baseline and at weeks 2, 4, 8, 12, 16, 20 and 24, were collected from patients with AFB sputum smear-positive and culture-confirmed pulmonary TB. Patients with multidrug-resistant TB or those with poor adherence were excluded. AFB conversion was compared between patients with a previous history of anti-tuberculosis treatment and those without. The median age of the 208 patients was 49.0 years; 58.3% were male, while 43 (20.7%) had a history of previous anti-tuberculosis treatment. Patients with a history of previous treatment had significantly lower sputum smear-negative conversion at 2 weeks of treatment compared with patients without (70.0% vs. 44.8%, P = 0.005). However, the two groups did not differ in culture conversion and in smear conversion at 4, 8, 12, 16, 20 and 24 weeks of anti-tuberculosis treatment. Patients with a history of previous anti-tuberculosis treatment are more likely to have positive sputum AFB smear at 2 weeks of treatment. However, sputum culture conversion is not affected by previous treatment history.

  5. [Tuberculosis annual report 2008--series 10. Treatment outcome and TB deaths].

    PubMed

    2010-08-01

    Evaluation of the outcome of treatment by the cohort analysis method is an important aspect of TB control. In the Japanese tuberculosis (TB) surveillance system, the outcome of treatment is automatically classified by computer according to the order of pre-set algorithm, so the treatment outcome is evaluated very rigidly. Although treatment outcomes are classified roughly into the eight categories of "cured", "completed", "died", "failed", "defaulted", "transferred", "still on treatment" and "not evaluated", there are actually 15 categories in our surveillance system; each category of "completed", "defaulted", and "still on treatment" has two subcategories and "not evaluated" has five subcategories. In the case of new sputum smear positive pulmonary cases (n=9,421) newly notified in 2007, their treatment outcome was as follows; "success" which combined "cured" and "completed" was 45.5%, "died" was 18.4%, "failed" was 1.0%, "defaulted" was 5.0%, "transferred" was 3.2%, "still on treatment" was 12.0% and "not evaluated" was 14.9%. Among the 5.0% who were classified as "defaulted", 0.7% was due to treatment interruption for more than consecutive 60 days or 2 months, and 4.3% was due to premature treatment cessation of any causes. The category "not evaluated" includes those who died before beginning treatment, those whose initial treatment regimen is unknown, those whose treatment is other than standard treatment, those who stopped INH and/or RFP before treatment completion, and those whose information is insufficient for classifying treatment outcome. In addition to evaluation of treatment outcome by the cohort method, the proportion of deaths was observed among all forms of TB patients (n = 25,184) and new sputum smear positive pulmonary patients (n=9421) who were newly registered in 2007. 16.4% of all forms of TB cases and 22.5% of new sputum smear positive pulmonary cases died within one year after beginning of treatment. Among new sputum smear positive pulmonary

  6. Treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis in China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L X

    1996-01-01

    During the past decade the number and gravity of tuberculosis (TB) cases has continued to increase, both in developing and industrialized nations. Coupled with the recent emergence of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB), the possibility that untreatable forms of the disease may become widespread has arisen. In China, the prevalence rate of smear-positive cases from three national surveys in 1979, 1984-1985 and 1990 was 187, 156 and 134/100,000, respectively, thus giving an annual average reduction rate of only 3.0%. This may be due to the accumulation of chronic cases, which is not surprising given that as many as 84.3% of new smear-positive cases received non-organized chemotherapy. To counteract this situation, a strategy was developed in Beijing to practice fully supervised chemotherapy for all new smear-positive cases. This is now 90% with a cure rate also of 90%. As a result, the prevalence rate of smear-positive cases has dropped, with an average annual reduction of 17%. Building upon this success, the World Bank Loan TB Control Project in China has been carried out in 12 provinces with 550 million people since 1992. The main objective of this project is to provide fully supervised, 6-month short-course chemotherapy for all newly detected smear-positive cases. The cure rate based on cohort analysis was 88% in 1993. Complete data are not available on resistance although the initial and acquired resistance rates were 28.1 and 41.1%, respectively. MDR-TB treated with ofloxacin has been increasing since 1992, with 317 cases reported during the period 1992-1995, of which 77% showed sputum conversion.

  7. [Total atalectasis of the left lung developing during the third month of treatment in a case of pulmonary tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Dalar, L; Karasulu, L; Sökücü, S; Düger, M; Altın, S

    2011-11-01

    Pulmonary tuberculosis and lung cancer are still important public health problems and can occur simultaneously. In this article, we present the case of a 38-year-old patient treated for smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis. During the third month of treatment, the patient developed respiratory distress and was found to have total atelectasis of the left lung. At rigid bronchoscopy, a lesion obstructing the left main bronchus was removed with a diode laser. Oncological treatment was started following the histological diagnosis of small cell bronchial carcinoma. Pulmonary tuberculosis and bronchial carcinoma can occur at the same time and cause diagnostic confusion. The possibility should be considered in situations where both diseases are endemic. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  8. Evaluation of genotype MTBDRplus VER 2.0 line probe assay for the detection of MDR-TB in smear positive and negative sputum samples.

    PubMed

    Meaza, Abyot; Kebede, Abebaw; Yaregal, Zelalem; Dagne, Zekarias; Moga, Shewki; Yenew, Bazezew; Diriba, Getu; Molalign, Helina; Tadesse, Mengistu; Adisse, Desalegn; Getahun, Muluwork; Desta, Kassu

    2017-04-17

    Multi drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) poses formidable challenges to TB control due to its complex diagnostic and treatment challenges and often associated with a high rate of mortality. Accurate and rapid detection of MDR-TB is critical for timely initiation of treatment. Line Probe Assay (LPA) is a qualitative in vitro diagnostic test based on DNA-STRIP technology for the identification of the M. tuberculosis complex and its resistance to rifampicin (RMP) and/or isoniazid (INH). Hain Lifescience, GmbH, Germany has improved the sensitivity of Genotype MTBDRplus VER 2.0 LPA for the detection of MDR-TB; with the possibility of applying the tool in smear negative sputum samples. A cross sectional study was conducted on 274 presumptive MDR-TB patients referred to the National TB Reference Laboratory (NTRL), Ethiopian Public Health Institute (EPHI) who submitted sputum samples for laboratory diagnosis of drug resistant-TB testing. Seventy-two smear and culture positive samples processed in smear positive direct LPA category and 197 smear negative sputum samples were processed for direct LPA. Among the smear negative samples 145 (73.6%) were culture negative and 26 (13.2%) were culture positive. All specimens were processed using NALC-NaOH method and ZN smear microscopy done from sediments. Genotype MTBDRplus VER 2.0 done from processed sputum sediments and the result was compared against the reference, BACTEC MGIT 960 culture and DST. Sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV of Genotype MTBDRplus VER 2.0 assay was determined and P-value <0.05 was considered as statistically significant. The sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV of Genotype MTBDRplus VER 2.0 LPA were 96.4, 100, 100 and 96.9%, respectively for the detection of MDR-TB from direct smear positive sputum samples. The sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV of Genotype MTBDR plus VER 2.0 LPA were 77.8, 97.2, 82.4 and 97.2%, respectively, for the detection of M. tuberculosis from direct smear negative sputum

  9. Natural History of Tuberculosis: Duration and Fatality of Untreated Pulmonary Tuberculosis in HIV Negative Patients: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Tiemersma, Edine W.; van der Werf, Marieke J.; Borgdorff, Martien W.; Williams, Brian G.; Nagelkerke, Nico J. D.

    2011-01-01

    Background The prognosis, specifically the case fatality and duration, of untreated tuberculosis is important as many patients are not correctly diagnosed and therefore receive inadequate or no treatment. Furthermore, duration and case fatality of tuberculosis are key parameters in interpreting epidemiological data. Methodology and Principal Findings To estimate the duration and case fatality of untreated pulmonary tuberculosis in HIV negative patients we reviewed studies from the pre-chemotherapy era. Untreated smear-positive tuberculosis among HIV negative individuals has a 10-year case fatality variously reported between 53% and 86%, with a weighted mean of 70%. Ten-year case fatality of culture-positive smear-negative tuberculosis was nowhere reported directly but can be indirectly estimated to be approximately 20%. The duration of tuberculosis from onset to cure or death is approximately 3 years and appears to be similar for smear-positive and smear-negative tuberculosis. Conclusions Current models of untreated tuberculosis that assume a total duration of 2 years until self-cure or death underestimate the duration of disease by about one year, but their case fatality estimates of 70% for smear-positive and 20% for culture-positive smear-negative tuberculosis appear to be satisfactory. PMID:21483732

  10. Impact of Community-Based DOT on Tuberculosis Treatment Outcomes: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, HaiYang; Ehiri, John; Yang, Huan; Tang, Shenglan; Li, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Background Poor adherence to tuberculosis (TB) treatment can lead to prolonged infectivity and poor treatment outcomes. Directly observed treatment (DOT) seeks to improve adherence to TB treatment by observing patients while they take their anti-TB medication. Although community-based DOT (CB-DOT) programs have been widely studied and promoted, their effectiveness has been inconsistent. The aim of this study was to critical appraise and summarize evidence of the effects of CB-DOT on TB treatment outcomes. Methods Studies published up to the end of February 2015 were identified from three major international literature databases: Medline/PubMed, EBSCO, and EMBASE. Unpublished data from the grey literature were identified through Google and Google Scholar searches. Results Seventeen studies involving 12,839 pulmonary TB patients (PTB) in eight randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and nine cohort studies from 12 countries met the criteria for inclusion in this review and 14 studies were included in meta-analysis. Compared with clinic-based DOT, pooled results of RCTs for all PTB cases (including smear-negative or -positive, new or retreated TB cases) and smear-positive PTB cases indicated that CB-DOT promoted successful treatment [pooled RRs (95%CIs): 1.11 (1.02–1.19) for all PTB cases and 1.11 (1.02–1.19) for smear-positive PTB cases], and completed treatment [pooled RRs (95%CIs): 1.74(1.05, 2.90) for all PTB cases and 2.22(1.16, 4.23) for smear-positive PTB cases], reduced death [pooled RRs (95%CIs): 0.44 (0.26–0.72) for all PTB cases and 0.39 (0.23–0.66) for smear-positive PTB cases], and transfer out [pooled RRs (95%CIs): 0.37 (0.23–0.61) for all PTB cases and 0.42 (0.25–0.70) for smear-positive PTB cases]. Pooled results of all studies (RCTs and cohort studies) with all PTB cases demonstrated that CB-DOT promoted successful treatment [pooled RR (95%CI): 1.13 (1.03–1.24)] and curative treatment [pooled RR (95%CI): 1.24 (1.04–1.48)] compared with

  11. Improving access to tuberculosis preventive therapy and treatment for children.

    PubMed

    Marais, Ben J

    2017-03-01

    Children suffer a huge burden of disease in tuberculosis (TB) endemic countries. This disease burden was largely invisible when TB control programmes focused exclusively on adults with sputum smear-positive disease. High-level advocacy and better data have improved visibility, but the establishment of functional paediatric TB programmes remains challenging. The key issues that limit children's access to TB preventive therapy and treatment in endemic areas are briefly discussed. Barriers to preventive therapy include (1) the perceived inability to rule out active disease, (2) fear of creating drug resistance, (3) non-implementation of existing guidelines in the absence of adequate monitoring, and (4) poor adherence with long preventive therapy courses. Barriers to TB treatment include (1) perceived diagnostic difficulties, (2) non-availability of chest radiography, (3) young children presenting to unprepared maternal and child health (MCH) services, and (4) the absence of child-friendly formulations. With drug-resistant disease there is currently no guidance on the use of preventive therapy and treatment is usually restricted to cases with bacteriologically confirmed disease, which excludes most young children from care, even if their likely source case has documented drug-resistant TB. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. Time to initiation of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis treatment and its relation with outcome in a high incidence district in Lima, Peru.

    PubMed

    Otero, L; De Orbegoso, A; Navarro, A F; Ríos, J; Párraga, T; Gotuzzo, E; Seas, C; Van der Stuyft, P

    2015-03-01

    To determine the time from diagnosis to start of multidrug resistant tuberculosis (MDR TB) treatment in Lima, Peru. We studied new smear-positive TB adults that were started on MDR TB treatment or that were switched to it between June 2008 and December 2011. Time from the first positive smear to MDR-TB treatment was >30 days in 35% (13/37) of patients. Among the 27% (24/88) of patients that switched to MDR-TB treatment, time from the last dose of a drug-susceptible regimen was >30 days. Start of and switching to MDR TB treatment is still delayed. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Plasma drug activity assay for treatment optimization in tuberculosis patients.

    PubMed

    Heysell, Scott K; Mtabho, Charles; Mpagama, Stellah; Mwaigwisya, Solomon; Pholwat, Suporn; Ndusilo, Norah; Gratz, Jean; Aarnoutse, Rob E; Kibiki, Gibson S; Houpt, Eric R

    2011-12-01

    Low antituberculosis (TB) drug levels are common, but their clinical significance remains unclear, and methods of measurement are resource intensive. Subjects initiating treatment for sputum smear-positive pulmonary TB were enrolled from Kibong'oto National TB Hospital, Tanzania, and levels of isoniazid, rifampin, ethambutol, and pyrazinamide were measured at the time of typical peak plasma concentration (C(2 h)). To evaluate the significance of the effect of observed drug levels on Mycobacterium tuberculosis growth, a plasma TB drug activity (TDA) assay was developed using the Bactec MGIT system. Time to detection of plasma-cocultured M. tuberculosis versus time to detection of control growth was defined as a TDA ratio. TDA assays were later performed using the subject's own M. tuberculosis isolate and C(2 h) plasma from the Tanzanian cohort and compared to drug levels and clinical outcomes. Sixteen subjects with a mean age of 37.8 years ± 10.7 were enrolled. Fourteen (88%) had C(2 h) rifampin levels and 11 (69%) had isoniazid levels below 90% of the lower limit of the expected range. Plasma spiked with various concentrations of antituberculosis medications found TDA assay results to be unaffected by ethambutol or pyrazinamide. Yet with a range of isoniazid and rifampin concentrations, TDA exhibited a statistically significant correlation with drug level and drug MIC, and a TDA of ~1.0 indicated the presence of multidrug-resistant TB. In Tanzania, low (≤ 2.0) TDA was significantly associated with both lower isoniazid and rifampin C(2 h) levels, and very low (≤ 1.5) TDA corresponded to a trend toward lack of cure. Study of TDA compared to additional clinical outcomes and as a therapeutic management tool is warranted.

  14. Burden of tuberculosis in Kampala, Uganda.

    PubMed Central

    Guwatudde, David; Zalwango, Sarah; Kamya, Moses R.; Debanne, Sara M.; Diaz, Mireya I.; Okwera, Alphonse; Mugerwa, Roy D.; King, Charles; Whalen, Christopher C.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence and incidence of tuberculosis in one of Uganda's poor peri-urban areas. METHODS: Multi-stage sampling was used to select a sample of households whose members were evaluated for presence of signs and/or symptoms of active tuberculosis; history of tuberculosis treatment; and relevant demographic, socioeconomic, and household environment characteristics. Patients with suspected tuberculosis underwent standardized evaluation for active disease. FINDINGS: A sample of 263 households with 1142 individuals was evaluated. Nineteen people were classified as having had tuberculosis during the one-year reference period (May 2001-April 2002): nine (47%) cases already had been diagnosed through the health care system, while 10 cases (53%) were diagnosed through the survey. The prevalences for all forms of tuberculosis and for sputum smear-positive tuberculosis were 14.0 (95% confidence interval (CI) 7.8-20.3) and 4.4 (CI = 0.83-7.89) per thousand, respectively. The incidences for all forms of tuberculosis and for sputum smear-positive tuberculosis were 9.2 (CI = 3.97-14.4) and 3.7 (CI = 0.39-6.95) per thousand per year, respectively. CONCLUSION: The rate of tuberculosis in this peri-urban community was exceptionally high and may be underestimated by current surveillance systems. The need for interventions aimed at reducing tuberculosis transmission in this, and other similar communities with high case rates, is urgent. PMID:14758406

  15. Profile and response to anti-tuberculosis treatment among elderly tuberculosis patients treated under the TB Control programme in South India.

    PubMed

    Velayutham, Banu Rekha Vaithilingam; Nair, Dina; Chandrasekaran, Vedachalam; Raman, Balambal; Sekar, Gomathy; Watson, Basilea; Charles, Niruparani; Malaisamy, Muniyandi; Thomas, Aleyamma; Swaminathan, Soumya

    2014-01-01

    The demographic transition in India has resulted in an increase in the elderly population. There is limited data on the profile of elderly tuberculosis (TB) patients and their treatment outcomes in India. To compare the clinical profile, presentation and response to anti-TB treatment among elderly (≥ 60 yrs) and younger (15-59 yrs) TB patients treated under the Revised National TB Control programme. Retrospective cohort analysis of TB patients treated from May 1999 to December 2004 in one Tuberculosis Unit of Tiruvallur district, South India. Records of 865 elderly and 4343 younger TB patients were examined: elderly were more likely to be male (84% vs. 71%), smokers (46% vs.37%), illiterate (63% vs. 45%), identified by active case finding through survey (19% vs. 11%), have pulmonary TB (96% vs. 91%) and initial smear negative disease (46% vs. 36%) compared to younger (for all p<0.001). Among a total of 352 elderly and 1933 younger new smear positive pulmonary TB, the elderly had higher loss to follow-up (15% vs. 11%; p = 0.03) and death rates (9% vs. 4%; p<0.001). Mycobacterium tuberculosis susceptibility to first line anti-TB drugs did not differ (elderly 87% vs. younger 84%) (p = 0.20). Side effects related to anti-TB drugs were reported by a higher proportion of elderly patients (63% vs. 54%) (p = 0.005). Previously treated patients had similar treatment outcomes in both the groups. Elderly TB patients are less likely to have smear positive disease. Newly diagnosed elderly TB patients are more likely to be lost to follow-up or die and report drug side effects. Suitable interventions need to be developed for effective management and better treatment outcomes of TB in the elderly.

  16. The rationale for recommending fixed-dose combination tablets for treatment of tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Blomberg, B.; Spinaci, S.; Fourie, B.; Laing, R.

    2001-01-01

    There is considerable exigency to take all necessary steps to cure tuberculosis cases and prevent further emergence of drug-resistant tuberculosis. The most important of these steps is to ensure that the treatment, particularly of sputum smear-positive cases, is adequate and that patients adhere to their treatment by supervised, direct observation of drug-taking according to the standardized regimens. Use of fixed-dose combinations (FDCs) of tablets against tuberculosis is now being recommended by WHO and the International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease (IUATLD) as an additional step to ensuring proper treatment. FDCs simplify the prescription of drugs and the management of drug supply, and may also limit the risk of drug-resistant tuberculosis arising as a result of inappropriate drug selection and monotherapy. Only FDCs of proven quality and proven rifampicin bioavailability should be purchased and used. In most situations, blood levels of the drugs are inadequate because of poor drug quality rather than poor absorption. This is true irrespective of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection status of the tuberculosis patients (other than those with overt acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, with CD4 counts < 200 cells/mm3). Currently, WHO, IUATLD and their partners are developing strategies for ensuring that only quality FDCs are used in tuberculosis programmes. A simplified and effective protocol for assessment of rifampicin bioavailability has been developed, and laboratories are being recruited to form a supranational network for quality assurance of FDCs. Standardization of FDC drug formulations has been proposed, which limits rifampicin-containing preparations to nine (including a four-drug FDC and three paediatric FDCs). PMID:11217670

  17. Directly observed treatment short-course (DOTS) for treatment of new tuberculosis cases in Somali Regional State, Eastern Ethiopia: ten years retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Woldeyohannes, Desalegn; Sisay, Solomon; Mengistu, Belete; Kassa, Hiwot

    2015-08-19

    A third of the world population is infected with tuberculosis (TB) bacilli. TB accounts for 25% of all avoidable deaths in developing countries. The objective of the study was to assess impact of directly observed treatment short-course (DOTS) strategy on new tuberculosis case finding and treatment outcomes in Somali Regional State, Ethiopia from 2003 up to 2012 and from 2004 up to 2013, respectively. A health facility based retrospective study was employed. Quarterly reports were collected using World Health Organization (WHO) reporting format for TB case finding and treatment outcome from all zones in the region to the Federal Ministry of Health. A total of 31, 198 all types of new TB cases were registered and reported during the period from 2003 up to 2012, in the region. Out of these, smear positive pulmonary TB cases were 12,466 (40%), and 10,537 (33.8%) and 8195 (26.2%) for smear negative pulmonary TB and extra-pulmonary TB cases, respectively. An average case detection rate (CDR) of 19.1% (SD 3.6) and treatment success rate (TSR) of 85.5% (SD 5.0) for smear positive pulmonary TB were reported for the specified years period. For the overall study period, trend chi-squire analysis for CDR was X(2) = 2.1; P > 0.05 and X(2) = 5.64; P < 0.05 for TSR. The recommended TSR set by WHO was achieved (85.5%) and the CDR reported was far below (19.1%) from the recommended target. Extensive efforts should be established to maintain the achieved TSR and to increase the low CDR for the smear positive pulmonary TB cases through implementing alternative case finding strategies.

  18. [Tuberculosis control].

    PubMed

    Schoch, Otto

    2011-07-01

    Tuberculosis control activities focus on identification and treatment of sputum smear positive tuberculosis patients. As soon as these patients can be treated, they not only have an optimal chance for cure, they also no longer spread Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) in the community. Screening is a systematic search for tuberculosis disease, often performed by radiological or by sputum smear examinations. On the other hand, Screening for Infection with M.tb is with immunological tests. Persons infected with M.tb have an increased risk to develop active tuberculosis in the future. Screening for infection is recommended in tuberculosis contact tracing and in several risk groups for the progression to tuberculosis disease, specifically before the start of immunosuppressive therapy with tumor necrosis factor antagonists or in transplant recipients. Several immunological tests are available. If compared to the traditional in vivo Mantoux tuberculin skin test, in vitro blood tests called Interferon Gamma Release Assays (IGRA) are more specific because the cell wall antigens used for the tests are not present in the wall of Bacille Calmitte Guerin BCG and most atypical mycobacteria. Another advantage of IGRA is the mitogen positive control, which detects unreliable tests in immunodeficiency. Persons found to be infected with M.tb are treated with prophylactic isoniacid for 9 months.

  19. Impact of tuberculosis treatment on health-related quality of life of pulmonary tuberculosis patients: a follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background At present, much of the attention within tuberculosis (TB) management is spent on microbiological cure, and its impact on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) is either undervalued or seldom considered. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of TB treatment on HRQoL of new smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) patients. Moreover, we also aimed to determine whether the selected socio-demographic and clinical variables were predictive of variability in the HRQoL scores over time. Methods This was a prospective follow-up of new smear positive PTB patients who were diagnosed at the chest clinic of Penang General Hospital between March 2010 and February 2011. All eligible patients (i.e., a new case of smear positive PTB, literate and aged 18 years or above) were asked to self-complete the SF-36v2 questionnaire at the start of their treatment, and then subsequently after the intensive phase and at the end of the treatment. A score on a health domain or component summary measure that was less than 47 norm-based scoring (NBS) point was considered indicative of impaired function within that health domain or dimension. Likewise, an individual having mental component summary (MCS) score ≤ 42 NBS point was considered to be at the risk of depression. Repeated measures ANOVA test was performed to examine how the summary scores varied over time, and to determine whether independent variables were predictive of variability in the physical component summary (PCS) and MCS scores over time. Results A total of 216 patients completed the SF-36v2 questionnaire at the start of their treatment. Out of these, 177 and 153 completed the questionnaire at the second and third follow-ups, respectively. The mean PCS scores at the start of the treatment, after the intensive phase and at the end of treatment were 41.9 (SD 5.1), 45.8 (SD 4.8) and 46.0 (SD 6.9), respectively. Similarly, the mean MCS scores at the start of the treatment, after the intensive phase

  20. Health extension workers improve tuberculosis case detection and treatment success in southern Ethiopia: a community randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Datiko, Daniel G; Lindtjørn, Bernt

    2009-01-01

    One of the main strategies to control tuberculosis (TB) is to find and treat people with active disease. Unfortunately, the case detection rates remain low in many countries. Thus, we need interventions to find and treat sufficient number of patients to control TB. We investigated whether involving health extension workers (HEWs: trained community health workers) in TB control improved smear-positive case detection and treatment success rates in southern Ethiopia. We carried out a community-randomized trial in southern Ethiopia from September 2006 to April 2008. Fifty-one kebeles (with a total population of 296, 811) were randomly allocated to intervention and control groups. We trained HEWs in the intervention kebeles on how to identify suspects, collect sputum, and provide directly observed treatment. The HEWs in the intervention kebeles advised people with productive cough of 2 weeks or more duration to attend the health posts. Two hundred and thirty smear-positive patients were identified from the intervention and 88 patients from the control kebeles. The mean case detection rate was higher in the intervention than in the control kebeles (122.2% vs 69.4%, p<0.001). In addition, more females patients were identified in the intervention kebeles (149.0 vs 91.6, p<0.001). The mean treatment success rate was higher in the intervention than in the control kebeles (89.3% vs 83.1%, p = 0.012) and more for females patients (89.8% vs 81.3%, p = 0.05). The involvement of HEWs in sputum collection and treatment improved smear-positive case detection and treatment success rate, possibly because of an improved service access. This could be applied in settings with low health service coverage and a shortage of health workers. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00803322.

  1. Health Extension Workers Improve Tuberculosis Case Detection and Treatment Success in Southern Ethiopia: A Community Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Datiko, Daniel G.; Lindtjørn, Bernt

    2009-01-01

    Background One of the main strategies to control tuberculosis (TB) is to find and treat people with active disease. Unfortunately, the case detection rates remain low in many countries. Thus, we need interventions to find and treat sufficient number of patients to control TB. We investigated whether involving health extension workers (HEWs: trained community health workers) in TB control improved smear-positive case detection and treatment success rates in southern Ethiopia. Methodology/Principal Finding We carried out a community-randomized trial in southern Ethiopia from September 2006 to April 2008. Fifty-one kebeles (with a total population of 296, 811) were randomly allocated to intervention and control groups. We trained HEWs in the intervention kebeles on how to identify suspects, collect sputum, and provide directly observed treatment. The HEWs in the intervention kebeles advised people with productive cough of 2 weeks or more duration to attend the health posts. Two hundred and thirty smear-positive patients were identified from the intervention and 88 patients from the control kebeles. The mean case detection rate was higher in the intervention than in the control kebeles (122.2% vs 69.4%, p<0.001). In addition, more females patients were identified in the intervention kebeles (149.0 vs 91.6, p<0.001). The mean treatment success rate was higher in the intervention than in the control kebeles (89.3% vs 83.1%, p = 0.012) and more for females patients (89.8% vs 81.3%, p = 0.05). Conclusions/Significance The involvement of HEWs in sputum collection and treatment improved smear-positive case detection and treatment success rate, possibly because of an improved service access. This could be applied in settings with low health service coverage and a shortage of health workers. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00803322 PMID:19424460

  2. [The development of tuberculosis control and tuberculosis epidemiology in East Germany].

    PubMed

    Steinbrück, P

    1983-01-01

    The fight against tuberculosis in the German Democratic Republic was performed from the very beginning as a task of the state and the society; it was developed according to the progress of economic possibilities and the epidemiological situation. The contribution of the community and of the social-economic development on tuberculosis epidemiology has proved to be decisively important factors in tuberculosis control. The specific methods applied in tuberculosis control in the course of more than 30 years have changed in their importance effectiveness and efficiency with the reduction of the tuberculosis problem and the development of new techniques. Therefore a continuous evaluation of the tuberculosis situation is necessary to recognize the most effective approach. By reducing the estimated annual infection rate to less than 0.05%, the incidence of smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis to less than 5/100,000 and the practical disappearance of tuberculosis among children tuberculosis has become an endemic localized disease among predominantly old citizens. People's mass x-ray examinations have considerably lost their value for finding tuberculosis. Early coverage and examination of persons with respiratory symptoms (21-days-coughers), of contact persons and high risk groups will determine the future activities of the chest clinics. Their integration into the system of outpatient clinics and the system of primary health care were an important step on this way. Successful treatment of each case of tuberculosis is now possible and must be attained. Early case finding + treatment considered as an united activity has become the decisively important measure in the control of tuberculosis. The endemic foci of tuberculosis in some communities have to be surveyed and eliminated with priority. Moreover, the cooperation of all physicians of public health is necessary. Only by this way tuberculosis can be eradicated in GDR in a defined time. (Aim of WHO and IUaT: 1 case of

  3. Substitution of rifapentine for rifampin during intensive phase treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis: study 29 of the tuberculosis trials consortium.

    PubMed

    Dorman, Susan E; Goldberg, Stefan; Stout, Jason E; Muzanyi, Grace; Johnson, John L; Weiner, Marc; Bozeman, Lorna; Heilig, Charles M; Feng, Pei-Jean; Moro, Ruth; Narita, Masahiro; Nahid, Payam; Ray, Susan; Bates, Edward; Haile, Betial; Nuermberger, Eric L; Vernon, Andrew; Schluger, Neil W

    2012-10-01

    Rifapentine administered 5 days per week has potent activity in mouse models of antituberculosis chemotherapy, but efficacy and safety data are limited in humans. We compared the antimicrobial activity and safety of rifapentine vs rifampin during the first 8 weeks of pulmonary tuberculosis treatment. In total, 531 adults with sputum smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis were randomized to rifapentine 10 mg/kg/dose or rifampin 10 mg/kg/dose, administered 5 days per week for 8 weeks (intensive phase), with isoniazid, pyrazinamide, and ethambutol. Coprimary outcomes were negative sputum culture on liquid and on solid media at completion of intensive phase. Negative cultures on solid media occurred in 145 of 174 participants (83.3%) in the rifampin group and 171 of 198 participants (86.4%) in the rifapentine group (difference, 3.0%; 95% confidence interval [CI]: -4.3, 10.5); negative cultures in liquid media occurred in 110 of 169 (65.1%) in the rifampin group and 133 of 196 (67.9%) in the rifapentine group (difference, 2.8%; 95% CI: -6.9, 12.4). Among 529 participants who received study therapy, 40 of 254 participants (15.7%) in the rifampin group and 40 of 275 participants (14.5%) in the rifapentine group prematurely discontinued treatment (P=.79). The rifapentine regimen was safe but not significantly more active than a standard rifampin regimen, by the surrogate endpoint of culture status at completion of intensive phase. Assessment of higher exposures to rifapentine for tuberculosis treatment is warranted. NCT00694629.

  4. Treatment default and death among tuberculosis patients in Hunan, China.

    PubMed

    Abuaku, Benjamin; Tan, Hongzhuan; Li, Xingli; Chen, Mengshi; Huang, Xin

    2010-04-01

    We used the 2005 and 2006 national surveillance data to elucidate some of the risk factors for treatment default and death among tuberculosis (TB) patients in Hunan, China. Risk of default was higher in males (odds ratio (OR) 1.25; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.08, 1.44); lowest in patients aged 15-24 y (OR 0.60; 95% CI 0.49, 0.75), and generally increased with increasing age; lower in patients living in cities with per capita gross domestic product (GDP) of less than 1000 US$ (OR 0.60, 95% CI 0.49, 0.72), and increased with increasing per capita GDP of city of residence; and higher in patients with previously treated smear-positive pulmonary TB (diagnostic category II according to the World Health Organization definition; OR 1.99; 95% CI 1.22, 3.23). Risk of death was lowest in patients aged 15-24 y (OR 0.07; 95% CI 0.05, 0.10), and increased with increasing age; lower in new cases (OR 0.50; 95% CI 0.33, 0.76); and highest in patients who treated themselves (OR 3.47; 95% CI 1.27, 9.46). We conclude that male TB patients, elderly TB patients, patients resident in cities with higher per capita GDP, and patients receiving category II treatment need special attention to reduce TB treatment default in the province. Furthermore, elderly TB patients and patients with a long history of TB need special attention to reduce mortality. Self-treatment also needs to be discouraged to reduce mortality.

  5. The treatment of tuberculosis in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Seung, K J; Bai, G H; Kim, S J; Lew, W J; Park, S K; Kim, J Y

    2003-10-01

    South Korea's complex system of tuberculosis control has never been fully described. The prevalence of tuberculosis has dropped dramatically since 1965, partly because of farsighted governmental policy that provided low-cost, accessible tuberculosis treatment to the entire population. Within the tuberculosis control system, public and private sector entities provide a wide variety of treatment options. The National Tuberculosis Program focuses on improving cure rates for new cases, while the private sector has taken more of a role in the treatment of drug-resistant tuberculosis and other types of complicated cases. There has been a decrease in drug-resistant tuberculosis since 1980 for multiple reasons, including increased cure rates from the introduction of rifampin-based regimens, improved nutrition and living standards, and the treatment of drug-resistant cases in the private sector. Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis, however, still poses a significant threat to public health. The limited outcomes data that exist in South Korea for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis treatment suggest that cure rates are low and failure and abandonment rates are high. New public health measures are needed to improve the control of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis.

  6. Short-term and long-term outcomes following DOTS-based treatment for tuberculosis patients in Burkina Faso.

    PubMed

    Doulougou, B; Kouanda, S; Nikiéma, L; Ouédraogo, G; Tiendrébeogo, S; Sondo, B; Greenwell, F; Salomon, J A

    2012-03-21

    A cross-sectional study was initiated in Burkina Faso's National Tuberculosis Programme to confirm successful treatment results within 3 months of completing treatment and to characterise longer-term outcomes 12-24 months after completion. The sample (n = 278) included 91 patients who had completed treatment 0-3 months earlier ('short-term' sample) and 187 patients who had completed treatment 12-24 months earlier ('long-term' sample). All sputum specimens from the short-term sample were confirmed as negative. In the long-term sample, among 154 patients with available information, 13 (8%) had died, 24 were not traced, and 117 (76%) were interviewed and had sputum examinations, of which 2 (2%) were smear-positive. Recording of successful treatment outcomes shows good validity.

  7. DOTS-based tuberculosis treatment and control during civil conflict and an HIV epidemic, Churachandpur District, India.

    PubMed Central

    Rodger, Alison J.; Toole, Mike; Lalnuntluangi, Baby; Muana, V.; Deutschmann, Peter

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To pilot the WHO guidelines on DOTS for tuberculosis (TB) among displaced people affected by conflict in Churachandpur District, Manipur State, north-east India, which has endured an HIV epidemic, injecting drug use, civil unrest, high levels of TB, and poor TB treatment and prevention services for many years. METHODS: Prerequisites for TB control programmes were established. WHO guidelines and protocols were adapted for local use. Outreach workers were appointed from each ethnic group involved in the conflict, and training was conducted. Quality control and evaluation processes were introduced. FINDINGS: TB was diagnosed in 178 people between June and December 1998. Of the 170 with pulmonary disease, 85 were smear-positive. Successful outcomes were recorded in 91% of all patients and in 86% of smear-positive cases of pulmonary TB. The default rate and the mortality rate were low at 3% each. HIV positive serostatus was the only factor associated with a poor treatment outcome. CONCLUSION: TB treatment and control were possible in a conflict setting and WHO targets for cure were attainable. The factors associated with the success of the programme were strong local community support, the selection of outreach workers from each ethnic group to allow access to all areas and patients, the use of directly observed therapy three times a week instead of daily in the interest of increased safety, and the limiting of distances travelled by both outreach workers and patients. PMID:12132001

  8. Directly Observed Therapy and Improved Tuberculosis Treatment Outcomes in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Anuwatnonthakate, Amornrat; Limsomboon, Pranom; Nateniyom, Sriprapa; Wattanaamornkiat, Wanpen; Komsakorn, Sittijate; Moolphate, Saiyud; Chiengsorn, Navarat; Kaewsa-ard, Samroui; Sombat, Potjaman; Siangphoe, Umaporn; Mock, Philip A.; Varma, Jay K.

    2008-01-01

    Background The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends that tuberculosis (TB) patients receive directly observed therapy (DOT). Randomized controlled trials have not consistently shown that this practice improves TB treatment success rates. In Thailand, one of 22 WHO-designated high burden TB countries, patients may have TB treatment observed by a health care worker (HCW), family member, or no one. We studied whether DOT improved TB treatment outcomes in a prospective, observational cohort. Methods and Findings We prospectively collected epidemiologic data about TB patients treated at public and private facilities in four provinces in Thailand and the national infectious diseases hospital from 2004–2006. Public health staff recorded the type of observed therapy that patients received during the first two months of TB treatment. We limited our analysis to pulmonary TB patients never previously treated for TB and not known to have multidrug-resistant TB. We analyzed the proportion of patients still on treatment at the end of two months and with treatment success at the end of treatment according to DOT type. We used propensity score analysis to control for factors associated with DOT and treatment outcome. Of 8,031 patients eligible for analysis, 24% received HCW DOT, 59% family DOT, and 18% self-administered therapy (SAT). Smear-positive TB was diagnosed in 63%, and 21% were HIV-infected. Of patients either on treatment or that defaulted at two months, 1601/1636 (98%) patients that received HCW DOT remained on treatment at two months compared with 1096/1268 (86%) patients that received SAT (adjusted OR [aOR] 3.8; 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.4–6.0) and 3782/3987 (95%) patients that received family DOT (aOR 2.1; CI, 1.4–3.1). Of patients that had treatment success or that defaulted at the end of treatment, 1369/1477 (93%) patients that received HCW DOT completed treatment compared with 744/1074 (69%) patients that received SAT (aOR 3.3; CI, 2.4–4.5) and

  9. Relationship between Nutritional Support and Tuberculosis Treatment Outcomes in West Bengal, India

    PubMed Central

    Samuel, Blesson; Volkmann, Tyson; Cornelius, Sushma; Mukhopadhay, Sugata; MejoJose; Mitra, Kaushik; Kumar, Ajay M. V.; Oeltmann, John E.; Parija, Sidhajyoti; Prabhakaran, Aslesh Ottapura; Moonan, Patrick K.; Chadha, Vineet K.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Poverty and poor nutrition are associated with the risk of developing tuberculosis (TB). Socioeconomic factors may interfere with anti-tuberculosis treatment compliance and its outcome. We examined whether providing nutritional support (monthly supply of rice and lentil beans) to TB patients who live below the poverty line was associated with TB treatment outcome. Methods This was a retrospective cohort study of sputum smear-positive pulmonary TB patients living below the poverty line (income of <$1.25 per day) registered for anti-tuberculosis treatment in two rural districts of West Bengal, India during 2012 to 2013. We compared treatment outcomes among patients who received nutritional support with those who did not. A log-binomial regression model was used to assess the relation between nutritional support and unsuccessful treatment outcome (loss-to-follow-up, treatment failure and death). Results Of 173 TB patients provided nutritional support, 15 (9%) had unsuccessful treatment outcomes, while 84 (21%) of the 400 not provided nutrition support had unsuccessful treatment outcomes (p < 0.001). After adjusting for age, sex and previous treatment, those who received nutritional support had a 50% reduced risk of unsuccessful treatment outcome than those who did not receive nutritional support (Relative Risk: 0.51; 95% Confidence Intervals: 0.30 - 0.86). Conclusion Under programmatic conditions, monthly rations of rice and lentils were associated with lower risk of unsuccessful treatment outcome among impoverished TB patients. Given the relatively small financial commitment needed per patient ($10 per patient per month), the national TB programme should consider scaling up nutritional support among TB patients living below the poverty line. PMID:28042591

  10. Relationship between Nutritional Support and Tuberculosis Treatment Outcomes in West Bengal, India.

    PubMed

    Samuel, Blesson; Volkmann, Tyson; Cornelius, Sushma; Mukhopadhay, Sugata; MejoJose; Mitra, Kaushik; Kumar, Ajay M V; Oeltmann, John E; Parija, Sidhajyoti; Prabhakaran, Aslesh Ottapura; Moonan, Patrick K; Chadha, Vineet K

    2016-12-01

    Poverty and poor nutrition are associated with the risk of developing tuberculosis (TB). Socioeconomic factors may interfere with anti-tuberculosis treatment compliance and its outcome. We examined whether providing nutritional support (monthly supply of rice and lentil beans) to TB patients who live below the poverty line was associated with TB treatment outcome. This was a retrospective cohort study of sputum smear-positive pulmonary TB patients living below the poverty line (income of <$1.25 per day) registered for anti-tuberculosis treatment in two rural districts of West Bengal, India during 2012 to 2013. We compared treatment outcomes among patients who received nutritional support with those who did not. A log-binomial regression model was used to assess the relation between nutritional support and unsuccessful treatment outcome (loss-to-follow-up, treatment failure and death). Of 173 TB patients provided nutritional support, 15 (9%) had unsuccessful treatment outcomes, while 84 (21%) of the 400 not provided nutrition support had unsuccessful treatment outcomes (p < 0.001). After adjusting for age, sex and previous treatment, those who received nutritional support had a 50% reduced risk of unsuccessful treatment outcome than those who did not receive nutritional support (Relative Risk: 0.51; 95% Confidence Intervals: 0.30 - 0.86). Under programmatic conditions, monthly rations of rice and lentils were associated with lower risk of unsuccessful treatment outcome among impoverished TB patients. Given the relatively small financial commitment needed per patient ($10 per patient per month), the national TB programme should consider scaling up nutritional support among TB patients living below the poverty line.

  11. [Treatment of extrapulmonary tuberculosis and complicated forms of pulmonary tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    2008-09-01

    Tuberculosis is one of the most important health problems worldwide. In developed countries there is an increased number of cases due to different reasons. The most likely determinant cause is from immigrants coming from high endemic areas. This phenomenon is a direct cause of the increase in extrapulmonary and complicated pulmonary forms of tuberculosis. There are only a few controlled clinical trials evaluating therapies for extrapulmonary tuberculosis. Consequently, documented evidence is scarce, particularly in paediatrics. The majority of therapeutic recommendations are based on series of cases or expert opinions, with a lack of uniformity provided by the different consensus of the main scientific societies. The main objective of this fourth consensus by the Tuberculosis Study Group of the Spanish Society of Paediatric Infectious Diseases (Sociedad Española de Infectología Pediátrica, SEIP) is to perform a thorough revision of the data obtained from scientific literature, in order to establish recommendations for the treatment of extrapulmonary tuberculosis and complicated forms of pulmonary tuberculosis, adapted to the characteristics and drugs available in Spain.

  12. Assessment of treatment response in tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Rockwood, Neesha; du Bruyn, Elsa; Morris, Thomas; Wilkinson, Robert J

    2016-06-01

    Antibiotic treatment of tuberculosis has a duration of several months. There is significant variability of the host immune response and the pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic properties of Mycobacterium tuberculosis sub-populations at the site of disease. A limitation of sputum-based measures of treatment response may be sub-optimal detection and monitoring of Mycobacterium tuberculosis sub-populations. Potential biomarkers and surrogate endpoints should be benchmarked against hard clinical outcomes (failure/relapse/death) and may need tailoring to specific patient populations. Here, we assess the evidence supporting currently utilized and future potential host and pathogen-based models and biomarkers for monitoring treatment response in active and latent tuberculosis. Biomarkers for monitoring treatment response in extrapulmonary, pediatric and drug resistant tuberculosis are research priorities.

  13. Treatment of Latent Tuberculosis Infection.

    PubMed

    Haley, Connie A

    2017-04-01

    There are approximately 56 million people who harbor Mycobacterium tuberculosis that may progress to active tuberculosis (TB) at some point in their lives. Modeling studies suggest that if only 8% of these individuals with latent TB infection (LTBI) were treated annually, overall global incidence would be 14-fold lower by 2050 compared to incidence in 2013, even in the absence of additional TB control measures. This highlights the importance of identifying and treating latently infected individuals, and that this intervention must be scaled up to achieve the goals of the Global End TB Strategy. The efficacy of LTBI treatment is well established, and the most commonly used regimen is 9 months of daily self-administered isoniazid. However, its use has been hindered by limited provider awareness of the benefits, concern about potential side effects such as hepatotoxicity, and low rates of treatment completion. There is increasing evidence that shorter rifamycin-based regimens are as effective, better tolerated, and more likely to be completed compared to isoniazid. Such regimens include four months of daily self-administered rifampin monotherapy, three months of once weekly directly observed isoniazid-rifapentine, and three months of daily self-administered isoniazid-rifampin. The success of LTBI treatment to prevent additional TB disease relies upon choosing an appropriate regimen individualized to the patient, monitoring for potential adverse clinical events, and utilizing strategies to promote adherence. Safer, more cost-effective, and more easily completed regimens are needed and should be combined with interventions to better identify, engage, and retain high-risk individuals across the cascade from diagnosis through treatment completion of LTBI.

  14. Cutaneous tuberculosis overview and current treatment regimens.

    PubMed

    van Zyl, Lindi; du Plessis, Jeanetta; Viljoen, Joe

    2015-12-01

    Tuberculosis is one of the oldest diseases known to humankind and it is currently a worldwide threat with 8-9 million new active disease being reported every year. Among patients with co-infection of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), tuberculosis is ultimately responsible for the most deaths. Cutaneous tuberculosis (CTB) is uncommon, comprising 1-1.5% of all extra-pulmonary tuberculosis manifestations, which manifests only in 8.4-13.7% of all tuberculosis cases. A more accurate classification of CTB includes inoculation tuberculosis, tuberculosis from an endogenous source and haematogenous tuberculosis. There is furthermore a definite distinction between true CTB caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis and CTB caused by atypical mycobacterium species. The lesions caused by mycobacterium species vary from small papules (e.g. primary inoculation tuberculosis) and warty lesions (e.g. tuberculosis verrucosa cutis) to massive ulcers (e.g. Buruli ulcer) and plaques (e.g. lupus vulgaris) that can be highly deformative. Treatment options for CTB are currently limited to conventional oral therapy and occasional surgical intervention in cases that require it. True CTB is treated with a combination of rifampicin, ethambutol, pyrazinamide, isoniazid and streptomycin that is tailored to individual needs. Atypical mycobacterium infections are mostly resistant to anti-tuberculous drugs and only respond to certain antibiotics. As in the case of pulmonary TB, various and relatively wide-ranging treatment regimens are available, although patient compliance is poor. The development of multi-drug and extremely drug-resistant strains has also threatened treatment outcomes. To date, no topical therapy for CTB has been identified and although conventional therapy has mostly shown positive results, there is a lack of other treatment regimens. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Resource utilization pattern and cost of tuberculosis treatment from the provider and patient perspectives in the state of Penang, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Atif, Muhammad; Sulaiman, Syed Azhar Syed; Shafie, Asrul Akmal; Asif, Muhammad; Babar, Zaheer-Ud-Din

    2014-08-19

    Studies from both developed and developing countries have demonstrated a considerable fluctuation in the average cost of TB treatment. The objective of this study was to analyze the medical resource utilization among new smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis patients. We also estimated the cost of tuberculosis treatment from the provider and patient perspectives, and identified the significant cost driving factors. All new smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis patients who were registered at the chest clinic of the Penang General Hospital, between March 2010 and February 2011, were invited to participate in the study. Provider sector costs were estimated using bottom-up, micro-costing technique. For the calculation of costs from the patients' perspective, all eligible patients who agreed to participate in the study were interviewed after the intensive phase and subsequently at the end of the treatment by a trained nurse. PASW was used to analyze the data (Predictive Analysis SoftWare, version 19.0, Armonk, NY: IBM Corp.). During the study period, 226 patients completed the treatment. However, complete costing data were available for 212 patients. The most highly utilized resources were chest X-ray followed by sputum smear examination. Only a smaller proportion of the patients were hospitalized. The average provider sector cost was MYR 992.34 (i.e., USD 325.35 per patient) whereby the average patient sector cost was MYR 1225.80 (i.e., USD 401.90 per patient). The average patient sector cost of our study population accounted for 5.7% of their annual family income. In multiple linear regression analysis, prolonged treatment duration (i.e., > 6 months) was the only predictor of higher provider sector costs whereby higher patient sector costs were determined by greater household income and persistent cough at the end of the intensive phase of the treatment. In relation to average provider sector cost, our estimates are substantially higher than the budget allocated by

  16. Tuberculosis case--finding and treatment in the central prison of Qazvin province, Islamic Republic of Iran.

    PubMed

    Assefzadeh, M; Barghi, R Gh; Shahidi, Sh S

    2009-01-01

    As a part of a comprehensive programme of tuberculosis (TB) control in the central prison in Qazvin, Islamic Republic of Iran, a programme of active case-finding was carried out from February 2004 to July 2005. From the 768 prisoners examined, 41 (5.3%) were suspected of TB and gave sputum samples. A total of 7 smear-positive TB cases were found, giving a TB prevalence in the prison of 910 per 100,000, 113 times the total TB prevalence in Qazvin province in the same year. From 7 diagnosed and treated patients, 4 were cured with the category 1 standard regimen, 1 completed treatment and 2 failed to complete treatment. Improvements are needed in TB case recognition of prisoners, especially newcomers.

  17. Pulmonary tuberculosis among migrants in Shandong, China: factors associated with treatment delay

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Chengchao; Chu, Jie; Geng, Hong; Wang, Xingzhou; Xu, Lingzhong

    2014-01-01

    Objective A timely initiation of treatment is crucial to better control tuberculosis (TB). The aim of this study is to describe treatment delay among migrant patients with TB and to identify factors associated with treatment delay, so as to provide evidence for strategy development and improvement of TB control among migrants in China. Design A cross-sectional study was conducted in Shandong province of China. A total of 314 confirmed smear positive migrant patients with pulmonary TB were included. Univariate logistic regression was used to analyse the association of variables with treatment delay among migrant patients with TB. A multilogistic regression model was developed to further assess the effect of variables on treatment delay. Results Of 314 migrant patients with TB, 65.6% experienced treatment delay (>1 day). Household income level, diagnosis symptom severity, understanding of whether TB is curable or not and knowledge about the free TB treatment policy are factors significantly associated with treatment delay. Conclusions Economic status and knowledge about TB are key barriers to accessing TB treatment. An integrated policy of carrying out TB-related health education and publicising the free TB treatment policy among migrants is needed. Health insurance schemes for migrants should be modified to make them transferrable and pro-poor. PMID:25534210

  18. Drug resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Malawi: a cross-sectional survey.

    PubMed

    Abouyannis, Michael; Dacombe, Russell; Dambe, Isaias; Mpunga, James; Faragher, Brian; Gausi, Francis; Ndhlovu, Henry; Kachiza, Chifundo; Suarez, Pedro; Mundy, Catherine; Banda, Hastings T; Nyasulu, Ishmael; Squire, S Bertel

    2014-11-01

    To document the prevalence of multidrug resistance among people newly diagnosed with - and those retreated for - tuberculosis in Malawi. We conducted a nationally representative survey of people with sputum-smear-positive tuberculosis between 2010 and 2011. For all consenting participants, we collected demographic and clinical data, two sputum samples and tested for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).The samples underwent resistance testing at the Central Reference Laboratory in Lilongwe, Malawi. All Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates found to be multidrug-resistant were retested for resistance to first-line drugs - and tested for resistance to second-line drugs - at a Supranational Tuberculosis Reference Laboratory in South Africa. Overall, M. tuberculosis was isolated from 1777 (83.8%) of the 2120 smear-positive tuberculosis patients. Multidrug resistance was identified in five (0.4%) of 1196 isolates from new cases and 28 (4.8%) of 581 isolates from people undergoing retreatment. Of the 31 isolates from retreatment cases who had previously failed treatment, nine (29.0%) showed multidrug resistance. Although resistance to second-line drugs was found, no cases of extensive drug-resistant tuberculosis were detected. HIV testing of people from whom M. tuberculosis isolates were obtained showed that 577 (48.2%) of people newly diagnosed and 386 (66.4%) of people undergoing retreatment were positive. The prevalence of multidrug resistance among people with smear-positive tuberculosis was low for sub-Saharan Africa - probably reflecting the strength of Malawi's tuberculosis control programme. The relatively high prevalence of such resistance observed among those with previous treatment failure may highlight a need for a change in the national policy for retreating this subgroup of people with tuberculosis.

  19. Drug resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Malawi: a cross-sectional survey

    PubMed Central

    Abouyannis, Michael; Dacombe, Russell; Dambe, Isaias; Mpunga, James; Faragher, Brian; Gausi, Francis; Ndhlovu, Henry; Kachiza, Chifundo; Suarez, Pedro; Mundy, Catherine; Banda, Hastings T; Nyasulu, Ishmael

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To document the prevalence of multidrug resistance among people newly diagnosed with – and those retreated for – tuberculosis in Malawi. Methods We conducted a nationally representative survey of people with sputum-smear-positive tuberculosis between 2010 and 2011. For all consenting participants, we collected demographic and clinical data, two sputum samples and tested for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).The samples underwent resistance testing at the Central Reference Laboratory in Lilongwe, Malawi. All Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates found to be multidrug-resistant were retested for resistance to first-line drugs – and tested for resistance to second-line drugs – at a Supranational Tuberculosis Reference Laboratory in South Africa. Findings Overall, M. tuberculosis was isolated from 1777 (83.8%) of the 2120 smear-positive tuberculosis patients. Multidrug resistance was identified in five (0.4%) of 1196 isolates from new cases and 28 (4.8%) of 581 isolates from people undergoing retreatment. Of the 31 isolates from retreatment cases who had previously failed treatment, nine (29.0%) showed multidrug resistance. Although resistance to second-line drugs was found, no cases of extensive drug-resistant tuberculosis were detected. HIV testing of people from whom M. tuberculosis isolates were obtained showed that 577 (48.2%) of people newly diagnosed and 386 (66.4%) of people undergoing retreatment were positive. Conclusion The prevalence of multidrug resistance among people with smear-positive tuberculosis was low for sub-Saharan Africa – probably reflecting the strength of Malawi’s tuberculosis control programme. The relatively high prevalence of such resistance observed among those with previous treatment failure may highlight a need for a change in the national policy for retreating this subgroup of people with tuberculosis. PMID:25378741

  20. Update on the treatment of tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Inge, Lisa D; Wilson, John W

    2008-08-15

    Approximately one third of the world's population, including more than 11 million persons in the United States, is latently infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Although most cases of tuberculosis in the United States occur in foreign-born persons from endemic countries, the prevalence is generally greater in economically disadvantaged populations and in persons with immunosuppressive conditions. Delays in detection and treatment allow for greater transmission of the infection. Compared with the traditional tuberculin skin test and acid-fast bacilli smear, newer interferon-gamma release assays and nucleic acid amplification assays lead to more rapid and specific detection of M. tuberculosis infection and active disease, respectively. Nine months of isoniazid therapy is the treatment of choice for most patients with latent tuberculosis infection. When active tuberculosis is identified, combination therapy with isoniazid, rifampin, pyrazinamide, and ethambutol should be promptly initiated for a two-month "intensive phase," and in most cases, followed by isoniazid and a rifamycin product for a four- to seven-month "continuation phase." Directly observed therapy should be used. Although currently limited in the United States, multidrug-resistant and extensively drug-resistant strains of tuberculosis are increasingly recognized in many countries, reaffirming the need for prompt diagnosis and adequate treatment strategies. Similarly, care of persons coinfected with human immunodeficiency virus and tuberculosis poses additional challenges, including drug interactions and immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome.

  1. Daily rifapentine for treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis. A randomized, dose-ranging trial.

    PubMed

    Dorman, Susan E; Savic, Radojka M; Goldberg, Stefan; Stout, Jason E; Schluger, Neil; Muzanyi, Grace; Johnson, John L; Nahid, Payam; Hecker, Emily J; Heilig, Charles M; Bozeman, Lorna; Feng, Pei-Jean I; Moro, Ruth N; MacKenzie, William; Dooley, Kelly E; Nuermberger, Eric L; Vernon, Andrew; Weiner, Marc

    2015-02-01

    Rifapentine has potent activity in mouse models of tuberculosis chemotherapy but its optimal dose and exposure in humans are unknown. We conducted a randomized, partially blinded dose-ranging study to determine tolerability, safety, and antimicrobial activity of daily rifapentine for pulmonary tuberculosis treatment. Adults with sputum smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis were assigned rifapentine 10, 15, or 20 mg/kg or rifampin 10 mg/kg daily for 8 weeks (intensive phase), with isoniazid, pyrazinamide, and ethambutol. The primary tolerability end point was treatment discontinuation. The primary efficacy end point was negative sputum cultures at completion of intensive phase. A total of 334 participants were enrolled. At completion of intensive phase, cultures on solid media were negative in 81.3% of participants in the rifampin group versus 92.5% (P = 0.097), 89.4% (P = 0.29), and 94.7% (P = 0.049) in the rifapentine 10, 15, and 20 mg/kg groups. Liquid cultures were negative in 56.3% (rifampin group) versus 74.6% (P = 0.042), 69.7% (P = 0.16), and 82.5% (P = 0.004), respectively. Compared with the rifampin group, the proportion negative at the end of intensive phase was higher among rifapentine recipients who had high rifapentine areas under the concentration-time curve. Percentages of participants discontinuing assigned treatment for reasons other than microbiologic ineligibility were similar across groups (rifampin, 8.2%; rifapentine 10, 15, or 20 mg/kg, 3.4, 2.5, and 7.4%, respectively). Daily rifapentine was well-tolerated and safe. High rifapentine exposures were associated with high levels of sputum sterilization at completion of intensive phase. Further studies are warranted to determine if regimens that deliver high rifapentine exposures can shorten treatment duration to less than 6 months. Clinical trial registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT 00694629).

  2. [Efficacy of the treatment for latent tuberculosis infection and delayed reactivation of tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Toyota, Makoto

    2013-09-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of treatment for latent tuberculosis infection and delayed reactivation of tuberculosis. During a large tuberculosis outbreak, 129 individuals who were in close contact with tuberculosis patients and subsequently tested strongly positive by the tuberculin skin test were followed up for 10 years after identification of the source case. Of the 129 individuals, 105 received treatment for latent tuberculosis infection for 6 months as per recommendation, while the remaining 24 did not receive treatment, because most of them were above 30 years of age and were therefore discouraged from receiving treatment, as was done in the earlier times in Japan. Of the 105 individuals, 5 (4.8%) were newly diagnosed with tuberculosis, and the average duration from identification of the source case to reactivation of tuberculosis was 53 months. Of the 24 individuals who did not receive treatment for latent tuberculosis infection, 6 (25.0%) were newly diagnosed with tuberculosis, and the average duration from identification of the source case to reactivation of tuberculosis was 8.2 months. The risk of active tuberculosis was reduced by 81.0% with treatment for latent tuberculosis infection, compared with that without treatment. Delayed reactivation of tuberculosis was observed among patients treated with isoniazid for latent tuberculosis infection for 6 months.

  3. Tuberculosis case burden and treatment outcomes in children, adults and older adults, Vanuatu, 2007–2011

    PubMed Central

    Harries, A. D.; Kool, B.; Ram, S.; Viney, K.; Marais, B.; Tarivonda, L.

    2014-01-01

    Setting: All five DOTS centres in Vanuatu. Objectives: To determine across the age spectrum the tuberculosis (TB) case burden, disease pattern and treatment outcomes in patients registered between 2007 and 2011. Design: Retrospective cohort study involving reviews of TB registers and treatment cards. Results: Of 588 TB patients, 142 (24%) were children (aged 0–14 years), 327 (56%) adults (aged 15–54 years) and 119 (20%) were older adults (aged ⩾55 years; subdivided into 55–64 and ⩾65 years); 568 were new patients, 13 had been treated previously and 7 had unknown status. Compared with adults, children with new TB had a higher prevalence of extra-pulmonary TB (75% vs. 34%, OR 5.7, 95%CI 3.6–9.0) and a lower prevalence of smear-positive pulmonary TB (11% vs. 45%, OR 0.15, 95%CI 0.1–0.3), while older adults with new TB had a higher prevalence of smear-negative pulmonary TB (38% vs. 21%, OR 2.4, 95%CI 1.5–3.8). Overall TB treatment success was 83%, but in the second category of older adults (⩾65 years) treatment success was 67% and case fatality was 18%. Conclusion: Children and older adults constitute 45% of the TB burden in Vanuatu. Differences in disease patterns and poorer treatment outcomes in older adults have implications for policy and practice. PMID:26477280

  4. [New drugs for treatment of tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Schaberg, T

    2016-02-01

    New effective drugs for the treatment of tuberculosis (TB) are necessary for two main reasons: firstly, it would be desirable to reduce the duration of TB treatment from 6 to 4 months and secondly, new drugs are urgently needed for the treatment of multidrug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. For the first time since 1960 the two new drugs bedaquiline and delamanid were approved and licensed in 2014 for the treatment of multidrug-resistant M. tuberculosis; however, efforts to reduce the duration of treatment to 4 months using fluoroquinolones have not been successful. Further new drugs are currently in phase 2 and phase 3 studies; therefore, new treatment options can be expected within the next few years.

  5. Delays in seeking treatment for symptomatic tuberculosis in Sabah, East Malaysia: factors for patient delay.

    PubMed

    Rundi, C; Fielding, K; Godfrey-Faussett, P; Rodrigues, L C; Mangtani, P

    2011-09-01

    The state of Sabah contributes one third of the tuberculosis (TB) cases in Malaysia. To collect information on factors that affect the time period from the onset of symptoms to first contact with health care providers, whether private or government. A cross-sectional study using a pre-tested questionnaire was conducted among 296 newly registered smear-positive TB patients in 10 districts in Sabah. Univariable and multivariable analyses were used to determine which risk factors were associated with patient delay (>30 days) and 'extreme' patient delay (>90 days). The percentage of patients who sought treatment after 30 and 90 days was respectively 51.8% (95%CI 45.7-57.9) and 23.5% (95%CI 18.6-29.0). The strongest factors associated with patient delay and 'extreme' patient delay was when the first choice for treatment was a non-government health facility and in 30-39-year-olds. 'Extreme' patient delay was also weakly associated, among other factors, with comorbidity and livestock ownership. Delay and extreme delay in seeking treatment were more common when the usual first treatment choice was a non-government health facility. Continuous health education on TB aimed at raising awareness and correcting misconceptions is needed, particularly among those who use non-government facilities.

  6. Drug-resistant tuberculosis: emerging treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Adhvaryu, Meghna; Vakharia, Bhasker

    2011-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis has emerged worldwide, with an increasing incidence due to failure of implementation of apparently effective first-line antituberculous therapy as well as primary infection with drug-resistant strains. Failure of current therapy is attributed to a long duration of treatment leading to nonadherence and irregular therapy, lack of patient education about the disease, poverty, irregular supply by care providers, drug–drug interactions in patients coinfected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), inadequate regulations causing market overlap and irresponsible drug usage in the private sector, and lack of research, with no addition of new drugs in the last four decades. Present standards of care for the treatment of drugsusceptible tuberculosis, multidrug-resistant tuberculosis, tuberculosis-HIV coinfection, and latent tuberculosis infection are all unsatisfactory. Since 2000, the World Health Organization (WHO) has focused on drug development for tuberculosis, as well as research in all relevant aspects to discover new regimens by 2015 and to eliminate tuberculosis as a public health concern by 2050. As a result, some 20 promising compounds from 14 groups of drugs have been discovered. Twelve candidates from eight classes are currently being evaluated in clinical trials. Ongoing research should prioritize identification of novel targets and newer application of existing drugs, discovery of multitargeted drugs from natural compounds, strengthening host factors by immunopotentiation with herbal immunomodulators, as well as protective vaccines before and after exposure, consideration of surgical measures when indicated, development of tools for rapid diagnosis, early identification of resistant strains, and markers for adequacy of treatment and an integrative approach to fulfill WHO goals. However, regulatory control over the drug market, as well as public-private partnership to use health program facilities to track patients and ensure

  7. Cross Sectional Study Evaluating Routine Contact Investigation in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia: A Missed Opportunity to Prevent Tuberculosis in Children.

    PubMed

    Assefa, Dawit; Klinkenberg, Eveline; Yosef, Genet

    2015-01-01

    The 2013 global roadmap for childhood tuberculosis calls for countries to implement contact screening and provide preventive therapy to children younger than 5 years. Therefore, this study designed to evaluate the implementation status of child contact screening and management in the health facilities of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Smear positive TB patients living with children attending daily observed treatment at the TB clinic and health care workers providing service were approached to address the study objective. Structured questionnaires were administered to smear positive index cases living with children whether they were requested to bring children age five year and below for TB screening and to health care providers in HIV, TB and child health clinics to assess their knowledge and practice on contact screening and management. Double data entry and analysis was done using EpiData software 3.1. In 27 health centres, 688 smear-positive index tuberculosis patients were approached of whom 203 (29.5%) reported to have children five years and below in their household. A total of 48 (23.6%) index cases had been requested by the health care workers to bring their children for tuberculosis screening and 45 (93.8%) had complied with this request. Of 230 children living with index smear positive tuberculosis patient, 152 (66.1%) were not screened for tuberculosis, 78 (33.9%) children screened, 2 had tuberculosis, 76 screened negative of which 3 (3.8%) received preventive treatment. None of the health care workers indicated to routinely record and report on child contact management. Household child contact screening and preventive intervention was sub-optimal in Addis Ababa. An important opportunity lost to prevent tuberculosis in young children. Training of health care workers, availing simple symptom based screening tool, and proper documentation could improve implementation.

  8. Cross Sectional Study Evaluating Routine Contact Investigation in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia: A Missed Opportunity to Prevent Tuberculosis in Children

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The 2013 global roadmap for childhood tuberculosis calls for countries to implement contact screening and provide preventive therapy to children younger than 5 years. Therefore, this study designed to evaluate the implementation status of child contact screening and management in the health facilities of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Smear positive TB patients living with children attending daily observed treatment at the TB clinic and health care workers providing service were approached to address the study objective. Structured questionnaires were administered to smear positive index cases living with children whether they were requested to bring children age five year and below for TB screening and to health care providers in HIV, TB and child health clinics to assess their knowledge and practice on contact screening and management. Double data entry and analysis was done using EpiData software 3.1. In 27 health centres, 688 smear-positive index tuberculosis patients were approached of whom 203 (29.5%) reported to have children five years and below in their household. A total of 48 (23.6%) index cases had been requested by the health care workers to bring their children for tuberculosis screening and 45 (93.8%) had complied with this request. Of 230 children living with index smear positive tuberculosis patient, 152 (66.1%) were not screened for tuberculosis, 78 (33.9%) children screened, 2 had tuberculosis, 76 screened negative of which 3 (3.8%) received preventive treatment. None of the health care workers indicated to routinely record and report on child contact management. Household child contact screening and preventive intervention was sub-optimal in Addis Ababa. An important opportunity lost to prevent tuberculosis in young children. Training of health care workers, availing simple symptom based screening tool, and proper documentation could improve implementation. PMID:26083244

  9. Plasma Drug Activity Assay for Treatment Optimization in Tuberculosis Patients ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Heysell, Scott K.; Mtabho, Charles; Mpagama, Stellah; Mwaigwisya, Solomon; Pholwat, Suporn; Ndusilo, Norah; Gratz, Jean; Aarnoutse, Rob E.; Kibiki, Gibson S.; Houpt, Eric R.

    2011-01-01

    Low antituberculosis (TB) drug levels are common, but their clinical significance remains unclear, and methods of measurement are resource intensive. Subjects initiating treatment for sputum smear-positive pulmonary TB were enrolled from Kibong'oto National TB Hospital, Tanzania, and levels of isoniazid, rifampin, ethambutol, and pyrazinamide were measured at the time of typical peak plasma concentration (C2 h). To evaluate the significance of the effect of observed drug levels on Mycobacterium tuberculosis growth, a plasma TB drug activity (TDA) assay was developed using the Bactec MGIT system. Time to detection of plasma-cocultured M. tuberculosis versus time to detection of control growth was defined as a TDA ratio. TDA assays were later performed using the subject's own M. tuberculosis isolate and C2 h plasma from the Tanzanian cohort and compared to drug levels and clinical outcomes. Sixteen subjects with a mean age of 37.8 years ± 10.7 were enrolled. Fourteen (88%) had C2 h rifampin levels and 11 (69%) had isoniazid levels below 90% of the lower limit of the expected range. Plasma spiked with various concentrations of antituberculosis medications found TDA assay results to be unaffected by ethambutol or pyrazinamide. Yet with a range of isoniazid and rifampin concentrations, TDA exhibited a statistically significant correlation with drug level and drug MIC, and a TDA of ∼1.0 indicated the presence of multidrug-resistant TB. In Tanzania, low (≤2.0) TDA was significantly associated with both lower isoniazid and rifampin C2 h levels, and very low (≤1.5) TDA corresponded to a trend toward lack of cure. Study of TDA compared to additional clinical outcomes and as a therapeutic management tool is warranted. PMID:21968363

  10. Clinical Features and Treatment Outcomes of Patients with Drug-Resistant and Drug-Sensitive Tuberculosis: A Historical Cohort Study in Porto Alegre, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Micheletti, Vania Celina Dezoti; Kritski, Afrânio Lineu; Braga, José Ueleres

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the clinical features and treatment outcomes of patients with pulmonary tuberculosis, stratified by level of drug resistance. Methods This was a historical cohort study based on data from the II National Anti-Tuberculosis Drug Resistance Survey (2006–2007) collected at eight participating health care facilities in Porto Alegre, southern Brazil. The cohort was followed for 3 years after the start of treatment. Results Of 299 cases of smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis included in the study, 216 (72.2%) were diagnosed at five public primary health care units and 83 (27.8%) at three public hospitals. Among these cases, the prevalence of drug-resistant tuberculosis was 14.4%, and that of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis was 4.7%. Overall, 32.0% of drug-resistant and 2.0% of multidrug-resistant cases occurred in previously treated patients. The most common comorbidity in the sample was HIV infection (26.2%). There was no association between drug-resistant or multidrug-resistant tuberculosis and sociodemographic variables. Cure was achieved in 66.7% of patients, and the default rate was 21.2%. The 2-month sputum conversion rate was 34.2%, and the relapse rate was 16.9%. Patients with drug-resistant tuberculosis had lower rates of cure (45.2%) and 2-month sputum conversion (25%), as well as a higher relapse rate (30.7%). Conclusion These results highlight the urgent need for a more effective TB control program in this geographical setting, with a major emphasis on treatment of drug-resistant and multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. PMID:27505633

  11. Treatment of Tuberculosis. A Historical Perspective.

    PubMed

    Murray, John F; Schraufnagel, Dean E; Hopewell, Philip C

    2015-12-01

    Of all achievements in medicine, the successful treatment of tuberculosis has had one of the greatest impacts on society. Tuberculosis was a leading cause of disease and a mortal enemy of humanity for millennia. The first step in finding a cure was the discovery of the cause of tuberculosis by Robert Koch in 1882. The sanatorium movement that began shortly afterward in Europe, and soon spread to the United States, brought attention to the plight of afflicted persons, and catalyzed public health action. The antituberculosis benefit of streptomycin was announced in 1945, although application was limited by the rapid development of resistance. para-Aminosalicylic acid, also discovered in 1945, when combined with streptomycin was found to greatly reduce the occurrence of drug resistance. In 1952, isoniazid opened the modern era of treatment; it was inexpensive, well tolerated, and safe. In the early 1960s, ethambutol was shown to be effective and better tolerated than para-aminosalicylic acid, which it replaced. In the 1970s, rifampin found its place as a keystone in the therapy of tuberculosis. The use of rifampin enabled the course of treatment to be reduced to nine months. Incorporation of pyrazinamide into the first-line regimen led to a further reduction of treatment duration to six months. Treatment of multiple drug-resistant tuberculosis remains a difficult problem requiring lengthy treatment with toxic drugs. However, shortened regimens show promise, and two new drugs, bedaquiline and delamanid, have demonstrated effectiveness in preliminary studies and are being used for extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis.

  12. Tuberculosis: current trends in diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Bello, A K; Njoku, C H; Njoku, A K

    2005-12-01

    Among communicable diseases, tuberculosis (TB) is the second leading cause of death worldwide, killing nearly 2 million people each year. It is estimated that about one-third of the world population are infected with TB (2 billion people) and about 10% of this figure will progress to disease state. Most cases are in the less-developed countries of the world. Tuberculosis incidence has been on the increase in Africa, mainly as a result of the burden of HIV infection. Definitive diagnosis of tuberculosis remains based on culture for Mycobacterium tuberculosis, but rapid diagnosis of infectious tuberculosis by simple sputum smear for acid fast bacilli remains an important tool, as more rapid molecular techniques are being developed. Treatment with several drugs for 6 months or more can cure more than 95% of patients. Direct observation of treatment, a component of the recommended five-element DOTS strategy, is judged to be the standard of care by most authorities. Currently only a third of cases worldwide are treated using this approach. There may be need to modify the treatment modalities especially with the choice of drugs and duration of therapy when TB infection occurs in special situation like pregnancy, liver disease, renal failure or even in coexistence with HlV/AIDS or the drug resistant state.

  13. [Spanish Society for Pediatric Infectious Diseases guidelines on tuberculosis in pregnant women and neonates (ii): Prophylaxis and treatment].

    PubMed

    Baquero-Artigao, F; Mellado Peña, M J; del Rosal Rabes, T; Noguera Julián, A; Goncé Mellgren, A; de la Calle Fernández-Miranda, M; Navarro Gómez, M L

    2015-10-01

    In pregnant women who have been exposed to tuberculosis (TB), primary isoniazid prophylaxis is only recommended in cases of immunosuppression, chronic medical conditions or obstetric risk factors, and close and sustained contact with a patient with infectious TB. Isoniazid prophylaxis for latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) is recommended in women who have close contact with an infectious TB patient or have risk factors for progression to active disease. Otherwise, it should be delayed until at least three weeks after delivery. Treatment of TB disease during pregnancy is the same as for the general adult population. Infants born to mothers with disseminated or extrapulmonary TB in pregnancy, with active TB at delivery, or with postnatal exposure to TB, should undergo a complete diagnostic evaluation. Primary isoniazid prophylaxis for at least 12 weeks is recommended for those with negative diagnostic tests and no evidence of disease. Repeated negative diagnostic tests are mandatory before interrupting prophylaxis. Isoniazid for 9 months is recommended in LTBI. Treatment of neonatal TB disease is similar to that of older children, but should be maintained for at least 9 months. Respiratory isolation is recommended in congenital TB, and in postnatal TB with positive gastric or bronchial aspirate acid-fast smears. Separation of mother and infant is only necessary when the mother has received treatment for less than 2 weeks, is sputum smear-positive, or has drug-resistant TB. Breastfeeding is not contraindicated, and in case of mother-infant separation expressed breast milk feeding is recommended.

  14. [Socio-economic status and duration of TB symptoms in males treated at the Mazovian Treatment Centre of Tuberculosis and Lung Diseases in Otwock].

    PubMed

    Jagodziński, Jacek; Zielonka, Tadeusz M; Błachnio, Maria

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of tuberculosis depends on many factors, not only on health issues but also on socioeconomic factors. The aim of this study was to assess the duration of symptoms and the extent of radiological changes in men with bacteriologically confirmed pulmonary tuberculosis in relation to their socioeconomic status. This was a retrospective study based on the analysis of 300 hospital records of patients hospitalised in 2004-2006 in the male ward of the Mazovian Treatment Centre of Lung Diseases and Tuberculosis in Otwock. In all patients, the diagnosis of tuberculosis was bacteriologically confirmed. We evaluated the duration of symptoms prior to hospitalisation, the extent of radiological changes and socioeconomic status. We also took into account the place of residence, professional activity, age and marital status. Among patients with TB hospitalised in the Mazovia Region, 74% were professionally inactive persons and 57% were unemployed. Patients population in cities and villages were similar, but as much as 10% of the patients hospitalised who were actively spreading bacilli in Mazovia Region were homeless. In the study group, 60% of the men were unmarried. In 63% of the patients symptoms of tuberculosis were present for more than two months. Chronic symptoms were reported more often in the unemployed (60%) and in single patients. As much as 81% of the patients at the initiation of treatment, had extensive radiological changes in 3 or more lung fields. Quite often sweeping pulmonary changes were observed in the homeless, unemployed and pensioners. Sputum smear-positive tuberculosis, was demonstrated in 87% of the examined patients. The incidence of tuberculosis observed in the Mazovia Region was especially observed in the unemployed, disabled and pensioners. Among these patients, many were homeless. The majority of patients in Mazovia Region at the start of treatment already had very extensive radiological changes and the symptoms were present with them for

  15. [Tuberculosis in Asia].

    PubMed

    2002-10-01

    populations. These factors pose particular problems for implementing DOTS in various ways. Socio-cultural and environmental factors are particularly important in Nepal, and several measures have been developed to overcome these difficulties. One is active community participation through the DOTS committee. The committee consists of a group of motivated people, including social workers, political leaders, health services providers, journalists, teachers, students, representatives of local organizations, medical schools and colleges, industries, private practitioners, and TB patients. One DOTS committee is formed in every treatment center. A key role of the DOTS committee is to identify local problems and their solutions. It increases public awareness about TB and DOTS; supports people with TB in the community by providing treatment observers and tracing late patients; and encourages cooperation among health institutions, health workers, NGOs, and political leaders. The case finding rate is now 69%, and nearly 95% of diagnosed TB cases are being treated under DOTS. The treatment success rate of new smear-positive cases is nearly 90%. Thus, DOTS increases the case finding and treatment success. 3. Cambodia: HIV/TB and the health sector reform: Tan Eang Mao (National Center for Tuberculosis and Leprosy Control, Cambodia) Cambodia is one of the 23 high burden countries of tuberculosis in the world. Moreover, HIV/AIDS has been spreading rapidly since 1990s, which is worsening the tuberculosis epidemics. To cope with the burden, Cambodia has started implementation of DOTS in 1994 and has expanded it to most of public hospitals across the country by 1998. NTP of Cambodia is now enjoying high cure rate of more than 90%. However, due to the constraints such as weak infrastructure and the poverty, it is proved that many of TB sufferers do not have access to the TB services, resulting in still low case detection rate. It is for this reason that the NTP has decided to expand DOTS to

  16. Rifapentine for the treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Munsiff, Sonal S; Kambili, Chrispin; Ahuja, Shama Desai

    2006-12-01

    Rifapentine is a recently approved antituberculosis drug that has not yet been widely used in clinical settings. Clinical data support intermittent use of rifapentine with isoniazid during the continuation phase of tuberculosis treatment. Patients with culture-positive, noncavitary, pulmonary tuberculosis whose sputum smear is negative for acid-fast bacilli at the end of the 2-month intensive treatment phase are eligible for rifapentine therapy. Rifapentine should not be used in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients, given their increased risk of developing rifampin resistance with currently recommended dosages. Rifapentine is not currently recommended for children aged <12 years, pregnant or lactating women, or individuals with culture-negative or extrapulmonary tuberculosis. Rifapentine (600 mg) is administered once weekly with isoniazid (900 mg) during the continuation phase of treatment. This combination should only be given under direct observation. As with rifampin, drug-drug interactions are common, and regular patient monitoring is required. Ease of administration makes this regimen attractive both for tuberculosis-control programs and for patients.

  17. Controlling the seedbeds of tuberculosis: diagnosis and treatment of tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Rangaka, Molebogeng X; Cavalcante, Solange C; Marais, Ben J; Thim, Sok; Martinson, Neil A; Swaminathan, Soumya; Chaisson, Richard E

    2015-12-05

    The billions of people with latent tuberculosis infection serve as the seedbeds for future cases of active tuberculosis. Virtually all episodes of tuberculosis disease are preceded by a period of asymptomatic Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection; therefore, identifying infected individuals most likely to progress to disease and treating such subclinical infections to prevent future disease provides a crucial opportunity to interrupt tuberculosis transmission and reduce the global burden of tuberculosis disease. Programmes focusing on single strategies rather than comprehensive programmes that deliver an integrated arsenal for tuberculosis control might continue to struggle. Tuberculosis preventive therapy is a poorly used method that is essential for controlling the reservoirs of disease that drive the epidemic. Comprehensive control strategies that combine preventive therapy for the most high-risk populations and communities with improved case-finding and treatment, control of transmission, and health systems strengthening could ultimately lead to worldwide tuberculosis elimination. In this Series paper we outline challenges to implementation of preventive therapy and provide pragmatic suggestions for overcoming them. We further advocate for tuberculosis preventive therapy as the core of a renewed worldwide focus to implement a comprehensive epidemic control strategy that would reduce new tuberculosis cases to elimination targets. This strategy would be underpinned by accelerated research to further understand the biology of subclinical tuberculosis infections, develop novel diagnostics and drug regimens specifically for subclinical tuberculosis infection, strengthen health systems and community engagement, and enhance sustainable large scale implementation of preventive therapy programmes.

  18. Controlling the Seedbeds of Tuberculosis: Diagnosis and Treatment of Tuberculosis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Rangaka, Molebogeng X.; Cavalcante, Solange C.; Marais, Ben J.; Thim, Sok; Martinson, Neil A.; Swaminathan, Soumya; Chaisson, Richard E.

    2015-01-01

    The billions of people with latent tuberculosis infection serve as the seedbeds for future cases of active tuberculosis. Virtually all episodes of tuberculosis disease are preceded by a period of asymptomatic Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection; therefore, identifying infected individuals most likely to progress to disease and treating such subclinical infections to prevent future disease provides a critical opportunity to interrupt tuberculosis transmission and reduce the global burden of tuberculosis disease. Programs focusing on single strategies rather than comprehensive programs that deliver an integrated arsenal for tuberculosis control may continue to struggle. Tuberculosis preventive therapy is a poorly utilized tool that is essential for controlling the reservoirs of disease that drive the current epidemic. Comprehensive control strategies that combine preventive therapy for the most high-risk populations and communities with improved case-finding and treatment, control of transmission and health systems strengthening could ultimately lead to worldwide tuberculosis elimination. This paper outlines challenges to implementation of preventive therapy and provides pragmatic suggestions for overcoming them. It further advocates for tuberculosis preventive therapy as the core of a renewed global focus to implement a comprehensive epidemic control strategy that would reduce new tuberculosis cases to elimination targets. This strategy would be underpinned by accelerated research to further understand the biology of subclinical tuberculosis infections, develop novel diagnostics, and drug regimens specifically for subclinical tuberculosis infection, strengthen health systems, community engagement, and enhance sustainable large scale implementation of preventive therapy programs. PMID:26515679

  19. Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Mumbai, India: Factors Responsible for Patient and Treatment Delays

    PubMed Central

    Tamhane, Ashutosh; Ambe, Girish; Vermund, Sten H; Kohler, Connie L; Karande, Alka; Sathiakumar, Nalini

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the factors responsible for patient delay and treatment delay in newly diagnosed sputum smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) patients. Methods: Study subjects (N = 150) were randomly selected from municipal health centers in Mumbai, India. Duration of symptoms, treatment, and reason for delay were assessed using interviews and medical records. We defined patient delay as presentation to a health care provider (HCP) >20 days of the onset of TB-related symptoms and treatment delay as therapy initiated more than 14 days after the first consultation (for TB-related symptoms) with an HCP. Results: Of the 150 subjects, 29% had patient delays and 81% had treatment delays. In multivariable analysis, patient delay was significantly associated with the self-perception that initial symptoms were due to TB [odds ratio (OR) = 3.8, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.1–12.6] and perceived inability to pay for care (OR = 2.9, 95% CI = 1.2–7.1). Treatment delay was significantly associated with consulting a non-allopathic provider (OR = 12.3, 95% CI = 1.4–105) and consulting >3 providers (OR = 5.0, 95% CI = 1.4–17.4). Patient interval was half the treatment interval (median days: 15 vs. 31). Women were slightly more likely to experience patient and treatment delays than men. For two-thirds of the patients, another TB patient was a source of TB-related knowledge, while health education material (16%) and television (10%) played a smaller role. Conclusion: Treatment delay, primarily due to diagnosis delay, was a greater problem than patient delay. Expanding public–public and public–private partnerships and regular training sessions for HCPs might decrease treatment delay. Media coverage and cured TB patients as peer advocates may help to reinforce TB-related health education messages. PMID:22973488

  20. Epidemiology and Treatment of Multidrug Resistant Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Mitnick, Carole D.; Appleton, Sasha C.; Shin, Sonya S.

    2010-01-01

    Multidrug resistant tuberculosis is now thought to afflict between 1 and 2 million patients annually. Although significant regional variability in the distribution of disease has been recorded, surveillance data are limited by several factors. The true burden of disease is likely underestimated. Nevertheless, the estimated burden is substantial enough to warrant concerted action. A range of approaches is possible, but all appropriate interventions require scale-up of laboratories and early treatment with regimens containing a sufficient number of second-line drugs. Ambulatory treatment for most patients, and improved infection control, can facilitate scale-up with decreased risk of nosocomial transmission. Several obstacles have been considered to preclude worldwide scale-up of treatment, mostly attributable to inadequate human, drug, and financial resources. Further delays in scale-up, however, risk continued generation and transmission of resistant tuberculosis, as well as associated morbidity and mortality. PMID:18810684

  1. Interventions to reduce tuberculosis mortality and transmission in low- and middle-income countries.

    PubMed Central

    Borgdorff, Martien W.; Floyd, Katherine; Broekmans, Jaap F.

    2002-01-01

    Tuberculosis is among the top ten causes of global mortality and affects low-income countries in particular. This paper examines, through a literature review, the impact of tuberculosis control measures on tuberculosis mortality and transmission, and constraints to scaling-up. It also provides estimates of the effectiveness of various interventions using a model proposed by Styblo. It concludes that treatment of smear-positive tuberculosis using the WHO directly observed treatment, short-course (DOTS) strategy has by far the highest impact. While BCG immunization reduces childhood tuberculosis mortality, its impact on tuberculosis transmission is probably minimal. Under specific conditions, an additional impact on mortality and transmission can be expected through treatment of smear-negative cases, intensification of case-finding for smear-positive tuberculosis, and preventive therapy among individuals with dual tuberculosis-HIV infection. Of these interventions, DOTS is the most cost-effective at around US$ 5-40 per disability-adjusted life year (DALY) gained. The cost for BCG immunization is likely to be under US$ 50 per DALY gained. Treatment of smear-negative patients has a cost per DALY gained of up to US$ 100 in low-income countries, and up to US$ 400 in middle-income settings. Other interventions, such as preventive therapy for HIV-positive individuals, appear to be less cost-effective. The major constraint to scaling up DOTS is lack of political commitment, resulting in shortages of funding and human resources for tuberculosis control. However, in recent years there have been encouraging signs of increasing political commitment. Other constraints are related to involvement of the private sector, health sector reform, management capacity of tuberculosis programmes, treatment delivery, and drug supply. Global tuberculosis control could benefit strongly from technical innovation, including the development of a vaccine giving good protection against smear-positive

  2. Nanotechnology-Based Approach in Tuberculosis Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Neyaz, Md. Kausar; Das, Shilpi

    2017-01-01

    Tuberculosis, commonly known as TB, is the second most fatal infectious disease after AIDS, caused by bacterium called Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Prolonged treatment, high pill burden, low compliance, and stiff administration schedules are factors that are responsible for emergence of MDR and XDR cases of tuberculosis. Till date, only BCG vaccine is available which is ineffective against adult pulmonary TB, which is the most common form of disease. Various unique antibodies have been developed to overcome drug resistance, reduce the treatment regimen, and elevate the compliance to treatment. Therefore, we need an effective and robust system to subdue technological drawbacks and improve the effectiveness of therapeutic drugs which still remains a major challenge for pharmaceutical technology. Nanoparticle-based ideology has shown convincing treatment and promising outcomes for chronic infectious diseases. Different types of nanocarriers have been evaluated as promising drug delivery systems for various administration routes. Controlled and sustained release of drugs is one of the advantages of nanoparticle-based antituberculosis drugs over free drug. It also reduces the dosage frequency and resolves the difficulty of low poor compliance. This paper reviews various nanotechnology-based therapies which can be used for the treatment of TB. PMID:28210505

  3. National profile and treatment outcomes of patients with extrapulmonary tuberculosis in Bénin.

    PubMed

    Ade, Serge; Harries, Anthony D; Trébucq, Arnaud; Ade, Gabriel; Agodokpessi, Gildas; Adjonou, Christine; Azon, Sophie; Anagonou, Sévérin

    2014-01-01

    In sub-Saharan Africa, there is a dearth of published literature on extrapulmonary tuberculosis (EPTB). To describe demographic, diagnostic and HIV-status characteristics of patients with EPTB in Bénin, their treatment outcomes, and among those who completed their treatment in the Centre National Hospitalier de Pneumo-Phtisiologie (CNHP-P), the proportion whose bodyweight increased during treatment. This was a retrospective cohort study with comparisons made between EPTB and new smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis (NPTB) patients diagnosed in the country from January to December 2011. There were 383 EPTB patients (9% of all TB cases) with a mean age of 35 years, male/female ratio of 1.3 and important regional variation. There were significantly more females (p = 0.001), children <15 years (p<0.001) and HIV-positive patients (p = 0.005) with EPTB compared with NPTB. Pleural effusion, spinal and lymph node tuberculosis accounted for 66% of all EPTB. Children <15 years represented 16% of cases, with lymph node disease being most common among them (p<0.001). Of 130 EPTB patients registered in CNHP-P, 7% had a confirmed bacteriological/histological diagnosis. There were 331 (86%) patients who successfully completed treatment. More patients with EPTB were lost-to-follow-up compared with NPTB (p<0.001) with all these patients from one region. The best treatment completion rates were in children <15 years (OR:3.5, 95%CI:1.0-14.8) while patients with pleural effusion and ascites had the worst outcomes. Of 72 HIV-coinfected patients, 88% were on antiretroviral therapy (ART). HIV-positive status was associated with poor outcomes while those on ART fared better. In the CNHP-P, more than 80% who completed their treatment showed an increase in bodyweight and this was more evident in HIV-positive compared with HIV-negative patients (p = 0.03). Patients with EPTB generally do well in Bénin, although the TB Programme would benefit through more attention to accurate

  4. Factors Associated with Fatality during the Intensive Phase of Anti-Tuberculosis Treatment.

    PubMed

    Rodrigo, T; Casals, M; Caminero, J A; García-García, J M; Jiménez-Fuentes, M A; Medina, J F; Millet, J P; Ruiz-Manzano, J; Caylá, J

    2016-01-01

    To determine the case-fatality rate (CFR) at the end of the intensive phase of tuberculosis (TB) treatment, and factors associated with fatality. TB patients diagnosed between 2006 and 2013 were followed-up during treatment. We computed the CFR at the end of the intensive phase of TB treatment, and the incidence of death per 100 person-days (pd) of follow-up. We performed survival analysis using the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox regression, and calculate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). A total of 5,182 patients were included, of whom 180 (3.5%) died; 87 of these deaths (48.3%) occurred during the intensive phase of treatment, with a CFR of 1.7%. The incidence of death was 0.028/100 pd. The following factors were associated with death during the intensive phase: being >50 years (HR = 36.9;CI:4.8-283.4); being retired (HR = 2.4;CI:1.1-5.1); having visited the emergency department (HR = 3.1;CI:1.2-7.7); HIV infection (HR = 3.4;CI:1.6-7.2); initial standard treatment with 3 drugs (HR = 2.0;CI:1.2-3.3) or non-standard treatments (HR = 2.68;CI:1.36-5.25); comprehension difficulties (HR = 2.8;CI:1.3-6.1); and smear-positive sputum (HR = 2.3-CI:1.0-4.8). There is a non-negligible CFR during the intensive phase of TB, whose reduction should be prioritised. The CFR could be a useful indicator for evaluating TB programs.

  5. Factors Associated with Fatality during the Intensive Phase of Anti-Tuberculosis Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Casals, M.; Caminero, J. A.; García-García, J. M.; Jiménez-Fuentes, M. A.; Medina, J. F.; Millet, J. P.; Ruiz-Manzano, J.; Caylá, J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the case-fatality rate (CFR) at the end of the intensive phase of tuberculosis (TB) treatment, and factors associated with fatality. Methods TB patients diagnosed between 2006 and 2013 were followed-up during treatment. We computed the CFR at the end of the intensive phase of TB treatment, and the incidence of death per 100 person-days (pd) of follow-up. We performed survival analysis using the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox regression, and calculate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results A total of 5,182 patients were included, of whom 180 (3.5%) died; 87 of these deaths (48.3%) occurred during the intensive phase of treatment, with a CFR of 1.7%. The incidence of death was 0.028/100 pd. The following factors were associated with death during the intensive phase: being >50 years (HR = 36.9;CI:4.8–283.4); being retired (HR = 2.4;CI:1.1–5.1); having visited the emergency department (HR = 3.1;CI:1.2–7.7); HIV infection (HR = 3.4;CI:1.6–7.2); initial standard treatment with 3 drugs (HR = 2.0;CI:1.2–3.3) or non-standard treatments (HR = 2.68;CI:1.36–5.25); comprehension difficulties (HR = 2.8;CI:1.3–6.1); and smear-positive sputum (HR = 2.3-CI:1.0–4.8). Conclusion There is a non-negligible CFR during the intensive phase of TB, whose reduction should be prioritised. The CFR could be a useful indicator for evaluating TB programs. PMID:27487189

  6. Profile and Treatment Outcomes of Tuberculosis in the Elderly in Southeastern Nigeria, 2011–2012

    PubMed Central

    Oshi, Daniel C.; Oshi, Sarah N.; Alobu, Isaac; Ukwaja, Kingsley N.

    2014-01-01

    Background The demographic transition and increasing life expectancy in Africa has lead to a rising elderly population. In Nigeria, little is known about the profile of and treatment outcomes of tuberculosis (TB) in the elderly. Methods Retrospective cohort study of adult TB patients treated between January 2011 and December 2012 in two large health facilities in Nigeria. The demographic, clinical and treatment outcomes of patients aged 60 and older were compared with those aged 15 to 59 years. Results Elderly (≥60 years) TB patients accounted for 12.7% of all (1668) adult TB enrolled. Elderly patients had a higher proportion of men compared to non-elderly (64.2% vs 56.8%; p = 0.043); but a lower proportion of smear-positive TB at baseline (40.7% vs 65.8%; p<0.001). A higher proportion of elderly patients failed to smear convert after the intensive phase of treatment (23.7% vs 19.8%; p = 0.06), and overall elderly patients had lower treatment success rates (68.9% vs 77.1%; p = 0.009). Unsuccessful outcomes were mainly due to higher default and deaths in the elderly. The risk factors for unsuccessful outcomes in the elderly were: extrapulmonary TB case (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 10.9; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.1–108), and HIV co-infection (aOR 3.6; CI 1.1–11.7). Conclusions Treatment outcomes of elderly TB patients were inferior to non-elderly adults with higher death and default rates being implicated. With the rising elderly population, specific strategies are needed to quickly address TB management in the elderly in resource-limited settings. PMID:25369001

  7. Prevalence of extended treatment in pulmonary tuberculosis patients receiving first-line therapy and its association with recurrent tuberculosis in Beijing, China

    PubMed Central

    Xia, YinYin; Goel, Sonu; Harries, Anthony D.; Zhang, ZhiGuo; Gao, TieJie; Wang, LiXia; Cheng, ShiMing; Lin, Yan; Du, Xin

    2014-01-01

    Background In China, it is known that extended treatment is given to patients with pulmonary TB after they have successfully completed 6 months of first-line treatment. This practice is not officially reported to the National Tuberculosis Control Programme, so there are no data on its prevalence, its possible benefits in terms of preventing recurrent disease or the costs. This study aimed to provide information, from a single TB dispensary in Beijing, China, on the prevalence of extended anti-TB treatment and its relationship with recurrent TB. Methods Retrospective cohort study using the electronic national TB information system and dispensary medical records. Results Of 935 patients with pulmonary TB who completed 6–7 months of first-line drug treatment, 399 (43%) were given extended treatment. This was more common in patients with smear-positive disease, and those with lung cavities and more extensive radiographic lobar involvement at the time of diagnosis. Over 3–4 years' follow-up, recurrent disease was not significantly different in patients who received extended treatment (2.8%, 11/399) as compared to those who received the standard 6-month treatment (3.7%, 20/534). The median length of extended treatment was 89 days at a median cost of US$111 for drugs and US$32 for laboratory examinations. Conclusions This study shows that extended treatment is common in one TB dispensary in Beijing. Further studies are needed to determine the countrywide prevalence of this practice and ascertain more conclusively the apparent lack of benefit. PMID:24864048

  8. Clinical evaluation of tuberculosis viability microscopy for assessing treatment response.

    PubMed

    Datta, Sumona; Sherman, Jonathan M; Bravard, Marjory A; Valencia, Teresa; Gilman, Robert H; Evans, Carlton A

    2015-04-15

    It is difficult to determine whether early tuberculosis treatment is effective in reducing the infectiousness of patients' sputum, because culture takes weeks and conventional acid-fast sputum microscopy and molecular tests cannot differentiate live from dead tuberculosis. To assess treatment response, sputum samples (n=124) from unselected patients (n=35) with sputum microscopy-positive tuberculosis were tested pretreatment and after 3, 6, and 9 days of empiric first-line therapy. Tuberculosis quantitative viability microscopy with fluorescein diacetate, quantitative culture, and acid-fast auramine microscopy were all performed in triplicate. Tuberculosis quantitative viability microscopy predicted quantitative culture results such that 76% of results agreed within ±1 logarithm (rS=0.85; P<.0001). In 31 patients with non-multidrug-resistant (MDR) tuberculosis, viability and quantitative culture results approximately halved (both 0.27 log reduction, P<.001) daily. For patients with non-MDR tuberculosis and available data, by treatment day 9 there was a >10-fold reduction in viability in 100% (24/24) of cases and quantitative culture in 95% (19/20) of cases. Four other patients subsequently found to have MDR tuberculosis had no significant changes in viability (P=.4) or quantitative culture (P=.6) results during early treatment. The change in viability and quantitative culture results during early treatment differed significantly between patients with non-MDR tuberculosis and those with MDR tuberculosis (both P<.001). Acid-fast microscopy results changed little during early treatment, and this change was similar for non-MDR tuberculosis vs MDR tuberculosis (P=.6). Tuberculosis quantitative viability microscopy is a simple test that within 1 hour predicted quantitative culture results that became available weeks later, rapidly indicating whether patients were responding to tuberculosis therapy. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of

  9. Treatment of tuberculosis and optimal dosing schedules.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kwok Chiu; Leung, Chi Chiu; Grosset, Jacques; Yew, Wing Wai

    2011-11-01

    Intermittent tuberculosis treatment regimens have been developed to facilitate treatment supervision. Their efficacy has been substantiated by clinical trials and tuberculosis control programmes, notwithstanding the lack of head-to-head comparison between daily and intermittent regimens. Recently, there has been opposing evidence from observational studies, pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic studies and animal models that intermittent treatment increases the risk of relapse, treatment failure or acquired rifamycin resistance, especially among HIV-infected patients. Systematic reviews have been conflicting. PubMed, Ovid MEDLINE and EMBASE were systematically searched for publications in English to evaluate the evidence about dosing schedules and treatment efficacy. Levels of evidence and grades of recommendation were assigned largely according to clinical evidence with reference to the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network guideline development handbook. A total of 32 articles were included after excluding 331 ineligible articles, 42 non-analytical studies, 22 narrative reviews or expert opinions and 44 articles embedded in systematic reviews. These included 9 systematic reviews, 8 controlled studies, 9 pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic studies, 5 mouse studies and 1 article about guinea pig experiments. Findings suggest high levels of evidence for using daily dosing schedules, especially during the initial phase in the presence of cavitation, isoniazid resistance and advanced HIV co-infection, to reduce the risk of treatment failure, recurrence and acquired drug resistance including acquired rifamycin resistance. This review justifies the use of daily schedules in standard tuberculosis treatment regimens (particularly in the initial phase), corroborates prevailing understanding of pharmacokinetics-pharmacodynamics and mycobacterial persisters, and supports exploration of rifapentine-containing regimens in higher dosages and frequency.

  10. Factors associated with recurrent tuberculosis more than 12 months after treatment completion

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Lindsay; Moonan, Patrick K.; Heilig, Charles M.; Yelk Woodruff, Rachel S.; Kammerer, J. Steve; Haddad, Maryam B.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Setting Even in persons with complete treatment of their first tuberculosis (TB) episode, patients with a TB history are at higher risk for having TB. Objective Describe factors from the initial TB episode associated with recurrent TB among patients who completed treatment and remained free of TB for at least 12 months. Design US TB cases, stratified by birth origin, during 1993–2006 were examined. Cox proportional hazards regression was employed to assess the association of factors during the initial episode with recurrence at least 12 months after treatment completion. Results Among 632 US-born patients, TB recurrence was associated with age 25–44 (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] 1.77, 99% confidence interval [CI] 1.02–3.09, attributable fraction [AF] 1%–34%), substance use (aHR 1.57, 99%CI 1.23–2.02, AF 8%–22%), and treatment supervised by health departments (aHR 1.42, 99%CI 1.03–1.97, AF 2%–28%). Among 211 foreign-born patients, recurrence was associated with HIV infection (aHR 2.24, 99%CI 1.27–3.98, AF 2%–9%) and smear-positive TB (aHR 1.56, 99%CI 1.06–2.30, AF 3%–33%). Conclusion Factors associated with recurrence differed by birth origin and might be useful for anticipating greater risk for recurrent TB among certain patients with a TB history. PMID:26688528

  11. Characteristics of tuberculosis patients at intake in Cambodia, two provinces in China, and Viet Nam.

    PubMed

    Hoa, Nguyen B; Wei, Chen; Sokun, Chay; Lauritsen, Jens M; Rieder, Hans L

    2011-05-23

    The tuberculosis register is a critical data source for the information system of national tuberculosis control programs. From the information in the tuberculosis case register, it is possible to extend the standard analysis of age and sex characteristics among sputum smear-positive cases to all tuberculosis case categories. National tuberculosis programs might utilize such information to identify problems related to referral and access to diagnosis and treatment. Based on the electronic database we created, our objectives were to provide a detailed description of age and sex characteristics of tuberculosis patients at registration and to provide a comparison of age-specific sex characteristics among incident and prevalent sputum smear-positive cases. A representative sample of tuberculosis case registers from 1 January 2003 to 31 December 2005 was selected in Cambodia, two provinces in China and Viet Nam. Age and sex characteristics of cases in the three separate prevalence surveys in the three jurisdictions (Cambodia: year 2002; China: year 2000; and Viet Nam: year 2006-2007) were obtained for comparison. A total 37,635 patients had been registered during the period in the selected units in the three countries. Cases were more frequently male in all three countries with 53%, 71%, and 69% in Cambodia, China, and Viet Nam, respectively.The ratios of the female-to-male odds in the notification system to that in the prevalence survey in smear-positive cases in Cambodia, China and Viet Nam were 2.1, 0.9, and 1.8, respectively. Because of the small proportion of extrapulmonary tuberculosis registered in China, we limited the analysis on age and sex distribution for extrapulmonary cases to Cambodia and Viet Nam. The proportion with extrapulmonary tuberculosis among all cases was 18.5% in Cambodia and 15.7% in Viet Nam, decreasing in frequency with increasing age. Characteristics of patients greatly differed between countries and between patient categories. In Cambodia

  12. An evaluation of systematic tuberculosis screening at private facilities in Karachi, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Creswell, Jacob; Khowaja, Saira; Codlin, Andrew; Hashmi, Rabia; Rasheed, Erum; Khan, Mubashir; Durab, Irfan; Mergenthaler, Christina; Hussain, Owais; Khan, Faisal; Khan, Aamir J

    2014-01-01

    In Pakistan, like many Asian countries, a large proportion of healthcare is provided through the private sector. We evaluated a systematic screening strategy to identify people with tuberculosis in private facilities in Karachi and assessed the approaches' ability to diagnose patients earlier in their disease progression. Lay workers at 89 private clinics and a large hospital outpatient department screened all attendees for tuberculosis using a mobile phone-based questionnaire during one year. The number needed to screen to detect a case of tuberculosis was calculated. To evaluate early diagnosis, we tested for differences in cough duration and smear grading by screening facility. 529,447 people were screened, 1,010 smear-positive tuberculosis cases were detected and 942 (93.3%) started treatment, representing 58.7% of all smear-positive cases notified in the intervention area. The number needed to screen to detect a smear-positive case was 124 (prevalence 806/100,000) at the hospital and 763 (prevalence 131/100,000) at the clinics; however, ten times the number of individuals were screened in clinics. People with smear-positive TB detected at the hospital were less likely to report cough lasting 2-3 weeks (RR 0.66 95%CI [0.49-0.90]) and more likely to report cough duration >3 weeks (RR 1.10 95%CI [1.03-1.18]). Smear-positive cases at the clinics were less likely to have a +3 grade (RR 0.76 95%CI [0.63-0.92]) and more likely to have +1 smear grade (RR 1.24 95%CI [1.02-1.51]). Tuberculosis screening at private facilities is acceptable and can yield large numbers of previously undiagnosed cases. Screening at general practitioner clinics may find cases earlier than at hospitals although more people must be screened to identify a case of tuberculosis. Limitations include lack of culture testing, therefore underestimating true TB prevalence. Using more sensitive and specific screening and diagnostic tests such as chest x-ray and Xpert MTB/RIF may improve results.

  13. A Phase 2 Randomized Trial of a Rifapentine plus Moxifloxacin-Based Regimen for Treatment of Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Conde, Marcus B.; Mello, Fernanda C. Q.; Duarte, Rafael Silva; Cavalcante, Solange C.; Rolla, Valeria; Dalcolmo, Margareth; Loredo, Carla; Durovni, Betina; Armstrong, Derek T.; Efron, Anne; Barnes, Grace L.; Marzinke, Mark A.; Savic, Radojka M.; Dooley, Kelly E.; Cohn, Silvia; Moulton, Lawrence H.; Chaisson, Richard E.; Dorman, Susan E.

    2016-01-01

    Background The combination of rifapentine and moxifloxacin administered daily with other anti-tuberculosis drugs is highly active in mouse models of tuberculosis chemotherapy. The objective of this phase 2 clinical trial was to determine the bactericidal activity, safety, and tolerability of a regimen comprised of rifapentine, moxifloxacin, isoniazid, and pyrazinamide administered daily during the first 8 weeks of pulmonary tuberculosis treatment. Methods Adults with sputum smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis were randomized to receive either rifapentine (approximately 7.5 mg/kg) plus moxifloxacin (investigational arm), or rifampin (approximately 10 mg/kg) plus ethambutol (control) daily for 8 weeks, along with isoniazid and pyrazinamide. The primary endpoint was sputum culture status at completion of 8 weeks of treatment. Results 121 participants (56% of accrual target) were enrolled. At completion of 8 weeks of treatment, negative cultures using Löwenstein-Jensen (LJ) medium occurred in 47/60 (78%) participants in the investigational arm vs. 43/51 (84%, p = 0.47) in the control arm; negative cultures using liquid medium occurred in 37/47 (79%) in the investigational arm vs. 27/41 (66%, p = 0.23) in the control arm. Time to stable culture conversion was shorter for the investigational arm vs. the control arm using liquid culture medium (p = 0.03), but there was no difference using LJ medium. Median rifapentine area under the concentration-time curve (AUC0-24) was 313 mcg*h/mL, similar to recent studies of rifapentine dosed at 450–600 mg daily. Median moxifloxacin AUC0-24 was 28.0 mcg*h/mL, much lower than in trials where rifapentine was given only intermittently with moxifloxacin. The proportion of participants discontinuing assigned treatment for reasons other than microbiological ineligibility was higher in the investigational arm vs. the control arm (11/62 [18%] vs. 3/59 [5%], p = 0.04) although the proportions of grade 3 or higher adverse events were

  14. Substitution of moxifloxacin for isoniazid during intensive phase treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Dorman, Susan E; Johnson, John L; Goldberg, Stefan; Muzanye, Grace; Padayatchi, Nesri; Bozeman, Lorna; Heilig, Charles M; Bernardo, John; Choudhri, Shurjeel; Grosset, Jacques H; Guy, Elizabeth; Guyadeen, Priya; Leus, Maria Corazon; Maltas, Gina; Menzies, Dick; Nuermberger, Eric L; Villarino, Margarita; Vernon, Andrew; Chaisson, Richard E

    2009-08-01

    Moxifloxacin has potent activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis in vitro and in a mouse model of antituberculosis (TB) chemotherapy, but data regarding its activity in humans are limited. Our objective was to compare the antimicrobial activity and safety of moxifloxacin versus isoniazid during the first 8 weeks of combination therapy for pulmonary TB. Adults with sputum smear-positive pulmonary TB were randomly assigned to receive either moxifloxacin 400 mg plus isoniazid placebo, or isoniazid 300 mg plus moxifloxacin placebo, administered 5 days/week for 8 weeks, in addition to rifampin, pyrazinamide, and ethambutol. All doses were directly observed. Sputum was collected for culture every 2 weeks. The primary outcome was negative sputum culture at completion of 8 weeks of treatment. Of 433 participants enrolled, 328 were eligible for the primary efficacy analysis. Of these, 35 (11%) were HIV positive, 248 (76%) had cavitation on baseline chest radiograph, and 213 (65%) were enrolled at African sites. Negative cultures at Week 8 were observed in 90/164 (54.9%) participants in the isoniazid arm, and 99/164 (60.4%) in the moxifloxacin arm (P = 0.37). In multivariate analysis, cavitation and enrollment at an African site were associated with lower likelihood of Week-8 culture negativity. The proportion of participants who discontinued assigned treatment was 31/214 (14.5%) for the moxifloxacin group versus 22/205 (10.7%) for the isoniazid group (RR, 1.35; 95% CI, 0.81, 2.25). Substitution of moxifloxacin for isoniazid resulted in a small but statistically nonsignificant increase in Week-8 culture negativity.

  15. Treatment Options for HIV-Associated Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Onyebujoh, Philip Chukwuka; Ribeiro, Isabela; Whalen, Christopher Curtis

    2010-01-01

    The vicious interaction between the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and tuberculosis (TB) pandemics poses special challenges to national control programs and individual physicians. Although recommendations for the treatment of TB in HIV-infected patients do not significantly differ from those for HIV-uninfected patients, the appropriate management of HIV-associated TB is complicated by health system issues, diagnostic difficulties, adherence concerns, overlapping adverse-effect profiles and drug interactions, and the occurrence of paradoxical reactions after the initiation of effective antiretroviral therapy. In this article, recommended treatment strategies and novel approaches to the management of HIV-associated TB are reviewed, including adjuvant treatment and options for treatment simplification. A focused research agenda is proposed in the context of the limitations of the current knowledge framework. PMID:17726832

  16. Integration of antiretroviral therapy with tuberculosis treatment.

    PubMed

    Abdool Karim, Salim S; Naidoo, Kogieleum; Grobler, Anneke; Padayatchi, Nesri; Baxter, Cheryl; Gray, Andrew L; Gengiah, Tanuja; Gengiah, Santhanalakshmi; Naidoo, Anushka; Jithoo, Niraksha; Nair, Gonasagrie; El-Sadr, Wafaa M; Friedland, Gerald; Abdool Karim, Quarraisha

    2011-10-20

    We previously reported that integrating antiretroviral therapy (ART) with tuberculosis treatment reduces mortality. However, the timing for the initiation of ART during tuberculosis treatment remains unresolved. We conducted a three-group, open-label, randomized, controlled trial in South Africa involving 642 ambulatory patients, all with tuberculosis (confirmed by a positive sputum smear for acid-fast bacilli), human immunodeficiency virus infection, and a CD4+ T-cell count of less than 500 per cubic millimeter. Findings in the earlier-ART group (ART initiated within 4 weeks after the start of tuberculosis treatment, 214 patients) and later-ART group (ART initiated during the first 4 weeks of the continuation phase of tuberculosis treatment, 215 patients) are presented here. At baseline, the median CD4+ T-cell count was 150 per cubic millimeter, and the median viral load was 161,000 copies per milliliter, with no significant differences between the two groups. The incidence rate of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) or death was 6.9 cases per 100 person-years in the earlier-ART group (18 cases) as compared with 7.8 per 100 person-years in the later-ART group (19 cases) (incidence-rate ratio, 0.89; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.44 to 1.79; P=0.73). However, among patients with CD4+ T-cell counts of less than 50 per cubic millimeter, the incidence rates of AIDS or death were 8.5 and 26.3 cases per 100 person-years, respectively (incidence-rate ratio, 0.32; 95% CI, 0.07 to 1.13; P=0.06). The incidence rates of the immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) were 20.1 and 7.7 cases per 100 person-years, respectively (incidence-rate ratio, 2.62; 95% CI, 1.48 to 4.82; P<0.001). Adverse events requiring a switching of antiretroviral drugs occurred in 10 patients in the earlier-ART group and 1 patient in the later-ART group (P=0.006). Early initiation of ART in patients with CD4+ T-cell counts of less than 50 per cubic millimeter increased AIDS

  17. Treatment guidelines for latent tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) has been established as valid for patients at high risk for developing active tuberculosis. Treatment of LTBI is also considered an important strategy for eliminating tuberculosis (TB) in Japan. In recent years, interferon-gamma release assays have come into widespread use; isoniazid (INH) preventive therapy for HIV patients has come to be recommended worldwide; and there have been increases in both types of biologics used in the treatment of immune diseases as well as the diseases susceptible to treatment. In light of the above facts, the Prevention Committee and the Treatment Committee of the Japanese Society for Tuberculosis have jointly drafted these guidelines. In determining subjects for LTBI treatment, the following must be considered: 1) risk of TB infection/ development; 2) infection diagnosis; 3) chest image diagnosis; 4) the impact of TB development; 5) the possible manifestation of side effects; and 6) the prospects of treatment completion. LTBI treatment is actively considered when relative risk is deemed 4 or higher, including risk factors such as the following: HIV/AIDS, organ transplants (immunosuppressant use), silicosis, dialysis due to chronic renal failure, recent TB infection (within 2 years), fibronodular shadows in chest radiographs (untreated old TB), the use of biologics, and large doses of corticosteroids. Although the risk is lower, the following risk factors require consideration of LTBI treatment when 2 or more of them are present: use of oral or inhaled corticosteroids, use of other immunosuppressants, diabetes, being underweight, smoking, gastrectomy, and so on. In principle, INH is administered for a period of 6 or 9 months. When INH cannot be used, rifampicin is administered for a period of 4 or 6 months. It is believed that there are no reasons to support long-term LTBI treatment for immunosuppressed patients in Japan, where the risk of infection is not considered markedly high

  18. Comprehensive treatment of extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Mitnick, Carole D; Shin, Sonya S; Seung, Kwonjune J; Rich, Michael L; Atwood, Sidney S; Furin, Jennifer J; Fitzmaurice, Garrett M; Alcantara Viru, Felix A; Appleton, Sasha C; Bayona, Jaime N; Bonilla, Cesar A; Chalco, Katiuska; Choi, Sharon; Franke, Molly F; Fraser, Hamish S F; Guerra, Dalia; Hurtado, Rocio M; Jazayeri, Darius; Joseph, Keith; Llaro, Karim; Mestanza, Lorena; Mukherjee, Joia S; Muñoz, Maribel; Palacios, Eda; Sanchez, Epifanio; Sloutsky, Alexander; Becerra, Mercedes C

    2008-08-07

    Extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis has been reported in 45 countries, including countries with limited resources and a high burden of tuberculosis. We describe the management of extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis and treatment outcomes among patients who were referred for individualized outpatient therapy in Peru. A total of 810 patients were referred for free individualized therapy, including drug treatment, resective surgery, adverse-event management, and nutritional and psychosocial support. We tested isolates from 651 patients for extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis and developed regimens that included five or more drugs to which the infecting isolate was not resistant. Of the 651 patients tested, 48 (7.4%) had extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis; the remaining 603 patients had multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. The patients with extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis had undergone more treatment than the other patients (mean [+/-SD] number of regimens, 4.2+/-1.9 vs. 3.2+/-1.6; P<0.001) and had isolates that were resistant to more drugs (number of drugs, 8.4+/-1.1 vs. 5.3+/-1.5; P<0.001). None of the patients with extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis were coinfected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Patients with extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis received daily, supervised therapy with an average of 5.3+/-1.3 drugs, including cycloserine, an injectable drug, and a fluoroquinolone. Twenty-nine of these patients (60.4%) completed treatment or were cured, as compared with 400 patients (66.3%) with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (P=0.36). Extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis can be cured in HIV-negative patients through outpatient treatment, even in those who have received multiple prior courses of therapy for tuberculosis. 2008 Massachusetts Medical Society

  19. Comprehensive Treatment of Extensively Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Mitnick, Carole D.; Shin, Sonya S.; Seung, Kwonjune J.; Rich, Michael L.; Atwood, Sidney S.; Furin, Jennifer J.; Fitzmaurice, Garrett M.; Alcantara Viru, Felix A.; Appleton, Sasha C.; Bayona, Jaime N.; Bonilla, Cesar A.; Chalco, Katiuska; Choi, Sharon; Franke, Molly F.; Fraser, Hamish S.F.; Guerra, Dalia; Hurtado, Rocio M.; Jazayeri, Darius; Joseph, Keith; Llaro, Karim; Mestanza, Lorena; Mukherjee, Joia S.; Muñoz, Maribel; Palacios, Eda; Sanchez, Epifanio; Sloutsky, Alexander; Becerra, Mercedes C.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND Extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis has been reported in 45 countries, including countries with limited resources and a high burden of tuberculosis. We describe the management of extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis and treatment outcomes among patients who were referred for individualized outpatient therapy in Peru. METHODS A total of 810 patients were referred for free individualized therapy, including drug treatment, resective surgery, adverse-event management, and nutritional and psychosocial support. We tested isolates from 651 patients for extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis and developed regimens that included five or more drugs to which the infecting isolate was not resistant. RESULTS Of the 651 patients tested, 48 (7.4%) had extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis; the remaining 603 patients had multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. The patients with extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis had undergone more treatment than the other patients (mean [±SD] number of regimens, 4.2±1.9 vs. 3.2±1.6; P<0.001) and had isolates that were resistant to more drugs (number of drugs, 8.4±1.1 vs. 5.3±1.5; P<0.001). None of the patients with extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis were coinfected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Patients with extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis received daily, supervised therapy with an average of 5.3±1.3 drugs, including cycloserine, an injectable drug, and a fluoroquinolone. Twenty-nine of these patients (60.4%) completed treatment or were cured, as compared with 400 patients (66.3%) with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (P=0.36). CONCLUSIONS Extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis can be cured in HIV-negative patients through outpatient treatment, even in those who have received multiple prior courses of therapy for tuberculosis. PMID:18687637

  20. Strengthened tuberculosis control programme and trend of multidrug resistant tuberculosis rate in Osaka City, Japan

    PubMed Central

    Ohkado, Akihiro; Matsumoto, Kenji; Komukai, Jun; Yoshida, Hideki; Ishikawa, Nobukatsu

    2013-01-01

    Osaka City has the highest tuberculosis (TB) notification rates in Japan. In the period 1999–2003, the TB control programme was strengthened, and the Stop TB Strategy was implemented to reduce the number of notified cases. The objective of this study was to assess the effect of these control activities in Osaka City, including the implementation of directly observed treatment (DOT), by analysing TB surveillance and routinely collected data. We reviewed the surveillance data of all sputum smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) cases registered in the Osaka City Public Health Office from 2001 to 2008 and data collected from the routine TB programme. The DOT implementation rate increased from 0% in 2001 to 68% in 2008 for smear-positive PTB cases of the general public and to 61% for all PTB cases of the homeless. The proportion of smear-positive PTB cases that had treatment failure and default combined, declined from 8.0% (52 of 650) in 2001 to 3.6% (20 of 548) in 2006. The proportion of cases among the homeless with previous treatment declined from 28% in 2001 to 15% in 2008. The proportion of cases with multidrug resistant-TB (MDR-TB) among those without previous treatment declined from 1.7% in 2001 to 0.9% in 2008. It is logical that reduction in the failure and default rate would lead to the reduction of cases with previous treatment and TB transmission, including resistant TB, therefore to the reduction of MDR-TB rates. PMID:23908949

  1. [Tuberculosis and HIV infection: experience of the national tuberculosis prevention program in Djibouti: 1990-1996].

    PubMed

    Renoux, E; Matan, A Barreh; Sevre, J P; Mohamed Ali, I; Chami, D; Vincent, V

    2002-01-01

    Based on analysis of data collected from the national tuberculosis prevention program in Djibouti between 1990 and 1996, the authors analyzed the relationship between HIV infection and tuberculosis. The study cohort comprised a total of 22,000 patients including 14,000 with documented HIV infection. Although HIV infection probably worsened the situation, it was neither the only nor the main factor involved in the resurgence of tuberculosis. Demographic growth, higher population density, and increasing poverty as well as the quality of the national tuberculosis prevention program must be taken into account. The incidence of smear-negative tuberculosis was not significantly higher in HIV-infected patients (incidence of smear positive cases, > 92%). Extrapulmonary tuberculosis especially of pleural involvement was more common (15% versus 9.4%). Treatment was effective in HIV-infected patients. If directly observed (DOT) therapy was used, there was no risk of emergence of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis strains. Drug side-effects associated with the protocols used in Djibouti were not greater in HIV-infected patients. Most additional mortality observed in HIV-infected tuberculosis patients (10.5% versus 2%) was due to progression of HIV infection.

  2. Review of Organism Density and Bacteriologic Conversion of Sputum among Tuberculosis Patients.

    PubMed

    Osei, Francis Adjei; Enimil, Anthony; Ansong, Daniel; Laryea, Dennis Odai; Mensah, Nicholas Karikari; Amuzu, Evans Xorse; Agyemang, Ebenezer Opambour; Sarpong, Phans Oduro; Nyanor, Isaac; Dekugmen Yar, Denis

    2017-01-01

    This study sought to describe the trend of sputum organism density and the rate of bacteriological conversion among smear positive TB patients assessing care at the Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital (KATH), Kumasi, Ghana. We conducted a retrospective patient folder review from January 2013 to March 2016 at the KATH, a tertiary hospital in Ghana. The data was entered into Microsoft Access database and exported into STATA for analysis. We applied basic descriptive statistics to study variables. Sputum conversion rate (SCR) was estimated using the number of negative tests recorded over a period (numerator) and the number of patients reported in the same period (denominator) and expressed as a percentage. A total of 278 patient records with sputum smear positive at onset were studied. Before treatment sputum density detected in smear microscopy was as follows: 1 acid-fast bacillus (+) (n = 114), scanty (n = 19), ++ (n = 67), and +++ (n = 78). We recorded sputum conversion rate of 80.90%, 94.56%, and 98.31% in the intensive, continuation, and completion phases, respectively. This study has shown an increasing trend in sputum conversion of smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis and an increasing trend in loss to follow-ups among tuberculosis patients on treatment.

  3. Treatment outcomes of childhood tuberculosis in Addis Ababa: a five-year retrospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Tilahun, Genene; Gebre-Selassie, Solomon

    2016-07-21

    Tuberculosis (TB) kills one child every 5 min. Childhood TB is given low priority in most national health programmes particularly in TB-endemic areas. TB among children is an indicator of a recent transmission of the disease in the community. Treatment outcome results serve as a proxy of the quality of treatment provided by a health care system. In Ethiopia, data on treatment outcomes of childhood TB are limited. The aim of the study was to determine the treatment outcomes of childhood TB in a hospital setting in Addis Ababa. The study was conducted during June to August 2014. The data of 491 children treated for TB in Zewditu Memorial Hospital during a 5 year (2009-2013) was analysed. TB was diagnosed using standard methods. Demographic and clinical data including type of TB, TB-HIV co-infection and treatment outcomes were collected from registry of the TB clinic. Treatment outcome definitions are used according to the World Health Organization. Of the 491 children, 272(55.4 %) were females, 107(21.8 %) were under 5 year old, 454(92.5 %) of them were new cases. The types of TB were extra-pulmonary tuberculosis (EPTB) 243(49.5 %) and 248(50.5 %) pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB). Of the PTB cases, 42(16.9 %) were sputum smear positive. Of the 291 children tested for HIV, 82(28.2 %) were positive. The overall treatment success rate was 420(85.5 %) and the poor treatment outcome was 71(14.5 %). Of the children with poor treatment outcome, 9(1.8 %) died, 3(0.6 %) defaulted from treatment, 2(0.4 %) were treatment failure and 55(11.2 %) were transferred out. Males and females had similar treatment success rates of 85.8 % and 85.3 %, respectively. Infants under one year had significantly lower treatment success rate of 72.7 % compared to those above 1 years of age of 86.5 % (P < 0.001). Treatment success rate ranged from 78.0 to 92.6 % during the study period. Associated factors for treatment outcome were age above 5 years (AOR = 0.59, 95 % CI: 0

  4. A time-to-event pharmacodynamic model describing treatment response in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis using days to positivity in automated liquid mycobacterial culture.

    PubMed

    Chigutsa, Emmanuel; Patel, Kashyap; Denti, Paolo; Visser, Marianne; Maartens, Gary; Kirkpatrick, Carl M J; McIlleron, Helen; Karlsson, Mats O

    2013-02-01

    Days to positivity in automated liquid mycobacterial culture have been shown to correlate with mycobacterial load and have been proposed as a useful biomarker for treatment responses in tuberculosis. However, there is currently no quantitative method or model to analyze the change in days to positivity with time on treatment. The objectives of this study were to describe the decline in numbers of mycobacteria in sputum collected once weekly for 8 weeks from patients on treatment for tuberculosis using days to positivity in liquid culture. One hundred forty-four patients with smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis were recruited from a tuberculosis clinic in Cape Town, South Africa. A nonlinear mixed-effects repeated-time-to-event modeling approach was used to analyze the time-to-positivity data. A biexponential model described the decline in the estimated number of bacteria in patients' sputum samples, while a logistic model with a lag time described the growth of the bacteria in liquid culture. At baseline, the estimated number of rapidly killed bacteria is typically 41 times higher than that of those that are killed slowly. The time to kill half of the rapidly killed bacteria was about 1.8 days, while it was 39 days for slowly killed bacteria. Patients with lung cavitation had higher bacterial loads than patients without lung cavitation. The model successfully described the increase in days to positivity as treatment progressed, differentiating between bacteria that are killed rapidly and those that are killed slowly. Our model can be used to analyze similar data from studies testing new drug regimens.

  5. Household income and poor treatment outcome among patients with tuberculosis in Georgia: a cohort study.

    PubMed

    Djibuti, Mamuka; Mirvelashvili, Eka; Makharashvili, Nutsa; Magee, Matthew J

    2014-01-29

    Poverty is associated with increased risk of active tuberculosis (TB) disease onset, but the relation between household income and TB treatment outcomes is not well understood. The objective of this study was to determine household income characteristics associated with poor TB treatment outcome among newly diagnosed patients with pulmonary TB in the country of Georgia. A prospective cohort study was conducted among newly diagnosed smear positive pulmonary TB patients. Clinical and household data were collected from all consecutive patients seeking care at TB facilities in two major cities and one rural region in Georgia. Patients were followed prospectively during anti-TB regimens to determine treatment outcome. Bivariate analyses were used to determine the association of individual patient and household level characteristics with poor TB treatment outcome. A multivariable logistic model was used to estimate the adjusted association between patient household characteristics and poor TB treatment outcome. After six months TB therapy, treatment outcome was available for 193 of 202 enrolled patients, of these 155 (80.3%) had a favorable TB treatment outcome. Compared to TB patients with poor treatment outcome, those with favorable treatment outcomes were younger (median 33.0 vs. 42.5 years), reported higher household monthly income (median $137 USD vs. $85 USD), were less likely to be unemployed (38.7 vs. 47.4%), and had higher level of education (38.7% vs. 31.6% with college education or greater). In multivariable analysis adjusted for age, sex, and socio-economic indicators, only low household income was remained statistically significantly associated with poor TB treatment outcome. Compared with patients from households with the highest tertile of monthly income, those in the middle tertile (aOR 4.28 95% CI 1.36, 13.53) and those in the lowest category of income (aOR 6.18 95% CI 1.83, 20.94) were significantly more likely to have poor treatment outcomes. We

  6. Characteristics and Treatment Outcomes of Patients with MDR and XDR Tuberculosis in a TB Referral Hospital in Beijing: A 13-Year Experience

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qi; Hu, Yong Liang; Zhu, Baoli; Woo, Patrick C. Y.

    2011-01-01

    Background Information on treatment outcomes among hospitalized patients with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB) are scarce in China. Methodology/Principal Findings We conducted this retrospective study to analyze the characteristics and treatment outcomes in MDR- and XDR-TB patients in the 309 Hospital in Beijing, China during 1996–2009. Socio-demographic and clinical data were retrieved from medical records and analyzed. Logistic regression analysis was performed to identify risk factors associated with poor treatment outcomes and Cox proportional hazards regression model was further used to determine risk factors associated with death in TB patients. Among the 3,551 non-repetitive hospitalized TB patients who had drug susceptibility testing (DST) results, 716 (20.2%) had MDR-TB and 51 (1.4%) had XDR-TB. A total of 3,270 patients who had medical records available were used for further analyses. Treatment success rates (cured and treatment completed) were 90.9%, 53.4% and 29.2% for patients with non-MDR-TB, patients with MDR-TB excluding XDR-TB and patients with XDR-TB, respectively. Independent risk factors associated with poor treatment outcomes in MDR-TB patients included being a migrant (adjusted OR = 1.77), smear-positivity at treatment onset (adjusted OR = 1.94) and not receiving 3 or more potentially effective drugs (adjusted OR = 3.87). Independent risk factors associated with poor treatment outcomes in XDR-TB patients were smear-positivity at treatment onset (adjusted OR = 10.42) and not receiving 3 or more potentially effective drugs (adjusted OR = 14.90). The independent risk factors associated with death in TB patients were having chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (adjusted HR = 5.25) and having hypertension (adjusted HR = 4.31). Conclusions/Significance While overall satisfactory treatment success for non-MDR-TB patients was achieved, more intensive efforts

  7. Rapid detection of in vitro antituberculous drug resistance among smear-positive respiratory samples using microcolony detection-based direct drug susceptibility testing method.

    PubMed

    Iftikhar, Irim; Irfan, Seema; Farooqi, Joveria; Azizullah, Zahida; Hasan, Rumina

    2017-01-01

    With the rise in multidrug-resistant tuberculosis, there is a search for newer techniques that will rapidly detect drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Although molecular techniques can detect resistance, culture is still considered gold standard, especially in resource-limited settings where quick, cheap, and easy techniques are needed. The aim of the study was to evaluate microcolony method thin layer agar (TLA) for quick detection of resistance against the first- and second-line antituberculous drugs in clinical isolates. This was a cross-sectional study performed at Aga Khan University Hospital. A total of 87 Z-N stain smear-positive pulmonary samples were received and indirect drug susceptibility test (ID-DST) was performed using Lowenstein-Jensen and mycobacteria growth indicator tube. Direct DST was performed using TLA on 7H10 agar. TLA was observed twice weekly under microscope for 4 weeks. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were calculated for TLA using indirect susceptibility method as the gold standard. Level of agreement was calculated using Kappa score. TLA showed sensitivity of 89% and 95.2% for isoniazid and rifampicin, while for ethionamide, ofloxacin, and injectable aminoglycosides, it was 96.6%, 92.1%, and 100%, respectively. Specificity for the first-line drugs was >95% while second-line drugs ranged from 70% to 100%. Mean time to positivity was 10.2 days by TLA as compared to 43.1 days by ID-DST. TLA is a quick and reliable method in identifying resistance, especially in resource-limited settings. However, additional liquid culture can be set up as backup, especially in patients on therapy to avoid false negative results.

  8. Adherence to Childhood Tuberculosis Treatment in Mozambique.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Varela, Elisa; Sequera, Victor Guillermo; García-Basteiro, Alberto L; Augusto, Orvalho Joaquim; Munguambe, Khatia; Sacarlal, Jahit; Alonso, Pedro L

    2017-04-01

    There is limited literature regarding adherence rates for the treatment of tuberculosis (TB) in children. We aimed to describe TB treatment outcomes and adherence as well as to evaluate associated factors to poor adherence in Mozambican children. This is a sub-study of a community TB incidence study among children <3 years of age. Incomplete adherence included the sum of lost-to-follow-up cases plus those with a delay of > 3 weeks to treatment completion. Fifty TB treatments were assessed. Forty-four (88.0%) patients completed treatment, two (4.0%) died during treatment and four (8.0%) were lost to follow-up. Incomplete adherence was observed in 31.3% (15 of 48) of cases and was associated with malnutrition or history of a migrant mother. Although treatment outcome is overall good, there is still a significant proportion of incomplete adherence. Further larger paediatric TB cohorts and qualitative approaches are needed to assess and confirm potential factors for non-adherence.

  9. Outcome of tuberculosis treatment in HIV-positive adults diagnosed through active versus passive case-finding.

    PubMed

    Balcha, Taye T; Skogmar, Sten; Sturegård, Erik; Björkman, Per; Winqvist, Niclas

    2015-01-01

    The World Health Organization strongly recommends regular screening for tuberculosis (TB) in HIV-positive individuals. To compare the outcome of anti-tuberculosis treatment (ATT) in HIV-positive adults diagnosed with TB through active case-finding (ACF) or passive case-finding (PCF). Antiretroviral therapy (ART)-naïve adults diagnosed with TB were included from two prospective cohort studies conducted in Ethiopia between September 2010 and March 2013. The PCF cohort was based at out-patient TB clinics, whereas participants in the ACF cohort were actively screened for TB by bacteriological sputum testing (smear microscopy, Xpert MTB/RIF assay, and liquid culture) without pre-selection on the basis of symptoms and signs. Outcomes of ATT were compared between participants in the two cohorts; characteristics at diagnosis and predictors of adverse outcomes were analysed. Among 439 TB/HIV co-infected participants, 307 and 132 belonged to PCF and ACF cohorts, respectively. Compared with the ACF participants, hemoptysis, conjunctival pallor, bedridden status, and low mid upper-arm circumference (MUAC) were significantly more common in participants identified through PCF. Sputum smear-positivity rates among pulmonary TB cases were 44.2% and 21.1% in the PCF and ACF cohorts, respectively (p<0.001). Treatment success was ascertained in 247 (80.5%) of the participants in the PCF cohort and 102 (77.2%) of the participants in the ACF cohorts (p=0.223). Low MUAC (p=0.001) independently predicted mortality in the participants in both cohorts. Although patients identified through ACF had less advanced TB disease, ATT outcome was similar to the patients identified through PCF. To achieve a better outcome, case management in ACF strategy should be strengthened through enhanced patient-centred counselling and adherence support.

  10. Evaluating Tuberculosis Case Detection via Real-Time Monitoring of Tuberculosis Diagnostic Services

    PubMed Central

    Davis, JLucian; Katamba, Achilles; Vasquez, Josh; Crawford, Erin; Sserwanga, Asadu; Kakeeto, Stella; Kizito, Fred; Dorsey, Grant; den Boon, Saskia; Vittinghoff, Eric; Huang, Laurence; Adatu, Francis; Kamya, Moses R; Hopewell, Philip C; Cattamanchi, Adithya

    2011-01-01

    Rationale: Tuberculosis case-detection rates are below internationally established targets in high-burden countries. Real-time monitoring and evaluation of adherence to widely endorsed standards of tuberculosis care might facilitate improved case finding. Objectives: To monitor and evaluate the quality of tuberculosis case-detection and management services in a low-income country with a high incidence of tuberculosis. Methods: We prospectively evaluated tuberculosis diagnostic services at five primary health-care facilities in Uganda for 1 year, after introducing a real-time, electronic performance-monitoring system. We collected data on every clinical encounter, and measured quality using indicators derived from the International Standards of Tuberculosis Care. Measurements and Main Results: In 2009, there were 62,909 adult primary-care visits. During the first quarter of 2009, clinicians referred only 21% of patients with cough greater than or equal to 2 weeks for sputum smear microscopy and only 71% of patients with a positive sputum examination for tuberculosis treatment. These proportions increased to 53% and 84%, respectively, in the fourth quarter of 2009. The cumulative probability that a smear-positive patient with cough greater than or equal to 2 weeks would be appropriately evaluated and referred for treatment rose from 11% to 34% (P = 0.005). The quarterly number of tuberculosis cases identified and prescribed treatment also increased four-fold, from 5 to 21. Conclusions: Poor adherence to internationally accepted standards of tuberculosis care improved after introduction of real-time performance monitoring and was associated with increased tuberculosis case detection. Real-time monitoring and evaluation can strengthen health systems in low-income countries and facilitate operational research on the effectiveness and sustainability of interventions to improve tuberculosis case detection. PMID:21471088

  11. Chest Radiographic Patterns and the Transmission of Tuberculosis: Implications for Automated Systems

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Angela; Barrie, James; Winter, Christopher; Elamy, Abdel-Halim; Tyrrell, Gregory; Long, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Background Computer-aided detection to identify and diagnose pulmonary tuberculosis is being explored. While both cavitation on chest radiograph and smear-positivity on microscopy are independent risk factors for the infectiousness of pulmonary tuberculosis it is unknown which radiographic pattern, were it detectable, would provide the greatest public health benefit; i.e. reduced transmission. Herein we provide that evidence. Objectives 1) to determine whether pulmonary tuberculosis in a high income, low incidence country is more likely to present with “typical” adult-type pulmonary tuberculosis radiographic features and 2) to determine whether those with “typical” radiographic features are more likely than those without such features to transmit the organism and/or cause secondary cases. Methods Over a three-year period beginning January 1, 2006 consecutive adults with smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis in the Province of Alberta, Canada, were identified and their pre-treatment radiographs scored by three independent readers as “typical” (having an upper lung zone predominant infiltrate, with or without cavitation but no discernable adenopathy) or “atypical” (all others). Each patient’s pre-treatment bacillary burden was carefully documented and, during a 30-month transmission window, each patient’s transmission events were recorded. Mycobacteriology, radiology and transmission were compared in those with “typical” versus “atypical” radiographs. Findings A total of 97 smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis cases were identified, 69 (71.1%) with and 28 (28.9%) without “typical” chest radiographs. “Typical” cases were more likely to have high bacillary burdens and cavitation (Odds Ratios and 95% Confidence Intervals: 2.75 [1.04–7.31] and 9.10 [2.51–32.94], respectively). Typical cases were also responsible for most transmission events—78% of tuberculin skin test conversions (p<0.002) and 95% of secondary cases in reported

  12. Childhood tuberculosis: epidemiology, diagnosis, treatment, and vaccination.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Kuo-Sheng; Chang, Hsiao-Ling; Chien, Shun-Tien; Chen, Kwo-Liang; Chen, Kou-Huang; Mai, Ming-Hsin; Chen, Kow-Tong

    2013-10-01

    Despite the existence of a government-run tuberculosis (TB) control program, the current nationwide burden of TB continues to be a public health problem in Taiwan. Intense current and previous efforts into diagnostic, therapeutic, and preventive interventions have focused on TB in adults, but childhood TB has been relatively neglected. Children are particularly vulnerable to severe disease and death following infection, and children with latent infections become reservoirs for future transmission following disease reactivation in adulthood, thus fueling future epidemics. Additional research, understanding, and prevention of childhood TB are urgently needed. This review assesses the epidemiology, diagnosis, treatment, and relevant principles of TB vaccine development and presents efficacy data for the currently licensed vaccines.

  13. Diagnosis and Treatment of Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Caminero, José A; Cayla, Joan A; García-García, José-María; García-Pérez, Francisco J; Palacios, Juan J; Ruiz-Manzano, Juan

    2017-03-27

    In the last 2 decades, drug-resistant tuberculosis has become a threat and a challenge to worldwide public health. The diagnosis and treatment of these forms of tuberculosis are much more complex and prognosis clearly worsens as the resistance pattern intensifies. Nevertheless, it is important to remember that with the appropriatesystematic clinical management, most of these patients can be cured. These guidelines itemize the basis for the diagnosis and treatment of all tuberculosis patients, from those infected by strains that are sensitive to all drugs, to those who are extensively drug-resistant. Specific recommendations are given forall cases. The current and future role of new molecular methods for detecting resistance, shorter multi-drug-resistant tuberculosis regimens, and new drugs with activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis are also addressed.

  14. Effect of common and experimental anti-tuberculosis treatments on Mycobacterium tuberculosis growing as biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, James P.; Uy, Benedict; Phummarin, Narisa; Copp, Brent R.; Denny, William A.; Swift, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Much is known regarding the antibiotic susceptibility of planktonic cultures of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the bacterium responsible for the lung disease tuberculosis (TB). As planktonically-grown M. tuberculosis are unlikely to be entirely representative of the bacterium during infection, we set out to determine how effective a range of anti-mycobacterial treatments were against M. tuberculosis growing as a biofilm, a bacterial phenotype known to be more resistant to antibiotic treatment. Light levels from bioluminescently-labelled M. tuberculosis H37Rv (strain BSG001) were used as a surrogate for bacterial viability, and were monitored before and after one week of treatment. After treatment, biofilms were disrupted, washed and inoculated into fresh broth and plated onto solid media to rescue any surviving bacteria. We found that in this phenotypic state M. tuberculosis was resistant to the majority of the compounds tested. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) increased by 20-fold to greater than 1,000-fold, underlying the potential of this phenotype to cause significant problems during treatment. PMID:27904808

  15. Drug adherence and efficacy of smear microscopy in the diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis after 2 months of medication in North-western Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Kidenya, Benson R; Mshana, Stephen E; Gerwing-Adima, Lisa; Kidola, Jeremiah; Kasang, Christa

    2017-10-01

    The study aimed at assessing the Tuberculosis (TB) medication adherence level and the efficacy of smear microscopy in the diagnosing pulmonary TB at month 2. A prospective study was conducted at the four sites located in the Northern-western Tanzania. New smear positive, pulmonary TB patients were followed up and their adherence to TB medication assessed after 2 months of the treatment. In addition, the acid fast bacilli (AFB) smear microscopy was performed after 2 and 5 months of the treatment. All smear positive samples were subjected to geneXpert (MTB/RIF) assay and culture on the Lowenstein Jensen (LJ) media. A total of 331 smear positive, newly diagnosed patients with pulmonary TB were enrolled. The median age was 36 [Interquartile range (IQR): 28-45] years and males formed the slightly majority, 187 (56.5%) of the participants. A total of 105 (31.7%) patients were infected with HIV. Out of 331 patients, 36 (10.9%) were still AFB smear positive at the end of two month. Of these 19 (52.8%) were positive on GeneXpert MTB RIF and none was Rifampicin resistant. Of note, only 13 (31.1%) were culture positive (viable). None of the patients was positive at month 5. Poor adherence to TB medications in the first 2 months of treatment was observed in 56/331 (16.9%) [95% CI=12.9-21.0] of the patients. Over two thirds of smear positive patients are wrongly put in one month extension of the intensive phase treatment; this may cause increased costs and drug toxicity. Culture should be advocated to confirm smear positivity after 2 months of medications. TB treatment drug adherence in our setting is good and is associated with successful cure. No multidrug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) was observed. Continued surveillance and emphasizing of TB drug adherence should be kept upbeat in order to control tuberculosis in developing countries. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. Mixed-Strain Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infections and the Implications for Tuberculosis Treatment and Control

    PubMed Central

    van Helden, Paul D.; Wilson, Douglas; Colijn, Caroline; McLaughlin, Megan M.; Abubakar, Ibrahim; Warren, Robin M.

    2012-01-01

    Summary: Numerous studies have reported that individuals can simultaneously harbor multiple distinct strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. To date, there has been limited discussion of the consequences for the individual or the epidemiological importance of mixed infections. Here, we review studies that documented mixed infections, highlight challenges associated with the detection of mixed infections, and discuss possible implications of mixed infections for the diagnosis and treatment of patients and for the community impact of tuberculosis control strategies. We conclude by highlighting questions that should be resolved in order to improve our understanding of the importance of mixed-strain M. tuberculosis infections. PMID:23034327

  17. It's complicated: why do tuberculosis patients not initiate or stay adherent to treatment? A qualitative study from South Africa.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Donald; Claassens, Mareli

    2016-11-25

    Individuals who test positive for active tuberculosis (TB) but do not initiate treatment present a challenge to TB programmes because they contribute to ongoing transmission within communities. To better understand why individuals do not initiate treatment, or are adherent after initiating treatment, South African respondents were approached to obtain insights as to which factors enabled and inhibited the treatment process. This qualitative work was nested in a larger study investigating initial loss to follow-up (LTFU) amongst new smear positive TB patients across five provinces of South Africa. In-depth interviews were done with 41 adherent and initial LTFU respondents. Key issues contributing to initial LTFU appeared to be a poor knowledge, or low awareness of TB treatment; stigma around TB including its connection to HIV; immediate problems in the respondents' lives particularly poverty, lack of access to transport and the need to continue working; and problems in the healthcare facilities including under resourced facilities, poor functioning health systems and negative staff attitudes. In contrast the reasons given for being adherent related to the level of illness, support received at home and healthcare facilities, a belief in the health system and positive experiences in the health service including positive attitudes from staff. Key changes need to be made to the healthcare system to enable patients to initiate treatment and remain adherent, but the six month regimen of daily observed treatment presents real practical and personal challenges to patients. Alternative strategies to DOTS at facility level should be investigated to bring services closer to communities to encourage patients to access care, initiate and adhere to treatment.

  18. [Hospital detention in tuberculosis control].

    PubMed

    Villalbí, Joan R; Rodríguez-Campos, Mònica; Orcau, Àngels; Espachs, M Àngels; Salamero, Marta; Maldonado, José; Caylà, Joan A

    2016-01-01

    This article describes the actions of public health services of the city of Barcelona to prevent tuberculosis transmission by noncompliant smear-positive patients by using the possibilities of Spanish Law 3/1986. The actions were based on a resolution of the health authorities on the need to locate such patients and to detain them in hospitals to provide treatment. This involved police cooperation, informing noncompliant patients, and requesting ratification from the Administrative Court. The article describes the process and the characteristics of the cases involved. Over nine years, from July 2006 to June 2015, the law was used in only twelve cases. The authors conclude that the criteria of prudence and proportionality were used in the application of the law, which resulted in the treatment of patients who posed a risk to their environment, reducing the transmission of infection. Copyright © 2016 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  19. [Consensus document on treatment of tuberculosis exposure and latent tuberculosis infection in children].

    PubMed

    2006-01-01

    The most important causes of the current tuberculosis pandemic are poverty, HIV infection, drug resistance, and the spread of infection by patients with latent tuberculosis infection. In industrialized countries, the main reasons for the increase of this disease are immigration from developing countries and the lack of effective surveillance programs. The situation of children is even more serious as they are more vulnerable to the disease than adults. The children most at risk are those who live with adults at risk for tuberculosis, immigrant children, and adoptees from developing countries. Although children are bacilliferous only exceptionally, the appropriate management of bacilliferous tuberculosis exposure and latent tuberculosis infection in children contributes to the creation of close surveillance of nuclear families and rigorous study of contacts. Moreover, it could prevent serious forms of the disease, which are more frequent in children. The principal objective of this second consensus document of the Spanish Society of Pediatric Infectious Diseases (Sociedad Española de Infectología Pediátrica [SEIP]) is to unify the criteria for the treatment of tuberculosis exposure and latent tuberculosis infection in children. A further aim is to increase awareness of the need for strict detection measures in high-risk populations among health authorities.

  20. Cutaneous tuberculosis: diagnosis, histopathology and treatment - Part II*

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Josemir Belo; Figueiredo, Ana Roberta; Ferraz, Cláudia Elise; de Oliveira, Márcia Helena; da Silva, Perla Gomes; de Medeiros, Vanessa Lucília Sileira

    2014-01-01

    The evolution in the knowledge of tuberculosis' physiopathology allowed not only a better understanding of the immunological factors involved in the disease process, but also the development of new laboratory tests, as well as the establishment of a histological classification that reflects the host's ability to contain the infectious agent. At the same time, the increasing bacilli resistance led to alterations in the basic tuberculosis treatment scheme in 2009. This article critically examines laboratory and histological investigations, treatment regimens for tuberculosis and possible adverse reactions to the most frequently used drugs. PMID:25054739

  1. Cutaneous tuberculosis: diagnosis, histopathology and treatment - part II.

    PubMed

    Santos, Josemir Belo dos; Figueiredo, Ana Roberta; Ferraz, Cláudia Elise; Oliveira, Márcia Helena de; Silva, Perla Gomes da; Medeiros, Vanessa Lucília Sileira de

    2014-01-01

    The evolution in the knowledge of tuberculosis' physiopathology allowed not only a better understanding of the immunological factors involved in the disease process, but also the development of new laboratory tests, as well as the establishment of a histological classification that reflects the host's ability to contain the infectious agent. At the same time, the increasing bacilli resistance led to alterations in the basic tuberculosis treatment scheme in 2009. This article critically examines laboratory and histological investigations, treatment regimens for tuberculosis and possible adverse reactions to the most frequently used drugs.

  2. [Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. Epidemiology, treatment, prevention and diagnostic research].

    PubMed

    Perronne, C; de Truchis, P

    1995-01-01

    The recent augmentation of the prevalence of multidrug resistant (MDR) tuberculosis is related to the high incidence of tuberculosis in HIV infected people, especially in those with low social status and no medical care; several nosocomial epidemics of MDR tuberculosis were observed in American and European institutions where HIV-infected persons were hospitalized; these MDR tuberculosis were associated with a high mortality-rate and frequent nosocomial transmission to immunocompromised contacts and care workers. The rapid institution of an adequate treatment with ancient antituberculosis agents (cycloserin, capreomycin, aminoglycosides) and/or new drugs (rifabutine, ofloxacin, sparfloxacin, etc) is necessary to avoid mortality and to diminish transmission. Prevention of MDR tuberculosis transmission is very important: patient isolation, adequate and prolonged therapy, better detection of resistance with gene-amplification methods (PCR) which are under investigation.

  3. Prevalence of tuberculosis and treatment outcome among university students in Northwest Ethiopia: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Moges, Beyene; Amare, Bemnet; Yismaw, Gizachew; Workineh, Meseret; Alemu, Shitaye; Mekonnen, Desalew; Diro, Ermias; Tesema, Belay; Kassu, Afework

    2015-01-21

    Universities tend to be highly congregate settings, both in the classroom and in residences, and thus provide special opportunities for large number of persons to be exposed to a person with tuberculosis (TB). Despite the high prevalence of TB in Ethiopia, the TB prevalence and the treatment outcome among students have never been studied. Therefore, this study was aimed at determining the prevalence and treatment outcome of TB among students at University of Gondar from January 2007 to December 2011. Data on age, sex, TB type, category, and treatment outcome of students with TB was collected from medical records of University of Gondar Hospital, TB Directly Observed Treatment Short Course (DOTS) clinic. All TB cases diagnosed with smear, culture, and/or radiography were included in the study. During the five year study period in the university, there were an average of 36 students with TB per year out of a mean of 10,036 enrolled students. Smear positive pulmonary TB, smear negative pulmonary TB, and extra pulmonary TB, respectively, were observed in 46 (25.4%), 81 (44.8%) and 54 (29.8%) of the cases. The prevalence of all forms of TB per 100,000 populations in the University ranged from 297.6 in 2009 to 404 in 2011, respectively. The prevalence of TB in the Social Sciences and Humanities Faculty was higher than the one observed in the Medical College. The overall treatment outcome was classified as cured in 36 (19.9%), completed in 91 (50.3%), defaulted in 9 (5%), failed in 3 (1.7%), died in 1 (0.6%), and transferred out in 41 (22.7%) of the cases. Treatment success rate (TSR) among students in University was generally low ranging from 58.1% in 2009 to 82.9% in 2011 with a mean TSR of 70.2%. The prevalence of TB is higher in comparison to the national figure among students in University of Gondar. Active surveillance systems could be important to get a clear picture of the TB situation in such settings. Assessing the factors associated with the high prevalence to

  4. HIV treatment cascade in tuberculosis patients

    PubMed Central

    Lessells, Richard J.; Swaminathan, Soumya; Godfrey-Faussett, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Globally, the number of deaths associated with tuberculosis (TB) and HIV coinfection remains unacceptably high. We review the evidence around the impact of strengthening the HIV treatment cascade in TB patients and explore recent findings about how best to deliver integrated TB/HIV services. Recent findings There is clear evidence that the timely provision of antiretroviral therapy (ART) reduces mortality in TB/HIV coinfected adults. Despite this, globally in 2013, only around a third of known HIV-positive TB cases were treated with ART. Although there is some recent evidence exploring the barriers to achieve high coverage of HIV testing and ART initiation in TB patients, our understanding of which factors are most important and how best to address these within different health systems remains incomplete. There are some examples of good practice in the delivery of integrated TB/HIV services to improve the HIV treatment cascade. However, evidence of the impact of such strategies is of relatively low quality for informing integrated TB/HIV programming more broadly. In most settings, there remain barriers to higher-level organizational and functional integration. Summary There remains a need for commitment to patient-centred integrated TB/HIV care in countries affected by the dual epidemic. There is a need for better quality evidence around how best to deliver integrated services to strengthen the HIV treatment cascade in TB patients, both at primary healthcare level and within community settings. PMID:26352390

  5. Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Pai, Madhukar; Behr, Marcel A; Dowdy, David; Dheda, Keertan; Divangahi, Maziar; Boehme, Catharina C; Ginsberg, Ann; Swaminathan, Soumya; Spigelman, Melvin; Getahun, Haileyesus; Menzies, Dick; Raviglione, Mario

    2016-10-27

    Tuberculosis (TB) is an airborne infectious disease caused by organisms of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. Although primarily a pulmonary pathogen, M. tuberculosis can cause disease in almost any part of the body. Infection with M. tuberculosis can evolve from containment in the host, in which the bacteria are isolated within granulomas (latent TB infection), to a contagious state, in which the patient will show symptoms that can include cough, fever, night sweats and weight loss. Only active pulmonary TB is contagious. In many low-income and middle-income countries, TB continues to be a major cause of morbidity and mortality, and drug-resistant TB is a major concern in many settings. Although several new TB diagnostics have been developed, including rapid molecular tests, there is a need for simpler point-of-care tests. Treatment usually requires a prolonged course of multiple antimicrobials, stimulating efforts to develop shorter drug regimens. Although the Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine is used worldwide, mainly to prevent life-threatening TB in infants and young children, it has been ineffective in controlling the global TB epidemic. Thus, efforts are underway to develop newer vaccines with improved efficacy. New tools as well as improved programme implementation and financing are necessary to end the global TB epidemic by 2035.

  6. Smoking increases the risk of relapse after successful tuberculosis treatment

    PubMed Central

    d’Arc Lyra Batista, Joanna; de Fátima Pessoa Militão de Albuquerque, Maria; de Alencar Ximenes, Ricardo Arraes; Rodrigues, Laura Cunha

    2008-01-01

    Background Recent tobacco smoking has been identified as a risk factor for developing tuberculosis, and two studies which have investigated its association with relapse of tuberculosis after completion of treatment had conflicting results (and did not control for confounding). The objective of this study was to investigate risk factors for tuberculosis relapse, with emphasis on smoking. Methods A cohort of newly diagnosed TB cases was followed up from their discharge after completion of treatment (in 2001–2003) until October 2006 and relapses of tuberculosis ascertained during that period. A case of relapse was defined as a patient who started a second treatment during the follow up. Results Smoking (OR 2.53, 95% CI 1.23–5.21) and living in an area where the family health program was not implemented (OR 3.61, 95% CI 1.46–8.93) were found to be independently associated with relapse of tuberculosis. Conclusions Our results establish that smoking is associated with relapse of tuberculosis even after adjustment for the socioeconomic variables. Smoking cessation support should be incorporated in the strategies to improve effectiveness of Tuberculosis Control Programs. PMID:18556729

  7. Reciprocity and Ethical Tuberculosis Treatment and Control.

    PubMed

    Silva, Diego S; Dawson, Angus; Upshur, Ross E G

    2016-03-01

    This paper explores the notion of reciprocity in the context of active pulmonary and laryngeal tuberculosis (TB) treatment and related control policies and practices. We seek to do three things: First, we sketch the background to contemporary global TB care and suggest that poverty is a key feature when considering the treatment of TB patients. We use two examples from TB care to explore the role of reciprocity: isolation and the use of novel TB drugs. Second, we explore alternative means of justifying the use of reciprocity through appeal to different moral and political theoretical traditions (i.e., virtue ethics, deontology, and consequentialism). We suggest that each theory can be used to provide reasons to take reciprocity seriously as an independent moral concept, despite any other differences. Third, we explore general meanings and uses of the concept of reciprocity, with the primary intention of demonstrating that it cannot be simply reduced to other more frequently invoked moral concepts such as beneficence or justice. We argue that reciprocity can function as a mid-level principle in public health, and generally, captures a core social obligation arising once an individual or group is burdened as a result of acting for the benefit of others (even if they derive a benefit themselves). We conclude that while more needs to be explored in relation to the theoretical justification and application of reciprocity, sufficient arguments can be made for it to be taken more seriously as a key principle within public health ethics and bioethics more generally.

  8. Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Karen R

    2017-02-07

    This issue provides a clinical overview of tuberculosis, focusing on screening, prevention, diagnosis, and treatment. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self-Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing divisions and with the assistance of additional science writers and physician writers.

  9. Tuberculosis treatment adherence and fatality in Spain

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The adherence to long tuberculosis (TB) treatment is a key factor in TB control programs. Always some patients abandon the treatment or die. The objective of this study is to identify factors associated with defaulting from or dying during antituberculosis treatment. Methods Prospective study of a large cohort of TB cases diagnosed during 2006-2007 by 61 members of the Spanish Society of Pneumology and Thoracic Surgery (SEPAR). Predictive factors of completion outcome (cured plus completed treatment vs. defaulters plus lost to follow-up) and fatality (died vs. the rest of patients) were based on logistic regression, calculating odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results Of the 1490 patients included, 29.7% were foreign-born. The treatment outcomes were: cured 792 (53.2%), completed treatment 540 (36.2%), failure 2 (0.1%), transfer-out 33 (2.2%), default 27 (1.8%), death 27 (1.8%), lost to follow-up 65 (4.4%), other 4 (0.3%). Completion outcome reached 93.5% and poor adherence was associated with: being an immigrant (OR = 2.03; CI:1.06-3.88), living alone (OR = 2.35; CI:1.05-5.26), residents of confined institutions (OR = 4.79; CI:1.74-13.14), previous treatment (OR = 2.93; CI:1.44-5.98), being an injecting drug user (IDU) (OR = 9.51; CI:2.70-33.47) and treatment comprehension difficulties (OR = 2.93; CI:1.44-5.98). Case fatality was 1.8% and it was associated with the following variables: age 50 or over (OR = 10.88; CI:1.12-105.01), retired (OR = 12.26;CI:1.74-86.04), HIV-infected (OR = 9.93; CI:1.48-66.34), comprehension difficulties (OR = 4.07; CI:1.24-13.29), IDU (OR = 23.59; CI:2.46-225.99) and Directly Observed Therapy (DOT) (OR = 3.54; CI:1.07-11.77). Conclusion Immigrants, those living alone, residents of confined institutions, patients treated previously, those with treatment comprehension difficulties, and IDU patients have poor adherence and should be targeted for DOT. To reduce fatality rates, stricter monitoring is required

  10. Recurrence after treatment for pulmonary multidrug-resistant tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Becerra, Mercedes C; Appleton, Sasha C; Franke, Molly F; Chalco, Katiuska; Bayona, Jaime; Murray, Megan B; Mitnick, Carole D

    2010-09-15

    We estimated the proportion of recurrence within 2 years among adults cured by individualized multidrug-resistant tuberculosis regimens in Peru. Among 310 individuals with at least 24 months of follow-up, 16 experienced an episode of recurrent tuberculosis. If we assume the worst for treatment effectiveness-that all 16 episodes were caused by the original tuberculosis strain-then 5.2% (95% confidence interval, 3.0%-8.2%) experienced true relapse. This is an upper-bound estimate of relapse on which new regimens must improve.

  11. Hematological and liver toxicity of anti-tuberculosis drugs

    PubMed Central

    Mirlohi, Maryam-Sadat; Ekrami, Alireza; Shirali, Saeed; Ghobeishavi, Mehdi; Pourmotahari, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Tuberculosis (TB) is a major global health problem, and anti-tuberculosis drugs can cause severe adverse reactions. The aim of this study was to determine hematological and biochemical changes and associated risk factors in smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis patients undergoing treatment with standard protocols. Methods In a descriptive study, a total of 40 tuberculosis patients aged between 15–60 years were collected from hospitals in Khuzestan Province (Iran) from March 2013 to March 2014. The patients were treated with drugs (isoniazid, rifampicin, ethambutol, and pyrazinamide) during the initial two months, followed by isoniazid and rifampicin for the next four to six months. Activities of liver enzymes (ALT, AST, and ALP) and hematological parameters were recorded before and after treatment. Data were analyzed using paired samples t-test and Wilcoxon test by SPSS 16. Results After using drug treatments, hematological parameters (RBC, Hb, HCT, MCV, MCH, and MCHC), except platelet count, were changed significantly (p ≤ 0.001). Liver enzyme activities (ALT, AST, and ALP) were decreased significantly (p ≤ 0.001) after treatment. Conclusion In this study, changes of hematological and biochemical parameters have been observed in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis. It can be concluded that the anti-tuberculosis treatment is associated with changes of hematological parameters and liver enzymes. PMID:27790357

  12. Ten-year experiences of the tuberculosis control programme in the southern region of Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Yassin, M A; Datiko, D G; Shargie, E B

    2006-10-01

    The tuberculosis control programme, southern region of Ethiopia. To assess the impact of the expansion of the DOTS strategy on tuberculosis (TB) case finding and treatment outcome. Reports of TB patients treated since the introduction of DOTS in the region were reviewed. Patients were diagnosed and treated according to World Health Organization (WHO) recommendations. Case notification and treatment outcome reports were compiled quarterly at district level and submitted to the regional programme. Of 136,572 cases registered between 1995 and 2004, 47% were smear-positive, 25% were smear-negative and 28% had extra-pulmonary tuberculosis (EPTB). In 2004, 94% of the health institutions were covered by DOTS. Between 1995 and 2004, the smear-positive case notification rate increased from 45 to 143 per 100,000 population, the case detection rate from 22% to 45%, and the treatment success rate from 53% to 85%. The default and failure rates decreased from 26% to 6% and from 7% to 1%, respectively. There was a steady increase in the treatment success rate with the decentralisation of DOTS. Although 94% coverage was achieved after 10 years, the stepwise scale-up was important in securing resources and dealing with challenges. The programme achieved 85% treatment success; however, with the current low case detection rate (45%), the 70% WHO target seems unachievable in the absence of alternative case-finding mechanisms.

  13. Incidence of Paradoxical Tuberculosis-Associated Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome and Impact on Patient Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Bonnet, Maryline; Baudin, Elisabeth; Jani, Ilesh V.; Nunes, Elizabete; Verhoustraten, François; Calmy, Alexandra; Bastos, Rui; Bhatt, Nilesh B.; Michon, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    Objectives and Design We used data from a randomized trial of HIV-tuberculosis co-infected patients in Mozambique to determine the incidence and predictors of paradoxical tuberculosis-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) occurring within 12 weeks of starting antiretroviral therapy, and to evaluate its association with patient outcome at 48 weeks. Methods HIV-tuberculosis co-infected and antiretroviral therapy-naïve adults with less than 250 CD4/mm3 were randomized to a nevirapine or efavirenz-based antiretroviral therapy initiated 4 to 6 weeks after starting tuberculosis treatment, and were then followed for 48 weeks. Tuberculosis cases were diagnosed using WHO guidelines, and tuberculosis-IRIS by case definitions of the International Network for the Study of HIV-associated IRIS. Results The 573 HIV-tuberculosis co-infected patients who initiated antiretroviral therapy had a median CD4 count of 92 cells/mm3 and HIV-1 RNA of 5.6 log10 copies/mL. Mortality at week 48 was 6.1% (35/573). Fifty-three (9.2%) patients presented a tuberculosis-IRIS within 12 weeks of starting antiretroviral therapy. Being female and having a low CD4 count, high HIV-1 RNA load, low body mass index and smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis were independently associated with tuberculosis-IRIS. After adjustment for baseline body mass index, CD4 count and hemoglobin, occurrence of tuberculosis-IRIS was independently associated with 48-week mortality (aOR 2.72 95%CI 1.14-6.54). Immunological and HIV-1 virological responses and tuberculosis treatment outcomes were not different between patients with and without tuberculosis-IRIS. Conclusion In this large prospective cohort, tuberculosis-IRIS occurrence within 12 weeks of starting antiretroviral therapy was independently associated with the mortality of HIV-tuberculosis co-infected patients at 48 weeks post antiretroviral therapy initiation. PMID:24367678

  14. Understanding pharmacokinetics to improve tuberculosis treatment outcome

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Jonathan; Heysell, Scott K

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Tuberculosis (TB) remains the leading cause of death from a curable infectious disease; drug-resistant TB threatens to dismantle all prior gains in global control. Suboptimal circulating anti-TB drug concentrations can lead to lack of cure and acquired drug resistance. Areas covered This review will introduce pharmacokinetic parameters for key anti-TB drugs, as well as the indications and limitations of measuring these parameters in clinical practice. Current and novel methodologies for delivering anti-TB pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic data are highlighted and gaps in operational research described. Expert opinion Individual pharmacokinetic variability is commonplace, underappreciated and difficult to predict without therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM). Pharmacokinetic thresholds associated with poor TB treatment outcome in drug-susceptible TB have recently been described and may now guide the application of TDM, but require validation in a variety of settings and comorbidities. Dried blood spots for TDM and prepackaged multidrug plates for minimum inhibitory concentration testing will overcome barriers of accessibility and represent areas for innovation. Operationalizing pharmacokinetics has the potential to improve TB outcomes in the most difficult-to-treat forms of the disease such as multidrug resistance. Clinical studies in these areas are eagerly anticipated and we expect will better define the rational introduction of novel therapeutics. PMID:24597717

  15. Implementation of the DOTS strategy for tuberculosis in the Leningrad Region, Russian Federation (1998-1999).

    PubMed

    Ruohonen, R P; Goloubeva, T M; Trnka, L; Fomin, M M; Zhemkova, G A; Sinitsyn, A V; Lichachev, A A; Koskela, K G

    2002-03-01

    The DOTS pilot project for tuberculosis control in the Leningrad Region of the Russian Federation, supported by the Finnish Lung Health Association and the World Health Organization (WHO). To assess the efficacy of WHO-recommended standard short-course chemotherapy in newly detected pulmonary tuberculosis cases positive by smear or with extensive lung lesions suggestive of culture positivity, under project conditions. Analysis of data on case detection, sputum smear conversion and treatment outcome based on standardised (WHO) registers from districts and a central computerised database. Of 859 adult pulmonary tuberculosis cases (292 smear-positive) notified in the Leningrad Region in the study period, 312 new cases were included in the project. The sputum conversion rate at the end of the second month was 82.8% and 91.1% at the end of the third month. Of bacteriologically confirmed cases, 71.3% were successfully treated, 4.9% died, 11.7% defaulted and 8.1% failed. In the first year of the pilot project in the Leningrad Region, the DOTS strategy revealed feasibility and moderate efficacy among new pulmonary tuberculosis cases who were either smear-positive or showed extensive lung lesions on chest X-ray, and who were therefore of high epidemiological and medical priority.

  16. [Tuberculosis incidence and primary drug resistance rates in young soldiers: data from 14 military hospitals in Turkey].

    PubMed

    Taş, Dilaver; Taşçı, Cantürk; Demirer, Ersin; Sezer, Ogün; Okutan, Oğuzhan; Kartaloğlu, Zafer

    2012-01-01

    Tuberculosis is an important health care problem worldwide as well as in Turkey and the control programmes are still in progress. Epidemiological data are necessary to conduct control studies related to the disease. Tuberculosis incidence and drug resistance rates are two necessary parameters which should be monitored for the effective establishment of tuberculosis control. In this objective, tuberculosis incidence and drug resistance rates were studied in young subjects performing their compulsory military service in Turkish Armed Forces. The study was performed in 14 military hospitals which served for the country-wide soldier patients. Based on the computerized medical database of these military hospitals, conscripts diagnosed with tuberculosis between January 01, 2009 and December 31, 2009 were retrospectively evaluated. Drug sensitivity tests of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex isolates were done prior to the treatment in the two military medical training hospitals of the two big cities of Turkey (Ankara and Istanbul). There were a total of 259 new tuberculosis cases in 2009 and they were all male with a mean age of 22.51 ± 4.63 years. The number of patients with pulmonary, extrapulmonary (pleuresia, lymphadenitis, others) and both pulmonary and extrapulmonary involvements were 175 (67.5%), 72 (27.8%) and 12 (4.6%), respectively. The total rate of pulmonary tuberculosis cases was 72.2% (187/259) and 64.7% (121/187) of them were smear positive. Since the number of soldiers in Turkish army in the midyear was 537.200; total tuberculosis, pulmonary tuberculosis and smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis incidences were estimated as 48.2/100.000, 34.8/100.000 and 22.5/100.000, respectively. Drug sensitivity tests was performed for the M.tuberculosis complex strains isolated from 104 cases. Primary resistance rate to at least one drug was detected as 16.3% (n= 17), while the rates of resistance for isoniazid, rifampicin, ethambutol and streptomycin were 12

  17. An Overview of Phytotherapeutic Approaches for the Treatment of Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Dushyant; Yadav, Jaya Parkash

    2017-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is highly infectious disease causing morbidity and death. Its causative organism is a contagious bacterium, Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The incidence of tuberculosis is increasing worldwide due to the emergence of drug resistance bacteria. The resistance is being developed in Mycobacterium tuberculosis against both the first line as well as the second line drugs used for the treatment. The tuberculosis control programme is being complicated and failed to get the desired impact due to the development of multi-drug resistant (MDR) and extensively-drug resistant (XDR) strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. So, there is a critical requirement to discover and produce newer anti-TB drugs with unique drug targets. Medicinal plants have been used for curing the diseases from ancient time. Medicinal plants are the novel sources for the production of alternate medicines for the treatment of TB caused by MDR and XDR strains. Plants produce a number of different kinds of secondary metabolites such as Alkaloids, Coumarins, Flavonoids, Polyphenols, Terpenoids, Quinines, etc. which have antimicrobial activity; thus may be useful in control of tuberculosis. These compounds do not contribute directly in growth and development but used by the plants for their defense. On the basis of various sources in the literature, about 72 phytochemicals constituents responsible for anti tubercular activity isolated from different plants have been explained along with their structure. Most effective isolated compounds from plants are plumbagin, maritinone, 3, 3'-biplumbagin, aloe emodin, epigallocatechin and umckalin. These phytochemicals are helpful for the treatment of MDR, XDR type of tuberculosis. This review describes an overview of the current synthetic medicines used for treatment of TB and the work carried out on anti tubercular plants along with their phytochemicals.

  18. [Factors associated with treatment adherence for tuberculosis infection].

    PubMed

    Gallardo, Carmen R; Gea Velázquez de Castro, María Teresa; Requena Puche, Juana; Miralles Bueno, Juan José; Rigo Medrano, María Vicenta; Aranaz Andrés, Jesús M

    2014-01-01

    To analyze adherence to treatment of tuberculosis infection and to identify risk factors for its compliance. An observational historical cohort study. Hospital Universitari Sant Joan d'Alacant (Alicante). All patients with a tuberculin skin test (TST) done during tuberculosis contact tracing during 6 years. We included 764 tuberculosis contacts in the analysis. 59.7% of the 566 patients who completed the contact tracing, had tuberculosis infection (TI). Of the patients with TI, 45.6% had not started treatment for tuberculosis infection (TTBI). Factors associated with not starting TTBI were: age (36-65 years, RR: 5.8; 95% CI: 1.2-27.5, and > 65 years, RR: 11.3; 95% CI: 2.0-64.0), the social relationship with TB case (RR: 2.2; 95% CI 1.2-3.8), and the TST reaction (≥ 15mm; RR: 0.5; 95% CI: 0.3-0.9). The completion rate for TTBI was 80.4% among people who started therapy. The treatment regimen was associated with greater compliance to TTBT (7-9H, RR: 12.7; 95% CI: 1.5-107.3). The treatment compliance rate of Tuberculosis infection was high among people who started therapy. Almost a half of the contacts with TI did not start treatment, and associated factors were: age, social relationship, and the TST reaction. The treatment regimen was associated with greater compliance. It is important to know the factors associated with adherence to treatment of TI in each health area, and focus efforts on risk groups; thereby approaching the global control of tuberculosis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  19. Recurrent tuberculosis and associated factors: A five - year countrywide study in Uzbekistan.

    PubMed

    Gadoev, Jamshid; Asadov, Damin; Harries, Anthony D; Parpieva, Nargiza; Tayler-Smith, Katie; Isaakidis, Petros; Ali, Engy; Hinderaker, Sven Gudmund; Ogtay, Gozalov; Ramsay, Andrew; Jalolov, Avazbek; Dara, Masoud

    2017-01-01

    In Uzbekistan, despite stable and relatively high tuberculosis treatment success rates, relatively high rates of recurrent tuberculosis have recently been reported. Recurrent tuberculosis is when a patient who was treated for pulmonary tuberculosis and cured, later develops the disease again. This requires closer analysis to identify possible causes and recommend interventions to improve the situation. Using countrywide data, this study aimed to analyse trends in recurrent tuberculosis cases and describe their associations with socio-demographic and clinical factors. Countrywide retrospective cohort study comparing recurrent tuberculosis patients with all new tuberculosis patients registered within the NTP between January 2006 and December 2010 using routinely collected data. Determinants studied were baseline characteristics and treatment outcomes. Of 107,380 registered patients during the period January 2006 and December 2010, 9358 (8.7%) were recurrent cases. Between 2006 and 2008, the number of recurrent cases per annum increased from 1530 to 2081, then fell slightly thereafter from 2081 to 1888 cases. The proportion of all notified cases during this period increased from 6.5% to 9.9%. Factors associated with recurrent tuberculosis included age (35-55 years old), having smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis, residing in certain areas of Uzbekistan, having particular co-morbidities (including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and HIV), and being unemployed, a pensioner or disabled. Recurrent tuberculosis patients also had a higher likelihood of having an unfavourable treatment outcome. Despite signs of declining national tuberculosis notifications between 2006 and 2010, the relative proportion of recurrent cases appears to have increased. These findings, together with the identification of possible risk factors associated with recurrent tuberculosis, highlight various areas where Uzbekistan needs to focus its tuberculosis control efforts, particularly in

  20. Pulmonary paragonimiasis and tuberculosis in Sorsogon, Philippines.

    PubMed

    Belizario, V; Guan, M; Borja, L; Ortega, A; Leonardia, W

    1997-01-01

    The clinical epidemiology of pulmonary paragonimiasis and tuberculosis was investigated in a known endemic municipality of Sorsogon, Philippines. Records of diagnosed tuberculosis patients on treatment and follow up at the local Rural Health Unit over a two year period from 1993 to 1994 were reviewed to provide an overview of pulmonary tuberculosis in the area, specifically to describe the population at risk, the basis for diagnosis and the proportion of case notification who were sputum negative. Patients from the same group of individuals as well as undiagnosed tuberculosis patients with productive cough, fever with chest and/or back pain, or hemoptysis were examined to look into clinical manifestations, duration of symptoms, history of crab-eating and sputum examination results for acid-fast bacilli and Paragonimus. There was difficulty in determining the number of non-responders as the records did not have any provision for the recording of such. Annual tuberculosis case notification rates for the two years (374 and 401 per 100,000 population) were higher than the national figure in 1991 (325 per 100,000 population) indicating that tuberculosis is still a major health problem in the area and tuberculosis control efforts may have to be more aggressive to better contain the disease. Twenty-six out of 160 individuals surveyed were sputum smear positive for Paragonimus. Paragonimiasis rates were not significantly different in the two groups (15.6% vs 16.9%, respectively) indicating that there is a need for routine sputum examination for Paragonimus which is not available at present. Only six patients surveyed were sputum smear positive for acid-fast bacilli. A high index of suspicion is necessary to diagnose paragonimiasis and to be able to differentiate it from tuberculosis. The diagnosis may be suggested by a patient's place of origin being a known endemic area, a long period of chronic cough and the habit of eating raw or insufficiently cooked crabs or crayfish

  1. Treatment Outcome of Tuberculosis Patients under Directly Observed Treatment Short Course and Factors Affecting Outcome in Southern Ethiopia: A Five-Year Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Gebrezgabiher, Gebremedhin; Romha, Gebremedhin; Ejeta, Eyasu; Asebe, Getahun; Zemene, Endalew; Ameni, Gobena

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the major public health and socio-economic issues in the 21st century globally. Assessment of TB treatment outcomes, and monitoring and evaluation of its risk factors in Directly Observed Treatment Short Course (DOTS) are among the major indicators of the performance of a national TB control program. Hence, this institution-based retrospective study was conducted to determine the treatment outcome of TB patients and investigate factors associated with unsuccessful outcome at Dilla University Referral Hospital, southern Ethiopia. Five years (2008 to 2013) TB record of TB clinic of the hospital was reviewed. A total 1537 registered TB patients with complete information were included. Of these, 942 (61.3%) were male, 1015 (66%) were from rural areas, 544 (35.4%) were smear positive pulmonary TB (PTB+), 816 (53.1%) were smear negative pulmonary TB (PTB-) and 177(11.5%) were extra pulmonary TB (EPTB) patients. Records of the 1537 TB patients showed that 181 (11.8%) were cured, 1129(73.5%) completed treatment, 171 (11.1%) defaulted, 52 (3.4%) died and 4 (0.3%) had treatment failure. The overall mean treatment success rate of the TB patients was 85.2%. The treatment success rate of the TB patients increased from 80.5% in September 2008-August 2009 to 84.8% in September 2012–May 2013. Tuberculosis type, age, residence and year of treatment were significantly associated with unsuccessful treatment outcome. The risk of unsuccessful outcome was significantly higher among TB patients from rural areas (AOR = 1.63, 95% CI: 1.21–2.20) compared to their urban counterparts. Unsuccessful treatment outcome was also observed in PTB- patients (AOR = 1.77, 95% CI: 1.26–2.50) and EPTB (AOR = 2.07, 95% CI: 1.28–3.37) compared to the PTB+ patients. In conclusion, it appears that DOTS have improved treatment success in the hospital during five years. Regular follow-up of patients with poor treatment outcome and provision of health information on TB

  2. Treatment Outcome of Tuberculosis Patients under Directly Observed Treatment Short Course and Factors Affecting Outcome in Southern Ethiopia: A Five-Year Retrospective Study.

    PubMed

    Gebrezgabiher, Gebremedhin; Romha, Gebremedhin; Ejeta, Eyasu; Asebe, Getahun; Zemene, Endalew; Ameni, Gobena

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the major public health and socio-economic issues in the 21st century globally. Assessment of TB treatment outcomes, and monitoring and evaluation of its risk factors in Directly Observed Treatment Short Course (DOTS) are among the major indicators of the performance of a national TB control program. Hence, this institution-based retrospective study was conducted to determine the treatment outcome of TB patients and investigate factors associated with unsuccessful outcome at Dilla University Referral Hospital, southern Ethiopia. Five years (2008 to 2013) TB record of TB clinic of the hospital was reviewed. A total 1537 registered TB patients with complete information were included. Of these, 942 (61.3%) were male, 1015 (66%) were from rural areas, 544 (35.4%) were smear positive pulmonary TB (PTB+), 816 (53.1%) were smear negative pulmonary TB (PTB-) and 177(11.5%) were extra pulmonary TB (EPTB) patients. Records of the 1537 TB patients showed that 181 (11.8%) were cured, 1129(73.5%) completed treatment, 171 (11.1%) defaulted, 52 (3.4%) died and 4 (0.3%) had treatment failure. The overall mean treatment success rate of the TB patients was 85.2%. The treatment success rate of the TB patients increased from 80.5% in September 2008-August 2009 to 84.8% in September 2012-May 2013. Tuberculosis type, age, residence and year of treatment were significantly associated with unsuccessful treatment outcome. The risk of unsuccessful outcome was significantly higher among TB patients from rural areas (AOR = 1.63, 95% CI: 1.21-2.20) compared to their urban counterparts. Unsuccessful treatment outcome was also observed in PTB- patients (AOR = 1.77, 95% CI: 1.26-2.50) and EPTB (AOR = 2.07, 95% CI: 1.28-3.37) compared to the PTB+ patients. In conclusion, it appears that DOTS have improved treatment success in the hospital during five years. Regular follow-up of patients with poor treatment outcome and provision of health information on TB treatment to

  3. Tuberculosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Can I Help Someone Who's Being Bullied? Volunteering Tuberculosis KidsHealth > For Teens > Tuberculosis Print A A A What's in this article? ... Duration When to Call the Doctor en español Tuberculosis TB Basics Tuberculosis (also known as "TB") is ...

  4. Tuberculosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Tuberculosis KidsHealth > For Teens > Tuberculosis A A A What's in this article? TB ... Duration When to Call the Doctor en español Tuberculosis TB Basics Tuberculosis (also known as "TB") is ...

  5. Adverse Reactions Due to Directly Observed Treatment Strategy Therapy in Chinese Tuberculosis Patients: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Xiaozhen; Tang, Shaowen; Xia, Yinyin; Wang, Xiaomeng; Yuan, Yanli; Hu, Daiyu; Liu, Feiying; Wu, Shanshan; Zhang, Yuan; Yang, Zhirong; Tu, Dehua; Chen, Yixin; Deng, Peiyuan; Ma, Yu; Chen, Ru; Zhan, Siyan

    2013-01-01

    Background More than 1 million tuberculosis (TB) patients are receiving directly observed treatment strategy (DOTS) therapy in China every year. As to the profile of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) due to DOTS therapy, no consensus has been reached. There is no report regarding ADRs due to DOTS therapy with a large Chinese TB population. This study aimed to determine the incidence and prognosis of ADRs due to DOTS therapy, and to evaluate their impact on anti-TB treatment in China. Methods A prospective population-based cohort study was performed during 2007–2008. Sputum smear positive pulmonary TB patients who received DOTS therapy were included and followed up for six to nine months in 52 counties of four regions in China. The suspected ADRs were recorded and reviewed by Chinese State Food and Drug Administration. Results A total of 4304 TB patients were included in this study. 649 patients (15.08%) showed at least one ADR and 766 cases in total were detected. The incidence (count) of ADR based on affected organ was: liver dysfunction 6.34% (273), gastrointestinal disorders 3.74% (161), arthralgia 2.51% (108), allergic reactions 2.35% (101), neurological system disorders 2.04% (88), renal impairment 0.07% (3) and others 0.05% (2). Most cases of ADRs (95%) had a good clinical outcome, while two with hepatotoxicity and one with renal impairment died. Compared with patients without ADRs, patients with ADRs were more likely to have positive smear test results at the end of the intensive phase (adjusted OR, 2.00; 95%CI, 1.44–2.78) and unsuccessful anti-TB outcomes (adjusted OR, 2.58; 95%CI, 1.43–4.68). Conclusions The incidence of ADRs due to DOTS therapy was 15.08%. Those ADRs had a substantial impact on TB control in China. This highlighted the importance of developing strategies to ameliorate ADRs both to improve the quality of patient care and to control TB safely. PMID:23750225

  6. Evaluation of the semiautomated Abbott LCx Mycobacterium tuberculosis assay for direct detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in respiratory specimens.

    PubMed Central

    Ausina, V; Gamboa, F; Gazapo, E; Manterola, J M; Lonca, J; Matas, L; Manzano, J R; Rodrigo, C; Cardona, P J; Padilla, E

    1997-01-01

    Five hundred twenty processed respiratory specimens from 326 patients received for the diagnosis of tuberculosis or other mycobacterial infections were tested by means of the LCx Mycobacterium tuberculosis Assay from Abbott Laboratories, which uses ligase chain reaction technology for the direct detection of M. tuberculosis complex in respiratory specimens. The results of the LCx M. tuberculosis Assay were compared with the results of culture and staining techniques. After a combination of culture results and the patient's clinical data, a total of 195 specimens were collected from 110 patients who were positively diagnosed as having pulmonary tuberculosis. Twenty-three of these 195 specimens which corresponded to 10 patients with a history of pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) and anti-TB treatment ranging from 1 to 6 months were culture negative. The other 172 specimens were culture positive for M. tuberculosis. With an overall positivity rate of 37.5% (195 of 520 specimens), the sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were 90.8, 100, 100, and 94.7%, respectively, for the LCx M. tuberculosis Assay; 88.2, 100, 100, and 93.4%, respectively, for culture; and 82.6, 92, 72.9, and 97.6%, respectively, for acid-fast staining. For 161 specimens (82.6%) from patients smear positive for the disease and 34 specimens (17.4%) from patients smear negative for the disease, the sensitivity values for the LCx M. tuberculosis Assay were 98.8 and 53%, respectively. There were no statistically significant differences in the sensitivities and specificities between the LCx M. tuberculosis Assay and culture (P > 0.05). Conclusively, the LCx M. tuberculosis Assay has proved to have an acceptable sensitivity and a high specificity in detecting M. tuberculosis and has the potential of reducing the diagnosis time to an 8-h working day. PMID:9230369

  7. Extra-Pulmonary Tuberculosis and Its Surgical Treatment.

    PubMed

    Fry, Donald E

    2016-08-01

    Tuberculous infection has declined in the United States but remains a major infectious disease with morbidity and death for millions of people. Although the primary therapy is drugs, complications of the disease require surgical interventions. The published literature on tuberculosis was reviewed to provide a current understanding of the medical treatment of the disease and to define those areas where surgical intervention continues to be necessary. Multi-drug therapy for tuberculosis has become the standard and has reduced the complications of the disease necessitating surgical intervention. However, multi-drug resistance and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis continue to be major problems and require effective initial therapy with surveillance to define resistant infections. The roles of surgery in tuberculosis are in establishing the diagnosis in extra-pulmonary infection and in the management of complications of disseminated disease. Tuberculosis remains an occupational risk for surgeons and surgical personnel. Tuberculosis is still a global problem, mandating recognition and treatment. Surgeons should have an understanding of the diverse presentation and complications of the disease.

  8. Lethal tuberculosis in a previously healthy adult with IL-12 receptor deficiency.

    PubMed

    Tabarsi, Payam; Marjani, Majid; Mansouri, Nahal; Farnia, Parisa; Boisson-Dupuis, Stephanie; Bustamante, Jacinta; Abel, Laurent; Adimi, Parisa; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Mansouri, Davood

    2011-08-01

    A 33-year-old man was admitted in hospital due to fever, generalized lymphadenopathy, and hepatosplenomegaly. He had a history of anti-tuberculosis treatment in the previous 3 years. Despite normal chest radiograph, a sputum sample was smear-positive for acid-fast bacilli, and polymerase chain reaction was positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. Drug susceptibility test revealed resistance to isoniazid and rifampin. Evaluation of the patient's immune system revealed IL-12Rβ1 deficiency. The patient died of disseminated tuberculosis (TB), despite appropriate antibiotic treatment. This is the first IL-12 receptor-deficient patient presenting with disseminated TB in adulthood, without any previous relevant medical history. This diagnosis should be considered in selected adult patients with unexplained, overwhelming TB. IL-12Rβ1 deficiency is a genetic etiology of severe TB in adults and should be considered in adult patients with disseminated TB.

  9. [Reasons for stopping and restarting tuberculosis treatment in Libreville (Gabon)].

    PubMed

    Mvé, Médard Toung; Bisvigou, Ulrich; Barry, Ndeye Coura Diop; Ondo, Clément Ella; Nkoghe, Dieudonné

    2010-01-01

    Tuberculosis is an important public health problem in Gabon, and the DOTS strategy recommended by the World Health Organisation has not been successfully applied. In 2006, 45% of patients abandoned treatment during the first phase. A pilot cross-sectional study was thus conducted from September 1 to November 30, 2006, at the Nkembo Tuberculosis Centre in Libreville, Gabon. Thirty patients with positive microscopy results who returned after having interrupted treatment completed a standardised questionnaire. They were mainly young men: their mean age was 33 years old and the male/female ratio was 2.7. Reasons for having abandoned treatment were a lack of money to pay for it (43%) and an impression that they had been cured (23%). The motivations for resuming treatment were the return of symptoms (73%). The risk of drug resistance requires that the Gabonese government play a greater role in the fight against tuberculosis.

  10. Poor performance status is a strong predictor for death in patients with smear-positive pulmonary TB admitted to two Japanese hospitals.

    PubMed

    Horita, Nobuyuki; Miyazawa, Naoki; Yoshiyama, Takashi; Kojima, Ryota; Omori, Naoko; Kaneko, Takeshi; Ishigatsubo, Yoshiaki

    2013-07-01

    Estimation of performance status (PS) has been assessed as a tool to determine which patients with newly diagnosed pulmonary TB (PTB) are most at risk of dying. This simple prediction rule has not been validated in patients with PTB with different background characteristics and from different geographic areas. A retrospective cohort study was conducted in two Japanese hospitals in different regions and included 432 inpatients with newly diagnosed smear-positive non-multidrug-resistant lung TB without HIV infection. The patients had a mean ± SD age of 64.9 ± 19.7 years and 135 were female (31.3%). Detailed nursing charts were reviewed to estimate PS, which was graded 0 (best condition), 1, 2, 3 or 4 (worst condition), for each patient. Single variable and multivariable Cox regression analyses models revealed that a one-point increase in PS was associated with a 2.8-fold (95% CI 2.2-3.6) and 2.3-fold (95% CI 1.8-3.0), adjusted for age, gender, comorbidities and treatment regimen, increase in the HR for death (p < 0.001 for both models). Kaplan-Meier curves also showed a significant difference in mortality among different PS groups (p < 0.001). PS was strongly associated with mortality from PTB in the study cohort. Estimation of PS at the start of treatment for newly diagnosed PTB patients could be a useful tool in case management in resource-limited countries.

  11. Shortening Isolation of Patients With Suspected Tuberculosis by Using Polymerase Chain Reaction Analysis: A Nationwide Cross-sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Fløe, Andreas; Hilberg, Ole; Thomsen, Vibeke Østergaard; Lillebaek, Troels; Wejse, Christian

    2015-11-01

    Isolation of patients suspected for pulmonary tuberculosis is guided by serial sputum smears. This can result in isolation for days for patients with noncontagious tuberculosis. To determine whether a single sample negative for Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex at polymerase chain reaction (PCR) can guide isolation. We retrospectively evaluated sputum samples analyzed for M. tuberculosis complex at the International Reference Laboratory of Mycobacteriology, Copenhagen, Denmark in 2002-2011. We selected culture-confirmed tuberculosis cases with ≥3 samples within 14 days before or after the initial culture-positive sample. We repeated the process for those with ≥2 samples within 28 days. The primary outcome was PCR-negative, smear-positive patients. We included 53 533 sputum samples from 20 928 individuals; 1636 had culture-confirmed tuberculosis. Of these, 856 had ≥3 sputum samples analyzed within the 28 days, and 482 had ≥1 PCR result. Nine patients (2.5% of smear-positive patients) were smear positive/PCR negative; 8 of the 9 had a smear-positive result in only 1 of 3 samples, and 5 had a low smear grade. Of 722 patients with 2 samples, 7 (1.3% of smear-positive patients) were smear positive/PCR negative. Overall, none were smear positive for the sample that produced the negative PCR result. Primary PCR identified >97% of serial smear-positive cases. The majority of the missed cases had low-grade smears. Nevertheless, the occurrence of smear-positive/PCR-negative cases underlines the importance of increasing the quantity and quality of samples. Moreover, it is important that samples analyzed with PCR are cultured, owing to higher-sensitivity drug susceptibility testing, differential diagnosis, and surveillance. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Efficacy and safety of a 4-drug fixed-dose combination regimen compared with separate drugs for treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis: the Study C randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Lienhardt, Christian; Cook, Sharlette V; Burgos, Marcos; Yorke-Edwards, Victoria; Rigouts, Leen; Anyo, Gladys; Kim, Sang-Jae; Jindani, Amina; Enarson, Don A; Nunn, Andrew J

    2011-04-13

    Fixed-dose combinations (FDCs) of drugs for treatment of tuberculosis have been advocated to prevent the emergence of drug resistance. To assess the efficacy and safety of a 4-drug FDC for the treatment of tuberculosis. The Study C trial, a parallel-group, open-label, noninferiority, randomized controlled trial conducted in 11 sites in Africa, Asia, and Latin America between 2003 and 2008. Patients were 1585 adults with newly diagnosed smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis. Patients were randomized to receive daily treatment with 4 drugs (rifampicin, isoniazid, pyrazinamide, ethambutol) given as an FDC (n = 798 patients) or separately (n = 787) in the 8-week intensive phase of treatment. Favorable treatment outcome, defined as negative culture result at 18 months post randomization and not having already been classified as unfavorable. Noninferiority was dependent on consistent results from a per-protocol and modified intention-to-treat analysis, using 2 different models for the latter, classifying all changes of treatment or refusal to continue treatment (eg, bacteriological failure/relapse, adverse event, default, drug resistance) as unfavorable (model 1) and classifying changes of treatment for reasons other than therapeutic outcomes according to their 18-month bacteriological outcome if available (post hoc model 2). The prespecified noninferiority margin was 4%. In the per-protocol analysis, 555 of 591 patients (93.9%) had a favorable outcome in the FDC group vs 548 of 579 (94.6%) in the separate-drugs group (risk difference, -0.7% [90% confidence interval {CI}, -3.0% to 1.5%]). In the model 1 analysis, 570 of 684 patients (83.3%) had a favorable outcome in the FDC group vs 563 of 664 (84.8%) in the separate-drugs group (risk difference, -1.5% [90% CI, -4.7% to 1.8%]). In the post hoc model 2 analysis, 591 of 658 patients (89.8%) in the FDC group and 589 of 647 (91.0%) in the separate-drugs group had a favorable outcome (risk difference, -1.2% [90% CI, -3.9% to

  13. Tuberculosis 2: exploring methods of diagnosis, treatment regimens and concordance.

    PubMed

    Jarvis, Miles

    The second in this two part unit on tuberculosis examines diagnosis and treatment options. Part I outlined background on epidemiology and control of this disease. This part draws on the guidance set out by the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence. Diagnostic methods are discussed and the standard treatment regimen is outlined.

  14. Active case finding for pulmonary tuberculosis using mobile digital chest radiography: an observational study.

    PubMed

    Story, A; Aldridge, R W; Abubakar, I; Stagg, H R; Lipman, M; Watson, J M; Hayward, A C

    2012-11-01

    Mobile digital chest radiography (CXR) is used routinely to screen for pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) in London among homeless populations, persons accessing drug treatment services and prisoners. 1) To establish the sensitivity and specificity of mobile digital CXR, and 2) to test the hypothesis that actively identified cases have reduced odds of sputum smear positivity vs. those presenting passively to health care services from the same populations. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated using a gold standard comparator of culture-confirmed cases of PTB reported to the national surveillance system within 90 days of screening. Logistic regression was used to determine whether actively detected cases had reduced odds of smear positivity compared to passively detected cases after adjustment for confounding. The intervention had a sensitivity of 81.8% (95%CI 64.5-93.0) and a specificity of 99.2% (95%CI 99.1-99.3). After adjusting for confounding, there was evidence that cases identified through screening were less likely to be smear-positive than passively identified cases (OR 0.34, 95%CI 0.14-0.85; likelihood ratio test P = 0.022). Digital CXR achieves a high level of sensitivity and specificity in an operational setting; targeted mobile radiographic screening can reduce the risk of onward transmission by identifying cases before they become infectious.

  15. Implementing intensified tuberculosis case-finding among street-connected youth and young adults in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Mercer, T.; Kimani, S.; Braitstein, P.; Buziba, N.; Carter, E. J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Street-connected youth and young adults (SCY) suffer a myriad of health problems. In Kenya, SCY are at high risk for tuberculosis (TB) due to their congregate living situations. TB screening is not routinely implemented in SCY and there has been no published literature on the burden of TB in SCY in western Kenya. Program description: In 2011, the AMPATH TB Program, an experienced TB screening program, partnered with the Tumaini Center, a trusted street youth organization, to conduct intensified case finding (ICF) for pulmonary TB among SCY. Our program aimed to investigate the numbers of SCY who reported symptoms and those diagnosed with smear-positive pulmonary TB, and link SCY with TB to treatment. Results: Of 116 SCY who were screened, 114 (98%) had a positive questionnaire; 104 (90%) provided a spot sputum sample, 39 (34%) provided a morning sputum sample, and 111 (97%) reported cough of >2 weeks. One street youth tested smear-positive for TB and was treated through to cure. Conclusions: Implementing TB ICF is feasible in low-resource settings through unique collaborations between health care programs and community-based organizations. In addition to identifying smear-positive TB, our program uncovered a high burden of respiratory symptoms among SCY in Eldoret, Kenya. PMID:27358809

  16. [Optimization of parodontitis treatment of patients with tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Aleksandrova, E A; Lepilin, A V; Kazimirova, N E; Shul'diakov, A A

    2010-01-01

    For the purpose to determine the clinic-pathogenetic efficacy of Cycloferon liniment in the combined therapy of parodontitis of patients with focal tuberculosis medical examination and treatment of 40 patients is carried out. It is established, that use of liniment Cycloferon in the combined treatment of patients with focal tuberculosis allows to accelerate process of normalization of lipid peroxidation parameters and antioxidant potential of blood, to decrease infection load (Herpes symplex virus I, Candida albicans, Staphylococcus aureus) in parodontal recess and evidence of local inflammation with reduction of activity of the tumours necrosis factor and interleukin 1beta, that provides acceleration of recuperation processes, lowering the frequency of parodontitis relapses.

  17. Reactivation of Pulmonary Tuberculosis following Treatment of Myelofibrosis with Ruxolitinib.

    PubMed

    Abidi, Maheen Z; Haque, Javeria; Varma, Parvathi; Olteanu, Horatiu; Guru Murthy, Guru Subramanian; Dhakal, Binod; Hari, Parameswaran

    2016-01-01

    Ruxolitinib is widely in use for treatment of myeloproliferative disorders. It causes inhibition of the Janus kinase (JAK) signal transducer and activation of transcription (STAT) pathway, which plays a key role in the underlying pathophysiology of myeloproliferative diseases. We describe a case of reactivation pulmonary tuberculosis in a retired physician while on treatment with ruxolitinib. We also review the literature on opportunistic infections following use of ruxolitinib. Our case highlights the importance of screening for latent tuberculosis in patients from highly endemic areas prior to start of therapy with ruxolitinib.

  18. Reactivation of Pulmonary Tuberculosis following Treatment of Myelofibrosis with Ruxolitinib

    PubMed Central

    Haque, Javeria; Varma, Parvathi; Guru Murthy, Guru Subramanian; Dhakal, Binod; Hari, Parameswaran

    2016-01-01

    Ruxolitinib is widely in use for treatment of myeloproliferative disorders. It causes inhibition of the Janus kinase (JAK) signal transducer and activation of transcription (STAT) pathway, which plays a key role in the underlying pathophysiology of myeloproliferative diseases. We describe a case of reactivation pulmonary tuberculosis in a retired physician while on treatment with ruxolitinib. We also review the literature on opportunistic infections following use of ruxolitinib. Our case highlights the importance of screening for latent tuberculosis in patients from highly endemic areas prior to start of therapy with ruxolitinib. PMID:27843657

  19. Major Delays in the Diagnosis and Management of Tuberculosis Patients in Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Mahato, Roshan Kumar; Vaeteewootacharn, Kriangsak; Koju, Rajendra; Bhattarai, Ratna

    2015-01-01

    Background Early diagnosis is a determining factor for spread of tuberculosis. Delay in diagnosis and treatment of tuberculosis geometrically increases spread and infectivity of the disease and is associated with higher risk of mortality. Aim The present study aimed to investigate the length of delays in diagnosis and treatment among new pulmonary tuberculosis patients in central development region of Nepal. Materials and Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted by administration of structured questionnaire interview and reviewing the medical records of the new sputum smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis cases during January–May 2015. Simple random sampling was applied to select samples from 5 districts of 19 districts comprising at least one each from 3 ecological regions of Nepal. Results A total of 374 new sputum smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis cases were included in the study. The median patient delay, health system delay, and total delay were 32 days, 3 days and 39.5 days respectively. The unacceptable patients delay was 53.21% (95% CI: 48.12-58.29) of all new patients, whereas it was 26.74% (95% CI: 22.23-31.24) for the unacceptable health system delay and the unacceptable total delay was 62.83% (95% CI: 57.91-67.75). Conclusion TB diagnosis and treatment is still a significant problem of Nepal. Majority of unacceptable delays were from patients. Identifying factors influencing delays and developing evidence-based approaches to address those delays will help in advancing tuberculosis prevention and management in low-income settings. PMID:26557545

  20. Tuberculosis

    MedlinePlus

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a disease caused by bacteria called Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The bacteria usually attack the lungs, but they can also damage other parts of the body. TB spreads through the air when a person with ...

  1. Low rate of fluoroquinolone resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from northern Tanzania.

    PubMed

    van den Boogaard, Jossy; Semvua, Hadija H; van Ingen, Jakko; Mwaigwisya, Solomon; van der Laan, Tridia; van Soolingen, Dick; Kibiki, Gibson S; Boeree, Martin J; Aarnoutse, Rob E

    2011-08-01

    Fluoroquinolones are used in second-line treatment of tuberculosis (TB) and have a potential role in shortening TB treatment duration. The wide use of fluoroquinolones in the treatment of other infections, including respiratory tract infections in patients with (undiagnosed) active TB, could result in fluoroquinolone-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We determined the rate of fluoroquinolone resistance in M. tuberculosis isolates obtained from Tanzanian patients and linked this to previous fluoroquinolone exposure and mycobacterial resistance to rifampicin and isoniazid. A total of 291 M. tuberculosis isolates were obtained between April 2009 and June 2010 from patients with smear-positive pulmonary TB and tested for susceptibility to ciprofloxacin, moxifloxacin, rifampicin and isoniazid. Information on previous fluoroquinolone use was obtained by interviewing patients and checking their medical files. Only 2 (0.7%) of the 291 M. tuberculosis isolates were resistant to ciprofloxacin; 1 of which was intermediately resistant to moxifloxacin as well. These two isolates were susceptible to rifampicin and isoniazid. Twenty-two (8%) of the 291 patients had a history of fluoroquinolone use (median: 7 days; interquartile range: 5-10 days). The patients from whom the fluoroquinolone-resistant M. tuberculosis isolates were obtained had no known history of previous fluoroquinolone use. Our findings indicate that the rate of fluoroquinolone-resistant M. tuberculosis in Tanzanian patients with TB is low and not related to previous, brief episodes of exposure to fluoroquinolones. The findings favour future application of fluoroquinolones in TB treatment regimens of shorter duration.

  2. Diabetes mellitus in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis in an aging population in Shanghai, China: Prevalence, clinical characteristics and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zheyuan; Guo, Juntao; Huang, Ying; Cai, Enmao; Zhang, Xia; Pan, Qichao; Yuan, Zheng'an; Shen, Xin

    2016-03-01

    To determine the prevalence of diabetes mellitus among pulmonary tuberculosis patients and the difference of clinical characteristics and outcomes between pulmonary tuberculosis patients with and without diabetes mellitus in an aging population in Shanghai, China. This is a retrospective population-based study. 201 newly diagnosed pulmonary tuberculosis patients in Changning District, Shanghai during 2007-2008 were included. Clinical characteristics and outcomes were collected. Determination of diabetes mellitus was based on the medical records before pulmonary tuberculosis was diagnosed. The prevalence of diabetes mellitus among pulmonary tuberculosis patients was 19.9% (40/201). Pulmonary tuberculosis patients with diabetes mellitus were more likely to be old (≥50, OR=5.23, 95% CI=2.07-13.25), to have pulmonary cavities (OR=3.02, 95% CI=1.31-6.98), to be sputum smear positive (OR=2.90, 95% CI=1.12-7.51), and to have extension of anti-tuberculosis treatment duration (OR=2.68, 95% CI 1.17-6.14). Besides, they had a higher 2nd month sputum smear positive proportion (OR=2.97, 95% CI 1.22-7.22) and a higher 5-year recurrence rate (OR=5.87, 95% CI 1.26-27.40). High prevalence, severe clinical characteristics and poor outcomes of pulmonary tuberculosis patients with diabetes mellitus highlight the necessity of early bi-directional screening and co-management of these two diseases in Shanghai, China. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. [Tuberculosis treatment for children: An update].

    PubMed

    Mellado Peña, María José; Santiago García, Begoña; Baquero-Artigao, Fernando; Moreno Pérez, David; Piñeiro Pérez, Roi; Méndez Echevarría, Ana; Ramos Amador, José Tomás; Gómez-Pastrana Durán, David; Noguera Julian, Antoni

    2017-07-17

    Tuberculosis (TB) is the most important infectious disease all over the world, with a high morbidity and mortality. Pediatric tuberculosis has been a neglected epidemic, due to the difficulties in assessing its global impact, reduced incidence and lower infectivity compared to adults. In 2015, the WHO reported 1 million cases of paediatric TB and 169,000 deaths. In Europe, the emergence of MDR TB is a major concern, representing 16% of the new diagnosis in Eastern Europe. In 2014, it was estimated that about 219,000 children were infected by MDR-TB-strains in Europe, and 2,120 developed the disease. Spain is the Western European country with more paediatric cases, with an incidence 4.3/100,000 inhabitants in 2014. Paediatric tuberculosis mortality in Spain is rare, but extra-pulmonary disease is associated with significant complications. The prevalence of paediatric drug resistant TB in Spain is over 4%, higher than the estimated incidence in adult population, representing mayor difficulties for therapeutic intervention. These data reveal that paediatric TB is still a Public Health priority in our country. The difficulties in diagnosis and the lack of optimal paediatric drug formulations are the major challenges for controlling the childhood's tuberculosis epidemic. A group of national paeditric TB experts has reviewed the international guidelines and the most recent evidences, and has established new recommendations for the management of paediatric TB contacts, latent infection and active TB disease, especially focused in drug resistant cases. This document replaces the former national guidelines from the Spanish Society for Pediatric Infectios Diseases, although the prior recommendations on the diagnosis remain valid. Copyright © 2017. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  4. Tuberculosis case-finding through a village outreach programme in a rural setting in southern Ethiopia: community randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Shargie, Estifanos Biru; Mørkve, Odd; Lindtjørn, Bernt

    2006-02-01

    To ascertain whether case-finding through community outreach in a rural setting has an effect on case-notification rate, symptom duration, and treatment outcome of smear-positive tuberculosis (TB). We randomly allocated 32 rural communities to intervention or control groups. In intervention communities, health workers from seven health centres held monthly diagnostic outreach clinics at which they obtained sputum samples for sputum microscopy from symptomatic TB suspects. In addition, trained community promoters distributed leaflets and discussed symptoms of TB during house visits and at popular gatherings. Symptomatic individuals were encouraged to visit the outreach team or a nearby health facility. In control communities, cases were detected through passive case-finding among symptomatic suspects reporting to health facilities. Smear-positive TB patients from the intervention and control communities diagnosed during the study period were prospectively enrolled. In the 1-year study period, 159 and 221 cases of smear-positive TB were detected in the intervention and control groups, respectively. Case-notification rates in all age groups were 124.6/10(5) and 98.1/10(5) person-years, respectively (P = 0.12). The corresponding rates in adults older than 14 years were 207/10(5) and 158/10(5) person-years, respectively (P = 0.09). The proportion of patients with >3 months' symptom duration was 41% in the intervention group compared with 63% in the control group (P<0.001). Pre-treatment symptom duration in the intervention group fell by 55-60% compared with 3-20% in the control group. In the intervention and control groups, 81% and 75%, respectively of patients successfully completed treatment (P = 0.12). The intervention was effective in improving the speed but not the extent of case finding for smear-positive TB in this setting. Both groups had comparable treatment outcomes.

  5. Tuberculosis case-finding through a village outreach programme in a rural setting in southern Ethiopia: community randomized trial.

    PubMed Central

    Shargie, Estifanos Biru; Mørkve, Odd; Lindtjørn, Bernt

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To ascertain whether case-finding through community outreach in a rural setting has an effect on case-notification rate, symptom duration, and treatment outcome of smear-positive tuberculosis (TB). METHODS: We randomly allocated 32 rural communities to intervention or control groups. In intervention communities, health workers from seven health centres held monthly diagnostic outreach clinics at which they obtained sputum samples for sputum microscopy from symptomatic TB suspects. In addition, trained community promoters distributed leaflets and discussed symptoms of TB during house visits and at popular gatherings. Symptomatic individuals were encouraged to visit the outreach team or a nearby health facility. In control communities, cases were detected through passive case-finding among symptomatic suspects reporting to health facilities. Smear-positive TB patients from the intervention and control communities diagnosed during the study period were prospectively enrolled. FINDINGS: In the 1-year study period, 159 and 221 cases of smear-positive TB were detected in the intervention and control groups, respectively. Case-notification rates in all age groups were 124.6/10(5) and 98.1/10(5) person-years, respectively (P = 0.12). The corresponding rates in adults older than 14 years were 207/10(5) and 158/10(5) person-years, respectively (P = 0.09). The proportion of patients with >3 months' symptom duration was 41% in the intervention group compared with 63% in the control group (P<0.001). Pre-treatment symptom duration in the intervention group fell by 55-60% compared with 3-20% in the control group. In the intervention and control groups, 81% and 75%, respectively of patients successfully completed treatment (P = 0.12). CONCLUSION: The intervention was effective in improving the speed but not the extent of case finding for smear-positive TB in this setting. Both groups had comparable treatment outcomes. PMID:16501728

  6. A review of emerging trends in the treatment of tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Manpreet; Garg, Tarun; Narang, R K

    2016-01-01

    This review attempts to summarize the information available on emerging trends in the treatment of tuberculosis caused by the bacteria Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Nanostructured biomaterials, liposomes, microparticles and solid lipid nanoparticles have unique physicochemical properties such as particularly small and convenient size, sustained release, great surface area to mass ratio and high reactivity with structure. These properties can be useful in easing the administration of antimicrobial drugs, thereby reducing the number of limitations in long-established antimicrobial therapeutics. In recent years, the encapsulation of antimicrobial drugs in all carrier systems has emerged as an innovative and promising change that increases therapeutic efficiency and reduces undesirable side effects of the drugs.

  7. Advances in the diagnosis and treatment of tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Nahid, Payam; Pai, Madhukar; Hopewell, Philip C

    2006-01-01

    Although truly major advances that would revolutionize tuberculosis (TB) diagnosis and treatment have not been realized, we are beginning to see the innovations that have been prompted by the recognition of the economic potential of the market for new diagnostic tests and treatments for TB and considerably increased public and private funding. Despite the enormous global burden of TB and the overall low rates of case detection worldwide, conventional approaches to diagnosis have, until recently, relied on tests that have major limitations. In this review of advances in diagnosis, we focus on strengths and limitations of newer tests that are available for the diagnosis of latent and active tuberculosis and rapid detection of drug resistance, specifically, tests that measure release of IFN-gamma in response to stimulation by Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens, nucleic acid amplification for identification of M. tuberculosis complex, and rapid tests for detecting drug resistance. Standard regimens for treating TB have not changed for more than 30 yr and still require a minimum of 6 mo to have a high likelihood of a lasting cure. In this article, we focus on important changes in the philosophy of treatment, emphasizing the responsibility of the provider to assure successful completion of treatment, and on the roles of existing anti-TB agents and newer drugs such as rifabutin, rifapentine, and fluoroquinolones.

  8. In silico evaluation and exploration of antibiotic tuberculosis treatment regimens

    DOE PAGES

    Pienaar, Elsje; Dartois, Véronique; Linderman, Jennifer J.; ...

    2015-11-14

    Improvement in tuberculosis treatment regimens requires selection of antibiotics and dosing schedules from a large design space of possibilities. Incomplete knowledge of antibiotic and host immune dynamics in tuberculosis granulomas impacts clinical trial design and success, and variations among clinical trials hamper side-by-side comparison of regimens. Our objective is to systematically evaluate the efficacy of isoniazid and rifampin regimens, and identify modifications to these antibiotics that improve treatment outcomes. We pair a spatio-temporal computational model of host immunity with pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic data on isoniazid and rifampin. The model is calibrated to plasma pharmacokinetic and granuloma bacterial load data frommore » non-human primate models of tuberculosis and to tissue and granuloma measurements of isoniazid and rifampin in rabbit granulomas. We predict the efficacy of regimens containing different doses and frequencies of isoniazid and rifampin. We predict impacts of pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic modifications on antibiotic efficacy. We demonstrate that suboptimal antibiotic concentrations within granulomas lead to poor performance of intermittent regimens compared to daily regimens. Improvements from dose and frequency changes are limited by inherent antibiotic properties, and we propose that changes in intracellular accumulation ratios and antimicrobial activity would lead to the most significant improvements in treatment outcomes. Results suggest that an increased risk of drug resistance in fully intermittent as compared to daily regimens arises from higher bacterial population levels early during treatment. In conclusion, our systems pharmacology approach complements efforts to accelerate tuberculosis therapeutic development.« less

  9. Increase in the number of tuberculosis cases treated following tuberculin skin testing in first-year schoolchildren in Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Ratovoson, Rila; Raharimanga, Voamalala; Rakotosamimanana, Niaina; Ravaloson, B; Ratsitorahina, Maherisosa; Randremanana, Rindra; Ramarokoto, Herimanana; Rajatonirina, Soatiana; Rasolofo, Voahangy; Richard, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis continues to cause unacceptably high levels of disease and death worldwide. Active preventive strategies are required to improve tuberculosis control and to increase the number of cases treated in developing countries. The aim of this study was to evaluate the utility of the tuberculin skin test (TST) in first-year schoolchildren as a means of increasing the number of tuberculosis cases detected through the screening of close contacts. All members of the households of 90 schoolchildren assigned to three groups on the basis of TST category (≤ 5 mm, [5-15)mm, ≥ 15 mm) were screened for sputum smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis. The percentage detection of tuberculosis in close contacts was compared between TST categories. We identified 433 close contacts of the 90 schoolchildren, who were then evaluated for tuberculosis. We identified 11 cases of pulmonary tuberculosis among the close contacts (7 already on treatment and 4 previously undiagnosed): 0 in TST category ≤ 5 mm, 3 in TST category [5-15) mm and 8 in TST category ≥ 15 mm). This approach increased the detection of tuberculosis cases by a factor of 1.6 in first-year schoolchildren of the TST ≥ 5 mm group. TST in first-year schoolchildren is a potentially effective method for improving the detection of tuberculosis in close contacts.

  10. Profile of tuberculosis patients with delayed sputum smear conversion in the Pacific island of Vanuatu

    PubMed Central

    Viney, K.; Tarivonda, L.; Roseveare, C.; Tagaro, M.; Marais, B. J.

    2014-01-01

    Setting: National tuberculosis control programme, Vanuatu. Objective: To assess tuberculosis (TB) trends, characterise sputum smear-positive patients with non-conversion at 2 months and assess their treatment outcomes. Design: Evaluation of programme data over a 9-year period (2004–2012), comparing 2-month sputum non-converters (delayed converters) with sputum smear converters diagnosed in 2011 and 2012. Results: Annual TB case numbers were similar over the study period, with an average TB notification rate of 58 per 100 000 population. Of 417 sputum smear-positive cases, 74 (18%) were delayed converters. Delayed converters were more likely than converters (88% vs. 79%) to have had high pre-treatment sputum smear grades (OR 2.5, 95%CI 0.97–6.45). Among delayed converters, treatment adherence was high (99% good adherence), outcomes were generally good (90% treatment success, 85% cure, 4% treatment failure) and no drug resistance was detected. Deaths were unexpectedly common among converters (11/80, 14%), with significantly more deaths in Tafea than in Shefa Province (7/58 vs. 2/80, OR 5.35, 95%CI 1.07–26.79). Tafea Province also had the greatest number of delayed converters (30/74, 40.5%) and the highest TB incidence rate. Conclusion: Delayed sputum conversion was relatively uncommon, and was not associated with adverse outcomes or drug resistance. Regional differences require further investigation to better understand local factors that may compromise patient management. PMID:26477281

  11. Childhood tuberculosis in Bhutan: profile and treatment outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Dorji, T.; Edgnton, M. E.; Kumar, A. M. V.; Wangchuk, D.; Dophu, U.; Jamtsho, T.; Rinzin, C.

    2013-01-01

    Setting: All hospitals and health centres under the National Tuberculosis Control Programme (NTCP) in Bhutan. Objective: To describe the number and proportion of childhood tuberculosis (TB) cases registered under the NTCP in 2010, their demographic and clinical characteristics and any associations with treatment outcomes. Design: Retrospective cohort study involving a review of TB treatment cards and registers. Results: Of 1332 TB cases registered, 187 (14%) were children aged <15 years, 75 (40%) were aged <5 years, and 180 (96%) were new cases; nearly half were extra-pulmonary TB, with lymphadenitis being the most common form. The overall treatment success rate was 93%, and none of the demographic and clinical characteristics were associated with treatment outcomes. A few recording deficiencies were identified. Conclusion: TB in children is well recognised in Bhutan, and their treatment outcomes were excellent. PMID:26392988

  12. Challenges in the diagnosis & treatment of miliary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Surendra K.; Mohan, Alladi; Sharma, Abhishek

    2012-01-01

    Miliary tuberculosis (TB) is a potentially lethal disease if not diagnosed and treated early. Diagnosing miliary TB can be a challenge that can perplex even the most experienced clinicians. Clinical manifestations are nonspecific, typical chest radiograph findings may not be evident till late in the disease, high resolution computed tomography (HRCT) shows randomly distributed miliary nodules and is relatively more sensitive. Ultrasonography, CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are useful in discerning the extent of organ involvement by lesions of miliary TB in extra-pulmonary locations. Fundus examination for choroid tubercles, histopathological examination of tissue biopsy specimens, conventional and rapid culture methods for isolation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, drug-susceptibility testing, along with use of molecular biology tools in sputum, body fluids, other body tissues are useful in confirming the diagnosis. Although several prognostic markers have been described which predict mortality, yet untreated miliary TB has a fatal outcome within one year. A high index of clinical suspicion and early diagnosis and timely institution of anti-tuberculosis treatment can be life-saving. Response to first-line anti-tuberculosis drugs is good but drug-induced hepatotoxicity and drug-drug interactions in human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) patients pose significant problems during treatment. However, sparse data are available from randomized controlled trials to define the optimum regimen and duration of treatment in patients with drug-sensitive as well as drug-resistant miliary TB, including those with HIV/AIDS. PMID:22771605

  13. Consensus Document on Prevention and Treatment of Tuberculosis in Patients for Biological Treatment.

    PubMed

    Mir Viladrich, Isabel; Daudén Tello, Esteban; Solano-López, Guillermo; López Longo, Francisco Javier; Taxonera Samso, Carlos; Sánchez Martínez, Paquita; Martínez Lacasa, Xavier; García Gasalla, Mercedes; Dorca Sargatal, Jordi; Arias-Guillén, Miguel; García García, José Maria

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis risk is increased in patients with chronic inflammatory diseases receiving any immunosuppressive treatment, notably tumor necrosis factor (TNF) antagonists therapy. Screening for the presence of latent infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis and targeted preventive treatment to reduce the risk of progression to TB is mandatory in these patients. This Consensus Document summarizes the current knowledge and expert opinion of biologic therapies including TNF-blocking treatments. It provides recommendations for the use of interferon-gamma release assays (IGRA) and tuberculin skin test (TST) for the diagnosis of latent tuberculosis infection in these patients, and for the type and duration of preventive therapy.

  14. [Report on fourth epidemiological survey for tuberculosis in Heilongjiang province].

    PubMed

    Wang, Pengfei

    2002-01-01

    To investigate the epidemiological trend of tuberculosis, to evaluate the efficacy of control measures and to provide scientific evidence for provincial 2001 approximately 2010 tuberculosis control programme. Tuberculin testing was carried out and BCG scar was examined among 0 approximately 14 years old children; fluroscopy was carried out for >/= 15 years old population and children of tuberculin testing positive; chest X-ray film, sputum smear and culture, drug sensitivity test were done for the patients of fluroscopy abnormal; the survey of tuberculosis infection rate for all population was carried out in 2 investigation points; a retrospective study of tuberculosis mortality was conducted at all investigation points; social economic study was done for the active pulmonary tuberculosis cases. The overall examination rate was more than 95%. The prevalence of active pulmonary tuberculosis was 512/100 000, the prevalence of smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis was 121/100 000 and the prevalence of bacteriological positive pulmonary tuberculosis was 146/100 000. In comparison with 1979, the annual reduction rates were 3.2% for the prevalence of active pulmonary tuberculosis and 2.0% for the prevalence of smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis. In comparison with 1990, the annual reduction rates were 1.49% and 0, respectively. The prevalence increased slightly in city and decreased slowly in countryside. The smear positive prevalence has not decreased since 1990. The governments at different levels must pay more attention to tuberculosis control programme, increase the budget, strengthen law management, implement DOTS strategy.

  15. Tuberculosis case notification data in Viet Nam, 2007 to 2012.

    PubMed

    Nhung, Nguyen Viet; Hoa, Nguyen Binh; Khanh, Pham Huyen; Hennig, Cornelia

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality, and Viet Nam ranks 12 among the 22 high-TB burden countries. This study analyses surveillance data of the National Tuberculosis Control Programme in Viet Nam for the six-year period 2007 to 2012. During the study period, 598,877 TB cases (all forms) were notified, and 313,225 (52.3%) were new smear-positive cases. The case notification rate of new smear-positive cases was decreased, from 65 per 100,000 population in 2007 to 57 per 100,000 population in 2012; this decrease was observed for males and females in all age groups except males aged 0-14 and females aged 15-24 years. The male-to-female ratio of new smear-positive TB cases increased from 2.85 in 2007 to 3.02 in 2012. The average annual cure rate of new smear-positive cases was 90.3%. The high male-to-female ratio for new smear-positive TB cases in this notification data was lower than that from the 2007 TB prevalence survey in Viet Nam, suggesting a lower case detection for males. The decrease in new smear-positive case notification rates may reflect a decline in TB incidence in Viet Nam as several programmatic improvements have been made, although further research is required to increase case detection among young males and children.

  16. Moxifloxacin in the Initial Therapy of Tuberculosis: A Randomized, Phase 2 Trial

    PubMed Central

    Conde, Marcus B.; Efron, Anne; Loredo, Carla; Muzy De Souza, Gilvan R.; Graça, Nadja P.; Cezar, Michelle C.; Ram, Malathi; Chaudhary, Mohammad A.; Bishai, William R.; Kritski, Afranio L.; Chaisson, Richard E.

    2009-01-01

    Background New therapies are needed to shorten the time required to cure tuberculosis and to treat drug-resistant strains. The fluoroquinolone moxifloxacin is a promising new agent that may have additive activity to existing antituberculosis agents. We conducted a Phase 2 clinical trial to determine the activity and safety of moxifloxacin in the initial stage of tuberculosis treatment. Methods We performed a randomized, double-blind trial of a moxifloxacin-containing regimen in patients with sputum smear-positive tuberculosis in Brazil. All participants received isoniazid, rifampin and pyrazinamide at standard doses and were randomized to receive either moxifloxacin or ethambutol and matching placebos five days per week for eight weeks. The primary endpoint was the proportion of patients whose sputum culture converted to negative by Week 8. Clinical trial identifier: NCT00082173. Results One hundred seventy patients were enrolled, and 146 met all study eligibility criteria. In an intention to treat analysis where missing results were considered treatment failures, 59 patients (80%) assigned to moxifloxacin converted their 8-week sputum culture to negative vs. 45 (63%) of those assigned to ethambutol (p=0.03). Among patients with available cultures at Week 8, conversion rates were 92% (59/64) for moxifloxacin vs. 72% (45/61) for ethambutol (p=0.006). No differences in toxicity were observed. In a multivariate analysis, younger age (odds ratio 0.98, p=0.05), heavy baseline sputum smear positivity (OR 0.45, p <0.001) and treatment with moxifloxacin (OR 1.88, p<0.001) were significantly associated with sputum culture conversion. Conclusion Moxifloxacin significantly improves culture conversion in the initial phase of tuberculosis treatment. Trials to assess whether moxifloxacin can be used to shorten the duration of tuberculosis therapy are justified. PMID:19345831

  17. Risk factors for unsuccessful tuberculosis treatment outcome (failure, default and death) in public health institutions, Eastern Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Amante, Tariku Dingeta; Ahemed, Tekabe Abdosh

    2015-01-01

    Unsuccessful TB treatment outcome is a serious public health concern. It is compelling to identify, and deal with factors determining unsuccessful treatment outcome. Therefore, study was aimed to determine pattern of unsuccessful TB treatment outcome and associated factors in eastern Ethiopia. A case control study was used. Cases were records of TB patients registered as defaulter, dead and/or treatment failure where as controls were those cured or treatment complete. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to derive adjusted odds ratios (OR) at 95% CI to examine the relationship between the unsuccessful TB treatment outcome and patients' characteristics. A total of 990 sample size (330 cases and 660 controls) were included. Among cases (n = 330), majority 212(64.2%) were because of death, 100(30.3%) defaulters and 18(5.5%) were treatment failure. Lack of contact person(OR = 1.37; 95% CI 1.14-2.9, P, .024), sputum smear negative treatment category at initiation of treatment (OR = 1.8; 95% CI 1.3-5.5,P, .028), smear positive sputum test result at 2(nd) month after initiation treatment (OR = 14; 95% CI 5.5-36, P,0.001) and HIV positive status (OR = 2.5; 95% CI 1.34-5.7, P, 0.01) were independently associated with increased risk of unsuccessful TB treatment outcome. Death was the major cause of unsuccessful TB treatment outcome. TB patients do not have contact person, sputum smear negative treatment category at initiation of treatment, smear positive on 2(nd) month after treatment initiation and HIV positive were factors significantly associated unsuccessful treatment outcome. TB patients with sputum smear negative treatment category, HIV positive and smear positive on 2(nd) nd month of treatment initiation need strict follow up throughout DOTs period.

  18. Rifampicin-induced disseminated intravascular coagulation in pulmonary tuberculosis treatment

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guo; He, Jian-Qing

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) induced by daily rifampicin therapy is rare, especially the patient is absent of malignancy, severe infection, and prior exposure to rifampicin. Patient concerns: We report a case of DIC induced by daily rifampicin treatment for pulmonary tuberculosis. A 22-year-old, previously healthy man received an anti-tuberculosis therapy consisting of isoniazid, rifampicin, ethambutol, and pyrazinamide on the daily dose recommended by the World Health Organization tuberculosis guidelines after a diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis. Two weeks later, he was transferred to the West China Hospital with nasal hemorrhage for 1 week, hematochezia, hematuria, and petechiae for 5 days. Diagnoses: Laboratory data and symptoms on admission indicated DIC. Interventions: The anti-tuberculosis drugs were discontinued after admission and he was initiated with targeted treatment for DIC, omeprazole and polyene hosphatidylcholine infusion, as well as nutrition supportive treatment. Five days after admission, ethambutol, moxifloxacin, and amikacin were added to the patient without further active hemorrhage. Eight days after admission, the platelet count had risen gradually. Isoniazid was administered on 24 days after admission, while his liver function tests and platelet counts returned to normal. No recurrence of DIC occurred. The diagnosis of rifampicin-induced DIC was confirmed. Outcomes: The patient recovered and left hospital with isoniazid, ethambutol, levofloxacin, and streptomycin after 4 weeks of hospitalization. There was no recurrence of DIC or hemorrhage during the 8 months of follow-up. The literature review revealed that there were 10 other cases of rifampicin-induced DIC. Only 4 cases received rifampicin on a daily basis for pulmonary tuberculosis treatment and the others were on intermittent dosing schedule for pulmonary tuberculosis or leprosy treatment. Lessons: As a rare adverse effect, DIC induced by

  19. The Incremental Cost-Effectiveness of Engaging Private Practitioners to Refer Tuberculosis Suspects to DOTS Services in Jogjakarta, Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Mahendradhata, Yodi; Probandari, Ari; Ahmad, Riris A.; Utarini, Adi; Trisnantoro, Laksono; Lindholm, Lars; van der Werf, Marieke J.; Kimerling, Michael; Boelaert, Marleen; Johns, Benjamin; Van der Stuyft, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the incremental cost-effectiveness of engaging private practitioners (PPs) to refer tuberculosis (TB) suspects to public health centers in Jogjakarta, Indonesia. Effectiveness was assessed for TB suspects notified between May 2004 and April 2005. Private practitioners referred 1,064 TB suspects, of which 57.5% failed to reach a health center. The smear-positive rate among patients reaching a health center was 61.8%. Two hundred eighty (280) out of a total of 1,306 (21.4%) new smear-positive cases were enrolled through the PPs strategy. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio per smear-positive case successfully treated for the PPs strategy was US$351.66 (95% CI 322.84–601.33). On the basis of an acceptability curve using the National TB control program's willingness-to-pay threshold (US$448.61), we estimate the probability that the PPs strategy is cost-effective at 66.8%. The strategy of engaging PPs was incrementally cost-effective, although under specific conditions, most importantly a well-functioning public directly observed treatment, short-course (DOTS) program. PMID:20519613

  20. Tuberculosis in sub-Saharan Africa: opportunities, challenges, and change in the era of antiretroviral treatment.

    PubMed

    Corbett, Elizabeth L; Marston, Barbara; Churchyard, Gavin J; De Cock, Kevin M

    2006-03-18

    Rapid scale-up of antiretroviral treatment programmes is happening in Africa, driven by international advocacy and policy directives and supported by unprecedented donor funding and technical assistance. This welcome development offers hope to millions of HIV-infected Africans, among whom tuberculosis is the major cause of serious illness and death. Little in the way of HIV diagnosis or care was previously offered to patients with tuberculosis, by either national tuberculosis or AIDS control programmes, with tuberculosis services focused exclusively on diagnosis and treatment of rising numbers of patients. Tuberculosis control in Africa has yet to adapt to the new climate of antiretroviral availability. Many barriers exist, from drug interactions to historic differences in the way that tuberculosis and HIV are perceived, but failure to successfully integrate HIV and tuberculosis control will threaten the viability of both programmes. Here, we review tuberculosis epidemiology in Africa and policy implications of HIV/AIDS treatment scale-up.

  1. An approach to the problems of diagnosing and treating adult smear-negative pulmonary tuberculosis in high-HIV-prevalence settings in sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed Central

    Harries, A. D.; Maher, D.; Nunn, P.

    1998-01-01

    The overlap between the populations in sub-Saharan Africa infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and Mycobacterium tuberculosis has led to an upsurge in tuberculosis cases over the last 10 years. The relative increase in the proportion of notified sputum-smear-negative pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) cases is greater than that of sputum-smear-positive PTB cases. This is a consequence of the following: the association between decreased host immunity and reduced sputum smear positivity; the difficulty in excluding other HIV-related diseases when making the diagnosis of smear-negative PTB; and an increase in false-negative sputum smears because of overstretched resources. This article examines problems in the diagnosis and treatment of smear-negative PTB in high-HIV-prevalence areas in sub-Saharan Africa. The main issues in diagnosis include: the criteria used to diagnose smear-negative PTB; the degree to which clinicians actually follow these criteria in practice; and the problem of how to exclude other respiratory diseases that can resemble, and be misdiagnosed as, smear-negative PTB. The most important aspect of the treatment of smear-negative PTB patients is abandoning 12-month "standard" treatment regimens in favour of short-course chemotherapy. Operational research is necessary to determine the most cost-effective approaches to the diagnosis and treatment of smear-negative PTB. Nevertheless, substantial improvement could be obtained by implementing the effective measures already available, such as improved adherence to diagnostic and treatment guidelines. PMID:10191561

  2. Mortality of tuberculosis patients in Chennai, India.

    PubMed Central

    Kolappan, C.; Subramani, R.; Karunakaran, K.; Narayanan, P. R.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We aimed to measure the mortality rate and excess general mortality as well as identify groups at high risk for mortality among a cohort of tuberculosis patients treated in Chennai Corporation clinics in south India. METHODS: In this retrospective cohort study we followed up 2674 patients (1800 males and 874 females) who were registered and treated under the DOTS strategy in Chennai Corporation clinics in 2000. The follow-up period from the date of start of treatment to either the date of interview, or death was 600 days. FINDINGS: The mortality rate among this cohort of tuberculosis patients was 60/1000 person-years. The excess general mortality expressed as standardized mortality ratio (SMR) was 6.1 (95% confidence interval (CI)=5.4-6.9). Younger patients, men, patients with Category II disease, patients who defaulted on, or failed courses of treatment, and male smokers who were alcoholics, all had higher mortality ratios when compared to the rest of the cohort. CONCLUSION: The excess mortality in this cohort was six times more than that in the general population. Young age, male sex, smear-positivity, treatment default, treatment failure and the combination of smoking and alcoholism were identified as risk factors for tuberculosis mortality. We suggest that mortality rate and excess mortality be routinely used as a monitoring tool for evaluating the efficiency of the national control programme. PMID:16878229

  3. Prevalence, Risk Factors, and Treatment Outcomes of Isoniazid- and Rifampicin- Mono-Resistant Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Lima, Peru

    PubMed Central

    Villegas, Leonela; Huaman, Moises A.; Van der Stuyft, Patrick; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Seas, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Background Isoniazid and rifampicin are the two most efficacious first-line agents for tuberculosis (TB) treatment. We assessed the prevalence of isoniazid and rifampicin mono-resistance, associated risk factors, and the association of mono-resistance on treatment outcomes. Methods A prospective, observational cohort study enrolled adults with a first episode of smear-positive pulmonary TB from 34 health facilities in a northern district of Lima, Peru, from March 2010 through December 2011. Participants were interviewed and a sputum sample was cultured on Löwenstein-Jensen (LJ) media. Drug susceptibility testing was performed using the proportion method. Medication regimens were documented for each patient. Our primary outcomes were treatment outcome at the end of treatment. The secondary outcome included recurrent episodes among cured patients within two years after completion of the treatment. Results Of 1292 patients enrolled, 1039 (80%) were culture-positive. From this subpopulation, isoniazid mono-resistance was present in 85 (8%) patients and rifampicin mono-resistance was present in 24 (2%) patients. In the multivariate logistic regression model, isoniazid mono-resistance was associated with illicit drug use (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 2.10; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.1–4.1), and rifampicin mono-resistance was associated with HIV infection (aOR = 9.43; 95%CI: 1.9–47.8). Isoniazid mono-resistant patients had a higher risk of poor treatment outcomes including treatment failure (2/85, 2%, p-value<0.01) and death (4/85, 5%, p<0.02). Rifampicin mono-resistant patients had a higher risk of death (2/24, 8%, p<0.01). Conclusion A high prevalence of isoniazid and rifampicin mono-resistance was found among TB patients in our low HIV burden setting which were similar to regions with high HIV burden. Patients with isoniazid and rifampicin mono-resistance had an increased risk of poor treatment outcomes. PMID:27045684

  4. Does directly observed treatment ("DOTS") contribute to tuberculosis treatment compliance?

    PubMed

    Terra, Maria Fernanda; Bertolozzi, Maria Rita

    2008-01-01

    This is a qualitative study performed in the theoretical framework of the Theory of Social Determination of the Health-Disease process and the concept of Compliance. The goal was to analyze meanings of DOTS in compliance with tuberculosis treatment, according to healthcare professionals of the Technical Healthcare Supervision of Butantã (SUVIS), a region of the São Paulo City Healthcare Secretariat, Brazil. The project was submitted to the Ethics Committee of the São Paulo Municipal Health Secretariat. All professionals (22 people) developing DOTS were interviewed, including service coordinators, healthcare professionals and the DOTS coordinator for the region. The statements were analyzed with an appropriate technique for discourse analysis. The results appoint that the strategy presents more potentialities than limits and is effective regarding compliance, since it allows the professionals to welcome and monitor the patients, considering their needs. The importance of increasing the understanding of compliance is also noted, so that it can go beyond the simple intake of medication, integrating the care for the sick person and his or her necessities by transcending those restricted to the biological dimension.

  5. Non-adherence to anti-tuberculosis treatment and determinant factors among patients with tuberculosis in northwest Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Adane, Akilew Awoke; Alene, Kefyalew Addis; Koye, Digsu Negese; Zeleke, Berihun Megabiaw

    2013-01-01

    Non-adherence to anti tuberculosis treatment is one of the crucial challenges in improving tuberculosis cure-rates and reducing further healthcare costs. The poor adherence to anti-tuberculosis treatment among patients with tuberculosis is a major problem in Ethiopia. Hence, this study assessed level of non-adherence to anti-tuberculosis therapy and associated factors among patients with tuberculosis in northwest Ethiopia. An institution based cross-sectional survey was conducted among tuberculosis patients who were following anti-tuberculosis treatment in North Gondar zone from February 20--March 30, 2013. Data were collected by trained data collectors using a structured and pre-tested questionnaire. Data were entered to EPI INFO version 3.5.3 and analyzed using statistical package for social sciences (SPSS) version 20. Multiple logistic regressions were fitted to identify associations and to control potential confounding variables. Odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval was calculated and p-values<0.05 were considered statistically significant. A total of 280 tuberculosis patients were interviewed; 55.7% were males and nearly three quarters (72.5%) were urban dwellers. The overall non-adherence for the last one month and the last four days before the survey were 10% and 13.6% respectively. Non-adherence was high if the patients had forgetfulness (AOR 7.04, 95% CI 1.40-35.13), is on the continuation phase of chemotherapy (AOR: 6.95, 95% CI 1.81-26.73), had symptoms of tuberculosis during the interview (AOR: 4.29, 95% CI 1.53-12.03), and had co-infection with HIV (AOR: 4.06, 95% CI 1.70-9.70). Non-adherence to anti-tuberculosis treatment was high. Forgetfulness, being in the continuation phases of chemotherapy, having symptoms of tuberculosis during the interview, and co-infected with HIV were significantly associated with non-adherence to anti-tuberculosis therapy. Special attention on adherence counseling should be given to symptomatic patients, TB/HIV co

  6. [Compliance with tuberculosis treatment in adults in Santiago, Chile].

    PubMed

    Ferrer, X; Kirschbaum, A; Toro, J; Jadue, J; Muñoz, M; Espinoza, A

    1991-11-01

    A prospective study was conducted to estimate the current magnitude of adherence to short-course tuberculosis treatment, the degree of abandonment, the characteristics of treatment dropouts, and the causes of this abandonment. The study group was made up of tuberculosis patients over the age of 15 who received care at the Western and Southern Health Services of the Metropolitan Region of Santiago, Chile, between 1 October 1987 and 31 January 1988. The percentage abandoning treatment, calculated by the life table method, was 11.5. The profile of patients who dropped out of treatment was as follows: male, under 45 years of age, single, low level of education, no steady work, homeless, and alcoholic. In addition, an opinion survey on the variables associated with abandonment was conducted and it was concluded that the main ones were alcoholism and intolerance to tuberculosis drugs. Awareness of this profile makes it possible to take measures to prevent patients from abandoning treatment, as well as to educate and even hospitalize at the start of treatment those tuberculous patients exhibiting such a profile.

  7. Does the type of treatment supporter influence tuberculosis treatment outcomes in Zimbabwe?

    PubMed

    Mlilo, N; Sandy, C; Harries, A D; Kumar, A M V; Masuka, N; Nyathi, B; Edginton, M; Isaakidis, P; Manzi, M; Siziba, N

    2013-06-21

    Zimbabwe National Tuberculosis Guidelines advise that direct observation of anti-tuberculosis treatment (DOT) can be provided by a family member/relative as a last resort. In 2011, in Nkayi District, of 763 registered tuberculosis (TB) patients, 59 (8%) received health facility-based DOT, 392 (51%) received DOT from a trained community worker and 306 (40%) from a family member/relative. There were no differences in TB treatment outcomes between the three DOT groups, apart from a higher frequency rate of 'no reported outcomes' for those receiving family-based DOT. Family members should be trained to use a suitable DOT support package.

  8. Sensitivity of the Quantiferon-Gold In-Tube Assay in Sputum Smear Positive TB Cases in Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Rutherford, Merrin; Alisjahbana, Bachti; Maharani, Winni; Sampurno, Hedy; van Crevel, Reinout; Hill, Philip C.

    2010-01-01

    Background As part of a formal evaluation of the Quantiferon-Gold in-tube assay (QFT-IT) for latent TB infection we compared its sensitivity to the tuberculin skin test (TST) in confirmed adult TB cases in Indonesia. Smear-positive TB disease was used as a proxy gold standard for latent TB infection. Methods and Findings We compared the sensitivity of QFT-IT and TST in 98 sputum smear and chest x-ray positive TB cases and investigated risk factors for negative and discordant results in both tests. Both tests showed high sensitivity; (QFT-IT; 88.7%: TST; 94.9%), not significantly different from each other (p value 0.11). Very high sensitivity was seen when tests were combined (98.9%). There were no variables significantly associated with discordant results or with a negative TST. For QFT-IT which particular staff member collected blood was significantly associated with test positivity (p value 0.01). Study limitations include small sample size and lack of culture confirmation or HIV test results. Conclusions The QFT-IT has similar sensitivity in Indonesian TB cases as in other locations. However, QFT-IT, like the TST cannot distinguish active TB disease from LTBI. In countries such as Indonesia, with high background rates of LTBI, test specificity for TB disease will likely be low. While our study was not designed to evaluate the QFT-IT in the diagnosis of active TB disease in TB suspects, the data suggest that a combination of TST and QFT-IT may prove useful for ruling out TB disease. Further research is required to explore the clinical role of QFT-IT in combination with other TB diagnostic tests. PMID:20711257

  9. Tuberculosis treatment outcomes in Europe: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Faustini, A; Hall, A J; Perucci, C A

    2005-09-01

    In order to facilitate the control of tuberculosis (TB), the World Health Organization (WHO) has defined a standardised short-course chemotherapy and a strategy, directly observed therapy. In 2000, WHO surveillance of TB treatments in Europe recorded a successful outcome rate of 77%. The aim of this report is to estimate treatment outcomes in European countries based on published studies and to identify their determinants. A systematic review was conducted of published reports of TB treatment outcomes in Europe. Meta-analysis, meta-regression and subgrouping were used to pool treatment outcomes and analyse associations with mean age, sex, immigration status and multidrug resistance. Of the 197 articles identified in the search, 26 were eligible for the review; 74.4% of outcomes were successful, 12.3% were unsuccessful and 6.8% of patients died. Heterogeneity was high for all outcomes. National estimates were possible for six countries. Multidrug resistance was inversely associated with successful outcome, which were fewer in populations with >9% multidrug-resistant TB, and in patients aged <44 yrs. Successful tuberculosis treatment outcomes were below the 85% threshold suggested by the World Health Organization. There was an inverse association with levels of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. The unexplained heterogeneity between the studies for unsuccessful outcomes seems to be due to differing interpretations given to World Health Organization definitions.

  10. Intensified tuberculosis case finding amongst vulnerable communities in southern India.

    PubMed

    Reddy, K K; Ananthakrishnan, R; Jacob, A G; Das, M; Isaakidis, P; Kumar, A M V

    2015-12-21

    India mainly uses passive case finding to detect tuberculosis (TB) patients through the Revised National Tuberculosis Control Programme (RNTCP). An intensified case finding (ICF) intervention was conducted among vulnerable communities in two districts of Karnataka during July-December 2013; 658 sputum smear-positive TB cases were detected. The number of smear-positive cases detected increased by 8.8% relative to the pre-intervention period (July-December 2012) in intervention communities as compared to an 8.6% decrease in communities without the ICF intervention. ICF activities brought TB services closer to vulnerable communities, moderately increasing TB case detection rates.

  11. Host-directed therapeutics as novel angle for tuberculosis treatment.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ye-Ram; Yang, Chul-Su

    2017-07-07

    Despite significant efforts to improve tuberculosis (TB) treatment, it remains a worldwide infectious disease due to the limitations of current TB regimens. Recent work on novel TB treatment strategies has suggested that directly targeting host factors is beneficial for TB treatment. Such strategies, termed host-directed therapeutics (HDTs), focus on host-pathogen interactions. HDTs are more beneficial than existed TB drugs, which are limited the long durations of treatment and the emergence of drug-resistant strains. Targets of HDTs include host factors such as cytokines, immune check points, immune cell functions, and essential enzyme activities. This article includes examples of potentially applicable HDTs and introduces novel approaches for their development.

  12. [Tuberculosis annual report 2010--(1) Summary of tuberculosis notification statistics in 2010].

    PubMed

    2012-06-01

    Annual reports of tuberculosis (TB) statistics in Japan have been compiled mainly from the database of the nationwide computerized tuberculosis surveillance system, which has been in operation since 1987. This system has been revised several times. The latest revision was conducted in 2007, and much new information was added. This summary of tuberculosis notification statistics is the first report of a new series for the Tuberculosis Annual Report 2010. The statistics are summarized as follows: The TB notification rate fell below 20 per 100,000 in 2007 and continued to decline, reaching 18.2 in 2010. However, there were still 23,261 TB patients newly notified in 2010. For sputum-smear positive pulmonary TB, the patient count was 9,019, with an incidence rate of 7.0 per 100,000 in 2010. Since June 2007, it has been compulsory to notify patients with latent TB infections (LTBI) requiring treatment; the number notified in 2010 was 4,930.

  13. Diagnosis & treatment of tuberculosis in HIV co-infected patients

    PubMed Central

    Padmapriyadarsini, C.; Narendran, G.; Swaminathan, Soumya

    2011-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) associated tuberculosis (TB) remains a major global public health challenge, with an estimated 1.4 million patients worldwide. Co-infection with HIV leads to challenges in both the diagnosis and treatment of tuberculosis. Further, there has been an increase in rates of drug resistant tuberculosis, including multi-drug (MDR-TB) and extensively drug resistant TB (XDRTB), which are difficult to treat and contribute to increased mortality. Because of the poor performance of sputum smear microscopy in HIV-infected patients, newer diagnostic tests are urgently required that are not only sensitive and specific but easy to use in remote and resource-constrained settings. The treatment of co-infected patients requires antituberculosis and antiretroviral drugs to be administered concomitantly; challenges include pill burden and patient compliance, drug interactions, overlapping toxic effects, and immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome. Also important questions about the duration and schedule of anti-TB drug regimens and timing of antiretroviral therapy remain unanswered. From a programmatic point of view, screening of all HIV-infected persons for TB and vice-versa requires good co-ordination and communication between the TB and AIDS control programmes. Linkage of co-infected patients to antiretroviral treatment centres is critical if early mortality is to be prevented. We present here an overview of existing diagnostic strategies, new tests in the pipeline and recommendations for treatment of patients with HIV-TB dual infection. PMID:22310818

  14. Shortening Tuberculosis Treatment With Fluoroquinolones: Lost in Translation?

    PubMed

    Lanoix, Jean-Philippe; Chaisson, Richard E; Nuermberger, Eric L

    2016-02-15

    The disappointing recent failure of fluoroquinolone-containing regimens to shorten the duration of tuberculosis treatment in costly phase 3 trials has raised serious questions about the reliability of preclinical tuberculosis models, especially mice, and the current paradigm of regimen development. Therefore we re-examined data from murine models and early-stage clinical trials on which the pivotal trials were based, concluding that phase 3 trial results were in line with preceding studies. Finally, we offer suggestions for a more efficient and integrated preclinical and clinical regimen development program where quantitative pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic models more predictive of curative treatment durations are set forth. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Tuberculosis in African Americans: clinical characteristics and outcome.

    PubMed Central

    Funnyé, A. S.; Ganesan, K.; Yoshikawa, T. T.

    1998-01-01

    This study examined the clinical characteristics and outcome of pulmonary tuberculosis in African Americans hospitalized in a teaching hospital in south-central Los Angeles from May 1992 through April 1994. The charts of 41 African Americans with culture-positive Mycobacterium tuberculosis were reviewed. Predisposing factors for pulmonary tuberculosis were identified in nearly half of cases. Cough and fever were the most common symptoms. Seventy-six percent had positive acid-fast bacilli (AFB) smears. Nine patients were human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive, and 6 of 9 HIV-positive patients had positive AFB smears whereas 17 of 19 HIV-negative patients had positive AFB smears. Radiographic changes were not significantly different between HIV-positive and HIV-negative patients. Drug resistance was identified in nine of 31 patients (29%). Eight of 41 patients (19.5%) died, with 2 being drug resistant. Human immunodeficiency virus infection was a major predisposing factor for tuberculosis, and no statistical differences were found in radiographic features or AFB smear positivity between HIV-positive and HIV-negative patients. Drug resistance and mortality were disproportionately high. These results indicate that HIV infection and drug resistance are major problems that predispose for tuberculosis infection and make its treatment difficult. PMID:9510620

  16. Tuberculosis in pregnancy: current recommendations for screening and treatment in the USA.

    PubMed

    Bergeron, Kimberly G; Bonebrake, Robert G; Gray, Caron J

    2004-08-01

    The main focus of this review is the management of active and latent tuberculosis in pregnancy in industrialized countries. The review is geared towards the healthcare professional taking care of the obstetric patient. The epidemiology of active and latent tuberculosis in the USA and recommendations for the screening of tuberculosis in pregnancy are considered. The history of treatment methodology and its relationship to the current treatment of active and latent tuberculosis in pregnancy is reviewed, and finally, a discussion of the best time to treat latent tuberculosis in a pregnant patient is undertaken, along with thoughts on future changes and advances in this field.

  17. Innovative community-based approaches doubled tuberculosis case notification and improve treatment outcome in Southern Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Yassin, Mohammed A; Datiko, Daniel G; Tulloch, Olivia; Markos, Paulos; Aschalew, Melkamsew; Shargie, Estifanos B; Dangisso, Mesay H; Komatsu, Ryuichi; Sahu, Suvanand; Blok, Lucie; Cuevas, Luis E; Theobald, Sally

    2013-01-01

    TB Control Programmes rely on passive case-finding to detect cases. TB notification remains low in Ethiopia despite major expansion of health services. Poor rural communities face many barriers to service access. A community-based intervention package was implemented in Sidama zone, Ethiopia. The package included advocacy, training, engaging stakeholders and communities and active case-finding by female Health Extension Workers (HEWs) at village level. HEWs conducted house-to-house visits, identified individuals with a cough for two or more weeks, with or without other symptoms, collected sputum, prepared smears and supervised treatment. Supervisors transported smears for microscopy, started treatment, screened contacts and initiated Isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT) for children. Outcomes were compared with the pre-implementation period and a control zone. Qualitative research was conducted to understand community and provider perceptions and experiences. HEWs screened 49,857 symptomatic individuals (60% women) from October 2010 to December 2011. 2,262 (4·5%) had smear-positive TB (53% women). Case notification increased from 64 to 127/100,000 population/year resulting in 5,090 PTB+ and 7,071 cases of all forms of TB. Of 8,005 contacts visited, 1,949 were symptomatic, 1,290 symptomatic were tested and 69 diagnosed with TB. 1,080 children received IPT. Treatment success for smear-positive TB increased from 77% to 93% and treatment default decreased from 11% to 3%. Service users and providers found the intervention package highly acceptable. Community-based interventions made TB diagnostic and treatment services more accessible to the poor, women, elderly and children, doubling the notification rate and improving treatment outcome. This approach could improve TB diagnosis and treatment in other high burden settings.

  18. Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Dheda, Keertan; Barry, Clifton E; Maartens, Gary

    2016-03-19

    Although the worldwide incidence of tuberculosis has been slowly decreasing, the global disease burden remains substantial (∼9 million cases and ∼1·5 million deaths in 2013), and tuberculosis incidence and drug resistance are rising in some parts of the world such as Africa. The modest gains achieved thus far are threatened by high prevalence of HIV, persisting global poverty, and emergence of highly drug-resistant forms of tuberculosis. Tuberculosis is also a major problem in health-care workers in both low-burden and high-burden settings. Although the ideal preventive agent, an effective vaccine, is still some time away, several new diagnostic technologies have emerged, and two new tuberculosis drugs have been licensed after almost 50 years of no tuberculosis drugs being registered. Efforts towards an effective vaccine have been thwarted by poor understanding of what constitutes protective immunity. Although new interventions and investment in control programmes will enable control, eradication will only be possible through substantial reductions in poverty and overcrowding, political will and stability, and containing co-drivers of tuberculosis, such as HIV, smoking, and diabetes.

  19. Treatment Default amongst Patients with Tuberculosis in Urban Morocco: Predicting and Explaining Default and Post-Default Sputum Smear and Drug Susceptibility Results

    PubMed Central

    Ghali, Iraqi; Kizub, Darya; Billioux, Alexander C.; Bennani, Kenza; Bourkadi, Jamal Eddine; Benmamoun, Abderrahmane; Lahlou, Ouafae; Aouad, Rajae El; Dooley, Kelly E.

    2014-01-01

    Setting Public tuberculosis (TB) clinics in urban Morocco. Objective Explore risk factors for TB treatment default and develop a prediction tool. Assess consequences of default, specifically risk for transmission or development of drug resistance. Design Case-control study comparing patients who defaulted from TB treatment and patients who completed it using quantitative methods and open-ended questions. Results were interpreted in light of health professionals’ perspectives from a parallel study. A predictive model and simple tool to identify patients at high risk of default were developed. Sputum from cases with pulmonary TB was collected for smear and drug susceptibility testing. Results 91 cases and 186 controls enrolled. Independent risk factors for default included current smoking, retreatment, work interference with adherence, daily directly observed therapy, side effects, quick symptom resolution, and not knowing one’s treatment duration. Age >50 years, never smoking, and having friends who knew one’s diagnosis were protective. A simple scoring tool incorporating these factors was 82.4% sensitive and 87.6% specific for predicting default in this population. Clinicians and patients described additional contributors to default and suggested locally-relevant intervention targets. Among 89 cases with pulmonary TB, 71% had sputum that was smear positive for TB. Drug resistance was rare. Conclusion The causes of default from TB treatment were explored through synthesis of qualitative and quantitative data from patients and health professionals. A scoring tool with high sensitivity and specificity to predict default was developed. Prospective evaluation of this tool coupled with targeted interventions based on our findings is warranted. Of note, the risk of TB transmission from patients who default treatment to others is likely to be high. The commonly-feared risk of drug resistance, though, may be low; a larger study is required to confirm these findings

  20. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Malate Synthase- and MPT51-Based Serodiagnostic Assay as an Adjunct to Rapid Identification of Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Achkar, Jacqueline M.; Dong, Yuxin; Holzman, Robert S.; Belisle, John; Kourbeti, Irene S.; Sherpa, Tsering; Condos, Rany; Rom, William N.; Laal, Suman

    2006-01-01

    The 81-kDa malate synthase (MS; Rv 1837c) and the 27-kDa MPT51 (Rv 3803c) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis are immunodominant antigens recognized by serum antibodies from ∼80% of human immunodeficiency virus-negative smear-positive tuberculosis patients from India. We now provide evidence that the use of the MS/MPT51-based serodiagnostic assay can serve as an adjunct to sputum microscopy in the rapid diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis. PMID:17090645

  1. Treatment outcome of tuberculosis patients under directly observed treatment in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Getahun, Belete; Ameni, Gobena; Medhin, Girmay; Biadgilign, Sibhatu

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis is one of the leading causes of mortality among infectious diseases worldwide. For effective tuberculosis control, it is a pre-requisite to detect the cases as early as possible, and to ensure that the tuberculosis patients complete their treatment and get cured. However, in many resource-constrained settings treatment outcome for tuberculosis has not been satisfactory. The aim of the study was to assess the treatment outcome of tuberculosis patients and investigate the association of demographic and clinical factors with treatment success of patients enrolled in Directly Observed Treatment Short Course program in government owned health centers over the course of five consecutive years in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. A register based historical cohort study covering the period of July 2004 to June 2009 was conducted to determine the treatment outcome of Directly Observed Treatment Short Course in government owned health centers in Addis Ababa. Sex and age of tuberculosis patients, health center at which the patient was treated, year of treatment, type of tuberculosis for which the patient was treated, type of treatment offered to the patient, follow-up status and documented treatment outcome were extracted from the Directly Observed Treatment Short Course clinics of three randomly selected health centers. Records of 6450 registered tuberculosis patients (n=3147 males and 3433 females) were included in this document review. Of these patients 18.1% were reported as being cured, 64.6% were documented as treatment completed, 3.7% died during follow-up, 5.1% were reported as defaulters, 0.4% were documented as treatment failure and 8.2% were transferred out to another health institution. Treatment center and year of enrollment were significantly associated with treatment success. Year of enrollment and treatment center were significantly associated with treatment success. Although the overall treatment success obtained in this study is in line with the World

  2. Treatment of latent tuberculosis in migrants to Victoria.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Michael G; Brown, Lynne K

    2015-12-31

    The proportion of eligible persons identified who are tested for latent tuberculosis (TB), offered treatment, and complete treatment are performance indicators in tuberculosis control. We report a retrospective database review of the Migrant Screening Clinic, Department of Respiratory and Sleep Disorders Medicine at Western Health Footscray Hospital during the years 1996-2006. Of 7,225 migrants aged less than 35 years, tuberculin skin testing (TST) was performed for 3,589 (49.7%), including 2,641 (65.6%) of 4,024 migrants under 35 years with an abnormal chest radiograph, and 2,297 (59.0%) of 3,893 migrants born in a high-burden country. Of 3,589 persons with both chest radiograph and TST results, 1,487 (41.4%) were referred for follow-up, including 81.3% of those with TST ≥10 mm. Outcome data were available for 1,047 persons considered for treatment of latent TB, of whom 12.5% did not attend an initial appointment, 21.6% attended and were not offered treatment, 65.9% attended and were offered treatment, and 41.7% completed treatment for latent TB. The Victorian program for treatment of latent TB in migrants has testing, treatment offer and treatment completions rates similar to other published studies. The impact on TB control is limited by the small proportion of migrants referred to this program.

  3. Bedaquiline for the treatment of drug-resistant tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Bélard, Sabine; Heuvelings, Charlotte C; Janssen, Saskia; Grobusch, Martin P

    2015-05-01

    Bedaquiline is a much-needed novel drug which is highly effective against drug-resistant tuberculosis. While its clinical development has been laudably fast-tracked and the drug is now available for inclusion into treatment regimens when no suitable alternatives exist, clinical experience with bedaquiline is still limited. Phase III trial data and Phase IV studies are needed particularly to study different patient populations and to optimize treatment regimens. Drug resistance to bedaquiline needs to be monitored carefully, and full access to bedaquiline treatment where it is appropriate and needed must be promoted.

  4. Multidrug resistance after inappropriate tuberculosis treatment: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    van der Werf, Marieke J.; Langendam, Miranda W.; Huitric, Emma; Manissero, Davide

    2012-01-01

    We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess the evidence for the postulation that inappropriate tuberculosis (TB) regimens are a risk for development of multidrug-resistant (MDR)-TB. MEDLINE, EMBASE and other databases were searched for relevant articles in January 2011. Cohort studies including TB patients who received treatment were selected and data on treatment regimen, drug susceptibility testing results and genotyping results before treatment and at failure or relapse were abstracted from the articles. Four studies were included in the systematic review and two were included in the meta-analysis. In these two studies the risk of developing MDR-TB in patients who failed treatment and used an inappropriate treatment regimen was increased 27-fold (RR 26.7, 95% CI 5.0–141.7) when compared with individuals who received an appropriate treatment regimen. This review provides evidence that supports the general opinion that the development of MDR-TB can be caused by inadequate treatment, given the drug susceptibility pattern of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacilli. It should be noted that only two studies provided data for the meta-analysis. The information can be used to advocate for adequate treatment for patients based on drug resistance profiles. PMID:22005918

  5. [Severe pulmonary tuberculosis in the ICU, diagnosis and treatment].

    PubMed

    Phelippeau, M; Petureau, F

    2015-10-01

    Pulmonary tuberculosis can rarely lead to acute respiratory distress syndrome and anti-tuberculous therapy initiation depends on this difficult diagnosis in ICU. A 50-year-old man presented a septic shock and acute respiratory distress syndrome with bilateral infiltrates mainly in the upper lobes on chest radiography. Diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis was made 10days after admission on examination of cavitary and diffuse infiltrates on a second CT scan, in addition to presence of acid-fast bacilli on smear examination of bronchial aspirates. Amikacin, with four first-line anti-tuberculous drugs, was started in the case of a resistant strain and seriousness of the illness. After 14weeks, he left on rifampicin and isoniazid treatment. There are no specific recommendations concerning pulmonary tuberculosis in ICU but a delay in initiation of anti-tuberculous therapy is a factor of poor prognosis. Using a second-line anti-tuberculous drug, like amikacin or/and fluoroquinolones, within initial treatment may accelerate improvement of sepsis and immediately treat resistant strains, when genomic methods for detection of resistance are not available in routine. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Evaluation of GeneXpert MTB/RIF for determination of rifampicin resistance among new tuberculosis cases in west and northwest Iran.

    PubMed

    Atashi, S; Izadi, B; Jalilian, S; Madani, S H; Farahani, A; Mohajeri, P

    2017-09-01

    Despite a Mycobacterium tuberculosis control programme and anti-tuberculosis drugs, drug-resistant tuberculosis (DR-TB) is one of the most serious public health issues worldwide. Rapid laboratory diagnosis of M. tuberculosis is needed for the diagnosis of multidrug-resistant (MDR) TB and to find the optimal treatment protocol. The purpose of this study was to detect resistance to rifampicin in new cases of TB using the GeneXpert MTB/RIF (M. tuberculosis/rifampicin) assay and the standard proportional method in west and northwest Iran. In this descriptive cross-sectional study, sputum samples were enrolled and screened for M. tuberculosis using Ziehl-Neelsen stain and mycobacterial culture. Samples from individuals with smear-positive TB were cultured on Lowenstein-Jensen medium; afterwards, the presence of resistance to rifampicin was examined by the GeneXpert MTB/RIF and standard proportional methods. A total of 400 new cases of suspected TB were collected, 162 (40.5%) of which were smear- and culture-positive for M. tuberculosis. The frequencies of rifampicin resistance in new smear-positive TB cases were 3.1% and 4.3% for GeneXpert and standard proportional method, respectively. Sensitivity and specificity of GeneXpert were 71% and 100%, respectively, compared with the proportional method. GeneXpert can be a quick and helpful method for the diagnosis of rifampicin-resistant TB in regions with high rates of DR-TB or MDR-TB. GeneXpert MTB-RIF assay must be used as an early diagnostic method whose results must be confirmed by the standard proportional method. The GeneXpert and proportional methods complement but do not replace each other.

  7. HIV infection-related tuberculosis: clinical manifestations and treatment.

    PubMed

    Sterling, Timothy R; Pham, Paul A; Chaisson, Richard E

    2010-05-15

    Several aspects of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection-related tuberculosis (TB) and its treatment differ from those of TB in HIV-uninfected persons. The risk of TB and the clinical and radiographic manifestations of disease are primary examples. Antiretroviral therapy has a profound effect on lowering the risk of TB in HIV-infected persons, but it can also be associated with immune reconstitution inflammatory disease and unmasking of previously subclinical disease. There are also differences in treatment of HIV infection-related TB because of overlapping drug toxicities and drug-drug interactions between antiretroviral therapy and anti-TB therapy.

  8. Synthetic investigational new drugs for the treatment of tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Yong-Soo; Koh, Won-Jung

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a major global health concern. And while there are treatments already on the market, there is a demand for new drugs that are effective and safe against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which reduce the number of drugs and the duration of treatment in both drug-susceptible TB and multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB). This review covers promising novel investigational TB drugs that are currently under development. Specifically, the authors review the efficacy of novel agents for the treatment of TB in preclinical, phase I and phase II clinical trials. The authors also review the safety and tolerability profiles of these drugs. Bedaquiline and delamanid are the most promising novel drugs for the treatment of MDR-TB, each having high efficacy and tolerability. However, the best regimen for achieving better outcomes and reducing adverse drug reactions remains to be determined, with safety concerns regarding cardiac events due to QT prolongation still to be addressed. Pretomanid is a novel drug that potentially shortens the duration of treatment in both drug-susceptible and drug-resistant TB in combination with moxifloxacin and pyrazinamide. Linezolid shows marked efficacy in the treatment of MDR-TB and extensively drug-resistant TB (XDR-TB), but the drug is known to cause significant adverse drug reactions, including peripheral neuropathy, optic neuropathy and myelosuppression. These adverse reactions must be considered prior to prescribing long-term usage of this drug.

  9. Pyrosequencing for rapid detection of tuberculosis resistance in clinical isolates and sputum samples from re-treatment pulmonary tuberculosis patients.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ruijuan; Zhu, Changtai; Guo, Qi; Qin, Lianhua; Wang, Jie; Lu, Junmei; Cui, Haiyan; Cui, Zhenling; Ge, Baoxue; Liu, Jinming; Hu, Zhongyi

    2014-04-13

    Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is a major public health problem. Early diagnosis of MDR-TB patients is essential for minimizing the risk of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) transmission. The conventional drug susceptibility testing (DST) methods for detection of drug-resistant M. tuberculosis are laborious and cannot provide the rapid detection for clinical practice. The aim of this study was to develop a pyrosequencing approach for the simultaneous detection of resistance to rifampin (RIF), isoniazid (INH), ethambutol (EMB), streptomycin (SM), ofloxacin (OFL) and amikacin (AMK) in M. tuberculosis clinical isolates and sputum samples from re-treatment pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) patients. We identified the optimum conditions for detection mutation of rpoB, katG, rpsl, embB, gyrA and rrs gene by pyrosequencing. Then this approach was applied to detect 205 clinical isolates and 24 sputum samples of M. tuberculosis from re-treatment PTB patients. The mutations of rpoB and gyrA gene were detected by pyrosequencig with the SQA mode, and the mutations of katG, rpsl, embB, gyrA and rrs gene were detected by pyrosequencing with SNP mode. Compared with the Bactec MGIT 960 mycobacterial detection system, the accuracy of pyrosequencing for the detection of RIF, INH, EMB, SM, AMK and OFL resistance in clinical isolates was 95.0%, 79.2%, 70.3%, 84.5%, 96.5% and 91.1%, respectively. In sputum samples the accuracy was 83.3%, 83.3%, 60.9%, 83.3%, 87.5% and 91.7%, respectively. The newly established pyrosequencing assay is a rapid and high-throughput method for the detection of resistance to RIF, INH, SM, EMB, OFL and AMK in M. tuberculosis. Pyrosequencing can be used as a practical molecular diagnostic tool for screening and predicting the resistance of re-treatment pulmonary tuberculosis patients.

  10. Treatment of tuberculosis in Turkey in terms of medical ethics.

    PubMed

    Demir, Müge; Örnek Büken, Nüket

    2015-09-01

    Having a history as old as the history of humanity, Tuberculosis (TB) is a serious disease and it is regarded as an important a public health problem not only for its medical aspect but also for its social and ethical aspects. As a result of the discovery of the cure for TB and the improvement of humans' living conditions, the TB problem was believed to be solved and a relaxation in the battle against TB was observed around the world by 1980s. World Health Organization (WHO) declared a state of emergency for the battle against TB in 1993. According to the "Global Tuberculosis Control 2014" which was published by WHO, TB remains one of the world's deadliest communicable diseases. This article argues that tuberculosis is one of the most important neglected topics in medical ethics as regards individual obligations to avoid infecting others, coercive social distancing measures, third-party notification, health workers' duty to treat contagious patients, and justice.The purpose of this article is provide a picture of the current situation of TB treatment in Turkey in terms of medical ethics.

  11. Tuberculosis Contact Screening and Isoniazid Preventive Therapy in a South Indian District: Operational Issues for Programmatic Consideration

    PubMed Central

    Pothukuchi, Madhavi; Nagaraja, Sharath Burugina; Kelamane, Santosha; Satyanarayana, Srinath; Shashidhar; Babu, Sai; Dewan, Puneet; Wares, Fraser

    2011-01-01

    Background Under India's Revised National Tuberculosis Control Programme (RNTCP), all household contacts of sputum smear positive Pulmonary Tuberculosis (PTB) patients are screened for TB. In the absence of active TB disease, household contacts aged <6 years are eligible for Isoniazid Preventive Therapy (IPT) (5 milligrams/kilogram body weight/day) for 6 months. Objectives To estimate the number of household contacts aged <6 years, of sputum smear positive PTB patients registered for treatment under RNTCP from April to June'2008 in Krishna District, to assess the extent to which they are screened for TB disease and in its absence initiated on IPT. Methods A cross sectional study was conducted. Households of all smear positive PTB cases (n = 848) registered for treatment from April to June'2008 were included. Data on the number of household contacts aged <6 years, the extent to which they were screened for TB disease, and the status of initiation of IPT, was collected. Results Households of 825 (97%) patients were visited, and 172 household contacts aged <6 years were identified. Of them, 116 (67%) were evaluated for TB disease; none were found to be TB diseased and 97 (84%) contacts were initiated on IPT and 19 (16%) contacts were not initiated on IPT due to shortage of INH tablets in peripheral health centers. The reasons for non-evaluation of the remaining eligible children (n = 56, 33%) include no home visit by the health staff in 25 contacts, home visit done but not evaluated in 31 contacts. House-hold contacts in rural areas were less likely to be evaluated and initiated on IPT [risk ratio 6.65 (95% CI; 3.06–14.42)]. Conclusion Contact screening and IPT implementation under routine programmatic conditions is sub-optimal. There is an urgent need to sensitize all concerned programme staff on its importance and establishment of mechanisms for rigorous monitoring. PMID:21799875

  12. Tuberculosis axillary lymph node coexistent breast cancer in adjuvant treatment: case report

    PubMed Central

    Bromberg, Silvio Eduardo; do Amaral, Paulo Gustavo Tenório

    2015-01-01

    Coexistence of breast cancer and tuberculosis is rare. In most cases, involvement by tuberculosis occurs in axillary lymph nodes. We report a case of a 43-years-old patient who had undergone adenomastectomy and left sentinel lymph node biopsy due to a triple negative ductal carcinoma. At the end of adjuvant treatment, the patient had an atypical lymph node in the left axilla. Lymph node was excised, and after laboratory analysis, the diagnosis was ganglion tuberculosis. The patient underwent treatment for primary tuberculosis. The development of these two pathologies can lead to problems in diagnosis and treatment. An accurate diagnosis is important to avoid unnecessary surgical procedures. PMID:26018148

  13. Evaluation of the AID TB resistance line probe assay for rapid detection of genetic alterations associated with drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains.

    PubMed

    Ritter, C; Lucke, K; Sirgel, F A; Warren, R W; van Helden, P D; Böttger, E C; Bloemberg, G V

    2014-03-01

    The rapid accurate detection of drug resistance mutations in Mycobacterium tuberculosis is essential for optimizing the treatment of tuberculosis and limiting the emergence and spread of drug-resistant strains. The TB Resistance line probe assay from Autoimmun Diagnostika GmbH (AID) (Strassburg, Germany) was designed to detect the most prevalent mutations that confer resistance to isoniazid, rifampin, streptomycin, amikacin, capreomycin, fluoroquinolones, and ethambutol. This assay detected resistance mutations in clinical M. tuberculosis isolates from areas with low and high levels of endemicity (Switzerland, n=104; South Africa, n=52) and in selected Mycobacterium bovis BCG 1721 mutant strains (n=5) with 100% accuracy. Subsequently, the line probe assay was shown to be capable of rapid genetic assessment of drug resistance in MGIT broth cultures, the results of which were in 100% agreement with those of DNA sequencing and phenotypic drug susceptibility testing. Finally, the line probe assay was assessed for direct screening of smear-positive clinical specimens. Screening of 98 clinical specimens demonstrated that the test gave interpretable results for >95% of them. Antibiotic resistance mutations detected in the clinical samples were confirmed by DNA sequencing. We conclude that the AID TB Resistance line probe assay is an accurate tool for the rapid detection of resistance mutations in cultured isolates and in smear-positive clinical specimens.

  14. The outcome of tuberculosis treatment in subjects with chronic kidney disease in Brazil: a multinomial analysis*

    PubMed Central

    Reis-Santos, Barbara; Gomes, Teresa; Horta, Bernardo Lessa; Maciel, Ethel Leonor Noia

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyze the association between clinical/epidemiological characteristics and outcomes of tuberculosis treatment in patients with concomitant tuberculosis and chronic kidney disease (CKD) in Brazil. METHODS: We used the Brazilian Ministry of Health National Case Registry Database to identify patients with tuberculosis and CKD, treated between 2007 and 2011. The tuberculosis treatment outcomes were compared with epidemiological and clinical characteristics of the subjects using a hierarchical multinomial logistic regression model, in which cure was the reference outcome. RESULTS: The prevalence of CKD among patients with tuberculosis was 0.4% (95% CI: 0.37-0.42%). The sample comprised 1,077 subjects. The outcomes were cure, in 58%; treatment abandonment, in 7%; death from tuberculosis, in 13%; and death from other causes, in 22%. The characteristics that differentiated the ORs for treatment abandonment or death were age; alcoholism; AIDS; previous noncompliance with treatment; transfer to another facility; suspected tuberculosis on chest X-ray; positive results in the first smear microscopy; and indications for/use of directly observed treatment, short-course strategy. CONCLUSIONS: Our data indicate the importance of sociodemographic characteristics for the diagnosis of tuberculosis in patients with CKD and underscore the need for tuberculosis control strategies targeting patients with chronic noncommunicable diseases, such as CKD. PMID:24310632

  15. Impact of three empirical anti-tuberculosis treatment strategies for people initiating antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Van Rie, A; Westreich, D; Sanne, I

    2014-11-01

    Early mortality in people initiating antiretroviral treatment (ART) remains high. Empirical anti-tuberculosis treatment strategies aim to reduce early mortality by initiating anti-tuberculosis treatment in individuals at high risk of death from undiagnosed TB. Using data from 16 913 individuals starting ART under program conditions, we simulated the impact of three empirical treatment strategies (two clinical trials and a pragmatic approach), assuming that 50% of early deaths and 100% of incident TB are averted in those eligible. Compared to starting anti-tuberculosis treatment on clinical or mycobacteriological grounds, 4.4-31.4% more individuals were eligible for anti-tuberculosis treatment, 5.5-25.4% of deaths were averted and 10.9-57.3% of incident TB cases were prevented under empirical anti-tuberculosis treatment strategies. The proportion receiving any anti-tuberculosis treatment during the first 6 months of ART increased from the observed 24.0% to an estimated 27.5%, 40.4% and 51.3%, under the PrOMPT, REMEMBER and pragmatic approach, respectively. The impact of empirical anti-tuberculosis treatment strategies depends greatly on the eligibility criteria chosen. The additional strain placed on anti-tuberculosis treatment facilities and the relatively limited impact of some empirical TB strategies raise the question as to whether the benefits will outweigh the risks at population level.

  16. Factors associated with tuberculosis treatment default among HIV-infected tuberculosis patients in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Kittikraisak, Wanitchaya; Burapat, Channawong; Kaewsa-ard, Samroui; Watthanaamornkiet, Wanpen; Sirinak, Chawin; Sattayawuthipong, Wanchai; Jittimanee, Suksont; Pobkeeree, Vallerut; Varma, Jay K

    2009-01-01

    Ensuring completion of tuberculosis (TB) treatment remains a major public health problem. In HIV-infected patients, TB is the most common severe opportunistic infection. Few studies have evaluated risk factors for TB treatment default in HIV-infected patients. We conducted a prospective, observational study of HIV-infected TB patients in Thailand. Patients underwent standardised evaluations at the beginning of TB treatment, at the end of the intensive phase and at the end of TB treatment. TB treatment outcomes were assessed according to WHO guidelines. The analysis was limited to patients who defaulted or who had treatment success. Of the 554 patients analysed, 61 (11%) defaulted. In multivariate analysis, factors associated with TB treatment default included incarceration history [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) 2.0, 95% CI 1.1-3.7), smoking (AOR 2.3, 95% CI 1.3-4.1) and having a symptom complaint score >15 (AOR 3.4, 95% CI 1.4-8.0); one marker of wealth, namely owning a refrigerator, was protective (AOR 0.4, 95% CI 0.2-0.8). Default during TB treatment was a significant problem in HIV-infected patients. Reducing default may require enhancing services for patients with a history of incarceration or smoking and designing patient-centred systems to address poverty and patient wellness.

  17. Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Lynne

    2017-03-10

    Essential facts Tuberculosis (TB) is an infection caused by a bacterium, mycobacterium tuberculosis. While it can affect any part of the body, only pulmonary TB is infectious. According to the charity TB Alert, there were 5,758 cases of TB in the UK in 2015 and 39% of them were in London. This represented a fall from a peak of 8,919 cases in 2011. Left untreated, TB is life-threatening, but is usually curable with antibiotics. The sooner it is diagnosed and treated, the better, both for the person's health and in preventing them from passing the infection on to others.

  18. Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Lynne

    2017-02-22

    Essential facts Tuberculosis (TB) is an infection caused by a bacterium, mycobacterium tuberculosis. While it can affect any part of the body, only pulmonary TB is infectious. According to the charity TB Alert, there were 5,758 cases of TB in the UK in 2015 and 39% of them were in London. This represented a fall from a peak of 8,919 cases in 2011. Left untreated, TB is life-threatening, but is usually curable with antibiotics. The sooner it is diagnosed and treated, the better, both for the person's health and in preventing them from passing the infection on to others.

  19. Surveillance of tuberculosis in Malawian prisons

    PubMed Central

    Banda, R. P.; Gausi, F.; Salaniponi, F. M.; Harries, A. D.; Mpunga, J.; Banda, H. M.; Munthali, C.; Ndindi, H.

    2012-01-01

    Setting: The Malawi National Tuberculosis Programme (NTP) has collaborated with the Prison Health Services (PHS) on tuberculosis (TB) control in prisons since 1996. Information on case finding and treatment outcomes is routinely collected, but there has not been any recent countrywide review of these prison data. Objectives: To determine 1) the number of prisoners registered for TB in 2007, 2) TB treatment outcomes in 2006 and 3) training of prison health care staff in all Malawian prisons. Design: Descriptive study involving a review of 2006 and 2007 data collected by the NTP during surveillance in 2008. Results: In 2007, 278 TB patients were registered in Malawian prisons, representing a TB case notification rate of 835 per 100 000 (higher than that in the general population, at 346/100 000). The treatment success rate for new smear-positive TB cases for 2006 was 73%, lower than the national average of 78%. In all, 52 prison health care staff had received 1 week of training in TB management, usually just after starting work in the prison. Conclusions: TB case notifications in Malawian prisons were higher than in the general population and treatment outcomes less favourable. The NTP and PHS need better collaboration to improve TB control in Malawian prisons. PMID:26392938

  20. Patients’ Experience of Tuberculosis Treatment Using Directly Observed Treatment, Short-Course (DOTS): A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Behzadifar, Masoud; Mirzaei, Masoud; Behzadifar, Meysam; Keshavarzi, Abouzar; Behzadifar, Maryam; Saran, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Background: Despite effective diagnosis and treatment, prevalence of tuberculosis (TB) is still growing. The directly observed treatment, short-course (DOTS) strategy to treat TB was introduced by the World Health Organization more than a decade ago. Little is known about patients’ experience of TB treatment, according to DOTS, in Iran. Objectives: This study aimed to understand the patients’ experience of tuberculosis treatment according to DOTS in Iran. Patients and Methods: This study is a qualitative study, using content analysis to examine patients’ experience of TB treatment and to understand their compliance during DOTS. In this study, a semi-structured interview with open questions was answered by 40 patients, who had a diagnosis of pulmonary and extrapulmonary tuberculosis, and improved during the course of their treatment. The method of sampling was purposive sample and the interview process lasted until data saturation. Results: Data analysis resulted in the extraction of six themes, which reflect the experiences of the study participants. The themes are: 1) individual factors; 2) change of the attitudes and beliefs of patients on TB treatment; 3) support terms of patients with tuberculosis; 4) the role of health care professionals; 5) social factors and 6) the financial burden. Conclusions: Successful completion of TB treatment requires an effective partnership between the patient and health care professionals, and a harmony between the cultural context, attitude of the patient, family support and health literacy. Future health policies should address these issues to improve patients’ adherence to DOTS. PMID:26023334

  1. [Early diagnosis of female genital tuberculosis by phage amplified biological assay].

    PubMed

    Liu, Bao-ying; Li, Yan; Zheng, Lei; Zhong, Mei; Yu, Yan-hong; Xiong, Meng-zhou

    2008-07-01

    To establish an early diagnostic method for detecting female genital tuberculosis. Eighty-six women with genital tuberculosis during January 2005-September 2007 were examined by phage amplified biological assay, and the results were compared with those from leucorrhea culture, smear and PCR. Forty-five patients were tuberculosis positive with 100% of specificity identified by phage amplified biological assay. Twenty patients were tuberculosis positive by PCR. Five patients were culture-positive tuberculosis and no case had smear-positive tuberculosis. Phage amplified biologically assay is sensitive and specific, which could be used for the early diagnosis of female genital tuberculosis.

  2. Tuberculosis--advances in development of new drugs, treatment regimens, host-directed therapies, and biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Wallis, Robert S; Maeurer, Markus; Mwaba, Peter; Chakaya, Jeremiah; Rustomjee, Roxana; Migliori, Giovanni Battista; Marais, Ben; Schito, Marco; Churchyard, Gavin; Swaminathan, Soumya; Hoelscher, Michael; Zumla, Alimuddin

    2016-04-01

    Tuberculosis is the leading infectious cause of death worldwide, with 9·6 million cases and 1·5 million deaths reported in 2014. WHO estimates 480,000 cases of these were multidrug resistant (MDR). Less than half of patients who entered into treatment for MDR tuberculosis successfully completed that treatment, mainly due to high mortality and loss to follow-up. These in turn illustrate weaknesses in current treatment regimens and national tuberculosis programmes, coupled with operational treatment challenges. In this Review we provide an update on recent developments in the tuberculosis drug-development pipeline (including new and repurposed antimicrobials and host-directed drugs) as they are applied to new regimens to shorten and improve outcomes of tuberculosis treatment. Several new or repurposed antimicrobial drugs are in advanced trial stages for MDR tuberculosis, and two new antimicrobial drug candidates are in early-stage trials. Several trials to reduce the duration of therapy in MDR and drug-susceptible tuberculosis are ongoing. A wide range of candidate host-directed therapies are being developed to accelerate eradication of infection, prevent new drug resistance, and prevent permanent lung injury. As these drugs have been approved for other clinical indications, they are now ready for repurposing for tuberculosis in phase 2 clinical trials. We assess risks associated with evaluation of new treatment regimens, and highlight opportunities to advance tuberculosis research generally through regulatory innovation in MDR tuberculosis. Progress in tuberculosis-specific biomarkers (including culture conversion, PET and CT imaging, and gene expression profiles) can support this innovation. Several global initiatives now provide unique opportunities to tackle the tuberculosis epidemic through collaborative partnerships between high-income countries and middle-income and low-income countries for clinical trials training and research, allowing funders to

  3. Attitudes towards preventive tuberculosis treatment among hospital staff.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Vidya; Harrington, Zinta; Dobler, Claudia C

    2016-01-01

    Background. Healthcare workers have an increased risk of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI), but previous studies suggested that they might be reluctant to accept preventive tuberculosis (TB) treatment. We aimed to examine doctors' and nurses' experience of TB screening and to explore their attitudes towards preventive TB treatment. Methods. We conducted a survey among randomly selected healthcare workers at a tertiary hospital in Sydney, Australia, using a paper-based questionnaire. Results. A total of 1,304 questionnaires were distributed and 311 (24%) responses were received. The majority of hospital staff supported preventive TB treatment in health care workers with evidence of latent TB infection (LTBI) in general (74%, 164/223) and for them personally (81%, 198/244) while 80 and 53 healthcare workers respectively had no opinion on the topic. Staff working in respiratory medicine were significantly less likely to support preventive TB treatment in health care workers in general or for them personally if they would have evidence of LTBI compared to other specialties (p = 0.001). Only 13% (14/106) of respondents with evidence of LTBI indicated that they had been offered preventive TB treatment. Twenty-one percent (64/306) of respondents indicated that they did not know the difference between active and latent TB. Among staff who had undergone testing for LTBI, only 33% (75/230) felt adequately informed about the meaning of their test results. Discussion. Hospital staff in general had positive attitudes towards preventive TB treatment, but actual treatment rates were low and perceived knowledge about LTBI was insufficient among a significant proportion of staff. The gap between high support for preventive TB treatment among staff and low treatment rates needs to be addressed. Better education on the concept of LTBI and the meaning of screening test results is required.

  4. Active contact investigation and treatment support: an integrated approach in rural and urban Sindh, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Shah, S A; Qayyum, S; Abro, R; Baig, S; Creswell, J

    2013-12-01

    Although household contacts of persons with tuberculosis (TB) have high rates of active TB, contact investigations are often not conducted. We present the results from a large-scale active contact investigation combined with treatment support in Sindh, Pakistan. Trained lay workers visited consenting smear-positive index patient homes in seven urban and 15 rural facilities. People with suspected TB were provided free transport to diagnostic centres, and sputum samples were collected for microscopy. Those diagnosed with smear-positive TB were given food baskets and sent text reminders to promote adherence. From 3037 index cases, 19,191 household contacts were screened for TB symptoms and 3478 (18.1%) symptomatic persons were identified. Of these, 2160 (62.1%) produced sputum samples on the spot for testing and 490 (22.7%) had smear-positive results. TB prevalence in urban households was 1504 per 100,000 population compared to 4044/100,000 in rural households (P < 0.001) and 2553/100,000 overall. Treatment success was high, with 80.4% cured and 17.6% completing treatment. Lay workers given basic training can conduct active contact investigations and provide treatment support to improve case detection and treatment outcomes in urban and rural areas of Pakistan. In areas with high levels of undiagnosed TB, particularly in rural areas, contact investigation should be prioritised as a means of improving case detection and early diagnosis.

  5. Gastric Cancer with Peritoneal Tuberculosis: Challenges in Diagnosis and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Alshahrani, Amer Saeed

    2016-01-01

    Herein, we report a 39-year-old female patient presenting with gastric cancer and tuberculous peritonitis. The differential diagnosis between advanced gastric cancer with peritoneal carcinomatosis and early gastric cancer with peritoneal tuberculosis (TB), and the treatment of these two diseases, were challenging in this case. Physicians should have a high index of suspicion for peritoneal TB if the patient has a history of this disease, especially in areas with a high incidence of TB, such as South Korea. An early diagnosis is critical for patient management and prognosis. A surgical approach including tissue biopsy or laparoscopic exploration is recommended to confirm the diagnosis. PMID:27433397

  6. Fluoroquinolones for the treatment of tuberculosis in children.

    PubMed

    Thee, S; Garcia-Prats, A J; Donald, P R; Hesseling, A C; Schaaf, H S

    2015-05-01

    The fluoroquinolones are key components of current multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) treatment regimens and are being evaluated in shortened treatment regimens as well as in the prevention of drug-resistant TB. The objective of this review was to identify existing evidence for the use of the fluoroquinolones ofloxacin, levofloxacin and moxifloxacin in the treatment of TB in children. Existing data from in vitro, animal and human studies consistently demonstrate the efficacy of the fluoroquinolones against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, with superiority of levofloxacin and moxifloxacin compared to ofloxacin. In vitro and murine studies demonstrated the potential of moxifloxacin to shorten drug-susceptible TB treatment, but in multiple randomized controlled trials shortened fluoroquinolone-containing regimens have not been non-inferior compared to standard therapy. Resistance occurs frequently via mutations in the gyrA gene, and emerges rapidly depending on the fluoroquinolone concentration, with newer more potent fluoroquinolones less likely to develop resistance. Emerging data from paediatric studies underlines the importance of fluoroquinolones in the treatment of MDR-TB in children. There is a paucity of pharmacokinetic data especially in children <5 years of age and HIV-infected children; existing studies show substantially lower serum concentrations in children compared to adults at currently recommended doses, probably due to faster elimination. This has implications for optimizing paediatric treatment and for the development of resistance. Fluoroquinolone use has been restricted in children due to concerns about drug-induced arthropathy. The available data does not demonstrate any serious arthropathy or other severe toxicity in children. Although there is limited paediatric safety data for the prolonged treatment of MDR-TB, extended administration of fluoroquinolones in adults with MDR-TB does not show serious adverse effects and there is no evidence

  7. Hepatotoxicity during Treatment for Tuberculosis in People Living with HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Araújo-Mariz, Carolline; Lopes, Edmundo Pessoa; Acioli-Santos, Bartolomeu; Maruza, Magda; Montarroyos, Ulisses Ramos; Ximenes, Ricardo Arraes de Alencar; Lacerda, Heloísa Ramos; Miranda-Filho, Demócrito de Barros; de Albuquerque, Maria de Fátima P. Militão

    2016-01-01

    Hepatotoxicity is frequently reported as an adverse reaction during the treatment of tuberculosis. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of hepatotoxicity and to identify predictive factors for developing hepatotoxicity after people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) start treatment for tuberculosis. This was a prospective cohort study with PLWHA who were monitored during the first 60 days of tuberculosis treatment in Pernambuco, Brazil. Hepatotoxicity was considered increased levels of aminotransferase, namely those that rose to three times higher than the level before initiating tuberculosis treatment, these levels being associated with symptoms of hepatitis. We conducted a multivariate logistic regression analysis and the magnitude of the associations was expressed by the odds ratio with a confidence interval of 95%. Hepatotoxicity was observed in 53 (30.6%) of the 173 patients who started tuberculosis treatment. The final multivariate logistic regression model demonstrated that the use of fluconazole, malnutrition and the subject being classified as a phenotypically slow acetylator increased the risk of hepatotoxicity significantly. The incidence of hepatotoxicity during treatment for tuberculosis in PLWHA was high. Those classified as phenotypically slow acetylators and as malnourished should be targeted for specific care to reduce the risk of hepatotoxicity during treatment for tuberculosis. The use of fluconazole should be avoided during tuberculosis treatment in PLWHA. PMID:27332812

  8. Hepatotoxicity during Treatment for Tuberculosis in People Living with HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Araújo-Mariz, Carolline; Lopes, Edmundo Pessoa; Acioli-Santos, Bartolomeu; Maruza, Magda; Montarroyos, Ulisses Ramos; Ximenes, Ricardo Arraes de Alencar; Lacerda, Heloísa Ramos; Miranda-Filho, Demócrito de Barros; Albuquerque, Maria de Fátima P Militão de

    2016-01-01

    Hepatotoxicity is frequently reported as an adverse reaction during the treatment of tuberculosis. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of hepatotoxicity and to identify predictive factors for developing hepatotoxicity after people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) start treatment for tuberculosis. This was a prospective cohort study with PLWHA who were monitored during the first 60 days of tuberculosis treatment in Pernambuco, Brazil. Hepatotoxicity was considered increased levels of aminotransferase, namely those that rose to three times higher than the level before initiating tuberculosis treatment, these levels being associated with symptoms of hepatitis. We conducted a multivariate logistic regression analysis and the magnitude of the associations was expressed by the odds ratio with a confidence interval of 95%. Hepatotoxicity was observed in 53 (30.6%) of the 173 patients who started tuberculosis treatment. The final multivariate logistic regression model demonstrated that the use of fluconazole, malnutrition and the subject being classified as a phenotypically slow acetylator increased the risk of hepatotoxicity significantly. The incidence of hepatotoxicity during treatment for tuberculosis in PLWHA was high. Those classified as phenotypically slow acetylators and as malnourished should be targeted for specific care to reduce the risk of hepatotoxicity during treatment for tuberculosis. The use of fluconazole should be avoided during tuberculosis treatment in PLWHA.

  9. Predicting results of mycobacterial culture on sputum smear reversion after anti-tuberculous treatment: a case control study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Little is currently known regarding sputum smear reversion (acid-fast smear becomes positive again after negative conversion) during anti-tuberculous treatment. This study aimed to evaluate its occurrence in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) and identify factors predicting results of mycobacterial culture for smear-reversion of sputum samples. Methods The retrospective review was performed in a tertiary referral center and a local teaching hospital in Taiwan. From 2000 to 2007, patients with smear-positive culture-confirmed pulmonary TB experiencing smear reversion after 14 days of anti-tuberculous treatment were identified. Results The 739 patients with smear-positive pulmonary TB had 74 (10%) episodes of sputum smear reversion that grew Mycobacterium tuberculosis in 22 (30%) (Mtb group). The remaining 52 episodes of culture-negative sputum samples were classified as the non-Mtb group. The anti-tuberculous regimen was modified after confirming smear reversion in 15 (20%). Fourteen episodes in the Mtb group and 15 in the non-Mtb group occurred during hospitalization. All were admitted to the negative-pressure rooms at the time of smear reversion. Statistical analysis showed that any TB drug resistance, smear reversion within the first two months of treatment or before culture conversion, and the absence of radiographic improvement before smear reversion were associated with the Mtb group. None of the smear reversion was due to viable M. tuberculosis if none of the four factors were present. Conclusions Sputum smear reversion develops in 10% of patients with smear-positive pulmonary TB, with 30% due to viable M. tuberculosis bacilli. Isolation and regimen modification may not be necessary for all drug-susceptible patients who already have radiographic improvement and develop smear reversion after two months of treatment or after sputum culture conversion. PMID:20205743

  10. Impact of HIV on mortality among patients treated for tuberculosis in Lima, Peru: a prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Velásquez, Gustavo E; Cegielski, J Peter; Murray, Megan B; Yagui, Martin J A; Asencios, Luis L; Bayona, Jaime N; Bonilla, César A; Jave, Hector O; Yale, Gloria; Suárez, Carmen Z; Sanchez, Eduardo; Rojas, Christian; Atwood, Sidney S; Contreras, Carmen C; Santa Cruz, Janeth; Shin, Sonya S

    2016-02-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated tuberculosis deaths have decreased worldwide over the past decade. We sought to evaluate the effect of HIV status on tuberculosis mortality among patients undergoing treatment for tuberculosis in Lima, Peru, a low HIV prevalence setting. We conducted a prospective cohort study of patients treated for tuberculosis between 2005 and 2008 in two adjacent health regions in Lima, Peru (Lima Ciudad and Lima Este). We constructed a multivariate Cox proportional hazards model to evaluate the effect of HIV status on mortality during tuberculosis treatment. Of 1701 participants treated for tuberculosis, 136 (8.0%) died during tuberculosis treatment. HIV-positive patients constituted 11.0% of the cohort and contributed to 34.6% of all deaths. HIV-positive patients were significantly more likely to die (25.1 vs. 5.9%, P < 0.001) and less likely to be cured (28.3 vs. 39.4%, P = 0.003). On multivariate analysis, positive HIV status (hazard ratio [HR] = 6.06; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.96-9.27), unemployment (HR = 2.24; 95% CI, 1.55-3.25), and sputum acid-fast bacilli smear positivity (HR = 1.91; 95% CI, 1.10-3.31) were significantly associated with a higher hazard of death. We demonstrate that positive HIV status was a strong predictor of mortality among patients treated for tuberculosis in the early years after Peru started providing free antiretroviral therapy. As HIV diagnosis and antiretroviral therapy provision are more widely implemented for tuberculosis patients in Peru, future operational research should document the changing profile of HIV-associated tuberculosis mortality.

  11. Drug regimens identified and optimized by output-driven platform markedly reduce tuberculosis treatment time.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bai-Yu; Clemens, Daniel L; Silva, Aleidy; Dillon, Barbara Jane; Masleša-Galić, Saša; Nava, Susana; Ding, Xianting; Ho, Chih-Ming; Horwitz, Marcus A

    2017-01-24

    The current drug regimens for treating tuberculosis are lengthy and onerous, and hence complicated by poor adherence leading to drug resistance and disease relapse. Previously, using an output-driven optimization platform and an in vitro macrophage model of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, we identified several experimental drug regimens among billions of possible drug-dose combinations that outperform the current standard regimen. Here we use this platform to optimize the in vivo drug doses of two of these regimens in a mouse model of pulmonary tuberculosis. The experimental regimens kill M. tuberculosis much more rapidly than the standard regimen and reduce treatment time to relapse-free cure by 75%. Thus, these regimens have the potential to provide a markedly shorter course of treatment for tuberculosis in humans. As these regimens omit isoniazid, rifampicin, fluoroquinolones and injectable aminoglycosides, they would be suitable for treating many cases of multidrug and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis.

  12. Drug regimens identified and optimized by output-driven platform markedly reduce tuberculosis treatment time

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bai-Yu; Clemens, Daniel L.; Silva, Aleidy; Dillon, Barbara Jane; Masleša-Galić, Saša; Nava, Susana; Ding, Xianting; Ho, Chih-Ming; Horwitz, Marcus A.

    2017-01-01

    The current drug regimens for treating tuberculosis are lengthy and onerous, and hence complicated by poor adherence leading to drug resistance and disease relapse. Previously, using an output-driven optimization platform and an in vitro macrophage model of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, we identified several experimental drug regimens among billions of possible drug-dose combinations that outperform the current standard regimen. Here we use this platform to optimize the in vivo drug doses of two of these regimens in a mouse model of pulmonary tuberculosis. The experimental regimens kill M. tuberculosis much more rapidly than the standard regimen and reduce treatment time to relapse-free cure by 75%. Thus, these regimens have the potential to provide a markedly shorter course of treatment for tuberculosis in humans. As these regimens omit isoniazid, rifampicin, fluoroquinolones and injectable aminoglycosides, they would be suitable for treating many cases of multidrug and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis. PMID:28117835

  13. Errors in the treatment of tuberculosis in Baltimore.

    PubMed

    Rao, S N; Mookerjee, A L; Obasanjo, O O; Chaisson, R E

    2000-03-01

    Incomplete or incorrect antibiotic therapy, especially in the initial phase of antituberculosis (anti-TB) treatment, is a major cause of acquired drug resistance and treatment failure. We determined the extent of errors in anti-TB treatment regimens by way of nonadherence to recommended treatment protocols among patients with TB in Baltimore, MD, a city with declining rates of disease. An error was defined as using too few drugs or the wrong drugs, giving inadequate doses of drugs, or prescribing an inadequate duration of treatment. We reviewed the records of all patients with culture-positive, pulmonary TB reported in the city of Baltimore from January 1, 1994, to December 31, 1995. We determined demographic information, initial anti-TB regimen, doses and duration of therapy, history or presence of resistance to anti-TB drugs, injecting-drug or alcohol abuse, HIV status, and whether treatment was given by a private physician or by the Tuberculosis Clinic of the Baltimore City Health Department (BCHD). Of the 110 cases of active pulmonary TB, 17 cases (15.4%) had errors in treatment for control of their current disease. Thirteen of 34 privately treated patients (38%) had some error in their initial anti-TB regimen, compared with 4 of 76 patients (5.2%) treated by the Tuberculosis Clinic of the BCHD (p < 0.0001). Patients were otherwise similar as determined by age, sex, HIV status, drug-resistance characteristics, and injecting-drug use, regardless of whether they had erroneous anti-TB regimens. In a low-prevalence area, private physicians make frequent errors in prescribing anti-TB therapy. Additional educational resources for physicians and increased use of expert consultation may contribute to improved TB control.

  14. Update on the diagnosis and treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Caminero Luna, J A

    2016-03-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains the most important human infectious disease. Currently, the TB diagnosis is still based on the clinical presentation, radiographic findings and microbiological results; all of which have sensitivity or specificity issues. For that reason, the immediate future involves rapid molecular microbiological techniques, in particular GeneXpert (which is more sensitive than bacilloscopy and is able to detect rifampicin resistance) and GenoType. The current six-month treatment for TB has remained unchanged for decades. Attempts to shorten this treatment have failed. In recent years, new drugs have been reported that could contribute to TB treatment in the near future, and are already being used in multi-drug-resistance TB.

  15. Tuberculosis Treatment Completion Rates in Southern New Mexico Colonias.

    PubMed

    Holden, Maria Arroyo; Huttlinger, Kathleen; Schultz, Pamela; Mullins, Iris; Forster-Cox, Sue

    2016-04-01

    TB medication completion treatment rates for active TB patients living in impoverished US-Mexico border communities called colonias in southern New Mexico counties are unknown. It might be suspected that residents of colonias have lower completion rates than those living in incorporated and medically more accessible areas. A retrospective record review of closed TB case records from 1993 to 2010 of southern New Mexico border counties, was conducted using a modified version of the New Mexico Department of Health Tuberculosis Targeted Health Assessment/History form (Appendix 1). Study findings reveal that despite their unincorporated status, poorer living conditions and questionable legal status, colonia TB patients had a higher medication completion rate than their non-colonia counterparts. A robust New Mexico TB treatment program contributed to high completion rates with death being the number-one reason for treatment non-completion in both colonia and non-colonias.

  16. Prevalence of inappropriate tuberculosis treatment regimens: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Langendam, M.W.; van der Werf, M.J.; Huitric, E.; Manissero, D.

    2012-01-01

    A potential threat to the success of new tuberculosis (TB) drugs is the development of resistance. Using drugs in appropriate regimens, such as those recommended in the World Health Organization (WHO) treatment guidelines, prevents the development of resistance. We performed a systematic review to assess the prevalence of inappropriate prescription of TB drugs for the treatment of TB. MEDLINE, EMBASE and other databases were searched for relevant articles in January 2011. Observational studies published from 2000 that included TB patients receiving treatment were selected. A treatment regimen was considered inappropriate if the regimen was not a WHO recommended regimen. 37 studies were included. Inappropriate treatment regimens were prescribed in 67% of studies. The percentage of patients receiving inappropriate regimens varied between 0.4% and 100%. In 19 studies the quality of treatment regimen reporting was low. Despite the fact that assessment of inappropriate treatment was hampered by low quality of reporting, our data indicate a reasonable amount of inappropriate prescription of TB treatment regimens. Thus, there is a risk that new drugs will be used in inappropriate treatment regimens, even with WHO guidelines in place, introducing the risk of resistance development. This article highlights the need to improve implementation of the WHO treatment of TB guidelines. PMID:22005923

  17. Clinical Effects of Gemifloxacin on the Delay of Tuberculosis Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seo Yun; Yim, Jae-Joon; Park, Jong Sun; Park, Sung Soo; Heo, Eun Young; Lee, Chang-Hoon; Chung, Hee Soon

    2013-01-01

    Although gemifloxacin has low in vitro activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the effect of gemifloxacin on the delay of tuberculosis (TB) treatment has not been validated in a clinical setting. The study group included patients with culture-confirmed pulmonary TB who initially received gemifloxacin for suspected community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Two control groups contained patients treated with other fluoroquinolones or nonfluoroquinolone antibiotics. Sixteen cases were treated with gemifloxacin for suspected CAP before TB diagnosis. Sixteen and 32 patients were treated with other fluoroquinolones and nonfluoroquinolones, respectively. The median period from the initiation of antibiotics to the administration of anti-TB medication was nine days in the gemifloxacin group, which was significantly different from the other fluoroquinolones group (35 days). The median times for the nonfluoroquinolone group and the gemifloxacin group were not significantly different. There were no significant differences between the gemifloxacin and other fluoroquinolone group in terms of symptomatic and radiographic improvements. However, the frequency of radiographic improvement in the other fluoroquinolones group tended to be higher than in the gemifloxacin group. Gemifloxacin might be the preferred fluoroquinolone for treating CAP, to alleviate any concerns about delaying TB treatment. PMID:23486643

  18. Clinical effects of gemifloxacin on the delay of tuberculosis treatment.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seo Yun; Yim, Jae-Joon; Park, Jong Sun; Park, Sung Soo; Heo, Eun Young; Lee, Chang-Hoon; Chung, Hee Soon; Kim, Deog Kyeom

    2013-03-01

    Although gemifloxacin has low in vitro activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the effect of gemifloxacin on the delay of tuberculosis (TB) treatment has not been validated in a clinical setting. The study group included patients with culture-confirmed pulmonary TB who initially received gemifloxacin for suspected community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Two control groups contained patients treated with other fluoroquinolones or nonfluoroquinolone antibiotics. Sixteen cases were treated with gemifloxacin for suspected CAP before TB diagnosis. Sixteen and 32 patients were treated with other fluoroquinolones and nonfluoroquinolones, respectively. The median period from the initiation of antibiotics to the administration of anti-TB medication was nine days in the gemifloxacin group, which was significantly different from the other fluoroquinolones group (35 days). The median times for the nonfluoroquinolone group and the gemifloxacin group were not significantly different. There were no significant differences between the gemifloxacin and other fluoroquinolone group in terms of symptomatic and radiographic improvements. However, the frequency of radiographic improvement in the other fluoroquinolones group tended to be higher than in the gemifloxacin group. Gemifloxacin might be the preferred fluoroquinolone for treating CAP, to alleviate any concerns about delaying TB treatment.

  19. Factors related to previous tuberculosis treatment of patients with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Rifat, Mahfuza; Hall, John; Oldmeadow, Christopher; Husain, Ashaque; Hinderaker, Sven Gudmund; Milton, Abul Hasnat

    2015-01-01

    Objective Previous tuberculosis (TB) treatment status is an established risk factor for multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB). This study explores which factors related to previous TB treatment may lead to the development of multidrug resistant in Bangladesh. Design We previously conducted a large case–control study to identify risk factors for developing MDR-TB in Bangladesh. Patients who had a history of previous TB treatment, either MDR-TB or non-MDR-TB, were interviewed about their previous treatment episode. This study restricts analysis to the strata of patients who have been previously treated for TB. Information was collected through face-to-face interviews and record reviews. Unadjusted and multivariable logistic regression was used for data analysis. Setting Central-level, district-level and subdistrict-level hospitals in rural and urban Bangladesh. Results The strata of previously treated patients include a total of 293 patients (245 current MDR-TB; 48 non-MDR-TB). Overall, 54% of patients received previous TB treatment more than once, and all of these patients were multidrug resistant. Patients with MDR-TB were more likely to have experienced the following factors: incomplete treatment (OR 4.3; 95% CI 1.7 to 10.6), adverse reactions due to TB treatment (OR 8.2; 95% CI 3.2 to 20.7), hospitalisation for symptoms associated with TB (OR 16.9; CI 1.8 to 156.2), DOTS (directly observed treatment, short-course) centre as treatment unit (OR 6.4; CI 1.8 to 22.8), supervised treatment (OR 3.8; CI 1.6 to 9.5); time-to-treatment centre (OR 0.984; CI 0.974 to 0.993). Conclusions Incomplete treatment, hospitalisation for TB treatment and adverse reaction are the factors related to previous TB treatment of patients with MDR-TB. Although the presence of supervised treatment (DOT), less time-to-treatment centres and being treated in DOTS centres were relatively higher among the patients with MDR-TB compared with patients without MDR-TB, these findings include information of

  20. Consensus statement on childhood tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    2010-01-01

    Revised National Tuberculosis Control Program (RNTCP) has focused on adults with smear positivity a tool not so well used in children with tuberculosis. There is a need to redefine standardization of diagnosis and management protocols for childhood tuberculosis. Indian Academy of Pediatrics constituted a Working Group to develop consensus statement on childhood tuberculosis (TB). Members of the Group were given individual responsibilities to review the existing literature on different aspects of the childhood TB. The group deliberated and developed a consensus which was circulated to all the members for review. Efforts were made to ensure that the recommendations are standardized. To produce recommendations and standard protocols for reasonably accurate diagnosis and rational treatment of tuberculosis in children. Fever and or cough > 2 weeks with loss of weight and recent contact with infectious case should arouse suspicion of TB. Chest Xray and trial with broad-spectrum antibiotic for 7-10 days is justified. In case of clinical and radiological non-response, Mantoux test and sputum or gastric aspirate for AFB is recommended. If AFB is positive, diagnosis is confirmed. If AFB is negative but chest Xray is suggestive and Mantoux test is positive, it is a probable case and if these tests are negative, alternate diagnosis must be sought and referral made to an expert. Ideally it is recommended to use 1TU of PPD for Mantoux test but 2 or 5 TU may be acceptable (but less preferred). Cut-off point of 10 mms for natural infection may be used for test done with 1, 2 or 5 TU. There is no linear relation of reaction to tuberculin strength and so no more than 5 TU should be used. BCG test is not recommended. Diagnosis must not be made without an attempt to look for AFB in gastric aspirate or sputum, as it is possible to get AFB even in primary complex. Elisa and PCR tests for TB are not recommended. There is no place for trial of anti tubercular therapy. Lymphnode

  1. Towards elimination of tuberculosis in a low income country: the experience of Cuba, 1962-97

    PubMed Central

    Marrero, A.; Caminero, J.; Rodriguez, R.; Billo, N.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—This study describes the epidemiological trends of tuberculosis in Cuba and the performance of the tuberculosis control programme. The circumstances that caused an increase in the incidence of new cases of tuberculosis between 1991 and 1994 had been analysed and were corrected in 1995-7.
METHODS—A descriptive study of the incidence rates of new cases of tuberculosis notified from 1962 to 1997 was made, with special emphasis on the total change between 1965 and 1991 and the increase thereafter.
RESULTS—The case notification rate of 14.7 per 100 000 in 1994 was almost three times the rate found in 1991 (4.8 per 100 000) and reversed the mean annual decrease of 5% observed since 1965. This increase was almost twofold in the rate of smear positive new cases (4.4 per 100 000 in 1991 and 8.3 in 1994). From 1971 onwards the programme had achieved a cure rate of 90% throughout the country with only 2% absconding by applying directly observed treatment. The main factors associated with the increasing trends were: (1) a probable underdetection of cases for the 1988-92 period that generated contagious sources in the community; (2) improved case finding from 1993 onwards and the introduction of an expanded case definition in 1994; (3) a considerable increase in the diagnostic delay from initial medical consultation to beginning of antituberculosis treatment (56.9 days in 1993); and (4) operational changes in the tuberculosis control programme due to the economic crisis in Cuba. In 1995, 1996 and 1997 it has been possible to reverse this trend, achieving rates of 14.1, 13.5, and 12.2 per 100 000, respectively (7.6, 7.6, and 6.9 for smear positive cases) as a result of effective intervention correcting the problems identified. Reducing the diagnostic delay attributable to shortcomings in the health care system and the study of contacts were of particular importance for re-establishing the tuberculosis programme as a priority.
CONCLUSIONS—Cuba represents

  2. Social, economic and operational research on tuberculosis: recent studies and some priority questions.

    PubMed

    Murray, C J

    1991-12-01

    Social, economic and operational research has already contributed to the growing global awareness of the neglected burden of tuberculosis on individuals, families and communities. These studies have also illustrated that short-course chemotherapy for smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis is a highly cost-effective tool for combatting tuberculosis. In the present work, the author examines the costs and effectiveness of the national tuberculosis programmes in Malawi, Mozambique and Tanzania. Chemotherapy for smear-positive tuberculosis is found to be among the most cost-effective health interventions known, costing 1-4 US dollars per year of life saved. In all situations, short-course chemotherapy is found to be more cost-effective than standard 12-month chemotherapy. General conclusions about the role of hospitalization are difficult to make; its cost-effectiveness depends on local patterns of compliance and the cost of hospitalization. Because more than three-quarters of the benefits of chemotherapy for smear-positive tuberculosis are due to transmission reduction, treating HIV sero-positives, smear-positives is probably cost-effective.

  3. [MINI-INVASIVE SURGICAL TREATMENTS FOR BILATERAL DESTRUCTIVE PULMONARY TUBERCULOSIS].

    PubMed

    2010-01-01

    The authors analyze the results of surgical treatment for bilateral destructive pulmonary tuberculosis in 234 patients who have under- gone 449 lung operations. A study group comprised 156 patients who received mini-invasive surgical treatments via mini-accesses under video-assisted thoracoscopic control. A comparison group included 78 patients operated on through standard approaches by the conventional procedures. In the study group, surgery of less duration was attended by less blood loss, a need for fewer blood transfusions, and the lower incidence and severity of intraoperative complications. Complications following mini-invasive surgery occurred 4 times less frequently and postoperative mortality was 5 times less than that in the comparison group. With mini-invasive surgical techniques, a complete clinical effect at surgical hospital discharge was achieved 1.5-fold more frequently and it was more steady-state in the late period.

  4. [Report on fourth national epidemiological sampling survey of tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Duanmu, Hongjin

    2002-01-01

    To investigate the epidemiological trend of tuberculosis, to evaluate the efficacy of control measures and to provide scientific basis for making National Tuberculosis Control Programme 2001 approximately 2010. Tuberculin testing was carried out among 0 approximately 14 years old children; fluroscopy was carried out for >/= 15 years old population and children with >/= 10 mm reaction of tuberculin testing; chest X-ray film, sputum smear and culture were done for the patients of fluroscopy abnormal and suspects of tuberculosis symptom (persistent cough for 3 weeks or more); drug sensitivity test was done for the patients with culture positive; a retrospective study of tuberculosis mortality in 1999 was conducted at all investigation points; social economic study was done for the active pulmonary tuberculosis cases; the survey of tuberculosis infection rate for all population was carried out in 59 investigation points. The population actually examined in this survey numbered 365 097. The examination rate was more than 95%. The prevalence of active pulmonary tuberculosis was 367/100 000, the prevalence of smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis was 122/100 000 and the prevalence of bacteriological positive pulmonary tuberculosis was 160/100 000. In comparison with 1979, the annual reduction rates were 4.5% for the standardized prevalence of active pulmonary tuberculosis and 3.8% for the standardized prevalence of smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis. In comparison with 1990, the annual reduction rates were 5.4% and 3.2%, respectively. The smear positive prevalence standardized showed a 44.4% decrease in the regions of implementing project of Health V but only 12.3% decrease in the regions without the project. The prevalence in the west region was higher than national average prevalence. The epidemic of tuberculosis is still serious and prevalence decrease was slow. The governments at different levels must pay more attention to tuberculosis control programme, increase

  5. Local problems, local solutions: improving tuberculosis control at the district level in Malawi.

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, P. M.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the causes of a low cure rate at the district level of a tuberculosis (TB) control programme and to formulate, implement, and evaluate an intervention to improve the situation. METHODS: The study setting was Mzuzu (population 60,000), where the annual smear-positive pulmonary TB incidence was 160 per 100,000 and the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) seroprevalence was 67% among TB patients. There is one TB treatment unit, but several other organizations are involved with TB control. An examination of case-holding activities was carried out, potential areas for improvement were identified, and interventions performed. FINDINGS: In 1990-91, the cure rate was 24% among smear-positive cases (29% among survivors to end of treatment). Problems identified included a fragmented TB control programme; inadequate training and supervision; suboptimal recording of patients' addresses; and nonadherence to national TB control programme protocols. These problems were addressed, and in 1992-93 the cure rate rose to 68% (relative risk (RR) = 2.85 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.63, 4.96)) and to 92% among survivors to the end of treatment (RR = 3.12 (95% CI = 1.84, 5.29)). High cure rates are therefore achievable despite high HIV prevalence. CONCLUSIONS: Simple, inexpensive, local programmatic interventions can dramatically improve TB case holding. This study demonstrates the need for evaluation, training, and supervision at all levels of the programme. PMID:11242817

  6. Low access to a highly effective therapy: a challenge for international tuberculosis control.

    PubMed Central

    Dye, Christopher; Watt, Catherine J.; Bleed, Daniel

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the scale of the tuberculosis (TB) problem facing the international Stop TB Partnership by measuring the gap between present rates of case detection and treatment success, and the global targets (70% and 85%, respectively) to be reached by 2005 under the WHO DOTS strategy. METHODS: We analysed case notifications submitted annually to WHO from up to 202 (of 210) countries and territories between 1980 and 2000, and the results of treatment for patients registered between 1994 and 1999. FINDINGS: Many of the 148 national DOTS programmes in existence by the end of 2000 have shown that they can achieve high treatment success rates, close to or exceeding the target of 85%. However, we estimate that only 27% of all the new smear-positive cases that arose in 2000 were notified under DOTS, and only 19% were successfully treated. The increment in case-finding has been steady at about 133 000 additional smear-positive cases in each year since 1994. In the interval 1999- 2000, more than half of the extra cases notified under DOTS were in Ethiopia, India, Myanmar, the Philippines, and South Africa. CONCLUSION: With the current rate of progress in DOTS expansion, the target of 70% case detection will not be reached until 2013. To reach this target by 2005, DOTS programmes must find an additional 333 000 cases each year. The challenge now is to show that DOTS expansion in the major endemic countries can significantly accelerate case finding while maintaining high cure rates. PMID:12131999

  7. Recent advances in the diagnosis and treatment of childhood tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Mani Kant; Kumar, Prashant; Singh, Anjali

    2015-01-01

    Despite over 2.3 million (26% of global burden) cases of tuberculosis (TB) in India the accurate diagnosis of childhood TB remains a major challenge. Children with TB usually have paucibacillary disease and contribute little to disease transmission within the community. Consequently the treatment of children with TB is often not considered a priority by TB control programmes. Adequate and timely assessment of TB infection in childhood could diminish epidemiological burden as underdiagnosed pediatric patients can eventually evolve in to an active state and have the potential to disseminate the etiological agent Mycobacterium tuberculosis, notably increasing this worldwide public health problem. In this review we discuss the most important recent advances in the diagnosis of childhood TB: (1) Symptom-based approaches, (2) novel immune-based approaches, including in vitro interferon-γ IGRA release assays IGRA tests; and (3) bacteriological and molecular methods that are more rapid and/or less expensive than conventional culture techniques for TB diagnosis and/or drug-resistance testing. Recent advances have improved our ability to diagnose latent infection and active TB in children, nevertheless establishing a diagnosis of either latent infection or active disease in HIV-infected children remains a major challenge. PMID:26283820

  8. A prospective study of tuberculosis drug susceptibility in sabah, malaysia, and an algorithm for management of isoniazid resistance.

    PubMed

    Rashid Ali, Muhammad Redzwan S; Parameswaran, Uma; William, Timothy; Bird, Elspeth; Wilkes, Christopher S; Lee, Wai Khew; Yeo, Tsin Wen; Anstey, Nicholas M; Ralph, Anna P

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. The burden of tuberculosis is high in eastern Malaysia, and rates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis drug resistance are poorly defined. Our objectives were to determine M. tuberculosis susceptibility and document management after receipt of susceptibility results. Methods. Prospective study of adult outpatients with smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) in Sabah, Malaysia. Additionally, hospital clinicians accessed the reference laboratory for clinical purposes during the study. Results. 176 outpatients were enrolled; 173 provided sputum samples. Mycobacterial culture yielded M. tuberculosis in 159 (91.9%) and nontuberculous Mycobacterium (NTM) in three (1.7%). Among outpatients there were no instances of multidrug resistant M. tuberculosis (MDR-TB). Seven people (4.5%) had isoniazid resistance (INH-R); all were switched to an appropriate second-line regimen for varying durations (4.5-9 months). Median delay to commencement of the second-line regimen was 13 weeks. Among 15 inpatients with suspected TB, 2 had multidrug resistant TB (one extensively drug resistant), 2 had INH-R, and 4 had NTM. Conclusions. Current community rates of MDR-TB in Sabah are low. However, INH-resistance poses challenges, and NTM is an important differential diagnosis in this setting, where smear microscopy is the usual diagnostic modality. To address INH-R management issues in our setting, we propose an algorithm for the treatment of isoniazid-resistant PTB.

  9. Infection Control for Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis: Early Diagnosis and Treatment Is the Key

    PubMed Central

    van Cutsem, Gilles; Isaakidis, Petros; Farley, Jason; Nardell, Ed; Volchenkov, Grigory; Cox, Helen

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant (MDR) tuberculosis, “Ebola with wings,” is a significant threat to tuberculosis control efforts. Previous prevailing views that resistance was mainly acquired through poor treatment led to decades of focus on drug-sensitive rather than drug-resistant (DR) tuberculosis, driven by the World Health Organization's directly observed therapy, short course strategy. The paradigm has shifted toward recognition that most DR tuberculosis is transmitted and that there is a need for increased efforts to control DR tuberculosis. Yet most people with DR tuberculosis are untested and untreated, driving transmission in the community and in health systems in high-burden settings. The risk of nosocomial transmission is high for patients and staff alike. Lowering transmission risk for MDR tuberculosis requires a combination approach centered on rapid identification of active tuberculosis disease and tuberculosis drug resistance, followed by rapid initiation of appropriate treatment and adherence support, complemented by universal tuberculosis infection control measures in healthcare facilities. It also requires a second paradigm shift, from the classic infection control hierarchy to a novel, decentralized approach across the continuum from early diagnosis and treatment to community awareness and support. A massive scale-up of rapid diagnosis and treatment is necessary to control the MDR tuberculosis epidemic. This will not be possible without intense efforts toward the implementation of decentralized, ambulatory models of care. Increasing political will and resources need to be accompanied by a paradigm shift. Instead of focusing on diagnosed cases, recognition that transmission is driven largely by undiagnosed, untreated cases, both in the community and in healthcare settings, is necessary. This article discusses this comprehensive approach, strategies available, and associated challenges. PMID:27118853

  10. Preventing tuberculosis among health workers in Malawi.

    PubMed Central

    Harries, A. D.; Hargreaves, N. J.; Gausi, F.; Kwanjana, J. H.; Salaniponi, F. M.

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Following the introduction of guidelines for the control of tuberculosis (TB) infection in all hospitals in Malawi, a study was carried out to determine whether the guidelines were being implemented, the time between admission to hospital and the diagnosis of pulmonary TB had been reduced, and the annual case notification rates among health workers had fallen and were comparable to those of primary-school teachers. METHODS: The study involved 40 district and mission hospitals. Staff and patients were interviewed in order to determine whether the guidelines had been adopted. In four hospitals the diagnostic process in patients with smear-positive pulmonary TB was evaluated before and after the introduction of the guidelines, with the aid of case notes and TB registers. In all hospitals the proportion of health workers registered with TB before and after the guidelines were introduced, in 1996 and 1999, respectively, was determined by conducting interviews and consulting staff lists and TB registers. A similar method was used to determine the proportion of primary-school teachers who were registered with TB in 1999. FINDINGS: The guidelines were not uniformly implemented. Only one hospital introduced voluntary counselling and testing for its staff. Most hospitals stated that they used rapid systems to diagnose pulmonary TB. However, there was no significant change in the interval between admission and diagnosis or between admission and treatment of patients with smear-positive pulmonary TB. The TB case notification rate for 2979 health workers in 1999 was 3.2%; this did not differ significantly from the value of 3.7% for 2697 health workers in 1996 but was significantly higher than that of 1.8% for 4367 primary-school teachers in 1999. CONCLUSION: The introduction of guidelines for the control of TB infection is an important intervention for reducing nosocomial transmission of the disease, but rigorous monitoring and follow-up are needed in order to ensure

  11. Recommendations for Optimizing Tuberculosis Treatment: Therapeutic Drug Monitoring, Pharmacogenetics, and Nutritional Status Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Rihwa; Jeong, Byeong-Ho

    2017-01-01

    Although tuberculosis is largely a curable disease, it remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Although the standard 6-month treatment regimen is highly effective for drug-susceptible tuberculosis, the use of multiple drugs over long periods of time can cause frequent adverse drug reactions. In addition, some patients with drug-susceptible tuberculosis do not respond adequately to treatment and develop treatment failure and drug resistance. Response to tuberculosis treatment could be affected by multiple factors associated with the host-pathogen interaction including genetic factors and the nutritional status of the host. These factors should be considered for effective tuberculosis control. Therefore, therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM), which is individualized drug dosing guided by serum drug concentrations during treatment, and pharmacogenetics-based personalized dosing guidelines of anti-tuberculosis drugs could reduce the incidence of adverse drug reactions and increase the likelihood of successful treatment outcomes. Moreover, assessment and management of comorbid conditions including nutritional status could improve anti-tuberculosis treatment response. PMID:28028995

  12. Recommendations for Optimizing Tuberculosis Treatment: Therapeutic Drug Monitoring, Pharmacogenetics, and Nutritional Status Considerations.

    PubMed

    Choi, Rihwa; Jeong, Byeong Ho; Koh, Won Jung; Lee, Soo Youn

    2017-03-01

    Although tuberculosis is largely a curable disease, it remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Although the standard 6-month treatment regimen is highly effective for drug-susceptible tuberculosis, the use of multiple drugs over long periods of time can cause frequent adverse drug reactions. In addition, some patients with drug-susceptible tuberculosis do not respond adequately to treatment and develop treatment failure and drug resistance. Response to tuberculosis treatment could be affected by multiple factors associated with the host-pathogen interaction including genetic factors and the nutritional status of the host. These factors should be considered for effective tuberculosis control. Therefore, therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM), which is individualized drug dosing guided by serum drug concentrations during treatment, and pharmacogenetics-based personalized dosing guidelines of anti-tuberculosis drugs could reduce the incidence of adverse drug reactions and increase the likelihood of successful treatment outcomes. Moreover, assessment and management of comorbid conditions including nutritional status could improve anti-tuberculosis treatment response.

  13. Does directly observed therapy improve tuberculosis treatment? More evidence is needed to guide tuberculosis policy.

    PubMed

    McLaren, Zoë M; Milliken, Amanda A; Meyer, Amanda J; Sharp, Alana R

    2016-10-04

    Tuberculosis (TB) now ranks alongside HIV as the leading infectious disease cause of death worldwide and incurs a global economic burden of over $12 billion annually. Directly observed therapy (DOT) recommends that TB patients complete the course of treatment under direct observation of a treatment supporter who is trained and overseen by health services to ensure that patients take their drugs as scheduled. Though the current WHO End TB Strategy does not mention DOT, only "supportive treatment supervision by treatment partners", many TB programs still use it despite the fact that the has not been demonstrated to be statistically significantly superior to self-administered treatment in ensuring treatment success or cure. DOT is designed to promote proper adherence to the full course of drug therapy in order to improve patient outcomes and prevent the development of drug resistance. Yet over 8 billion dollars is spent on TB treatment each year and thousands undergo DOT for all or part of their course of treatment, despite the absence of rigorous evidence supporting the superior effectiveness of DOT over self-administration for achieving drug susceptible TB (DS-TB) cure. Moreover, the DOT component burdens patients with financial and opportunity costs, and the potential for intensified stigma. To rigorously evaluate the effectiveness of DOT and identify the essential contributors to both successful treatment and minimized patient burden, we call for a pragmatic experimental trial conducted in real-world program settings, the gold standard for evidence-based health policy decisions. It is time to invest in the rigorous evaluation of DOT and reevaluate the DOT requirement for TB treatment worldwide. Rigorously evaluating the choice of treatment supporter, the frequency of health care worker contact and the development of new educational materials in a real-world setting would build the evidence base to inform the optimal design of TB treatment protocol. Implementing a

  14. Efficiency and safety of the combination of moxifloxacin, pretomanid (PA-824), and pyrazinamide during the first 8 weeks of antituberculosis treatment: a phase 2b, open-label, partly randomised trial in patients with drug-susceptible or drug-resistant pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Rodney; Diacon, Andreas H; Everitt, Daniel; van Niekerk, Christo; Donald, Peter R; Burger, Divan A; Schall, Robert; Spigelman, Melvin; Conradie, Almari; Eisenach, Kathleen; Venter, Amour; Ive, Prudence; Page-Shipp, Liesl; Variava, Ebrahim; Reither, Klaus; Ntinginya, Nyanda E; Pym, Alexander; von Groote-Bidlingmaier, Florian; Mendel, Carl M

    2015-05-02

    New antituberculosis regimens are urgently needed to shorten tuberculosis treatment. Following on from favourable assessment in a 2 week study, we investigated a novel regimen for efficacy and safety in drug-susceptible and multidrug-resistant (MDR) tuberculosis during the first 8 weeks of treatment. We did this phase 2b study of bactericidal activity--defined as the decrease in colony forming units (CFUs) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the sputum of patients with microscopy smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis-at eight sites in South Africa and Tanzania. We enrolled treatment-naive patients with drug-susceptible, pulmonary tuberculosis, who were randomly assigned by computer-generated sequences to receive either 8 weeks of moxifloxacin, 100 mg pretomanid (formerly known as PA-824), and pyrazinamide (MPa100Z regimen); moxifloxacin, 200 mg pretomanid, and pyrazinamide (MPa200Z regimen); or the current standard care for drug-susceptible pulmonary tuberculosis, isoniazid, rifampicin, PZA, and ethambutol (HRZE regimen). A group of patients with MDR tuberculosis received MPa200Z (DRMPa200Z group). The primary outcome was bactericidal activity measured by the mean daily rate of reduction in M tuberculosis CFUs per mL overnight sputum collected once a week, with joint Bayesian non-linear mixed-effects regression modelling. We also assessed safety and tolerability by monitoring adverse events. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01498419. Between March 24, 2012, and July 26, 2013 we enrolled 207 patients and randomly assigned them to treatment groups; we assigned 60 patients to the MPa100Z regimen, 62 to the MPa200Z regimen, and 59 to the HRZE regimen. We non-randomly assigned 26 patients with drug-resistant tuberculosis to the DRMPa200Z regimen. In patients with drug-susceptible tuberculosis, the bactericidal activity of MPa200Z (n=54) on days 0-56 (0·155, 95% Bayesian credibility interval 0·133-0·178) was significantly greater than for HRZE

  15. The timing of death in patients with tuberculosis who die during anti-tuberculosis treatment in Andhra Pradesh, South India

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background India has 2.0 million estimated tuberculosis (TB) cases per annum with an estimated 280,000 TB-related deaths per year. Understanding when in the course of TB treatment patients die is important for determining the type of intervention to be offered and crucially when this intervention should be given. The objectives of the current study were to determine in a large cohort of TB patients in India:- i) treatment outcomes including the number who died while on treatment, ii) the month of death and iii) characteristics associated with "early" death, occurring in the initial 8 weeks of treatment. Methods This was a retrospective study in 16 selected Designated Microscopy Centres (DMCs) in Hyderabad, Krishna and Adilabad districts of Andhra Pradesh, South India. A review was performed of treatment cards and medical records of all TB patients (adults and children) registered and placed on standardized anti-tuberculosis treatment from January 2005 to September 2009. Results There were 8,240 TB patients (5183 males) of whom 492 (6%) were known to have died during treatment. Case-fatality was higher in those previously treated (12%) and lower in those with extra-pulmonary TB (2%). There was an even distribution of deaths during anti-tuberculosis treatment, with 28% of all patients dying in the first 8 weeks of treatment. Increasing age and new as compared to recurrent TB disease were significantly associated with "early death". Conclusion In this large cohort of TB patients, deaths occurred with an even frequency throughout anti-TB treatment. Reasons may relate to i) the treatment of the disease itself, raising concerns about drug adherence, quality of anti-tuberculosis drugs or the presence of undetected drug resistance and ii) co-morbidities, such as HIV/AIDS and diabetes mellitus, which are known to influence mortality. More research in this area from prospective and retrospective studies is needed. PMID:22166132

  16. The human immune response to tuberculosis and its treatment: a view from the blood

    PubMed Central

    Cliff, Jacqueline M; Kaufmann, Stefan H E; McShane, Helen; van Helden, Paul; O'Garra, Anne

    2015-01-01

    The immune response upon infection with the pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis is poorly understood, hampering the discovery of new treatments and the improvements in diagnosis. In the last years, a blood transcriptional signature in tuberculosis has provided knowledge on the immune response occurring during active tuberculosis disease. This signature was absent in the majority of asymptomatic individuals who are latently infected with M. tuberculosis (referred to as latent). Using modular and pathway analyses of the complex data has shown, now in multiple studies, that the signature of active tuberculosis is dominated by overexpression of interferon-inducible genes (consisting of both type I and type II interferon signaling), myeloid genes, and inflammatory genes. There is also downregulation of genes encoding B and T-cell function. The blood signature of tuberculosis correlates with the extent of radiographic disease and is diminished upon effective treatment suggesting the possibility of new improved strategies to support diagnostic assays and methods for drug treatment monitoring. The signature suggested a previously under-appreciated role for type I interferons in development of active tuberculosis disease, and numerous mechanisms have now been uncovered to explain how type I interferon impedes the protective response to M. tuberculosis infection. PMID:25703554

  17. A performance evaluation of MTBDRplus version 2 for the diagnosis of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Seifert, M; Ajbani, K; Georghiou, S B; Catanzaro, D; Rodrigues, C; Crudu, V; Victor, T C; Garfein, R S; Catanzaro, A; Rodwell, T C

    2016-05-01

    To evaluate the performance of a recently updated rapid molecular diagnostic test, GenoType® MTBDRplus version 2, designed to detect drug resistance in both acid-fast bacilli (AFB) smear-negative and -positive specimens. Sputum samples from 1128 patients at risk for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) were tested using MTBDRplus v2 and compared with reference standard MGIT™ 960™ drug susceptibility testing. The relationship of participant human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) status, diabetic status, previous treatment, and smear gradation to the likelihood of obtaining an interpretable result was assessed using logistic regression. The sensitivity and specificity of MTBDRplus v2 for detecting MDR-TB, when compared to a reference standard, were respectively 96.0% (95%CI 93.5-97.6) and 99.2% (95%CI 97.0-99.9) in AFB smear-positive specimens and 82.8% (95%CI 63.5-93.5) and 98.3% (95%CI 89.9-99.9) in AFB smear-negative specimens. A dose-response relationship was observed between the proportion of interpretable test results and AFB smear bacterial load after adjusting for age, sex, body mass index, HIV status, previous treatment and diabetic status. While MTBDRplus v2 performs well among both AFB smear-positive and -negative specimens, smear gradation appears to influence both the probability of obtaining an interpretable result and test sensitivity, indicating a significant association between bacillary load and test performance.

  18. Latent tuberculosis infection: screening and treatment in an urban setting.

    PubMed

    Morano, Jamie P; Walton, Mary R; Zelenev, Alexei; Bruce, R Douglas; Altice, Frederick L

    2013-10-01

    Despite its benefit for treating active tuberculosis, directly observed therapy (DOT) for latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) has been largely understudied among challenging inner city populations. Utilizing questionnaire data from a comprehensive mobile healthcare clinic in New Haven, CT from 2003 to July 2011, a total of 2,523 completed tuberculin skin tests (TSTs) resulted in 356 new LTBIs. Multivariate logistic regression correlated covariates of the two outcomes (a) initiation of isoniazid preventative therapy (IPT) and (b) completion of 9 months of IPT. Of the 357 newly positive TSTs, 86.3 % (n = 308) completed screening chest radiographs (CXRs): 90.3 % (n = 278) were normal, and 0.3 % (n = 1) had active tuberculosis. Of those completing CXR screening, 44.0 % (n = 135) agreed to IPT: 69.6 % (n = 94) selected DOT, and 30.4 % (n = 41) selected self-administered therapy (SAT). Initiating IPT was correlated with undocumented status (AOR = 3.43; p < 0.001) and being born in a country of highest and third highest tuberculosis prevalence (AOR = 14.09; p = 0.017 and AOR = 2.25; p = 0.005, respectively). Those selecting DOT were more likely to be Hispanic (83.0 vs 53.7 %; p < 0.0001), undocumented (57.4 vs 41.5 %; p = 0.012), employed (p < 0.0001), uninsured (p = 0.014), and have stable housing (p = 0.002), no prior cocaine or crack use (p = 0.013) and no recent incarceration (p = 0.001). Completing 9 months of IPT was correlated with no recent incarceration (AOR 5.95; p = 0.036) and younger age (AOR 1.03; p = 0.031). SAT and DOT participants did not significantly differ for IPT duration (6.54 vs 5.68 months; p = 0.216) nor 9-month completion (59.8 vs 46.3 %; p = 0.155). In an urban mobile healthcare sample, screening completion for LTBI was high with nearly half initiating IPT. Undocumented, Hispanic immigrants from high prevalence tuberculosis countries were more likely to self-select DOT at the mobile

  19. Emerging strategies for the treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis: promise and limitations?

    PubMed

    Yew, Wing Wai; Koh, Won-Jung

    2016-01-01

    A worsening scenario of drug-resistant tuberculosis has increased the need for new treatment strategies to tackle this worldwide emergency. There is a pressing need to simplify and shorten the current 6-month treatment regimen for drug-susceptible tuberculosis. Rifamycins and fluoroquinolones, as well as several new drugs, are potential candidates under evaluation. At the same time, treatment outcomes of patients with drug-resistant tuberculosis should be improved through optimizing the use of fluoroquinolones, repurposed agents and newly developed drugs. In this context, the safety and tolerance of new therapeutic approaches must be addressed.

  20. Treatment outcome of patients with isoniazid mono-resistant tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Chien, J-Y; Chen, Y-T; Wu, S-G; Lee, J-J; Wang, J-Y; Yu, C-J

    2015-01-01

    Isoniazid mono-resistance is the most common first-line drug resistance in tuberculosis (TB), but its treatment outcome remains unclear. From January 2004 to October 2011, 425 (5.1%) of 8414 patients with culture-confirmed pulmonary TB from four hospitals in Taiwan were identified as having isoniazid mono-resistant TB. Among them, 395 (92.9%) were included and followed up for 2 years after complete treatment. Although 328 (83.0%) patients were successfully treated, 67 (17.0%) had unfavourable outcomes, including death in 56 (14.2%) and treatment failure in 11 (2.8%). The treatment success rate was similar in patients with high-level and low-level isoniazid-resistant TB (82.2% versus 83.4%, p 0.785) and among those taking anti-TB treatment with and without isoniazid (83.1% versus 83.0%, p 1.000). Patients without rifampicin interruption had lower risk of unfavourable outcome (14.3% versus 37.0%, p <0.001), especially those with low-level isoniazid resistance (11.5% versus 56.5%, p <0.001). Supplementation with a new-generation fluoroquinolone improved treatment success (60.0% versus 12.5%, p 0.003). The presence of cavitary lesions was significantly associated with a higher relapse rate (4.1% versus 0.0%, p 0.006) and extended treatment of 7-9, 10-12 and >12 months had less relapse than 6-month treatment (3.2%, 0%, 3.7% and 25.0%, respectively, p 0.037). Multivariate Cox proportional hazards analysis revealed that co-morbidity with cancer (hazard ratio, 2.43) and rifampicin interruption (hazard ratio 1.91) were independent factors associated with unfavourable outcomes. Treatment throughout with rifampicin and extended treatment for cavitary disease are crucial for improving outcomes in patients with isoniazid mono-resistant TB.

  1. Endobronchial valve treatment of destructive multidrug-resistant tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Levin, A.; Felker, I.; Tceymach, E.; Krasnov, D.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY BACKGROUND: In accordance with the existing hypothesis, the application of an endobronchial valve (EbV) leads to selective curative atelectasis of the affected part of the lung, contributing to early closure of cavities. OBJECTIVE: To assess the effect of EbV treatment on the course of tuberculosis (TB). METHODS: We compared the efficacy of EbV treatment and complex second-line treatment in treating patients with destructive pulmonary multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB). Bacteriological conversion and closure of cavities were selected as criteria to assess the effectiveness of EbV application. A total of 102 patients with destructive MDR-TB were enrolled into the study and randomly divided into two groups: 49 patients had an EbV installed (intervention group) and 53 patients received complex second-line treatment (control group). Complex chemotherapy was administered to both groups throughout the study period. RESULTS: The cure rate in the short- and long-term follow-up periods in the intervention group was shown to be much higher, 95.9% by bacteriological conversion and 67.3% by cavity closure. On comparison with the control group, this was respectively 37.7% and 20.7% (P < 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS: The application of EbV treatment can significantly improve the effectiveness of second-line chemotherapy regimens in MDR-TB patients. PMID:27776598

  2. Host Immune Responses Differ between M. africanum- and M. tuberculosis-Infected Patients following Standard Anti-tuberculosis Treatment.

    PubMed

    Tientcheu, Leopold D; Haks, Mariëlle C; Agbla, Schadrac C; Sutherland, Jayne S; Adetifa, Ifedayo M; Donkor, Simon; Quinten, Edwin; Daramy, Mohammed; Antonio, Martin; Kampmann, Beate; Ottenhoff, Tom H M; Dockrell, Hazel M; Ota, Martin O

    2016-05-01

    Epidemiological differences exist between Mycobacterium africanum (Maf)- and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb)-infected patients, but to date, contributing host factors have not been characterised. We analysed clinical outcomes, as well as soluble markers and gene expression profiles in unstimulated, and ESAT6/CFP-10-, whole-Maf- and Mtb-stimulated blood samples of 26 Maf- and 49 Mtb-HIV-negative tuberculosis patients before, and after 2 and 6 months of anti-tuberculosis therapy. Before treatment, both groups had similar clinical parameters, but differed in few cytokines concentration and gene expression profiles. Following treatment the body mass index, skinfold thickness and chest X-ray scores showed greater improvement in the Mtb- compared to Maf-infected patients, after adjusting for age, sex and ethnicity (p = 0.02; 0.04 and 0.007, respectively). In addition, in unstimulated blood, IL-12p70, IL12A and TLR9 were significantly higher in Maf-infected patients, while IL-15, IL-8 and MIP-1α were higher in Mtb-infected patients. Overnight stimulation with ESAT-6/CFP-10 induced significantly higher levels of IFN-γ and TNF-α production, as well as gene expression of CCL4, IL1B and TLR4 in Mtb- compared to Maf-infected patients. Our study confirms differences in clinical features and immune genes expression and concentration of proteins associated with inflammatory processes between Mtb- and Maf-infected patients following anti-tuberculosis treatment These findings have public health implications for treatment regimens, and biomarkers for tuberculosis diagnosis and susceptibility.

  3. Socio-economic status and the duration of pulmonary tuberculosis symptoms in women treated at the Mazovian Treatment Centre of Tuberculosis and Lung Diseases in Otwock.

    PubMed

    Błachnio, Maria; Zielonka, Tadeusz M; Błachnio, Antoni; Jagodziński, Jacek

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of tuberculosis depends on various factors such as migration, homelessness, malnutrition, unemployment, bad life conditions and the aging of a society. The aim of this study was to evaluate tuberculosis in females treated at the Mazovian Treatment Centre of Tuberculosis and Lung Diseases (Mazowieckie Centrum Leczenia Chorób Płuc i Gruźlicy) in Otwock, regarding the context of demographic, social and professional status of female patients. The duration of the illness and the extent of radiographic changes were also taken into consideration. The study was carried out retrospectively. The medical documentation that was evaluated concerned 100 women, aged between 20 and 92, hospitalized at the Mazovian Treatment Centre of Tuberculosis and Lung Diseases in Otwock in the years 2005 and 2006 due to bacteriologically confirmed tuberculosis. Most women with tuberculosis lived in cities (65%), 32% of the evaluated patients lived in villages and 3% were homeless. 1/3 of females were under 40 years of age, and 1/3 were over 60 years of age. Only 29% of the women were professionally active and 25% were unemployed. 60% of women were not married. 35% of women with tuberculosis were bringing up children and 7% had abandoned their offspring. More than 1/3 of women had had tuberculosis symptoms for more than half a year before tuberculosis was diagnosed. 40% of women with tuberculosis had small radiological changes (1 to 2 lung fields); however, 26% of them had extensive changes covering 4 to 6 lung fields. The majority of women with tuberculosis in the Mazovian district are single, over 40 years old, unemployed inhabitants of cities. 30% of women in the study group had had symptoms for more than 6 months before tuberculosis was diagnosed. 40% of women with tuberculosis had very extensive radiological changes covering 4 to 6 lung fields.

  4. New approaches in the diagnosis and treatment of latent tuberculosis infection

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    With nearly 9 million new active disease cases and 2 million deaths occurring worldwide every year, tuberculosis continues to remain a major public health problem. Exposure to Mycobacterium tuberculosis leads to active disease in only ~10% people. An effective immune response in remaining individuals stops M. tuberculosis multiplication. However, the pathogen is completely eradicated in ~10% people while others only succeed in containment of infection as some bacilli escape killing and remain in non-replicating (dormant) state (latent tuberculosis infection) in old lesions. The dormant bacilli can resuscitate and cause active disease if a disruption of immune response occurs. Nearly one-third of world population is latently infected with M. tuberculosis and 5%-10% of infected individuals will develop active disease during their life time. However, the risk of developing active disease is greatly increased (5%-15% every year and ~50% over lifetime) by human immunodeficiency virus-coinfection. While active transmission is a significant contributor of active disease cases in high tuberculosis burden countries, most active disease cases in low tuberculosis incidence countries arise from this pool of latently infected individuals. A positive tuberculin skin test or a more recent and specific interferon-gamma release assay in a person without overt signs of active disease indicates latent tuberculosis infection. Two commercial interferon-gamma release assays, QFT-G-IT and T-SPOT.TB have been developed. The standard treatment for latent tuberculosis infection is daily therapy with isoniazid for nine months. Other options include therapy with rifampicin for 4 months or isoniazid + rifampicin for 3 months or rifampicin + pyrazinamide for 2 months or isoniazid + rifapentine for 3 months. Identification of latently infected individuals and their treatment has lowered tuberculosis incidence in rich, advanced countries. Similar approaches also hold great promise for other

  5. [Results of treatment in patients with destructive pulmonary tuberculosis without consideration of drug sensitivity in Mycobacterium tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Abashev, I M; Kozlova, A I; Ivanova, L N

    2008-01-01

    Treatment of 63 patients having infiltrative and disseminated pulmonary tuberculosis attended by decay and bacterial excretion with 4 essential drugs (isoniazid, rifadine, pyrazinamide, ethambutol) and, in disseminated processes, additionally with streptomycin without determining their drug sensitivity contributed to the cessation of sputum acid-resistant mycobacteria in 96.8% and to cavity cicatrisation in 77.8%. Irregular use of izoniazid and rifadine during continued treatment is one of the reasons for the low rates of cavity resolution.

  6. Identification of novel host biomarkers in plasma as candidates for the immunodiagnosis of tuberculosis disease and monitoring of tuberculosis treatment response

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Ruschca; Malherbe, Stephanus; Loxton, Andre G.; Stanley, Kim; van der Spuy, Gian; Walzl, Gerhard; Chegou, Novel N.

    2016-01-01

    There is an urgent need for new tools for the rapid diagnosis of tuberculosis disease. We evaluated the potentials of 74 host markers as biomarkers for the immunological diagnosis of tuberculosis and monitoring of treatment response. Fifty-five individuals that presented with signs and symptoms requiring investigation for tuberculosis disease were prospectively recruited prior to clinical diagnosis, at a health centre in Cape Town, South Africa. Patients were later classified as having tuberculosis disease or other respiratory diseases (ORD) using a combination of clinical, radiological and laboratory findings. Out of 74 host markers that were evaluated in plasma samples from study participants using a multiplex platform, 18 showed potential as tuberculosis diagnostic candidates with the most promising being NCAM, CRP, SAP, IP-10, ferritin, TPA, I-309, and MIG, which diagnosed tuberculosis disease individually, with area under the ROC curve ≥0.80. Six-marker biosignatures containing NCAM diagnosed tuberculosis disease with a sensitivity of 100% (95%CI, 86.3-100%) and specificity of 89.3% (95%CI, 67.6-97.3%) irrespective of HIV status, and 100% accuracy in the absence of HIV infection. Furthermore, the concentrations of 11 of these proteins changed with treatment, thereby indicating that they may be useful in monitoring of the response to tuberculosis treatment. Our findings have potential to be translated into a point-of-care screening test for tuberculosis, after future validation studies. PMID:27557501

  7. Sex-related trends in non-conversion of new smear-positive tuberculosis patients in the Free State, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Heunis, J C; Kigozi, N G; van der Merwe, S; Chikobvu, P; Beyers, N

    2014-03-21

    Contexte : Province de l'Etat Libre, Afrique du Sud.Objectif : Examiner les tendances en fonction du sexe de la nonconversion des frottis de crachats après 2 mois chez des nouveaux cas de tuberculose (TB) à frottis positifs pendant une période où la stratégie DOTS opérait.Schéma : Réalisation d'une étude rétrospective de cohorte des cas de TB enregistrés entre 2003 et 2009. La non-conversion était définie par un résultat de frottis positif après 2 mois de traitement. Des analyses descriptives et de modèles linéaires généralisés ont été réalisées et les tendances de non conversion à 2 mois en fonction du sexe ont été estimées.Résultats : Le taux d'ensemble de non conversion était de 12,5% chez les hommes et de 9,3% chez les femmes. La non conversion était significativement associée à l'âge chez les hommes (P < 0,001). Le taux de non conversion a significativement diminué entre 2003 et 2009 de 15,9% à 10,8% chez les hommes (P < 0,001) et de 12% à 6,6% chez les femmes (P < 0,001). Le taux moyen de déclin de la non-conversion était plus élevé chez les femmes à 1% (IC95% 0,8–1,2%) que chez les hommes à 0,8% (IC95% 0,5–1%). En 2009, le risque de non conversion était plus élevé de 60% chez les hommes (RR 1,60; IC95% 1,37–1,86).Conclusion : Le déclin de la tendance à la non-conversion du frottis de crachats après 2 mois de traitement a mis en évidence le succès relatif de la stratégie DOTS dans la lutte contre la TB, avec un meilleur résultat chez les femmes que chez les hommes. Les interventions devraient tenir compte du sexe et de l'âge des patients afin d'améliorer le taux de conversion du frottis de crachats à 2 mois.

  8. Tuberculosis and HIV co-infection: screening and treatment strategies.

    PubMed

    Venkatesh, Kartik K; Swaminathan, Soumya; Andrews, Jason R; Mayer, Kenneth H

    2011-06-18

    Globally, tuberculosis (TB) and HIV interact in deadly synergy. The high burden of TB among HIV-infected individuals underlies the importance of TB diagnosis, treatment and prevention for clinicians involved in HIV care. Despite expanding access to antiretroviral therapy (ART) to treat HIV infection in resource-limited settings, many individuals in need of therapy initiate ART too late and have already developed clinically significant TB by the time they present for care. Many co-infected individuals are in need of concurrent ART and anti-TB therapy, which dramatically improves survival, but also raises several management challenges, including drug interactions, shared drug toxicities and TB immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS). Due to the survival benefits of promptly initiating ART among all HIV-infected individuals, including those with TB, it is recommended that co-infected individuals receive treatment for both diseases, regardless of CD4+ cell count. We review current screening and treatment strategies for TB and HIV co-infection. Recent findings and ongoing studies will assist clinicians in managing the prevention and treatment of TB and HIV co-infection, which remains a major global health challenge.

  9. High prevalence of pulmonary tuberculosis and inadequate case finding in rural western Kenya.

    PubMed

    van't Hoog, Anna H; Laserson, Kayla F; Githui, Willie A; Meme, Helen K; Agaya, Janet A; Odeny, Lazarus O; Muchiri, Benson G; Marston, Barbara J; DeCock, Kevin M; Borgdorff, Martien W

    2011-05-01

    Limited information exists on the prevalence of tuberculosis and adequacy of case finding in African populations with high rates of HIV. To estimate the prevalence of bacteriologically confirmed pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) and the fraction attributable to HIV, and to evaluate case detection. Residents aged 15 years and older, from 40 randomly sampled clusters, provided two sputum samples for microscopy; those with chest radiograph abnormalities or symptoms suggestive of PTB provided one additional sputum sample for culture. PTB was defined by a culture positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis or two positive smears. Persons with PTB were offered HIV testing and interviewed on care-seeking behavior. We estimated the population-attributable fraction of HIV on prevalent and notified PTB, the patient diagnostic rate, and case detection rate using provincial TB notification data. Among 20,566 participants, 123 had PTB. TB prevalence was 6.0/1,000 (95% confidence interval, 4.6-7.4) for all PTB and 2.5/1,000 (1.6-3.4) for smear-positive PTB. Of 101 prevalent TB cases tested, 52 (51%) were HIV infected, and 58 (64%) of 91 cases who were not on treatment and were interviewed had not sought care. Forty-eight percent of prevalent and 65% of notified PTB cases were attributable to HIV. For smear-positive and smear-negative PTB combined, the patient diagnostic rate was 1.4 cases detected per person-year among HIV-infected persons having PTB and 0.6 for those who were HIV uninfected, corresponding to case detection rates of 56 and 65%, respectively. Undiagnosed PTB is common in this community. TB case finding needs improvement, for instance through intensified case finding with mobile smear microscopy services, rigorous HIV testing, and improved diagnosis of smear-negative TB.

  10. [Treatment of the newly diagnosed destructive lung tuberculosis with elimination of bacilli].

    PubMed

    Giller, D B; Bizhanov, A B; Khasanshin, G S; Trishina, L V; Klestova, A A

    2013-01-01

    The study aimed to increase the efficacy of the newly diagnosed destructive lung tuberculosis with elimination of bacilli, using the collapsotherapeutic and surgical methods combined with intensive chemotherapy. 334 patients were diagnosed with lung tuberculosis in 2009 in Pensa region. Different methods of collapsotherapeutic and/or surgery were used in 255 (76.4%) patients. The comparative analysis of treatment results with patients, diagnosed with tuberculosis in 2006 and 2007 years, before the introduction of the new treatment modality, showed almost two-fold increase of the efficacy and 3-fold decrease of mortality rate.

  11. A randomized controlled study of socioeconomic support to enhance tuberculosis prevention and treatment, Peru

    PubMed Central

    Tovar, Marco A; Huff, Doug; Boccia, Delia; Montoya, Rosario; Ramos, Eric; Datta, Sumona; Saunders, Matthew J; Lewis, James J; Gilman, Robert H; Evans, Carlton A

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective To evaluate the impact of socioeconomic support on tuberculosis preventive therapy initiation in household contacts of tuberculosis patients and on treatment success in patients. Methods A non-blinded, household-randomized, controlled study was performed between February 2014 and June 2015 in 32 shanty towns in Peru. It included patients being treated for tuberculosis and their household contacts. Households were randomly assigned to either the standard of care provided by Peru’s national tuberculosis programme (control arm) or the same standard of care plus socioeconomic support (intervention arm). Socioeconomic support comprised conditional cash transfers up to 230 United States dollars per household, community meetings and household visits. Rates of tuberculosis preventive therapy initiation and treatment success (i.e. cure or treatment completion) were compared in intervention and control arms. Findings Overall, 282 of 312 (90%) households agreed to participate: 135 in the intervention arm and 147 in the control arm. There were 410 contacts younger than 20 years: 43% in the intervention arm initiated tuberculosis preventive therapy versus 25% in the control arm (adjusted odds ratio, aOR: 2.2; 95% confidence interval, CI: 1.1–4.1). An intention-to-treat analysis showed that treatment was successful in 64% (87/135) of patients in the intervention arm versus 53% (78/147) in the control arm (unadjusted OR: 1.6; 95% CI: 1.0–2.6). These improvements were equitable, being independent of household poverty. Conclusion A tuberculosis-specific, socioeconomic support intervention increased uptake of tuberculosis preventive therapy and tuberculosis treatment success and is being evaluated in the Community Randomized Evaluation of a Socioeconomic Intervention to Prevent TB (CRESIPT) project. PMID:28479622

  12. Effectiveness of interventions for diagnosis and treatment of tuberculosis in hard-to-reach populations in countries of low and medium tuberculosis incidence: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Heuvelings, Charlotte C; de Vries, Sophia G; Greve, Patrick F; Visser, Benjamin J; Bélard, Sabine; Janssen, Saskia; Cremers, Anne L; Spijker, René; Shaw, Beth; Hill, Ruaraidh A; Zumla, Alimuddin; Sandgren, Andreas; van der Werf, Marieke J; Grobusch, Martin P

    2017-03-10

    Tuberculosis is over-represented in hard-to-reach (underserved) populations in high-income countries of low tuberculosis incidence. The mainstay of tuberculosis care is early detection of active tuberculosis (case finding), contact tracing, and treatment completion. We did a systematic review with a scoping component of relevant studies published between 1990 and 2015 to update and extend previous National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) reviews on the effectiveness of interventions for identifying and managing tuberculosis in hard-to-reach populations. The analyses showed that tuberculosis screening by (mobile) chest radiography improved screening coverage and tuberculosis identification, reduced diagnostic delay, and was cost-effective among several hard-to-reach populations. Sputum culture for pre-migration screening and active referral to a tuberculosis clinic improved identification. Furthermore, monetary incentives improved tuberculosis identification and management among drug users and homeless people. Enhanced case management, good cooperation between services, and directly observed therapy improved treatment outcome and compliance. Strong conclusions cannot be drawn because of the heterogeneity of evidence with regard to study population, methodology, and quality.

  13. Trends of tuberculosis case notification and treatment outcomes in the Sidama Zone, southern Ethiopia: ten-year retrospective trend analysis in urban-rural settings.

    PubMed

    Dangisso, Mesay Hailu; Datiko, Daniel Gemechu; Lindtjørn, Bernt

    2014-01-01

    Ethiopia is one of the high tuberculosis (TB) burden countries. An analysis of trends and differentials in case notifications and treatment outcomes of TB may help improve our understanding of the performance of TB control services. A retrospective trend analysis of TB cases was conducted in the Sidama Zone in southern Ethiopia. We registered all TB cases diagnosed and treated during 2003-2012 from all health facilities in the Sidama Zone, and analysed trends of TB case notification rates and treatment outcomes. The smear positive (PTB+) case notification rate (CNR) increased from 55 (95% CI 52.5-58.4) to 111 (95% CI 107.4-114.4) per 105 people. The CNRs of PTB+ in people older than 45 years increased by fourfold, while the mortality of cases during treatment declined from 11% to 3% for smear negative (PTB-) (X2trend, P<0.001) and from 5% to 2% for PTB+ (X2trend, P<0.001). The treatment success was higher in rural areas (AOR 1.11; CI 95%: 1.03-1.2), less for PTB- (AOR 0.86; CI 95%: 0.80-0.92) and higher for extra-pulmonary TB (AOR 1.10; CI 95%: 1.02-1.19) compared to PTB+. A higher lost-to-follow up was observed in men (AOR 1.15; CI 95%: 1.06-1.24) and among PTB- cases (AOR 1.14; CI 95%: 1.03-1.25). More deaths occurred in PTB-cases (AOR 1.65; 95% CI: 1.44-1.90) and among cases older than 65 years (AOR 3.86; CI 95%: 2.94-5.10). Lastly, retreatment cases had a higher mortality than new cases (6% vs 3%). Over the past decade TB CNRs and treatment outcomes improved, whereas the disparities of disease burden by gender and place of residence reduced and mortality declined. Strategies should be devised to address higher risk groups for poor treatment outcomes.

  14. Trends of Tuberculosis Case Notification and Treatment Outcomes in the Sidama Zone, Southern Ethiopia: Ten-Year Retrospective Trend Analysis in Urban-Rural Settings

    PubMed Central

    Dangisso, Mesay Hailu; Datiko, Daniel Gemechu; Lindtjørn, Bernt

    2014-01-01

    Background Ethiopia is one of the high tuberculosis (TB) burden countries. An analysis of trends and differentials in case notifications and treatment outcomes of TB may help improve our understanding of the performance of TB control services. Methods A retrospective trend analysis of TB cases was conducted in the Sidama Zone in southern Ethiopia. We registered all TB cases diagnosed and treated during 2003–2012 from all health facilities in the Sidama Zone, and analysed trends of TB case notification rates and treatment outcomes. Results The smear positive (PTB+) case notification rate (CNR) increased from 55 (95% CI 52.5–58.4) to 111 (95% CI 107.4–114.4) per 105 people. The CNRs of PTB+ in people older than 45 years increased by fourfold, while the mortality of cases during treatment declined from 11% to 3% for smear negative (PTB-) (X2trend, P<0.001) and from 5% to 2% for PTB+ (X2trend, P<0.001). The treatment success was higher in rural areas (AOR 1.11; CI 95%: 1.03–1.2), less for PTB- (AOR 0.86; CI 95%: 0.80–0.92) and higher for extra-pulmonary TB (AOR 1.10; CI 95%: 1.02–1.19) compared to PTB+. A higher lost-to-follow up was observed in men (AOR 1.15; CI 95%: 1.06–1.24) and among PTB- cases (AOR 1.14; CI 95%: 1.03–1.25). More deaths occurred in PTB-cases (AOR 1.65; 95% CI: 1.44–1.90) and among cases older than 65 years (AOR 3.86; CI 95%: 2.94–5.10). Lastly, retreatment cases had a higher mortality than new cases (6% vs 3%). Conclusion Over the past decade TB CNRs and treatment outcomes improved, whereas the disparities of disease burden by gender and place of residence reduced and mortality declined. Strategies should be devised to address higher risk groups for poor treatment outcomes. PMID:25460363

  15. Persistently elevated T cell interferon-γ responses after treatment for latent tuberculosis infection among health care workers in India: a preliminary report

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Madhukar; Joshi, Rajnish; Dogra, Sandeep; Mendiratta, Deepak K; Narang, Pratibha; Dheda, Keertan; Kalantri, Shriprakash

    2006-01-01

    Background T cell-based interferon-γ (IFN-γ) release assays (IGRAs) are novel tests for latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI). It has been suggested that T cell responses may be correlated with bacterial burden and, therefore, IGRAs may have a role in monitoring treatment response. We investigated IFN-γ responses to specific TB antigens among Indian health care workers (HCWs) before, and after LTBI preventive therapy. Methods In 2004, we established a cohort of HCWs who underwent tuberculin skin testing (TST) and a whole-blood IGRA (QuantiFERON-TB-Gold In-Tube [QFT-G], Cellestis Ltd, Victoria, Australia) at a rural hospital in India. HCWs positive by either test were offered 6 months of isoniazid (INH) preventive therapy. Among the HCWs who underwent therapy, we prospectively followed-up 10 nursing students who were positive by both tests at baseline. The QFT-G assay was repeated 4 and 10 months after INH treatment completion (i.e. approximately 12 months and 18 months after the initial testing). IFN-γ responses to ESAT-6, CFP-10 and TB7.7 peptides were measured using ELISA, and IFN-γ ≥0.35 IU/mL was used to define a positive QFT-G test result. Results All participants (N = 10) reported direct contact with smear-positive TB patients at baseline, during and after LTBI treatment. All participants except one started treatment with high baseline IFN-γ responses (median 10.0 IU/mL). The second QFT-G was positive in 9 of 10 participants, but IFN-γ responses had declined (median 5.0 IU/mL); however, this difference was not significant (P = 0.10). The third QFT-G assay continued to be positive in 9 of 10 participants, with persistently elevated IFN-γ responses (median 7.9 IU/mL; P = 0.32 for difference against baseline average). Conclusion In an environment with ongoing, intensive nosocomial exposure, HCWs had strong IFN-γ responses at baseline, and continued to have persistently elevated responses, despite LTBI treatment. It is plausible that persistence of

  16. Gatifloxacin for short, effective treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Chiang, C-Y; Van Deun, A; Rieder, H L

    2016-09-01

    The 9-month regimen for the treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) piloted in Bangladesh and used, with modifications, in Cameroon and Niger, has achieved treatment success in a very large proportion of patients; gatifloxacin (GFX) is likely to have played a critical role in this success. Two months after the publication of a study reporting that GFX and not moxifloxacin (MFX) was associated with dysglycaemia, the manufacturer announced the withdrawal of GFX from the market. The findings of that study may have less significance for the majority of MDR-TB patients living in high-incidence countries who are much younger, have a lower risk of dysglycaemia and suffer from a highly fatal condition. The problem of dysglycaemia is not limited to GFX use and may occur with other fluoroquinolones; furthermore, GFX-associated dysglycemia was manageable among those MDR-TB patients in Bangladesh and Niger in whom it occurred. GFX has now become unavailable in Bangladesh, Cameroon, Niger and other countries piloting the shorter MDR-TB regimens, depriving resource-poor countries of an efficacious, effective and inexpensive drug with a demonstrated good safety profile for the given indication. There is little reason not to make GFX available for MDR-TB treatment as long as the superiority of non-GFX-based MDR-TB regimens is not demonstrated.

  17. Retrospective descriptive study of adult tuberculosis in Wuhan, China.

    PubMed

    Chamla, D D; Nie, S; Duan, Q

    2004-06-01

    To determine the rate and associated factors of adult tuberculosis (TB) in the central Chinese city of Wuhan. A retrospective descriptive study of 417 patients registered for TB treatment from 1 January to 31 December 2001. The mean age of admission was 38.47 (median 35) years, with males aged 20-40 years mostly affected; 191 (45.8%) TB patients were classified as smear-positive, 221 (53%) smear-negative and for five (1.2%) the sputum results were not known. Of all admissions, 43 (10.32%) were retreatment cases and 50 (11.99%) were diagnosed as extra-pulmonary TB. All patients were treated under the DOTS strategy, with 391 (93.76%) cures, five (1.2%) treatment completed, five (1.2%) treatment failures, four (0.96%) deaths, three (0.72%) defaults and nine (2.16%) transfers out. Cure was associated with age (chi2 = 3.92, P < 0.05), but not with sex, retreatment TB, extra-pulmonary TB, type of treatment regimen, BCG status or delay in treatment (P > 0.05). DOTS provides high TB cure rates. The reasons for the low detection rates, high retreatment rates and the increasing number of young adults affected by TB need further elucidation. For these purposes, routine human immunodeficiency virus screening and sputum culture for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis and case detection may be required.

  18. Gallbladder tuberculosis camouflaging as gallbladder cancer – case series and review focussing on treatment

    PubMed Central

    Krishnamurthy, Gautham; Singh, Harjeet; Rajendran, Jayapal; Sharma, Vishal; Yadav, Thakur Deen; Gaspar, Balan Louis; Vasishta, Rakesh Kumar; Singh, Rajinder

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Gallbladder tuberculosis, in an endemic region, is a common infectious etiology affecting a rare organ. The high prevalence of carcinoma gallbladder in the endemic regions of tuberculosis, like India, poses diagnostic dilemma. Case series: We are reporting three cases of gallbladder tuberculosis mimicking carcinoma gallbladder of which the first two cases were operated with a presumptive diagnosis of malignancy. The third case presented to us after laparoscopic cholecystectomy elsewhere and on evaluation was found to have disseminated tuberculosis. Discussion: The lack of pathognomonic clinical and radiological characters results in histological surprise of gallbladder tuberculosis following surgery performed for other indications like malignancy. In preoperatively diagnosed patients medical management plays pivotal role in management. Surgery is required in symptomatic patients. On the other hand, histologically proven cases following surgical resection require antitubercular therapy. Conclusion: Previous history of tuberculosis or concomitant tuberculosis at other sites may provide clue to the diagnosis of biliary tuberculosis. Antitubercular treatment after surgery plays an important role in preventing further dissemination. PMID:28386408

  19. Tuberculosis epidemiology in Croydon.

    PubMed

    Harding, M J; Pilkington, P; Thomas, J

    1995-07-01

    A survey of tuberculosis in Croydon between 1988 and 1991, using Chest Clinic health visitor records, showed that the disease occurred most frequently in those of Indian Sub-Continent (ISC) ethnic origin. Of the 222 cases during the 4-year period, 65% were of ISC ethnic origin, 22% were Caucasian and 11% Afro-Caribbean. Non-Caucasian cases were younger (P < 0.0001), and more likely to be female (P = 0.064) or present with non-pulmonary disease (P = 0.064). One-quarter of ISC patients developed active tuberculosis more than 15 years after immigration into the UK. Only seven cases were children. The contact tracing procedure resulted in three additional cases, all of whom were contacts of smear-positive index cases. There were significantly fewer Heaf or radiologically positive contacts of non-smear positive pulmonary, or non-pulmonary index cases (P = 0.0002). The value of the current contact tracing system is discussed.

  20. Outcome assessment of a Global Fund grant for tuberculosis control at the district level in rural Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Yumo, H A; Mbanya, D; Kuaban, C; Neuhann, F

    2011-03-01

    Batibo District Hospital (BDH), North-West Cameroon. To assess the outcome of the implementation of the Global Fund (GF) Grant Round 3 for tuberculosis (TB) control at the district level. A retrospective study for the period 2003-2008 comparing TB programme outcome indicators before (2003-2005) and after (2006-2008) the GF grant. During the study period 293 TB cases were enrolled on treatment. Comparing the cumulative outcome indicators for smear-positive pulmonary TB cases 3 years before and after the grant, case notification increased by >50%, case detection by almost 50% and treatment success by nearly 20% during the grant period. The case detection rate for smear-positive pulmonary TB nearly doubled, while the treatment success rate reached 100% in 2006. Default and mortality rates dropped to zero in 2006 and 2007 from maximum values of respectively 15% and 23% in 2004 and 2005. However, in 2008, there was a decline across all programme indicators, probably due to staff turnover. Outcome indicators of the TB programme in BDH increased markedly following the implementation of the GF grant. Nevertheless, if not tackled appropriately, staff turnover might impede the sustainability of this positive outcome.

  1. Treatment outcomes after early initiation of antiretroviral therapy for human immunodeficiency virus-associated tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Chan, C K; Wong, K H; Leung, C C; Tam, C M; Chan, K C W; Pang, K W; Chan, W K; Mak, I K Y

    2013-12-01

    To evaluate the optimal timing for initiating antiretroviral therapy in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated tuberculosis in Hong Kong. Historical cohort. SETTING. Tuberculosis and Chest Service and Special Preventive Programme, Public Health Service Branch, Centre for Health Protection, Department of Health, Hong Kong. Consecutive patients with HIV-associated tuberculosis in a territory-wide TB-HIV registry encountered from 1996 to 2009. Of the 260 antiretroviral therapy-naïve patients with HIV-associated tuberculosis, 32 (12%) had antiretroviral therapy initiated within 2 months after starting anti-tuberculosis treatment (early antiretroviral therapy). Early antiretroviral therapy was associated with a more favourable outcome (cure or treatment completion without relapse) at 24 months (91% vs 67%; P=0.007) than those with antiretroviral therapy started later or not initiated, and remained an independent predictor of a favourable outcome after adjustment for potential confounders. Adverse effects from anti-tuberculosis drugs tended to occur more frequently in patients with early antiretroviral therapy (13/32 or 41%) compared with the remainder (59/228 or 26%; P=0.08). A significantly higher proportion of patients in the former group experienced immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome than in the latter group (7/32 or 22% vs 9/228 or 4%; P<0.001). There was no death attributable to immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome. Early initiation of antiretroviral therapy is associated with more favourable tuberculosis treatment outcomes in patients with HIV-associated tuberculosis with a low CD4 count (<200/µL). Drug co-toxicity and immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome that may be increased by earlier initiation of antiretroviral therapy does not undermine tuberculosis treatment outcomes to a significant extent.

  2. Detection of lipoarabinomannan as a diagnostic test for tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Sada, E; Aguilar, D; Torres, M; Herrera, T

    1992-01-01

    A coagglutination technique was established for the detection of lipoarabinomannan of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in human serum samples and evaluated for its utility in the diagnosis of tuberculosis at the Instituto Nacional de Enfermedades Respiratorias in Mexico City. The test had a sensitivity of 88% in patients with sputum-smear-positive active pulmonary tuberculosis. The sensitivity in patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis negative for acid-fast bacilli in sputum was 67%. Less favorable results were obtained for patients with AIDS and tuberculosis, with a sensitivity of 57%. The specificity in control patients with lung diseases different from tuberculosis and in healthy subjects was 100%. The positive predictive value was 100%, and the negative predictive value for patients with sputum-positive active pulmonary tuberculosis was 97%. The results of this study suggest that the detection of lipoarabinomannan is an accurate test for the diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis. PMID:1401008

  3. Gynaecomastia in two men on stable antiretroviral therapy who commenced treatment for tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Kratz, Jeremy D; El-Shazly, Ahmad Y; Mambuque, Santos G; Demetria, Elpidio; Veldkamp, Peter; Anderson, Timothy S

    2016-12-01

    Gynaecomastia is a common clinical presentation that varies from benign presentations in stages of human development to hormonal pathology, mainly due to hepatic dysfunction, malignancy, and adverse pharmacologic effects. We describe the development of significant bilateral gynaecomastia after starting treatment for pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) in two males with WHO stage III Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection on stable antiretroviral regimens. Emerging reports suggest that distinct hepatic impairment in efavirenz metabolism modulates oestrogenic activity, which may be potentiated by anti-tuberculosis therapy. Clinical application includes early recognition of efavirenz-induced gynaecomastia, especially after commencing tuberculosis treatment. To avoid decreased adherence resulting from the distressing side effect of gynecomastia, transition to an alternative ART regimen over the course of tuberculosis treatment should be considered.

  4. Treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus by immunoadsorption in a patient suffering from tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Schmaldienst, Sabine; Jansen, Martin; Hollenstein, Ursula; Graninger, Winfried; Regele, Heinz; Hörl, Walter Hermann; Derfler, Kurt

    2002-02-01

    We report on a 40-year-old man, admitted with fever and weight loss, in whom systemic lupus erythematosus (lupus nephritis World Health Organization type IV) and concomitant acute lung tuberculosis were diagnosed. Conventional treatment of diffuse proliferative nephritis with cytotoxic drugs was thought to be too dangerous in the presence of active tuberculosis. A combination of immunoadsorption and steroids was instituted for the treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus. Antibodies against double-stranded DNA decreased, and proteinuria decreased from 10 g/24 hours to less than 1 g/24 hours. Tuberculosis was treated initially with quadruple-drug therapy, then a triple-drug protocol. Primarily enlarged lymph nodes decreased to normal size after 3 months. The combined treatment modality of steroids and immunoadsorption was effective and safe, even in this patient with active tuberculosis. Copyright 2002 by the National Kidney Foundation, Inc.

  5. Spatial analysis of the tuberculosis treatment dropout, Buenos Aires, Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Herrero, María Belén; Arrossi, Silvina; Ramos, Silvina; Braga, Jose Ueleres

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Identify spatial distribution patterns of the proportion of nonadherence to tuberculosis treatment and its associated factors. METHODS We conducted an ecological study based on secondary and primary data from municipalities of the metropolitan area of Buenos Aires, Argentina. An exploratory analysis of the characteristics of the area and the distributions of the cases included in the sample (proportion of nonadherence) was also carried out along with a multifactor analysis by linear regression. The variables related to the characteristics of the population, residences and families were analyzed. RESULTS Areas with higher proportion of the population without social security benefits (p = 0.007) and of households with unsatisfied basic needs had a higher risk of nonadherence (p = 0.032). In addition, the proportion of nonadherence was higher in areas with the highest proportion of households with no public transportation within 300 meters (p = 0.070). CONCLUSIONS We found a risk area for the nonadherence to treatment characterized by a population living in poverty, with precarious jobs and difficult access to public transportation. PMID:26270011

  6. Spatial analysis of the tuberculosis treatment dropout, Buenos Aires, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Herrero, María Belén; Arrossi, Silvina; Ramos, Silvina; Braga, Jose Ueleres

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Identify spatial distribution patterns of the proportion of nonadherence to tuberculosis treatment and its associated factors. METHODS We conducted an ecological study based on secondary and primary data from municipalities of the metropolitan area of Buenos Aires, Argentina. An exploratory analysis of the characteristics of the area and the distributions of the cases included in the sample (proportion of nonadherence) was also carried out along with a multifactor analysis by linear regression. The variables related to the characteristics of the population, residences and families were analyzed. RESULTS Areas with higher proportion of the population without social security benefits (p = 0.007) and of households with unsatisfied basic needs had a higher risk of nonadherence (p = 0.032). In addition, the proportion of nonadherence was higher in areas with the highest proportion of households with no public transportation within 300 meters (p = 0.070). CONCLUSIONS We found a risk area for the nonadherence to treatment characterized by a population living in poverty, with precarious jobs and difficult access to public transportation.

  7. Bedaquiline for the treatment of resistant tuberculosis: promises and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Kakkar, Ashish Kumar; Dahiya, Neha

    2014-07-01

    Treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is hindered by limited efficacy and significant toxicity of second-line drugs. The need for new therapeutic options is critical to combat the global MDR-TB epidemic. Bedaquiline is a novel oral diarylquinoline approved by Food and Drug administration (FDA) for the treatment of adults with pulmonary MDR-TB on the basis of Phase IIb trial data under the provisions of the accelerated approval regulations for serious or life-threatening conditions. The FDA advisory committee members voted unanimously on efficacy data based on surrogate measures, however they were split on the issues of safety of bedaquiline. Main safety concerns include QT interval prolongation, hepatic related adverse events, and excess mortality in bedaquiline treated patients. While bedaquiline approval is a story of many firsts and certainly a welcome addition to the existing arsenal of anti-TB agents, a cautiously optimistic approach is required to assess the risk benefit profile of the drug. Acceleration of further Phase III trials and clinical studies is imperative, as is timely analysis of emerging data on the real world use of the drug. This mini review outlines the clinical pharmacology of bedaquiline highlighting the potential promises and challenges that implicate the risk benefit profile of drug.

  8. Cost implications of delays to tuberculosis diagnosis among pulmonary tuberculosis patients in Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Delays seeking care worsen the burden of tuberculosis and cost of care for patients, families and the public health system. This study investigates costs of tuberculosis diagnosis incurred by patients, escorts and the public health system in 10 districts of Ethiopia. Methods New pulmonary tuberculosis patients ≥ 15 years old were interviewed regarding their health care seeking behaviour at the time of diagnosis. Using a structured questionnaire patients were interviewed about the duration of delay at alternative care providers and the public health system prior to diagnosis. Costs incurred by patients, escorts and the public health system were quantified through patient interview and review of medical records. Results Interviews were held with 537 (58%) smear positive patients and 387 (42%) smear negative pulmonary patients. Of these, 413 (45%) were female; 451 (49%) were rural residents; and the median age was 34 years. The mean (median) days elapsed for consultation at alternative care providers and public health facilities prior to tuberculosis diagnosis was 5 days (0 days) and 3 (3 days) respectively. The total median cost incurred from first consultation to diagnosis was $27 per patient (mean = $59). The median costs per patient incurred by patient, escort and the public health system were $16 (mean = $29), $3 (mean = $23) and $3 (mean = $7) respectively. The total cost per patient diagnosed was higher for women, rural residents; those who received government food for work support, patients with smear negative pulmonary tuberculosis and patients who were not screened for TB in at least one district diagnostic centers. Conclusions The costs of tuberculosis diagnosis incurred by patients and escorts represent a significant portion of their monthly income. The costs arising from time lost in seeking care comprised a major portion of the total cost of diagnosis, and may worsen the economic position of patients and their families. Getting treatment

  9. Molecular typing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex isolated from pulmonary tuberculosis patients in central Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Bedewi, Zufan; Worku, Adane; Mekonnen, Yalemtsehay; Yimer, Getnet; Medhin, Girmay; Mamo, Gezahegne; Pieper, Rembert; Ameni, Gobena

    2017-03-01

    Identification of the types of strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) complex causing tuberculosis (TB) could contribute to TB control program of specific geographic region as well as it could add knowledge onto the existing literature on TB worldwide. The objective of the present study was to identify the species and strains of M. tuberculosis complex causing pulmonary tuberculosis in central Ethiopia. A health institution- based cross-sectional study was conducted on 338 smear positive TB cases visiting three hospitals between October 2012 and September 2013. Morning and spot sputum samples were collected before the starting of treatment regimens. Thus, a total of 338 pooled sputum samples collected from these cases. Samples were cultured on Löwenstein Jensen media and the isolates were identified by the region of difference (RD) 9 based polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and spoligotyping. Of the total isolates 98.6% of the isolates were identified to be M. tuberculosis while the remaining 1.4% were identified as M. africanum. Further, typing of M. tuberculosis using spoligotyping lead to the identification of 90 different strains of M. tuberculosis. Of these strains, 32 were clustered consisting of more than one isolate while the remaining 58 strains were unique consisting of single isolate. Thus, 79.3% (223/281) of the isolates were found in the clustered while only 20.6% (58/281) of the strains were unique. Forty-five of the spolgotyping patterns were registeredin the SITVIT2 or SpolDB4 database in while the remaining 45 were notfound in the database and hence were orphan strains. The dominant strains were SIT53, SIT149, and SIT54, consisting of 43, 37 and 34 isolates, respectively. Classification of the spoligotype patterns using TB-insight RUN TB-Lineage showed that 86.8, 6.4, 5, 1.4% ofthe isolatesbelonged to the Euro-American lineage, East-African-Indian, Indo-oceanic and M. africanum, respectively. The identification of clustered and new

  10. [Therapy and Rehabilitation of Patients with Pulmonary Tuberculosis and Different Treatment Adherence].

    PubMed

    Rubleva, N V; Kolomiets, V M; Kochetkova, E Ya

    2016-01-01

    The pulmonary tuberculosis process as dependent on the disease form and the therapy efficacy with the use of Cycloferon in the treatment scheme were investigated. The study had two stages. At the first stage the data concerning 358 patients with primary pulmonary tuberculosis and infiltration (93 patients) or degradation (89 patients) and 176 patients with pulmonary fibrocavernous tuberculosis were analysed. At the second stage the efficacy of the treatment schemes applied to the patients with pulmonary fibrocavernous tuberculosis was compared. The etiotropic therapy intensive phase was applied to all the patients. Moreover, 56 patients (group 1) under the therapy and rehabilitatinon were treated with Cycloferon in a dose of 0.25 administered intramuscularly twice a week (not less than 16 injections for the course), 60 patients (group 2) were treated with Omega 3, 30 patients (group 3) were given the standard complex (vitamins and tonics), 30 patients (group 4) were under the etiotropic therapy alone. The following additional factors promoting progression and aggravation of the tuberculosis process were confirmed: degradation at the time of the disease diagnosis, high resistance of the pathogen to antituberculosis drugs, low adherence to the treatment, social desadaptation and especially psychofunctional state of the patients. The use of Cycloferon in the schemes of the intensive phase treatment of the primary fibrocavernous tuberculosis resulted in reduction of the intoxication signs, bacteria isolation, positive dynamics of the cavity healing, lower lung infiltration and consequently high frequency of the treatment positive outcomes (94.1 ± 3.33%).

  11. Current status and opportunities for therapeutic drug monitoring in the treatment of tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Zuur, Marlanka A; Bolhuis, Mathieu S; Anthony, Richard; den Hertog, Alice; van der Laan, Tridia; Wilffert, Bob; de Lange, Wiel; van Soolingen, Dick; Alffenaar, Jan-Willem C

    2016-05-01

    Tuberculosis remains a global health problem and pharmacokinetic variability has been postulated as one of the causes of treatment failure and acquired drug resistance. New developments enable implementation of therapeutic drug monitoring, a strategy to evaluate drug exposure in order to tailor the dose to the individual patient, in tuberculosis treatment. Literature on pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of anti-tuberculosis drugs was explored to evaluate the effect of drug exposure in relation to drug susceptibility, toxicity and efficacy. New, down-sized strategies, like dried blood spot analysis and limited sampling strategies are reviewed. In addition, molecular resistance testing of Mycobacteria tuberculosis, combining a short turn-around time with relevant information on drug susceptibility of the causative pathogen was explored. Newly emerging host biomarkers provide information on the response to treatment. Therapeutic drug monitoring can minimize toxicity and increase efficacy of tuberculosis treatment and prevent the development of resistance. Dried blood spot analysis and limited sampling strategies, can be combined to provide us with a more patient friendly approach. Furthermore, rapid information on drug susceptibility by molecular testing, and information from host biomarkers on the bacteriological response, can be used to further optimize tuberculosis treatment.

  12. M2 macrophages or IL-33 treatment attenuate ongoing Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection

    PubMed Central

    Piñeros, A. R.; Campos, L. W.; Fonseca, D. M.; Bertolini, T. B.; Gembre, A. F.; Prado, R. Q.; Alves-Filho, J. C.; Ramos, S. G.; Russo, M.; Bonato, V. L. D.

    2017-01-01

    The protective effects of mycobacterial infections on lung allergy are well documented. However, the inverse relationship between tuberculosis and type 2 immunity is still elusive. Although type 1 immunity is essential to protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis it might be also detrimental to the host due to the induction of extensive tissue damage. Here, we determined whether lung type 2 immunity induced by allergen sensitization and challenge could affect the outcome of M. tuberculosis infection. We used two different protocols in which sensitization and allergen challenge were performed before or after M. tuberculosis infection. We found an increased resistance to M. tuberculosis only when allergen exposure was given after, but not before infection. Infected mice exposed to allergen exhibited lower bacterial load and cellular infiltrates in the lungs. Enhanced resistance to infection after allergen challenge was associated with increased gene expression of alternatively activated macrophages (M2 macrophages) and IL-33 levels. Accordingly, either adoptive transfer of M2 macrophages or systemic IL-33 treatment was effective in attenuating M. tuberculosis infection. Notably, the enhanced resistance induced by allergen exposure was dependent on IL-33 receptor ST2. Our work indicates that IL-33 might be an alternative therapeutic treatment for severe tuberculosis. PMID:28128217

  13. Occult hepatitis B virus infection: clinical implications in tuberculosis treatment.

    PubMed

    Trigo, C; do Brasil, P E A A; Costa, M J M; de Castro, L

    2016-12-01

    Occult hepatitis B virus infection (OBI) is characterized by the absence of HBsAg and persistence of the virus genome (HBV-DNA) in liver tissue and/or blood. OBI has been reported in several clinical contexts. However, the clinical significance of OBI in tuberculosis (TB) treatment is unknown. We investigated the OBI prevalence and its impact on the risk of drug-induced liver injury (DILI) during TB treatment. This was a prospective cohort study with one hundred patients who were treated for TB from 2008 to 2015. Laboratory, clinical and demographic data of TB patients were extracted from medical records. Based on HBV-DNA testing of serum samples, an OBI prevalence of 12% was established; almost half of these patients had both anti-HBc and anti-HBs serological markers. Low CD4(+) cell counts have been shown to be a risk factor for OBI among TB patients co-infected with HIV (P=.036). High DILI incidence was observed in this study. A multivariable Cox proportional hazard model was conducted and identified OBI (HR 2.98, 95% CI 1.30-6.86) as the strongest predictor for DILI when adjusted to CD4(+) cell count (HR 0.38, 95% CI 0.17-0.90), ALT before TB treatment (HR 1.37, 95% CI 0.81-2.32) and TB extrapulmonary clinical form (HR 2.91, 95% CI 1.75-7.21). The main aim of this study was to highlight DILI as a clinical outcome during treatment of TB patients with OBI. Therefore, HBV-DNA testing should be considered routinely in monitoring DILI, and also in other clinical implications associated with OBI, reduce morbidity and mortality.

  14. Which urban migrants default from tuberculosis treatment in Shanghai, China?

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Qi, Lihong; Xia, Zhen; Shen, Mei; Shen, Xin; Mei, Jian; DeRiemer, Kathryn; Zheng'an Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Migration is a major challenge to tuberculosis (TB) control worldwide. TB treatment requires multiple drugs for at least six months. Some TB patients default before completing their treatment regimen, which can lead to ongoing infectiousness and drug resistance. We conducted a retrospective analysis of 29,943 active TB cases among urban migrants that were reported between 2000 to 2008 in Shanghai, China. We used logistic regression models to identify factors independently associated with treatment defaults in TB patients among urban migrants during 2005-2008. Fifty-two percent of the total TB patients reported in Shanghai during the study period were among urban migrants. Three factors increased the odds of a treatment default: case management using self-administered therapy (OR, 5.84, 95% CI, 3.14-10.86, p<0.0005), being a retreatment case (OR, 1.47, 95% CI, 1.25-1.71, p<0.0005), and age >60 years old (OR, 1.33, 95% CI, 1.05-1.67, p=0.017). The presence of a cavity in the initial chest radiograph decreased the odds for a treatment default (OR, 0.87, 95% CI, 0.77-0.97, p=0.015), as did migration from central China (OR, 0.85, 95% CI, 0.73-0.99, p=0.042), case management by family members (OR, 0.73, 95% CI 0.66-0.81, p<0.0005), and the combination of case detection by a required physical exam and case management by health care staff (OR, 0.64, 95% CI, 0.45-0.93, p=0.019). Among TB patients who were urban migrants in Shanghai, case management using self-administered therapy was the strongest modifiable risk factor that was independently associated with treatment defaults. Interventions that target retreated TB cases could also reduce treatment defaults among urban migrants. Health departments should develop effective measures to prevent treatment defaults among urban migrants, to ensure completion of therapy among urban migrants who move between cities and provinces, and to improve reporting of treatment outcomes.

  15. Assess drug resistance pattern and genetic profile of Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates by molecular typing methods using direct repeats and IS6110 in pulmonary tuberculosis cases

    PubMed Central

    Kalo, Deepika; Kant, Surya; Srivastava, Kanchan; Sharma, Ajay K

    2017-01-01

    Background: Tuberculosis (TB), a highly contagious disease that sees no gender, age, or race is mainly a disease of lungs. According to World Health Organization, a TB patient can be completely cured with 6–9 months of anti-TB treatment under directly observed treatment short course. Objectives: The aim of this study was to check the mono, multi- and triple-drug resistance to first line drugs (FLDs) among TB patients and to access their genetic profile using DR 3074, DR 0270, DR 0642, DR 2068, and DR 4110 using molecular techniques. Material and Methods: To gain a better understanding of drug resistant TB, we characterized 121 clinical isolates recovered from 159 drug resistant pulmonary tuberculosis patients by IS6110 genotyping. MTB isolates recovered from HIV- negative, and smear positive cases of both genders, age varied from 18 to 70 years with drug resistant-TB that was refractory to chemotherapy given for > 12 months. Of a total of 159 sputum smear positive patients sum number of male and female patients was 121 (76.10%) and 38 (23.89%), respectively. Among these patients, number of literate and illiterate patients were 123 (77.3%) and 36 (22.6%). 25 (15.7%) patients had farming as their occupation, 80 (50.3%) had nonagricultural occupation and 54 (33.9%) women were housewives. Results: Mono drug resistant, multi-drug resistant, and totally drug resistant (TDR) cases of TB were calculated as 113.83%, 125.1%, and 67.9%. Isoniazid showed the highest percentage of resistance among the patients. Conclusion: Any noncompliance to TB medications, lack of knowledge, and poor management in health centers, etc., results in the emergence of deadly direct repeat forms of TB, which are further complicated and complex to treat. PMID:28360464

  16. Determinants of Default from Tuberculosis Treatment among Patients with Drug-Susceptible Tuberculosis in Karachi, Pakistan: A Mixed Methods Study.

    PubMed

    Chida, Natasha; Ansari, Zara; Hussain, Hamidah; Jaswal, Maria; Symes, Stephen; Khan, Aamir J; Mohammed, Shama

    2015-01-01

    Non-adherence to tuberculosis therapy can lead to drug resistance, prolonged infectiousness, and death; therefore, understanding what causes treatment default is important. Pakistan has one of the highest burdens of tuberculosis in the world, yet there have been no qualitative studies in Pakistan that have specifically examined why default occurs. We conducted a mixed methods study at a tuberculosis clinic in Karachi to understand why patients with drug-susceptible tuberculosis default from treatment, and to identify factors associated with default. Patients attending this clinic pick up medications weekly and undergo family-supported directly observed therapy. In-depth interviews were administered to 21 patients who had defaulted. We also compared patients who defaulted with those who were cured, had completed, or had failed treatment in 2013. Qualitative analyses showed the most common reasons for default were the financial burden of treatment, and medication side effects and beliefs. The influence of finances on other causes of default was also prominent, as was concern about the effect of treatment on family members. In quantitative analysis, of 2120 patients, 301 (14.2%) defaulted. Univariate analysis found that male gender (OR: 1.34, 95% CI: 1.04-1.71), being 35-59 years of age (OR: 1.54, 95% CI: 1.14-2.08), or being 60 years of age or older (OR: 1.84, 95% CI: 1.17-2.88) were associated with default. After adjusting for gender, disease site, and patient category, being 35-59 years of age (aOR: 1.49, 95% CI: 1.10-2.03) or 60 years of age or older (aOR: 1.76, 95% CI: 1.12-2.77) were associated with default. In multivariate analysis age was the only variable associated with default. This lack of identifiable risk factors and our qualitative findings imply that default is complex and often due to extrinsic and medication-related factors. More tolerable medications, improved side effect management, and innovative cost-reduction measures are needed to reduce

  17. SIMPLE MEASURES ARE AS EFFECTIVE AS INVASIVE TECHNIQUES IN THE DIAGNOSIS OF PULMONARY TUBERCULOSIS IN MALAWI

    PubMed Central

    Bell, David J; Dacombe, Russell; Graham, Stephen M; Hicks, Alexander; Cohen, Danielle; Chikaonda, Tarsizio; French, Neil; Molyneux, Malcolm E; Zijlstra, Ed E; Squire, S Bertel; Gordon, Stephen B

    2010-01-01

    Setting Detection of smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) cases is vital for tuberculosis control. Methods to augment sputum collection are available but their additional benefit is uncertain in resource-limited settings. Objective To compare the diagnostic yields using five methods to obtain sputum from adults diagnosed with smear-negative PTB in Malawi. Design Self-expectorated sputum was collected under supervision for microscopy and mycobacterial culture in the study laboratory. Confirmed smear-negative patients, provided physiotherapy-assisted sputum and induced sputum followed, the next morning, by gastric washing and bronchoalveolar-lavage samples. Results 150 patients, diagnosed with smear-negative PTB by the hospital service, were screened. 39 (26%) were smear-positive from supervised self-expectorated sputum examined in the study laboratory. The remaining 111 confirmed smear-negative patients were enrolled; 89% were HIV positive. Seven additional smear-positive cases were diagnosed using the augmented sputum collection techniques. No differences were observed in the numbers of cases detected using the different methods. 44 (95.6%) of the 46 smear-positive cases could be detected from self-expectorated and physiotherapy-assisted samples Conclusions For countries like Malawi, the best use of limited resources to detect smear-positive PTB cases would be to improve the quality of self-expectorated sputum collection and microscopy. The additional diagnostic yield using bronchoalveolar-lavage after induced sputum is limited. PMID:19105886

  18. Simple measures are as effective as invasive techniques in the diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis in Malawi.

    PubMed

    Bell, D J; Dacombe, R; Graham, S M; Hicks, A; Cohen, D; Chikaonda, T; French, N; Molyneux, M E; Zijlstra, E E; Squire, S B; Gordon, S B

    2009-01-01

    Detection of smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) cases is vital for tuberculosis (TB) control. Methods to augment sputum collection are available, but their additional benefit is uncertain in resource-limited settings. To compare the diagnostic yields using five methods to obtain sputum from adults diagnosed with smear-negative PTB in Malawi. Self-expectorated sputum was collected under supervision for microscopy and mycobacterial culture in the study laboratory. Confirmed smear-negative patients provided physiotherapy-assisted sputum and induced sputum, followed the next morning by gastric washing and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) samples. A total of 150 patients diagnosed with smear-negative PTB by the hospital service were screened; 39 (26%) were smear-positive from supervised self-expectorated sputum examined in the study laboratory. The remaining 111 confirmed smear-negative patients were enrolled in the study; 89% were human immunodeficiency virus positive. Seven additional smear-positive cases were diagnosed using the augmented sputum collection techniques. No differences were observed in the numbers of cases detected using the different methods. Of the 46 smear-positive cases, 44 (95.6%) could be detected from self-expectorated and physiotherapy-assisted samples. For countries such as Malawi, the best use of limited resources to detect smear-positive PTB cases would be to improve the quality of self-expectorated sputum collection and microscopy. The additional diagnostic yield using BAL after induced sputum is limited.

  19. [Clinical detection and significance of plasma IL-37 in patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junai; Liu, Ganbin; Zeng, Jincheng; Wang, Wandang; Xiang, Wenyu; Kong, Bin; Yi, Lailong; Xu, Junfa

    2015-04-01

    To investigate the level of plasma interleukin 37 (IL-37) and explore the clinical significance of IL-37 in patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis (ATB). ELISA was used to detect the level of plasma IL-37 from 30 patients with ATB, 15 patients who had been treated for ATB, and 21 healthy volunteers as controls. The level of plasma IL-37 in patients with ATB was significantly higher than that in healthy controls. The monitoring on the 15 patients showed that plasma IL-37 was reduced after treatment for ATB. The level of plasma IL-37 in patients with anti-Mycobecterium tuberculosis antibody positive or sputum smear positive were higher than that in patients with anti-Mycobecterium tuberculosis antibody negative or sputum smear negative for Mycobecterium tuberculosis, and the level was negatively correlated with the number of white blood cells in peripheral blood. The patients with ATB present with significantly increased level of plasma IL-37, which might be an indicator of curative effect in ATB.

  20. Tuberculosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... infection is much more likely to develop TB disease during his or her lifetime than a person without HIV infection. Fortunately, treatment is available. Learn about Treatment . TB Disease When TB germs are active (multiplying in your ...

  1. Childhood tuberculosis: management and treatment outcomes among children in Northwest Ethiopia: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Kebede, Zemene Tigabu; Taye, Belaynew Wasie; Matebe, Yohannes Hailu

    2017-01-01

    Childhood tuberculosis (TB) treatment is becoming a major challenge in the TB control efforts of the Ethiopian health system. This study assessed childhood tuberculosis management, and treatment outcomes among children who completed anti-TB treatment in Northwest Ethiopia. A cross-sectional study was conducted among children who completed their anti-TB treatment in Gondar University Referral Hospital and 6 satellite health centers. Data from each child with tuberculosis were obtained from review of medical records. P-values < 0.05 were considered statistically significant. The commonest method of childhood TB diagnosis was clinical assessment combined with chest x-ray (48.5%). Absence of compliance with TB treatment guideline (98.7%), providing inadequate anti-TB regimen (1.8%), and poor adherence to treatment (22.5%) were challenges in management of childhood tuberculosis. Treatment success rate was 78.9%. In the bivariate regression, factors associated with TB treatment outcomes were permanent residence (OR=8.3, 95%CI: 4.1, 16.7), antiretroviral therapy (OR=4.5, 95%CI: 1.2, 16), and adherence to treatment (p < 0.001). After controlling for confounders, adherence to anti-TB treatment (OR=0.003, 95% CI: 0.001, 0.02) was independent predictor of treatment success. Anti-tuberculosis treatment success rate was still low among children in Northwest Ethiopia. The health centers and hospital shall enhance strong follow-up of children on anti-tuberculosis treatment to improve treatment success with focus on rural children.

  2. [Problems in the diagnosis and surgical treatment in an osseous tuberculosis hospital].

    PubMed

    Sokolov, N I; Evlashkin, D V; Karzhavina, G I

    2006-01-01

    The diagnosed patients treated at an osseous tuberculosis hospital are analyzed. In the reporting period, the diagnosis of osseous tuberculosis has not been verified. Late detection of osseous tuberculosis, as its prehospital hyperdiagnosis is one of the main reasons of a grave condition in this group of patients. The paper characterizes plastic reparative versus palliative decompressive operations for tuberculous spondylitis with spinal-cord abnormalities and shows that radical surgery has a higher efficiency (89%) in the treatment of an inflammatory process and in the regression of neurological complications. In generalized forms of osteoarticular lesions if there is an indication for surgical treatment, long-term drug therapy for tuberculosis of the lung and other organs is not warranted.

  3. Cost analysis of paediatric tuberculosis treatment in Japan.

    PubMed

    Rahman, M; Takahashi, O; Takamatsu, I; Sekimoto, M; Hira, K; Fukui, T

    2003-03-01

    To estimate the cost of treating a tuberculosis (TB) case and to analyse TB-related medical service utilisation, a cost-of-illness study was conducted for all patients with a primary diagnosis of TB admitted to a public hospital in Japan. Retrospective analysis by abstracting in- and out-patient medical records of 57 paediatric patients diagnosed with TB during 1993-1998 at a public hospital in Osaka prefecture. Costs were estimated based on third party's payer perspectives according to the service utilisation pattern. In addition to cost data, sociodemographic information and service utilisation pattern were also extracted from the medical records. Cost of preventing a case of TB was abstracted from the published literature. The average cost of treatment was 8384 US dollars (95%CI 5667-11,099), while the average length of hospitalisation was 63 days (95%CI 43-84). Based on 20-80% vaccine efficacy, the cost of preventing a case of TB was 35,950-175,862 US dollars. In univariate analysis, site of TB (P = 0.04) was significantly associated with TB treatment cost, while case-finding method (contact tracing, symptoms, etc.) was associated with length of hospitalisation (P = 0.03). Multivariate regression analysis, however, showed none of the factors to be significant predictors of TB treatment cost and length of hospital stay. The cost of treating a case of paediatric TB is much lower than that of preventing one. Japan's universal BCG vaccination policy should be re-examined in the light of economic, social and political issues.

  4. Pharmaceutical aerosols for the treatment and prevention of Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Hanif, Shumaila N. M.; Garcia-Contreras, Lucila

    2012-01-01

    Historically, pharmaceutical aerosols have been employed for the treatment of obstructive airway diseases, such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, but in the past decades their use has been expanded to treat lung infections associated with cystic fibrosis and other respiratory diseases. Tuberculosis (TB) is acquired after inhalation of aerosol droplets containing the bacilli from the cough of infected individuals. Even though TB affects other organs, the lungs are the primary site of infection, which makes the pulmonary route an ideal alternative route to administer vaccines or drug treatments. Optimization of formulations and delivery systems for anti-TB vaccines and drugs, as well as the proper selection of the animal model to evaluate those is of paramount importance if novel vaccines or drug treatments are to be successful. Pharmaceutical aerosols for patient use are generated from metered dose inhalers, nebulizers, and dry powder inhalers (DPIs). In addition to the advantages of providing more efficient delivery of the drug, low cost, and portability, pharmaceutical dry powder aerosols are more stable than inhalable liquid dosage forms and do not require refrigeration. Methods to manufacture dry powders in respirable sizes include micronization, spray drying, and other proprietary technologies. Inhalable dry powders are characterized in terms of their drug content, particle size, and dispersibility to ensure deposition in the appropriate lung region and effective aerosolization from the device. These methods will be illustrated as they were applied for the manufacture and characterization of powders containing anti-tubercular agents and vaccines for pulmonary administration. The influence of formulation, selection of animal model, method of aerosol generation, and administration on the efficacy demonstrated in a given study will be illustrated by the evaluation of pharmaceutical aerosols of anti-TB drugs and vaccines in guinea pigs by our

  5. Long distance travelling and financial burdens discourage tuberculosis DOTs treatment initiation and compliance in Ethiopia: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Tadesse, Takele; Demissie, Meaza; Berhane, Yemane; Kebede, Yigzaw; Abebe, Markos

    2013-05-01

    Timely tuberculosis treatment initiation and compliance are the two key factors for a successful tuberculosis control program. However, studies to understand patents' perspective on tuberculosis treatment initiation and compliance have been limited in Ethiopia. The aim of this study is to attempt to do that in rural Ethiopia. This qualitative, phenomenological study conducted 26 in-depth interviews with tuberculosis patients. A thematic content analysis of the interviews was performed using the Open Code software version 3.1. We found that lack of geographic access to health facilities, financial burdens, use of traditional healing systems and delay in diagnosis by health care providers were the main reasons for not initiating tuberculosis treatment timely. Lack of geographic access to health facilities, financial burdens, quality of health services provided and social support were also identified as the main reasons for failing to fully comply with tuberculosis treatments. This study highlighted complexities surrounding tuberculosis control efforts in Dabat District. Challenges of geographic access to health care facilities and financial burdens were factors that most influenced timely tuberculosis treatment initiation and compliance. Decentralization of tuberculosis diagnosis and treatment services to peripheral health facilities, including health posts is of vital importance to make progress toward achieving tuberculosis control targets in Ethiopia.

  6. Understanding latent tuberculosis: the key to improved diagnostic and novel treatment strategies

    PubMed Central

    Esmail, Hanif; Barry, Clifton E; Wilkinson, Robert J

    2012-01-01

    Treatment of latent tuberculosis (LTBI) is a vital component of tuberculosis elimination but is not efficiently implemented with available diagnostics and therapeutics. The tuberculin skin test and interferon gamma release assays can inform that infection has occurred but do not prove that it persists. Treatment of LTBI with isoniazid targets actively replicating bacilli but not non-replicating populations, prolonging treatment duration. Developing more predictive diagnostic tests and treatments of shorter duration requires a greater understanding of the biology of latent tuberculosis, from both host and bacillary perspectives. In this article we discuss the basis of current diagnosis and treatment of LTBI and review recent developments in understanding the biology of latency that may enable future improved diagnostic and treatment strategies. PMID:22198298

  7. Serum Concentrations of Trace Elements in Patients with Tuberculosis and Its Association with Treatment Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Rihwa; Kim, Hyoung-Tae; Lim, Yaeji; Kim, Min-Ji; Kwon, O Jung; Jeon, Kyeongman; Park, Hye Yun; Jeong, Byeong-Ho; Koh, Won-Jung; Lee, Soo-Youn

    2015-01-01

    Deficiencies in essential trace elements are associated with impaired immunity in tuberculosis infection. However, the trace element concentrations in the serum of Korean patients with tuberculosis have not yet been investigated. This study aimed to compare the serum trace element concentrations of Korean adult patients with tuberculosis with noninfected controls and to assess the impact of serum trace element concentration on clinical outcome after antituberculosis treatment. The serum concentrations of four trace elements in 141 consecutively recruited patients with tuberculosis and 79 controls were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. Demographic characteristics were also analyzed. Serum cobalt and copper concentrations were significantly higher in patients with tuberculosis compared with controls, while zinc and selenium concentrations were significantly lower (p < 0.01). Moreover, serum selenium and zinc concentrations were positively correlated (ρ = 0.41, p < 0.05). A high serum copper concentration was associated with a worse clinical outcome, as assessed after one month of antituberculosis therapy. Specifically, culture-positive patients had higher serum copper concentrations than culture-negative patients (p < 0.05). Patients with tuberculosis had altered serum trace element concentrations. Further research is needed to elucidate the roles of individual trace elements and to determine their clinical impact on patients with tuberculosis. PMID:26197334

  8. Serum Concentrations of Trace Elements in Patients with Tuberculosis and Its Association with Treatment Outcome.

    PubMed

    Choi, Rihwa; Kim, Hyoung-Tae; Lim, Yaeji; Kim, Min-Ji; Kwon, O Jung; Jeon, Kyeongman; Park, Hye Yun; Jeong, Byeong-Ho; Koh, Won-Jung; Lee, Soo-Youn

    2015-07-21

    Deficiencies in essential trace elements are associated with impaired immunity in tuberculosis infection. However, the trace element concentrations in the serum of Korean patients with tuberculosis have not yet been investigated. This study aimed to compare the serum trace element concentrations of Korean adult patients with tuberculosis with noninfected controls and to assess the impact of serum trace element concentration on clinical outcome after antituberculosis treatment. The serum concentrations of four trace elements in 141 consecutively recruited patients with tuberculosis and 79 controls were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. Demographic characteristics were also analyzed. Serum cobalt and copper concentrations were significantly higher in patients with tuberculosis compared with controls, while zinc and selenium concentrations were significantly lower (p < 0.01). Moreover, serum selenium and zinc concentrations were positively correlated (ρ = 0.41, p < 0.05). A high serum copper concentration was associated with a worse clinical outcome, as assessed after one month of antituberculosis therapy. Specifically, culture-positive patients had higher serum copper concentrations than culture-negative patients (p < 0.05). Patients with tuberculosis had altered serum trace element concentrations. Further research is needed to elucidate the roles of individual trace elements and to determine their clinical impact on patients with tuberculosis.

  9. HIV-associated tuberculosis in developing countries: clinical features, diagnosis, and treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Raviglione, M. C.; Narain, J. P.; Kochi, A.

    1992-01-01

    This article reviews the clinical aspects and diagnosis of HIV-associated tuberculosis in developing countries, and summarizes WHO's recommendations for treatment. According to WHO estimates (early 1992) over 4 million persons worldwide have been infected with HIV and tuberculosis; 95% of them are in the developing countries. Clinical features of HIV-associated pulmonary tuberculosis in adults are frequently atypical, particularly in the late stage of HIV infection, with non-cavitary disease, lower lobe infiltrates, hilar lymphadenopathy and pleural effusion. More typical post-primary tuberculosis with upper lobe infiltrates and cavitations is seen in the earlier stages of HIV infection. Extrapulmonary tuberculosis is reported more frequently, despite the difficulties in diagnosing it. WHO's recent guidelines recommend 6-month short-course chemotherapy with isoniazid, rifampicin, pyrazinamide and ethambutol for patients with HIV-associated tuberculosis. The older 12-month regimen without rifampicin is much less effective. Streptomycin should not be used, because of the risk of transmitting blood-borne pathogens through contaminated needles. Thioacetazone should be abandoned, because of severe adverse reactions observed among HIV-infected patients. The roles of preventive chemotherapy and BCG vaccination for prevention of tuberculosis are also briefly discussed. PMID:1394786

  10. pH-Responsive Isoniazid-Loaded Nanoparticles Markedly Improve Tuberculosis Treatment in Mice.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Angela A; Lee, Bai-Yu; Clemens, Daniel L; Dillon, Barbara Jane; Zink, Jeffrey I; Horwitz, Marcus A

    2015-10-01

    Tuberculosis is a major global health problem for which improved therapeutics are needed to shorten the course of treatment and combat emergence of drug resistance. Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the etiologic agent of tuberculosis, is an intracellular pathogen of mononuclear phagocytes. As such, it is an ideal pathogen for nanotherapeutics because macrophages avidly ingest nanoparticles even without specific targeting molecules. Hence, a nanoparticle drug delivery system has the potential to target and deliver high concentrations of drug directly into M. tuberculosis-infected cells-greatly enhancing efficacy while avoiding off-target toxicities. Stimulus-responsive mesoporous silica nanoparticles of two different sizes, 100 and 50 nm, are developed as carriers for the major anti-tuberculosis drug isoniazid in a prodrug configuration. The drug is captured by the aldehyde-functionalized nanoparticle via hydrazone bond formation and coated with poly(ethylene imine)-poly(ethylene glycol) (PEI-PEG). The drug is released from the nanoparticles in response to acidic pH at levels that naturally occur within acidified endolysosomes. It is demonstrated that isoniazid-loaded PEI-PEG-coated nanoparticles are avidly ingested by M. tuberculosis-infected human macrophages and kill the intracellular bacteria in a dose-dependent manner. It is further demonstrated in a mouse model of pulmonary tuberculosis that the nanoparticles are well tolerated and much more efficacious than an equivalent amount of free drug.

  11. Delayed consultation among pulmonary tuberculosis patients: a cross sectional study of 10 DOTS districts of Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Mesfin, Mengiste M; Newell, James N; Walley, John D; Gessessew, Amanuel; Madeley, Richard J

    2009-01-01

    Background Delays seeking care increase transmission of pulmonary tuberculosis and hence the burden of tuberculosis, which remains high in developing countries. This study investigates patterns of health seeking behavior and determines risk factors for delayed patient consultation at public health facilities in 10 districts of Ethiopia. Methods New pulmonary TB patients ≥ 15 years old were recruited at 18 diagnostic centres. Patients were asked about their health care seeking behaviour and the time from onset of symptoms to first consultation at a public health facility. First consultation at a public health facility 30 days or longer after onset of symptoms was regarded as prolonged patient delay. Results Interviews were held with 924 pulmonary patients. Of these, 537 (58%) were smear positive and 387 (42%) were smear negative; 413 (45%) were female; 451 (49%) were rural residents; and the median age was 34 years. Prior to their first consultation at a public health facility, patients received treatment from a variety of informal sources: the Orthodox Church, where they were treated with holy water (24%); private practitioners (13%); rural drug vendors (7%); and traditional healers (3%). The overall median patient delay was 30 days (mean = 60 days). Fifty three percent [95% Confidence Intervals (CI) (50%, 56%)] of patients had delayed their first consultation for ≥ 30 days. Patient delay for women was 54%; 95% CI (54%, 58%) and men 51%; 95% CI (47%, 55%). The delay was higher for patients who used informal treatment (median 31 days) than those who did not (15 days). Prolonged patient delay (≥ 30 days) was significantly associated with both patient-related and treatment-related factors. Significant patient-related factors were smear positive pulmonary disease [Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR) 1.4; 95% CI (1.1 to 1.9)], rural residence [AOR 1.4; 95% CI (1.1 to 1.9)], illiteracy [AOR 1.7; 95% CI (1.2 to 2.4)], and lack of awareness/misperceptions of causes of

  12. Does Alcohol Consumption during Multidrug-resistant Tuberculosis Treatment Affect Outcome?

    PubMed Central

    Duraisamy, Karthickeyan; Mrithyunjayan, Sunilkumar; Ghosh, Smita; Nair, Sreenivas Achuthan; Balakrishnan, Shibu; Subramoniapillai, Jayasankar; Oeltmann, John E.; Moonan, Patrick K.; Kumar, Ajay M. V.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale India reports the largest number of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis cases in the world; yet, no longitudinal study has assessed factors related to treatment outcomes under programmatic conditions in the public sector. Objectives To describe demographic, clinical, and risk characteristics associated with treatment outcomes for all patients with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis registered in the Revised National Tuberculosis Control Programme, Kerala State, India from January 1, 2009 to June 30, 2010. Methods Cox regression methods were used to calculate adjusted hazard ratios with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) to assess factors associated with an unsuccessful treatment outcome. Measurements and Main Results Of 179 patients with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis registered, 112 (63%) had successful treatment outcomes (77 bacteriologically cured, 35 treatment completed) and 67 (37%) had unsuccessful treatment outcomes (30 died, 26 defaulted, 9 failed treatment, 1 stopped treatment because of drug-related adverse events, and 1 developed extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis). The hazard for unsuccessful outcome was significantly higher among patients who consumed alcohol during treatment (adjusted hazard ratio, 4.3; 95% CI, 1.1–17.6) than those who did not. Persons who consumed alcohol during treatment, on average, missed 18 more intensive-phase doses (95% CI, 13–22) than those who did not. Although many patients had diabetes (33%), were ever smokers (39%), or had low body mass index (47%), these factors were not associated with outcome. Conclusion Overall treatment success was greater than global and national averages; however, outcomes among patients consuming alcohol remained poor. Integration of care for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis and alcoholism should be considered to improve treatment adherence and outcomes. PMID:24735096

  13. Treatment Outcomes for Adolescents With Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis in Lima, Peru

    PubMed Central

    Tierney, Dylan B.; Milstein, Meredith B.; Manjourides, Justin; Furin, Jennifer J.; Mitnick, Carole D.

    2016-01-01

    Treatment outcomes for adolescents with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis are rarely reported and, to date, have been poor. Among 90 adolescents from Lima, Peru, 68 (75.6%) achieved cure or completion of treatment. Unsuccessful treatment was less common in the Peru cohort than previously described in the literature. PMID:27826599

  14. New drugs for the treatment of tuberculosis: needs, challenges, promise, and prospects for the future.

    PubMed

    Lienhardt, Christian; Raviglione, Mario; Spigelman, Mel; Hafner, Richard; Jaramillo, Ernesto; Hoelscher, Michael; Zumla, Alimuddin; Gheuens, Jan

    2012-05-15

    For the first time in 40 years, a portfolio of promising new compounds for the treatment of tuberculosis is on the horizon. The introduction of new drugs in combination treatment for all forms of tuberculosis raises several issues related to patients' access to novel treatments, programmatic feasibility, cost effectiveness, and implications for monitoring and surveillance, particularly with regard to the development of drug resistance. Particular attention should be given to the identification of optimal drug combination(s) for the treatment of all forms of tuberculosis, particularly in high-risk and vulnerable groups, such as human immunodeficiency virus-coinfected persons and children, and to the rational use of new drugs. Addressing these issues adequately requires the establishment of clear guidelines to assist countries in the development of policies for the proper use of tuberculosis drugs in a way that guarantees access to best treatments for all those in need and avoids inappropriate use of new drugs. After a description of these various challenges, we present activities that will be carried out by the World Health Organization in collaboration with key stakeholders for the development of policy guidelines for optimal treatment of tuberculosis.

  15. Tuberculin sensitivity testing and treatment of latent tuberculosis remains effective for tuberculosis control in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Lin, A W C; Chan, K C W; Chan, W K; Wong, K H

    2013-10-01

    To evaluate whether a policy to treat latent tuberculosis identified by annual tuberculin sensitivity testing is effective for tuberculosis control in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients in Hong Kong. Historical cohort study. Integrated Treatment Centre, Department of Health, Hong Kong. Patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus without a history of tuberculosis were offered annual tuberculin sensitivity testing, coupled with treatment of latent tuberculosis if they tested positive. All such patients were followed for new tuberculosis. In all, 1154 patients on antiretroviral therapy, contributing to 5587 patient-years of observation, were analysed; 1032 patients (89%) received annual tuberculin sensitivity testing. Their baseline characteristics, including CD4 counts and other risk factors for tuberculosis, did not differ significantly from those who declined testing. The overall incidence rate of tuberculosis was 0.59 case per 100 patient-years. It was lower in those who received annual tuberculin sensitivity testing than those who did not (0.41 vs 3.85 per 100 patient-years; P<0.0001). Only a low baseline CD4 count and a history of tuberculin sensitivity testing were shown to be significant indicators of incident tuberculosis using multivariate analysis. The hazard ratio was 0.36 (95% confidence interval, 0.16-0.85; P=0.02) for those with a baseline CD4 count of 100/mm3 or above, and 0.26 (95% confidence interval, 0.08-0.77; P=0.016) for those who received annual tuberculin sensitivity testing. The incidence of tuberculosis was highest within 90 days of antiretroviral therapy initiation. The established policy continues to be effective. The high risk of tuberculosis during the early period of antiretroviral therapy supports early use of tuberculin sensitivity testing. Alternatively, the strategy of universal isoniazid preventive therapy at antiretroviral therapy initiation could be studied for those with very low baseline CD4 counts.

  16. [Effects of war on control of tuberculosis in Côte d'Ivoire from 2002 to 2007].

    PubMed

    Daix, A T J; Bakayoko, A S; Coulibaly, G; Samaké, K; Koné, Z; Coulibaly, T N; Diakité, A; Pitta, M; Kouassi, F; Kouamé, A; Kouakou, A O; Kouakou, J; Domoua, K

    2013-10-01

    To specify consequences of armed conflict in Côte d'Ivoire from 2002 to 2007 on treatment outcomes of new cases of smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB+) and retreatment cases. Retrospective analysis of treatment outcomes and reprocessing notified to the National Program against Tuberculosis from 2001 to 2008. Totally, 7,4232 cases of TPM+ and 5094 cases of reprocessing had been declared during the war period in Côte d'Ivoire. The global average rate of therapeutic success was 72% with a lower average rate of success in retreatment in Center, Northern et Western (CNO) zone (54%) than in Southern zone (73%). The average rate of lost sight was higher in CNO zone than in the South with respectively 27% and 11%. The average rate of success in retreatment was 60% on the national level with a lower rate in CNO zone (48%) than in the South zone (62%) and the average rate of lost sight in retreatment was higher in CNO zone than in the South zone (28% versus 16%). Our results show that there was no early epidemic of tuberculosis during the armed conflict in Côte d'Ivoire which has although severely disrupted activities of tuberculosis management in ex-nongovernmental zone. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Targeted Drug-Resistance Testing Strategy for Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis Detection, Lima, Peru, 2005–2008

    PubMed Central

    Velásquez, Gustavo E.; Yagui, Martin; Cegielski, J. Peter; Asencios, Luis; Bayona, Jaime; Bonilla, Cesar; Jave, Hector O.; Yale, Gloria; Suárez, Carmen; Atwood, Sidney; Contreras, Carmen C.

    2011-01-01

    The Peruvian National Tuberculosis Control Program issued guidelines in 2006 specifying criteria for culture and drug-susceptibility testing (DST), including district-level rapid DST. All patients referred for culture and DST in 2 districts of Lima, Peru, during January 2005–November 2008 were monitored prospectively. Of 1,846 patients, 1,241 (67.2%) had complete DST results for isoniazid and rifampin; 419 (33.8%) patients had multidrug-resistant (MDR) TB at the time of referral. Among patients with new smear-positive TB, household contact and suspected category I failure were associated with MDR TB, compared with concurrent regional surveillance data. Among previously treated patients with smear-positive TB, adult household contact, suspected category II failure, early relapse after category I, and multiple previous TB treatments were associated with MDR TB, compared with concurrent regional surveillance data. The proportion of MDR TB detected by using guidelines was higher than that detected by a concurrent national drug-resistance survey, indicating that the strategy effectively identified patients for DST. PMID:21392434

  18. Fatty acid derivative, chemokine, and cytokine profiles in exhaled breath condensates can differentiate adult and children paucibacillary tuberculosis patients.

    PubMed

    Mosquera-Restrepo, Sergio Fabián; Caro, Ana Cecilia; García, Luis F; Peláez-Jaramillo, Carlos Alberto; Rojas, Mauricio

    2017-01-09

    The anti-mycobacterial immune response in adults and children with tuberculosis (TB), as well as the response in bacteriologically positive and negative patients, is different. However, knowledge of the immunological events occurring in the lungs in these clinical situations remains scarce. Exhaled breath condensate (EBC) samples may be useful for studying the inflammatory environment of the lower airways in TB patients. The fatty acid, cytokine, and chemokine profiles in EBC from healthy adults; smear-positive and smear-negative adult patients; and healthy, asthmatic, and TB children were determined using gas chromatography and LUMINEX, respectively. Unsaturated fatty acids, particularly oleate, were increased in TB adults and children compared with healthy individuals. Elevated levels of IL-17 were characteristic of paucibacillary patients (adults and children), whereas elevated MCP-1 (monocyte chemotactic protein-1) levels were characteristic of adult patients (smear-positive and smear-negative). The levels of all of the molecules were comparable to the controls after anti-TB treatment, suggesting that changes in the levels of the molecules detected in the EBC samples were the result of the active pulmonary TB. EBC samples may be an important tool for the detection of potential early biomarkers in the different clinical manifestations of pulmonary TB and a useful tool for the diagnosis of TB, particularly in children.

  19. [A CLINICAL EXPERIENCE OF RIFAMPICIN SUPPOSITORY FOR THE TREATMENT OF PULMONARY TUBERCULOSIS].

    PubMed

    Tsubota, Noriyuki; Tanimukai, Shigeatsu

    2015-06-01

    The usefulness of a rifampicin (RFP) suppository for treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis was examined in patients who had difficulty with oral consumption of medication. Among inpatients receiving first-time treatment for pulmonary tuberculosis susceptible to both isoniazid (INH) and RFP, and who underwent standard 3- or 4-drug treatments including INH and RFP, we compared the number of days required for obtaining two and three consecutive negative sputum smears and cultures, respectively, in patients who received hospital-made suppositories or standard oral RFP administration. There was no significant difference between groups in the number of days required for negative cultures and smears; although the times were equivalent, there were more number of elderly patients and those in generally poor condition in the RFP suppository group than the oral intake group. RFP suppositories may be one method for administration of standard tuberculosis treatment in patients with difficulty in oral consumption of medication.

  20. Standardised second-line treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Tabarsi, P; Moradi, A; Baghaei, P; Marjani, M; Shamaei, M; Mansouri, N; Chitsaz, E; Farnia, P; Mansouri, D; Masjedi, M; Velayati, A

    2011-04-01

    We describe the efficacy and outcome of standardised second-line anti-tuberculosis (TB) medications during pregnancy. Treatment outcomes of five pregnant women with documented multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB) referred to the National Research Institute of Tuberculosis and Lung Diseases from 2003 to 2009 were analysed in two categories, maternal and neonatal. Patients became pregnant during treatment for MDR-TB without any changes in their anti-tuberculosis regimen. None of them had any adverse effects during pregnancy and delivery. No adverse effects were observed in mothers or neonates. The treatment of MDR-TB during pregnancy with a standardised second-line regimen in this study population was safe, with an acceptable rate of treatment success.

  1. WHO Treatment Guidelines for Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis, 2016 Update: Applicability in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Doosoo

    2017-10-01

    Despite progress made in tuberculosis control worldwide, the disease burden and treatment outcome of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) patients have remained virtually unchanged. In 2016, the World Health Organization released new guidelines for the management of MDR-TB. The guidelines are intended to improve detection rate and treatment outcome for MDR-TB through novel, rapid molecular testing and shorter treatment regimens. Key changes include the introduction of a new, shorter MDR-TB treatment regimen, a new classification of medicines and updated recommendations for the conventional MDR-TB regimen. This paper will review these key changes and discuss the potential issues with regard to the implementation of these guidelines in South Korea. Copyright©2017. The Korean Academy of Tuberculosis and Respiratory Diseases.

  2. Health system delay in treatment of multidrug resistant tuberculosis patients in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Rifat, Mahfuza; Hall, John; Oldmeadow, Christopher; Husain, Ashaque; Milton, Abul Hasnat

    2015-11-16

    Bangladesh is one of the 27 high burden countries for multidrug resistant tuberculosis listed by the World Health Organization. Delay in multidrug resistant tuberculosis treatment may allow progression of the disease and affect the attempts to curb transmission of drug resistant tuberculosis. The main objective of this study was to investigate the health system delay in multidrug resistant tuberculosis treatment in Bangladesh and to explore the factors related to the delay. Information related to the delay was collected as part of a previously conducted case-control study. The current study restricts analysis to patients with multidrug resistant tuberculosis who were diagnosed using rapid diagnostic methods (Xpert MTB/RIF or the line probe assay). Information was collected by face-to-face interviews and through record reviews from all three Government hospitals providing multidrug resistant tuberculosis services, from September 2012 to April 2013. Multivariable regression analysis was performed using Bootstrap variance estimators. Definitions were as follows: Provider delay: time between visiting a provider for first consultation on MDR-TB related symptom to visiting a designated diagnostic centre for testing; Diagnostic delay: time from date of diagnostic sample provided to date of result; Treatment initiation delay: time between the date of diagnosis and date of treatment initiation; Health system delay: time between visiting a provider to start of treatment. Health system delay was derived by adding provider delay, diagnostic delay and treatment initiation delay. The 207 multidrug resistant tuberculosis patients experienced a health system delay of median 7.1 weeks. The health system delay consists of provider delay (median 4 weeks), diagnostic delay (median 5 days) and treatment initiation delay (median 10 days). Health system delay (Coefficient: 37.7; 95 %; CI 15.0-60.4; p 0.003) was associated with the visit to private practitioners for first consultation

  3. The dynamic of tuberculosis case finding in the era of the public-private mix strategy for tuberculosis control in Central Java, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Reviono, Reviono; Setianingsih, Wahyu; Damayanti, Kusmadewi Eka; Ekasari, Ratna

    2017-01-01

    The public-private mix (PPM) strategy has strengthened tuberculosis care and control in many countries. Indonesia, a country with a high tuberculosis burden, has a low tuberculosis case detection rate (CDR), despite PPM implementation in 2003. The PPM in Indonesia involves primary healthcare centers, hospitals, and specialized chest clinics. The long-term impact of the strategy is unknown.  We aimed to explore the case detection achievements of the tuberculosis program since PPM implementation in Central Java in 2003. This retrospective cohort study covered the period 1 January 2000 to 31 December 2014. The data from tuberculosis patients treated in all health facilities in Central Java implementing directly observed treatment short-course, recorded via a standardized form, were analyzed after being validated by the Office of Health of Central Java Province. We evaluated the CDR, case notification rate, and total number of cases, using linear regression to analyze the temporal trends of those indicators in the phases of PPM implementation. The CDR increased during the initial phase (2000-2005), decreased during the mid-phase (2006-2009), and increased slightly during the late phase (2010-2014), ranging from 13 to 61.72. These trends were observed despite a steady increase in the number of participating healthcare facilities. The regression analysis showed that the CDR of referral institutions contributed the most to the total CDR of Central Java Province. Many of the smear-negative tuberculosis cases recorded at primary healthcare centers may have been smear positive; this probable misclassification could have been partially avoided if more specific and sensitive diagnostic tools were available. The CDR remains below the national target (70%). Early awareness of a negative trend in certain program indicators is important to ensure program sustainability. Careful observation of the indicator pattern will secure the long-term success of the program.

  4. Factors associated with smoking among tuberculosis patients in Spain.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Fuentes, María Ángeles; Rodrigo, Teresa; Altet, María Neus; Jiménez-Ruiz, Carlos A; Casals, Martí; Penas, Antón; Mir, Isabel; Solano Reina, Segismundo; Riesco-Miranda, Juan Antonio; Caylá, Joan A

    2016-09-14

    To determine the prevalence of smoking and analyze associated factors in a cohort of patients diagnosed with tuberculosis (TB) in Spain between 2006 and 2013. Multicenter, cross-sectional, descriptive, observational study using a national database of TB patients, using logistic regression to calculate odds ratios (OR) and confidence intervals (CI). We analyzed 5,846 cases (62 % men, mean age 39 years, 33 % foreigners). 23.4 % were alcohol abuser, 1.3 % were injected drug users (IDU), 4.6 % were co-infected with HIV, and 7.5 % had a history of TB treatment. 6.6 % and 0.8 % showed resistance to one and multiple drugs, respectively. The predominant clinical presentation was pulmonary (71 %) with a cavitary radiological pattern in 32.8 % of cases. 82 % of cases were confirmed microbiologically, and 54 % were smear-positive microscopy. 2,300 (39.3 %) patients were smokers. The following factors were associated with smoking: male sex (OR = 2.26;CI:1.97;2.60), Spanish origin (OR = 2.79;CI:2.40-3.24), alcoholism (OR = 2.85;CI:2.46;3.31), IDU (OR = 2.78;CI:1.48;5.52), homelessness (OR = 1.99;CI:1.14-3.57), pulmonary TB (OR = 1.61;CI:1.16;2.24), cavitary radiological pattern (OR = 1.99;CI:1.43;2.79) and a smear-positive microscopy at the time of diagnosis (OR = 1.39;CI:1.14;1.17). The prevalence of smoking among TB patients is high. Smokers with TB have a distinct sociodemographic, clinical, radiological and microbiological profile to non-smokers.

  5. Functional and phenotypic changes in monocytes from patients with tuberculosis are reversed with treatment.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, María D; García, Yoenis; Montes, Carlos; París, Sara C; Rojas, Mauricio; Barrera, Luis F; Arias, Mauricio A; García, Luis F

    2006-08-01

    Alterations of monocyte/macrophages have been reported in patients with tuberculosis (TB), but their significance is poorly understood. Blood mononuclear cells from patients with different clinical forms of TB, at various times of anti-TB treatment, and healthy tuberculin positive individuals, were double-stained for CD14 plus CD206, TLR-2, IFN-gammaR1, CD40, HLA-DR, CD36 and CD163, and analyzed by flow cytometry. Monocytes were infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv and 24h later the phenotype, induction of necrosis and apoptosis and production of tumor necrosis factor TNFalpha, interleukin (IL)-10 and IL-12p40 were determined. TB patients presented higher percentage of CD14+ cells but lower percentage of CD14+DR+ and CD14+CD36+ cells. Expression of CD14, HLA-DR and CD36 was decreased in TB patients. Normal percentages and expression were restored during anti-TB treatment. Monocytes from TB patients underwent necrosis and apoptosis after M. tuberculosis infection, whereas monocytes from healthy controls exhibited only apoptosis. Anti-TB treatment reverted necrosis. There were no differences between the various clinical forms of TB. In vitro M. tuberculosis infection decreased expression of the membrane molecules studied. HLA-DR and CD36 inhibition correlated with induction of apoptosis. Restoration of monocyte alterations during anti-TB treatment suggests that such alterations may be caused by the high M. tuberculosis load present during active disease.

  6. Effective Treatment of Acute and Chronic Murine Tuberculosis with Liposome-Encapsulated Clofazimine

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Linda B.; Sinha, Indu; Franzblau, Scott G.; Krahenbuhl, James L.; Mehta, Reeta T.

    1999-01-01

    The therapeutic efficacy of liposomal clofazimine (L-CLF) was studied in mice infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis Erdman. Groups of mice were treated with either free clofazimine (F-CLF), L-CLF, or empty liposomes twice a week for five treatments beginning on day 1 (acute), day 21 (established), or day 90 (chronic) postinfection. One day after the last treatment, the numbers of CFU of M. tuberculosis in the spleen, liver, and lungs were determined. F-CLF at the maximum tolerated dose of 5 mg/kg of body weight was ineffective; however, 10-fold-higher doses of L-CLF demonstrated a dose response with significant CFU reduction in all tissues without any toxic effects. In acutely infected mice, 50 mg of L-CLF/kg reduced CFU 2 to 3 log units in all three organs. In established or chronic infection, treated mice showed no detectable CFU in the spleen or liver and 1- to 2-log-unit reduction in the lungs. A second series of L-CLF treatments cleared M. tuberculosis in all three tissues. L-CLF appears to be bactericidal in the liver and spleen, which remained negative for M. tuberculosis growth for 2 months. Thus, L-CLF could be useful in the treatment of tuberculosis. PMID:10390215

  7. From mosques to classrooms: mobilizing the community to enhance case detection of tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Rifat, Mahfuza; Rusen, I D; Mahmud, Mohammad Hasan; Nayer, Israt; Islam, Akramul; Ahmed, Faruque

    2008-09-01

    In response to the global challenge of inadequate case detection of tuberculosis (TB), the Fund for Innovative DOTS Expansion through Local Initiatives to Stop Tuberculosis (FIDELIS) was developed in 2003 to rapidly assess and implement innovative approaches to increase the detection of new smear-positive TB cases. As previously reported, a wide range of target populations and interventions has been incorporated into successful FIDELIS projects.

  8. From Mosques to Classrooms: Mobilizing the Community to Enhance Case Detection of Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Rifat, Mahfuza; Rusen, I. D.; Mahmud, Mohammad Hasan; Nayer, Israt; Islam, Akramul; Ahmed, Faruque

    2008-01-01

    In response to the global challenge of inadequate case detection of tuberculosis (TB), the Fund for Innovative DOTS Expansion through Local Initiatives to Stop Tuberculosis (FIDELIS) was developed in 2003 to rapidly assess and implement innovative approaches to increase the detection of new smear-positive TB cases. As previously reported, a wide range of target populations and interventions has been incorporated into successful FIDELIS projects. PMID:18633095

  9. Tobacco smoking and tuberculosis treatment outcomes: a prospective cohort study in Georgia.

    PubMed

    Gegia, Medea; Magee, Matthew J; Kempker, Russell R; Kalandadze, Iagor; Chakhaia, Tsira; Golub, Jonathan E; Blumberg, Henry M

    2015-06-01

    To assess the effect of tobacco smoking on the outcome of tuberculosis treatment in Tbilisi, Georgia. We conducted a prospective cohort study of adults with laboratory-confirmed tuberculosis from May 2011 to November 2013. History of tobacco smoking was collected using a standardized questionnaire adapted from the global adult tobacco survey. We considered tuberculosis therapy to have a poor outcome if participants defaulted, failed treatment or died. We used multivariable regressions to estimate the risk of a poor treatment outcome. Of the 591 tuberculosis patients enrolled, 188 (31.8%) were past smokers and 271 (45.9%) were current smokers. Ninety (33.2%) of the current smokers and 24 (18.2%) of the participants who had never smoked had previously been treated for tuberculosis (P < 0.01). Treatment outcome data were available for 524 of the participants, of whom 128 (24.4%) - including 80 (32.9%) of the 243 current smokers and 21 (17.2%) of the 122 individuals who had never smoked - had a poor treatment outcome. Compared with those who had never smoked, current smokers had an increased risk of poor treatment outcome (adjusted relative risk, aRR: 1.70; 95% confidence interval, CI: 1.00-2.90). Those who had ceased smoking more than two months before enrolment did not have such an increased risk (aRR: 1.01; 95% CI: 0.51-1.99). There is a high prevalence of smoking among patients with tuberculosis in Georgia and smoking increases the risk of a poor treatment outcome.

  10. Tobacco smoking and tuberculosis treatment outcomes: a prospective cohort study in Georgia

    PubMed Central

    Gegia, Medea; Kempker, Russell R; Kalandadze, Iagor; Chakhaia, Tsira; Golub, Jonathan E; Blumberg, Henry M

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To assess the effect of tobacco smoking on the outcome of tuberculosis treatment in Tbilisi, Georgia. Methods We conducted a prospective cohort study of adults with laboratory-confirmed tuberculosis from May 2011 to November 2013. History of tobacco smoking was collected using a standardized questionnaire adapted from the global adult tobacco survey. We considered tuberculosis therapy to have a poor outcome if participants defaulted, failed treatment or died. We used multivariable regressions to estimate the risk of a poor treatment outcome. Findings Of the 591 tuberculosis patients enrolled, 188 (31.8%) were past smokers and 271 (45.9%) were current smokers. Ninety (33.2%) of the current smokers and 24 (18.2%) of the participants who had never smoked had previously been treated for tuberculosis (P < 0.01). Treatment outcome data were available for 524 of the participants, of whom 128 (24.4%) – including 80 (32.9%) of the 243 current smokers and 21 (17.2%) of the 122 individuals who had never smoked – had a poor treatment outcome. Compared with those who had never smoked, current smokers had an increased risk of poor treatment outcome (adjusted relative risk, aRR: 1.70; 95% confidence interval, CI: 1.00–2.90). Those who had ceased smoking more than two months before enrolment did not have such an increased risk (aRR: 1.01; 95% CI: 0.51–1.99). Conclusion There is a high prevalence of smoking among patients with tuberculosis in Georgia and smoking increases the risk of a poor treatment outcome. PMID:26240460

  11. Reduced importation of tuberculosis after the implementation of an enhanced pre-immigration screening protocol.

    PubMed

    Lowenthal, P; Westenhouse, J; Moore, M; Posey, D L; Watt, J P; Flood, J

    2011-06-01

    Importation of infectious tuberculosis (TB) threatens TB control in California and the United States. To assess the effectiveness of an enhanced pre-immigration screening and treatment protocol to prevent the importation of infectious TB. Retrospective analysis of immigrants ≥ 15 years of age with TB suspect classifications who were screened for TB in their countries of origin before (pre-intervention cohort) and after (post-intervention cohort) implementation of enhanced pre-immigration screening. Enhanced pre-immigration screening added sputum cultures to the existing screening system based on sputum smears for persons with abnormal chest radiographs. The pre- and post-intervention cohorts included respectively 2049 and 1430 immigrants. The occurrence of tuberculosis ≤ 6 months after US arrival in this population decreased following the intervention, from 4.2% (86 cases) to 1.5% (22 cases, P < 0.001). Among pre-intervention cohort cases, 14% were sputum acid-fast bacilli (AFB) smear-positive and 81% were sputum culture-positive for TB, compared with 5% sputum AFB smear-positive (P = 0.46) and 68% sputum culture-positive (P = 0.18) among the post-intervention cohort cases. The enhanced pre-immigration screening was associated with a decline in the proportion of immigrants with TB suspect classifications identified with TB within 6 months of arrival in the United States. Continued state and national surveillance is critical to monitor the effectiveness of the revised pre-immigration screening as it is implemented in additional countries.

  12. [Research and control of relapse tuberculosis cases].

    PubMed

    Yamagishi, Fumio; Toyota, Makoto

    2009-12-01

    lesions in chest X-p, sputum smear positive and heavy alcohol-drinkers. The factors leading to defaulting of the treatment were lack in understanding of the treatment and their economic problems. Reexamination of the treatment and support of the patients are important to prevent the retreatment of the pulmonary tuberculosis. 6. Proportion of drug resistance among relapse tuberculosis cases, summary of Ryoken studies 1977-2002: Takashi YOSHIYAMA (Fukujuji Hospital). We have no historical analysis of the proportion of drug resistance among relapse TB cases. Therefore we would like to analyze the proportion of drug resistance among relapse cases in Japan. Re-analysis of the data of drug susceptibility survey of Ryoken from 1977 to 2002. The proportion of relapse cases among Ryoken has decreased in 1982-1987 and that proportion was 10% in 2002. The average age of relapse cases was 5 years older than the new cases and it was 66 years in 2002. The proportion of drug resistance among relapse cases has decreased form 39% (in 1977) to 16% (in 2002) for isoniazid, was stable and around 10% for rifampicin with 7.5% in 2002. The risk factors for drug resistance were younger age, foreigners and part time job. The proportion of drug resistance was higher among cases that were failure with previous treatment, then default with previous treatment and lower among cases with cure/completion at the previous treatment but this tendency was without significance.

  13. Extensively Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis: Report and Literature Review on Two Cases Requiring Prolonged Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Matos-Tocasca, Martha; De la Cruz-Ku, Gabriel; Auccacusi, Erick; Fernandez-Salas, Diego; García-Ahuanari, Tatiana; Valcarcel-Valdivia, Bryan

    2016-01-01

    Case series Patient: Female, 28 • Male, 20 Final Diagnosis: Extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis Symptoms: Cough productive • dyspnea • hemoptysis • respiratory failure • weight loss Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Pulmonology Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB) is a global problem due to the high morbidity and mortality it causes. Peru is one of the countries with the highest numbers of cases of XDR-TB, which increase every year. Case Report: We present the case of two siblings who developed XDR-TB, underwent surgery twice, and were in individualized treatment for more than 6 years. Finally they achieved remission of symptoms, despite not having standardized treatment schemes during their diagnosis period. Conclusions: Extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis can be cured with a treatment that involves both medical care and patient actions to achieve remission of the disease. PMID:27807339

  14. Delayed treatment of tuberculosis patients in rural areas of Yogyakarta province, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Mahendradhata, Yodi; Syahrizal, Bobby M; Utarini, Adi

    2008-11-26

    In year 2000, the entire population in Indonesia was 201 million and 57.6 percent of that was living in rural areas. This paper reports analyses that address to what extent the rural structure influence the way TB patients seek care prior to diagnosis by a DOTS facility. We documented healthcare utilization pattern of smear positive TB patients prior to diagnosis and treatment by DOTS services (health centre, chest clinic, public and private hospital) in Yogyakarta province. We calculated the delay in treatment as the number of weeks between the onset of symptoms and the start of DOTS treatment. Statistical analysis was carried out with Epi Info version 3.3 (October 5, 2004). The only factor which was significantly associated with total delay was urban-rural setting (p = < 0.0001). The median total delay for TB patients in urban districts was 8 (1st Quartile = 4; 3rd Quartile = 12) weeks compared to 12 (1st Quartile = 7; 3rd Quartile = 23) weeks for patients in rural districts. Multivariate analysis suggested no confounding between individual factors and urban-rural setting remained as the main factor for total delay (p = < 0.0001). Primary health centre was the first choice provider for most (38.7%) of these TB patients. Urban-rural setting was also the only factor which was significantly associated with choice of first provider (p = 0.03). Improving access to DOTS services in rural areas is an area of vital importance in aiming to make progress toward achieving TB control targets in Indonesia.

  15. Delayed treatment of tuberculosis patients in rural areas of Yogyakarta province, Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Mahendradhata, Yodi; Syahrizal, Bobby M; Utarini, Adi

    2008-01-01

    Background In year 2000, the entire population in Indonesia was 201 million and 57.6 percent of that was living in rural areas. This paper reports analyses that address to what extent the rural structure influence the way TB patients seek care prior to diagnosis by a DOTS facility. Methods We documented healthcare utilization pattern of smear positive TB patients prior to diagnosis and treatment by DOTS services (health centre, chest clinic, public and private hospital) in Yogyakarta province. We calculated the delay in treatment as the number of weeks between the onset of symptoms and the start of DOTS treatment. Statistical analysis was carried out with Epi Info version 3.3 (October 5, 2004). Results The only factor which was significantly associated with total delay was urban-rural setting (p = < 0.0001). The median total delay for TB patients in urban districts was 8 (1st Quartile = 4; 3rd Quartile = 12) weeks compared to 12 (1st Quartile = 7; 3rd Quartile = 23) weeks for patients in rural districts. Multivariate analysis suggested no confounding between individual factors and urban-rural setting remained as the main factor for total delay (p = < 0.0001). Primary health centre was the first choice provider for most (38.7%) of these TB patients. Urban-rural setting was also the only factor which was significantly associated with choice of first provider (p = 0.03). Conclusion Improving access to DOTS services in rural areas is an area of vital importance in aiming to make progress toward achieving TB control targets in Indonesia. PMID:19036164

  16. Rapid molecular detection of tuberculosis and rifampicin drug resistance: retrospective analysis of a national U.K. molecular service over the last decade.

    PubMed

    Seoudi, N; Mitchell, S L; Brown, T J; Dashti, F; Amin, A K; Drobniewski, F A

    2012-04-01

    Fast and reliable detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) and drug resistance is crucial in establishing effective treatment and enforcing timely public health measures. The authors analysed the performance of a national U.K. molecular diagnostic service over a decade, based on the use of a line probe assay (Innolipa, LiPA) compared with conventional liquid and solid cultures with rapid molecular identification and culture-based drug resistance testing. Data were available for 7836 consecutive patient samples using LiPA and the reference microbiological technique (conventional liquid and solid cultures with rapid molecular identification and culture-based drug resistance testing). For all sputum specimens (n=3382) the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and accuracy for MTBC detection were 93.4%, 85.6%, 92.7%, 86.9% and 90.7%; the equivalent values for smear-positive sputum specimens (n=2606) were 94.7%, 80.9%, 93.9%, 83.3% and 91.3%. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and accuracy for detection of rifampicin resistance in all sputum samples (n=1667) were 92.1%, 99.3%, 89.4%, 99.5% and 98.9%, respectively; the equivalent values for smear-positive sputum specimens (n=1477) were 93.3%, 99.3%, 87.5%, 99.6% and 99%. Between January 2006 and December 2008, LiPA saved 25.3 and 32.2 days for TB diagnosis and rifampicin resistance of smear-positive samples, respectively. A molecular diagnostic service, using a non-automated line probe assay approach, provides a rapid and reliable national service for diagnosing MTBC and rifampicin resistance.

  17. [THE RESULTS OF IMPLEMENTATION OF THE INTERNATIONAL BANK FOR RECONSTRUCTION AND DEVELOPMENT LOAN PROJECT "PREVENTION, DIAGNOSIS, AND TREATMENT OF TUBERCULOSIS AND AIDS", A "TUBERCULOSIS" COMPONENT].

    PubMed

    2010-01-01

    Due to the implementation of the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (IBRD) loan project "Prevention, diagnosis, treatment of tuberculosis and AIDS", a "Tuberculosis" component that is an addition to the national tuberculosis control program in 15 subjects of the Russian Federation, followed up by the Central Research Institute of Tuberculosis, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, the 2005-2008 measures stipulated by the Project have caused substantial changes in the organization of tuberculosis control: implementation of Orders Nos. 109, 50, and 690 and supervision of their implementation; modernization of the laboratories of the general medical network and antituberbulosis service (404 kits have been delivered for clinical diagnostic laboratories and 12 for bacteriological laboratories, including BACTEC 960 that has been provided in 6 areas); 91 training seminars have been held at the federal and regional levels; 1492 medical workers have been trained in the detection, diagnosis, and treatment of patients with tuberculosis; 8 manuals and guidelines have been prepared and sent to all areas. In the period 2005-2008, the tuberculosis morbidity and mortality rates in the followed-up areas reduced by 1.2 and 18.6%, respectively. The analysis of patient cohorts in 2007 and 2005 revealed that the therapeutic efficiency evaluated from sputum smear microscopy increased by 16.3%; there were reductions in the proportion of patients having ineffective chemotherapy (from 16.1 to 11.1%), patients who died from tuberculosis (from 11.6 to 9.9%), and those who interrupted therapy ahead of time (from 11.8 to 7.8%). Implementation of the IBR project has contributed to the improvement of the national strategy and the enhancement of the efficiency of tuberculosis control.

  18. Evaluation of a simplified IS6110 PCR for the rapid diagnosis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in an area with high tuberculosis incidence.

    PubMed

    Ben Kahla, I; Ben Selma, W; Marzouk, M; Ferjeni, A; Ghezal, S; Boukadida, J

    2011-06-01

    To assess the diagnostic yield of a simplified IS6110-PCR in an area with high tuberculosis incidence. Pulmonary (218) and extrapulmonary (121) samples were collected from 236 patients including smearpositive leprosy patients. All samples were processed to detect acidfast bacilli by microscopy, culture on solid media and PCR. To remove PCR inhibitors, three washing steps of the decontaminated pellet were included before mycobacterial cell lysis by heat treatment. No detergents, enzymes, or chelating agents were used. From the 339 samples, 34 were selected basing on their large volume and were tested by the commercial kit GenoType Mycobacteria Direct (GTMD) (VER 4, Hain Lifescience, Germany) in addition to the tests cited above. The overall sensitivity and specificity of PCR were 93.8 and 98.6% for pulmonary samples, 63.6 and 100% for extrapulmonary samples, respectively. The assay detected MTC in 94.2% of smear positive samples with a positive predictive value of 100%. No inhibition was found among seven samples that were PCR negative but bacteriological confirmed as containing Mycobacterium tuberculosis. No false positive result occurred with samples from leprosy patients. The sensitivities for PCR and GTMD were 81.8 and 75%, respectively. PCR could efficiently complement conventional bacteriological tools for the rapid diagnosis of tuberculosis but cannot replace them. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. [Actuality of problem of coexistent diabetes mellitus and pulmonary tuberculosis in patients, when surgical treatment is necessary].

    PubMed

    Opanasenko, M S; Levanda, L I; Kononenko, V A; KYimenko, V I; Tereshkovych, O V; Kalenychenko, M I; Konik, V M; Obrems'ka, O K; Demus, R S; Kshanovs'kyĭ, O E

    2013-10-01

    Actual issue, concerning coexistent pulmonary tuberculosis and diabetes mellitus, was studied. The data about the rate of various types of diabetes mellitus in phthysiosurgery were adduced. The results of surgical treatment of 116 patients, suffering pulmonary tuberculosis on the diabetes mellitus background, were summarized. Total efficacy of the treatment have constituted 96.0%. The surgical complications rate was 12.2%.

  20. Comparison of Results from Inpatient and Outpatient Treatment of Tuberculosis in Republic of Macedonia

    PubMed Central

    Simonovska, Ljiljana; Ilievska-Popovska, Biljana

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The successful treatment of patients with active tuberculosis is one of the priorities in the Tuberculosis Control Programs. AIM: The aim was to establish whether there was a statistically significant difference in the treatment outcome in patients with tuberculosis who began their initial treatment phase and/or pursued it as inpatient, as opposed to patients with tuberculosis who underwent their entire treatment regime as outpatient. Moreover, our goal was to determine whether there is a statistically significant difference in the outcome from the treatment between patients with tuberculosis who were hospitalized up to one month, two months, or more than two months. MATERIALS AND METHOD: The study includes 355 patients, divided into two groups. The first group, which consists of 219 patients, began their initial treatment phase as inpatient, and then they continued the treatment as outpatient. The second group, 136 patients, underwent their entire treatment as outpatient. The treatment outcome is determined with every patient (cured, treatment completed, treatment default, treatment failed, died, treatment in progress). For the statistical data analysis and for establishing the significance of the findings regarding the differences between the two groups we used the Pearson Chi-Square Test and the Yates Corrected Test. RESULTS: The statistical analysis with the Pearson Chi-Square Test showed that the treatment outcome does not significantly depend on the model of treatment (p = 0.31). The statistical data analysis showed that there is no statistically significant difference in the achievement of conversion of the bacterial result of the sputum at the end of the initial phase of treatment regarding the studied groups (p = 0.89). The statistical data analysis showed that the length of inpatient treatment affects the outcome of the treatment and that the difference is statistically highly significant (p < 0.00005). CONCLUSION: There are no statistically

  1. Patient education and counselling for promoting adherence to treatment for tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    M'imunya, James Machoki; Kredo, Tamara; Volmink, Jimmy

    2012-05-16

    Non-adherence to tuberculosis treatment can lead to prolonged periods of infectiousness, relapse, emergence of drug-resistance, and increased morbidity and mortality. In this review, we assess whether patient education or counselling, or both, promotes adherence to tuberculosis treatment. To evaluate the effects of patient education or counselling, or both, on treatment completion and cure in people requiring treatment for active or latent tuberculosis. Without language restriction, we searched for eligible studies in the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group Specialized Register, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and LILACS; checked reference lists of relevant articles; and contacted relevant researchers and organizations up to 24 November 2011. Randomized controlled trials examining the effects of education or counselling, or both, on treatment completion and cure in people with clinical tuberculosis; and treatment completion and clinical tuberculosis in people with latent disease. We independently screened identified studies for eligibility, assessed methodological quality, and extracted data; with differences resolved by consensus. We expressed study results as risk ratios (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). We found three trials, with a total of 1437 participants, which examined the effects of different educational and counselling interventions on adherence to treatment for latent tuberculosis.All three trials reported the proportion of people who successfully completed treatment for latent tuberculosis. Overall, education or counselling interventions may increase successful treatment completion but the magnitude of benefit is likely to vary depending on the nature of the intervention, and the setting (data not pooled, 923 participants, three trials, low quality evidence).In a four-arm trial in children from Spain, counselling by nurses via telephone increased the proportion of children completing treatment from 65% to 94% (RR

  2. The Association between Symptoms and Microbiologically Defined Response to Tuberculosis Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Hales, Craig M.; Heilig, Charles M.; Chaisson, Richard; Leung, Chi Chiu; Chang, Kwok Chiu; Goldberg, Stefan V.; Gordin, Fred; Johnson, John L.; Muzanyi, Grace; Saukkonen, Jussi; Vernon, Andrew; Villarino, M. Elsa; Burman, William J.

    2017-01-01

    Rationale The lack of consistent associations between clinical outcomes and microbiological responses to therapy for some infectious diseases has raised questions about the adequacy of microbiological endpoints for tuberculosis treatment trials. Objectives To evaluate the association between symptoms and microbiological response to tuberculosis treatment. Methods We performed a retrospective analysis of four clinical trials in which participants had culture-positive tuberculosis, standardized symptom assessment, and follow-up mycobacterial cultures. Two trials (studies 22 and 23) followed participants to identify recurrent tuberculosis; participants in studies 27 and 28 were only followed to treatment completion. Measurements and Main Results This analysis included 1,978 participants; 39 (2.0%) had culture-confirmed treatment failure, and 75 (3.9%) had culture-confirmed recurrence. Productive cough was associated with indices of increased mycobacterial burden at diagnosis (acid-fast smear grade, severity of radiographic abnormalities). Fever and sweats improved rapidly with treatment, whereas productive cough decreased more slowly and was present in 20% of visits after treatment completion. During treatment, study participants with productive cough more often had concurrent culture positivity compared with those without productive cough (studies 22 and 23: adjusted odds ratio, 1.80; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.33–2.44). Finally, symptoms during the latter part of treatment and follow-up were associated with culture-confirmed treatment failure and recurrence in studies 22 and 23 (for cough: adjusted hazard ratio, 2.07; 95% CI, 1.23–3.49; for fever: adjusted hazard ratio, 5.05; 95% CI, 2.76–9.19). Conclusions There are consistent relationships between symptoms and microbiological indices of tuberculosis, including measures of mycobacterial burden at baseline, culture positivity during treatment, and time to culture-confirmed treatment failure and recurrence

  3. The association between symptoms and microbiologically defined response to tuberculosis treatment.

    PubMed

    Hales, Craig M; Heilig, Charles M; Chaisson, Richard; Leung, Chi Chiu; Chang, Kwok Chiu; Goldberg, Stefan V; Gordin, Fred; Johnson, John L; Muzanyi, Grace; Saukkonen, Jussi; Vernon, Andrew; Villarino, M Elsa; Burman, William J

    2013-02-01

    The lack of consistent associations between clinical outcomes and microbiological responses to therapy for some infectious diseases has raised questions about the adequacy of microbiological endpoints for tuberculosis treatment trials. To evaluate the association between symptoms and microbiological response to tuberculosis treatment. We performed a retrospective analysis of four clinical trials in which participants had culture-positive tuberculosis, standardized symptom assessment, and follow-up mycobacterial cultures. Two trials (studies 22 and 23) followed participants to identify recurrent tuberculosis; participants in studies 27 and 28 were only followed to treatment completion. This analysis included 1,978 participants; 39 (2.0%) had culture-confirmed treatment failure, and 75 (3.9%) had culture-confirmed recurrence. Productive cough was associated with indices of increased mycobacterial burden at diagnosis (acid-fast smear grade, severity of radiographic abnormalities). Fever and sweats improved rapidly with treatment, whereas productive cough decreased more slowly and was present in 20% of visits after treatment completion. During treatment, study participants with productive cough more often had concurrent culture positivity compared with those without productive cough (studies 22 and 23: adjusted odds ratio, 1.80; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.33-2.44). Finally, symptoms during the latter part of treatment and follow-up were associated with culture-confirmed treatment failure and recurrence in studies 22 and 23 (for cough: adjusted hazard ratio, 2.07; 95% CI, 1.23-3.49; for fever: adjusted hazard ratio, 5.05; 95% CI, 2.76-9.19). There are consistent relationships between symptoms and microbiological indices of tuberculosis, including measures of mycobacterial burden at baseline, culture positivity during treatment, and time to culture-confirmed treatment failure and recurrence.

  4. Directly observed treatment, short-course strategy and multidrug-resistant tuberculosis: are any modifications required?

    PubMed Central

    Bastian, I.; Rigouts, L.; Van Deun, A.; Portaels, F.

    2000-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDRTB) should be defined as tuberculosis with resistance to at least isoniazid and rifampicin because these drugs are the cornerstone of short-course chemotherapy, and combined isoniazid and rifampicin resistance requires prolonged treatment with second-line agents. Short-course chemotherapy is a key ingredient in the tuberculosis control strategy known as directly observed treatment, short-course (DOTS). For populations in which multidrug-resistant tuberculosis is endemic, the outcome of the standard short-course chemotherapy regimen remains uncertain. Unacceptable failure rates have been reported and resistance to additional agents may be induced. As a consequence there have been calls for well-functioning DOTS programmes to provide additional services in areas with high rates of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. These "DOTS-plus for MDRTB programmes" may need to modify all five elements of the DOTS strategy: the treatment may need to be individualized rather than standardized; laboratory services may need to provide facilities for on-site culture and antibiotic susceptibility testing; reliable supplies of a wide range of expensive second-line agents would have to be supplied; operational studies would be required to determine the indications for and format of the expanded programmes; financial and technical support from international organizations and Western governments would be needed in addition to that obtained from local governments. PMID:10743297

  5. [The effect evaluation of a new tuberculosis management model in rural areas of Guangxi].

    PubMed

    Xu, Guang-bao; Liu, Fei-ying; Feng, Qi-ming; Liang, Xin-yuan; Su, Li

    2011-01-01

    To explore the effect of new model for tuberculosis (TB) control and management, and provide a scientific basis and justification for making TB control strategies in rural communities. Among those townships with low TB service accessibility by the county TB control institute in Guangxi Xingye county (population of 679 thousands), four townships with total population of 152 518 and inconvenient transportation, were selected as the experimental group to conduct a new model research project.Based on the accessibility for community services, setting diagnosis and treatment management centers in township hospitals, employing family treatment supporters to supervise the treatment process. The TB cases of the base-line and the project expiration of the experimental group were 44 and 117. Meanwhile, three townships including Dapingshan, Longan and Gaofeng in the county with the similar condition and total population of 133 303 were selected as the control group. The control group conducted the provisions of national TB control program in the county TB clinic management. The TB cases of the base-line and the project expiration of the control group were 56 and 110. By double-direction comparison method, the effect of the new model was evaluated through TB patients detection, treatment outcomes and TB control management data. SPSS 13.0 statistical software was adopted and Chi-square test was used for analyzing technical data. After two-year project research implementation, in the experimental group the detection rate of new smear-positive TB patients increased from 16.39/100 000 (25/152 518) to 51.14/100 000 (78/152 518) (χ(2) = 27.281, P < 0.01), the cure rate of new smear-positive cases increased from 71.4% (15/21)to 91.1% (51/56) (χ(2) = 4.812, P < 0.05), and the completing treatment rate in newly diagnosed smear-negative cases improved from 23.5% (4/17)to 71.4% (15/21) (χ(2) = 8.622, P < 0.01); the loss rate of newly diagnosed smear-positive cases dropped from 23.8% (5

  6. Comparative Proteomics of Activated THP-1 Cells Infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis Identifies Putative Clearance Biomarkers for Tuberculosis Treatment.

    PubMed

    Kaewseekhao, Benjawan; Naranbhai, Vivek; Roytrakul, Sittiruk; Namwat, Wises; Paemanee, Atchara; Lulitanond, Viraphong; Chaiprasert, Angkana; Faksri, Kiatichai

    2015-01-01

    Biomarkers for determining clearance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection during anti-tuberculosis therapy or following exposure could facilitate enhanced monitoring and treatment. We screened for biomarkers indicating clearance of Mtb infection in vitro. A comparative proteomic analysis was performed using GeLC MSI/MS. Intracellular and secreted proteomes from activated THP-1 cells infected with the Mtb H37Rv strain (MOI = 1) and treated with isoniazid and rifampicin for 1 day (infection stage) and 5 days (clearance stage) were analyzed. Host proteins associated with early infection (n = 82), clearance (n = 121), sustained in both conditions (n = 34) and suppressed by infection (n = 46) were elucidated. Of the potential clearance markers, SSFA2 and CAECAM18 showed the highest and lowest protein intensities, respectively. A western blot of CAECAM18 validated the LC MS/MS result. For three clearance markers (SSFA2, PARP14 and PSME4), in vivo clinical validation was concordantly reported in previous patient cohorts. A network analysis revealed that clearance markers were enriched amongst four protein interaction networks centered on: (i) CD44/CCND1, (ii) IFN-β1/NF-κB, (iii) TP53/TGF-β and (iv) IFN-γ/CCL2. After infection, proteins associated with proliferation, and recruitment of immune cells appeared to be enriched possibly reflecting recruitment of defense mechanisms. Counteracting proteins (CASP3 vs. Akt and NF-κB vs. TP53) associated with apoptosis regulation and its networks were enriched among the early and sustained infection biomarkers, indicating host-pathogen competition. The BRCA1/2 network was suppressed during infection, suggesting that cell proliferation suppression is a feature of Mtb survival. Our study provides insights into the mechanisms of host-Mtb interaction by comparing the stages of infection clearance. The identified clearance biomarkers may be useful in monitoring tuberculosis treatment.

  7. Cost comparison of wirelessly vs. directly observed therapy for adherence confirmation in anti-tuberculosis treatment.

    PubMed

    Au-Yeung, K Y; DiCarlo, L

    2012-11-01

    A US clinic treating patients entering the continuation phase of treatment for Mycobacterium tuberculosis. To compare the costs of direct confirmation of treatment using wirelessly observed therapy (WOT) vs. standard of care utilizing World Health Organization-recommended 7-day and 3-day directly observed therapy (DOT). A model was created comparing the costs between the two types of DOT and WOT, using data from public sources of treatment, personnel costs, patient spending, and interview responses. The model considered public health facility's cost-to-treat and patient's cost-to-be-treated. Cost drivers for M. tuberculosis treatment monitoring were identified, and four univariate sensitivity analyses were conducted on selected variables. The cost of WOT was estimated to be 36% of 7-day DOT, and 71% of 3-day DOT in public health facility's cost-to-treat. The patient's cost-to-be-treated with WOT was estimated to be 4% of 7-day DOT and 8% of 3-day DOT. Sensitivity analyses indicated that WOT was likely to provide immediate cost savings over a range of WOT costs, time spent on WOT monitoring, WOT-related treatment failure rates and clinician compensations. Under several potential cost scenarios, the immediate cost of M. tuberculosis treatment by WOT appears to be substantially less than DOT. Further WOT development for M. tuberculosis treatment appears warranted.

  8. Interferon-gamma response to the treatment of active pulmonary and extra-pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Liang, L; Shi, R; Liu, X; Yuan, X; Zheng, S; Zhang, G; Wang, W; Wang, J; England, K; Via, L E; Cai, Y; Goldfeder, L C; Dodd, L E; Barry, C E; Chen, R Y

    2017-10-01

    Interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) release assays (IGRAs) are used to diagnose tuberculosis (TB) but not to measure treatment response. To measure IFN-γ response to active anti-tuberculosis treatment. Patients from the Henan Provincial Chest Hospital, Henan, China, with TB symptoms and/or signs were enrolled into this prospective, observational cohort study and followed for 6 months of treatment, with blood and sputum samples collected at 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 16 and 24 weeks. The QuantiFERON® TB-Gold assay was run on collected blood samples. Participants received a follow-up telephone call at 24 months to determine relapse status. Of the 152 TB patients enrolled, 135 were eligible for this analysis: 118 pulmonary (PTB) and 17 extra-pulmonary TB (EPTB) patients. IFN-γ levels declined significantly over time among all patients (P = 0.002), with this decline driven by PTB patients (P = 0.001), largely during the initial 8 weeks of treatment (P = 0.019). IFN-γ levels did not change among EPTB patients over time or against baseline culture or drug resistance status. After 6 months of effective anti-tuberculosis treatment, IFN-γ levels decreased significantly in PTB patients, largely over the initial 8 weeks of treatment. IFN-γ concentrations may offer some value for monitoring anti-tuberculosis treatment response among PTB patients.

  9. Epidemiology of Tuberculosis in Immigrants in a Large City with Large-Scale Immigration (1991-2013).

    PubMed

    Ospina, Jesús E; Orcau, Àngels; Millet, Joan-Pau; Ros, Miriam; Gil, Sonia; Caylà, Joan A

    2016-01-01

    The increase in immigration in Barcelona between 2000 and 2008 forced a reorganization of the control of tuberculosis (TB). TB clinical units (TBCU) were created and community health workers (CHW) were gradually included. To understand trends in the incidence of TB among immigrants, their main characteristics and treatment compliance during the period 1991-2013. We conducted a cross-sectional population-based study of cases detected among immigrants by the Tuberculosis Program in Barcelona, Spain. Sociodemographic, clinical characteristics and risk factors were described. The annual incidence was calculated for various periods and geographical areas of origin. In the linear trend analysis, a p-value of <0.05 was considered statistically significant. We detected 3,284 cases. Incidence decreased from 144.8/100,000 inhabitants in 1991 to 53.4/100,000 in 2013. Individuals born in Pakistan-India-Bangladesh had the highest average annual incidence (675/100,000). In all, 2,156 cases (65.7%) were male. 2,272 (69.2%) had pulmonary TB, of which 48.2% were smear-positive. 33% of the cases (1,093) lived in the inner city. Contact tracing (CT) coverage in smear-positive individuals rose from 56.8% in 1991-1999 to 81.4% in 2000-2013 (p<0.01); this value was less than 50% in people from Africa and Eastern European countries. The case fatality rate was 3.6% overall and 9.8% among those born in high-income countries (p<0.01). The highest rate of treatment default (12.8%) was observed among cases from the Maghreb. The rate of successful treatment increased from 69.9% in 1991-1999 to 87.5% in 2000-2013 (p<0.01). The incidence of TB in immigrants is decreasing in Barcelona. Organizational actions, such as incorporating CHWs and TBCUs, have been decisive for the observed improvements.

  10. [Paracoccidioidomicosis and multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (TBC-MDR) in patient coinfected with HIV and hepatitis C].

    PubMed

    Nunura R, Juan; Salazar M, Daniela; Vásquez L, Tania; Endo G, Sergio; Rodríguez F, Alejandrina; Zerpa L, Rito

    2010-12-01

    A case of an adult male patient diagnosed with HIV and Hepatitis C co infection is presented. He had granu-lomatuos hepatitis and blood smear positive to Paracoccidioides brasiliensis concomitant to the detection of MDR Mycobacterium tuberculosis in sputum further complicated with reactivation of cytomegalovirus (possible pancreatitis and retinitis). Difficulties in diagnostic and therapeutic approach in a patient with multiple infections are reviewed.

  11. Leveraging Advances in Tuberculosis Diagnosis and Treatment to Address Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Disease.

    PubMed

    Raju, Ravikiran M; Raju, Sagar M; Zhao, Yanlin; Rubin, Eric J

    2016-03-01

    The nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM), defined as any mycobacterial pathogen other than Mycobacterium tuberculosis or Mycobacterium leprae, are a diverse group of pathogens that collectively cause a substantive but often unappreciated w