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Sample records for smooth function spaces

  1. Some new function spaces of variable smoothness

    SciTech Connect

    Tyulenev, A I

    2015-06-30

    A new Besov space of variable smoothness is introduced on which the norm is defined in terms of difference relations. This space is shown to be the trace of a weighted Sobolev space with a weight in the corresponding Muckenhoupt class. Methods of nonlinear spline approximation are applied to derive an atomic decomposition theorem for functions in a Besov space of variable smoothness. A complete description of traces on the hyperplane of a Besov space of variable smoothness and of a weighted Besov space with a weight in the corresponding Muckenhoupt class is given. Bibliography: 27 titles.

  2. KOLMOGOROV'S (n,\\,\\delta)-WIDTHS OF SPACES OF SMOOTH FUNCTIONS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maĭorov, V. E.

    1994-02-01

    Kolmogorov's (n,\\,\\delta)-widths of the Sobolev spaces W_2^r, equipped with a Gaussian probability measure \\mu, are studied in the metric of L_q: \\displaystyle d_{n,\\delta}(W_2^r,\\,\\mu,\\,L_q)=\\inf_{G\\subset W_2^r}d_n(W_2^r\\setminus G,\\,L_q),where d_n(K,\\, L_q) is Kolmogorov's n-width of the set K in the space L_q, and the infimum is taken over all possible subsets G\\subset W_2^r with measure \\mu(G)\\leq\\delta, 0\\leq\\delta\\leq1. The asymptotic equality \\displaystyle d_{n,\\delta}(W_2^r,\\,\\mu,\\,L_q)\\asymp n^{-r-\\varepsilon}\\sqrt{1+\\frac1n\\ln\\frac1\\delta}with respect to n and \\delta is obtained, where 1\\leq q\\leq\\infty and \\varepsilon>0 is an arbitrary number depending only on the measure \\mu.Bibliography: 20 titles.

  3. A partial regularity result for an anisotropic smoothing functional for image restoration in BV space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wunderli, Thomas

    2008-03-01

    Here we examine the partial regularity of minimizers of a functional used for image restoration in BV space. This functional is a combination of a regularized p-Laplacian for the part of the image with small gradient and a total variation functional for the part with large gradient. This model was originally introduced in Chambolle and Lions using the Laplacian. Due to the singular nature of the p-Laplacian we study a regularized p-Laplacian. We show that where the gradient is small, the regularized p-Laplacian smooths the image u, in the sense that u[set membership, variant]C1,[alpha] for some 0<[alpha]<1. This functional thus anisotropically smooths the image where the gradient is small and preserves edges via total variation where the gradient is large.

  4. Superalgebraically convergent smoothly windowed lattice sums for doubly periodic Green functions in three-dimensional space

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, Oscar P.; Turc, Catalin; Venakides, Stephanos

    2016-01-01

    This work, part I in a two-part series, presents: (i) a simple and highly efficient algorithm for evaluation of quasi-periodic Green functions, as well as (ii) an associated boundary-integral equation method for the numerical solution of problems of scattering of waves by doubly periodic arrays of scatterers in three-dimensional space. Except for certain ‘Wood frequencies’ at which the quasi-periodic Green function ceases to exist, the proposed approach, which is based on smooth windowing functions, gives rise to tapered lattice sums which converge superalgebraically fast to the Green function—that is, faster than any power of the number of terms used. This is in sharp contrast to the extremely slow convergence exhibited by the lattice sums in the absence of smooth windowing. (The Wood-frequency problem is treated in part II.) This paper establishes rigorously the superalgebraic convergence of the windowed lattice sums. A variety of numerical results demonstrate the practical efficiency of the proposed approach. PMID:27493573

  5. THE WEIGHTED SPACES L_{p,r}^\\alpha(\\rho_1,\\,\\rho_2) OF DIFFERENTIABLE FUNCTIONS OF FRACTIONAL SMOOTHNESS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nogin, V. A.

    1988-02-01

    This is an investigation of weighted spaces of differentiable functions of fractional smoothness consisting of functions f(x) which are r-integrable with a weight \\rho_1 and have "fractional derivatives" which are p-integrable with a weight \\rho_2.Bibliography: 20 titles.

  6. Approximation of Bivariate Functions via Smooth Extensions

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhihua

    2014-01-01

    For a smooth bivariate function defined on a general domain with arbitrary shape, it is difficult to do Fourier approximation or wavelet approximation. In order to solve these problems, in this paper, we give an extension of the bivariate function on a general domain with arbitrary shape to a smooth, periodic function in the whole space or to a smooth, compactly supported function in the whole space. These smooth extensions have simple and clear representations which are determined by this bivariate function and some polynomials. After that, we expand the smooth, periodic function into a Fourier series or a periodic wavelet series or we expand the smooth, compactly supported function into a wavelet series. Since our extensions are smooth, the obtained Fourier coefficients or wavelet coefficients decay very fast. Since our extension tools are polynomials, the moment theorem shows that a lot of wavelet coefficients vanish. From this, with the help of well-known approximation theorems, using our extension methods, the Fourier approximation and the wavelet approximation of the bivariate function on the general domain with small error are obtained. PMID:24683316

  7. An Example of the Estimation and Display of a Smoothly Varying Function of Time and Space--The Incidence of the Disease Mumps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eddy, William F.; Mockus, Audris

    1994-01-01

    Describes animation algorithms for creating smooth functions of time- and space-varying phenomenon. The incidence of the disease mumps from 1968-88 in the United States is used to demonstrate the algorithms. Figures that illustrate the findings are included. (14 references) (KRN)

  8. An Example of the Estimation and Display of a Smoothly Varying Function of Time and Space--The Incidence of the Disease Mumps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eddy, William F.; Mockus, Audris

    1994-01-01

    Describes animation algorithms for creating smooth functions of time- and space-varying phenomenon. The incidence of the disease mumps from 1968-88 in the United States is used to demonstrate the algorithms. Figures that illustrate the findings are included. (14 references) (KRN)

  9. Boundary smoothness of analytic functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Farrell, Anthony G.

    2014-06-01

    We consider the behaviour of holomorphic functions on a bounded open subset of the plane, satisfying a Lipschitz condition with exponent , with , in the vicinity of an exceptional boundary point where all such functions exhibit some kind of smoothness. Specifically, we consider the relation between the abstract idea of a bounded point derivation on the algebra of such functions and the classical complex derivative evaluated as a limit of difference quotients. We obtain a result which applies, for example, when the open set admits an interior cone at the special boundary point.

  10. Smooth Constrained Heuristic Optimization of a Combinatorial Chemical Space

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-01

    ARL-TR-7294•MAY 2015 US Army Research Laboratory Smooth ConstrainedHeuristic Optimization of a Combinatorial Chemical Space by Berend Christopher...7294•MAY 2015 US Army Research Laboratory Smooth ConstrainedHeuristic Optimization of a Combinatorial Chemical Space by Berend Christopher...

  11. Vascular smooth muscle phenotypic diversity and function

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The control of force production in vascular smooth muscle is critical to the normal regulation of blood flow and pressure, and altered regulation is common to diseases such as hypertension, heart failure, and ischemia. A great deal has been learned about imbalances in vasoconstrictor and vasodilator signals, e.g., angiotensin, endothelin, norepinephrine, and nitric oxide, that regulate vascular tone in normal and disease contexts. In contrast there has been limited study of how the phenotypic state of the vascular smooth muscle cell may influence the contractile response to these signaling pathways dependent upon the developmental, tissue-specific (vascular bed) or disease context. Smooth, skeletal, and cardiac muscle lineages are traditionally classified into fast or slow sublineages based on rates of contraction and relaxation, recognizing that this simple dichotomy vastly underrepresents muscle phenotypic diversity. A great deal has been learned about developmental specification of the striated muscle sublineages and their phenotypic interconversions in the mature animal under the control of mechanical load, neural input, and hormones. In contrast there has been relatively limited study of smooth muscle contractile phenotypic diversity. This is surprising given the number of diseases in which smooth muscle contractile dysfunction plays a key role. This review focuses on smooth muscle contractile phenotypic diversity in the vascular system, how it is generated, and how it may determine vascular function in developmental and disease contexts. PMID:20736412

  12. Interstitial Cells: Regulators of Smooth Muscle Function

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Kenton M.; Ward, Sean M.; Koh, Sang Don

    2014-01-01

    Smooth muscles are complex tissues containing a variety of cells in addition to muscle cells. Interstitial cells of mesenchymal origin interact with and form electrical connectivity with smooth muscle cells in many organs, and these cells provide important regulatory functions. For example, in the gastrointestinal tract, interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) and PDGFRα+ cells have been described, in detail, and represent distinct classes of cells with unique ultrastructure, molecular phenotypes, and functions. Smooth muscle cells are electrically coupled to ICC and PDGFRα+ cells, forming an integrated unit called the SIP syncytium. SIP cells express a variety of receptors and ion channels, and conductance changes in any type of SIP cell affect the excitability and responses of the syncytium. SIP cells are known to provide pacemaker activity, propagation pathways for slow waves, transduction of inputs from motor neurons, and mechanosensitivity. Loss of interstitial cells has been associated with motor disorders of the gut. Interstitial cells are also found in a variety of other smooth muscles; however, in most cases, the physiological and pathophysiological roles for these cells have not been clearly defined. This review describes structural, functional, and molecular features of interstitial cells and discusses their contributions in determining the behaviors of smooth muscle tissues. PMID:24987007

  13. Interstitial cells: regulators of smooth muscle function.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Kenton M; Ward, Sean M; Koh, Sang Don

    2014-07-01

    Smooth muscles are complex tissues containing a variety of cells in addition to muscle cells. Interstitial cells of mesenchymal origin interact with and form electrical connectivity with smooth muscle cells in many organs, and these cells provide important regulatory functions. For example, in the gastrointestinal tract, interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) and PDGFRα(+) cells have been described, in detail, and represent distinct classes of cells with unique ultrastructure, molecular phenotypes, and functions. Smooth muscle cells are electrically coupled to ICC and PDGFRα(+) cells, forming an integrated unit called the SIP syncytium. SIP cells express a variety of receptors and ion channels, and conductance changes in any type of SIP cell affect the excitability and responses of the syncytium. SIP cells are known to provide pacemaker activity, propagation pathways for slow waves, transduction of inputs from motor neurons, and mechanosensitivity. Loss of interstitial cells has been associated with motor disorders of the gut. Interstitial cells are also found in a variety of other smooth muscles; however, in most cases, the physiological and pathophysiological roles for these cells have not been clearly defined. This review describes structural, functional, and molecular features of interstitial cells and discusses their contributions in determining the behaviors of smooth muscle tissues.

  14. Compressive Sensing via Nonlocal Smoothed Rank Function

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Ya-Ru; Liu, Jun; Zhao, Xi-Le

    2016-01-01

    Compressive sensing (CS) theory asserts that we can reconstruct signals and images with only a small number of samples or measurements. Recent works exploiting the nonlocal similarity have led to better results in various CS studies. To better exploit the nonlocal similarity, in this paper, we propose a non-convex smoothed rank function based model for CS image reconstruction. We also propose an efficient alternating minimization method to solve the proposed model, which reduces a difficult and coupled problem to two tractable subproblems. Experimental results have shown that the proposed method performs better than several existing state-of-the-art CS methods for image reconstruction. PMID:27583683

  15. Compressive Sensing via Nonlocal Smoothed Rank Function.

    PubMed

    Fan, Ya-Ru; Huang, Ting-Zhu; Liu, Jun; Zhao, Xi-Le

    2016-01-01

    Compressive sensing (CS) theory asserts that we can reconstruct signals and images with only a small number of samples or measurements. Recent works exploiting the nonlocal similarity have led to better results in various CS studies. To better exploit the nonlocal similarity, in this paper, we propose a non-convex smoothed rank function based model for CS image reconstruction. We also propose an efficient alternating minimization method to solve the proposed model, which reduces a difficult and coupled problem to two tractable subproblems. Experimental results have shown that the proposed method performs better than several existing state-of-the-art CS methods for image reconstruction.

  16. On Factorizations of Smooth Nonnegative Matrix-Values Functions and on Smooth Functions with Values in Polyhedra

    SciTech Connect

    Krylov, N. V.

    2008-12-15

    We discuss the possibility to represent smooth nonnegative matrix-valued functions as finite linear combinations of fixed matrices with positive real-valued coefficients whose square roots are Lipschitz continuous. This issue is reduced to a similar problem for smooth functions with values in a polyhedron.

  17. A smoothing algorithm using cubic spline functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. E., Jr.; Price, J. M.; Howser, L. M.

    1974-01-01

    Two algorithms are presented for smoothing arbitrary sets of data. They are the explicit variable algorithm and the parametric variable algorithm. The former would be used where large gradients are not encountered because of the smaller amount of calculation required. The latter would be used if the data being smoothed were double valued or experienced large gradients. Both algorithms use a least-squares technique to obtain a cubic spline fit to the data. The advantage of the spline fit is that the first and second derivatives are continuous. This method is best used in an interactive graphics environment so that the junction values for the spline curve can be manipulated to improve the fit.

  18. Regulation of Gastrointestinal Smooth Muscle Function by Interstitial Cells.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Kenton M; Kito, Yoshihiko; Hwang, Sung Jin; Ward, Sean M

    2016-09-01

    Interstitial cells of mesenchymal origin form gap junctions with smooth muscle cells in visceral smooth muscles and provide important regulatory functions. In gastrointestinal (GI) muscles, there are two distinct classes of interstitial cells, c-Kit(+) interstitial cells of Cajal and PDGFRα(+) cells, that regulate motility patterns. Loss of these cells may contribute to symptoms in GI motility disorders.

  19. Smooth estimation of the survival function for interval censored data.

    PubMed

    Pan, W

    2000-10-15

    Interval censored data arise naturally in large-scale panel studies where subjects can only be followed periodically and the event of interest can only be observed in some time intervals. To estimate the survival function the non-parametric maximum likelihood estimator (NPMLE) is commonly used, which is a step function having some large jumps. However, in many applications the underlying survival function can be reasonably assumed to be smooth, and then the NPMLE does not efficiently use this information. Two smooth estimators have been f the NPMLE; another is the logspline density model. However, to our knowledge there is no finite sample study yet to assess their performance in the literature. In this paper we first show by simulation that both smooth estimators improve over the NPMLE for smooth survival functions. We then apply these estimators to compare two survival curves. The test statistics based on the maximum difference between two survival functions (Kolmogorov-Smirnov test) and on the integrated weighted difference of two survival functions (IWDB test) are investigated via the bootstrap. From our simulation studies the IWDB test seems particularly promising for some stochastically ordered survival functions that do not satisfy the proportional hazards model. The methods are illustrated by reanalysing the Breast Cosmesis Study data set.

  20. Convergence rate of spherical harmonic expansions of smooth functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Feng; Wang, Kunyang

    2008-12-01

    We extend a well-known result of Bonami and Clerc on the almost everywhere (a.e.) convergence of Cesàro means of spherical harmonic expansions. For smooth functions measured in terms of [phi]-derivatives on the unit sphere, we obtained the sharp a.e. convergence rate of Cesàro means of their spherical harmonic expansions.

  1. Beta-function B-spline smoothing on triangulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dechevsky, Lubomir T.; Zanaty, Peter

    2013-03-01

    In this work we investigate a novel family of Ck-smooth rational basis functions on triangulations for fitting, smoothing, and denoising geometric data. The introduced basis function is closely related to a recently introduced general method introduced in utilizing generalized expo-rational B-splines, which provides Ck-smooth convex resolutions of unity on very general disjoint partitions and overlapping covers of multidimensional domains with complex geometry. One of the major advantages of this new triangular construction is its locality with respect to the star-1 neighborhood of the vertex on which the said base is providing Hermite interpolation. This locality of the basis functions can be in turn utilized in adaptive methods, where, for instance a local refinement of the underlying triangular mesh affects only the refined domain, whereas, in other method one needs to investigate what changes are occurring outside of the refined domain. Both the triangular and the general smooth constructions have the potential to become a new versatile tool of Computer Aided Geometric Design (CAGD), Finite and Boundary Element Analysis (FEA/BEA) and Iso-geometric Analysis (IGA).

  2. On the existence of smooth Cauchy steep time functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minguzzi, E.

    2016-06-01

    A simple proof (based on results in Chruściel et al 2015 Ann. Henri Poincaré arXiv:1301.2909) is given that every globally hyperbolic spacetime admits a smooth Cauchy steep time function. This result is useful in order to show that globally hyperbolic spacetimes can be isometrically embedded in Minkowski spacetimes and that they split as a product. The proof is based on a recent result on the differentiability of Geroch’s volume functions.

  3. Exponentially accurate approximations to piece-wise smooth periodic functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greer, James; Banerjee, Saheb

    1995-01-01

    A family of simple, periodic basis functions with 'built-in' discontinuities are introduced, and their properties are analyzed and discussed. Some of their potential usefulness is illustrated in conjunction with the Fourier series representations of functions with discontinuities. In particular, it is demonstrated how they can be used to construct a sequence of approximations which converges exponentially in the maximum norm to a piece-wise smooth function. The theory is illustrated with several examples and the results are discussed in the context of other sequences of functions which can be used to approximate discontinuous functions.

  4. Contractile function of smooth muscle retained after overnight storage.

    PubMed

    Loong, B J; Tan, J H; Lim, K H; Mbaki, Y; Ting, K N

    2015-10-01

    The functional responses of different overnight-stored in vitro tissues are not clearly described in any animal model. The influence of overnight storage in an animal model may vary between tissue types. We employed Sprague-Dawley rat as our animal model and investigated the functional changes of rat aorta, trachea, bronchus and bladder that were used (i) immediately after surgical removal (denoted as fresh) and (ii) after storage in aerated (95% O2, 5% CO2) Krebs-Ringer bicarbonate solution at 4 °C for 24 h (denoted as stored). The aorta ring was pre-contracted with phenylephrine, and the functional response of the tissue was investigated using isoprenaline, forskolin and carbachol. Carbachol was also used to increase the tone in trachea, bronchus rings and bladder strips. A clear reduced function of endothelium, with a minor if any effect in the smooth muscle function in rat aorta was observed after overnight storage. The contractile response of overnight-stored rat airway (trachea and bronchus) and bladder smooth muscles remained unchanged. Among all tested tissues, only bronchus showed a reduced response rate (only 40% responded) after storage. In vitro rat tissues that are stored in Krebs solution at 4 °C for 24 h can still be used to investigate smooth muscle responses, however, not endothelium-mediated responses for aorta. The influence of overnight storage on different tissues from an animal model (Sprague-Dawley rat in our study) also provides an insight in maximising the use of sacrificed animals.

  5. Pulmonary function in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, J. B.; Elliott, A. R.; Guy, H. J.; Prisk, G. K.

    1997-01-01

    The lung is exquisitely sensitive to gravity, and so it is of interest to know how its function is altered in the weightlessness of space. Studies on National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Spacelabs during the last 4 years have provided the first comprehensive data on the extensive changes in pulmonary function that occur in sustained microgravity. Measurements of pulmonary function were made on astronauts during space shuttle flights lasting 9 and 14 days and were compared with extensive ground-based measurements before and after the flights. Compared with preflight measurements, cardiac output increased by 18% during space flight, and stroke volume increased by 46%. Paradoxically, the increase in stroke volume occurred in the face of reductions in central venous pressure and circulating blood volume. Diffusing capacity increased by 28%, and the increase in the diffusing capacity of the alveolar membrane was unexpectedly large based on findings in normal gravity. The change in the alveolar membrane may reflect the effects of uniform filling of the pulmonary capillary bed. Distributions of blood flow and ventilation throughout the lung were more uniform in space, but some unevenness remained, indicating the importance of nongravitational factors. A surprising finding was that airway closing volume was approximately the same in microgravity and in normal gravity, emphasizing the importance of mechanical properties of the airways in determining whether they close. Residual volume was unexpectedly reduced by 18% in microgravity, possibly because of uniform alveolar expansion. The findings indicate that pulmonary function is greatly altered in microgravity, but none of the changes observed so far will apparently limit long-term space flight. In addition, the data help to clarify how gravity affects pulmonary function in the normal gravity environment on Earth.

  6. Trigonometric polynomial approximation, K-functionals and generalized moduli of smoothness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Runovskii, K. V.

    2017-02-01

    Best approximation and approximation by families of linear polynomial operators (FLPO) in the spaces L_p, 0, are investigated for periodic functions of an arbitrary number of variables in terms of the generalized modulus of smoothness generated by a periodic generator which, near the origin, is assumed to be close in a certain sense to some homogeneous function of positive order. Direct and inverse theorems (Jackson- and Bernstein-type estimates) are proved; conditions on the generators are obtained under which the approximation error by an FLPO is equivalent to an appropriate modulus of smoothness. These problems are solved by going over from the modulus to an equivalent K-functional. The general results obtained are applied to classical objects in the theory of approximation and smoothness. In particular, they are applied to the methods of approximation generated by Fejér, Riesz and Bochner-Riesz kernels, and also to the moduli of smoothness and K-functionals corresponding to the conventional, Weyl and Riesz derivatives and to the Laplace operator. Bibliography: 24 titles.

  7. Menthol inhibiting parasympathetic function of tracheal smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hsing-Won; Liu, Shao-Cheng; Chao, Pin-Zhir; Lee, Fei-Peng

    2016-01-01

    Menthol is used as a constituent of food and drink, tobacco and cosmetics nowadays. This cold receptor agonist has been used as a nasal inhalation solution in the daily life. The effect of menthol on nasal mucosa in vivo is well known; however, the effect of the drug on tracheal smooth muscle has been rarely explored. Therefore, during administration of the drug for nasal symptoms, it might also affect the trachea via oral intake or inhalation. We used our preparation to test the effectiveness of menthol on isolated rat tracheal smooth muscle. A 5 mm long portion of rat trachea was submersed in 30 ml Krebs solution in a muscle bath at 37ºC. Changes in tracheal contractility in response to the application of a parasympathetic mimetic agent were measured using a transducer connected to a Pentium III computer equipped with polygraph software. The following assessments of menthol were performed: (1) effect on tracheal smooth muscle resting tension; (2) effect on contraction caused by 10-6 M methacholine as a parasympathetic mimetic; (3) effect of the drug on electrically induced tracheal smooth muscle contractions. Results indicated that addition of a parasympathetic mimetic to the incubation medium caused the trachea to contract in a dose-dependent manner. Addition of menthol at doses of 10-5 M or above elicited a relaxation response to 10-6 M methacholine-induced contraction. Menthol could also inhibit electrical field stimulation (EFS) induced spike contraction. However, it alone had a minimal effect on the basal tension of trachea as the concentration increased. We concluded that the degree of drug-induced tracheal contraction or relaxation was dose-dependent. In addition, this study indicated that high concentrations of menthol might actually inhibit parasympathetic function of the trachea. PMID:27994497

  8. Space race functional responses.

    PubMed

    Sjödin, Henrik; Brännström, Åke; Englund, Göran

    2015-02-22

    We derive functional responses under the assumption that predators and prey are engaged in a space race in which prey avoid patches with many predators and predators avoid patches with few or no prey. The resulting functional response models have a simple structure and include functions describing how the emigration of prey and predators depend on interspecific densities. As such, they provide a link between dispersal behaviours and community dynamics. The derived functional response is general but is here modelled in accordance with empirically documented emigration responses. We find that the prey emigration response to predators has stabilizing effects similar to that of the DeAngelis-Beddington functional response, and that the predator emigration response to prey has destabilizing effects similar to that of the Holling type II response. A stability criterion describing the net effect of the two emigration responses on a Lotka-Volterra predator-prey system is presented. The winner of the space race (i.e. whether predators or prey are favoured) is determined by the relationship between the slopes of the species' emigration responses. It is predicted that predators win the space race in poor habitats, where predator and prey densities are low, and that prey are more successful in richer habitats. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  9. Dry Lubricant Smooths the Way for Space Travel, Industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2015-01-01

    Reviving industry standards for coating parts in tungsten disulfide, a dry lubricant developed for the Mariner space probes managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in the 1960s and '70s, Applied Tungstenite, a relatively new Temecula, California-based company, has found a client base in the mushrooming commercial space industry, as well as other manufacturers.

  10. Vascular smooth muscle function: defining the diabetic vascular phenotype.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Rosa Maria; Ghiadoni, Lorenzo

    2013-10-01

    In this issue of Diabetologia, a meta-analysis performed by Montero and co-authors (Diabetologia doi 10.1007/s00125-013-2974-1 ) demonstrates a significant impairment of vascular smooth muscle (VSM) function in type 2 diabetic patients. Endothelial function and VSM function between type 2 diabetic and healthy individuals were associated, especially in the microcirculation, confirming the hypothesis that unresponsiveness of VSM cells to NO may amplify the consequences of reduced NO availability. This study suggests a novel interpretation for endothelial dysfunction in diabetic patients, indicating VSM cells as key players. Causative mechanisms of VSM dysfunction, which seems to be a feature of the vascular phenotype of type 2 diabetes mellitus, are largely unexplored in humans. Future studies should also address the crucial issue of the prognostic significance of VSM dysfunction in diabetic patients, and possibly in other conditions characterised by high cardiovascular risk.

  11. Approximating smooth functions using algebraic-trigonometric polynomials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharapudinov, Idris I.

    2011-01-01

    The problem under consideration is that of approximating classes of smooth functions by algebraic-trigonometric polynomials of the form p_n(t)+\\tau_m(t), where p_n(t) is an algebraic polynomial of degree n and \\tau_m(t)=a_0+\\sum_{k=1}^ma_k\\cos k\\pi t+b_k\\sin k\\pi t is a trigonometric polynomial of order m. The precise order of approximation by such polynomials in the classes W^r_\\infty(M) and an upper bound for similar approximations in the class W^r_p(M) with \\frac43 are found. The proof of these estimates uses mixed series in Legendre polynomials which the author has introduced and investigated previously. Bibliography: 13 titles.

  12. Smooth conditional distribution function and quantiles under random censorship.

    PubMed

    Leconte, Eve; Poiraud-Casanova, Sandrine; Thomas-Agnan, Christine

    2002-09-01

    We consider a nonparametric random design regression model in which the response variable is possibly right censored. The aim of this paper is to estimate the conditional distribution function and the conditional alpha-quantile of the response variable. We restrict attention to the case where the response variable as well as the explanatory variable are unidimensional and continuous. We propose and discuss two classes of estimators which are smooth with respect to the response variable as well as to the covariate. Some simulations demonstrate that the new methods have better mean square error performances than the generalized Kaplan-Meier estimator introduced by Beran (1981) and considered in the literature by Dabrowska (1989, 1992) and Gonzalez-Manteiga and Cadarso-Suarez (1994).

  13. Approximating smooth functions using algebraic-trigonometric polynomials

    SciTech Connect

    Sharapudinov, Idris I

    2011-01-14

    The problem under consideration is that of approximating classes of smooth functions by algebraic-trigonometric polynomials of the form p{sub n}(t)+{tau}{sub m}(t), where p{sub n}(t) is an algebraic polynomial of degree n and {tau}{sub m}(t)=a{sub 0}+{Sigma}{sub k=1}{sup m}a{sub k} cos k{pi}t + b{sub k} sin k{pi}t is a trigonometric polynomial of order m. The precise order of approximation by such polynomials in the classes W{sup r}{sub {infinity}(}M) and an upper bound for similar approximations in the class W{sup r}{sub p}(M) with 4/3

  14. A new smoothing function to introduce long-range electrostatic effects in QM/MM calculations.

    PubMed

    Fang, Dong; Duke, Robert E; Cisneros, G Andrés

    2015-07-28

    A new method to account for long range electrostatic contributions is proposed and implemented for quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics long range electrostatic correction (QM/MM-LREC) calculations. This method involves the use of the minimum image convention under periodic boundary conditions and a new smoothing function for energies and forces at the cutoff boundary for the Coulomb interactions. Compared to conventional QM/MM calculations without long-range electrostatic corrections, the new method effectively includes effects on the MM environment in the primary image from its replicas in the neighborhood. QM/MM-LREC offers three useful features including the avoidance of calculations in reciprocal space (k-space), with the concomitant avoidance of having to reproduce (analytically or approximately) the QM charge density in k-space, and the straightforward availability of analytical Hessians. The new method is tested and compared with results from smooth particle mesh Ewald (PME) for three systems including a box of neat water, a double proton transfer reaction, and the geometry optimization of the critical point structures for the rate limiting step of the DNA dealkylase AlkB. As with other smoothing or shifting functions, relatively large cutoffs are necessary to achieve comparable accuracy with PME. For the double-proton transfer reaction, the use of a 22 Å cutoff shows a close reaction energy profile and geometries of stationary structures with QM/MM-LREC compared to conventional QM/MM with no truncation. Geometry optimization of stationary structures for the hydrogen abstraction step by AlkB shows some differences between QM/MM-LREC and the conventional QM/MM. These differences underscore the necessity of the inclusion of the long-range electrostatic contribution.

  15. A new smoothing function to introduce long-range electrostatic effects in QM/MM calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Dong; Duke, Robert E.; Andrés Cisneros, G.

    2015-07-28

    A new method to account for long range electrostatic contributions is proposed and implemented for quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics long range electrostatic correction (QM/MM-LREC) calculations. This method involves the use of the minimum image convention under periodic boundary conditions and a new smoothing function for energies and forces at the cutoff boundary for the Coulomb interactions. Compared to conventional QM/MM calculations without long-range electrostatic corrections, the new method effectively includes effects on the MM environment in the primary image from its replicas in the neighborhood. QM/MM-LREC offers three useful features including the avoidance of calculations in reciprocal space (k-space), with the concomitant avoidance of having to reproduce (analytically or approximately) the QM charge density in k-space, and the straightforward availability of analytical Hessians. The new method is tested and compared with results from smooth particle mesh Ewald (PME) for three systems including a box of neat water, a double proton transfer reaction, and the geometry optimization of the critical point structures for the rate limiting step of the DNA dealkylase AlkB. As with other smoothing or shifting functions, relatively large cutoffs are necessary to achieve comparable accuracy with PME. For the double-proton transfer reaction, the use of a 22 Å cutoff shows a close reaction energy profile and geometries of stationary structures with QM/MM-LREC compared to conventional QM/MM with no truncation. Geometry optimization of stationary structures for the hydrogen abstraction step by AlkB shows some differences between QM/MM-LREC and the conventional QM/MM. These differences underscore the necessity of the inclusion of the long-range electrostatic contribution.

  16. A new smoothing function to introduce long-range electrostatic effects in QM/MM calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Dong; Duke, Robert E.; Cisneros, G. Andrés

    2015-07-01

    A new method to account for long range electrostatic contributions is proposed and implemented for quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics long range electrostatic correction (QM/MM-LREC) calculations. This method involves the use of the minimum image convention under periodic boundary conditions and a new smoothing function for energies and forces at the cutoff boundary for the Coulomb interactions. Compared to conventional QM/MM calculations without long-range electrostatic corrections, the new method effectively includes effects on the MM environment in the primary image from its replicas in the neighborhood. QM/MM-LREC offers three useful features including the avoidance of calculations in reciprocal space (k-space), with the concomitant avoidance of having to reproduce (analytically or approximately) the QM charge density in k-space, and the straightforward availability of analytical Hessians. The new method is tested and compared with results from smooth particle mesh Ewald (PME) for three systems including a box of neat water, a double proton transfer reaction, and the geometry optimization of the critical point structures for the rate limiting step of the DNA dealkylase AlkB. As with other smoothing or shifting functions, relatively large cutoffs are necessary to achieve comparable accuracy with PME. For the double-proton transfer reaction, the use of a 22 Å cutoff shows a close reaction energy profile and geometries of stationary structures with QM/MM-LREC compared to conventional QM/MM with no truncation. Geometry optimization of stationary structures for the hydrogen abstraction step by AlkB shows some differences between QM/MM-LREC and the conventional QM/MM. These differences underscore the necessity of the inclusion of the long-range electrostatic contribution.

  17. Impaired arterial smooth muscle cell vasodilatory function in methamphetamine users.

    PubMed

    Nabaei, Ghaemeh; Oveisgharan, Shahram; Ghorbani, Askar; Fatehi, Farzad

    2016-11-15

    Methamphetamine use is a strong risk factor for stroke. This study was designed to evaluate arterial function and structure in methamphetamine users ultrasonographically. In a cross-sectional study, 20 methamphetamine users and 21 controls, aged between 20 and 40years, were enrolled. Common carotid artery intima-media thickness (CCA-IMT) marker of early atherogenesis, flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) determinants of endothelium-dependent vasodilation, and nitroglycerine-mediated dilatation (NMD) independent marker of vasodilation were measured in two groups. There were no significant differences between the two groups regarding demographic and metabolic characteristics. The mean (±SD) CCA-IMT in methamphetamine users was 0.58±0.09mm, versus 0.59±0.07mm in the controls (p=0.84). Likewise, FMD% was not significantly different between the two groups [7.6±6.1% in methamphetamine users vs. 8.2±5.1% in the controls; p=0.72], nor were peak flow and shear rate after hyperemia. However, NMD% was considerably decreased in the methamphetamine users [8.5±7.8% in methamphetamine users vs. 13.4±6.2% in controls; p=0.03]. According to our results, NMD is reduced among otherwise healthy methamphetamine users, which represents smooth muscle dysfunction in this group. This may contribute to the high risk of stroke among methamphetamine users. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Construction of spline functions in spreadsheets to smooth experimental data

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A previous manuscript detailed how spreadsheet software can be programmed to smooth experimental data via cubic splines. This addendum corrects a few errors in the previous manuscript and provides additional necessary programming steps. ...

  19. A decomposition theorem for the space of C{sup 1}-smooth skew products with complicated dynamics of the quotient map

    SciTech Connect

    Efremova, L S

    2013-11-30

    We use the notions of the Ω-function and functions suitable to it, to give a detailed proof of a decomposition theorem for the space of C{sup 1}-smooth skew products of interval maps whose quotient maps have complicated dynamics and satisfy the additional condition of Ω-stability with respect to the C{sup 1}-norm. In our theorem, the space of C{sup 1}-smooth skew products is decomposed into a union of four nonempty, pairwise disjoint subspaces. We give examples of maps contained in each of the four subspaces. Bibliography: 46 titles.

  20. Radial Basis Function Based Quadrature over Smooth Surfaces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-24

    weights for a particular node set. This thesis expands upon the same spherical quadrature method and applies it to an arbitrary smooth closed surface...recent technique 1 for spherical quadrature is expanded upon in Chapter II and adapted for use in approximating integrals of arbitrary smooth closed...logN) operations and O(N) memory usage. When expanding the computation of weights beyond one core, parallel scalability with number of cores was also

  1. Smoothing of functions of range and range rate measurements from earth orbiting satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grenchik, T. J.; Murray, C. W., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    It is shown that for satellites in circular Earth orbits with altitudes of 500 kilometers to 1500 kilometers, and for satellites in elliptical orbits with an approximate 4000 kilometer height of perigee, a high degree least squares polynomial (e.g., a 9th or 10th degree in some cases) is required to smooth both range and range rate data for purposes of input to orbit determination programs. In order to circumvent this problem, functions of range and range rate are smoothed with lower degree least squares polynomials (e.g., 3rd and 4th degree) and it is shown that under the above geometric constraints the standard deviation of fit can be reduced to levels commensurate with typical S-band tracking system resolution which is 1 to 2 meters in range and 0.005 meters/second in range rate for a 1 per second data rate. Also shown are the effects of Gaussian random noise, biases, and periodic noise. This analysis includes numerous examples applied to the 44 point data smoothing interval currently used in much of the operational preprocessing at the Goddard Space Flight Center.

  2. The Temporal Impulse Response Function during Smooth Pursuit

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Jianliang; Ramamurthy, Mahalakshmi; Patel, Saumil S.; Vu-Yu, Lan-Phuong; Bedell, Harold E.

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that the extent of perceived motion smear is attenuated asymmetrically during smooth pursuit eye movements, based on the relative directions of the target and eye motion. We conducted two experiments to determine if the reduction of perceived smear during pursuit might be associated with an acceleration of the temporal impulse response function (TIRF). In Experiment 1, two-pulse increment sensitivity was determined during fixation and rightward pursuit for sequential flashes of a long horizontal line, presented with stimulus-onset asynchronies between 5.9 and 234 ms. In Experiment 2, temporal contrast sensitivity was measured during fixation and rightward pursuit for a vertical 1 cpd grating with retinal image velocities between 4 and 30 Hz. During pursuit, grating motion was either in the same or the opposite direction as the eye movement. TIRFs were modeled as the impulse responses of a second-order, low-pass linear system, fit to the two-pulse increment sensitivity data by an optimization procedure and to the temporal contrast sensitivity results by iterative Fourier synthesis. The results indicate that the natural temporal frequency of the fitted TIRFs was approximately 10% higher during pursuit than fixation. In experiment 2, the increased natural frequency of the TIRF was restricted to the condition in which the grating moved spatially in the opposite direction of the pursuit eye movement. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that extra-retinal signals reduce the extent of perceived motion smear during pursuit, in part by increasing the speed of visual processing preferentially for one direction of image motion. PMID:19706304

  3. An improved nearly-orthogonal structured mesh generation system with smoothness control functions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This paper presents an improved nearly-orthogonal structured mesh generation system with a set of smoothness control functions, which were derived based on the ratio between the Jacobian of the transformation matrix and the Jacobian of the metric tensor. The proposed smoothness control functions are...

  4. Invariant measures of smooth dynamical systems, generalized functions and summation methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, V. V.

    2016-04-01

    We discuss conditions for the existence of invariant measures of smooth dynamical systems on compact manifolds. If there is an invariant measure with continuously differentiable density, then the divergence of the vector field along every solution tends to zero in the Cesàro sense as time increases unboundedly. Here the Cesàro convergence may be replaced, for example, by any Riesz summation method, which can be arbitrarily close to ordinary convergence (but does not coincide with it). We give an example of a system whose divergence tends to zero in the ordinary sense but none of its invariant measures is absolutely continuous with respect to the `standard' Lebesgue measure (generated by some Riemannian metric) on the phase space. We give examples of analytic systems of differential equations on analytic phase spaces admitting invariant measures of any prescribed smoothness (including a measure with integrable density), but having no invariant measures with positive continuous densities. We give a new proof of the classical Bogolyubov-Krylov theorem using generalized functions and the Hahn-Banach theorem. The properties of signed invariant measures are also discussed.

  5. Recovery of partial differential operators on classes of periodic functions with mixed smoothness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balgimbayeva, Sholpan

    2016-08-01

    We consider the problem of optimal linear recovery for mixed partial differential operator A on the unit ball SBpθ r(Tn) of the Nikol'skii-Besov space of periodic functions with mixed smoothness. We find error bounds sharp in order for optimal linear recovery of operator A on class SBpθ r(Tn) . As information IMδ(f ) about the functions f from class SBpθ r(Tn) we shall use Fourier coefficients with numbers from step "hyperbolic" cross. As the linear method using the information about Fourier coefficients, we shall consider action of the mixed partial differential operator A on the special "private" sum of decomposition on system (type as wavelets) trigonometric polynomials.

  6. Signalling functions of alpha-tocopherol in smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Azzi, A; Boscoboinik, D; Clément, S; Ozer, N K; Ricciarelli, R; Stocker, A; Tasinato, A; Sirikçi, O

    1997-01-01

    alpha-Tocopherol but not beta-tocopherol, activates protein phosphatase 2A, decreases protein kinase C activity and attenuates smooth muscle cell proliferation at physiological concentrations. beta-Tocopherol prevents the effects of alpha-tocopherol. Inhibition of protein kinase C alpha, but not of the other isoforms, by the inhibitor Gö6976 prevents the effect of alpha-tocopherol. Protein kinase C alpha, immunoprecipitated from alpha-tocopherol treated cells, is less phosphorylated and inactive. It is proposed that the specific activation of protein phosphatase 2A by alpha-tocopherol results in dephosphorylation and inactivation of protein kinase C alpha. Finally, this cascade of events leads to smooth muscle cell proliferation inhibition.

  7. The transcription factor TEAD1 represses smooth muscle-specific gene expression by abolishing myocardin function.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fang; Wang, Xiaobo; Hu, Guoqing; Wang, Yong; Zhou, Jiliang

    2014-02-07

    The TEAD (transcriptional enhancer activator domain) proteins share an evolutionarily conserved DNA-binding TEA domain, which binds to the MCAT cis-acting regulatory element. Previous studies have shown that TEAD proteins are involved in regulating the expression of smooth muscle α-actin. However, it remains undetermined whether TEAD proteins play a broader role in regulating expression of other genes in vascular smooth muscle cells. In this study, we show that the expression of TEAD1 is significantly induced during smooth muscle cell phenotypic modulation and negatively correlates with smooth muscle-specific gene expression. We further demonstrate that TEAD1 plays a novel role in suppressing expression of smooth muscle-specific genes, including smooth muscle α-actin, by abolishing the promyogenic function of myocardin, a key mediator of smooth muscle differentiation. Mechanistically, we found that TEAD1 competes with myocardin for binding to serum response factor (SRF), resulting in disruption of myocardin and SRF interactions and thereby attenuating expression of smooth muscle-specific genes. This study provides the first evidence demonstrating that TEAD1 is a novel general repressor of smooth muscle-specific gene expression through interfering with myocardin binding to SRF.

  8. Defining an olfactory receptor function in airway smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Aisenberg, William H.; Huang, Jessie; Zhu, Wanqu; Rajkumar, Premraj; Cruz, Randy; Santhanam, Lakshmi; Natarajan, Niranjana; Yong, Hwan Mee; De Santiago, Breann; Oh, Jung Jin; Yoon, A-Rum; Panettieri, Reynold A.; Homann, Oliver; Sullivan, John K.; Liggett, Stephen B.; Pluznick, Jennifer L.; An, Steven S.

    2016-01-01

    Pathways that control, or can be exploited to alter, the increase in airway smooth muscle (ASM) mass and cellular remodeling that occur in asthma are not well defined. Here we report the expression of odorant receptors (ORs) belonging to the superfamily of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), as well as the canonical olfaction machinery (Golf and AC3) in the smooth muscle of human bronchi. In primary cultures of isolated human ASM, we identified mRNA expression for multiple ORs. Strikingly, OR51E2 was the most highly enriched OR transcript mapped to the human olfactome in lung-resident cells. In a heterologous expression system, OR51E2 trafficked readily to the cell surface and showed ligand selectivity and sensitivity to the short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) acetate and propionate. These endogenous metabolic byproducts of the gut microbiota slowed the rate of cytoskeletal remodeling, as well as the proliferation of human ASM cells. These cellular responses in vitro were found in ASM from non-asthmatics and asthmatics, and were absent in OR51E2-deleted primary human ASM. These results demonstrate a novel chemo-mechanical signaling network in the ASM and serve as a proof-of-concept that a specific receptor of the gut-lung axis can be targeted to treat airflow obstruction in asthma. PMID:27905542

  9. Defining an olfactory receptor function in airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Aisenberg, William H; Huang, Jessie; Zhu, Wanqu; Rajkumar, Premraj; Cruz, Randy; Santhanam, Lakshmi; Natarajan, Niranjana; Yong, Hwan Mee; De Santiago, Breann; Oh, Jung Jin; Yoon, A-Rum; Panettieri, Reynold A; Homann, Oliver; Sullivan, John K; Liggett, Stephen B; Pluznick, Jennifer L; An, Steven S

    2016-12-01

    Pathways that control, or can be exploited to alter, the increase in airway smooth muscle (ASM) mass and cellular remodeling that occur in asthma are not well defined. Here we report the expression of odorant receptors (ORs) belonging to the superfamily of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), as well as the canonical olfaction machinery (Golf and AC3) in the smooth muscle of human bronchi. In primary cultures of isolated human ASM, we identified mRNA expression for multiple ORs. Strikingly, OR51E2 was the most highly enriched OR transcript mapped to the human olfactome in lung-resident cells. In a heterologous expression system, OR51E2 trafficked readily to the cell surface and showed ligand selectivity and sensitivity to the short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) acetate and propionate. These endogenous metabolic byproducts of the gut microbiota slowed the rate of cytoskeletal remodeling, as well as the proliferation of human ASM cells. These cellular responses in vitro were found in ASM from non-asthmatics and asthmatics, and were absent in OR51E2-deleted primary human ASM. These results demonstrate a novel chemo-mechanical signaling network in the ASM and serve as a proof-of-concept that a specific receptor of the gut-lung axis can be targeted to treat airflow obstruction in asthma.

  10. Space station functional relationships analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tullis, Thomas S.; Bied, Barbra R.

    1988-01-01

    A systems engineering process is developed to assist Space Station designers to understand the underlying operational system of the facility so that it can be physically arranged and configured to support crew productivity. The study analyzes the operational system proposed for the Space Station in terms of mission functions, crew activities, and functional relationships in order to develop a quantitative model for evaluation of interior layouts, configuration, and traffic analysis for any Station configuration. Development of the model involved identification of crew functions, required support equipment, criteria of assessing functional relationships, and tools for analyzing functional relationship matrices, as well as analyses of crew transition frequency, sequential dependencies, support equipment requirements, potential for noise interference, need for privacy, and overall compatability of functions. The model can be used for analyzing crew functions for the Initial Operating Capability of the Station and for detecting relationships among these functions. Note: This process (FRA) was used during Phase B design studies to test optional layouts of the Space Station habitat module. The process is now being automated as a computer model for use in layout testing of the Space Station laboratory modules during Phase C.

  11. Vascular smooth muscle cell functional contractility depends on extracellular mechanical properties

    PubMed Central

    Steucke, Kerianne E.; Tracy, Paige V.; Hald, Eric S.; Hall, Jennifer L.; Alford, Patrick W.

    2015-01-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells’ primary function is to maintain vascular homeostasis through active contraction and relaxation. In diseases such as hypertension and atherosclerosis, this function is inhibited concurrent to changes in the mechanical environment surrounding vascular smooth muscle cells. It is well established that cell function and extracellular mechanics are interconnected; variations in substrate modulus affect cell migration, proliferation, and differentiation. To date, it is unknown how the evolving extracellular mechanical environment of vascular smooth muscle cells affects their contractile function. Here, we have built upon previous vascular muscular thin film technology to develop a variable-modulus vascular muscular thin film that measures vascular tissue functional contractility on substrates with a range of pathological and physiological moduli. Using this modified vascular muscular thin film, we found that vascular smooth muscle cells generated greater stress on substrates with higher moduli compared to substrates with lower moduli. We then measured protein markers typically thought to indicate a contractile phenotype in vascular smooth muscle cells and found that phenotype is unaffected by substrate modulus. These data suggest that mechanical properties of vascular smooth muscle cells’ extracellular environment directly influence their functional behavior and do so without inducing phenotype switching. PMID:26283412

  12. Expansion of direction space around the cardinal axes revealed by smooth pursuit eye movements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krukowski, Anton E.; Stone, Leland S.

    2005-01-01

    It is well established that perceptual direction discrimination shows an oblique effect; thresholds are higher for motion along diagonal directions than for motion along cardinal directions. Here, we compare simultaneous direction judgments and pursuit responses for the same motion stimuli and find that both pursuit and perceptual thresholds show similar anisotropies. The pursuit oblique effect is robust under a wide range of experimental manipulations, being largely resistant to changes in trajectory (radial versus tangential motion), speed (10 versus 25 deg/s), directional uncertainty (blocked versus randomly interleaved), and cognitive state (tracking alone versus concurrent tracking and perceptual tasks). Our data show that the pursuit oblique effect is caused by an effective expansion of direction space surrounding the cardinal directions and the requisite compression of space for other directions. This expansion suggests that the directions around the cardinal directions are in some way overrepresented in the visual cortical pathways that drive both smooth pursuit and perception.

  13. Expansion of direction space around the cardinal axes revealed by smooth pursuit eye movements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krukowski, Anton E.; Stone, Leland S.

    2005-01-01

    It is well established that perceptual direction discrimination shows an oblique effect; thresholds are higher for motion along diagonal directions than for motion along cardinal directions. Here, we compare simultaneous direction judgments and pursuit responses for the same motion stimuli and find that both pursuit and perceptual thresholds show similar anisotropies. The pursuit oblique effect is robust under a wide range of experimental manipulations, being largely resistant to changes in trajectory (radial versus tangential motion), speed (10 versus 25 deg/s), directional uncertainty (blocked versus randomly interleaved), and cognitive state (tracking alone versus concurrent tracking and perceptual tasks). Our data show that the pursuit oblique effect is caused by an effective expansion of direction space surrounding the cardinal directions and the requisite compression of space for other directions. This expansion suggests that the directions around the cardinal directions are in some way overrepresented in the visual cortical pathways that drive both smooth pursuit and perception.

  14. Cardiovascular function in space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicogossian, A. E.; Charles, J. B.; Bungo, M. W.; Leach-Huntoon, C. S.

    1990-01-01

    Postflight orthostatic intolerance and cardiac hemodynamics associated with manned space flight have been investigated on seven STS missions. Orthostatic heart rates appear to be influenced by the mission duration. The rates increase during the first 7-10 days of flight and recover partially after that. Fluid loading is used as a countermeasure to the postflight orthostatic intolerance. The carotid baroreceptor function shows only slight responsiveness to orthostatic stimulation. Plots of the baroreceptor function are presented. It is concluded that an early adaptation to the space flight conditions involves a fluid shift and that the subsequent alterations in the neutral controlling mechanisms contribute to the orthoststic intolerance.

  15. Cardiovascular function in space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicogossian, A. E.; Charles, J. B.; Bungo, M. W.; Leach-Huntoon, C. S.

    1990-01-01

    Postflight orthostatic intolerance and cardiac hemodynamics associated with manned space flight have been investigated on seven STS missions. Orthostatic heart rates appear to be influenced by the mission duration. The rates increase during the first 7-10 days of flight and recover partially after that. Fluid loading is used as a countermeasure to the postflight orthostatic intolerance. The carotid baroreceptor function shows only slight responsiveness to orthostatic stimulation. Plots of the baroreceptor function are presented. It is concluded that an early adaptation to the space flight conditions involves a fluid shift and that the subsequent alterations in the neutral controlling mechanisms contribute to the orthoststic intolerance.

  16. Evaluation of the performance of smoothing functions in generalized additive models for spatial variation in disease.

    PubMed

    Siangphoe, Umaporn; Wheeler, David C

    2015-01-01

    Generalized additive models (GAMs) with bivariate smoothing functions have been applied to estimate spatial variation in risk for many types of cancers. Only a handful of studies have evaluated the performance of smoothing functions applied in GAMs with regard to different geographical areas of elevated risk and different risk levels. This study evaluates the ability of different smoothing functions to detect overall spatial variation of risk and elevated risk in diverse geographical areas at various risk levels using a simulation study. We created five scenarios with different true risk area shapes (circle, triangle, linear) in a square study region. We applied four different smoothing functions in the GAMs, including two types of thin plate regression splines (TPRS) and two versions of locally weighted scatterplot smoothing (loess). We tested the null hypothesis of constant risk and detected areas of elevated risk using analysis of deviance with permutation methods and assessed the performance of the smoothing methods based on the spatial detection rate, sensitivity, accuracy, precision, power, and false-positive rate. The results showed that all methods had a higher sensitivity and a consistently moderate-to-high accuracy rate when the true disease risk was higher. The models generally performed better in detecting elevated risk areas than detecting overall spatial variation. One of the loess methods had the highest precision in detecting overall spatial variation across scenarios and outperformed the other methods in detecting a linear elevated risk area. The TPRS methods outperformed loess in detecting elevated risk in two circular areas.

  17. Evaluation of the Performance of Smoothing Functions in Generalized Additive Models for Spatial Variation in Disease

    PubMed Central

    Siangphoe, Umaporn; Wheeler, David C.

    2015-01-01

    Generalized additive models (GAMs) with bivariate smoothing functions have been applied to estimate spatial variation in risk for many types of cancers. Only a handful of studies have evaluated the performance of smoothing functions applied in GAMs with regard to different geographical areas of elevated risk and different risk levels. This study evaluates the ability of different smoothing functions to detect overall spatial variation of risk and elevated risk in diverse geographical areas at various risk levels using a simulation study. We created five scenarios with different true risk area shapes (circle, triangle, linear) in a square study region. We applied four different smoothing functions in the GAMs, including two types of thin plate regression splines (TPRS) and two versions of locally weighted scatterplot smoothing (loess). We tested the null hypothesis of constant risk and detected areas of elevated risk using analysis of deviance with permutation methods and assessed the performance of the smoothing methods based on the spatial detection rate, sensitivity, accuracy, precision, power, and false-positive rate. The results showed that all methods had a higher sensitivity and a consistently moderate-to-high accuracy rate when the true disease risk was higher. The models generally performed better in detecting elevated risk areas than detecting overall spatial variation. One of the loess methods had the highest precision in detecting overall spatial variation across scenarios and outperformed the other methods in detecting a linear elevated risk area. The TPRS methods outperformed loess in detecting elevated risk in two circular areas. PMID:25983545

  18. Approximation bounds for smooth functions in C(IRd) by neural and mixture networks.

    PubMed

    Maiorov, V; Meir, R S

    1998-01-01

    We consider the approximation of smooth multivariate functions in C(IRd) by feedforward neural networks with a single hidden layer of nonlinear ridge functions. Under certain assumptions on the smoothness of the functions being approximated and on the activation functions in the neural network, we present upper bounds on the degree of approximation achieved over the domain IRd, thereby generalizing available results for compact domains. We extend the approximation results to the so-called mixture of expert architecture, which has received considerable attention in recent years, showing that the same type of approximation bound may be achieved.

  19. Constrained minimization of smooth functions using a genetic algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moerder, Daniel D.; Pamadi, Bandu N.

    1994-01-01

    The use of genetic algorithms for minimization of differentiable functions that are subject to differentiable constraints is considered. A technique is demonstrated for converting the solution of the necessary conditions for a constrained minimum into an unconstrained function minimization. This technique is extended as a global constrained optimization algorithm. The theory is applied to calculating minimum-fuel ascent control settings for an energy state model of an aerospace plane.

  20. Function Spaces for Liquid Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedford, Stephen

    2016-02-01

    We consider the relationship between three continuum liquid crystal theories: Oseen-Frank, Ericksen and Landau-de Gennes. It is known that the function space is an important part of the mathematical model and by considering various function space choices for the order parameters s, n, and Q, we establish connections between the variational formulations of these theories. We use these results to justify a version of the Oseen-Frank theory using special functions of bounded variation. This proposed model can describe both orientable and non-orientable defects. Finally we study a number of frustrated nematic and cholesteric liquid crystal systems and show that the model predicts the existence of point and surface discontinuities in the director.

  1. Correlation of tracheal smooth muscle function with structure and protein expression during early development.

    PubMed

    Cullen, Aaron B; Cooke, Peter H; Driska, Steven P; Wolfson, Marla R; Shaffer, Thomas H

    2007-05-01

    With increased survival of premature infants, understanding the impact of development on airway function and structure is imperative. Airway smooth muscle plays a primary role in the modulation of airway function. The purpose of this study is to correlate the functional maturation of airway smooth muscle during the perinatal period with structural alterations at the cellular, ultrastructural, and molecular levels. Length-tension and dose-response analyses were performed on tracheal rings acquired from preterm and term newborn lambs. Subsequent structural analyses included isolated airway smooth muscle cell length, electron microscopy, and myosin heavy chain isoform expression measurements. Functionally the compliance, contractility, and agonist sensitivity of the tracheal rings matured during preterm to term development. Structurally, isolated cell lengths and electron microscopic ultrastructure were not significantly altered during perinatal development. However, expression of myosin heavy chain isoforms increased significantly across the age range analyzed, correlating with the maturational increase in smooth muscle contractility. In conclusion, the developmental alterations in tracheal function appear due, in part, to enhanced smooth muscle myosin heavy chain expression. Copyright 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Families of smooth confidence bands for the survival function under the general random censorship model.

    PubMed

    Gulati, S; Padgett, W J

    1996-01-01

    Randomly right censored data often arise in industrial life testing and clinical trials. Several authors have proposed asymptotic confidence bands for the survival function when data are randomly censored on the right. All of these bands are based on the empirical estimator of the survival function. In this paper, families of asymptotic (1-alpha) 100% level confidence bands are developed from the smoothed estimate of the survival function under the general random censorship model. The new bands are compared to empirical bands, and it is shown that for small sample sizes, the smooth bands have a higher coverage probability than the empirical counterparts.

  3. Optimization with quadratic support functions in nonconvex smooth optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khamisov, O. V.

    2016-10-01

    Problem of global minimization of twice continuously differentiable function with Lipschitz second derivatives over a polytope is considered. We suggest a branch and bound method with polytopes as partition elements. Due to the Lipschitz property of the objective function we can construct a quadratic support minorant at each point of the feasible set. Global minimum of of this minorant provides a lower bound of the objective over given partition subset. The main advantage of the suggested method consists in the following. First quadratic minorants usually are nonconvex and we have to solve auxiliary global optimization problem. This problem is reduced to a mixed 0-1 linear programming problem and can be solved by an advanced 0-1 solver. Then we show that the quadratic minorants are getting convex as soon as partition elements are getting smaller in diameter. Hence, at the final steps of the branch and bound method we solve convex auxiliary quadratic problems. Therefore, the method accelerates when we are close to the global minimum of the initial problem.

  4. Approximating Smooth Step Functions Using Partial Fourier Series Sums

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    interp1(xt(ii), smoothstepbez( t(ii), min(t(ii)), max(t(ii)), ’y’), t(ii), ’linear’, ’ extrap ’); ii = find( abs(t - tau/2) <= epi ); iii = t(ii...interp1( xt(ii), smoothstepbez( rt, min(rt), max(rt), ’y’), t(ii), ’linear’, ’ extrap ’ ); % stepm(ii) = 1 - interp1(xt(ii), smoothstepbez( t(ii...min(t(ii)), max(t(ii)), ’y’), t(ii), ’linear’, ’ extrap ’); In this case, because x is also defined as a function of the independent parameter

  5. Arterial Smooth Muscle Mitochondria Amplify Hydrogen Peroxide Microdomains Functionally Coupled to L-Type Calcium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Chaplin, Nathan L.; Nieves-Cintrón, Madeline; Fresquez, Adriana M.; Navedo, Manuel F.; Amberg, Gregory C.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Mitochondria are key integrators of convergent intracellular signaling pathways. Two important second messengers modulated by mitochondria are calcium and reactive oxygen species. To date, coherent mechanisms describing mitochondrial integration of calcium and oxidative signaling in arterial smooth muscle are incomplete. Objective To address and add clarity to this issue we tested the hypothesis that mitochondria regulate subplasmalemmal calcium and hydrogen peroxide microdomain signaling in cerebral arterial smooth muscle. Methods and Results Using an image-based approach we investigated the impact of mitochondrial regulation of L-type calcium channels on subcellular calcium and ROS signaling microdomains in isolated arterial smooth muscle cells. Our single cell observations were then related experimentally to intact arterial segments and to living animals. We found that subplasmalemmal mitochondrial amplification of hydrogen peroxide microdomain signaling stimulates L-type calcium channels and that this mechanism strongly impacts the functional capacity of the vasoconstrictor angiotensin II. Importantly, we also found that disrupting this mitochondrial amplification mechanism in vivo normalized arterial function and attenuated the hypertensive response to systemic endothelial dysfunction. Conclusions From these observations we conclude that mitochondrial amplification of subplasmalemmal calcium and hydrogen peroxide microdomain signaling is a fundamental mechanism regulating arterial smooth muscle function. As the principle components involved are fairly ubiquitous and positioning of mitochondria near the plasma membrane is not restricted to arterial smooth muscle, this mechanism could occur in many cell types and contribute to pathological elevations of intracellular calcium and increased oxidative stress associated with many diseases. PMID:26390880

  6. Phenotypic and Functional Changes of Endothelial and Smooth Muscle Cells in Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Malashicheva, Anna; Kostina, Daria; Kostina, Aleksandra; Irtyuga, Olga; Voronkina, Irina; Smagina, Larisa; Ignatieva, Elena; Gavriliuk, Natalia; Uspensky, Vladimir; Moiseeva, Olga; Vaage, Jarle; Kostareva, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Thoracic aortic aneurysm develops as a result of complex series of events that alter the cellular structure and the composition of the extracellular matrix of the aortic wall. The purpose of the present work was to study the cellular functions of endothelial and smooth muscle cells from the patients with aneurysms of the thoracic aorta. We studied endothelial and smooth muscle cells from aneurysms in patients with bicuspid aortic valve and with tricuspid aortic valve. The expression of key markers of endothelial (CD31, vWF, and VE-cadherin) and smooth muscle (SMA, SM22α, calponin, and vimentin) cells as well extracellular matrix and MMP activity was studied as well as and apoptosis and cell proliferation. Expression of functional markers of endothelial and smooth muscle cells was reduced in patient cells. Cellular proliferation, migration, and synthesis of extracellular matrix proteins are attenuated in the cells of the patients. We show for the first time that aortic endothelial cell phenotype is changed in the thoracic aortic aneurysms compared to normal aortic wall. In conclusion both endothelial and smooth muscle cells from aneurysms of the ascending aorta have downregulated specific cellular markers and altered functional properties, such as growth rate, apoptosis induction, and extracellular matrix synthesis. PMID:26904289

  7. Phenotypic and Functional Changes of Endothelial and Smooth Muscle Cells in Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Malashicheva, Anna; Kostina, Daria; Kostina, Aleksandra; Irtyuga, Olga; Voronkina, Irina; Smagina, Larisa; Ignatieva, Elena; Gavriliuk, Natalia; Uspensky, Vladimir; Moiseeva, Olga; Vaage, Jarle; Kostareva, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Thoracic aortic aneurysm develops as a result of complex series of events that alter the cellular structure and the composition of the extracellular matrix of the aortic wall. The purpose of the present work was to study the cellular functions of endothelial and smooth muscle cells from the patients with aneurysms of the thoracic aorta. We studied endothelial and smooth muscle cells from aneurysms in patients with bicuspid aortic valve and with tricuspid aortic valve. The expression of key markers of endothelial (CD31, vWF, and VE-cadherin) and smooth muscle (SMA, SM22α, calponin, and vimentin) cells as well extracellular matrix and MMP activity was studied as well as and apoptosis and cell proliferation. Expression of functional markers of endothelial and smooth muscle cells was reduced in patient cells. Cellular proliferation, migration, and synthesis of extracellular matrix proteins are attenuated in the cells of the patients. We show for the first time that aortic endothelial cell phenotype is changed in the thoracic aortic aneurysms compared to normal aortic wall. In conclusion both endothelial and smooth muscle cells from aneurysms of the ascending aorta have downregulated specific cellular markers and altered functional properties, such as growth rate, apoptosis induction, and extracellular matrix synthesis.

  8. Cardiovascular function in space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicogossian, A. E.; Charles, J. B.; Bungo, M. W.; Leach-Huntoon, C. S.; Nicgossian, A. E.

    1991-01-01

    Changes in orthostatic heart rate have been noted universally in Soviet and U.S. crewmembers post space flight. The magnitude of these changes appears to be influenced by mission duration, with increasing orthostatic intolerance for the first 7-10 days of flight and then a partial recovery in the orthostatic heart rate response. Fluid loading has been used as a countermeasure to this postflight orthostatic intolerance. Previous reports have documented the effectiveness of this technique, but it has also been noted that the effectiveness of volume expansion diminishes as flight duration exceeds one week. The response of carotid baroreceptor function was investigated utilizing a commercially available neck collar which could apply positive and negative pressure to effect receptor stimulation. Bedrest studies had validated the usefulness and validity of the device. In these studies it was shown that carotid baroreceptor function curves demonstrated less responsiveness to orthostatic stimulation than control individuals. Twelve Space Shuttle crewmembers were examined pre- and postflight from flights lasting from 4-5 days. Plots of baroreceptor function were constructed and plotted as change in R-R interval vs. carotid distending pressure (an orthostatic stimulus). Typical sigmoidal curves were obtained. Postflight the resting heart rate was higher (smaller R-R interval) and the range of R-R value and the slope of the carotid sigmoidal response were both depressed. These changes were not significant immediately postflight (L + O), but did become significant by the second day postflight (L + 2), and remained suppressed for several days thereafter. It is hypothesized that the early adaptation to space flight involves a central fluid shift during the initial days of flight, but subsequent alterations in neural controlling mechanisms (such as carotid baroreceptor function) contribute to orthostatic intolerance.

  9. Cardiovascular function in space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicogossian, A. E.; Charles, J. B.; Bungo, M. W.; Leach-Huntoon, C. S.; Nicgossian, A. E.

    1991-01-01

    Changes in orthostatic heart rate have been noted universally in Soviet and U.S. crewmembers post space flight. The magnitude of these changes appears to be influenced by mission duration, with increasing orthostatic intolerance for the first 7-10 days of flight and then a partial recovery in the orthostatic heart rate response. Fluid loading has been used as a countermeasure to this postflight orthostatic intolerance. Previous reports have documented the effectiveness of this technique, but it has also been noted that the effectiveness of volume expansion diminishes as flight duration exceeds one week. The response of carotid baroreceptor function was investigated utilizing a commercially available neck collar which could apply positive and negative pressure to effect receptor stimulation. Bedrest studies had validated the usefulness and validity of the device. In these studies it was shown that carotid baroreceptor function curves demonstrated less responsiveness to orthostatic stimulation than control individuals. Twelve Space Shuttle crewmembers were examined pre- and postflight from flights lasting from 4-5 days. Plots of baroreceptor function were constructed and plotted as change in R-R interval vs. carotid distending pressure (an orthostatic stimulus). Typical sigmoidal curves were obtained. Postflight the resting heart rate was higher (smaller R-R interval) and the range of R-R value and the slope of the carotid sigmoidal response were both depressed. These changes were not significant immediately postflight (L + O), but did become significant by the second day postflight (L + 2), and remained suppressed for several days thereafter. It is hypothesized that the early adaptation to space flight involves a central fluid shift during the initial days of flight, but subsequent alterations in neural controlling mechanisms (such as carotid baroreceptor function) contribute to orthostatic intolerance.

  10. The evolutionarily conserved RNA binding protein SMOOTH is essential for maintaining normal muscle function.

    PubMed

    Draper, Isabelle; Tabaka, Meg E; Jackson, F Rob; Salomon, Robert N; Kopin, Alan S

    2009-01-01

    The Drosophila smooth gene encodes an RNA binding protein that has been well conserved through evolution. To investigate the pleiotropic functions mediated by the smooth gene, we have selected and characterized two sm mutants, which are viable as adults yet display robust phenotypes (including a significant decrease in lifespan). Utilizing these mutants, we have made the novel observation that disruption of the smooth/CG9218 locus leads to age-dependent muscle degeneration, and motor dysfunction. Histological characterization of adult sm mutants revealed marked abnormalities in the major thoracic tubular muscle: the tergal depressor of the trochanter (TDT). Corresponding defects include extensive loss/disruption of striations and nuclei. These pathological changes are recapitulated in flies that express a smooth RNA interference construct (sm RNAi) in the mesoderm. In contrast, targeting sm RNAi constructs to motor neurons does not alter muscle morphology. In addition to examining the TDT phenotype, we explored whether other muscular abnormalities were evident. Utilizing physiological assays developed in the laboratory, we have found that the thoracic muscle defect is preceded by dysmotility of the gastrointestinal tract. SMOOTH thus joins a growing list of hnRNPs that have previously been linked to muscle physiology/pathophysiology. Our findings in Drosophila set the stage for investigating the role of the corresponding mammalian homolog, hnRNP L, in muscle function.

  11. Smooth Muscle Endothelin B Receptors Regulate Blood Pressure but Not Vascular Function or Neointimal Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Eileen; Czopek, Alicja; Duthie, Karolina M.; Kirkby, Nicholas S.; van de Putte, Elisabeth E. Fransen; Christen, Sibylle; Kimmitt, Robert A.; Moorhouse, Rebecca; Castellan, Raphael F.P.; Kotelevtsev, Yuri V.; Kuc, Rhoda E.; Davenport, Anthony P.; Dhaun, Neeraj; Webb, David J.

    2017-01-01

    The role of smooth muscle endothelinB (ETB) receptors in regulating vascular function, blood pressure (BP), and neointimal remodeling has not been established. Selective knockout mice were generated to address the hypothesis that loss of smooth muscle ETB receptors would reduce BP, alter vascular contractility, and inhibit neointimal remodeling. ETB receptors were selectively deleted from smooth muscle by crossing floxed ETB mice with those expressing cre-recombinase controlled by the transgelin promoter. Functional consequences of ETB deletion were assessed using myography. BP was measured by telemetry, and neointimal lesion formation induced by femoral artery injury. Lesion size and composition (day 28) were analyzed using optical projection tomography, histology, and immunohistochemistry. Selective deletion of ETB was confirmed by genotyping, autoradiography, polymerase chain reaction, and immunohistochemistry. ETB-mediated contraction was reduced in trachea, but abolished from mesenteric veins, of knockout mice. Induction of ETB-mediated contraction in mesenteric arteries was also abolished in these mice. Femoral artery function was unaltered, and baseline BP modestly elevated in smooth muscle ETB knockout compared with controls (+4.2±0.2 mm Hg; P<0.0001), but salt-induced and ETB blockade–mediated hypertension were unaltered. Circulating endothelin-1 was not altered in knockout mice. ETB-mediated contraction was not induced in femoral arteries by incubation in culture medium or lesion formation, and lesion size was not altered in smooth muscle ETB knockout mice. In the absence of other pathology, ETB receptors in vascular smooth muscle make a small but significant contribution to ETB-dependent regulation of BP. These ETB receptors have no effect on vascular contraction or neointimal remodeling. PMID:28028193

  12. A Novel Selectable Islet 1 Positive Progenitor Cell Reprogrammed to Expandable and Functional Smooth Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Turner, Elizabeth C; Huang, Chien-Ling; Sawhney, Neha; Govindarajan, Kalaimathi; Clover, Anthony J P; Martin, Kenneth; Browne, Tara C; Whelan, Derek; Kumar, Arun H S; Mackrill, John J; Wang, Shaohua; Schmeckpeper, Jeffrey; Stocca, Alessia; Pierce, William G; Leblond, Anne-Laure; Cai, Liquan; O'Sullivan, Donnchadh M; Buneker, Chirlei K; Choi, Janet; MacSharry, John; Ikeda, Yasuhiro; Russell, Stephen J; Caplice, Noel M

    2016-05-01

    Disorders affecting smooth muscle structure/function may require technologies that can generate large scale, differentiated and contractile smooth muscle cells (SMC) suitable for cell therapy. To date no clonal precursor population that provides large numbers of differentiated SMC in culture has been identified in a rodent. Identification of such cells may also enhance insight into progenitor cell fate decisions and the relationship between smooth muscle precursors and disease states that implicate differentiated SMC.  In this study, we used classic clonal expansion techniques to identify novel self-renewing Islet 1 (Isl-1) positive primitive progenitor cells (PPC) within rat bone marrow that exhibited canonical stem cell markers and preferential differentiation towards a smooth muscle-like fate. We subsequently used molecular tagging to select Isl-1 positive clonal populations from expanded and de novo marrow cell populations. We refer to these previously undescribed cells as the PPC given its stem cell marker profile, and robust self-renewal capacity. PPC could be directly converted into induced smooth muscle cells (iSMC) using single transcription factor (Kruppel-like factor 4) knockdown or transactivator (myocardin) overexpression in contrast to three control cells (HEK 293, endothelial cells and mesenchymal stem cells) where such induction was not possible. iSMC exhibited immuno- and cytoskeletal-phenotype, calcium signaling profile and contractile responses similar to bona fide SMC. Passaged iSMC could be expanded to a scale sufficient for large scale tissue replacement.  PPC and reprogramed iSMC so derived may offer future opportunities to investigate molecular, structure/function and cell-based replacement therapy approaches to diverse cardiovascular, respiratory, gastrointestinal, and genitourinary diseases that have as their basis smooth muscle cell functional aberrancy or numerical loss. Stem Cells 2016;34:1354-1368.

  13. Smooth Muscle Endothelin B Receptors Regulate Blood Pressure but Not Vascular Function or Neointimal Remodeling.

    PubMed

    Miller, Eileen; Czopek, Alicja; Duthie, Karolina M; Kirkby, Nicholas S; van de Putte, Elisabeth E Fransen; Christen, Sibylle; Kimmitt, Robert A; Moorhouse, Rebecca; Castellan, Raphael F P; Kotelevtsev, Yuri V; Kuc, Rhoda E; Davenport, Anthony P; Dhaun, Neeraj; Webb, David J; Hadoke, Patrick W F

    2017-02-01

    The role of smooth muscle endothelinB (ETB) receptors in regulating vascular function, blood pressure (BP), and neointimal remodeling has not been established. Selective knockout mice were generated to address the hypothesis that loss of smooth muscle ETB receptors would reduce BP, alter vascular contractility, and inhibit neointimal remodeling. ETB receptors were selectively deleted from smooth muscle by crossing floxed ETB mice with those expressing cre-recombinase controlled by the transgelin promoter. Functional consequences of ETB deletion were assessed using myography. BP was measured by telemetry, and neointimal lesion formation induced by femoral artery injury. Lesion size and composition (day 28) were analyzed using optical projection tomography, histology, and immunohistochemistry. Selective deletion of ETB was confirmed by genotyping, autoradiography, polymerase chain reaction, and immunohistochemistry. ETB-mediated contraction was reduced in trachea, but abolished from mesenteric veins, of knockout mice. Induction of ETB-mediated contraction in mesenteric arteries was also abolished in these mice. Femoral artery function was unaltered, and baseline BP modestly elevated in smooth muscle ETB knockout compared with controls (+4.2±0.2 mm Hg; P<0.0001), but salt-induced and ETB blockade-mediated hypertension were unaltered. Circulating endothelin-1 was not altered in knockout mice. ETB-mediated contraction was not induced in femoral arteries by incubation in culture medium or lesion formation, and lesion size was not altered in smooth muscle ETB knockout mice. In the absence of other pathology, ETB receptors in vascular smooth muscle make a small but significant contribution to ETB-dependent regulation of BP. These ETB receptors have no effect on vascular contraction or neointimal remodeling. © 2016 The Authors.

  14. Space Shuttle critical function audit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sacks, Ivan J.; Dipol, John; Su, Paul

    1990-01-01

    A large fault-tolerance model of the main propulsion system of the US space shuttle has been developed. This model is being used to identify single components and pairs of components that will cause loss of shuttle critical functions. In addition, this model is the basis for risk quantification of the shuttle. The process used to develop and analyze the model is digraph matrix analysis (DMA). The DMA modeling and analysis process is accessed via a graphics-based computer user interface. This interface provides coupled display of the integrated system schematics, the digraph models, the component database, and the results of the fault tolerance and risk analyses.

  15. Space Shuttle critical function audit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sacks, Ivan J.; Dipol, John; Su, Paul

    1990-01-01

    A large fault-tolerance model of the main propulsion system of the US space shuttle has been developed. This model is being used to identify single components and pairs of components that will cause loss of shuttle critical functions. In addition, this model is the basis for risk quantification of the shuttle. The process used to develop and analyze the model is digraph matrix analysis (DMA). The DMA modeling and analysis process is accessed via a graphics-based computer user interface. This interface provides coupled display of the integrated system schematics, the digraph models, the component database, and the results of the fault tolerance and risk analyses.

  16. Optimized method for isolating highly purified and functional porcine aortic endothelial and smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Beigi, Farideh; Patel, Mitalben; Morales-Garza, Marco A; Winebrenner, Caitlin; Gobin, Andrea S; Chau, Eric; Sampaio, Luiz C; Taylor, Doris A

    2017-11-01

    Numerous protocols exist for isolating aortic endothelial and smooth muscle cells from small animals. However, establishing a protocol for isolating pure cell populations from large animal vessels that are more elastic has been challenging. We developed a simple sequential enzymatic approach to isolate highly purified populations of porcine aortic endothelial and smooth muscle cells. The lumen of a porcine aorta was filled with 25 U/ml dispase solution and incubated at 37°C to dissociate the endothelial cells. The smooth muscle cells were isolated by mincing the tunica media of the treated aorta and incubating the pieces in 0.2% and then 0.1% collagenase type I solution. The isolated endothelial cells stained positive for von Willebrand factor, and 97.2% of them expressed CD31. Early and late passage endothelial cells had a population doubling time of 38 hr and maintained a capacity to take up DiI-Ac-LDL and form tubes in Matrigel®. The isolated smooth muscle cells stained highly positive for alpha-smooth muscle actin, and an impurities assessment showed that only 1.8% were endothelial cells. Population doubling time for the smooth muscle cells was ∼70 hr at passages 3 and 7; and the cells positively responded to endothelin-1, as shown by a 66% increase in the intracellular calcium level. This simple protocol allows for the isolation of highly pure populations of endothelial and smooth muscle cells from porcine aorta that can survive continued passage in culture without losing functionality or becoming overgrown by fibroblasts. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Functional linkage of Na+-Ca2+-exchanger to sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ pump in coronary artery: comparison of smooth muscle and endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Davis, Kim A; Samson, Sue E; Hammel, Kaitlin E; Kiss, Lorand; Fulop, Ferenc; Grover, Ashok K

    2009-08-01

    An increase in cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration in coronary artery smooth muscle causes a contraction but in endothelium it causes relaxation. Na(+)-Ca(2+)-exchanger (NCX) may play a role in Ca(2+) dynamics in both the cell types. Here, the NCX-mediated (45)Ca(2+) uptake was compared in Na(+)-loaded pig coronary artery smooth muscle and endothelial cells. In both the cell types, this uptake was inhibited by KB-R7943, SEA 0400 and by monensin, but not by cariporide. Prior loading of the cells with the Ca(2+) chelator BAPTA increased the NCX-mediated (45)Ca(2+) uptake in smooth muscle but not in endothelial cells. In the presence or absence of BAPTA loading, the Na(+)-mediated (45)Ca(2+) uptake was greater in endothelial than in smooth muscle cells. In smooth muscle cells without BAPTA loading, thapsigargin diminished the NCX-mediated (45)Ca(2+) entry. This effect was not observed in endothelial cells or in either cell type after BAPTA loading. The results in the smooth muscle cells are consistent with a limited diffusional space model in which the NCX-mediated (45)Ca(2+) uptake was enhanced by chelation of cytosolic Ca(2+) or by its sequestration by the sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) pump (SERCA). They suggest a functional linkage between NCX and SERCA in the smooth muscle but not in the endothelial cells. The concept of a linkage between NCX and SERCA in smooth muscle was also confirmed by similar distribution of NCX and SERCA2 proteins when detergent-treated microsomes were fractionated by flotation on sucrose density gradients. Thus, the coronary artery smooth muscle and endothelial cells differ not only in the relative activities of NCX but also in its functional linkage to SERCA.

  18. Smooth muscle architecture within cell-dense vascular tissues influences functional contractility.

    PubMed

    Win, Zaw; Vrla, Geoffrey D; Steucke, Kerianne E; Sevcik, Emily N; Hald, Eric S; Alford, Patrick W

    2014-12-01

    The role of vascular smooth muscle architecture in the function of healthy and dysfunctional vessels is poorly understood. We aimed at determining the relationship between vascular smooth muscle architecture and contractile output using engineered vascular tissues. We utilized microcontact printing and a microfluidic cell seeding technique to provide three different initial seeding conditions, with the aim of influencing the cellular architecture within the tissue. Cells seeded in each condition formed confluent and aligned tissues but within the tissues, the cellular architecture varied. Tissues with a more elongated cellular architecture had significantly elevated basal stress and produced more contractile stress in response to endothelin-1 stimulation. We also found a correlation between the contractile phenotype marker expression and the cellular architecture, contrary to our previous findings in non-confluent tissues. Taken with previous results, these data suggest that within cell-dense vascular tissues, smooth muscle contractility is strongly influenced by cell and tissue architectures.

  19. A functional role for the 'fibroblast-like cells' in gastrointestinal smooth muscles.

    PubMed

    Kurahashi, Masaaki; Zheng, Haifeng; Dwyer, Laura; Ward, Sean M; Koh, Sang Don; Sanders, Kenton M

    2011-02-01

    Smooth muscles, as in the gastrointestinal tract, are composed of several types of cells. Gastrointestinal muscles contain smooth muscle cells, enteric neurons, glial cells, immune cells, and various classes of interstitial cells. One type of interstitial cell, referred to as 'fibroblast-like cells' by morphologists, are common, but their function is unknown. These cells are found near the terminals of enteric motor neurons, suggesting they could have a role in generating neural responses that help control gastrointestinal movements. We used a novel mouse with bright green fluorescent protein expressed specifically in the fibroblast-like cells to help us identify these cells in the mixture of cells obtained when whole muscles are dispersed with enzymes. We isolated these cells and found they respond to a major class of inhibitory neurotransmitters - purines. We characterized these responses, and our results provide a new hypothesis about the role of fibroblast-like cells in smooth muscle tissues.

  20. Surgical Skin Markers Impair Human Saphenous Vein Graft Smooth Muscle and Endothelial Function

    PubMed Central

    EAGLE, SUSAN; BROPHY, COLLEEN M.; KOMALAVILAS, PADMINI; HOCKING, KYLE; PUTUMBAKA, GOWTHAMI; OSGOOD, MICHAEL; SEXTON, KEVIN; LEACCHE, MARZIA; CHEUNG-FLYNN, JOYCE

    2012-01-01

    Marking human saphenous vein graft (HSV) with a surgical skin marker to prevent twisting on implantation is a common practice in peripheral and coronary artery bypass procedures. This study is designed to examine the effects of surgical skin markers on the HSV smooth muscle and endothelial functional responses. De-identified HSV remnants were collected during peripheral and coronary artery bypass procedures. Physiologic responses of the HSV were measured using a muscle bath. Veins that were marked with surgical skin markers intraoperatively generated significantly less contractile force to depolarizing KCl (110 mM) and receptor-mediated contractile agonists than unmarked HSV, suggesting that surgical skin markers impaired HSV smooth muscle contractility. To directly access the effects of chemical components in the surgical skin markers, unmarked HSV was exposed to isopropyl alcohol (a solvent commonly used in surgical skin markers) or methylene blue (a dye). Smooth muscle contractility was significantly reduced by isopropyl alcohol and methylene blue. Endothelial-dependent relaxation to carbachol was significantly reduced after exposure to surgical skin markers. Our data demonstrated that marking HSV with surgical skin markers reduces smooth muscle and endothelial functional viability. PMID:21944360

  1. Spaces defined by the Paley function

    SciTech Connect

    Astashkin, S V; Semenov, E M

    2013-07-31

    The paper is concerned with Haar and Rademacher series in symmetric spaces, and also with the properties of spaces defined by the Paley function. In particular, the symmetric hull of the space of functions with uniformly bounded Paley function is found. Bibliography: 27 titles.

  2. Using Cochran's Z Statistic to Test the Kernel-Smoothed Item Response Function Differences between Focal and Reference Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zheng, Yinggan; Gierl, Mark J.; Cui, Ying

    2010-01-01

    This study combined the kernel smoothing procedure and a nonparametric differential item functioning statistic--Cochran's Z--to statistically test the difference between the kernel-smoothed item response functions for reference and focal groups. Simulation studies were conducted to investigate the Type I error and power of the proposed…

  3. Using Cochran's Z Statistic to Test the Kernel-Smoothed Item Response Function Differences between Focal and Reference Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zheng, Yinggan; Gierl, Mark J.; Cui, Ying

    2010-01-01

    This study combined the kernel smoothing procedure and a nonparametric differential item functioning statistic--Cochran's Z--to statistically test the difference between the kernel-smoothed item response functions for reference and focal groups. Simulation studies were conducted to investigate the Type I error and power of the proposed…

  4. Smoothing individual head-related transfer functions in the frequency and spatial domains.

    PubMed

    Rasumow, Eugen; Blau, Matthias; Hansen, Martin; van de Par, Steven; Doclo, Simon; Mellert, Volker; Püschel, Dirk

    2014-04-01

    When re-synthesizing individual head related transfer functions (HRTFs) with a microphone array, smoothing HRTFs spectrally and/or spatially prior to the computation of appropriate microphone filters may improve the synthesis accuracy. In this study, the limits of the associated HRTF modifications, until which no perceptual degradations occur, are explored. First, complex spectral smoothing of HRTFs into constant relative bandwidths was considered. As a prerequisite to complex smoothing, the HRTF phase spectra were substituted by linear phases, either for the whole frequency range or above a certain cut-off frequency only. The results indicate that a broadband phase linearization of HRTFs can be perceived for certain directions/subjects and that the thresholds can be predicted by a simple model. HRTF phase spectra can be linearized above 1 kHz without being detectable. After substituting the original phase by a linear phase above 5 kHz, HRTFs may be smoothed complexly into constant relative bandwidths of 1/5 octave, without introducing noticeable artifacts. Second, spatially smoother HRTF directivity patterns were obtained by levelling out spatial notches. It turned out that spatial notches do not have to be retained if they are less than 29 dB below the maximum level in the directivity pattern.

  5. Distinct function of estrogen receptor α in smooth muscle and fibroblast cells in prostate development.

    PubMed

    Vitkus, Spencer; Yeh, Chiuan-Ren; Lin, Hsiu-Hsia; Hsu, Iawen; Yu, Jiangzhou; Chen, Ming; Yeh, Shuyuan

    2013-01-01

    Estrogen signaling, through estrogen receptor (ER)α, has been shown to cause hypertrophy in the prostate. Our recent report has shown that epithelial ERα knockout (KO) will not affect the normal prostate development or homeostasis. However, it remains unclear whether ERα in different types of stromal cells has distinct roles in prostate development. This study proposed to elucidate how KO of ERα in the stromal smooth muscle or fibroblast cells may interrupt cross talk between prostate stromal and epithelial cells. Smooth muscle ERαKO (smERαKO) mice showed decreased glandular infolding with the proximal area exhibiting a significant decrease. Fibroblast ERαKO mouse prostates did not exhibit this phenotype but showed a decrease in the number of ductal tips. Additionally, the amount of collagen observed in the basement membrane was reduced in smERαKO prostates. Interestingly, these phenotypes were found to be mutually exclusive among smERαKO or fibroblast ERαKO mice. Compound KO of ERα in both fibroblast and smooth muscle showed combined phenotypes from each of the single KO. Further mechanistic studies showed that IGF-I and epidermal growth factor were down-regulated in prostate smooth muscle PS-1 cells lacking ERα. Together, our results indicate the distinct functions of fibroblast vs. smERα in prostate development.

  6. Automatically smoothing the spectroscopic data by Cubic B-spline basis functions.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Meng-Hua; Liu, Liang-Gang; Zheng, Mei; Qi, Dong-Xu; Zheng, Cai-Mu

    2009-10-01

    In the present paper, a new criterion is derived to obtain the optimum fitting curve while using Cubic B-spline basis functions to remove the statistical noise in the spectroscopic data. In this criterion, firstly, smoothed fitting curves using Cubic B-spline basis functions are selected with the increasing knot number. Then, the best fitting curves are selected according to the value of the minimum residual sum of squares (RSS) of two adjacent fitting curves. In the case of more than one best fitting curves, the authors use Reinsch's first condition to find a better one. The minimum residual sum of squares (RSS) of fitting curve with noisy data is not recommended as the criterion to determine the best fitting curve, because this value decreases to zero as the number of selected channels increases and the minimum value gives no smoothing effect. Compared with Reinsch's method, the derived criterion is simple and enables the smoothing conditions to be determined automatically without any initial input parameter. With the derived criterion, the satisfactory result was obtained for the experimental spectroscopic data to remove the statistical noise using Cubic B-spline basis functions.

  7. Immunohistochemical and functional studies on calcium-sensing receptors in rat uterine smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Pistilli, Marc J; Petrik, James J; Holloway, Alison C; Crankshaw, Denis J

    2012-01-01

    1. Activation of calcium-sensing receptors (CaS) leads to relaxation of vascular smooth muscle. However, the role of CaS in uterine smooth muscle is unknown. Therefore the aim of the present study was to investigate the expression and function of CaS in the uterus. 2. The expression of CaS in the oestrogen-dominated rat uterus was investigated using immunohistochemistry. The effects of putative CaS ligands on oxytocin-induced contractions of longitudinally orientated uterine strips from oestrogen-dominated rats were determined at reduced extracellular Ca²⁺ concentrations using conventional organ bath techniques. 3. Immunohistochemical evidence showed the presence of CaS in the endometrium and smooth muscle layers of the rat uterus. Oxytocin-induced contractions were inhibited by cations (Gd³⁺ > Ca²⁺ = Mg²⁺), polyamines (spermine > spermidine) and the positive allosteric modulators cinacalcet and calindol. However (R)- and (S)-cinacalcet were equipotent, indicating a lack of stereoselectivity, and the negative allosteric modulator calhex-231 also caused dose-dependent relaxation. In addition, although intermediate-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels and cytochrome P450-dependent signal transduction have been implicated in CaS-induced relaxation of vascular smooth muscle, neither Tram-34 nor miconazole (1 μmol/L), which block these pathways, respectively, had any effect on the ability of cinacalcet to inhibit oxytocin-induced contractions. 4. Calcium-sensing receptors are expressed in smooth muscle layers of the rat uterus and their ligands produce potent relaxation of longitudinally orientated uterine strips. However, the pharmacological profile of inhibition of contractility by CaS ligands is not consistent with a role for CaS in the regulation of uterine contractility in the rat.

  8. Functional and molecular expression of volume-regulated chloride channels in canine vascular smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Yamazaki, Jun; Duan, Dayue; Janiak, Robert; Kuenzli, Karri; Horowitz, Burton; Hume, Joseph R

    1998-01-01

    We examined the possibility of functional and molecular expression of volume-regulated Cl− channels in vascular smooth muscle using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique and quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) on cells from canine pulmonary and renal arteries. Decreasing external osmolarity induced cell swelling, which was accompanied by activation of Cl−-dependent outward-rectifying membrane currents with an anion permeability sequence of SCN− > I− > Br− > Cl− > aspartate−. These currents were sensitive to block by DIDS, extracellular ATP and the antioestrogen compound tamoxifen. Experiments were performed to determine whether the molecular form of the volume-regulated chloride channel (ClC-3) is expressed in pulmonary and renal arteries. Quantitative RT-PCR confirmed expression of ClC-3 in both types of smooth muscle. ClC-3 expression was 76.4% of β-actin in renal artery and 48.0% of β-actin in pulmonary artery. We conclude that volume-regulated Cl− channels are expressed in vascular smooth muscle cells and exhibit functional properties similar to those found in other types of cells, presumably contributing to the regulation of cell volume, electrical activity and, possibly, myogenic tone. PMID:9508834

  9. ECM-mimetic heparin glycosamioglycan-functionalized surface favors constructing functional vascular smooth muscle tissue in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jimin; Wang, Jianing; Wei, Yongzhen; Gao, Cheng; Chen, Xuejiao; Kong, Wei; Kong, Deling; Zhao, Qiang

    2016-10-01

    Contractile vascular smooth muscle accounts for the normal physiological function of artery. Heparin, as a native glycosaminoglycan, has been well known for its important function in promoting or maintaining the contractile phenotype of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). In this study, heparin-functionalized non-woven poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) mat was fabricated by a facile and efficient surface modification protocol, which enables the control of surface heparin density within a broad range. Surface heparization remarkably increased the hydrophilicity of PCL, and reduced platelet adhesion. MTT assay showed that VSMC proliferation was evidently inhibited on the heparin-functionalized PCL surface in a dose-dependent manner. Gene analysis confirmed that surface heparization also promoted the transition of VSMCs from synthetic phenotype to contractile one. Furthermore, with a proper surface density of heparin, it allowed VSMCs to grow in a certain rate, while exhibiting contractile phenotype. Culture of VSMCs on a modified PCL mat with moderate heparin density (PCL-Hep-20) for 2 days resulted in a confluent layer of contractile smooth muscle cells. These data suggest that the heparin-modified PCL scaffolds may be a promising candidate to generate functional vascular tissues in vitro.

  10. Novel expression of a functional glycine receptor chloride channel that attenuates contraction in airway smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Yim, Peter D.; Gallos, George; Xu, Dingbang; Zhang, Yi; Emala, Charles W.

    2011-01-01

    Airway smooth muscle (ASM) contraction is an important component of the pathophysiology of asthma. Taurine, an agonist of glycine receptor chloride (GlyR Cl−) channels, was found to relax contracted ASM, which led us to question whether functional GlyR Cl− channels are expressed in ASM. Messenger RNA for β (GLRB), α1 (GLRA1), α2 (GLRA2), and α4 (GLRA4) subunits were found in human (Homo sapiens) and guinea pig (Cavia porcellus) tracheal smooth muscle. Immunoblotting confirmed the protein expression of GLRA1 and GLRB subunits in ASM. Electrical activity of cultured human ASM cells was assessed using a fluorescent potentiometric dye and electrophysiological recordings. Glycine increased current and significantly increased fluorescence in a dose-dependent manner. The GlyR Cl− channel antagonist strychnine significantly blocked the effects of glycine on potentiometric fluorescence in ASM cells. Guinea pig airway ring relaxation of ACh-induced contractions by isoproterenol was significantly left-shifted in the presence of glycine. This effect of glycine was blocked by pretreatment with the GlyR Cl− channel antagonist strychnine. Glycine treatment during tachykinin- and acetylcholine-induced contractions significantly decreased the maintenance of muscle force compared to control. GlyR Cl− channels are expressed on ASM and regulate smooth muscle force and offer a novel target for therapeutic relaxation of ASM.—Yim, P. D., Gallos, G., Xu, D., Zhang, Y., Emala, C. W. Novel expression of a functional glycine receptor chloride channel that attenuates contraction in airway smooth muscle. PMID:21282206

  11. Detrimental effects of mechanical stretch on smooth muscle function in saphenous veins.

    PubMed

    Hocking, Kyle M; Brophy, Colleen; Rizvi, Syed Z; Komalavilas, Padmini; Eagle, Susan; Leacche, Marzia; Balaguer, Jorge M; Cheung-Flynn, Joyce

    2011-02-01

    This study evaluated the smooth muscle functional response and viability of human saphenous vein (HSV) grafts after harvest and explored the effect of mechanical stretch on contractile responses of porcine saphenous vein (PSV). The contractile responses (stress, 10(5) N/m(2)) of deidentified, remnant HSV grafts to depolarizing potassium chloride and the agonist norepinephrine were measured in a muscle organ bath. Cellular viability was evaluated using a methyl thiazole tetrazolium (MTT) assay. A PSV model was used to evaluate the effect of radial, longitudinal, and angular stretch on smooth muscle contractile responses. Contractile responses varied greatly in HSV harvested for autologous vascular and coronary bypass procedures (0.04198 ± 0.008128 × 10(5) N/m(2) to 0.1192 ± 0.02776 × 10(5) N/m(2)). Contractility of the HSV correlated with the cellular viability of the grafts. In the PSV model, manual radial distension of ≥ 300 mm Hg had no impact on the smooth muscle responses of PSV to potassium chloride. Longitudinal and angular stretch significantly decreased the contractile function of PSV by 33.16% and 15.26%, respectively (P < .03). There is considerable variability in HSV harvested for use as an autologous conduit. Longitudinal and angular stretching during surgical harvest impairs contractile responsiveness of the smooth muscle in saphenous vein. Avoiding stretch-induced injuries to the conduits during harvest and preparation for implantation may reduce adverse biologic responses in the graft (eg, intimal hyperplasia) and improve patency of autologous vein graft bypasses. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  12. Detrimental Effects Of Mechanical Stretch On Smooth Muscle Function In Saphenous Veins

    PubMed Central

    Hocking, Kyle M.; Brophy, Colleen; Rizvi, Syed Z.; Komalavilas, Padmini; Eagle, Susan; Leacche, Marzia; Balaguer, Jorge M.; Cheung-Flynn, Joyce

    2010-01-01

    Objective The present study evaluated the smooth muscle functional response and viability of human saphenous vein (HSV) grafts after harvest, and explored the effect of mechanical stretch on contractile responses of porcine saphenous vein (PSV). Design of study The contractile responses (stress, 105N/m2) of de-identified, remnant HSV grafts to depolarizing potassium chloride and the agonist norepinephrine was measured in a muscle organ bath. Cellular viability was evaluated using a methylthiazol tetrazolium (MTT) assay. A PSV model was used to evaluate the effect of radial, longitudinal and angular stretch on smooth muscle contractile responses. Results Contractile responses varied greatly in HSV harvested for autologous vascular and coronary bypass procedures (0.04198×105 N/m2 ± 0.008128 to 0.1192×105N/m2 ± 0.02776). Contractility of the HSV correlated with the cellular viability of the grafts. In the PSV model, manual radial distension of ≥300mmHg had no impact on the smooth muscle responses of PSV to potassium chloride. Longitudinal and angular stretch significantly decreased the contractile function of PSV by 33.16% and 15.26%, respectively. Conclusions There is considerable variability in HSV harvested for use as an autologous conduit. Longitudinal and angular stretching during surgical harvest impair contractile responsiveness of the smooth muscle in saphenous vein. Avoiding stretch-induced injuries to the conduits during harvest and preparation for implantation may reduce adverse biologic responses in the graft (e.g. intimal hyperplasia) and improve patency of autologous vein graft bypasses. PMID:21146345

  13. Graphical functions in parametric space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golz, Marcel; Panzer, Erik; Schnetz, Oliver

    2016-12-01

    Graphical functions are positive functions on the punctured complex plane Csetminus {0,1} which arise in quantum field theory. We generalize a parametric integral representation for graphical functions due to Lam, Lebrun and Nakanishi, which implies the real analyticity of graphical functions. Moreover, we prove a formula that relates graphical functions of planar dual graphs.

  14. Quantization of the Sobolev space of half-differentiable functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeev, A. G.

    2016-10-01

    A quantization of the Sobolev space V=H_01/2(S^1, R) of half- differentiable functions on the circle, which is closely connected with string theory, is constructed. The group {QS}(S^1) of quasisymmetric circle homeomorphisms acts on V by reparametrizations, but this action is not smooth. Nevertheless, a quantum infinitesimal action of {QS}(S^1) on V can be defined, which enables one to construct a quantum algebra of observables which is associated with the system (V,{QS}(S^1)). Bibliography: 7 titles.

  15. Higher order smooth fitting for the convex cavities in the multiply connected plane domain by multiple functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Jialian; Wan, Chaoyan; Zhao, Wenzhong

    2013-07-01

    In order to satisfy different engineering applications, a new higher order smooth fitting method for the convex cavities in the multiply connected plane domain by multiple functions is put forward. For the boundaries of convex cavities in the multiply connected domain--every close domain, the unique fitting function KS, is represented with some fitting precision controlled by only one single parameter (Rho). The fitted smooth figure can be drawn according to the function.

  16. The role of mechanotransduction on vascular smooth muscle myocytes' [corrected] cytoskeleton and contractile function.

    PubMed

    Ye, George J C; Nesmith, Alexander P; Parker, Kevin Kit

    2014-09-01

    Smooth muscle (SM) exhibits a highly organized structural hierarchy that extends over multiple spatial scales to perform a wide range of functions at the cellular, tissue, and organ levels. Early efforts primarily focused on understanding vascular SM (VSM) function through biochemical signaling. However, accumulating evidence suggests that mechanotransduction, the process through which cells convert mechanical stimuli into biochemical cues, is requisite for regulating contractility. Cytoskeletal proteins that comprise the extracellular, intercellular, and intracellular domains are mechanosensitive and can remodel their structure and function in response to external mechanical cues. Pathological stimuli such as malignant hypertension can act through the same mechanotransductive pathways to induce maladaptive remodeling, leading to changes in cellular shape and loss of contractile function. In both health and disease, the cytoskeletal architecture integrates the mechanical stimuli and mediates structural and functional remodeling in the VSM. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Immune function during space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald; Shearer, William T.

    2002-01-01

    It is very likely that the human immune system will be altered in astronauts exposed to the conditions of long-term space flight: isolation, containment, microgravity, radiation, microbial contamination, sleep disruption, and insufficient nutrition. In human and animal subjects flown in space, there is evidence of immune compromise, reactivation of latent virus infection, and possible development of a premalignant or malignant condition. Moreover, in ground-based space flight model investigations, there is evidence of immune compromise and reactivation of latent virus infection. All of these observations in space flight itself or in ground-based models of space flight have a strong resonance in a wealth of human pathologic conditions involving the immune system where reactivated virus infections and cancer appear as natural consequences. The clinical conditions of Epstein-Barr-driven lymphomas in transplant patients and Kaposi's sarcoma in patients with autoimmune deficiency virus come easily to mind in trying to identify these conditions. With these thoughts in mind, it is highly appropriate, indeed imperative, that careful investigations of human immunity, infection, and cancer be made by space flight researchers.

  18. Immune function during space flight.

    PubMed

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald; Shearer, William T

    2002-10-01

    It is very likely that the human immune system will be altered in astronauts exposed to the conditions of long-term space flight: isolation, containment, microgravity, radiation, microbial contamination, sleep disruption, and insufficient nutrition. In human and animal subjects flown in space, there is evidence of immune compromise, reactivation of latent virus infection, and possible development of a premalignant or malignant condition. Moreover, in ground-based space flight model investigations, there is evidence of immune compromise and reactivation of latent virus infection. All of these observations in space flight itself or in ground-based models of space flight have a strong resonance in a wealth of human pathologic conditions involving the immune system where reactivated virus infections and cancer appear as natural consequences. The clinical conditions of Epstein-Barr-driven lymphomas in transplant patients and Kaposi's sarcoma in patients with autoimmune deficiency virus come easily to mind in trying to identify these conditions. With these thoughts in mind, it is highly appropriate, indeed imperative, that careful investigations of human immunity, infection, and cancer be made by space flight researchers.

  19. The Transcription Factor TEAD1 Represses Smooth Muscle-specific Gene Expression by Abolishing Myocardin Function*♦

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fang; Wang, Xiaobo; Hu, Guoqing; Wang, Yong; Zhou, Jiliang

    2014-01-01

    The TEAD (transcriptional enhancer activator domain) proteins share an evolutionarily conserved DNA-binding TEA domain, which binds to the MCAT cis-acting regulatory element. Previous studies have shown that TEAD proteins are involved in regulating the expression of smooth muscle α-actin. However, it remains undetermined whether TEAD proteins play a broader role in regulating expression of other genes in vascular smooth muscle cells. In this study, we show that the expression of TEAD1 is significantly induced during smooth muscle cell phenotypic modulation and negatively correlates with smooth muscle-specific gene expression. We further demonstrate that TEAD1 plays a novel role in suppressing expression of smooth muscle-specific genes, including smooth muscle α-actin, by abolishing the promyogenic function of myocardin, a key mediator of smooth muscle differentiation. Mechanistically, we found that TEAD1 competes with myocardin for binding to serum response factor (SRF), resulting in disruption of myocardin and SRF interactions and thereby attenuating expression of smooth muscle-specific genes. This study provides the first evidence demonstrating that TEAD1 is a novel general repressor of smooth muscle-specific gene expression through interfering with myocardin binding to SRF. PMID:24344135

  20. Fast convolution with free-space Green's functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vico, Felipe; Greengard, Leslie; Ferrando, Miguel

    2016-10-01

    We introduce a fast algorithm for computing volume potentials - that is, the convolution of a translation invariant, free-space Green's function with a compactly supported source distribution defined on a uniform grid. The algorithm relies on regularizing the Fourier transform of the Green's function by cutting off the interaction in physical space beyond the domain of interest. This permits the straightforward application of trapezoidal quadrature and the standard FFT, with superalgebraic convergence for smooth data. Moreover, the method can be interpreted as employing a Nystrom discretization of the corresponding integral operator, with matrix entries which can be obtained explicitly and rapidly. This is of use in the design of preconditioners or fast direct solvers for a variety of volume integral equations. The method proposed permits the computation of any derivative of the potential, at the cost of an additional FFT.

  1. [Primary culture and functional identification of distal pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells in mice].

    PubMed

    Li, M C; Chen, Y Q; Zhang, C T; Jiang, Q; Lu, W J; Wang, J

    2017-02-12

    Objective: To establish a method of isolation and primary culture of mice distal pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) and identify the functional properties. Methods: PASMCs were harvested from the distal pulmonary artery (PA) tissue of mice by enzymatic digestion of collagenaseⅠand papain; and the growth characteristics were observed under inverted microscope and identified by Immunofluorescence technique. Effects on the intracellular calcium ion concentration of distal PASMCs were detected by Fura-2-AM fluorescent probe tracer under a fluorescence microscope in Krebs solution containing clopiazonic acid (CPA) and nifedipin (Nif). Results: PASMCs density reached approximately to 80% in a typical valley-peak-like shape after 6 days. Cell α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) immunofluorescence identified that 95% of the cultured cells were PASMCs. More than 95% PASMCs responded well to calcium-potassium Krebs solution (potassium ion concentration of 60 mmol/L) and showed a rapid increase in basal [Ca(2+) ](i) after 1 minute's perfusion (Δ[Ca(2+) ](i)>50), which demonstrated that the voltage-dependent calcium channels (VDCC) of distal PASMCs were in good function; after the perfusion of calcium Krebs, calcium-free/calcium-Krebs containing CPA and Nif, distal PASMCs showed two typical peaks, indicated the full function of store-operated calcium channel (SOCC) in distal PASMCs. Conclusion: This experiment successfully established a stable and reliable mice distal PASMCs model and the study of pulmonary vascular diseases could benefit from its higher purity and better functional condition.

  2. Smoothing of cost function leads to faster convergence of neural network learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Li-Qun; Hall, Trevor J.

    1994-03-01

    One of the major problems in supervised learning of neural networks is the inevitable local minima inherent in the cost function f(W,D). This often makes classic gradient-descent-based learning algorithms that calculate the weight updates for each iteration according to (Delta) W(t) equals -(eta) (DOT)$DELwf(W,D) powerless. In this paper we describe a new strategy to solve this problem, which, adaptively, changes the learning rate and manipulates the gradient estimator simultaneously. The idea is to implicitly convert the local- minima-laden cost function f((DOT)) into a sequence of its smoothed versions {f(beta t)}Ttequals1, which, subject to the parameter (beta) t, bears less details at time t equals 1 and gradually more later on, the learning is actually performed on this sequence of functionals. The corresponding smoothed global minima obtained in this way, {Wt}Ttequals1, thus progressively approximate W-the desired global minimum. Experimental results on a nonconvex function minimization problem and a typical neural network learning task are given, analyses and discussions of some important issues are provided.

  3. Experimental studies of mitochondrial function in CADASIL vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Viitanen, Matti; Sundström, Erik; Baumann, Marc; Poyhonen, Minna; Tikka, Saara; Behbahani, Homira

    2013-02-01

    Cerebral Autosomal Dominant Arteriopathy with Subcortical Infarcts and Leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is a familiar fatal progressive degenerative disorder characterized by cognitive decline, and recurrent stroke in young adults. Pathological features include a dramatic reduction of brain vascular smooth muscle cells and severe arteriopathy with the presence of granular osmophilic material in the arterial walls. Here we have investigated the cellular and mitochondrial function in vascular smooth muscle cell lines (VSMCs) established from CADASIL mutation carriers (R133C) and healthy controls. We found significantly lower proliferation rates in CADASIL VSMC as compared to VSMC from controls. Cultured CADASIL VSMCs were not more vulnerable than control cells to a number of toxic substances. Morphological studies showed reduced mitochondrial connectivity and increased number of mitochondria in CADASIL VSMCs. Transmission electron microscopy analysis demonstrated increased irregular and abnormal mitochondria in CADASIL VSMCs. Measurements of mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψ(m)) showed a lower percentage of fully functional mitochondria in CADASIL VSMCs. For a number of genes previously reported to be changed in CADASIL VSMCs, immunoblotting analysis demonstrated a significantly reduced SOD1 expression. These findings suggest that alteration of proliferation and mitochondrial function in CADASIL VSMCs might have an effect on vital cellular functions important for CADASIL pathology.

  4. THE HALO MASS FUNCTION FROM EXCURSION SET THEORY. I. GAUSSIAN FLUCTUATIONS WITH NON-MARKOVIAN DEPENDENCE ON THE SMOOTHING SCALE

    SciTech Connect

    Maggiore, Michele; Riotto, Antonio

    2010-03-10

    A classic method for computing the mass function of dark matter halos is provided by excursion set theory, where density perturbations evolve stochastically with the smoothing scale, and the problem of computing the probability of halo formation is mapped into the so-called first-passage time problem in the presence of a barrier. While the full dynamical complexity of halo formation can only be revealed through N-body simulations, excursion set theory provides a simple analytic framework for understanding various aspects of this complex process. In this series of papers we propose improvements of both technical and conceptual aspects of excursion set theory, and we explore up to which point the method can reproduce quantitatively the data from N-body simulations. In Paper I of the series, we show how to derive excursion set theory from a path {integral} formulation. This allows us both to derive rigorously the absorbing barrier boundary condition, that in the usual formulation is just postulated, and to deal analytically with the non-Markovian nature of the random walk. Such a non-Markovian dynamics inevitably enters when either the density is smoothed with filters such as the top-hat filter in coordinate space (which is the only filter associated with a well-defined halo mass) or when one considers non-Gaussian fluctuations. In these cases, beside 'Markovian' terms, we find 'memory' terms that reflect the non-Markovianity of the evolution with the smoothing scale. We develop a general formalism for evaluating perturbatively these non-Markovian corrections, and in this paper we perform explicitly the computation of the halo mass function for Gaussian fluctuations, to first order in the non-Markovian corrections due to the use of a top-hat filter in coordinate space. In Paper II of this series we propose to extend excursion set theory by treating the critical threshold for collapse as a stochastic variable, which better captures some of the dynamical complexity of

  5. Edge preserving smoothing and segmentation of 4-D images via transversely isotropic scale-space processing and fingerprint analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Reutter, Bryan W.; Algazi, V. Ralph; Gullberg, Grant T; Huesman, Ronald H.

    2004-01-19

    Enhancements are described for an approach that unifies edge preserving smoothing with segmentation of time sequences of volumetric images, based on differential edge detection at multiple spatial and temporal scales. Potential applications of these 4-D methods include segmentation of respiratory gated positron emission tomography (PET) transmission images to improve accuracy of attenuation correction for imaging heart and lung lesions, and segmentation of dynamic cardiac single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images to facilitate unbiased estimation of time-activity curves and kinetic parameters for left ventricular volumes of interest. Improved segmentation of lung surfaces in simulated respiratory gated cardiac PET transmission images is achieved with a 4-D edge detection operator composed of edge preserving 1-D operators applied in various spatial and temporal directions. Smoothing along the axis of a 1-D operator is driven by structure separation seen in the scale-space fingerprint, rather than by image contrast. Spurious noise structures are reduced with use of small-scale isotropic smoothing in directions transverse to the 1-D operator axis. Analytic expressions are obtained for directional derivatives of the smoothed, edge preserved image, and the expressions are used to compose a 4-D operator that detects edges as zero-crossings in the second derivative in the direction of the image intensity gradient. Additional improvement in segmentation is anticipated with use of multiscale transversely isotropic smoothing and a novel interpolation method that improves the behavior of the directional derivatives. The interpolation method is demonstrated on a simulated 1-D edge and incorporation of the method into the 4-D algorithm is described.

  6. A variational multi-symplectic particle-in-cell algorithm with smoothing functions for the Vlasov-Maxwell system

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Jianyuan; Liu, Jian; Qin, Hong; Yu, Zhi

    2013-10-15

    Smoothing functions are commonly used to reduce numerical noise arising from coarse sampling of particles in particle-in-cell (PIC) plasma simulations. When applying smoothing functions to symplectic algorithms, the conservation of symplectic structure should be guaranteed to preserve good conservation properties. In this paper, we show how to construct a variational multi-symplectic PIC algorithm with smoothing functions for the Vlasov-Maxwell system. The conservation of the multi-symplectic structure and the reduction of numerical noise make this algorithm specifically suitable for simulating long-term dynamics of plasmas, such as those in the steady-state operation or long-pulse discharge of a super-conducting tokamak. The algorithm has been implemented in a 6D large scale PIC code. Numerical examples are given to demonstrate the good conservation properties of the multi-symplectic algorithm and the reduction of the noise due to the application of smoothing function.

  7. Smooth Function Modeling for On-Line Trajectory Reshaping Application (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-02-01

    A. N., and Arsenin , V. Y., “ Solutions of ill - posed problems ,”: Winston, Washington DC 1977 20 Jancaitis, J.R., and Junkins J.L., “Modeling N...dynamical system is a solution of a two-point boundary value problem for a set of governing differential equation of motion. The real world systems such as...AFRL- VA -WP-TP-2006-316 SMOOTH FUNCTION MODELING FOR ON-LINE TRAJECTORY RESHAPING APPLICATION (PREPRINT) Ajay Verma, Kaylan Vadakkeveedu

  8. Charge density distributions derived from smoothed electrostatic potential functions: design of protein reduced point charge models.

    PubMed

    Leherte, Laurence; Vercauteren, Daniel P

    2011-10-01

    To generate reduced point charge models of proteins, we developed an original approach to hierarchically locate extrema in charge density distribution functions built from the Poisson equation applied to smoothed molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) functions. A charge fitting program was used to assign charge values to the so-obtained reduced representations. In continuation to a previous work, the Amber99 force field was selected. To easily generate reduced point charge models for protein structures, a library of amino acid templates was designed. Applications to four small peptides, a set of 53 protein structures, and four KcsA ion channel models, are presented. Electrostatic potential and solvation free energy values generated by the reduced models are compared with the corresponding values obtained using the original set of atomic charges. Results are in closer agreement with the original all-atom electrostatic properties than those obtained with a previous reduced model that was directly built from the smoothed MEP functions [Leherte and Vercauteren in J Chem Theory Comput 5:3279-3298, 2009].

  9. Functional up-regulation of KCNA gene family expression in murine mesenteric resistance artery smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Fountain, S J; Cheong, A; Flemming, R; Mair, L; Sivaprasadarao, A; Beech, D J

    2004-01-01

    This study focused on the hypothesis that KCNA genes (which encode KVα1 voltage-gated K+ channels) have enhanced functional expression in smooth muscle cells of a primary determinant of peripheral resistance – the small mesenteric artery. Real-time PCR methodology was developed to measure cell type-specific in situ gene expression. Profiles were determined for arterial myocyte expression of RNA species encoding KVα1 subunits as well as KVβ1, KVα2.1, KVγ9.3, BKCaα1 and BKCaβ1. The seven major KCNA genes were expressed and more readily detected in endothelium-denuded mesenteric resistance artery compared with thoracic aorta; quantification revealed dramatic differential expression of one to two orders of magnitude. There was also four times more RNA encoding KVα2.1 but less or similar amounts encoding KVβ1, KVγ9.3, BKCaα1 and BKCaβ1. Patch-clamp recordings from freshly isolated smooth muscle cells revealed dominant KVα1 K+ current and current density twice as large in mesenteric cells. Therefore, we suggest the increased RNA production of the resistance artery impacts on physiological function, although there is quantitatively less K+ current than might be expected. The mechanism conferring up-regulated expression of KCNA genes may be common to all the gene family and play a functional role in the physiological control of blood pressure. PMID:14742730

  10. Polynomial approximation of functions in Sobolev spaces

    SciTech Connect

    Dupont, T.; Scott, R.

    1980-04-01

    Constructive proofs and several generalizations of approximation results of J. H. Bramble and S. R. Hilbert are presented. Using an averaged Taylor series, we represent a function as a polynomical plus a remainder. The remainder can be manipulated in many ways to give different types of bounds. Approximation of functions in fractional order Sobolev spaces is treated as well as the usual integer order spaces and several nonstandard Sobolev-like spaces.

  11. Polynomial approximation of functions in Sobolev spaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dupont, T.; Scott, R.

    1980-01-01

    Constructive proofs and several generalizations of approximation results of J. H. Bramble and S. R. Hilbert are presented. Using an averaged Taylor series, we represent a function as a polynomial plus a remainder. The remainder can be manipulated in many ways to give different types of bounds. Approximation of functions in fractional order Sobolev spaces is treated as well as the usual integer order spaces and several nonstandard Sobolev-like spaces.

  12. Polynomial approximation of functions in Sobolev spaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dupont, T.; Scott, R.

    1980-01-01

    Constructive proofs and several generalizations of approximation results of J. H. Bramble and S. R. Hilbert are presented. Using an averaged Taylor series, we represent a function as a polynomial plus a remainder. The remainder can be manipulated in many ways to give different types of bounds. Approximation of functions in fractional order Sobolev spaces is treated as well as the usual integer order spaces and several nonstandard Sobolev-like spaces.

  13. A method for the accurate and smooth approximation of standard thermodynamic functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coufal, O.

    2013-01-01

    A method is proposed for the calculation of approximations of standard thermodynamic functions. The method is consistent with the physical properties of standard thermodynamic functions. This means that the approximation functions are, in contrast to the hitherto used approximations, continuous and smooth in every temperature interval in which no phase transformations take place. The calculation algorithm was implemented by the SmoothSTF program in the C++ language which is part of this paper. Program summaryProgram title:SmoothSTF Catalogue identifier: AENH_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AENH_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 3807 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 131965 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++. Computer: Any computer with gcc version 4.3.2 compiler. Operating system: Debian GNU Linux 6.0. The program can be run in operating systems in which the gcc compiler can be installed, see http://gcc.gnu.org/install/specific.html. RAM: 256 MB are sufficient for the table of standard thermodynamic functions with 500 lines Classification: 4.9. Nature of problem: Standard thermodynamic functions (STF) of individual substances are given by thermal capacity at constant pressure, entropy and enthalpy. STF are continuous and smooth in every temperature interval in which no phase transformations take place. The temperature dependence of STF as expressed by the table of its values is for further application approximated by temperature functions. In the paper, a method is proposed for calculating approximation functions which, in contrast to the hitherto used approximations, are continuous and smooth in every temperature interval. Solution method: The approximation functions are

  14. Tropomyosin variants describe distinct functional subcellular domains in differentiated vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Gallant, Cynthia; Appel, Sarah; Graceffa, Philip; Leavis, Paul; Lin, Jim Jung-Ching; Gunning, Peter W; Schevzov, Galina; Chaponnier, Christine; DeGnore, Jon; Lehman, William; Morgan, Kathleen G

    2011-06-01

    Tropomyosin (Tm) is known to be an important gatekeeper of actin function. Tm isoforms are encoded by four genes, and each gene produces several variants by alternative splicing, which have been proposed to play roles in motility, proliferation, and apoptosis. Smooth muscle studies have focused on gizzard smooth muscle, where a heterodimer of Tm from the α-gene (Tmsm-α) and from the β-gene (Tmsm-β) is associated with contractile filaments. In this study we examined Tm in differentiated mammalian vascular smooth muscle (dVSM). Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC MS/MS) analysis and Western blot screening with variant-specific antibodies revealed that at least five different Tm proteins are expressed in this tissue: Tm6 (Tmsm-α) and Tm2 from the α-gene, Tm1 (Tmsm-β) from the β-gene, Tm5NM1 from the γ-gene, and Tm4 from the δ-gene. Tm6 is by far most abundant in dVSM followed by Tm1, Tm2, Tm5NM1, and Tm4. Coimmunoprecipitation and coimmunofluorescence studies demonstrate that Tm1 and Tm6 coassociate with different actin isoforms and display different intracellular localizations. Using an antibody specific for cytoplasmic γ-actin, we report here the presence of a γ-actin cortical cytoskeleton in dVSM cells. Tm1 colocalizes with cortical cytoplasmic γ-actin and coprecipitates with γ-actin. Tm6, on the other hand, is located on contractile bundles. These data indicate that Tm1 and Tm6 do not form a classical heterodimer in dVSM but rather describe different functional cellular compartments.

  15. Biomechanical regulation of vascular smooth muscle cell functions: from in vitro to in vivo understanding

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Juhui; Zheng, Yiming; Hu, Jianjun; Liao, Donghua; Gregersen, Hans; Deng, Xiaoyan; Fan, Yubo; Wang, Guixue

    2014-01-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) have critical functions in vascular diseases. Haemodynamic factors are important regulators of VSMC functions in vascular pathophysiology. VSMCs are physiologically active in the three-dimensional matrix and interact with the shear stress sensor of endothelial cells (ECs). The purpose of this review is to illustrate how haemodynamic factors regulate VSMC functions under two-dimensional conditions in vitro or three-dimensional co-culture conditions in vivo. Recent advances show that high shear stress induces VSMC apoptosis through endothelial-released nitric oxide and low shear stress upregulates VSMC proliferation and migration through platelet-derived growth factor released by ECs. This differential regulation emphasizes the need to construct more actual environments for future research on vascular diseases (such as atherosclerosis and hypertension) and cardiovascular tissue engineering. PMID:24152813

  16. A marginal approach to reduced-rank penalized spline smoothing with application to multilevel functional data

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Huaihou; Paik, Myunghee Cho; Choi, H. Alex

    2014-01-01

    Multilevel functional data is collected in many biomedical studies. For example, in a study of the effect of Nimodipine on patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), patients underwent multiple 4-hour treatment cycles. Within each treatment cycle, subjects’ vital signs were reported every 10 minutes. This data has a natural multilevel structure with treatment cycles nested within subjects and measurements nested within cycles. Most literature on nonparametric analysis of such multilevel functional data focus on conditional approaches using functional mixed effects models. However, parameters obtained from the conditional models do not have direct interpretations as population average effects. When population effects are of interest, we may employ marginal regression models. In this work, we propose marginal approaches to fit multilevel functional data through penalized spline generalized estimating equation (penalized spline GEE). The procedure is effective for modeling multilevel correlated generalized outcomes as well as continuous outcomes without suffering from numerical difficulties. We provide a variance estimator robust to misspecification of correlation structure. We investigate the large sample properties of the penalized spline GEE estimator with multilevel continuous data and show that the asymptotics falls into two categories. In the small knots scenario, the estimated mean function is asymptotically efficient when the true correlation function is used and the asymptotic bias does not depend on the working correlation matrix. In the large knots scenario, both the asymptotic bias and variance depend on the working correlation. We propose a new method to select the smoothing parameter for penalized spline GEE based on an estimate of the asymptotic mean squared error (MSE). We conduct extensive simulation studies to examine property of the proposed estimator under different correlation structures and sensitivity of the variance estimation to the choice

  17. A marginal approach to reduced-rank penalized spline smoothing with application to multilevel functional data.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huaihou; Wang, Yuanjia; Paik, Myunghee Cho; Choi, H Alex

    2013-10-01

    Multilevel functional data is collected in many biomedical studies. For example, in a study of the effect of Nimodipine on patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), patients underwent multiple 4-hour treatment cycles. Within each treatment cycle, subjects' vital signs were reported every 10 minutes. This data has a natural multilevel structure with treatment cycles nested within subjects and measurements nested within cycles. Most literature on nonparametric analysis of such multilevel functional data focus on conditional approaches using functional mixed effects models. However, parameters obtained from the conditional models do not have direct interpretations as population average effects. When population effects are of interest, we may employ marginal regression models. In this work, we propose marginal approaches to fit multilevel functional data through penalized spline generalized estimating equation (penalized spline GEE). The procedure is effective for modeling multilevel correlated generalized outcomes as well as continuous outcomes without suffering from numerical difficulties. We provide a variance estimator robust to misspecification of correlation structure. We investigate the large sample properties of the penalized spline GEE estimator with multilevel continuous data and show that the asymptotics falls into two categories. In the small knots scenario, the estimated mean function is asymptotically efficient when the true correlation function is used and the asymptotic bias does not depend on the working correlation matrix. In the large knots scenario, both the asymptotic bias and variance depend on the working correlation. We propose a new method to select the smoothing parameter for penalized spline GEE based on an estimate of the asymptotic mean squared error (MSE). We conduct extensive simulation studies to examine property of the proposed estimator under different correlation structures and sensitivity of the variance estimation to the choice

  18. Armstrong Laboratory Space Visual Function Tester Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oneal, Melvin R.; Task, H. Lee; Gleason, Gerald A.

    1992-01-01

    Viewgraphs on space visual function tester program are presented. Many astronauts and cosmonauts have commented on apparent changes in their vision while on-orbit. Comments have included descriptions of earth features and objects that would suggest enhanced distance visual acuity. In contrast, some cosmonaut observations suggest a slight loss in their object discrimination during initial space flight. Astronauts have also mentioned a decreased near vision capability that did not recover to normal until return to earth. Duntley space vision experiment, USSR space vision experiments, and visual function testers are described.

  19. The expression of functional postsynaptic α2-adrenoceptors in the corpus cavernosum smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sandeep; Moreland, Robert B; Yang, Stone; Gallant, Cynthia M; Goldstein, Irwin; Traish, Abdulmaged

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if corpus cavernosum smooth muscle expresses functional postsynaptic α2-adrenoceptors (AR).The α2-adrenoceptor agonist UK 14,304 elicited concentration-dependent contractions in rabbit corpus cavernosum smooth muscle (CCSM). The half-maximal response occurred at 0.32±0.03 μM and the maximum contraction at 10 μM UK 14,304.Pretreatment of CCSM strips with selective α2-adrenoceptor antagonists, rauwolscine and RS-15385, produced rightward shifts in the dose-response curves to UK 14,304 (pA2 values 7.1 and 8.5, respectively). In contrast, these antagonists did not alter contraction induced by the α1-adrenoceptor agonist phenylephrine (PE) or oxymetazoline. UK 14,304-induced contractions were also inhibited by prazosin (pA2=9.08).UK 14,304-induced contractions, unlike those to PE, were highly dependent on the presence of extracellular Ca2+.[3H]-rauwolscine bound to CCSM membranes with high affinity (Kd=1.5 nM). [3H]-rauwolscine binding was displaced by unlabelled rauwolscine, RS-15385, UK 14,304 and prazosin, but not by PE.UK 14,304 inhibited forskolin and prostaglandin E1 (PGE1)-induced increases in intracellular cyclic AMP concentration in primary cultures of rabbit CCSM cells.These results demonstrate that CCSM expresses Gi-coupled postsynaptic α2-adrenoceptors, and activation of these receptors causes contraction of trabecular smooth muscle. PMID:9559910

  20. Ion channel regulation of intracellular calcium and airway smooth muscle function.

    PubMed

    Perez-Zoghbi, Jose F; Karner, Charlotta; Ito, Satoru; Shepherd, Malcolm; Alrashdan, Yazan; Sanderson, Michael J

    2009-10-01

    Airway hyper-responsiveness associated with asthma is mediated by airway smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and has a complicated etiology involving increases in cell contraction and proliferation and the secretion of inflammatory mediators. Although these pathological changes are diverse, a common feature associated with their regulation is a change in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)). Because the [Ca(2+)](i) itself is a function of the activity and expression of a variety of ion channels, in both the plasma membrane and sarcoplasmic reticulum of the SMC, the modification of this ion channel activity may predispose airway SMCs to hyper-responsiveness. Our objective is to review how ion channels determine the [Ca(2+)](i) and influence the function of airway SMCs and emphasize the potential of ion channels as sites for therapeutic approaches to asthma.

  1. Localization and function of KLF4 in cytoplasm of vascular smooth muscle cell.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Zheng, Bin; Zhang, Xin-Hua; Nie, Chan-Juan; Li, Yong-Hui; Wen, Jin-Kun

    2013-06-28

    The Krüppel-like factor 4 is a DNA-binding transcriptional regulator that regulates a diverse array of cellular processes, including development, differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis. The previous studies about KLF4 functions mainly focused on its role as a transcription factor, its functions in the cytoplasm are still unknown. In this study, we found that PDGF-BB could prompt the translocation of KLF4 to the cytoplasm through CRM1-mediated nuclear export pathway in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and increased the interaction of KLF4 with actin in the cytoplasm. Further study showed that both KLF4 phosphorylation and SUMOylation induced by PDGF-BB participates in regulation of cytoskeletal organization by stabilizing the actin cytoskeleton in VSMCs. In conclusion, these results identify that KLF4 participates in the cytoskeletal organization by stabilizing cytoskeleton in the cytoplasm of VSMCs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Experimental studies of mitochondrial function in CADASIL vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Viitanen, Matti; Sundström, Erik; Baumann, Marc; Tikka, Saara

    2013-02-01

    Cerebral Autosomal Dominant Arteriopathy with Subcortical Infarcts and Leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is a familiar fatal progressive degenerative disorder characterized by cognitive decline, and recurrent stroke in young adults. Pathological features include a dramatic reduction of brain vascular smooth muscle cells and severe arteriopathy with the presence of granular osmophilic material in the arterial walls. Here we have investigated the cellular and mitochondrial function in vascular smooth muscle cell lines (VSMCs) established from CADASIL mutation carriers (R133C) and healthy controls. We found significantly lower proliferation rates in CADASIL VSMC as compared to VSMC from controls. Cultured CADASIL VSMCs were not more vulnerable than control cells to a number of toxic substances. Morphological studies showed reduced mitochondrial connectivity and increased number of mitochondria in CADASIL VSMCs. Transmission electron microscopy analysis demonstrated increased irregular and abnormal mitochondria in CADASIL VSMCs. Measurements of mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψ{sub m}) showed a lower percentage of fully functional mitochondria in CADASIL VSMCs. For a number of genes previously reported to be changed in CADASIL VSMCs, immunoblotting analysis demonstrated a significantly reduced SOD1 expression. These findings suggest that alteration of proliferation and mitochondrial function in CADASIL VSMCs might have an effect on vital cellular functions important for CADASIL pathology. -- Highlights: ► CADASIL is an inherited disease of cerebral vascular cells. ► Mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in the pathogenesis of CADASIL. ► Lower proliferation rates in CADASIL VSMC. ► Increased irregular and abnormal mitochondria and lower mitochondrial membrane potential in CADASIL VSMCs. ► Reduced mitochondrial connectivity and increased number of mitochondria in CADASIL VSMCs.

  3. Exploring smooth muscle phenotype and function in a bioreactor model of abdominal aortic aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Vascular smooth muscle cells (SMC) are central to arterial structure and function yet their involvement in the progression of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) disease is not well studied. The progressive and silent nature of AAA in man essentially restricts research to the use of “end-stage” tissue recovered during surgical repair. This study aimed to generate an ex vivo model of AAA using protease-treated porcine carotid arteries maintained in a novel bioreactor, and to compare the structural and functional changes in SMC cultured from the recovered vessels with those from human tissue acquired at elective surgical repair. Methods Freshly isolated porcine arteries were pretreated with collagenase and/or elastase before culturing under flow in a bioreactor for 12 days. Human end-stage aneurysmal tissue and saphenous veins from age-matched controls were collected from patients undergoing surgery. SMC were cultured and characterised (immunocytochemistry, measurement of spread cell area) and assessed functionally at the level of proliferation (cell-counting) and matrix-metalloproteinase (MMP) secretion (gelatin zymography). Cellular senescence was investigated using β-galactosidase staining and apoptosis was quantified using a fluorescence-based caspase 3 assay. Results Co-expression of alpha-smooth muscle actin and smooth muscle myosin heavy chain confirmed all cell populations as SMC. Porcine SMC harvested and cultivated after collagenase/elastase pretreatment displayed a prominent “rhomboid” morphology, increased spread area (32%, P < 0.01), impaired proliferation (47% reduction, P < 0.05), increased senescence (52%, P < 0.001), susceptibility to apoptosis and reduced MMP-2 secretion (60% decrease, P < 0.01) compared with SMC from vehicle, collagenase or elastase pre-treated vessels. Notably, these changes were comparable to those observed in human AAA SMC which were 2.4-fold larger than non-aneurysmal SMC (P < 0.001) and

  4. On PAC learning of functions with smoothness properties using feedforward sigmoidal networks

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, N.S.V.; Protopopescu, V.A.

    1996-04-01

    We consider Probably and Approximately Corrct (PAC) learning of an unknown function f: [0,1]{sup d} {r_arrow} [0,1], based on finite samples using feedforward sigmoidal networks. The unknown function f is chosen from the family F{intersection}C([0,1]{sup d}) or F{intersection}L{sup {infinity}}([0,1]{sup d}), where F has either bounded modulus of smoothness or bounded capacity or both. The learning sample is given by (X{sub 1},f(X{sub 1})),(X{sub 2},f(X{sub 2})),{hor_ellipsis},(X{sub n},f(X{sub n})), where X{sub 1},X{sub 2},{hor_ellipsis},X{sub n} are independently and identically distributed according to an unknown distribution. We consider the feedforward networks with a a single hidden layer of 1/(1 + e{sup {minus}{gamma}z})-units and bounded parameters, but the results can be extended to other neural networks where the hidden units satisfy suitable smoothness conditions. We analyze three function estimators based on nearest neighbor rule, local averaging, and Nadaraya-Watson estimator, all computed using the Haar system. It is shown that given a sufficiently large sample, each of these estimators approximates the best neural network to any given error with arbitrarily high probability. This result is crucical for establishing the essentially equivalent capabilities of neural networks and the above estimators for PAC learning from finite samples. Practical importance of this ``equivalence`` stems from the fact that computing a neural network which approximates the best possible one is computationally difficult, whereas the three estimators are linear-time computable in terms of sample size.

  5. Function and regulation of large conductance Ca(2+)-activated K+ channel in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiang-Qun; Zhang, Lubo

    2012-09-01

    Large conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (BK(Ca)) channels are abundantly expressed in vascular smooth muscle cells. Activation of BK(Ca) channels leads to hyperpolarization of cell membrane, which in turn counteracts vasoconstriction. Therefore, BK(Ca) channels have an important role in regulation of vascular tone and blood pressure. The activity of BK(Ca) channels is subject to modulation by various factors. Furthermore, the function of BK(Ca) channels are altered in both physiological and pathophysiological conditions, such as pregnancy, hypertension and diabetes, which has dramatic impacts on vascular tone and hemodynamics. Consequently, compounds and genetic manipulation that alter activity and expression of the channel might be of therapeutic interest.

  6. Functional role of stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1) in vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Yoichiro; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Murakami, Manabu; Ono, Kyoichi; Munehisa, Yoshiko; Koyama, Takashi; Nobori, Kiyoshi; Iijima, Toshihiko; Ito, Hiroshi

    2007-10-05

    We investigated the functional role of STIM1, a Ca{sup 2+} sensor in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that regulates store-operated Ca{sup 2+} entry (SOCE), in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). STIM1 was mainly localized at the ER and plasma membrane. The knockdown of STIM1 expression by small interfering (si) RNA drastically decreased SOCE. In contrast, an EF-hand mutant of STIM1, STIM1{sup E87A}, produced a marked increase in SOCE, which was abolished by co-transfection with siRNA to transient receptor potential canonical 1 (TRPC1). In addition, transfection with siRNA against STIM1 suppressed phosphorylation of cAMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB) and cell growth. These results suggest that STIM1 is an essential component of SOCE and that it is involved in VSMC proliferation.

  7. Detection of the toughest: Pedestrian injury risk as a smooth function of age.

    PubMed

    Niebuhr, Tobias; Junge, Mirko

    2017-07-04

    Though it is common to refer to age-specific groups (e.g., children, adults, elderly), smooth trends conditional on age are mainly ignored in the literature. The present study examines the pedestrian injury risk in full-frontal pedestrian-to-passenger car accidents and incorporates age-in addition to collision speed and injury severity-as a plug-in parameter. Recent work introduced a model for pedestrian injury risk functions using explicit formulae with easily interpretable model parameters. This model is expanded by pedestrian age as another model parameter. Using the German In-Depth Accident Study (GIDAS) to obtain age-specific risk proportions, the model parameters are fitted to the raw data and then smoothed by broken-line regression. The approach supplies explicit probabilities for pedestrian injury risk conditional on pedestrian age, collision speed, and injury severity under investigation. All results yield consistency to each other in the sense that risks for more severe injuries are less probable than those for less severe injuries. As a side product, the approach indicates specific ages at which the risk behavior fundamentally changes. These threshold values can be interpreted as the most robust ages for pedestrians. The obtained age-wise risk functions can be aggregated and adapted to any population. The presented approach is formulated in such general terms that in can be directly used for other data sets or additional parameters; for example, the pedestrian's sex. Thus far, no other study using age as a plug-in parameter can be found.

  8. Functional Vascular Smooth Muscle-like Cells Derived from Adult Mouse Uterine Mesothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lachaud, Christian Claude; Pezzolla, Daniela; Domínguez-Rodríguez, Alejandro; Smani, Tarik

    2013-01-01

    In mammalian visceral organs, vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) originate from an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of embryonic mesothelial cells (MCs). The ability of adult MCs to recapitulate EMT and to acquire smooth muscle (SM) markers upon provasculogenic culture suggested they might retain embryonic vasculogenic differentiation potential. However, it remains unknown whether adult MCs-derived SM-like cells may acquire specific vascular SM lineage markers and the functionality of differentiated contractile VSMCs. Here, we describe how a gentle trypsinization of adult mouse uterine cords could selectively detach their outermost uterine mesothelial layer cells. As other MCs; uterine MCs (UtMCs) uniformly expressed the epithelial markers β-catenin, ZO-1, E-cadherin, CD54, CD29, and CK18. When cultured in a modified SM differentiation media (SMDM) UtMCs initiated a loss of epithelial characteristics and gained markers expression of EMT (Twist, Snail, and Slug), stem and progenitor (Nanog, Sox2, C-kit, Gata-4, Isl-1, and nestin), SM (α-SMA, calponin, caldesmon, SM22α, desmin, SM-MHC, and smoothelin-B) and cardiac (BMP2, BMP4, ACTC1, sACTN, cTnI, cTnT, ANF, Cx43, and MLC2a). UtMCs repeatedly subcultured in SMDM acquired differentiated VSM-like characteristics and expressed smoothelin-B in the typical stress-fiber pattern expression of contractile VSMCs. Relevantly, UtMCs-derived VSM-like cells could generate “mechanical force” to compact collagen lattices and displayed in diverse degree voltage (K+) and receptor (endothelin-1, oxytocin, norepinephrine, carbachol and vasopressin)-induced [Ca2+]i rises and contraction. Thus, we show for the first time that UtMCs could recapitulate in vitro differentiative events of early cardiovascular differentiation and transdifferentiate in cells exhibiting molecular and functional characteristics of VSMCs. PMID:23405120

  9. On the Modeling of Polar Component of Solvation Energy using Smooth Gaussian-Based Dielectric Function.

    PubMed

    Li, Lin; Li, Chuan; Alexov, Emil

    2014-05-01

    Traditional implicit methods for modeling electrostatics in biomolecules use a two-dielectric approach: a biomolecule is assigned low dielectric constant while the water phase is considered as a high dielectric constant medium. However, such an approach treats the biomolecule-water interface as a sharp dielectric border between two homogeneous dielectric media and does not account for inhomogeneous dielectric properties of the macromolecule as well. Recently we reported a new development, a smooth Gaussian-based dielectric function which treats the entire system, the solute and the water phase, as inhomogeneous dielectric medium (J Chem Theory Comput. 2013 Apr 9; 9(4): 2126-2136.). Here we examine various aspects of the modeling of polar solvation energy in such inhomogeneous systems in terms of the solute-water boundary and the inhomogeneity of the solute in the absence of water surrounding. The smooth Gaussian-based dielectric function is implemented in the DelPhi finite-difference program, and therefore the sensitivity of the results with respect to the grid parameters is investigated, and it is shown that the calculated polar solvation energy is almost grid independent. Furthermore, the results are compared with the standard two-media model and it is demonstrated that on average, the standard method overestimates the magnitude of the polar solvation energy by a factor 2.5. Lastly, the possibility of the solute to have local dielectric constant larger than of a bulk water is investigated in a benchmarking test against experimentally determined set of pKa's and it is speculated that side chain rearrangements could result in local dielectric constant larger than 80.

  10. Coulomb wave functions in momentum space

    SciTech Connect

    Eremenko, V.; Upadhyay, N. J.; Thompson, I. J.; Elster, Ch.; Nunes, F. M.; Arbanas, G.; Escher, J. E.; Hlophe, L.

    2015-10-15

    We present an algorithm to calculate non-relativistic partial-wave Coulomb functions in momentum space. The arguments are the Sommerfeld parameter η, the angular momentum l, the asymptotic momentum q and the 'running' momentum p, where both momenta are real. Since the partial-wave Coulomb functions exhibit singular behavior when p → q, different representations of the Legendre functions of the 2nd kind need to be implemented in computing the functions for the values of p close to the singularity and far away from it. The code for the momentum-space Coulomb wave functions is applicable for values of vertical bar eta vertical bar in the range of 10-1 to 10, and thus is particularly suited for momentum space calculations of nuclear reactions.

  11. Coulomb wave functions in momentum space

    DOE PAGES

    Eremenko, V.; Upadhyay, N. J.; Thompson, I. J.; ...

    2015-10-15

    We present an algorithm to calculate non-relativistic partial-wave Coulomb functions in momentum space. The arguments are the Sommerfeld parameter η, the angular momentum l, the asymptotic momentum q and the 'running' momentum p, where both momenta are real. Since the partial-wave Coulomb functions exhibit singular behavior when p → q, different representations of the Legendre functions of the 2nd kind need to be implemented in computing the functions for the values of p close to the singularity and far away from it. The code for the momentum-space Coulomb wave functions is applicable for values of vertical bar eta vertical barmore » in the range of 10-1 to 10, and thus is particularly suited for momentum space calculations of nuclear reactions.« less

  12. Vascular smooth muscle function in type 2 diabetes mellitus: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Montero, David; Walther, Guillaume; Pérez-Martin, Antonia; Vicente-Salar, Nestor; Roche, Enrique; Vinet, Agnès

    2013-10-01

    In type 2 diabetes, in contrast to the well-documented endothelial dysfunction, studies assessing vascular smooth muscle (VSM) function have yielded discrepant results over the last two decades. We therefore sought to determine whether or not VSM function is impaired in individuals with type 2 diabetes. We conducted a systematic search of MEDLINE, Cochrane, Scopus and Web of Science databases, from their respective inceptions until December 2012, for articles evaluating VSM function in individuals with type 2 diabetes. A meta-analysis was performed to compare the standardised mean difference (SMD) in VSM function between individuals with type 2 diabetes and age-matched controls. Subgroup analyses and meta-regression were used to identify sources of heterogeneity. Twenty-seven articles (1,042 individuals with type 2 diabetes and 601 control subjects) were included in this analysis. VSM function was significantly impaired in diabetic compared with control subjects (SMD -0.68, 95% CI -0.84, -0.52; p < 0.001). Although moderate heterogeneity among studies was found (I (2) = 52%), no significant publication bias was detected. Subgroup analyses showed a further decline in VSM function assessed in the microcirculation compared with the macrocirculation of individuals with type 2 diabetes (p = 0.009). In meta-regression, VSM function in the microcirculation was inversely associated with BMI and triacylglycerols and was positively associated with HDL-cholesterol. In addition to the endothelium, the VSM is a source of vascular dysfunction in type 2 diabetes. An exacerbation of VSM function in the microcirculation may be a distinctive feature in type 2 diabetes.

  13. Prox-regular functions in Hilbert spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, Frédéric; Thibault, Lionel

    2005-03-01

    This paper studies the prox-regularity concept for functions in the general context of Hilbert space. In particular, a subdifferential characterization is established as well as several other properties. It is also shown that the Moreau envelopes of such functions are continuously differentiable.

  14. Space-Time Smoothing of Complex Survey Data: Small Area Estimation for Child Mortality.

    PubMed

    Mercer, Laina D; Wakefield, Jon; Pantazis, Athena; Lutambi, Angelina M; Masanja, Honorati; Clark, Samuel

    2015-12-01

    Many people living in low and middle-income countries are not covered by civil registration and vital statistics systems. Consequently, a wide variety of other types of data including many household sample surveys are used to estimate health and population indicators. In this paper we combine data from sample surveys and demographic surveillance systems to produce small area estimates of child mortality through time. Small area estimates are necessary to understand geographical heterogeneity in health indicators when full-coverage vital statistics are not available. For this endeavor spatio-temporal smoothing is beneficial to alleviate problems of data sparsity. The use of conventional hierarchical models requires careful thought since the survey weights may need to be considered to alleviate bias due to non-random sampling and non-response. The application that motivated this work is estimation of child mortality rates in five-year time intervals in regions of Tanzania. Data come from Demographic and Health Surveys conducted over the period 1991-2010 and two demographic surveillance system sites. We derive a variance estimator of under five years child mortality that accounts for the complex survey weighting. For our application, the hierarchical models we consider include random effects for area, time and survey and we compare models using a variety of measures including the conditional predictive ordinate (CPO). The method we propose is implemented via the fast and accurate integrated nested Laplace approximation (INLA).

  15. Bioengineering functional human aortic vascular smooth-muscle strips in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hecker, Louise; Khait, Luda; Welsh, Michael J; Birla, Ravi

    2008-07-01

    The contraction and relaxation of VSM (vascular smooth muscle) are responsible for the maintenance of vascular tone, which is a major determinant of blood pressure. However, the molecular events leading to the contraction and relaxation of VSM are poorly understood. The development of three-dimensional bioengineered tissues provides an opportunity to investigate the molecular events controlling vascular tone in vitro. In the present study we used fibrin-gel casting to bioengineer functional VSM strips from primary human aortic VSM cells. Our bioengineered VSM strips are functionally similar to VSM in vivo and remained viable in culture for up to 5 weeks. VSM strips demonstrate spontaneous basal tone and can generate an active force (contraction) of up to 85.2 microN on stimulation with phenylephrine. Bioengineered VSM strips exhibited Ca(2+)-dependent contraction and calcium-independent relaxation. The development of functional bioengineered VSM tissue provides a new in vitro model system that can be used to investigate the molecular events controlling vascular tone.

  16. Role of potassium ion channels in detrusor smooth muscle function and dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Petkov, Georgi V.

    2013-01-01

    Contraction and relaxation of the detrusor smooth muscle (DSM), which makes up the wall of the urinary bladder, facilitates the storage and voiding of urine. Several families of K+ channels, including voltage-gated K+ (KV) channels, Ca2+-activated K+ (KCa) channels, inward-rectifying ATP-sensitive K+ (Kir, KATP) channels, and two-pore-domain K+ (K2P) channels, are expressed and functional in DSM. They control DSM excitability and contractility by maintaining the resting membrane potential and shaping the action potentials that determine the phasic nature of contractility in this tissue. Defects in DSM K+ channel proteins or in the molecules involved in their regulatory pathways may underlie certain forms of bladder dysfunction, such as overactive bladder. K+ channels represent an opportunity for novel pharmacological manipulation and therapeutic intervention in human DSM. Modulation of DSM K+ channels directly or indirectly by targeting their regulatory mechanisms has the potential to control urinary bladder function. This Review summarizes our current state of knowledge of the functional role of K+ channels in DSM in health and disease, with special emphasis on current advancements in the field. PMID:22158596

  17. Ablation of astrocytic laminin impairs vascular smooth muscle cell function and leads to hemorrhagic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zu-Lin; Yao, Yao; Norris, Erin H.; Kruyer, Anna; Jno-Charles, Odella; Akhmerov, Akbarshakh

    2013-01-01

    Astrocytes express laminin and assemble basement membranes (BMs) at their endfeet, which ensheath the cerebrovasculature. The function of astrocytic laminin in cerebrovascular integrity is unknown. We show that ablation of astrocytic laminin by tissue-specific Cre-mediated recombination disrupted endfeet BMs and led to hemorrhage in deep brain regions of adult mice, resembling human hypertensive hemorrhage. The lack of astrocytic laminin led to impaired function of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), where astrocytes have a closer association with VSMCs in small arterioles, and was associated with hemorrhagic vessels, which exhibited VSMC fragmentation and vascular wall disassembly. Acute disruption of astrocytic laminin in the striatum of adult mice also impaired VSMC function, indicating that laminin is necessary for VSMC maintenance. In vitro, both astrocytes and astrocytic laminin promoted brain VSMC differentiation. These results show that astrocytes regulate VSMCs and vascular integrity in small vessels of deep brain regions. Therefore, astrocytes may be a possible target for hemorrhagic stroke prevention and therapy. PMID:23857767

  18. The Function of Vascular Smooth Muscle Phosphodiesterase III is Preserved in Healthy Human Aging

    PubMed Central

    Elvebak, Rachel L.; Eisenach, John H.; Joyner, Michael J.; Nicholson, Wayne T.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Phosphodiesterase (PDE) III is an enzyme in vascular smooth muscle that metabolizes cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP). Milrinone inhibits PDE III, increasing the availability of cAMP. Cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), which is regulated by nitric oxide (NO), also inhibits PDE III. The endothelial NO component of prostacyclin (PGI2)‐mediated vasodilation is reduced in aging. This study investigated if PGI2‐mediated vasodilation during concomitant inhibition of endothelial NO and smooth muscle PDE III is affected by healthy aging. PDE III was inhibited with milrinone in 10 older subjects and 10 young matched controls while simultaneously infusing NG‐monomethyl‐l‐arginine acetate (l‐NMMA) to remove the confounding inhibitory effects of cGMP on PDE III. Incremental doses of PGI2 and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) were administered to the brachial artery during separate trials. l‐NMMA decreased baseline blood flow similarly, and the addition of milrinone increased baseline blood flow similarly in both groups. The forearm blood flow responses to PGI2 were similar between groups (younger: 7.62 ± 0.72; older: 6.88 ± 0.81 mL•dL−1 FAV•min−1 at the highest dose of PGI2). SNP responses were also similar. This study suggests that the vasodilator pathway associated with PDE III function, the bioavailability of cAMP, and the interaction with cGMP may be preserved in healthy aging. Clin Trans Sci 2010; Volume 3: 239–242. PMID:21500398

  19. Human isolated bronchial smooth muscle contains functional ryanodine/caffeine-sensitive Ca-release channels.

    PubMed

    Hyvelin, J M; Martin, C; Roux, E; Marthan, R; Savineau, J P

    2000-08-01

    Human bronchial smooth muscle (HBSM) contraction is implicated in a variety of respiratory diseases, including asthma. Yet, the presence of an operative calcium-induced calcium release (CICR) mechanism, identified in various smooth muscles, has not been established in HBSM. We therefore studied Ca-releasing mechanisms in HBSM obtained at thoracotomy with special attention to ryanodine-sensitive receptor channels (RyRs). In freshly isolated bronchial myocytes, ryanodine (0.5 to 50 microM) and caffeine (1 to 25 mM) induced transient increases in the cytoplasmic calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)). Higher ryanodine concentrations (> 100 microM) inhibited the caffeine-induced [Ca(2+)](i) response, which was also blocked in the presence of tetracaine (300 microM) or ruthenium red (200 microM), two potent CICR inhibitors. In HBSM strips, caffeine induced a transient contraction which, likewise, was inhibited by ryanodine and tetracaine. However, ryanodine (200 microM) modified neither the [Ca(2+)](i) response nor the contraction induced by K(+)-rich (110 mM) solution. Reverse transcriptase/polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and RNase protection assay performed in HBSM have revealed the existence of mRNAs encoding only the type 3 RyR. We also characterized acetylcholine-induced [Ca(2+)](i) and contractile responses. None of these responses was altered by ryanodine or by tetracaine. These results demonstrate, for the first time, the existence of functional RyRs in HBSM cells which, owing to the type of isoform or the amount of protein expressed, are not involved, under physiologic conditions, in depolarization- or agonist-induced contraction.

  20. Molecular and functional characterization of Kv7 K+ channel in murine gastrointestinal smooth muscles.

    PubMed

    Jepps, Thomas A; Greenwood, Iain A; Moffatt, James D; Sanders, Kenton M; Ohya, Susumu

    2009-07-01

    Members of the K(v)7 voltage-gated K(+) channel family are important determinants of cardiac and neuronal membrane excitability. Recently, we and others have shown that K(v)7 channels are also crucial regulators of smooth muscle activity. The aim of the present study was to assess the K(v)7 expression in different parts of the murine gastrointestinal (GI) tract and to assess their functional roles by use of pharmacological agents. Of KCNQ/K(v)7 members, both KCNQ4/K(v)7.4 and KCNQ5/K(v)7.5 genes and proteins were the most abundantly expressed K(v)7 channels in smooth muscles throughout the GI tract. Immunohistochemical staining also revealed that K(v)7.4 and K(v)7.5 but not K(v)7.1 were expressed in the circular muscle layer of the colon. In segments of distal colon circular muscle exhibiting spontaneous phasic contractions, the nonselective K(v)7 blockers XE991 and linopirdine increased the integral of tension. Increases in the integral of tension were also observed under conditions of neuronal blockade. Similar effects, although less marked, were observed in the proximal colon. As expected, the K(v)7.1-selective blocker chromanol 293B had no effect in either type of segment. These data show that K(v)7.x especially K(v)7.4 and K(v)7.5 are expressed in different regions of the murine gastrointestinal tract and blockers of K(v)7 channels augment inherent contractile activity. Drugs that selectively block K(v)7.4/7.5 might be promising therapeutics for the treatment of motility disorders such as constipation associated with irritable bowel syndrome.

  1. Update on corpus cavernosum smooth muscle contractile pathways in erectile function: a role for testosterone?

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin-Hua; Melman, Arnold; Disanto, Michael E

    2011-07-01

    Normal erectile function (EF) involves a coordinated relaxation of the arteries that supply the penis and the corpus cavernosum smooth muscle (CCSM), resulting in expansion of the sinusoids and increased intracavernous pressure. But the CCSM spends the majority of its time in the contracted state which is mediated by norepinephrine released from nerve endings and other vasoconstrictors like endothelins released from the endothelium. These agents cause smooth muscle myosin (SMM) phosphorylation by elevating intracellular calcium. When calcium returns to basal levels, the calcium sensitivity increases and prevents myosin dephosphorylation, which involves the RhoA/Rho-kinase (ROK) mechanism, thus maintaining force. Although mounting evidences demonstrate that androgens have a major influence on EF that is not just centrally mediated, this notion remains quite controversial. To summarize the current knowledge on CCSM contractile pathways, the role they play in modulating EF, and the influence of androgens. The article reviews the literature and contains some previously unpublished data on CCSM contraction signaling including the role that androgens are known to play in modulating these pathways. Data from peer-reviewed publications and previously unpublished observations. In addition to downregulation of many pro-erectile molecular mechanisms, decreased testosterone (T) levels upregulate CCSM contractility, including hyperresponsiveness to α-adrenergic agonists, increased SMM phosphorylation, alteration of SMM isoform composition, activation of RhoA/ROK signaling and modulation of sphingosine-1-phosphate regulation of CCSM tone. Decreased T levels upregulate CCSM contractile signaling. Meanwhile, it downregulates CCSM relaxation pathways synergizing to produce erectile dysfunction (ED). Although some urologists and researchers are still skeptical of the influence of androgens on penile erection, understanding these molecular control mechanisms as well as the influence

  2. Connexin45 is expressed in vascular smooth muscle but its function remains elusive.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Volker J; Jobs, Alexander; von Maltzahn, Julia; Wörsdörfer, Philipp; Willecke, Klaus; de Wit, Cor

    2012-01-01

    Connexins (Cx) form gap junctions and allow the coordination of cellular behaviour. In vessels, expression of Cx40, Cx37, and Cx43 is well established and specifically Cx40 serves important functions in endothelial cells. In contrast, expression and physiological functions of Cx45 is unclear although its expression has been suggested in vascular smooth muscle (VSM). Therefore, we studied expression and function of Cx45 in vessels using different mice models allowing to identify and delete Cx45. Smooth muscle cell (SMC)-specific deletion was achieved by the Cre/loxP system using Cre-recombinase driven by a Nestin promoter. Deletion of Cx45 leads concomitantly to the expression of enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) in these mice. Conduction of vasomotor responses was studied in cremasteric arterioles using intravital microscopy and arterial pressure was measured telemetrically. Cx45 is transcriptionally expressed in VSM as detected by EGFP expression in SMC-specific Cx45-deficient mice (Cx45fl/fl:Nestin-Cre) but not in endothelial cells (Cx45fl/fl:TIE2-Cre). Moreover, EGFP was located at VSM cell borders in arterioles of transgenic mice carrying an EGFP-tagged Cx45. Expectedly, arteriolar conduction of dilations evoked by the endothelium-dependent agonist acetylcholine were not different between Cx45fl/fl:Nestin-Cre mice and controls carrying homozygously a floxed Cx45 gene (Cx45fl/fl). Surprisingly, the amplitude of locally initiated endothelium-independent constrictions (K(+)) and dilations (adenosine) declined similarly with distance in both genotypes indicating an intact VSM conduction pathway also in mice being deficient for Cx45 in VSM. Arterial pressure was not different between freely moving Cx45fl/fl and Cx45fl/fl:Nestin-Cre mice during day or night. We conclude that Cx45 is physiologically expressed in VSM, but not in EC in murine arterioles. However, Cx45 is dispensable for the conduction of vasomotor responses along these arterioles. Possibly

  3. On the Controlled Approximation Order from Certain Spaces of Smooth Bivariate Splines.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-05-01

    follows from [BHI1] that, for any function a: Z2 R, we have D,( a(J)M(-J)) ) Via (J)M-\\e (9-j) if e i e T je2 je 2 i 2 We define, for any function f...analysis of the finite element variational method, C.I.M.E. II, Ciclo Erice, 1971, Constructive Aspects of Functional Analysis, G. Geymonat ed., 1973, 794

  4. Interpolating Functions on Lines in 3-Space

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-01-01

    numbers comprise the compilation report: ADP011967 thru ADPO12009 UNCLASSIFIED Interpolating Functions on Lines in 3-Space Martin Peternell and Helmut...reproduction in any form reserved. 352 M. Peternell and H. Pottmann §2. Lines in Space An oriented line L in Euclidean 3-space E 3 is determined by a...intersection r = Q n T is a quadratic cone with vertex Z. The intersection e = E n T is a hyperplane 354 M. Peternell and H. Pottmann X t) Fig. 2. Local

  5. Evaluation of Arteriolar Smooth Muscle Cell Function in an Ex Vivo Microvascular Network Model.

    PubMed

    Motherwell, Jessica M; Azimi, Mohammad S; Spicer, Kristine; Alves, Natascha G; Hodges, Nicholas A; Breslin, Jerome W; Katakam, Prasad V G; Murfee, Walter L

    2017-05-19

    An emerging challenge in tissue engineering biomimetic models is recapitulating the physiological complexity associated with real tissues. Recently, our laboratory introduced the rat mesentery culture model as an ex vivo experimental platform for investigating the multi-cellular dynamics involved in angiogenesis within an intact microvascular network using time-lapse imaging. A critical question remains whether the vessels maintain their functionality. The objective of this study was to determine whether vascular smooth muscle cells in cultured microvascular networks maintain the ability to constrict. Adult rat mesenteric tissues were harvested and cultured for three days in either MEM or MEM plus 10% serum. On Day 0 and Day 3 live microvascular networks were visualized with FITC conjugated BSI-lectin labeling and arteriole diameters were compared before and five minutes after topical exposure to vasoconstrictors (50 mM KCl and 20 nM Endothelin-1). Arterioles displayed a vasoconstriction response to KCl and endothelin for each experimental group. However, the Day 3 serum cultured networks were angiogenic, characterized by increased vessel density, and displayed a decreased vasoconstriction response compared to Day 0 networks. The results support the physiological relevance of the rat mesentery culture model as a biomimetic tool for investigating microvascular growth and function ex vivo.

  6. Localization and function of KLF4 in cytoplasm of vascular smooth muscle cell

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yan; Zheng, Bin; Zhang, Xin-hua; Nie, Chan-juan; Li, Yong-hui; Wen, Jin-kun

    2013-06-28

    Highlights: •PDGF-BB prompts the translocation of KLF4 to the cytoplasm. •PDGF-BB promotes interaction between KLF4 and actin in the cytoplasm. •Phosphorylation and SUMOylation of KLF4 participates in regulation of cytoskeletal organization. •KLF4 regulates cytoskeleton by promoting the expression of contraction-associated genes. -- Abstract: The Krüppel-like factor 4 is a DNA-binding transcriptional regulator that regulates a diverse array of cellular processes, including development, differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis. The previous studies about KLF4 functions mainly focused on its role as a transcription factor, its functions in the cytoplasm are still unknown. In this study, we found that PDGF-BB could prompt the translocation of KLF4 to the cytoplasm through CRM1-mediated nuclear export pathway in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and increased the interaction of KLF4 with actin in the cytoplasm. Further study showed that both KLF4 phosphorylation and SUMOylation induced by PDGF-BB participates in regulation of cytoskeletal organization by stabilizing the actin cytoskeleton in VSMCs. In conclusion, these results identify that KLF4 participates in the cytoskeletal organization by stabilizing cytoskeleton in the cytoplasm of VSMCs.

  7. Bioengineering functional human sphincteric and non-sphincteric gastrointestinal smooth muscle constructs.

    PubMed

    Rego, Stephen L; Zakhem, Elie; Orlando, Giuseppe; Bitar, Khalil N

    2016-04-15

    Digestion and motility of luminal content through the gastrointestinal (GI) tract are achieved by cooperation between distinct cell types. Much of the 3 dimensional (3D) in vitro modeling used to study the GI physiology and disease focus solely on epithelial cells and not smooth muscle cells (SMCs). SMCs of the gut function either to propel and mix luminal contents (phasic; non-sphincteric) or to act as barriers to prevent the movement of luminal materials (tonic; sphincteric). Motility disorders including pyloric stenosis and chronic intestinal pseudoobstruction (CIPO) affect sphincteric and non-sphincteric SMCs, respectively. Bioengineering offers a useful tool to develop functional GI tissue mimics that possess similar characteristics to native tissue. The objective of this study was to bioengineer 3D human pyloric sphincter and small intestinal (SI) constructs in vitro that recapitulate the contractile phenotypes of sphincteric and non-sphincteric human GI SMCs. Bioengineered 3D human pylorus and circular SI SMC constructs were developed and displayed a contractile phenotype. Constructs composed of human pylorus SMCs displayed tonic SMC characteristics, including generation of basal tone, at higher levels than SI SMC constructs which is similar to what is seen in native tissue. Both constructs contracted in response to potassium chloride (KCl) and acetylcholine (ACh) and relaxed in response to vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP). These studies provide the first bioengineered human pylorus constructs that maintain a sphincteric phenotype. These bioengineered constructs provide appropriate models to study motility disorders of the gut or replacement tissues for various GI organs.

  8. Impaired function of alpha-2 adrenoceptors in smooth muscle of mesenteric arteries from spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Feres, T; Borges, A C; Silva, E G; Paiva, A C; Paiva, T B

    1998-11-01

    The alpha2-adrenoceptor function in mesenteric arteries of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) was investigated by comparing membrane potential changes in response to adrenergic agonists in preparations from female SHR, Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) and normotensive Wistar rats (NWR). Resting membrane potential was found to be less negative in mesenteric arteries from SHR than in those from NWR and WKY. Apamin induced a decrease in the membrane potential of mesenteric artery rings without endothelium from NWR and WKY, but had no effects in those from SHR. Both UK 14,304 and adrenaline, in the presence of prazosin, induced a hyperpolarization that was significantly lower in de-endothelialized mesenteric rings from SHR than in those from NWR and WKY. In mesenteric rings with endothelium, however, similar hyperpolarization was observed in the three strains. In NWR mesenteric rings with endothelium the hyperpolarization induced by activation of alpha2-adrenoceptors was abolished by apamin, whereas in intact SHR mesenteric rings this hyperpolarization was slightly reduced by apamin and more efficiently reduced by Nomega-nitro-L-arginine. It is concluded that the activity of potassium channels coupled to alpha2-adrenoceptors is altered in the smooth muscle cells of SHR mesenteric arteries, contributing to their less negative membrane potential. On the other hand, the endothelial alpha2-receptors are functioning in mesenteric vessels from SHR and their stimulation induces a hyperpolarization mainly through the release of nitric oxide.

  9. Aging impairs smooth muscle-mediated regulation of aortic stiffness: a defect in shock absorption function?

    PubMed

    Gao, Yuan Z; Saphirstein, Robert J; Yamin, Rina; Suki, Bela; Morgan, Kathleen G

    2014-10-15

    Increased aortic stiffness is an early and independent biomarker of cardiovascular disease. Here we tested the hypothesis that vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) contribute significantly to aortic stiffness and investigated the mechanisms involved. The relative contributions of VSMCs, focal adhesions (FAs), and matrix to stiffness in mouse aorta preparations at optimal length and with confirmed VSMC viability were separated by the use of small-molecule inhibitors and activators. Using biomechanical methods designed for minimal perturbation of cellular function, we directly quantified changes with aging in aortic material stiffness. An alpha adrenoceptor agonist, in the presence of N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME) to remove interference of endothelial nitric oxide, increases stiffness by 90-200% from baseline in both young and old mice. Interestingly, increases are robustly suppressed by the Src kinase inhibitor PP2 in young but not old mice. Phosphotyrosine screening revealed, with aging, a biochemical signature of markedly impaired agonist-induced FA remodeling previously associated with Src signaling. Protein expression measurement confirmed a decrease in Src expression with aging. Thus we report here an additive model for the in vitro biomechanical components of the mouse aortic wall in which 1) VSMCs are a surprisingly large component of aortic stiffness at physiological lengths and 2) regulation of the VSMC component through FA signaling and hence plasticity is impaired with aging, diminishing the aorta's normal shock absorption function in response to stressors.

  10. Interstitial cells of Cajal: a new perspective on smooth muscle function

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Kenton M; Ward, Sean M

    2006-01-01

    Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) were described more than 100 years ago by Ramon y Cajal. For many years these cells were identified only by non-specific histological stains and later, more reliably, by electron microscopy. Ultrastructural features and the anatomical locations of ICC suggested important physiological roles for these cells. A breakthrough occurred in our ability to study ICC when it was recognized that antibodies for Kit could be used to identify ICC, even in living tissues. Signalling via Kit, a receptor tyrosine kinase, is also necessary for ICC development and maintenance of phenotype. Thus, blocking Kit, by a variety of techniques, caused loss of ICC in experimental animals and demonstrated the critical physiological functions of these cells in gastrointestinal motility. Loss of ICC in human gastrointestinal diseases may contribute to the motor pathologies observed. Unrestrained Kit signalling leads to the transformation of ICC and the development of gastrointestinal stromal tumours. Now ICC-like cells have been identified in a variety of smooth muscle tissues, and the race is on to discover whether these cells have equivalent or even novel functions in organs outside the gastrointestinal tract. This perspectives article gives a short overview of the history of ICC research and directions for future investigation. PMID:16873406

  11. Aging impairs smooth muscle-mediated regulation of aortic stiffness: a defect in shock absorption function?

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yuan Z.; Saphirstein, Robert J.; Yamin, Rina; Suki, Bela

    2014-01-01

    Increased aortic stiffness is an early and independent biomarker of cardiovascular disease. Here we tested the hypothesis that vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) contribute significantly to aortic stiffness and investigated the mechanisms involved. The relative contributions of VSMCs, focal adhesions (FAs), and matrix to stiffness in mouse aorta preparations at optimal length and with confirmed VSMC viability were separated by the use of small-molecule inhibitors and activators. Using biomechanical methods designed for minimal perturbation of cellular function, we directly quantified changes with aging in aortic material stiffness. An alpha adrenoceptor agonist, in the presence of NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME) to remove interference of endothelial nitric oxide, increases stiffness by 90–200% from baseline in both young and old mice. Interestingly, increases are robustly suppressed by the Src kinase inhibitor PP2 in young but not old mice. Phosphotyrosine screening revealed, with aging, a biochemical signature of markedly impaired agonist-induced FA remodeling previously associated with Src signaling. Protein expression measurement confirmed a decrease in Src expression with aging. Thus we report here an additive model for the in vitro biomechanical components of the mouse aortic wall in which 1) VSMCs are a surprisingly large component of aortic stiffness at physiological lengths and 2) regulation of the VSMC component through FA signaling and hence plasticity is impaired with aging, diminishing the aorta's normal shock absorption function in response to stressors. PMID:25128168

  12. Arm weight support training improves functional motor outcome and movement smoothness after stroke

    PubMed Central

    Bartolo, Michelangelo; De Nunzio, Alessandro Marco; Sebastiano, Fabio; Spicciato, Francesca; Tortola, Paolo; Nilsson, Jan; Pierelli, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Summary The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness in acute stroke patients of a rehabilitation program performed with or without an arm weight support device. Twenty-eight acute, first-ever unilateral stroke patients were enrolled in a single-blind, randomized controlled trial. Clinical evaluation included Fugl-Mayer Assessment, Functional Independence Measure and kinematic analysis [maximum and mean hand velocity, maximum range of motion (Max RoM), normalized jerk (NJ)]. Patients received 12 daily 30-minute sessions (6/week) of additional upper limb therapy performed using an arm weight support device (study group) or additional traditional physiotherapy (control group). The patients were evaluated on admission and at the end of the rehabilitation intervention. The two groups were clinically comparable on admission (p>0.05). Both groups showed significant improvements in clinical scale scores and in Max RoM in flexion-extension, while only the study group showed improvements in NJ and in Max RoM in adduction-abduction. Rehabilitation training using an arm weight support device appears to be a useful method to supplement conventional therapy in acute stroke patients, increasing smoothness of movement and motor function. PMID:25014045

  13. A method for anisotropic spatial smoothing of functional magnetic resonance images using distance transformation of a structural image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Haewon; Lee, Dongha; Doo Lee, Jong; Park, Hae-Jeong

    2011-08-01

    Spatial smoothing using isotropic Gaussian kernels to remove noise reduces spatial resolution and increases the partial volume effect of functional magnetic resonance images (fMRI), thereby reducing localization power. To minimize these limitations, we propose a novel anisotropic smoothing method for fMRI data. To extract an anisotropic tensor for each voxel of the functional data, we derived an intensity gradient using the distance transformation of the segmented gray matter of the fMRI-coregistered T1-weighted image. The intensity gradient was then used to determine the anisotropic smoothing kernel at each voxel of the fMRI data. Performance evaluations on both real and simulated data showed that the proposed method had 10% higher statistical power and about 20% higher gray matter localization compared to isotropic smoothing and robustness to the registration errors (up to 4 mm translations and 4° rotations) between T1 structural images and fMRI data. The proposed method also showed higher performance than the anisotropic smoothing with diffusion gradients derived from the fMRI intensity data.

  14. The effects of in utero vitamin D deficiency on airway smooth muscle mass and lung function.

    PubMed

    Foong, Rachel E; Bosco, Anthony; Jones, Anya C; Gout, Alex; Gorman, Shelley; Hart, Prue H; Zosky, Graeme R

    2015-11-01

    We have previously demonstrated increased airway smooth muscle (ASM) mass and airway hyperresponsiveness in whole-life vitamin D-deficient female mice. In this study, we aimed to uncover the molecular mechanisms contributing to altered lung structure and function. RNA was extracted from lung tissue of whole-life vitamin D-deficient and -replete female mice, and gene expression patterns were profiled by RNA sequencing. The data showed that genes involved in embryonic organ development, pattern formation, branching morphogenesis, Wingless/Int signaling, and inflammation were differentially expressed in vitamin D-deficient mice. Network analysis suggested that differentially expressed genes were connected by the hubs matrix metallopeptidase 9; NF-κ light polypeptide gene enhancer in B cells inhibitor, α; epidermal growth factor receptor; and E1A binding protein p300. Given our findings that developmental pathways may be altered, we investigated if the timing of vitamin D exposure (in utero vs. postnatal) had an impact on lung health outcomes. Gene expression was measured in in utero or postnatal vitamin D-deficient mice, as well as whole-life vitamin D-deficient and -replete mice at 8 weeks of age. Baseline lung function, airway hyperresponsiveness, and airway inflammation were measured and lungs fixed for lung structure assessment using stereological methods and quantification of ASM mass. In utero vitamin D deficiency was sufficient to increase ASM mass and baseline airway resistance and alter lung structure. There were increased neutrophils but decreased lymphocytes in bronchoalveolar lavage. Expression of inflammatory molecules S100A9 and S100A8 was mainly increased in postnatal vitamin D-deficient mice. These observations suggest that in utero vitamin D deficiency can alter lung structure and function and increase inflammation, contributing to symptoms in chronic diseases, such as asthma.

  15. Birefringence Microscopy Platform for Assessing Airway Smooth Muscle Structure and Function in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Adams, David C.; Hariri, Lida P.; Miller, Alyssa J.; Wang, Yan; Cho, Josalyn L.; Villiger, Martin; Holz, Jasmin A.; Szabari, Margit V.; Hamilos, Daniel L.; Harris, R. Scott; Griffith, Jason W.; Bouma, Brett E.; Luster, Andrew D.; Medoff, Benjamin D.; Suter, Melissa J.

    2017-01-01

    The inability to visualize airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells in vivo is a major obstacle in understanding their role in normal physiology and diseases. At present, there is no imaging modality available to assess ASM in vivo. Confocal endomicroscopy lacks the penetration depth and field of view, and conventional optical coherence tomography (OCT) does not have sufficient contrast to differentiate ASM from surrounding tissues. We have developed a birefringence microscopy platform which leverages the micro-organization of tissue to add further dimension to traditional OCT. We have utilized this technology to validate ASM measurements in ex vivo swine and canine studies, visualize and characterize volumetric representations of ASM in vivo, and to quantify and predict ASM contractile force as a function of optical retardation. We provide in vivo images and volumetric assessments of ASM in living humans and document structural disease variations in subjects with mild asthma. The opportunity to link inflammatory responses to ASM responses, and to link ASM responses to clinical responses and outcomes could lead to an increased understanding of diseases of the airway and ultimately to improved patient outcomes. PMID:27708064

  16. MicroRNAs are necessary for vascular smooth muscle growth, differentiation, and function.

    PubMed

    Albinsson, Sebastian; Suarez, Yajaira; Skoura, Athanasia; Offermanns, Stefan; Miano, Joseph M; Sessa, William C

    2010-06-01

    Regulation of vascular smooth muscle (VSM) proliferation and contractile differentiation is an important factor in vascular development and subsequent cardiovascular diseases. Recently, microRNAs (miRNAs) have been shown to regulate fundamental cellular processes in a number of cell types, but the integrated role of miRNAs in VSM in blood vessels is unknown. Here, we investigated the role of miRNAs in VSM by deleting the rate-limiting enzyme in miRNA synthesis, Dicer. Deletion of Dicer in VSM results in late embryonic lethality at embryonic day 16 to 17, associated with extensive internal hemorrhage. The loss of VSM Dicer results in dilated, thin-walled blood vessels caused by a reduction in cellular proliferation. In addition, blood vessels from VSM-deleted Dicer mice exhibited impaired contractility because of a loss of contractile protein markers. We found this effect to be associated with a loss of actin stress fibers and partly rescued by overexpression of microRNA (miR)-145 or myocardin. Dicer-dependent miRNAs are important for VSM development and function by regulating proliferation and contractile differentiation.

  17. Effects of polydopamine functionalized titanium dioxide nanotubes on endothelial cell and smooth muscle cell.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Si; Luo, Rifang; Wang, Xin; Tang, Linlin; Wu, Jian; Wang, Jin; Huang, Runbo; Sun, Hong; Huang, Nan

    2014-04-01

    Previous investigations have demonstrated that TiO2 nanotubes (NTs) with particular structure cues could control the behavior of different types of cells, including endothelial cells (ECs) and smooth muscle cells (SMCs). Besides, polydopamine (PDA) modified surfaces were reported to be beneficial to increase the proliferation and viability of ECs and meanwhile could inhibit the proliferation of SMCs. The TiO2 nanotubes (NTs) were functionalized with polydopamine (PDA) (PDA/NTs) to study the synergetic effect of both nanotopography (NTs) and chemical cues (PDA) of TiO2 nanotubes on the regulation of cellular behavior of ECs and SMCs. The PDA-modified TiO2 nanotubes were subjected to field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and water contact angle (WCA) analysis. In vitro cell culture tests confirmed that, comparing with flat titanium (Ti) and TiO2 nanotubes, PDA/NTs surface synergistically promoted ECs attachment, proliferation, migration and release of nitric oxide (NO). Meanwhile, the PDA/NTs performed well in reducing SMCs adhesion and proliferation. This novel approach might provide a new platform to investigate the synergistic effect of local chemistry and topography, as well as the applications for the development of titanium-based implants for enhanced endothelialization. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Comparison of smooth pursuit and combined eye-head tracking in human subjects with deficient labyrinthine function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leigh, R. J.; Thurston, S. E.; Sharpe, J. A.; Ranalli, P. J.; Hamid, M. A.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of deficient labyrinthine function on smooth visual tracking with the eyes and head were investigated, using ten patients with bilateral peripheral vestibular disease and ten normal controls. Active, combined eye-head tracking (EHT) was significantly better in patients than smooth pursuit with the eyes alone, whereas normal subjects pursued equally well in both cases. Compensatory eye movements during active head rotation in darkness were always less in patients than in normal subjects. These data were used to examine current hypotheses that postulate central cancellation of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) during EHT. A model that proposes summation of an integral smooth pursuit command and VOR/compensatory eye movements is consistent with the findings. Observation of passive EHT (visual fixation of a head-fixed target during en bloc rotation) appears to indicate that in this mode parametric gain changes contribute to modulation of the VOR.

  19. Comparison of smooth pursuit and combined eye-head tracking in human subjects with deficient labyrinthine function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leigh, R. J.; Thurston, S. E.; Sharpe, J. A.; Ranalli, P. J.; Hamid, M. A.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of deficient labyrinthine function on smooth visual tracking with the eyes and head were investigated, using ten patients with bilateral peripheral vestibular disease and ten normal controls. Active, combined eye-head tracking (EHT) was significantly better in patients than smooth pursuit with the eyes alone, whereas normal subjects pursued equally well in both cases. Compensatory eye movements during active head rotation in darkness were always less in patients than in normal subjects. These data were used to examine current hypotheses that postulate central cancellation of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) during EHT. A model that proposes summation of an integral smooth pursuit command and VOR/compensatory eye movements is consistent with the findings. Observation of passive EHT (visual fixation of a head-fixed target during en bloc rotation) appears to indicate that in this mode parametric gain changes contribute to modulation of the VOR.

  20. Bitter taste receptor agonists alter mitochondrial function and induce autophagy in airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Pan, Shi; Sharma, Pawan; Shah, Sushrut D; Deshpande, Deepak A

    2017-07-01

    Airway remodeling, including increased airway smooth muscle (ASM) mass, is a hallmark feature of asthma and COPD. We previously identified the expression of bitter taste receptors (TAS2Rs) on human ASM cells and demonstrated that known TAS2R agonists could promote ASM relaxation and bronchodilation and inhibit mitogen-induced ASM growth. In this study, we explored cellular mechanisms mediating the antimitogenic effect of TAS2R agonists on human ASM cells. Pretreatment of ASM cells with TAS2R agonists chloroquine and quinine resulted in inhibition of cell survival, which was largely reversed by bafilomycin A1, an autophagy inhibitor. Transmission electron microscope studies demonstrated the presence of double-membrane autophagosomes and deformed mitochondria. In ASM cells, TAS2R agonists decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and increased mitochondrial ROS and mitochondrial fragmentation. Inhibiting dynamin-like protein 1 (DLP1) reversed TAS2R agonist-induced mitochondrial membrane potential change and attenuated mitochondrial fragmentation and cell death. Furthermore, the expression of mitochondrial protein BCL2/adenovirus E1B 19-kDa protein-interacting protein 3 (Bnip3) and mitochondrial localization of DLP1 were significantly upregulated by TAS2R agonists. More importantly, inhibiting Bnip3 mitochondrial localization by dominant-negative Bnip3 significantly attenuated cell death induced by TAS2R agonist. Collectively the TAS2R agonists chloroquine and quinine modulate mitochondrial structure and function, resulting in ASM cell death. Furthermore, Bnip3 plays a central role in TAS2R agonist-induced ASM functional changes via a mitochondrial pathway. These findings further establish the cellular mechanisms of antimitogenic effects of TAS2R agonists and identify a novel class of receptors and pathways that can be targeted to mitigate airway remodeling as well as bronchoconstriction in obstructive airway diseases. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological

  1. Airway smooth muscle cell tone amplifies contractile function in the presence of chronic cyclic strain.

    PubMed

    Fairbank, Nigel J; Connolly, Sarah C; Mackinnon, James D; Wehry, Kathrin; Deng, Linhong; Maksym, Geoffrey N

    2008-09-01

    Chronic contractile activation, or tone, in asthma coupled with continuous stretching due to breathing may be involved in altering the contractile function of airway smooth muscle (ASM). Previously, we (11) showed that cytoskeletal remodeling and stiffening responses to acute (2 h) localized stresses were modulated by the level of contractile activation of ASM. Here, we investigated if altered contractility in response to chronic mechanical strain was dependent on repeated modulation of contractile tone. Cultured human ASM cells received 5% cyclic (0.3 Hz), predominantly uniaxial strain for 5 days, with once-daily dosing of either sham, forskolin, carbachol, or histamine to alter tone. Stiffness, contractility (KCl), and "relaxability" (forskolin) were then measured as was cell alignment, myosin light-chain phosphorylation (pMLC), and myosin light-chain kinase (MLCK) content. Cells became aligned and baseline stiffness increased with strain, but repeated lowering of tone inhibited both effects (P < 0.05). Strain also reversed a negative tone-modulation dependence of MLCK, observed in static conditions in agreement with previous reports, with strain and tone together increasing both MLCK and pMLC. Furthermore, contractility increased 176% (SE 59) with repeated tone elevation. These findings indicate that with strain, and not without, repeated tone elevation promoted contractile function through changes in cytoskeletal organization and increased contractile protein. The ability of repeated contractile activation to increase contractility, but only with mechanical stretching, suggests a novel mechanism for increased ASM contractility in asthma and for the role of continuous bronchodilator and corticosteroid therapy in reversing airway hyperresponsiveness.

  2. Matrix stiffness-modulated proliferation and secretory function of the airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Shkumatov, Artem; Thompson, Michael; Choi, Kyoung M; Sicard, Delphine; Baek, Kwanghyun; Kim, Dong Hyun; Tschumperlin, Daniel J; Prakash, Y S; Kong, Hyunjoon

    2015-06-01

    Multiple pulmonary conditions are characterized by an abnormal misbalance between various tissue components, for example, an increase in the fibrous connective tissue and loss/increase in extracellular matrix proteins (ECM). Such tissue remodeling may adversely impact physiological function of airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs) responsible for contraction of airways and release of a variety of bioactive molecules. However, few efforts have been made to understand the potentially significant impact of tissue remodeling on ASMCs. Therefore, this study reports how ASMCs respond to a change in mechanical stiffness of a matrix, to which ASMCs adhere because mechanical stiffness of the remodeled airways is often different from the physiological stiffness. Accordingly, using atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements, we found that the elastic modulus of the mouse bronchus has an arithmetic mean of 23.1 ± 14 kPa (SD) (median 18.6 kPa). By culturing ASMCs on collagen-conjugated polyacrylamide hydrogels with controlled elastic moduli, we found that gels designed to be softer than average airway tissue significantly increased cellular secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Conversely, gels stiffer than average airways stimulated cell proliferation, while reducing VEGF secretion and agonist-induced calcium responses of ASMCs. These dependencies of cellular activities on elastic modulus of the gel were correlated with changes in the expression of integrin-β1 and integrin-linked kinase (ILK). Overall, the results of this study demonstrate that changes in matrix mechanics alter cell proliferation, calcium signaling, and proangiogenic functions in ASMCs. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  3. Loop expansion in a functional space

    SciTech Connect

    Kroger, H.; Labelle, P.

    1989-07-15

    As an alternative to the loop expansion of the effective potential, wesuggest a functional expansion of the generating functional for an/ital n/-point Euclidean Green's function. The formulation of the scheme isindependent of the space-time dimension of the model. The scheme yieldsstandard perturbation theory in the regime of a small coupling constant andallows to extract information on the regime of strong coupling. As an explicitexample we consider the scalar /Phi//sup 4/ model and computecontributions up to the four-loop level.

  4. [VESTIBULAR FUNCTION AFTER REPEATED SPACE FLIGHTS].

    PubMed

    Naumov, I A; Kornilova, L N; Glukhikh, D O; Pavlova, A S; Khabarova, E V; Ekimovsky, G A; Vasin, A V

    2015-01-01

    Results of the vestibular function testing of 32 cosmonauts on return from repeated 125- to 215-day space flights (SF) on the International space station are presented. The cosmonauts were tested twice before flight (baseline data collection) and on days 1-2, 4-5 and 8-9 after landing. Electro- and video-oculography were used to register simultaneously eye and head movements. It was found that deadaptation following a repeated stay in long-duration SF takes statistically much shorter time. Most often, atypical vestibular disorders and changed patterns of the otolith-semicircular canal interaction are observed in cosmonauts who have made their maiden flights to microgravity.

  5. Human Embryonic Stem Cell Derived Vascular Progenitor Cells Capable of Endothelial and Smooth Muscle Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Katherine L; Obrtlikova, Petra; Alvarez, Diego F; King, Judy A; Keirstead, Susan A; Allred, Jeremy R; Kaufman, Dan S

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Previous studies have demonstrated development of endothelial cells (ECs) and smooth muscle cells (SMCs) as separate cell lineages derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). We demonstrate CD34+ cells isolated from differentiated hESCs function as vascular progenitor cells capable of producing both ECs and SMCs. These studies better define the developmental origin and reveal the relationship between these two cell types, as well as provide a more complete biological characterization. MATERIALS AND METHODS hESCs are co-cultured on M2-10B4 stromal cells or Wnt1 expressing M2-10B4 for 13–15 days to generate a CD34+ cell population. These cells are isolated using a magnetic antibody separation kit and cultured on fibronectin coated dishes in EC medium. To induce SMC differentiation, culture medium is changed and a morphological and phenotypic change occurs within 24–48 hours. RESULTS CD34+ vascular progenitor cells give rise to ECs and SMCs. The two populations express respective cell specific transcripts and proteins, exhibit intracellular calcium in response to various agonists, and form robust tube-like structures when co-cultured in Matrigel. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) cultured under SMC conditions do not exhibit a change in phenotype or genotype. Wnt1 overexpressing stromal cells produced an increased number of progenitor cells. CONCLUSIONS The ability to generate large numbers of ECs and SMCs from a single vascular progenitor cell population is promising for therapeutic use to treat a variety of diseased and ischemic conditions. The step-wise differentiation outlined here is an efficient, reproducible method with potential for large scale cultures suitable for clinical applications. PMID:20067819

  6. TLR4-Activated MAPK-IL-6 Axis Regulates Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Function.

    PubMed

    Lee, Guan-Lin; Wu, Jing-Yiing; Tsai, Chien-Sung; Lin, Chih-Yuan; Tsai, Yi-Ting; Lin, Chin-Sheng; Wang, Yi-Fu; Yet, Shaw-Fang; Hsu, Yu-Juei; Kuo, Cheng-Chin

    2016-08-24

    Migration of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) into the intima is considered to be a vital event in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis. Despite substantial evidence supporting the pathogenic role of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in the progression of atherogenesis, its function in the regulation of VSMC migration remains unclear. The goal of the present study was to elucidate the mechanism by which TLR4 regulates VSMC migration. Inhibitor experiments revealed that TLR4-induced IL-6 secretion and VSMC migration were mediated via the concerted actions of MyD88 and TRIF on the activation of p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 signaling. Neutralizing anti-IL-6 antibodies abrogated TLR4-driven VSMC migration and F-actin polymerization. Blockade of p38 MAPK or ERK1/2 signaling cascade inhibited TLR4 agonist-mediated activation of cAMP response element binding protein (CREB). Moreover, siRNA-mediated suppression of CREB production repressed TLR4-induced IL-6 production and VSMC migration. Rac-1 inhibitor suppressed TLR4-driven VSMC migration but not IL-6 production. Importantly, the serum level of IL-6 and TLR4 endogenous ligand HMGB1 was significantly higher in patients with coronary artery diseases (CAD) than in healthy subjects. Serum HMGB1 level was positively correlated with serum IL-6 level in CAD patients. The expression of both HMGB1 and IL-6 was clearly detected in the atherosclerotic tissue of the CAD patients. Additionally, there was a positive association between p-CREB and HMGB1 in mouse atherosclerotic tissue. Based on our findings, we concluded that, upon ligand binding, TLR4 activates p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 signaling through MyD88 and TRIF in VSMCs. These signaling pathways subsequently coordinate an additive augmentation of CREB-driven IL-6 production, which in turn triggers Rac-1-mediated actin cytoskeleton to promote VSMC migration.

  7. Protein Kinase C as Regulator of Vascular Smooth Muscle Function and Potential Target in Vascular Disorders.

    PubMed

    Ringvold, H C; Khalil, R A

    2017-01-01

    Vascular smooth muscle (VSM) plays an important role in maintaining vascular tone. In addition to Ca(2+)-dependent myosin light chain (MLC) phosphorylation, protein kinase C (PKC) is a major regulator of VSM function. PKC is a family of conventional Ca(2+)-dependent α, β, and γ, novel Ca(2+)-independent δ, ɛ, θ, and η, and atypical ξ, and ι/λ isoforms. Inactive PKC is mainly cytosolic, and upon activation it undergoes phosphorylation, maturation, and translocation to the surface membrane, the nucleus, endoplasmic reticulum, and other cell organelles; a process facilitated by scaffold proteins such as RACKs. Activated PKC phosphorylates different substrates including ion channels, pumps, and nuclear proteins. PKC also phosphorylates CPI-17 leading to inhibition of MLC phosphatase, increased MLC phosphorylation, and enhanced VSM contraction. PKC could also initiate a cascade of protein kinases leading to phosphorylation of the actin-binding proteins calponin and caldesmon, increased actin-myosin interaction, and VSM contraction. Increased PKC activity has been associated with vascular disorders including ischemia-reperfusion injury, coronary artery disease, hypertension, and diabetic vasculopathy. PKC inhibitors could test the role of PKC in different systems and could reduce PKC hyperactivity in vascular disorders. First-generation PKC inhibitors such as staurosporine and chelerythrine are not very specific. Isoform-specific PKC inhibitors such as ruboxistaurin have been tested in clinical trials. Target delivery of PKC pseudosubstrate inhibitory peptides and PKC siRNA may be useful in localized vascular disease. Further studies of PKC and its role in VSM should help design isoform-specific PKC modulators that are experimentally potent and clinically safe to target PKC in vascular disease. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Bivalirudin inhibits periprocedural platelet function and tissue factor expression of human smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Pepke, Wojciech; Eisenreich, Andreas; Jaster, Markus; Ayral, Yunus; Bobbert, Peter; Mayer, Alexander; Schultheiss, Heinz-Peter; Rauch, Ursula

    2013-04-01

    A major concern of stent implantation after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is acute stent thrombosis. Effective inhibition of periprocedural platelet function in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) leads to an improved outcome. In this study, we examined the periprocedural platelet reactivity after administrating bivalirudin during PCI compared to unfractionated heparin (UFH) administration. Further, the effect of bivalirudin on induced tissue factor (TF) expression in smooth muscle cells (SMC) was determined. Patients with CAD (n = 58) and double antithrombotic medication were treated intraprocedural with UFH (n = 30) or bivalirudin (n = 28). Platelet activation markers were flow cytometrically measured before and after stenting. The expression of TF in SMC was determined by real-time PCR and Western blotting. The thrombogenicity of platelet-derived microparticles and SMC was assessed via a TF activity assay. Bivalirudin significantly diminished the agonist-induced platelet reactivity post-PCI. Compared to UFH treatment, the adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and thrombin receptor-activating peptide (TRAP)-induced thrombospondin expression post-PCI was reduced when bivalirudin was administrated during intervention. In contrast to UFH, bivalirudin reduced the P-selectin expression of unstimulated and ADP-induced platelets post-PCI. Moreover, bivalirudin inhibited the thrombin-, but not FVIIa- or FVIIa/FX-induced TF expression and pro-coagulant TF activity of SMC. Moreover, bivalirudin reduced the TF activity of platelet-derived microparticles postinduction with TRAP or ADP. Bivalirudin is better than UFH in reducing periprocedural platelet activation. Moreover, thrombin-induced TF expression is inhibited by bivalirudin. Thus, bivalirudin seems to be a better anticoagulant during PCI than UFH. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. Molecular and functional significance of Ca2+-activated Cl− channels in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Forrest, Abigail S.; Ayon, Ramon J.; Wiwchar, Michael; Angermann, Jeff E.; Pritchard, Harry A. T.; Singer, Cherie A.; Valencik, Maria L.; Britton, Fiona; Greenwood, Iain A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Increased peripheral resistance of small distal pulmonary arteries is a hallmark signature of pulmonary hypertension (PH) and is believed to be the consequence of enhanced vasoconstriction to agonists, thickening of the arterial wall due to remodeling, and increased thrombosis. The elevation in arterial tone in PH is attributable, at least in part, to smooth muscle cells of PH patients being more depolarized and displaying higher intracellular Ca2+ levels than cells from normal subjects. It is now clear that downregulation of voltage-dependent K+ channels (e.g., Kv1.5) and increased expression and activity of voltage-dependent (Cav1.2) and voltage-independent (e.g., canonical and vanilloid transient receptor potential [TRPC and TRPV]) Ca2+ channels play an important role in the functional remodeling of pulmonary arteries in PH. This review focuses on an anion-permeable channel that is now considered a novel excitatory mechanism in the systemic and pulmonary circulations. It is permeable to Cl− and is activated by a rise in intracellular Ca2+ concentration (Ca2+-activated Cl− channel, or CaCC). The first section outlines the biophysical and pharmacological properties of the channel and ends with a description of the molecular candidate genes postulated to encode for CaCCs, with particular emphasis on the bestrophin and the newly discovered TMEM16 and anoctamin families of genes. The second section provides a review of the various sources of Ca2+ activating CaCCs, which include stimulation by mobilization from intracellular Ca2+ stores and Ca2+ entry through voltage-dependent and voltage-independent Ca2+ channels. The third and final section summarizes recent findings that suggest a potentially important role for CaCCs and the gene TMEM16A in PH. PMID:26064450

  10. Functional regulation of ClC-3 in the migration of vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Ganapathi, Sindura B; Wei, Shun-Guang; Zaremba, Angelika; Lamb, Fred S; Shears, Stephen B

    2013-01-01

    Migration of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) into neointima contributes to atherosclerosis and restenosis. This migration requires coordinated plasmalemmal fluxes of water and ions. Here, we show that aortic VSMC migration depends on the regulation of transmembrane Cl(-) flux by ClC-3, a Cl(-) channel/transporter. The contribution of ClC-3 to plasmalemmal Cl(-) current was studied in VSMCs by electrophysiological recordings. Cl(-) current was negligible in cells perfused with 0 [Ca(2+)]. Raising intracellular [Ca(2+)] to 0.5 μM activated a Cl(-) current (I(Cl.Ca)), approximately half of which was eliminated on inhibition by KN-93 of calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II. I(Cl.Ca) was also halved by inositol-3,4,5,6-tetrakisphosphate, a cellular signal with the biological function of specifically preventing calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II from activating I(Cl.Ca). Gene disruption of ClC-3 reduced I(Cl.Ca) by 50%. Moreover, I(Cl.Ca) in the ClC-3 null VSMCs was not affected by either KN-93 or inositol-3,4,5,6-tetrakisphosphate. We conclude that I(Cl.Ca) is composed of 2 components, one is ClC-3 independent whereas the other is ClC-3 dependent, activated by calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II and inhibited by inositol-3,4,5,6-tetrakisphosphate. We also assayed VSMC migration in transwell assays. Migration was halved in ClC-3 null cells versus wild-type cells. In addition, inhibition of ClC-3 by niflumic acid, KN-93, or inositol-3,4,5,6-tetrakisphosphate each reduced cell migration in wild-type cells but not in ClC-3 null cells. These cell-signaling roles of ClC-3 in VSMC migration suggest new therapeutic approaches to vascular remodeling diseases.

  11. Expression and function of K(V)2-containing channels in human urinary bladder smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Hristov, Kiril L; Chen, Muyan; Afeli, Serge A Y; Cheng, Qiuping; Rovner, Eric S; Petkov, Georgi V

    2012-06-01

    The functional role of the voltage-gated K(+) (K(V)) channels in human detrusor smooth muscle (DSM) is largely unexplored. Here, we provide molecular, electrophysiological, and functional evidence for the expression of K(V)2.1, K(V)2.2, and the electrically silent K(V)9.3 subunits in human DSM. Stromatoxin-1 (ScTx1), a selective inhibitor of K(V)2.1, K(V)2.2, and K(V)4.2 homotetrameric channels and of K(V)2.1/9.3 heterotetrameric channels, was used to examine the role of these channels in human DSM function. Human DSM tissues were obtained during open bladder surgeries from patients without a history of overactive bladder. Freshly isolated human DSM cells were studied using RT-PCR, immunocytochemistry, live-cell Ca(2+) imaging, and the perforated whole cell patch-clamp technique. Isometric DSM tension recordings of human DSM isolated strips were conducted using tissue baths. RT-PCR experiments showed mRNA expression of K(V)2.1, K(V)2.2, and K(V)9.3 (but not K(V)4.2) channel subunits in human isolated DSM cells. K(V)2.1 and K(V)2.2 protein expression was confirmed by Western blot analysis and immunocytochemistry. Perforated whole cell patch-clamp experiments revealed that ScTx1 (100 nM) inhibited the amplitude of the voltage step-induced K(V) current in freshly isolated human DSM cells. ScTx1 (100 nM) significantly increased the intracellular Ca(2+) level in DSM cells. In human DSM isolated strips, ScTx1 (100 nM) increased the spontaneous phasic contraction amplitude and muscle force, and enhanced the amplitude of the electrical field stimulation-induced contractions within the range of 3.5-30 Hz stimulation frequencies. These findings reveal that ScTx1-sensitive K(V)2-containing channels are key regulators of human DSM excitability and contractility and may represent new targets for pharmacological or genetic intervention for bladder dysfunction.

  12. Microvesicles Derived from Inflammation-Challenged Endothelial Cells Modulate Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Functions

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Qunwen; Liu, Hua; Zheng, Chunyan; Zhao, Yuhui; Liao, Xiaorong; Wang, Yan; Chen, Yanfang; Zhao, Bin; Lazartigues, Eric; Yang, Yi; Ma, Xiaotang

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Microvesicles (MV) can modulate the function of recipient cells by transferring their contents. Our previous study highlighted that MV released from tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) plus serum deprivation (SD)-stimulated endothelial progenitor cells, induce detrimental effects on endothelial cells. In this study, we investigated the potential effects of endothelial MV (EMV) on proliferation, migration, and apoptosis of human brain vascular smooth cells (HBVSMC). Methods: EMV were prepared from human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC) cultured in a TNF-α plus SD medium. RNase-EMV were made by treating EMV with RNase A for RNA depletion. The proliferation, apoptosis and migration abilities of HBVSMC were determined after co-culture with EMV or RNase-EMV. The Mek1/2 inhibitor, PD0325901, was used for pathway analysis. Western blot was used for analyzing the proteins of Mek1/2, Erk1/2, phosphorylation Erk1/2, activated caspase-3 and Bcl-2. The level of miR-146a-5p was measured by qRT-PCR. Results: (1) EMV significantly promoted the proliferation and migration of HBVSMC. The effects were accompanied by an increase in Mek1/2 and p-Erk1/2, which could be abolished by PD0325901; (2) EMV decreased the apoptotic rate of HBVSMC by approximately 35%, which was accompanied by cleaved caspase-3 down-regulation and Bcl-2 up-regulation; (3) EMV increased miR-146a-5p level in HBVSMC by about 2-folds; (4) RNase-treated EMV were less effective than EMV on HBVSMC activities and miR-146a-5p expression. Conclusion: EMV generated under inflammation challenge can modulate HBVSMC function and fate via their carried RNA. This is associated with activation of theMek1/2/Erk1/2 pathway and caspase-3/Bcl-2 regulation, during which miR-146a-5p may play an important role. The data suggest that EMV derived from inflammation-challenged endothelial cells are detrimental to HBVSMC homeostatic functions, highlighting potential novel therapeutic targets for vascular diseases. PMID

  13. Space shuttle configuration accounting functional design specification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    An analysis is presented of the requirements for an on-line automated system which must be capable of tracking the status of requirements and engineering changes and of providing accurate and timely records. The functional design specification provides the definition, description, and character length of the required data elements and the interrelationship of data elements to adequately track, display, and report the status of active configuration changes. As changes to the space shuttle program levels II and III configuration are proposed, evaluated, and dispositioned, it is the function of the configuration management office to maintain records regarding changes to the baseline and to track and report the status of those changes. The configuration accounting system will consist of a combination of computers, computer terminals, software, and procedures, all of which are designed to store, retrieve, display, and process information required to track proposed and proved engineering changes to maintain baseline documentation of the space shuttle program levels II and III.

  14. Signal-transduction pathways that regulate visceral smooth muscle function. III. Coupling of muscarinic receptors to signaling kinases and effector proteins in gastrointestinal smooth muscles.

    PubMed

    Gerthoffer, William T

    2005-05-01

    Stimulation of muscarinic M3 and M2 receptors on gastrointestinal smooth muscle elicits contraction via activation of G proteins that are coupled to a diverse set of downstream signaling pathways and effector proteins. Many studies suggest a canonical excitation-contraction coupling pathway that includes activation of phospholipases, production of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate and diacylglycerol, release of calcium from the sarcoplasmic reticulum, activation of L-type calcium channels, and activation of nonselective cation channels. These events lead to elevated intracellular calcium concentration, which activates myosin light chain kinase to phosphorylate and activate myosin II thus causing contraction. In addition, muscarinic receptors are coupled to signaling pathways that modulate the effect of activator calcium. The Rho/Rho kinase pathway inhibits myosin light chain phosphatase, one of the key steps in sensitization of the contractile proteins to calcium. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases and Src family tyrosine kinases are also activated by muscarinic agonists. Src family tyrosine kinases regulate L-type calcium and nonselective cation channels. Src activation also leads to activation of ERK and p38 MAPKs. ERK MAPKs phosphorylate caldesmon, an actin filament binding protein. P38 MAPKs activate phospholipases and MAPKAP kinase 2/3, which phosphorylate HSP27. HSP27 may regulate cross-bridge function, actin filament formation, and actin filament attachment to the cell membrane. In addition to the well-known role of M3 muscarinic receptors to regulate myoplasmic calcium levels, the integrated effect of muscarinic activation probably also includes signaling pathways that modulate phospholipases, cyclic nucleotides, contractile protein function, and cytoskeletal protein function.

  15. Random function theory revisited - Exact solutions versus the first order smoothing conjecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerche, I.; Parker, E. N.

    1975-01-01

    We remark again that the mathematical conjecture known as first order smoothing or the quasi-linear approximation does not give the correct dependence on correlation length (time) in many cases, although it gives the correct limit as the correlation length (time) goes to zero. In this sense, then, the method is unreliable.

  16. Role of rho kinase in the functional and dysfunctional tonic smooth muscles.

    PubMed

    de Godoy, Márcio A F; Rattan, Satish

    2011-07-01

    Tonic smooth muscles play pivotal roles in the pathophysiology of debilitating diseases of the gastrointestinal and cardiovascular systems. Tonic smooth muscles differ from phasic smooth muscles in the ability to spontaneously develop myogenic tone. This ability has been primarily attributed to the local production of specific neurohumoral substances that can work in conjunction with calcium sensitization via signal transduction events associated with the Ras homolog gene family, member A (RhoA)/Rho-associated, coiled-coil containing protein kinase 2 (ROCK II) pathways. In this article, we discuss the molecular pathways involved in the myogenic properties of tonic smooth muscles, particularly the contribution of protein kinase C vs the RhoA/ROCK II pathway in the genesis of basal tone, pathophysiology and novel therapeutic approaches for certain gastrointestinal and cardiovascular diseases. Emerging evidence suggests that manipulation of RhoA/ROCK II activity through inhibitors or silencing of RNA interface techniques could represent a new therapeutic approach for various gastrointestinal and cardiovascular diseases.

  17. The Effects of Selection Strategies for Bivariate Loglinear Smoothing Models on NEAT Equating Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moses, Tim; Holland, Paul W.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, eight statistical strategies were evaluated for selecting the parameterizations of loglinear models for smoothing the bivariate test score distributions used in nonequivalent groups with anchor test (NEAT) equating. Four of the strategies were based on significance tests of chi-square statistics (Likelihood Ratio, Pearson,…

  18. The Effects of Selection Strategies for Bivariate Loglinear Smoothing Models on NEAT Equating Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moses, Tim; Holland, Paul W.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, eight statistical strategies were evaluated for selecting the parameterizations of loglinear models for smoothing the bivariate test score distributions used in nonequivalent groups with anchor test (NEAT) equating. Four of the strategies were based on significance tests of chi-square statistics (Likelihood Ratio, Pearson,…

  19. Arterial wall mechanics as a function of heart rate: role of vascular smooth muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvucci, Fernando Pablo; Schiavone, Jonathan; Craiem, Damian; Barra, Juan Gabriel

    2007-11-01

    Vascular wall viscoelasticity can be evaluated using a first-order lumped model. This model consists of a spring with elastic constant E and a dashpot with viscous constant η. More importantly, this viscoelastic model can be fitted in-vivo measuring arterial pressure and diameter. The aim of this work is to analyze the influence of heart rate over E and η. In two anesthetized sheep, diameter in thoracic aorta and intravascular pressure has been registered. The right atrium was connected to a programmable stimulator through a pair of pace-maker wires to produce changes in stimulation heart rate (HR) from 80 to 160 bpm. Additionally, local activation of vascular smooth muscle was induced with phenylephrine. After converting pressure and diameter signals into stress and strain respectively, E y η were calculated in control state and during muscle activation. The elastic modulus E did not present significant changes with heart rate. The viscous modulus η decreased 49% with a two-fold acceleration in heart rate from 80 to 160 bpm. However, the product η HR remained stable. The viscous modulus η increased 39% with smooth muscle activation. No significant pressure changes were registered during the experiment. The contractile action of vascular smooth muscle could contribute to increasing arterial wall viscosity. The decrease of η when HR increased might be related to smooth muscle relaxation mediated by endothelium activity, which was stimulated by flow increase. We conclude that HR can modulate arterial wall viscoelasticity through endothelium-dependent mechanisms.

  20. The Deep Space Network. [tracking and communication functions and facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The objectives, functions, and organization of the Deep Space Network are summarized. The Deep Space Instrumentation Facility, the Ground Communications Facility, and the Network Control System are described.

  1. Free Fatty Acid Palmitate Impairs the Vitality and Function of Cultured Human Bladder Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Oberbach, Andreas; Schlichting, Nadine; Heinrich, Marco; Till, Holger; Stolzenburg, Jens-Uwe; Neuhaus, Jochen

    2012-01-01

    Background Incidence of urinary tract infections is elevated in patients with diabetes mellitus. Those patients show increased levels of the saturated free fatty acid palmitate. As recently shown metabolic alterations induced by palmitate include production and secretion of the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukine-6 (IL-6) in cultured human bladder smooth muscle cells (hBSMC). Here we studied the influence of palmitate on vital cell properties, for example, regulation of cell proliferation, mitochondrial enzyme activity and antioxidant capacity in hBSMC, and analyzed the involvement of major cytokine signaling pathways. Methodology/Principal Findings HBSMC cultures were set up from bladder tissue of patients undergoing cystectomy and stimulated with palmitate. We analyzed cell proliferation, mitochondrial enzyme activity, and antioxidant capacity by ELISA and confocal immunofluorescence. In signal transduction inhibition experiments we evaluated the involvement of NF-κB, JAK/STAT, MEK1, PI3K, and JNK in major cytokine signaling pathway regulation. We found: (i) palmitate decreased cell proliferation, increased mitochondrial enzyme activity and antioxidant capacity; (ii) direct inhibition of cytokine receptor by AG490 even more strongly suppressed cell proliferation in palmitate-stimulated cells, while counteracting palmitate-induced increase of antioxidant capacity; (iii) in contrast knockdown of the STAT3 inhibitor SOCS3 increased cell proliferation and antioxidant capacity; (iv) further downstream JAK/STAT3 signaling cascade the inhibition of PI3K or JNK enhanced palmitate induced suppression of cell proliferation; (v) increase of mitochondrial enzyme activity by palmitate was enhanced by inhibition of PI3K but counteracted by inhibition of MEK1. Conclusions/Significance Saturated free fatty acids (e.g., palmitate) cause massive alterations in vital cell functions of cultured hBSMC involving distinct major cytokine signaling pathways. Thereby, certain

  2. Androgen Action via Testicular Arteriole Smooth Muscle Cells Is Important for Leydig Cell Function, Vasomotion and Testicular Fluid Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Welsh, Michelle; Sharpe, Richard M.; Moffat, Lindsey; Atanassova, Nina; Saunders, Philippa T. K.; Kilter, Sigrid; Bergh, Anders; Smith, Lee B.

    2010-01-01

    Regulation of blood flow through the testicular microvasculature by vasomotion is thought to be important for normal testis function as it regulates interstitial fluid (IF) dynamics which is an important intra-testicular transport medium. Androgens control vasomotion, but how they exert these effects remains unclear. One possibility is by signalling via androgen receptors (AR) expressed in testicular arteriole smooth muscle cells. To investigate this and determine the overall importance of this mechanism in testis function, we generated a blood vessel smooth muscle cell-specific AR knockout mouse (SMARKO). Gross reproductive development was normal in SMARKO mice but testis weight was reduced in adulthood compared to control littermates; this reduction was not due to any changes in germ cell volume or to deficits in testosterone, LH or FSH concentrations and did not cause infertility. However, seminiferous tubule lumen volume was reduced in adult SMARKO males while interstitial volume was increased, perhaps indicating altered fluid dynamics; this was associated with compensated Leydig cell failure. Vasomotion was impaired in adult SMARKO males, though overall testis blood flow was normal and there was an increase in the overall blood vessel volume per testis in adult SMARKOs. In conclusion, these results indicate that ablating arteriole smooth muscle AR does not grossly alter spermatogenesis or affect male fertility but does subtly impair Leydig cell function and testicular fluid exchange, possibly by locally regulating microvascular blood flow within the testis. PMID:21049031

  3. Graded effects of unregulated smooth muscle myosin on intestinal architecture, intestinal motility and vascular function in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Abrams, Joshua; Einhorn, Zev; Seiler, Christoph; Zong, Alan B.; Sweeney, H. Lee; Pack, Michael

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Smooth muscle contraction is controlled by the regulated activity of the myosin heavy chain ATPase (Myh11). Myh11 mutations have diverse effects in the cardiovascular, digestive and genitourinary systems in humans and animal models. We previously reported a recessive missense mutation, meltdown (mlt), which converts a highly conserved tryptophan to arginine (W512R) in the rigid relay loop of zebrafish Myh11. The mlt mutation disrupts myosin regulation and non-autonomously induces invasive expansion of the intestinal epithelium. Here, we report two newly identified missense mutations in the switch-1 (S237Y) and coil-coiled (L1287M) domains of Myh11 that fail to complement mlt. Cell invasion was not detected in either homozygous mutant but could be induced by oxidative stress and activation of oncogenic signaling pathways. The smooth muscle defect imparted by the mlt and S237Y mutations also delayed intestinal transit, and altered vascular function, as measured by blood flow in the dorsal aorta. The cell-invasion phenotype induced by the three myh11 mutants correlated with the degree of myosin deregulation. These findings suggest that the vertebrate intestinal epithelium is tuned to the physical state of the surrounding stroma, which, in turn, governs its response to physiologic and pathologic stimuli. Genetic variants that alter the regulation of smooth muscle myosin might be risk factors for diseases affecting the intestine, vasculature, and other tissues that contain smooth muscle or contractile cells that express smooth muscle proteins, particularly in the setting of redox stress. PMID:26893369

  4. Graded effects of unregulated smooth muscle myosin on intestinal architecture, intestinal motility and vascular function in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Abrams, Joshua; Einhorn, Zev; Seiler, Christoph; Zong, Alan B; Sweeney, H Lee; Pack, Michael

    2016-05-01

    Smooth muscle contraction is controlled by the regulated activity of the myosin heavy chain ATPase (Myh11). Myh11 mutations have diverse effects in the cardiovascular, digestive and genitourinary systems in humans and animal models. We previously reported a recessive missense mutation, meltdown (mlt), which converts a highly conserved tryptophan to arginine (W512R) in the rigid relay loop of zebrafish Myh11. The mlt mutation disrupts myosin regulation and non-autonomously induces invasive expansion of the intestinal epithelium. Here, we report two newly identified missense mutations in the switch-1 (S237Y) and coil-coiled (L1287M) domains of Myh11 that fail to complement mlt Cell invasion was not detected in either homozygous mutant but could be induced by oxidative stress and activation of oncogenic signaling pathways. The smooth muscle defect imparted by the mlt and S237Y mutations also delayed intestinal transit, and altered vascular function, as measured by blood flow in the dorsal aorta. The cell-invasion phenotype induced by the three myh11 mutants correlated with the degree of myosin deregulation. These findings suggest that the vertebrate intestinal epithelium is tuned to the physical state of the surrounding stroma, which, in turn, governs its response to physiologic and pathologic stimuli. Genetic variants that alter the regulation of smooth muscle myosin might be risk factors for diseases affecting the intestine, vasculature, and other tissues that contain smooth muscle or contractile cells that express smooth muscle proteins, particularly in the setting of redox stress. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  5. Amino acid mutations in the caldesmon COOH-terminal functional domain increase force generation in bladder smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Maoxian; Boopathi, Ettickan; Hypolite, Joseph A.; Raabe, Tobias; Chang, Shaohua; Zderic, Stephen; Wein, Alan J.

    2013-01-01

    Caldesmon (CaD), a component of smooth muscle thin filaments, binds actin, tropomyosin, calmodulin, and myosin and inhibits actin-activated ATP hydrolysis by smooth muscle myosin. Internal deletions of the chicken CaD functional domain that spans from amino acids (aa) 718 to 731, which corresponds to aa 512–530 including the adjacent aa sequence in mouse CaD, lead to diminished CaD-induced inhibition of actin-activated ATP hydrolysis by myosin. Transgenic mice with mutations of five aa residues (Lys523 to Gln, Val524 to Leu, Ser526 to Thr, Pro527 to Cys, and Lys529 to Ser), which encompass the ATPase inhibitory determinants located in exon 12, were generated by homologous recombination. Homozygous (−/−) animals did not develop, but heterozygous (+/−) mice carrying the expected mutations in the CaD ATPase inhibitory domain (CaD mutant) matured and reproduced normally. The peak force produced in response to KCl and electrical field stimulation by the detrusor smooth muscle from the CaD mutant was high compared with that of the wild type. CaD mutant mice revealed nonvoiding contractions during bladder filling on awake cystometry, suggesting that the CaD ATPase inhibitory domain suppresses force generation during the filling phase and this suppression is partially released by mutations in 50% of CaD in heterozygous. Our data show for the first time a functional phenotype, at the intact smooth muscle tissue and in vivo organ levels, following mutation of a functional domain at the COOH-terminal region of CaD. PMID:23986516

  6. Amino acid mutations in the caldesmon COOH-terminal functional domain increase force generation in bladder smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Deng, Maoxian; Boopathi, Ettickan; Hypolite, Joseph A; Raabe, Tobias; Chang, Shaohua; Zderic, Stephen; Wein, Alan J; Chacko, Samuel

    2013-11-15

    Caldesmon (CaD), a component of smooth muscle thin filaments, binds actin, tropomyosin, calmodulin, and myosin and inhibits actin-activated ATP hydrolysis by smooth muscle myosin. Internal deletions of the chicken CaD functional domain that spans from amino acids (aa) 718 to 731, which corresponds to aa 512-530 including the adjacent aa sequence in mouse CaD, lead to diminished CaD-induced inhibition of actin-activated ATP hydrolysis by myosin. Transgenic mice with mutations of five aa residues (Lys(523) to Gln, Val(524) to Leu, Ser(526) to Thr, Pro(527) to Cys, and Lys(529) to Ser), which encompass the ATPase inhibitory determinants located in exon 12, were generated by homologous recombination. Homozygous (-/-) animals did not develop, but heterozygous (+/-) mice carrying the expected mutations in the CaD ATPase inhibitory domain (CaD mutant) matured and reproduced normally. The peak force produced in response to KCl and electrical field stimulation by the detrusor smooth muscle from the CaD mutant was high compared with that of the wild type. CaD mutant mice revealed nonvoiding contractions during bladder filling on awake cystometry, suggesting that the CaD ATPase inhibitory domain suppresses force generation during the filling phase and this suppression is partially released by mutations in 50% of CaD in heterozygous. Our data show for the first time a functional phenotype, at the intact smooth muscle tissue and in vivo organ levels, following mutation of a functional domain at the COOH-terminal region of CaD.

  7. Calculating a parameter space to smoothly transport magnetically-trapped suspended superparamagnetic microbeads with electric-field domain wall control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLellan, Brenda; Nowakowski, Mark; Bokor, Jeffrey; Liang, Cheng-Yen; Hockel, Joshua; Wetzlar, Kyle; Keller, Scott; Sohn, Hyunmin; Carman, Gregory; Young, Anthony; Doran, Andrew; Marcus, Matthew; Klaui, Mathias; Candler, Robert

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate the capture and electrically-driven piecewise transport of superparamagnetic microbeads trapped in a magnetostatic potential energy well produced by the magnetic domain walls of Ni microrings on a [Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3) O3]0.66-[PbTiO3]0.34 (PMN-PT) substrate. Here I present micromagnetic simulations that illustrate the formation of field-initialized domain walls in Ni microrings and calculate the approximate force of attraction experienced by superparamagnetic microbeads near the domain walls. This force is estimated as a function of the ring geometry, bead diameter, and distance from the domain wall, and provides an upper bound for the strain-mediated, electrically-induced domain wall velocity that can be implemented to smoothly transport coupled microbeads within a fluidic environment. These results provide an initial estimate for important technological parameters and set a foundation for the optimization of this microfluidic magnetic control scheme. Supported by E3S and TANMS.

  8. Functional expression of KCNQ (Kv7) channels in guinea pig bladder smooth muscle and their contribution to spontaneous activity

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, U A; Carson, C; Johnston, L; Joshi, S; Gurney, A M; McCloskey, K D

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose The aim of the study was to determine whether KCNQ channels are functionally expressed in bladder smooth muscle cells (SMC) and to investigate their physiological significance in bladder contractility. Experimental Approach KCNQ channels were examined at the genetic, protein, cellular and tissue level in guinea pig bladder smooth muscle using RT-PCR, immunofluorescence, patch-clamp electrophysiology, calcium imaging, detrusor strip myography, and a panel of KCNQ activators and inhibitors. Key Results KCNQ subtypes 1–5 are expressed in bladder detrusor smooth muscle. Detrusor strips typically displayed TTX-insensitive myogenic spontaneous contractions that were increased in amplitude by the KCNQ channel inhibitors XE991, linopirdine or chromanol 293B. Contractility was inhibited by the KCNQ channel activators flupirtine or meclofenamic acid (MFA). The frequency of Ca2+-oscillations in SMC contained within bladder tissue sheets was increased by XE991. Outward currents in dispersed bladder SMC, recorded under conditions where BK and KATP currents were minimal, were significantly reduced by XE991, linopirdine, or chromanol, and enhanced by flupirtine or MFA. XE991 depolarized the cell membrane and could evoke transient depolarizations in quiescent cells. Flupirtine (20 μM) hyperpolarized the cell membrane with a simultaneous cessation of any spontaneous electrical activity. Conclusions and Implications These novel findings reveal the role of KCNQ currents in the regulation of the resting membrane potential of detrusor SMC and their important physiological function in the control of spontaneous contractility in the guinea pig bladder. PMID:23586426

  9. Distribution function approach to redshift space distortions

    SciTech Connect

    Seljak, Uroš; McDonald, Patrick E-mail: pvmcdonald@lbl.gov

    2011-11-01

    We develop a phase space distribution function approach to redshift space distortions (RSD), in which the redshift space density can be written as a sum over velocity moments of the distribution function. These moments are density weighted and have well defined physical interpretation: their lowest orders are density, momentum density, and stress energy density. The series expansion is convergent if kμu/aH < 1, where k is the wavevector, H the Hubble parameter, u the typical gravitational velocity and μ = cos θ, with θ being the angle between the Fourier mode and the line of sight. We perform an expansion of these velocity moments into helicity modes, which are eigenmodes under rotation around the axis of Fourier mode direction, generalizing the scalar, vector, tensor decomposition of perturbations to an arbitrary order. We show that only equal helicity moments correlate and derive the angular dependence of the individual contributions to the redshift space power spectrum. We show that the dominant term of μ{sup 2} dependence on large scales is the cross-correlation between the density and scalar part of momentum density, which can be related to the time derivative of the matter power spectrum. Additional terms contributing to μ{sup 2} and dominating on small scales are the vector part of momentum density-momentum density correlations, the energy density-density correlations, and the scalar part of anisotropic stress density-density correlations. The second term is what is usually associated with the small scale Fingers-of-God damping and always suppresses power, but the first term comes with the opposite sign and always adds power. Similarly, we identify 7 terms contributing to μ{sup 4} dependence. Some of the advantages of the distribution function approach are that the series expansion converges on large scales and remains valid in multi-stream situations. We finish with a brief discussion of implications for RSD in galaxies relative to dark matter

  10. Determination of discontinuities in the derivative of a piecewise-smooth function on the basis of the results of measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurin, L. S.; Ivanova, N. P.

    1975-01-01

    A piecewise-smooth function with discontinuity in the first derivative on a given interval is considered. The values of the function are measured at a sequence of points in the interval and a random error is included in the measurements. A method is proposed to estimate the position of the discontinuity in the derivative. Regression lines are associated with each measurement point and account for k - 1 points preceding or following the point. The estimate for the position of the discontinuity is the measurement point with the largest angle between the regression lines. The error in the estimate is analyzed and the results are verified.

  11. Functional ion channels in human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells: Voltage-dependent cation channels

    PubMed Central

    Firth, Amy L.; Remillard, Carmelle V.; Platoshyn, Oleksandr; Fantozzi, Ivana; Ko, Eun A.; Yuan, Jason X.-J.

    2011-01-01

    The activity of voltage-gated ion channels is critical for the maintenance of cellular membrane potential and generation of action potentials. In turn, membrane potential regulates cellular ion homeostasis, triggering the opening and closing of ion channels in the plasma membrane and, thus, enabling ion transport across the membrane. Such transmembrane ion fluxes are important for excitation–contraction coupling in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMC). Families of voltage-dependent cation channels known to be present in PASMC include voltage-gated K+ (Kv) channels, voltage-dependent Ca2+-activated K+ (Kca) channels, L- and T- type voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels, voltage-gated Na+ channels and voltage-gated proton channels. When cells are dialyzed with Ca2+-free K+- solutions, depolarization elicits four components of 4-aminopyridine (4-AP)-sensitive Kvcurrents based on the kinetics of current activation and inactivation. In cell-attached membrane patches, depolarization elicits a wide range of single-channel K+ currents, with conductances ranging between 6 and 290 pS. Macroscopic 4-AP-sensitive Kv currents and iberiotoxin-sensitive Kca currents are also observed. Transcripts of (a) two Na+ channel α-subunit genes (SCN5A and SCN6A), (b) six Ca2+ channel α–subunit genes (α1A, α1B, α1X, α1D, α1Eand α1G) and many regulatory subunits (α2δ1, β1-4, and γ6), (c) 22 Kv channel α–subunit genes (Kv1.1 - Kv1.7, Kv1.10, Kv2.1, Kv3.1, Kv3.3, Kv3.4, Kv4.1, Kv4.2, Kv5.1, Kv 6.1-Kv6.3, Kv9.1, Kv9.3, Kv10.1 and Kv11.1) and three Kv channel β-subunit genes (Kvβ1-3) and (d) four Kca channel α–subunit genes (Sloα1 and SK2-SK4) and four Kca channel β-subunit genes (Kcaβ1-4) have been detected in PASMC. Tetrodotoxin-sensitive and rapidly inactivating Na+ currents have been recorded with properties similar to those in cardiac myocytes. In the presence of 20 mM external Ca2+, membrane depolarization from a holding potential of -100 mV elicits a rapidly

  12. On the string equation with a singular weight belonging to the space of multipliers in Sobolev spaces with negative index of smoothness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikhonov, Yu V.; Sheipak, I. A.

    2016-12-01

    We study spectral properties of the boundary-value problem -y''-λρ y=0, y(0)=y(1)=0, in the case when the weight ρ belongs to the space M of multipliers from the space \\overset{\\circ}{W}{}_21 \\lbrack 0,1 \\rbrack to the dual space \\bigl(\\overset{\\circ}{W}{}_21 \\lbrack 0,1 \\rbrack \\bigr)'. We obtain a criterion for the generalized derivative (in the sense of distributions) of a piecewise-constant affinely self-similar function to lie in M. For general weights in this class we show that the spectrum of the problem is discrete and the eigenvalues grow exponentially. The nature of this growth is determined by the parameters of self-similarity. When the parameters of self-similarity reach the boundary of the set where ρ\\in M, the problem exhibits continuous spectrum.

  13. Toxic inhibition of smooth muscle contractility by plant-derived sesquiterpenes caused by their chemically reactive alpha-methylenebutyrolactone functions.

    PubMed Central

    Hay, A. J.; Hamburger, M.; Hostettmann, K.; Hoult, J. R.

    1994-01-01

    1. Previous studies have shown that extracts of feverfew (Tanacetum parthenium) and parthenolide, a sesquiterpene alpha-methylenebutyrolactone obtained from it, inhibit smooth muscle contractility in a time-dependent, non-specific and irreversible manner. 2. The hypothesis that this toxic effect is due specifically to the presence in the sesquiterpene lactone of the potentially reactive alpha-methylene function was tested on rabbit isolated aortic ring preparations. This was done (a) by comparing the effects of two plant-derived sesquiterpene lactones purified from yellow star thistle (Centaurea solstitialis): cynaropicrin (an alpha-methylenebutyrolactone) and solstitialin 13-acetate (lacking the alpha-methylene function), and (b) by chemically inactivating the alpha-methylene functions in cynaropicrin and parthenolide by reaction with cysteine. 3. The results show that the characteristic smooth muscle inhibitory profile is demonstrated by the two alpha-methylenebutyrolactones (parthenolide and cynaropicrin), but not by the compound lacking this functional group (solstitialin 13-acetate), or by those previously active compounds in which it has been inactivated with cysteine. 4. Thus the alpha-methylene function is critical for this aspect of the toxic pharmacological profile of the sesquiterpene butyrolactones, which are natural products widely distributed in the Compositae family of flowering plants. PMID:8032668

  14. Influence of balancing-side occlusal interference on smoothness of working-side condylar movement and intra-articular space in chewing efforts.

    PubMed

    Yashiro, K; Yamamoto, K; Takada, K; Murakami, S; Uchiyama, Y; Furukawa, S

    2015-01-01

    Response of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) articulation adapting to occlusal alteration has been sparsely known. For 10 healthy adults with acceptably good occlusion, an artificial occlusal interference (OI) was introduced to the lower molar on the balancing side of unilateral chewing. Subjects were asked to chew a gum on their preferred side. The chewing jaw movements with/without the OI were recorded using a video-based optoelectronic system. The mandibular movements were generated in each individual's TMJ model reconstructed by magnetic resonance images. The smoothness of local condylar point movements towards the normal direction of the condylar surface and interarticular space on the working side was measured. Overall, the smoothness of condylar point movements in the closing phase was impaired immediately after introduction of the OI. In the intercuspal phase, the OI increased the joint space. After about 60 chewing cycles, the movement smoothness and joint space began to recover. These findings suggest that OI on the balancing side induced irregular stress field translation on the working-side condylar surface followed by acute recovery process. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. FUSED KERNEL-SPLINE SMOOTHING FOR REPEATEDLY MEASURED OUTCOMES IN A GENERALIZED PARTIALLY LINEAR MODEL WITH FUNCTIONAL SINGLE INDEX.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Fei; Ma, Yanyuan; Wang, Yuanjia

    We propose a generalized partially linear functional single index risk score model for repeatedly measured outcomes where the index itself is a function of time. We fuse the nonparametric kernel method and regression spline method, and modify the generalized estimating equation to facilitate estimation and inference. We use local smoothing kernel to estimate the unspecified coefficient functions of time, and use B-splines to estimate the unspecified function of the single index component. The covariance structure is taken into account via a working model, which provides valid estimation and inference procedure whether or not it captures the true covariance. The estimation method is applicable to both continuous and discrete outcomes. We derive large sample properties of the estimation procedure and show different convergence rate of each component of the model. The asymptotic properties when the kernel and regression spline methods are combined in a nested fashion has not been studied prior to this work even in the independent data case.

  16. FUSED KERNEL-SPLINE SMOOTHING FOR REPEATEDLY MEASURED OUTCOMES IN A GENERALIZED PARTIALLY LINEAR MODEL WITH FUNCTIONAL SINGLE INDEX*

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Fei; Ma, Yanyuan; Wang, Yuanjia

    2015-01-01

    We propose a generalized partially linear functional single index risk score model for repeatedly measured outcomes where the index itself is a function of time. We fuse the nonparametric kernel method and regression spline method, and modify the generalized estimating equation to facilitate estimation and inference. We use local smoothing kernel to estimate the unspecified coefficient functions of time, and use B-splines to estimate the unspecified function of the single index component. The covariance structure is taken into account via a working model, which provides valid estimation and inference procedure whether or not it captures the true covariance. The estimation method is applicable to both continuous and discrete outcomes. We derive large sample properties of the estimation procedure and show different convergence rate of each component of the model. The asymptotic properties when the kernel and regression spline methods are combined in a nested fashion has not been studied prior to this work even in the independent data case. PMID:26283801

  17. Functional expression of the TMEM16 family of calcium-activated chloride channels in airway smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Remy, Kenneth E.; Danielsson, Jennifer; Funayama, Hiromi; Fu, Xiao Wen; Chang, Herng-Yu Sucie; Yim, Peter; Xu, Dingbang; Emala, Charles W.

    2013-01-01

    Airway smooth muscle hyperresponsiveness is a key component in the pathophysiology of asthma. Although calcium-activated chloride channel (CaCC) flux has been described in many cell types, including human airway smooth muscle (HASM), the true molecular identity of the channels responsible for this chloride conductance remains controversial. Recently, a new family of proteins thought to represent the true CaCCs was identified as the TMEM16 family. This led us to question whether members of this family are functionally expressed in native and cultured HASM. We further questioned whether expression of these channels contributes to the contractile function of HASM. We identified the mRNA expression of eight members of the TMEM16 family in HASM cells and show immunohistochemical evidence of TMEM16A in both cultured and native HASM. Functionally, we demonstrate that the classic chloride channel inhibitor, 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)benzoic acid (NPPB), inhibited halide flux in cultured HASM cells. Moreover, HASM cells displayed classical electrophysiological properties of CaCCs during whole cell electrophysiological recordings, which were blocked by using an antibody selective for TMEM16A. Furthermore, two distinct TMEM16A antagonists (tannic acid and benzbromarone) impaired a substance P-induced contraction in isolated guinea pig tracheal rings. These findings demonstrate that multiple members of this recently described family of CaCCs are expressed in HASM cells, they display classic electrophysiological properties of CaCCs, and they modulate contractile tone in airway smooth muscle. The TMEM16 family may provide a novel therapeutic target for limiting airway constriction in asthma. PMID:23997176

  18. Altered vascular smooth muscle function in the ApoE knockout mouse during the progression of atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ewart, Marie-Ann; Kennedy, Simon; Macmillan, Debbi; Raja, Abhirami L N; Watt, Ian M; Currie, Susan

    2014-05-01

    Relaxation of vascular smooth muscle (VSM) requires re-uptake of cytosolic Ca(2+) into the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) via the Sarco/Endoplasmic Reticulum Ca(2+) ATPase (SERCA), or extrusion via the Plasma Membrane Ca(2+) ATPase (PMCA) or sodium Ca(2+) exchanger (NCX). Peroxynitrite, a reactive species formed in vascular inflammatory diseases, upregulates SERCA activity to induce relaxation but, chronically, can contribute to atherogenesis and altered vascular function by escalating endoplasmic reticulum stress. Our objectives were to determine if peroxynitrite-induced relaxation and Ca(2+) handling processes within vascular smooth muscle cells were altered as atherosclerosis develops. Aortae from control and ApoE(-/-) mice were studied histologically, functionally and for protein expression levels of SERCA and PMCA. Ca(2+) responses were assessed in dissociated aortic smooth muscle cells in the presence and absence of extracellular Ca(2+). Relaxation to peroxynitrite was concentration-dependent and endothelium-independent. The abilities of the SERCA blocker thapsigargin and the PMCA inhibitor carboxyeosin to block this relaxation were altered during fat feeding and plaque progression. SERCA levels were progressively reduced, while PMCA expression was upregulated. In ApoE(-/-) VSM cells, increases in cytosolic Ca(2+) [Ca(2+)]c in response to SERCA blockade were reduced, while SERCA-independent Ca(2+) clearance was faster compared to control. As atherosclerosis develops in the ApoE(-/-) mouse, expression and function of Ca(2+) handling proteins are altered. Up-regulation of Ca(2+) removal via PMCA may offer a potential compensatory mechanism to help normalise the dysfunctional relaxation observed during disease progression. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Velocity-space synthesis of ISEE-1 measurements of the three dimensional electron distribution function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzenreiter, R. J.; Scudder, J. D.

    1981-01-01

    A computer package which produces contour plots of the three dimensional electron distribution function measured by an electron spectrometer aboard ISEE-1 is described. Examples of the contour plots and an explanation of how to use the program, including the necessary computer code for running the program on the GSFC 360/91 computer is presented. The method by which the discrete measurements of the distribution function, given by points on the four dimensional surface are synthesized into a smooth surface in a three dimensional space which can be contoured is described. The velocity components are parallel and perpendicular to the magnetic field, respectively, in the proper frame of the electrons.

  20. The point-characteristic function, wavefronts, and caustic of a spherical wave refracted by an arbitrary smooth surface.

    PubMed

    Marciano-Melchor, Magdalena; Navarro-Morales, Esperanza; Román-Hernández, Edwin; Santiago-Santiago, José Guadalupe; Silva-Ortigoza, Gilberto; Silva-Ortigoza, Ramón; Suárez-Xique, Román

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this paper is to obtain expressions for the k-function, the wavefront train, and the caustic associated with the light rays refracted by an arbitrary smooth surface after being emitted by a point light source located at an arbitrary position in a three-dimensional homogeneous optical medium. The general results are applied to a parabolic refracting surface. For this case, we find that when the point light source is off the optical axis, the caustic locally has singularities of the hyperbolic umbilic type, while the refracted wavefront, at the caustic region, locally has singularities of the cusp ridge and swallowtail types.

  1. Functional renormalization group in Floquet space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eissing, Anna Katharina; Meden, Volker; Kennes, Dante Marvin

    2016-12-01

    We present an extension of the functional renormalization group to Floquet space, which enables us to treat the long time behavior of interacting time periodically driven quantum dots. It is one of its strength that the method is neither bound to small driving amplitudes nor to small driving frequencies, i.e., very general time periodic signals can be considered. It is applied to the interacting resonant level model, a prototype model of a spinless, fermionic quantum dot. The renormalization in several setups with different combinations of time periodic parameters is studied, where the numerical results are complemented by analytic expressions for the renormalization in the limit of small driving amplitude. We show how the driving frequency acts as an infrared cutoff of the underlying renormalization group flow which manifests in novel power laws. We utilize the tunability of the effective reservoir distribution function in a periodically driven onsite energy setup to show how its shape is directly reflected in the renormalization group flow. This allows us to flexibly tune the power-law renormalization generically encountered in quantum dot structures. Finally, an in-phase quantum pump as well as a single parameter pump are investigated in the whole regime of driving frequency, demonstrating that the new power law in the driving frequency is reflected in the mean current of the latter.

  2. Unmasking the ancestral activity of integron integrases reveals a smooth evolutionary transition during functional innovation

    PubMed Central

    Escudero, Jose Antonio; Loot, Celine; Parissi, Vincent; Nivina, Aleksandra; Bouchier, Christiane; Mazel, Didier

    2016-01-01

    Tyrosine (Y)-recombinases have evolved to deliver mechanistically different reactions on a variety of substrates, but these evolutionary transitions are poorly understood. Among them, integron integrases are hybrid systems recombining single- and double-stranded DNA partners. These reactions are asymmetric and need a replicative resolution pathway, an exception to the canonical second strand exchange model of Y-recombinases. Integron integrases possess a specific domain for this specialized pathway. Here we show that despite this, integrases are still capable of efficiently operating the ancestral second strand exchange in symmetrical reactions between double-stranded substrates. During these reactions, both strands are reactive and Holliday junction resolution can follow either pathway. A novel deep-sequencing approach allows mapping of the crossover point for the second strand exchange. The persistence of the ancestral activity in integrases illustrates their robustness and shows that innovation towards new recombination substrates and resolution pathways was a smooth evolutionary process. PMID:26961432

  3. Smoothed square well potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salamon, P.; Vertse, T.

    2017-07-01

    The classical square well potential is smoothed with a finite range smoothing function in order to get a new simple strictly finite range form for the phenomenological nuclear potential. The smoothed square well form becomes exactly zero smoothly at a finite distance, in contrast to the Woods-Saxon form. If the smoothing range is four times the diffuseness of the Woods-Saxon shape both the central and the spin-orbit terms of the Woods-Saxon shape are reproduced reasonably well. The bound single-particle energies in a Woods-Saxon potential can be well reproduced with those in the smoothed square well potential. The same is true for the complex energies of the narrow resonances.

  4. Functional expression of γ-amino butyric acid transporter 2 in human and guinea pig airway epithelium and smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Zaidi, Sarah; Gallos, George; Yim, Peter D; Xu, Dingbang; Sonett, Joshua R; Panettieri, Reynold A; Gerthoffer, William; Emala, Charles W

    2011-08-01

    γ-Amino butyric acid (GABA) is a primary inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, and is classically released by fusion of synaptic vesicles with the plasma membrane or by egress via GABA transporters (GATs). Recently, a GABAergic system comprised of GABA(A) and GABA(B) receptors has been identified on airway epithelial and smooth muscle cells that regulate mucus secretion and contractile tone of airway smooth muscle (ASM). In addition, the enzyme that synthesizes GABA, glutamic acid decarboxylase, has been identified in airway epithelial cells; however, the mechanism(s) by which this synthesized GABA is released from epithelial intracellular stores is unknown. We questioned whether any of the four known isoforms of GATs are functionally expressed in ASM or epithelial cells. We detected mRNA and protein expression of GAT2 and -4, and isoforms of glutamic acid decarboxylase in native and cultured human ASM and epithelial cells. In contrast, mRNA encoding vesicular GAT (VGAT), the neuronal GABA transporter, was not detected. Functional inhibition of (3)H-GABA uptake was demonstrated using GAT2 and GAT4/betaine-GABA transporter 1 (BGT1) inhibitors in both human ASM and epithelial cells. These results demonstrate that two isoforms of GATs, but not VGAT, are expressed in both airway epithelial and smooth muscle cells. They also provide a mechanism by which locally synthesized GABA can be released from these cells into the airway to activate GABA(A) channels and GABA(B) receptors, with subsequent autocrine and/or paracrine signaling effects on airway epithelium and ASM.

  5. Coronary endothelial function and vascular smooth muscle proliferation are programmed by early-gestation dexamethasone exposure in sheep

    PubMed Central

    Volk, Kenneth A.; Roghair, Robert D.; Jung, Felicia; Scholz, Thomas D.; Lamb, Fred S.

    2010-01-01

    Exposure of the early-gestation ovine fetus to exogenous glucocorticoids induces changes in postnatal cardiovascular physiology. We sought to characterize coronary artery vascular function in this model by elucidating the contribution of nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species to altered coronary vascular reactivity and examining the proliferative potential of coronary artery vascular smooth muscle cells. Dexamethasone (dex, 0.28 mg·kg−1·day−1 for 48 h) was administered to pregnant ewes at 27–28-day gestation (term 145 days). Coronary arteries were isolated from 1- to 2-wk-old dex-exposed offspring and aged-matched controls. Compared with controls, coronary arteries from dex-exposed lambs demonstrated enhanced vasoconstriction to endothelin-1 and ACh that was abolished by endothelial removal or preincubation with the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor l-NNA, membrane-permeable superoxide dismutase + catalase, or apamin + charybdotoxin, but not indomethacin. The rate of coronary vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation was also significantly greater in dex-exposed lambs. Protein levels of the proliferating cell nuclear antigen were increased and α-smooth muscle actin decreased in dex-exposed coronary VSMC, consistent with a proliferative state. Finally, expression of the NADPH oxidase Nox 4, but not Nox 1, mRNA was also decreased in coronary VSMC from dex-exposed lambs. These findings suggest an important interaction exists between early-gestation glucocorticoid exposure and reactive oxygen species that is associated with alterations in endothelial function and coronary VSMC proliferation. These changes in coronary physiology are consistent with those associated with the development of atherosclerosis and may provide an important link between an adverse intrauterine environment and increased risk for coronary artery disease. PMID:20335378

  6. On the constrained minimization of smooth Kurdyka—Łojasiewicz functions with the scaled gradient projection method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prato, Marco; Bonettini, Silvia; Loris, Ignace; Porta, Federica; Rebegoldi, Simone

    2016-10-01

    The scaled gradient projection (SGP) method is a first-order optimization method applicable to the constrained minimization of smooth functions and exploiting a scaling matrix multiplying the gradient and a variable steplength parameter to improve the convergence of the scheme. For a general nonconvex function, the limit points of the sequence generated by SGP have been proved to be stationary, while in the convex case and with some restrictions on the choice of the scaling matrix the sequence itself converges to a constrained minimum point. In this paper we extend these convergence results by showing that the SGP sequence converges to a limit point provided that the objective function satisfies the Kurdyka-Łojasiewicz property at each point of its domain and its gradient is Lipschitz continuous.

  7. Adaptive smoothing of high angular resolution diffusion-weighted imaging data by generalized cross-validation improves Q-ball orientation distribution function reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Metwalli, Nader S; Hu, Xiaoping P; Carew, John D

    2010-09-01

    Q-ball imaging (QBI) is a high angular resolution diffusion-weighted imaging (HARDI) technique for reconstructing the orientation distribution function (ODF). Some form of smoothing or regularization is typically required in the ODF reconstruction from low signal-to-noise ratio HARDI data. The amount of smoothing or regularization is usually set a priori at the discretion of the investigator. In this article, we apply an adaptive and objective means of smoothing the raw HARDI data using the smoothing splines on the sphere method with generalized cross-validation (GCV) to estimate the diffusivity profile in each voxel. Subsequently, we reconstruct the ODF, from the smoothed data, based on the Funk-Radon transform (FRT) used in QBI. The spline method was applied to both simulated data and in vivo human brain data. Simulated data show that the smoothing splines on the sphere method with GCV smoothing reduces the mean squared error in estimates of the ODF as compared with the standard analytical QBI approach. The human data demonstrate the utility of the method for estimating smooth ODFs.

  8. Surface-mediated functional gene delivery: an effective strategy for enhancing competitiveness of endothelial cells over smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hao; Ren, Ke-feng; Wang, Jin-Lei; Zhang, He; Wang, Bai-liang; Zheng, Shan-mei; Zhou, Yuan-yuan; Ji, Jian

    2013-04-01

    The non-biorecognition of general biomaterials and inherent biospecificity of biological systems pose key challenges to the optimal functions of medical devices. In this study, we constructed the surface-mediated functional gene delivery through layer-by-layer self-assembly of protamine sulfate (PrS) and plasmid DNA encoding hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), aiming at specific enhancing endothelial cells (EC) compeititiveness over smooth muscle cells (SMC). Characterizations of the (PrS/HGF-pDNA) multilayered films present the linear buildup with homogeneous and flat topographical feature. The amount of DNA can be easily controlled. By using these multilayered films, both human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and human umbilical artery smooth muscle cells (HUASMC) can be directly transfected when they contact with the multilayered films. On transfection, increasing secretion of HGF has been detected in both HUVEC and HUASMC culture, which leads to selective promotion of HUVEC proliferation. In the co-culture experiment, we also exhibit the promoted and hindered growth of HUVEC and HUASMC, respectively, which could be attributed to the inverse influence of HUVEC on HUASMC. These results collectively demonstrate that our system can be served as a powerful tool for enhancing competitiveness of EC over SMC, which opens perspectives for the regulation of intercellular competitiveness in the field of interventional therapy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Implications of autophagy for vascular smooth muscle cell function and plasticity.

    PubMed

    Salabei, Joshua K; Hill, Bradford G

    2013-12-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) are fundamental in regulating blood pressure and distributing oxygen and nutrients to peripheral tissues. They also possess remarkable plasticity, with the capacity to switch to synthetic, macrophage-like, or osteochondrogenic phenotypes when cued by external stimuli. In arterial diseases such as atherosclerosis and restenosis, this plasticity seems to be critical and, depending on the disease context, can be deleterious or beneficial. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms regulating VSMC phenotype and survival is essential for developing new therapies for vascular disease as well as understanding how secondary complications due to surgical interventions develop. In this regard, the cellular process of autophagy is increasingly being recognized as a major player in vascular biology and a critical determinant of VSMC phenotype and survival. Although autophagy was identified in lesional VSMCs in the 1960s, our understanding of the implications of autophagy in arterial diseases and the stimuli promoting its activation in VSMCs is only now being elucidated. In this review, we highlight the evidence for autophagy occurring in VSMCs in vivo, elaborate on the stimuli and processes regulating autophagy, and discuss the current understanding of the role of autophagy in vascular disease. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Increasing evidence of mechanical force as a functional regulator in smooth muscle myosin light chain kinase

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, Fabian; Bauer, Magnus Sebastian; Rees, Martin; Alexandrovich, Alexander; Gautel, Mathias; Pippig, Diana Angela; Gaub, Hermann Eduard

    2017-01-01

    Mechanosensitive proteins are key players in cytoskeletal remodeling, muscle contraction, cell migration and differentiation processes. Smooth muscle myosin light chain kinase (smMLCK) is a member of a diverse group of serine/threonine kinases that feature cytoskeletal association. Its catalytic activity is triggered by a conformational change upon Ca2+/calmodulin (Ca2+/CaM) binding. Due to its significant homology with the force-activated titin kinase, smMLCK is suspected to be also regulatable by mechanical stress. In this study, a CaM-independent activation mechanism for smMLCK by mechanical release of the inhibitory elements is investigated via high throughput AFM single-molecule force spectroscopy. The characteristic pattern of transitions between different smMLCK states and their variations in the presence of different substrates and ligands are presented. Interaction between kinase domain and regulatory light chain (RLC) substrate is identified in the absence of CaM, indicating restored substrate-binding capability due to mechanically induced removal of the auto-inhibitory regulatory region. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.26473.001 PMID:28696205

  11. Monocyte/macrophage cytokine activity regulates vascular smooth muscle cell function within a degradable polyurethane scaffold.

    PubMed

    Battiston, K G; Ouyang, B; Labow, R S; Simmons, C A; Santerre, J P

    2014-03-01

    Tissue engineering strategies rely on the ability to promote cell proliferation and migration into porous biomaterial constructs, as well as to support specific phenotypic states of the cells in vitro. The present study investigated the use of released factors from monocytes and their derived macrophages (MDM) and the mechanism by which they regulate vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) response in a VSMC-monocyte co-culture system within a porous degradable polyurethane (D-PHI) scaffold. VSMCs cultured in monocyte/MDM-conditioned medium (MCM), generated from the culture of monocytes/MDM on D-PHI scaffolds for up to 28 days, similarly affected VSMC contractile marker expression, growth and three-dimensional migration when compared to direct VSMC-monocyte co-culture. Monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) were identified as two cytokines present in MCM, at concentrations that have previously been shown to influence VSMC phenotype. VSMCs cultured alone on D-PHI scaffolds and exposed to MCP-1 (5 ng ml(-1)) or IL-6 (1 ng ml(-1)) for 7 days experienced a suppression in contractile marker expression (with MCP-1 or IL-6) and increased growth (with MCP-1) compared to no cytokine medium supplementation. These effects were also observed in VSMC-monocyte co-culture on D-PHI. Neutralization of IL-6, but not MCP-1, was subsequently shown to decrease VSMC growth and enhance calponin expression for VSMC-monocyte co-cultures on D-PHI scaffolds for 7 days, implying that IL-6 mediates VSMC response in monocyte-VSMC co-cultures. This study highlights the use of monocytes and their derived macrophages in conjunction with immunomodulatory biomaterials, such as D-PHI, as agents for regulating VSMC response, and demonstrates the importance of monocyte/MDM-released factors, such as IL-6 in particular, in this process.

  12. ON THE \\overline{\\partial}-NEUMANN PROBLEM FOR SMOOTH FUNCTIONS AND DISTRIBUTIONS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kytmanov, A. M.

    1991-02-01

    We consider the following \\overline{\\partial}-Neumann problem for functions: given a function \\varphi on the boundary of a domain D\\subset\\mathbf{C}^n with boundary of class C^\\infty, find a harmonic function F in D such that \\overline{\\partial}_nF=\\varphi on \\partial D (where \\overline{\\partial}_nF is the normal part of the differential form \\overline{\\partial} F). It is shown that with the homogeneous boundary condition \\overline{\\partial}_nF=0, the only solutions of this problem are holomorphic functions. Solvability of this problem is proved in strictly pseudoconvex domains if the function (or distribution) \\varphi is orthogonal to holomorphic functions f for integration over \\partial D. An integral formula for the solution of the \\overline{\\partial}-Neumann problem in the ball is given. The proof uses known results on solvability of the \\overline{\\partial}-Neumann problem for forms of type (p,\\,q) for q>0.

  13. Smooth Nonparametric Estimation of the Failure Rate Function and its First Two Derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koshkin, G. M.

    2016-10-01

    The class of nonparametric estimators of kernel type is considered for the unknown failure rate function and its derivatives. The convergence of the suggested estimations in distribution and in the mean square sense to the unknown failure rate function and its derivatives is proved. The interval estimator of the failure rate function is constructed. Advantages of the nonparametric estimators in comparison with the parametric algorithms are discussed. The suggested estimators of the failure rate function can be used to solve problems of exploitation reliability of complex physical, technical, and software systems under uncertainty conditions.

  14. Alteration of Contractile Function and Calcium Ion Movements in Vascular Smooth Muscle by Gentamicin and Other Aminoglycoside Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Adams, H. Richard; Goodman, Frank R.; Weiss, George B.

    1974-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to examine the effects of certain aminoglycoside antibiotics on contractile responses and related calcium ion (Ca2+) movements in isolated vascular smooth muscle. Gentamicin, kanamycin, and streptomycin decreased contractile responses produced by norepinephrine, histamine, and high K+ in rabbit aortic strips. The inhibitory action of these antibiotics on mechanical function was more pronounced when the Ca2+ concentration of the bathing solution was decreased from 1.5 mM (normal Ca2+ solution) to 0.05 mM (low Ca2+ solution). The uptake of radiocalcium (45Ca) into the isolated media-intimal layer of rabbit aortae was decreased in a maintained manner by each antibiotic. With gentamicin, the inhibitory effect on 45Ca uptake was shown to be dependent upon the concentration of gentamicin employed and to be more evident in a 0.1 mM Ca2+ solution than in a normal Ca2+ solution. In addition, the rate of 45Ca efflux from the rabbit aortic media-intimal layer was increased in a sustained manner by gentamicin, streptomycin, and kanamycin. Furthermore, contractile responses induced by high K+ and norepinephrine in canine carotid arterial strips were inhibited by gentamicin. Present findings indicate that aminoglycoside antibiotics interfere with Ca2+-linked events leading to activation of the contractile mechanism of vascular smooth muscle. These in vitro findings may partially explain the occurrence of in vivo cardiovascular depression that has occasionally been observed after the administration of chemically related antimicrobial agents. PMID:15825418

  15. Predictors of immune function in space flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shearer, William T.; Zhang, Shaojie; Reuben, James M.; Lee, Bang-Ning; Butel, Janet S.

    2007-02-01

    Of all of the environmental conditions of space flight that might have an adverse effect upon human immunity and the incidence of infection, space radiation stands out as the single-most important threat. As important as this would be on humans engaged in long and deep space flight, it obviously is not possible to plan Earth-bound radiation and infection studies in humans. Therefore, we propose to develop a murine model that could predict the adverse effects of space flight radiation and reactivation of latent virus infection for humans. Recent observations on the effects of gamma and latent virus infection demonstrate latent virus reactivation and loss of T cell mediated immune responses in a murine model. We conclude that using this small animal method of quantitating the amounts of radiation and latent virus infection and resulting alterations in immune responses, it may be possible to predict the degree of immunosuppression in interplanetary space travel for humans. Moreover, this model could be extended to include other space flight conditions, such as microgravity, sleep deprivation, and isolation, to obtain a more complete assessment of space flight risks for humans.

  16. Expression pattern and function of tyrosine receptor kinase B isoforms in rat mesenteric arterial smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Otani, Kosuke; Okada, Muneyoshi; Yamawaki, Hideyuki

    2015-11-27

    Tyrosine receptor kinaseB (TrkB) is a high affinity receptor for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). TrkB isoforms involve full length TrkB (TrkB FL) and truncated TrkB type1 (TrkB T1) and type 2 (TrkB T2) in rats. The aim of present study was to explore their expression pattern and function in mesenteric arterial smooth muscle cells (MASMCs). The expression of TrkB isoform protein and mRNA was examined by Western blotting, immunofluorescence and quantitative RT-PCR analyses. Cell proliferation was measured by a bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation assay. Cell migration was measured by a Boyden chamber assay. Cell morphology was observed with a phase-contrast microscope. Protein and mRNA expression of BDNF and TrkB isoforms was confirmed in MASMCs. Expression level of TrkB FL was less, while that of TrkB T1 was the highest in MASMCs. Although BDNF increased phosphorylation of ERK, it had no influence on migration and proliferation of MASMCs. TrkB T1 gene knockdown by a RNA interference induced morphological changes and reduced expression level of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) in MASMCs. Similar morphological changes and reduced α-SMA expression were induced in MASMCs by a Rho kinase inhibitor, Y-27632. In conclusion, we for the first time demonstrate that TrkB T1 expressed highly in MASMCs contributes to maintain normal cell morphology possibly via regulation of Rho activity. This study firstly defined expression level of TrkB isoforms and partly revealed their functions in peripheral vascular cells. - Highlights: • BDNF-TrkB axis mediates neurogenesis, growth, differentiation and survival. • Expression pattern and function of TrkB in vascular smooth muscle remain unclear. • Expression of TrkB FL is low, while that of TrkB T1 is the highest. • TrkB T1 contributes to maintain normal morphology possibly via activating Rho.

  17. Delayed evacuatory function due to specific smooth muscle reactivity in the gastrointestinal tracts of tacrine-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Krustev, A; Sirakov, V; Turiiski, V; Getova, D; Velkova, K; Prissadova, N

    2008-01-01

    Most of the side effects induced by tacrine are associated with the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. The aim of the study was to analyze the nature of radiographically registered, tacrine-induced changes in evacuatory function, as well as to find a possible correlation with the immediate in vitro action of the drug on smooth muscles from the GI tracts of rats. The tacrine dose we used reliably delayed GI passage: contrast matter was not fully evacuated, predominantly from the stomach and cecum. The delay resulted from changes in tone and peristaltic activity, specific for the various regions of the tract. These changes were associated with a superposing of the responses due to the anticholinesterase and noncholinergic action of tacrine.

  18. Localized states in an unbounded neural field equation with smooth firing rate function: a multi-parameter analysis.

    PubMed

    Faye, Grégory; Rankin, James; Chossat, Pascal

    2013-05-01

    The existence of spatially localized solutions in neural networks is an important topic in neuroscience as these solutions are considered to characterize working (short-term) memory. We work with an unbounded neural network represented by the neural field equation with smooth firing rate function and a wizard hat spatial connectivity. Noting that stationary solutions of our neural field equation are equivalent to homoclinic orbits in a related fourth order ordinary differential equation, we apply normal form theory for a reversible Hopf bifurcation to prove the existence of localized solutions; further, we present results concerning their stability. Numerical continuation is used to compute branches of localized solution that exhibit snaking-type behaviour. We describe in terms of three parameters the exact regions for which localized solutions persist.

  19. The Redshift and Real-Space Correlation Functions from the ESP Galaxy Redshift Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzzo, Luigi; Bartlett, J. G.; Cappi, A.; Maurogordato, S.; Zucca, E.; Zamorani, G.; Balkowski, C.; Blanchard, A.; Cayatte, V.; Chincarini, G.; Collins, C.; Maccagni, D.; MacGillivray, H.; Merighi, R.; Mignoli, M.; Proust, D.; Ramella, M.; Scaramella, R.; Stirpe, G. M.; Vettolani, G.

    We discuss the behaviour of the redshift- and real-space correlation functions from the ESO Slice Project (ESP) galaxy redshift survey. xis for the whole survey is positive out to ~80hmpc, with a smooth break from a power law. By projecting xip, we recover the real-space correlation function xir, which below 10hmpc is reasonably well described by a power law xi(r) = (r/r_circ)^{-gamma}, with r_circ = 4.15^{+0.20}_{-0.21} h^{-1} Mpc and gamma = 1.67^{+0.07}_{-0.09}. The same analysis, applied to four volume-limited subsamples, evidences a small but significant growth of clustering with luminosity (r_circ varies from 3.4 to 5.2hmpc, when the luminosity threshold is increased from -18.5 to -20).

  20. Valorisation of smooth hound (Mustelus mustelus) waste biomass through recovery of functional, antioxidative and antihypertensive bioactive peptides.

    PubMed

    Sayari, Nadhem; Sila, Assaâd; Haddar, Anissa; Balti, Rafik; Ellouz-Chaabouni, Semia; Bougatef, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Concerns over the environmental and waste disposal problems created by the large amounts of by-products generated from fish processing industries are increasing worldwide. The bioconversion of those marine waste by-products through the enzymatic hydrolysis of their protein content offers the possibility for the development of bioactive peptides for use in various biotechnological applications. The present study aimed to investigate and evaluate the biological and functional properties of smooth hound (Mustelus mustelus) protein hydrolysates (SHPHs) obtained by treatment with intestinal and gastric enzyme preparations from M. mustelus viscera and porcine pancreatin. The results revealed that the SHPHs exhibited different degrees of hydrolysis and antioxidant activity. The hydrolysate produced by the intestinal crude extract presented the highest rate of antioxidative activity, showing an IC50 value of 1.47 ± 0.07 mg/mL in 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) scavenging assays. The alkaline protease extract from the intestine of M. mustelus produced hydrolysate with the highest angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity (82 ± 1.52% at 2 mg/mL). All the protein hydrolysates showed excellent solubility and interfacial properties that were governed by pH. The major amino acids detected in SHPHs were glutamic acid/glutamine, aspartic acid/asparagine, histidine and arginine, followed by methionine, phenylalanine, serine, valine and leucine. Overall, the results indicated that smooth hound by-products can be used to generate high value-added products, thus offering a valuable source of bioactive peptides for application in wide range of biotechnological and functional food applications.

  1. Nonequilibrium Flows with Smooth Particle Applied Mechanics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kum, Oyeon

    Smooth particle methods are relatively new methods for simulating solid and fluid flows though they have a 20-year history of solving complex hydrodynamic problems in astrophysics, such as colliding planets and stars, for which correct answers are unknown. The results presented in this thesis evaluate the adaptability or fitness of the method for typical hydrocode production problems. For finite hydrodynamic systems, boundary conditions are important. A reflective boundary condition with image particles is a good way to prevent a density anomaly at the boundary and to keep the fluxes continuous there. Boundary values of temperature and velocity can be separately controlled. The gradient algorithm, based on differentiating the smooth particle expressions for (urho) and (Trho), does not show numerical instabilities for the stress tensor and heat flux vector quantities which require second derivatives in space when Fourier's heat -flow law and Newton's viscous force law are used. Smooth particle methods show an interesting parallel linking them to molecular dynamics. For the inviscid Euler equation, with an isentropic ideal gas equation of state, the smooth particle algorithm generates trajectories isomorphic to those generated by molecular dynamics. The shear moduli were evaluated based on molecular dynamics calculations for the three weighting functions, B spline, Lucy, and Cusp functions. The accuracy and applicability of the methods were estimated by comparing a set of smooth particle Rayleigh -Benard problems, all in the laminar regime, to corresponding highly-accurate grid-based numerical solutions of continuum equations. Both transient and stationary smooth particle solutions reproduce the grid-based data with velocity errors on the order of 5%. The smooth particle method still provides robust solutions at high Rayleigh number where grid-based methods fails. Considerably fewer smooth particles are required than atoms in a corresponding molecular dynamics

  2. The tyrosine phosphatase SHP-2 controls urokinase-dependent signaling and functions in human vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kiyan, Julia Haller, Hermann; Dumler, Inna

    2009-04-01

    The urokinase (uPA)/urokinase receptor (uPAR) multifunctional system is an important mediator of functional behaviour of human vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). uPAR associates with platelet-derived growth factor receptor {beta} (PDGFR-{beta}), which serves as a transmembrane adaptor for uPAR in VSMC, to transduce intracellular signaling and initiate functional changes. The precise and rapid propagation of these signaling cascades demands both strict and flexible regulatory mechanisms that remain unexplored. We provide evidence that the tyrosine phosphatase SHP-2 mediates these processes. uPA regulated SHP-2 phosphorylation, catalytic activity, and its co-localization and association with the PDGFR-{beta}. Active PDGFR-{beta} was required for the uPA-induced SHP-2 phosphorylation. uPAR-directed STAT1 pathway was disturbed in cells expressing SHP-2 inactive mutant. Both, cell proliferation and migration were impaired in VSMC with downregulated SHP-2. Elucidating the underlying mechanisms, we found that uPA induced SHP-2 recruitment to lipid rafts. Disruption of rafts abolished uPA-related control of SHP-2 phosphorylation, its association with PDGFR-{beta} and finally the VSMC functional responses. Our results demonstrate that SHP-2 plays an important role in uPA-directed signaling and functional control of human VSMC and suggest that this phosphatase might contribute to the pathogenesis of the uPA-related vascular remodeling.

  3. Signal-transduction pathways that regulate smooth muscle function I. Signal transduction in phasic (esophageal) and tonic (gastroesophageal sphincter) smooth muscles.

    PubMed

    Harnett, Karen M; Cao, Weibiao; Biancani, Piero

    2005-03-01

    Contraction of esophageal (Eso) and lower esophageal sphincter (LES) circular muscle depends on distinct signal-transduction pathways. ACh-induced contraction of Eso muscle is linked to phosphatidylcholine metabolism, production of diacylglycerol and arachidonic acid (AA), and activation of the Ca(2+)-insensitive PKCepsilon. Although PKCepsilon does not require Ca(2+) for activation, either influx of extracellular Ca(2+) or release of Ca(2+) from stores is needed to activate the phospholipases responsible for hydrolysis of membrane phospholipids and production of second messengers, which activate PKCepsilon. In contrast, the LES uses two distinct intracellular pathways: 1) a PKC-dependent pathway activated by low doses of agonists or during maintenance of spontaneous tone, and 2) a Ca(2+)-calmodulin-myosin light chain kinase (MLCK)-dependent pathway activated in response to maximally effective doses of agonists during the initial phase of contraction. The Ca(2+) levels, released by agonist-induced activity of phospholipase C, determine which contractile pathway is activated in the LES. The Ca(2+)-calmodulin-MLCK-dependent contractile pathway has been well characterized in a variety of smooth muscles. The steps linking activation of PKC to myosin light chain (MLC20) phosphorylation and contraction, however, have not been clearly defined for LES, Eso, or other smooth muscles. In addition, in LES circular muscle, a low-molecular weight pancreatic-like phospholipase A2 (group I PLA2) causes production of AA, which is metabolized to prostaglandins and thromboxanes. These AA metabolites act on receptors linked to heterotrimeric G proteins to induce activation of phospholipases and production of second messengers to maintain contraction of LES circular muscle. We have examined the signal-transduction pathways activated by PGF(2alpha) and by thromboxane analogs during the initial contractile phase and found that these pathways are the same as those activated by other

  4. Asplund sets, differentiability and subdifferentiability of functions in Banach spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xianfu

    2006-11-01

    We show that Asplund sets are effective tools to study differentiability of Lipschitz functions, and [epsilon]-subdifferentiability of lower semicontinuous functions on general Banach spaces. If a locally Lipschitz function defined on an Asplund generated space has a minimal Clarke subdifferential mapping, then it is -uniformly strictly differentiable on a dense G[delta] subset of X. Examples are given of locally Lipschitz functions that are -uniformly strictly differentiable everywhere, but nowhere Frechet differentiable.

  5. The G Protein-coupled Receptor P2Y14 Influences Insulin Release and Smooth Muscle Function in Mice*

    PubMed Central

    Meister, Jaroslawna; Le Duc, Diana; Ricken, Albert; Burkhardt, Ralph; Thiery, Joachim; Pfannkuche, Helga; Polte, Tobias; Grosse, Johannes; Schöneberg, Torsten; Schulz, Angela

    2014-01-01

    UDP sugars were identified as extracellular signaling molecules, assigning a new function to these compounds in addition to their well defined role in intracellular substrate metabolism and storage. Previously regarded as an orphan receptor, the G protein-coupled receptor P2Y14 (GPR105) was found to bind extracellular UDP and UDP sugars. Little is known about the physiological functions of this G protein-coupled receptor. To study its physiological role, we used a gene-deficient mouse strain expressing the bacterial LacZ reporter gene to monitor the physiological expression pattern of P2Y14. We found that P2Y14 is mainly expressed in pancreas and salivary glands and in subpopulations of smooth muscle cells of the gastrointestinal tract, blood vessels, lung, and uterus. Among other phenotypical differences, knock-out mice showed a significantly impaired glucose tolerance following oral and intraperitoneal glucose application. An unchanged insulin tolerance suggested altered pancreatic islet function. Transcriptome analysis of pancreatic islets showed that P2Y14 deficiency significantly changed expression of components involved in insulin secretion. Insulin secretion tests revealed a reduced insulin release from P2Y14-deficient islets, highlighting P2Y14 as a new modulator of proper insulin secretion. PMID:24993824

  6. Functional coupling between the caffeine/ryanodine-sensitive Ca2+ store and mitochondria in rat aortic smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Vallot, O; Combettes, L; Lompré, A M

    2001-07-15

    We investigated the role of mitochondria in the agonist-induced and/or caffeine-induced Ca2+ transients in rat aortic smooth muscle cells. We explored the possibility that proliferation modulates the coupling between mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum. Ca2+ transients induced by either ATP or caffeine were measured in presence or absence of drugs interfering with mitochondrial activity in freshly dissociated cells (day 1) and in subconfluent primary culture (day 12). We found that the mitochondrial inhibitors, rotenone or carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone, as well as the permeability transition pore inhibitor, cyclosporin A, had no effect on the ATP-induced Ca2+ transient at either day 1 or day 12, but prevented caffeine-induced cytosolic Ca2+ increase at day 12 but not at day 1. Close connections between ryanodine receptors and mitochondria were observed at both day 1 and 12. Thapsigargin (TG) prevented ATP- and caffeine-induced Ca2+ transients at day 1. At day 12, where only 50% of the cells were sensitive to caffeine, TG did not prevent the caffeine-induced Ca2+ transient, and prevented ATP-induced Ca2+ transient in only half of the cells. Together, these data demonstrate that rat aortic smooth muscle cells at day 1 have an ATP- and caffeine-sensitive pool, which is functionally independent but physically closely linked to mitochondria and totally inhibited by TG. At day 12, we propose the existence of two cell populations: half contains IP3 receptors and TG-sensitive Ca2+ pumps only; the other half contains, in addition to the IP3-sensitive pool independent from mitochondria, a caffeine-sensitive pool. This latter pool is linked to mitochondria through the permeability transition pore and is refilled by both TG-sensitive and insensitive mechanisms.

  7. Functional coupling between the caffeine/ryanodine-sensitive Ca2+ store and mitochondria in rat aortic smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Vallot, O; Combettes, L; Lompré, A M

    2001-01-01

    We investigated the role of mitochondria in the agonist-induced and/or caffeine-induced Ca2+ transients in rat aortic smooth muscle cells. We explored the possibility that proliferation modulates the coupling between mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum. Ca2+ transients induced by either ATP or caffeine were measured in presence or absence of drugs interfering with mitochondrial activity in freshly dissociated cells (day 1) and in subconfluent primary culture (day 12). We found that the mitochondrial inhibitors, rotenone or carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone, as well as the permeability transition pore inhibitor, cyclosporin A, had no effect on the ATP-induced Ca2+ transient at either day 1 or day 12, but prevented caffeine-induced cytosolic Ca2+ increase at day 12 but not at day 1. Close connections between ryanodine receptors and mitochondria were observed at both day 1 and 12. Thapsigargin (TG) prevented ATP- and caffeine-induced Ca2+ transients at day 1. At day 12, where only 50% of the cells were sensitive to caffeine, TG did not prevent the caffeine-induced Ca2+ transient, and prevented ATP-induced Ca2+ transient in only half of the cells. Together, these data demonstrate that rat aortic smooth muscle cells at day 1 have an ATP- and caffeine-sensitive pool, which is functionally independent but physically closely linked to mitochondria and totally inhibited by TG. At day 12, we propose the existence of two cell populations: half contains IP3 receptors and TG-sensitive Ca2+ pumps only; the other half contains, in addition to the IP3-sensitive pool independent from mitochondria, a caffeine-sensitive pool. This latter pool is linked to mitochondria through the permeability transition pore and is refilled by both TG-sensitive and insensitive mechanisms. PMID:11439085

  8. Effects of high calcium diet on arterial smooth muscle function and electrolyte balance in mineralocorticoid-salt hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Arvola, P; Ruskoaho, H; Pörsti, I

    1993-04-01

    1. The effects of a high calcium diet (2.5%) on blood pressure, electrolyte balance, plasma and tissue atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i), and arterial smooth muscle responses were studied in one-kidney deoxycorticosterone (DOC)-NaCl hypertensive Wistar rats. 2. Calcium supplementation for 8 weeks markedly attenuated the development of DOC-NaCl hypertension and the associated cardiac hypertrophy, and prevented the DOC-NaCl-induced sodium-volume retention as judged by reduced plasma Na+, and decreased plasma and ventricular ANP concentrations in high calcium-fed DOC-NaCl rats. However, calcium supplementation did not affect the DOC-NaCl-induced rise in platelet [Ca2+]i. 3. Smooth muscle contractions of isolated mesenteric arterial rings in response to depolarization by K+ (20-30 mM) were enhanced in DOC-NaCl-treated rats, this enhancement being abolished by concurrent oral calcium loading. The Ca2+ entry blocker nifedipine (10 nM) inhibited the contractions induced by K+ (30-125 mM) more effectively in DOC-NaCl rats than in controls, while the inhibition in calcium-loaded DOC-NaCl rats was significantly greater than in controls only with 30 mM K+. 4. The contractions of mesenteric arterial rings induced by omission of K+ from the organ baths were used to evaluate cell membrane permeability to ions. In chemically denervated rings the onset of the gradual rise in contractile force in K(+)-free medium occurred earlier, and the rate of the contraction was faster in DOC-NaCl-treated rats than in controls and high calcium-fed DOC-NaCl rats. Smooth muscle relaxation induced by 0.5 mM K+ upon K(+)-free contractions was clearly slower in DOC-NaCl rats than in controls and calcium-supplemented DOC-NaCl rats. 5. The functions of arterial smooth muscle Na+, Ca2+ exchange and Ca(2+)-ATPase were evaluated by the aortic contractions elicited by low Na+ medium, and the subsequent relaxation responses induced by Ca(2+)-free solution (in the

  9. Diamond Smoothing Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voronov, Oleg

    2007-01-01

    Diamond smoothing tools have been proposed for use in conjunction with diamond cutting tools that are used in many finish-machining operations. Diamond machining (including finishing) is often used, for example, in fabrication of precise metal mirrors. A diamond smoothing tool according to the proposal would have a smooth spherical surface. For a given finish machining operation, the smoothing tool would be mounted next to the cutting tool. The smoothing tool would slide on the machined surface left behind by the cutting tool, plastically deforming the surface material and thereby reducing the roughness of the surface, closing microcracks and otherwise generally reducing or eliminating microscopic surface and subsurface defects, and increasing the microhardness of the surface layer. It has been estimated that if smoothing tools of this type were used in conjunction with cutting tools on sufficiently precise lathes, it would be possible to reduce the roughness of machined surfaces to as little as 3 nm. A tool according to the proposal would consist of a smoothing insert in a metal holder. The smoothing insert would be made from a diamond/metal functionally graded composite rod preform, which, in turn, would be made by sintering together a bulk single-crystal or polycrystalline diamond, a diamond powder, and a metallic alloy at high pressure. To form the spherical smoothing tip, the diamond end of the preform would be subjected to flat grinding, conical grinding, spherical grinding using diamond wheels, and finally spherical polishing and/or buffing using diamond powders. If the diamond were a single crystal, then it would be crystallographically oriented, relative to the machining motion, to minimize its wear and maximize its hardness. Spherically polished diamonds could also be useful for purposes other than smoothing in finish machining: They would likely also be suitable for use as heat-resistant, wear-resistant, unlubricated sliding-fit bearing inserts.

  10. Large covariance matrices: smooth models from the two-point correlation function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connell, Ross; Eisenstein, Daniel; Vargas, Mariana; Ho, Shirley; Padmanabhan, Nikhil

    2016-11-01

    We introduce a new method for estimating the covariance matrix for the galaxy correlation function in surveys of large-scale structure. Our method combines simple theoretical results with a realistic characterization of the survey to dramatically reduce noise in the covariance matrix. For example, with an investment of only ≈1000 CPU hours we can produce a model covariance matrix with noise levels that would otherwise require ˜35 000 mocks. Non-Gaussian contributions to the model are calibrated against mock catalogues, after which the model covariance is found to be in impressive agreement with the mock covariance matrix. Since calibration of this method requires fewer mocks than brute force approaches, we believe that it could dramatically reduce the number of mocks required to analyse future surveys.

  11. Effects of high calcium diet on arterial smooth muscle function and electrolyte balance in mineralocorticoid-salt hypertensive rats.

    PubMed Central

    Arvola, P.; Ruskoaho, H.; Pörsti, I.

    1993-01-01

    1. The effects of a high calcium diet (2.5%) on blood pressure, electrolyte balance, plasma and tissue atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i), and arterial smooth muscle responses were studied in one-kidney deoxycorticosterone (DOC)-NaCl hypertensive Wistar rats. 2. Calcium supplementation for 8 weeks markedly attenuated the development of DOC-NaCl hypertension and the associated cardiac hypertrophy, and prevented the DOC-NaCl-induced sodium-volume retention as judged by reduced plasma Na+, and decreased plasma and ventricular ANP concentrations in high calcium-fed DOC-NaCl rats. However, calcium supplementation did not affect the DOC-NaCl-induced rise in platelet [Ca2+]i. 3. Smooth muscle contractions of isolated mesenteric arterial rings in response to depolarization by K+ (20-30 mM) were enhanced in DOC-NaCl-treated rats, this enhancement being abolished by concurrent oral calcium loading. The Ca2+ entry blocker nifedipine (10 nM) inhibited the contractions induced by K+ (30-125 mM) more effectively in DOC-NaCl rats than in controls, while the inhibition in calcium-loaded DOC-NaCl rats was significantly greater than in controls only with 30 mM K+. 4. The contractions of mesenteric arterial rings induced by omission of K+ from the organ baths were used to evaluate cell membrane permeability to ions. In chemically denervated rings the onset of the gradual rise in contractile force in K(+)-free medium occurred earlier, and the rate of the contraction was faster in DOC-NaCl-treated rats than in controls and high calcium-fed DOC-NaCl rats. Smooth muscle relaxation induced by 0.5 mM K+ upon K(+)-free contractions was clearly slower in DOC-NaCl rats than in controls and calcium-supplemented DOC-NaCl rats. 5. The functions of arterial smooth muscle Na+, Ca2+ exchange and Ca(2+)-ATPase were evaluated by the aortic contractions elicited by low Na+ medium, and the subsequent relaxation responses induced by Ca(2+)-free solution (in the

  12. Probing the Nodal Structure of Landau Level Wave Functions in Real Space.

    PubMed

    Bindel, J R; Ulrich, J; Liebmann, M; Morgenstern, M

    2017-01-06

    The inversion layer of p-InSb(110) obtained by Cs adsorption of 1.8% of a monolayer is used to probe the Landau level wave functions within smooth potential valleys by scanning tunneling spectroscopy at 14 T. The nodal structure becomes apparent as a double peak structure of each spin polarized first Landau level, while the zeroth Landau level exhibits a single peak per spin level only. The real space data show single rings of the valley-confined drift states for the zeroth Landau level and double rings for the first Landau level. The result is reproduced by a recursive Green function algorithm using the potential landscape obtained experimentally. We show that the result is generic by comparing the local density of states from the Green function algorithm with results from a well-controlled analytic model based on the guiding center approach.

  13. Probing the Nodal Structure of Landau Level Wave Functions in Real Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bindel, J. R.; Ulrich, J.; Liebmann, M.; Morgenstern, M.

    2017-01-01

    The inversion layer of p -InSb (110 ) obtained by Cs adsorption of 1.8% of a monolayer is used to probe the Landau level wave functions within smooth potential valleys by scanning tunneling spectroscopy at 14 T. The nodal structure becomes apparent as a double peak structure of each spin polarized first Landau level, while the zeroth Landau level exhibits a single peak per spin level only. The real space data show single rings of the valley-confined drift states for the zeroth Landau level and double rings for the first Landau level. The result is reproduced by a recursive Green function algorithm using the potential landscape obtained experimentally. We show that the result is generic by comparing the local density of states from the Green function algorithm with results from a well-controlled analytic model based on the guiding center approach.

  14. Green's Functions in Space and Time.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowe, E. G. Peter

    1979-01-01

    Gives a sketch of some topics in distribution theory that is technically simple, yet provides techniques for handling the partial differential equations satisfied by the most important Green's functions in physics. (Author/GA)

  15. Critical Function Models for Operation of the International Space Station

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, William Roy; Bagian, T. M.

    2000-11-01

    Long duration and exploration class space missions will place new requirements on human performance when compared to current space shuttle missions. Specifically, assembly and operation of the International Space Station (ISS) will place significant new demands on the crew. For example, maintenance of systems that provide habitability will become an ongoing activity for the international flight crews. Tasks for maintaining space station habitability will need to be integrated with tasks associated with scientific research. In addition, tasks and resources will need to be prioritized and allocated dynamically in response to changing operational conditions and unplanned system breakdowns. This paper describes an ongoing program to develop a habitability index (HI) for space operations based on the critical function approach. This pilot project focuses on adaptation of the critical function approach to develop a habitability index specifically tailored for space operations. Further work will then be needed to expand and validate the habitability index for application in the ISS operational environment.

  16. The Activation Function-1 of Estrogen Receptor Alpha Prevents Arterial Neointima Development Through a Direct Effect on Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Smirnova, Natalia F.; Fontaine, Coralie; Buscato, Mélissa; Lupieri, Adrien; Vinel, Alexia; Valera, Marie-Cécile; Guillaume, Maeva; Malet, Nicole; Foidart, Jean-Michel; Raymond-Letron, Isabelle; Lenfant, Francoise; Gourdy, Pierre; Katzenellenbogen, Benita S.; Katzenellenbogen, John A.; Laffargue, Muriel; Arnal, Jean-Francois

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: 17β-Estradiol (E2) exerts numerous beneficial effects in vascular disease. It regulates gene transcription through nuclear estrogen receptor α (ERα) via 2 activation functions, AF1 and AF2, and can also activate membrane ERα. The role of E2 on the endothelium relies on membrane ERα activation, but the molecular mechanisms of its action on vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) are not fully understood. Objective: The aim of this study was to determine which cellular target and which ERα subfunction are involved in the preventive action of E2 on neointimal hyperplasia. Methods and Results: To trigger neointimal hyperplasia of VSMC, we used a mouse model of femoral arterial injury. Cre-Lox models were used to distinguish between the endothelial- and the VSMC-specific actions of E2. The molecular mechanisms underlying the role of E2 were further characterized using both selective ERα agonists and transgenic mice in which the ERαAF1 function had been specifically invalidated. We found that (1) the selective inactivation of ERα in VSMC abrogates the neointimal hyperplasia protection induced by E2, whereas inactivation of endothelial and hematopoietic ERα has no effect; (2) the selective activation of membrane ERα does not prevent neointimal hyperplasia; and (3) ERαAF1 is necessary and sufficient to inhibit postinjury VSMC proliferation. Conclusions: Altogether, ERαAF1-mediated nuclear action is both necessary and sufficient to inhibit postinjury arterial VSMC proliferation, whereas membrane ERα largely regulates the endothelial functions of E2. This highlights the exquisite cell/tissue-specific actions of the ERα subfunctions and helps to delineate the spectrum of action of selective ER modulators. PMID:26316608

  17. Functional changes in nonadrenergic, noncholinergic inhibitory neurons in ileal circular smooth muscle after small bowel transplantation in rats.

    PubMed

    Shibata, C; Balsiger, B M; Anding, W J; Duenes, J A; Miller, V M; Sarr, M G

    1998-11-01

    This experiment was designed to determine mechanisms of change in nonadrenergic, noncholinergic (NANC) inhibitory neurons in the ileum after small bowel transplantation (SBT) in the rat and whether nitric oxide (NO) serves as an important NANC inhibitory neurotransmitter in the rat ileum. Eight groups of rats (N > or =8 rats/group) were studied: neurally intact unoperated controls; rats one week after anesthesia and sham celiotomy; and separate groups one and eight weeks after either 40 min of cold ischemia of the jejunoileum, combined jejunal and ileal intestinal transection/reanastomosis, or orthotopic SBT of the entire jejunoileum. Contractile activity was evaluated in full-thickness ileal circular muscle strips under isometric conditions. Spontaneous activity did not differ among groups. In all groups, exogenous NO, NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA, an NO synthase inhibitor), and methylene blue (soluble guanylate cyclase inhibitor) had no effect on spontaneous activity, while 8-bromocyclic guanosine monophosphate (8Br-cGMP) inhibited contractile activity in all groups. Low frequency (2-10 Hz) electrical field stimulation (EFS) inhibited contractile activity only in control and SBT groups; L-NMMA and methylene blue did not alter the response to EFS in any group. These results suggest that each aspect of the SBT procedure, ischemia/reperfusion injury, disruption of enteric neural continuity by intestinal transection, and extrinsic denervation, alter function of enteric ileal inhibitory neurons separately early (one week) after operation. NO, a known inhibitory neurotransmitter in other gut regions, does not affect ileal circular muscle in neurally intact tissue nor mediate functional changes in inhibitory nerve function nor smooth muscle contractility after SBT.

  18. Different modes of endothelial-smooth muscle cell interaction elicit differential β-catenin phosphorylations and endothelial functions.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shun-Fu; Chen, Li-Jing; Lee, Pei-Ling; Lee, Ding-Yu; Chien, Shu; Chiu, Jeng-Jiann

    2014-02-04

    β-Catenin phosphorylation plays important roles in modulating its functions, but the effects of different phosphorylated forms of β-catenin in response to heterocellular interaction are unclear. Here we investigated whether distinct modes of phosphorylation on β-catenin could be triggered through heterocellular interactions between endothelial cells (ECs) and smooth muscle cells (SMCs), and the consequent modulation of EC functions. ECs were cocultured with SMCs to initiate direct contact and paracrine interaction. EC-SMC coculture induced EC β-catenin phosphorylations simultaneously at tyrosine 142 (Tyr142) and serine 45/threonine 41 (Ser45/Thr41) at the cytoplasm/nuclei and the membrane, respectively. Treating ECs with SMC-conditional medium induced β-catenin phosphorylation only at Ser45/Thr41. These findings indicate that different phosphorylation effects of EC-SMC coculture were induced through heterocellular direct contact and paracrine effects, respectively. Using specific blocking peptides, antagonists, and siRNAs, we found that the β-catenin Tyr142-phosphorylation was mediated by connexin 43/Fer and that the β-catenin Ser45/Thr41-phosphorylation was mediated by SMC-released bone morphogenetic proteins through VE-cadherin and bone morphogenetic protein receptor-II/Smad5. Transfecting ECs with β-catenin-Tyr142 or -Ser45 mutants showed that these two phosphorylated forms of β-catenin modulate differential EC function: The Tyr142-phosphorylated β-catenin stimulates vascular cell-adhesion molecule-1 expression to increase EC-monocytic adhesion, but the Ser45/Thr41-phosphorylated β-catenin attenuates VE-cadherin-dependent junction structures to increase EC permeability. Our findings provide new insights into the understanding of regulatory complexities of distinct modes of β-catenin phosphorylations under EC-SMC interactions and suggest that different phosphorylated forms of β-catenin play important roles in modulating vascular pathophysiology

  19. New Insights into Mechanisms and Functions of Chemokine (C-X-C Motif) Receptor 4 Heteromerization in Vascular Smooth Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Ann E.; Tripathi, Abhishek; LaPorte, Heather M.; Brueggemann, Lioubov I.; Singh, Abhay Kumar; Albee, Lauren J.; Byron, Kenneth L.; Tarasova, Nadya I.; Volkman, Brian F.; Cho, Thomas Yoonsang; Gaponenko, Vadim; Majetschak, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4) heteromerizes with α1A/B-adrenoceptors (AR) and atypical chemokine receptor 3 (ACKR3) and that CXCR4:α1A/B-AR heteromers are important for α1-AR function in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). Structural determinants for CXCR4 heteromerization and functional consequences of CXCR4:α1A/B-AR heteromerization in intact arteries, however, remain unknown. Utilizing proximity ligation assays (PLA) to visualize receptor interactions in VSMC, we show that peptide analogs of transmembrane-domain (TM) 2 and TM4 of CXCR4 selectively reduce PLA signals for CXCR4:α1A-AR and CXCR4:ACKR3 interactions, respectively. While both peptides inhibit CXCL12-induced chemotaxis, only the TM2 peptide inhibits phenylephrine-induced Ca2+-fluxes, contraction of VSMC and reduces efficacy of phenylephrine to constrict isolated arteries. In a Cre-loxP mouse model to delete CXCR4 in VSMC, we observed 60% knockdown of CXCR4. PLA signals for CXCR4:α1A/B-AR and CXCR4:ACKR3 interactions in VSMC, however, remained constant. Our observations point towards TM2/4 of CXCR4 as possible contact sites for heteromerization and suggest that TM-derived peptide analogs permit selective targeting of CXCR4 heteromers. A molecular dynamics simulation of a receptor complex in which the CXCR4 homodimer interacts with α1A-AR via TM2 and with ACKR3 via TM4 is presented. Our findings further imply that CXCR4:α1A-AR heteromers are important for intrinsic α1-AR function in intact arteries and provide initial and unexpected insights into the regulation of CXCR4 heteromerization in VSMC. PMID:27331810

  20. Engineering vascular tissue with functional smooth muscle cells derived from human iPS cells and nanofibrous scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongyu; Hu, Jiang; Jiao, Jiao; Liu, Zhongning; Zhou, Zhou; Zhao, Chao; Chang, Lung-Ji; Chen, Y Eugene; Ma, Peter X; Yang, Bo

    2014-10-01

    Tissue-engineered blood vessels (TEBVs) are promising in the replacement of diseased vascular tissues. However, it remains a great challenge to obtain a sufficient number of functional smooth muscle cells (SMCs) in a clinical setting to construct patient-specific TEBVs. In addition, it is critical to develop a scaffold to accommodate these cells and retain their functional phenotype for the regeneration of TEBVs. In this study, human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) were established from primary human aortic fibroblasts, and characterized with the pluripotency markers expression and cells' capabilities to differentiate into all three germ layer cells. A highly efficient method was then developed to induce these human iPSCs into proliferative SMCs. After multiple times of expansion, the expanded SMCs retained the potential to be induced into the functional contractile phenotype of mature SMCs, which was characterized by the contractile response to carbachol treatment, up-regulation of specific collagen genes under transforming growth factor β1 treatment, and up-regulation of specific matrix metalloproteinase genes under cytokine stimulation. We also developed an advanced macroporous and nanofibrous (NF) poly(l-lactic acid) (PLLA) scaffold with suitable pore size and interpore connectivity to seed these human iPSC-derived SMCs and maintain their differentiated phenotype. Subcutaneous implantation of the SMC-scaffold construct in nude mice demonstrated vascular tissue formation, with robust collagenous matrix deposition inside the scaffold and the maintenance of differentiated SMC phenotype. Taken together, this study established an exciting approach towards the construction of patient-specific TEBVs. We established patient-specific human iPSCs, derived proliferative SMCs for expansion, turned on their mature contractile SMC phenotype, and developed an advanced scaffold for these cells to regenerate vascular tissue in vivo.

  1. Control of vascular smooth muscle function by Src-family kinases and reactive oxygen species in health and disease.

    PubMed

    MacKay, Charles E; Knock, Greg A

    2015-09-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are now recognised as second messenger molecules that regulate cellular function by reversibly oxidising specific amino acid residues of key target proteins. Amongst these are the Src-family kinases (SrcFKs), a multi-functional group of non-receptor tyrosine kinases highly expressed in vascular smooth muscle (VSM). In this review we examine the evidence supporting a role for ROS-induced SrcFK activity in normal VSM contractile function and in vascular remodelling in cardiovascular disease. VSM contractile responses to G-protein-coupled receptor stimulation, as well as hypoxia in pulmonary artery, are shown to be dependent on both ROS and SrcFK activity. Specific phosphorylation targets are identified amongst those that alter intracellular Ca(2+) concentration, including transient receptor potential channels, voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels and various types of K(+) channels, as well as amongst those that regulate actin cytoskeleton dynamics and myosin phosphatase activity, including focal adhesion kinase, protein tyrosine kinase-2, Janus kinase, other focal adhesion-associated proteins, and Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factors. We also examine a growing weight of evidence in favour of a key role for SrcFKs in multiple pro-proliferative and anti-apoptotic signalling pathways relating to oxidative stress and vascular remodelling, with a particular focus on pulmonary hypertension, including growth-factor receptor transactivation and downstream signalling, hypoxia-inducible factors, positive feedback between SrcFK and STAT3 signalling and positive feedback between SrcFK and NADPH oxidase dependent ROS production. We also discuss evidence for and against the potential therapeutic targeting of SrcFKs in the treatment of pulmonary hypertension.

  2. Control of vascular smooth muscle function by Src-family kinases and reactive oxygen species in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    MacKay, Charles E; Knock, Greg A

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are now recognised as second messenger molecules that regulate cellular function by reversibly oxidising specific amino acid residues of key target proteins. Amongst these are the Src-family kinases (SrcFKs), a multi-functional group of non-receptor tyrosine kinases highly expressed in vascular smooth muscle (VSM). In this review we examine the evidence supporting a role for ROS-induced SrcFK activity in normal VSM contractile function and in vascular remodelling in cardiovascular disease. VSM contractile responses to G-protein-coupled receptor stimulation, as well as hypoxia in pulmonary artery, are shown to be dependent on both ROS and SrcFK activity. Specific phosphorylation targets are identified amongst those that alter intracellular Ca2+ concentration, including transient receptor potential channels, voltage-gated Ca2+ channels and various types of K+ channels, as well as amongst those that regulate actin cytoskeleton dynamics and myosin phosphatase activity, including focal adhesion kinase, protein tyrosine kinase-2, Janus kinase, other focal adhesion-associated proteins, and Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factors. We also examine a growing weight of evidence in favour of a key role for SrcFKs in multiple pro-proliferative and anti-apoptotic signalling pathways relating to oxidative stress and vascular remodelling, with a particular focus on pulmonary hypertension, including growth-factor receptor transactivation and downstream signalling, hypoxia-inducible factors, positive feedback between SrcFK and STAT3 signalling and positive feedback between SrcFK and NADPH oxidase dependent ROS production. We also discuss evidence for and against the potential therapeutic targeting of SrcFKs in the treatment of pulmonary hypertension. PMID:25384773

  3. Smooth Sailing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Beverley; Pincott, Maxine; Rebman, Ashley; Northcutt, Jen; Barsanti, Amy; Silkunas, Betty; Brighton, Susan K.; Reitz, David; Winkler, Maureen

    1999-01-01

    Presents discipline tips from several teachers to keep classrooms running smoothly all year. Some of the suggestions include the following: a bear-cave warning system, peer mediation, a motivational mystery, problem students acting as the teacher's assistant, a positive-behavior-reward chain, a hallway scavenger hunt (to ensure quiet passage…

  4. Smooth Sailing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Beverley; Pincott, Maxine; Rebman, Ashley; Northcutt, Jen; Barsanti, Amy; Silkunas, Betty; Brighton, Susan K.; Reitz, David; Winkler, Maureen

    1999-01-01

    Presents discipline tips from several teachers to keep classrooms running smoothly all year. Some of the suggestions include the following: a bear-cave warning system, peer mediation, a motivational mystery, problem students acting as the teacher's assistant, a positive-behavior-reward chain, a hallway scavenger hunt (to ensure quiet passage…

  5. Kernel-Smoothing Estimation of Item Characteristic Functions for Continuous Personality Items: An Empirical Comparison with the Linear and the Continuous-Response Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrando, Pere J.

    2004-01-01

    This study used kernel-smoothing procedures to estimate the item characteristic functions (ICFs) of a set of continuous personality items. The nonparametric ICFs were compared with the ICFs estimated (a) by the linear model and (b) by Samejima's continuous-response model. The study was based on a conditioned approach and used an error-in-variables…

  6. Calponin Isoforms CNN1, CNN2 and CNN3: Regulators for Actin Cytoskeleton Functions in Smooth Muscle and Non-Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Rong; Jin, J-P

    2016-01-01

    Calponin is an actin filament-associated regulatory protein expressed in smooth muscle and multiple types of non-muscle cells. Three homologous genes, CNN1, CNN2 and CNN3, encoding calponin isoforms 1, 2, and 3, respectively, are present in vertebrate species. All three calponin isoforms are actin-binding proteins with functions in inhibiting actin-activated myosin ATPase and stabilizing the actin cytoskeleton, while each isoform executes different physiological roles based on their cell type-specific expressions. Calponin 1 is specifically expressed in smooth muscle cells and plays a role in fine-tuning smooth muscle contractility. Calponin 2 is expressed in both smooth muscle and non-muscle cells and regulates multiple actin cytoskeleton-based functions. Calponin 3 participates in actin cytoskeleton-based activities in embryonic development and myogenesis. Phosphorylation has been extensively studied for the regulation of calponin functions. Cytoskeleton tension regulates the transcription of CNN2 gene and the degradation of calponin 2 protein. This review summarizes our knowledge learned from studies over the past three decades, focusing on the evolutionary lineage of calponin isoform genes, their tissue- and cell type-specific expressions, structure-function relationships, and mechanoregulation. PMID:26970176

  7. Kernel-Smoothing Estimation of Item Characteristic Functions for Continuous Personality Items: An Empirical Comparison with the Linear and the Continuous-Response Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrando, Pere J.

    2004-01-01

    This study used kernel-smoothing procedures to estimate the item characteristic functions (ICFs) of a set of continuous personality items. The nonparametric ICFs were compared with the ICFs estimated (a) by the linear model and (b) by Samejima's continuous-response model. The study was based on a conditioned approach and used an error-in-variables…

  8. Effect of dietary salt loading and high-calcium diet on vascular smooth muscle responses and endothelium function in rats.

    PubMed

    Adegunloye, B J; Sofola, O A

    1997-11-01

    1. The present study examined the effects of concurrent manipulation of dietary calcium and salt on contractile responses of vascular smooth muscle (VSM) and endothelial function of aortic rings from Sprague-Dawley rats. 2. Salt loading enhanced the contractile response of the aortic rings to noradrenaline (NA), an effect that was blunted by a high calcium intake. 3. Removal of the endothelium and incubation of aortic rings in physiological salt solution containing methylene blue increased the sensitivity of the rings to NA. 4. The increase in the sensitivity of aortic rings induced by endothelium removal was more pronounced in aortic rings from salt-loaded rats. 5. Acetylcholine caused similar degrees of relaxation in all experimental groups, but the relaxation to histamine was smaller (P < 0.05) in salt-loaded rats than in other groups of rats; however, after removal of the endothelium, the contractile response to histamine was higher in salt-loaded rats. 6. The results indicate that the hypersensitivity of isolated aortic rings to agonists, as observed in salt-loaded rats, is due to altered responses of the VSM and not as a result of changes in the endothelium. In addition, salt loading tends to increase the synthesis of endothelium-dependent relaxing factor. The ability of salt loading to enhance the contractile responses of VSM to agonists can be prevented by supplementing the diet with high calcium.

  9. Lymphocyte Functions in Space - Related Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Risin, D.; Sundaresan, A.; Pellis, N. R.; Davson, David L. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Our previous studies showed that modeled (MMG) and true (STS-54 and STS-56) microgravity (MG) inhibit human lymphocyte locomotion. MMG also suppresses polyclonal and antigen-specific lymphocyte activation. Analysis of the relationship between activation deficits and the loss of locomotion in MG suggested a fundamental defect in signal transduction mechanism localized either at the PKC level or upstream at the cell membrane. FACS analysis of the expression of PKC isoforms in PBMC revealed that MMG selectively inhibits the PKC isoforms expression. The decrease was most prominent in PKC epsilon, less obvious in PKC delta and almost marginal and insignificant in PKC alpha. Western blot analysis confirmed these results (PKC epsilon protein expression was downregulated at 24, 72 and 96 hours in MG). We also found a decrease in PKC epsilon mRNA expression. MMG inhibited programmed cell death (PCD) in lymphocytes. Inhibition was observed in two types of experiments: 1) when PCD was induced by gamma-radiation of PBMC, and 2) when PCD in activated T cells was triggered by PHA-M or PMA + ionomycin restimulation. The established direct effects of MG on signal transduction mechanisms as well as on PCD in lymphocytes could contribute to the impairment of the immunity in space.

  10. Layered smooth muscle cell-endothelial progenitor cell sheets derived from the bone marrow augment postinfarction ventricular function.

    PubMed

    Shudo, Yasuhiro; Goldstone, Andrew B; Cohen, Jeffrey E; Patel, Jay B; Hopkins, Michael S; Steele, Amanda N; Edwards, Bryan B; Kawamura, Masashi; Miyagawa, Shigeru; Sawa, Yoshiki; Woo, Y Joseph

    2017-09-01

    The angiogenic potential of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) may be limited by the absence of their natural biologic foundation, namely smooth muscle pericytes. We hypothesized that joint delivery of EPCs and smooth muscle cells (SMCs) in a novel, totally bone marrow-derived cell sheet will mimic the native architecture of a mature blood vessel and act as an angiogenic construct to limit post infarction ventricular remodeling. Primary EPCs and mesenchymal stem cells were isolated from bone marrow of Wistar rats. Mesenchymal stem cells were transdifferentiated into SMCs by culture on fibronectin-coated culture dishes. Confluent SMCs topped with confluent EPCs were detached from an Upcell dish to create a SMC-EPC bi-level cell sheet. A rodent model of ischemic cardiomyopathy was then created by ligating the left anterior descending artery. Rats were randomized into 3 groups: cell sheet transplantation (n = 9), no treatment (n = 12), or sham surgery control (n = 7). Four weeks postinfarction, mature vessel density tended to increase in cell sheet-treated animals compared with controls. Cell sheet therapy significantly attenuated the extent of cardiac fibrosis compared with that of the untreated group (untreated vs cell sheet, 198 degrees [interquartile range (IQR), 151-246 degrees] vs 103 degrees [IQR, 92-113 degrees], P = .04). Furthermore, EPC-SMC cell sheet transplantation attenuated myocardial dysfunction, as evidenced by an increase in left ventricular ejection fraction (untreated vs cell sheet vs sham, 33.5% [IQR, 27.8%-35.7%] vs 45.9% [IQR, 43.6%-48.4%] vs 59.3% [IQR, 58.8%-63.5%], P = .001) and decreases in left ventricular dimensions. The bone marrow-derived, spatially arranged SMC-EPC bi-level cell sheet is a novel, multilineage cellular therapy obtained from a translationally practical source. Interactions between SMCs and EPCs augment mature neovascularization, limit adverse remodeling, and improve ventricular function after myocardial

  11. Biscalar and Bivector Green's Functions in de Sitter Space Time

    PubMed Central

    Narlikar, J. V.

    1970-01-01

    Biscalar and bivector Green's functions of wave equations are calculated explicitly in de Sitter space time. The calculation is performed by considering the electromagnetic field generated by the spontaneous creation of an electric charge. PMID:16591816

  12. Vestibular function in the space environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Baumgarten, R. J.; Harth, O.; Thuemler, R.; Baldrighi, G.; Shillinger, G. L., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The present work presents new results about the interdependence of optical illusory sensations and eye movements in man. To establish to what degree certain illusions previously obtained during centrifugation and parabolic flight can be explained by eye movements and by neuronal integration in the brain, real eye movements were measured as they occurred in the dark without optical fixation, during rectilinear accelerations on the ground, and during weightlessness in parabolic flight. Results provide valuable insight into normal vestibular function as well as resolution of within-the-eye and behind-the-eye contributions to the above illusions.

  13. Vestibular function in the space environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Baumgarten, R. J.; Harth, O.; Thuemler, R.; Baldrighi, G.; Shillinger, G. L., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The present work presents new results about the interdependence of optical illusory sensations and eye movements in man. To establish to what degree certain illusions previously obtained during centrifugation and parabolic flight can be explained by eye movements and by neuronal integration in the brain, real eye movements were measured as they occurred in the dark without optical fixation, during rectilinear accelerations on the ground, and during weightlessness in parabolic flight. Results provide valuable insight into normal vestibular function as well as resolution of within-the-eye and behind-the-eye contributions to the above illusions.

  14. Wigner function and Schroedinger equation in phase-space representation

    SciTech Connect

    Chruscinski, Dariusz; Mlodawski, Krzysztof

    2005-05-15

    We discuss a family of quasidistributions (s-ordered Wigner functions of Agarwal and Wolf [Phys. Rev. D 2, 2161 (1970); Phys. Rev. D 2, 2187 (1970); Phys. Rev. D 2, 2206 (1970)]) and its connection to the so-called phase space representation of the Schroedinger equation. It turns out that although Wigner functions satisfy the Schroedinger equation in phase space, they have a completely different interpretation.

  15. Towards a theory of BV functions in abstract Wiener spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrosio, Luigi; Miranda, Michele; Maniglia, Stefania; Pallara, Diego

    2010-08-01

    Functions of bounded variation in an abstract Wiener space, i.e., an infinite dimensional Banach space endowed with a Gaussian measure and a related differentiable structure, have been introduced by M. Fukushima and M. Hino using Dirichlet forms, and their properties have been studied with tools from stochastics. In this paper we reformulate, with purely analytical tools, the definition and the main properties of BV functions, and start investigating further properties.

  16. Nonequilibrium flows with smooth particle applied mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Kum, Oyeon

    1995-07-01

    Smooth particle methods are relatively new methods for simulating solid and fluid flows through they have a 20-year history of solving complex hydrodynamic problems in astrophysics, such as colliding planets and stars, for which correct answers are unknown. The results presented in this thesis evaluate the adaptability or fitness of the method for typical hydrocode production problems. For finite hydrodynamic systems, boundary conditions are important. A reflective boundary condition with image particles is a good way to prevent a density anomaly at the boundary and to keep the fluxes continuous there. Boundary values of temperature and velocity can be separately controlled. The gradient algorithm, based on differentiating the smooth particle expression for (uρ) and (Tρ), does not show numerical instabilities for the stress tensor and heat flux vector quantities which require second derivatives in space when Fourier`s heat-flow law and Newton`s viscous force law are used. Smooth particle methods show an interesting parallel linking to them to molecular dynamics. For the inviscid Euler equation, with an isentropic ideal gas equation of state, the smooth particle algorithm generates trajectories isomorphic to those generated by molecular dynamics. The shear moduli were evaluated based on molecular dynamics calculations for the three weighting functions, B spline, Lucy, and Cusp functions. The accuracy and applicability of the methods were estimated by comparing a set of smooth particle Rayleigh-Benard problems, all in the laminar regime, to corresponding highly-accurate grid-based numerical solutions of continuum equations. Both transient and stationary smooth particle solutions reproduce the grid-based data with velocity errors on the order of 5%. The smooth particle method still provides robust solutions at high Rayleigh number where grid-based methods fails.

  17. Analysis of SM22alpha-deficient mice reveals unanticipated insights into smooth muscle cell differentiation and function.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J C; Kim, S; Helmke, B P; Yu, W W; Du, K L; Lu, M M; Strobeck, M; Yu, Q; Parmacek, M S

    2001-02-01

    SM22alpha is a 22-kDa smooth muscle cell (SMC) lineage-restricted protein that physically associates with cytoskeletal actin filament bundles in contractile SMCs. To examine the function of SM22alpha, gene targeting was used to generate SM22alpha-deficient (SM22(-/-LacZ)) mice. The gene targeting strategy employed resulted in insertion of the bacterial lacZ reporter gene at the SM22alpha initiation codon, permitting precise analysis of the temporal and spatial pattern of SM22alpha transcriptional activation in the developing mouse. Northern and Western blot analyses confirmed that the gene targeting strategy resulted in a null mutation. Histological analysis of SM22(+/-LacZ) embryos revealed detectable beta-galactosidase activity in the unturned embryonic day 8.0 embryo in the layer of cells surrounding the paired dorsal aortae concomitant with its expression in the primitive heart tube, cephalic mesenchyme, and yolk sac vasculature. Subsequently, during postnatal development, beta-galactosidase activity was observed exclusively in arterial, venous, and visceral SMCs. SM22alpha-deficient mice are viable and fertile. Their blood pressure and heart rate do not differ significantly from their control SM22alpha(+/-) and SM22alpha(+/+) littermates. The vasculature and SMC-containing tissues of SM22alpha-deficient mice develop normally and appear to be histologically and ultrastructurally similar to those of their control littermates. Taken together, these data demonstrate that SM22alpha is not required for basal homeostatic functions mediated by vascular and visceral SMCs in the developing mouse. These data also suggest that signaling pathways that regulate SMC specification and differentiation from local mesenchyme are activated earlier in the angiogenic program than previously recognized.

  18. Identification, characterization and functional analysis of regulatory region of nanos gene from half-smooth tongue sole (Cynoglossus semilaevis).

    PubMed

    Huang, Jinqiang; Li, Yongjuan; Shao, Changwei; Wang, Na; Chen, Songlin

    2017-03-25

    The nanos gene encodes an RNA-binding zinc finger protein, which is required in the development and maintenance of germ cells. However, there is very limited information about nanos in flatfish, which impedes its application in fish breeding. In this study, we report the molecular cloning, characterization and functional analysis of the 3'-untranslated region of the nanos gene (Csnanos) from half-smooth tongue sole (Cynoglossus semilaevis), which is an economically important flatfish in China. The 1233-bp cDNA sequence, 1709-bp genomic sequence and flanking sequences (2.8-kb 5'- and 1.6-kb 3'-flanking regions) of Csnanos were cloned and characterized. Sequence analysis revealed that CsNanos shares low homology with Nanos in other species, but the zinc finger domain of CsNanos is highly similar. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that CsNanos belongs to the Nanos2 subfamily. Csnanos expression was widely detected in various tissues, but the expression level was higher in testis and ovary. During early development and sex differentiation, Csnanos expression exhibited a clear sexually dimorphic pattern, suggesting its different roles in the migration and differentiation of primordial germ cells (PGCs). Higher expression levels of Csnanos mRNA in normal females and males than in neomales indicated that the nanos gene may play key roles in maintaining the differentiation of gonad. Moreover, medaka PGCs were successfully labeled by the microinjection of synthesized mRNA consisting of green fluorescence protein and the 3'-untranslated region of Csnanos. These findings provide new insights into nanos gene expression and function, and lay the foundation for further study of PGC development and applications in tongue sole breeding.

  19. Restoration of noisy blurred images by a smoothing spline filter.

    PubMed

    Peyrovian, M J; Sawchuk, A A

    1977-12-01

    For the restoration of noisy blurred images, a controllable smoothing criterion based on the locally variable statistics and minimization of the second derivative is defined, and the corresponding filter, applicable to both space-variant and space-invariant degradations, is obtained. The output of this filter is a cubic spline function. The parameters of the filter determine the local smoothing window and over-all extent of smoothing, and thus the tradeoff between resolution and smoothing is controllable in a spatially nonstationary manner. The interesting properties of this filter have made it capable of restoring signal-dependent noisy images, and it has been successfully applied for filtering images degraded by film-grain noise. Since the matrices of this filter are banded circulant or Toeplitz, efficient algorithms are used for matrix manipulations.

  20. Local function conservation in sequence and structure space.

    PubMed

    Weinhold, Nils; Sander, Oliver; Domingues, Francisco S; Lengauer, Thomas; Sommer, Ingolf

    2008-07-04

    We assess the variability of protein function in protein sequence and structure space. Various regions in this space exhibit considerable difference in the local conservation of molecular function. We analyze and capture local function conservation by means of logistic curves. Based on this analysis, we propose a method for predicting molecular function of a query protein with known structure but unknown function. The prediction method is rigorously assessed and compared with a previously published function predictor. Furthermore, we apply the method to 500 functionally unannotated PDB structures and discuss selected examples. The proposed approach provides a simple yet consistent statistical model for the complex relations between protein sequence, structure, and function. The GOdot method is available online (http://godot.bioinf.mpi-inf.mpg.de).

  1. BP and Vascular Function Following Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatton, Daniel C.; Yue, Qi; Chapman, Justin; Xue, Hong; Dierickx, Jacqueline; Roullet, Chantal; Roullet, Jean-Baptiste; Phanouvong, Thongchanh; Watanabe, Mitsuaki; Otsuka, Keiichi; McCarron, David A.

    1997-01-01

    Blood pressure and mesenteric resistance artery function were assessed in 9-week-old spontaneously hypertensive rats following an 18 day shuttle flight on STS-80. Blood pressure was measured twice, first in conscious animals using a tail-cuff method and then while the animals were anesthetized with 2% halothane in O2. Isolated mesenteric resistance artery responses to cumulative additions of norepinephrine, acetylcholine, sodium nitroprusside, and calcium were measured within 17 hours of landing using wire myography. Blood pressure was slightly reduced in conscious animals following flight (p=0.056) but was significantly elevated (p less than.001) above vivarium control group values in anesthetized animals. Maximal contraction of mesenteric arteries to norepinephrine was attenuated in the flight animals (p less than.001)aswasrelaxationtoacetylcholine(p less than .001)andcalcium(p less than .05). There was no difference between flight and control animals in the vessel response to sodium nitroprusside (p greater than .05). The results suggest that there may have been an increase in synthesis and release of nitric oxide in the flight animals.

  2. Quark mass functions and pion structure in Minkowski space

    SciTech Connect

    Biernat, Elmer P.; Gross, Franz L.; Pena, Maria Teresa; Stadler, Alfred

    2014-03-01

    We present a study of the dressed quark mass function and the pion structure in Minkowski space using the Covariant Spectator Theory (CST). The quark propagators are dressed with the same kernel that describes the interaction between different quarks. We use an interaction kernel in momentum space that is a relativistic generalization of the linear confining q-qbar potential and a constant potential shift that defines the energy scale. The confining interaction has a Lorentz scalar part that is not chirally invariant by itself but decouples from the equations in the chiral limit and therefore allows the Nambu--Jona-Lasinio (NJL) mechanism to work. We adjust the parameters of our quark mass function calculated in Minkowski-space to agree with LQCD data obtained in Euclidean space. Results of a calculation of the pion electromagnetic form factor in the relativistic impulse approximation using the same mass function are presented and compared with experimental data.

  3. Communication: Smoothing out excited-state dynamics: Analytical gradients for dynamically weighted complete active space self-consistent field

    SciTech Connect

    Glover, W. J.

    2014-11-07

    State averaged complete active space self-consistent field (SA-CASSCF) is a workhorse for determining the excited-state electronic structure of molecules, particularly for states with multireference character; however, the method suffers from known issues that have prevented its wider adoption. One issue is the presence of discontinuities in potential energy surfaces when a state that is not included in the state averaging crosses with one that is. In this communication I introduce a new dynamical weight with spline (DWS) scheme that mimics SA-CASSCF while removing energy discontinuities due to unweighted state crossings. In addition, analytical gradients for DWS-CASSCF (and other dynamically weighted schemes) are derived for the first time, enabling energy-conserving excited-state ab initio molecular dynamics in instances where SA-CASSCF fails.

  4. Space and cognition: the measurement of behavioral functions during a 6-day space mission.

    PubMed

    Benke, T; Koserenko, O; Watson, N V; Gerstenbrand, F

    1993-05-01

    We measured nonspecific (attention, mental flexibility, psychomotor speed) and visuospatial cognitive processing in a single case study during a 6-d visit on the Russian orbital complex MIR, using computer-based psychometric tasks. Reaction times and accuracy scores showed only minor, nonsignificant changes between preflight, flight, and postflight assessments. These results suggest that several behavioral functions, among them complex visuospatial processing skills, remain essentially intact on short space visits, provided that the performing subject experiences no symptoms of space motion sickness or other physical impairments. Computerized psychometric tasks are a sensitive and flexible tool to measure behavioral functions in space life sciences.

  5. Functional Adaptation of Venous Smooth Muscle Response to Vasoconstriction in Proximal, Distal and Varix Segments of Varicose Veins

    PubMed Central

    Raffetto, Joseph D.; Qiao, Xiaoying; Beauregard, Katie G.; Tanbe, Alain F.; Kumar, Abhinav; Mam, Virak; Khalil, Raouf A.

    2009-01-01

    Background Varicose Veins (VarV) is a common disorder of venous dilation and turtuosity with unclear mechanism. Although venous smooth muscle constitutes a significant component of the vein wall, the functional integrity and the ability of various regions of the VarV to constrict is unclear. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that the different degrees of venodilation in different regions of VarV reflect segmental differences in the responsiveness to receptor-dependent vasoconstrictive stimuli and/or in the post-receptor signaling mechanisms of vasoconstriction. Methods Varix segments and adjacent proximal and distal segments were obtained from patients undergoing VarV stripping. Control greater saphenous vein specimens were obtained from patients undergoing lower extremity arterial bypass and coronary artery bypass graft (CABG). Circular vein segments were equilibrated under 2 g of tension in a tissue bath, and the changes in isometric constriction in response to angiotensin II (AngII, 10−11−10−7 M), phenylephrine (PHE, 10−9−10−4 M), and KCl (96 mM) were recorded. The amount of angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1R) was measured in vein tissue homogenate using Western blot analysis. Results AngII caused concentration-dependent constriction in control vein (max 35.3±9.6 mg/mg tissue, pED50 8.48±0.34). AngII caused less contraction and was less potent in proximal (max 7.9±2.5, pED50 6.85±0.61), distal (max 5.7±1.2, pED50 6.74±0.68) and varix segments of VarV (max 7.2±2.0, pED50 7.11±0.50), suggesting reduced AT1R-receptor-mediated contractile mechanisms. Western blot analysis revealed similar amount of AT1R in VarV compared to control veins. α-adrenergic receptor stimulation with PHE caused concentration-dependent constriction in control veins (max 73.0±13.9 mg/mg tissue, pED50 5.48±0.12), that was greater in magnitude than that of AngII. PHE produced similar constriction and was equally potent in varix and distal segments, but

  6. Two Figla homologues have disparate functions during sex differentiation in half-smooth tongue sole (Cynoglossus semilaevis)

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hailong; Xu, Wenteng; Zhang, Ning; Shao, Changwei; Zhu, Ying; Dong, Zhongdian; Wang, Na; Jia, Xiaodong; Xu, Hao; Chen, Songlin

    2016-01-01

    Figla is a germ-cell-specific transcription factor associated with ovary development and differentiation. In vertebrates, one transcriptional form of Figla is commonly found. However, besides the common form of this gene (named Figla_tv1), a new transcriptional form (named Figla_tv2) was identified in half-smooth tongue sole (Cynoglossus semilaevis). The full-length cDNA of Figla_tv1 was 1057 bp long with a 591-bp open reading frame encoding a predicted 196 amino acid protein, while Figla_tv2 encoded a 125 amino acid protein. Figla_tv1 and Figla_tv2 expression in various tissues was detected by qRT-PCR. Figla_tv1 was expressed mainly in ovary, skin and liver, while Figla_tv2 was expressed in all examined tissues. In the gonads, Figla_tv1 was expressed in ovary, while Figla_tv2 was predominately expressed in testis of pseudomales. Further, in situ hybridization located Figla_tv1 only in oocytes and Figla_tv2 mainly in germ cells of pseudomale testis. After knocking down Figla_tv2 in a pseudomale testis cell line, the expression of two steroid hormone-encoding genes, StAR and P450scc, was significantly up-regulated (P < 0.05). Our findings suggest that Figla_tv1 has a conserved function in folliculogenesis, as in other vertebrates, and that Figla_tv2 may have a role in the spermatogenesis of pseudomales by regulating the synthesis and metabolism of steroid hormones. PMID:27313147

  7. Human embryonic stem cell-derived vascular progenitor cells capable of endothelial and smooth muscle cell function.

    PubMed

    Hill, Katherine L; Obrtlikova, Petra; Alvarez, Diego F; King, Judy A; Keirstead, Susan A; Allred, Jeremy R; Kaufman, Dan S

    2010-03-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated development of endothelial cells (ECs) and smooth muscle cells (SMCs) as separate cell lineages derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). We demonstrate CD34(+) cells isolated from differentiated hESCs function as vascular progenitor cells capable of producing both ECs and SMCs. These studies better define the developmental origin and reveal the relationship between these two cell types, as well as provide a more complete biological characterization. hESCs are cocultured on M2-10B4 stromal cells or Wnt1-expressing M2-10B4 for 13 to 15 days to generate a CD34(+) cell population. These cells are isolated using a magnetic antibody separation kit and cultured on fibronectin-coated dishes in EC medium. To induce SMC differentiation, culture medium is changed and a morphological and phenotypic change occurs within 24 to 48 hours. CD34(+) vascular progenitor cells give rise to ECs and SMCs. The two populations express respective cell-specific transcripts and proteins, exhibit intracellular calcium in response to various agonists, and form robust tube-like structures when cocultured in Matrigel. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells cultured under SMC conditions do not exhibit a change in phenotype or genotype. Wnt1-overexpressing stromal cells produced an increased number of progenitor cells. The ability to generate large numbers of ECs and SMCs from a single vascular progenitor cell population is promising for therapeutic use to treat a variety of diseased and ischemic conditions. The stepwise differentiation outlined here is an efficient, reproducible method with potential for large-scale cultures suitable for clinical applications. Copyright 2010 ISEH - Society for Hematology and Stem Cells. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Cooperation between the two heads of smooth muscle myosin is essential for full activation of the motor function by phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Rong-Na; Mabuchi, Katsuhide; Li, Jing; Lu, Zekuan; Wang, Chih-Lueh Albert; Li, Xiang-dong

    2013-09-10

    The motor function of smooth muscle myosin (SmM) is regulated by phosphorylation of the regulatory light chain (RLC) bound to the neck region of the SmM heavy chain. It is generally accepted that unphosphorylated RLC induces interactions between the two heads and between the head and the tail, thus inhibiting the motor activity of SmM, whereas phosphorylation of RLC interrupts those interactions, thus reversing the inhibition and restoring the motor activity to the maximal value. One assumption of this model is that single-headed SmM is fully active regardless of phosphorylation. To re-evaluate this model, we produced a number of SmM constructs with coiled coils of various lengths and examined their structure and regulation. With these constructs we identified the segment in the coiled-coil key for the formation of a stable double-headed structure. In agreement with the current model, we found that the actin-activated ATPase activity of unphosphorylated SmM increased with shortening of the coiled-coil. However, contrary to the current model, we found that the actin-activated ATPase activity of phosphorylated SmM decreased with shortening coiled-coil and only the stable double-headed SmM was fully activated by phosphorylation. These results indicate that single-headed SmM is neither fully active nor fully inhibited. Based on our findings, we propose that cooperation between the two heads is essential, not only for the inhibition of unphosphorylated SmM, but also for the activation of phosphorylated SmM.

  9. Hydrophobic bile salts inhibit gallbladder smooth muscle function via stimulation of GPBAR1 receptors and activation of KATP channels

    PubMed Central

    Lavoie, Brigitte; Balemba, Onesmo B; Godfrey, Cody; Watson, Conall A; Vassileva, Galya; Corvera, Carlos U; Nelson, Mark T; Mawe, Gary M

    2010-01-01

    Hydrophobic bile salts are thought to contribute to the disruption of gallbladder smooth muscle (GBSM) function that occurs in gallstone disease, but their mechanism of action is unknown. The current study was undertaken to determine how hydrophobic bile salts interact with GBSM, and how they reduce GBSM activity. The effect of hydrophobic bile salts on the activity of GBSM was measured by intracellular recording and calcium imaging using wholemount preparations from guinea pig and mouse gallbladder. RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry were used to evaluate expression of the G protein-coupled bile acid receptor, GPBAR1. Application of tauro-chenodeoxycholate (CDC, 50–100 μm) to in situ GBSM rapidly reduced spontaneous Ca2+ flashes and action potentials, and caused a membrane hyperpolarization. Immunoreactivity and transcript for GPBAR1 were detected in gallbladder muscularis. The GPBAR1 agonist, tauro-lithocholic acid (LCA, 10 μm) mimicked the effect of CDC on GBSM. The actions of LCA were blocked by the protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor, KT5720 (0.5–1.0 μm) and the KATP channel blocker, glibenclamide (10 μm). Furthermore, LCA failed to disrupt GBSM activity in Gpbar1−/− mice. The findings of this study indicate that hydrophobic bile salts activate GPBAR1 on GBSM, and this leads to activation of the cyclic AMP–PKA pathway, and ultimately the opening of KATP channels, thus hyperpolarizing the membrane and decreasing GBSM activity. This inhibitory effect of hydrophobic bile salt activation of GPBAR1 could be a contributing factor in the manifestation of gallstone disease. PMID:20624794

  10. Boundedness of generalized Cesaro averaging operators on certain function spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, M. R.; Howlett, P. G.; Lucas, S. K.; Naik, S.; Ponnusamy, S.

    2005-08-01

    We define a two-parameter family of Cesaro averaging operators , where , is analytic on the unit disc [Delta], and F(a,b;c;z) is the classical hypergeometric function. In the present article the boundedness of , , on various function spaces such as Hardy, BMOA and a-Bloch spaces is proved. In the special case b=1+[alpha] and c=1, becomes the [alpha]-Cesaro operator , . Thus, our results connect the special functions in a natural way and extend and improve several well-known results of Hardy-Littlewood, Miao, Stempak and Xiao.

  11. Functional expression of smooth muscle-specific ion channels in TGF-β1-treated human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Park, Won Sun; Heo, Soon Chul; Jeon, Eun Su; Hong, Da Hye; Son, Youn Kyoung; Ko, Jae-Hong; Kim, Hyoung Kyu; Lee, Sun Young; Kim, Jae Ho

    2013-01-01

    Human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hASCs) have the power to differentiate into various cell types including chondrocytes, osteocytes, adipocytes, neurons, cardiomyocytes, and smooth muscle cells. We characterized the functional expression of ion channels after transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1)-induced differentiation of hASCs, providing insights into the differentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells. The treatment of hASCs with TGF-β1 dramatically increased the contraction of a collagen-gel lattice and the expression levels of specific genes for smooth muscle including α-smooth muscle actin, calponin, smooth mucle-myosin heavy chain, smoothelin-B, myocardin, and h-caldesmon. We observed Ca2+, big-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (BKCa), and voltage-dependent K+ (Kv) currents in TGF-β1-induced, differentiated hASCs and not in undifferentiated hASCs. The currents share the characteristics of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs). RT-PCR and Western blotting revealed that the L-type (Cav1.2) and T-type (Cav3.1, 3.2, and 3.3), known to be expressed in vascular SMCs, dramatically increased along with the Cavβ1 and Cavβ3 subtypes in TGF-β1-induced, differentiated hASCs. Although the expression-level changes of the β-subtype BKCa channels varied, the major α-subtype BKCa channel (KCa1.1) clearly increased in the TGF-β1-induced, differentiated hASCs. Most of the Kv subtypes, also known to be expressed in vascular SMCs, dramatically increased in the TGF-β1-induced, differentiated hASCs. Our results suggest that TGF-β1 induces the increased expression of vascular SMC-like ion channels and the differentiation of hASCs into contractile vascular SMCs. PMID:23761629

  12. Functional expression of smooth muscle-specific ion channels in TGF-β(1)-treated human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Won Sun; Heo, Soon Chul; Jeon, Eun Su; Hong, Da Hye; Son, Youn Kyoung; Ko, Jae-Hong; Kim, Hyoung Kyu; Lee, Sun Young; Kim, Jae Ho; Han, Jin

    2013-08-15

    Human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hASCs) have the power to differentiate into various cell types including chondrocytes, osteocytes, adipocytes, neurons, cardiomyocytes, and smooth muscle cells. We characterized the functional expression of ion channels after transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1)-induced differentiation of hASCs, providing insights into the differentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells. The treatment of hASCs with TGF-β1 dramatically increased the contraction of a collagen-gel lattice and the expression levels of specific genes for smooth muscle including α-smooth muscle actin, calponin, smooth mucle-myosin heavy chain, smoothelin-B, myocardin, and h-caldesmon. We observed Ca(2+), big-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (BKCa), and voltage-dependent K(+) (Kv) currents in TGF-β1-induced, differentiated hASCs and not in undifferentiated hASCs. The currents share the characteristics of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs). RT-PCR and Western blotting revealed that the L-type (Cav1.2) and T-type (Cav3.1, 3.2, and 3.3), known to be expressed in vascular SMCs, dramatically increased along with the Cavβ1 and Cavβ3 subtypes in TGF-β1-induced, differentiated hASCs. Although the expression-level changes of the β-subtype BKCa channels varied, the major α-subtype BKCa channel (KCa1.1) clearly increased in the TGF-β1-induced, differentiated hASCs. Most of the Kv subtypes, also known to be expressed in vascular SMCs, dramatically increased in the TGF-β1-induced, differentiated hASCs. Our results suggest that TGF-β1 induces the increased expression of vascular SMC-like ion channels and the differentiation of hASCs into contractile vascular SMCs.

  13. Physiological principles of vestibular function on earth and in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minor, L. B.

    1998-01-01

    Physiological mechanisms underlying vestibular function have important implications for our ability to understand, predict, and modify balance processes during and after spaceflight. The microgravity environment of space provides many unique opportunities for studying the effects of changes in gravitoinertial force on structure and function of the vestibular system. Investigations of basic vestibular physiology and of changes in reflexes occurring as a consequence of exposure to microgravity have important implications for diagnosis and treatment of vestibular disorders in human beings. This report reviews physiological principles underlying control of vestibular processes on earth and in space. Information is presented from a functional perspective with emphasis on signals arising from labyrinthine receptors. Changes induced by microgravity in linear acceleration detected by the vestibulo-ocular reflexes. Alterations of the functional requirements for postural control in space are described. Areas of direct correlation between studies of vestibular reflexes in microgravity and vestibular disorders in human beings are discussed.

  14. Physiological principles of vestibular function on earth and in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minor, L. B.

    1998-01-01

    Physiological mechanisms underlying vestibular function have important implications for our ability to understand, predict, and modify balance processes during and after spaceflight. The microgravity environment of space provides many unique opportunities for studying the effects of changes in gravitoinertial force on structure and function of the vestibular system. Investigations of basic vestibular physiology and of changes in reflexes occurring as a consequence of exposure to microgravity have important implications for diagnosis and treatment of vestibular disorders in human beings. This report reviews physiological principles underlying control of vestibular processes on earth and in space. Information is presented from a functional perspective with emphasis on signals arising from labyrinthine receptors. Changes induced by microgravity in linear acceleration detected by the vestibulo-ocular reflexes. Alterations of the functional requirements for postural control in space are described. Areas of direct correlation between studies of vestibular reflexes in microgravity and vestibular disorders in human beings are discussed.

  15. [Dorsal gliding and functional spaces of the metacarpophalangeal transition].

    PubMed

    Bade, H; Schubert, M; Koebke, J

    1994-09-01

    Although the relevance of capillary and gliding spaces of the back of the hand and the finger located dorsal to the extensor aponeurosis in the metacarpo-phalangeal region between the layers of the subdermal connective tissue is often emphasized clinically in inflammatory and acute traumatic occurrences, hardly any information has been published concerning the morphology of these spaces. By means of plastic-injection techniques, varying configurations of capillary spaces in the distal region of the dorsum manus of cadavers were found. The deep connective tissue spaces located dorsal to the extensor aponeurosis were shown to have proximal connections to the dorsal tendon sheaths of the carpus, whereas superficial gliding spaces tended to vary in their expanse depending on the subcutaneous and epifascial septa. The deep as well as the superficial capillary gliding spaces are adapted as mobilizing and limiting structures for the movements of the metacarpo-phalangeal joints and the various mechanical stresses of the skin of the back of the hand. A high degree of exactness in the reconstruction of the marginal elements of such functional spaces appears to be of special importance with regard to a total restoration of the functional capability of the metacarpo-phalangeal joint region.

  16. Re-Identification in the Function Space of Feature Warps.

    PubMed

    Martinel, Niki; Das, Abir; Micheloni, Christian; Roy-Chowdhury, Amit K

    2015-08-01

    Person re-identification in a non-overlapping multicamera scenario is an open challenge in computer vision because of the large changes in appearances caused by variations in viewing angle, lighting, background clutter, and occlusion over multiple cameras. As a result of these variations, features describing the same person get transformed between cameras. To model the transformation of features, the feature space is nonlinearly warped to get the "warp functions". The warp functions between two instances of the same target form the set of feasible warp functions while those between instances of different targets form the set of infeasible warp functions. In this work, we build upon the observation that feature transformations between cameras lie in a nonlinear function space of all possible feature transformations. The space consisting of all the feasible and infeasible warp functions is the warp function space (WFS). We propose to learn a discriminating surface separating these two sets of warp functions in the WFS and to re-identify persons by classifying a test warp function as feasible or infeasible. Towards this objective, a Random Forest (RF) classifier is employed which effectively chooses the warp function components according to their importance in separating the feasible and the infeasible warp functions in the WFS. Extensive experiments on five datasets are carried out to show the superior performance of the proposed approach over state-of-the-art person re-identification methods. We show that our approach outperforms all other methods when large illumination variations are considered. At the same time it has been shown that our method reaches the best average performance over multiple combinations of the datasets, thus, showing that our method is not designed only to address a specific challenge posed by a particular dataset.

  17. Spaces of Analytic Functions of Prescribed Growth Near the Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Napalkov, V. V.

    1988-04-01

    Let D be an arbitrary bounded convex domain in the plane \\mathbf C. For a certain sequence of convex functions \\varphi=\\{\\varphi_j\\}_{j=1}^\\infty, \\varphi_j(z)\\geqslant\\varphi_{j+1}(z), given on D the space H_\\varphi (D) is constructed as the projective limit of the normed spaces \\displaystyle H_j(D)=\\{f(z)\\in H(D):\\Vert f\\Vert _j=\\sup_D\\vert f(z)\\vert\\exp{(-\\varphi_j(z))}<\\infty\\},\\qquad j=1,2,\\dots, where H(D) is the space of analytic functions on D. The space H_\\varphi^*(D) is described in terms of Laplace transforms. A special role in this description is played by a generalization, proved in the article, of the Paley-Wiener theorem to the case of spaces of infinitely differentiable functions with prescribed growth near the boundary. The result is used in questions involving expansions of functions in Dirichlet series. Figures: 1. Bibliography: 17 titles.

  18. State estimation of a compound non-smooth sandwich system with backlash and dead zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zupeng; Tan, Yonghong; Xie, Yangqiu; Dong, Ruili

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a novel switching non-smooth observer is proposed to deal with the state estimation of compound non-smooth sandwich system with backlash and dead zone. Based on the characteristic of the system, two separate non-smooth state-space functions are constructed to describe the input-output relationships of backlash. Then, a Luenberger-type non-smooth observer is developed based on the two separate non-smooth state-space functions and the backlash and dead zone input output functions. The observer can switch among the different operating zones automatically in terms of the change of real operation conditions. The observability of the system has been analyzed and the convergence of the switching compound non-smooth observer has been verified. Finally motor servo hydraulic systems which can be represented as a compound non-smooth sandwich system have been studied as an application case. The comparisons between the proposed non-smooth scheme and the conventional method are illustrated. It is demonstrated that the proposed non-smooth approach can achieve much better performance in the aspects of state estimation accuracy and state estimation convergence speed than the conventional one.

  19. Smoothly deformed light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenholm, Stig

    1993-01-01

    A single mode cavity is deformed smoothly to change its electromagnetic eigenfrequency. The system is modeled as a simple harmonic oscillator with a varying period. The Wigner function of the problem is obtained exactly by starting with a squeezed initial state. The result is evaluated for a linear change of the cavity length. The approach to the adiabatic limit is investigated. The maximum squeezing is found to occur for smooth change lasting only a fraction of the oscillational period. However, only a factor of two improvement over the adiabatic result proves to be possible. The sudden limit cannot be investigated meaningfully within the model.

  20. Current opinions on the control and role of vascular smooth muscle cell adhesion, calcium sensitization, and the cytoskeleton in vascular structure and function.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Lemus, Luis A

    2014-04-01

    Vascular smooth muscle contraction and relaxation play a preponderant role on the active (acute) and structural (long-term) control of vascular diameter. This editorial overview summarizes and highlights the opinions expressed in seven reviews contained in this special topic issue of Microcirculation. The reviews address diverse aspects of the mechanisms that influence cell adhesion, calcium homeostasis, and cytoskeletal remodeling, and how these mechanisms affect vascular structure and function at different levels of the circulation. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Topological vector spaces of harmonic functions and the trace operator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sansò, F.; Venuti, G.

    2005-07-01

    Many problems in physical geodesy can be formulated in terms of boundary-value problems (BVPs) for the gravitational potential; many of them can be ultimately formulated as a Dirichlet problem. For this reason, there is a flourishing literature of geodetic contributions to potential theory. In this paper, the authors pick up some classical arguments from the mathematical analysis of BVPs and show, by using only Hilbert spaces of harmonic functions, how they can be systematically cast into a functional scheme clarifying the role of duality when dealing with the harmonic subspaces of classical Sobolev spaces, of any real order. The analysis is here restricted to the case of functions harmonic in spherical domains to make the results transparent and more readable by geodesists. A further step is then taken showing how to generalize the Dirichlet problem for the space of all the functions that are harmonic outside a sphere, which exploits the more general theory of Fréchet topological spaces. Basically, the result is that any functions harmonic in the exterior of a sphere can be uniquely identified by a suitably defined trace on the sphere. The paper concludes with comments and discussion of future work.

  2. Functional differences of Na+/Ca2+ exchanger expression in Ca2+ transport system of smooth muscle of guinea pig stomach.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Yasushi; Kinoshita, Hiroki; Saitou, Keiichirou; Homma, Ikuo; Nobe, Koji; Iwamoto, Takahiro

    2005-01-01

    The plasma membrane ATP-dependent Ca2+ pump and the Na+/Ca2+ exchanger (NCX) are the major means of Ca2+ extrusion in smooth muscle. However, little is known regarding distribution and function of the NCX in guinea pig gastric smooth muscle. The expression pattern and distribution of NCX isoforms suggest a role as a regulator of Ca2+ transport in cells. Na+ pump inhibition and the consequent to removal of K+ caused gradual contraction in fundus. In contrast, the response was significantly less in antrum. Western blotting analysis revealed that NCX1 and NCX2 are the predominant NCX isoforms expressed in stomach, the former was expressed strongly in antrum, whereas the latter displayed greater expression in fundus. Isolated plasma membrane fractions derived from gastric fundus smooth muscle were also investigated to clarify the relationship between NCX protein expression and function. Na+-dependent Ca2+ uptake increased directly with Ca2+ concentration. Ca2+ uptake in Na+-loaded vesicles was markedly elevated in comparison with K+-loaded vesicles. Additionally, Ca2+ uptake by the Na+- or K+-loaded vesicles was substantially higher in the presence of A23187 than in its absence. The result can be explained based on the assumption that Na+ gradients facilitate downhill movement of Ca2+. Na+-dependent Ca2+ uptake was abolished by the monovalent cationic ionophore, monensin. NaCl enhanced Ca2+ efflux from vesicles, and this efflux was significantly inhibited by gramicidin. Results documented evidence that NCX2 isoform functionally contributes to Ca2+ extrusion and maintenance of contraction-relaxation cycle in gastric fundus smooth muscle.

  3. Functional design specification for the problem data system. [space shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boatman, T. W.

    1975-01-01

    The purpose of the Functional Design Specification is to outline the design for the Problem Data System. The Problem Data System is a computer-based data management system designed to track the status of problems and corrective actions pertinent to space shuttle hardware.

  4. Approximation of functions and their conjugates in variable Lebesgue spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volosivets, S. S.

    2017-01-01

    One-sided Steklov means are used to introduce moduli of continuity of natural order in variable Lp(\\cdot)2π-spaces. A direct theorem of Jackson- Stechkin type and an inverse theorem of Salem-Stechkin type are given. Similar results are obtained for the conjugate functions. Bibliography: 24 titles.

  5. Hubble Space Telescope On-orbit Transfer Function Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vadlamudi, N.; Blair, M. A.; Clapp, B. R.

    1992-01-01

    The paper describes the On-orbit Transfer Function Test (TFT) designed for on-orbit vibration testing of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The TFT provides means for extracting accurate on-orbit characteristics of HST flexible body dynamics, making it possible to check periodically the state of the vehicle on-orbit and to assess changes in modal parameters.

  6. Friction force of smooth surfaces of SiO 2-SiO 2 as a function of residual pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deulin, E. A.; Gatsenko, A. A.; Loginov, B. A.

    1999-08-01

    Experiments were carried out to study aspects of the dry friction of 'smooth' surfaces of silicon monocrystal wafers covered with SiO 2 over a wide range of residual pressure from 10 5 to 10 -8 Pa. The experiments show that a plot of the dynamic friction coefficient, fd, versus residual pressure, P, for smooth surfaces is more complex than the same for 'traditional' surfaces and confirm the existence of four ranges of pressure with different behavior of fd in each: (1) surface tension, (2) quasi-viscous, (3) adhesive and (4) cohesive friction. The behavior of fd in the pressure range P=10 -2-10 -9 Pa ensures the basis of the criterion of the extremely high vacuum (EHV) formulation. The friction coefficient fd decreases with pressure in the ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) range P=10 -2-10 -7 Pa and increases in the pressure range P<10 -7 Pa (UHV).

  7. Relaxation of tracheal smooth muscle independent on functional epithelium cells induced by lidocaine, bupivacaine and isomers in rats.

    PubMed

    Lautner, Roberto Q; Zapata-Sudo, Gisele; Sudo, Roberto T

    2009-05-21

    Lidocaine is a local anesthetic which has been used to protect spasm reaction during tracheal intubation and bronchoscopy. We compared the potency of lidocaine, bupivacaine (RS(+/-)-bupivacaine) and isomers (S(-)-bupivacaine and R(+)-bupivacaine) to promote relaxation of tracheal smooth muscle. Relaxation of airways smooth muscle can be dependent on the release of relaxing factors by epithelium such as prostanoids and nitric oxide (NO). Possible mechanisms involved in the tracheal smooth muscle relaxation induced by these local anesthetics were evaluated in preparation in which the epithelium layer was intact or denuded. Bupivacaine and its isomers were approximately six to eleven-fold more potent than lidocaine to promote relaxation on acetylcholine-induced contraction in tracheal rings. The concentration of lidocaine, RS(+/-)-bupivacaine, S(-)-bupivacaine and R(+)-bupivacaine necessary to produce a 50% reduction of maximal contraction to acetylcholine (IC(50)) in tracheal rings with intact epithelium was 1.25+/-0.01, 0.11+/-0.01, 0.15+/-0.01, 0.19+/-0.01 mM, respectively. Removal of epithelium or exposure to N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, indomethacin did not alter the IC(50). However, calcium influx of depolarized tracheal smooth muscle was inhibited by lidocaine, bupivacaine and isomers. S(-)-bupivacaine reduced by 78.8+/-7.4% the calcium influx followed by RS(+/-)-bupivacaine (41.8+/-6.7%) and R(+)-bupivacaine (25.6+/-9.5%). In conclusion, local anesthetic action was stereoselective and partially dependent on blockade of Ca(2+) influx to muscular cells. The isomer S(-)-bupivacaine is more potent and less toxic which could represent a valuable clinical advantage to use as broncholitic agent.

  8. Constancy in Functional Space across a Species Richness Anomaly.

    PubMed

    Swenson, Nathan G; Weiser, Michael D; Mao, Lingfeng; Normand, Signe; Rodríguez, Miguel Ángel; Lin, Luxiang; Cao, Min; Svenning, Jens-Christian

    2016-04-01

    The relationship between large-scale gradients in species richness and functional diversity provides important information regarding the mechanisms driving patterns of biodiversity. A classic hypothesis in ecology is that strong interspecific interactions should result in an increase in the functional volume of assemblages as the species richness increases, whereas climatic constraints may result in no change in functional volume. Most research of this kind examines latitudinal gradients in species richness, but the results are likely confounded by underlying gradients in climate and phylogenetic composition. We take an alternative approach that examines functional richness across a tree species richness anomaly where species richness doubles from Europe to eastern North America. The results demonstrate that the functional richness on both continents saturates at a similar point as species richness increases and that the packing of functional space becomes tighter. Further, the species richness anomaly is driven primarily by genera unique to North America, but those genera contribute less than expected functional richness to the region, indicating a high level of redundancy with genera shared between the continents. Taken together, the results indicate that the species richness anomaly is associated with diversification within a climatically constrained trait space. More generally, the work demonstrates the power of utilizing species richness anomalies in biodiversity research, particularly when they are coupled with information regarding organismal function.

  9. Embedding smooth diffeomorphisms in flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiang

    In this paper we study the problem on embedding germs of smooth diffeomorphisms in flows in higher dimensional spaces. First we prove the existence of embedding vector fields for a local diffeomorphism with its nonlinear term a resonant polynomial. Then using this result and the normal form theory, we obtain a class of local C diffeomorphisms for k∈N∪{∞,ω} which admit embedding vector fields with some smoothness. Finally we prove that for any k∈N∪{∞} under the coefficient topology the subset of local C diffeomorphisms having an embedding vector field with some smoothness is dense in the set of all local C diffeomorphisms.

  10. Cova functions for unevenly and noncorrespondingly spaced processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzfeld, Ute Christina

    A cova function is a representation of coherency of two time series, which is defined for unevenly and noncorrespondingly spaced series akin to the cross-variogram of geostatistics. Whereas cross-variogram calculation implicitly assumes that data are sampled at the same points in both processes, the cova functions introduced here are defined also for unevenly and noncorrespondingly spaced data processes. Residual cova functions are valid for nonstationary time series. In the program COVA, a FORTRAN 77-code is given for time series. As a demonstration, COVA is applied to simulated processes and thereafter used to compare climatological data with marine-geochemical data in order to investigate common variational patterns underlying the observations through time.

  11. Changes of phasic and tonic smooth muscle function of jejunum in type 2 diabetic Goto-Kakizaki rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jing-Bo; Chen, Peng-Min; Gregersen, Hans

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To generate phasic and tonic stress-strain curves for evaluation of intestinal smooth muscle function in type 2 diabetic rats during active and passive conditions. METHODS: Seven diabetic Goto-Kakizaki (GK) male rats, 32-wk old (GK group), and 9 age-matched normal Wistar rats (Normal group) were included in the study. Jejunal segments were distended up to a pressure of 10 cm H2O in an organ bath containing 37 °C Krebs solution with addition of carbachol (CA). The pressure and outer diameter changes were synchronously recorded. Passive conditions were obtained using calcium-free Krebs solution containing ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid and papaverine. Total phasic, tonic and passive circumferential stress and strain were computed from the diameter and pressure data with reference to the zero-stress state geometry. The active phasic and tonic stresses were defined as the total phasic and tonic stresses minus the passive stress. RESULTS: Diabetes increased jejunal mucosa and muscle layer thicknesses compared to the Normal group (mucosa, 755.8 ± 63.3 vs 633.1 ± 59.1 μm, P < 0.01; muscle, 106.3 ± 12.9 vs 85.2 ± 11.7 μm, P < 0.05). The pressure and stress thresholds were decreased in the GK group after CA application compared to distensions without CA application (pressure, 1.01 ± 0.07 vs 1.99 ± 0.19 cmH2O, P < 0.01; stress, 0.11 ± 0.01 vs 0.24 ± 0.02 kPa, P < 0.01). CA application did not change the pressure and stress threshold in the Normal group (pressure, 2.13 ± 0.32 vs 2.34 ± 0.32 cm H2O, P > 0.05; stress, 0.25 ± 0.03 vs 0.35 ± 0.06 kPa, P > 0.05). The amplitude of total phasic, total tonic, active phasic and active tonic circumferential stresses did not differ for the distensions without CA application between the GK group and the Normal group. However, the total phasic and total tonic stresses increased after CA application in the GK group compared those in the Normal group. When normalized to muscle layer thickness, the amplitude of active

  12. History of fluid balance and kidney function in space.

    PubMed

    Drummer, Christian; Cirillo, Massimo; De Santo, Natale G

    2004-01-01

    During the last four decades, about 400 people have been in Space, since Yuri Gagarin was sent in 1961 as the first human into Earth orbit. From the very beginning, the circulatory system of astronauts (meaning heart, vascular system, body fluid distribution and balance, and the kidney) was central to the medical concerns of Space physiologists and physicians because of its gravity-dependence. The present manuscript puts emphasize on some key scientists who worked in the field of body fluid regulation and kidney function in the USA, in Russia and in Europe during recent decades. The manuscript in particular summarizes the outcome of this research and describes the present understanding of how the body fluid regulatory system adapts to the extreme environment of Space.

  13. [BEHAVIOURAL AND FUNCTIONAL VESTIBULAR DISTURBANCES AFTER SPACE FLIGHT. 1. MAMMALS].

    PubMed

    Lychakov, D V

    2015-01-01

    The review contains data on functional changes in mammals caused by changes in the operation of vestibular system after space flight. These data show that the vestibular system of mammals responds to weightlessness challenge differently at various ontogenetic stages. Orbital space flight conditions have a weak effect on the developing vestibular system during embryonic period. The weightlessness conditions have rather beneficial effect on development of the fetuses. During the early postnatal period, when optimal sensory-motor tactics are created, the prolonged stay under conditions of space flight leads to development of novel, "extraterrestrial" sensory-motor programs that can be fixed in CNS, apparently, for the whole life. In adult individuals after landing essential vestibular changes and disturbances may occur that depend on the spaceflight duration. The adult organism must simultaneously solve two contradicting problems--it should adapt to weightlessness conditions, and should not adapt to them to pass the process of readaptation after returning easier. Thus, individuals must protect themselves against weightlessness influence to keep the intact initial state of health. The protection methods against weightlessness ought to be adjusted according to the duration of space flight. It should be mentioned that not all functional changes registered in adult individuals after landing can be adequately explained. Some of these changes may have chronic or even pathological character. The question of necessity to examine the influence of weightlessness on an aging (senile) organism and on its vestibular system is raised for the first time in this review. In our opinion the development of space gerontology, as a special branch of space biology and medicine, is of undoubted interest, and in the future it may be of practical importance especially taking into account the steadily growing age of cosmonauts (astronauts).

  14. Abstracting Attribute Space for Transfer Function Exploration and Design.

    PubMed

    Maciejewski, Ross; Jang, Yun; Woo, Insoo; Jänicke, Heike; Gaither, Kelly P; Ebert, David S

    2013-01-01

    Currently, user centered transfer function design begins with the user interacting with a one or two-dimensional histogram of the volumetric attribute space. The attribute space is visualized as a function of the number of voxels, allowing the user to explore the data in terms of the attribute size/magnitude. However, such visualizations provide the user with no information on the relationship between various attribute spaces (e.g., density, temperature, pressure, x, y, z) within the multivariate data. In this work, we propose a modification to the attribute space visualization in which the user is no longer presented with the magnitude of the attribute; instead, the user is presented with an information metric detailing the relationship between attributes of the multivariate volumetric data. In this way, the user can guide their exploration based on the relationship between the attribute magnitude and user selected attribute information as opposed to being constrained by only visualizing the magnitude of the attribute. We refer to this modification to the traditional histogram widget as an abstract attribute space representation. Our system utilizes common one and two-dimensional histogram widgets where the bins of the abstract attribute space now correspond to an attribute relationship in terms of the mean, standard deviation, entropy, or skewness. In this manner, we exploit the relationships and correlations present in the underlying data with respect to the dimension(s) under examination. These relationships are often times key to insight and allow us to guide attribute discovery as opposed to automatic extraction schemes which try to calculate and extract distinct attributes a priori. In this way, our system aids in the knowledge discovery of the interaction of properties within volumetric data.

  15. Determinantal Point Processes Associated with Hilbert Spaces of Holomorphic Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bufetov, Alexander I.; Qiu, Yanqi

    2017-04-01

    We study determinantal point processes on C induced by the reproducing kernels of generalized Fock spaces as well as those on the unit disc D induced by the reproducing kernels of generalized Bergman spaces. In the first case, we show that all reduced Palm measures of the same order are equivalent. The Radon-Nikodym derivatives are computed explicitly using regularized multiplicative functionals. We also show that these determinantal point processes are rigid in the sense of Ghosh and Peres, hence reduced Palm measures of different orders are singular. In the second case, we show that all reduced Palm measures, of all orders, are equivalent. The Radon-Nikodym derivatives are computed using regularized multiplicative functionals associated with certain Blaschke products. The quasi-invariance of these determinantal point processes under the group of diffeomorphisms with compact supports follows as a corollary.

  16. Continuous Slice Functional Calculus in Quaternionic Hilbert Spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghiloni, Riccardo; Moretti, Valter; Perotti, Alessandro

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this work is to define a continuous functional calculus in quaternionic Hilbert spaces, starting from basic issues regarding the notion of spherical spectrum of a normal operator. As properties of the spherical spectrum suggest, the class of continuous functions to consider in this setting is the one of slice quaternionic functions. Slice functions generalize the concept of slice regular function, which comprises power series with quaternionic coefficients on one side and that can be seen as an effective generalization to quaternions of holomorphic functions of one complex variable. The notion of slice function allows to introduce suitable classes of real, complex and quaternionic C*-algebras and to define, on each of these C*-algebras, a functional calculus for quaternionic normal operators. In particular, we establish several versions of the spectral map theorem. Some of the results are proved also for unbounded operators. However, the mentioned continuous functional calculi are defined only for bounded normal operators. Some comments on the physical significance of our work are included.

  17. Green's functions in layered poroelastic half-spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, E.

    1999-11-01

    In this paper, the complete Green's functions in a multilayered, isotropic, and poroelastic half-space are presented. It is the first time that all the common point sources, i.e. the total force, fluid force, fluid dilatation, and dislocation, are considered for a layered system. The Laplace transform is applied first to suppress the time variable. The cylindrical and Cartesian systems of vector functions and the propagator matrix method are then employed to derive the Green's functions. In the treatment of a point dislocation, an equivalent body-source concept is introduced, and the difference of a dislocation in a purely elastic and a poroelastic medium is discussed. While the spatial integrals involved in the Green's functions can be evaluated accurately by an adaptive Gauss quadrature with continued fraction expansions, the inverse Laplace transform can be carried out by applying a common numerical inversion technique. These complete Green's functions can be implemented into a suitable boundary element formulation to study the deformation and fracture problems in a layered poroelastic half-space.

  18. Exploring Heart and Lung Function in Space: ARMS Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuipers, Andre; Cork, Michael; LeGouic, Marine

    2002-01-01

    The Advanced Respiratory Monitoring System (ARMS) is a suite of monitoring instruments and supplies used to study the heart, lungs, and metabolism. Many experiments sponsored by the European Space Agency (ESA) will be conducted using ARMS during STS-107. The near-weightless environment of space causes the body to undergo many physiological adaptations, and the regulation of blood pressure is no exception. Astronauts also experience a decrease in blood volume as an adaptation to microgravity. Reduced blood volume may not provide enough blood pressure to the head during entry or landing. As a result, astronauts often experience light-headedness, and sometimes even fainting, when they stand shortly after returning to Earth. To help regulate blood pressure and heart rate, baroreceptors, sensors located in artery walls in the neck and near the heart, control blood pressure by sending information to the brain and ensuring blood flow to organs. These mechanisms work properly in Earth's gravity but must adapt in the microgravity environment of space. However, upon return to Earth during entry and landing, the cardiovascular system must readjust itself to gravity, which can cause fluctuation in the control of blood pressure and heart rate. Although the system recovers in hours or days, these occurrences are not easily predicted or understood - a puzzle investigators will study with the ARMS equipment. In space, researchers can focus on aspects of the cardiovascular system normally masked by gravity. The STS-107 experiments using ARMS will provide data on how the heart and lungs function in space, as well as how the nervous system controls them. Exercise will also be combined with breath holding and straining (the Valsalva maneuver) to test how heart rate and blood pressure react to different stresses. This understanding will improve astronauts' cardiopulmonary function after return to Earth, and may well help Earthbound patients who experience similar effects after long

  19. Cognitive Functioning in Space Exploration Missions: A Human Requirement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fiedler, Edan; Woolford, Barbara

    2005-01-01

    Solving cognitive issues in the exploration missions will require implementing results from both Human Behavior and Performance, and Space Human Factors Engineering. Operational and research cognitive requirements need to reflect a coordinated management approach with appropriate oversight and guidance from NASA headquarters. First, this paper will discuss one proposed management method that would combine the resources of Space Medicine and Space Human Factors Engineering at JSC, other NASA agencies, the National Space Biomedical Research Institute, Wyle Labs, and other academic or industrial partners. The proposed management is based on a Human Centered Design that advocates full acceptance of the human as a system equal to other systems. Like other systems, the human is a system with many subsystems, each of which has strengths and limitations. Second, this paper will suggest ways to inform exploration policy about what is needed for optimal cognitive functioning of the astronaut crew, as well as requirements to ensure necessary assessment and intervention strategies for the human system if human limitations are reached. Assessment strategies will include clinical evaluation and fitness-to-perform evaluations. Clinical intervention tools and procedures will be available to the astronaut and space flight physician. Cognitive performance will be supported through systematic function allocation, task design, training, and scheduling. Human factors requirements and guidelines will lead to well-designed information displays and retrieval systems that reduce crew time and errors. Means of capturing process, design, and operational requirements to ensure crew performance will be discussed. Third, this paper will describe the current plan of action, and future challenges to be resolved before a lunar or Mars expedition. The presentation will include a proposed management plan for research, involvement of various organizations, and a timetable of deliverables.

  20. Cognitive Functioning in Space Exploration Missions: A Human Requirement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fiedler, Edan; Woolford, Barbara

    2005-01-01

    Solving cognitive issues in the exploration missions will require implementing results from both Human Behavior and Performance, and Space Human Factors Engineering. Operational and research cognitive requirements need to reflect a coordinated management approach with appropriate oversight and guidance from NASA headquarters. First, this paper will discuss one proposed management method that would combine the resources of Space Medicine and Space Human Factors Engineering at JSC, other NASA agencies, the National Space Biomedical Research Institute, Wyle Labs, and other academic or industrial partners. The proposed management is based on a Human Centered Design that advocates full acceptance of the human as a system equal to other systems. Like other systems, the human is a system with many subsystems, each of which has strengths and limitations. Second, this paper will suggest ways to inform exploration policy about what is needed for optimal cognitive functioning of the astronaut crew, as well as requirements to ensure necessary assessment and intervention strategies for the human system if human limitations are reached. Assessment strategies will include clinical evaluation and fitness-to-perform evaluations. Clinical intervention tools and procedures will be available to the astronaut and space flight physician. Cognitive performance will be supported through systematic function allocation, task design, training, and scheduling. Human factors requirements and guidelines will lead to well-designed information displays and retrieval systems that reduce crew time and errors. Means of capturing process, design, and operational requirements to ensure crew performance will be discussed. Third, this paper will describe the current plan of action, and future challenges to be resolved before a lunar or Mars expedition. The presentation will include a proposed management plan for research, involvement of various organizations, and a timetable of deliverables.

  1. Functional Itô versus Banach space stochastic calculus and strict solutions of semilinear path-dependent equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosso, Andrea; Russo, Francesco

    2016-11-01

    Functional Itô calculus was introduced in order to expand a functional F(t,Xṡ+t,Xt) depending on time t, past and present values of the process X. Another possibility to expand F(t,Xṡ+t,Xt) consists in considering the path Xṡ+t = {Xx+t,x ∈ [-T, 0]} as an element of the Banach space of continuous functions on C([-T, 0]) and to use Banach space stochastic calculus. The aim of this paper is threefold. (1) To reformulate functional Itô calculus, separating time and past, making use of the regularization procedures which match more naturally the notion of horizontal derivative which is one of the tools of that calculus. (2) To exploit this reformulation in order to discuss the (not obvious) relation between the functional and the Banach space approaches. (3) To study existence and uniqueness of smooth solutions to path-dependent partial differential equations which naturally arise in the study of functional Itô calculus. More precisely, we study a path-dependent equation of Kolmogorov type which is related to the window process of the solution to an Itô stochastic differential equation with path-dependent coefficients. We also study a semilinear version of that equation.

  2. Functional connectivity analysis in EEG source space: The choice of method

    PubMed Central

    Knyazeva, Maria G.

    2017-01-01

    Functional connectivity (FC) is among the most informative features derived from EEG. However, the most straightforward sensor-space analysis of FC is unreliable owing to volume conductance effects. An alternative—source-space analysis of FC—is optimal for high- and mid-density EEG (hdEEG, mdEEG); however, it is questionable for widely used low-density EEG (ldEEG) because of inadequate surface sampling. Here, using simulations, we investigate the performance of the two source FC methods, the inverse-based source FC (ISFC) and the cortical partial coherence (CPC). To examine the effects of localization errors of the inverse method on the FC estimation, we simulated an oscillatory source with varying locations and SNRs. To compare the FC estimations by the two methods, we simulated two synchronized sources with varying between-source distance and SNR. The simulations were implemented for hdEEG, mdEEG, and ldEEG. We showed that the performance of both methods deteriorates for deep sources owing to their inaccurate localization and smoothing. The accuracy of both methods improves with the increasing between-source distance. The best ISFC performance was achieved using hd/mdEEG, while the best CPC performance was observed with ldEEG. In conclusion, with hdEEG, ISFC outperforms CPC and therefore should be the preferred method. In the studies based on ldEEG, the CPC is a method of choice. PMID:28727750

  3. Estimation of sparse null space functions for compressed sensing in SPECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Joyeeta Mitra; Sidky, Emil; King, Michael A.

    2014-03-01

    Compressed sensing (CS) [1] is a novel sensing (acquisition) paradigm that applies to discrete-to-discrete system models and asserts exact recovery of a sparse signal from far fewer measurements than the number of unknowns [1- 2]. Successful applications of CS may be found in MRI [3, 4] and optical imaging [5]. Sparse reconstruction methods exploiting CS principles have been investigated for CT [6-8] to reduce radiation dose, and to gain imaging speed and image quality in optical imaging [9]. In this work the objective is to investigate the applicability of compressed sensing principles for a faster brain imaging protocol on a hybrid collimator SPECT system. As a proofof- principle we study the null space of the fan-beam collimator component of our system with regards to a particular imaging object. We illustrate the impact of object sparsity on the null space using pixel and Haar wavelet basis functions to represent a piecewise smooth phantom chosen as our object of interest.

  4. Characterizing the space of interatomic distance distribution functions consistent with solution scattering data.

    PubMed

    Kavathekar, Paritosh A; Craig, Bruce A; Friedman, Alan M; Bailey-Kellogg, Chris; Balkcom, Devin J

    2010-04-01

    Scattering of neutrons and X-rays from molecules in solution offers alternative approaches to the study of a wide range of macromolecular structures in their solution state without crystallization. We study one part of the problem of elucidating three-dimensional structure from solution scattering data, determining the distribution of interatomic distances, P(r), where r is the distance between two atoms in the protein molecule. This problem is known to be ill-conditioned: for a single observed diffraction pattern, there may be many consistent distance distribution functions, and there is a risk of overfitting the observed scattering data. We propose a new approach to avoiding this problem: accepting the validity of multiple alternative P(r) curves rather than seeking a single "best." We place linear constraints to ensure that a computed P(r) is consistent with the experimental data. The constraints enforce smoothness in the P(r) curve, ensure that the P(r) curve is a probability distribution, and allow for experimental error. We use these constraints to precisely describe the space of all consistent P(r) curves as a polytope of histogram values or Fourier coefficients. We develop a linear programming approach to sampling the space of consistent, realistic P(r) curves. On both experimental and simulated scattering data, our approach efficiently generates ensembles of such curves that display substantial diversity.

  5. Space-time ambiguity functions for electronically scanned ISR applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swoboda, John; Semeter, Joshua; Erickson, Philip

    2015-05-01

    Electronically steerable array (ESA) technology has recently been applied to incoherent scatter radar (ISR) systems. These arrays allow for pulse-to-pulse steering of the antenna beam to collect data in a three-dimensional region. This is in direct contrast to dish-based antennas, where ISR acquisition is limited at any one time to observations in a two-dimensional slice. This new paradigm allows for more flexibility in the measurement of ionospheric plasma parameters. Multiple ESA-based ISR systems operate currently in the high-latitude region where the ionosphere is highly variable in both space and time. Because of the highly dynamic nature of the ionosphere in this region, it is important to differentiate between measurement-induced artifacts and the true behavior of the plasma. Often, three-dimensional ISR data produced by ESA systems are fitted in a spherical coordinate space and then the parameters are interpolated to a Cartesian grid, potentially introducing error and impacting the reconstructions of the plasma parameters. To take advantage of the new flexibility inherent in ESA systems, we present a new way of analyzing ISR observations through use of the space-time ambiguity function. The use of this new measurement ambiguity function allows us to pose the ISR observational problem in terms of a linear inverse problem whose goal is the estimate of the time domain lags of the intrinsic plasma autocorrelation function used for parameter fitting. The framework allows us to explore the impact of nonuniformity in plasma parameters in both time and space. We discuss examples of possible artifacts in high-latitude situations and discuss possible ways of reducing them and improving the quality of data products from electronically steerable ISRs.

  6. Control of functional differential equations to target sets in function space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Kent, G. A.

    1971-01-01

    Optimal control of systems governed by functional differential equations of retarded and neutral type is considered. Problems with function space initial and terminal manifolds are investigated. Existence of optimal controls, regularity, and bang-bang properties are discussed. Necessary and sufficient conditions are derived, and several solved examples which illustrate the theory are presented.

  7. Differential responsiveness to contractile agents of isolated smooth muscle cells from human colons as a function of age and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Boyer, J C; Guitton, C; Pignodel, C; Cuq, P; Moussu, P; Pouderoux, P; Christen, M O; Balmes, J L; Bali, J P

    1997-11-01

    To study the involvement of age and inflammation in motor colonic activity in man, contractile responses to CCK, carbachol, and KCl of isolated colonic smooth muscle cells (SMC) from normal and inflamed human colons were evaluated; the incidence of sex and smoking on contraction was also analyzed. Contractile responses to the three agonists were significantly lower in tissues with a low degree of inflammation than in tissues with high level of inflammation or normal tissues. This reduction in cell responsiveness appears to be nonspecific and nonreceptor mediated. A positive correlation of the contractile responses to the three stimulants with the age of patients was observed. In contrast, no association was found between sex, smoking, and cell contraction. In conclusion, contractions of SMC due to CCK, carbachol, and KCl were significantly modified during life; inflammation of the colon led to a loss of SMC responsiveness.

  8. Study of the function of sarcoplasmic reticulum of vascular smooth muscle during activation due to depolarization-induced calcium influx

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, K.S.

    1987-01-01

    The role of sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) in vascular smooth muscle was evaluated with respect to regulation of myoplasmic Ca{sup 2+} during the Ca{sup 2+} entry induced by depolarization. Calcium agonist, Bay K8644, stimulated Ca{sup 2+} influx as well as tension in physiological salt solution, (PSS) in contrast to the priming effects due to the depolarization originally reported. Disparity, however, was found between the Ca{sup 2+} entered and tension developed. Correlation between the tension and {sup 45}Ca influx showed a typical threshold phenomenon; the basal Ca{sup 2+} influx can be raised to a certain level (25%) without tension induction, after which a minor increase in Ca{sup 2+} influx produced significant tension. This subthreshold Ca{sup 2+} influx was found accumulated in the caffeine-sensitive Ca stores, the SR. This confirmed the dependency of tension on the rate of Ca{sup 2+} entry demonstrated by a previous report.

  9. Endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cell function on poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) with nano-structured surface features.

    PubMed

    Miller, Derick C; Thapa, Anil; Haberstroh, Karen M; Webster, Thomas J

    2004-01-01

    Biomaterials that successfully integrate into surrounding tissue should match not only the tissue's mechanical properties, but also its topography. The cellular response to a biomaterial may be enhanced in synthetic polymer formulations by mimicking the surface roughness created by the associated nano-structured extra-cellular matrix components of natural tissue. As a first step towards this endeavor, the goal of the present in vitro study was to use these design parameters to develop a synthetic, nano-structured, polymeric biomaterial that promotes cell adhesion and growth for vascular applications. In a novel manner, poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) (50/50wt% mix) was synthesized to possess a range (from micron to nanometer) of surface features. Reduction of surface features was accomplished by treating conventional PLGA with various concentrations of NaOH for select periods of time. Results from cell experiments indicated that, compared to conventional PLGA, NaOH treated PLGA enhanced vascular smooth muscle cell adhesion and proliferation. However, PLGA prepared by soaking in NaOH decreased endothelial cell adhesion and proliferation compared to conventional PLGA. After further investigation, this finding was determined to be a result of chemical (and not topographical) changes during polymer synthesis. Surface chemistry effects were removed while retaining nano-structured topography by using polymer/elastomer casting methods. Results demonstrated that endothelial and smooth muscle cell densities increased on nano-structured cast PLGA. For these reasons, the present in vitro study provided the first evidence that nano-structured surface features can significantly improve vascular cell densities; such design criteria can be used in the synthesis of the next-generation of more successful tissue-engineered vascular grafts.

  10. Effects of Space Flight on Neutrophil Functions in Astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaur, Indreshpal; Valadez, Victoria A.; Simons, Elizabeth R.; Pierson, Duane L.

    2000-01-01

    Neutrophil phagocytosis, oxidative burst, degranulation, and the expression of selected surface markers were studied in 25 astronauts following 4 space shuttle missions. Space flight duration ranged from 5 to 11 days. Blood specimens were obtained 10 days before launch, immediately after landing, and again at 3 days after landing. The number of neutrophils increased at landing by 85%. Phagocytosis of Escherichia coli (E. coli) and oxidative burst following the medium length (9 to 11 days) missions were lower than the control mean values. Whereas, following the short-duration (5 days) mission, these functions were unchanged from control values. No consistent changes in degranulation were observed following either short or medium length space missions. The expression of CD16, CD32, CD11a, CD11b, CD11c, L-selectin and CD36 were measured and found to be variable. Specifically, CD16 and CD32 did not correlate with the changes in oxidative burst. Mission duration appears to be a factor in phagocytic and oxidative functions.

  11. Improving smoothing efficiency of rigid conformal polishing tool using time-dependent smoothing evaluation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Chi; Zhang, Xuejun; Zhang, Xin; Hu, Haifei; Zeng, Xuefeng

    2017-06-01

    A rigid conformal (RC) lap can smooth mid-spatial-frequency (MSF) errors, which are naturally smaller than the tool size, while still removing large-scale errors in a short time. However, the RC-lap smoothing efficiency performance is poorer than expected, and existing smoothing models cannot explicitly specify the methods to improve this efficiency. We presented an explicit time-dependent smoothing evaluation model that contained specific smoothing parameters directly derived from the parametric smoothing model and the Preston equation. Based on the time-dependent model, we proposed a strategy to improve the RC-lap smoothing efficiency, which incorporated the theoretical model, tool optimization, and efficiency limit determination. Two sets of smoothing experiments were performed to demonstrate the smoothing efficiency achieved using the time-dependent smoothing model. A high, theory-like tool influence function and a limiting tool speed of 300 RPM were o

  12. Improving smoothing efficiency of rigid conformal polishing tool using time-dependent smoothing evaluation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Chi; Zhang, Xuejun; Zhang, Xin; Hu, Haifei; Zeng, Xuefeng

    2017-01-01

    A rigid conformal (RC) lap can smooth mid-spatial-frequency (MSF) errors, which are naturally smaller than the tool size, while still removing large-scale errors in a short time. However, the RC-lap smoothing efficiency performance is poorer than expected, and existing smoothing models cannot explicitly specify the methods to improve this efficiency. We presented an explicit time-dependent smoothing evaluation model that contained specific smoothing parameters directly derived from the parametric smoothing model and the Preston equation. Based on the time-dependent model, we proposed a strategy to improve the RC-lap smoothing efficiency, which incorporated the theoretical model, tool optimization, and efficiency limit determination. Two sets of smoothing experiments were performed to demonstrate the smoothing efficiency achieved using the time-dependent smoothing model. A high, theory-like tool influence function and a limiting tool speed of 300 RPM were o

  13. Functional Expression of γ–Amino Butyric Acid Transporter 2 in Human and Guinea Pig Airway Epithelium and Smooth Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Zaidi, Sarah; Gallos, George; Yim, Peter D.; Xu, Dingbang; Sonett, Joshua R.; Panettieri, Reynold A.; Gerthoffer, William; Emala, Charles W.

    2011-01-01

    γ−Amino butyric acid (GABA) is a primary inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, and is classically released by fusion of synaptic vesicles with the plasma membrane or by egress via GABA transporters (GATs). Recently, a GABAergic system comprised of GABAA and GABAB receptors has been identified on airway epithelial and smooth muscle cells that regulate mucus secretion and contractile tone of airway smooth muscle (ASM). In addition, the enzyme that synthesizes GABA, glutamic acid decarboxylase, has been identified in airway epithelial cells; however, the mechanism(s) by which this synthesized GABA is released from epithelial intracellular stores is unknown. We questioned whether any of the four known isoforms of GATs are functionally expressed in ASM or epithelial cells. We detected mRNA and protein expression of GAT2 and -4, and isoforms of glutamic acid decarboxylase in native and cultured human ASM and epithelial cells. In contrast, mRNA encoding vesicular GAT (VGAT), the neuronal GABA transporter, was not detected. Functional inhibition of 3H-GABA uptake was demonstrated using GAT2 and GAT4/betaine–GABA transporter 1 (BGT1) inhibitors in both human ASM and epithelial cells. These results demonstrate that two isoforms of GATs, but not VGAT, are expressed in both airway epithelial and smooth muscle cells. They also provide a mechanism by which locally synthesized GABA can be released from these cells into the airway to activate GABAA channels and GABAB receptors, with subsequent autocrine and/or paracrine signaling effects on airway epithelium and ASM. PMID:21057105

  14. ESTIMATION OF THE SPACE SHUTTLE ROLLOUT FORCING FUNCTION

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, George H., III; Carne, Thomas; Elliott, Kenny; Wilson, Bruce

    2005-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Vehicle is assembled in the Vertical Assembly Building (VAB) at Kennedy Space Flight Center in Florida. The Vehicle is stacked on a Mobile Launch Platform (MLP) that weighs eight million pounds. A Crawler Transporter (CT) then carries the MLP and the stacked vehicle (12 million pounds total weight) to the launch complex located 5 miles away. This operation is performed at 0.9 mph resulting in a 4.5-hour transport. A recent test was performed to monitor the dynamic environment that was produced during rollout. It was found that the rollout is a harmonic-rich dynamic environment that was previously not understood. This paper will describe work that has been performed to estimate the forcing function that is produced in the transportation process. The rollout analysis team has determined that there are two families of harmonics of the drive train, which excite the system as a function of CT speed. There are also excitation sources, which are random or narrow-band in frequency and are not a function of CT speed. This presentation will discuss the application of the Sum of Weighted Accelerations Technique (SWAT) to further refine this understanding by estimating the forces and moments at the center-of-mass.

  15. Gallic acid tailoring surface functionalities of plasma-polymerized allylamine-coated 316L SS to selectively direct vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cell fate for enhanced endothelialization.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhilu; Xiong, Kaiqin; Qi, Pengkai; Yang, Ying; Tu, Qiufen; Wang, Jin; Huang, Nan

    2014-02-26

    The creation of a platform for enhanced vascular endothelia cell (VEC) growth while suppressing vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation offers possibility for advanced coatings of vascular stents. Gallic acid (GA), a chemically unique phenolic acid with important biological functions, presents benefits to the cardiovascular disease therapy because of its superior antioxidant effect and a selectivity to support the growth of ECs more than SMCs. In this study, GA was explored to tailor such a multifunctional stent surface combined with plasma polymerization technique. On the basis of the chemical coupling reaction, GA was bound to an amine-group-rich plasma-polymerized allylamine (PPAam) coating. The GA-functionalized PPAam (GA-PPAam) surface created a favorable microenvironment to obtain high ECs and SMCs selectivity. The GA-PPAam coating showed remarkable enhancement in the adhesion, viability, proliferation, migration, and release of nitric oxide (NO) of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). The GA-PPAam coating also resulted in remarkable inhibition effect on human umbilical artery smooth muscle cell (HUASMC) adhesion and proliferation. These striking findings may provide a guide for designing the new generation of multifunctional vascular devices.

  16. Differential Regulation of NOTCH2 and NOTCH3 Contribute to Their Unique Functions in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Baeten, Jeremy T.; Lilly, Brenda

    2015-01-01

    Notch signaling is a key regulator of vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) phenotypes, including differentiation, proliferation, and cell survival. However, the exact contribution of the individual Notch receptors has not been thoroughly delineated. In this study, we identify unique roles for NOTCH2 and NOTCH3 in regulating proliferation and cell survival in cultured VSMCs. Our results indicate that NOTCH2 inhibits PDGF-B-dependent proliferation and its expression is decreased by PDGF-B. In contrast, NOTCH3 promotes proliferation and receptor expression is increased by PDGF-B. Additionally, data show that NOTCH3, but not NOTCH2 protects VSMCs from apoptosis and apoptosis mediators degrade NOTCH3 protein. We identified three pro-survival genes specifically regulated by NOTCH3 in cultured VSMCs and in mouse aortas. This regulation is mediated through MAP kinase signaling, which we demonstrate can be activated by NOTCH3, but not NOTCH2. Overall, this study highlights discrete roles for NOTCH2 and NOTCH3 in VSMCs and connects these roles to specific upstream regulators that control their expression. PMID:25957400

  17. Automatic control: the vertebral column of dogfish sharks behaves as a continuously variable transmission with smoothly shifting functions.

    PubMed

    Porter, Marianne E; Ewoldt, Randy H; Long, John H

    2016-09-15

    During swimming in dogfish sharks, Squalus acanthias, both the intervertebral joints and the vertebral centra undergo significant strain. To investigate this system, unique among vertebrates, we cyclically bent isolated segments of 10 vertebrae and nine joints. For the first time in the biomechanics of fish vertebral columns, we simultaneously characterized non-linear elasticity and viscosity throughout the bending oscillation, extending recently proposed techniques for large-amplitude oscillatory shear (LAOS) characterization to large-amplitude oscillatory bending (LAOB). The vertebral column segments behave as non-linear viscoelastic springs. Elastic properties dominate for all frequencies and curvatures tested, increasing as either variable increases. Non-linearities within a bending cycle are most in evidence at the highest frequency, 2.0 Hz, and curvature, 5 m(-1) Viscous bending properties are greatest at low frequencies and high curvatures, with non-linear effects occurring at all frequencies and curvatures. The range of mechanical behaviors includes that of springs and brakes, with smooth transitions between them that allow for continuously variable power transmission by the vertebral column to assist in the mechanics of undulatory propulsion.

  18. Space Station Human Factors Research Review. Volume 3: Space Station Habitability and Function: Architectural Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Marc M. (Editor); Eichold, Alice (Editor); Heers, Susan (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    Articles are presented on a space station architectural elements model study, space station group activities habitability module study, full-scale architectural simulation techniques for space stations, and social factors in space station interiors.

  19. Super Resolved Harmonic Structure Function for Space Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dikeman, R.; Stanko, E.; Reagan, J.

    Lockheed Martin Hawaii presents the application of the combination of two novel signal processing algorithm for non-resolved object characterization. We introduce the Super Resolved Harmonic Structure Function (SR-HSF) and demonstrate its utility in providing "fingerprints" for space based objects. The work presented here is making a major impact in the Missile Defense Agency's Project Hercules group but the results presented here are shown in an unclassified form. First, the SR-HSF algorithm is detailed. The SR-HSF is shown to pull out key space situational awareness fingerprints from a minimal set of observations. Next, the mathematical definition of the SR-HSF is detailed. SR-HSF is shown to be both optimal, and also applicable in the real-time sense. Then, applications to both simulations and unclassified data collected at AMOS of space based bodies are used for analysis. The SR-HSF is then used to analyze these fidelity simulations. It is shown that the SR-HSF is capable of "tagging" an object with a minimal set of observations - a previously impossible result. This analysis yield important considerations for sensor developers, SSA systems, and operators.

  20. Wigner function in Liouville space: A canonical formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royer, Antoine

    1991-01-01

    The Wigner-Weyl (WW) phase-space formulation of quantum mechanics is discussed within the Liouville-space formalism, where quantum operators A^ are viewed as vectors, represented by L kets ||A^>>, on which act ``superoperators'' the scalar product is <>=TrA^°B^. With every operator A^, we associate commutation and anticommutation superoperators A^- and A^+, defined by their actions on any operator B^ as A^-B^=ħ-1[A^,B^], A^+B^=1/2(AB^+BÂ^). The WW representation corresponds to the choice of a special basis in Liouville space, namely, the eigenbasis of the position and momentum anticommutation superoperators q^+ and p^+ (where [q^,p^]=iħ). These, together with the commutation superoperators q^- and p^-, form a canonical set of superoperators, [q^+,p^-]=[q^-,p^+]=i (the other commutators vanishing), as functions of which all other super- operators can be expressed. Weyl ordering is expressed as f(q^,p^)Weyl ordering=f(q^+,p^+)1^. A generalization of Ehrenfest's theorem is obtained.

  1. Null-space function estimation for the interior problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Gengsheng L.; Gullberg, Grant T.

    2012-04-01

    In single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), projection data can be truncated when the camera's field of view is smaller than the object to be imaged. Using truncated projections to reconstruct a region of interest (ROI) is a reality we must face if small detectors are used. The truncated data result in an underdetermined system of imaging equations, which may lead to non-unique solutions. Data sampling and photon attenuation may also affect the solution uniqueness and stability. The uniqueness of the solutions in the ROI can be investigated by studying the null-space functions in the ROI. This paper uses an iterative algorithm to estimate the null-space image, to determine the sampling conditions under which a stable ROI reconstruction is possible with truncated data and to investigate whether attenuation can influence the ROI reconstruction bias. This iterative algorithm is validated by the singular value decomposition method. We show that if the ROI is sufficiently sampled, the null-space image is close to zero inside the ROI, and any almost-zero offset is insignificant in SPECT, because the noise is a much more dominating degradation factor.

  2. Smooth Transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    22 February 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a transition from one of the many layered troughs in the north polar region of Mars to the relatively homogeneous-looking upper surface of the polar cap. The difference in brightness across this scene is a function of several factors, one of which is the amount of dust versus that of ice in any given location. The bright material that dominates the scene is largely water ice.

    Location near: 83.2oN, 297.8oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower right Season: Northern Summer

  3. Exploring Connectivity in Sequence Space of Functional RNA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wei, Chenyu; Pohorille, Andrzej; Popovic, Milena; Ditzler, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Emergence of replicable genetic molecules was one of the marking points in the origin of life, evolution of which can be conceptualized as a walk through the space of all possible sequences. A theoretical concept of fitness landscape helps to understand evolutionary processes through assigning a value of fitness to each genotype. Then, evolution of a phenotype is viewed as a series of consecutive, single-point mutations. Natural selection biases evolution toward peaks of high fitness and away from valleys of low fitness. whereas neutral drift occurs in the sequence space without direction as mutations are introduced at random. Large networks of neutral or near-neutral mutations on a fitness landscape, especially for sufficiently long genomes, are possible or even inevitable. Their detection in experiments, however, has been elusive. Although a few near-neutral evolutionary pathways have been found, recent experimental evidence indicates landscapes consist of largely isolated islands. The generality of these results, however, is not clear, as the genome length or the fraction of functional molecules in the genotypic space might have been insufficient for the emergence of large, neutral networks. Thorough investigation on the structure of the fitness landscape is essential to understand the mechanisms of evolution of early genomes. RNA molecules are commonly assumed to play the pivotal role in the origin of genetic systems. They are widely believed to be early, if not the earliest, genetic and catalytic molecules, with abundant biochemical activities as aptamers and ribozymes, i.e. RNA molecules capable, respectively, to bind small molecules or catalyze chemical reactions. Here, we present results of our recent studies on the structure of the sequence space of RNA ligase ribozymes selected through in vitro evolution. Several hundred thousands of sequences active to a different degree were obtained by way of deep sequencing. Analysis of these sequences revealed

  4. microRNAs Distinctively Regulate Vascular Smooth Muscle and Endothelial Cells: Functional Implications in Angiogenesis, Atherosclerosis, and In-Stent Restenosis

    PubMed Central

    Santulli, Gaetano

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial cells (EC) and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) are the main cell types within the vasculature. We describe here how microRNAs (miRs)—noncoding RNAs that can regulate gene expression via translational repression and/or post-transcriptional degradation—distinctively modulate EC and VSMC function in physiology and disease. In particular, the specific roles of miR-126 and miR-143/145, master regulators of EC and VSMC function, respectively, are deeply explored. We also describe the mechanistic role of miRs in the regulation of the pathophysiology of key cardiovascular processes including angiogenesis, atherosclerosis, and in-stent restenosis post-angioplasty. Drawbacks of currently available therapeutic options are discussed, pointing at the challenges and potential clinical opportunities provided by miR-based treatments. PMID:26662986

  5. The Necessity of Functional Analysis for Space Exploration Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, A. Terry; Breidenthal, Julian C.

    2011-01-01

    As NASA moves toward expanded commercial spaceflight within its human exploration capability, there is increased emphasis on how to allocate responsibilities between government and commercial organizations to achieve coordinated program objectives. The practice of program-level functional analysis offers an opportunity for improved understanding of collaborative functions among heterogeneous partners. Functional analysis is contrasted with the physical analysis more commonly done at the program level, and is shown to provide theoretical performance, risk, and safety advantages beneficial to a government-commercial partnership. Performance advantages include faster convergence to acceptable system solutions; discovery of superior solutions with higher commonality, greater simplicity and greater parallelism by substituting functional for physical redundancy to achieve robustness and safety goals; and greater organizational cohesion around program objectives. Risk advantages include avoidance of rework by revelation of some kinds of architectural and contractual mismatches before systems are specified, designed, constructed, or integrated; avoidance of cost and schedule growth by more complete and precise specifications of cost and schedule estimates; and higher likelihood of successful integration on the first try. Safety advantages include effective delineation of must-work and must-not-work functions for integrated hazard analysis, the ability to formally demonstrate completeness of safety analyses, and provably correct logic for certification of flight readiness. The key mechanism for realizing these benefits is the development of an inter-functional architecture at the program level, which reveals relationships between top-level system requirements that would otherwise be invisible using only a physical architecture. This paper describes the advantages and pitfalls of functional analysis as a means of coordinating the actions of large heterogeneous organizations

  6. The Necessity of Functional Analysis for Space Exploration Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, A. Terry; Breidenthal, Julian C.

    2011-01-01

    As NASA moves toward expanded commercial spaceflight within its human exploration capability, there is increased emphasis on how to allocate responsibilities between government and commercial organizations to achieve coordinated program objectives. The practice of program-level functional analysis offers an opportunity for improved understanding of collaborative functions among heterogeneous partners. Functional analysis is contrasted with the physical analysis more commonly done at the program level, and is shown to provide theoretical performance, risk, and safety advantages beneficial to a government-commercial partnership. Performance advantages include faster convergence to acceptable system solutions; discovery of superior solutions with higher commonality, greater simplicity and greater parallelism by substituting functional for physical redundancy to achieve robustness and safety goals; and greater organizational cohesion around program objectives. Risk advantages include avoidance of rework by revelation of some kinds of architectural and contractual mismatches before systems are specified, designed, constructed, or integrated; avoidance of cost and schedule growth by more complete and precise specifications of cost and schedule estimates; and higher likelihood of successful integration on the first try. Safety advantages include effective delineation of must-work and must-not-work functions for integrated hazard analysis, the ability to formally demonstrate completeness of safety analyses, and provably correct logic for certification of flight readiness. The key mechanism for realizing these benefits is the development of an inter-functional architecture at the program level, which reveals relationships between top-level system requirements that would otherwise be invisible using only a physical architecture. This paper describes the advantages and pitfalls of functional analysis as a means of coordinating the actions of large heterogeneous organizations

  7. Generalised partition functions: inferences on phase space distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treumann, Rudolf A.; Baumjohann, Wolfgang

    2016-06-01

    It is demonstrated that the statistical mechanical partition function can be used to construct various different forms of phase space distributions. This indicates that its structure is not restricted to the Gibbs-Boltzmann factor prescription which is based on counting statistics. With the widely used replacement of the Boltzmann factor by a generalised Lorentzian (also known as the q-deformed exponential function, where κ = 1/|q - 1|, with κ, q ∈ R) both the kappa-Bose and kappa-Fermi partition functions are obtained in quite a straightforward way, from which the conventional Bose and Fermi distributions follow for κ → ∞. For κ ≠ ∞ these are subject to the restrictions that they can be used only at temperatures far from zero. They thus, as shown earlier, have little value for quantum physics. This is reasonable, because physical κ systems imply strong correlations which are absent at zero temperature where apart from stochastics all dynamical interactions are frozen. In the classical large temperature limit one obtains physically reasonable κ distributions which depend on energy respectively momentum as well as on chemical potential. Looking for other functional dependencies, we examine Bessel functions whether they can be used for obtaining valid distributions. Again and for the same reason, no Fermi and Bose distributions exist in the low temperature limit. However, a classical Bessel-Boltzmann distribution can be constructed which is a Bessel-modified Lorentzian distribution. Whether it makes any physical sense remains an open question. This is not investigated here. The choice of Bessel functions is motivated solely by their convergence properties and not by reference to any physical demands. This result suggests that the Gibbs-Boltzmann partition function is fundamental not only to Gibbs-Boltzmann but also to a large class of generalised Lorentzian distributions as well as to the corresponding nonextensive statistical mechanics.

  8. A Functional Role for Nicotinic Acid Adenine Dinucleotide Phosphate in Oxytocin-Mediated Contraction of Uterine Smooth Muscle from Rat

    PubMed Central

    Aley, Parvinder K.; Noh, Hyun J.; Gao, Xin; Tica, Andrei A.; Brailoiu, Eugen

    2010-01-01

    Conventionally, G protein-coupled receptors are thought to increase calcium via inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3). More recent evidence shows that an alternative second messenger, nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP), also has a role to play, causing researchers to question established calcium releasing pathways. With the recent development, by our group, of cell-permeant NAADP (NAADP-aceteoxymethyl ester) and a selective NAADP receptor antagonist (Ned-19; 1-(3-((4-(2-fluorophenyl)piperazin-1-yl)methyl)-4-methoxyphenyl)-2,3,4,9-tetrahydro-1H-pyrido[3,4-b]indole-3-carboxylic acid),the ability to investigate this signaling pathway has improved. Therefore, we investigated a role for NAADP in oxytocin-mediated responses in the rat uterus. Oxytocin- and NAADP-mediated effects were investigated by using contractile measurements of whole uterine strips from rat in organ baths. Responses were correlated to calcium release in cultured rat uterine smooth muscle cells measured by fluorescence microscopy. Inhibition of both oxytocin-induced contraction and calcium release by the traditional NAADP-signaling disrupter bafilomycin and the NAADP receptor antagonist Ned-19 clearly demonstrated a role for NAADP in oxytocin-induced signaling. A cell-permeant form of NAADP was able to produce both uterine contractions and calcium release. This response was unaffected by depletion of sarcoplasmic reticulum stores with thapsigargin, but was abolished by both bafilomycin and Ned-19. Crucially, oxytocin stimulated an increase in NAADP in rat uterine tissue. The present study demonstrates directly that NAADP signaling plays a role in rat uterine contractions. Moreover, investigation of this signaling pathway highlights yet another component of oxytocin-mediated signaling, stressing the need to consider the action of new components as they are discovered, even in signaling pathways that are thought to be well established. PMID:20304938

  9. Broadband strong motion simulation in layered half-space using stochastic Green's function technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hisada, Y.

    2008-04-01

    The stochastic Green’s function method, which simulates one component of the far-field S-waves from an extended fault plane at high frequencies (Kamae et al., J Struct Constr Eng Trans AIJ, 430:1 9, 1991), is extended to simulate the three components of the full waveform in layered half-spaces for broadband frequency range. The method firstly computes ground motions from small earthquakes, which correspond to the ruptures of sub-faults on a fault plane of a large earthquake, and secondly constructs the strong motions of the large earthquake by superposing the small ground motions using the empirical Green’s function technique (e.g., Irikura, Proc 7th Japan Earthq Eng Symp, 151 156, 1986). The broadband stochastic omega-square model is proposed as the moment rate functions of the small earthquakes, in which random and zero phases are used at higher and lower frequencies, respectively. The zero phases are introduced to simulate a smooth ramp function of the moment function with the duration of 1/fc s (fc: the corner frequency) and to reproduce coherent strong motions at low frequencies (i.e., the directivity pulse). As for the radiation coefficients, the theoretical values of double couple sources for lower frequencies and the theoretical isotropic values for the P-, SV-, and SH-waves (Onishi and Horike, J Struct Constr Eng Trans AIJ, 586:37 44, 2004) for high frequencies are used. The proposed method uses the theoretical Green’s functions of layered half-spaces instead of the far-field S-waves, which reproduce the complete waves including the direct and reflected P- and S-waves and surface waves at broadband frequencies. Finally, the proposed method is applied to the 1994 Northridge earthquake, and results show excellent agreement with the observation records at broadband frequencies. At the same time, the method still needs improvements especially because it underestimates the high-frequency vertical components in the near fault range. Nonetheless, the method

  10. Trajectory fitting in function space with application to analytic modeling of surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barger, Raymond L.

    1992-01-01

    A theory for representing a parameter-dependent function as a function trajectory is described. Additionally, a theory for determining a piecewise analytic fit to the trajectory is described. An example is given that illustrates the application of the theory to generating a smooth surface through a discrete set of input cross-section shapes. A simple procedure for smoothing in the parameter direction is discussed, and a computed example is given. Application of the theory to aerodynamic surface modeling is demonstrated by applying it to a blended wing-fuselage surface.

  11. Interaction of human smooth muscle cells with nanofibrous scaffolds: Effect of fiber orientation on cell adhesion, proliferation, and functional gene expression.

    PubMed

    Kuppan, Purushothaman; Sethuraman, Swaminathan; Krishnan, Uma Maheswari

    2015-07-01

    Poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL) and PCL-gelatin random and aligned nanofibers with diameters in the range of 200-400 nm were developed through electrospinning. Mechanical properties of aligned PCL and PCL-gelatin nanofibers were compared, and it was found that aligned PCL nanofibers showed significantly higher tensile strength and Young's modulus than the PCL-gelatin nanofiber system (p < 0.05). The in vitro degradation of aligned nanofibers showed that PCL-gelatin nanofibers degrade faster than aligned PCL nanofibers. Further, human smooth muscle cells were cultured on the random and aligned PCL-gelatin nanofibers and evaluated for adhesion, orientation, morphology, viability, proliferation and gene expression. Our results demonstrate that PCL-gelatin promotes higher cell adhesion and proliferation than the PCL nanofibers after 3, 7, and 10 days of culture. Aligned topography favored orientation of the cells along their directions and cell stretching was better in aligned nanofibers than the random nanofibers. The upregulation of α-actin, myosin heavy chain, collagen type I, and elastin genes demonstrate good cell-matrix interactions in both random and aligned scaffolds. Therefore, the present study concludes that aligned PCL-gelatin nanofibers could serve as potential scaffolding for culture of smooth muscle cells and may promote functional regeneration of tubular organs. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Heat-killed and γ-irradiated Brucella strain RB51 stimulates enhanced dendritic cell activation, but not function compared with the virulent smooth strain 2308.

    PubMed

    Surendran, Naveen; Hiltbold, Elizabeth M; Heid, Bettina; Sriranganathan, Nammalwar; Boyle, Stephen M; Zimmerman, Kurt L; Witonsky, Sharon G

    2010-11-01

    Brucella spp. are Gram-negative, facultative intracellular bacterial pathogens that cause abortion in livestock and undulant fever in humans worldwide. Brucella abortus strain 2308 is a pathogenic strain that affects cattle and humans. Currently, there are no efficacious human vaccines available. However, B. abortus strain RB51, which is approved by the USDA, is a live-attenuated rough vaccine against bovine brucellosis. Live strain RB51 induces protection via CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell-mediated immunity. To generate an optimal T-cell response, strong innate immune responses by dendritic cells (DCs) are crucial. Because of safety concerns, the use of live vaccine strain RB51 in humans is limited. Therefore, in this study, we analyzed the differential ability of the same doses of live, heat-killed (HK) and γ-irradiated (IR) strain RB51 in inducing DC activation and function. Smooth strain 2308, live strain RB51 and lipopolysaccharide were used as controls. Studies using mouse bone marrow-derived DCs revealed that, irrespective of viability, strain RB51 induced greater DC activation than smooth strain 2308. Live strain RB51 induced significantly (P≤0.05) higher DC maturation than HK and IR strains, and only live strain RB51-infected DCs (at multiplicity of infection 1:100) induced significant (P≤0.05) tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-12 secretion.

  13. Development of a Refined Space Vehicle Rollout Forcing Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, George; Tucker, Jon-Michael; Valle, Gerard; Grady, Robert; Schliesing, John; Fahling, James; Emory, Benjamin; Armand, Sasan

    2016-01-01

    For several decades, American manned spaceflight vehicles and the associated launch platforms have been transported from final assembly to the launch pad via a pre-launch phase called rollout. The rollout environment is rich with forced harmonics and higher order effects can be used for extracting structural dynamics information. To enable this utilization, processing tools are needed to move from measured and analytical data to dynamic metrics such as transfer functions, mode shapes, modal frequencies, and damping. This paper covers the range of systems and tests that are available to estimate rollout forcing functions for the Space Launch System (SLS). The specific information covered in this paper includes: the different definitions of rollout forcing functions; the operational and developmental data sets that are available; the suite of analytical processes that are currently in-place or in-development; and the plans and future work underway to solve two immediate problems related to rollout forcing functions. Problem 1 involves estimating enforced accelerations to drive finite element models for developing design requirements for the SLS class of launch vehicles. Problem 2 involves processing rollout measured data in near real time to understand structural dynamics properties of a specific vehicle and the class to which it belongs.

  14. Stress functions and stress-function spaces for 3-dimensional elastostatics and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minagawa, Sitiro

    The investigation on the geometrical theory of stress functions was initiated by Schaefer [1]. The author re-examined his theory, attempting to establish the theory of stress-function spaces and its applications. The investigations were performed as a part of Kazuo Kondo's non-Riemannian plasticity theory [2]. The aim of this paper is to report some of the results of those investigations.

  15. Revisiting noninteracting string partition functions in Rindler space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertens, Thomas G.; Verschelde, Henri; Zakharov, Valentin I.

    2016-05-01

    We revisit noninteracting string partition functions in Rindler space by summing over fields in the spectrum. In field theory, the total partition function splits in a natural way into a piece that does not contain surface terms and a piece consisting of solely the so-called edge states. For open strings, we illustrate that surface contributions to the higher-spin fields correspond to open strings piercing the Rindler origin, unifying the higher-spin surface contributions in string language. For closed strings, we demonstrate that the string partition function is not quite the same as the sum over the partition functions of the fields in the spectrum: an infinite overcounting is present for the latter. Next we study the partition functions obtained by excluding the surface terms. Using recent results of He et al. [J. High Energy Phys. 05 (2015) 106], this construction, first done by Emparan [arXiv:hep-th/9412003], can be put on much firmer ground. We generalize to type II and heterotic superstrings and demonstrate modular invariance. All of these exhibit an IR divergence that can be interpreted as a maximal acceleration close to the black hole horizon. Ultimately, since these partition functions are only part of the full story, divergences here should not be viewed as a failure of string theory: maximal acceleration is a feature of a faulty treatment of the higher-spin fields in the string spectrum. We comment on the relevance of this to Solodukhin's recent proposal [Phys. Rev. D 91, 084028 (2015)]. A possible link with the firewall paradox is apparent.

  16. Connected Functional Working Spaces: A Framework for the Teaching and Learning of Functions at Upper Secondary Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minh, Tran Kiem; Lagrange, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-01-01

    This paper aims at contributing to remedy the narrow treatment of functions at upper secondary level. Assuming that students make sense of functions by working on functional situations in distinctive settings, we propose to consider functional working spaces inspired by geometrical working spaces. We analyse a classroom situation based on a…

  17. Connected Functional Working Spaces: A Framework for the Teaching and Learning of Functions at Upper Secondary Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minh, Tran Kiem; Lagrange, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-01-01

    This paper aims at contributing to remedy the narrow treatment of functions at upper secondary level. Assuming that students make sense of functions by working on functional situations in distinctive settings, we propose to consider functional working spaces inspired by geometrical working spaces. We analyse a classroom situation based on a…

  18. Locally-Based Kernal PLS Smoothing to Non-Parametric Regression Curve Fitting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosipal, Roman; Trejo, Leonard J.; Wheeler, Kevin; Korsmeyer, David (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We present a novel smoothing approach to non-parametric regression curve fitting. This is based on kernel partial least squares (PLS) regression in reproducing kernel Hilbert space. It is our concern to apply the methodology for smoothing experimental data where some level of knowledge about the approximate shape, local inhomogeneities or points where the desired function changes its curvature is known a priori or can be derived based on the observed noisy data. We propose locally-based kernel PLS regression that extends the previous kernel PLS methodology by incorporating this knowledge. We compare our approach with existing smoothing splines, hybrid adaptive splines and wavelet shrinkage techniques on two generated data sets.

  19. Effect of prolonged space flight on cardiac function and dimensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, W. L.; Epstein, S. E.; Griffith, J. M.; Goldstein, R. E.; Redwood, D. R.

    1974-01-01

    Echocardiographic studies were performed preflight 5 days before launch and on recovery day and 1, 2, 4, 11, 31 and 68 days postflight. From these echocardiograms measurements were made. From these primary measurements, left ventricular end-diastolic volume, end-systolic volume, stroke volume, and mass were derived using the accepted assumptions. Findings in the Scientist Pilot and Pilot resemble those seen in trained distance runners. Wall thickness measurements were normal in all three crewmembers preflight. Postflight basal studies were unchanged in the Commander on recovery day through 68 days postflight in both the Scientist Pilot and Pilot, however, the left ventricular end-diastolic volume, stroke volume, and mass were decreased slightly. Left ventricular function curves were constructed for the Commander and Pilot by plotting stroke volume versus end-diastolic volume. In both astronauts, preflight and postflight data fell on the same straight line demonstrating that no deterioration in cardiac function had occurred. These data indicate that the cardiovascular system adapts well to prolonged weightlessness and suggest that alterations in cardiac dimensions and function are unlikely to limit man's future in space.

  20. Smooth Phase Interpolated Keying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borah, Deva K.

    2007-01-01

    Smooth phase interpolated keying (SPIK) is an improved method of computing smooth phase-modulation waveforms for radio communication systems that convey digital information. SPIK is applicable to a variety of phase-shift-keying (PSK) modulation schemes, including quaternary PSK (QPSK), octonary PSK (8PSK), and 16PSK. In comparison with a related prior method, SPIK offers advantages of better performance and less complexity of implementation. In a PSK scheme, the underlying information waveform that one seeks to convey consists of discrete rectangular steps, but the spectral width of such a waveform is excessive for practical radio communication. Therefore, the problem is to smooth the step phase waveform in such a manner as to maintain power and bandwidth efficiency without incurring an unacceptably large error rate and without introducing undesired variations in the amplitude of the affected radio signal. Although the ideal constellation of PSK phasor points does not cause amplitude variations, filtering of the modulation waveform (in which, typically, a rectangular pulse is converted to a square-root raised cosine pulse) causes amplitude fluctuations. If a power-efficient nonlinear amplifier is used in the radio communication system, the fluctuating-amplitude signal can undergo significant spectral regrowth, thus compromising the bandwidth efficiency of the system. In the related prior method, one seeks to solve the problem in a procedure that comprises two major steps: phase-value generation and phase interpolation. SPIK follows the two-step approach of the related prior method, but the details of the steps are different. In the phase-value-generation step, the phase values of symbols in the PSK constellation are determined by a phase function that is said to be maximally smooth and that is chosen to minimize the spectral spread of the modulated signal. In this step, the constellation is divided into two groups by assigning, to information symbols, phase values

  1. Improving the Performance of the Space Surveillance Telescope as a Function of Seeing Parameter

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-26

    IMPROVING THE PERFORMANCE OF THE SPACE SURVEILLANCE TELESCOPE AS A FUNCTION OF SEEING PARAMETER...States. AFIT-ENG-MS-15-M-050 IMPROVING THE PERFORMANCE OF THE SPACE SURVEILLANCE TELESCOPE AS A FUNCTION OF SEEING PARAMETER THESIS...AFIT-ENG-MS-15-M-050 IMPROVING THE PERFORMANCE OF THE SPACE SURVEILLANCE TELESCOPE AS A FUNCTION OF SEEING PARAMETER Jae H

  2. Fluid and Electrolyte Balance and Kidney Function Research in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norsk, P.; Juel, N.; Kramer, H. J.; de Santo, N. G.; Regnard, J.; Heer, M.

    2005-06-01

    Fluid and electrolyte regulation in humans is modulated by gravitational stress through a complex interaction of cardiovascular reflexes, neuroendocrine variables, physical factors and renal function.Weightlessness is a unique tool to obtain more information on integrated fluid volume control. Results from space, however, have been unexpected and unpredictable from the results of ground- based simulations.The concept of how weightlesness and gravity modulate the regulation of body fluids and associated blood components must therefore be revised and a new simulation model developed. There are several main questions to be asked. Does weightlessness induce diuresis and natriuresis during the initial hours of spaceflight, leading to an extracellular and intravascular fluid volume deficit? Why are fluid- and sodium-retaining systems activated by spaceflight, and why are the renal responses to saline and water stimuli attenuated? Can excess sodium be stored in an hitherto unknown way, in particular during spaceflight? How can the effects of weightlessness on fluid and electrolyte regulation be correctly simulated on the ground? The information obtained from space might help us to understand how gravity degrades the fluid and electrolyte balance in sodium-retaining and oedema- forming states, such as in heart failure.

  3. Aerosol transfer of bladder urothelial and smooth muscle cells onto demucosalized colonic segments for bladder augmentation: in vivo, long term, and functional pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Hidas, Guy; Lee, Hak J.; Bahoric, Andrej; Kelly, Maryellen S.; Watts, Blake; Liu, Zhongbo; Saharti, Samah; Lusch, Achim; Alamsahebpour, Alireza; Kerbl, David; Truong, Hung; Zi, Xiaolin; Khoury, Antoine E.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Bladder augmentation technique has changed over the years and the current practice has significant adverse health effects and long-term sequelae. Previously, we reported a novel cell transfer technology for covering demucosalized colonic segments with bladder urothelium and smooth muscle cells through an aerosol spraying of these cells and a fibrin glue mixture. Objective To determine the long-term durability and functional characteristics of demucosalized segments of colon repopulated with urothelial cells in the bladder of swine for use in augmentation cystoplasty. Study design Nine swine were divided into three groups. The first group (control) underwent standard colocystoplasty; the second group underwent colocystoplasty with colonic demucosalization and aerosol application of fibrin glue and urothelial cell mixture; in the third group detrusor cells were added to the mixture described in group two. The animals were kept for 6 months. Absorptive and secretory function was assessed. Bladders were harvested for histological and immunohistochemical evaluation. Results All animals but one in the experimental groups showed confluent urothelial coverage of the colonic segment in the bladder without any evidence of fibrosis, inflammation, or regrowth of colonic epithelial cells. Ten percent of the instilled water in the bladder was absorbed within an hour in the control group, but none in experimental groups(p=0.02). The total urine sediment and protein contents were higher in the control group compared with experimental groups (p<0.05). Discussion Both study groups developed a uniform urothelial lining. Histologically, the group with smooth muscle had an added layer of submucosal smooth muscle. Six months after bladder augmentation the new lining was durable. We were also able to demonstrate that the reconstituted augmented segments secrete and absorb significantly less than the control colocystoplasty group. We used a non-validated simple method

  4. Totally semi-continuous and semi totally-continuous functions in double fuzzy topological spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmood Mohammed, Fatimah; Md Noorani, Mohd Salmi; Salleh, Abdul Razak

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to introduce new classes of functions called totally-continuous functions and its variants totally semi-continuous functions and semi totally-continuous functions in double fuzzy topological spaces. Their characterizations, examples and relationship with other notions of continuous functions in this space are provided.

  5. Efficacy and Safety of Immuno‐Magnetically Sorted Smooth Muscle Progenitor Cells Derived from Human‐Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells for Restoring Urethral Sphincter Function

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanhui; Green, Morgaine; Wei, Yi; Wani, Prachi; Wang, Zhe; Reijo Pera, Renee; Chen, Bertha

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Human‐induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs)‐based cell therapy holds promise for treating stress urinary incontinence (SUI). However, safety concerns, especially tumorgenic potential of residual undifferentiated cells in hiPSC derivatives, are major barriers for its clinical translation. An efficient, fast and clinical‐scale strategy for purifying committed cells is also required. Our previous studies demonstrated the regenerative effects of hiPSC‐derived smooth muscle progenitor cells (pSMCs) on the injured urethral sphincter in SUI, but the differentiation protocol required fluorescence‐activated cell sorting (FACS) which is not practical for autologous clinical applications. In this study, we examined the efficacy and safety of hiPSC‐derived pSMC populations sorted by FDA‐approved magnetic‐activated cell sorting (MACS) using cell‐surface marker CD34 for restoring urethral sphincter function. Although the heterogeneity of MACS‐sorted pSMCs was higher than that of FACS‐sorted pSMCs, the percentage of undifferentiated cells dramatically decreased after directed differentiation in vitro. In vivo studies demonstrated long‐term cell integration and no tumor formation of MACS‐sorted pSMCs after transplantation. Furthermore, transplantation of MACS‐sorted pSMCs into immunodeficient SUI rats was comparable to transplantation with FACS‐sorted pSMCs for restoration of the extracellular matrix metabolism and function of the urethral sphincter. In summary, purification of hiPSC derivatives using MACS sorting for CD34 expression represent an efficient approach for production of clinical‐scale pSMCs for autologous stem cell therapy for regeneration of smooth muscle tissues. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017;6:1158–1167 PMID:28213970

  6. Efficacy and Safety of Immuno-Magnetically Sorted Smooth Muscle Progenitor Cells Derived from Human-Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells for Restoring Urethral Sphincter Function.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanhui; Green, Morgaine; Wen, Yan; Wei, Yi; Wani, Prachi; Wang, Zhe; Reijo Pera, Renee; Chen, Bertha

    2017-04-01

    Human-induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs)-based cell therapy holds promise for treating stress urinary incontinence (SUI). However, safety concerns, especially tumorgenic potential of residual undifferentiated cells in hiPSC derivatives, are major barriers for its clinical translation. An efficient, fast and clinical-scale strategy for purifying committed cells is also required. Our previous studies demonstrated the regenerative effects of hiPSC-derived smooth muscle progenitor cells (pSMCs) on the injured urethral sphincter in SUI, but the differentiation protocol required fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) which is not practical for autologous clinical applications. In this study, we examined the efficacy and safety of hiPSC-derived pSMC populations sorted by FDA-approved magnetic-activated cell sorting (MACS) using cell-surface marker CD34 for restoring urethral sphincter function. Although the heterogeneity of MACS-sorted pSMCs was higher than that of FACS-sorted pSMCs, the percentage of undifferentiated cells dramatically decreased after directed differentiation in vitro. In vivo studies demonstrated long-term cell integration and no tumor formation of MACS-sorted pSMCs after transplantation. Furthermore, transplantation of MACS-sorted pSMCs into immunodeficient SUI rats was comparable to transplantation with FACS-sorted pSMCs for restoration of the extracellular matrix metabolism and function of the urethral sphincter. In summary, purification of hiPSC derivatives using MACS sorting for CD34 expression represent an efficient approach for production of clinical-scale pSMCs for autologous stem cell therapy for regeneration of smooth muscle tissues. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017;6:1158-1167.

  7. Smooth Ground on Rosetta Destination Comet

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-11-11

    A patch of relatively smooth ground on the nucleus surface of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko appears in this image taken by the navigation camera on the European Space Agency Rosetta spacecraft in October 2014.

  8. Functional and Proteomic Investigations Reveal Major Royal Jelly Protein 1 Associated with Anti-hypertension Activity in Mouse Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Pei; Han, Bin; Feng, Mao; Fang, Yu; Zhang, Lan; Hu, Han; Hao, Yue; Qi, Yuping; Zhang, Xiaozhen; Li, Jianke

    2016-01-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) are a major cell type of the arterial wall and their functionality is associated with blood pressure regulation. Although royal jelly (RJ) has reported effects on anti-hypertension, the mechanism of blood pressure regulation by major royal jelly protein 1 (MRJP1), the most abundant RJ protein, is still unknown. The mrjp1 gene was inserted into mouse VSMCs to investigate how MRJP1 influences VSMC functionality by functional and proteomic analysis. The expression of MRJP1 in VSMCs significantly reduced cell contraction, migration, and proliferation, suggesting a potential role in decreasing hypertension via action on VSMCs. These anti-hypertension activities were further observed in the changes of the proteome setting of mouse VSMCs. Among 675 different proteins after MRJP1 expression, 646 were down-regulated and significantly enriched in pathways implicated in VSMC contraction and migration, which suggest MRJP1 lowers VSMC contraction and migration by inhibiting muscle filament movement. The down-regulated proteins also enriched pathways in proliferation, indicating that MRJP1 hinders VSMC proliferation by reducing the supply of energy and genetic material. This is the first report integrating MRJP1 into VSMC, revealing the function and mechanism correlated with anti-hypertensive activity. This offers a therapeutic potential to control hypertension by gene-therapy using bee-products. PMID:27444336

  9. PAF-receptor is preferentially expressed in a distinct synthetic phenotype of smooth muscle cells cloned from human internal thoracic artery: Functional implications in cell migration

    SciTech Connect

    Stengel, Dominique; O'Neil, Caroline; Brocheriou, Isabelle; Karabina, Sonia-Athina; Durand, Herve; Caplice, Noel M.; Pickering, J. Geoffrey; Ninio, Ewa . E-mail: ninio@chups.jussieu.fr

    2006-08-04

    Platelet-activating-Factor (PAF) and its structural analogues formed upon low density lipoprotein oxidation are involved in atherosclerotic plaque formation and may signal through PAF-receptor (PAF-R) expressed in human macrophages and in certain smooth muscle cells (SMCs) in the media, but rarely in the intima of human plaques. Our aim was to determine which SMC phenotype expresses PAF-R and whether this receptor is functional in cell migration. Circulating SMC progenitors and two phenotypically distinct clones of proliferative, epithelioid phenotype vs contractile, spindle-shaped SMCs from the media of adult internal thoracic artery were studied for the presence of PAF-receptor (PAF-R). The levels of specific mRNA were obtained by reverse transcription/real-time PCR, the protein expression was deduced from immunohistochemistry staining, and the functional transmigration assay was performed by Boyden chamber-type chemotaxis assay. Only SMCs of spindle-shape and synthetic phenotype expressed both mRNA and PAF-R protein and in the functional test migrated at low concentrations of PAF. Two unrelated, specific PAF-R antagonists inhibited PAF-induced migration, but did not modify the migration initiated by PDGF. The presence of functional PAF-R in arterial spindle-shaped SMCs of synthetic phenotype may be important for their migration from the media into the intima and atherosclerotic plaques formation.

  10. Study of space shuttle orbiter system management computer function. Volume 2: Automated performance verification concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The findings are presented of investigations on concepts and techniques in automated performance verification. The investigations were conducted to provide additional insight into the design methodology and to develop a consolidated technology base from which to analyze performance verification design approaches. Other topics discussed include data smoothing, function selection, flow diagrams, data storage, and shuttle hydraulic systems.

  11. A conserved MADS-box phosphorylation motif regulates differentiation and mitochondrial function in skeletal, cardiac, and smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Mughal, W; Nguyen, L; Pustylnik, S; da Silva Rosa, S C; Piotrowski, S; Chapman, D; Du, M; Alli, N S; Grigull, J; Halayko, A J; Aliani, M; Topham, M K; Epand, R M; Hatch, G M; Pereira, T J; Kereliuk, S; McDermott, J C; Rampitsch, C; Dolinsky, V W; Gordon, J W

    2015-10-29

    Exposure to metabolic disease during fetal development alters cellular differentiation and perturbs metabolic homeostasis, but the underlying molecular regulators of this phenomenon in muscle cells are not completely understood. To address this, we undertook a computational approach to identify cooperating partners of the myocyte enhancer factor-2 (MEF2) family of transcription factors, known regulators of muscle differentiation and metabolic function. We demonstrate that MEF2 and the serum response factor (SRF) collaboratively regulate the expression of numerous muscle-specific genes, including microRNA-133a (miR-133a). Using tandem mass spectrometry techniques, we identify a conserved phosphorylation motif within the MEF2 and SRF Mcm1 Agamous Deficiens SRF (MADS)-box that regulates miR-133a expression and mitochondrial function in response to a lipotoxic signal. Furthermore, reconstitution of MEF2 function by expression of a neutralizing mutation in this identified phosphorylation motif restores miR-133a expression and mitochondrial membrane potential during lipotoxicity. Mechanistically, we demonstrate that miR-133a regulates mitochondrial function through translational inhibition of a mitophagy and cell death modulating protein, called Nix. Finally, we show that rodents exposed to gestational diabetes during fetal development display muscle diacylglycerol accumulation, concurrent with insulin resistance, reduced miR-133a, and elevated Nix expression, as young adult rats. Given the diverse roles of miR-133a and Nix in regulating mitochondrial function, and proliferation in certain cancers, dysregulation of this genetic pathway may have broad implications involving insulin resistance, cardiovascular disease, and cancer biology.

  12. Novel Pathological Role of hnRNPA1 (Heterogeneous Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein A1) in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Function and Neointima Hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Chen, Qishan; An, Weiwei; Yang, Feng; Maguire, Eithne Margaret; Chen, Dan; Zhang, Cheng; Wen, Guanmei; Yang, Mei; Dai, Bin; Luong, Le Anh; Zhu, Jianhua; Xu, Qingbo; Xiao, Qingzhong

    2017-09-14

    hnRNPA1 (heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1) plays a variety of roles in gene expression. However, little is known about the functional involvement of hnRNPA1 in vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) function and neointima hyperplasia. In this study, we have attempted to investigate the functional roles of hnRNPA1 in the contexts of VSMC function, injury-induced vessel remodeling, and human atherosclerotic lesions, as well as discern the molecular mechanisms involved. APPROACH AND RESULTS: hnRNPA1 expression levels were consistently modulated during VSMC phenotype switching and neointimal lesion formation induced by wire injury. Functional studies showed that VSMC-specific gene expression, proliferation, and migration were regulated by hnRNPA1. Our data show that hnRNPA1 exerts its effects on VSMC functions through modulation of IQGAP1 (IQ motif containing GTPase activating protein 1). Mechanistically, hnRNPA1 regulates IQGAP1 mRNA degradation through 2 mechanisms: upregulating microRNA-124 (miR-124) and binding to AU-rich element of IQGAP1 gene. Further evidence suggests that hnRNPA1 upregulates miR-124 by modulating miR-124 biogenesis and that IQGAP1 is the authentic target gene of miR-124. Importantly, ectopic overexpression of hnRNPA1 greatly reduced VSMC proliferation and inhibited neointima formation in wire-injured carotid arteries. Finally, lower expression levels of hnRNPA1 and miR-124, while higher expression levels of IQGAP1, were observed in human atherosclerotic lesions. Our data show that hnRNPA1 is a critical regulator of VSMC function and behavior in the context of neointima hyperplasia, and the hnRNPA1/miR-124/IQGAP1 regulatory axis represents a novel therapeutic target for the prevention of cardiovascular diseases. © 2017 The Authors.

  13. Molecular Expression and Pharmacological Evidence for a Functional Role of Kv7 Channel Subtypes in Guinea Pig Urinary Bladder Smooth Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Afeli, Serge A. Y.; Malysz, John; Petkov, Georgi V.

    2013-01-01

    Voltage-gated Kv7 (KCNQ) channels are emerging as essential regulators of smooth muscle excitability and contractility. However, their physiological role in detrusor smooth muscle (DSM) remains to be elucidated. Here, we explored the molecular expression and function of Kv7 channel subtypes in guinea pig DSM by RT-PCR, qRT-PCR, immunohistochemistry, electrophysiology, and isometric tension recordings. In whole DSM tissue, mRNAs for all Kv7 channel subtypes were detected in a rank order: Kv7.1~Kv7.2Kv7.3~Kv7.5Kv7.4. In contrast, freshly-isolated DSM cells showed mRNA expression of: Kv7.1~Kv7.2Kv7.5Kv7.3~Kv7.4. Immunohistochemical confocal microscopy analyses of DSM, conducted by using co-labeling of Kv7 channel subtype-specific antibodies and α-smooth muscle actin, detected protein expression for all Kv7 channel subtypes, except for the Kv7.4, in DSM cells. L-364373 (R-L3), a Kv7.1 channel activator, and retigabine, a Kv7.2-7.5 channel activator, inhibited spontaneous phasic contractions and the 10-Hz electrical field stimulation (EFS)-induced contractions of DSM isolated strips. Linopiridine and XE991, two pan-Kv7 (effective at Kv7.1-Kv7.5 subtypes) channel inhibitors, had opposite effects increasing DSM spontaneous phasic and 10 Hz EFS-induced contractions. EFS-induced DSM contractions generated by a wide range of stimulation frequencies were decreased by L-364373 (10 µM) or retigabine (10 µM), and increased by XE991 (10 µM). Retigabine (10 µM) induced hyperpolarization and inhibited spontaneous action potentials in freshly-isolated DSM cells. In summary, Kv7 channel subtypes are expressed at mRNA and protein levels in guinea pig DSM cells. Their pharmacological modulation can control DSM contractility and excitability; therefore, Kv7 channel subtypes provide potential novel therapeutic targets for urinary bladder dysfunction. PMID:24073284

  14. The Galaxy Count Correlation Function in Redshift Space Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campagne, J.-E.; Plaszczynski, S.; Neveu, J.

    2017-08-01

    In the near future, cosmology will enter the wide and deep galaxy survey era, enabling high-precision studies of the large-scale structure of the universe in three dimensions. To test cosmological models and determine their parameters accurately, it is necessary to use data with exact theoretical expectations expressed in observational parameter space (angles and redshift). The data-driven, galaxy number count fluctuations on redshift shells can be used to build correlation functions ξ (θ ,{z}1,{z}2) on and between shells to probe the baryonic acoustic oscillations and distance-redshift distortions, as well as gravitational lensing and other relativistic effects. To obtain a numerical estimation of ξ (θ ,{z}1,{z}2) from a cosmological model, it is typical to use either a closed form derived from a tripolar spherical expansion or to compute the power spectrum {C}{\\ell }({z}1,{z}2) and perform a Legendre polynomial {P}{\\ell }(\\cos θ ) expansion. Here, we present a new derivation of a ξ (θ ,{z}1,{z}2) closed form using the spherical harmonic expansion and proceeding to an infinite sum over multipoles thanks to an addition theorem. We demonstrate that this new expression is perfectly compatible with the existing closed forms but is simpler to establish and manipulate. We provide formulas for the leading density and redshift-space contributions, but also show how Doppler-like and lensing terms can be easily included in this formalism. We have implemented and made publicly available software for computing those correlations efficiently, without any Limber approximation, and validated this software with the CLASSgal code. It is available at https://gitlab.in2p3.fr/campagne/AngPow.

  15. Molecular characterization and functional divergence of two Gadd45g homologs in sex determination in half-smooth tongue sole (Cynoglossus semilaevis).

    PubMed

    Liu, Wan-Jun; Zhang, Li-Yan; Shao, Chang-Wei; Wang, Na; Liu, Kun; Wen, Hai-Shen; Zhang, Ning; Dong, Zhong-Dian; Zhang, Jun-Jie; Chen, Song-Lin

    2014-01-01

    The growth arrest and DNA-damage-inducible protein 45 gamma (Gadd45g) is known to play a major role in embryonic development and sex determination. In this study, two Gadd45g genes were isolated from half-smooth tongue sole (Cynoglossus semilaevis). Using chromosomal fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), Gadd45g1 and Gadd45g2 were located on the W and Z chromosomes, respectively. The full-length cDNA sequences of Gadd45g1 (1270bp) and Gadd45g2 (1181bp) were predicted to contain a 480-bp coding sequence that could encode a protein of 159 amino acids residues. A phylogenetic tree showed that the predicted Gadd45g1 and Gadd45g2 amino acid sequences clustered closely in one branch. It is proposed that Gadd45g1 and Gadd45g2 are paralogous genes derived from the divergence of the sex chromosome. Ka/Ks ratios indicated that Gadd45g1 and Gadd45g2 may have undergone a high number of mutations and have a divergence time of only about 68,000years, although Gadd45g homologs are highly conserved. The qRT-PCR demonstrated that Gadd45g1 and Gadd45g2 were highly expressed in ovary, and negligibly expressed in testis of male and neo-male. During development of the ovary (from 80 to 150days), the expression levels of both genes reached high levels. Gadd45g1 was also highly expressed at 50days, the stage just before gonad differentiation in C. semilaevis. All these findings imply functional divergence of the two Gadd45g homologs; Gadd45g1 may be necessary for sex differentiation in the early stage of gonad development, and then Gadd45g1 and Gadd45g2 maintain ovary development and the female character of half-smooth tongue sole.

  16. Pharmacological evidence that potentiation of plasmalemmal Ca(2+)-extrusion is functionally coupled to inhibition of SR Ca(2+)-ATPases in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen-Bo; Kwan, Chiu-Yin

    2016-04-01

    Cyclopiazonic acid (CPA), a specific inhibitor of sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+)-ATPases, causes slowly developing and subsequently diminishing characteristic contractions in vascular smooth muscle, and the second application of CPA has incompletely repeatable effects, depending on the vessel type. The objective of the present study was to examine the mechanisms underlying the significant decrease of CPA-induced contractions upon the second application. A pharmacological intervention of Ca(2+) extrusion process as a strategy was performed to modulate vasoconstrictor effects of CPA in rat aortic ring preparations. CPA-induced contractions, expressed as percentages of the contractions induced by KCl (80 mM), were significantly decreased from 44.1 ± 5.7 to 7.6 ± 1.8 % (P < 0.001) upon the second application. The contractions, however, were completely repeatable in the presence of vanadate, an inhibitor of ATPases, but not of ouabain, an inhibitor of Na(+)-pumps. Strikingly, CPA-induced contractions were sustained and completely repeatable in Na(+)-free and low Na(+) medium. Furthermore, we found that the contractions were completely repeatable in the presence of 2',4'-dichlorobenzamil, an inhibitor of the forward mode of Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchangers, but not of KBR7943, an inhibitor of the reverse mode of Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchangers. Our findings indicate that CPA by inducing a transient rise in cytosolic Ca(2+) level causes a long-lasting upregulation of plasma membrane (PM) Ca(2+) extruders and thus leads to a diminished contraction upon its second application in blood vessels. This suggests that there is a functional coupling between PM Ca(2+) extruders and SR Ca(2+)-ATPases in rat aortic smooth muscle cells.

  17. Divergent effects of 17-{beta}-estradiol on human vascular smooth muscle and endothelial cell function diminishes TNF-{alpha}-induced neointima formation

    SciTech Connect

    Nintasen, Rungrat; Riches, Kirsten; Mughal, Romana S.; Viriyavejakul, Parnpen; Chaisri, Urai; Maneerat, Yaowapa; Turner, Neil A.; Porter, Karen E.

    2012-04-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TNF-{alpha} augments neointimal hyperplasia in human saphenous vein. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TNF-{alpha} induces detrimental effects on endothelial and smooth muscle cell function. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Estradiol exerts modulatory effects on TNF-induced vascular cell functions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The modulatory effects of estradiol are discriminatory and cell-type specific. -- Abstract: Coronary heart disease (CHD) is a condition characterized by increased levels of proinflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}). TNF-{alpha} can induce vascular endothelial cell (EC) and smooth muscle cell (SMC) dysfunction, central events in development of neointimal lesions. The reduced incidence of CHD in young women is believed to be due to the protective effects of estradiol (E2). We therefore investigated the effects of TNF-{alpha} on human neointima formation and SMC/EC functions and any modulatory effects of E2. Saphenous vein (SV) segments were cultured in the presence of TNF-{alpha} (10 ng/ml), E2 (2.5 nM) or both in combination. Neointimal thickening was augmented by incubation with TNF-{alpha}, an effect that was abolished by co-culture with E2. TNF-{alpha} increased SV-SMC proliferation in a concentration-dependent manner that was optimal at 10 ng/ml (1.5-fold increase), and abolished by E2 at all concentrations studied (1-50 nM). Surprisingly, E2 itself at low concentrations (1 and 5 nM) stimulated SV-SMC proliferation to a level comparable to that of TNF-{alpha} alone. SV-EC migration was significantly impaired by TNF-{alpha} (42% of control), and co-culture with E2 partially restored the ability of SV-EC to migrate and repair the wound. In contrast, TNF-{alpha} increased SV-SMC migration by 1.7-fold, an effect that was completely reversed by co-incubation with E2. Finally, TNF-{alpha} potently induced ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression in both SV-EC and SV-SMC. However there

  18. Novel regulatory mechanism in human urinary bladder: central role of transient receptor potential melastatin 4 channels in detrusor smooth muscle function

    PubMed Central

    Hristov, Kiril L.; Smith, Amy C.; Parajuli, Shankar P.; Malysz, John; Rovner, Eric S.

    2016-01-01

    Transient receptor potential melastatin 4 (TRPM4) channels are Ca2+-activated nonselective cation channels that have been recently identified as regulators of detrusor smooth muscle (DSM) function in rodents. However, their expression and function in human DSM remain unexplored. We provide insights into the functional role of TRPM4 channels in human DSM under physiological conditions. We used a multidisciplinary experimental approach, including RT-PCR, Western blotting, immunohistochemistry and immunocytochemistry, patch-clamp electrophysiology, and functional studies of DSM contractility. DSM samples were obtained from patients without preoperative overactive bladder symptoms. RT-PCR detected mRNA transcripts for TRPM4 channels in human DSM whole tissue and freshly isolated single cells. Western blotting and immunohistochemistry with confocal microscopy revealed TRPM4 protein expression in human DSM. Immunocytochemistry further detected TRPM4 protein expression in DSM single cells. Patch-clamp experiments showed that 9-phenanthrol, a selective TRPM4 channel inhibitor, significantly decreased the transient inward cation currents and voltage step-induced whole cell currents in freshly isolated human DSM cells. In current-clamp mode, 9-phenanthrol hyperpolarized the human DSM cell membrane potential. Furthermore, 9-phenanthrol attenuated the spontaneous phasic, carbachol-induced and nerve-evoked contractions in human DSM isolated strips. Significant species-related differences in TRPM4 channel activity between human, rat, and guinea pig DSM were revealed, suggesting a more prominent physiological role for the TRPM4 channel in the regulation of DSM function in humans than in rodents. In conclusion, TRPM4 channels regulate human DSM excitability and contractility and are critical determinants of human urinary bladder function. Thus, TRPM4 channels could represent promising novel targets for the pharmacological or genetic control of overactive bladder. PMID:26791488

  19. The Neglected Educative Function of Public Space on Preadolescent Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giardiello, Mauro

    2017-01-01

    The crisis of public spaces implies a closure to the private sphere and, as a consequence, the inanity of the education processes. Space privatization involves the supremacy of the "?????" (house) on the "a???a" (public space), so that the house assumes the role of an enclosed community. The effect of this closure is a…

  20. Function spaces in the topology of pointwise convergence, and compact sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkhangelskii, A. V.

    1984-10-01

    CONTENTSIntroduction § 1. The Ptak approach § 2. Bounded sets in function spaces and Grothendieck's theorem § 3. Theorems on tightness and monolithicity in function spaces over compact sets § 4. Namioka's theorem § 5. Function spaces over pseudocompact spaces § 6. The structure of the space C_p(X) over Eberlein or Corson compacta § 7. Pseudocompact, \\sigma-compact, and countably paracompact subspaces of C_p(X) § 8. Two generalizations of Grothendieck's theorem § 9. When is the space C_p(X) \\sigma-compact? References

  1. Dualities and Curved Space Partition Functions of Supersymmetric Theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Prarit

    In this dissertation we discuss some conjectured dualities in supersymmetric field theories and provide non-trivial checks for these conjectures. A quick review of supersymmetry and related topics is provided in chapter 1. In chapter 2, we develop a method to identify the so called BPS states in the Hilbert space of a supersymmetric field theory (that preserves at least two real supercharges) on a generic curved space. As an application we obtain the superconformal index (SCI) of 4d theories. The large N SCI of quiver gauge theories has been previously noticed to factorize over the set of extremal BPS mesonic operators. In chapter 3, we reformulate this factorization in terms of the zigzag paths in the dimer model associated to the quiver and extend the factorization theorem of the index to include theories obtained from D-branes probing orbifold singularities. In chapter 4, we consider the dualities in two classes of 3 dimensional theories. The first class consist of dualities of certain necklace type Chern-Simons (CS) quiver gauge theories. A non trivial check of these dualities is provided by matching their squashed sphere partition functions. The second class consists of theories whose duals are described by a collection of free fields. In such cases, due to mixing between the superconformal R-symmetry and accidental symmetries, the matching of electric and magnetic partition functions is not straightforward. We provide a prescription to rectify this mismatch. In chapter 5, we consider some the N = 1 4d theories with orthogonal and symplectic gauge groups, arising from N = 1 preserving reduction of 6d theories on a Riemann surface. This construction allows us to dual descriptions of 4d theories. Some of the dual frames have no known Lagrangian description. We check the dualities by computing the anomaly coefficients and the superconformal indices. We also give a prescription to write the index of the theory obtained by reduction of 6d theories on a three

  2. Reconstruction of probability density function of intensity fluctuations relevant to free-space laser communications through atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumdar, Arun K.; Luna, Carlos E.; Idell, Paul S.

    2007-09-01

    A new method of reconstructing and predicting an unknown probability density function (PDF) characterizing the statistics of intensity fluctuations of optical beams propagating through atmospheric turbulence is presented in this paper. The method is based on a series expansion of generalized Laguerre polynomials ; the expansion coefficients are expressed in terms of the higher-order intensity moments of intensity statistics. This method generates the PDF from the data moments without any prior knowledge of specific statistics and converges smoothly. The utility of reconstructed PDF relevant to free-space laser communication in terms of calculating the average bit error rate and probability of fading is pointed out. Simulated numerical results are compared with some known non-Gaussian test PDFs: Log-Normal, Rice-Nakagami and Gamma-Gamma distributions and show excellent agreement obtained by the method developed. The accuracy of the reconstructed PDF is also evaluated.

  3. Characterizing the Pressure Smoothing Scale of the Intergalactic Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Girish; Hennawi, Joseph F.; Oñorbe, Jose; Rorai, Alberto; Springel, Volker

    2015-10-01

    The thermal state of the intergalactic medium (IGM) at z < 6 constrains the nature and timing of cosmic reionization events, but its inference from the Lyα forest is degenerate with the 3D structure of the IGM on ˜100 kpc scales, where, analogous to the classical Jeans argument, the pressure of the T ≃ 104 K gas supports it against gravity. We simulate the IGM using smoothed particle hydrodynamics, and find that, at z < 6, the gas density power spectrum does not exhibit the expected filtering scale cutoff, because dense gas in collapsed halos dominates the small-scale power masking pressure smoothing effects. We introduce a new statistic, the real-space Lyα flux, Freal, which naturally suppresses dense gas, and is thus robust against the poorly understood physics of galaxy formation, revealing pressure smoothing in the diffuse IGM. The Freal power spectrum is accurately described by a simple fitting function with cutoff at λF, allowing us to rigorously quantify the pressure smoothing scale for the first time: we find λF = 79 kpc (comoving) at z = 3 for our fiducial thermal model. This statistic has the added advantage that it directly relates to observations of correlated Lyα forest absorption in close quasar pairs, recently proposed as a method to measure the pressure smoothing scale. Our results enable one to quantify the pressure smoothing scale in simulations, and ask meaningful questions about its dependence on reionization and thermal history. Accordingly, the standard description of the IGM in terms of the amplitude T0 and slope γ of the temperature-density relation T={T}0{(ρ /\\bar{ρ })}γ -1 should be augmented with a third pressure smoothing scale parameter λF.

  4. A Meshfree Cell-based Smoothed Point Interpolation Method for Solid Mechanics Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Guiyong; Liu Guirong

    2010-05-21

    In the framework of a weakened weak (W{sup 2}) formulation using a generalized gradient smoothing operation, this paper introduces a novel meshfree cell-based smoothed point interpolation method (CS-PIM) for solid mechanics problems. The W{sup 2} formulation seeks solutions from a normed G space which includes both continuous and discontinuous functions and allows the use of much more types of methods to create shape functions for numerical methods. When PIM shape functions are used, the functions constructed are in general not continuous over the entire problem domain and hence are not compatible. Such an interpolation is not in a traditional H{sup 1} space, but in a G{sup 1} space. By introducing the generalized gradient smoothing operation properly, the requirement on function is now further weakened upon the already weakened requirement for functions in a H{sup 1} space and G{sup 1} space can be viewed as a space of functions with weakened weak (W{sup 2}) requirement on continuity. The cell-based smoothed point interpolation method (CS-PIM) is formulated based on the W{sup 2} formulation, in which displacement field is approximated using the PIM shape functions, which possess the Kronecker delta property facilitating the enforcement of essential boundary conditions [3]. The gradient (strain) field is constructed by the generalized gradient smoothing operation within the cell-based smoothing domains, which are exactly the triangular background cells. A W{sup 2} formulation of generalized smoothed Galerkin (GS-Galerkin) weak form is used to derive the discretized system equations. It was found that the CS-PIM possesses the following attractive properties: (1) It is very easy to implement and works well with the simplest linear triangular mesh without introducing additional degrees of freedom; (2) it is at least linearly conforming; (3) this method is temporally stable and works well for dynamic analysis; (4) it possesses a close-to-exact stiffness, which is much

  5. Heterogeneity of alpha1 receptors associated with vascular smooth muscle: evidence from functional and ligand binding studies

    SciTech Connect

    Babich, M.; Pedigo, N.W.; Butler, B.T.; Piascik, M.T.

    1987-08-10

    The nature of the alpha1 receptor associated with rabbit aorta has been examined in functional and receptor binding studies. In isolated aortic rings the dose-response curve for (-)metaraminol was not parallel to that of (-)epinephrine, (-)norepinephrine or (-)phenylephrine. Following inactivation of a portion of the alpha receptors with phenoxybenzamine, the occupancy versus response relationship for metaraminol, in contrast to the other test agonists, was biphasic. In microsomes prepared from aorta, metaraminol bound to two classes of sites labelled by the selective alpha1 antagonist (TH) prazosin. Norepinephrine also bound to two sites on the alpha receptor in all three preparations tested. The Scatchard plot of (TH)prazosin binding to microsomes prepared from frozen aorta was curvilinear. Estimates of the affinities and site densities were 49.6 +/- 15.3 pM and 44.8 +/- 11.8 pmol/gm protein and 1.0 +/- 0.2 nM and 43.8 +/- 17.4 pmol/gm for the high and low affinity sites, respectively. These data are consistent with the idea that there are subtypes of the alpha1 receptor. 33 references, 5 figures.

  6. Generating Smooth Motions For Robotic Manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bejczy, Antal K.; Szakaly, Zoltan F.

    1993-01-01

    In improved method for generating trajectory of robotic manipulator, each straight-line segment of trajectory composed of constant-velocity main portion sandwiched between smooth acceleration at start and smooth deceleration at finish. Algorithm implementing method computes velocity in each accelerating portion as sinusoidal function of position along line. This motion chosen for two reasons: closely approximates motion of human hand along straight-line trajectory, and provides very smooth transitions between constant-velocity portion and accelerated and decelerational end portions.

  7. Smooth GERBS, orthogonal systems and energy minimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dechevsky, Lubomir T.; Zanaty, Peter

    2013-12-01

    New results are obtained in three mutually related directions of the rapidly developing theory of generalized expo-rational B-splines (GERBS) [7, 6]: closed-form computability of C∞-smooth GERBS in terms of elementary and special functions, Hermite interpolation and least-squares best approximation via smooth GERBS, energy minimizing properties of smooth GERBS similar to those of the classical cubic polynomial B-splines.

  8. Smooth GERBS, orthogonal systems and energy minimization

    SciTech Connect

    Dechevsky, Lubomir T. E-mail: pza@hin.no; Zanaty, Peter E-mail: pza@hin.no

    2013-12-18

    New results are obtained in three mutually related directions of the rapidly developing theory of generalized expo-rational B-splines (GERBS) [7, 6]: closed-form computability of C{sup ∞}-smooth GERBS in terms of elementary and special functions, Hermite interpolation and least-squares best approximation via smooth GERBS, energy minimizing properties of smooth GERBS similar to those of the classical cubic polynomial B-splines.

  9. Smooth-muscle-specific gene transfer with the human maxi-k channel improves erectile function and enhances sexual behavior in atherosclerotic cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Christ, George J; Andersson, Karl-Erik; Williams, Koudy; Zhao, Weixin; D'Agostino, Ralph; Kaplan, Jay; Aboushwareb, Tamer; Yoo, James; Calenda, Giulia; Davies, Kelvin P; Sellers, Rani S; Melman, Arnold

    2009-12-01

    Despite the advent of effective oral therapies for erectile dysfunction (ED), many patients are not successfully treated, and side effects have been documented. To further evaluate the potential utility of naked DNA-based gene transfer as an attractive treatment option for ED. The effects of gene transfer on erectile function and sexual behavior were evaluated in eight male cynomolgus monkeys with ED secondary to moderately severe, diet-induced atherosclerosis. Following establishment of baseline characteristics, animals were subjected to intracavernous injection of a smooth-muscle-specific gene transfer vector (pSMAA-hSlo) encoding the pore-forming subunit of the human large-conductance, calcium-sensitive potassium channel (Maxi-K). For the sexual behavior studies, 2 wk of baseline data were obtained, and then animals were placed in the presence of estrogen-implanted females (n=2) three times per week for 30 min, and sexual behavior was recorded. The intracavernous pressure response to papaverine injection was also monitored. Dramatic changes in erectile function and sexual behavior were observed after intracorporal gene transfer. The frequency of partial (6±2 to 10±2) and full (2±1.5 to 5±1.4) erections were significantly increased, with a parallel 2-3-fold increase in the duration of the observed erections. The frequency and latency of ejaculation were increased and decreased, respectively. Frequency and duration of grooming by the female were increased, and the latency decreased. Increased latency and decreased frequency of body contact was also observed, and this is characteristic of the typical drop in consort intimacy that occurs after mating in most macaque species. In addition, an increased responsiveness to intracavernous papaverine injection was observed. The data indicate that intracorporal Maxi-K-channel gene transfer enhances erectile capacity and sexual behavior; the data imply that increased erectile function per se may lead to increased sexual

  10. Criteria for compactness in L{sup p}-spaces, p {>=} 0

    SciTech Connect

    Krotov, Veniamin G

    2012-07-31

    The paper puts forward new compactness criteria for spaces of summable and measurable functions on a metric space with measure satisfying the doubling condition. These criteria are formulated in terms of either local smoothness inequalities or maximal operators that measure local smoothness. Bibliography: 28 titles.

  11. Effects of Spaced versus Massed Training in Function Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDaniel, Mark A.; Fadler, Cynthia L.; Pashler, Harold

    2013-01-01

    A robust finding in the literature is that spacing material leads to better retention than massing; however, the benefit of spacing for concept learning is less clear. When items are massed, it may help the learner to discover the relationship between instances, leading to better abstraction of the underlying concept. Two experiments addressed…

  12. Evolutionary Innovations and the Organization of Protein Functions in Genotype Space

    PubMed Central

    Ferrada, Evandro; Wagner, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    The organization of protein structures in protein genotype space is well studied. The same does not hold for protein functions, whose organization is important to understand how novel protein functions can arise through blind evolutionary searches of sequence space. In systems other than proteins, two organizational features of genotype space facilitate phenotypic innovation. The first is that genotypes with the same phenotype form vast and connected genotype networks. The second is that different neighborhoods in this space contain different novel phenotypes. We here characterize the organization of enzymatic functions in protein genotype space, using a data set of more than 30,000 proteins with known structure and function. We show that different neighborhoods of genotype space contain proteins with very different functions. This property both facilitates evolutionary innovation through exploration of a genotype network, and it constrains the evolution of novel phenotypes. The phenotypic diversity of different neighborhoods is caused by the fact that some functions can be carried out by multiple structures. We show that the space of protein functions is not homogeneous, and different genotype neighborhoods tend to contain a different spectrum of functions, whose diversity increases with increasing distance of these neighborhoods in sequence space. Whether a protein with a given function can evolve specific new functions is thus determined by the protein's location in sequence space. PMID:21152394

  13. Function and expression of ryanodine receptors and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors in smooth muscle cells of murine feed arteries and arterioles.

    PubMed

    Westcott, Erika B; Goodwin, Erica L; Segal, Steven S; Jackson, William F

    2012-04-15

    We tested the hypothesis that vasomotor control is differentially regulated between feed arteries and downstream arterioles from the cremaster muscle of C57BL/6 mice. In isolated pressurized arteries, confocal Ca(2+) imaging of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) revealed Ca(2+) sparks and Ca(2+) waves. Ryanodine receptor (RyR) antagonists (ryanodine and tetracaine) inhibited both sparks and waves but increased global Ca(2+) and myogenic tone. In arterioles, SMCs exhibited only Ca(2+) waves that were insensitive to ryanodine or tetracaine. Pharmacological interventions indicated that RyRs are functionally coupled to large-conductance, Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels (BK(Ca)) in SMCs of arteries, whereas BK(Ca) appear functionally coupled to voltage-gated Ca2+ channels in SMCs of arterioles. Inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R) antagonists (xestospongin D or 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate) or a phospholipase C inhibitor (U73122) attenuated Ca(2+) waves, global Ca(2+) and myogenic tone in arteries and arterioles but had no effect on arterial sparks. Real-time PCR of isolated SMCs revealed RyR2 as the most abundant isoform transcript; arteries expressed twice the RyR2 but only 65% the RyR3 of arterioles and neither vessel expressed RyR1. Immunofluorescent localisation of RyR protein indicated bright, clustered staining of arterial SMCs in contrast to diffuse staining in arteriolar SMCs. Expression of IP(3)R transcripts and protein immunofluorescence were similar in SMCs of both vessels with IP(3)R1>IP(3)R2>IP(3)R3. Despite similar expression of IP(3)Rs and dependence of Ca(2+) waves on IP(3)Rs, these data illustrate pronounced regional heterogeneity in function and expression of RyRs between SMCs of the same vascular resistance network. We conclude that vasomotor control is differentially regulated in feed arteries vs. downstream arterioles.

  14. Function and expression of ryanodine receptors and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors in smooth muscle cells of murine feed arteries and arterioles

    PubMed Central

    Westcott, Erika B; Goodwin, Erica L; Segal, Steven S; Jackson, William F

    2012-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that vasomotor control is differentially regulated between feed arteries and downstream arterioles from the cremaster muscle of C57BL/6 mice. In isolated pressurized arteries, confocal Ca2+ imaging of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) revealed Ca2+ sparks and Ca2+ waves. Ryanodine receptor (RyR) antagonists (ryanodine and tetracaine) inhibited both sparks and waves but increased global Ca2+ and myogenic tone. In arterioles, SMCs exhibited only Ca2+ waves that were insensitive to ryanodine or tetracaine. Pharmacological interventions indicated that RyRs are functionally coupled to large-conductance, Ca2+-activated K+ channels (BKCa) in SMCs of arteries, whereas BKCa appear functionally coupled to voltage-gated Ca2+ channels in SMCs of arterioles. Inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R) antagonists (xestospongin D or 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate) or a phospholipase C inhibitor (U73122) attenuated Ca2+ waves, global Ca2+ and myogenic tone in arteries and arterioles but had no effect on arterial sparks. Real-time PCR of isolated SMCs revealed RyR2 as the most abundant isoform transcript; arteries expressed twice the RyR2 but only 65% the RyR3 of arterioles and neither vessel expressed RyR1. Immunofluorescent localisation of RyR protein indicated bright, clustered staining of arterial SMCs in contrast to diffuse staining in arteriolar SMCs. Expression of IP3R transcripts and protein immunofluorescence were similar in SMCs of both vessels with IP3R1>>IP3R2>IP3R3. Despite similar expression of IP3Rs and dependence of Ca2+ waves on IP3Rs, these data illustrate pronounced regional heterogeneity in function and expression of RyRs between SMCs of the same vascular resistance network. We conclude that vasomotor control is differentially regulated in feed arteries vs. downstream arterioles. PMID:22331418

  15. Facilitating the Genesis of Functional Working Spaces in Guided Explorations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miranda, Vicente Carrión; Pluvinage, François; Adjiage, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Approximating given real-valued functions by affine functions is among the most basic activities with functions. In this study we examine two contexts in which two such approximations are performed. The first involves a microscopic representation of functions for the study of tangents; the second a macroscopic representation of functions for the…

  16. Facilitating the Genesis of Functional Working Spaces in Guided Explorations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miranda, Vicente Carrión; Pluvinage, François; Adjiage, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Approximating given real-valued functions by affine functions is among the most basic activities with functions. In this study we examine two contexts in which two such approximations are performed. The first involves a microscopic representation of functions for the study of tangents; the second a macroscopic representation of functions for the…

  17. Function and role of voltage-gated sodium channel NaV1.7 expressed in aortic smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Meguro, Kentaro; Iida, Haruko; Takano, Haruhito; Morita, Toshihiro; Sata, Masataka; Nagai, Ryozo; Nakajima, Toshiaki

    2009-01-01

    Voltage-gated Na(+) channel currents (I(Na)) are expressed in several types of smooth muscle cells. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the expression of I(Na), its functional role, pathophysiology in cultured human (hASMCs) and rabbit aortic smooth muscle cells (rASMCs), and its association with vascular intimal hyperplasia. In whole cell voltage clamp, I(Na) was observed at potential positive to -40 mV, was blocked by tetrodotoxin (TTX), and replacing extracellular Na(+) with N-methyl-d-glucamine in cultured hASMCs. In contrast to native aorta, cultured hASMCs strongly expressed SCN9A encoding Na(V)1.7, as determined by quantitative RT-PCR. I(Na) was abolished by the treatment with SCN9A small-interfering (si)RNA (P < 0.01). TTX and SCN9A siRNA significantly inhibited cell migration (P < 0.01, respectively) and horseradish peroxidase uptake (P < 0.01, respectively). TTX also significantly reduced the secretion of matrix metalloproteinase-2 6 and 12 h after the treatment (P < 0.01 and P < 0.05, respectively). However, neither TTX nor siRNA had any effect on cell proliferation. L-type Ca(2+) channel current was recorded, and I(Na) was not observed in freshly isolated rASMCs, whereas TTX-sensitive I(Na) was recorded in cultured rASMCs. Quantitative RT-PCR and immunostaining for Na(V)1.7 revealed the prominent expression of SCN9A in cultured rASMCs and aorta 48 h after balloon injury but not in native aorta. In conclusion, these studies show that I(Na) is expressed in cultured and diseased conditions but not in normal aorta. The Na(V)1.7 plays an important role in cell migration, endocytosis, and secretion. Na(V)1.7 is also expressed in aorta after balloon injury, suggesting a potential role for Na(V)1.7 in the progression of intimal hyperplasia.

  18. MicroRNA-146a and microRNA-146b expression and anti-inflammatory function in human airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Comer, Brian S; Camoretti-Mercado, Blanca; Kogut, Paul C; Halayko, Andrew J; Solway, Julian; Gerthoffer, William T

    2014-11-01

    MicroRNA (miR)-146a and miR-146b are negative regulators of inflammatory gene expression in lung fibroblasts, epithelial cells, monocytes, and endothelial cells. The abundance of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and IL-1β is negatively regulated by the miR-146 family, suggesting miR-146a and/or miR-146b might modulate inflammatory mediator expression in airway smooth muscle thereby contributing to pathogenesis of asthma. To test this idea we compared miR-146a and miR-146b expression in human airway smooth muscle cells (hASMCs) from nonasthmatic and asthmatic subjects treated with cytomix (IL-1β, TNF-α, and IFNγ) and examined the miRNAs' effects on COX-2 and IL-1β expression. We found that cytomix treatment elevated miR-146a and miR-146b abundance. Induction with cytomix was greater than induction with individual cytokines, and asthmatic cells exhibited higher levels of miR-146a expression following cytomix treatment than nonasthmatic cells. Transfection of miR-146a or miR-146b mimics reduced COX-2 and IL-1β expression. A miR-146a inhibitor increased COX-2 and IL-1β expression, but a miR-146b inhibitor was ineffective. Repression of COX-2 and IL-1β expression by miR-146a correlated with reduced abundance of the RNA-binding protein human antigen R. These results demonstrate that miR-146a and miR-146b expression is inducible in hASMCs by proinflammatory cytokines and that miR-146a expression is greater in asthmatic cells. Both miR-146a and miR-146b can negatively regulate COX-2 and IL-1β expression at pharmacological levels, but loss-of-function studies showed that only miR-146a is an endogenous negative regulator in hASMCs. The results suggest miR-146 mimics may be an attractive candidate for further preclinical studies as an anti-inflammatory treatment of asthma.

  19. Right Ventricular Enlargement and Renal Function Are Associated With Smooth Introduction of Adaptive Servo-Ventilation Therapy in Chronic Heart Failure Patients.

    PubMed

    Iwasaku, Toshihiro; Okuhara, Yoshitaka; Eguchi, Akiyo; Ando, Tomotaka; Naito, Yoshiro; Masuyama, Tohru; Hirotani, Shinichi

    2017-04-06

    Although adaptive servo-ventilation (ASV) therapy has beneficial effects on chronic heart failure (CHF), a relatively large number of CHF patients cannot undergo ASV therapy due to general discomfort from the mask and/or positive airway pressure. The present study aimed to clarify baseline patient characteristics which are associated with the smooth introduction of ASV treatment in stable CHF inpatients.Thirty-two consecutive heart failure (HF) inpatients were enrolled (left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) < 45%, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) > 10 mL/minute/1.73m(2), and apnea-hypopnea index < 30/hour). After the patients were clinically stabilized on optimal therapy, they underwent portable polysomnography and echocardiography, and then received ASV therapy. The patients were divided into two groups: a smooth introduction group (n = 18) and non-smooth introduction group (n = 14). Smooth introduction of ASV treatment was defined as ASV usage for 4 hours and more on the first night. Univariate analysis showed that the smooth introduction group differed significantly from the non-smooth introduction group in age, hemoglobin level, eGFR, HF origin, LVEF, right ventricular (RV) diastolic dimension (RVDd), RV dp/dt, and RV fractional shortening. Multivariate analyses revealed that RVDd, eGFR, and LVEF were independently associated with smooth introduction. In addition, RVDd and eGFR seemed to be better diagnostic parameters for longer usage for ASV therapy according to the analysis of receiver operating characteristics curves.RV enlargement, eGFR, and LVEF are associated with the smooth introduction of ASV therapy in CHF inpatients.

  20. Effects of space flight and IGF-1 on immune function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) would ameliorate space flight-induced effects on the immune system. Twelve male, Sprague-Dawley rats, surgically implanted with mini osmotic pumps, were subjected to space flight for 10 days on STS-77. Six rats received 10 mg/kg/day of IGF-1 and 6 rats received saline. Flight animals had a lymphocytopenia and granulocytosis which were reversed by IGF-1. Flight animals had significantly higher corticosterone levels than ground controls but IGF-1 did not impact this stress hormone. Therefore, the reversed granulocytosis did not correlate with serum corticosterone. Space flight and IGF-1 also combined to induce a monocytopenia that was not evident in ground control animals treated with IGF-1 or in animals subjected to space flight but given physiological saline. There was a significant increase in spleen weights in vivarium animals treated with IGF-1, however, this change did not occur in flight animals. We observed reduced agonist-induced lymph node cell proliferation by cells from flight animals compared to ground controls. The reduced proliferation was not augmented by IGF-1 treatment. There was enhanced secretion of TNF, IL-6 and NO by flight-animal peritoneal macrophages compared to vivarium controls, however, O2- secretion was not affected. These data suggest that IGF-1 can ameliorate some of the effects of space flight but that space flight can also impact the normal response to IGF-1.

  1. LDL-Induced Impairment of Human Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Repair Function Is Reversed by HMG-CoA Reductase Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Padró, Teresa; Lugano, Roberta; García-Arguinzonis, Maisa; Badimon, Lina

    2012-01-01

    Growing human atherosclerotic plaques show a progressive loss of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) becoming soft and vulnerable. Lipid loaded-VSMC show impaired vascular repair function and motility due to changes in cytoskeleton proteins involved in cell-migration. Clinical benefits of statins reducing coronary events have been related to repopulation of vulnerable plaques with VSMC. Here, we investigated whether HMG-CoA reductase inhibition with rosuvastatin can reverse the effects induced by atherogenic concentrations of LDL either in the native (nLDL) form or modified by aggregation (agLDL) on human VSMC motility. Using a model of wound repair, we showed that treatment of human coronary VSMC with rosuvastatin significantly prevented (and reversed) the inhibitory effect of nLDL and agLDL in the repair of the cell depleted areas. In addition, rosuvastatin significantly abolished the agLDL-induced dephosphorylation of myosin regulatory light chain as demonstrated by 2DE-electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Besides, confocal microscopy showed that rosuvastatin enhances actin-cytoskeleton reorganization during lipid-loaded-VSMC attachment and spreading. The effects of rosuvastatin on actin-cytoskeleton dynamics and cell migration were dependent on ROCK-signalling. Furthermore, rosuvastatin caused a significant increase in RhoA-GTP in the cytosol of VSMC. Taken together, our study demonstrated that inhibition of HMG-CoA reductase restores the migratory capacity and repair function of VSMC that is impaired by native and aggregated LDL. This mechanism may contribute to the stabilization of lipid-rich atherosclerotic plaques afforded by statins. PMID:22719992

  2. A small molecule PAI-1 functional inhibitor attenuates neointimal hyperplasia and vascular smooth muscle cell survival by promoting PAI-1 cleavage.

    PubMed

    Simone, Tessa M; Higgins, Stephen P; Archambeault, Jaclyn; Higgins, Craig E; Ginnan, Roman G; Singer, Harold; Higgins, Paul J

    2015-05-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), the primary inhibitor of urokinase-and tissue-type plasminogen activators (uPA and tPA), is an injury-response gene implicated in the development of tissue fibrosis and cardiovascular disease. PAI-1 mRNA and protein levels were elevated in the balloon catheter-injured carotid and in the vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC)-enriched neointima of ligated arteries. PAI-1/uPA complex formation and PAI-1 antiproteolytic activity can be inhibited, via proteolytic cleavage, by the small molecule antagonist tiplaxtinin which effectively increased the VSMC apoptotic index in vitro and attenuated carotid artery neointimal formation in vivo. In contrast to the active full-length serine protease inhibitor (SERPIN), elastase-cleaved PAI-1 (similar to tiplaxtinin) also promoted VSMC apoptosis in vitro and similarly reduced neointimal formation in vivo. The mechanism through which cleaved PAI-1 (CL-PAI-1) stimulates apoptosis appears to involve the TNF-α family member TWEAK (TNF-α weak inducer of apoptosis) and it's cognate receptor, fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-inducible 14 (FN14). CL-PAI-1 sensitizes cells to TWEAK-stimulated apoptosis while full-length PAI-1 did not, presumably due to its ability to down-regulate FN14 in a low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1)-dependent mechanism. It appears that prolonged exposure of VSMCs to CL-PAI-1 induces apoptosis by augmenting TWEAK/FN14 pro-apoptotic signaling. This work identifies a critical, anti-stenotic, role for a functionally-inactive (at least with regard to its protease inhibitory function) cleaved SERPIN. Therapies that promote the conversion of full-length to cleaved PAI-1 may have translational implications.

  3. Astrophysical smooth particle hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosswog, Stephan

    2009-04-01

    The paper presents a detailed review of the smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method with particular focus on its astrophysical applications. We start by introducing the basic ideas and concepts and thereby outline all ingredients that are necessary for a practical implementation of the method in a working SPH code. Much of SPH's success relies on its excellent conservation properties and therefore the numerical conservation of physical invariants receives much attention throughout this review. The self-consistent derivation of the SPH equations from the Lagrangian of an ideal fluid is the common theme of the remainder of the text. We derive a modern, Newtonian SPH formulation from the Lagrangian of an ideal fluid. It accounts for changes of the local resolution lengths which result in corrective, so-called "grad-h-terms". We extend this strategy to special relativity for which we derive the corresponding grad-h equation set. The variational approach is further applied to a general-relativistic fluid evolving in a fixed, curved background space-time. Particular care is taken to explicitly derive all relevant equations in a coherent way.

  4. Lattice spacings and domain sizes of room-temperature epitaxial LixNi1-xO (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.48) thin films grown on ultra-smooth sapphire substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Anli; Sakata, Osami; Yamauchi, Ryosuke; Katsuya, Yoshio; Kumara, L. S. R.; Shimada, Yoshitomo; Matsuda, Akifumi; Yoshimoto, Mamoru

    2014-11-01

    The effects of heavy Li doping on lattice spacings, out-of-plane, and in-plane domain sizes of room-temperature epitaxial LixNi1-xO (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.48) thin films on ultra-smooth sapphire (0 0 0 1) substrates were investigated. The pseudocubic-on-hexagonal epitaxial relationship between the LixNi1-xO epitaxial thin films and the sapphire substrates was verified. The (1 1 1) lattice spacing of the film was larger than the (1 1 bar 1) lattice spacing of the film regardless of the Li content. It indicated that all the crystal structures deviated from the ideal cubic structure and elongated along the [1 1 1] out-of-plane growth direction. The crystal domain sizes of LixNi1-xO thin films in the in-plane direction were found to be very similar, while the out-of-plane domain size increased with a Li content up to 48 mol%. It suggested that the out-of-plane growth can be improved by heavy Li doping. Moreover, the crystal quality of the films was compared with that grown by high temperature pulse laser deposition in view of the domain size information.

  5. A low-complexity 2-point step size gradient projection method with selective function evaluations for smoothed total variation based CBCT reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Bongyong; Park, Justin C.; Song, William Y.

    2014-11-01

    The Barzilai-Borwein (BB) 2-point step size gradient method is receiving attention for accelerating Total Variation (TV) based CBCT reconstructions. In order to become truly viable for clinical applications, however, its convergence property needs to be properly addressed. We propose a novel fast converging gradient projection BB method that requires ‘at most one function evaluation’ in each iterative step. This Selective Function Evaluation method, referred to as GPBB-SFE in this paper, exhibits the desired convergence property when it is combined with a ‘smoothed TV’ or any other differentiable prior. This way, the proposed GPBB-SFE algorithm offers fast and guaranteed convergence to the desired 3DCBCT image with minimal computational complexity. We first applied this algorithm to a Shepp-Logan numerical phantom. We then applied to a CatPhan 600 physical phantom (The Phantom Laboratory, Salem, NY) and a clinically-treated head-and-neck patient, both acquired from the TrueBeam™ system (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA). Furthermore, we accelerated the reconstruction by implementing the algorithm on NVIDIA GTX 480 GPU card. We first compared GPBB-SFE with three recently proposed BB-based CBCT reconstruction methods available in the literature using Shepp-Logan numerical phantom with 40 projections. It is found that GPBB-SFE shows either faster convergence speed/time or superior convergence property compared to existing BB-based algorithms. With the CatPhan 600 physical phantom, the GPBB-SFE algorithm requires only 3 function evaluations in 30 iterations and reconstructs the standard, 364-projection FDK reconstruction quality image using only 60 projections. We then applied the algorithm to a clinically-treated head-and-neck patient. It was observed that the GPBB-SFE algorithm requires only 18 function evaluations in 30 iterations. Compared with the FDK algorithm with 364 projections, the GPBB-SFE algorithm produces visibly equivalent quality CBCT

  6. A low-complexity 2-point step size gradient projection method with selective function evaluations for smoothed total variation based CBCT reconstructions.

    PubMed

    Song, Bongyong; Park, Justin C; Song, William Y

    2014-11-07

    The Barzilai-Borwein (BB) 2-point step size gradient method is receiving attention for accelerating Total Variation (TV) based CBCT reconstructions. In order to become truly viable for clinical applications, however, its convergence property needs to be properly addressed. We propose a novel fast converging gradient projection BB method that requires 'at most one function evaluation' in each iterative step. This Selective Function Evaluation method, referred to as GPBB-SFE in this paper, exhibits the desired convergence property when it is combined with a 'smoothed TV' or any other differentiable prior. This way, the proposed GPBB-SFE algorithm offers fast and guaranteed convergence to the desired 3DCBCT image with minimal computational complexity. We first applied this algorithm to a Shepp-Logan numerical phantom. We then applied to a CatPhan 600 physical phantom (The Phantom Laboratory, Salem, NY) and a clinically-treated head-and-neck patient, both acquired from the TrueBeam™ system (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA). Furthermore, we accelerated the reconstruction by implementing the algorithm on NVIDIA GTX 480 GPU card. We first compared GPBB-SFE with three recently proposed BB-based CBCT reconstruction methods available in the literature using Shepp-Logan numerical phantom with 40 projections. It is found that GPBB-SFE shows either faster convergence speed/time or superior convergence property compared to existing BB-based algorithms. With the CatPhan 600 physical phantom, the GPBB-SFE algorithm requires only 3 function evaluations in 30 iterations and reconstructs the standard, 364-projection FDK reconstruction quality image using only 60 projections. We then applied the algorithm to a clinically-treated head-and-neck patient. It was observed that the GPBB-SFE algorithm requires only 18 function evaluations in 30 iterations. Compared with the FDK algorithm with 364 projections, the GPBB-SFE algorithm produces visibly equivalent quality CBCT image for

  7. A Paley-Wiener theorem for generalized entire functions on infinite-dimensional spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khrennikov, A. Yu; Petersson, H.

    2001-04-01

    We study entire functions on infinite-dimensional spaces. The basis is the study of spaces of Gateaux holomorphic functions that are bounded on certain subsets (bounded entire functions). The main goal is to characterize the Fourier image of the corresponding spaces of generalized entire functions (ultra-distributions) by an infinite-dimensional Paley-Wiener theorem. We introduce entire functions of exponential type and prove a generalization of the classical Paley-Wiener theorem. The crucial point of our theory is the dimension-invariant estimate given by Lemma 4.12.

  8. Multiwavelet characterization of function spaces adapted to the Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakey, Joseph D.; Obeidat, S.; Pereyra, M. Cristina

    2000-12-01

    We use wavelets based ona modification of the Geronimo- Hardin-Massopust construction to define localized extension/restriction operators form half-spaces to their full spaces/boundaries respectively. These operations are continuous in Sobolev and Morrey space norms. We also prove estimates for multiresolution projections of pointwise products of functions in these spaces. These are two of the key steps in extending results of Federbush and of Cannone and Meyer concerning solutions of Navier-Stokes with initial data in Sobolev and Morrey spaces to the case of half spaces and, ultimately, to more general domains with boundary.

  9. Agonistic Anti-PDGF Receptor Autoantibodies from Patients with Systemic Sclerosis Impact Human Pulmonary Artery Smooth Muscle Cells Function In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Svegliati, Silvia; Amico, Donatella; Spadoni, Tatiana; Fischetti, Colomba; Finke, Doreen; Moroncini, Gianluca; Paolini, Chiara; Tonnini, Cecilia; Grieco, Antonella; Rovinelli, Marina; Funaro, Ada; Gabrielli, Armando

    2017-01-01

    One of the earliest events in the pathogenesis of systemic sclerosis (SSc) is microvasculature damage with intimal hyperplasia and accumulation of cells expressing PDGF receptor. Stimulatory autoantibodies targeting PDGF receptor have been detected in SSc patients and demonstrated to induce fibrosis in vivo and convert in vitro normal fibroblasts into SSc-like cells. Since there is no evidence of the role of anti-PDGF receptor autoantibodies in the pathogenesis of SSc vascular lesions, we investigated the biologic effect of agonistic anti-PDGF receptor autoantibodies from SSc patients on human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells and the signaling pathways involved. The synthetic (proliferation, migration, and type I collagen gene α1 chain expression) and contractile (smooth muscle-myosin heavy chain and smooth muscle-calponin expression) profiles of human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells were assessed in vitro after incubation with SSc anti-PDGF receptors stimulatory autoantibodies. The role of reactive oxygen species, NOX isoforms, and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) was investigated. Human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells acquired a synthetic phenotype characterized by higher growth rate, migratory activity, gene expression of type I collagen α1 chain, and less expression of markers characteristic of the contractile phenotype such as smooth muscle-myosin heavy chain and smooth muscle-calponin when stimulated with PDGF and autoantibodies against PDGF receptor, but not with normal IgG. This phenotypic profile is mediated by increased generation of reactive oxygen species and expression of NOX4 and mTORC1. Our data indicate that agonistic anti-PDGF receptor autoantibodies may contribute to the pathogenesis of SSc intimal hyperplasia.

  10. Agonistic Anti-PDGF Receptor Autoantibodies from Patients with Systemic Sclerosis Impact Human Pulmonary Artery Smooth Muscle Cells Function In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Svegliati, Silvia; Amico, Donatella; Spadoni, Tatiana; Fischetti, Colomba; Finke, Doreen; Moroncini, Gianluca; Paolini, Chiara; Tonnini, Cecilia; Grieco, Antonella; Rovinelli, Marina; Funaro, Ada; Gabrielli, Armando

    2017-01-01

    One of the earliest events in the pathogenesis of systemic sclerosis (SSc) is microvasculature damage with intimal hyperplasia and accumulation of cells expressing PDGF receptor. Stimulatory autoantibodies targeting PDGF receptor have been detected in SSc patients and demonstrated to induce fibrosis in vivo and convert in vitro normal fibroblasts into SSc-like cells. Since there is no evidence of the role of anti-PDGF receptor autoantibodies in the pathogenesis of SSc vascular lesions, we investigated the biologic effect of agonistic anti-PDGF receptor autoantibodies from SSc patients on human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells and the signaling pathways involved. The synthetic (proliferation, migration, and type I collagen gene α1 chain expression) and contractile (smooth muscle-myosin heavy chain and smooth muscle-calponin expression) profiles of human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells were assessed in vitro after incubation with SSc anti-PDGF receptors stimulatory autoantibodies. The role of reactive oxygen species, NOX isoforms, and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) was investigated. Human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells acquired a synthetic phenotype characterized by higher growth rate, migratory activity, gene expression of type I collagen α1 chain, and less expression of markers characteristic of the contractile phenotype such as smooth muscle-myosin heavy chain and smooth muscle-calponin when stimulated with PDGF and autoantibodies against PDGF receptor, but not with normal IgG. This phenotypic profile is mediated by increased generation of reactive oxygen species and expression of NOX4 and mTORC1. Our data indicate that agonistic anti-PDGF receptor autoantibodies may contribute to the pathogenesis of SSc intimal hyperplasia. PMID:28228756

  11. Smoothing error pitfalls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Clarmann, T.

    2014-04-01

    The difference due to the content of a priori information between a constrained retrieval and the true atmospheric state is usually represented by the so-called smoothing error. In this paper it is shown that the concept of the smoothing error is questionable because it is not compliant with Gaussian error propagation. The reason for this is that the smoothing error does not represent the expected deviation of the retrieval from the true state but the expected deviation of the retrieval from the atmospheric state sampled on an arbitrary grid, which is itself a smoothed representation of the true state. The idea of a sufficiently fine sampling of this reference atmospheric state is untenable because atmospheric variability occurs on all scales, implying that there is no limit beyond which the sampling is fine enough. Even the idealization of infinitesimally fine sampling of the reference state does not help because the smoothing error is applied to quantities which are only defined in a statistical sense, which implies that a finite volume of sufficient spatial extent is needed to meaningfully talk about temperature or concentration. Smoothing differences, however, which play a role when measurements are compared, are still a useful quantity if the involved a priori covariance matrix has been evaluated on the comparison grid rather than resulting from interpolation. This is, because the undefined component of the smoothing error, which is the effect of smoothing implied by the finite grid on which the measurements are compared, cancels out when the difference is calculated.

  12. Stopping smooth pursuit.

    PubMed

    Missal, Marcus; Heinen, Stephen J

    2017-04-19

    If a visual object of interest suddenly starts to move, we will try to follow it with a smooth movement of the eyes. This smooth pursuit response aims to reduce image motion on the retina that could blur visual perception. In recent years, our knowledge of the neural control of smooth pursuit initiation has sharply increased. However, stopping smooth pursuit eye movements is less well understood and will be discussed in this paper. The most straightforward way to study smooth pursuit stopping is by interrupting image motion on the retina. This causes eye velocity to decay exponentially towards zero. However, smooth pursuit stopping is not a passive response, as shown by behavioural and electrophysiological evidence. Moreover, smooth pursuit stopping is particularly influenced by active prediction of the upcoming end of the target. Here, we suggest that a particular class of inhibitory neurons of the brainstem, the omnipause neurons, could play a central role in pursuit stopping. Furthermore, the role of supplementary eye fields of the frontal cortex in smooth pursuit stopping is also discussed.This article is part of the themed issue 'Movement suppression: brain mechanisms for stopping and stillness'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  13. Minimum of a functional in a metric space and fixed points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arutyunov, A. V.; Gel'Man, B. D.

    2009-07-01

    The existence of minimizers is examined for a function defined on a metric space. Theorems are proved that assert the existence of minimizers, and examples of the functions for which these theorems are valid are given. Then, these theorems are applied to proving theorems on fixed points of univalent and multivalued mappings of metric spaces. Finally, coincident points of two mappings are examined.

  14. Quantum State Smoothing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guevara, Ivonne; Wiseman, Howard

    2015-10-01

    Smoothing is an estimation method whereby a classical state (probability distribution for classical variables) at a given time is conditioned on all-time (both earlier and later) observations. Here we define a smoothed quantum state for a partially monitored open quantum system, conditioned on an all-time monitoring-derived record. We calculate the smoothed distribution for a hypothetical unobserved record which, when added to the real record, would complete the monitoring, yielding a pure-state "quantum trajectory." Averaging the pure state over this smoothed distribution yields the (mixed) smoothed quantum state. We study how the choice of actual unraveling affects the purity increase over that of the conventional (filtered) state conditioned only on the past record.

  15. Quantum State Smoothing.

    PubMed

    Guevara, Ivonne; Wiseman, Howard

    2015-10-30

    Smoothing is an estimation method whereby a classical state (probability distribution for classical variables) at a given time is conditioned on all-time (both earlier and later) observations. Here we define a smoothed quantum state for a partially monitored open quantum system, conditioned on an all-time monitoring-derived record. We calculate the smoothed distribution for a hypothetical unobserved record which, when added to the real record, would complete the monitoring, yielding a pure-state "quantum trajectory." Averaging the pure state over this smoothed distribution yields the (mixed) smoothed quantum state. We study how the choice of actual unraveling affects the purity increase over that of the conventional (filtered) state conditioned only on the past record.

  16. BK channel-mediated relaxation of urinary bladder smooth muscle: a novel paradigm for phosphodiesterase type 4 regulation of bladder function.

    PubMed

    Xin, Wenkuan; Li, Ning; Cheng, Qiuping; Petkov, Georgi V

    2014-04-01

    Elevation of intracellular cAMP and activation of protein kinase A (PKA) lead to activation of large conductance voltage- and Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (BK) channels, thus attenuation of detrusor smooth muscle (DSM) contractility. In this study, we investigated the mechanism by which pharmacological inhibition of cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4) with rolipram or Ro-20-1724 (C(15)H(22)N(2)O(3)) suppresses guinea pig DSM excitability and contractility. We used high-speed line-scanning confocal microscopy, ratiometric fluorescence Ca(2+) imaging, and perforated whole-cell patch-clamp techniques on freshly isolated DSM cells, along with isometric tension recordings of DSM isolated strips. Rolipram caused an increase in the frequency of Ca(2+) sparks and the spontaneous transient BK currents (TBKCs), hyperpolarized the cell membrane potential (MP), and decreased the intracellular Ca(2+) levels. Blocking BK channels with paxilline reversed the hyperpolarizing effect of rolipram and depolarized the MP back to the control levels. In the presence of H-89 [N-[2-[[3-(4-bromophenyl)-2-propenyl]amino]ethyl]-5-isoquinolinesulfonamide dihydrochloride], a PKA inhibitor, rolipram did not cause MP hyperpolarization. Rolipram or Ro-20-1724 reduced DSM spontaneous and carbachol-induced phasic contraction amplitude, muscle force, duration, and frequency, and electrical field stimulation-induced contraction amplitude, muscle force, and tone. Paxilline recovered DSM contractility, which was suppressed by pretreatment with PDE4 inhibitors. Rolipram had reduced inhibitory effects on DSM contractility in DSM strips pretreated with paxilline. This study revealed a novel cellular mechanism whereby pharmacological inhibition of PDE4 leads to suppression of guinea pig DSM contractility by increasing the frequency of Ca(2+) sparks and the functionally coupled TBKCs, consequently hyperpolarizing DSM cell MP. Collectively, this decreases the global intracellular Ca(2+) levels and DSM

  17. Complete primary structure of vertebrate smooth muscle myosin heavy chain deduced from its complementary DNA sequence. Implications on topography and function of myosin.

    PubMed

    Yanagisawa, M; Hamada, Y; Katsuragawa, Y; Imamura, M; Mikawa, T; Masaki, T

    1987-11-20

    The 1979 amino acid sequence of embryonic chicken gizzard smooth muscle myosin heavy chain (MHC) have been determined by cloning and sequencing its cDNA. Genomic Southern analysis and Northern analysis with the cDNA sequence show that gizzard MHC is encoded by a single-copy gene, and this gene is expressed in the gizzard and aorta. The encoded protein has a calculated Mr of 229 X 10(3), and can be divided into a long alpha-helical rod and a globular head. Only 32 to 33% of the amino acid residues in the rod and 48 to 49% in the head are conserved when compared with nematode or vertebrate sarcomeric MHC sequences. However, the seven residue hydrophobic periodicity, together with the 28 and 196 residue repeat of charge distribution previously described in nematode myosin rod, are all present in the gizzard myosin rod. Two of the trypsin-sensitive sites in gizzard light meromyosin have been mapped by partial peptide sequencing to 99 nm and 60 nm from the tip of the myosin tail, where these sites coincide with the two "hinges" for the 6 S/10 S transition. In the head sequence, several polypeptide segments, including the regions around the putative ATP-binding site and the reactive thiol groups, are highly conserved. These areas presumably reflect conserved structural elements important for the function of myosin. A multi-domain folding model of myosin head is proposed on the basis of the conserved sequences, information on the topography of myosin in the literature, and the predicted secondary structures. In this model, Mg2+ ATP is bound to a pocket between two opposing alpha/beta domains, while actin undergoes electrostatic interactions with lysine-rich surface loops on two other domains. The actin-myosin interactions are thought to be modulated through relative movements of the domains induced by the binding of ATP.

  18. Functional interactions in smooth muscle: kinetic characterization of the relaxation and desensitization responses to a beta adrenergic agonist in the rabbit aorta.

    PubMed

    Keitz, S A; Osman, R; Clarke, W P; Goldfarb, J; Maayani, S

    1990-11-01

    Vascular smooth muscle tone is continuously modulated in vivo by the functional interaction of a variety of vasoconstrictor and vasodilator stimuli. Endogenous substances such as epinephrine simultaneously activate alpha adrenergic receptors that elicit muscle contraction and beta adrenergic receptors that relax the muscle. This study characterizes the beta adrenergic response in the isolated rabbit aorta precontracted with 1 microM phenylephrine. The beta adrenergic agonist isoproterenol (0.03-10 microM) produces a biphasic response that is composed of a rapid relaxation followed by a slower regaining of tension, which is identified as desensitization. An exploratory kinetic model that describes both the relaxation and the desensitization as first-order processes provides a good fit to the experimental data. The parameters used to describe the isoproterenol response are: 1) the observed rate constant for relaxation and its magnitude (krel and R, respectively), 2) the observed rate constant for desensitization and its magnitude (kdes and D, respectively) and 3) the observed delay in the onset of the desensitization response (td). Both the krel and the fractional relaxation were dependent on concentration of isoproterenol in a saturable manner (EC50 = 0.017 and 0.067 microM, respectively). No concentration dependence was observed for kdes, fractional desensitization and td (the average values +/- S.E.M. of these parameters are (4.7 +/- 0.2). 10(-3) sec-1, 0.83 +/- 0.02 and 191 +/- 6 sec, respectively). This work demonstrates that a kinetic approach is necessary to characterize the desensitization response and is also very useful in characterizing the kinetic and steady-state parameters of the relaxation response.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Myosin filament structure in vertebrate smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    The in vivo structure of the myosin filaments in vertebrate smooth muscle is unknown. Evidence from purified smooth muscle myosin and from some studies of intact smooth muscle suggests that they may have a nonhelical, side-polar arrangement of crossbridges. However, the bipolar, helical structure characteristic of myosin filaments in striated muscle has not been disproved for smooth muscle. We have used EM to investigate this question in a functionally diverse group of smooth muscles (from the vascular, gastrointestinal, reproductive, and visual systems) from mammalian, amphibian, and avian species. Intact muscle under physiological conditions, rapidly frozen and then freeze substituted, shows many myosin filaments with a square backbone in transverse profile. Transverse sections of fixed, chemically skinned muscles also show square backbones and, in addition, reveal projections (crossbridges) on only two opposite sides of the square. Filaments gently isolated from skinned smooth muscles and observed by negative staining show crossbridges with a 14.5-nm repeat projecting in opposite directions on opposite sides of the filament. Such filaments subjected to low ionic strength conditions show bare filament ends and an antiparallel arrangement of myosin tails along the length of the filament. All of these observations are consistent with a side-polar structure and argue against a bipolar, helical crossbridge arrangement. We conclude that myosin filaments in all smooth muscles, regardless of function, are likely to be side-polar. Such a structure could be an important factor in the ability of smooth muscles to contract by large amounts. PMID:8698822

  20. A k-space Green's function solution for acoustic initial value problems in homogeneous media with power law absorption.

    PubMed

    Treeby, Bradley E; Cox, B T

    2011-06-01

    An efficient Green's function solution for acoustic initial value problems in homogeneous media with power law absorption is derived. The solution is based on the homogeneous wave equation for lossless media with two additional terms. These terms are dependent on the fractional Laplacian and separately account for power law absorption and dispersion. Given initial conditions for the pressure and its temporal derivative, the solution allows the pressure field for any time t>0 to be calculated in a single step using the Fourier transform and an exact k-space time propagator. For regularly spaced Cartesian grids, the former can be computed efficiently using the fast Fourier transform. Because no time stepping is required, the solution facilitates the efficient computation of the pressure field in one, two, or three dimensions without stability constraints. Several computational aspects of the solution are discussed, including the effect of using a truncated Fourier series to represent discrete initial conditions, the use of smoothing, and the properties of the encapsulated absorption and dispersion.

  1. On s*g-continuous Functions on Topological Spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, M.; Hussain, Murad

    2010-11-01

    The aim of this paper is to introduce and study the concept of s*g-continuous and s*g-closed functions. We investigate their relation with already existing notions. We also introduce s*g-irresolute function and investigate its relation with s*g-continuous function. When the s*g-closed sets are preserved, is also studied. In the end, we define and study the notions of s*g-compactness and s*g-connectedness.

  2. Pulmonary function evaluation during and following Skylab space flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawin, C. F.; Nicogossian, A. E.; Schachter, A. P.; Rummel, J. A.; Michel, E. L.

    1977-01-01

    Cardiac output measurements were made in the laboratory during preflight and postflight exercise tests. Due to the magnitude of decreases in cardiac output following the first and second manned Skylab missions and because the method used is based upon normal pulmonary function, it was decided to perform more thorough pulmonary function screening in conjunction with the final and longest duration Skylab mission. This paper summarized pulmonary function data obtained during all three Skylab missions.

  3. Effect of Space Flight on Adrenal Medullary Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lelkes, Peter I.

    1999-01-01

    We hypothesize that microgravity conditions during space flight alter the expression and specific activities of the adrenal medullary CA synthesizing enzymes (CASE). Previously, we examined adrenals from six rats flown for six days aboard STS 54 and reported that microgravity induced a decrease in the expression and specific activity of rat adrenal medullary tyrosine hydroxylase, the rate limiting enzyme of CA synthesis, without affecting the expression of other CASE. In the past, we analyzed some of the > 300 adrenals from two previous Space Shuttle missions (PARE 03 and SLS 2). The preliminary results (a) attest to the good state of tissue preservation, thus proving the feasibility of subsequent large-scale evaluation, and (b) confirm and extend our previous findings. With this grant we will be able to expeditiously analyze all our specimens and to complete our studies in a timely fashion.

  4. Nanosatellite Demonstration of Multi-Functional Space Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-31

    built upon, and helped focus, the on-going BalloonSat program, termed Instrumentation Carrier for Aerospace Research in the Upper Stratosphere ( ICARUS ...of students, of a series of nanosatellite-scale payloads to altitudes approaching 100,000 ft by weather balloon; three ICARUS launches have occurred...to date since Spring 2005. In particular, the BEARSat thermal switch experiment was tested in space-like conditions on ICARUS missions and, if BEARSat

  5. Exploring the Functioning of Decision Space: A Review of the Available Health Systems Literature.

    PubMed

    Roman, Tamlyn Eslie; Cleary, Susan; McIntyre, Diane

    2017-02-27

    The concept of decision space holds appeal as an approach to disaggregating the elements that may influence decision-making in decentralized systems. This narrative review aims to explore the functioning of decision space and the factors that influence decision space. A narrative review of the literature was conducted with searches of online databases and academic journals including PubMed Central, Emerald, Wiley, Science Direct, JSTOR, and Sage. The articles were included in the review based on the criteria that they provided insight into the functioning of decision space either through the explicit application of or reference to decision space, or implicitly through discussion of decision-making related to organizational capacity or accountability mechanisms. The articles included in the review encompass literature related to decentralisation, management and decision space. The majority of the studies utilise qualitative methodologies to assess accountability mechanisms, organisational capacities such as finance, human resources and management, and the extent of decision space. Of the 138 articles retrieved, 76 articles were included in the final review. The literature supports Bossert's conceptualization of decision space as being related to organizational capacities and accountability mechanisms. These functions influence the decision space available within decentralized systems. The exact relationship between decision space and financial and human resource capacities needs to be explored in greater detail to determine the potential influence on system functioning.

  6. Exploring the Functioning of Decision Space: A Review of the Available Health Systems Literature

    PubMed Central

    Roman, Tamlyn Eslie; Cleary, Susan; McIntyre, Diane

    2017-01-01

    Background: The concept of decision space holds appeal as an approach to disaggregating the elements that may influence decision-making in decentralized systems. This narrative review aims to explore the functioning of decision space and the factors that influence decision space. Methods: A narrative review of the literature was conducted with searches of online databases and academic journals including PubMed Central, Emerald, Wiley, Science Direct, JSTOR, and Sage. The articles were included in the review based on the criteria that they provided insight into the functioning of decision space either through the explicit application of or reference to decision space, or implicitly through discussion of decision-making related to organizational capacity or accountability mechanisms. Results: The articles included in the review encompass literature related to decentralisation, management and decision space. The majority of the studies utilise qualitative methodologies to assess accountability mechanisms, organisational capacities such as finance, human resources and management, and the extent of decision space. Of the 138 articles retrieved, 76 articles were included in the final review. Conclusion: The literature supports Bossert’s conceptualization of decision space as being related to organizational capacities and accountability mechanisms. These functions influence the decision space available within decentralized systems. The exact relationship between decision space and financial and human resource capacities needs to be explored in greater detail to determine the potential influence on system functioning. PMID:28812832

  7. Green’s functions and energy eigenvalues for delta-perturbed space-fractional quantum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Nayga, M. M. Esguerra, J. P.

    2016-02-15

    Starting from the propagator, we introduced a time-ordered perturbation expansion and employed Wick rotation to obtain a general energy-dependent Green’s function expressions for space-fractional quantum systems with Dirac delta-function perturbation. We then obtained the Green’s functions and equations for the bound state energies for the space-fractional Schrödinger equation with single and double Dirac delta well potentials and the delta-perturbed infinite well.

  8. Effect of prolonged space flight on cardiac function and dimensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, W. L.; Epstein, S. E.; Griffith, J. M.; Goldstein, R. E.; Redwood, D. R.

    1977-01-01

    By taking advantage of the capabilities of echocardiography to measure noninvasively left ventricular volume, stroke volume, and ejection fraction, and of the fact that the astronauts were routinely subjected to lower body negative pressure (whereby cardiac filling is progressively decreased), it was possible to construct classic ventricular function curves noninvasively, thereby obviating the difficulties encountered in comparing cardiac function at different end-diastolic volumes preflight and postflight. In this manner, the effect of an 84-day period of weightlessness on cardiac structure and function was evaluated in the Skylab 4 astronauts.

  9. Smooth and Scrambled

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 19 June 2003

    A flat-floored crater in central Arabia hosts an interior crater with interesting ejecta. The scrambled patterns in the ejecta suggest fluidized flow during emplacement. This contrasts with the much smoother terrain on the left side of the image. Although there is some ambiguity, it appears that the smooth material has lapped up onto the ejecta, which raises the question of where the source is for this more recent flow of material.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 2.8, Longitude 37 East (323 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  10. Variational principle and one-point functions in three-dimensional flat space Einstein gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detournay, Stephane; Grumiller, Daniel; Schöller, Friedrich; Simón, Joan

    2014-04-01

    We provide a well-defined variational principle for three-dimensional flat space Einstein gravity by adding one-half of the Gibbons-Hawking-York boundary term to the bulk action. We check the zero-point function, recovering consistency with thermodynamics of flat space cosmologies. We then apply our result to calculate the one-point functions in flat space Einstein gravity for the vacuum and all flat space cosmologies. The results are compatible with the ones for the zero-mode charges obtained by canonical analysis.

  11. Distances in spaces of physical models: partition functions versus spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornelissen, Gunther; Kontogeorgis, Aristides

    2017-01-01

    We study the relation between convergence of partition functions (seen as general Dirichlet series) and convergence of spectra and their multiplicities. We describe applications to convergence in physical models, e.g., related to topology change and averaging in cosmology.

  12. Hydrodynamic function of biomimetic shark skin: effect of denticle pattern and spacing.

    PubMed

    Wen, Li; Weaver, James C; Thornycroft, Patrick J M; Lauder, George V

    2015-11-18

    The structure of shark skin has been the subject of numerous studies and recently biomimetic shark skin has been fabricated with rigid denticles (scales) on a flexible substrate. This artificial skin can bend and generate thrust when attached to a mechanical controller. The ability to control the manufacture of biomimetic shark skin facilitates manipulation of surface parameters and understanding the effects of changing denticle patterns on locomotion. In this paper we investigate the effect of changing the spacing and arrangement of denticles on the surface of biomimetic shark skin on both static and dynamic locomotor performance. We designed 3D-printed flexible membranes with different denticle patterns and spacings: (1) staggered-overlapped, (2) linear-overlapped, and (3) linear-non-overlapped, and compared these to a 3D-printed smooth-surfaced control. These 3D printed shark skin models were then tested in a flow tank with a mechanical flapping device that allowed us to either hold the models in a stationary position or move them dynamically. We swam the membranes at a frequency of 1 Hz with different heave amplitudes (from ±1 cm to ±3 cm) while measuring forces, torques, self-propelled swimming speed, and cost of transport (COT). Static tests revealed drag reduction of denticle patterns compared to a smooth control at low speeds, but increased drag at speeds above 25 cm s(-1). However, during dynamic (swimming) tests, the staggered-overlapped pattern produced the fastest swimming speeds with no significant increase in the COT at lower heave values. For instance, at a heave frequency of 1 Hz and amplitude of ±1 cm, swimming speed of the staggered-overlapped pattern increased by 25.2% over the smooth control. At higher heave amplitudes, significantly faster self-propelled swimming speeds were achieved by the staggered-overlapped pattern, but with higher COT. Only the staggered-overlapped pattern provides a significant swimming performance advantage over the

  13. Accurate estimators of correlation functions in Fourier space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sefusatti, E.; Crocce, M.; Scoccimarro, R.; Couchman, H. M. P.

    2016-08-01

    Efficient estimators of Fourier-space statistics for large number of objects rely on fast Fourier transforms (FFTs), which are affected by aliasing from unresolved small-scale modes due to the finite FFT grid. Aliasing takes the form of a sum over images, each of them corresponding to the Fourier content displaced by increasing multiples of the sampling frequency of the grid. These spurious contributions limit the accuracy in the estimation of Fourier-space statistics, and are typically ameliorated by simultaneously increasing grid size and discarding high-frequency modes. This results in inefficient estimates for e.g. the power spectrum when desired systematic biases are well under per cent level. We show that using interlaced grids removes odd images, which include the dominant contribution to aliasing. In addition, we discuss the choice of interpolation kernel used to define density perturbations on the FFT grid and demonstrate that using higher order interpolation kernels than the standard Cloud-In-Cell algorithm results in significant reduction of the remaining images. We show that combining fourth-order interpolation with interlacing gives very accurate Fourier amplitudes and phases of density perturbations. This results in power spectrum and bispectrum estimates that have systematic biases below 0.01 per cent all the way to the Nyquist frequency of the grid, thus maximizing the use of unbiased Fourier coefficients for a given grid size and greatly reducing systematics for applications to large cosmological data sets.

  14. Functional testing of the space station plasma contactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, Michael J.; Hamley, John A.; Sarver-Verhey, Timothy R.; Soulas, George C.

    1995-03-01

    A plasma contactor system has been baselined for the International Space Station Alpha (ISSA) to control the electrical potentials of surfaces to eliminate/mitigate damaging interactions with the space environment. The system represents a dual-use technology which is a direct outgrowth of the NASA electric propulsion program and, in particular, the technology development effort on ion thruster systems. The plasma contactor subsystems include a hollow cathode assembly, a power electronics unit, and an expellant management unit. Under a pre-flight development program these subsystems are being developed to the level of maturity appropriate for transfer to U.S. industry for final development. Development efforts for the hollow cathode assembly include design selection and refinement, validating its required lifetime, and quantifying the cathode performance and interface specifications. To date, cathode components have demonstrated over 10,000 hours lifetime, and a hollow cathode assembly has demonstrated over 3,000 ignitions. Additionally, preliminary integration testing of a hollow cathode assembly with a breadboard power electronics unit has been completed. This paper discusses test results and the development status of the plasma contactor subsystems for ISSA, and in particular, the hollow cathode assembly.

  15. Functional Assessment of NK and LAK Cells Following Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaur, Indreshpal; Pierson, Duane L.; Paloski, W. H. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Space flight associated stress alters some aspects of the human immune response. In this study, we determined the effects of 10 days aboard the Space Shuttle on the cytotoxic activity of NK and LAK cells. PBMCs were collected from 10-ml blood specimens from 5 astronauts 10 days before launch, immediately after landing, and again at 3 days after landing and stored at -80 C. All PBMCs were thawed simultaneously, and the cytotoxic activities of NK and LAK cells were measured by a 4 hour Cr-51 release assay. K562 cells were used to assess NK cell cytotoxicity. Following 4 days of IL-2 activation, the LAK cell cytotoxic activity was determined using K562 cells and Daudi cells as the target cells. NK cell cytotoxicity decreased at landing (p<.05) in 3/5 astronauts, and recovered to preflight levels by 3 days following landing; NK cell cytotoxicity was increased (p=0.1) in the remaining 2 astronauts at landing. In 4/5 astronauts, LAK cytotoxic activity was decreased at landing against K562 cells (p = 0.13) and Daudi cells (p = 0.08). Phenotyping of PBMC's and LAK cells showed alterations in some surface markers and adhesion molecules (CD11b, CD11c, CD11a, CD16, L-selectin, and CD3).

  16. Functional Assessment of NK and LAK Cells Following Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaur, Indreshpal; Pierson, Duane L.; Paloski, W. H. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Space flight associated stress alters some aspects of the human immune response. In this study, we determined the effects of 10 days aboard the Space Shuttle on the cytotoxic activity of NK and LAK cells. PBMCs were collected from 10-ml blood specimens from 5 astronauts 10 days before launch, immediately after landing, and again at 3 days after landing and stored at -80 C. All PBMCs were thawed simultaneously, and the cytotoxic activities of NK and LAK cells were measured by a 4 hour Cr-51 release assay. K562 cells were used to assess NK cell cytotoxicity. Following 4 days of IL-2 activation, the LAK cell cytotoxic activity was determined using K562 cells and Daudi cells as the target cells. NK cell cytotoxicity decreased at landing (p<.05) in 3/5 astronauts, and recovered to preflight levels by 3 days following landing; NK cell cytotoxicity was increased (p=0.1) in the remaining 2 astronauts at landing. In 4/5 astronauts, LAK cytotoxic activity was decreased at landing against K562 cells (p = 0.13) and Daudi cells (p = 0.08). Phenotyping of PBMC's and LAK cells showed alterations in some surface markers and adhesion molecules (CD11b, CD11c, CD11a, CD16, L-selectin, and CD3).

  17. A global minimization algorithm for Tikhonov functionals with p-convex (p\\,\\geqslant \\,2) penalty terms in Banach spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Min; Wang, Wei

    2016-10-01

    We extend the globally convergent TIGRA method in Ramlau (2003 Inverse Prob. 19 433-65) for the computation of a minimizer of the Tikhonov-type functional with the p-convex (p≥slant 2) penalty terms Θ for nonlinear forward operators in Banach spaces. The Θ are allowed to be non-smooth to include {L}p-{L}1 or {L}p- TV (total variation) functionals, which are significant in reconstructing special features of solutions such as sparsity and discontinuities. The proposed TIGRA-Θ method uses a dual gradient descent method in the inner iteration and linearly decreases the regularization parameter in the outer iteration. We present the global convergence analysis for the algorithm under suitable parameter selections, and the convergence rate results are provided under both a priori and a posteriori stopping rules. Two numerical examples—an auto-convolution problem and a parameter identification problem—are presented to illustrate the theoretic analysis and verify the effectiveness of the method.

  18. Discrete square root smoothing.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaminski, P. G.; Bryson, A. E., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    The basic techniques applied in the square root least squares and square root filtering solutions are applied to the smoothing problem. Both conventional and square root solutions are obtained by computing the filtered solutions, then modifying the results to include the effect of all measurements. A comparison of computation requirements indicates that the square root information smoother (SRIS) is more efficient than conventional solutions in a large class of fixed interval smoothing problems.

  19. Quantum Theta Functions and Gabor Frames for Modulation Spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luef, Franz; Manin, Yuri I.

    2009-06-01

    Representations of the celebrated Heisenberg commutation relations in quantum mechanics (and their exponentiated versions) form the starting point for a number of basic constructions, both in mathematics and mathematical physics (geometric quantization, quantum tori, classical and quantum theta functions) and signal analysis (Gabor analysis). In this paper we will try to bridge the two communities, represented by the two co-authors: that of noncommutative geometry and that of signal analysis. After providing a brief comparative dictionary of the two languages, we will show, e.g. that the Janssen representation of Gabor frames with generalized Gaussians as Gabor atoms yields in a natural way quantum theta functions, and that the Rieffel scalar product and associativity relations underlie both the functional equations for quantum thetas and the Fundamental Identity of Gabor analysis.

  20. Pulmonary function evaluation during and following Skylab space flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawin, C. F.; Nicogossian, A. E.; Schachter, A. P.; Rummel, J. A.; Michel, E. L.

    1974-01-01

    Previous experience during the Apollo postflight exercise testing indicated no major changes in pulmonary function. Although pulmonary function has been studied in detail following exposure to hypoxic and hyperoxic environments, few studies have dealt with normoxic environments at reduced total pressure as encountered during the Skylab missions. Forced vital capacity was measured during the preflight and postflight periods of the Skylab 2 mission. Initial in-flight measurements of vital capacity were obtained during the last two weeks of the second manned mission (Skylab 3). Comprehensive pulmonary function screening was accomplished during the Skylab 4 mission. The primary measurements made during Skylab 4 testing included residual volume determination, closing volume, vital capacity, and forced vital capacity and its derivatives. In addition, comprehensive in-flight vital capacity measurements were made during the Skylab 4 mission. Vital capacity was decreased slightly during flight in all Skylab 4 crewmen. No major preflight to postflight changes were observed in the other parameters.

  1. Space Tug avionics definition study. Volume 2: Avionics functional requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Flight and ground operational phases of the tug/shuttle system are analyzed to determine the general avionics support functions that are needed during each of the mission phases and sub-phases. Each of these general support functions is then expanded into specific avionics system requirements, which are then allocated to the appropriate avionics subsystems. This process is then repeated at the next lower level of detail where these subsystem requirements are allocated to each of the major components that comprise a subsystem.

  2. A generalized smoothness criterion for acoustic-to-articulatory inversion

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Prasanta Kumar; Narayanan, Shrikanth

    2010-01-01

    The many-to-one mapping from representations in the speech articulatory space to acoustic space renders the associated acoustic-to-articulatory inverse mapping non-unique. Among various techniques, imposing smoothness constraints on the articulator trajectories is one of the common approaches to handle the non-uniqueness in the acoustic-to-articulatory inversion problem. This is because, articulators typically move smoothly during speech production. A standard smoothness constraint is to minimize the energy of the difference of the articulatory position sequence so that the articulator trajectory is smooth and low-pass in nature. Such a fixed definition of smoothness is not always realistic or adequate for all articulators because different articulators have different degrees of smoothness. In this paper, an optimization formulation is proposed for the inversion problem, which includes a generalized smoothness criterion. Under such generalized smoothness settings, the smoothness parameter can be chosen depending on the specific articulator in a data-driven fashion. In addition, this formulation allows estimation of articulatory positions recursively over time without any loss in performance. Experiments with the MOCHA TIMIT database show that the estimated articulator trajectories obtained using such a generalized smoothness criterion have lower RMS error and higher correlation with the actual measured trajectories compared to those obtained using a fixed smoothness constraint. PMID:20968386

  3. Dialogic Space: Intersections between Dialogic Teaching and Systemic Functional Linguistics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammond, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this article is to foster dialogue between proponents of Alexander's notion of dialogic teaching and those working with educational linguistics--in particular those working with systemic functional theory. To this end, the article begins by highlighting important points of alignment between dialogic teaching and systemic theory: their…

  4. Dialogic Space: Intersections between Dialogic Teaching and Systemic Functional Linguistics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammond, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this article is to foster dialogue between proponents of Alexander's notion of dialogic teaching and those working with educational linguistics--in particular those working with systemic functional theory. To this end, the article begins by highlighting important points of alignment between dialogic teaching and systemic theory: their…

  5. The relationship between cognitive function and life space: the potential role of personal control beliefs.

    PubMed

    Sartori, Andrea C; Wadley, Virginia G; Clay, Olivio J; Parisi, Jeanine M; Rebok, George W; Crowe, Michael

    2012-06-01

    We examined the relationship of cognitive and functional measures with life space (a measure of spatial mobility examining extent of movement within a person's environment) in older adults, and investigated the potential moderating role of personal control beliefs. Internal control beliefs reflect feelings of competence and personal agency, while attributions of external control imply a more dependent or passive point of view. Participants were 2,737 adults from the ACTIVE study, with a mean age of 74 years. Females comprised 76% of the sample, with good minority representation (27% African American). In multiple regression models controlling for demographic factors, cognitive domains of memory, reasoning, and processing speed were significantly associated with life space (p < .001 for each), and reasoning ability appeared most predictive (B = .117). Measures of everyday function also showed significant associations with life space, independent from the traditional cognitive measures. Interactions between cognitive function and control beliefs were tested, and external control beliefs moderated the relationship between memory and life space, with the combination of high objective memory and low external control beliefs yielding the highest life space (t = -2.07; p = .039). In conclusion, older adults with better cognitive function have a larger overall life space. Performance-based measures of everyday function may also be useful in assessing the functional outcome of life space. Additionally, subjective external control beliefs may moderate the relationship between objective cognitive function and life space. Future studies examining the relationships between these factors longitudinally appear worthwhile to further elucidate the interrelationships of cognitive function, control beliefs, and life space. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved

  6. The Relationship Between Cognitive Function and Life Space: The Potential Role of Personal Control Beliefs

    PubMed Central

    Sartori, Andrea C.; Wadley, Virginia G.; Clay, Olivio J.; Parisi, Jeanine M.; Rebok, George W.; Crowe, Michael

    2011-01-01

    We examined the relationship of cognitive and functional measures with life space (a measure of spatial mobility examining extent of movement within a person’s environment) in older adults, and investigated the potential moderating role of personal control beliefs. Internal control beliefs reflect feelings of competence and personal agency, while attributions of external control imply a more dependent or passive point of view. Participants were 2,737 adults from the ACTIVE study, with a mean age of 74 years. Females comprised 76% of the sample, with good minority representation (27% African American). In multiple regression models controlling for demographic factors, cognitive domains of memory, reasoning, and processing speed were significantly associated with life space (p<.001 for each), and reasoning ability appeared most predictive (B=.117). Measures of everyday function also showed significant associations with life space, independent from the traditional cognitive measures. Interactions between cognitive function and control beliefs were tested, and external control beliefs moderated the relationship between memory and life space, with the combination of high objective memory and low external control beliefs yielding the highest life space (t=−2.07; p=.039). In conclusion, older adults with better cognitive function have a larger overall life space. Performance-based measures of everyday function may also be useful in assessing the functional outcome of life space. Additionally, subjective external control beliefs may moderate the relationship between objective cognitive function and life space. Future studies examining the relationships between these factors longitudinally appear worthwhile to further elucidate the interrelationships of cognitive function, control beliefs, and life space. PMID:21875217

  7. Smoothing error pitfalls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Clarmann, T.

    2014-09-01

    The difference due to the content of a priori information between a constrained retrieval and the true atmospheric state is usually represented by a diagnostic quantity called smoothing error. In this paper it is shown that, regardless of the usefulness of the smoothing error as a diagnostic tool in its own right, the concept of the smoothing error as a component of the retrieval error budget is questionable because it is not compliant with Gaussian error propagation. The reason for this is that the smoothing error does not represent the expected deviation of the retrieval from the true state but the expected deviation of the retrieval from the atmospheric state sampled on an arbitrary grid, which is itself a smoothed representation of the true state; in other words, to characterize the full loss of information with respect to the true atmosphere, the effect of the representation of the atmospheric state on a finite grid also needs to be considered. The idea of a sufficiently fine sampling of this reference atmospheric state is problematic because atmospheric variability occurs on all scales, implying that there is no limit beyond which the sampling is fine enough. Even the idealization of infinitesimally fine sampling of the reference state does not help, because the smoothing error is applied to quantities which are only defined in a statistical sense, which implies that a finite volume of sufficient spatial extent is needed to meaningfully discuss temperature or concentration. Smoothing differences, however, which play a role when measurements are compared, are still a useful quantity if the covariance matrix involved has been evaluated on the comparison grid rather than resulting from interpolation and if the averaging kernel matrices have been evaluated on a grid fine enough to capture all atmospheric variations that the instruments are sensitive to. This is, under the assumptions stated, because the undefined component of the smoothing error, which is the

  8. A Smoothed Eclipse Model for Solar Electric Propulsion Trajectory Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aziz, Jonathan D.; Scheeres, Daniel J.; Parker, Jeffrey S.; Englander, Jacob A.

    2017-01-01

    Solar electric propulsion (SEP) is the dominant design option for employing low-thrust propulsion on a space mission. Spacecraft solar arrays power the SEP system but are subject to blackout periods during solar eclipse conditions. Discontinuity in power available to the spacecraft must be accounted for in trajectory optimization, but gradient-based methods require a differentiable power model. This work presents a power model that smooths the eclipse transition from total eclipse to total sunlight with a logistic function. Example trajectories are computed with differential dynamic programming, a second-order gradient-based method.

  9. A numerical optimization approach to generate smoothing spherical splines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machado, L.; Monteiro, M. Teresa T.

    2017-01-01

    Approximating data in curved spaces is a common procedure that is extremely required by modern applications arising, for instance, in aerospace and robotics industries. Here, we are particularly interested in finding smoothing cubic splines that best fit given data in the Euclidean sphere. To achieve this aim, a least squares optimization problem based on the minimization of a certain cost functional is formulated. To solve the problem a numerical algorithm is implemented using several routines from MATLAB toolboxes. The proposed algorithm is shown to be easy to implement, very accurate and precise for spherical data chosen randomly.

  10. Airway smooth muscle growth in asthma: proliferation, hypertrophy, and migration.

    PubMed

    Bentley, J Kelley; Hershenson, Marc B

    2008-01-01

    Increased airway smooth muscle mass is present in fatal and non-fatal asthma. However, little information is available regarding the cellular mechanism (i.e., hyperplasia vs. hypertrophy). Even less information exists regarding the functional consequences of airway smooth muscle remodeling. It would appear that increased airway smooth muscle mass would tend to increase airway narrowing and airflow obstruction. However, the precise effects of increased airway smooth muscle mass on airway narrowing are not known. This review will consider the evidence for airway smooth muscle cell proliferation and hypertrophy in asthma, potential functional effects, and biochemical mechanisms.

  11. Second-Order Perturbation Theory for Generalized Active Space Self-Consistent-Field Wave Functions.

    PubMed

    Ma, Dongxia; Li Manni, Giovanni; Olsen, Jeppe; Gagliardi, Laura

    2016-07-12

    A multireference second-order perturbation theory approach based on the generalized active space self-consistent-field (GASSCF) wave function is presented. Compared with the complete active space (CAS) and restricted active space (RAS) wave functions, GAS wave functions are more flexible and can employ larger active spaces and/or different truncations of the configuration interaction expansion. With GASSCF, one can explore chemical systems that are not affordable with either CASSCF or RASSCF. Perturbation theory to second order on top of GAS wave functions (GASPT2) has been implemented to recover the remaining electron correlation. The method has been benchmarked by computing the chromium dimer ground-state potential energy curve. These calculations show that GASPT2 gives results similar to CASPT2 even with a configuration interaction expansion much smaller than the corresponding CAS expansion.

  12. Reinterpreting space, time lags, and functional responses in ecological models.

    PubMed

    Keeling, M J; Wilson, H B; Pacala, S W

    2000-12-01

    Natural enemy-victim interactions are of major applied importance and of fundamental interest to ecologists. A key question is what stabilizes these interactions, allowing the long-term coexistence of the two species. Three main theoretical explanations have been proposed: behavioral responses, time-dependent factors such as delayed density dependence, and spatial heterogeneity. Here, using the powerful moment-closure technique, we show a fundamental equivalence between these three elements. Limited movement by organisms is a ubiquitous feature of ecological systems, allowing spatial structure to develop; we show that the effects of this can be naturally described in terms of time lags or within-generation functional responses.

  13. Higher Eyes in the Sky: The Feasibility of Moving AWACS and JSTARS Functions into Space

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-06-01

    GRANT NUMBER 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Higher Eyes in the Sky: The Feasibility of Moving AWACS and JSTARS Functions into Space Unclassified 5c. PROGRAM...703 767-9007 DSN 427-9007 HIGHER EYES IN THE SKY: THE FEASIBILITY OF MOVING AWACS AND JSTARS FUNCTIONS INTO SPACE BY MAJOR KIM CORCORAN A THESIS...enjoyed a much higher operations rate than expected and contain outdated, and increasingly difficult to maintain, computer technology and radar

  14. Optimal Space Station solar array gimbal angle determination via radial basis function neural networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clancy, Daniel J.; Oezguener, Uemit; Graham, Ronald E.

    1994-01-01

    The potential for excessive plume impingement loads on Space Station Freedom solar arrays, caused by jet firings from an approaching Space Shuttle, is addressed. An artificial neural network is designed to determine commanded solar array beta gimbal angle for minimum plume loads. The commanded angle would be determined dynamically. The network design proposed involves radial basis functions as activation functions. Design, development, and simulation of this network design are discussed.

  15. Functional requirements for onboard management of space shuttle consumables, volume 2.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graf, P. J.; Herwig, H. A.; Neel, L. W.

    1973-01-01

    A study was conducted to develop the functional requirements for onboard management of space shuttle consumables. A specific consumables management concept for the space shuttle vehicle was developed and the functional requirements for the onboard portion of the concept were generated. Consumables management is the process of controlling or influencing the usage of expendable materials involved in vehicle subsystem operation. The subsystems considered in the study are: (1) propulsion, (2) power generation, and (3) environmental and life support.

  16. Smoothing Splines: Regression, Derivatives and Deconvolution.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-11-01

    1977 ). Solutions of Ill - posed Problems . V. H. Winston and Sons. Wahba, G. (1975). Smoothing noisy data with spline functions. Num. Math., 24, 309...ds . (1.3) Many examples of this type may be found in Tikhonov and Arsenin ( 1977 ). The method of regularization is used to control the instability... solutions of certain minimax problems , Powell (1981) and Speckman (1981). It appears that flexibility is lost by guarding against worst cases. Smoothing

  17. Choosing compact support of radial basis function based on landmarks space distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xuan; Pei, Jihong; Zhang, Zhixiong

    2007-12-01

    In image local elastic transformation, compact support radial basis functions are used to implement image elastic deformation. The elastic deformation area is related to the support of the radial basis function. However, how to choose the support based on space distribution of landmarks still is an unresolved problem. In this paper, the relation between the support and three landmarks space locations is analyzed using simple triangle structure for Wendland radial basis function. Moreover, for landmarks set, Delaunay triangle is constructed to obtain the support of each triangle, and the optimal support of radial basis function is chosen as the maximum. Experiments of artificial images and medial images show the feasibility of our conclusions.

  18. EDF: Computing electron number probability distribution functions in real space from molecular wave functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francisco, E.; Pendás, A. Martín; Blanco, M. A.

    2008-04-01

    Given an N-electron molecule and an exhaustive partition of the real space ( R) into m arbitrary regions Ω,Ω,…,Ω ( ⋃i=1mΩ=R), the edf program computes all the probabilities P(n,n,…,n) of having exactly n electrons in Ω, n electrons in Ω,…, and n electrons ( n+n+⋯+n=N) in Ω. Each Ω may correspond to a single basin (atomic domain) or several such basins (functional group). In the later case, each atomic domain must belong to a single Ω. The program can manage both single- and multi-determinant wave functions which are read in from an aimpac-like wave function description ( .wfn) file (T.A. Keith et al., The AIMPAC95 programs, http://www.chemistry.mcmaster.ca/aimpac, 1995). For multi-determinantal wave functions a generalization of the original .wfn file has been introduced. The new format is completely backwards compatible, adding to the previous structure a description of the configuration interaction (CI) coefficients and the determinants of correlated wave functions. Besides the .wfn file, edf only needs the overlap integrals over all the atomic domains between the molecular orbitals (MO). After the P(n,n,…,n) probabilities are computed, edf obtains from them several magnitudes relevant to chemical bonding theory, such as average electronic populations and localization/delocalization indices. Regarding spin, edf may be used in two ways: with or without a splitting of the P(n,n,…,n) probabilities into α and β spin components. Program summaryProgram title: edf Catalogue identifier: AEAJ_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEAJ_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 5387 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 52 381 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran 77 Computer

  19. From direct-space discrepancy functions to crystallographic least squares.

    PubMed

    Giacovazzo, Carmelo

    2015-01-01

    Crystallographic least squares are a fundamental tool for crystal structure analysis. In this paper their properties are derived from functions estimating the degree of similarity between two electron-density maps. The new approach leads also to modifications of the standard least-squares procedures, potentially able to improve their efficiency. The role of the scaling factor between observed and model amplitudes is analysed: the concept of unlocated model is discussed and its scattering contribution is combined with that arising from the located model. Also, the possible use of an ancillary parameter, to be associated with the classical weight related to the variance of the observed amplitudes, is studied. The crystallographic discrepancy factors, basic tools often combined with least-squares procedures in phasing approaches, are analysed. The mathematical approach here described includes, as a special case, the so-called vector refinement, used when accurate estimates of the target phases are available.

  20. Radon-Nikodým derivatives for vector measures belonging to Köthe function spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calabuig, J. M.; Gregori, P.; Sánchez Pérez, E. A.

    2008-12-01

    Let m, n be a couple of vector measures with values on a Banach space. We develop a separation argument which provides a characterization of when the Radon-Nikodým derivative of n with respect to m--in the sense of the Bartle-Dunford-Schwartz integral--exists and belongs to a particular sublattice Z([mu]) of the space of integrable functions L1(m). We show that this theorem is in fact a particular feature of our separation argument, which can be applied to prove other results in both the vector measure and the function space settings.

  1. Comment on "Discretization Problems for Functional Integrals in Phase Space"

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-02-25

    7 , m- -P-- - - -50- 11 PROFESSIONAL PAPER 281 IMay 1980 o COMMENT ON "DISC RETIZATI ON PROBLEMS OF FUNCTIONAL INTEGRALS IN PHASE SPACE " Mau rice M...on "Discretization problems of functional integrals in phase space " Maurice M. Mizrahi Centerfor Naval Analyses of the University of Rocheste llOONorth...m ’(t)p"(l)dw(p,q) , (2) lina f q(t)p2 (l’)dw(p.q)-ih f p(t)dw(p.q) where a, is phase space and w is the "measure" (the equivalence of these

  2. Space Station data system analysis/architecture study. Task 1: Functional requirements definition, DR-5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The initial task in the Space Station Data System (SSDS) Analysis/Architecture Study is the definition of the functional and key performance requirements for the SSDS. The SSDS is the set of hardware and software, both on the ground and in space, that provides the basic data management services for Space Station customers and systems. The primary purpose of the requirements development activity was to provide a coordinated, documented requirements set as a basis for the system definition of the SSDS and for other subsequent study activities. These requirements should also prove useful to other Space Station activities in that they provide an indication of the scope of the information services and systems that will be needed in the Space Station program. The major results of the requirements development task are as follows: (1) identification of a conceptual topology and architecture for the end-to-end Space Station Information Systems (SSIS); (2) development of a complete set of functional requirements and design drivers for the SSIS; (3) development of functional requirements and key performance requirements for the Space Station Data System (SSDS); and (4) definition of an operating concept for the SSIS. The operating concept was developed both from a Space Station payload customer and operator perspective in order to allow a requirements practicality assessment.

  3. Self-calibrated correlation imaging with k-space variant correlation functions.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu; Edalati, Masoud; Du, Xingfu; Wang, Hui; Cao, Jie J

    2017-07-07

    Correlation imaging is a previously developed high-speed MRI framework that converts parallel imaging reconstruction into the estimate of correlation functions. The presented work aims to demonstrate this framework can provide a speed gain over parallel imaging by estimating k-space variant correlation functions. Because of Fourier encoding with gradients, outer k-space data contain higher spatial-frequency image components arising primarily from tissue boundaries. As a result of tissue-boundary sparsity in the human anatomy, neighboring k-space data correlation varies from the central to the outer k-space. By estimating k-space variant correlation functions with an iterative self-calibration method, correlation imaging can benefit from neighboring k-space data correlation associated with both coil sensitivity encoding and tissue-boundary sparsity, thereby providing a speed gain over parallel imaging that relies only on coil sensitivity encoding. This new approach is investigated in brain imaging and free-breathing neonatal cardiac imaging. Correlation imaging performs better than existing parallel imaging techniques in simulated brain imaging acceleration experiments. The higher speed enables real-time data acquisition for neonatal cardiac imaging in which physiological motion is fast and non-periodic. With k-space variant correlation functions, correlation imaging gives a higher speed than parallel imaging and offers the potential to image physiological motion in real-time. Magn Reson Med, 2017. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  4. Analysis of crew functions as an aid in Space Station interior layout

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinberg, A. L.; Tullis, Thomas S.; Bied, Barbra

    1986-01-01

    The Space Station must be designed to facilitate all of the functions that its crew will perform, both on-duty and off-duty, as efficiently and comfortably as possible. This paper examines the functions to be performed by the Space Station crew in order to make inferences about the design of an interior layout that optimizes crew productivity. Twenty-seven crew functions were defined, as well as five criteria for assessing relationships among all pairs of those functions. Hierarchical clustering and multidimensional scaling techniques were used to visually summarize the relationships. A key result was the identification of two dimensions for describing the configuration of crew functions: 'Private-Public' and 'Group-Individual'. Seven specific recommendations for Space Station interior layout were derived from the analyses.

  5. Functional architecture of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate signaling in restricted spaces of myoendothelial projections.

    PubMed

    Ledoux, Jonathan; Taylor, Mark S; Bonev, Adrian D; Hannah, Rachael M; Solodushko, Viktoriya; Shui, Bo; Tallini, Yvonne; Kotlikoff, Michael I; Nelson, Mark T

    2008-07-15

    Calcium (Ca(2+)) release through inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (IP(3)Rs) regulates the function of virtually every mammalian cell. Unlike ryanodine receptors, which generate local Ca(2+) events ("sparks") that transmit signals to the juxtaposed cell membrane, a similar functional architecture has not been reported for IP(3)Rs. Here, we have identified spatially fixed, local Ca(2+) release events ("pulsars") in vascular endothelial membrane domains that project through the internal elastic lamina to adjacent smooth muscle membranes. Ca(2+) pulsars are mediated by IP(3)Rs in the endothelial endoplasmic reticulum of these membrane projections. Elevation of IP(3) by the endothelium-dependent vasodilator, acetylcholine, increased the frequency of Ca(2+) pulsars, whereas blunting IP(3) production, blocking IP(3)Rs, or depleting endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) inhibited these events. The elementary properties of Ca(2+) pulsars were distinct from ryanodine-receptor-mediated Ca(2+) sparks in smooth muscle and from IP(3)-mediated Ca(2+) puffs in Xenopus oocytes. The intermediate conductance, Ca(2+)-sensitive potassium (K(Ca)3.1) channel also colocalized to the endothelial projections, and blockage of this channel caused an 8-mV depolarization. Inhibition of Ca(2+) pulsars also depolarized to a similar extent, and blocking K(Ca)3.1 channels was without effect in the absence of pulsars. Our results support a mechanism of IP(3) signaling in which Ca(2+) release is spatially restricted to transmit intercellular signals.

  6. The ESO Slice Project (ESP) galaxy redshift survey. VII. The redshift and real-space correlation functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzzo, L.; Bartlett, J. G.; Cappi, A.; Maurogordato, S.; Zucca, E.; Zamorani, G.; Balkowski, C.; Blanchard, A.; Cayatte, V.; Chincarini, G.; Collins, C. A.; Maccagni, D.; MacGillivray, H.; Merighi, R.; Mignoli, M.; Proust, D.; Ramella, M.; Scaramella, R.; Stirpe, G. M.; Vettolani, G.

    2000-03-01

    We present analyses of the two-point correlation properties of the ESO Slice Project (ESP) galaxy redshift survey, both in redshift and real space. From the redshift-space correlation function $xi (r) i(s) we are able to trace positive clustering out to separations as large as 50 h^{-1} Mpc, after which xi (r) i(s) smoothly breaks down, crossing the zero value between 60 and 80 h^{-1} Mpc. This is best seen from the whole magnitude-limited redshift catalogue, using the J_3 miniμm-variance weighting estimator. xi (r) i(s) is reasonably well described by a shallow power law with \\gamma\\sim 1.5 between 3 and 50 h^{-1} Mpc, while on smaller scales (0.2-2 h^{-1} Mpc) it has a shallower slope (\\gamma\\sim 1). This flattening is shown to be mostly due to the redshift-space damping produced by virialized structures, and is less evident when volume-limited samples of the survey are analysed. We examine the full effect of redshift-space distortions by computing the two-dimensional correlation function xi (r) i(r_p,\\pi) , from which we project out the real-space xi (r) i(r) below 10 h^{-1} Mpc. This function is well described by a power-law model (r/r_o)^{-\\gamma}, with r_o=4.15^{+0.20}_{-0.21} h^{-1} Mpc and \\gamma=1.67^{+0.07}_{-0.09} for the whole magnitude-limited catalogue. Comparison to other redshift surveys shows a consistent picture in which galaxy clustering remains positive out to separations of 50 h^{-1} Mpc or larger, in substantial agreement with the results obtained from angular surveys like the APM and EDSGC. Also the shape of the two-point correlation function is remarkably unanimous among these data sets, in all cases requiring more power on scales larger than 5 h^{-1} Mpc (a `shoulder'), with respect to a simple extrapolation of the canonical xi (r) i(r) =(r/5)^{-1.8}. The analysis of xi (r) i(s) for volume-limited subsamples with different luminosity shows evidence of luminosity segregation only for the most luminous sample with Mb_J <= -20.5. For

  7. Radiation durability and functional reliability of polymeric materials in space systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haruvy, Y.

    Polymeric materials are preferred for the light-weight construction of space-systems. Materials in space systems are required to fulfill a complete set of specifications, at utmost reliability, throughout the whole period of service in space, while being exposed to the hazardous influence of the space environment. The major threats of the space environment in orbits at the geostationary altitude (GSO) are implied by the ionizing radiations, the main constituents of which are highly energetic protons (affecting mainly the surface) and the fast electrons (which produce the main threat to the electronic components). The maximum dose of ionizing radiation (within the limits of uncertainty of the calculations) at the surface of a material mounted on a space system, namely the "Skin-Dose", is ca. 2500 Mrads/yr. Space systems such as telecommunication satellites are planned to serve for prolonged periods of 30 years and longer. The cumulative predicted dose of ionizing-radiation over such periods presents a severe threat of chemical degradation to most of the polymeric construction materials commonly utilized in space systems. The reliability of functioning of each of the polymeric materials must be evaluated in detail, considering each of the relevant typical threats, such as ionizing-radiation, UV radiation, meteoroides flux, thermal cycling and ultra-high vacuum. For each of the exposed materials, conservation of the set of functional characteristics such as mechanical integrity, electrical and thermo-optical properties, electrical conductivity, surface charging and outgassing properties, which may cause contamination of neighboring systems, is evaluated. The reliability of functioning of the materials exposed to the space environment can thus be predicted, utilizing data from the literature, experimental results reported from space flights and laboratory simulations, and by chemical similarity of untested polymers to others, which are widely experienced for space uses.

  8. Spectral functions with the density matrix renormalization group: Krylov-space approach for correction vectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nocera, A.; Alvarez, G.

    2016-11-01

    Frequency-dependent correlations, such as the spectral function and the dynamical structure factor, help illustrate condensed matter experiments. Within the density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) framework, an accurate method for calculating spectral functions directly in frequency is the correction-vector method. The correction vector can be computed by solving a linear equation or by minimizing a functional. This paper proposes an alternative to calculate the correction vector: to use the Krylov-space approach. This paper then studies the accuracy and performance of the Krylov-space approach, when applied to the Heisenberg, the t-J, and the Hubbard models. The cases studied indicate that the Krylov-space approach can be more accurate and efficient than the conjugate gradient, and that the error of the former integrates best when a Krylov-space decomposition is also used for ground state DMRG.

  9. Spectral functions with the density matrix renormalization group: Krylov-space approach for correction vectors

    DOE PAGES

    None, None

    2016-11-21

    Frequency-dependent correlations, such as the spectral function and the dynamical structure factor, help illustrate condensed matter experiments. Within the density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) framework, an accurate method for calculating spectral functions directly in frequency is the correction-vector method. The correction vector can be computed by solving a linear equation or by minimizing a functional. Our paper proposes an alternative to calculate the correction vector: to use the Krylov-space approach. This paper also studies the accuracy and performance of the Krylov-space approach, when applied to the Heisenberg, the t-J, and the Hubbard models. The cases we studied indicate that themore » Krylov-space approach can be more accurate and efficient than the conjugate gradient, and that the error of the former integrates best when a Krylov-space decomposition is also used for ground state DMRG.« less

  10. Spectral functions with the density matrix renormalization group: Krylov-space approach for correction vectors

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2016-11-21

    Frequency-dependent correlations, such as the spectral function and the dynamical structure factor, help illustrate condensed matter experiments. Within the density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) framework, an accurate method for calculating spectral functions directly in frequency is the correction-vector method. The correction vector can be computed by solving a linear equation or by minimizing a functional. Our paper proposes an alternative to calculate the correction vector: to use the Krylov-space approach. This paper also studies the accuracy and performance of the Krylov-space approach, when applied to the Heisenberg, the t-J, and the Hubbard models. The cases we studied indicate that the Krylov-space approach can be more accurate and efficient than the conjugate gradient, and that the error of the former integrates best when a Krylov-space decomposition is also used for ground state DMRG.

  11. Spectral functions with the density matrix renormalization group: Krylov-space approach for correction vectors.

    PubMed

    Nocera, A; Alvarez, G

    2016-11-01

    Frequency-dependent correlations, such as the spectral function and the dynamical structure factor, help illustrate condensed matter experiments. Within the density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) framework, an accurate method for calculating spectral functions directly in frequency is the correction-vector method. The correction vector can be computed by solving a linear equation or by minimizing a functional. This paper proposes an alternative to calculate the correction vector: to use the Krylov-space approach. This paper then studies the accuracy and performance of the Krylov-space approach, when applied to the Heisenberg, the t-J, and the Hubbard models. The cases studied indicate that the Krylov-space approach can be more accurate and efficient than the conjugate gradient, and that the error of the former integrates best when a Krylov-space decomposition is also used for ground state DMRG.

  12. Chronic Cigarette Smoking Impairs Erectile Function through Increased Oxidative Stress and Apoptosis, Decreased nNOS, Endothelial and Smooth Muscle Contents in a Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yun-Ching; Chin, Chih-Chien; Chen, Chih-Shou; Shindel, Alan W; Ho, Dong-Ru; Lin, Ching-Shwun; Shi, Chung-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Cigarette use is an independent risk factor for the development of erectile dysfunction (ED). While the association between chronic smoking and ED is well established, the fundamental mechanism(s) of cigarette-related ED are incompletely understood, partly due to no reliable animal model of smoking-induced ED. The present study was designed to validate an in vivo rat model of chronic cigarette-induced ED. Forty 12-week old male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 4 groups. Ten rats served as control group and were exposed only to room air. The remaining 30 rats were passively exposed to cigarette smoke (CS) for 4 weeks (n = 10), 12 weeks (n = 10), and 24 weeks (n = 10). At the 24-week time point all rats were assessed with intracavernous pressure (ICP) during cavernous nerve electrostimulation. Blood and urine were collected to measure serum testosterone and oxidative stress, respectively. Corporal tissue was assessed by Western blot for neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS). Penile tissues were subjected to immunohistochemistry for endothelial, smooth muscle, and apoptotic content. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) was significantly higher in 24-week cigarette exposed animals compared to the control animals. Mean ICP/MAP ratio and cavernosal smooth muscle/endothelial contents were significantly lower in the 12- and 24-week rats compared to control animals. Oxidative stress was significantly higher in the 24-week cigarette exposed group compared to control animals. Mean nNOS expression was significantly lower, and apoptotic index significantly higher, in CS-exposed animals compared to control animals. These findings indicate that the rat model exposure to CS increases apoptosis and oxidative stress and decreases nNOS, endothelial and smooth muscle contents, and ICP in a dose dependent fashion. The rat model is a useful tool for further study of the molecular and cellular mechanisms of CS-related ED.

  13. Chronic Cigarette Smoking Impairs Erectile Function through Increased Oxidative Stress and Apoptosis, Decreased nNOS, Endothelial and Smooth Muscle Contents in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yun-Ching; Chin, Chih-Chien; Chen, Chih-Shou; Shindel, Alan. W.; Ho, Dong-Ru; Lin, Ching-Shwun; Shi, Chung-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Cigarette use is an independent risk factor for the development of erectile dysfunction (ED). While the association between chronic smoking and ED is well established, the fundamental mechanism(s) of cigarette-related ED are incompletely understood, partly due to no reliable animal model of smoking-induced ED. The present study was designed to validate an in vivo rat model of chronic cigarette-induced ED. Forty 12-week old male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 4 groups. Ten rats served as control group and were exposed only to room air. The remaining 30 rats were passively exposed to cigarette smoke (CS) for 4 weeks (n = 10), 12 weeks (n = 10), and 24 weeks (n = 10). At the 24-week time point all rats were assessed with intracavernous pressure (ICP) during cavernous nerve electrostimulation. Blood and urine were collected to measure serum testosterone and oxidative stress, respectively. Corporal tissue was assessed by Western blot for neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS). Penile tissues were subjected to immunohistochemistry for endothelial, smooth muscle, and apoptotic content. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) was significantly higher in 24-week cigarette exposed animals compared to the control animals. Mean ICP/MAP ratio and cavernosal smooth muscle/endothelial contents were significantly lower in the 12- and 24-week rats compared to control animals. Oxidative stress was significantly higher in the 24-week cigarette exposed group compared to control animals. Mean nNOS expression was significantly lower, and apoptotic index significantly higher, in CS-exposed animals compared to control animals. These findings indicate that the rat model exposure to CS increases apoptosis and oxidative stress and decreases nNOS, endothelial and smooth muscle contents, and ICP in a dose dependent fashion. The rat model is a useful tool for further study of the molecular and cellular mechanisms of CS-related ED. PMID:26491965

  14. Functional design specification for Stowage List And Hardware Tracking System (SLAHTS). [space shuttles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keltner, D. J.

    1975-01-01

    This functional design specification defines the total systems approach to meeting the requirements stated in the Detailed Requirements Document for Stowage List and Hardware Tracking System for the space shuttle program. The stowage list and hardware tracking system is identified at the system and subsystem level with each subsystem defined as a function of the total system.

  15. The Mental Space Function of BUT as a Lexical Discourse Marker in American Sign Language Lectures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrow, William George

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation centers on the application of the mental space theory to expand our understanding of the role lexical discourse markers (LDMs) play in discourse. LDMs have been recognized by many researchers for their discourse connective function(s) (Levinson, 1983; Schiffrin, 1987; Blakemore, 1989, 2000, 2001, 2002; Fraser, 1996, 1999, 2006).…

  16. The Mental Space Function of BUT as a Lexical Discourse Marker in American Sign Language Lectures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrow, William George

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation centers on the application of the mental space theory to expand our understanding of the role lexical discourse markers (LDMs) play in discourse. LDMs have been recognized by many researchers for their discourse connective function(s) (Levinson, 1983; Schiffrin, 1987; Blakemore, 1989, 2000, 2001, 2002; Fraser, 1996, 1999, 2006).…

  17. Infinite space Green’s function of the time-dependent radiative transfer equation

    PubMed Central

    Liemert, André; Kienle, Alwin

    2012-01-01

    This study contains the derivation of an infinite space Green’s function of the time-dependent radiative transfer equation in an anisotropically scattering medium based on analytical approaches. The final solutions are analytical regarding the time variable and given by a superposition of real and complex exponential functions. The obtained expressions were successfully validated with Monte Carlo simulations. PMID:22435101

  18. Functional requirements for design of the Space Ultrareliable Modular Computer (SUMC) system simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, R. T.; Hornfeck, W. A.

    1972-01-01

    The functional requirements for the design of an interpretive simulator for the space ultrareliable modular computer (SUMC) are presented. A review of applicable existing computer simulations is included along with constraints on the SUMC simulator functional design. Input requirements, output requirements, and language requirements for the simulator are discussed in terms of a SUMC configuration which may vary according to the application.

  19. Multipole-preserving quadratures for the discretization of functions in real-space electronic structure calculations.

    PubMed

    Genovese, Luigi; Deutsch, Thierry

    2015-12-21

    Discretizing an analytic function on a uniform real-space grid is often done via a straightforward collocation method. This is ubiquitous in all areas of computational physics and quantum chemistry. An example in density functional theory (DFT) is given by the external potential or the pseudo-potential describing the interaction between ions and electrons. The accuracy of the collocation method used is therefore very important for the reliability of subsequent treatments like self-consistent field solutions of the electronic structure problems. By construction, the collocation method introduces numerical artifacts typical of real-space treatments, like the so-called egg-box error, which may spoil the numerical stability of the description when the real-space grid is too coarse. As the external potential is an input of the problem, even a highly precise computational treatment cannot cope this inconvenience. We present in this paper a new quadrature scheme that is able to exactly preserve the moments of a given analytic function even for large grid spacings, while reconciling with the traditional collocation method when the grid spacing is small enough. In the context of real-space electronic structure calculations, we show that this method improves considerably the stability of the results for large grid spacings, opening up the path towards reliable low-accuracy DFT calculations with a reduced number of degrees of freedom.

  20. Smooth Pursuit of Flicker-Defined Motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulligan, Jeffrey B.; Stevenson, Scott B.

    2014-01-01

    We examined the pursuit response to stimuli defined by space-variant flicker of a dense random dot carrier pattern. On each frame, every element of the pattern could change polarity, with a probability given by a two-dimensional Gaussian distribution. A normal distribution produces a circular region of twinkle, while inverting the distribution results in a spot of static texture in a twinkling surround. In this latter case, the carrier texture could be stationary, or could move with the twinkle modulator, thereby producing first-order motion in the region of the spot. While the twinkle-defined spot produces a strong sensation of motion, the complementary stimulus defined by the absence of twinkle does not, when viewed peripherally, it appears to move in steps even when the generating distribution moves smoothly. We examined pursuit responses to these stimuli using two techniques: 1) the eye movement correlogram, obtained by cross-correlating eye velocity with the velocity of a randomly-moving stimulus; and 2) delayed visual feedback, where transient stabilization of a target can produce spontaneous oscillations of the eye, with a period empirically observed to vary linearly with the applied delay. Both techniques provide an estimate of the internal processing time, which can be as short as 100 milliseconds for a first-order target. Assessed by the correlogram method, the response to flicker-defined motion is delayed by more than 100 milliseconds, and significantly weaker (especially in the vertical dimension). When initially presented in the delayed feedback condition, purely saccadic oscillation is observed. One subject eventually developed smooth oscillations (albeit with significant saccadic intrusions), showing a period-versus-delay slope similar to that observed for first-order targets. This result is somewhat surprising, given that we interpret the slope of the period-versus-delay-function as reflecting the balance between position- and velocity

  1. Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamic Simulator

    SciTech Connect

    2016-10-05

    This code is a highly modular framework for developing smoothed particle hydrodynamic (SPH) simulations running on parallel platforms. The compartmentalization of the code allows for rapid development of new SPH applications and modifications of existing algorithms. The compartmentalization also allows changes in one part of the code used by many applications to instantly be made available to all applications.

  2. Hummocky and Smooth Plains

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-01-15

    This image, from NASA Mariner 10 spacecraft which launched in 1974, is located about 500 km east of the Caloris basin and shows hummocky plains interpreted as Caloris ejecta in the upper half of the picture and smooth plains in the lower half.

  3. Quantum algorithm to solve function inversion with time-space trade-off

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, WanQing; Zhang, HuanGuo

    2017-07-01

    In general, it is a difficult problem to solve the inverse of any function. With the inverse implication operation, we present a quantum algorithm for solving the inversion of function via using time-space trade-off in this paper. The details are as follows. Let function f(x)=y have k solutions, where x\\in {0, 1}n, y\\in {0, 1}m for any integers n, m. We show that an iterative algorithm can be used to solve the inverse of function f( x) with successful probability 1-( 1-k/2n) L for L\\in Z+. The space complexity of proposed quantum iterative algorithm is O( Ln), where L is the number of iterations. The paper concludes that, via using time-space trade-off strategy, we improve the successful probability of algorithm.

  4. A perturbative approach to the redshift space correlation function: beyond the Standard Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Benjamin; Koyama, Kazuya

    2017-08-01

    We extend our previous redshift space power spectrum code to the redshift space correlation function. Here we focus on the Gaussian Streaming Model (GSM). Again, the code accommodates a wide range of modified gravity and dark energy models. For the non-linear real space correlation function used in the GSM we use the Fourier transform of the RegPT 1-loop matter power spectrum. We compare predictions of the GSM for a Vainshtein screened and Chameleon screened model as well as GR. These predictions are compared to the Fourier transform of the Taruya, Nishimichi and Saito (TNS) redshift space power spectrum model which is fit to N-body data. We find very good agreement between the Fourier transform of the TNS model and the GSM predictions, with <= 6% deviations in the first two correlation function multipoles for all models for redshift space separations in 50Mpch <= s <= 180Mpc/h. Excellent agreement is found in the differences between the modified gravity and GR multipole predictions for both approaches to the redshift space correlation function, highlighting their matched ability in picking up deviations from GR. We elucidate the timeliness of such non-standard templates at the dawn of stage-IV surveys and discuss necessary preparations and extensions needed for upcoming high quality data.

  5. Baker-Akhiezer Spinor Kernel and Tau-functions on Moduli Spaces of Meromorphic Differentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalla, C.; Korotkin, D.

    2014-11-01

    In this paper we study the Baker-Akhiezer spinor kernel on moduli spaces of meromorphic differentials on Riemann surfaces. We introduce the Baker-Akhiezer tau-function which is related to both the Bergman tau-function (which was studied before in the context of Hurwitz spaces and spaces of holomorphic Abelian and quadratic differentials) and the KP tau-function on such spaces. In particular, we derive variational formulas of Rauch-Ahlfors type on moduli spaces of meromorphic differentials with prescribed singularities: we use the system of homological coordinates, consisting of absolute and relative periods of the meromorphic differential, and show how to vary the fundamental objects associated to a Riemann surface (the matrix of b-periods, normalized Abelian differentials, the Bergman bidifferential, the Szegö kernel and the Baker-Akhiezer spinor kernel) with respect to these coordinates. The variational formulas encode dependence both on the moduli of the Riemann surface and on the choice of meromorphic differential (variation of the meromorphic differential while keeping the Riemann surface fixed corresponds to flows of KP type). Analyzing the global properties of the Bergman and Baker-Akhiezer tau-functions, we establish relationships between various divisor classes on the moduli spaces.

  6. Smoothing non-smooth systems with low-pass filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hook, James

    2014-02-01

    Low pass filters, which are used to remove high frequency noise from time series data, smooth the signals they are applied to. In this paper we examine the action of low pass filters on discontinuous or non-differentiable signals from non-smooth dynamical systems. We show that the application of such a filter is equivalent to a change of variables, which transforms the non-smooth system into a smooth one. We examine this smoothing action on a variety of examples and demonstrate how it is useful in the calculation of a non-smooth system's Lyapunov spectrum.

  7. The 5-hydroxytryptamine transporter is functional in human coronary artery smooth muscle cells proliferation and is regulated by Interleukin-1 beta

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qing-Jie; Wang, Dong; Tang, Cheng-Chun

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (hCASMCs) proliferation and migration are key factors in coronary artery restenosis after percutaneous coronary intervention. Platelets release 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), which is a strong mitogen for pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells proliferation and migration. Here, we investigated the effects of 5-HT and role of 5-HT transporter (5-HTT) on hCASMCs proliferation and migration. The 5-HT (10-6-10-5 mol/l) significantly increased hCASMCs proliferation and migration, and these effects were inhibited by fluoxetine (10-5 mol/l) and citalopram (10-6 mol/l), two 5-HTT blocker. Overexpression in hCASMCs enhanced 5-HT induced cells proliferation and migration. The 5-HTT and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) expression were increased in rat balloon injury carotid arteries. Treatment with IL-1β (10 ng/ml, 3d) upregulates 5-HTT expression in hCASMCs and increased 5-HT induced currents in Human Embryonic Kidney 293-5-HTT cells. PMID:26221231

  8. Why Are Galaxies So Smooth?

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-04-30

    This image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows the spiral galaxy NGC 2841, located about 46 million light-years from Earth in the constellation Ursa Major. The galaxy is helping astronomers solve one of the oldest puzzles in astronomy: Why do galaxies look so smooth, with stars sprinkled evenly throughout? An international team of astronomers has discovered that rivers of young stars flow from their hot, dense stellar nurseries, dispersing out to form large, smooth distributions. This image is a composite of three different wavelengths from Spitzer's infrared array camera. The shortest wavelengths are displayed inblue, and mostly show the older stars in NGC 2841, as well as foreground stars in our own Milky Way galaxy. The cooler areas are highlighted in red, and show the dusty, gaseous regions of the galaxy. Blue shows infrared light of 3.6 microns, green represents 4.5-micron light and red, 8.0-micron light. The contribution from starlight measured at 3.6 microns has been subtracted from the 8.0-micron data to enhance the visibility of the dust features.The shortest wavelengths are displayed inblue, and mostly show the older stars in NGC 2841, as well as foreground stars in our own Milky Way galaxy. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA12001

  9. Functional connectivity among spikes in low dimensional space during working memory task in rat.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Mei; Li, Shuangyan; Tian, Xin

    2014-01-01

    Working memory (WM) is critically important in cognitive tasks. The functional connectivity has been a powerful tool for understanding the mechanism underlying the information processing during WM tasks. The aim of this study is to investigate how to effectively characterize the dynamic variations of the functional connectivity in low dimensional space among the principal components (PCs) which were extracted from the instantaneous firing rate series. Spikes were obtained from medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) of rats with implanted microelectrode array and then transformed into continuous series via instantaneous firing rate method. Granger causality method is proposed to study the functional connectivity. Then three scalar metrics were applied to identify the changes of the reduced dimensionality functional network during working memory tasks: functional connectivity (GC), global efficiency (E) and casual density (CD). As a comparison, GC, E and CD were also calculated to describe the functional connectivity in the original space. The results showed that these network characteristics dynamically changed during the correct WM tasks. The measure values increased to maximum, and then decreased both in the original and in the reduced dimensionality. Besides, the feature values of the reduced dimensionality were significantly higher during the WM tasks than they were in the original space. These findings suggested that functional connectivity among the spikes varied dynamically during the WM tasks and could be described effectively in the low dimensional space.

  10. Functional Connectivity among Spikes in Low Dimensional Space during Working Memory Task in Rat

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Xin

    2014-01-01

    Working memory (WM) is critically important in cognitive tasks. The functional connectivity has been a powerful tool for understanding the mechanism underlying the information processing during WM tasks. The aim of this study is to investigate how to effectively characterize the dynamic variations of the functional connectivity in low dimensional space among the principal components (PCs) which were extracted from the instantaneous firing rate series. Spikes were obtained from medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) of rats with implanted microelectrode array and then transformed into continuous series via instantaneous firing rate method. Granger causality method is proposed to study the functional connectivity. Then three scalar metrics were applied to identify the changes of the reduced dimensionality functional network during working memory tasks: functional connectivity (GC), global efficiency (E) and casual density (CD). As a comparison, GC, E and CD were also calculated to describe the functional connectivity in the original space. The results showed that these network characteristics dynamically changed during the correct WM tasks. The measure values increased to maximum, and then decreased both in the original and in the reduced dimensionality. Besides, the feature values of the reduced dimensionality were significantly higher during the WM tasks than they were in the original space. These findings suggested that functional connectivity among the spikes varied dynamically during the WM tasks and could be described effectively in the low dimensional space. PMID:24658291

  11. Results of the investigation of the otolith function in manned space flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kornilova, L. N.; Syrykh, G. D.; Tarasov, I. K.; Yakovleva, I. Y.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of conditions of long term and short term space flights on the otolith function of cosmonauts were investigated via pre and post examinations. The results show that after long term flight, the intensity of the otolith reflex increased and asymmetry occurred in the indicators of the otolith function. Large changes in terms of expression and duration in the indicators of the otolith function after long term flight as compared with short term flight were also noted.

  12. Modified Dendrogram of High-dimensional Feature Space for Transfer Function Design

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; Zhao, Xin; Kaufman, Arie

    2010-01-01

    We introduce a modified dendrogram (MD) (with sub-trees to represent the feature space clusters) and display it in continuous space for multi-dimensional transfer function (TF) design and modification. Such a TF for direct volume rendering often employs a multi-dimensional feature space. In an n-dimensional (nD) feature space, each voxel is described using n attributes and represented by a vector of n values. The MD reveals the hierarchical structure information of the high-dimensional feature space clusters. Using the MD user interface (UI), the user can design and modify the TF in 2D in an intuitive and informative manner instead of designing it directly in multi-dimensional space where it is complicated and harder to understand the relationship of the feature space vectors. In addition, we provide the capability to interactively change the granularity of the MD. The coarse-grained MD shows primarily the global information of the feature space while the fine-grained MD reveals the finer details, and the separation ability of the high-dimensional feature space is completely preserved in the finest granularity. With the so called multi-grained method, the user can efficiently create a TF using the coarse-grained MD, then fine tune it with the finer-grained MDs to improve the quality of the volume rendering. Furthermore, we propose a fast interactive hierarchical clustering (FIHC) algorithm for accelerating the MD computation and supporting the interactive multi-grained TF design. In the FIHC, the finest-grained MD is established by linking the feature space vectors, then the feature space vectors being the leaves of this tree are clustered using a hierarchical leaf clustering (HLC) algorithm forming a leaf vector hierarchical tree (LVHT). The granularity of the MD can be changed by setting the precision of the LVHT. Our method is independent on the type of the attributes and supports arbitrary-dimension feature space. PMID:26279612

  13. Evaluation of functional substances in the selected food materials for space agriculture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomita-Yokotani, Kaori; Kimura, Yasuko; Yamashita, Masamichi; Kimura, Shunta; Sato, Seigo; Katoh, Hiroshi; Abe, Yusuke; Ajioka, Reiko

    We have been studying the useful life-support system in closed bio-ecosystem for space agriculture. We have already proposed the several species as food material, such as Nostoc sp. HK-01 and Prunnus sp., cyanobacterium and Japanese cherry tree, respectively. The cyanobacterium, Nostoc sp Hk-01, has high tolerances to several space environment. Furthermore, the woody plant materials have useful utilization elements in our habitation environment. The studies of woody plants under a space-environment in the vegetable kingdom have a high contribution to the study of various and exotic environmental responses, too. We have already found that they can produce the important functional substances for human. Here, we will show the evaluation of functional substances in the selected food materials under the possible conditions for space agriculture after cooking.

  14. Smooth muscle actin and myosin expression in cultured airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Wong, J Z; Woodcock-Mitchell, J; Mitchell, J; Rippetoe, P; White, S; Absher, M; Baldor, L; Evans, J; McHugh, K M; Low, R B

    1998-05-01

    In this study, the expression of smooth muscle actin and myosin was examined in cultures of rat tracheal smooth muscle cells. Protein and mRNA analyses demonstrated that these cells express alpha- and gamma-smooth muscle actin and smooth muscle myosin and nonmuscle myosin-B heavy chains. The expression of the smooth muscle specific actin and myosin isoforms was regulated in the same direction when growth conditions were changed. Thus, at confluency in 1 or 10% serum-containing medium as well as for low-density cells (50-60% confluent) deprived of serum, the expression of the smooth muscle forms of actin and myosin was relatively high. Conversely, in rapidly proliferating cultures at low density in 10% serum, smooth muscle contractile protein expression was low. The expression of nonmuscle myosin-B mRNA and protein was more stable and was upregulated only to a small degree in growing cells. Our results provide new insight into the molecular basis of differentiation and contractile function in airway smooth muscle cells.

  15. On the spectrum of the Cesàro operator on spaces of analytic functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persson, Anna-Maria

    2008-04-01

    This paper concerns the Cesàro operator acting on various spaces of analytic functions on the unit disc. The remarkable fact that this operator is subnormal when acting on the Hardy space H2 has lead to extensive studies of its spectral picture on other spaces of this type. We present some of the methods that have been used to obtain information about the spectrum of the Cesàro operator acting on Hardy and Bergman spaces and give a unified approach to these problems which also yields new results in this direction. In particular, we prove that the Cesàro operator is subdecomposable on H1 and on the standard weighted Bergman spaces , [alpha][greater-or-equal, slanted]0.

  16. Lensing smoothing of BAO wiggles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Dio, Enea

    2017-03-01

    We study non-perturbatively the effect of the deflection angle on the BAO wiggles of the matter power spectrum in real space. We show that from redshift z~2 this introduces a dispersion of roughly 1 Mpc at BAO scale, which corresponds approximately to a 1% effect. The lensing effect induced by the deflection angle, which is completely geometrical and survey independent, smears out the BAO wiggles. The effect on the power spectrum amplitude at BAO scale is about 0.1 % for z~2 and 0.2 % for z~4. We compare the smoothing effects induced by the lensing potential and non-linear structure formation, showing that the two effects become comparable at z ~ 4, while the lensing effect dominates for sources at higher redshifts. We note that this effect is not accounted through BAO reconstruction techniques.

  17. Time domain half-space dyadic Green's functions for eddy-current calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowler, J. R.

    1999-12-01

    The field due to an impulsive current dipole embedded in a half-space conductor adjoining a nonconducting half space is given by an exact solution of the quasistatic field equations. This solution has been used to construct a half-space dyadic Green's function containing a term for an unbounded conductor plus terms representing the field reflected at the interface between conducting and nonconducting regions. The resulting kernel can be used in the formulation of time-dependent scattering problems to express the electric field in a conductor as an integral over an electric dipole distribution.

  18. Exponential rational function method for space-time fractional differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksoy, Esin; Kaplan, Melike; Bekir, Ahmet

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, exponential rational function method is applied to obtain analytical solutions of the space-time fractional Fokas equation, the space-time fractional Zakharov Kuznetsov Benjamin Bona Mahony, and the space-time fractional coupled Burgers' equations. As a result, some exact solutions for them are successfully established. These solutions are constructed in fractional complex transform to convert fractional differential equations into ordinary differential equations. The fractional derivatives are described in Jumarie's modified Riemann-Liouville sense. The exact solutions obtained by the proposed method indicate that the approach is easy to implement and effective.

  19. Functional gliding spaces of the dorsal side of the human finger.

    PubMed

    Schubert, M; Bade, H; Notermans, H P; Knifka, J; Koebke, J

    1996-01-01

    Although the clinical and functional importance of gliding and connective tissue spaces has been repeatedly emphasized (e.g. their role in the spreading of suppurative phlegmonic inflammation) only few literary findings can be presented dealing with the connective tissue spaces in the finger in the metacarpo-phalangeal transition region. Three separate gliding spaces of the finger above the dorsal aponeurosis and their various regional connections can be displayed by means of a plastic injection technique followed by plastination and production of sectional series. These gliding spaces were also examined on fixed and unfixed hands using plastic injection and subsequent dissection. A space was depicted between the proximal interphalangeal joint and the insertion of the dorsal aponeurosis on the distal phalanx of the finger, as well as a further bursa-like space over the proximal interphalangeal joint. A third space was also depicted between the metacarpophalangeal joint and the proximal interphalangeal joint, which displays a variable connection to the gliding canal of the respective extensor tendons. Methodical, functional and clinical aspects will be discussed.

  20. On the periodicity of symbolic observations of piecewise smooth discrete-time systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramadge, Peter J.

    1990-01-01

    A study is made of the behavior of discrete-time systems composed of a set of smooth transition maps coupled by a quantized feedback function. The feedback function partitions the state space into disjoint regions and assigns a smooth transition function to each region. The main result is that under a constraint on the norm of the derivative of the transition maps, a bounded state trajectory with limit points in the interior of the switching regions leads to a region index sequence that is eventually periodic. Under these assumptions, it is shown that eventually the feedback function is determined by a finite state automaton. A similar result is proved in the case of finite state dynamic feedback.

  1. The metric on field space, functional renormalization, and metric–torsion quantum gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Reuter, Martin Schollmeyer, Gregor M.

    2016-04-15

    Searching for new non-perturbatively renormalizable quantum gravity theories, functional renormalization group (RG) flows are studied on a theory space of action functionals depending on the metric and the torsion tensor, the latter parameterized by three irreducible component fields. A detailed comparison with Quantum Einstein–Cartan Gravity (QECG), Quantum Einstein Gravity (QEG), and “tetrad-only” gravity, all based on different theory spaces, is performed. It is demonstrated that, over a generic theory space, the construction of a functional RG equation (FRGE) for the effective average action requires the specification of a metric on the infinite-dimensional field manifold as an additional input. A modified FRGE is obtained if this metric is scale-dependent, as it happens in the metric–torsion system considered.

  2. Identification of a new functional splice variant of the enzyme methionine sulphoxide reductase A (MSRA) expressed in rat vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Haenold, Ronny; Wassef, Ramez; Hansel, Alfred; Heinemann, Stefan H; Hoshi, Toshinori

    2007-11-01

    Reactive oxygen species contribute to ageing of the vascular system and development of cardiovascular disease. Methionine-S-sulphoxide, an oxidized form of methionine, is repaired by the enzyme methionine sulphoxide reductase A (MSRA). The enzyme, targeted to mitochondria or the cytosol by alternative splicing, is vital for oxidative stress resistance. This study was designed to examine the endogenous expression and intracellular localization of MSRA in rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). We detected robust MSRA immunoreactivity exclusively in mitochondria. Sequence analysis of msrA transcripts revealed the presence of a novel mitochondrial splice variant, msrA2a, in cultured rat VSMCs as well as in aortic tissue preparations. The enzymatic activity of a recombinant MSRA2a protein was confirmed by the reduction of methionine sulphoxide in a model substrate peptide. We conclude that multiple MSRA variants participate in the repair of oxidized proteins in VSMC mitochondria, but that other protective mechanisms may exist in the cytoplasmic compartment.

  3. Functional census of mutation sequence spaces: The example of p53 cancer rescue mutants

    PubMed Central

    Danziger, Samuel A.; Swamidass, S. Joshua; Zeng, Jue; Dearth, Lawrence R.; Lu, Qiang; Chen, Jonathan H.; Cheng, Jainlin; Hoang, Vinh P.; Saigo, Hiroto; Luo, Ray; Baldi, Pierre; Brachmann, Rainer K.; Lathrop, Richard H.

    2009-01-01

    Many biomedical problems relate to mutant functional properties across a sequence space of interest, e.g., flu, cancer, and HIV. Detailed knowledge of mutant properties and function improves medical treatment and prevention. A functional census of p53 cancer rescue mutants would aid the search for cancer treatments from p53 rescue. We devised a general methodology for conducting a functional census of a mutation sequence space, and conducted a double-blind predictive test on the functional rescue property of 71 novel putative p53 cancer rescue mutants iteratively predicted in sets of 3. Double-blind predictive accuracy (15-point moving window) rose from 47% to 86% over the trial (r = 0.74). Code and data are available upon request1. PMID:17048398

  4. Intrinsic functional brain mapping in reconstructed 4D magnetic susceptibility (χ) data space.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zikuan; Calhoun, Vince

    2015-02-15

    By solving an inverse problem of T2*-weighted magnetic resonance imaging for a dynamic fMRI study, we reconstruct a 4D magnetic susceptibility source (χ) data space for intrinsic functional mapping. A 4D phase dataset is calculated from a 4D complex fMRI dataset. The background field and phase wrapping effect are removed by a Laplacian technique. A 3D χ source map is reconstructed from a 3D phase image by a computed inverse MRI (CIMRI) scheme. A 4D χ data space is reconstructed by repeating the 3D χ source reconstruction for each time point. A functional map is calculated by a temporal correlation between voxel signals in the 4D χ space and the timecourse of the task paradigm. With a finger-tapping experiment, we obtain two 3D functional mappings in the 4D magnitude data space and in the reconstructed 4D χ data space. We find that the χ-based functional mapping reveals co-occurrence of bidirectional responses in a 3D activation map that is different from the conventional magnitude-based mapping. The χ-based functional mapping can also be achieved by a 3D deconvolution of a phase activation map. Based on a subject experimental comparison, we show that the 4D χ tomography method could produce a similar χ activation map as obtained by the 3D deconvolution method. By removing the dipole effect and other fMRI technological contaminations, 4D χ tomography provides a 4D χ data space that allows a more direct and truthful functional mapping of a brain activity. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Beam-smoothing investigation on Heaven I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Yi-huai; Gao, Zhi-xing; Tong, Xiao-hui; Dai, Hui; Tang, Xiu-zhang; Shan, Yu-sheng

    2007-01-01

    Directly driven targets for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) require laser beams with extremely smooth irradiance profiles to prevent hydrodynamic instabilities that destroy the spherical symmetry of the target during implosion. Such instabilities can break up and mix together the target's wall and fuel material, preventing it from reaching the density and temperature required for fusion ignition. 1,2 Measurements in the equation of state (EOS) experiments require laser beams with flat-roofed profiles to generate uniform shockwave 3. Some method for beam smooth, is thus needed. A technique called echelon-free induced spatial incoherence (EFISI) is proposed for producing smooth target beam profiles with large KrF lasers. The idea is basically an image projection technique that projects the desired time-averaged spatial profile onto the target via the laser system, using partially coherent broadband lighe. Utilize the technique, we developing beam- smoothing investigation on "Heaven I". At China Institute of Atomic Energy , a new angular multiplexing providing with beam-smoothing function has been developed, the total energy is 158J, the stability of energy is 4%, the pulse duration is 25ns, the effective diameter of focusing spot is 400um, and the ununiformity is about 1.6%, the power density on the target is about 3.7×10 12W/cm2. At present, the system have provided steady and smooth laser irradiation for EOS experiments.

  6. Functional Task Test: 3. Skeletal Muscle Performance Adaptations to Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryder, Jeffrey W.; Wickwire, P. J.; Buxton, R. E.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Ploutz-Snyder, L.

    2011-01-01

    The functional task test is a multi-disciplinary study investigating how space-flight induced changes to physiological systems impacts functional task performance. Impairment of neuromuscular function would be expected to negatively affect functional performance of crewmembers following exposure to microgravity. This presentation reports the results for muscle performance testing in crewmembers. Functional task performance will be presented in the abstract "Functional Task Test 1: sensory motor adaptations associated with postflight alternations in astronaut functional task performance." METHODS: Muscle performance measures were obtained in crewmembers before and after short-duration space flight aboard the Space Shuttle and long-duration International Space Station (ISS) missions. The battery of muscle performance tests included leg press and bench press measures of isometric force, isotonic power and total work. Knee extension was used for the measurement of central activation and maximal isometric force. Upper and lower body force steadiness control were measured on the bench press and knee extension machine, respectively. Tests were implemented 60 and 30 days before launch, on landing day (Shuttle crew only), and 6, 10 and 30 days after landing. Seven Space Shuttle crew and four ISS crew have completed the muscle performance testing to date. RESULTS: Preliminary results for Space Shuttle crew reveal significant reductions in the leg press performance metrics of maximal isometric force, power and total work on R+0 (p<0.05). Bench press total work was also significantly impaired, although maximal isometric force and power were not significantly affected. No changes were noted for measurements of central activation or force steadiness. Results for ISS crew were not analyzed due to the current small sample size. DISCUSSION: Significant reductions in lower body muscle performance metrics were observed in returning Shuttle crew and these adaptations are likely

  7. 41 CFR 102-73.75 - What functions must Federal agencies perform with regard to leasing building space?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Federal agencies perform with regard to leasing building space? 102-73.75 Section 102-73.75 Public... functions must Federal agencies perform with regard to leasing building space? Federal agencies, upon approval from GSA, must perform all functions of leasing building space, and land incidental thereto,...

  8. 41 CFR 102-73.75 - What functions must Federal agencies perform with regard to leasing building space?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Federal agencies perform with regard to leasing building space? 102-73.75 Section 102-73.75 Public... functions must Federal agencies perform with regard to leasing building space? Federal agencies, upon approval from GSA, must perform all functions of leasing building space, and land incidental thereto,...

  9. Structuring feature space: a non-parametric method for volumetric transfer function generation.

    PubMed

    Maciejewski, Ross; Woo, Insoo; Chen, Wei; Ebert, David S

    2009-01-01

    The use of multi-dimensional transfer functions for direct volume rendering has been shown to be an effective means of extracting materials and their boundaries for both scalar and multivariate data. The most common multi-dimensional transfer function consists of a two-dimensional (2D) histogram with axes representing a subset of the feature space (e.g., value vs. value gradient magnitude), with each entry in the 2D histogram being the number of voxels at a given feature space pair. Users then assign color and opacity to the voxel distributions within the given feature space through the use of interactive widgets (e.g., box, circular, triangular selection). Unfortunately, such tools lead users through a trial-and-error approach as they assess which data values within the feature space map to a given area of interest within the volumetric space. In this work, we propose the addition of non-parametric clustering within the transfer function feature space in order to extract patterns and guide transfer function generation. We apply a non-parametric kernel density estimation to group voxels of similar features within the 2D histogram. These groups are then binned and colored based on their estimated density, and the user may interactively grow and shrink the binned regions to explore feature boundaries and extract regions of interest. We also extend this scheme to temporal volumetric data in which time steps of 2D histograms are composited into a histogram volume. A three-dimensional (3D) density estimation is then applied, and users can explore regions within the feature space across time without adjusting the transfer function at each time step. Our work enables users to effectively explore the structures found within a feature space of the volume and provide a context in which the user can understand how these structures relate to their volumetric data. We provide tools for enhanced exploration and manipulation of the transfer function, and we show that the initial

  10. Anti-smooth muscle antibody

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003531.htm Anti-smooth muscle antibody To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Anti-smooth muscle antibody is a blood test that detects the ...

  11. A real-space stochastic density matrix approach for density functional electronic structure.

    PubMed

    Beck, Thomas L

    2015-12-21

    The recent development of real-space grid methods has led to more efficient, accurate, and adaptable approaches for large-scale electrostatics and density functional electronic structure modeling. With the incorporation of multiscale techniques, linear-scaling real-space solvers are possible for density functional problems if localized orbitals are used to represent the Kohn-Sham energy functional. These methods still suffer from high computational and storage overheads, however, due to extensive matrix operations related to the underlying wave function grid representation. In this paper, an alternative stochastic method is outlined that aims to solve directly for the one-electron density matrix in real space. In order to illustrate aspects of the method, model calculations are performed for simple one-dimensional problems that display some features of the more general problem, such as spatial nodes in the density matrix. This orbital-free approach may prove helpful considering a future involving increasingly parallel computing architectures. Its primary advantage is the near-locality of the random walks, allowing for simultaneous updates of the density matrix in different regions of space partitioned across the processors. In addition, it allows for testing and enforcement of the particle number and idempotency constraints through stabilization of a Feynman-Kac functional integral as opposed to the extensive matrix operations in traditional approaches.

  12. BeeSpace Navigator: exploratory analysis of gene function using semantic indexing of biological literature

    PubMed Central

    Sen Sarma, Moushumi; Arcoleo, David; Khetani, Radhika S.; Chee, Brant; Ling, Xu; He, Xin; Jiang, Jing; Mei, Qiaozhu; Zhai, ChengXiang; Schatz, Bruce

    2011-01-01

    With the rapid decrease in cost of genome sequencing, the classification of gene function is becoming a primary problem. Such classification has been performed by human curators who read biological literature to extract evidence. BeeSpace Navigator is a prototype software for exploratory analysis of gene function using biological literature. The software supports an automatic analogue of the curator process to extract functions, with a simple interface intended for all biologists. Since extraction is done on selected collections that are semantically indexed into conceptual spaces, the curation can be task specific. Biological literature containing references to gene lists from expression experiments can be analyzed to extract concepts that are computational equivalents of a classification such as Gene Ontology, yielding discriminating concepts that differentiate gene mentions from other mentions. The functions of individual genes can be summarized from sentences in biological literature, to produce results resembling a model organism database entry that is automatically computed. Statistical frequency analysis based on literature phrase extraction generates offline semantic indexes to support these gene function services. The website with BeeSpace Navigator is free and open to all; there is no login requirement at www.beespace.illinois.edu for version 4. Materials from the 2010 BeeSpace Software Training Workshop are available at www.beespace.illinois.edu/bstwmaterials.php. PMID:21558175

  13. BeeSpace Navigator: exploratory analysis of gene function using semantic indexing of biological literature.

    PubMed

    Sen Sarma, Moushumi; Arcoleo, David; Khetani, Radhika S; Chee, Brant; Ling, Xu; He, Xin; Jiang, Jing; Mei, Qiaozhu; Zhai, ChengXiang; Schatz, Bruce

    2011-07-01

    With the rapid decrease in cost of genome sequencing, the classification of gene function is becoming a primary problem. Such classification has been performed by human curators who read biological literature to extract evidence. BeeSpace Navigator is a prototype software for exploratory analysis of gene function using biological literature. The software supports an automatic analogue of the curator process to extract functions, with a simple interface intended for all biologists. Since extraction is done on selected collections that are semantically indexed into conceptual spaces, the curation can be task specific. Biological literature containing references to gene lists from expression experiments can be analyzed to extract concepts that are computational equivalents of a classification su